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Sample records for ferroelastic domain walls

  1. Mesoscopic Metal-Insulator Transition at Ferroelastic Domain Walls in VO2

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Keith M; Kalinin, Sergei V; Kolmakov, Andrei; Luk'yanchuk, Prof. Igor A.; Meunier, Vincent; Proksch, Roger; Shelton Jr, William Allison; Strelcov, Evgheni; Tselev, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    The novel phenomena induced by symmetry breaking at homointerfaces between ferroic variants in ferroelectric and ferroelastic materials have attracted recently much attention. Using variable temperature scanning microwave microscopy, we demonstrate the mesoscopic strain-induced metal-insulator phase transitions in the vicinity of ferroelastic domain walls in the semiconductive VO2 that nucleated at temperatures as much as 10-12 C below bulk transition, resulting in the formation of conductive channels in the material. Density functional theory is used to rationalize the process low activation energy. This behavior, linked to the strain inhomogeneity inherent in ferroelastic materials, can strongly affect interpretation of phase-transition studies in VO2 and similar materials with symmetry-lowering transitions, and can also be used to enable new generations of electronic devices though strain engineering of conductive and semiconductive regions.

  2. Highly mobile ferroelastic domain walls in compositionally graded ferroelectric thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agar, J. C.; Damodaran, A. R.; Okatan, M. B.; Kacher, J.; Gammer, C.; Vasudevan, R. K.; Pandya, S.; Dedon, L. R.; Mangalam, R. V. K.; Velarde, G. A.; Jesse, S.; Balke, N.; Minor, A. M.; Kalinin, S. V.; Martin, L. W.

    2016-05-01

    Domains and domain walls are critical in determining the response of ferroelectrics, and the ability to controllably create, annihilate, or move domains is essential to enable a range of next-generation devices. Whereas electric-field control has been demonstrated for ferroelectric 180° domain walls, similar control of ferroelastic domains has not been achieved. Here, using controlled composition and strain gradients, we demonstrate deterministic control of ferroelastic domains that are rendered highly mobile in a controlled and reversible manner. Through a combination of thin-film growth, transmission-electron-microscopy-based nanobeam diffraction and nanoscale band-excitation switching spectroscopy, we show that strain gradients in compositionally graded PbZr1-xTixO3 heterostructures stabilize needle-like ferroelastic domains that terminate inside the film. These needle-like domains are highly labile in the out-of-plane direction under applied electric fields, producing a locally enhanced piezoresponse. This work demonstrates the efficacy of novel modes of epitaxy in providing new modalities of domain engineering and potential for as-yet-unrealized nanoscale functional devices.

  3. Highly mobile ferroelastic domain walls in compositionally graded ferroelectric thin films.

    PubMed

    Agar, J C; Damodaran, A R; Okatan, M B; Kacher, J; Gammer, C; Vasudevan, R K; Pandya, S; Dedon, L R; Mangalam, R V K; Velarde, G A; Jesse, S; Balke, N; Minor, A M; Kalinin, S V; Martin, L W

    2016-05-01

    Domains and domain walls are critical in determining the response of ferroelectrics, and the ability to controllably create, annihilate, or move domains is essential to enable a range of next-generation devices. Whereas electric-field control has been demonstrated for ferroelectric 180° domain walls, similar control of ferroelastic domains has not been achieved. Here, using controlled composition and strain gradients, we demonstrate deterministic control of ferroelastic domains that are rendered highly mobile in a controlled and reversible manner. Through a combination of thin-film growth, transmission-electron-microscopy-based nanobeam diffraction and nanoscale band-excitation switching spectroscopy, we show that strain gradients in compositionally graded PbZr1-xTixO3 heterostructures stabilize needle-like ferroelastic domains that terminate inside the film. These needle-like domains are highly labile in the out-of-plane direction under applied electric fields, producing a locally enhanced piezoresponse. This work demonstrates the efficacy of novel modes of epitaxy in providing new modalities of domain engineering and potential for as-yet-unrealized nanoscale functional devices. PMID:26878312

  4. Highly mobile ferroelastic domain walls in compositionally graded ferroelectric thin films

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Damodaran, Anoop; Okatan, M. B.; Kacher, J.; Gammer, C.; Vasudevan, Rama; Pandya, S.; Dedon, L. R.; Mangalam, R. V.; Jesse, Stephen; Balke, Nina; et al

    2016-02-15

    Domains and domain walls are critical in determining the response of ferroelectrics, and the ability to controllably create, annihilate, or move domains is essential to enable a range of next-generation devices. Whereas electric-field control has been demonstrated for ferroelectric 180° domain walls, similar control of ferroelastic domains has not been achieved. Here, using controlled composition and strain gradients, we demonstrate deterministic control of ferroelastic domains that are rendered highly mobile in a controlled and reversible manner. Through a combination of thin-film growth, transmission-electron-microscopy-based nanobeam diffraction and nanoscale band-excitation switching spectroscopy, we show that strain gradients in compositionally graded PbZr1-xTixO3 heterostructuresmore » stabilize needle-like ferroelastic domains that terminate inside the film. These needle-like domains are highly labile in the out-of-plane direction under applied electric fields, producing a locally enhanced piezoresponse. This work demonstrates the efficacy of novel modes of epitaxy in providing new modalities of domain engineering and potential for as-yet-unrealized nanoscale functional devices.« less

  5. Asymmetric Response of Ferroelastic Domain-Wall Motion under Applied Bias.

    PubMed

    Jablonski, Michael L; Liu, Shi; Winkler, Christopher R; Damodaran, Anoop R; Grinberg, Ilya; Martin, Lane W; Rappe, Andrew M; Taheri, Mitra L

    2016-02-10

    The switching of domains in ferroelectric and multiferroic materials plays a central role in their application to next-generation computer systems, sensing applications, and memory storage. A detailed understanding of the response to electric fields and the switching behavior in the presence of complex domain structures and extrinsic effects (e.g., defects and dislocations) is crucial for the design of improved ferroelectrics. In this work, in situ transmission electron microscopy is coupled with atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to explore the response of 71° ferroelastic domain walls in BiFeO3 with various orientations under applied electric-field excitation. We observe that 71° domain walls can have intrinsically asymmetric responses to opposing biases. In particular, when the electric field has a component normal to the domain wall, forward and backward domain-wall velocities can be dramatically different for equal and opposite fields. Additionally, the presence of defects and dislocations can strongly affect the local switching behaviors through pinning or nucleation of the domain walls. These results offer insight for controlled ferroelastic domain manipulation via electric-field engineering. PMID:26695346

  6. Ferroelectric/Ferroelastic domain wall motion in dense and porous tetragonal lead zirconate titanate films.

    PubMed

    Johnson-Wilke, Raegan L; Wilke, Rudeger H T; Wallace, Margeaux; Rajashekhar, Adarsh; Esteves, Giovanni; Merritt, Zachary; Jones, Jacob L; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Direct evidence of ferroelectric/ferroelastic domain reorientation is shown in Pb(Zr0.30Ti0.70)O3 (PZT30/70) thin films clamped to a rigid silicon substrate using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction during application of electric fields. Both dense films and films with 3 to 4 vol% porosity were measured. On application of electric fields exceeding the coercive field, it is shown that the porous films exhibit a greater volume fraction of ferroelastic domain reorientation (approximately 12 vol% of domains reorient at 3 times the coercive field, Ec) relative to the dense films (~3.5 vol% at 3Ec). Furthermore, the volume fraction of domain reorientation significantly exceeded that predicted by linear mixing rules. The high response of domain reorientation in porous films is discussed in the context of two mechanisms: local enhancement of the electric field near the pores and a reduction of substrate clamping resulting from the lowering of the film stiffness as a result of the porosity. Similar measurements during weak-field (subcoercive) amplitudes showed 0.6% volume fraction of domains reoriented for the porous films, which demonstrates that extrinsic effects contribute to the dielectric and piezoelectric properties. PMID:25585389

  7. Application of real-time, stroboscopic x-ray diffraction with dynamical mechanical analysis to characterize the motion of ferroelastic domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Richard J.; Redfern, Simon A. T.; Buckley, Andrew; Salje, Ekhard K. H.

    2004-02-01

    The dynamic response of ferroelastic twins to an alternating stress has been studied in situ at high temperature using a stroboscopic x-ray diffractometer and combined dynamical mechanical analyzer (XRD-DMA). The XRD-DMA is designed to allow x-ray rocking curves to be collected while the sample is undergoing simultaneous dynamical mechanical analysis in three-point-bend geometry. The detection of diffracted x-rays is synchronized with the applied load, so that rocking curves corresponding to different parts of the dynamic load cycle can be obtained separately. The technique is applied to single-crystal LaAlO3, which undergoes a cubic to rhombohedral phase transition at 550 °C, leading to the generation of characteristic "chevron" twins. The rocking-curve topology is calculated as a function of crystal orientation for each chevron type. Systematic changes in the rocking curves during heating and cooling under dynamic load demonstrate a clear preference for chevrons containing {100}pc walls perpendicular to the sample surface and {110}pc walls oriented at 45° to the sample surface. These domain walls are oriented favorably with respect to the applied stress (i.e., they separate domains with contrasting components of spontaneous strain parallel to the sample length). Below 200 °C, the superelastic strain is accommodated by rapid advancement/retraction of vertical {100}pc needle domains, with little effect on the dynamic rocking curves. Above 200 °C, a dynamic shift in peak position between rocking curves measured at the maximum and minimum applied loads is detected. The onset of a dynamic response correlates with the loss of the {100}pc needle domains and the transformation of the microstructure to 45° {110}pc walls. Superelastic strain is then accommodated by domain wall displacement/rotation, causing the wall to sweep back and forth across the x-ray beam and diffraction to occur from alternate domains at the maximum and minimum points of the stress cycle. A

  8. Inhomogeneous rotation in ferroelastic domain patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, A. E.; Curnoe, S. H.; Desai, R. C.

    2004-03-01

    We study static, two-dimensional domain patterns obtained by numerical minimization of the strain energy for proper triangular→centered-rectangular (T-CR) and square→rectangular ferroelastics. Applications are made to hexagonal→orthorhombic and related materials (lead orthovanadate, Mg_3Cd, Ta_4N, etc) and YBa_2Cu_3O_7-δ. Examinatin of the local rotation, the local energy density and the non-order-parameter strains reveals wedge and other disclinations responsible for the complexity of the patterns. The rotation might be observed in birefringence imaging. We report also unusual structures obtained near Tc in T-CR systems, including trapped high-T phase and pencil-like domains.

  9. Effect of ferroelastic twin walls on local polarization switching: Phase-field modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, S.; Zhang, J. X.; Li, Y. L.; Chen, L. Q.; Jia, Q. X.; Kalinin, S. V.

    2008-10-01

    Local polarization switching in epitaxial ferroelectric thin films in the presence of ferroelastic domain walls was studied using phase-field approach. The nucleation bias profile across a twin wall was analyzed, and the localization of preferential nucleation sites was established. This analysis was further extended to a realistic domain structure with multiple twin boundaries. It was observed that the local nucleation voltage required for a 180° domain switching is closely related to the number of such local defects.

  10. Effect of ferroelastic twin walls on local polarizations switching - phase field modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Quanzi; Choudhury, S; Zhang, J X; Li, Y L; Chen, Q; Kalinin, S V

    2008-01-01

    Local polarization switching in epitaxial ferroelectric thin films in the presence of ferroelastic domain walls was studied using phase-field approach. The nucleation bias profile across a twin wall was analyzed, and the localization of preferential nucleation sites was established. This analysis was further extended to a realistic domain structure with multiple twin boundaries. It was observed that the local nucleation voltage required for a 180{sup o} domain switching is closely related to the number of such local defects.

  11. Dynamics of ferroelastic domains in ferroelectric thin films.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, V; Roytburd, A; Stanishevsky, A; Prasertchoung, S; Zhao, T; Chen, L; Melngailis, J; Auciello, O; Ramesh, R

    2003-01-01

    Dynamics of domain interfaces in a broad range of functional thin-film materials is an area of great current interest. In ferroelectric thin films, a significantly enhanced piezoelectric response should be observed if non-180 degrees domain walls were to switch under electric field excitation. However, in continuous thin films they are clamped by the substrate, and therefore their contribution to the piezoelectric response is limited. In this paper we show that when the ferroelectric layer is patterned into discrete islands using a focused ion beam, the clamping effect is significantly reduced, thereby facilitating the movement of ferroelastic walls. Piezo-response scanning force microscopy images of such islands in PbZr0.2Ti0.8O3 thin films clearly point out that the 90 degrees domain walls can move. Capacitors 1 microm2 show a doubling of the remanent polarization at voltages higher than approximately 15 V, associated with 90 degrees domain switching, coupled with a d33 piezoelectric coefficient of approximately 250 pm V-1 at remanence, which is approximately three times the predicted value of 87 pm V-1 for a single domain single crystal. PMID:12652672

  12. Twinning, Epitaxy and Domain Switching in Ferroelastic Inclusion Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollingsworth, Mark D.; Peterson, Matthew L.

    2003-01-01

    Our research is in the area of solid-state organic chemistry, which lies at the interface between physical organic chemistry and materials science. We use crystalline solids as models to probe fundamental issues about physical processes, molecular interactions and chemical reactions that are important for fabrication, stabilization and application of technological materials. Much of our most recent work has focused on the phenomena of ferroelastic and ferroelectric domain switching, in which application of an external force or electric field to a crystal causes the molecules inside the crystal to reorient, in tandem, to a new orientational state. To better understand and control the domain switching process, we have designed and synthesized over twenty closely related, ferroelastic organic crystals. Our approach has been to use crystalline inclusion compounds, in which one molecule (the guest) is trapped within the crystalline framework of a second molecule (the host). By keeping the host constant and varying the proportions and kinds of guests, it has been possible to tailor these materials so that domain switching is rapid and reversible (which is desirable for high technology applications). Inclusion compounds therefore serve as powerful systems for understanding the specific molecular mechanisms that control domain switching.

  13. Anomalous Electronic Anisotropy Triggered by Ferroelastic Coupling in Multiferroic Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Ju, Changcheng; Yang, Jan-Chi; Luo, Cheng; Shafer, Padraic; Liu, Heng-Jui; Huang, Yen-Lin; Kuo, Ho-Hung; Xue, Fei; Luo, Chih-Wei; He, Qing; Yu, Pu; Arenholz, Elke; Chen, Long-Qing; Zhu, Jinsong; Lu, Xiaomei; Chu, Ying-Hao

    2016-02-01

    The ferroelastic strain coupling in multiferroic heterostructures is explored aiming at novel physical effects and fascinating functionality. Ferroelastic domain walls in manganites induced by a stripe BiFeO3 template can modulate the electronic transfer and sufficiently block the magnetic ordering, creating a vast anisotropy. The findings suggest the great importance of ferroelastic strain engineering in material modifications. PMID:26640119

  14. Domain structure and magnetic resonance studies of ferroelastic BiVO4 revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choh, Sung Ho; Jang, Min Su

    2016-04-01

    Bismuth vanadate (BiVO4) is a ferroelastic material undergoing a reversible second order phase transition at 528 K(T c) between the tetragonal and monoclinic structure. There have been experimental studies on the incommensurate domain wall (W‧) which reported different orientation angles. In order to clarify this we have tried to calculate it numerically in terms of lattice constants above and below T c by employing the theory of Sapriel, and obtained it to be either 35.9° or 54.1°. It also turns out that the shear strain (S 21) in the ferroelastic phase depends on the crystal growing condition. The remaining internal stress appears to be responsible for the formation of W‧ wall. The host atom nuclear magnetic resonance and the S-state impurity electron magnetic resonance are also reviewed. The nuclear electric quadrupole interaction of 51V and 209Bi in BiVO4 was evaluated in terms of the point charge model based on the crystal structure. The result of electric field gradient tensor turns out to be reasonable with experimental values. The zero-field splitting tensor of Mn2+, Fe3+ and Gd3+ are also compared, and the deduced local environment of these ions in the host are confirmed. Finally the second-order phase transition according to the Landau’s framework is found in this crystal from the temperature dependence of magnetic resonance parameters. Supported by The National Academy of Sciences, Republic of Korea (2014) through SHC.

  15. Local electrical control of magnetic order and orientation by ferroelastic domain arrangements just above room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, L. C.; Cherifi, R. O.; Ivanovskaya, V.; Zobelli, A.; Infante, I. C.; Jacquet, E.; Guiblin, N.; Ünal, A. A.; Kronast, F.; Dkhil, B.; Barthélémy, A.; Bibes, M.; Valencia, S.

    2015-01-01

    Ferroic materials (ferromagnetic, ferroelectric, ferroelastic) usually divide into domains with different orientations of their order parameter. Coupling between different ferroic systems creates new functionalities, for instance the electrical control of macroscopic magnetic properties including magnetization and coercive field. Here we show that ferroelastic domains can be used to control both magnetic order and magnetization direction at the nanoscale with a voltage. We use element-specific X-ray imaging to map the magnetic domains as a function of temperature and voltage in epitaxial FeRh on ferroelastic BaTiO3. Exploiting the nanoscale phase-separation of FeRh, we locally interconvert between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic states with a small electric field just above room temperature. Imaging and ab initio calculations show the antiferromagnetic phase of FeRh is favoured by compressive strain on c-oriented BaTiO3 domains, and the resultant magnetoelectric coupling is larger and more reversible than previously reported from macroscopic measurements. Our results emphasize the importance of nanoscale ferroic domain structure and the promise of first-order transition materials to achieve enhanced coupling in artificial multiferroics. PMID:25969926

  16. Local electrical control of magnetic order and orientation by ferroelastic domain arrangements just above room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, L. C.; Cherifi, R. O.; Ivanovskaya, V.; Zobelli, A.; Infante, I. C.; Jacquet, E.; Guiblin, N.; Ünal, A. A.; Kronast, F.; Dkhil, B.; Barthélémy, A.; Bibes, M.; Valencia, S.

    2015-05-01

    Ferroic materials (ferromagnetic, ferroelectric, ferroelastic) usually divide into domains with different orientations of their order parameter. Coupling between different ferroic systems creates new functionalities, for instance the electrical control of macroscopic magnetic properties including magnetization and coercive field. Here we show that ferroelastic domains can be used to control both magnetic order and magnetization direction at the nanoscale with a voltage. We use element-specific X-ray imaging to map the magnetic domains as a function of temperature and voltage in epitaxial FeRh on ferroelastic BaTiO3. Exploiting the nanoscale phase-separation of FeRh, we locally interconvert between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic states with a small electric field just above room temperature. Imaging and ab initio calculations show the antiferromagnetic phase of FeRh is favoured by compressive strain on c-oriented BaTiO3 domains, and the resultant magnetoelectric coupling is larger and more reversible than previously reported from macroscopic measurements. Our results emphasize the importance of nanoscale ferroic domain structure and the promise of first-order transition materials to achieve enhanced coupling in artificial multiferroics.

  17. Local electrical control of magnetic order and orientation by ferroelastic domain arrangements just above room temperature.

    PubMed

    Phillips, L C; Cherifi, R O; Ivanovskaya, V; Zobelli, A; Infante, I C; Jacquet, E; Guiblin, N; Ünal, A A; Kronast, F; Dkhil, B; Barthélémy, A; Bibes, M; Valencia, S

    2015-01-01

    Ferroic materials (ferromagnetic, ferroelectric, ferroelastic) usually divide into domains with different orientations of their order parameter. Coupling between different ferroic systems creates new functionalities, for instance the electrical control of macroscopic magnetic properties including magnetization and coercive field. Here we show that ferroelastic domains can be used to control both magnetic order and magnetization direction at the nanoscale with a voltage. We use element-specific X-ray imaging to map the magnetic domains as a function of temperature and voltage in epitaxial FeRh on ferroelastic BaTiO3. Exploiting the nanoscale phase-separation of FeRh, we locally interconvert between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic states with a small electric field just above room temperature. Imaging and ab initio calculations show the antiferromagnetic phase of FeRh is favoured by compressive strain on c-oriented BaTiO3 domains, and the resultant magnetoelectric coupling is larger and more reversible than previously reported from macroscopic measurements. Our results emphasize the importance of nanoscale ferroic domain structure and the promise of first-order transition materials to achieve enhanced coupling in artificial multiferroics. PMID:25969926

  18. Moving Towards Domain Wall Devices in Ferroics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, Marty

    Domain walls in ferroelectric, ferroelastic and multiferroic oxides are distinct functional materials in their own right. They can be conducting, or even superconducting, when surrounding domains are insulating; they can demonstrate magnetism when the surrounding bulk is non-magnetic and they can contain ordered electrical dipoles when the matrix containing them is non-polar. Since domain walls can also be created, destroyed, and controllably moved from place to place, there is an amazing opportunity for us to design new forms of devices in which functionality is actively and dynamically deployed (now you see it; now you don't). This is the essence of the emerging field known as ``domain wall nanoelectronics''. In time, this arena of research could change the way we think of nanoscale functional devices, moving increasingly towards agile circuitry and neuromorphic device architectures. While the control of domain wall injection, movement and annihilation has been developed rather well in the nanomagnetics community (in race-track and domain wall logic research), similar research has not been widely performed in nanoscale ferroelectrics, ferroelastics and multiferroics. This talk will discuss progress that has been made to date and the way in which nanomagnetics research can be used as a source of inspiration. Site-specific domain wall injection and motion control in both proper and improper ferroelectrics using inhomogeneous electric and elastic fields, as well as dielectric patterning in uniaxial ferroelectrics, will be specifically considered. As will be shown, sufficient control has been developed to allow the creation of a diode for domain wall motion in ferroelectrics, for example. The author acknowledges support from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

  19. Post-deposition control of ferroelastic stripe domains and internal electric field by thermal treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Feigl, L.; Iwanowska, M.; Sandu, C. S.; Setter, N.; Janolin, P.-E.; Yamada, T.

    2015-01-19

    The dependence of the formation of ferroelastic stripe domain patterns on the thermal history is investigated by detailed piezoresponse force microscopy and X-ray diffraction experiments after and during annealing of tensile strained tetragonal Pb(Ti,Zr)O{sub 3} epitaxial thin films on DyScO{sub 3} substrates. In particular, the ferroelastic pattern is reversibly interchanged between a cross-hatched and a stripe domain pattern if the films are cooled at different rates after annealing above the formation temperature of a-domains. Different types of 180° and non-180° patterns can be created, depending on the thermal treatment. The changes in the 180° domain structure and lattice parameters are attributed to a change of oxygen vacancy concentration, which results in a modification of the internal electric field and unit cell size, causing also a shift of T{sub C}. Thermal treatment is done on rhombohedral La:BiFeO{sub 3} thin films as well. It is observed that also in these films, appropriate heat treatment modifies the domain pattern and films with a stripe domain pattern can be created, confirming the general validity of the developed model.

  20. Post-deposition control of ferroelastic stripe domains and internal electric field by thermal treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigl, L.; Janolin, P.-E.; Yamada, T.; Iwanowska, M.; Sandu, C. S.; Setter, N.

    2015-01-01

    The dependence of the formation of ferroelastic stripe domain patterns on the thermal history is investigated by detailed piezoresponse force microscopy and X-ray diffraction experiments after and during annealing of tensile strained tetragonal Pb(Ti,Zr)O3 epitaxial thin films on DyScO3 substrates. In particular, the ferroelastic pattern is reversibly interchanged between a cross-hatched and a stripe domain pattern if the films are cooled at different rates after annealing above the formation temperature of a-domains. Different types of 180° and non-180° patterns can be created, depending on the thermal treatment. The changes in the 180° domain structure and lattice parameters are attributed to a change of oxygen vacancy concentration, which results in a modification of the internal electric field and unit cell size, causing also a shift of TC. Thermal treatment is done on rhombohedral La:BiFeO3 thin films as well. It is observed that also in these films, appropriate heat treatment modifies the domain pattern and films with a stripe domain pattern can be created, confirming the general validity of the developed model.

  1. Hydrodynamics of domain walls in ferroelectrics and multiferroics: Impact on memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, J. F.; Evans, D. M.; Gregg, J. M.; Gruverman, A.

    2016-07-01

    The standard "Kittel Law" for the thickness and shape of ferroelectric, ferroelastic, or ferromagnet domains assumes mechanical equilibrium. The present paper shows that such domains may be highly nonequilibrium, with unusual thicknesses and shapes. In lead germanate and multiferroic lead zirconate titanate iron tantalate domain wall instabilities resemble hydrodynamics (Richtmyer-Meshkov and Helfrich-Hurault, respectively).

  2. Electric-field-driven dynamics of magnetic domain walls in magnetic nanowires patterned on ferroelectric domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van de Wiele, Ben; Leliaert, Jonathan; Franke, Kévin J. A.; van Dijken, Sebastiaan

    2016-03-01

    Strong coupling of magnetic domain walls onto straight ferroelastic boundaries of a ferroelectric layer enables full and reversible electric-field control of magnetic domain wall motion. In this paper, the dynamics of this new driving mechanism is analyzed using micromagnetic simulations. We show that transverse domain walls with a near-180° spin structure are stabilized in magnetic nanowires and that electric fields can move these walls with high velocities. Above a critical velocity, which depends on material parameters, nanowire geometry and the direction of domain wall motion, the magnetic domain walls depin abruptly from the ferroelastic boundaries. Depinning evolves either smoothly or via the emission and annihilation of a vortex or antivortex core (Walker breakdown). In both cases, the magnetic domain wall slows down after depinning in an oscillatory fashion and eventually comes to a halt. The simulations provide design rules for hybrid ferromagnetic-ferroelectric domain-wall-based devices and indicate that material disorder and structural imperfections only influence Walker-breakdown-like depinning at high domain wall velocities.

  3. Ferroelasticity and domain physics in two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenbin; Li, Ju

    2016-01-01

    Monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides can exist in several structural polymorphs, including 2H, 1T and 1T'. The low-symmetry 1T' phase has three orientation variants, resulting from the three equivalent directions of Peierls distortion in the parental 1T phase. Using first-principles calculations, we predict that mechanical strain can switch the relative thermodynamic stability between the orientation variants of the 1T' phase. We find that such strain-induced variant switching only requires a few percent elastic strain, which is eminently achievable experimentally with transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers. Calculations indicate that the transformation barrier associated with such variant switching is small (<0.2 eV per chemical formula unit), suggesting that strain-induced variant switching can happen under laboratory conditions. Monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides with 1T' structure therefore have the potential to be ferroelastic and shape memory materials with interesting domain physics. PMID:26906152

  4. Ferroelasticity and domain physics in two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenbin; Li, Ju

    2016-01-01

    Monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides can exist in several structural polymorphs, including 2H, 1T and 1T′. The low-symmetry 1T′ phase has three orientation variants, resulting from the three equivalent directions of Peierls distortion in the parental 1T phase. Using first-principles calculations, we predict that mechanical strain can switch the relative thermodynamic stability between the orientation variants of the 1T′ phase. We find that such strain-induced variant switching only requires a few percent elastic strain, which is eminently achievable experimentally with transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers. Calculations indicate that the transformation barrier associated with such variant switching is small (<0.2 eV per chemical formula unit), suggesting that strain-induced variant switching can happen under laboratory conditions. Monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides with 1T′ structure therefore have the potential to be ferroelastic and shape memory materials with interesting domain physics. PMID:26906152

  5. Ferroelasticity and domain physics in two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Wenbin; Li, Ju

    2016-02-24

    Monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides can exist in several structural polymorphs, including 2H, 1T and 1T'. The low-symmetry 1T' phase has three orientation variants, resulting from the three equivalent directions of Peierls distortion in the parental 1T phase. Using first-principles calculations, we predict that mechanical strain can switch the relative thermodynamic stability between the orientation variants of the 1T' phase. We find that such strain-induced variant switching only requires a few percent elastic strain, which is eminently achievable experimentally with transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers. Calculations indicate that the transformation barrier associated with such variant switching is small (<0.2 eV permore » chemical formula unit), suggesting that strain-induced variant switching can happen under laboratory conditions. Furthermore, monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides with 1T' structure therefore have the potential to be ferroelastic and shape memory materials with interesting domain physics.« less

  6. Domain wall filters

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Oliver; Narayanan, Rajamani; Neuberger, Herbert; Witzel, Oliver

    2007-03-15

    We propose using the extra dimension separating the domain walls carrying lattice quarks of opposite handedness to gradually filter out the ultraviolet fluctuations of the gauge fields that are felt by the fermionic excitations living in the bulk. This generalization of the homogeneous domain wall construction has some theoretical features that seem nontrivial.

  7. Impact of pulse poling on static and dynamic ferroelastic-domain contributions in tetragonal Pb(Ti, Zr)O{sub 3} films determined by in-situ x–ray diffraction analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Mitsumasa; Wada, Ayumi; Ehara, Yoshitaka; Funakubo, Hiroshi; Yamada, Tomoaki; Kobayashi, Takeshi

    2014-11-21

    The effects of bipolar pulse poling on the ferroelastic domain structure and their contribution to the electrical and piezoelectric properties of Pb(Ti{sub 0.7}Zr{sub 0.3})O{sub 3} films are investigated. Micro x-ray diffraction measurements clearly show that the volume fraction of the c-domain increases irreversibly as the poling field is increased, leading to changes in the remanent polarization, dielectric constant, and piezoelectric coefficient. Theoretical estimations well explain the changes of remanent polarization and dielectric constant, but the increase in piezoelectric coefficient is much larger than the theoretical estimation. In-situ x-ray diffraction analysis under an electric field reveals that this disagreement is due to the unexpected activation of the ferroelastic domain wall motion. Our results provide new insight into the poling effect on the electric and piezoelectric properties of ferroelectric films.

  8. Oscillons and domain walls

    SciTech Connect

    Hindmarsh, Mark; Salmi, Petja

    2008-05-15

    Oscillons, extremely long-lived localized oscillations of a scalar field, are shown to be produced by evolving domain wall networks in {phi}{sup 4} theory in two spatial dimensions. We study the oscillons in frequency space using the classical spectral function at zero momentum, and obtain that the velocity distribution is suppressed as {gamma}{sup -2} at large Lorentz factor {gamma}, with oscillons produced up to at least {gamma}{approx}10. This leads us to speculate that oscillons are produced at cusps, regions of the domain wall travelling near the speed of light. In order to gain some insight onto the dilute oscillon 'gas' produced by the domain walls, we prepare a denser gas by filling the simulation volume with oscillons boosted in random directions. We finish the study by revisiting collisions between oscillons and between an oscillon and a domain wall, showing that in the latter case they can pass straight through with minimal distortion.

  9. Polar domain walls trigger magnetoelectric coupling

    PubMed Central

    Fontcuberta, Josep; Skumryev, Vassil; Laukhin, Vladimir; Granados, Xavier; Salje, Ekhard K. H.

    2015-01-01

    Interface physics in oxides heterostructures is pivotal in material’s science. Domain walls (DWs) in ferroic systems are examples of naturally occurring interfaces, where order parameter of neighboring domains is modified and emerging properties may develop. Here we show that electric tuning of ferroelastic domain walls in SrTiO3 leads to dramatic changes of the magnetic domain structure of a neighboring magnetic layer (La1/2Sr1/2MnO3) epitaxially clamped on a SrTiO3 substrate. We show that the properties of the magnetic layer are intimately connected to the existence of polar regions at twin boundaries of SrTiO3, developing at , that can be electrically modulated. These findings illustrate that by exploiting the responsiveness of DWs nanoregions to external stimuli, even in absence of any domain contribution, prominent and adjustable macroscopic reactions of neighboring layers can be obtained. We conclude that polar DWs, known to exist in other materials, can be used to trigger tunable responses and may lead to new ways for the manipulation of interfacial emerging properties. PMID:26387597

  10. Realization of face-shear piezoelectric coefficient d36 in PZT ceramics via ferroelastic domain engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Hongchen; Li, Faxin

    2015-09-01

    The piezoelectric face-shear ( d36 ) mode may be the most useful shear mode in piezoelectrics, while currently this mode can only exist in single crystals of specific point groups and cut directions. Theoretically, the d36 coefficient vanishes in piezoelectric ceramics because of its transversally isotropic symmetry. In this work, we modified the symmetry of poled PZT ceramics from transversally isotropic to orthogonal through ferroelastic domain switching by applying a high lateral stress along the "2" direction and holding the stress for several hours. After removing the compression, the piezoelectric coefficient d31 is found much larger than d32 . Then, by cutting the compressed sample along the Z x t ±45 ° direction, we realized d36 coefficients up to 206 pC/N , which is measured by using a modified d33 meter. The obtained large d36 coefficients in PZT ceramics could be very promising for face-shear mode resonators and shear horizontal wave generation in nondestructive testing.

  11. Axion domain wall baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Daido, Ryuji; Kitajima, Naoya; Takahashi, Fuminobu

    2015-07-28

    We propose a new scenario of baryogenesis, in which annihilation of axion domain walls generates a sizable baryon asymmetry. Successful baryogenesis is possible for a wide range of the axion mass and decay constant, m≃10{sup 8}–10{sup 13} GeV and f≃10{sup 13}–10{sup 16} GeV. Baryonic isocurvature perturbations are significantly suppressed in our model, in contrast to various spontaneous baryogenesis scenarios in the slow-roll regime. In particular, the axion domain wall baryogenesis is consistent with high-scale inflation which generates a large tensor-to-scalar ratio within the reach of future CMB B-mode experiments. We also discuss the gravitational waves produced by the domain wall annihilation and its implications for the future gravitational wave experiments.

  12. Strain Control of Domain-Wall Stability in Epitaxial BiFeO3 (110) Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, M. P.; Chu, Y. H.; Zhang, J. X.; Yang, P. L.; Zavaliche, F.; He, Q.; Shafer, P.; Chen, L. Q.; Ramesh, R.

    2007-11-01

    We have studied the stability of domains and domain walls in multiferroic BiFeO3 thin films using a combination of piezoelectric force microscopy and phase-field simulations. We have discovered that a film-substrate misfit strain may result in a drastically different thermodynamic stability of two parallel domain walls with the same orientation. A fundamental understanding of the underlying physics, the stress distribution in a domain structure, leads to a novel approach to control the ferroelastic domain stability in the multiferroic BiFeO3 system.

  13. Optical and Acoustic Device Applications of Ferroelastic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meeks, Steven Wayne

    This dissertation presents the discovery of a means of creating uniformly periodic domain gratings in a ferroelastic crystal of neodymium pentaphosphate (NPP). The uniform and non-uniform domain structures which can be created in NPP have the potential applications as tunable active gratings for lasers, tunable diffraction gratings, tunable Bragg reflection gratings, tunable acoustic filters, optical modulators, and optical domain wall memories. The interaction of optical and acoustic waves with ferroelastic domain walls in NPP is presented in detail. Acoustic amplitude reflection coefficients from a single domain wall in NPP are much larger than other ferroelastic-ferroelectrics such as gadolinium molybdate (GMO). Domain walls of NPP are used to make two demonstration acoustic devices: a tunable comb filter and a tunable delay line. The tuning process is accomplished by moving the position of the reflecting surface (the domain wall). A theory of the reflection of optical waves from NPP domain walls is discussed. The optical reflection is due to a change in the polarization of the wave, and not a change in the index, as the wave crosses the domain wall. Theoretical optical power reflection coefficients show good agreement with the experimentally measured values. The largest optical reflection coefficient of a single domain wall is at a critical angle and is 2.2% per domain wall. Techniques of injecting periodic and aperiodic domain walls into NPP are presented. The nucleation process of the uniformly periodic domain gratings in NPP is described in terms of a newly-discovered domain structure, namely the ferroelastic bubble. A ferroelastic bubble is the elastic analogue to the well-known magnetic bubble. The period of the uniformly periodic domain grating is tunable from 100 to 0.5 microns and the grating period may be tuned relatively rapidly. The Bragg efficiency of these tunable gratings is 77% for an uncoated crystal. Several demonstration devices which use

  14. Dynamical domain wall and localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyozato, Yuta; Higuchi, Masafumi; Nojiri, Shin'ichi

    2016-03-01

    Based on the previous works (Toyozato et al., 2013 [24]; Higuchi and Nojiri, 2014 [25]), we investigate the localization of the fields on the dynamical domain wall, where the four-dimensional FRW universe is realized on the domain wall in the five-dimensional space-time. Especially we show that the chiral spinor can localize on the domain wall, which has not been succeeded in the past works as the seminal work in George et al. (2009) [23].

  15. Domain Walls with Strings Attached

    SciTech Connect

    Shmakova, Marina

    2001-08-20

    We have constructed a bulk and brane action of IIA theory which describes a pair of BPS domain walls on S{sub 1}/Z{sub 2}, with strings attached. The walls are given by two orientifold O8-planes with coincident D8-branes and F1-D0-strings are stretched between the walls. This static configuration satisfies all matching conditions for the string and domain wall sources and has 1/4 of unbroken supersymmetry.

  16. Domain walls riding the wave.

    SciTech Connect

    Karapetrov, G.; Novosad, V.; Materials Science Division

    2010-11-01

    Recent years have witnessed a rapid proliferation of electronic gadgets around the world. These devices are used for both communication and entertainment, and it is a fact that they account for a growing portion of household energy consumption and overall world consumption of electricity. Increasing the energy efficiency of these devices could have a far greater and immediate impact than a gradual switch to renewable energy sources. The advances in the area of spintronics are therefore very important, as gadgets are mostly comprised of memory and logic elements. Recent developments in controlled manipulation of magnetic domains in ferromagnet nanostructures have opened opportunities for novel device architectures. This new class of memories and logic gates could soon power millions of consumer electronic devices. The attractiveness of using domain-wall motion in electronics is due to its inherent reliability (no mechanical moving parts), scalability (3D scalable architectures such as in racetrack memory), and nonvolatility (retains information in the absence of power). The remaining obstacles in widespread use of 'racetrack-type' elements are the speed and the energy dissipation during the manipulation of domain walls. In their recent contribution to Physical Review Letters, Oleg Tretiakov, Yang Liu, and Artem Abanov from Texas A&M University in College Station, provide a theoretical description of domain-wall motion in nanoscale ferromagnets due to the spin-polarized currents. They find exact conditions for time-dependent resonant domain-wall movement, which could speed up the motion of domain walls while minimizing Ohmic losses. Movement of domain walls in ferromagnetic nanowires can be achieved by application of external magnetic fields or by passing a spin-polarized current through the nanowire itself. On the other hand, the readout of the domain state is done by measuring the resistance of the wire. Therefore, passing current through the ferromagnetic wire is

  17. NMR study of ferroelastic phase transition of tetramethylammonium tetrabromocobaltate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran; Kim, Sun Ha

    2016-09-01

    Static and magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments were carried out on 1H, 13C, and 14N nuclei in order to understand the structural changes of the N(CH3)4 groups in [N(CH3)4]2CoBr4 near the ferroelastic phase transition temperature TC. The two chemically inequivalent N(CH3)4 groups were distinguished using 13C cross-polarization/(CP)MAS and 14N static NMR. The changes in chemical shifts, line intensities, and the spin-lattice relaxation time near TC can be correlated with the changing structural geometry, which underlies the phase transition. The 14N NMR spectra indicated a crystal symmetry change at TC, which is related to the ferroelastic domain with different orientations of the N(CH3)4 groups. The ferroelastic domain walls were confirmed by optical polarizing microscopy, and the wall orientations were described by the Sapriel theory. The transition to the ferroelastic phase was found to be related to the orientational ordering of the N(CH3)4 groups.

  18. Functional domain walls in multiferroics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Dennis

    2015-11-01

    During the last decade a wide variety of novel and fascinating correlation phenomena has been discovered at domain walls in multiferroic bulk systems, ranging from unusual electronic conductance to inseparably entangled spin and charge degrees of freedom. The domain walls represent quasi-2D functional objects that can be induced, positioned, and erased on demand, bearing considerable technological potential for future nanoelectronics. Most of the challenges that remain to be solved before turning related device paradigms into reality, however, still fall in the field of fundamental condensed matter physics and materials science. In this topical review seminal experimental findings gained on electric and magnetic domain walls in multiferroic bulk materials are addressed. A special focus is put on the physical properties that emerge at so-called charged domain walls and the added functionality that arises from coexisting magnetic order. The research presented in this review highlights that we are just entering a whole new world of intriguing nanoscale physics that is yet to be explored in all its details. The goal is to draw attention to the persistent challenges and identify future key directions for the research on functional domain walls in multiferroics.

  19. Functional domain walls in multiferroics.

    PubMed

    Meier, Dennis

    2015-11-25

    During the last decade a wide variety of novel and fascinating correlation phenomena has been discovered at domain walls in multiferroic bulk systems, ranging from unusual electronic conductance to inseparably entangled spin and charge degrees of freedom. The domain walls represent quasi-2D functional objects that can be induced, positioned, and erased on demand, bearing considerable technological potential for future nanoelectronics. Most of the challenges that remain to be solved before turning related device paradigms into reality, however, still fall in the field of fundamental condensed matter physics and materials science. In this topical review seminal experimental findings gained on electric and magnetic domain walls in multiferroic bulk materials are addressed. A special focus is put on the physical properties that emerge at so-called charged domain walls and the added functionality that arises from coexisting magnetic order. The research presented in this review highlights that we are just entering a whole new world of intriguing nanoscale physics that is yet to be explored in all its details. The goal is to draw attention to the persistent challenges and identify future key directions for the research on functional domain walls in multiferroics. PMID:26523728

  20. Domain walls inside localised orientifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blåbäck, J.; van der Woerd, E.; Van Riet, T.; Williams, M.

    2015-12-01

    The equations of motion of toroidal orientifold compactifications with fluxes are in one-to-one correspondence with gauged supergravity if the orientifold (and D-brane) sources are smeared over the compact space. This smeared limit is identical to the approximation that ignores warping. It is therefore relevant to compare quantities obtained from the gauged supergravity with the true 10d solution with localised sources. In this paper we find the correspondence between BPS domain walls in gauged SUGRA and 10D SUGRA with localised sources. Our model is the simplest orientifold with fluxes we are aware of: an O6/D6 compactification on {T}^3/{Z}_2 in massive IIA with H 3-flux. The BPS domain walls correspond to a O6/D6/NS5/D8 bound state. Our analysis reveals that the domain wall energy computed in gauged SUGRA is unaffected by the localisation of the O6/D6 sources.

  1. Domains within Domains and Walls within Walls: Evidence for Polar Domains in Cryogenic SrTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salje, E. K. H.; Aktas, O.; Carpenter, M. A.; Laguta, V. V.; Scott, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    Resonant piezoelectric spectroscopy shows polar resonances in paraelectric SrTiO3 at temperatures below 80 K. These resonances become strong at T<40K. The resonances are induced by weak electric fields and lead to standing mechanical waves in the sample. This piezoelectric response does not exist in paraelastic SrTiO3 nor at temperatures just below the ferroelastic phase transition. The interpretation of the resonances is related to ferroelastic twin walls which become polar at low temperatures in close analogy with the known behavior of CaTiO3. SrTiO3 is different from CaTiO3, however, because the wall polarity is thermally induced; i.e., there exists a small temperature range well below the ferroelastic transition point at 105 K where polarity appears on cooling. As the walls are atomistically thin, this transition has the hallmarks of a two-dimensional phase transition restrained to the twin boundaries rather than a classic bulk phase transition.

  2. Domains within domains and walls within walls: evidence for polar domains in cryogenic SrTiO3.

    PubMed

    Salje, E K H; Aktas, O; Carpenter, M A; Laguta, V V; Scott, J F

    2013-12-13

    Resonant piezoelectric spectroscopy shows polar resonances in paraelectric SrTiO3 at temperatures below 80 K. These resonances become strong at T<40  K. The resonances are induced by weak electric fields and lead to standing mechanical waves in the sample. This piezoelectric response does not exist in paraelastic SrTiO3 nor at temperatures just below the ferroelastic phase transition. The interpretation of the resonances is related to ferroelastic twin walls which become polar at low temperatures in close analogy with the known behavior of CaTiO3. SrTiO3 is different from CaTiO3, however, because the wall polarity is thermally induced; i.e., there exists a small temperature range well below the ferroelastic transition point at 105 K where polarity appears on cooling. As the walls are atomistically thin, this transition has the hallmarks of a two-dimensional phase transition restrained to the twin boundaries rather than a classic bulk phase transition. PMID:24483700

  3. Heat transport by phonons and the generation of heat by fast phonon processes in ferroelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, X.; Salje, E. K. H.

    2015-05-01

    Thermal conductivity of ferroelastic device materials can be reversibly controlled by strain. The nucleation and growth of twin boundaries reduces thermal conductivity if the heat flow is perpendicular to the twin wall. The twin walls act as phonon barriers whereby the thermal conductivity decreases linearly with the number of such phonon barriers. Ferroelastic materials also show elasto-caloric properties with a high frequency dynamics. The upper frequency limit is determined by heat generation on a time scale, which is some 5 orders of magnitude below the typical bulk phonon times. Some of these nano-structural processes are irreversible under stress release (but remain reversible under temperature cycling), in particular the annihilation of needle domains that are a key indicator for ferroelastic behaviour in multiferroic materials.

  4. Self-powdering and nonlinear optical domain structures in ferroelastic beta'-Gd{sub 2}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 3} crystals formed in glass

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukada, Y.; Honma, T.; Komatsu, T.

    2009-08-15

    Ferroelastic beta'-Gd{sub 2}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 3}, (GMO), crystals are formed through the crystallization of 21.25Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}-63.75MoO{sub 3}-15B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glass (mol%), and two scientific curious phenomena are observed. (1) GMO crystals formed in the crystallization break into small pieces with a triangular prism or pyramid shape having a length of 50-500 {mu}m spontaneously during the crystallizations in the inside of an electric furnace, not during the cooling in air after the crystallization. This phenomenon is called 'self-powdering phenomenon during crystallization' in this paper. (2) Each self-powdered GMO crystal grain shows a periodic domain structure with different refractive indices, and a spatially periodic second harmonic generation (SHG) depending on the domain structure is observed. It is proposed from polarized micro-Raman scattering spectra and the azimuthal dependence of second harmonic intensities that GMO crystals are oriented in each crystal grain and the orientation of (MoO{sub 4}){sup 2-} tetrahedra in GMO crystals changes periodically due to spontaneous strains in ferroelastic GMO crystals. - Graphical abstract: This figure shows the polarized optical photograph at room temperature for a particle (piece) obtained by a heat treatment of the glass at 590 deg. C for 2 h in an electric furnace in air. This particle was obtained through the self-powdering behavior in the crystallization of glass. The periodic domain structure is observed. Ferroelastic beta'-Gd{sub 2}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 3} crystals are formed in the particle, and second harmonic generations are detected, depending on the domain structure.

  5. New ferroelastic K2Sr(MoO4)2: Synthesis, phase transitions, crystal and domain structures, ionic conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyrenova, Galina D.; Pavlova, Erzhena T.; Solodovnikov, Sergey F.; Popova, Nadezhda N.; Kardash, Tatyana Yu.; Stefanovich, Sergey Yu.; Gudkova, Irina A.; Solodovnikova, Zoya A.; Lazoryak, Bogdan I.

    2016-05-01

    K2Sr(MoO4)2 crystals were synthesized and their properties examined. The distortive polymorphic transformations at 421 K (α (LT)→ β(MT)) and 744 K (β(MT)→γ (HT)) of K2Sr(MoO4)2 were studied. It has been shown that the transitions go in sequence from the high-temperature palmierite K2Pb(SO4)2-type γ-phase (R 3 bar m) to an intermediate β-phase with a probable incommensurate structure and then to a low-temperature α-phase. Domain structures peculiarities in ferroelastic α-K2Sr(MoO4)2 have been investigated. The electrical conductivity of K2Sr(MoO4)2 rises tenfold in the vicinity of the phase transition at 744 K that may be associated with a change conductivity path from quasi-one-dimensional to two-dimensional. The crystal structure of the α-phase (sp. gr. C2/c, e=14.318(3) Å, b=5.9337(12) Å, c=10.422(2) Å, β=105.83(3)°, Z=4, R=0.0219) is similar to that of α-Pb3(PO4)2. Sr-atoms are mainly located at site with the coordination number CN=8 (a tetragonal antiprism with bond lengths of 2.578(2)-2.789(2) Å) and K atoms are located at site with CN=9+1.

  6. Self-powdering and nonlinear optical domain structures in ferroelastic β‧-Gd2(MoO4)3 crystals formed in glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukada, Y.; Honma, T.; Komatsu, T.

    2009-08-01

    Ferroelastic β'-Gd 2(MoO 4) 3, (GMO), crystals are formed through the crystallization of 21.25Gd 2O 3-63.75MoO 3-15B 2O 3 glass (mol%), and two scientific curious phenomena are observed. (1) GMO crystals formed in the crystallization break into small pieces with a triangular prism or pyramid shape having a length of 50-500 μm spontaneously during the crystallizations in the inside of an electric furnace, not during the cooling in air after the crystallization. This phenomenon is called "self-powdering phenomenon during crystallization" in this paper. (2) Each self-powdered GMO crystal grain shows a periodic domain structure with different refractive indices, and a spatially periodic second harmonic generation (SHG) depending on the domain structure is observed. It is proposed from polarized micro-Raman scattering spectra and the azimuthal dependence of second harmonic intensities that GMO crystals are oriented in each crystal grain and the orientation of (MoO 4) 2- tetrahedra in GMO crystals changes periodically due to spontaneous strains in ferroelastic GMO crystals.

  7. Domain wall fermion quenched spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malureanu, Catalin Ionut

    We measure y and the hadron spectrum on quenched ensembles using the domain wall fermion formulation. For the first time a 1/mf behavior of y for small valence masses has been observed. Our measurements of y on two different volumes of 83 x 32 and 163 x 32 at β = 5.85 suggest the behavior goes away on large enough volumes. Extensive spectrum calculations were done on 8 3 x 32 lattices at β = 5.7 and 5.85 corresponding roughly to a box size of 1.6 fm and 1.0 fm respectively. We have investigated five values of the extent of the fifth dimension Ls = 10, 16, 24, 32 and 48 with valence masses in the range 0.02 to 0.2 for the β = 5.7 ensemble and two values of Ls = 10 and 16 with valence masses in the range 0.02 to 0.08 for the β = 5.85 ensemble. Our pion remains massive in the infinite Ls extrapolation. This may be a finite volume effect. The nucleon to rho mass ratio stays constant at 1.4(1). Scaling violations for domain wall fermions are smaller roughly by a factor of four compared to the scaling violations in similar calculations done with staggered fermions.

  8. Domain wall dynamics in cylindrical nanomagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Soumik; Singh, Amrita; Ghosh, Arindam

    2011-06-01

    The stochasticity associated with domain wall nucleation and propagation in a cylinderical nanowire has been studied using time resolved resistance measurement in presence of magnetic field. We have shown that the propagation stochasticity of domain wall in a cylindrical nanowire is reflected in the magnetic field dependent velocity distribution whereas the stochasticity involved in the domain wall nucleation can be effectively tuned by varying the angle between the direction of applied magnetic field and the long axis of the cylinder.

  9. Asymmetric counter propagation of domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade-Silva, I.; Clerc, M. G.; Odent, V.

    2016-07-01

    Far from equilibrium systems show different states and domain walls between them. These walls, depending on the type of connected equilibria, exhibit a rich spatiotemporal dynamics. Here, we investigate the asymmetrical counter propagation of domain walls in an in-plane-switching cell filled with a nematic liquid crystal. Experimentally, we characterize the shape and speed of the domain walls. Based on the molecular orientation, we infer that the counter propagative walls have different elastic deformations. These deformations are responsible of the asymmetric counter propagating fronts. Theoretically, based on symmetry arguments, we propose a simple bistable model under the influence of a nonlinear gradient, which qualitatively describes the observed dynamics.

  10. Ferroelastic dynamics and strain compatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lookman, T.; Shenoy, S. R.; Rasmussen, K. Ø.; Saxena, A.; Bishop, A. R.

    2003-01-01

    rectangular lattice (Nop=2,n=1,Nc=1) and from a square to a rectangular lattice (Nop=1,n=2,Nc=1) for which the OP compatibility kernel is retarded in time, or frequency dependent in Fourier space (in fact, acoustically resonant in ω/k). We present structural dynamics for all other 2D symmetry-allowed proper ferroelastic transitions: the procedure is also applicable to the 3D case. Simulations of the BG evolution equations confirm the inherent richness of the static and dynamic texturings, including strain oscillations, domain-wall propagation at near-sound speeds, grain-boundary motion, and nonlocal “elastic photocopying” of imposed local stress patterns.

  11. Artificial chemical and magnetic structure at the domain walls of an epitaxial oxide.

    PubMed

    Farokhipoor, S; Magén, C; Venkatesan, S; Íñiguez, J; Daumont, C J M; Rubi, D; Snoeck, E; Mostovoy, M; de Graaf, C; Müller, A; Döblinger, M; Scheu, C; Noheda, B

    2014-11-20

    Progress in nanotechnology requires new approaches to materials synthesis that make it possible to control material functionality down to the smallest scales. An objective of materials research is to achieve enhanced control over the physical properties of materials such as ferromagnets, ferroelectrics and superconductors. In this context, complex oxides and inorganic perovskites are attractive because slight adjustments of their atomic structures can produce large physical responses and result in multiple functionalities. In addition, these materials often contain ferroelastic domains. The intrinsic symmetry breaking that takes place at the domain walls can induce properties absent from the domains themselves, such as magnetic or ferroelectric order and other functionalities, as well as coupling between them. Moreover, large domain wall densities create intense strain gradients, which can also affect the material's properties. Here we show that, owing to large local stresses, domain walls can promote the formation of unusual phases. In this sense, the domain walls can function as nanoscale chemical reactors. We synthesize a two-dimensional ferromagnetic phase at the domain walls of the orthorhombic perovskite terbium manganite (TbMnO3), which was grown in thin layers under epitaxial strain on strontium titanate (SrTiO3) substrates. This phase is yet to be created by standard chemical routes. The density of the two-dimensional sheets can be tuned by changing the film thickness or the substrate lattice parameter (that is, the epitaxial strain), and the distance between sheets can be made as small as 5 nanometres in ultrathin films, such that the new phase at domain walls represents up to 25 per cent of the film volume. The general concept of using domain walls of epitaxial oxides to promote the formation of unusual phases may be applicable to other materials systems, thus giving access to new classes of nanoscale materials for applications in nanoelectronics and

  12. Artificial chemical and magnetic structure at the domain walls of an epitaxial oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farokhipoor, S.; Magén, C.; Venkatesan, S.; Íñiguez, J.; Daumont, C. J. M.; Rubi, D.; Snoeck, E.; Mostovoy, M.; de Graaf, C.; Müller, A.; Döblinger, M.; Scheu, C.; Noheda, B.

    2014-11-01

    Progress in nanotechnology requires new approaches to materials synthesis that make it possible to control material functionality down to the smallest scales. An objective of materials research is to achieve enhanced control over the physical properties of materials such as ferromagnets, ferroelectrics and superconductors. In this context, complex oxides and inorganic perovskites are attractive because slight adjustments of their atomic structures can produce large physical responses and result in multiple functionalities. In addition, these materials often contain ferroelastic domains. The intrinsic symmetry breaking that takes place at the domain walls can induce properties absent from the domains themselves, such as magnetic or ferroelectric order and other functionalities, as well as coupling between them. Moreover, large domain wall densities create intense strain gradients, which can also affect the material's properties. Here we show that, owing to large local stresses, domain walls can promote the formation of unusual phases. In this sense, the domain walls can function as nanoscale chemical reactors. We synthesize a two-dimensional ferromagnetic phase at the domain walls of the orthorhombic perovskite terbium manganite (TbMnO3), which was grown in thin layers under epitaxial strain on strontium titanate (SrTiO3) substrates. This phase is yet to be created by standard chemical routes. The density of the two-dimensional sheets can be tuned by changing the film thickness or the substrate lattice parameter (that is, the epitaxial strain), and the distance between sheets can be made as small as 5 nanometres in ultrathin films, such that the new phase at domain walls represents up to 25 per cent of the film volume. The general concept of using domain walls of epitaxial oxides to promote the formation of unusual phases may be applicable to other materials systems, thus giving access to new classes of nanoscale materials for applications in nanoelectronics and

  13. Giant photovoltaic effect of ferroelectric domain walls in perovskite single crystals

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Ryotaro; Ishikawa, Shotaro; Imura, Ryota; Kitanaka, Yuuki; Oguchi, Takeshi; Noguchi, Yuji; Miyayama, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    The photovoltaic (PV) effect in polar materials offers great potential for light-energy conversion that generates a voltage beyond the bandgap limit of present semiconductor-based solar cells. Ferroelectrics have received renewed attention because of the ability to deliver a high voltage in the presence of ferroelastic domain walls (DWs). In recent years, there has been considerable debate over the impact of the DWs on the PV effects, owing to lack of information on the bulk PV tensor of host ferroelectrics. In this article, we provide the first direct evidence of an unusually large PV response induced by ferroelastic DWs—termed ‘DW’-PV effect. The precise estimation of the bulk PV tensor in single crystals of barium titanate enables us to quantify the giant PV effect driven by 90° DWs. We show that the DW-PV effect arises from an effective electric field consisting of a potential step and a local PV component in the 90° DW region. This work offers a starting point for further investigation into the DW-PV effect of alternative systems and opens a reliable route for enhancing the PV properties in ferroelectrics based on the engineering of domain structures in either bulk or thin-film form. PMID:26443381

  14. Giant photovoltaic effect of ferroelectric domain walls in perovskite single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Ryotaro; Ishikawa, Shotaro; Imura, Ryota; Kitanaka, Yuuki; Oguchi, Takeshi; Noguchi, Yuji; Miyayama, Masaru

    2015-10-01

    The photovoltaic (PV) effect in polar materials offers great potential for light-energy conversion that generates a voltage beyond the bandgap limit of present semiconductor-based solar cells. Ferroelectrics have received renewed attention because of the ability to deliver a high voltage in the presence of ferroelastic domain walls (DWs). In recent years, there has been considerable debate over the impact of the DWs on the PV effects, owing to lack of information on the bulk PV tensor of host ferroelectrics. In this article, we provide the first direct evidence of an unusually large PV response induced by ferroelastic DWs—termed ‘DW’-PV effect. The precise estimation of the bulk PV tensor in single crystals of barium titanate enables us to quantify the giant PV effect driven by 90° DWs. We show that the DW-PV effect arises from an effective electric field consisting of a potential step and a local PV component in the 90° DW region. This work offers a starting point for further investigation into the DW-PV effect of alternative systems and opens a reliable route for enhancing the PV properties in ferroelectrics based on the engineering of domain structures in either bulk or thin-film form.

  15. Giant photovoltaic effect of ferroelectric domain walls in perovskite single crystals.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Ryotaro; Ishikawa, Shotaro; Imura, Ryota; Kitanaka, Yuuki; Oguchi, Takeshi; Noguchi, Yuji; Miyayama, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    The photovoltaic (PV) effect in polar materials offers great potential for light-energy conversion that generates a voltage beyond the bandgap limit of present semiconductor-based solar cells. Ferroelectrics have received renewed attention because of the ability to deliver a high voltage in the presence of ferroelastic domain walls (DWs). In recent years, there has been considerable debate over the impact of the DWs on the PV effects, owing to lack of information on the bulk PV tensor of host ferroelectrics. In this article, we provide the first direct evidence of an unusually large PV response induced by ferroelastic DWs-termed 'DW'-PV effect. The precise estimation of the bulk PV tensor in single crystals of barium titanate enables us to quantify the giant PV effect driven by 90° DWs. We show that the DW-PV effect arises from an effective electric field consisting of a potential step and a local PV component in the 90° DW region. This work offers a starting point for further investigation into the DW-PV effect of alternative systems and opens a reliable route for enhancing the PV properties in ferroelectrics based on the engineering of domain structures in either bulk or thin-film form. PMID:26443381

  16. Charged domain walls in ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluka, Tomas

    2014-03-01

    Solid interfaces including compositionally homogeneous ferroic domain walls (DWs) display uniquely distorted electronic structures and ionic displacements. Their intrinsic properties may therefore be fundamentally different from those of their parent matrices. Indeed, phenomena like semiconductor-metal transition, the quantum Hall effect, magnetoresistance and superconductivity were discovered at hetero-interfaces between transition metal oxides and elevated photoactivity and conductivity were reported at (multi-) ferroic DWs. Unlike hetero-interfaces, the DWs provide ``perfect'' structure by nature and can be written, displaced, and erased inside a material monolith of functioning devices. Theory predicts the existence of charged DWs which seemingly violate electrostatic compatibility due to head-to-head and tail-to-tail polarization discontinuity, but are stable because bound polarization charge is compensated by mobile charge carriers including quasi-two-dimensional electron gas. This talk will introduce current theory, engineering, control and characteristics of charged DWs, which are mobile, extremely wide and exhibit steady metallic-like conductivity up to 109 times that of the insulating bulk.

  17. Automotion of domain walls for spintronic interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Young, Ian A.

    2014-06-07

    We simulate “automotion,” the transport of a magnetic domain wall under the influence of demagnetization and magnetic anisotropy, in nanoscale spintronic interconnects. In contrast to spin transfer driven magnetic domain wall motion, the proposed interconnects operate without longitudinal charge current transfer, with only a transient current pulse at domain wall creation and have favorable scaling down to the 20 nm dimension. Cases of both in-plane and out-of-plane magnetization are considered. Analytical dependence of the velocity of domain walls on the angle of magnetization are compared with full micromagnetic simulations. Deceleration, attenuation and disappearance, and reflection of domain walls are demonstrated through simulation. Dependences of the magnetization angle on the current pulse parameters are studied. The energy and delay analysis suggests that automotion is an attractive option for spintronic logic interconnects.

  18. Automotion of domain walls for spintronic interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Young, Ian A.

    2014-06-01

    We simulate "automotion," the transport of a magnetic domain wall under the influence of demagnetization and magnetic anisotropy, in nanoscale spintronic interconnects. In contrast to spin transfer driven magnetic domain wall motion, the proposed interconnects operate without longitudinal charge current transfer, with only a transient current pulse at domain wall creation and have favorable scaling down to the 20 nm dimension. Cases of both in-plane and out-of-plane magnetization are considered. Analytical dependence of the velocity of domain walls on the angle of magnetization are compared with full micromagnetic simulations. Deceleration, attenuation and disappearance, and reflection of domain walls are demonstrated through simulation. Dependences of the magnetization angle on the current pulse parameters are studied. The energy and delay analysis suggests that automotion is an attractive option for spintronic logic interconnects.

  19. Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Domain Walls in Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretiakov, Oleg; Goussev, Arseni; Robbins, J. M.; Slastikov, Valeriy

    2015-03-01

    We study domain walls in thin ferromagnetic nanotubes with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI). Dramatic effects arise from the interplay of space curvature and spin-orbit induced DMI on the domain wall structure in these systems. The domain walls become narrower in systems with DMI and curvature. Moreover, the domain walls created in such nanotubes can propagate without Walker breakdown for arbitrary applied currents, thus allowing for a robust and controlled domain-wall motion. The domain-wall velocity is directly proportional to the non-adiabatic spin transfer torque current term and is insensitive to the adiabatic current term. Application of an external magnetic field along the nanotube axis triggers rich dynamical response of the curved domain wall. In particular, we show that the propagation velocity is a non-linear function of both the applied field and DMI, and strongly depends on the orientation and chirality of the wall. We acknowledge support by the Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research (No. 25800184 and No. 25247056) from the MEXT, Japan and SpinNet.

  20. Domain wall conduction in multiaxial ferroelectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Eliseev, E. A.; Morozovska, A. N.; Svechnikov, S. V.; Maksymovych, Petro; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2012-01-01

    The conductance of domain wall structures consisting of either stripes or cylindrical domains in multiaxial ferroelectric-semiconductors is analyzed. The effects of the flexoelectric coupling, domain size, wall tilt, and curvature on charge accumulation are analyzed using the Landau-Ginsburg Devonshire theory for polarization vector combined with the Poisson equation for charge distributions. The proximity and size effect of the electron and donor accumulation/depletion by thin stripe domains and cylindrical nanodomains are revealed. In contrast to thick domain stripes and wider cylindrical domains, in which the carrier accumulation (and so the static conductivity) sharply increases at the domain walls only, small nanodomains of radii less than 5-10 correlation lengths appeared conducting across the entire cross-section. Implications of such conductive nanosized channels may be promising for nanoelectronics.

  1. Gravitational waves from collapsing domain walls

    SciTech Connect

    Hiramatsu, Takashi; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Saikawa, Ken'ichi E-mail: kawasaki@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2010-05-01

    We study the production of gravitational waves from cosmic domain walls created during phase transition in the early universe. We investigate the process of formation and evolution of domain walls by running three dimensional lattice simulations. If we introduce an approximate discrete symmetry, walls become metastable and finally disappear. This process might occur by a pressure difference between two vacua if a quantum tunneling is neglected. We calculate the spectrum of gravitational waves produced by collapsing metastable domain walls. Extrapolating the numerical results, we find that the signal of gravitational waves produced by domain walls whose energy scale is around 10{sup 10}-10{sup 12}GeV will be observable in the next generation gravitational wave interferometers.

  2. Domain wall geometry controls conduction in ferroelectrics.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, R K; Morozovska, A N; Eliseev, E A; Britson, J; Yang, J-C; Chu, Y-H; Maksymovych, P; Chen, L Q; Nagarajan, V; Kalinin, S V

    2012-11-14

    A new paradigm of domain wall nanoelectronics has emerged recently, in which the domain wall in a ferroic is itself an active device element. The ability to spatially modulate the ferroic order parameter within a single domain wall allows the physical properties to be tailored at will and hence opens vastly unexplored device possibilities. Here, we demonstrate via ambient and ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) scanning probe microscopy (SPM) measurements in bismuth ferrite that the conductivity of the domain walls can be modulated by up to 500% in the spatial dimension as a function of domain wall curvature. Landau-Ginzburg-Devonshire calculations reveal the conduction is a result of carriers or vacancies migrating to neutralize the charge at the formed interface. Phase-field modeling indicates that anisotropic potential distributions can occur even for initially uncharged walls, from polarization dynamics mediated by elastic effects. These results are the first proof of concept for modulation of charge as a function of domain wall geometry by a proximal probe, thereby expanding potential applications for oxide ferroics in future nanoscale electronics. PMID:22994244

  3. The formation and evolution of domain walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Press, William H.; Ryden, Barbara S.; Spergel, David N.

    1991-01-01

    Domain walls are sheet-like defects produced when the low energy vacuum has isolated degenerate minima. The researchers' computer code follows the evolution of a scalar field, whose dynamics are determined by its Lagrangian density. The topology of the scalar field determines the evolution of the domain walls. This approach treats both wall dynamics and reconnection. The researchers investigated not only potentials that produce single domain walls, but also potentials that produce a network of walls and strings. These networks arise in axion models where the U(1) Peccei-Quinn symmetry is broken into Z sub N discrete symmetries. If N equals 1, the walls are bounded by strings and the network quickly disappears. For N greater than 1, the network of walls and strings behaved qualitatively just as the wall network shown in the figures given here. This both confirms the researchers' pessimistic view that domain walls cannot play an important role in the formation of large scale structure and implies that axion models with multiple minimum can be cosmologically disastrous.

  4. Domain wall manipulation with a magnetic tip.

    PubMed

    Stapelfeldt, T; Wieser, R; Vedmedenko, E Y; Wiesendanger, R

    2011-07-01

    A theoretical concept of local manipulation of magnetic domain walls is introduced. In the proposed procedure, a domain wall is driven by a spin-polarized current induced by a magnetic tip, as used in a scanning tunneling microscope, placed above a magnetic nanostripe and then moved along its long axis with a current flowing through the vacuum barrier. The angular momentum from the spin-polarized current exerts a torque on the magnetic moments underneath the tip and leads to a displacement of the domain wall. Particularly, the manipulation of a ferromagnetic 180° transverse domain wall has been studied by means of Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. Different relative orientations of the tip and the sample magnetization have been considered. PMID:21797636

  5. Structural domain walls in polar hexagonal manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, Yu

    2014-03-01

    The domain structure in the multiferroic hexagonal manganites is currently intensely investigated, motivated by the observation of intriguing sixfold topological defects at their meeting points [Choi, T. et al,. Nature Mater. 9, 253 (2010).] and nanoscale electrical conductivity at the domain walls [Wu, W. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 077203 (2012).; Meier, D. et al., Nature Mater. 11, 284 (2012).], as well as reports of coupling between ferroelectricity, magnetism and structural antiphase domains [Geng, Y. et al., Nano Lett. 12, 6055 (2012).]. The detailed structure of the domain walls, as well as the origin of such couplings, however, was previously not fully understood. In the present study, we have used first-principles density functional theory to calculate the structure and properties of the low-energy structural domain walls in the hexagonal manganites [Kumagai, Y. and Spaldin, N. A., Nature Commun. 4, 1540 (2013).]. We find that the lowest energy domain walls are atomically sharp, with {210}orientation, explaining the orientation of recently observed stripe domains and suggesting their topological protection [Chae, S. C. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 167603 (2012).]. We also explain why ferroelectric domain walls are always simultaneously antiphase walls, propose a mechanism for ferroelectric switching through domain-wall motion, and suggest an atomistic structure for the cores of the sixfold topological defects. This work was supported by ETH Zurich, the European Research Council FP7 Advanced Grants program me (grant number 291151), the JSPS Postdoctoral Fellowships for Research Abroad, and the MEXT Elements Strategy Initiative to Form Core Research Center TIES.

  6. Domain walls as probes of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Dvali, Gia; Gabadadze, Gregory; Pujolas, Oriol; Rahman, Rakibur

    2007-06-15

    We show that domain walls are probes that enable one to distinguish large-distance modified gravity from general relativity (GR) at short distances. For example, low-tension domain walls are stealth in modified gravity, while they do produce global gravitational effects in GR. We demonstrate this by finding exact solutions for various domain walls in the DGP model. A wall with tension lower than the fundamental Planck scale does not inflate and has no gravitational effects on a 4D observer, since its 4D tension is completely screened by gravity itself. We argue that this feature remains valid in a generic class of models of infrared modified gravity. As a byproduct, we obtain exact solutions for supermassive codimension-2 branes.

  7. On thick domain walls in general relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, Guenter; Noetzold, Dirk

    1989-01-01

    Planar scalar field configurations in general relativity differ considerably from those in flat space. It is shown that static domain walls of finite thickness in curved space-time do not possess a reflection symmetry. At infinity, the space-time tends to the Taub vacuum on one side of the wall and to the Minkowski vacuum (Rindler space-time) on the other. Massive test particles are always accelerated towards the Minkowski side, i.e., domain walls are attractive on the Taub side, but repulsive on the Minkowski side (Taub-vacuum cleaner). It is also proved that the pressure in all directions is always negative. Finally, a brief comment is made concerning the possibility of infinite, i.e., bigger than horizon size, domain walls in our universe. All of the results are independent of the form of the potential V(phi) greater than or equal to 0 of the scalar field phi.

  8. Quasiparticles near domain walls in hexagonal superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, S. P.; Samokhin, K. V.

    2016-02-01

    We calculate the energy spectrum of quasiparticles trapped by a domain wall separating different time-reversal symmetry-breaking ground states in a hexagonal superconductor, such as UPt3. The bound-state energy is found to be strongly dependent on the gap symmetry, the domain-wall orientation, the quasiparticle's direction of semiclassical propagation, and the phase difference between the domains. We calculate the corresponding density of states and show how one can use its prominent features, in particular, the zero-energy singularity, to distinguish between different pairing symmetries.

  9. Quasiparticles near domain walls in hexagonal superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Soumya; Samokhin, Kirill

    We calculate the energy spectrum of quasiparticles trapped by a domain wall separating different time reversal symmetry-breaking ground states in a hexagonal superconductor, such as UPt3. The bound state energy is found to be strongly dependent on the gap symmetry, the domain wall orientation, the quasiparticle's direction of semiclassical propagation, and the phase difference between the domains. We calculate the corresponding density of states and show how one can use its prominent features, in particular, the zero-energy singularity, to distinguish between different pairing symmetries. Discovery Grant from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

  10. Confinement and localization on domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auzzi, R.; Bolognesi, S.; Shifman, M.; Yung, A.

    2009-02-01

    We continue the studies of localization of the U(1) gauge fields on domain walls. Depending on dynamics of the bulk theory the gauge field localized on the domain wall can be either in the Coulomb phase or squeezed into flux tubes implying (Abelian) confinement of probe charges on the wall along the wall surface. First, we consider a simple toy model with one flavor in the bulk at weak coupling (a minimal model) realizing the latter scenario. We then suggest a model presenting an extension of the Seiberg-Witten theory which is at strong coupling, but all theoretical constructions are under full control if we base our analysis on a dual effective action. Finally, we compare our findings with the wall in a “nonminimal” theory with two distinct quark flavors that had been studied previously. In this case the U(1) gauge field trapped on the wall is exactly massless because it is the Goldstone boson of a U(1) symmetry in the bulk spontaneously broken on the wall. The theory on the wall is in the Coulomb phase. We explain why the mechanism of confinement discussed in the first part of the paper does not work in this case, and strings are not formed on the walls.

  11. Domain walls and the creation of strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergshoeff, Eric; Gran, Ulf; Linares, Román; Nielsen, Mikkel; Roest, Diederik

    2003-08-01

    The phenomenon of creation of strings, occurring when particles pass through a domain wall and related to the Hanany Witten effect via dualities, is discussed in ten and nine dimensions. We consider both the particle actions in massive backgrounds and the 1/4-supersymmetric particle string domain-wall supergravity solutions and discuss their physical interpretation. In 10D we discuss the D0 F1 D8 system in massive IIA theory while in 9D the SL(2, Bbb R)-generalization is constructed. It consists of (p, q)-particles, (r, s)-strings and the double domain-wall solution of the three different 9D gauged supergravities where a subgroup of SL(2, Bbb R) is gauged.

  12. Conduction at domain walls in oxide multiferroics

    SciTech Connect

    Seidel, Jan; Martin, Lane W; He, Q; Zhan, Q; Rother, A; Hawkridge, M. E.; Maksymovych, Petro; Yu, Pu; Gajek, Martin; Balke, Nina; Kalinin, Sergei V; Gemming, S; Catalan, G; Scott, J F; Spalding, Nicola A; Orenstein, J; Ramesh, R.

    2009-01-01

    Domain walls may play an important role in future electronic devices, given their small size as well as the fact that their location can be controlled. Here, we report the observation of room-temperature electronic conductivity at ferroelectric domain walls in the insulating multiferroic BiFeO{sub 3}. The origin and nature of the observed conductivity are probed using a combination of conductive atomic force microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and first-principles density functional computations. Our analyses indicate that the conductivity correlates with structurally driven changes in both the electrostatic potential and the local electronic structure, which shows a decrease in the bandgap at the domain wall. Additionally, we demonstrate the potential for device applications of such conducting nanoscale features.

  13. Ferroelastic twin structures in epitaxial WO3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Shinhee; Woo, Chang-Su; Kim, Gi-Yeop; Sharma, Pankaj; Lee, Jin Hong; Chu, Kanghyun; Song, Jong Hyun; Chung, Sung-Yoon; Seidel, Jan; Choi, Si-Young; Yang, Chan-Ho

    2015-12-01

    Tungsten trioxide is a binary oxide that has potential applications in electrochromic windows, gas sensors, photo-catalysts, and superconductivity. Here, we analyze the crystal structure of atomically flat epitaxial layers on YAlO3 single crystal substrates and perform nanoscale investigations of the ferroelastic twins revealing a hierarchical structure at multiple length scales. We have found that the finest stripe ferroelastic twin walls along pseudocubic <100> axes are associated with cooperative mosaic rotations of the monoclinic films and the larger stripe domains along pseudocubic <110> axes are created to reduce the misfit strain through a commensurate matching of an effective in-plane lattice parameter between film and substrate. The typical widths of the two fine and larger stripe domains increase with film thickness following a power law with scaling exponents of ˜0.6 and ˜0.4, respectively. We have also found that the twin structure can be readily influenced by illumination with an electron beam or a tip-based mechanical compression.

  14. Standing gravitational waves from domain walls

    SciTech Connect

    Gogberashvili, Merab; Myrzakul, Shynaray; Singleton, Douglas

    2009-07-15

    We construct a plane symmetric, standing gravitational wave for a domain wall plus a massless scalar field. The scalar field can be associated with a fluid which has the properties of 'stiff' matter, i.e., matter in which the speed of sound equals the speed of light. Although domain walls are observationally ruled out in the present era, the solution has interesting features which might shed light on the character of exact nonlinear wave solutions to Einstein's equations. Additionally this solution may act as a template for higher dimensional 'brane-world' model standing waves.

  15. Interactions between domain walls and spin currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaui, M.; Laufenberg, M.; Backes, D.; Buhrer, W.; Rudiger, U.; Vila, L.; Vouille, C.; Faini, G.

    2006-03-01

    A promising novel approach for switching magnetic nanostructures is current-induced domain wall propagation (CIDP), where due to a spin torque effect, electrons transfer angular momentum to a head-to-head domain wall and thereby push it in the direction of the electron flow without any externally applied fields. This effect has been observed with a variety of techniques including MFM [1] and spin polarized scanning electron microscopy [2] to directly observe current-induced domain wall propagation in ferromagnetic nanostructures and magnetoresistance measurements to systematically probe the critical current densities as a function of the geometry [3]. The observed wall velocities and critical current densities, where wall motion sets in at room temperature, do not agree well with theoretical 0K calculations [4]. We have therefore measured the critical current densities as a function of the sample temperature. We find that the spin torque effect becomes more efficient at low temperatures, which could account for some of the observed discrepancies between the 300K experiment and the 0K simulation. [1] A. Yamaguchi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 77205 (2004); [2] M. Klaui et al., PRL 95, 26601 (2005); [3] M. Klaui et al., PRL 94, 106601 (2005); [4] A. Thiaville et al., EPL 69, 990 (2005); G. Tatara et al., APL 86, 252509 (2005);

  16. The dynamics of domain walls and strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Ruth; Haws, David; Garfinkle, David

    1989-01-01

    The leading order finite-width corrections to the equation of motion describing the motion of a domain wall are derived. The regime in which this equation of motion is invalid is discussed. Spherically and cylindrically symmetric solutions to this equation of motion are found. A misconception that has arisen in recent years regarding the rigidity (or otherwise) of cosmic strings is also clarified.

  17. Low-temperature thermal conductivity of ferroelastic Gd 2(MoO 4) 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielcarek, S.; Mróz, B.; Tylczyński, Z.; Piskunowicz, P.; Trybuła, Z.; Bromberek, M.

    2001-05-01

    Thermal conductivity, k, of GMO crystal has been measured in temperatures from 0.5 to 80 K. The maximum of k appears at 18 K and its value depends on the current domain state of the sample. The ferroelastic domain walls and antiphase boundaries, characterised by elastic inhomogeneities, are responsible for additional phonon scattering and a decrease in the thermal conductivity. The deviation of the temperature dependence of thermal conductivity from the classical Debye theory observed below 4 K is related to the anomalous behaviour of specific heat in the region of the antiferromagnetic transition at T N=0.3 K .

  18. Defect junctions and domain wall dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Avelino, P.P.; Oliveira, J.C.R.E.; Martins, C.J.A.P.; Menezes, J.; Menezes, R.

    2006-06-15

    We study a number of domain wall forming models where various types of defect junctions can exist. These illustrate some of the mechanisms that will determine the evolution of defect networks with junctions. Understanding these mechanisms is vital for a proper assessment of a number of cosmological scenarios: we will focus on the issue of whether or not cosmological frustrated domain wall networks can exist at all, but our results are also relevant for the dynamics of cosmic (super)strings, where junctions are expected to be ubiquitous. We also define and discuss the properties that would make up the ideal model in terms of hypothetical frustrated wall networks, and provide an explicit construction for such a model. We carry out a number of numerical simulations of the evolution of these networks, analyze and contrast their results, and discuss their implications for our no-frustration conjecture.

  19. A symmetry comparison of orientation-twin and antiphase domain walls in Pb3(VO4)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatt, R. A.; Hatch, D. M.

    2001-04-01

    A group-theoretical comparison of domain walls in orientation twins and antiphase structures is presented for the improper ferroelastic transition in lead orthovanadate, Pb3(VO4)2. Six possible domains arise in the daughter state: three orientation states and three translation-related antiphase states. The transition is driven by a three-component primary order parameter belonging to the F+2 irrep, with secondary order parameters consisting of elements of the spontaneous strain tensor. Order-parameter profiles across domain walls which arise in structures composed of pairs of the allowed daughter states can be calculated by constructing the Landau-Ginzburg free energy and applying the Euler-Lagrange equations. We present some solutions of the resulting differential equations, and note some interesting features in the symmetries of the profiles described by these solutions. In particular, the antiphase wall is described by the same diperiodic group as the domains on either side of it, whereas the orientation-twin wall is described by a different diperiodic group to either of the two domains bordering it.

  20. Antiferromagnetic Domain Wall Motion Driven by Spin-Orbit Torques.

    PubMed

    Shiino, Takayuki; Oh, Se-Hyeok; Haney, Paul M; Lee, Seo-Won; Go, Gyungchoon; Park, Byong-Guk; Lee, Kyung-Jin

    2016-08-19

    We theoretically investigate the dynamics of antiferromagnetic domain walls driven by spin-orbit torques in antiferromagnet-heavy-metal bilayers. We show that spin-orbit torques drive antiferromagnetic domain walls much faster than ferromagnetic domain walls. As the domain wall velocity approaches the maximum spin-wave group velocity, the domain wall undergoes Lorentz contraction and emits spin waves in the terahertz frequency range. The interplay between spin-orbit torques and the relativistic dynamics of antiferromagnetic domain walls leads to the efficient manipulation of antiferromagnetic spin textures and paves the way for the generation of high frequency signals from antiferromagnets. PMID:27588878

  1. Skyrmion domain wall collision and domain wall-gated skyrmion logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Xiangjun; Pong, Philip W. T.; Zhou, Yan

    2016-08-01

    Skyrmions and domain walls are significant spin textures of great technological relevance to magnetic memory and logic applications, where they can be used as carriers of information. The unique topology of skyrmions makes them display emergent dynamical properties as compared with domain walls. Some studies have demonstrated that the two topologically inequivalent magnetic objects could be interconverted by using cleverly designed geometric structures. Here, we numerically address the skyrmion domain wall collision in a magnetic racetrack by introducing relative motion between the two objects based on a specially designed junction. An electric current serves as the driving force that moves a skyrmion toward a trapped domain wall pair. We see different types of collision dynamics depending on the driving parameters. Most importantly, the modulation of skyrmion transport using domain walls is realized in this system, allowing a set of domain wall-gated logical NOT, NAND, and NOR gates to be constructed. This work provides a skyrmion-based spin-logic architecture that is fully compatible with racetrack memories.

  2. New chemical and magnetic structure at the domain walls of an epitaxial oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farokhipoor, Saeedeh; Magen, C.; Venkatesan, S.; Iniguez, J.; Daumont, C. J. M.; Rubi, D.; Snoeck, E.; Mostovoy, M.; de Graaf, C.; Muller, A.; Doblinger, M.; Scheu, C.; Noheda, B.

    2015-03-01

    Domain walls (DWs) in multiferroic thin films are nanoscale regions presenting different properties compared to the adjacent domains. This distinct behavior originates from the broken crystal symmetry and intense strain gradients around the walls. Therefore, engineering and controlling the properties of DWs in different types of functional materials, in particular in complex oxides, can become a promising path to design and tailor novel nano-electronic and spintronic devices. In TbMnO3, an antiferromagnetic orthorhombic perovskite in bulk form, ferroelastic DWs can also be achieved in a very controlled way, with densities that increase inversely proportional to the film thickness, such that for the thinnest films, the volume fraction of DWs can become up to 25% of the total film volume. These DWs, display a net magnetic moment that originates in a unique chemical environment: a novel Mn coordination has been locally synthesized due to the local stress present at the DWs. We believe that this method can be applied more generally to obtain embedded 2D ferromagnetic sheets of interest in electronics and spintronics. S. Farokhipoor, et al., Nature (20.Nov.2014).

  3. Domain wall motion in ferroelectrics: Barkhausen noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shur, V.; Rumyantsev, E.; Kozhevnikov, V.; Nikolaeva, E.; Shishkin, E.

    2002-03-01

    The switching current noise has been recorded during polarization reversal in single-crystalline gadolinium molybdate (GMO) and lithium tantalate (LT). Analysis of Barkhausen noise (BN) data allows to classify the noise types by determination of the critical indexes and fractal dimensions. BN is manifested as the short pulses during the polarization reversal. We have analyzed the BN data recorded in GMO and LT with various types of controlled domain structure. The data treatment in terms of probability distribution of duration, area and energy of individual pulses reveals the critical behavior typical for the fractal records in time. We used the Fourier transform and Hurst's rescaled range analysis for obtaining the Hurst factor, fractal dimension and classifying the noise types. We investigated by computer simulation the mechanism of sideways motion of 180O domain wall by nucleation at the wall taking into account the nuclei-nuclei interaction. It was shown that the moving domain walls display the fractal shape and their motion is accompanied by Flicker noise, which is in accord with experimental data. The research was made possible in part by Programs "Basic Research in Russian Universities" and "Priority Research in High School. Electronics", by Grant No. 01-02-17443 of RFBR, by Award No.REC-005 of CRDF.

  4. Entropy production by domain wall decay in the NMSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Hironori; Kobayashi, Tatsuo; Omoto, Naoya; Seto, Osamu

    2015-11-01

    We consider domain walls in the Z3 symmetric next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model. The spontaneous Z3 discrete symmetry breaking produces domain walls, and the stable domain walls are problematic. Thus, we assume the Z3 symmetry is slightly but explicitly broken and the domain walls decay. Such a decay causes a large late-time entropy production. We study its cosmological implications on unwanted relics such as the moduli, gravitino, lightest superparticle, and axion.

  5. Constricted nanowire with stabilized magnetic domain wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sbiaa, R.; Al Bahri, M.

    2016-08-01

    Domain wall (DW)-based magnetic memory offers the possibility for increasing the storage capacity. However, stability of DW remains the major drawback of this scheme. In this letter, we propose a stepped nanowire for pinning DW in a desirable position. From micromagnetic simulation, the proposed design applied to in-plane magnetic anisotropy materials shows that by adjusting the nanowire step size and its width it is possible to stabilize DW for a desirable current density range. In contrast, only a movement of DW could be seen for conventional nanowire. An extension to a multi-stepped nanowire could be used for multi-bit per cell magnetic memory.

  6. Magnetic domain wall motion by spin transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grollier, Julie; Chanthbouala, A.; Matsumoto, R.; Anane, A.; Cros, V.; Nguyen van Dau, F.; Fert, Albert

    2011-04-01

    The discovery that a spin polarized current can exert a large torque on a ferromagnet through a transfusion of spin angular momentum, offers a new way to control a magnetization by simple current injection, without the help of an applied external field. Spin transfer can be used to induce magnetization reversals and oscillations, or to control the position of a magnetic domain wall. In this review, we focus on this last mechanism, which is today the subject of an extensive research, both because the microscopic details for its origin are still debated, but also because promising applications are at stake for non-volatile magnetic memories.

  7. Polarization control at spin-driven ferroelectric domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leo, Naëmi; Bergman, Anders; Cano, Andres; Poudel, Narayan; Lorenz, Bernd; Fiebig, Manfred; Meier, Dennis

    2015-04-01

    Unusual electronic states arise at ferroelectric domain walls due to the local symmetry reduction, strain gradients and electrostatics. This particularly applies to improper ferroelectrics, where the polarization is induced by a structural or magnetic order parameter. Because of the subordinate nature of the polarization, the rigid mechanical and electrostatic boundary conditions that constrain domain walls in proper ferroics are lifted. Here we show that spin-driven ferroelectricity promotes the emergence of charged domain walls. This provides new degrees of flexibility for controlling domain-wall charges in a deterministic and reversible process. We create and position a domain wall by an electric field in Mn0.95Co0.05WO4. With a magnetic field we then rotate the polarization and convert neutral into charged domain walls, while its magnetic properties peg the wall to its location. Using atomistic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert simulations we quantify the polarization changes across the two wall types and highlight their general occurrence.

  8. Tunable conductance of magnetic nanowires with structured domain walls.

    PubMed

    Dugaev, V K; Berakdar, J; Barnaś, J

    2006-02-01

    We show that in a magnetic nanowire with double magnetic domain walls, quantum interference results in spin-split quasistationary states localized mainly between the domain walls. Spin-flip-assisted transmission through the domain structure increases strongly when these size-quantized states are tuned on resonance with the Fermi energy, e.g., upon varying the distance between the domain walls which results in resonance-type peaks of the wire conductance. This novel phenomenon is shown to be utilizable to manipulate the spin density in the domain vicinity. The domain wall parameters are readily controllable, and the predicted effect is hence exploitable in spintronic devices. PMID:16486888

  9. A diode for ferroelectric domain-wall motion

    PubMed Central

    Whyte, J.R.; Gregg, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    For over a decade, controlling domain-wall injection, motion and annihilation along nanowires has been the preserve of the nanomagnetics research community. Revolutionary technologies have resulted, like racetrack memory and domain-wall logic. Until recently, equivalent research in analogous ferroic materials did not seem important. However, with the discovery of sheet conduction, the control of domain walls in ferroelectrics has become vital for the future of what has been termed ‘domain-wall electronics'. Here we report the creation of a ferroelectric domain-wall diode, which allows a single direction of motion for all domain walls, irrespective of their polarity, under a series of alternating electric field pulses. The diode's sawtooth morphology is central to its function. Domain walls can move readily in the direction in which thickness increases gradually, but are prevented from moving in the other direction by the sudden thickness increase at the sawtooth edge. PMID:26059779

  10. Inflationary power asymmetry from primordial domain walls

    SciTech Connect

    Jazayeri, Sadra; Akrami, Yashar; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Solomon, Adam R.; Wang, Yi E-mail: yashar.akrami@astro.uio.no E-mail: a.r.solomon@damtp.cam.ac.uk

    2014-11-01

    We study the asymmetric primordial fluctuations in a model of inflation in which translational invariance is broken by a domain wall. We calculate the corrections to the power spectrum of curvature perturbations; they are anisotropic and contain dipole, quadrupole, and higher multipoles with non-trivial scale-dependent amplitudes. Inspired by observations of these multipole asymmetries in terms of two-point correlations and variance in real space, we demonstrate that this model can explain the observed anomalous power asymmetry of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) sky, including its characteristic feature that the dipole dominates over higher multipoles. We test the viability of the model and place approximate constraints on its parameters by using observational values of dipole, quadrupole, and octopole amplitudes of the asymmetry measured by a local-variance estimator. We find that a configuration of the model in which the CMB sphere does not intersect the domain wall during inflation provides a good fit to the data. We further derive analytic expressions for the corrections to the CMB temperature covariance matrix, or angular power spectra, which can be used in future statistical analysis of the model in spherical harmonic space.

  11. Ferroelastic phase transition in Cs3Bi2I9: A neutron diffraction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorio, A.; Currat, R.; Myles, D. A. A.; McIntyre, G. J.; Aleksandrova, I. P.; Kiat, J. M.; Saint-Grégoire, P.

    2000-02-01

    Crystalline Cs3Bi2I9, with the P63/mmc symmetry at room temperature was studied by Laue and four-circle neutron diffractometry from room temperature down to 50 K. At T0=220 K the crystal undergoes a second-order proper ferroelastic phase transition to a polydomain structure with a nonprimitive monoclinic C12/m1 space group. Satellites were not found below T0, indicating that the continuous distribution of sites observed in previous 127I nuclear quadrupole resonance experiments is due either to an undetected incommensurate phase characterized by a very small displacement amplitude, or due to the fraction of the crystal volume occupied by domain walls. We argue that thick domain walls are expected in the present structure due to the absence of mechanical compatibility between domains.

  12. PREFACE: Domain wall dynamics in nanostructures Domain wall dynamics in nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrows, C. H.; Meier, G.

    2012-01-01

    Domain structures in magnetic materials are ubiquitous and have been studied for decades. The walls that separate them are topological defects in the magnetic order parameter and have a wide variety of complex forms. In general, their investigation is difficult in bulk materials since only the domain structure on the surface of a specimen is visible. Cutting the sample to reveal the interior causes a rearrangement of the domains into a new form. As with many other areas of magnetism, the study of domain wall physics has been revitalised by the advent of nanotechnology. The ability to fabricate nanoscale structures has permitted the formation of simplified and controlled domain patterns; the development of advanced microscopy methods has permitted them to be imaged and then modelled; subjecting them to ultrashort field and current pulses has permitted their dynamics to be explored. The latest results from all of these advances are described in this special issue. Not only has this led to results of great scientific beauty, but also to concepts of great applicability to future information technologies. In this issue the reader will find the latest results for these domain wall dynamics and the high-speed processes of topological structures such as domain walls and magnetic vortices. These dynamics can be driven by the application of magnetic fields, or by flowing currents through spintronic devices using the novel physics of spin-transfer torque. This complexity has been studied using a wide variety of experimental techniques at the edge of the spatial and temporal resolution currently available, and can be described using sophisticated analytical theory and computational modelling. As a result, the dynamics can be engineered to give rise to finely controlled memory and logic devices with new functionality. Moreover, the field is moving to study not only the conventional transition metal ferromagnets, but also complex heterostructures, novel magnets and even other

  13. Soliton-dependent plasmon reflection at bilayer graphene domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lili; Shi, Zhiwen; Zeng, Bo; Wang, Sheng; Kang, Ji-Hun; Joshi, Trinity; Jin, Chenhao; Ju, Long; Kim, Jonghwan; Lyu, Tairu; Shen, Yuen-Ron; Crommie, Michael; Gao, Hong-Jun; Wang, Feng

    2016-08-01

    Layer-stacking domain walls in bilayer graphene are emerging as a fascinating one-dimensional system that features stacking solitons structurally and quantum valley Hall boundary states electronically. The interactions between electrons in the 2D graphene domains and the one-dimensional domain-wall solitons can lead to further new quantum phenomena. Domain-wall solitons of varied local structures exist along different crystallographic orientations, which can exhibit distinct electrical, mechanical and optical properties. Here we report soliton-dependent 2D graphene plasmon reflection at different 1D domain-wall solitons in bilayer graphene using near-field infrared nanoscopy. We observe various domain-wall structures in mechanically exfoliated graphene bilayers, including network-forming triangular lattices, individual straight or bent lines, and even closed circles. The near-field infrared contrast of domain-wall solitons arises from plasmon reflection at domain walls, and exhibits markedly different behaviours at the tensile- and shear-type domain-wall solitons. In addition, the plasmon reflection at domain walls exhibits a peculiar dependence on electrostatic gating. Our study demonstrates the unusual and tunable coupling between 2D graphene plasmons and domain-wall solitons.

  14. Dynamics of domain wall driven by spin-transfer torque

    SciTech Connect

    Chureemart, P.; Evans, R. F. L.; Chantrell, R. W.

    2011-05-01

    Spin-torque switching of magnetic devices offers new technological possibilities for data storage and integrated circuits. We have investigated domain-wall motion in a ferromagnetic thin film driven by a spin-polarized current using an atomistic spin model with a modified Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation including the effect of the spin-transfer torque. The presence of the spin-transfer torque is shown to create an out-of-plane domain wall, in contrast to the external-field-driven case where an in-plane wall is found. We have investigated the effect of the spin torque on domain-wall displacement, domain-wall velocity, and domain-wall width, as well as the equilibration time in the presence of the spin-transfer torque. We have shown that the minimum spin-current density, regarded as the critical value for domain-wall motion, decreases with increasing temperature.

  15. Composite domain walls in flat nanomagnets: The magnetostatic limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youk, H.; Chern, G.-W.; Merit, K.; Oppenheimer, B.; Tchernyshyov, O.

    2006-04-01

    We discuss the structure of the so-called ``vortex'' domain walls in soft magnetic nanoparticles. A wall of this kind is a composite object consisting of three elementary topological defects: two edge defects with winding numbers -1/2 and a vortex with a winding number +1 between them. We provide a qualitative model accounting for the energetics of such a domain wall.

  16. Current driven asymmetric domain wall propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Chirag; Pushp, Aakash; Phung, Timothy; Yang, See-Hun; Hughes, Brian P.; Rettner, Charles; Parkin, Stuart S. P.

    In ultrathin magnetic heterostructures, the presence of spin-orbit coupling gives rise to chiral Neel walls which are stabilized by the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction (DMI), and also to a highly efficient chiral spin torque mechanism. In straight nanowires, the current-driven propagation of alternating Néel DWs without the presence of an in-plane field is equivalent, leading to the lock-step motion of several DWs in a nanowire. Here, we show that by engineering the structure in which the domain walls propagate, which in our case is in the shape of a Y-shaped junction, the DW propagation process becomes selective to the polarity of the DWs even in the absence of any externally applied magnetic fields. We remarkably find that after splitting at the Y-shaped junction, the DW velocity in one branch remains largely unaffected compared to its initial velocity whereas simultaneously the DW velocity in the other branch decreases by as much as 10-90%. We show that this large change in the DW velocity in a particular branch depends on the relative angle between the local magnetization of the DW and the spin current emanating from the underlying heavy-metal layer in these nanowires.

  17. Cosmic microwave background anisotropies generated by domain wall networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, L.; Avelino, P. P.

    2015-10-01

    We develop a numerical tool for the fast computation of the temperature and polarization power spectra generated by domain wall networks, by extending the publicly available cmbact code—which calculates the cosmic microwave background signatures generated by active sources—to also describe domain wall networks. In order to achieve this, we adapt the unconnected segment model for cosmic strings to also describe domain wall networks, and use it to model the energy-momentum contribution of domain wall networks throughout their cosmological history. We use this new tool to compute and study the TT, EE, TE and BB power spectra generated by standard domain wall networks, and derive a conservative constraint on the energy scale of the domain wall-forming phase transition of η <0.92 MeV (which is a slight improvement over the original Zel'dovich bound of 1 MeV).

  18. Frequency Dependent Microwave Impedance Microscopy of Ferroelectric Domain Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Scott; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    ABO3 ferroelectrics are known to exhibit domain wall conductivity which is of great fundamental and technological interest. Microwave Impedance Microscopy is a near field measurement technique which allows local, non-contact measurement of AC conductivity and permittivity. In this work, Microwave Impedance Microscopy over a wide frequency range is used to probe the electrical properties of domain walls in ABO3 ferroelectrics. An unexpected, strong frequency dependence in the microwave dissipation near domain walls is observed.

  19. Ferroelastic shear bands in Pb3(PO4)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Suzhi; Bismayer, Ulli; Ding, Xiangdong; Salje, Ekhard K. H.

    2016-01-01

    We report shear bands as a precursor structure of deformation twinning in Pb3(PO4)2. Atomic force microscopy shows "slip-line" like traces on the surface of untwinned regions of the sample. The traces are shear bands oriented along twin boundaries of the ferroelastic R 3 ¯ m -C2/c transition. Computer simulations reproduce the shear band patterns and show that each shear band is a precursor embryo of a twin wall that forms under higher shear stress. This observation reveals the structural origin of twin boundaries under stress conditions just before ferroelastic switching occurs.

  20. Magnetic domain-wall dynamics in wide permalloy strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estévez, Virginia; Laurson, Lasse

    2016-02-01

    Domain walls in soft permalloy strips may exhibit various equilibrium micromagnetic structures depending on the width and thickness of the strip, ranging from the well-known transverse and vortex walls in narrow and thin strips to double and triple vortex walls recently reported in wider strips [V. Estévez and L. Laurson, Phys. Rev. B 91, 054407 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.91.054407]. Here, we analyze the field driven dynamics of such domain walls in permalloy strips of widths from 240 nm up to 6 μ m , using the known equilibrium domain wall structures as initial configurations. Our micromagnetic simulations show that the domain wall dynamics in wide strips is very complex, and depends strongly on the geometry of the system, as well as on the magnitude of the driving field. We discuss in detail the rich variety of the dynamical behaviors found, including dynamic transitions between different domain wall structures, periodic dynamics of a vortex core close to the strip edge, transitions towards simpler domain wall structures of the multi-vortex domain walls controlled by vortex polarity, and the fact that for some combinations of the strip geometry and the driving field the system cannot support a compact domain wall.

  1. Anisotropies of the cosmic background radiation by domain wall networks

    SciTech Connect

    Nambu, Yasusada; Ishihara, Hideki; Gouda, Naoteru; Sugiyama, Naoshi )

    1991-06-01

    This paper discusses cosmological effects by domain wall formation associated with a late time phase transition after decoupling. Assuming the existence of rigid domain wall networks, a simple one-dimensional model is constructed and the quadrupole anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) is calculated. Contrary to expectation, the gravitational potential of a domain wall itself does not disturb the isotropy of CBR. Estimating the quadrupole anisotropy of CBR induced by the wall-driven growth of matter density perturbations, a 100/h Mpc periodic wall structure is found to be consistent with the observed upper bound. 12 refs.

  2. Indirect control of antiferromagnetic domain walls with spin current.

    PubMed

    Wieser, R; Vedmedenko, E Y; Wiesendanger, R

    2011-02-11

    The indirect controlled displacement of an antiferromagnetic domain wall by a spin current is studied by Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert spin dynamics. The antiferromagnetic domain wall can be shifted both by a spin-polarized tunnel current of a scanning tunneling microscope or by a current driven ferromagnetic domain wall in an exchange coupled antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic layer system. The indirect control of antiferromagnetic domain walls opens up a new and promising direction for future spin device applications based on antiferromagnetic materials. PMID:21405493

  3. Hamilton-Jacobi method for curved domain walls and cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skenderis, Kostas; Townsend, Paul K.

    2006-12-01

    We use Hamiltonian methods to study curved domain walls and cosmologies. This leads naturally to first-order equations for all domain walls and cosmologies foliated by slices of maximal symmetry. For Minkowski and AdS-sliced domain walls (flat and closed FLRW cosmologies) we recover a recent result concerning their (pseudo)supersymmetry. We show how domain-wall stability is consistent with the instability of AdS vacua that violate the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound. We also explore the relationship to Hamilton-Jacobi theory and compute the wave-function of a 3-dimensional closed universe evolving towards de Sitter spacetime.

  4. Ferroelastic switching for nanoscale non-volatile magnetoelectric devices

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, S. H.; Jang, H. W.; Folkman, C. M.; Li, Yulan; Winchester, B.; Zhang, J. X.; He, Q.; Chu, Y. H.; Nelson, C. T.; Rzchowski, M. S.; Pan, X. Q.; Ramesh, R.; Chen , L.Q.; Eom, C.B.

    2010-04-01

    Multiferroics, where (anti-) ferromagnetic, ferroelectric, and ferroelastic order parameters coexist [1-5], enables manipulation of magnetic ordering by electric field through switching of the electric polarization [6-9]. It has been shown that realization of magnetoelectric coupling in single-phase multiferroic such as BiFeO3 requires ferroelastic (71o, 109o) rather than ferroelectric (180o) domain switching [6]. However, the control of such ferroleastic switching in a singlephase system has been a significant challenge as elastic interactions tend to destabilize small switched volumes, resulting in subsequent ferroelastic backswitching at zero electric field, thus disappearance of nonvolatile information storage [10, 11]. Guided by our phase-field simulations, we here report an approach to stabilize ferroelastic switching by eliminating the stress-induced instability responsible for back-switching using isolated monodomain BiFeO3islands. This work demonstrates a critical step to control and utilize nonvolatile magnetoelectric coupling at the nanoscale. Beyond magnetoelectric coupling, it provides a framework for exploring a route to control multiple order parameters coupled to ferroelastic order in other low-symmetry materials.

  5. Evolution of string-wall networks and axionic domain wall problem

    SciTech Connect

    Hiramatsu, Takashi; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Saikawa, Ken'ichi E-mail: kawasaki@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2011-08-01

    We study the cosmological evolution of domain walls bounded by strings which arise naturally in axion models. If we introduce a bias in the potential, walls become metastable and finally disappear. We perform two dimensional lattice simulations of domain wall networks and estimate the decay rate of domain walls. By using the numerical results, we give a constraint for the bias parameter and the Peccei-Quinn scale. We also discuss the possibility to probe axion models by direct detection of gravitational waves produced by domain walls.

  6. Chiral damping of magnetic domain walls.

    PubMed

    Jué, Emilie; Safeer, C K; Drouard, Marc; Lopez, Alexandre; Balint, Paul; Buda-Prejbeanu, Liliana; Boulle, Olivier; Auffret, Stephane; Schuhl, Alain; Manchon, Aurelien; Miron, Ioan Mihai; Gaudin, Gilles

    2016-03-01

    Structural symmetry breaking in magnetic materials is responsible for the existence of multiferroics, current-induced spin-orbit torques and some topological magnetic structures. In this Letter we report that the structural inversion asymmetry (SIA) gives rise to a chiral damping mechanism, which is evidenced by measuring the field-driven domain-wall (DW) motion in perpendicularly magnetized asymmetric Pt/Co/Pt trilayers. The DW dynamics associated with the chiral damping and those with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) exhibit identical spatial symmetry. However, both scenarios are differentiated by their time reversal properties: whereas DMI is a conservative effect that can be modelled by an effective field, the chiral damping is purely dissipative and has no influence on the equilibrium magnetic texture. When the DW motion is modulated by an in-plane magnetic field, it reveals the structure of the internal fields experienced by the DWs, allowing one to distinguish the physical mechanism. The chiral damping enriches the spectrum of physical phenomena engendered by the SIA, and is essential for conceiving DW and skyrmion devices owing to its coexistence with DMI (ref. ). PMID:26689141

  7. Domain wall QCD with physical quark masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, T.; Boyle, P. A.; Christ, N. H.; Frison, J.; Garron, N.; Hudspith, R. J.; Izubuchi, T.; Janowski, T.; Jung, C.; Jüttner, A.; Kelly, C.; Kenway, R. D.; Lehner, C.; Marinkovic, M.; Mawhinney, R. D.; McGlynn, G.; Murphy, D. J.; Ohta, S.; Portelli, A.; Sachrajda, C. T.; Soni, A.; Rbc; Ukqcd Collaborations

    2016-04-01

    We present results for several light hadronic quantities (fπ , fK, BK, mu d, ms, t01 /2, w0) obtained from simulations of 2 +1 flavor domain wall lattice QCD with large physical volumes and nearly physical pion masses at two lattice spacings. We perform a short, O (3 )%, extrapolation in pion mass to the physical values by combining our new data in a simultaneous chiral/continuum "global fit" with a number of other ensembles with heavier pion masses. We use the physical values of mπ, mK and mΩ to determine the two quark masses and the scale—all other quantities are outputs from our simulations. We obtain results with subpercent statistical errors and negligible chiral and finite-volume systematics for these light hadronic quantities, including fπ=130.2 (9 ) MeV ; fK=155.5 (8 ) MeV ; the average up/down quark mass and strange quark mass in the MS ¯ scheme at 3 GeV, 2.997(49) and 81.64(1.17) MeV respectively; and the neutral kaon mixing parameter, BK, in the renormalization group invariant scheme, 0.750(15) and the MS ¯ scheme at 3 GeV, 0.530(11).

  8. Chiral damping of magnetic domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jué, Emilie; Safeer, C. K.; Drouard, Marc; Lopez, Alexandre; Balint, Paul; Buda-Prejbeanu, Liliana; Boulle, Olivier; Auffret, Stephane; Schuhl, Alain; Manchon, Aurelien; Miron, Ioan Mihai; Gaudin, Gilles

    2016-03-01

    Structural symmetry breaking in magnetic materials is responsible for the existence of multiferroics, current-induced spin-orbit torques and some topological magnetic structures. In this Letter we report that the structural inversion asymmetry (SIA) gives rise to a chiral damping mechanism, which is evidenced by measuring the field-driven domain-wall (DW) motion in perpendicularly magnetized asymmetric Pt/Co/Pt trilayers. The DW dynamics associated with the chiral damping and those with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) exhibit identical spatial symmetry. However, both scenarios are differentiated by their time reversal properties: whereas DMI is a conservative effect that can be modelled by an effective field, the chiral damping is purely dissipative and has no influence on the equilibrium magnetic texture. When the DW motion is modulated by an in-plane magnetic field, it reveals the structure of the internal fields experienced by the DWs, allowing one to distinguish the physical mechanism. The chiral damping enriches the spectrum of physical phenomena engendered by the SIA, and is essential for conceiving DW and skyrmion devices owing to its coexistence with DMI (ref. ).

  9. Dynamics of domain wall networks with junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Avelino, P. P.; Oliveira, J. C. R. E.; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Menezes, J.; Menezes, R.

    2008-11-15

    We use a combination of analytic tools and an extensive set of the largest and most accurate three-dimensional field theory numerical simulations to study the dynamics of domain wall networks with junctions. We build upon our previous work and consider a class of models which, in the limit of large number N of coupled scalar fields, approaches the so-called ''ideal'' model (in terms of its potential to lead to network frustration). We consider values of N between N=2 and N=20, and a range of cosmological epochs, and we also compare this class of models with other toy models used in the past. In all cases we find compelling evidence for a gradual approach to scaling, strongly supporting our no-frustration conjecture. We also discuss the various possible types of junctions (including cases where there is a hierarchy of them) and their roles in the dynamics of the network. Finally, we provide a cosmological Zel'dovich-type bound on the energy scale of this kind of defect network: it must be lower than 10 keV.

  10. Domain Walls in AdS-EINSTEIN-SCALAR Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Sangheon

    In this paper, we show that the supergravity theory which is dual to ABJM field theory can be consistently reduced to scalar-coupled AdS-Einstein gravity and then consider the reflection symmetric domain wall and its small fluctuation. It is also shown that this domain wall solution is none other than dimensional reduction of M2-brane configuration.

  11. Asymmetric Domain Walls of Small Angle in Soft Ferromagnetic Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döring, Lukas; Ignat, Radu

    2016-05-01

    We focus on a special type of domain wall appearing in the Landau-Lifshitz theory for soft ferromagnetic films. These domain walls are divergence-free S^2-valued transition layers that connect two directions {m_θ^± in S^2} (differing by an angle {2θ}) and minimize the Dirichlet energy. Our main result is the rigorous derivation of the asymptotic structure and energy of such "asymmetric" domain walls in the limit {θ downarrow 0}. As an application, we deduce that a supercritical bifurcation causes the transition from symmetric to asymmetric walls in the full micromagnetic model.

  12. Mechanically driven domain wall movement in magnetoelastic nanomagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathurin, Théo; Giordano, Stefano; Dusch, Yannick; Tiercelin, Nicolas; Pernod, Philippe; Preobrazhensky, Vladimir

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic domain walls are fundamental objects arising in ferromagnetic materials, largely investigated both through micromagnetic simulations and experiments. While current- and field-based techniques for inducing domain wall propagation have been widely studied for fundamental understanding and application-oriented purposes, the possibility to manipulate domain walls using mechanical stress in magnetoelastic materials has only recently drawn interest. Here, a complete analytical model describing stress-induced transverse domain wall movement in ferromagnetic nanostripe with variable cross-section is presented. This approach yields a nonlinear integro-differential equation describing the magnetization field. Its numerical implementation, based on the nonlinear relaxation method, demonstrates the possibility to precisely control the position of a domain wall through mechanical action.

  13. Ferroelectric domain wall motion induced by polarized light.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Marcos, Fernando; Del Campo, Adolfo; Marchet, Pascal; Fernández, Jose F

    2015-01-01

    Ferroelectric materials exhibit spontaneous and stable polarization, which can usually be reoriented by an applied external electric field. The electrically switchable nature of this polarization is at the core of various ferroelectric devices. The motion of the associated domain walls provides the basis for ferroelectric memory, in which the storage of data bits is achieved by driving domain walls that separate regions with different polarization directions. Here we show the surprising ability to move ferroelectric domain walls of a BaTiO₃ single crystal by varying the polarization angle of a coherent light source. This unexpected coupling between polarized light and ferroelectric polarization modifies the stress induced in the BaTiO₃ at the domain wall, which is observed using in situ confocal Raman spectroscopy. This effect potentially leads to the non-contact remote control of ferroelectric domain walls by light. PMID:25779918

  14. Contribution of domain wall networks to the CMB power spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazanu, A.; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Shellard, E. P. S.

    2015-07-01

    We use three domain wall simulations from the radiation era to the late-time dark energy domination era based on the PRS algorithm to calculate the energy-momentum tensor components of domain wall networks in an expanding universe. Unequal time correlators in the radiation, matter and cosmological constant epochs are calculated using the scaling regime of each of the simulations. The CMB power spectrum of a network of domain walls is determined. The first ever quantitative constraint for the domain wall surface tension is obtained using a Markov chain Monte Carlo method; an energy scale of domain walls of 0.93 MeV, which is close but below the Zel'dovich bound, is determined.

  15. Thermal effects on transverse domain wall dynamics in magnetic nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Leliaert, J.; Van de Wiele, B.; Vandermeulen, J.; Coene, A.; Dupré, L.; Vansteenkiste, A.; Waeyenberge, B. Van; Laurson, L.; Durin, G.

    2015-05-18

    Magnetic domain walls are proposed as data carriers in future spintronic devices, whose reliability depends on a complete understanding of the domain wall motion. Applications based on an accurate positioning of domain walls are inevitably influenced by thermal fluctuations. In this letter, we present a micromagnetic study of the thermal effects on this motion. As spin-polarized currents are the most used driving mechanism for domain walls, we have included this in our analysis. Our results show that at finite temperatures, the domain wall velocity has a drift and diffusion component, which are in excellent agreement with the theoretical values obtained from a generalized 1D model. The drift and diffusion component are independent of each other in perfect nanowires, and the mean square displacement scales linearly with time and temperature.

  16. Ferroelectric domain wall motion induced by polarized light

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Marcos, Fernando; Del Campo, Adolfo; Marchet, Pascal; Fernández, Jose F.

    2015-01-01

    Ferroelectric materials exhibit spontaneous and stable polarization, which can usually be reoriented by an applied external electric field. The electrically switchable nature of this polarization is at the core of various ferroelectric devices. The motion of the associated domain walls provides the basis for ferroelectric memory, in which the storage of data bits is achieved by driving domain walls that separate regions with different polarization directions. Here we show the surprising ability to move ferroelectric domain walls of a BaTiO3 single crystal by varying the polarization angle of a coherent light source. This unexpected coupling between polarized light and ferroelectric polarization modifies the stress induced in the BaTiO3 at the domain wall, which is observed using in situ confocal Raman spectroscopy. This effect potentially leads to the non-contact remote control of ferroelectric domain walls by light. PMID:25779918

  17. High-temperature phase transformation and topochemical nature in ferroelastic (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kwang-Sei; Oh, In-Hwan; Ko, Jae-Hyeon

    2014-04-01

    The electrical conductivity of ferroelastic ammonium sulfate (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} revealed an anomaly at around 130 °C (=403 K, T{sub P}) on heating with large and irreversible thermal hysteresis through thermal cycle. Ferroelastic domain walls and surface morphology of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} were investigated by hot-stage polarizing microscopy. Structural phase transition from an orthorhombic ferroelastic phase to a hexagonal paraelastic phase was not identified at T{sub P} upon heating. On further heating above T{sub P}, microscopic spots appeared and grew on the crystal surface, suggesting that the high-temperature anomaly at T{sub P} was an indication of an onset of thermal decomposition controlled by topochemical factors. The increase of electrical conductivity above T{sub P} was attributed to proton migration. - Graphical abstract: Surface morphology of the (100) face of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} on heating, showing chemical reaction at the surface. - Highlights: • We investigate the high-temperature phase transformation of ammonium sulfate. • The increasing conductivity upon heating is attributed to proton migration. • Structural phase transition from orthorhombic to hexagonal phase is not confirmed. • High-temperature anomaly is related to an onset of thermal decomposition. • The nature of the high-temperature anomaly is topochemical controlled by defects.

  18. Ballistic rectification of vortex domain wall chirality at nanowire corners

    SciTech Connect

    Omari, K.; Bradley, R. C.; Broomhall, T. J.; Hodges, M. P. P.; Hayward, T. J.; Rosamond, M. C.; Linfield, E. H.; Im, M.-Y.; Fischer, P.

    2015-11-30

    The interactions of vortex domain walls with corners in planar magnetic nanowires are probed using magnetic soft X-ray transmission microscopy. We show that when the domain walls are propagated into sharp corners using applied magnetic fields above a critical value, their chiralities are rectified to either clockwise or anticlockwise circulation depending on whether the corners turn left or right. Single-shot focused magneto-optic Kerr effect measurements are then used to demonstrate how, when combined with modes of domain propagation that conserve vortex chirality, this allows us to dramatically reduce the stochasticity of domain pinning at artificial defect sites. Our results provide a tool for controlling domain wall chirality and pinning behavior both in further experimental studies and in future domain wall-based memory, logic and sensor technologies.

  19. Ballistic rectification of vortex domain wall chirality at nanowire corners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omari, K.; Bradley, R. C.; Broomhall, T. J.; Hodges, M. P. P.; Rosamond, M. C.; Linfield, E. H.; Im, M.-Y.; Fischer, P.; Hayward, T. J.

    2015-11-01

    The interactions of vortex domain walls with corners in planar magnetic nanowires are probed using magnetic soft X-ray transmission microscopy. We show that when the domain walls are propagated into sharp corners using applied magnetic fields above a critical value, their chiralities are rectified to either clockwise or anticlockwise circulation depending on whether the corners turn left or right. Single-shot focused magneto-optic Kerr effect measurements are then used to demonstrate how, when combined with modes of domain propagation that conserve vortex chirality, this allows us to dramatically reduce the stochasticity of domain pinning at artificial defect sites. Our results provide a tool for controlling domain wall chirality and pinning behavior both in further experimental studies and in future domain wall-based memory, logic and sensor technologies.

  20. Formation of charged ferroelectric domain walls with controlled periodicity.

    PubMed

    Bednyakov, Petr S; Sluka, Tomas; Tagantsev, Alexander K; Damjanovic, Dragan; Setter, Nava

    2015-01-01

    Charged domain walls in proper ferroelectrics were shown recently to possess metallic-like conductivity. Unlike conventional heterointerfaces, these walls can be displaced inside a dielectric by an electric field, which is of interest for future electronic circuitry. In addition, theory predicts that charged domain walls may influence the electromechanical response of ferroelectrics, with strong enhancement upon increased charged domain wall density. The existence of charged domain walls in proper ferroelectrics is disfavoured by their high formation energy and methods of their preparation in predefined patterns are unknown. Here we develop the theoretical background for the formation of charged domain walls in proper ferroelectrics using energy considerations and outline favourable conditions for their engineering. We experimentally demonstrate, in BaTiO3 single crystals the controlled build-up of high density charged domain wall patterns, down to a spacing of 7 μm with a predominant mixed electronic and ionic screening scenario, hinting to a possible exploitation of charged domain walls in agile electronics and sensing devices. PMID:26516026

  1. Formation of charged ferroelectric domain walls with controlled periodicity

    PubMed Central

    Bednyakov, Petr S.; Sluka, Tomas; Tagantsev, Alexander K.; Damjanovic, Dragan; Setter, Nava

    2015-01-01

    Charged domain walls in proper ferroelectrics were shown recently to possess metallic-like conductivity. Unlike conventional heterointerfaces, these walls can be displaced inside a dielectric by an electric field, which is of interest for future electronic circuitry. In addition, theory predicts that charged domain walls may influence the electromechanical response of ferroelectrics, with strong enhancement upon increased charged domain wall density. The existence of charged domain walls in proper ferroelectrics is disfavoured by their high formation energy and methods of their preparation in predefined patterns are unknown. Here we develop the theoretical background for the formation of charged domain walls in proper ferroelectrics using energy considerations and outline favourable conditions for their engineering. We experimentally demonstrate, in BaTiO3 single crystals the controlled build-up of high density charged domain wall patterns, down to a spacing of 7 μm with a predominant mixed electronic and ionic screening scenario, hinting to a possible exploitation of charged domain walls in agile electronics and sensing devices. PMID:26516026

  2. Domain walls of linear polarization in isotropic Kerr media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louis, Y.; Sheppard, A. P.; Haelterman, M.

    1997-09-01

    We present a new type of domain-wall vector solitary waves in isotropic self-defocusing Kerr media. These domain walls consist of localized structures separating uniform field domains of orthogonal linear polarizations. They result from the interplay between diffraction, self-phase modulation and cross-phase modulation in cases where the nonlinear birefringence coefficient B = {χxyyx(3)}/{χxxxx(3)} is negative. Numerical simulations show that these new vector solitary waves are stable.

  3. Dynamical evolution of domain walls in an expanding universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Press, William H.; Ryden, Barbara S.; Spergel, David N.

    1989-01-01

    Whenever the potential of a scalar field has two or more separated, degenerate minima, domain walls form as the universe cools. The evolution of the resulting network of domain walls is calculated for the case of two potential minima in two and three dimensions, including wall annihilation, crossing, and reconnection effects. The nature of the evolution is found to be largely independent of the rate at which the universe expands. Wall annihilation and reconnection occur almost as fast as causality allows, so that the horizon volume is 'swept clean' and contains, at any time, only about one, fairly smooth, wall. Quantitative statistics are given. The total area of wall per volume decreases as the first power of time. The relative slowness of the decrease and the smoothness of the wall on the horizon scale make it impossible for walls to both generate large-scale structure and be consistent with quadrupole microwave background anisotropy limits.

  4. Imaging Ferroelectric Domains and Domain Walls Using Charge Gradient Microscopy: Role of Screening Charges.

    PubMed

    Tong, Sheng; Jung, Il Woong; Choi, Yoon-Young; Hong, Seungbum; Roelofs, Andreas

    2016-02-23

    Advanced scanning probe microscopies (SPMs) open up the possibilities of the next-generation ferroic devices that utilize both domains and domain walls as active elements. However, current SPMs lack the capability of dynamically monitoring the motion of domains and domain walls in conjunction with the transport of the screening charges that lower the total electrostatic energy of both domains and domain walls. Charge gradient microscopy (CGM) is a strong candidate to overcome these shortcomings because it can map domains and domain walls at high speed and mechanically remove the screening charges. Yet the underlying mechanism of the CGM signals is not fully understood due to the complexity of the electrostatic interactions. Here, we designed a semiconductor-metal CGM tip, which can separate and quantify the ferroelectric domain and domain wall signals by simply changing its scanning direction. Our investigation reveals that the domain wall signals are due to the spatial change of polarization charges, while the domain signals are due to continuous removal and supply of screening charges at the CGM tip. In addition, we observed asymmetric CGM domain currents from the up and down domains, which are originated from the different debonding energies and the amount of the screening charges on positive and negative bound charges. We believe that our findings can help design CGM with high spatial resolution and lead to breakthroughs in information storage and energy-harvesting devices. PMID:26751281

  5. Ferroelastic twin structures in epitaxial WO{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Shinhee; Woo, Chang-Su; Lee, Jin Hong; Chu, Kanghyun; Kim, Gi-Yeop; Choi, Si-Young; Sharma, Pankaj; Seidel, Jan; Song, Jong Hyun; Chung, Sung-Yoon; Yang, Chan-Ho

    2015-12-21

    Tungsten trioxide is a binary oxide that has potential applications in electrochromic windows, gas sensors, photo-catalysts, and superconductivity. Here, we analyze the crystal structure of atomically flat epitaxial layers on YAlO{sub 3} single crystal substrates and perform nanoscale investigations of the ferroelastic twins revealing a hierarchical structure at multiple length scales. We have found that the finest stripe ferroelastic twin walls along pseudocubic 〈100〉 axes are associated with cooperative mosaic rotations of the monoclinic films and the larger stripe domains along pseudocubic 〈110〉 axes are created to reduce the misfit strain through a commensurate matching of an effective in-plane lattice parameter between film and substrate. The typical widths of the two fine and larger stripe domains increase with film thickness following a power law with scaling exponents of ∼0.6 and ∼0.4, respectively. We have also found that the twin structure can be readily influenced by illumination with an electron beam or a tip-based mechanical compression.

  6. Polarization control at spin-driven ferroelectric domain walls.

    PubMed

    Leo, Naëmi; Bergman, Anders; Cano, Andres; Poudel, Narayan; Lorenz, Bernd; Fiebig, Manfred; Meier, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Unusual electronic states arise at ferroelectric domain walls due to the local symmetry reduction, strain gradients and electrostatics. This particularly applies to improper ferroelectrics, where the polarization is induced by a structural or magnetic order parameter. Because of the subordinate nature of the polarization, the rigid mechanical and electrostatic boundary conditions that constrain domain walls in proper ferroics are lifted. Here we show that spin-driven ferroelectricity promotes the emergence of charged domain walls. This provides new degrees of flexibility for controlling domain-wall charges in a deterministic and reversible process. We create and position a domain wall by an electric field in Mn0.95Co0.05WO4. With a magnetic field we then rotate the polarization and convert neutral into charged domain walls, while its magnetic properties peg the wall to its location. Using atomistic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert simulations we quantify the polarization changes across the two wall types and highlight their general occurrence. PMID:25868608

  7. Bit Storage by 360 (°) Domain Walls in Ferromagnetic Nanorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muratov, Cyrill B.; Osipov, Viatcheslav V.

    2009-08-01

    We propose a design for the magnetic memory cell which allows an efficient storage, recording, and readout of information on the basis of thin film ferromagnetic nanorings. The information bit is represented by the polarity of a stable 360$^\\circ$ domain wall introduced into the ring. Switching between the two magnetization states is achieved by the current applied to a wire passing through the ring, whereby the $360^\\circ$ domain wall splits into two charged $180^\\circ$ walls, which then move to the opposite extreme of the ring to recombine into a $360^\\circ$ wall of the opposite polarity.

  8. Phase field simulation of domain switching dynamics in multiaxial lead zirconate titanate thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britson, Jason

    The defining characteristic of ferroelectric materials is their ability to be switched between energetically equivalent polarization states. This behavior has led to an interest in ferroelectrics for a wide range of bulk and thin film applications such as mechanical actuators and ferroelectric random access memory devices. Ferroelectric switching depends on domain wall motion, however, and is critically influenced by the existence of defects such as dislocations and preexisting domains. Domain wall motion in thin film applications can be controlled by individual local defects due to the reduced length scale of the system. This dissertation describes the impact of preexisting ferroelastic domains and misfits dislocations in coherent (001)-oriented Pb(Zr0.2,Ti0.8)O3 (PZT) thin films on the switching response and domain structure. A phase field model based on the Landau-Ginzburg-Devonshire theory that accounts for the electrostatic and mechanical interactions is used to describe domain structures in ferroelectric PZT thin films. To solve the governing equations a semi-implicit Fourier-Spectral scheme is developed that accommodates boundary conditions appropriate to the thin film geometry. Errors are reduced in the solutions at the film edges through extensions to the model developed to correct the Fourier transform around stationary discontinuities at the thin film edges. This correction is shown to result in increased accuracy of the phase field model needed to appropriately describe dynamic switching responses in the thin film. Investigation of switching around preexisting ferroelastic domains showed these defects are strong obstacles to switching in PZT thin films. Directly above the ferroelastic domain the magnitude of the required nucleation bias underneath a tip-like electrode was found to be elevated compared to the required bias far from the domain. Locally both the piezoelectric and dielectric responses of the thin film were found to be suppressed, which is

  9. Mirror Domain Structures Induced by Interlayer Magnetic Wall Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lew, W. S.; Li, S. P.; Lopez-Diaz, L.; Hatton, D. C.; Bland, J. A.

    2003-05-01

    We have found that during giant magnetoresistance measurements in ˜10×10 mm2 NiFe/Cu/Co continuous film spin-valve structures, the resistance value suddenly drops to its absolute minimum during the NiFe reversal. The results reveal that the alignment of all magnetic domains in the NiFe film follow exactly that of corresponding domains in the Co film for an appropriate applied field strength. This phenomenon is caused by trapping of the NiFe domain walls through the magnetostatic interaction with the Co domain-wall stray fields. Consequently, the interlayer domain-wall coupling induces a mirror domain structure in the magnetic trilayer.

  10. Microwave conductance of ferroelectric domain walls in lead titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tselev, Alexander; Cao, Ye; Yu, Pu; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Maksymovych, Petro

    Numerous theoretical works predicted electronically conducting domain walls in otherwise insulating ferroelectric crystals. A number of recent experiments reported conducting walls, although conductivity itself and a conclusive proof of conductance mechanism remain elusive, largely due to the electrical contact problem. The latter can be overcome using high-frequency AC voltage. Here we will present our successful measurements of microwave conductance at 180o domain walls in lead titanate using microwave microscopy. AC conducting domain walls can be repeatably reconfigured and have extraordinary stability in time and temperature. AC conductivity is detected even when DC is not. Quantitative modeling reveals that the conductance of domain walls is comparable to doped silicon. We will also present a new and robust mechanism to create charged domain walls in any ferroelectric lattice. Overall, this sets the stage for a new generation of local experiments on conducting domain walls, and furthers the prospects of their application in fast electronic devices. AT, YC, SVK, PM supported by Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, U. S. DOE. PY supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (2015CB921700).

  11. Current induced domain wall motion: Analysis and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei

    The subject of current induced magnetic reversal has received considerable interest recently due to its attractive property for magnetic nanodevice applications. In this thesis, 3D simulations are performed to study current induced magnetic domain motion in magnetic nanostrips and nanowires based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert model with a spin transfer torque. For sufficiently thin strips and wires, the LLG equation can be reduced to a one dimensional model. For the simplified models, the dynamic laws for the domain wall motion are derived from a matched asymptotic expansion. The results are consistent with the numerical results. We also study the current induced magnetic domain wall motion in magnetic nanostrips with defects. Our numerical results show that when a domain wall passes through a defect, it experiences a strong attracting force. There is a critical current density below which the domain wall will oscillate around the defect and eventually be pinned at the defect. From the asymptotic expansion analysis, we show that the amplitude of this domain wall oscillation can be resonantly amplified by an ac current with proper frequency for the first time. This suggests a way to reduce the critical current for depinning of the domain wall.

  12. Highly Efficient Domain Walls Injection in Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy Nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. F.; Gan, W. L.; Kwon, J.; Luo, F. L.; Lim, G. J.; Wang, J. B.; Lew, W. S.

    2016-04-01

    Electrical injection of magnetic domain walls in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy nanowire is crucial for data bit writing in domain wall-based magnetic memory and logic devices. Conventionally, the current pulse required to nucleate a domain wall is approximately ~1012 A/m2. Here, we demonstrate an energy efficient structure to inject domain walls. Under an applied electric potential, our proposed Π-shaped stripline generates a highly concentrated current distribution. This creates a highly localized magnetic field that quickly initiates the nucleation of a magnetic domain. The formation and motion of the resulting domain walls can then be electrically detected by means of Ta Hall bars across the nanowire. Our measurements show that the Π-shaped stripline can deterministically write a magnetic data bit in 15 ns even with a relatively low current density of 5.34 × 1011 A/m2. Micromagnetic simulations reveal the evolution of the domain nucleation – first, by the formation of a pair of magnetic bubbles, then followed by their rapid expansion into a single domain. Finally, we also demonstrate experimentally that our injection geometry can perform bit writing using only about 30% of the electrical energy as compared to a conventional injection line.

  13. Highly Efficient Domain Walls Injection in Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy Nanowire

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, S. F.; Gan, W. L.; Kwon, J.; Luo, F. L.; Lim, G. J.; Wang, J. B.; Lew, W. S.

    2016-01-01

    Electrical injection of magnetic domain walls in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy nanowire is crucial for data bit writing in domain wall-based magnetic memory and logic devices. Conventionally, the current pulse required to nucleate a domain wall is approximately ~1012 A/m2. Here, we demonstrate an energy efficient structure to inject domain walls. Under an applied electric potential, our proposed Π-shaped stripline generates a highly concentrated current distribution. This creates a highly localized magnetic field that quickly initiates the nucleation of a magnetic domain. The formation and motion of the resulting domain walls can then be electrically detected by means of Ta Hall bars across the nanowire. Our measurements show that the Π-shaped stripline can deterministically write a magnetic data bit in 15 ns even with a relatively low current density of 5.34 × 1011 A/m2. Micromagnetic simulations reveal the evolution of the domain nucleation – first, by the formation of a pair of magnetic bubbles, then followed by their rapid expansion into a single domain. Finally, we also demonstrate experimentally that our injection geometry can perform bit writing using only about 30% of the electrical energy as compared to a conventional injection line. PMID:27098108

  14. Highly Efficient Domain Walls Injection in Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy Nanowire.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S F; Gan, W L; Kwon, J; Luo, F L; Lim, G J; Wang, J B; Lew, W S

    2016-01-01

    Electrical injection of magnetic domain walls in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy nanowire is crucial for data bit writing in domain wall-based magnetic memory and logic devices. Conventionally, the current pulse required to nucleate a domain wall is approximately ~10(12) A/m(2). Here, we demonstrate an energy efficient structure to inject domain walls. Under an applied electric potential, our proposed Π-shaped stripline generates a highly concentrated current distribution. This creates a highly localized magnetic field that quickly initiates the nucleation of a magnetic domain. The formation and motion of the resulting domain walls can then be electrically detected by means of Ta Hall bars across the nanowire. Our measurements show that the Π-shaped stripline can deterministically write a magnetic data bit in 15 ns even with a relatively low current density of 5.34 × 10(11) A/m(2). Micromagnetic simulations reveal the evolution of the domain nucleation - first, by the formation of a pair of magnetic bubbles, then followed by their rapid expansion into a single domain. Finally, we also demonstrate experimentally that our injection geometry can perform bit writing using only about 30% of the electrical energy as compared to a conventional injection line. PMID:27098108

  15. Scalar triplet on a domain wall: an exact solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gani, Vakhid A.; Lizunova, Mariya A.; Radomskiy, Roman V.

    2016-04-01

    We study a model with a real scalar Higgs field and a scalar triplet field that allows existence of a topological defect — a domain wall. The wall breaks the global O(3) symmetry of the model, which gives rise to non-Abelian orientational degrees of freedom. We found an exact analytic solution that describes a domain wall with a localized configuration of the triplet field on it. This solution enables one to calculate contributions to the action from the orientational and translational degrees of freedom of the triplet field. We also study the linear stability of the domain wall with the triplet field switched off. We obtain that degrees of freedom localized on the wall can appear or do not appear depending on the parameters of the model.

  16. Goldstone bosons versus domain walls bounded by cosmic strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvali, G. R.

    1991-08-01

    It is shown that two possible schemes of string bounded domain wall formation are closely related. Walls can be avoided if a certain type of couplings between scalars, responsible for string and wall formation, is excluded from the potential. This enlarges the continous global symmetry of the model which, being broken, instead of domain walls gives rise to global strings and Gold-stone bosons. A realistic example of spontaneously broken family symmetry is considered. It is shown that the existence of the axion in the model with local chiral flavour symmetry SU(3)H can solve the domain wall problem. I would very much like to thank Z. Berezhiani, T. Bibilashvili, J. Chkareuli, E. Gurvich, O. Kancheli and S.M. Mahajan for very useful discussions.

  17. Chirality-Dependent Transmission of Spin Waves through Domain Walls.

    PubMed

    Buijnsters, F J; Ferreiros, Y; Fasolino, A; Katsnelson, M I

    2016-04-01

    Spin-wave technology (magnonics) has the potential to further reduce the size and energy consumption of information-processing devices. In the submicrometer regime (exchange spin waves), topological defects such as domain walls may constitute active elements to manipulate spin waves and perform logic operations. We predict that spin waves that pass through a domain wall in an ultrathin perpendicular-anisotropy film experience a phase shift that depends on the orientation of the domain wall (chirality). The effect, which is absent in bulk materials, originates from the interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction and can be interpreted as a geometric phase. We demonstrate analytically and by means of micromagnetic simulations that the phase shift is strong enough to switch between constructive and destructive interference. The two chirality states of the domain wall may serve as a memory bit or spin-wave switch in magnonic devices. PMID:27104725

  18. BPS pion domain walls in the supersymmetric chiral Lagrangian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudnason, Sven Bjarke; Nitta, Muneto; Sasaki, Shin

    2016-07-01

    We construct exact solutions of BPS pion domain walls in the four-dimensional N =1 supersymmetric S U (N ) chiral Lagrangian with pion masses introduced via linear and quadratic superpotentials. The model admits N discrete vacua in the center of S U (N ) for the linear superpotential. In addition to the latter, new vacua appear for the quadratic superpotential. We find that the domain wall solutions of pions (Nambu-Goldstone bosons) that interpolate between a pair of (pion) vacua preserve half of supersymmetry. Contrary to our expectations, we have not been able to find domain walls involving the quasi-Nambu-Goldstone bosons present in the theory, which in turn has the consequence that not all vacua of the theory are connected by a BPS domain wall solution.

  19. Domain wall assisted GMR head with spin-Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arun, R.; Sabareesan, P.; Daniel, M.

    2016-05-01

    We theoretically study the dynamics of a field induced domain wall in the Py/Pt bi-layer structure in the presence of spin-Hall effect (SHE) by solving the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation along with the adiabatic, nonadiabatic and SHE spin-transfer torques (STTs). It is observed that a weak magnetic field moves the domain wall with high velocity in the presence of SHE and the direction of the velocity is changed by changing the direction of the weak field. The numerical results show that the magnetization of the ferromagnetic layer can be reversed quickly through domain wall motion by changing the direction of a weak external field in the presence of SHE while the direction of current is fixed. The SHE reduces the magnetization reversal time of 1000 nm length strip by 14.7 ns. This study is extended to model a domain wall based GMR (Giant Magnetoresistance) read head with SHE.

  20. Chirality-Dependent Transmission of Spin Waves through Domain Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buijnsters, F. J.; Ferreiros, Y.; Fasolino, A.; Katsnelson, M. I.

    2016-04-01

    Spin-wave technology (magnonics) has the potential to further reduce the size and energy consumption of information-processing devices. In the submicrometer regime (exchange spin waves), topological defects such as domain walls may constitute active elements to manipulate spin waves and perform logic operations. We predict that spin waves that pass through a domain wall in an ultrathin perpendicular-anisotropy film experience a phase shift that depends on the orientation of the domain wall (chirality). The effect, which is absent in bulk materials, originates from the interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction and can be interpreted as a geometric phase. We demonstrate analytically and by means of micromagnetic simulations that the phase shift is strong enough to switch between constructive and destructive interference. The two chirality states of the domain wall may serve as a memory bit or spin-wave switch in magnonic devices.

  1. Domain wall formation in late-time phase transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, Edward W.; Wang, Yun

    1992-01-01

    We examine domain wall formulation in late time phase transitions. We find that in the invisible axion domain wall phenomenon, thermal effects alone are insufficient to drive different parts of the disconnected vacuum manifold. This suggests that domain walls do not form unless either there is some supplemental (but perhaps not unreasonable) dynamics to localize the scalar field responsible for the phase transition to the low temperature maximum (to an extraordinary precision) before the onset of the phase transition, or there is some non-thermal mechanism to produce large fluctuations in the scalar field. The fact that domain wall production is not a robust prediction of late time transitions may suggest future directions in model building.

  2. Axion cosmology with long-lived domain walls

    SciTech Connect

    Hiramatsu, Takashi; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Saikawa, Ken'ichi; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu E-mail: kawasaki@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp E-mail: sekiguti@a.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the cosmological constraints on axion models where the domain wall number is greater than one. In these models, multiple domain walls attached to strings are formed, and they survive for a long time. Their annihilation occurs due to the effects of explicit symmetry breaking term which might be raised by Planck-scale physics. We perform three-dimensional lattice simulations and compute the spectra of axions and gravitational waves produced by long-lived domain walls. Using the numerical results, we estimated relic density of axions and gravitational waves. We find that the existence of long-lived domain walls leads to the overproduction of cold dark matter axions, while the density of gravitational waves is too small to observe at the present time. Combining the results with other observational constraints, we find that the whole parameter region of models are excluded unless an unacceptable fine-tuning exists.

  3. Electrically controlled pinning of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Koji; Tretiakov, Oleg A.

    2016-03-01

    We propose a method to all-electrically control a domain-wall position in a ferromagnetic nanowire with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. The strength of this interaction can be controlled by an external electric field, which in turn allows a fine tuning of the pinning potential of a spin-spiral domain wall. It allows to create more mobile pinning sites and can also be advantageous for ultra-low power electronics.

  4. Direct observation of closure domain wall mediated spin waves

    SciTech Connect

    Mozooni, Babak McCord, Jeffrey

    2015-07-27

    The generation and guiding of spin waves from and by magnetic domain walls are demonstrated. The spin waves radiate from pinned and oscillating magnetic closure domain walls and propagate linearly along a narrow path formed by the surrounding 180° asymmetric Bloch domain walls. The propagating spin wave modes are directly visualized by time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr microscopy with picosecond temporal resolution. A linear relationship between excitation frequency, wavelength, and number of spin waves per domain exists. Independent of the field excitation frequency, a constant phase velocity of spin waves propagation is obtained. Spin waves characteristics can be tuned by varying the magnetic domain dynamics, allowing for variable spin wave characteristics with magnetic field characteristics and histories.

  5. Quasi-one-dimensional domain walls in ferroelectric ceramics: Evidence from domain dynamics and wall roughness measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pertsev, N. A.; Kiselev, D. A.; Bdikin, I. K.; Kosec, M.; Kholkin, A. L.

    2011-09-01

    Direct measurements of the motion of domain walls in disordered ferroelectrics provide important information on their interaction with defects, which is crucial for the functioning of various ferroelectric devices such as high-K capacitors and ferroelectric-based memories. In this work, we report on the results of the nanoscale measurements of domain-wall velocity and static domain-wall roughness in disordered (Pb,La)(Zr,Ti)O3 (PLZT) ceramics prepared by hot press sintering. Relaxation of domain walls to their equilibrium configurations at short length scales yields the apparent roughness exponent ζ ≈ 0.67 in PLZT 9.5/65/35. At the same time, the dynamical exponent μ was found to be about 0.25 from the independent measurements of domain-wall creep under local application of electric field. An analysis of these two values points to the effective dimensionality deff = 1 for the domain walls in PLZT with high La content. This result is confirmed by the layer-by-layer polishing followed by the imaging of an artificially created domain. The origin of disorder and its dependence on La concentration in PLZT solid solutions are discussed.

  6. Cosmology for a Domain-Wall Brane Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkas, Raymond R.

    I discuss how standard FRW cosmology can arise for a domain-wall brane universe. While standard cosmological evolution is recovered in the thin-wall limit, at finite thickness we find that different particle species experience different cosmological expansion rates. This work was performed in collaboration with Damien P. George and Mark Trodden.

  7. Characteristic microwave background distortions from collapsing domain wall bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, Guenter; Noetzold, Dirk

    1990-01-01

    The magnitude and angular pattern of distortions of the microwave background are analyzed by collapsing spherical domain walls. A characteristic pattern of redshift distortions of red or blue spikes surrounded by blue discs was found. The width and height of a spike is related to the diameter and magnitude of the disc. A measurement of the relations between these quantities thus can serve as an unambiguous indicator for a collapsing spherical domain wall. From the redshift distortion in the blue discs an upper bound was found on the surface energy density of the walls sigma is less than or approximately 8 MeV cubed.

  8. Spin waves and domain wall modes in curved magnetic nanowires.

    PubMed

    Bocklage, Lars; Motl-Ziegler, Sandra; Topp, Jesco; Matsuyama, Toru; Meier, Guido

    2014-07-01

    The confinement of spin waves in inhomogeneous fields and spin wave interaction with domain walls has attracted interest due to possible applications in magnonics. We investigate spin waves in curved ferromagnetic nanowires. The field dispersion and localization of spin waves is revealed by comparison to known modes in stripes and taking into account the specific field reversal of the curved wire. In small wires we find a strongly altered mode spectrum in a certain field regime. Micromagnetic simulations show an extended domain wall within the wire in this field region. The domain wall shows several dynamic modes and changes the remaining spin wave modes. We find mode suppression as well as newly arising modes due to the strong inhomogenous internal field of the wall. PMID:24911994

  9. Detection of electromotive force induced by domain wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Geoffrey

    2010-03-01

    A magnetic domain wall can be displaced by current via the transfer of spin angular momentum from conduction electrons to the local magnetization. The capacity of spin-transfer torque to drive domain wall motion is now well established experimentally and theoretically [1], and is a central topic in the growing field of spintronics. This talk will describe the first experimental evidence [2] that the coupling between spin and charge also works in reverse; namely, that a domain wall driven by a field through a stationary electron gas generates an experimentally-detectible voltage. This new spintronic effect [3] was measured by precisely controlling the motion of a single domain wall in a Permalloy nanowire and isolated from other sources using a field modulation scheme to differentiate between the small domain wall-induced voltage and conventional inductive voltages. The domain wall-induced voltage was found to scale in proportion to the driving field magnitude, and its sign depends only on the direction of domain wall motion. These results are consistent with theoretical predictions [2, 4, 5], and will be discussed in terms of a generalized two-dimensional topological framework [2] capable of treating vortex DWs. [4pt] [1] G.S.D. Beach, M. Tsoi, and J.L. Erskine, J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 320, 1272 (2008). [0pt] [2] S. Yang, G.S.D. Beach, C. Knutson, D. Xiao, Q. Niu, M. Tsoi, and J.L. Erskine, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 067201 (2009). [0pt] [3]. R. McMichael, and M. Stiles, Physics 2, 11 (2009). [0pt] [4] L. Berger, Phys. Rev. B 33, 1572 (1986) [0pt] [5] S. E. Barnes and S. Maekawa, Appl. Phys. 89, 122507 (2006).

  10. Energy of domain walls in ferrite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, M. E.; Prieto, P.; Mendoza, A.; Guzman, O.

    2007-03-01

    MnZn Ferrite films were deposited by RF sputtering on (001) single crystal MgO substrates. AFM images show an increment in grain size with the film thickness. Grains with diameter between φ ˜ 70 and 700 nm have been observed. The coercive field Hc as a function of the grain size reaches a maximum value of about 80 Oe for φc˜ 300 nm. The existence of a multidomain structure associated with a critical grain size was identified by Magneto-optical Kerr effect technique (MOKE). The transition of the one-domain regime to the two-domain regime was observed at a critical grain size of Dc˜ 530 nm. This value agree with values predicted previously. The Jiles-Atherton model (JAM) was used to discuss the experimental hysteresis loops. The k pinning parameter obtained from JAM shows a maximum value of k/μo = 67 Am^2 for grains with Lc˜ 529 nm. The total energy per unit area E was correlated with k and D. We found a simple phenomenological relationship given by E α kD; where D is the magnetic domain width.

  11. Domain walls in supersymmetric QCD: The taming of the zoo

    SciTech Connect

    Binosi, Daniele; ter Veldhuis, Tonnis

    2001-04-15

    We provide a unified picture of the domain wall spectrum in supersymmetric QCD with N{sub c} colors and N{sub f} flavors of quarks in the (anti) fundamental representation. Within the framework of the Veneziano-Yankielowicz-Taylor effective Lagrangian, we consider domain walls connecting chiral symmetry breaking vacua, and we take the quark masses to be degenerate. For N{sub f}/N{sub c}<1/2, there is one BPS saturated domain wall for any value of the quark mass m. For 1/2{<=}N{sub f}/N{sub c}<1 there are two critical masses m{sub *} and m{sub **} which depend on the number of colors and flavors only through the ratio N{sub f}/N{sub c}. If mwalls; if m{sub *}wall; and if m>m{sub **}, there is no domain wall. We numerically determine m{sub *} and m{sub **} as a function of N{sub f}/N{sub c}, and we find that m{sub **} approaches a constant value in the limit that this ratio goes to 1.

  12. Domain wall pinning for racetrack memory using exchange bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polenciuc, I.; Vick, A. J.; Allwood, D. A.; Hayward, T. J.; Vallejo-Fernandez, G.; O'Grady, K.; Hirohata, A.

    2014-10-01

    The pinning of domain walls in ferromagnetic (F) wires is one possible technique for the creation of a solid state magnetic memory. Such a system has been under consideration for some time but one of the main limitations is the control of, and non-uniformity of the domain wall pinning. Techniques such as the lithographic definition of notches and steps in the substrate have had some success in creating local pins but have the disadvantage of being expensive to fabricate and the reproducibility of the domain wall pinning strength is limited. In this letter, we report on an alternative strategy to create pins of reproducible strength using crossed ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic (AF) wires such that exchange bias can be introduced at the crossing points. Such a system has the advantage of ease of fabrication and creating domain wall pins of controlled strength by varying the width of the AF wire. We have achieved domain wall pinning field strengths of up to 37 Oe in a system where the AF wire is deposited above the F wire which is comparable to the values achieved using notches.

  13. Voltage-controlled domain wall traps in ferromagnetic nanowires.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Uwe; Emori, Satoru; Beach, Geoffrey S D

    2013-06-01

    Electrical control of magnetism has the potential to bring about revolutionary new spintronic devices, many of which rely on efficient manipulation of magnetic domain walls in ferromagnetic nanowires. Recently, it has been shown that voltage-induced charge accumulation at a metal-oxide interface can influence domain wall motion in ultrathin metallic ferromagnets, but the effects have been relatively modest and limited to the slow, thermally activated regime. Here we show that a voltage can generate non-volatile switching of magnetic properties at the nanoscale by modulating interfacial chemistry rather than charge density. Using a solid-state ionic conductor as a gate dielectric, we generate unprecedentedly strong voltage-controlled domain wall traps that function as non-volatile, electrically programmable and switchable pinning sites. Pinning strengths of at least 650 Oe can be readily achieved, enough to bring to a standstill domain walls travelling at speeds of at least ~20 m s(-1). We exploit this new magneto-ionic effect to demonstrate a prototype non-volatile memory device in which voltage-controlled domain wall traps facilitate electrical bit selection in a magnetic nanowire register. PMID:23708429

  14. Majorana Fermion Rides on a Magnetic Domain Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Se Kwon; Tewari, Sumanta; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    Owing to the recent progress on endowing the electronic structure of magnetic nanowires with topological properties, the associated topological solitons in the magnetic texture--magnetic domain walls--appear as very natural hosts for exotic electronic excitations. Here, we propose to use the magnetic domain walls to engender Majorana fermions, which has several notable advantages compared to the existing approaches. First of all, the local tunneling density-of-states anomaly associated with the Majorana zero mode bound to a smooth magnetic soliton is immune to most of parasitic artifacts associated with the abrupt physical ends of a wire, which mar the existing experimental probes. Second, a viable route to move and braid Majorana fermions is offered by domain-wall motion. In particular, we envision the recently demonstrated heat-current induced motion of domain walls in insulating ferromagnets as a promising tool for nonintrusive displacement of Majorana modes. This leads us to propose a feasible scheme for braiding domain walls within a magnetic nanowire network, which manifests the nob-Abelian exchange statistics within the Majorana subspace. This work has been supported in part by the U.S. DOE-BES, FAME, and AFOSR grants.

  15. Magnetoelectric domain wall dynamics and its implications for magnetoelectric memory

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Belashchenko, K. D.; Tchernyshyov, O.; Kovalev, Alexey A.; Tretiakov, O. A.

    2016-03-30

    Domain wall dynamics in a magnetoelectric antiferromagnet is analyzed, and its implications for magnetoelectric memory applications are discussed. Cr2O3 is used in the estimates of the materials parameters. It is found that the domain wall mobility has a maximum as a function of the electric field due to the gyrotropic coupling induced by it. In Cr2O3, the maximal mobility of 0.1 m/(s Oe) is reached at E≈0.06 V/nm. Fields of this order may be too weak to overcome the intrinsic depinning field, which is estimated for B-doped Cr2O3. These major drawbacks for device implementation can be overcome by applying amore » small in-plane shear strain, which blocks the domain wall precession. Domain wall mobility of about 0.7 m/(s Oe) can then be achieved at E = 0.2 V/nm. Furthermore, a split-gate scheme is proposed for the domain-wall controlled bit element; its extension to multiple-gate linear arrays can offer advantages in memory density, programmability, and logic functionality.« less

  16. Magnetoelectric domain wall dynamics and its implications for magnetoelectric memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belashchenko, K. D.; Tchernyshyov, O.; Kovalev, Alexey A.; Tretiakov, O. A.

    2016-03-01

    Domain wall dynamics in a magnetoelectric antiferromagnet is analyzed, and its implications for magnetoelectric memory applications are discussed. Cr2O3 is used in the estimates of the materials parameters. It is found that the domain wall mobility has a maximum as a function of the electric field due to the gyrotropic coupling induced by it. In Cr2O3, the maximal mobility of 0.1 m/(s Oe) is reached at E ≈0.06 V/nm. Fields of this order may be too weak to overcome the intrinsic depinning field, which is estimated for B-doped Cr2O3. These major drawbacks for device implementation can be overcome by applying a small in-plane shear strain, which blocks the domain wall precession. Domain wall mobility of about 0.7 m/(s Oe) can then be achieved at E = 0.2 V/nm. A split-gate scheme is proposed for the domain-wall controlled bit element; its extension to multiple-gate linear arrays can offer advantages in memory density, programmability, and logic functionality.

  17. Local Domain-Wall Velocity Engineering via Tailored Potential Landscapes in Ferromagnetic Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Kornel; Krone, Andrea; Mawass, Mohamad-Assaad; Krüger, Benjamin; Weigand, Markus; Stoll, Hermann; Schütz, Gisela; Kläui, Mathias

    2016-02-01

    We report the local control of the domain-wall velocity by tailoring the domain-wall potential landscape via local variations of a curved ring geometry. Employing time-resolved scanning-transmission x-ray microscopy, we dynamically image the motion of domain walls in rotating magnetic fields and quantify the contribution of the spatially varying potential to the domain-wall dynamics. We explain our experimentally obtained angular dependences of domain-wall velocities by the interplay between long-range forces arising from the Zeeman interaction of domain walls with the external magnetic field with local forces arising from variations of domain-wall energy due to a varying ring width. The interplay of these forces leads to distortion-free wall motion, and we use the engineered domain-wall potential landscape for spatial synchronization of domain-wall velocities in ferromagnetic rings, which are both a key prerequisite for the implementation of domain-wall-based devices.

  18. Study of gravitational radiation from cosmic domain walls

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Saikawa, Ken'ichi E-mail: saikawa@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, following the previous study, we evaluate the spectrum of gravitational wave background generated by domain walls which are produced if some discrete symmetry is spontaneously broken in the early universe. We apply two methods to calculate the gravitational wave spectrum: One is to calculate the gravitational wave spectrum directly from numerical simulations, and another is to calculate it indirectly by estimating the unequal time anisotropic stress power spectrum of the scalar field. Both analysises indicate that the slope of the spectrum changes at two characteristic frequencies corresponding to the Hubble radius at the decay of domain walls and the width of domain walls, and that the spectrum between these two characteristic frequencies becomes flat or slightly red tilted. The second method enables us to evaluate the GW spectrum for the frequencies which cannot be resolved in the finite box lattice simulations, but relies on the assumptions for the unequal time correlations of the source.

  19. Domain wall and isocurvature perturbation problems in axion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.; Yoshino, Kazuyoshi

    2013-11-01

    Axion models have two serious cosmological problems, domain wall and isocurvature perturbation problems. In order to solve these problems we investigate the Linde's model in which the field value of the Peccei-Quinn (PQ) scalar is large during inflation. In this model the fluctuations of the PQ field grow after inflation through the parametric resonance and stable axionic strings may be produced, which results in the domain wall problem. We study formation of axionic strings using lattice simulations. It is found that in chaotic inflation the axion model is free from both the domain wall and the isocurvature perturbation problems if the initial misalignment angle θa is smaller than O(10-2). Furthermore, axions can also account for the dark matter for the breaking scale v simeq 1012-16 GeV and the Hubble parameter during inflation Hinflesssim1011-12 GeV in general inflation models.

  20. Magnetic domain walls as reconfigurable spin-wave nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Wagner, K; Kákay, A; Schultheiss, K; Henschke, A; Sebastian, T; Schultheiss, H

    2016-05-01

    In the research field of magnonics, it is envisaged that spin waves will be used as information carriers, promoting operation based on their wave properties. However, the field still faces major challenges. To become fully competitive, novel schemes for energy-efficient control of spin-wave propagation in two dimensions have to be realized on much smaller length scales than used before. In this Letter, we address these challenges with the experimental realization of a novel approach to guide spin waves in reconfigurable, nano-sized magnonic waveguides. For this purpose, we make use of two inherent characteristics of magnetism: the non-volatility of magnetic remanence states and the nanometre dimensions of domain walls formed within these magnetic configurations. We present the experimental observation and micromagnetic simulations of spin-wave propagation inside nano-sized domain walls and realize a first step towards a reconfigurable domain-wall-based magnonic nanocircuitry. PMID:26828849

  1. Ground state and constrained domain walls in Gd /Fe multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Aken, Bas B.; Prieto, José L.; Mathur, Neil D.

    2005-03-01

    The magnetic ground state of antiferromagnetically coupled Gd /Fe multilayers and the evolution of in-plane domain walls is modeled with micromagnetics. The twisted state is characterized by a rapid decrease of the interface angle with increasing magnetic field. We found that for certain ratios MFe:MGd, the twisted state is already present at low fields. However, the magnetic ground state is not only determined by the ratio MFe:MGd but also by the thicknesses of the layers; that is by the total moments of the layer. The dependence of the magnetic ground state is explained by the amount of overlap of the domain walls at the interface. Thicker layers suppress the Fe-aligned and the Gd-aligned state in favor of the twisted state. On the other hand, ultrathin layers exclude the twisted state, since wider domain walls cannot form in these ultrathin layers.

  2. Magnetic domain walls as reconfigurable spin-wave nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, K.; Kákay, A.; Schultheiss, K.; Henschke, A.; Sebastian, T.; Schultheiss, H.

    2016-05-01

    In the research field of magnonics, it is envisaged that spin waves will be used as information carriers, promoting operation based on their wave properties. However, the field still faces major challenges. To become fully competitive, novel schemes for energy-efficient control of spin-wave propagation in two dimensions have to be realized on much smaller length scales than used before. In this Letter, we address these challenges with the experimental realization of a novel approach to guide spin waves in reconfigurable, nano-sized magnonic waveguides. For this purpose, we make use of two inherent characteristics of magnetism: the non-volatility of magnetic remanence states and the nanometre dimensions of domain walls formed within these magnetic configurations. We present the experimental observation and micromagnetic simulations of spin-wave propagation inside nano-sized domain walls and realize a first step towards a reconfigurable domain-wall-based magnonic nanocircuitry.

  3. Epitaxial Engineering of Domain Walls and Distortions in Ferrite Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundy, Julia

    The defining feature of ferroics is the ability of an external stimulus--electric field, magnetic field, or stress--to move domain walls. These topological defects and their motion enables many useful attributes, e.g., memories that can be reversibly written between stable states as well as enhanced conductivity, permittivity, permeability, and piezoelectricity. Although methods are known to drastically increase their density, the placement of domain walls with atomic precision has until now evaded control. Here we engineer the location of domain walls with monolayer precision and exploit this ability to create a novel multiferroic in which ferroelectricity enhances magnetism at all relevant length scales. Starting with hexagonal LuFeO3, a geometric ferroelectric with the greatest known planar rumpling, we introduce individual extra monolayers of FeO during growth to construct formula-unit-thick syntactic layers of ferrimagnetic LuFe2O4 within the LuFeO3 matrix, i.e., (LuFeO3)m /(LuFe2O4)1 superlattices. The severe rumpling imposed by the neighboring LuFeO3 drives the ferrimagnetic LuFe2O4 into a simultaneously ferroelectric state and reduces the LuFe2O4 spin frustration. This increases the magnetic transition temperature significantly--to 281 K for the (LuFeO3)9 /(LuFe2O4)1 superlattice. Moreover, LuFeO3 can form charged ferroelectric domain walls, which we align to the LuFe2O4 bilayers with monolayer precision. Charge transfers to these domain walls to alleviate the otherwise electrostatically unstable polarization arrangement, further boosting the magnetic moment. Our results demonstrate the utility of combining ferroics at the atomic-layer level with attention to domain walls, geometric frustration and polarization doping to create multiferroics by design.

  4. Novel current driven domain wall dynamics in synthetic antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, See-Hun

    It was reported that the domain walls in nanowires can be moved efficiently by electrical currents by a new type of torque, chiral spin torque (CST), the combination of spin Hall effect and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. Recently we domonstrated that ns-long current pulses can move domain walls at extraordinarily high speeds (up to ~750 m s -1) in synthetic antiferromagnetic (SAF) nanowires that have almost zero net magnetization, which is much more efficient compared with similar nanowires in which the sub-layers are coupled ferromagnetically (SF). This high speed is found to be due to a new type of powerful torque, exchange coupling torque (ECT) that is directly proportional to the strength of the antiferromagnetic exchange coupling between the two sub-layers, showing that the ECT is effective only in SAF not in SF. Moreover, it is found that the dependence of the wall velocity on the magnetic field applied along the nanowire is non-monotonic. Most recently we predict an Walker-breakdown-like domain wall precession in SAF nanowires in the presence of in-plane field based on the model we develop, and this extraordinary precession has been observed. In this talk I will discuss this in details by showing a unique characteristics of SAF sublayers' DW boost-and-drag mechanism along with CST and ECT. Novel current driven domain wall dynamics in synthetic antiferromagnets.

  5. Model of bound interface dynamics for coupled magnetic domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Politi, P.; Metaxas, P. J.; Jamet, J.-P.; Stamps, R. L.; Ferré, J.

    2011-08-01

    A domain wall in a ferromagnetic system will move under the action of an external magnetic field. Ultrathin Co layers sandwiched between Pt have been shown to be a suitable experimental realization of a weakly disordered 2D medium in which to study the dynamics of 1D interfaces (magnetic domain walls). The behavior of these systems is encapsulated in the velocity-field response v(H) of the domain walls. In a recent paper [P. J. Metaxas , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.104.237206 104, 237206 (2010)] we studied the effect of ferromagnetic coupling between two such ultrathin layers, each exhibiting different v(H) characteristics. The main result was the existence of bound states over finite-width field ranges, wherein walls in the two layers moved together at the same speed. Here we discuss in detail the theory of domain wall dynamics in coupled systems. In particular, we show that a bound creep state is expected for vanishing H and we give the analytical, parameter free expression for its velocity which agrees well with experimental results.

  6. Thick domain walls in AdS black hole spacetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Moderski, Rafal; Rogatko, Marek

    2006-08-15

    Equations of motion for a real self-gravitating scalar field in the background of a black hole with negative cosmological constant were solved numerically. We obtain a sequence of static axisymmetric solutions representing thick domain wall cosmological black hole systems, depending on the mass of black hole, cosmological parameter and the parameter binding black hole mass with the width of the domain wall. For the case of extremal cosmological black hole the expulsion of scalar field from the black hole strongly depends on it.

  7. Tailoring of domain wall dynamics in amorphous microwires by annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chichay, K.; Zhukova, V.; Rodionova, V.; Ipatov, M.; Talaat, A.; Blanco, J. M.; Gonzalez, J.; Zhukov, A.

    2013-05-01

    We studied the effect of annealing on the magnetic properties and domain wall (DW) dynamics of magnetically bistable, Fe-based, glass-covered microwires with two different compositions, and different diameters. We observed the correlation of the domain wall dynamics with the distribution of the nucleation fields, measured in as-prepared samples, and after annealing for up to 150 min at temperatures of 250 and 300 °C. We found that both DW velocity and the range of the field limiting the single DW dynamics changed after annealing.

  8. Low energy electron imaging of domains and domain walls in magnesium-doped lithium niobate.

    PubMed

    Nataf, G F; Grysan, P; Guennou, M; Kreisel, J; Martinotti, D; Rountree, C L; Mathieu, C; Barrett, N

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of domain structures, specifically domain walls, currently attracts a significant attention in the field of (multi)-ferroic materials. In this article, we analyze contrast formation in full field electron microscopy applied to domains and domain walls in the uniaxial ferroelectric lithium niobate, which presents a large 3.8 eV band gap and for which conductive domain walls have been reported. We show that the transition from Mirror Electron Microscopy (MEM - electrons reflected) to Low Energy Electron Microscopy (LEEM - electrons backscattered) gives rise to a robust contrast between domains with upwards (Pup) and downwards (Pdown) polarization, and provides a measure of the difference in surface potential between the domains. We demonstrate that out-of-focus conditions of imaging produce contrast inversion, due to image distortion induced by charged surfaces, and also carry information on the polarization direction in the domains. Finally, we show that the intensity profile at domain walls provides experimental evidence for a local stray, lateral electric field. PMID:27608605

  9. Low energy electron imaging of domains and domain walls in magnesium-doped lithium niobate

    PubMed Central

    Nataf, G. F.; Grysan, P.; Guennou, M.; Kreisel, J.; Martinotti, D.; Rountree, C. L.; Mathieu, C.; Barrett, N.

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of domain structures, specifically domain walls, currently attracts a significant attention in the field of (multi)-ferroic materials. In this article, we analyze contrast formation in full field electron microscopy applied to domains and domain walls in the uniaxial ferroelectric lithium niobate, which presents a large 3.8 eV band gap and for which conductive domain walls have been reported. We show that the transition from Mirror Electron Microscopy (MEM – electrons reflected) to Low Energy Electron Microscopy (LEEM – electrons backscattered) gives rise to a robust contrast between domains with upwards (Pup) and downwards (Pdown) polarization, and provides a measure of the difference in surface potential between the domains. We demonstrate that out-of-focus conditions of imaging produce contrast inversion, due to image distortion induced by charged surfaces, and also carry information on the polarization direction in the domains. Finally, we show that the intensity profile at domain walls provides experimental evidence for a local stray, lateral electric field. PMID:27608605

  10. Light wave propagation through a dilaton-Maxwell domain wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, J. R.; Schulze-Halberg, A.

    2015-10-01

    We consider the propagation of electromagnetic waves through a dilaton-Maxwell domain wall of the type introduced by Gibbons and Wells [G. W. Gibbons and C. G. Wells, Classical and Quantum Gravity 11, 2499 (1994)]. It is found that if such a wall exists within our observable Universe, it would be absurdly thick, or else have a magnetic field in its core which is much stronger than observed intergalactic fields. We conclude that it is highly improbable that any such wall is physically realized.

  11. Matter antimatter domains: A possible solution to the CP domain wall problem in the early universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohanty, A. K.; Stecker, F. W.

    1984-01-01

    An SU(5) grand unified theory model is used to show how the degeneracy between vacua with different spontaneously broken charge parity can be dynamically lifted by a condensate of heavy fermion pairs. This drives a phase transition to a unique vacuum state with definite charge parity. The transition eliminates the domain walls in a matter antimatter symmetric domain cosmology.

  12. Standard model on a domain-wall brane?

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, Rhys; George, Damien P.; Volkas, Raymond R.

    2008-06-15

    We propose a 4+1-dimensional action that is a candidate for realizing a standard-model-like effective theory for fields dynamically localized to a domain-wall brane. Our construction is in part based on the conjecture that the Dvali-Shifman mechanism for dynamically localizing gauge bosons to a domain wall works correctly in 4+1-d. Assuming this to be so, we require the gauge symmetry to be SU(5) in the bulk, spontaneously breaking to SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1) inside the domain wall, thus dynamically localizing the standard-model gauge bosons provided that the SU(5) theory in the bulk exhibits confinement. The wall is created jointly by a real singlet-Higgs field {eta} configured as a kink, and an SU(5) adjoint-Higgs field {chi} that takes nonzero values inside the wall. Chiral 3+1-dimensional quarks and leptons are confined and split along the bulk direction via their Yukawa couplings to {eta} and {chi}. The Higgs doublet and its color triplet SU(5) partner are similarly localized and split. The splittings can suppress colored-Higgs-induced proton decay and, because of the different localization profiles, the usual SU(5) mass relation m{sub e}=m{sub d} does not arise. Localized gravity is generated via the Randall-Sundrum alternative to compactification.

  13. Textural domain walls in superfluid 3He-B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizushima, Takeshi

    Owing to the richness of symmetry, the superfluid 3He serves as a rich repository of topological quantum phenomena. This includes the emergence of surface Majorana fermions and their quantum mass acquisition at the topological critical point. Furthermore, the marriage of the prototype topological superfluid with nanofabrication techniques brings about a rich variety of spontaneous symmetry breaking, such as the formation of the stripe order and nontrivial domain walls. In this work, we examine the possible formation of textural domain walls in the superfluid 3He-B confined to a thin slab with a sub-micron thickness. When an applied magnetic field is much higher than the dipolar field, two nearly degenerate ground states appear, which are characterized by the Ising order associated with the spontaneous breaking of a magnetic order-two symmetry, lcirc;z = + 1 and - 1 . We here discuss the structure of the textural domain wall formed by the spatial modulation of the Ising order, such as low-lying quasiparticle excitations and spontaneous spin current. We also report bosonic modes bound to the textural domain wall.

  14. Nucleation of reversed domain and pinning effect on domain wall motion in nanocomposite magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. B.; Shen, B. G.; Niu, E.; Sun, J. R.

    2013-08-01

    The magnetization behaviors show a strong pinning effect on domain wall motion in optimally melt-spun Pr8Fe87B5 ribbons at room temperature. According to analysis, the coercivity is determined by the nucleation field of reversed domain, and the pinning effect, which results from the weak exchange coupling at interface, makes domain nucleation processes independent and leads to non-uniform magnetization reversals. At a temperature of 60 K, owing to the weak exchange coupling between soft-hard grains, magnetization reversal undergoes processes of spring domain nucleation in soft grains and irreversible domain nucleation in hard grains, and the pinning effect remains strong among hard grains.

  15. The dynamics of the asymmetric motion of domain walls of sandwich domain structure in a Fe-based amorphous ribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhmetko, D. N.; Zhmetko, S. D.; Troschenkov, Y. N.; Matsura, A. V.

    2013-08-01

    The frequency dependence of asymmetry of the domain walls velocity relative to the middle plane of amorphous ribbon is investigated. An additional pressure of the same direction acting on each domain wall caused by dependence of eddy current damping on the coordinate of the domain wall is revealed. The microscopic mechanisms of this additional pressure are considered.

  16. Domain wall mobility, stability and Walker breakdown in magnetic nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mougin, A.; Cormier, M.; Adam, J. P.; Metaxas, P. J.; Ferré, J.

    2007-06-01

    We present an analytical calculation of the velocity of a single 180° domain wall in a magnetic structure with reduced thickness and/or lateral dimension under the combined action of an external applied magnetic field and an electrical current. As for the case of field-induced domain wall propagation in thick films, two motion regimes with different mobilities are obtained, below and far above the so-called Walker field. Additionally, for the case of current induced motion, a Walker-like current density threshold is defined. The threshold field and current density, stating the wall's internal structure stability, differ from those in thick films; both are reduced by the same geometrical demagnetising factor which accounts for the confinement. This points out the fact that the velocity dependence over an extended field/current range and the knowledge of the Walker breakdown are mandatory to draw conclusions about the phenomenological Gilbert damping parameter tuning the magnetisation dynamics.

  17. From domain wall to overlap in 2 + 1d

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hands, Simon

    2016-03-01

    The equivalence of domain wall and overlap fermion formulations is demonstrated for lattice gauge theories in 2 + 1 spacetime dimensions with parity-invariant mass terms. Even though the domain wall approach distinguishes propagation along a third direction with projectors 1/2 (1 ±γ3), the truncated overlap operator obtained for finite wall separation Ls is invariant under interchange of γ3 and γ5. In the limit Ls → ∞ the resulting Ginsparg-Wilson relations recover the expected U (2Nf) global symmetry up to O (a) corrections. Finally it is shown that finite-Ls corrections to bilinear condensates associated with dynamical mass generation are characterised by whether even powers of the symmetry-breaking mass are present; such terms are absent for antihermitian bilinears such as i ψ bar γ3 ψ, markedly improving the approach to the large-Ls limit.

  18. Stability of domain walls coupled to Abelian gauge fields

    SciTech Connect

    George, Damien P.; Volkas, Raymond R.

    2005-11-15

    Rozowsky, Volkas and Wali [J. Rozowsky, R. Volkas, and K. Wali, Phys. Lett. B 580, 249 (2004).] recently found interesting numerical solutions to the field equations for a gauged U(1)xU(1) scalar field model. Their solutions describe a reflection-symmetric domain wall with scalar fields and coupled gauge configurations that interpolate between constant magnetic fields on one side of the wall and exponentially decaying ones on the other side. This corresponds physically to an infinite sheet of supercurrent confined to the domain wall with a linearly rising gauge potential on one side and Meissner suppression on the other. While it was shown that these static solutions satisfied the field equations, their stability was left unresolved. In this paper, we analyze the normal modes of perturbations of the static solutions to demonstrate their perturbative stability.

  19. Non-volatile polarization switch of magnetic domain wall velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.; Stolichnov, I.; Setter, N.; Bernand-Mantel, A.; Schott, Marine; Pizzini, S.; Ranno, L.; Auffret, S.; Gaudin, G.

    2015-12-21

    Controlled propagation speed of individual magnetic domains in metal channels at the room temperature is obtained via the non-volatile field effect associated with the switchable polarization of P(VDF-TrFE) (polyvinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) ferroelectric polymer. Polarization domains directly written using conducting atomic force microscope probe locally accelerate/decelerate the magnetic domains in the 0.6 nm thick Co film. The change of the magnetic domain wall velocity is consistent with the magnetic anisotropy energy modulation through the polarization upward/downward orientation. Excellent retention is observed. The demonstrated local non-destructive and reversible change of magnetic properties via rewritable patterning of ferroelectric domains could be attractive for exploring the ultimate limit of miniaturization in devices based on ferromagnetic/ferroelectric bilayers.

  20. Conducting Ferroelectric Walls, Domain Topology, and Domain Switching Kinetics in a Hybrid Improper Ferroelectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, Sang-Wook; Rutgers Center For Emergent Materials Team

    Charged polar interfaces such as charged ferroelectric domain walls or heterostructured interfaces of ZnO/(Zn,Mg)O and LaAlO 3 /SrTiO 3 , across which the normal component of electric polarization changes suddenly, can host large two-dimensional conduction. Charged ferroelectric domain walls can be highly conducting but energetically unfavored; however, they were found to be mysteriously abundant in hybrid improper ferroelectric (Ca,Sr) 3 Ti 2 O 7 single crystals. From the exploration of antiphase domain boundaries, which are hidden in piezoresponse force microscopy, using dark-field electron microscopy, we have explored the macroscopic topology of polarization domains and antiphase domains. We found that the macroscopic domain topology is directly responsible for the presence of charged domain walls, and is closely related with the polarization domain switching mechanism in (Ca,Sr) 3 Ti 2 O 7 . Rutgers Center for Emergent Materials and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854, USA.

  1. Rashba Torque Driven Domain Wall Motion in Magnetic Helices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pylypovskyi, Oleksandr V.; Sheka, Denis D.; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Yershov, Kostiantyn V.; Makarov, Denys; Gaididei, Yuri

    2016-03-01

    Manipulation of the domain wall propagation in magnetic wires is a key practical task for a number of devices including racetrack memory and magnetic logic. Recently, curvilinear effects emerged as an efficient mean to impact substantially the statics and dynamics of magnetic textures. Here, we demonstrate that the curvilinear form of the exchange interaction of a magnetic helix results in an effective anisotropy term and Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction with a complete set of Lifshitz invariants for a one-dimensional system. In contrast to their planar counterparts, the geometrically induced modifications of the static magnetic texture of the domain walls in magnetic helices offer unconventional means to control the wall dynamics relying on spin-orbit Rashba torque. The chiral symmetry breaking due to the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction leads to the opposite directions of the domain wall motion in left- or right-handed helices. Furthermore, for the magnetic helices, the emergent effective anisotropy term and Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction can be attributed to the clear geometrical parameters like curvature and torsion offering intuitive understanding of the complex curvilinear effects in magnetism.

  2. Rashba Torque Driven Domain Wall Motion in Magnetic Helices.

    PubMed

    Pylypovskyi, Oleksandr V; Sheka, Denis D; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P; Yershov, Kostiantyn V; Makarov, Denys; Gaididei, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Manipulation of the domain wall propagation in magnetic wires is a key practical task for a number of devices including racetrack memory and magnetic logic. Recently, curvilinear effects emerged as an efficient mean to impact substantially the statics and dynamics of magnetic textures. Here, we demonstrate that the curvilinear form of the exchange interaction of a magnetic helix results in an effective anisotropy term and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction with a complete set of Lifshitz invariants for a one-dimensional system. In contrast to their planar counterparts, the geometrically induced modifications of the static magnetic texture of the domain walls in magnetic helices offer unconventional means to control the wall dynamics relying on spin-orbit Rashba torque. The chiral symmetry breaking due to the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction leads to the opposite directions of the domain wall motion in left- or right-handed helices. Furthermore, for the magnetic helices, the emergent effective anisotropy term and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction can be attributed to the clear geometrical parameters like curvature and torsion offering intuitive understanding of the complex curvilinear effects in magnetism. PMID:27008975

  3. Rashba Torque Driven Domain Wall Motion in Magnetic Helices

    PubMed Central

    Pylypovskyi, Oleksandr V.; Sheka, Denis D.; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Yershov, Kostiantyn V.; Makarov, Denys; Gaididei, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Manipulation of the domain wall propagation in magnetic wires is a key practical task for a number of devices including racetrack memory and magnetic logic. Recently, curvilinear effects emerged as an efficient mean to impact substantially the statics and dynamics of magnetic textures. Here, we demonstrate that the curvilinear form of the exchange interaction of a magnetic helix results in an effective anisotropy term and Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction with a complete set of Lifshitz invariants for a one-dimensional system. In contrast to their planar counterparts, the geometrically induced modifications of the static magnetic texture of the domain walls in magnetic helices offer unconventional means to control the wall dynamics relying on spin-orbit Rashba torque. The chiral symmetry breaking due to the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction leads to the opposite directions of the domain wall motion in left- or right-handed helices. Furthermore, for the magnetic helices, the emergent effective anisotropy term and Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction can be attributed to the clear geometrical parameters like curvature and torsion offering intuitive understanding of the complex curvilinear effects in magnetism. PMID:27008975

  4. Dissipative dynamics of composite domain walls in magnetic nanostrips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretiakov, O.; Bazaliy, Ya. B.; Tchernyshyov, O.

    2007-03-01

    We describe the dynamics of domain walls in thin magnetic nanostrips of submicron width under the action of magnetic field. Once the fast precession of magnetization is averaged out, the dynamics reduces to purely dissipative motion where the system follows the direction of the local energy gradient (Glauber's model A) [1]. We then apply the method of collective coordinates [2] to our variational model of the domain wall [3] reducing the dynamics to the evolution of two collective coordinates (the location of the vortex core). In weak magnetic fields the wall moves steadily. The calculated velocity is in good agreement with the results of numerical simulations (no adjustable parameters were used). In higher fields the steady motion breaks down and acquires an oscillatory character caused by periodic creation and annihilation of topological defects comprising the domain wall [3]. Numerical simulations uncover at least two different modes of oscillation. [1] C. J. Garc'ia-Cervera and W. E, J. Appl. Phys. 90, 370 (2001). [2] A. S'anchez and A. R. Bishop, SIAM Rev. 40, 579 (1998). [3] Preceding talk by O. Tchernyshyov.

  5. Sequential injection of domain walls into ferroelectrics at different bias voltages: Paving the way for “domain wall memristors”

    SciTech Connect

    Whyte, J. R.; McQuaid, R. G. P.; Einsle, J. F.; Gregg, J. M.; Ashcroft, C. M.; Canalias, C.; Gruverman, A.

    2014-08-14

    Simple meso-scale capacitor structures have been made by incorporating thin (∼300 nm) single crystal lamellae of KTiOPO{sub 4} (KTP) between two coplanar Pt electrodes. The influence that either patterned protrusions in the electrodes or focused ion beam milled holes in the KTP have on the nucleation of reverse domains during switching was mapped using piezoresponse force microscopy imaging. The objective was to assess whether or not variations in the magnitude of field enhancement at localised “hot-spots,” caused by such patterning, could be used to both control the exact locations and bias voltages at which nucleation events occurred. It was found that both the patterning of electrodes and the milling of various hole geometries into the KTP could allow controlled sequential injection of domain wall pairs at different bias voltages; this capability could have implications for the design and operation of domain wall electronic devices, such as memristors, in the future.

  6. Faster motion of double 360° domain walls system induced by spin-polarized current

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S. F.; Zhu, Q. Y.; Mu, C. P.; Zheng, Q.; Liu, X. Y.; Liu, Q. F.; Wang, J. B.

    2014-05-07

    By micromagnetic simulation, we investigated a double 360° domain walls system in two parallel nanowires. Two domain walls are coupled to each other via magnetostatic interaction. When a spin-polarized current is applied to only one nanowire or both nanowires with the same direction, the two domain walls propagate along nanowires together. The critical velocity of such system is obviously higher than that of a single 360° domain wall. The interaction between the two domain walls can be modeled as two bodies that connected by a spring, and we analyzed the coupling characteritics of the double 360° domain walls at last.

  7. Optical Spin-Transfer-Torque-Driven Domain-Wall Motion in a Ferromagnetic Semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsay, A. J.; Roy, P. E.; Haigh, J. A.; Otxoa, R. M.; Irvine, A. C.; Janda, T.; Campion, R. P.; Gallagher, B. L.; Wunderlich, J.

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate optical manipulation of the position of a domain wall in a dilute magnetic semiconductor, GaMnAsP. Two main contributions are identified. First, photocarrier spin exerts a spin-transfer torque on the magnetization via the exchange interaction. The direction of the domain-wall motion can be controlled using the helicity of the laser. Second, the domain wall is attracted to the hot spot generated by the focused laser. Unlike magnetic-field-driven domain-wall depinning, these mechanisms directly drive domain-wall motion, providing an optical tweezerlike ability to position and locally probe domain walls.

  8. Ultrafast optical demagnetization manipulates nanoscale spin structure in domain walls

    PubMed Central

    Pfau, B.; Schaffert, S.; Müller, L.; Gutt, C.; Al-Shemmary, A.; Büttner, F.; Delaunay, R.; Düsterer, S.; Flewett, S.; Frömter, R.; Geilhufe, J.; Guehrs, E.; Günther, C.M.; Hawaldar, R.; Hille, M.; Jaouen, N.; Kobs, A.; Li, K.; Mohanty, J.; Redlin, H.; Schlotter, W.F.; Stickler, D.; Treusch, R.; Vodungbo, B.; Kläui, M.; Oepen, H.P.; Lüning, J.; Grübel, G.; Eisebitt, S.

    2012-01-01

    During ultrafast demagnetization of a magnetically ordered solid, angular momentum has to be transferred between the spins, electrons, and phonons in the system on femto- and picosecond timescales. Although the intrinsic spin-transfer mechanisms are intensely debated, additional extrinsic mechanisms arising due to nanoscale heterogeneity have only recently entered the discussion. Here we use femtosecond X-ray pulses from a free-electron laser to study thin film samples with magnetic domain patterns. We observe an infrared-pump-induced change of the spin structure within the domain walls on the sub-picosecond timescale. This domain-topography-dependent contribution connects the intrinsic demagnetization process in each domain with spin-transport processes across the domain walls, demonstrating the importance of spin-dependent electron transport between differently magnetized regions as an ultrafast demagnetization channel. This pathway exists independent from structural inhomogeneities such as chemical interfaces, and gives rise to an ultrafast spatially varying response to optical pump pulses. PMID:23033076

  9. Domain wall width of lithium niobate poled during growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, R.; Townsend, P. D.; Hole, D. E.; Callejo, D.; Bermúdez, V.; Diéguez, E.

    2003-04-01

    Good quality crystals of periodically poled lithium niobate can be generated directly during growth. However, the temperature gradients at the zone boundaries define the width of the regions where the polarity is reversed. Hence, the region influenced the domain transition may be a significant fraction of the overall poling period for material poled during growth. Evidence for the scale of this feature is reported both by chemical etching and by the less common method of ion beam luminescence and the `domain wall' width approximately 1 mum for these analyses. The influence of the reversal region may differ for alternative techniques but the relevance to device design for second harmonic generation is noted.

  10. Discontinuous properties of current-induced magnetic domain wall depinning

    PubMed Central

    Hu, X. F.; Wu, J.; Niu, D. X.; Chen, L.; Morton, S. A.; Scholl, A.; Huang, Z. C.; Zhai, Y.; Zhang, W.; Will, I.; Xu, Y. B.; Zhang, R.; van der Laan, G.

    2013-01-01

    The current-induced motion of magnetic domain walls (DWs) confined to nanostructures is of great interest for fundamental studies as well as for technological applications in spintronic devices. Here, we present magnetic images showing the depinning properties of pulse-current-driven domain walls in well-shaped Permalloy nanowires obtained using photoemission electron microscopy combined with x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. In the vicinity of the threshold current density (Jth = 4.2 × 1011 A.m−2) for the DW motion, discontinuous DW depinning and motion have been observed as a sequence of “Barkhausen jumps”. A one-dimensional analytical model with a piecewise parabolic pinning potential has been introduced to reproduce the DW hopping between two nearest neighbour sites, which reveals the dynamical nature of the current-driven DW motion in the depinning regime. PMID:24170087

  11. Vertical Spin Current Injection induced Domain Wall Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sanchar; Muralidharan, Bhaskaran; Tulapurkar, Ashwin

    2015-03-01

    We present a novel oscillator based on domain wall motion using vertical spin current injection and an external magnetic field above the Walker breakdown. We numerically simulate 1D Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation to extract the oscillation parameters such as the amplitude, the frequency and the Q-factor, as a function of the inputs. We also provide a theoretical analysis using rigid domain walls and find an approximate waveform for the oscillations. We find that the oscillation frequency is twice the resonant frequency of a magnet in an applied magnetic field; while the amplitude is approximately a linear function of the ratio of the demagnetization field and the applied magnetic field. Both of them are independent of input current and other material parameters to a very good degree of accuracy; and hence can be of great technological advantage for accurate oscillatory waveforms.

  12. Tunable chiral spin texture in magnetic domain-walls.

    PubMed

    Franken, J H; Herps, M; Swagten, H J M; Koopmans, B

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic domain-walls (DWs) with a preferred chirality exhibit very efficient current-driven motion. Since structural inversion asymmetry (SIA) is required for their stability, the observation of chiral domain walls in highly symmetric Pt/Co/Pt is intriguing. Here, we tune the layer asymmetry in this system and observe, by current-assisted DW depinning experiments, a small chiral field which sensitively changes. Moreover, we convincingly link the observed efficiency of DW motion to the DW texture, using DW resistance as a direct probe for the internal orientation of the DW under the influence of in-plane fields. The very delicate effect of capping layer thickness on the chiral field allows for its accurate control, which is important in designing novel materials for optimal spin-orbit-torque-driven DW motion. PMID:24919162

  13. Tunable chiral spin texture in magnetic domain-walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franken, J. H.; Herps, M.; Swagten, H. J. M.; Koopmans, B.

    2014-06-01

    Magnetic domain-walls (DWs) with a preferred chirality exhibit very efficient current-driven motion. Since structural inversion asymmetry (SIA) is required for their stability, the observation of chiral domain walls in highly symmetric Pt/Co/Pt is intriguing. Here, we tune the layer asymmetry in this system and observe, by current-assisted DW depinning experiments, a small chiral field which sensitively changes. Moreover, we convincingly link the observed efficiency of DW motion to the DW texture, using DW resistance as a direct probe for the internal orientation of the DW under the influence of in-plane fields. The very delicate effect of capping layer thickness on the chiral field allows for its accurate control, which is important in designing novel materials for optimal spin-orbit-torque-driven DW motion.

  14. Localization and chiral symmetry in three flavor domain wall QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Antonio, David J.; Bowler, Kenneth C.; Boyle, Peter A.; Hart, Alistair; Kenway, Richard D.; Tweedie, Robert J.; Christ, Norman H.; Cohen, Saul D.; Li, Shu; Lin, Meifeng; Mawhinney, Robert D.; Clark, Michael A.; Dawson, Chris; Joo, Balint; Jung, Chulwoo; Maynard, Christopher M.; Ohta, Shigemi; Yamaguchi, Azusa

    2008-01-01

    We present results for the dependence of the residual mass of domain wall fermions on the size of the fifth dimension and its relation to the density and localization properties of low-lying eigenvectors of the corresponding Hermitian Wilson Dirac operator in three flavor domain wall QCD. Using the DBW2 and Iwasaki gauge actions, we generate ensembles of configurations with a 16{sup 3}x32 space-time volume and an extent of 8 in the fifth dimension for the sea quarks. We demonstrate the existence of a regime where the degree of locality, the size of chiral symmetry breaking, and the rate of topology change can be acceptable for inverse lattice spacings a{sup -1}{>=}1.6 GeV, enabling a programme of simulations of 2+1 flavor QCD to be conducted safely in this region of parameter space.

  15. 360 degree domain walls monitored by anisotropic magnetoresistance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Chunghee; Ross, C. A.

    2013-03-01

    This study investigates the electrical observation of the formation of a 360° magnetic domain wall (360DW) in an elliptical Co ring structure. Because the 360DW consists of two 180° domain walls, a decrease in resistance is observed in the switching process due to anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR). Certain AMR measurements exhibit an increase in the resistance in the switching process, indicating that a flux-closure vortex state is formed without first forming a 360DW state. The difference between the 360DW and vortex state in the switching process reflects differences in the DW depinning mechanism from the onion state. The minor loop of the AMR measurements is also dependent on the initial magnetic configuration between the 360DW and the vortex state.

  16. Heat transport along domain walls and surfaces of superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorontsov, Anton; Richard, Caroline

    2015-03-01

    We calculate thermal transport in non-uniform states of unconventional superconductors, that appear near pairbreaking surfaces, or due to formation of domain walls in the order parameter. The spectrum of the quasiparticles states in these regions is dominated by the Andreev bound states, including topologically protected modes. We investigate how these states contribute to the heat transport, using non-equilibrium quasiclassical theory in linear response. We report self-consistent calculation of the order parameter, impurity self-energies, density of states and vertex corrections. Particular attention is paid to the non-local nature of the response. We show differences and similarities between domain walls in d-wave materials, and surfaces of multi-component chiral superconducting states. We describe results for Born and unitary impurity scattering limits, and effects of the Zeeman magnetic field on thermal transport. Supported by NSF Grants DMR-0954342.

  17. Kaon B-parameter from quenched domain-wall QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Y.; Blum, T.; Christ, N.H.; Mawhinney, R.D.

    2006-05-01

    We present numerical results for the kaon B-parameter, B{sub K}, determined in the quenched approximation of lattice QCD. Our simulations are performed using domain-wall fermions and the renormalization group improved, DBW2 gauge action which combine to give quarks with good chiral symmetry at finite lattice spacing. Operators are renormalized nonperturbatively using the RI/MOM scheme. We study scaling by performing the simulation on two different lattices with a{sup -1}=1.982(30) and 2.914(54) GeV. We combine this quenched scaling study with an earlier calculation of B{sub K} using two flavors of dynamical, domain-wall quarks at a single lattice spacing to obtain B{sub K}{sup MSNDR}({mu}=2 GeV)=0.563(21)(39)(30), were the first error is statistical, the second systematic (without quenching errors) and the third estimates the error due to quenching.

  18. Analysis of ultra-narrow ferromagnetic domain walls

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, Catherine; Paul, David

    2012-01-10

    New materials with high magnetic anisotropy will have domains separated by ultra-narrow ferromagnetic walls with widths on the order of a few unit cells, approaching the limit where the elastic continuum approximation often used in micromagnetic simulations is accurate. The limits of this approximation are explored, and the static and dynamic interactions with intrinsic crystalline defects and external driving elds are modeled. The results developed here will be important when considering the stability of ultra-high-density storage media.

  19. Domain-wall motion in random potential and hysteresis modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquale, M.; Basso, V.; Bertotti, G.; Jiles, D.C.; Bi, Y.

    1998-06-01

    Two different approaches to hysteresis modeling are compared using a common ground based on energy relations, defined in terms of dissipated and stored energy. Using the Preisach model and assuming that magnetization is mainly due to domain-wall motion, one can derive the expression of magnetization along a major loop typical of the Jiles{endash}Atherton model and then extend its validity to cases where mean-field effects and reversible contributions are present. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Giant Resistive Switching via Control of Ferroelectric Charged Domain Walls.

    PubMed

    Li, Linze; Britson, Jason; Jokisaari, Jacob R; Zhang, Yi; Adamo, Carolina; Melville, Alexander; Schlom, Darrell G; Chen, Long-Qing; Pan, Xiaoqing

    2016-08-01

    Controlled switching of resistivity in ferroelectric thin films is demonstrated by writing and erasing stable, nanoscale, strongly charged domain walls using an in situ transmission electron microscopy technique. The resistance can be read nondestructively and presents the largest off/on ratio (≈10(5) ) ever reported in room-temperature ferroelectric devices, opening new avenues for engineering ferroelectric thin-film devices. PMID:27213756

  1. Factorized domain wall partition functions in trigonometric vertex models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foda, O.; Wheeler, M.; Zuparic, M.

    2007-10-01

    We obtain factorized domain wall partition functions for two sets of trigonometric vertex models: (1) the N-state Deguchi Akutsu models, for N \\in \\{2, 3, 4\\} (and conjecture the result for all N>=5), and (2) the sl(r+1|s+1) Perk Schultz models, for \\{r, s \\in \\mathbb {N}\\} , where (given the symmetries of these models) the result is independent of {r,s}.

  2. Domain-wall motion in random potential and hysteresis modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquale, M.; Basso, V.; Bertotti, G.; Jiles, D. C.; Bi, Y.

    1998-06-01

    Two different approaches to hysteresis modeling are compared using a common ground based on energy relations, defined in terms of dissipated and stored energy. Using the Preisach model and assuming that magnetization is mainly due to domain-wall motion, one can derive the expression of magnetization along a major loop typical of the Jiles-Atherton model and then extend its validity to cases where mean-field effects and reversible contributions are present.

  3. Domain wall network evolution in (N+1)-dimensional FRW universes

    SciTech Connect

    Avelino, P. P.; Sousa, L.

    2011-02-15

    We develop a velocity-dependent one-scale model for the evolution of domain wall networks in flat expanding or collapsing homogeneous and isotropic universes with an arbitrary number of spatial dimensions, finding the corresponding scaling laws in frictionless and friction dominated regimes. We also determine the allowed range of values of the curvature parameter and the expansion exponent for which a linear scaling solution is possible in the frictionless regime.

  4. Domain wall motion driven by adiabatic spin transfer torque through excitation of nonlinear dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Dong, Yulan; Yan, Zhou; Wang, Xi-guang; He, Jun; Guo, Guang-hua

    2016-05-01

    Domain wall dynamics under the joint action of a linearly polarized microwave magnetic field and spin transfer torque was analysed in terms of the domain wall collective coordinates. It was found that a microwave-assisted steady domain wall motion driven by adiabatic spin transfer torque can be adequately described by three domain wall collective coordinates. Analytical expression for the domain wall velocity showed that there are two contributions to the steady domain wall motion. One is derived from the nonlinear oscillation of domain wall width excited by the microwave field, and the other is from the heterodyne process between the width oscillation and the microwave field. The former always propels a domain wall to move in the positive direction, which is defined as the direction of the applied current. The latter contribution to the domain wall velocity can be positive or negative, depending on the polarization of the microwave field. The final domain wall velocity is determined by the competition between those two contributions, which indicates that by simply changing the polarization of the microwave field, the direction of the domain wall motion can be reversed. Our analysis demonstrated that the characteristics of domain wall motion can be tuned by selective excitation of nonlinear domain wall dynamics.

  5. Composite domain walls in a multiferroic perovskite ferrite.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Yusuke; Furukawa, Nobuo; Sakai, Hideaki; Taguchi, Yasujiro; Arima, Taka-hisa; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2009-07-01

    Controlling ferromagnetism by an external electric field has been a great challenge in materials physics, for example towards the development of low-power-consumption spintronics devices. To achieve an efficient mutual control of electricity and magnetism, the use of multiferroics--materials that show both ferroelectric and ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic order--is one of the most promising approaches. Here, we show that GdFeO(3), one of the most orthodox perovskite oxides, is not only a weak ferromagnet but also possesses a ferroelectric ground state, in which the ferroelectric polarization is generated by the striction through the exchange interaction between the Gd and Fe spins. Furthermore, in this compound, ferroelectric polarization and magnetization are successfully controlled by magnetic and electric fields, respectively. This unprecedented mutual controllability of electricity and magnetism is attributed to the unique feature of composite domain wall clamping of the respective domain walls for electric and magnetic orders. This domain wall feature generally determines the efficiency of the mutual controllability and thus could have an important role towards the application of multiferroics to practical devices. PMID:19503067

  6. Dynamic domain wall chirality rectification by rotating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisig, Andre; Mawass, Mohamad-Assaad; Stärk, Martin; Moutafis, Christoforos; Rhensius, Jan; Heidler, Jakoba; Gliga, Sebastian; Weigand, Markus; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Van Waeyenberge, Bartel; Stoll, Hermann; Schütz, Gisela; Kläui, Mathias

    2015-03-01

    We report on the observation of magnetic vortex domain wall chirality reversal in ferromagnetic rings that is controlled by the sense of rotation of a magnetic field. We use time-resolved X-ray microscopy to dynamically image the chirality-switching process and perform micromagnetic simulations to deduce the switching details from time-resolved snapshots. We find experimentally that the switching occurs within less than 4 ns and is observed in all samples with ring widths ranging from 0.5 μm to 2 μm, ring diameters between 2 μm and 5 μm, and a thickness of 30 nm, where a vortex domain wall is present in the magnetic onion state of the ring. From the magnetic contrast in the time-resolved images, we can identify effects of thermal activation, which plays a role for the switching process. Moreover, we find that the process is highly reproducible so that the domain wall chirality can be set with high fidelity.

  7. Domain wall and isocurvature perturbation problems in axion models

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Yoshino, Kazuyoshi; Yanagida, Tsutomu T. E-mail: tsutomu.tyanagida@ipmu.jp

    2013-11-01

    Axion models have two serious cosmological problems, domain wall and isocurvature perturbation problems. In order to solve these problems we investigate the Linde's model in which the field value of the Peccei-Quinn (PQ) scalar is large during inflation. In this model the fluctuations of the PQ field grow after inflation through the parametric resonance and stable axionic strings may be produced, which results in the domain wall problem. We study formation of axionic strings using lattice simulations. It is found that in chaotic inflation the axion model is free from both the domain wall and the isocurvature perturbation problems if the initial misalignment angle θ{sub a} is smaller than O(10{sup −2}). Furthermore, axions can also account for the dark matter for the breaking scale v ≅ 10{sup 12−16} GeV and the Hubble parameter during inflation H{sub inf}∼<10{sup 11−12} GeV in general inflation models.

  8. Before sailing on a domain-wall sea

    SciTech Connect

    Golterman, Maarten; Shamir, Yigal

    2005-02-01

    We discuss the very different roles of the valence-quark and the sea-quark residual masses (m{sub res}{sup v} and m{sub res}{sup s}) in dynamical domain-wall fermions simulations. Focusing on matrix elements of the effective weak Hamiltonian containing a power divergence, we find that m{sub res}{sup v} can be a source of a much bigger systematic error. To keep all systematic errors due to residual masses at the 1% level, we estimate that one needs am{sub res}{sup s} < or approx. 10{sup -3} and am{sub res}{sup v} < or approx. 10{sup -5}, at a lattice spacing a{approx}0.1 fm. The practical implications are that (1) optimal use of computer resources calls for a mixed scheme with different domain-wall fermion actions for the valence and sea quarks; (2) better domain-wall fermion actions are needed for both the sea and the valence sectors.

  9. Dynamics of biased domain walls and the devaluation mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Avelino, P. P.; Sousa, L.; Martins, C. J. A. P.

    2008-08-15

    We study the evolution of biased domain walls in the early universe. We explicitly discuss the roles played by the surface tension and volume pressure in the evolution of the walls, and quantify their effects by looking at the collapse of spherical wall solutions. We then apply our results to a particular mechanism, known as the devaluation scenario, in which the dynamics of biased domain walls was suggested as a possible solution to the cosmological constant problem. Our results indicate that devaluation will, in general, lead to values of the cosmological constant that differ by several orders of magnitude from the observationally inferred value, {rho}{sub vac}{sup 1/4}{approx}10{sup -3} eV. We also argue that the reasons behind this are not specific to a particular realization, and are expected to persist in any scenario of this kind, except if a low-energy cutoff on the spectra of vacuum energy densities, of the order of the critical density at the present time, is postulated. This implies that any such scenario will require a fine-tuning similar to the usual one.

  10. Advanced atomic force microscopy studies of ferroelectric domains and domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paruch, Patrycja

    2010-03-01

    The nanoscale resolution of atomic force microscopy (AFM) makes it a powerful tool for local studies of ferroelectric domain nucleation and growth. In particular, domain walls provide a useful model elastic disordered system: their behavior is governed by the competition between their elastic energy, which tends to minimize the domain wall surface, and the randomly varying potential landscape due to disorder present in the samples, which allows pinning. The domain walls present a characteristic static roughness, and a complex dynamic response when subjected to a driving force (electric field), with non-linear creep observed for small forces [1]. In addition, as a result of different symmetries and electronic structure, as well as possible defect migration, these intrinsically nanoscale interfaces often show additional properties, beyond those of their already multifunctional parent material, opening new perspectives for device applications. I will present results of our AFM studies of the static and dynamic behavior of domain walls in epitaxially grown thin films of Pb(Zr0.2Ti0.8)O3 focusing in particular on thermal effects, and on the observation of a lateral piezoresponse signal specifically due to the shear displacement of 180^o domain walls in this purely out-of-plane-polarized material [2], potentially useful for surface acoustic wave devices. I will also show how this same response can be more generally observed, necessitating care in the interpretation of lateral piezoresponse imaging in materials such as BiFeO3, where it is superimposed on signal due to the in-plane polarization components. Finally, I will present our studies of the switching mechanisms in this latter material under the influence of the electric field applied by the AFM tip. [4pt] [1] P. Paruch et al., Phys. Rev. Lett 94, 197601 (2005); J. Appl. Phys. 100, 051608 (2006); T. Tybell et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 097601 (2002)[0pt] [2] J. Guyonnet et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 95 132902 (2009)

  11. Third type of domain wall in soft magnetic nanostrips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, V. D.; Fruchart, O.; Pizzini, S.; Vogel, J.; Toussaint, J.-C.; Rougemaille, N.

    2015-07-01

    Magnetic domain walls (DWs) in nanostructures are low-dimensional objects that separate regions with uniform magnetisation. Since they can have different shapes and widths, DWs are an exciting playground for fundamental research, and became in the past years the subject of intense works, mainly focused on controlling, manipulating, and moving their internal magnetic configuration. In nanostrips with in-plane magnetisation, two DWs have been identified: in thin and narrow strips, transverse walls are energetically favored, while in thicker and wider strips vortex walls have lower energy. The associated phase diagram is now well established and often used to predict the low-energy magnetic configuration in a given magnetic nanostructure. However, besides the transverse and vortex walls, we find numerically that another type of wall exists in permalloy nanostrips. This third type of DW is characterised by a three-dimensional, flux closure micromagnetic structure with an unusual length and three internal degrees of freedom. Magnetic imaging on lithographically-patterned permalloy nanostrips confirms these predictions and shows that these DWs can be moved with an external magnetic field of about 1 mT. An extended phase diagram describing the regions of stability of all known types of DWs in permalloy nanostrips is provided.

  12. Propagating and reflecting of spin wave in permalloy nanostrip with 360° domain wall

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Senfu; Mu, Congpu; Zhu, Qiyuan; Zheng, Qi; Liu, Xianyin; Wang, Jianbo; Liu, Qingfang

    2014-01-07

    By micromagnetic simulation, we investigated the interaction between propagating spin wave (or magnonic) and a 360° domain wall in a nanostrip. It is found that propagating spin wave can drive a 360° domain wall motion, and the velocity and direction are closely related to the transmission coefficient of the spin wave of the domain wall. When the spin wave passes through the domain wall completely, the 360° domain wall moves toward the spin wave source. When the spin wave is reflected by the domain wall, the 360° domain wall moves along the spin wave propagation direction. Moreover, when the frequency of the spin wave is coincident with that of the 360° domain wall normal mode, the 360° domain wall velocity will be resonantly enhanced no matter which direction the 360 DW moves along. On the other hand, when the spin wave is reflected from the moving 360° domain wall, we observed the Doppler effect clearly. After passing through a 360° domain wall, the phase of the spin wave is changed, and the phase shift is related to the frequency. Nevertheless, phase shift could be manipulated by the number of 360° domain walls that spin wave passing through.

  13. Controlled motion of domain walls in submicron amorphous wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ťibu, Mihai; Lostun, Mihaela; Allwood, Dan A.; Rotǎrescu, Cristian; Atiťoaie, Alexandru; Lupu, Nicoleta; Óvári, Tibor-Adrian; Chiriac, Horia

    2016-05-01

    Results on the control of the domain wall displacement in cylindrical Fe77.5Si7.5B15 amorphous glass-coated submicron wires prepared by rapid quenching from the melt are reported. The control methods have relied on conical notches with various depths, up to a few tens of nm, made in the glass coating and in the metallic nucleus using a focused ion beam (FIB) system, and on the use of small nucleation coils at one of the sample ends in order to apply magnetic field pulses aimed to enhance the nucleation of reverse domains. The notch-based method is used for the first time in the case of cylindrical ultrathin wires. The results show that the most efficient technique of controlling the domain wall motion in this type of samples is the simultaneous use of notches and nucleation coils. Their effect depends on wire diameter, notch depth, its position on the wire length, and characteristics of the applied pulse.

  14. Octahedral tilt-suppression of ferroelectric domain wall dynamics and the associated piezoelectric activity in Pb(Zr,Ti)O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eitel, R.; Randall, C. A.

    2007-03-01

    The R3m-R3c transition is in a limited phase field in the Pb(Zr1-x,Tix)O3 (PZT) phase diagram and is a ferroelectric-ferroelectric phase transition that involves the coupling of a secondary displacive ferroelastic phase transition, associated with a structural rotation of the octahedra about the polar threefold axis. Through systematic temperature-dependent piezoelectric characterization under resonance conditions and high-field unipolar ac drive the influence of the aforementioned transition on piezoelectric and electromechanical properties is noted for two compositions x=0.30 and x=0.40mol fraction lead titanate. Applying Rayleigh law analysis to access the relative extrinsic domain wall contributions to the nonlinear permittivity and converse piezoelectric properties, we observe significant differences in the nonlinear response between the R3m and R3c phases and note a discontinuity at the transition for both PZT compositions. A complementary study was conducted through diffraction contrast transmission electron microscopy to access structure property relations. Diffraction contrast imaging reveals that antiphase boundaries (APB’s) associated with octahedral tilt may coincide with non-180° ferroelectric domain walls. This microstructural evidence suggests that APB’s suppress the motion of non-180° ferroelectric domain walls, leading to reduced extrinsic contributions to the piezoelectric and dielectric response in the low-temperature phase (R3c) . The implications of these observations are discussed in relation to both the PZT system and other perovskite-based systems such as BiMO3-PbTiO3 systems.

  15. Domain wall motion in magnetic nanowires: an asymptotic approach.

    PubMed

    Goussev, Arseni; Lund, Ross G; Robbins, J M; Slastikov, Valeriy; Sonnenberg, Charles

    2013-12-01

    We develop a systematic asymptotic description for domain wall motion in one-dimensional magnetic nanowires under the influence of small applied magnetic fields and currents and small material anisotropy. The magnetization dynamics, as governed by the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation, is investigated via a perturbation expansion. We compute leading-order behaviour, propagation velocities and first-order corrections of both travelling waves and oscillatory solutions, and find bifurcations between these two types of solutions. This treatment provides a sound mathematical foundation for numerous results in the literature obtained through more ad hoc arguments. PMID:24353468

  16. Domain wall motion in magnetic nanowires: an asymptotic approach

    PubMed Central

    Goussev, Arseni; Lund, Ross G.; Robbins, J. M.; Slastikov, Valeriy; Sonnenberg, Charles

    2013-01-01

    We develop a systematic asymptotic description for domain wall motion in one-dimensional magnetic nanowires under the influence of small applied magnetic fields and currents and small material anisotropy. The magnetization dynamics, as governed by the Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert equation, is investigated via a perturbation expansion. We compute leading-order behaviour, propagation velocities and first-order corrections of both travelling waves and oscillatory solutions, and find bifurcations between these two types of solutions. This treatment provides a sound mathematical foundation for numerous results in the literature obtained through more ad hoc arguments. PMID:24353468

  17. Magnetic domain walls of relic fermions as Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Yajnik, Urjit A.

    2005-12-02

    We show that relic fermions of the Big Bang can enter a ferromagnetic state if they possess a magnetic moment and satisfy the requirements of Stoner theory of itinerant ferromagnetism. The domain walls of this ferromagnetism can successfully simulate Dark Energy over the observable epoch spanning {approx} 10 billion years. We obtain conditions on the anomalous magnetic moment of such fermions and their masses. Known neutrinos fail to satisfy the requirements thus pointing to the possibility of a new ultralight sector in Particle Physics.

  18. Domain wall displacement by remote spin-current injection

    SciTech Connect

    Skirdkov, P. N.; Zvezdin, K. A.; Belanovsky, A. D.; Zvezdin, A. K.; Grollier, J.; Cros, V.

    2014-06-16

    We demonstrate numerically the ability to displace a magnetic domain wall (DW) by remote spin current injection. We consider a long and narrow magnetic nanostripe with a single DW. The spin-polarized current is injected perpendicularly to the film plane through a small nanocontact which is located at certain distance from the DW initial position. We show that the DW motion can be initiated not only by conventional spin-transfer torque but also by indirect spin-torque, created by remote spin-current injection and then transferred to the DW by the exchange-spring mechanism. An analytical description of this effect is proposed.

  19. Observation of injection and pinning of domain walls in magneticnanowires using photoemission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Luc; Rettner, Charles; Hayashi, Masamitsu; Samant, MaheshG.; Parkin Stuart S.P.; Doran, Andrew; Scholl, Andreas

    2005-12-19

    Photoemission electron microscopy is used to explore the injection and pinning of magnetic domain walls in 250-nm-wide, 20-nm-thick Permalloy nanowires. Domain walls are injected from a micron-sized elliptical nucleation pad at one end of the nanowire. A vortex-like structure is readily nucleated in this pad at low magnetic fields 15 Oe, whereas injection of a domain wall into the nanowire requires significantly larger fields 60 Oe. Domain walls are pinned in the nanowire at notches patterned along the wires edges. The domain walls are observed to have vortex-like structures with chiralities that vary in successive experiments.

  20. Longitudinal domain wall formation in elongated assemblies of ferromagnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Varón, Miriam; Beleggia, Marco; Jordanovic, Jelena; Schiøtz, Jakob; Kasama, Takeshi; Puntes, Victor F.; Frandsen, Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    Through evaporation of dense colloids of ferromagnetic ~13 nm ε-Co particles onto carbon substrates, anisotropic magnetic dipolar interactions can support formation of elongated particle structures with aggregate thicknesses of 100–400 nm and lengths of up to some hundred microns. Lorenz microscopy and electron holography reveal collective magnetic ordering in these structures. However, in contrast to continuous ferromagnetic thin films of comparable dimensions, domain walls appear preferentially as longitudinal, i.e., oriented parallel to the long axis of the nanoparticle assemblies. We explain this unusual domain structure as the result of dipolar interactions and shape anisotropy, in the absence of inter-particle exchange coupling. PMID:26416297

  1. Magnetic Hardening from the Suppression of Domain Walls by Nonmagnetic Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Shenyang Y.; Li, Yulan; McCloy, John S.; Montgomery, Robert O.; Henager, Charles H.

    2013-03-07

    Magnetic domain switching and hysteresis loops in a single crystal α-iron with and without nonmagnetic particles were simulated based on the magnetization dynamics of the Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert equation. It is found that the 360o Bloch domain wall is the easiest nucleation site for an anti-direction domain. The nucleation occurs by splitting the 360o Bloch domain wall into two 180o domain walls. However, the existence of nonmagnetic particles destroys the 180o domain walls and prevents the formation of 360o Bloch domain walls. Simulation results demonstrate that the impact of nonmagnetic particle on the formation of the 360o Bloch domain wall is a magnetic hardening mechanism.

  2. Rise of Racetrack Memory! Domain Wall Spin-Orbitronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkin, Stuart

    Memory-storage devices based on the current controlled motion of a series of domain walls (DWs) in magnetic racetracks promise performance and reliability beyond that of conventional magnetic disk drives and solid state storage devices (1). Racetracks that are formed from atomically thin, perpendicularly magnetized nano-wires, interfaced with adjacent metal layers with high spin-orbit coupling, give rise to domain walls that exhibit a chiral Néel structure (2). These DWs can be moved very efficiently with current via chiral spin-orbit torques (2,3). Record-breaking current-induced DW speeds exceeding 1,000 m/sec are found in synthetic antiferromagnetic structures (3) in which the net magnetization of the DWs is tuned to almost zero, making them ``invisible''. Based on these recent discoveries, Racetrack Memory devices have the potential to operate on picosecond timescales and at densities more than 100 times greater than other memory technologies. (1) S.S.P. Parkin et al., Science 320, 5873 (2008); S.S.P. Parkin and S.-H. Yang, Nat. Nano. 10, 195 (2015). (2) K.-S. Ryu metal. Nat. Nano. 8, 527 (2013). (3) S.-H. Yang, K.-S. Ryu and S.S.P. Parkin, Nat. Nano. 10, 221 (2015). (4). S.S.P. Parkin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 67, 3598 (1991).

  3. Honeycomb and triangular domain wall networks in heteroepitaxial systems.

    PubMed

    Elder, K R; Chen, Z; Elder, K L M; Hirvonen, P; Mkhonta, S K; Ying, S-C; Granato, E; Huang, Zhi-Feng; Ala-Nissila, T

    2016-05-01

    A comprehensive study is presented for the influence of misfit strain, adhesion strength, and lattice symmetry on the complex Moiré patterns that form in ultrathin films of honeycomb symmetry adsorbed on compact triangular or honeycomb substrates. The method used is based on a complex Ginzburg-Landau model of the film that incorporates elastic strain energy and dislocations. The results indicate that different symmetries of the heteroepitaxial systems lead to distinct types of domain wall networks and phase transitions among various surface Moiré patterns and superstructures. More specifically, the results show a dramatic difference between the phase diagrams that emerge when a honeycomb film is adsorbed on substrates of honeycomb versus triangular symmetry. It is also shown that in the small deformation limit, the complex Ginzburg-Landau model reduces to a two-dimensional sine-Gordon free energy form. This free energy can be solved exactly for one dimensional patterns and reveals the role of domains walls and their crossings in determining the nature of the phase diagrams. PMID:27155643

  4. Honeycomb and triangular domain wall networks in heteroepitaxial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elder, K. R.; Chen, Z.; Elder, K. L. M.; Hirvonen, P.; Mkhonta, S. K.; Ying, S.-C.; Granato, E.; Huang, Zhi-Feng; Ala-Nissila, T.

    2016-05-01

    A comprehensive study is presented for the influence of misfit strain, adhesion strength, and lattice symmetry on the complex Moiré patterns that form in ultrathin films of honeycomb symmetry adsorbed on compact triangular or honeycomb substrates. The method used is based on a complex Ginzburg-Landau model of the film that incorporates elastic strain energy and dislocations. The results indicate that different symmetries of the heteroepitaxial systems lead to distinct types of domain wall networks and phase transitions among various surface Moiré patterns and superstructures. More specifically, the results show a dramatic difference between the phase diagrams that emerge when a honeycomb film is adsorbed on substrates of honeycomb versus triangular symmetry. It is also shown that in the small deformation limit, the complex Ginzburg-Landau model reduces to a two-dimensional sine-Gordon free energy form. This free energy can be solved exactly for one dimensional patterns and reveals the role of domains walls and their crossings in determining the nature of the phase diagrams.

  5. Magnetic domain wall induced ferroelectricity in double perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Hai Yang; Zhao, Hong Jian E-mail: xmchen59@zju.edu.cn; Chen, Xiang Ming E-mail: xmchen59@zju.edu.cn; Zhang, Wen Qing

    2015-04-13

    Recently, a magnetically induced ferroelectricity occurring at magnetic domain wall of double perovskite Lu{sub 2}CoMnO{sub 6} has been reported experimentally. However, there exists a conflict whether the electric polarization is along b or c direction. Here, by first-principles calculations, we show that the magnetic domain wall (with ↑↑↓↓ spin configuration) can lead to the ferroelectric displacements of R{sup 3+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 4+}, and O{sup 2−} ions in double perovskites R{sub 2}NiMnO{sub 6} (R = rare earth ion) via exchange striction. The resulted electric polarization is along b direction with the P2{sub 1} symmetry. We further reveal the origin of the ferroelectric displacements as that: (1) on a structural point of view, such displacements make the two out-of-plane Ni-O-Mn bond angles as well as Ni-Mn distance unequal, and (2) on an energy point of view, such displacements weaken the out-of-plane Ni-Mn super-exchange interaction obviously. Finally, our calculations show that such a kind of ferroelectric order is general in ferromagnetic double perovskites.

  6. Notch-Boosted Domain Wall Propagation in Magnetic Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiang Rong; Yuan, Hauiyang

    Magnetic domain wall (DW) motion along a nanowire underpins many proposals of spintronic devices. High DW propagation velocity is obviously important because it determines the device speed. Thus it is interesting to search for effective control knobs of DW dynamics. We report a counter-intuitive finding that notches in an otherwise homogeneous magnetic nanowire can boost current-induced domain wall (DW) propagation. DW motion in notch-modulated wires can be classified into three phases: 1) A DW is pinned around a notch when the current density is below the depinning current density. 2) DW propagation velocity above the depinning current density is boosted by notches when non-adiabatic spin-transfer torque strength is smaller than the Gilbert damping constant. The boost can be many-fold. 3) DW propagation velocity is hindered when non-adiabatic spin-transfer torque strength is larger than the Gilbert damping constant. This work was supported by Hong Kong GRF Grants (Nos. 163011151 and 605413) and the Grant from NNSF of China (No. 11374249).

  7. Domain wall motion in sub-100 nm magnetic wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Saima; Dutta, Sumit; Currivan, Jean Anne; Ross, Caroline; Baldo, Marc

    2015-03-01

    Nonvolatile memory devices such as racetrack memory rely on the manipulation of domain wall (DW) in magnetic nanowires, and scaling of these devices requires an understanding of domain wall behavior as a function of the wire width. Due to the increased importance of edge roughness and magnetostatic interaction, DW pinning increases dramatically as the wire dimensions decrease and stochastic behavior is expected depending on the distribution of pinning sites. We report on the field driven DW statistics in sub-100 nm wide nanowires made from Co films with very small edge roughness. The nanowires were patterned in the form of a set of concentric rings of 10 μm diameter. Two different width nanowires with two different spacings have been studied. The rings were first saturated in plane to produce onion states and then the DWs were translated in the wires using an orthogonal in-plane field. The position of the DWs in the nanowires was determined with magnetic force microscopy. From the positions of the DWs in the nanowires, the strength of the extrinsic pinning sites was identified and they follow two different distributions in two different types of nanowire rings. For the closely spaced wires, magnetostatic interactions led to correlated movement of DWs in neighboring wires. The implications of DW pinning and interaction in nanoscale DW devices will be discussed.

  8. Soliton-dependent plasmon reflection at bilayer graphene domain walls.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lili; Shi, Zhiwen; Zeng, Bo; Wang, Sheng; Kang, Ji-Hun; Joshi, Trinity; Jin, Chenhao; Ju, Long; Kim, Jonghwan; Lyu, Tairu; Shen, Yuen-Ron; Crommie, Michael; Gao, Hong-Jun; Wang, Feng

    2016-08-01

    Layer-stacking domain walls in bilayer graphene are emerging as a fascinating one-dimensional system that features stacking solitons structurally and quantum valley Hall boundary states electronically. The interactions between electrons in the 2D graphene domains and the one-dimensional domain-wall solitons can lead to further new quantum phenomena. Domain-wall solitons of varied local structures exist along different crystallographic orientations, which can exhibit distinct electrical, mechanical and optical properties. Here we report soliton-dependent 2D graphene plasmon reflection at different 1D domain-wall solitons in bilayer graphene using near-field infrared nanoscopy. We observe various domain-wall structures in mechanically exfoliated graphene bilayers, including network-forming triangular lattices, individual straight or bent lines, and even closed circles. The near-field infrared contrast of domain-wall solitons arises from plasmon reflection at domain walls, and exhibits markedly different behaviours at the tensile- and shear-type domain-wall solitons. In addition, the plasmon reflection at domain walls exhibits a peculiar dependence on electrostatic gating. Our study demonstrates the unusual and tunable coupling between 2D graphene plasmons and domain-wall solitons. PMID:27240109

  9. Domain-wall superconductivity in superconductor-ferromagnet hybrids.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaorong; Lange, Martin; Volodin, Alexander; Szymczak, Ritta; Moshchalkov, Victor V

    2004-11-01

    Superconductivity and magnetism are two antagonistic cooperative phenomena, and the intriguing problem of their coexistence has been studied for several decades. Recently, artificial hybrid superconductor-ferromagnet systems have been commonly used as model systems to reveal the interplay between competing superconducting and magnetic order parameters, and to verify the existence of new physical phenomena, including the predicted domain-wall superconductivity (DWS). Here we report the experimental observation of DWS in superconductor-ferromagnet hybrids using a niobium film on a BaFe(12)O(19) single crystal. We found that the critical temperature T(c) of the superconductivity nucleation in niobium increases with increasing field until it reaches the saturation field of BaFe(12)O(19). In accordance with the field-shift of the maximum value of T(c), pronounced hysteresis effects have been found in resistive transitions. We argue that the compensation of the applied field by the stray fields of the magnetic domains as well as the change in the domain structure is responsible for the appearance of the DWS and the coexistence of superconductivity and magnetism in the superconductor-ferromagnet hybrids. PMID:15467724

  10. X-ray imaging of extended magnetic domain walls in Ni80Fe20 wires

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, S.; Fry, P. W.; Allwood, D. A.; Bryan, M. T.; Gibbs, M. R. J.; Schrefl, T.; Im, M.-Y.; Fischer, P.

    2009-06-20

    We have used magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy to image magnetization configurations in 700 nm wide Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} planar wires attached to 'nucleation' pads Domain walls were observed to inject only across half of the wire width but extend to several micrometers in length. Magnetostatic interactions with adjacent wires caused further unusual domain wall behavior. Micromagnetic modeling suggests the extended walls have Neel-like structure along their length and indicates weaker exchange coupling than is often assumed. These observations explain previous measurements of domain wall injection and demonstrate that magnetic domain walls in larger nanowires cannot always be considered as localized entities.

  11. Suppression of Walker breakdown in magnetic domain wall propagation through structural control of spin wave emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burn, David M.; Atkinson, Del

    2013-06-01

    The control of individual magnetic domain walls has potential for future spintronic memory and data processing applications. The speed and reliability of such devices are determined by the dynamic properties of the domain walls. Typically, spin precession limitations lead to Walker breakdown, limiting wall velocity resulting in low mobility. Here, we show the suppression of Walker breakdown by the careful design of small amplitude periodic nanowire structuring to match the periodicity of domain wall spin structure transformations. This opens up a channel for energy dissipation via spin wave emission, allowing a domain wall to maintain its spin structure during propagation.

  12. Electric-field-controlled suppression of Walker breakdown and chirality switching in magnetic domain wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hong-Bo; Li, You-Quan

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically study the dynamics of a magnetic domain wall controlled by an electric field in the presence of the spin flexoelectric interaction. We reveal that this interaction generates an effective spin torque and results in significant changes in the current-driven domain wall motion. In particular, the electric field can stabilize the domain wall motion, leading to strong suppression of the current-induced Walker breakdown and thus allowing a higher maximum wall velocity. We can furthermore use this electric-field control to efficiently switch the chirality of a moving domain wall in the steady regime.

  13. Domain Wall Dynamics in Ginzburg-Landau-Type Equations with Conservative Quantities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu; Akamine, Hiroshi

    2014-06-01

    In the Ginzburg-Landau equation, there are domain walls connecting two metastable states. The dynamics of domain walls has been intensively studied, but there remain still unsolved but crucial problems even for a single domain. We study the domain wall dynamics in three different Ginzburg-Landau-type equations satisfying conservation laws. In a modified ϕ4 model satisfying the law of energy conservation and the Lorentz invariance, the motion of a domain wall is accelerated and the velocity approaches its maximum. In a one-dimensional model of eutectic growth, the order parameter is conserved and a domain wall connecting a metastable uniform state and a spatially periodic pattern appears. We try to find a selection rule for the wavelength of a spatially periodic pattern. In a model equation for martensitic transformation, a domain wall connecting a uniform metastable state and a zigzag structure appears which propagates at a high velocity.

  14. Magnetic domain wall gratings for magnetization reversal tuning and confined dynamic mode localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trützschler, Julia; Sentosun, Kadir; Mozooni, Babak; Mattheis, Roland; McCord, Jeffrey

    2016-08-01

    High density magnetic domain wall gratings are imprinted in ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic thin films by local ion irradiation by which alternating head-to-tail-to-head-to-tail and head-to-head-to-tail-to-tail spatially overlapping domain wall networks are formed. Unique magnetic domain processes result from the interaction of anchored domain walls. Non-linear magnetization response is introduced by the laterally distributed magnetic anisotropy phases. The locally varying magnetic charge distribution gives rise to localized and guided magnetization spin-wave modes directly constrained by the narrow domain wall cores. The exchange coupled multiphase material structure leads to unprecedented static and locally modified dynamic magnetic material properties.

  15. Dynamically strained ferroelastics: Statistical behavior in elastic and plastic regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, X.; Lookman, T.; Zhao, Z.; Saxena, A.; Sun, J.; Salje, E. K. H.

    2013-03-01

    The dynamic evolution in ferroelastic crystals under external shear is explored by computer simulation of a two-dimensional model. The characteristic geometrical patterns obtained during shear deformation include dynamic tweed in the elastic regime as well as interpenetrating needle domains in the plastic regime. As a result, the statistics of jerk energy differ in the elastic and plastic regimes. In the elastic regime the distributions of jerk energy are sensitive to temperature and initial configurations. However, in the plastic regime the jerk distributions are rather robust and do not depend much on the details of the configurations, although the geometrical pattern formed after yield is strongly influenced by the elastic constants of the materials and the configurations we used. Specifically, for all geometrical configurations we studied, the energy distribution of jerks shows a power-law noise pattern P(E)˜E-(γ-1)(γ-1=1.3-2) at low temperatures and a Vogel-Fulcher distribution P(E) ˜ exp-(E/E0) at high temperatures. More complex behavior occurs at the crossover between these two regimes where our simulated jerk distributions are very well described by a generalized Poisson distributions P(E)˜E-(γ-1) exp-(E/E0)n with n = 0.4-0.5 and γ-1 ≈ 0 (Kohlrausch law). The geometrical mechanisms for the evolution of the ferroelastic microstructure under strain deformation remain similar in all thermal regimes, whereas their thermodynamic behavior differs dramatically: on heating, from power-law statistics via the Kohlrausch law to a Vogel-Fulcher law. There is hence no simple way to predict the local evolution of the twin microstructure from just the observed statistical behavior of a ferroelastic crystal. It is shown that the Poisson distribution is a convenient way to describe the crossover behavior contained in all the experimental data without recourse to specific scaling functions or temperature-dependent cutoff lengths.

  16. Chaotic dynamics of magnetic domain walls in nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivano, A.; Dolocan, V. O.

    2016-04-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of a transverse domain wall (TDW) in permalloy and nickel nanostrips with two artificially patterned pinning centers is studied numerically up to rf frequencies. The phase diagram frequency-driving amplitude shows a rich variety of dynamical behaviors depending on the material parameters and the type and shape of pinning centers. We find that T-shaped traps (antinotches) create a classical double well Duffing potential that leads to a small chaotic region in the case of nickel and a large one for Py. In contrast, the rectangular constrictions (notches) create an exponential potential that leads to larger chaotic regions interspersed with periodic windows for both Py and Ni. The influence of temperature manifests itself by enlarging the chaotic region and activating thermal jumps between the pinning sites while reducing the depinning field at low frequency in the notched strips.

  17. Instability of Walker propagating domain wall in magnetic nanowires.

    PubMed

    Hu, B; Wang, X R

    2013-07-12

    The stability of the well-known Walker propagating domain wall (DW) solution of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation is analytically investigated. Surprisingly, a propagating DW is always dressed with spin waves so that the Walker rigid-body propagating DW mode does not occur in reality. In the low field region only stern spin waves are emitted while both stern and bow waves are generated under high fields. In a high enough field, but below the Walker breakdown field, the Walker solution could be convective or absolute unstable if the transverse magnetic anisotropy is larger than a critical value, corresponding to a significant modification of the DW profile and DW propagating speed. PMID:23889437

  18. Depinning Transition of a Domain Wall in Ferromagnetic Films

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Bin; Luo, Meng-Bo; Vinokur, Valerii M.; Hu, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    We report first principle numerical study of domain wall (DW) depinning in two-dimensional magnetic film, which is modeled by 2D random-field Ising system with the dipole-dipole interaction. We observe nonconventional activation-type motion of DW and reveal the fractal structure of DW near the depinning transition. We determine scaling functions describing critical dynamics near the transition and obtain universal exponents establishing connection between thermal softening of pinning potential and critical dynamics. We observe that tuning the strength of the dipole-dipole interaction switches DW dynamics between two different universality classes, corresponding to two distinct dynamic regimes characterized by non-Arrhenius and conventional Arrhenius-type DW motions. PMID:26365753

  19. Depinning transition of a domain wall in ferromagnetic films

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, Bin; Luo, Meng -Bo; Vinokur, Valerii M.; Hu, Xiao

    2015-09-14

    We report first principle numerical study of domain wall (DW) depinning in two-dimensional magnetic film, which is modeled by 2D random-field Ising system with the dipole-dipole interaction. We observe non-conventional activation-type motion of DW and reveal the fractal structure of DW near the depinning transition. We determine scaling functions describing critical dynamics near the transition and obtain universal exponents establishing connection between thermal softening of pinning potential and critical dynamics. In addition, we observe that tuning the strength of the dipole-dipole interaction switches DW dynamics between two different universality classes, corresponding to two distinct dynamic regimes characterized by non-Arrhenius and conventional Arrhenius-type DW motions.

  20. Investigation of dominant spin wave modes by domain walls collision

    SciTech Connect

    Ramu, M.; Purnama, I.; Goolaup, S.; Chandra Sekhar, M.; Lew, W. S.

    2014-06-28

    Spin wave emission due to field-driven domain wall (DW) collision has been investigated numerically and analytically in permalloy nanowires. The spin wave modes generated are diagonally symmetric with respect to the collision point. The non-propagating mode has the highest amplitude along the middle of the width. The frequency of this mode is strongly correlated to the nanowire geometrical dimensions and is independent of the strength of applied field within the range of 0.1 mT to 1 mT. For nanowire with film thickness below 5 nm, a second spin wave harmonic mode is observed. The decay coefficient of the spin wave power suggests that the DWs in a memory device should be at least 300 nm apart for them to be free of interference from the spin waves.

  1. Interaction of the moving domain wall with phonons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demokritov, S. O.; Kirilyuk, A. I.; Kreines, N. M.; Kudinov, V. I.; Smirnov, V. B.; Chetkin, M. V.

    1991-12-01

    The interaction between the moving domain wall (DW) and acoustic phonons in the weak ferromagnet YFeO 3 has been investigated by means of Brillouin-Mandel'stam spectroscopy method for the first time. The light scattering by the moving DW with the frequency shift due to the Doppler effect has been observed. The DW velocity and the intensity of the scattered light were determined from the spectra as a function of pulsed magnetic field at different temperatures. It was determined that as the DW velocity approaches that of transverse of longitudinal sound extra phonons, or sound soliton, are generated. The light scattering from the excited phonons was observed directly. The space and time evolution of this sound soliton was investigated at T=2 K. Nonstationary supersound DW motion has been observed. Nonlinear excitation of longitudinal sound was discovered. The temperature dependence of the DW mobility was also measured. The general picture of the DW motion at v≈ s was discussed.

  2. Domain wall oscillations induced by spin torque in magnetic nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Sbiaa, R.; Chantrell, R. W.

    2015-02-07

    Using micromagnetic simulations, the effects of the non-adiabatic spin torque (β) and the geometry of nanowires on domain wall (DW) dynamics are investigated. For the case of in-plane anisotropy nanowire, it is observed that the type of DW and its dynamics depends on its dimension. For a fixed length, the critical switching current decreases almost exponentially with the width W, while the DW speed becomes faster for larger W. For the case of perpendicular anisotropy nanowire, it was observed that DW dynamics depends strongly on β. For small values of β, oscillations of DW around the center of nanowire were revealed even after the current is switched off. In addition to nanowire geometry and intrinsic material properties, β could provide a way to control DW dynamics.

  3. Coupled domain wall oscillations in magnetic cylindrical nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Murapaka, Chandrasekhar; Goolaup, S.; Purnama, I.; Lew, W. S.

    2015-02-07

    We report on transverse domain wall (DW) dynamics in two closely spaced cylindrical nanowires. The magnetostatically coupled DWs are shown to undergo an intrinsic oscillatory motion along the nanowire length in addition to their default rotational motion. In the absence of external forces, the amplitude of the DW oscillation is governed by the change in the frequency of the DW rotation. It is possible to sustain the DW oscillations by applying spin-polarized current to the nanowires to balance the repulsive magnetostatic coupling. The current density required to sustain the DW oscillation is found to be in the order of 10{sup 5 }A/cm{sup 2}. Morover, our analysis of the oscillation reveals that the DWs in cylindrical nanowires possess a finite mass.

  4. Depinning transition of a domain wall in ferromagnetic films

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xi, Bin; Luo, Meng -Bo; Vinokur, Valerii M.; Hu, Xiao

    2015-09-14

    We report first principle numerical study of domain wall (DW) depinning in two-dimensional magnetic film, which is modeled by 2D random-field Ising system with the dipole-dipole interaction. We observe non-conventional activation-type motion of DW and reveal the fractal structure of DW near the depinning transition. We determine scaling functions describing critical dynamics near the transition and obtain universal exponents establishing connection between thermal softening of pinning potential and critical dynamics. In addition, we observe that tuning the strength of the dipole-dipole interaction switches DW dynamics between two different universality classes, corresponding to two distinct dynamic regimes characterized by non-Arrhenius andmore » conventional Arrhenius-type DW motions.« less

  5. BPS domain walls in {N}=4 supergravity and dual flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassani, Davide; Dall'Agata, Gianguido; Faedo, Anton F.

    2013-03-01

    We establish the conditions for supersymmetric domain wall solutions to {N}=4 gauged supergravity in five dimensions. These read as BPS first-order equations for the warp factor and the scalar fields, driven by a superpotential and supplemented by a set of constraints that we specify in detail. Then we apply our results to certain consistent truncations of IIB supergravity, thus exploring their dual field theory renormalization group flows. We find a universal flow deforming superconformal theories on D3-branes at Calabi-Yau cones. Moreover, we obtain a superpotential for the solution corresponding to the baryonic branch of the Klebanov-Strassler theory, as well as the superpotential for the flow describing D3 and wrapped D5-branes on the resolved conifold.

  6. Domain Wall Trajectory Determined by its Fractional Topological Edge Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushp, Aakash

    2014-03-01

    The theory of topological defects has had a significant influence on the understanding of various physical phenomena ranging from superfluid Helium-3 to liquid crystals. Topological defects are general features in systems with broken symmetries such as head-to-head (HH) and tail-to-tail (TT) domain walls (DWs) in soft ferromagnetic nanowires (NWs). Such DWs are further composed of elementary topological bulk and edge defects with integer and fractional winding numbers, respectively; whose relative spatial arrangement determines the chirality of the DW. Understanding the influence of the DW structure on its motion is critical for both fundamental and technological reasons. In this talk, I will show how one can understand and control the trajectory of DWs in magnetic branched networks, composed of connected NWs, by a consideration of their fractional elementary topological defects and how they interact with those innate to the network. I will describe a simple and yet a highly reliable mechanism that we have developed for the injection of a DW of a given chirality into a NW and exploit it to show that it is the DW's chirality that determines which branch the DW follows at a symmetric Y-shaped magnetic junction, the fundamental building block of the network. Using these concepts, I'll unravel the microscopic origin of the one-dimensional (1D) nature of magnetization reversal of artificial spin ice systems that have been observed in the form of Dirac strings. This understanding will allow for the formation of more complex chiral magnetic orders by controllably generating and propagating several domain walls of specific chiralities into artificial spin ice structures to form defined lattices of Dirac strings.

  7. High domain wall velocities via spin transfer torque using vertical current injection

    PubMed Central

    Metaxas, Peter J.; Sampaio, Joao; Chanthbouala, André; Matsumoto, Rie; Anane, Abdelmadjid; Fert, Albert; Zvezdin, Konstantin A.; Yakushiji, Kay; Kubota, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Akio; Yuasa, Shinji; Nishimura, Kazumasa; Nagamine, Yoshinori; Maehara, Hiroki; Tsunekawa, Koji; Cros, Vincent; Grollier, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Domain walls, nanoscale transition regions separating oppositely oriented ferromagnetic domains, have significant promise for use in spintronic devices for data storage and memristive applications. The state of these devices is related to the wall position and thus rapid operation will require a controllable onset of domain wall motion and high speed wall displacement. These processes are traditionally driven by spin transfer torque due to lateral injection of spin polarized current through a ferromagnetic nanostrip. However, this geometry is often hampered by low maximum wall velocities and/or a need for prohibitively high current densities. Here, using time-resolved magnetotransport measurements, we show that vertical injection of spin currents through a magnetic tunnel junction can drive domain walls over hundreds of nanometers at ~500 m/s using current densities on the order of 6 MA/cm2. Moreover, these measurements provide information about the stochastic and deterministic aspects of current driven domain wall mediated switching. PMID:23670402

  8. High domain wall velocities via spin transfer torque using vertical current injection.

    PubMed

    Metaxas, Peter J; Sampaio, Joao; Chanthbouala, André; Matsumoto, Rie; Anane, Abdelmadjid; Fert, Albert; Zvezdin, Konstantin A; Yakushiji, Kay; Kubota, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Akio; Yuasa, Shinji; Nishimura, Kazumasa; Nagamine, Yoshinori; Maehara, Hiroki; Tsunekawa, Koji; Cros, Vincent; Grollier, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Domain walls, nanoscale transition regions separating oppositely oriented ferromagnetic domains, have significant promise for use in spintronic devices for data storage and memristive applications. The state of these devices is related to the wall position and thus rapid operation will require a controllable onset of domain wall motion and high speed wall displacement. These processes are traditionally driven by spin transfer torque due to lateral injection of spin polarized current through a ferromagnetic nanostrip. However, this geometry is often hampered by low maximum wall velocities and/or a need for prohibitively high current densities. Here, using time-resolved magnetotransport measurements, we show that vertical injection of spin currents through a magnetic tunnel junction can drive domain walls over hundreds of nanometers at ~500 m/s using current densities on the order of 6 MA/cm(2). Moreover, these measurements provide information about the stochastic and deterministic aspects of current driven domain wall mediated switching. PMID:23670402

  9. High domain wall velocities via spin transfer torque using vertical current injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metaxas, Peter J.; Sampaio, Joao; Chanthbouala, André; Matsumoto, Rie; Anane, Abdelmadjid; Fert, Albert; Zvezdin, Konstantin A.; Yakushiji, Kay; Kubota, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Akio; Yuasa, Shinji; Nishimura, Kazumasa; Nagamine, Yoshinori; Maehara, Hiroki; Tsunekawa, Koji; Cros, Vincent; Grollier, Julie

    2013-05-01

    Domain walls, nanoscale transition regions separating oppositely oriented ferromagnetic domains, have significant promise for use in spintronic devices for data storage and memristive applications. The state of these devices is related to the wall position and thus rapid operation will require a controllable onset of domain wall motion and high speed wall displacement. These processes are traditionally driven by spin transfer torque due to lateral injection of spin polarized current through a ferromagnetic nanostrip. However, this geometry is often hampered by low maximum wall velocities and/or a need for prohibitively high current densities. Here, using time-resolved magnetotransport measurements, we show that vertical injection of spin currents through a magnetic tunnel junction can drive domain walls over hundreds of nanometers at ~500 m/s using current densities on the order of 6 MA/cm2. Moreover, these measurements provide information about the stochastic and deterministic aspects of current driven domain wall mediated switching.

  10. Coupled Néel domain wall motion in sandwiched perpendicular magnetic anisotropy nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Purnama, I.; Kerk, I. S.; Lim, G. J.; Lew, W. S.

    2015-01-01

    The operating performance of a domain wall-based magnetic device relies on the controlled motion of the domain walls within the ferromagnetic nanowires. Here, we report on the dynamics of coupled Néel domain wall in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) nanowires via micromagnetic simulations. The coupled Néel domain wall is obtained in a sandwich structure, where two PMA nanowires that are separated by an insulating layer are stacked vertically. Under the application of high current density, we found that the Walker breakdown phenomenon is suppressed in the sandwich structure. Consequently, the coupled Néel domain wall of the sandwich structure is able to move faster as compared to individual domain walls in a single PMA nanowire. PMID:25736593

  11. Current driven dynamics of magnetic domain walls in permalloy nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Masamitsu

    The significant advances in micro-fabrication techniques opened the door to access interesting properties in solid state physics. With regard to magnetic materials, geometrical confinement of magnetic structures alters the defining parameters that govern magnetism. For example, development of single domain nano-pillars made from magnetic multilayers led to the discovery of electrical current controlled magnetization switching, which revealed the existence of spin transfer torque. Magnetic domain walls (DWs) are boundaries in magnetic materials that divide regions with distinct magnetization directions. DWs play an important role in the magnetization reversal processes of both bulk and thin film magnetic materials. The motion of DW is conventionally controlled by magnetic fields. Recently, it has been proposed that spin polarized current passed across the DW can also control the motion of DWs. Current in most magnetic materials is spin-polarized, due to spin-dependent scattering of the electrons, and thus can deliver spin angular momentum to the DW, providing a "spin transfer" torque on the DW which leads to DW motion. In addition, owing to the development of micro-fabrication techniques, geometrical confinement of magnetic materials enables creation and manipulation of a "single" DW in magnetic nanostructures. New paradigms for DW-based devices are made possible by the direct manipulation of DWs using spin polarized electrical current via spin transfer torque. This dissertation covers research on current induced DW motion in magnetic nanowires. Fascinating effects arising from the interplay between DWs with spin polarized current will be revealed.

  12. Jamming Behavior of Domain Walls in an Antiferromagnetic Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sunil

    2014-03-01

    Over the last few years, attempts have been made to unify many aspects of the freezing behavior of glasses, granular materials, gels, supercooled liquids, etc. into a general conceptual framework of what is called jamming behavior. This occurs when particles reach packing densities high enough that their motions become highly restricted. A general phase diagram has been proposed onto which various materials systems, e.g glasses or granular materials, can be mapped. We will discuss some recent applications of resonant and non-resonant soft X-ray Grazing Incidence Scattering to mesoscopic science, for example the study of magnetic domain wall fluctuations in thin films. For these studies, we use resonant magnetic x-ray scattering with a coherent photon beam and the technique of X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy. find that at the ordering temperature the domains of an antiferromagnetic system, namely Dysprosium metal, behave very much also like a jammed system and their associated fluctuations exhibit behavior which exhibit some of the universal characteristics of jammed systems, such as non-exponential relaxation and Vogel-Fulcher type freezing. Work supported by Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Dept. of Energy under Grant Number: DE-SC0003678.

  13. Micromagnetic analysis of current-induced domain wall motion in a bilayer nanowire with synthetic antiferromagnetic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komine, Takashi; Aono, Tomosuke

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate current-induced domain wall motion in bilayer nanowire with synthetic antiferromagnetic (SAF) coupling by modeling two body problems for motion equations of domain wall. The influence of interlayer exchange coupling and magnetostatic interactions on current-induced domain wall motion in SAF nanowires was also investigated. By assuming the rigid wall model for translational motion, the interlayer exchange coupling and the magnetostatic interaction between walls and domains in SAF nanowires enhances domain wall speed without any spin-orbit-torque. The enhancement of domain wall speed was discussed by energy distribution as a function of wall angle configuration in bilayer nanowires.

  14. Strain-induced magnetic domain wall control by voltage in hybrid piezoelectric BaTiO3 ferrimagnetic TbFe structures

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau, Olivier; Weil, Raphael; Rohart, Stanislas; Mougin, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the voltage dependence of the magnetization reversal of a thin amorphous ferromagnetic TbFe film grown on a ferroelectric and piezoelectric BaTiO3 single crystal. Magneto-optical measurements, at macroscopic scale or in a microscope, demonstrate how the ferroelectric BaTiO3 polarisation history influences the properties of the perpendicularly magnetized TbFe film. Unpolarised and twinned regions are obtained when the sample is zero voltage cooled whereas flat and saturated regions are obtained when the sample is voltage cooled through the ferroelectric ordering temperature of the BaTiO3 crystal, as supported by atomic force microscopy experiments. The two steps involved in the TbFe magnetization reversal, namely nucleation and propagation of magnetic domain walls, depend on the polarisation history. Nucleation is associated to coupling through strains with the piezoelectric BaTiO3 crystal and propagation to pinning with the ferroelastic surface patterns visible in the BaTiO3 topography. PMID:26987937

  15. Introduction of an artificial domain wall into BiFeO3 thin film using SrTiO3 bicrystal substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujisawa, Hironori; Seto, Shota; Nakashima, Seiji; Shimizu, Masaru

    2015-10-01

    For the future realization of nanoelectronic devices using domain walls (DWs) in ferroelectric thin films as a functional element, the artificial introduction and position control of DWs in BiFeO3 (BFO) thin films using SrTiO3 bicrystal substrates are demonstrated. The BFO thin film follows the bicrystal nature of SrTiO3, and consequently the boundary with an out-of-plane misorientation angle of 8° is formed immediately above that of the substrate. The boundary shows a charged nature induced by a head-to-head polarization configuration. The BFO bicrystal film exhibits a well-saturated polarization hysteresis loop equivalent to those of single-crystalline films. The piezoresponse scanning force microscopy of polarization switching suggests ferroelastic relaxation-mediated 180° switching through 71° switching. Although the boundary corresponds to a low-angle symmetry boundary with misfit dislocations, experimental results show that it behaves just like normal DWs by crystallographic twinning. Therefore, it is concluded that the artificially introduced boundary can be considered as a charged 101° DW.

  16. Strain-induced magnetic domain wall control by voltage in hybrid piezoelectric BaTiO3 ferrimagnetic TbFe structures.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Olivier; Weil, Raphael; Rohart, Stanislas; Mougin, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the voltage dependence of the magnetization reversal of a thin amorphous ferromagnetic TbFe film grown on a ferroelectric and piezoelectric BaTiO3 single crystal. Magneto-optical measurements, at macroscopic scale or in a microscope, demonstrate how the ferroelectric BaTiO3 polarisation history influences the properties of the perpendicularly magnetized TbFe film. Unpolarised and twinned regions are obtained when the sample is zero voltage cooled whereas flat and saturated regions are obtained when the sample is voltage cooled through the ferroelectric ordering temperature of the BaTiO3 crystal, as supported by atomic force microscopy experiments. The two steps involved in the TbFe magnetization reversal, namely nucleation and propagation of magnetic domain walls, depend on the polarisation history. Nucleation is associated to coupling through strains with the piezoelectric BaTiO3 crystal and propagation to pinning with the ferroelastic surface patterns visible in the BaTiO3 topography. PMID:26987937

  17. Strain-induced magnetic domain wall control by voltage in hybrid piezoelectric BaTiO3 ferrimagnetic TbFe structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Olivier; Weil, Raphael; Rohart, Stanislas; Mougin, Alexandra

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports on the voltage dependence of the magnetization reversal of a thin amorphous ferromagnetic TbFe film grown on a ferroelectric and piezoelectric BaTiO3 single crystal. Magneto-optical measurements, at macroscopic scale or in a microscope, demonstrate how the ferroelectric BaTiO3 polarisation history influences the properties of the perpendicularly magnetized TbFe film. Unpolarised and twinned regions are obtained when the sample is zero voltage cooled whereas flat and saturated regions are obtained when the sample is voltage cooled through the ferroelectric ordering temperature of the BaTiO3 crystal, as supported by atomic force microscopy experiments. The two steps involved in the TbFe magnetization reversal, namely nucleation and propagation of magnetic domain walls, depend on the polarisation history. Nucleation is associated to coupling through strains with the piezoelectric BaTiO3 crystal and propagation to pinning with the ferroelastic surface patterns visible in the BaTiO3 topography.

  18. Cosmic bubble and domain wall instabilities II: fracturing of colliding walls

    SciTech Connect

    Braden, Jonathan; Bond, J. Richard; Mersini-Houghton, Laura

    2015-08-26

    We study collisions between nearly planar domain walls including the effects of small initial nonplanar fluctuations. These perturbations represent the small fluctuations that must exist in a quantum treatment of the problem. In a previous paper, we demonstrated that at the linear level a subset of these fluctuations experience parametric amplification as a result of their coupling to the planar symmetric background. Here we study the full three-dimensional nonlinear dynamics using lattice simulations, including both the early time regime when the fluctuations are well described by linear perturbation theory as well as the subsequent stage of fully nonlinear evolution. We find that the nonplanar fluctuations have a dramatic effect on the overall evolution of the system. Specifically, once these fluctuations begin to interact nonlinearly the split into a planar symmetric part of the field and the nonplanar fluctuations loses its utility. At this point the colliding domain walls dissolve, with the endpoint of this being the creation of a population of oscillons in the collision region. The original (nearly) planar symmetry has been completely destroyed at this point and an accurate study of the system requires the full three-dimensional simulation.

  19. Domain wall dynamics of periodic magnetic domain patterns in Co2MnGe-Heusler microstripes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, K.; Westerholt, K.; Zabel, H.

    2016-03-01

    Highly symmetric periodic domain patterns were obtained in Co2MnGe-Heusler microstripes as a result of the competition between growth-induced in-plane magnetic anisotropy and shape anisotropy. Zero field magnetic configurations and magnetic field-induced domain wall (DW) motion were studied by magnetic force microscopy-image technique for two different cases: dominant uniaxial- and dominant cubic in-plane anisotropy. We implemented a magneto-optical Kerr effect susceptometer to investigate the DW dynamics of periodic domain structures by measuring the in-phase and out-of-phase components of the Kerr signal as a function of magnetic field frequency and amplitude. The DW dynamics for fields applied transversally to the long stripe axis was found to be dominated by viscous slide motion. We used the inherent symmetry/periodicity properties of the magnetic domain structure to fit the experimental results with a theoretical model allowing to extract the DW mobility for the case of transverse DWs (μ TDW = 1.1 m s-1 Oe-1) as well as for vortex-like DWs (μ VDW = 8.7 m s-1 Oe-1). Internal spin structure transformations may cause a reduction of DW mobility in TDWs as observed by OMMFF simulations.

  20. Non-destructive generation of nano-scale periodic pinning potentials for magnetic domain walls: a way to bias domain wall propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metaxas, Peter; Zermatten, Pierre-Jean; Novak, Rafael; Jamet, Jean-Pierre; Weil, Raphael; Rohart, Stanislas; Ferre, Jacques; Mougin, Alexandra; Stamps, Robert; Baltz, Vincent; Rodmacq, Bernard; Gaudin, Gilles

    2012-02-01

    The stray magnetic field of an array of ferromagnetic nanodots is used to generate a spatially periodic pinning potential for domain walls moving through a physically separate, weakly disordered, magnetic layer lying beneath the array. This technique represents a non-destructive method to create tunable and localised pinning sites for domain walls which are consequently subject to co-existing (but independent) periodic and disordered pinning potentials. Beyond the fundamentally attractive application of creating a model experimental system to study interface motion through multiple co-existing pinning potentials, our system interestingly exhibits many characteristics that are normally associated with exchange bias. This is a direct result of the fact that pinning effects induced by the periodic pinning potential depend upon the polarity of the applied magnetic field which drives the domain wall motion, a phenomenon which manifests itself in field-polarity-dependent domain wall mobilities and profiles.

  1. Persistent conductive footprints of 109° domain walls in bismuth ferrite films

    SciTech Connect

    Stolichnov, I.; Iwanowska, M.; Colla, E.; Setter, N.; Ziegler, B.; Gaponenko, I.; Paruch, P.; Huijben, M.; Rijnders, G.

    2014-03-31

    Using conductive and piezoforce microscopy, we reveal a complex picture of electronic transport at weakly conductive 109° domain walls in bismuth ferrite films. Even once initial ferroelectric stripe domains are changed/erased, persistent conductive paths signal the original domain wall position. The conduction at such domain wall “footprints” is activated by domain movement and decays rapidly with time, but can be re-activated by opposite polarity voltage. The observed phenomena represent true leakage conduction rather than merely displacement currents. We propose a scenario of hopping transport in combination with thermionic injection over interfacial barriers controlled by the ferroelectric polarization.

  2. Time-resolved imaging of current-induced domain-wall oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Bocklage, Lars; Krueger, Benjamin; Eiselt, Rene; Bolte, Markus; Fischer, Peter; Meier, Guido

    2008-10-07

    Current-induced domain-wall dynamics is investigated via high-resolution soft x-ray transmission microscopy by a stroboscopic pump-and-probe measurement scheme at a temporal resolution of 200 ps. A 180{sup o} domain wall in a restoring potential of a permalloy microstructure is displaced from its equilibrium position by nanosecond current pulses leading to oscillations with velocities up to 325 m/s. The motion of the wall is described with an analytical model of a rigid domain wall in a nonharmonic potential allowing one to determine the mass of the domain wall. We show that Oersted fields dominate the domain-wall dynamics in our geometry.

  3. Transverse field-induced nucleation pad switching modes during domain wall injection

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, M. T.; Fry, P. W.; Schrefl, T.; Gibbs, M. R. J.; Allwood, D. A.; Im, M.-Y.; Fischer, P.

    2010-03-12

    We have used magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy (M-TXM) to image in-field magnetization configurations of patterned Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} domain wall 'injection pads' and attached planar nanowires. Comparison with micromagnetic simulations suggests that the evolution of magnetic domains in rectangular injection pads depends on the relative orientation of closure domains in the remanent state. The magnetization reversal pathway is also altered by the inclusion of transverse magnetic fields. These different modes explain previous results of domain wall injection into nanowires. Even more striking was the observation of domain walls injecting halfway across the width of wider (>400 nm wide) wires but over wire lengths of several micrometers. These extended Neel walls can interact with adjacent nanowires and cause a switching in the side of the wire undergoing reversal as the domain wall continues to expand.

  4. Current at domain walls, roughly speaking: nanoscales studies of disorder roughening and conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paruch, Patrycja

    2013-03-01

    Domain walls in (multi)ferroic materials are the thin elastic interfaces separating regions with different orientations of magnetisation, electric polarisation, or spontaneous strain. Understanding their behaviour, and controlling domain size and stability, is key for their integration into applications, while fundamentally, domain walls provide an excellent model system in which the rich physics of disordered elastic interfaces can be accesses. In addition, domain walls can present novel properties, quite different from those of their parent materials, making them potentially useful as active components in future nano-devices. Here, we present our atomic force microscopy studies of ferroelectric domain walls in epitaxial Pb(Zr0.2Ti0.8)O3 and BiFeO3 thin films, in which we use piezorespose force microscopy to show unusual domain wall roughening behaviour, with very localised disorder regions in the sample leading to a complex, multi-affine scaling of the domain wall shape. We also show the effects of temperature, environmental conditions, and defects on switching dynamics and domain wall roughness. We combine these observations with parallel conductive-tip atomic force microscopy current measurements, which also show highly localised variations in conduction, and highlight the key role played by oxygen vacancies in the observed domain wall conduction.

  5. Nonlinear domain wall resonance in garnet films with perpendicular anisotropy: Critical role of nonlinear damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukadinovic, N.; Ben Youssef, J.; Beaulieu, N.; Castel, V.

    2015-12-01

    Domain wall resonance spectra in the weakly nonlinear regime for garnet films with a perpendicular anisotropy supporting parallel stripe domains have been investigated using micromagnetic simulations and zero-field broadband ferromagnetic resonance experiments. The main characteristics of the 2D numerical micromagnetic approach we developed is to solve the Landau-Lifshitz equation by an iterative method in the frequency domain and to incorporate a nonlinear phenomenological damping term. It is shown that the nonlinear damping affects simultaneously the driving field dependencies of the resonance frequency and the resonance linewidth for the fundamental domain wall resonance of parallel stripe domains, and the critical field for the domain wall resonance foldover. The micromagnetic simulations allow us to reproduce quantitatively both the nonlinear redshift of the domain wall resonance frequency and the nonlinear line broadening experimentally observed for increasing values of the input microwave power.

  6. Micromagnetic study of interaction between achiral and homochiral domain walls in ultrathin ferromagnetic strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alejos, Óscar; Martínez, Eduardo

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic domain walls have been repetitively proposed for its use in memory and logic devices. Most promising devices are based on ferromagnetic/heavy-metal bilayers, with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The characteristics of the walls in these devices are influenced by the strength of the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. When this interaction is strong, it results in the formation of homochiral Néel walls, while its practical absence allows the formation of Bloch walls, either in parallel or antiparallel configurations. For isolated domain walls, a one-dimensional model can be successfully derived from the dynamic equations, which are of great help in order to understand their dynamics under different stimuli. However, a thorough study of the interactions between domain walls is required if such models are to be extended to two or more close walls. The present work studies the coexistence of two close nucleated domain walls by means of micromagnetic simulations, either in the case of Bloch walls, both parallel and antiparallel, or in the case of homochiral Néel walls, when a strong Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction is present. Two interaction mechanisms between such walls have been revealed. The first one seems to be relevant for relatively distant walls as being inversely proportional to the square of distance, in rather agreement with the mechanism proposed by other authors. The second one, which can be straightly characterized in the case of Néel walls, has been estimated as inversely proportional to the fourth power of distance, then dominating for relatively close walls. Such dipolar-like interaction has been associated with the equivalent magnetic moments of domain walls. Finally, numerical simulations of the interaction in time of domain walls are shown, which can be appropriately explained by means of the mechanisms here described.

  7. Depinning of domain walls in permalloy nanowires with asymmetric notches.

    PubMed

    Gao, Y; You, B; Ruan, X Z; Liu, M Y; Yang, H L; Zhan, Q F; Li, Z; Lei, N; Zhao, W S; Pan, D F; Wan, J G; Wu, J; Tu, H Q; Wang, J; Zhang, W; Xu, Y B; Du, J

    2016-01-01

    Effective control of the domain wall (DW) motion along the magnetic nanowires is of great importance for fundamental research and potential application in spintronic devices. In this work, a series of permalloy nanowires with an asymmetric notch in the middle were fabricated with only varying the width (d) of the right arm from 200 nm to 1000 nm. The detailed pinning and depinning processes of DWs in these nanowires have been studied by using focused magneto-optic Kerr effect (FMOKE) magnetometer, magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and micromagnetic simulation. The experimental results unambiguously exhibit the presence of a DW pinned at the notch in a typical sample with d equal to 500 nm. At a certain range of 200 nm < d < 500 nm, both the experimental and simulated results show that the DW can maintain or change its chirality randomly during passing through the notch, resulting in two DW depinning fields. Those two depinning fields have opposite d dependences, which may be originated from different potential well/barrier generated by the asymmetric notch with varying d. PMID:27600627

  8. Magnetic bead detection using domain wall-based nanosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corte-León, H.; Krzysteczko, P.; Schumacher, H. W.; Manzin, A.; Cox, D.; Antonov, V.; Kazakova, O.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the effect of a single magnetic bead (MB) on the domain wall (DW) pinning/depinning fields of a DW trapped at the corner of an L-shaped magnetic nanodevice. DW propagation across the device is investigated using magnetoresistance measurements. DW pinning/depinning fields are characterized in as-prepared devices and after placement of a 1 μm-sized MB (Dynabeads® MyOne™) at the corner. The effect of the MB on the DW dynamics is seen as an increase in the depinning field for specific orientations of the device with respect to the external magnetic field. The shift of the depinning field, ΔBdep = 4.5-27.0 mT, is highly stable and reproducible, being significantly above the stochastic deviation which is about 0.5 mT. The shift in the deppinning field is inversely proportional to the device width and larger for small negative angles between the device and the external magnetic field. Thus, we demonstrate that DW-based devices can be successfully used for detection of single micron size MB.

  9. Magnetic bead detection using domain wall-based nanosensor

    SciTech Connect

    Corte-León, H.; Krzysteczko, P.; Schumacher, H. W.; Manzin, A.; Cox, D.; Antonov, V.; Kazakova, O.

    2015-05-07

    We investigate the effect of a single magnetic bead (MB) on the domain wall (DW) pinning/depinning fields of a DW trapped at the corner of an L-shaped magnetic nanodevice. DW propagation across the device is investigated using magnetoresistance measurements. DW pinning/depinning fields are characterized in as-prepared devices and after placement of a 1 μm-sized MB (Dynabeads{sup ®} MyOne{sup ™}) at the corner. The effect of the MB on the DW dynamics is seen as an increase in the depinning field for specific orientations of the device with respect to the external magnetic field. The shift of the depinning field, ΔB{sub dep} = 4.5–27.0 mT, is highly stable and reproducible, being significantly above the stochastic deviation which is about 0.5 mT. The shift in the deppinning field is inversely proportional to the device width and larger for small negative angles between the device and the external magnetic field. Thus, we demonstrate that DW-based devices can be successfully used for detection of single micron size MB.

  10. Magnetic domain wall shift registers for data storage applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, Dan; O'Brien, L.; Zeng, H. T.; Lewis, E. R.; Petit, D.; Sampaio, J.; Thevenard, L.; Cowburn, R. P.

    2009-03-01

    Data storage devices based on magnetic domain walls (DWs) propagating through permalloy (Py) nanowires have been proposed [Allwood et al. Science 309, 1688 (2005), S. S. Parkin, US Patent 6,834,005 (2004)] and have attracted a great deal of attention. We experimentally demonstrate such a device using shift registers constructed from magnetic NOT gates used in combination with a globally applied rotating magnetic field. We have demonstrated data writing, propagation, and readout in individually addressable Py nanowires 90 nm wide and 10 nm thick. Electrical data writing is achieved using the Oersted field due to current pulses in gold stripes (4 μm wide, 150 nm thick), patterned on top of and perpendicular to the nanowires. The conduit-like properties of the nanowires allow the propagation of data sequences over distances greater than 100 μm. Using spatially resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) measurements we can directly detect the propagation of single DWs in individual nanostructures without requiring data averaging. Electrical readout was demonstrated by detecting the presence of DWs at deliberately introduced pinning sites in the wire.

  11. Depinning of domain walls in permalloy nanowires with asymmetric notches

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Y.; You, B.; Ruan, X. Z.; Liu, M. Y.; Yang, H. L.; Zhan, Q. F.; Li, Z.; Lei, N.; Zhao, W. S.; Pan, D. F.; Wan, J. G.; Wu, J.; Tu, H. Q.; Wang, J.; Zhang, W.; Xu, Y. B.; Du, J.

    2016-01-01

    Effective control of the domain wall (DW) motion along the magnetic nanowires is of great importance for fundamental research and potential application in spintronic devices. In this work, a series of permalloy nanowires with an asymmetric notch in the middle were fabricated with only varying the width (d) of the right arm from 200 nm to 1000 nm. The detailed pinning and depinning processes of DWs in these nanowires have been studied by using focused magneto-optic Kerr effect (FMOKE) magnetometer, magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and micromagnetic simulation. The experimental results unambiguously exhibit the presence of a DW pinned at the notch in a typical sample with d equal to 500 nm. At a certain range of 200 nm < d < 500 nm, both the experimental and simulated results show that the DW can maintain or change its chirality randomly during passing through the notch, resulting in two DW depinning fields. Those two depinning fields have opposite d dependences, which may be originated from different potential well/barrier generated by the asymmetric notch with varying d. PMID:27600627

  12. Experimentally tunable chiral spin transfer torque in domain wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Kwang-Su; Yang, See-Hun; Parkin, Stuart

    2016-05-01

    Domain walls (DWs) can be moved very efficiently with nanosecond long current pulses in perpendicularly magnetized Co/Ni/Co nanowires formed with platinum under- and over-layers due to a chiral spin torque mechanism. In these structures the DWs exhibit a chiral Néel structure that has been proposed is set by a Dyzaloshinskii–Moriya exchange interaction (DMI) arising from the Pt/Co and Co/Pt interfaces. The strength of this interaction can be measured from the longitudinal field dependence of the current induced DW velocity. We show, thereby, that the magnitude and sign of the DMI is strongly dependent and monotonically changes as small changes in the thicknesses of the Co layers are made. However, due to the chiral nature of the DMI we show that the magnitude and sign of the DMI is determined by the difference between the respective DMI at the upper and lower interfaces, which compensate each other. Thus, we find that the DMI increases as the lower Co thickness is increased but decreases as the upper Co thickness is increased, changing sign in both cases.

  13. Bi-directional magnetic domain wall shift register

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, D. E.; O'Brien, L.; Zeng, H. T.; Lewis, E. R.; Petit, D.; Cowburn, R. P.

    2010-03-01

    Data storage devices based on magnetic domain walls (DWs) propagating through ferromagnetic nanowires have attracted a great deal of attention in recent years [1,2]. Here we experimentally demonstrate a shift register based on an open-ended chain of ferromagnetic NOT gates. When used in combination with a globally applied magnetic field such devices can support bi-directional data flow [3]. We have demonstrated data writing, propagation, and readout in individually addressable NiFe nanowires 90 nm wide and 10 nm thick. Up to eight data bits are electrically input to the device, stored for extended periods without power supplied to the device, and then output using either a first in first out or a last in first out mode of operation. Compared to traditional electronic transistor-based circuits, the inherent bi-directionality afforded by these DW logic gates offers a range of devices that are reversible and not limited to only one mode of operation. [1] S. S. Parkin, US Patent 6,834,005 (2004) [2] D. A. Allwod, et al., Science 309 (5741), 1688 (2005) [3] L. O'Brien, et al. accepted for publication in APL (2009)

  14. Evidence of domain wall pinning in aluminum substituted cobalt ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, J. C.; Janrao, P. S.; Datar, A. A.; Kanhe, N. S.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Mathe, V. L.

    2016-08-01

    In the present work spinel structured cobalt ferrites with aluminum substitution having composition CoAlxFe2-xO4 (x=0.0, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3) have been synthesized using chemical co-precipitation method. Their microstructural, magnetic, magnetostriction and magnetoimpedance properties have been investigated. The piezomagnetic coefficient (dλ/dH) obtained from magnetostriction data is found to enhance with 0.1 Al substitutions in place of iron which decreases with further increase of Al content. It is noticed that 0.3 Al substitutions in place of Fe introduces domain wall pinning as evidenced from magnetostriction, magnetoimpedance and dc magnetization data. It is noted that ferrites so prepared using a simple procedure are magnetostrictive in good measure and with the addition of very small amount of non-magnetic aluminum their magnetostriction has shown saturation at relatively low magnetic fields. Such magnetostrictive ferrites find their applications in magnetic sensors and actuators.

  15. Increased magnetic damping of a single domain wall and adjacent magnetic domains detected by spin torque diode in a nanostripe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lequeux, Steven; Sampaio, Joao; Bortolotti, Paolo; Devolder, Thibaut; Matsumoto, Rie; Yakushiji, Kay; Kubota, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Akio; Yuasa, Shinji; Nishimura, Kazumasa; Nagamine, Yoshinori; Tsunekawa, Koji; Cros, Vincent; Grollier, Julie

    2015-11-01

    Spin torque resonance has been used to simultaneously probe the dynamics of a magnetic domain wall and of magnetic domains in a nanostripe magnetic tunnel junction. Due to the large associated resistance variations, we are able to analyze quantitatively the resonant properties of these single nanoscale magnetic objects. In particular, we find that the magnetic damping of both the domains and the domain wall is doubled compared to the damping value of the host magnetic layer. We estimate the contributions to the damping arising from the dipolar couplings between the different layers in the junction and from the intralayer spin pumping effect, and find that they cannot explain the large damping enhancement that we observe. We conclude that the measured increased damping is intrinsic to large amplitudes excitations of spatially localized modes or solitons such as vibrating or propagating domain walls.

  16. Increased magnetic damping of a single domain wall and adjacent magnetic domains detected by spin torque diode in a nanostripe

    SciTech Connect

    Lequeux, Steven; Sampaio, Joao; Bortolotti, Paolo; Cros, Vincent; Grollier, Julie; Matsumoto, Rie; Yakushiji, Kay; Kubota, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Akio; Yuasa, Shinji; Nishimura, Kazumasa; Nagamine, Yoshinori; Tsunekawa, Koji

    2015-11-02

    Spin torque resonance has been used to simultaneously probe the dynamics of a magnetic domain wall and of magnetic domains in a nanostripe magnetic tunnel junction. Due to the large associated resistance variations, we are able to analyze quantitatively the resonant properties of these single nanoscale magnetic objects. In particular, we find that the magnetic damping of both the domains and the domain wall is doubled compared to the damping value of the host magnetic layer. We estimate the contributions to the damping arising from the dipolar couplings between the different layers in the junction and from the intralayer spin pumping effect, and find that they cannot explain the large damping enhancement that we observe. We conclude that the measured increased damping is intrinsic to large amplitudes excitations of spatially localized modes or solitons such as vibrating or propagating domain walls.

  17. Comparison of Current and Field Driven Domain Wall Motion in Beaded Permalloy Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lage, Enno; Dutta, Sumit; Ross, Caroline A.

    2015-03-01

    Domain wall based devices are promising candidates for non-volatile memory devices with no static power consumption. A common approach is the use of (field assisted) current driven domain wall motion in magnetic nanowires. In such systems local variations in linewidth act as obstacles for propagating domain walls. In this study we compare simulated field driven and current driven domain wall motion in permalloy nanowires with anti-notches. The simulations were obtained using the Object Oriented MicroMagnetics Framework (OOMMF). The wires with a constant thickness of 8 nm exhibit linewidths ranging from 40 nm to 300 nm. Circular shaped anti-notches extend the linewidth locally by 10% to 30% and raise information about the domain wall propagation in such beaded nanowires. The results are interpreted in terms of the observed propagation behavior and summarized in maps indicating ranges of different ability to overcome the pinning caused by anti-notches of different sizes. Furthermore, regimes of favored domain wall type (transverse walls or vortex walls) and complex propagation effects like walker breakdown behavior or dynamic change between domain wall structures are identified The authors thank the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) for funding.

  18. Ferroelasticity in a metal-organic framework perovskite; towards a new class of multiferroics

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei; Zhang, Zhiying; Bithell, Erica G.; Batsanov, Andrei S.; Barton, Phillip T.; Saines, Paul J.; Jain, Prashant; Howard, Christopher J.; Carpenter, Michael A.; Cheetham, Anthony K.

    2013-07-05

    A metal–organic framework perovskite, [(CH2)3NH2][Mn(HCOO)3], exhibits a weakly first order ferroelastic phase transition at ~272 K, from orthorhombic Pnma to monoclinic P21/n, and a further transition associated with antiferromagnetic ordering at ~8.5 K. The main structural changes, through the phase transition, are orientational ordering of the azetidium groups and associated changes in hydrogen bonding. In marked contrast to conventional improper ferroelastic oxide perovskites, the driving mechanism is associated with the X-point of the cubic Brillouin zone rather than being driven by R- and M-point octahedral tilting. The total ferroelastic shear strain of up to ~5% is substantially greater than found for typical oxide perovskites, and highlights the potential of the flexible framework to undergo large relaxations in response to local structural changes. Measurements of elastic and anelastic properties by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy show some of the characteristic features of ferroelastic materials. In particular, acoustic dissipation below the transition point can be understood in terms of mobility of twin walls under the influence of external stress with relaxation times on the order of ~10-7 s. Elastic softening as the transition is approached from above is interpreted in terms of coupling between acoustic modes and dynamic local ordering of the azetidium groups. Subsequent stiffening with further temperature reduction is interpreted in terms of classical strain–order parameter coupling at an improper ferroelastic transition which is close to being tricritical. By way of contrast, there are no overt changes in elastic or anelastic properties near 9 K, implying that any coupling of the antiferromagnetic order parameter with strain is weak or negligible.

  19. Nucleon Structure with Domain Wall Fermions at a = 0.086 fm

    SciTech Connect

    Syritsyn, Sergey; Bratt, Jonathan; Lin, Meifeng; Meyer, Harvey; Negele, John; Pochinsky, Andrew; Procura, M.; Edwards, Robert; Orginos, Konstantinos; Richards, David; Engelhardt, Michael; Fleming, George; Haegler, Philipp; Musch, Bernhard; Renner, Dru; Schroers, Wolfram

    2008-12-01

    We present initial calculations of nucleon matrix elements of twist-two operators with 2+1 flavors of domain wall fermions at a lattice spacing a = 0.084 fm for pion masses down to 300 MeV. We also compare the results with the domain wall calculations on a coarser lattice.

  20. Current-induced 360° domain wall motion with Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chendong; Zhang, Senfu; Zhu, Qiyuan; Liu, Xianyin; Chen, Shujun; Song, Chengkun; Wang, Jianbo; Liu, Qingfang

    2016-05-01

    By micromagnetic simulation, we investigated the effect of the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction (DMI) on the static and dynamic characteristics of a 360° domain wall. Simulation results show that both the energy and the size of a 360° domain wall decrease with the increase of DMI intensity. In the presence of DMI, the stable motion of a 360° domain wall can be either along the  +x direction or  ‑x direction depending on the sign of the DMI. For stable motion, the maximum velocity of a 360° domain wall is 19.87% larger than that without the DMI. Increasing the current density beyond the Walker threshold, conversion between the 360° domain wall state and the vortex state was observed. Further increasing the current density, the proliferation of 360° domain walls becomes possible. Moreover, the 360° domain wall becomes more flexible and easier to pass a notch by considering the DMI. These findings may offer guidance for the development of 360° domain wall-based racetrack memories.

  1. Spin-wave-driven high-speed domain-wall motions in soft magnetic nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jaehak; Yoo, Myoung-Woo; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2015-10-28

    We report on a micromagnetic simulation study of interactions between propagating spin waves and a head-to-head domain wall in geometrically confined magnetic nanotubes. We found that incident spin waves of specific frequencies can lead to sufficiently high-speed (on the order of a few hundreds of m/s or higher) domain-wall motions in the same direction as that of the incident spin-waves. The domain-wall motions and their speed vary remarkably with the frequency and the amplitude of the incident spin-waves. High-speed domain-wall motions originate from the transfer torque of spin waves' linear momentum to the domain wall, through the partial or complete reflection of the incident spin waves from the domain wall. This work provides a fundamental understanding of the interaction of the spin waves with a domain wall in the magnetic nanotubes as well as a route to all-magnetic control of domain-wall motions in the magnetic nanoelements.

  2. Current-driven vortex domain wall motion in wire-tube nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espejo, A. P.; Vidal-Silva, N.; López-López, J. A.; Goerlitz, D.; Nielsch, K.; Escrig, J.

    2015-03-01

    We have investigated the current-driven domain wall motion in nanostructures comprised of a pair of nanotube and nanowire segments. Under certain values of external magnetic fields, it is possible to pin a vortex domain wall in the transition zone between the wire and tube segments. We explored the behavior of this domain wall under the action of an electron flow applied in the opposite direction to the magnetic field. Thus, for a fixed magnetic field, it is possible to release a domain wall pinned simply by increasing the intensity of the current density, or conversely, for a fixed current density, it is possible to release the domain wall simply decreasing the magnetic external field. When the domain wall remains pinned due to the competition between the current density and the magnetic external field, it exhibits a oscillation frequency close to 8 GHz. The amplitude of the oscillations increases with the current density and decreases over time. On the other hand, when the domain wall is released and propagated through the tube segment, this shows the standard separation between a steady and a precessional regime. The ability to pin and release a domain wall by varying the geometric parameters, the current density, or the magnetic field transforms these wire-tube nanostructures in an interesting alternative as an on/off switch nano-transistor.

  3. Current-driven vortex domain wall motion in wire-tube nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Espejo, A. P.; Vidal-Silva, N.; López-López, J. A.; Goerlitz, D.; Nielsch, K.; Escrig, J.

    2015-03-30

    We have investigated the current-driven domain wall motion in nanostructures comprised of a pair of nanotube and nanowire segments. Under certain values of external magnetic fields, it is possible to pin a vortex domain wall in the transition zone between the wire and tube segments. We explored the behavior of this domain wall under the action of an electron flow applied in the opposite direction to the magnetic field. Thus, for a fixed magnetic field, it is possible to release a domain wall pinned simply by increasing the intensity of the current density, or conversely, for a fixed current density, it is possible to release the domain wall simply decreasing the magnetic external field. When the domain wall remains pinned due to the competition between the current density and the magnetic external field, it exhibits a oscillation frequency close to 8 GHz. The amplitude of the oscillations increases with the current density and decreases over time. On the other hand, when the domain wall is released and propagated through the tube segment, this shows the standard separation between a steady and a precessional regime. The ability to pin and release a domain wall by varying the geometric parameters, the current density, or the magnetic field transforms these wire-tube nanostructures in an interesting alternative as an on/off switch nano-transistor.

  4. Sustained chiral magnetic domain wall motion driven by spin-orbit torques under the tilted current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Peng-Bin; Yan, Han; Cai, Meng-Qiu; Li, Zai-Dong

    2016-06-01

    We theoretically investigate the steady magnetic domain wall driven by spin-orbit torques in the heavy-metal/magnet bilayers with perpendicular anisotropy. Based on collective coordinates method and stability analysis, we analyze the effects of tilted current and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction on the wall. We find that the wall acquires a sustained motion in the high-current regime by deviating the current from the wall track. Also, a persistent motion can be supported by the competition between spin-orbit torques and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction in transforming wall type. In the low-current regime, there exist a switching of wall chirality and a reversal of wall motion.

  5. SH3b Cell wall binding domains can enhance anti-staphylococcal activity of endolysin lytic domains.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacteriophage endolysins are peptidoglycan hydrolases and a potential new source of antimicrobials. A large subset of these proteins contain a C-terminal SH3b_5 cell wall binding domain that has been shown [for some] to be essential for accurate cell wall recognition and subsequent staphylolytic ac...

  6. Magnetic domain wall propagation in a submicron spin-valve stripe: Influence of the pinned layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briones, J.; Montaigne, F.; Lacour, D.; Hehn, M.; Carey, M. J.; Childress, J. R.

    2008-01-01

    The propagation of a domain wall in a submicron ferromagnetic spin-valve stripe is investigated using giant magnetoresistance. A notch in the stripe efficiently traps an injected wall stopping the domain propagation. The authors show that the magnetic field at which the wall is depinned displays a stochastic nature. Moreover, the depinning statistics are significantly different for head-to-head and tail-to-tail domain walls. This is attributed to the dipolar field generated in the vicinity of the notch by the pinned layer of the spin valve.

  7. Spin torque and domain wall velocity in ferromagnetic semiconductor π and 2π N'eel walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovatski, E. A.; Flatté, M. E.

    2010-03-01

    The motion of a domain wall under an applied spin-polarized current[1] has interesting device applications for the development of spintronic devices. We model 2π N'eel walls (energetically favorable in thin films) in ferromagnetic semiconductors, and compare the results to those for the more-frequently studied π walls. Under coherent transport conditions, analytic solutions for spin-dependent reflection and transmission coefficients are possible[2,3]. We calculate charge resistance, spin torque, and domain wall velocity. We find the peak spin torque is more than twice as large for a 2π wall than for a π wall. We also find that the peak velocity of a 2π wall is larger than that of a π wall, but the peak velocities of 3π and 4π walls are smaller than those of both π and 2π walls. This work was supported by an ARO MURI.[4pt] [1] M. Yamanouchi, D. Chiba, F. Matsukura, and H. Ohno, Nature 428, 539 (2004).[0pt] [2] G. Vignale and M. Flatt'e, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89 (2002).[0pt] [3] D. Ralph and M. Stiles, Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials 320, 1190 (2008).

  8. Vortex head-to-head domain walls and their formation in onion-state ring elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, M. H.; Hong, Y. K.; Choi, B. C.; Donahue, M. J.; Han, H.; Gee, S. H.

    2006-03-01

    Magnetization configuration of vortex head-to-head (HTH) domain walls and the wall-formation process in Ni80Fe20 ring elements were investigated using magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and micromagnetic simulation. At remanence, two types of vortex HTH domain walls were observed to be stable in the onion configuration, depending on the film thickness: single- and double-vortex HTH domain walls for 40 and 65nm thick ring elements, respectively. As the vortex core nucleated during formation of the HTH domain wall, exchange energy began to decrease, accompanied by an increase in the width of the wall. Vortex nucleation in the 65nm thick ring was found to be much faster than in the 40nm thick ring element. This effect can be attributed to the higher initial magnetostatic energy density in the thicker ring.

  9. Phase field simulation of domain switching dynamics in multiaxial lead zirconate titanate thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britson, Jason

    The defining characteristic of ferroelectric materials is their ability to be switched between energetically equivalent polarization states. This behavior has led to an interest in ferroelectrics for a wide range of bulk and thin film applications such as mechanical actuators and ferroelectric random access memory devices. Ferroelectric switching depends on domain wall motion, however, and is critically influenced by the existence of defects such as dislocations and preexisting domains. Domain wall motion in thin film applications can be controlled by individual local defects due to the reduced length scale of the system. This dissertation describes the impact of preexisting ferroelastic domains and misfits dislocations in coherent (001)-oriented Pb(Zr0.2,Ti0.8)O3 (PZT) thin films on the switching response and domain structure. A phase field model based on the Landau-Ginzburg-Devonshire theory that accounts for the electrostatic and mechanical interactions is used to describe domain structures in ferroelectric PZT thin films. To solve the governing equations a semi-implicit Fourier-Spectral scheme is developed that accommodates boundary conditions appropriate to the thin film geometry. Errors are reduced in the solutions at the film edges through extensions to the model developed to correct the Fourier transform around stationary discontinuities at the thin film edges. This correction is shown to result in increased accuracy of the phase field model needed to appropriately describe dynamic switching responses in the thin film. Investigation of switching around preexisting ferroelastic domains showed these defects are strong obstacles to switching in PZT thin films. Directly above the ferroelastic domain the magnitude of the required nucleation bias underneath a tip-like electrode was found to be elevated compared to the required bias far from the domain. Locally both the piezoelectric and dielectric responses of the thin film were found to be suppressed, which is

  10. Athermal domain-wall creep near a ferroelectric quantum critical point

    PubMed Central

    Kagawa, Fumitaka; Minami, Nao; Horiuchi, Sachio; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Ferroelectric domain walls are typically stationary because of the presence of a pinning potential. Nevertheless, thermally activated, irreversible creep motion can occur under a moderate electric field, thereby underlying rewritable and non-volatile memory applications. Conversely, as the temperature decreases, the occurrence of creep motion becomes less likely and eventually impossible under realistic electric-field magnitudes. Here we show that such frozen ferroelectric domain walls recover their mobility under the influence of quantum fluctuations. Nonlinear permittivity and polarization-retention measurements of an organic charge-transfer complex reveal that ferroelectric domain-wall creep occurs via an athermal process when the system is tuned close to a pressure-driven ferroelectric quantum critical point. Despite the heavy masses of material building blocks such as molecules, the estimated effective mass of the domain wall is comparable to the proton mass, indicating the realization of a ferroelectric domain wall with a quantum-particle nature near the quantum critical point. PMID:26880041

  11. Direct Imaging of Thermally Driven Domain Wall Motion in Magnetic Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wanjun; Upadhyaya, Pramey; Fan, Yabin; Zhao, Jing; Wang, Minsheng; Chang, Li-Te; Lang, Murong; Wong, Kin L.; Lewis, Mark; Lin, Yen-Ting; Tang, Jianshi; Cherepov, Sergiy; Zhou, Xuezhi; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Schwartz, Robert N.; Wang, Kang L.

    2013-04-01

    Thermally induced domain wall motion in a magnetic insulator was observed using spatiotemporally resolved polar magneto-optical Kerr effect microscopy. The following results were found: (i) the domain wall moves towards hot regime; (ii) a threshold temperature gradient (5K/mm), i.e., a minimal temperature gradient required to induce domain wall motion; (iii) a finite domain wall velocity outside of the region with a temperature gradient, slowly decreasing as a function of distance, which is interpreted to result from the penetration of a magnonic current into the constant temperature region; and (iv) a linear dependence of the average domain wall velocity on temperature gradient, beyond a threshold thermal bias. Our observations can be qualitatively explained using a magnonic spin transfer torque mechanism, which suggests the utility of magnonic spin transfer torque for controlling magnetization dynamics.

  12. Suppression of the intrinsic stochastic pinning of domain walls in magnetic nanostripes.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Manuel; Prieto, José L

    2011-01-01

    Nanofabrication has allowed the development of new concepts such as magnetic logic and race-track memory, both of which are based on the displacement of magnetic domain walls on magnetic nanostripes. One of the issues that has to be solved before devices can meet the market demands is the stochastic behaviour of the domain wall movement in magnetic nanostripes. Here we show that the stochastic nature of the domain wall motion in permalloy nanostripes can be suppressed at very low fields (0.6-2.7 Oe). We also find different field regimes for this stochastic motion that match well with the domain wall propagation modes. The highest pinning probability is found around the precessional mode and, interestingly, it does not depend on the external field in this regime. These results constitute an experimental evidence of the intrinsic nature of the stochastic pinning of domain walls in soft magnetic nanostripes. PMID:22127058

  13. Modulated Magnetic Nanowires for Controlling Domain Wall Motion: Toward 3D Magnetic Memories.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Yurii P; Chuvilin, Andrey; Lopatin, Sergei; Kosel, Jurgen

    2016-05-24

    Cylindrical magnetic nanowires are attractive materials for next generation data storage devices owing to the theoretically achievable high domain wall velocity and their efficient fabrication in highly dense arrays. In order to obtain control over domain wall motion, reliable and well-defined pinning sites are required. Here, we show that modulated nanowires consisting of alternating nickel and cobalt sections facilitate efficient domain wall pinning at the interfaces of those sections. By combining electron holography with micromagnetic simulations, the pinning effect can be explained by the interaction of the stray fields generated at the interface and the domain wall. Utilizing a modified differential phase contrast imaging, we visualized the pinned domain wall with a high resolution, revealing its three-dimensional vortex structure with the previously predicted Bloch point at its center. These findings suggest the potential of modulated nanowires for the development of high-density, three-dimensional data storage devices. PMID:27138460

  14. Athermal domain-wall creep near a ferroelectric quantum critical point.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Fumitaka; Minami, Nao; Horiuchi, Sachio; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Ferroelectric domain walls are typically stationary because of the presence of a pinning potential. Nevertheless, thermally activated, irreversible creep motion can occur under a moderate electric field, thereby underlying rewritable and non-volatile memory applications. Conversely, as the temperature decreases, the occurrence of creep motion becomes less likely and eventually impossible under realistic electric-field magnitudes. Here we show that such frozen ferroelectric domain walls recover their mobility under the influence of quantum fluctuations. Nonlinear permittivity and polarization-retention measurements of an organic charge-transfer complex reveal that ferroelectric domain-wall creep occurs via an athermal process when the system is tuned close to a pressure-driven ferroelectric quantum critical point. Despite the heavy masses of material building blocks such as molecules, the estimated effective mass of the domain wall is comparable to the proton mass, indicating the realization of a ferroelectric domain wall with a quantum-particle nature near the quantum critical point. PMID:26880041

  15. Athermal domain-wall creep near a ferroelectric quantum critical point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagawa, Fumitaka; Minami, Nao; Horiuchi, Sachio; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2016-02-01

    Ferroelectric domain walls are typically stationary because of the presence of a pinning potential. Nevertheless, thermally activated, irreversible creep motion can occur under a moderate electric field, thereby underlying rewritable and non-volatile memory applications. Conversely, as the temperature decreases, the occurrence of creep motion becomes less likely and eventually impossible under realistic electric-field magnitudes. Here we show that such frozen ferroelectric domain walls recover their mobility under the influence of quantum fluctuations. Nonlinear permittivity and polarization-retention measurements of an organic charge-transfer complex reveal that ferroelectric domain-wall creep occurs via an athermal process when the system is tuned close to a pressure-driven ferroelectric quantum critical point. Despite the heavy masses of material building blocks such as molecules, the estimated effective mass of the domain wall is comparable to the proton mass, indicating the realization of a ferroelectric domain wall with a quantum-particle nature near the quantum critical point.

  16. Pinning induced by inter-domain wall interactions in planar magnetic nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Hayward, T.J.; Bryan, M.T.; Fry, P.W.; Fundi, P.M.; Gibbs, M.R.J.; Allwood, D.A.; Im, M.-Y.; Fischer, P.

    2009-10-30

    We have investigated pinning potentials created by inter-domain wall magnetostatic interactions in planar magnetic nanowires. We show that these potentials can take the form of an energy barrier or an energy well depending on the walls' relative monopole moments, and that the applied magnetic fields required to overcome these potentials are significant. Both transverse and vortex wall pairs are investigated and it is found that transverse walls interact more strongly due to dipolar coupling between their magnetization structures. Simple analytical models which allow the effects of inter-domain wall interactions to be estimated are also presented.

  17. Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya domain wall resonance in ferromagnetic nanowires with a spin-transfer torque

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zai-Dong; Liu, Fei; Li, Qiu-Yan; He, P. B.

    2015-05-07

    We theoretically investigate the current-induced domain wall resonance in ferromagnetic nanowires with a Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. The adiabatic and nonadiabatic torques distort the wall's internal structure and exert a global pressure on the wall. An effective Newton's equation is obtained analytically for a domain wall moving in one-dimensional potential and subject to a viscous friction and a driving force. Our results demonstrate that the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction affects the critical current density for depinning the wall, resonance frequency, and amplitude.

  18. One-dimensional domain walls in thin ferromagnetic films with fourfold anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, Ross G.; Muratov, Cyrill B.

    2016-06-01

    We study the properties of domain walls and domain patterns in ultrathin epitaxial magnetic films with two orthogonal in-plane easy axes, which we call fourfold materials. In these materials, the magnetization vector is constrained to lie entirely in the film plane and has four preferred directions dictated by the easy axes. We prove the existence of {{90}\\circ} and {{180}\\circ} domain walls in these materials as minimizers of a nonlocal one-dimensional energy functional. Further, we investigate numerically the role of the considered domain wall solutions for pattern formation in a rectangular sample.

  19. Evolution of domain wall networks: The Press-Ryden-Spergel algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Sousa, L.; Avelino, P. P.

    2010-04-15

    The Press-Ryden-Spergel (PRS) algorithm is a modification to the field theory equations of motion, parametrized by two parameters ({alpha} and {beta}), implemented in numerical simulations of cosmological domain wall networks, in order to ensure a fixed comoving resolution. In this paper we explicitly demonstrate that the PRS algorithm provides the correct domain wall dynamics in (N+1)-dimensional Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universes if {alpha}+{beta}/2=N, fully validating its use in numerical studies of cosmic domain evolution. We further show that this result is valid for generic thin featureless domain walls, independently of the Lagrangian of the model.

  20. Flexoelectricity and the polarity of complex ferroelastic twin patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salje, Ekhard K. H.; Li, Suzhi; Stengel, Massimiliano; Gumbsch, Peter; Ding, Xiangdong

    2016-07-01

    We study, by means of an atomistic toy model, the interplay of ferroelastic twin patterns and electrical polarization. Our molecular dynamics simulations reproduce polarity in straight twin walls as observed experimentally. We show, by making contact with continuum theory, that the effect is governed by linear flexoelectricity. Complex twin patterns, with very high densities of kinks and/or junctions, produce winding structures in the dipolar field, which are reminiscent of polarization vortices. By means of a "cold shearing" technique, we produce patches with high vortex densities; these unexpectedly show a net macroscopic polarization even if neither the original sample nor the applied mechanical perturbation breaks inversion symmetry by itself. These results may explain some puzzling experimental observations of "parasitic" polarity in the paraelectric phase of BaTi O3 and LaAl O3 .

  1. Domain walls in the (Ga,Mn)as diluted magnetic semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Akira; Kasai, H; Tonomura, A; Brown, P D; Campion, R P; Edmonds, K W; Gallagher, B L; Zemen, J; Jungwirth, T

    2008-02-01

    We report experimental and theoretical studies of magnetic domain walls in an in-plane magnetized (Ga,Mn)As dilute moment ferromagnetic semiconductor. Our high-resolution electron holography technique provides direct images of domain wall magnetization profiles. The experiments are interpreted based on microscopic calculations of the micromagnetic parameters and Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert simulations. We find that the competition of uniaxial and biaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropies in the film is directly reflected in orientation dependent wall widths, ranging from approximately 40 to 120 nm. The domain walls are of the Néel type and evolve from near-90 degrees walls at low temperatures to large angle [11[over ]0]-oriented walls and small angle [110]-oriented walls at higher temperatures. PMID:18352324

  2. Controlling the stability of both the structure and velocity of domain walls in magnetic nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandão, J.; Atkinson, D.

    2016-08-01

    For magnetic nanowire devices, the precise control of both domain wall (DW) motion and pinning behaviour is essential for reliable functional performance. The domain wall velocity and wall structure are typically sensitive to the driving field or spin-polarized current, and the pinning behaviour depends on the walls' structure and chirality, leading to variability in behaviour. Here, a systematic study combining experimental measurements and micromagnetic simulations of planar nanowires with small fixed-angle structural modulations on both edges was undertaken to study the domain wall reversal regime. A phase diagram for the reversal field as a function of modulation amplitude was obtained that shows that three DW reversal regime. A range of field and modulation amplitudes were identified in which stable DW reversal occurs, where the wall velocity is constant as a function of field and the wall structure is stable, which is well suited to applications.

  3. Microstructure from ferroelastic transitions using strain pseudospin clock models in two and three dimensions: A local mean-field analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasseur, Romain; Lookman, Turab; Shenoy, Subodh R.

    2010-09-01

    We show how microstructure can arise in first-order ferroelastic structural transitions, in two and three spatial dimensions, through a local mean-field approximation of their pseudospin Hamiltonians, that include anisotropic elastic interactions. Such transitions have symmetry-selected physical strains as their NOP -component order parameters, with Landau free energies that have a single zero-strain “austenite” minimum at high temperatures, and spontaneous-strain “martensite” minima of NV structural variants at low temperatures. The total free energy also has gradient terms, and power-law anisotropic effective interactions, induced by “no-dislocation” St Venant compatibility constraints. In a reduced description, the strains at Landau minima induce temperature dependent, clocklike ZNV+1 Hamiltonians, with NOP -component strain-pseudospin vectors S⃗ pointing to NV+1 discrete values (including zero). We study elastic texturing in five such first-order structural transitions through a local mean-field approximation of their pseudospin Hamiltonians, that include the power-law interactions. As a prototype, we consider the two-variant square/rectangle transition, with a one-component pseudospin taking NV+1=3 values of S=0,±1 , as in a generalized Blume-Capel model. We then consider transitions with two-component (NOP=2) pseudospins: the equilateral to centered rectangle (NV=3) ; the square to oblique polygon (NV=4) ; the triangle to oblique (NV=6) transitions; and finally the three-dimensional (3D) cubic to tetragonal transition (NV=3) . The local mean-field solutions in two-dimensional and 3D yield oriented domain-wall patterns as from continuous-variable strain dynamics, showing the discrete-variable models capture the essential ferroelastic texturings. Other related Hamiltonians illustrate that structural transitions in materials science can be the source of interesting spin models in statistical mechanics.

  4. Electric resistance of magnetic domain wall in NiFe wires with CoSm pinning pads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagahama, T.; Mibu, K.; Shinjo, T.

    2000-05-01

    The contribution of a magnetic domain wall to electric resistivity was measured using NiFe wires (width: 1 μm) partially covered with hard magnetic pads (CoSm). When the wire is covered with N pinning pads, 2N domain walls can be produced in the wire by reversing the magnetization only at the uncovered parts. The resistance for the magnetically saturated state (no domain wall structure) and that for the magnetic structure with 2N domain walls were compared at zero applied field. It was found that the resistance is smaller when magnetic domain walls exist, and that the domain wall resistance is almost temperature independent.

  5. Scanning secondary-electron microscopy on ferroelectric domains and domain walls in YMnO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.; Yang, H. X.; Tian, H. F.; Ma, C.; Li, J. Q.; Zhang, S.; Zhao, Y. G.

    2012-04-09

    Ferroelectric domain structures in YMnO{sub 3} single crystals on the hexagonal polar surface have been investigated by scanning electron microscopy in secondary electron emission mode. The experimental results demonstrate that the domain, as well as domain walls, can be clearly revealed under the operation voltages ranging from 0.6 to 3 kV. Evolution of domain contrasts arising from electron-beam irradiation can be mainly explained by the pyroelectric effect and related charging process. A rich variety of microstructure features of ferroelectric domains can be clearly revealed in YMnO{sub 3} by this high-resolution technique.

  6. Physical results from 2+1 flavor domain wall QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Scholz,E.E.

    2008-07-14

    We review recent results for the chiral behavior of meson masses and decay constants and the determination of the light quark masses by the RBC and UKQCD collaborations. We find that one-loop SU(2) chiral perturbation theory represents the behavior of our lattice data better than one-loop SU(3) chiral perturbation theory in both the pion and kaon sectors. The simulations have been performed using the Iwasaki gauge action at two different lattice spacings with the physical spatial volume held approximately fixed at (2.7fm){sup 3}. The Domain Wall fermion formulation was used for the 2+1 dynamical quark flavors: two (mass degenerate) light flavors with masses as light as roughly 1/5 the mass of the physical strange quark mass and one heavier quark flavor at approximately the value of the physical strange quark mass, On the ensembles generated with the coarser lattice spacing, we obtain for the physical average up- and down-quark and strange quark masses m{sub ud}{sup {ovr MS}} (2 GeV) = 3.72(0.16){sub stat}(0.33){sub ren}(0.18){sub syst}MeV and m{sub s}{sup {ovr MS}} (2 GeV) = 107.3(4.4){sub stat}(9.7){sub ren}(4.9){sub syst} MeV, respectively, while they find for the pion and kaon decay constants f{sub {pi}} = 124.1(3.6){sub stat}(6.9){sub syst}MeV, f{sub K} = 149.6(3.6){sub stat}(6.3){sub syst} MeV. The analysis for the finer lattice spacing has not been fully completed yet, but we already present some first (preliminary) results.

  7. How to move domain walls in an antiferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Se Kwon

    Domain walls (DWs) in an easy-axis antiferromagnet can be driven by several stimuli: a charge current (in conducting antiferromagnets), a magnon current, and a temperature gradient. In this talk, we discuss the dynamics of a DW induced by two latter external perturbations, which are applicable in both metallic and insulating antiferromagnets. First of all, we study the Brownian dynamics of a DW subjected to a temperature gradient. To this end, we derive the Langevin equation for the DW's center of mass with the aid of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. A DW behaves as a classical massive particle immersed in a viscous medium. By considering a thermodynamic ensemble of DWs, we obtain the Fokker-Planck equation, from which we extract the average drift velocity of a DW. We briefly address other mechanisms of thermally driven DW motion. Secondly, we analyze the dynamics of a DW driven by circularly polarized magnons. Magnons passing through a DW reverse their spin upon transmission, thereby transferring two quanta of angular momentum to the DW and causing it to precess. A precessing DW partially reflects magnons back to the source. The reflection of magnons creates a previously identified reactive force. We point out a second mechanism of propulsion of the DW, which we term redshift: magnons passing through a precessing DW reduce their linear momentum and transfer the decrease to the DW. We solve the equations of motion for magnons in the background of a uniformly precessing DW with the aid of supersymmetric quantum mechanics and compute the net force and torque applied by magnons to the DW. The theory agrees well with micromagnetic simulations. This work has been supported in part by the ARO, the U.S. DOE-BES, and the U.S. NSF grants.

  8. Domain-wall depinning dominated by the Spin Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swagten, Henk

    2013-03-01

    Current induced domain wall motion (CIDWM) in perpendicular materials is believed to be very efficient. We will show that the Spin Hall effect (SHE) provides a radically new mechanism for CIDWM in these systems. Using focused-ion-beam irradiation we are able to stabilize and pin two DWs in a Pt/Co/Pt nanowire. By depinning the DWs under the application of a perpendicular field as well as an injected charge current and in-plane magnetic field, we are able to disentangle the contributions to DW motion originating from (1) conventional spin transfer torques that act on magnetization gradients and (2) from the hitherto unexplored SHE torques. The fact the perpendicular depinning field H as a function of charge current J for the two DWs has equal slope dH/dJ, as well as a sign change of the slope when we change the polarity of the DWs, directly proves the dominance of the SHE contribution. To further proof that the SHE is governing the depinning process, we have tuned the internal spin structure of the DW from Bloch to Néel, by varying the in-plane field parallel to the current, and find that the influence of current on the depinning is highest when the DW has the Néel structure. This behavior is verified by macrospin simulations, which can quantitatively explain our data. As a final compelling evidence, we have varied the thickness of the bottom and top Pt, showing that we are able to tune the spin Hall currents originating from the nonmagnetic Pt layers. The work is part of the research programme of the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), which is part of the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO).

  9. Domain walls and vortices in linearly coupled systems.

    PubMed

    Dror, Nir; Malomed, Boris A; Zeng, Jianhua

    2011-10-01

    We investigate one- and two-dimensional radial domain-wall (DW) states in the system of two nonlinear-Schrödinger (NLS) or Gross-Pitaevskii (GP) equations, which are couple by linear mixing and by nonlinear XPM (cross-phase-modulation). The system has straightforward applications to two-component Bose-Einstein condensates, and to bimodal light propagation in nonlinear optics. In the former case the two components represent different hyperfine atomic states, while in the latter setting they correspond to orthogonal polarizations of light. Conditions guaranteeing the stability of flat continuous wave (CW) asymmetric bimodal states are established, followed by the study of families of the corresponding DW patterns. Approximate analytical solutions for the DWs are found near the point of the symmetry-breaking bifurcation of the CW states. An exact DW solution is produced for ratio 3:1 of the XPM and SPM (self-phase modulation) coefficients. The DWs between flat asymmetric states, which are mirror images of each other, are completely stable, and all other species of the DWs, with zero crossings in one or two components, are fully unstable. Interactions between two DWs are considered too, and an effective potential accounting for the attraction between them is derived analytically. Direct simulations demonstrate merger and annihilation of the interacting DWs. The analysis is extended for the system including single- and double-peak external potentials. Generic solutions for trapped DWs are obtained in a numerical form, and their stability is investigated. An exact stable solution is found for the DW trapped by a single-peak potential. In the 2D geometry, stable two-component vortices are found, with topological charges s=1,2,3. Radial oscillations of annular DW-shaped pulsons, with s=0,1,2, are studied too. A linear relation between the period of the oscillations and the mean radius of the DW ring is derived analytically. PMID:22181291

  10. Domain walls and vortices in linearly coupled systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dror, Nir; Malomed, Boris A.; Zeng Jianhua

    2011-10-15

    We investigate one- and two-dimensional radial domain-wall (DW) states in the system of two nonlinear-Schroedinger (NLS) or Gross-Pitaevskii (GP) equations, which are couple by linear mixing and by nonlinear XPM (cross-phase-modulation). The system has straightforward applications to two-component Bose-Einstein condensates, and to bimodal light propagation in nonlinear optics. In the former case the two components represent different hyperfine atomic states, while in the latter setting they correspond to orthogonal polarizations of light. Conditions guaranteeing the stability of flat continuous wave (CW) asymmetric bimodal states are established, followed by the study of families of the corresponding DW patterns. Approximate analytical solutions for the DWs are found near the point of the symmetry-breaking bifurcation of the CW states. An exact DW solution is produced for ratio 3:1 of the XPM and SPM (self-phase modulation) coefficients. The DWs between flat asymmetric states, which are mirror images of each other, are completely stable, and all other species of the DWs, with zero crossings in one or two components, are fully unstable. Interactions between two DWs are considered too, and an effective potential accounting for the attraction between them is derived analytically. Direct simulations demonstrate merger and annihilation of the interacting DWs. The analysis is extended for the system including single- and double-peak external potentials. Generic solutions for trapped DWs are obtained in a numerical form, and their stability is investigated. An exact stable solution is found for the DW trapped by a single-peak potential. In the 2D geometry, stable two-component vortices are found, with topological charges s=1,2,3. Radial oscillations of annular DW-shaped pulsons, with s=0,1,2, are studied too. A linear relation between the period of the oscillations and the mean radius of the DW ring is derived analytically.

  11. Synchronous precessional motion of multiple domain walls in a ferromagnetic nanowire by perpendicular field pulses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, June-Seo; Mawass, Mohamad-Assaad; Bisig, André; Krüger, Benjamin; Reeve, Robert M.; Schulz, Tomek; Büttner, Felix; Yoon, Jungbum; You, Chun-Yeol; Weigand, Markus; Stoll, Hermann; Schütz, Gisela; Swagten, Henk J. M.; Koopmans, Bert; Eisebitt, Stefan; Kläui, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic storage and logic devices based on magnetic domain wall motion rely on the precise and synchronous displacement of multiple domain walls. The conventional approach using magnetic fields does not allow for the synchronous motion of multiple domains. As an alternative method, synchronous current-induced domain wall motion was studied, but the required high-current densities prevent widespread use in devices. Here we demonstrate a radically different approach: we use out-of-plane magnetic field pulses to move in-plane domains, thus combining field-induced magnetization dynamics with the ability to move neighbouring domain walls in the same direction. Micromagnetic simulations suggest that synchronous permanent displacement of multiple magnetic walls can be achieved by using transverse domain walls with identical chirality combined with regular pinning sites and an asymmetric pulse. By performing scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, we are able to experimentally demonstrate in-plane magnetized domain wall motion due to out-of-plane magnetic field pulses. PMID:24663150

  12. Domain wall kinetics of lithium niobate single crystals near the hexagonal corner

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Ju Won; Ko, Do-Kyeong; Yu, Nan Ei E-mail: jhro@pnu.edu; Kitamura, Kenji; Ro, Jung Hoon E-mail: jhro@pnu.edu

    2015-03-09

    A mesospheric approach based on a simple microscopic 2D Ising model in a hexagonal lattice plane is proposed to explain macroscopic “asymmetric in-out domain wall motion” observation in the (0001) plane of MgO-doped stoichiometric lithium niobate. Under application of an electric field that was higher than the conventional coercive field (E{sub c}) to the ferroelectric crystal, a natural hexagonal domain was obtained with walls that were parallel to the Y-axis of the crystal. When a fraction of the coercive field of around 0.1E{sub c} is applied in the reverse direction, this hexagonal domain is shrunk (moved inward) from the corner site into a shape with a corner angle of around 150° and 15° wall slopes to the Y-axis. A flipped electric field of 0.15E{sub c} is then applied to recover the natural hexagonal shape, and the 150° corner shape changes into a flat wall with 30° slope (moved outward). The differences in corner domain shapes between inward and outward domain motion were analyzed theoretically in terms of corner and wall site energies, which are described using the domain corner angle and wall slope with respect to the crystal Y-axis, respectively. In the inward domain wall motion case, the energy levels of the evolving 150° domain corner and 15° slope walls are most competitive, and could co-exist. In the outward case, the energy levels of corners with angles >180° are highly stable when compared with the possible domain walls; only a flat wall with 30° slope to the Y-axis is possible during outward motion.

  13. Formation and structure of 360 and 540 degree domain walls in thin magnetic stripes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Youngman; Bowden, S. R.; Mascaro, Mark; Unguris, J.; Ross, C. A.

    2012-02-01

    360°, 540°, and other complex transverse domain walls have been created in narrow cobalt wires connected to injection pads by cycling a magnetic field perpendicular to the wire length. The composite walls, formed by impingement of 180° transverse walls of alternating chirality, are stable over a wide field range. The structure of the walls observed at remanence by scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis and by magnetic force microscopy is in good quantitative agreement with the prediction of micromagnetic simulations.

  14. Temperature dependence of critical sizes, wall widths and moments in two-domain magnetite grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newell, Andrew J.; Dunlop, David J.; Enkin, Randolph J.

    We use a one-dimensional micromagnetic model with temperature-dependent parameters for the mineral magnetite to calculate the critical sizes dSDmax, above which a single-domain (SD) state does not exist; d2Dmin, below which no two-domain state exists; and d0, at which the SD and two-domain states have equal energies, all as a function of temperature up to the Curie point TC. We also compute the structures, widths, and net moments of domain walls in two-domain particles from room temperature up to TC. In two-domain grains just above d2Dmin, the domain wall expands to fill an increasing fraction of the particle volume. In cubic SD grains just below dSDmax, magnetic moments are twisted symmetrically away from the easy axis at opposite ends of the crystal. The limits dSDmax and d2Dmin are determined with a precision of < 0.001 μm in particle size. There are no intermediate structures to indicate how the wall nucleates or denucleates. At room temperature, SD and two-domain states are both permitted over a range of grain lengths of about 0.4 μm in elongated ( q = 1.5) magnetites, but this coexistence range narrows to about 0.1 μm from 400°C to TC. In cubic magnetites, there is no significant size range over which SD and two-domain states are both metastable above ˜ 250°C. Domain walls in two-domain magnetites expand with rising temperature; however, the expansion is slow and the domain wall fills no more than 50% of the particle except within a few degrees of TC. The √( A/ K) expansion predicted by Landau and Lifschitz and subsequent theories, in which there is no upper limit to the size of the walls, is a result of ignoring the demagnetizing energy of the domain wall. Domain walls have considerable structure, including 'skirts' of magnetic moments rotated beyond 0° and 180°. The skirts partly compensate the wall moment and expand as the temperature rises. As a result of the competing effects of expanding walls and expanding skirts flanking the walls, the net

  15. Nanoscale imaging and control of domain-wall hopping with a nitrogen-vacancy center microscope.

    PubMed

    Tetienne, J-P; Hingant, T; Kim, J-V; Diez, L Herrera; Adam, J-P; Garcia, K; Roch, J-F; Rohart, S; Thiaville, A; Ravelosona, D; Jacques, V

    2014-06-20

    The control of domain walls in magnetic wires underpins an emerging class of spintronic devices. Propagation of these walls in imperfect media requires defects that pin them to be characterized on the nanoscale. Using a magnetic microscope based on a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond, we report domain-wall imaging on a 1-nanometer-thick ferromagnetic nanowire and directly observe Barkhausen jumps between two pinning sites spaced 50 nanometers apart. We further demonstrate in situ laser control of these jumps, which allows us to drag the domain wall along the wire and map the pinning landscape. Our work demonstrates the potential of NV microscopy to study magnetic nano-objects in complex media, whereas controlling domain walls with laser light may find an application in spintronic devices. PMID:24948732

  16. Velocity Control of 180° Domain Walls in Ferroelectric Thin Films by Electrode Modification.

    PubMed

    McGilly, L J; Feigl, L; Sluka, T; Yudin, P; Tagantsev, A K; Setter, N

    2016-01-13

    The velocity of individual 180° domain walls in thin ferroelectric films of PbZr0.1Ti0.9O3 is strongly dependent on the thickness of the top Pt electrode made by electron-beam induced deposition (EBID). We show that when the thickness is varied in the range <100 nm the domain wall velocity is seen to change by 7 orders of magnitude. We attribute this huge range of velocities to the similarly large range of resistivities for the EBID Pt electrode as extrapolated from four-point probe measurements. The domain wall motion is governed by the supply of charges to the domain wall, determined by the top electrode resistivity, and which is described using a modified Stefan Problem model. This has significant implications for the feasibility of ferroelectric domain wall nanoelectronics, wherein the speed of operation will be limited by the maximum velocity of the propagating domain wall front. Furthermore, by introducing sections of either modified thickness or width along the length of a "line" electrode, the domain wall velocity can be changed at these locations, opening up possibilities for dynamic regimes. PMID:26685053

  17. Domain wall in a quantum anomalous Hall insulator as a magnetoelectric piston

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyaya, Pramey; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically study the magnetoelectric coupling in a quantum anomalous Hall insulator state induced by interfacing a dynamic magnetization texture to a topological insulator. In particular, we propose that the quantum anomalous Hall insulator with a magnetic configuration of a domain wall, when contacted by electrical reservoirs, acts as a magnetoelectric piston. A moving domain wall pumps charge current between electrical leads in a closed circuit, while applying an electrical bias induces reciprocal domain-wall motion. This pistonlike action is enabled by a finite reflection of charge carriers via chiral modes imprinted by the domain wall. Moreover, we find that, when compared with the recently discovered spin-orbit torque-induced domain-wall motion in heavy metals, the reflection coefficient plays the role of an effective spin-Hall angle governing the efficiency of the proposed electrical control of domain walls. Quantitatively, this effective spin-Hall angle is found to approach a universal value of 2, providing an efficient scheme to reconfigure the domain-wall chiral interconnects for possible memory and logic applications.

  18. Magnetic domain wall gratings for magnetization reversal tuning and confined dynamic mode localization.

    PubMed

    Trützschler, Julia; Sentosun, Kadir; Mozooni, Babak; Mattheis, Roland; McCord, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    High density magnetic domain wall gratings are imprinted in ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic thin films by local ion irradiation by which alternating head-to-tail-to-head-to-tail and head-to-head-to-tail-to-tail spatially overlapping domain wall networks are formed. Unique magnetic domain processes result from the interaction of anchored domain walls. Non-linear magnetization response is introduced by the laterally distributed magnetic anisotropy phases. The locally varying magnetic charge distribution gives rise to localized and guided magnetization spin-wave modes directly constrained by the narrow domain wall cores. The exchange coupled multiphase material structure leads to unprecedented static and locally modified dynamic magnetic material properties. PMID:27487941

  19. Magnetic domain wall gratings for magnetization reversal tuning and confined dynamic mode localization

    PubMed Central

    Trützschler, Julia; Sentosun, Kadir; Mozooni, Babak; Mattheis, Roland; McCord, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    High density magnetic domain wall gratings are imprinted in ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic thin films by local ion irradiation by which alternating head-to-tail-to-head-to-tail and head-to-head-to-tail-to-tail spatially overlapping domain wall networks are formed. Unique magnetic domain processes result from the interaction of anchored domain walls. Non-linear magnetization response is introduced by the laterally distributed magnetic anisotropy phases. The locally varying magnetic charge distribution gives rise to localized and guided magnetization spin-wave modes directly constrained by the narrow domain wall cores. The exchange coupled multiphase material structure leads to unprecedented static and locally modified dynamic magnetic material properties. PMID:27487941

  20. Domain wall conductivity in semiconducting hexagonal ferroelectric TbMnO3 thin films.

    PubMed

    Kim, D J; Connell, J G; Seo, S S A; Gruverman, A

    2016-04-15

    Although enhanced conductivity of ferroelectric domain boundaries has been found in BiFeO3 and Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 films as well as hexagonal rare-earth manganite single crystals, the mechanism of the domain wall conductivity is still under debate. Using conductive atomic force microscopy, we observe enhanced conductance at the electrically-neutral domain walls in semiconducting hexagonal ferroelectric TbMnO3 thin films where the structure and polarization direction are strongly constrained along the c-axis. This result indicates that domain wall conductivity in ferroelectric rare-earth manganites is not limited to charged domain walls. We show that the observed conductivity in the TbMnO3 films is governed by a single conduction mechanism, namely, the back-to-back Schottky diodes tuned by the segregation of defects. PMID:26933770

  1. Charge-order domain walls with enhanced conductivity in a layered manganite

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Eric Yue; Bryant, Benjamin; Tokunaga, Yusuke; Aeppli, Gabriel; Tokura, Yoshinori; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2015-01-01

    Interfaces and boundaries in condensed-matter systems often have electronic properties distinct from the bulk material and thus have become a topic of both fundamental scientific interest and technological importance. Here we identify, using microwave impedance microscopy, enhanced conductivity of charge-order domain walls in the layered manganite Pr(Sr0.1Ca0.9)2Mn2O7. We obtain a complete mesoscopic map of surface topography, crystalline orientation and electronic phase, and visualize the thermal phase transition between two charge-ordered phases. In both phases, charge-order domains occur with domain walls showing enhanced conductivity likely due to local lifting of the charge order. Finite element analysis shows that the resolved domain walls can be as narrow as few nanometres. The domain walls are stabilized by structural twins and have a strong history dependence, suggesting that they may be manipulated to create novel devices. PMID:26139185

  2. Domain wall conductivity in semiconducting hexagonal ferroelectric TbMnO3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D. J.; Connell, J. G.; Seo, S. S. A.; Gruverman, A.

    2016-04-01

    Although enhanced conductivity of ferroelectric domain boundaries has been found in BiFeO3 and Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 films as well as hexagonal rare-earth manganite single crystals, the mechanism of the domain wall conductivity is still under debate. Using conductive atomic force microscopy, we observe enhanced conductance at the electrically-neutral domain walls in semiconducting hexagonal ferroelectric TbMnO3 thin films where the structure and polarization direction are strongly constrained along the c-axis. This result indicates that domain wall conductivity in ferroelectric rare-earth manganites is not limited to charged domain walls. We show that the observed conductivity in the TbMnO3 films is governed by a single conduction mechanism, namely, the back-to-back Schottky diodes tuned by the segregation of defects.

  3. Charge-order domain walls with enhanced conductivity in a layered manganite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Eric Yue; Bryant, Benjamin; Tokunaga, Yusuke; Aeppli, Gabriel; Tokura, Yoshinori; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2015-07-01

    Interfaces and boundaries in condensed-matter systems often have electronic properties distinct from the bulk material and thus have become a topic of both fundamental scientific interest and technological importance. Here we identify, using microwave impedance microscopy, enhanced conductivity of charge-order domain walls in the layered manganite Pr(Sr0.1Ca0.9)2Mn2O7. We obtain a complete mesoscopic map of surface topography, crystalline orientation and electronic phase, and visualize the thermal phase transition between two charge-ordered phases. In both phases, charge-order domains occur with domain walls showing enhanced conductivity likely due to local lifting of the charge order. Finite element analysis shows that the resolved domain walls can be as narrow as few nanometres. The domain walls are stabilized by structural twins and have a strong history dependence, suggesting that they may be manipulated to create novel devices.

  4. Control of domain wall thickness by spatial modulation of uniaxial anisotropy and exchange stiffness parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Hiroko; Imamura, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    The effect of spatial modulation of the uniaxial anisotropy (K) and exchange stiffness (A) parameters on the domain wall thickness was theoretically studied. We derived the Euler-Lagrange equation and the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation considering the modulation of K and A, and showed that the modulation of A gives rise to an additional term consisting of the first derivatives of A and the magnetization unit vector. Owing to this term, the modulation of A is more effective to modify the domain wall thickness than K. The condition for domain wall pinning by controlling its thickness through the modulation of K and A was also obtained.

  5. Current-induced three-dimensional domain wall propagation in cylindrical NiFe nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, D. W.; Purnama, I.; Lim, G. J.; Gan, W. L.; Murapaka, C.; Lew, W. S.

    2016-04-01

    We report on the magnetization configurations in single NiFe cylindrical nanowires grown by template-assisted electrodeposition. Angular anisotropic magnetoresistance measurements reveal that a three-dimensional helical domain wall is formed naturally upon relaxation from a saturated state. Micromagnetic simulations support the helical domain wall properties and its reversal process, which involves a splitting of the clockwise and anticlockwise vortices. When a pulsed current is applied to the nanowire, the helical domain wall propagation is observed with a minimum current density needed to overcome its intrinsic pinning.

  6. Curvature and torsion effects in spin-current driven domain wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yershov, Kostiantyn V.; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Sheka, Denis D.; Gaididei, Yuri

    2016-03-01

    The domain wall motion along a helix-shaped nanowire is studied for the case of spin-current driving via the Zhang-Li mechanism. The analysis is based on the collective variable approach. Two effects are ascertained: (i) the curvature results in the appearance of the Walker limit for a uniaxial wire, and (ii) the torsion results in effective shift of the nonadiabatic spin torque parameter β . The latter effect changes considerably the domain wall velocity and can result in negative domain wall mobility. This effect can be also used for an experimental determination of the nonadiabatic parameter β and damping coefficient α .

  7. Large exchange-dominated domain wall velocities in antiferromagnetically coupled nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuteifan, Majd; Lubarda, M. V.; Fu, S.; Chang, R.; Escobar, M. A.; Mangin, S.; Fullerton, E. E.; Lomakin, V.

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic nanowires supporting field- and current-driven domain wall motion are envisioned for methods of information storage and processing. A major obstacle for their practical use is the domain-wall velocity, which is traditionally limited for low fields and currents due to the Walker breakdown occurring when the driving component reaches a critical threshold value. We show through numerical and analytical modeling that the Walker breakdown limit can be extended or completely eliminated in antiferromagnetically coupled magnetic nanowires. These coupled nanowires allow for large domain-wall velocities driven by field and/or current as compared to conventional nanowires.

  8. Domain wall motion driven by spin Hall effect—Tuning with in-plane magnetic anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Rushforth, A. W.

    2014-04-21

    This letter investigates the effects of in-plane magnetic anisotropy on the current induced motion of magnetic domain walls in systems with dominant perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, where accumulated spins from the spin Hall effect in an adjacent heavy metal layer are responsible for driving the domain wall motion. It is found that that the sign and magnitude of the domain wall velocity in the uniform flow regime can be tuned significantly by the in-plane magnetic anisotropy. These effects are sensitive to the ratio of the adiabatic and non-adiabatic spin transfer torque parameters and are robust in the presence of pinning and thermal fluctuations.

  9. Domain wall displacements in amorphous films and multilayers studied with a magnetic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhil, Taras G.

    1997-04-01

    The magnetic force microscope (MFM) was used to study the displacement of domain walls (DW) in amorphous TbFe alloy films and Co/Pd multilayer films with high spatial resolution. The reversible bending of domain wall segments pinned to defects and irreversible, jumplike displacement of domain wall segments were imaged with the MFM in an applied magnetic field. The maximum reversible displacement of domain walls was 50-100 nm and the length of the segments which reversibly curved in the field was about 150 nm. Measurement of the change in radius of curvature of a DW segment in response to an applied field allowed estimation of the DW energy density and self-demagnetizing field of the film acting on the DW. The DW energy density for the TbFe films was about 1 erg/cm2. It was shown that the self-demagnetizing field acting on a domain wall depends on the domain structure surrounding the studied DW segment. For instance, for a film with saturation magnetization 100 G and thickness 80 nm, which exhibited a mazelike domain structure, the demagnetizing field varied from 100 G in the center of a mazelike domain to 400 G near the edge of a domain. The irreversible displacement of a DW was not a continuous process. The 200-400 nm long DW segments exhibited jumplike motion over distances of 100-150 nm.

  10. Fast Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in a Ring-Shaped Nanowire Driven by a Voltage.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jia-Mian; Yang, Tiannan; Momeni, Kasra; Cheng, Xiaoxing; Chen, Lei; Lei, Shiming; Zhang, Shujun; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Gopalan, Venkatraman; Carman, Gregory P; Nan, Ce-Wen; Chen, Long-Qing

    2016-04-13

    Magnetic domain-wall motion driven by a voltage dissipates much less heat than by a current, but none of the existing reports have achieved speeds exceeding 100 m/s. Here phase-field and finite-element simulations were combined to study the dynamics of strain-mediated voltage-driven magnetic domain-wall motion in curved nanowires. Using a ring-shaped, rough-edged magnetic nanowire on top of a piezoelectric disk, we demonstrate a fast voltage-driven magnetic domain-wall motion with average velocity up to 550 m/s, which is comparable to current-driven wall velocity. An analytical theory is derived to describe the strain dependence of average magnetic domain-wall velocity. Moreover, one 180° domain-wall cycle around the ring dissipates an ultrasmall amount of heat, as small as 0.2 fJ, approximately 3 orders of magnitude smaller than those in current-driven cases. These findings suggest a new route toward developing high-speed, low-power-dissipation domain-wall spintronics. PMID:27002341

  11. Dynamics of domain walls in thin films with out-of-plane magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhfudz, Imam; Krüger, Benjamin; Tchernyshyov, Oleg

    2010-03-01

    A thin magnetic film with a strong easy-axis anisotropy favoring the out-of-plane direction breaks up into mesoscopic magnetic domains separated by Bloch domain walls. Depending on magnetic history, these domains can form ordered stripes or disordered labyrinthine patterns. The physics of these domain walls is strongly influenced by dipolar interactions that mediate a long-range interaction between domain walls and make the wall tension negative [1]. Here we point out that the dominance of the gyrotropic force over the viscous one makes the dynamics of Bloch walls rather unusual. Low-frequency waves on such a wall are chiral: the speed of propagation is different for the two directions along the wall. The puzzling star-shaped trajectory of a magnetic bubble noted in [2] is a result of superposition of two waves with the same wavenumber and different frequencies running in opposite directions along the wall that surrounds the bubble. We point out a similarity to the edges of a quantum Hall state. [1] S. A. Langer, R. E. Goldstein, and D. P. Jackson, Phys. Rev. A 46, 4894 (1992). [2] C. Moutafis, S. Komineas, and J. A. C. Bland, Phys. Rev. B 79, 224429 (2009).

  12. Time evolution of temperature and entropy of various collapsing domain walls

    SciTech Connect

    Halstead, Evan

    2013-08-01

    We investigate the time evolution of the temperature and entropy of gravitationally collapsing shells of matter, represented by domain walls, as seen by an asymptotic observer. In particular, we seek to understand how topology and the addition of a cosmological constant affect the gravitational collapse. Previous work has shown that the entropy of a spherically symmetric collapsing domain approaches a constant. In this paper, we reproduce these results, using both a fully quantum and a semi-classical approach, then we repeat the process for a de Sitter Schwarzschild domain wall (spherical with cosmological constant) and a (3+1) BTZ domain wall (cylindrical). We do this by coupling a scalar field to the background of the domain wall and analyzing the spectrum of radiation as a function of time. We find that the spectrum is quasi-thermal, with the degree of thermality increasing as the domain wall approaches the horizon. The thermal distribution allows for the determination of the temperature as a function of time, and we find that the late time temperature is consistent with the Hawking temperature. From the temperature we find the entropy. Since the collapsing domain wall is what forms a black hole, we can compare the results to those of the standard entropy-area relation. We find that the entropy does in fact approach a constant that is consistent with the Hawking entropy. However, both the de Sitter Schwarzschild domain wall and the (3+1) BTZ domain wall show periods of decreasing entropy, which suggests that spontaneous collapse may be prevented.

  13. Tunable short-wavelength spin wave excitation from pinned magnetic domain walls

    PubMed Central

    Van de Wiele, Ben; Hämäläinen, Sampo J.; Baláž, Pavel; Montoncello, Federico; van Dijken, Sebastiaan

    2016-01-01

    Miniaturization of magnonic devices for wave-like computing requires emission of short-wavelength spin waves, a key feature that cannot be achieved with microwave antennas. In this paper, we propose a tunable source of short-wavelength spin waves based on highly localized and strongly pinned magnetic domain walls in ferroelectric-ferromagnetic bilayers. When driven into oscillation by a microwave spin-polarized current, the magnetic domain walls emit spin waves with the same frequency as the excitation current. The amplitude of the emitted spin waves and the range of attainable excitation frequencies depend on the availability of domain wall resonance modes. In this respect, pinned domain walls in magnetic nanowires are particularly attractive. In this geometry, spin wave confinement perpendicular to the nanowire axis produces a multitude of domain wall resonances enabling efficient spin wave emission at frequencies up to 100 GHz and wavelengths down to 20 nm. At high frequency, the emission of spin waves in magnetic nanowires becomes monochromatic. Moreover, pinning of magnetic domain wall oscillators onto the same ferroelectric domain boundary in parallel nanowires guarantees good coherency between spin wave sources, which opens perspectives towards the realization of Mach-Zehnder type logic devices and sensors. PMID:26883893

  14. Tunable short-wavelength spin wave excitation from pinned magnetic domain walls.

    PubMed

    Van de Wiele, Ben; Hämäläinen, Sampo J; Baláž, Pavel; Montoncello, Federico; van Dijken, Sebastiaan

    2016-01-01

    Miniaturization of magnonic devices for wave-like computing requires emission of short-wavelength spin waves, a key feature that cannot be achieved with microwave antennas. In this paper, we propose a tunable source of short-wavelength spin waves based on highly localized and strongly pinned magnetic domain walls in ferroelectric-ferromagnetic bilayers. When driven into oscillation by a microwave spin-polarized current, the magnetic domain walls emit spin waves with the same frequency as the excitation current. The amplitude of the emitted spin waves and the range of attainable excitation frequencies depend on the availability of domain wall resonance modes. In this respect, pinned domain walls in magnetic nanowires are particularly attractive. In this geometry, spin wave confinement perpendicular to the nanowire axis produces a multitude of domain wall resonances enabling efficient spin wave emission at frequencies up to 100 GHz and wavelengths down to 20 nm. At high frequency, the emission of spin waves in magnetic nanowires becomes monochromatic. Moreover, pinning of magnetic domain wall oscillators onto the same ferroelectric domain boundary in parallel nanowires guarantees good coherency between spin wave sources, which opens perspectives towards the realization of Mach-Zehnder type logic devices and sensors. PMID:26883893

  15. Tunable short-wavelength spin wave excitation from pinned magnetic domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Wiele, Ben; Hämäläinen, Sampo J.; Baláž, Pavel; Montoncello, Federico; van Dijken, Sebastiaan

    2016-02-01

    Miniaturization of magnonic devices for wave-like computing requires emission of short-wavelength spin waves, a key feature that cannot be achieved with microwave antennas. In this paper, we propose a tunable source of short-wavelength spin waves based on highly localized and strongly pinned magnetic domain walls in ferroelectric-ferromagnetic bilayers. When driven into oscillation by a microwave spin-polarized current, the magnetic domain walls emit spin waves with the same frequency as the excitation current. The amplitude of the emitted spin waves and the range of attainable excitation frequencies depend on the availability of domain wall resonance modes. In this respect, pinned domain walls in magnetic nanowires are particularly attractive. In this geometry, spin wave confinement perpendicular to the nanowire axis produces a multitude of domain wall resonances enabling efficient spin wave emission at frequencies up to 100 GHz and wavelengths down to 20 nm. At high frequency, the emission of spin waves in magnetic nanowires becomes monochromatic. Moreover, pinning of magnetic domain wall oscillators onto the same ferroelectric domain boundary in parallel nanowires guarantees good coherency between spin wave sources, which opens perspectives towards the realization of Mach-Zehnder type logic devices and sensors.

  16. Study of the structure of ferroelectric domain walls in barium titanate ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Normand, L.; Thorel, A.; Kilaas, R.; Montardi, Y.

    1995-02-01

    Structure of 90{degree} ferroelectric domain boundaries in barium titanate ceramics has been studied by means of Transmission Electron Microscopy and High Resolution TEM. Tilts of specific fringes across domain walls are measured on HREM images and Selected Area Diffraction Patterns. They are in a good agreement with the twin model admitted for these domain boundaries. A computerized method has been developed to give access to quantitative information about atomic displacements across these ferroelectric domain walls. The so calculated displacement field is then compared with Landau-Ginzburg based theoretical predictions.

  17. In-situ structural investigations of ferroelasticity in soft and hard rhombohedral and tetragonal PZT

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, Maxim I. Einarsrud, Mari-Ann; Tolchard, Julian R.; Grande, Tor; Geiger, Philipp T.; Webber, Kyle G.; Damjanovic, Dragan

    2015-10-28

    Despite the technological importance of hard and soft PZT, Pb(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3}, ceramics, the mechanisms of ferroelectric hardening and softening remain widely discussed in the literature. The hardening and softening phenomena have traditionally been investigated in relation with dielectric manifestations such as aging of the dielectric susceptibility and constriction of the polarization-electric field hysteresis loop. Here, we present a systematic investigation of the ferroelectric and ferroelastic properties of soft and hard PZT in both the tetragonal and rhombohedral phases. A particular focus has been devoted to ferroelastic domain switching by characterizing the macroscopic mechanical constitutive behavior and in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction during compression. It is demonstrated that variation of the ordering state of point defects in PZT ceramics affects the switching behavior of both ferroelectric and ferroelastic domains under mechanical or electrical fields. Softening of the mechanical and electrical properties of originally hard PZT ceramics was conferred by quenching the materials from above the Curie temperature. The present findings are discussed with respect to the current understanding of hardening-softening transitions in ferroelectric materials.

  18. Pion form factor using domain wall valence quarks and asqtad sea quarks

    SciTech Connect

    George Fleming; Frederic Bonnet; Robert Edwards; Randal Lewis; David Richards

    2004-09-01

    We compute the pion electromagnetic form factor in a hybrid calculation with domain wall valence quarks and improved staggered (asqtad) sea quarks. This method can easily be extended to rho-to-gamma-pi transition form factors.

  19. Imaging and Tailoring the Chirality of Domain Walls in Magnetic Films.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gong; Schmid, Andreas K

    2015-10-14

    Electric-current-induced magnetization switching is a keystone concept in the development of spintronics devices. In the last few years this field has experienced a significant boost with the discovery of ultrafast domain wall motions and very low threshold currents in structures designed to stabilize chiral spin textures. Imaging domain-wall spin textures in situ, while fabricating magnetic multilayer structures, is a powerful way to investigate the forces stabilizing this type of chirality, and informs strategies to engineer structures with controlled spin textures. Here, recent results applying spin-polarized low-energy electron microscopy to image chiral domain walls in magnetic multilayer films are summarized. Providing a way to measure the strength of the asymmetric exchange interaction that causes the chirality, this approach can be used to tailor the texture and handedness of magnetic domain walls by interface engineering. These results advance understanding of the underlying physics and offer new insights toward the design of spintronic devices. PMID:26032892

  20. Direct observation of stochastic domain-wall depinning in magnetic nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Im, Mi-Young; Bocklage, Lars; Fischer, Peter; Meier, Guido

    2008-11-01

    The stochastic field-driven depinning of a domain wall pinned at a notch in a magnetic nanowire is directly observed using magnetic X-ray microscopy with high lateral resolution down to 15 nm. The depinning-field distribution in Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} nanowires considerably depends on the wire width and the notch depth. The difference in the multiplicity of domain-wall types generated in the vicinity of a notch is responsible for the observed dependence of the stochastic nature of the domain wall depinning field on the wire width and the notch depth. Thus the random nature of the domain wall depinning process is controllable by an appropriate design of the nanowire.

  1. Domain wall model in the galactic Bose-Einstein condensate halo

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, J.C.C. de; Pires, M.O.C. E-mail: marcelo.pires@ufabc.edu.br

    2013-05-01

    We assume that the galactic dark matter halo, considered composed of an axionlike particles Bose-Einstein condensate [1], can present topological defects, namely domain walls, arising as the dark soliton solution for the Gross-Pitaevskii equation in a self-graviting potential. We investigate the influence that such substructures would have in the gravitational interactions within a galaxy. We find that, for the simple domain wall model proposed, the effects are too small to be identified, either by means of a local measurement of the gradient of the gravitational field or by analysing galaxy rotation curves. In the first case, the gradient of the gravitational field in the vicinity of the domain wall would be 10{sup −31} (m/s{sup 2})/m. In the second case, the ratio of the tangential velocity correction of a star due to the presence of the domain wall to the velocity in the spherical symmetric case would be 10{sup −8}.

  2. Externally driven collisions of domain walls in bistable systems near criticality

    SciTech Connect

    Janutka, Andrzej

    2011-05-15

    Multidomain solutions to the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equation in the presence of an external field are analyzed using the Hirota bilinearization method. Domain-wall collisions are studied in detail considering different regimes of the critical parameter. I show the dynamics of the Ising and Bloch domain walls of the Ginzburg-Landau equation in the bistable regime to be similar to that of the Landau-Lifshitz domain walls. Domain-wall reflections lead to the appearance of bubble and pattern structures. Above the Bloch-Ising transition point, spatial structures are determined by the collisions of fronts propagating into an unstable state. Mutual annihilation of such fronts is described.

  3. Domain-wall theory and nonstationarity in driven flow with exclusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stinchcombe, R. B.; de Queiroz, S. L. A.

    2016-07-01

    We study the dynamical evolution toward steady state of the stochastic nonequilibrium model known as the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process, in both uniform and nonuniform (staggered) one-dimensional systems with open boundaries. Domain-wall theory and numerical simulations are used and, where pertinent, their results are compared to existing mean-field predictions and exact solutions where available. For uniform chains we find that the inclusion of fluctuations inherent to the domain-wall formulation plays a crucial role in providing good agreement with simulations, which is severely lacking in the corresponding mean-field predictions. For alternating-bond chains the domain-wall predictions for the features of the phase diagram in the parameter space of injection and ejection rates turn out to be realized only in an incipient and quantitatively approximate way. Nevertheless, significant quantitative agreement can be found between several additional domain-wall theory predictions and numerics.

  4. Direct imaging of topological edge states at a bilayer graphene domain wall.

    PubMed

    Yin, Long-Jing; Jiang, Hua; Qiao, Jia-Bin; He, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The AB-BA domain wall in gapped graphene bilayers is a rare naked structure hosting topological electronic states. Although it has been extensively studied in theory, a direct imaging of its topological edge states is still missing. Here we image the topological edge states at the graphene bilayer domain wall by using scanning tunnelling microscope. The simultaneously obtained atomic-resolution images of the domain wall provide us unprecedented opportunities to measure the spatially varying edge states within it. The one-dimensional conducting channels are observed to be mainly located around the two edges of the domain wall, which is reproduced quite well by our theoretical calculations. Our experiment further demonstrates that the one-dimensional topological states are quite robust even in the presence of high magnetic fields. The result reported here may raise hopes of graphene-based electronics with ultra-low dissipation. PMID:27312315

  5. Domain-wall theory and nonstationarity in driven flow with exclusion.

    PubMed

    Stinchcombe, R B; de Queiroz, S L A

    2016-07-01

    We study the dynamical evolution toward steady state of the stochastic nonequilibrium model known as the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process, in both uniform and nonuniform (staggered) one-dimensional systems with open boundaries. Domain-wall theory and numerical simulations are used and, where pertinent, their results are compared to existing mean-field predictions and exact solutions where available. For uniform chains we find that the inclusion of fluctuations inherent to the domain-wall formulation plays a crucial role in providing good agreement with simulations, which is severely lacking in the corresponding mean-field predictions. For alternating-bond chains the domain-wall predictions for the features of the phase diagram in the parameter space of injection and ejection rates turn out to be realized only in an incipient and quantitatively approximate way. Nevertheless, significant quantitative agreement can be found between several additional domain-wall theory predictions and numerics. PMID:27575075

  6. Direct imaging of topological edge states at a bilayer graphene domain wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Long-Jing; Jiang, Hua; Qiao, Jia-Bin; He, Lin

    2016-06-01

    The AB-BA domain wall in gapped graphene bilayers is a rare naked structure hosting topological electronic states. Although it has been extensively studied in theory, a direct imaging of its topological edge states is still missing. Here we image the topological edge states at the graphene bilayer domain wall by using scanning tunnelling microscope. The simultaneously obtained atomic-resolution images of the domain wall provide us unprecedented opportunities to measure the spatially varying edge states within it. The one-dimensional conducting channels are observed to be mainly located around the two edges of the domain wall, which is reproduced quite well by our theoretical calculations. Our experiment further demonstrates that the one-dimensional topological states are quite robust even in the presence of high magnetic fields. The result reported here may raise hopes of graphene-based electronics with ultra-low dissipation.

  7. Modulated helical metals at magnetic domain walls of pyrochlore iridium oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaji, Youhei; Imada, Masatoshi

    2016-05-01

    Spontaneous symmetry breakings, metal-insulator transitions, and transport properties of magnetic-domain-wall states in pyrochlore iridium oxides are studied by employing a symmetry-adapted effective Hamiltonian with a slab perpendicular to the (111) direction of the pyrochlore structure. Emergent metallic domain wall, which has an unconventional topological nature with a controllable and mobile metallic layer, is shown to host Fermi surfaces with modulated helical spin textures resembling Rashba metals. The helical nature of the domain-wall Fermi surfaces is experimentally detectable by anomalous Hall conductivity, circular dichroism, and optical Hall conductivity under external magnetic fields. Possible applications of the domain-wall metals to spin-current generation and "half-metallic" conduction are also discussed.

  8. Adiabatic spin-transfer-torque-induced domain wall creep in a magnetic metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duttagupta, S.; Fukami, S.; Zhang, C.; Sato, H.; Yamanouchi, M.; Matsukura, F.; Ohno, H.

    2016-04-01

    The dynamics of elastic interfaces is a general field of interest in statistical physics, where magnetic domain wall has served as a prototypical example. Domain wall `creep’ under the action of sub-threshold driving forces with thermal activation is known to be described by a scaling law with a certain universality class, which represents the mechanism of the interaction of domain walls with the applied forces over the disorder of the system. Here we show different universality classes depending on the driving forces, magnetic field or spin-polarized current, in a metallic system, which have hitherto been seen only in a magnetic semiconductor. We reveal that an adiabatic spin-transfer torque plays a major role in determining the universality class of current-induced creep, which does not depend on the intricacies of material disorder. Our results shed light on the physics of the creep motion of domain walls and other elastic systems.

  9. Multiple integral representation for the trigonometric SOS model with domain wall boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galleas, W.

    2012-05-01

    Using the dynamical Yang-Baxter algebra we derive a functional equation for the partition function of the trigonometric SOS model with domain wall boundary conditions. The solution of the equation is given in terms of a multiple contour integral.

  10. Analytical modelling and x-ray imaging of oscillations of a single magnetic domain wall

    SciTech Connect

    Bocklage, Lars; Kruger, Benjamin; Fischer, Peter; Meier, Guido

    2009-07-10

    Domain-wall oscillation in a pinnig potential is described analytically in a one dimensional model for the feld-driven case. For a proper description the pinning potential has to be extended by nonharmonic contributions. Oscillations of a domain wall are observed on its genuine time scale by magnetic X-ray microscopy. It is shown that the nonharmonic terms are present in real samples with a strong restoring potential. In the framework of our model we gain deep insight into the domain-wall motion by looking at different phase spaces. The corrections of the harmonic potential can change the motion of the domain wall significantly. The damping parameter of permalloy is determined via the direct imaging technique.

  11. Mobile metallic domain walls in an all-in-all-out magnetic insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Eric Yue; Cui, Yong-Tao; Ueda, Kentaro; Tang, Shujie; Chen, Kai; Tamura, Nobumichi; Wu, Phillip M.; Fujioka, Jun; Tokura, Yoshinori; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic domain walls are boundaries between regions with different configurations of the same magnetic order. In a magnetic insulator, where the magnetic order is tied to its bulk insulating property, it has been postulated that electrical properties are drastically different along the domain walls, where the order is inevitably disturbed. Here we report the discovery of highly conductive magnetic domain walls in a magnetic insulator, Nd2Ir2O7, that has an unusual all-in-all-out magnetic order, via transport and spatially resolved microwave impedance microscopy. The domain walls have a virtually temperature-independent sheet resistance of ~1 kilohm per square, show smooth morphology with no preferred orientation, are free from pinning by disorders, and have strong thermal and magnetic field responses that agree with expectations for all-in-all-out magnetic order.

  12. Mobile metallic domain walls in an all-in-all-out magnetic insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Eric Yue

    Magnetic domain walls are boundaries between regions with different configurations of the same magnetic order. In a magnetic insulator where the magnetic order is tied to its bulk insulating property, it has been postulated that electrical properties are drastically different along the domain walls, where the order is inevitably disturbed. Here we report the discovery of highly conductive magnetic domain walls in a magnetic insulator Nd2Ir2O7, which has an unusual all-in-all-out magnetic order, via transport and spatially resolved microwave impedance microscopy. The domain walls have a virtually temperature-independent sheet resistance (averaged over mesoscopic distances) of ~1 kilohm per square, show smooth morphology with no preferred orientation, are free from pinning by disorders, and have strong thermal and magnetic field responses that agree with expectations for all-in-all-out magnetic order. This work is supported by funding from NSF, Moore Foundation, JSPS, NSFC and DOE.

  13. Anomalous Quasiparticles on the Domain Wall Between Topological Insulators and Spin Ice Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanazawa, I.; Sasaki, T.

    We have discussed the behavior of anomalous quasiparticle with fractional electronic charge on the domain wall between topological insulators and spin ice compounds from the standpoint of the field-theoretical formula.

  14. Direct imaging of topological edge states at a bilayer graphene domain wall

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Long-Jing; Jiang, Hua; Qiao, Jia-Bin; He, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The AB–BA domain wall in gapped graphene bilayers is a rare naked structure hosting topological electronic states. Although it has been extensively studied in theory, a direct imaging of its topological edge states is still missing. Here we image the topological edge states at the graphene bilayer domain wall by using scanning tunnelling microscope. The simultaneously obtained atomic-resolution images of the domain wall provide us unprecedented opportunities to measure the spatially varying edge states within it. The one-dimensional conducting channels are observed to be mainly located around the two edges of the domain wall, which is reproduced quite well by our theoretical calculations. Our experiment further demonstrates that the one-dimensional topological states are quite robust even in the presence of high magnetic fields. The result reported here may raise hopes of graphene-based electronics with ultra-low dissipation. PMID:27312315

  15. Coupling between Current and Dynamic Magnetization : from Domain Walls to Spin Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucassen, M. E.

    2012-05-01

    So far, we have derived some general expressions for domain-wall motion and the spin motive force. We have seen that the β parameter plays a large role in both subjects. In all chapters of this thesis, there is an emphasis on the determination of this parameter. We also know how to incorporate thermal fluctuations for rigid domain walls, as shown above. In Chapter 2, we study a different kind of fluctuations: shot noise. This noise is caused by the fact that an electric current consists of electrons, and therefore has fluctuations. In the process, we also compute transmission and reflection coefficients for a rigid domain wall, and from them the linear momentum transfer. More work on fluctuations is done in Chapter 3. Here, we consider a (extrinsically pinned) rigid domain wall under the influence of thermal fluctuations that induces a current via spin motive force. We compute how the resulting noise in the current is related to the β parameter. In Chapter 4 we look into in more detail into the spin motive forces from field driven domain walls. Using micro magnetic simulations, we compute the spin motive force due to vortex domain walls explicitly. As mentioned before, this gives qualitatively different results than for a rigid domain wall. The final subject in Chapter 5 is the application of the general expression for spin motive forces to magnons. Although this might seem to be unrelated to domain-wall motion, this calculation allows us to relate the β parameter to macroscopic transport coefficients. This work was supported by Stichting voor Fundamenteel Onderzoek der Materie (FOM), the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO), and by the European Research Council (ERC) under the Seventh Framework Program (FP7).

  16. Single-domain wall propagation and damping mechanism during magnetic switching of bistable amorphous microwires.

    PubMed

    Varga, R; Garcia, K L; Vázquez, M; Vojtanik, P

    2005-01-14

    The mechanism of nucleation and propagation of a single-domain wall is studied as a function of temperature in bistable Fe-based amorphous microwire with a unique simple domain structure. An extended nucleation-propagation model is proposed with a negative nucleation field. From quantitative analysis of the propagating wall characteristics, a new damping is theoretically introduced as arising from structural relaxation which dominates in the low temperature regime. PMID:15698124

  17. Nucleation, imaging, and motion of magnetic domain walls in cylindrical nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da, S., Col; Jamet, S.; StaÅo, M.; Trapp, B.; Le Denmat, S.; Cagnon, L.; Toussaint, J. C.; Fruchart, O.

    2016-08-01

    We report several procedures for the robust nucleation of magnetic domain walls in cylindrical permalloy nanowires. Specific features of the magnetic force microscopy (MFM) contrast of such wires are discussed, to avoid the misinterpretation of the magnetization states. The domain walls moved under quasistatic magnetic fields in the range 0.1-10 mT, as evidenced by MFM at remanence at different stages of their motion.

  18. Domain wall pinning in FeCoCu bamboo-like nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Berganza, Eider; Bran, Cristina; Jaafar, Miriam; Vázquez, Manuel; Asenjo, Agustina

    2016-01-01

    The three dimensional nature of cylindrical magnetic nanowires has opened a new way to control the domain configuration as well as the magnetization reversal process. The pinning effect of the periodic diameter modulations on the domain wall propagation in FeCoCu individual nanowires is determined by Magnetic Force Microscopy, MFM. A main bistable magnetic configuration is firstly concluded from MFM images characterized by the spin reversal between two nearly single domain states with opposite axial magnetization. Complementary micromagnetic simulations confirm a vortex mediated magnetization reversal process. A non-standard variable field MFM imaging procedure allows us to observe metastable magnetic states where the propagating domain wall is pinned at certain positions with enlarged diameter. Moreover, it is demonstrated that it is possible to control the position of the pinned domain walls by an external magnetic field. PMID:27406891

  19. Domain wall pinning in FeCoCu bamboo-like nanowires.

    PubMed

    Berganza, Eider; Bran, Cristina; Jaafar, Miriam; Vázquez, Manuel; Asenjo, Agustina

    2016-01-01

    The three dimensional nature of cylindrical magnetic nanowires has opened a new way to control the domain configuration as well as the magnetization reversal process. The pinning effect of the periodic diameter modulations on the domain wall propagation in FeCoCu individual nanowires is determined by Magnetic Force Microscopy, MFM. A main bistable magnetic configuration is firstly concluded from MFM images characterized by the spin reversal between two nearly single domain states with opposite axial magnetization. Complementary micromagnetic simulations confirm a vortex mediated magnetization reversal process. A non-standard variable field MFM imaging procedure allows us to observe metastable magnetic states where the propagating domain wall is pinned at certain positions with enlarged diameter. Moreover, it is demonstrated that it is possible to control the position of the pinned domain walls by an external magnetic field. PMID:27406891

  20. Domain wall pinning in FeCoCu bamboo-like nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berganza, Eider; Bran, Cristina; Jaafar, Miriam; Vázquez, Manuel; Asenjo, Agustina

    2016-07-01

    The three dimensional nature of cylindrical magnetic nanowires has opened a new way to control the domain configuration as well as the magnetization reversal process. The pinning effect of the periodic diameter modulations on the domain wall propagation in FeCoCu individual nanowires is determined by Magnetic Force Microscopy, MFM. A main bistable magnetic configuration is firstly concluded from MFM images characterized by the spin reversal between two nearly single domain states with opposite axial magnetization. Complementary micromagnetic simulations confirm a vortex mediated magnetization reversal process. A non-standard variable field MFM imaging procedure allows us to observe metastable magnetic states where the propagating domain wall is pinned at certain positions with enlarged diameter. Moreover, it is demonstrated that it is possible to control the position of the pinned domain walls by an external magnetic field.

  1. Structures of 90{degrees} domain walls in ferroelectric barium titanate ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Normand, L.; Thorel, A.; Kilaas, R.

    1995-03-01

    Ferroelectric domain walls in tetragonal ferroelectric barium titanate ceramics are studied by means of electron microscopy. SEM and TEM observations are consistent with domain configuration already proposed. Conventional TEM measurements on SADP agree very well with twin-related model currently admitted for ferroelectric domains. In spite of the very small lattice parameter variation during cooling (involving a small spontaneous strain) of BaTiO{sub 3} ceramics, displacements of specific features associated with atomic column positions are measured across domain walls on high resolution images. Using a dedicated image analysis software, these displacements are calculated with a high precision. 2D vector-maps of the atomic displacements show different kinds of atomistic structure for different domain walls.

  2. Externally driven transmission and collisions of domain walls in ferromagnetic wires

    SciTech Connect

    Janutka, Andrzej

    2011-05-15

    Analytical multidomain solutions to the dynamical (Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert) equation of a one-dimensional ferromagnet including an external magnetic field and spin-polarized electric current are found using the Hirota bilinearization method. A standard approach to solve the Landau-Lifshitz equation (without the Gilbert term) is modified in order to treat the dissipative dynamics. I establish the relations between the spin interaction parameters (the constants of exchange, anisotropy, dissipation, external-field intensity, and electric-current intensity) and the domain-wall parameters (width and velocity) and compare them to the results of the Walker approximation and micromagnetic simulations. The domain-wall motion driven by a longitudinal external field is analyzed with especial relevance to the field-induced collision of two domain walls. I determine the result of such a collision (which is found to be an elastic one) on the domain-wall parameters below and above the Walker breakdown (in weak- and strong-field regimes). Single-domain-wall dynamics in the presence of an external transverse field is studied with relevance to the challenge of increasing the domain-wall velocity below the breakdown.

  3. Externally driven transmission and collisions of domain walls in ferromagnetic wires.

    PubMed

    Janutka, Andrzej

    2011-05-01

    Analytical multidomain solutions to the dynamical (Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert) equation of a one-dimensional ferromagnet including an external magnetic field and spin-polarized electric current are found using the Hirota bilinearization method. A standard approach to solve the Landau-Lifshitz equation (without the Gilbert term) is modified in order to treat the dissipative dynamics. I establish the relations between the spin interaction parameters (the constants of exchange, anisotropy, dissipation, external-field intensity, and electric-current intensity) and the domain-wall parameters (width and velocity) and compare them to the results of the Walker approximation and micromagnetic simulations. The domain-wall motion driven by a longitudinal external field is analyzed with especial relevance to the field-induced collision of two domain walls. I determine the result of such a collision (which is found to be an elastic one) on the domain-wall parameters below and above the Walker breakdown (in weak- and strong-field regimes). Single-domain-wall dynamics in the presence of an external transverse field is studied with relevance to the challenge of increasing the domain-wall velocity below the breakdown. PMID:21728682

  4. A summary of staphylococcal C-terminal SH3b_5 cell wall binding domains.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Staphylococcal peptidoglycan hydrolases are a potential new source of antimicrobials. A large subset of these proteins contain a C-terminal SH3b_5 cell wall binding domain that has been shown for some to be essential for accurate cell wall recognition and subsequent staphylolytic activity, propert...

  5. Experimental observation of the interaction of propagating spin waves with Néel domain walls in a Landau domain structure

    SciTech Connect

    Pirro, P.; Sebastian, T.; Leven, B.; Hillebrands, B.; Koyama, T.; Brächer, T.

    2015-06-08

    The interaction of propagating dipolar spin waves with magnetic domain walls is investigated in square-shaped microstructures patterned from the Heusler compound Co{sub 2}Mn{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 0.4}Si. Using magnetic force microscopy, the reversible preparation of a Landau state with four magnetic domains separated by Néel domain walls is confirmed. A local spin-wave excitation using a microstructured antenna is realized in one of the domains. It is shown by Brillouin light scattering microscopy that the domain structure in the remanence state has a strong influence on the spin-wave excitation and propagation. The domain walls strongly reflect the spin waves and can be used as spin-wave reflectors. A comparison with micromagnetic simulations shows that the strong reflection is due to the long-range dipolar interaction which has important implications for the use of these spin waves for exerting an all-magnonic spin-transfer torque.

  6. Direct imaging of domain wall interactions in Ni80Fe20 planar nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Hayward, T. J.; Bryan, M. T.; Fry, P. W.; Fundi, P. M.; Gibbs, M. R. J.; Allwood, D. A.; Im, M.-Y.; Fischer, P.

    2010-01-18

    We have investigated magnetostatic interactions between domain walls in Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} planar nanowires using magnetic soft x-ray microscopy and micromagnetic simulations. In addition to significant monopole-like attraction and repulsion effects we observe that there is coupling of the magnetization configurations of the walls. This is explained in terms of an interaction energy that depends not only on the distance between the walls, but also upon their internal magnetization structure.

  7. Movement of magnetic domain walls induced by single femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandig, O.; Shokr, Y. A.; Vogel, J.; Valencia, S.; Kronast, F.; Kuch, W.

    2016-08-01

    We present a microscopic investigation of how the magnetic domain structure in ultrathin films changes after direct excitation by single ultrashort laser pulses. Using photoelectron emission microscopy in combination with x-ray magnetic circular dichroism in the resonant absorption of soft x rays, we find that individual laser pulses of ≈60 fs duration and a central wavelength of 800 nm lead to clear changes in the domain structure of a Co layer of three atomic monolayers thickness in an epitaxial Co/Cu/Ni trilayer on a Cu(001) single-crystal substrate. A relatively small enhancement of the sample base temperature by 40 K is sufficient to lower the threshold of laser fluence for domain wall motion by about a factor of two. Pump-probe measurements with a laser fluence just below this threshold indicate that the laser-induced demagnetization of the sample is far from complete in these experiments. Although the domain wall motion appears similar to thermal domain wall fluctuations, quantitatively it cannot be explained by pure thermal activation of domain wall motion by the transient rise of sample temperature after the laser pulse, but it is likely to be triggered by a laser-induced depinning of domain walls.

  8. High Domain Wall Velocity at Zero Magnetic Field Induced by Low Current Densities in Spin Valve Nanostripes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzini, Stefania; Uhlíř, Vojtěch; Vogel, Jan; Rougemaille, Nicolas; Laribi, Sana; Cros, Vincent; Jiménez, Erika; Camarero, Julio; Tieg, Carsten; Bonet, Edgar; Bonfim, Marlio; Mattana, Richard; Deranlot, Cyrile; Petroff, Frédéric; Ulysse, Christian; Faini, Giancarlo; Fert, Albert

    2009-02-01

    Current-induced magnetic domain wall motion at zero magnetic field is observed in the permalloy layer of a spin-valve-based nanostripe using photoemission electron microscopy. The domain wall movement is hampered by pinning sites, but in between them high domain wall velocities (exceeding 150 m/s) are obtained for current densities well below 1012 A/m2, suggesting that these trilayer systems are promising for applications in domain wall devices in case of well controlled pinning positions. Vertical spin currents in these structures provide a potential explanation for the increase in domain wall velocity at low current densities.

  9. Ferroelectric domain structures in SrBi2Nb2O9 epitaxial thin films: Electron microscopy and phase-field simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. L.; Chen, L. Q.; Asayama, G.; Schlom, D. G.; Zurbuchen, M. A.; Streiffer, S. K.

    2004-06-01

    Ferroelectric domain structures of (001)SrBi2Nb2O9 epitaxial films, investigated using both transmission electron microscopy and phase-field simulations, are reported. Experiment and numerical simulation both reveal that the domain structures consist of irregularly shaped domains with curved domain walls. It is shown that the elastic contribution to domain structures can be neglected in SrBi2Nb2O9 due to its small ferroelastic distortion, less than 0.0018%. Two-beam dark-field imaging using reflections unique to domains of each of the two 90° polarization axes reveal the domain structure. Phase-field simulation is based on the elastic and electrostatic solutions obtained for thin films under different mechanical and electric boundary conditions. The effects of ferroelastic distortion and dielectric constant on ferroelectric domains are systematically analyzed. It is demonstrated that electrostatic interactions which favor straight domain walls are not sufficient to overcome the domain wall energy which favors curved domains in SrBi2Nb2O9.

  10. Spectroscopic signatures of domain walls in hexagonal ErMnO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Q.-C.; Xi, Xiaoxiang; Wang, X.; Lee, N.; Mazumdar, D.; Smith, R. J.; Carr, G. L.; Cheong, S.-W.; Musfeldt, J. L.

    2014-09-01

    We measured the spectroscopic response of stripe- and vortex-containing ErMnO3 in order to uncover the electronic properties of the domain walls. We quantify Born effective charge and polarization differences using the lattice behavior, analyze the local rare earth environment from the f-manifold excitations, and reveal how shifts in the charge transfer excitations impact the band gap. The increased Born charge, polarization, and band gap in the vortex-containing material are brought together with a discussion of hybridization and wall density effects. The domain wall optical constants are strongly frequency dependent.

  11. Interaction Energy of Domain Walls in a Nonlocal Ginzburg-Landau Type Model from Micromagnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignat, Radu; Moser, Roger

    2016-07-01

    We study a variational model from micromagnetics involving a nonlocal Ginzburg-Landau type energy for {S1}-valued vector fields. These vector fields form domain walls, called Néel walls, that correspond to one-dimensional transitions between two directions within the unit circle {S1}. Due to the nonlocality of the energy, a Néel wall is a two length scale object, comprising a core and two logarithmically decaying tails. Our aim is to determine the energy differences leading to repulsion or attraction between Néel walls. In contrast to the usual Ginzburg-Landau vortices, we obtain a renormalised energy for Néel walls that shows both a tail-tail interaction and a core-tail interaction. This is a novel feature for Ginzburg-Landau type energies that entails attraction between Néel walls of the same sign and repulsion between Néel walls of opposite signs.

  12. Controlled creation and displacement of charged domain walls in ferroelectric thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigl, L.; Sluka, T.; McGilly, L. J.; Crassous, A.; Sandu, C. S.; Setter, N.

    2016-08-01

    Charged domain walls in ferroelectric materials are of high interest due to their potential use in nanoelectronic devices. While previous approaches have utilized complex scanning probe techniques or frustrative poling here we show the creation of charged domain walls in ferroelectric thin films during simple polarization switching using either a conductive probe tip or patterned top electrodes. We demonstrate that ferroelectric switching is accompanied - without exception - by the appearance of charged domain walls and that these walls can be displaced and erased reliably. We ascertain from a combination of scanning probe microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and phase field simulations that creation of charged domain walls is a by-product of, and as such is always coupled to, ferroelectric switching. This is due to the (110) orientation of the tetragonal (Pb,Sr)TiO3 thin films and the crucial role played by the limited conduction of the LSMO bottom electrode layer used in this study. This work highlights that charged domain walls, far from being exotic, unstable structures, as might have been assumed previously, can be robust, stable easily-controlled features in ferroelectric thin films.

  13. Controlled creation and displacement of charged domain walls in ferroelectric thin films

    PubMed Central

    Feigl, L.; Sluka, T.; McGilly, L. J.; Crassous, A.; Sandu, C. S.; Setter, N.

    2016-01-01

    Charged domain walls in ferroelectric materials are of high interest due to their potential use in nanoelectronic devices. While previous approaches have utilized complex scanning probe techniques or frustrative poling here we show the creation of charged domain walls in ferroelectric thin films during simple polarization switching using either a conductive probe tip or patterned top electrodes. We demonstrate that ferroelectric switching is accompanied - without exception - by the appearance of charged domain walls and that these walls can be displaced and erased reliably. We ascertain from a combination of scanning probe microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and phase field simulations that creation of charged domain walls is a by-product of, and as such is always coupled to, ferroelectric switching. This is due to the (110) orientation of the tetragonal (Pb,Sr)TiO3 thin films and the crucial role played by the limited conduction of the LSMO bottom electrode layer used in this study. This work highlights that charged domain walls, far from being exotic, unstable structures, as might have been assumed previously, can be robust, stable easily-controlled features in ferroelectric thin films. PMID:27507433

  14. Controlled creation and displacement of charged domain walls in ferroelectric thin films.

    PubMed

    Feigl, L; Sluka, T; McGilly, L J; Crassous, A; Sandu, C S; Setter, N

    2016-01-01

    Charged domain walls in ferroelectric materials are of high interest due to their potential use in nanoelectronic devices. While previous approaches have utilized complex scanning probe techniques or frustrative poling here we show the creation of charged domain walls in ferroelectric thin films during simple polarization switching using either a conductive probe tip or patterned top electrodes. We demonstrate that ferroelectric switching is accompanied - without exception - by the appearance of charged domain walls and that these walls can be displaced and erased reliably. We ascertain from a combination of scanning probe microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and phase field simulations that creation of charged domain walls is a by-product of, and as such is always coupled to, ferroelectric switching. This is due to the (110) orientation of the tetragonal (Pb,Sr)TiO3 thin films and the crucial role played by the limited conduction of the LSMO bottom electrode layer used in this study. This work highlights that charged domain walls, far from being exotic, unstable structures, as might have been assumed previously, can be robust, stable easily-controlled features in ferroelectric thin films. PMID:27507433

  15. In Situ Atom Scale Visualization of Domain Wall Dynamics in VO2 Insulator-Metal Phase Transition

    PubMed Central

    He, Xinfeng; Xu, Tao; Xu, Xiaofeng; Zeng, Yijie; Xu, Jing; Sun, Litao; Wang, Chunrui; Xing, Huaizhong; Wu, Binhe; Lu, Aijiang; Liu, Dingquan; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Chu, Junhao

    2014-01-01

    A domain wall, as a device, can bring about a revolution in developing manipulation of semiconductor heterostructures devices at the atom scale. However, it is a challenge for these new devices to control domain wall motion through insulator-metal transition of correlated-electron materials. To fully understand and harness this motion, it requires visualization of domain wall dynamics in real space. Here, domain wall dynamics in VO2 insulator-metal phase transition was observed directly by in situ TEM at atom scale. Experimental results depict atom scale evolution of domain morphologies and domain wall exact positions in (202) and (040) planes referring to rutile structure at 50°C. In addition, microscopic mechanism of domain wall dynamics and accurate lattice basis vector relationship of two domains were investigated with the assistance of X-ray diffraction, ab initio calculations and image simulations. This work offers a route to atom scale tunable heterostructure device application. PMID:25292447

  16. Simulations of super-structure domain walls in two dimensional assemblies of magnetic nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Jordanovic, J.; Frandsen, C.; Beleggia, M.; Schiøtz, J.

    2015-07-28

    We simulate the formation of domain walls in two-dimensional assemblies of magnetic nanoparticles. Particle parameters are chosen to match recent electron holography and Lorentz microscopy studies of almost monodisperse cobalt nanoparticles assembled into regular, elongated lattices. As the particles are small enough to consist of a single magnetic domain each, their magnetic interactions can be described by a spin model in which each particle is assigned a macroscopic “superspin.” Thus, the magnetic behaviour of these lattices may be compared to magnetic crystals with nanoparticle superspins taking the role of the atomic spins. The coupling is, however, different. The superspins interact only by dipolar interactions as exchange coupling between individual nanoparticles may be neglected due to interparticle spacing. We observe that it is energetically favorable to introduce domain walls oriented along the long dimension of nanoparticle assemblies rather than along the short dimension. This is unlike what is typically observed in continuous magnetic materials, where the exchange interaction introduces an energetic cost proportional to the area of the domain walls. Structural disorder, which will always be present in realistic assemblies, pins longitudinal domain walls when the external field is reversed, and makes a gradual reversal of the magnetization by migration of longitudinal domain walls possible, in agreement with previous experimental results.

  17. Magnetic domain walls as reconfigurable spin-wave nano-channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Kai

    Research efforts to utilize spin waves as information carriers for wave based logic in micro- and nano-structured ferromagnetic materials have increased tremendously over the recent years. However, finding efficient means of tailoring and downscaling guided spin-wave propagation in two dimensions, while maintaining energy efficiency and reconfigurability, still remains a delicate challenge. Here we target these challenges by spin-wave transport inside nanometer-scaled potential wells formed along magnetic domain walls. For this, we investigate the magnetization dynamics of a rectangular-like element in a Landau state exhibiting a so called 180° Néel wall along its center. By microwave antennae the rf-excitation is constricted to one end of the domain wall and the spin-wave intensities are recorded by means of Brillouin-Light Scattering microscopy revealing channeled transport. Additional micromagnetic simulations with pulsed as well as cw-excitation are performed to yield further insight into this class of modes. We find several spin-wave modes quantized along the width of the domain wall yet with well defined wave vectors along the wall, exhibiting positive dispersion. In a final step, we demonstrate the flexibility of these spin-wave nano-channels based on domain walls. In contrast to wave guides realised by fixed geometries, domain walls can be easily manipulated. Here we utilize small external fields to control its position with nanometer precision over a micrometer range, while still enabling transport. Domain walls thus, open the perspective for reprogrammable and yet non-volatile spin-wave waveguides of nanometer width. Financial support by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft within project SCHU2922/1-1 is gratefully acknowledged.

  18. Correlated polarization switching in the proximity of a 180 degrees domain wall

    SciTech Connect

    Aravind, Vasudeva Rao; Morozovska, A. N.; Bhattacharya, S.; Lee, Dongwa; Jesse, Stephen; Grinberg, I; Li, Y L; Choudhury, S; Wu, P; Seal, Katyayani; Rappe, Andrew M; Rar, Andrei; Svechnikov, S. V.; Eliseev, Eugene; Phillpot, S. R.; Chen, L. Q.; Gopalana, V.; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2010-01-01

    Domain-wall dynamics in ferroic materials underpins functionality of data storage and information technology devices. Using localized electric field of a scanning probe microscopy tip, we experimentally demonstrate a surprisingly rich range of polarization reversal behaviors in the vicinity of the initially flat 180 degrees ferroelectric domain wall. The nucleation bias is found to increase by an order of magnitude from a two-dimensional (2D) nucleus at the wall to three-dimensional nucleus in the bulk. The wall is thus significantly ferroelectrically softer than the bulk. The wall profoundly affects switching on length scales on the order of micrometers. The mechanism of correlated switching is analyzed using analytical theory and phase-field modeling. The long-range effect is ascribed to wall bending under the influence of a tip with bias that is well below the bulk nucleation level at large distances from the wall. These studies provide an experimental link between the macroscopic and mesoscopic physics of domain walls in ferroelectrics and atomistic models of 2D nucleation.

  19. Evolution of domain walls in the early universe. Ph.D. Thesis - Chicago Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawano, Lawrence

    1989-01-01

    The evolution of domain walls in the early universe is studied via 2-D computer simulation. The walls are initially configured on a triangular lattice and then released from the lattice, their evolution driven by wall curvature and by the universal expansion. The walls attain an average velocity of about 0.3c and their surface area per volume (as measured in comoving coordinates) goes down with a slope of -1 with respect to conformal time, regardless of whether the universe is matter or radiation dominated. The additional influence of vacuum pressure causes the energy density to fall away from this slope and steepen, thus allowing a situation in which domain walls can constitute a significant portion of the energy density of the universe without provoking an unacceptably large perturbation upon the microwave background.

  20. Domain walls and long-range triplet correlations in SFS Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzdin, A. I.; Mel'Nikov, A. S.; Pugach, N. G.

    2011-04-01

    We study the contribution of domain walls to the Josephson current through a ferromagnetic metal both in clean and diffusive limits. Our consideration of these limits is based on the quasiclassical version of the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations and the Usadel theory, correspondingly. In the clean limit, the domain walls connecting superconducting leads are shown to be responsible for strong enhancement of the Josephson current, even for a domain structure with collinear magnetic moments. In the dirty limit, a noticeable increase in the critical current appears only for a system with noncollinear magnetic moments. We demonstrate that a thin domain wall in this case may serve as an efficient source of the long-range triplet proximity effect.

  1. All-in-all-out magnetic domain wall conduction in a pyrochlore iridate heterointerface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, T. C.; Uchida, M.; Kozuka, Y.; Sano, W.; Tsukazaki, A.; Arima, T.; Kawasaki, M.

    2016-02-01

    Pyrochlore oxides possessing "all-in-all-out" spin ordering have attracted burgeoning interest as a rich ground of emergent states. This ordering has two distinct types of magnetic domains (all-in-all-out or all-out-all-in) with broken time-reversal symmetry, and a nontrivial metallic surface state has been theoretically demonstrated to appear at their domain wall. Here, we report on the observation of this metallic conduction at the single all-in-all-out/all-out-all-in magnetic domain wall formed at the heterointerface of two pyrochlore iridates. By utilizing the different magnetoresponses of them with different lanthanide ions, the domain wall is controllably inserted at the heterointerface, the surface state being detected as an anomalous conduction enhancement with a ferroic hysteresis. Our establishment paves the way for further investigation and manipulation of this new type of surface transport.

  2. Imaging and characterization of conducting ferroelectric domain walls by photoemission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Schaab, J.; Meier, D.; Krug, I. P.; Nickel, F.; Gottlob, D. M.; Doğanay, H.; Schneider, C. M.; Cano, A.; Hentschel, M.; Yan, Z.; Bourret, E.; Ramesh, R.

    2014-06-09

    High-resolution X-ray photoemission electron microscopy (X-PEEM) is a well-established method for imaging ferroelectric domain structures. Here, we expand the scope of application of X-PEEM and demonstrate its capability for imaging and investigating domain walls in ferroelectrics with high spatial resolution. Using ErMnO{sub 3} as test system, we show that ferroelectric domain walls can be visualized based on photo-induced charging effects and local variations in their electronic conductance can be mapped by analyzing the energy distribution of photoelectrons. Our results open the door for non-destructive, contact-free, and element-specific studies of the electronic and chemical structure at domain walls in ferroelectrics.

  3. Spin polarized current controlled dynamics of domain walls in magnetic films with in-plane anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, B. N.; Dubovik, M. N.; Korzunin, L. G.

    2016-06-01

    We study the dynamic properties of asymmetric vortex Bloch walls and classical 1D Néel walls controlled by a spin-polarized current in magnetic films with in-plane anisotropy. It is shown that fairly high velocities of domain walls (up to 100 m/s) can be obtained for the current density in the range j = 106-108 A/cm2. The nonlinear dependence of the wall velocity on the film thickness and the linear dependence of the velocity on the current density and inverse damping parameter are found.

  4. Suppression of stochastic pinning in magnetic nanowire devices using “virtual” domain walls

    SciTech Connect

    Hodges, M. P. P.; Hayward, T. J.; Bryan, M. T.; Fry, P. W.; Im, M.-Y.; Fischer, P.

    2014-09-28

    We have investigated the pinning and depinning of “virtual” domain walls in planar magnetic nanowires. Such virtual walls are created when a conventional domain wall becomes annihilated at a narrow gap between two segments of a discontinuous nanowire. By using focused magneto-optical Kerr effect magnetometry to study the repeatability of their depinning, we show that virtual walls exhibit single-mode depinning distributions, characterized by remarkably low, sub-Oersted standard deviations. This is in stark contrast to the depinning of domain walls from conventional notch-shaped defects, which typically exhibit multi-mode depinning field distributions spanning tens to hundreds of Oersteds. High-resolution magnetic soft x-ray microscopy measurements are used to reveal that this high level of repeatability is the result of a simple mediated-nucleation process, which decouples the depinning mechanism from structure of the initially injected DWs. Our work serves as an example of how the complex and dynamical stochastic behaviors exhibited by domain walls in nanowires can be controlled.

  5. Suppression of stochastic pinning in magnetic nanowire devices using "virtual" domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, M. P. P.; Bryan, M. T.; Fry, P. W.; Im, M.-Y.; Fischer, P.; Hayward, T. J.

    2014-09-01

    We have investigated the pinning and depinning of "virtual" domain walls in planar magnetic nanowires. Such virtual walls are created when a conventional domain wall becomes annihilated at a narrow gap between two segments of a discontinuous nanowire. By using focused magneto-optical Kerr effect magnetometry to study the repeatability of their depinning, we show that virtual walls exhibit single-mode depinning distributions, characterized by remarkably low, sub-Oersted standard deviations. This is in stark contrast to the depinning of domain walls from conventional notch-shaped defects, which typically exhibit multi-mode depinning field distributions spanning tens to hundreds of Oersteds. High-resolution magnetic soft x-ray microscopy measurements are used to reveal that this high level of repeatability is the result of a simple mediated-nucleation process, which decouples the depinning mechanism from structure of the initially injected DWs. Our work serves as an example of how the complex and dynamical stochastic behaviors exhibited by domain walls in nanowires can be controlled.

  6. Current-induced domain wall motion in permalloy nanowires with a rectangular cross-section

    SciTech Connect

    Ai, J. H.; Miao, B. F.; Sun, L.; You, B.; Hu, An; Ding, H. F.

    2011-11-01

    We performed micromagnetic simulations of the current-induced domain wall motion in permalloy nanowires with rectangular cross-section. In the absence of the nonadiabatic spin-transfer term, a threshold current, J{sub c} is required to drive the domain wall moving continuously. We find that J{sub c} is proportional to the maximum cross product of the demagnetization field and magnetization orientation of the domain wall and the domain wall width. With varying both the wire thickness and width, a minimum threshold current in the order of 10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2} is obtained when the thickness is equivalent to the wire width. With the nonadiabatic spin-transfer term, the calculated domain wall velocity {nu} equals to the adiabatic spin transfer velocity u when the current is far above the Walker limit J{sub w}. Below J{sub w}, {nu}=({beta}/{alpha})u, where {beta} is the nonadiabatic parameter and {alpha} is the damping factor. For different {beta}, we find the Walker limit can be scaled as J{sub w}=({alpha}/{beta}-{alpha})J{sub c}. Our simulations agree well with the one dimensional analytical calculation, suggesting the findings are the general behaviors of the systems in this particular geometry.

  7. Detection of ferromagnetic domain wall pinning and depinning with a semiconductor device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malec, Chris E.; Bennett, Brian R.; Johnson, Mark B.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate the detection of a ferromagnetic domain wall using a nanoscale Hall cross. A narrow permalloy wire is defined lithographically on top of a Hall cross fabricated from an InAs quantum well. The width of the Hall cross (500 nm-1 μm) is similar to the width of the ferromagnetic wire (200-500 nm), and a geometric pinning site is fabricated in the ferromagnetic wire to trap a domain wall within the area of the Hall cross. The devices provide a signal that is often the same order of magnitude as the offset Hall voltage when a domain wall is located above the Hall cross, and may be useful for memory applications. Different geometries for the Hall cross and ferromagnetic wire are tested, and radiofrequency pulses are sent into the wire to demonstrate current driven domain wall motion. Further changes to the Hall bar geometry with respect to the wire geometry are investigated by numerical computation. A large gain in signal is seen for Hall bars only slightly wider than the ferromagnetic wires as compared to those twice as wide, as well as a larger sensitivity to the exact position of the domain wall with respect to the center of the Hall cross.

  8. Proposal for a Domain Wall Nano-Oscillator driven by Non-uniform Spin Currents

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sanchar; Muralidharan, Bhaskaran; Tulapurkar, Ashwin

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new mechanism and a related device concept for a robust, magnetic field tunable radio-frequency (rf) oscillator using the self oscillation of a magnetic domain wall subject to a uniform static magnetic field and a spatially non-uniform vertical dc spin current. The self oscillation of the domain wall is created as it translates periodically between two unstable positions, one being in the region where both the dc spin current and the magnetic field are present, and the other, being where only the magnetic field is present. The vertical dc spin current pushes it away from one unstable position while the magnetic field pushes it away from the other. We show that such oscillations are stable under noise and can exhibit a quality factor of over 1000. A domain wall under dynamic translation, not only being a source for rich physics, is also a promising candidate for advancements in nanoelectronics with the actively researched racetrack memory architecture, digital and analog switching paradigms as candidate examples. Devising a stable rf oscillator using a domain wall is hence another step towards the realization of an all domain wall logic scheme. PMID:26420544

  9. Proposal for a Domain Wall Nano-Oscillator driven by Non-uniform Spin Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sanchar; Muralidharan, Bhaskaran; Tulapurkar, Ashwin

    2015-09-01

    We propose a new mechanism and a related device concept for a robust, magnetic field tunable radio-frequency (rf) oscillator using the self oscillation of a magnetic domain wall subject to a uniform static magnetic field and a spatially non-uniform vertical dc spin current. The self oscillation of the domain wall is created as it translates periodically between two unstable positions, one being in the region where both the dc spin current and the magnetic field are present, and the other, being where only the magnetic field is present. The vertical dc spin current pushes it away from one unstable position while the magnetic field pushes it away from the other. We show that such oscillations are stable under noise and can exhibit a quality factor of over 1000. A domain wall under dynamic translation, not only being a source for rich physics, is also a promising candidate for advancements in nanoelectronics with the actively researched racetrack memory architecture, digital and analog switching paradigms as candidate examples. Devising a stable rf oscillator using a domain wall is hence another step towards the realization of an all domain wall logic scheme.

  10. Detection of ferromagnetic domain wall pinning and depinning with a semiconductor device

    SciTech Connect

    Malec, Chris E.; Bennett, Brian R.; Johnson, Mark B.

    2015-12-21

    We demonstrate the detection of a ferromagnetic domain wall using a nanoscale Hall cross. A narrow permalloy wire is defined lithographically on top of a Hall cross fabricated from an InAs quantum well. The width of the Hall cross (500 nm–1 μm) is similar to the width of the ferromagnetic wire (200–500 nm), and a geometric pinning site is fabricated in the ferromagnetic wire to trap a domain wall within the area of the Hall cross. The devices provide a signal that is often the same order of magnitude as the offset Hall voltage when a domain wall is located above the Hall cross, and may be useful for memory applications. Different geometries for the Hall cross and ferromagnetic wire are tested, and radiofrequency pulses are sent into the wire to demonstrate current driven domain wall motion. Further changes to the Hall bar geometry with respect to the wire geometry are investigated by numerical computation. A large gain in signal is seen for Hall bars only slightly wider than the ferromagnetic wires as compared to those twice as wide, as well as a larger sensitivity to the exact position of the domain wall with respect to the center of the Hall cross.

  11. Identification of defect distribution at ferroelectric domain walls from evolution of nonlinear dielectric response during the aging process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokrý, Pavel; Sluka, Tomáš

    2016-02-01

    The motion of ferroelectric domain walls greatly contributes to the macroscopic dielectric and piezoelectric response of ferroelectric materials. The domain-wall motion through the ferroelectric material is, however, hindered by pinning on crystal defects, which substantially reduces these contributions. Here, using thermodynamic models based on the Landau-Ginzburg-Devonshire theory, we find a relation between the microscopic reversible motion of nonferroelastic 180∘ domain walls interacting with a periodic array of pinning centers and the nonlinear macroscopic permittivity. We show that the reversible motion of domain walls can be split into two basic modes: first, the bending of a domain wall between pinning centers, and, second, the uniform movement of the domain-wall plane. We show that their respective contributions may change when the distribution of pinning centers is rearranged during the material aging. We demonstrate that it is possible to indicate which mechanism of the domain-wall motion is affected during material aging. This allows one to judge whether the defects only homogeneously accumulate at domain walls or prefer to align in certain directions inside the domain-wall plane. We suggest that this information can be obtained using simple macroscopic dielectric measurements and a proper analysis of the nonlinear response. Our results may therefore serve as a simple and useful tool to obtain details on domain-wall pinning in an aging process.

  12. Local structure and shaping of ferroelectric domain walls for photonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scrymgeour, David

    Ferroelectric lithium niobate (LiNbO3) and lithium tantalate (LiTaO3) have emerged as key technological materials for use in photonic applications, due to the high quality of crystal growth, optical transparency over a wide frequency range (240nm--4.5 mum), and their large electro-optic and nonlinear optical coefficients. Emerging fields of optical communications, optical data storage, displays, biomedical devices, sensing, and defense applications will all rely heavily on such ferroelectrics as a versatile solid-state photonic platform. Diverse functionalities can be created in these materials simply through the patterning of the ferroelectric domains. By creating specific domain features in these materials, it is possible to create new laser wavelengths from existing sources as well as active electro-optic structures that can dynamically focus, shape and steer light. However, the process of domain shaping today is mostly empirical, based on trial-and-error rather than sound, predictive science. The central focus of this thesis work is to develop a fundamental understanding of how to shape and control domain walls in ferroelectrics, specifically in lithium niobate and lithium tantalate, for photonic applications. An understanding of the domain wall phenomena is being approached at two levels: the macroscale and the nanoscale. On the macroscale, different electric field poling techniques are developed and used to create domain shapes of arbitrary orientation. A theoretical framework based on Ginzburg-Landau-Devonshire theory is developed to determine the preferred domain wall shapes. Differences in the poling characteristics and domain wall shapes between the two materials as well as differences in material composition relates to nonstoichiometric defects in the crystal. At the nanoscale, these defects influence the local electromechanical properties of the domain wall. Understanding from both of these approaches has been used to design and create photonic devices

  13. Néel-like domain walls in ferroelectric Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 single crystals.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xian-Kui; Jia, Chun-Lin; Sluka, Tomas; Wang, Bi-Xia; Ye, Zuo-Guang; Setter, Nava

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to the flexible rotation of magnetization direction in ferromagnets, the spontaneous polarization in ferroelectric materials is highly confined along the symmetry-allowed directions. Accordingly, chirality at ferroelectric domain walls was treated only at the theoretical level and its real appearance is still a mystery. Here we report a Néel-like domain wall imaged by atom-resolved transmission electron microscopy in Ti-rich ferroelectric Pb(Zr1-xTix)O3 crystals, where nanometre-scale monoclinic order coexists with the tetragonal order. The formation of such domain walls is interpreted in the light of polarization discontinuity and clamping effects at phase boundaries between the nesting domains. Phase-field simulation confirms that the coexistence of both phases as encountered near the morphotropic phase boundary promotes the polarization to rotate in a continuous manner. Our results provide a further insight into the complex domain configuration in ferroelectrics, and establish a foundation towards exploring chiral domain walls in ferroelectrics. PMID:27539075

  14. Néel-like domain walls in ferroelectric Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 single crystals

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xian-Kui; Jia, Chun-Lin; Sluka, Tomas; Wang, Bi-Xia; Ye, Zuo-Guang; Setter, Nava

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to the flexible rotation of magnetization direction in ferromagnets, the spontaneous polarization in ferroelectric materials is highly confined along the symmetry-allowed directions. Accordingly, chirality at ferroelectric domain walls was treated only at the theoretical level and its real appearance is still a mystery. Here we report a Néel-like domain wall imaged by atom-resolved transmission electron microscopy in Ti-rich ferroelectric Pb(Zr1−xTix)O3 crystals, where nanometre-scale monoclinic order coexists with the tetragonal order. The formation of such domain walls is interpreted in the light of polarization discontinuity and clamping effects at phase boundaries between the nesting domains. Phase-field simulation confirms that the coexistence of both phases as encountered near the morphotropic phase boundary promotes the polarization to rotate in a continuous manner. Our results provide a further insight into the complex domain configuration in ferroelectrics, and establish a foundation towards exploring chiral domain walls in ferroelectrics. PMID:27539075

  15. A Tunable Magnetic Domain Wall Conduit Regulating Nanoparticle Diffusion.

    PubMed

    Tierno, Pietro; Johansen, Tom H; Sancho, José M

    2016-08-10

    We demonstrate a general and robust method to confine on a plane strongly diffusing nanoparticles in water by using size tunable magnetic channels. These virtual conduits are realized with pairs of movable Bloch walls located within an epitaxially grown ferrite garnet film. We show that once inside the magnetic conduit the particles experience an effective local parabolic potential in the transverse direction, while freely diffusing along the conduit. The stiffness of the magnetic potential is determined as a function of field amplitude that varies the width of the magnetic channel. Precise control of the degree of confinement is demonstrated by tuning the applied field. The magnetic conduit is then used to realize single files of nonpassing particles and to induce periodic condensation of an ensemble of particles into parallel stripes in a completely controllable and reversible manner. PMID:27434042

  16. An all-metallic logic gate based on current-driven domain wall motion.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peng; Xia, Ke; Gu, Changzhi; Tang, Ling; Yang, Haifang; Li, Junjie

    2008-02-01

    The walls of magnetic domains can become trapped in a ferromagnetic metallic point contact when the thickness of the film and the width of the contact are less than their critical values. The discovery that domain walls can be moved from such constrictions by a sufficiently large current has attracted considerable attention from researchers working on both fundamental research and potential applications. Here we show that Invar nanocontacts fabricated on silica substrates exhibit a sharp drop in resistance with increasing bias voltage at room temperature in the absence of an applied magnetic field. Moreover, when two nanocontacts are combined in an all-metallic comparison circuit, it is possible to perform logical NOT operations. The use of electrical currents rather than applied magnetic fields to control the domain walls also reduces energy consumption and the risk of crosstalk in devices. PMID:18654469

  17. Substrate Clamping Effects on Irreversible Domain Wall Dynamics in Lead Zirconate Titanate Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Griggio, Flavio; Jesse, Stephen; Kumar, Amit; Ovchinnikov, Oleg S; Kim, H.; Jackson, T. N.; Damjanovic, Dragan; Kalinin, Sergei V; Trolier-Mckinstry, Susan E

    2012-01-01

    The role of long-range strain interactions on domain wall dynamics is explored through macroscopic and local measurements of nonlinear behavior in mechanically clamped and released polycrystalline lead zirconate-titanate (PZT) films. Released films show a dramatic change in the global dielectric nonlinearity and its frequency dependence as a function of mechanical clamping. Furthermore, we observe a transition from strong clustering of the nonlinear response for the clamped case to almost uniform nonlinearity for the released film. This behavior is ascribed to increased mobility of domain walls. These results suggest the dominant role of collective strain interactions mediated by the local and global mechanical boundary conditions on the domain wall dynamics. The work presented in this Letter demonstrates that measurements on clamped films may considerably underestimate the piezoelectric coefficients and coupling constants of released structures used in microelectromechanical systems, energy harvesting systems, and microrobots.

  18. Time domain computational modeling of viscothermal acoustic propagation in catalytic converter substrates with porous walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickey, N. S.; Selamet, A.; Miazgowicz, K. D.; Tallio, K. V.; Parks, S. J.

    2005-08-01

    Models for viscothermal effects in catalytic converter substrates are developed for time domain computational methods. The models are suitable for use in one-dimensional approaches for the prediction of exhaust system performance (engine tuning characteristics) and radiated sound levels. Starting with the ``low reduced frequency'' equations for viscothermal acoustic propagation in capillary tubes, time domain submodels are developed for the frequency-dependent wall friction, frequency-dependent wall heat transfer, and porous wall effects exhibited by catalytic converter substrates. Results from a time domain computational approach employing these submodels are compared to available analytical solutions for the low reduced frequency equations. The computational results are shown to agree well with the analytical solutions for capillary geometries representative of automotive catalytic converter substrates.

  19. Speed of field-driven domain walls in nanowires with large transverse magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depassier, M. C.

    2015-07-01

    Recent analytical and numerical work on field-driven domain wall propagation in nanowires and thin films has shown that for large transverse anisotropy and sufficiently large applied fields the Walker profile becomes unstable before the breakdown field, giving way to a domain wall whose speed increases at a slower rate with the applied field. We perform an asymptotic expansion of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation for large transverse magnetic anisotropy and show that the asymptotic dynamics reproduces this behavior. The appearance of a different regime in the asymptotic dynamics is due to a transition from a pushed to a pulled front of a reaction diffusion equation in which the speed of the domain wall increases with the square root of the applied field

  20. Field-driven sense elements for chirality-dependent domain wall detection and storage

    SciTech Connect

    Bowden, S. R.; Unguris, J.

    2013-12-14

    A method for locally sensing and storing data of transverse domain wall chirality in planar nanowire logic and memory systems is presented. Patterned elements, in close proximity to the nanowires, respond to the asymmetry in the stray field from the domain wall to produce a chirality-dependent response. When a bias field is applied, a stray field-assisted reversal of the element magnetization results in a reversed remanent state, measurable by scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis (SEMPA). The elements are designed as triangles with tips pointing toward the nanowire, allowing the shape anisotropy to be dominated by the base but having a portion with lower volume and lower energy barrier closest to the domain wall. Micromagnetic modeling assists in the design of the nanowire-triangle systems and experiments using SEMPA confirm the importance of aspect ratio and spacing given a constant bias field magnitude.

  1. Spectral properties and chiral symmetry violations of (staggered) domain wall fermions in the Schwinger model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoelbling, Christian; Zielinski, Christian

    2016-07-01

    We follow up on a suggestion by Adams and construct explicit domain wall fermion operators with staggered kernels. We compare different domain wall formulations, namely the standard construction as well as Boriçi's modified and Chiu's optimal construction, utilizing both Wilson and staggered kernels. In the process, we generalize the staggered kernels to arbitrary even dimensions and introduce both truncated and optimal staggered domain wall fermions. Some numerical investigations are carried out in the (1 +1 )-dimensional setting of the Schwinger model, where we explore spectral properties of the bulk, effective and overlap Dirac operators in the free-field case, on quenched thermalized gauge configurations and on smooth topological configurations. We compare different formulations using the effective mass, deviations from normality and violations of the Ginsparg-Wilson relation as measures of chirality.

  2. Highly asymmetric magnetic domain wall propagation due to coupling to a periodic pinning potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, R. L.; Metaxas, P. J.; Jamet, J.-P.; Weil, R.; Ferré, J.; Mougin, A.; Rohart, S.; Stamps, R. L.; Zermatten, P.-J.; Gaudin, G.; Baltz, V.; Rodmacq, B.

    2015-06-01

    Magneto-optical microscopy and magnetometry have been used to study magnetization reversal in an ultrathin magnetically soft (Pt/Co)2 ferromagnetic film coupled to an array of magnetically harder (Co/Pt)4 nanodots via a predominantly dipolar interaction across a 3 nm Pt spacer. This interaction generates a spatially periodic pinning potential for domain walls propagating through the continuous magnetic film. When reversing the applied field with respect to the static nanodot array magnetization orientation, strong asymmetries in the wall velocity and switching fields are observed. Asymmetric switching fields mean that hysteresis of the film is characterized by a large bias field of dipolar origin which is linked to the wall velocity asymmetry. This latter asymmetry, though large at low fields, vanishes at high fields where the domains become round and compact. A field-polarity-controlled transition from dendritic to compact faceted domain structures is also seen at intermediate fields and a model is proposed to interpret the transition.

  3. Integrated capture, transport, and magneto-mechanical resonant sensing of superparamagnetic microbeads using magnetic domain walls.

    PubMed

    Rapoport, E; Montana, D; Beach, G S D

    2012-11-01

    An integrated platform for the capture, transport, and detection of individual superparamagnetic microbeads is described for lab-on-a-chip biomedical applications. Magnetic domain walls in magnetic tracks have previously been shown to be capable of capturing and transporting individual beads through a fluid at high speeds. Here it is shown that the strong magnetostatic interaction between a bead and a domain wall leads to a distinct magneto-mechanical resonance that reflects the susceptibility and hydrodynamic size of the trapped bead. Numerical and analytical modeling is used to quantitatively explain this resonance, and the magneto-mechanical resonant response under sinusoidal drive is experimentally characterized both optically and electrically. The observed bead resonance presents a new mechanism for microbead sensing and metrology. The dual functionality of domain walls as both bead carriers and sensors is a promising platform for the development of lab-on-a-bead technologies. PMID:22955796

  4. Stress-mediated magnetoelectric control of ferromagnetic domain wall position in multiferroic heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathurin, Théo; Giordano, Stefano; Dusch, Yannick; Tiercelin, Nicolas; Pernod, Philippe; Preobrazhensky, Vladimir

    2016-02-01

    The motion of a ferromagnetic domain wall in nanodevices is usually induced by means of external magnetic fields or polarized currents. Here, we demonstrate the possibility to reversibly control the position of a Néel domain wall in a ferromagnetic nanostripe through a uniform mechanical stress. The latter is generated by an electro-active substrate combined with the nanostripe in a multiferroic heterostructure. We develop a model describing the magnetization distribution in the ferromagnetic material, properly taking into account the magnetoelectric coupling. Through its numerical implementation, we obtain the relationship between the electric field applied to the piezoelectric substrate and the position of the magnetic domain wall in the nanostripe. As an example, we analyze a structure composed of a PMN-PT substrate and a TbCo2/FeCo composite nanostripe.

  5. Pfaffian quantum Hall state made simple: Multiple vacua and domain walls on a thin torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergholtz, E. J.; Kailasvuori, J.; Wikberg, E.; Hansson, T. H.; Karlhede, A.

    2006-08-01

    We analyze the Moore-Read Pfaffian state on a thin torus. The known sixfold degeneracy is realized by two inequivalent crystalline states with a four- and twofold degeneracy, respectively. The fundamental quasihole and quasiparticle excitations are domain walls between these vacua, and simple counting arguments give a Hilbert space of dimension 2n-1 for 2n-k holes and k particles at fixed positions and assign each a charge ±e/4 . This generalizes the known properties of the hole excitations in the Pfaffian state as deduced using conformal field theory techniques. Numerical calculations using a model Hamiltonian and a small number of particles support the presence of a stable phase with degenerate vacua and quarter-charged domain walls also away from the thin-torus limit. A spin-chain Hamiltonian encodes the degenerate vacua and the various domain walls.

  6. Stress-induced phase transition in ferroelectric domain walls of BaTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepkova, V.; Marton, P.; Hlinka, J.

    2012-05-01

    The seminal paper by Zhirnov (1958 Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz. 35 1175-80) explained why the structure of domain walls in ferroelectrics and ferromagnets is drastically different. Here we show that the antiparallel ferroelectric walls in rhombohedral ferroelectric BaTiO3 can be switched between the Ising-like state (typical for ferroelectrics) and a Bloch-like state (unusual for ferroelectric walls but typical for magnetic ones). Phase-field simulations using a Ginzburg-Landau-Devonshire model suggest that this symmetry-breaking transition can be induced by a compressive epitaxial stress. The strain-tunable chiral properties of these domain walls promise a range of novel phenomena in epitaxial ferroelectric thin films.

  7. Dynamic Interplay of Coherent Rotations and Domain Wall Motion in Faraday Rotators based on Ferromagnetic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzarella, Anthony; Wu, Dong; Shinn, Mannix

    Under small, externally-applied magnetic fields, the Faraday rotation in magneto-optic material containing ferromagnetic domains is driven primarily by two principal mechanisms: domain wall motion and coherent domain rotations. Domain wall motion yields a larger Faraday responsivity but is limited by magnetically induced optical incoherence and by damping effects. Coherent domain rotation yields smaller Faraday rotations, but exhibits a flatter and broader frequency response. The two mechanisms occur along orthogonal principal axes and may be probed independently. However, when probed along an oblique angle to the principal axes, the relationship between the Faraday rotation and the external field changes from linear to tensorial. Although this may lead to more complicated phenomena (e.g. a sensitivity axis that depends on RF frequency), the interplay of domain rotation and domain wall motion can be exploited to improve responsivity or bandwidth. The detailed experimental data can be understood in terms of a quantitative model for the magnitude and direction of the responsivity vector. Applications to magnetic field sensors based on arrayed bismuth doped iron garnet films will be emphasized in this presentation.

  8. Magnetostatic dipolar domain-wall pinning in chains of permalloy triangular rings.

    SciTech Connect

    Vavassori, P.; Bisero, D.; Bonanni, V.; Busato, A.; Grimsditch, M.; Lebecki, K. M.; Metlushko, V.; Ilic, B.; Materials Science Division; CIC nanoGUNE Consolider; Univ. di Ferrara; CNR-INFM National Research Centre; Polish Academy of Science; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago; Cornell Univ.

    2008-01-01

    In a combined experimental and numerical study, we investigated the details of the motion and pinning of domain walls in isolated and interacting permalloy triangular rings (side 2 {micro}m, width 250 nm, and thickness 25 nm). To induce interaction between the rings, they were arranged either in vertical chains with an apex of each triangle in proximity to the edge center of the triangle above it or in horizontal chains where the proximity is between the adjacent corners of the triangles. Using longitudinal and diffraction magneto-optic Kerr effects, magnetic force microscopy, and micromagnetic simulations, we determined the field dependence of the spin structure in the rings. In all cases the remnant state of each ring is an 'onion' state characterized by two domain walls - one head to head the other tail to tail - pinned at the apexes. In isolated rings the magnetization reversal occurs between two onion states via the formation of an intermediate vortex state, which arises from the motion and annihilation of the two domain walls. In the case of the horizontal chains the reversal mechanism is unchanged except that the dipolar interaction affects the field range in which the rings are in the vortex state. In the case of vertical chains an additional intermediate state is observed during reversal. The new state involves a domain wall pinned at the center of the edge that is in close proximity to the apex of its neighbor. We show that the domain-wall motion in this last case can be modeled by a triple potential well. Because the new state requires that a domain wall be pinned at the neighboring apex, our observations can be viewed as a very elementary form of magnetic logic.

  9. Light-induced domain inversion with real-time diagnostics of the defect/domain wall interaction in lithium niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandmann, Christian; Dierolf, Volkmar

    2004-03-01

    Lithium niobate is a mature material which has widely been used in several applications, many of them exploiting the possibility to engineer domains in arbitrary shapes and patterns. Despite this technological driving force, the dramatic role of defects in the domain inversion (reflected e.g.: in a wide variation of coercive fields with stoichiometry) has not be clarified. To this end we will report two major breakthroughs enabling investigation of the dynamics of the domain wall/defect interaction. (1) light-induced domain inversion using visible laser in a confocal microscope, that allows us to directly "write" precise domain patterns, (2) real time observation of the changes occurring in the defect configuration of probe defect ions during domain inversion by probing defect luminescence. The latter can be used as a feedback for the light induced domain inversion. Moreover, we have a new tool to study the correlation between the rearrangement of defects and the occurrence of strain fields, as well as to investigate the origin of the light induced electric fields responsible for (1).

  10. Localized domain wall nucleation dynamics in asymmetric ferromagnetic rings revealed by direct time-resolved magnetic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Kornel; Krone, Andrea; Mawass, Mohamad-Assaad; Krüger, Benjamin; Weigand, Markus; Stoll, Hermann; Schütz, Gisela; Kläui, Mathias

    2016-07-01

    We report time-resolved observations of field-induced domain wall nucleation in asymmetric ferromagnetic rings using single direction field pulses and rotating fields. We show that the asymmetric geometry of a ring allows for controlling the position of nucleation events, when a domain wall is nucleated by a rotating magnetic field. Direct observation by scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) reveals that the nucleation of domain walls occurs through the creation of transient ripplelike structures. This magnetization state is found to exhibit a surprisingly high reproducibility even at room temperature and we determine the combinations of field strengths and field directions that allow for reliable nucleation of domain walls and directly quantify the stability of the magnetic states. Our analysis of the processes occurring during field induced domain wall nucleation shows how the effective fields determine the nucleation location reproducibly, which is a key prerequisite toward using domain walls for spintronic devices.

  11. Piezoelectric control of the mobility of a domain wall driven by adiabatic and non-adiabatic torques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ranieri, E.; Roy, P. E.; Fang, D.; Vehsthedt, E. K.; Irvine, A. C.; Heiss, D.; Casiraghi, A.; Campion, R. P.; Gallagher, B. L.; Jungwirth, T.; Wunderlich, J.

    2013-09-01

    The rich internal degrees of freedom of magnetic domain walls make them an attractive complement to electron charge for exploring new concepts of storage, transport and processing of information. Here we use the tunable internal structure of a domain wall in a perpendicularly magnetized GaMnAsP/GaAs ferromagnetic semiconductor and demonstrate devices in which piezoelectrically controlled magnetic anisotropy yields up to 500% mobility variations for an electrical-current-driven domain wall. We observe current-induced domain wall motion over a wide range of current-pulse amplitudes and report a direct observation and the piezoelectric control of the Walker breakdown separating two regimes with different mobilities. Our work demonstrates that in spin-orbit-coupled ferromagnets with weak extrinsic domain wall pinning, the piezoelectric control allows one to experimentally assess the upper and lower boundaries of the characteristic ratio of adiabatic and non-adiabatic spin-transfer torques in the current-driven domain wall motion.

  12. Spatially periodic domain wall pinning potentials: Asymmetric pinning and dipolar biasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metaxas, P. J.; Zermatten, P.-J.; Novak, R. L.; Rohart, S.; Jamet, J.-P.; Weil, R.; Ferré, J.; Mougin, A.; Stamps, R. L.; Gaudin, G.; Baltz, V.; Rodmacq, B.

    2013-02-01

    Domain wall propagation has been measured in continuous, weakly disordered, quasi-two-dimensional, Ising-like magnetic layers that are subject to spatially periodic domain wall pinning potentials. The potentials are generated non-destructively using the stray magnetic field of ordered arrays of magnetically hard [Co/Pt]m nanoplatelets, which are patterned above and are physically separated from the continuous magnetic layer. The effect of the periodic pinning potentials on thermally activated domain wall creep dynamics is shown to be equivalent, at first approximation, to that of a uniform, effective retardation field, Hret, which acts against the applied field, H. We show that Hret depends not only on the array geometry but also on the relative orientation of H and the magnetization of the nanoplatelets. A result of the latter dependence is that wall-mediated hysteresis loops obtained for a set nanoplatelet magnetization exhibit many properties that are normally associated with ferromagnet/antiferromagnet exchange bias systems. These include a switchable bias, coercivity enhancement, and domain wall roughness that is dependent on the applied field polarity.

  13. Critical current density of domain wall oscillation due to spin-transfer torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, T.; Imamura, H.

    2011-04-01

    The domain wall oscillation due to spin-transfer torque was studied by numerically solving the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation. For a domain wall whose rotation angle θmax is less than 180°, we found the existence of the critical current density above which the magnetization dynamics are induced. We studied the dependence of the critical current density on the rotation angle θmax and found that the critical current density is proportional to 180° - θmax.

  14. Analytical and micromagnetic study of a Néel domain wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivkin, K.; Romanov, K.; Abanov, Ar.; Adamov, Y.; Saslow, W. M.

    2008-06-01

    For ferromagnets with exchange, dipolar interaction, and uniaxial anisotropy, by both analytic methods and micromagnetic simulations we study Néel domain walls in thin ferromagnetic strips of finite width. Comparison of the numerical results with the analytics yields parameter values that had been unspecified by the analytics, and determines the modifications needed to describe the magnetization both near the strip center and near the boundaries. With no uniaxial anisotropy, the domain wall center can be described by the same hyperbolic secant form as with uniaxial anisotropy, but the effective anisotropy constant must now be thought of as increasing with increasing film thickness and decreasing with increasing film width.

  15. Magneto-mechanical resonance of a single superparamagnetic microbead trapped by a magnetic domain wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapoport, Elizabeth; Beach, Geoffrey S. D.

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic domain walls in ferromagnetic tracks can be used to trap and transport superparamagnetic beads for lab-on-a-chip applications. Here it is shown that the magnetostatic binding between a domain wall and a superparamagnetic bead suspended in a host fluid leads to a distinct magneto-mechanical resonance under application of a sinusoidal driving field. The characteristic resonant frequency depends on the ratio of the magnetostatic binding force to the viscous drag on the bead. This resonance has been experimentally detected for a single trapped superparamagnetic bead using an optical detection technique.

  16. Electric field driven magnetic domain wall motion in ferromagnetic-ferroelectric heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Wiele, Ben; Laurson, Lasse; Franke, Kévin J. A.; Dijken, Sebastiaan van

    2014-01-06

    We investigate magnetic domain wall (MDW) dynamics induced by applied electric fields in ferromagnetic-ferroelectric thin-film heterostructures. In contrast to conventional driving mechanisms where MDW motion is induced directly by magnetic fields or electric currents, MDW motion arises here as a result of strong pinning of MDWs onto ferroelectric domain walls (FDWs) via local strain coupling. By performing extensive micromagnetic simulations, we find several dynamical regimes, including instabilities such as spin wave emission and complex transformations of the MDW structure. In all cases, the time-averaged MDW velocity equals that of the FDW, indicating the absence of Walker breakdown.

  17. Domain wall dynamics in a spin-reorientation transition system Au/Co/Au

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Sujoy; Seu, Keoki; Turner, Joshua J.; Park, Sungkyun; Kevan, Steve; Falco, Charles M.

    2009-05-14

    We report measurements of domain wall dynamics in an ultrathin Au/Co/Au system that exhibits a spin reorientation phase transition as a function of temperature.The domain walls exhibit cooperative motion throughout the temperature range of 150 - 300 K. The decay times were found to exhibit a maximum at the transition temperature. The slowdown has been explained as due to formation of a double well in the energy landscape by the different competing interactions. Our results show that the complex, slow dynamics can provide a more fundamental understanding of magnetic phase transitions.

  18. Gravitational waves from domain walls in the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model

    SciTech Connect

    Kadota, Kenji; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Saikawa, Ken’ichi

    2015-10-16

    The next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model predicts the formation of domain walls due to the spontaneous breaking of the discrete Z{sub 3}-symmetry at the electroweak phase transition, and they collapse before the epoch of big bang nucleosynthesis if there exists a small bias term in the potential which explicitly breaks the discrete symmetry. Signatures of gravitational waves produced from these unstable domain walls are estimated and their parameter dependence is investigated. It is shown that the amplitude of gravitational waves becomes generically large in the decoupling limit, and that their frequency is low enough to be probed in future pulsar timing observations.

  19. Microwave a.c. conductivity of domain walls in ferroelectric thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tselev, Alexander; Yu, Pu; Cao, Ye; Dedon, Liv R.; Martin, Lane W.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-05-01

    Ferroelectric domain walls are of great interest as elementary building blocks for future electronic devices due to their intrinsic few-nanometre width, multifunctional properties and field-controlled topology. To realize the electronic functions, domain walls are required to be electrically conducting and addressable non-destructively. However, these properties have been elusive because conducting walls have to be electrically charged, which makes them unstable and uncommon in ferroelectric materials. Here we reveal that spontaneous and recorded domain walls in thin films of lead zirconate and bismuth ferrite exhibit large conductance at microwave frequencies despite being insulating at d.c. We explain this effect by morphological roughening of the walls and local charges induced by disorder with the overall charge neutrality. a.c. conduction is immune to large contact resistance enabling completely non-destructive walls read-out. This demonstrates a technological potential for harnessing a.c. conduction for oxide electronics and other materials with poor d.c. conduction, particularly at the nanoscale.

  20. Non-overlapping domain decomposition for near-wall turbulence modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utyuzhnikov, Sergey

    2016-06-01

    Near-wall turbulence modeling is computationally a very expensive problem. The talk considers a novel approach based on non-overlapping domain decomposition. It allows us to avoid calculations of the region with high gradients in the vicinity of the wall while retaining sufficient overall accuracy. The technique is introduced in application to low-Reynolds number RANS models. The domain decomposition is achieved via the transfer of the boundary condition from the wall to an interface boundary. If the governing equations in the inner domain are simplified, then the interface boundary conditions are of Robin type. These boundary conditions can be obtained in an analytical form despite the fact that they are nonlinear. Possible ways to achieve a reasonable trade-off between efficiency and accuracy are discussed. The obtained interface boundary conditions are mesh-independent. They can be used to avoid the computationally expensive resolution of a high-gradient region near the wall. Moreover, once the solution is constructed in the outer region, the near-wall profile can be restored if required. In two extreme cases, if the interface boundary is too close to the wall or too far from it, the so-constructed solution to the problem automatically corresponds to low- and high-Reynolds number RANS models, respectively. Different applications are considered including unsteady problems and complex geometries. The developed approach proved to be quite robust and relatively universal. It does not contain any tuning parameters. The technique might be extended to other multiscale problems.

  1. Microwave a.c. conductivity of domain walls in ferroelectric thin films.

    PubMed

    Tselev, Alexander; Yu, Pu; Cao, Ye; Dedon, Liv R; Martin, Lane W; Kalinin, Sergei V; Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-01-01

    Ferroelectric domain walls are of great interest as elementary building blocks for future electronic devices due to their intrinsic few-nanometre width, multifunctional properties and field-controlled topology. To realize the electronic functions, domain walls are required to be electrically conducting and addressable non-destructively. However, these properties have been elusive because conducting walls have to be electrically charged, which makes them unstable and uncommon in ferroelectric materials. Here we reveal that spontaneous and recorded domain walls in thin films of lead zirconate and bismuth ferrite exhibit large conductance at microwave frequencies despite being insulating at d.c. We explain this effect by morphological roughening of the walls and local charges induced by disorder with the overall charge neutrality. a.c. conduction is immune to large contact resistance enabling completely non-destructive walls read-out. This demonstrates a technological potential for harnessing a.c. conduction for oxide electronics and other materials with poor d.c. conduction, particularly at the nanoscale. PMID:27240997

  2. Effect of surface domain structure on wall mobility in amorphous microwires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiriac, H.; Óvári, T.-A.; Ţibu, M.

    2009-04-01

    Recently reported results on domain wall propagation within the inner core of bistable Fe-based positive magnetostrictive amorphous microwires opened up the way for future spintronic applications of amorphous microwires. Domain wall propagation has also been investigated in Co-based nearly zero magnetostrictive microwires, which become bistable under certain conditions. Wall velocity and mobility values were found to be superior in the latter type of microwires due to their much smaller magnetoelastic anisotropy. In this paper, the key role played by the surface domain structure of microwires in determining the wall mobility is investigated. Wall velocity measurements have been performed on (Co0.94Fe0.06)72.5Si12.5B15 microwires in as-cast glass-coated state and after glass removal with a hydrofluoric acid solution. Surface magnetization has been studied employing magneto-optical Kerr effect. The results show that both as-cast glass-coated microwires and microwires with the glass coating removed, which are bistable, display a helical magnetization in the surface region. The direction of the magnetization in this region affects the mobility of the propagating wall due to the stray fields associated with the preponderant components of the magnetization.

  3. Microwave a.c. conductivity of domain walls in ferroelectric thin films

    PubMed Central

    Tselev, Alexander; Yu, Pu; Cao, Ye; Dedon, Liv R.; Martin, Lane W.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-01-01

    Ferroelectric domain walls are of great interest as elementary building blocks for future electronic devices due to their intrinsic few-nanometre width, multifunctional properties and field-controlled topology. To realize the electronic functions, domain walls are required to be electrically conducting and addressable non-destructively. However, these properties have been elusive because conducting walls have to be electrically charged, which makes them unstable and uncommon in ferroelectric materials. Here we reveal that spontaneous and recorded domain walls in thin films of lead zirconate and bismuth ferrite exhibit large conductance at microwave frequencies despite being insulating at d.c. We explain this effect by morphological roughening of the walls and local charges induced by disorder with the overall charge neutrality. a.c. conduction is immune to large contact resistance enabling completely non-destructive walls read-out. This demonstrates a technological potential for harnessing a.c. conduction for oxide electronics and other materials with poor d.c. conduction, particularly at the nanoscale. PMID:27240997

  4. Magnetization reversal process and domain wall resistance in a water drop shape ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D. C.; Chiang, D. P.; Yao, Y. D.

    2006-03-01

    Patterned permalloy (Ni80-Fe20) materials have been fabricated by e-beam lithography in the shape of water drop ring. A tip is intentionally added into ring as geometrical defects to interrupt the continuity of magnetization reversal process, in order to create domain wall. Image from Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) with real- time external field confirmed this domain structure. As a result of magneto- resistance (MR) measurement, the ratio of MR is about 0.137 ˜ 0.233% and 0.23 ˜ 0.71% at sweeping angles of samples and sweeping external field, respectively. The ratio of the change in the electric resistance which is measured by I-V curve is just about the value of domain wall MR ratio which is measured by sweeping angles and external field. In summary, we have successfully demonstrated that the domain wall motion along the direction of perimeter in a ferromagnetic ring at its onion state; and the critical field to form onion state is near 200 Oe and the lowest field which can still drag the domain wall is between 100 and 50 Oe.

  5. Wall mechanics and exocytosis define the shape of growth domains in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Abenza, Juan F.; Couturier, Etienne; Dodgson, James; Dickmann, Johanna; Chessel, Anatole; Dumais, Jacques; Salas, Rafael E. Carazo

    2015-01-01

    The amazing structural variety of cells is matched only by their functional diversity, and reflects the complex interplay between biochemical and mechanical regulation. How both regulatory layers generate specifically shaped cellular domains is not fully understood. Here, we report how cell growth domains are shaped in fission yeast. Based on quantitative analysis of cell wall expansion and elasticity, we develop a model for how mechanics and cell wall assembly interact and use it to look for factors underpinning growth domain morphogenesis. Surprisingly, we find that neither the global cell shape regulators Cdc42-Scd1-Scd2 nor the major cell wall synthesis regulators Bgs1-Bgs4-Rgf1 are reliable predictors of growth domain geometry. Instead, their geometry can be defined by cell wall mechanics and the cortical localization pattern of the exocytic factors Sec6-Syb1-Exo70. Forceful re-directioning of exocytic vesicle fusion to broader cortical areas induces proportional shape changes to growth domains, demonstrating that both features are causally linked. PMID:26455310

  6. Domain wall dynamics in CoFeSiB microwires under axial applied stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sossmeier, K. D.; Oliveira, J. T. D.; Schelp, L. F.; Carara, M.

    2007-09-01

    In this work, we present a domain wall dynamics study on Joule heated Co 68.15Fe 4.35Si 12.5B 15 glass-covered amorphous microwires. Three samples were annealed with: (i) DC current or AC current with frequency of (ii) 100 Hz and (iii) 500 Hz. The current density was equivalent to an annealing temperature of 250 °C. The permeability spectra were obtained from the magnetoimpedance measurements at different axial applied stresses. Contributions from domain wall motion and magnetization rotation to the total permeability were separated and analyzed. Without axial stress, the samples present a longitudinal anisotropy, which is converted to a core-shell domain structure (bamboo-like structure) when stress is applied. A huge increase of domain wall component of the permeability until a critical stress followed by a linear reduction is present in all samples. The main difference is that the domain wall contribution to the permeability and the critical stress are lowest for the DC annealed sample and reach a maximum for the sample annealed at 500 Hz. The results are discussed in terms of the field-induced anisotropy during the annealing and the internal stress distribution.

  7. Wall mechanics and exocytosis define the shape of growth domains in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Abenza, Juan F; Couturier, Etienne; Dodgson, James; Dickmann, Johanna; Chessel, Anatole; Dumais, Jacques; Carazo Salas, Rafael E

    2015-01-01

    The amazing structural variety of cells is matched only by their functional diversity, and reflects the complex interplay between biochemical and mechanical regulation. How both regulatory layers generate specifically shaped cellular domains is not fully understood. Here, we report how cell growth domains are shaped in fission yeast. Based on quantitative analysis of cell wall expansion and elasticity, we develop a model for how mechanics and cell wall assembly interact and use it to look for factors underpinning growth domain morphogenesis. Surprisingly, we find that neither the global cell shape regulators Cdc42-Scd1-Scd2 nor the major cell wall synthesis regulators Bgs1-Bgs4-Rgf1 are reliable predictors of growth domain geometry. Instead, their geometry can be defined by cell wall mechanics and the cortical localization pattern of the exocytic factors Sec6-Syb1-Exo70. Forceful re-directioning of exocytic vesicle fusion to broader cortical areas induces proportional shape changes to growth domains, demonstrating that both features are causally linked. PMID:26455310

  8. Control and braiding of Majorana fermions bound to magnetic domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Se Kwon; Tewari, Sumanta; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2015-07-01

    Owing to the recent progress on endowing the electronic structure of magnetic nanowires with topological properties, the associated topological solitons in the magnetic texture—magnetic domain walls—appear as very natural hosts for exotic electronic excitations. Here, we propose to use the magnetic domain walls to engender Majorana fermions, which has several notable advantages compared to the existing approaches. First of all, the local tunneling density-of-states anomaly associated with the Majorana zero mode bound to a smooth magnetic soliton is immune to most of parasitic artifacts associated with the abrupt physical ends of a wire, which mar the existing experimental probes. Second, a viable route to move and braid Majorana fermions is offered by domain-wall motion. In particular, we envision the recently demonstrated heat-current induced motion of domain walls in insulating ferromagnets as a promising tool for nonintrusive displacement of Majorana modes. This leads us to propose a feasible scheme for braiding domain walls within a magnetic nanowire network, which manifests the nob-Abelian exchange statistics within the Majorana subspace.

  9. Wall mechanics and exocytosis define the shape of growth domains in fission yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abenza, Juan F.; Couturier, Etienne; Dodgson, James; Dickmann, Johanna; Chessel, Anatole; Dumais, Jacques; Salas, Rafael E. Carazo

    2015-10-01

    The amazing structural variety of cells is matched only by their functional diversity, and reflects the complex interplay between biochemical and mechanical regulation. How both regulatory layers generate specifically shaped cellular domains is not fully understood. Here, we report how cell growth domains are shaped in fission yeast. Based on quantitative analysis of cell wall expansion and elasticity, we develop a model for how mechanics and cell wall assembly interact and use it to look for factors underpinning growth domain morphogenesis. Surprisingly, we find that neither the global cell shape regulators Cdc42-Scd1-Scd2 nor the major cell wall synthesis regulators Bgs1-Bgs4-Rgf1 are reliable predictors of growth domain geometry. Instead, their geometry can be defined by cell wall mechanics and the cortical localization pattern of the exocytic factors Sec6-Syb1-Exo70. Forceful re-directioning of exocytic vesicle fusion to broader cortical areas induces proportional shape changes to growth domains, demonstrating that both features are causally linked.

  10. An exact solution for a thick domain wall in general relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, Guenter; Noetzold, Dirk

    1989-01-01

    An exact solution of the Einstein equations for a static, planar domain wall with finite thickness is presented. At infinity, density and pressure vanish and the space-time tends to the Minkowski vacuum on one side of the wall and to the Taub vacuum on the other side. A surprising feature of this solution is that the density and pressure distribution are symmetric about the central plane of the wall whereas the space-time metric and therefore also the gravitational field experienced by a test particle is asymmetric.

  11. Ferroelectric polarization reversal via successive ferroelastic transitions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ruijuan; Liu, Shi; Grinberg, Ilya; Karthik, J; Damodaran, Anoop R; Rappe, Andrew M; Martin, Lane W

    2015-01-01

    Switchable polarization makes ferroelectrics a critical component in memories, actuators and electro-optic devices, and potential candidates for nanoelectronics. Although many studies of ferroelectric switching have been undertaken, much remains to be understood about switching in complex domain structures and in devices. In this work, a combination of thin-film epitaxy, macro- and nanoscale property and switching characterization, and molecular dynamics simulations are used to elucidate the nature of switching in PbZr(0.2)Ti(0.8)O3 thin films. Differences are demonstrated between (001)-/(101)- and (111)-oriented films, with the latter exhibiting complex, nanotwinned ferroelectric domain structures with high densities of 90° domain walls and considerably broadened switching characteristics. Molecular dynamics simulations predict both 180° (for (001)-/(101)-oriented films) and 90° multi-step switching (for (111)-oriented films) and these processes are subsequently observed in stroboscopic piezoresponse force microscopy. These results have implications for our understanding of ferroelectric switching and offer opportunities to change domain reversal speed. PMID:25344784

  12. Observation of field-induced domain wall propagation in magnetic nanowires by magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, M. T.; Fry, P. W.; Fischer, P.; Allwood, D. A.

    2007-12-01

    Magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy (M-TXM) is used to image domain walls in magnetic ring structures formed by a 300 nm wide, 24 nm thick Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} nanowire. Both transverse and vortex type domain walls are observed after application of different field sequences. Domain walls can be observed by comparing images obtained from opposite field sequences, or else domain wall propagation observed by comparing successive images in a particular field sequence. This demonstrates the potential use of M-TXM in developing and understanding planar magnetic nanowire behavior.

  13. Observation of field-induced domain wall propagation in magnetic nanowires by magnetic transmission x-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, M. T.; Fry, P. W.; Fischer, P. J.; Allwood, D. A.

    2008-04-01

    Magnetic transmission x-ray microscopy (M-TXM) is used to image domain walls in magnetic ring structures formed by a 300nm wide, 24nm thick Ni81Fe19 nanowire. Both transverse- and vortex-type domain walls are observed after application of different field sequences. Domain walls can be observed by comparing images obtained from opposite field sequences or else domain wall propagation observed by comparing successive images in a particular field sequence. This demonstrates the potential use of M-TXM in developing and understanding planar magnetic nanowire behavior.

  14. Localized NMR Mediated by Electrical-Field-Induced Domain Wall Oscillation in Quantum-Hall-Ferromagnet Nanowire.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, S; Miura, T; Watanabe, S; Nagase, K; Hirayama, Y

    2016-03-01

    We present fractional quantum Hall domain walls confined in a gate-defined wire structure. Our experiments utilize spatial oscillation of domain walls driven by radio frequency electric fields to cause nuclear magnetic resonance. The resulting spectra are discussed in terms of both large quadrupole fields created around the wire and hyperfine fields associated with the oscillating domain walls. This provides the experimental fact that the domain walls survive near the confined geometry despite of potential deformation, by which a localized magnetic resonance is allowed in electrical means. PMID:26885703

  15. Direct observation of interlocked domain walls and topological four-state vortex-like domain patterns in multiferroic YMnO{sub 3} single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Lei; Wang, Yumei Ge, Binghui; Zhang, Xiangqun; Zhang, Zhihua

    2015-03-16

    Using the advanced spherical aberration-corrected high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscope imaging techniques, we investigated atomic-scale structural features of domain walls and domain patterns in YMnO{sub 3} single crystal. Three different types of interlocked ferroelectric-antiphase domain walls and two abnormal topological four-state vortex-like domain patterns are identified. Each ferroelectric domain wall is accompanied by a translation vector, i.e., 1/6[210] or −1/6[210], demonstrating its interlocked nature. Different from the four-state vortex domain patterns caused by a partial edge dislocation, two four-state vortex-like domain configurations have been obtained at atomic level. These observed phenomena can further extend our understanding of the fascinating vortex domain patterns in multiferroic hexagonal rare-earth manganites.

  16. Magnetostatic dipolar domain-wall pinning in chains of permalloy triangular rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavassori, P.; Bisero, D.; Bonanni, V.; Busato, A.; Grimsditch, M.; Lebecki, K. M.; Metlushko, V.; Ilic, B.

    2008-11-01

    In a combined experimental and numerical study, we investigated the details of the motion and pinning of domain walls in isolated and interacting permalloy triangular rings (side 2μm , width 250 nm, and thickness 25 nm). To induce interaction between the rings, they were arranged either in vertical chains with an apex of each triangle in proximity to the edge center of the triangle above it or in horizontal chains where the proximity is between the adjacent corners of the triangles. Using longitudinal and diffraction magneto-optic Kerr effects, magnetic force microscopy, and micromagnetic simulations, we determined the field dependence of the spin structure in the rings. In all cases the remnant state of each ring is an “onion” state characterized by two domain walls—one head to head the other tail to tail—pinned at the apexes. In isolated rings the magnetization reversal occurs between two onion states via the formation of an intermediate vortex state, which arises from the motion and annihilation of the two domain walls. In the case of the horizontal chains the reversal mechanism is unchanged except that the dipolar interaction affects the field range in which the rings are in the vortex state. In the case of vertical chains an additional intermediate state is observed during reversal. The new state involves a domain wall pinned at the center of the edge that is in close proximity to the apex of its neighbor. We show that the domain-wall motion in this last case can be modeled by a triple potential well. Because the new state requires that a domain wall be pinned at the neighboring apex, our observations can be viewed as a very elementary form of magnetic logic.

  17. Modal resonant ultrasound spectroscopy for ferroelastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landa, Michal; Sedlák, Petr; Seiner, Hanuš; Heller, Luděk; Bicanová, Lucie; Šittner, Petr; Novák, Václav

    2009-08-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical improvements of resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) are summarized to investigate elastic constants of phases in shape memory alloys. The proposed inversion procedure, described in this work, is particularly suitable to reliable evaluation of the temperature dependence of elastic constants of low-symmetry ferroelastic materials which may be strongly elastically anisotropic and tend to exist in twinned forms. The method is applicable even for the evaluation of single-crystal elastic constants from RUS measurements on microtwinned crystals, since it involves a homogenization algorithm based on the macroscopic deformation response of the layered structure. This potentially allows performing meaningful acoustic studies on samples with a general submicron-size layered structure.

  18. Internal friction due to domain-wall motion in martensitically transformed A15 compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, C.L. Jr.; Welch, D.O.

    1985-01-01

    A lattice instability in A15 materials in some cases leads to a cubic-to-tetragonal martensitic transformation at low temperatures. The transformed material orients in lamellae with c axes alternately aligned along the <100> directions producing domain walls between the lamellae. An internal-friction (delta) feature below T/sub m/ is attributed to stress-induced domain-wall motion. The magnitude of the friction increases as temperature is lowered below T/sub m/ as (1-c/a) increases, and behaves as (1-c/a)/sup 2/ from T/sub m/ down to the superconducting critical temperature where the increasing tetragonality is inhibited. The effect of strain in the lattice is to decrease the domain-wall internal friction, but not affect T/sub m/. Neutron-induced disorder and the addition of some third-elements in alloying decrease both delta and T/sub m/, with some elements reducing only the former. Less than 1 at. % H is seen to completely suppress both delta and T/sub m. Martensitically transformed V/sub 2/Zr demonstrates low-temperature internal-friction and modulus behavior consists with easy ..beta../m wall motion relative to the easy m/m motion of the A15's. For the V/sub 2/Zr, a peak in delta is observed, qualitatively in agreement with expected ..beta../m wall motion.

  19. Magnetic domain wall creep in the presence of an effective interlayer coupling field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metaxas, P. J.; Jamet, J. P.; Ferré, J.; Rodmacq, B.; Dieny, B.; Stamps, R. L.

    We investigate thermally activated domain wall creep in a system consisting of two ultrathin Co layers with perpendicular anisotropy coupled antiferromagnetically through a 4 nm thick Pt spacer layer. The field driven dynamics of domain walls in the softer Co layer have been measured while keeping the harder Co layer negatively saturated. The effect of the interlayer interaction on the soft layer is interpreted in terms of an effective coupling field, HJ, which results in an asymmetry between the domain wall speeds measured under positive and negative driving fields. We show that creep theory remains valid to describe the observed wall motion when the effective coupling field is included in the creep velocity law as a component of the total field acting on the wall. Using the resultant modified creep expression, we determine a value for the effective coupling field which is consistent with that measured from the shift of the soft layer's minor hysteresis loop. The net antiferromagnetic coupling is attributed to a combination of RKKY and orange-peel coupling.

  20. Asymmetric driven dynamics of Dzyaloshinskii domain walls in ultrathin ferromagnetic strips with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Tejerina, L.; Alejos, Ó.; Martínez, E.; Muñoz, J. M.

    2016-07-01

    The dynamics of domain walls in ultrathin ferromagnetic strips with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy is studied from both numerical and analytical micromagnetics. The influence of a moderate interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction associated to a bi-layer strip arrangement has been considered, giving rise to the formation of Dzyaloshinskii domain walls. Such walls possess under equilibrium conditions an inner magnetization structure defined by a certain orientation angle that make them to be considered as intermediate configurations between Bloch and Néel walls. Two different dynamics are considered, a field-driven and a current-driven dynamics, in particular, the one promoted by the spin torque due to the spin-Hall effect. Results show an inherent asymmetry associated with the rotation of the domain wall magnetization orientation before reaching the stationary regime, characterized by a constant terminal speed. For a certain initial DW magnetization orientation at rest, the rotation determines whether the reorientation of the DW magnetization prior to reach stationary motion is smooth or abrupt. This asymmetry affects the DW motion, which can even reverse for a short period of time. Additionally, it is found that the terminal speed in the case of the current-driven dynamics may depend on either the initial DW magnetization orientation at rest or the sign of the longitudinally injected current.

  1. Ballistic conductivity of graphene channel with p-n junction at ferroelectric domain wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozovska, Anna N.; Eliseev, Eugene A.; Strikha, Maksym V.

    2016-06-01

    The influence of a ferroelectric domain wall on the ballistic conductance of a single-layer graphene channel in the graphene/physical gap/ferroelectric film heterostructure has been studied in the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation. The self-consistent numerical simulation of the electric field and the space charge dynamics in the heterostructure, as well as the approximate analytical theory, show that the contact between the domain wall and the surface creates a p-n junction in the graphene channel. We calculated that the carrier concentration induced in graphene by uncompensated ferroelectric dipoles originated from the abrupt spontaneous polarization change near the surface can reach values of about 1019 m-2, which are two orders of magnitude higher than those obtained for the graphene on non-ferroelectric substrates. Therefore, we predict that the graphene channel with the p-n junction caused by the ferroelectric domain wall would be characterized by rather a high ballistic conductivity. Moreover, the graphene p-n junction at the ferroelectric domain wall can be an excellent rectifier with a conductivity ratio of about 10 between the direct and reverse polarities of the applied voltage.

  2. Axionic domain wall number related to U(1)anom global symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jihn E.

    2016-08-01

    The QCD axion with fa at an intermediate scale, 109 GeV ∼1012 GeV, seems in conflict with the gravity spoil of global symmetries and may face the axionic domain wall problem. We point out that the string compactifications with an anomalous U(1) gauge symmetry, allowing desirable chiral matter spectra, circumvent these two problems simultaneously.

  3. NMR study of domain wall pinning in a magnetically ordered material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleshakov, I. V.; Popov, P. S.; Kuz'min, Yu. I.; Dudkin, V. I.

    2016-01-01

    The use of nuclear magnetic resonance in the form of spin echo in combination with magnetic field pulses applied to a magnetically ordered material sample offers a convenient tool for studying characteristics of the centers of domain-wall pinning. Possibilities of this method have been demonstrated in experiments with lithium-zinc ferrite.

  4. Domain wall contribution to the nonlinear dielectric response: effective potential model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placeres-Jiménez, R.; Rino, J. P.; Gonçalves, A. M.; Eiras, J. A.

    2015-11-01

    Domain wall displacement has an important contribution to the different nonlinear dielectric responses observed in ferroelectrics. For a moderated alternating electric field, domain walls perform a small displacement around their equilibrium positions. Such motion of the domain walls can be modelled as a body moving in a viscous medium under the action of an effective potential W(l). From this model the dispersion relationships are derived. The exact expression for the effective potential is found assuming that the dielectric permittivity depends on the electric field strength as \\varepsilon \\propto 1/(α +β {{E}2}) . The effect of multidomain structure and polarization hysteresis are introduced through the effective field approximation {{E}\\text{eff}}\\equiv E+κ P(E) . An important merit of the model is that it allows the simulation of transient polarization processes for the arbitrary input signal, predicting a power law for the polarization and depolarization currents. An analytic expression is found for the dependence of the permittivity on the electric field strength that correctly reproduces its hysteretic behaviour. The polarization loop and nonlinear dielectric response for subswitching the alternating electric field are simulated and compared with experimental data obtained from PZT thin films. It was observed that the simulated dielectric loss was lower than the experimental one, which can be explained as a result of the interaction of domain walls with defects. Point defects are introduced into the model as a perturbation of the effective potential, showing the dependence of the dielectric loss on the concentration of the defects.

  5. Domain-wall melting in ultracold-boson systems with hole and spin-flip defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halimeh, Jad C.; Wöllert, Anton; McCulloch, Ian; Schollwöck, Ulrich; Barthel, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Quantum magnetism is a fundamental phenomenon of nature. As of late, it has garnered a lot of interest because experiments with ultracold atomic gases in optical lattices could be used as a simulator for phenomena of magnetic systems. A paradigmatic example is the time evolution of a domain-wall state of a spin-1/2 Heisenberg chain, the so-called domain-wall melting. The model can be implemented by having two species of bosonic atoms with unity filling and strong on-site repulsion U in an optical lattice. In this paper, we study the domain-wall melting in such a setup on the basis of the time-dependent density matrix renormalization group (tDMRG). We are particularly interested in the effects of defects that originate from an imperfect preparation of the initial state. Typical defects are holes (empty sites) and flipped spins. We show that the dominating effects of holes on observables like the spatially resolved magnetization can be taken account of by a linear combination of spatially shifted observables from the clean case. For sufficiently large U, further effects due to holes become negligible. In contrast, the effects of spin flips are more severe as their dynamics occur on the same time scale as that of the domain-wall melting itself. It is hence advisable to avoid preparation schemes that are based on spin flips.

  6. Photonic realization of topologically protected bound states in domain-wall waveguide arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Thorp, J. P.; Vukićević, I.; Xu, X.; Yang, J.; Fefferman, C. L.; Wong, C. W.; Weinstein, M. I.

    2016-03-01

    We present an analytical theory of topologically protected photonic states for the two-dimensional Maxwell equations for a class of continuous periodic dielectric structures, modulated by a domain wall. We further numerically confirm the applicability of this theory for three-dimensional structures.

  7. A small cellulose binding domain protein in Phytophtora is cell wall localized

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cellulose binding domains (CBD) are structurally conserved regions linked to catalytic regions of cellulolytic enzymes. While widespread amongst saprophytic fungi that subsist on plant cell wall polysaccharides, they are not generally present in plant pathogenic fungi. A genome wide survey of CBDs w...

  8. Resonant translational, breathing, and twisting modes of transverse magnetic domain walls pinned at notches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metaxas, Peter J.; Albert, Maximilian; Lequeux, Steven; Cros, Vincent; Grollier, Julie; Bortolotti, Paolo; Anane, Abdelmadjid; Fangohr, Hans

    2016-02-01

    We study resonant translational, breathing, and twisting modes of transverse magnetic domain walls pinned at notches in ferromagnetic nanostrips. We demonstrate that a mode's sensitivity to notches depends strongly on the mode's characteristics. For example, the frequencies of modes that involve lateral motion of the wall are the most sensitive to changes in the notch intrusion depth, especially at the narrow, more strongly confined end of the domain wall. In contrast, the breathing mode, whose dynamics are concentrated away from the notches is relatively insensitive to changes in the notches' sizes. We also demonstrate a sharp drop in the translational mode's frequency towards zero when approaching depinning which is confirmed, using a harmonic oscillator model, to be consistent with a reduction in the local slope of the notch-induced confining potential at its edge.

  9. Fermions, scalars, and Randall-Sundrum gravity on domain-wall branes

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, Rhys; George, Damien P.

    2007-11-15

    We analyze the general features of localization of fermions and scalars in smoothed field-theoretical versions of the type 2 Randall-Sundrum braneworld model. A scalar field domain wall forms the brane, inducing warped gravity, and we study the mass spectra of the matter fields in the dimensionally reduced theory. We demonstrate explicitly that both scalar and fermion fields exhibit a continuum of properly normalizable modes starting at zero mass. If discrete bound modes are present in the gravity-free case, these become resonances in the continuum, while off-resonant modes are highly suppressed on the brane. We describe briefly how another scalar field can be used to break a symmetry on the domain wall while leaving it unbroken far from the wall, as has already been done in the flat space case. Finally we present numerical calculations for a toy model which demonstrates the decoupling of continuum modes at low energies, so the theory becomes four dimensional.

  10. Evolution of light domain walls interacting with dark matter, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massarotti, Alessandro

    1990-01-01

    The evolution of domain walls generated in the early Universe is discussed considering an interaction between the walls and a major gaseous component of the dark matter. The walls are supposed able to reflect the particles elastically and with a reflection coefficient of unity. A toy Lagrangian that could give rise to such a phenomenon is discussed. In the simple model studied, highly non-relativistic and slowly varying speeds are obtained for the domain walls (approximately 10 (exp -2)(1+z)(exp -1)) and negligible distortions of the microwave background. In addition, these topological defects may provide a mechanism of forming the large scale structure of the Universe, by creating fluctuations in the dark matter (delta rho/rho approximately O(1)) on a scale comparable with the distance the walls move from the formation (in the model d less than 20 h(exp -1) Mpc). The characteristic scale of the wall separation can be easily chosen to be of the order of 100 Mpc instead of being restricted to the horizon scale, as usually obtained.

  11. 90-degree polarization switching in BaTiO3 crystals without domain wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. W.; Scott, J. F.; Fang, D. N.; Li, F. X.

    2013-12-01

    We report 90° polarization switching in a BaTiO3 crystal without domain wall (DW) motion by prefabricating samples with interlocking domains via compression. During electric re-poling of the depoled and aged crystals, 90° domain nucleation still exists, but 90° DW motion is inhibited by the strong constraints from surrounding domains, leading to DW-free 90° polarization switching. The measured coercive field of 500 V/mm for the DW-free 90° switching is close to the intrinsic values and much larger than that of 80 V/mm via 90° DW motion. Compared to the rather difficult domain-free 180° polarization switching in ultrathin films, 90° DW-free switching is easier.

  12. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION Critical exponents of domain walls in the two-dimensional Potts model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubail, Jérôme; Lykke Jacobsen, Jesper; Saleur, Hubert

    2010-12-01

    We address the geometrical critical behavior of the two-dimensional Q-state Potts model in terms of the spin clusters (i.e. connected domains where the spin takes a constant value). These clusters are different from the usual Fortuin-Kasteleyn clusters, and are separated by domain walls that can cross and branch. We develop a transfer matrix technique enabling the formulation and numerical study of spin clusters even when Q is not an integer. We further identify geometrically the crossing events which give rise to conformal correlation functions. This leads to an infinite series of fundamental critical exponents h_{\\ell _1-\\ell _2,2\\ell _1}, valid for 0 <= Q <= 4, that describe the insertion of ell1 thin and ell2 thick domain walls.

  13. Anisotropic Magnetoresistance State Space of Permalloy Nanowires with Domain Wall Pinning Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Corte-León, Héctor; Nabaei, Vahid; Manzin, Alessandra; Fletcher, Jonathan; Krzysteczko, Patryk; Schumacher, Hans W.; Kazakova, Olga

    2014-01-01

    The domain wall-related change in the anisotropic magnetoresistance in L-shaped permalloy nanowires is measured as a function of the magnitude and orientation of the applied magnetic field. The magnetoresistance curves, compiled into so-called domain wall magnetoresistance state space maps, are used to identify highly reproducible transitions between domain states. Magnetic force microscopy and micromagnetic modelling are correlated with the transport measurements of the devices in order to identify different magnetization states. Analysis allows to determine the optimal working parameters for specific devices, such as the minimal field required to switch magnetization or the most appropriate angle for maximal separation of the pinning/depinning fields. Moreover, the complete state space maps can be used to predict evolution of nanodevices in magnetic field without a need of additional electrical measurements and for repayable initialization of magnetic sensors into a well-specified state. PMID:25116470

  14. Stability of a pinned magnetic domain wall as a function of its internal configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Montaigne, F.; Duluard, A.; Briones, J.; Lacour, D.; Hehn, M.; Childress, J. R.

    2015-01-14

    It is shown that there are many stable configurations for a domain wall pinned by a notch along a magnetic stripe. The stability of several of these configurations is investigated numerically as a function of the thickness of the magnetic film. The depinning mechanism depends on the structure of the domain wall and on the thickness of the magnetic film. In the case of a spin-valve structure, it appears that the stray fields emerging from the hard layer at the notch location influence the stability of the micromagnetic configuration. Different depinning mechanisms are thus observed for the same film thickness depending on the magnetization orientation of the propagating domain. This conclusion qualitatively explains experimental magnetoresistance measurements.

  15. Effects of grain size and disorder on domain wall propagation in CoFeB thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voto, Michele; Lopez-Diaz, Luis; Torres, Luis

    2016-05-01

    Micromagnetic simulations are used to investigate the effect of disorder on field-driven domain wall motion in perpendicularly magnetized CoFeB thin films. It is found that some degree of inhomogeneity in the form of an irregular grain structure needs to be introduced in the model in order to account for the domain wall velocities measured experimentally, even for applied fields much larger than the finite propagation field induced by weak disorder in the film. Moreover, the details of this grain structure have a large impact on domain wall motion in this flow regime. In particular, it is found that, for a fixed applied field, domain wall velocity rapidly increases with grain size up to a diameter of 40 nm, above which it slowly decreases. This is explained showing that the grain structure of the material introduces a new form of dissipation of energy via spin wave emission during domain wall propagation. We focus on the relation between grain size and domain wall velocity, finding that the frequency of emission of spin waves packets during domain wall motion depends on the grain size and affects directly the domain wall velocity of propagation.

  16. Temperature dependence of carrier spin polarization determined from current-induced domain wall motion in a Co/Ni nanowire

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, K.; Koyama, T.; Hiramatsu, R.; Kobayashi, K.; Ono, T.; Chiba, D.; Fukami, S.; Tanigawa, H.; Suzuki, T.; Ohshima, N.; Ishiwata, N.; Nakatani, Y.

    2012-05-14

    We have investigated the temperature dependence of the current-induced magnetic domain wall (DW) motion in a perpendicularly magnetized Co/Ni nanowire at various temperatures and with various applied currents. The carrier spin polarization was estimated from the measured domain wall velocity. We found that it decreased more with increasing temperature from 100 K to 530 K than the saturation magnetization did.

  17. High Antiferromagnetic Domain Wall Velocity Induced by Néel Spin-Orbit Torques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomonay, O.; Jungwirth, T.; Sinova, J.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate the possibility to drive an antiferromagnetic domain wall at high velocities by fieldlike Néel spin-orbit torques. Such torques arise from current-induced local fields that alternate their orientation on each sublattice of the antiferromagnet and whose orientation depends primarily on the current direction, giving them their fieldlike character. The domain wall velocities that can be achieved by this mechanism are 2 orders of magnitude greater than the ones in ferromagnets. This arises from the efficiency of the staggered spin-orbit fields to couple to the order parameter and from the exchange-enhanced phenomena in antiferromagnetic texture dynamics, which leads to a low domain wall effective mass and the absence of a Walker breakdown limit. In addition, because of its nature, the staggered spin-orbit field can lift the degeneracy between two 180° rotated states in a collinear antiferromagnet, and it provides a force that can move such walls and control the switching of the states.

  18. High Antiferromagnetic Domain Wall Velocity Induced by Néel Spin-Orbit Torques.

    PubMed

    Gomonay, O; Jungwirth, T; Sinova, J

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate the possibility to drive an antiferromagnetic domain wall at high velocities by fieldlike Néel spin-orbit torques. Such torques arise from current-induced local fields that alternate their orientation on each sublattice of the antiferromagnet and whose orientation depends primarily on the current direction, giving them their fieldlike character. The domain wall velocities that can be achieved by this mechanism are 2 orders of magnitude greater than the ones in ferromagnets. This arises from the efficiency of the staggered spin-orbit fields to couple to the order parameter and from the exchange-enhanced phenomena in antiferromagnetic texture dynamics, which leads to a low domain wall effective mass and the absence of a Walker breakdown limit. In addition, because of its nature, the staggered spin-orbit field can lift the degeneracy between two 180° rotated states in a collinear antiferromagnet, and it provides a force that can move such walls and control the switching of the states. PMID:27419586

  19. A memristor based on current-induced domain-wall motion in a nanostructured giant magnetoresistance device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Münchenberger, Jana; Reiss, Günter; Thomas, Andy

    2012-04-01

    The possibility of controlling the resistance of a memristive giant magnetoresistance (GMR) system via current-induced domain-wall motion was investigated. For a narrow spin-valve structure, current-induced domain-wall motion in the free layer can be detected once the current density exceeds a critical threshold. Then, the resistance of the device depends on the position of the domain wall. The GMR system shows a MR ratio of 10% in the as-prepared state. Narrow stripes were fabricated by e-beam lithography and ion-beam etching with a width of 200 nm. The stripes exhibit GMR ratios up to 8% at room temperature. Micromagnetic simulations of the domain-wall motion in the free layer allow an estimation of the time scale of the domain-wall migration in the stripe. Furthermore, the simulations were compared with measured critical current densities in the free layer with and without an applied external field.

  20. Magneto-optic imaging of domain walls in ferrimagnetic garnet films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, H.; Bekeris, V.; Johansen, T. H.

    2007-09-01

    Magneto-optic (MO) imaging is based on Faraday rotation of a linearly polarized incident light beam illuminating a sensitive MO layer (MOL) placed in close contact to the sample. For in-plane magnetized layers of Lu 3-xBi xFe 5-yGa yO 12 ferrimagnetic garnet films, zig-zag domain formation occurs whenever the sample stray parallel field component, H∥, changes sign. Considering the anisotropy, exchange and magnetostatic energies in the Néel tails, and the contribution of an applied magnetic field, it is possible to describe the zig-zag walls that separate domains with opposite in-plane magnetization. The size of the walls decreases with the spatial derivative of H∥. We studied the evolution of these domains as we steadily forced the change in sign of H∥ to shorter length scales, from hundreds to a few microns. We describe the samples used to control the change in sign of H∥ at the MOL plane, and we analyze the images that evolve from zig-zag walls to much more complex closed domain structures.

  1. Current-spin coupling for ferromagnetic domain walls in fine wires.

    PubMed

    Barnes, S E; Maekawa, S

    2005-09-01

    The coupling between a current and a domain wall is examined. In the presence of a finite current and in the absence of a potential which breaks the translational symmetry, there is a perfect transfer of angular momentum from the conduction electrons to the wall. As a result, the ground state is in uniform motion and this remains the case even when relaxation is included. This is described by, appropriately modified, Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equations. The results for a simple pinning model are compared with experiment. PMID:16196962

  2. Light domain walls, massive neutrinos and the large scale structure of the Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massarotti, Alessandro

    1991-01-01

    Domain walls generated through a cosmological phase transition are considered, which interact nongravitationally with light neutrinos. At a redshift z greater than or equal to 10(exp 4), the network grows rapidly and is virtually decoupled from the matter. As the friction with the matter becomes dominant, a comoving network scale close to that of the comoving horizon scale at z of approximately 10(exp 4) gets frozen. During the later phases, the walls produce matter wakes of a thickness d of approximately 10h(exp -1)Mpc, that may become seeds for the formation of the large scale structure observed in the Universe.

  3. Tunneling decay of false domain walls: The silence of the lambs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberichter, Mareike; MacKenzie, Richard; Paranjape, M. B.; Ung, Yvan

    2016-04-01

    We study the decay of "false" domain walls, that is, metastable states of the quantum theory where the true vacuum is trapped inside the wall with the false vacuum outside. We consider a theory with two scalar fields, a shepherd field and a field of sheep. The shepherd field serves to herd the solitons of the sheep field so that they are nicely bunched together. However, quantum tunnelling of the shepherd field releases the sheep to spread out uncontrollably. We show how to calculate the tunnelling amplitude for such a disintegration.

  4. Optimized cobalt nanowires for domain wall manipulation imaged by in situ Lorentz microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, L. A.; Magen, C.; Snoeck, E.; Gatel, C.; Serrano-Ramon, L.; and others

    2013-01-14

    Direct observation of domain wall (DW) nucleation and propagation in focused electron beam induced deposited Co nanowires as a function of their dimensions was carried out by Lorentz microscopy (LTEM) upon in situ application of magnetic field. Optimal dimensions favoring the unambiguous DW nucleation/propagation required for applications were found in 500-nm-wide and 13-nm-thick Co nanowires, with a maximum nucleation field and the largest gap between nucleation and propagation fields. The internal DW structures were resolved using the transport-of-intensity equation formalism in LTEM images and showed that the optimal nanowire dimensions correspond to the crossover between the nucleation of transverse and vortex walls.

  5. Local conductance: A means to extract polarization and depolarizing fields near domain walls in ferroelectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, A. M.; Kumar, A.; Gregg, J. M.; Whatmore, R. W.

    2015-10-26

    Conducting atomic force microscopy images of bulk semiconducting BaTiO{sub 3} surfaces show clear stripe domain contrast. High local conductance correlates with strong out-of-plane polarization (mapped independently using piezoresponse force microscopy), and current-voltage characteristics are consistent with dipole-induced alterations in Schottky barriers at the metallic tip-ferroelectric interface. Indeed, analyzing current-voltage data in terms of established Schottky barrier models allows relative variations in the surface polarization, and hence the local domain structure, to be determined. Fitting also reveals the signature of surface-related depolarizing fields concentrated near domain walls. Domain information obtained from mapping local conductance appears to be more surface-sensitive than that from piezoresponse force microscopy. In the right materials systems, local current mapping could therefore represent a useful complementary technique for evaluating polarization and local electric fields with nanoscale resolution.

  6. The creation of 360 degree domain walls in ferromagnetic nanorings by circular applied magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bickel, Jessica; Smith, Spencer; Aidala, Katherine

    2014-03-01

    360° domain walls (DWs) are the proposed transition state of ferromagnetic nanorings which are candidate devices for magnetic memory. Using micromagnetic simulations, we examine the formation of 360° DWs created by the application of a circular Oersted field for the transition of a 5nm thick ring from a CCW to a CW vortex. The magnetic reversal begins by canting of the magnetization either inward or outward. As the spin continues to rotate, exchange interactions result in the rotation of adjacent spins. Finally, the rotate spin aligns with the applied magnetic field, creating a transition state made of two 180° DWs of opposite winding number. As the center of the rotated domain grows, the 180° walls of adjacent domains meet. Adjacent domains cant in opposite directions to lower the magnetostatic energy relative to canting in the same direction. Therefore 180° DWs at the boundaries have the same winding number and combine to form 360° DWs. Each pair of rotated domains results in a pair of two 360° DWs of opposite winding number. This work provides better understanding of the formation of 360° DWs and may lead to the ability to control the formation of DWs via geometry.

  7. Domain Wall Motion Across Various Grain Boundaries in Ferroelectric Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Marincel, Daniel M.; Zhang, Huairuo; Jesse, Stephen; Belianinov, Alex; Okatan, Mahmut B.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Rainforth, W. Mark; Reaney, Ian M.; Randall, Clive A.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan

    2015-03-21

    Domain wall movement at and near engineered 10°, 15°, and 24° tilt and 10° and 30° twist grain boundaries was measured by band excitation piezoresponse force microscopy for Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 films with Zr/Ti ratio of 45/55 and 52/48. A minimum in nonlinear response was observed at the grain boundary for the highest angle twist and tilt grain boundaries, while a maximum in nonlinear response was observed at the 10° tilt grain boundaries. Lastly, the observed nonlinear response was correlated to the domain structure imaged in cross section by transmission electron microscopy.

  8. An experimental investigation of domain wall motion in polycrystalline Ni during high-rate compressive loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Dipankar; Bah, Abubakarr; Carman, Gregory P.; Ravichandran, Guruswami

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes experimental data on a polycrystalline nickel subjected to compressive loads induced in a split Hopkinson pressure bar test. A perpendicular bias magnetic field with respect to the loading direction is used to orient the domains and a pick-up coil measures the magnetic response of the sample during loading. Utilizing this experimental configuration, this study investigated the coupled effects of the magnetic and mechanical fields on domain wall motion in a polycrystalline magnetostrictive material (Ni) during the high-rate elastic loading. The experimental measurements reveal that the magnitude of the stress-induced magnetization change is dependent upon bias magnetic field.

  9. Domain Wall Motion Across Various Grain Boundaries in Ferroelectric Thin Films

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Marincel, Daniel M.; Zhang, Huairuo; Jesse, Stephen; Belianinov, Alex; Okatan, Mahmut B.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Rainforth, W. Mark; Reaney, Ian M.; Randall, Clive A.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan

    2015-03-21

    Domain wall movement at and near engineered 10°, 15°, and 24° tilt and 10° and 30° twist grain boundaries was measured by band excitation piezoresponse force microscopy for Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 films with Zr/Ti ratio of 45/55 and 52/48. A minimum in nonlinear response was observed at the grain boundary for the highest angle twist and tilt grain boundaries, while a maximum in nonlinear response was observed at the 10° tilt grain boundaries. Lastly, the observed nonlinear response was correlated to the domain structure imaged in cross section by transmission electron microscopy.

  10. Switching local magnetization by electric-field-induced domain wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakizakai, Haruka; Ando, Fuyuki; Koyama, Tomohiro; Yamada, Kihiro; Kawaguchi, Masashi; Kim, Sanghoon; Kim, Kab-Jin; Moriyama, Takahiro; Chiba, Daichi; Ono, Teruo

    2016-06-01

    Electric field effect on magnetism is an appealing technique for manipulating magnetization at a low energy cost. Here, we show that the local magnetization of an ultrathin Co film can be switched by simply applying a gate electric field without the assistance of any external magnetic field or current flow. The local magnetization switching is explained by nucleation and annihilation of magnetic domains through domain wall motion induced by the electric field. Our results lead to external-field-free and ultralow-energy spintronic applications.

  11. Time-resolved magnetization dynamics of cross-tie domain walls in permalloy microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miguel, J.; Sánchez-Barriga, J.; Bayer, D.; Kurde, J.; Heitkamp, B.; Piantek, M.; Kronast, F.; Aeschlimann, M.; Dürr, H. A.; Kuch, W.

    2009-12-01

    We report on a picosecond time-resolved x-ray magnetic circular dichroic-photoelectron emission microscopy study of the evolution of the magnetization components of a microstructured permalloy platelet comprising three cross-tie domain walls. A laser-excited photoswitch has been used to apply a triangular 80 Oe, 160 ps magnetic pulse. Micromagnetic calculations agree well with the experimental results, both in time and frequency, illustrating the large angle precession in the magnetic domains with magnetization perpendicular to the applied pulse, and showing how the magnetic vortices revert their core magnetization while the antivortices remain unaffected.

  12. Insights into Substrate Specificity of NlpC/P60 Cell Wall Hydrolases Containing Bacterial SH3 Domains

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingping; Liu, Xueqian W.; Patin, Delphine; Farr, Carol L.; Grant, Joanna C.; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Knuth, Mark W.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial SH3 (SH3b) domains are commonly fused with papain-like Nlp/P60 cell wall hydrolase domains. To understand how the modular architecture of SH3b and NlpC/P60 affects the activity of the catalytic domain, three putative NlpC/P60 cell wall hydrolases were biochemically and structurally characterized. These enzymes all have γ-d-Glu-A2pm (A2pm is diaminopimelic acid) cysteine amidase (or dl-endopeptidase) activities but with different substrate specificities. One enzyme is a cell wall lysin that cleaves peptidoglycan (PG), while the other two are cell wall recycling enzymes that only cleave stem peptides with an N-terminal l-Ala. Their crystal structures revealed a highly conserved structure consisting of two SH3b domains and a C-terminal NlpC/P60 catalytic domain, despite very low sequence identity. Interestingly, loops from the first SH3b domain dock into the ends of the active site groove of the catalytic domain, remodel the substrate binding site, and modulate substrate specificity. Two amino acid differences at the domain interface alter the substrate binding specificity in favor of stem peptides in recycling enzymes, whereas the SH3b domain may extend the peptidoglycan binding surface in the cell wall lysins. Remarkably, the cell wall lysin can be converted into a recycling enzyme with a single mutation. PMID:26374125

  13. Localization and chiral symmetry in 2+1 flavor domain wall QCD

    SciTech Connect

    David J. Antonio; Kenneth C. Bowler; Peter A. Boyle; Norman H. Christ; Michael A. Clark; Saul D. Cohen; Chris Dawson; Alistair Hart; Balint Joó; Chulwoo Jung; Richard D. Kenway; Shu Li; Meifeng Lin; Robert D. Mawhinney; Christopher M. Maynard; Shigemi Ohta; Robert J. Tweedie; Azusa Yamaguchi

    2008-01-01

    We present results for the dependence of the residual mass of domain wall fermions (DWF) on the size of the fifth dimension and its relation to the density and localization properties of low-lying eigenvectors of the corresponding hermitian Wilson Dirac operator relevant to simulations of 2+1 flavor domain wall QCD. Using the DBW2 and Iwasaki gauge actions, we generate ensembles of configurations with a $16^3\\times 32$ space-time volume and an extent of 8 in the fifth dimension for the sea quarks. We demonstrate the existence of a regime where the degree of locality, the size of chiral symmetry breaking and the rate of topology change can be acceptable for inverse lattice spacings $a^{-1} \\ge 1.6$ GeV.

  14. Logic circuit prototypes for three-terminal magnetic tunnel junctions with mobile domain walls.

    PubMed

    Currivan-Incorvia, J A; Siddiqui, S; Dutta, S; Evarts, E R; Zhang, J; Bono, D; Ross, C A; Baldo, M A

    2016-01-01

    Spintronic computing promises superior energy efficiency and nonvolatility compared to conventional field-effect transistor logic. But, it has proven difficult to realize spintronic circuits with a versatile, scalable device design that is adaptable to emerging material physics. Here we present prototypes of a logic device that encode information in the position of a magnetic domain wall in a ferromagnetic wire. We show that a single three-terminal device can perform inverter and buffer operations. We demonstrate one device can drive two subsequent gates and logic propagation in a circuit of three inverters. This prototype demonstration shows that magnetic domain wall logic devices have the necessary characteristics for future computing, including nonlinearity, gain, cascadability, and room temperature operation. PMID:26754412

  15. Three-dimensional simulation of irregular dynamics of topological solitons in moving magnetic domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zverev, V. V.; Filippov, B. N.

    2016-03-01

    A three-dimensional computer simulation of dynamic processes occurring in a domain wall moving in a soft-magnetic uniaxial film with in-plane anisotropy has been performed based on the micromagnetic approach. It has been shown that the domain wall motion is accompanied by topological transformations of the magnetization distribution, or, more specifically, by "fast" processes associated with the creation and annihilation of vortices, antivortices, and singular (Bloch) points. The method used for visualizing the topological structure of magnetization distributions is based on the numerical determination of topological charges of two types by means of the integration over the contours and surfaces with variable geometry. The obtained data indicate that the choice of the initial configuration predetermines the dynamic scenario of topological transformations.

  16. Logic circuit prototypes for three-terminal magnetic tunnel junctions with mobile domain walls

    PubMed Central

    Currivan-Incorvia, J. A.; Siddiqui, S.; Dutta, S.; Evarts, E. R.; Zhang, J.; Bono, D.; Ross, C. A.; Baldo, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Spintronic computing promises superior energy efficiency and nonvolatility compared to conventional field-effect transistor logic. But, it has proven difficult to realize spintronic circuits with a versatile, scalable device design that is adaptable to emerging material physics. Here we present prototypes of a logic device that encode information in the position of a magnetic domain wall in a ferromagnetic wire. We show that a single three-terminal device can perform inverter and buffer operations. We demonstrate one device can drive two subsequent gates and logic propagation in a circuit of three inverters. This prototype demonstration shows that magnetic domain wall logic devices have the necessary characteristics for future computing, including nonlinearity, gain, cascadability, and room temperature operation. PMID:26754412

  17. Low field domain wall dynamics in artificial spin-ice basis structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, J.; Goolaup, S.; Lim, G. J.; Kerk, I. S.; Chang, C. H.; Roy, K.; Lew, W. S.

    2015-10-01

    Artificial magnetic spin-ice nanostructures provide an ideal platform for the observation of magnetic monopoles. The formation of a magnetic monopole is governed by the motion of a magnetic charge carrier via the propagation of domain walls (DWs) in a lattice. To date, most experiments have been on the static visualization of DW propagation in the lattice. In this paper, we report on the low field dynamics of DW in a unit spin-ice structure measured by magnetoresistance changes. Our results show that reversible DW propagation can be initiated within the spin-ice basis. The initial magnetization configuration of the unit structure strongly influences the direction of DW motion in the branches. Single or multiple domain wall nucleation can be induced in the respective branches of the unit spin ice by the direction of the applied field.

  18. On the estimation of gravitational wave spectrum from cosmic domain walls

    SciTech Connect

    Hiramatsu, Takashi; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Saikawa, Ken'ichi E-mail: kawasaki@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-02-01

    We revisit the production of gravitational waves from unstable domain walls analyzing their spectrum by the use of field theoretic lattice simulations with grid size 1024{sup 3}, which is larger than the previous study. We have recognized that there exists an error in the code used in the previous study, and the correction of the error leads to the suppression of the spectrum of gravitational waves at high frequencies. The peak of the spectrum is located at the scale corresponding to the Hubble radius at the time of the decay of domain walls, and its amplitude is consistent with the naive estimation based on the quadrupole formula. Using the numerical results, the magnitude and the peak frequency of gravitational waves at the present time are estimated. It is shown that for some choices of parameters the signal of gravitational waves is strong enough to be probed in the future gravitational wave experiments.

  19. Quenched domain wall QCD with DBW2 gauge action toward nucleon decay matrix element calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Yasumichi

    2001-10-01

    The domain wall fermion action is a promising way to control chiral symmetry in lattice gauge theory. By the good chiral symmetry of this approach even at finite lattice spacing, one is able to extract hadronic matrix elements, like kaon weak matrix elements, for which the symmetry is extremely important. Ordinary fermions with poor chiral symmetry make calculation difficult because of the large mixing of operators with different chiral structure. Even though the domain wall fermion action with the simple Wilson gauge action has a good chiral symmetry, one can further improve the symmetry by using a different gauge action. We take a non-perturbatively improved action, the DBW2 action of the QCD Taro group. Hadron masses are systematically examined for a range of parameters. Application to nucleon decay matrix element is also discussed.

  20. Perterbative O(asa) matching in static heavy and domain-wall light quark system

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa,T.

    2008-07-14

    We discuss the perturbative O(a{sub s}a) matching in the static heavy and domain-wall light quark system. The gluon action is the Iwasaki action and the link smearing is performed in the static heavy action. The chiral symmetry of the light quark realized by using the domain-wall fermion formulation does not prohibit the mixing of the operators at O(a). The application of O(a) improvement to the actual data shows that the B meson decay constant f{sub B}, the matrix elements M{sub B} and the B parameter B{sub B} have non-negligible effects, while the effect on the SU(3) breaking ratio {zeta} is small.

  1. Switching of ± 360° domain wall states in a nanoring by an azimuthal Oersted field.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, N R; Licht, A S; Li, Y; Sun, Y; Tuominen, M T; Aidala, K E

    2011-12-01

    We demonstrate magnetic switching between two 360° domain wall vortex states in cobalt nanorings, which are candidate magnetic states for robust and low power magnetoresistive random access memory (MRAM) devices. These 360° domain wall (DW) or 'twisted onion' states can have clockwise or counterclockwise circulation, the two states for data storage. Reliable switching between the states is necessary for any realistic device. We accomplish this switching by applying a circular Oersted field created by passing current through a metal atomic force microscope tip placed at the center of the ring. After initializing in an onion state, we rotate the DWs to one side of the ring by passing a current through the center, and can switch between the two twisted states by reversing the current, causing the DWs to split and meet again on the opposite side of the ring. A larger current will annihilate the DWs and create a perfect vortex state in the rings. PMID:22071779

  2. Switching of ± 360° domain wall states in a nanoring by an azimuthal Oersted field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, N. R.; Licht, A. S.; Li, Y.; Sun, Y.; Tuominen, M. T.; Aidala, K. E.

    2011-12-01

    We demonstrate magnetic switching between two 360° domain wall vortex states in cobalt nanorings, which are candidate magnetic states for robust and low power magnetoresistive random access memory (MRAM) devices. These 360° domain wall (DW) or 'twisted onion' states can have clockwise or counterclockwise circulation, the two states for data storage. Reliable switching between the states is necessary for any realistic device. We accomplish this switching by applying a circular Oersted field created by passing current through a metal atomic force microscope tip placed at the center of the ring. After initializing in an onion state, we rotate the DWs to one side of the ring by passing a current through the center, and can switch between the two twisted states by reversing the current, causing the DWs to split and meet again on the opposite side of the ring. A larger current will annihilate the DWs and create a perfect vortex state in the rings.

  3. Universal magnetic domain wall dynamics in the presence of weak disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferré, Jacques; Metaxas, Peter J.; Mougin, Alexandra; Jamet, Jean-Pierre; Gorchon, Jon; Jeudy, Vincent

    2013-10-01

    The motion of elastic interfaces in disordered media is a broad topic relevant to many branches of physics. Field-driven magnetic domain wall motion in ultrathin ferromagnetic Pt/Co/Pt films can be well interpreted within the framework of theories developed to describe elastic interface dynamics in the presence of weak disorder. Indeed, the three theoretically predicted dynamic regimes of creep, depinning, and flow have all been directly evidenced in this model experimental system. We discuss these dynamic regimes and demonstrate how field-driven creep can be controlled not only by temperature and pinning, but also via interactions with magnetic entities located inside or outside the magnetic layer. Consequences of confinement effects in nano-devices are briefly reviewed, as some recent results on domain wall motion driven by an electric current or assisted by an electric field. Finally new theoretical developments and perspectives are discussed.

  4. Logic circuit prototypes for three-terminal magnetic tunnel junctions with mobile domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currivan-Incorvia, J. A.; Siddiqui, S.; Dutta, S.; Evarts, E. R.; Zhang, J.; Bono, D.; Ross, C. A.; Baldo, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Spintronic computing promises superior energy efficiency and nonvolatility compared to conventional field-effect transistor logic. But, it has proven difficult to realize spintronic circuits with a versatile, scalable device design that is adaptable to emerging material physics. Here we present prototypes of a logic device that encode information in the position of a magnetic domain wall in a ferromagnetic wire. We show that a single three-terminal device can perform inverter and buffer operations. We demonstrate one device can drive two subsequent gates and logic propagation in a circuit of three inverters. This prototype demonstration shows that magnetic domain wall logic devices have the necessary characteristics for future computing, including nonlinearity, gain, cascadability, and room temperature operation.

  5. 360° domain walls: stability, magnetic field and electric current effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinshuo; Siddiqui, Saima A.; Ho, Pin; Currivan-Incorvia, Jean Anne; Tryputen, Larysa; Lage, Enno; Bono, David C.; Baldo, Marc A.; Ross, Caroline A.

    2016-05-01

    The formation of 360° magnetic domain walls (360DWs) in Co and Ni80Fe20 thin film wires was demonstrated experimentally for different wire widths, by successively injecting two 180° domain walls (180DWs) into the wire. For narrow wires (≤50 nm wide for Co), edge roughness prevented the combination of the 180DWs into a 360DW, and for wide wires (200 nm for Co) the 360DW was unstable and annihilated spontaneously, but over an intermediate range of wire widths, reproducible 360DW formation occurred. The annihilation and dissociation of 360DWs was demonstrated by applying a magnetic field parallel to the wire, showing that annihilation fields were several times higher than dissociation fields in agreement with micromagnetic modeling. The annihilation of a 360DW by current pulsing was demonstrated.

  6. Low field domain wall dynamics in artificial spin-ice basis structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, J.; Goolaup, S.; Lim, G. J.; Kerk, I. S.; Lew, W. S.; Chang, C. H.; Roy, K.

    2015-10-28

    Artificial magnetic spin-ice nanostructures provide an ideal platform for the observation of magnetic monopoles. The formation of a magnetic monopole is governed by the motion of a magnetic charge carrier via the propagation of domain walls (DWs) in a lattice. To date, most experiments have been on the static visualization of DW propagation in the lattice. In this paper, we report on the low field dynamics of DW in a unit spin-ice structure measured by magnetoresistance changes. Our results show that reversible DW propagation can be initiated within the spin-ice basis. The initial magnetization configuration of the unit structure strongly influences the direction of DW motion in the branches. Single or multiple domain wall nucleation can be induced in the respective branches of the unit spin ice by the direction of the applied field.

  7. Chiral extrapolations in 2+1 flavor domain wall fermion simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Meifeng

    2006-12-01

    Simulations with 2+1 flavors of domain wall fermions provide us with the opportunity to compare the lattice data directly to the predictions of continuum chiral perturbation theory, up to correc- tions from the residual chiral symmetry breaking, mres , and O(a) lattice artefacts, which are rela- tively small for domain wall fermions. We present preliminary results for the pseudoscalar meson masses and decay constants from partially quenched simulations and examine the next-to-leading order chiral extrapolations at small quark masses. The simulations were carried out on two lattice volumes : 163 × 32 and 243 × 64, with the lattice spacing fixed at about 0.1 fm. The subtleties of the chiral fits are discussed. We also explore the roles of mres and O(a) terms in the NLO chiral expansions and their effects on the chiral extrapolations for the pseudoscalar masses and decay constants.

  8. Melting of a spin domain wall in the context of recent experiments with ultracold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidmar, Lev; Iyer, Deepak; Rigol, Marcos

    When a one-dimensional spin domain wall of the form |up ...up up down down ...down>is melting, transverse spin correlations in the XX model exhibit a power-law decay in the melted region. This model can be mapped to hard-core bosons via Jordan-Wigner transformation. For hard-core bosons, these emerging power-law correlations correspond to singularities in the quasimomentum distribution at finite quasimomenta +/- pi/2, resulting in a dynamical quasicondensation with the emerging phase order different from the ground-state order. This phenomenon has been recently observed experimentally with ultracold bosons in optical lattices. Here we study the emergence of correlations in melting domain walls for hard-core bosons, spinless fermions and the Fermi-Hubbard model at infinite onsite repulsion. In all cases, the density dynamics exhibit identical ballistic expansion, while the correlations show strikingly different features.

  9. Universal Pinning Energy Barrier for Driven Domain Walls in Thin Ferromagnetic Films.

    PubMed

    Jeudy, V; Mougin, A; Bustingorry, S; Savero Torres, W; Gorchon, J; Kolton, A B; Lemaître, A; Jamet, J-P

    2016-07-29

    We report a comparative study of magnetic field driven domain wall motion in thin films made of different magnetic materials for a wide range of field and temperature. The full thermally activated creep motion, observed below the depinning threshold, is shown to be described by a unique universal energy barrier function. Our findings should be relevant for other systems whose dynamics can be modeled by elastic interfaces moving on disordered energy landscapes. PMID:27517790

  10. Swift thermal steering of domain walls in ferromagnetic MnBi stripes

    PubMed Central

    Sukhov, Alexander; Chotorlishvili, Levan; Ernst, Arthur; Zubizarreta, Xabier; Ostanin, Sergey; Mertig, Ingrid; Gross, Eberhard K. U.; Berakdar, Jamal

    2016-01-01

    We predict a fast domain wall (DW) motion induced by a thermal gradient across a nanoscopic ferromagnetic stripe of MnBi. The driving mechanism is an exchange torque fueled by magnon accumulation at the DWs. Depending on the thickness of the sample, both hot-to-cold and cold-to-hot DW motion directions are possible. The finding unveils an energy efficient way to manipulate DWs as an essential element in magnetic information processing such as racetrack memory. PMID:27076097

  11. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ENTITLED - DOMAIN WALL FERMIONS AT TEN YEARS (VOLUME 84)

    SciTech Connect

    BLUM,T.; SONI,A.

    2007-03-15

    The workshop was held to mark the 10th anniversary of the first numerical simulations of QCD using domain wall fermions initiated at BNL. It is very gratifying that in the intervening decade widespread use of domain wall and overlap fermions is being made. It therefore seemed appropriate at this stage for some ''communal introspection'' of the progress that has been made, hurdles that need to be overcome, and physics that can and should be done with chiral fermions. The meeting was very well attended, drawing about 60 registered participants primarily from Europe, Japan and the US. It was quite remarkable that pioneers David Kaplan, Herbert Neuberger, Rajamani Narayanan, Yigal Shamir, Sinya Aoki, and Pavlos Vranas all attended the workshop. Comparisons between domain wall and overlap formulations, with their respective advantages and limitations, were discussed at length, and a broad physics program including pion and kaon physics, the epsilon regime, nucleon structure, and topology, among others, emerged. New machines and improved algorithms have played a key role in realizing realistic dynamical fermion lattice simulations (small quark mass, large volume, and so on), so much in fact that measurements are now as costly. Consequently, ways to make the measurements more efficient were also discussed. We were very pleased to see the keen and ever growing interest in chiral fermions in our community and the significant strides our colleagues have made in bringing chiral fermions to the fore of lattice QCD calculations. Their contributions made the workshop a success, and we thank them deeply for sharing their time and ideas. Finally, we must especially acknowledge Norman Christ and Bob Mawhinney for their early and continued collaboration without which the success of domain wall fermions would not have been possible.

  12. Swift thermal steering of domain walls in ferromagnetic MnBi stripes.

    PubMed

    Sukhov, Alexander; Chotorlishvili, Levan; Ernst, Arthur; Zubizarreta, Xabier; Ostanin, Sergey; Mertig, Ingrid; Gross, Eberhard K U; Berakdar, Jamal

    2016-01-01

    We predict a fast domain wall (DW) motion induced by a thermal gradient across a nanoscopic ferromagnetic stripe of MnBi. The driving mechanism is an exchange torque fueled by magnon accumulation at the DWs. Depending on the thickness of the sample, both hot-to-cold and cold-to-hot DW motion directions are possible. The finding unveils an energy efficient way to manipulate DWs as an essential element in magnetic information processing such as racetrack memory. PMID:27076097

  13. Hadronic physics with domain-wall valence and improved staggered sea quarks

    SciTech Connect

    D. B. Renner; W. Schroers; R. Edwards; G. T. Fleming; Ph. Hagler; J. W. Negele; K. Orginos; A. V. Pochinski; D. Richards

    2004-06-01

    With the advent of chiral fermion formulations, the simulation of light valence quarks has finally become realistic for numerical simulations of lattice QCD. The simulation of light dynamical quarks, however, remains one of the major challenges and is still an obstacle to realistic simulations. We attempt to meet this challenge using a hybrid combination of Asqtad sea quarks and domain-wall valence quarks. Initial results for the proton form factor and the nucleon axial coupling are presented.

  14. Quantum Decay of the 'False Vacuum' and Pair Creation of Soliton Domain Walls

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, John H. Jr.

    2011-03-28

    Quantum decay of metastable states ('false vacua') has been proposed as a mechanism for bubble nucleation of new universes and phase transitions in the early universe. Experiments indicate the occurrence of false vacuum decay, within a region bounded by soliton domain walls that nucleate via quantum tunneling, in a highly anisotropic condensed matter system. This phenomenon provides a compelling example of false vacuum decay in the laboratory.

  15. Bottom hadrons from lattice QCD with domain wall and NRQCD fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan Meinel, William Detmold, C.-J. David Lin, Matthew Wingate

    2009-07-01

    Dynamical 2+1 flavor lattice QCD is used to calculate the masses of bottom hadrons, including B mesons, singly and doubly bottom baryons, and for the first time also the triply-bottom baryon Omega{sub bbb}. The domain wall action is used for the up-, down-, and strange quarks (both valence and sea), while the bottom quark is implemented with non-relativistic QCD. A calculation of the bottomonium spectrum is also presented.

  16. Swift thermal steering of domain walls in ferromagnetic MnBi stripes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhov, Alexander; Chotorlishvili, Levan; Ernst, Arthur; Zubizarreta, Xabier; Ostanin, Sergey; Mertig, Ingrid; Gross, Eberhard K. U.; Berakdar, Jamal

    2016-04-01

    We predict a fast domain wall (DW) motion induced by a thermal gradient across a nanoscopic ferromagnetic stripe of MnBi. The driving mechanism is an exchange torque fueled by magnon accumulation at the DWs. Depending on the thickness of the sample, both hot-to-cold and cold-to-hot DW motion directions are possible. The finding unveils an energy efficient way to manipulate DWs as an essential element in magnetic information processing such as racetrack memory.

  17. Domain wall motion effect on the anelastic behavior in lead zirconate titanate piezoelectric ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourim, El Mostafa; Tanaka, Hidehiko; Gabbay, Maurice; Fantozzi, Gilbert; Cheng, Bo Lin

    2002-05-01

    Three undoped lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics were prepared with compositions close to the morphotropic phase boundary: Pb(Zr0.50Ti0.50)O3, Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3, and Pb(Zr0.54Ti0.46)O3. Internal friction Q-1 and shear modulus G were measured versus temperature from 20 °C to 500 °C. Experiments were performed on an inverted torsional pendulum at low frequencies (0.1, 0.3, and 1 Hz). The ferroelectric-paraelectric phase transition results in a peak (P1) of Q-1 correlated with a sharp minimum M1 of G. Moreover the Q-1(T) curves show two relaxation peaks called R1 and R2 respectively, correlated with two shear modulus anomalies called A1 and A2 on the G(T) curves. The main features of the transition P1 peak are studied, they suggest that its behavior is similar to the internal friction peaks associated with martensitic transformation. The relaxation peak, R1 and R2 are both attributed to motion of domain walls (DWs), and can be analyzed by thermal activated process described by Arrhenius law. The R2 peak is demonstrated to be due to the interaction of domain walls and oxygen vacancies because it depends on oxygen vacancy concentration and electrical polarization. However, the R1 peak is more complex; its height is found to be increased as stress amplitude and heating rate increase. It seems that the R1 peak is influenced by three mechanisms: (i) relaxation due to DW-point defects interaction, (ii) variation of domain wall density, and (iii) domain wall depinning from point defect clusters.

  18. Δmix parameter in the overlap on domain-wall mixed action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lujan, M.; Alexandru, A.; Chen, Y.; Draper, T.; Freeman, W.; Gong, M.; Lee, F. X.; Li, A.; Liu, K. F.; Mathur, N.

    2012-07-01

    A direct calculation of the mixed action parameter Δmix with valence overlap fermions on a domain-wall fermion sea is presented. The calculation is performed on four ensembles of the 2+1 flavor domain-wall gauge configurations: 243×64 (aml=0.005, a=0.114fm) and 323×64 (aml=0.004, 0.006, 0.008, a=0.085fm). For pion masses close to 300 MeV we find Δmix=0.030(6)GeV4 at a=0.114fm and Δmix=0.033(12)GeV4 at a=0.085fm. The results are quite independent of the lattice spacing and they are significantly smaller than the results for valence domain-wall fermions on asqtad sea or those of valence overlap fermions on clover sea. Combining the results extracted from these two ensembles, we get Δmix=0.030(6)(5)GeV4, where the first error is statistical and the second is the systematic error associated with the fitting method.

  19. Depinning probability of a magnetic domain wall in nanowires by spin-polarized currents.

    PubMed

    Fukami, S; Yamanouchi, M; Ikeda, S; Ohno, H

    2013-01-01

    Current-induced magnetic domain wall motion is attractive for manipulating magnetization direction in spintronics devices, which open a new era of electronics. Up to now, in spite of a crucial significance to applications, investigation on a current-induced domain wall depinning probability, especially in sub-nano to a-few-nanosecond range has been lacking. Here we report on the probability of the depinning in perpendicularly magnetized Co/Ni nanowires in this timescale. A high depinning probability was obtained even for 2-ns pulses with a current density of less than 10¹² A m⁻². A one-dimensional Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert calculation taking into account thermal fluctuations reproduces well the experimental results. We also calculate the depinning probability as functions of various parameters and found that parameters other than the coercive field do not affect the transition width of the probability. These findings will allow one to design high-speed and reliable magnetic devices based on the domain wall motion. PMID:23945735

  20. All-electrical deterministic single domain wall generation for on-chip applications

    PubMed Central

    Guite, Chinkhanlun; Kerk, I. S.; Sekhar, M. Chandra; Ramu, M.; Goolaup, S.; Lew, W. S.

    2014-01-01

    Controlling domain wall (DW) generation and dynamics behaviour in ferromagnetic nanowire is critical to the engineering of domain wall-based non-volatile logic and magnetic memory devices. Previous research showed that DW generation suffered from a random or stochastic nature and that makes the realization of DW based device a challenging task. Conventionally, stabilizing a Néel DW requires a long pulsed current and the assistance of an external magnetic field. Here, we demonstrate a method to deterministically produce single DW without having to compromise the pulse duration. No external field is required to stabilize the DW. This is achieved by controlling the stray field magnetostatic interaction between a current-carrying strip line generated DW and the edge of the nanowire. The natural edge-field assisted domain wall generation process was found to be twice as fast as the conventional methods and requires less current density. Such deterministic DW generation method could potentially bring DW device technology, a step closer to on-chip application. PMID:25500734