Science.gov

Sample records for ferritic ods alloys

  1. Joining Techniques for Ferritic ODS Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    V.G. Krishnardula; V.G. Krishnardula; D.E. Clark; T.C. Totemeier

    2005-06-01

    This report presents results of research on advanced joining techniques for ferritic oxide-dispersion strengthened alloys MA956 and PM2000. The joining techniques studied were resistance pressure welding (also known as pressure forge welding), transient liquid phase bonding, and diffusion bonding. All techniques were shown to produce sound joints in fine-grained, unrecrystallized alloys. Post-bond heat treatment to produce a coarse-grained, recrystallized microstructure resulted in grain growth across the bondline for transient liquid phase and diffusion bonds, giving microstructures essentially identical to that of the parent alloy in the recrystallized condition. The effects of bond orientation, boron interlayer thickness, and bonding parameters are discussed for transient liquid phase and diffusion bonding. The report concludes with a brief discussion of ODS joining techniques and their applicability to GEN IV reactor systems.

  2. Ion-induced swelling of ODS ferritic alloy MA957 tubing to 500 dpa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloczko, M. B.; Garner, F. A.; Voyevodin, V. N.; Bryk, V. V.; Borodin, O. V.; Mel'nychenko, V. V.; Kalchenko, A. S.

    2014-10-01

    In order to study the potential swelling behavior of the ODS ferritic alloy MA957 at very high dpa levels, specimens were prepared from pressurized tubes that were unirradiated archives of tubes previously irradiated in FFTF to doses as high as 110 dpa. These unirradiated specimens were irradiated with 1.8 MeV Cr+ ions to doses ranging from 100 to 500 dpa and examined by transmission electron microscopy. No co-injection of helium or hydrogen was employed. It was shown that compared to several tempered ferritic/martensitic steels irradiated in the same facility, these tubes were rather resistant to void swelling, reaching a maximum value of only 4.5% at 500 dpa and 450 °C. In this fine-grained material, the distribution of swelling was strongly influenced by the presence of void denuded zones along the grain boundaries.

  3. Ion-induced swelling of ODS ferritic alloy MA957 tubing to 500 dpa

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Garner, F. A.; Voyevodin, V.; Bryk, V. V.; Borodin, O. V.; Melnichenko, V. V.; Kalchenko, A. S.

    2014-10-01

    In order to study the potential swelling behavior of the ODS ferritic alloy MA957 at very high dpa levels, specimens were prepared from pressurized tubes that were unirradiated archives of tubes previously irradiated in FFTF to doses as high at 110 dpa. These unirradiated specimens were irradiated with 1.8 MeV Cr+ ions to doses ranging from 100 to 500 dpa and examined by transmission electron microscopy. No coinjection of helium or hydrogen was employed. It was shown that compared to several ferritic/martensitic steels irradiated in the same facility, these tubes were rather resistant to void swelling, reaching a maximum value of only 4.5% at 500 dpa and 450°C. In this fine-grained material, the distribution of swelling was strongly influenced by the presence of void denuded zones along the grain boundaries.

  4. ODS Ferritic/martensitic alloys for Sodium Fast Reactor fuel pin cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubuisson, Philippe; Carlan, Yann de; Garat, Véronique; Blat, Martine

    2012-09-01

    The development of ODS materials for the cladding for Sodium Fast Reactors is a key issue to achieve the objectives required for the GEN IV reactors. CEA, AREVA and EDF have launched in 2007 an important program to determine the optimal fabrication parameters, and to measure and understand the microstructure and properties before, under and after irradiation of such cladding materials. The aim of this paper is to present the French program and the major results obtained recently at CEA on Fe-9/14/18Cr1WTiY2O3 ferritic/martensitic ODS materials. The first step of the program was to consolidate Fe-9/14/18Cr ODS materials as plates and bars to study the microstructure and the mechanical properties of the new alloys. The second step consists in producing tubes at a geometry representative of the cladding of new Sodium Fast Reactors. The optimization of the fabrication route at the laboratory scale is conducted and different tubes were produced. Their microstructure depends on the martensitic (Fe-9Cr) or ferritic (Fe-14Cr) structure. To join the plug to the tube, the reference process is the welding resistance. A specific approach is developed to model the process and support the development of the welds performed within the "SOPRANO" facility. The development at CEA of Fe-9/14/18Cr new ODS materials for the cladding for GENIV Sodium Fast Reactors is in progress. The first microstructural and mechanical characterizations are very encouraging and the full assessment and qualification of this new alloys and products will pass through the irradiation of specimens, tubes, fuel pins and subassemblies up to high doses.

  5. Effect of mechanical alloying atmosphere on the microstructure and Charpy impact properties of an ODS ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksiuta, Z.; Baluc, N.

    2009-04-01

    Two types of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels, with the composition of Fe-14Cr-2W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3 (in weight percent), have been produced by mechanically alloying elemental powders of Fe, Cr, W, and Ti with Y 2O 3 particles either in argon atmosphere or in hydrogen atmosphere, degassing at various temperatures, and compacting the mechanically alloyed powders by hot isostatic pressing. It was found in particular that mechanical alloying in hydrogen yields a significant reduction in oxygen content in the materials, a lower dislocation density, and a strong improvement in the fast fracture properties of the ODS ferritic steels, as measured by Charpy impact tests.

  6. Residual ferrite formation in 12CrODS steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukai, S.; Kudo, Y.; Wu, X.; Oono, N.; Hayashi, S.; Ohtsuka, S.; Kaito, T.

    2014-12-01

    Increasing Cr content from 9 to 12 mass% leads to superior corrosion and high-temperature oxidation resistances, and usually changes microstructure from martensite to a ferrite. To make transformable martensitic type of 12CrODS steels that have superior processing capability by using α/γ phase transformation, alloy design was conducted through varying nickel content. The structure of 12CrODS steels was successfully modified from full ferrite to a transformable martensite-base matrix containing ferrite. This ferrite consists of both equilibrium ferrite and a metastable residual ferrite. It was shown that the fraction of the equilibrium ferrite is predictable by computed phase diagram and formation of the residual ferrite was successfully evaluated through pinning of α/γ interfacial boundaries by oxide particles.

  7. Past research and fabrication conducted at SCK•CEN on ferritic ODS alloys used as cladding for FBR's fuel pins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bremaecker, Anne

    2012-09-01

    -destructive tests (ultrasonic and eddy currents) were also developed. In-pile creep in argon and in liquid sodium was deeply studied on pressurized segments irradiated up to 75 dpaNRT. Finally two fuel assemblies cladded with such ODS alloys were irradiated in Phenix to the max dose of 90 dpa. Creep deformation and swelling were limited but the irradiation-induced embrittlement became acute. The programme was stopped shortly after the Chernobyl disaster, before the embrittlement problem was solved.

  8. Role of Y-Al oxides during extended recovery process of a ferritic ODS alloy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Capdevila, C.; Pimentel, G.; Aranda, M. M.; Rementeria, R.; Dawson, K.; Urones-Garrote, E.; Tatlock, G. J.; Miller, Michael K.

    2015-08-04

    The microstructural stability of Y-Al oxides during the recrystallization of Fe-Cr-Al oxide dispersion strengthened alloy is studied in this work. The goal is to determine the specific distribution pattern of oxides depending where they are located: in the matrix or at the grain boundaries. It was concluded that those located at the grain boundaries yielded a faster coarsening than the ones in the matrix, although no significant differences in composition and/or crystal structure were observed. However, the recrystallization heat treatment leads to the dissolution of the Y2O3 and its combination with Al to form the YAlO3 perovskite oxide particles process,more » mainly located at the grain boundaries. Lastly, atom probe tomography analysis revealed a significant Ti build-up at the grain boundaries that might affect subsequent migration during recrystallization.« less

  9. Role of Y-Al oxides during extended recovery process of a ferritic ODS alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Capdevila, C.; Pimentel, G.; Aranda, M. M.; Rementeria, R.; Dawson, K.; Urones-Garrote, E.; Tatlock, G. J.; Miller, Michael K.

    2015-08-04

    The microstructural stability of Y-Al oxides during the recrystallization of Fe-Cr-Al oxide dispersion strengthened alloy is studied in this work. The goal is to determine the specific distribution pattern of oxides depending where they are located: in the matrix or at the grain boundaries. It was concluded that those located at the grain boundaries yielded a faster coarsening than the ones in the matrix, although no significant differences in composition and/or crystal structure were observed. However, the recrystallization heat treatment leads to the dissolution of the Y2O3 and its combination with Al to form the YAlO3 perovskite oxide particles process, mainly located at the grain boundaries. Lastly, atom probe tomography analysis revealed a significant Ti build-up at the grain boundaries that might affect subsequent migration during recrystallization.

  10. Role of Y-Al Oxides During Extended Recovery Process of a Ferritic ODS Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capdevila, C.; Pimentel, G.; Aranda, M. M.; Rementeria, R.; Dawson, K.; Urones-Garrote, E.; Tatlock, G. J.; Miller, M. K.

    2015-08-01

    The microstructural stability of Y-Al oxides during the recrystallization of Fe-Cr-Al oxide dispersion strengthened alloy is studied in this work. The goal is to determine the specific distribution pattern of oxides depending where they are located: in the matrix or at the grain boundaries. It was concluded that those located at the grain boundaries yielded a faster coarsening than the ones in the matrix, although no significant differences in composition and/or crystal structure were observed. However, the recrystallization heat treatment leads to the dissolution of the Y2O3 and its combination with Al to form the YAlO3 perovskite oxide particles process, mainly located at the grain boundaries. Finally, atom probe tomography analysis revealed a significant Ti build-up at the grain boundaries that might affect subsequent migration during recrystallization.

  11. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, David S.; Ghoniem, Nasr M.; Powell, Roger W.

    1986-01-01

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  12. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, D.S.; Ghoniem, N.M.; Powell, R.W.

    1985-02-07

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  13. The oxidation and corrosion of ODS alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowell, Carl E.; Barrett, Charles A.

    1990-01-01

    The oxidation and hot corrosion of high temperature oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys are reviewed. The environmental resistance of such alloys are classified by oxide growth rate, oxide volatility, oxide spalling, and hot corrosion limitations. Also discussed are environmentally resistant coatings for ODS materials. It is concluded that ODS NiCrAl and FeCrAl alloys are highly oxidation and corrosion resistant and can probably be used uncoated.

  14. Precipitates and boundaries interaction in ferritic ODS steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallez, Nicolas; Hatzoglou, Constantinos; Delabrouille, Fredéric; Sornin, Denis; Chaffron, Laurent; Blat-Yrieix, Martine; Radiguet, Bertrand; Pareige, Philippe; Donnadieu, Patricia; Bréchet, Yves

    2016-04-01

    In the course of a recrystallization study of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels during extrusion, particular interest was paid to the (GB) Grain Boundaries interaction with precipitates. Complementary and corresponding characterization experiments using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and Atom Probe Tomography (APT) have been carried out on a voluntarily interrupted extrusion or extruded samples. Microscopic observations of Precipitate Free Zones (PFZ) and precipitates alignments suggest precipitate interaction with migrating GB involving dissolution and Oswald ripening of the precipitates. This is consistent with the local chemical information gathered by EDX and APT. This original mechanism for ODS steels is similar to what had been proposed in the late 80s for similar observation made on Ti alloys reinforced by nanosized yttrium oxides: An interaction mechanism between grain boundaries and precipitates involving a diffusion controlled process of precipitates dissolution at grain boundaries. It is believed that this mechanism can be of primary importance to explain the mechanical behaviour of such steels.

  15. The filler powders laser welding of ODS ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Shenyong; Lei, Yucheng; Zhu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Laser welding was performed on Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel with the self-designed filler powders. The filler powders were added to weld metal to produce nano-particles (Y-M-O and TiC), submicron particles (Y-M-O) and dislocation rings. The generated particles were evenly distributed in the weld metal and their forming mechanism and behavior were analyzed. The results of the tests showed that the nano-particles, submicron particles and dislocation rings were able to improve the micro-hardness and tensile strength of welded joint, and the filler powders laser welding was an effective welding method of ODS ferritic steel.

  16. The influence of Cr content on the mechanical properties of ODS ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shaofu; Zhou, Zhangjian; Jang, Jinsung; Wang, Man; Hu, Helong; Sun, Hongying; Zou, Lei; Zhang, Guangming; Zhang, Liwei

    2014-12-01

    The present investigation aimed at researching the mechanical properties of the oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels with different Cr content, which were fabricated through a consolidation of mechanical alloyed (MA) powders of 0.35 wt.% nano Y2O3 dispersed Fe-12.0Cr-0.5Ti-1.0W (alloy A), Fe-16.0Cr-0.5Ti-1.0W (alloy B), and Fe-18.0Cr-0.5Ti-1.0W (alloy C) alloys (all in wt.%) by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) with 100 MPa pressure at 1150 °C for 3 h. The mechanical properties, including the tensile strength, hardness, and impact fracture toughness were tested by universal testers, while Young's modulus was determined by ultrasonic wave non-destructive tester. It was found that the relationship between Cr content and the strength of ODS ferritic steels was not a proportional relationship. However, too high a Cr content will cause the precipitation of Cr-enriched segregation phase, which is detrimental to the ductility of ODS ferritic steels.

  17. Progress in ODS Alloys: A Synopsis of a 2010 Workshop on Fe- Based ODS Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kad, Bimal; Dryepondt, Sebastien N; Jones, Andy R.; Vito, Cedro III; Tatlock, Gordon J; Pint, Bruce A; Tortorelli, Peter F; Rawls, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    In Fall 2010, a workshop on the role and future of Fe-based Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) alloys gathered together ODS alloy suppliers, potential industrial end-users, and technical experts in relevant areas. Presentations and discussions focused on the current state of development of these alloys, their availability from commercial suppliers, past major evaluations of ODS alloy components in fossil and nuclear energy applications, and the technical and economic issues attendant to commercial use of ODS alloys. Significant progress has been achieved in joining ODS alloys, with creep resistant joints successfully made by inertia welding, friction stir welding and plasma-assisted pulse diffusion bonding, and in improving models for the prediction of lifetime components. New powder and alloy fabrication methods to lower cost or improve endproduct properties were also described. The final open discussion centered on challenges and pathways for further development and large-scale use of ODS alloys.

  18. Structure of Oxide Nanoparticles in Fe-16Cr MA/ODS Ferritic Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L; Fluss, M; Kimura, A

    2010-04-06

    Oxide nanoparticles in Fe-16Cr ODS ferritic steel fabricated by mechanical alloying (MA) method have been examined using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. A partial crystallization of oxide nanoparticles was frequently observed in as-fabricated ODS steel. The crystal structure of crystalline oxide particles is identified to be mainly Y{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 9} (YAM) with a monoclinic structure. Large nanoparticles with a diameter larger than 20 nm tend to be incoherent and have a nearly spherical shape, whereas small nanoparticles with a diameter smaller than 10 nm tend to be coherent or semi-coherent and have faceted boundaries. The oxide nanoparticles become fully crystallized after prolonged annealing at 900 C. These results lead us to propose a three-stage formation mechanism of oxide nanoparticles in MA/ODS steels.

  19. High strength ferritic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Hagel, William C.; Smidt, Frederick A.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1977-01-01

    A high-strength ferritic alloy useful for fast reactor duct and cladding applications where an iron base contains from about 9% to about 13% by weight chromium, from about 4% to about 8% by weight molybdenum, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight niobium, from about 0.1% to about 0.3% by weight vanadium, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight silicon, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight manganese, a maximum of about 0.05% by weight nitrogen, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight sulfur, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight phosphorous, and from about 0.04% to about 0.12% by weight carbon.

  20. HRTEM Study of the Role of Nanoparticles in ODS Ferritic Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L; Tumey, S; Fluss, M; Serruys, Y; Willaime, F

    2011-08-30

    Structures of nanoparticles and their role in dual-ion irradiated Fe-16Cr-4.5Al-0.3Ti-2W-0.37Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (K3) ODS ferritic steel produced by mechanical alloying (MA) were studied using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. The observation of Y{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 9} complex-oxide nanoparticles in the ODS steel imply that decomposition of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} in association with internal oxidation of Al occurred during mechanical alloying. HRTEM observations of crystalline and partially crystalline nanoparticles larger than {approx}2 nm and amorphous cluster-domains smaller than {approx}2 nm provide an insight into the formation mechanism of nanoparticles/clusters in MA/ODS steels, which we believe involves solid-state amorphization and re-crystallization. The role of nanoparticles/clusters in suppressing radiation-induced swelling is revealed through TEM examinations of cavity distributions in (Fe + He) dual-ion irradiated K3-ODS steel. HRTEM observations of helium-filled cavities (helium bubbles) preferably trapped at nanoparticle/clusters in dual-ion irradiated K3-ODS are presented.

  1. Reduction in Defect Content of ODS Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ritherdon, J

    2001-05-15

    The work detailed within this report is a continuation of earlier work carried out under contract number 1DX-SY382V. The earlier work comprises a literature review of the sources and types of defects found principally in Fe-based ODS alloys as well as experimental work designed to identify defects in the prototype ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al alloy, deduce their origins and to recommend methods of defect reduction. The present work is an extension of the experimental work already reported and concentrates on means of reduction of defects already identified rather than the search for new defect types. This report also includes results gathered during powder separation trials, conducted by the University of Groningen, Netherlands and coordinated by the University of Liverpool, involving the separation of different metallic powders in terms of their differing densities. The scope and objectives of the present work were laid out in the technical proposal ''Reduction in Defect Content in ODS Alloys-III''. All the work proposed in the ''Statement of Work'' section of the technical proposal has been carried out and all work extra to the ''Statement of Work'' falls within the context of an ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al alloy of improved overall quality and potential creep performance in the consolidated form. The outturn of the experimental work performed is reported in the following sections.

  2. Characterization of Two ODS Alloys: Chromium-18 ODS and Chromium-9 ODS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Julianne

    ODS alloys, or oxide dispersion strengthened alloys, are made from elemental or pre-alloyed metal powders mechanically alloyed with oxide powders in a high-energy attributor mill, and then consolidated by either hot isostatic pressing or hot extrusion causing the production of nanometer scale oxide and carbide particles within the alloy matrix; crystalline properties such as creep strength, ductility, corrosion resistance, tensile strength, swelling resistance, and resistance to embrittlement are all observed to be improved by the presence of nanoparticles in the matrix. The presented research uses various methods to observe and characterize the microstructural and microchemical properties of two experimental ODS alloys, 18Cr ODS and 9Cr ODS. The results found aid in assessing the influence of chemical and structural variations on the effectiveness of the alloy, and further aid in the optimization of these advanced alloys for future use in nuclear cladding and structural applications in Generation IV nuclear reactors. Characterization of these alloys has been conducted in order to identify the second-phase small precipitates through FESEM, TEM, EDS, Synchrotron X-ray diffraction analysis, and CuKalpha XRD analysis of bulk samples and of nanoparticles after extraction from the alloy matrix. Comparison of results from these methods allows further substantiation of the accuracy of observed nanoparticle composition and identification. Also, TEM samples of the two alloys have been irradiated in-situ with 1 MeV Kr and 300 keV Fe ions to various doses and temperatures at the IVEM-Tandem TEM at Argonne National Laboratory and post-irradiated characterization has been conducted and compared to the pre-irradiated characterization results in order to observe the microstructural and microchemical evolution of nanoparticles under irradiation. Overall in the as-received state, the initial Y2O3 is not found anymore and in addition to oxide particles the alloys contain carbides

  3. Microstructure of a 14Cr-ODS ferritic steel before and after helium ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chenyang; Lu, Zheng; Xie, Rui; Liu, Chunming; Wang, Lumin

    2014-12-01

    A 14Cr-ODS ferritic steel with the nominal compositions of Fe-14Cr-2 W-0.3Ti-0.3Y2O3 (wt.%) was produced by mechanical alloying (MA) and hot isostatic pressing (HIP). Helium ion was implanted into the 14Cr-ODS steel along with Eurofer 97 steel as reference at 400 °C to a fluence of 1 × 1017 He+/cm2. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), high angle annual dark field (HAADF) scanning TEM (STEM) and atom probe tomography (APT) were used to characterize the microstructure of 14Cr-ODS and Eurofer 97 steels before and after helium implantation. High-density Y-Ti-O-rich nanoclusters and Y2Ti2O7 precipitates as well as large Cr-Ti rich oxides were observed in the 14Cr-ODS steel. The average size of Y-Ti-O nanoclusters and Y2Ti2O7 precipitates is 9 nm. After helium implantation, the helium bubbles formed in the 14Cr-ODS steel exhibit the smaller size and the lower volume fraction than that in Eurofer 97 steel, indicating high-density nano-scale precipitates can effectively suppress the coarsening of helium bubbles.

  4. Reduction in Defect Content in ODS Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, A.R.; Ritherdon, J.; Prior, D.J.

    2003-04-22

    In order to develop FeCrAl-based ODS alloy tubing with the coarse, high aspect ratio, appropriately oriented grain structures likely to deliver enhanced high temperature (11000C) hoop creep strength compared to conventionally formed ODS alloy tubing, flow forming techniques were explored in a European funded programme. The evolution of microstructure in PM2000 alloy tubing formed by warm flow forming techniques has been the subject of continuing investigation and more detailed study in the current work. The warm flow formed tubes investigated were produced by reverse flow forming using three, 1200 opposed rollers described around a tube preform supported on a driven mandrel. This produced a complex pattern of shape changing deformation, driven from the outer surface of the tube preforms. The grain size and shape together with the pattern of nucleation and growth of secondary recrystallization that developed through the thickness of the tube wall during the subsequent high temperature annealing (13800C) of these warm flow formed samples is described, as are the textures that formed. The unusual pattern and shape of secondary recrystallized grain structures that formed on the outer surfaces of the flow formed tubes closely follows the pattern and pitch of the flow forming rollers. The local texture, grain shape and pattern of misorientation in the surface of warm flow formed tubes that was associated with the development of these outer surface microstructures are described. Parallel studies have continued on the influence of microstructural inhomogeneities on the development of secondary recrystallized grain structures in ODS alloys. As part of this work, a separate variant of PM2000 alloy with additions of 1 wt.% ODS-free Fe powder have been manufactured as extruded bar by Plansee GmbH. The initial recrystallization behavior of the variant has been studied and cross-compared with the recrystallization behavior found in a prototype ODS-Fe3Al alloy, notably where the

  5. Reduction in Defect Content of ODS Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ritherdon, J

    2003-11-17

    The work detailed within this report is a continuation of earlier work carried out under contract number 1DX-SY382V. The earlier work comprises a literature review of the sources and types of defects found principally in Fe-based ODS alloys as well as experimental work designed to identify defects in the prototype ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al alloy, deduce their origins and to recommend methods of defect reduction. The present work is an extension of the experimental work already reported and concentrates on means of reduction of defects already identified rather than the search for new defect types. This report also includes work regarding the manipulation of grain structures via deformation processing and further results gathered during powder separation trials involving the separation of different metallic powders in terms of their differing densities. The scope and objectives of the present work were laid out in the technical proposal ''Reduction in Defect Content in ODS Alloys-IV''. All the work proposed in the ''Statement of Work'' section of the technical proposal has been carried out except for some of that dependent on the acquisition of materials from other sources. However, wherever omissions from the ''Plan of Action'' detailed in the ''Statement of Work'' have occurred due to lack of suitable materials, other related experimental work has been devised to fill the gaps where possible. All work extra to the ''Statement of Work'' falls within the context of an ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al alloy of improved overall quality and potential creep performance in the consolidated form. The outturn of the experimental work performed is reported in the following sections.

  6. Mechanical behaviour of ferritic ODS steels - Temperature dependancy and anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, B.; Steckmeyer, A.; Rouffie, A.-L.; Malaplate, J.; Garnier, J.; Ratti, M.; Wident, P.; Ziolek, L.; Tournie, I.; Rabeau, V.; Gentzbittel, J. M.; Kruml, T.; Kubena, I.

    2012-11-01

    Ferritic 14%Cr and 18%Cr ODS steels produced at CEA in round bars or plates were tested mechanically. The present paper reports results obtained in tension, impact, fatigue, creep and toughness tests. These tests were carried out at various temperatures and in different directions. These materials show a pronounced anisotropy at all tested temperatures. No matter the loading, the transversal direction is always found to be far less resistant than the longitudinal one. This anisotropy is mainly observed in terms of damage mechanisms, with intergranular fracture preferentially occurring along the extrusion direction. This intergranular fracture mode leads to very low and anisotropic toughness values and to the absence of tertiairy creep stage, pointing out the unstable nature of fracture, even at high temperature. The unrealistically high values of the Norton exponent measured in creep suggests the existence of a threshold stress, which is consistent with the mainly kinematic nature of the stress as revealed by fatigue tests.

  7. Development of Austenitic ODS Strengthened Alloys for Very High Temperature Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbins, James; Heuser, Brent; Robertson, Ian; Sehitoglu, Huseyin; Sofronis, Petros; Gewirth, Andrew

    2015-04-22

    This “Blue Sky” project was directed at exploring the opportunities that would be gained by developing Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) alloys based on the Fe-Cr-Ni austenitic alloy system. A great deal of research effort has been directed toward ferritic and ferritic/martensitic ODS alloys which has resulted in reasonable advances in alloy properties. Similar gains should be possible with austenitic alloy which would also take advantage of other superior properties of that alloy system. The research effort was aimed at the developing an in-depth understanding of the microstructural-level strengthening effects of ODS particles in austentic alloys. This was accomplished on a variety of alloy compositions with the main focus on 304SS and 316SS compositions. A further goal was to develop an understanding other the role of ODS particles on crack propagation and creep performance. Since these later two properties require bulk alloy material which was not available, this work was carried out on promising austentic alloy systems which could later be enhanced with ODS strengthening. The research relied on a large variety of micro-analytical techniques, many of which were available through various scientific user facilities. Access to these facilities throughout the course of this work was instrumental in gathering complimentary data from various analysis techniques to form a well-rounded picture of the processes which control austenitic ODS alloy performance. Micromechanical testing of the austenitic ODS alloys confirmed their highly superior mechanical properties at elevated temperature from the enhanced strengthening effects. The study analyzed the microstructural mechanisms that provide this enhanced high temperature performance. The findings confirm that the smallest size ODS particles provide the most potent strengthening component. Larger particles and other thermally- driven precipitate structures were less effective contributors and, in some cases, limited

  8. On the Role of Alloy Composition and Sintering Parameters in the Bimodal Grain Size Distribution and Mechanical Properties of ODS Ferritic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Junceda, Andrea; Campos, Mónica; García-Rodríguez, Nerea; Torralba, José Manuel

    2016-04-01

    A sintered 14Cr-5Al-3W oxide dispersion strengthened steel was produced by mechanical alloying and consolidated by field-assisted hot pressing. First, a nanostructured powder was developed thanks to the high-energy milling used for introducing 0.4Ti-0.25Y2O3-0.6ZrO2 into the prealloyed Fe-Cr-Al-W powder, and then the processed powders were consolidated under a low diffusive technique to better retain the microstructure inherited from milling. The effect of the addition of zirconia and of the pressure applied during sintering on the final bimodal grain microstructure and mechanical properties is assessed. Both parameters are responsible for the refinement of the microstructure by increasing the volume fraction of the ultrafine grains (0 to 400 nm), leading to an enhancement of the mechanical properties, such as the microhardness and tensile strength.

  9. Long-term high temperature oxidation behavior of ODS ferritics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pint, B. A.; Wright, I. G.

    2002-12-01

    Four oxide dispersion strengthened Fe-(13-14 at.%) Cr ferritic compositions were exposed in air and air with 10 vol.% water vapor for up to 10 000 h at 700-1100 °C. At 700-800 °C in air, the reaction rates were very low for all of the alloys compared to stainless steels. At 900 °C, a dispersion of Y 2O 3, compared to Al 2O 3, showed a distinct benefit in improving the oxidation resistance, due to a reactive element effect. However, failure occurred after 7000 h at 900 °C when only 13% Cr was present. The absence of Ti and W in one alloy appeared to result in a thinner reaction product after oxidation at 800 °C. One composition was exposed in 10 vol.% water vapor at 800 and 900 °C and in air at 1000 and 1100 °C. Under both of these conditions, there was a significant increase in the rates of oxidation. With the relatively low Cr contents in these alloys, their corrosion-limited operating temperature in air is near 900 °C.

  10. Hot-rolling of reduced activation 8CrODS ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaochao; Ukai, Shigeharu; Leng, Bin; Oono, Naoko; Hayashi, Shigenari; Sakasegawa, Hideo; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu

    2013-11-01

    The 8CrODS ferritic steel is based on J1-lot developed for the advanced fusion blanket material to increase the coolant outlet temperature. A hot-rolling was conducted at the temperature above Ar3 of 716 °C, and its effect on the microstructure and tensile strength in 8CrODS ferritic steel was evaluated, comparing together with normalized and tempered specimen. It was confirmed that hot-rolling leads to slightly increased fraction of the ferrite and highly improved tensile strength. This ferrite was formed by transformation from the hot-rolled austenite during cooling due to fine austenite grains induced by hot-rolling. The coarsening of the transformed ferrite in hot-rolled specimen can be attributed to the crystalline rotation and coalescence of the similar oriented grains. The improved strength of hot-rolled specimen was ascribed to the high dislocation density and replacement of easily deformed martensite with the transformed coarse ferrite.

  11. In situ synchrotron tensile investigations on 14YWT, MA957, and 9-Cr ODS alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jun-Li; Mo, Kun; Yun, Di; Miao, Yinbin; Liu, Xiang; Zhao, Huijuan; Hoelzer, David T.; Park, Jun-Sang; Almer, Jonathan; Zhang, Guangming; Zhou, Zhangjian; Stubbins, James F.; Yacout, Abdellatif M.

    2016-04-01

    Advanced ODS alloys provide exceptional radiation tolerance and high-temperature mechanical properties when compared to traditional ferritic and ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels. Their remarkable properties result from ultrahigh density and ultrafine size of Y-Ti-O nanoclusters within the ferritic matrix. In this work, we applied a high-energy synchrotron radiation X-ray to study the deformation process of three advanced ODS materials including 14YWT, MA957, and 9-Cr ODS steel. Only the relatively large nanoparticles in the 9-Cr ODS were observed in the synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The nanoclusters in both 14YWT and MA957 were invisible in the measurement due to their non-stoichiometric nature. Due to the different sizes of nanoparticles and nanoclusters in the materials, the Orowan looping was considered to be the major strengthening mechanism in the 9-Cr ODS, while the dispersed-barrier-hardening is dominant strengthening mechanism in both 14YWT and MA957, This analysis was inferred from the different build-up rates of dislocation density when plastic deformation was initiated. Finally, the dislocation densities interpreted from the X-ray measurements were successfully modeled using the Bergström's dislocation models.

  12. Tensile anisotropy and creep properties of a Fe-14CrWTi ODS ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steckmeyer, A.; Rodrigo, Vargas Hideroa; Gentzbittel, J. M.; Rabeau, V.; Fournier, B.

    2012-07-01

    A Fe-14Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel is studied as a potential material for cladding tube application for the next generation of fast-breeder nuclear reactors. Tensile specimens machined out from a hot extruded round bar in three different orientations are used to evaluate the mechanical anisotropy of this steel for temperatures in the range 20-750 °C. Its anisotropy is discussed both in terms of mechanical strength and fracture mode. At high temperatures (HTs), above 500 °C, the longitudinal direction appears to be the most ductile and most resistant direction. Longitudinal creep tests between 650 °C and 900 °C were also carried out. They show this ODS steel has a high HT creep lifetime and a low creep failure strain. Intergranular cracks aligned along the loading axis were observed on fractured creep specimens. They reveal a particular weakness of prior particle boundaries and suggest to modify the elaboration process through mechanical alloying and hot extrusion.

  13. High heat flux testing of 12-14Cr ODS ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pintsuk, G.; Oksiuta, Z.; Linke, J.; Baluc, N.

    2010-01-01

    The thermal performance of Fe-(12-14)Cr-2W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3 ODS reduced activation ferritic steels, which are considered as candidate first wall materials for the future fusion power reactors and were manufactured by mechanical alloying in hydrogen and hot isostatic pressing, was assessed by high heat flux (HHF) testing with the electron beam JUDITH facility at the Forschungszentrum Jülich (FZJ), Germany. An analysis of the microhardness and microstructure of the specimens was done before and after HHF tests. In general, both materials present a ferritic (α-Fe, bcc) microstructure with a wide range of grain sizes from 100 to 500 nm up to a few micrometers. The coarse grains are almost dislocation-free, while the smaller ones are surrounded by tangles of dislocations. Oxide and carbide impurities (about a few hundreds nm in size) and a high density of Y-Ti-O nano-clusters, with a mean size of about 5 nm, are also present. The microhardness, density and tensile strength of the 14Cr material are slightly larger than those of the 12Cr material. HHF tests revealed that there is no difference in thermal performance, level of degradation and erosion behaviour of 12Cr and 14Cr ODS steels. The onset of melting of the materials occurs for an energy density between 1 and 1.5 MJ/m 2. Below this value only some kind of thermal etching takes place. This is a significant improvement compared to stainless steel, for which severe plastic deformation at the material surface was observed.

  14. In Situ Synchrotron Tensile Investigations on 14YWT, MA957 and 9-Cr ODS Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jun-Li; Mo, Kun; Yun, Di; Miao, Yinbin; Liu, Xiang; Zhao, Huijuan; Hoelzer, David T; Park, Jun-Sang; Almer, Jonathan; Zhang, Guangming; Zhou, Zhangjian; Stubbins, James; Yacout, Abdellatif

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) provide exceptional radiation tolerance and high-temperature mechanical properties when compared to traditional ferritic and ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels. Their remarkable properties result from ultrahigh density and ultrafine size of Y-Ti-O nanoclusters within the ferritic matrix. In this work, we applied a high-energy synchrotron radiation X-ray to study the deformation process of two NFAs including 14YWT and MA957, and a 9-Cr ODS steel. Only the relatively large nanoparticles in the 9-Cr ODS were observed in the synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The nanoclusters in both 14 YWT and MA957 were invisible in the measurement due to their non-stoichiometric nature. Due to the different sizes of nanoparticles and nanoclusters in the materials, the Orowan looping was considered to be the major strengthening mechanism in the 9-Cr ODS, while the dispersed-barrier-hardening is dominant strengthening mechanism in both 14YWT and MA957, respectively. This analysis was inferred from the different build-up rates of dislocation density when plastic deformation was initiated. Finally, the dislocation densities interpreted from the X-ray measurements were successfully modeled using the Bergstr m s dislocation models.

  15. Tantalum modified ferritic iron base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldrieve, R. E.; Blankenship, C. P. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Strong ferritic alloys of the Fe-CR-Al type containing 0.4% to 2% tantalum were developed. These alloys have improved fabricability without sacrificing high temperature strength and oxidation resistance in the 800 C (1475 F) to 1040 C (1900 F) range.

  16. Development of ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, I.G.; Pint, B.A.; Tortorelli, P.F.; McKamey, C.G.

    1997-12-01

    The overall goal of this program is to develop an oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) version of Fe{sub 3}Al that has sufficient creep strength and resistance to oxidation at temperatures in the range 1000 to 1200 C to be suitable for application as heat exchanger tubing in advanced power generation cycles. The main areas being addressed are: (a) alloy processing to achieve the desired alloy grain size and shape, and (b) optimization of the oxidation behavior to provide increased service life compared to semi-commercial ODS-FeCrAl alloys intended for the same applications. The recent studies have focused on mechanically-alloyed powder from a commercial alloy vendor. These starting alloy powders were very clean in terms of oxygen content compared to ORNL-produced powders, but contained similar levels of carbon picked up during the milling process. The specific environment used in milling the powder appears to exert a considerable influence on the post-consolidation recrystallization behavior of the alloy. A milling environment which produced powder particles having a high surface carbon content resulted in a consolidated alloy which readily recrystallized, whereas powder with a low surface carbon level after milling resulted in no recrystallization even at 1380 C. A feature of these alloys was the appearance of voids or porosity after the recrystallization anneal, as had been found with ORNL-produced alloys. Adjustment of the recrystallization parameters did not reveal any range of conditions where recrystallization could be accomplished without the formation of voids. Initial creep tests of specimens of the recrystallized alloys indicated a significant increase in creep strength compared to cast or wrought Fe{sub 3}Al, but the specimens failed prematurely by a mechanism that involved brittle fracture of one of the two grains in the test cross section, followed by ductile fracture of the remaining grain. The reasons for this behavior are not yet understood. The

  17. Microstructural Characterization of Co-Based ODS Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lin; Qu, Xuanhui; He, Xinbo; Din, Rafi-ud; Liu, Hengsan; Qin, Mingli; Zhu, Hongmin

    2012-11-01

    Co-based ODS alloys, strengthened by nanosized oxide dispersion and γ' precipitates, are potential high-temperature structural materials. The characteristics of the mechanically alloyed powder and the microstructural evolution of the Co-based ODS alloys were investigated. The results revealed that mechanical alloying had induced the formation of supersaturated solid solution in immiscible Co-Al-W-based alloys, originating mainly from extensive grain boundary region, high dislocation density, and ample point defect. Chemical compositions of mechanically alloyed Co-Al-W-based ODS alloys easily deviate from the γ/γ' two-phase region, leading to the existence of Al x Co, Co3W, Co7W6, and W phases in addition to the γ and γ' phases. Nonuniform distribution of alloying elements brings about the differences in morphologies and sizes of γ' precipitates. Microstructural formation process is impelled by spinodal decomposition mode, and spinodal decomposition behavior has been accelerated in the fine-grained alloy because of the presence of short-circuited diffusion paths for atomic movement.

  18. Microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir processed ODS ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Sanghoon; Kasada, Ryuta; Kimura, Akihiko; Park, Seung Hwan C.; Hirano, Satoshi

    2011-10-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are considered to be one of the candidate structural materials for advanced blanket systems because of its excellent properties in fusion environments. For more applications of the ODS steels to fusion systems with a huge and complex structure, development of joining technologies is a key issue to be solved. To reserve nano-oxide particles in the matrix homogeneously, the friction stir welding (FSW) is a suitable way to get good welding characteristics as a solid-state processing technique. In this research, effects of friction stir processing (FSP) on microstructure and mechanical properties of a ODS steel were studied to apply FSW process to ODS steels. The microstructure of FSPed ODS steel consists of stirred zone (SZ) and base metal (BM), as reported for other ferritic steels. Although equiaxed grain coarsening occurred through dynamic recrystallization during FSP, the nano-oxide particles in SZ showed fewer change in the size distribution. This resulted that FSP is effective to suppress the anisotropy and minimize the change of nano-oxide particles dispersion morphologies of ODS steel.

  19. Cold worked ferritic alloys and components

    DOEpatents

    Korenko, Michael K.

    1984-01-01

    This invention relates to liquid metal fast breeder reactor and steam generator precipitation hardening fully ferritic alloy components which have a microstructure substantially free of the primary precipitation hardening phase while having cells or arrays of dislocations of varying population densities. It also relates to the process by which these components are produced, which entails solution treating the alloy followed by a final cold working step. In this condition, the first significant precipitation hardening of the component occurs during high temperature use.

  20. Effect of thermo-mechanical treatments on the microstructure and mechanical properties of an ODS ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksiuta, Z.; Mueller, P.; Spätig, P.; Baluc, N.

    2011-05-01

    The Fe-14Cr-2W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3 oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) reduced activation ferritic (RAF) steel was fabricated by mechanical alloying of a pre-alloyed, gas atomised powder with yttria nano-particles, followed by hot isostatic pressing and thermo-mechanical treatments (TMTs). Two kinds of TMT were applied: (i) hot pressing, or (ii) hot rolling, both followed by annealing in vacuum at 850 °C. The use of a thermo-mechanical treatment was found to yield strong improvement in the microstructure and mechanical properties of the ODS RAF steel. In particular, hot pressing leads to microstructure refinement, equiaxed grains without texture, and an improvement in Charpy impact properties, especially in terms of the upper shelf energy (about 4.5 J). Hot rolling leads to elongated grains in the rolling direction, with a grain size ratio of 6:1, higher tensile strength and reasonable ductility up to 750 °C, and better Charpy impact properties, especially in terms of the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (about 55 °C).

  1. Energy-filtered TEM imaging and EELS study of ODS particles and argon-filled cavities in ferritic-martensitic steels.

    PubMed

    Klimiankou, M; Lindau, R; Möslang, A

    2005-01-01

    Oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) ferritic-martensitic steels with yttrium oxide (Y(2)O(3)) have been produced by mechanical alloying and hot isostatic pressing for use as advanced material in fusion power reactors. Argon gas, usually widely used as inert gas during mechanical alloying, was surprisingly detected in the nanodispersion-strengthened materials. Energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) led to the following results: (i) chemical composition of ODS particles, (ii) voids with typical diameters of 1-6 nm are formed in the matrix, (iii) these voids are filled with Ar gas, and (iv) the high-density nanosized ODS particles serve as trapping centers for the Ar bubbles. The Ar L(3,2) energy loss edge at 245 eV as well as the absorption features of the ODS particle elements were identified in the EELS spectrum. The energy resolution in the EEL spectrum of about 1.0 eV allows to identify the electronic structure of the ODS particles. PMID:15582472

  2. Microstructure examination of Fe-14Cr ODS ferritic steels produced through different processing routes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksiuta, Z.; Hosemann, P.; Vogel, S. C.; Baluc, N.

    2014-08-01

    Various thermo-mechanical treatments were applied to refine and homogenise grain size and improve mechanical properties of hot-isostatically pressed (HIP) 14%Cr ODS ferritic steel. The grain size was reduced, improving mechanical properties, tensile strength and Charpy impact, however bimodal-like distribution was also observed. As a result, larger, frequently elongated grains with size above 1 μm and refined, equiaxed grains with a diameter ranging from 250 to 500 nm. Neutron diffraction measurements revealed that for HIP followed by hydrostatic extrusion material the strongest fiber texture was observed oriented parallel to the extrusion direction. In comparison with hot rolling and hot pressing methods, this material exhibited promising mechanical properties: the ultimate tensile strength of 1350 MPa, yield strength of 1280 MPa, total elongation of 21.7% and Charpy impact energy of 5.8 J. Inferior Charpy impact energy of ∼3.0 J was measured for HIP and hot rolled material, emphasising that parameters of this manufacturing process still have to be optimised. As an alternative manufacturing route, due to the uniform microstructure and simplicity of the process, hot pressing might be a promising method for production of smaller parts of ODS ferritic steels. Besides, the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of all thermo-mechanically treated materials, in comparison with as-HIPped ODS steel, was improved by more than 50%, the transition temperature ranging from 50 to 70 °C (323 and 343 K) remains still unsatisfactory.

  3. Microstructural development under irradiation in European ODS ferritic/martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäublin, R.; Ramar, A.; Baluc, N.; de Castro, V.; Monge, M. A.; Leguey, T.; Schmid, N.; Bonjour, C.

    2006-06-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened steels based on the ferritic/martensitic steel EUROFER97 are promising candidates for a fusion reactor because of their improved high temperature mechanical properties and their potential higher radiation resistance relative to the base material. Several EUROFER97 based ODS F/M steels are investigated in this study. There are the Plansee ODS steels containing 0.3 wt% yttria, and the CRPP ODS steels, whose production route is described in detail. The reinforcing particles represent 0.3-0.5% weight and are composed of yttria. The effect of 0.3 wt% Ti addition is studied. ODS steel samples have been irradiated with 590 MeV protons to 0.3 and 1.0 dpa at room temperature and 350 °C. Microstructure is investigated by transmission electron microscopy and mechanical properties are assessed by tensile and Charpy tests. While the Plansee ODS presents a ferritic structure, the CRPP ODS material presents a tempered martensitic microstructure and a uniform distribution of the yttria particles. Both materials provide a yield stress higher than the base material, but with reduced elongation and brittle behaviour. Ti additions improve elongation at high temperatures. After irradiation, mechanical properties of the material are only slightly altered with an increase in the yield strength, but without significant decrease in the total elongation, relative to the base material. Samples irradiated at room temperature present radiation induced defects in the form of blacks dots with a size range from 2 to 3 nm, while after irradiation at 350 °C irradiation induced a0<1 0 0>{1 0 0} dislocation loops are clearly visible along with nanocavities. The dispersed yttria particles with an average size of 6-8 nm are found to be stable for all irradiation conditions. The density of the defects and the dispersoid are measured and found to be about 2.3 × 10 22 m -3 and 6.2 × 10 22 m -3, respectively. The weak impact of irradiation on mechanical properties of ODS F

  4. Microstructural characterizations of 14Cr ODS ferritic steels subjected to hot torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karch, A.; Sornin, D.; Barcelo, F.; Bosonnet, S.; de Carlan, Y.; Logé, R.

    2015-04-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are very promising materials for nuclear applications. In this paper, the hot working behavior of ODS ferritic steels, consolidated by hot extrusion, is studied through torsion tests. Three ODS steels are produced acting on both the quantity of Ti and Y2O3 added to the matrix (wt% Fe-14Cr-1W), and the density and size of the nanoparticles. A temperature range of 1000-1200 °C and strain rates from 5 ṡ 10-2 to 5 s-1 are considered. The microstructures of deformed samples are examined by Electron Back-Scatter Diffraction and X-ray diffraction techniques. It is observed that hot plastic strain leads to an early damage with nucleation and growth of cavities along grain boundaries. Except for the damage, very few microstructural and textural evolutions are noticed. The three tested ODS steels exhibit almost the same behavior under hot torsion straining, regardless of the precipitation state. Overall, the experimental results are interpreted through a mechanism of strain accommodation at grain boundaries, with low dislocation activity in the bulk of the grains.

  5. Tensile properties and deformation mechanisms of a 14Cr ODS ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steckmeyer, A.; Praud, M.; Fournier, B.; Malaplate, J.; Garnier, J.; Béchade, J. L.; Tournié, I.; Tancray, A.; Bougault, A.; Bonnaillie, P.

    2010-10-01

    The search for a new cladding material is part of the research studies carried out at CEA to develop a sodium-cooled fast reactor meeting the expectations of the Generation IV International Forum. In this study, the tensile properties of a ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened steel produced by hot extrusion at CEA have been evaluated. They prove the studied alloy to be as resistant as and more ductile than the other nano-reinforced alloys of literature. The effects of the strain rate and temperature on the total plastic strain of the material remind of diffusion phenomena. Intergranular damage and intergranular decohesion are clearly highlighted.

  6. Mechanical properties of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) molybdenum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Bianco, R.; Buckman, R.W. Jr.

    1998-03-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened molybdenum, Mo-ODS, developed by a proprietary powder metallurgy process, exhibits a creep rupture life at 0.65T{sub m} (1,600 C) of three to five orders of magnitude greater than unalloyed molybdenum, while maintaining ductile fracture behavior at temperatures significantly below room temperature. In comparison, the creep rupture life of the Mo-50Re solid solution strengthened alloy at 1,600 C is only an order of magnitude greater than unalloyed molybdenum. The results of microstructural characterization and thermal stability and mechanical property testing are discussed.

  7. Helium entrapment in a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Edmondson, Philip D; Parish, Chad M; Zhang, Yanwen; Hallen, Dr Anders; Miller, Michael K

    2011-01-01

    The nanostructured ferritic alloy 14YWT has been irradiated with He ions to simulate accumulation of He during the service life of a nuclear reactor to test the hypothesis that the large surface area for nanoclusters is a preferential nucleation site for bubbles. Transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography showed that high number densities of He bubbles were formed on the surface of nanoclusters and Ti(C,N) precipitates, and along grain boundaries and dislocations. At higher fluences, facetted bubbles are formed and it is postulated that the lowest energy state configuration is the truncated rhombic dodecahedron.

  8. Irradiation hardening of ODS ferritic steels under helium implantation and heavy-ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hengqing; Zhang, Chonghong; Yang, Yitao; Meng, Yancheng; Jang, Jinsung; Kimura, Akihiko

    2014-12-01

    Irradiation hardening of ODS ferritic steels after multi-energy He-ion implantation, or after irradiation with energetic heavy ions including Xe and Bi-ions was investigated with nano-indentation technique. Three kinds of high-Cr ODS ferritic steels including the commercial MA956 (19Cr-3.5Al), the 16Cr-0.1Ti and the 16Cr-3.5Al-0.1Zr were used. Data of nano-hardness were analyzed with an approach based on Nix-Gao model. The depth profiles of nano-hardness can be understood by the indentation size effect (ISE) in specimens of MA956 implanted with multi-energy He-ions or irradiated with 328 MeV Xe ions, which produced a plateau damage profile in the near-surface region. However, the damage gradient overlaps the ISE in the specimens irradiated with 9.45 Bi ions. The dose dependence of the nano-hardness shows a rapid increase at low doses and a slowdown at higher doses. An 1/2-power law dependence on dpa level is obtained. The discrepancy in nano-hardness between the helium implantation and Xe-ion irradiation can be understood by using the average damage level instead of the peak dpa level. Helium-implantation to a high dose (7400 appm/0.5 dpa) causes an additional hardening, which is possibly attributed to the impediment of motion dislocations by helium bubbles formed in high concentration in specimens.

  9. Microstructure Evolution of Gas Atomized Iron Based ODS Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, J.R.; Anderson, I.E.; Kramer, M.J.

    2011-08-09

    In a simplified process to produce precursor powders for oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys, gas-atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) was used to induce a surface oxide layer on molten droplets of three differing erritic stainless steel alloys during break-up and rapid solidification. The chemistry of the surface oxide was identified using auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The precursor iron-base powders were consolidated at 850 C and 1,300 C using hot isostatic pressing (HIPing). Consolidation at the lower temperature resulted in a fully dense microstructure, while preventing substantial prior particle-boundary-oxide dissociation. Microstructural analysis of the alloys consolidated at the higher temperature confirmed a significant reduction in prior-particle-boundary-oxide volume fraction, in comparison with the lower-temperature-consolidated sample. This provided evidence that a high-temperature internal oxygen-exchange reaction occurred between the metastable prior particle-boundary-oxide phase (chromium oxide) and the yttrium contained within each prior particle. This internal oxygen-exchange reaction is shown to result in the formation of yttrium-enriched oxide dispersoids throughout the alloy microstructure. The evolving microstructure was characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-energy X-ray diffraction (HE-XRD).

  10. Microstructure Evolution of Gas Atomized Iron Based ODS Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, J.R.; Anderson, I.E.; Kramer, M.J.; Anderegg, J.W.; Shechtman, D.

    2009-12-01

    In a simplified process to produce precursor powders for oxide dispersion-strength- ened (ODS) alloys, gas-atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) was used to induce a surface oxide layer on molten droplets of three differing erritic stainless steel alloys during break-up and rapid solidification. The chemistry of the surface oxide was identified using auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The precursor iron-base powders were consolidated at 850 C and 1,300 C using hot isostatic pressing (HIPing). Consolidation at the lower temperature resulted in a fully dense microstructure, while preventing substantial prior particle-boundary-oxide dissociation. Microstructural analysis of the alloys consolidated at the higher temperature confirmed a significant reduction in prior-particle-boundary-oxide volume fraction, in comparison with the lower-temperature-consolidated sample. This provided evidence that a high-temperature internal oxygen-exchange reaction occurred between the metastable prior particle-boundary-oxide phase (chromium oxide) and the yttrium contained within each prior particle. This internal oxygen-exchange reaction is shown to result in the formation of yttrium-enriched oxide dispersoids throughout the alloy microstructure. The evolving microstructure was characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-energy X-ray diffraction (HE-XRD).

  11. HRTEM Study of Oxide Nanoparticles in K3-ODS Ferritic Steel Developed for Radiation Tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L; Fluss, M; Tumey, S; Kuntz, J; El-Dasher, B; Wall, M; Choi, W; Kimura, A; Willaime, F; Serruys, Y

    2009-11-02

    Crystal and interfacial structures of oxide nanoparticles and radiation damage in 16Cr-4.5Al-0.3Ti-2W-0.37 Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} ODS ferritic steel have been examined using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. Oxide nanoparticles with a complex-oxide core and an amorphous shell were frequently observed. The crystal structure of complex-oxide core is identified to be mainly monoclinic Y{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 9} (YAM) oxide compound. Orientation relationships between the oxide and the matrix are found to be dependent on the particle size. Large particles (> 20 nm) tend to be incoherent and have a spherical shape, whereas small particles (< 10 nm) tend to be coherent or semi-coherent and have a faceted interface. The observations of partially amorphous nanoparticles and multiple crystalline domains formed within a nanoparticle lead us to propose a three-stage mechanism to rationalize the formation of oxide nanoparticles containing core/shell structures in as-fabricated ODS steels. Effects of nanoparticle size and density on cavity formation induced by (Fe{sup 8+} + He{sup +}) dual-beam irradiation are briefly addressed.

  12. Hot deformation behavior and processing map of a 9Cr ferritic/martensitic ODS steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guangming; Zhou, Zhangjian; Sun, Hongying; Zou, Lei; Wang, Man; Li, Shaofu

    2014-12-01

    The hot deformation behavior of 9Cr oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steel fabricated through the process of mechanical alloying and hot isostatic pressing (HIP) as investigated through hot compression deformation tests on the Gleeble-1500D simulator in the temperature range of 1050-1200 °C and strain rate range of 0.001 s-1-1 s-1. The relationship between the rheological stress and the strain rate was also studied. The activation energy and the stress and material parameters of the hyperbolic-sine equation were resolved according to the data obtained. The processing map was also proposed. The results show that the flow stress decreases as the temperature increases, and that decreasing of the strain rate of the 9Cr ODS steel results in a positive strain rate sensitivity. It is clear that dynamic recrystallization is influenced by both temperature and strain rate. The results of this study may provide a good reference for the selection of hot working parameters for 9Cr ODS steel. The optimum processing domains are at 1200 °C with a strain rate of 1 s-1 and in the range of 1080-1100 °C with a strain rate between 0.018 s-1 and 0.05 s-1.

  13. Microstructural study of a mechanically alloyed ODS superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Mujahid, M.; Gater, C.A.; Martin, J.W.

    1998-08-01

    Extruded bars of oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloy MA-6000 have been annealed isothermally as well as in temperature gradients. The temperatures used for annealing produced secondary recrystallization in all the samples, although the final grain aspect ratio was different for each annealing process. Interrupted gradient anneal experiments showed a curved secondary recrystallization front, with the surface recrystallizing at a lower temperature than the interior. It is believed this is caused indirectly by the strain gradients arising during extrusion. Grain-orientation analysis of recrystallized material revealed that a <110> fiber texture is present. A progressive grain reorientation toward <110> has been measured behind the recrystallization front using microbeam electron diffraction. In addition, changes in the distribution, size, and morphology of different types of precipitates and particles occurring during various stages of annealing have also been studied. Grain-boundary pinning by the stable oxide particles plays an important role in determining the grain growth behavior at high temperatures.

  14. High strength ferritic alloy-D53

    DOEpatents

    Hagel, William C.; Smidt, Frederick A.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1977-01-01

    A high strength ferritic alloy is described having from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight nickel, from about 2.5% to about 3.6% by weight chromium, from about 2.5% to about 3.5% by weight molybdenum, from about 0.1% to about 0.5% by weight vanadium, from about 0.1% to about 0.5% by weight silicon, from about 0.1% to about 0.6% by weight manganese, from about 0.12% to about 0.20% by weight carbon, from about 0.02% to about 0.1% by weight boron, a maximum of about 0.05% by weight nitrogen, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight phosphorous, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight sulfur, and the balance iron.

  15. Innovative Powder Processing of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened ODS Ferritic Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, Joel; Anderson, Iver; Kramer, Matthew

    2011-04-01

    An innovative gas atomization reaction synthesis technique was employed as a viable method to dramatically lower the processing cost for precursor oxide dispersion forming ferritic stainless steel powders (i.e., Fe-Cr-(Hf,Ti)-Y). During this rapid solidification process the atomized powders were enveloped by a nano-metric Cr-enriched metastable oxide film. Elevated temperature heat treatment was used to dissociate this metastable oxide phase through oxygen exchange reactions with Y-(Hf,Ti) enriched intermetallic compound precipitates. These solid state reactions resulted in the formation of highly stable nano-metric mixed oxide dispersoids (i.e., Y-Ti-O or Y-Hf-O) throughout the alloy microstructure. Subsequent high temperature (1200 C) heat treatments were used to elucidate the thermal stability of each nano-metric oxide dispersoid phase. Transmission electron microscopy coupled with X-ray diffraction was used to evaluate phase evolution within the alloy microstructure.

  16. Charpy impact test results for low-activation ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, N.S.; Hu, W.L.; Gelles, D.S.

    1987-05-01

    The objective of this work is to evaluate the shift of the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and the reduction of the upper shelf energy (USE) due to neutron irradiation of low activation ferritic alloys. Six low activation ferritic alloys have been tested following irradiation at 365/sup 0/C to 10 dpa and compared with control specimens in order to assess the effect of irradiation on Charpy impact properties.

  17. Behavior of Fe-ODS Alloys After Thermal Aging Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano Garcia, Marta; Hernández-Mayoral, Mercedes; Esparraguera, Elvira Oñorbe

    2016-03-01

    Oxide dispersion alloys are one of the candidates as cladding materials for Gen IV fast reactors, due to their high strength at high temperature, good creep properties, and swelling resistance. This good performance is mainly due to a fine dispersion of nano-oxide particles on the microstructure and to non-grained structure. The microstructural stability and the mechanical properties of a Fe-ODS alloy are studied after different thermal aging experiments at 973 K (700 °C), 5000 hours; 973 K (700 °C), 10,000 hours; and 1123 K (850 °C), 10,000 hours. SEM/EBSD and TEM together with tensile and impact tests on the as-received and thermally aged material have been carried out. In general, for all the tested conditions, a slight softening effect is observed attributed to the changes in the grain structure as well as to the changes in the amount and size of nano-oxide particles. In addition, the aged material shows a lower impact USE value while the DBTT is maintained.

  18. Behavior of Fe-ODS Alloys After Thermal Aging Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano Garcia, Marta; Hernández-Mayoral, Mercedes; Esparraguera, Elvira Oñorbe

    2016-06-01

    Oxide dispersion alloys are one of the candidates as cladding materials for Gen IV fast reactors, due to their high strength at high temperature, good creep properties, and swelling resistance. This good performance is mainly due to a fine dispersion of nano-oxide particles on the microstructure and to non-grained structure. The microstructural stability and the mechanical properties of a Fe-ODS alloy are studied after different thermal aging experiments at 973 K (700 °C), 5000 hours; 973 K (700 °C), 10,000 hours; and 1123 K (850 °C), 10,000 hours. SEM/EBSD and TEM together with tensile and impact tests on the as-received and thermally aged material have been carried out. In general, for all the tested conditions, a slight softening effect is observed attributed to the changes in the grain structure as well as to the changes in the amount and size of nano-oxide particles. In addition, the aged material shows a lower impact USE value while the DBTT is maintained.

  19. Towards Radiation Tolerant Nanostructured Ferritic Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Michael K; Hoelzer, David T; Russell, Kaye F

    2010-01-01

    The high temperature and irradiation response of a new class of nanostructured ferritic alloys have been investigated by atom probe tomography. These materials are candidate materials for use in the extreme environments that will be present in the next generation of power generating systems. Atom probe tomography has revealed that the yttria powder is forced into solid solution during the mechanical alloying process andsubsequently 2-nm-diameter Ti-, Y- and O-enriched nanoclusters are formedduring the extrusion process. These nanoclusters have been shown to be remarkably stable during isothermal annealing treatments up to 0.92 of the melting temperature and during proton irradiation up to 3 displacements per atom. No significant difference in sizes, compositions and number densities of the nanoclusters was also observed between the unirradiated and proton irradiated conditions. The grain boundaries were found to have high number densities of nanoclusters as well as chromium and tungsten segregation which pin the grain boundary to minimize creep and grain growth.

  20. Microstructural examination of commercial ferritic alloys at 200 dpa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelles, D. S.

    1996-10-01

    Microstructures and density change measurements are reported for martensitic commercial steels HT-9 and modified 9Cr1Mo (T91) and oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloys MA956 and MA957 following irradiation in the FFTF/MOTA at 420°C to 200 dpa. Swelling as determined by density change remains below 2% for all conditions. Microstructures are found to be stable except in recrystallized grains of MA957, which are fabrication artifacts, with only minor swelling in the martensitic steels and α' precipitation in alloys with 12% or more chromium. These results further demonstrate the high swelling resistance and microstructural stability of the ferritic alloy class.

  1. Processing and characterization of oxide dispersion strengthened 14YWT ferritic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Michael Keith

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels are currently being investigated as candidate materials for nuclear applications due to their increased high temperature strength and low activation characteristics. Recent studies have shown that ODS ferritic steels containing Ti exhibit enhanced high temperature properties due to the formation of a very fine dispersion of nanometer-sized oxide clusters based on Ti, Y, and O. Studies are currently underway to examine so called 14YWT alloys with nominal compositions of Fe-14Cr-3W-0.4Ti (wt. %) mechanically alloyed with 0.25 (wt.%) Y2O3. The focus of this study was to investigate how the early stages of processing of 14YWT alloys during mechanical milling, heat treatment, and consolidation affect the structure and properties of the alloys. The 14YWT alloys were milled at different times up to 80 hours, along with alloy powder compositions of Fe-14Cr + 0.25 wt.% Y2O 3 (14Y) and Fe-14Cr without Y2O3 (Fe-14Cr). The evolution of the microstructure and mechanical properties during milling was examined with a combination of optical metallography, x-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, atom probe tomography, and nanoindentation. Alloy powders were also heat treated and studied using high temperature x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry methods. Special attention was paid to milling parameters and temperature ranges which lead to the formation of nanosized oxide clusters in the alloys. Finally, the microstructure of consolidated alloys was examined and related to milling and heat treatment methods. Mechanical properties and microstructure during milling were similar in the three alloy powders examined regardless of dispersoid or alloy addition. Mechanical mixing of the alloy powders was inefficient after 40 hours of milling. Milling did not produce bulk amorphous phases but quickly reduced the crystallite size to ˜10-20 nm. Milling also resulted in relatively uniform dissolution of Y2O3. Thermal

  2. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H.; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Huang, Shenyan; Teng, Zhenke; Liu, Chain T.; Asta, Mark D.; Gao, Yanfei; Dunand, David C.; Ghosh, Gautam; Chen, Mingwei; Fine, Morris E.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-11-01

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones. These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. The present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures.

  3. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H.; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Huang, Shenyan; Teng, Zhenke; Liu, Chain T.; Asta, Mark D.; Gao, Yanfei; Dunand, David C.; Ghosh, Gautam; Chen, Mingwei; Fine, Morris E.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones. These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. The present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures. PMID:26548303

  4. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H.; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Huang, Shenyan; et al

    2015-11-09

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones.more » These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. Finally, the present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures.« less

  5. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H.; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Huang, Shenyan; Teng, Zhenke; Liu, Chain T.; Asta, Mark D.; Gao, Yanfei; Dunand, David C.; Ghosh, Gautam; Chen, Mingwei; Fine, Morris E.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-11-09

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones. These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. Finally, the present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures.

  6. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates.

    PubMed

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N; Huang, Shenyan; Teng, Zhenke; Liu, Chain T; Asta, Mark D; Gao, Yanfei; Dunand, David C; Ghosh, Gautam; Chen, Mingwei; Fine, Morris E; Liaw, Peter K

    2015-01-01

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones. These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. The present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures. PMID:26548303

  7. Development and characterisation of a new ODS ferritic steel for fusion reactor application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksiuta, Z.; Olier, P.; de Carlan, Y.; Baluc, N.

    2009-08-01

    This paper describes the microstructure, tensile properties and Charpy impact resistance of a reduced activation oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel Fe-14Cr-2W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3 produced by mechanical alloying of a pre-alloyed, gas atomised steel powder with Y 2O 3 particles, compaction by hot extrusion at 1100 °C, hot rolling at 700 °C and heat treatment at 1050 °C for 1 h. At room temperature the material exhibits a high ultimate tensile strength of about 1420 MPa and high yield strength of about 1340 MPa in the transverse direction. In the longitudinal direction the values are about 10% lower, due to the anisotropy of the microstructure (elongated grains in the rolling direction). At 750 °C the material still exhibits relatively high yield strengths of about 325 MPa and 305 MPa in the longitudinal and transverse directions, respectively. The material exhibits reasonable uniform and total elongation values over the temperature range 23-750 °C, in both transverse and longitudinal directions. The material exhibits weak Charpy impact properties in the transverse direction. Charpy impact properties are slightly better in the longitudinal direction, with upper shelf energy of about 4.2 J and a ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of about 8.8 °C.

  8. Advanced ODS FeCrAl alloys for accident-tolerant fuel cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Dryepondt, Sebastien N; Unocic, Kinga A; Hoelzer, David T; Pint, Bruce A

    2014-09-01

    ODS FeCrAl alloys are being developed with optimum composition and properties for accident tolerant fuel cladding. Two oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-15Cr-5Al+Y2O3 alloys were fabricated by ball milling and extrusion of gas atomized metallic powder mixed with Y2O3 powder. To assess the impact of Mo on the alloy mechanical properties, one alloy contained 1%Mo. The hardness and tensile properties of the two alloys were close and higher than the values reported for fine grain PM2000 alloy. This is likely due to the combination of a very fine grain structure and the presence of nano oxide precipitates. The nano oxide dispersion was however not sufficient to prevent grain boundary sliding at 800 C and the creep properties of the alloys were similar or only slightly superior to fine grain PM2000 alloy. Both alloys formed a protective alumina scale at 1200 C in air and steam and the mass gain curves were similar to curves generated with 12Cr-5Al+Y2O3 (+Hf or Zr) ODS alloys fabricated for a different project. To estimate the maximum temperature limit of use for the two alloys in steam, ramp tests at a rate of 5 C/min were carried out in steam. Like other ODS alloys, the two alloys showed a significant increase of the mas gains at T~ 1380 C compared with ~1480 C for wrought alloys of similar composition. The beneficial effect of Yttrium for wrought FeCrAl does not seem effective for most ODS FeCrAl alloys. Characterization of the hardness of annealed specimens revealed that the microstructure of the two alloys was not stable above 1000 C. Concurrent radiation results suggested that Cr levels <15wt% are desirable and the creep and oxidation results from the 12Cr ODS alloys indicate that a lower Cr, high strength ODS alloy with a higher maximum use temperature could be achieved.

  9. Unusual Thermal Stability of Nano-structured Ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xun-Li; Liu, Chain T; Stoica, A. D.; Keiderling, Dr. Uwe; Yang, Ling; Miller, Michael K; Fu, Chong Long; Ma, Dong; An, Ke

    2012-01-01

    A scientific question vitally important to the materials community is whether there exist self-assembled nanoclusters that are thermodynamically stable at elevated temperatures. Using in-situ neutron scattering, we characterized the structure and thermal stability of a nano-structured ferritic (NSF) alloy. Nanometer sized clusters were found to persist up to ~1400 C, providing direct evidence of a thermodynamically stable alloying state for the nanoclusters. Cluster formation requires the coexistence of Y, Ti, and O without the precipitation of oxide phases. The presence of thermally stable nanoclusters at grain boundaries limits the diffusion of Fe atoms, thereby stabilizing the microstructure of the ferritic matrix at high temperatures. Our experimental results provide physical insights of the dramatically improved high-temperature mechanical properties in NSF alloy and point to a new direction in alloy design.

  10. Ferritic Fe-Mn alloy for cryogenic applications

    DOEpatents

    Hwang, Sun-Keun; Morris, Jr., John W.

    1979-01-01

    A ferritic, nickel-free alloy steel composition, suitable for cryogenic applications, which consists essentially of about 10-13% manganese, 0.002-0.01% boron, 0.1-0.5% titanium, 0-0.05% aluminum, and the remainder iron and incidental impurities normally associated therewith.

  11. Development of ODS FeCrAl alloys for accident-tolerant fuel cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Dryepondt, Sebastien N.; Hoelzer, David T.; Pint, Bruce A.; Unocic, Kinga A.

    2015-09-18

    FeCrAl alloys are prime candidates for accident-tolerant fuel cladding due to their excellent oxidation resistance up to 1400 C and good mechanical properties at intermediate temperature. Former commercial oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) FeCrAl alloys such as PM2000 exhibit significantly better tensile strength than wrought FeCrAl alloys, which would alloy for the fabrication of a very thin (~250 m) ODS FeCrAl cladding and limit the neutronic penalty from the replacement of Zr-based alloys by Fe-based alloys. Several Fe-12-Cr-5Al ODS alloys where therefore fabricated by ball milling FeCrAl powders with Y2O3 and additional oxides such as TiO2 or ZrO2. The new Fe-12Cr-5Al ODS alloys showed excellent tensile strength up to 800 C but limited ductility. Good oxidation resistance in steam at 1200 and 1400 C was observed except for one ODS FeCrAl alloy containing Ti. Rolling trials were conducted at 300, 600 C and 800 C to simulate the fabrication of thin tube cladding and a plate thickness of ~0.6mm was reached before the formation of multiple edge cracks. Hardness measurements at different stages of the rolling process, before and after annealing for 1h at 1000 C, showed that a thinner plate thickness could likely be achieved by using a multi-step approach combining warm rolling and high temperature annealing. Finally, new Fe-10-12Cr-5.5-6Al-Z gas atomized powders have been purchased to fabricate the second generation of low-Cr ODS FeCrAl alloys. The main goals are to assess the effect of O, C, N and Zr contents on the ODS FeCrAl microstructure and mechanical properties, and to optimize the fabrication process to improve the ductility of the 2nd gen ODS FeCrAl while maintaining good mechanical strength and oxidation resistance.

  12. Radiation effects on the microstructure of a 9Cr-ODS alloy.

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, J.; Allen, T. R.; Birtcher, R. C.; Shutthanandan, S.; Thevothasan, S.; Materials Science Division; INL; Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison; PNNL

    2008-01-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are prime candidates for high-temperature, high-dose cladding in advanced nuclear reactors. When a 9Cr-ODS alloy was irradiated with 5 MeV nickel ions at temperatures of 500-700 C to doses up to 150 dpa, there was no significant change in the dislocation arrangement. For oxide particles, there is a small shrinkage in size and increase in density with increasing irradiation dose. This work confirms that oxide particles and the microstructure of the 9Cr-ODS show minimal changes under irradiation at temperatures up to 700 C and doses up to 150 dpa.

  13. High temperature deformation mechanism of 15CrODS ferritic steels at cold-rolled and recrystallized conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugino, Yoshito; Ukai, Shigeharu; Oono, Naoko; Hayashi, Shigenari; Kaito, Takeji; Ohtsuka, Satoshi; Masuda, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Satoshi; Sato, Eiichi

    2015-11-01

    The ODS ferritic steels realize potentially higher operating temperature due to structural stability by the dispersed nano-size oxide particles. The deformation process and mechanism of 15CrODS ferritic steels were investigated at 1073 K and 1173 K for the cold-rolled and recrystallized conditions. Tensile and creep tests were conducted at the stress in parallel (LD) and perpendicular (TD) directions to the grain boundaries. Strain rate varied from 10-1 to 10-9 s-1. For the LD specimens, deformation in the cold rolled and recrystallized conditions is reinforced by finely dispersed oxide particles. The dominant deformation process for the recrystallized TD specimen is controlled through the grain boundary sliding and stress accommodation via diffusional creep at temperature of 1173 K and lower strain rate less than 10-4 s-1. The grain boundary sliding couldn't be rate-controlling process at 1073 K for the as-cold rolled TD specimen, where a dynamic recovery of the dislocation produced by cold-rolling is related to the deformation process.

  14. The Role of Alloying Elements in Nanostructured Ferritic Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Michael K; Parish, Chad M

    2010-01-01

    The roles of the alloying elements in three nanostructured ferritic alloys (14YWT, MA957 and Eurofer 97) have been established through the characterisation of the microstructure by atom probe tomography and spectrum imaging in a transmission electron microscope. Cr, W, Mo, Ti and Y were found in the ferrite matrix and contributed to solid solution hardening. Ti, Y, C, O and N were found in high number densities of precipitates and nanoclusters both in the grain interior and on grain boundaries and thereby contributed to precipitation hardening. Cr, W and Mo were enriched at the intraparticle regions of the grain boundaries. The solute segregation and precipitation pinned the grain boundaries and contributed to the excellent creep properties of the alloys.

  15. High Temperature Fracture Characteristics of a Nanostructured Ferritic Alloy (NFA)

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Thak Sang; Kim, Jeoung H; Ji Hyun, Yoon; Hoelzer, David T

    2010-01-01

    High temperature fracture behavior has been investigated for the nanostructured ferritic alloy 14YWT (SM10). The fracture toughness of the alloy was above 140 MPa m at low temperatures, room temperature (RT) and 200 C, but decreased to a low fracture toughness range of 52 82 MPa m at higher temperatures up to 700 C. This behavior was explained by the fractography results indicating that the unique nanostructure of 14YWT alloy produced shallow plasticity layers at high temperatures and a low-ductility grain boundary debonding occurred at 700 C.

  16. Initial Development in Joining of ODS Alloys Using Friction Stir Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Weiju; Feng, Zhili

    2007-08-01

    Solid-state welding of oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloy MA956 sheets using friction stir welding (FSW) was investigated. Butt weld was successfully produced. The weld and base metals were characterized using optical microscopy, scanning electronic microscopy, transmission electronic microscopy, and energy dispersion x-ray spectrum. Microhardness mapping was also conducted over the weld region. Analyses indicate that the distribution of the strengthening oxides was preserved in the weld. Decrease in microhardness of the weld was observed but was insignificant. The preliminary results seem to confirm the envisioned feasibility of FSW application to ODS alloy joining. For application to Gen IV nuclear reactor heat exchanger, further investigation is suggested.

  17. Irradiation effects in oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Ni-base alloys for Gen. IV nuclear reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oono, Naoko; Ukai, Shigeharu; Kondo, Sosuke; Hashitomi, Okinobu; Kimura, Akihiko

    2015-10-01

    Oxide particle dispersion strengthened (ODS) Ni-base alloys are irradiated by using simulation technique (Fe/He dual-ion irradiation) to investigate the reliability to Gen. IV high-temperature reactors. The fine oxide particles with less than 10 nm in average size and approximately 8.0 × 1022 m-3 in number density remained after 101 dpa irradiation. The tiny helium bubbles were inside grains, not at grain-boundaries; it is advantageous effect of oxide particles which trap the helium atoms at the particle-matrix interface. Ni-base ODS alloys demonstrated their great ability to overcome He embrittlement.

  18. Latent tracks of swift heavy ions in Cr23C6 and Y-Ti-O nanoparticles in ODS alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skuratov, V. A.; Sohatsky, A. S.; O'Connell, J. H.; Kornieieva, K.; Nikitina, A. A.; Uglov, V. V.; Neethling, J. H.; Ageev, V. S.

    2016-05-01

    The radiation stability of dielectric nanoparticles embedded into a metallic matrix is of considerable practical value due to the growing interest in oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels as promising nuclear reactor materials. In this report the results of a TEM study of structural changes in Cr23C6 and Y-Ti-O nanoparticles in several ODS alloys irradiated with 1.2 MeV/amu Xe and 3.4 MeV/amu Bi ions is presented. It was found that swift heavy ion irradiation leads to the formation of amorphous latent tracks in both materials. The upper limit of the threshold electronic stopping power for track formation in carbides is estimated to be around 35 keV/nm. Multiple ion track overlapping leads to complete amorphization of carbide and Y-Ti oxide nanoparticles. Microstructural analysis have revealed a strong influence of the ferritic matrix on track morphology in Y2Ti2O7 nanoparticles in pre-thinned TEM targets after postradiation annealing and irradiation at elevated temperatures.

  19. Load partitioning between ferrite/martensite and dispersed nanoparticles of a 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guangming; Mo, Kun; Miao, Yinbin; Liu, Xiang; Almer, Jonathan; Zhou, Zhangjian; Stubbins, James F.

    2015-06-18

    In this study, a high-energy synchrotron radiation X-ray technique was used to investigate the tensile deformation processes of a 9Cr-ODS ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steel at different temperatures. Two minor phases within the 9Cr-ODS F/M steel matrix were identified as Y2Ti2O7 and TiN by the high-energy X-ray diffraction, and confirmed by the analysis using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) of scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The lattice strains of the matrix and particles were measured through the entire tensile deformation process. During the tensile tests, the lattice strains of the ferrite/martensite and the particles (TiN and Y2Ti2O7) showed a strong temperature dependence, decreasing with increasing temperature. Analysis of the internal stress at three temperatures showed that the load partitioning between the ferrite/martensite and the particles (TiN and Y2Ti2O7) was initiated during sample yielding and reached to a peak during sample necking. At three studied temperatures, the internal stress of minor phases (Y2Ti2O7 and TiN) was about 2 times that of F/M matrix at yielding position, while the internal stress of Y2Ti2O7 and TiN reached about 4.5-6 times and 3-3.5 times that of the F/M matrix at necking position, respectively. It indicates that the strengthening of the matrix is due to minor phases (Y2Ti2O7 and TiN), especially Y2Ti2O7 particles. Although the internal stresses of all phases decreased with increasing temperature from RT to 600 degrees C, the ratio of internal stresses of each phase at necking position stayed in a stable range (internal stresses of Y2Ti2O7 and TiN were about 4.5-6 times and 3-3.5 times of that of F/M matrix, respectively). The difference between internal stress of the F/M matrix and the applied stress at 600 degrees C is slightly lower than those at RI and 300 degrees C, indicating that the nanoparticles still have good strengthening effect at 600 degrees C. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. CROSS-ROLL FLOW FORMING OF ODS ALLOY HEAT EXCHANGER TUBES FOR HOOP CREEP ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2005-06-27

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. Recent studies in cross-rolled ODS-alloy sheets (produced from flattened tubes) indicate that transverse creep is significantly enhanced via controlled transverse grain fibering, and similar improvements are expected for cross-rolled tubes. The research program outlined here is iterative in nature and is intended to systematically (i) prescribe extrusion consolidation methodologies via detailed

  1. CROSS-ROLL FLOW FORMING OF ODS ALLOY HEAT EXCHANGER TUBES FOR HOOP CREEP ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2005-02-28

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. Recent studies in cross-rolled ODS-alloy sheets (produced from flattened tubes) indicate that transverse creep is significantly enhanced via controlled transverse grain fibering, and similar improvements are expected for cross-rolled tubes. The research program outlined here is iterative in nature and is intended to systematically (i) prescribe extrusion consolidation methodologies via detailed

  2. CROSS-ROLL FLOW FORMING OF ODS ALLOY HEAT EXCHANGER TUBES FOR HOOP CREEP ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2004-08-31

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. Recent studies in cross-rolled ODS-alloy sheets (produced from flattened tubes) indicate that transverse creep is significantly enhanced via controlled transverse grain fibering, and similar improvements are expected for cross-rolled tubes. The research program outlined here is iterative in nature and is intended to systematically (i) prescribe extrusion consolidation methodologies via detailed

  3. CROSS-ROLL FLOW FORMING OF ODS ALLOY HEAT EXCHANGER TUBES FOR HOOP CREEP ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2004-11-30

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. Recent studies in cross-rolled ODS-alloy sheets (produced from flattened tubes) indicate that transverse creep is significantly enhanced via controlled transverse grain fibering, and similar improvements are expected for cross-rolled tubes. The research program outlined here is iterative in nature and is intended to systematically (i) prescribe extrusion consolidation methodologies via detailed

  4. CROSS-ROLL FLOW FORMING OF ODS ALLOY HEAT EXCHANGER TUBES FOR HOOP CREEP ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2004-03-31

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. Recent studies in cross-rolled ODS-alloy sheets (produced from flattened tubes) indicate that transverse creep is significantly enhanced via controlled transverse grain fibering, and similar improvements are expected for cross-rolled tubes. The research program outlined here is iterative in nature and is intended to systematically (1) prescribe extrusion consolidation methodologies via detailed

  5. CROSS-ROLL FLOW FORMING OF ODS ALLOY HEAT EXCHANGER TUBES FOR HOOP CREEP ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2004-05-31

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. Recent studies in cross-rolled ODS-alloy sheets (produced from flattened tubes) indicate that transverse creep is significantly enhanced via controlled transverse grain fibering, and similar improvements are expected for cross-rolled tubes. The research program outlined here is iterative in nature and is intended to systematically (1) prescribe extrusion consolidation methodologies via detailed

  6. Recovery and recrystallisation in mechanically alloyed and annealed, legacy, FeCrAlY ODS alloy precursor powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, K.; Rao, A.; Tatlock, G. J.; Jones, A. R.

    2015-08-01

    This study presents findings related to the recrystallisation behaviour in Mechanically Alloyed (MA) and annealed powders of legacy commercial Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) FeCrAl alloys PM2000, MA956 and ODM751. Annealing of as-MA ODS alloy powders at temperatures ≥ 800 °C induced primary recrystallisation. The volume fraction (Vf) recrystallised increased with higher annealing temperatures in the range studied (∼800-1050 °C). However, low temperature (650 °C) recovery reduced the subsequent kinetics of recrystallisation in PM2000 alloy. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) analysis of annealed PM2000 and MA956 alloy powders indicates that precipitation of nano-particulate Y-Al-O phases begins at temperatures as low as 650 °C and microstructural changes during annealing of ODS powders involved interactions between nano-particle formation and recovery/recrystallisation processes. High number densities (NV > 1023 m-3) of coherent nano-precipitates were identified in both recovered and recrystallised regions of powder particles. These formed over a range of temperatures used in the consolidation processing of ODS alloys. The orientation relationship between nano-particles and the matrix was identical in both recovered and recrystallised grains, indicating that particles were dissolved at recrystallising interfaces and subsequently reprecipitated. Examination and comparison of as-MA and annealed powder specimens suggests that nuances in the manufacturing of these three, nominally similar, alloys leads to differences in recovery/recrystallisation behaviour, which may influence microstructure and, ultimately, properties in the final product form.

  7. Mechanical alloying of lanthana-bearing nanostructured ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Somayeh Paseban; Indrajit Charit; Yaqiao Q. Wu; Jatuporn Burns; Kerry N. Allahar; Darryl P. Butt; James I. Cole

    2013-09-01

    A novel nanostructured ferritic steel powder with the nominal composition Fe–14Cr–1Ti–0.3Mo–0.5La2O3 (wt.%) was developed via high energy ball milling. La2O3 was added to this alloy instead of the traditionally used Y2O3. The effects of varying the ball milling parameters, such as milling time, steel ball size and ball to powder ratio, on the mechanical properties and micro structural characteristics of the as-milled powder were investigated. Nanocrystallites of a body-centered cubic ferritic solid solution matrix with a mean size of approximately 20 nm were observed by transmission electron microscopy. Nanoscale characterization of the as-milled powder by local electrode atom probe tomography revealed the formation of Cr–Ti–La–O-enriched nanoclusters during mechanical alloying. The Cr:Ti:La:O ratio is considered “non-stoichiometric”. The average size (radius) of the nanoclusters was about 1 nm, with number density of 3.7 1024 m3. The mechanism for formation of nanoclusters in the as-milled powder is discussed. La2O3 appears to be a promising alternative rare earth oxide for future nanostructured ferritic steels.

  8. Evaluation of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) molybdenum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Bianco, R.; Buckman, R.W. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    A series of fourteen (14) novel high-strength molybdenum alloy compositions containing a dispersion of very fine (< 1 {mu}m diameter) oxide particles were consolidated using two proprietary powder metallurgy techniques. The developmental compositions were evaluated to determine the microstructural stability and mechanical properties from cryogenic (-148{degrees}F) to elevated temperatures (4000{degrees}F) for material in the as-swaged (>98% cold work) condition and for as-swaged material in the heat treated condition. Extremely fine oxide particle sizes (<1000 {Angstrom}) were observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) for a number of the experimental compositions in the as-swaged condition. A one hour recrystallization temperature as high as 3990{degrees}F was measured and a ductile-to-brittle transition temperature as low as {approximately}58{degrees}F for material in the recrystallized condition was determined. The preliminary results support the alloy design concept feasibility.

  9. Mantle region accommodating two-dimensional grain boundary sliding in ODS ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Hiroshi; Tobe, Hirobumi; Sato, Eiichi; Sugino, Yoshito; Ukai, Shigeharu

    2015-07-01

    Two-dimensional grain-boundary sliding (GBS) was achieved microscopically in an oxide-dispersion-strengthened ferritic steel with an elongated and aligned grain structure, which was deformed perpendicular to the long axis. At the border between superplastic regions II and III, microscopic deformation was observed using sub-micron grids drawn on the material surface using a focused ion beam. GBS was accommodated by intragranular deformations in narrow areas around grain boundaries, which has been predicted by earlier researchers as characteristics of the core-mantle model. These observations suggest that dislocations slip only in the mantle regions around wavy boundaries to relax the stress concentration caused by GBS during superplasticity.

  10. Reactive gas atomization processing for Fe-based ODS alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, Joel R; Anderson, Iver E; Kramer, Matthew J; Odette, G R; Stergar, E; Haney, E

    2011-08-24

    Gas atomization reaction synthesis was employed as a simplified method for processing oxide dispersion forming precursor Fe-based powders (e.g., Fe–Cr–Y–Hf). During this process a reactive atomization gas (i.e., Ar–O2) was used to oxidize the powder surfaces during primary break-up and rapid solidification of the molten alloy. This resulted in envelopment of the powders by an ultra-thin (t < 50 nm) metastable Cr-enriched oxide shell that was used as a vehicle to transport oxygen into the consolidated microstructure. Subsequent elevated temperature heat treatment promoted thermodynamically driven oxygen exchange reactions between trapped films of Cr-enriched oxide and internal (Y, Hf)-enriched intermetallic precipitates, resulting in highly stable nano-metric mixed oxide dispersoids (i.e., Y–Hf–O) that were identified with X-ray diffraction. Transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography results also revealed that the size and distribution of the dispersoids were found to depend strongly on the original rapidly solidified microstructure. To exploit this, several oxide dispersion strengthened microstructures were engineered from different powder particle size ranges, illustrating microstructural control as a function of particle solidification rate. Additionally, preliminary thermal–mechanical processing was used to develop a fine scale dislocation substructure for ultimate strengthening of the alloy.

  11. Characterization of high performance austenitic and ODS alloys for SCWR conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Penttila, S.; Toivonen, A.; Auerkari, P.; Novotny, R.

    2012-07-01

    High temperature oxidation resistance is of critical importance for the in-reactor components of the European supercritical water reactor (SCWR) concept. To consider candidate materials for this purpose, selected austenitic steels, iron based ODS (Oxide Dispersion Strengthened) alloys and one Ni alloy have been tested by exposure to supercritical water at 650 deg. C/25 MPa up to 2000 h. Results of observed mass change, oxide thickness and composition after exposure are shown and discussed regarding implications for long term oxidation performance. (authors)

  12. Gas atomized precursor alloy powder for oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, Joel

    2011-12-13

    Gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) was employed as a simplified method for producing precursor powders for oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic stainless steels (e.g., Fe-Cr-Y-(Ti,Hf)-O), departing from the conventional mechanical alloying (MA) process. During GARS processing a reactive atomization gas (i.e., Ar-O2) was used to oxidize the powder surfaces during primary break-up and rapid solidification of the molten alloy. This resulted in envelopment of the powders by an ultra-thin (t < 150 nm) metastable Cr-enriched oxide layer that was used as a vehicle for solid-state transport of O into the consolidated microstructure. In an attempt to better understand the kinetics of this GARS reaction, theoretical cooling curves for the atomized droplets were calculated and used to establish an oxidation model for this process. Subsequent elevated temperature heat treatments, which were derived from Rhines pack measurements using an internal oxidation model, were used to promote thermodynamically driven O exchange reactions between trapped films of the initial Cr-enriched surface oxide and internal Y-enriched intermetallic precipitates. This novel microstructural evolution process resulted in the successful formation of nano-metric Y-enriched dispersoids, as confirmed using high energy X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), equivalent to conventional ODS alloys from MA powders. The thermal stability of these Y-enriched dispersoids was evaluated using high temperature (1200°C) annealing treatments ranging from 2.5 to 1,000 hrs of exposure. In a further departure from current ODS practice, replacing Ti with additions of Hf appeared to improve the Y-enriched dispersoid thermal stability by means of crystal structure modification. Additionally, the spatial distribution of the dispersoids was found to depend strongly on the original rapidly solidified microstructure. To exploit this, ODS microstructures were engineered from

  13. Gas atomized precursor alloy powder for oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieken, Joel Rodney

    Gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) was employed as a simplified method for producing precursor powders for oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic stainless steels (e.g., Fe-Cr-Y-(Ti,Hf)-O), departing from the conventional mechanical alloying (MA) process. During GARS processing a reactive atomization gas (i.e., Ar-O2) was used to oxidize the powder surfaces during primary break-up and rapid solidification of the molten alloy. This resulted in envelopment of the powders by an ultra-thin (t < 150 nm) metastable Cr-enriched oxide layer that was used as a vehicle for solid-state transport of O into the consolidated microstructure. In an attempt to better understand the kinetics of this GARS reaction, theoretical cooling curves for the atomized droplets were calculated and used to establish an oxidation model for this process. Subsequent elevated temperature heat treatments, which were derived from Rhines pack measurements using an internal oxidation model, were used to promote thermodynamically driven O exchange reactions between trapped films of the initial Cr-enriched surface oxide and internal Y-enriched intermetallic precipitates. This novel microstructural evolution process resulted in the successful formation of nano-metric Y-enriched dispersoids, as confirmed using high energy X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), equivalent to conventional ODS alloys from MA powders. The thermal stability of these Y-enriched dispersoids was evaluated using high temperature (1200°C) annealing treatments ranging from 2.5 to 1,000 hrs of exposure. In a further departure from current ODS practice, replacing Ti with additions of Hf appeared to improve the Y-enriched dispersoid thermal stability by means of crystal structure modification. Additionally, the spatial distribution of the dispersoids was found to depend strongly on the original rapidly solidified microstructure. To exploit this, ODS microstructures were engineered from different

  14. High-temperature corrosion behavior of coatings and ODS alloys based on Fe{sub 3}Al

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; Pint, B.A.; Wright, I.G.

    1996-06-01

    Iron aluminides containing greater than about 20-25 @ % Al have oxidation/sulfidation resistance at temperatures well above those at which these alloys have adequate mechanical strength. In addition to alloying modifications for improved creep resistance of wrought material, this strength limitation is being addressed by development of oxide-dispersion- strengthened (ODS) iron aluminides and by evaluation of Fe{sub 3}Al alloy compositions as coatings or claddings on higher-strength, less corrosion-resistant materials. As part of these efforts, the high-temperature corrosion behavior of iron-aluminide weld overlays and ODS alloys is being characterized and compared to previous results for ingot-processed material.

  15. The role of nickel in radiation damage of ferritic alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Osetskiy, Yury N.; Anento, Napoleon; Serra, Anna; Terentyev, Dmitry

    2014-11-26

    According to the modern theory damage evolution under neutron irradiation depends on the fraction of self interstitial atoms (SIAs) produced in the form of one-dimensionally (1-D) glissile clusters. These clusters, having a low interaction cross-section with other defects, sink mainly on grain boundaries and dislocations creating the so-called production bias. It is known empirically that addition of certain alloying elements affect many radiation effects, including swelling, however the mechanisms are unknown in many cases. In this paper we report the results of an extensive multi-technique atomistic level modeling of SIA clusters mobility in bcc Fe-Ni alloys with Ni content frommore » 0.8 to 10 at.%. We have found that Ni interacts strongly with periphery of clusters affecting their mobility. The total effect is defined by all Ni atoms interacting with the cluster at the same time and can be significant even in low-Ni alloys. Thus 1nm (37SIAs) cluster is practically immobile at T < 500K in the Fe-0.8at.% Ni alloy. Increasing cluster size and Ni content enhance cluster immobilization. Furthermore, this effect should have quite broad consequences in swelling rate, matrix damage accumulation, radiation induced hardening, etc. and the results obtained help in better understanding and prediction of radiation effects in Fe-Ni ferritic alloys.« less

  16. The role of nickel in radiation damage of ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Osetskiy, Yury N.; Anento, Napoleon; Serra, Anna; Terentyev, Dmitry

    2014-11-26

    According to the modern theory damage evolution under neutron irradiation depends on the fraction of self interstitial atoms (SIAs) produced in the form of one-dimensionally (1-D) glissile clusters. These clusters, having a low interaction cross-section with other defects, sink mainly on grain boundaries and dislocations creating the so-called production bias. It is known empirically that addition of certain alloying elements affect many radiation effects, including swelling, however the mechanisms are unknown in many cases. In this paper we report the results of an extensive multi-technique atomistic level modeling of SIA clusters mobility in bcc Fe-Ni alloys with Ni content from 0.8 to 10 at.%. We have found that Ni interacts strongly with periphery of clusters affecting their mobility. The total effect is defined by all Ni atoms interacting with the cluster at the same time and can be significant even in low-Ni alloys. Thus 1nm (37SIAs) cluster is practically immobile at T < 500K in the Fe-0.8at.% Ni alloy. Increasing cluster size and Ni content enhance cluster immobilization. Furthermore, this effect should have quite broad consequences in swelling rate, matrix damage accumulation, radiation induced hardening, etc. and the results obtained help in better understanding and prediction of radiation effects in Fe-Ni ferritic alloys.

  17. Cross-Roll Flow Forming of ODS Alloy Heat Exchanger Tubes For Hoop Creep Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2005-11-23

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. Recent studies in crossrolled ODS-alloy sheets (produced from flattened tubes) indicate that transverse creep is significantly enhanced via controlled transverse grain fibering, and similar improvements are expected for cross-rolled tubes. The research program outlined here is iterative in nature and is intended to systematically (1) examine and identify post-extrusion forming methodologies to

  18. Discussion on the Alloying Element Partition and Growth Kinetics of Proeutectoid Ferrite in Fe-C-Mn-X Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, R.; Enomoto, M.

    2011-12-01

    Experimental data on alloying element partition and growth kinetics of proeutectoid ferrite in quaternary Fe-C-Mn-Si, Ni, and Co alloys were reanalyzed using an approximate method, which permits a quick evaluation of alloy partitioning to be made. The method yielded results in good agreement with DICTRA and is applicable to Fe-C base multicomponent alloys. Differences of the predicted local condition at the α/ γ boundary from those previously presented in the alloys are noted.

  19. Creep and rupture of an ODS alloy with high stress rupture ductility. [Oxide Dispersion Strengthened

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcalarney, M. E.; Arsons, R. M.; Howson, T. E.; Tien, J. K.; Baranow, S.

    1982-01-01

    The creep and stress rupture properties of an oxide (Y2O3) dispersion strengthened nickel-base alloy, which also is strengthened by gamma-prime precipitates, was studied at 760 and 1093 C. At both temperatures, the alloy YDNiCrAl exhibits unusually high stress rupture ductility as measured by both elongation and reduction in area. Failure was transgranular, and different modes of failure were observed including crystallographic fracture at intermediate temperatures and tearing or necking almost to a chisel point at higher temperatures. While the rupture ductility was high, the creep strength of the alloy was low relative to conventional gamma prime strengthened superalloys in the intermediate temperature range and to ODS alloys in the higher temperature range. These findings are discussed with respect to the alloy composition; the strengthening oxide phases, which are inhomogeneously dispersed; the grain morphology, which is coarse and elongated and exhibits many included grains; and the second phase inclusion particles occurring at grain boundaries and in the matrix. The creep properties, in particular the high stress dependencies and high creep activation energies measured, are discussed with respect to the resisting stress model of creep in particle strengthened alloys.

  20. Cross-Roll Flow Forming of ODS Alloy Heat Exchanger Tubes for Hoop Creep Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2006-04-10

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. The research program outlined here is iterative in nature and is intended to systematically (1) examine and identify post-extrusion forming methodologies to create hoop strengthened tubes, which will be (2) evaluated at ''in-service'' loads at service temperatures and environments. This research program is being conducted in collaboration with the DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the vested

  1. Cross-Roll Flow Forming of ODS Alloy Heat Exchanger Tubes For Hoop Creep Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal Kad

    2007-09-30

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program were to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. The research program outlined was iterative and intended to systematically (i) examine and identify post-extrusion forming methodologies to create hoop strengthened tubes, to be (ii) evaluated at 'in-service' loads at service temperatures and environments. Our report outlines the significant hoop creep enhancements possible via secondary cross-rolling and/or flow-forming operations. Each of the

  2. Cross-Roll Flow Forming of ODS Alloy Heat Exchanger Tubes For Hoop Creep Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2006-09-30

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. The research program outlined here is iterative in nature and is intended to systematically (a) examine and identify post-extrusion forming methodologies to create hoop strengthened tubes, which will be (b) evaluated at ''in-service'' loads at service temperatures and environments. In this 12th quarter of performance, program activities are concluded for Task 2 and continuing for Tasks 3, 4 and

  3. Phase Stability under Irradiation of Precipitates and Solid Solutions in Model ALloys and in ODS Alloys Relevant for Gen IV

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur T. Motta; Robert C. Birtcher

    2007-10-17

    The overall objective of this program is to investigate the irradiation-altered phase stability of oxide precipitates in ODS steels and of model alloy solid solutions of associated systems. This information can be used to determine whether the favorable mechanical propertiies of these steels are maintained under irradiation, thus addressing one of the main materials research issues for this class of steels as identified by the GenIV working groups. The research program will also create fundamental understanding of the irradiation precipitation/dissolution problem by studying a "model" system in which the variables can be controlled and their effects understood individually.

  4. Nanoscale characterization of ODS Fe-9%Cr model alloys compacted by spark plasma sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heintze, C.; Hernández-Mayoral, M.; Ulbricht, A.; Bergner, F.; Shariq, A.; Weissgärber, T.; Frielinghaus, H.

    2012-09-01

    Ferritic/martensitic high-chromium steels are leading candidates for fission and fusion reactor components. Oxide dispersion strengthening is an effective way to improve properties related to thermal and irradiation-induced creep and to extend their elevated temperature applications. An extensive experimental study focusing on the microstructural characterization of oxide-dispersion strengthened Fe-9wt%Cr model alloys is reported. Several material variants were produced by means of high-energy milling of elemental powders of Fe, Cr and commercial yttria powders. Consolidation was based on spark plasma sintering. Special emphasis is placed on the characterization of the nano-particles using transmission electron microscopy, small-angle neutron scattering and atom probe tomography. The microstructure of the investigated alloys and the role of the process parameters are discussed. Implications for the reliability of the applied characterization techniques are also highlighted.

  5. Stability of Y–Ti–O precipitates in friction stir welded nanostructured ferritic alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yu, Xinghua; Mazumder, B.; Miller, M. K.; David, S. A.; Feng, Z.

    2015-01-19

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys, which have complex microstructures which consist of ultrafine ferritic grains with a dispersion of stable oxide particles and nanoclusters, are promising materials for fuel cladding and structural applications in the next generation nuclear reactor. This paper evaluates microstructure of friction stir welded nanostructured ferritic alloys using electron microscopy and atom probe tomography techniques. Atom probe tomography results revealed that nanoclusters are coarsened and inhomogeneously distributed in the stir zone and thermomechanically affected zone. Three hypotheses on coarsening of nanoclusters are presented. Finally, the hardness difference in different regions of friction stir weld has been explained.

  6. Dispersoid Distribution and Microstructure in Fe-Cr-Al Ferritic Oxide Dispersion-Strengthened Alloy Prepared by Friction Consolidation

    SciTech Connect

    Catalini, David; Kaoumi, Djamel; Reynolds, Anthony; Grant, Glenn J.

    2015-07-09

    INCOLOY® MA956 is a ferritic Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) alloy. Three different oxides, Y4Al2O9, YAlO3 and Y3Al5O12, have been observed in this alloy. The oxide particle sizes range from just a few up to hundreds of nm and these particles are responsible of the high temperature mechanical strength of this alloy. Mechanically alloyed MA956 powder was consolidated via Friction Consolidation using three different processing conditions. As a result, three small compacts of low porosity were produced. The compacts exhibited a refined equiaxed grain structure with grain sizes smaller than 10 µm and the desired oxide dispersion.YAlO3 and Y3Al5O12 were identified in the compacts by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The size distribution of precipitates above 50 nm showed a direct proportionality between average precipitate size and grain size. The total energy input during processing was correlated with the relative amount of each of the oxides in the disks: the higher the total processing energy input, the higher the relative amount of Y3Al5O12 precipitates. The elemental composition of the oxide precipitates was also probed individually by EDS showing an aluminum enrichment trend as precipitates grow in size.

  7. Detection and quantification of solute clusters in a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. K.; Reinhard, D.; Larson, D. J.

    2015-07-01

    A series of simulated atom probe datasets were examined with a friends-of-friends method to establish the detection efficiency required to resolve solute clusters in the ferrite phase of a 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy. The size and number densities of solute clusters in the ferrite of the as-milled mechanically-alloyed condition and the stir zone of a friction stir weld were estimated with a prototype high-detection-efficiency (∼80%) local electrode atom probe. High number densities, 1.8 × 1024 m-3 and 1.2 × 1024 m-3, respectively of solute clusters containing between 2 and 9 solute atoms of Ti, Y and O and were detected for these two conditions. These results support first principle calculations that predicted that vacancies stabilize these Ti-Y-O- clusters, which retard diffusion and contribute to the excellent high temperature stability of the microstructure and radiation tolerance of nanostructured ferritic alloys.

  8. Neutron irradiation effects on the microstructure of low-activation ferritic alloys*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, A.; Matsui, H.

    1994-09-01

    Microstructures of low-activation ferritic alloys, such as 2.25% Cr-2% W, 7% Cr-2% W, 9% Cr-2% W and 12% Cr-2% W alloys, were observed after FFTF irradiation at 698 K to a dose of 36 dpa. Martensite in 7% Cr-2% W, 9% Cr-2% W and 12% Cr-2% W alloys and bainite in 2.25% Cr-2% W alloy were fairly stable after the irradiation. Microvoids were observed in the martensite in each alloy but not in bainite and δ-ferrite in 12% Cr-2% W alloys. An addition of 0.02% Ti to 9% Cr-2% W alloy considerably reduced the void density. Spherical (Ta, W) and Ti-rich precipitates were observed in the Ti-added 9% Cr-2% W alloy. Precipitates observed in 9% Cr-2% W and 7% Cr-2% W alloys are mainly Cr-rich M 23C 6 (Ta, W) and Ta(W)-rich M 6C and Fe-rich Laves phase. In 2.25% Cr-2% W alloy, high density of fine (Ta, W)-rich M 2C type precipitates as well as M 6C were observed. Spherical small α' Cr-rich particles were observed in both martensite and α-ferrite in 12% Cr-2% W alloys. Correlation between postirradiation microstructure and irradiation hardening is shown and discussed for these alloys.

  9. Radiation damage of F/M and ODS alloys after Fe3+-ion irradiation at 300 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Suk Hoon; Chun, Young-Bum; Noh, Sanghoon; Jang, Jinsung; Jeong, Yong-Hwan; Kim, Tae Kyu

    2015-02-01

    In this study, Fe3+ self-ion irradiation is used as means of introducing irradiation damage in ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steel and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel. The ion accelerator named DuET (at Kyoto University, Japan) was used for irradiation with 6.4 MeV Fe3+ ions at 300 °C. The total number of accelerated ions was 2.5 × 1020 ions/m2, and the maximum damage rates in the F/M and the ODS steels were estimated to be roughly 6 dpa. The irradiation-induced hardness change in the damaged layer was evaluated by using nano-indentation. The F/M steel and the ODS steel commonly exhibited irradiation hardening; however, the irradiation hardening was more active in the F/M steel than in the ODS steel. The microstructure evolutions after the irradiation were investigated; point or line defects were dominantly observed in the F/M steel, while small circular cavities were typically observed in ODS steel.

  10. Microstructural characterization of a new mechanically alloyed Ni-base ODS superalloy powder

    SciTech Connect

    Seyyed Aghamiri, S.M.; Shahverdi, H.R.; Ukai, S.; Oono, N.; Taya, K.; Miura, S.; Hayashi, S.; Okuda, T.

    2015-02-15

    The microstructure of a new Ni-base oxide dispersion strengthened superalloy powder was studied for high temperature gas turbine applications after the mechanical alloying process. In this study, an atomized powder with a composition similar to the CMSX-10 superalloy was mechanically alloyed with yttria and Hf powders. The mechanically alloyed powder included only the supersaturated solid solution γ phase without γ′ and yttria provided by severe plastic deformation, while after the 3-step aging, the γ′ phase was precipitated due to the partitioning of Al and Ta to the γ′ and Co, Cr, Re, W, and Mo to the γ phase. Mechanical alloying modified the morphology of γ′ to the new coherent γ–γ′ nanoscale lamellar structure to minimize the elastic strain energy of the precipitation, which yielded a low lattice misfit of 0.16% at high temperature. The γ′ lamellae aligned preferentially along the elastically soft [100] direction. Also, the precipitated oxide particles were refined in the γ phase by adding Hf from large incoherent YAlO{sub 3} to fine semi-coherent Y{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} oxide particles with the average size of 7 nm and low interparticle spacing of 76 nm. - Highlights: • A new Ni-base ODS superalloy powder was produced by mechanical alloying. • The nanoscale γ–γ′ lamellar structure was precipitated after the aging treatment. • Fine semi-coherent Y{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} oxide particles were precipitated by addition of Hf.

  11. Progress toward determining the potential of ODS alloys for gas turbine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreshfield, R. L.; Hoppin, G., III; Sheffler, K.

    1983-01-01

    The Materials for Advanced Turbine Engine (MATE) Program managed by the NASA Lewis Research Center is supporting two projects to evaluate the potential of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys for aircraft gas turbine applications. One project involves the evaluation of Incoloy (TM) MA-956 for application as a combustor liner material. An assessment of advanced engine potential will be conducted by means of a test in a P&WA 2037 turbofan engine. The other project involves the evaluation of Inconel (TM) MA 6000 for application as a high pressure turbine blade material and includes a test in a Garrett TFE 731 turbofan engine. Both projects are progressing toward these engine tests in 1984.

  12. Vacancy-controlled ultrastable nanoclusters in nanostructured ferritic alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Z. W.; Yao, L.; Wang, X. -L.; Miller, M. K.

    2015-05-29

    A new class of advanced structural materials, based on the Fe-O-vacancy system, has exceptional resistance to high-temperature creep and excellent tolerance to extremely high-dose radiation. Although these remarkable improvements in properties compared to steels are known to be associated with the Y-Ti-O-enriched nanoclusters, the roles of vacancies in facilitating the nucleation of nanoclusters are a long-standing puzzle, due to the experimental difficulties in characterizing vacancies, particularly in-situ while the nanoclusters are forming. We report an experiment study that provides the compelling evidence for the presence of significant concentrations of vacancies in Y-Ti-O-enriched nanoclusters in a nanostructured ferritic alloy using amore » combination of state-of-the-art atom-probe tomography and in situ small angle neutron scattering. The nucleation of nanoclusters starts from the O-enriched solute clustering with vacancy mediation. The nanoclusters grow with an extremely low growth rate through attraction of vacancies and O:vacancy pairs, leading to the unusual stability of the nanoclusters.« less

  13. Vacancy-controlled ultrastable nanoclusters in nanostructured ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. W.; Yao, L.; Wang, X. -L.; Miller, M. K.

    2015-05-29

    A new class of advanced structural materials, based on the Fe-O-vacancy system, has exceptional resistance to high-temperature creep and excellent tolerance to extremely high-dose radiation. Although these remarkable improvements in properties compared to steels are known to be associated with the Y-Ti-O-enriched nanoclusters, the roles of vacancies in facilitating the nucleation of nanoclusters are a long-standing puzzle, due to the experimental difficulties in characterizing vacancies, particularly in-situ while the nanoclusters are forming. We report an experiment study that provides the compelling evidence for the presence of significant concentrations of vacancies in Y-Ti-O-enriched nanoclusters in a nanostructured ferritic alloy using a combination of state-of-the-art atom-probe tomography and in situ small angle neutron scattering. The nucleation of nanoclusters starts from the O-enriched solute clustering with vacancy mediation. The nanoclusters grow with an extremely low growth rate through attraction of vacancies and O:vacancy pairs, leading to the unusual stability of the nanoclusters.

  14. Vacancy-controlled ultrastable nanoclusters in nanostructured ferritic alloys

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Z. W.; Yao, L.; Wang, X.-L.; Miller, M. K.

    2015-01-01

    A new class of advanced structural materials, based on the Fe-O-vacancy system, has exceptional resistance to high-temperature creep and excellent tolerance to extremely high-dose radiation. Although these remarkable improvements in properties compared to steels are known to be associated with the Y-Ti-O-enriched nanoclusters, the roles of vacancies in facilitating the nucleation of nanoclusters are a long-standing puzzle, due to the experimental difficulties in characterizing vacancies, particularly in-situ while the nanoclusters are forming. Here we report an experiment study that provides the compelling evidence for the presence of significant concentrations of vacancies in Y-Ti-O-enriched nanoclusters in a nanostructured ferritic alloy using a combination of state-of-the-art atom-probe tomography and in situ small angle neutron scattering. The nucleation of nanoclusters starts from the O-enriched solute clustering with vacancy mediation. The nanoclusters grow with an extremely low growth rate through attraction of vacancies and O:vacancy pairs, leading to the unusual stability of the nanoclusters. PMID:26023747

  15. R&D of ferritic-martensitic steel EP450 ODS for fuel pin claddings of prospective fast reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitina, A. A.; Ageev, V. S.; Chukanov, A. P.; Tsvelev, V. V.; Porezanov, N. P.; Kruglov, O. A.

    2012-09-01

    Present paper performs research results of structure and mechanical properties of the ODS steel on the base of steel EP450 (Fe-13Cr-2Mo-Nb-V-B-0,12C) on all stages of producing: from powders to thin-walled tubes. Also, the results of research on method of sealing thin-walled tubes from steel EP450 ODS by pressurized resistance welding are shown.

  16. Stability of Y Ti O Precipitates in Friction Stir Welded Nanostructured Ferritic Alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yu, Xinghua; Mazumder, Baishakhi; Miller, Michael K; David, Stan A; Feng, Zhili

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs), which have complex microstructures consisting of ultrafine ferritic grains with a dispersion of stable oxide particles and nanoclusters (NC), are promising materials for fuel cladding and structural applications in the next generation nuclear reactor. This study evaluates microstructure of friction stir welded NFA using electron microscopy and atom probe tomography (APT) techniques. APT results revealed NCs are coarsened and inhomogeneously distributed in the stir zone. Three hypotheses on coarsening of NC are presented.

  17. Nano-particle precipitation in mechanically alloyed and annealed precursor powders of legacy PM2000 ODS alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Karl; Haigh, Sarah J.; Tatlock, Gordon J.; Jones, Andy R.

    2015-09-01

    The early stages of nano-particulate formation in mechanically alloyed and annealed, precursor powders used to manufacture the legacy commercial oxide dispersion strengthened alloy PM2000, formerly produced by Plansee GmbH, have been investigated. Powders were analysed in both the as-mechanically-alloyed condition and after annealing over the temperature range 923-1423 K. The nucleation and growth of coherent nano-particles in the partially recovered, fine grained, ferritic matrix of powders annealed at temperatures as low as 923 K has been confirmed. Powders annealed for 1 h at temperatures of 1123 K and 1223 K were partially recrystallised and contained high number densities (NV > 1023 m-3) of coherent 2 nm yttrium-aluminium-oxygen rich nano-particles. The identification of particle free zones in recrystallised grains, adjacent to recrystallising interfaces, plus the identical orientation relationships between nano-particles and the matrices in both unrecrystallised and recrystallised grains, indicates that the Y-Al-O nano-particles, first formed in fine grained regions, are dissolved during recrystallisation and re-precipitated subsequently in recrystallised grains.

  18. Irradiation creep of various ferritic alloys irradiated {approximately}400 C in the PFR and FFTF reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, M.B.; Garner, F.A.; Eiholzer, C.R.

    1998-03-01

    Three ferritic alloys were irradiated in two fast reactors to doses of 50 dpa or more at temperatures near 400 C. One martensitic alloy, HT9, was irradiated in both the FFTF and PFR reactors. PFR is the Prototype Fast Reactor in Dourneay, Scotland, and FFTF is the Fast Flux Test Facility in Richland, WA. D57 is a developmental alloy that was irradiated in PFR only, and MA957 is a Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion-hardened ferritic alloy that was irradiated only in FFTF. These alloys exhibited little or no void swelling at {approximately}400 C. Depending on the alloy starting condition, these steels develop a variety of non-creep strains early in the irradiation that are associated with phase changes. Each of these alloys creeps at a rate that is significantly lower than that of austenitic steels irradiated in the same experiments. The creep compliance for ferritic alloys in general appears to be {approximately}0.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} MPa{sup {minus}1} dpa{sup {minus}1}, independent of both composition and starting state. The addition of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a dispersoid does not appear to change the creep behavior.

  19. Tensile and fracture toughness properties of the nanostructured oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy 13Cr-1W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiselt, Ch. Ch.; Klimenkov, M.; Lindau, R.; Möslang, A.; Odette, G. R.; Yamamoto, T.; Gragg, D.

    2011-10-01

    The realization of fusion power as an attractive energy source requires advanced structural materials that can cope with ultra-severe thermo-mechanical loads and high neutron fluxes experienced by fusion power plant components, such as the first wall, divertor and blanket structures. Towards this end, two variants of a 13Cr-1W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3 reduced activation ferritic (RAF-) ODS steel were produced by ball milling phase blended Fe-13Cr-1W, 0.3Y 20 3 and 0.3Ti powders in both argon and hydrogen atmospheres. The milled powders were consolidated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). The as-HIPed alloys were then hot rolled into 6 mm plates. Microstructural, tensile and fracture toughness characterization of the hot rolled alloys are summarized here and compared to results previously reported for the as-HIPed condition.

  20. Charpy impact test results for low activation ferritic alloys irradiated to 30 dpa

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, L.E.; Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S.

    1996-04-01

    Miniature specimens of six low activation ferritic alloys have been impact field tested following irradiation at 370{degrees}C to 30 dpa. Comparison of the results with those of control specimens and specimens irradiated to 10 dpa indicates that degradation in the impact behavior appears to have saturated by {approx}10 dpa in at least four of these alloys. The 7.5Cr-2W alloy referred to as GA3X appears most promising for further consideration as a candidate structural material in fusion reactor applications, although the 9Cr-1V alloy may also warrant further investigation.

  1. Swelling and dislocation evolution in simple ferritic alloys irradiated to high fluence in FFTF/MOTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katoh, Yutai; Kohyama, Akira; Gelles, David S.

    1995-08-01

    Microstructures of a series of Fe sbnd Cr binary ferritic alloys were examined following neutron irradiation to 140 dpa at 698 K in FFTF/MOTA. The chromium concentration ranged from 3 to 18% in 3% increments and the irradiation temperature corresponded to the peak swelling condition for this alloy class. The swelling varied from 0.4 to 2.9% depending on chromium concentration, and the highest swelling was found in the Fe sbnd 9Cr alloy. The cavity microstructures corresponded to transient to early steady-state swelling regime. Dislocations were composed of networks with both a<100> and ( a/2)<111> Burgers vector and a<100> type interstitial loops. The dislocation density was negatively correlated with swelling. Explanation for the observed chromium concentration dependence of microstructural development and low swelling in the ferritic alloys will be studied in connection with the dislocation bias efficiency and the theory of sink strength ratio.

  2. Fatigue properties of MA 6000E, a gamma-prime strengthened ODS alloy. [Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Ni-base alloy for gas turbine blade applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Y. G.; Merrick, H. F.

    1980-01-01

    MA 6000E is a corrosion resistant, gamma-prime strengthened ODS alloy under development for advanced turbine blade applications. The high temperature, 1093 C, rupture strength is superior to conventional nickel-base alloys. This paper addresses the fatigue behavior of the alloy. Excellent properties are exhibited in low and high cycle fatigue and also thermal fatigue. This is attributed to a unique combination of microstructural features, i.e., a fine distribution of dispersed oxides and other nonmetallics, and the highly elongated grain structure which advantageously modify the deformation characteristics and crack initiation and propagation modes from that characteristic of conventional gamma-prime hardened superalloys.

  3. Effect of Y2O3 content on the oxidation behavior of Fe-Cr-Al-based ODS alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ul-Hamid, Anwar

    2003-02-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the cyclic oxidation behavior of two oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al based alloys containing 0.17 wt.% and 0.7 wt.% Y2O3. The alloys were oxidized in air for 100 h at 1200°C based on a 24 h cycle period. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to characterize the structure, morphology, and composition of the oxide scales. Both alloys formed highly adherent and continuous layers of α-Al2O3 exhibiting a morphology indicative of inward scale growth. The role of Y2O3 was to promote adherence by segregating to the grain boundaries within the oxide. Concurrently, Y2O3 generated micro-porosity resulting in a scale of comparatively higher thickness in the alloy with 0.7 wt.% Y2O3.

  4. Measuring the Fracture Toughness of TZM and ODS Molybdenum Alloys Using Standard and Sub-Sized Bend Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, B. V.

    2002-12-01

    Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) and TZM molybdenum have excellent creep resistance and strength at high temperatures in inert atmospheres. Fracture toughness and tensile testing was performed at temperatures between -150 degrees C and 450 degrees C to characterize 6.35 mm thick plate material of ODS and TZM molybdenum. A transition from low fracture toughness values (5.8 to 29.6 MPa square root m) to values greater than 30 MPa square root m is observed for TZM molybdenum in the longitudinal orientation at 100 degrees C and in the transverse orientation at 150 degrees C. These results are consistent with data reported in literature for molybdenum. A transition to low fracture toughness values (less than 30 MPa square root m) was not observed for longitudinal ODS molybdenum at temperatures greater than or equal to -150 degrees C, while a transition to low fracture toughness values (12.6 to 25.4 MPa square root m) was observed for the transverse orientation at room-temperature. The fi ne spacing of La-oxide precipitates that are present in ODS molybdenum result in a transition temperature that is significantly lower than any molybdenum alloy reported to date, with upper bound fracture toughness values that bound the literature data. A comparison of fracture toughness values obtained using a 1T, 0.5T, and 0.25T Charpy shows that a 0.5T Charpy could be used as a sub-sized specimen geometry.

  5. Self-Consistent Model for Planar Ferrite Growth in Fe-C-X Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurob, H. S.; Panahi, D.; Hutchinson, C. R.; Brechet, Y.; Purdy, G. R.

    2013-08-01

    A self-consistent model for non-partitioning planar ferrite growth from alloyed austenite is presented. The model captures the evolution with time of interfacial contact conditions for substitutional and interstitial solutes. Substitutional element solute drag is evaluated in terms of the dissipation of free energy within the interface, and an estimate is provided for the rate of buildup of the alloying element "spike" in austenite. The transport of the alloying elements within the interface region is modeled using a discrete-jump model, while the bulk diffusion of C is treated using a standard continuum treatment. The model is validated against ferrite precipitation and decarburization kinetics in the Fe-Ni-C, Fe-Mn-C, and Fe-Mo-C systems.

  6. The Effect of H and He on Irradiation Performance of Fe and Ferritic Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    James F. Stubbins

    2010-01-22

    This research program was designed to look at basic radiation damage and effects and mechanical properties in Fe and ferritic alloys. The program scope included a number of materials ranging from pure single crystal Fe to more complex Fe-Cr-C alloys. The range of materials was designed to examine materials response and performance on ideal/model systems and gradually move to more complex systems. The experimental program was coordinated with a modeling effort. The use of pure and model alloys also facilitated the ability to develop and employ atomistic-scale modeling techniques to understand the inherent physics underlying materials performance

  7. Detection and quantification of solute clusters in a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Miller, Michael K.; Larson, David J.; Reinhard, D. A.

    2014-12-26

    A series of simulated atom probe datasets were examined with a friends-of-friends method to establish the detection efficiency required to resolve solute clusters in the ferrite phase of a 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy. The size and number densities of solute clusters in the ferrite of the as-milled mechanically-alloyed condition and the stir zone of a friction stir weld were estimated with a prototype high-detection-efficiency (~80%) local electrode atom probe. High number densities, 1.8 × 1024 m–3 and 1.2 × 1024 m–3, respectively of solute clusters containing between 2 and 9 solute atoms of Ti, Y and O and were detectedmore » for these two conditions. Furthermore, these results support first principle calculations that predicted that vacancies stabilize these Ti–Y–O– clusters, which retard diffusion and contribute to the excellent high temperature stability of the microstructure and radiation tolerance of nanostructured ferritic alloys.« less

  8. Detection and quantification of solute clusters in a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Michael K.; Larson, David J.; Reinhard, D. A.

    2014-12-26

    A series of simulated atom probe datasets were examined with a friends-of-friends method to establish the detection efficiency required to resolve solute clusters in the ferrite phase of a 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy. The size and number densities of solute clusters in the ferrite of the as-milled mechanically-alloyed condition and the stir zone of a friction stir weld were estimated with a prototype high-detection-efficiency (~80%) local electrode atom probe. High number densities, 1.8 × 1024 m–3 and 1.2 × 1024 m–3, respectively of solute clusters containing between 2 and 9 solute atoms of Ti, Y and O and were detected for these two conditions. Furthermore, these results support first principle calculations that predicted that vacancies stabilize these Ti–Y–O– clusters, which retard diffusion and contribute to the excellent high temperature stability of the microstructure and radiation tolerance of nanostructured ferritic alloys.

  9. Irradiation creep of various ferritic alloys irradiated at ˜400°C in the PFR and FFTF reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloczko, M. B.; Garner, F. A.; Eiholzer, C. R.

    1998-10-01

    Irradiation creep of three ferritic alloys at ˜400 ∘C has been studied. Specimens were in the form of pressurized tubes. In a joint US/UK creep study, two identical sets of creep specimens constructed from one heat of HT9 were irradiated in fast reactors, one in the Prototypic Fast Reactor (PFR) and the other in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The specimens in PFR were irradiated to a dose of ˜50 dpa, whereas the specimens in FFTF were irradiated to a dose of 165 dpa. The observed swelling and creep behavior were very different in the two reactors. Creep specimens constructed from D57, a developmental alloy ferritic alloy, were also irradiated in PFR to a dose of ˜50 dpa. Creep behavior typical of previous studies on ferritic alloys was observed. Finally, creep specimens constructed from MA957, a Y 2O 3 dispersion-hardened ferritic alloy, were irradiated in FFTF to a dose of ˜110 dpa. This alloy exhibited a large amount of densification, and the creep behavior was different than observed in more conventional ferritic or ferritic-martensitic alloys.

  10. Oxidation resistance of novel ferritic stainless steels alloyed with titanium for SOFC interconnect applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, P.D.; Alman, D.E.

    2008-05-15

    Chromia (Cr2O3) forming ferritic stainless steels are being developed for interconnect application in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC). A problem with these alloys is that in the SOFC environment chrome in the surface oxide can evaporate and deposit on the electrochemically active sites within the fuel cell. This poisons and degrades the performance of the fuel cell. The development of steels that can form conductive outer protective oxide layers other than Cr2O3 or (CrMn)3O4 such as TiO2 may be attractive for SOFC application. This study was undertaken to assess the oxidation behavior of ferritic stainless steel containing 1 weight percent (wt.%) Ti, in an effort to develop alloys that form protective outer TiO2 scales. The effect of Cr content (6–22 wt.%) and the application of a Ce-based surface treatment on the oxidation behavior (at 800° C in air+3% H2O) of the alloys was investigated. The alloys themselves failed to form an outer TiO2 scale even though the large negative {delta}G of this compound favors its formation over other species. It was found that in conjunction with the Ce-surface treatment, a continuous outer TiO2 oxide layer could be formed on the alloys, and in fact the alloy with 12 wt.% Cr behaved in an identical manner as the alloy with 22 wt.% Cr.

  11. Computational Design of Creep-Resistant Alloys and Experimental Validation in Ferritic Superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Liaw, Peter

    2014-12-31

    A new class of ferritic superalloys containing B2-type zones inside parent L21-type precipitates in a disordered solid-solution matrix, also known as a hierarchical-precipitate strengthened ferritic alloy (HPSFA), has been developed for high-temperature structural applications in fossil-energy power plants. These alloys were designed by the addition of the Ti element into a previously-studied NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy (denoted as FBB8 in this study). In the present research, systematic investigations, including advanced experimental techniques, first-principles calculations, and numerical simulations, have been integrated and conducted to characterize the complex microstructures and excellent creep resistance of HPSFAs. The experimental techniques include transmission-electron microscopy, scanningtransmission- electron microscopy, neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography, which provide detailed microstructural information of HPSFAs. Systematic tension/compression creep tests revealed that HPSFAs exhibit the superior creep resistance, compared with the FBB8 and conventional ferritic steels (i.e., the creep rates of HPSFAs are about 4 orders of magnitude slower than the FBB8 and conventional ferritic steels.) First-principles calculations include interfacial free energies, anti-phase boundary (APB) free energies, elastic constants, and impurity diffusivities in Fe. Combined with kinetic Monte- Carlo simulations of interdiffusion coefficients, and the integration of computational thermodynamics and kinetics, these calculations provide great understanding of thermodynamic and mechanical properties of HPSFAs. In addition to the systematic experimental approach and first-principles calculations, a series of numerical tools and algorithms, which assist in the optimization of creep properties of ferritic superalloys, are utilized and developed. These numerical simulation results are compared with the available experimental data and previous first

  12. Temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy and mesoscale deformation in a nanostructured ferritic alloy.

    PubMed

    Stoica, G M; Stoica, A D; Miller, M K; Ma, D

    2014-01-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys are a new class of ultrafine-grained oxide dispersion-strengthened steels that have promising properties for service in extreme environments in future nuclear reactors. This is due to the remarkable stability of their complex microstructures containing numerous Y-Ti-O nanoclusters within grains and along grain boundaries. Although nanoclusters account primarily for the exceptional resistance to irradiation damage and high-temperature creep, little is known about the mechanical roles of the polycrystalline grains that constitute the ferritic matrix. Here we report an in situ mesoscale characterization of anisotropic responses of ultrafine ferrite grains to stresses using state-of-the-art neutron diffraction. We show the experimental determination of single-crystal elastic constants for a 14YWT alloy, and reveal a strong temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy that leads to elastic softening and instability of the ferrite. We also demonstrate, from anisotropy-induced intergranular strains, that a deformation crossover exists from low-temperature lattice hardening to high-temperature lattice softening in response to extensive plastic deformation. PMID:25300893

  13. Temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy and mesoscale deformation in a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoica, G. M.; Stoica, A. D.; Miller, M. K.; Ma, D.

    2014-10-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys are a new class of ultrafine-grained oxide dispersion-strengthened steels that have promising properties for service in extreme environments in future nuclear reactors. This is due to the remarkable stability of their complex microstructures containing numerous Y-Ti-O nanoclusters within grains and along grain boundaries. Although nanoclusters account primarily for the exceptional resistance to irradiation damage and high-temperature creep, little is known about the mechanical roles of the polycrystalline grains that constitute the ferritic matrix. Here we report an in situ mesoscale characterization of anisotropic responses of ultrafine ferrite grains to stresses using state-of-the-art neutron diffraction. We show the experimental determination of single-crystal elastic constants for a 14YWT alloy, and reveal a strong temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy that leads to elastic softening and instability of the ferrite. We also demonstrate, from anisotropy-induced intergranular strains, that a deformation crossover exists from low-temperature lattice hardening to high-temperature lattice softening in response to extensive plastic deformation.

  14. Investigation on different oxides as candidates for nano-sized ODS particles in reduced-activation ferritic (RAF) steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Jan; Rieth, Michael; Lindau, Rainer; Klimenkov, Michael; Möslang, Anton; Sandim, Hugo Ricardo Zschommler

    2013-11-01

    Future generation reactor concepts are based on materials that can stand higher temperatures and higher neutron doses in corrosive environments. Oxide dispersion strengthened steels with chromium contents ranging from 9 to 14 wt.% - produced by mechanical alloying - are typical candidate materials for future structural materials in fission and fusion power plants.

  15. High Frequency Properties of Ferrite/Fe-Si-Al Alloy Soft Magnetic Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stergiou, Charalampos A.; Zaspalis, Vassilios

    The inclusion of Fe-Si-Al alloy particles in NiCuZn ferrite matrix was investigated with regard to the high frequency electromagnetic properties (complex permeability and permittivity). The resultant composites of relatively low density exhibit a shift of the permeability spectra to higher frequencies and an increase of dielectric polarization, which finally favour the electromagnetic wave attenuation at microwave frequencies. Thus, wider band return loss peaks are attained at frequencies above 6 GHz by thinner composite materials.

  16. Impurity content of reduced-activation ferritic steels and a vanadium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Bloom, E.E.

    1997-04-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to analyze a reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel and a vanadium alloy for low-level impurities that would compromise the reduced-activation characteristics of these materials. The ferritic steel was from the 5-ton IEA heat of modified F82H, and the vanadium alloy was from a 500-kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti. To compare techniques for analysis of low concentrations of impurities, the vanadium alloy was also examined by glow discharge mass spectrometry. Two other reduced-activation steels and two commercial ferritic steels were also analyzed to determine the difference in the level of the detrimental impurities in the IEA heat and steels for which no extra effort was made to restrict some of the tramp impurities. Silver, cobalt, molybdenum, and niobium proved to be the tramp impurities of most importance. The levels observed in these two materials produced with present technology exceeded the limits for low activation for either shallow land burial or recycling. The chemical analyses provide a benchmark for the improvement in production technology required to achieve reduced activation; they also provide a set of concentrations for calculating decay characteristics for reduced-activation materials. The results indicate the progress that has been made and give an indication of what must still be done before the reduced-activation criteria can be achieved.

  17. A micro-alloyed ferritic steel strengthened by nanoscale precipitates

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yongfeng; Wang, Chong M.; Sun, Xin

    2011-10-25

    A ferritic steel with finely dispersive precipitates was investigated to reveal the fundamental strengthening mechanisms. The steel has a yield strength of 760 MPa, approximately three times higher than that of conventional Ti-bearing high strength hot-rolled sheet steels, and its ultimate tensile strength reaches 850 MPa with an elongation-to-failure value of 18%. Using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) and transmission electron microscope (TEM), fine carbides TiC with an average diameter of 10 nm were observed in the ferrite matrix of the 0.08%Ti steel, and some cubic M23C6 precipitates were also observed at the grain boundaries and the interior of the grains. The finely dispersive TiC precipitates in the matrix provide matrix strengthening. The estimated magnitude of precipitation strengthening is around 458 MPa, depending on the average size of the nanoscale precipitates. Dislocation densities increased from 3.42×1013 m-2 to 1.69 × 1014 m-2, respectively, with increasing tensile strain from 5.5% to 22%. The measured work-hardening behavior can be related to the observed dislocation accumulations resulting from the dispersive nano-scale precipitates.

  18. Development of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, D.K.; Froes, F.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1998-03-01

    An oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel with high temperature strength has been developed in line with low activation criteria for application in fusion power systems. The composition Fe-13.5Cr-2W-0.5Ti-0.25Y{sub 2}O{sup 3} was chosen to provide a minimum chromium content to insure fully delta-ferrite stability. High temperature strength has been demonstrated by measuring creep response of the ODS alloy in uniaxial tension at 650 and 900 C in an inert atmosphere chamber. Results of tests at 900 C demonstrate that this alloy has creep properties similar to other alloys of similar design and can be considered for use in high temperature fusion power system designs. The alloy selection process, materials production, microstructural evaluation and creep testing are described.

  19. Surface modification of ferritic and Ni based alloys for improved oxidation resistance of SOFC interconnect applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Alman, David E.; Kung, Steven C.

    2005-08-01

    This research is aimed at evaluating a surface modification of ferritic stainless steels (Type-430 and Crofer 22APU) and nickel-base alloys (Haynes 230) for use in the SOFC temperature range of 700 to 800°C. A surface treatment was devised to enhance the stability of the base metal oxide that forms and to reduce the oxidation rate of the materials at high temperature. Oxidation tests (in wet air; treated and untreated) were conducted at 800°C to evaulate the corrosion resistance of the alloys. It was found that the surface treatment improved the oxidation resistance of all the alloys tested. However, the treatment improved the performance of 430SS more than that of the other alloys.

  20. Effect of Alloy Composition, Surface Preparation and Exposure Conditions on the Selective Oxidation Behavior of Ferritic Fe-Cr and Fe-Cr-X Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, G H; Mu, N; Yanar, N M; Pettit, F S; Piron Abellan, J; Olszewski, T; Quadakkers, W J; Holcomb, G R

    2010-09-01

    Abstract Selective oxidation behavior of ferritic martensitic Fe–Cr base alloys, exposed in various atmospheres containing combinations of O2, CO2, and H2O, were studied at various temperatures relevant to oxy-fuel combustion. This paper begins with a discussion of the required Cr content to form a continuous external chromia scale on a simple binary Fe–Cr alloy exposed in oxygen or air based on experiments and calculations using the classic Wagner model. Then, the effects of the exposure environment and Cr content on the selective oxidation of Fe–Cr alloys are evaluated. Finally, the effects produced by alloying additions of Si, commonly present in various groups of commercially available ferritic steels, are described. The discussion compares the oxide scale formation on simple binary and ternary Fe–Cr base model alloys with that on several commercially available ferritic steels.

  1. ODS iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, I.G.; McKamey, C.G.; Pint, B.A.

    1995-07-01

    Since oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) FeCrAl-based alloys have sufficient creep strength and good oxidation resistance at the very high temperatures of interest for the primary heat exchanger in advanced, closed-cycle gas turbine systems, they constitute viable alternative candidates to ceramics. A major life-limiting factor of these alloys is the ability to continue to form a protective scale of aluminum oxide, a factor proportional to the total amount of aluminum contained in the alloy. Fe{sub 3}Al has oxidation resistance comparable to that of the FeCrAl-based alloys, and significantly superior sulfidation resistance. Also, because of its larger reservoir of aluminum, Fe{sub 3}Al would be expected to exhibit longer lifetimes at the temperatures of interest. Since the strengthening effects of ODS processing are expected to confer similar high-temperature creep properties to those found for the FeCrAl-based alloys, ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al is considered to have excellent potential for the very high-temperature heat exchanger application. The program effort on ODS Fe{sub 3}Al includes examination of the properties of available ODS-FeCrAl alloys; development of mechanical alloying parameters for ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al; determination of the effects of a dispersion of reactive element oxides on the high-temperature oxidation behavior of Fe{sub 3}Al; and evaluation of methods for joining them.

  2. A Micro-Alloyed Ferritic Steel Strengthened by Nanoscale Precipitates

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yongfeng; Wang, Chong M.; Sun, Xin

    2011-08-04

    A high strength ferritic steel with finely dispersive precipitates was investigated to reveal the fundamental strengthening mechanisms. Using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) and transmission electron microscope (TEM), fine carbides with an average diameter of 10 nm were observed in the ferrite matrix of the 0.08%Ti steel, and some cubic M23C6 precipitates were also observed at the grain boundaries and the interior of grains. The dual precipitate structure of finely dispersive TiC precipitates in the matrix and coarse M23C6 at grain boundaries provides combined matrix and grain boundary strengthening. The calculated amount of precipitation strengthening by the carbides was approximately 450 ~ 630 MPa, depending on the average size of nanoscale precipitates. This value is two or three times higher than that of conventional Ti-bearing high strength hot-rolled sheet steels. Dislocation densities increased from 3.42×1013 m-2 to 1.69 × 1014 m-2, espectively, with increasing tensile strain from 5.5% to 22%. The effect of the particle size, particle distribution and intrinsic particle strength have been investigated through dislocation dynamics (DD) simulations and the relationship for resolved shear stress for single crystal under this condition has been presented using simulation data. The results show that the finely dispersive precipitates can strengthen the material by pinning the dislocations up to a certain shear stress and retarding the recovery as well as annihilation of dislocations. The DD results also show that strengthening is not only a function of the density of the nano-scale precipitates but also of their size.

  3. Experimental study of the distribution of alloying elements after the formation of epitaxial ferrite upon cooling in a low-carbon steel

    SciTech Connect

    Santofimia, M.J.; Kwakernaak, C.; Sloof, W.G.; Zhao, L.; Sietsma, J.

    2010-10-15

    The distributions of carbon and substitutional elements in a low-carbon steel during the formation of epitaxial ferrite on cooling after intercritical annealing have been studied by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The analysis has shown that the formation of epitaxial ferrite takes place with a partial redistribution of alloying elements between the epitaxial ferrite and the austenite. This redistribution of alloying elements causes compositional gradients in the epitaxial ferrite that lead to a different etching behaviour with respect to the intercritical ferrite. Contrary to Thermo-Calc predictions, a distinct partitioning behaviour of silicon has been observed.

  4. The role of processing route on the microstructure of 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazumder, B.; Parish, C. M.; Bei, H.; Miller, M. K.

    2015-10-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys have outstanding high temperature creep properties and enhanced tolerance to radiation damage over conventional ferritic alloys. To achieve these properties, NFAs are fabricated by mechanical alloying of metallic and yttria powders. Atom probe tomography has demonstrated that milling times of at least 40 h are required to produce a uniform distribution of solutes in the flakes. After milling and hot extrusion, the microstructure consists of α-Fe, high number densities of Ti-Y-O-vacancy-enriched nanoclusters, and coarse Y2Ti2O7 and Ti(O,C,N) precipitates on the grain boundaries. In contrast, the as-cast condition consists of α-Fe with 50-100 μm irregularly-shaped Y2Ti2O7 pyrochlore precipitates with smaller embedded precipitates with the Y3Al5O12 (yttrium-aluminum garnet) crystal structure indicating that this traditional processing route is not a viable approach to achieve the desired microstructure. The nano-hardnesses were also substantially different, i.e., 4 and 8 GPa for the as-cast and as-extruded conditions, respectively. These variances can be explained by the microstructural differences and the effects of the high vacancy content introduced by mechanical alloying, and the strong binding energy of vacancies with O, Ti, and Y atoms that retard diffusion.

  5. The role of processing route on the microstructure of 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazumder, B.; Parish, C. M.; Bei, H.; Miller, M. K.

    2015-10-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys have outstanding high temperature creep properties and enhanced tolerance to radiation damage over conventional ferritic alloys. To achieve these properties, NFAs are fabricated by mechanical alloying of metallic and yttria powders. Atom probe tomography has demonstrated that milling times of at least 40 h are required to produce a uniform distribution of solutes in the flakes. After milling and hot extrusion, the microstructure consists of α-Fe, high number densities of Ti-Y-O-vacancy-enriched nanoclusters, and coarse Y2Ti2O7 and Ti(O,C,N) precipitates on the grain boundaries. In contrast, the as-cast condition consists of α-Fe with 50-100 μm irregularly-shaped Y2Ti2O7 pyrochlore precipitates with smaller embedded precipitates with the Y3Al5O12 (yttrium-aluminum garnet) crystal structure indicating that this traditional processing route is not a viable approach to achieve the desired microstructure. The nano-hardnesses were also substantially different, i.e., 4 and 8 GPa for the as-cast and as-extruded conditions, respectively. These variances can be explained by the microstructural differences and the effects of the high vacancy content introduced by mechanical alloying, and the strong binding energy of vacancies with O, Ti, and Y atoms that retard diffusion.

  6. Dynamical interaction of helium bubbles with cascade damage in Fe-9Cr ferritic alloy.

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, K.; Miyamoto, M.; Arakawa, K.; Birtcher, R. C.; Materials Science Division; Shimane Univ.; Osaka Univ.

    2008-12-01

    Dynamic interaction of helium bubble with cascade damage in Fe-9Cr ferritic alloy has been studied using in situ irradiation and electron microscopy. During the irradiation of the alloy by 400 keV Fe{sup +} ions at temperatures where no thermal motion takes place, induced displacement of small helium bubbles was observed: the bubbles underwent sporadic and instant displacement. The displacement was of the order of a few nanometers. The experimentally determined displacement probability of helium bubbles is consistent with the calculated probability of their dynamic interaction with sub-cascades introduced by the irradiation. Furthermore, during the irradiation of the alloy at higher temperatures, both retarded and accelerated Brownian type motions were observed. These results are discussed on the basis of dynamic interaction of helium bubbles with point defects that survive through high-energy self-ion irradiation.

  7. Irradiation Creep and Swelling from 400 C to 600 C of the Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Ferritic Alloy MA957

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Gelles, David S.; Garner, Francis A.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Abe, Katsunori

    2004-04-24

    Recently, there has been a growing interest in the use of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels for fusion reactor applications. As part of an extensive study performed at PNNL on the ODS steel MA957 [1], irradiation creep tests were performed on pressurized tubes made from MA957 by two different methods. The tubes were made either by gun drilling alone or by a combination of rod drawing and gun drilling. The different fabrication methods were explored because ODS steels have been difficult to form. The pressurized tubes were irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) to doses ranging from 40 dpa to 110 dpa at temperatures ranging from 400 C to 600 C. The effective stresses resulting from the pressurization of the tubes ranged from 0 MPa to 175 MPa.

  8. ODS iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, I.G.; Pint, B.A.; Ohriner, E.K.; Tortorelli, P.F.

    1996-08-01

    The overall goal of this program is to develop an oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) version of Fe{sub 3}Al that has sufficient creep strength and resistance to oxidation at temperatures in the range 1000 to 1200{degrees}C to be suitable for application as heat exchanger tubing in advanced power generation cycles. The program has two main thrusts: (a) alloy processing, which involves mechanical alloying and thermomechanical processing to achieve the desired size and distribution of the oxide dispersoid, and (b) optimization of the oxidation behavior to provide increased service life compared to ODS-FeCrAl alloys intended for the same applications. Control of the grain size and shape in the final alloy is very dependent on the homogeneity of the alloy powder, in terms of the size and distribution of the dispersed oxide particles, and on the level of strain and temperature applied in the recrystallization step. Studies of the effects of these variables are being made using mechanically-alloyed powder from two sources: a commercial powder metallurgy alloy vendor and an in-house, controlled environment high-energy mill. The effects of milling parameters on the microstructure and composition of the powder and consolidated alloy are described. Comparison of the oxidation kinetics of ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al alloys with commercial ODS-FeCrAl alloys in air at 1000-1300{degrees}C indicated that the best Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys oxidized isothermally at the same rate as the ODS-FeCrAl alloys but, under thermal cycling conditions, the oxidation rate of ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al was faster. The main difference was that the ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al experienced significantly more scale spallation above 1000{degrees}C. The differences in oxidation behavior were translated into expected lifetimes which indicated that, for an alloy section thickness of 2.5 mm, the scale spallation of ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al leads to an expected service lifetime similar to that for the INCO alloy MA956 at 1100 to 1300{degrees}C.

  9. Charpy impact test results of four low activation ferritic alloys irradiated at 370{degrees}C to 15 DPA

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, L.E.; Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S.

    1996-10-01

    Miniature CVN specimens of four low activation ferritic alloys have been impact tested following irradiation at 370{degrees}C to 15 dpa. Comparison of the results with those of control specimens indicates that degradation in the impact behavior occurs in each of these four alloys. The 9Cr-2W alloy referred to as GA3X and the similar alloy F82H with 7.8Cr-2W appear most promising for further consideration as candidate structural materials in fusion energy system applications. These two alloys exhibit a small DBTT shift to higher temperatures but show increased absorbed energy on the upper shelf.

  10. System and method of forming nanostructured ferritic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Dial, Laura Cerully; DiDomizio, Richard; Alinger, Matthew Joseph; Huang, Shenyan

    2016-07-26

    A system for mechanical milling and a method of mechanical milling are disclosed. The system includes a container, a feedstock, and milling media. The container encloses a processing volume. The feedstock and the milling media are disposed in the processing volume of the container. The feedstock includes metal or alloy powder and a ceramic compound. The feedstock is mechanically milled in the processing volume using metallic milling media that includes a surface portion that has a carbon content less than about 0.4 weight percent.

  11. Investigation of Magnetic Signatures and Microstructures for Heat-Treated Ferritic/Martensitic HT-9 Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.; McCloy, John S.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Edwards, Danny J.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Li, Yulan

    2013-05-01

    There is increased interest in improved methods for in-situ nondestructive interrogation of materials for nuclear reactors in order to ensure reactor safety and quantify material degradation (particularly embrittlement) prior to failure. Therefore, a prototypical ferritic/martensitic alloy, HT-9, of interest to the nuclear materials community was investigated to assess microstructure effects on micromagnetics measurements – Barkhausen noise emission, magnetic hysteresis measurements, and first-order reversal curve analysis – for samples with three different heat-treatments. Microstructural and physical measurements consisted of high-precision density, resonant ultrasound elastic constant determination, Vickers microhardness, grain size, and texture. These were varied in the HT-9 alloy samples and related to various magnetic signatures. In parallel, a meso-scale microstructure model was created for alpha iron and effects of polycrystallinity and demagnetization factor were explored. It was observed that Barkhausen noise emission decreased with increasing hardness and decreasing grain size (lath spacing) while coercivity increased. The results are discussed in terms of the use of magnetic signatures for nondestructive interrogation of radiation damage and other microstructural changes in ferritic/martensitic alloys.

  12. Influence of the - phase separation on the tensile properties of Fe-base ODS PM 2000 alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Capdevila, C.; Miller, Michael K; Toda, I; Chao, J.

    2010-01-01

    The yield and ultimate tensile strengths of an ultrafine grained, oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) PM 2000 alloy increased during aging at 475 C. Atom probe tomography and X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the decrease in lattice parameter and the increases in the yield and ultimate tensile strengths were correlated with phase separation into Fe-rich {alpha} and Cr-enriched {alpha}{prime} phases. The lattice misfit between the emerging {alpha} and {alpha}{prime} domains and the resulting elastic strain, and the increment of the elastic modulus with aging time due to the corresponding decrease of lattice parameter during {alpha}-{alpha}{prime} phase separation, can be regarded as the main causes of hardening.

  13. Effect of alloying on microstructure and precipitate evolution in ferritic weld metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Badri Kannan

    The effect of alloying on the microstructure of ferritic weld metal produced with an self-shielded flux cored arc welding process (FCAW-S) has been studied. The welding electrode has a flux core that is intentionally alloyed with strong deoxidizers and denitriding elements such as aluminum, titanium and zirconium in addition to austenite formers such as manganese and nickel. This results in formation of microstructure consisting of carbide free bainite, retained austenite and twinned martensite. The work focuses on characterization of the microstructures and the precipitates formed during solidification and the allotropic phase transformation of the weld metal. Aluminum, manganese and nickel have significant solubility in iron while aluminum, titanium and zirconium have very strong affinity for nitrogen and oxygen. The effect of these alloying elements on the phase transformation and precipitation of oxides and nitrides have been studied with various characterization techniques. In-situ X-ray synchrotron diffraction has been used to characterize the solidification path and the effect of heating and cooling rates on microstructure evolution. Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) in conjunction with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) was used to study the effect of micro-alloying additions on inclusion evolution. The formation of core-shell structure of oxide/nitride is identified as being key to improvement in toughness of the weld metal. Electron Back Scattered Diffraction (EBSD) in combination with Orientation Imaging Microscopy (OIM) and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been employed to study the effect of alloying on austenite to ferrite transformation modes. The prevention of twinned martensite has been identified to be key to improving ductility for achieving high strength weld metal.

  14. Microstructural development in reduced activation ferritic alloys irradiated to 200 dpa at 420$deg;C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelles, D. S.

    1994-09-01

    Density change and microstructural development are reported for nine reduced activation ferritic steels covering the range 2.3 to 12Cr with varying additions of V and/or W for hardening and up to 6.5 Mn for austenite stability. Specimens were examined following irradiation in FFTF/MOTA at 420°C to a dose exceeding 200 dpa. Void swelling was found, but the swelling remained at 5% or below, with the worst case in an alloy of 9Cr-2Mn-1WV. The carbide structure pinning martensite lath boundaries remained in place.

  15. Alloying Element Nitride Development in Ferritic Fe-Based Materials Upon Nitriding: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, T.; Mittemeijer, E. J.

    2016-04-01

    With the aim of achieving a better understanding of the nitriding process of iron-based components (steels), as applied in engineering practice, the theoretical background and experimental observations currently available on the crystallographic, morphological, and compositional properties of the nitride precipitates in nitrided model binary and ternary, ferritic Fe-based alloys are summarily presented. Thermodynamic and kinetic considerations are employed in order to highlight their importance for the nitriding reaction and the resulting properties of the nitrided zone, thereby providing a more fundamental understanding of the nitriding process.

  16. Some microstructural characterisations in a friction stir welded oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legendre, F.; Poissonnet, S.; Bonnaillie, P.; Boulanger, L.; Forest, L.

    2009-04-01

    The goal of this study is to characterize microstructure of a friction stir welded oxide dispersion strengthened alloy. The welded material is constituted by two sheets of an yttria-dispersion-strengthened PM 2000 ferritic steel. Different areas of the friction stir welded product were analyzed using field emission gun secondary electron microscopy (FEG-SEM) and electron microprobe whereas nanoindentation was used to evaluate mechanical properties. The observed microstructural evolution, including distribution of the yttria dispersoids, after friction stir welding process is discussed and a correlation between the microstructure and the results of nanoindentation tests is established.

  17. Alloying Element Nitride Development in Ferritic Fe-Based Materials Upon Nitriding: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, T.; Mittemeijer, E. J.

    2016-06-01

    With the aim of achieving a better understanding of the nitriding process of iron-based components (steels), as applied in engineering practice, the theoretical background and experimental observations currently available on the crystallographic, morphological, and compositional properties of the nitride precipitates in nitrided model binary and ternary, ferritic Fe-based alloys are summarily presented. Thermodynamic and kinetic considerations are employed in order to highlight their importance for the nitriding reaction and the resulting properties of the nitrided zone, thereby providing a more fundamental understanding of the nitriding process.

  18. Irradiation creep of various ferritic alloys irradiated at {approximately}400{degrees}C in the PFR and FFTF reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, M.B.; Garner, F.A.; Eiholzer, C.R.

    1997-04-01

    Three ferritic alloys were irradiated in two fast reactors to doses of 50 dpa or more at temperatures near 400{degrees}C. One martensitic alloy, HT9, was irradiated in both the FFTF and PFR reactors. PFR is the Prototype Fast Reactor in Dourneay, Scotland, and FFTF is the Fast Flux Test Facility in Richland, WA. D57 is a developmental alloy that was irradiated in PFR only, and MA957 is a Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion-hardened ferritic alloy that was irradiated only in FFTF. These alloys exhibited little or no void swelling at {approximately}400{degrees}C. Depending on the alloy starting condition, these steels develop a variety of non-creep strains early in the irradiation that are associated with phase changes. Each of these alloys creeps at a rate that is significantly lower than that of austenitic steels irradiated in the same experiments. The creep compliance for ferritic alloys in general appears to be {approximately}0.5 x 10{sup {minus}6} MPa{sup {minus}1} dpa{sup {minus}1}, independent of both composition and starting state. The addition of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a dispersoid does not appear to change the creep behavior.

  19. Corrosion of ferritic-martensitic steels and nickel-based alloys in supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xiaowei

    The corrosion behavior of ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels and Ni-based alloys in supercritical water (SCW) has been studied due to their potential applications in future nuclear reactor systems, fossil fuel power plants and waste treatment processes. 9˜12% chromium ferritic/martensitic steels exhibit good radiation resistance and stress corrosion cracking resistance. Ni-based alloys with an austenitic face-centered cubic (FCC) structure are designed to retain good mechanical strength and corrosion/oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures. Corrosion tests were carried out at three temperatures, 360°C, 500°C and 600°C, with two dissolved oxygen contents, 25 ppb and 2 ppm for up to 3000 hours. Alloys modified by grain refinement and reactive element addition were also investigated to determine their ability to improve the corrosion resistance in SCW. A duplex oxide structure was observed in the F/M steels after exposure to 25 ppb oxygen SCW, including an outer oxide layer with columnar magnetite grains and an inner oxide layer constituted of a mixture of spinel and ferrite phases in an equiaxed grain structure. An additional outermost hematite layer formed in the SCW-exposed samples when the oxygen content was increased to 2 ppm. Weight gain in the F/M steels increased with exposure temperatures and times, and followed parabolic growth kinetics in most of the samples. In Ni-based alloys after exposure to SCW, general corrosion and pitting corrosion were observed, and intergranular corrosion was found when exposed at 600°C due to formation of a local healing layer. The general oxide structure on the Ni-based alloys was characterized as NiO/Spinel/(CrxFe 1-x)2O3/(Fe,Ni). No change in oxidation mechanism was observed in crossing the critical point despite the large change in water properties. Corrosion resistance of the F/M steels was significantly improved by plasma-based yttrium surface treatment because of restrained outward diffusion of iron by the

  20. Influence of Ti content on synthesis and characteristics of W-Ti ODS alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chun-Liang; Zeng, Yong

    2016-02-01

    Tungsten-titanium alloys are considered as promising materials for the future fusion devices, in particular for the divertor and other first wall components. The microstructure and the mechanical properties of the material are dependent on the amount of Ti present in the alloy. In this study, W-Ti-Y2O3 alloys with varied Ti contents between 1 wt.% and 10 wt.% fabricated by mechanical alloying were investigated. The effect of Ti on the phase formation and mechanical properties of W-Ti-Y2O3 alloys has been examined. The results suggest that the alloys containing low Ti content exhibit homogeneous microstructure with a uniform distribution of fine titanium oxide particles and tungsten carbides, leading to a significant increase in hardness and elastic modulus of alloys. In addition, high-energy ball milling can facilitate a solid-state reaction between Y2O3 particles and the tungsten-titanium matrix and the subsequent sintering processing promotes the formation of stable nano Ti2Y2O7 oxide particles, which greatly increase the mechanical properties at elevated temperature and enhance irradiation resistance.

  1. Duplex precipitates and their effects on the room-temperature fracture behaviour of a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sun, Zhiqian; Song, Gian; Ilavsky, Jan; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-03-23

    Duplex precipitates are presented in a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy. They were characterized by the ultra-small angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscope. Fine cooling precipitates with the size of several to tens of nanometres harden the matrix considerably at room temperature. Cracks are likely to initiate from precipitates, and coalesce and propagate quickly through the matrix due to the excessive hardening effect of cooling precipitates, which lead to the premature fracture of NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloys.

  2. Phase Field Modeling of Cyclic Austenite-Ferrite Transformations in Fe-C-Mn Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hao; Zhu, Benqiang; Militzer, Matthias

    2016-08-01

    Three different approaches for considering the effect of Mn on the austenite-ferrite interface migration in an Fe-0.1C-0.5Mn alloy have been coupled with a phase field model (PFM). In the first approach (PFM-I), only long-range C diffusion is considered while Mn is assumed to be immobile during the phase transformations. Both long-range C and Mn diffusions are considered in the second approach (PFM-II). In the third approach (PFM-III), long-range C diffusion is considered in combination with the Gibbs energy dissipation due to Mn diffusion inside the interface instead of solving for long-range diffusion of Mn. The three PFM approaches are first benchmarked with isothermal austenite-to-ferrite transformation at 1058.15 K (785 °C) before considering cyclic phase transformations. It is found that PFM-II can predict the stagnant stage and growth retardation experimentally observed during cycling transformations, whereas PFM-III can only replicate the stagnant stage but not the growth retardation and PFM-I predicts neither the stagnant stage nor the growth retardation. The results of this study suggest a significant role of Mn redistribution near the interface on reducing transformation rates, which should, therefore, be considered in future simulations of austenite-ferrite transformations in steels, particularly at temperatures in the intercritical range and above.

  3. Phase Field Modeling of Cyclic Austenite-Ferrite Transformations in Fe-C-Mn Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hao; Zhu, Benqiang; Militzer, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Three different approaches for considering the effect of Mn on the austenite-ferrite interface migration in an Fe-0.1C-0.5Mn alloy have been coupled with a phase field model (PFM). In the first approach (PFM-I), only long-range C diffusion is considered while Mn is assumed to be immobile during the phase transformations. Both long-range C and Mn diffusions are considered in the second approach (PFM-II). In the third approach (PFM-III), long-range C diffusion is considered in combination with the Gibbs energy dissipation due to Mn diffusion inside the interface instead of solving for long-range diffusion of Mn. The three PFM approaches are first benchmarked with isothermal austenite-to-ferrite transformation at 1058.15 K (785 °C) before considering cyclic phase transformations. It is found that PFM-II can predict the stagnant stage and growth retardation experimentally observed during cycling transformations, whereas PFM-III can only replicate the stagnant stage but not the growth retardation and PFM-I predicts neither the stagnant stage nor the growth retardation. The results of this study suggest a significant role of Mn redistribution near the interface on reducing transformation rates, which should, therefore, be considered in future simulations of austenite-ferrite transformations in steels, particularly at temperatures in the intercritical range and above.

  4. Temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy and mesoscale deformation in a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Stoica, G. M.; Stoica, A. D.; Miller, M. K.; Ma, D.

    2014-10-10

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFA) are a new class of ultrafine-grained oxide dispersion-strengthened steels, promising for service in extreme environments of high temperature and high irradiation in the next-generation of nuclear reactors. This is owing to the remarkable stability of their complex microstructures containing a high density of Y-Ti-O nanoclusters within grains and along the grain boundaries. While nanoclusters have been recognized to be the primary contributor to the exceptional resistance to irradiation and high-temperature creep, very little is known about the mechanical roles of the polycrystalline grains that constitute the bulk ferritic matrix. Here we report the mesoscale characterization of anisotropic responses of the ultrafine NFA grains to tensile stresses at various temperatures using the state-of-the-art in situ neutron diffraction. We show the first experimental determination of temperature-dependent single-crystal elastic constants for the NFA, and reveal a strong temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy due to a sharp decrease in the shear stiffness constant [c'=(c_11-c_12)/2] when a critical temperature ( T_c ) is approached, indicative of elastic softening and instability of the ferritic matrix. We also show, from anisotropy-induced intergranular strain/stress accumulations, that a common dislocation slip mechanism operates at the onset of yielding for low temperatures, while there is a deformation crossover from low-temperature lattice hardening to high temperature lattice softening in response to extensive plastic deformation.

  5. Temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy and mesoscale deformation in a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stoica, G. M.; Stoica, A. D.; Miller, M. K.; Ma, D.

    2014-10-10

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFA) are a new class of ultrafine-grained oxide dispersion-strengthened steels, promising for service in extreme environments of high temperature and high irradiation in the next-generation of nuclear reactors. This is owing to the remarkable stability of their complex microstructures containing a high density of Y-Ti-O nanoclusters within grains and along the grain boundaries. While nanoclusters have been recognized to be the primary contributor to the exceptional resistance to irradiation and high-temperature creep, very little is known about the mechanical roles of the polycrystalline grains that constitute the bulk ferritic matrix. Here we report the mesoscale characterization ofmore » anisotropic responses of the ultrafine NFA grains to tensile stresses at various temperatures using the state-of-the-art in situ neutron diffraction. We show the first experimental determination of temperature-dependent single-crystal elastic constants for the NFA, and reveal a strong temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy due to a sharp decrease in the shear stiffness constant [c'=(c_11-c_12)/2] when a critical temperature ( T_c ) is approached, indicative of elastic softening and instability of the ferritic matrix. We also show, from anisotropy-induced intergranular strain/stress accumulations, that a common dislocation slip mechanism operates at the onset of yielding for low temperatures, while there is a deformation crossover from low-temperature lattice hardening to high temperature lattice softening in response to extensive plastic deformation.« less

  6. The effect of fusion-relevant helium levels on the mechanical properties of isotopically tailored ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hankin, G.L.; Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S.

    1997-04-01

    The yield and maximum strengths of an irradiated series of isotopically tailored ferritic alloys were evaluated using the shear punch test. The composition of three of the alloys was Fe-12Cr-1.5Ni. Different balances of nickel isotopes were used in each alloy in order to produce different helium levels. A fourth alloy, which contained no nickel, was also irradiated. The addition of nickel at any isotopic balance to the Fe-12Cr base alloy significantly increased the shear yield and maximum strengths of the alloys, and as expected, the strength of the alloys decreased with increasing irradiation temperature. Helium itself, up to 75 appm over 7 dpa appears to have little effect on the mechanical properties of the alloys.

  7. TEM examination of microstructural evolution during processing of 14CrYWTi nanostructured ferritic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, H.; Alinger, M. J.; Odette, G. R.; Yamamoto, T.

    2004-08-01

    A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study was carried out on the co-evolution of the coarser-scale microstructural features in mechanically alloyed (MA) powders and hot isostatic press (HIP) consolidated Fe-14Cr-3W-0 and 0.4Ti-0.25Y 2O 3 nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs). The pancake shaped nanoscale grains in the as-MA powders are textured and elongated parallel to the particle surface. Powder annealing results in re-crystallization at 850 °C and grain growth at 1150 °C. The grains also recrystallize and may grow in the alloys HIPed at 850 °C, but appear to retain a polygonized sub-grain structure. The grains are larger and more distinct in the alloys HIPed at 1000 and 1150 °C. However, annealing resulted in bi-modal grain size distribution. Finer grains retained a significant dislocation density and populations of small precipitates with crystal structures distinct form the matrix. The grains and precipitates were much larger in alloys without Ti.

  8. Investigation on the Behavior of Austenite and Ferrite Phases at Stagnation Region in the Turning of Duplex Stainless Steel Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomani, J.; Pramanik, A.; Hilditch, T.; Littlefair, G.

    2016-06-01

    This paper investigates the deformation mechanisms and plastic behavior of austenite and ferrite phases in duplex stainless steel alloys 2205 and 2507 under chip formation from a machine turning operation. SEM images and EBSD phase mapping of frozen chip root samples detected a build-up of ferrite bands in the stagnation region, and between 65 and 85 pct, more ferrite was identified in the stagnation region compared to austenite. SEM images detected micro-cracks developing in the ferrite phase, indicating ferritic build-up in the stagnation region as a potential triggering mechanism to the formation of built-up edge, as transgranular micro-cracks found in the stagnation region are similar to micro-cracks initiating built-up edge formation. Higher plasticity of austenite due to softening under high strain is seen responsible for the ferrite build-up. Flow lines indicate that austenite is plastically deforming at a greater rate into the chip, while ferrite shows to partition most of the strain during deformation. The loss of annealing twins and activation of multiple slip planes triggered at high strain may explain the highly plastic behavior shown by austenite.

  9. Investigation on the Behavior of Austenite and Ferrite Phases at Stagnation Region in the Turning of Duplex Stainless Steel Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomani, J.; Pramanik, A.; Hilditch, T.; Littlefair, G.

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates the deformation mechanisms and plastic behavior of austenite and ferrite phases in duplex stainless steel alloys 2205 and 2507 under chip formation from a machine turning operation. SEM images and EBSD phase mapping of frozen chip root samples detected a build-up of ferrite bands in the stagnation region, and between 65 and 85 pct, more ferrite was identified in the stagnation region compared to austenite. SEM images detected micro-cracks developing in the ferrite phase, indicating ferritic build-up in the stagnation region as a potential triggering mechanism to the formation of built-up edge, as transgranular micro-cracks found in the stagnation region are similar to micro-cracks initiating built-up edge formation. Higher plasticity of austenite due to softening under high strain is seen responsible for the ferrite build-up. Flow lines indicate that austenite is plastically deforming at a greater rate into the chip, while ferrite shows to partition most of the strain during deformation. The loss of annealing twins and activation of multiple slip planes triggered at high strain may explain the highly plastic behavior shown by austenite.

  10. Mechanical behavior of aluminum-bearing ferritic alloys for accident-tolerant fuel cladding applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guria, Ankan

    Nuclear power currently provides about 13% of electrical power worldwide. Nuclear reactors generating this power traditionally use Zirconium (Zr) based alloys as the fuel cladding material. Exothermic reaction of Zr with steam under accident conditions may lead to production of hydrogen with the possibility of catastrophic consequences. Following the Fukushima-Daiichi incident, the exploration of accident-tolerant fuel cladding materials accelerated. Aluminum-rich (around 5 wt. %) ferritic steels such as Fecralloy, APMT(TM) and APM(TM) are considered as potential materials for accident-tolerant fuel cladding applications. These materials create an aluminum-based oxide scale protecting the alloy at elevated temperatures. Tensile deformation behavior of the above alloys was studied at different temperatures (25-500 °C) at a strain rate of 10-3 s-1 and correlated with microstructural characteristics. Higher strength and decent ductility of APMT(TM) led to further investigation of the alloy at various combination of strain rates and temperatures followed by fractography and detailed microscopic analyses. Serrations appeared in the stress-strain curves of APMT(TM) and Fecralloy steel tested in a limited temperature range (250-400 °C). The appearance of serrations is explained on the basis of dynamic strain aging (DSA) effect due to solute-dislocation interactions. The research in this study is being performed using the funds received from the US DOE Office of Nuclear Energy's Nuclear Energy University Programs (NEUP).

  11. Controlling diffusion for a self-healing radiation tolerant nanostructured ferritic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. K.; Parish, C. M.; Bei, H.

    2015-07-01

    Diffusion plays a major role in the stability of microstructures to extreme conditions of high temperature and high doses of irradiation. In nanostructured ferritic alloys, first principle calculations indicate that the binding energy of vacancies is reduced by the presence of oxygen, titanium and yttrium atoms. Therefore, the number of free vacancies available for diffusion can be greatly reduced. The mechanical properties of these alloys, compared to traditional wrought alloys of similar composition and grain structure, is distinctly different, and the ultrafine grained alloy is distinguished by a high number density of Ti-Y-O-enriched nanoclusters and solute clusters, which drives the mechanical response. When a displacement cascade interacts with a nanocluster, the solute atoms are locally dispersed into the matrix by ballistic collisions, but immediately a new nanocluster reforms due to the local supersaturation of solutes and vacancies until the excess vacancies are consumed. The result of these processes is a structural material for advanced energy systems with a microstructure that is self-healing and tolerant to high doses of radiation and high temperatures.

  12. The consequences of helium production on microstructural development in isotopically tailored ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.

    1996-10-01

    A series of alloys have been made adding various isotopes of nickel in order to vary the production of helium during irradiation by a two step nuclear reaction in a mixed spectrum reactor. The alloys use a base composition of Fe-12Cr with an addition of 1.5% nickel, either in the form of {sup 60}Ni which produces no helium, {sup 59}Ni which produces helium at a rate of about 10 appm He/dpa, or natural nickel ({sup Nat}Ni) which provides an intermediate level of helium due to delayed development of {sup 59}Ni. Specimens were irradiated in the HFIR at Oak Ridge, TN to {approx}7 dpa at 300 and 400{degrees}C. Microstructural examinations indicated that nickel additions promote precipitation in all alloys, but the effect appears to be much stronger at 400{degrees}C than at 300{degrees}C. There is sufficient dose by 7 dpa (and with 2 appm He) to initiate void swelling in ferritic/martensitic alloys. Little difference was found between response from {sup 59}Ni and {sup Nat}Ni. Also, helium bubble development for high helium generation conditions appeared to be very different at 300 and 400{degrees}C. At 300{degrees}C, it appeared that high densities of bubbles formed whereas at 400{degrees}C, bubbles could not be identified, possibly because of the complexity of the microstructure, but more likely because helium accumulated at precipitate interfaces.

  13. Controlling diffusion for a self-healing radiation tolerant nanostructured ferritic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Michael K.; Parish, Chad M.; Bei, Hongbin

    2014-12-18

    Diffusion plays a major role in the stability of microstructures to extreme conditions of high temperature and high doses of irradiation. In nanostructured ferritic alloys, first principle calculations indicate that the binding energy of vacancies is reduced by the presence of oxygen, titanium and yttrium atoms. Therefore, the number of free vacancies available for diffusion can be greatly reduced. The mechanical properties of these alloys, compared to traditional wrought alloys of similar composition and grain structure, is distinctly different, and the ultrafine grained alloy is distinguished by a high number density of Ti–Y–O-enriched nanoclusters and solute clusters, which drives the mechanical response. When a displacement cascade interacts with a nanocluster, the solute atoms are locally dispersed into the matrix by ballistic collisions, but immediately a new nanocluster reforms due to the local supersaturation of solutes and vacancies until the excess vacancies are consumed. Furthermore, the result of these processes is a structural material for advanced energy systems with a microstructure that is self-healing and tolerant to high doses of radiation and high temperatures.

  14. Controlling diffusion for a self-healing radiation tolerant nanostructured ferritic alloy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Miller, Michael K.; Parish, Chad M.; Bei, Hongbin

    2014-12-18

    Diffusion plays a major role in the stability of microstructures to extreme conditions of high temperature and high doses of irradiation. In nanostructured ferritic alloys, first principle calculations indicate that the binding energy of vacancies is reduced by the presence of oxygen, titanium and yttrium atoms. Therefore, the number of free vacancies available for diffusion can be greatly reduced. The mechanical properties of these alloys, compared to traditional wrought alloys of similar composition and grain structure, is distinctly different, and the ultrafine grained alloy is distinguished by a high number density of Ti–Y–O-enriched nanoclusters and solute clusters, which drives themore » mechanical response. When a displacement cascade interacts with a nanocluster, the solute atoms are locally dispersed into the matrix by ballistic collisions, but immediately a new nanocluster reforms due to the local supersaturation of solutes and vacancies until the excess vacancies are consumed. Furthermore, the result of these processes is a structural material for advanced energy systems with a microstructure that is self-healing and tolerant to high doses of radiation and high temperatures.« less

  15. Notch Impact Behavior of Oxide-Dispersion-Strengthened (ODS) Fe20Cr5Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, J.; Capdevila, C.; Serrano, M.; Garcia-Junceda, A.; Jimenez, J. A.; Pimentel, G.; Urones-Garrote, E.

    2013-10-01

    In this article, tensile tests as well as LS and LT notched Charpy impact tests were performed at the temperature range between 77 K (-196 °C) and 473 K (200 °C) on an oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) Fe20Cr6Al0.5Y2O3 hot-rolled tube. The absorbed energy values in the range of high temperatures of LS notched specimens are considerably higher than those of LT notched specimens; however, such values tend to converge as temperature increases. Ductile fracture on the normal planes to RD with delaminations parallel to the tube surface was observed in the temperature range between room temperature (RT) and 473 K (200 °C). Delaminations of crack divider type were observed in LT specimens, whereas delaminations of crack arrester type were observed in LS specimens. The yttria particles in the grain boundaries and the transverse plastic anisotropy are the possible reasons why the delaminations were parallel to the tube surface.

  16. PHASE SEPARATION IN PM 2000 FE-BASE ODS ALLOY: EXPERIMENTAL STUDY AT THE ATOMIC LEVEL

    SciTech Connect

    Capdevila, C.; Miller, Michael K; Russell, Kaye F; Chao, J.; Gonzalez-Carrasco, J. L.

    2008-01-01

    The coarsening of the three-dimensional microstructure resulting from phase separation during ageing at 748 K of a Fe-based PM 2000{trademark} oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel has been investigated by atom probe tomography and hardness measurements. Phase separation resulted in the formation of isolated particles of the chromium-enriched {alpha}{prime} phase. The aluminum and titanium were found to preferential partition to the iron-rich {alpha} phase. The partitioning of aluminum is consistent with theoretical calculations. The change in the scale of the chromium-enriched {alpha}{prime} phase was found to fit a power law with a time exponent of 0.32 in accordance with that predicted by the classical Lifshitz, Slyozov and Wagner (LSW) theory. The solute concentrations of the coexisting {alpha} and {alpha}{prime} phases were estimated from concentration frequency distributions with the Langer-Bar-on-Miller (LBM) method and proximity histograms. The hardness was linearly related to the chromium content of the {alpha}{prime} phase.

  17. Irradiation creep and swelling from 400 to 600 °C of the oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy MA957

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloczko, M. B.; Gelles, D. S.; Garner, F. A.; Kurtz, R. J.; Abe, K.

    2004-08-01

    An irradiation creep and swelling study was performed on the Y 2O 3-strengthened ODS ferritic steel MA957. Pressurized tubes were irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) to doses ranging from 40 to 110 dpa at temperatures ranging from 400 to 600 °C. None of the stress-free tubes exhibited any evidence of swelling as determined by diameter change measurements. With a few exceptions, the irradiation creep behavior is similar to that of conventional ferritic-martensitic steels. Calculated creep compliance values are equal to those of HT9 irradiated within the same temperature range, except at 600 °C where the creep rate of MA957 is about one-half the value for HT9. The magnitude of the creep transient for MA957 is comparable to HT9, again except at 600 °C where the transient is much lower for MA957.

  18. Ferritic Alloys as Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding Material for Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, Raul B.

    2014-12-30

    provide hermetic seal. The replacement of a zirconium alloy using a ferritic material containing chromium and aluminum appears to be the most near term implementation for accident tolerant nuclear fuels.

  19. The role of processing route on the microstructure of 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Mazumder, B.; Parish, C. M.; Bei, H.; Miller, M. K.

    2015-06-03

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) have outstanding high temperature creep properties and extreme tolerance to radiation damage. To achieve these properties, NFAs are fabricated by mechanical alloying of metallic and yttria powders. Atom probe tomography has demonstrated that milling times of at least 40 h are required to produce a uniform distribution of solutes in the flakes. After milling and hot extrusion, the microstructure consists of -Fe, high number densities of Ti-Y-O-vacancy-enriched nanoclusters, and coarse Y2Ti2O7 and Ti(O,C,N) precipitates on the grain boundaries. In contrast, the as-cast condition consists of -Fe with 50-100 m irregularly-shaped Y2Ti2O7 pyrochlore precipitates with smaller embedded precipitates with the Al5Y3O12 (yttrium-aluminum garnet) crystal structure indicating that this traditional processing route is not a viable approach to achieve the desired microstructure. The nano-hardnesses were also substantially different, i.e., 4 and 8 GPa for the as-cast and as-extruded conditions, respectively. These differences can be explained by the differences in the microstructure and the effects of the high vacancy content introduced by mechanical alloying, and the strong binding energy of vacancies with O, Ti, and Y atoms retarding diffusion.

  20. The role of processing route on the microstructure of 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mazumder, B.; Parish, C. M.; Bei, H.; Miller, M. K.

    2015-06-03

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) have outstanding high temperature creep properties and extreme tolerance to radiation damage. To achieve these properties, NFAs are fabricated by mechanical alloying of metallic and yttria powders. Atom probe tomography has demonstrated that milling times of at least 40 h are required to produce a uniform distribution of solutes in the flakes. After milling and hot extrusion, the microstructure consists of -Fe, high number densities of Ti-Y-O-vacancy-enriched nanoclusters, and coarse Y2Ti2O7 and Ti(O,C,N) precipitates on the grain boundaries. In contrast, the as-cast condition consists of -Fe with 50-100 m irregularly-shaped Y2Ti2O7 pyrochlore precipitates with smaller embeddedmore » precipitates with the Al5Y3O12 (yttrium-aluminum garnet) crystal structure indicating that this traditional processing route is not a viable approach to achieve the desired microstructure. The nano-hardnesses were also substantially different, i.e., 4 and 8 GPa for the as-cast and as-extruded conditions, respectively. These differences can be explained by the differences in the microstructure and the effects of the high vacancy content introduced by mechanical alloying, and the strong binding energy of vacancies with O, Ti, and Y atoms retarding diffusion.« less

  1. Influence of solute drag on the growth of proeutectoid ferrite in Fe-C-Mn alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Enomoto, M.

    1999-10-08

    The diffusion-controlled growth of proeutectoid ferrite ({alpha}) from austenite ({gamma}) in an Fe-C-Mn alloy was simulated incorporating the possible drag effect of Mn on the migration of {alpha}:{gamma} interphase boundaries. The magnitude of drag force or the dissipation of free energy by drag was evaluated by means of Cahn and Purdy-Brechet models. The growth rate of ferrite was calculated from the flux balance equation for carbon taking into account the fact that the carbon concentration at the boundary in austenite varied with time. Whereas the time exponent of growth deviated from one-half at each moment, the overall time dependence was dictated by carbon volume diffusion in austenite. The reported differences of experimental growth rates from those calculated assuming paraequilibrium were reduced considerably by incorporating the drag of Mn, although simulation results may largely depend on the shape and depth of solute interaction potential with {alpha}:{gamma} boundaries and Mn diffusivity within the boundary, etc.

  2. Development of Low Cost Gas Atomization of Precursor Powders for Simplified ODS Alloy Production

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iver

    2014-08-05

    A novel gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) method was developed in this project to enable production (at our partner’s facility) a precursor Ni-Cr-Y-Ti powder with a surface oxide and an internal rare earth (RE) containing intermetallic compound (IMC) phase. Consolidation and heat-treatment experiments were performed at Ames Lab to promote the exchange of oxygen from the surface oxide to the RE intermetallic to form nano-metric oxide dispersoids. Alloy selection was aided by an internal oxidation and serial grinding experiments at Ames Lab and found that Hf-containing alloys may form more stable dispersoids than Ti-containing alloy, i.e., the Hf-containing system exhibited five different oxide phases and two different intermetallics compared to the two oxide phases and one intermetallic in the Ti-containing alloys. Since the simpler Ti-containing system was less complex to characterize, and make observations on the effects of processing parameters, the Ti-containing system was selected by Ames Lab for experimental atomization trials at our partner. An internal oxidation model was developed at Ames Lab and used to predict the heat treatment times necessary for dispersoid formation as a function of powder size and temperature. A new high-pressure gas atomization (HPGA) nozzle was developed at Ames Lab with the aim of promoting fine powder production at scales similar to that of the high gas-flow and melt-flow of industrial atomizers. The atomization nozzle was characterized using schlieren imaging and aspiration pressure testing at Ames Lab to determine the optimum melt delivery tip geometry and atomization pressure to promote enhanced secondary atomization mechanisms. Six atomization trials were performed at our partner to investigate the effects of: gas atomization pressure and reactive gas concentration on the particle size distribution (PSD) and the oxygen content of the resulting powder. Also, the effect on the rapidly solidified microstructure (as a

  3. Creep behavior of pack cementation aluminide coatings on Grade 91 ferritic martensitic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, Brian; Zhang, Ying; Dryepondt, Sebastien N; Pint, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    The creep behavior of various pack cementation aluminide coatings on Grade 91 ferritic-martensitic steel was investigated at 650 C in laboratory air. The coatings were fabricated in two temperature regimes, i.e., 650 or 700 C (low temperature) and 1050 C(high temperature), and consisted of a range of Al levels and thicknesses. For comparison, uncoated specimens heat-treated at 1050 C to simulate the high temperature coating cycle also were included in the creep test. All coated specimens showed a reduction in creep resistance, with 16 51% decrease in rupture life compared to the as-received bare substrate alloy. However, the specimens heat-treated at 1050 C exhibited the lowest creep resistance among all tested samples, with a surprisingly short rupture time of < 25 h, much shorter than the specimen coated at 1050 C. Factors responsible for the reduction in creep resistance of both coated and heat-treated specimens were discussed.

  4. Fracture behavior of 9Cr nanostructured ferritic alloy with improved fracture toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Yoon, Ji Hyun; Wee, Sung Hun; Hoelzer, David T.; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2014-06-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) have been considered as primary candidate materials for both fission and fusion reactors because of their excellent creep and irradiation resistances. It has been shown that high temperature fracture toughness could be significantly improved by appropriate thermo-mechanical treatments (TMTs). This article focuses on the static fracture behaviors of newly developed 9Cr NFAs with improved toughness. Optimal TMTs resulted in high fracture toughness at room temperature (>250 MPa √m) and in retaining higher than 100 MPa √m over a wide temperature range of 22-700 °C. Significant differences were found in fracture surfaces and fracture resistance (J-R) curves after different TMTs. Unique fracture surface features such as shallow nanoscale facets decorated with shear lips and flake-like grains were observed in high toughness specimens.

  5. Process development for 9Cr nanostructured ferritic alloy (NFA) with high fracture toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Yoon, Ji Hyun; Hoelzer, David T.; Lee, Yong Bok; Kang, Suk Hoon; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2014-06-01

    This article is to summarize the process development and key characterization results for the newly-developed Fe-9Cr based nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) with high fracture toughness. One of the major drawbacks from pursuing ultra-high strength in the past development of NFAs is poor fracture toughness at high temperatures although a high fracture toughness is essential to prevent cracking during manufacturing and to mitigate or delay irradiation-induced embrittlement in irradiation environments. A study on fracture mechanism using the NFA 14YWT found that the low-energy grain boundary decohesion in fracture process at a high temperature (>200 °C) resulted in low fracture toughness. Lately, efforts have been devoted to explore an integrated process to enhance grain bonding. Two base materials were produced through mechanical milling and hot extrusion and designated as 9YWTV-PM1 and 9YWTV-PM2. Isothermal annealing (IA) and controlled rolling (CR) treatments in two phase region were used to enhance diffusion across the interfaces and boundaries. The PM2 alloy after CR treatments showed high fracture toughness (KJQ) at represented temperatures: 240-280 MPa √m at room temperature and 160-220 MPa √m at 500 °C, which indicates that the goal of 100 MPa √m over possible nuclear application temperature range has been well achieved. Furthermore, it is also confirmed by comparison that the CR treatments on 9YWTV-PM2 result in high fracture toughness similar to or higher than those of the conventional ferritic-martensitic steels such as HT9 and NF616.

  6. Development of brazing foils to join monocrystalline tungsten alloys with ODS-EUROFER steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalin, B. A.; Fedotov, V. T.; Sevrjukov, O. N.; Kalashnikov, A. N.; Suchkov, A. N.; Moeslang, A.; Rohde, M.

    2007-08-01

    Results on rapidly solidified filler metals for brazing W with W and monocrystalline W with EUROFER steel (FS) are presented. Rapidly quenched powder-type filler metals based on Ti bal-V-Cr-Be were developed to braze polycrystalline W with monocrystalline W. In addition, Fe bal-Ta-Ge-Si-B-Pd alloys were developed to braze monocrystalline W with FS for helium gas cooled divertors and plasma-facing components. The W to FS brazed joints were fabricated under vacuum at 1150 °C, using a Ta spacer of 0.1 mm in thickness to account for the different thermal expansions. The monocrystalline tungsten as well as the related brazed joints withstood 30 cycles between 750 °C/20 min and air cooling/3-5 min.

  7. Microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of friction stir welded ODS alloy MA754

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiye; Yuan, Wei; Mishra, Rajiv S.; Charit, Indrajit

    2013-11-01

    Microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of MA754, an yttrium oxide dispersion-strengthened nickel-based superalloy, were investigated after friction stir welding (FSW). A tool rotation rate of 1000 revolution per minute and a traverse speed of 50.8 mm per minute were employed using a cermet (WC-Co) tool. After FSW, fine equiaxed grain structure with a high dislocation density and a random texture was achieved. Agglomeration of yttrium oxide dispersoids was observed in FSW MA754. Room-temperature tensile properties of FSW MA754 were compared to those of as-received MA754 alloy, and the results indicated that particle strengthening contribution decreased as a result of dispersoid agglomeration.

  8. Irradiation hardening of Fe-9Cr-based alloys and ODS Eurofer: Effect of helium implantation and iron-ion irradiation at 300 °C including sequence effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heintze, C.; Bergner, F.; Hernández-Mayoral, M.; Kögler, R.; Müller, G.; Ulbricht, A.

    2016-03-01

    Single-beam, dual-beam and sequential iron- and/or helium-ion irradiations are widely accepted to emulate more application-relevant but hardly accessible irradiation conditions of generation-IV fission and fusion candidate materials for certain purposes such as material pre-selection, identification of basic mechanisms or model calibration. However, systematic investigations of sequence effects capable to critically question individual approaches are largely missing. In the present study, sequence effects of iron-ion irradiations at 300 °C up to 5 dpa and helium implantations up to 100 appm He are investigated by means of post-irradiation nanoindentation of an Fe9%Cr model alloy, ferritic/martensitic 9%Cr steels T91 and Eurofer97 and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Eurofer. Different types of sequence effects, both synergistic and antagonistic, are identified and tentative interpretations are suggested. It is found that different accelerated irradiation approaches have a great impact on the mechanical hardening. This stresses the importance of experimental design in attempts to emulate in-reactor conditions.

  9. On the structure and chemistry of complex oxide nanofeatures in nanostructured ferritic alloy U14YWT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, D.; Dickerson, P.; Odette, G. R.; Maloy, S. A.; Misra, A.; Nastasi, M. A.

    2012-06-01

    The remarkable radiation damage resistance of nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) is attributed to the large numbers of matrix nanofeatures (NFs) of various types, which can enhance the recombination of displacement defects and trap transmutant helium in fine scale bubbles. Characterizing the chemistry, crystallographic structure and orientation relationships of the NFs is critical to understanding how they enhance the radiation damage resistance of NFAs. Conventional and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy were used to characterize the various types of NF and larger oxide phases in a model 14Cr-3 W-0.4Ti-0.25Y2O3 NFA (14YWT) hot isostatic pressed (HIP-ed) at 1150°C. Large CrTiO3 precipitates (50-300 nm) and small diffracting NFs (<5 nm) were found in this alloy. One major new result is the observation of an additional type of nanofeature (10-50 nm), orthorhombic in structure, with a square center cross-section, which constitutes a new kind of Y-Ti-oxide phase with lattice parameters different from those of known Y and Ti complex oxides. The interfaces of these particles seem to be semicoherent, while manifesting a possible orientation relationship with the BCC matrix. The ratio of Y to Ti varies between <1 and 2 for these larger NFs.

  10. Influence of displacement damage on deuterium and helium retention in austenitic and ferritic-martensitic alloys considered for ADS service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voyevodin, V. N.; Karpov, S. A.; Kopanets, I. E.; Ruzhytskyi, V. V.; Tolstolutskaya, G. D.; Garner, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    The behavior of ion-implanted hydrogen (deuterium) and helium in austenitic 18Cr10NiTi stainless steel, EI-852 ferritic steel and ferritic/martensitic steel EP-450 and their interaction with displacement damage were investigated. Energetic argon irradiation was used to produce displacement damage and bubble formation to simulate nuclear power environments. The influence of damage morphology and the features of radiation-induced defects on deuterium and helium trapping in structural alloys was studied using ion implantation, the nuclear reaction D(3He,p)4He, thermal desorption spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy. It was found in the case of helium irradiation that various kinds of helium-radiation defect complexes are formed in the implanted layer that lead to a more complicated spectra of thermal desorption. Additional small changes in the helium spectra after irradiation with argon ions to a dose of ≤25 dpa show that the binding energy of helium with these traps is weakly dependent on the displacement damage. It was established that retention of deuterium in ferritic and ferritic-martensitic alloys is three times less than in austenitic steel at damage of ˜1 dpa. The retention of deuterium in steels is strongly enhanced by presence of radiation damages created by argon ion irradiation, with a shift in the hydrogen release temperature interval of 200 K to higher temperature. At elevated temperatures of irradiation the efficiency of deuterium trapping is reduced by two orders of magnitude.

  11. ODS iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, I.G.; Pint, B.A.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Ohriner, E.K.

    1996-06-01

    Interest in advanced cycles that involve indirectly-fired gas turbines, in which coal- or gas-fired high-temperature heat exchangers are used to heat a working fluid in a closed system, has led to investigation of materials for heat exchangers capable of operation at temperatures of the order of 1200 to 1300{degrees}C. The candidate materials are ceramics and, possibly, oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys. An ODS FeCrAl alloy was found to meet the strength requirements for such an application, in which the working fluid at 0.9 MPa was to be heated from 800 to 1100{degrees}C over a tube length of 4 m. The oxidation life of ODS FeCrAl alloys is determined by their ability to form or reform a protective alumina scale, and can be related to the time for the aluminum content of the alloy to be depleted to some minimum level. As a result, the service life is a function of the available aluminum content of the alloys and the minimum aluminum level at which breakaway oxidation occurs, hence there is a limit on the minimum cross section which can be safely employed at temperatures above 1200{degrees}C. Because of their significantly higher aluminum content ({ge}28 atom %/{ge}16 wt. percent compared to {approx}9 atom %15 wt. percent), alloys based on Fe{sub 3}Al afford a potentially larger reservoir of aluminum to sustain oxidation resistance at higher temperatures and, therefore, offer a possible improvement over the currently-available ODS FeCrAl alloys, providing they can be strengthened in a similar manner.

  12. The evolution of internal stress and dislocation during tensile deformation in a 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel investigated by high-energy X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guangming; Zhou, Zhangjian; Mo, Kun; Miao, Yinbin; Liu, Xiang; Almer, Jonathan; Stubbins, James F.

    2015-12-01

    An application of high-energy wide angle synchrotron X-ray diffraction to investigate the tensile deformation of 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel is presented. With tensile loading and in-situ Xray exposure, the lattice strain development of matrix was determined. The lattice strain was found to decrease with increasing temperature, and the difference in Young's modulus of six different reflections at different temperatures reveals the temperature dependence of elastic anisotropy. The mean internal stress was calculated and compared with the applied stress, showing that the strengthening factor increased with increasing temperature, indicating that the oxide nanoparticles have a good strengthening impact at high temperature. The dislocation density and character were also measured during tensile deformation. The dislocation density decreased with increasing of temperature due to the greater mobility of dislocation at high temperature. The dislocation character was determined by best-fit methods for different dislocation average contrasts with various levels of uncertainty. The results shows edge type dislocations dominate the plastic strain at room temperature (RT) and 300 C, while the screw type dislocations dominate at 600 C. The dominance of edge character in 9Cr F/M ODS steels at RT and 300 C is likely due to the pinning effect of nanoparticles for higher mobile edge dislocations when compared with screw dislocations, while the stronger screw type of dislocation structure at 600 C may be explained by the activated cross slip of screw segments.

  13. The evolution of internal stress and dislocation during tensile deformation in a 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel investigated by high-energy X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guangming; Zhou, Zhangjian; Mo, Kun; Miao, Yinbin; Liu, Xiang; Almer, Jonathan; Stubbins, James F.

    2015-12-01

    An application of high-energy wide angle synchrotron X-ray diffraction to investigate the tensile deformation of 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel is presented. With tensile loading and in-situ X-ray exposure, the lattice strain development of matrix was determined. The lattice strain was found to decrease with increasing temperature, and the difference in Young's modulus of six different reflections at different temperatures reveals the temperature dependence of elastic anisotropy. The mean internal stress was calculated and compared with the applied stress, showing that the strengthening factor increased with increasing temperature, indicating that the oxide nanoparticles have a good strengthening impact at high temperature. The dislocation density and character were also measured during tensile deformation. The dislocation density decreased with increasing of temperature due to the greater mobility of dislocation at high temperature. The dislocation character was determined by best-fit methods for different dislocation average contrasts with various levels of uncertainty. The results shows edge type dislocations dominate the plastic strain at room temperature (RT) and 300 °C, while the screw type dislocations dominate at 600 °C. The dominance of edge character in 9Cr F/M ODS steels at RT and 300 °C is likely due to the pinning effect of nanoparticles for higher mobile edge dislocations when compared with screw dislocations, while the stronger screw type of dislocation structure at 600 °C may be explained by the activated cross slip of screw segments.

  14. Effects of Partial Phase Transformation on Characteristics of 9Cr Nanostructured Ferritic Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Ji Hyun, Yoon; Byun, Thak Sang; Hoelzer, David T

    2014-01-01

    The core structures of future nuclear systems require tolerance to extreme irradiation, and some critical components, for example, the fuel cladding in Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs), have to maintain mechanical integrity to very high doses of 200 -400 dpa at high temperatures up to 700 degrees C. The high Cr nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) are under intense research worldwide as a candidate core material. Although the NFAs have some admirable characteristics for high-temperature applications, their crack sensitivity is very high at high temperatures. The fracture toughness of high strength NFAs is unacceptably low above 300 degrees C. The objective of this study is to develop processes and microstructures with improved high temperature fracture toughness and ductility. To optimize the afterextrusion heat treatment condition, both the computational simulation technique on phase equilibrium and the basic microstructural and mechanical characterization have been carried out. 9 Cr-NFA was produced by the mechanical alloying of pre-alloyed Fe-9Cr base metallic powder and yttria particles, and subsequent extrusion. The post-extrusion heat-treatments of various conditions were applied to the asextruded NFA. The tensile and fracture toughness tests were conducted for as-extruded and heat-treated samples at up to 700 degrees C. Fracture toughness of the NFA has increased by more than 40% at every testing temperature after heat-treatment in the inter-critical temperature range. The increment of fracture toughness of the NFA after post-extrusion heat-treatment is attributed to the increased strength at below 500 degrees C, and an increased ductility at 700 degrees C.

  15. Evaluation of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Nano-Y2O3-Dispersed Ferritic Alloy Synthesized by Mechanical Alloying and Consolidated by High-Pressure Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karak, Swapan Kumar; Dutta Majumdar, J.; Witczak, Zbigniew; Lojkowski, Witold; Ciupiński, Łukasz; Kurzydłowski, K. J.; Manna, Indranil

    2013-06-01

    In this study, an attempt has been made to synthesize 1.0 wt pct nano-Y2O3-dispersed ferritic alloys with nominal compositions: 83.0 Fe-13.5 Cr-2.0 Al-0.5 Ti (alloy A), 79.0 Fe-17.5 Cr-2.0 Al-0.5 Ti (alloy B), 75.0 Fe-21.5 Cr-2.0 Al-0.5 Ti (alloy C), and 71.0 Fe-25.5 Cr-2.0 Al-0.5 Ti (alloy D) steels (all in wt pct) by solid-state mechanical alloying route and consolidation the milled powder by high-pressure sintering at 873 K, 1073 K, and 1273 K (600°C, 800°C, and 1000°C) using 8 GPa uniaxial pressure for 3 minutes. Subsequently, an extensive effort has been undertaken to characterize the microstructural and phase evolution by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Mechanical properties including hardness, compressive strength, Young's modulus, and fracture toughness were determined using micro/nano-indentation unit and universal testing machine. The present ferritic alloys record extraordinary levels of compressive strength (from 1150 to 2550 MPa), Young's modulus (from 200 to 240 GPa), indentation fracture toughness (from 3.6 to 15.4 MPa√m), and hardness (from13.5 to 18.5 GPa) and measure up to 1.5 through 2 times greater strength but with a lower density (~7.4 Mg/m3) than other oxide dispersion-strengthened ferritic steels (<1200 MPa) or tungsten-based alloys (<2200 MPa). Besides superior mechanical strength, the novelty of these alloys lies in the unique microstructure comprising uniform distribution of either nanometric (~10 nm) oxide (Y2Ti2O7/Y2TiO5 or un-reacted Y2O3) or intermetallic (Fe11TiY and Al9.22Cr2.78Y) particles' ferritic matrix useful for grain boundary pinning and creep resistance.

  16. Effect of friction stir welding and post-weld heat treatment on a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazumder, B.; Yu, X.; Edmondson, P. D.; Parish, C. M.; Miller, M. K.; Meyer, H. M.; Feng, Z.

    2016-02-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) are new generation materials for use in high temperature energy systems, such as nuclear fission or fusion reactors. However, joining these materials is a concern, as their unique microstructure is destroyed by traditional liquid-state welding methods. The microstructural evolution of a friction stir welded 14YWT NFA was investigated by atom probe tomography, before and after a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 1123K. The particle size, number density, elemental composition, and morphology of the titanium-yttrium-oxygen-enriched nanoclusters (NCs) in the stir and thermally-affected zones were studied and compared with the base metal. No statistical difference in the size of the NCs was observed in any of these conditions. After the PWHT, increases in the number density and the oxygen enrichment in the NCs were observed. Therefore, these new results provide additional supporting evidence that friction stir welding appears to be a viable joining technique for NFAs, as the microstructural parameters of the NCs are not strongly affected, in contrast to traditional welding techniques.

  17. Effect of friction stir welding and post-weld heat treatment on a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mazumder, Baishakhi; Yu, Xinghua; Edmondson, Philip D.; Parish, Chad M.; Miller, Michael K; Meyer, H. M.; Feng, Zhili

    2015-12-08

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) are new generation materials for use in high temperature energy systems, such as nuclear fission or fusion reactors. However, joining these materials is a concern, as their unique microstructure is destroyed by traditional liquid-state welding methods. The microstructural evolution of a friction stir welded 14YWT NFA was investigated by atom probe tomography, before and after a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 1123K. The particle size, number density, elemental composition, and morphology of the titanium-yttrium-oxygenenriched nanoclusters (NCs) in the stir and thermally-affected zones were studied and compared with the base metal. No statistical difference in the sizemore » of the NCs was observed in any of these conditions. After the PWHT, increases in the number density and the oxygen enrichment in the NCs were observed. Therefore, these new results provide additional supporting evidence that friction stir welding appears to be a viable joining technique for NFAs, as the microstructural parameters of the NCs are not strongly affected, in contrast to traditional welding techniques.« less

  18. Effect of friction stir welding and post-weld heat treatment on a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Mazumder, Baishakhi; Yu, Xinghua; Edmondson, Philip D.; Parish, Chad M.; Miller, Michael K; Meyer, H. M.; Feng, Zhili

    2015-12-08

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) are new generation materials for use in high temperature energy systems, such as nuclear fission or fusion reactors. However, joining these materials is a concern, as their unique microstructure is destroyed by traditional liquid-state welding methods. The microstructural evolution of a friction stir welded 14YWT NFA was investigated by atom probe tomography, before and after a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 1123K. The particle size, number density, elemental composition, and morphology of the titanium-yttrium-oxygenenriched nanoclusters (NCs) in the stir and thermally-affected zones were studied and compared with the base metal. No statistical difference in the size of the NCs was observed in any of these conditions. After the PWHT, increases in the number density and the oxygen enrichment in the NCs were observed. Therefore, these new results provide additional supporting evidence that friction stir welding appears to be a viable joining technique for NFAs, as the microstructural parameters of the NCs are not strongly affected, in contrast to traditional welding techniques.

  19. Response of nanostructured ferritic alloys to high-dose heavy ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Parish, Chad M.; White, Ryan M.; LeBeau, James M.; Miller, Michael K.

    2014-02-01

    A latest-generation aberration-corrected scanning/transmission electron microscope (STEM) is used to study heavy-ion-irradiated nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs). Results are presented for STEM X-ray mapping of NFA 14YWT irradiated with 10 MeV Pt to 16 or 160 dpa at -100°C and 750°C, as well as pre-irradiation reference material. Irradiation at -100°C results in ballistic destruction of the beneficial microstructural features present in the pre-irradiated reference material, such as Ti-Y-O nanoclusters (NCs) and grain boundary (GB) segregation. Irradiation at 750°C retains these beneficial features, but indicates some coarsening of the NCs, diffusion of Al to the NCs, and a reduction of the Cr-W GB segregation (or solute excess) content. Ion irradiation combined with the latest-generation STEM hardware allows for rapid screening of fusion candidate materials and improved understanding of irradiation-induced microstructural changes in NFAs.

  20. Development of rapidly quenched brazing foils to join tungsten alloys with ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalin, B. A.; Fedotov, V. T.; Sevrjukov, O. N.; Moeslang, A.; Rohde, M.

    2004-08-01

    Results on rapidly solidified filler metals for tungsten brazing are presented. A rapidly quenched foil-type filler metal based on Ni bal-15Cr-4Mo-4Fe-(0.5-1.0)V-7.5Si-1.5B was developed to braze tungsten to ferritic/martensitic Crl3Mo2NbVB steel (FS) for helium gas cooled divertors and plasma facing components. Polycrystalline W-2CeO 2 and monocrystalline pure tungsten were brazed to the steel under vacuum at 1150 °C, using a 0.5 mm thick foil spacer made of a 50Fe-50Ni alloy. As a result of thermocycling tests (100 cycles between 700 °C/20 min and air-water cooling/3-5 min) on brazed joints, tungsten powder metallurgically processed W-2CeO 2 failed due to residual stresses, whereas the brazed joint with zone-melted monocrystalline tungsten withstood the thermocycling tests.

  1. Microstructure and oxidation properties of 16Cr-5Al-ODS steel prepared by sol-gel and spark plasma sintering methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Y. P.; Wang, X. P.; Zhuang, Z.; Sun, Q. X.; Zhang, T.; Fang, Q. F.; Hao, T.; Liu, C. S.

    2013-01-01

    The 16Cr-5Al oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel was fabricated by sol-gel method in combination with hydrogen reduction, mechanical alloying (MA) and spark plasma sintering (SPS) techniques. The phase characterization, microstructure and oxidation resistance of the 16Cr-5Al-ODS steel were investigated in comparison with the Al free 16Cr-ODS steel. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns showed that the Al free and Al added 16Cr-ODS steels exhibited typical ferritic characteristic structure. The microstructure analysis investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) revealed that Y-Ti-O complexes with particle size of 10-30 nm were formed in the Al free matrix and Y-Al-O complexes with particle size of 20-100 nm were formed in the Al contained high-Cr ODS steel matrix. These complexes are homogeneously distributed in the matrices. The fabricated 16Cr-5Al-ODS steel exhibited superior oxidation resistance compared with the Al free 16Cr-ODS steel and the commercial 304 stainless steel owing to the formation of continuous and dense Al2O3 film on the surface.

  2. An empirical approach to strain to fracture of two-ductile-phase alloys. [Ti-Mn alloys and ferrite-martensite steels

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Z.; Miodownik, A.P. )

    1993-04-15

    Two-ductile-phase alloys refer to the alloys comprising two phases which are plastically deformable under applied stress, for example, [alpha]-[beta] brasses, [alpha]-[beta] Ti-alloys and dual-phase steels. As a group, two-ductile-phase alloys offer an excellent combination of high strength, good ductility and promising fracture toughness. In this paper, the authors present an empirical approach to the strain to fracture of two-ductile-phase alloys, based on the microstructural characterization method developed by Fan et al. The proposed approach can predict the strain to fracture of two-ductile-phase alloys in terms of the strains to fracture of the constituent phases and the microstructural parameters, such as volume fraction, contiguity and grain size of each constituent phase. The predictions by the present approach will be compared with the experimental results in [alpha]-[beta] Ti-Mn alloys and ferrite-martensite dual-phase steels drawn from the literature. In addition, the effect of relative grain size (the grain size ratio) on the strain to fracture of two-ductile-phase alloys will be discussed.

  3. Further Charpy impact test results of low activation ferritic alloys, irradiated at 430{degrees}C to 67 dpa

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, L.E.; Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S.

    1997-04-01

    Miniature CVN specimens of four ferritic alloys, GA3X, F82H, GA4X and HT9, have been impact tested following irradiation at 430{degrees}C to 67 dpa. Comparison of the results with those of the previously tested lower dose irradiation condition indicates that the GA3X and F82H alloys, two primary candidate low activation alloys, exhibit virtually identical behavior following irradiation at 430{degrees}C to {approximately}67 dpa and at 370{degrees}C to {approximately}15 dpa. Very little shift is observed in either DBTT or USE relative to the unirradiated condition. The shifts in DBTT and USE observed in both GA4X and HT9 were smaller after irradiation at 430{degrees}C to {approximately}67 dpa than after irradiation at 370{degrees}C to {approximately}15 dpa.

  4. A review of advantages of high-efficiency X-ray spectrum imaging for analysis of nanostructured ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Parish, Chad M.; Miller, Michael K.

    2014-12-09

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) exhibit complex microstructures consisting of 100-500 nm ferrite grains, grain boundary solute enrichment, and multiple populations of precipitates and nanoclusters (NCs). Understanding these materials' excellent creep and radiation-tolerance properties requires a combination of multiple atomic-scale experimental techniques. Recent advances in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) hardware and data analysis methods have the potential to revolutionize nanometer to micrometer scale materials analysis. The application of these methods is applied to NFAs as a test case and is compared to both conventional STEM methods as well as complementary methods such as scanning electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. In this paper, we review past results and present new results illustrating the effectiveness of latest-generation STEM instrumentation and data analysis.

  5. A review of advantages of high-efficiency X-ray spectrum imaging for analysis of nanostructured ferritic alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Parish, Chad M.; Miller, Michael K.

    2014-12-09

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) exhibit complex microstructures consisting of 100-500 nm ferrite grains, grain boundary solute enrichment, and multiple populations of precipitates and nanoclusters (NCs). Understanding these materials' excellent creep and radiation-tolerance properties requires a combination of multiple atomic-scale experimental techniques. Recent advances in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) hardware and data analysis methods have the potential to revolutionize nanometer to micrometer scale materials analysis. The application of these methods is applied to NFAs as a test case and is compared to both conventional STEM methods as well as complementary methods such as scanning electron microscopy and atom probe tomography.more » In this paper, we review past results and present new results illustrating the effectiveness of latest-generation STEM instrumentation and data analysis.« less

  6. A review of advantages of high-efficiency X-ray spectrum imaging for analysis of nanostructured ferritic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, Chad M.; Miller, Michael K.

    2015-07-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) exhibit complex microstructures consisting of 100-500 nm ferrite grains, grain boundary solute enrichment, and multiple populations of precipitates and nanoclusters (NCs). Understanding these materials' excellent creep and radiation-tolerance properties requires a combination of multiple atomic-scale experimental techniques. Recent advances in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) hardware and data analysis methods have the potential to revolutionize nanometer-to micrometer-scale materials analysis. Modern high-brightness, high-X-ray collection STEM instruments are capable of enabling advanced experiments, such as simultaneous energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy spectrum imaging at nm to sub-nm resolution, that are now well-established for the study of nuclear materials. In this paper, we review past results and present new results illustrating the effectiveness of latest-generation STEM instrumentation and data analysis.

  7. Formation Mechanisms of Alloying Element Nitrides in Recrystallized and Deformed Ferritic Fe-Cr-Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhlaghi, Maryam; Meka, Sai Ramudu; Jägle, Eric A.; Kurz, Silke J. B.; Bischoff, Ewald; Mittemeijer, Eric J.

    2016-07-01

    The effect of the initial microstructure (recrystallized or cold-rolled) on the nitride precipitation process upon gaseous nitriding of ternary Fe-4.3 at. pct Cr-8.1 at. pct Al alloy was investigated at 723 K (450 °C) employing X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atom probe tomography (APT), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). In recrystallized Fe-Cr-Al specimens, one type of nitride develops: ternary, cubic, NaCl-type mixed Cr1-x Al x N. In cold-rolled Fe-Cr-Al specimens, precipitation of two types of nitrides occurs: ternary, cubic, NaCl-type mixed Cr1-x Al x N and binary, cubic, NaCl-type AlN. By theoretical analysis, it was shown that for the recrystallized specimens an energy barrier for the nucleation of mixed Cr1-x Al x N exists, whereas in the cold-rolled specimens no such energy barriers for the development of mixed Cr1-x Al x N and of binary, cubic AlN occur. The additional development of the cubic AlN in the cold-rolled microstructure could be ascribed to the preferred heterogeneous nucleation of cubic AlN on dislocations. The nitrogen concentration-depth profile of the cold-rolled specimen shows a stepped nature upon prolonged nitriding as a consequence of instantaneous nucleation of nitride upon arrival of nitrogen and nitride growth rate-limited by nitrogen transport through the thickening nitrided zone.

  8. Formation Mechanisms of Alloying Element Nitrides in Recrystallized and Deformed Ferritic Fe-Cr-Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhlaghi, Maryam; Meka, Sai Ramudu; Jägle, Eric A.; Kurz, Silke J. B.; Bischoff, Ewald; Mittemeijer, Eric J.

    2016-09-01

    The effect of the initial microstructure (recrystallized or cold-rolled) on the nitride precipitation process upon gaseous nitriding of ternary Fe-4.3 at. pct Cr-8.1 at. pct Al alloy was investigated at 723 K (450 °C) employing X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atom probe tomography (APT), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). In recrystallized Fe-Cr-Al specimens, one type of nitride develops: ternary, cubic, NaCl-type mixed Cr1- x Al x N. In cold-rolled Fe-Cr-Al specimens, precipitation of two types of nitrides occurs: ternary, cubic, NaCl-type mixed Cr1- x Al x N and binary, cubic, NaCl-type AlN. By theoretical analysis, it was shown that for the recrystallized specimens an energy barrier for the nucleation of mixed Cr1- x Al x N exists, whereas in the cold-rolled specimens no such energy barriers for the development of mixed Cr1- x Al x N and of binary, cubic AlN occur. The additional development of the cubic AlN in the cold-rolled microstructure could be ascribed to the preferred heterogeneous nucleation of cubic AlN on dislocations. The nitrogen concentration-depth profile of the cold-rolled specimen shows a stepped nature upon prolonged nitriding as a consequence of instantaneous nucleation of nitride upon arrival of nitrogen and nitride growth rate-limited by nitrogen transport through the thickening nitrided zone.

  9. The ferrite and austenite lattice parameters of Fe-Co and Fe-Cu binary alloys as a function of temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Velthuis, S.G.E. te; Sietsma, J.; Rekveldt, M.T.; Zwaag, S. van der; Root, J.H.

    1998-09-18

    The lattice parameters of Fe-15 Cu, Fe-2% Cu, Fe-1% Co, and Fe-2% Co binary alloys were determined by means of neutron diffraction at temperatures around the austenite-ferrite phase transformation (860--1350 K). While the thermal expansion coefficients prove to be similar to those of Fe for all alloys, Cu and Co have an opposite effect on the lattice parameter of Fe. Addition of Cu increases the lattice parameter in both ferrite ({alpha}) and austenite ({gamma}), while Co decreases the lattice parameter. For all alloys, the {alpha} {leftrightarrow} {gamma} phase transformation introduces a volume change of 1.0%. Evidence is found that both ferrite and austenite are slightly strained ({epsilon} < 8 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}) when both phases are present simultaneously.

  10. The Kinetics of Dislocation Loop Formation in Ferritic Alloys Through the Aggregation of Irradiation Induced Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohnert, Aaron Anthony

    The mechanical properties of materials are often degraded over time by exposure to irradiation environments, a phenomenon that has hindered the development of multiple nuclear reactor design concepts. Such property changes are the result of microstructural changes induced by the collision of high energy particles with the atoms in a material. The lattice defects generated in these recoil events migrate and interact to form extended damage structures. This study has used theoretical models based on the mean field chemical reaction rate theory to analyze the aggregation of isolated lattice defects into larger microstructural features that are responsible for long term property changes, focusing on the development of black dot damage in ferritic iron based alloys. The purpose of such endeavors is two-fold. Primarily, such models explain and quantify the processes through which these microstructures form. Additionally, models provide insight into the behavior and properties of the point defects and defect clusters which drive general microstructural evolution processes. The modeling effort presented in this work has focused on physical fidelity, drawing from a variety of sources of information to characterize the unobservable defect generation and agglomeration processes that give rise to the observable features reported in experimental data. As such, the models are based not solely on isolated point defect creation, as is the case with many older rate theory approaches, but instead on realistic estimates of the defect cluster population produced in high energy cascade damage events. Experimental assessments of the microstructural changes evident in transmission electron microscopy studies provide a means to measure the efficacy of the kinetic models. Using common assumptions of the mobility of defect clusters generated in cascade damage conditions, an unphysically high density of damage features develops at the temperatures of interest with a temperature dependence

  11. Assessment of a new fabrication route for Fe-9Cr-1W ODS cladding tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toualbi, L.; Cayron, C.; Olier, P.; Malaplate, J.; Praud, M.; Mathon, M.-H.; Bossu, D.; Rouesne, E.; Montani, A.; Logé, R.; de Carlan, Y.

    2012-09-01

    Oxide Dispersion Strengthened ferritic/martensitic steels are developed as future cladding materials for Generation IV Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors. ODS alloys are elaborated by powder metallurgy, consolidated by hot extrusion and manufactured into tube cladding using cold rolling process. ODS steels present low ductility and high hardness at room temperature which complicate their manufacturing. Cold working leads to the hardening of the tube which needs to be softened by heat treatment. A new high temperature fabrication route performed on a Fe-9Cr-1W-Ti-Y2O3-ODS martensitic steel has been designed by following the hardness values, the morphological and crystallographic anisotropy and the nano-precipitation size evolution at each step of the fabrication route. Observations show that phase transformation from ferrite (α) to austenite (γ) is crucial to reduce the morphological and the crystallographic anisotropy induced by the manufacturing processes. The high temperature heat treatments permit to make the austenitic grain grow leading to an improvement of the cold workability. Ultimate Tensile Strength values obtained in the hoop direction remain about 315 MPa at 650 °C which is slightly lower compared to other Fe-9Cr ODS tubes but the new microstructure could be more favorable for creep properties.

  12. EBSD as a tool to identify and quantify bainite and ferrite in low-alloyed Al-TRIP steels.

    PubMed

    Zaefferer, S; Romano, P; Friedel, F

    2008-06-01

    Bainite is thought to play an important role for the chemical and mechanical stabilization of metastable austenite in low-alloyed TRIP steels. Therefore, in order to understand and improve the material properties, it is important to locate and quantify the bainitic phase. To this aim, electron backscatter diffraction-based orientation microscopy has been employed. The main difficulty herewith is to distinguish bainitic ferrite from ferrite because both have bcc crystal structure. The most important difference between them is the occurrence of transformation induced geometrically necessary dislocations in the bainitic phase. To determine the areas with larger geometrically necessary dislocation density, the following orientation microscopy maps were explored: pattern quality maps, grain reference orientation deviation maps and kernel average misorientation maps. We show that only the latter allow a reliable separation of the bainitic and ferritic phase. The kernel average misorientation threshold value that separates both constituents is determined by an algorithm that searches for the smoothness of the boundaries between them. PMID:18503676

  13. Simulation of Ferrite Formation in Fe-C Alloys Based on a Three-Dimensional Mixed-Mode Transformation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Bohemen, S. M. C.; Bos, C.; Sietsma, J.

    2011-09-01

    A three-dimensional mixed-mode (MM) transformation model accounting for both soft impingement and hard impingement was developed that calculates the growth kinetics of ferrite grains in an austenite matrix. The simulations are compared to the kinetics of ferrite formation in high-purity Fe-C alloys for which phase-transformation kinetics were measured isothermally by dilatometry at several temperatures in the range of 973 K to 1043 K (700 °C to 770 °C). The interface mobility is obtained from the best fit of the data at 1023 K (750 °C) for which the nucleus density N is estimated from the final microstructure. Subsequently, the experimental ferrite kinetics in Fe-0.36C at the other temperatures are simulated. The values of N extracted from the fits can be described with a nucleation model. The significance of the MM calculations is rationalized by comparing the results for Fe-0.17C with simulations assuming purely diffusion-controlled (DC) and purely interface-controlled (IC) growth. Comparison of simulated fraction curves for Fe-0.57C with the three models demonstrates that the transformation in high-carbon steels is essentially DC.

  14. Development and characterization of advanced 9Cr ferritic/martensitic steels for fission and fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saroja, S.; Dasgupta, A.; Divakar, R.; Raju, S.; Mohandas, E.; Vijayalakshmi, M.; Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.; Raj, Baldev

    2011-02-01

    This paper presents the results on the physical metallurgy studies in 9Cr Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) and Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steels. Yttria strengthened ODS alloy was synthesized through several stages, like mechanical milling of alloy powders and yttria, canning and consolidation by hot extrusion. During characterization of the ODS alloy, it was observed that yttria particles possessed an affinity for Ti, a small amount of which was also helpful in refining the dispersoid particles containing mixed Y and Ti oxides. The particle size and their distribution in the ferrite matrix, were studied using Analytical and High Resolution Electron Microscopy at various stages. The results showed a distribution of Y 2O 3 particles predominantly in the size range of 5-20 nm. A Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic steel has also been developed with the replacement of Mo and Nb by W and Ta with strict control on the tramp and trace elements (Mo, Nb, B, Cu, Ni, Al, Co, Ti). The transformation temperatures ( Ac1, Ac3 and Ms) for this steel have been determined and the transformation behavior of the high temperature austenite phase has been studied. The complete phase domain diagram has been generated which is required for optimization of the processing and fabrication schedules for the steel.

  15. Growth kinetics of grain boundary allotriomorphs of proeutectoid ferrite in Fe-C-Mn-X{sub 2} alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Aaronson, H.I.; Enomoto, M.

    1995-03-01

    The parabolic rate constant for the thickening of grain boundary ferrite allotriomorphs at the faces of austenite grain boundaries was measured as a function of isothermal transformation temperature in three Fe-C-X{sub 1}-X{sub 2} alloys where X{sub 1} is Mn and X{sub 2} is successively Si, Ni, and Co. The results were compared with the predictions of the local equilibrium model for multi-component systems and with those derived from the theory of growth under paraequilibrium conditions. The distribution of Mn and Si in ferrite and austenite in the Fe-C-Mn-Si alloy was also measured as a function of reaction temperature with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The observed temperature below which alloying element partition ceased was in good agreement with the local equilibrium model. Whereas the parabolic rate constant for thickening was considerably larger than the amount predicted by this theory in the alloying element diffusion-controlled regime, the opposite was true in the carbon diffusion-controlled regime. Similarly, the calculated paraequilibrium constant was usually considerably larger than that measured experimentally. Synergistic enhancements of the effects of Mn and X{sub 2} in diminishing thickening kinetics were observed for each X{sub 2}. The time-temperature-transformation (TTT) curves for the beginning of transformation were calculated from a modified Cahn analysis for the overall kinetics of grain-boundary-nucleated reactions using values of the nucleation rate and the parabolic growth rate constant computed from various models and compared with experimentally determined TTT curves.

  16. Effect of austenitizing conditions on the impact properties of an alloyed austempered ductile iron of initially ferritic matrix structure

    SciTech Connect

    Delia, M.; Alaalam, M.; Grech, M.

    1998-04-01

    The effect of austenitizing conditions on the microstructure and impact properties of an austempered ductile iron (ADI) containing 1.6% Cu and 1.6% Ni as the main alloying elements was investigated. Impact tests were carried out on samples of initially ferritic matrix structure and which had been first austenitized at 850, 900, 950, and 1,000 C for 15 to 360 min and austempered at 360 C for 180 min. Results showed that the austenitizing temperature, T{sub {gamma}}, and time, t{sub {gamma}} have a significant effect on the impact properties of the alloy. This has been attributed to the influence of these variables on the carbon kinetics. Microstructures of samples austenitized at 950 and 1,000 C contain no pro-eutectoid ferrite. The impact properties of the former structures are independent of t{sub {gamma}}, while those solution treated at 1,000 C are generally low and show wide variation over the range of soaking time investigated. For fully ausferritic structures, impact properties fall with an increase in T{sub {gamma}}. This is particularly evident at 1,000 C. As the T{sub {gamma}} increases, the amount of carbon dissolved in the original austenite increases. This slows down the rate of austenite transformation and results in coarser structures with lower mechanical properties. Optimum impact properties are obtained following austenitizing between 900 and 950 C for 120 to 180 min.

  17. Nano-sized precipitate stability and its controlling factors in a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sun, Zhiqian; Song, Gian; Ilavsky, Jan; Ghosh, Gautam; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-11-05

    Coherent B2-ordered NiAl-type precipitates have been used to reinforce solid-solution bodycentered- cubic iron for high-temperature application in fossil-energy power plants. In this study, the stability of nano-sized precipitates in a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy was investigated at 700 - 950°C using ultra-small angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopies. Here we show that the coarsening kinetics of NiAl-type precipitates is in excellent agreement with the ripening model in multicomponent alloys. We further demonstrate that the interfacial energy between the matrix and NiAl-type precipitates is strongly dependent to differences in the matrix/precipitate compositions. The results profile the ripening process in multicomponent alloys bymore » illustrating controlling factors (i.e., interfacial energy, diffusivities, and element partitioning). As a result, the study provides guidelines to design and develop high-temperature alloys with stable microstructures for long-term service.« less

  18. Nano-sized precipitate stability and its controlling factors in a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhiqian; Song, Gian; Ilavsky, Jan; Ghosh, Gautam; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    Coherent B2-ordered NiAl-type precipitates have been used to reinforce solid-solution body-centered-cubic iron for high-temperature application in fossil-energy power plants. In this study, we investigate the stability of nano-sized precipitates in a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy at 700–950 °C using ultra-small angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopies. Here we show that the coarsening kinetics of NiAl-type precipitates is in excellent agreement with the ripening model in multicomponent alloys. We further demonstrate that the interfacial energy between the matrix and NiAl-type precipitates is strongly dependent on differences in the matrix/precipitate compositions. Our results profile the ripening process in multicomponent alloys by illustrating controlling factors of interfacial energy, diffusivities, and element partitioning. The study provides guidelines to design and develop high-temperature alloys with stable microstructures for long-term service. PMID:26537060

  19. Nucleation kinetics of grain boundary allotriomorphs of proeutectoid ferrite in Fe-C-Mn-X{sub 2} alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Aaronson, H.I.; Enomoto, M.

    1995-03-01

    The steady-state nucleation rates of ferrite allotriomorphs at the ``faces`` of austenite grain boundaries were measured in Fe-C-X{sub 1}-X{sub 2} alloys, where X{sub 1} was Mn and X{sub 2} was successively Si, Ni, and Co, using techniques previously developed for counterpart studies on Fe-C and Fe-C-X alloys. The results were compared with the predictions of the classical nucleation theory, using the pillbox-shaped critical nucleus model. The volume free energy changes associated with nucleation in Fe-C-X{sub 1}-X{sub 2} quaternary systems were evaluated from the central atoms model (CAM) for both para- and orthoequilibrium modes of transformation. The nucleation process was assumed to be controlled by volume and/or grain boundary diffusion of alloying elements. The so-called synergistic effects of alloying elements were considered in terms of the volume free energy change and interfacial energies on the basis of the result of the nucleation rate measurements.

  20. Nano-sized precipitate stability and its controlling factors in a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Zhiqian; Song, Gian; Ilavsky, Jan; Ghosh, Gautam; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-11-05

    Coherent B2-ordered NiAl-type precipitates have been used to reinforce solid-solution bodycentered- cubic iron for high-temperature application in fossil-energy power plants. In this study, the stability of nano-sized precipitates in a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy was investigated at 700 - 950°C using ultra-small angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopies. Here we show that the coarsening kinetics of NiAl-type precipitates is in excellent agreement with the ripening model in multicomponent alloys. We further demonstrate that the interfacial energy between the matrix and NiAl-type precipitates is strongly dependent to differences in the matrix/precipitate compositions. The results profile the ripening process in multicomponent alloys by illustrating controlling factors (i.e., interfacial energy, diffusivities, and element partitioning). As a result, the study provides guidelines to design and develop high-temperature alloys with stable microstructures for long-term service.

  1. Correlation of Fe/Cr phase decomposition process and age-hardening in Fe-15Cr ferritic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dongsheng; Kimura, Akihiko; Han, Wentuo

    2014-12-01

    The effects of thermal aging on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Fe-15Cr ferritic model alloys were investigated by TEM examinations, micro-hardness measurements and tensile tests. The materials used in this work were Fe-15Cr, Fe-15Cr-C and Fe-15Cr-X alloys, where X refers to Si, Mn and Ni to simulate a pressure vessel steel. Specimens were isothermally aged at 475 °C up to 5000 h. Thermal aging causes a significant increase in the hardness and strength. An almost twice larger hardening is required for embrittlement of Fe-15Cr-X relative to Fe-15Cr. The age-hardening is mainly due to the formation of Cr-rich α‧ precipitates, while the addition of minor elements has a small effect on the saturation level of age-hardening. The correlation of phase decomposition process and age-hardening in Fe-15Cr alloy was interpreted by dispersion strengthened models.

  2. Journal of Nuclear Materials - Radiation-induced segregation and phase stability in ferritic-martensitic alloy T 91

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Zhijie; Busby, Jeremy T; Was, Gary S; Jiao, Zhijie

    2010-01-01

    Radiation-induced segregation in ferritic martensitic alloy T 91 was studied to understand the behavior of solutes as a function of dose and temperature. Irradiations were conducted using 2 MeV protons to doses of 1, 3, 7 and 10 dpa at 400 C. Radiation-induced segregation at prior austenite grain boundaries was measured, and various features of the irradiated microstructure were characterized, including grain boundary carbide coverage, the dislocation microstructure, radiation-induced precipitation and irradiation hardening. Results showed that Cr, Ni and Si segregate to prior austenite grain boundaries at low dose, but segregation ceases and redistribution occurs above 3 dpa. Grain boundary carbide coverage mirrors radiation-induced segregation. Irradiation induces formation of Ni Si Mn and Cu-rich precipitates that account for the majority of irradiation hardening. Radiation-induced segregation behavior is likely linked to the evolution of the precipitate and dislocation microstructures. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved

  3. First principles assessment of helium trapping in Y2TiO5 in nano-featured ferritic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yanan; Jiang, Yong; Yang, Litong; Lan, Guoqiang; Robert Odette, G.; Yamamoto, Takuya; Shang, Jiacheng; Dang, Ying

    2014-10-01

    Nano-scale Y2Ti2O7 and Y2TiO5 oxides are the major features that provide high strength and irradiation tolerance in nano-structured ferritic alloys. Here, we employ density functional theory to study helium trapping in Y2TiO5. The results suggest that helium is more deeply trapped in Y2TiO5 compared to Y2Ti2O7. Helium occupies open channels in Y2TiO5, where it weakly chemically interacts with neighboring oxygen anions, and results in less volume expansion compared to Y2Ti2O7, reducing strains in the iron matrix. The corresponding helium mobility in these channels is very high. While its ultimate fate is to form oxide/matrix interface bubbles, transient deep trapping of helium in oxides plays a major role in the ability of NFA to manage helium distribution.

  4. High-temperature corrosion behavior of coatings and ODS alloys based on Fe{sub 3}Al

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; Pint, B.A.; Wright, I.G.

    1996-08-01

    Iron-aluminide coatings were prepared by gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc weld-overlay techniques. All the weld overlays showed good oxidation/sulfidation behavior under isothermal conditions, including a gas metal arc deposit with only 21 at.% Al. A rapid degradation in corrosion resistance was observed under thermal cycling conditions when the initially grown scales spalled and the subsequent rate of reaction was not controlled by the formation of slowly growing aluminum oxides. Higher starting aluminum concentrations (>{approximately}25 at.%) are needed to assure adequate oxidation/sulfidation lifetimes of the weld overlays. A variety of stable oxides was added to a base Fe-28 at.% Al-2 % Cr alloy to assess the effect of these dopants on the oxidation behavior at 1200{degrees}C. A Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion improved the scale adhesion relative to a Zr alloy addition, but wasn`t as effective as it is in other alumina-forming alloys. Preliminary data for powder-processed Fe-28 at.% Al-2% Cr exposed to the H{sub 2}S-H{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-Ar gas at 800{degrees}C showed that the oxidation/sulfidation rate was similar to that of many Fe{sub 3}Al alloys produced by ingot metallurgy routes.

  5. ODS steel raw material local structure analysis using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cintins, A.; Anspoks, A.; Purans, J.; Kuzmin, A.; Timoshenko, J.; Vladimirov, P.; Gräning, T.; Hoffmann, J.

    2015-03-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are promising materials for fusion power reactors, concentrated solar power plants, jet engines, chemical reactors as well as for hydrogen production from thermolysis of water. In this study we used X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Fe and Cr K-edges as a tool to get insight into the local structure of ferritic and austenitic ODS steels around Fe and Cr atoms and its transformation during mechanical alloying process. Using the analysis of X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) we found that for austenitic samples a transformation of ferritic steel to austenitic steel is detectable after 10 hours of milling and proceeds till 40 hours of milling; only small amount of a-phase remains after 80 hours of milling. We found that the Cr K-edge EXAFS can be used to observe distortions inside the material and to get an impression on the formation of chromium clusters. In-situ EXAFS experiments offer a reliable method to investigate the ferritic to austenitic transformation.

  6. Soft magnetic properties of a ferritic Fe-Ni-Cr alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, S.; Sherwood, R. C.; Chin, G. Y.; Wernick, J. H.; Bordelon, C. M.

    1984-03-01

    Technologically important applications may exist for magnetically soft alloys that possess, in addition to the appropriate magnetic properties, relatively high mechanical strength and corrosion resistance. Such an alloy can be used, for example, for certain types of telephone receiver armature applications. In the present paper, we report the magnetic and mechanical properties of the ternary Fe-3Ni-5Cr alloy. The soft magnetic properties of the alloy are significantly improved by heat treatment within the (α+γ) two-phase region. Exemplary properties after heat treatment at ˜625 °C for 2 h are Hc˜1.2 Oe, μm˜4700, yield strength ˜59 ksi, and elongation ˜30%. The alloy exhibits reasonably good corrosion resistance. Magnetic, mechanical, and electrical properties of the alloy as well as the acoustic performance of telephone receivers using it, have been found to be comparable to those of the 2V-Permendur alloy.

  7. ODS iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, I.G.; McKamey, C.G.; Pint, B.A.

    1995-06-01

    There has been a recent increase of interest in advanced cycles that involve indirectly-fired gas turbines, in which coal- or gas-fired high-temperature heat exchangers are used to heat a working fluid in a closed system. In a program conducted as part of the European COST-501 Concerted Action Project, available alloys based on FeCrAl-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} were evaluated for use in the main heat exchanger in a similar closed-cycle gas turbine application. One of the currently available ODS FeCrAl alloys was found to meet the strength requirements for this application, in which the working fluid at 0.9 MPa (131 psi) flowing at 5,889 kg/hr (12,955 lb/hr) was to be heated from 800 to 1100{degrees}C (1472 to 2012{degrees}F) over a tube length of 4 m (13 ft).

  8. Structural applications of mechanical alloying; Proceedings of the ASM International Conference, Myrtle Beach, SC, Mar. 27-29, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Froes, F.H.; Debarbadillo, J.J. Inco Alloys International, Inc., Huntington, WV )

    1990-01-01

    The present conference on mechanically alloyed (MA) products discusses their aerospace and industrial applications, the design and isothermal forging of Ni-base oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) superalloys, the microstructure and tensile properties of ODS ferritic alloys, the high temperature corrosion resistance of MA refractory products, the mechanical properties of novel MA Fe-based ODS alloys, and dispersoids in MA metals. Also discussed are MA Al-alloys for aircraft applications, the microstructure and properties of MA Al-Mn, the MA processing of the Ti-Al system, the origin of the strength of MA Al alloys, the interaction of Al with SiC during MA processing, the synthesis of chromium silicide via MA, and the MA production of 'TiC-steel'.

  9. Characterization of ion-irradiated ODS Fe-Cr alloys by doppler broadening spectroscopy using a positron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parente, P.; Leguey, T.; de Castro, V.; Gigl, T.; Reiner, M.; Hugenschmidt, C.; Pareja, R.

    2015-09-01

    The damage profile of oxide dispersion strengthened steels after single-, or simultaneous triple-ion irradiation at different conditions has been characterized using a low energy positron beam in order to provide information on microstructural changes induced by irradiation. Doppler broadening and coincident Doppler broadening measurements of the positron annihilation line have been performed on different Fe-Cr-(W,Ti) alloys reinforced with Y2O3, to identify the nature and stability of irradiation-induced open-volume defects and their possible association with the oxide nanoparticles. It was found that irradiation induced vacancy clusters are associated with Cr atoms. The results are of highest interest for modeling the damage induced by 14 MeV neutrons in reduced activation Fe-Cr alloys relevant for fusion devices.

  10. Dispersoid Distribution and Microstructure in Fe-Cr-Al Ferritic Oxide Dispersion-Strengthened Alloy Prepared by Friction Consolidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalini, David; Kaoumi, Djamel; Reynolds, Anthony P.; Grant, Glenn J.

    2015-10-01

    INCOLOY® MA956 is a ferritic oxide dispersion-strengthened alloy manufactured by mechanical alloying followed by hot extrusion in vacuum-sealed cans or by degassing and hot isostatic pressing. This could be followed by a tailored heat treatment sequence in order to obtain a desired microstructure and to allow the oxide dispersion to precipitate. Three different oxides, responsible for the high-temperature mechanical strength, have been observed in this alloy: Y4Al2O9, YAlO3, and Y3Al5O12. Their sizes range from just a few to hundreds of nanometers. In this work, mechanically alloyed MA956 powder was consolidated via friction consolidation, a single-step and potentially cheaper processing alternative. Three fully dense compacts were produced. The compacts exhibited a refined, equiaxed grain structure with grain sizes smaller than 10 µm and the desired oxide dispersion. YAlO3 and Y3Al5O12 were identified by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray diffraction. The size distribution of precipitates above 50 nm showed a direct proportionality between average precipitate size and grain size. The total energy input during processing was correlated with the relative amount of each of the oxides in the disks: the higher the total processing energy input, the higher the relative amount of Y3Al5O12 precipitates. The elemental composition of the oxide precipitates was also probed individually by EDS, showing an aluminum enrichment trend as precipitates grew in size.

  11. Development of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel prepared by chemical reduction and mechanical milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Q. X.; Fang, Q. F.; Zhou, Y.; Xia, Y. P.; Zhang, T.; Wang, X. P.; Liu, C. S.

    2013-08-01

    The oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel with a nominal composition of Fe-14Cr-2W-0.5Ti-0.06Si-0.2V-0.1Mn-0.05Ta-0.03C-0.3Y2O3 (14Cr-ODS) was fabricated by sol-gel method in combination with hydrogen reduction, mechanical alloying (MA) and hot isostatic pressing (HIP) techniques. Pure Fe-1.5Y2O3 precursor was obtained by a sol-gel process and a reduction process at 650 °C for 3 h and pure 14Cr-ODS alloy powders were obtained from this precursor and the alloying metallic powders by mechanical alloying. The microstructure analysis investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) reveal that Y-Ti-O complexes and V-Ti-O complexes with a main particle size of 8 nm are formed in the 14Cr-ODS steel matrix. After HIP sintering the weight and the relative density of the compacted ingots are about 0.8 kg and 99.7%. The uniform elongation and ultimate tensile strength of the ODS steel obtained by HIP after annealing at 1100 °C for 5 h are about 13% and 840 MPa, respectively.

  12. Effects of heat treatment conditions on the microstructure and impact properties of EUROFER 97 ODS steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Martino, S. F.; Faulkner, R. G.; Riddle, N. B.; Monge, M. A.; Munoz, A.

    2011-12-01

    Probably the most important range of materials to consider for the blanket material in the tokamak design for fusion reactors such as ITER and DEMO is the high alloy Fe9Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels. These steels possess exceptional thermal conductivity and low thermal expansion while being strongly resistant to void swelling. Their main drawback is the high ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT), particularly in the ODS versions of the material. This paper describes attempts that are being made to reduce this DBTT in as yet unirradiated materials by a novel heat treatment procedure. The principle behind this approach is that low DBTT in the unirradiated materials will lead to relatively low DBTT even in He-containing material that has been irradiated with fusion blanket-type irradiations. New batches of high alloy Fe9Cr ODS (EUROFER) ferritic steel have been produced by a powder metallurgical route, and relatively homogeneous material has been produced by a hot isostatic pressing procedure. Mini-Charpy test specimens were made from materials that had been subjected to a matrix of heat treatments designed to show up variations in solution treatment (ST) temperature, cooling rate from the ST temperature and tempering treatment. The initial DBTT was in the range 150-200 °C. Extremely interesting results have been obtained. DBTT downward shifts of up to 200 °C have been observed by using a high 1300 °C ST temperature and a low cooling rate. The paper goes on to describe the microstructure of this material, and discusses the possible microstructural factors needed to produce these very high DBTT downward shifts. Low dissolved carbon and higher proportions of low-angle grain boundaries seem to provide the key to the understanding of the alloy behaviour.

  13. Effect of tube processing methods on the texture and grain boundary characteristics of 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aydogan, E.; Pal, S.; Anderoglu, O.; Maloy, S. A.; Vogel, S. C.; Odette, G. R.; Lewandowski, J. J.; Hoelzer, D. T.; Anderson, I. E.; Rieken, J. R.

    2016-03-08

    In this paper, texture and microstructure of tubes and plates fabricated from a nanostructured ferritic alloy (14YWT), produced either by spray forming followed by hydrostatic extrusion (Process I) or hot extrusion and cross-rolling a plate followed by hydrostatic tube extrusion (Process II) have been characterized in terms of their effects on texture and grain boundary character. Hydrostatic extrusion results in a combination of plane strain and shear deformations which generate low intensity α- and γ-fiber components of {001}<110> and {111}<110> together with a weak ζ-fiber component of {011}<211> and {011}<011>. In contrast, multi-step plane strain deformation by hot extrusion andmore » cross-rolling of the plate leads to a strong texture component of {001}<110> together with a weaker {111}<112> component. Although the total strains are similar, shear dominated deformation leads to much lower texture indexes compared to plane strain deformations. Further, the texture intensity decreases after hydrostatic extrusion of the alloy plate formed by plane strain deformation, due to a lower number of activated slip systems during shear dominated deformation. Finally and notably, hot extruded and cross-rolled plate subjected to plane strain deformation to ~50% engineering strain creates only a modest population of low angle grain boundaries, compared to the much larger population observed following the combination of plane strain and shear deformation of ~44% engineering strain resulting from subsequent hydrostatic extrusion.« less

  14. Release of deuterium from irradiation damage in Fe-9Cr-2W ferritic alloy irradiated with deuterium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, K.; Miyamoto, M.; Kudo, F.

    2014-09-01

    The release profile of deuterium from an Fe-9Cr-2W ferritic alloy irradiated with low-energy deuterium ions was studied by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) and in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was found that one sharp TDS peak appeared at a temperature around 410 K depending on the heating rate that ranged from 1.5 to 20 K/min. The TDS peak height increased with increasing fluence from 2 × 1019 to 2 × 1021 D+/m2 with no shift of the peak temperature. A close correlation between these TDS peaks and the disappearance of dislocation loops formed by the irradiation was observed. The effects of tiny bubbles on TDS were small. These results suggest that most of the deuterium was trapped by dislocation loops, which affected the thermal stability of dislocation loops in the alloy. The dependence of TDS peak temperature on the heating rate yielded an activation energy of 0.63 ± 0.02 eV for deuterium de-trapping from dislocation loops. The retention properties of the total amount of deuterium exhibited a tendency of saturation at values on the order of 1020 D+/m2, which corresponded to a saturation tendency of the loop density.

  15. Low temperature embrittlement behaviour of different ferritic-martensitic alloys for fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieth, M.; Dafferner, B.

    1996-10-01

    In the last few years a lot of different low activation CrWVTa steels have been developed world-wide. Without irradiation some of these alloys show clearly a better low temperature embrittlement behaviour than commercial CrNiMoV(Nb) alloys. Within the MANITU project a study was carried out to compare, prior to the irradiation program, the embrittlement behaviour of different alloys in the unirradiated condition performing instrumented Charpy impact bending tests with sub-size specimens. The low activation materials (LAM) considered were different OPTIFER alloys (Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe), F82H (JAERI), 9Cr2WVTa (ORNL), and GA3X (PNL). The modified commercial 10-11% CrNiMoVNb steels were MANET and OPTIMAR. A meaningful comparison between these alloys could be drawn, since the specimens of all materials were manufactured and tested under the same conditions.

  16. Modified ferritic iron alloys with improved high-temperature mechanical properties and oxidation resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldrieve, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    An alloy modification program was conducted in which the compositions of two existing Fe-Cr-Al alloys (Armco 18SR and GE-1541) were changed to achieve either improved high-temperature strength or improved fabricability. Only modifications of Armco 18SR were successful in achieving increased strength without loss of fabricability or oxidation resistance. The best modified alloy, designated NASA-18T, had twice the rupture strength of Armco 18SR at 800 and 1000 C. The NASA-18T alloy also had better oxidation resistance than Armco 18SR and comparable fabricability. The nominal composition of NASA-18T is Fe-18Cr-2Al-1Si-1.25Ta. All attempted modifications of the GE-1541 alloy were unsuccessful in terms of achieving better fabricability without sacrificing high-temperature strength and oxidation resistance.

  17. Epitaxial Fe/Y2O3 interfaces as a model system for oxide-dispersion-strengthened ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Bowden, Mark E.; Wang, Chong M.; Shutthanandan, V.; Overman, Nicole R.; Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Wirth, Brian D.; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2015-02-01

    The fundamental mechanisms underlying the superior radiation tolerance properties of oxide-dispersion-strengthened ferritic steels and nanostructured ferritic alloys are poorly understood. Thin film heterostructures of Fe/Y2O3 can serve as a model system for fundamental studies of radiation damage. Epitaxial thin films of Y2O3 were deposited by pulsed laser deposition on 8% Y:ZrO2 (YSZ) substrates with (100), (110), and (111) orientation. Metallic Fe was subsequently deposited by molecular beam epitaxy. Characterization by x-ray diffraction and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in the channeling geometry revealed a degree of epitaxial or axiotaxial ntation for Fe(211) deposited on Y2O3(110)/YSZ(110). In contrast, Fe on Y2O3(111)/YSZ(111) was fully polycrystalline, and Fe on Y2O3(100)/YSZ(100) exhibited out-of-plane texture in the [110] direction with little or no preferential in-plane orientation. Scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging of Fe(211)/Y2O3(110)/YSZ(110) revealed a strongly islanded morphology for the Fe film, with no epitaxial grains visible in the cross-sectional sample. Well-ordered Fe grains with no orientation to the underlying Y2O3 were observed. Well-ordered crystallites of Fe with both epitaxial and non-epitaxial orientations on Y2O3 are a promising model system for fundamental studies of radiation damage phenomena. This is illustrated with preliminary results of He bubble formation following implantation with a helium ion microscope. He bubble formation is shown to preferentially occur at the Fe/Y2O3 interface.

  18. Effect of Cr content on the nanostructural evolution of irradiated ferritic/martensitic alloys: An object kinetic Monte Carlo model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiapetto, M.; Malerba, L.; Becquart, C. S.

    2015-10-01

    Self-interstitial cluster diffusivity in Fe-Cr alloys, model materials for high-Cr ferritic/martensitic steels, is known to be reduced in a non-monotonic way as a function of Cr concentration: it first decreases, then increases. This non-monotonic behaviour is caused by a relatively long-ranged attractive interaction between Cr atoms and crowdions and correlates well with the experimentally observed swelling in these alloys under neutron irradiation, also seen to first decrease and then increase with increasing Cr content, under comparable irradiation conditions. Moreover, recent studies reveal that C atoms dispersed in the Fe matrix form under irradiation complexes with vacancies which, in turn, act as trap for one-dimensionally migrating self-interstitial clusters. The mobility of one-dimensional migrating clusters is considered key to determine swelling susceptibility. However, no model has ever been built that quantitatively describes the dependence of swelling on Cr content, allowing for the presence of C in the matrix. In this work we developed physically-based sets of parameters for object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) simulations intended to study the nanostructure evolution under irradiation in Fe-Cr-C alloys. The nanostructural evolution in Fe-C and in four Fe-Cr-C alloys (containing 2.5, 5, 9 and 12 wt.% Cr) neutron irradiated up to ∼0.6 dpa at 563 K was simulated according to the model and reference experiments were reproduced. Our model shows that the SIA cluster reduced mobility has a major influence on the nanostructural evolution: it increases the number of vacancy-SIA recombinations and thus leads to the suppression of voids formation. This provides a clear framework to interpret the non-monotonic dependence of swelling in Fe-Cr alloys versus Cr content. Our model also suggests that the amount of C in the matrix has an equally important role: high amounts of it may counteract the beneficial effect that Cr has in reducing swelling.

  19. Structure and elevated temperature properties of carbon-free ferritic alloys strengthened by a Laves phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhandarkar, M. D.; Zackay, V. F.; Parker, E. R.; Bhat, M. S.

    1975-01-01

    A Laves phase, Fe2Ta, was utilized to obtain good elevated temperature properties in a carbon-free iron alloy containing 1 at. pct Ta and 7 at. pct Cr. Room temperature embrittlement resulting from the precipitation of the Laves phase at grain boundaries was overcome by spheroidizing the precipitate. This was accomplished by thermally cycling the alloys through the alpha to gamma transformation. The short-time yield strength of the alloys decreased very slowly with increase in test temperature up to 600 C, but above this temperature, the strength decreased rapidly. Results of constant load creep and stress rupture tests conducted at several temperatures and stresses indicated that the rupture and creep strengths of spheroidized 1 Ta-7 Cr alloy were higher than those of several commercial steels containing chromium and/or molybdenum carbides but lower than those of steels containing substantial amounts of tungsten and vanadium. When molybdenum was added to the base Fe-Ta-Cr alloy, the rupture and creep strengths were considerably increased.

  20. Influence of hot rolling and high speed hydrostatic extrusion on the microstructure and mechanical properties of an ODS RAF steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksiuta, Z.; Lewandowska, M.; Kurzydlowski, K. J.; Baluc, N.

    2011-02-01

    An argon gas atomized, pre-alloyed Fe-14Cr-2W-0.3Ti (wt.%) reduced activation ferritic (RAF) steel powder was mechanically alloyed with 0.3wt.% Y 2O 3 nano-particles in an attritor ball mill and consolidated by hot isostatic pressing at 1150 °C under a pressure of 200 MPa for 3 h. In the aim to improve its mechanical properties the ODS steel was then submitted to a thermo-mechanical treatment (TMT): hot rolling (HR) at 850 °C or high speed hydrostatic extrusion (HSHE) at 900 °C, followed by heat treatment (HT). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations of the ODS alloys after TMT and heat treatment revealed the presence of elongated grains in the longitudinal direction, with an average width of 8 μm and an average length of 75 μm, and equiaxed grains, a few microns in diameter, in the transverse direction. Two populations of oxide particles were observed by TEM: large Ti-Al-O particles, up to 250 nm in diameter, usually located at the grain boundaries and small Y-Ti-O nanoclusters, about 2.5 nm in diameter, uniformly distributed in the matrix. Charpy impact tests revealed that the HSHE material exhibits a larger upper shelf energy (5.8 J) than the HR material (2.9 J). The ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of both alloys is relatively high, in the range of 55-72 °C. Tensile mechanical properties of both ODS alloys were found satisfactory over the full range of investigated temperatures (23-750 °C). The HSHE material exhibits better tensile strength and ductility than the HR material. These results indicate that HSHE can be considered as a promising TMT method for improving the mechanical properties of ODS RAF steels.

  1. Radiation-induced strengthening and absorption of dislocation loops in ferritic Fe-Cr alloys: the role of Cr segregation.

    PubMed

    Terentyev, D; Bakaev, A

    2013-07-01

    The understanding of radiation-induced strengthening in ferritic FeCr-based steels remains an essential issue in the assessment of materials for fusion and fission reactors. Both early and recent experimental works on Fe-Cr alloys reveal Cr segregation on radiation-induced nanostructural features (mainly dislocation loops), whose impact on the modification of the mechanical response of the material might be key for explaining quantitatively the radiation-induced strengthening in these alloys. In this work, we use molecular dynamics to study systematically the interaction of dislocations with 1/2<111> and <100> loops in all possible orientations, both enriched by Cr atoms and undecorated, for different temperatures, loop sizes and dislocation velocities. The configurations of the enriched loops have been obtained using a non-rigid lattice Monte Carlo method. The study reveals that Cr segregation influences the interaction mechanisms with both 1/2<111> and <100> loops. The overall effect of Cr enrichment is to penalize the mobility of intrinsically glissile 1/2<111> loops, modifying the reaction mechanisms as a result. The following three most important effects associated with Cr enrichment have been revealed: (i) absence of dynamic drag; (ii) suppression of complete absorption; (iii) enhanced strength of small dislocation loops (2 nm and smaller). Overall the effect of the Cr enrichment is therefore to increase the unpinning stress, so experimentally 'invisible' nanostructural features may also contribute to radiation-induced strengthening. The reasons for the modification of the mechanisms are explained and the impact of the loading conditions is discussed. PMID:23756468

  2. Development of High-Temperature Ferritic Alloys and Performance Prediction Methods for Advanced Fission Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    G. RObert Odette; Takuya Yamamoto

    2009-08-14

    Reports the results of a comprehensive development and analysis of a database on irradiation hardening and embrittlement of tempered martensitic steels (TMS). Alloy specific quantitative semi-empirical models were derived for the dpa dose, irradiation temperature (ti) and test (Tt) temperature of yield stress hardening (or softening) .

  3. Gas- and plasma-driven hydrogen permeation through a reduced activation ferritic steel alloy F82H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Haishan; Hirooka, Yoshi; Ashikawa, Naoko; Muroga, Takeo; Sagara, Akio

    2014-12-01

    The first wall of a magnetic fusion power reactor will be subjected to hydrogen isotope permeation by the two mechanisms: one is gas-driven and the other is plasma-driven. Hydrogen transport through a reduced activation ferritic steel alloy F82H has been investigated using a steady-state laboratory-scale plasma device. Permeation parameters including permeability, solubility and diffusivity have been measured in the temperature range from 150 to 520 °C. The surface recombination coefficient for hydrogen has also been estimated by a one-dimensional steady-state permeation model with the input data taken from experiments. Using these parameters, the hydrogen plasma-driven permeation flux and inventory for a 0.5 cm thick first wall around 500 °C are estimated to be ∼1.0 × 1013 atom cm-2 s-1 and ∼2 × 1016 atom cm-3, respectively. Also, the implications of all these data on reactor operation are discussed.

  4. Ab Initio Investigation of He Bubbles at the Y2Ti2O7-Fe Interface in Nanostructured Ferritic Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, Thomas; Tea, Eric; Hin, Celine

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys are promising materials candidates for the next generation of nuclear reactors due to their ability to withstand high temperatures, high pressures, high neutron flux and especially, the presence of high concentrations of transmutation product helium. As helium diffuses through the matrix, large number densities of complex oxide nanoclusters, namely Y2Ti2O7, Y2O3 and Y2TiO5, act as trapping sites for individual helium atoms and helium clusters. Consequently, there is a significant decrease in the amount of helium that reaches grain boundaries, mitigating the threat of pressurized bubble formation and embrittlement. In order to understand the helium trapping mechanisms of the oxides at a fundamental level, the interface between the nanoclusters and the iron matrix must be modeled. We present results obtained using density functional theory on the Y2Ti2O7-Fe interface where the structure has been modeled based on experimental observations. Helium has been added along the interface in order to investigate the influence of helium on the structure and to obtain thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of helium along the interface.

  5. Effect of ferrite formation on abnormal austenite grain coarsening in low-alloy steels during the hot rolling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asahi, Hitoshi; Yagi, Akira; Ueno, Masakatsu

    1998-05-01

    Abnormal coarsening of austenite (γ) grains occurred in low-alloy steels during a seamless pipe hotrolling process. Often, the grains became several hundred micrometers in diameter. This made it difficult to apply direct quenching to produce high-performance pipes. The phenomenon of grain coarsening was successfully reproduced using a thermomechanical simulator, and the factors which affected grain coarsening were clarified. The mechanism was found to be basically strain-induced grain rowth which occurred during reheating at around 930 °C. Furthermore, once a pipe temperature decreased to the dual-phase region after the minimal hot working and prior to the reheating process, the grain coarsening was more pronounced. It was understood that the formation of ferrite along grain boundaries had the role of reducing the migration of grain boundaries into neighboring grains, leaving a strain-free, recrystallized region behind. This abnormal grain coarsening was found to be effectively prevented by an addition of Nb, the content of which varied depending on the C content. The effect of the Nb addition was confirmed by an in-line test.

  6. Effect of ferrite formation on abnormal austenite grain coarsening in low-alloy steels during hot rolling process

    SciTech Connect

    Asahi, Hitoshi; Ueno, Masakatsu; Yagi, Akira

    1998-05-01

    Abnormal coarsening of austenite ({gamma}) grains occurred in low-alloy steels during a seamless pipe hot-rolling process. Often, the grains became several hundred micrometer in diameter. This made it difficult to apply direct quenching to produce high-performance pipes. The phenomenon of grain coarsening was successfully reproduced using a thermomechanical simulator, and the factors which affected grain coarsening were clarified. The mechanism was found to be basically strain-induced grain growth which occurred during reheating at around 930 C. Furthermore, once a pipe temperature decreased to the dual-phase region after the minimal hot working and prior to the reheating process, the grain coarsening was more pronounced. It was understood that the formation of ferrite along grain boundaries had the role of reducing the migration of grain boundaries into neighboring grains, leaving a strain-free, recrystallized region behind. This abnormal grain coarsening was found to be effectively prevented by an addition of Nb, the content of which varied depending on the C content. The effect of the Nb addition was confirmed by an in-line test.

  7. Characterization of neutron-irradiated ferritic model alloys and a RPV steel from combined APT, SANS, TEM and PAS analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meslin, E.; Lambrecht, M.; Hernández-Mayoral, M.; Bergner, F.; Malerba, L.; Pareige, P.; Radiguet, B.; Barbu, A.; Gómez-Briceño, D.; Ulbricht, A.; Almazouzi, A.

    2010-11-01

    Understanding the behavior of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels under irradiation is a mandatory task that has to be elucidated in order to be able to operate safely a nuclear power plant or to extend its lifetime. To build up predictive tools, a substantial experimental data base is needed at the nanometre scale to extract quantitative information on neutron-irradiated materials and to validate the theoretical models. To reach this experimental goal, ferritic model alloys and French RPV steel were neutron irradiated in a test reactor at an irradiation flux of 9 × 10 17 nm -2 s, doses from 0.18 to 1.3 × 10 24 nm -2 and 300 °C. The main goal of this paper is to report the characterization of the radiation-induced microstructural change in the materials by using the state-of-the-art of characterization techniques available in Europe at the nanometre scale. Possibilities, limitations and complementarities of the techniques to each other are highlighted.

  8. Effects of proton irradiation on nanocluster precipitation in ferritic steel containing fcc alloying additions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhongwu; Liu, C T; Wang, Xun-Li; Miller, Michael K; Ma, Dong; Chen, Guang; Williams, J R; Chin, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    Newly-developed precipitate-strengthened ferritic steels with and without pre-existing nanoscale precipitates were irradiated with 4 MeV protons to a dose of ~5 mdpa at 50 C and subsequently examined by nanoindentation and atom probe tomography (APT). Irradiation-enhanced precipitation and coarsening of pre-existing nanoscale precipitates were observed. Copper partitions to the precipitate core along with a segregation of Ni, Al and Mn to the precipitate/matrix interface after both thermal aging and proton irradiation. Proton irradiation induces the precipitation reaction and coarsening of pre-existing nanoscale precipitates, and these results are similar to a thermal aging process. The precipitation and coarsening of nanoscale precipitates are responsible for the changes in hardness. The observation of the radiation-induced softening is essentially due to the coarsening of the pre-existing Cu-rich nanoscale precipitates. The implication of the precipitation on the embrittlement of reactor-pressure-vessel steels after irradiation is discussed.

  9. Dual and Triple Ion-Beam Irradiations of Fe, Fe(Cr) and Fe(Cr)-ODS Final Report: IAEA SMoRE CRP

    SciTech Connect

    Fluss, M J; Hsiung, L L; Marian, J

    2011-11-20

    Structures of nanoparticles in Fe-16Cr-4.5Al-0.3Ti-2W-0.37Y2O3 (K3) and Fe-20Cr-4.5Al-0.34Ti-0.5Y2O3 (MA956) oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels produced by mechanical alloying (MA) and followed by hot extrusion have been studied using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques to gain insight about the formation mechanism of nanoparticles in MA/ODS steels. The observations of Y-Al-O complex-oxide nanoparticles in both ODS steels imply that decomposition of Y2O3 in association with internal oxidation of Al occurred during mechanical alloying. While the majority of oxide nanoparticles formed in both steels is Y4Al2O9, a few oxide particles of YAlO3 are also occasionally observed. These results reveal that Ti (0.3 wt %) plays an insignificant role in forming oxide nanoparticles in the presence of Al (4.5 wt %). HRTEM observations of crystalline nanoparticles larger than {approx}2 nm and amorphous or disordered cluster domains smaller than {approx}2 nm provide an insight into the formation mechanism of oxide nanoparticle in MA/ODS steels, which we believe from our observations involves a solid-state amorphous precursor followed by recrystallization. Dual ion-beam irradiations using He{sup +} + Fe{sup +8} ions were employed to gain more detailed insight about the role of nanoparticles in suppressing radiation-induced swelling. This is elaborated through TEM examinations of cavity distributions in ion-irradiated Fe-14Cr and K3-ODS ferritic steels. HRTEM observations of helium-filled cavities (helium bubbles) preferably trapped at nanoscale oxide particles and clusters in ion-irradiated K3-ODS are presented. Finally, we describe the results from triple ion-beam irradiations using H{sup +} + He{sup +} + Fe{sup +8} ions to emulate fusion first wall radiation effects. Preliminary work is reported that confirms the existence of significant hydrogen synergistic effects described earlier by Tanaka et al., for Fe(Cr) and by Wakai et al

  10. Comparison of fracture behavior for low-swelling ferritic and austenitic alloys irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) to 180 DPA

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, F.H.

    1992-02-01

    Fracture toughness testing was conducted to investigate the radiation embrittlement of high-nickel superalloys, modified austenitic steels and ferritic steels. These materials have been experimentally proven to possess excellent resistance to void swelling after high neutron exposures. In addition to swelling resistance, post-irradiation fracture resistance is another important criterion for reactor material selection. By means of fracture mechanics techniques the fracture behavior of those highly irradiated alloys was characterized in terms of irradiation and test conditions. Precipitation-strengthened alloys failed by channel fracture with very low postirradiation ductility. The fracture toughness of titanium-modified austenitic stainless steel D9 deteriorates with increasing fluence to about 100 displacement per atom (dpa), the fluence level at which brittle fracture appears to occur. Ferritic steels such as HT9 are the most promising candidate materials for fast and fusion reactor applications. The upper-shelf fracture toughness of alloy HT9 remained adequate after irradiation to 180 dpa although its ductile- brittle transition temperature (DBTT) shift by low temperature irradiation rendered the material susceptible to brittle fracture at room temperature. Understanding the fracture characteristics under various irradiation and test conditions helps reduce the potential for brittle fracture by permitting appropriate measure to be taken.

  11. Isothermal Annealing of a Thermally Stabilized Fe-Based Ferritic Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotan, Hasan; Darling, Kris A.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the stability and microstructural evolution, including grain size and hardness of nanocrystalline Fe91Ni8Zr1 alloyed powders, produced by ball milling, were investigated after annealing at 900 and 1000 °C for up to 24 h. Results indicate that rapid grain growth to the micron scale occurs within the first few minutes of exposure to the elevated annealing temperatures. However, despite the loss of nanocrystallinity, an extremely stable and efficient hardening effect persists, which has been found to be equal to that predicted by Hall-Petch strengthening even at the smallest grain sizes. The mechanical properties of the samples consolidated to bulk via equal channel angular extrusion at 900 °C were evaluated by uniaxial compression at room and elevated temperatures. Results reveal high compressive yield stress as well as the appearance and disappearance of a yield drop indicating the presence of coherent (GP zone like) precipitates within the microstructure. Such a hardening mechanism has implications for developing new Fe-Ni-based alloys exhibiting a combination of high strength and ductility for high temperature applications.

  12. Interdiffusion Behavior of Al-Rich Oxidation Resistant Coatings on Ferritic-Martensitic Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Velraj, S.; Zhang, Ying; Hawkins, W. E.; Pint, Bruce A.

    2012-06-21

    We investigated interdiffusion of thin Al-rich coatings synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and pack cementation on 9Cr ferritic–martensitic alloys in the temperature range of 650–700°C. The compositional changes after long-term exposures in laboratory air and air + 10 vol% H2O were examined experimentally. Interdiffusion was modeled by a modified coating oxidation and substrate interdiffusion model (COSIM) program. The modification enabled the program to directly input the concentration profiles of the as-deposited coating determined by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Reasonable agreement was achieved between the simulated and experimental Al profiles after exposures. Moreover, the model was also applied to predict coating lifetime at 650–700°C based on a minimum Al content (Cb) required at the coating surface to re-form protective oxide scale. In addition to a Cb value established from the failure of a thin CVD coating at 700°C, values reported for slurry aluminide coatings were also included in lifetime predictions.

  13. J/sub Ic/ fracture toughness of ferritic DCI (ductile cast iron) alloys: A comparison of two versions of ASTM E 813

    SciTech Connect

    Salzbrenner, R.

    1989-05-01

    The fracture toughness of several ductile cast iron (DCI) alloys has been calculated according to two versions of the ASTM Standard covering the determination of J/sub Ic/. The original version (ASTM E 813-81) had previously been used to establish the relationship between ferritic DCI alloys and the graphite nodule spacing. The J/sub Ic/ values were recalculated by the methods of the revised version of the ASTM Standard (ASME 813-87), and were found to be 5 to 8% higher than those determined by the original standard. A linear regression analysis was used to reaffirm that the fracture toughness is directly related to the graphite nodule size or spacing. 6 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Optimization of the chemical composition and manufacturing route for ODS RAF steels for fusion reactor application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksiuta, Z.; Baluc, N.

    2009-05-01

    As the upper temperature for use of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels is presently limited by a drop in mechanical strength at about 550 °C, Europe, Japan and the US are actively researching steels with high strength at higher operating temperatures, mainly using stable oxide dispersion. In addition, the numerous interfaces between matrix and oxide particles are expected to act as sinks for the irradiation-induced defects. The main R&D activities aim at finding a compromise between good tensile and creep strength and sufficient ductility, especially in terms of fracture toughness. Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) reduced activation ferritic (RAF) steels appear as promising materials for application in fusion power reactors up to about 750 °C. Six different ODS RAF steels, with compositions of Fe-(12-14)Cr-2W-(0.1-0.3-0.5)Ti-0.3Y2O3 (in wt%), were produced by powder metallurgy techniques, including mechanical alloying, canning and degassing of the milled powders and compaction of the powders by hot isostatic pressing, using various devices and conditions. The materials have been characterized in terms of microstructure and mechanical properties. The results have been analysed in terms of optimal chemical composition and manufacturing conditions. In particular, it was found that the composition of the materials should lie in the range Fe-14Cr-2W-(0.3-0.4)Ti-(0.25-0.3)Y2O3, as 14Cr ODS RAF steels exhibit higher tensile strength and better Charpy impact properties and are more stable than 12Cr materials (no risk of martensitic transformation), while materials with 0.5% Ti or more should not be further investigated, due to potential embrittlement by large TiO2 particles.

  15. Microstructural behavior of 8Cr-ODS martensitic steels during creep deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinozuka, K.; Esaka, H.; Tamura, M.; Tanigawa, H.

    2011-10-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels show a high anisotropy in their creep behavior because of the δ-ferrite grain elongated in the hot-rolled direction and the characteristic formation of creep cavities. In this work, the relationship between the δ-ferrite grain and the growth of creep cavities in 8Cr-ODS steels was investigated. The samples of two ODS steels with different δ-ferrite volume fractions were machined parallel and perpendicular to the hot-rolled direction. Creep rupture tests and interrupted tests were performed at 700 °C and about 197 MPa. Cavities formed in the martensite along δ-ferrite grains during creep deformation. The area fraction of the cavities of all specimens increased in proportion to the cube root of test time. When the volume fraction of δ-ferrite was high and δ-ferrite grains elongated parallel to the load direction, δ-ferrite then obstructed the propagation of cracks. However, when the volume fraction of δ-ferrite was low and δ-ferrite grains elongated perpendicular to the load direction, δ-ferrite grains had little effect on crack propagation.

  16. Kinetic of solute clustering in neutron irradiated ferritic model alloys and a French pressure vessel steel investigated by atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meslin, E.; Radiguet, B.; Pareige, P.; Barbu, A.

    2010-04-01

    The embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels under neutron irradiation is partly due to the formation of solute clusters. To gain more insight into their formation mechanisms, ferritic model alloys (low copper Fe-0.08 at.% Cu, Fe-0.09 Cu-1.1 Mn-0.7 Ni (at.%), and a copper free Fe-1.1 Mn-0.7 Ni (at.%)) and a French 16MND5 reactor pressure vessel steel, were irradiated in a test reactor at two fluxes of 0.15 and 9 × 10 17 n( E> 1 MeV) m -2 s -1 and at increasing doses from 0.18 to 1.3 × 10 24 n( E> 1 MeV) m -2. Atom probe tomography analyses revealed that nanometer-size solute clusters were formed during irradiation in all the materials, even in the copper free Fe-1.1 Mn-0.7 Ni (at.%) alloy. It should be noted that solute segregation in a low-Ni ferritic material was never reported before in absence of the highly insoluble copper impurity. The manganese and nickel segregation is suggested to result from a radiation-induced mechanism.

  17. High-temperature creep rupture of low alloy ferritic steel butt-welded pipes subjected to combined internal pressure and end loadings.

    PubMed

    Vakili-Tahami, F; Hayhurst, D R; Wong, M T

    2005-11-15

    Constitutive equations are reviewed and presented for low alloy ferritic steels which undergo creep deformation and damage at high temperatures; and, a thermodynamic framework is provided for the deformation rate potentials used in the equations. Finite element continuum damage mechanics studies have been carried out using these constitutive equations on butt-welded low alloy ferritic steel pipes subjected to combined internal pressure and axial loads at 590 and 620 degrees C. Two dominant modes of failure have been identified: firstly, fusion boundary failure at high stresses; and, secondly, Type IV failure at low stresses. The stress level at which the switch in failure mechanism takes place has been found to be associated with the relative creep resistance and lifetimes, over a wide range of uniaxial stresses, for parent, heat affected zone, Type IV and weld materials. The equi-biaxial stress loading condition (mean diameter stress equal to the axial stress) has been confirmed to be the worst loading condition. For this condition, simple design formulae are proposed for both 590 and 620 degrees C. PMID:16243708

  18. Optimization and testing results of Zr-bearing ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lizhen; Yang, Ying; Tyburska-Puschel, Beata; Sridharan, K.

    2014-09-01

    The mission of the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program is to develop crosscutting technologies for nuclear energy applications. Advanced structural materials with superior performance at elevated temperatures are always desired for nuclear reactors, which can improve reactor economics, safety margins, and design flexibility. They benefit not only new reactors, including advanced light water reactors (LWRs) and fast reactors such as sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) that is primarily designed for management of high-level wastes, but also life extension of the existing fleet when component exchange is needed. Developing and utilizing the modern materials science tools (experimental, theoretical, and computational tools) is an important path to more efficient alloy development and process optimization. Ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels are important structural materials for nuclear reactors due to their advantages over other applicable materials like austenitic stainless steels, notably their resistance to void swelling, low thermal expansion coefficients, and higher thermal conductivity. However, traditional FM steels exhibit a noticeable yield strength reduction at elevated temperatures above ~500°C, which limits their applications in advanced nuclear reactors which target operating temperatures at 650°C or higher. Although oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels have shown excellent high-temperature performance, their extremely high cost, limited size and fabricability of products, as well as the great difficulty with welding and joining, have limited or precluded their commercial applications. Zirconium has shown many benefits to Fe-base alloys such as grain refinement, improved phase stability, and reduced radiation-induced segregation. The ultimate goal of this project is, with the aid of computational modeling tools, to accelerate the development of a new generation of Zr-bearing ferritic alloys to be fabricated using conventional

  19. HIGH TEMPERATURE BRAZING ALLOY FOR JOINT Fe-Cr-Al MATERIALS AND AUSTENITIC AND FERRITIC STAINLESS STEELS

    DOEpatents

    Cost, R.C.

    1958-07-15

    A new high temperature brazing alloy is described that is particularly suitable for brazing iron-chromiumaluminum alloys. It consists of approximately 20% Cr, 6% Al, 10% Si, and from 1.5 to 5% phosphorus, the balance being iron.

  20. Load partitioning between the bcc-iron matrix and NiAl-type precipitates in a ferritic alloy on multiple length scales

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Zhiqian; Song, Gian; Sisneros, Thomas A.; Clausen, Bjorn; Pu, Chao; Li, Lin; Gao, Yanfei; Liaw, Peter K

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of load sharing among constituent phases aids in designing mechanical properties of multiphase materials. Here we investigate load partitioning between the body-centered-cubic iron matrix and NiAl-type precipitates in a ferritic alloy during uniaxial tensile tests at 364 and 506 C on multiple length scales by in situ neutron diffraction and crystal plasticity finite element modeling. Our findings show that the macroscopic load-transfer efficiency is not as high as that predicted by the Eshelby model; moreover, it depends on the matrix strain-hardening behavior. We explain the grain-level anisotropic load-partitioning behavior by considering the plastic anisotropy of the matrix and elastic anisotropy of precipitates. We further demonstrate that the partitioned load on NiAl-type precipitates relaxes at 506 C, most likely through thermally-activated dislocation rearrangement on the microscopic scale. The study contributes to further understanding of load-partitioning characteristics in multiphase materials.

  1. Effects of surface conditions on the plasma-driven permeation behavior through a ferritic steel alloy observed in VEHICLE-1 and QUEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, H.; Hirooka, Y.; Zushi, H.; Kuzmin, A.; Ashikawa, N.; Muroga, T.; Sagara, A.

    2015-08-01

    Effects of surface conditions on the plasma-driven permeation of hydrogen through a ferritic steel alloy F82H have been studied in a laboratory-scale plasma device: VEHICLE-1 and the medium-sized spherical tokamak: QUEST. Both of the surface contamination and area effects have been examined and discussed. Thick surface impurity film has been found to act as a second layer for diffusion and affect the permeation behavior in laboratory-scale and tokamak experiments. Hydrogen diffusion coefficient in the impurity layer has been estimated using the multi-layer diffusion model. A decrease in steady state permeation flux has been measured when increasing the plasma-facing surface area, which is in agreement with theoretical prediction.

  2. TEM characterization of simultaneous triple ion implanted ODS Fe12Cr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro, Vanessa; Briceno, Martha; Lozano-Perez, Sergio; Trocellier, Patrick; Roberts, Steve G.; Pareja, Ramiro

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the behavior of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic/martensitic steels under irradiation is vital in the design of advanced fusion reactors. In this work, a simultaneous triple ion implanted ODS Fe12Cr steel was investigated by transmission electron microscopy in order to determine the effect of irradiation on the grain and dislocation structures, oxide nanoparticles and other secondary phases present in the steel. The ODS steel was irradiated at RT with Fe8+, He+ and H+ at the JANNUS-Saclay facility to a damage of 4.4 dpa. Results show that ODS nanoparticles appear very stable under these irradiation conditions.

  3. Ferrite morphology and variations in ferrite content in austenitic stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Hanzelka, S.E.; Haltom, C.P.

    1981-07-01

    Four distinct ferrite morphologies have been identified in type 308 stainless steel multipass welds: vermicular, lacy, acicular, and globular. The first three ferrite types are related to transformations following solidification and the fourth is related to the shape instability of the residual ferrite. An earlier study showed that most of the ferrite observed in austenitic stainless steel welds contaning a duplex structure may be identified as residual primary ferrite resulting from incomplete delta ..-->.. ..gamma.. transformation during solidification and/or residual ferrite after Widmanstaetten austenite precipitation in primary ferrite. These modes of ferrite formation can be used to explain observed ferrite morphologies in austenitic stainless steel welds. Variations in ferrite content within the weld were related to weld metal composition, ferrite morphology, and dissolution of ferrite resulting from thermal cycles during subsequent weld passes. An investigation of the type 308 stainless steel filler metal solidified over cooling rates ranging from 7 to 1600/sup 0/C/s showed that the cooling rate of the weld metal within the freezing range of the alloy affects the amount of ferrite in the microstructure very litte. However, the scale of the solidification substructure associated with various solidification rates may influence the ferrite dissolution kinetics.

  4. Ferrite morphology and variations in ferrite content in austenitic stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.

    1981-04-01

    Four distinct ferrite morphologies have been identified in Type 308 stainless steel multipass welds: vermicular, lacy, acicular, and globular. The first three ferrite types are related to transformations following solidfication and the fourth is related to the shape instability of the residual ferrite. An earlier study showed that most of the ferrite observed in austenitic stainless steel welds containing a duplex structure may be identified as residual primary ferrite resulting from incomplete delta ..-->.. ..gamma.. transformation during solidification and/or residual ferrite after Widmanstatten austenite precipitation in primary ferrite. These modes of ferrite formation can be used to explain observed ferrite morphologies in austenitic stainless steel welds. Variations in ferrite content within the weld were also related to weld metal composition, ferrite morphology, and dissolution of ferrite resulting from thermal cycles during subsequent weld passes. An investigation of the Type 308 stainless steel filler metal solidified over cooling rates ranging from 7 to 1600/sup 0/C/s (44.6 to 2912/sup 0/F/s) showed that the cooling rate of the weld metal within the freezing range of the alloy affects the amount of ferrite in the microstructure very little. However, the scale of the solidification substructure associated with various solidification rates may influence the ferrite dissolution kinetics.

  5. Characterization of low alloy ferritic steel–Ni base alloy dissimilar metal weld interface by SPM techniques, SEM/EDS, TEM/EDS and SVET

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Siyan; Ding, Jie; Ming, Hongliang; Zhang, Zhiming; Wang, Jianqiu

    2015-02-15

    The interface region of welded A508–Alloy 52 M is characterized by scanning probe microscope (SPM) techniques, scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM)/Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and scanning vibrate electrode technique (SVET). The regions along the welded A508–Alloy 52 M interface can be categorized into two types according to their different microstructures. In the type-I interface region, A508 and Alloy 52 M are separated by the fusion boundary, while in the type-II interface region, A508 and Alloy 52 M are separated by a martensite zone. A508, martensite zone and grain boundaries in Alloy 52 M are ferromagnetic while the Alloy 52 M matrix is paramagnetic. The Volta potentials measured by scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM) of A508, martensite zone and Alloy 52 M follow the order: V{sub 52} {sub M} > V{sub A508} > V{sub martensite}. The corrosion behavior of A508–Alloy 52 M interface region is galvanic corrosion, in which Alloy 52 M is cathode while A508 is anode. The martensite dissolves faster than Alloy 52 M, but slower than A508 in the test solution. - Highlights: • The A508–Alloy 52 M interface regions can be categorized into two types. • The chromium depleted region is observed along the Alloy 52 M grain boundary. • The Alloy 52 M grain boundaries which are close to the interface are ferromagnetic. • Martensite zone has lower Volta potential but higher corrosion resistance than A508.

  6. Processing and microstructure characterisation of oxide dispersion strengthened Fe-14Cr-0.4Ti-0.25Y2O3 ferritic steels fabricated by spark plasma sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongtao; Huang, Yina; Ning, Huanpo; Williams, Ceri A.; London, Andrew J.; Dawson, Karl; Hong, Zuliang; Gorley, Michael J.; Grovenor, Chris R. M.; Tatlock, Gordon J.; Roberts, Steve G.; Reece, Michael J.; Yan, Haixue; Grant, Patrick S.

    2015-09-01

    Ferritic steels strengthened with Ti-Y-O nanoclusters are leading candidates for fission and fusion reactor components. A Fe-14Cr-0.4Ti + 0.25Y2O3 (14YT) alloy was fabricated by mechanical alloying and subsequently consolidated by spark plasma sintering (SPS). The densification of the 14YT alloys significantly improved with an increase in the sintering temperature. Scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction revealed that 14YT SPS-sintered at 1150 °C under 50 MPa for 5 min had a high density (99.6%), a random grain orientation and a bimodal grain size distribution (<500 nm and 1-20 μm). Synchrotron X-ray diffraction patterns showed bcc ferrite, Y2Ti2O7, FeO, and chromium carbides, while transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography showed uniformly dispersed Y2Ti2O7 nanoclusters of <5 nm diameter and number density of 1.04 × 1023 m-3. Due to the very much shorter consolidation times and lower pressures used in SPS compared with the more usual hot isostatic pressing routes, SPS is shown to be a cost-effective technique for oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy manufacturing with microstructural features consistent with the best-performing ODS alloys.

  7. Establishing a Scientific Basis for Optimizing Compositions, Process Paths and Fabrication Methods for Nanostructured Ferritic Alloys for Use in Advanced Fission Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Odette, G Robert; Cunningham, Nicholas J., Wu, Yuan; Etienne, Auriane; Stergar, Erich; Yamamoto, Takuya

    2012-02-21

    The broad objective of this NEUP was to further develop a class of 12-15Cr ferritic alloys that are dispersion strengthened and made radiation tolerant by an ultrahigh density of Y-Ti-O nanofeatures (NFs) in the size range of less than 5 nm. We call these potentially transformable materials nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs). NFAs are typically processed by ball milling pre-alloyed rapidly solidified powders and yttria (Y2O3) powders. Proper milling effectively dissolves the Ti, Y and O solutes that precipitate as NFs during hot consolidation. The tasks in the present study included examining alternative processing paths, characterizing and optimizing the NFs and investigating solid state joining. Alternative processing paths involved rapid solidification by gas atomization of Fe, 14% Cr, 3% W, and 0.4% Ti powders that are also pre-alloyed with 0.2% Y (14YWT), where the compositions are in wt.%. The focus is on exploring the possibility of minimizing, or even eliminating, the milling time, as well as producing alloys with more homogeneous distributions of NFs and a more uniform, fine grain size. Three atomization environments were explored: Ar, Ar plus O (Ar/O) and He. The characterization of powders and alloys occurred through each processing step: powder production by gas atomization; powder milling; and powder annealing or hot consolidation by hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) or hot extrusion. The characterization studies of the materials described here include various combinations of: a) bulk chemistry; b) electron probe microanalysis (EPMA); c) atom probe tomography (APT); d) small angle neutron scattering (SANS); e) various types of scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM); and f) microhardness testing. The bulk chemistry measurements show that preliminary batches of gas-atomized powders could be produced within specified composition ranges. However, EPMA and TEM showed that the Y is heterogeneously distributed and phase separated, but

  8. Characterization of TiN, TiC and Ti(C,N) in titanium-alloyed ferritic chromium steels focusing on the significance of different particle morphologies

    SciTech Connect

    Michelic, S.K.; Loder, D.; Reip, T.; Ardehali Barani, A.; Bernhard, C.

    2015-02-15

    Titanium-alloyed ferritic chromium steels are a competitive option to classical austenitic stainless steels owing to their similar corrosion resistance. The addition of titanium significantly influences their final steel cleanliness. The present contribution focuses on the detailed metallographic characterization of titanium nitrides, titanium carbides and titanium carbonitrides with regard to their size, morphology and composition. The methods used are manual and automated Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy as well as optical microscopy. Additional thermodynamic calculations are performed to explain the precipitation procedure of the analyzed titanium nitrides. The analyses showed that homogeneous nucleation is decisive at an early process stage after the addition of titanium. Heterogeneous nucleation gets crucial with ongoing process time and essentially influences the final inclusion size of titanium nitrides. A detailed investigation of the nuclei for heterogeneous nucleation with automated Scanning Electron Microscopy proved to be difficult due to their small size. Manual Scanning Electron Microscopy and optical microscopy have to be applied. Furthermore, it was found that during solidification an additional layer around an existing titanium nitride can be formed which changes the final inclusion morphology significantly. These layers are also characterized in detail. Based on these different inclusion morphologies, in combination with thermodynamic results, tendencies regarding the formation and modification time of titanium containing inclusions in ferritic chromium steels are derived. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • The formation and modification of TiN in the steel 1.4520 was examined. • Heterogeneous nucleation essentially influences the final steel cleanliness. • In most cases heterogeneous nuclei in TiN inclusions are magnesium based. • Particle morphology provides important information

  9. Delta ferrite in the weld metal of reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sam, Shiju; Das, C. R.; Ramasubbu, V.; Albert, S. K.; Bhaduri, A. K.; Jayakumar, T.; Rajendra Kumar, E.

    2014-12-01

    Formation of delta(δ)-ferrite in the weld metal, during autogenous bead-on-plate welding of Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel using Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) process, has been studied. Composition of the alloy is such that delta-ferrite is not expected in the alloy; but examination of the weld metal revealed presence of delta-ferrite in the weld metal. Volume fraction of delta-ferrite is found to be higher in the weld interface than in the rest of the fusion zone. Decrease in the volume fraction of delta-ferrite, with an increase in preheat temperature or with an increase in heat input, is observed. Results indicate that the cooling rate experienced during welding affects the volume fraction of delta-ferrite retained in the weld metal and variation in the delta-ferrite content with cooling rate is explained with variation in the time that the weld metal spends in various temperature regimes in which delta-ferrite is stable for the alloy during its cooling from the liquid metal to the ambient temperature. This manuscript will discuss the effect of welding parameters on formation of delta-ferrite and its retention in the weld metal of RAFM steel.

  10. Deformation mechanisms in a precipitation-strengthened ferritic super alloy revealed by in situ neutron dffraction studies at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shenyan; Gao, Yanfei; An, Ke; Zheng, Lili; Teng, Zhenke; Wu, Wei; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    The ferritic superalloy Fe–10Ni–6.5Al–10Cr–3.4Mo strengthened by ordered (Ni,Fe)AlB2-type precipitates is a candidate material for ultra-supercritical steam turbine applications above 923 K. Despite earlier success in improving its room-temperature ductility, the creep resistance of this material at high temperatures needs to be further improved, which requires a fundamental understanding of the high-temperature deformation mechanisms at the scales of individual phases and grains. In situ neutron diffraction has been utilized to investigate the lattice strain evolution and the microscopic load-sharing mechanisms during tensile deformation of this ferritic superalloy at elevated temperatures. Finite-element simulations based on the crystal plasticity theory are employed and compared with the experimental results, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Based on these interphase and intergranular load-partitioning studies, it is found that the deformation mechanisms change from dislocation slip to those related to dislocation climb, diffusional flow and possibly grain boundary sliding, below and above 873 K, respectively. Insights into microstructural design for enhancing creep resistance are also discussed.

  11. Long term high temperature oxidation characteristics of La and Cu alloyed ferritic stainless steels for solid oxide fuel cell interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Srinivasan; Lee, Young-Su; Kim, Dong-Ik

    2016-09-01

    To ensure the best performance of solid oxide fuel cell metallic interconnects, the Fe-22 wt.% Cr ferritic stainless steels with various La contents (0.006-0.6 wt.%) and Cu addition (1.57 wt.%), are developed. Long-term isothermal oxidation behavior of these steels is investigated in air at 800 °C, for 2700 h. Chemistry, morphology, and microstructure of the thermally grown oxide scale are examined using XPS, SEM-EDX, and XRD techniques. Broadly, all the steels show a double layer consisting of an inner Cr2O3 and outer (Mn, Cr)3O4. Distinctly, in the La-added steels, binary oxides of Cr, Mn and Ti are found at the oxide scale surface together with (Mn, Cr)3O4. Furthermore, all La-varied steels possess the metallic Fe protrusions along with discontinuous (Mn, Cr)3O4 spinel zones at the oxide scale/metal interface and isolated precipitates of Ti-oxides in the underlying matrix. Increase of La content to 0.6 wt.% is detrimental to the oxidation resistance. For the Cu-added steel, Cu is found to segregate strongly at the oxide scale/metal interface which inhibits the ingress of oxygen thereby suppressing the subscale formation of (Mn, Cr)3O4. Thus, Cu addition to the Fe-22Cr ferritic stainless steels benefits the oxidation resistance.

  12. Delta ferrite-containing austenitic stainless steel resistant to the formation of undesirable phases upon aging

    SciTech Connect

    Leitnaker, J.M.

    1981-05-05

    Austenitic stainless steel alloys containing delta ferrite, such as are used as weld deposits, are protected against the transformation of delta ferrite to sigma phase during aging by the presence of carbon plus nitrogen in a weight percent 015-0.030 times the volume percent ferrite present in alloy. The formation of chi phase upon aging is controlled by controlling the mo content.

  13. Evaluation of mechanical properties and biological response of an alumina-forming Ni-free ferritic alloy.

    PubMed

    González-Carrasco, J L; Ciapetti, G; Montealegre, M A; Pagani, S; Chao, J; Baldini, N

    2005-06-01

    PM 2000 is a Ni-free oxide dispersion strengthened Fe-20Cr-5Al alloy able to develop a fine, dense and tightly adherent alpha-alumina scale during high-temperature oxidation. Despite the high temperature involved during thermal oxidation (1100 degrees C), microstructural changes in the candidate material, a hot rolled product, hardly occurs. Consequently, the good mechanical properties of the as-received material are not significantly affected. Moreover, due to the high compressive residual stresses at the alumina scale, an increase in the fatigue limit from 500 to 530 MPa is observed. Such stresses also account for the high capability of the coating/metal system to withstand more than 1% tensile deformation without cracking. The biocompatibility of the alloy was assessed in comparison to commercial alumina. Saos-2 osteoblast-like cells were either challenged with PM 2000 particles, or seeded onto PM 2000 (with and without scale) solid samples. Viability, growth, and ALP release from cells were assessed after 3 or 7 days, while mineralization was checked at 18 days. This study has demonstrated that PM 2000 with and without scale are capable of supporting in vitro growth and function of osteoblast-like cells over a period of 18 days. Results from this study suggest that the resulting alumina/alloy system combines the good mechanical properties of the alloy with the superior biocompatibility of the alpha-alumina, for which there is very good clinical experience. PMID:15626434

  14. Load partitioning between the bcc-iron matrix and NiAl-type precipitates in a ferritic alloy on multiple length scales

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sun, Zhiqian; Song, Gian; Sisneros, Thomas A.; Clausen, Bjorn; Pu, Chao; Li, Lin; Gao, Yanfei; Liaw, Peter K.

    2016-03-16

    An understanding of load sharing among constituent phases aids in designing mechanical properties of multiphase materials. Here we investigate load partitioning between the body-centered-cubic iron matrix and NiAl-type precipitates in a ferritic alloy during uniaxial tensile tests at 364 and 506 C on multiple length scales by in situ neutron diffraction and crystal plasticity finite element modeling. Our findings show that the macroscopic load-transfer efficiency is not as high as that predicted by the Eshelby model; moreover, it depends on the matrix strain-hardening behavior. We explain the grain-level anisotropic load-partitioning behavior by considering the plastic anisotropy of the matrix andmore » elastic anisotropy of precipitates. We further demonstrate that the partitioned load on NiAl-type precipitates relaxes at 506 C, most likely through thermally-activated dislocation rearrangement on the microscopic scale. Furthermore, the study contributes to further understanding of load-partitioning characteristics in multiphase materials.« less

  15. First principles assessment of helium trapping in Y{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} in nano-featured ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Yanan; Jiang, Yong E-mail: odette@engineering.ucsb.edu; Yang, Litong; Lan, Guoqiang; Robert Odette, G. E-mail: odette@engineering.ucsb.edu; Yamamoto, Takuya; Shang, Jiacheng; Dang, Ying

    2014-10-14

    Nano-scale Y{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Y{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} oxides are the major features that provide high strength and irradiation tolerance in nano-structured ferritic alloys. Here, we employ density functional theory to study helium trapping in Y{sub 2}TiO{sub 5}. The results suggest that helium is more deeply trapped in Y{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} compared to Y{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}. Helium occupies open channels in Y{sub 2}TiO{sub 5}, where it weakly chemically interacts with neighboring oxygen anions, and results in less volume expansion compared to Y{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}, reducing strains in the iron matrix. The corresponding helium mobility in these channels is very high. While its ultimate fate is to form oxide/matrix interface bubbles, transient deep trapping of helium in oxides plays a major role in the ability of NFA to manage helium distribution.

  16. Effect of aluminizing of Cr-containing ferritic alloys on the seal strength of a novel high-temperature solid oxide fuel cell sealing glass

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

    2008-12-01

    A novel high-temperature alkaline-earth silicate sealing glass was developed for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. The glass was used to join two metallic coupons of Cr-containing ferritic stainless steel for seal strength evaluation. In previous work, SrCrO4 was found to form along the glass/steel interface, which led to severe strength degradation. In the present study, aluminization of the steel surface was investigated as a remedy to minimize or prevent the strontium chromate formation. Three different processes for aluminization were evaluated with Crofer22APU stainless steel: pack cementation, vapor phase deposition, and aerosol spraying. It was found that pack cementation resulted in a rough surface with occasional cracks in the Al-diffused region. Vapor phase deposition yielded a smoother surface, but the resulting high Al content increased the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), resulting in failure of joined coupons. Aerosol spraying of an Al-containing salt resulted in formation of a thin aluminum oxide layer without any surface damage. The room temperature seal strength was evaluated in the as-fired state and in environmentally aged conditions. In contrast to earlier results with uncoated Crofer22APU, the aluminized samples showed no strength degradation even for samples aged in air. Interfacial and chemical compatibility was also investigated. The results showed aluminization to be a viable candidate approach to minimize undesirable chromate formation between alkaline earth silicate sealing glass and Cr-containing interconnect alloys for SOFC applications.

  17. Load partitioning between the bcc-iron matrix and NiAl-type precipitates in a ferritic alloy on multiple length scales.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhiqian; Song, Gian; Sisneros, Thomas A; Clausen, Bjørn; Pu, Chao; Li, Lin; Gao, Yanfei; Liaw, Peter K

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of load sharing among constituent phases aids in designing mechanical properties of multiphase materials. Here we investigate load partitioning between the body-centered-cubic iron matrix and NiAl-type precipitates in a ferritic alloy during uniaxial tensile tests at 364 and 506 °C on multiple length scales by in situ neutron diffraction and crystal plasticity finite element modeling. Our findings show that the macroscopic load-transfer efficiency is not as high as that predicted by the Eshelby model; moreover, it depends on the matrix strain-hardening behavior. We explain the grain-level anisotropic load-partitioning behavior by considering the plastic anisotropy of the matrix and elastic anisotropy of precipitates. We further demonstrate that the partitioned load on NiAl-type precipitates relaxes at 506 °C, most likely through thermally-activated dislocation rearrangement on the microscopic scale. The study contributes to further understanding of load-partitioning characteristics in multiphase materials. PMID:26979660

  18. Load partitioning between the bcc-iron matrix and NiAl-type precipitates in a ferritic alloy on multiple length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhiqian; Song, Gian; Sisneros, Thomas A.; Clausen, Bjørn; Pu, Chao; Li, Lin; Gao, Yanfei; Liaw, Peter K.

    2016-03-01

    An understanding of load sharing among constituent phases aids in designing mechanical properties of multiphase materials. Here we investigate load partitioning between the body-centered-cubic iron matrix and NiAl-type precipitates in a ferritic alloy during uniaxial tensile tests at 364 and 506 °C on multiple length scales by in situ neutron diffraction and crystal plasticity finite element modeling. Our findings show that the macroscopic load-transfer efficiency is not as high as that predicted by the Eshelby model; moreover, it depends on the matrix strain-hardening behavior. We explain the grain-level anisotropic load-partitioning behavior by considering the plastic anisotropy of the matrix and elastic anisotropy of precipitates. We further demonstrate that the partitioned load on NiAl-type precipitates relaxes at 506 °C, most likely through thermally-activated dislocation rearrangement on the microscopic scale. The study contributes to further understanding of load-partitioning characteristics in multiphase materials.

  19. Load partitioning between the bcc-iron matrix and NiAl-type precipitates in a ferritic alloy on multiple length scales

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhiqian; Song, Gian; Sisneros, Thomas A.; Clausen, Bjørn; Pu, Chao; Li, Lin; Gao, Yanfei; Liaw, Peter K.

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of load sharing among constituent phases aids in designing mechanical properties of multiphase materials. Here we investigate load partitioning between the body-centered-cubic iron matrix and NiAl-type precipitates in a ferritic alloy during uniaxial tensile tests at 364 and 506 °C on multiple length scales by in situ neutron diffraction and crystal plasticity finite element modeling. Our findings show that the macroscopic load-transfer efficiency is not as high as that predicted by the Eshelby model; moreover, it depends on the matrix strain-hardening behavior. We explain the grain-level anisotropic load-partitioning behavior by considering the plastic anisotropy of the matrix and elastic anisotropy of precipitates. We further demonstrate that the partitioned load on NiAl-type precipitates relaxes at 506 °C, most likely through thermally-activated dislocation rearrangement on the microscopic scale. The study contributes to further understanding of load-partitioning characteristics in multiphase materials. PMID:26979660

  20. A dual ion irradiation study of helium-dpa interactions on cavity evolution in tempered martensitic steels and nanostructured ferritic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takuya; Wu, Yuan; Robert Odette, G.; Yabuuchi, Kiyohiro; Kondo, Sosuke; Kimura, Akihiko

    2014-06-01

    Cavity evolutions in a normalized and tempered martensitic steel (TMS) and two nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFA) under Fe3+ and He+ dual ion beam irradiations (DII) at 500 °C and 650 °C were characterized. The irradiation conditions encompass a wide range of displacement per atom damage (dpa), He and He/dpa. The 500 °C DII produced damage and He levels of ≈10-47 dpa and ≈400-2000 appm, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that DII of a 8Cr TMS, at 500 °C to up to 60 dpa and 2100 appm He, produced a moderate density of non-uniformly distributed cavities with bimodal sizes ranging from ≈1 nm He bubbles to ≈20 nm faceted voids, and swelling ≈0.44%. In contrast, the same irradiation conditions produced only small ≈1.3 nm diameter bubbles and swelling of ≈0.05% in the NFA MA957. Similar bubble distributions were observed in MA957 and a developmental NFA DII at 650 °C up to ≈80 dpa and ≈3900 appm He. These results demonstrate the outstanding He management capability of the oxide nano-features in the NFA. The various data trends are shown as a function of dpa, He, He/dpa and He*dpa.

  1. Effect of aluminizing of Cr-containing ferritic alloys on the seal strength of a novel high-temperature solid oxide fuel cell sealing glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Yeong-Shyung; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

    A novel high-temperature alkaline earth silicate sealing glass was developed for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. The glass was used to join two metallic coupons of Cr-containing ferritic stainless steel for seal strength evaluation. In previous work, SrCrO 4 was found to form along the glass/steel interface, which led to severe strength degradation. In the present study, aluminization of the steel surface was investigated as a remedy to minimize or prevent the strontium chromate formation. Three different processes for aluminization were evaluated with Crofer22APU stainless steel: pack cementation, vapor-phase deposition, and aerosol spraying. It was found that pack cementation resulted in a rough surface with occasional cracks in the Al-diffused region. Vapor-phase deposition yielded a smoother surface, but the resulting high Al content increased the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), resulting in the failure of joined coupons. Aerosol spraying of an Al-containing salt resulted in the formation of a thin aluminum oxide layer without any surface damage. The room temperature seal strength was evaluated in the as-fired state and in environmentally aged conditions. In contrast to earlier results with uncoated Crofer22APU, the aluminized samples showed no strength degradation even for samples aged in air. Interfacial and chemical compatibility was also investigated. The results showed aluminization to be a viable candidate approach to minimize undesirable chromate formation between alkaline earth silicate sealing glass and Cr-containing interconnect alloys for SOFC applications.

  2. ENABLING THE PRACTICAL APPLICATION OF OXIDE DISPERSION-STRENGTHENED FERRITIC STEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Ian G; Pint, Bruce A; Dyadko, Dr. Eugene G.; Bornstein, Norman S.; Tatlock, Gordon J

    2007-01-01

    Effort has continued to evaluate joints made in oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) FeCrAl by (i) pulsed plasma-assisted diffusion (PPAD) bonding, and (ii) transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding. Creep tests of PPAD-bonded butt joints in air at 1000 C, using small, shoulder-loaded, dog bone-shaped specimens and an incrementally-loaded test technique, indicated that failure occurred at loads of up to 82% of that required to fail the parent alloy in the same test. For high creep-strength ferritic steels joined by conventional welding methods, strength reduction factors of 50-80% are considered to be acceptable. The failures apparently did not initiate along the joints; the observed mode of failure of the joined specimens was the same as observed for monolithic specimens of this alloy, by crack-initiated transgranular brittle fracture, followed by ductile overload failure. The progress of TLP bonding has been slower, with the major effort focused on understanding the behavior of the transient liquid phase and its interaction with the alloy microstructure during the various stages of bonding. Creep testing using the same procedures also has been used to evaluate changes resulting from torsional deformation of ODS-FeCrAl tubes in an attempt to modify their microstructures and increase their hoop strength. Interpretation of the results so far has not shown a clear trend, largely due to difficulties in measuring the effective angle of twist in the specimen gauge lengths. Other issues that have been addressed are the refinement of an approach for prediction of the oxidation-limited service lifetime of alumina scale-forming ODS alloys, and alternative routes for ODS alloy powder processing. Analysis of alloy specimens oxidized to failure (in some cases involving exposures for many thousands of hours) over a range of temperatures has provided an improved basis for calculating the values of parameters required in the lifing model (minimum Al content for protective behavior

  3. Standard specification for seamless ferritic and austenitic alloy-steel boiler, superheater, and heat-exchanger tubes. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee A-1 on Steel, Stainless Steel and Related Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee A01.10 on Tubing. Current edition approved Oct. 10 and Nov. 10, 1995. 1995 and was published April 1996. Originally published as A 213-39T. Last previous edition was A 213/A 213M-94b.

  4. Impedance spectroscopy of the oxide films formed during high temperature oxidation of a cobalt-plated ferritic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velraj, S.; Zhu, J. H.; Painter, A. S.; Du, S. W.; Li, Y. T.

    2014-02-01

    Impedance spectroscopy was used to evaluate the oxide films formed on cobalt-coated Crofer 22 APU ferritic stainless steel after thermal oxidation at 800 °C in air for different times (i.e. 2, 50, 100 and 500 h). Impedance spectra of the oxide films exhibited two or three semicircles depending on the oxidation time, which correspond to the presence of two or three individual oxide layers. Coupled with scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), the individual oxide layer corresponding to each semicircle was determined unambiguously. Impedance spectrum analysis of the oxide films formed on the sample after thermal exposure at 800 °C in air for 2 h led to the identification of the low-frequency and high-frequency semicircles as being from Cr2O3 and Co3O4, respectively. SEM/EDS and XRD analysis of the 500-h sample clearly revealed the presence of three oxide layers, analyzed to be Co3-xCrxO4, CoCr2O4, and Cr2O3. Although the SEM images of the 50-h and 100-h samples did not clearly show the CoCr2O4 layer, impedance plots implied their presence. The oxide scales were assigned to their respective semicircles and the electrical properties of Co3-xCrxO4, CoCr2O4 and Cr2O3 were determined from the impedance data.

  5. Study of the Structure, Composition, and Stability of Yttrium-Ti-Oxygen nm-Scale Features in Nano-Structured Ferritic Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Nicholas John

    This work advances the understanding of the Y-Ti-O nanofeatures (NFs) in nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs); a class of high temperature, oxide dispersion strengthened iron alloys with applications in both advanced fission and fusion reactors. NFAs exhibit high creep strength up to 800ºC and a remarkable radiation damage tolerance and He management. However, the NFs, which are responsible for these properties, are not fully understood. This work addresses key questions including: a) what is the NF structure and composition and how are they affected by alloy composition and processing; b) what is the NFA long-term thermal stability; c) and what alternative processing paths are available to reduce costs and produce more uniform NF distributions? A detailed study using small angle neutron scattering (SANS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM-group member Y. Wu), and atom probe tomography (APT) evaluated the NF average size (), number density (N), volume fraction (f), composition, and structure in two heats of the commercial NFA MA957. The and N were ≈2.6 nm and ≈5x1023 m-3 , respectively, for both heats, with TEM indicating the NF are Y 2Ti2O7. However, SANS indicates a mixture of NF compositions or atomic densities with a difference between the heats, while APT shows compositions with ≈ 10% Cr and a Y/Ti ratio < 1. However, microscope artifacts such as preferential undercounting of Y and O or trajectory aberrations that prevent resolving Ti segregation to the NF-matrix interface could account for the discrepancy. The microstructure and NFs in MA957 were stable for long times at temperatures up to 900ºC. Notably, Ti in the matrix and some from the NFs migrates to large, Ti-rich phases. Aging at higher temperatures up to 1000ºC for 19.5 kh produced modest coarsening for ≈ 3.8 nm and ≈30% increase in grain size for a corresponding 13% reduction in microhardness. A coarsening model shows no significant NF coarsening will occur at temperatures less than

  6. Effects of Grit Blasting and Annealing on the High-Temperature Oxidation Behavior of Austenitic and Ferritic Fe-Cr Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proy, M.; Utrilla, M. V.; Otero, E.; Bouchaud, B.; Pedraza, F.

    2014-08-01

    Grit blasting (corundum) of an austenitic AISI 304 stainless steel (18Cr-8Ni) and of a low-alloy SA213 T22 ferritic steel (2.25Cr-1Mo) followed by annealing in argon resulted in enhanced outward diffusion of Cr, Mn, and Fe. Whereas 3 bar of blasting pressure allowed to grow more Cr2O3 and Mn x Cr3- x O4 spinel-rich scales, higher pressures gave rise to Fe2O3-enriched layers and were therefore disregarded. The effect of annealing pre-oxidation treatment on the isothermal oxidation resistance was subsequently evaluated for 48 h for both steels and the results were compared with their polished counterparts. The change of oxidation kinetics of the pre-oxidized 18Cr-8Ni samples at 850 °C was ascribed to the growth of a duplex Cr2O3/Mn x Cr3- x O4 scale that remained adherent to the substrate. Such a positive effect was less marked when considering the oxidation kinetics of the 2.25Cr-1Mo steel but a more compact and thinner Fe x Cr3- x O4 subscale grew at 650 °C compared to that of the polished samples. It appeared that the beneficial effect is very sensitive to the experimental blasting conditions. The input of Raman micro-spectroscopy was shown to be of ground importance in the precise identification of multiple oxide phases grown under the different conditions investigated in this study.

  7. Microstructural and mechanical property characterization of ingot metallurgy ODS iron aluminide

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Howell, C.R.; Hall, F.; Valykeo, J.

    1997-12-01

    This paper deals with a novel, lower cost method of producing a oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) iron-aluminide alloy. A large 250-kg batch of ODS iron-aluminide alloy designated as FAS was produced by Hoskins Manufacturing Company (Hoskins) [Hamburg, Michigan] using the new process. Plate and bar stock of the ODS alloy were the two major products received. Each of the products was characterized for its microstructure, including grain size and uniformity of oxide dispersion. Tensile tests were completed from room temperature to 1100 C. Only 100-h creep tests were completed at 800 and 1000 C. The results of these tests are compared with the commercial ODS alloy designated as MA-956. An assessment of these data is used to develop future plans for additional work and identifying applications.

  8. Articles comprising ferritic stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Rakowski, James M.

    2016-06-28

    An article of manufacture comprises a ferritic stainless steel that includes a near-surface region depleted of silicon relative to a remainder of the ferritic stainless steel. The article has a reduced tendency to form an electrically resistive silica layer including silicon derived from the steel when the article is subjected to high temperature oxidizing conditions. The ferritic stainless steel is selected from the group comprising AISI Type 430 stainless steel, AISI Type 439 stainless steel, AISI Type 441 stainless steel, AISI Type 444 stainless steel, and E-BRITE.RTM. alloy, also known as UNS 44627 stainless steel. In certain embodiments, the article of manufacture is a fuel cell interconnect for a solid oxide fuel cell.

  9. Development of Simultaneous Corrosion Barrier and Optimized Microstructure in FeCrAl Heat-Resistant Alloy for Energy Applications. Part 1: The Protective Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimentel, G.; Aranda, M. M.; Chao, J.; González-Carrasco, J. L.; Capdevila, C.

    2015-09-01

    Coarse-grained Fe-based oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels are a class of advanced materials for combined cycle gas turbine systems to deal with operating temperatures and pressures of around 1100°C and 15-30 bar in aggressive environments, which would increase biomass energy conversion efficiencies up to 45% and above. This two-part paper reports the possibility of the development of simultaneous corrosion barrier and optimized microstructure in a FeCrAl heat-resistant alloy for energy applications. The first part reports the mechanism of generating a dense, self-healing α-alumina layer by thermal oxidation, during a heat treatment that leads to a coarse-grained microstructure with a potential value for high-temperature creep resistance in a FeCrAl ODS ferritic alloy, which will be described in more detail in the second part.

  10. On the synthesis of copper-nickel binary alloy nanoparticles and binding silane coupling agents to magnetic ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchett, Jeremy Scott

    This dissertation addresses the creation of a multifunctional nanoplatform for cancer targeting, imaging, and therapy. Magnetic oxide nanoparticles were labeled with silane coupling agents that could be used for targeting. The magnetic oxides have application as contrast enhancing agents for magnetic resonance imaging. Copper-nickel binary alloy nanoparticles were prepared for possible use in Curie temperature limited hyperthermia therapy. Spherical, single crystal iron oxide nanoparticles with average diameters of 4 nm, 6 nm, 8 nm, 11 nm, or 16 nm were prepared using published procedures. The iron oxide particle chemistry was extended to synthesize 13 nm diameter CoFe2O4, 9 nm diameter MnFe2O4, and 12 nm diameter NiFe2O4. The particles had a coating of oleic acid and oleylamine ligands. Silane coupling chemistry was used to displace these ligands with either beta-aminoethyl-gamma-aminopropyl-trimethoxysilane, triethoxysilane-PEG, or triethoxysilane-biotin. The silane ligands would allow the particles to be conjugated with a targeting group. New chemistry was developed to synthesize fcc CuNi nanoparticles with the objective of finding methods that give particles with an average size less than 50 nm, a narrow distribution of particle sizes, and control of particle composition. The particle synthesis involves the reduction of a mixture of copper(II) and nickel(II) and the reduction conditions included diol reduction, polyol synthesis, seeding by diol reduction, and oleate reduction. One of the main issues is the formation of hcp nickel particles as a containment in the method. The factors that avoided the formation of hcp nickel particles and allow only fcc particles to form were the choice of reducing agent, ratio of surfactants, and heating time. Both the oleate reduction and diol reduction gave a mixture of the hcp and fcc phases. By controlling certain reaction conditions, such as keeping the ratio of oleic acid to oleylamine 1:1 and slowly heating to reflux for

  11. Irradiation creep and microstructural changes of ODS steels of different Cr-contents during helium implantation under stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Jung, P.; Henry, J.; de Carlan, Y.; Sauvage, T.; Duval, F.; Barthe, M. F.; Hoffelner, W.

    2013-06-01

    Irradiation creep and microstructural changes of two ferritic ODS steels with 12% and 14% Cr have been studied by homogeneously implantation with helium under uniaxial tensile stresses from 40 to 300 MPa. The maximum dose was about 1.2 dpa (5000 appm-He) with displacement damage rates of 1 × 10-5 dpa/s at a temperature of 300 °C. Irradiation creep compliances were measured to be 4.0 × 10-6 dpa-1 MPa-1 and 10 × 10-6 dpa-1 MPa-1 for 12 and 14Cr ODS, respectively. Subsequently, microstructural evolution was studied in detail by TEM observations, showing dislocation loops and bubbles distributed homogenously in the matrix. Some bubbles were attached to ODS particles. Finally, the effects of Cr content on irradiation creep and microstructural changes are discussed, including earlier results of a 19Cr ODS and a PM2000 ferritic steel. Irradiation creep rates of both 12Cr and 14Cr-ODS ferritic steels a temperature of 300 °C show linear stress dependence up to 300 MPa at. Irradiation creep rate per dose rate and stress at a temperature of 300 °C amounts to 4.0 × 10-6 dpa-1 MPa-1 and 10 × 10-6 dpa-1 MPa-1 for 12Cr- and 14Cr-ODS, respectively. Irradiation creep properties are remarkably insensitive to Cr content, grain size and dispersoid size. Dislocation loops and helium bubbles are distributed homogenously in the matrix. In the case of high density fine dispersoids, most bubbles are attached to ODS particles. This may suppress loop formation as well as growth of bubbles, thereby increasing the resistance of ODS ferritic steels against helium embrittlement.

  12. Fabrication technology for ODS Alloy MA957

    SciTech Connect

    ML Hamilton; DS Gelles; RJ Lobsinger; MM Paxton; WF Brown

    2000-03-16

    A successful fabrication schedule has been developed at Carpenter Technology Corporation for the production of MA957 fuel and blanket cladding. Difficulties with gun drilling, plug drawing and recrystallization were overcome to produce a pilot lot of tubing. This report documents the fabrication efforts of two qualified vendors and the support studies performed at WHC to develop the fabrication-schedule.

  13. Alloy Design and Development of Cast Cr-W-V Ferritic Steels for Improved High-Temperature Strength for Power Generation Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R L; Maziasz, P J; Vitek, J M; Evans, N D; Hashimoto, N

    2006-09-23

    Economic and environmental concerns demand that the power-generation industry seek increased efficiency for gas turbines. Higher efficiency requires higher operating temperatures, with the objective temperature for the hottest sections of new systems {approx} 593 C, and increasing to {approx} 650 C. Because of their good thermal properties, Cr-Mo-V cast ferritic steels are currently used for components such as rotors, casings, pipes, etc., but new steels are required for the new operating conditions. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed new wrought Cr-W-V steels with 3-9% Cr, 2-3% W, 0.25% V (compositions are in wt.%), and minor amounts of additional elements. These steels have the strength and toughness required for turbine applications. Since cast alloys are expected to behave differently from wrought material, work was pursued to develop new cast steels based on the ORNL wrought compositions. Nine casting test blocks with 3, 9, and 11% Cr were obtained. Eight were Cr-W-V-Ta-type steels based on the ORNL wrought steels; the ninth was COST CB2, a 9Cr-Mo-Co-V-Nb cast steel, which was the most promising cast steel developed in a European alloy-development program. The COST CB2 was used as a control to which the new compositions were compared, and this also provided a comparison between Cr-W-V-Ta and Cr-Mo-V-Nb compositions. Heat treatment studies were carried out on the nine castings to determine normalizing-and-tempering treatments. Microstructures were characterized by both optical and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Tensile, impact, and creep tests were conducted. Test results on the first nine cast steel compositions indicated that properties of the 9Cr-Mo-Co-V-Nb composition of COST CB2 were better than those of the 3Cr-, 9Cr-, and 11Cr-W-V-Ta steels. Analysis of the results of this first iteration using computational thermodynamics raised the question of the effectiveness in cast steels of the Cr-W-V-Ta combination versus the Cr

  14. Dependence of the nitriding rate of ferritic and austenitic substrates on the crystallographic orientation of surface grains; gaseous nitriding of Fe-Cr and Ni-Ti alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhlaghi, M.; Jung, M.; Meka, S. R.; Fonović, M.; Leineweber, A.; Mittemeijer, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    Gaseous nitriding of ferritic Fe-Cr and austenitic Ni-Ti solid solutions reveals that the extent of the uptake of dissolved nitrogen depends on the crystallographic orientation of the surface grains of the substrate. In both ferritic and austenitic substrates, the surface nitrogen concentration and the nitriding depth decrease upon increasing the smallest angle between the surface normal and the normal of a {1 0 0} plane of the surface grain considered. This phenomenon could be ascribed to the residual compressive macrostress developed during nitriding which varies as a function of crystallographic orientation of the (surface) grains due to the elastically anisotropic nature of ferrite and austenite solid solutions investigated in this study.

  15. Delta ferrite-containing austenitic stainless steel resistant to the formation of undesirable phases upon aging

    DOEpatents

    Leitnaker, J.M.

    Austenitic stainless steel alloys containing delta ferrite, such as are used as weld deposits, are protected against the transformation of delta ferrite to sigma phase during aging by the presence of carbon plus nitrogen in a weight percent 0.015 to 0.030 times the volume percent ferrite present in the alloy. The formation of chi phase upon aging is controlled by controlling the Mo content.

  16. Delta ferrite-containing austenitic stainless steel resistant to the formation of undesirable phases upon aging

    DOEpatents

    Leitnaker, James M.

    1981-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steel alloys containing delta ferrite, such as are used as weld deposits, are protected against the transformation of delta ferrite to sigma phase during aging by the presence of carbon plus nitrogen in a weight percent 0.015-0.030 times the volume percent ferrite present in the alloy. The formation of chi phase upon aging is controlled by controlling the Mo content.

  17. Irradiation embrittlement of neutron-irradiated low activation ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayano, H.; Kimura, A.; Narui, M.; Sasaki, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Ohta, S.

    1988-07-01

    Effects of neutron irradiation and additions of small amounts of alloying elements on the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of three different groups of ferritic steels were investigated by means of the Charpy impact test in order to gain an insight into the development of low-activation ferritic steels suitable for the nuclear fusion reactor. The groups of ferritic steels used in this study were (1) basic 0-5% Cr ferritic steels, (2) low-activation ferritic steels which are FeCrW steels with additions of small amounts of V, Mn, Ta, Ti, Zr, etc. and (3) FeCrMo, Nb or V ferritic steels for comparison. In Fe-0-15% Cr and FeCrMo steels, Fe-3-9% Cr steels showed minimum brittleness and provided good resistance against irradiation embrittlement. Investigations on the effects of additions of trace amounts of alloying elements on the fracture toughness of low-activation ferritic steels made clear the optimum amounts of each alloying element to obtain higher toughness and revealed that the 9Cr-2W-Ta-Ti-B ferritic steel showed the highest toughness. This may result from the refinement of crystal grains and improvement of quenching characteristics caused by the complex effect of Ti and B.

  18. Irradiation effects in ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechtenberg, Thomas

    1985-08-01

    Since 1979 the Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance (ADIP) task funded by the US Department of Energy has been studying the 2-12Cr class of ferritic steels to establish the feasibility of using them in fusion reactor first wall/breeding blanket (FW/B) applications. The advantages of ferritic steels include superior swelling resistance, low thermal stresses compared to austenitic stainless steels, attractive mechanical properties up to 600°C. and service histories exceeding 100 000 h. These steels are commonly used in a range of microstructural conditions which include ferritic, martensitic. tempered martensitic, bainitic etc. Throughout this paper where the term "ferritic" is used it should be taken to mean any of these microstructures. The ADIP task is studying several candidate alloy systems including 12Cr-1MoWV (HT-9), modified 9Cr-1MoVNb, and dual-phased steels such as EM-12 and 2 {1}/{4}Cr-Mo. These materials are ferromagnetic (FM), body centered cubic (bcc), and contain chromium additions between 2 and 12 wt% and molybdenum additions usually below 2%. The perceived issues associated with the application of this class of steel to fusion reactors are the increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) with neutron damage, the compatibility of these steels with liquid metals and solid breeding materials, and their weldability. The ferromagnetic character of these steels can also be important in reactor design. It is the purpose of this paper to review the current understanding of these bcc steels and the effects of irradiation. The major points of discussion will be irradiation-induced or -enhanced dimensional changes such as swelling and creep, mechanical properties such as tensile strength and various measurements of toughness, and activation by neutron interactions with structural materials.

  19. Modeling C-Curves for the Growth Rate of Widmanstätten and Bainitic Ferrite in Fe-C Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, Lindsay; Hillert, Mats; Borgenstam, Annika

    2016-01-01

    When Zener formulated his maximum growth rate criterion for predicting the coarseness of various metallographic objects, he simplified the growth rate equations and predicted that the optimum coarseness should be twice the critical value for which all the driving force would be absorbed by interfacial energy. It is now emphasized that a composition dependence of the diffusion coefficient has a considerable influence and can result in a ratio much larger than two. Various approximations have now been removed from the growth rate equation. When applied to acicular ferrite in the Fe-C system, a C-curve for the growth rate is obtained that resembles the unusually wide C-curve obtained experimentally when information on Widmanstätten ferrite and bainite is combined. It is not necessary to explain that shape as a combination of separate curves for Widmanstätten ferrite and bainite. The main reason for the wide C-curve is the direct effect of the composition dependence of the diffusivity of carbon in austenite.

  20. Fabrication of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic clad fuel pins

    SciTech Connect

    Zirker, L.R. ); Bottcher, J.H. ); Shikakura, S. ); Tsai, C.L. . Dept. of Welding Engineering); Hamilton, M.L. )

    1991-01-01

    A resistance butt welding procedure was developed and qualified for joining ferritic fuel pin cladding to end caps. The cladding are INCO MA957 and PNC ODS lots 63DSA and 1DK1, ferritic stainless steels strengthened by oxide dispersion, while the end caps are HT9 a martensitic stainless steel. With adequate parameter control the weld is formed without a residual melt phase and its strength approaches that of the cladding. This welding process required a new design for fuel pin end cap and weld joint. Summaries of the development, characterization, and fabrication processes are given for these fuel pins. 13 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Annealing effects on the microstructure and mechanical properties of hot-rolled 14Cr-ODS steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, R.; Zhang, T.; Ding, H. L.; Jiang, Y.; Wang, X. P.; Fang, Q. F.; Liu, C. S.

    2015-10-01

    The oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels with nominal composition (weight percent) of Fe-14Cr-2W-0.5Ti-0.06Si-0.2V-0.1Mn-0.05Ta-0.03C-0.3Y2O3 were fabricated by sol-gel method, mechanical alloying, and hot isostatic pressing techniques. The evolution of microstructure and mechanical properties of the hot-rolled specimens with heat treatment was investigated. Tensile strength and hardness of hot-rolled ODS steel are significantly enhanced due to the formation of mechanical twins and high density dislocations. Uniformly dispersed oxide particles (10-40 nm) and fine-grained structure (200-400 nm) are responsible for the superior mechanical properties of the hot-rolled specimen annealed between 650 °C and 850 °C. With further increasing annealing temperature, the grain size of the hot-rolled specimens increases while the size of oxide particles decreases, which leads to lower strength and hardness but better ductility. The tensile strength and total elongation of samples in the rolling direction are higher than those in the transverse direction after the same treatments owing to the grain anisotropy induced by the large mechanical deformation.

  2. Microstructure control for high strength 9Cr ferritic-martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lizhen; Hoelzer, David T; Busby, Jeremy T; Sokolov, Mikhail A; Klueh, Ronald L

    2012-01-01

    Ferritic-martensitic (F-M) steels with 9 wt.%Cr are important structural materials for use in advanced nuclear reactors. Alloying composition adjustment, guided by computational thermodynamics, and thermomechanical treatment (TMT) were employed to develop high strength 9Cr F-M steels. Samples of four heats with controlled compositions were subjected to normalization and tempering (N&T) and TMT, respectively. Their mechanical properties were assessed by Vickers hardness and tensile testing. Ta-alloying showed significant strengthening effect. The TMT samples showed strength superior to the N&T samples with similar ductility. All the samples showed greater strength than NF616, which was either comparable to or greater than the literature data of the PM2000 oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steel at temperatures up to 650 C without noticeable reduction in ductility. A variety of microstructural analyses together with computational thermodynamics provided rational interpretations on the strength enhancement. Creep tests are being initiated because the increased yield strength of the TMT samples is not able to deduce their long-term creep behavior.

  3. Unraveling the Effect of Thermomechanical Treatment on the Dissolution of Delta Ferrite in Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezayat, Mohammad; Mirzadeh, Hamed; Namdar, Masih; Parsa, Mohammad Habibi

    2016-02-01

    Considering the detrimental effects of delta ferrite stringers in austenitic stainless steels and the industrial considerations regarding energy consumption, investigating, and optimizing the kinetics of delta ferrite removal is of vital importance. In the current study, a model alloy prone to the formation of austenite/delta ferrite dual phase microstructure was subjected to thermomechanical treatment using the wedge rolling test aiming to dissolve delta ferrite. The effect of introducing lattice defects and occurrence of dynamic recrystallization (DRX) were investigated. It was revealed that pipe diffusion is responsible for delta ferrite removal during thermomechanical process, whereas when the DRX is dominant, the kinetics of delta ferrite dissolution tends toward that of the static homogenization treatment for delta ferrite removal that is based on the lattice diffusion of Cr and Ni in austenite. It was concluded that the optimum condition for dissolution of delta ferrite can be defined by the highest rolling temperature and strain in which DRX is not pronounced.

  4. A comparative study of different concentrations of pure Zn powder effects on synthesis, structure, magnetic and microwave-absorbing properties in mechanically-alloyed Ni-Zn ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajalilou, Abdollah; Mazlan, Saiful Amri; Shameli, Kamyar

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a powder mixture of Zn, Fe2O3 and NiO was used to produce different compositions of Ni1-xZnxFe2O4 (x=0.36, 0.5 and 0.64) nanopowders. High-energy ball milling with a subsequent heat treatment method was carried out. The XRD results indicated that for the content of Zn, x=0.64 a single phase of Ni-Zn ferrite was produced after 30 h milling while for the contents of Zn, x=0.36 and 0.5, the desired ferrite was formed after sintering the 30 h-milled powders at 500 °C. The average crystallite size decreased with increase in the Zn content. A DC electrical resistivity of the Ni-Zn ferrite, however, decreased with increase in the Zn content, its value was much higher than those samples prepared by the conventional ceramic route by using ZnO instead of Zn. This is attributed to smaller grains size which were obtained by using Zn. The FT-IR results suggested two absorption bands for octahedral and tetrahedral sites in the range of 350-700 cm-1. The VSM results revealed that by increasing the Zn content from 0.36 to 0.5, a saturation magnetization reached its maximum value; afterwards, a decrease was observed for Zn with x=0.64. Finally, magnetic permeability and dielectric permittivity were studied by using vector network analyzer to explore microwave-absorbing properties in X-band frequency. The minimum reflection loss value obtained for Ni0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 samples, about -34 dB at 9.7 GHz, making them the best candidates for high frequency applications.

  5. Method for making conductors for ferrite memory arrays. [from pre-formed metal conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckler, C. H.; Baba, P. D.; Bhiwandker, N. C. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The ferrite memory arrays are made from pre-formed metal conductors for the ferrite arrays. The conductors are made by forming a thin sheet of a metallizing paste of metal alloy powder, drying the paste layer, bisque firing the dried sheet at a first temperature, and then punching the conductors from the fired sheet. During the bisque firing, the conductor sheet shrinks to 58 percent of its pre-fired volume and the alloy particles sinter together. The conductors are embedded in ferrite sheet material and finally fired at a second higher temperature during which firing the conductors shrink approximately the same degree as the ferrite material.

  6. TEM Examination of Advanced Alloys Irradiated in ATR

    SciTech Connect

    Jian Gan, PhD

    2007-09-01

    Successful development of materials is critical to the deployment of advanced nuclear power systems. Irradiation studies of candidate materials play a vital role for better understanding materials performance under various irradiation environments of advanced system designs. In many cases, new classes of materials have to be investigated to meet the requirements of these advanced systems. For applications in the temperature range of 500 800ºC which is relevant to the fast neutron spectrum burner reactors for the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) program, oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) and ferritic martensitic steels (e.g., MA957 and others) are candidates for advanced cladding materials. In the low temperature regions of the core (<600ºC), alloy 800H, HCM12A (also called T 122) and HT 9 have been considered.

  7. Enabling Inexpensive Metallic Alloys as SOFC Interconnects: An Investigation into Hybrid Coating Technologies to Deposit Nanocomposite Functional Coatings on Ferritic Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Gannon, Paul; Gorokhovsky, Vladimir I.; Deibert, Max; Smith, Richard J.; Kayani, Asghar N.; White, P T.; Sofie, Stephen W.; Yang, Z Gary; Mccready, David E.; Visco, S.; Jacobson, C.; Kurokawa, H.

    2007-11-01

    Reduced operating temperatures (600-800°C) of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) may enable the use of inexpensive ferritic steels as interconnects. Due to the demanding SOFC interconnect operating environment, protective coatings are required to increase long-term stability. In this study, large area filtered arc deposition (LAFAD) and hybrid filtered arc-assisted electron beam physical vapor deposition (FA-EBPVD) technologies were used to deposit two-segment coatings with Cr-Al-Y-O nanocomposite bottom segments and Mn-Co-O spinel-based top segments. Coatings were deposited on ferritic steels and subsequently annealed in air for various times. Surface oxidation was investigated using SEM/EDS, XRD and RBS analyses. Cr-volatilization was evaluated by transpiration and ICP-MS analysis of the resultant condensate. Time dependent Area Specific Resistance (ASR) was studied using the four-point technique. The oxidation behavior, Cr volatilization rate, and ASR of coated and uncoated samples are reported. Significant long-term (>1,000 hours) surface stability, low ASR, and dramatically reduced Cr-volatility were observed with the coated specimens. Improvement mechanisms, including the coating diffusion barrier properties and electrical conductivity are discussed.

  8. Design of tough ferritic steels for cryogenic use

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1985-10-01

    This paper describes the design of ferritic steels and weldments that combine strength and toughness at cryogenic temperatures. The alloy must have a ductile-brittle transition temperature below the intended service temperature and a high fracture toughness in the ductile mode. Its systematic design uses the microstructure-property relations that govern the transition temperature and fracture toughness to identify a suitable microstructure, and then employs the microstructure-processing relations that govern its thermal response to manipulate the microstructure into the appropriate form. The procedure is illustrated by describing the heat treatments, microstructures and properties of a variety of laboratory and commercial alloys, including conventional ''9Ni'' steel, the low-Ni and Fe-Mn ferritic steels that have been developed as an alternative to 9Ni, the 12Ni steels that are promising for use at 4K, and the welding procedures and ferritic filler metals that are useful for ferritic cryogenic steels.

  9. Precipitation of Nb in Ferrite After Austenite Conditioning. Part II: Strengthening Contribution in High-Strength Low-Alloy (HSLA) Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altuna, M. A.; Iza-Mendia, Amaia; Gutiérrez, I.

    2012-12-01

    Often, Nb contributes to the strength of a microalloyed steel beyond the expected level because of the grain size strengthening resulting from thermomechanical processing. Two different mechanisms are behind this phenomenon, and both of them have to do with the amount of Nb remaining in solution after hot rolling. The first of them is the increase of the hardenability of the steel as a result of Nb, and the second one is the fine precipitation of NbC in ferrite. Three Nb microalloyed steels were thermomechanically processed in the laboratory and coiled at different temperatures to investigate the effect of Nb content on the tensile properties. The extra strength was linearly related to the Nb remaining in solution after the hot working. The maximum contribution from Nb was reached for a coiling temperature of 873 K (600 °C).

  10. Ferrite Formation Dynamics and Microstructure Due to Inclusion Engineering in Low-Alloy Steels by Ti2O3 and TiN Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Wangzhong; Shibata, Hiroyuki; Hedström, Peter; Jönsson, Pär Göran; Nakajima, Keiji

    2016-08-01

    The dynamics of intragranular ferrite (IGF) formation in inclusion engineered steels with either Ti2O3 or TiN addition were investigated using in situ high temperature confocal laser scanning microscopy. Furthermore, the chemical composition of the inclusions and the final microstructure after continuous cooling transformation was investigated using electron probe microanalysis and electron backscatter diffraction, respectively. It was found that there is a significant effect of the chemical composition of the inclusions, the cooling rate, and the prior austenite grain size on the phase fractions and the starting temperatures of IGF and grain boundary ferrite (GBF). The fraction of IGF is larger in the steel with Ti2O3 addition compared to the steel with TiN addition after the same thermal cycle has been imposed. The reason for this difference is the higher potency of the TiO x phase as nucleation sites for IGF formation compared to the TiN phase, which was supported by calculations using classical nucleation theory. The IGF fraction increases with increasing prior austenite grain size, while the fraction of IGF in both steels was the highest for the intermediate cooling rate of 70 °C/min, since competing phase transformations were avoided, the structure of the IGF was though refined with increasing cooling rate. Finally, regarding the starting temperatures of IGF and GBF, they decrease with increasing cooling rate and the starting temperature of GBF decreases with increasing grain size, while the starting temperature of IGF remains constant irrespective of grain size.

  11. Ferrite Formation Dynamics and Microstructure Due to Inclusion Engineering in Low-Alloy Steels by Ti2O3 and TiN Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Wangzhong; Shibata, Hiroyuki; Hedström, Peter; Jönsson, Pär Göran; Nakajima, Keiji

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of intragranular ferrite (IGF) formation in inclusion engineered steels with either Ti2O3 or TiN addition were investigated using in situ high temperature confocal laser scanning microscopy. Furthermore, the chemical composition of the inclusions and the final microstructure after continuous cooling transformation was investigated using electron probe microanalysis and electron backscatter diffraction, respectively. It was found that there is a significant effect of the chemical composition of the inclusions, the cooling rate, and the prior austenite grain size on the phase fractions and the starting temperatures of IGF and grain boundary ferrite (GBF). The fraction of IGF is larger in the steel with Ti2O3 addition compared to the steel with TiN addition after the same thermal cycle has been imposed. The reason for this difference is the higher potency of the TiO x phase as nucleation sites for IGF formation compared to the TiN phase, which was supported by calculations using classical nucleation theory. The IGF fraction increases with increasing prior austenite grain size, while the fraction of IGF in both steels was the highest for the intermediate cooling rate of 70 °C/min, since competing phase transformations were avoided, the structure of the IGF was though refined with increasing cooling rate. Finally, regarding the starting temperatures of IGF and GBF, they decrease with increasing cooling rate and the starting temperature of GBF decreases with increasing grain size, while the starting temperature of IGF remains constant irrespective of grain size.

  12. Effect of recrystallization on ion-irradiation hardening and microstructural changes in 15Cr-ODS steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Yoosung; Kimura, Akihiko

    2015-12-01

    The effects of recrystallization on ion-irradiation hardening and microstructural changes were investigated for a 15Cr-ODS ferritic steel. Dual ion-irradiation experiments were performed at 470 °C using 6.4 MeV Fe3+ ions simultaneously with energy-degraded 1 MeV He+ ions. The displacement of damage at 600 nm depth from the specimen surface was 30 dpa. Nano-indentation test with Berkovich type indentation tip was measured by constant stiffness measurement (CSM) technique. Results from nano-indentation tests indicate irradiation hardening in ODS steels even at 470 °C, while it wasn't observed in reduced activation ferritic steel. Recrystallized ODS steel shows a larger irradiation hardening, which is considered to be due to the reduction of grain boundaries and interfaces of matrix/oxide particles. In 20% cold rolled ODS steel after recrystallization, both the hardening and bubble number density were lower than those of recrystallized ODS steel, suggesting that dislocations generated by cold rolling suppress bubble formation. Based on the estimation of irradiation hardening from TEM observation results, it is considered that the bubbles are not the main factor controlling ion-irradiation hardening.

  13. R&D of low activation ferritic steels for fusion in japanese universities*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohyama, Akira; Kohno, Yutaka; Asakura, Kentaro; Kayano, Hideo

    1994-09-01

    Following the brief review of the R&D of low activation ferritic steels in Japanese universities, the status of 9Cr-2W type ferritic steels development is presented. The main emphasis is on mechanical property changes by fast neutron irradiation in FFTF. Bend test, tensile test, CVN test and in-reactor creep results are provided including some data about low activation ferritic steels with Cr variation from 2.25 to 12%. The 9Cr-2W ferritic steel, denoted as JLF-1, showed excellent mechanical properties under fast neutron irradiation as high as 60 dpa. As potential materials for DEMO and beyond, innovative oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) quasi-amorphous low activation ferritic steels are introduced. The baseline properties, microstructural evolution under ion irradiation and the recent progress of new processes are provided.

  14. Neutron Absorbing Alloys

    DOEpatents

    Mizia, Ronald E.; Shaber, Eric L.; DuPont, John N.; Robino, Charles V.; Williams, David B.

    2004-05-04

    The present invention is drawn to new classes of advanced neutron absorbing structural materials for use in spent nuclear fuel applications requiring structural strength, weldability, and long term corrosion resistance. Particularly, an austenitic stainless steel alloy containing gadolinium and less than 5% of a ferrite content is disclosed. Additionally, a nickel-based alloy containing gadolinium and greater than 50% nickel is also disclosed.

  15. Understanding of copper precipitation under electron or ion irradiations in FeCu0.1 wt% ferritic alloy by combination of experiments and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radiguet, B.; Barbu, A.; Pareige, P.

    2007-02-01

    This work is dedicated to the understanding of the basic processes involved in the formation of copper enriched clusters in low alloyed FeCu binary system (FeCu0.1 wt%) under irradiation at temperature close to 300 °C. Such an alloy was irradiated with electrons or with ions (Fe+ or He+) in order to deconvolute the effect of displacement cascades and the associated generation of point defect clusters (ion irradiations), and the super-saturation of mono-vacancies and self-interstitial atoms (electron irradiation). The microstructure of this alloy was characterised by tomographic atom probe. Experimental results were compared with results obtained with cluster dynamic model giving an estimation of the evolution of point defects (free or agglomerated) under irradiation on the one hand and describing homogeneous enhanced precipitation of copper on the other hand. The comparison between the results obtained on the different irradiation conditions and the model suggests that the point defect clusters (dislocation loops and/or nano-voids) created in displacement cascades play a major role in copper clustering in low copper alloy irradiated at 573 K.

  16. Characterizing and Modeling Ferrite-Core Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbagh, Harold A.; Murphy, R. Kim; Sabbagh, Elias H.; Aldrin, John C.

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, we accurately and carefully characterize a ferrite-core probe that is widely used for aircraft inspections. The characterization starts with the development of a model that can be executed using the proprietary volume-integral code, VIC-3D©, and then the model is fitted to measured multifrequency impedance data taken with the probe in freespace and over samples of a titanium alloy and aluminum. Excellent results are achieved, and will be discussed.

  17. Influence of Alloy Content and Prior Microstructure on Evolution of Secondary Phases in Weldments of 9Cr-Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas Paul, V.; Sudha, C.; Saroja, S.

    2015-08-01

    9Cr-Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic steels with 1 and 1.4 wt pct tungsten are materials of choice for the test blanket module in fusion reactors. The steels possess a tempered martensite microstructure with a decoration of inter- and intra-lath carbides, which undergoes extensive modification on application of heat. The change in substructure and precipitation behavior on welding and subsequent thermal exposure has been studied using both experimental and computational techniques. Changes i.e., formation of various phases, their volume fraction, size, and morphology in different regions of the weldment due to prolonged thermal exposure was influenced not only by the time and temperature of exposure but also the prior microstructure. Laves phase of type Fe2W was formed in the high tungsten steel, on aging the weldment at 823 K (550 °C). It formed in the fine-grained heat-affected zone (HAZ) at much shorter durations than in the base metal. The accelerated kinetics has been understood in terms of enhanced precipitation of carbides at lath/grain boundaries during aging and the concomitant depletion of carbon and chromium and enrichment of tungsten in the vicinity of the carbides. Therefore, the fine-grained HAZ in the weldment was identified as a region susceptible for failure during service.

  18. Corrosion performance of laser-welded austenitic-ferritic connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigl, M.; Schmidt, M.

    2013-02-01

    In order to reduce the material costs of white-goods made of stainless steels, tailored constructions with unequally alloyed stainless steels shall be used. For that purpose nickel-alloyed austenitic stainless steels are supposed to be limited to zones with demanding needs for corrosions resistance, whereas nickel-free ferritic stainless steels provide an attractive cost-performance ratio for the remaining components of a system. Particularly the present article discusses the corrosion performance of austenitic-ferritic connections, welded with high-power disc lasers at accelerated feed rates, as a function of the shielding gas composition and the surface condition.

  19. Comminuting irradiated ferritic steel

    DOEpatents

    Bauer, Roger E.; Straalsund, Jerry L.; Chin, Bryan A.

    1985-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of comminuting irradiated ferritic steel by placing the steel in a solution of a compound selected from the group consisting of sulfamic acid, bisulfate, and mixtures thereof. The ferritic steel is used as cladding on nuclear fuel rods or other irradiated components.

  20. XXIst Century Ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazaleyrat, F.; Zehani, K.; Pasko, A.; Loyau, V.; LoBue, M.

    2012-05-01

    Ferrites have always been a subject of great interest from point of view of magnetic application, since the fist compass to present date. In contrast, the scientific interest for iron based magnetic oxides decreased after Ørsted discovery as they where replaced by coil as magnetizing sources. Neel discovery of ferrimagnetism boosted again interest and leads to strong developments during two decades before being of less interest. Recently, the evolution of power electronics toward higher frequency, the downsizing of ceramics microstucture to nanometer scale, the increasing price of rare-earth elements and the development of magnetocaloric materials put light again on ferrites. A review on three ferrite families is given herein: harder nanostructured Ba2+Fe12O19 magnet processed by spark plasma sintering, magnetocaloric effect associated to the spin transition reorientation of W-ferrite and low temperature spark plasma sintered Ni-Zn-Cu ferrites for high frequency power applications.

  1. The role of molybdenum additions and prior deformation on acicular ferrite formation in microalloyed Nb-Ti low-carbon line-pipe steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Zhenghua Stumpf, Waldo

    2008-06-15

    Microstructures in Nb-Ti-microalloyed line-pipe steels with various molybdenum additions, consisted mostly of acicular ferrite plus polygonal ferrite after hot rolling and rapid cooling. Structure-sensitive surface relief after etching on shadowed extraction replicas, allowed quantification of the acicular and polygonal ferrite contents. Continuous cooling transformation diagrams of two alloys, one Mo-free and the other containing 0.22% Mo, were determined for cooling rates from 0.1 to 40 deg. C s{sup -1} without and with prior deformation of the austenite below the nil-recrystallisation temperature. Molybdenum additions slightly enhanced the acicular ferrite formation in the strain-free austenite whereas prior deformation had a much greater effect, and strongly promoted acicular ferrite formation in both alloys. Thin foil electron microscopy of acicular ferrite in these low-inclusion content alloys showed a preference for parallel acicular ferrite laths with less 'chaotically' nucleated laths.

  2. Effect of Process Parameters on Microstructure and Hardness of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened 18Cr Ferritic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagini, M.; Vijay, R.; Rajulapati, Koteswararao V.; Rao, K. Bhanu Sankara; Ramakrishna, M.; Reddy, A. V.; Sundararajan, G.

    2016-08-01

    Pre-alloyed ferritic 18Cr steel (Fe-18Cr-2.3W-0.3Ti) powder was milled with and without nano-yttria in high-energy ball mill for varying times until steady-state is reached. The milled powders were consolidated by upset forging followed by hot extrusion. Microstructural changes were examined at all stages of processing (milling, upset forging, and extrusion). In milled powders, crystallite size decreases and hardness increases with increasing milling time reaching a steady-state beyond 5 hours. The size of Y2O3 particles in powders decreases with milling time and under steady-state milling conditions; the particles either dissolve in matrix or form atomic clusters. Upset forged sample consists of unrecrystallized grain structure with few pockets of fine recrystallized grains and dispersoids of 2 to 4 nm. In extruded and annealed rods, the particles are of cuboidal Y2Ti2O7 at all sizes and their size decreased from 15 nm to 5 nm along with significant increase in number density. The oxide particles in ODS6 are of cuboidal Y2Ti2O7 with diamond cubic crystal structure ( Fd bar{3} m) having a lattice parameter of 10.1 Å and are semicoherent with the matrix. The hardness values of extruded and annealed samples predicted by linear summation model compare well with measured values.

  3. Microstructure and Charpy impact properties of 12 14Cr oxide dispersion-strengthened ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksiuta, Z.; Baluc, N.

    2008-02-01

    This paper describes the microstructure and Charpy impact properties of 12-14 Cr ODS ferritic steels fabricated by mechanical alloying of pure Fe, Cr, W, Ti and Y 2O 3 powders in a Retsch ball mill in argon atmosphere, followed by hot isostatic pressing at 1100 °C under 200 MPa for 4 h and heat treatment at 850 °C for 1 h. Weak Charpy impact properties were obtained in the case of both types of as-hipped materials. In the case of 14Cr materials, the weak Charpy properties appeared related to a bimodal grain size distribution and a heterogeneous dislocation density between the coarse and fine grains. No changes in microstructure were evidenced after heat treatment at 850 °C. Significant improvement in the transition temperature and upper shelf energy of 12Cr materials was obtained by heat treatment at 850 °C for 1 h, which was attributed to the formation of smaller grains, homogenous in size and containing fewer dislocations, with respect to the as-hipped microstructure. This modified microstructure results in a good compromise between strength and Charpy impact properties.

  4. Effect of Process Parameters on Microstructure and Hardness of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened 18Cr Ferritic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagini, M.; Vijay, R.; Rajulapati, Koteswararao V.; Rao, K. Bhanu Sankara; Ramakrishna, M.; Reddy, A. V.; Sundararajan, G.

    2016-06-01

    Pre-alloyed ferritic 18Cr steel (Fe-18Cr-2.3W-0.3Ti) powder was milled with and without nano-yttria in high-energy ball mill for varying times until steady-state is reached. The milled powders were consolidated by upset forging followed by hot extrusion. Microstructural changes were examined at all stages of processing (milling, upset forging, and extrusion). In milled powders, crystallite size decreases and hardness increases with increasing milling time reaching a steady-state beyond 5 hours. The size of Y2O3 particles in powders decreases with milling time and under steady-state milling conditions; the particles either dissolve in matrix or form atomic clusters. Upset forged sample consists of unrecrystallized grain structure with few pockets of fine recrystallized grains and dispersoids of 2 to 4 nm. In extruded and annealed rods, the particles are of cuboidal Y2Ti2O7 at all sizes and their size decreased from 15 nm to 5 nm along with significant increase in number density. The oxide particles in ODS6 are of cuboidal Y2Ti2O7 with diamond cubic crystal structure (Fd bar{3} m) having a lattice parameter of 10.1 Å and are semicoherent with the matrix. The hardness values of extruded and annealed samples predicted by linear summation model compare well with measured values.

  5. A Results-Oriented Approach to OD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moravec, Milan

    1978-01-01

    Describes Bechtel Corporation's Organization Development (OD) system, which focuses on action/task identification, planning, operating decisions, and productivity. Presents eight-step process through which OD specialists help managers assess work-related problems (largely through interviews), action planning, implementation, and followup. Process…

  6. Optimization of High Temperature Hoop Creep Response in ODS-Fe3Al Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Kad, B.K.; Heatherington, J.H.; McKamey, C.; Wright, I.; Sikka, V.; Judkins, R.

    2003-04-22

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe3Al alloys are currently being developed for heat-exchanger tubes for eventual use at operating temperatures of up to 1100 C in the power generation industry. The development challenges include (a) efforts to produce thin walled ODS-Fe3Al tubes, employing powder extrusion methodologies, with (b) adequate increased strength for service at operating temperatures to (c) mitigate creep failures by enhancing the as-processed grain size. A detailed and comprehensive research and development methodology is prescribed to produce ODS-Fe3Al thin walled tubes. Current single step extrusion consolidation methodologies typically yield 8ft. lengths of 1-3/8 inch diameter, 1/8 inch wall thickness ODS-Fe3Al tubes. The process parameters for such consolidation methodologies have been prescribed and evaluated as being routinely reproducible. Recrystallization treatments at 1200 C produce elongated grains (with their long axis parallel to the extrusion axis), typically 200-2000 {micro}m in diameter, and several millimeters long. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloys requires an understanding and manipulating the factors that control grain alignment and recrystallization behavior. Current efforts are focused on examining the processing dependent longitudinal vs. transverse creep anisotropy, and exploring post-extrusion methods to improve hoop creep response in ODS-Fe3Al alloy tubes. In this report we examine the mechanisms of hoop creep failure and describe our efforts to improve creep performance via variations in thermal-mechanical treatments.

  7. Development of ODS FeCrAl for compatibility in fusion and fission energy applications

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pint, Bruce A.; Dryepondt, Sebastien N.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Hoelzer, David T.

    2014-11-15

    In this paper, oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) FeCrAl alloys with 12–15% Cr are being evaluated for improved compatibility with Pb-Li for a fusion energy application and with high temperature steam for a more accident-tolerant light water reactor fuel cladding application. A 12% Cr content alloy showed low mass losses in static Pb-Li at 700°C, where a LiAlO2 surface oxide formed and inhibited dissolution into the liquid metal. All the evaluated compositions formed a protective scale in steam at 1200°C, which is not possible with ODS FeCr alloys. However, most of the compositions were not protective at 1400°C, which is amore » general and somewhat surprising problem with ODS FeCrAl alloys that is still being studied. More work is needed to optimize the alloy composition, microstructure and oxide dispersion, but initial promising tensile and creep results have been obtained with mixed oxide additions, i.e. Y2O3 with ZrO2, HfO2 or TiO2.« less

  8. Development of ODS FeCrAl for compatibility in fusion and fission energy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, Bruce A.; Dryepondt, Sebastien N.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Hoelzer, David T.

    2014-11-15

    In this paper, oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) FeCrAl alloys with 12–15% Cr are being evaluated for improved compatibility with Pb-Li for a fusion energy application and with high temperature steam for a more accident-tolerant light water reactor fuel cladding application. A 12% Cr content alloy showed low mass losses in static Pb-Li at 700°C, where a LiAlO2 surface oxide formed and inhibited dissolution into the liquid metal. All the evaluated compositions formed a protective scale in steam at 1200°C, which is not possible with ODS FeCr alloys. However, most of the compositions were not protective at 1400°C, which is a general and somewhat surprising problem with ODS FeCrAl alloys that is still being studied. More work is needed to optimize the alloy composition, microstructure and oxide dispersion, but initial promising tensile and creep results have been obtained with mixed oxide additions, i.e. Y2O3 with ZrO2, HfO2 or TiO2.

  9. Development of ODS FeCrAl for Compatibility in Fusion and Fission Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pint, B. A.; Dryepondt, S.; Unocic, K. A.; Hoelzer, D. T.

    2014-12-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) FeCrAl alloys with 12-15% Cr are being evaluated for improved compatibility with Pb-Li for a fusion energy application and with high temperature steam for a more accident-tolerant light water reactor fuel cladding application. A 12% Cr content alloy showed low mass losses in static Pb-Li at 700°C, where a LiAlO2 surface oxide formed and inhibited dissolution into the liquid metal. All the evaluated compositions formed a protective scale in steam at 1200°C, which is not possible with ODS FeCr alloys. However, most of the compositions were not protective at 1400°C, which is a general and somewhat surprising problem with ODS FeCrAl alloys that is still being studied. More work is needed to optimize the alloy composition, microstructure and oxide dispersion, but initial promising tensile and creep results have been obtained with mixed oxide additions, i.e. Y2O3 with ZrO2, HfO2 or TiO2.

  10. Development oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, D.K.; Froes, F.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1997-04-01

    Uniaxial tension creep response is reported for an oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel, Fe-13.5Cr-2W-0.5Ti-0.25 Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (in weight percent) manufactured using the mechanical alloying process. Acceptable creep response is obtained at 900{degrees}C.

  11. The Effect of Interfacial Element Partitioning on Ferrite and Bainite Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hao; van der Zwaag, Sybrand

    2016-05-01

    The formation of bainitic ferrite and that of grain boundary ferrite in low alloy steels have been two of the most important and interesting research topics in the field of solid state ferrous phase transformation for several decades, and various aspects of these two transformations have been discussed extensively in the literature. Recently, a so-called Gibbs energy balance (GEB) model was proposed by the authors to evaluate alloying element effects on the growth of bainitic ferrite and grain boundary ferrite. The model predicts a growth mode transition from paraequilibrium, negligible partitioning to partitioning during the isothermal formation of bainitic ferrite and grain boundary ferrite. Transformation stasis and bay phenomenon are well explained by the GEB model and both of them are found to be due to alloying element diffusion at the interface. This overview gives a summary of the authors' recent progress in the understanding of the growth of bainitic ferrite and grain boundary ferrite, with particular focus on the growth mode transition, the transformation stasis phenomenon and the bay phenomenon.

  12. Alloy development for irradiation performance. Quarterly progress report for period ending December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    Progress is reported in eight sections: analysis and evaluation studies, test matrices and test methods development, Path A Alloy Development (austenitic stainless steels), Path C Alloy Development (Ti and V alloys), Path D Alloy Development (Fe alloys), Path E Alloy Development (ferritic steels), irradiation experiments and materials inventory, and materials compatibility and hydrogen permeation studies. (DLC)

  13. In situ observation of thermal expansion of tetragonal C11b phase in Zr2Cu(1-x)Odx alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Min; Ye, Y. Y.; Morris, James R; Sordelet, D. J.; Kramer, M. J.

    2010-01-01

    The C11b phase crystalline structure (structure type MoSi{sub 2}, space group I4/mmm) in the Zr{sub 2}Cu{sub (1-x)}Pd{sub x} (x = 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1) alloys was examined in situ using high temperature X-ray diffraction (HTXRD) and Rietveld refinement of the data obtained at a constant heating rate. While the cell volume increases with increasing Pd as expected by the larger atomic radii, the coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) do not follow a uniform trend. The bonding in the basal plane is more elastically rigid than along the c-axis for all compositions. The CTE is more anisotropic for Zr{sub 2}Pd than for Zr{sub 2}Cu, which is consistent with the first-principles calculations that illustrate the rigidity of c-axis relatively to a-axis to be the less for Zr{sub 2}Pd. The CTE of the a-axis for Zr{sub 2}Pd is in fact negative over the temperature range measured.

  14. Advanced characterizations of austenitic oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels for high-temperature reactor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Yinbin

    Future advanced nuclear systems involve higher operation temperatures, intenser neutron flux, and more aggressive coolants, calling for structural materials with excellent performances in multiple aspects. Embedded with densely and dispersedly distributed oxide nanoparticles that are capable of not only pinning dislocations but also trapping radiation-induced defects, oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels provide excellence in mechanical strength, creep resistance, and radiation tolerance. In order to develop ODS steels with qualifications required by advanced nuclear applications, it is important to understand the fundamental mechanisms of the enhancement of ODS steels in mechanical properties. In this dissertation, a series of austenitic ODS stainless steels were investigated by coordinated state-of-the-art techniques. A series of different precipitate phases, including multiple Y-Ti-O, Y-Al-O, and Y-Ti-Hf-O complex oxides, were observed to form during mechanical alloying. Small precipitates are likely to have coherent or cubic-on-cubic orientation relationships with the matrix, allowing the dislocation to shear through. The Orowan looping mechanism is the dominant particle-dislocation interaction mode as the temperature is low, whereas the shearing mechanism and the Hirsch mechanism are also observed. Interactions between the particles and the dislocations result in the load-partitioning phenomenon. Smaller particles were found to have the stronger loading-partitioning effect. More importantly, the load-partitioning of large size particles are marginal at elevated temperatures, while the small size particles remain sustaining higher load, explaining the excellent high temperature mechanical performance of ODS steels.

  15. Impedance calculation for ferrite inserts

    SciTech Connect

    Breitzmann, S.C.; Lee, S.Y.; Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    Passive ferrite inserts were used to compensate the space charge impedance in high intensity space charge dominated accelerators. They study the narrowband longitudinal impedance of these ferrite inserts. they find that the shunt impedance and the quality factor for ferrite inserts are inversely proportional to the imaginary part of the permeability of ferrite materials. They also provide a recipe for attaining a truly passive space charge impedance compensation and avoiding narrowband microwave instabilities.

  16. Microstructure and texture of Nb + Ti stabilized ferritic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Haitao Bi Hongyun; Li Xin; Xu Zhou

    2008-12-15

    The microstructure, texture and grain boundary character distribution of Nb + Ti stabilized ferritic stainless steel were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The addition of alloying elements such as Ti and Nb to ferritic stainless steel causes the formation of TiN, NbC and Fe{sub 2}Nb. The textures of cold rolled samples were dominated by the {alpha}-fiber, while the textures of annealed samples exhibit a very strong {gamma}-fiber. The changes in texture are closely related to the grain boundary characteristics.

  17. ON QUANTIFICATION OF HELIUM EMBRITTLEMENT IN FERRITIC/MARTENSITIC STEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, David S.

    2000-12-01

    Helium accumulation due to transmutation has long been considered a potential cause for embrittlement in ferritic/martensitic steels. Three Charpy impact databases involving nickel- and boron-doped alloys are quantified with respect to helium accumulation, and it is shown that all predict a very large effect of helium production on embrittlement. If these predictions are valid, use of Ferritic/Martensitic steels for Fusion first wall applications is highly unlikely. It is therefore necessary to reorient efforts regarding development of these steels for fusion applications to concentrate on the issue of helium embrittlement.

  18. Creep and tensile properties of several oxide-dispersion-strengthened nickel-base alloys at 1365 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wittenberger, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    The tensile properties at room temperature and at 1365 K and the tensile creep properties at low strain rates at 1365 K were measured for several oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys. The alloys examined included ODS Ni, ODS Ni-20Cr, and ODS Ni-16Cr-Al. Metallography of creep tested, large grain size ODS alloys indicated that creep of these alloys is an inhomogeneous process. All alloys appear to possess a threshold stress for creep. This threshold stress is believed to be associated with diffusional creep in the large grain size ODS alloys and normal dislocation motion in perfect single crystal (without transverse low angle boundaries) ODS alloys. Threshold stresses for large grain size ODS Ni-20Cr and Ni-16Cr-Al type alloys are dependent on the grain aspect ratio. Because of the deleterious effect of prior creep on room temperature mechanical properties of large grain size ODS alloys, it is speculated that the threshold stress may be the design limiting creep strength property.

  19. Ferrite logic reliability study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baer, J. A.; Clark, C. B.

    1973-01-01

    Development and use of digital circuits called all-magnetic logic are reported. In these circuits the magnetic elements and their windings comprise the active circuit devices in the logic portion of a system. The ferrite logic device belongs to the all-magnetic class of logic circuits. The FLO device is novel in that it makes use of a dual or bimaterial ferrite composition in one physical ceramic body. This bimaterial feature, coupled with its potential for relatively high speed operation, makes it attractive for high reliability applications. (Maximum speed of operation approximately 50 kHz.)

  20. SEDS Tether M/OD Damage Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashida, K. B.; Robinson, J. H.; Hill, S. A.

    1997-01-01

    The Small Expendable Deployer System (SEDS) was designed to deploy an endmass at the end of a 20-km-long tether which acts as an upper stage rocket, and the threats from the meteoroid and orbital debris (M/OD) particle environments on SEDS components are important issues for the safety and success of any SEDS mission. However, the possibility of severing the tether due to M/OD particle impacts is an even more serious concern, since the SEDS tether has a relatively large exposed area to the M/OD environments although its diameter is quite small. The threats from the M/OD environments became a very important issue for the third SEDS mission, since the project office proposed using the shuttle orbiter as a launch platform instead of the second stage of a Delta II expendable rocket, which was used for the first two SEDS missions. A series of hyper-velocity impact tests were performed at the Johnson Space Center and Arnold Engineering Development Center to help determine the critical particle sizes required to sever the tether. The computer hydrodynamic code or hydrocode called CTH, developed by the Sandia National Laboratories, was also used to simulate the damage on the SEDS tether caused by both the orbital debris and test particle impacts. The CTH hydrocode simulation results provided the much needed information to help determine the critical particle sizes required to sever the tether. The M/OD particle sizes required to sever the tether were estimated to be less than 0.1 cm in diameter from these studies, and these size particles are more abundant in low-Earth orbit than larger size particles. Finally, the authors performed the M/OD damage analyses for the three SEDS missions; i.e., SEDS-1, -2, and -3 missions, by using the information obtained from the hypervelocity impact test and hydrocode simulations results.

  1. A Comparison of Creep Rupture Strength of Ferritic/Austenitic Dissimilar Weld Joints of Different Grades of Cr-Mo Ferritic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K. S.; Parameswaran, P.; Goyal, Sunil; Mathew, M. D.

    2012-04-01

    Evaluations of creep rupture properties of dissimilar weld joints of 2.25Cr-1Mo, 9Cr-1Mo, and 9Cr-1MoVNb steels with Alloy 800 at 823 K were carried out. The joints were fabricated by a fusion welding process employing an INCONEL 182 weld electrode. All the joints displayed lower creep rupture strength than their respective ferritic steel base metals, and the strength reduction was greater in the 2.25Cr-1Mo steel joint and less in the 9Cr-1Mo steel joint. Failure location in the joints was found to shift from the ferritic steel base metal to the intercritical region of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of the ferritic steel (type IV cracking) with the decrease in stress. At still lower stresses, the failure in the joints occurred at the ferritic/austenitic weld interface. The stress-life variation of the joints showed two-slope behavior and the slope change coincided with the occurrence of ferritic/austenitic weld interface cracking. Preferential creep cavitation in the soft intercritical HAZ induced type IV failure, whereas creep cavitation at the interfacial particles induced ferritic/austenitic weld interface cracking. Micromechanisms of the type IV failure and the ferritic/austenitic interface cracking in the dissimilar weld joint of the ferritic steels and relative cracking susceptibility of the joints are discussed based on microstructural investigation, mechanical testing, and finite element analysis (FEA) of the stress state across the joint.

  2. Effects of Solute Nb Atoms and Nb Precipitates on Isothermal Transformation Kinetics from Austenite to Ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li; Parker, Sally; Rose, Andrew; West, Geoff; Thomson, Rachel

    2016-05-01

    Nb is a very important micro-alloying element in low-carbon steels, for grain size refinement and precipitation strengthening, and even a low content of Nb can result in a significant effect on phase transformation kinetics from austenite to ferrite. Solute Nb atoms and Nb precipitates may have different effects on transformation behaviors, and these effects have not yet been fully characterized. This paper examines in detail the effects of solute Nb atoms and Nb precipitates on isothermal transformation kinetics from austenite to ferrite. The mechanisms of the effects have been analyzed using various microscopy techniques. Many solute Nb atoms were found to be segregated at the austenite/ferrite interface and apply a solute drag effect. It has been found that solute Nb atoms have a retardation effect on ferrite nucleation rate and ferrite grain growth rate. The particle pinning effect caused by Nb precipitates is much weaker than the solute drag effect.

  3. Effect of chemical composition and ferrite content on room temperature SCC behavior of austenitic weld metals

    SciTech Connect

    Raghunatha Rao, B.; Prasad Rao, K.; Iyer, K.J.L. )

    1993-03-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are widely used in the welded condition especially in chemical, petrochemical, thermal power, and nuclear industries where they are subjected to stresses in corrosive environments. Since austenitic stainless steel weld metals invariably contain some delta ferrite to avoid hot cracking, the effect of ferrite on the stress corrosion cracking behavior is important. Austenitic weld metals with different alloy additions and different ferrite contents were investigated for their resistance to room temperature stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in 5 N H[sub 2]SO[sub 4] + 0.5 N NaCl solution. It was found that the delta ferrite content in the weld metals had a predominant effect on the SCC resistance. Higher ferrite contents increased the tendency for SCC. Post-weld heat treatment of weld metals resulted in the improvement of the SCC resistance.

  4. Effects of Solute Nb Atoms and Nb Precipitates on Isothermal Transformation Kinetics from Austenite to Ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li; Parker, Sally; Rose, Andrew; West, Geoff; Thomson, Rachel

    2016-07-01

    Nb is a very important micro-alloying element in low-carbon steels, for grain size refinement and precipitation strengthening, and even a low content of Nb can result in a significant effect on phase transformation kinetics from austenite to ferrite. Solute Nb atoms and Nb precipitates may have different effects on transformation behaviors, and these effects have not yet been fully characterized. This paper examines in detail the effects of solute Nb atoms and Nb precipitates on isothermal transformation kinetics from austenite to ferrite. The mechanisms of the effects have been analyzed using various microscopy techniques. Many solute Nb atoms were found to be segregated at the austenite/ferrite interface and apply a solute drag effect. It has been found that solute Nb atoms have a retardation effect on ferrite nucleation rate and ferrite grain growth rate. The particle pinning effect caused by Nb precipitates is much weaker than the solute drag effect.

  5. Quantification of oxide particle composition in model oxide dispersion strengthened steel alloys.

    PubMed

    London, A J; Lozano-Perez, S; Moody, M P; Amirthapandian, S; Panigrahi, B K; Sundar, C S; Grovenor, C R M

    2015-12-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels (ODS) are being considered for structural components of future designs of fission and fusion reactors because of their impressive high-temperature mechanical properties and resistance to radiation damage, both of which arise from the nanoscale oxide particles they contain. Because of the critical importance of these nanoscale phases, significant research activity has been dedicated to analysing their precise size, shape and composition (Odette et al., Annu. Rev. Mater. Res. 38 (2008) 471-503 [1]; Miller et al., Mater. Sci. Technol. 29(10) (2013) 1174-1178 [2]). As part of a project to develop new fuel cladding alloys in India, model ODS alloys have been produced with the compositions, Fe-0.3Y2O3, Fe-0.2Ti-0.3Y2O3 and Fe-14Cr-0.2Ti-0.3Y2O3. The oxide particles in these three model alloys have been studied by APT in their as-received state and following ion irradiation (as a proxy for neutron irradiation) at various temperatures. In order to adequately quantify the composition of the oxide clusters, several difficulties must be managed, including issues relating to the chemical identification (ranging and variable peak-overlaps); trajectory aberrations and chemical structure; and particle sizing. This paper presents how these issues can be addressed by the application of bespoke data analysis tools and correlative microscopy. A discussion follows concerning the achievable precision in these measurements, with reference to the fundamental limiting factors. PMID:25754233

  6. Microstructural evolution of delta ferrite in SAVE12 steel under heat treatment and short-term creep

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shengzhi; Eliniyaz, Zumrat; Zhang, Lanting; Sun, Feng; Shen, Yinzhong; Shan, Aidang

    2012-11-15

    This research focused on the formation and microstructural evolution of delta ferrite phase in SAVE12 steel. The formation of delta ferrite was due to the high content of ferrite forming alloy elements such as Cr, W, and Ta. This was interpreted through either JMatPro-4.1 computer program or Cr{sub eq} calculations. Delta ferrite was found in bamboo-like shape and contained large amount of MX phase. It was surrounded by Laves phases before creep or aging treatment. Annealing treatments were performed under temperatures from 1050 Degree-Sign C to 1100 Degree-Sign C and various time periods to study its dissolution kinetics. The result showed that most of the delta ferrite can be dissolved by annealing in single phase austenitic region. Dissolution process of delta ferrite may largely depend on dissolution kinetic factors, rather than on thermodynamic factors. Precipitation behavior during short-term (1100 h) creep was investigated at temperature of 600 Degree-Sign C under a stress of 180 MPa. The results demonstrated that delta ferrite became preferential nucleation sites for Laves phase at the early stage of creep. Laves phase on the boundary around delta ferrite showed relatively slower growth and coarsening rate than that inside delta ferrite. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Delta ferrite is systematically studied under heat treatment and short-term creep. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Delta ferrite contains large number of MX phase and is surrounded by Laves phases before creep or aging treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Formation of delta ferrite is interpreted by theoretical and empirical methods. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Most of the delta ferrite is dissolved by annealing in single phase austenitic region. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Delta ferrite becomes preferential nucleation sites for Laves phase at the early stage of creep.

  7. Development of low activation Ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, T.; Abe, F.; Araki, H.; Okada, M.

    1986-11-01

    Fe-(2-15)%Cr-(0-4)%W-0.1%C and Fe-9%Cr-(0-l)%V-0.1%C steels were prepared on the basis of reduced activation of ferritic steels. Tempering characteristics of these alloys were studied as a preliminary evaluation of mechanical properties. Alloys except for 12-15%Cr, 9%Cr-4%W, and 9%Cr-1%V showed a single phase of martensite. Carbides which precipitated in as-tempered steels are M 23C 6, M 6C, and W 2C for Cr-W steels and M 23C 6 and V 4C 3 for Cr-V steels. The toughness of the alloys was examined with Charpy impact test. The minimum DBTT (ductile-brittle transition temperature) was observed at around 0.25 at% of W or V concentration for 9%Cr steels. 9%Cr-V steels were superior to commercial 9%Cr-2%Mo steel in the point of toughness. The order of alloying element with a low DBTT was V > Mo > W.

  8. 75 FR 9232 - Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) 2010-2014 Strategic Plan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-01

    ... Knowledge and Understanding of Dietary Supplements. The strategic plan is available in pdf format on the ODS Web site: http://ods.od.nih.gov/pubs/strategicplan/StrategicPlan2010-2014.pdf . The ODS strategic...

  9. Contributions from research on irradiated ferritic/martensitic steels to materials science and engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelles, D. S.

    1990-05-01

    Ferritic and martensitic steels are finding increased application for structural components in several reactor systems. Low-alloy steels have long been used for pressure vessels in light water fission reactors. Martensitic stainless steels are finding increasing usage in liquid metal fast breeder reactors and are being considered for fusion reactor applications when such systems become commercially viable. Recent efforts have evaluated the applicability of oxide dispersion-strengthened ferritic steels. Experiments on the effect of irradiation on these steels provide several examples where contributions are being made to materials science and engineering. Examples are given demonstrating improvements in basic understanding, small specimen test procedure development, and alloy development.

  10. A Study on Formation and Thermal Stability of Nano-sized Oxide Clusters in Mechanically Alloyed Nickel Aluminum for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-Deog

    The intermetallic compound, B2 NiAl, is a promising material for high temperature structural applications such as in aviation jet engines or gas turbines, provided that its high temperature mechanical properties can be improved. Although extensive efforts over the last several decades have been devoted toward enhancing ductility through alloying design and reducing impurities, as well as improving high temperature creep strength through precipitation and dispersion strengthening, these efforts have relied on traditional approaches, a combination of large grain size to limit diffusional creep and precipitation/dispersion (50 ˜ 100 nm size) strengthening to limit dislocation creep, for high temperature strengthening. While traditional approaches have shown a good improvement from a relatively high temperature strengthening point of view, the size and number density of dispersoids were not able to provide sufficient strength in the high temperature creep regime. Furthermore, details of the interaction mechanism between dislocations and dispersoids are not yet well understood. This study focuses on designing and developing advanced oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) NiAl intermetallics with improved high temperature creep strength by incorporating a high number density (˜1024 m-3) of very thermally stable Y-Ti-O nano-clusters, akin to those recently observed to improve creep strength and radiation resistance in nano-structured ferritic alloys. Advanced ODS NiAl alloys have been produced by mechanical alloying of pre-alloyed Ni-50at%Al with Y2O3 and Ti elemental powders. The milled powders were subsequently consolidated by spark plasma sintering, with the objective of producing very high number densities of nano-sized Y-Ti-O precipitates, along with fine grain size. Advanced experimental characterization techniques, combined with microhardness strength measurement, were used to investigate the material microstructure and strength following processing and to evaluate

  11. Development of ferritic weldments for grain-refined ferritic steels for 4. 2K service

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H.J.

    1982-11-01

    The weldability of grain-refined ferritic nickel steels designed for structural use in liquid helium was investigated. Plates of interstitial-free Fe-12Ni-0.25Ti alloy and carbon-containing 9 Ni steel were welded with 14 Ni ferritic fillers using a gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process with pure argon gas shielding. The ferritic weldments made have a strength closely matching those of the base plates without a significant loss in base metal toughness at temperatures as low as 4.2 K. The comparable toughness obtained in the welded region is attributed to three factors; the defect-free weldment, the chemical cleanliness of the GTAW weld deposit, and the in-process formation of an appropriate microstructure in the welded region. Special emphasis in this study was placed on changes in microstructures with respect to the characteristic of the weld thermal cycles and the effect of the resultant microstructures on low temperature toughness. In the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of multipass welded 9Ni steel, the retained (or precipitated) austenite is removed by the weld heat cycles but the sequential rapid heat cycles to successively lower peak temperatures associated with succeeding weld passes re-establish high toughness by sequentially refining the grain size and gettering carbon in the form of cementite precipitates. On the other hand, the high toughness in the HAZ of the 12Ni alloy and in the weld deposit is a direct consequence of repeated grain refinement through the overlapped austenitizing cycles and is not affected by the tempering cycles because of the carbon-free nature of these materials. 46 figures.

  12. Development of ferritic weldments for grain-refined ferritic steels for 4. 2K service

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H.J.

    1982-01-01

    The weldability of grain-refined ferritic nickel steels designed for structural use in liquid helium was investigated. Plates of interstitial-free Fe-12Ni-0.25Ti alloy and carbon-containing 9Ni steel were welded with 14Ni ferritic fillers using a gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process with pure argon gas shielding. The ferritic weldments made have a strength closely matching those of the base plates without a significant loss in base metal toughness at temperatures as low as 4.2K. The comparable toughness obtained in the welded region is attributed to three factors; the defect-free weldment, the chemical cleanliness of the GTAW weld deposit, and the in-process formation of an appropriate microstructure in the welded region. Special emphasis in this study was placed on changes in microstructures with respect to the characteristic of the weld thermal cycles and the effect of the resultant microstructures on low temperature toughness. In the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of multipass welded 9Ni steel, the retained (or precipitated) austenite is removed by the weld heat cycles but the sequential rapid heat cycles to successively lower peak temperatures associated with succeeding weld passes re-establish high toughness by sequentially refining the grain size and gettering carbon in the form of cementite precipitates. On the other hand, the high toughness in the HAZ of the 12Ni alloy and in the weld deposit is a direct consequence of repeated grain refinement through the overlapped austenitizing cycles and is not affected by the tempering cycles because of the carbon-free nature of these materials.

  13. Friction consolidation of oxide dispersion strengthened INCOLOY RTM alloy MA956 powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalini, David

    INCOLOYRTM MA956 is a ferritic ODS alloy. It has very good oxidation resistance by virtue of its large chromium and aluminum concentrations and high mechanical strength and creep resistance at elevated temperatures thanks to oxide dispersion strengthening. The conventional processing route utilized to obtain this alloy involves two main multistep stages. The first (or front end) stage of the process consists of a dry, high-energy milling process which mixes very fine Y2O3 particles with elemental alloy powders by Mechanical Alloying (MA) in an attritor. The second (or back end) stage of the process consists of consolidating the mechanically alloyed powder by hot extrusion in vacuum-sealed cans at about 1000°C, or by degassing followed by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). The precipitation of a fine dispersion of yttrium-aluminum-rich oxides (Y-Al-O) during the consolidation is at the origin of the high temperature mechanical strength of this alloy. Three different thermodynamically stable oxides are known to exist for the binary Y2O3:Al 2O3 system: Y4Al2O9, YAlO 3 and Y3Al5O12. All three of them have been observed in this type of alloys when processed by the route described above. Their size ranges from just a few up to hundreds of nm. In this work, the applicability of Friction Consolidation to this ODS alloy was investigated in order to tackle the downsides of the conventional processing route (multisteps and extremely high raw material final cost). For this study, mechanically alloyed INCOLOYRTM MA956 powder was consolidated through Friction Consolidation under three different sets of processing conditions. As a result, three small compacts of low porosity have been achieved with a refined equiaxed ferritic grain structure smaller than 10 microns and the desired oxide dispersion. Two types of mixed Y-Al oxides were observed by different complementary techniques, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD

  14. Residual Ferrite and Relationship Between Composition and Microstructure in High-Nitrogen Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qingchuan; Ren, Yibin; Yao, Chunfa; Yang, Ke; Misra, R. D. K.

    2015-12-01

    A series of high-nitrogen stainless steels (HNS) containing δ-ferrite, which often retained in HNS, were studied to establish the relationship between composition and microstructure. Both ferrite and nitrogen depletions were found in the center regions of cast ingots, and the depletion of nitrogen in that area was found to be the main reason for the existence of δ-ferrite. Because of the existence of heterogeneity, the variation of microstructure with nitrogen content was detected. Hence, the critical contents of nitrogen (CCN) for the fully austenitic HNS were obtained. Then the effects of elements such as N, Cr, Mn, and Mo on austenite stability were investigated via thermodynamic calculations. The CCN of HNS alloys were also obtained by calculations. Comparing the CCN obtained from experiment and calculation, it was found that the forged microstructure of the HNS was close to the thermodynamic equilibrium. To elucidate the above relationship, by regression analysis using calculated thermodynamic data, nitrogen equivalent and a new constitution diagram were proposed. The constitution diagram accurately distinguishes the austenitic single-phase region and the austenite + ferrite dual-phase region. The nitrogen equivalent and the new constitution diagram can be used for alloying design and microstructural prediction in HNS. According to the nitrogen equivalent, the ferrite stabilizing ability of Mo is weaker than Cr, and with Mn content increases, Mn behaves as a weak austenite stabilizer first and then as a ferrite stabilizer.

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF ODS HEAT EXCHANGER TUBING

    SciTech Connect

    Mark A. Harper, Ph.D.

    2002-04-01

    Work continued on three major tasks of this project--increasing the circumferential strength of MA956 tubing, joining of the MA956 alloy, and determination of the high temperature corrosion limits of the MA956 alloy. With respect to increasing the circumferential strength of a MA956 tube, all of the cold working operations (0, 10, 20, 30, 40%) and annealing treatments (1000, 1150, 1300 C) have been completed. The sample microstructures produced by this processing continue to be analyzed with TEM results providing valuable information on the strengthening mechanism of this alloy. Creep testing to determine the ''stress threshold'' curves for this alloy continues. Regarding joining of the MA956 alloy, additional welds were produced with the friction welding and transient liquid phase bonding techniques. And finally, laboratory high temperature corrosion testing of the material continues in both fluid-side and fire-side simulated environments.

  16. A Comparative Study of Welded ODS Cladding materials for AFCI/GNEP Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Indrajit Charit; Megan Frary; Darryl Butt; K.L. Murty; Larry Zirker; James Cole; Mitchell Meyer; Rajiv S. Mishra; Mark Woltz

    2011-03-31

    This research project involved working on the pressure resistance welding of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys which will have a large role to play in advanced nuclear reactors. The project also demonstrated the research collaboration between four universities and one nation laboratory (Idaho National Laboratory) with participation from an industry for developing for ODS alloys. These alloys contain a high number density of very fine oxide particles that can impart high temperature strength and radiation damage resistance suitable for in-core applications in advanced reactors. The conventional fusion welding techniques tend to produce porosity-laden microstructure in the weld region and lead to the agglomeration and non-uniform distribution of the neededoxide particles. That is why two solid state welding methods - pressure resistance welding (PRW) and friction stir welding (FSW) - were chosen to be evaluated in this project. The proposal is expected to support the development of Advanced Burner Reactors (ABR) under the GNEP program (now incorporated in Fuel Cycle R&D program). The outcomes of the concluded research include training of graduate and undergraduate students and get them interested in nuclear related research.

  17. Cast Stainless Steel Ferrite and Grain Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ruud, Clayton O.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Mathews, Royce; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2012-09-01

    In-service inspection requirements dictate that piping welds in the primary pressure boundary of light-water reactors be subject to a volumetric examination based on the rules contained within the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI. The purpose of the inspection is the reliable detection and accurate sizing of service-induced degradation and/or material flaws introduced during fabrication. The volumetric inspection is usually carried out using ultrasonic testing (UT) methods. However, the varied metallurgical macrostructures and microstructures of cast austenitic stainless steel piping and fittings, including statically cast stainless steel and centrifugally cast stainless steel (CCSS), introduce significant variations in the propagation and attenuation of ultrasonic energy. These variations complicate interpretation of the UT responses and may compromise the reliability of UT inspection. A review of the literature indicated that a correlation may exist between the microstructure and the delta ferrite content of the casting alloy. This paper discusses the results of a recent study where the goal was to determine if a correlation existed between measured and/or calculated ferrite content and grain structure in CCSS pipe.

  18. High temperature tensile properties and fracture characteristics of bimodal 12Cr-ODS steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Ankur; Litvinov, Dimitri; Aktaa, Jarir

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the tensile properties and fracture characteristics of a 12Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel with unique elongated bimodal grain size distribution. The tensile tests were carried out at four different temperatures, ranging from room temperature to 700 °C, at a nominal strain rate of 10-3 s-1. At room temperature the material exhibits a high tensile strength of 1294 MPa and high yield strength of 1200 MPa. At 700 °C, the material still exhibits relatively high tensile strength of 300 MPa. The total elongation-to-failure exceeds 18% over the whole temperature range and has a maximum value of 29% at 600 °C. This superior ductility is attributed to the material's bimodal grain size distribution. In comparison to other commercial, as well as experimental, ODS steels, the material shows an excellent compromise between strength and ductility. The fracture surface studies reveal a change in fracture behavior from a mixed mode fracture at room temperature to fully ductile fracture at 600 °C. At 700 °C, the fracture path changes from intragranular to intergranular fracture, which is associated with a reduced ductility.

  19. High-pressure Raman studies on laurionite-type hydroxides Ba(OD)X (X = Cl, Br, I) and Sr(OD) 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, C.; Lutz, H. D.

    1996-07-01

    High-pressure Raman studies on Sr(OD) 2 and laurionite-type barium hydroxide halides Ba(OD)Cl, Ba(OD)Br, and Ba(OD)I were performed under hydrostatic compression up to 5 GPa using a diamond anvil cell. The pressure evolution of the OD stretching vibrations of the isostructural Ba(OD)X and Sr(OD) 2 is discussed with respect to the different behaviours of the respective hydrogen bond systems. The OD stretching modes slightly increase ( {dν OD}/{dp } = 4 cm-1 GPa -1) with increase in pressure if the respective ions are not involved in hydrogen bonds as in the case of Ba(OD)I and OD(2) of Sr(OD) 2 (lattice repulsion effect). The wavenumbers of OD stretching modes of ions involved in hydrogen bonds, as OD(1) of Sr(OD) 2, decrease due to a strengthening of the respective bonds with increasing pressure. A discontinuous decrease of νOD is observed for Ba(OD)Br indicating transition from a weakly hydrogen-bonded structure to a more strongly bonded one via reorientation of the OD - ions. In the case of Sr(OD) 2, it is confirmed that one of two crystallographically different hydroxide ions is involved in hydrogen bonding but the other is not.

  20. Castable hot corrosion resistant alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Charles A. (Inventor); Holt, William H. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    Some 10 wt percent nickel is added to an Fe-base alloy which has a ferrite microstructure to improve the high temperature castability and crack resistance while about 0.2 wt percent zirconium is added for improved high temperatur cyclic oxidation and corrosion resistance. The basic material is a high temperature FeCrAl heater alloy, and the addition provides a material suitable for burner rig nozzles.

  1. Characterization of Irradiated Nanostructured Ferritic Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, James; Hoelzer, David T; Tanigawa, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Odette, George R.

    2007-01-01

    The past decade has seen the development of a new class of mechanically alloyed (MA) ferritic steels with outstanding mechanical properties that come, at least in part, from the presence of high concentrations (>10{sup 23} m{sup -3}) of Ti-, Y-, and O-enriched nanoclusters (NC). From the outset, there has been much interest in their potential use for applications to fission and proposed fusion reactors, not only because of their attractive high-temperature strength, but also because the presence of NC may result in a highly radiation-resistant material by efficiently trapping point defects to enhance recombination. Of special interest for fusion applications is the potential of NC to trap transmutation-produced He in high concentrations of small cavities, rather than in fewer but larger cavities that lead to greater radiation-induced swelling and other degraded properties.

  2. Characterization of Low Temperature Ferrite/Austenite Transformations in the Heat Affected Zone of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel Arc Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T A; Elmer, J W; Babu, S S; Vitek, J M

    2003-08-20

    Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (SRXRD) has been used to identify a previously unobserved low temperature ferrite ({delta})/austenite({gamma}) phase transformation in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel (DSS) welds. In this ''ferrite dip'' transformation, the ferrite transforms to austenite during heating to peak temperatures on the order of 750 C, and re-transforms to ferrite during cooling, resulting in a ferrite volume fraction equivalent to that in the base metal. Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (TRXRD) and laser dilatometry measurements during Gleeble{reg_sign} thermal simulations are performed in order to verify the existence of this low temperature phase transformation. Thermodynamic and kinetic models for phase transformations, including both local-equilibrium and para-equilibrium diffusion controlled growth, show that diffusion of substitutional alloying elements does not provide a reasonable explanation for the experimental observations. On the other hand, the diffusion of interstitial alloying elements may be rapid enough to explain this behavior. Based on both the experimental and modeling results, two mechanisms for the ''ferrite dip'' transformation, including the formation and decomposition of secondary austenite and an athermal martensitic-type transformation of ferrite to austenite, are considered.

  3. Excimer laser ablation of ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, A. C.; Leung, W. P.; Krajnovich, D.

    1991-02-01

    Laser etching of ferrites was previously done by scanning a focused continuous-wave laser beam on a ferrite sample in a chemical environment. We study the phenomenon of photo-ablation of Ni-Zn or Mn-Zn ferrites by pulsed 248-nm KrF excimer laser irradiation. A transfer lens system is used to project a grating pattern of a mask irradiated by the pulsed KrF laser onto the ferrite sample. The threshold fluence for ablation at the ferrite surface is about 0.3 J/cm2. A typical fluence of 1 J/cm2 is used. The etched grooves produced are typically 20-50 μm wide, with depths achieved as deep as 70 μm . Groove straightness is good as long as a sharp image is projected onto the sample surface. The wall angle is steeper than 60 degrees. Scanning electron microscopy of the etched area shows a ``glassy'' skin with extensive microcracks and solidified droplets being ejected that is frozen in action. We found that this skin can be entirely removed by ultrasonic cleaning. A fairly efficient etching rate of about 10 nm/pulse for a patterned area of about 2 mm×2 mm is obtained at a fluence of 1 J/cm2. This study shows that projection excimer laser ablation is useful for micromachining of ferrite ceramics, and indicates that a hydrodynamic sputtering mechanism involving droplet emission is a cause of material removal.

  4. Characterization and comparative analysis of the tensile properties of five tempered martensitic steels and an oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy irradiated at ≈295 °C to ≈6.5 dpa

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Maloy, Stuart A.; Saleh, Tarik A.; Anderoglu, Osman; Romero, Tobias J.; Odette, G. Robert; Yamamoto, Takuya; Li, S.; Cole, James I.; Fielding, Randall

    2015-08-06

    Tensile test results at 25 and 300 °C on five 9-12Cr tempered martensitic steels and one 14Cr oxide dispersion strengthened alloy, that were side-by side irradiated to 6.5 dpa at 295 °C in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), are reported. The engineering stress–strain curves are analyzed to provide true stress–strain constitutive σ(ε) laws for all of these alloys. In the irradiated condition, the σ(ε) fall into categories of: strain softening, nearly perfectly plastic and strain hardening. Increases in yield stress (Δσy) and reductions in uniform strain ductility (eu) are observed, where as the latter can be understood in terms ofmore » the alloy's σ(ε) behavior. Increases in the average σ(ε) in the range of 0–10% strain are smaller than the corresponding Δσy, and vary more from alloy to alloy. The data are analyzed to establish relations between Δσy and coupled changes in the ultimate stresses as well as the effects of both test temperature and the unirradiated yield stress (σyu). The latter shows that higher σyu correlates with lower Δσy. In five out of six cases the effects of irradiation are generally consistent with previous observations on these alloys. However, the particular heat of the 12Cr HT-9 tempered martensitic steel in this study has a much higher eu than observed for earlier heats. The reasons for this improved behavior are not understood and may be microstructural in origin. However, it is noted that the new heat of HT-9, which was procured under modern quality assurance standards, has lower interstitial nitrogen than previous heats. As a result, notably lower interstitial solute contents correlate with improved ductility and homogenous deformation in broadly similar steels.« less

  5. Characterization and comparative analysis of the tensile properties of five tempered martensitic steels and an oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy irradiated at ≈295 °C to ≈6.5 dpa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloy, S. A.; Saleh, T. A.; Anderoglu, O.; Romero, T. J.; Odette, G. R.; Yamamoto, T.; Li, S.; Cole, J. I.; Fielding, R.

    2016-01-01

    Tensile test results at 25 and 300 °C on five 9-12Cr tempered martensitic steels and one 14Cr oxide dispersion strengthened alloy, that were side-by side irradiated to 6.5 dpa at 295 °C in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), are reported. The engineering stress-strain curves are analyzed to provide true stress-strain constitutive σ(ɛ) laws for all of these alloys. In the irradiated condition, the σ(ɛ) fall into categories of: strain softening, nearly perfectly plastic and strain hardening. Increases in yield stress (Δσy) and reductions in uniform strain ductility (eu) are observed, where the latter can be understood in terms of the alloy's σ(ɛ) behavior. Increases in the average σ(ɛ) in the range of 0-10% strain are smaller than the corresponding Δσy, and vary more from alloy to alloy. The data are also analyzed to establish relations between Δσy and coupled changes in the ultimate stresses as well as the effects of both test temperature and the unirradiated yield stress (σyu). The latter shows that higher σyu correlates with lower Δσy. In five out of six cases the effects of irradiation are generally consistent with previous observations on these alloys. However, the particular heat of the 12Cr HT-9 tempered martensitic steel in this study has a much higher eu than observed for earlier heats. The reasons for this improved behavior are not understood and may be microstructural in origin. However, it is noted that the new heat of HT-9, which was procured under modern quality assurance standards, has lower interstitial nitrogen than previous heats. Notably lower interstitial solute contents correlate with improved ductility and homogenous deformation in broadly similar steels.

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF ODS HEAT EXCHANGER TUBING

    SciTech Connect

    Mark A. Harper, Ph.D.

    2003-04-01

    Due to extenuating circumstances Special Metals Corporation is terminating their role as prime contractor with this Vision 21 project. In response to this situation, a status report for the project as of this date, has been prepared and follows. Significant work has been accomplished on three major tasks of this project--increasing the circumferential strength of MA956 tubing, joining of the MA956 alloy, and determination of the high temperature corrosion limits of the MA956 alloy. With respect to increasing the circumferential strength of a MA956 tube, the first rod extrusion campaign has been completed with microstructure analysis providing valuable information on the strengthening mechanism of this alloy. Also, based on the results obtained thus far extrusions of tubes are in process and creep testing to determine the ''stress threshold'' curves for this alloy continues. Regarding joining of the MA956 alloy, welds have been produced using the friction, explosive, magnetic impulse, and diffusion bonding techniques. Complete elevated temperature mechanical testing has not been conducted on joints produced using these methods, however room temperature tensile and shear testing has shown promising results on friction and explosive welds. And finally, laboratory high temperature corrosion testing of the material continues in both fluid-side and fire-side simulated environments. Brief summary status statements from each of the subcontractors is appended to this report which additionally contains the expected funding needed to complete the project.

  7. Photoabsorption cross section of OD at 115-180 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nee, J. B.; Lee, L. C.

    1984-01-01

    The photoabsorption cross sections of OD in the 115-180 nm region were measured. The OD radicals were produced from a pulsed discharge in a mixture containing a trace of D2O in a few Torr of argon. Results are compared with the photoabsorption of OH previously measured.

  8. Nanocluster-associated vacancies in nanocluster-strengthened ferritic steel as seen via positron-lifetime spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jun; Liu, C. T.; Miller, M. K.; Chen, Hongmin

    2009-01-01

    Nanocluster-strengthened ferritic alloys are promising as structural materials because of their excellent high-temperature strength and radiation-damage resistance. Recently, Fu [Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 225502 (2007)] predicted that vacancies play an essential role in the formation and stabilization of nanoclusters in these materials. Positron-lifetime spectroscopy has been used to test this theoretical prediction in a nanocluster-strengthened Fe-based alloy. Nanoclusters (2-4 nm in diameter) containing Ti, Y, and O have been observed in a mechanically alloyed ferritic steel by atom-probe tomography. Vacancy clusters containing four to six vacancies have also been found in this material. In contrast, no vacancy clusters were detected in similar alloys containing no nanoclusters. These results indicate that vacancies are a vital component of the nanoclusters in these alloys.

  9. Deuterium Retention and Physical Sputtering of Low Activation Ferritic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    T, Hino; K, Yamaguchi; Y, Yamauchi; Y, Hirohata; K, Tsuzuki; Y, Kusama

    2005-04-01

    Low activation materials have to be developed toward fusion demonstration reactors. Ferritic steel, vanadium alloy and SiC/SiC composite are candidate materials of the first wall, vacuum vessel and blanket components, respectively. Although changes of mechanical-thermal properties owing to neutron irradiation have been investigated so far, there is little data for the plasma material interactions, such as fuel hydrogen retention and erosion. In the present study, deuterium retention and physical sputtering of low activation ferritic steel, F82H, were investigated by using deuterium ion irradiation apparatus. After a ferritic steel sample was irradiated by 1.7 keV D+ ions, the weight loss was measured to obtain the physical sputtering yield. The sputtering yield was 0.04, comparable to that of stainless steel. In order to obtain the retained amount of deuterium, technique of thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was employed to the irradiated sample. The retained deuterium desorbed at temperature ranging from 450 K to 700 K, in the forms of DHO, D2, D2O and hydrocarbons. Hence, the deuterium retained can be reduced by baking with a relatively low temperature. The fluence dependence of retained amount of deuterium was measured by changing the ion fluence. In the ferritic steel without mechanical polish, the retained amount was large even when the fluence was low. In such a case, a large amount of deuterium was trapped in the surface oxide layer containing O and C. When the fluence was large, the thickness of surface oxide layer was reduced by the ion sputtering, and then the retained amount in the oxide layer decreased. In the case of a high fluence, the retained amount of deuterium became comparable to that of ferritic steel with mechanical polish or SS 316L, and one order of magnitude smaller than that of graphite. When the ferritic steel is used, it is required to remove the surface oxide layer for reduction of fuel hydrogen retention. Ferritic steel sample was

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF ODS HEAT EXCHANGER TUBING

    SciTech Connect

    Mark A. Harper, Ph.D.

    2001-10-01

    Work continued on four major tasks of this project--increasing the circumferential strength of MA956 tubing, joining of the MA956 alloy, determining the bending limits of MA956 tubing, and determination of the high temperature corrosion limits of the MA956 alloy. With respect to increasing the circumferential strength of a MA956 tube, an additional 120 MA956 rods have been extruded (total of 180 rods) using 16:1 and 10:1 extrusion ratios and extrusion temperatures of 1000, 1075, 1150, and 1200 C. Also, approximately 40 cold work (0, 10, 20, 30, 40%) plus annealing treatments (1000, 1150, 1300 C) have been completed with the resulting sample microstructures presently being analyzed. Creep testing to determine the ''stress threshold'' curves for this alloy continues. Regarding joining of the MA956 alloy, work continued using friction welding, magnetic impulse welding, explosive welding, and transient liquid phase bonding, with encouraging results obtained from the friction, explosive, and transient liquid phase joining methods. Initial work on determining the bending limits of the MA956 tubing has shown that the recrystallized material shows good ductility but the unrecrystallized material does not. And finally, fluid-side high temperature corrosion testing of the material continues and the environment for the laboratory fireside corrosion testing has been established and testing initiated.

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF ODS HEAT EXCHANGER TUBING

    SciTech Connect

    Mark A. Harper, Ph.D.

    2002-01-01

    Work continued on four major tasks of this project--increasing the circumferential strength of MA956 tubing, joining of the MA956 alloy, determining the bending limits of MA956 tubing, and determination of the high temperature corrosion limits of the MA956 alloy. With respect to increasing the circumferential strength of a MA956 tube, all of the extrusions plus decanning operations have been completed (total of 180 rods) for Task 2.1.1 (Extrusion Ratio = 20:1, 16:1, 10:1 and Extrusion Temperature = 1000, 1075, 1150, and 1200 C). Also, essentially all of the cold working operations have been completed (0, 10, 20, 30, 40%) with approximately 100 annealing treatments (1000, 1150, 1300 C) remaining. The sample microstructures produced by this processing continue to be analyzed. Creep testing to determine the ''stress threshold'' curves for this alloy continues. Regarding joining of the MA956 alloy, advances were made using transient liquid phase bonding. And finally, laboratory high temperature corrosion testing of the material continues (both fluid-side and fire-side) with fabrication of the field probes initiated.

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF ODS HEAT EXCHANGER TUBING

    SciTech Connect

    Mark A. Harper

    2001-07-01

    Work continued on three major tasks of this project--increasing the circumferential strength of the MA956 tube, joining of the MA956 alloy, and determination of the high temperature corrosion limits of the MA956 alloy. With respect to increasing the circumferential strength of a MA956 tube, an additional 120 MA956 rods have been extruded (total of 180 rods) using 16:1 and 10:1 extrusion ratios and extrusion temperatures of 1000, 1075, 1150, and 1200 C. Also, approximately 40 cold work (0, 10, 20, 30, 40%) plus annealing treatments (1000, 1150, 1300 C) have been completed with sample microstructure presently being analyzed. Also, creep testing to determine the ''stress threshold'' curves for this alloy continues. Regarding joining of the alloy MA956, work continued on the friction welding, magnetic impulse welding, explosive welding, and transient liquid phase bonding, with joints produced using the friction, magnetic impulse and explosive welding techniques. And finally, fluid-side high temperature corrosion tests of the material have been initiated.

  13. Features of structure-phase transformations and segregation processes under irradiation of austenitic and ferritic-martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neklyudov, I. M.; Voyevodin, V. N.

    1994-09-01

    The difference between crystal lattices of austenitic and ferritic steels leads to distinctive features in mechanisms of physical-mechanical change. This paper presents the results of investigations of dislocation structure and phase evolution, and segregation phenomena in austenitic and ferritic-martensitic steels and alloys during irradiation with heavy ions in the ESUVI and UTI accelerators and by neutrons in fast reactors BOR-60 and BN-600. The influence of different factors (including different alloying elements) on processes of structure-phase transformation was studied.

  14. Ferrite attenuator modulation improves antenna performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooks, J. C.; Larson, S. G.; Shorkley, F. H.; Williams, B. T.

    1970-01-01

    Ferrite attenuator inserted into appropriate waveguide reduces the gain of the antenna element which is causing interference. Modulating the ferrite attenuator to change the antenna gain at the receive frequency permits ground tracking until the antenna is no longer needed.

  15. Catalysts prepared from copper-nickel ferrites for the steam reforming of methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yung-Han; Wang, Sea-Fue; Tsai, An-Pang; Kameoka, Satoshi

    2015-05-01

    In this study, Fe3O4-supported Cu and Ni catalysts are prepared through reduction of Cu-Ni (Ni1-xCuxFe2O4) ferrites. The Cu-Ni ferrites, synthesized using a solid-state reaction method, are reduced at temperatures from 240 °C to 500 °C in a H2 atmosphere. All ferrites are characterized with granular morphology and a smooth particle surface before reduction. For the CuFe2O4, Ni0.5Cu0.5Fe2O4 and NiFe2O4 ferrites reduced at 240, 300, and 400 °C, respectively, nanosized Cu and/or Ni particles (5-32 nm) and mesopores (5-30 nm) are distributed and adhered on the surfaces of Fe3O4 supports. After increasing the reduction temperature of NiFe2O4 ferrite to 500 °C, the Ni particles and mesopores disappear from the Fe3O4 surfaces, which is due to the formation of a Fe-Ni alloy covering on the Fe3O4 surfaces. The CuFe2O4 ferrite after H2 reduction at 240 °C exhibits the highest H2 production rate of 149 ml STP/min g-cat at 360 °C. The existence of Ni content in the Cu-Ni ferrites enhances the reverse water gas shift reaction, and raises the CO selectivity while reducing the CO2 selectivity. Formation of a Fe-Ni alloy exaggerates the trend and poisons the H2 production rate.

  16. Characterization and comparative analysis of the tensile properties of five tempered martensitic steels and an oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy irradiated at ≈295 °C to ≈6.5 dpa

    SciTech Connect

    Maloy, Stuart A.; Saleh, Tarik A.; Anderoglu, Osman; Romero, Tobias J.; Odette, G. Robert; Yamamoto, Takuya; Li, S.; Cole, James I.; Fielding, Randall

    2015-08-06

    Tensile test results at 25 and 300 °C on five 9-12Cr tempered martensitic steels and one 14Cr oxide dispersion strengthened alloy, that were side-by side irradiated to 6.5 dpa at 295 °C in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), are reported. The engineering stress–strain curves are analyzed to provide true stress–strain constitutive σ(ε) laws for all of these alloys. In the irradiated condition, the σ(ε) fall into categories of: strain softening, nearly perfectly plastic and strain hardening. Increases in yield stress (Δσy) and reductions in uniform strain ductility (eu) are observed, where as the latter can be understood in terms of the alloy's σ(ε) behavior. Increases in the average σ(ε) in the range of 0–10% strain are smaller than the corresponding Δσy, and vary more from alloy to alloy. The data are analyzed to establish relations between Δσy and coupled changes in the ultimate stresses as well as the effects of both test temperature and the unirradiated yield stress (σyu). The latter shows that higher σyu correlates with lower Δσy. In five out of six cases the effects of irradiation are generally consistent with previous observations on these alloys. However, the particular heat of the 12Cr HT-9 tempered martensitic steel in this study has a much higher eu than observed for earlier heats. The reasons for this improved behavior are not understood and may be microstructural in origin. However, it is noted that the new heat of HT-9, which was procured under modern quality assurance standards, has lower interstitial nitrogen than previous heats. As a result, notably lower interstitial solute contents correlate with improved ductility and homogenous deformation in broadly similar steels.

  17. Continuation of Studies on Development of ODS Heat Exchanger Tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence Brown; David Workman; Bimal Kad; Gaylord Smith; Archie Robertson; Ian Wright

    2008-04-15

    The Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Center (NETL), has initiated a strategic plan for the development of advanced technologies needed to design and build fossil fuel plants with very high efficiency and environmental performance. These plants, referred to as 'Vision 21' and FutureGen programs by DOE, will produce electricity, chemicals, fuels, or a combination of these products, and possibly secondary products such as steam/heat for industrial use. MA956 is a prime candidate material being considered for a high temperature heat exchanger in the 'Vision 21' and FutureGen programs. This material is an oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy; however, there are some gaps in the data required to commit to the use of these alloys in a full-size plant. To fill the technology gaps for commercial production and use of the material for 'Advanced Power Generation Systems' this project has performed development activity to significant increase in circumferential strength of MA956 as compared to currently available material, investigated bonding technologies for bonding tube-to-tube joints through joining development, and performed tensile, creep and fire-side corrosion tests to validate the use and fabrication processes of MA956 to heat exchanger tubing applications. Development activities within this projected has demonstrated increased circumferential strength of MA956 tubes through flow form processing. Of the six fabrication technologies for bonding tube-to-tube joints, inertia friction welding (IFW) and flash butt welding (FBW) were identified as processes for joining MA956 tubes. Tensile, creep, and fire-side corrosion test data were generated for both base metal and weld joints. The data can be used for design of future systems employing MA956. Based upon the positive development activities, two test probes were designed and fabricated for field exposure testing at 1204 C ({approx}2200 F) flue gas. The probes contained tube portions with FBW

  18. Low cost fabrication development for oxide dispersion strengthened alloy vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, R. J.; Bailey, P. G.

    1978-01-01

    Viable processes were developed for secondary working of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys to near-net shapes (NNS) for aircraft turbine vanes. These processes were shown capable of producing required microstructure and properties for vane applications. Material cost savings of 40 to 50% are projected for the NNS process over the current procedures which involve machining from rectangular bar. Additional machining cost savings are projected. Of three secondary working processes evaluated, directional forging and plate bending were determined to be viable NNS processes for ODS vanes. Directional forging was deemed most applicable to high pressure turbine (HPT) vanes with their large thickness variations while plate bending was determined to be most cost effective for low pressure turbine (LPT) vanes because of their limited thickness variations. Since the F101 LPT vane was selected for study in this program, development of plate bending was carried through to establishment of a preliminary process. Preparation of ODS alloy plate for bending was found to be a straight forward process using currently available bar stock, providing that the capability for reheating between roll passes is available. Advanced ODS-NiCrAl and ODS-FeCrAl alloys were utilized on this program. Workability of all alloys was adequate for directional forging and plate bending, but only the ODS-FeCrAl had adequate workability for shaped preform extrustion.

  19. Effect of ferrite on cast stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Nadezhdin, A.; Cooper, K. ); Timbers, G. . Kraft Pulp Division)

    1994-09-01

    Premature failure of stainless steel castings in bleach washing service is attributed to poor casting quality high porosity and to a high ferrite content, which makes the castings susceptible to corrosion by hot acid chloride solutions. A survey of the chemical compositions and ferrite contents of corrosion-resistant castings in bleach plants at three pulp mills found high [delta]-ferrite levels in the austenitic matrix due to the improper balance between austenite and ferrite stabilizers.

  20. Nature of anisotropy of impact toughness of structural steels with ferrite-pearlite structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goritskii, V. M.; Shneyderov, G. R.; Lushkin, M. A.

    2013-10-01

    The anisotropy of the impact toughness of low-alloy steels of various compositions and purities with a ferrite-pearlite structure has been investigated using samples of type 11 according to the Russian Standard GOST 9454-78. It has been established that the anisotropy coefficient of the impact toughness depends on the anisotropy coefficient of the work of crack propagation and is independent of the degree of striation of the ferrite-pearlite structure and the work for nucleation of the ductile crack.

  1. Deuterium and helium trapping at TiC particles in ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitznagel, J. A.; Brenner, S. S.; Miller, M. K.; Choyke, W. J.

    1984-05-01

    First wall and blanket materials in Tokamak machines must accommodate increasing concentrations of helium and hydrogen isotopes. Alloy design principles point to the efficacy of trapping He and hydrogen at finely dispersed precipitates to minimize their impact on mechanical properties. Titanium carbide particles are known to trap He effectively in austenitic stainless steel. Less is known about TiC as a trap for helium and hydrogen isotopes in ferritic steels. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of directly measuring the trapping of helium and deuterium at TiC-ferrite interfaces using atom probe field ion microscopy.

  2. A complex carbonitride of niobium and vanadium in 9% Cr ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tokuno, K.; Hamada, K.; Takeda, T. ); Uemori, R. ); Itoh, K. )

    1991-01-01

    It has been considered that small additions of Nb and V have striking effects on the creep strength of high Cr ferritic steels which are used for elevated temperature services such as boilers, steam generators etc. Although Nb and V are thought to form complex precipitates which may act as obstacles for the dislocation glide, the distribution and morphology of the precipitates have not been clarified yet. Several examples of simple precipitates of V in low alloy steels were only reported. In this paper, the morphology of the complex carbonitride of Nb and V in 9% Cr ferritic steels was investigated and the role of the carbonitride on the creep strength was discussed.

  3. High power ferrite microwave switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardash, I.; Roschak, N. K.

    1975-01-01

    A high power ferrite microwave switch was developed along with associated electronic driver circuits for operation in a spaceborne high power microwave transmitter in geostationary orbit. Three units were built and tested in a space environment to demonstrate conformance to the required performance characteristics. Each unit consisted of an input magic-tee hybrid, two non-reciprocal latching ferrite phase shifters, an out short-slot 3 db quadrature coupler, a dual driver electronic circuit, and input logic interface circuitry. The basic mode of operation of the high power ferrite microwave switch is identical to that of a four-port, differential phase shift, switchable circulator. By appropriately designing the phase shifters and electronic driver circuits to operate in the flux-transfer magnetization mode, power and temperature insensitive operation was achieved. A list of the realized characteristics of the developed units is given.

  4. Small high directivity ferrite antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, T. M. B.

    A centimeter-wavelength antenna of millimetric dimensions, which uses the intrinsic angular sensitivity of ferrites, is described, with an emphasis on the modification of the material's permeability. The construction of both the ferrite film lens antenna and the ferrite film cassegrain antenna are detailed; both can be devised in a number of configurations for appropriate beam positioning and rf filtering. The antenna design, discussed primarily in the context of smart missiles, electronic warfare, and satellite systems, presents the possibility of magnetically switching between the transmit and receive modes within the antenna structure itself. Finally, it is noted that for a simple 2-dipole array the angular resolution can be two orders of magnitude higher than with the conventional techniques.

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF ODS HEAT EXCHANGER TUBING

    SciTech Connect

    Mark A. Harper, Ph.D.

    2001-04-30

    Work has begun under three major tasks of this project. With respect to increasing the circumferential strength of a MA956 tube, approximately 60 MA956 rods have been extruded using a 20:1 extrusion ratio and extrusion temperatures of 1000, 1075, 1150, and 1200 C. Also, creep testing is underway for the purpose of determining the ''stress threshold'' curves for this alloy. Regarding joining of the alloy MA956, work has begun on the friction welding, magnetic impulse welding, explosive welding, and transient liquid phase bonding aspects of this project. And finally, material is being prepared for the laboratory fire-side high temperature corrosion tests, with potential gas and deposits for a typical Vision 21 plant being reviewed for final determination of these variables in the test program.

  6. Preliminary study of oxide-dispersion-strengthened B-1900 prepared by mechanical alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasgow, T. K.; Quatinetz, M.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy based on the B-1900 composition was produced by the mechanical alloying process. Without optimization of the processing for the alloy or the alloy for the processing, recrystallization of the extruded product to large elongated grains was achieved. Materials having grain length-width ratios of 3 and 5.5 were tested in tension and stress-rupture. The ODS B-1900 exhibited tensile strength similar to that of cast B-1900. Its stress-rupture life was lower than that of cast B-1900 at 760 C. At 1095 C the ODS B-1900 with the higher grain length-width ratio (5.5) had stress-rupture life superior to that of cast B-1900. It was concluded that, with optimization, oxide dispersion strengthening of B-1900 and other complex cast nickel-base alloys has potential for improving high temperature properties over those of the cast alloy counterparts.

  7. An oxide dispersion strengthened Ni-W-Al alloy with superior high temperature strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasgow, T. K.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy, WAZ-D, derived from the WAZ-20 composition was produced by the mechanical alloying process. Cast WAZ-20 is strengthened by both a high refractory metal content, and 70 volume percent of gamma prime. The ODS alloy WAZ-D was responsive to variables of alloy content, of attritor processing, of consolidation by extrusion, and of heat treatment. The best material produced had large highly elongated grains. It exhibited tensile strengths generally superior to a comparable cast alloy. The ODS alloy exhibited high temperature stress rupture life considerably superior to any known cast superalloy. Tensile and rupture ductility were low, as was intermediate temperature rupture life. Very low creep rates were noted and some specimens failed with essentially no third stage creep. Also the benefit derived from the oxide dispersion, far out-weighed that from the elongated microstructure alone.

  8. Effect of neutron irradiation on vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Braski, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    Neutron-irradiated vanadium alloys were evaluated for their susceptibility to irradiation hardening, helium embrittlement, swelling, and residual radioactivity, and the results were compared with those for the austenitic and ferritic stainless steels. The VANSTAR-7 and V-15Cr-5Ti alloys showed the greatest hardening between 400 and 600/sup 0/C while V-3Ti-1Si and V-20Ti had lower values that were comparable to those of ferritic steels. The V-15Cr-5Ti and VANSTAR-7 alloys were susceptible to helium embrittlement caused by the combination of weakened grain boundaries and irradiation-hardened grain matrices. Specimen fractures were entirely intergranular in the most severe instances of embrittlement. The V-3Ti-1Si and V-20Ti alloys were more resistant to helium embrittlement. Except for VANSTAR-7 irradiated to 40 dpa at 520/sup 0/C, all of the vanadium alloys exhibited low swelling that was similar to the ferritic steels. Swelling was greater in specimens that were preimplanted with helium using the tritium trick. The vanadium alloys clearly exhibit lower residual radioactivity after irradiation than the ferrous alloys.

  9. Development of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, D.K.; Suryanarayana, C.; Froes, F.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1996-04-01

    Seven ODS steels, Fe(5-13.5)Cr-2W-0.5Ti-0.25 Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (in weight percent) were manufactured using the mechanical alloying process. Only the composition Fe-13.5Cr3W-0.5Ti-0.25Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} showed no austenite formation at any temperature using differential thermal analysis and hence was selected as an experimental alloy for the present investigation. Milled powders were consolidated by hot isostatic pressing and hot swaging. Electron microscopy studies indicated high material homogeneity. The hardness of the as-swaged specimen was 65 R{sub c}. Annealing of the as-swaged material at 800, 900, 1000, 1100, and 1200{degrees}C showed a minor decrease in the hardness.

  10. Nano-sized Superlattice Clusters Created by Oxygen Ordering in Mechanically Alloyed Fe Alloys

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yong-Jie; Li, Jing; Darling, Kristopher A.; Wang, William Y.; VanLeeuwen, Brian K.; Liu, Xuan L.; Kecskes, Laszlo J.; Dickey, Elizabeth C.; Liu, Zi-Kui

    2015-01-01

    Creating and maintaining precipitates coherent with the host matrix, under service conditions is one of the most effective approaches for successful development of alloys for high temperature applications; prominent examples include Ni- and Co-based superalloys and Al alloys. While ferritic alloys are among the most important structural engineering alloys in our society, no reliable coherent precipitates stable at high temperatures have been found for these alloys. Here we report discovery of a new, nano-sized superlattice (NSS) phase in ball-milled Fe alloys, which maintains coherency with the BCC matrix up to at least 913 °C. Different from other precipitates in ferritic alloys, this NSS phase is created by oxygen-ordering in the BCC Fe matrix. It is proposed that this phase has a chemistry of Fe3O and a D03 crystal structure and becomes more stable with the addition of Zr. These nano-sized coherent precipitates effectively double the strength of the BCC matrix above that provided by grain size reduction alone. This discovery provides a new opportunity for developing high-strength ferritic alloys for high temperature applications. PMID:26134420

  11. Nano-sized Superlattice Clusters Created by Oxygen Ordering in Mechanically Alloyed Fe Alloys.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yong-Jie; Li, Jing; Darling, Kristopher A; Wang, William Y; VanLeeuwen, Brian K; Liu, Xuan L; Kecskes, Laszlo J; Dickey, Elizabeth C; Liu, Zi-Kui

    2015-01-01

    Creating and maintaining precipitates coherent with the host matrix, under service conditions is one of the most effective approaches for successful development of alloys for high temperature applications; prominent examples include Ni- and Co-based superalloys and Al alloys. While ferritic alloys are among the most important structural engineering alloys in our society, no reliable coherent precipitates stable at high temperatures have been found for these alloys. Here we report discovery of a new, nano-sized superlattice (NSS) phase in ball-milled Fe alloys, which maintains coherency with the BCC matrix up to at least 913 °C. Different from other precipitates in ferritic alloys, this NSS phase is created by oxygen-ordering in the BCC Fe matrix. It is proposed that this phase has a chemistry of Fe3O and a D03 crystal structure and becomes more stable with the addition of Zr. These nano-sized coherent precipitates effectively double the strength of the BCC matrix above that provided by grain size reduction alone. This discovery provides a new opportunity for developing high-strength ferritic alloys for high temperature applications. PMID:26134420

  12. Nano-sized Superlattice Clusters Created by Oxygen Ordering in Mechanically Alloyed Fe Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yong-Jie; Li, Jing; Darling, Kristopher A.; Wang, William Y.; Vanleeuwen, Brian K.; Liu, Xuan L.; Kecskes, Laszlo J.; Dickey, Elizabeth C.; Liu, Zi-Kui

    2015-07-01

    Creating and maintaining precipitates coherent with the host matrix, under service conditions is one of the most effective approaches for successful development of alloys for high temperature applications; prominent examples include Ni- and Co-based superalloys and Al alloys. While ferritic alloys are among the most important structural engineering alloys in our society, no reliable coherent precipitates stable at high temperatures have been found for these alloys. Here we report discovery of a new, nano-sized superlattice (NSS) phase in ball-milled Fe alloys, which maintains coherency with the BCC matrix up to at least 913 °C. Different from other precipitates in ferritic alloys, this NSS phase is created by oxygen-ordering in the BCC Fe matrix. It is proposed that this phase has a chemistry of Fe3O and a D03 crystal structure and becomes more stable with the addition of Zr. These nano-sized coherent precipitates effectively double the strength of the BCC matrix above that provided by grain size reduction alone. This discovery provides a new opportunity for developing high-strength ferritic alloys for high temperature applications.

  13. Newly Released Inmates Account for 1 in 10 Fatal ODs

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159858.html Newly Released Inmates Account for 1 in 10 Fatal ODs Many may not realize ... the general population," Persaud added. Not only did one in 10 overdose deaths involve a recently released ...

  14. Manufacture and engine test of advanced oxide dispersion strengthened alloy turbine vanes. [for space shuttle thermal protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, P. G.

    1977-01-01

    Oxide-Dispersion-strengthened (ODS) Ni-Cr-Al alloy systems were exploited for turbine engine vanes which would be used for the space shuttle thermal protection system. Available commercial and developmental advanced ODS alloys were evaluated, and three were selected based on established vane property goals and manufacturing criteria. The selected alloys were evaluated in an engine test. Candidate alloys were screened by strength, thermal fatigue resistance, oxidation and sulfidation resistance. The Ni-16Cr (3 to 5)Al-ThO2 system was identified as having attractive high temperature oxidation resistance. Subsequent work also indicated exceptional sulfidation resistance for these alloys.

  15. High-temperature oxidation behavior of two-phase iron-manganese-aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.Y.; Lee, C.L.; Kao, C.H.; Perng, T.P.

    2000-04-01

    Oxidation behavior of two series of two-phase Fe-Mn-Al alloys in air up to 800 C was investigated. For the first series of alloys with various ratios of ferrite-austenite, the oxidation resistance of these alloys increased as the ferrite content increased. Two layers of oxide were formed mainly on the austenite grains, and oxidation in the ferrite phase was much less severe. The other layer of the scale on austenite was enriched with Mn and Fe, while Al was concentrated in the inner layer. For the second series of alloys with nearly the same contents of ferrite and C but various contents of Cr, the addition of Cr changed the oxidation characteristics and increased the oxidation resistance. Cr assisted the formation of a dense film of alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) to prevent further oxidation.

  16. The Optical Depth Sensor (ODS) for Mars atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo, D.; Rannou, P.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Sarkissian, A.; Foujols, T.

    2015-10-01

    A small and sophisticated optical depth sensor (ODS) has been designed to work in both Martian and Earth environments. The principal goal of ODS is to carry out the opacity due to the Martian dust as well as to characterize the high altitude clouds at twilight, crucial parameters in understanding of Martian meteorology. The instrument was initially designed for the failed MARS96 Russian mission, and also was included in the payload of several other missions [1]. Until recently, it was selected (NASA/ESA AO) in the payload of the atmospheric package DREAMS onboard the MARS 2016 mission. But following a decision of the CNES, it is no more included in the payload. In order to study the performance of ODS under a wide range of conditions as well as its capable to provide daily measurements of both dust optical thickness and high altitude clouds properties, the instrument has participated in different terrestrial campaigns. A good performance of ODS prototype (Figure 1) on cirrus clouds detection and in dust opacity estimation was previously archived in Africa during 2004-2005 and in Brasil from 2012 to nowadays. Moreover, a campaign in the arctic is expected before 2016 where fifteen ODSs will be part of an integrated observing system over the Arctic Ocean, allowing test the ODS performance in extreme conditions. In this presentation we present main principle of the retrieval, the instrumental concept, the result of the tests performed and the principal objectives of ODS in Mars.

  17. Gas porosity evolution and ion-implanted helium behavior in reactor ferritic/martensitic and austenitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, I. I.; Kalin, B. A.; Staltsov, M. S.; Oo, Kyi Zin; Binyukova, S. Yu.; Staltsova, O. S.; Polyansky, A. A.; Ageev, V. S.; Nikitina, A. A.

    2015-04-01

    The peculiarities of gas porosity formation and helium retention and release in reactor ferritic/martensitic EP-450 and EP-450-ODS and austenitic ChS-68 steels are investigated by transmission electron microscopy and helium thermal desorption spectrometry (HTDS). The samples were irradiated by 40 keV He+ ions up to a fluence of 5 · 1020 m-2 at 293 and 923 K. An nonuniform distribution of helium bubbles and high-level gas swelling in ferritic/martensitic steels were found at high-temperature helium implantation. The same irradiation conditions result in formation of uniformly distributed helium bubbles and low-level swelling in ChS-68 steel. Temperature range of helium release from EP-450-ODS steel was considerably wider in comparison to HTDS-spectra of the EP-450 steel. A considerable quantity of helium is released from ODS steel in the high-temperature range after the main peak of the HTDS-spectrum.

  18. Multiferroic bismuth ferrite material core based inductive displacement sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeswari, R.; Biswal, M. R.; Nanda, J.; Mishra, N. C.

    2012-07-01

    In this research, an inductive displacement sensor with multiferroic bismuth ferrite core has been realized. The bismuth ferrite sample is synthesized and its structural and dielectric properties are studied. A rod-shaped bismuth ferrite core is prepared and displaced through the inductor of a RLC circuit. The performance of the prepared bismuth ferrite core has been compared with a commercially available ferrite core.

  19. Post-Irradiation Fracture Toughness of Unalloyed Molybdenum, ODS molybdenum, and TZM molybdenum following irradiation at 244C to 507C

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, Brian V; Byun, Thak Sang; Leonard, Keith J; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2013-01-01

    Commercially available unalloyed molybdenum (Low Carbon Arc Cast (LCAC)), Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) molybdenum, and TZM molybdenum were neutron irradiated at temperatures of nominally 244 C, 407 C, and 509 C to neutron fluences between 1.0 to 4.6x1025 n/m2 (E>0.1 MeV). Post-irradiation fracture toughness testing was performed. All alloys exhibited a Ductile to Brittle Transition Temperature that was defined to occur at 30 4 MPa-m1/2. The highest post-irradiated fracture toughness values (26-107 MPa-m1/2) and lowest DBTT (100-150 C) was observed for ODS molybdenum in the L-T orientation. The finer grain size for ODS molybdenum results in fine laminates that improve the ductile laminate toughening. The results for ODS molybdenum are anisotropic with lower post-irradiated toughness values (20-30 MPa-m1/2) and higher DBTT (450-600 C) in the T-L orientation. The results for T-L ODS molybdenum are consistent or slightly better than those for LCAC molybdenum (21-71 MPa-m1/2 and 450-800 C DBTT). The fracture toughness values measured for LCAC and T-L ODS molybdenum at temperatures below the DBTT were determined to be 8-18 MPa-m1/2. Lower non-irradiated fracture toughness values were measured for TZM molybdenum that are attributed to the large carbide precipitates serving as preferential fracture initiation sites. The role of microstructure and grain size on post-irradiated fracture toughness was evaluated by comparing the results for LCAC molybdenum and ODS molybdenum.

  20. The effect of solution pH on the electrochemical performance of nanocrystalline metal ferrites MFe2O4 (M=Cu, Zn, and Ni) thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsayed, E. M.; Rashad, M. M.; Khalil, H. F. Y.; Ibrahim, I. A.; Hussein, M. R.; El-Sabbah, M. M. B.

    2016-04-01

    Nanocrystalline metal ferrite MFe2O4 (M=Cu, Zn, and Ni) thin films have been synthesized via electrodeposition-anodization process. Electrodeposited (M)Fe2 alloys were obtained from aqueous sulfate bath. The formed alloys were electrochemically oxidized (anodized) in aqueous (1 M KOH) solution, at room temperature, to the corresponding hydroxides. The parameters controlling the current efficiency of the electrodeposition of (M)Fe2 alloys such as the bath composition and the current density were studied and optimized. The anodized (M)Fe2 alloy films were annealed in air at 400 °C for 2 h. The results revealed the formation of three ferrite thin films were formed. The crystallite sizes of the produced films were in the range between 45 and 60 nm. The microstructure of the formed film was ferrite type dependent. The corrosion behavior of ferrite thin films in different pH solutions was investigated using open circuit potential (OCP) and potentiodynamic polarization measurements. The open circuit potential indicates that the initial potential E im of ZnFe2O4 thin films remained constant for a short time, then sharply increased in the less negative direction in acidic and alkaline medium compared with Ni and Cu ferrite films. The values of the corrosion current density I corr were higher for the ZnFe2O4 films at pH values of 1 and 12 compared with that of NiFe2O4 and CuFe2O4 which were higher only at pH value 1. The corrosion rate was very low for the three ferrite films when immersion in the neutral medium. The surface morphology recommended that Ni and Cu ferrite films were safely used in neutral and alkaline medium, whereas Zn ferrite film was only used in neutral atmospheres.

  1. Defect and void evolution in oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels under 3.2 MeV Fe + ion irradiation with simultaneous helium injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, I.-S.; Hunn, J. D.; Hashimoto, N.; Larson^1, D. L.; Maziasz, P. J.; Miyahara, K.; Lee, E. H.

    2000-08-01

    In an attempt to explore the potential of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels for fission and fusion structural materials applications, a set of ODS steels with varying oxide particle dispersion were irradiated at 650°C, using 3.2 MeV Fe + and 330 keV He + ions simultaneously. The void formation mechanisms in these ODS steels were studied by juxtaposing the response of a 9Cr-2WVTa ferritic/martensitic steel and solution annealed AISI 316LN austenitic stainless steel under the same irradiation conditions. The results showed that void formation was suppressed progressively by introducing and retaining a higher dislocation density and finer precipitate particles. Theoretical analyses suggest that the delayed onset of void formation in ODS steels stems from the enhanced point defect recombination in the high density dislocation microstructure, lower dislocation bias due to oxide particle pinning, and a very fine dispersion of helium bubbles caused by trapping helium atoms at the particle-matrix interfaces.

  2. 46 CFR 54.25-20 - Low temperature operation-ferritic steels with properties enhanced by heat treatment (modifies...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 54.01-1... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Low temperature operation-ferritic steels with... VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-20 Low temperature...

  3. 46 CFR 54.25-20 - Low temperature operation-ferritic steels with properties enhanced by heat treatment (modifies...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 54.01-1... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Low temperature operation-ferritic steels with... VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-20 Low temperature...

  4. 46 CFR 54.25-20 - Low temperature operation-ferritic steels with properties enhanced by heat treatment (modifies...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 54.01-1... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Low temperature operation-ferritic steels with... VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-20 Low temperature...

  5. 46 CFR 54.25-20 - Low temperature operation-ferritic steels with properties enhanced by heat treatment (modifies...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 54.01-1... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Low temperature operation-ferritic steels with... VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-20 Low temperature...

  6. Laser-induced oxidation of Zn and Zn alloy films for direct-write grayscale photomasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Chang, Marian; Tu, Yuqiang; Poon, David K.; Chapman, Glenn H.; Choo, Chinheng; Peng, Jun

    2006-02-01

    Previous research showed that bimetallic Bi/In and Sn/In films exhibit good grayscale levels after laser exposure due to controlled film oxidation. While giving a large alteration in optical density (OD) from 3.0OD to 0.22OD at 365 nm, Bi/In and Sn/In films show a very nonlinear OD change with laser power, making fine control of grayscale writing difficult at some gray levels. This paper studies Zn and Zn alloy films as possible candidates for improved direct-write grayscale photomask applications. Zn and Zn alloys laser oxidation have been reported previously, but without grayscale optical measurements and applications. In this paper Zn films (50 nm ~ 240 nm), Sn/Zn (100 nm), Al/Zn (100 nm), Bi/Zn (100 nm) and In/Zn (100 nm) were DC- and RF-sputtered onto glass slides and then were scanned by argon ion CW laser (488 nm). Among these films, the highest OD change, 3OD (from 3.2OD before exposure to 0.2OD after laser exposure) at 365 nm, was found in the In/Zn (25/75 nm or 84at% Zn) film. The characterization of grayscale level to laser power modulation in Zn and Zn alloy films with various thickness or composition ratios were investigated. The Zn OD change versus laser power curve is more linear than those of Sn/In and Bi/In films. In/Zn films have better characterization of grayscale level versus laser writing power than pure Zn film. Among these four Zn alloy films, Zn/Al shows most linear relation of OD at 365 nm to laser power modulation.

  7. The partitioning of alloying elements in vacuum arc remelted, Pd-modified PH 13-8 Mo alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieslak, M. J.; Vandenavyle, J. A.; Carr, M. J.; Hills, C. R.; Semarge, R. E.

    1988-12-01

    The partitioning of alloying elements in as-solidified PH 13-8 Mo stainless steel containing up to 1.02 wt pct Pd has been investigated. The as-solidified structure is composed of two major phases, martensite and ferrite. Electron probe microanalysis reveals that Mo, Cr, and Al partition to the ferrite phase while Fe, Ni, Mn, and Pd partition to the martensite (prior austenite) during solidification and cooling from the solidus. In addition to bulk segregation between phases, precipitation of the intermetallic, PdAI, in the retained ferrite is observed. Precipitation of the normal hardening phase, β-NiAl, is also observed in the retained ferrite. Partition ratios of the various alloying elements are determined and are compared with those observed previously in duplex Fe-Cr-Ni stainless steel solidification structures. The martensite start temperature (Ms) was observed to decrease with increasing Pd concentration.

  8. Characterization of ferritic G. M. A. weld deposits in 9% Ni steel for cryogenic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mahin, K.W.

    1980-04-01

    Low temperature containment vessels of 9% Ni are normally fabricated using the shielded metal arc (S.M.A.W.) or the gas metal arc (G.M.A.W.) welding processes. Available filler metals compatible with these processes are highly alloyed austenitics, whose strength levels undermatch those of the base plate. A more efficient weld joint would be a low alloy ferritic deposit. Although acceptable matching ferritic gas tungsten arc weld (G.T.A.W.) wires have been developed, similar progress has not been made in the area of ferritic G.M.A. weld wires. Most of the prior work in this area has focused on correlating composition with mechanical properties, without a corresponding evaluation of resultant microstructure. The study presented focused on establishing correlations between chemistry, microstructure and mechanical properties for four different ferritic G.M.A. weld deposits in 9% Ni steel, with the purpose of developing a better understanding of the factors controlling the 77K (-196/sup 0/C) toughness behavior of these weld metals. Microstructural characterization was carried out using standard optical and scanning electron microscopes, as well as a variety of advanced analytical techniques, including transmission electron microscopy (T.E.M.), scanning T.E.M., Moessbauer spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy.

  9. High gas velocity oxidation and hot corrosion testing of oxide dispersion-strengthened nickel-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Lowell, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    Several oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) nickel-base alloys were tested in high velocity gases for cyclic oxidation resistance at temperatures to 1200 C and times to 500 hours and for hot corrosion resistance at 900 C for 200 hours. Nickel-chromium-aluminum ODS alloys were found to have superior resistance to oxidation and hot corrosion when compared to bare and coated nickel-chromium ODS alloys. The best of the alloys tested had compositions of nickel - 15.5 to 16 weight percent chromium with aluminum weight percents between 4.5 and 5.0. All of the nickel-chromium-aluminum ODS materials experienced small weight losses (less than 16 mg/sq cm).

  10. Development of a monolithic ferrite memory array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckler, C. H., Jr.; Bhiwandker, N. C.

    1972-01-01

    The results of the development and testing of ferrite monolithic memory arrays are presented. This development required the synthesis of ferrite materials having special magnetic and physical characteristics and the development of special processes; (1) for making flexible sheets (laminae) of the ferrite composition, (2) for embedding conductors in ferrite, and (3) bonding ferrite laminae together to form a monolithic structure. Major problems encountered in each of these areas and their solutions are discussed. Twenty-two full-size arrays were fabricated and fired during the development of these processes. The majority of these arrays were tested for their memory characteristics as well as for their physical characteristics and the results are presented. The arrays produced during this program meet the essential goals and demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating monolithic ferrite memory arrays by the processes developed.

  11. Creep degradation in oxide-dispersion-strengthened alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened Ni-base alloys in wrought bar form are studied for creep degradation effects similar to those found in thin gage sheet. The bar products evaluated included ODS-Ni, ODS-NiCr, and three types of advanced ODS-NiCrAl alloys. Tensile test specimens were exposed to creep at various stress levels at 1365 K and then tensile tested at room temperature. Low residual tensile properties, change in fracture mode, the appearance of dispersoid-free bands, grain boundary cavitation, and internal oxidation in the microstructure were interpreted as creep degradation effects. This work showed that many ODS alloys are subject to creep damage. Degradation of tensile properties occurred after very small amounts of creep strain, ductility being the most sensitive property. All the ODS alloys which were creep damaged possessed a large grain size. Creep damage appears to have been due to diffusional creep which produced dispersoid-free bands around boundaries acting as vacancy sources. Low angle and possibly twin boundaries acted as vacancy sources.

  12. Development of improved ATF engineering alloy - Mechanical testing of Phase 2 alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Anderoglu, Osman; Lovato, Manuel L.; Maloy, Stuart Andrew

    2015-06-15

    In this report we present the results on the tensile testing of phase 2 FeCrAl alloys (Mo and Nb added for high temperature strength) developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. We also compare FeCrAl with MA956 which is an ODS FeCrAl.

  13. High Temperature Irradiation Effects in Selected Generation IV Structural Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, Randy K; McClintock, David A; Hoelzer, David T; Tan, Lizhen; Allen, Todd R.

    2009-01-01

    In the Generation IV Materials Program cross-cutting task, irradiation and testing were carried out to address the issue of high temperature irradiation effects with selected current and potential candidate metallic alloys. The materials tested were (1) a high-nickel iron-base alloy (Alloy 800H); (2) a nickel-base alloy (Alloy 617); (3) two advanced nano-structured ferritic alloys (designated 14YWT and 14WT); and (4) a commercial ferritic-martensitic steel (annealed 9Cr-1MoV). Small tensile specimens were irradiated in rabbit capsules in the High-Flux Isotope Reactor at temperatures from about 550 to 700 C and to irradiation doses in the range 1.2 to 1.6 dpa. The Alloy 800H and Alloy 617 exhibited significant hardening after irradiation at 580 C; some hardening occurred at 660 C as well, but the 800H showed extremely low tensile elongations when tested at 700 C. Notably, the grain boundary engineered 800H exhibited even greater hardening at 580 C and retained a high amount of ductility. Irradiation effects on the two nano-structured ferritic alloys and the annealed 9Cr-1MoV were relatively slight at this low dose.

  14. Factors affecting chromium carbide precipitate dissolution during alloy oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, R.N.; Gleeson, B.; Young, D.J.

    1998-08-01

    Ferrous alloys containing significant volume fractions of chromium carbides were formulated so as to contain an overall chromium level of 15% (by weight) but a nominal metal matrix chromium concentration of only 11%. Their oxidation at 850 C in pure oxygen led to either protective Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale formation accompanied by subsurface carbide dissolution or rapid growth of iron-rich oxide scales associated with rapid alloy surface recession, which engulfed the carbides before they could dissolve. Carbide size was important in austenitic alloys: an as-cast Fe-15Cr-0.5C alloy contained relatively coarse carbides and failed to form a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale, whereas the same alloy when hot-forged to produce very fine carbides oxidized protectively. In ferritic alloys, however, even coarse carbides dissolved sufficiently rapidly to provide the chromium flux necessary to form and maintain the growth of a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale, a result attributed to the high diffusivity of the ferrite phase. Small additions of silicon to the as-cast Fe-15Cr-0.5C alloy rendered it ferritic and led to protective cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} growth. However, when the silicon-containing alloy was made austenitic (by the addition of nickel), it still formed a protective Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale, showing that the principal function of silicon was in modifying the scale-alloy interface.

  15. Magnetocaloric effect in ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poddar, P.; Gass, J.; Rebar, D. J.; Srinath, S.; Srikanth, H.; Morrison, S. A.; Carpenter, E. E.

    2006-12-01

    A comparative study of the magnetocaloric effect (MCE) is reported in two different types of chemically synthesized magnetic nanoparticle systems—cobalt ferrite and manganese zinc ferrite with mean size around 5 and 15 nm, respectively. While CoFe 2O 4 nanoparticles were synthesized using co-precipitation, the Mn 0.68Zn 0.25Fe 2.07O 4 (MZFO) nanoparticles were prepared by reverse micelle technique using AOT as surfactant. Our results indicate that the change in entropy with the change in applied magnetic field (d S/d H) is reasonably large for this class of nanoparticles and has a wide distribution over a broad temperature range covering the region above and below the blocking temperature. The maximum entropy change is influenced by the particle size, overall distribution in anisotropy and magnetic moments.

  16. Effect of oxide inclusions on the solid state transformation in low-alloy steel fusion welds

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, S.S.; David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    Non-metallic inclusions are known to influence the properties of low alloy steel weld metal by altering the microstructure development. Isothermal transformation kinetics of austenite to acicular ferrite and allotriomorphic ferrite were measured in reheated low alloy steel weld deposits with similar weld compositions and austenite grain size but different inclusion characteristics. Accelerated kinetics of the transformation to acicular ferrite were observed in the weld metal containing coarser titanium-rich inclusions. The results are also discussed in relation to the predictions of inclusion model. The kinetics of the transformation to allotriomorphic ferrite were not influenced by a change in the inclusion characteristics, but, rather, by a change in austenite grain size. A theoretical analysis of austenite grain development during weld cooling is considered in this work. The austenite grain size was found to depend on the driving force for transformation from 6 ferrite to austenite ({Delta}G{sup {sigma}->{gamma}}) calculated from ThermoCalc{trademark} software.

  17. Vanadium-base alloys for fusion reactor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.L.; Loomis, B.A.; Diercks, D.R.

    1984-10-01

    Vanadium-base alloys offer potentially significant advantages over other candidate alloys as a structural material for fusion reactor first wall/blanket applications. Although the data base is more limited than that for the other leading candidate structural materials, viz., austenitic and ferritic steels, vanadium-base alloys exhibit several properties that make them particularly attractive for the fusion reactor environment. This paper presents a review of the structural material requirements, a summary of the materials data base for selected vanadium-base alloys, and a comparison of projected performance characteristics compared to other candidate alloys. Also, critical research and development (R and D) needs are defined.

  18. Multifunctionality of nanocrystalline lanthanum ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Atma; Thakur, Awalendra K.

    2016-05-01

    Nanocrystalline lanthanum ferrite has been synthesized by adopting modified Pechini route. No evidence of impurity or secondary phase has been detected up to the detection of error limit of X-ray diffractometer (XRD). Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction pattern reveals orthorhombic crystal system with space group Pnma (62).Crystallite size and lattice strain was found to be ˜42.8nm and 0.306% respectively. Optical band gap was found to be 2.109 eV, by UV-Visible diffused reflectance spectrum (DRS). Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) surface area was found to be ˜3.45 m2/g. Magnetization-hysteresis (M-H) loop was recorded at room temperature (300K) reveals weak ferromagnetism in Nanocrystalline lanthanum ferrite. The weak ferromagnetism in lanthanum ferrite is due to the uncompensated antiferromagnetic spin ordering. Ferroelectric loop hysteresis observed at room temperature at 100Hz depicts the presence of ferroelectric ordering in LaFeO3.Simultanious presence of magnetic and ferroelectric ordering at room temperature makes it suitable candidate of Multiferroic family.

  19. Swelling in several commercial alloys irradiated to very high neutron fluence

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.; Pintler, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    Swelling values have been obtained from a set of commercial alloys irradiated in EBR-II to a peak fluence of 2.5 x 10/sup 23/ n/cm/sup 2/ (E > 0.1 MeV) or approx. 125 dpa covering the range 400 to 650/sup 0/C. The alloys can be ranked for swelling resistance from highest to lowest as follows: the martensitic and ferritic alloys, the niobium based alloys, the precipitation strengthened iron and nickel based alloys, the molybdenum alloys and the austenitic alloys.

  20. Comparative study of helium effects on EU-ODS EUROFER and EUROFER97 by nanoindentation and TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldán, M.; Fernández, P.; Rams, J.; Jiménez-Rey, D.; Materna-Morris, E.; Klimenkov, M.

    2015-05-01

    Helium effects on EU-ODS EUROFER were studied by means of nanoindentation and TEM. The results were compared with those of EUROFER97. Both steels were implanted in a stair-like profile configuration using energies from 2 MeV (maximum He content ∼750 appm He) to 15 MeV (minimum He ∼350 appm He) at room temperature. The nanoindentation tests on He implanted samples showed a hardness increase that depended on the He concentration. The maximum hardness increase observed at 5 mN was 21% in EU-ODS EUROFER and 41% in EUROFER97; it corresponded with the zone with the highest He concentration which was around 750 appm, according to MARLOWE simulation. In addition, FIB lamellae were prepared from EUROFER97 and EU-ODS EUROFER containing the aforementioned zones with maximum (750 appm) and minimum (300 appm) He. TEM investigations carried out showed small and homogeneously distributed He nanobubbles on both alloys in the zone corresponding with maximum He content. These microstructural features seem to be the cause of the hardness increase measured by nanoindentation.

  1. Dilution and Ferrite Number Prediction in Pulsed Current Cladding of Super-Duplex Stainless Steel Using RSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eghlimi, Abbas; Shamanian, Morteza; Raeissi, Keyvan

    2013-12-01

    Super-duplex stainless steels have an excellent combination of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance at relatively low temperatures and can be used as a coating to improve the corrosion and wear resistance of low carbon and low alloy steels. Such coatings can be produced using weld cladding. In this study, pulsed current gas tungsten arc cladding process was utilized to deposit super-duplex stainless steel on high strength low alloy steel substrates. In such claddings, it is essential to understand how the dilution affects the composition and ferrite number of super-duplex stainless steel layer in order to be able to estimate its corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. In the current study, the effect of pulsed current gas tungsten arc cladding process parameters on the dilution and ferrite number of super-duplex stainless steel clad layer was investigated by applying response surface methodology. The validity of the proposed models was investigated by using quadratic regression models and analysis of variance. The results showed an inverse relationship between dilution and ferrite number. They also showed that increasing the heat input decreases the ferrite number. The proposed mathematical models are useful for predicting and controlling the ferrite number within an acceptable range for super-duplex stainless steel cladding.

  2. Exchange coupled ferrite nanocomposites through chemical synthesis.

    PubMed

    Dai, Qilin; Patel, Ketan; Ren, Shenqiang

    2016-08-16

    Exchange coupling between magnetically hard and soft phases has the potential to yield a large gain in the energy product. In this work, we present a scalable chemical synthetic route to produce magnetic iron oxide based nanocomposites, consisting of cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) and strontium ferrite (SrFe12O19) components. PMID:27476744

  3. Abnormal ferrite in hyper-eutectoid steels

    SciTech Connect

    Chairuangsri, T.; Edmonds, D.V.

    2000-04-19

    The microstructural characteristics of ultra-high carbon hyper-eutectoid Fe-C and Fe-C-Cu experimental steels have been examined after isothermal transformation in a range just beneath the eutectoid temperature. Particular attention was paid to the formation of so-called abnormal ferrite, which refers to coarse ferrite grains which can form, in hyper-eutectoid compositions, on the pro-eutectoid cementite before the pearlite reaction occurs. Thus it is confirmed that the abnormal ferrite is not a result of pearlite coarsening, but of austenite decomposition before the conditions for coupled growth of pearlite are established. The abnormal ferrite formed on both allotriomorphic and Widmanstaetten forms of pro-eutectoid cementite, and significantly, it was observed that the pro-eutectoid cementite continued to grow, despite being enclosed by the abnormal ferrite. Under certain conditions this could lead to the eventual formation of substantially reduced amounts of pearlite. Thus, a model for carbon redistribution that allows the proeutectoid cementite to thicken concurrently with the abnormal ferrite is presented. The orientation relationships between the abnormal ferrite and pro-eutectoid cementite were also determined and found to be close to those which have been reported between pearlitic ferrite and pearlitic cementite.

  4. Control of Particle Size and Morphology of Cobalt-Ferrite Nanoparticles by Salt-Matrix during Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizi, A.; Sadrnezhaad, S. K.; Mostafavi, M.

    Salt-matrix annealing of mechanically alloyed Co-ferrite nanopowder was used to modify its particle size and morphology. Efficiency improvement due to suppression of sintering and growth resulted in reduction of average particle size from 100nm for salt-less to 40nm for salt-full annealing procedure. Nanosized single-phase cobalt-ferrite particles were observed after 2h annealing at 750°C in the samples milled for 20 hours both with and without NaCl. NaCl:CoFe2O4 ratio of 10:1 resulted in cabbage-like clusters containing particles smaller than 50 nm.

  5. Effects of aluminum additions to gas atomized reaction synthesis produced oxide dispersion strengthened alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spicher, Alexander Lee

    The production of an aluminum containing ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy was investigated. The production method used in this study was gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS). GARS was chosen over the previously commercial method of mechanical alloying (MA) process due to complications from this process. The alloy compositions was determined from three main components; corrosion resistance, dispersoid formation, and additional elements. A combination of Cr and Al were necessary in order to create a protective oxide in the steam atmosphere that the boiler tubing in the next generation of coal-fired power plants would be exposed to. Hf and Y were chosen as dispersoid forming elements due to their increased thermal stability and potential to avoid decreased strength caused by additions of Al to traditional ODS materials. W was used as an additive due to benefits as a strengthener as well as its benefits for creep rupture time. The final composition chosen for the alloy was Fe-16Cr-12Al-0.9W-0.25Hf-0.2Y at%. The aforementioned alloy, GA-1-198, was created through gas atomization with atomization gas of Ar-300ppm O2. The actual composition created was found to be Fe-15Cr-12.3Al-0.9W-0.24Hf-0.19Y at%. An additional alloy that was nominally the same without the inclusion of aluminum was created as a comparison for the effects on mechanical and corrosion properties. The actual composition of the comparison alloy, GA-1-204, was Fe-16Cr-0Al-0.9W-0.25Hf-0.24Y at%. An investigation on the processing parameters for these alloys was conducted on the GA-1-198 alloy. In order to predict the necessary amount of time for heat treatment, a diffusion study was used to find the diffusion rate of oxygen in cast alloys with similar composition. The diffusion rate was found to be similar to that of other GARS compositions that have been created without the inclusion of aluminum. The effect of heat treatment time was investigated with temperatures of 950°C, 1000

  6. Phase transformations and microstructure development in low alloy steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, S.S.; David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.

    1995-07-01

    Microstructure development in low alloy steel welds depends on various phase transformations that are a function of weld heating and cooling. The phase changes include non-metallic oxide inclusion formation in the liquid state, weld pool solidification, and solid state transformations. In this paper the mechanism of inclusion formation during low alloy steel welding is considered and the model predictions are compared with published results. The effect of inclusions on the austenite to ferrite transformation kinetics is measured and the mechanisms of transformation are discussed. The austenite gain development is related to the driving force for transformation of {delta} ferrite to austenite.

  7. 46 CFR 280.4 - Standards governing payment of ODS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standards governing payment of ODS. 280.4 Section 280.4 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING SUBSIDIZED VESSELS AND OPERATORS LIMITATIONS ON THE AWARD AND PAYMENT OF OPERATING-DIFFERENTIAL SUBSIDY FOR LINER OPERATORS §...

  8. 46 CFR 280.4 - Standards governing payment of ODS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standards governing payment of ODS. 280.4 Section 280.4 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING SUBSIDIZED VESSELS AND OPERATORS LIMITATIONS ON THE AWARD AND PAYMENT OF OPERATING-DIFFERENTIAL SUBSIDY FOR LINER OPERATORS §...

  9. Development of ferritic steels for fusion reactor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Maziasz, P.J.; Corwin, W.R.

    1988-08-01

    Chromium-molybdenum ferritic (martensitic) steels are leading candidates for the structural components for future fusion reactors. However, irradiation of such steels in a fusion environment will produce long-lived radioactive isotopes that will lead to difficult waste-disposal problems. Such problems could be reduced by replacing the elements in the steels (i.e., Mo, Nb, Ni, N, and Cu) that lead to long-lived radioactive isotopes. We have proposed the development of ferritic steels analogous to conventional Cr-Mo steels, which contain molybdenum and niobium. It is proposed that molybdenum be replaced by tungsten and niobium be replaced by tantalum. Eight experimental steels were produced. Chromium concentrations of 2.25, 5, 9, and 12% were used (all concentrations are in wt %). Steels with these chromium compositions, each containing 2% W and 0.25% V, were produced. To determine the effect of tungsten and vanadium, 2.25 Cr steels were produced with 2% W and no vanadium and with 0.25% V and O and 1% W. A 9Cr steel containing 2% W, 0.25 V, and 0.07% Ta was also studied. For all alloys, carbon was maintained at 0.1%. Tempering studies on the normalized steels indicated that the tempering behavior of the new Cr-W steels was similar to that of the analogous Cr-Mo steels. Microscopy studies indicated that 2% tungsten was required in the 2.25 Cr steels to produce 100% bainite in 15.9-mm-thick plate during normalization. The 5Cr and 9Cr steels were 100% martensite, but the 12 Cr steel contained about 75% martensite with the balance delta-ferrite. 33 refs., 35 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Hot-Pressed Ferrite-Lead Zirconate Titanate Magnetoelectric Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devreugd, C. P.; Srinivasan, G.; Micheli, A. L.; Mantese, J. V.

    2004-03-01

    The electromagnetic coupling in magnetostrictive/piezoelectric is mediated by mechanical stress: magnetostriction induced mechanical deformation and piezoelectric effect induced electric fields. Composites studied so far include ferrite-lead zirconate titanate (PZT) and manganite-PZT [1-3]. Bulk or layered composites are usually synthesized by conventional sintering of mixture of powders or laminated thick films. This study is concerned with the fabrication of novel ferromagnetic-ferroelectric bulk and thin film layered composites by hot pressing together with studies on the nature of magnetoelectric interactions. The objective is to obtain defect free samples with good interface coupling. Systems studied includes Ni-Zn, Co-Zn and Co-Ni ferrites that are predicted to show high piezomagnetic and magnetomechanical couplings and PZT. Samples were prepared using aluminum oxide or high temperature alloy dies. Sintering was done at 1300 K at a pressure of 5000-7000 psi. Measurements of transverse and longitudinal ME coefficients are performed at low frequencies (10 Hz-1kHz), and at electromechanical resonance (100-300 kHz). Important results of our studies are follows. (1) Hot-pressed samples show an order of magnitude improvement in ME voltage coefficient compared to samples processed by conventional sintering. The enhancement is attributed to an increase in density, sample resistivity, and interface coupling. (2) The longitudinal coupling is stronger than the transverse effect. (3) There is a significant increase in ME interactions at electromechanical resonance. (4) Samples with Ni-Zn ferrites show the highest ME coefficients. The results are analysed using our model for a bulk composite. - supported by a grant from the National Science Foundation (DMR-0322254) 1. G. Srinivasan, E. T. Rasmussen, J. Gallegos, Yu. I. Bokhan, and V. M. Laletin, Phys. Rev. B, 64, 214408 (2001). 2. G. Srinivasan, E. T. Rasmussen, B. J. Levin, and R. Hayes, Phys. Rev. B 65, 134402 (2002). 3

  11. Several braze filler metals for joining an oxide-dispersion-strengthened nickel-chromium-aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyorgak, C. A.

    1975-01-01

    An evaluation was made of five braze filler metals for joining an aluminum-containing oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloy, TD-NiCrAl. All five braze filler metals evaluated are considered suitable for joining TD-NiCrAl in terms of wettability and flow. Also, the braze alloys appear to be tolerant of slight variations in brazing procedures since joints prepared by three sources using three of the braze filler metals exhibited similar brazing characteristics and essentially equivalent 1100 C stress-rupture properties in a brazed butt-joint configuration. Recommendations are provided for brazing the aluminum-containing ODS alloys.

  12. Oxide strengthened molybdenum-rhenium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Bianco, Robert; Buckman, Jr., R. William

    2000-01-01

    Provided is a method of making an ODS molybdenum-rhenium alloy which includes the steps of: (a) forming a slurry containing molybdenum oxide and a metal salt dispersed in an aqueous medium, the metal salt being selected from nitrates or acetates of lanthanum, cerium or thorium; (b) heating the slurry in the presence of hydrogen to form a molybdenum powder comprising molybdenum and an oxide of the metal salt; (c) mixing rhenium powder with the molybdenum powder to form a molybdenum-rhenium powder; (d) pressing the molybdenum-rhenium powder to form a molybdenum-rhenium compact; (e) sintering the molybdenum-rhenium compact in hydrogen or under a vacuum to form a molybdenum-rhenium ingot; and (f) compacting the molybdenum-rhenium ingot to reduce the cross-sectional area of the molybdenum-rhenium ingot and form a molybdenum-rhenium alloy containing said metal oxide. The present invention also provides an ODS molybdenum-rhenium alloy made by the method. A preferred Mo--Re-ODS alloy contains 7-14 weight % rhenium and 2-4 volume % lanthanum oxide.

  13. Ferrite-Martensite Band Formation During the Intercritical Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etesami, S. A.; Enayati, M. H.

    2016-02-01

    Microstructural evolution during the intercritical annealing at 740 and 770 °C for 120-900 s in a low-carbon low-alloy steel from the initial martensitic matrix was studied by electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction. It was seen that during the intercritical annealing, the martensitic structure changes to the tempered martensite with carbides. The results depicted that the temperature and time of intercritical annealing influence significantly the distribution and amount of the formed carbides. Two types of austenite morphology were identified to grow simultaneously, i.e., globular and acicular. A longer annealing time led to the coarse globular and thick acicular austenite morphology. The austenite with globular morphology nucleated preferably at prior austenite grain boundary triple and quadruple junctions. The austenite with globular and acicular morphology was developed in Mn-rich and -poor regions, respectively. The globular austenite morphology intensified the banded microstructure of ferrite-martensite dual-phase steel, whereas the acicular austenite morphology led to a more isotropic microstructure. The experimental results illustrated that the intercritical temperature is a significant factor which can contribute to intensify the banded ferrite-martensite microstructure. The volume fractions of austenite with globular and acicular morphology were quantitatively measured. The volume fraction of globular to acicular morphology of austenite was high and low at 770 and 740 °C, respectively.

  14. Creep and residual mechanical properties of cast superalloys and oxide dispersion strengthened alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    Tensile, stress-rupture, creep, and residual tensile properties after creep testing were determined for two typical cast superalloys and four advanced oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys. The superalloys examined included the nickel-base alloy B-1900 and the cobalt-base alloy MAR-M509. The nickel-base ODS MA-757 (Ni-16CR-4Al-0.6Y2O3 and the iron-base ODS alloy MA-956 (Fe-20Cr-5Al-0.8Y2O3) were extensively studied, while limited testing was conducted on the ODS nickel-base alloys STCA (Ni-16Cr-4.5Al-2Y2O3) with a without Ta and YD-NiCrAl (Ni-16Cr-5Al-2Y2O3). Elevated temperature testing was conducted from 114 to 1477 K except for STCA and YD-NiCrAl alloys, which were only tested at 1366 K. The residual tensile properties of B-1900 and MAR-M509 are not reduced by prior creep testing (strains at least up to 1 percent), while the room temperature tensile properties of ODS nickel-base alloys can be reduced by small amounts of prior creep strain (less than 0.5 percent). The iron-base ODS alloy MA-956 does not appear to be susceptible to creep degradation at least up to strains of about 0.25 percent. However, MA-956 exhibits unusual creep behavior which apparently involves crack nucleation and growth.

  15. Alloy development for irradiation performance. Quarterly progress report for period ending December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Ashdown, B.G.

    1980-04-01

    Progress is reported concerning preparation of a materials handbook for fusion, creep-fatigue of first-wall structural materials, test results on miniature compact tension fracture toughness specimens, austenitic stainless steels, Fe-Ni-Cr alloys, iron-base alloys with long-range crystal structure, ferritic steels, irradiation experiments, corrosion testing, and hydrogen permeation studies. (FS)

  16. Effect of milling atmosphere on structural and magnetic properties of Ni-Zn ferrite nanocrystalline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajalilou, Abdollah; Hashim, Mansor; Ebrahimi-Kahrizsangi, Reza; Masoudi Mohamad, Taghi

    2015-04-01

    Powder mixtures of Zn, NiO, and Fe2O3 are mechanically alloyed by high energy ball milling to produce Ni-Zn ferrite with a nominal composition of Ni0.36Zn0.64Fe2O4. The effects of milling atmospheres (argon, air, and oxygen), milling time (from 0 to 30 h) and heat treatment are studied. The products are characterized using x-ray diffractometry, field emission scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and transmitted electron microscopy. The results indicate that the desired ferrite is not produced during the milling in the samples milled under either air or oxygen atmospheres. In those samples milled under argon, however, Zn/NiO/Fe2O3 reacts with a solid-state diffusion mode to produce Ni-Zn ferrite nanocrystalline in a size of 8 nm after 30-h-milling. The average crystallite sizes decrease to 9 nm and 10 nm in 30-h-milling samples under air and oxygen atmospheres, respectively. Annealing the 30-h-milling samples at 600 °C for 2 h leads to the formation of a single phase of Ni-Zn ferrite, an increase of crystallite size, and a reduction of internal lattice strain. Finally, the effects of the milling atmosphere and heating temperature on the magnetic properties of the 30-h-milling samples are investigated. Project supported by the University Putra Malaysia Graduate Research Fellowship Section.

  17. Design of Radiation-Tolerant Structural Alloys for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, T.R.; Was, G.S.; Bruemmer, S.M.; Gan, J.; Ukai, S.

    2005-12-28

    The objective of this program is to improve the radiation tolerance of both austenitic and ferritic-martensitic (F-M) alloys projected for use in Generation IV systems. The expected materials limitations of Generation IV components include: creep strength, dimensional stability, and corrosion/stress corrosion compatibility. The material design strategies to be tested fall into three main categories: (1) engineering grain boundaries; (2) alloying, by adding oversized elements to the matrix; and (3) microstructural/nanostructural design, such as adding matrix precipitates. These three design strategies were tested across both austenitic and ferritic-martensitic alloy classes

  18. Development of new generation reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steels for advanced fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, L.; Snead, L. L.; Katoh, Y.

    2016-09-01

    International development of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels has focused on 9 wt percentage Cr, which primarily contain M23C6 (M = Cr-rich) and small amounts of MX (M = Ta/V, X = C/N) precipitates, not adequate to maintain strength and creep resistance above ∼500 °C. To enable applications at higher temperatures for better thermal efficiency of fusion reactors, computational alloy thermodynamics coupled with strength modeling have been employed to explore a new generation RAFM steels. The new alloys are designed to significantly increase the amount of MX nanoprecipitates, which are manufacturable through standard and scalable industrial steelmaking methods. Preliminary experimental results of the developed new alloys demonstrated noticeably increased amount of MX, favoring significantly improved strength, creep resistance, and Charpy impact toughness as compared to current RAFM steels. The strength and creep resistance were comparable or approaching to the lower bound of, but impact toughness was noticeably superior to 9-20Cr oxide dispersion-strengthened ferritic alloys.

  19. Development of new generation reduced activation ferritic-martenstic steels for advanced fusion reactors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tan, Lizhen; Snead, Lance Lewis; Katoh, Yutai

    2016-05-26

    International development of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels has focused on 9 wt percentage Cr, which primarily contain M23C6 (M = Cr-rich) and small amounts of MX (M = Ta/V, X = C/N) precipitates, not adequate to maintain strength and creep resistance above ~500 °C. To enable applications at higher temperatures for better thermal efficiency of fusion reactors, computational alloy thermodynamics coupled with strength modeling have been employed to explore a new generation RAFM steels. The new alloys are designed to significantly increase the amount of MX nanoprecipitates, which are manufacturable through standard and scalable industrial steelmaking methods. Preliminary experimentalmore » results of the developed new alloys demonstrated noticeably increased amount of MX, favoring significantly improved strength, creep resistance, and Charpy impact toughness as compared to current RAFM steels. Furthermore, the strength and creep resistance were comparable or approaching to the lower bound of, but impact toughness was noticeably superior to 9–20Cr oxide dispersion-strengthened ferritic alloys.« less

  20. Progress in the R and D Project on Oxide Dispersion Strengthened and Precipitation Hardened Ferritic Steels for Sodium Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Kaito, Takeji; Ohtsuka, Satoshi; Inoue, Masaki

    2007-07-01

    High burnup capability of sodium cooled fast breeder reactor (SFR) fuels depends significantly on irradiation performance of their component materials. Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has been developing oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels and a precipitation hardened (PH) ferritic steel as the most prospective materials for fuel pin cladding and duct tubes, respectively. Technology for small-scale manufacturing is already established, and several hundreds of ODS steel cladding tubes and dozens of PH steel duct tubes were successfully produced. We will step forward to develop manufacturing technology for mass production to supply these steels for future SFR fuels. Mechanical properties of the products were examined by out-of-pile and in-pile tests including material irradiation tests in the experimental fast reactor JOYO and foreign fast reactors. The material strength standards (MSSs) were tentatively compiled in 2005 for ODS steels and in 1993 for PH steel. In order to upgrade the MSSs and to demonstrate high burnup capability of the materials, we will perform a series of irradiation tests in BOR-60 and JOYO until 2015 and contribute to design study for a demonstration SFR of which operation is expected after 2025. (authors)

  1. TEM microscopical examination of the magnetic domain boundaries in a super duplex austenitic-ferritic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Fourlaris, G.; Gladman, T.; Maylin, M.

    1996-12-31

    It has been demonstrated in an earlier publication that significant improvements in the coercivity, maximum induction and remanence values can be achieved, by using a 2205 type Duplex austenitic-ferritic stainless steel (DSS) instead of the low alloy medium carbon steels currently being used. These improvements are achieved in the as received 2205 material, and after small amounts of cold rolling have been applied, to increase the strength. In addition, the modification of the duplex austenitic-ferritic microstructure, via a heat treatment route, results in a finer austenite `island` dispersion in a ferritic matrix and provides an attractive option for further modification of the magnetic characteristics of the material. However, the 2205 type DSS exhibits {open_quotes}marginal{close_quotes} corrosion protection in a marine environment, so that a study has been undertaken to examine whether the beneficial effects exhibited by the 2205 DSS, are also present in a 2507 type super-DSS.

  2. Structural analysis of emerging ferrite: Doped nickel zinc ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rajinder; Kumar, Hitanshu; Singh, Ragini Raj; Barman, P. B.

    2015-08-28

    Ni{sub 0.6-x}Zn{sub 0.4}Co{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x = 0, 0.033, 0.264) nanoparticles were synthesized by sol-gel method and annealed at 900°C. Structural properties of all prepared samples were examined with X-ray diffraction (XRD). The partial formation of hematite (α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) secondary phase with spinel phase cubic structure of undoped and cobalt doped nickel zinc ferrite was found by XRD peaks. The variation in crystallite size and other structural parameters with cobalt doping has been calculated for most prominent peak (113) of XRD and has been explained on the basis of cations ionic radii difference.

  3. Modeling the austenite decomposition into ferrite and bainite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazeli, Fateh

    2005-12-01

    during the industrial treatments. The thermodynamic boundary conditions for the kinetic model were assessed with respect to paraequilibrium. The potential interaction between the alloying atoms and the moving ferrite-austenite interface, referred to as solute drag effect, was accounted for rigorously in the model. To quantify the solute drag pressure the Purdy-Brechet approach was modified prior to its implementation into the model. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  4. Report on thermal aging effects on tensile properties of ferritic-martensitic steels.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, M.; Soppet, W.K.; Rink, D.L.; Listwan, J.T.; Natesan, K.

    2012-05-10

    This report provides an update on the evaluation of thermal-aging induced degradation of tensile properties of advanced ferritic-martensitic steels. The report is the first deliverable (level 3) in FY11 (M3A11AN04030103), under the Work Package A-11AN040301, 'Advanced Alloy Testing' performed by Argonne National Laboratory, as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for the Advanced Reactor Concepts. This work package supports the advanced structural materials development by providing tensile data on aged alloys and a mechanistic model, validated by experiments, with a predictive capability on long-term performance. The scope of work is to evaluate the effect of thermal aging on the tensile properties of advanced alloys such as ferritic-martensitic steels, mod.9Cr-1Mo, NF616, and advanced austenitic stainless steel, HT-UPS. The aging experiments have been conducted over a temperature of 550-750 C for various time periods to simulate the microstructural changes in the alloys as a function of time at temperature. In addition, a mechanistic model based on thermodynamics and kinetics has been used to address the changes in microstructure of the alloys as a function of time and temperature, which is developed in the companion work package at ANL. The focus of this project is advanced alloy testing and understanding the effects of long-term thermal aging on the tensile properties. Advanced materials examined in this project include ferritic-martensitic steels mod.9Cr-1Mo and NF616, and austenitic steel, HT-UPS. The report summarizes the tensile testing results of thermally-aged mod.9Cr-1Mo, NF616 H1 and NF616 H2 ferritic-martensitic steels. NF616 H1 and NF616 H2 experienced different thermal-mechanical treatments before thermal aging experiments. NF616 H1 was normalized and tempered, and NF616 H2 was normalized and tempered and cold-rolled. By examining these two heats, we evaluated the effects of thermal-mechanical treatments on material microstructures and

  5. Irradiation performance of 9--12 Cr ferritic/martensitic stainless steels and their potential for in-core application in LWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1993-08-01

    Ferritic-martensitic stainless steels exhibit radiation stability and stress corrosion resistance that make them attractive replacement materials for austenitic stainless steels for in-core applications. Recent radiation studies have demonstrated that 9% Cr ferritic/martensitic stainless steel had less than a 30C shift in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) following irradiation at 365C to a dose of 14 dpa. These steels also exhibit very low swelling rates, a result of the microstructural stability of these alloys during radiation. The 9 to 12% Cr alloys to also exhibit excellent corrosion and stress corrosion resistance in out-of-core applications. Demonstration of the applicability of ferritic/martensitic stainless steels for in-core LWR application will require verification of the irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking behavior, measurement of DBTT following irradiation at 288C, and corrosion rates measurements for in-core water chemistry.

  6. Irradiation creep of low-activation ferritic steels in FFTF/MOTA*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohyama, A.; Kohno, Y.; Asakura, K.; Yoshino, M.; Namba, C.; Eiholzer, C. R.

    1994-09-01

    Irradiation creep behavior of low-activation steels, developed as structural materials for fusion reactors (JLF series steels), was investigated to obtain a fundamental understanding of these alloys under fast neutron irradiation in FFTF. (2.25-8)Cr(1-2)W bainitic steels and 12Cr-2W ferritic steels showed superior creep resistance to type-316 stainless steels under fast neutron irradiation up to 520°C. At temperatures below 460°C the creep strain increased with increasing Cr content up to 7 Cr, and further increments of Cr content up to 12% reduced the creep strain. At temperatures between 460 and 600°C, 7-8 Cr ferritic steels showed the largest creep strain. Swelling-enhanced creep, near the peak swelling temperature of 410°C, was also observed. The 9Cr-2W ferritic steel JLF-1 presented excellent properties, suggesting it as a leading candidate alloy for structural components of fusion reactors.

  7. Technical Letter Report on the Cracking of Irradiated Cast Stainless Steels with Low Ferrite Content

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Alexandreanu, B.; Natesan, K.

    2014-11-01

    Crack growth rate and fracture toughness J-R curve tests were performed on CF-3 and CF-8 cast austenite stainless steels (CASS) with 13-14% of ferrite. The tests were conducted at ~320°C in either high-purity water with low dissolved oxygen or in simulated PWR water. The cyclic crack growth rates of CF-8 were higher than that of CF-3, and the differences between the aged and unaged specimens were small. No elevated SCC susceptibility was observed among these samples, and the SCC CGRs of these materials were comparable to those of CASS alloys with >23% ferrite. The fracture toughness values of unirradiated CF-3 were similar between unaged and aged specimens, and neutron irradiation decreased the fracture toughness significantly. The fracture toughness of CF-8 was reduced after thermal aging, and declined further after irradiation. It appears that while lowering ferrite content may help reduce the tendency of thermal aging embrittlement, it is not very effective to mitigate irradiation-induced embrittlement. Under a combined condition of thermal aging and irradiation, neutron irradiation plays a dominant role in causing embrittlement in CASS alloys.

  8. Humidity sensing properties of CNT-OD-VETP nanocomposite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleem, M.; Karimov, Kh. S.; Karieva, Z. M.; Mateen, A.

    2010-11-01

    In this study, the blend of orange dye (OD), C 17H 17N 5O 2 (5 wt%), vinyl-ethynyl-trimethyl-piperidole (VETP), C 12H 19NO, (5 wt%) and carbon nanotube (CNT) powder (10 wt%) in a mixture of distilled water (80 wt%) and spirit were drop-casted on glass substrates with pre-deposited surface-type silver electrodes to fabricate CNT-OD-VETP nanocomposite thin films. In the process of thin films deposition, 2 V DC was applied to Ag electrodes. The thicknesses of the CNT-OD-VETP films were in the range of 10-15 μm. The I-V characteristics of the surface-type Ag/CNT-OD-VETP/Ag samples showed rectification behavior. The effect of humidity on the electrical properties of the nanocomposite films was investigated by measurement of the capacitance and dissipation of the samples at two different frequencies of the applied voltage: 120 Hz and 1 kHz. The resistance of the samples was determined from values of dissipation. It was observed that at 120 Hz and 1 kHz, under humidity of up to 90% RH, the capacitance of the cell increased by 7.4×10 3 and 740 times and resistance decreased by 2.3×10 4 and 3.8×10 4 times, accordingly, with respect to 40% RH conditions. The average response and recovery times of the films were obtained by capacitance-time measurements to evaluate the dynamics of the water vapor absorption and desorption processes. The experimental results have been supported by the simulation of the capacitance-humidity relationship. It is assumed that the humidity response of the cell is associated with diffusion of water vapors and doping of the semiconductor nanocomposite by water molecules.

  9. Nanoindentation creep study on an ion beam irradiated oxide dispersion strengthened alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zijing; Harris, Adrian; Maloy, Stuart A.; Hosemann, Peter

    2014-08-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys are considered advanced structural materials for nuclear application due to their radiation tolerance and creep resistance. Ion beam irradiation is used to study the property changes due to displacement damage. In this work 1 dpa displacement damage in an ODS was produced followed by a nanoindentation creep study at temperatures up to 600 °C to evaluate the changes in mechanical properties due to irradiation. Converted yield strength (YS) and creep related parameters are reported.

  10. Mechanically alloyed Ni-base alloys for heat-resistant applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.K.; Fischer, J.J.

    1995-12-31

    INCONEL alloys MA 754 and MA 758 are nickel-base oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys made by mechanical alloying (MA). Commercial use of Ma Ni-base alloys to date has been predominantly in aerospace applications of alloy MA 754 as turbine engine vanes. Both alloys are suitable for industrial heat treating components and other heat resistant alloy applications. Field trials and commercial experience in such applications of MA alloys are being gained while high temperature property characterization and new product form development continue. Hot isostatic pressing (HIP) is the standard consolidation method for billets from which large bar and plate are produced for industrial applications of MA. This paper describes production of standard mill shapes from HIP billets, and it presents information on current and potential uses of MA alloys in applications such as: skid rails for use in high temperature walking beam furnaces, heat treating furnace components, components for handling molten glass, and furnace tubes. The paper includes comparison of the properties obtained in alloy MA 754 (20% Cr) and alloy MA 758 (30% Cr).

  11. Influence of structural-phase state of ferritic-martensitic steels on the helium porosity development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, I. I.; Staltsov, M. S.; Kalin, B. A.; Bogachev, I. A.; Guseva, L. Yu; Dzhumaev, P. S.; Emelyanova, O. V.; Drozhzhina, M. V.; Manukovsky, K. V.; Nikolaeva, I. D.

    2016-04-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been used to study the effect of the initial structural-phase state (SPhS) of ferritic-martensitic steels EK-181, EP-450 and EP-450- ODS (with 0.5 wt.% nanoparticles of Y2O3) on the of helium porosity formation and gas swelling. Different SPhS of steel EK-181 was produced by water quenching, annealing, normalizing plus tempered, intensive plastic deformation by torsion (HPDT). Irradiation was carried out by He+-40 keV ions at 923 K up to fluence of 5-1020 He+/m2. It is shown that the water quenching causes the formation of uniformly distributed small bubbles (d¯ ∼ 2 nm) of the highest density (ρ∼ 1025 m-3). After normalization followed by tempering as well as after annealing bubbles distribution is highly non-uniform both by volume and in size. Very large faceted bubbles (pre-equilibrium gas-filled voids) are formed in ferrite grains resulting in high level of gas swelling of the irradiated layer with S = 4,9 ± 1,2 and 3.8 ± 0.9% respectively. Nano- and microcrystalline structure created by HPDT completely degenerate at irradiation temperature and ion irradiation formed bubbles of the same parameters as in the annealed steel. Bubbles formed in EP-450-ODS steel are smaller in size and density, which led to a decrease of helium swelling by 4 times (S = 0.8 ± 0.2%) as compared to the swelling of the matrix steel EP-450 (S = 3.1 ± 0.7%).

  12. Ferrite Nanoparticles in Pharmacological Modulation of Angiogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, Aparna; Radha, S.; Khan, Y.; Tilak, Priya

    2011-07-01

    Nanoparticles are being explored in the targeted drug delivery of pharmacological agents : angiogenesis being one such novel application which involves formation of new blood vessels or branching of existing ones. The present study involves the use of ferrite nanoparticles for precise therapeutic modulation of angiogenesis. The ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by co-precipitation of ferrous and ferric salts by a suitable base, were found to be 10-20 nm from X-ray diffraction and TEM measurements. The magnetization measurements showed superparamagnetic behavior of the uncoated nanoparticles. These ferrite nanoparticles were found to be bio-compatible with lymphocytes and neural cell lines from the biochemical assays. The chick chorioallantoic membrane(CAM) from the shell of fertile white Leghorn eggs was chosen as a model to study angiogenic activity. An enhancement in the angiogenic activity in the CAM due to addition of uncoated ferrite nanoparticles was observed.

  13. ALL-FERRITE RHIC INJECTION KICKER

    SciTech Connect

    HAHN,H.; FISCHER,W.; PTITSYN,V.I.; TUOZZOLO,J.E.

    2001-06-18

    Ion beams are transferred from the AGS into RHIC in boxcar fashion as single bunches. The nominal design assumes 60 bunches per ring but increasing the number of bunches to gain luminosity is possible, thereby requiring injection kickers with a shorter rise time. The original injection system consists of traveling-wave dielectric loaded kicker magnets and a Blumlein pulser with a rise time adequate for the present operation. Voltage breakdown in the dielectric kickers suggested the use of all-ferrite magnets. In order to minimize the conversion cost, the design of the all-ferrite kicker uses the same components as the dielectric loaded units. The all-ferrite kickers showed in bench measured good breakdown properties and a current rise time of < 50 ns. A prototype kicker has been installed in the blue ring and was tested with beam. Beam measurements indicate suitability of all-ferrite kicker magnets for upgraded operation.

  14. Ferrite HOM Absorber for the RHIC ERL

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn,H.; Choi, E.M.; Hammons, L.

    2008-10-01

    A superconducting Energy Recovery Linac is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory to serve as test bed for RHIC upgrades. The damping of higher-order modes in the superconducting five-cell cavity for the Energy-Recovery linac at RHIC is performed exclusively by two ferrite absorbers. The ferrite properties have been measured in ferrite-loaded pill box cavities resulting in the permeability values given by a first-order Debye model for the tiled absorber structure and an equivalent permeability value for computer simulations with solid ring dampers. Measured and simulated results for the higher-order modes in the prototype copper cavity are discussed. First room-temperature measurements of the finished niobium cavity are presented which confirm the effective damping of higher-order modes in the ERL. by the ferrite absorbers.

  15. Improved ferrite number prediction in stainless steel arc welds using artificial neural networks -- Part 2: Neural network results

    SciTech Connect

    Vitek, J.M.; Iskander, Y.S.; Oblow, E.M.

    2000-02-01

    The development of a neural network model, named FNN-1999, for predicting Ferrite Number in arc welds as a function of alloy composition is described in Part 1. In this paper, the results of the model are compared to other means of predicting Ferrite Number in stainless steel welds. It was found the accuracy of the FNN-1999 model in predicting Ferrite Number is superior to that of the WRC-1992 diagram, the Function Fit model and a preliminary neural network model developed earlier. The error in fitting the current model to the training set was 40% less than that for the WRC-1992 diagram. In addition, the FNN-1999 model removes the restriction found in WRC-1992 and many other constitution diagrams that each element's contribution to the Ferrite Number is constant, regardless of the overall composition. Examples are given that show that with this added flexibility of the FNN-1999 model, the impact of alloying additions varies as a function of concentration, and in some cases the variation can be quite significant.

  16. Ferrite insertion at Recycler Flying Wire System

    SciTech Connect

    K.Y. Ng

    2004-02-27

    Ferrite rods are installed inside the flying-wire cavity of the Recycler Ring and at entrance and exit beam pipes in order to absorb high-frequency electromagnetic waves excited by the beam. However, these rods may also deteriorate the vacuum pressure of the ring. An investigation is made to analyze the necessity of the ferrite rods at the entrance and exit beam pipes.

  17. Effect of Niobium on the Ferrite Continuous-Cooling-Transformation (CCT) Curve of Ultrahigh-Thickness Cr-Mo Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sanghoon; Na, Hyesung; Kim, Byunghoon; Kim, Dongjin; Kang, Chungyun

    2013-06-01

    Pressure vessels made for petrochemical and power plants using Cr-Mo steel must be thick (≥400 mm) and have high tensile strength (≥600 MPa). However, the tensile strength in the middle portion of the vessel is very low as a result of ferrite formation. Therefore, research was performed to study the ferrite transformation that occurs in the middle portion of high-thickness Cr-Mo steel when Nb is added to it. The ferrite-formation start time of the continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) curve decreased with an increase in Nb content until the latter reached 0.05 pct. On cooling from the austenitizing temperature, some of the NbC present at the austenitizing temperature of 1203 K (930 °C) goes into austenite solution in the temperature range of 1173 K to 1073 K (900 °C to 800 °C). However, the ferrite curve shifted to the left for the alloy containing 0.075 pct Nb. It is postulated that the surplus NbC could act as ferrite nucleation sites despite the lower cooling rate. As a result, the hardenability improved in the order of the following Nb content: 0.05 pct, 0.025 pct, 0 pct, and 0.075 pct.

  18. Method for reducing formation of electrically resistive layer on ferritic stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Rakowski, James M.

    2013-09-10

    A method of reducing the formation of electrically resistive scale on a an article comprising a silicon-containing ferritic stainless subjected to oxidizing conditions in service includes, prior to placing the article in service, subjecting the article to conditions under which silica, which includes silicon derived from the steel, forms on a surface of the steel. Optionally, at least a portion of the silica is removed from the surface to placing the article in service. A ferritic stainless steel alloy having a reduced tendency to form silica on at least a surface thereof also is provided. The steel includes a near-surface region that has been depleted of silicon relative to a remainder of the steel.

  19. Modeling of He - Defect Interactions in Ferritic Alloys for Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, Richard J.; Heinisch, Howard L.; Gao, Fei

    2008-12-01

    High concentrations of helium will be produced in fusion reactor structural materials due to neutron capture reactions. The creep-rupture and fracture properties may be severely degraded if helium aggregates at grain boundaries to a sufficiently high level. To design helium-resistant microstructures requires detailed knowledge of the transport and fate of helium to sinks. We utilize atomistic methods to study the fate of helium in the neighborhood of dislocations, grain boundaries and coherent nano-clusters in alpha-iron. The binding energies of helium to these defects are strongly correlated with excess atomic volume. Molecular dynamics and the dimer saddle point search method were employed to study the mobility of both interstitial helium atoms and helium-vacancy complexes in dislocations and grain boundaries. The migration energy of interstitial helium in these defects was found to range from about 0.4 to 0.5 eV.

  20. Solidification microstructure formation in HK40 and HH40 alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xian-fei; Liu, Dong-fang; Guo, Pei-liang; Zheng, Yun-rong; Feng, Qiang

    2016-04-01

    The microstructure formation processes in HK40 and HH40 alloys were investigated through JmatPro calculations and quenching performed during directional solidification. The phase transition routes of HK40 and HH40 alloys were determined as L → L + γ → L + γ + M7C3 → γ + M7C3 → γ + M7C3 + M23C6→ γ + M23C6 and L → L + δ → L + δ + γ→ L + δ + γ + M23C6 δ + γ + M23C6, respectively. The solidification mode was determined to be the austenitic mode (A mode) in HK40 alloy and the ferritic-austenitic solidification mode (FA mode) in HH40 alloy. In HK40 alloy, eutectic carbides directly precipitate in a liquid and coarsen during cooling. The primary γ dendrites grow at the 60° angle to each other. On the other hand, in HH40 alloy, residual δ forms because of the incomplete transformation from δ to γ. Cr23C6 carbide is produced in solid delta ferrite δ but not directly in liquid HH40 alloy. Because of carbide formation in the solid phase and no rapid growth of the dendrite in a non-preferential direction, HH40 alloy is more resistant to cast defect formation than HK40 alloy.

  1. Metal-bonded Co-ferrite composites for magnetorestrictive torque sensor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Snyder, J.E.; Schwichtenberg, C.R.; Dennis, K.W.; McCallum, R.W.; Jiles, D.C.

    1999-09-01

    A new class of magnetomechanical sensor materials, co-ferrite (CoO {center{underscore}dot} Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and metal-bonded (Ag, Ni, Co) Co-ferrite composites, has been investigated. These materials exhibited magnetostriction in excess of 200 ppm and high d{sub 33} ({partial{underscore}derivative}{lambda}/{partial{underscore}derivative}H){sub {sigma}} coefficient, 1.3 x 10{sup {minus}9} A{sup {minus}1}m, at low applied field (<100 kA/m). Selected compositions were formed into test samples in the form of rings brazed to stainless steel through-shafts. Changes of surface axial magnetic field in response to applied torque as high as 64 AN{sup {minus}1}m{sup {minus}2} were observed for a demonstration sample of dimensions 25 mm OD, 12.5 mm ID, and 8 mm high. A hysteresis of {+-}0.5 N{center{underscore}dot}m was observed. These materials appear to be promising candidates for torque sensors, and other magnetostrictive sensor and actuator applications.

  2. Morphological and crystallographic evolution of bainite transformation in Fe-0.15C binary alloy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Di; Terasaki, Hidenori; Komizo, Yuichi

    2010-01-01

    In this article, an in situ observation method, combining laser scanning confocal microscopy and electron backscattering diffraction, was used to investigate the morphological and crystallographic evolution of bainite transformation in a Fe-0.15C binary alloy. The nucleation at a grain boundary and inclusions, sympathetic nucleation, and impingement event of bainitic ferrite were directly shown in real time. The variant evolution during bainite transformation and misorientation between bainitic ferrites were clarified. Strong variant selection was observed during sympathetic nucleation. PMID:19588518

  3. Characterization of Solid State Phase Transformation in Continuously Heated and Cooled Ferritic Weld Metal

    SciTech Connect

    Narayana, B; Mills, Michael J.; Specht, Eliot D; Santella, Michael L; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh

    2010-12-01

    Arc welding processes involve cooling rates that vary over a wide range (1-100 K/s). The final microstructire is thus a product of the heating and cooling cycles experienced by the weld in addition to the weld composition. It has been shown that the first phase to form under weld cooling conditions may not be that predicted by equilibrium calculations. The partitioning of different interstitial/substitutional alloying elements at high temperatures can dramatically affect the subsequent phase transformations. In order to understand the effect of alloying on phase transformation temperatures and final microstructures time-resolved X-ray diffraction technique has been successfully used for characterization. The work by Jacot and Rappaz on pearlitic steels provided insight into austenitization of hypoeutectic steels using a finite volume model. However there is very little work done on the effect of heating and cooling rates on the phase transformation paths in bainitic/martensitic steels and weld metals. Previous work on a weld with higher aluminum content, deposited with a FCAW-S process indicated that even at aluminum levels where the primary phase to solidify from liquid should be delta ferrite, non-equilibrium austenite was observed. The presence of inhomogeneity in composition of the parent microstructure has been attributed to differences in transformation modes, temperatures and microstructures in dual-phase, TRIP steels and ferritic welds. The objectives of the work included the identification of the stability regions of different phases during heating and cooling, differences in the effect of weld heating and cooling rates on the phase transformation temperatures, and the variation in phase fractions of austenite and ferrite in the two phase regions as a function of temperature. The base composition used for the present work is a Fe-1%Al-2%Mn-1%Ni-0.04%C weld metal. A pseudo-binary phase diagram shows the expected solidification path under equilibrium

  4. HRTEM Study of Oxide Nanoparticles in 16Cr-4Al-2W-0.3Ti-0.3Y2O3 ODS Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L; Fluss, M; Wall, M; Kimura, A

    2009-11-18

    Crystal and interfacial structures of oxide nanoparticles in 16Cr-4Al-2W-0.3Ti-0.3Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} ODS ferritic steel have been examined using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. Oxide nanoparticles with a complex-oxide core and an amorphous shell were frequently observed. The crystal structure of complex-oxide core is identified to be mainly monoclinic Y{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 9} (YAM) oxide compound. Orientation relationships between the oxide and matrix are found to be dependent on the particle size. Large particles (> 20 nm) tend to be incoherent and have a spherical shape, whereas small particles (< 10 nm) tend to be coherent or semi-coherent and have a faceted interface. The observations of partially amorphous nanoparticles lead us to propose three-stage mechanisms to rationalize the formation of oxide nanoparticles containing core/shell structures in as-fabricated ODS steels.

  5. Microstructural Investigation of Fe-Ni-Mn-Mo-V-C-N Ferritic Steels by Neutron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeva, M.; Beskrovnyi, A. I.; Parshorov, I.; Vassilovskii, S. G.

    2010-01-01

    The design of alloys, that economize strategic element as chromium requires detailed physical investigations of their structure and phase composition. In the search for new materials in the last two decades a new class of Fe alloys was composed—the so-called nitrogen steels. The contemporary achievements in the casting technology—the use of nitrogen under high preasure above the melt—made possible the production of Fe alloys with nitrogen concentration even above 0.4 wt%. The wide application of investigated alloy system is connected with creation of alloys without presence of strong carbides-forming elements. The microstructure and phase formation of these new materials are insufficiently studied. The aim of this work is to characterize the microstructure and phase composition of two series Fe-alloys casted with and without nitrogen pressure above the melt. The so cast steels appear as experimental ones and they are directed to demonstrate the possibility for nitrogen doping of steels without presence of Chromium in them. The latter is technologically difficult to fulfil at usual conditions. Six samples [with lower nitrogen, N = 0.0111 wt%] are cast at normal pressure, and six samples [with higher nitrogen, N0.2121 wt%] are cast at pressure of 10.106 Pa. The results of Rietveld structure analysis of Time-Of-Flight neutron diffraction data show that studied steels consist of purely ferritic crystal phase (Body Centered Cubic crystal lattice).

  6. The development of ferritic-martensitic steels with reduced long-term activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlich, K.; Kelzenberg, S.; Röhrig, H.-D.; Schäfer, L.; Schirra, M.

    1994-09-01

    Ferritic-martensitic 9-12% CrMoVNb steels of MANET type possess a number of advantageous properties for fusion reactor application. Their optimization has led to improved creep and fracture-toughness properties. New 9-10% CrWVTa alloys have been developed by KfK/IMF in collaboration with the SAARSTAHL GmbH which have a reduced long-term activation and show in addition superior fracture toughness properties. The calculation of dose rate and other radiological parameters with the presently available FISPACT/EAF codes, extended by KfK files for sequential reactions has shown that the long-term dose-rate in these alloys is governed by the remaining 'impurity level' of Nb and the alloying elements W and Ta. Sequential reactions — though relevant for single alloying elements like Cr, Mn, V and N — provide only a second order effect in Fe-based alloys. A challenge for the future materials development is the production of alloys with the desired narrow specification of elements and impurities, which necessitates new ways of steelmaking.

  7. Effect of Structural Heterogeneity on In Situ Deformation of Dissimilar Weld Between Ferritic and Austenitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, M.; Santosh, R.; Das, S. K.; Das, G.; Mahato, B.; Korody, J.; Kumar, S.; Singh, P. K.

    2015-08-01

    Low-alloy steel and 304LN austenitic stainless steel were welded using two types of buttering material, namely 309L stainless steel and IN 182. Weld metals were 308L stainless steel and IN 182, respectively, for two different joints. Cross-sectional microstructure of welded assemblies was investigated. Microhardness profile was determined perpendicular to fusion boundary. In situ tensile test was performed in scanning electron microscope keeping low-alloy steel-buttering material interface at the center of gage length. Adjacent to fusion boundary, low-alloy steel exhibited carbon-depleted region and coarsening of matrix grains. Between coarse grain and base material structure, low-alloy steel contained fine grain ferrite-pearlite aggregate. Adjacent to fusion boundary, buttering material consisted of Type-I and Type-II boundaries. Within buttering material close to fusion boundary, thin cluster of martensite was formed. Fusion boundary between buttering material-weld metal and weld metal-304LN stainless steel revealed unmixed zone. All joints failed within buttering material during in situ tensile testing. The fracture location was different for various joints with respect to fusion boundary, depending on variation in local microstructure. Highest bond strength with adequate ductility was obtained for the joint produced with 309L stainless steel-buttering material. High strength of this weld might be attributed to better extent of solid solution strengthening by alloying elements, diffused from low-alloy steel to buttering material.

  8. Elastic anomalies in Fe-Cr alloys.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hualei; Wang, Guisheng; Punkkinen, Marko P J; Hertzman, Staffan; Johansson, Börje; Vitos, Levente

    2013-05-15

    Using ab initio alloy theory, we determine the elastic parameters of ferromagnetic and paramagnetic Fe(1-c)Cr(c) (0 ≤ c ≤ 1) alloys in the body centered cubic crystallographic phase. Comparison with the experimental data demonstrates that the employed theoretical approach accurately describes the observed composition dependence of the polycrystalline elastic moduli. The predicted single-crystal elastic constants follow complex anomalous trends, which are shown to originate from the interplay between magnetic and chemical effects. The nonmonotonic composition dependence of the elastic parameters has marked implications on the micro-mechanical properties of ferrite stainless steels. PMID:23604218

  9. Deformation at ambient and high temperature of in situ Laves phases-ferrite composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnadieu, Patricia; Pohlmann, Carsten; Scudino, Sergio; Blandin, Jean-Jacques; Babu Surreddi, Kumar; Eckert, Jürgen

    2014-06-01

    The mechanical behavior of a Fe80Zr10Cr10 alloy has been studied at ambient and high temperature. This Fe80Zr10Cr10 alloy, whoose microstructure is formed by alternate lamellae of Laves phase and ferrite, constitutes a very simple example of an in situ CMA phase composite. The role of the Laves phase type was investigated in a previous study while the present work focuses on the influence of the microstructure length scale owing to a series of alloys cast at different cooling rates that display microstructures with Laves phase lamellae width ranging from ˜50 nm to ˜150 nm. Room temperature compression tests have revealed a very high strength (up to 2 GPa) combined with a very high ductility (up to 35%). Both strength and ductility increase with reduction of the lamella width. High temperature compression tests have shown that a high strength (900 MPa) is maintained up to 873 K. Microstructural study of the deformed samples suggests that the confinement of dislocations in the ferrite lamellae is responsible for strengthening at both ambient and high temperature. The microstructure scale in addition to CMA phase structural features stands then as a key parameter for optimization of mechanical properties of CMA in situ composites.

  10. Cr-W-V bainitic/ferritic steel with improved strength and toughness and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Klueh, R.L.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1994-03-08

    This work describes a high strength, high toughness bainitic/ferritic steel alloy comprising about 2.75% to 4.0% chromium, about 2.0% to 3.5% tungsten, about 0.10% to 0.30% vanadium, and about 0.1% to 0.15% carbon with the balance iron, wherein the percentages are by total weight of the composition, wherein the alloy having been heated to an austenitizing temperature and then cooled at a rate sufficient to produce carbide-free acicular bainite. 15 figures.

  11. Magnetocaloric effect in ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebar, D.

    2005-03-01

    Miniaturization of the electronic devices for space, military and consumer applications requires cooling devices to be fabricated on a chip for power efficient, noise-free operations. Refrigeration based on the adiabatic-demagnetization has been used for several decades for cooling down to sub-kelvin temperatures. Superparamagnetic particles also hold tremendous potential towards this application. We have studied magnetocaloric effect (MCE) properties in chemically synthesized ferrite nanoparticles over a broad range in temperature and magnetic fields. Nanoparticles investigated include Fe3O4 (average size = 8 nm, synthesized using co-precipitation method), MnZnFe2O4 (average size = 15 nm, synthesized using reverse-micelle technique) and CoFe2O4 (average size 8 nm, synthesized using pyrolectic technique). The magnetic entropy change was calculated by applying Maxwell's relations to magnetization vs magnetic field curves at various temperatures. Our results indicate that the single-domain particles in their superparamagnetic state show a considerable entropy change near the blocking temperature. The influence of interactions on MCE effect will also be discussed. Work supported by NSF through Grant No. CTS-0408933

  12. Effect of prior creep at 1365 K on the room temperature tensile properties of several oxide dispersion strengthened alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to determine whether oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) Ni-base alloys in wrought bar form are subject to creep degradation effects similar to those found in thin-gage sheet. The bar products evaluated included ODS-Ni, ODS-NiCr, and advanced ODS-NiCrAl types; the alloys included microstructures ranging from an essentially perfect single crystal to a structure consisting of very small elongated grains. Tensile test specimens were exposed to creep at various stress levels at 1365 K and then tensile tested at room temperature. Low residual tensile properties, change in fracture mode, appearance of dispersoid free bands, grain boundary cavitation, and/or internal oxidation are interpreted as creep degradation effects. The amount of degradation depends on creep strain, and degradation appears to be due to diffusional creep which produces dispersoid free bands around grain boundaries acting as vacancy sources.

  13. Influence of recrystallization on phase separation kinetics of oxide dispersion strengthened Fe Cr Al alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Capdevila, C.; Miller, Michael K; Pimentel, G.; Chao, J.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of different starting microstructures on the kinetics of Fe-rich ({alpha}) and Cr-rich ({alpha}') phase separation during aging of Fe-Cr-Al oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys has been analyzed with a combination of atom probe tomography and thermoelectric power measurements. The results revealed that the high recrystallization temperature necessary to produce a coarse grained microstructure in Fe-base ODS alloys affects the randomness of Cr-atom distributions and defect density, which consequently affect the phase separation kinetics at low annealing temperatures.

  14. Mechanically Alloyed-Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steels for Use in Space Nuclear Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Tournier, Jean-Michel

    2004-02-01

    The mechanical and thermo-physical properties of Mechanically Alloyed (MA)-Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) steels are reviewed and their potential for use in space nuclear reactor power systems is examined. The three MA-ODS alloys examined are Inconel MA-ODS754 (77.55Ni, 20Cr, 1Fe, 0.5Ti, 0.3Al, 0.05C, and 0.6Y2O3), Incoloy MA-ODS956 (74.45Fe, 20Cr, 4.5Al, 0.5Ti, 0.05C, 0.5Y2O3), and Incoloy MA-ODS957 (84.55Fe, 14Cr, 0.3Mo, 0.9Ti, 0.25Y2O3). The major advantages of these alloys are: (a) their strength at high temperatures (>1000 K) is relatively higher and decreases slower with temperature than niobium (Nb) and molybdenum (Mo) refractory alloys; (b) they are relatively lightweight and less expensive; (c) they have been shown to experience low swelling and embrittlement with exposure to high-energy neutrons (> 0.1 MeV) up to a fluence of 1023 n/cm2; and (d) their high resistance to oxidation and nitration at high temperatures, which simplifies handling and assembly. These MS-ODS alloys are also lighter and much stronger than 316-stainless steel and super-alloys such as Inconel 601, Haynes 25, and Hastalloy-X at moderately high temperatures (688-1000 K). The little data available on the compatibility of the MA-ODS alloys with alkali liquid metals up to 1100 K are encouraging, however, additional tests at typical operation temperatures (1000-1400 K) in liquid metal cooled and alkali metal heat pipe-cooled space nuclear reactors are needed. The anisotropy of the MA-ODS alloys when cold worked, and in particularly when rolled into tubes, should not hinder their use in space nuclear power systems, in which the operation pressure is either near atmospheric or as high as 2 MPa.

  15. Mechanically Alloyed-Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steels for Use in Space Nuclear Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Tournier, Jean-Michel

    2004-02-04

    The mechanical and thermo-physical properties of Mechanically Alloyed (MA)-Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) steels are reviewed and their potential for use in space nuclear reactor power systems is examined. The three MA-ODS alloys examined are Inconel MA-ODS754 (77.55Ni, 20Cr, 1Fe, 0.5Ti, 0.3Al, 0.05C, and 0.6Y2O3), Incoloy MA-ODS956 (74.45Fe, 20Cr, 4.5Al, 0.5Ti, 0.05C, 0.5Y2O3), and Incoloy MA-ODS957 (84.55Fe, 14Cr, 0.3Mo, 0.9Ti, 0.25Y2O3). The major advantages of these alloys are: (a) their strength at high temperatures (>1000 K) is relatively higher and decreases slower with temperature than niobium (Nb) and molybdenum (Mo) refractory alloys; (b) they are relatively lightweight and less expensive; (c) they have been shown to experience low swelling and embrittlement with exposure to high-energy neutrons (> 0.1 MeV) up to a fluence of 1023 n/cm2; and (d) their high resistance to oxidation and nitration at high temperatures, which simplifies handling and assembly. These MS-ODS alloys are also lighter and much stronger than 316-stainless steel and super-alloys such as Inconel 601, Haynes 25, and Hastalloy-X at moderately high temperatures (688-1000 K). The little data available on the compatibility of the MA-ODS alloys with alkali liquid metals up to 1100 K are encouraging, however, additional tests at typical operation temperatures (1000-1400 K) in liquid metal cooled and alkali metal heat pipe-cooled space nuclear reactors are needed. The anisotropy of the MA-ODS alloys when cold worked, and in particularly when rolled into tubes, should not hinder their use in space nuclear power systems, in which the operation pressure is either near atmospheric or as high as 2 MPa.

  16. Radiation hardening and deformation behavior of irradiated ferritic-martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, J.P.; Klueh, R.L.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Shiba, K.

    1998-03-01

    Tensile data from several 8--12% Cr alloys irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to doses up to 34 dpa at temperatures ranging from 90 to 600 C are discussed in this paper. One of the critical questions surrounding the use of ferritic-martensitic steels in a fusion environment concerns the loss of uniform elongation after irradiation at low temperatures. Irradiation and testing at temperatures below 200--300 C results in uniform elongations less than 1% and stress-strain curves in which plastic instability immediately follows yielding, implying dislocation channeling and flow localization. Reductions in area and total elongations, however, remain high.

  17. Summary of Prior Work on Joining of Oxide Dispersion-Strengthened Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Ian G; Tatlock, Gordon J; Badairy, H.; Chen, C-L.

    2009-08-01

    There is a range of joining techniques available for use with ODS alloys, but care should be exercised in matching the technique to the final duty requirements of the joint. The goal for joining ODS alloys is a joint with no local disruption of the distribution of the oxide dispersion, and no significant change in the size and orientation of the alloy microstructure. Not surprisingly, the fusion welding processes typically employed with wrought alloys produce the least satisfactory results with ODS alloys, but some versions, such as fusion spot welding, and the laser and electron-beam welding technologies, have demonstrated potential for producing sound joints. Welds made using solid-state spot welding reportedly have exhibited parent metal properties. Thus, it is possible to employ processes that result in significant disruption of the alloy microstructure, as long as the processing parameters are adjustment to minimize the extent of or influence of the changes in the alloy microstructure. Selection among these joining approaches largely depends on the particular application and component configuration, and an understanding of the relationships among processing, alloy microstructure, and final properties is key. Recent developments have resulted in friction welding evolving to be a prime method for joining ODS sheet products, and variants of brazing/diffusion bonding have shown excellent promise for use with tubes and pipes. The techniques that come closest to the goal defined above involve solid-state diffusion bonding and, in particular, it has been found that secondary recrystallization of joints made by pulsed plasma-assisted diffusion can produce the desired, continuous, large alloy grain structure through the joint. Such joints have exhibited creep rupture failure at >82% of the load needed to fail the monolithic parent alloy at 1000 C.

  18. Iridium porphyrins in CD3OD: reduction of Ir(III), CD3-OD bond cleavage, Ir-D acid dissociation and alkene reactions.

    PubMed

    Bhagan, Salome; Imler, Gregory H; Wayland, Bradford B

    2013-04-15

    Methanol solutions of iridium(III) tetra(p-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin [(TSPP)Ir(III)] form an equilibrium distribution of methanol and methoxide complexes ([(TSPP)Ir(III)(CD3OD)(2-n)(OCD3)n]((3+n)-)). Reaction of [(TSPP)Ir(III) with dihydrogen (D2) in methanol produces an iridium hydride [(TSPP)Ir(III)-D(CD3OD)](4-) in equilibrium with an iridium(I) complex ([(TSPP)Ir(I)(CD3OD)](5-)). The acid dissociation constant of the iridium hydride (Ir-D) in methanol at 298 K is 3.5 × 10(-12). The iridium(I) complex ([(TSPP)Ir(I)(CD3OD)](5-)) catalyzes reaction of [(TSPP)Ir(III)-D(CD3OD)](4-) with CD3-OD to produce an iridium methyl complex [(TSPP)Ir(III)-CD3(CD3OD)](4-) and D2O. Reactions of the iridium hydride with ethene and propene produce iridium alkyl complexes, but the Ir-D complex fails to give observable addition with acetaldehyde and carbon monoxide in methanol. Reaction of the iridium hydride with propene forms both the isopropyl and propyl complexes with free energy changes (ΔG° 298 K) of -1.3 and -0.4 kcal mol(-1) respectively. Equilibrium thermodynamics and reactivity studies are used in discussing relative Ir-D, Ir-OCD3 and Ir-CD2- bond energetics in methanol. PMID:23540797

  19. ODS Characterization Progress Report 06/27/08

    SciTech Connect

    El-Dasher, B

    2008-11-25

    This progress report is intended to help keep track of the work that has been performed in characterizing ODS steels for the LIFE project. This specific report details the current status of the characterization of a 24% Cr, 1% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} ODS steel obtained from Wayne King via Geoff Campbell. Since no pedigree of the material could be obtained, a baseline characterization was necessary prior to studying processing, welding, and corrosion behavior. This document details the results obtained from analysis performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). At the time of writing, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and microhardness measurements have not been completed, and will be included in a future report. The results are presented in two sections: microstructure, and phase identification. As the names suggest, the first section will report on the microstructure in the general sense and include details such as grain size and texture, and the second section will include the identification of the phases present in the baseline material.

  20. Rapid phase synthesis of nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Shanmugavel, T.; Raj, S. Gokul; Rajarajan, G.; Kumar, G. Ramesh

    2014-04-24

    Synthesis of single phase nanocrystalline Cobalt Ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) was achieved by single step autocombustion technique with the use of citric acid as a chelating agent in mono proportion with metal. Specimens prepared with this method showed significantly higher initial permeability's than with the conventional process. Single phase nanocrystalline cobalt ferrites were formed at very low temperature. Surface morphology identification were carried out by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. The average grain size and density at low temperature increased gradually with increasing the temperature. The single phase formation is confirmed through powder X-ray diffraction analysis. Magnetization measurements were obtained at room temperature by using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), which showed that the calcined samples exhibited typical magnetic behaviors. Temperature dependent magnetization results showed improved behavior for the nanocrystalline form of cobalt ferrite when compared to the bulk nature of materials synthesized by other methods.

  1. Excimer laser ablation of ferrite ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, A. C.; Leung, W. P.; Krajnovich, D.

    We study the ablation of Ni-Zn or Mn-7n ferrites by 248-nm KrF excimer laser irradiation for high-resolution patterning. A transfer lens system is used to project the image of a mask irradiated by the pulsed KrF laser onto the ferrite sample. The threshold fluente for ablation of the ferrite surface is about 0.3 J/cm2. A typical fluente of 1 J/cm2 is used to produce good-quality patterning. Scanning electron microscopy of the ablated area shows a "glassy" skin with extensive microcracks and solidified droplets being ejected that is frozen in action. This skin can be removed by ultrasonic cleaning.

  2. Integrity assessment of the ferritic / austenitic dissimilar weld joint between intermediate heat exchanger and steam generator in fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jayakumar, T.; Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K. S.; Parameswaran, P.; Goyal, S.; Kumar, J. G.; Mathew, M. D.

    2012-07-01

    Integrity of the modified 9Cr-1Mo / alloy 800 dissimilar joint welded with Inconel 182 electrodes has been assessed under creep condition based on the detailed analysis of microstructure and stress distribution across the joint by finite element analysis. A hardness peak at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface and a hardness trough at the inter-critical heat affected zone (HAZ) in ferritic base metal developed. Un-tempered martensite was found at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface to impart high hardness in it; whereas annealing of martensitic structure of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel by inter-critical heating during welding thermal cycle resulted in hardness tough in the inter-critical HAZ. Creep tests were carried out on the joint and ferritic steel base metal at 823 K over a stress range of 160-320 MPa. The joint possessed lower creep rupture strength than its ferritic steel base metal. Failure of the joint at relatively lower stresses occurred at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface; whereas it occurred at inter-critical region of HAZ at moderate stresses. Cavity nucleation associated with the weld interface particles led to premature failure of the joint. Finite element analysis of stress distribution across the weld joint considering the micro-mechanical strength inhomogeneity across it revealed higher von-Mises and principal stresses at the weld interface. These stresses induced preferential creep cavitation at the weld interface. Role of precipitate in enhancing creep cavitation at the weld interface has been elucidated based on the FE analysis of stress distribution across it. (authors)

  3. Cation distributions on rapidly solidified cobalt ferrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Guire, Mark R.; Kalonji, Gretchen; O'Handley, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    The cation distributions in two rapidly solidified cobalt ferrites have been determined using Moessbauer spectroscopy at 4.2 K in an 8-T magnetic field. The samples were obtained by gas atomization of a Co0-Fe2O3-P2O5 melt. The degree of cation disorder in both cases was greater than is obtainable by cooling unmelted cobalt ferrite. The more rapidly cooled sample exhibited a smaller departure from the equilibrium cation distribution than did the more slowly cooled sample. This result is explained on the basis of two competing effects of rapid solidification: high cooling rate of the solid, and large undercooling.

  4. Development of Lanthanum Ferrite SOFC Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Simner, Steve P.; Bonnett, Jeff F.; Canfield, Nathan L.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Shelton, Jayne P.; Sprenkle, Vince L.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2003-01-01

    A number of studies have been conducted concerning compositional/microstructural modifications of a Sr-doped lanthanum ferrite (LSF) cathode and protective Sm-doped ceria (SDC) layer in an anode supported solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Emphasis was placed on achieving enhanced low temperature (700-800 degrees C) performance, and long-term cell stability. Investigations involved manipulation of the lanthanum ferrite chemistry, addition of noble metal oxygen reduction catalysts, incorporation of active cathode layer compositions containing Co, Fe and higher Sr contents, and attempts to optimize the ceria barrier layer between the LSF cathode and YSZ electrolyte.

  5. Alloy materials

    DOEpatents

    Hans Thieme, Cornelis Leo; Thompson, Elliott D.; Fritzemeier, Leslie G.; Cameron, Robert D.; Siegal, Edward J.

    2002-01-01

    An alloy that contains at least two metals and can be used as a substrate for a superconductor is disclosed. The alloy can contain an oxide former. The alloy can have a biaxial or cube texture. The substrate can be used in a multilayer superconductor, which can further include one or more buffer layers disposed between the substrate and the superconductor material. The alloys can be made a by process that involves first rolling the alloy then annealing the alloy. A relatively large volume percentage of the alloy can be formed of grains having a biaxial or cube texture.

  6. Irradiation response of delta ferrite in as-cast and thermally aged cast stainless steel

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Zhangbo; Lo, Wei-Yang; Chen, Yiren; Pakarinen, Janne; Wu, Yaqiao; Allen, Todd; Yang, Yong

    2015-08-08

    To enable the life extension of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) beyond 60 years, it is critical to gain adequate knowledge for making conclusive predictions to assure the integrity of duplex stainless steel reactor components, e.g. primary pressure boundary and reactor vessel internal. Microstructural changes in the ferrite of thermally aged, neutron irradiated only, and neutron irradiated after being thermally aged cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS) were investigated using atom probe tomography. The thermal aging was performed at 400 °C for 10,000 h and the irradiation was conducted in the Halden reactor at ~315 °C to 0.08 dpa (5.6 × 1019more » n/cm2 E > 1 MeV). Low dose neutron irradiation at a dose rate of 5 × 10-9 dpa/s was found to induce spinod,al decomposition in the ferrite of as-cast microstructure, and further to enhance the spinodal decomposition in the thermally aged cast alloys. Regarding the G-phase precipitates, the neutron irradiation dramatically increases the precipitate size, and alters the composition of the precipitates with increased, Mn, Ni, Si and Mo and reduced Fe and Cr contents. Lastly, The results have shown that low dose neutron irradiation can further accelerate the degradation of ferrite in a duplex stainless steel at the LWR relevant condition.« less

  7. Atom probe study of vanadium interphase precipitates and randomly distributed vanadium precipitates in ferrite.

    PubMed

    Nöhrer, M; Zamberger, S; Primig, S; Leitner, H

    2013-01-01

    Atom probe tomography and transmission electron microscopy were used to examine the precipitation reaction in the austenite and ferrite phases in vanadium micro-alloyed steel after a thermo-mechanical process. It was observed that only in the ferrite phase precipitates could be found, whereupon two different types were detected. Thus, the aim was to reveal the difference between these two types. The first type was randomly distributed precipitates from V supersaturated ferrite and the second type V interphase precipitates. Not only the arrangement of the particles was different also the chemical composition. The randomly distributed precipitates consisted of V, C and N in contrast to that the interphase precipitates showed a composition of V, C and Mn. Furthermore the randomly distributed precipitates had maximum size of 20 nm and the interphase precipitates a maximum size of 15 nm. It was assumed that the reason for these differences is caused by the site in which they were formed. The randomly distributed precipitates were formed in a matrix consisting mainly of 0.05 at% C, 0.68 at% Si, 0.03 at% N, 0.145 at% V and 1.51 at% Mn. The interphase precipitates were formed in a region with a much higher C, Mn and V content. PMID:24041583

  8. Irradiation response of delta ferrite in as-cast and thermally aged cast stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhangbo; Lo, Wei-Yang; Chen, Yiren; Pakarinen, Janne; Wu, Yaqiao; Allen, Todd; Yang, Yong

    2015-08-08

    To enable the life extension of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) beyond 60 years, it is critical to gain adequate knowledge for making conclusive predictions to assure the integrity of duplex stainless steel reactor components, e.g. primary pressure boundary and reactor vessel internal. Microstructural changes in the ferrite of thermally aged, neutron irradiated only, and neutron irradiated after being thermally aged cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS) were investigated using atom probe tomography. The thermal aging was performed at 400 °C for 10,000 h and the irradiation was conducted in the Halden reactor at ~315 °C to 0.08 dpa (5.6 × 1019 n/cm2 E > 1 MeV). Low dose neutron irradiation at a dose rate of 5 × 10-9 dpa/s was found to induce spinod,al decomposition in the ferrite of as-cast microstructure, and further to enhance the spinodal decomposition in the thermally aged cast alloys. Regarding the G-phase precipitates, the neutron irradiation dramatically increases the precipitate size, and alters the composition of the precipitates with increased, Mn, Ni, Si and Mo and reduced Fe and Cr contents. Lastly, The results have shown that low dose neutron irradiation can further accelerate the degradation of ferrite in a duplex stainless steel at the LWR relevant condition.

  9. Solute Segregation During Ferrite Growth: Solute/Interphase and Substitutional/Interstitial Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Landeghem, H. P.; Langelier, B.; Panahi, D.; Purdy, G. R.; Hutchinson, C. R.; Botton, G. A.; Zurob, H. S.

    2016-05-01

    The segregation of solutes to austenite/ferrite transformation interfaces during decarburization/denitriding of Fe-Mn-C, Fe-Mn-N, and Fe-Si-C ternary alloys was studied by using atom probe tomography. Manganese was found to segregate noticeably to the transformation interface in the presence of carbon, while no segregation could be detected in the presence of nitrogen. This result might indicate that manganese interacts little with the interface itself and that its interaction with the interstitial controls its segregation behavior. In the case of Fe-Si-C, the experiments were complicated by interface motion during quenching. Preliminary results suggest that silicon was depleted at the interface in contrast to the commonly observed segregation behavior of silicon at grain boundaries of ferrite and austenite. This observation could be explained by taking into account the repulsive interaction between silicon and carbon along with the intense segregation of carbon to the interface. This would lead to a net repulsive interaction of silicon with the interface even when considering the intrinsic tendency of silicon to segregate to the boundary in the absence of carbon. The results presented here emphasize the need to account for the interaction of all solutes present at the interface in ferrite growth models.

  10. Irradiation response of delta ferrite in as-cast and thermally aged cast stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhangbo; Lo, Wei-Yang; Chen, Yiren; Pakarinen, Janne; Wu, Yaqiao; Allen, Todd; Yang, Yong

    2015-11-01

    To enable the life extension of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) beyond 60 years, it is critical to gain adequate knowledge for making conclusive predictions to assure the integrity of duplex stainless steel reactor components, e.g. primary pressure boundary and reactor vessel internal. Microstructural changes in the ferrite of thermally aged, neutron irradiated only, and neutron irradiated after being thermally aged cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS) were investigated using atom probe tomography. The thermal aging was performed at 400 °C for 10,000 h and the irradiation was conducted in the Halden reactor at ∼315 °C to 0.08 dpa (5.6 × 1019 n/cm2, E > 1 MeV). Low dose neutron irradiation at a dose rate of 5 × 10-9 dpa/s was found to induce spinodal decomposition in the ferrite of as-cast microstructure, and further to enhance the spinodal decomposition in the thermally aged cast alloys. Regarding the G-phase precipitates, the neutron irradiation dramatically increases the precipitate size, and alters the composition of the precipitates with increased, Mn, Ni, Si and Mo and reduced Fe and Cr contents. The results have shown that low dose neutron irradiation can further accelerate the degradation of ferrite in a duplex stainless steel at the LWR relevant condition.

  11. Evaluation on Fatigue Crack Propagation of Reduced Activation Ferritic Steel (JLF-1) at High Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Han Ki; Kim, Sa Woong; Lee, Sang Pill; Katoh, Yutai; Kohyama, Akira

    Recently, reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel, vanadium alloy and SiC/SiC composite are embossed for nuclear fusion reactor in accordance with the coolant. Especially, reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel is very suitable material for nuclear fusion reactor, because it has low coefficient of thermal expansion and excellent heat conductivity. The objective of this study is to investigate fatigue crack propagation behavior in the Reduced Activation Ferritic Steel (JLF-1). The fatigue crack propagation behavior of the JLF-1 steel was investigated by the constant-amplitude loading test for the stress ratios R = 0.1, 0.3 and 0.5 respectively. The fatigue crack growth tests carried out at room temperature and 400°C for base metal and weld metal. The effects of stress ratio, test temperature, specimen size and TIG welding on the fatigue crack propagation behaviors for JLF-1 steel were discussed within the Paris law. Particularly, the fatigue crack propagation rate of a weld metal was similar to that of base metal at the stress ratio of 0.3. Also, the fatigue crack propagation rate of a half size specimen was similar to that of a full size specimen at the stress ratios of 0.1, 0.3 and 0.5 respectively. From this result, we can recognize that the fatigue crack propagation behavior of this material can be evaluated by using the half size specimens.

  12. Elevated-Temperature Ferritic and Martensitic Steels and Their Application to Future Nuclear Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, RL

    2005-01-31

    In the 1970s, high-chromium (9-12% Cr) ferritic/martensitic steels became candidates for elevated-temperature applications in the core of fast reactors. Steels developed for conventional power plants, such as Sandvik HT9, a nominally Fe-12Cr-1Mo-0.5W-0.5Ni-0.25V-0.2C steel (composition in wt %), were considered in the United States, Europe, and Japan. Now, a new generation of fission reactors is in the planning stage, and ferritic, bainitic, and martensitic steels are again candidates for in-core and out-of-core applications. Since the 1970s, advances have been made in developing steels with 2-12% Cr for conventional power plants that are significant improvements over steels originally considered. This paper will review the development of the new steels to illustrate the advantages they offer for the new reactor concepts. Elevated-temperature mechanical properties will be emphasized. Effects of alloying additions on long-time thermal exposure with and without stress (creep) will be examined. Information on neutron radiation effects will be discussed as it applies to ferritic and martensitic steels.

  13. Oxidation of interconnect alloys in an electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.; Alman, D.E.; Adler, T.A.; Jablonski, P.D.

    2006-10-01

    The effect of an electric field on the oxidation of interconnect alloys was examined with a representative array of materials: an iron-base ferritic chromia former (E-brite), an iron-base ferritic chromia former with Mn and La (Crofer 22APU), a nickel-base chromia former (IN-718), and a nickelbase chromia former with Mn and La (Haynes 230). Environmental variables include temperature and oxygen partial pressure. The resulting scales were examined to determine if applied electrical current induces changes in mechanism or scale growth kinetics.

  14. A preliminary ferritic-martensitic stainless steel constitution diagram

    SciTech Connect

    Balmforth, M.C.; Lippold, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes preliminary research to develop a constitution diagram that will more accurately predict the microstructure of ferritic and martensitic stainless steel weld deposits. A button melting technique was used to produce a wide range of compositions using mixtures of conventional ferritic and martensitic stainless steels, including types 403, 409, 410, 430, 439 and 444. These samples were prepared metallographically, and the vol-% ferrite and martensite was determined quantitatively. In addition, the hardness and ferrite number (FN) were measured. Using this data, a preliminary constitution diagram is proposed that provides a more accurate method for predicting the microstructures of arc welds in ferritic and martensitic stainless steels.

  15. Stress-relief cracking of a new ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawrocki, Jesse Gerald

    The mechanism of stress-relief cracking in the coarse-grained heat-affected zone (CGHAZ) of low-alloy ferritic steels was studied through a tempering study, stress-relaxation testing, and detailed microstructural characterization. A new ferritic alloy steel, HCM2S, was used as the model system. Common 2.25Cr-1 Mo steel, which is susceptible to stress-relief cracking, was used for comparison to HCM2S. The CGHAZ was simulated using Gleeble techniques. A dense distribution of small tungsten-rich carbides within the prior austenite grains induced secondary hardening in the CGHAZ of HCM2S. The CGHAZ of 2.25Cr-1 Mo steel exhibited secondary hardening due to the intragranular precipitation of many Fe-rich M3C carbides. The hardness of HCM2S was more stable at longer times and high temperatures than 2.25Cr-1 Mo steel due to the intragranular precipitation of small W and V-rich carbides. The CGHAZs of HCM2S and 2.25Cr-1 Mo steel were susceptible to stress-relief cracking between 575 and 725°C. HCM2S exhibited C-curve behavior with respect to the time to failure as a function of post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) temperature. No segregation of tramp elements to prior austenite grain boundaries was detected in HCM2S. Both intergranular and intragranular carbide precipitation controlled the stress-relief cracking behavior. The amount of intergranular failure increased with test temperature due to the increasing amounts of Fe-rich M3C carbides at the prior austenite grain boundaries. These carbides acted as cavity nucleation sites. The cavities coalesced to form microcracks along prior austenite grain boundaries. Eventually, the remaining uncracked areas could not support the load and failed by ductile rupture. The balance of intergranular and intragranular carbide precipitation resulted in the C-curve behavior. The nose of the C-curve occurred at 675°C. The intragranular regions were strong because of a dense distribution of W/Fe-rich carbides, but the prior austenite grain

  16. Structure formed in two-phase (α + γ) field and mechanical properties of a cryogenic alloy 10N7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomskaya, I. V.

    2010-08-01

    The effect of different types of structures produced by quenching from the intercritical temperature range on the strength, plasticity, and impact toughness of the Fe-6.9Ni-0.1C alloy has been studied. Two structures—ferrite + globular cementite and lath martensite—have been used as the initial state. The rate of heating into the two-phase (α + γ) field has been selected such that four morphological types of twophase structures, namely, ferritic-martensitic (Widmanstäten or globular) and duplex (lamellar or lamellarglobular), could be formed in a single alloy as a result of partial α → γ and γ → α transformations. It has been found that the mechanical properties of the alloy depend on the type of the initial structure and on the rate and temperature of heating to the intercritical temperature range. It has been shown that the alloy with a Widmanstätten ferritic-martensitic structure has a more favorable combination of the strength and plasticity properties than the alloy with a globular structure. The alloy with a lamellar duplex structure offers a much higher level of the impact toughness, plasticity, and strength at low temperatures than the alloy with a Widmanstätten ferritic-martensitic structure.

  17. Effects of vanadium on polarization of 18% Cr ferritic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, R.D. . Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering)

    1993-07-01

    Effects of alloying on the anodic polarization of a low interstitial, 18% chromium (Cr) ferritic stainless steel in sulfuric acid (H[sub 2]SO[sub 4]) were examined. Vanadium (V) from 1 to 4% was added alone and with up to 1.5% nickel (Ni), silicon (Si), copper (Cu), and molybdenum (MO). The carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) level varied from 84 to 168 ppm. The alloys were stabilized with titanium (Ti) or niobium (Nb). Increasing V had a variable effect on passivation in 1 N H[sub 2]SO[sub 4]. The critical current density for passivation lowered. The breakdown potential also lowered. Stabilization with Ti prevented lowering of the breakdown potential. Ni addition to Cr-V-Ti alloys broadened the passive region of the alloys and lowered the minimum current density for passivation. Mo and Cu were beneficial, but Si had little effect on passivation. The alloys did not appear to undergo intergranular corrosion in the modified Strauss test.

  18. Accelerated development of Zr-containing new generation ferritic steels for advanced nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lizhen; Yang, Ying; Sridharan, K.

    2015-12-01

    The mission of the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program is to develop crosscutting technologies for nuclear energy applications. Advanced structural materials with superior performance at elevated temperatures are always desired for nuclear reactors, which can improve reactor economics, safety margins, and design flexibility. They benefit not only new reactors, including advanced light water reactors (LWRs) and fast reactors such as the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) that is primarily designed for management of high-level wastes, but also life extension of the existing fleet when component exchange is needed. Developing and utilizing the modern materials science tools (experimental, theoretical, and computational tools) is an important path to more efficient alloy development and process optimization. The ultimate goal of this project is, with the aid of computational modeling tools, to accelerate the development of Zr-bearing ferritic alloys that can be fabricated using conventional steelmaking methods. The new alloys are expected to have superior high-temperature creep performance and excellent radiation resistance as compared to Grade 91. The designed alloys were fabricated using arc-melting and drop-casting, followed by hot rolling and conventional heat treatments. Comprehensive experimental studies have been conducted on the developed alloys to evaluate their hardness, tensile properties, creep resistance, Charpy impact toughness, and aging resistance, as well as resistance to proton and heavy ion (Fe2+) irradiation.

  19. Materials for Advanced Turbine Engines (MATE): Project 3: Design, fabrication and evaluation of an oxide dispersion strengthened sheet alloy combustor liner, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henricks, R. J.; Sheffler, K. D.

    1984-01-01

    The suitability of wrought oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) superalloy sheet for gas turbine engine combustor applications was evaluated. Incoloy MA 956 (FeCrAl base) and Haynes Developmental Alloy (HDA) 8077 (NiCrAl base) were evaluated. Preliminary tests showed both alloys to be potentially viable combustor materials, with neither alloy exhibiting a significant advantage over the other. Both alloys demonstrated a +167C (300 F) advantage of creep and oxidation resistance with no improvement in thermal fatigue capability compared to a current generation combustor alloy (Hastelloy X). MA956 alloy was selected for further demonstration because it exhibited better manufacturing reproducibility than HDA8077. Additional property tests were conducted on MA956. To accommodate the limited thermal fatigue capability of ODS alloys, two segmented, mechanically attached, low strain ODS combustor design concepts having predicted fatigue lives or = 10,000 engine cycles were identified. One of these was a relatively conventional louvered geometry, while the other involved a transpiration cooled configuration. A series of 10,000 cycle combustor rig tests on subscale MA956 and Hastelloy X combustor components showed no cracking, thereby confirming the beneficial effect of the segmented design on thermal fatigue capability. These tests also confirmed the superior oxidation and thermal distortion resistance of the ODS alloy. A hybrid PW2037 inner burner liner containing MA956 and Hastelloy X components was designed and constructed.

  20. Atomic scale investigation of redistribution of alloying elements in pearlitic steel wires upon cold-drawing and annealing.

    PubMed

    Li, Y J; Choi, P; Goto, S; Borchers, C; Raabe, D; Kirchheim, R

    2013-09-01

    A local electrode atom probe has been employed to analyze the redistribution of alloying elements including Si, Mn, and Cr in pearlitic steel wires upon cold-drawing and subsequent annealing. It has been found that the three elements undergo mechanical mixing upon cold-drawing at large strains, where Mn and Cr exhibit a nearly homogeneous distribution throughout both ferrite and cementite, whereas Si only dissolves slightly in cementite. Annealing at elevated temperatures leads to a reversion of the mechanical alloying. Si atoms mainly segregate at well-defined ferrite (sub)grain boundaries formed during annealing. Cr and Mn are strongly concentrated in cementite adjacent to the ferrite/cementite interface due to their lower diffusivities in cementite than in ferrite. PMID:23237772