Science.gov

Sample records for ferritic ods alloys

  1. Joining Techniques for Ferritic ODS Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    V.G. Krishnardula; V.G. Krishnardula; D.E. Clark; T.C. Totemeier

    2005-06-01

    This report presents results of research on advanced joining techniques for ferritic oxide-dispersion strengthened alloys MA956 and PM2000. The joining techniques studied were resistance pressure welding (also known as pressure forge welding), transient liquid phase bonding, and diffusion bonding. All techniques were shown to produce sound joints in fine-grained, unrecrystallized alloys. Post-bond heat treatment to produce a coarse-grained, recrystallized microstructure resulted in grain growth across the bondline for transient liquid phase and diffusion bonds, giving microstructures essentially identical to that of the parent alloy in the recrystallized condition. The effects of bond orientation, boron interlayer thickness, and bonding parameters are discussed for transient liquid phase and diffusion bonding. The report concludes with a brief discussion of ODS joining techniques and their applicability to GEN IV reactor systems.

  2. Ion-induced swelling of ODS ferritic alloy MA957 tubing to 500 dpa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloczko, M. B.; Garner, F. A.; Voyevodin, V. N.; Bryk, V. V.; Borodin, O. V.; Mel'nychenko, V. V.; Kalchenko, A. S.

    2014-10-01

    In order to study the potential swelling behavior of the ODS ferritic alloy MA957 at very high dpa levels, specimens were prepared from pressurized tubes that were unirradiated archives of tubes previously irradiated in FFTF to doses as high as 110 dpa. These unirradiated specimens were irradiated with 1.8 MeV Cr+ ions to doses ranging from 100 to 500 dpa and examined by transmission electron microscopy. No co-injection of helium or hydrogen was employed. It was shown that compared to several tempered ferritic/martensitic steels irradiated in the same facility, these tubes were rather resistant to void swelling, reaching a maximum value of only 4.5% at 500 dpa and 450 °C. In this fine-grained material, the distribution of swelling was strongly influenced by the presence of void denuded zones along the grain boundaries.

  3. Ion-induced swelling of ODS ferritic alloy MA957 tubing to 500 dpa

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Garner, F. A.; Voyevodin, V.; Bryk, V. V.; Borodin, O. V.; Melnichenko, V. V.; Kalchenko, A. S.

    2014-10-01

    In order to study the potential swelling behavior of the ODS ferritic alloy MA957 at very high dpa levels, specimens were prepared from pressurized tubes that were unirradiated archives of tubes previously irradiated in FFTF to doses as high at 110 dpa. These unirradiated specimens were irradiated with 1.8 MeV Cr+ ions to doses ranging from 100 to 500 dpa and examined by transmission electron microscopy. No coinjection of helium or hydrogen was employed. It was shown that compared to several ferritic/martensitic steels irradiated in the same facility, these tubes were rather resistant to void swelling, reaching a maximum value of only 4.5% at 500 dpa and 450°C. In this fine-grained material, the distribution of swelling was strongly influenced by the presence of void denuded zones along the grain boundaries.

  4. ODS Ferritic/martensitic alloys for Sodium Fast Reactor fuel pin cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubuisson, Philippe; Carlan, Yann de; Garat, Véronique; Blat, Martine

    2012-09-01

    The development of ODS materials for the cladding for Sodium Fast Reactors is a key issue to achieve the objectives required for the GEN IV reactors. CEA, AREVA and EDF have launched in 2007 an important program to determine the optimal fabrication parameters, and to measure and understand the microstructure and properties before, under and after irradiation of such cladding materials. The aim of this paper is to present the French program and the major results obtained recently at CEA on Fe-9/14/18Cr1WTiY2O3 ferritic/martensitic ODS materials. The first step of the program was to consolidate Fe-9/14/18Cr ODS materials as plates and bars to study the microstructure and the mechanical properties of the new alloys. The second step consists in producing tubes at a geometry representative of the cladding of new Sodium Fast Reactors. The optimization of the fabrication route at the laboratory scale is conducted and different tubes were produced. Their microstructure depends on the martensitic (Fe-9Cr) or ferritic (Fe-14Cr) structure. To join the plug to the tube, the reference process is the welding resistance. A specific approach is developed to model the process and support the development of the welds performed within the "SOPRANO" facility. The development at CEA of Fe-9/14/18Cr new ODS materials for the cladding for GENIV Sodium Fast Reactors is in progress. The first microstructural and mechanical characterizations are very encouraging and the full assessment and qualification of this new alloys and products will pass through the irradiation of specimens, tubes, fuel pins and subassemblies up to high doses.

  5. Effect of mechanical alloying atmosphere on the microstructure and Charpy impact properties of an ODS ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksiuta, Z.; Baluc, N.

    2009-04-01

    Two types of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels, with the composition of Fe-14Cr-2W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3 (in weight percent), have been produced by mechanically alloying elemental powders of Fe, Cr, W, and Ti with Y 2O 3 particles either in argon atmosphere or in hydrogen atmosphere, degassing at various temperatures, and compacting the mechanically alloyed powders by hot isostatic pressing. It was found in particular that mechanical alloying in hydrogen yields a significant reduction in oxygen content in the materials, a lower dislocation density, and a strong improvement in the fast fracture properties of the ODS ferritic steels, as measured by Charpy impact tests.

  6. Residual ferrite formation in 12CrODS steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukai, S.; Kudo, Y.; Wu, X.; Oono, N.; Hayashi, S.; Ohtsuka, S.; Kaito, T.

    2014-12-01

    Increasing Cr content from 9 to 12 mass% leads to superior corrosion and high-temperature oxidation resistances, and usually changes microstructure from martensite to a ferrite. To make transformable martensitic type of 12CrODS steels that have superior processing capability by using α/γ phase transformation, alloy design was conducted through varying nickel content. The structure of 12CrODS steels was successfully modified from full ferrite to a transformable martensite-base matrix containing ferrite. This ferrite consists of both equilibrium ferrite and a metastable residual ferrite. It was shown that the fraction of the equilibrium ferrite is predictable by computed phase diagram and formation of the residual ferrite was successfully evaluated through pinning of α/γ interfacial boundaries by oxide particles.

  7. Past research and fabrication conducted at SCK•CEN on ferritic ODS alloys used as cladding for FBR's fuel pins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bremaecker, Anne

    2012-09-01

    -destructive tests (ultrasonic and eddy currents) were also developed. In-pile creep in argon and in liquid sodium was deeply studied on pressurized segments irradiated up to 75 dpaNRT. Finally two fuel assemblies cladded with such ODS alloys were irradiated in Phenix to the max dose of 90 dpa. Creep deformation and swelling were limited but the irradiation-induced embrittlement became acute. The programme was stopped shortly after the Chernobyl disaster, before the embrittlement problem was solved.

  8. Role of Y-Al oxides during extended recovery process of a ferritic ODS alloy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Capdevila, C.; Pimentel, G.; Aranda, M. M.; Rementeria, R.; Dawson, K.; Urones-Garrote, E.; Tatlock, G. J.; Miller, Michael K.

    2015-08-04

    The microstructural stability of Y-Al oxides during the recrystallization of Fe-Cr-Al oxide dispersion strengthened alloy is studied in this work. The goal is to determine the specific distribution pattern of oxides depending where they are located: in the matrix or at the grain boundaries. It was concluded that those located at the grain boundaries yielded a faster coarsening than the ones in the matrix, although no significant differences in composition and/or crystal structure were observed. However, the recrystallization heat treatment leads to the dissolution of the Y2O3 and its combination with Al to form the YAlO3 perovskite oxide particles process,more » mainly located at the grain boundaries. Lastly, atom probe tomography analysis revealed a significant Ti build-up at the grain boundaries that might affect subsequent migration during recrystallization.« less

  9. Role of Y-Al oxides during extended recovery process of a ferritic ODS alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Capdevila, C.; Pimentel, G.; Aranda, M. M.; Rementeria, R.; Dawson, K.; Urones-Garrote, E.; Tatlock, G. J.; Miller, Michael K.

    2015-08-04

    The microstructural stability of Y-Al oxides during the recrystallization of Fe-Cr-Al oxide dispersion strengthened alloy is studied in this work. The goal is to determine the specific distribution pattern of oxides depending where they are located: in the matrix or at the grain boundaries. It was concluded that those located at the grain boundaries yielded a faster coarsening than the ones in the matrix, although no significant differences in composition and/or crystal structure were observed. However, the recrystallization heat treatment leads to the dissolution of the Y2O3 and its combination with Al to form the YAlO3 perovskite oxide particles process, mainly located at the grain boundaries. Lastly, atom probe tomography analysis revealed a significant Ti build-up at the grain boundaries that might affect subsequent migration during recrystallization.

  10. Role of Y-Al Oxides During Extended Recovery Process of a Ferritic ODS Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capdevila, C.; Pimentel, G.; Aranda, M. M.; Rementeria, R.; Dawson, K.; Urones-Garrote, E.; Tatlock, G. J.; Miller, M. K.

    2015-08-01

    The microstructural stability of Y-Al oxides during the recrystallization of Fe-Cr-Al oxide dispersion strengthened alloy is studied in this work. The goal is to determine the specific distribution pattern of oxides depending where they are located: in the matrix or at the grain boundaries. It was concluded that those located at the grain boundaries yielded a faster coarsening than the ones in the matrix, although no significant differences in composition and/or crystal structure were observed. However, the recrystallization heat treatment leads to the dissolution of the Y2O3 and its combination with Al to form the YAlO3 perovskite oxide particles process, mainly located at the grain boundaries. Finally, atom probe tomography analysis revealed a significant Ti build-up at the grain boundaries that might affect subsequent migration during recrystallization.

  11. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, D.S.; Ghoniem, N.M.; Powell, R.W.

    1985-02-07

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  12. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, David S.; Ghoniem, Nasr M.; Powell, Roger W.

    1986-01-01

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  13. The oxidation and corrosion of ODS alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowell, Carl E.; Barrett, Charles A.

    1990-01-01

    The oxidation and hot corrosion of high temperature oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys are reviewed. The environmental resistance of such alloys are classified by oxide growth rate, oxide volatility, oxide spalling, and hot corrosion limitations. Also discussed are environmentally resistant coatings for ODS materials. It is concluded that ODS NiCrAl and FeCrAl alloys are highly oxidation and corrosion resistant and can probably be used uncoated.

  14. Precipitates and boundaries interaction in ferritic ODS steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallez, Nicolas; Hatzoglou, Constantinos; Delabrouille, Fredéric; Sornin, Denis; Chaffron, Laurent; Blat-Yrieix, Martine; Radiguet, Bertrand; Pareige, Philippe; Donnadieu, Patricia; Bréchet, Yves

    2016-04-01

    In the course of a recrystallization study of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels during extrusion, particular interest was paid to the (GB) Grain Boundaries interaction with precipitates. Complementary and corresponding characterization experiments using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and Atom Probe Tomography (APT) have been carried out on a voluntarily interrupted extrusion or extruded samples. Microscopic observations of Precipitate Free Zones (PFZ) and precipitates alignments suggest precipitate interaction with migrating GB involving dissolution and Oswald ripening of the precipitates. This is consistent with the local chemical information gathered by EDX and APT. This original mechanism for ODS steels is similar to what had been proposed in the late 80s for similar observation made on Ti alloys reinforced by nanosized yttrium oxides: An interaction mechanism between grain boundaries and precipitates involving a diffusion controlled process of precipitates dissolution at grain boundaries. It is believed that this mechanism can be of primary importance to explain the mechanical behaviour of such steels.

  15. The filler powders laser welding of ODS ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Shenyong; Lei, Yucheng; Zhu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Laser welding was performed on Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel with the self-designed filler powders. The filler powders were added to weld metal to produce nano-particles (Y-M-O and TiC), submicron particles (Y-M-O) and dislocation rings. The generated particles were evenly distributed in the weld metal and their forming mechanism and behavior were analyzed. The results of the tests showed that the nano-particles, submicron particles and dislocation rings were able to improve the micro-hardness and tensile strength of welded joint, and the filler powders laser welding was an effective welding method of ODS ferritic steel.

  16. The influence of Cr content on the mechanical properties of ODS ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shaofu; Zhou, Zhangjian; Jang, Jinsung; Wang, Man; Hu, Helong; Sun, Hongying; Zou, Lei; Zhang, Guangming; Zhang, Liwei

    2014-12-01

    The present investigation aimed at researching the mechanical properties of the oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels with different Cr content, which were fabricated through a consolidation of mechanical alloyed (MA) powders of 0.35 wt.% nano Y2O3 dispersed Fe-12.0Cr-0.5Ti-1.0W (alloy A), Fe-16.0Cr-0.5Ti-1.0W (alloy B), and Fe-18.0Cr-0.5Ti-1.0W (alloy C) alloys (all in wt.%) by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) with 100 MPa pressure at 1150 °C for 3 h. The mechanical properties, including the tensile strength, hardness, and impact fracture toughness were tested by universal testers, while Young's modulus was determined by ultrasonic wave non-destructive tester. It was found that the relationship between Cr content and the strength of ODS ferritic steels was not a proportional relationship. However, too high a Cr content will cause the precipitation of Cr-enriched segregation phase, which is detrimental to the ductility of ODS ferritic steels.

  17. Progress in ODS Alloys: A Synopsis of a 2010 Workshop on Fe- Based ODS Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kad, Bimal; Dryepondt, Sebastien N; Jones, Andy R.; Vito, Cedro III; Tatlock, Gordon J; Pint, Bruce A; Tortorelli, Peter F; Rawls, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    In Fall 2010, a workshop on the role and future of Fe-based Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) alloys gathered together ODS alloy suppliers, potential industrial end-users, and technical experts in relevant areas. Presentations and discussions focused on the current state of development of these alloys, their availability from commercial suppliers, past major evaluations of ODS alloy components in fossil and nuclear energy applications, and the technical and economic issues attendant to commercial use of ODS alloys. Significant progress has been achieved in joining ODS alloys, with creep resistant joints successfully made by inertia welding, friction stir welding and plasma-assisted pulse diffusion bonding, and in improving models for the prediction of lifetime components. New powder and alloy fabrication methods to lower cost or improve endproduct properties were also described. The final open discussion centered on challenges and pathways for further development and large-scale use of ODS alloys.

  18. Structure of Oxide Nanoparticles in Fe-16Cr MA/ODS Ferritic Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L; Fluss, M; Kimura, A

    2010-04-06

    Oxide nanoparticles in Fe-16Cr ODS ferritic steel fabricated by mechanical alloying (MA) method have been examined using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. A partial crystallization of oxide nanoparticles was frequently observed in as-fabricated ODS steel. The crystal structure of crystalline oxide particles is identified to be mainly Y{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 9} (YAM) with a monoclinic structure. Large nanoparticles with a diameter larger than 20 nm tend to be incoherent and have a nearly spherical shape, whereas small nanoparticles with a diameter smaller than 10 nm tend to be coherent or semi-coherent and have faceted boundaries. The oxide nanoparticles become fully crystallized after prolonged annealing at 900 C. These results lead us to propose a three-stage formation mechanism of oxide nanoparticles in MA/ODS steels.

  19. High strength ferritic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Hagel, William C.; Smidt, Frederick A.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1977-01-01

    A high-strength ferritic alloy useful for fast reactor duct and cladding applications where an iron base contains from about 9% to about 13% by weight chromium, from about 4% to about 8% by weight molybdenum, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight niobium, from about 0.1% to about 0.3% by weight vanadium, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight silicon, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight manganese, a maximum of about 0.05% by weight nitrogen, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight sulfur, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight phosphorous, and from about 0.04% to about 0.12% by weight carbon.

  20. HRTEM Study of the Role of Nanoparticles in ODS Ferritic Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L; Tumey, S; Fluss, M; Serruys, Y; Willaime, F

    2011-08-30

    Structures of nanoparticles and their role in dual-ion irradiated Fe-16Cr-4.5Al-0.3Ti-2W-0.37Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (K3) ODS ferritic steel produced by mechanical alloying (MA) were studied using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. The observation of Y{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 9} complex-oxide nanoparticles in the ODS steel imply that decomposition of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} in association with internal oxidation of Al occurred during mechanical alloying. HRTEM observations of crystalline and partially crystalline nanoparticles larger than {approx}2 nm and amorphous cluster-domains smaller than {approx}2 nm provide an insight into the formation mechanism of nanoparticles/clusters in MA/ODS steels, which we believe involves solid-state amorphization and re-crystallization. The role of nanoparticles/clusters in suppressing radiation-induced swelling is revealed through TEM examinations of cavity distributions in (Fe + He) dual-ion irradiated K3-ODS steel. HRTEM observations of helium-filled cavities (helium bubbles) preferably trapped at nanoparticle/clusters in dual-ion irradiated K3-ODS are presented.

  1. Reduction in Defect Content of ODS Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ritherdon, J

    2001-05-15

    The work detailed within this report is a continuation of earlier work carried out under contract number 1DX-SY382V. The earlier work comprises a literature review of the sources and types of defects found principally in Fe-based ODS alloys as well as experimental work designed to identify defects in the prototype ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al alloy, deduce their origins and to recommend methods of defect reduction. The present work is an extension of the experimental work already reported and concentrates on means of reduction of defects already identified rather than the search for new defect types. This report also includes results gathered during powder separation trials, conducted by the University of Groningen, Netherlands and coordinated by the University of Liverpool, involving the separation of different metallic powders in terms of their differing densities. The scope and objectives of the present work were laid out in the technical proposal ''Reduction in Defect Content in ODS Alloys-III''. All the work proposed in the ''Statement of Work'' section of the technical proposal has been carried out and all work extra to the ''Statement of Work'' falls within the context of an ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al alloy of improved overall quality and potential creep performance in the consolidated form. The outturn of the experimental work performed is reported in the following sections.

  2. Characterization of Two ODS Alloys: Chromium-18 ODS and Chromium-9 ODS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Julianne

    ODS alloys, or oxide dispersion strengthened alloys, are made from elemental or pre-alloyed metal powders mechanically alloyed with oxide powders in a high-energy attributor mill, and then consolidated by either hot isostatic pressing or hot extrusion causing the production of nanometer scale oxide and carbide particles within the alloy matrix; crystalline properties such as creep strength, ductility, corrosion resistance, tensile strength, swelling resistance, and resistance to embrittlement are all observed to be improved by the presence of nanoparticles in the matrix. The presented research uses various methods to observe and characterize the microstructural and microchemical properties of two experimental ODS alloys, 18Cr ODS and 9Cr ODS. The results found aid in assessing the influence of chemical and structural variations on the effectiveness of the alloy, and further aid in the optimization of these advanced alloys for future use in nuclear cladding and structural applications in Generation IV nuclear reactors. Characterization of these alloys has been conducted in order to identify the second-phase small precipitates through FESEM, TEM, EDS, Synchrotron X-ray diffraction analysis, and CuKalpha XRD analysis of bulk samples and of nanoparticles after extraction from the alloy matrix. Comparison of results from these methods allows further substantiation of the accuracy of observed nanoparticle composition and identification. Also, TEM samples of the two alloys have been irradiated in-situ with 1 MeV Kr and 300 keV Fe ions to various doses and temperatures at the IVEM-Tandem TEM at Argonne National Laboratory and post-irradiated characterization has been conducted and compared to the pre-irradiated characterization results in order to observe the microstructural and microchemical evolution of nanoparticles under irradiation. Overall in the as-received state, the initial Y2O3 is not found anymore and in addition to oxide particles the alloys contain carbides

  3. Microstructure of a 14Cr-ODS ferritic steel before and after helium ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chenyang; Lu, Zheng; Xie, Rui; Liu, Chunming; Wang, Lumin

    2014-12-01

    A 14Cr-ODS ferritic steel with the nominal compositions of Fe-14Cr-2 W-0.3Ti-0.3Y2O3 (wt.%) was produced by mechanical alloying (MA) and hot isostatic pressing (HIP). Helium ion was implanted into the 14Cr-ODS steel along with Eurofer 97 steel as reference at 400 °C to a fluence of 1 × 1017 He+/cm2. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), high angle annual dark field (HAADF) scanning TEM (STEM) and atom probe tomography (APT) were used to characterize the microstructure of 14Cr-ODS and Eurofer 97 steels before and after helium implantation. High-density Y-Ti-O-rich nanoclusters and Y2Ti2O7 precipitates as well as large Cr-Ti rich oxides were observed in the 14Cr-ODS steel. The average size of Y-Ti-O nanoclusters and Y2Ti2O7 precipitates is 9 nm. After helium implantation, the helium bubbles formed in the 14Cr-ODS steel exhibit the smaller size and the lower volume fraction than that in Eurofer 97 steel, indicating high-density nano-scale precipitates can effectively suppress the coarsening of helium bubbles.

  4. Reduction in Defect Content in ODS Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, A.R.; Ritherdon, J.; Prior, D.J.

    2003-04-22

    In order to develop FeCrAl-based ODS alloy tubing with the coarse, high aspect ratio, appropriately oriented grain structures likely to deliver enhanced high temperature (11000C) hoop creep strength compared to conventionally formed ODS alloy tubing, flow forming techniques were explored in a European funded programme. The evolution of microstructure in PM2000 alloy tubing formed by warm flow forming techniques has been the subject of continuing investigation and more detailed study in the current work. The warm flow formed tubes investigated were produced by reverse flow forming using three, 1200 opposed rollers described around a tube preform supported on a driven mandrel. This produced a complex pattern of shape changing deformation, driven from the outer surface of the tube preforms. The grain size and shape together with the pattern of nucleation and growth of secondary recrystallization that developed through the thickness of the tube wall during the subsequent high temperature annealing (13800C) of these warm flow formed samples is described, as are the textures that formed. The unusual pattern and shape of secondary recrystallized grain structures that formed on the outer surfaces of the flow formed tubes closely follows the pattern and pitch of the flow forming rollers. The local texture, grain shape and pattern of misorientation in the surface of warm flow formed tubes that was associated with the development of these outer surface microstructures are described. Parallel studies have continued on the influence of microstructural inhomogeneities on the development of secondary recrystallized grain structures in ODS alloys. As part of this work, a separate variant of PM2000 alloy with additions of 1 wt.% ODS-free Fe powder have been manufactured as extruded bar by Plansee GmbH. The initial recrystallization behavior of the variant has been studied and cross-compared with the recrystallization behavior found in a prototype ODS-Fe3Al alloy, notably where the

  5. Reduction in Defect Content of ODS Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ritherdon, J

    2003-11-17

    The work detailed within this report is a continuation of earlier work carried out under contract number 1DX-SY382V. The earlier work comprises a literature review of the sources and types of defects found principally in Fe-based ODS alloys as well as experimental work designed to identify defects in the prototype ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al alloy, deduce their origins and to recommend methods of defect reduction. The present work is an extension of the experimental work already reported and concentrates on means of reduction of defects already identified rather than the search for new defect types. This report also includes work regarding the manipulation of grain structures via deformation processing and further results gathered during powder separation trials involving the separation of different metallic powders in terms of their differing densities. The scope and objectives of the present work were laid out in the technical proposal ''Reduction in Defect Content in ODS Alloys-IV''. All the work proposed in the ''Statement of Work'' section of the technical proposal has been carried out except for some of that dependent on the acquisition of materials from other sources. However, wherever omissions from the ''Plan of Action'' detailed in the ''Statement of Work'' have occurred due to lack of suitable materials, other related experimental work has been devised to fill the gaps where possible. All work extra to the ''Statement of Work'' falls within the context of an ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al alloy of improved overall quality and potential creep performance in the consolidated form. The outturn of the experimental work performed is reported in the following sections.

  6. Mechanical behaviour of ferritic ODS steels - Temperature dependancy and anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, B.; Steckmeyer, A.; Rouffie, A.-L.; Malaplate, J.; Garnier, J.; Ratti, M.; Wident, P.; Ziolek, L.; Tournie, I.; Rabeau, V.; Gentzbittel, J. M.; Kruml, T.; Kubena, I.

    2012-11-01

    Ferritic 14%Cr and 18%Cr ODS steels produced at CEA in round bars or plates were tested mechanically. The present paper reports results obtained in tension, impact, fatigue, creep and toughness tests. These tests were carried out at various temperatures and in different directions. These materials show a pronounced anisotropy at all tested temperatures. No matter the loading, the transversal direction is always found to be far less resistant than the longitudinal one. This anisotropy is mainly observed in terms of damage mechanisms, with intergranular fracture preferentially occurring along the extrusion direction. This intergranular fracture mode leads to very low and anisotropic toughness values and to the absence of tertiairy creep stage, pointing out the unstable nature of fracture, even at high temperature. The unrealistically high values of the Norton exponent measured in creep suggests the existence of a threshold stress, which is consistent with the mainly kinematic nature of the stress as revealed by fatigue tests.

  7. Development of Austenitic ODS Strengthened Alloys for Very High Temperature Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbins, James; Heuser, Brent; Robertson, Ian; Sehitoglu, Huseyin; Sofronis, Petros; Gewirth, Andrew

    2015-04-22

    This “Blue Sky” project was directed at exploring the opportunities that would be gained by developing Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) alloys based on the Fe-Cr-Ni austenitic alloy system. A great deal of research effort has been directed toward ferritic and ferritic/martensitic ODS alloys which has resulted in reasonable advances in alloy properties. Similar gains should be possible with austenitic alloy which would also take advantage of other superior properties of that alloy system. The research effort was aimed at the developing an in-depth understanding of the microstructural-level strengthening effects of ODS particles in austentic alloys. This was accomplished on a variety of alloy compositions with the main focus on 304SS and 316SS compositions. A further goal was to develop an understanding other the role of ODS particles on crack propagation and creep performance. Since these later two properties require bulk alloy material which was not available, this work was carried out on promising austentic alloy systems which could later be enhanced with ODS strengthening. The research relied on a large variety of micro-analytical techniques, many of which were available through various scientific user facilities. Access to these facilities throughout the course of this work was instrumental in gathering complimentary data from various analysis techniques to form a well-rounded picture of the processes which control austenitic ODS alloy performance. Micromechanical testing of the austenitic ODS alloys confirmed their highly superior mechanical properties at elevated temperature from the enhanced strengthening effects. The study analyzed the microstructural mechanisms that provide this enhanced high temperature performance. The findings confirm that the smallest size ODS particles provide the most potent strengthening component. Larger particles and other thermally- driven precipitate structures were less effective contributors and, in some cases, limited

  8. On the Role of Alloy Composition and Sintering Parameters in the Bimodal Grain Size Distribution and Mechanical Properties of ODS Ferritic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Junceda, Andrea; Campos, Mónica; García-Rodríguez, Nerea; Torralba, José Manuel

    2016-04-01

    A sintered 14Cr-5Al-3W oxide dispersion strengthened steel was produced by mechanical alloying and consolidated by field-assisted hot pressing. First, a nanostructured powder was developed thanks to the high-energy milling used for introducing 0.4Ti-0.25Y2O3-0.6ZrO2 into the prealloyed Fe-Cr-Al-W powder, and then the processed powders were consolidated under a low diffusive technique to better retain the microstructure inherited from milling. The effect of the addition of zirconia and of the pressure applied during sintering on the final bimodal grain microstructure and mechanical properties is assessed. Both parameters are responsible for the refinement of the microstructure by increasing the volume fraction of the ultrafine grains (0 to 400 nm), leading to an enhancement of the mechanical properties, such as the microhardness and tensile strength.

  9. Long-term high temperature oxidation behavior of ODS ferritics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pint, B. A.; Wright, I. G.

    2002-12-01

    Four oxide dispersion strengthened Fe-(13-14 at.%) Cr ferritic compositions were exposed in air and air with 10 vol.% water vapor for up to 10 000 h at 700-1100 °C. At 700-800 °C in air, the reaction rates were very low for all of the alloys compared to stainless steels. At 900 °C, a dispersion of Y 2O 3, compared to Al 2O 3, showed a distinct benefit in improving the oxidation resistance, due to a reactive element effect. However, failure occurred after 7000 h at 900 °C when only 13% Cr was present. The absence of Ti and W in one alloy appeared to result in a thinner reaction product after oxidation at 800 °C. One composition was exposed in 10 vol.% water vapor at 800 and 900 °C and in air at 1000 and 1100 °C. Under both of these conditions, there was a significant increase in the rates of oxidation. With the relatively low Cr contents in these alloys, their corrosion-limited operating temperature in air is near 900 °C.

  10. Hot-rolling of reduced activation 8CrODS ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaochao; Ukai, Shigeharu; Leng, Bin; Oono, Naoko; Hayashi, Shigenari; Sakasegawa, Hideo; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu

    2013-11-01

    The 8CrODS ferritic steel is based on J1-lot developed for the advanced fusion blanket material to increase the coolant outlet temperature. A hot-rolling was conducted at the temperature above Ar3 of 716 °C, and its effect on the microstructure and tensile strength in 8CrODS ferritic steel was evaluated, comparing together with normalized and tempered specimen. It was confirmed that hot-rolling leads to slightly increased fraction of the ferrite and highly improved tensile strength. This ferrite was formed by transformation from the hot-rolled austenite during cooling due to fine austenite grains induced by hot-rolling. The coarsening of the transformed ferrite in hot-rolled specimen can be attributed to the crystalline rotation and coalescence of the similar oriented grains. The improved strength of hot-rolled specimen was ascribed to the high dislocation density and replacement of easily deformed martensite with the transformed coarse ferrite.

  11. In situ synchrotron tensile investigations on 14YWT, MA957, and 9-Cr ODS alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jun-Li; Mo, Kun; Yun, Di; Miao, Yinbin; Liu, Xiang; Zhao, Huijuan; Hoelzer, David T.; Park, Jun-Sang; Almer, Jonathan; Zhang, Guangming; Zhou, Zhangjian; Stubbins, James F.; Yacout, Abdellatif M.

    2016-04-01

    Advanced ODS alloys provide exceptional radiation tolerance and high-temperature mechanical properties when compared to traditional ferritic and ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels. Their remarkable properties result from ultrahigh density and ultrafine size of Y-Ti-O nanoclusters within the ferritic matrix. In this work, we applied a high-energy synchrotron radiation X-ray to study the deformation process of three advanced ODS materials including 14YWT, MA957, and 9-Cr ODS steel. Only the relatively large nanoparticles in the 9-Cr ODS were observed in the synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The nanoclusters in both 14YWT and MA957 were invisible in the measurement due to their non-stoichiometric nature. Due to the different sizes of nanoparticles and nanoclusters in the materials, the Orowan looping was considered to be the major strengthening mechanism in the 9-Cr ODS, while the dispersed-barrier-hardening is dominant strengthening mechanism in both 14YWT and MA957, This analysis was inferred from the different build-up rates of dislocation density when plastic deformation was initiated. Finally, the dislocation densities interpreted from the X-ray measurements were successfully modeled using the Bergström's dislocation models.

  12. Tensile anisotropy and creep properties of a Fe-14CrWTi ODS ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steckmeyer, A.; Rodrigo, Vargas Hideroa; Gentzbittel, J. M.; Rabeau, V.; Fournier, B.

    2012-07-01

    A Fe-14Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel is studied as a potential material for cladding tube application for the next generation of fast-breeder nuclear reactors. Tensile specimens machined out from a hot extruded round bar in three different orientations are used to evaluate the mechanical anisotropy of this steel for temperatures in the range 20-750 °C. Its anisotropy is discussed both in terms of mechanical strength and fracture mode. At high temperatures (HTs), above 500 °C, the longitudinal direction appears to be the most ductile and most resistant direction. Longitudinal creep tests between 650 °C and 900 °C were also carried out. They show this ODS steel has a high HT creep lifetime and a low creep failure strain. Intergranular cracks aligned along the loading axis were observed on fractured creep specimens. They reveal a particular weakness of prior particle boundaries and suggest to modify the elaboration process through mechanical alloying and hot extrusion.

  13. High heat flux testing of 12-14Cr ODS ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pintsuk, G.; Oksiuta, Z.; Linke, J.; Baluc, N.

    2010-01-01

    The thermal performance of Fe-(12-14)Cr-2W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3 ODS reduced activation ferritic steels, which are considered as candidate first wall materials for the future fusion power reactors and were manufactured by mechanical alloying in hydrogen and hot isostatic pressing, was assessed by high heat flux (HHF) testing with the electron beam JUDITH facility at the Forschungszentrum Jülich (FZJ), Germany. An analysis of the microhardness and microstructure of the specimens was done before and after HHF tests. In general, both materials present a ferritic (α-Fe, bcc) microstructure with a wide range of grain sizes from 100 to 500 nm up to a few micrometers. The coarse grains are almost dislocation-free, while the smaller ones are surrounded by tangles of dislocations. Oxide and carbide impurities (about a few hundreds nm in size) and a high density of Y-Ti-O nano-clusters, with a mean size of about 5 nm, are also present. The microhardness, density and tensile strength of the 14Cr material are slightly larger than those of the 12Cr material. HHF tests revealed that there is no difference in thermal performance, level of degradation and erosion behaviour of 12Cr and 14Cr ODS steels. The onset of melting of the materials occurs for an energy density between 1 and 1.5 MJ/m 2. Below this value only some kind of thermal etching takes place. This is a significant improvement compared to stainless steel, for which severe plastic deformation at the material surface was observed.

  14. In Situ Synchrotron Tensile Investigations on 14YWT, MA957 and 9-Cr ODS Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jun-Li; Mo, Kun; Yun, Di; Miao, Yinbin; Liu, Xiang; Zhao, Huijuan; Hoelzer, David T; Park, Jun-Sang; Almer, Jonathan; Zhang, Guangming; Zhou, Zhangjian; Stubbins, James; Yacout, Abdellatif

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) provide exceptional radiation tolerance and high-temperature mechanical properties when compared to traditional ferritic and ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels. Their remarkable properties result from ultrahigh density and ultrafine size of Y-Ti-O nanoclusters within the ferritic matrix. In this work, we applied a high-energy synchrotron radiation X-ray to study the deformation process of two NFAs including 14YWT and MA957, and a 9-Cr ODS steel. Only the relatively large nanoparticles in the 9-Cr ODS were observed in the synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The nanoclusters in both 14 YWT and MA957 were invisible in the measurement due to their non-stoichiometric nature. Due to the different sizes of nanoparticles and nanoclusters in the materials, the Orowan looping was considered to be the major strengthening mechanism in the 9-Cr ODS, while the dispersed-barrier-hardening is dominant strengthening mechanism in both 14YWT and MA957, respectively. This analysis was inferred from the different build-up rates of dislocation density when plastic deformation was initiated. Finally, the dislocation densities interpreted from the X-ray measurements were successfully modeled using the Bergstr m s dislocation models.

  15. Tantalum modified ferritic iron base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldrieve, R. E.; Blankenship, C. P. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Strong ferritic alloys of the Fe-CR-Al type containing 0.4% to 2% tantalum were developed. These alloys have improved fabricability without sacrificing high temperature strength and oxidation resistance in the 800 C (1475 F) to 1040 C (1900 F) range.

  16. Development of ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, I.G.; Pint, B.A.; Tortorelli, P.F.; McKamey, C.G.

    1997-12-01

    The overall goal of this program is to develop an oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) version of Fe{sub 3}Al that has sufficient creep strength and resistance to oxidation at temperatures in the range 1000 to 1200 C to be suitable for application as heat exchanger tubing in advanced power generation cycles. The main areas being addressed are: (a) alloy processing to achieve the desired alloy grain size and shape, and (b) optimization of the oxidation behavior to provide increased service life compared to semi-commercial ODS-FeCrAl alloys intended for the same applications. The recent studies have focused on mechanically-alloyed powder from a commercial alloy vendor. These starting alloy powders were very clean in terms of oxygen content compared to ORNL-produced powders, but contained similar levels of carbon picked up during the milling process. The specific environment used in milling the powder appears to exert a considerable influence on the post-consolidation recrystallization behavior of the alloy. A milling environment which produced powder particles having a high surface carbon content resulted in a consolidated alloy which readily recrystallized, whereas powder with a low surface carbon level after milling resulted in no recrystallization even at 1380 C. A feature of these alloys was the appearance of voids or porosity after the recrystallization anneal, as had been found with ORNL-produced alloys. Adjustment of the recrystallization parameters did not reveal any range of conditions where recrystallization could be accomplished without the formation of voids. Initial creep tests of specimens of the recrystallized alloys indicated a significant increase in creep strength compared to cast or wrought Fe{sub 3}Al, but the specimens failed prematurely by a mechanism that involved brittle fracture of one of the two grains in the test cross section, followed by ductile fracture of the remaining grain. The reasons for this behavior are not yet understood. The

  17. Microstructural Characterization of Co-Based ODS Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lin; Qu, Xuanhui; He, Xinbo; Din, Rafi-ud; Liu, Hengsan; Qin, Mingli; Zhu, Hongmin

    2012-11-01

    Co-based ODS alloys, strengthened by nanosized oxide dispersion and γ' precipitates, are potential high-temperature structural materials. The characteristics of the mechanically alloyed powder and the microstructural evolution of the Co-based ODS alloys were investigated. The results revealed that mechanical alloying had induced the formation of supersaturated solid solution in immiscible Co-Al-W-based alloys, originating mainly from extensive grain boundary region, high dislocation density, and ample point defect. Chemical compositions of mechanically alloyed Co-Al-W-based ODS alloys easily deviate from the γ/γ' two-phase region, leading to the existence of Al x Co, Co3W, Co7W6, and W phases in addition to the γ and γ' phases. Nonuniform distribution of alloying elements brings about the differences in morphologies and sizes of γ' precipitates. Microstructural formation process is impelled by spinodal decomposition mode, and spinodal decomposition behavior has been accelerated in the fine-grained alloy because of the presence of short-circuited diffusion paths for atomic movement.

  18. Microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir processed ODS ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Sanghoon; Kasada, Ryuta; Kimura, Akihiko; Park, Seung Hwan C.; Hirano, Satoshi

    2011-10-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are considered to be one of the candidate structural materials for advanced blanket systems because of its excellent properties in fusion environments. For more applications of the ODS steels to fusion systems with a huge and complex structure, development of joining technologies is a key issue to be solved. To reserve nano-oxide particles in the matrix homogeneously, the friction stir welding (FSW) is a suitable way to get good welding characteristics as a solid-state processing technique. In this research, effects of friction stir processing (FSP) on microstructure and mechanical properties of a ODS steel were studied to apply FSW process to ODS steels. The microstructure of FSPed ODS steel consists of stirred zone (SZ) and base metal (BM), as reported for other ferritic steels. Although equiaxed grain coarsening occurred through dynamic recrystallization during FSP, the nano-oxide particles in SZ showed fewer change in the size distribution. This resulted that FSP is effective to suppress the anisotropy and minimize the change of nano-oxide particles dispersion morphologies of ODS steel.

  19. Cold worked ferritic alloys and components

    DOEpatents

    Korenko, Michael K.

    1984-01-01

    This invention relates to liquid metal fast breeder reactor and steam generator precipitation hardening fully ferritic alloy components which have a microstructure substantially free of the primary precipitation hardening phase while having cells or arrays of dislocations of varying population densities. It also relates to the process by which these components are produced, which entails solution treating the alloy followed by a final cold working step. In this condition, the first significant precipitation hardening of the component occurs during high temperature use.

  20. Effect of thermo-mechanical treatments on the microstructure and mechanical properties of an ODS ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksiuta, Z.; Mueller, P.; Spätig, P.; Baluc, N.

    2011-05-01

    The Fe-14Cr-2W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3 oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) reduced activation ferritic (RAF) steel was fabricated by mechanical alloying of a pre-alloyed, gas atomised powder with yttria nano-particles, followed by hot isostatic pressing and thermo-mechanical treatments (TMTs). Two kinds of TMT were applied: (i) hot pressing, or (ii) hot rolling, both followed by annealing in vacuum at 850 °C. The use of a thermo-mechanical treatment was found to yield strong improvement in the microstructure and mechanical properties of the ODS RAF steel. In particular, hot pressing leads to microstructure refinement, equiaxed grains without texture, and an improvement in Charpy impact properties, especially in terms of the upper shelf energy (about 4.5 J). Hot rolling leads to elongated grains in the rolling direction, with a grain size ratio of 6:1, higher tensile strength and reasonable ductility up to 750 °C, and better Charpy impact properties, especially in terms of the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (about 55 °C).

  1. Energy-filtered TEM imaging and EELS study of ODS particles and argon-filled cavities in ferritic-martensitic steels.

    PubMed

    Klimiankou, M; Lindau, R; Möslang, A

    2005-01-01

    Oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) ferritic-martensitic steels with yttrium oxide (Y(2)O(3)) have been produced by mechanical alloying and hot isostatic pressing for use as advanced material in fusion power reactors. Argon gas, usually widely used as inert gas during mechanical alloying, was surprisingly detected in the nanodispersion-strengthened materials. Energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) led to the following results: (i) chemical composition of ODS particles, (ii) voids with typical diameters of 1-6 nm are formed in the matrix, (iii) these voids are filled with Ar gas, and (iv) the high-density nanosized ODS particles serve as trapping centers for the Ar bubbles. The Ar L(3,2) energy loss edge at 245 eV as well as the absorption features of the ODS particle elements were identified in the EELS spectrum. The energy resolution in the EEL spectrum of about 1.0 eV allows to identify the electronic structure of the ODS particles. PMID:15582472

  2. Microstructure examination of Fe-14Cr ODS ferritic steels produced through different processing routes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksiuta, Z.; Hosemann, P.; Vogel, S. C.; Baluc, N.

    2014-08-01

    Various thermo-mechanical treatments were applied to refine and homogenise grain size and improve mechanical properties of hot-isostatically pressed (HIP) 14%Cr ODS ferritic steel. The grain size was reduced, improving mechanical properties, tensile strength and Charpy impact, however bimodal-like distribution was also observed. As a result, larger, frequently elongated grains with size above 1 μm and refined, equiaxed grains with a diameter ranging from 250 to 500 nm. Neutron diffraction measurements revealed that for HIP followed by hydrostatic extrusion material the strongest fiber texture was observed oriented parallel to the extrusion direction. In comparison with hot rolling and hot pressing methods, this material exhibited promising mechanical properties: the ultimate tensile strength of 1350 MPa, yield strength of 1280 MPa, total elongation of 21.7% and Charpy impact energy of 5.8 J. Inferior Charpy impact energy of ∼3.0 J was measured for HIP and hot rolled material, emphasising that parameters of this manufacturing process still have to be optimised. As an alternative manufacturing route, due to the uniform microstructure and simplicity of the process, hot pressing might be a promising method for production of smaller parts of ODS ferritic steels. Besides, the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of all thermo-mechanically treated materials, in comparison with as-HIPped ODS steel, was improved by more than 50%, the transition temperature ranging from 50 to 70 °C (323 and 343 K) remains still unsatisfactory.

  3. Microstructural development under irradiation in European ODS ferritic/martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäublin, R.; Ramar, A.; Baluc, N.; de Castro, V.; Monge, M. A.; Leguey, T.; Schmid, N.; Bonjour, C.

    2006-06-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened steels based on the ferritic/martensitic steel EUROFER97 are promising candidates for a fusion reactor because of their improved high temperature mechanical properties and their potential higher radiation resistance relative to the base material. Several EUROFER97 based ODS F/M steels are investigated in this study. There are the Plansee ODS steels containing 0.3 wt% yttria, and the CRPP ODS steels, whose production route is described in detail. The reinforcing particles represent 0.3-0.5% weight and are composed of yttria. The effect of 0.3 wt% Ti addition is studied. ODS steel samples have been irradiated with 590 MeV protons to 0.3 and 1.0 dpa at room temperature and 350 °C. Microstructure is investigated by transmission electron microscopy and mechanical properties are assessed by tensile and Charpy tests. While the Plansee ODS presents a ferritic structure, the CRPP ODS material presents a tempered martensitic microstructure and a uniform distribution of the yttria particles. Both materials provide a yield stress higher than the base material, but with reduced elongation and brittle behaviour. Ti additions improve elongation at high temperatures. After irradiation, mechanical properties of the material are only slightly altered with an increase in the yield strength, but without significant decrease in the total elongation, relative to the base material. Samples irradiated at room temperature present radiation induced defects in the form of blacks dots with a size range from 2 to 3 nm, while after irradiation at 350 °C irradiation induced a0<1 0 0>{1 0 0} dislocation loops are clearly visible along with nanocavities. The dispersed yttria particles with an average size of 6-8 nm are found to be stable for all irradiation conditions. The density of the defects and the dispersoid are measured and found to be about 2.3 × 10 22 m -3 and 6.2 × 10 22 m -3, respectively. The weak impact of irradiation on mechanical properties of ODS F

  4. Microstructural characterizations of 14Cr ODS ferritic steels subjected to hot torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karch, A.; Sornin, D.; Barcelo, F.; Bosonnet, S.; de Carlan, Y.; Logé, R.

    2015-04-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are very promising materials for nuclear applications. In this paper, the hot working behavior of ODS ferritic steels, consolidated by hot extrusion, is studied through torsion tests. Three ODS steels are produced acting on both the quantity of Ti and Y2O3 added to the matrix (wt% Fe-14Cr-1W), and the density and size of the nanoparticles. A temperature range of 1000-1200 °C and strain rates from 5 ṡ 10-2 to 5 s-1 are considered. The microstructures of deformed samples are examined by Electron Back-Scatter Diffraction and X-ray diffraction techniques. It is observed that hot plastic strain leads to an early damage with nucleation and growth of cavities along grain boundaries. Except for the damage, very few microstructural and textural evolutions are noticed. The three tested ODS steels exhibit almost the same behavior under hot torsion straining, regardless of the precipitation state. Overall, the experimental results are interpreted through a mechanism of strain accommodation at grain boundaries, with low dislocation activity in the bulk of the grains.

  5. Tensile properties and deformation mechanisms of a 14Cr ODS ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steckmeyer, A.; Praud, M.; Fournier, B.; Malaplate, J.; Garnier, J.; Béchade, J. L.; Tournié, I.; Tancray, A.; Bougault, A.; Bonnaillie, P.

    2010-10-01

    The search for a new cladding material is part of the research studies carried out at CEA to develop a sodium-cooled fast reactor meeting the expectations of the Generation IV International Forum. In this study, the tensile properties of a ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened steel produced by hot extrusion at CEA have been evaluated. They prove the studied alloy to be as resistant as and more ductile than the other nano-reinforced alloys of literature. The effects of the strain rate and temperature on the total plastic strain of the material remind of diffusion phenomena. Intergranular damage and intergranular decohesion are clearly highlighted.

  6. Mechanical properties of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) molybdenum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Bianco, R.; Buckman, R.W. Jr.

    1998-03-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened molybdenum, Mo-ODS, developed by a proprietary powder metallurgy process, exhibits a creep rupture life at 0.65T{sub m} (1,600 C) of three to five orders of magnitude greater than unalloyed molybdenum, while maintaining ductile fracture behavior at temperatures significantly below room temperature. In comparison, the creep rupture life of the Mo-50Re solid solution strengthened alloy at 1,600 C is only an order of magnitude greater than unalloyed molybdenum. The results of microstructural characterization and thermal stability and mechanical property testing are discussed.

  7. Helium entrapment in a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Edmondson, Philip D; Parish, Chad M; Zhang, Yanwen; Hallen, Dr Anders; Miller, Michael K

    2011-01-01

    The nanostructured ferritic alloy 14YWT has been irradiated with He ions to simulate accumulation of He during the service life of a nuclear reactor to test the hypothesis that the large surface area for nanoclusters is a preferential nucleation site for bubbles. Transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography showed that high number densities of He bubbles were formed on the surface of nanoclusters and Ti(C,N) precipitates, and along grain boundaries and dislocations. At higher fluences, facetted bubbles are formed and it is postulated that the lowest energy state configuration is the truncated rhombic dodecahedron.

  8. Irradiation hardening of ODS ferritic steels under helium implantation and heavy-ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hengqing; Zhang, Chonghong; Yang, Yitao; Meng, Yancheng; Jang, Jinsung; Kimura, Akihiko

    2014-12-01

    Irradiation hardening of ODS ferritic steels after multi-energy He-ion implantation, or after irradiation with energetic heavy ions including Xe and Bi-ions was investigated with nano-indentation technique. Three kinds of high-Cr ODS ferritic steels including the commercial MA956 (19Cr-3.5Al), the 16Cr-0.1Ti and the 16Cr-3.5Al-0.1Zr were used. Data of nano-hardness were analyzed with an approach based on Nix-Gao model. The depth profiles of nano-hardness can be understood by the indentation size effect (ISE) in specimens of MA956 implanted with multi-energy He-ions or irradiated with 328 MeV Xe ions, which produced a plateau damage profile in the near-surface region. However, the damage gradient overlaps the ISE in the specimens irradiated with 9.45 Bi ions. The dose dependence of the nano-hardness shows a rapid increase at low doses and a slowdown at higher doses. An 1/2-power law dependence on dpa level is obtained. The discrepancy in nano-hardness between the helium implantation and Xe-ion irradiation can be understood by using the average damage level instead of the peak dpa level. Helium-implantation to a high dose (7400 appm/0.5 dpa) causes an additional hardening, which is possibly attributed to the impediment of motion dislocations by helium bubbles formed in high concentration in specimens.

  9. Microstructure Evolution of Gas Atomized Iron Based ODS Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, J.R.; Anderson, I.E.; Kramer, M.J.

    2011-08-09

    In a simplified process to produce precursor powders for oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys, gas-atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) was used to induce a surface oxide layer on molten droplets of three differing erritic stainless steel alloys during break-up and rapid solidification. The chemistry of the surface oxide was identified using auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The precursor iron-base powders were consolidated at 850 C and 1,300 C using hot isostatic pressing (HIPing). Consolidation at the lower temperature resulted in a fully dense microstructure, while preventing substantial prior particle-boundary-oxide dissociation. Microstructural analysis of the alloys consolidated at the higher temperature confirmed a significant reduction in prior-particle-boundary-oxide volume fraction, in comparison with the lower-temperature-consolidated sample. This provided evidence that a high-temperature internal oxygen-exchange reaction occurred between the metastable prior particle-boundary-oxide phase (chromium oxide) and the yttrium contained within each prior particle. This internal oxygen-exchange reaction is shown to result in the formation of yttrium-enriched oxide dispersoids throughout the alloy microstructure. The evolving microstructure was characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-energy X-ray diffraction (HE-XRD).

  10. Microstructure Evolution of Gas Atomized Iron Based ODS Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, J.R.; Anderson, I.E.; Kramer, M.J.; Anderegg, J.W.; Shechtman, D.

    2009-12-01

    In a simplified process to produce precursor powders for oxide dispersion-strength- ened (ODS) alloys, gas-atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) was used to induce a surface oxide layer on molten droplets of three differing erritic stainless steel alloys during break-up and rapid solidification. The chemistry of the surface oxide was identified using auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The precursor iron-base powders were consolidated at 850 C and 1,300 C using hot isostatic pressing (HIPing). Consolidation at the lower temperature resulted in a fully dense microstructure, while preventing substantial prior particle-boundary-oxide dissociation. Microstructural analysis of the alloys consolidated at the higher temperature confirmed a significant reduction in prior-particle-boundary-oxide volume fraction, in comparison with the lower-temperature-consolidated sample. This provided evidence that a high-temperature internal oxygen-exchange reaction occurred between the metastable prior particle-boundary-oxide phase (chromium oxide) and the yttrium contained within each prior particle. This internal oxygen-exchange reaction is shown to result in the formation of yttrium-enriched oxide dispersoids throughout the alloy microstructure. The evolving microstructure was characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-energy X-ray diffraction (HE-XRD).

  11. HRTEM Study of Oxide Nanoparticles in K3-ODS Ferritic Steel Developed for Radiation Tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L; Fluss, M; Tumey, S; Kuntz, J; El-Dasher, B; Wall, M; Choi, W; Kimura, A; Willaime, F; Serruys, Y

    2009-11-02

    Crystal and interfacial structures of oxide nanoparticles and radiation damage in 16Cr-4.5Al-0.3Ti-2W-0.37 Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} ODS ferritic steel have been examined using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. Oxide nanoparticles with a complex-oxide core and an amorphous shell were frequently observed. The crystal structure of complex-oxide core is identified to be mainly monoclinic Y{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 9} (YAM) oxide compound. Orientation relationships between the oxide and the matrix are found to be dependent on the particle size. Large particles (> 20 nm) tend to be incoherent and have a spherical shape, whereas small particles (< 10 nm) tend to be coherent or semi-coherent and have a faceted interface. The observations of partially amorphous nanoparticles and multiple crystalline domains formed within a nanoparticle lead us to propose a three-stage mechanism to rationalize the formation of oxide nanoparticles containing core/shell structures in as-fabricated ODS steels. Effects of nanoparticle size and density on cavity formation induced by (Fe{sup 8+} + He{sup +}) dual-beam irradiation are briefly addressed.

  12. Hot deformation behavior and processing map of a 9Cr ferritic/martensitic ODS steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guangming; Zhou, Zhangjian; Sun, Hongying; Zou, Lei; Wang, Man; Li, Shaofu

    2014-12-01

    The hot deformation behavior of 9Cr oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steel fabricated through the process of mechanical alloying and hot isostatic pressing (HIP) as investigated through hot compression deformation tests on the Gleeble-1500D simulator in the temperature range of 1050-1200 °C and strain rate range of 0.001 s-1-1 s-1. The relationship between the rheological stress and the strain rate was also studied. The activation energy and the stress and material parameters of the hyperbolic-sine equation were resolved according to the data obtained. The processing map was also proposed. The results show that the flow stress decreases as the temperature increases, and that decreasing of the strain rate of the 9Cr ODS steel results in a positive strain rate sensitivity. It is clear that dynamic recrystallization is influenced by both temperature and strain rate. The results of this study may provide a good reference for the selection of hot working parameters for 9Cr ODS steel. The optimum processing domains are at 1200 °C with a strain rate of 1 s-1 and in the range of 1080-1100 °C with a strain rate between 0.018 s-1 and 0.05 s-1.

  13. Microstructural study of a mechanically alloyed ODS superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Mujahid, M.; Gater, C.A.; Martin, J.W.

    1998-08-01

    Extruded bars of oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloy MA-6000 have been annealed isothermally as well as in temperature gradients. The temperatures used for annealing produced secondary recrystallization in all the samples, although the final grain aspect ratio was different for each annealing process. Interrupted gradient anneal experiments showed a curved secondary recrystallization front, with the surface recrystallizing at a lower temperature than the interior. It is believed this is caused indirectly by the strain gradients arising during extrusion. Grain-orientation analysis of recrystallized material revealed that a <110> fiber texture is present. A progressive grain reorientation toward <110> has been measured behind the recrystallization front using microbeam electron diffraction. In addition, changes in the distribution, size, and morphology of different types of precipitates and particles occurring during various stages of annealing have also been studied. Grain-boundary pinning by the stable oxide particles plays an important role in determining the grain growth behavior at high temperatures.

  14. High strength ferritic alloy-D53

    DOEpatents

    Hagel, William C.; Smidt, Frederick A.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1977-01-01

    A high strength ferritic alloy is described having from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight nickel, from about 2.5% to about 3.6% by weight chromium, from about 2.5% to about 3.5% by weight molybdenum, from about 0.1% to about 0.5% by weight vanadium, from about 0.1% to about 0.5% by weight silicon, from about 0.1% to about 0.6% by weight manganese, from about 0.12% to about 0.20% by weight carbon, from about 0.02% to about 0.1% by weight boron, a maximum of about 0.05% by weight nitrogen, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight phosphorous, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight sulfur, and the balance iron.

  15. Innovative Powder Processing of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened ODS Ferritic Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, Joel; Anderson, Iver; Kramer, Matthew

    2011-04-01

    An innovative gas atomization reaction synthesis technique was employed as a viable method to dramatically lower the processing cost for precursor oxide dispersion forming ferritic stainless steel powders (i.e., Fe-Cr-(Hf,Ti)-Y). During this rapid solidification process the atomized powders were enveloped by a nano-metric Cr-enriched metastable oxide film. Elevated temperature heat treatment was used to dissociate this metastable oxide phase through oxygen exchange reactions with Y-(Hf,Ti) enriched intermetallic compound precipitates. These solid state reactions resulted in the formation of highly stable nano-metric mixed oxide dispersoids (i.e., Y-Ti-O or Y-Hf-O) throughout the alloy microstructure. Subsequent high temperature (1200 C) heat treatments were used to elucidate the thermal stability of each nano-metric oxide dispersoid phase. Transmission electron microscopy coupled with X-ray diffraction was used to evaluate phase evolution within the alloy microstructure.

  16. Charpy impact test results for low-activation ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, N.S.; Hu, W.L.; Gelles, D.S.

    1987-05-01

    The objective of this work is to evaluate the shift of the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and the reduction of the upper shelf energy (USE) due to neutron irradiation of low activation ferritic alloys. Six low activation ferritic alloys have been tested following irradiation at 365/sup 0/C to 10 dpa and compared with control specimens in order to assess the effect of irradiation on Charpy impact properties.

  17. Behavior of Fe-ODS Alloys After Thermal Aging Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano Garcia, Marta; Hernández-Mayoral, Mercedes; Esparraguera, Elvira Oñorbe

    2016-03-01

    Oxide dispersion alloys are one of the candidates as cladding materials for Gen IV fast reactors, due to their high strength at high temperature, good creep properties, and swelling resistance. This good performance is mainly due to a fine dispersion of nano-oxide particles on the microstructure and to non-grained structure. The microstructural stability and the mechanical properties of a Fe-ODS alloy are studied after different thermal aging experiments at 973 K (700 °C), 5000 hours; 973 K (700 °C), 10,000 hours; and 1123 K (850 °C), 10,000 hours. SEM/EBSD and TEM together with tensile and impact tests on the as-received and thermally aged material have been carried out. In general, for all the tested conditions, a slight softening effect is observed attributed to the changes in the grain structure as well as to the changes in the amount and size of nano-oxide particles. In addition, the aged material shows a lower impact USE value while the DBTT is maintained.

  18. Behavior of Fe-ODS Alloys After Thermal Aging Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano Garcia, Marta; Hernández-Mayoral, Mercedes; Esparraguera, Elvira Oñorbe

    2016-06-01

    Oxide dispersion alloys are one of the candidates as cladding materials for Gen IV fast reactors, due to their high strength at high temperature, good creep properties, and swelling resistance. This good performance is mainly due to a fine dispersion of nano-oxide particles on the microstructure and to non-grained structure. The microstructural stability and the mechanical properties of a Fe-ODS alloy are studied after different thermal aging experiments at 973 K (700 °C), 5000 hours; 973 K (700 °C), 10,000 hours; and 1123 K (850 °C), 10,000 hours. SEM/EBSD and TEM together with tensile and impact tests on the as-received and thermally aged material have been carried out. In general, for all the tested conditions, a slight softening effect is observed attributed to the changes in the grain structure as well as to the changes in the amount and size of nano-oxide particles. In addition, the aged material shows a lower impact USE value while the DBTT is maintained.

  19. Towards Radiation Tolerant Nanostructured Ferritic Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Michael K; Hoelzer, David T; Russell, Kaye F

    2010-01-01

    The high temperature and irradiation response of a new class of nanostructured ferritic alloys have been investigated by atom probe tomography. These materials are candidate materials for use in the extreme environments that will be present in the next generation of power generating systems. Atom probe tomography has revealed that the yttria powder is forced into solid solution during the mechanical alloying process andsubsequently 2-nm-diameter Ti-, Y- and O-enriched nanoclusters are formedduring the extrusion process. These nanoclusters have been shown to be remarkably stable during isothermal annealing treatments up to 0.92 of the melting temperature and during proton irradiation up to 3 displacements per atom. No significant difference in sizes, compositions and number densities of the nanoclusters was also observed between the unirradiated and proton irradiated conditions. The grain boundaries were found to have high number densities of nanoclusters as well as chromium and tungsten segregation which pin the grain boundary to minimize creep and grain growth.

  20. Microstructural examination of commercial ferritic alloys at 200 dpa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelles, D. S.

    1996-10-01

    Microstructures and density change measurements are reported for martensitic commercial steels HT-9 and modified 9Cr1Mo (T91) and oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloys MA956 and MA957 following irradiation in the FFTF/MOTA at 420°C to 200 dpa. Swelling as determined by density change remains below 2% for all conditions. Microstructures are found to be stable except in recrystallized grains of MA957, which are fabrication artifacts, with only minor swelling in the martensitic steels and α' precipitation in alloys with 12% or more chromium. These results further demonstrate the high swelling resistance and microstructural stability of the ferritic alloy class.

  1. Processing and characterization of oxide dispersion strengthened 14YWT ferritic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Michael Keith

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels are currently being investigated as candidate materials for nuclear applications due to their increased high temperature strength and low activation characteristics. Recent studies have shown that ODS ferritic steels containing Ti exhibit enhanced high temperature properties due to the formation of a very fine dispersion of nanometer-sized oxide clusters based on Ti, Y, and O. Studies are currently underway to examine so called 14YWT alloys with nominal compositions of Fe-14Cr-3W-0.4Ti (wt. %) mechanically alloyed with 0.25 (wt.%) Y2O3. The focus of this study was to investigate how the early stages of processing of 14YWT alloys during mechanical milling, heat treatment, and consolidation affect the structure and properties of the alloys. The 14YWT alloys were milled at different times up to 80 hours, along with alloy powder compositions of Fe-14Cr + 0.25 wt.% Y2O 3 (14Y) and Fe-14Cr without Y2O3 (Fe-14Cr). The evolution of the microstructure and mechanical properties during milling was examined with a combination of optical metallography, x-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, atom probe tomography, and nanoindentation. Alloy powders were also heat treated and studied using high temperature x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry methods. Special attention was paid to milling parameters and temperature ranges which lead to the formation of nanosized oxide clusters in the alloys. Finally, the microstructure of consolidated alloys was examined and related to milling and heat treatment methods. Mechanical properties and microstructure during milling were similar in the three alloy powders examined regardless of dispersoid or alloy addition. Mechanical mixing of the alloy powders was inefficient after 40 hours of milling. Milling did not produce bulk amorphous phases but quickly reduced the crystallite size to ˜10-20 nm. Milling also resulted in relatively uniform dissolution of Y2O3. Thermal

  2. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H.; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Huang, Shenyan; Teng, Zhenke; Liu, Chain T.; Asta, Mark D.; Gao, Yanfei; Dunand, David C.; Ghosh, Gautam; Chen, Mingwei; Fine, Morris E.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-11-01

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones. These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. The present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures.

  3. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H.; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Huang, Shenyan; Teng, Zhenke; Liu, Chain T.; Asta, Mark D.; Gao, Yanfei; Dunand, David C.; Ghosh, Gautam; Chen, Mingwei; Fine, Morris E.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones. These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. The present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures. PMID:26548303

  4. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H.; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Huang, Shenyan; et al

    2015-11-09

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones.more » These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. Finally, the present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures.« less

  5. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H.; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Huang, Shenyan; Teng, Zhenke; Liu, Chain T.; Asta, Mark D.; Gao, Yanfei; Dunand, David C.; Ghosh, Gautam; Chen, Mingwei; Fine, Morris E.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-11-09

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones. These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. Finally, the present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures.

  6. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates.

    PubMed

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N; Huang, Shenyan; Teng, Zhenke; Liu, Chain T; Asta, Mark D; Gao, Yanfei; Dunand, David C; Ghosh, Gautam; Chen, Mingwei; Fine, Morris E; Liaw, Peter K

    2015-01-01

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones. These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. The present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures. PMID:26548303

  7. Development and characterisation of a new ODS ferritic steel for fusion reactor application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksiuta, Z.; Olier, P.; de Carlan, Y.; Baluc, N.

    2009-08-01

    This paper describes the microstructure, tensile properties and Charpy impact resistance of a reduced activation oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel Fe-14Cr-2W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3 produced by mechanical alloying of a pre-alloyed, gas atomised steel powder with Y 2O 3 particles, compaction by hot extrusion at 1100 °C, hot rolling at 700 °C and heat treatment at 1050 °C for 1 h. At room temperature the material exhibits a high ultimate tensile strength of about 1420 MPa and high yield strength of about 1340 MPa in the transverse direction. In the longitudinal direction the values are about 10% lower, due to the anisotropy of the microstructure (elongated grains in the rolling direction). At 750 °C the material still exhibits relatively high yield strengths of about 325 MPa and 305 MPa in the longitudinal and transverse directions, respectively. The material exhibits reasonable uniform and total elongation values over the temperature range 23-750 °C, in both transverse and longitudinal directions. The material exhibits weak Charpy impact properties in the transverse direction. Charpy impact properties are slightly better in the longitudinal direction, with upper shelf energy of about 4.2 J and a ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of about 8.8 °C.

  8. Advanced ODS FeCrAl alloys for accident-tolerant fuel cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Dryepondt, Sebastien N; Unocic, Kinga A; Hoelzer, David T; Pint, Bruce A

    2014-09-01

    ODS FeCrAl alloys are being developed with optimum composition and properties for accident tolerant fuel cladding. Two oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-15Cr-5Al+Y2O3 alloys were fabricated by ball milling and extrusion of gas atomized metallic powder mixed with Y2O3 powder. To assess the impact of Mo on the alloy mechanical properties, one alloy contained 1%Mo. The hardness and tensile properties of the two alloys were close and higher than the values reported for fine grain PM2000 alloy. This is likely due to the combination of a very fine grain structure and the presence of nano oxide precipitates. The nano oxide dispersion was however not sufficient to prevent grain boundary sliding at 800 C and the creep properties of the alloys were similar or only slightly superior to fine grain PM2000 alloy. Both alloys formed a protective alumina scale at 1200 C in air and steam and the mass gain curves were similar to curves generated with 12Cr-5Al+Y2O3 (+Hf or Zr) ODS alloys fabricated for a different project. To estimate the maximum temperature limit of use for the two alloys in steam, ramp tests at a rate of 5 C/min were carried out in steam. Like other ODS alloys, the two alloys showed a significant increase of the mas gains at T~ 1380 C compared with ~1480 C for wrought alloys of similar composition. The beneficial effect of Yttrium for wrought FeCrAl does not seem effective for most ODS FeCrAl alloys. Characterization of the hardness of annealed specimens revealed that the microstructure of the two alloys was not stable above 1000 C. Concurrent radiation results suggested that Cr levels <15wt% are desirable and the creep and oxidation results from the 12Cr ODS alloys indicate that a lower Cr, high strength ODS alloy with a higher maximum use temperature could be achieved.

  9. Unusual Thermal Stability of Nano-structured Ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xun-Li; Liu, Chain T; Stoica, A. D.; Keiderling, Dr. Uwe; Yang, Ling; Miller, Michael K; Fu, Chong Long; Ma, Dong; An, Ke

    2012-01-01

    A scientific question vitally important to the materials community is whether there exist self-assembled nanoclusters that are thermodynamically stable at elevated temperatures. Using in-situ neutron scattering, we characterized the structure and thermal stability of a nano-structured ferritic (NSF) alloy. Nanometer sized clusters were found to persist up to ~1400 C, providing direct evidence of a thermodynamically stable alloying state for the nanoclusters. Cluster formation requires the coexistence of Y, Ti, and O without the precipitation of oxide phases. The presence of thermally stable nanoclusters at grain boundaries limits the diffusion of Fe atoms, thereby stabilizing the microstructure of the ferritic matrix at high temperatures. Our experimental results provide physical insights of the dramatically improved high-temperature mechanical properties in NSF alloy and point to a new direction in alloy design.

  10. Ferritic Fe-Mn alloy for cryogenic applications

    DOEpatents

    Hwang, Sun-Keun; Morris, Jr., John W.

    1979-01-01

    A ferritic, nickel-free alloy steel composition, suitable for cryogenic applications, which consists essentially of about 10-13% manganese, 0.002-0.01% boron, 0.1-0.5% titanium, 0-0.05% aluminum, and the remainder iron and incidental impurities normally associated therewith.

  11. Development of ODS FeCrAl alloys for accident-tolerant fuel cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Dryepondt, Sebastien N.; Hoelzer, David T.; Pint, Bruce A.; Unocic, Kinga A.

    2015-09-18

    FeCrAl alloys are prime candidates for accident-tolerant fuel cladding due to their excellent oxidation resistance up to 1400 C and good mechanical properties at intermediate temperature. Former commercial oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) FeCrAl alloys such as PM2000 exhibit significantly better tensile strength than wrought FeCrAl alloys, which would alloy for the fabrication of a very thin (~250 m) ODS FeCrAl cladding and limit the neutronic penalty from the replacement of Zr-based alloys by Fe-based alloys. Several Fe-12-Cr-5Al ODS alloys where therefore fabricated by ball milling FeCrAl powders with Y2O3 and additional oxides such as TiO2 or ZrO2. The new Fe-12Cr-5Al ODS alloys showed excellent tensile strength up to 800 C but limited ductility. Good oxidation resistance in steam at 1200 and 1400 C was observed except for one ODS FeCrAl alloy containing Ti. Rolling trials were conducted at 300, 600 C and 800 C to simulate the fabrication of thin tube cladding and a plate thickness of ~0.6mm was reached before the formation of multiple edge cracks. Hardness measurements at different stages of the rolling process, before and after annealing for 1h at 1000 C, showed that a thinner plate thickness could likely be achieved by using a multi-step approach combining warm rolling and high temperature annealing. Finally, new Fe-10-12Cr-5.5-6Al-Z gas atomized powders have been purchased to fabricate the second generation of low-Cr ODS FeCrAl alloys. The main goals are to assess the effect of O, C, N and Zr contents on the ODS FeCrAl microstructure and mechanical properties, and to optimize the fabrication process to improve the ductility of the 2nd gen ODS FeCrAl while maintaining good mechanical strength and oxidation resistance.

  12. Radiation effects on the microstructure of a 9Cr-ODS alloy.

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, J.; Allen, T. R.; Birtcher, R. C.; Shutthanandan, S.; Thevothasan, S.; Materials Science Division; INL; Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison; PNNL

    2008-01-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are prime candidates for high-temperature, high-dose cladding in advanced nuclear reactors. When a 9Cr-ODS alloy was irradiated with 5 MeV nickel ions at temperatures of 500-700 C to doses up to 150 dpa, there was no significant change in the dislocation arrangement. For oxide particles, there is a small shrinkage in size and increase in density with increasing irradiation dose. This work confirms that oxide particles and the microstructure of the 9Cr-ODS show minimal changes under irradiation at temperatures up to 700 C and doses up to 150 dpa.

  13. High temperature deformation mechanism of 15CrODS ferritic steels at cold-rolled and recrystallized conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugino, Yoshito; Ukai, Shigeharu; Oono, Naoko; Hayashi, Shigenari; Kaito, Takeji; Ohtsuka, Satoshi; Masuda, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Satoshi; Sato, Eiichi

    2015-11-01

    The ODS ferritic steels realize potentially higher operating temperature due to structural stability by the dispersed nano-size oxide particles. The deformation process and mechanism of 15CrODS ferritic steels were investigated at 1073 K and 1173 K for the cold-rolled and recrystallized conditions. Tensile and creep tests were conducted at the stress in parallel (LD) and perpendicular (TD) directions to the grain boundaries. Strain rate varied from 10-1 to 10-9 s-1. For the LD specimens, deformation in the cold rolled and recrystallized conditions is reinforced by finely dispersed oxide particles. The dominant deformation process for the recrystallized TD specimen is controlled through the grain boundary sliding and stress accommodation via diffusional creep at temperature of 1173 K and lower strain rate less than 10-4 s-1. The grain boundary sliding couldn't be rate-controlling process at 1073 K for the as-cold rolled TD specimen, where a dynamic recovery of the dislocation produced by cold-rolling is related to the deformation process.

  14. The Role of Alloying Elements in Nanostructured Ferritic Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Michael K; Parish, Chad M

    2010-01-01

    The roles of the alloying elements in three nanostructured ferritic alloys (14YWT, MA957 and Eurofer 97) have been established through the characterisation of the microstructure by atom probe tomography and spectrum imaging in a transmission electron microscope. Cr, W, Mo, Ti and Y were found in the ferrite matrix and contributed to solid solution hardening. Ti, Y, C, O and N were found in high number densities of precipitates and nanoclusters both in the grain interior and on grain boundaries and thereby contributed to precipitation hardening. Cr, W and Mo were enriched at the intraparticle regions of the grain boundaries. The solute segregation and precipitation pinned the grain boundaries and contributed to the excellent creep properties of the alloys.

  15. High Temperature Fracture Characteristics of a Nanostructured Ferritic Alloy (NFA)

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Thak Sang; Kim, Jeoung H; Ji Hyun, Yoon; Hoelzer, David T

    2010-01-01

    High temperature fracture behavior has been investigated for the nanostructured ferritic alloy 14YWT (SM10). The fracture toughness of the alloy was above 140 MPa m at low temperatures, room temperature (RT) and 200 C, but decreased to a low fracture toughness range of 52 82 MPa m at higher temperatures up to 700 C. This behavior was explained by the fractography results indicating that the unique nanostructure of 14YWT alloy produced shallow plasticity layers at high temperatures and a low-ductility grain boundary debonding occurred at 700 C.

  16. Initial Development in Joining of ODS Alloys Using Friction Stir Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Weiju; Feng, Zhili

    2007-08-01

    Solid-state welding of oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloy MA956 sheets using friction stir welding (FSW) was investigated. Butt weld was successfully produced. The weld and base metals were characterized using optical microscopy, scanning electronic microscopy, transmission electronic microscopy, and energy dispersion x-ray spectrum. Microhardness mapping was also conducted over the weld region. Analyses indicate that the distribution of the strengthening oxides was preserved in the weld. Decrease in microhardness of the weld was observed but was insignificant. The preliminary results seem to confirm the envisioned feasibility of FSW application to ODS alloy joining. For application to Gen IV nuclear reactor heat exchanger, further investigation is suggested.

  17. Irradiation effects in oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Ni-base alloys for Gen. IV nuclear reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oono, Naoko; Ukai, Shigeharu; Kondo, Sosuke; Hashitomi, Okinobu; Kimura, Akihiko

    2015-10-01

    Oxide particle dispersion strengthened (ODS) Ni-base alloys are irradiated by using simulation technique (Fe/He dual-ion irradiation) to investigate the reliability to Gen. IV high-temperature reactors. The fine oxide particles with less than 10 nm in average size and approximately 8.0 × 1022 m-3 in number density remained after 101 dpa irradiation. The tiny helium bubbles were inside grains, not at grain-boundaries; it is advantageous effect of oxide particles which trap the helium atoms at the particle-matrix interface. Ni-base ODS alloys demonstrated their great ability to overcome He embrittlement.

  18. Latent tracks of swift heavy ions in Cr23C6 and Y-Ti-O nanoparticles in ODS alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skuratov, V. A.; Sohatsky, A. S.; O'Connell, J. H.; Kornieieva, K.; Nikitina, A. A.; Uglov, V. V.; Neethling, J. H.; Ageev, V. S.

    2016-05-01

    The radiation stability of dielectric nanoparticles embedded into a metallic matrix is of considerable practical value due to the growing interest in oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels as promising nuclear reactor materials. In this report the results of a TEM study of structural changes in Cr23C6 and Y-Ti-O nanoparticles in several ODS alloys irradiated with 1.2 MeV/amu Xe and 3.4 MeV/amu Bi ions is presented. It was found that swift heavy ion irradiation leads to the formation of amorphous latent tracks in both materials. The upper limit of the threshold electronic stopping power for track formation in carbides is estimated to be around 35 keV/nm. Multiple ion track overlapping leads to complete amorphization of carbide and Y-Ti oxide nanoparticles. Microstructural analysis have revealed a strong influence of the ferritic matrix on track morphology in Y2Ti2O7 nanoparticles in pre-thinned TEM targets after postradiation annealing and irradiation at elevated temperatures.

  19. Load partitioning between ferrite/martensite and dispersed nanoparticles of a 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guangming; Mo, Kun; Miao, Yinbin; Liu, Xiang; Almer, Jonathan; Zhou, Zhangjian; Stubbins, James F.

    2015-06-18

    In this study, a high-energy synchrotron radiation X-ray technique was used to investigate the tensile deformation processes of a 9Cr-ODS ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steel at different temperatures. Two minor phases within the 9Cr-ODS F/M steel matrix were identified as Y2Ti2O7 and TiN by the high-energy X-ray diffraction, and confirmed by the analysis using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) of scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The lattice strains of the matrix and particles were measured through the entire tensile deformation process. During the tensile tests, the lattice strains of the ferrite/martensite and the particles (TiN and Y2Ti2O7) showed a strong temperature dependence, decreasing with increasing temperature. Analysis of the internal stress at three temperatures showed that the load partitioning between the ferrite/martensite and the particles (TiN and Y2Ti2O7) was initiated during sample yielding and reached to a peak during sample necking. At three studied temperatures, the internal stress of minor phases (Y2Ti2O7 and TiN) was about 2 times that of F/M matrix at yielding position, while the internal stress of Y2Ti2O7 and TiN reached about 4.5-6 times and 3-3.5 times that of the F/M matrix at necking position, respectively. It indicates that the strengthening of the matrix is due to minor phases (Y2Ti2O7 and TiN), especially Y2Ti2O7 particles. Although the internal stresses of all phases decreased with increasing temperature from RT to 600 degrees C, the ratio of internal stresses of each phase at necking position stayed in a stable range (internal stresses of Y2Ti2O7 and TiN were about 4.5-6 times and 3-3.5 times of that of F/M matrix, respectively). The difference between internal stress of the F/M matrix and the applied stress at 600 degrees C is slightly lower than those at RI and 300 degrees C, indicating that the nanoparticles still have good strengthening effect at 600 degrees C. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. CROSS-ROLL FLOW FORMING OF ODS ALLOY HEAT EXCHANGER TUBES FOR HOOP CREEP ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2004-05-31

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. Recent studies in cross-rolled ODS-alloy sheets (produced from flattened tubes) indicate that transverse creep is significantly enhanced via controlled transverse grain fibering, and similar improvements are expected for cross-rolled tubes. The research program outlined here is iterative in nature and is intended to systematically (1) prescribe extrusion consolidation methodologies via detailed

  1. CROSS-ROLL FLOW FORMING OF ODS ALLOY HEAT EXCHANGER TUBES FOR HOOP CREEP ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2005-06-27

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. Recent studies in cross-rolled ODS-alloy sheets (produced from flattened tubes) indicate that transverse creep is significantly enhanced via controlled transverse grain fibering, and similar improvements are expected for cross-rolled tubes. The research program outlined here is iterative in nature and is intended to systematically (i) prescribe extrusion consolidation methodologies via detailed

  2. CROSS-ROLL FLOW FORMING OF ODS ALLOY HEAT EXCHANGER TUBES FOR HOOP CREEP ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2005-02-28

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. Recent studies in cross-rolled ODS-alloy sheets (produced from flattened tubes) indicate that transverse creep is significantly enhanced via controlled transverse grain fibering, and similar improvements are expected for cross-rolled tubes. The research program outlined here is iterative in nature and is intended to systematically (i) prescribe extrusion consolidation methodologies via detailed

  3. CROSS-ROLL FLOW FORMING OF ODS ALLOY HEAT EXCHANGER TUBES FOR HOOP CREEP ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2004-08-31

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. Recent studies in cross-rolled ODS-alloy sheets (produced from flattened tubes) indicate that transverse creep is significantly enhanced via controlled transverse grain fibering, and similar improvements are expected for cross-rolled tubes. The research program outlined here is iterative in nature and is intended to systematically (i) prescribe extrusion consolidation methodologies via detailed

  4. CROSS-ROLL FLOW FORMING OF ODS ALLOY HEAT EXCHANGER TUBES FOR HOOP CREEP ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2004-11-30

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. Recent studies in cross-rolled ODS-alloy sheets (produced from flattened tubes) indicate that transverse creep is significantly enhanced via controlled transverse grain fibering, and similar improvements are expected for cross-rolled tubes. The research program outlined here is iterative in nature and is intended to systematically (i) prescribe extrusion consolidation methodologies via detailed

  5. CROSS-ROLL FLOW FORMING OF ODS ALLOY HEAT EXCHANGER TUBES FOR HOOP CREEP ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2004-03-31

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. Recent studies in cross-rolled ODS-alloy sheets (produced from flattened tubes) indicate that transverse creep is significantly enhanced via controlled transverse grain fibering, and similar improvements are expected for cross-rolled tubes. The research program outlined here is iterative in nature and is intended to systematically (1) prescribe extrusion consolidation methodologies via detailed

  6. Recovery and recrystallisation in mechanically alloyed and annealed, legacy, FeCrAlY ODS alloy precursor powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, K.; Rao, A.; Tatlock, G. J.; Jones, A. R.

    2015-08-01

    This study presents findings related to the recrystallisation behaviour in Mechanically Alloyed (MA) and annealed powders of legacy commercial Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) FeCrAl alloys PM2000, MA956 and ODM751. Annealing of as-MA ODS alloy powders at temperatures ≥ 800 °C induced primary recrystallisation. The volume fraction (Vf) recrystallised increased with higher annealing temperatures in the range studied (∼800-1050 °C). However, low temperature (650 °C) recovery reduced the subsequent kinetics of recrystallisation in PM2000 alloy. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) analysis of annealed PM2000 and MA956 alloy powders indicates that precipitation of nano-particulate Y-Al-O phases begins at temperatures as low as 650 °C and microstructural changes during annealing of ODS powders involved interactions between nano-particle formation and recovery/recrystallisation processes. High number densities (NV > 1023 m-3) of coherent nano-precipitates were identified in both recovered and recrystallised regions of powder particles. These formed over a range of temperatures used in the consolidation processing of ODS alloys. The orientation relationship between nano-particles and the matrix was identical in both recovered and recrystallised grains, indicating that particles were dissolved at recrystallising interfaces and subsequently reprecipitated. Examination and comparison of as-MA and annealed powder specimens suggests that nuances in the manufacturing of these three, nominally similar, alloys leads to differences in recovery/recrystallisation behaviour, which may influence microstructure and, ultimately, properties in the final product form.

  7. Mechanical alloying of lanthana-bearing nanostructured ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Somayeh Paseban; Indrajit Charit; Yaqiao Q. Wu; Jatuporn Burns; Kerry N. Allahar; Darryl P. Butt; James I. Cole

    2013-09-01

    A novel nanostructured ferritic steel powder with the nominal composition Fe–14Cr–1Ti–0.3Mo–0.5La2O3 (wt.%) was developed via high energy ball milling. La2O3 was added to this alloy instead of the traditionally used Y2O3. The effects of varying the ball milling parameters, such as milling time, steel ball size and ball to powder ratio, on the mechanical properties and micro structural characteristics of the as-milled powder were investigated. Nanocrystallites of a body-centered cubic ferritic solid solution matrix with a mean size of approximately 20 nm were observed by transmission electron microscopy. Nanoscale characterization of the as-milled powder by local electrode atom probe tomography revealed the formation of Cr–Ti–La–O-enriched nanoclusters during mechanical alloying. The Cr:Ti:La:O ratio is considered “non-stoichiometric”. The average size (radius) of the nanoclusters was about 1 nm, with number density of 3.7 1024 m3. The mechanism for formation of nanoclusters in the as-milled powder is discussed. La2O3 appears to be a promising alternative rare earth oxide for future nanostructured ferritic steels.

  8. Evaluation of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) molybdenum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Bianco, R.; Buckman, R.W. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    A series of fourteen (14) novel high-strength molybdenum alloy compositions containing a dispersion of very fine (< 1 {mu}m diameter) oxide particles were consolidated using two proprietary powder metallurgy techniques. The developmental compositions were evaluated to determine the microstructural stability and mechanical properties from cryogenic (-148{degrees}F) to elevated temperatures (4000{degrees}F) for material in the as-swaged (>98% cold work) condition and for as-swaged material in the heat treated condition. Extremely fine oxide particle sizes (<1000 {Angstrom}) were observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) for a number of the experimental compositions in the as-swaged condition. A one hour recrystallization temperature as high as 3990{degrees}F was measured and a ductile-to-brittle transition temperature as low as {approximately}58{degrees}F for material in the recrystallized condition was determined. The preliminary results support the alloy design concept feasibility.

  9. Mantle region accommodating two-dimensional grain boundary sliding in ODS ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Hiroshi; Tobe, Hirobumi; Sato, Eiichi; Sugino, Yoshito; Ukai, Shigeharu

    2015-07-01

    Two-dimensional grain-boundary sliding (GBS) was achieved microscopically in an oxide-dispersion-strengthened ferritic steel with an elongated and aligned grain structure, which was deformed perpendicular to the long axis. At the border between superplastic regions II and III, microscopic deformation was observed using sub-micron grids drawn on the material surface using a focused ion beam. GBS was accommodated by intragranular deformations in narrow areas around grain boundaries, which has been predicted by earlier researchers as characteristics of the core-mantle model. These observations suggest that dislocations slip only in the mantle regions around wavy boundaries to relax the stress concentration caused by GBS during superplasticity.

  10. Reactive gas atomization processing for Fe-based ODS alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, Joel R; Anderson, Iver E; Kramer, Matthew J; Odette, G R; Stergar, E; Haney, E

    2011-08-24

    Gas atomization reaction synthesis was employed as a simplified method for processing oxide dispersion forming precursor Fe-based powders (e.g., Fe–Cr–Y–Hf). During this process a reactive atomization gas (i.e., Ar–O2) was used to oxidize the powder surfaces during primary break-up and rapid solidification of the molten alloy. This resulted in envelopment of the powders by an ultra-thin (t < 50 nm) metastable Cr-enriched oxide shell that was used as a vehicle to transport oxygen into the consolidated microstructure. Subsequent elevated temperature heat treatment promoted thermodynamically driven oxygen exchange reactions between trapped films of Cr-enriched oxide and internal (Y, Hf)-enriched intermetallic precipitates, resulting in highly stable nano-metric mixed oxide dispersoids (i.e., Y–Hf–O) that were identified with X-ray diffraction. Transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography results also revealed that the size and distribution of the dispersoids were found to depend strongly on the original rapidly solidified microstructure. To exploit this, several oxide dispersion strengthened microstructures were engineered from different powder particle size ranges, illustrating microstructural control as a function of particle solidification rate. Additionally, preliminary thermal–mechanical processing was used to develop a fine scale dislocation substructure for ultimate strengthening of the alloy.

  11. Characterization of high performance austenitic and ODS alloys for SCWR conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Penttila, S.; Toivonen, A.; Auerkari, P.; Novotny, R.

    2012-07-01

    High temperature oxidation resistance is of critical importance for the in-reactor components of the European supercritical water reactor (SCWR) concept. To consider candidate materials for this purpose, selected austenitic steels, iron based ODS (Oxide Dispersion Strengthened) alloys and one Ni alloy have been tested by exposure to supercritical water at 650 deg. C/25 MPa up to 2000 h. Results of observed mass change, oxide thickness and composition after exposure are shown and discussed regarding implications for long term oxidation performance. (authors)

  12. Gas atomized precursor alloy powder for oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieken, Joel Rodney

    Gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) was employed as a simplified method for producing precursor powders for oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic stainless steels (e.g., Fe-Cr-Y-(Ti,Hf)-O), departing from the conventional mechanical alloying (MA) process. During GARS processing a reactive atomization gas (i.e., Ar-O2) was used to oxidize the powder surfaces during primary break-up and rapid solidification of the molten alloy. This resulted in envelopment of the powders by an ultra-thin (t < 150 nm) metastable Cr-enriched oxide layer that was used as a vehicle for solid-state transport of O into the consolidated microstructure. In an attempt to better understand the kinetics of this GARS reaction, theoretical cooling curves for the atomized droplets were calculated and used to establish an oxidation model for this process. Subsequent elevated temperature heat treatments, which were derived from Rhines pack measurements using an internal oxidation model, were used to promote thermodynamically driven O exchange reactions between trapped films of the initial Cr-enriched surface oxide and internal Y-enriched intermetallic precipitates. This novel microstructural evolution process resulted in the successful formation of nano-metric Y-enriched dispersoids, as confirmed using high energy X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), equivalent to conventional ODS alloys from MA powders. The thermal stability of these Y-enriched dispersoids was evaluated using high temperature (1200°C) annealing treatments ranging from 2.5 to 1,000 hrs of exposure. In a further departure from current ODS practice, replacing Ti with additions of Hf appeared to improve the Y-enriched dispersoid thermal stability by means of crystal structure modification. Additionally, the spatial distribution of the dispersoids was found to depend strongly on the original rapidly solidified microstructure. To exploit this, ODS microstructures were engineered from different

  13. Gas atomized precursor alloy powder for oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, Joel

    2011-12-13

    Gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) was employed as a simplified method for producing precursor powders for oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic stainless steels (e.g., Fe-Cr-Y-(Ti,Hf)-O), departing from the conventional mechanical alloying (MA) process. During GARS processing a reactive atomization gas (i.e., Ar-O2) was used to oxidize the powder surfaces during primary break-up and rapid solidification of the molten alloy. This resulted in envelopment of the powders by an ultra-thin (t < 150 nm) metastable Cr-enriched oxide layer that was used as a vehicle for solid-state transport of O into the consolidated microstructure. In an attempt to better understand the kinetics of this GARS reaction, theoretical cooling curves for the atomized droplets were calculated and used to establish an oxidation model for this process. Subsequent elevated temperature heat treatments, which were derived from Rhines pack measurements using an internal oxidation model, were used to promote thermodynamically driven O exchange reactions between trapped films of the initial Cr-enriched surface oxide and internal Y-enriched intermetallic precipitates. This novel microstructural evolution process resulted in the successful formation of nano-metric Y-enriched dispersoids, as confirmed using high energy X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), equivalent to conventional ODS alloys from MA powders. The thermal stability of these Y-enriched dispersoids was evaluated using high temperature (1200°C) annealing treatments ranging from 2.5 to 1,000 hrs of exposure. In a further departure from current ODS practice, replacing Ti with additions of Hf appeared to improve the Y-enriched dispersoid thermal stability by means of crystal structure modification. Additionally, the spatial distribution of the dispersoids was found to depend strongly on the original rapidly solidified microstructure. To exploit this, ODS microstructures were engineered from

  14. High-temperature corrosion behavior of coatings and ODS alloys based on Fe{sub 3}Al

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; Pint, B.A.; Wright, I.G.

    1996-06-01

    Iron aluminides containing greater than about 20-25 @ % Al have oxidation/sulfidation resistance at temperatures well above those at which these alloys have adequate mechanical strength. In addition to alloying modifications for improved creep resistance of wrought material, this strength limitation is being addressed by development of oxide-dispersion- strengthened (ODS) iron aluminides and by evaluation of Fe{sub 3}Al alloy compositions as coatings or claddings on higher-strength, less corrosion-resistant materials. As part of these efforts, the high-temperature corrosion behavior of iron-aluminide weld overlays and ODS alloys is being characterized and compared to previous results for ingot-processed material.

  15. The role of nickel in radiation damage of ferritic alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Osetskiy, Yury N.; Anento, Napoleon; Serra, Anna; Terentyev, Dmitry

    2014-11-26

    According to the modern theory damage evolution under neutron irradiation depends on the fraction of self interstitial atoms (SIAs) produced in the form of one-dimensionally (1-D) glissile clusters. These clusters, having a low interaction cross-section with other defects, sink mainly on grain boundaries and dislocations creating the so-called production bias. It is known empirically that addition of certain alloying elements affect many radiation effects, including swelling, however the mechanisms are unknown in many cases. In this paper we report the results of an extensive multi-technique atomistic level modeling of SIA clusters mobility in bcc Fe-Ni alloys with Ni content frommore » 0.8 to 10 at.%. We have found that Ni interacts strongly with periphery of clusters affecting their mobility. The total effect is defined by all Ni atoms interacting with the cluster at the same time and can be significant even in low-Ni alloys. Thus 1nm (37SIAs) cluster is practically immobile at T < 500K in the Fe-0.8at.% Ni alloy. Increasing cluster size and Ni content enhance cluster immobilization. Furthermore, this effect should have quite broad consequences in swelling rate, matrix damage accumulation, radiation induced hardening, etc. and the results obtained help in better understanding and prediction of radiation effects in Fe-Ni ferritic alloys.« less

  16. The role of nickel in radiation damage of ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Osetskiy, Yury N.; Anento, Napoleon; Serra, Anna; Terentyev, Dmitry

    2014-11-26

    According to the modern theory damage evolution under neutron irradiation depends on the fraction of self interstitial atoms (SIAs) produced in the form of one-dimensionally (1-D) glissile clusters. These clusters, having a low interaction cross-section with other defects, sink mainly on grain boundaries and dislocations creating the so-called production bias. It is known empirically that addition of certain alloying elements affect many radiation effects, including swelling, however the mechanisms are unknown in many cases. In this paper we report the results of an extensive multi-technique atomistic level modeling of SIA clusters mobility in bcc Fe-Ni alloys with Ni content from 0.8 to 10 at.%. We have found that Ni interacts strongly with periphery of clusters affecting their mobility. The total effect is defined by all Ni atoms interacting with the cluster at the same time and can be significant even in low-Ni alloys. Thus 1nm (37SIAs) cluster is practically immobile at T < 500K in the Fe-0.8at.% Ni alloy. Increasing cluster size and Ni content enhance cluster immobilization. Furthermore, this effect should have quite broad consequences in swelling rate, matrix damage accumulation, radiation induced hardening, etc. and the results obtained help in better understanding and prediction of radiation effects in Fe-Ni ferritic alloys.

  17. Cross-Roll Flow Forming of ODS Alloy Heat Exchanger Tubes For Hoop Creep Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2005-11-23

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. Recent studies in crossrolled ODS-alloy sheets (produced from flattened tubes) indicate that transverse creep is significantly enhanced via controlled transverse grain fibering, and similar improvements are expected for cross-rolled tubes. The research program outlined here is iterative in nature and is intended to systematically (1) examine and identify post-extrusion forming methodologies to

  18. Discussion on the Alloying Element Partition and Growth Kinetics of Proeutectoid Ferrite in Fe-C-Mn-X Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, R.; Enomoto, M.

    2011-12-01

    Experimental data on alloying element partition and growth kinetics of proeutectoid ferrite in quaternary Fe-C-Mn-Si, Ni, and Co alloys were reanalyzed using an approximate method, which permits a quick evaluation of alloy partitioning to be made. The method yielded results in good agreement with DICTRA and is applicable to Fe-C base multicomponent alloys. Differences of the predicted local condition at the α/ γ boundary from those previously presented in the alloys are noted.

  19. Creep and rupture of an ODS alloy with high stress rupture ductility. [Oxide Dispersion Strengthened

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcalarney, M. E.; Arsons, R. M.; Howson, T. E.; Tien, J. K.; Baranow, S.

    1982-01-01

    The creep and stress rupture properties of an oxide (Y2O3) dispersion strengthened nickel-base alloy, which also is strengthened by gamma-prime precipitates, was studied at 760 and 1093 C. At both temperatures, the alloy YDNiCrAl exhibits unusually high stress rupture ductility as measured by both elongation and reduction in area. Failure was transgranular, and different modes of failure were observed including crystallographic fracture at intermediate temperatures and tearing or necking almost to a chisel point at higher temperatures. While the rupture ductility was high, the creep strength of the alloy was low relative to conventional gamma prime strengthened superalloys in the intermediate temperature range and to ODS alloys in the higher temperature range. These findings are discussed with respect to the alloy composition; the strengthening oxide phases, which are inhomogeneously dispersed; the grain morphology, which is coarse and elongated and exhibits many included grains; and the second phase inclusion particles occurring at grain boundaries and in the matrix. The creep properties, in particular the high stress dependencies and high creep activation energies measured, are discussed with respect to the resisting stress model of creep in particle strengthened alloys.

  20. Cross-Roll Flow Forming of ODS Alloy Heat Exchanger Tubes For Hoop Creep Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2006-09-30

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. The research program outlined here is iterative in nature and is intended to systematically (a) examine and identify post-extrusion forming methodologies to create hoop strengthened tubes, which will be (b) evaluated at ''in-service'' loads at service temperatures and environments. In this 12th quarter of performance, program activities are concluded for Task 2 and continuing for Tasks 3, 4 and

  1. Cross-Roll Flow Forming of ODS Alloy Heat Exchanger Tubes for Hoop Creep Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2006-04-10

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. The research program outlined here is iterative in nature and is intended to systematically (1) examine and identify post-extrusion forming methodologies to create hoop strengthened tubes, which will be (2) evaluated at ''in-service'' loads at service temperatures and environments. This research program is being conducted in collaboration with the DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the vested

  2. Cross-Roll Flow Forming of ODS Alloy Heat Exchanger Tubes For Hoop Creep Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal Kad

    2007-09-30

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program were to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. The research program outlined was iterative and intended to systematically (i) examine and identify post-extrusion forming methodologies to create hoop strengthened tubes, to be (ii) evaluated at 'in-service' loads at service temperatures and environments. Our report outlines the significant hoop creep enhancements possible via secondary cross-rolling and/or flow-forming operations. Each of the

  3. Phase Stability under Irradiation of Precipitates and Solid Solutions in Model ALloys and in ODS Alloys Relevant for Gen IV

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur T. Motta; Robert C. Birtcher

    2007-10-17

    The overall objective of this program is to investigate the irradiation-altered phase stability of oxide precipitates in ODS steels and of model alloy solid solutions of associated systems. This information can be used to determine whether the favorable mechanical propertiies of these steels are maintained under irradiation, thus addressing one of the main materials research issues for this class of steels as identified by the GenIV working groups. The research program will also create fundamental understanding of the irradiation precipitation/dissolution problem by studying a "model" system in which the variables can be controlled and their effects understood individually.

  4. Nanoscale characterization of ODS Fe-9%Cr model alloys compacted by spark plasma sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heintze, C.; Hernández-Mayoral, M.; Ulbricht, A.; Bergner, F.; Shariq, A.; Weissgärber, T.; Frielinghaus, H.

    2012-09-01

    Ferritic/martensitic high-chromium steels are leading candidates for fission and fusion reactor components. Oxide dispersion strengthening is an effective way to improve properties related to thermal and irradiation-induced creep and to extend their elevated temperature applications. An extensive experimental study focusing on the microstructural characterization of oxide-dispersion strengthened Fe-9wt%Cr model alloys is reported. Several material variants were produced by means of high-energy milling of elemental powders of Fe, Cr and commercial yttria powders. Consolidation was based on spark plasma sintering. Special emphasis is placed on the characterization of the nano-particles using transmission electron microscopy, small-angle neutron scattering and atom probe tomography. The microstructure of the investigated alloys and the role of the process parameters are discussed. Implications for the reliability of the applied characterization techniques are also highlighted.

  5. Stability of Y–Ti–O precipitates in friction stir welded nanostructured ferritic alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yu, Xinghua; Mazumder, B.; Miller, M. K.; David, S. A.; Feng, Z.

    2015-01-19

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys, which have complex microstructures which consist of ultrafine ferritic grains with a dispersion of stable oxide particles and nanoclusters, are promising materials for fuel cladding and structural applications in the next generation nuclear reactor. This paper evaluates microstructure of friction stir welded nanostructured ferritic alloys using electron microscopy and atom probe tomography techniques. Atom probe tomography results revealed that nanoclusters are coarsened and inhomogeneously distributed in the stir zone and thermomechanically affected zone. Three hypotheses on coarsening of nanoclusters are presented. Finally, the hardness difference in different regions of friction stir weld has been explained.

  6. Dispersoid Distribution and Microstructure in Fe-Cr-Al Ferritic Oxide Dispersion-Strengthened Alloy Prepared by Friction Consolidation

    SciTech Connect

    Catalini, David; Kaoumi, Djamel; Reynolds, Anthony; Grant, Glenn J.

    2015-07-09

    INCOLOY® MA956 is a ferritic Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) alloy. Three different oxides, Y4Al2O9, YAlO3 and Y3Al5O12, have been observed in this alloy. The oxide particle sizes range from just a few up to hundreds of nm and these particles are responsible of the high temperature mechanical strength of this alloy. Mechanically alloyed MA956 powder was consolidated via Friction Consolidation using three different processing conditions. As a result, three small compacts of low porosity were produced. The compacts exhibited a refined equiaxed grain structure with grain sizes smaller than 10 µm and the desired oxide dispersion.YAlO3 and Y3Al5O12 were identified in the compacts by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The size distribution of precipitates above 50 nm showed a direct proportionality between average precipitate size and grain size. The total energy input during processing was correlated with the relative amount of each of the oxides in the disks: the higher the total processing energy input, the higher the relative amount of Y3Al5O12 precipitates. The elemental composition of the oxide precipitates was also probed individually by EDS showing an aluminum enrichment trend as precipitates grow in size.

  7. Detection and quantification of solute clusters in a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. K.; Reinhard, D.; Larson, D. J.

    2015-07-01

    A series of simulated atom probe datasets were examined with a friends-of-friends method to establish the detection efficiency required to resolve solute clusters in the ferrite phase of a 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy. The size and number densities of solute clusters in the ferrite of the as-milled mechanically-alloyed condition and the stir zone of a friction stir weld were estimated with a prototype high-detection-efficiency (∼80%) local electrode atom probe. High number densities, 1.8 × 1024 m-3 and 1.2 × 1024 m-3, respectively of solute clusters containing between 2 and 9 solute atoms of Ti, Y and O and were detected for these two conditions. These results support first principle calculations that predicted that vacancies stabilize these Ti-Y-O- clusters, which retard diffusion and contribute to the excellent high temperature stability of the microstructure and radiation tolerance of nanostructured ferritic alloys.

  8. Neutron irradiation effects on the microstructure of low-activation ferritic alloys*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, A.; Matsui, H.

    1994-09-01

    Microstructures of low-activation ferritic alloys, such as 2.25% Cr-2% W, 7% Cr-2% W, 9% Cr-2% W and 12% Cr-2% W alloys, were observed after FFTF irradiation at 698 K to a dose of 36 dpa. Martensite in 7% Cr-2% W, 9% Cr-2% W and 12% Cr-2% W alloys and bainite in 2.25% Cr-2% W alloy were fairly stable after the irradiation. Microvoids were observed in the martensite in each alloy but not in bainite and δ-ferrite in 12% Cr-2% W alloys. An addition of 0.02% Ti to 9% Cr-2% W alloy considerably reduced the void density. Spherical (Ta, W) and Ti-rich precipitates were observed in the Ti-added 9% Cr-2% W alloy. Precipitates observed in 9% Cr-2% W and 7% Cr-2% W alloys are mainly Cr-rich M 23C 6 (Ta, W) and Ta(W)-rich M 6C and Fe-rich Laves phase. In 2.25% Cr-2% W alloy, high density of fine (Ta, W)-rich M 2C type precipitates as well as M 6C were observed. Spherical small α' Cr-rich particles were observed in both martensite and α-ferrite in 12% Cr-2% W alloys. Correlation between postirradiation microstructure and irradiation hardening is shown and discussed for these alloys.

  9. Radiation damage of F/M and ODS alloys after Fe3+-ion irradiation at 300 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Suk Hoon; Chun, Young-Bum; Noh, Sanghoon; Jang, Jinsung; Jeong, Yong-Hwan; Kim, Tae Kyu

    2015-02-01

    In this study, Fe3+ self-ion irradiation is used as means of introducing irradiation damage in ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steel and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel. The ion accelerator named DuET (at Kyoto University, Japan) was used for irradiation with 6.4 MeV Fe3+ ions at 300 °C. The total number of accelerated ions was 2.5 × 1020 ions/m2, and the maximum damage rates in the F/M and the ODS steels were estimated to be roughly 6 dpa. The irradiation-induced hardness change in the damaged layer was evaluated by using nano-indentation. The F/M steel and the ODS steel commonly exhibited irradiation hardening; however, the irradiation hardening was more active in the F/M steel than in the ODS steel. The microstructure evolutions after the irradiation were investigated; point or line defects were dominantly observed in the F/M steel, while small circular cavities were typically observed in ODS steel.

  10. Microstructural characterization of a new mechanically alloyed Ni-base ODS superalloy powder

    SciTech Connect

    Seyyed Aghamiri, S.M.; Shahverdi, H.R.; Ukai, S.; Oono, N.; Taya, K.; Miura, S.; Hayashi, S.; Okuda, T.

    2015-02-15

    The microstructure of a new Ni-base oxide dispersion strengthened superalloy powder was studied for high temperature gas turbine applications after the mechanical alloying process. In this study, an atomized powder with a composition similar to the CMSX-10 superalloy was mechanically alloyed with yttria and Hf powders. The mechanically alloyed powder included only the supersaturated solid solution γ phase without γ′ and yttria provided by severe plastic deformation, while after the 3-step aging, the γ′ phase was precipitated due to the partitioning of Al and Ta to the γ′ and Co, Cr, Re, W, and Mo to the γ phase. Mechanical alloying modified the morphology of γ′ to the new coherent γ–γ′ nanoscale lamellar structure to minimize the elastic strain energy of the precipitation, which yielded a low lattice misfit of 0.16% at high temperature. The γ′ lamellae aligned preferentially along the elastically soft [100] direction. Also, the precipitated oxide particles were refined in the γ phase by adding Hf from large incoherent YAlO{sub 3} to fine semi-coherent Y{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} oxide particles with the average size of 7 nm and low interparticle spacing of 76 nm. - Highlights: • A new Ni-base ODS superalloy powder was produced by mechanical alloying. • The nanoscale γ–γ′ lamellar structure was precipitated after the aging treatment. • Fine semi-coherent Y{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} oxide particles were precipitated by addition of Hf.

  11. Progress toward determining the potential of ODS alloys for gas turbine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreshfield, R. L.; Hoppin, G., III; Sheffler, K.

    1983-01-01

    The Materials for Advanced Turbine Engine (MATE) Program managed by the NASA Lewis Research Center is supporting two projects to evaluate the potential of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys for aircraft gas turbine applications. One project involves the evaluation of Incoloy (TM) MA-956 for application as a combustor liner material. An assessment of advanced engine potential will be conducted by means of a test in a P&WA 2037 turbofan engine. The other project involves the evaluation of Inconel (TM) MA 6000 for application as a high pressure turbine blade material and includes a test in a Garrett TFE 731 turbofan engine. Both projects are progressing toward these engine tests in 1984.

  12. Vacancy-controlled ultrastable nanoclusters in nanostructured ferritic alloys

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Z. W.; Yao, L.; Wang, X.-L.; Miller, M. K.

    2015-01-01

    A new class of advanced structural materials, based on the Fe-O-vacancy system, has exceptional resistance to high-temperature creep and excellent tolerance to extremely high-dose radiation. Although these remarkable improvements in properties compared to steels are known to be associated with the Y-Ti-O-enriched nanoclusters, the roles of vacancies in facilitating the nucleation of nanoclusters are a long-standing puzzle, due to the experimental difficulties in characterizing vacancies, particularly in-situ while the nanoclusters are forming. Here we report an experiment study that provides the compelling evidence for the presence of significant concentrations of vacancies in Y-Ti-O-enriched nanoclusters in a nanostructured ferritic alloy using a combination of state-of-the-art atom-probe tomography and in situ small angle neutron scattering. The nucleation of nanoclusters starts from the O-enriched solute clustering with vacancy mediation. The nanoclusters grow with an extremely low growth rate through attraction of vacancies and O:vacancy pairs, leading to the unusual stability of the nanoclusters. PMID:26023747

  13. Vacancy-controlled ultrastable nanoclusters in nanostructured ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. W.; Yao, L.; Wang, X. -L.; Miller, M. K.

    2015-05-29

    A new class of advanced structural materials, based on the Fe-O-vacancy system, has exceptional resistance to high-temperature creep and excellent tolerance to extremely high-dose radiation. Although these remarkable improvements in properties compared to steels are known to be associated with the Y-Ti-O-enriched nanoclusters, the roles of vacancies in facilitating the nucleation of nanoclusters are a long-standing puzzle, due to the experimental difficulties in characterizing vacancies, particularly in-situ while the nanoclusters are forming. We report an experiment study that provides the compelling evidence for the presence of significant concentrations of vacancies in Y-Ti-O-enriched nanoclusters in a nanostructured ferritic alloy using a combination of state-of-the-art atom-probe tomography and in situ small angle neutron scattering. The nucleation of nanoclusters starts from the O-enriched solute clustering with vacancy mediation. The nanoclusters grow with an extremely low growth rate through attraction of vacancies and O:vacancy pairs, leading to the unusual stability of the nanoclusters.

  14. Vacancy-controlled ultrastable nanoclusters in nanostructured ferritic alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Z. W.; Yao, L.; Wang, X. -L.; Miller, M. K.

    2015-05-29

    A new class of advanced structural materials, based on the Fe-O-vacancy system, has exceptional resistance to high-temperature creep and excellent tolerance to extremely high-dose radiation. Although these remarkable improvements in properties compared to steels are known to be associated with the Y-Ti-O-enriched nanoclusters, the roles of vacancies in facilitating the nucleation of nanoclusters are a long-standing puzzle, due to the experimental difficulties in characterizing vacancies, particularly in-situ while the nanoclusters are forming. We report an experiment study that provides the compelling evidence for the presence of significant concentrations of vacancies in Y-Ti-O-enriched nanoclusters in a nanostructured ferritic alloy using amore » combination of state-of-the-art atom-probe tomography and in situ small angle neutron scattering. The nucleation of nanoclusters starts from the O-enriched solute clustering with vacancy mediation. The nanoclusters grow with an extremely low growth rate through attraction of vacancies and O:vacancy pairs, leading to the unusual stability of the nanoclusters.« less

  15. R&D of ferritic-martensitic steel EP450 ODS for fuel pin claddings of prospective fast reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitina, A. A.; Ageev, V. S.; Chukanov, A. P.; Tsvelev, V. V.; Porezanov, N. P.; Kruglov, O. A.

    2012-09-01

    Present paper performs research results of structure and mechanical properties of the ODS steel on the base of steel EP450 (Fe-13Cr-2Mo-Nb-V-B-0,12C) on all stages of producing: from powders to thin-walled tubes. Also, the results of research on method of sealing thin-walled tubes from steel EP450 ODS by pressurized resistance welding are shown.

  16. Stability of Y Ti O Precipitates in Friction Stir Welded Nanostructured Ferritic Alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yu, Xinghua; Mazumder, Baishakhi; Miller, Michael K; David, Stan A; Feng, Zhili

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs), which have complex microstructures consisting of ultrafine ferritic grains with a dispersion of stable oxide particles and nanoclusters (NC), are promising materials for fuel cladding and structural applications in the next generation nuclear reactor. This study evaluates microstructure of friction stir welded NFA using electron microscopy and atom probe tomography (APT) techniques. APT results revealed NCs are coarsened and inhomogeneously distributed in the stir zone. Three hypotheses on coarsening of NC are presented.

  17. Nano-particle precipitation in mechanically alloyed and annealed precursor powders of legacy PM2000 ODS alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Karl; Haigh, Sarah J.; Tatlock, Gordon J.; Jones, Andy R.

    2015-09-01

    The early stages of nano-particulate formation in mechanically alloyed and annealed, precursor powders used to manufacture the legacy commercial oxide dispersion strengthened alloy PM2000, formerly produced by Plansee GmbH, have been investigated. Powders were analysed in both the as-mechanically-alloyed condition and after annealing over the temperature range 923-1423 K. The nucleation and growth of coherent nano-particles in the partially recovered, fine grained, ferritic matrix of powders annealed at temperatures as low as 923 K has been confirmed. Powders annealed for 1 h at temperatures of 1123 K and 1223 K were partially recrystallised and contained high number densities (NV > 1023 m-3) of coherent 2 nm yttrium-aluminium-oxygen rich nano-particles. The identification of particle free zones in recrystallised grains, adjacent to recrystallising interfaces, plus the identical orientation relationships between nano-particles and the matrices in both unrecrystallised and recrystallised grains, indicates that the Y-Al-O nano-particles, first formed in fine grained regions, are dissolved during recrystallisation and re-precipitated subsequently in recrystallised grains.

  18. Irradiation creep of various ferritic alloys irradiated {approximately}400 C in the PFR and FFTF reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, M.B.; Garner, F.A.; Eiholzer, C.R.

    1998-03-01

    Three ferritic alloys were irradiated in two fast reactors to doses of 50 dpa or more at temperatures near 400 C. One martensitic alloy, HT9, was irradiated in both the FFTF and PFR reactors. PFR is the Prototype Fast Reactor in Dourneay, Scotland, and FFTF is the Fast Flux Test Facility in Richland, WA. D57 is a developmental alloy that was irradiated in PFR only, and MA957 is a Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion-hardened ferritic alloy that was irradiated only in FFTF. These alloys exhibited little or no void swelling at {approximately}400 C. Depending on the alloy starting condition, these steels develop a variety of non-creep strains early in the irradiation that are associated with phase changes. Each of these alloys creeps at a rate that is significantly lower than that of austenitic steels irradiated in the same experiments. The creep compliance for ferritic alloys in general appears to be {approximately}0.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} MPa{sup {minus}1} dpa{sup {minus}1}, independent of both composition and starting state. The addition of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a dispersoid does not appear to change the creep behavior.

  19. Tensile and fracture toughness properties of the nanostructured oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy 13Cr-1W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiselt, Ch. Ch.; Klimenkov, M.; Lindau, R.; Möslang, A.; Odette, G. R.; Yamamoto, T.; Gragg, D.

    2011-10-01

    The realization of fusion power as an attractive energy source requires advanced structural materials that can cope with ultra-severe thermo-mechanical loads and high neutron fluxes experienced by fusion power plant components, such as the first wall, divertor and blanket structures. Towards this end, two variants of a 13Cr-1W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3 reduced activation ferritic (RAF-) ODS steel were produced by ball milling phase blended Fe-13Cr-1W, 0.3Y 20 3 and 0.3Ti powders in both argon and hydrogen atmospheres. The milled powders were consolidated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). The as-HIPed alloys were then hot rolled into 6 mm plates. Microstructural, tensile and fracture toughness characterization of the hot rolled alloys are summarized here and compared to results previously reported for the as-HIPed condition.

  20. Charpy impact test results for low activation ferritic alloys irradiated to 30 dpa

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, L.E.; Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S.

    1996-04-01

    Miniature specimens of six low activation ferritic alloys have been impact field tested following irradiation at 370{degrees}C to 30 dpa. Comparison of the results with those of control specimens and specimens irradiated to 10 dpa indicates that degradation in the impact behavior appears to have saturated by {approx}10 dpa in at least four of these alloys. The 7.5Cr-2W alloy referred to as GA3X appears most promising for further consideration as a candidate structural material in fusion reactor applications, although the 9Cr-1V alloy may also warrant further investigation.

  1. Swelling and dislocation evolution in simple ferritic alloys irradiated to high fluence in FFTF/MOTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katoh, Yutai; Kohyama, Akira; Gelles, David S.

    1995-08-01

    Microstructures of a series of Fe sbnd Cr binary ferritic alloys were examined following neutron irradiation to 140 dpa at 698 K in FFTF/MOTA. The chromium concentration ranged from 3 to 18% in 3% increments and the irradiation temperature corresponded to the peak swelling condition for this alloy class. The swelling varied from 0.4 to 2.9% depending on chromium concentration, and the highest swelling was found in the Fe sbnd 9Cr alloy. The cavity microstructures corresponded to transient to early steady-state swelling regime. Dislocations were composed of networks with both a<100> and ( a/2)<111> Burgers vector and a<100> type interstitial loops. The dislocation density was negatively correlated with swelling. Explanation for the observed chromium concentration dependence of microstructural development and low swelling in the ferritic alloys will be studied in connection with the dislocation bias efficiency and the theory of sink strength ratio.

  2. Fatigue properties of MA 6000E, a gamma-prime strengthened ODS alloy. [Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Ni-base alloy for gas turbine blade applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Y. G.; Merrick, H. F.

    1980-01-01

    MA 6000E is a corrosion resistant, gamma-prime strengthened ODS alloy under development for advanced turbine blade applications. The high temperature, 1093 C, rupture strength is superior to conventional nickel-base alloys. This paper addresses the fatigue behavior of the alloy. Excellent properties are exhibited in low and high cycle fatigue and also thermal fatigue. This is attributed to a unique combination of microstructural features, i.e., a fine distribution of dispersed oxides and other nonmetallics, and the highly elongated grain structure which advantageously modify the deformation characteristics and crack initiation and propagation modes from that characteristic of conventional gamma-prime hardened superalloys.

  3. Effect of Y2O3 content on the oxidation behavior of Fe-Cr-Al-based ODS alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ul-Hamid, Anwar

    2003-02-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the cyclic oxidation behavior of two oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al based alloys containing 0.17 wt.% and 0.7 wt.% Y2O3. The alloys were oxidized in air for 100 h at 1200°C based on a 24 h cycle period. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to characterize the structure, morphology, and composition of the oxide scales. Both alloys formed highly adherent and continuous layers of α-Al2O3 exhibiting a morphology indicative of inward scale growth. The role of Y2O3 was to promote adherence by segregating to the grain boundaries within the oxide. Concurrently, Y2O3 generated micro-porosity resulting in a scale of comparatively higher thickness in the alloy with 0.7 wt.% Y2O3.

  4. Measuring the Fracture Toughness of TZM and ODS Molybdenum Alloys Using Standard and Sub-Sized Bend Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, B. V.

    2002-12-01

    Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) and TZM molybdenum have excellent creep resistance and strength at high temperatures in inert atmospheres. Fracture toughness and tensile testing was performed at temperatures between -150 degrees C and 450 degrees C to characterize 6.35 mm thick plate material of ODS and TZM molybdenum. A transition from low fracture toughness values (5.8 to 29.6 MPa square root m) to values greater than 30 MPa square root m is observed for TZM molybdenum in the longitudinal orientation at 100 degrees C and in the transverse orientation at 150 degrees C. These results are consistent with data reported in literature for molybdenum. A transition to low fracture toughness values (less than 30 MPa square root m) was not observed for longitudinal ODS molybdenum at temperatures greater than or equal to -150 degrees C, while a transition to low fracture toughness values (12.6 to 25.4 MPa square root m) was observed for the transverse orientation at room-temperature. The fi ne spacing of La-oxide precipitates that are present in ODS molybdenum result in a transition temperature that is significantly lower than any molybdenum alloy reported to date, with upper bound fracture toughness values that bound the literature data. A comparison of fracture toughness values obtained using a 1T, 0.5T, and 0.25T Charpy shows that a 0.5T Charpy could be used as a sub-sized specimen geometry.

  5. Self-Consistent Model for Planar Ferrite Growth in Fe-C-X Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurob, H. S.; Panahi, D.; Hutchinson, C. R.; Brechet, Y.; Purdy, G. R.

    2013-08-01

    A self-consistent model for non-partitioning planar ferrite growth from alloyed austenite is presented. The model captures the evolution with time of interfacial contact conditions for substitutional and interstitial solutes. Substitutional element solute drag is evaluated in terms of the dissipation of free energy within the interface, and an estimate is provided for the rate of buildup of the alloying element "spike" in austenite. The transport of the alloying elements within the interface region is modeled using a discrete-jump model, while the bulk diffusion of C is treated using a standard continuum treatment. The model is validated against ferrite precipitation and decarburization kinetics in the Fe-Ni-C, Fe-Mn-C, and Fe-Mo-C systems.

  6. The Effect of H and He on Irradiation Performance of Fe and Ferritic Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    James F. Stubbins

    2010-01-22

    This research program was designed to look at basic radiation damage and effects and mechanical properties in Fe and ferritic alloys. The program scope included a number of materials ranging from pure single crystal Fe to more complex Fe-Cr-C alloys. The range of materials was designed to examine materials response and performance on ideal/model systems and gradually move to more complex systems. The experimental program was coordinated with a modeling effort. The use of pure and model alloys also facilitated the ability to develop and employ atomistic-scale modeling techniques to understand the inherent physics underlying materials performance

  7. Detection and quantification of solute clusters in a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Miller, Michael K.; Larson, David J.; Reinhard, D. A.

    2014-12-26

    A series of simulated atom probe datasets were examined with a friends-of-friends method to establish the detection efficiency required to resolve solute clusters in the ferrite phase of a 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy. The size and number densities of solute clusters in the ferrite of the as-milled mechanically-alloyed condition and the stir zone of a friction stir weld were estimated with a prototype high-detection-efficiency (~80%) local electrode atom probe. High number densities, 1.8 × 1024 m–3 and 1.2 × 1024 m–3, respectively of solute clusters containing between 2 and 9 solute atoms of Ti, Y and O and were detectedmore » for these two conditions. Furthermore, these results support first principle calculations that predicted that vacancies stabilize these Ti–Y–O– clusters, which retard diffusion and contribute to the excellent high temperature stability of the microstructure and radiation tolerance of nanostructured ferritic alloys.« less

  8. Detection and quantification of solute clusters in a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Michael K.; Larson, David J.; Reinhard, D. A.

    2014-12-26

    A series of simulated atom probe datasets were examined with a friends-of-friends method to establish the detection efficiency required to resolve solute clusters in the ferrite phase of a 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy. The size and number densities of solute clusters in the ferrite of the as-milled mechanically-alloyed condition and the stir zone of a friction stir weld were estimated with a prototype high-detection-efficiency (~80%) local electrode atom probe. High number densities, 1.8 × 1024 m–3 and 1.2 × 1024 m–3, respectively of solute clusters containing between 2 and 9 solute atoms of Ti, Y and O and were detected for these two conditions. Furthermore, these results support first principle calculations that predicted that vacancies stabilize these Ti–Y–O– clusters, which retard diffusion and contribute to the excellent high temperature stability of the microstructure and radiation tolerance of nanostructured ferritic alloys.

  9. Irradiation creep of various ferritic alloys irradiated at ˜400°C in the PFR and FFTF reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloczko, M. B.; Garner, F. A.; Eiholzer, C. R.

    1998-10-01

    Irradiation creep of three ferritic alloys at ˜400 ∘C has been studied. Specimens were in the form of pressurized tubes. In a joint US/UK creep study, two identical sets of creep specimens constructed from one heat of HT9 were irradiated in fast reactors, one in the Prototypic Fast Reactor (PFR) and the other in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The specimens in PFR were irradiated to a dose of ˜50 dpa, whereas the specimens in FFTF were irradiated to a dose of 165 dpa. The observed swelling and creep behavior were very different in the two reactors. Creep specimens constructed from D57, a developmental alloy ferritic alloy, were also irradiated in PFR to a dose of ˜50 dpa. Creep behavior typical of previous studies on ferritic alloys was observed. Finally, creep specimens constructed from MA957, a Y 2O 3 dispersion-hardened ferritic alloy, were irradiated in FFTF to a dose of ˜110 dpa. This alloy exhibited a large amount of densification, and the creep behavior was different than observed in more conventional ferritic or ferritic-martensitic alloys.

  10. Oxidation resistance of novel ferritic stainless steels alloyed with titanium for SOFC interconnect applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, P.D.; Alman, D.E.

    2008-05-15

    Chromia (Cr2O3) forming ferritic stainless steels are being developed for interconnect application in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC). A problem with these alloys is that in the SOFC environment chrome in the surface oxide can evaporate and deposit on the electrochemically active sites within the fuel cell. This poisons and degrades the performance of the fuel cell. The development of steels that can form conductive outer protective oxide layers other than Cr2O3 or (CrMn)3O4 such as TiO2 may be attractive for SOFC application. This study was undertaken to assess the oxidation behavior of ferritic stainless steel containing 1 weight percent (wt.%) Ti, in an effort to develop alloys that form protective outer TiO2 scales. The effect of Cr content (6–22 wt.%) and the application of a Ce-based surface treatment on the oxidation behavior (at 800° C in air+3% H2O) of the alloys was investigated. The alloys themselves failed to form an outer TiO2 scale even though the large negative {delta}G of this compound favors its formation over other species. It was found that in conjunction with the Ce-surface treatment, a continuous outer TiO2 oxide layer could be formed on the alloys, and in fact the alloy with 12 wt.% Cr behaved in an identical manner as the alloy with 22 wt.% Cr.

  11. Computational Design of Creep-Resistant Alloys and Experimental Validation in Ferritic Superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Liaw, Peter

    2014-12-31

    A new class of ferritic superalloys containing B2-type zones inside parent L21-type precipitates in a disordered solid-solution matrix, also known as a hierarchical-precipitate strengthened ferritic alloy (HPSFA), has been developed for high-temperature structural applications in fossil-energy power plants. These alloys were designed by the addition of the Ti element into a previously-studied NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy (denoted as FBB8 in this study). In the present research, systematic investigations, including advanced experimental techniques, first-principles calculations, and numerical simulations, have been integrated and conducted to characterize the complex microstructures and excellent creep resistance of HPSFAs. The experimental techniques include transmission-electron microscopy, scanningtransmission- electron microscopy, neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography, which provide detailed microstructural information of HPSFAs. Systematic tension/compression creep tests revealed that HPSFAs exhibit the superior creep resistance, compared with the FBB8 and conventional ferritic steels (i.e., the creep rates of HPSFAs are about 4 orders of magnitude slower than the FBB8 and conventional ferritic steels.) First-principles calculations include interfacial free energies, anti-phase boundary (APB) free energies, elastic constants, and impurity diffusivities in Fe. Combined with kinetic Monte- Carlo simulations of interdiffusion coefficients, and the integration of computational thermodynamics and kinetics, these calculations provide great understanding of thermodynamic and mechanical properties of HPSFAs. In addition to the systematic experimental approach and first-principles calculations, a series of numerical tools and algorithms, which assist in the optimization of creep properties of ferritic superalloys, are utilized and developed. These numerical simulation results are compared with the available experimental data and previous first

  12. Temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy and mesoscale deformation in a nanostructured ferritic alloy.

    PubMed

    Stoica, G M; Stoica, A D; Miller, M K; Ma, D

    2014-01-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys are a new class of ultrafine-grained oxide dispersion-strengthened steels that have promising properties for service in extreme environments in future nuclear reactors. This is due to the remarkable stability of their complex microstructures containing numerous Y-Ti-O nanoclusters within grains and along grain boundaries. Although nanoclusters account primarily for the exceptional resistance to irradiation damage and high-temperature creep, little is known about the mechanical roles of the polycrystalline grains that constitute the ferritic matrix. Here we report an in situ mesoscale characterization of anisotropic responses of ultrafine ferrite grains to stresses using state-of-the-art neutron diffraction. We show the experimental determination of single-crystal elastic constants for a 14YWT alloy, and reveal a strong temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy that leads to elastic softening and instability of the ferrite. We also demonstrate, from anisotropy-induced intergranular strains, that a deformation crossover exists from low-temperature lattice hardening to high-temperature lattice softening in response to extensive plastic deformation. PMID:25300893

  13. Temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy and mesoscale deformation in a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoica, G. M.; Stoica, A. D.; Miller, M. K.; Ma, D.

    2014-10-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys are a new class of ultrafine-grained oxide dispersion-strengthened steels that have promising properties for service in extreme environments in future nuclear reactors. This is due to the remarkable stability of their complex microstructures containing numerous Y-Ti-O nanoclusters within grains and along grain boundaries. Although nanoclusters account primarily for the exceptional resistance to irradiation damage and high-temperature creep, little is known about the mechanical roles of the polycrystalline grains that constitute the ferritic matrix. Here we report an in situ mesoscale characterization of anisotropic responses of ultrafine ferrite grains to stresses using state-of-the-art neutron diffraction. We show the experimental determination of single-crystal elastic constants for a 14YWT alloy, and reveal a strong temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy that leads to elastic softening and instability of the ferrite. We also demonstrate, from anisotropy-induced intergranular strains, that a deformation crossover exists from low-temperature lattice hardening to high-temperature lattice softening in response to extensive plastic deformation.

  14. Investigation on different oxides as candidates for nano-sized ODS particles in reduced-activation ferritic (RAF) steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Jan; Rieth, Michael; Lindau, Rainer; Klimenkov, Michael; Möslang, Anton; Sandim, Hugo Ricardo Zschommler

    2013-11-01

    Future generation reactor concepts are based on materials that can stand higher temperatures and higher neutron doses in corrosive environments. Oxide dispersion strengthened steels with chromium contents ranging from 9 to 14 wt.% - produced by mechanical alloying - are typical candidate materials for future structural materials in fission and fusion power plants.

  15. High Frequency Properties of Ferrite/Fe-Si-Al Alloy Soft Magnetic Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stergiou, Charalampos A.; Zaspalis, Vassilios

    The inclusion of Fe-Si-Al alloy particles in NiCuZn ferrite matrix was investigated with regard to the high frequency electromagnetic properties (complex permeability and permittivity). The resultant composites of relatively low density exhibit a shift of the permeability spectra to higher frequencies and an increase of dielectric polarization, which finally favour the electromagnetic wave attenuation at microwave frequencies. Thus, wider band return loss peaks are attained at frequencies above 6 GHz by thinner composite materials.

  16. Impurity content of reduced-activation ferritic steels and a vanadium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Bloom, E.E.

    1997-04-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to analyze a reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel and a vanadium alloy for low-level impurities that would compromise the reduced-activation characteristics of these materials. The ferritic steel was from the 5-ton IEA heat of modified F82H, and the vanadium alloy was from a 500-kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti. To compare techniques for analysis of low concentrations of impurities, the vanadium alloy was also examined by glow discharge mass spectrometry. Two other reduced-activation steels and two commercial ferritic steels were also analyzed to determine the difference in the level of the detrimental impurities in the IEA heat and steels for which no extra effort was made to restrict some of the tramp impurities. Silver, cobalt, molybdenum, and niobium proved to be the tramp impurities of most importance. The levels observed in these two materials produced with present technology exceeded the limits for low activation for either shallow land burial or recycling. The chemical analyses provide a benchmark for the improvement in production technology required to achieve reduced activation; they also provide a set of concentrations for calculating decay characteristics for reduced-activation materials. The results indicate the progress that has been made and give an indication of what must still be done before the reduced-activation criteria can be achieved.

  17. A micro-alloyed ferritic steel strengthened by nanoscale precipitates

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yongfeng; Wang, Chong M.; Sun, Xin

    2011-10-25

    A ferritic steel with finely dispersive precipitates was investigated to reveal the fundamental strengthening mechanisms. The steel has a yield strength of 760 MPa, approximately three times higher than that of conventional Ti-bearing high strength hot-rolled sheet steels, and its ultimate tensile strength reaches 850 MPa with an elongation-to-failure value of 18%. Using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) and transmission electron microscope (TEM), fine carbides TiC with an average diameter of 10 nm were observed in the ferrite matrix of the 0.08%Ti steel, and some cubic M23C6 precipitates were also observed at the grain boundaries and the interior of the grains. The finely dispersive TiC precipitates in the matrix provide matrix strengthening. The estimated magnitude of precipitation strengthening is around 458 MPa, depending on the average size of the nanoscale precipitates. Dislocation densities increased from 3.42×1013 m-2 to 1.69 × 1014 m-2, respectively, with increasing tensile strain from 5.5% to 22%. The measured work-hardening behavior can be related to the observed dislocation accumulations resulting from the dispersive nano-scale precipitates.

  18. Development of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, D.K.; Froes, F.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1998-03-01

    An oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel with high temperature strength has been developed in line with low activation criteria for application in fusion power systems. The composition Fe-13.5Cr-2W-0.5Ti-0.25Y{sub 2}O{sup 3} was chosen to provide a minimum chromium content to insure fully delta-ferrite stability. High temperature strength has been demonstrated by measuring creep response of the ODS alloy in uniaxial tension at 650 and 900 C in an inert atmosphere chamber. Results of tests at 900 C demonstrate that this alloy has creep properties similar to other alloys of similar design and can be considered for use in high temperature fusion power system designs. The alloy selection process, materials production, microstructural evaluation and creep testing are described.

  19. Surface modification of ferritic and Ni based alloys for improved oxidation resistance of SOFC interconnect applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Alman, David E.; Kung, Steven C.

    2005-08-01

    This research is aimed at evaluating a surface modification of ferritic stainless steels (Type-430 and Crofer 22APU) and nickel-base alloys (Haynes 230) for use in the SOFC temperature range of 700 to 800°C. A surface treatment was devised to enhance the stability of the base metal oxide that forms and to reduce the oxidation rate of the materials at high temperature. Oxidation tests (in wet air; treated and untreated) were conducted at 800°C to evaulate the corrosion resistance of the alloys. It was found that the surface treatment improved the oxidation resistance of all the alloys tested. However, the treatment improved the performance of 430SS more than that of the other alloys.

  20. Effect of Alloy Composition, Surface Preparation and Exposure Conditions on the Selective Oxidation Behavior of Ferritic Fe-Cr and Fe-Cr-X Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, G H; Mu, N; Yanar, N M; Pettit, F S; Piron Abellan, J; Olszewski, T; Quadakkers, W J; Holcomb, G R

    2010-09-01

    Abstract Selective oxidation behavior of ferritic martensitic Fe–Cr base alloys, exposed in various atmospheres containing combinations of O2, CO2, and H2O, were studied at various temperatures relevant to oxy-fuel combustion. This paper begins with a discussion of the required Cr content to form a continuous external chromia scale on a simple binary Fe–Cr alloy exposed in oxygen or air based on experiments and calculations using the classic Wagner model. Then, the effects of the exposure environment and Cr content on the selective oxidation of Fe–Cr alloys are evaluated. Finally, the effects produced by alloying additions of Si, commonly present in various groups of commercially available ferritic steels, are described. The discussion compares the oxide scale formation on simple binary and ternary Fe–Cr base model alloys with that on several commercially available ferritic steels.

  1. ODS iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, I.G.; McKamey, C.G.; Pint, B.A.

    1995-07-01

    Since oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) FeCrAl-based alloys have sufficient creep strength and good oxidation resistance at the very high temperatures of interest for the primary heat exchanger in advanced, closed-cycle gas turbine systems, they constitute viable alternative candidates to ceramics. A major life-limiting factor of these alloys is the ability to continue to form a protective scale of aluminum oxide, a factor proportional to the total amount of aluminum contained in the alloy. Fe{sub 3}Al has oxidation resistance comparable to that of the FeCrAl-based alloys, and significantly superior sulfidation resistance. Also, because of its larger reservoir of aluminum, Fe{sub 3}Al would be expected to exhibit longer lifetimes at the temperatures of interest. Since the strengthening effects of ODS processing are expected to confer similar high-temperature creep properties to those found for the FeCrAl-based alloys, ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al is considered to have excellent potential for the very high-temperature heat exchanger application. The program effort on ODS Fe{sub 3}Al includes examination of the properties of available ODS-FeCrAl alloys; development of mechanical alloying parameters for ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al; determination of the effects of a dispersion of reactive element oxides on the high-temperature oxidation behavior of Fe{sub 3}Al; and evaluation of methods for joining them.

  2. A Micro-Alloyed Ferritic Steel Strengthened by Nanoscale Precipitates

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yongfeng; Wang, Chong M.; Sun, Xin

    2011-08-04

    A high strength ferritic steel with finely dispersive precipitates was investigated to reveal the fundamental strengthening mechanisms. Using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) and transmission electron microscope (TEM), fine carbides with an average diameter of 10 nm were observed in the ferrite matrix of the 0.08%Ti steel, and some cubic M23C6 precipitates were also observed at the grain boundaries and the interior of grains. The dual precipitate structure of finely dispersive TiC precipitates in the matrix and coarse M23C6 at grain boundaries provides combined matrix and grain boundary strengthening. The calculated amount of precipitation strengthening by the carbides was approximately 450 ~ 630 MPa, depending on the average size of nanoscale precipitates. This value is two or three times higher than that of conventional Ti-bearing high strength hot-rolled sheet steels. Dislocation densities increased from 3.42×1013 m-2 to 1.69 × 1014 m-2, espectively, with increasing tensile strain from 5.5% to 22%. The effect of the particle size, particle distribution and intrinsic particle strength have been investigated through dislocation dynamics (DD) simulations and the relationship for resolved shear stress for single crystal under this condition has been presented using simulation data. The results show that the finely dispersive precipitates can strengthen the material by pinning the dislocations up to a certain shear stress and retarding the recovery as well as annihilation of dislocations. The DD results also show that strengthening is not only a function of the density of the nano-scale precipitates but also of their size.

  3. Experimental study of the distribution of alloying elements after the formation of epitaxial ferrite upon cooling in a low-carbon steel

    SciTech Connect

    Santofimia, M.J.; Kwakernaak, C.; Sloof, W.G.; Zhao, L.; Sietsma, J.

    2010-10-15

    The distributions of carbon and substitutional elements in a low-carbon steel during the formation of epitaxial ferrite on cooling after intercritical annealing have been studied by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The analysis has shown that the formation of epitaxial ferrite takes place with a partial redistribution of alloying elements between the epitaxial ferrite and the austenite. This redistribution of alloying elements causes compositional gradients in the epitaxial ferrite that lead to a different etching behaviour with respect to the intercritical ferrite. Contrary to Thermo-Calc predictions, a distinct partitioning behaviour of silicon has been observed.

  4. The role of processing route on the microstructure of 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazumder, B.; Parish, C. M.; Bei, H.; Miller, M. K.

    2015-10-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys have outstanding high temperature creep properties and enhanced tolerance to radiation damage over conventional ferritic alloys. To achieve these properties, NFAs are fabricated by mechanical alloying of metallic and yttria powders. Atom probe tomography has demonstrated that milling times of at least 40 h are required to produce a uniform distribution of solutes in the flakes. After milling and hot extrusion, the microstructure consists of α-Fe, high number densities of Ti-Y-O-vacancy-enriched nanoclusters, and coarse Y2Ti2O7 and Ti(O,C,N) precipitates on the grain boundaries. In contrast, the as-cast condition consists of α-Fe with 50-100 μm irregularly-shaped Y2Ti2O7 pyrochlore precipitates with smaller embedded precipitates with the Y3Al5O12 (yttrium-aluminum garnet) crystal structure indicating that this traditional processing route is not a viable approach to achieve the desired microstructure. The nano-hardnesses were also substantially different, i.e., 4 and 8 GPa for the as-cast and as-extruded conditions, respectively. These variances can be explained by the microstructural differences and the effects of the high vacancy content introduced by mechanical alloying, and the strong binding energy of vacancies with O, Ti, and Y atoms that retard diffusion.

  5. The role of processing route on the microstructure of 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazumder, B.; Parish, C. M.; Bei, H.; Miller, M. K.

    2015-10-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys have outstanding high temperature creep properties and enhanced tolerance to radiation damage over conventional ferritic alloys. To achieve these properties, NFAs are fabricated by mechanical alloying of metallic and yttria powders. Atom probe tomography has demonstrated that milling times of at least 40 h are required to produce a uniform distribution of solutes in the flakes. After milling and hot extrusion, the microstructure consists of α-Fe, high number densities of Ti-Y-O-vacancy-enriched nanoclusters, and coarse Y2Ti2O7 and Ti(O,C,N) precipitates on the grain boundaries. In contrast, the as-cast condition consists of α-Fe with 50-100 μm irregularly-shaped Y2Ti2O7 pyrochlore precipitates with smaller embedded precipitates with the Y3Al5O12 (yttrium-aluminum garnet) crystal structure indicating that this traditional processing route is not a viable approach to achieve the desired microstructure. The nano-hardnesses were also substantially different, i.e., 4 and 8 GPa for the as-cast and as-extruded conditions, respectively. These variances can be explained by the microstructural differences and the effects of the high vacancy content introduced by mechanical alloying, and the strong binding energy of vacancies with O, Ti, and Y atoms that retard diffusion.

  6. Dynamical interaction of helium bubbles with cascade damage in Fe-9Cr ferritic alloy.

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, K.; Miyamoto, M.; Arakawa, K.; Birtcher, R. C.; Materials Science Division; Shimane Univ.; Osaka Univ.

    2008-12-01

    Dynamic interaction of helium bubble with cascade damage in Fe-9Cr ferritic alloy has been studied using in situ irradiation and electron microscopy. During the irradiation of the alloy by 400 keV Fe{sup +} ions at temperatures where no thermal motion takes place, induced displacement of small helium bubbles was observed: the bubbles underwent sporadic and instant displacement. The displacement was of the order of a few nanometers. The experimentally determined displacement probability of helium bubbles is consistent with the calculated probability of their dynamic interaction with sub-cascades introduced by the irradiation. Furthermore, during the irradiation of the alloy at higher temperatures, both retarded and accelerated Brownian type motions were observed. These results are discussed on the basis of dynamic interaction of helium bubbles with point defects that survive through high-energy self-ion irradiation.

  7. Irradiation Creep and Swelling from 400 C to 600 C of the Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Ferritic Alloy MA957

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Gelles, David S.; Garner, Francis A.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Abe, Katsunori

    2004-04-24

    Recently, there has been a growing interest in the use of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels for fusion reactor applications. As part of an extensive study performed at PNNL on the ODS steel MA957 [1], irradiation creep tests were performed on pressurized tubes made from MA957 by two different methods. The tubes were made either by gun drilling alone or by a combination of rod drawing and gun drilling. The different fabrication methods were explored because ODS steels have been difficult to form. The pressurized tubes were irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) to doses ranging from 40 dpa to 110 dpa at temperatures ranging from 400 C to 600 C. The effective stresses resulting from the pressurization of the tubes ranged from 0 MPa to 175 MPa.

  8. Charpy impact test results of four low activation ferritic alloys irradiated at 370{degrees}C to 15 DPA

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, L.E.; Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S.

    1996-10-01

    Miniature CVN specimens of four low activation ferritic alloys have been impact tested following irradiation at 370{degrees}C to 15 dpa. Comparison of the results with those of control specimens indicates that degradation in the impact behavior occurs in each of these four alloys. The 9Cr-2W alloy referred to as GA3X and the similar alloy F82H with 7.8Cr-2W appear most promising for further consideration as candidate structural materials in fusion energy system applications. These two alloys exhibit a small DBTT shift to higher temperatures but show increased absorbed energy on the upper shelf.

  9. System and method of forming nanostructured ferritic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Dial, Laura Cerully; DiDomizio, Richard; Alinger, Matthew Joseph; Huang, Shenyan

    2016-07-26

    A system for mechanical milling and a method of mechanical milling are disclosed. The system includes a container, a feedstock, and milling media. The container encloses a processing volume. The feedstock and the milling media are disposed in the processing volume of the container. The feedstock includes metal or alloy powder and a ceramic compound. The feedstock is mechanically milled in the processing volume using metallic milling media that includes a surface portion that has a carbon content less than about 0.4 weight percent.

  10. ODS iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, I.G.; Pint, B.A.; Ohriner, E.K.; Tortorelli, P.F.

    1996-08-01

    The overall goal of this program is to develop an oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) version of Fe{sub 3}Al that has sufficient creep strength and resistance to oxidation at temperatures in the range 1000 to 1200{degrees}C to be suitable for application as heat exchanger tubing in advanced power generation cycles. The program has two main thrusts: (a) alloy processing, which involves mechanical alloying and thermomechanical processing to achieve the desired size and distribution of the oxide dispersoid, and (b) optimization of the oxidation behavior to provide increased service life compared to ODS-FeCrAl alloys intended for the same applications. Control of the grain size and shape in the final alloy is very dependent on the homogeneity of the alloy powder, in terms of the size and distribution of the dispersed oxide particles, and on the level of strain and temperature applied in the recrystallization step. Studies of the effects of these variables are being made using mechanically-alloyed powder from two sources: a commercial powder metallurgy alloy vendor and an in-house, controlled environment high-energy mill. The effects of milling parameters on the microstructure and composition of the powder and consolidated alloy are described. Comparison of the oxidation kinetics of ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al alloys with commercial ODS-FeCrAl alloys in air at 1000-1300{degrees}C indicated that the best Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys oxidized isothermally at the same rate as the ODS-FeCrAl alloys but, under thermal cycling conditions, the oxidation rate of ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al was faster. The main difference was that the ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al experienced significantly more scale spallation above 1000{degrees}C. The differences in oxidation behavior were translated into expected lifetimes which indicated that, for an alloy section thickness of 2.5 mm, the scale spallation of ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al leads to an expected service lifetime similar to that for the INCO alloy MA956 at 1100 to 1300{degrees}C.

  11. Investigation of Magnetic Signatures and Microstructures for Heat-Treated Ferritic/Martensitic HT-9 Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.; McCloy, John S.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Edwards, Danny J.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Li, Yulan

    2013-05-01

    There is increased interest in improved methods for in-situ nondestructive interrogation of materials for nuclear reactors in order to ensure reactor safety and quantify material degradation (particularly embrittlement) prior to failure. Therefore, a prototypical ferritic/martensitic alloy, HT-9, of interest to the nuclear materials community was investigated to assess microstructure effects on micromagnetics measurements – Barkhausen noise emission, magnetic hysteresis measurements, and first-order reversal curve analysis – for samples with three different heat-treatments. Microstructural and physical measurements consisted of high-precision density, resonant ultrasound elastic constant determination, Vickers microhardness, grain size, and texture. These were varied in the HT-9 alloy samples and related to various magnetic signatures. In parallel, a meso-scale microstructure model was created for alpha iron and effects of polycrystallinity and demagnetization factor were explored. It was observed that Barkhausen noise emission decreased with increasing hardness and decreasing grain size (lath spacing) while coercivity increased. The results are discussed in terms of the use of magnetic signatures for nondestructive interrogation of radiation damage and other microstructural changes in ferritic/martensitic alloys.

  12. Influence of the - phase separation on the tensile properties of Fe-base ODS PM 2000 alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Capdevila, C.; Miller, Michael K; Toda, I; Chao, J.

    2010-01-01

    The yield and ultimate tensile strengths of an ultrafine grained, oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) PM 2000 alloy increased during aging at 475 C. Atom probe tomography and X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the decrease in lattice parameter and the increases in the yield and ultimate tensile strengths were correlated with phase separation into Fe-rich {alpha} and Cr-enriched {alpha}{prime} phases. The lattice misfit between the emerging {alpha} and {alpha}{prime} domains and the resulting elastic strain, and the increment of the elastic modulus with aging time due to the corresponding decrease of lattice parameter during {alpha}-{alpha}{prime} phase separation, can be regarded as the main causes of hardening.

  13. Effect of alloying on microstructure and precipitate evolution in ferritic weld metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Badri Kannan

    The effect of alloying on the microstructure of ferritic weld metal produced with an self-shielded flux cored arc welding process (FCAW-S) has been studied. The welding electrode has a flux core that is intentionally alloyed with strong deoxidizers and denitriding elements such as aluminum, titanium and zirconium in addition to austenite formers such as manganese and nickel. This results in formation of microstructure consisting of carbide free bainite, retained austenite and twinned martensite. The work focuses on characterization of the microstructures and the precipitates formed during solidification and the allotropic phase transformation of the weld metal. Aluminum, manganese and nickel have significant solubility in iron while aluminum, titanium and zirconium have very strong affinity for nitrogen and oxygen. The effect of these alloying elements on the phase transformation and precipitation of oxides and nitrides have been studied with various characterization techniques. In-situ X-ray synchrotron diffraction has been used to characterize the solidification path and the effect of heating and cooling rates on microstructure evolution. Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) in conjunction with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) was used to study the effect of micro-alloying additions on inclusion evolution. The formation of core-shell structure of oxide/nitride is identified as being key to improvement in toughness of the weld metal. Electron Back Scattered Diffraction (EBSD) in combination with Orientation Imaging Microscopy (OIM) and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been employed to study the effect of alloying on austenite to ferrite transformation modes. The prevention of twinned martensite has been identified to be key to improving ductility for achieving high strength weld metal.

  14. Microstructural development in reduced activation ferritic alloys irradiated to 200 dpa at 420$deg;C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelles, D. S.

    1994-09-01

    Density change and microstructural development are reported for nine reduced activation ferritic steels covering the range 2.3 to 12Cr with varying additions of V and/or W for hardening and up to 6.5 Mn for austenite stability. Specimens were examined following irradiation in FFTF/MOTA at 420°C to a dose exceeding 200 dpa. Void swelling was found, but the swelling remained at 5% or below, with the worst case in an alloy of 9Cr-2Mn-1WV. The carbide structure pinning martensite lath boundaries remained in place.

  15. Alloying Element Nitride Development in Ferritic Fe-Based Materials Upon Nitriding: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, T.; Mittemeijer, E. J.

    2016-04-01

    With the aim of achieving a better understanding of the nitriding process of iron-based components (steels), as applied in engineering practice, the theoretical background and experimental observations currently available on the crystallographic, morphological, and compositional properties of the nitride precipitates in nitrided model binary and ternary, ferritic Fe-based alloys are summarily presented. Thermodynamic and kinetic considerations are employed in order to highlight their importance for the nitriding reaction and the resulting properties of the nitrided zone, thereby providing a more fundamental understanding of the nitriding process.

  16. Alloying Element Nitride Development in Ferritic Fe-Based Materials Upon Nitriding: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, T.; Mittemeijer, E. J.

    2016-06-01

    With the aim of achieving a better understanding of the nitriding process of iron-based components (steels), as applied in engineering practice, the theoretical background and experimental observations currently available on the crystallographic, morphological, and compositional properties of the nitride precipitates in nitrided model binary and ternary, ferritic Fe-based alloys are summarily presented. Thermodynamic and kinetic considerations are employed in order to highlight their importance for the nitriding reaction and the resulting properties of the nitrided zone, thereby providing a more fundamental understanding of the nitriding process.

  17. Some microstructural characterisations in a friction stir welded oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legendre, F.; Poissonnet, S.; Bonnaillie, P.; Boulanger, L.; Forest, L.

    2009-04-01

    The goal of this study is to characterize microstructure of a friction stir welded oxide dispersion strengthened alloy. The welded material is constituted by two sheets of an yttria-dispersion-strengthened PM 2000 ferritic steel. Different areas of the friction stir welded product were analyzed using field emission gun secondary electron microscopy (FEG-SEM) and electron microprobe whereas nanoindentation was used to evaluate mechanical properties. The observed microstructural evolution, including distribution of the yttria dispersoids, after friction stir welding process is discussed and a correlation between the microstructure and the results of nanoindentation tests is established.

  18. Irradiation creep of various ferritic alloys irradiated at {approximately}400{degrees}C in the PFR and FFTF reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, M.B.; Garner, F.A.; Eiholzer, C.R.

    1997-04-01

    Three ferritic alloys were irradiated in two fast reactors to doses of 50 dpa or more at temperatures near 400{degrees}C. One martensitic alloy, HT9, was irradiated in both the FFTF and PFR reactors. PFR is the Prototype Fast Reactor in Dourneay, Scotland, and FFTF is the Fast Flux Test Facility in Richland, WA. D57 is a developmental alloy that was irradiated in PFR only, and MA957 is a Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion-hardened ferritic alloy that was irradiated only in FFTF. These alloys exhibited little or no void swelling at {approximately}400{degrees}C. Depending on the alloy starting condition, these steels develop a variety of non-creep strains early in the irradiation that are associated with phase changes. Each of these alloys creeps at a rate that is significantly lower than that of austenitic steels irradiated in the same experiments. The creep compliance for ferritic alloys in general appears to be {approximately}0.5 x 10{sup {minus}6} MPa{sup {minus}1} dpa{sup {minus}1}, independent of both composition and starting state. The addition of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a dispersoid does not appear to change the creep behavior.

  19. Corrosion of ferritic-martensitic steels and nickel-based alloys in supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xiaowei

    The corrosion behavior of ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels and Ni-based alloys in supercritical water (SCW) has been studied due to their potential applications in future nuclear reactor systems, fossil fuel power plants and waste treatment processes. 9˜12% chromium ferritic/martensitic steels exhibit good radiation resistance and stress corrosion cracking resistance. Ni-based alloys with an austenitic face-centered cubic (FCC) structure are designed to retain good mechanical strength and corrosion/oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures. Corrosion tests were carried out at three temperatures, 360°C, 500°C and 600°C, with two dissolved oxygen contents, 25 ppb and 2 ppm for up to 3000 hours. Alloys modified by grain refinement and reactive element addition were also investigated to determine their ability to improve the corrosion resistance in SCW. A duplex oxide structure was observed in the F/M steels after exposure to 25 ppb oxygen SCW, including an outer oxide layer with columnar magnetite grains and an inner oxide layer constituted of a mixture of spinel and ferrite phases in an equiaxed grain structure. An additional outermost hematite layer formed in the SCW-exposed samples when the oxygen content was increased to 2 ppm. Weight gain in the F/M steels increased with exposure temperatures and times, and followed parabolic growth kinetics in most of the samples. In Ni-based alloys after exposure to SCW, general corrosion and pitting corrosion were observed, and intergranular corrosion was found when exposed at 600°C due to formation of a local healing layer. The general oxide structure on the Ni-based alloys was characterized as NiO/Spinel/(CrxFe 1-x)2O3/(Fe,Ni). No change in oxidation mechanism was observed in crossing the critical point despite the large change in water properties. Corrosion resistance of the F/M steels was significantly improved by plasma-based yttrium surface treatment because of restrained outward diffusion of iron by the

  20. Influence of Ti content on synthesis and characteristics of W-Ti ODS alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chun-Liang; Zeng, Yong

    2016-02-01

    Tungsten-titanium alloys are considered as promising materials for the future fusion devices, in particular for the divertor and other first wall components. The microstructure and the mechanical properties of the material are dependent on the amount of Ti present in the alloy. In this study, W-Ti-Y2O3 alloys with varied Ti contents between 1 wt.% and 10 wt.% fabricated by mechanical alloying were investigated. The effect of Ti on the phase formation and mechanical properties of W-Ti-Y2O3 alloys has been examined. The results suggest that the alloys containing low Ti content exhibit homogeneous microstructure with a uniform distribution of fine titanium oxide particles and tungsten carbides, leading to a significant increase in hardness and elastic modulus of alloys. In addition, high-energy ball milling can facilitate a solid-state reaction between Y2O3 particles and the tungsten-titanium matrix and the subsequent sintering processing promotes the formation of stable nano Ti2Y2O7 oxide particles, which greatly increase the mechanical properties at elevated temperature and enhance irradiation resistance.

  1. Duplex precipitates and their effects on the room-temperature fracture behaviour of a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sun, Zhiqian; Song, Gian; Ilavsky, Jan; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-03-23

    Duplex precipitates are presented in a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy. They were characterized by the ultra-small angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscope. Fine cooling precipitates with the size of several to tens of nanometres harden the matrix considerably at room temperature. Cracks are likely to initiate from precipitates, and coalesce and propagate quickly through the matrix due to the excessive hardening effect of cooling precipitates, which lead to the premature fracture of NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloys.

  2. Phase Field Modeling of Cyclic Austenite-Ferrite Transformations in Fe-C-Mn Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hao; Zhu, Benqiang; Militzer, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Three different approaches for considering the effect of Mn on the austenite-ferrite interface migration in an Fe-0.1C-0.5Mn alloy have been coupled with a phase field model (PFM). In the first approach (PFM-I), only long-range C diffusion is considered while Mn is assumed to be immobile during the phase transformations. Both long-range C and Mn diffusions are considered in the second approach (PFM-II). In the third approach (PFM-III), long-range C diffusion is considered in combination with the Gibbs energy dissipation due to Mn diffusion inside the interface instead of solving for long-range diffusion of Mn. The three PFM approaches are first benchmarked with isothermal austenite-to-ferrite transformation at 1058.15 K (785 °C) before considering cyclic phase transformations. It is found that PFM-II can predict the stagnant stage and growth retardation experimentally observed during cycling transformations, whereas PFM-III can only replicate the stagnant stage but not the growth retardation and PFM-I predicts neither the stagnant stage nor the growth retardation. The results of this study suggest a significant role of Mn redistribution near the interface on reducing transformation rates, which should, therefore, be considered in future simulations of austenite-ferrite transformations in steels, particularly at temperatures in the intercritical range and above.

  3. Temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy and mesoscale deformation in a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Stoica, G. M.; Stoica, A. D.; Miller, M. K.; Ma, D.

    2014-10-10

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFA) are a new class of ultrafine-grained oxide dispersion-strengthened steels, promising for service in extreme environments of high temperature and high irradiation in the next-generation of nuclear reactors. This is owing to the remarkable stability of their complex microstructures containing a high density of Y-Ti-O nanoclusters within grains and along the grain boundaries. While nanoclusters have been recognized to be the primary contributor to the exceptional resistance to irradiation and high-temperature creep, very little is known about the mechanical roles of the polycrystalline grains that constitute the bulk ferritic matrix. Here we report the mesoscale characterization of anisotropic responses of the ultrafine NFA grains to tensile stresses at various temperatures using the state-of-the-art in situ neutron diffraction. We show the first experimental determination of temperature-dependent single-crystal elastic constants for the NFA, and reveal a strong temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy due to a sharp decrease in the shear stiffness constant [c'=(c_11-c_12)/2] when a critical temperature ( T_c ) is approached, indicative of elastic softening and instability of the ferritic matrix. We also show, from anisotropy-induced intergranular strain/stress accumulations, that a common dislocation slip mechanism operates at the onset of yielding for low temperatures, while there is a deformation crossover from low-temperature lattice hardening to high temperature lattice softening in response to extensive plastic deformation.

  4. Phase Field Modeling of Cyclic Austenite-Ferrite Transformations in Fe-C-Mn Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hao; Zhu, Benqiang; Militzer, Matthias

    2016-08-01

    Three different approaches for considering the effect of Mn on the austenite-ferrite interface migration in an Fe-0.1C-0.5Mn alloy have been coupled with a phase field model (PFM). In the first approach (PFM-I), only long-range C diffusion is considered while Mn is assumed to be immobile during the phase transformations. Both long-range C and Mn diffusions are considered in the second approach (PFM-II). In the third approach (PFM-III), long-range C diffusion is considered in combination with the Gibbs energy dissipation due to Mn diffusion inside the interface instead of solving for long-range diffusion of Mn. The three PFM approaches are first benchmarked with isothermal austenite-to-ferrite transformation at 1058.15 K (785 °C) before considering cyclic phase transformations. It is found that PFM-II can predict the stagnant stage and growth retardation experimentally observed during cycling transformations, whereas PFM-III can only replicate the stagnant stage but not the growth retardation and PFM-I predicts neither the stagnant stage nor the growth retardation. The results of this study suggest a significant role of Mn redistribution near the interface on reducing transformation rates, which should, therefore, be considered in future simulations of austenite-ferrite transformations in steels, particularly at temperatures in the intercritical range and above.

  5. Temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy and mesoscale deformation in a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stoica, G. M.; Stoica, A. D.; Miller, M. K.; Ma, D.

    2014-10-10

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFA) are a new class of ultrafine-grained oxide dispersion-strengthened steels, promising for service in extreme environments of high temperature and high irradiation in the next-generation of nuclear reactors. This is owing to the remarkable stability of their complex microstructures containing a high density of Y-Ti-O nanoclusters within grains and along the grain boundaries. While nanoclusters have been recognized to be the primary contributor to the exceptional resistance to irradiation and high-temperature creep, very little is known about the mechanical roles of the polycrystalline grains that constitute the bulk ferritic matrix. Here we report the mesoscale characterization ofmore » anisotropic responses of the ultrafine NFA grains to tensile stresses at various temperatures using the state-of-the-art in situ neutron diffraction. We show the first experimental determination of temperature-dependent single-crystal elastic constants for the NFA, and reveal a strong temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy due to a sharp decrease in the shear stiffness constant [c'=(c_11-c_12)/2] when a critical temperature ( T_c ) is approached, indicative of elastic softening and instability of the ferritic matrix. We also show, from anisotropy-induced intergranular strain/stress accumulations, that a common dislocation slip mechanism operates at the onset of yielding for low temperatures, while there is a deformation crossover from low-temperature lattice hardening to high temperature lattice softening in response to extensive plastic deformation.« less

  6. The effect of fusion-relevant helium levels on the mechanical properties of isotopically tailored ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hankin, G.L.; Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S.

    1997-04-01

    The yield and maximum strengths of an irradiated series of isotopically tailored ferritic alloys were evaluated using the shear punch test. The composition of three of the alloys was Fe-12Cr-1.5Ni. Different balances of nickel isotopes were used in each alloy in order to produce different helium levels. A fourth alloy, which contained no nickel, was also irradiated. The addition of nickel at any isotopic balance to the Fe-12Cr base alloy significantly increased the shear yield and maximum strengths of the alloys, and as expected, the strength of the alloys decreased with increasing irradiation temperature. Helium itself, up to 75 appm over 7 dpa appears to have little effect on the mechanical properties of the alloys.

  7. TEM examination of microstructural evolution during processing of 14CrYWTi nanostructured ferritic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, H.; Alinger, M. J.; Odette, G. R.; Yamamoto, T.

    2004-08-01

    A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study was carried out on the co-evolution of the coarser-scale microstructural features in mechanically alloyed (MA) powders and hot isostatic press (HIP) consolidated Fe-14Cr-3W-0 and 0.4Ti-0.25Y 2O 3 nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs). The pancake shaped nanoscale grains in the as-MA powders are textured and elongated parallel to the particle surface. Powder annealing results in re-crystallization at 850 °C and grain growth at 1150 °C. The grains also recrystallize and may grow in the alloys HIPed at 850 °C, but appear to retain a polygonized sub-grain structure. The grains are larger and more distinct in the alloys HIPed at 1000 and 1150 °C. However, annealing resulted in bi-modal grain size distribution. Finer grains retained a significant dislocation density and populations of small precipitates with crystal structures distinct form the matrix. The grains and precipitates were much larger in alloys without Ti.

  8. Investigation on the Behavior of Austenite and Ferrite Phases at Stagnation Region in the Turning of Duplex Stainless Steel Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomani, J.; Pramanik, A.; Hilditch, T.; Littlefair, G.

    2016-06-01

    This paper investigates the deformation mechanisms and plastic behavior of austenite and ferrite phases in duplex stainless steel alloys 2205 and 2507 under chip formation from a machine turning operation. SEM images and EBSD phase mapping of frozen chip root samples detected a build-up of ferrite bands in the stagnation region, and between 65 and 85 pct, more ferrite was identified in the stagnation region compared to austenite. SEM images detected micro-cracks developing in the ferrite phase, indicating ferritic build-up in the stagnation region as a potential triggering mechanism to the formation of built-up edge, as transgranular micro-cracks found in the stagnation region are similar to micro-cracks initiating built-up edge formation. Higher plasticity of austenite due to softening under high strain is seen responsible for the ferrite build-up. Flow lines indicate that austenite is plastically deforming at a greater rate into the chip, while ferrite shows to partition most of the strain during deformation. The loss of annealing twins and activation of multiple slip planes triggered at high strain may explain the highly plastic behavior shown by austenite.

  9. Investigation on the Behavior of Austenite and Ferrite Phases at Stagnation Region in the Turning of Duplex Stainless Steel Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomani, J.; Pramanik, A.; Hilditch, T.; Littlefair, G.

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates the deformation mechanisms and plastic behavior of austenite and ferrite phases in duplex stainless steel alloys 2205 and 2507 under chip formation from a machine turning operation. SEM images and EBSD phase mapping of frozen chip root samples detected a build-up of ferrite bands in the stagnation region, and between 65 and 85 pct, more ferrite was identified in the stagnation region compared to austenite. SEM images detected micro-cracks developing in the ferrite phase, indicating ferritic build-up in the stagnation region as a potential triggering mechanism to the formation of built-up edge, as transgranular micro-cracks found in the stagnation region are similar to micro-cracks initiating built-up edge formation. Higher plasticity of austenite due to softening under high strain is seen responsible for the ferrite build-up. Flow lines indicate that austenite is plastically deforming at a greater rate into the chip, while ferrite shows to partition most of the strain during deformation. The loss of annealing twins and activation of multiple slip planes triggered at high strain may explain the highly plastic behavior shown by austenite.

  10. Controlling diffusion for a self-healing radiation tolerant nanostructured ferritic alloy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Miller, Michael K.; Parish, Chad M.; Bei, Hongbin

    2014-12-18

    Diffusion plays a major role in the stability of microstructures to extreme conditions of high temperature and high doses of irradiation. In nanostructured ferritic alloys, first principle calculations indicate that the binding energy of vacancies is reduced by the presence of oxygen, titanium and yttrium atoms. Therefore, the number of free vacancies available for diffusion can be greatly reduced. The mechanical properties of these alloys, compared to traditional wrought alloys of similar composition and grain structure, is distinctly different, and the ultrafine grained alloy is distinguished by a high number density of Ti–Y–O-enriched nanoclusters and solute clusters, which drives themore » mechanical response. When a displacement cascade interacts with a nanocluster, the solute atoms are locally dispersed into the matrix by ballistic collisions, but immediately a new nanocluster reforms due to the local supersaturation of solutes and vacancies until the excess vacancies are consumed. Furthermore, the result of these processes is a structural material for advanced energy systems with a microstructure that is self-healing and tolerant to high doses of radiation and high temperatures.« less

  11. Mechanical behavior of aluminum-bearing ferritic alloys for accident-tolerant fuel cladding applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guria, Ankan

    Nuclear power currently provides about 13% of electrical power worldwide. Nuclear reactors generating this power traditionally use Zirconium (Zr) based alloys as the fuel cladding material. Exothermic reaction of Zr with steam under accident conditions may lead to production of hydrogen with the possibility of catastrophic consequences. Following the Fukushima-Daiichi incident, the exploration of accident-tolerant fuel cladding materials accelerated. Aluminum-rich (around 5 wt. %) ferritic steels such as Fecralloy, APMT(TM) and APM(TM) are considered as potential materials for accident-tolerant fuel cladding applications. These materials create an aluminum-based oxide scale protecting the alloy at elevated temperatures. Tensile deformation behavior of the above alloys was studied at different temperatures (25-500 °C) at a strain rate of 10-3 s-1 and correlated with microstructural characteristics. Higher strength and decent ductility of APMT(TM) led to further investigation of the alloy at various combination of strain rates and temperatures followed by fractography and detailed microscopic analyses. Serrations appeared in the stress-strain curves of APMT(TM) and Fecralloy steel tested in a limited temperature range (250-400 °C). The appearance of serrations is explained on the basis of dynamic strain aging (DSA) effect due to solute-dislocation interactions. The research in this study is being performed using the funds received from the US DOE Office of Nuclear Energy's Nuclear Energy University Programs (NEUP).

  12. Controlling diffusion for a self-healing radiation tolerant nanostructured ferritic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. K.; Parish, C. M.; Bei, H.

    2015-07-01

    Diffusion plays a major role in the stability of microstructures to extreme conditions of high temperature and high doses of irradiation. In nanostructured ferritic alloys, first principle calculations indicate that the binding energy of vacancies is reduced by the presence of oxygen, titanium and yttrium atoms. Therefore, the number of free vacancies available for diffusion can be greatly reduced. The mechanical properties of these alloys, compared to traditional wrought alloys of similar composition and grain structure, is distinctly different, and the ultrafine grained alloy is distinguished by a high number density of Ti-Y-O-enriched nanoclusters and solute clusters, which drives the mechanical response. When a displacement cascade interacts with a nanocluster, the solute atoms are locally dispersed into the matrix by ballistic collisions, but immediately a new nanocluster reforms due to the local supersaturation of solutes and vacancies until the excess vacancies are consumed. The result of these processes is a structural material for advanced energy systems with a microstructure that is self-healing and tolerant to high doses of radiation and high temperatures.

  13. Controlling diffusion for a self-healing radiation tolerant nanostructured ferritic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Michael K.; Parish, Chad M.; Bei, Hongbin

    2014-12-18

    Diffusion plays a major role in the stability of microstructures to extreme conditions of high temperature and high doses of irradiation. In nanostructured ferritic alloys, first principle calculations indicate that the binding energy of vacancies is reduced by the presence of oxygen, titanium and yttrium atoms. Therefore, the number of free vacancies available for diffusion can be greatly reduced. The mechanical properties of these alloys, compared to traditional wrought alloys of similar composition and grain structure, is distinctly different, and the ultrafine grained alloy is distinguished by a high number density of Ti–Y–O-enriched nanoclusters and solute clusters, which drives the mechanical response. When a displacement cascade interacts with a nanocluster, the solute atoms are locally dispersed into the matrix by ballistic collisions, but immediately a new nanocluster reforms due to the local supersaturation of solutes and vacancies until the excess vacancies are consumed. Furthermore, the result of these processes is a structural material for advanced energy systems with a microstructure that is self-healing and tolerant to high doses of radiation and high temperatures.

  14. The consequences of helium production on microstructural development in isotopically tailored ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.

    1996-10-01

    A series of alloys have been made adding various isotopes of nickel in order to vary the production of helium during irradiation by a two step nuclear reaction in a mixed spectrum reactor. The alloys use a base composition of Fe-12Cr with an addition of 1.5% nickel, either in the form of {sup 60}Ni which produces no helium, {sup 59}Ni which produces helium at a rate of about 10 appm He/dpa, or natural nickel ({sup Nat}Ni) which provides an intermediate level of helium due to delayed development of {sup 59}Ni. Specimens were irradiated in the HFIR at Oak Ridge, TN to {approx}7 dpa at 300 and 400{degrees}C. Microstructural examinations indicated that nickel additions promote precipitation in all alloys, but the effect appears to be much stronger at 400{degrees}C than at 300{degrees}C. There is sufficient dose by 7 dpa (and with 2 appm He) to initiate void swelling in ferritic/martensitic alloys. Little difference was found between response from {sup 59}Ni and {sup Nat}Ni. Also, helium bubble development for high helium generation conditions appeared to be very different at 300 and 400{degrees}C. At 300{degrees}C, it appeared that high densities of bubbles formed whereas at 400{degrees}C, bubbles could not be identified, possibly because of the complexity of the microstructure, but more likely because helium accumulated at precipitate interfaces.

  15. PHASE SEPARATION IN PM 2000 FE-BASE ODS ALLOY: EXPERIMENTAL STUDY AT THE ATOMIC LEVEL

    SciTech Connect

    Capdevila, C.; Miller, Michael K; Russell, Kaye F; Chao, J.; Gonzalez-Carrasco, J. L.

    2008-01-01

    The coarsening of the three-dimensional microstructure resulting from phase separation during ageing at 748 K of a Fe-based PM 2000{trademark} oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel has been investigated by atom probe tomography and hardness measurements. Phase separation resulted in the formation of isolated particles of the chromium-enriched {alpha}{prime} phase. The aluminum and titanium were found to preferential partition to the iron-rich {alpha} phase. The partitioning of aluminum is consistent with theoretical calculations. The change in the scale of the chromium-enriched {alpha}{prime} phase was found to fit a power law with a time exponent of 0.32 in accordance with that predicted by the classical Lifshitz, Slyozov and Wagner (LSW) theory. The solute concentrations of the coexisting {alpha} and {alpha}{prime} phases were estimated from concentration frequency distributions with the Langer-Bar-on-Miller (LBM) method and proximity histograms. The hardness was linearly related to the chromium content of the {alpha}{prime} phase.

  16. Notch Impact Behavior of Oxide-Dispersion-Strengthened (ODS) Fe20Cr5Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, J.; Capdevila, C.; Serrano, M.; Garcia-Junceda, A.; Jimenez, J. A.; Pimentel, G.; Urones-Garrote, E.

    2013-10-01

    In this article, tensile tests as well as LS and LT notched Charpy impact tests were performed at the temperature range between 77 K (-196 °C) and 473 K (200 °C) on an oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) Fe20Cr6Al0.5Y2O3 hot-rolled tube. The absorbed energy values in the range of high temperatures of LS notched specimens are considerably higher than those of LT notched specimens; however, such values tend to converge as temperature increases. Ductile fracture on the normal planes to RD with delaminations parallel to the tube surface was observed in the temperature range between room temperature (RT) and 473 K (200 °C). Delaminations of crack divider type were observed in LT specimens, whereas delaminations of crack arrester type were observed in LS specimens. The yttria particles in the grain boundaries and the transverse plastic anisotropy are the possible reasons why the delaminations were parallel to the tube surface.

  17. Irradiation creep and swelling from 400 to 600 °C of the oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy MA957

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloczko, M. B.; Gelles, D. S.; Garner, F. A.; Kurtz, R. J.; Abe, K.

    2004-08-01

    An irradiation creep and swelling study was performed on the Y 2O 3-strengthened ODS ferritic steel MA957. Pressurized tubes were irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) to doses ranging from 40 to 110 dpa at temperatures ranging from 400 to 600 °C. None of the stress-free tubes exhibited any evidence of swelling as determined by diameter change measurements. With a few exceptions, the irradiation creep behavior is similar to that of conventional ferritic-martensitic steels. Calculated creep compliance values are equal to those of HT9 irradiated within the same temperature range, except at 600 °C where the creep rate of MA957 is about one-half the value for HT9. The magnitude of the creep transient for MA957 is comparable to HT9, again except at 600 °C where the transient is much lower for MA957.

  18. Ferritic Alloys as Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding Material for Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, Raul B.

    2014-12-30

    provide hermetic seal. The replacement of a zirconium alloy using a ferritic material containing chromium and aluminum appears to be the most near term implementation for accident tolerant nuclear fuels.

  19. The role of processing route on the microstructure of 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Mazumder, B.; Parish, C. M.; Bei, H.; Miller, M. K.

    2015-06-03

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) have outstanding high temperature creep properties and extreme tolerance to radiation damage. To achieve these properties, NFAs are fabricated by mechanical alloying of metallic and yttria powders. Atom probe tomography has demonstrated that milling times of at least 40 h are required to produce a uniform distribution of solutes in the flakes. After milling and hot extrusion, the microstructure consists of -Fe, high number densities of Ti-Y-O-vacancy-enriched nanoclusters, and coarse Y2Ti2O7 and Ti(O,C,N) precipitates on the grain boundaries. In contrast, the as-cast condition consists of -Fe with 50-100 m irregularly-shaped Y2Ti2O7 pyrochlore precipitates with smaller embedded precipitates with the Al5Y3O12 (yttrium-aluminum garnet) crystal structure indicating that this traditional processing route is not a viable approach to achieve the desired microstructure. The nano-hardnesses were also substantially different, i.e., 4 and 8 GPa for the as-cast and as-extruded conditions, respectively. These differences can be explained by the differences in the microstructure and the effects of the high vacancy content introduced by mechanical alloying, and the strong binding energy of vacancies with O, Ti, and Y atoms retarding diffusion.

  20. The role of processing route on the microstructure of 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mazumder, B.; Parish, C. M.; Bei, H.; Miller, M. K.

    2015-06-03

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) have outstanding high temperature creep properties and extreme tolerance to radiation damage. To achieve these properties, NFAs are fabricated by mechanical alloying of metallic and yttria powders. Atom probe tomography has demonstrated that milling times of at least 40 h are required to produce a uniform distribution of solutes in the flakes. After milling and hot extrusion, the microstructure consists of -Fe, high number densities of Ti-Y-O-vacancy-enriched nanoclusters, and coarse Y2Ti2O7 and Ti(O,C,N) precipitates on the grain boundaries. In contrast, the as-cast condition consists of -Fe with 50-100 m irregularly-shaped Y2Ti2O7 pyrochlore precipitates with smaller embeddedmore » precipitates with the Al5Y3O12 (yttrium-aluminum garnet) crystal structure indicating that this traditional processing route is not a viable approach to achieve the desired microstructure. The nano-hardnesses were also substantially different, i.e., 4 and 8 GPa for the as-cast and as-extruded conditions, respectively. These differences can be explained by the differences in the microstructure and the effects of the high vacancy content introduced by mechanical alloying, and the strong binding energy of vacancies with O, Ti, and Y atoms retarding diffusion.« less

  1. Influence of solute drag on the growth of proeutectoid ferrite in Fe-C-Mn alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Enomoto, M.

    1999-10-08

    The diffusion-controlled growth of proeutectoid ferrite ({alpha}) from austenite ({gamma}) in an Fe-C-Mn alloy was simulated incorporating the possible drag effect of Mn on the migration of {alpha}:{gamma} interphase boundaries. The magnitude of drag force or the dissipation of free energy by drag was evaluated by means of Cahn and Purdy-Brechet models. The growth rate of ferrite was calculated from the flux balance equation for carbon taking into account the fact that the carbon concentration at the boundary in austenite varied with time. Whereas the time exponent of growth deviated from one-half at each moment, the overall time dependence was dictated by carbon volume diffusion in austenite. The reported differences of experimental growth rates from those calculated assuming paraequilibrium were reduced considerably by incorporating the drag of Mn, although simulation results may largely depend on the shape and depth of solute interaction potential with {alpha}:{gamma} boundaries and Mn diffusivity within the boundary, etc.

  2. Development of Low Cost Gas Atomization of Precursor Powders for Simplified ODS Alloy Production

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iver

    2014-08-05

    A novel gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) method was developed in this project to enable production (at our partner’s facility) a precursor Ni-Cr-Y-Ti powder with a surface oxide and an internal rare earth (RE) containing intermetallic compound (IMC) phase. Consolidation and heat-treatment experiments were performed at Ames Lab to promote the exchange of oxygen from the surface oxide to the RE intermetallic to form nano-metric oxide dispersoids. Alloy selection was aided by an internal oxidation and serial grinding experiments at Ames Lab and found that Hf-containing alloys may form more stable dispersoids than Ti-containing alloy, i.e., the Hf-containing system exhibited five different oxide phases and two different intermetallics compared to the two oxide phases and one intermetallic in the Ti-containing alloys. Since the simpler Ti-containing system was less complex to characterize, and make observations on the effects of processing parameters, the Ti-containing system was selected by Ames Lab for experimental atomization trials at our partner. An internal oxidation model was developed at Ames Lab and used to predict the heat treatment times necessary for dispersoid formation as a function of powder size and temperature. A new high-pressure gas atomization (HPGA) nozzle was developed at Ames Lab with the aim of promoting fine powder production at scales similar to that of the high gas-flow and melt-flow of industrial atomizers. The atomization nozzle was characterized using schlieren imaging and aspiration pressure testing at Ames Lab to determine the optimum melt delivery tip geometry and atomization pressure to promote enhanced secondary atomization mechanisms. Six atomization trials were performed at our partner to investigate the effects of: gas atomization pressure and reactive gas concentration on the particle size distribution (PSD) and the oxygen content of the resulting powder. Also, the effect on the rapidly solidified microstructure (as a

  3. Creep behavior of pack cementation aluminide coatings on Grade 91 ferritic martensitic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, Brian; Zhang, Ying; Dryepondt, Sebastien N; Pint, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    The creep behavior of various pack cementation aluminide coatings on Grade 91 ferritic-martensitic steel was investigated at 650 C in laboratory air. The coatings were fabricated in two temperature regimes, i.e., 650 or 700 C (low temperature) and 1050 C(high temperature), and consisted of a range of Al levels and thicknesses. For comparison, uncoated specimens heat-treated at 1050 C to simulate the high temperature coating cycle also were included in the creep test. All coated specimens showed a reduction in creep resistance, with 16 51% decrease in rupture life compared to the as-received bare substrate alloy. However, the specimens heat-treated at 1050 C exhibited the lowest creep resistance among all tested samples, with a surprisingly short rupture time of < 25 h, much shorter than the specimen coated at 1050 C. Factors responsible for the reduction in creep resistance of both coated and heat-treated specimens were discussed.

  4. Fracture behavior of 9Cr nanostructured ferritic alloy with improved fracture toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Yoon, Ji Hyun; Wee, Sung Hun; Hoelzer, David T.; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2014-06-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) have been considered as primary candidate materials for both fission and fusion reactors because of their excellent creep and irradiation resistances. It has been shown that high temperature fracture toughness could be significantly improved by appropriate thermo-mechanical treatments (TMTs). This article focuses on the static fracture behaviors of newly developed 9Cr NFAs with improved toughness. Optimal TMTs resulted in high fracture toughness at room temperature (>250 MPa √m) and in retaining higher than 100 MPa √m over a wide temperature range of 22-700 °C. Significant differences were found in fracture surfaces and fracture resistance (J-R) curves after different TMTs. Unique fracture surface features such as shallow nanoscale facets decorated with shear lips and flake-like grains were observed in high toughness specimens.

  5. Process development for 9Cr nanostructured ferritic alloy (NFA) with high fracture toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Yoon, Ji Hyun; Hoelzer, David T.; Lee, Yong Bok; Kang, Suk Hoon; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2014-06-01

    This article is to summarize the process development and key characterization results for the newly-developed Fe-9Cr based nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) with high fracture toughness. One of the major drawbacks from pursuing ultra-high strength in the past development of NFAs is poor fracture toughness at high temperatures although a high fracture toughness is essential to prevent cracking during manufacturing and to mitigate or delay irradiation-induced embrittlement in irradiation environments. A study on fracture mechanism using the NFA 14YWT found that the low-energy grain boundary decohesion in fracture process at a high temperature (>200 °C) resulted in low fracture toughness. Lately, efforts have been devoted to explore an integrated process to enhance grain bonding. Two base materials were produced through mechanical milling and hot extrusion and designated as 9YWTV-PM1 and 9YWTV-PM2. Isothermal annealing (IA) and controlled rolling (CR) treatments in two phase region were used to enhance diffusion across the interfaces and boundaries. The PM2 alloy after CR treatments showed high fracture toughness (KJQ) at represented temperatures: 240-280 MPa √m at room temperature and 160-220 MPa √m at 500 °C, which indicates that the goal of 100 MPa √m over possible nuclear application temperature range has been well achieved. Furthermore, it is also confirmed by comparison that the CR treatments on 9YWTV-PM2 result in high fracture toughness similar to or higher than those of the conventional ferritic-martensitic steels such as HT9 and NF616.

  6. Microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of friction stir welded ODS alloy MA754

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiye; Yuan, Wei; Mishra, Rajiv S.; Charit, Indrajit

    2013-11-01

    Microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of MA754, an yttrium oxide dispersion-strengthened nickel-based superalloy, were investigated after friction stir welding (FSW). A tool rotation rate of 1000 revolution per minute and a traverse speed of 50.8 mm per minute were employed using a cermet (WC-Co) tool. After FSW, fine equiaxed grain structure with a high dislocation density and a random texture was achieved. Agglomeration of yttrium oxide dispersoids was observed in FSW MA754. Room-temperature tensile properties of FSW MA754 were compared to those of as-received MA754 alloy, and the results indicated that particle strengthening contribution decreased as a result of dispersoid agglomeration.

  7. Development of brazing foils to join monocrystalline tungsten alloys with ODS-EUROFER steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalin, B. A.; Fedotov, V. T.; Sevrjukov, O. N.; Kalashnikov, A. N.; Suchkov, A. N.; Moeslang, A.; Rohde, M.

    2007-08-01

    Results on rapidly solidified filler metals for brazing W with W and monocrystalline W with EUROFER steel (FS) are presented. Rapidly quenched powder-type filler metals based on Ti bal-V-Cr-Be were developed to braze polycrystalline W with monocrystalline W. In addition, Fe bal-Ta-Ge-Si-B-Pd alloys were developed to braze monocrystalline W with FS for helium gas cooled divertors and plasma-facing components. The W to FS brazed joints were fabricated under vacuum at 1150 °C, using a Ta spacer of 0.1 mm in thickness to account for the different thermal expansions. The monocrystalline tungsten as well as the related brazed joints withstood 30 cycles between 750 °C/20 min and air cooling/3-5 min.

  8. Irradiation hardening of Fe-9Cr-based alloys and ODS Eurofer: Effect of helium implantation and iron-ion irradiation at 300 °C including sequence effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heintze, C.; Bergner, F.; Hernández-Mayoral, M.; Kögler, R.; Müller, G.; Ulbricht, A.

    2016-03-01

    Single-beam, dual-beam and sequential iron- and/or helium-ion irradiations are widely accepted to emulate more application-relevant but hardly accessible irradiation conditions of generation-IV fission and fusion candidate materials for certain purposes such as material pre-selection, identification of basic mechanisms or model calibration. However, systematic investigations of sequence effects capable to critically question individual approaches are largely missing. In the present study, sequence effects of iron-ion irradiations at 300 °C up to 5 dpa and helium implantations up to 100 appm He are investigated by means of post-irradiation nanoindentation of an Fe9%Cr model alloy, ferritic/martensitic 9%Cr steels T91 and Eurofer97 and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Eurofer. Different types of sequence effects, both synergistic and antagonistic, are identified and tentative interpretations are suggested. It is found that different accelerated irradiation approaches have a great impact on the mechanical hardening. This stresses the importance of experimental design in attempts to emulate in-reactor conditions.

  9. On the structure and chemistry of complex oxide nanofeatures in nanostructured ferritic alloy U14YWT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, D.; Dickerson, P.; Odette, G. R.; Maloy, S. A.; Misra, A.; Nastasi, M. A.

    2012-06-01

    The remarkable radiation damage resistance of nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) is attributed to the large numbers of matrix nanofeatures (NFs) of various types, which can enhance the recombination of displacement defects and trap transmutant helium in fine scale bubbles. Characterizing the chemistry, crystallographic structure and orientation relationships of the NFs is critical to understanding how they enhance the radiation damage resistance of NFAs. Conventional and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy were used to characterize the various types of NF and larger oxide phases in a model 14Cr-3 W-0.4Ti-0.25Y2O3 NFA (14YWT) hot isostatic pressed (HIP-ed) at 1150°C. Large CrTiO3 precipitates (50-300 nm) and small diffracting NFs (<5 nm) were found in this alloy. One major new result is the observation of an additional type of nanofeature (10-50 nm), orthorhombic in structure, with a square center cross-section, which constitutes a new kind of Y-Ti-oxide phase with lattice parameters different from those of known Y and Ti complex oxides. The interfaces of these particles seem to be semicoherent, while manifesting a possible orientation relationship with the BCC matrix. The ratio of Y to Ti varies between <1 and 2 for these larger NFs.

  10. Influence of displacement damage on deuterium and helium retention in austenitic and ferritic-martensitic alloys considered for ADS service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voyevodin, V. N.; Karpov, S. A.; Kopanets, I. E.; Ruzhytskyi, V. V.; Tolstolutskaya, G. D.; Garner, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    The behavior of ion-implanted hydrogen (deuterium) and helium in austenitic 18Cr10NiTi stainless steel, EI-852 ferritic steel and ferritic/martensitic steel EP-450 and their interaction with displacement damage were investigated. Energetic argon irradiation was used to produce displacement damage and bubble formation to simulate nuclear power environments. The influence of damage morphology and the features of radiation-induced defects on deuterium and helium trapping in structural alloys was studied using ion implantation, the nuclear reaction D(3He,p)4He, thermal desorption spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy. It was found in the case of helium irradiation that various kinds of helium-radiation defect complexes are formed in the implanted layer that lead to a more complicated spectra of thermal desorption. Additional small changes in the helium spectra after irradiation with argon ions to a dose of ≤25 dpa show that the binding energy of helium with these traps is weakly dependent on the displacement damage. It was established that retention of deuterium in ferritic and ferritic-martensitic alloys is three times less than in austenitic steel at damage of ˜1 dpa. The retention of deuterium in steels is strongly enhanced by presence of radiation damages created by argon ion irradiation, with a shift in the hydrogen release temperature interval of 200 K to higher temperature. At elevated temperatures of irradiation the efficiency of deuterium trapping is reduced by two orders of magnitude.

  11. ODS iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, I.G.; Pint, B.A.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Ohriner, E.K.

    1996-06-01

    Interest in advanced cycles that involve indirectly-fired gas turbines, in which coal- or gas-fired high-temperature heat exchangers are used to heat a working fluid in a closed system, has led to investigation of materials for heat exchangers capable of operation at temperatures of the order of 1200 to 1300{degrees}C. The candidate materials are ceramics and, possibly, oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys. An ODS FeCrAl alloy was found to meet the strength requirements for such an application, in which the working fluid at 0.9 MPa was to be heated from 800 to 1100{degrees}C over a tube length of 4 m. The oxidation life of ODS FeCrAl alloys is determined by their ability to form or reform a protective alumina scale, and can be related to the time for the aluminum content of the alloy to be depleted to some minimum level. As a result, the service life is a function of the available aluminum content of the alloys and the minimum aluminum level at which breakaway oxidation occurs, hence there is a limit on the minimum cross section which can be safely employed at temperatures above 1200{degrees}C. Because of their significantly higher aluminum content ({ge}28 atom %/{ge}16 wt. percent compared to {approx}9 atom %15 wt. percent), alloys based on Fe{sub 3}Al afford a potentially larger reservoir of aluminum to sustain oxidation resistance at higher temperatures and, therefore, offer a possible improvement over the currently-available ODS FeCrAl alloys, providing they can be strengthened in a similar manner.

  12. Effects of Partial Phase Transformation on Characteristics of 9Cr Nanostructured Ferritic Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Ji Hyun, Yoon; Byun, Thak Sang; Hoelzer, David T

    2014-01-01

    The core structures of future nuclear systems require tolerance to extreme irradiation, and some critical components, for example, the fuel cladding in Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs), have to maintain mechanical integrity to very high doses of 200 -400 dpa at high temperatures up to 700 degrees C. The high Cr nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) are under intense research worldwide as a candidate core material. Although the NFAs have some admirable characteristics for high-temperature applications, their crack sensitivity is very high at high temperatures. The fracture toughness of high strength NFAs is unacceptably low above 300 degrees C. The objective of this study is to develop processes and microstructures with improved high temperature fracture toughness and ductility. To optimize the afterextrusion heat treatment condition, both the computational simulation technique on phase equilibrium and the basic microstructural and mechanical characterization have been carried out. 9 Cr-NFA was produced by the mechanical alloying of pre-alloyed Fe-9Cr base metallic powder and yttria particles, and subsequent extrusion. The post-extrusion heat-treatments of various conditions were applied to the asextruded NFA. The tensile and fracture toughness tests were conducted for as-extruded and heat-treated samples at up to 700 degrees C. Fracture toughness of the NFA has increased by more than 40% at every testing temperature after heat-treatment in the inter-critical temperature range. The increment of fracture toughness of the NFA after post-extrusion heat-treatment is attributed to the increased strength at below 500 degrees C, and an increased ductility at 700 degrees C.

  13. The evolution of internal stress and dislocation during tensile deformation in a 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel investigated by high-energy X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guangming; Zhou, Zhangjian; Mo, Kun; Miao, Yinbin; Liu, Xiang; Almer, Jonathan; Stubbins, James F.

    2015-12-01

    An application of high-energy wide angle synchrotron X-ray diffraction to investigate the tensile deformation of 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel is presented. With tensile loading and in-situ Xray exposure, the lattice strain development of matrix was determined. The lattice strain was found to decrease with increasing temperature, and the difference in Young's modulus of six different reflections at different temperatures reveals the temperature dependence of elastic anisotropy. The mean internal stress was calculated and compared with the applied stress, showing that the strengthening factor increased with increasing temperature, indicating that the oxide nanoparticles have a good strengthening impact at high temperature. The dislocation density and character were also measured during tensile deformation. The dislocation density decreased with increasing of temperature due to the greater mobility of dislocation at high temperature. The dislocation character was determined by best-fit methods for different dislocation average contrasts with various levels of uncertainty. The results shows edge type dislocations dominate the plastic strain at room temperature (RT) and 300 C, while the screw type dislocations dominate at 600 C. The dominance of edge character in 9Cr F/M ODS steels at RT and 300 C is likely due to the pinning effect of nanoparticles for higher mobile edge dislocations when compared with screw dislocations, while the stronger screw type of dislocation structure at 600 C may be explained by the activated cross slip of screw segments.

  14. The evolution of internal stress and dislocation during tensile deformation in a 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel investigated by high-energy X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guangming; Zhou, Zhangjian; Mo, Kun; Miao, Yinbin; Liu, Xiang; Almer, Jonathan; Stubbins, James F.

    2015-12-01

    An application of high-energy wide angle synchrotron X-ray diffraction to investigate the tensile deformation of 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel is presented. With tensile loading and in-situ X-ray exposure, the lattice strain development of matrix was determined. The lattice strain was found to decrease with increasing temperature, and the difference in Young's modulus of six different reflections at different temperatures reveals the temperature dependence of elastic anisotropy. The mean internal stress was calculated and compared with the applied stress, showing that the strengthening factor increased with increasing temperature, indicating that the oxide nanoparticles have a good strengthening impact at high temperature. The dislocation density and character were also measured during tensile deformation. The dislocation density decreased with increasing of temperature due to the greater mobility of dislocation at high temperature. The dislocation character was determined by best-fit methods for different dislocation average contrasts with various levels of uncertainty. The results shows edge type dislocations dominate the plastic strain at room temperature (RT) and 300 °C, while the screw type dislocations dominate at 600 °C. The dominance of edge character in 9Cr F/M ODS steels at RT and 300 °C is likely due to the pinning effect of nanoparticles for higher mobile edge dislocations when compared with screw dislocations, while the stronger screw type of dislocation structure at 600 °C may be explained by the activated cross slip of screw segments.

  15. Evaluation of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Nano-Y2O3-Dispersed Ferritic Alloy Synthesized by Mechanical Alloying and Consolidated by High-Pressure Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karak, Swapan Kumar; Dutta Majumdar, J.; Witczak, Zbigniew; Lojkowski, Witold; Ciupiński, Łukasz; Kurzydłowski, K. J.; Manna, Indranil

    2013-06-01

    In this study, an attempt has been made to synthesize 1.0 wt pct nano-Y2O3-dispersed ferritic alloys with nominal compositions: 83.0 Fe-13.5 Cr-2.0 Al-0.5 Ti (alloy A), 79.0 Fe-17.5 Cr-2.0 Al-0.5 Ti (alloy B), 75.0 Fe-21.5 Cr-2.0 Al-0.5 Ti (alloy C), and 71.0 Fe-25.5 Cr-2.0 Al-0.5 Ti (alloy D) steels (all in wt pct) by solid-state mechanical alloying route and consolidation the milled powder by high-pressure sintering at 873 K, 1073 K, and 1273 K (600°C, 800°C, and 1000°C) using 8 GPa uniaxial pressure for 3 minutes. Subsequently, an extensive effort has been undertaken to characterize the microstructural and phase evolution by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Mechanical properties including hardness, compressive strength, Young's modulus, and fracture toughness were determined using micro/nano-indentation unit and universal testing machine. The present ferritic alloys record extraordinary levels of compressive strength (from 1150 to 2550 MPa), Young's modulus (from 200 to 240 GPa), indentation fracture toughness (from 3.6 to 15.4 MPa√m), and hardness (from13.5 to 18.5 GPa) and measure up to 1.5 through 2 times greater strength but with a lower density (~7.4 Mg/m3) than other oxide dispersion-strengthened ferritic steels (<1200 MPa) or tungsten-based alloys (<2200 MPa). Besides superior mechanical strength, the novelty of these alloys lies in the unique microstructure comprising uniform distribution of either nanometric (~10 nm) oxide (Y2Ti2O7/Y2TiO5 or un-reacted Y2O3) or intermetallic (Fe11TiY and Al9.22Cr2.78Y) particles' ferritic matrix useful for grain boundary pinning and creep resistance.

  16. Effect of friction stir welding and post-weld heat treatment on a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazumder, B.; Yu, X.; Edmondson, P. D.; Parish, C. M.; Miller, M. K.; Meyer, H. M.; Feng, Z.

    2016-02-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) are new generation materials for use in high temperature energy systems, such as nuclear fission or fusion reactors. However, joining these materials is a concern, as their unique microstructure is destroyed by traditional liquid-state welding methods. The microstructural evolution of a friction stir welded 14YWT NFA was investigated by atom probe tomography, before and after a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 1123K. The particle size, number density, elemental composition, and morphology of the titanium-yttrium-oxygen-enriched nanoclusters (NCs) in the stir and thermally-affected zones were studied and compared with the base metal. No statistical difference in the size of the NCs was observed in any of these conditions. After the PWHT, increases in the number density and the oxygen enrichment in the NCs were observed. Therefore, these new results provide additional supporting evidence that friction stir welding appears to be a viable joining technique for NFAs, as the microstructural parameters of the NCs are not strongly affected, in contrast to traditional welding techniques.

  17. Effect of friction stir welding and post-weld heat treatment on a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mazumder, Baishakhi; Yu, Xinghua; Edmondson, Philip D.; Parish, Chad M.; Miller, Michael K; Meyer, H. M.; Feng, Zhili

    2015-12-08

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) are new generation materials for use in high temperature energy systems, such as nuclear fission or fusion reactors. However, joining these materials is a concern, as their unique microstructure is destroyed by traditional liquid-state welding methods. The microstructural evolution of a friction stir welded 14YWT NFA was investigated by atom probe tomography, before and after a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 1123K. The particle size, number density, elemental composition, and morphology of the titanium-yttrium-oxygenenriched nanoclusters (NCs) in the stir and thermally-affected zones were studied and compared with the base metal. No statistical difference in the sizemore » of the NCs was observed in any of these conditions. After the PWHT, increases in the number density and the oxygen enrichment in the NCs were observed. Therefore, these new results provide additional supporting evidence that friction stir welding appears to be a viable joining technique for NFAs, as the microstructural parameters of the NCs are not strongly affected, in contrast to traditional welding techniques.« less

  18. Effect of friction stir welding and post-weld heat treatment on a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Mazumder, Baishakhi; Yu, Xinghua; Edmondson, Philip D.; Parish, Chad M.; Miller, Michael K; Meyer, H. M.; Feng, Zhili

    2015-12-08

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) are new generation materials for use in high temperature energy systems, such as nuclear fission or fusion reactors. However, joining these materials is a concern, as their unique microstructure is destroyed by traditional liquid-state welding methods. The microstructural evolution of a friction stir welded 14YWT NFA was investigated by atom probe tomography, before and after a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 1123K. The particle size, number density, elemental composition, and morphology of the titanium-yttrium-oxygenenriched nanoclusters (NCs) in the stir and thermally-affected zones were studied and compared with the base metal. No statistical difference in the size of the NCs was observed in any of these conditions. After the PWHT, increases in the number density and the oxygen enrichment in the NCs were observed. Therefore, these new results provide additional supporting evidence that friction stir welding appears to be a viable joining technique for NFAs, as the microstructural parameters of the NCs are not strongly affected, in contrast to traditional welding techniques.

  19. Development of rapidly quenched brazing foils to join tungsten alloys with ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalin, B. A.; Fedotov, V. T.; Sevrjukov, O. N.; Moeslang, A.; Rohde, M.

    2004-08-01

    Results on rapidly solidified filler metals for tungsten brazing are presented. A rapidly quenched foil-type filler metal based on Ni bal-15Cr-4Mo-4Fe-(0.5-1.0)V-7.5Si-1.5B was developed to braze tungsten to ferritic/martensitic Crl3Mo2NbVB steel (FS) for helium gas cooled divertors and plasma facing components. Polycrystalline W-2CeO 2 and monocrystalline pure tungsten were brazed to the steel under vacuum at 1150 °C, using a 0.5 mm thick foil spacer made of a 50Fe-50Ni alloy. As a result of thermocycling tests (100 cycles between 700 °C/20 min and air-water cooling/3-5 min) on brazed joints, tungsten powder metallurgically processed W-2CeO 2 failed due to residual stresses, whereas the brazed joint with zone-melted monocrystalline tungsten withstood the thermocycling tests.

  20. Response of nanostructured ferritic alloys to high-dose heavy ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Parish, Chad M.; White, Ryan M.; LeBeau, James M.; Miller, Michael K.

    2014-02-01

    A latest-generation aberration-corrected scanning/transmission electron microscope (STEM) is used to study heavy-ion-irradiated nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs). Results are presented for STEM X-ray mapping of NFA 14YWT irradiated with 10 MeV Pt to 16 or 160 dpa at -100°C and 750°C, as well as pre-irradiation reference material. Irradiation at -100°C results in ballistic destruction of the beneficial microstructural features present in the pre-irradiated reference material, such as Ti-Y-O nanoclusters (NCs) and grain boundary (GB) segregation. Irradiation at 750°C retains these beneficial features, but indicates some coarsening of the NCs, diffusion of Al to the NCs, and a reduction of the Cr-W GB segregation (or solute excess) content. Ion irradiation combined with the latest-generation STEM hardware allows for rapid screening of fusion candidate materials and improved understanding of irradiation-induced microstructural changes in NFAs.

  1. Microstructure and oxidation properties of 16Cr-5Al-ODS steel prepared by sol-gel and spark plasma sintering methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Y. P.; Wang, X. P.; Zhuang, Z.; Sun, Q. X.; Zhang, T.; Fang, Q. F.; Hao, T.; Liu, C. S.

    2013-01-01

    The 16Cr-5Al oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel was fabricated by sol-gel method in combination with hydrogen reduction, mechanical alloying (MA) and spark plasma sintering (SPS) techniques. The phase characterization, microstructure and oxidation resistance of the 16Cr-5Al-ODS steel were investigated in comparison with the Al free 16Cr-ODS steel. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns showed that the Al free and Al added 16Cr-ODS steels exhibited typical ferritic characteristic structure. The microstructure analysis investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) revealed that Y-Ti-O complexes with particle size of 10-30 nm were formed in the Al free matrix and Y-Al-O complexes with particle size of 20-100 nm were formed in the Al contained high-Cr ODS steel matrix. These complexes are homogeneously distributed in the matrices. The fabricated 16Cr-5Al-ODS steel exhibited superior oxidation resistance compared with the Al free 16Cr-ODS steel and the commercial 304 stainless steel owing to the formation of continuous and dense Al2O3 film on the surface.

  2. An empirical approach to strain to fracture of two-ductile-phase alloys. [Ti-Mn alloys and ferrite-martensite steels

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Z.; Miodownik, A.P. )

    1993-04-15

    Two-ductile-phase alloys refer to the alloys comprising two phases which are plastically deformable under applied stress, for example, [alpha]-[beta] brasses, [alpha]-[beta] Ti-alloys and dual-phase steels. As a group, two-ductile-phase alloys offer an excellent combination of high strength, good ductility and promising fracture toughness. In this paper, the authors present an empirical approach to the strain to fracture of two-ductile-phase alloys, based on the microstructural characterization method developed by Fan et al. The proposed approach can predict the strain to fracture of two-ductile-phase alloys in terms of the strains to fracture of the constituent phases and the microstructural parameters, such as volume fraction, contiguity and grain size of each constituent phase. The predictions by the present approach will be compared with the experimental results in [alpha]-[beta] Ti-Mn alloys and ferrite-martensite dual-phase steels drawn from the literature. In addition, the effect of relative grain size (the grain size ratio) on the strain to fracture of two-ductile-phase alloys will be discussed.

  3. Further Charpy impact test results of low activation ferritic alloys, irradiated at 430{degrees}C to 67 dpa

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, L.E.; Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S.

    1997-04-01

    Miniature CVN specimens of four ferritic alloys, GA3X, F82H, GA4X and HT9, have been impact tested following irradiation at 430{degrees}C to 67 dpa. Comparison of the results with those of the previously tested lower dose irradiation condition indicates that the GA3X and F82H alloys, two primary candidate low activation alloys, exhibit virtually identical behavior following irradiation at 430{degrees}C to {approximately}67 dpa and at 370{degrees}C to {approximately}15 dpa. Very little shift is observed in either DBTT or USE relative to the unirradiated condition. The shifts in DBTT and USE observed in both GA4X and HT9 were smaller after irradiation at 430{degrees}C to {approximately}67 dpa than after irradiation at 370{degrees}C to {approximately}15 dpa.

  4. A review of advantages of high-efficiency X-ray spectrum imaging for analysis of nanostructured ferritic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, Chad M.; Miller, Michael K.

    2015-07-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) exhibit complex microstructures consisting of 100-500 nm ferrite grains, grain boundary solute enrichment, and multiple populations of precipitates and nanoclusters (NCs). Understanding these materials' excellent creep and radiation-tolerance properties requires a combination of multiple atomic-scale experimental techniques. Recent advances in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) hardware and data analysis methods have the potential to revolutionize nanometer-to micrometer-scale materials analysis. Modern high-brightness, high-X-ray collection STEM instruments are capable of enabling advanced experiments, such as simultaneous energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy spectrum imaging at nm to sub-nm resolution, that are now well-established for the study of nuclear materials. In this paper, we review past results and present new results illustrating the effectiveness of latest-generation STEM instrumentation and data analysis.

  5. A review of advantages of high-efficiency X-ray spectrum imaging for analysis of nanostructured ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Parish, Chad M.; Miller, Michael K.

    2014-12-09

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) exhibit complex microstructures consisting of 100-500 nm ferrite grains, grain boundary solute enrichment, and multiple populations of precipitates and nanoclusters (NCs). Understanding these materials' excellent creep and radiation-tolerance properties requires a combination of multiple atomic-scale experimental techniques. Recent advances in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) hardware and data analysis methods have the potential to revolutionize nanometer to micrometer scale materials analysis. The application of these methods is applied to NFAs as a test case and is compared to both conventional STEM methods as well as complementary methods such as scanning electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. In this paper, we review past results and present new results illustrating the effectiveness of latest-generation STEM instrumentation and data analysis.

  6. A review of advantages of high-efficiency X-ray spectrum imaging for analysis of nanostructured ferritic alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Parish, Chad M.; Miller, Michael K.

    2014-12-09

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) exhibit complex microstructures consisting of 100-500 nm ferrite grains, grain boundary solute enrichment, and multiple populations of precipitates and nanoclusters (NCs). Understanding these materials' excellent creep and radiation-tolerance properties requires a combination of multiple atomic-scale experimental techniques. Recent advances in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) hardware and data analysis methods have the potential to revolutionize nanometer to micrometer scale materials analysis. The application of these methods is applied to NFAs as a test case and is compared to both conventional STEM methods as well as complementary methods such as scanning electron microscopy and atom probe tomography.more » In this paper, we review past results and present new results illustrating the effectiveness of latest-generation STEM instrumentation and data analysis.« less

  7. Formation Mechanisms of Alloying Element Nitrides in Recrystallized and Deformed Ferritic Fe-Cr-Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhlaghi, Maryam; Meka, Sai Ramudu; Jägle, Eric A.; Kurz, Silke J. B.; Bischoff, Ewald; Mittemeijer, Eric J.

    2016-07-01

    The effect of the initial microstructure (recrystallized or cold-rolled) on the nitride precipitation process upon gaseous nitriding of ternary Fe-4.3 at. pct Cr-8.1 at. pct Al alloy was investigated at 723 K (450 °C) employing X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atom probe tomography (APT), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). In recrystallized Fe-Cr-Al specimens, one type of nitride develops: ternary, cubic, NaCl-type mixed Cr1-x Al x N. In cold-rolled Fe-Cr-Al specimens, precipitation of two types of nitrides occurs: ternary, cubic, NaCl-type mixed Cr1-x Al x N and binary, cubic, NaCl-type AlN. By theoretical analysis, it was shown that for the recrystallized specimens an energy barrier for the nucleation of mixed Cr1-x Al x N exists, whereas in the cold-rolled specimens no such energy barriers for the development of mixed Cr1-x Al x N and of binary, cubic AlN occur. The additional development of the cubic AlN in the cold-rolled microstructure could be ascribed to the preferred heterogeneous nucleation of cubic AlN on dislocations. The nitrogen concentration-depth profile of the cold-rolled specimen shows a stepped nature upon prolonged nitriding as a consequence of instantaneous nucleation of nitride upon arrival of nitrogen and nitride growth rate-limited by nitrogen transport through the thickening nitrided zone.

  8. Formation Mechanisms of Alloying Element Nitrides in Recrystallized and Deformed Ferritic Fe-Cr-Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhlaghi, Maryam; Meka, Sai Ramudu; Jägle, Eric A.; Kurz, Silke J. B.; Bischoff, Ewald; Mittemeijer, Eric J.

    2016-09-01

    The effect of the initial microstructure (recrystallized or cold-rolled) on the nitride precipitation process upon gaseous nitriding of ternary Fe-4.3 at. pct Cr-8.1 at. pct Al alloy was investigated at 723 K (450 °C) employing X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atom probe tomography (APT), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). In recrystallized Fe-Cr-Al specimens, one type of nitride develops: ternary, cubic, NaCl-type mixed Cr1- x Al x N. In cold-rolled Fe-Cr-Al specimens, precipitation of two types of nitrides occurs: ternary, cubic, NaCl-type mixed Cr1- x Al x N and binary, cubic, NaCl-type AlN. By theoretical analysis, it was shown that for the recrystallized specimens an energy barrier for the nucleation of mixed Cr1- x Al x N exists, whereas in the cold-rolled specimens no such energy barriers for the development of mixed Cr1- x Al x N and of binary, cubic AlN occur. The additional development of the cubic AlN in the cold-rolled microstructure could be ascribed to the preferred heterogeneous nucleation of cubic AlN on dislocations. The nitrogen concentration-depth profile of the cold-rolled specimen shows a stepped nature upon prolonged nitriding as a consequence of instantaneous nucleation of nitride upon arrival of nitrogen and nitride growth rate-limited by nitrogen transport through the thickening nitrided zone.

  9. The ferrite and austenite lattice parameters of Fe-Co and Fe-Cu binary alloys as a function of temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Velthuis, S.G.E. te; Sietsma, J.; Rekveldt, M.T.; Zwaag, S. van der; Root, J.H.

    1998-09-18

    The lattice parameters of Fe-15 Cu, Fe-2% Cu, Fe-1% Co, and Fe-2% Co binary alloys were determined by means of neutron diffraction at temperatures around the austenite-ferrite phase transformation (860--1350 K). While the thermal expansion coefficients prove to be similar to those of Fe for all alloys, Cu and Co have an opposite effect on the lattice parameter of Fe. Addition of Cu increases the lattice parameter in both ferrite ({alpha}) and austenite ({gamma}), while Co decreases the lattice parameter. For all alloys, the {alpha} {leftrightarrow} {gamma} phase transformation introduces a volume change of 1.0%. Evidence is found that both ferrite and austenite are slightly strained ({epsilon} < 8 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}) when both phases are present simultaneously.

  10. The Kinetics of Dislocation Loop Formation in Ferritic Alloys Through the Aggregation of Irradiation Induced Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohnert, Aaron Anthony

    The mechanical properties of materials are often degraded over time by exposure to irradiation environments, a phenomenon that has hindered the development of multiple nuclear reactor design concepts. Such property changes are the result of microstructural changes induced by the collision of high energy particles with the atoms in a material. The lattice defects generated in these recoil events migrate and interact to form extended damage structures. This study has used theoretical models based on the mean field chemical reaction rate theory to analyze the aggregation of isolated lattice defects into larger microstructural features that are responsible for long term property changes, focusing on the development of black dot damage in ferritic iron based alloys. The purpose of such endeavors is two-fold. Primarily, such models explain and quantify the processes through which these microstructures form. Additionally, models provide insight into the behavior and properties of the point defects and defect clusters which drive general microstructural evolution processes. The modeling effort presented in this work has focused on physical fidelity, drawing from a variety of sources of information to characterize the unobservable defect generation and agglomeration processes that give rise to the observable features reported in experimental data. As such, the models are based not solely on isolated point defect creation, as is the case with many older rate theory approaches, but instead on realistic estimates of the defect cluster population produced in high energy cascade damage events. Experimental assessments of the microstructural changes evident in transmission electron microscopy studies provide a means to measure the efficacy of the kinetic models. Using common assumptions of the mobility of defect clusters generated in cascade damage conditions, an unphysically high density of damage features develops at the temperatures of interest with a temperature dependence

  11. Assessment of a new fabrication route for Fe-9Cr-1W ODS cladding tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toualbi, L.; Cayron, C.; Olier, P.; Malaplate, J.; Praud, M.; Mathon, M.-H.; Bossu, D.; Rouesne, E.; Montani, A.; Logé, R.; de Carlan, Y.

    2012-09-01

    Oxide Dispersion Strengthened ferritic/martensitic steels are developed as future cladding materials for Generation IV Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors. ODS alloys are elaborated by powder metallurgy, consolidated by hot extrusion and manufactured into tube cladding using cold rolling process. ODS steels present low ductility and high hardness at room temperature which complicate their manufacturing. Cold working leads to the hardening of the tube which needs to be softened by heat treatment. A new high temperature fabrication route performed on a Fe-9Cr-1W-Ti-Y2O3-ODS martensitic steel has been designed by following the hardness values, the morphological and crystallographic anisotropy and the nano-precipitation size evolution at each step of the fabrication route. Observations show that phase transformation from ferrite (α) to austenite (γ) is crucial to reduce the morphological and the crystallographic anisotropy induced by the manufacturing processes. The high temperature heat treatments permit to make the austenitic grain grow leading to an improvement of the cold workability. Ultimate Tensile Strength values obtained in the hoop direction remain about 315 MPa at 650 °C which is slightly lower compared to other Fe-9Cr ODS tubes but the new microstructure could be more favorable for creep properties.

  12. Simulation of Ferrite Formation in Fe-C Alloys Based on a Three-Dimensional Mixed-Mode Transformation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Bohemen, S. M. C.; Bos, C.; Sietsma, J.

    2011-09-01

    A three-dimensional mixed-mode (MM) transformation model accounting for both soft impingement and hard impingement was developed that calculates the growth kinetics of ferrite grains in an austenite matrix. The simulations are compared to the kinetics of ferrite formation in high-purity Fe-C alloys for which phase-transformation kinetics were measured isothermally by dilatometry at several temperatures in the range of 973 K to 1043 K (700 °C to 770 °C). The interface mobility is obtained from the best fit of the data at 1023 K (750 °C) for which the nucleus density N is estimated from the final microstructure. Subsequently, the experimental ferrite kinetics in Fe-0.36C at the other temperatures are simulated. The values of N extracted from the fits can be described with a nucleation model. The significance of the MM calculations is rationalized by comparing the results for Fe-0.17C with simulations assuming purely diffusion-controlled (DC) and purely interface-controlled (IC) growth. Comparison of simulated fraction curves for Fe-0.57C with the three models demonstrates that the transformation in high-carbon steels is essentially DC.

  13. EBSD as a tool to identify and quantify bainite and ferrite in low-alloyed Al-TRIP steels.

    PubMed

    Zaefferer, S; Romano, P; Friedel, F

    2008-06-01

    Bainite is thought to play an important role for the chemical and mechanical stabilization of metastable austenite in low-alloyed TRIP steels. Therefore, in order to understand and improve the material properties, it is important to locate and quantify the bainitic phase. To this aim, electron backscatter diffraction-based orientation microscopy has been employed. The main difficulty herewith is to distinguish bainitic ferrite from ferrite because both have bcc crystal structure. The most important difference between them is the occurrence of transformation induced geometrically necessary dislocations in the bainitic phase. To determine the areas with larger geometrically necessary dislocation density, the following orientation microscopy maps were explored: pattern quality maps, grain reference orientation deviation maps and kernel average misorientation maps. We show that only the latter allow a reliable separation of the bainitic and ferritic phase. The kernel average misorientation threshold value that separates both constituents is determined by an algorithm that searches for the smoothness of the boundaries between them. PMID:18503676

  14. Development and characterization of advanced 9Cr ferritic/martensitic steels for fission and fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saroja, S.; Dasgupta, A.; Divakar, R.; Raju, S.; Mohandas, E.; Vijayalakshmi, M.; Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.; Raj, Baldev

    2011-02-01

    This paper presents the results on the physical metallurgy studies in 9Cr Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) and Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steels. Yttria strengthened ODS alloy was synthesized through several stages, like mechanical milling of alloy powders and yttria, canning and consolidation by hot extrusion. During characterization of the ODS alloy, it was observed that yttria particles possessed an affinity for Ti, a small amount of which was also helpful in refining the dispersoid particles containing mixed Y and Ti oxides. The particle size and their distribution in the ferrite matrix, were studied using Analytical and High Resolution Electron Microscopy at various stages. The results showed a distribution of Y 2O 3 particles predominantly in the size range of 5-20 nm. A Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic steel has also been developed with the replacement of Mo and Nb by W and Ta with strict control on the tramp and trace elements (Mo, Nb, B, Cu, Ni, Al, Co, Ti). The transformation temperatures ( Ac1, Ac3 and Ms) for this steel have been determined and the transformation behavior of the high temperature austenite phase has been studied. The complete phase domain diagram has been generated which is required for optimization of the processing and fabrication schedules for the steel.

  15. Growth kinetics of grain boundary allotriomorphs of proeutectoid ferrite in Fe-C-Mn-X{sub 2} alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Aaronson, H.I.; Enomoto, M.

    1995-03-01

    The parabolic rate constant for the thickening of grain boundary ferrite allotriomorphs at the faces of austenite grain boundaries was measured as a function of isothermal transformation temperature in three Fe-C-X{sub 1}-X{sub 2} alloys where X{sub 1} is Mn and X{sub 2} is successively Si, Ni, and Co. The results were compared with the predictions of the local equilibrium model for multi-component systems and with those derived from the theory of growth under paraequilibrium conditions. The distribution of Mn and Si in ferrite and austenite in the Fe-C-Mn-Si alloy was also measured as a function of reaction temperature with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The observed temperature below which alloying element partition ceased was in good agreement with the local equilibrium model. Whereas the parabolic rate constant for thickening was considerably larger than the amount predicted by this theory in the alloying element diffusion-controlled regime, the opposite was true in the carbon diffusion-controlled regime. Similarly, the calculated paraequilibrium constant was usually considerably larger than that measured experimentally. Synergistic enhancements of the effects of Mn and X{sub 2} in diminishing thickening kinetics were observed for each X{sub 2}. The time-temperature-transformation (TTT) curves for the beginning of transformation were calculated from a modified Cahn analysis for the overall kinetics of grain-boundary-nucleated reactions using values of the nucleation rate and the parabolic growth rate constant computed from various models and compared with experimentally determined TTT curves.

  16. Effect of austenitizing conditions on the impact properties of an alloyed austempered ductile iron of initially ferritic matrix structure

    SciTech Connect

    Delia, M.; Alaalam, M.; Grech, M.

    1998-04-01

    The effect of austenitizing conditions on the microstructure and impact properties of an austempered ductile iron (ADI) containing 1.6% Cu and 1.6% Ni as the main alloying elements was investigated. Impact tests were carried out on samples of initially ferritic matrix structure and which had been first austenitized at 850, 900, 950, and 1,000 C for 15 to 360 min and austempered at 360 C for 180 min. Results showed that the austenitizing temperature, T{sub {gamma}}, and time, t{sub {gamma}} have a significant effect on the impact properties of the alloy. This has been attributed to the influence of these variables on the carbon kinetics. Microstructures of samples austenitized at 950 and 1,000 C contain no pro-eutectoid ferrite. The impact properties of the former structures are independent of t{sub {gamma}}, while those solution treated at 1,000 C are generally low and show wide variation over the range of soaking time investigated. For fully ausferritic structures, impact properties fall with an increase in T{sub {gamma}}. This is particularly evident at 1,000 C. As the T{sub {gamma}} increases, the amount of carbon dissolved in the original austenite increases. This slows down the rate of austenite transformation and results in coarser structures with lower mechanical properties. Optimum impact properties are obtained following austenitizing between 900 and 950 C for 120 to 180 min.

  17. Nano-sized precipitate stability and its controlling factors in a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhiqian; Song, Gian; Ilavsky, Jan; Ghosh, Gautam; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    Coherent B2-ordered NiAl-type precipitates have been used to reinforce solid-solution body-centered-cubic iron for high-temperature application in fossil-energy power plants. In this study, we investigate the stability of nano-sized precipitates in a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy at 700–950 °C using ultra-small angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopies. Here we show that the coarsening kinetics of NiAl-type precipitates is in excellent agreement with the ripening model in multicomponent alloys. We further demonstrate that the interfacial energy between the matrix and NiAl-type precipitates is strongly dependent on differences in the matrix/precipitate compositions. Our results profile the ripening process in multicomponent alloys by illustrating controlling factors of interfacial energy, diffusivities, and element partitioning. The study provides guidelines to design and develop high-temperature alloys with stable microstructures for long-term service. PMID:26537060

  18. Nucleation kinetics of grain boundary allotriomorphs of proeutectoid ferrite in Fe-C-Mn-X{sub 2} alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Aaronson, H.I.; Enomoto, M.

    1995-03-01

    The steady-state nucleation rates of ferrite allotriomorphs at the ``faces`` of austenite grain boundaries were measured in Fe-C-X{sub 1}-X{sub 2} alloys, where X{sub 1} was Mn and X{sub 2} was successively Si, Ni, and Co, using techniques previously developed for counterpart studies on Fe-C and Fe-C-X alloys. The results were compared with the predictions of the classical nucleation theory, using the pillbox-shaped critical nucleus model. The volume free energy changes associated with nucleation in Fe-C-X{sub 1}-X{sub 2} quaternary systems were evaluated from the central atoms model (CAM) for both para- and orthoequilibrium modes of transformation. The nucleation process was assumed to be controlled by volume and/or grain boundary diffusion of alloying elements. The so-called synergistic effects of alloying elements were considered in terms of the volume free energy change and interfacial energies on the basis of the result of the nucleation rate measurements.

  19. Nano-sized precipitate stability and its controlling factors in a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sun, Zhiqian; Song, Gian; Ilavsky, Jan; Ghosh, Gautam; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-11-05

    Coherent B2-ordered NiAl-type precipitates have been used to reinforce solid-solution bodycentered- cubic iron for high-temperature application in fossil-energy power plants. In this study, the stability of nano-sized precipitates in a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy was investigated at 700 - 950°C using ultra-small angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopies. Here we show that the coarsening kinetics of NiAl-type precipitates is in excellent agreement with the ripening model in multicomponent alloys. We further demonstrate that the interfacial energy between the matrix and NiAl-type precipitates is strongly dependent to differences in the matrix/precipitate compositions. The results profile the ripening process in multicomponent alloys bymore » illustrating controlling factors (i.e., interfacial energy, diffusivities, and element partitioning). As a result, the study provides guidelines to design and develop high-temperature alloys with stable microstructures for long-term service.« less

  20. Nano-sized precipitate stability and its controlling factors in a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Zhiqian; Song, Gian; Ilavsky, Jan; Ghosh, Gautam; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-11-05

    Coherent B2-ordered NiAl-type precipitates have been used to reinforce solid-solution bodycentered- cubic iron for high-temperature application in fossil-energy power plants. In this study, the stability of nano-sized precipitates in a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy was investigated at 700 - 950°C using ultra-small angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopies. Here we show that the coarsening kinetics of NiAl-type precipitates is in excellent agreement with the ripening model in multicomponent alloys. We further demonstrate that the interfacial energy between the matrix and NiAl-type precipitates is strongly dependent to differences in the matrix/precipitate compositions. The results profile the ripening process in multicomponent alloys by illustrating controlling factors (i.e., interfacial energy, diffusivities, and element partitioning). As a result, the study provides guidelines to design and develop high-temperature alloys with stable microstructures for long-term service.

  1. Correlation of Fe/Cr phase decomposition process and age-hardening in Fe-15Cr ferritic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dongsheng; Kimura, Akihiko; Han, Wentuo

    2014-12-01

    The effects of thermal aging on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Fe-15Cr ferritic model alloys were investigated by TEM examinations, micro-hardness measurements and tensile tests. The materials used in this work were Fe-15Cr, Fe-15Cr-C and Fe-15Cr-X alloys, where X refers to Si, Mn and Ni to simulate a pressure vessel steel. Specimens were isothermally aged at 475 °C up to 5000 h. Thermal aging causes a significant increase in the hardness and strength. An almost twice larger hardening is required for embrittlement of Fe-15Cr-X relative to Fe-15Cr. The age-hardening is mainly due to the formation of Cr-rich α‧ precipitates, while the addition of minor elements has a small effect on the saturation level of age-hardening. The correlation of phase decomposition process and age-hardening in Fe-15Cr alloy was interpreted by dispersion strengthened models.

  2. Journal of Nuclear Materials - Radiation-induced segregation and phase stability in ferritic-martensitic alloy T 91

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Zhijie; Busby, Jeremy T; Was, Gary S; Jiao, Zhijie

    2010-01-01

    Radiation-induced segregation in ferritic martensitic alloy T 91 was studied to understand the behavior of solutes as a function of dose and temperature. Irradiations were conducted using 2 MeV protons to doses of 1, 3, 7 and 10 dpa at 400 C. Radiation-induced segregation at prior austenite grain boundaries was measured, and various features of the irradiated microstructure were characterized, including grain boundary carbide coverage, the dislocation microstructure, radiation-induced precipitation and irradiation hardening. Results showed that Cr, Ni and Si segregate to prior austenite grain boundaries at low dose, but segregation ceases and redistribution occurs above 3 dpa. Grain boundary carbide coverage mirrors radiation-induced segregation. Irradiation induces formation of Ni Si Mn and Cu-rich precipitates that account for the majority of irradiation hardening. Radiation-induced segregation behavior is likely linked to the evolution of the precipitate and dislocation microstructures. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved

  3. First principles assessment of helium trapping in Y2TiO5 in nano-featured ferritic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yanan; Jiang, Yong; Yang, Litong; Lan, Guoqiang; Robert Odette, G.; Yamamoto, Takuya; Shang, Jiacheng; Dang, Ying

    2014-10-01

    Nano-scale Y2Ti2O7 and Y2TiO5 oxides are the major features that provide high strength and irradiation tolerance in nano-structured ferritic alloys. Here, we employ density functional theory to study helium trapping in Y2TiO5. The results suggest that helium is more deeply trapped in Y2TiO5 compared to Y2Ti2O7. Helium occupies open channels in Y2TiO5, where it weakly chemically interacts with neighboring oxygen anions, and results in less volume expansion compared to Y2Ti2O7, reducing strains in the iron matrix. The corresponding helium mobility in these channels is very high. While its ultimate fate is to form oxide/matrix interface bubbles, transient deep trapping of helium in oxides plays a major role in the ability of NFA to manage helium distribution.

  4. Soft magnetic properties of a ferritic Fe-Ni-Cr alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, S.; Sherwood, R. C.; Chin, G. Y.; Wernick, J. H.; Bordelon, C. M.

    1984-03-01

    Technologically important applications may exist for magnetically soft alloys that possess, in addition to the appropriate magnetic properties, relatively high mechanical strength and corrosion resistance. Such an alloy can be used, for example, for certain types of telephone receiver armature applications. In the present paper, we report the magnetic and mechanical properties of the ternary Fe-3Ni-5Cr alloy. The soft magnetic properties of the alloy are significantly improved by heat treatment within the (α+γ) two-phase region. Exemplary properties after heat treatment at ˜625 °C for 2 h are Hc˜1.2 Oe, μm˜4700, yield strength ˜59 ksi, and elongation ˜30%. The alloy exhibits reasonably good corrosion resistance. Magnetic, mechanical, and electrical properties of the alloy as well as the acoustic performance of telephone receivers using it, have been found to be comparable to those of the 2V-Permendur alloy.

  5. High-temperature corrosion behavior of coatings and ODS alloys based on Fe{sub 3}Al

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; Pint, B.A.; Wright, I.G.

    1996-08-01

    Iron-aluminide coatings were prepared by gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc weld-overlay techniques. All the weld overlays showed good oxidation/sulfidation behavior under isothermal conditions, including a gas metal arc deposit with only 21 at.% Al. A rapid degradation in corrosion resistance was observed under thermal cycling conditions when the initially grown scales spalled and the subsequent rate of reaction was not controlled by the formation of slowly growing aluminum oxides. Higher starting aluminum concentrations (>{approximately}25 at.%) are needed to assure adequate oxidation/sulfidation lifetimes of the weld overlays. A variety of stable oxides was added to a base Fe-28 at.% Al-2 % Cr alloy to assess the effect of these dopants on the oxidation behavior at 1200{degrees}C. A Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion improved the scale adhesion relative to a Zr alloy addition, but wasn`t as effective as it is in other alumina-forming alloys. Preliminary data for powder-processed Fe-28 at.% Al-2% Cr exposed to the H{sub 2}S-H{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-Ar gas at 800{degrees}C showed that the oxidation/sulfidation rate was similar to that of many Fe{sub 3}Al alloys produced by ingot metallurgy routes.

  6. ODS steel raw material local structure analysis using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cintins, A.; Anspoks, A.; Purans, J.; Kuzmin, A.; Timoshenko, J.; Vladimirov, P.; Gräning, T.; Hoffmann, J.

    2015-03-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are promising materials for fusion power reactors, concentrated solar power plants, jet engines, chemical reactors as well as for hydrogen production from thermolysis of water. In this study we used X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Fe and Cr K-edges as a tool to get insight into the local structure of ferritic and austenitic ODS steels around Fe and Cr atoms and its transformation during mechanical alloying process. Using the analysis of X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) we found that for austenitic samples a transformation of ferritic steel to austenitic steel is detectable after 10 hours of milling and proceeds till 40 hours of milling; only small amount of a-phase remains after 80 hours of milling. We found that the Cr K-edge EXAFS can be used to observe distortions inside the material and to get an impression on the formation of chromium clusters. In-situ EXAFS experiments offer a reliable method to investigate the ferritic to austenitic transformation.

  7. Structural applications of mechanical alloying; Proceedings of the ASM International Conference, Myrtle Beach, SC, Mar. 27-29, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Froes, F.H.; Debarbadillo, J.J. Inco Alloys International, Inc., Huntington, WV )

    1990-01-01

    The present conference on mechanically alloyed (MA) products discusses their aerospace and industrial applications, the design and isothermal forging of Ni-base oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) superalloys, the microstructure and tensile properties of ODS ferritic alloys, the high temperature corrosion resistance of MA refractory products, the mechanical properties of novel MA Fe-based ODS alloys, and dispersoids in MA metals. Also discussed are MA Al-alloys for aircraft applications, the microstructure and properties of MA Al-Mn, the MA processing of the Ti-Al system, the origin of the strength of MA Al alloys, the interaction of Al with SiC during MA processing, the synthesis of chromium silicide via MA, and the MA production of 'TiC-steel'.

  8. ODS iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, I.G.; McKamey, C.G.; Pint, B.A.

    1995-06-01

    There has been a recent increase of interest in advanced cycles that involve indirectly-fired gas turbines, in which coal- or gas-fired high-temperature heat exchangers are used to heat a working fluid in a closed system. In a program conducted as part of the European COST-501 Concerted Action Project, available alloys based on FeCrAl-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} were evaluated for use in the main heat exchanger in a similar closed-cycle gas turbine application. One of the currently available ODS FeCrAl alloys was found to meet the strength requirements for this application, in which the working fluid at 0.9 MPa (131 psi) flowing at 5,889 kg/hr (12,955 lb/hr) was to be heated from 800 to 1100{degrees}C (1472 to 2012{degrees}F) over a tube length of 4 m (13 ft).

  9. Characterization of ion-irradiated ODS Fe-Cr alloys by doppler broadening spectroscopy using a positron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parente, P.; Leguey, T.; de Castro, V.; Gigl, T.; Reiner, M.; Hugenschmidt, C.; Pareja, R.

    2015-09-01

    The damage profile of oxide dispersion strengthened steels after single-, or simultaneous triple-ion irradiation at different conditions has been characterized using a low energy positron beam in order to provide information on microstructural changes induced by irradiation. Doppler broadening and coincident Doppler broadening measurements of the positron annihilation line have been performed on different Fe-Cr-(W,Ti) alloys reinforced with Y2O3, to identify the nature and stability of irradiation-induced open-volume defects and their possible association with the oxide nanoparticles. It was found that irradiation induced vacancy clusters are associated with Cr atoms. The results are of highest interest for modeling the damage induced by 14 MeV neutrons in reduced activation Fe-Cr alloys relevant for fusion devices.

  10. Dispersoid Distribution and Microstructure in Fe-Cr-Al Ferritic Oxide Dispersion-Strengthened Alloy Prepared by Friction Consolidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalini, David; Kaoumi, Djamel; Reynolds, Anthony P.; Grant, Glenn J.

    2015-10-01

    INCOLOY® MA956 is a ferritic oxide dispersion-strengthened alloy manufactured by mechanical alloying followed by hot extrusion in vacuum-sealed cans or by degassing and hot isostatic pressing. This could be followed by a tailored heat treatment sequence in order to obtain a desired microstructure and to allow the oxide dispersion to precipitate. Three different oxides, responsible for the high-temperature mechanical strength, have been observed in this alloy: Y4Al2O9, YAlO3, and Y3Al5O12. Their sizes range from just a few to hundreds of nanometers. In this work, mechanically alloyed MA956 powder was consolidated via friction consolidation, a single-step and potentially cheaper processing alternative. Three fully dense compacts were produced. The compacts exhibited a refined, equiaxed grain structure with grain sizes smaller than 10 µm and the desired oxide dispersion. YAlO3 and Y3Al5O12 were identified by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray diffraction. The size distribution of precipitates above 50 nm showed a direct proportionality between average precipitate size and grain size. The total energy input during processing was correlated with the relative amount of each of the oxides in the disks: the higher the total processing energy input, the higher the relative amount of Y3Al5O12 precipitates. The elemental composition of the oxide precipitates was also probed individually by EDS, showing an aluminum enrichment trend as precipitates grew in size.

  11. Development of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel prepared by chemical reduction and mechanical milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Q. X.; Fang, Q. F.; Zhou, Y.; Xia, Y. P.; Zhang, T.; Wang, X. P.; Liu, C. S.

    2013-08-01

    The oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel with a nominal composition of Fe-14Cr-2W-0.5Ti-0.06Si-0.2V-0.1Mn-0.05Ta-0.03C-0.3Y2O3 (14Cr-ODS) was fabricated by sol-gel method in combination with hydrogen reduction, mechanical alloying (MA) and hot isostatic pressing (HIP) techniques. Pure Fe-1.5Y2O3 precursor was obtained by a sol-gel process and a reduction process at 650 °C for 3 h and pure 14Cr-ODS alloy powders were obtained from this precursor and the alloying metallic powders by mechanical alloying. The microstructure analysis investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) reveal that Y-Ti-O complexes and V-Ti-O complexes with a main particle size of 8 nm are formed in the 14Cr-ODS steel matrix. After HIP sintering the weight and the relative density of the compacted ingots are about 0.8 kg and 99.7%. The uniform elongation and ultimate tensile strength of the ODS steel obtained by HIP after annealing at 1100 °C for 5 h are about 13% and 840 MPa, respectively.

  12. Effects of heat treatment conditions on the microstructure and impact properties of EUROFER 97 ODS steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Martino, S. F.; Faulkner, R. G.; Riddle, N. B.; Monge, M. A.; Munoz, A.

    2011-12-01

    Probably the most important range of materials to consider for the blanket material in the tokamak design for fusion reactors such as ITER and DEMO is the high alloy Fe9Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels. These steels possess exceptional thermal conductivity and low thermal expansion while being strongly resistant to void swelling. Their main drawback is the high ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT), particularly in the ODS versions of the material. This paper describes attempts that are being made to reduce this DBTT in as yet unirradiated materials by a novel heat treatment procedure. The principle behind this approach is that low DBTT in the unirradiated materials will lead to relatively low DBTT even in He-containing material that has been irradiated with fusion blanket-type irradiations. New batches of high alloy Fe9Cr ODS (EUROFER) ferritic steel have been produced by a powder metallurgical route, and relatively homogeneous material has been produced by a hot isostatic pressing procedure. Mini-Charpy test specimens were made from materials that had been subjected to a matrix of heat treatments designed to show up variations in solution treatment (ST) temperature, cooling rate from the ST temperature and tempering treatment. The initial DBTT was in the range 150-200 °C. Extremely interesting results have been obtained. DBTT downward shifts of up to 200 °C have been observed by using a high 1300 °C ST temperature and a low cooling rate. The paper goes on to describe the microstructure of this material, and discusses the possible microstructural factors needed to produce these very high DBTT downward shifts. Low dissolved carbon and higher proportions of low-angle grain boundaries seem to provide the key to the understanding of the alloy behaviour.

  13. Release of deuterium from irradiation damage in Fe-9Cr-2W ferritic alloy irradiated with deuterium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, K.; Miyamoto, M.; Kudo, F.

    2014-09-01

    The release profile of deuterium from an Fe-9Cr-2W ferritic alloy irradiated with low-energy deuterium ions was studied by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) and in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was found that one sharp TDS peak appeared at a temperature around 410 K depending on the heating rate that ranged from 1.5 to 20 K/min. The TDS peak height increased with increasing fluence from 2 × 1019 to 2 × 1021 D+/m2 with no shift of the peak temperature. A close correlation between these TDS peaks and the disappearance of dislocation loops formed by the irradiation was observed. The effects of tiny bubbles on TDS were small. These results suggest that most of the deuterium was trapped by dislocation loops, which affected the thermal stability of dislocation loops in the alloy. The dependence of TDS peak temperature on the heating rate yielded an activation energy of 0.63 ± 0.02 eV for deuterium de-trapping from dislocation loops. The retention properties of the total amount of deuterium exhibited a tendency of saturation at values on the order of 1020 D+/m2, which corresponded to a saturation tendency of the loop density.

  14. Effect of tube processing methods on the texture and grain boundary characteristics of 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aydogan, E.; Pal, S.; Anderoglu, O.; Maloy, S. A.; Vogel, S. C.; Odette, G. R.; Lewandowski, J. J.; Hoelzer, D. T.; Anderson, I. E.; Rieken, J. R.

    2016-03-08

    In this paper, texture and microstructure of tubes and plates fabricated from a nanostructured ferritic alloy (14YWT), produced either by spray forming followed by hydrostatic extrusion (Process I) or hot extrusion and cross-rolling a plate followed by hydrostatic tube extrusion (Process II) have been characterized in terms of their effects on texture and grain boundary character. Hydrostatic extrusion results in a combination of plane strain and shear deformations which generate low intensity α- and γ-fiber components of {001}<110> and {111}<110> together with a weak ζ-fiber component of {011}<211> and {011}<011>. In contrast, multi-step plane strain deformation by hot extrusion andmore » cross-rolling of the plate leads to a strong texture component of {001}<110> together with a weaker {111}<112> component. Although the total strains are similar, shear dominated deformation leads to much lower texture indexes compared to plane strain deformations. Further, the texture intensity decreases after hydrostatic extrusion of the alloy plate formed by plane strain deformation, due to a lower number of activated slip systems during shear dominated deformation. Finally and notably, hot extruded and cross-rolled plate subjected to plane strain deformation to ~50% engineering strain creates only a modest population of low angle grain boundaries, compared to the much larger population observed following the combination of plane strain and shear deformation of ~44% engineering strain resulting from subsequent hydrostatic extrusion.« less

  15. Low temperature embrittlement behaviour of different ferritic-martensitic alloys for fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieth, M.; Dafferner, B.

    1996-10-01

    In the last few years a lot of different low activation CrWVTa steels have been developed world-wide. Without irradiation some of these alloys show clearly a better low temperature embrittlement behaviour than commercial CrNiMoV(Nb) alloys. Within the MANITU project a study was carried out to compare, prior to the irradiation program, the embrittlement behaviour of different alloys in the unirradiated condition performing instrumented Charpy impact bending tests with sub-size specimens. The low activation materials (LAM) considered were different OPTIFER alloys (Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe), F82H (JAERI), 9Cr2WVTa (ORNL), and GA3X (PNL). The modified commercial 10-11% CrNiMoVNb steels were MANET and OPTIMAR. A meaningful comparison between these alloys could be drawn, since the specimens of all materials were manufactured and tested under the same conditions.

  16. Modified ferritic iron alloys with improved high-temperature mechanical properties and oxidation resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldrieve, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    An alloy modification program was conducted in which the compositions of two existing Fe-Cr-Al alloys (Armco 18SR and GE-1541) were changed to achieve either improved high-temperature strength or improved fabricability. Only modifications of Armco 18SR were successful in achieving increased strength without loss of fabricability or oxidation resistance. The best modified alloy, designated NASA-18T, had twice the rupture strength of Armco 18SR at 800 and 1000 C. The NASA-18T alloy also had better oxidation resistance than Armco 18SR and comparable fabricability. The nominal composition of NASA-18T is Fe-18Cr-2Al-1Si-1.25Ta. All attempted modifications of the GE-1541 alloy were unsuccessful in terms of achieving better fabricability without sacrificing high-temperature strength and oxidation resistance.

  17. Epitaxial Fe/Y2O3 interfaces as a model system for oxide-dispersion-strengthened ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Bowden, Mark E.; Wang, Chong M.; Shutthanandan, V.; Overman, Nicole R.; Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Wirth, Brian D.; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2015-02-01

    The fundamental mechanisms underlying the superior radiation tolerance properties of oxide-dispersion-strengthened ferritic steels and nanostructured ferritic alloys are poorly understood. Thin film heterostructures of Fe/Y2O3 can serve as a model system for fundamental studies of radiation damage. Epitaxial thin films of Y2O3 were deposited by pulsed laser deposition on 8% Y:ZrO2 (YSZ) substrates with (100), (110), and (111) orientation. Metallic Fe was subsequently deposited by molecular beam epitaxy. Characterization by x-ray diffraction and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in the channeling geometry revealed a degree of epitaxial or axiotaxial ntation for Fe(211) deposited on Y2O3(110)/YSZ(110). In contrast, Fe on Y2O3(111)/YSZ(111) was fully polycrystalline, and Fe on Y2O3(100)/YSZ(100) exhibited out-of-plane texture in the [110] direction with little or no preferential in-plane orientation. Scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging of Fe(211)/Y2O3(110)/YSZ(110) revealed a strongly islanded morphology for the Fe film, with no epitaxial grains visible in the cross-sectional sample. Well-ordered Fe grains with no orientation to the underlying Y2O3 were observed. Well-ordered crystallites of Fe with both epitaxial and non-epitaxial orientations on Y2O3 are a promising model system for fundamental studies of radiation damage phenomena. This is illustrated with preliminary results of He bubble formation following implantation with a helium ion microscope. He bubble formation is shown to preferentially occur at the Fe/Y2O3 interface.

  18. Effect of Cr content on the nanostructural evolution of irradiated ferritic/martensitic alloys: An object kinetic Monte Carlo model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiapetto, M.; Malerba, L.; Becquart, C. S.

    2015-10-01

    Self-interstitial cluster diffusivity in Fe-Cr alloys, model materials for high-Cr ferritic/martensitic steels, is known to be reduced in a non-monotonic way as a function of Cr concentration: it first decreases, then increases. This non-monotonic behaviour is caused by a relatively long-ranged attractive interaction between Cr atoms and crowdions and correlates well with the experimentally observed swelling in these alloys under neutron irradiation, also seen to first decrease and then increase with increasing Cr content, under comparable irradiation conditions. Moreover, recent studies reveal that C atoms dispersed in the Fe matrix form under irradiation complexes with vacancies which, in turn, act as trap for one-dimensionally migrating self-interstitial clusters. The mobility of one-dimensional migrating clusters is considered key to determine swelling susceptibility. However, no model has ever been built that quantitatively describes the dependence of swelling on Cr content, allowing for the presence of C in the matrix. In this work we developed physically-based sets of parameters for object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) simulations intended to study the nanostructure evolution under irradiation in Fe-Cr-C alloys. The nanostructural evolution in Fe-C and in four Fe-Cr-C alloys (containing 2.5, 5, 9 and 12 wt.% Cr) neutron irradiated up to ∼0.6 dpa at 563 K was simulated according to the model and reference experiments were reproduced. Our model shows that the SIA cluster reduced mobility has a major influence on the nanostructural evolution: it increases the number of vacancy-SIA recombinations and thus leads to the suppression of voids formation. This provides a clear framework to interpret the non-monotonic dependence of swelling in Fe-Cr alloys versus Cr content. Our model also suggests that the amount of C in the matrix has an equally important role: high amounts of it may counteract the beneficial effect that Cr has in reducing swelling.

  19. Structure and elevated temperature properties of carbon-free ferritic alloys strengthened by a Laves phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhandarkar, M. D.; Zackay, V. F.; Parker, E. R.; Bhat, M. S.

    1975-01-01

    A Laves phase, Fe2Ta, was utilized to obtain good elevated temperature properties in a carbon-free iron alloy containing 1 at. pct Ta and 7 at. pct Cr. Room temperature embrittlement resulting from the precipitation of the Laves phase at grain boundaries was overcome by spheroidizing the precipitate. This was accomplished by thermally cycling the alloys through the alpha to gamma transformation. The short-time yield strength of the alloys decreased very slowly with increase in test temperature up to 600 C, but above this temperature, the strength decreased rapidly. Results of constant load creep and stress rupture tests conducted at several temperatures and stresses indicated that the rupture and creep strengths of spheroidized 1 Ta-7 Cr alloy were higher than those of several commercial steels containing chromium and/or molybdenum carbides but lower than those of steels containing substantial amounts of tungsten and vanadium. When molybdenum was added to the base Fe-Ta-Cr alloy, the rupture and creep strengths were considerably increased.

  20. Influence of hot rolling and high speed hydrostatic extrusion on the microstructure and mechanical properties of an ODS RAF steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksiuta, Z.; Lewandowska, M.; Kurzydlowski, K. J.; Baluc, N.

    2011-02-01

    An argon gas atomized, pre-alloyed Fe-14Cr-2W-0.3Ti (wt.%) reduced activation ferritic (RAF) steel powder was mechanically alloyed with 0.3wt.% Y 2O 3 nano-particles in an attritor ball mill and consolidated by hot isostatic pressing at 1150 °C under a pressure of 200 MPa for 3 h. In the aim to improve its mechanical properties the ODS steel was then submitted to a thermo-mechanical treatment (TMT): hot rolling (HR) at 850 °C or high speed hydrostatic extrusion (HSHE) at 900 °C, followed by heat treatment (HT). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations of the ODS alloys after TMT and heat treatment revealed the presence of elongated grains in the longitudinal direction, with an average width of 8 μm and an average length of 75 μm, and equiaxed grains, a few microns in diameter, in the transverse direction. Two populations of oxide particles were observed by TEM: large Ti-Al-O particles, up to 250 nm in diameter, usually located at the grain boundaries and small Y-Ti-O nanoclusters, about 2.5 nm in diameter, uniformly distributed in the matrix. Charpy impact tests revealed that the HSHE material exhibits a larger upper shelf energy (5.8 J) than the HR material (2.9 J). The ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of both alloys is relatively high, in the range of 55-72 °C. Tensile mechanical properties of both ODS alloys were found satisfactory over the full range of investigated temperatures (23-750 °C). The HSHE material exhibits better tensile strength and ductility than the HR material. These results indicate that HSHE can be considered as a promising TMT method for improving the mechanical properties of ODS RAF steels.

  1. Radiation-induced strengthening and absorption of dislocation loops in ferritic Fe-Cr alloys: the role of Cr segregation.

    PubMed

    Terentyev, D; Bakaev, A

    2013-07-01

    The understanding of radiation-induced strengthening in ferritic FeCr-based steels remains an essential issue in the assessment of materials for fusion and fission reactors. Both early and recent experimental works on Fe-Cr alloys reveal Cr segregation on radiation-induced nanostructural features (mainly dislocation loops), whose impact on the modification of the mechanical response of the material might be key for explaining quantitatively the radiation-induced strengthening in these alloys. In this work, we use molecular dynamics to study systematically the interaction of dislocations with 1/2<111> and <100> loops in all possible orientations, both enriched by Cr atoms and undecorated, for different temperatures, loop sizes and dislocation velocities. The configurations of the enriched loops have been obtained using a non-rigid lattice Monte Carlo method. The study reveals that Cr segregation influences the interaction mechanisms with both 1/2<111> and <100> loops. The overall effect of Cr enrichment is to penalize the mobility of intrinsically glissile 1/2<111> loops, modifying the reaction mechanisms as a result. The following three most important effects associated with Cr enrichment have been revealed: (i) absence of dynamic drag; (ii) suppression of complete absorption; (iii) enhanced strength of small dislocation loops (2 nm and smaller). Overall the effect of the Cr enrichment is therefore to increase the unpinning stress, so experimentally 'invisible' nanostructural features may also contribute to radiation-induced strengthening. The reasons for the modification of the mechanisms are explained and the impact of the loading conditions is discussed. PMID:23756468

  2. Development of High-Temperature Ferritic Alloys and Performance Prediction Methods for Advanced Fission Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    G. RObert Odette; Takuya Yamamoto

    2009-08-14

    Reports the results of a comprehensive development and analysis of a database on irradiation hardening and embrittlement of tempered martensitic steels (TMS). Alloy specific quantitative semi-empirical models were derived for the dpa dose, irradiation temperature (ti) and test (Tt) temperature of yield stress hardening (or softening) .

  3. Effect of ferrite formation on abnormal austenite grain coarsening in low-alloy steels during hot rolling process

    SciTech Connect

    Asahi, Hitoshi; Ueno, Masakatsu; Yagi, Akira

    1998-05-01

    Abnormal coarsening of austenite ({gamma}) grains occurred in low-alloy steels during a seamless pipe hot-rolling process. Often, the grains became several hundred micrometer in diameter. This made it difficult to apply direct quenching to produce high-performance pipes. The phenomenon of grain coarsening was successfully reproduced using a thermomechanical simulator, and the factors which affected grain coarsening were clarified. The mechanism was found to be basically strain-induced grain growth which occurred during reheating at around 930 C. Furthermore, once a pipe temperature decreased to the dual-phase region after the minimal hot working and prior to the reheating process, the grain coarsening was more pronounced. It was understood that the formation of ferrite along grain boundaries had the role of reducing the migration of grain boundaries into neighboring grains, leaving a strain-free, recrystallized region behind. This abnormal grain coarsening was found to be effectively prevented by an addition of Nb, the content of which varied depending on the C content. The effect of the Nb addition was confirmed by an in-line test.

  4. Gas- and plasma-driven hydrogen permeation through a reduced activation ferritic steel alloy F82H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Haishan; Hirooka, Yoshi; Ashikawa, Naoko; Muroga, Takeo; Sagara, Akio

    2014-12-01

    The first wall of a magnetic fusion power reactor will be subjected to hydrogen isotope permeation by the two mechanisms: one is gas-driven and the other is plasma-driven. Hydrogen transport through a reduced activation ferritic steel alloy F82H has been investigated using a steady-state laboratory-scale plasma device. Permeation parameters including permeability, solubility and diffusivity have been measured in the temperature range from 150 to 520 °C. The surface recombination coefficient for hydrogen has also been estimated by a one-dimensional steady-state permeation model with the input data taken from experiments. Using these parameters, the hydrogen plasma-driven permeation flux and inventory for a 0.5 cm thick first wall around 500 °C are estimated to be ∼1.0 × 1013 atom cm-2 s-1 and ∼2 × 1016 atom cm-3, respectively. Also, the implications of all these data on reactor operation are discussed.

  5. Characterization of neutron-irradiated ferritic model alloys and a RPV steel from combined APT, SANS, TEM and PAS analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meslin, E.; Lambrecht, M.; Hernández-Mayoral, M.; Bergner, F.; Malerba, L.; Pareige, P.; Radiguet, B.; Barbu, A.; Gómez-Briceño, D.; Ulbricht, A.; Almazouzi, A.

    2010-11-01

    Understanding the behavior of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels under irradiation is a mandatory task that has to be elucidated in order to be able to operate safely a nuclear power plant or to extend its lifetime. To build up predictive tools, a substantial experimental data base is needed at the nanometre scale to extract quantitative information on neutron-irradiated materials and to validate the theoretical models. To reach this experimental goal, ferritic model alloys and French RPV steel were neutron irradiated in a test reactor at an irradiation flux of 9 × 10 17 nm -2 s, doses from 0.18 to 1.3 × 10 24 nm -2 and 300 °C. The main goal of this paper is to report the characterization of the radiation-induced microstructural change in the materials by using the state-of-the-art of characterization techniques available in Europe at the nanometre scale. Possibilities, limitations and complementarities of the techniques to each other are highlighted.

  6. Effect of ferrite formation on abnormal austenite grain coarsening in low-alloy steels during the hot rolling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asahi, Hitoshi; Yagi, Akira; Ueno, Masakatsu

    1998-05-01

    Abnormal coarsening of austenite (γ) grains occurred in low-alloy steels during a seamless pipe hotrolling process. Often, the grains became several hundred micrometers in diameter. This made it difficult to apply direct quenching to produce high-performance pipes. The phenomenon of grain coarsening was successfully reproduced using a thermomechanical simulator, and the factors which affected grain coarsening were clarified. The mechanism was found to be basically strain-induced grain rowth which occurred during reheating at around 930 °C. Furthermore, once a pipe temperature decreased to the dual-phase region after the minimal hot working and prior to the reheating process, the grain coarsening was more pronounced. It was understood that the formation of ferrite along grain boundaries had the role of reducing the migration of grain boundaries into neighboring grains, leaving a strain-free, recrystallized region behind. This abnormal grain coarsening was found to be effectively prevented by an addition of Nb, the content of which varied depending on the C content. The effect of the Nb addition was confirmed by an in-line test.

  7. Ab Initio Investigation of He Bubbles at the Y2Ti2O7-Fe Interface in Nanostructured Ferritic Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, Thomas; Tea, Eric; Hin, Celine

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys are promising materials candidates for the next generation of nuclear reactors due to their ability to withstand high temperatures, high pressures, high neutron flux and especially, the presence of high concentrations of transmutation product helium. As helium diffuses through the matrix, large number densities of complex oxide nanoclusters, namely Y2Ti2O7, Y2O3 and Y2TiO5, act as trapping sites for individual helium atoms and helium clusters. Consequently, there is a significant decrease in the amount of helium that reaches grain boundaries, mitigating the threat of pressurized bubble formation and embrittlement. In order to understand the helium trapping mechanisms of the oxides at a fundamental level, the interface between the nanoclusters and the iron matrix must be modeled. We present results obtained using density functional theory on the Y2Ti2O7-Fe interface where the structure has been modeled based on experimental observations. Helium has been added along the interface in order to investigate the influence of helium on the structure and to obtain thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of helium along the interface.

  8. Effects of proton irradiation on nanocluster precipitation in ferritic steel containing fcc alloying additions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhongwu; Liu, C T; Wang, Xun-Li; Miller, Michael K; Ma, Dong; Chen, Guang; Williams, J R; Chin, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    Newly-developed precipitate-strengthened ferritic steels with and without pre-existing nanoscale precipitates were irradiated with 4 MeV protons to a dose of ~5 mdpa at 50 C and subsequently examined by nanoindentation and atom probe tomography (APT). Irradiation-enhanced precipitation and coarsening of pre-existing nanoscale precipitates were observed. Copper partitions to the precipitate core along with a segregation of Ni, Al and Mn to the precipitate/matrix interface after both thermal aging and proton irradiation. Proton irradiation induces the precipitation reaction and coarsening of pre-existing nanoscale precipitates, and these results are similar to a thermal aging process. The precipitation and coarsening of nanoscale precipitates are responsible for the changes in hardness. The observation of the radiation-induced softening is essentially due to the coarsening of the pre-existing Cu-rich nanoscale precipitates. The implication of the precipitation on the embrittlement of reactor-pressure-vessel steels after irradiation is discussed.

  9. Dual and Triple Ion-Beam Irradiations of Fe, Fe(Cr) and Fe(Cr)-ODS Final Report: IAEA SMoRE CRP

    SciTech Connect

    Fluss, M J; Hsiung, L L; Marian, J

    2011-11-20

    Structures of nanoparticles in Fe-16Cr-4.5Al-0.3Ti-2W-0.37Y2O3 (K3) and Fe-20Cr-4.5Al-0.34Ti-0.5Y2O3 (MA956) oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels produced by mechanical alloying (MA) and followed by hot extrusion have been studied using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques to gain insight about the formation mechanism of nanoparticles in MA/ODS steels. The observations of Y-Al-O complex-oxide nanoparticles in both ODS steels imply that decomposition of Y2O3 in association with internal oxidation of Al occurred during mechanical alloying. While the majority of oxide nanoparticles formed in both steels is Y4Al2O9, a few oxide particles of YAlO3 are also occasionally observed. These results reveal that Ti (0.3 wt %) plays an insignificant role in forming oxide nanoparticles in the presence of Al (4.5 wt %). HRTEM observations of crystalline nanoparticles larger than {approx}2 nm and amorphous or disordered cluster domains smaller than {approx}2 nm provide an insight into the formation mechanism of oxide nanoparticle in MA/ODS steels, which we believe from our observations involves a solid-state amorphous precursor followed by recrystallization. Dual ion-beam irradiations using He{sup +} + Fe{sup +8} ions were employed to gain more detailed insight about the role of nanoparticles in suppressing radiation-induced swelling. This is elaborated through TEM examinations of cavity distributions in ion-irradiated Fe-14Cr and K3-ODS ferritic steels. HRTEM observations of helium-filled cavities (helium bubbles) preferably trapped at nanoscale oxide particles and clusters in ion-irradiated K3-ODS are presented. Finally, we describe the results from triple ion-beam irradiations using H{sup +} + He{sup +} + Fe{sup +8} ions to emulate fusion first wall radiation effects. Preliminary work is reported that confirms the existence of significant hydrogen synergistic effects described earlier by Tanaka et al., for Fe(Cr) and by Wakai et al

  10. Comparison of fracture behavior for low-swelling ferritic and austenitic alloys irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) to 180 DPA

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, F.H.

    1992-02-01

    Fracture toughness testing was conducted to investigate the radiation embrittlement of high-nickel superalloys, modified austenitic steels and ferritic steels. These materials have been experimentally proven to possess excellent resistance to void swelling after high neutron exposures. In addition to swelling resistance, post-irradiation fracture resistance is another important criterion for reactor material selection. By means of fracture mechanics techniques the fracture behavior of those highly irradiated alloys was characterized in terms of irradiation and test conditions. Precipitation-strengthened alloys failed by channel fracture with very low postirradiation ductility. The fracture toughness of titanium-modified austenitic stainless steel D9 deteriorates with increasing fluence to about 100 displacement per atom (dpa), the fluence level at which brittle fracture appears to occur. Ferritic steels such as HT9 are the most promising candidate materials for fast and fusion reactor applications. The upper-shelf fracture toughness of alloy HT9 remained adequate after irradiation to 180 dpa although its ductile- brittle transition temperature (DBTT) shift by low temperature irradiation rendered the material susceptible to brittle fracture at room temperature. Understanding the fracture characteristics under various irradiation and test conditions helps reduce the potential for brittle fracture by permitting appropriate measure to be taken.