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Sample records for ferritic fe-cr alloys

  1. Formation Mechanisms of Alloying Element Nitrides in Recrystallized and Deformed Ferritic Fe-Cr-Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhlaghi, Maryam; Meka, Sai Ramudu; Jägle, Eric A.; Kurz, Silke J. B.; Bischoff, Ewald; Mittemeijer, Eric J.

    2016-07-01

    The effect of the initial microstructure (recrystallized or cold-rolled) on the nitride precipitation process upon gaseous nitriding of ternary Fe-4.3 at. pct Cr-8.1 at. pct Al alloy was investigated at 723 K (450 °C) employing X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atom probe tomography (APT), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). In recrystallized Fe-Cr-Al specimens, one type of nitride develops: ternary, cubic, NaCl-type mixed Cr1-x Al x N. In cold-rolled Fe-Cr-Al specimens, precipitation of two types of nitrides occurs: ternary, cubic, NaCl-type mixed Cr1-x Al x N and binary, cubic, NaCl-type AlN. By theoretical analysis, it was shown that for the recrystallized specimens an energy barrier for the nucleation of mixed Cr1-x Al x N exists, whereas in the cold-rolled specimens no such energy barriers for the development of mixed Cr1-x Al x N and of binary, cubic AlN occur. The additional development of the cubic AlN in the cold-rolled microstructure could be ascribed to the preferred heterogeneous nucleation of cubic AlN on dislocations. The nitrogen concentration-depth profile of the cold-rolled specimen shows a stepped nature upon prolonged nitriding as a consequence of instantaneous nucleation of nitride upon arrival of nitrogen and nitride growth rate-limited by nitrogen transport through the thickening nitrided zone.

  2. Formation Mechanisms of Alloying Element Nitrides in Recrystallized and Deformed Ferritic Fe-Cr-Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhlaghi, Maryam; Meka, Sai Ramudu; Jägle, Eric A.; Kurz, Silke J. B.; Bischoff, Ewald; Mittemeijer, Eric J.

    2016-09-01

    The effect of the initial microstructure (recrystallized or cold-rolled) on the nitride precipitation process upon gaseous nitriding of ternary Fe-4.3 at. pct Cr-8.1 at. pct Al alloy was investigated at 723 K (450 °C) employing X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atom probe tomography (APT), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). In recrystallized Fe-Cr-Al specimens, one type of nitride develops: ternary, cubic, NaCl-type mixed Cr1- x Al x N. In cold-rolled Fe-Cr-Al specimens, precipitation of two types of nitrides occurs: ternary, cubic, NaCl-type mixed Cr1- x Al x N and binary, cubic, NaCl-type AlN. By theoretical analysis, it was shown that for the recrystallized specimens an energy barrier for the nucleation of mixed Cr1- x Al x N exists, whereas in the cold-rolled specimens no such energy barriers for the development of mixed Cr1- x Al x N and of binary, cubic AlN occur. The additional development of the cubic AlN in the cold-rolled microstructure could be ascribed to the preferred heterogeneous nucleation of cubic AlN on dislocations. The nitrogen concentration-depth profile of the cold-rolled specimen shows a stepped nature upon prolonged nitriding as a consequence of instantaneous nucleation of nitride upon arrival of nitrogen and nitride growth rate-limited by nitrogen transport through the thickening nitrided zone.

  3. Effect of Alloy Composition, Surface Preparation and Exposure Conditions on the Selective Oxidation Behavior of Ferritic Fe-Cr and Fe-Cr-X Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, G H; Mu, N; Yanar, N M; Pettit, F S; Piron Abellan, J; Olszewski, T; Quadakkers, W J; Holcomb, G R

    2010-09-01

    Abstract Selective oxidation behavior of ferritic martensitic Fe–Cr base alloys, exposed in various atmospheres containing combinations of O2, CO2, and H2O, were studied at various temperatures relevant to oxy-fuel combustion. This paper begins with a discussion of the required Cr content to form a continuous external chromia scale on a simple binary Fe–Cr alloy exposed in oxygen or air based on experiments and calculations using the classic Wagner model. Then, the effects of the exposure environment and Cr content on the selective oxidation of Fe–Cr alloys are evaluated. Finally, the effects produced by alloying additions of Si, commonly present in various groups of commercially available ferritic steels, are described. The discussion compares the oxide scale formation on simple binary and ternary Fe–Cr base model alloys with that on several commercially available ferritic steels.

  4. Radiation-induced strengthening and absorption of dislocation loops in ferritic Fe-Cr alloys: the role of Cr segregation.

    PubMed

    Terentyev, D; Bakaev, A

    2013-07-01

    The understanding of radiation-induced strengthening in ferritic FeCr-based steels remains an essential issue in the assessment of materials for fusion and fission reactors. Both early and recent experimental works on Fe-Cr alloys reveal Cr segregation on radiation-induced nanostructural features (mainly dislocation loops), whose impact on the modification of the mechanical response of the material might be key for explaining quantitatively the radiation-induced strengthening in these alloys. In this work, we use molecular dynamics to study systematically the interaction of dislocations with 1/2<111> and <100> loops in all possible orientations, both enriched by Cr atoms and undecorated, for different temperatures, loop sizes and dislocation velocities. The configurations of the enriched loops have been obtained using a non-rigid lattice Monte Carlo method. The study reveals that Cr segregation influences the interaction mechanisms with both 1/2<111> and <100> loops. The overall effect of Cr enrichment is to penalize the mobility of intrinsically glissile 1/2<111> loops, modifying the reaction mechanisms as a result. The following three most important effects associated with Cr enrichment have been revealed: (i) absence of dynamic drag; (ii) suppression of complete absorption; (iii) enhanced strength of small dislocation loops (2 nm and smaller). Overall the effect of the Cr enrichment is therefore to increase the unpinning stress, so experimentally 'invisible' nanostructural features may also contribute to radiation-induced strengthening. The reasons for the modification of the mechanisms are explained and the impact of the loading conditions is discussed. PMID:23756468

  5. Dispersoid Distribution and Microstructure in Fe-Cr-Al Ferritic Oxide Dispersion-Strengthened Alloy Prepared by Friction Consolidation

    SciTech Connect

    Catalini, David; Kaoumi, Djamel; Reynolds, Anthony; Grant, Glenn J.

    2015-07-09

    INCOLOY® MA956 is a ferritic Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) alloy. Three different oxides, Y4Al2O9, YAlO3 and Y3Al5O12, have been observed in this alloy. The oxide particle sizes range from just a few up to hundreds of nm and these particles are responsible of the high temperature mechanical strength of this alloy. Mechanically alloyed MA956 powder was consolidated via Friction Consolidation using three different processing conditions. As a result, three small compacts of low porosity were produced. The compacts exhibited a refined equiaxed grain structure with grain sizes smaller than 10 µm and the desired oxide dispersion.YAlO3 and Y3Al5O12 were identified in the compacts by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The size distribution of precipitates above 50 nm showed a direct proportionality between average precipitate size and grain size. The total energy input during processing was correlated with the relative amount of each of the oxides in the disks: the higher the total processing energy input, the higher the relative amount of Y3Al5O12 precipitates. The elemental composition of the oxide precipitates was also probed individually by EDS showing an aluminum enrichment trend as precipitates grow in size.

  6. Correlation of Fe/Cr phase decomposition process and age-hardening in Fe-15Cr ferritic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dongsheng; Kimura, Akihiko; Han, Wentuo

    2014-12-01

    The effects of thermal aging on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Fe-15Cr ferritic model alloys were investigated by TEM examinations, micro-hardness measurements and tensile tests. The materials used in this work were Fe-15Cr, Fe-15Cr-C and Fe-15Cr-X alloys, where X refers to Si, Mn and Ni to simulate a pressure vessel steel. Specimens were isothermally aged at 475 °C up to 5000 h. Thermal aging causes a significant increase in the hardness and strength. An almost twice larger hardening is required for embrittlement of Fe-15Cr-X relative to Fe-15Cr. The age-hardening is mainly due to the formation of Cr-rich α‧ precipitates, while the addition of minor elements has a small effect on the saturation level of age-hardening. The correlation of phase decomposition process and age-hardening in Fe-15Cr alloy was interpreted by dispersion strengthened models.

  7. Dispersoid Distribution and Microstructure in Fe-Cr-Al Ferritic Oxide Dispersion-Strengthened Alloy Prepared by Friction Consolidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalini, David; Kaoumi, Djamel; Reynolds, Anthony P.; Grant, Glenn J.

    2015-10-01

    INCOLOY® MA956 is a ferritic oxide dispersion-strengthened alloy manufactured by mechanical alloying followed by hot extrusion in vacuum-sealed cans or by degassing and hot isostatic pressing. This could be followed by a tailored heat treatment sequence in order to obtain a desired microstructure and to allow the oxide dispersion to precipitate. Three different oxides, responsible for the high-temperature mechanical strength, have been observed in this alloy: Y4Al2O9, YAlO3, and Y3Al5O12. Their sizes range from just a few to hundreds of nanometers. In this work, mechanically alloyed MA956 powder was consolidated via friction consolidation, a single-step and potentially cheaper processing alternative. Three fully dense compacts were produced. The compacts exhibited a refined, equiaxed grain structure with grain sizes smaller than 10 µm and the desired oxide dispersion. YAlO3 and Y3Al5O12 were identified by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray diffraction. The size distribution of precipitates above 50 nm showed a direct proportionality between average precipitate size and grain size. The total energy input during processing was correlated with the relative amount of each of the oxides in the disks: the higher the total processing energy input, the higher the relative amount of Y3Al5O12 precipitates. The elemental composition of the oxide precipitates was also probed individually by EDS, showing an aluminum enrichment trend as precipitates grew in size.

  8. Hydrogen permeation characteristics of some Fe-Cr-Al alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Deventer, E. H.; Maroni, V. A.

    1983-01-01

    Hydrogen permeation data are reported for two Fe-Cr-Al alloys, Type-405 SS (Cr 14-A1 0.2) and a member of the Fecralloy family of alloys (Cr 16-A1 5). The hydrogen permeability of each alloy (in a partially oxidized condition) was measured over a period of several weeks at randomly selected temperatures (between 150 and 850°C) and upstream H 2 pressures (between 2 and 1.5 × 10 4 Pa). The permeabilities showed considerable scatter with both time and temperature and were 10 2 to 10 3 times lower than those of pure iron, even in strongly reducing environments. The exponent, n, for the relationship between upstream H 2 pressure, P, and permeability, φ, ( φ ~ Pn) was closer to 0.7 than to the expected 0.5, indicating a process limited by surface effects (e.g., surface oxide films) as opposed to bulk material effects. Comparison of these results with prior permeation measurements on other Fe-Cr-Al alloys, on Fe-Cr alloys, and on pure iron shows that the presence of a few weight percent aluminum offers the best prospects for achieving low tritium permeabilities with martensitic and ferritic steels used in fusion-reactor first wall and blanket applications.

  9. HIGH TEMPERATURE BRAZING ALLOY FOR JOINT Fe-Cr-Al MATERIALS AND AUSTENITIC AND FERRITIC STAINLESS STEELS

    DOEpatents

    Cost, R.C.

    1958-07-15

    A new high temperature brazing alloy is described that is particularly suitable for brazing iron-chromiumaluminum alloys. It consists of approximately 20% Cr, 6% Al, 10% Si, and from 1.5 to 5% phosphorus, the balance being iron.

  10. Dependence of the nitriding rate of ferritic and austenitic substrates on the crystallographic orientation of surface grains; gaseous nitriding of Fe-Cr and Ni-Ti alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhlaghi, M.; Jung, M.; Meka, S. R.; Fonović, M.; Leineweber, A.; Mittemeijer, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    Gaseous nitriding of ferritic Fe-Cr and austenitic Ni-Ti solid solutions reveals that the extent of the uptake of dissolved nitrogen depends on the crystallographic orientation of the surface grains of the substrate. In both ferritic and austenitic substrates, the surface nitrogen concentration and the nitriding depth decrease upon increasing the smallest angle between the surface normal and the normal of a {1 0 0} plane of the surface grain considered. This phenomenon could be ascribed to the residual compressive macrostress developed during nitriding which varies as a function of crystallographic orientation of the (surface) grains due to the elastically anisotropic nature of ferrite and austenite solid solutions investigated in this study.

  11. Elastic anomalies in Fe-Cr alloys.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hualei; Wang, Guisheng; Punkkinen, Marko P J; Hertzman, Staffan; Johansson, Börje; Vitos, Levente

    2013-05-15

    Using ab initio alloy theory, we determine the elastic parameters of ferromagnetic and paramagnetic Fe(1-c)Cr(c) (0 ≤ c ≤ 1) alloys in the body centered cubic crystallographic phase. Comparison with the experimental data demonstrates that the employed theoretical approach accurately describes the observed composition dependence of the polycrystalline elastic moduli. The predicted single-crystal elastic constants follow complex anomalous trends, which are shown to originate from the interplay between magnetic and chemical effects. The nonmonotonic composition dependence of the elastic parameters has marked implications on the micro-mechanical properties of ferrite stainless steels. PMID:23604218

  12. Surface modification to improve fireside corrosion resistance of Fe-Cr ferritic steels

    DOEpatents

    Park, Jong-Hee; Natesan, Krishnamurti; Rink, David L.

    2010-03-16

    An article of manufacture and a method for providing an Fe--Cr ferritic steel article of manufacture having a surface layer modification for corrosion resistance. Fe--Cr ferritic steels can be modified to enhance their corrosion resistance to liquid coal ash and other chemical environments, which have chlorides or sulfates containing active species. The steel is modified to form an aluminide/silicide passivating layer to reduce such corrosion.

  13. Ion irradiation testing and characterization of FeCrAl candidate alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Anderoglu, Osman; Aydogan, Eda; Maloy, Stuart Andrew; Wang, Yongqiang

    2014-10-29

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program’s Advanced Fuels Campaign has initiated a multifold effort aimed at facilitating development of accident tolerant fuels. This effort involves development of fuel cladding materials that will be resistant to oxidizing environments for extended period of time such as loss of coolant accident. Ferritic FeCrAl alloys are among the promising candidates due to formation of a stable Al₂O₃ oxide scale. In addition to being oxidation resistant, these promising alloys need to be radiation tolerant under LWR conditions (maximum dose of 10-15 dpa at 250 – 350°C). Thus, in addition to a number of commercially available alloys, nuclear grade FeCrAl alloys developed at ORNL were tested using high energy proton irradiations and subsequent characterization of irradiation hardening and damage microstructure. This report summarizes ion irradiation testing and characterization of three nuclear grade FeCrAl cladding materials developed at ORNL and four commercially available Kanthal series FeCrAl alloys in FY14 toward satisfying FCRD campaign goals.

  14. On the radiation-induced segregation: Contribution of interstitial mechanism in Fe-Cr alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechenkin, V. A.; Molodtsov, V. L.; Ryabov, V. A.; Terentyev, D.

    2013-02-01

    In this work, we perform molecular dynamics simulations to study the diffusion characteristics of a self-interstitial atom (SIA) in BCC Fe-Cr alloys and corresponding mass transport of Fe and Cr atoms via SIA migration mechanism. The calculations have been performed in the temperature range 600-1000 K in the alloys with Cr content 5-25 at.%, which is relevant for ferritic/martensitic steels. The results of atomistic simulations have been applied to evaluate the contribution of SIA diffusion mechanism to radiation-induced segregation (RIS) phenomenon. An original treatment is proposed in this work to account for the contribution from both vacancy and SIA mechanisms to RIS at sinks for point defects in multi-component system. By combining available experimental data on diffusion of Fe and Cr via vacancy mechanism with the results of MD simulations for SIAs, we demonstrate that enrichment of sinks by Cr atoms is possible in the Fe-Cr alloys containing less than 13% Cr. This result is discussed in the light of available experimental data on the RIS in Fe-Cr alloys and ferritic/martensitic steels. It is predicted that the degree of the Cr enrichment goes up with decreasing Cr content in the alloy and irradiation temperature.

  15. Effects of Grit Blasting and Annealing on the High-Temperature Oxidation Behavior of Austenitic and Ferritic Fe-Cr Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proy, M.; Utrilla, M. V.; Otero, E.; Bouchaud, B.; Pedraza, F.

    2014-08-01

    Grit blasting (corundum) of an austenitic AISI 304 stainless steel (18Cr-8Ni) and of a low-alloy SA213 T22 ferritic steel (2.25Cr-1Mo) followed by annealing in argon resulted in enhanced outward diffusion of Cr, Mn, and Fe. Whereas 3 bar of blasting pressure allowed to grow more Cr2O3 and Mn x Cr3- x O4 spinel-rich scales, higher pressures gave rise to Fe2O3-enriched layers and were therefore disregarded. The effect of annealing pre-oxidation treatment on the isothermal oxidation resistance was subsequently evaluated for 48 h for both steels and the results were compared with their polished counterparts. The change of oxidation kinetics of the pre-oxidized 18Cr-8Ni samples at 850 °C was ascribed to the growth of a duplex Cr2O3/Mn x Cr3- x O4 scale that remained adherent to the substrate. Such a positive effect was less marked when considering the oxidation kinetics of the 2.25Cr-1Mo steel but a more compact and thinner Fe x Cr3- x O4 subscale grew at 650 °C compared to that of the polished samples. It appeared that the beneficial effect is very sensitive to the experimental blasting conditions. The input of Raman micro-spectroscopy was shown to be of ground importance in the precise identification of multiple oxide phases grown under the different conditions investigated in this study.

  16. Effects of dpa rate on swelling in neutron-irradiated Fe-Cr and Fe-Cr-Mo alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okita, T.; Sekimura, N.; Garner, F. A.

    2011-10-01

    Data are presented on the void swelling of three model Fe-Cr ferritic alloys following irradiation in TEM packets in FFTF-MOTA over the range 373-600 °C and a wide range of dpa rates. It is shown that raising the chromium level decreases the steady-state swelling rate at ˜420 °C. Addition of Mo to the Fe-12Cr alloy does not change the swelling rate significantly but does lead to an apparent swelling of ˜3% that arises from the radiation-accelerated formation of Chi phase. Swelling tends to decrease with increasing irradiation temperature for all three alloys. It is shown that the sensitivity of swelling to dpa rate expresses itself not at the various packet positions in FFTF, each with their characteristic nominal dpa rates, but also in response to variations in dpa rate along the length of the packet containing the specimens. The latter introduces second-order uncertainties in determination of the dpa levels and dpa rates, but these are not sufficient to obscure the major conclusion concerning dpa rate and composition.

  17. Amorphization of C-implanted Fe(Cr) alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, J.A.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Sorensen, N.R.; Pope, L.E.

    1990-01-01

    The amorphous phase formed by implanting C into Fe alloyed with Cr, which is prototype for the amorphous phase formed by implanting C into stainless steels, is compared to that formed by implanting C plus Ti into Fe and steels. The composition range of the phase has been examined; higher Cr and C concentrations are required than needed with Ti and C. The friction and wear benefits obtained by implanting stainless steels with C alone do not persist for the long durations and high wear loads found with Ti and C. However, the amorphous Fe-Cr-C alloys exhibits good aqueous corrosion resistance. 9 refs., 3 figs., 1 tabs.

  18. Constrained non-collinear magnetism in disordered Fe and Fe-Cr alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen-Manh, D.; Ma, Pui-Wai; Lavrentiev, M. Yu.; Dudarev, S. L.

    2014-06-01

    The development of quantitative models for radiation damage effects in iron, iron alloys and steels, particularly for the high temperature properties of the alloys, requires understanding of magnetic interactions, which control the phase stability of ferritic-martensitic, ferritic, and austenitic steels. In this work, disordered magnetic configurations of pure iron and Fe-Cr alloys are investigated using Density Functional Theory (DFT) formalism, in the form of constrained non-collinear magnetic calculations, with the objective of creating a database of atomic magnetic moments and forces acting between the atoms. From a given disordered atomic configuration of either pure Fe or Fe-Cr alloy, a penalty contribution to the usual spin-polarized DFT total energy has been calculated by constraining the magnitude and direction of magnetic moments. An extensive database of non-collinear magnetic moment and force components for various atomic configurations has been generated and used for interpolating the spatially-dependent magnetic interaction parameters, for applications in large-scale spin-lattice dynamics and magnetic Monte-Carlo simulations.

  19. Contribution of di-SIA to mass transport in Fe-Cr alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, V. A.; Pechenkin, V. A.; Molodtsov, V. L.; Terentyev, D.

    2016-04-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to study the diffusion characteristics of di-self interstitial atom (di-SIA) in BCC Fe-Cr alloys and corresponding mass transport of Fe and Cratoms in the temperature range 600-1000 K in the alloys with Cr content 5-25 at%, which is relevant for ferritic/martensitic steels. An original treatment is proposed in this work to account for a mixed migration mode composed of the diffusion of the cluster itself and break-up into a pair of independent SIAs. The ratio of self-diffusion coefficients of Cr and Fe is found to exceed unity in Fe-5Cr and Fe-10Cr alloys, which implies that under cascade-producing damage, 3D-migrating small SIA clusters will effectively contribute to the segregation of Cr to neutral and SIA-preferential sinks, eventually causing radiation induced segregation.

  20. Tantalum modified ferritic iron base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldrieve, R. E.; Blankenship, C. P. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Strong ferritic alloys of the Fe-CR-Al type containing 0.4% to 2% tantalum were developed. These alloys have improved fabricability without sacrificing high temperature strength and oxidation resistance in the 800 C (1475 F) to 1040 C (1900 F) range.

  1. Effects of Cr on the interdiffusion between Ce and Fe-Cr alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Wei-Yang; Silva, Nicolas; Wu, Yuedong; Winmann-Smith, Robert; Yang, Yong

    2015-03-01

    Fuel cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) has been a long-standing issue for the metallic fuel with a steel cladding in a sodium-cooled fast reactor, particularly for a high burnup fuel. Although the FCCI has been largely improved by alloying the fuels with Zr or Pd elements, applying a physical diffusion barrier between fuel and cladding, and employing advanced ferritic/martensitic (F/M) claddings, there is a scientific knowledge gap in understanding the behavior of chromium and its effects on the interdiffusion between lanthanides and advanced F/M steels that contain 9-12 wt.% Cr. In this paper, we systematically studied the interdiffusion between cerium and Fe-Cr model alloys with Cr contents of 6, 9 and 12 wt.%. Following the thermal annealing at 560 °C for up to 100 h, detailed microstructural characterizations were performed to determine the interdiffusion microstructures, compositional distributions, diffusion kinetics, and phase structures in the interdiffusion zone. This study unambiguously disclosed that, as the Ce diffuses into Fe-Cr model alloys, Cr segregates and precipitates into Cr-rich σ phase consisted of Fe and Cr instead of forming a ternary phase together with Fe and Ce. The precipitation of those nano-sized σ phase particles at the Ce diffusion front would effectively slow down the interdiffusion.

  2. Carbon Nanostructures Grown on Fe-Cr-Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čaplovičová, Mária; Čaplovič, Ľubomír; Búc, Dalibor; Vinduška, Peter; Janík, Ján

    2010-11-01

    The morphology and nanostructure of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), synthesized directly on Fe-Cr-Al-based alloy substrate using an alcohol catalytic chemical vapour deposition method (ACCVD), were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The grown CNTs were entangled with chain-like, bamboo-like, and necklace-like morphologies. The CNT morphology was affected by the elemental composition of catalysts and local instability of deposition process. Straight and bended CNTs with bamboo-like nanostructure grew mainly on γ-Fe and Fe3C particles. The synthesis of necklace-like nanostructures was influenced by silicon oxide, and growth of chain-like nanostructures was supported by a catalysts consisting of Fe, Si, oxygen and trace of Cr. Most of nanotubes grew according to base growth mechanism.

  3. NEUTRON-INDUCED SWELLING OF Fe-Cr BINARY ALLOYS IN FFTF AT ~400 DEGREES C

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, Francis A.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Okita, Taira; Sekimura, Naoto; Wolfer, W. G.

    2002-12-31

    The purpose of this effort is to determine the influence of dpa rate, He/dpa ratio and composition on the void swelling of simple binary Fe-Cr alloys. Contrary to the behavior of swelling of model fcc Fe-Cr-Ni alloys irradiated in the same FFTF-MOTA experiment, model bcc Fe-Cr alloys do not exhibit a dependence of swelling on dpa rate at approximately 400 degrees C. This is surprising in that an apparent flux-sensitivity was observed in an earlier comparative irradiation of Fe-Cr binaries conducted in EBR-II and FFTF. The difference in behavior is ascribed to the higher helium generation rates of Fe-Cr alloys in EBR-II compared to that of FFTF, and also the fact that lower dpa rates in FFTF are accompanied by progressively lower helium generation rates.

  4. Magnetism and electronic structure of CoFeCrX (X = Si, Ge) Heusler alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Y.; Kharel, P.; Lukashev, P.; Valloppilly, S.; Staten, B.; Herran, J.; Tutic, I.; Mitrakumar, M.; Bhusal, B.; O'Connell, A.; Yang, K.; Huh, Y.; Skomski, R.; Sellmyer, D. J.

    2016-08-01

    The structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of CoFeCrX (X = Si, Ge) Heusler alloys have been investigated. Experimentally, the alloys were synthesized in the cubic L21 structure with small disorder. The cubic phase of CoFeCrSi was found to be highly stable against heat treatment, but CoFeCrGe disintegrated into other new compounds when the temperature reached 402 °C (675 K). Although the first-principle calculation predicted the possibility of tetragonal phase in CoFeCrGe, the tetragonal phase could not be stabilized experimentally. Both CoFeCrSi and CoFeCrGe compounds showed ferrimagnetic spin order at room temperature and have Curie temperatures (TC) significantly above room temperature. The measured TC for CoFeCrSi is 790 K but that of CoFeCrGe could not be measured due to its dissociation into new compounds at 675 K. The saturation magnetizations of CoFeCrSi and CoFeCrGe are 2.82 μB/f.u. and 2.78 μB/f.u., respectively, which are close to the theoretically predicted value of 3 μB/f.u. for their half-metallic phases. The calculated band gaps for CoFeCrSi and CoFeCrGe are, respectively, 1 eV and 0.5 eV. These materials have potential for spintronic device applications, as they exhibit half-metallic electronic structures with large band gaps, and Curie temperatures significantly above room temperature.

  5. Evaluation on the Effect of Composition on Radiation Hardening and Embrittlement in Model FeCrAl Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G.; Briggs, Samuel A.; Edmondson, Philip; Hu, Xunxiang; Littrell, Kenneth C.; Howard, Richard; Parish, Chad M.; Yamamoto, Yukinori

    2015-09-18

    This report details the findings of post-radiation mechanical testing and microstructural characterization performed on a series of model and commercial FeCrAl alloys to assist with the development of a cladding technology with enhanced accident tolerance. The samples investigated include model alloys with simple ferritic grain structure and two commercial alloys with minor solute additions. These samples were irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) up to nominal doses of 7.0 dpa near or at Light Water Reactor (LWR) relevant temperatures (300-400 C). Characterization included a suite of techniques including small angle neutron scattering (SANS), atom probe tomography (APT), and transmission based electron microscopy techniques. Mechanical testing included tensile tests at room temperature on sub-sized tensile specimens. The goal of this work was to conduct detailed characterization and mechanical testing to begin establishing empirical and/or theoretical structure-property relationships for radiation-induced hardening and embrittlement in the FeCrAl alloy class. Development of such relationships will provide insight on the performance of FeCrAl alloys in an irradiation environment and will enable further development of the alloy class for applications within a LWR environment. A particular focus was made on establishing trends, including composition and radiation dose. The report highlights in detail the pertinent findings based on this work. This report shows that radiation hardening in the alloys is primarily composition dependent due to the phase separation in the high-Cr FeCrAl alloys. Other radiation induced/enhanced microstructural features were less dependent on composition and when observed at low number densities, were not a significant contributor to the observed mechanical responses. Pre-existing microstructure in the alloys was found to be important, with grain boundaries and pre-existing dislocation

  6. Simple bond-order-type interatomic potential for an intermixed Fe-Cr-C system of metallic and covalent bondings in heat-resistant ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Kumagai, Tomohisa Nakamura, Kaoru; Yamada, Susumu; Ohnuma, Toshiharu

    2014-12-28

    It is known that M{sub 23}C{sub 6}(M = Cr/Fe) behavior in heat-resistant ferritic steels affects the strength of the material at high temperature. The ability to garner direct information regarding the atomic motion using classical molecular dynamics simulations is useful for investigating the M{sub 23}C{sub 6} behavior in heat-resistant ferritic steels. For such classical molecular dynamics calculations, a suitable interatomic potential is needed. To satisfy this requirement, an empirical bond-order-type interatomic potential for Fe-Cr-C systems was developed because the three main elements to simulate the M{sub 23}C{sub 6} behavior in heat-resistant ferritic steels are Fe, Cr, and C. The angular-dependent term, which applies only in non-metallic systems, was determined based on the similarity between a Finnis-Sinclair-type embedded-atom-method interatomic potential and a Tersoff-type bond-order potential. The potential parameters were determined such that the material properties of Fe-Cr-C systems were reproduced. These properties include the energy and lattice constants of 89 crystal structures; the elastic constants of four realistic precipitates; the bulk moduli of B1, B2, and B3 crystals; the surface energies of B1 and B2 crystals; and the defect-formation energies and atomic configurations of 66 Fe-Cr-C complexes. Most of these material properties were found to be reproduced by our proposed empirical bond-order potentials. The formation energies and lattice constants of randomly mixed Fe-Cr alloys calculated using the interatomic potentials were comparable to those obtained through experiments and first-principles calculations. Furthermore, the energies and structures of interfaces between Cr carbide and α-Fe as predicted through first-principles calculations were well reproduced using these interatomic potentials.

  7. Elastic Modulus Measurement of ORNL ATF FeCrAl Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Zachary T.; Terrani, Kurt A.; Yamamoto, Yukinori

    2015-10-01

    Elastic modulus and Poisson’s ratio for a number of wrought FeCrAl alloys, intended for accident tolerant fuel cladding application, are determined via resonant ultrasonic spectroscopy. The results are reported as a function of temperature from room temperature to 850°C. The wrought alloys were in the fully annealed and unirradiated state. The elastic modulus for the wrought FeCrAl alloys is at least twice that of Zr-based alloys over the temperature range of this study. The Poisson’s ratio of the alloys was 0.28 on average and increased very slightly with increasing temperature.

  8. Microstructures, mechanical properties, and electrical resistivity of rapidly quenched Fe-Cr-Al alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naohara, T.; Inoue, A.; Minemura, T.; Masumoto, T.; Kumada, K.

    1982-03-01

    By the rapid quenching technique, ductile supersaturated ferrite solid solution with high hardness and strength as well as unusual electrical properties has been found in Fe-Cr-Al ternary system. This formation range is limited to less than about 35 at. pct Cr and 23 at. pct Al. The ferrite phase has fine grains of about 10 μm in diameter. Their hardness, yield strength, and tensile fracture strength increase with increase in the amounts of chromium and aluminum, and the highest values reach about 290 DPN, 720 MPa, and 740 MPa. These alloys are so ductile that no cracks are observed even after closely contacted bending test. The good strength and ductility remain almost unchanged on tempering for one hour until heated to about 923 K where a large amount of Cr2Al compound begins to precipitate preferentially along the grain boundaries of the ferrite phase. The room-temperature resistivity increases with increasing chromium and aluminum contents and reaches as high as 1.86 μ Ώ m for Fe50Cr30Al20 alloy. Also, the temperature coefficient of resistivity in the temperature range between room temperature and 773 K decreases with increasing chromium and aluminum contents and becomes zero in the vicinity of 20 to 30 at. pct Cr and 15 at. pct Al. Thus, the present alloys may be attractive as fine gauge high-resistance and/or standard-resistance wires and plates because of the unusual electrical properties combined with high strength and good ductility.

  9. Hydrogen permeation in FeCrAl alloys for LWR cladding application

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hu, Xunxiang; Terrani, Kurt A.; Wirth, Brian D.; Snead, Lance L.

    2015-03-19

    FeCrAl is an advanced oxidation-resistant iron-based alloy class, is a highly prevalent candidate as an accident-tolerant fuel cladding material. Compared with traditional zirconium alloy fuel cladding, increased tritium permeation through FeCrAl fuel cladding to the primary coolant is expected, raising potential safety concerns. In our study, the hydrogen permeability of several FeCrAl alloys was obtained using a static permeation test station, which was calibrated and validated using 304 stainless steel. The high hydrogen permeability of FeCrAl alloys leads to concerns with respect to potentially significant tritium release when used for fuel cladding in LWRs. Also, the total tritium inventory insidemore » the primary coolant of a light water reactor was quantified by applying a 1-dimensional steady state tritium diffusion model to demonstrate the dependence of tritium inventory on fuel cladding type. Furthermore, potential mitigation strategies for tritium release from FeCrAl fuel cladding were discussed and indicate the potential for application of an alumina layer on the inner clad surface to serve as a tritium barrier. More effort is required to develop a robust, economical mitigation strategy for tritium permeation in reactors using FeCrAl clad fuel assemblies.« less

  10. Hydrogen permeation in FeCrAl alloys for LWR cladding application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xunxiang; Terrani, Kurt A.; Wirth, Brian D.; Snead, Lance L.

    2015-06-01

    FeCrAl, an advanced oxidation-resistant iron-based alloy class, is a highly prevalent candidate as an accident-tolerant fuel cladding material. Compared with traditional zirconium alloy fuel cladding, increased tritium permeation through FeCrAl fuel cladding to the primary coolant is expected, raising potential safety concerns. In this study, the hydrogen permeability of several FeCrAl alloys was obtained using a static permeation test station, which was calibrated and validated using 304 stainless steel. The high hydrogen permeability of FeCrAl alloys leads to concerns with respect to potentially significant tritium release when used for fuel cladding in LWRs. The total tritium inventory inside the primary coolant of a light water reactor was quantified by applying a 1-dimensional steady state tritium diffusion model to demonstrate the dependence of tritium inventory on fuel cladding type. Furthermore, potential mitigation strategies for tritium release from FeCrAl fuel cladding were discussed and indicate the potential for application of an alumina layer on the inner clad surface to serve as a tritium barrier. More effort is required to develop a robust, economical mitigation strategy for tritium permeation in reactors using FeCrAl clad fuel assemblies.

  11. Hydrogen permeation in FeCrAl alloys for LWR cladding application

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Xunxiang; Terrani, Kurt A.; Wirth, Brian D.; Snead, Lance L.

    2015-03-19

    FeCrAl is an advanced oxidation-resistant iron-based alloy class, is a highly prevalent candidate as an accident-tolerant fuel cladding material. Compared with traditional zirconium alloy fuel cladding, increased tritium permeation through FeCrAl fuel cladding to the primary coolant is expected, raising potential safety concerns. In our study, the hydrogen permeability of several FeCrAl alloys was obtained using a static permeation test station, which was calibrated and validated using 304 stainless steel. The high hydrogen permeability of FeCrAl alloys leads to concerns with respect to potentially significant tritium release when used for fuel cladding in LWRs. Also, the total tritium inventory inside the primary coolant of a light water reactor was quantified by applying a 1-dimensional steady state tritium diffusion model to demonstrate the dependence of tritium inventory on fuel cladding type. Furthermore, potential mitigation strategies for tritium release from FeCrAl fuel cladding were discussed and indicate the potential for application of an alumina layer on the inner clad surface to serve as a tritium barrier. More effort is required to develop a robust, economical mitigation strategy for tritium permeation in reactors using FeCrAl clad fuel assemblies.

  12. Thermal evolution of vacancy-type defects in quenched FeCrNi alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C. X.; Cao, X. Z.; Li, Y. H.; Jin, S. X.; Lu, E. Y.; Tian, H. W.; Zhang, P.; Wang, B. Y.

    2015-06-01

    The effect of isochronal annealing on vacancy-type defects in quenched FeCrNi alloys and SUS316 was investigated via positron annihilation technique. Vacancy-type defects clustered and grew with increasing annealing temperatures of up to 523 K and, in FeCrNi alloys, were gradually annihilated with increasing temperature. The annihilation temperature was relatively insensitive to the addition of Mo and nonmetal elements, and after annealing at 673 K, the vacancy-type defects were annihilated and dislocation-type defects were formed in all of the alloys. In addition, due to the formation of Mo-vacancy complexes, the density of defects in the Mo-diluted FeCrNi model alloy was lower than that in the FeCrNi model alloy. The long lifetime of vacancy-type defects in commercial stainless steel SUS316 was smaller than that in the FeCrNi model alloys due to the nonmetal-element-induced change in mobility of the defects. Moreover, the vacancy-type and dislocation-type defects contributed to the S and W parameters of positron annihilation during the entire annealing treatment.

  13. Development of ODS FeCrAl alloys for accident-tolerant fuel cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Dryepondt, Sebastien N.; Hoelzer, David T.; Pint, Bruce A.; Unocic, Kinga A.

    2015-09-18

    FeCrAl alloys are prime candidates for accident-tolerant fuel cladding due to their excellent oxidation resistance up to 1400 C and good mechanical properties at intermediate temperature. Former commercial oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) FeCrAl alloys such as PM2000 exhibit significantly better tensile strength than wrought FeCrAl alloys, which would alloy for the fabrication of a very thin (~250 m) ODS FeCrAl cladding and limit the neutronic penalty from the replacement of Zr-based alloys by Fe-based alloys. Several Fe-12-Cr-5Al ODS alloys where therefore fabricated by ball milling FeCrAl powders with Y2O3 and additional oxides such as TiO2 or ZrO2. The new Fe-12Cr-5Al ODS alloys showed excellent tensile strength up to 800 C but limited ductility. Good oxidation resistance in steam at 1200 and 1400 C was observed except for one ODS FeCrAl alloy containing Ti. Rolling trials were conducted at 300, 600 C and 800 C to simulate the fabrication of thin tube cladding and a plate thickness of ~0.6mm was reached before the formation of multiple edge cracks. Hardness measurements at different stages of the rolling process, before and after annealing for 1h at 1000 C, showed that a thinner plate thickness could likely be achieved by using a multi-step approach combining warm rolling and high temperature annealing. Finally, new Fe-10-12Cr-5.5-6Al-Z gas atomized powders have been purchased to fabricate the second generation of low-Cr ODS FeCrAl alloys. The main goals are to assess the effect of O, C, N and Zr contents on the ODS FeCrAl microstructure and mechanical properties, and to optimize the fabrication process to improve the ductility of the 2nd gen ODS FeCrAl while maintaining good mechanical strength and oxidation resistance.

  14. Thermodynamic analysis of chemical compatibility of several compounds with Fe-Cr-Al alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical compatibility between Fe-19.8Cr-4.8Al (weight percent), which is the base composition for the commercial superalloy MA956, and several carbides, borides, nitrides, oxides, and silicides was analyzed from thermodynamic considerations. The effect of addition of minor alloying elements, such as Ti, Y, and Y2O3, to the Fe-Cr-Al alloy on chemical compatibility between the alloy and various compounds was also analyzed. Several chemically compatible compounds that can be potential reinforcement materials and/or interface coating materials for Fe-Cr-Al based composites were identified.

  15. Third element effect in the surface zone of Fe-Cr-Al alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airiskallio, E.; Nurmi, E.; Heinonen, M. H.; Väyrynen, I. J.; Kokko, K.; Ropo, M.; Punkkinen, M. P. J.; Pitkänen, H.; Alatalo, M.; Kollár, J.; Johansson, B.; Vitos, L.

    2010-01-01

    The third element effect to improve the high temperature corrosion resistance of the low-Al Fe-Cr-Al alloys is suggested to involve a mechanism that boosts the recovering of the Al concentration to the required level in the Al-depleted zone beneath the oxide layer. We propose that the key factor in this mechanism is the coexistent Cr depletion that helps to maintain a sufficient Al content in the depleted zone. Several previous experiments related to our study support that conditions for such a mechanism to be functional prevail in real oxidation processes of Fe-Cr-Al alloys.

  16. Resistance of Nanostructured Fe-Cr Alloys to Oxidative Degradation: Role of Zr and Cr Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahesh, B. V.; Singh Raman, R. K.; Koch, C. C.

    2015-04-01

    This article investigates the effect of grain size and Cr concentration on the oxidation resistance of nanocrystalline Fe-Cr alloys having varying Cr contents between 2 and 10 wt pct. The results have been compared with microcrystalline Fe-Cr alloys with 10 and 20 wt pct Cr. Pellets of nanocrystalline and microcrystalline Fe-Cr alloys were prepared by mechanical alloying followed by hot compaction and sintering, and then oxidized at 823 K (550 °C) for 150-hours. Oxidation kinetics was determined by measuring the weight gain during oxidation, and the post-oxidation characterization of the oxide scales was performed using secondary ion mass spectroscopy. The chromium content at the inner oxide scale of nanocrystalline Fe-Cr alloys (with >7 pct Cr) was found to be comparable with that of microcrystalline 20 pctCr alloy, which suggests that nanocrystalline grain size distribution can be exploited to develop highly oxidation resistant alloys with much lower amounts of expensive alloying element (Cr). A mechanistic understanding of the high temperature oxidation in nanostructured alloys has been presented and the critical amount of bulk Cr content required to form a protective chromia layer has been calculated. The paper also investigates the role of a reactive element Zr on the high temperature oxidation resistance of nanocrystalline Fe-Cr. The beneficial effect is more pronounced at low bulk Cr (2 to 4 pct) concentrations (compared to higher Cr (>7 pct) concentration), however, at low bulk Cr, insufficient Cr enrichment occurs to establish a protective chromium oxide layer.

  17. Normal and excess nitrogen uptake by iron-based Fe-Cr-Al alloys: the role of the Cr/Al atomic ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, K. S.; Schacherl, R. E.; Bischoff, E.; Mittemeijer, E. J.

    2011-06-01

    Upon nitriding ferritic iron-based Fe-Cr-Al alloys, containing a total of 1.50 at. % (Cr + Al) alloying elements with varying Cr/Al atomic ratio (0.21-2.00), excess nitrogen uptake occurred, i.e. more nitrogen was incorporated in the specimens than compatible with only inner nitride formation and equilibrium nitrogen solubility of the unstrained ferrite matrix. The amount of excess nitrogen increased with decreasing Cr/Al atomic ratio. The microstructure of the nitrided zone was investigated by X-ray diffraction, electron probe microanalysis, transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy. Metastable, fine platelet-type, mixed Cr1- x Al x N nitride precipitates developed in the nitrided zone for all of the investigated specimens. The degree of coherency of the nitride precipitates with the surrounding ferrite matrix is discussed in view of the anisotropy of the misfit. Analysis of nitrogen-absorption isotherms, recorded after subsequent pre- and de-nitriding treatments, allowed quantitative differentiation of different types of nitrogen taken up. The amounts of the different types of excess nitrogen as function of the Cr/Al atomic ratio are discussed in terms of the nitride/matrix misfit and the different chemical affinities of Cr and Al for N. The strikingly different nitriding behaviors of Fe-Cr-Al and Fe-Cr-Ti alloys could be explained on this basis.

  18. Microstructural stability of Fe-Cr-Al alloys at 450-550 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejenstam, Jesper; Thuvander, Mattias; Olsson, Pär; Rave, Fernando; Szakalos, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Iron-Chromium-Aluminium (Fe-Cr-Al) alloys have been widely investigated as candidate materials for various nuclear applications. Albeit the excellent corrosion resistance, conventional Fe-Cr-Al alloys suffer from α-α‧ phase separation and embrittlement when subjected to temperatures up to 500 °C, due to their high Cr-content. Low-Cr Fe-Cr-Al alloys are anticipated to be embrittlement resistant and provide adequate oxidation properties, yet long-term aging experiments and simulations are lacking in literature. In this study, Fe-10Cr-(4-8)Al alloys and a Fe-21Cr-5Al were thermally aged in the temperature interval of 450-550 °C for times up to 10,000 h, and the microstructures were evaluated mainly using atom probe tomography. In addition, a Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) model of the Fe-Cr-Al system was developed. No phase separation was observed in the Fe-10Cr-(4-8)Al alloys, and the developed KMC model yielded results in good agreement with the experimental data.

  19. Study of the effect of short ranged ordering on the magnetism in FeCr alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jena, Ambika Prasad; Sanyal, Biplab; Mookerjee, Abhijit

    2014-01-01

    For the study of magnetism in systems where the local environment plays an important role, we propose a marriage between the Monte Carlo simulation and Zunger's special quasi-random structures. We apply this technique on disordered FeCr alloys and show that our estimates of the transition temperature is in good agreement with earlier experiments.

  20. Epitaxial growth, alloying and magnetic structure of interfaces in Fe/Cr (0 0 1) superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzdin, V.; Keune, W.; Walterfang, M.

    2002-02-01

    Fe/Cr(0 0 1) superlattices containing two-monolayers thick 57Fe probe layers at the Fe/Cr (Fe-on-Cr) or Cr/Fe (Cr-on-Fe) interfaces were studied using conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy (CEMS). For the interpretation of the CEMS data of superlattices annealed at different temperatures, we performed theoretical modeling of their chemical and magnetic structure. Roughness and interface alloying were introduced to the model by algorithms of epitaxial growth, which included ballistic deposition with subsequent floating of some atoms on the surface. Self-consistent calculations of magnetic moments within the periodic Anderson model confirmed the proportionality between hyperfine fields and magnetic moments. For the explanation of the evolution of CEM spectra versus annealing temperature, the difference in the melting points of bulk Fe and Cr has to be taken into account.

  1. Assessing the elastic properties and ductility of Fe-Cr-Al alloys from ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurmi, E.; Wang, G.; Kokko, K.; Vitos, L.

    2016-01-01

    Fe-Al is one of the best corrosion resistant alloys at high temperatures. The flip side of Al addition to Fe is the deterioration of the mechanical properties. This problem can be solved by adding a suitable amount of third alloying component. In the present work, we use ab initio calculations based on density functional theory to study the elastic properties of Fe?Cr?Al? alloys for Al and Cr contents up to 20 at.%. We assess the ductility as a function of chemistry by making use of the semi-empirical correlations between the elastic parameters and mechanical properties. In particular, we derive the bulk modulus to shear modulus ratio and the Cauchy pressure and monitor their trends in terms of chemical composition. The present findings are contrasted with the previously established oxidation resistance of Fe-Cr-Al alloys.

  2. PVD synthesis and high-throughput property characterization of NiFeCr alloy libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Rar, A.; Frafjord, J. J.; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Specht, E. D.; Rack, P. D.; Santella, M. L.; Bei, H.; George, E. P.; Pharr, G. M.

    2004-12-16

    Three methods of alloy library synthesis, thick-layer deposition followed by interdiffusion, composition-spread codeposition and electron-beam melting of thick deposited layers, have been applied to Ni-Fe-Cr ternary and Ni-Cr binary alloys. Structural XRD mapping and mechanical characterization by means of nanoindentation have been used to characterize the properties of the libraries. The library synthesis methods are compared from the point of view of the structural and mechanical information they can provide.

  3. Host Atom Diffusion in Ternary Fe-Cr-Al Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrberg, Diana; Spitzer, Karl-Heinz; Dörrer, Lars; Kulińska, Anna J.; Borchardt, Günter; Fraczkiewicz, Anna; Markus, Torsten; Jacobs, Michael H. G.; Schmid-Fetzer, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    In the Fe-rich corner of the Fe-Cr-Al ternary phase diagram, both interdiffusion experiments [1048 K to 1573 K (775 °C to 1300 °C)] and 58Fe tracer diffusion experiments [873 K to 1123 K (600 °C to 850 °C)] were performed along the Fe50Cr50-Fe50Al50 section. For the evaluation of the interdiffusion data, a theoretical model was used which directly yields the individual self-diffusion coefficients of the three constituents and the shift of the original interface of the diffusion couple through inverse modeling. The driving chemical potential gradients were derived using a phenomenological Gibbs energy function which was based on thoroughly assessed thermodynamic data. From the comparison of the individual self-diffusivities of Fe as obtained from interdiffusion profiles and independent 58Fe tracer diffusivities, the influence of the B2-A2 order-disorder transition becomes obvious, resulting in a slightly higher activation enthalpy for the bcc-B2 phase and a significantly lower activation entropy for this phase.

  4. Radiation tolerance of neutron-irradiated model Fe-Cr-Al alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Kevin G.; Hu, Xunxiang; Littrell, Kenneth C.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Snead, Lance L.

    2015-10-01

    The Fe-Cr-Al alloy system has the potential to form an important class of enhanced accident-tolerant cladding materials in the nuclear power industry owing to the alloy system's higher oxidation resistance in high-temperature steam environments compared with traditional zirconium-based alloys. However, radiation tolerance of Fe-Cr-Al alloys has not been fully established. In this study, a series of Fe-Cr-Al alloys with 10-18 wt % Cr and 2.9-4.9 wt % Al were neutron irradiated at 382 °C to 1.8 dpa to investigate the irradiation-induced microstructural and mechanical property evolution as a function of alloy composition. Dislocation loops with Burgers vector of a/2<111> and a<100> were detected and quantified. Results indicate precipitation of Cr-rich α‧ is primarily dependent on the bulk chromium composition. Mechanical testing of sub-size-irradiated tensile specimens indicates the hardening response seen after irradiation is dependent on the bulk chromium composition. A structure-property relationship was developed; it indicated that the change in yield strength after irradiation is caused by the formation of these radiation-induced defects and is dominated by the large number density of Cr-rich α‧ precipitates at sufficiently high chromium contents after irradiation.

  5. Radiation tolerance of neutron-irradiated model Fe-Cr-Al alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Kevin G.; Hu, Xunxiang; Littrell, Kenneth C.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Snead, Lance L.

    2015-10-01

    The Fe-Cr-Al alloy system has the potential to form an important class of enhanced accident-tolerant cladding materials in the nuclear power industry owing to the alloy system's higher oxidation resistance in high-temperature steam environments compared with traditional zirconium-based alloys. However, radiation tolerance of Fe-Cr-Al alloys has not been fully established. In this study, a series of Fe-Cr-Al alloys with 10-18 wt % Cr and 2.9-4.9 wt % Al were neutron irradiated at 382 °C to 1.8 dpa to investigate the irradiation-induced microstructural and mechanical property evolution as a function of alloy composition. Dislocation loops with Burgers vector of a/2<111> and a<100> were detected and quantified. Results indicate precipitation of Cr-rich α‧ is primarily dependent on the bulk chromium composition. Mechanical testing of sub-size-irradiated tensile specimens indicates the hardening response seen after irradiation is dependent on the bulk chromium composition. A structure-property relationship was developed; it indicated that the change in yield strength after irradiation is caused by the formation of these radiation-induced defects and is dominated by the large number density of Cr-rich α‧ precipitates at sufficiently high chromium contents after irradiation.

  6. Radiation tolerance of neutron-irradiated model Fe-Cr-Al alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Field, Kevin G.; Hu, Xunxiang; Littrell, Kenneth C.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2015-07-14

    The Fe Cr Al alloy system has the potential to form an important class of enhanced accident-tolerant cladding materials in the nuclear power industry owing to the alloy system's higher oxidation resistance in high-temperature steam environments compared with traditional zirconium-based alloys. However, radiation tolerance of Fe Cr Al alloys has not been fully established. In this study, a series of Fe Cr Al alloys with 10 18 wt % Cr and 2.9 4.9 wt % Al were neutron irradiated at 382 C to 1.8 dpa to investigate the irradiation-induced microstructural and mechanical property evolution as a function of alloy composition.more » Dislocation loops with Burgers vector of a/2 111 and a 100 were detected and quantified. Results indicate precipitation of Cr-rich is primarily dependent on the bulk chromium composition. Mechanical testing of sub-size-irradiated tensile specimens indicates the hardening response seen after irradiation is dependent on the bulk chromium composition. Furthermore, a structure property relationship was developed; it indicated that the change in yield strength after irradiation is caused by the formation of these radiation-induced defects and is dominated by the large number density of Cr-rich α' precipitates at sufficiently high chromium contents after irradiation.« less

  7. Radiation tolerance of neutron-irradiated model Fe-Cr-Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G.; Hu, Xunxiang; Littrell, Kenneth C.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2015-07-14

    The Fe Cr Al alloy system has the potential to form an important class of enhanced accident-tolerant cladding materials in the nuclear power industry owing to the alloy system's higher oxidation resistance in high-temperature steam environments compared with traditional zirconium-based alloys. However, radiation tolerance of Fe Cr Al alloys has not been fully established. In this study, a series of Fe Cr Al alloys with 10 18 wt % Cr and 2.9 4.9 wt % Al were neutron irradiated at 382 C to 1.8 dpa to investigate the irradiation-induced microstructural and mechanical property evolution as a function of alloy composition. Dislocation loops with Burgers vector of a/2 111 and a 100 were detected and quantified. Results indicate precipitation of Cr-rich is primarily dependent on the bulk chromium composition. Mechanical testing of sub-size-irradiated tensile specimens indicates the hardening response seen after irradiation is dependent on the bulk chromium composition. Furthermore, a structure property relationship was developed; it indicated that the change in yield strength after irradiation is caused by the formation of these radiation-induced defects and is dominated by the large number density of Cr-rich α' precipitates at sufficiently high chromium contents after irradiation.

  8. Hafnium influence on the microstructure of FeCrAl alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geanta, V.; Voiculescu, I.; Stanciu, E.-M.

    2016-06-01

    Due to their special properties at high temperatures, FeCrAl alloys micro-alloyed with Zr can be regarded as potential materials for use at nuclear power plants, generation 4R. These materials are resistant to oxidation at high temperatures, to corrosion, erosion and to the penetrating radiations in liquid metal environments. Also, these are able to form continuously, by the self-generation process of an oxide coating with high adhesive strength. The protective oxide layers must be textured and regenerable, with a good mechanical strength, so that crack and peeling can not appear. To improve the mechanical and chemical characteristics of the oxide layer, we introduced limited quantities of Zr, Ti, Y, Hf, Ce in the range of 1-3%wt in the FeCrAl alloy. These elements, with very high affinity to the oxygen, are capable to stabilize the alumina structure and to improve the oxide adherence to the metallic substrate. FeCrAl alloys microalloyed with Hf were prepared using VAR (Vacuum Arc Remelting) unit, under high argon purity atmosphere. Three different experimental alloys have been prepared using the same metallic matrix of Fe-14Cr-5Al, by adding of 0.5%wt Hf, 1.0%wt Hf and respectively 1.5%wt Hf. The microhardness values for the experimental alloys have been in the range 154 ... 157 HV0.2. EDAX analyses have been performed to determine chemical composition on the oxide layer and in the bulk of sample and SEM analyze has been done to determine the microstructural features. The results have shown the capacity of FeCrAl alloy to form oxide layers, with different texture and rich in elements such as Al and Hf.

  9. Irradiation-enhanced α' precipitation in model FeCrAl alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Edmondson, Philip D.; Briggs, Samuel A.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Howard, Richard H.; Sridharan, Kumar; Terrani, Kurt A.; Field, Kevin G.

    2016-02-17

    Model FeCrAl alloys with varying compositions (Fe(10–18)Cr(10–6)Al at.%) have been neutron irradiated at ~ 320 to damage levels of ~ 7 displacements per atom (dpa) to investigate the compositional influence on the formation of irradiation-induced Cr-rich α' precipitates using atom probe tomography. In all alloys, significant number densities of these precipitates were observed. Cluster compositions were investigated and it was found that the average cluster Cr content ranged between 51.1 and 62.5 at.% dependent on initial compositions. This is significantly lower than the Cr-content of α' in binary FeCr alloys. As a result, significant partitioning of the Al from themore » α' precipitates was also observed.« less

  10. Development of Simultaneous Corrosion Barrier and Optimized Microstructure in FeCrAl Heat-Resistant Alloy for Energy Applications. Part 1: The Protective Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimentel, G.; Aranda, M. M.; Chao, J.; González-Carrasco, J. L.; Capdevila, C.

    2015-09-01

    Coarse-grained Fe-based oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels are a class of advanced materials for combined cycle gas turbine systems to deal with operating temperatures and pressures of around 1100°C and 15-30 bar in aggressive environments, which would increase biomass energy conversion efficiencies up to 45% and above. This two-part paper reports the possibility of the development of simultaneous corrosion barrier and optimized microstructure in a FeCrAl heat-resistant alloy for energy applications. The first part reports the mechanism of generating a dense, self-healing α-alumina layer by thermal oxidation, during a heat treatment that leads to a coarse-grained microstructure with a potential value for high-temperature creep resistance in a FeCrAl ODS ferritic alloy, which will be described in more detail in the second part.

  11. The Study of Nano-Sized Carbide Particles Formed in Fe-Cr-W-V Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novinrooz, Abdul Javad; Moniri, Samira; Asadi Asadabad, Mohsen; Hojabri, Alireza

    2012-07-01

    The microstructural features of nanocarbide particles formed in Fe-Cr-W-V alloy were studied. A Fe-Cr-W-V alloy was first heat treated under different conditions. In this study, optical microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and hardness tester were used. The shape, size distribution, type, and lattice parameters of the extracted particles were investigated. The identified carbides were MC, M7C3, and M23C6. The particle size measurements showed that the mean length of carbide particles during 0.5, 5, and 20 h was about 103, 128, and 142 nm, respectively. Also, the mean thickness of carbide particles during 0.5, 5, and 20 h was about 54, 67, and 74 nm, respectively.

  12. Nucleation of Cr precipitates in Fe-Cr alloy under irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Y. Y.; Ao, L.; Sun, Qing- Qiang; Yang, L.; Nie, JL; Peng, SM; Long, XG; Zhou, X. S.; Zu, Xiaotao; Liu, L.; Sun, Xin; Terentyev, Dimtry; Gao, Fei

    2015-04-01

    The nucleation of Cr precipitates induced by overlapping of displacement cascades in Fe-Cr alloys has been investigated using the combination of molecular dynamics (MD) and Metropolis Monte Carlo (MMC) simulations. The results reveal that the number of Frenkel pairs increases with the increasing of overlapped cascades. Overlapping cascades could promote the formation of Cr precipitates in Fe-Cr alloys, as analyzed using short range order (SRO) parameters to quantify the degree of ordering and clustering of Cr atoms. In addition, the simulations using MMC approach show that the presence of small Cr clusters and vacancy clusters formed within cascade overlapped region enhance the nucleation of Cr precipitates, leading to the formation of large Cr dilute precipitates.

  13. On the mobility of vacancy clusters in reduced activation steels: an atomistic study in the Fe-Cr-W model alloy.

    PubMed

    Bonny, G; Castin, N; Bullens, J; Bakaev, A; Klaver, T C P; Terentyev, D

    2013-08-01

    Reduced activation steels are considered as structural materials for future fusion reactors. Besides iron and the main alloying element chromium, these steels contain other minor alloying elements, typically tungsten, vanadium and tantalum. In this work we study the impact of chromium and tungsten, being major alloying elements of ferritic Fe-Cr-W-based steels, on the stability and mobility of vacancy defects, typically formed under irradiation in collision cascades. For this purpose, we perform ab initio calculations, develop a many-body interatomic potential (EAM formalism) for large-scale calculations, validate the potential and apply it using an atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo method to characterize the lifetime and diffusivity of vacancy clusters. To distinguish the role of Cr and W we perform atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo simulations in Fe-Cr, Fe-W and Fe-Cr-W alloys. Within the limitation of transferability of the potentials it is found that both Cr and W enhance the diffusivity of vacancy clusters, while only W strongly reduces their lifetime. The cluster lifetime reduction increases with W concentration and saturates at about 1-2 at.%. The obtained results imply that W acts as an efficient 'breaker' of small migrating vacancy clusters and therefore the short-term annealing process of cascade debris is modified by the presence of W, even in small concentrations. PMID:23838265

  14. Segregation, precipitation, and α -α' phase separation in Fe-Cr alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuronen, A.; Granroth, S.; Heinonen, M. H.; Perälä, R. E.; Kilpi, T.; Laukkanen, P.; Lâng, J.; Dahl, J.; Punkkinen, M. P. J.; Kokko, K.; Ropo, M.; Johansson, B.; Vitos, L.

    2015-12-01

    Iron-chromium alloys, the base components of various stainless steel grades, have numerous technologically and scientifically interesting properties. However, these features are not yet sufficiently understood to allow their full exploitation in technological applications. In this work, we investigate segregation, precipitation, and phase separation in Fe-Cr systems analyzing the physical mechanisms behind the observed phenomena. To get a comprehensive picture of Fe-Cr alloys as a function of composition, temperature, and time the present investigation combines Monte Carlo simulations using semiempirical interatomic potential, first-principles total energy calculations, and experimental spectroscopy. In order to obtain a general picture of the relation of the atomic interactions and properties of Fe-Cr alloys in bulk, surface, and interface regions several complementary methods have to be used. Using the exact muffin-tin orbitals method with the coherent potential approximation (CPA-EMTO) the effective chemical potential as a function of Cr content (0-15 at. % Cr) is calculated for a surface, second atomic layer, and bulk. At ˜10 at. % Cr in the alloy the reversal of the driving force of a Cr atom to occupy either bulk or surface sites is obtained. The Cr-containing surfaces are expected when the Cr content exceeds ˜10 at. %. The second atomic layer forms about a 0.3 eV barrier for the migration of Cr atoms between the bulk and surface atomic layer. To get information on Fe-Cr in larger scales we use semiempirical methods. However, for Cr concentration regions less than 10 at. %, the ab initio (CPA-EMTO) result of the important role of the second atomic layer to the surface is not reproducible from the large-scale Monte Carlo molecular dynamics (MCMD) simulation. On the other hand, for the nominal concentration of Cr larger than 10 at. % the MCMD simulations show the precipitation of Cr into isolated pockets in bulk Fe-Cr and the existence of the upper limit of

  15. Advanced ODS FeCrAl alloys for accident-tolerant fuel cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Dryepondt, Sebastien N; Unocic, Kinga A; Hoelzer, David T; Pint, Bruce A

    2014-09-01

    ODS FeCrAl alloys are being developed with optimum composition and properties for accident tolerant fuel cladding. Two oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-15Cr-5Al+Y2O3 alloys were fabricated by ball milling and extrusion of gas atomized metallic powder mixed with Y2O3 powder. To assess the impact of Mo on the alloy mechanical properties, one alloy contained 1%Mo. The hardness and tensile properties of the two alloys were close and higher than the values reported for fine grain PM2000 alloy. This is likely due to the combination of a very fine grain structure and the presence of nano oxide precipitates. The nano oxide dispersion was however not sufficient to prevent grain boundary sliding at 800 C and the creep properties of the alloys were similar or only slightly superior to fine grain PM2000 alloy. Both alloys formed a protective alumina scale at 1200 C in air and steam and the mass gain curves were similar to curves generated with 12Cr-5Al+Y2O3 (+Hf or Zr) ODS alloys fabricated for a different project. To estimate the maximum temperature limit of use for the two alloys in steam, ramp tests at a rate of 5 C/min were carried out in steam. Like other ODS alloys, the two alloys showed a significant increase of the mas gains at T~ 1380 C compared with ~1480 C for wrought alloys of similar composition. The beneficial effect of Yttrium for wrought FeCrAl does not seem effective for most ODS FeCrAl alloys. Characterization of the hardness of annealed specimens revealed that the microstructure of the two alloys was not stable above 1000 C. Concurrent radiation results suggested that Cr levels <15wt% are desirable and the creep and oxidation results from the 12Cr ODS alloys indicate that a lower Cr, high strength ODS alloy with a higher maximum use temperature could be achieved.

  16. Deformation Behavior of Laser Welds in High Temperature Oxidation Resistant Fe-Cr-Al Alloys for Fuel Cladding Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G; Gussev, Maxim N; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2014-11-01

    Ferritic-structured Fe-Cr-Al alloys are being developed and show promise as oxidation resistant accident tolerant light water reactor fuel cladding. This study focuses on investigating the weldability of three model alloys in a range of Fe-(13-17.5)Cr-(3-4.4)Al in weight percent with a minor addition of yttrium using laser-welding techniques. A detailed study on the mechanical performance of bead-on-plate welds has been carried out to determine the performance of welds as a function of alloy composition. Laser welding resulted in a defect free weld devoid of cracking or inclusions for all alloys studied. Results indicated a reduction in the yield strength within the fusion zone compared to the base metal. Yield strength reduction was found to be primarily constrained to the fusion zone due to grain coarsening with a less severe reduction in the heat affected zone. No significant correlation was found between the deformation behavior/mechanical performance of welds and the level of Cr or Al in the alloy ranges studied.

  17. Zener Relaxation Peak in an Fe-Cr-Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zheng-Cun; Cheng, He-Fa; Gong, Chen-Li; Wei, Jian-Ning; Han, Fu-Sheng

    2002-11-01

    We have studied the temperature spectra of internal friction and relative dynamic modulus of the Fe-(25 wt%)Cr-(5 wt%)Al alloy with different grain sizes. It is found that a peak appears in the internal friction versus temperature plot at about 550°C. The peak is of a stable relaxation and is reversible, which occurs not only during heating but also during cooling. Its activation energy is 2.5 (+/- 0.15) eV in terms of the Arrhenius relation. In addition, the peak is not obvious in specimens with a smaller grain size. It is suggested that the peak originates from Zener relaxation.

  18. Influence of recrystallization on phase separation kinetics of oxide dispersion strengthened Fe Cr Al alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Capdevila, C.; Miller, Michael K; Pimentel, G.; Chao, J.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of different starting microstructures on the kinetics of Fe-rich ({alpha}) and Cr-rich ({alpha}') phase separation during aging of Fe-Cr-Al oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys has been analyzed with a combination of atom probe tomography and thermoelectric power measurements. The results revealed that the high recrystallization temperature necessary to produce a coarse grained microstructure in Fe-base ODS alloys affects the randomness of Cr-atom distributions and defect density, which consequently affect the phase separation kinetics at low annealing temperatures.

  19. Deformation behavior of laser welds in high temperature oxidation resistant Fe-Cr-Al alloys for fuel cladding applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Kevin G.; Gussev, Maxim N.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Snead, Lance L.

    2014-11-01

    Ferritic-structured Fe-Cr-Al alloys are being developed and show promise as oxidation resistant accident tolerant light water reactor fuel cladding. This study focuses on investigating the weldability and post-weld mechanical behavior of three model alloys in a range of Fe-(13-17.5)Cr-(3-4.4)Al (wt.%) with a minor addition of yttrium using modern laser-welding techniques. A detailed study on the mechanical performance of bead-on-plate welds using sub-sized, flat dog-bone tensile specimens and digital image correlation (DIC) has been carried out to determine the performance of welds as a function of alloy composition. Results indicated a reduction in the yield strength within the fusion zone compared to the base metal. Yield strength reduction was found to be primarily constrained to the fusion zone due to grain coarsening with a less severe reduction in the heat affected zone. For all proposed alloys, laser welding resulted in a defect free weld devoid of cracking or inclusions.

  20. Interstitial precipitation in Fe-Cr-Al alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spear, W. S.; Polonis, D. H.

    1994-06-01

    Two separate stages of precipitation have been identified during the aging of ternary Fel8Cr3Al and Fel8Cr5Al alloys at temperatures in the vicinity of 475 °C. The first stage involves the formation of interstitial precipitates resulting from C and N impurities; the second and slower stage is the formation of the Cr-rich α' phase. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results show that carbonitride precipitation occurs preferentially at dislocations, stacking faults, and grain boundaries, and also uniformly through the matrix. Aging for times in excess of 400 hours at 475 °C promotes coarsening of the heterogeneous precipitates and dissolution of the uniformly distributed matrix particles. A resistometric analysis shows that the kinetics of the initial stages of precipitation can be described by a (time)2/3 relation. This kinetic behavior is explained in terms of stress-assisted diffusion in the highly stressed matrix resulting from coherency strains accompanying carbonitride precipitation. Experimental values of the activation energy for the first stage reaction correlate closely with those reported for the interstitial diffusion of C and N in alpha iron.

  1. Physical, Mechanical, and Dry Sliding Wear Properties of Fe-Cr-W-C Hardfacing Alloys Under Different Tungsten Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajihashemi, Mahdi; Shamanian, Morteza; Azimi, Ghasem

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the effects of tungsten on microstructure and wear performance of Fe-Cr-C claddings were evaluated. In this regard, tungsten inert gas surfacing process was employed to deposit Fe-Cr-C and Fe-Cr-C-W hardfacing alloys on plain carbon steel substrate using preplaced powders. Phase composition, microstructure, and wear behavior of clad layers were investigated using X-ray diffraction analysis, optical and scanning electron microscopy, and reciprocating wear tests, respectively. The claddings were well bonded to the substrate and showed a uniform microstructure. Cr7C3 and WC carbides were detected in the deposited layers. Further investigations indicated that the hardness and wear resistance can be improved by adding tungsten into Fe-Cr-C hardfacing alloys.

  2. Half-metallicity and tetragonal distortion in semi-Heusler alloy FeCrSe

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H. M. Luo, S. J.; Yao, K. L.

    2014-01-28

    Full-potential linearized augmented plane wave methods are carried out to investigate the electronic structures and magnetic properties in semi-Heusler alloy FeCrSe. Results show that FeCrSe is half-metallic ferromagnet with the half-metallic gap 0.31 eV at equilibrium lattice constant. Calculated total magnetic moment of 2.00μ{sub B} per formula unit follows the Slater-Pauling rule quite well. Two kinds of structural changes are used to investigate the sensitivity of half-metallicity. It is found that the half-metallicity can be retained when lattice constant is changed by −4.56% to 3.52%, and the results of tetragonal distortion indicate the half-metallicity can be kept at the range of c/a ratio from 0.85 to 1.20. The Curie temperature, cohesive energy, and heat of formations of FeCrSe are also discussed.

  3. Microchemical effects in irradiated Fe-Cr alloys as revealed by atomistic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malerba, L.; Bonny, G.; Terentyev, D.; Zhurkin, E. E.; Hou, M.; Vörtler, K.; Nordlund, K.

    2013-11-01

    Neutron irradiation produces evolving nanostructural defects in materials, that affect their macroscopic properties. Defect production and evolution is expected to be influenced by the chemical composition of the material. In turn, the accumulation of defects in the material results in microchemical changes, which may induce further changes in macroscopic properties. In this work we review the results of recent atomic-level simulations conducted in Fe-Cr alloys, as model materials for high-Cr ferritic-martensitic steels, to address the following questions: 1. Is the primary damage produced in displacement cascades influenced by the Cr content? If so, how? 2. Does Cr change the stability of radiation-produced defects? 3. Is the diffusivity of cascade-produced defects changed by Cr content? 4. How do Cr atoms redistribute under irradiation inside the material under the action of thermodynamic driving forces and radiation-defect fluxes? It is found that the presence of Cr does not influence the type of damage created by displacement cascades, as compared to pure Fe, while cascades do contribute to redistributing Cr, in the same direction as thermodynamic driving forces. The presence of Cr does change the stability of point-defects: the effect is weak in the case of vacancies, stronger in the case of self-interstitials. In the latter case, Cr increases the stability of self-interstitial clusters, especially those so small to be invisible to the electron microscope. Cr reduces also significantly the diffusivity of self-interstitials and their clusters, in a way that depends in a non-monotonic way on Cr content, as well as on cluster size and temperature; however, the effect is negligible on the mobility of self-interstitial clusters large enough to become visible dislocation loops. Finally, Cr-rich precipitate formation is favoured in the tensile region of edge dislocations, while it appears not to be influenced by screw dislocations; prismatic dislocation loops

  4. Thermal stability of intermetallic phases in Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yang, Ying; Tan, Lizhen; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-06-12

    Understanding the stability of precipitate phases in the Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys is critical to the alloy design and application of Mo-containing Austenitic steels. Coupled with thermodynamic modeling, stability of the chi and Laves phases in two Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys were investigated at 1000, 850 and 700 °C for different annealing time. The morphologies, compositions and crystal structures of the matrix and precipitate phases were carefully examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Electron Probe Microanalysis, X-ray diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The two key findings resulted from this work. One is that the chi phase is stable at high temperature and transformed intomore » the Laves phase at low temperature. The other is that both the chi and Laves phases have large solubilites of Cr, Mo and Ni, among which the Mo solubility has a major role on the relative stability of the precipitate phases. The developed thermodynamic models were then applied to evaluating the Mo effect on the stability of precipitate phases in AISI 316 and NF709 alloys.« less

  5. Thermal stability of intermetallic phases in Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ying; Tan, Lizhen; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-06-12

    Understanding the stability of precipitate phases in the Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys is critical to the alloy design and application of Mo-containing Austenitic steels. Coupled with thermodynamic modeling, stability of the chi and Laves phases in two Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys were investigated at 1000, 850 and 700 °C for different annealing time. The morphologies, compositions and crystal structures of the matrix and precipitate phases were carefully examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Electron Probe Microanalysis, X-ray diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The two key findings resulted from this work. One is that the chi phase is stable at high temperature and transformed into the Laves phase at low temperature. The other is that both the chi and Laves phases have large solubilites of Cr, Mo and Ni, among which the Mo solubility has a major role on the relative stability of the precipitate phases. The developed thermodynamic models were then applied to evaluating the Mo effect on the stability of precipitate phases in AISI 316 and NF709 alloys.

  6. Helium generation rates in isotopically tailored Fe-Cr-Ni alloys irradiated in FFTF/MOTA

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Garner, F.A. ); Oliver, B.M. . Rocketdyne Div.)

    1991-11-01

    Three Fe-Cr-Ni alloys have been doped with 0.4% {sup 59}Ni for side-by-side irradiations of doped and undoped materials in order to determine the effects of fusion-relevant levels of helium production on microstructural development and mechanical properties. The alloys were irradiated in three successive cycles of the Materials Open Test Assembly (MOTA) located in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). Following irradiation, helium levels were measured by isotope dilution mass spectrometry. The highest level of helium achieved in doped alloys was 172 appm at 9.1 dpa for a helium(appm)-to-dpa ratio of 18.9. The overall pattern of predicted helium generation rates in doped and undoped alloys is in good agreement with the helium measurements.

  7. Thermal Stability of Intermetallic Phases in Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ying; Tan, Lizhen; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the thermal stability of intermetallic phases in Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys is critical to alloy design and application of Mo-containing austenitic steels. Coupled with thermodynamic modeling, the thermal stability of intermetallic Chi and Laves phases in two Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys was investigated at 1273 K, 1123 K, and 973 K (1000 °C, 850 °C, and 700 °C) for different annealing times. The morphologies, compositions, and crystal structures of the precipitates of the intermetallic phases were carefully examined by scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Two key findings resulted from this study. First, the Chi phase is stable at high temperature, and with the decreasing temperature it transforms into the Laves phase that is stable at low temperature. Secondly, Cr, Mo, and Ni are soluble in both the Chi and Laves phases, with the solubility of Mo playing a major role in the relative stability of the intermetallic phases. The thermodynamic models that were developed were then applied to evaluating the effect of Mo on the thermal stability of intermetallic phases in type 316 and NF709 stainless steels.

  8. High spin polarization and spin splitting in equiatomic quaternary CoFeCrAl Heusler alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bainsla, Lakhan; Mallick, A. I.; Coelho, A. A.; Nigam, A. K.; Varaprasad, B. S. D. Ch. S.; Takahashi, Y. K.; Alam, Aftab; Suresh, K. G.; Hono, K.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate CoFeCrAl alloy by means of ab-initio electronic structure calculations and various experimental techniques. The alloy is found to exist in the B2-type cubic Heusler structure, which is very similar to Y-type (or LiMgPdSn prototype) structure with space group F-43m (#216). Saturation magnetization (MS) of about 2 μB/f.u. is observed at 8 K under ambient pressure, which is in good agreement with the Slater-Pauling rule. MS values are found to be independent of pressure, which is a prerequisite for half-metals. The ab-initio electronic structure calculations predict half-metallicity for the alloy with a spin slitting energy of 0.31 eV. Importantly, this system shows a high current spin polarization value of 0.67±0.02, as deduced from the point contact Andreev reflection measurements. Linear dependence of electrical resistivity with temperature indicates the possibility of reasonably high spin polarization at elevated temperatures (~150 K) as well. All these suggest that CoFeCrAl is a promising material for the spintronic devices.

  9. Growth characteristics of primary M7C3 carbide in hypereutectic Fe-Cr-C alloy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sha; Zhou, Yefei; Xing, Xiaolei; Wang, Jibo; Ren, Xuejun; Yang, Qingxiang

    2016-01-01

    The microstructure of the hypereutectic Fe-Cr-C alloy is observed by optical microscopy (OM). The initial growth morphology, the crystallographic structure, the semi-molten morphology and the stacking faults of the primary M7C3 carbide are observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The in-suit growth process of the primary M7C3 carbide was observed by confocal laser microscope (CLM). It is found that the primary M7C3 carbide in hypereutectic Fe-Cr-C alloy is irregular polygonal shape with several hollows in the center and gaps on the edge. Some primary M7C3 carbides are formed by layers of shell or/and consist of multiple parts. In the initial growth period, the primary M7C3 carbide forms protrusion parallel to {} crystal planes. The extending and revolving protrusion forms the carbide shell. The electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) maps show that the primary M7C3 carbide consists of multiple parts. The semi-molten M7C3 carbide contains unmelted shell and several small-scale carbides inside, which further proves that the primary M7C3 carbide is not an overall block. It is believed that the coalescence of the primary M7C3 carbides is ascribed to the growing condition of the protrusion and the gap filling process. PMID:27596718

  10. Growth characteristics of primary M7C3 carbide in hypereutectic Fe-Cr-C alloy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sha; Zhou, Yefei; Xing, Xiaolei; Wang, Jibo; Ren, Xuejun; Yang, Qingxiang

    2016-01-01

    The microstructure of the hypereutectic Fe-Cr-C alloy is observed by optical microscopy (OM). The initial growth morphology, the crystallographic structure, the semi-molten morphology and the stacking faults of the primary M7C3 carbide are observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The in-suit growth process of the primary M7C3 carbide was observed by confocal laser microscope (CLM). It is found that the primary M7C3 carbide in hypereutectic Fe-Cr-C alloy is irregular polygonal shape with several hollows in the center and gaps on the edge. Some primary M7C3 carbides are formed by layers of shell or/and consist of multiple parts. In the initial growth period, the primary M7C3 carbide forms protrusion parallel to {} crystal planes. The extending and revolving protrusion forms the carbide shell. The electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) maps show that the primary M7C3 carbide consists of multiple parts. The semi-molten M7C3 carbide contains unmelted shell and several small-scale carbides inside, which further proves that the primary M7C3 carbide is not an overall block. It is believed that the coalescence of the primary M7C3 carbides is ascribed to the growing condition of the protrusion and the gap filling process. PMID:27596718

  11. Cyclic Corrosion and Chlorination of an FeCrAl Alloy in the Presence of KCl

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Israelsson, Niklas; Unocic, Kinga A.; Hellström, K.; Svensson, J-E; Johansson, L-G

    2015-05-30

    The KCl-induced corrosion of the FeCrAl alloy Kanthal® APMT in an O2 + N2 + H2O environment was studied at 600 °C. The samples were pre-oxidized prior to exposure in order to investigate the protective nature of alumina scales in the present environment. The microstructure and composition of the corroded surface was investigated in detail. Corrosion started at flaws in the pre-formed α-alumina scales, i.e. α-alumina was protective in itself. Consequently, KCl-induced corrosion started locally and, subsequently, spread laterally. An electrochemical mechanism is proposed here by which a transition metal chloride forms in the alloy and K2CrO4 forms at themore » scale/gas interface. Scale de-cohesion is attributed to the formation of a sub-scale transition metal chloride.« less

  12. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Laves Phase-strengthened Fe-Cr-Zr Alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tan, Lizhen; Yang, Ying

    2014-12-05

    Laves phase-reinforced alloys have shown some preliminary promising performance at room temperatures. This paper aims at evaluating mechanical properties of Laves phase-strengthened alloys at elevated temperatures. Three Fe-Cr-Zr alloys were designed to favor the formation of eutectic microstructures containing Laves and body-centered cubic phases with the aid of thermodynamic calculations. Microstructural characterization was carried out on the alloys in as-processed and aged states using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The effect of thermal aging and alloy composition on microstructure has been discussed based on microstructural characterization results. Mechanical properties have been evaluated by meansmore » of Vickers microhardness measurements, tensile testing at temperatures up to 973.15 K (700.15 °C), and creep testing at 873.15 K (600.15 °C) and 260 MPa. Alloys close to the eutectic composition show significantly superior strength and creep resistance compared to P92. Finally, however, their low tensile ductility may limit their applications at relatively low temperatures.« less

  13. Model many-body Stoner Hamiltonian for binary FeCr alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen-Manh, D.; Dudarev, S. L.

    2009-09-01

    We derive a model tight-binding many-body d -electron Stoner Hamiltonian for FeCr binary alloys and investigate the sensitivity of its mean-field solutions to the choice of hopping integrals and the Stoner exchange parameters. By applying the local charge-neutrality condition within a self-consistent treatment we show that the negative enthalpy-of-mixing anomaly characterizing the alloy in the low chromium concentration limit is due entirely to the presence of the on-site exchange Stoner terms and that the occurrence of this anomaly is not specifically related to the choice of hopping integrals describing conventional chemical bonding between atoms in the alloy. The Bain transformation pathway computed, using the proposed model Hamiltonian, for the Fe15Cr alloy configuration is in excellent agreement with ab initio total-energy calculations. Our investigation also shows how the parameters of a tight-binding many-body model Hamiltonian for a magnetic alloy can be derived from the comparison of its mean-field solutions with other, more accurate, mean-field approximations (e.g., density-functional calculations), hence stimulating the development of large-scale computational algorithms for modeling radiation damage effects in magnetic alloys and steels.

  14. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Laves Phase-strengthened Fe-Cr-Zr Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lizhen; Yang, Ying

    2014-12-05

    Laves phase-reinforced alloys have shown some preliminary promising performance at room temperatures. This paper aims at evaluating mechanical properties of Laves phase-strengthened alloys at elevated temperatures. Three Fe-Cr-Zr alloys were designed to favor the formation of eutectic microstructures containing Laves and body-centered cubic phases with the aid of thermodynamic calculations. Microstructural characterization was carried out on the alloys in as-processed and aged states using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The effect of thermal aging and alloy composition on microstructure has been discussed based on microstructural characterization results. Mechanical properties have been evaluated by means of Vickers microhardness measurements, tensile testing at temperatures up to 973.15 K (700.15 °C), and creep testing at 873.15 K (600.15 °C) and 260 MPa. Alloys close to the eutectic composition show significantly superior strength and creep resistance compared to P92. Finally, however, their low tensile ductility may limit their applications at relatively low temperatures.

  15. Thermal aging modeling and validation on the Mo containing Fe-Cr-Ni alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ying; Tan, Lizhen; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-04-01

    Thermodynamics of intermetallic phases in Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys is critical knowledge to understand thermal aging effect on the phase stability of Mo-containing austenitic steels, which subsequently facilitates alloy design/improvement and degradation mitigation of these materials for reactor applications. Among the intermetallic phases, Chi (χ), Laves, and Sigma (σ) are often of concern because of their tendency to cause embrittlement of the materials. The focus of this study is thermal stability of the Chi and Laves phases as they were less studied compared to the Sigma phase. Coupled with thermodynamic modeling, thermal stability of intermetallic phases in Mo containing Fe-Cr-Ni alloys was investigated at 1000, 850 and 700 C for different annealing times. The morphologies, compositions and crystal structures of the precipitates of the intermetallic phases were carefully examined by scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Three key findings resulted from this study. First, the Chi phase is stable at high temperature, and with decreasing temperature it transforms into the Laves phase that is stable at low temperature. Secondly, Cr, Mo, Ni are soluble in both the Chi and Laves phases, with the solubility of Mo playing a major role in the relative stability of the intermetallic phases. Thirdly, in situ transformation from Chi phase to Laves phase was directly observed, which increased the local strain field, generated dislocations in the intermetallic phases, and altered the precipitate phase orientation relationship with the austenitic matrix. The thermodynamic models that were developed and validated were then applied to evaluating the effect of Mo on the thermal stability of intermetallic phases in type 316 and NF709 stainless steels.

  16. Letter Report Documenting Progress of Second Generation ATF FeCrAl Alloy Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Y.; Yang, Y.; Field, K. G.; Terrani, K.; Pint, B. A.; Snead, L. L.

    2014-06-10

    Development of the 2nd generation ATF FeCrAl alloy has been initiated, and a candidate alloy was selected for trial tube fabrication through hot-extrusion and gun-drilling processes. Four alloys based on Fe-13Cr-4.5Al-0.15Y in weight percent were newly cast with minor alloying additions of Mo, Si, Nb, and C to promote solid-solution and second-phase precipitate strengthening. The alloy compositions were selected with guidance from computational thermodynamic tools. The lab-scale heats of ~ 600g were arc-melted and drop-cast, homogenized, hot-forged and -rolled, and then annealed producing plate shape samples. An alloy with Mo and Nb additions (C35MN) processed at 800°C exhibits very fine sub-grain structure with the sub-grain size of 1-3μm which exhibited more than 25% better yield and tensile strengths together with decent ductility compared to the other FeCrAl alloys at room temperature. It was found that the Nb addition was key to improving thermal stability of the fine sub-grain structure. Optimally, grains of less than 30 microns are desired, with grains up to and order of magnitude in desired produced through Nb addition. Scale-up effort of the C35MN alloy was made in collaboration with a commercial cast company who has a capability of vacuum induction melting. A 39lb columnar ingot with ~81mm diameter and ~305mm height (with hot-top) was commercially cast, homogenized, hot-extruded, and annealed providing 10mm-diameter bar-shape samples with the fine sub-grain structure. This commercial heat proved consistent with materials produced at ORNL at the lab-scale. Tubes and end caps were machined from the bar sample and provided to another work package for the ATF-1 irradiation campaign in the milestone M3FT-14OR0202251.

  17. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Ni-Fe-Cr Alloys Relevant to Nuclear Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persaud, Suraj

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of Ni-Fe-Cr alloys and weld metals was investigated in simulated environments representative of high temperature water used in the primary and secondary circuits of nuclear power plants. The mechanism of primary water SCC (PWSCC) was studied in Alloys 600, 690, 800 and Alloy 82 dissimilar metal welds using the internal oxidation model as a guide. Initial experiments were carried out in a 480°C hydrogenated steam environment considered to simulate high temperature reducing primary water. Ni alloys underwent classical internal oxidation intragranularly resulting in the expulsion of the solvent metal, Ni, to the surface. Selective intergranular oxidation of Cr in Alloy 600 resulted in embrittlement, while other alloys were resistant owing to their increased Cr contents. Atom probe tomography was used to determine the short-circuit diffusion path used for Ni expulsion at a sub-nanometer scale, which was concluded to be oxide-metal interfaces. Further exposures of Alloys 600 and 800 were done in 315°C simulated primary water and intergranular oxidation tendency was comparable to 480°C hydrogenated steam. Secondary side work involved SCC experiments and electrochemical measurements, which were done at 315°C in acid sulfate solutions. Alloy 800 C-rings were found to undergo acid sulfate SCC (AcSCC) to a depth of up to 300 microm in 0.55 M sulfate solution at pH 4.3. A focused-ion beam was used to extract a crack tip from a C-ring and high resolution analytical electron microscopy revealed a duplex oxide structure and the presence of sulfur. Electrochemical measurements were taken on Ni alloys to complement crack tip analysis; sulfate was concluded to be the aggressive anion in mixed sulfate and chloride systems. Results from electrochemical measurements and crack tip analysis suggested a slip dissolution-type mechanism to explain AcSCC in Ni alloys.

  18. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, D.S.; Ghoniem, N.M.; Powell, R.W.

    1985-02-07

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  19. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, David S.; Ghoniem, Nasr M.; Powell, Roger W.

    1986-01-01

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  20. Precipitation and growth study of intermetallics and their effect on oxidation behavior in Zr-Sn-Fe-Cr alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhuri, G.; Neogy, S.; Sen, D.; Mazumder, S.; Srivastava, D.; Dey, G. K.; Shah, B. K.

    2012-11-01

    Microstructural evolution of the second phase precipitates and their microchemistry in Zr-Sn-Fe-Cr alloy during various alpha annealing heat treatments have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometer attached with scanning transmission microscopy. Two types of precipitates, namely, Zr - rich Zr2(FeCr) with aspect ratio one and Zr lean Zr(FeCr)2 with parallelepiped morphology were identified. Size distribution of the precipitates was estimated from small angle neutron scattering. The effect of precipitate size, its distribution and matrix microstructure on the oxidation behavior of the alloy was studied during accelerated autoclaving. The shorter duration annealing at 700 °C does not improve the oxidation resistance of the alloy as it would lead to formation of non uniform distribution of alloying elements and precipitates in the matrix. It is revealed that alpha annealing at 700 °C for 10 h imparts a significant resistance to oxidation as well as substantial formation of Zr(FeCr)2 precipitates.

  1. Uniform corrosion of FeCrAl alloys in LWR coolant environments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Terrani, K. A.; Pint, B. A.; Kim, Y. -J.; Unocic, K. A.; Yang, Y.; Silva, C. M.; Meyer, III, H. M.; Rebak, R. B.

    2016-06-29

    In this study, the corrosion behavior of commercial and model FeCrAl alloys and type 310 stainless steel was examined by autoclave tests and compared to Zircaloy-4, the reference cladding materials in light water reactors. The corrosion studies were carried out in three distinct water chemistry environments found in pressurized and boiling water reactor primary coolant loop conditions for up to one year. The structure and morphology of the oxides formed on the surface of these alloys was consistent with thermodynamic predictions. Spinel-type oxides were found to be present after hydrogen water chemistry exposures, while the oxygenated water tests resulted inmore » the formation of very thin and protective hematite-type oxides. Unlike the alloys exposed to oxygenated water tests, the alloys tested in hydrogen water chemistry conditions experienced mass loss as a function of time. This mass loss was the result of net sum of mass gain due to parabolic oxidation and mass loss due to dissolution that also exhibits parabolic kinetics. Finally, the maximum thickness loss after one year of LWR water corrosion in the absence of irradiation was ~2 μm, which is inconsequential for a ~300–500 μm thick cladding.« less

  2. Uniform corrosion of FeCrAl alloys in LWR coolant environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrani, K. A.; Pint, B. A.; Kim, Y.-J.; Unocic, K. A.; Yang, Y.; Silva, C. M.; Meyer, H. M.; Rebak, R. B.

    2016-10-01

    The corrosion behavior of commercial and model FeCrAl alloys and type 310 stainless steel was examined by autoclave tests and compared to Zircaloy-4, the reference cladding materials in light water reactors. The corrosion studies were carried out in three distinct water chemistry environments found in pressurized and boiling water reactor primary coolant loop conditions for up to one year. The structure and morphology of the oxides formed on the surface of these alloys was consistent with thermodynamic predictions. Spinel-type oxides were found to be present after hydrogen water chemistry exposures, while the oxygenated water tests resulted in the formation of very thin and protective hematite-type oxides. Unlike the alloys exposed to oxygenated water tests, the alloys tested in hydrogen water chemistry conditions experienced mass loss as a function of time. This mass loss was the result of net sum of mass gain due to parabolic oxidation and mass loss due to dissolution that also exhibits parabolic kinetics. The maximum thickness loss after one year of LWR water corrosion in the absence of irradiation was ∼2 μm, which is inconsequential for a ∼300-500 μm thick cladding.

  3. Rapid Solidification Behavior of Fe-Cr-Mn-Mo-Si-C Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranganathan, Sathees; Makaya, Advenit; Fredriksson, Hasse; Savage, Steven

    2007-12-01

    The rapid solidification behavior of alloys in the Fe-Cr-Mn-Mo-Si-C system was investigated for different compositions and cooling rates. The C content was varied and alloying additions of Mo and B were studied with respect to their effect on the microstructure. The alloys were cast as either melt-spun ribbons or as 1-mm-thick plates after levitation or as rods 2 to 4 mm in diameter by injection into copper molds. A homogeneous single-phase structure was obtained for the alloy of composition 72.8Fe-8Cr-6Mn-5Si-5Mo-3.2C (wt pct), for a sample diameter of 2.85 mm, at a cooling rate of ≈1100 K/s. The single-phase structure was identified as a metastable solid solution, exhibiting the characteristics of the ɛ phase. Upon reheating, decomposition of the single-phase structure into fine bainite plates and secondary carbides was observed between 600 °C and 700 °C. The annealed structure obtained showed high hardness values (>850 HV).

  4. Fine structure of Fe-Co-Ga and Fe-Cr-Ga alloys with low Ga content

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinerman, Nadezhda M. Serikov, Vadim V. Vershinin, Aleksandr V. Mushnikov, Nikolai V. Stashkova, Liudmila A.

    2014-10-27

    Investigation of Ga influence on the structure of Fe-Cr and Fe-Co alloys was performed with the use of {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction methods. In the alloys of the Fe-Cr system, doping with Ga handicaps the decomposition of solid solutions, observed in the binary alloys, and increases its stability. In the alloys with Co, Ga also favors the uniformity of solid solutions. The analysis of Mössbauer experiments gives some grounds to conclude that if, owing to liquation, clusterization, or initial stages of phase separation, there exist regions enriched in iron, some amount of Ga atoms prefer to enter the nearest surroundings of iron atoms, thus forming binary Fe-Ga regions (or phases)

  5. Effects of composition and heat treatments on the strength and ductility of Fe-Cr-Co alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kubarych, K.G.

    1980-06-01

    The relationship between the microstructure and mechanical properties of spinodally decomposed Fe-Cr-Co ductile permanent magnet alloys was investigated using transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction, tensile testing, and Charpy impact testing. Isothermal aging and step aging of four alloys (Fe-28 wt % Cr-15 wt % Co, Fe-23 wt % Cr-15-wt % Co-5 wt % V, Fe-23 wt % Cr-15 wt % Co-3 wt % V-2 wt % Ti, and Fe-31 wt % Cr-23 % Co) resulted in decomposition into two phases, an Fe-Co rich (..cap alpha../sub 1/) phase and a Cr rich (..cap alpha../sub 2/) phase. The microstructural features of the decomposition products were consistent with those expected from a spinodal reaction and agree with the reported work on the Fe-Cr-Co system. An Fe-23 wt % Cr-15 wt % Co-5 wt % V alloy was found to have, among the four alloys, the best combinations of strength and ductility.

  6. Correlated recombination and annealing of point defects in dilute and concentrated Fe-Cr alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terentyev, D.; Castin, N.; Ortiz, C. J.

    2012-11-01

    In this work, we present a comprehensive combined modelling approach to study the annealing of lattice defects in dilute and concentrated metallic alloys. The developed approach consists in the combination of molecular dynamics, atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo (AKMC) and mean field rate theory methods, linked at appropriate time and space scales. For the first time, the AKMC tool has been designed to model the evolution of point defects (both vacancies and self-interstitial atoms) in random concentrated alloys, taking into account the influence of lattice distortion on the local migration energy barrier due to the mutual interaction of point defects and solutes. Good accuracy and outstanding speed of calculations has been achieved by introducing the artificial neural network regression as an engine of the AKMC applied to calculate migration barriers for mobile defects. The developed method was applied to study correlated recombination in bcc Fe and random Fe-Cr alloys, aiming at the reproduction of a set of experimental studies after electron irradiation. The obtained results agree well with the available experimental data, implying that the developed modelling procedure correctly captures the undergoing physical process.

  7. Interplay between magnetism and energetics in Fe-Cr alloys from a predictive noncollinear magnetic tight-binding model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soulairol, R.; Barreteau, C.; Fu, Chu-Chun

    2016-07-01

    Magnetism is a key driving force controlling several thermodynamic and kinetic properties of Fe-Cr systems. We present a tight-binding model for Fe-Cr, where magnetism is treated beyond the usual collinear approximation. A major advantage of this model consists in a rather simple fitting procedure. In particular, no specific property of the binary system is explicitly required in the fitting database. The present model is proved to be accurate and highly transferable for electronic, magnetic, and energetic properties of a large variety of structural and chemical environments: surfaces, interfaces, embedded clusters, and the whole compositional range of the binary alloy. The occurrence of noncollinear magnetic configurations caused by magnetic frustrations is successfully predicted. The present tight-binding approach can apply to other binary magnetic transition-metal alloys. It is expected to be particularly promising if the size difference between the alloying elements is rather small and the electronic properties prevail.

  8. Spin-driven ordering of Cr in the equiatomic high entropy alloy NiFeCrCo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, C.; Zaddach, A. J.; Oni, A. A.; Sang, X.; Hurt, J. W.; LeBeau, J. M.; Koch, C. C.; Irving, D. L.

    2015-04-01

    Spin-driven ordering of Cr in an equiatomic fcc NiFeCrCo high entropy alloy (HEA) was predicted by first-principles calculations. Ordering of Cr is driven by the reduction in energy realized by surrounding anti-ferromagnetic Cr with ferromagnetic Ni, Fe, and Co in an alloyed L12 structure. The fully Cr-ordered alloyed L12 phase was predicted to have a magnetic moment that is 36% of that for the magnetically frustrated random solid solution. Three samples were synthesized by milling or casting/annealing. The cast/annealed sample was found to have a low temperature magnetic moment that is 44% of the moment in the milled sample, which is consistent with theoretical predictions for ordering. Scanning transmission electron microscopy measurements were performed and the presence of ordered nano-domains in cast/annealed samples throughout the equiatomic NiFeCrCo HEA was identified.

  9. Electronic properties of excess Cr at Fe site in FeCr{sub 0.02}Se alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sandeep Singh, Prabhakar P.

    2015-06-24

    We have studied the effect of substitution of transition-metal chromium (Cr) in excess on Fe sub-lattice in the electronic structure of iron-selenide alloys, FeCr{sub 0.02}Se. In our calculations, we used Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker coherent potential approximation method in the atomic sphere approximation (KKR-ASA-CPA). We obtained different band structure of this alloy with respect to the parent FeSe and this may be reason of changing their superconducting properties. We did unpolarized calculations for FeCr{sub 0.02}Se alloy in terms of density of states (DOS) and Fermi surfaces. The local density approximation (LDA) is used in terms of exchange correlation potential.

  10. Spin-driven ordering of Cr in the equiatomic high entropy alloy NiFeCrCo

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, C.; Zaddach, A. J.; Oni, A. A.; Sang, X.; LeBeau, J. M.; Koch, C. C.; Irving, D. L.; Hurt, J. W.

    2015-04-20

    Spin-driven ordering of Cr in an equiatomic fcc NiFeCrCo high entropy alloy (HEA) was predicted by first-principles calculations. Ordering of Cr is driven by the reduction in energy realized by surrounding anti-ferromagnetic Cr with ferromagnetic Ni, Fe, and Co in an alloyed L1{sub 2} structure. The fully Cr-ordered alloyed L1{sub 2} phase was predicted to have a magnetic moment that is 36% of that for the magnetically frustrated random solid solution. Three samples were synthesized by milling or casting/annealing. The cast/annealed sample was found to have a low temperature magnetic moment that is 44% of the moment in the milled sample, which is consistent with theoretical predictions for ordering. Scanning transmission electron microscopy measurements were performed and the presence of ordered nano-domains in cast/annealed samples throughout the equiatomic NiFeCrCo HEA was identified.

  11. Conduction mechanism of the anodic film on Fe-Cr alloys in sulfate solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Bojinov, M.; Fabricius, G.; Laitinen, T.; Maekelae, K.; Saario, T.; Sundholm, G.

    1999-09-01

    The passive state of Fe-12% Cr and Fe-25% Cr alloys in 1 M sulfate solutions of pH 0 and 5 was studied with a combination of electrochemical techniques: impedance spectroscopy, photoelectrochemistry, and dc resistance measurements by the contact electric resistance technique. The investigations were supported by studies on pure metal constituents (Fe, Cr) in the same solutions. As a result, the steady-state passive film on the alloys (and on pure Cr) can be described as a thin, essentially insulating layer. Polarization of the steady-state metal/anodic film/electrolyte system to negative and positive potentials away from the potential region corresponding to the highest electronic resistance was concluded to lead to the generation of lower or higher valency defects at the interfaces via solid-state electrochemical reactions. These reactions result in a substantial increase of the conductivity in the first layers adjacent to either the metal/film or the film/electrolyte interface. At very negative (or very positive) potentials the film is transformed into a conductor allowing active (or transpassive) dissolution to take place. A quantitative physical model of the conduction mechanism on the basis of the surface charge approach is proposed and compared with experimental data.

  12. Cyclic Corrosion and Chlorination of an FeCrAl Alloy in the Presence of KCl

    SciTech Connect

    Israelsson, Niklas; Unocic, Kinga A.; Hellström, K.; Svensson, J-E; Johansson, L-G

    2015-05-30

    The KCl-induced corrosion of the FeCrAl alloy Kanthal® APMT in an O2 + N2 + H2O environment was studied at 600 °C. The samples were pre-oxidized prior to exposure in order to investigate the protective nature of alumina scales in the present environment. The microstructure and composition of the corroded surface was investigated in detail. Corrosion started at flaws in the pre-formed α-alumina scales, i.e. α-alumina was protective in itself. Consequently, KCl-induced corrosion started locally and, subsequently, spread laterally. An electrochemical mechanism is proposed here by which a transition metal chloride forms in the alloy and K2CrO4 forms at the scale/gas interface. Scale de-cohesion is attributed to the formation of a sub-scale transition metal chloride.

  13. Characterization of ion-irradiated ODS Fe-Cr alloys by doppler broadening spectroscopy using a positron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parente, P.; Leguey, T.; de Castro, V.; Gigl, T.; Reiner, M.; Hugenschmidt, C.; Pareja, R.

    2015-09-01

    The damage profile of oxide dispersion strengthened steels after single-, or simultaneous triple-ion irradiation at different conditions has been characterized using a low energy positron beam in order to provide information on microstructural changes induced by irradiation. Doppler broadening and coincident Doppler broadening measurements of the positron annihilation line have been performed on different Fe-Cr-(W,Ti) alloys reinforced with Y2O3, to identify the nature and stability of irradiation-induced open-volume defects and their possible association with the oxide nanoparticles. It was found that irradiation induced vacancy clusters are associated with Cr atoms. The results are of highest interest for modeling the damage induced by 14 MeV neutrons in reduced activation Fe-Cr alloys relevant for fusion devices.

  14. Deuterium ion irradiation induced precipitation in Fe-Cr alloy: Characterization and effects on irradiation behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, P. P.; Yu, R.; Zhu, Y. M.; Zhao, M. Z.; Bai, J. W.; Wan, F. R.; Zhan, Q.

    2015-04-01

    A new phase was found to precipitate in a Fe-Cr model alloy after 58 keV deuterium ion irradiation at 773 K. The nanoscale radiation-induced precipitate was studied systematically using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), image simulation and in-situ ultrahigh voltage transmission electron microscopy (HVEM). B2 structure is proposed for the new Cr-rich phase, which adopts a cube-on-cube orientation relationship with regard to the Fe matrix. Geometric phase analysis (GPA) was employed to measure the strain fields around the precipitate and this was used to explain its characteristic 1-dimensional elongation along the <1 0 0> Fe direction. The precipitate was stable under subsequent electron irradiation at different temperatures. We suggest that the precipitate with a high interface-to-volume ratio enhances the radiation resistance of the material. The reason for this is the presence of a large number of interfaces between the precipitate and the matrix, which may greatly reduce the concentration of point defects around the dislocation loops. This leads to a significant decrease in the growth rate.

  15. Anomalous surface segregation profiles in ferritic Fe-Cr stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levesque, Maximilien

    2013-02-01

    The iron-chromium alloy and its derivatives are widely used for their remarkable resistance to corrosion, which only occurs in a narrow concentration range around 9 to 13 atomic percent chromium. Although known to be due to chromium enrichment of a few atoms thick layer at the surfaces, the understanding of its complex atomistic origin has been a remaining challenge. We report an investigation of the thermodynamics of such surfaces at the atomic scale by means of Monte Carlo simulations. We use a Hamiltonian which provides a parametrization of previous ab initio results and successfully describes the alloy's unusual thermodynamics. We report a strong enrichment in Cr of the surfaces for low bulk concentrations, with a narrow optimum around 12 atomic percent chromium, beyond which the surface composition decreases drastically. This behavior is explained by a synergy between (i) the complex phase separation in the bulk alloy, (ii) local phase transitions that tune the layers closest to the surface to an iron-rich state and inhibit the bulk phase separation in this region, and (iii) its compensation by a strong and nonlinear enrichment in Cr of the next few layers. Implications with respect to the design of prospective nanomaterials are briefly discussed.

  16. Preliminary Results on FeCrAl Alloys in the As-received and Welded State Designed to Have Enhanced Weldability and Radiation Tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G.; Gussev, Maxim N.; Hu, Xunxiang; Yamamoto, Yukinori

    2015-09-30

    The present report summarizes and discusses the recent results on developing a modern, nuclear grade FeCrAl alloy designed to have enhanced radiation tolerance and weldability. The alloys used for these investigations are modern FeCrAl alloys based on a Fe-13Cr-5Al-2Mo-0.2Si-0.05Y alloy (in wt.%, designated C35M). Development efforts have focused on assessing the influence of chemistry and microstructure on the fabricability and performance of these newly developed alloys. Specific focus was made to assess the weldability, thermal stability, and radiation tolerance.

  17. Influence cobalt on microstructural and hardness property of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-Fe-Cr-Ni P/ M alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeem, Haider T.; Mohammad, Kahtan S.; Hussin, Kamarudin; Rahmat, Azim; Bashirom, Nurhuda

    2015-05-01

    In this study, influence cobalt additives on the microstructural and hardness properties of an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-Fe-Cr-Ni PM alloy undergone the retrogression and re-aging treatment were carried out. Green compacts pressed at 370 MPa were then sintered at temperature 650°C in argon atmosphere for two hours. The sintered compacts subjected to a homogenizing treated at 470°C for 1.5 hours then aged at 120°C for 24 hours and retrogressed at 180°C for 30 minutes, and then re-aged at 120°C for 24 hours. Microstructural results of the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-Fe-Cr-Ni-Co alloys introduced an intermetallics compound in the matrix of alloy, identified as the Al5Co2, Al70Co20Ni10 and Al4Ni3 phases besides to the MgZn2 and Mg2Zn11 phases which produced of the precipitation hardening during heat treatment. These compounds with precipitates provided strengthening of dispersion that led to improved Vickers's hardness and dinsifications properties of the alloy. The highest Vickers hardness of aluminum alloy containing cobalt was gotten after applying the retrogression and re-aging treatment.

  18. The role of Zr and Nb in oxidation/sulfidation behavior of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K. ); Baxter, D.J. INCO Alloy Ltd., Hereford, England )

    1990-11-01

    05Structural Fe-Cr-Ni alloys may undergo rapid degradation at elevated temperatures unless protective surface oxide scales are formed and maintained. The ability of alloys to resist rapid degradation strongly depends on their Cr content and the chemistry of the exposure environment. Normally, 20 wt % Cr is required for service at temperatures up to 1000{degree}C; the presence of sulfur, however, inhibits formation of a protective surface oxide scale. The oxidation and sulfidation behavior of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys is examined over a wide temperature range (650 to 1000{degree}C), with particular emphasis on the effects of alloy Cr content and the radiation of reactive elements such as Nb and Zr. Both Nb and Zr are shown to promote protective oxidation behavior on the 12 wt % Cr alloy in oxidizing environments and to suppress sulfidation in mixed oxygen/sulfur environments. Additions of Nb and Zr at 3 wt % level resulted in stabilization of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale and led to a barrier layer of Nb- or Zr-rich oxide at the scale/metal interface, which acted to minimize the transport of base metal cations across the scale. Oxide scales were preformed in sulfur-free environments and subsequently exposed to oxygen/sulfur mixed-gas atmospheres. Preformed scales were found to delay the onset of breakaway corrosion. Corrosions test results obtained under isothermal and thermal cycling conditions are presented. 58 refs., 55 figs., 8 tabs.

  19. Recovery and recrystallisation in mechanically alloyed and annealed, legacy, FeCrAlY ODS alloy precursor powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, K.; Rao, A.; Tatlock, G. J.; Jones, A. R.

    2015-08-01

    This study presents findings related to the recrystallisation behaviour in Mechanically Alloyed (MA) and annealed powders of legacy commercial Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) FeCrAl alloys PM2000, MA956 and ODM751. Annealing of as-MA ODS alloy powders at temperatures ≥ 800 °C induced primary recrystallisation. The volume fraction (Vf) recrystallised increased with higher annealing temperatures in the range studied (∼800-1050 °C). However, low temperature (650 °C) recovery reduced the subsequent kinetics of recrystallisation in PM2000 alloy. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) analysis of annealed PM2000 and MA956 alloy powders indicates that precipitation of nano-particulate Y-Al-O phases begins at temperatures as low as 650 °C and microstructural changes during annealing of ODS powders involved interactions between nano-particle formation and recovery/recrystallisation processes. High number densities (NV > 1023 m-3) of coherent nano-precipitates were identified in both recovered and recrystallised regions of powder particles. These formed over a range of temperatures used in the consolidation processing of ODS alloys. The orientation relationship between nano-particles and the matrix was identical in both recovered and recrystallised grains, indicating that particles were dissolved at recrystallising interfaces and subsequently reprecipitated. Examination and comparison of as-MA and annealed powder specimens suggests that nuances in the manufacturing of these three, nominally similar, alloys leads to differences in recovery/recrystallisation behaviour, which may influence microstructure and, ultimately, properties in the final product form.

  20. Changes in cluster magnetism and suppression of local superconductivity in amorphous FeCrB alloy irradiated by Ar+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okunev, V. D.; Samoilenko, Z. A.; Szymczak, H.; Szewczyk, A.; Szymczak, R.; Lewandowski, S. J.; Aleshkevych, P.; Malinowski, A.; Gierłowski, P.; Więckowski, J.; Wolny-Marszałek, M.; Jeżabek, M.; Varyukhin, V. N.; Antoshina, I. A.

    2016-02-01

    We show that cluster magnetism in ferromagnetic amorphous Fe67Cr18B15 alloy is related to the presence of large, D=150-250 Å, α-(Fe Cr) clusters responsible for basic changes in cluster magnetism, small, D=30-100 Å, α-(Fe, Cr) and Fe3B clusters and subcluster atomic α-(Fe, Cr, B) groupings, D=10-20 Å, in disordered intercluster medium. For initial sample and irradiated one (Φ=1.5×1018 ions/cm2) superconductivity exists in the cluster shells of metallic α-(Fe, Cr) phase where ferromagnetism of iron is counterbalanced by antiferromagnetism of chromium. At Φ=3×1018 ions/cm2, the internal stresses intensify and the process of iron and chromium phase separation, favorable for mesoscopic superconductivity, changes for inverse one promoting more homogeneous distribution of iron and chromium in the clusters as well as gigantic (twice as much) increase in density of the samples. As a result, in the cluster shells ferromagnetism is restored leading to the increase in magnetization of the sample and suppression of local superconductivity. For initial samples, the temperature dependence of resistivity ρ(T)~T2 is determined by the electron scattering on quantum defects. In strongly inhomogeneous samples, after irradiation by fluence Φ=1.5×1018 ions/cm2, the transition to a dependence ρ(T)~T1/2 is caused by the effects of weak localization. In more homogeneous samples, at Φ=3×1018 ions/cm2, a return to the dependence ρ(T)~T2 is observed.

  1. Phase-Field Simulation of the Separation Kinetics of a Nanoscale Phase in a Fe-Cr Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Li, Yongsheng; Wu, Xingchao; Hou, Zhiyuan; Hu, Kai

    2016-05-01

    The separation of a Cr-enriched nanometer-scale α' phase can induce the embrittlement of Fe-Cr alloys at high temperature, and the separation kinetics of the α' phase determines its spatial morphology. The quantitative kinetics of the α' phase formed by spinodal decomposition was studied in a Fe-42 at.% Cr alloy by phase-field simulation at various aging temperatures; the temporal morphology, average particle radius, volume fraction, particle number density, and particle size distribution of α' phase were investigated. The results indicate that the coarsening rate of the α' phase increases with increasing aging temperature, and the particle number density shows a large slope in the coarsening stage at higher aging temperature. The particle size distribution also demonstrates faster growth and coarsening rates of the α' phase at higher aging temperature. The mutual effects of supercooling and diffusion during phase decomposition result in a highest decomposition rate at 725 K than that of 700 and 750 K in the Fe-42 at.% Cr alloy. The simulation results of the kinetics of the Cr-enriched α' phase provide a basic understanding of the thermal aging and morphology evolution of Fe-Cr alloys.

  2. Effect of Y2O3 content on the oxidation behavior of Fe-Cr-Al-based ODS alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ul-Hamid, Anwar

    2003-02-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the cyclic oxidation behavior of two oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al based alloys containing 0.17 wt.% and 0.7 wt.% Y2O3. The alloys were oxidized in air for 100 h at 1200°C based on a 24 h cycle period. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to characterize the structure, morphology, and composition of the oxide scales. Both alloys formed highly adherent and continuous layers of α-Al2O3 exhibiting a morphology indicative of inward scale growth. The role of Y2O3 was to promote adherence by segregating to the grain boundaries within the oxide. Concurrently, Y2O3 generated micro-porosity resulting in a scale of comparatively higher thickness in the alloy with 0.7 wt.% Y2O3.

  3. Two-body, dry abrasive wear of Fe/Cr/C experimental alloys - relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, C.K.S.

    1982-01-01

    A systematic study of abrasive wear resistance of Fe/Cr/Mn based alloys has been carried out using a two body pin-on-disc wear machine. Abrasives used were silicon carbide, alumina and quartz. The objective of this study was to evaluate the abrasive wear resistance and to investigate the relationships between microstructure, mechanical properties, and abrasive wear resistance for these experimental alloys. Several commercial alloys were also tested to provide a basis for comparison. The goal of this study was to develop information so as to improve wear resistance of these experimental alloys by means of thermal treatments. Grain-refinement by double heat treatment was carried out in this research.

  4. Nanomechanical characterization of alumina coatings grown on FeCrAl alloy by thermal oxidation.

    PubMed

    Frutos, E; González-Carrasco, J L; Polcar, T

    2016-04-01

    This work studies the feasibility of using repetitive-nano-impact tests with a cube-corner tip and low loads for obtaining quantitative fracture toughness values in thin and brittle coatings. For this purpose, it will be assumed that the impacts are able to produce a cracking, similar to the pattern developed for the classical fracture toughness tests in bulk materials, and therefore, from the crack developed in the repetitive impacts it will be possible to evaluate the suitability of the classical indentation models (Anstins and Laugier) for measuring fracture toughness. However, the length of this crack has to be lower than 10% of the total coating thickness to avoid substrate contributions. For this reason, and in order to ensure a small plastic region localized at the origin of the crack tip, low load values (or small distance between the indenter tip and the surface) have to be used. In order to demonstrate the validity of this technique, repetitive-nano-impact will be done in a fine and dense oxide layer (α-Al2O3), which has been developed on the top of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) FeCrAl alloys (PM 2000) by thermal oxidation at elevated temperatures. Moreover, it will be shown how it is possible to know with each new impact the crack geometry evolution from Palmqvist crack to half-penny crack, being able to study the proper evolution of the different values of fracture toughness in terms of both indentation models and as a function of the strain rate, ε̇, decreasing. Thereby, fracture toughness values for α-Al2O3 layer decrease from ~4.40MPam , for high ϵ̇ value (10(3)s(-1)), to ~3.21MPam, for quasi-static ϵ̇ value (10(-3)s(-1)). On the other hand, ϵ̇ a new process to obtain fracture toughness values will be analysed, when the classical indentation models are not met. These values are typically found in the literature for bulk α-Al2O3, demonstrating the use of repetitive-nano-impact tests which not only provide qualitative information about

  5. Defect and solute properties in dilute Fe-Cr-Ni austenitic alloys from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaver, T. P. C.; Hepburn, D. J.; Ackland, G. J.

    2012-05-01

    to the <100> dumbbell in the tensile site by 0.1 eV and was repelled from mixed and compressive sites. In contrast, Cr showed a preferential binding to interstitials. Calculation of tracer diffusion coefficients found that Ni diffuses significantly more slowly than both Cr and Fe, which is consistent with the standard mechanism used to explain radiation-induced segregation effects in Fe-Cr-Ni austenitic alloys by vacancy-mediated diffusion. Comparison of our results with those for bcc Fe showed strong similarity for pure Fe and no correlation with dilute Ni and Cr.

  6. Effects of Cr and Ni on Interdiffusion and Reaction between U and Fe-Cr-Ni Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    K. Huang; Y. Park; L. Zhou; K.R. Coffey; Y.H. Sohn; B.H. Sencer; J. R. Kennedy

    2014-08-01

    Metallic U-alloy fuel cladded in steel has been examined for high temperature fast reactor technology wherein the fuel cladding chemical interaction is a challenge that requires a fundamental and quantitative understanding. In order to study the fundamental diffusional interactions between U with Fe and the alloying effect of Cr and Ni, solid-to-solid diffusion couples were assembled between pure U and Fe, Fe–15 wt.%Cr or Fe–15 wt.%Cr–15 wt.%Ni alloy, and annealed at high temperature ranging from 580 to 700 °C. The microstructures and concentration profiles that developed from the diffusion anneal were examined by scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS), respectively. Thick U6Fe and thin UFe2 phases were observed to develop with solubilities: up to 2.5 at.% Ni in U6(Fe,Ni), up to 20 at.%Cr in U(Fe, Cr)2, and up to 7 at.%Cr and 14 at.% Ni in U(Fe, Cr, Ni)2. The interdiffusion and reactions in the U vs. Fe and U vs. Fe–Cr–Ni exhibited a similar temperature dependence, while the U vs. Fe–Cr diffusion couples, without the presence of Ni, yielded greater activation energy for the growth of intermetallic phases – lower growth rate at lower temperature but higher growth rate at higher temperature.

  7. Effect of nano-additives on microstructure, mechanical properties and wear behaviour of Fe-Cr-B hardfacing alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Junfeng; Lu, Pengpeng; Wang, You; Liu, Saiyue; Zou, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    Fe-Cr-B hardfacing alloys with different nano-additives content were investigated. The effects of nano-additives on the microstructures of hardfacing alloy were studied by using optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffractometer. The hardness and the fracture toughness of hardfacing alloys were measured, respectively. The sliding wear tests were carried out using a ball-on-disc tribometer. The experimental results showed that primary carbide of hardfacing alloys was refined and its distribution became uniform with content of nano-additives increased. The hardfacing alloys are composed of Cr7C3, Fe7C3, α-Fe and Fe2B according to the results of X-ray diffraction. The hardness of hardfacing alloys increased linearly with the increase of nano-additives. The hardness of the hardfacing alloy with 1.5 wt.% nano-additives increased 54.8% than that of the hardfacing alloy without nano-additives and reached to 1011HV. The KIC of the hardfacing alloy with 0.65 wt.% nano-additives was 15.4 MPam1/2, which reached a maximum. The value increased 57.1% than that of the hardfacing alloy without nano-additives. The wear rates of the hardfacing layer with 0.65 wt.% and 1.0 wt.% nano-additives decreased about 88% than that of the hardfacing layer without nano-additives. The main wear mechanism was adhesion wear.

  8. High strength ferritic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Hagel, William C.; Smidt, Frederick A.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1977-01-01

    A high-strength ferritic alloy useful for fast reactor duct and cladding applications where an iron base contains from about 9% to about 13% by weight chromium, from about 4% to about 8% by weight molybdenum, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight niobium, from about 0.1% to about 0.3% by weight vanadium, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight silicon, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight manganese, a maximum of about 0.05% by weight nitrogen, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight sulfur, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight phosphorous, and from about 0.04% to about 0.12% by weight carbon.

  9. Role of Chemical Driving Force in Martensitic Transformations of High-Purity Fe-Cr-Ni Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behjati, P.; Najafizadeh, A.

    2011-12-01

    The main objective of the present work is to point out the respective roles of chemical driving force and stacking fault energy (SFE) in the occurrence of martensitic transformations in high-purity Fe-Cr-Ni alloys. For this purpose, the transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffractometer, thermal differential microanalyzer (TDA), and tension test were employed to report M s temperatures, austenite stacking fault energies, and driving forces for the concerned alloys. It was observed that the martensitic transformations in the studied alloys occur through the γ → ɛ → α' steps. As a remarkable result, it was shown that a low SFE, if necessary to ɛ-phase nucleation, is not a sufficient condition for nucleation of α' phase. In fact, the formation of stable α' nuclei from α' embryos occur if the required chemical driving force is provided. Also, an equation was proposed for the kinetics of spontaneous martensitic transformation as a function of driving force.

  10. Oxide scales formed on Fe-Cr-Al-based model alloys exposed to oxygen containing molten lead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisenburger, A.; Jianu, A.; Doyle, S.; Bruns, M.; Fetzer, R.; Heinzel, A.; DelGiacco, M.; An, W.; Müller, G.

    2013-06-01

    Based on the state of the art oxide maps concerning oxidation behavior of Fe-Cr-Al model alloys at 800 and 1000 °C in oxygen atmosphere, ten compositions, belonging to this alloy system, were designed in order to tap the borders of the alumina stability domain, during their exposure to oxygen (10-6 wt.%) containing lead, at 400, 500 and 600 °C. Eight alloys, Fe-6Cr-6Al, Fe-8Cr-6Al, Fe-10Cr-5Al, Fe-14Cr-4Al, Fe-16Cr-4Al, Fe-6Cr-8Al, Fe-10Cr-7Al and Fe-12Cr-5Al, were found to be protected against corrosion in oxygen containing lead, either by a duplex layer (Fe3O4 + (Fe1-x-yCrxAly)3O4) or by (Fe1-x-yCrxAly)3O4, depending on the temperature at which they were exposed. Two alloys namely Fe-12Cr-7Al and Fe-16Cr-6Al were found to form transient aluminas, κ-Al2O3 (at 400 and 500 °C) and θ-Al2O3 (at 600 °C), as protective oxide scale against corrosion in oxygen containing lead. An oxide map illustrating the stability domain of alumina, grown on Fe-Cr-Al alloys when exposed to molten, oxygen containing lead, was drawn. The map includes also additional points, extracted from literature and corresponding to alumina forming alloys, when exposed to HLMs, which fit very well with our findings. Chromium and aluminium contents of 12.5-17 wt.% and 6-7.5 wt.%, respectively, are high enough to obtain thin, stable and protective alumina scales on Fe-Cr-Al-based alloys exposed to oxygen containing lead at 400, 500 and 600 °C. For the temperature range and exposure times used during the current evaluation, the growth rate of the alumina scale was low. No area with detached scale was observed and no trace of α-Al2O3 was detected.

  11. Stability domain of alumina thermally grown on Fe-Cr-Al-based model alloys and modified surface layers exposed to oxygen-containing molten Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jianu, A.; Fetzer, R.; Weisenburger, A.; Doyle, S.; Bruns, M.; Heinzel, A.; Hosemann, P.; Mueller, G.

    2016-03-01

    The paper gives experimental results concerning the morphology, composition, structure and thickness of the oxide scales grown on Fe-Cr-Al-based bulk alloys during exposure to oxygen-containing molten lead. The results are discussed and compared with former results obtained on Al-containing surface layers, modified by melting with intense pulsed electron beam and exposed to similar conditions. The present and previous results provide the alumina stability domain and also the criterion of the Al/Cr ratio for the formation of a highly protective alumina layer on the surface of Fe-Cr-Al-based alloys and on modified surface layers exposed to molten lead with 10-6 wt.% oxygen at 400-600 °C. The protective oxide scales, grown on alumina-forming Fe-Cr-Al alloys under the given experimental conditions, were transient aluminas, namely, kappa-Al2O3 and theta-Al2O3.

  12. Observation of Oxide Formation for Molten Fe-Cr-C Alloy at a High Carbon Region by Oxygen Top Blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihara, Ryosuke; Gao, Xu; Kaneko, Shigeru; Kim, Sunjoong; Ueda, Shigeru; Shibata, Hiroyuki; Seok, Min Oh; Kitamura, Shin-ya

    2016-04-01

    The oxide formation behavior during decarburization by top blowing for molten Fe-Cr-C alloy was directly observed. For 11 mass pct Cr alloy at 1673 K to 1723 K (1400 °C to 1450 °C), as well as for 14 mass pct Cr alloy at 1623 K to 1673 K (1350 °C to 1400 °C), oxide particles always formed within several minutes after decarburization started. Also, unstable oxide film followed by stable oxide film formed after C content was decreased to certain levels. For 11 mass pct Cr alloy at 1773 K (1500 °C) and 14 mass pct Cr alloy at 1723 K (1450 °C), only the oxide particle and stable oxide film were observed. For 18 mass pct Cr-5 mass pct C alloy at 1723 K (1450 °C), stable oxide film formed twice. By comparing the critical C and Cr contents of alloy when oxides started to form with the equilibrium relation, the formation of the oxide particle and unstable oxide film was found to be under a nonequilibrium condition, whereas the stable oxide film that formed was near an equilibrium condition. For 11 and 14 mass pct Cr alloy, the decarburization rate stayed constant and was not affected by the formation of the oxide particle or unstable oxide film, but it started to decrease after the formation of the stable oxide film.

  13. Precipitation sensitivity to alloy composition in Fe-Cr-Mn austenitic steels developed for reduced activation for fusion application

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, P.J.; Klueh, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    Special austenitic steels are being designed in which alloying elements like Mo, Nb, and Ni are replaced with Mn, W, V, Ti, and/or Ta to reduce the long-term radioactivity induced by fusion reactor irradiation. However, the new steels still need to have properties otherwise similar to commercial steels like type 316. Precipitation strongly affects strength and radiation-resistance in austenitic steels during irradiation at 400--600/degree/C, and precipitation is also usually quite sensitive to alloy composition. The initial stage of development was to define a base Fe-Cr-Mn-C composition that formed stable austenite after annealing and cold-working, and resisted recovery or excessive formation of coarse carbide and intermetallic phases during elevated temperature annealing. These studies produced a Fe-12Cr-20Mn-0.25C base alloy. The next stage was to add the minor alloying elements W, Ti, V, P, and B for more strength and radiation-resistance. One of the goals was to produce fine MC precipitation behavior similar to the Ti-modified Fe-Cr-Ni prime candidate alloy (PCA). Additions of Ti+V+P+B produced fine MC precipitation along network dislocations and recovery/recrystallization resistance in 20% cold worked material aged at 800/degree/C for 166h, whereas W, Ti, W+Ti, or Ti+P+B additions did not. Addition of W+Ti+V+P+B also produced fine MC, but caused some sigma phase formation and more recrystallization as well. 29 refs., 14 figs., 9 tabs.

  14. An investigation on corrosion protection of chromium nitride coated Fe-Cr alloy as a bipolar plate material for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, T. J.; Zhang, B.; Li, J.; He, Y. X.; Lin, F.

    2014-12-01

    The corrosion properties of chromium nitride (CrN) coating are investigated to assess the potential use of this material as a bipolar plate for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Conductive metallic ceramic CrN layers are firstly deposited onto Fe-Cr alloy using a multi-arc ion plating technique to increase the corrosion resistance of the base alloy. Electrochemical measurements indicate that the corrosion resistance of the substrate alloy is greatly enhanced by the CrN coating. The free corrosion potential of the substrate is increased by more than 50 mV. Furthermore, a decrease in three orders of magnitude of corrosive current density for the CrN-coated alloy is observed compared to the as-received Fe-Cr alloy. Long-term immersion tests show that the CrN layer is highly stable and effectively acts as a barrier to inhibit permeation of corrosive species. On the contrary, corrosion of the Fe-Cr alloy is rather severe without the protection of CrN coating due to the active dissolution. Finally, the corresponding electrochemical impedance models are proposed to elucidate the corrosion process of the CrN/Fe-Cr alloy submerged in a simulated PEMFCs environment.

  15. Electron irradiation-induced defects in Mo-diluted FeCrNi austenitic alloy during void swelling incubation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B. Y.; Lu, E. Y.; Zhang, C. X.; Xu, Q.; Jin, S. X.; Zhang, P.; Cao, X. Z.

    2016-01-01

    The microstructural features and the effect of Mo addition in FeCrNi austenitic alloy during incubation period were investigated using positron annihilation technique and micro- Vickers Hardness. The electron irradiation, which could induce vacancy defects in material, was performed at room temperature up to the dose of 1.7×10-4 and 5×10-4 dpa, respectively. The defect concentration was estimated about 10-4-10-7 though the standard trapping model. The added Mo atoms could trap vacancies to form Mo-vacancy complexes, which may restrain the migration and growth of vacancy defects during electron irradiation. In addition, the microstructural evolution during electron radiation resulted in hardening, while the added Mo might improve the hardening property of the alloy.

  16. Investigation Of Helium Implanted Fe-Cr Alloys By Means Of X-Ray Diffraction And Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novák, Patrik; Gokhman, Aleksandr; Dobročka, Edmund; Bokor, Jozef; Pecko, Stanislav

    2015-11-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) and positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) have been used for the characterization of the two binary alloys Fe-Cr with Cr content 2.36 and 8.39 wt%. The influence of ion implantation on these alloys was studied. Different implantation doses of helium, up to 0.5 C/cm2, were used to simulate neutron-induced damage in a sub-surface region. To characterize the damage, a lattice parameter, coherent domain size, residual stress and a crystallographic texture have been studied by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD). It was found out that these parameters showed a similar dependence on the implantation dose as the positron lifetime determined by positron annihilation spectroscopy.

  17. Laser surface alloying of carbon steel with Fe-Cr-Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] powders

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.C.; Tsai, W.T.; Lee, J.T. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1994-06-01

    Laser surface alloying (LSA) is a relatively new technique for producing a highly alloyed layer on metal surfaces. Surface failures such as corrosion and wear can be improved by modifying surface chemistry with LSA. It reduces the amount of scarce and costly alloying elements, while retaining the bulk properties of the substrate. The beneficial effect of nitrogen on enhancing mechanical properties and corrosion resistance, especially local corrosion, as compared with conventional austenitic stainless steels (SSs), has been reported. During the last decade, there have been intensive studies on introducing large amounts of nitrogen into the SSs. Mass alloying of nitrogen into SSs can be achieved by using techniques such as pressurized induction melting, plasma remelting, hot isostatic pressure (HIP) melting, and pressurized electroslag remelting (PESR). The PESR process in which nitrogen is added directly into the melt via a metal nitride addition has become commercially available. Whether surface modification of carbon steel with high nitrogen stainless steel is possible is of interest. In the present investigation, a technique used to produced a nitrogen-alloyed SS surface layer by laser melting the Fe-Cr-Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] powders on carbon steel is attempted. The chemical states and concentration of the alloying elements in the LSA layers are analyzed and presented.

  18. The dependence of helium generation rate on nickel content of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys irradiated at high dpa levels in fast reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, F.A.; Oliver, B.M.; Greenwood, L.R.

    1997-04-01

    With a few exceptions in the literature, it is generally accepted that it is nickel in Fe-Cr-Ni alloys that produces most of the transmutant helium and that the helium generation rate should scale linearly with the nickel content. Surprisingly, this assumption is based only on irradiations of pure nickel and has never been tested in an alloy series. There have also been no extensive tests of the predictions for helium production in alloys in various fast reactors spectra.

  19. Influence of composition and microstructure on the corrosion behavior of different Fe-Cr-Al alloys in molten LBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Giacco, M.; Weisenburger, A.; Jianu, A.; Lang, F.; Mueller, G.

    2012-02-01

    Corrosion tests in molten Lead Bismuth Eutectic (LBE) are performed on materials aimed for high temperature applications. The experiments include tests with oxygen content in solution of 10 -6-10 -8 wt.% at temperature of 500, 600 and 750 °C for 1000 h duration. The materials under investigation are Fe-Cr-Al Kanthal like alloys, namely: Kanthal - D, AF, APM and Alkrothal. The mentioned group of alloys is discussed as alternative solution for thermally high loaded parts, e.g. spacer grids, of future accelerator driven systems (ADSs) and nuclear fast reactors cooled by molten LBE. The experimental campaign highlighted the central role of temperature, oxygen content, composition (Cr and Al content) and, in some cases, microstructure for the corrosion behavior. Up to 600 °C, Kanthal alloys generally show good compatibility with LBE due to the formation of thin and protective Al 2O 3 scale. Even at 750 °C these alloys show the favorable alumina scale formation when the oxygen concentration in LBE is 10 -6 wt.%; also at 750 °C but at lower oxygen concentration of 10 -8 wt.%, dissolution attack affects Kanthal alloys except the Kanthal Alkrothal.

  20. The effect of prolonged irradiation on defect production and ordering in Fe-Cr and Fe-Ni alloys.

    PubMed

    Vörtler, K; Juslin, N; Bonny, G; Malerba, L; Nordlund, K

    2011-09-01

    The understanding of the primary radiation damage in Fe-based alloys is of interest for the use of advanced steels in future fusion and fission reactors. In this work Fe-Cr alloys (with 5, 6.25, 10 and 15% Cr content) and Fe-Ni alloys (with 10, 40, 50 and 75% Ni content) were used as model materials for studying the features of steels from a radiation damage perspective. The effect of prolonged irradiation (neglecting diffusion), i.e. the overlapping of single 5 keV displacement cascade events, was studied by molecular dynamics simulation. Up to 200 single cascades were simulated, randomly induced in sequence in one simulation cell, to study the difference between fcc and bcc lattices, as well as initially ordered and random crystals. With increasing numbers of cascades we observed a saturation of Frenkel pairs in the bcc alloys. In fcc Fe-Ni, in contrast, we saw a continuous accumulation of defects: the growth of stacking-fault tetrahedra and a larger number of self-interstitial atom clusters were seen in contrast to bcc alloys. For all simulations the defect clusters and the short range order parameter were analysed in detail depending on the number of cascades in the crystal. We also report the modification of the repulsive part of the Fe-Ni interaction potential, which was needed to study the non-equilibrium processes. PMID:21846941

  1. Formation of grain boundary segregations in alloy Fe-Cr-Ni during strong deformation and under radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starikov, S. A.; Kuznetsov, A. R.; Sagaradze, V. V.; Gornostyrev, Yu. N.; Pechenkin, V. A.; Stepanov, I. A.

    2012-03-01

    Segregation of nickel in grain boundaries (GBs) in the Fe-Cr-Ni alloy induced by radiation (RIS) or plastic deformation (DIS) has been studied in the framework of a model which considers the generation of point defects, their mutual recombination, and absorption in GBs. It has been demonstrated that at sufficiently high rates of generation of point defects and in certain temperature ranges the achievement of a stationary state can be preceded by the stage of "rapid" segregation at which the Ni concentration in GBs reaches its maximum. Such mode of formation of segregations can be observed not only upon radiation ("rapid" RIS mode), but also under the conditions of severe deformation (cold rolling, equal-channel angular pressing); in the latter case, the segregates are inherited after the termination of deformation.

  2. Production and characterization of high porosity porous Fe-Cr-C alloys by the space holder leaching technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Da-rong; Pang, Yu-hua; Yu, Liang; Sun, Li

    2016-07-01

    Spherical carbamide particles were employed to produce porous Fe-Cr-C alloy with high porosity and large aperture via the space-holder leaching technique. A series of porous samples were prepared by regulating the processing parameters, which included the carbamide content and the compaction pressure. The pore characteristics and compression properties of the produced samples were investigated. The samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, image analysis, and compression tests. The results showed that the macro-porosity and the mean pore size were in the ranges 40.4%-82.4% and 0.6-1.5 mm, respectively. The compressive strength varied between 25.38 MPa and 127.9 MPa, and was observed to decrease with increasing total porosity.

  3. The Relationship between the Microstructure and Abrasive Resistance of a Hardfacing Alloy in the Fe-Cr-C-Nb-V System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, E. O.; Alcântara, N. G.; Tecco, D. G.; Kumar, R. V.

    2007-08-01

    The relationship between abrasive wear resistance and microstructure of a hardfacing alloy based on the Fe-Cr-C-Nb-V system was investigated. This material was developed for cladding, by an open arc welding technique, of components subjected to severe abrasive wear. The work undertaken included the solidification study, microstructural characterization, and abrasion testing. Microstructural examinations of hardfaced layer showed that the microstructure of the alloy consisted of a large volume fraction of primary niobium carbides randomly dispersed in a metastable austenitic matrix containing fine M3C carbides and “islands” of eutectic mixture of γ/M7C3. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis results showed that V preferentially partitioned into the NbC and M3C phases. In comparison with the conventional high carbon/high chromium hardfacing alloy with higher hardness, a Fe-Cr-C-Nb-V hardfacing alloy exhibited improved abrasive wear resistance and a microstructure with higher toughness.

  4. The Effect of H and He on Irradiation Performance of Fe and Ferritic Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    James F. Stubbins

    2010-01-22

    This research program was designed to look at basic radiation damage and effects and mechanical properties in Fe and ferritic alloys. The program scope included a number of materials ranging from pure single crystal Fe to more complex Fe-Cr-C alloys. The range of materials was designed to examine materials response and performance on ideal/model systems and gradually move to more complex systems. The experimental program was coordinated with a modeling effort. The use of pure and model alloys also facilitated the ability to develop and employ atomistic-scale modeling techniques to understand the inherent physics underlying materials performance

  5. First Annual Progress Report on Radiation Tolerance of Controlled Fusion Welds in High Temperature Oxidation Resistant FeCrAl Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G.; Gussev, Maxim N.; Hu, Xunxiang; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Howard, Richard H.

    2015-12-01

    The present report summarizes and discusses the first year efforts towards developing a modern, nuclear grade FeCrAl alloy designed to have enhanced radiation tolerance and weldability under the Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program. Significant efforts have been made within the first year of this project including the fabrication of seven candidate FeCrAl alloys with well controlled chemistry and microstructure, the microstructural characterization of these alloys using standardized and advanced techniques, mechanical properties testing and evaluation of base alloys, the completion of welding trials and production of weldments for subsequent testing, the design of novel tensile specimen geometry to increase the number of samples that can be irradiated in a single capsule and also shorten the time of their assessment after irradiation, the development of testing procedures for controlled hydrogen ingress studies, and a detailed mechanical and microstructural assessment of weldments prior to irradiation or hydrogen charging. These efforts and research results have shown promise for the FeCrAl alloy class as a new nuclear grade alloy class.

  6. Corrosion performance of Fe-Cr-Al and Fe aluminide alloys in complex gas environments

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Johnson, R.N.

    1995-05-01

    Alumina-forming structural alloys can offer superior resistance to corrosion in the presence of sulfur-containing environments, which are prevalent in coal-fired fossil energy systems. Further, Fe aluminides are being developed for use as structural materials and/or cladding alloys in these systems. Extensive development has been in progress on Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys to improve their engineering ductility. In addition, surface coatings of Fe aluminide are being developed to impart corrosion resistance to structural alloys. This paper describes results from an ongoing program that is evaluating the corrosion performance of alumina-forming structural alloys, Fe-Al and Fe aluminide bulk alloys, and Fe aluminide coatings in environments typical of coal-gasification and combustion atmospheres. Experiments were conducted at 650-1000{degrees}C in simulated oxygen/sulfur gas mixtures. Other aspects of the program are corrosion evaluation of the aluminides in the presence of HCl-containing gases. Results are used to establish threshold Al levels in the alloys for development of protective alumina scales and to determine the modes of corrosion degradation that occur in the materials when they are exposed to S/Cl-containing gaseous environments.

  7. Mechanical activation of a hard magnetic Fe-Cr-Co alloy powder charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alymov, M. I.; Milyaev, I. M.; Sychev, A. E.; Kovalev, D. Yu.; Korneev, V. P.; Morozov, Yu. G.; Yusupov, V. S.; Bompe, T. A.

    2014-07-01

    The mechanical activation (MA) of a charge of a hard magnetic 22Kh15KT alloy is studied by wet and dry milling in a planetary mill in a medium of argon and ethyl alcohol with addition of surface-active materials and without them. It is shown that, upon dry MA, powder alloy components are alloyed with formation of two bcc solid solutions and, upon wet MA, charge particles are only intensely dispersed. Dispersion is developed at the highest degree in the first five minutes of MA.

  8. Non-classical nuclei and growth kinetics of Cr precipitates in FeCr alloys during ageing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Xin

    2014-03-01

    In this manuscript, we have quantitatively calculated the thermodynamic properties of the critical nuclei of Cr precipitates in FeCr alloys. The concentration profiles of the critical nuclei and nucleation energy barriers were predicted by the constrained shrinking dimer dynamics method. It is found that Cr concentration distribution in the critical nuclei strongly depends on the overall Cr concentration as well as on the temperature. The critical nuclei are non-classical because the concentration in the nuclei is smaller than the thermodynamic equilibrium value. These results are in agreement with atomic probe observation. The growth kinetics of both classical and non-classical nuclei was investigated by the phase-field approach. The simulations of critical nucleus evolution showed a number of interesting phenomena: (1) a critical classical nucleus first shrinks toward its non-classical nucleus and then grows; (2) a non-classical nucleus has much slower growth kinetics at its earlier growth stage compared to the diffusion-controlled growth kinetics and (3) a critical classical nucleus grows faster at the earlier growth stage than does a non-classical nucleus. All of these results demonstrate that it is critical to introduce the correct critical nuclei in order to correctly capture the kinetics of precipitation.

  9. Non-classical nuclei and growth kinetics of Cr precipitates in FeCr alloys during ageing

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Xin

    2014-01-10

    In this manuscript, we quantitatively calculated the thermodynamic properties of critical nuclei of Cr precipitates in FeCr alloys. The concentration profiles of the critical nuclei and nucleation energy barriers were predicted by the constrained shrinking dimer dynamics (CSDD) method. It is found that Cr concentration distribution in the critical nuclei strongly depend on the overall Cr concentration as well as temperature. The critical nuclei are non-classical because the concentration in the nuclei is smaller than the thermodynamic equilibrium value. These results are in agreement with atomic probe observation. The growth kinetics of both classical and non-classical nuclei was investigated by the phase field approach. The simulations of critical nucleus evolution showed a number of interesting phenomena: 1) a critical classical nucleus first shrinks toward its non-classical nucleus and then grows; 2) a non-classical nucleus has much slower growth kinetics at its earlier growth stage compared to the diffusion-controlled growth kinetics. 3) a critical classical nucleus grows faster at the earlier growth stage than the non-classical nucleus. All of these results demonstrate that it is critical to introduce the correct critical nuclei in order to correctly capture the kinetics of precipitation.

  10. Diamond growth on Fe-Cr-Al alloy by H2-plasma enhanced graphite etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. S.; Hirose, A.

    2007-04-01

    Without intermediate layer and surface pretreatment, adherent diamond films with high initial nucleation density have been deposited on Fe-15Cr-5Al (wt. %) alloy substrate. The deposition was performed using microwave hydrogen plasma enhanced graphite etching in a wide temperature range from 370to740°C. The high nucleation density and growth rate of diamond are primarily attributed to the unique precursors used (hydrogen plasma etched graphite) and the chemical nature of the substrate. The improvement in diamond adhesion to steel alloys is ascribed to the important role played by Al, mitigation of the catalytic function of iron by suppressing the preferential formation of loose graphite intermediate phase on steel surface.

  11. Corrosion behavior of amorphous fe-cr-al-p-c ribbon alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Kangjo; Hwang, Choll-Hong; Ryeom, Yeong-Jo; Pak, Chang-Su

    1982-05-01

    Corrosion resistance of amorphous Fe72Cr8-xAlxP13C7 ribbons produced by a rapid quenching method has been investigated in several solutions. The corrosion test for amorphous ribbons was carried out, and anodic polarization curves have been measured in the solutions. Resultantly, even in the amorphous Fe72Cr8-xAlxP13C7 ribbons containing a low Cr content, this composition of amorphous alloys showed the high corrosion resistance.

  12. Swelling in commercial Fe-Cr-Ni based alloys under electron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, L. E.; Gelles, D. S.

    1982-08-01

    Electron irradiation in a 1 MeV electron microscope has been used to study the void swelling response of several commercial austenitic stainless steels and iron-nickel based superalloys. Use of the 1 MeV microscope permits direct, continuous observation of the void development during elevated-temperature irradiations at displacement rates about 10 000 times greater then those in a fast breeder reactor. The alloys examined in this work included AISI 310, RA 330, A286, M813, Nimonic PE16, Inconel 706, Inconel 718 and Incoloy 901. Both helium preinjected specimens and uninjected specimens were studied. In all of the above alloys, swelling proceeds by formation of irradiation-induced dislocations and voids, followed by growth of the voids. The swelling rates and peak swelling temperatures vary considerably with alloy composition, heat treatment and helium preinjection. Comparisons of these results with recently reported swelling data from the same alloys after high fluence neutron irradiation in the EBR-II reactor shows good qualitative agreement in most cases. Helium preinjection of the electron irradiated specimens generally produced a poorer simulation than no helium preinjection. In one or two cases where the electron and neutron irradiation results strongly disagree, the differences appear to result from differences in irradiation-induced precipitation. Although the correlations between neutron and electron irradiation results are inadequate to obtain reliable engineering data by simulation, in-reactor swelling behavior is in general qualitatively well-represented by swelling response in the 1 MeV electron microscope. Nimonic is the registered trademark of Henry Wiggin and Company, UK. Inconel and Incoloy are registered trademarks of the International Nickel Company, Inc.

  13. Invar and Elinvar type amorphous Fe-Cr-B alloys with high corrosion resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kikuci, M.; Fukamichi, K.; Masumoto, T.

    1987-01-01

    Amorphous (Fe(1-x)Cr(x))85B15 alloys (x = 0 to 0.15) were prepared from the melts by rapid quenching using a single roller techinque, and their Invar and Elinvar characteristics and corrosion resistance were investigated. With an increase in chromium content the Curie temperature and the saturation magnetic moment per iron atom decreased monotonically, while the crystallization temperature incresed gradually. The thermal expansion coefficient alpha around room temperature became slightly larger with increasing chromium content. Nevertheless, these amorphous alloys exhibited excellent Invar characteristics below the Curie temperature. The value of Young's modulus increased remarkably in a relatively low magnetic field and then saturated at a field of about 80 kA/m, showing a large delta E effect. Its value as well as a longitudinal linear magnetostriction became smaller with an increase in chromium content. The temperature coefficient of Young's modulus changed from postive to negative, and the temperature range showing the Elinvar characteristics became narrower with chromium content. The temperature coefficient of delay time determined from the values of alpha and e was very small. The corrosion resistance of these alloys was extremely improved by chromium addition.

  14. Alloying effects on the microstructure and phase stability of Fe-Cr-Mn steels

    SciTech Connect

    Rawers, J.C.

    2008-05-01

    Austenitic Fe–Cr–Mn stainless steels interstitially alloyed with nitrogen have received considerable interest lately, due to their many property improvements over conventional Fe–Cr–Ni alloys. The addition of nitrogen to Fe–Cr–Mn stabilizes the fcc structure and increases the carbon solubility. The benefits of increased interstitial nitrogen and carbon content include: enhanced strength, hardness, and wear resistance. This study examines the effect of carbon, silicon, molybdenum, and nickel additions on the phase stability and tensile behavior of nitrogen-containing Fe–Cr–Mn alloys. Nitrogen and carbon concentrations exceeding 2.0 wt.% were added to the base Fe–18Cr–18Mn composition without the formation of nitride or carbide precipitates. Minor additions of molybdenum, silicon, and nickel did not affect nitrogen interstitial solubility, but did reduce carbon solubility resulting in the formation of M23C6 (M=Cr, Fe, Mo) carbides. Increasing the interstitial content increases the lattice distortion strain, which is directly correlated with an increase in yield stress.

  15. An experimental and theoretical study of cementite dissolution in an Fe-Cr-C alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zi-Kui; Höglund, Lars; Jönsson, Björn; Ågren, John

    1991-08-01

    The dissolution of cementite at 910 °C in an Fe-2.06Cr-3.91C (at. pct) alloy is investigated experimentally. The Cr concentration profiles in austenite and cementite are measured by means of the scanning transmission electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrometry (STEM/EDS) technique at different dissolution times. The measurements show the Cr enrichment in the cementite during the dissolution process. The measurements suggest that the main part of the reaction for this alloy is controlled by Cr diffusion in the cementite or in the austenite matrix. This observation is in agreement with predictions of the local equilibrium hypothesis. The carbide fraction and average particle diameter are evaluated as functions of dissolution time. The Cr enrichment of the cementite results in a supersaturation and a possible decomposition of the cementite. Microstructural evidence for such a decomposition is found by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A new program package called DICTRA,[11] which is suitable for the simulation of diffusional reactions in multicomponent alloys, has been applied to the present case. The simulation is compared with the experimental data, and a good agreement between the two is found.

  16. Microstructure evolution in proton-irradiated austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys under LWR core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Jian

    1999-11-01

    Irradiation-induced microstructure of austenitic stainless steel was investigated using proton irradiation. High-purity alloys of Fe-20Cr-9Ni (UHP 304 SS), Fe-20Cr-24Ni and Ni-18Cr-9Fe were irradiated using 3.2 MeV protons at a dose rate of 7 × 10-6 dpa/s between 300°C and 600°C. The irradiation produced a microstructure consisting of dislocation loops and voids. The dose and temperature dependence of the number density and size of dislocation loops and voids were investigated. The changes in yield strength due to irradiation were estimated from Vickers hardness measurements and compared to calculations using a dispersed-barrier hardening model. The dose and temperature dependence of microstructure and hardness change for proton irradiation follows the same trend as that for neutron irradiation at comparable irradiation conditions. Commercial purity alloys of CP 304 SS and CP 316 SS were irradiated at 360°C to doses between 0.3 and 3.0 dpa. The irradiated microstructure consists of dislocation loops. No voids were detected at doses up to 3.0 dpa. Loop size distributions are in close agreement with that in the same alloys neutron-irradiated in a LWR core. The loop density also agrees with neutron irradiation data. The yield strength as a function of dose in proton irradiated commercial purity alloys is consistent with the neutron- data trend. A fast-reactor microstructure model was adapted for light water reactor (LWR) irradiation conditions (275°C, 7 × 10 -8 dpa/s) and then applied to proton irradiation under conditions (360°C, 7 × 10-6 dpa/s) relevant to LWRs. The original model was modified by including in-cascade interstitial clustering and the loss of interstitial clusters to sinks by cluster diffusion. It was demonstrated that loop nucleation for both LWR irradiation condition and proton irradiation are driven by in-cascade interstitial clustering. One important result from this modeling work is that the difference in displacement cascade between

  17. High-temperature relaxation in a Fe-Cr-Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Z. C.; Han, F. S.

    2003-09-01

    Two relaxational internal friction peaks were found in a (wt%)Fe-25Cr-5Al alloy. The low-temperature peak is related to Zener relaxation and the high-temperature one to grain-boundary relaxation. Their activation energy values are 2.55 (+/-0.14) eV for the Zener peak and 4.07(+/-0.15) eV for the grain-boundary relaxation peak, respectively. Grain-boundary relaxation strength remarkably increases with decreasing grain size, while the Zener peak is independent of the grain size. (

  18. Silicon's role in determining swelling in neutron-irradiated Fe-Cr-Ni-Si alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sekimura, N. ); Garner, F. A. ); Newkirk, J.W. )

    1991-11-01

    Two silicon-modified alloy series, one based on Fe-15Cr-20Ni and another based on Fe-15Cr-25Ni were irradiated at target temperatures between 399 and 649{degree}C in EBR-II. The influence of silicon on swelling is more complex than previously envisioned and indicates that silicon plays two or more competing roles while in solution. Radiation-induced formation of {gamma}{prime} (Ni{sub 3}Si) precipitates is dependent on silicon and nickel content, as well as temperature. Precipitation of {gamma}{prime} appears to play only a minor role in void formation.

  19. Swelling suppression in phosphorous-modified Fe-Cr-Ni alloys during neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.H.; Packan, N.H.

    1988-01-01

    Phosphorous-containing austenitic alloys in the solution annealed condition were irradiated at 745--760/degree/K. The alloys were variations on Fe--13Cr--15Ni--0.05P with respective additions of 0.8 Si, 0.2 Ti, or 0.8 Si /plus/ 0.2 Ti; also included were low (0.01) and zero P compositions (all values in wt. %). The reference ternary and the two phosphorous-only variations contained little precipitation and numerous voids and swelled rapidly, while the three variants containing P with Si and/or Ti showed little or no void formation and profuse phosphide precipitation. Results indicate that phosphorous in solution alone does not have a major influence on void swelling, whereas fine-scale phosphide precipitation is quite effective at eliminating void formation. The principal mechanism restricting swelling is the effect of the dense precipitate microstructure. These precipitates foster profuse cavity nucleation which in turn dilutes the helium atoms (and more time) in order for individual cavities to surpass their critical size and number of gas atoms necessary for subsequent growth as voids. This mechanism for swelling suppression was not found to be particularly sensitive to moderate variations in either the dislocation or cavity densities; the mechanism is strongest at elevated temperature where the critical quantities are large and is less effective at lower temperatures where the critical quantities are small. 19 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Corrosion Performance of Fe-Cr-Ni Alloys in Artificial Saliva and Mouthwash Solution

    PubMed Central

    Porcayo-Calderon, J.; Casales-Diaz, M.; Salinas-Bravo, V. M.; Martinez-Gomez, L.

    2015-01-01

    Several austenitic stainless steels suitable for high temperature applications because of their high corrosion resistance and excellent mechanical properties were investigated as biomaterials for dental use. The steels were evaluated by electrochemical techniques such as potentiodynamic polarization curves, cyclic polarization curves, measurements of open circuit potential, and linear polarization resistance. The performance of steels was evaluated in two types of environments: artificial saliva and mouthwash solution at 37°C for 48 hours. In order to compare the behavior of steels, titanium a material commonly used in dental applications was also tested in the same conditions. Results show that tested steels have characteristics that may make them attractive as biomaterials for dental applications. Contents of Cr, Ni, and other minor alloying elements (Mo, Ti, and Nb) determine the performance of stainless steels. In artificial saliva steels show a corrosion rate of the same order of magnitude as titanium and in mouthwash have greater corrosion resistance than titanium. PMID:26064083

  1. Corrosion Performance of Fe-Cr-Ni Alloys in Artificial Saliva and Mouthwash Solution.

    PubMed

    Porcayo-Calderon, J; Casales-Diaz, M; Salinas-Bravo, V M; Martinez-Gomez, L

    2015-01-01

    Several austenitic stainless steels suitable for high temperature applications because of their high corrosion resistance and excellent mechanical properties were investigated as biomaterials for dental use. The steels were evaluated by electrochemical techniques such as potentiodynamic polarization curves, cyclic polarization curves, measurements of open circuit potential, and linear polarization resistance. The performance of steels was evaluated in two types of environments: artificial saliva and mouthwash solution at 37°C for 48 hours. In order to compare the behavior of steels, titanium a material commonly used in dental applications was also tested in the same conditions. Results show that tested steels have characteristics that may make them attractive as biomaterials for dental applications. Contents of Cr, Ni, and other minor alloying elements (Mo, Ti, and Nb) determine the performance of stainless steels. In artificial saliva steels show a corrosion rate of the same order of magnitude as titanium and in mouthwash have greater corrosion resistance than titanium. PMID:26064083

  2. Kinetic analysis of spinodal decomposition process in Fe-Cr alloys by small angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ujihara, T.; Osamura, K.

    2000-04-19

    The rate of spinodal decomposition depends on the spatial composition distribution. In order to estimate the time dependence of its rate experimentally, the structure change was investigated in Fe-30 at.% Cr and Fe-50 at.% Cr alloys aged at 748, 773, 798, and 823 K via small angle neutron scattering and a kinetic analysis of experimental data was carried out by using the Langer-Bar-on-Miller (LBM) theory. Their theory contains a rate term of a physical meaning similar to the diffusion coefficient. As a result, it becomes clear that the rate term corresponding to the diffusion coefficient decreases as decomposition advances and this fact can be explained by the modified LBM theory considering the composition-dependent mobility.

  3. Numerical modeling of solidification and subsequent transformation of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Koseki, T.; Ogawa, T. . Steel Research Labs.); Matsumiya, T.; Yamada, W. . Advanced Materials and Technology Labs.)

    1994-06-01

    A computational method for the analysis of phase transformation involving solidification was developed with the assumption of thermodynamic equilibria at interfaces. The region of interest was divided into finite segments, and solute diffusion across the segments was computed by the use of the direct finite difference method (FDM). Simultaneously, thermodynamic equilibrium at each interface was updated at every step of the diffusion analysis to determine the location of the interfaces. The temperature decrease and the increment of fraction solid were calculated based on thermal balance, including a heat extraction condition. Solid state transformation from [delta] to [gamma] phase within each FDM segment was modeled by the use of a Clyne-Kurz (C-K) type analysis with assumptions of complete mixing of solutes in the [delta] phase and limited back diffusion in the [gamma] phase. The calculation results were compared with welding solidification experiments in the iron-chromium-nickel ternary system. Good agreement was obtained with respect to solute distribution and residual fraction of [delta] phase over different compositions and solidification modes of the alloys used.

  4. Vibrational Properties of {alpha}- and {sigma}-phase Fe-Cr alloy.

    SciTech Connect

    Dubiel, S. M.; Cieslak, J.; Sturhahn, W.; Sternik, M.; Piekarz, P.; Stankov, S.; Parlinski, K.; AGH Univ. of Science and Technology; Polish Academy of Sciences; Karlsruher Inst. of Tech.

    2010-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies, of the Fe-partial phonon density of states (PDOS) for Fe{sub 52.5}Cr{sub 47.5} alloy having {alpha} and {sigma} phases were carried out. The former using the nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering method, and the latter with the direct one. Characteristic features of PDOS, which distinguish one phase from the other, were revealed and successfully reproduced by the theory. Data pertinent to the dynamics such as the Lamb-Moessbauer factor, f, the kinetic energy per atom, E{sub k}, and the mean force constant, D, were directly derived, while vibrational specific heat at constant volume, C{sub V}, and vibrational entropy, S were calculated using the Fe partial PDOS. Based on the values of f and C{sub V}, we determined Debye temperatures, {Theta}{sub D}. An excellent agreement for some quantities derived from experiment and first-principles theory, like C{sub V} and quite good ones for others like D and S were obtained.

  5. Eutectic equilibria in the quaternary system Fe-Cr-Mn-C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowotny, H.; Wayne, S.; Schuster, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    The constitution of the quaternary system, Fe-Cr-Mn-C and to a lesser extent of the quinary system, Fe-Cr-Mn-Al-C were examined for in situ composite alloy candidates. Multivariant eutectic compositions were determined from phase equilibria studies wherein M7C3 carbides (approximately 30% by volume) formed from the melt within gamma iron. An extended field of the hexagonal carbide, (Cr, Fe, Mn)7 C3, was found without undergoing transformation to the orthorhombic structure. Increasing stability for this carbide was found for higher ratios of Cr/Fe(+) Cr + Mn. Aluminum additions promoted a ferritic matrix while manganese favored the desired gamma austenitic matrix. In coexistence with the matrix phase, chromium enters preferentially the carbide phase while manganese distributes equally between the gamma matrix and the M7C3 carbide. The composition and lattice parameters of the carbide and matrix phases were determined to establish their respective stabilities.

  6. Phase-field Model for Interstitial Loop Growth Kinetics and Thermodynamic and Kinetic Models of Irradiated Fe-Cr Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-06-15

    strength of interstitial loop for interstitials. In part II, we present a generic phase field model and discuss the thermodynamic and kinetic properties in phase-field models including the reaction kinetics of radiation defects and local free energy of irradiated materials. In particular, a two-sublattice thermodynamic model is suggested to describe the local free energy of alloys with irradiated defects. Fe-Cr alloy is taken as an example to explain the required thermodynamic and kinetic properties for quantitative phase-field modeling. Finally the great challenges in phase-field modeling will be discussed.

  7. Microstructure and wear resistance of the hypereutectic Fe-Cr-C alloy hardfacing metals with different La2O3 additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jian; Tian, Jianjun; Hao, Feifei; Dan, Ting; Ren, Xuejun; Yang, Yulin; Yang, Qingxiang

    2014-01-01

    Hardfacing (harden-surface-welding) metal of the hypereutectic Fe-Cr-C alloy with different La2O3 additives was developed. The microstructure of the hardfacing metal was observed by optical microscopy. The phase structure was determined by X-ray diffraction. The hardness and wear resistance of the hardfacing metal were measured by hardness tester and dry sand rubber wheel abrasive tester, respectively. The worn surface morphology was observed by field emission scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry. The solidification curve of the hardfacing metal and the relationship between the content of each phase and the temperature were calculated by thermodynamics software Thermo-Calc and Jmatpro, respectively. The results indicate that, with the increase of the La2O3 additives, the dimension of the primary M7C3 carbide in the hypereutectic Fe-Cr-C alloy hardfacing metal decreases gradually. When the La2O3 additive is 0.78 wt.%, it reaches minimum, which is 11.37 μm. The amount of M7C3 carbide (including the primary carbide and the eutectic carbide) decreases firstly then increases. The hardness of the hardfacing metal increases smally, while the wear resistance of it increases firstly then decreases and reaches the most excellent when the La2O3 additive is 0.78 wt.%. The formation temperature of M7C3 carbide is higher than that of austenite in the hypereutectic Fe-Cr-C alloy hardfacing metal. Austenite precipitated in the liquid phase can improve the precipitation rate of M7C3 carbide in a certain extent. As the temperature of the molten pool drops from 870 °C to 840 °C, γ-Fe transforms into α-Fe completely, so a large number of C atoms precipitate, which promotes the growth of the M7C3 carbide in short period.

  8. Effect of external stress on the Fe-Cr phase separation in 15-5 PH and Fe-15Cr-5Ni alloys.

    PubMed

    Danoix, F; Lacaze, J; Gibert, A; Mangelinck, D; Hoummada, K; Andrieu, E

    2013-09-01

    The effect on Fe-Cr phase separation of a uniaxial stress during thermal ageing at 425 °C is investigated on a Fe-15Cr-5Ni steel, a model alloy of commercial 15-5 PH steel. The applied stress is shown to accelerate the ageing kinetics, and influence the morphology of Cr rich domains. A dependence of the phase separation decomposition kinetics on the relative orientations of the load and the crystal local orientation has also been observed. PMID:23522972

  9. Investigation of the thermo-mechanical behavior of neutron-irradiated Fe-Cr alloys by self-consistent plasticity theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xiazi; Terentyev, Dmitry; Yu, Long; Bakaev, A.; Jin, Zhaohui; Duan, Huiling

    2016-08-01

    The thermo-mechanical behavior of non-irradiated (at 223 K, 302 K and 573 K) and neutron irradiated (at 573 K) Fe-2.5Cr, Fe-5Cr and Fe-9Cr alloys is studied by a self-consistent plasticity theory, which consists of constitutive equations describing the contribution of radiation defects at grain level, and the elastic-viscoplastic self-consistent method to obtain polycrystalline behaviors. Attention is paid to two types of radiation-induced defects: interstitial dislocation loops and solute rich clusters, which are believed to be the main sources of hardening in Fe-Cr alloys at medium irradiation doses. Both the hardening mechanism and microstructural evolution are investigated by using available experimental data on microstructures, and implementing hardening rules derived from atomistic data. Good agreement with experimental data is achieved for both the yield stress and strain hardening of non-irradiated and irradiated Fe-Cr alloys by treating dislocation loops as strong thermally activated obstacles and solute rich clusters as weak shearable ones.

  10. A Microstructural and Kinetic Investigation of the KCl-Induced Corrosion of an FeCrAl Alloy at 600 °C

    SciTech Connect

    Israelsson, Niklas; Unocic, Kinga A.; Hellström, K.; Jonsson, T.; Norell, M.; Svensson, J. -E.; Johansson, L. -G.

    2015-03-18

    In this paper, the corrosion behaviour of a FeCrAl alloy was investigated at 600 °C in O2 + H2O with solid KCl applied. A kinetics and microstructural investigation showed that KCl accelerates corrosion and that potassium chromate formation depletes the protective scale in Cr, thus triggering the formation of a fast-growing iron-rich scale. Iron oxide was found to grow both inward and outward, on either side of the initial oxide. A chromia layer is formed with time underneath the iron oxide. Finally, it was found that although the alloy does not form a continuous pure alumina scale at the investigated temperature, aluminium is, however, always enriched at the oxide/alloy interface.

  11. A Microstructural and Kinetic Investigation of the KCl-Induced Corrosion of an FeCrAl Alloy at 600 °C

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Israelsson, Niklas; Unocic, Kinga A.; Hellström, K.; Jonsson, T.; Norell, M.; Svensson, J. -E.; Johansson, L. -G.

    2015-03-18

    In this paper, the corrosion behaviour of a FeCrAl alloy was investigated at 600 °C in O2 + H2O with solid KCl applied. A kinetics and microstructural investigation showed that KCl accelerates corrosion and that potassium chromate formation depletes the protective scale in Cr, thus triggering the formation of a fast-growing iron-rich scale. Iron oxide was found to grow both inward and outward, on either side of the initial oxide. A chromia layer is formed with time underneath the iron oxide. Finally, it was found that although the alloy does not form a continuous pure alumina scale at the investigatedmore » temperature, aluminium is, however, always enriched at the oxide/alloy interface.« less

  12. Thermodynamic Modeling and Experimental Study of the Fe-Cr-Zr System

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ying; Tan, Lizhen; Bei, Hongbin; Busby, Jeremy T

    2013-01-01

    Wide applications of zircaloys, stainless steels and their interactions in nuclear reactors require the knowledge on phase stability and thermodynamic property of the Fe-Cr-Zr system. This knowledge is also important to develop new Zr-contained Fe-Cr ferritic steels. This work aims at developing thermodynamic models for describing phase stability and thermodynamic property of the Fe-Cr-Zr system using the Calphad approach coupled with experimental study. Thermodynamic descriptions of the Fe-Cr and Cr-Zr systems were either directly adopted or slightly modified from literature. The Fe-Zr system has been remodeled to accommodate recent ab-initio calculation of formation enthalpies of various Fe-Zr compounds. Reliable ternary experimental data and thermodynamic models were mainly available in the Zr-rich region. Therefore, selected ternary alloys located in the vicinity of the eutectic valley of (Fe,Cr,Zr) and (Fe,Cr)2Zr laves phase in the Fe-rich region have been experimentally investigated in this study. Microstructure has been examined by using scanning electron microscope, energy-dispersive Xray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. These experimental results, along with the literature data were then used to develop thermodynamic models for phases in the Fe-Cr-Zr system. Calculated phase equilibria and thermodynamic properties of the ternary system yield satisfactory agreements with available experimental data, which gives the confidence to use these models as building blocks for developing a Zr, Fe and Cr contained multicomponent thermodynamic database for broader applications in nuclear reactors.

  13. Roles of vacancy/interstitial diffusion and segregation in the microchemistry at grain boundaries of irradiated Fe-Cr-Ni alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ying; Field, Kevin G.; Allen, Todd R.; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2016-05-01

    This work presents a detailed analysis of the diffusion fluxes near and at grain boundaries of irradiated Fe-Cr-Ni alloys, induced by preferential atom-vacancy and atom-interstitial coupling. The diffusion flux equations were based on the Perks model formulated through the linear theory of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. The preferential atom-vacancy coupling was described by the mobility model, whereas the preferential atom-interstitial coupling was described by the interstitial binding model. The composition dependence of the thermodynamic factor was modeled using the CALPHAD approach. The calculated fluxes up to 10 dpa suggested the dominant diffusion mechanism for chromium and iron is via vacancy, while that for nickel can swing from the vacancy to the interstitial dominant mechanism. The diffusion flux in the vicinity of a grain boundary was found to be greatly modified by the segregation induced by irradiation, leading to the oscillatory behavior of alloy compositions in this region.

  14. A novel low Cr-containing Fe-Cr-Co alloy for metallic interconnects in planar intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenying; Yan, Dong; Yang, Jie; Chen, Jing; Chi, Bo; Pu, Jian; Li, Jian

    2014-12-01

    A newly developed low-Cr containing Fe-Cr-Co alloy, named as FeCro, is evaluated as a candidate material of metallic interconnects for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs). This alloy possesses excellent oxidation resistance and adequate electrical conductivity at 750 °C in air, and shows slight Cr deposition in/around La0.72Sr0.18MnO3(LSM) electrode under a harsh accelerating condition of 400 mA cm-2 and 850 °C. The thickness of the oxide scale thermally grown at 750 °C in air for 1000 his less than 1 μm, presenting a double-layered structure with dense (Mn, Cr)3O4 on the top of Cr2O3. The oxidation kinetics at 750 °C obeys the parabolic law with a low rate constant of1.42 × 10-15 g2 cm-4 s-1. The Cr deposition in/around the LSM electrode in the presence of the FeCro alloy is remarkably reduced, compared to the commercial Crofer 22H alloy. The measured area specific resistance (ASR) at 750 °C in air after 1000 h isothermal oxidation is 14 mΩ cm2. It is the unique microstructure of the formed oxide scale that significantly enhances the resistances of the FeCro alloy to oxidation and Cr volatilization.

  15. Effect of mechanical alloying atmosphere on the microstructure and Charpy impact properties of an ODS ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksiuta, Z.; Baluc, N.

    2009-04-01

    Two types of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels, with the composition of Fe-14Cr-2W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3 (in weight percent), have been produced by mechanically alloying elemental powders of Fe, Cr, W, and Ti with Y 2O 3 particles either in argon atmosphere or in hydrogen atmosphere, degassing at various temperatures, and compacting the mechanically alloyed powders by hot isostatic pressing. It was found in particular that mechanical alloying in hydrogen yields a significant reduction in oxygen content in the materials, a lower dislocation density, and a strong improvement in the fast fracture properties of the ODS ferritic steels, as measured by Charpy impact tests.

  16. NEAMS-ATF M3 Milestone Report: Literature Review of Modeling of Radiation-Induced Swelling in Fe-Cr-Al Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Xianming; Biner, Suleyman Bulent; Jiang, Chao

    2015-12-01

    Fe-Cr-Al steels are proposed as accident-tolerant-fuel (ATF) cladding materials in light water reactors due to their excellent oxidation resistance at high temperatures. Currently, the understanding of their performance in reactor environment is still limited. In this review, firstly we reviewed the experimental studies of Fe-Cr-Al based alloys with particular focus on the radiation effects in these alloys. Although limited data are available in literature, several previous and recent experimental studies have shown that Fe-Cr-Al based alloys have very good void swelling resistance at low and moderate irradiation doses but the growth of dislocation loops is very active. Overall, the behavior of radiation damage evolution is similar to that in Fe-Cr ferritic/martensitic alloys. Secondly, we reviewed the rate theory-based modeling methods for modeling the coevolution of voids and dislocation loops in materials under irradiation such as Frenkel pair three-dimensional diffusion model (FP3DM) and cluster dynamics. Finally, we summarized and discussed our review and proposed our future plans for modeling radiation damage in Fe-Cr-Al based alloys.

  17. Cold worked ferritic alloys and components

    DOEpatents

    Korenko, Michael K.

    1984-01-01

    This invention relates to liquid metal fast breeder reactor and steam generator precipitation hardening fully ferritic alloy components which have a microstructure substantially free of the primary precipitation hardening phase while having cells or arrays of dislocations of varying population densities. It also relates to the process by which these components are produced, which entails solution treating the alloy followed by a final cold working step. In this condition, the first significant precipitation hardening of the component occurs during high temperature use.

  18. Ferritic Alloys as Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding Material for Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, Raul B.

    2014-12-30

    The objective of the GE project is to demonstrate that advanced steels such as iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys could be used as accident tolerant fuel cladding material in commercial light water reactors. The GE project does not include fuel development. Current findings support the concept that a FeCrAl alloy could be used for the cladding of commercial nuclear fuel. The use of this alloy will benefit the public since it is going to make the power generating light water reactors safer. In the Phase 1A of this cost shared project, GE (GRC + GNF) teamed with the University of Michigan, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study the environmental and mechanical behavior of more than eight candidate cladding materials both under normal operation conditions of commercial nuclear reactors and under accident conditions in superheated steam (loss of coolant condition). The main findings are as follows: (1) Under normal operation conditions the candidate alloys (e.g. APMT, Alloy 33) showed excellent resistance to general corrosion, shadow corrosion and to environmentally assisted cracking. APMT also showed resistance to proton irradiation up to 5 dpa. (2) Under accident conditions the selected candidate materials showed several orders of magnitude improvement in the reaction with superheated steam as compared with the current zirconium based alloys. (3) Tube fabrication feasibility studies of FeCrAl alloys are underway. The aim is to obtain a wall thickness that is below 400 µm. (4) A strategy is outlined for the regulatory path approval and for the insertion of a lead fuel assembly in a commercial reactor by 2022. (5) The GE team worked closely with INL to have four rodlets tested in the ATR. GE provided the raw stock for the alloys, the fuel for the rodlets and the cost for fabrication/welding of the rodlets. INL fabricated the rodlets and the caps and welded them to

  19. Development and property evaluation of nuclear grade wrought FeCrAl fuel cladding for light water reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Pint, B. A.; Terrani, K. A.; Field, K. G.; Yang, Y.; Snead, L. L.

    2015-12-01

    Development of nuclear grade, iron-based wrought FeCrAl alloys has been initiated for light water reactor (LWR) fuel cladding to serve as a substitute for zirconium-based alloys with enhanced accident tolerance. Ferritic alloys with sufficient chromium and aluminum additions can exhibit significantly improved oxidation kinetics in high-temperature steam environments when compared to zirconium-based alloys. In the first phase, a set of model FeCrAl alloys containing 10-20Cr, 3-5Al, and 0-0.12Y in weight percent, were prepared by conventional arc-melting and hot-working processes to explore the effect of composition on the properties of FeCrAlY alloys. It was found that the tensile properties were insensitive to the alloy compositions studied; however, the steam oxidation resistance strongly depended on both the chromium and the aluminum contents. The second phase development focused on strengthening Fe-13Cr-5Al with minor alloying additions of molybdenum, niobium, and silicon. Combined with an optimized thermo-mechanical treatment, a thermally stable microstructure was produced with improved tensile properties at temperatures up to 741 °C.

  20. Development and property evaluation of nuclear grade wrought FeCrAl fuel cladding for light water reactors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yamamoto, Yukinori; Pint, Bruce A.; Terrani, Kurt A.; Field, Kevin G.; Yang, Ying; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2015-10-19

    Development of nuclear grade, iron-based wrought FeCrAl alloys has been initiated for light water reactor (LWR) fuel cladding to serve as a substitute for zirconium-based alloys with enhanced accident tolerance. Ferritic alloys with sufficient chromium and aluminum additions can exhibit significantly improved oxidation kinetics in high-temperature steam environments when compared to zirconium-based alloys. In the first phase, a set of model FeCrAl alloys containing 10–20Cr, 3–5Al, and 0–0.12Y in weight percent, were prepared by conventional arc-melting and hot-working processes to explore the effect of composition on the properties of FeCrAlY alloys. It was found that the tensile properties were insensitivemore » to the alloy compositions studied; however, the steam oxidation resistance strongly depended on both the chromium and the aluminum contents. The second phase development focused on strengthening Fe-13Cr-5Al with minor alloying additions of molybdenum, niobium, and silicon. Combined with an optimized thermo-mechanical treatment, a thermally stable microstructure was produced with improved tensile properties at temperatures up to 741°C.« less

  1. Development and property evaluation of nuclear grade wrought FeCrAl fuel cladding for light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Yukinori; Pint, Bruce A.; Terrani, Kurt A.; Field, Kevin G.; Yang, Ying; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2015-10-19

    Development of nuclear grade, iron-based wrought FeCrAl alloys has been initiated for light water reactor (LWR) fuel cladding to serve as a substitute for zirconium-based alloys with enhanced accident tolerance. Ferritic alloys with sufficient chromium and aluminum additions can exhibit significantly improved oxidation kinetics in high-temperature steam environments when compared to zirconium-based alloys. In the first phase, a set of model FeCrAl alloys containing 10–20Cr, 3–5Al, and 0–0.12Y in weight percent, were prepared by conventional arc-melting and hot-working processes to explore the effect of composition on the properties of FeCrAlY alloys. It was found that the tensile properties were insensitive to the alloy compositions studied; however, the steam oxidation resistance strongly depended on both the chromium and the aluminum contents. The second phase development focused on strengthening Fe-13Cr-5Al with minor alloying additions of molybdenum, niobium, and silicon. Combined with an optimized thermo-mechanical treatment, a thermally stable microstructure was produced with improved tensile properties at temperatures up to 741°C.

  2. Kinetics of oxidation of Fe-Cr-Al alloy Characterization by electrochemical spectroscopy of impedance in a 3% medium NaCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadli, H.; Retima, M.; Khenioui, Y.

    2009-11-01

    The film growths kinetic study developed on the Fe-Cr-Al alloy oxidation under ambient air has been studied due to its tremendous uses in the automobile industry, specifically in catalytic exhaust. In this work, we report on its behavior as a function of various parameters such as the temperature, the oxidation duration, elaboration mode or the substrate nature and geometry. It has been shown that the growth, the morphology or the adherence of the formed layers are strongly affected by these parameters. At high temperature (900-1100 ∘C), the formed protective film for the materials studied in this work is primarily consisted of alumina. Below these temperatures, several phases may coexist, namely, the γ phase and the θ phase. The extension of this alloy application has led us to perform spectroscopic measurements of electrochemical impedance (SEI) in an aqueous environment 3% (NaCl). These measurements have shown that sane coatings preserve excellent insulating properties and the corrosion risks are related to defects in the layers while are formed.

  3. Electronic structure, magnetism, and antisite disorder in CoFeCrGe and CoMnCrAl quaternary Heusler alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Enamullah, .; Venkateswara, Y.; Gupta, Sachin; Varma, Manoj Raama; Singh, Prashant; Suresh, K. G.; Alam, Aftab

    2015-12-10

    In this study, we present a combined theoretical and experimental study of two quaternary Heusler alloys CoFeCrGe (CFCG) and CoMnCrAl (CMCA), promising candidates for spintronics applications. Magnetization measurement shows the saturation magnetization and transition temperature to be 3 μB, 866 K and 0.9 μB, 358 K for CFCG and CMCA respectively. The magnetization values agree fairly well with our theoretical results and also obey the Slater-Pauling rule, a prerequisite for half metallicity. A striking difference between the two systems is their structure; CFCG crystallizes in fully ordered Y-type structure while CMCA has L21 disordered structure. The antisite disorder adds a somewhat unique property to the second compound, which arises due to the probabilistic mutual exchange of Al positions with Cr/Mn and such an effect is possibly expected due to comparable electronegativities of Al and Cr/Mn. Ab initio simulation predicted a unique transition from half metallic ferromagnet to metallic antiferromagnet beyond a critical excess concentration of Al in the alloy.

  4. Electronic structure, magnetism, and antisite disorder in CoFeCrGe and CoMnCrAl quaternary Heusler alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Enamullah, .; Venkateswara, Y.; Gupta, Sachin; Varma, Manoj Raama; Singh, Prashant; Suresh, K. G.; Alam, Aftab

    2015-12-10

    In this study, we present a combined theoretical and experimental study of two quaternary Heusler alloys CoFeCrGe (CFCG) and CoMnCrAl (CMCA), promising candidates for spintronics applications. Magnetization measurement shows the saturation magnetization and transition temperature to be 3 μB, 866 K and 0.9 μB, 358 K for CFCG and CMCA respectively. The magnetization values agree fairly well with our theoretical results and also obey the Slater-Pauling rule, a prerequisite for half metallicity. A striking difference between the two systems is their structure; CFCG crystallizes in fully ordered Y-type structure while CMCA has L21 disordered structure. The antisite disorder adds amore » somewhat unique property to the second compound, which arises due to the probabilistic mutual exchange of Al positions with Cr/Mn and such an effect is possibly expected due to comparable electronegativities of Al and Cr/Mn. Ab initio simulation predicted a unique transition from half metallic ferromagnet to metallic antiferromagnet beyond a critical excess concentration of Al in the alloy.« less

  5. Effects of irradiation temperature and dose rate on the mechanical properties of self-ion implanted Fe and Fe-Cr alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardie, Christopher D.; Williams, Ceri A.; Xu, Shuo; Roberts, Steve G.

    2013-08-01

    Pure Fe and model Fe-Cr alloys containing 5, 10 and 14%Cr were irradiated with Fe+ ions at a maximum energy of 2 MeV to the same dose of 0.6 dpa at temperatures of 300 °C, 400 °C and 500 °C, and at dose rates corresponding to 6 × 10-4 dpa/s and 3 × 10-5 dpa/s. All materials exhibited an increase in hardness after irradiation at 300 °C. After irradiation at 400 °C, hardening was observed only in Fe-Cr alloys, and not in the pure Fe. After irradiation at 500 °C, no hardening was observed in any of the materials tested. For irradiations at both 300 °C and 400 °C, greater hardening was found in the Fe-Cr alloys irradiated at the lower dose rate. Transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography of Fe 5%Cr identified larger dislocation loop densities and sizes in the alloy irradiated with the high dose rate and Cr precipitation in the alloy irradiated with the low dose rate. Loss of defects at extended sinks such as dislocations and grain boundaries. Growth or shrinkage of defect clusters by the capture of point defects. Mutual annihilation by the recombination of a vacancy and interstitial. At low dose rates and/or high irradiation temperatures, reaction path (i) (sinks) dominates and at a high dose rates and/or low irradiation temperature reaction path (iii) (recombination) dominates [2]. The evolution of radiation damage such as dislocation loops and voids and phenomena such as radiation induced segregation, swelling and creep, depend on the fraction of point defects which migrate to sinks, recombine or cluster within the lattice and will be influenced by the reaction path that dominates the microstructural evolution of the material under irradiation.The relative proportions of these reaction types are directly dependent on the density and mobility of the defects, and hence dependent on dose rate and temperature. In iron, vacancy type defects are generally found to have significantly higher activation energy for migration compared to interstitial

  6. Effects of irradiation temperature and dose rate on the mechanical properties of self-ion implanted Fe and Fe-Cr alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardie, Christopher D.; Williams, Ceri A.; Xu, Shuo; Roberts, Steve G.

    2013-08-01

    Pure Fe and model Fe-Cr alloys containing 5, 10 and 14%Cr were irradiated with Fe+ ions at a maximum energy of 2 MeV to the same dose of 0.6 dpa at temperatures of 300 °C, 400 °C and 500 °C, and at dose rates corresponding to 6 × 10-4 dpa/s and 3 × 10-5 dpa/s. All materials exhibited an increase in hardness after irradiation at 300 °C. After irradiation at 400 °C, hardening was observed only in Fe-Cr alloys, and not in the pure Fe. After irradiation at 500 °C, no hardening was observed in any of the materials tested. For irradiations at both 300 °C and 400 °C, greater hardening was found in the Fe-Cr alloys irradiated at the lower dose rate. Transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography of Fe 5%Cr identified larger dislocation loop densities and sizes in the alloy irradiated with the high dose rate and Cr precipitation in the alloy irradiated with the low dose rate. Loss of defects at extended sinks such as dislocations and grain boundaries. Growth or shrinkage of defect clusters by the capture of point defects. Mutual annihilation by the recombination of a vacancy and interstitial. At low dose rates and/or high irradiation temperatures, reaction path (i) (sinks) dominates and at a high dose rates and/or low irradiation temperature reaction path (iii) (recombination) dominates [2]. The evolution of radiation damage such as dislocation loops and voids and phenomena such as radiation induced segregation, swelling and creep, depend on the fraction of point defects which migrate to sinks, recombine or cluster within the lattice and will be influenced by the reaction path that dominates the microstructural evolution of the material under irradiation.The relative proportions of these reaction types are directly dependent on the density and mobility of the defects, and hence dependent on dose rate and temperature. In iron, vacancy type defects are generally found to have significantly higher activation energy for migration compared to interstitial

  7. Structure, Mechanical Properties, and Fracture Behavior of a Fe-Cr-V Alloy Doped with Nitrogen by High-Temperature Gas-Phase Nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikulin, Sergey A.; Khatkevich, Vladimir M.; Rogachev, Stanislav O.; Denisenko, Kristina S.

    2015-12-01

    The microstructure, phase composition, and room-temperature mechanical properties of the corrosion-resistant Fe-20pctCr-5pctV alloy doped with nitrogen by high-temperature gas-phase nitriding under different conditions have been investigated. The nitriding of the Fe-20pctCr-5pctV alloy at T = 1223 K to 1373 K (950 °C to 1100 °C) and subsequent annealing at T = 973 K (700 °C) lead to the precipitation of large vanadium nitride and disperse chromium nitride particles in the ferrite matrix. Such a treatment increases the strength of the Fe-20pctCr-5pctV alloy at room temperature by 1.6 times, while maintaining the adequate relative elongation. The alloy in the initial state and after nitriding is highly resistant to corrosion.

  8. Transmission electron microscopy investigation of the microstructure of Fe-Cr alloys induced by neutron and ion irradiation at 300 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Mayoral, M.; Heintze, C.; Oñorbe, E.

    2016-06-01

    Four Fe-Cr binary alloys, with Cr content from 2.5 up to 12wt%, were neutron or ion irradiated up to a dose of 0.6 dpa at 300 °C. The microstructural response to irradiation has been characterised using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Both, neutrons and ions, gave rise to the formation of dislocation loops. The most striking difference between ion and neutron irradiation is the distribution of these loops in the sample. Except for the lowest Cr content, loops are distributed mainly along grain boundaries and dislocations in the neutron irradiated samples. The inhomogeneous distribution of dislocation loops could be related to the presence of α‧ precipitates in the matrix. In contrast, a homogeneous distribution is observed in all ion irradiated samples. This important difference is attributed to the orders of magnitude difference in dose rate between these two irradiation conditions. Moreover, the density of loops depends non-monotonically on Cr content in case of neutron irradiation, while it seems to increase with Cr content for ion implantation. Differences are also observed in terms of cluster size, with larger sizes for neutron irradiation than for ion implantation, again pointing towards an effect of the dose rate.

  9. Recrystallization Process in Fe-Cr-Al Oxide Dispersion-Strengthened Alloy: Microstructural Evolution and Recrystallization Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimentel, G.; Chao, J.; Capdevila, C.

    2014-05-01

    Mechanically alloyed iron-base oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys are the class of advanced materials for application in heat exchangers tubing in which creep and oxidation resistance are paramount. The yttria dispersion in such alloys improves the high-temperature creep and stress rupture life. The strength is further enhanced by the development of a coarse-grained microstructure during recrystallization. Factors controlling the evolution of this desirable microstructure are explored in this work, focusing specifically on PM 2000. The results presented in terms of orientation imaging, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy indicate that the recrystallization process consists of two different stages. Before the coarse grain takes place, the alloy undergoes an extended recovery process followed by abnormal grain growth. The initial microstructure consisted of subgrains (submicrometer sizes) with a strong <110>∥RD fiber texture ( α fiber), which are transformed into coarse grains (mm sizes) with orientations <112>∥RD. The aim of this study is to describe the mechanisms involved in the intermediate stages of recrystallization process from the submicrometer grain size to the abnormal grain size.

  10. Water Vapor Effects on the Oxidation Behavior of Fe-Cr and Ni-Cr Alloys in Atmospheres Relevant to Oxy-fuel Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, N.; Jung, K. Y.; Yanar, N. M.; Meier, G. H.; Pettit, F. S.; Holcomb, G. R.

    2011-10-01

    The oxidation behavior of a number of Fe–Cr- and Ni–Cr-based alloys was studied in atmospheres relevant to oxyfuel combustion at 650 °C. Oxidation was greatly enhanced in ferritic model alloys exposed in low p(O{sub 2}) CO{sub 2} + 30%H{sub 2}O and Ar + 30%H{sub 2}O gases. Rapidly growing iron oxides appear to be porous and gas permeable. Transition from non-protective to protective oxidation occurs on alloys with higher Cr contents between 13.5 and 22 wt% in H{sub 2}O. Excess oxygen, usually found in the actual oxyfuel combustion environments, disrupts the selective oxidation of Fe–Cr alloys by accelerating vaporization of early-formed Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} in combination with accelerated chromia growth induced by the H{sub 2}O. Rapid Cr consumption leads to the nucleation and rapid growth of iron oxides. On the contrary, Ni–Cr alloys are less affected by the presence of H{sub 2}O and excess O{sub 2}. The difference between Fe–Cr and Ni–Cr alloys is not clear but is postulated to involve less acceleration of chromia growth by water vapor for the latter group of alloys.

  11. Microstructure evolution in austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys irradiated with rotons: comparison with neutron-irradiated microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, J.; Was, G. S.

    2001-08-01

    Irradiation-induced microstructures of high purity and commercial purity austenitic stainless steels were investigated using proton-irradiation. For high purity alloys, Fe-20Cr-9Ni (HP 304 SS), Fe-20Cr-24Ni and Ni-18Cr-9Fe were irradiated using 3.2 MeV protons between 300°C and 600°C at a dose rate of 7×10 -6 dpa/ s to doses up to 3.0 dpa. The commercial purity alloys, CP 304 SS and CP 316 SS were irradiated at 360°C to doses between 0.3 and 5.0 dpa. The dose, temperature and composition dependence of the number density and size of dislocation loops and voids were characterized. The changes in yield strength due to irradiation were estimated from Vickers hardness measurements and compared to calculations using a dispersed-barrier-hardening (DBH) model. The dose and temperature dependence of proton-irradiated microstructure (loops, voids) and the irradiation hardening are consistent with the neutron-data trend. Results indicate that proton-irradiation can accurately reproduce the microstructure of austenitic alloys irradiated in LWR cores.

  12. Influence of the chemical composition of rapidly quenched amorphous alloys (Ni, Fe, Cr)-B-Si on its crystallization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmanov, G.; Dzhumaev, P.; Ivanitskaya, E.; Skrytnyi, V.; Ruslanov, A.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents results of research of the structure and phase transformations during the multistage crystallization of the metallic glasses with the compositions Ni71,5Cr6,8Fe2,7B11,9Si7,1 and Ni63,4Cr7,4Fe4,3Mn0,8B15,6Si8,5 labeled as AWS BNi-2 according to American Welding Society. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX) were used as experimental research methods. The influence of the alloys chemical composition (boron, manganese and iron) on the temperatures and the exothermic heat effects of phase transformations, as well as on the phase composition of alloys at three stages of crystallization was analyzed. We present a thermodynamic explanation of the observed heat effects. It has been shown that manganese has the main influence on the phase transformations temperatures and heat effects in these two alloys. It is also assumed that at the final crystallization stage simultaneously with the formation of phases Ni3B and β1-Ni3Si should occur the nucleation of borides of CrB type with high Cr and low Si content.

  13. Silicon`s role in determining swelling in neutron-irradiated Fe-Cr-Ni-Si alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sekimura, N.; Garner, F. A.; Newkirk, J.W.

    1991-11-01

    Two silicon-modified alloy series, one based on Fe-15Cr-20Ni and another based on Fe-15Cr-25Ni were irradiated at target temperatures between 399 and 649{degree}C in EBR-II. The influence of silicon on swelling is more complex than previously envisioned and indicates that silicon plays two or more competing roles while in solution. Radiation-induced formation of {gamma}{prime} (Ni{sub 3}Si) precipitates is dependent on silicon and nickel content, as well as temperature. Precipitation of {gamma}{prime} appears to play only a minor role in void formation.

  14. Joining Techniques for Ferritic ODS Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    V.G. Krishnardula; V.G. Krishnardula; D.E. Clark; T.C. Totemeier

    2005-06-01

    This report presents results of research on advanced joining techniques for ferritic oxide-dispersion strengthened alloys MA956 and PM2000. The joining techniques studied were resistance pressure welding (also known as pressure forge welding), transient liquid phase bonding, and diffusion bonding. All techniques were shown to produce sound joints in fine-grained, unrecrystallized alloys. Post-bond heat treatment to produce a coarse-grained, recrystallized microstructure resulted in grain growth across the bondline for transient liquid phase and diffusion bonds, giving microstructures essentially identical to that of the parent alloy in the recrystallized condition. The effects of bond orientation, boron interlayer thickness, and bonding parameters are discussed for transient liquid phase and diffusion bonding. The report concludes with a brief discussion of ODS joining techniques and their applicability to GEN IV reactor systems.

  15. Helium entrapment in a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Edmondson, Philip D; Parish, Chad M; Zhang, Yanwen; Hallen, Dr Anders; Miller, Michael K

    2011-01-01

    The nanostructured ferritic alloy 14YWT has been irradiated with He ions to simulate accumulation of He during the service life of a nuclear reactor to test the hypothesis that the large surface area for nanoclusters is a preferential nucleation site for bubbles. Transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography showed that high number densities of He bubbles were formed on the surface of nanoclusters and Ti(C,N) precipitates, and along grain boundaries and dislocations. At higher fluences, facetted bubbles are formed and it is postulated that the lowest energy state configuration is the truncated rhombic dodecahedron.

  16. Effect of Cr content on the nanostructural evolution of irradiated ferritic/martensitic alloys: An object kinetic Monte Carlo model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiapetto, M.; Malerba, L.; Becquart, C. S.

    2015-10-01

    Self-interstitial cluster diffusivity in Fe-Cr alloys, model materials for high-Cr ferritic/martensitic steels, is known to be reduced in a non-monotonic way as a function of Cr concentration: it first decreases, then increases. This non-monotonic behaviour is caused by a relatively long-ranged attractive interaction between Cr atoms and crowdions and correlates well with the experimentally observed swelling in these alloys under neutron irradiation, also seen to first decrease and then increase with increasing Cr content, under comparable irradiation conditions. Moreover, recent studies reveal that C atoms dispersed in the Fe matrix form under irradiation complexes with vacancies which, in turn, act as trap for one-dimensionally migrating self-interstitial clusters. The mobility of one-dimensional migrating clusters is considered key to determine swelling susceptibility. However, no model has ever been built that quantitatively describes the dependence of swelling on Cr content, allowing for the presence of C in the matrix. In this work we developed physically-based sets of parameters for object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) simulations intended to study the nanostructure evolution under irradiation in Fe-Cr-C alloys. The nanostructural evolution in Fe-C and in four Fe-Cr-C alloys (containing 2.5, 5, 9 and 12 wt.% Cr) neutron irradiated up to ∼0.6 dpa at 563 K was simulated according to the model and reference experiments were reproduced. Our model shows that the SIA cluster reduced mobility has a major influence on the nanostructural evolution: it increases the number of vacancy-SIA recombinations and thus leads to the suppression of voids formation. This provides a clear framework to interpret the non-monotonic dependence of swelling in Fe-Cr alloys versus Cr content. Our model also suggests that the amount of C in the matrix has an equally important role: high amounts of it may counteract the beneficial effect that Cr has in reducing swelling.

  17. Simultaneous aluminizing and chromizing of steels to form (Fe,Cr){sub 3}Al coatings and Ge-doped silicide coatings of Cr-Zr base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, M.; He, Y.R.; Rapp, R.A.

    1997-12-01

    A halide-activated cementation pack involving elemental Al and Cr powders has been used to achieve surface compositions of approximately Fe{sub 3}Al plus several percent Cr for low alloy steels (T11, T2 and T22) and medium carbon steel (1045 steel). A two-step treatment at 925 C and 1150 C yields the codeposition and diffusion of aluminum and chromium to form dense and uniform ferrite coatings of about 400 {micro}m thickness, while preventing the formation of a blocking chromium carbide at the substrate surfaces. Upon cyclic oxidation in air at 700 C, the coated steel exhibits a negligible 0.085 mg/cm{sup 2} weight gain for 1900 one-hour cycles. Virtually no attack was observed on coated steels tested at ABB in simulated boiler atmospheres at 500 C for 500 hours. But coatings with a surface composition of only 8 wt% Al and 6 wt% Cr suffered some sulfidation attack in simulated boiler atmospheres at temperatures higher than 500 C for 1000 hours. Two developmental Cr-Zr based Laves phase alloys (CN129-2 and CN117(Z)) were silicide/germanide coated. The cross-sections of the Ge-doped silicide coatings closely mimicked the microstructure of the substrate alloys. Cyclic oxidation in air at 1100 C showed that the Ge-doped silicide coating greatly improved the oxidation resistance of the Cr-Zr based alloys.

  18. High strength ferritic alloy-D53

    DOEpatents

    Hagel, William C.; Smidt, Frederick A.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1977-01-01

    A high strength ferritic alloy is described having from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight nickel, from about 2.5% to about 3.6% by weight chromium, from about 2.5% to about 3.5% by weight molybdenum, from about 0.1% to about 0.5% by weight vanadium, from about 0.1% to about 0.5% by weight silicon, from about 0.1% to about 0.6% by weight manganese, from about 0.12% to about 0.20% by weight carbon, from about 0.02% to about 0.1% by weight boron, a maximum of about 0.05% by weight nitrogen, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight phosphorous, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight sulfur, and the balance iron.

  19. Charpy impact test results for low-activation ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, N.S.; Hu, W.L.; Gelles, D.S.

    1987-05-01

    The objective of this work is to evaluate the shift of the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and the reduction of the upper shelf energy (USE) due to neutron irradiation of low activation ferritic alloys. Six low activation ferritic alloys have been tested following irradiation at 365/sup 0/C to 10 dpa and compared with control specimens in order to assess the effect of irradiation on Charpy impact properties.

  20. Towards Radiation Tolerant Nanostructured Ferritic Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Michael K; Hoelzer, David T; Russell, Kaye F

    2010-01-01

    The high temperature and irradiation response of a new class of nanostructured ferritic alloys have been investigated by atom probe tomography. These materials are candidate materials for use in the extreme environments that will be present in the next generation of power generating systems. Atom probe tomography has revealed that the yttria powder is forced into solid solution during the mechanical alloying process andsubsequently 2-nm-diameter Ti-, Y- and O-enriched nanoclusters are formedduring the extrusion process. These nanoclusters have been shown to be remarkably stable during isothermal annealing treatments up to 0.92 of the melting temperature and during proton irradiation up to 3 displacements per atom. No significant difference in sizes, compositions and number densities of the nanoclusters was also observed between the unirradiated and proton irradiated conditions. The grain boundaries were found to have high number densities of nanoclusters as well as chromium and tungsten segregation which pin the grain boundary to minimize creep and grain growth.

  1. The electrodeposition of FeCrNi stainless steel: microstructural changes induced by anode reactions.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Madoka; Yoon, Songhak; Guillonneau, Gaylord; Zhang, Yucheng; Frantz, Cédric; Niederberger, Christoph; Weidenkaff, Anke; Michler, Johann; Philippe, Laetitia

    2014-12-21

    The FeCrNi alloy, whose composition is close to that of stainless steel 304, was prepared by electrodeposition and characterized. Nanocrystalline FeCrNi (nc-FeCrNi) was obtained by employing a double-compartment cell where the anode is separated from the cathode compartment, while amorphous FeCrNi (a-FeCrNi) was deposited in a conventional single electrochemical cell. The carbon content of nc-FeCrNi was found to be significantly lower than that of a-FeCrNi, suggesting that carbon inclusion is responsible for the change in the microstructure. The major source of carbon is associated with the reaction compounds at the anode electrode, presumably decomposed glycine. Crystal structure analysis by XRD and TEM revealed that the as-deposited nc-FeCrNi deposits consist of α-Fe which transforms to γ-Fe upon thermal annealing. Nanoindentation tests showed that nc-FeCrNi exhibits higher hardness than a-FeCrNi, which is consistent with the inverse Hall-Petch behavior. PMID:25367332

  2. Microstructural examination of commercial ferritic alloys at 200 dpa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelles, D. S.

    1996-10-01

    Microstructures and density change measurements are reported for martensitic commercial steels HT-9 and modified 9Cr1Mo (T91) and oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloys MA956 and MA957 following irradiation in the FFTF/MOTA at 420°C to 200 dpa. Swelling as determined by density change remains below 2% for all conditions. Microstructures are found to be stable except in recrystallized grains of MA957, which are fabrication artifacts, with only minor swelling in the martensitic steels and α' precipitation in alloys with 12% or more chromium. These results further demonstrate the high swelling resistance and microstructural stability of the ferritic alloy class.

  3. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H.; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Huang, Shenyan; Teng, Zhenke; Liu, Chain T.; Asta, Mark D.; Gao, Yanfei; Dunand, David C.; Ghosh, Gautam; Chen, Mingwei; Fine, Morris E.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-11-01

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones. These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. The present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures.

  4. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H.; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Huang, Shenyan; Teng, Zhenke; Liu, Chain T.; Asta, Mark D.; Gao, Yanfei; Dunand, David C.; Ghosh, Gautam; Chen, Mingwei; Fine, Morris E.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones. These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. The present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures. PMID:26548303

  5. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H.; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Huang, Shenyan; et al

    2015-11-09

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones.more » These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. Finally, the present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures.« less

  6. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H.; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Huang, Shenyan; Teng, Zhenke; Liu, Chain T.; Asta, Mark D.; Gao, Yanfei; Dunand, David C.; Ghosh, Gautam; Chen, Mingwei; Fine, Morris E.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-11-09

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones. These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. Finally, the present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures.

  7. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates.

    PubMed

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N; Huang, Shenyan; Teng, Zhenke; Liu, Chain T; Asta, Mark D; Gao, Yanfei; Dunand, David C; Ghosh, Gautam; Chen, Mingwei; Fine, Morris E; Liaw, Peter K

    2015-01-01

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones. These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. The present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures. PMID:26548303

  8. Unusual Thermal Stability of Nano-structured Ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xun-Li; Liu, Chain T; Stoica, A. D.; Keiderling, Dr. Uwe; Yang, Ling; Miller, Michael K; Fu, Chong Long; Ma, Dong; An, Ke

    2012-01-01

    A scientific question vitally important to the materials community is whether there exist self-assembled nanoclusters that are thermodynamically stable at elevated temperatures. Using in-situ neutron scattering, we characterized the structure and thermal stability of a nano-structured ferritic (NSF) alloy. Nanometer sized clusters were found to persist up to ~1400 C, providing direct evidence of a thermodynamically stable alloying state for the nanoclusters. Cluster formation requires the coexistence of Y, Ti, and O without the precipitation of oxide phases. The presence of thermally stable nanoclusters at grain boundaries limits the diffusion of Fe atoms, thereby stabilizing the microstructure of the ferritic matrix at high temperatures. Our experimental results provide physical insights of the dramatically improved high-temperature mechanical properties in NSF alloy and point to a new direction in alloy design.

  9. Development of Advanced Corrosion-Resistant Fe-Cr-Ni Austenitic Stainless Steel Alloy with Improved High-Temperature Strength and Creep-Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, P.J.; Swindeman, R.W.

    2001-06-15

    In February of 1999, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Special Metals Corporation - Huntington Alloys (formerly INCO Alloys International, Inc.) to develop a modified wrought austenitic stainless alloy with considerably more strength and corrosion resistance than alloy 800H or 800HT, but with otherwise similar engineering and application characteristics. Alloy 800H and related alloys have extensive use in coal flue gas environments, as well as for tubing or structural components in chemical and petrochemical applications. The main concept of the project was make small, deliberate elemental microalloying additions to this Fe-based alloy to produce, with proper processing, fine stable carbide dispersions for enhanced high temperature creep-strength and rupture resistance, with similar or better oxidation/corrosion resistance. The project began with alloy 803, a Fe-25Cr-35NiTi,Nb alloy recently developed by INCO, as the base alloy for modification. Smaller commercial developmental alloy heats were produced by Special Metal. At the end of the project, three rounds of alloy development had produced a modified 803 alloy with significantly better creep resistance above 815 C (1500 C) than standard alloy 803 in the solution-annealed (SA) condition. The new upgraded 803 alloy also had the potential for a processing boost in that creep resistance for certain kinds of manufactured components that was not found in the standard alloy. The upgraded 803 alloy showed similar or slightly better oxidation and corrosion resistance relative to standard 803. Creep strength and oxidation/corrosion resistance of the upgraded 803 alloy were significantly better than found in alloy 800 H, as originally intended. The CRADA was terminated in February 2003. A contributing factor was Special Metals Corporation being in Chapter 11 Bankruptcy. Additional testing, further commercial scale-up, and any potential

  10. Dual and Triple Ion-Beam Irradiations of Fe, Fe(Cr) and Fe(Cr)-ODS Final Report: IAEA SMoRE CRP

    SciTech Connect

    Fluss, M J; Hsiung, L L; Marian, J

    2011-11-20

    Structures of nanoparticles in Fe-16Cr-4.5Al-0.3Ti-2W-0.37Y2O3 (K3) and Fe-20Cr-4.5Al-0.34Ti-0.5Y2O3 (MA956) oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels produced by mechanical alloying (MA) and followed by hot extrusion have been studied using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques to gain insight about the formation mechanism of nanoparticles in MA/ODS steels. The observations of Y-Al-O complex-oxide nanoparticles in both ODS steels imply that decomposition of Y2O3 in association with internal oxidation of Al occurred during mechanical alloying. While the majority of oxide nanoparticles formed in both steels is Y4Al2O9, a few oxide particles of YAlO3 are also occasionally observed. These results reveal that Ti (0.3 wt %) plays an insignificant role in forming oxide nanoparticles in the presence of Al (4.5 wt %). HRTEM observations of crystalline nanoparticles larger than {approx}2 nm and amorphous or disordered cluster domains smaller than {approx}2 nm provide an insight into the formation mechanism of oxide nanoparticle in MA/ODS steels, which we believe from our observations involves a solid-state amorphous precursor followed by recrystallization. Dual ion-beam irradiations using He{sup +} + Fe{sup +8} ions were employed to gain more detailed insight about the role of nanoparticles in suppressing radiation-induced swelling. This is elaborated through TEM examinations of cavity distributions in ion-irradiated Fe-14Cr and K3-ODS ferritic steels. HRTEM observations of helium-filled cavities (helium bubbles) preferably trapped at nanoscale oxide particles and clusters in ion-irradiated K3-ODS are presented. Finally, we describe the results from triple ion-beam irradiations using H{sup +} + He{sup +} + Fe{sup +8} ions to emulate fusion first wall radiation effects. Preliminary work is reported that confirms the existence of significant hydrogen synergistic effects described earlier by Tanaka et al., for Fe(Cr) and by Wakai et al

  11. Ferritic Fe-Mn alloy for cryogenic applications

    DOEpatents

    Hwang, Sun-Keun; Morris, Jr., John W.

    1979-01-01

    A ferritic, nickel-free alloy steel composition, suitable for cryogenic applications, which consists essentially of about 10-13% manganese, 0.002-0.01% boron, 0.1-0.5% titanium, 0-0.05% aluminum, and the remainder iron and incidental impurities normally associated therewith.

  12. Development of Advanced Corrosion-Resistant Fe-Cr-Ni Austenitic Stainless Steel Alloy with Improved High Temperature Strenth and Creep-Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, PJ

    2004-09-30

    In February of 1999, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Special Metals Corporation-Huntington Alloys (formerly INCO Alloys International, Inc.) to develop a modified wrought austenitic stainless alloy with considerably more strength and corrosion resistance than alloy 800H or 800HT, but with otherwise similar engineering and application characteristics. Alloy 800H and related alloys have extensive use in coal flue gas environments, as well as for tubing or structural components in chemical and petrochemical applications. The main concept of the project was make small, deliberate elemental microalloying additions to this Fe-based alloy to produce, with proper processing, fine stable carbide dispersions for enhanced high temperature creep-strength and rupture resistance, with similar or better oxidation/corrosion resistance. The project began with alloy 803, a Fe-25Cr-35NiTi,Nb alloy recently developed by INCO, as the base alloy for modification. Smaller commercial developmental alloy heats were produced by Special Metals. At the end of the project, three rounds of alloy development had produced a modified 803 alloy with significantly better creep resistance above 815EC (1500EC) than standard alloy 803 in the solution-annealed (SA) condition. The new upgraded 803 alloy also had the potential for a processing boost in that creep resistance for certain kinds of manufactured components that was not found in the standard alloy. The upgraded 803 alloy showed similar or slightly better oxidation and corrosion resistance relative to standard 803. Creep strength and oxidation/corrosion resistance of the upgraded 803 alloy were significantly better than found in alloy 800H, as originally intended. The CRADA was terminated in February 2003. A contributing factor was Special Metals Corporation being in Chapter 11 Bankruptcy. Additional testing, further commercial scale-up, and any potential

  13. The Role of Alloying Elements in Nanostructured Ferritic Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Michael K; Parish, Chad M

    2010-01-01

    The roles of the alloying elements in three nanostructured ferritic alloys (14YWT, MA957 and Eurofer 97) have been established through the characterisation of the microstructure by atom probe tomography and spectrum imaging in a transmission electron microscope. Cr, W, Mo, Ti and Y were found in the ferrite matrix and contributed to solid solution hardening. Ti, Y, C, O and N were found in high number densities of precipitates and nanoclusters both in the grain interior and on grain boundaries and thereby contributed to precipitation hardening. Cr, W and Mo were enriched at the intraparticle regions of the grain boundaries. The solute segregation and precipitation pinned the grain boundaries and contributed to the excellent creep properties of the alloys.

  14. High Temperature Fracture Characteristics of a Nanostructured Ferritic Alloy (NFA)

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Thak Sang; Kim, Jeoung H; Ji Hyun, Yoon; Hoelzer, David T

    2010-01-01

    High temperature fracture behavior has been investigated for the nanostructured ferritic alloy 14YWT (SM10). The fracture toughness of the alloy was above 140 MPa m at low temperatures, room temperature (RT) and 200 C, but decreased to a low fracture toughness range of 52 82 MPa m at higher temperatures up to 700 C. This behavior was explained by the fractography results indicating that the unique nanostructure of 14YWT alloy produced shallow plasticity layers at high temperatures and a low-ductility grain boundary debonding occurred at 700 C.

  15. Gas atomized precursor alloy powder for oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieken, Joel Rodney

    Gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) was employed as a simplified method for producing precursor powders for oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic stainless steels (e.g., Fe-Cr-Y-(Ti,Hf)-O), departing from the conventional mechanical alloying (MA) process. During GARS processing a reactive atomization gas (i.e., Ar-O2) was used to oxidize the powder surfaces during primary break-up and rapid solidification of the molten alloy. This resulted in envelopment of the powders by an ultra-thin (t < 150 nm) metastable Cr-enriched oxide layer that was used as a vehicle for solid-state transport of O into the consolidated microstructure. In an attempt to better understand the kinetics of this GARS reaction, theoretical cooling curves for the atomized droplets were calculated and used to establish an oxidation model for this process. Subsequent elevated temperature heat treatments, which were derived from Rhines pack measurements using an internal oxidation model, were used to promote thermodynamically driven O exchange reactions between trapped films of the initial Cr-enriched surface oxide and internal Y-enriched intermetallic precipitates. This novel microstructural evolution process resulted in the successful formation of nano-metric Y-enriched dispersoids, as confirmed using high energy X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), equivalent to conventional ODS alloys from MA powders. The thermal stability of these Y-enriched dispersoids was evaluated using high temperature (1200°C) annealing treatments ranging from 2.5 to 1,000 hrs of exposure. In a further departure from current ODS practice, replacing Ti with additions of Hf appeared to improve the Y-enriched dispersoid thermal stability by means of crystal structure modification. Additionally, the spatial distribution of the dispersoids was found to depend strongly on the original rapidly solidified microstructure. To exploit this, ODS microstructures were engineered from different

  16. Gas atomized precursor alloy powder for oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, Joel

    2011-12-13

    Gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) was employed as a simplified method for producing precursor powders for oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic stainless steels (e.g., Fe-Cr-Y-(Ti,Hf)-O), departing from the conventional mechanical alloying (MA) process. During GARS processing a reactive atomization gas (i.e., Ar-O2) was used to oxidize the powder surfaces during primary break-up and rapid solidification of the molten alloy. This resulted in envelopment of the powders by an ultra-thin (t < 150 nm) metastable Cr-enriched oxide layer that was used as a vehicle for solid-state transport of O into the consolidated microstructure. In an attempt to better understand the kinetics of this GARS reaction, theoretical cooling curves for the atomized droplets were calculated and used to establish an oxidation model for this process. Subsequent elevated temperature heat treatments, which were derived from Rhines pack measurements using an internal oxidation model, were used to promote thermodynamically driven O exchange reactions between trapped films of the initial Cr-enriched surface oxide and internal Y-enriched intermetallic precipitates. This novel microstructural evolution process resulted in the successful formation of nano-metric Y-enriched dispersoids, as confirmed using high energy X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), equivalent to conventional ODS alloys from MA powders. The thermal stability of these Y-enriched dispersoids was evaluated using high temperature (1200°C) annealing treatments ranging from 2.5 to 1,000 hrs of exposure. In a further departure from current ODS practice, replacing Ti with additions of Hf appeared to improve the Y-enriched dispersoid thermal stability by means of crystal structure modification. Additionally, the spatial distribution of the dispersoids was found to depend strongly on the original rapidly solidified microstructure. To exploit this, ODS microstructures were engineered from

  17. Interaction UMo fuel with Fe and FeCr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, S. N.; Shornikov, D. P.; Tarasov, B. A.; Baranov, V. G.

    2016-04-01

    Uranium-molybdenum alloys are perspective nuclear fuel for fast reactors. In this work, a study was conducted of the interaction of uranium-molybdenum alloy with iron and chromium steel at an elevated temperature of 750 °C for 5 hours. It was found that the constant rate of the interaction layer growth for diffusion couple UMo/FeCr is about 5.4-10-12 m2/s at 750 °C. The phase composition of the interaction layers for the both diffusion couples was determined. The interaction comes along the grain boundaries, there are not interacts UMo alloy grain in the structure of the diffusion zone.

  18. FEG-SEM investigation of α-alumina scales formed on FeCrAlY alloys oxidised at 1200° C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Badairy, H.; Tatlock, G.; Fawcett, S.; Beahan, P.; Hunt, J.

    2005-05-01

    This work is part of an ongoing European funded project, “SMILER”, with the aim of improving the performance of alumina forming Fe-20Cr-5Al-Y alloys for high temperature industrial applications. One aspect of the project is to investigate the influence of additives on the oxidation behaviour of these alloys. During this study a LEO 1550 FESEM (field emission scanning electron microscope), equipped with INCA X-ray microanalysis facilities was used. Ultra-high-purity model alloys, where the levels of additives (Hf, Zr, Ti, Si, La and Y) were carefully controlled, and two commercial Aluchrom YHfAl and Kanthal AMPT alloys were oxidised at 1200° C for up to 3100h (100h/cycle). The YHfAl, (Y+Ti+Zr)- and (Y+Zr+Hf)-containing alloys showed the highest oxidation rates when oxidised, whereas the La-containing alloy showed the lowest oxidation rate. However, the La-containing alloy spalled the most, while the (Y+Zr+Hf)-containing and YHfAl alloys showed little spallation, and the additives appeared to have a major influence on the spallation of the α -alumina scale formed. On the alloys with La and Si respectively, the scale spalled at the scale/metal interface (adhesively), whereas on alloys containing (Y+Hf+Ti) and (Y+Hf+Zr) and the YHfAl alloy, the scale spalled mainly in a cohesive manner (within the scale). Also, the added elements affected the scale topography. In general the scale had a columnar structure at the scale/metal interface, whereas the grains were equiaxed at the scale/gas interface. However, in the case of YHfAl and (Y+Zr+Hf)-containing alloys, a sunflower type structure was observed in both fractured samples, in the regions where the scale spalled cohesively. Preliminary EDX analyses revealed that, in the case of YHfAl, for example, the center of the sunflower structure was rich in Mg. This suggests that there may be inhomogeneities in the metal substrate, prior to oxidation, where high concentrations of Mg increase the local oxide growth rate.

  19. Castable hot corrosion resistant alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Charles A. (Inventor); Holt, William H. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    Some 10 wt percent nickel is added to an Fe-base alloy which has a ferrite microstructure to improve the high temperature castability and crack resistance while about 0.2 wt percent zirconium is added for improved high temperatur cyclic oxidation and corrosion resistance. The basic material is a high temperature FeCrAl heater alloy, and the addition provides a material suitable for burner rig nozzles.

  20. Selective aluminum dissolution as a means to observe the microstructure of nanocrystalline intermetallic phases from Al-Fe-Cr-Ti-Ce rapidly solidified alloy.

    PubMed

    Michalcová, Alena; Vojtěch, Dalibor; Novák, Pavel

    2013-02-01

    Rapidly solidified aluminum alloys are promising materials with very fine microstructure. The microscopy observation of these materials is complicated due to overlay of fcc-Al matrix and different intermetallic phases. A possible way to solve this problem is to dissolve the Al matrix. By this process powder formed by single intermetallic phase particles is obtained. In this paper a new aqueous based dissolving agent for Al-based alloy is presented. The influence of oxidation agent (FeCl(3)) concentration on quality of extraction process was studied. PMID:23177792

  1. Structural disorder and magnetism in the spin-gapless semiconductor CoFeCrAl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Renu; Kharel, Parashu; Valloppilly, Shah R.; Jin, Yunlong; O'Connell, Andrew; Huh, Yung; Gilbert, Simeon; Kashyap, Arti; Sellmyer, D. J.; Skomski, Ralph

    2016-05-01

    Disordered CoFeCrAl and CoFeCrSi0.5Al0.5 alloys have been investigated experimentally and by first-principle calculations. The melt-spun and annealed samples all exhibit Heusler-type superlattice peaks, but the peak intensities indicate a substantial degree of B2-type chemical disorder. Si substitution reduces the degree of this disorder. Our theoretical analysis also considers several types of antisite disorder (Fe-Co, Fe-Cr, Co-Cr) in Y-ordered CoFeCrAl and partial substitution of Si for Al. The substitution transforms the spin-gapless semiconductor CoFeCrAl into a half-metallic ferrimagnet and increases the half-metallic band gap by 0.12 eV. Compared CoFeCrAl, the moment of CoFeCrSi0.5Al0.5 is predicted to increase from 2.01 μB to 2.50 μB per formula unit, in good agreement with experiment.

  2. The influence of cooling rate and Fe/Cr content on the evolution of Fe-rich compounds in a secondary Al-Si-Cu diecasting alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabrizi, A.; Timelli, G.

    2016-03-01

    This study investigates the morphological evolution of primary α-Al(Fe,Mn,Cr)Si phase in a secondary Al-Si-Cu alloy with respect to the initial Fe and Cr contents as well as to the cooling rate. The solidification experiments have been designed in order to cover a wide range of cooling rates, and the Fe and Cr contents have been varied over two levels. Metallographic and image analysis techniques have been used to quantitatively examine the microstructural changes occurring at different experimental conditions. The morphological evolution of the α-Fe phase has been also analysed by observing deep etched samples. By changing the cooling rate, α-Al15(Fe,Mn,Cr)3Si2 dodecahedron crystals, as well as Chinese- script, branched structures and dendrites form, while primary coarse β-Al5(Fe,Mn)Si needles appear in the alloy with the highest Fe content at low cooling rates.

  3. The effect of helium on microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys as determined in a spectral tailoring experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Sekimura, N. ); Garner, F.A. ); Griffin, R.D. )

    1991-11-01

    Fe-15Cr-XNi alloys irradiated at both low (0.66 to 1.2) and very high (27 to 58) helium/dpa levels exhibit significantly different levels of strengthening due to an unprecedented refinement of cavity microstructure at the very high helium levels. When compounded with the nickel dependence of helium generation, the cavity distribution for some irradiation conditions and alloy compositions can be driven below the critical radius for bubble-to-void conversion, leading to a delay in swelling. The critical radius also appears to be dependent on the nickel level. The refinement may not have resulted from the high helium levels alone, however but also may have been influenced by differences in displacement rate and temperature history in the two experiments.

  4. Role of oxygen in the angular distribution of sputtered constituents from Fe/Cr alloy studied by laser post-ionization SNMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Hoong-Sun; Ichimura, S.

    1997-02-01

    Laser post-ionization sputtered neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS) has been applied to study the angular distribution of the sputtered constituents of Fe-40at%Cr alloys. Preferred Cr ejection was observed in the direction of the target normal under sputtering in atmosphere with a sufficient amount of oxygen gas, while there is no distinct difference in the angular dependence of the ratio of ejected components without oxygen. Comparing the results obtained by this method with those by the thin film deposition method, it is certified that the same results can be attained by both methods, although in-situ measurement of the angular distribution of the sputtered constituents is possible only by the laser SNMS method. This tendency is considered to be due to the formation of Fe segregated layeres on the surface of the alloy by the presence of oxygen.

  5. Characterisation of Cr, Si and P distribution at dislocations and grain-boundaries in neutron irradiated Fe-Cr model alloys of low purity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuksenko, V.; Pareige, C.; Genevois, C.; Pareige, P.

    2013-03-01

    Segregations at some dislocations and grain boundaries in Fe-5%Cr, Fe-9%Cr and Fe-12%Cr model alloys of low purity after neutron irradiation at 300 °C up to 0.6 dpa have been analyzed with atom probe tomography. All dislocation lines and low- and high-angle grain boundaries (GBs) which have been observed were enriched with Cr, Si and P. The segregations reveal the different dislocation structures associated to different type of analysed GBs. Cr and Si atoms were found to be nonhomogenously distributed around the dislocation cores because of the non isotropic stress field induced by edge dislocation lines. Concerning GBs, precipitate free zones (PFZs) are exhibited around the planar defects which were analysed in Fe-9%Cr and Fe-12%Cr model alloys. These PFZ are size dependant with the nominal level of Cr.

  6. Mechanical alloying of lanthana-bearing nanostructured ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Somayeh Paseban; Indrajit Charit; Yaqiao Q. Wu; Jatuporn Burns; Kerry N. Allahar; Darryl P. Butt; James I. Cole

    2013-09-01

    A novel nanostructured ferritic steel powder with the nominal composition Fe–14Cr–1Ti–0.3Mo–0.5La2O3 (wt.%) was developed via high energy ball milling. La2O3 was added to this alloy instead of the traditionally used Y2O3. The effects of varying the ball milling parameters, such as milling time, steel ball size and ball to powder ratio, on the mechanical properties and micro structural characteristics of the as-milled powder were investigated. Nanocrystallites of a body-centered cubic ferritic solid solution matrix with a mean size of approximately 20 nm were observed by transmission electron microscopy. Nanoscale characterization of the as-milled powder by local electrode atom probe tomography revealed the formation of Cr–Ti–La–O-enriched nanoclusters during mechanical alloying. The Cr:Ti:La:O ratio is considered “non-stoichiometric”. The average size (radius) of the nanoclusters was about 1 nm, with number density of 3.7 1024 m3. The mechanism for formation of nanoclusters in the as-milled powder is discussed. La2O3 appears to be a promising alternative rare earth oxide for future nanostructured ferritic steels.

  7. Development and quality assessments of commercial heat production of ATF FeCrAl tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Yukinori

    2015-09-01

    Development and quality assessment of the 2nd generation ATF FeCrAl tube production with commercial manufacturers were conducted. The manufacturing partners include Sophisticated Alloys, Inc. (SAI), Butler, PA for FeCrAl alloy casting via vacuum induction melting, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for extrusion process to prepare the master bars/tubes to be tube-drawn, and Rhenium Alloys, Inc. (RAI), North Ridgeville, OH, for tube-drawing process. The masters bars have also been provided to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) who works with Century Tubes, Inc., (CTI), San Diego, CA, as parallel tube production effort under the current program.

  8. Design of alumina forming FeCrAl steels for lead or lead-bismuth cooled fast reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jun; Hwang, Il Soon; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2013-10-01

    Iron-chromium-aluminum alloys containing 15-20 wt.% Cr and 4-6 wt.% Al have shown excellent corrosion resistance in the temperature range up to 600 °C or higher in liquid lead and lead-bismuth eutectic environments by the formation of protective Al2O3 layers. However, the higher Cr and Al concentrations in ferritic alloys could be problematic because of severe embrittlement in the manufacturing process as well as in service, caused by the formation of brittle phases. For this reason, efforts worldwide have so far mainly focused on the development of aluminizing surface treatments. However, aluminizing surface treatments have major disadvantages of cost, processing difficulties and reliability issues. In this study, a new FeCrAl alloy is proposed for structural materials in lead and lead-bismuth cooled nuclear applications. The alloy design relied on corrosion experiments in high temperature lead and lead-bismuth eutectic environments and computational thermodynamic calculations using the commercial software, JMatPro. The design of new alloys has focused on the optimization of Cr and Al levels for the formation of an external Al2O3 layer which can provide excellent oxidation and corrosion resistance in liquid lead alloys in the temperature range 300-600 °C while still retaining workable mechanical properties.

  9. A study of the micro- and nanoscale deformation behavior of individual austenitic dendrites in a FeCrMoVC cast alloy using micro- and nanoindentation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeisig, J.; Hufenbach, J.; Wendrock, H.; Gemming, T.; Eckert, J.; Kühn, U.

    2016-04-01

    Micro- and nanoindentation experiments were conducted to investigate the deformation mechanisms in a Fe79.4Cr13Mo5V1C1.6 (wt. %) cast alloy. This alloy consists of an as cast microstructure mainly composed of austenite, martensite, and a complex carbide network. During microhardness testing, metastable austenite transforms partially into martensite confirmed by electron backscatter diffraction. For nanoindentation tests, two different indenter geometries were applied (Berkovich and cube corner type). Load-displacement curves of nanoindentation in austenitic dendrites depicted pop-ins after transition into plastic deformation for both nanoindenters. Characterizations of the region beneath a nanoindent by transmission electron microscopy revealed a martensitic transformation as an activated deformation mechanism and suggest a correlation with the pop-in phenomena of the load-displacement curves. Furthermore, due to an inhomogeneous chemical composition within the austenitic dendrites, more stabilized regions deform by mechanical twinning. This additional deformation mechanism was only observed for the cube corner indenter with the sharper geometry since higher shear stresses are induced beneath the contact area.

  10. Roles of Vacancy/Interstitial Diffusion and Segregation in the Microchemistry at Grain Boundaries of Irradiated Fe-Cr-Ni alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yang, Ying; Field, Kevin G.; Allen, Todd R.; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2016-02-23

    A detailed analysis of the diffusion fluxes near and at grain boundaries of irradiated Fe–Cr–Ni alloys, induced by preferential atom-vacancy and atom-interstitial coupling, is presented. The diffusion flux equations were based on the Perks model formulated through the linear theory of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. The preferential atom-vacancy coupling was described by the mobility model, whereas the preferential atom-interstitial coupling was described by the interstitial binding model. The composition dependence of the thermodynamic factor was modeled using the CALPHAD approach. The calculated fluxes up to 10 dpa suggested the dominant diffusion mechanism for chromium and iron is via vacancy,more » while that for nickel can swing from the vacancy to the interstitial dominant mechanism. The diffusion flux in the vicinity of a grain boundary was found to be greatly modified by the segregation induced by irradiation, leading to the oscillatory behavior of alloy compositions in this region.« less

  11. High-resolution chemical analysis by STEM-EELS of nanosized oxide particles in a mechanically-alloyed FeCrAl intermetallic

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, D.G. Muñoz-Morris, M.A.

    2015-05-15

    The chemical composition of nanosized oxides has been analysed in a mechanically-alloyed (MA) iron–chromium–aluminium intermetallic containing yttria additions using an aberration-corrected, high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The oxide particles are seen to contain yttrium and oxygen only, but very little of the matrix metallic elements, while the matrix in the immediate vicinity shows a very low iron content. Possible reasons for the change of matrix composition outside the particle-matrix interface are discussed. - Highlights: • High-resolution chemical analysis of oxide particles was performed using STEM-EELS. • Oxide particles contain Y and O but essentially no elements from the Fe–Cr–Al matrix. • The matrix immediately outside the particles appears to be depleted in Fe. • Diffusion of Y during particle growth possibly transports vacancies to the interface.

  12. Nucleation and phase selection in undercooled Fe-Cr-Ni melts. Part 2: Containerless solidification experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Volkmann, T.; Herlach, D.M.; Loeser, W.

    1997-02-01

    The solidification behavior of undercooled Fe-Cr-Ni melts of different compositions is investigated with respect to the competitive formation of {delta}-bcc (ferrite) and {gamma}-fcc phase (austenite). Containerless solidification experiments, electromagnetic levitation melting and drop tube experiments of atomized particles, show that {delta} (bcc) solidification is preferred in the highly undercooled melt even at compositions where {delta} is metastable. Time-resolved detection of the recalescence events during crystallization at different undercooling levels enable the determination of a critical undercooling for the transition to metastable bcc phase solidification in equilibrium fcc-type alloys. Measurements of the growth velocities of stable and metastable phases, as functions of melt undercooling prior to solidification, reveal that phase selection is controlled by nucleation. Phase selection diagrams for solidification processes as function of alloy composition and melt undercooling are derived from two types of experiments: X-ray phase analysis of quenched samples and in situ observations of the recalescence events of undercooled melts. The experimental results fit well with the theoretical predictions of the metastable phase diagram and the improved nucleation theory presented in an earlier article. In particular, the tendency of metastable {delta} phase formation in a wide composition range is confirmed.

  13. The dependence of helium generation rate on nickel content of Fe Cr Ni alloys irradiated to high dpa levels in EBR-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, F. A.; Oliver, B. M.; Greenwood, L. R.

    1998-10-01

    Fusion-relevant helium-effects experiments conducted on austenitic steels in the Materials Open Test Assembly (MOTA) of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) fast reactor had to recognize the contributions of both the high neutron energy (n,α) reactions and that of the 58Ni(n,γ) 59Ni(n,α) reaction sequence with low energy neutrons. An experiment conducted in the harder neutron spectra found within the core of Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) has shown that the helium in this reactor was generated almost exclusively from the interaction of high energy neutrons with the natural isotopes of nickel. There was very little contribution from 59Ni. The helium production was found to scale directly with the nickel content over the range 25-75% Ni. Even at very high neutron exposures, the helium production in such reactors can be predicted within 5% accuracy on the basis of high energy reactions, as demonstrated by an experiment conducted on three Fe-15Cr-Ni ternary alloys irradiated to doses of 75-131 dpa in EBR-II.

  14. The role of nickel in radiation damage of ferritic alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Osetskiy, Yury N.; Anento, Napoleon; Serra, Anna; Terentyev, Dmitry

    2014-11-26

    According to the modern theory damage evolution under neutron irradiation depends on the fraction of self interstitial atoms (SIAs) produced in the form of one-dimensionally (1-D) glissile clusters. These clusters, having a low interaction cross-section with other defects, sink mainly on grain boundaries and dislocations creating the so-called production bias. It is known empirically that addition of certain alloying elements affect many radiation effects, including swelling, however the mechanisms are unknown in many cases. In this paper we report the results of an extensive multi-technique atomistic level modeling of SIA clusters mobility in bcc Fe-Ni alloys with Ni content frommore » 0.8 to 10 at.%. We have found that Ni interacts strongly with periphery of clusters affecting their mobility. The total effect is defined by all Ni atoms interacting with the cluster at the same time and can be significant even in low-Ni alloys. Thus 1nm (37SIAs) cluster is practically immobile at T < 500K in the Fe-0.8at.% Ni alloy. Increasing cluster size and Ni content enhance cluster immobilization. Furthermore, this effect should have quite broad consequences in swelling rate, matrix damage accumulation, radiation induced hardening, etc. and the results obtained help in better understanding and prediction of radiation effects in Fe-Ni ferritic alloys.« less

  15. The role of nickel in radiation damage of ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Osetskiy, Yury N.; Anento, Napoleon; Serra, Anna; Terentyev, Dmitry

    2014-11-26

    According to the modern theory damage evolution under neutron irradiation depends on the fraction of self interstitial atoms (SIAs) produced in the form of one-dimensionally (1-D) glissile clusters. These clusters, having a low interaction cross-section with other defects, sink mainly on grain boundaries and dislocations creating the so-called production bias. It is known empirically that addition of certain alloying elements affect many radiation effects, including swelling, however the mechanisms are unknown in many cases. In this paper we report the results of an extensive multi-technique atomistic level modeling of SIA clusters mobility in bcc Fe-Ni alloys with Ni content from 0.8 to 10 at.%. We have found that Ni interacts strongly with periphery of clusters affecting their mobility. The total effect is defined by all Ni atoms interacting with the cluster at the same time and can be significant even in low-Ni alloys. Thus 1nm (37SIAs) cluster is practically immobile at T < 500K in the Fe-0.8at.% Ni alloy. Increasing cluster size and Ni content enhance cluster immobilization. Furthermore, this effect should have quite broad consequences in swelling rate, matrix damage accumulation, radiation induced hardening, etc. and the results obtained help in better understanding and prediction of radiation effects in Fe-Ni ferritic alloys.

  16. Modified ferritic iron alloys with improved high-temperature mechanical properties and oxidation resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldrieve, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    An alloy modification program was conducted in which the compositions of two existing Fe-Cr-Al alloys (Armco 18SR and GE-1541) were changed to achieve either improved high-temperature strength or improved fabricability. Only modifications of Armco 18SR were successful in achieving increased strength without loss of fabricability or oxidation resistance. The best modified alloy, designated NASA-18T, had twice the rupture strength of Armco 18SR at 800 and 1000 C. The NASA-18T alloy also had better oxidation resistance than Armco 18SR and comparable fabricability. The nominal composition of NASA-18T is Fe-18Cr-2Al-1Si-1.25Ta. All attempted modifications of the GE-1541 alloy were unsuccessful in terms of achieving better fabricability without sacrificing high-temperature strength and oxidation resistance.

  17. Investigations of Local Corrosion Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed FeCr Nanocomposite Coating by SECM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xi; Shu, Mingyong; Zhong, Qingdong; Zhang, Junliang; Zhou, Qiongyu; Bui, Quoc Binh

    2016-02-01

    FeCr alloy coating can be sprayed on low-carbon steel to improve the corrosion resistance because of FeCr alloy's high anti-corrosion capacity. In this paper, Fe microparticles/Cr nanoparticles coating (NFC) and FeCr microparticles coating (MFC) were prepared by atmospheric plasma spraying and NFC was heat-treated under hydrogen atmosphere at 800 °C (HNFC). EDS mapping showed no penetration of Ni in MFC and NFC while penetration of Ni occurred in HNFC. X-ray diffraction results indicated the form of the NiCrFe (bcc) solid solution in HNFC. SECM testing in 3.5 (wt.%) NaCl revealed that the anti-corrosion capacity of NFC improved compared with MFC, while HNFC improved further.

  18. Analysis of the FeCrAl Accident Tolerant Fuel Concept Benefits during BWR Station Blackout Accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Robb, Kevin R

    2015-01-01

    Iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys are being considered for fuel concepts with enhanced accident tolerance. FeCrAl alloys have very slow oxidation kinetics and good strength at high temperatures. FeCrAl could be used for fuel cladding in light water reactors and/or as channel box material in boiling water reactors (BWRs). To estimate the potential safety gains afforded by the FeCrAl concept, the MELCOR code was used to analyze a range of postulated station blackout severe accident scenarios in a BWR/4 reactor employing FeCrAl. The simulations utilize the most recently known thermophysical properties and oxidation kinetics for FeCrAl. Overall, when compared to the traditional Zircaloy-based cladding and channel box, the FeCrAl concept provides a few extra hours of time for operators to take mitigating actions and/or for evacuations to take place. A coolable core geometry is retained longer, enhancing the ability to stabilize an accident. Finally, due to the slower oxidation kinetics, substantially less hydrogen is generated, and the generation is delayed in time. This decreases the amount of non-condensable gases in containment and the potential for deflagrations to inhibit the accident response.

  19. Discussion on the Alloying Element Partition and Growth Kinetics of Proeutectoid Ferrite in Fe-C-Mn-X Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, R.; Enomoto, M.

    2011-12-01

    Experimental data on alloying element partition and growth kinetics of proeutectoid ferrite in quaternary Fe-C-Mn-Si, Ni, and Co alloys were reanalyzed using an approximate method, which permits a quick evaluation of alloy partitioning to be made. The method yielded results in good agreement with DICTRA and is applicable to Fe-C base multicomponent alloys. Differences of the predicted local condition at the α/ γ boundary from those previously presented in the alloys are noted.

  20. Irradiation-induced formation of a spinel phase at the FeCr/MgO interface

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yun; Yadav, Satyesh Kumar; Aguiar, Jeffery A.; Anderoglu, Osman; Baldwin, Jon Kevin; Wang, Yongqiang; Misra, Amit; Luo, Hongmei; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Li, Nan

    2015-04-27

    Oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic/martensitic alloys have attracted significant attention for their potential uses in future nuclear reactors and storage vessels, as the metal/oxide interfaces act as stable high-strength sinks for point defects while also dispersing helium. Here, in order to unravel the evolution and interplay of interface structure and chemistry upon irradiation in these types of materials, an atomically sharp FeCr/MgO interface was synthesized at 500 °C and separately annealed and irradiated with Ni3+ ions at 500 °C. After annealing, a slight enrichment of Cr atoms was observed at the interface, but no other structural changes were found. However, under irradiation, sufficient Cr diffuses across the interface into the MgO to form a Cr-enriched transition layer that contains spinel precipitates. First-principles calculations indicate that it is energetically favorable to incorporate Cr, but not Fe, substitutionally into MgO. Furthermore, our results indicate that irradiation can be used to form new phases and complexions at interfaces, which may have different radiation tolerance than the pristine structures.

  1. Irradiation-induced formation of a spinel phase at the FeCr/MgO interface

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xu, Yun; Yadav, Satyesh Kumar; Aguiar, Jeffery A.; Anderoglu, Osman; Baldwin, Jon Kevin; Wang, Yongqiang; Misra, Amit; Luo, Hongmei; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Li, Nan

    2015-04-27

    Oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic/martensitic alloys have attracted significant attention for their potential uses in future nuclear reactors and storage vessels, as the metal/oxide interfaces act as stable high-strength sinks for point defects while also dispersing helium. Here, in order to unravel the evolution and interplay of interface structure and chemistry upon irradiation in these types of materials, an atomically sharp FeCr/MgO interface was synthesized at 500 °C and separately annealed and irradiated with Ni3+ ions at 500 °C. After annealing, a slight enrichment of Cr atoms was observed at the interface, but no other structural changes were found. However, undermore » irradiation, sufficient Cr diffuses across the interface into the MgO to form a Cr-enriched transition layer that contains spinel precipitates. First-principles calculations indicate that it is energetically favorable to incorporate Cr, but not Fe, substitutionally into MgO. Furthermore, our results indicate that irradiation can be used to form new phases and complexions at interfaces, which may have different radiation tolerance than the pristine structures.« less

  2. Microgravity experiments on the effect of internal flow on solidification of Fe-Cr-Ni stainless steels.

    PubMed

    Hanlon, Alaina B; Matson, Douglas M; Hyers, Robert W

    2006-09-01

    A new hypothesis has been developed to explain the effect of internal fluid flow on the lifetime of a metastable phase in solidifying Fe-Cr-Ni alloys. The hypothesis shows excellent agreement with available experimental results, but microgravity experiments are required for complete validation. Certain Fe-Cr-Ni stainless steel alloys solidify from an undercooled melt by a two-step process in which the metastable ferrite phase forms first followed by the stable austenite phase. Recent experiments using containerless processing techniques have shown that the lifetime of the metastable phase is strongly influenced by flow within the molten sample. Simulations using a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) package, FIDAP, were performed to determine the time required for collision of dendrites and compared to experimental delay time. If the convective velocities are strong enough to bend the primary arms, then the secondary arms of adjacent dendrites can touch. The points of collision form low-angle boundaries and result in high-energy sites that can serve as nuclei for the transformation to the stable phase. It has been determined that the convective velocities in electrostatic levitation (ESL) are not strong enough to cause collision. However, in ground-based electromagnetic levitation (EML), the convective velocities are strong enough to cause the dendrites to deflect so that the secondary arms of adjacent dendrites collide. There is quantitative agreement between the numerically determined time to collision and the experimentally observed delay time in EML. The strong internal velocity due to convection within the EML samples is the reason for the observed difference in delay times between ESL and EML. Microgravity testing is essential because the significant change in nucleation behavior occurs between the ranges accessible by ground-based ESL and EML. Testing in microgravity using EML will permit a large range of internal convective velocities including

  3. Oxidation of Fe-Cr-Al and Fe-Cr-Al-Y Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabke, H. J.; Siegers, M.; Tolpygo, V. K.

    1995-03-01

    Single crystal samples of the alloy Fe-20%Cr-5%Al with and without Y-doping were used to study the "reactive element" (RE) effect, which causes improved oxidation behaviour and formation of a protective Al2O3 layer on this alloy. The oxidation was followed by AES at 10-7 mbar O2 up to about 1000 °C. Most observations were peculiar for this low pO2 environment, but yttrium clearly favors the formation of Al-oxide and stabilizes it also under these conditions, probably by favoring its nucleation. The oxides formed are surface compounds of about monolayer thickness, not clearly related to bulk oxides. Furthermore, the morphologies of oxide scales were investigated by SEM, after oxidation at 1000°C for 100 h at 133 mbar O2. On Fe-Cr-Al the scale is strongly convoluted and tends to spalling, whereas the presence of Y leads to flat scales which are well adherent. This difference is explained by a change in growth mechanism. The tendency for separation of oxide and metal was highest for the samples with low energy metal surface, i.e. (100) and (110), the scale was better adherent on the (111) oriented surface and on the polycrystalline specimen, since in the latter cases the overall energy for scale/metal separation is higher. All observations, from the low and from the high pO2 experiments, are discussed in relation to the approximately ten mechanisms proposed in the literature for explanation of the RE effects.

  4. Investigation on the suitability of plasma sprayed Fe Cr Al coatings as tritium permeation barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazio, C.; Stein-Fechner, K.; Serra, E.; Glasbrenner, H.; Benamati, G.

    1999-08-01

    Results on the fabrication of a tritium permeation barrier by spraying Fe-Cr-Al powders are described. The sprayed coatings were deposited at temperatures below the Ac1 temperature of the ferritic-martensitic steel substrate and no post-deposition heat treatment was applied. The aim of the investigation was the determination of the efficiency of the coatings to act as tritium permeation barrier. Metallurgical investigations as well as hydrogen isotope permeation measurements were carried out onto the produced coatings. The depositions were performed on ferritic-martensitic steels by means of three types of spray techniques: high velocity oxy fuel, air plasma spray and vacuum plasma spray.

  5. Stability of Y–Ti–O precipitates in friction stir welded nanostructured ferritic alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yu, Xinghua; Mazumder, B.; Miller, M. K.; David, S. A.; Feng, Z.

    2015-01-19

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys, which have complex microstructures which consist of ultrafine ferritic grains with a dispersion of stable oxide particles and nanoclusters, are promising materials for fuel cladding and structural applications in the next generation nuclear reactor. This paper evaluates microstructure of friction stir welded nanostructured ferritic alloys using electron microscopy and atom probe tomography techniques. Atom probe tomography results revealed that nanoclusters are coarsened and inhomogeneously distributed in the stir zone and thermomechanically affected zone. Three hypotheses on coarsening of nanoclusters are presented. Finally, the hardness difference in different regions of friction stir weld has been explained.

  6. Detection and quantification of solute clusters in a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. K.; Reinhard, D.; Larson, D. J.

    2015-07-01

    A series of simulated atom probe datasets were examined with a friends-of-friends method to establish the detection efficiency required to resolve solute clusters in the ferrite phase of a 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy. The size and number densities of solute clusters in the ferrite of the as-milled mechanically-alloyed condition and the stir zone of a friction stir weld were estimated with a prototype high-detection-efficiency (∼80%) local electrode atom probe. High number densities, 1.8 × 1024 m-3 and 1.2 × 1024 m-3, respectively of solute clusters containing between 2 and 9 solute atoms of Ti, Y and O and were detected for these two conditions. These results support first principle calculations that predicted that vacancies stabilize these Ti-Y-O- clusters, which retard diffusion and contribute to the excellent high temperature stability of the microstructure and radiation tolerance of nanostructured ferritic alloys.

  7. Surface half-metallicity of half-Heusler compound FeCrSe and interface half-metallicity of FeCrSe/GaP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalaf Al-zyadi, Jabbar M.; Jolan, Mudhahir H.; Yao, Kai-Lun

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies showed that half-Heusler FeCrSe exhibits half-metallic ferromagnetism (Huang et al. [20]). In this paper, we investigate extensively the electronic, magnetic, and half-metallic properties of the half-Heusler alloy FeCrSe (111) and (001) surfaces and the interface with GaP (111) substrate by using the first-principles calculations within the density functional theory. The atomic density of states demonstrates that the half-me tallicity verified in the bulk FeCrSe is maintained at the CrSe-terminated (001) and Se-terminated (111) surfaces, but lost at both Cr- and Fe-terminated (111) surfaces and the Fe-terminated (001) surface. Alternatively, for the interface of FeCrSe/GaP (111), the bulk half-metallicity is destroyed at Se-P configuration while Se-Ga interface and subinterface show nearly 100% spin polarization. Moreover, the calculated interfacial adhesion energies exhibit that Se-Ga shape is more stable than the Se-P one. The calculated magnetic moments of Se, Ga at the Se-Ga (111) interface and P at the Se-P (111) interface increase with respect to the corresponding bulk values while the atomic magnetic moment of Se atom at the Se-P (111) interface decreases. We also notice that the magnetic moments of subinterface Fe at both Se-Ga and Se-P (111) interfaces decrease compared to the bulk values.

  8. Neutron irradiation effects on the microstructure of low-activation ferritic alloys*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, A.; Matsui, H.

    1994-09-01

    Microstructures of low-activation ferritic alloys, such as 2.25% Cr-2% W, 7% Cr-2% W, 9% Cr-2% W and 12% Cr-2% W alloys, were observed after FFTF irradiation at 698 K to a dose of 36 dpa. Martensite in 7% Cr-2% W, 9% Cr-2% W and 12% Cr-2% W alloys and bainite in 2.25% Cr-2% W alloy were fairly stable after the irradiation. Microvoids were observed in the martensite in each alloy but not in bainite and δ-ferrite in 12% Cr-2% W alloys. An addition of 0.02% Ti to 9% Cr-2% W alloy considerably reduced the void density. Spherical (Ta, W) and Ti-rich precipitates were observed in the Ti-added 9% Cr-2% W alloy. Precipitates observed in 9% Cr-2% W and 7% Cr-2% W alloys are mainly Cr-rich M 23C 6 (Ta, W) and Ta(W)-rich M 6C and Fe-rich Laves phase. In 2.25% Cr-2% W alloy, high density of fine (Ta, W)-rich M 2C type precipitates as well as M 6C were observed. Spherical small α' Cr-rich particles were observed in both martensite and α-ferrite in 12% Cr-2% W alloys. Correlation between postirradiation microstructure and irradiation hardening is shown and discussed for these alloys.

  9. Electrochemical and corrosion properties of YNi{sub 2.5}M{sub 0.5} (M = Ni, Al, Fe, Cr, Cu, Co, Mn) hybride-forming alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Korobov, I.I.; Vasina, S.Ya.; Petrii, O.A.

    1995-06-01

    Hydrogen sorption by electrode materials based on YNi{sub 2.5}M{sub 0.5} (M = Ni, Al, Fe, Cr, Co, Cu, Mn) intermetallic compounds (IMC) with Cu and PTFE binders is studied in 1 M NaOH solution. The obtained reversible electrochemical capacities correspond to YNi{sub 2.5}M{sub 0.5}H{sub 1.3-1.7} hybrides which are stable at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The application of Cu binder allows one to more completely use the material sorption capacity and promotes both extraction and sorption of hydrogen by IMC.

  10. Vacancy-controlled ultrastable nanoclusters in nanostructured ferritic alloys

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Z. W.; Yao, L.; Wang, X.-L.; Miller, M. K.

    2015-01-01

    A new class of advanced structural materials, based on the Fe-O-vacancy system, has exceptional resistance to high-temperature creep and excellent tolerance to extremely high-dose radiation. Although these remarkable improvements in properties compared to steels are known to be associated with the Y-Ti-O-enriched nanoclusters, the roles of vacancies in facilitating the nucleation of nanoclusters are a long-standing puzzle, due to the experimental difficulties in characterizing vacancies, particularly in-situ while the nanoclusters are forming. Here we report an experiment study that provides the compelling evidence for the presence of significant concentrations of vacancies in Y-Ti-O-enriched nanoclusters in a nanostructured ferritic alloy using a combination of state-of-the-art atom-probe tomography and in situ small angle neutron scattering. The nucleation of nanoclusters starts from the O-enriched solute clustering with vacancy mediation. The nanoclusters grow with an extremely low growth rate through attraction of vacancies and O:vacancy pairs, leading to the unusual stability of the nanoclusters. PMID:26023747

  11. Vacancy-controlled ultrastable nanoclusters in nanostructured ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. W.; Yao, L.; Wang, X. -L.; Miller, M. K.

    2015-05-29

    A new class of advanced structural materials, based on the Fe-O-vacancy system, has exceptional resistance to high-temperature creep and excellent tolerance to extremely high-dose radiation. Although these remarkable improvements in properties compared to steels are known to be associated with the Y-Ti-O-enriched nanoclusters, the roles of vacancies in facilitating the nucleation of nanoclusters are a long-standing puzzle, due to the experimental difficulties in characterizing vacancies, particularly in-situ while the nanoclusters are forming. We report an experiment study that provides the compelling evidence for the presence of significant concentrations of vacancies in Y-Ti-O-enriched nanoclusters in a nanostructured ferritic alloy using a combination of state-of-the-art atom-probe tomography and in situ small angle neutron scattering. The nucleation of nanoclusters starts from the O-enriched solute clustering with vacancy mediation. The nanoclusters grow with an extremely low growth rate through attraction of vacancies and O:vacancy pairs, leading to the unusual stability of the nanoclusters.

  12. Vacancy-controlled ultrastable nanoclusters in nanostructured ferritic alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Z. W.; Yao, L.; Wang, X. -L.; Miller, M. K.

    2015-05-29

    A new class of advanced structural materials, based on the Fe-O-vacancy system, has exceptional resistance to high-temperature creep and excellent tolerance to extremely high-dose radiation. Although these remarkable improvements in properties compared to steels are known to be associated with the Y-Ti-O-enriched nanoclusters, the roles of vacancies in facilitating the nucleation of nanoclusters are a long-standing puzzle, due to the experimental difficulties in characterizing vacancies, particularly in-situ while the nanoclusters are forming. We report an experiment study that provides the compelling evidence for the presence of significant concentrations of vacancies in Y-Ti-O-enriched nanoclusters in a nanostructured ferritic alloy using amore » combination of state-of-the-art atom-probe tomography and in situ small angle neutron scattering. The nucleation of nanoclusters starts from the O-enriched solute clustering with vacancy mediation. The nanoclusters grow with an extremely low growth rate through attraction of vacancies and O:vacancy pairs, leading to the unusual stability of the nanoclusters.« less

  13. Development of ODS FeCrAl for compatibility in fusion and fission energy applications

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pint, Bruce A.; Dryepondt, Sebastien N.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Hoelzer, David T.

    2014-11-15

    In this paper, oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) FeCrAl alloys with 12–15% Cr are being evaluated for improved compatibility with Pb-Li for a fusion energy application and with high temperature steam for a more accident-tolerant light water reactor fuel cladding application. A 12% Cr content alloy showed low mass losses in static Pb-Li at 700°C, where a LiAlO2 surface oxide formed and inhibited dissolution into the liquid metal. All the evaluated compositions formed a protective scale in steam at 1200°C, which is not possible with ODS FeCr alloys. However, most of the compositions were not protective at 1400°C, which is amore » general and somewhat surprising problem with ODS FeCrAl alloys that is still being studied. More work is needed to optimize the alloy composition, microstructure and oxide dispersion, but initial promising tensile and creep results have been obtained with mixed oxide additions, i.e. Y2O3 with ZrO2, HfO2 or TiO2.« less

  14. Development of ODS FeCrAl for compatibility in fusion and fission energy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, Bruce A.; Dryepondt, Sebastien N.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Hoelzer, David T.

    2014-11-15

    In this paper, oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) FeCrAl alloys with 12–15% Cr are being evaluated for improved compatibility with Pb-Li for a fusion energy application and with high temperature steam for a more accident-tolerant light water reactor fuel cladding application. A 12% Cr content alloy showed low mass losses in static Pb-Li at 700°C, where a LiAlO2 surface oxide formed and inhibited dissolution into the liquid metal. All the evaluated compositions formed a protective scale in steam at 1200°C, which is not possible with ODS FeCr alloys. However, most of the compositions were not protective at 1400°C, which is a general and somewhat surprising problem with ODS FeCrAl alloys that is still being studied. More work is needed to optimize the alloy composition, microstructure and oxide dispersion, but initial promising tensile and creep results have been obtained with mixed oxide additions, i.e. Y2O3 with ZrO2, HfO2 or TiO2.

  15. Development of ODS FeCrAl for Compatibility in Fusion and Fission Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pint, B. A.; Dryepondt, S.; Unocic, K. A.; Hoelzer, D. T.

    2014-12-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) FeCrAl alloys with 12-15% Cr are being evaluated for improved compatibility with Pb-Li for a fusion energy application and with high temperature steam for a more accident-tolerant light water reactor fuel cladding application. A 12% Cr content alloy showed low mass losses in static Pb-Li at 700°C, where a LiAlO2 surface oxide formed and inhibited dissolution into the liquid metal. All the evaluated compositions formed a protective scale in steam at 1200°C, which is not possible with ODS FeCr alloys. However, most of the compositions were not protective at 1400°C, which is a general and somewhat surprising problem with ODS FeCrAl alloys that is still being studied. More work is needed to optimize the alloy composition, microstructure and oxide dispersion, but initial promising tensile and creep results have been obtained with mixed oxide additions, i.e. Y2O3 with ZrO2, HfO2 or TiO2.

  16. Stability of Y Ti O Precipitates in Friction Stir Welded Nanostructured Ferritic Alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yu, Xinghua; Mazumder, Baishakhi; Miller, Michael K; David, Stan A; Feng, Zhili

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs), which have complex microstructures consisting of ultrafine ferritic grains with a dispersion of stable oxide particles and nanoclusters (NC), are promising materials for fuel cladding and structural applications in the next generation nuclear reactor. This study evaluates microstructure of friction stir welded NFA using electron microscopy and atom probe tomography (APT) techniques. APT results revealed NCs are coarsened and inhomogeneously distributed in the stir zone. Three hypotheses on coarsening of NC are presented.

  17. Irradiation creep of various ferritic alloys irradiated {approximately}400 C in the PFR and FFTF reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, M.B.; Garner, F.A.; Eiholzer, C.R.

    1998-03-01

    Three ferritic alloys were irradiated in two fast reactors to doses of 50 dpa or more at temperatures near 400 C. One martensitic alloy, HT9, was irradiated in both the FFTF and PFR reactors. PFR is the Prototype Fast Reactor in Dourneay, Scotland, and FFTF is the Fast Flux Test Facility in Richland, WA. D57 is a developmental alloy that was irradiated in PFR only, and MA957 is a Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion-hardened ferritic alloy that was irradiated only in FFTF. These alloys exhibited little or no void swelling at {approximately}400 C. Depending on the alloy starting condition, these steels develop a variety of non-creep strains early in the irradiation that are associated with phase changes. Each of these alloys creeps at a rate that is significantly lower than that of austenitic steels irradiated in the same experiments. The creep compliance for ferritic alloys in general appears to be {approximately}0.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} MPa{sup {minus}1} dpa{sup {minus}1}, independent of both composition and starting state. The addition of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a dispersoid does not appear to change the creep behavior.

  18. Corrosion behavior of coated 2 1/4 Cr-1Mo and mild steel substrates in a simulated waste heat recovery system environment of a coal gasifier. [FeCrAl or CoCrAl alloys and pack-diffusion aluminizing or chromizing

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, D.J.

    1985-07-01

    Cossosion tests have been conducted on coated 2 1/4Cr-1Mo and A106 mild steel in a gaseous environment typical of that expected in a downstream waste-heat recovery system of a coal gasifier. The environment contained controlled oxygen and sulfur levels, and the tests were run in a rig designed to expose specimens under simulated heat-exchanger conditions. Uncoated steel substrates exhibited breakaway corrosion behavior. Furnace-fused coatings of FeCrAl or CoCrAl alloys contained numerous defects, such as voids and cracks, and subsequently underwent substantial degradation during exposure. Coatings containing the stable oxide-forming elements Al and Cr were also applied by pack diffusion processes. Sequential chromizing of the A106 mild steel could not be achieved due to massive Cr carbide formation in the initial chromizing stage. Sequential chromizing/aluminizing of the 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel was successful, but the coating contained numerous defects, which permitted considerable attack of the coated substrate. Simultaneous aluminizing/chromizing produced mixed results, depending upon the particular process used in applying the coating. Coatings exhibited behavior ranging from protective to complete breakdown. A solid FeCrAlY alloy exhibited protective oxidation behavior. With respect to joining or repair methods for coated steels, four different weld metals were used to simulate joining or repair operations of prior aluminized steel substrates. The Ni-base Inconel 625 weld showed good corrosion resistance with Inconel 72 sustaining minor internal attack. The Co-base L605 and Fe-base 309 SS weld metals exhibited breakaway corrosion characterized by the formation of thick scales and deep internal attack. 19 refs., 21 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Role of Y-Al oxides during extended recovery process of a ferritic ODS alloy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Capdevila, C.; Pimentel, G.; Aranda, M. M.; Rementeria, R.; Dawson, K.; Urones-Garrote, E.; Tatlock, G. J.; Miller, Michael K.

    2015-08-04

    The microstructural stability of Y-Al oxides during the recrystallization of Fe-Cr-Al oxide dispersion strengthened alloy is studied in this work. The goal is to determine the specific distribution pattern of oxides depending where they are located: in the matrix or at the grain boundaries. It was concluded that those located at the grain boundaries yielded a faster coarsening than the ones in the matrix, although no significant differences in composition and/or crystal structure were observed. However, the recrystallization heat treatment leads to the dissolution of the Y2O3 and its combination with Al to form the YAlO3 perovskite oxide particles process,more » mainly located at the grain boundaries. Lastly, atom probe tomography analysis revealed a significant Ti build-up at the grain boundaries that might affect subsequent migration during recrystallization.« less

  20. Role of Y-Al oxides during extended recovery process of a ferritic ODS alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Capdevila, C.; Pimentel, G.; Aranda, M. M.; Rementeria, R.; Dawson, K.; Urones-Garrote, E.; Tatlock, G. J.; Miller, Michael K.

    2015-08-04

    The microstructural stability of Y-Al oxides during the recrystallization of Fe-Cr-Al oxide dispersion strengthened alloy is studied in this work. The goal is to determine the specific distribution pattern of oxides depending where they are located: in the matrix or at the grain boundaries. It was concluded that those located at the grain boundaries yielded a faster coarsening than the ones in the matrix, although no significant differences in composition and/or crystal structure were observed. However, the recrystallization heat treatment leads to the dissolution of the Y2O3 and its combination with Al to form the YAlO3 perovskite oxide particles process, mainly located at the grain boundaries. Lastly, atom probe tomography analysis revealed a significant Ti build-up at the grain boundaries that might affect subsequent migration during recrystallization.

  1. Role of Y-Al Oxides During Extended Recovery Process of a Ferritic ODS Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capdevila, C.; Pimentel, G.; Aranda, M. M.; Rementeria, R.; Dawson, K.; Urones-Garrote, E.; Tatlock, G. J.; Miller, M. K.

    2015-08-01

    The microstructural stability of Y-Al oxides during the recrystallization of Fe-Cr-Al oxide dispersion strengthened alloy is studied in this work. The goal is to determine the specific distribution pattern of oxides depending where they are located: in the matrix or at the grain boundaries. It was concluded that those located at the grain boundaries yielded a faster coarsening than the ones in the matrix, although no significant differences in composition and/or crystal structure were observed. However, the recrystallization heat treatment leads to the dissolution of the Y2O3 and its combination with Al to form the YAlO3 perovskite oxide particles process, mainly located at the grain boundaries. Finally, atom probe tomography analysis revealed a significant Ti build-up at the grain boundaries that might affect subsequent migration during recrystallization.

  2. Effect of hydrogen on internal friction and Young`s modulus of Fe-Cr-Mn austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Usui, Makoto; Asano, Shigeru

    1996-06-01

    The internal friction technique has so far been applied to studies on hydrogen behavior in iron and steel. The hydrogen cold-work peak is well known for pure iron and has also been observed in BCC iron alloys such as ferritic stainless steel and maraging steel. It provides important information about the hydrogen- dislocation interaction in the BCC iron lattice. Meanwhile, for FCC iron alloys such as austenitic stainless steel, another characteristic hydrogen internal friction peak has been found by authors` group and confirmed by several other investigators. In the present study, type 205 austenitic stainless steel (Fe-17Cr-15Mn) was chosen as a nickel-free FCC iron alloy, in which manganese is totally substituted for nickel in type 304 steel. This steel has an unstable FCC lattice as is the case of type 304 steel, in which hydrogen-induced phase transformation depends on the austenite stability. However, the present steel was confirmed to form the {var_epsilon}{sub H} phase after cathodic hydrogen charging in a similar manner to the stable FCC lattice of type 310 steel. In addition, the Fe-Cr-Mn alloy shows a marked anomaly in the temperature dependence of Young`s modulus: an abrupt drop near the Neel temperature T{sub N} and successive lowering below T{sub N}, as has been reported in the literature for some antiferromagnetic materials. The effect of hydrogen on Young`s modulus was studied by several investigators, but there was great inconsistency among their experimental results. The purpose of this paper is to confirm the hydrogen peak of internal friction in type 205 steel and to examine the effect of hydrogen on Young`s modulus of this steel.

  3. Solute redistribution and phase stability at FeCr/TiO2–x interfaces under ion irradiation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xu, Y.; Aguiar, J. A.; Yadav, S. K.; Anderoglu, O.; Baldwin, J. K.; Wang, Y. Q.; Valdez, James A.; Misra, A.; Luo, H. M.; Uberuaga, B. P.; et al

    2015-02-26

    Cr diffusion in trilayer thin films of 100 nm Fe–18Cr/125 nm TiO2–x/100 nm Fe–18Cr deposited on MgO substrates at 500 °C was studied by either annealing at 500 °C or Ni3+ ion irradiation at 500 °C. Microchemistry and microstructure evolution at the metal/oxide interfaces were investigated using (high-resolution) transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy. Diffusion of Cr into the O-deficient TiO2 layer, with negligible segregation to the FeCr/TiO2–x interface itself, was observed under both annealing and irradiation. Cr diffusion into TiO2–x was enhanced in ion-irradiated samples as compared to annealed. Irradiation-induced voids and amorphization ofmore » TiO2–x was also observed. The experimental results are rationalized using first-principles calculations that suggest an energetic preference for substituting Ti with Cr in sub-stoichiometric TiO2. Furthermore, the implications of these results on the irradiation stability of oxide-dispersed ferritic alloys are discussed.« less

  4. Charpy impact test results for low activation ferritic alloys irradiated to 30 dpa

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, L.E.; Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S.

    1996-04-01

    Miniature specimens of six low activation ferritic alloys have been impact field tested following irradiation at 370{degrees}C to 30 dpa. Comparison of the results with those of control specimens and specimens irradiated to 10 dpa indicates that degradation in the impact behavior appears to have saturated by {approx}10 dpa in at least four of these alloys. The 7.5Cr-2W alloy referred to as GA3X appears most promising for further consideration as a candidate structural material in fusion reactor applications, although the 9Cr-1V alloy may also warrant further investigation.

  5. Swelling and dislocation evolution in simple ferritic alloys irradiated to high fluence in FFTF/MOTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katoh, Yutai; Kohyama, Akira; Gelles, David S.

    1995-08-01

    Microstructures of a series of Fe sbnd Cr binary ferritic alloys were examined following neutron irradiation to 140 dpa at 698 K in FFTF/MOTA. The chromium concentration ranged from 3 to 18% in 3% increments and the irradiation temperature corresponded to the peak swelling condition for this alloy class. The swelling varied from 0.4 to 2.9% depending on chromium concentration, and the highest swelling was found in the Fe sbnd 9Cr alloy. The cavity microstructures corresponded to transient to early steady-state swelling regime. Dislocations were composed of networks with both a<100> and ( a/2)<111> Burgers vector and a<100> type interstitial loops. The dislocation density was negatively correlated with swelling. Explanation for the observed chromium concentration dependence of microstructural development and low swelling in the ferritic alloys will be studied in connection with the dislocation bias efficiency and the theory of sink strength ratio.

  6. SURFACE-MODIFIED FERRITIC INTERCONNECT MATERIALS FOR SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce R. Lanning; James Arps; Ronghua Wei; Goeff Dearnaley

    2004-03-15

    Interconnects are a critical element of an SOFC assembly and although much work has focused on chromium and chromium-iron alloys containing an oxide that is both oxidation resistant and electrically conductive, the thermal instability of typical native metal oxides allow interdiffusion of cations across the interconnect-electrode boundary that ultimately leads to degradation of SOFC performance. Phase I of the SECA Core Technology Program has been a one-year effort to investigate and evaluate the feasibility of: (1) Ion implanting an alumina-scale forming ferritic steel, such as FeCrAlY, to form an interconnect material with low resistance (< 0.1 {Omega}/cm{sup 2}) in oxidizing/reducing environments up to 800 C, and (2) Maintaining the above low resistance metric for an extended time (> 1000 hours at 800 C) in contact with an LSF cathode material. We confirmed, as part of our oxidation kinetics evaluation of FeCrAlY and 430 ferritic steel, the parabolic growth of a mixed chromia/alumina scale on FeCrAlY and a single chromia layer in the case of the 430 stainless steel; the outer contiguous layer of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, in the case of FeCrAlY, forming a stable, self-limiting, protective scale with no detectable cation interdiffusion between FeCrAlY and an LSF electrode even after 1000 hours at 800 C in air. To render the alumina scale conductive, we implanted either titanium or niobium ions into FeCrAlY scales to a fixed depth (0.12 {micro}m), varying only the thickness of the oxide. ASR for an un-doped FeCrAlY oxide scale (i.e., alumina) was more than an order of magnitude greater than the 430 control sample whereas, the ASR for the doped FeCrAlY oxide scale sample was comparable to the 430 control sample; hence, the resistance of a doped alumina scale on FeCrAlY was equal to the resistance of a chromia-scale forming alloy, such as 430 (chromia scales of which are typically < 0.1 {Omega}-cm). Along with the ASR measurements, AC impedance measurements were conducted

  7. The partitioning of alloying elements in vacuum arc remelted, Pd-modified PH 13-8 Mo alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieslak, M. J.; Vandenavyle, J. A.; Carr, M. J.; Hills, C. R.; Semarge, R. E.

    1988-12-01

    The partitioning of alloying elements in as-solidified PH 13-8 Mo stainless steel containing up to 1.02 wt pct Pd has been investigated. The as-solidified structure is composed of two major phases, martensite and ferrite. Electron probe microanalysis reveals that Mo, Cr, and Al partition to the ferrite phase while Fe, Ni, Mn, and Pd partition to the martensite (prior austenite) during solidification and cooling from the solidus. In addition to bulk segregation between phases, precipitation of the intermetallic, PdAI, in the retained ferrite is observed. Precipitation of the normal hardening phase, β-NiAl, is also observed in the retained ferrite. Partition ratios of the various alloying elements are determined and are compared with those observed previously in duplex Fe-Cr-Ni stainless steel solidification structures. The martensite start temperature (Ms) was observed to decrease with increasing Pd concentration.

  8. Self-Consistent Model for Planar Ferrite Growth in Fe-C-X Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurob, H. S.; Panahi, D.; Hutchinson, C. R.; Brechet, Y.; Purdy, G. R.

    2013-08-01

    A self-consistent model for non-partitioning planar ferrite growth from alloyed austenite is presented. The model captures the evolution with time of interfacial contact conditions for substitutional and interstitial solutes. Substitutional element solute drag is evaluated in terms of the dissipation of free energy within the interface, and an estimate is provided for the rate of buildup of the alloying element "spike" in austenite. The transport of the alloying elements within the interface region is modeled using a discrete-jump model, while the bulk diffusion of C is treated using a standard continuum treatment. The model is validated against ferrite precipitation and decarburization kinetics in the Fe-Ni-C, Fe-Mn-C, and Fe-Mo-C systems.

  9. Detection and quantification of solute clusters in a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Miller, Michael K.; Larson, David J.; Reinhard, D. A.

    2014-12-26

    A series of simulated atom probe datasets were examined with a friends-of-friends method to establish the detection efficiency required to resolve solute clusters in the ferrite phase of a 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy. The size and number densities of solute clusters in the ferrite of the as-milled mechanically-alloyed condition and the stir zone of a friction stir weld were estimated with a prototype high-detection-efficiency (~80%) local electrode atom probe. High number densities, 1.8 × 1024 m–3 and 1.2 × 1024 m–3, respectively of solute clusters containing between 2 and 9 solute atoms of Ti, Y and O and were detectedmore » for these two conditions. Furthermore, these results support first principle calculations that predicted that vacancies stabilize these Ti–Y–O– clusters, which retard diffusion and contribute to the excellent high temperature stability of the microstructure and radiation tolerance of nanostructured ferritic alloys.« less

  10. Detection and quantification of solute clusters in a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Michael K.; Larson, David J.; Reinhard, D. A.

    2014-12-26

    A series of simulated atom probe datasets were examined with a friends-of-friends method to establish the detection efficiency required to resolve solute clusters in the ferrite phase of a 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy. The size and number densities of solute clusters in the ferrite of the as-milled mechanically-alloyed condition and the stir zone of a friction stir weld were estimated with a prototype high-detection-efficiency (~80%) local electrode atom probe. High number densities, 1.8 × 1024 m–3 and 1.2 × 1024 m–3, respectively of solute clusters containing between 2 and 9 solute atoms of Ti, Y and O and were detected for these two conditions. Furthermore, these results support first principle calculations that predicted that vacancies stabilize these Ti–Y–O– clusters, which retard diffusion and contribute to the excellent high temperature stability of the microstructure and radiation tolerance of nanostructured ferritic alloys.