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Sample records for fetal frontal cortex

  1. Sexual differentiation of mammalian frontal cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Maggi, A.; Zucchi, I.

    1987-03-23

    The pattern of distribution of the progesterone binding sites was examined in selected nuclei of the brain of male and female rat. In female rats the frontal cortex resulted to be the region with the highest concentration of /sup 3/H R5020 biding sites. However, in male rats the same region showed very little progestin binding activity. When female rats were androgenized via neonatal exposure to testosterone, the progestin binding activity of the frontal cortex became similar to that observed in male rats. The present investigation indicates that sexual differentiation of the rat brain may include also brain regions not clearly involved in sex related functions like the frontal cortex. 30 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  2. The scaling of frontal cortex in primates and carnivores

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Eliot C.; Allman, John M.

    2004-01-01

    Size has a profound effect on the structure of the brain. Many brain structures scale allometrically, that is, their relative size changes systematically as a function of brain size. Here we use independent contrasts analysis to examine the scaling of frontal cortex in 43 species of mammals including 25 primates and 15 carnivores. We find evidence for significant differences in scaling between primates and carnivores. Primate frontal cortex hyperscales relative to the rest of neocortex and the rest of the brain. The slope of frontal cortex contrasts on rest of cortex contrasts is 1.18 (95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.30) for primates, which is significantly greater than isometric. It is also significantly greater than the carnivore value of 0.94 (95% confidence interval, 0.82-1.07). This finding supports the idea that there are substantial differences in frontal cortex structure and development between the two groups. PMID:15007170

  3. Frontal cortex mediates unconsciously triggered inhibitory control.

    PubMed

    van Gaal, Simon; Ridderinkhof, K Richard; Fahrenfort, Johannes J; Scholte, H Steven; Lamme, Victor A F

    2008-08-01

    To further our understanding of the function of conscious experience we need to know which cognitive processes require awareness and which do not. Here, we show that an unconscious stimulus can trigger inhibitory control processes, commonly ascribed to conscious control mechanisms. We combined the metacontrast masking paradigm and the Go/No-Go paradigm to study whether unconscious No-Go signals can actively trigger high-level inhibitory control processes, strongly associated with the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Behaviorally, unconscious No-Go signals sometimes triggered response inhibition to the level of complete response termination and yielded a slow down in the speed of responses that were not inhibited. Electroencephalographic recordings showed that unconscious No-Go signals elicit two neural events: (1) an early occipital event and (2) a frontocentral event somewhat later in time. The first neural event represents the visual encoding of the unconscious No-Go stimulus, and is also present in a control experiment where the masked stimulus has no behavioral relevance. The second event is unique to the Go/No-Go experiment, and shows the subsequent implementation of inhibitory control in the PFC. The size of the frontal activity pattern correlated highly with the impact of unconscious No-Go signals on subsequent behavior. We conclude that unconscious stimuli can influence whether a task will be performed or interrupted, and thus exert a form of cognitive control. These findings challenge traditional views concerning the proposed relationship between awareness and cognitive control and stretch the alleged limits and depth of unconscious information processing. PMID:18685030

  4. The Organization of Dorsal Frontal Cortex in Humans and Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Mars, Rogier B.; Noonan, MaryAnn P.; Neubert, Franz-Xaver; Jbabdi, Saad; O'Reilly, Jill X.; Filippini, Nicola; Thomas, Adam G.; Rushworth, Matthew F.

    2013-01-01

    The human dorsal frontal cortex has been associated with the most sophisticated aspects of cognition, including those that are thought to be especially refined in humans. Here we used diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) and functional MRI (fMRI) in humans and macaques to infer and compare the organization of dorsal frontal cortex in the two species. Using DW-MRI tractography-based parcellation, we identified 10 dorsal frontal regions lying between the human inferior frontal sulcus and cingulate cortex. Patterns of functional coupling between each area and the rest of the brain were then estimated with fMRI and compared with functional coupling patterns in macaques. Areas in human medial frontal cortex, including areas associated with high-level social cognitive processes such as theory of mind, showed a surprising degree of similarity in their functional coupling patterns with the frontal pole, medial prefrontal, and dorsal prefrontal convexity in the macaque. We failed to find evidence for “new” regions in human medial frontal cortex. On the lateral surface, comparison of functional coupling patterns suggested correspondences in anatomical organization distinct from those that are widely assumed. A human region sometimes referred to as lateral frontal pole more closely resembled area 46, rather than the frontal pole, of the macaque. Overall the pattern of results suggest important similarities in frontal cortex organization in humans and other primates, even in the case of regions thought to carry out uniquely human functions. The patterns of interspecies correspondences are not, however, always those that are widely assumed. PMID:23884933

  5. Specialized cortical subnetworks differentially connect frontal cortex to parahippocampal areas.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Yasuharu; Morishima, Mieko; Karube, Fuyuki; Kawaguchi, Yasuo

    2012-02-01

    How information is manipulated and segregated within local circuits in the frontal cortex remains mysterious, in part because of inadequate knowledge regarding the connectivity of diverse pyramidal cell subtypes. The frontal cortex participates in the formation and retrieval of declarative memories through projections to the perirhinal cortex, and in procedural learning through projections to the striatum/pontine nuclei. In rat frontal cortex, we identified two pyramidal cell subtypes selectively projecting to distinct subregions of perirhinal cortex (PRC). PRC-projecting cells in upper layer 2/3 (L2/3) of the frontal cortex projected to perirhinal area 35, while neurons in L5 innervated perirhinal area 36. L2/3 PRC-projecting cells partially overlapped with those projecting to the basolateral amygdala. L5 PRC-projecting cells partially overlapped with crossed corticostriatal cells, but were distinct from neighboring corticothalamic (CTh)/corticopontine cells. L5 PRC-projecting and CTh cells were different in their electrophysiological properties and dendritic/axonal morphologies. Within the frontal cortex, L2/3 PRC-projecting cells innervated L5 PRC-projecting and CTh cells with similar probabilities, but received feedback excitation only from PRC-projecting cells. These data suggest that specific neuron subtypes in different cortical layers are reciprocally excited via interlaminar loops. Thus, two interacting output channels send information from the frontal cortex to different hierarchical stages of the parahippocampal network, areas 35 and 36, with additional collaterals selectively targeting the amygdala or basal ganglia, respectively. Combined with the hierarchical connectivity of PRC-projecting and CTh cells, these observations demonstrate an exquisite diversification of frontal projection neurons selectively connected according to their participation in distinct memory subsystems. PMID:22302828

  6. Mechanisms of spatial attention control in frontal and parietal cortex.

    PubMed

    Szczepanski, Sara M; Konen, Christina S; Kastner, Sabine

    2010-01-01

    Theories of spatial attentional control have been largely based upon studies of patients suffering from visuospatial neglect, resulting from circumscribed lesions of frontal and posterior parietal cortex. In the intact brain, the control of spatial attention has been related to a distributed frontoparietal attention network. Little is known about the nature of the control mechanisms exerted by this network. Here, we used a novel region-of-interest approach to relate activations of the attention network to recently described topographic areas in frontal cortex [frontal eye field (FEF), PreCC/IFS (precentral cortex/inferior frontal sulcus)] and parietal cortex [intraparietal sulcus areas (IPS1-IPS5) and an area in the superior parietal lobule (SPL1)] to examine their spatial attention signals. We found that attention signals in most topographic areas were spatially specific, with stronger responses when attention was directed to the contralateral than to the ipsilateral visual field. Importantly, two hemispheric asymmetries were found. First, a region in only right, but not left SPL1 carried spatial attention signals. Second, left FEF and left posterior parietal cortex (IPS1/2) generated stronger contralateral biasing signals than their counterparts in the right hemisphere. These findings are the first to characterize spatial attention signals in topographic frontal and parietal cortex and provide a neural basis in support of an interhemispheric competition account of spatial attentional control. PMID:20053897

  7. Causal evidence for frontal cortex organization for perceptual decision making.

    PubMed

    Rahnev, Dobromir; Nee, Derek Evan; Riddle, Justin; Larson, Alina Sue; D'Esposito, Mark

    2016-05-24

    Although recent research has shown that the frontal cortex has a critical role in perceptual decision making, an overarching theory of frontal functional organization for perception has yet to emerge. Perceptual decision making is temporally organized such that it requires the processes of selection, criterion setting, and evaluation. We hypothesized that exploring this temporal structure would reveal a large-scale frontal organization for perception. A causal intervention with transcranial magnetic stimulation revealed clear specialization along the rostrocaudal axis such that the control of successive stages of perceptual decision making was selectively affected by perturbation of successively rostral areas. Simulations with a dynamic model of decision making suggested distinct computational contributions of each region. Finally, the emergent frontal gradient was further corroborated by functional MRI. These causal results provide an organizational principle for the role of frontal cortex in the control of perceptual decision making and suggest specific mechanistic contributions for its different subregions. PMID:27162349

  8. Causal evidence for frontal cortex organization for perceptual decision making

    PubMed Central

    Nee, Derek Evan; Riddle, Justin; Larson, Alina Sue; D’Esposito, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Although recent research has shown that the frontal cortex has a critical role in perceptual decision making, an overarching theory of frontal functional organization for perception has yet to emerge. Perceptual decision making is temporally organized such that it requires the processes of selection, criterion setting, and evaluation. We hypothesized that exploring this temporal structure would reveal a large-scale frontal organization for perception. A causal intervention with transcranial magnetic stimulation revealed clear specialization along the rostrocaudal axis such that the control of successive stages of perceptual decision making was selectively affected by perturbation of successively rostral areas. Simulations with a dynamic model of decision making suggested distinct computational contributions of each region. Finally, the emergent frontal gradient was further corroborated by functional MRI. These causal results provide an organizational principle for the role of frontal cortex in the control of perceptual decision making and suggest specific mechanistic contributions for its different subregions. PMID:27162349

  9. Changes in rat frontal cortex gene expression following chronic cocaine.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Willard M; Brebner, Karen; Lynch, Wendy J; Patel, Kruti M; Robertson, Daniel J; Roberts, David C S; Vrana, Kent E

    2002-07-15

    Alterations in gene expression caused by repeated cocaine administration have been implicated in the long-term behavioral aspects of cocaine abuse. The frontal cortex mediates reinforcement, sensory, associative, and executive functions and plays an important role in the mesocortical dopamine reinforcement system. Repeated cocaine administration causes changes in frontal cortex gene expression that may lead to changes in the behaviors subserved by this brain region. Rats treated non-contingently with a binge model of cocaine (45 mg/kg/day, i.p.) for 14 days were screened for changes in relative mRNA abundance in the frontal cortex by cDNA hybridization arrays. To confirm changes, immunoreactive protein was measured (via protein-specific immunoblots) in a second group of identically-treated animals. Protein levels of protein tyrosine kinase 2 (PYK2), activity-regulated cytoskeletal protein (ARC), as well as an antigen related to nerve growth factor I-B (NGFI-B-RA) were shown to be significantly induced after cocaine administration. Levels of NGFI-B mRNA were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR to be increased with cocaine administration. These observations are similar to previously reported cocaine-responsive changes in gene expression but novel to the frontal cortex. This study also validates the use of hybridization arrays for screening of neuronal gene expression changes and the utility of relative protein quantification as a post-hoc confirmation tool. PMID:12117546

  10. Orbito-Frontal Cortex Is Necessary for Temporal Context Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duarte, Audrey; Henson, Richard N.; Knight, Robert T.; Emery, Tina; Graham, Kim S.

    2010-01-01

    Lesion and neuroimaging studies suggest that orbito-frontal cortex (OFC) supports temporal aspects of episodic memory. However, it is unclear whether OFC contributes to the encoding and/or retrieval of temporal context and whether it is selective for temporal relative to nontemporal (spatial) context memory. We addressed this issue with two…

  11. Role of Frontal Cortex in Attentional Capture by Singleton Distractors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Fockert, Jan W.; Theeuwes, Jan

    2012-01-01

    The role of frontal cortex in selective attention to visual distractors was examined in an attentional capture task in which participants searched for a unique shape in the presence or absence of an additional colour singleton distractor. The presence of the additional singleton was associated with slower behavioural responses to the shape target,…

  12. Frontal cortex BOLD signal changes in premanifest Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Ferraro, Stefania; Piacentini, Sylvie; Mandelli, Maria L.; Bertolino, Nicola; Ghielmetti, Francesco; Epifani, Francesca; Nigri, Anna; Taroni, Franco; Bruzzone, Maria G.; Donato, Stefano Di; Savoiardo, Mario; Mariotti, Caterina; Grisoli, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To identify a possible functional imaging biomarker sensitive to the earliest neural changes in premanifest Huntington disease (preHD), allowing early therapeutic approaches aimed at preventing or delaying clinical onset. Methods: Sixteen preHD and 18 healthy participants were submitted to anatomical acquisitions and functional MRI (fMRI) acquisitions during the execution of the exogenous covert orienting of attention task. Due to strong a priori hypothesis, all fMRI correlation analyses were restricted to the following: (1) the frontal oculomotor cortex identified by the means of a prosaccadic task, comprising frontal eye fields and supplementary frontal eye fields; and (2) the data collected during inhibition of return, a phenomenon occurring during the executed task. In preHD, multiple regression analysis was performed between fMRI data and the probability to develop the disease in the next 5 years (p5HD). Moreover, mean blood oxygen level–dependent (BOLD) signal changes in the frontal oculomotor cortex and striatal volumes were linearly correlated with p5HD. Results: In preHD, multiple regression analysis showed that clusters of activity strongly correlated with p5HD in the right frontal oculomotor cortex. Importantly, mean BOLD signal changes of this region correlated with p5HD (r2 = 0.52). Among the considered striatal volumes, a modest correlation (r2 = 0.29) was observed in the right putamen and p5HD. Conclusion: fMRI activations in the right-frontal oculomotor cortex during inhibition of return can be considered a possible functional imaging biomarker in preHD. PMID:24898924

  13. Responses of primate frontal cortex neurons during natural vocal communication

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, A. Wren; Nummela, Samuel U.; de la Mothe, Lisa A.

    2015-01-01

    The role of primate frontal cortex in vocal communication and its significance in language evolution have a controversial history. While evidence indicates that vocalization processing occurs in ventrolateral prefrontal cortex neurons, vocal-motor activity has been conjectured to be primarily subcortical and suggestive of a distinctly different neural architecture from humans. Direct evidence of neural activity during natural vocal communication is limited, as previous studies were performed in chair-restrained animals. Here we recorded the activity of single neurons across multiple regions of prefrontal and premotor cortex while freely moving marmosets engaged in a natural vocal behavior known as antiphonal calling. Our aim was to test whether neurons in marmoset frontal cortex exhibited responses during vocal-signal processing and/or vocal-motor production in the context of active, natural communication. We observed motor-related changes in single neuron activity during vocal production, but relatively weak sensory responses for vocalization processing during this natural behavior. Vocal-motor responses occurred both prior to and during call production and were typically coupled to the timing of each vocalization pulse. Despite the relatively weak sensory responses a population classifier was able to distinguish between neural activity that occurred during presentations of vocalization stimuli that elicited an antiphonal response and those that did not. These findings are suggestive of the role that nonhuman primate frontal cortex neurons play in natural communication and provide an important foundation for more explicit tests of the functional contributions of these neocortical areas during vocal behaviors. PMID:26084912

  14. Modulation of Orthographic Decoding by Frontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Whaley, Meagan Lee; Kadipasaoglu, Cihan Mehmet; Cox, Steven James

    2016-01-01

    Opinions are divided on whether word reading processes occur in a hierarchical, feedforward fashion or within an interactive framework. To critically evaluate these competing theories, we recorded electrocorticographic (ECoG) data from 15 human patients with intractable epilepsy during a word completion task and evaluated brain network dynamics across individuals. We used a novel technique of analyzing multihuman ECoG recordings to identify cortical regions most relevant to processing lexical information. The mid fusiform gyrus showed the strongest, earliest response after stimulus onset, whereas activity was maximal in frontal, dorsal lateral prefrontal, and sensorimotor regions toward articulation onset. To evaluate interregional functional connectivity, ECoG data from electrodes situated over specific cortical regions of interest were fit into linear multivariate autoregressive (MVAR) models. Spectral characteristics of the MVAR models were used to precisely reveal the timing and the magnitude of information flow between localized brain regions. This is the first application of MVAR for developing a comprehensive account of interregional interactions from a word reading ECoG dataset. Our comprehensive findings revealed both top-down and bottom-up influences between higher-level language areas and the mid fusiform gyrus. Our findings thus challenge strictly hierarchical, feedforward views of word reading and suggest that orthographic processes are modulated by prefrontal and sensorimotor regions via an interactive framework. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Word reading is a critical part of everyday life. When the ability to read is disrupted, it can lead to learning disorders, as well as emotional and academic difficulties. The neural mechanisms underlying word reading are not well understood due to limitations in the spatial and temporal specificity of prior word reading studies. Our research analyzed data recorded from sensors implanted directly from surface of human

  15. Frontal cortex and the discovery of abstract action rules

    PubMed Central

    Badre, David; Kayser, Andrew S.; D’Esposito, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Summary Although we often encounter circumstances with which we have no prior experience, we rapidly learn how to behave in these novel situations. Such adaptive behavior relies on abstract behavioral rules that are generalizable, rather than concrete rules mapping specific cues to specific responses. Though the frontal cortex is known to support concrete rule learning, less well understood are the neural mechanisms supporting the acquisition of abstract rules. Here we use a novel reinforcement learning paradigm to demonstrate that more anterior regions along the rostro-caudal axis of frontal cortex support rule learning at higher levels of abstraction. Moreover, these results indicate that when humans confront new rule learning problems, this rostro-caudal division of labor supports the search for relationships between context and action at multiple levels of abstraction simultaneously. PMID:20435006

  16. FRONTAL AND PARIETAL CORTEX CONTRIBUTIONS TO ACTION MODIFICATION

    PubMed Central

    Mutha, Pratik K.; Stapp, Lee H.; Sainburg, Robert L.; Haaland, Kathleen Y.

    2014-01-01

    Successful achievement of task goals depends critically on the ability to adjust ongoing actions in response to environmental changes. The neural substrates underlying action modification have been a topic of great controversy: both, posterior parietal cortex and frontal regions, particularly prefrontal cortex have been previously identified as crucial in this regard, with most studies arguing in favor of one or the other. We aimed to address this controversy and understand whether frontal and parietal regions might play distinct roles during action modification. We tested ipsilesional arm performance of 27 stroke patients with focal lesions to frontal or parietal regions of the left or right cerebral hemisphere, and left or right arm performance of 18 healthy subjects on the classic double-step task in which a target is unpredictably displaced to a new location, requiring modification of the ongoing action. Only right hemisphere frontal lesions adversely impacted the timing of initiation of the modified response, while only left hemisphere parietal lesions impaired the accuracy of the modified action. Patients with right frontal lesions tended to complete the ongoing action to the initially displayed baseline target and initiated the new movement after a significant delay. In contrast, patients with left parietal damage did not accurately reach the new target location, but compared to the other groups, initiated the new action during an earlier phase of motion, before their baseline action was complete. Our findings thus suggest distinct, hemisphere specific contributions of frontal and parietal regions to action modification, and bring together, for the first time, disparate sets of prior findings about its underlying neural substrates. PMID:24763127

  17. Learning a New Selection Rule in Visual and Frontal Cortex.

    PubMed

    van der Togt, Chris; Stănişor, Liviu; Pooresmaeili, Arezoo; Albantakis, Larissa; Deco, Gustavo; Roelfsema, Pieter R

    2016-08-01

    How do you make a decision if you do not know the rules of the game? Models of sensory decision-making suggest that choices are slow if evidence is weak, but they may only apply if the subject knows the task rules. Here, we asked how the learning of a new rule influences neuronal activity in the visual (area V1) and frontal cortex (area FEF) of monkeys. We devised a new icon-selection task. On each day, the monkeys saw 2 new icons (small pictures) and learned which one was relevant. We rewarded eye movements to a saccade target connected to the relevant icon with a curve. Neurons in visual and frontal cortex coded the monkey's choice, because the representation of the selected curve was enhanced. Learning delayed the neuronal selection signals and we uncovered the cause of this delay in V1, where learning to select the relevant icon caused an early suppression of surrounding image elements. These results demonstrate that the learning of a new rule causes a transition from fast and random decisions to a more considerate strategy that takes additional time and they reveal the contribution of visual and frontal cortex to the learning process. PMID:27269960

  18. Learning a New Selection Rule in Visual and Frontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    van der Togt, Chris; Stănişor, Liviu; Pooresmaeili, Arezoo; Albantakis, Larissa; Deco, Gustavo; Roelfsema, Pieter R.

    2016-01-01

    How do you make a decision if you do not know the rules of the game? Models of sensory decision-making suggest that choices are slow if evidence is weak, but they may only apply if the subject knows the task rules. Here, we asked how the learning of a new rule influences neuronal activity in the visual (area V1) and frontal cortex (area FEF) of monkeys. We devised a new icon-selection task. On each day, the monkeys saw 2 new icons (small pictures) and learned which one was relevant. We rewarded eye movements to a saccade target connected to the relevant icon with a curve. Neurons in visual and frontal cortex coded the monkey's choice, because the representation of the selected curve was enhanced. Learning delayed the neuronal selection signals and we uncovered the cause of this delay in V1, where learning to select the relevant icon caused an early suppression of surrounding image elements. These results demonstrate that the learning of a new rule causes a transition from fast and random decisions to a more considerate strategy that takes additional time and they reveal the contribution of visual and frontal cortex to the learning process. PMID:27269960

  19. Cascade of neural processing orchestrates cognitive control in human frontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hanlin; Yu, Hsiang-Yu; Chou, Chien-Chen; Crone, Nathan E; Madsen, Joseph R; Anderson, William S; Kreiman, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Rapid and flexible interpretation of conflicting sensory inputs in the context of current goals is a critical component of cognitive control that is orchestrated by frontal cortex. The relative roles of distinct subregions within frontal cortex are poorly understood. To examine the dynamics underlying cognitive control across frontal regions, we took advantage of the spatiotemporal resolution of intracranial recordings in epilepsy patients while subjects resolved color-word conflict. We observed differential activity preceding the behavioral responses to conflict trials throughout frontal cortex; this activity was correlated with behavioral reaction times. These signals emerged first in anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) before dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC), followed by medial frontal cortex (mFC) and then by orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). These results disassociate the frontal subregions based on their dynamics, and suggest a temporal hierarchy for cognitive control in human cortex. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12352.001 PMID:26888070

  20. Occipital cortex of blind individuals is functionally coupled with executive control areas of frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Deen, Ben; Saxe, Rebecca; Bedny, Marina

    2015-08-01

    In congenital blindness, the occipital cortex responds to a range of nonvisual inputs, including tactile, auditory, and linguistic stimuli. Are these changes in functional responses to stimuli accompanied by altered interactions with nonvisual functional networks? To answer this question, we introduce a data-driven method that searches across cortex for functional connectivity differences across groups. Replicating prior work, we find increased fronto-occipital functional connectivity in congenitally blind relative to blindfolded sighted participants. We demonstrate that this heightened connectivity extends over most of occipital cortex but is specific to a subset of regions in the inferior, dorsal, and medial frontal lobe. To assess the functional profile of these frontal areas, we used an n-back working memory task and a sentence comprehension task. We find that, among prefrontal areas with overconnectivity to occipital cortex, one left inferior frontal region responds to language over music. By contrast, the majority of these regions responded to working memory load but not language. These results suggest that in blindness occipital cortex interacts more with working memory systems and raise new questions about the function and mechanism of occipital plasticity. PMID:25803598

  1. Frontal cortex functioning in the infant broader autism phenotype.

    PubMed

    Holmboe, Karla; Elsabbagh, Mayada; Volein, Agnes; Tucker, Leslie A; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Bolton, Patrick; Charman, Tony; Johnson, Mark H

    2010-12-01

    Atypical attention has been proposed as a marker of the broader autism phenotype. In the present study we investigated this and the related process of inhibitory control at the youngest possible age through the study of infant siblings of children with an autism spectrum disorder (Sibs-ASD). Both attention and inhibition have been related to the frontal cortex of the brain. Nine- to ten-month-old Sibs-ASD and low-risk control infants completed the Freeze-Frame task, in which infants are encouraged to inhibit looks to peripherally presented distractors whilst looking at a central animation. The attractiveness of the central stimulus is varied in order to investigate the selectivity of infants' responses. In line with previous studies, it was found that a subset of Sibs-ASD infants had difficulty disengaging attention from a central stimulus in order to orient to a peripheral stimulus. The Sibs-ASD group also showed less Selective Inhibition than controls. However, Sibs-ASD infants did demonstrate Selective Inhibitory Learning. These results provide preliminary evidence for atypical frontal cortex functioning in the infant broader autism phenotype. PMID:20609478

  2. A Method for Recording Single-cell Activity in the Frontal Pole Cortex of Macaque Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Mitz, Andrew R.; Tsujimoto, Satoshi; MacLarty, Arthur J.; Wise, Steven P.

    2009-01-01

    Neurophysiological research has explored most of the prefrontal cortex of macaque monkeys, but the relatively inaccessible frontal pole cortex remains unexamined. Here we describe a method for gaining access to the frontal pole cortex with moveable microelectrodes. The key innovation is a direct approach through the frontal air sinus. In addition, the small size of the frontal pole cortex in macaques led to the design of a smaller recording chamber than typically used in behavioral neurophysiology. The method has proven successful in two subjects, with no adverse health consequences. PMID:18977387

  3. Giant cell glioblastoma in the frontal cortex of a dog.

    PubMed

    Uchida, K; Kuroki, K; Priosoeryanto, B P; Kato, K; Yano, Y; Murakami, T; Yamaguchi, R; Tateyama, S

    1995-03-01

    A dark gray mass 3 cm in diameter replacing the right frontal cortex was found in the brain of a 5-year-old male Doberman Pinscher dog at necropsy. Microscopic studies revealed that the mass consisted of a proliferation of pleomorphic tumor cells: large bizarre or plump eosinophilic cells, multinucleated giant cells, and small lymphocytic cells. These neoplastic cells at the margin of the necrotic area had a psuedopalisade arrangement and tended to proliferate around blood vessels. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells reacted intensely with the antibody for vimentin and moderately with those for S-100 and glial fibrillary acidic protein. This canine tumor is placed in the category of glioblastoma or undifferentiated astrocytoma, which is analogous to human giant cell glioblastoma. PMID:7771064

  4. Neuronal reference frames for social decisions in primate frontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Steve W. C.; Gariépy, Jean-Francois; Platt, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    Social decisions play a crucial role in the success of individuals and the groups they compose. Group members respond vicariously to benefits obtained by others, and impairments in this capacity contribute to neuropsychiatric disorders like autism and sociopathy. We studied how neurons in three frontal cortical areas encode the outcomes of social decisions as monkeys performed a reward-allocation task. Neurons in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) predominantly encoded rewards delivered to oneself. Neurons in the anterior cingulate gyrus (ACCg) encoded reward allocations to the other monkey, reward allocations to oneself, or both. Neurons in the anterior cingulate sulcus (ACCs) signaled reward allocations to the other monkey or no one. Within this network of received (OFC) and foregone (ACCs) reward signaling, ACCg emerges as a key nexus for the computation of shared experience and social reward. Individual and species-specific variations in social decision-making might result from the relative activation and influence of these areas. PMID:23263442

  5. Human Medial Frontal Cortex Mediates Unconscious Inhibition of Voluntary Action

    PubMed Central

    Sumner, Petroc; Nachev, Parashkev; Morris, Peter; Peters, Andrew M.; Jackson, Stephen R.; Kennard, Christopher; Husain, Masud

    2007-01-01

    Summary Within the medial frontal cortex, the supplementary eye field (SEF), supplementary motor area (SMA), and pre-SMA have been implicated in the control of voluntary action, especially during motor sequences or tasks involving rapid choices between competing response plans. However, the precise roles of these areas remain controversial. Here, we study two extremely rare patients with microlesions of the SEF and SMA to demonstrate that these areas are critically involved in unconscious and involuntary motor control. We employed masked-prime stimuli that evoked automatic inhibition in healthy people and control patients with lateral premotor or pre-SMA damage. In contrast, our SEF/SMA patients showed a complete reversal of the normal inhibitory effect—ocular or manual—corresponding to the functional subregion lesioned. These findings imply that the SEF and SMA mediate automatic effector-specific suppression of motor plans. This automatic mechanism may contribute to the participation of these areas in the voluntary control of action. PMID:17553420

  6. Microcircuitry of agranular frontal cortex: contrasting laminar connectivity between occipital and frontal areas.

    PubMed

    Ninomiya, Taihei; Dougherty, Kacie; Godlove, David C; Schall, Jeffrey D; Maier, Alexander

    2015-05-01

    Neocortex is striking in its laminar architecture. Tracer studies have uncovered anatomical connectivity among laminae, but the functional connectivity between laminar compartments is still largely unknown. Such functional connectivity can be discerned through spontaneous neural correlations during rest. Previous work demonstrated a robust pattern of mesoscopic resting-state connectivity in macaque primary visual cortex (V1) through interlaminar cross-frequency coupling. Here we investigated whether this pattern generalizes to other cortical areas by comparing resting-state laminar connectivity between V1 and the supplementary eye field (SEF), a frontal area lacking a granular layer 4 (L4). Local field potentials (LFPs) were recorded with linear microelectrode arrays from all laminae of granular V1 and agranular SEF while monkeys rested in darkness. We found substantial differences in the relationship between the amplitude of gamma-band (>30 Hz) LFP and the phase of alpha-band (7-14 Hz) LFP between these areas. In V1, gamma amplitudes in L2/3 and L5 were coupled with alpha-band LFP phase in L5, as previously described. In contrast, in SEF phase-amplitude coupling was prominent within L3 and much weaker across layers. These results suggest that laminar interactions in agranular SEF are unlike those in granular V1. Thus the intrinsic functional connectivity of the cortical microcircuit does not seem to generalize across cortical areas. PMID:25744881

  7. Facilitated lexical ambiguity processing by transcranial direct current stimulation over the left inferior frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Aya S; Mimura, Takanori; Soshi, Takahiro; Yorifuji, Shiro; Hirata, Masayuki; Goto, Tetsu; Yoshinime, Toshiki; Umehara, Hiroaki; Fujimaki, Norio

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that the left inferior frontal cortex is involved in the resolution of lexical ambiguities for language comprehension. In this study, we hypothesized that processing of lexical ambiguities is improved when the excitability of the left inferior frontal cortex is enhanced. To test the hypothesis, we conducted an experiment with transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). We investigated the effect of anodal tDCS over the left inferior frontal cortex on behavioral indexes for semantic judgment on lexically ambiguous and unambiguous words within a context. Supporting the hypothesis, the RT was shorter in the anodal tDCS session than in the sham session for ambiguous words. The results suggest that controlled semantic retrieval and contextual selection were facilitated by anodal tDCS over the left inferior frontal cortex. PMID:25208744

  8. Plasticity and Functions of the Orbital Frontal Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Bryan; Pellis, Sergio; Robinson, Terry E.

    2004-01-01

    We compare the effects of psychoactive drugs such as morphine and amphetamine on the synaptic organization of neurons in the orbital frontal (OFC) and medial frontal (mPFC) regions in the rat. Both regions are altered chronically by exposure to intermittent doses of either drug but the effects are area-dependent. For example, whereas morphine…

  9. The differing roles of the frontal cortex in fluency tests

    PubMed Central

    Shallice, Tim; Bozzali, Marco; Cipolotti, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Fluency tasks have been widely used to tap the voluntary generation of responses. The anatomical correlates of fluency tasks and their sensitivity and specificity have been hotly debated. However, investigation of the cognitive processes involved in voluntary generation of responses and whether generation is supported by a common, general process (e.g. fluid intelligence) or specific cognitive processes underpinned by particular frontal regions has rarely been addressed. This study investigates a range of verbal and non-verbal fluency tasks in patients with unselected focal frontal (n = 47) and posterior (n = 20) lesions. Patients and controls (n = 35) matched for education, age and sex were administered fluency tasks including word (phonemic/semantic), design, gesture and ideational fluency as well as background cognitive tests. Lesions were analysed by standard anterior/posterior and left/right frontal subdivisions as well as a finer-grained frontal localization method. Thus, patients with right and left lateral lesions were compared to patients with superior medial lesions. The results show that all eight fluency tasks are sensitive to frontal lobe damage although only the phonemic word and design fluency tasks were specific to the frontal region. Superior medial patients were the only group to be impaired on all eight fluency tasks, relative to controls, consistent with an energization deficit. The most marked fluency deficits for lateral patients were along material specific lines (i.e. left—phonemic and right—design). Phonemic word fluency that requires greater selection was most severely impaired following left inferior frontal damage. Overall, our results support the notion that frontal functions comprise a set of specialized cognitive processes, supported by distinct frontal regions. PMID:22669082

  10. Association fiber pathways to the frontal cortex from the superior temporal region in the rhesus monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Petrides, M.; Pandya, D.N.

    1988-07-01

    The projections to the frontal cortex that originate from the various areas of the superior temporal region of the rhesus monkey were investigated with the autoradiographic technique. The results demonstrated that the rostral part of the superior temporal gyrus (areas Pro, Ts1, and Ts2) projects to the proisocortical areas of the orbital and medial frontal cortex, as well as to the nearby orbital areas 13, 12, and 11, and to medial areas 9, 10, and 14. These fibers travel to the frontal lobe as part of the uncinate fascicle. The middle part of the superior temporal gyrus (areas Ts3 and paAlt) projects predominantly to the lateral frontal cortex (areas 12, upper 46, and 9) and to the dorsal aspect of the medial frontal lobe (areas 9 and 10). Only a small number of these fibers terminated within the orbitofrontal cortex. The temporofrontal fibers originating from the middle part of the superior temporal gyrus occupy the lower portion of the extreme capsule and lie just dorsal to the fibers of the uncinate fascicle. The posterior part of the superior temporal gyrus projects to the lateral frontal cortex (area 46, dorsal area 8, and the rostralmost part of dorsal area 6). Some of the fibers from the posterior superior temporal gyrus run initially through the extreme capsule and then cross the claustrum as they ascend to enter the external capsule before continuing their course to the frontal lobe. A larger group of fibers curves round the caudalmost Sylvian fissure and travels to the frontal cortex occupying a position just above and medial to the upper branch of the circular sulcus. This latter pathway constitutes a part of the classically described arcuate fasciculus.

  11. Ventral frontal cortex functions and quantified MRI in traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Esther; Schwartz, Michael L.; Gao, Fuqiang; Black, Sandra E.; Levine, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Ventral frontal cortex is commonly involved in traumatic brain injury (TBI). The Smell Identification Test (SIT), Object Alternation (OA), and the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) are associated with this brain region in experimental and neuropsychological research. We examined the relationship of performance on these tests to residual structural brain integrity quantified from MRI in 58 TBI patients, including 18 patients with focal cortical contusions and 40 patients with diffuse injury only. Image analysis yielded regional volumetric measures of gray matter, white matter and cerebrospinal fluid. Multivariate analyses identified distributed patterns of regional volume loss associated with test performance across all three behavioral measures. The tasks were sensitive to effects of TBI. In multivariate analyses, performance in all three tasks was related to gray matter loss including ventral frontal cortex, but the SIT was most sensitive to ventral frontal cortex damage, even in patients without focal lesions. The SIT was further related to temporal lobe and posterior cingulate/retrosplenial volumes. OA and the IGT were associated with superior medial frontal volumes. Complex tasks, such as OA and the IGT, do not consistently localize to a single cortical region. The SIT is associated with the integrity of ventral frontal regions, but it is also affected by distributed damage, although the contribution of undetected olfactory tract or bulb damage could not be ruled out. This study illustrates the scope and limitations of functional localization in human ventral frontal cortex. PMID:17976665

  12. Vulnerability of the Medial Frontal Corticospinal Projection Accompanies Combined Lateral Frontal and Parietal Cortex Injury in Rhesus Monkey

    PubMed Central

    Morecraft, R.J.; Ge, J.; Stilwell-Morecraft, K.S.; McNeal, D.W.; Hynes, S.M.; Pizzimenti, M.A.; Rotella, D.L.; Darling, W.G.

    2014-01-01

    Concurrent damage to the lateral frontal and parietal cortex is common following middle cerebral artery infarction leading to upper extremity paresis, paresthesia and sensory loss. Motor recovery is often poor and the mechanisms that support, or impede this process are unclear. Since the medial wall of the cerebral hemisphere is commonly spared following stroke, we investigated the long-term (6 and 12 month) effects of lateral frontoparietal injury (F2P2 lesion) on the terminal distribution of the corticospinal projection (CSP) from intact, ipsilesional supplementary motor cortex (M2) at spinal levels C5 to T1. Isolated injury to the frontoparietal arm/hand region resulted in a significant loss of contralateral corticospinal boutons from M2 compared to controls. Specifically, reductions occurred in the medial and lateral parts of lamina VII and the dorsal quadrants of lamina IX. There were no statistical differences in the ipsilateral corticospinal projection. Contrary to isolated lateral frontal motor injury (F2 lesion) which results in substantial increases in contralateral M2 labeling in laminae VII and IX (McNeal et al., Journal of Comparative Neurology 518:586-621, 2010), the added effect of adjacent parietal cortex injury to the frontal motor lesion (F2P2 lesion) not only impedes a favorable compensatory neuroplastic response, but results in a substantial loss of M2 CSP terminals. This dramatic reversal of the CSP response suggests a critical trophic role for cortical somatosensory influence on spared ipsilesional frontal corticospinal projections, and that restoration of a favorable compensatory response will require therapeutic intervention. PMID:25349147

  13. Source versus content memory in patients with a unilateral frontal cortex or a temporal lobe excision.

    PubMed

    Thaiss, Laila; Petrides, Michael

    2003-05-01

    It has been suggested previously that patients with a frontal lobe lesion might have a specific impairment in the retrieval of the source of information despite adequate memory for facts. Patients with an anterior temporal excision are known to have impairments in memory for facts and the question arises as to whether they are also impaired in source memory. The present study compared memory for facts and their source in patients with a unilateral frontal cortical or an anterior temporal excision in a situation in which both types of information were encoded explicitly. Patients with a unilateral frontal cortex or a temporal lobe excision watched videos of a game show and were instructed to attend to both the trivia facts and their source (the identity of the speaker or the relative time of presentation). Patients with a frontal cortex excision were not impaired on either fact or source memory. This was true even when a subgroup of patients with an excision involving the dorsolateral frontal cortex was examined. In contrast, patients with a left temporal lobe excision were impaired in both fact and identity source memory and right temporal lobe patients were impaired in identity source memory. All patients performed similarly to normal controls in temporal source memory. The present results are consistent with the view that source information is part of an associative network of information about an episode and that the medial temporal region is critical for both source and content memory. Furthermore, if source information is encoded explicitly, the frontal cortex does not appear to be necessary for its retrieval. Instead, it is proposed that the frontal cortex plays a metacognitive role in memory retrieval. PMID:12690051

  14. Noradrenaline depletion blocks behavioral sparing and alters cortical morphogenesis after neonatal frontal cortex damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Kolb, B; Sutherland, R J

    1992-06-01

    The possibility that cortical noradrenaline (NA) is necessary for sparing of function that occurs after neonatal frontal cortex damage was examined. Spatial localization by rats with frontal cortex damage on postnatal day 7 (P7) was better than that by rats with similar damage sustained as adults. The sparing was abolished in rats depleted of cortical NA by means of neonatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6HDA) administration. The blockade of sparing in the P7 frontal operates was associated with a smaller brain, thinner cortex, and reduced cortical dendritic branching relative to saline-treated P7 frontal operates. NA depletion alone in unoperated rats did not affect spatial learning but did reduce brain size and dendritic branching. Rats with frontal lesions on P4 did not show sparing of spatial localization, and 6HDA administration had no additional behavioral effect. Overall, these data are consistent with the notion that NA has some general function in maintaining some forms of plasticity in posterior cortex. PMID:1607943

  15. Rule learning enhances structural plasticity of long-range axons in frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Carolyn M; Peckler, Hannah; Tai, Lung-Hao; Wilbrecht, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Rules encompass cue-action-outcome associations used to guide decisions and strategies in a specific context. Subregions of the frontal cortex including the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) are implicated in rule learning, although changes in structural connectivity underlying rule learning are poorly understood. We imaged OFC axonal projections to dmPFC during training in a multiple choice foraging task and used a reinforcement learning model to quantify explore-exploit strategy use and prediction error magnitude. Here we show that rule training, but not experience of reward alone, enhances OFC bouton plasticity. Baseline bouton density and gains during training correlate with rule exploitation, while bouton loss correlates with exploration and scales with the magnitude of experienced prediction errors. We conclude that rule learning sculpts frontal cortex interconnectivity and adjusts a thermostat for the explore-exploit balance. PMID:26949122

  16. Rule learning enhances structural plasticity of long-range axons in frontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Carolyn M.; Peckler, Hannah; Tai, Lung-Hao; Wilbrecht, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Rules encompass cue-action-outcome associations used to guide decisions and strategies in a specific context. Subregions of the frontal cortex including the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) are implicated in rule learning, although changes in structural connectivity underlying rule learning are poorly understood. We imaged OFC axonal projections to dmPFC during training in a multiple choice foraging task and used a reinforcement learning model to quantify explore–exploit strategy use and prediction error magnitude. Here we show that rule training, but not experience of reward alone, enhances OFC bouton plasticity. Baseline bouton density and gains during training correlate with rule exploitation, while bouton loss correlates with exploration and scales with the magnitude of experienced prediction errors. We conclude that rule learning sculpts frontal cortex interconnectivity and adjusts a thermostat for the explore–exploit balance. PMID:26949122

  17. Influence of motivation on control hierarchy in the human frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Bahlmann, Jörg; Aarts, Esther; D'Esposito, Mark

    2015-02-18

    The frontal cortex mediates cognitive control and motivation to shape human behavior. It is generally observed that medial frontal areas are involved in motivational aspects of behavior, whereas lateral frontal regions are involved in cognitive control. Recent models of cognitive control suggest a rostro-caudal gradient in lateral frontal regions, such that progressively more rostral (anterior) regions process more complex aspects of cognitive control. How motivation influences such a control hierarchy is still under debate. Although some researchers argue that both systems work in parallel, others argue in favor of an interaction between motivation and cognitive control. In the latter case it is yet unclear how motivation would affect the different levels of the control hierarchy. This was investigated in the present functional MRI study applying different levels of cognitive control under different motivational states (low vs high reward anticipation). Three levels of cognitive control were tested by varying rule complexity: stimulus-response mapping (low-level), flexible task updating (mid-level), and sustained cue-task associations (high-level). We found an interaction between levels of cognitive control and motivation in medial and lateral frontal subregions. Specifically, flexible updating (mid-level of control) showed the strongest beneficial effect of reward and only this level exhibited functional coupling between dopamine-rich midbrain regions and the lateral frontal cortex. These findings suggest that motivation differentially affects the levels of a control hierarchy, influencing recruitment of frontal cortical control regions depending on specific task demands. PMID:25698755

  18. Hierarchy of prediction errors for auditory events in human temporal and frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Dürschmid, Stefan; Edwards, Erik; Reichert, Christoph; Dewar, Callum; Hinrichs, Hermann; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Kirsch, Heidi E; Dalal, Sarang S; Deouell, Leon Y; Knight, Robert T

    2016-06-14

    Predictive coding theories posit that neural networks learn statistical regularities in the environment for comparison with actual outcomes, signaling a prediction error (PE) when sensory deviation occurs. PE studies in audition have capitalized on low-frequency event-related potentials (LF-ERPs), such as the mismatch negativity. However, local cortical activity is well-indexed by higher-frequency bands [high-γ band (Hγ): 80-150 Hz]. We compared patterns of human Hγ and LF-ERPs in deviance detection using electrocorticographic recordings from subdural electrodes over frontal and temporal cortices. Patients listened to trains of task-irrelevant tones in two conditions differing in the predictability of a deviation from repetitive background stimuli (fully predictable vs. unpredictable deviants). We found deviance-related responses in both frequency bands over lateral temporal and inferior frontal cortex, with an earlier latency for Hγ than for LF-ERPs. Critically, frontal Hγ activity but not LF-ERPs discriminated between fully predictable and unpredictable changes, with frontal cortex sensitive to unpredictable events. The results highlight the role of frontal cortex and Hγ activity in deviance detection and PE generation. PMID:27247381

  19. Stimulus Expectancy Modulates Inferior Frontal Gyrus and Premotor Cortex Activity in Auditory Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osnes, Berge; Hugdahl, Kenneth; Hjelmervik, Helene; Specht, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    In studies on auditory speech perception, participants are often asked to perform active tasks, e.g. decide whether the perceived sound is a speech sound or not. However, information about the stimulus, inherent in such tasks, may induce expectations that cause altered activations not only in the auditory cortex, but also in frontal areas such as…

  20. Cognitive Functioning after Medial Frontal Lobe Damage Including the Anterior Cingulate Cortex: A Preliminary Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Amee; Dewar, Bonnie-Kate; Critchley, Hugo; Gilbert, Sam J.; Dolan, Raymond J.; Cipolotti, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    Two patients with medial frontal lobe damage involving the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) performed a range of cognitive tasks, including tests of executive function and anterior attention. Both patients lesions extended beyond the ACC, therefore caution needs to be exerted in ascribing observed deficits to the ACC alone. Patient performance was…

  1. Protective effects of quercetine on the neuronal injury in frontal cortex after chronic toluene exposure.

    PubMed

    Kanter, Mehmet

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was designed to evaluate the possible protective effects of quercetine (QE) on the neuronal injury in the frontal cortex after chronic toluene exposure in rats. The rats were randomly allotted into one of the three experimental groups, namely, groups A (control), B (toluene treated) and C (toluene-treated with QE), where each group contains 10 animals. Control group received 1 ml of normal saline solution, and toluene treatment was performed by the inhalation of 3000 ppm toluene in an 8-h/day and 6-day/week order for 12 weeks. The rats in QE-treated group was given QE (15 mg/kg body weight) once a day intraperitoneally for 12 weeks, starting just after toluene exposure. Tissue samples were obtained for histopathological investigation. To date, no histopathological changes of neurodegeneration in the frontal cortex after chronic toluene exposure in rats by QE treatment have been reported. In this study, the morphology of neurons in the QE treatment group was well protected. Chronic toluene exposure caused severe degenerative changes, shrunken cytoplasm and extensively dark picnotic nuclei in neurons of the frontal cortex. We conclude that QE therapy causes morphologic improvement in neurodegeneration of frontal cortex after chronic toluene exposure in rats. We believe that further preclinical research into the utility of QE may indicate its usefulness as a potential treatment on neurodegeneration after chronic toluene exposure in rats. PMID:22252859

  2. Tritiated imipramine binding sites are decreased in the frontal cortex of suicides

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, M.; Virgilio, J.; Gershon, S.

    1982-06-18

    Binding characteristics of tritiated imipramine were determined in the frontal cortex of suicides and well-matched controls. Maximal binding was significantly lower in brains from the suicides. This finding is consistent with reports of decreased tritiated imipramine binding in the platelets of patients diagnosed as having a major affective disorder.

  3. Intra- and Interindividual Differences in Lateralized Cognitive Performance and Asymmetrical EEG Activity in the Frontal Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papousek, Ilona; Murhammer, Daniela; Schulter, Gunter

    2011-01-01

    The study shows that changes in relative verbal vs. figural working memory and fluency performance from one session to a second session two to 3 weeks apart covary with spontaneously occurring changes of cortical asymmetry in the lateral frontal and central cortex, measured by electroencephalography (EEG) in resting conditions before the execution…

  4. Functional organization of human intraparietal and frontal cortex for attending, looking, and pointing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Astafiev, Serguei V.; Shulman, Gordon L.; Stanley, Christine M.; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Van Essen, David C.; Corbetta, Maurizio

    2003-01-01

    We studied the functional organization of human posterior parietal and frontal cortex using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to map preparatory signals for attending, looking, and pointing to a peripheral visual location. The human frontal eye field and two separate regions in the intraparietal sulcus were similarly recruited in all conditions, suggesting an attentional role that generalizes across response effectors. However, the preparation of a pointing movement selectively activated a different group of regions, suggesting a stronger role in motor planning. These regions were lateralized to the left hemisphere, activated by preparation of movements of either hand, and included the inferior and superior parietal lobule, precuneus, and posterior superior temporal sulcus, plus the dorsal premotor and anterior cingulate cortex anteriorly. Surface-based registration of macaque cortical areas onto the map of fMRI responses suggests a relatively good spatial correspondence between human and macaque parietal areas. In contrast, large interspecies differences were noted in the topography of frontal areas.

  5. Memory and executive function impairments after frontal or posterior cortex lesions.

    PubMed

    Daum, Irene; Mayes, Andrew R.

    2000-01-01

    Free recall and recognition, memory for temporal order, spatial memory and prospective memory were assessed in patients with frontal lobe lesions, patients with posterior cortex lesions and control subjects. Both patient groups showed equivalent memory deficits relative to control subjects on a range of free recall and recognition tasks, on memory for temporal order and on a prospective memory task. The patient groups also performed equivalently on the spatial memory task although only patients with frontal lobe lesions were significantly impaired. However, the patients with frontal lobe lesions showed an increased false alarm rate and made more intrusion errors relative not only to the control subjects, but also to the patients with poster or cortex lesions. These memory problems are discussed in relation to deficits in executive function and basic memory processes. PMID:11568428

  6. Cortical Connections of Functional Zones in Posterior Parietal Cortex and Frontal Cortex Motor Regions in New World Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Stepniewska, Iwona; Kaas, Jon H.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the connections of posterior parietal cortex (PPC) with motor/premotor cortex (M1/PM) and other cortical areas. Electrical stimulation (500 ms trains) delivered to microelectrode sites evoked movements of reach, defense, and grasp, from distinct zones in M1/PM and PPC, in squirrel and owl monkeys. Tracer injections into M1/PM reach, defense, and grasp zones showed dense connections with M1/PM hand/forelimb representations. The densest inputs outside of frontal cortex were from PPC zones. M1 zones were additionally connected with somatosensory hand/forelimb representations in areas 3a, 3b, and 1 and the somatosensory areas of the upper bank of the lateral sulcus (S2/PV). Injections into PPC zones showed primarily local connections and the densest inputs outside of PPC originated from M1/PM zones. The PPC reach zone also received dense inputs from cortex caudal to PPC, which likely relayed visual information. In contrast, the PPC grasp zone was densely connected with the hand/forelimb representations of areas 3a, 3b, 1, and S2/PV. Thus, the dorsal parietal–frontal network involved in reaching was preferentially connected to visual cortex, whereas the more ventral network involved in grasping received somatosensory inputs. Additional weak interlinks between dissimilar zones (e.g., PPC reach and PPC grasp) were apparent and may coordinate actions. PMID:21263034

  7. The Neural System of Postdecision Evaluation in Rostral Frontal Cortex during Problem-solving Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Xiaohong; Cheng, Kang

    2016-01-01

    Little attention has been paid to the postdecision processing in fMRI studies with task paradigms in which there was no explicit feedback. Although late-onset BOLD responses were previously observed in the lateral frontopolar cortex after the familiar-novel decision on visually presented words, the nature of neural activations that caused the late-onset BOLD responses remained elusive. We here found, in human experts conducting complicated problem-solving tasks in their expertise domain, that the rostral frontal cortex, including the lateral frontopolar cortex, along with the anterior inferior parietal lobule, was activated only during the postdecision period, although there was no feedback. That is, these areas showed late-onset BOLD responses, and fitting of the BOLD responses with different models indicates that they were caused by neural activations that occurred after the decision. However, there was no response after performing a sensory-motor control task, and the magnitude of postdecision activations was correlated with the degree of uncertainty about the preceding decision, which suggests that the postdecision neural activations were associated with the preceding decision procedure. Furthermore, the same set of areas was more strongly activated when the subject explicitly rethought the preceding problem. These results suggest that the rostral frontal cortex, together with anterior inferior parietal lobule, comprises a network for uncertainty monitoring and exploration of alternative resolutions in postdecision evaluation. The present results thus introduce a new aspect of the functional gradient along the rostrocaudal axis in the frontal cortex. PMID:27595134

  8. The Neural System of Postdecision Evaluation in Rostral Frontal Cortex during Problem-solving Tasks.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiaohong; Cheng, Kang; Tanaka, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    Little attention has been paid to the postdecision processing in fMRI studies with task paradigms in which there was no explicit feedback. Although late-onset BOLD responses were previously observed in the lateral frontopolar cortex after the familiar-novel decision on visually presented words, the nature of neural activations that caused the late-onset BOLD responses remained elusive. We here found, in human experts conducting complicated problem-solving tasks in their expertise domain, that the rostral frontal cortex, including the lateral frontopolar cortex, along with the anterior inferior parietal lobule, was activated only during the postdecision period, although there was no feedback. That is, these areas showed late-onset BOLD responses, and fitting of the BOLD responses with different models indicates that they were caused by neural activations that occurred after the decision. However, there was no response after performing a sensory-motor control task, and the magnitude of postdecision activations was correlated with the degree of uncertainty about the preceding decision, which suggests that the postdecision neural activations were associated with the preceding decision procedure. Furthermore, the same set of areas was more strongly activated when the subject explicitly rethought the preceding problem. These results suggest that the rostral frontal cortex, together with anterior inferior parietal lobule, comprises a network for uncertainty monitoring and exploration of alternative resolutions in postdecision evaluation. The present results thus introduce a new aspect of the functional gradient along the rostrocaudal axis in the frontal cortex. PMID:27595134

  9. The Rostro-Caudal Axis of Frontal Cortex Is Sensitive to the Domain of Stimulus Information

    PubMed Central

    Bahlmann, Jörg; Blumenfeld, Robert S.; D'Esposito, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests that lateral frontal cortex implements cognitive control processing along its rostro-caudal axis, yet other evidence supports a dorsal–ventral functional organization for processes engaged by different stimulus domains (e.g., spatial vs. nonspatial). This functional magnetic resonance imaging study investigated whether separable dorsolateral and ventrolateral rostro-caudal gradients exist in humans, while participants performed tasks requiring cognitive control at 3 levels of abstraction with language or spatial stimuli. Abstraction was manipulated by using 3 different task sets that varied in relational complexity. Relational complexity refers to the process of manipulating the relationship between task components (e.g., to associate a particular cue with a task) and drawing inferences about that relationship. Tasks using different stimulus domains engaged distinct posterior regions, but within the lateral frontal cortex, we found evidence for a single rostro-caudal gradient that was organized according to the level of abstraction and was independent of processing of the stimulus domain. However, a pattern of dorsal/ventral segregation of processing engaged by domain-specific information was evident in each separable frontal region only within the most rostral region recruited by task demands. These results suggest that increasingly abstract information is represented in the frontal cortex along distinct rostro-caudal gradients that also segregate along a dorsal–ventral axis dependent on task demands. PMID:24451658

  10. Different involvement of subregions within dorsal premotor and medial frontal cortex for pro- and antisaccades.

    PubMed

    Cieslik, Edna C; Seidler, Isabelle; Laird, Angela R; Fox, Peter T; Eickhoff, Simon B

    2016-09-01

    The antisaccade task has been widely used to investigate cognitive action control. While the general network for saccadic eye movements is well defined, the exact location of eye fields within the frontal cortex strongly varies between studies. It is unknown whether this inconsistency reflects spatial uncertainty or is the result of different involvement of subregions for specific aspects of eye movement control. The aim of the present study was to examine functional differentiations within the frontal cortex by integrating results from neuroimaging studies analyzing pro- and antisaccade behavior using meta-analyses. The results provide evidence for a differential functional specialization of neighboring oculomotor frontal regions, with lateral frontal eye fields (FEF) and supplementary eye field (SEF) more often involved in prosaccades while medial FEF and anterior midcingulate cortex (aMCC) revealed consistent stronger involvement for antisaccades. This dissociation was furthermore mirrored by functional connectivity analyses showing that the lateral FEF and SEF are embedded in a motor output network, while medial FEF and aMCC are integrated in a multiple demand network. PMID:27211526

  11. Top-Down Control of Human Visual Cortex by Frontal and Parietal Cortex in Anticipatory Visual Spatial Attention

    PubMed Central

    Bressler, Steven L.; Tang, Wei; Sylvester, Chad M.; Shulman, Gordon L.; Corbetta, Maurizio

    2008-01-01

    Advance information about an impending stimulus facilitates its subsequent identification and ensuing behavioral responses. This facilitation is thought to be mediated by top-down control signals from frontal and parietal cortex that modulate sensory cortical activity. Here we show, using Granger Causality measures on blood oxygen-level-dependent time series, that frontal eye field (FEF) and intraparietal sulcus (IPS) activity predicts visual occipital activity prior to an expected visual stimulus. Top-down levels of Granger Causality from FEF and IPS to visual occipital cortex were significantly greater than both bottom-up and mean cortex-wide levels in all individual subjects and the group. In the group and most individual subjects, Granger Causality was significantly greater from FEF to IPS than from IPS to FEF, and significantly greater from both FEF and IPS to intermediate-tier than lower-tier ventral visual areas. Moreover, top-down Granger Causality from right IPS to intermediate-tier areas was predictive of correct behavioral performance. These results suggest that FEF and IPS modulate visual occipital cortex, and FEF modulates IPS, in relation to visual attention. The current approach may prove advantageous for the investigation of interregional directed influences in other human brain functions. PMID:18829963

  12. Orbito-Frontal Cortex Volumes in Panic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Hanefi; Gurok, M. Gurkan; Akyol, Muammer

    2012-01-01

    Objective Given the association between the pathophysiology of panic disorder and prefrontal cortex function, we aimed to perform a volumetric MRI study in patients with panic disorder and healthy controls focusing on the in vivo neuroanatomy of the OFC. Methods Twenty right-handed patients with panic disorder and 20 right-handed healthy control subjects were studied. The volumes of whole brain, total white and gray matters, and OFC were measured by using T1-weighted coronal MRI images, with 1.5-mm-thick slices, at 1.5T. In addition, for psychological valuation, Hamilton Depression Rating (HDRS) and Panic Agoraphobia Scales (PAS) were administered. Results Unadjusted mean volumes of the whole brain volume, total white and gray matter were not different between the patients and healthy controls while the patient group had significantly smaller left (t=-6.70, p<0.0001) and right (t=-5.86, p<0.0001) OFC volumes compared with healthy controls. Conclusion Our findings indicate an alteration of OFC morphology in the panic disorder and suggest that OFC abnormalities may be involved in the pathophysiology of panic disorder. PMID:23251207

  13. Control of prepotent responses by the superior medial frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chiao-Yun; Muggleton, Neil G; Tzeng, Ovid J L; Hung, Daisy L; Juan, Chi-Hung

    2009-01-15

    The inhibitory control of prepotent action is vital for appropriate behaviour. An example of the importance of such control can be seen in the inhibition of aggressive behavior, deficits in which may have broader consequences for society. Many studies have related lesions or the under-development of the prefrontal cortex to inefficiency of inhibitory control. Here we used transcranial magnetic stimulation and a stop-signal task, which occasionally requires the inhibition of a prepotent motor response, to investigate the role of pre-supplementary motor area (Pre-SMA) in inhibitory control. While no effects were seen on the ability to generate responses, TMS delivered over the Pre-SMA disrupted the ability to respond to a stop signal. These results are the first to establish a casual link between Pre-SMA and inhibitory control in normal subjects. The understanding of the underlying mechanisms of inhibitory control may lead to clearer understanding of the neural basis of inappropriate behaviour. PMID:18852054

  14. The frontal cortex and the criminal justice system.

    PubMed Central

    Sapolsky, Robert M

    2004-01-01

    In recent decades, the general trend in the criminal justice system in the USA has been to narrow the range of insanity defences available, with an increasing dependence solely on the M'Naghten rule. This states that innocence by reason of insanity requires that the perpetrator could not understand the nature of their criminal act, or did not know that the act was wrong, by reason of a mental illness. In this essay, I question the appropriateness of this, in light of contemporary neuroscience. Specifically, I focus on the role of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in cognition, emotional regulation, control of impulsive behaviour and moral reasoning. I review the consequences of PFC damage on these endpoints, the capacity for factors such as alcohol and stress to transiently impair PFC function, and the remarkably late development of the PFC (in which full myelination may not occur until early adulthood). I also consider how individual variation in PFC function and anatomy, within the normative range, covaries with some of these endpoints. This literature is reviewed because of its relevance to issues of criminal insanity; specifically, damage can produce an individual capable of differentiating right from wrong but who, nonetheless, is organically incapable of appropriately regulating their behaviour. PMID:15590619

  15. Frontal and motor cortex contributions to response inhibition: evidence from electrocorticography.

    PubMed

    Fonken, Yvonne M; Rieger, Jochem W; Tzvi, Elinor; Crone, Nathan E; Chang, Edward; Parvizi, Josef; Knight, Robert T; Krämer, Ulrike M

    2016-04-01

    Changes in the environment require rapid modification or inhibition of ongoing behavior. We used the stop-signal paradigm and intracranial recordings to investigate response preparation, inhibition, and monitoring of task-relevant information. Electrocorticographic data were recorded in eight patients with electrodes covering frontal, temporal, and parietal cortex, and time-frequency analysis was used to examine power differences in the beta (13-30 Hz) and high-gamma bands (60-180 Hz). Over motor cortex, beta power decreased, and high-gamma power increased during motor preparation for both go trials (Go) and unsuccessful stops (US). For successful stops (SS), beta increased, and high-gamma was reduced, indexing the cancellation of the prepared response. In the middle frontal gyrus (MFG), stop signals elicited a transient high-gamma increase. The MFG response occurred before the estimated stop-signal reaction time but did not distinguish between SS and US trials, likely signaling attention to the salient stop stimulus. A postresponse high-gamma increase in MFG was stronger for US compared with SS and absent in Go, supporting a role in behavior monitoring. These results provide evidence for differential contributions of frontal subregions to response inhibition, including motor preparation and inhibitory control in motor cortex and cognitive control and action evaluation in lateral prefrontal cortex. PMID:26864760

  16. Dyslexic children lack word selectivity gradients in occipito-temporal and inferior frontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Olulade, O.A.; Flowers, D.L.; Napoliello, E.M.; Eden, G.F.

    2015-01-01

    fMRI studies using a region-of-interest approach have revealed that the ventral portion of the left occipito-temporal cortex, which is specialized for orthographic processing of visually presented words (and includes the so-called “visual word form area”, VWFA), is characterized by a posterior-to-anterior gradient of increasing selectivity for words in typically reading adults, adolescents, and children (e.g. Brem et al., 2006, 2009). Similarly, the left inferior frontal cortex (IFC) has been shown to exhibit a medial-to-lateral gradient of print selectivity in typically reading adults (Vinckier et al., 2007). Functional brain imaging studies of dyslexia have reported relative underactivity in left hemisphere occipito-temporal and inferior frontal regions using whole-brain analyses during word processing tasks. Hence, the question arises whether gradient sensitivities in these regions are altered in dyslexia. Indeed, a region-of-interest analysis revealed the gradient-specific functional specialization in the occipito-temporal cortex to be disrupted in dyslexic children (van der Mark et al., 2009). Building on these studies, we here (1) investigate if a word-selective gradient exists in the inferior frontal cortex in addition to the occipito-temporal cortex in normally reading children, (2) compare typically reading with dyslexic children, and (3) examine functional connections between these regions in both groups. We replicated the previously reported anterior-to-posterior gradient of increasing selectivity for words in the left occipito-temporal cortex in typically reading children, and its absence in the dyslexic children. Our novel finding is the detection of a pattern of increasing selectivity for words along the medial-to-lateral axis of the left inferior frontal cortex in typically reading children and evidence of functional connectivity between the most lateral aspect of this area and the anterior aspects of the occipito-temporal cortex. We report

  17. Dyslexic children lack word selectivity gradients in occipito-temporal and inferior frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Olulade, O A; Flowers, D L; Napoliello, E M; Eden, G F

    2015-01-01

    fMRI studies using a region-of-interest approach have revealed that the ventral portion of the left occipito-temporal cortex, which is specialized for orthographic processing of visually presented words (and includes the so-called "visual word form area", VWFA), is characterized by a posterior-to-anterior gradient of increasing selectivity for words in typically reading adults, adolescents, and children (e.g. Brem et al., 2006, 2009). Similarly, the left inferior frontal cortex (IFC) has been shown to exhibit a medial-to-lateral gradient of print selectivity in typically reading adults (Vinckier et al., 2007). Functional brain imaging studies of dyslexia have reported relative underactivity in left hemisphere occipito-temporal and inferior frontal regions using whole-brain analyses during word processing tasks. Hence, the question arises whether gradient sensitivities in these regions are altered in dyslexia. Indeed, a region-of-interest analysis revealed the gradient-specific functional specialization in the occipito-temporal cortex to be disrupted in dyslexic children (van der Mark et al., 2009). Building on these studies, we here (1) investigate if a word-selective gradient exists in the inferior frontal cortex in addition to the occipito-temporal cortex in normally reading children, (2) compare typically reading with dyslexic children, and (3) examine functional connections between these regions in both groups. We replicated the previously reported anterior-to-posterior gradient of increasing selectivity for words in the left occipito-temporal cortex in typically reading children, and its absence in the dyslexic children. Our novel finding is the detection of a pattern of increasing selectivity for words along the medial-to-lateral axis of the left inferior frontal cortex in typically reading children and evidence of functional connectivity between the most lateral aspect of this area and the anterior aspects of the occipito-temporal cortex. We report absence

  18. Top-down-directed synchrony from medial frontal cortex to nucleus accumbens during reward anticipation.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael X; Bour, Lo; Mantione, Mariska; Figee, Martijn; Vink, Matthijs; Tijssen, Marina A J; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; van den Munckhof, Pepijn; Schuurman, P Richard; Denys, Damiaan

    2012-01-01

    The nucleus accumbens and medial frontal cortex (MFC) are part of a loop involved in modulating behavior according to anticipated rewards. However, the precise temporal landscape of their electrophysiological interactions in humans remains unknown because it is not possible to record neural activity from the nucleus accumbens using noninvasive techniques. We recorded electrophysiological activity simultaneously from the nucleus accumbens and cortex (via surface EEG) in humans who had electrodes implanted as part of deep-brain-stimulation treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder. Patients performed a simple reward motivation task previously shown to activate the ventral striatum. Spectral Granger causality analyses were applied to dissociate "top-down" (cortex → nucleus accumbens)- from "bottom-up" (nucleus accumbens → cortex)-directed synchronization (functional connectivity). "Top-down"-directed synchrony from cortex to nucleus accumbens was maximal over medial frontal sites and was significantly stronger when rewards were anticipated. These findings provide direct electrophysiological evidence for a role of the MFC in modulating nucleus accumbens reward-related processing and may be relevant to understanding the mechanisms of deep-brain stimulation and its beneficial effects on psychiatric conditions. PMID:21547982

  19. Enhancement of 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Metabolism in Rat Brain Frontal Cortex Using a β3 Adrenoceptor Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Mirbolooki, M. Reza; Schade, Kimberly N.; Constantinescu, Cristian C.; Pan, Min-Liang; Mukherjee, Jogeshwar

    2014-01-01

    We report the use of β3-adrenergic receptor mediated activation of rat brain frontal cortex using mirabegron (a selective β3-adrenoceptor agonist), measured by 18F-FDG PET/CT. Another β3-agonis t, CL 316,243, did not have this effect due to impermeability through the blood brain barrier (BBB), while atomoxetine, a norepinephrine transporter blocker, did increase 18F-FDG uptake in the frontal cortex. Mirabegron exhibited a dose-dependent increase in frontal cortex 18F-FDG uptake. These findings suggest a possible use of selective β3-adrenoceptor agonists in reversing regional glucose hypometabolism in the brain. PMID:25347981

  20. Reduced high affinity cholecystokinin binding in hippocampus and frontal cortex of schizophrenic patients

    SciTech Connect

    Farmery, S.M.; Owen, F.; Poulter, M.; Crow, T.J.

    1985-02-04

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) binding sites were assessed in post-mortem brain membrane preparations from controls and schizophrenic patients. /sup 125/ I-BH CCK/sub 33/ specific binding was reduced by 40% (p < 0.02) in the hippocampus and by 20% (p < 0.01) in the frontal cortex of schizophrenic patients compared with controls. There were no differences in /sup 125/I-BH CCK/sub 33/ binding between the two groups in the amygdala, temporal cortex or caudate nucleus. 20 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  1. Direction- and distance-dependent interareal connectivity of pyramidal cell subpopulations in the rat frontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ueta, Yoshifumi; Hirai, Yasuharu; Otsuka, Takeshi; Kawaguchi, Yasuo

    2013-01-01

    The frontal cortex plays an important role in the initiation and execution of movements via widespread projections to various cortical and subcortical areas. Layer 2/3 (L2/3) pyramidal cells in the frontal cortex send axons mainly to other ipsilateral/contralateral cortical areas. Subpopulations of layer 5 (L5) pyramidal cells that selectively project to the pontine nuclei or to the contralateral cortex [commissural (COM) cells] also target diverse and sometimes overlapping ipsilateral cortical areas. However, little is known about target area-dependent participation in ipsilateral corticocortical (iCC) connections by subclasses of L2/3 and L5 projection neurons. To better understand the functional hierarchy between cortical areas, we compared iCC connectivity between the secondary motor cortex (M2) and adjacent areas, such as the orbitofrontal and primary motor cortices, and distant non-frontal areas, such as the perirhinal and posterior parietal cortices. We particularly assessed the laminar distribution of iCC cells and fibers, and identified the subtypes of pyramidal cells participating in those projections. For connections between M2 and frontal areas, L2/3 and L5 cells in both areas contributed to reciprocal projections, which can be viewed as “bottom-up” or “top-down” on the basis of their differential targeting of cortical lamina. In connections between M2 and non-frontal areas, neurons participating in bottom-up and top-down projections were segregated into the different layers: bottom-up projections arose primarily from L2/3 cells, while top-down projections were dominated by L5 COM cells. These findings suggest that selective participation in iCC connections by pyramidal cell subtypes lead to directional connectivity between M2 and other cortical areas. Based on these findings, we propose a provisional unified framework of interareal hierarchy within the frontal cortex, and discuss the interaction of local circuits with long-range interareal

  2. GABAA receptor complex function in frontal cortex membranes from control and neurological patients.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, G K; Lowenthal, A; Javoy-Agid, F; Constantidinis, J

    1991-05-01

    The functional integrity of the GABAA receptor-benzodiazepine (BZ) recognition site-Cl- ionophore complex was assessed by means of [35S]TBPS (t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate) binding to frontal cortex membranes prepared from frozen postmortem brain tissue taken from control (n = 4), Alzheimer (n = 7), Parkinson (n = 3) and Huntington's chorea (n = 2) patients. Specific [35S]TBPS binding was similar in control, Parkinson's disease and Huntington's chorea brains, but was significantly reduced (78% control, P less than 0.01) in frontal cortex membranes from Alzheimer's patients. The linkage between the BZ recognition sites and the GABAA receptor-linked Cl- ionophore was functionally intact in these membranes as BZ site agonists (zolpidem, alpidem, flunitrazepam and clonazepam) enhanced [35S]TBPS binding under the conditions used (well-washed membranes in the presence of 1.0 M NaCl). Zolpidem (BZ1 selective) exhibited a biphasic enhancement in control membranes whereas the other compounds induced a bell-shaped concentration-response curve. The enhancement of [35S]TBPS binding by alpidem, flunitrazepam and clonazepam was greater in frontal cortex membranes from Alzheimer's patients than in controls whereas it tended to be reduced in membranes from the brains of Huntington's chorea patients. These studies demonstrate the functional integrity of the GABAA receptor macromolecular complex and also the usefulness of [35S]TBPS binding in the study of human postmortem tissue. PMID:1654259

  3. Hypoactivation in right inferior frontal cortex is specifically associated with motor response inhibition in adult ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Morein-Zamir, Sharon; Dodds, Chris; van Hartevelt, Tim J; Schwarzkopf, Wolfgang; Sahakian, Barbara; Müller, Ulrich; Robbins, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Adult ADHD has been linked to impaired motor response inhibition and reduced associated activation in the right inferior frontal cortex (IFC). However, it is unclear whether abnormal inferior frontal activation in adult ADHD is specifically related to a response inhibition deficit or reflects a more general deficit in attentional processing. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we tested a group of 19 ADHD patients with no comorbidities and a group of 19 healthy control volunteers on a modified go/no-go task that has been shown previously to distinguish between cortical responses related to response inhibition and attentional shifting. Relative to the healthy controls, ADHD patients showed increased commission errors and reduced activation in inferior frontal cortex during response inhibition. Crucially, this reduced activation was observed when controlling for attentional processing, suggesting that hypoactivation in right IFC in ADHD is specifically related to impaired response inhibition. The results are consistent with the notion of a selective neurocognitive deficit in response inhibition in adult ADHD associated with abnormal functional activation in the prefrontal cortex, whilst ruling out likely group differences in attentional orienting, arousal and motivation. Hum Brain Mapp 35:5141–5152, 2014. PMID:24819224

  4. A direct GABAergic output from the basal ganglia to frontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Arpiar; Oldenburg, Ian A.; Berezovskii, Vladimir K.; Johnson, Caroline A.; Kingery, Nathan D.; Elliott, Hunter L.; Xie, Tiao; Gerfen, Charles R.; Sabatini, Bernardo L.

    2014-01-01

    The basal ganglia (BG) are phylogenetically conserved subcortical nuclei necessary for coordinated motor action and reward learning1. Current models postulate that the BG modulate cerebral cortex indirectly via an inhibitory output to thalamus, bidirectionally controlled by the BG via direct (dSPNs) and indirect (iSPNs) pathway striatal projection neurons2–4. The BG thalamic output sculpts cortical activity by interacting with signals from sensory and motor systems5. Here we describe a direct projection from the globus pallidus externus (GP), a central nucleus of the BG, to frontal regions of the cerebral cortex (FC). Two cell types make up the GP-FC projection, distinguished by their electrophysiological properties, cortical projections and expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), a synthetic enzyme for the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh). Despite these differences, ChAT+ cells, which have been historically identified as an extension of the nucleus basalis (NB), as well as ChAT− cells, release the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) and are inhibited by iSPNs and dSPNs of dorsal striatum. Thus GP-FC cells comprise a direct GABAergic/cholinergic projection under the control of striatum that activates frontal cortex in vivo. Furthermore, iSPN inhibition of GP-FC cells is sensitive to dopamine 2 receptor signaling, revealing a pathway by which drugs that target dopamine receptors for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders can act in the BG to modulate frontal cortices. PMID:25739505

  5. A direct GABAergic output from the basal ganglia to frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Arpiar; Oldenburg, Ian A; Berezovskii, Vladimir K; Johnson, Caroline A; Kingery, Nathan D; Elliott, Hunter L; Xie, Tiao; Gerfen, Charles R; Sabatini, Bernardo L

    2015-05-01

    The basal ganglia are phylogenetically conserved subcortical nuclei necessary for coordinated motor action and reward learning. Current models postulate that the basal ganglia modulate cerebral cortex indirectly via an inhibitory output to thalamus, bidirectionally controlled by direct- and indirect-pathway striatal projection neurons (dSPNs and iSPNs, respectively). The basal ganglia thalamic output sculpts cortical activity by interacting with signals from sensory and motor systems. Here we describe a direct projection from the globus pallidus externus (GP), a central nucleus of the basal ganglia, to frontal regions of the cerebral cortex (FC). Two cell types make up the GP-FC projection, distinguished by their electrophysiological properties, cortical projections and expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), a synthetic enzyme for the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh). Despite these differences, ChAT(+) cells, which have been historically identified as an extension of the nucleus basalis, as well as ChAT(-) cells, release the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) and are inhibited by iSPNs and dSPNs of dorsal striatum. Thus, GP-FC cells comprise a direct GABAergic/cholinergic projection under the control of striatum that activates frontal cortex in vivo. Furthermore, iSPN inhibition of GP-FC cells is sensitive to dopamine 2 receptor signalling, revealing a pathway by which drugs that target dopamine receptors for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders can act in the basal ganglia to modulate frontal cortices. PMID:25739505

  6. Septum and medial frontal cortex contribution to spatial problem-solving.

    PubMed

    Poucet, B; Herrmann, T

    1990-03-26

    An attempt was made to contrast the effects of lesions to the medial frontal cortex and septum in two spatial tasks. In the fixed-goal (FG) task, the food was located on the same table throughout testing, and the start table was randomly varied from day to day. In the variable-goal (VG) task, the start table remained constant but the food was randomly distributed on one or the other of the two remaining tables. In both tasks, normal animals performed better than frontal and septal rats whose performance, however, improved over days in the FG, but not in the VG, task. In both tasks, significant improvement within days was found in medial frontal animals, but not in septal animals. Additional analyses revealed that septal animals had a general pattern of disrupted exploration and a tendency to use a response strategy (i.e. to repeat the same response both within and between days) which decreased over days in the FG task. In contrast, medial frontal animals did not demonstrate disrupted exploration nor any response tendency. It is concluded that both septal and medial frontal cortical damage produce a common spatial working memory impairment. However, there is some evidence to suggest that this common memory impairment could result from disruption of distinct mechanisms in septal and frontal animals. It is proposed that medial frontal lesions could affect some specific mechanism related either to attentional processes or to the ability to anticipate future events, whereas septal damage would interfere with the building of comprehensive and flexible spatial memories. PMID:2340101

  7. Microcircuitry of Agranular Frontal Cortex: Testing the Generality of the Canonical Cortical Microcircuit

    PubMed Central

    Godlove, David C.; Maier, Alexander; Woodman, Geoffrey F.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether a frontal area that lacks granular layer IV, supplementary eye field, exhibits features of laminar circuitry similar to those observed in primary sensory areas. We report, for the first time, visually evoked local field potentials (LFPs) and spiking activity recorded simultaneously across all layers of agranular frontal cortex using linear electrode arrays. We calculated current source density from the LFPs and compared the laminar organization of evolving sinks to those reported in sensory areas. Simultaneous, transient synaptic current sinks appeared first in layers III and V followed by more prolonged current sinks in layers I/II and VI. We also found no variation of single- or multi-unit visual response latency across layers, and putative pyramidal neurons and interneurons displayed similar response latencies. Many units exhibited pronounced discharge suppression that was strongest in superficial relative to deep layers. Maximum discharge suppression also occurred later in superficial than in deep layers. These results are discussed in the context of the canonical cortical microcircuit model originally formulated to describe early sensory cortex. The data indicate that agranular cortex resembles sensory areas in certain respects, but the cortical microcircuit is modified in nontrivial ways. PMID:24719113

  8. Attentional Control of Task and Response in Lateral and Medial Frontal Cortex: Brain Activity and Reaction Time Distributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aarts, Esther; Roelofs, Ardi; van Turennout, Miranda

    2009-01-01

    It is unclear whether task conflict is reflected in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) or in more dorsal regions of the medial frontal cortex (MFC). When participants switch between tasks involving incongruent, congruent, and neutral stimuli, it is possible to examine both response conflict (incongruent vs. congruent) and task conflict (congruent…

  9. Co-Activation-Based Parcellation of the Lateral Prefrontal Cortex Delineates the Inferior Frontal Junction Area.

    PubMed

    Muhle-Karbe, Paul S; Derrfuss, Jan; Lynn, Margaret T; Neubert, Franz X; Fox, Peter T; Brass, Marcel; Eickhoff, Simon B

    2016-05-01

    The inferior frontal junction (IFJ) area, a small region in the posterior lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC), has received increasing interest in recent years due to its central involvement in the control of action, attention, and memory. Yet, both its function and anatomy remain controversial. Here, we employed a meta-analytic parcellation of the left LPFC to show that the IFJ can be isolated based on its specific functional connections. A seed region, oriented along the left inferior frontal sulcus (IFS), was subdivided via cluster analyses of voxel-wise whole-brain co-activation patterns. The ensuing clusters were characterized by their unique connections, the functional profiles of associated experiments, and an independent topic mapping approach. A cluster at the posterior end of the IFS matched previous descriptions of the IFJ in location and extent and could be distinguished from a more caudal cluster involved in motor control, a more ventral cluster involved in linguistic processing, and 3 more rostral clusters involved in other aspects of cognitive control. Overall, our findings highlight that the IFJ constitutes a core functional unit within the frontal lobe and delineate its borders. Implications for the IFJ's role in human cognition and the organizational principles of the frontal lobe are discussed. PMID:25899707

  10. Stimulus expectancy modulates inferior frontal gyrus and premotor cortex activity in auditory perception.

    PubMed

    Osnes, Berge; Hugdahl, Kenneth; Hjelmervik, Helene; Specht, Karsten

    2012-04-01

    In studies on auditory speech perception, participants are often asked to perform active tasks, e.g. decide whether the perceived sound is a speech sound or not. However, information about the stimulus, inherent in such tasks, may induce expectations that cause altered activations not only in the auditory cortex, but also in frontal areas such as inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and motor cortices, even in the absence of an explicit task. To investigate this, we applied spectral mixes of a flute sound and either vowels or specific music instrument sounds (e.g. trumpet) in an fMRI study, in combination with three different instructions. The instructions either revealed no information about stimulus features, or explicit information about either the music instrument or the vowel features. The results demonstrated that, besides an involvement of posterior temporal areas, stimulus expectancy modulated in particular a network comprising IFG and premotor cortices during this passive listening task. PMID:22377261

  11. Auditory sequence processing reveals evolutionarily conserved regions of frontal cortex in macaques and humans.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Benjamin; Kikuchi, Yukiko; Sun, Li; Hunter, David; Dick, Frederic; Smith, Kenny; Thiele, Alexander; Griffiths, Timothy D; Marslen-Wilson, William D; Petkov, Christopher I

    2015-01-01

    An evolutionary account of human language as a neurobiological system must distinguish between human-unique neurocognitive processes supporting language and evolutionarily conserved, domain-general processes that can be traced back to our primate ancestors. Neuroimaging studies across species may determine whether candidate neural processes are supported by homologous, functionally conserved brain areas or by different neurobiological substrates. Here we use functional magnetic resonance imaging in Rhesus macaques and humans to examine the brain regions involved in processing the ordering relationships between auditory nonsense words in rule-based sequences. We find that key regions in the human ventral frontal and opercular cortex have functional counterparts in the monkey brain. These regions are also known to be associated with initial stages of human syntactic processing. This study raises the possibility that certain ventral frontal neural systems, which play a significant role in language function in modern humans, originally evolved to support domain-general abilities involved in sequence processing. PMID:26573340

  12. Auditory sequence processing reveals evolutionarily conserved regions of frontal cortex in macaques and humans

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Benjamin; Kikuchi, Yukiko; Sun, Li; Hunter, David; Dick, Frederic; Smith, Kenny; Thiele, Alexander; Griffiths, Timothy D.; Marslen-Wilson, William D.; Petkov, Christopher I.

    2015-01-01

    An evolutionary account of human language as a neurobiological system must distinguish between human-unique neurocognitive processes supporting language and evolutionarily conserved, domain-general processes that can be traced back to our primate ancestors. Neuroimaging studies across species may determine whether candidate neural processes are supported by homologous, functionally conserved brain areas or by different neurobiological substrates. Here we use functional magnetic resonance imaging in Rhesus macaques and humans to examine the brain regions involved in processing the ordering relationships between auditory nonsense words in rule-based sequences. We find that key regions in the human ventral frontal and opercular cortex have functional counterparts in the monkey brain. These regions are also known to be associated with initial stages of human syntactic processing. This study raises the possibility that certain ventral frontal neural systems, which play a significant role in language function in modern humans, originally evolved to support domain-general abilities involved in sequence processing. PMID:26573340

  13. An Additional Motor-Related Field in the Lateral Frontal Cortex of Squirrel Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Duric, Vanja; Barbay, Scott; Frost, Shawn B.; Stylianou, Antonis; Nudo, Randolph J.

    2008-01-01

    Our earlier efforts to document the cortical connections of the ventral premotor cortex (PMv) revealed dense connections with a field rostral and lateral to PMv, an area we called the frontal rostral field (FR). Here, we present data collected in FR using electrophysiological and anatomical methods. Results show that FR contains an isolated motor representation of the forelimb that can be differentiated from PMv based on current thresholds and latencies to evoke electromyographic activity using intracortical microstimulation techniques. In addition, FR has a different pattern of cortical connections compared with PMv. Together, these data support that FR is an additional, previously undescribed motor-related area in squirrel monkeys. PMID:18424778

  14. Neonatal Leptin Deficiency Reduces Frontal Cortex Volumes and Programs Adult Hyperactivity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dexter, Benjamin C; Rahmouni, Kamal; Cushman, Taylor; Hermann, Gregory M; Ni, Charles; Nopoulos, Peg C; Thedens, Daniel L; Roghair, Robert D

    2014-01-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction and premature delivery decrease circulating levels of the neurotrophic hormone leptin and increase the risk of adult psychiatric disease. In mouse models, neonatal leptin replacement normalizes brain growth and improves the neurodevelopmental outcomes of growth restricted mice, but leptin supplementation of well-grown mice decreases adult locomotor activity. We hypothesized isolated neonatal leptin deficiency is sufficient to reduce adult brain volumes and program behavioral outcomes, including hyperactivity. C57Bl/6 pups were randomized to daily injections of saline or PEG-leptin antagonist (LX, 12.5 mg/kg) from postnatal day 4 to 14. After 4 months, fear conditioning and open field testing were performed followed by carotid radiotelemetry for the measurement of baseline activity and blood pressure. Neonatal LX did not significantly increase cue-based fear or blood pressure, but increased adult locomotor activity during assessment in both the open field (beam breaks: control 930±40, LX 1099±42, P<0.01) and the home cage (radiotelemetry counts: control 4.5±0.3, LX 5.6±0.3, P=0.02). Follow-up MRI revealed significant reductions in adult frontal cortex volumes following neonatal LX administration (control 45.1±0.4 mm3, LX 43.8±0.4 mm3, P=0.04). This was associated with a significant increase in cerebral cortex leptin receptor mRNA expression. In conclusion, isolated neonatal leptin deficiency increases cerebral cortex leptin receptor expression and reduces frontal cortex volumes in association with increased adult locomotor activity. We speculate neonatal leptin deficiency may contribute to the adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes associated with perinatal growth restriction, and postnatal leptin therapy may be protective. PMID:24472638

  15. [Interaction between neurons of the frontal cortex and hippocampus during the realization of choice of food reinforcement quality in cats].

    PubMed

    Merzhanova, G Kh; Dolbakian, E E; Khokhlova, V N

    2003-01-01

    Six cats were subjected to the procedure of appetitive instrumental conditioning (with light as a conditioned stimuls) by the method of the "active choice" of reinforcement quality. Short-delay conditioned bar-press responses were rewarded with bread-meat mixture, and the delayed responses were reinforced by meat. The animals differed in behavior strategy: four animals preferred the bar-pressing with a long delay (the so-called "self-control" group), and two cats preferred the bar-pressing with a short delay (the so-called "impulsive" group). Multiunit activity in the frontal cortex and hippocampus (CA3) was recorded via chronically implanted nichrome wire semimicroelectrodes. An interaction between the neighboring neurons in the frontal cortex and hippocampus (within local neural networks) and between the neurons of the frontal cortex and hippocampus (distributed neural networks in frontal-hippocampal and hippocampal-frontal directions) was evaluated by means of statistical crosscorrelation analysis of spike trains. Crosscorrelations between neuronal spike trains in the delay range of 0-100 ms were explored. It was shown that the number of crosscorrelations between the neuronal discharges both in the local and distributed networks was significantly higher in the "self-control" cats. It was suggested that the local and distributed neural networks of the frontal cortex and hippocampus are involved in the system of brain structures which determine the behavioral strategy of animals in the "self-control" group. PMID:12889201

  16. Microglia recapitulate a hematopoietic master regulator network in the aging human frontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Wehrspaun, Claudia C.; Haerty, Wilfried; Ponting, Chris P.

    2015-01-01

    Microglia form the immune system of the brain. Previous studies in cell cultures and animal models suggest altered activation states and cellular senescence in the aged brain. Instead, we analyzed 3 transcriptome data sets from the postmortem frontal cortex of 381 control individuals to show that microglia gene markers assemble into a transcriptional module in a gene coexpression network. These markers predominantly represented M1 and M1/M2b activation phenotypes. Expression of genes in this module generally declines over the adult life span. This decrease was more pronounced in microglia surface receptors for microglia and/or neuron crosstalk than in markers for activation state phenotypes. In addition to these receptors for exogenous signals, microglia are controlled by brain-expressed regulatory factors. We identified a subnetwork of transcription factors, including RUNX1, IRF8, PU.1, and TAL1, which are master regulators (MRs) for the age-dependent microglia module. The causal contributions of these MRs on the microglia module were verified using publicly available ChIP-Seq data. Interactions of these key MRs were preserved in a protein-protein interaction network. Importantly, these MRs appear to be essential for regulating microglia homeostasis in the adult human frontal cortex in addition to their crucial roles in hematopoiesis and myeloid cell-fate decisions during embryogenesis. PMID:26002684

  17. Evolution of increased glia–neuron ratios in the human frontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Chet C.; Stimpson, Cheryl D.; Raghanti, Mary Ann; Wildman, Derek E.; Uddin, Monica; Grossman, Lawrence I.; Goodman, Morris; Redmond, John C.; Bonar, Christopher J.; Erwin, Joseph M.; Hof, Patrick R.

    2006-01-01

    Evidence from comparative studies of gene expression and evolution suggest that human neocortical neurons may be characterized by unusually high levels of energy metabolism. The current study examined whether there is a disproportionate increase in glial cell density in the human frontal cortex in comparison with other anthropoid primate species (New World monkeys, Old World monkeys, and hominoids) to support greater metabolic demands. Among 18 species of anthropoids, humans displayed the greatest departure from allometric scaling expectations for the density of glia relative to neurons in layer II/III of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (area 9L). However, the human glia–neuron ratio in this prefrontal region did not differ significantly from allometric predictions based on brain size. Further analyses of glia–neuron ratios across frontal areas 4, 9L, 32, and 44 in a sample of humans, chimpanzees, and macaque monkeys showed that regions involved in specialized human cognitive functions, such as “theory of mind” (area 32) and language (area 44) have not evolved differentially higher requirements for metabolic support. Taken together, these findings suggest that greater metabolic consumption of human neocortical neurons relates to the energetic costs of maintaining expansive dendritic arbors and long-range projecting axons in the context of an enlarged brain. PMID:16938869

  18. Longitudinal Effects of Ketamine on Dendritic Architecture In Vivo in the Mouse Medial Frontal Cortex123

    PubMed Central

    Phoumthipphavong, Victoria; Barthas, Florent; Hassett, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A single subanesthetic dose of ketamine, an NMDA receptor antagonist, leads to fast-acting antidepressant effects. In rodent models, systemic ketamine is associated with higher dendritic spine density in the prefrontal cortex, reflecting structural remodeling that may underlie the behavioral changes. However, turnover of dendritic spines is a dynamic process in vivo, and the longitudinal effects of ketamine on structural plasticity remain unclear. The purpose of the current study is to use subcellular resolution optical imaging to determine the time course of dendritic alterations in vivo following systemic ketamine administration in mice. We used two-photon microscopy to visualize repeatedly the same set of dendritic branches in the mouse medial frontal cortex (MFC) before and after a single injection of ketamine or saline. Compared to controls, ketamine-injected mice had higher dendritic spine density in MFC for up to 2 weeks. This prolonged increase in spine density was driven by an elevated spine formation rate, and not by changes in the spine elimination rate. A fraction of the new spines following ketamine injection was persistent, which is indicative of functional synapses. In a few cases, we also observed retraction of distal apical tuft branches on the day immediately after ketamine administration. These results indicate that following systemic ketamine administration, certain dendritic inputs in MFC are removed immediately, while others are added gradually. These dynamic structural modifications are consistent with a model of ketamine action in which the net effect is a rebalancing of synaptic inputs received by frontal cortical neurons. PMID:27066532

  19. Microglia recapitulate a hematopoietic master regulator network in the aging human frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Wehrspaun, Claudia C; Haerty, Wilfried; Ponting, Chris P

    2015-08-01

    Microglia form the immune system of the brain. Previous studies in cell cultures and animal models suggest altered activation states and cellular senescence in the aged brain. Instead, we analyzed 3 transcriptome data sets from the postmortem frontal cortex of 381 control individuals to show that microglia gene markers assemble into a transcriptional module in a gene coexpression network. These markers predominantly represented M1 and M1/M2b activation phenotypes. Expression of genes in this module generally declines over the adult life span. This decrease was more pronounced in microglia surface receptors for microglia and/or neuron crosstalk than in markers for activation state phenotypes. In addition to these receptors for exogenous signals, microglia are controlled by brain-expressed regulatory factors. We identified a subnetwork of transcription factors, including RUNX1, IRF8, PU.1, and TAL1, which are master regulators (MRs) for the age-dependent microglia module. The causal contributions of these MRs on the microglia module were verified using publicly available ChIP-Seq data. Interactions of these key MRs were preserved in a protein-protein interaction network. Importantly, these MRs appear to be essential for regulating microglia homeostasis in the adult human frontal cortex in addition to their crucial roles in hematopoiesis and myeloid cell-fate decisions during embryogenesis. PMID:26002684

  20. What makes the dorsomedial frontal cortex active during reading the mental states of others?

    PubMed

    Isoda, Masaki; Noritake, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    The dorsomedial frontal part of the cerebral cortex is consistently activated when people read the mental states of others, such as their beliefs, desires, and intentions, the ability known as having a theory of mind (ToM) or mentalizing. This ubiquitous finding has led many researchers to conclude that the dorsomedial frontal cortex (DMFC) constitutes a core component in mentalizing networks. Despite this, it remains unclear why the DMFC becomes active during ToM tasks. We argue that key psychological and behavioral aspects in mentalizing are closely associated with DMFC functions. These include executive inhibition, distinction between self and others, prediction under uncertainty, and perception of intentions, all of which are important for predicting others' intention and behavior. We review the literature supporting this claim, ranging in fields from developmental psychology to human neuroimaging and macaque electrophysiology. Because perceiving intentions in others' actions initiates mentalizing and forms the basis of virtually all types of social interaction, the fundamental issue in social neuroscience is to determine the aspects of physical entities that make an observer perceive that they are intentional beings and to clarify the neurobiological underpinnings of the perception of intentionality in others' actions. PMID:24367287

  1. The scarcity heuristic impacts reward processing within the medial-frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Williams, Chad C; Saffer, Boaz Y; McCulloch, Robert B; Krigolson, Olave E

    2016-05-01

    Objects that are rare are often perceived to be inherently more valuable than objects that are abundant - a bias brought about in part by the scarcity heuristic. In the present study, we sought to test whether perception of rarity impacted reward evaluation within the human medial-frontal cortex. Here, participants played a gambling game in which they flipped rare and abundant 'cards' on a computer screen to win financial rewards while electroencephalographic data were recorded. Unbeknownst to participants, reward outcome and frequency was random and equivalent for both rare and abundant cards; thus, only a perception of scarcity was true. Analysis of the electroencephalographic data indicated that the P300 component of the event-related brain potential differed in amplitude for wins and losses following the selection of rare cards, but not following the selection of abundant cards. Importantly, then, we found that the perception of card rarity impacted reward processing even though reward feedback was independent of and subsequent to card selection. Our data indicate a top-down influence of the scarcity heuristic on reward evaluation, and specifically the processing of reward magnitude, within the human medial-frontal cortex. PMID:27031875

  2. Less efficient and costly processes of frontal cortex in childhood chronic fatigue syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Kei; Tanaka, Masaaki; Tanabe, Hiroki C.; Joudoi, Takako; Kawatani, Junko; Shigihara, Yoshihito; Tomoda, Akemi; Miike, Teruhisa; Imai-Matsumura, Kyoko; Sadato, Norihiro; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    The ability to divide one's attention deteriorates in patients with childhood chronic fatigue syndrome (CCFS). We conducted a study using a dual verbal task to assess allocation of attentional resources to two simultaneous activities (picking out vowels and reading for story comprehension) and functional magnetic resonance imaging. Patients exhibited a much larger area of activation, recruiting additional frontal areas. The right middle frontal gyrus (MFG), which is included in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, of CCFS patients was specifically activated in both the single and dual tasks; this activation level was positively correlated with motivation scores for the tasks and accuracy of story comprehension. In addition, in patients, the dorsal anterior cingulate gyrus (dACC) and left MFG were activated only in the dual task, and activation levels of the dACC and left MFG were positively associated with the motivation and fatigue scores, respectively. Patients with CCFS exhibited a wider area of activated frontal regions related to attentional resources in order to increase their poorer task performance with massive mental effort. This is likely to be less efficient and costly in terms of energy requirements. It seems to be related to the pathophysiology of patients with CCFS and to cause a vicious cycle of further increases in fatigue. PMID:26594619

  3. Less efficient and costly processes of frontal cortex in childhood chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Kei; Tanaka, Masaaki; Tanabe, Hiroki C; Joudoi, Takako; Kawatani, Junko; Shigihara, Yoshihito; Tomoda, Akemi; Miike, Teruhisa; Imai-Matsumura, Kyoko; Sadato, Norihiro; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    The ability to divide one's attention deteriorates in patients with childhood chronic fatigue syndrome (CCFS). We conducted a study using a dual verbal task to assess allocation of attentional resources to two simultaneous activities (picking out vowels and reading for story comprehension) and functional magnetic resonance imaging. Patients exhibited a much larger area of activation, recruiting additional frontal areas. The right middle frontal gyrus (MFG), which is included in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, of CCFS patients was specifically activated in both the single and dual tasks; this activation level was positively correlated with motivation scores for the tasks and accuracy of story comprehension. In addition, in patients, the dorsal anterior cingulate gyrus (dACC) and left MFG were activated only in the dual task, and activation levels of the dACC and left MFG were positively associated with the motivation and fatigue scores, respectively. Patients with CCFS exhibited a wider area of activated frontal regions related to attentional resources in order to increase their poorer task performance with massive mental effort. This is likely to be less efficient and costly in terms of energy requirements. It seems to be related to the pathophysiology of patients with CCFS and to cause a vicious cycle of further increases in fatigue. PMID:26594619

  4. Thalamocortical Connections of Functional Zones in Posterior Parietal Cortex and Frontal Cortex Motor Regions in New World Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Stepniewska, Iwona; Burish, Mark J.; Kaas, Jon H.

    2010-01-01

    Posterior parietal cortex (PPC) links primate visual and motor systems and is central to visually guided action. Relating the anatomical connections of PPC to its neurophysiological functions may elucidate the organization of the parietal–frontal network. In owl and squirrel monkeys, long-duration electrical stimulation distinguished several functional zones within the PPC and motor/premotor cortex (M1/PM). Multijoint forelimb movements reminiscent of reach, defense, and grasp behaviors characterized each functional zone. In PPC, functional zones were organized parallel to the lateral sulcus. Thalamocortical connections of PPC and M1/PM zones were investigated with retrograde tracers. After several days of tracer transport, brains were processed, and labeled cells in thalamic nuclei were plotted. All PPC zones received dense inputs from the lateral posterior nucleus and the anterior pulvinar. PPC zones received additional projections from ventral lateral (VL) divisions of motor thalamus, which were also the primary source of input to M1/PM. Projections to PPC from rostral motor thalamus were sparse. Dense projections from ventral posterior (VP) nucleus of somatosensory thalamus distinguished the rostrolateral grasp zone from the other PPC zones. PPC connections with VL and VP provide links to cerebellar nuclei and the somatosensory system, respectively, that may integrate PPC functions with M1/PM. PMID:20080929

  5. Functional and Structural Remodeling of Glutamate Synapses in Prefrontal and Frontal Cortex Induced by Behavioral Stress

    PubMed Central

    Musazzi, Laura; Treccani, Giulia; Popoli, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence has shown that the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders, including mood disorders, is associated with abnormal function and regulation of the glutamatergic system. Consistently, preclinical studies on stress-based animal models of pathology showed that glucocorticoids and stress exert crucial effects on neuronal excitability and function, especially in cortical and limbic areas. In prefrontal and frontal cortex, acute stress was shown to induce enhancement of glutamate release/transmission dependent on activation of corticosterone receptors. Although the mechanisms whereby stress affects glutamate transmission have not yet been fully understood, it was shown that synaptic, non-genomic action of corticosterone is required to increase the readily releasable pool of glutamate vesicles, but is not sufficient to enhance transmission in prefrontal and frontal cortex. Slower, partly genomic mechanisms are probably necessary for the enhancement of glutamate transmission induced by stress. Combined evidence has suggested that the changes in glutamate release and transmission are responsible for the dendritic remodeling and morphological changes induced by stress and it has been argued that sustained alterations of glutamate transmission may play a key role in the long-term structural/functional changes associated with mood disorders in patients. Intriguingly, modifications of the glutamatergic system induced by stress in the prefrontal cortex seem to be biphasic. Indeed, while the fast response to stress suggests an enhancement in the number of excitatory synapses, synaptic transmission and working memory, long-term adaptive changes – including those consequent to chronic stress – induce opposite effects. Better knowledge of the cellular effectors involved in this biphasic effect of stress may be useful to understand the pathophysiology of stress-related disorders, and open new paths for the development of therapeutic approaches. PMID

  6. Placental Estrogen Suppresses Cyclin D1 Expression in the Nonhuman Primate Fetal Adrenal Cortex*

    PubMed Central

    Dumitrescu, Adina; Aberdeen, Graham W.; Pepe, Gerald J.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that estrogen selectively suppresses growth of the fetal zone of the baboon fetal adrenal cortex, which produces the C19-steroid precursors, eg, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, which are aromatized to estrogen within the placenta. In the present study, we determined whether fetal adrenal expression of cell cycle regulators are altered by estrogen and thus provide a mechanism by which estrogen regulates fetal adrenocortical development. Cyclin D1 mRNA levels in the whole fetal adrenal were increased 50% (P < .05), and the number of cells in the fetal adrenal definitive zone expressing cyclin D1 protein was increased 2.5-fold (P < .05), whereas the total number of cells in the fetal zone and fetal serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels were elevated 2-fold (P < .05) near term in baboons in which fetal serum estradiol levels were decreased by 95% (P < .05) after maternal administration of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole and restored to normal by concomitant administration of letrozole plus estradiol throughout second half of gestation. However, fetal adrenocortical expression of cyclin D2, the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)-2, Cdk4, and Cdk6, and Cdk regulatory proteins p27Kip1 and p57Kip2 were not changed by letrozole or letrozole plus estradiol administration. We suggest that estrogen controls the growth of the fetal zone of the fetal adrenal by down-regulating cyclin D1 expression and thus proliferation of progenitor cells within the definitive zone that migrate to the fetal zone. We propose that estrogen restrains growth and function of the fetal zone via cyclin D1 to maintain estrogen levels in a physiological range during primate pregnancy. PMID:25247468

  7. Reduced frontal cortex thickness and cortical volume associated with pathological narcissism.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yu; Sang, Na; Wang, Yongchao; Hou, Xin; Huang, Hui; Wei, Dongtao; Zhang, Jinfu; Qiu, Jiang

    2016-07-22

    Pathological narcissism is often characterized by arrogant behavior, a lack of empathy, and willingness to exploit other individuals. Generally, individuals with high levels of narcissism are more likely to suffer mental disorders. However, the brain structural basis of individual pathological narcissism trait among healthy people has not yet been investigated with surface-based morphometry. Thus, in this study, we investigated the relationship between cortical thickness (CT), cortical volume (CV), and individual pathological narcissism in a large healthy sample of 176 college students. Multiple regression was used to analyze the correlation between regional CT, CV, and the total Pathological Narcissism Inventory (PNI) score, adjusting for age, sex, and total intracranial volume. The results showed that the PNI score was significantly negatively associated with CT and CV in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC, key region of the central executive network, CEN), which might be associated with impaired emotion regulation processes. Furthermore, the PNI score showed significant negative associations with CV in the right postcentral gyrus, left medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), and the CT in the right inferior frontal cortex (IFG, overlap with social brain network), which may be related to impairments in social cognition. Together, these findings suggest a unique structural basis for individual differences in pathological narcissism, distributed across different gray matter regions of the social brain network and CEN. PMID:27129440

  8. Distributed representations of rule identity and rule order in human frontal cortex and striatum.

    PubMed

    Reverberi, Carlo; Görgen, Kai; Haynes, John-Dylan

    2012-11-28

    Humans are able to flexibly devise and implement rules to reach their desired goals. For simple situations, we can use single rules, such as "if traffic light is green then cross the street." In most cases, however, more complex rule sets are required, involving the integration of multiple layers of control. Although it has been shown that prefrontal cortex is important for rule representation, it has remained unclear how the brain encodes more complex rule sets. Here, we investigate how the brain represents the order in which different parts of a rule set are evaluated. Participants had to follow compound rule sets that involved the concurrent application of two single rules in a specific order, where one of the rules always had to be evaluated first. The rules and their assigned order were independently manipulated. By applying multivariate decoding to fMRI data, we found that the identity of the current rule was encoded in a frontostriatal network involving right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, right superior frontal gyrus, and dorsal striatum. In contrast, rule order could be decoded in the dorsal striatum and in the right premotor cortex. The nonhomogeneous distribution of information across brain areas was confirmed by follow-up analyses focused on relevant regions of interest. We argue that the brain encodes complex rule sets by "decomposing" them in their constituent features, which are represented in different brain areas, according to the aspect of information to be maintained. PMID:23197733

  9. Prenatal exposure to moderate levels of ethanol alters social behavior in adult rats: Relationship to structural plasticity and immediate early gene expression in frontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Derek A.; Akers, Katherine G.; Rice, James P.; Johnson, Travis E.; Candelaria-Cook, Felicha T.; Maes, Levi I.; Rosenberg, Martina; Valenzuela, C. Fernando; Savage, Daniel D.

    2009-01-01

    The goals of the present study were to characterize the effects of prenatal exposure to moderate levels of ethanol on adult social behavior, and to evaluate fetal-ethanol-related effects on dendritic morphology, structural plasticity and activity-related immediate early gene (IEG) expression in the agranular insular (AID) and prelimbic (Cg3) regions of frontal cortex. Baseline fetal-ethanol-related alterations in social behavior were limited to reductions in social investigation in males. Repeated experience with novel cage-mates resulted in comparable increases in wrestling and social investigation among saccharin- and ethanol-exposed females, whereas social behavioral effects among males were more evident in ethanol-exposed animals. Male ethanol-exposed rats also displayed profound increases in wrestling when social interaction was motivated by 24 hours of isolation. Baseline decreases in dendritic length and spine density in AID were observed in ethanol-exposed rats that were always housed with the same cage-mate. Modest experience-related decreases in dendritic length and spine density in AID were observed in saccharin-exposed rats housed with various cage-mates. In contrast, fetal-ethanol-exposed rats displayed experience-related increases in dendritic length in AID, and no experience-related changes in spine density. The only effect observed in Cg3 was a baseline increase in basilar dendritic length among male ethanol-exposed rats. Robust increases in activity-related IEG expression in AID (c-fos and Arc) and Cg3 (c-fos) were observed following social interaction in saccharin-exposed rats, however, activity-related increases in IEG expression were not observed in fetal-ethanol-exposed rats in either region. The results indicate that deficits in social behavior are among the long-lasting behavioral consequences of moderate ethanol exposure during brain development, and implicate AID, and to a lesser degree Cg3, in fetal-ethanol-related social behavior

  10. Exploratory Metabolomic Analyses Reveal Compounds Correlated with Lutein Concentration in Frontal Cortex, Hippocampus, and Occipital Cortex of Human Infant Brain

    PubMed Central

    Lieblein-Boff, Jacqueline C.; Johnson, Elizabeth J.; Kennedy, Adam D.; Lai, Chron-Si; Kuchan, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Lutein is a dietary carotenoid well known for its role as an antioxidant in the macula, and recent reports implicate a role for lutein in cognitive function. Lutein is the dominant carotenoid in both pediatric and geriatric brain tissue. In addition, cognitive function in older adults correlated with macular and postmortem brain lutein concentrations. Furthermore, lutein was found to preferentially accumulate in the infant brain in comparison to other carotenoids that are predominant in diet. While lutein is consistently related to cognitive function, the mechanisms by which lutein may influence cognition are not clear. In an effort to identify potential mechanisms through which lutein might influence neurodevelopment, an exploratory study relating metabolite signatures and lutein was completed. Post-mortem metabolomic analyses were performed on human infant brain tissues in three regions important for learning and memory: the frontal cortex, hippocampus, and occipital cortex. Metabolomic profiles were compared to lutein concentration, and correlations were identified and reported here. A total of 1276 correlations were carried out across all brain regions. Of 427 metabolites analyzed, 257 were metabolites of known identity. Unidentified metabolite correlations (510) were excluded. In addition, moderate correlations with xenobiotic relationships (2) or those driven by single outliers (3) were excluded from further study. Lutein concentrations correlated with lipid pathway metabolites, energy pathway metabolites, brain osmolytes, amino acid neurotransmitters, and the antioxidant homocarnosine. These correlations were often brain region—specific. Revealing relationships between lutein and metabolic pathways may help identify potential candidates on which to complete further analyses and may shed light on important roles of lutein in the human brain during development. PMID:26317757

  11. Echo-planar magnetic resonance imaging studies of frontal cortex activation during word generation in humans.

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, G; Blamire, A M; Rothman, D L; Gruetter, R; Shulman, R G

    1993-01-01

    Nine subjects were studied by high-speed magnetic resonance imaging while performing language-based tasks. Subjects were asked either to repeat or to generate verbs associated with nouns read by an experimenter while magnetic resonance images were obtained of the left inferior frontal lobe. The echo-planar imaging sequence was used with a gradient echo time of 70 ms to give an apparent transverse relaxation time weighting (T2* that is sensitive to local hemoglobin levels. Images were acquired every 3 s (repetition time) in series of 32. In plane resolution was 6 x 4.5 mm and slice thickness was 10 mm. An increase in signal accompanied performance of the tasks, with significantly more activation for verb generation than for repeating. The activation effect occurred within 3 s after task onset and could be observed in single images from individual subjects. The primary focus of activation appeared in gray matter along a sulcus anterior to the lateral sulcus that included the anterior insula, Brodmann's area 47, and extending to area 10. Little or no activation of this region was found for a passive listening, covert generation, or mouth-movement control tasks. Significant activation was also found for a homologous region in the right frontal cortex but not for control regions in calcarine cortex. These results are consistent with prior studies that have used positron emission tomography imaging with 15O-labeled water as a blood flow tracer. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8506340

  12. Topographic analysis of individual activation patterns in medial frontal cortex in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Stern, Emily R; Welsh, Robert C; Fitzgerald, Kate D; Taylor, Stephan F

    2009-07-01

    Individual variability in the location of neural activations poses a unique problem for neuroimaging studies employing group averaging techniques to investigate the neural bases of cognitive and emotional functions. This may be especially challenging for studies examining patient groups, which often have limited sample sizes and increased intersubject variability. In particular, medial frontal cortex (MFC) dysfunction is thought to underlie performance monitoring dysfunction among patients with schizophrenia, yet previous studies using group averaging to compare schizophrenic patients to controls have yielded conflicting results. To examine individual activations in MFC associated with two aspects of performance monitoring, interference and error processing, functional magnetic resonance imaging data were acquired while 17 patients with schizophrenia and 21 healthy controls (HCs) performed an event-related version of the multisource interference task. Comparisons of averaged data revealed few differences between the groups. By contrast, topographic analysis of individual activations for errors showed that control subjects exhibited activations spanning across both posterior and anterior regions of MFC while patients primarily activated posterior MFC, possibly reflecting an impaired emotional response to errors in schizophrenia. This discrepancy between topographic and group-averaged results may be due to the significant dispersion among individual activations, particularly in HCs, highlighting the importance of considering intersubject variability when interpreting the medial frontal response to error commission. PMID:18819107

  13. The role of the frontal cortex in memory: an investigation of the Von Restorff effect

    PubMed Central

    Elhalal, Anat; Davelaar, Eddy J.; Usher, Marius

    2014-01-01

    Evidence from neuropsychology and neuroimaging indicate that the pre-frontal cortex (PFC) plays an important role in human memory. Although frontal patients are able to form new memories, these memories appear qualitatively different from those of controls by lacking distinctiveness. Neuroimaging studies of memory indicate activation in the PFC under deep encoding conditions, and under conditions of semantic elaboration. Based on these results, we hypothesize that the PFC enhances memory by extracting differences and commonalities in the studied material. To test this hypothesis, we carried out an experimental investigation to test the relationship between the PFC-dependent factors and semantic factors associated with common and specific features of words. These experiments were performed using Free-Recall of word lists with healthy adults, exploiting the correlation between PFC function and fluid intelligence. As predicted, a correlation was found between fluid intelligence and the Von-Restorff effect (better memory for semantic isolates, e.g., isolate “cat” within category members of “fruit”). Moreover, memory for the semantic isolate was found to depend on the isolate's serial position. The isolate item tends to be recalled first, in comparison to non-isolates, suggesting that the process interacts with short term memory. These results are captured within a computational model of free recall, which includes a PFC mechanism that is sensitive to both commonality and distinctiveness, sustaining a trade-off between the two. PMID:25018721

  14. An Herbal Nasal Drop Enhanced Frontal and Anterior Cingulate Cortex Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Agnes S.; Cheung, Mei-chun; Sze, Sophia L.; Leung, Winnie W.; Shi, Dejian

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined the neuro-electrophysiological activity of the brain associated with the application of a herbal remedy developed by a Shaolin monk based upon the Chan healing principle of clearing the orifices (i.e., the nasal cavities). A repeated-measures design was used. Fourteen normal adults were administered herbal remedy and saline solution intranasally on separate sessions. Two intervals of eyes-closed resting EEG data were obtained individually before and after each administration. Results showed that only the herbal remedy but not the saline solution induced elevation in cordance, an index correlated with cerebral perfusion, in the anterior brain region. In addition, the activity of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), as examined by the LORETA analysis, was also increased after the application of the herbal remedy but not saline solution. The present study provided some preliminary evidence suggesting that the herbal nasal drop enhanced the activity of the frontal lobe and ACC. Implications for the potential clinical application of the herbal remedy to treat patients with frontal lobe disorders were discussed. PMID:19996154

  15. Manatee cerebral cortex: cytoarchitecture of the frontal region in Trichechus manatus latirostris.

    PubMed

    Reep, R L; Johnson, J I; Switzer, R C; Welker, W I

    1989-01-01

    Members of the order Sirenia are unique among mammals in being the only totally aquatic herbivores. They display correspondingly specialized physiological, behavioral and anatomical features. There have been few reports concerning sirenian neuroanatomy, and most of these have consisted of gross anatomical observations. Our interest in Sirenia stems from the desire to understand neuroanatomical specializations in the context of behavior and the effort to elucidate trends in mammalian brain evolution. The architecture of frontal regions of cerebral cortex was investigated in several brains of the Florida manatee, Trichechus manatus latirostris. Through observation of sections stained for Nissl substance or myelinated fibers, several distinct cortical areas were identified on the basis of laminar organization. These range from areas with poorly defined laminae to those having 6 well-defined layers, some of which exhibit sublayers. Two cortical areas exhibit pronounced cell clusters in layer VI, and these stain positively for acetylcholinesterase and cytochrome oxidase. We hypothesize that these clusters may be involved in perioral tactile bristle function. Certain of our findings are consistent with previous observations in the literature on the brains of dugongs. On the basis of their lamination patterns, these frontal cortical areas appear to be organized into concentric zones of allocortex, mesocortex and isocortex. PMID:2611642

  16. The effects of chronic fluoxetine treatment following injury of medial frontal cortex in mice.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Brendan B; Spanswick, Simon C; Patel, Payal P; Barneto, Alison A; Dyck, Richard H

    2015-09-01

    Injury of the brain is a leading cause of long-term disability. Recent evidence indicates that the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drug fluoxetine may be beneficial when administered following brain injury. However, its potential to promote recovery and the mechanisms by which it might do so require further characterization. In the present experiment, fluoxetine was administered to mice for 4 weeks following injury of medial frontal cortex (MFC). MFC injury altered behavior, reducing locomotion, decreasing swim speed in the Morris water task, and decreasing anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze. Fluoxetine treatment did not affect these behavioral alterations, but it did increase the social dominance of the injured mice, as assessed by the tube test. Fluoxetine treatment also hastened learning of a T-maze position discrimination task, independently of lesion condition. Anatomically, fluoxetine failed to decrease lesion size, increase the survival of cells born 1-week post injury in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, or reverse the reduction in spine density in layer II/III pyramidal neurons in cingulate cortex caused by the lesions. Fluoxetine did, however, increase the dendritic arborization of these cells, which was reduced in the mice with lesions. Thus, while not all the effects of MFC injury were ameliorated, the behavioral outcome of mice with MFC injuries was improved, and one of the neuroanatomical sequelae of the lesions counteracted, by chronic fluoxetine, further contributing to the evidence that fluoxetine could be a useful treatment following brain injury. PMID:25956871

  17. Dorso-Lateral Frontal Cortex of the Ferret Encodes Perceptual Difficulty during Visual Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhe Charles; Yu, Chunxiu; Sellers, Kristin K.; Fröhlich, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    Visual discrimination requires sensory processing followed by a perceptual decision. Despite a growing understanding of visual areas in this behavior, it is unclear what role top-down signals from prefrontal cortex play, in particular as a function of perceptual difficulty. To address this gap, we investigated how neurons in dorso-lateral frontal cortex (dl-FC) of freely-moving ferrets encode task variables in a two-alternative forced choice visual discrimination task with high- and low-contrast visual input. About two-thirds of all recorded neurons in dl-FC were modulated by at least one of the two task variables, task difficulty and target location. More neurons in dl-FC preferred the hard trials; no such preference bias was found for target location. In individual neurons, this preference for specific task types was limited to brief epochs. Finally, optogenetic stimulation confirmed the functional role of the activity in dl-FC before target touch; suppression of activity in pyramidal neurons with the ArchT silencing opsin resulted in a decrease in reaction time to touch the target but not to retrieve reward. In conclusion, dl-FC activity is differentially recruited for high perceptual difficulty in the freely-moving ferret and the resulting signal may provide top-down behavioral inhibition. PMID:27025995

  18. Antiamnesic effect of acyl-prolyl-containing dipeptide (GVS-111) in compression-induced damage to frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Romanova, G A; Mirzoev, T K; Barskov, I V; Victorov, I V; Gudasheva, T A; Ostrovskaya, R U

    2000-09-01

    Antiamnestic effect of acyl-prolyl-containing dipeptide GVS-111 was demonstrated in rats with bilateral compression-induced damage to the frontal cortex. Both intraperitoneal and oral administration of the dipeptide improved retrieval of passive avoidance responses in rats with compression-induced cerebral ischemia compared to untreated controls. PMID:11177261

  19. Frontal Eye Fields Control Attentional Modulation of Alpha and Gamma Oscillations in Contralateral Occipitoparietal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    O'Shea, Jacinta; Jensen, Ole; Bergmann, Til O.

    2015-01-01

    Covertly directing visuospatial attention produces a frequency-specific modulation of neuronal oscillations in occipital and parietal cortices: anticipatory alpha (8–12 Hz) power decreases contralateral and increases ipsilateral to attention, whereas stimulus-induced gamma (>40 Hz) power is boosted contralaterally and attenuated ipsilaterally. These modulations must be under top-down control; however, the control mechanisms are not yet fully understood. Here we investigated the causal contribution of the human frontal eye field (FEF) by combining repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) with subsequent magnetoencephalography. Following inhibitory theta burst stimulation to the left FEF, right FEF, or vertex, participants performed a visual discrimination task requiring covert attention to either visual hemifield. Both left and right FEF TMS caused marked attenuation of alpha modulation in the occipitoparietal cortex. Notably, alpha modulation was consistently reduced in the hemisphere contralateral to stimulation, leaving the ipsilateral hemisphere relatively unaffected. Additionally, right FEF TMS enhanced gamma modulation in left visual cortex. Behaviorally, TMS caused a relative slowing of response times to targets contralateral to stimulation during the early task period. Our results suggest that left and right FEF are causally involved in the attentional top-down control of anticipatory alpha power in the contralateral visual system, whereas a right-hemispheric dominance seems to exist for control of stimulus-induced gamma power. These findings contrast the assumption of primarily intrahemispheric connectivity between FEF and parietal cortex, emphasizing the relevance of interhemispheric interactions. The contralaterality of effects may result from a transient functional reorganization of the dorsal attention network after inhibition of either FEF. PMID:25632139

  20. Cortical thickness of superior frontal cortex predicts impulsiveness and perceptual reasoning in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Schilling, C; Kühn, S; Paus, T; Romanowski, A; Banaschewski, T; Barbot, A; Barker, G J; Brühl, R; Büchel, C; Conrod, P J; Dalley, J W; Flor, H; Ittermann, B; Ivanov, N; Mann, K; Martinot, J-L; Nees, F; Rietschel, M; Robbins, T W; Smolka, M N; Ströhle, A; Kathmann, N; Garavan, H; Heinz, A; Schumann, G; Gallinat, J

    2013-05-01

    Impulsiveness is a pivotal personality trait representing a core domain in all major personality inventories. Recently, impulsiveness has been identified as an important modulator of cognitive processing, particularly in tasks that require the processing of large amounts of information. Although brain imaging studies have implicated the prefrontal cortex to be a common underlying representation of impulsiveness and related cognitive functioning, to date a fine-grain and detailed morphometric analysis has not been carried out. On the basis of ahigh-resolution magnetic resonance scans acquired in 1620 healthy adolescents (IMAGEN), the individual cortical thickness (CT) was estimated. Correlations between Cloninger's impulsiveness and CT were studied in an entire cortex analysis. The cluster identified was tested for associations with performance in perceptual reasoning tasks of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC IV). We observed a significant inverse correlation between trait impulsiveness and CT of the left superior frontal cortex (SFC; Monte Carlo Simulation P<0.01). CT within this cluster correlated with perceptual reasoning scores (Bonferroni corrected) of the WISC IV. On the basis of a large sample of adolescents, we identified an extended area in the SFC as a correlate of impulsiveness, which appears to be in line with the trait character of this prominent personality facet. The association of SFC thickness with perceptual reasoning argues for a common neurobiological basis of personality and specific cognitive domains comprising attention, spatial reasoning and response selection. The results may facilitate the understanding of the role of impulsiveness in several psychiatric disorders associated with prefrontal dysfunctions and cognitive deficits. PMID:22665261

  1. Ipsi- and contralateral frontal cortex oxygenation during handgrip task does not follow decrease on maximal force output.

    PubMed

    Kuboyama, Naomi; Shibuya, Kenichi

    2015-01-01

    The effect of fatiguing exercise on the ipsi- and contralateral frontal cortex has not been fully clarified. The purpose of this study was to investigate by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) the frontal cortex oxygenation response to a prolonged fatiguing repetitive handgrip exercise performed at maximal voluntary contraction. It was found a significant oxyhemoglobin concentration ([HbO2]) increase (p < 0.05), accompanied by a smaller and delayed deoxyhemoglobin concentration ([Hb]) decrease (p < 0.05), in both hemispheres. Then, it was indicated higher delayed oxygenation in ipsilateral oxygenation compared to contralateral oxygenation. These results provide further evidence that the complemental interaction between the ipsilateral and contralateral cortex during the fatiguing maximal exercise. PMID:26536889

  2. Chronic Ritalin Administration during Adulthood Increases Serotonin Pool in Rat Medial Frontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Daniali, Samira; Nahavandi, Arezo; Madjd, Zahra; Shahbazi, Ali; Niknazar, Somayeh; Shahbazzadeh, Delavar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ritalin has high tendency to be abused. It has been the main indication to control attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The college students may seek for it to improve their memory, decrease the need for sleep (especially during exams), which at least partially, can be related to serotonergic system. Therefore, it seems worthy to evaluate the effect of Ritalin intake on mature brain. There are many studies on Ritalin effect on developing brain, but only few studies on adults are available. This study was undertaken to find Ritalin effect on serotonin transporter (SERT) density in medial frontal cortex (MFC) of mature rat. Methods: Thirty male Wistar rats were used in the study. Rats were assigned into five groups (n = 6 per group): one control, two Ritalin and two vehicle groups. Twelve rats received Ritalin (20 mg/kg/twice a day) orally for eleven continuous days. After one week of withdrawal and another two weeks of rest, in order to evaluate short-term effects of Ritalin, six rats were sacrificed. Another six rats were studied to detect the long-term effects of Ritalin; therefore, they were sacrificed 12 weeks after the previous group. The immunohistochemistry was performed to evaluate the results. Results: Immunohistochemistry studies showed a higher density of SERT in both 2 and 12 weeks after withdrawal from Ritalin intake in MFC of rat and there was no significant difference between these two groups. Conclusions: Our findings demonstrated both short- and long-term effects of Ritalin on frontal serotonergic system after withdrawal period. PMID:23748891

  3. Aberrant network integrity of the inferior frontal cortex in women with anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Kullmann, Stephanie; Giel, Katrin E.; Teufel, Martin; Thiel, Ansgar; Zipfel, Stephan; Preissl, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies investigating the neural profile of anorexia nervosa (AN) have revealed a predominant imbalance between the reward and inhibition systems of the brain, which are also hallmark characteristics of the disorder. However, little is known whether these changes can also be determined independent of task condition, using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, in currently ill AN patients. Therefore the aim of our study was to investigate resting-state connectivity in AN patients (n = 12) compared to healthy athlete (n = 12) and non-athlete (n = 14) controls. For this purpose, we used degree centrality to investigate functional connectivity of the whole-brain network and then Granger causality to analyze effective connectivity (EC), to understand directional aspects of potential alterations. We were able to show that the bilateral inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) is a region of special functional importance within the whole-brain network, in AN patients, revealing reduced functional connectivity compared to both healthy control groups. Furthermore, we found decreased EC from the right IFG to the midcingulum and increased EC from the bilateral orbitofrontal gyrus to the right IFG. For the left IFG, we only observed increased EC from the bilateral insula to the left IFG. These results suggest that AN patients have reduced connectivity within the cognitive control system of the brain and increased connectivity within regions important for salience processing. Due to its fundamental role in inhibitory behavior, including motor response, altered integrity of the inferior frontal cortex could contribute to hyperactivity in AN. PMID:24936412

  4. Dissociable Roles of Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex and Frontal Eye Fields During Saccadic Eye Movements

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Ian G. M.; Riddle, Justin M.; D’Esposito, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and the frontal eye fields (FEF) have both been implicated in the executive control of saccades, yet possible dissociable roles of each region have not been established. Specifically, both establishing a “task set” as well as suppressing an inappropriate response have been linked to DLPFC and FEF activity, with behavioral outcome measures of these mechanisms mainly being the percentage of pro-saccade errors made on anti-saccade trials. We used continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS) to disrupt FEF or DLPFC function in humans during an anti-saccade task to assess the causal role of these regions in these executive control processes, and in programming saccades towards (pro-saccade) or away (anti-saccade) from visual targets. After right FEF cTBS, as compared to control cTBS to the right primary somatosensory cortex (rS1), anti-saccade amplitude of the first saccade decreased and the number of anti-saccades to acquire final position increased; however direction errors to the visual target were not different. In contrast, after left DLPFC cTBS, as compared to left S1 cTBS, subjects displayed greater direction errors for contralateral anti-saccades; however, there were no impairments on the number of saccades or the saccade amplitude. These results are consistent with the notion that DLPFC is necessary for executive control of saccades, whereas FEF is necessary for visuo-motor aspects of anti-saccade programming. PMID:26635572

  5. A causal role for posterior medial frontal cortex in choice-induced preference change.

    PubMed

    Izuma, Keise; Akula, Shyam; Murayama, Kou; Wu, Daw-An; Iacoboni, Marco; Adolphs, Ralph

    2015-02-25

    After a person chooses between two items, preference for the chosen item will increase and preference for the unchosen item will decrease because of the choice made. In other words, we tend to justify or rationalize our past behavior by changing our attitude. This phenomenon of choice-induced preference change has been traditionally explained by cognitive dissonance theory. Choosing something that is disliked or not choosing something that is liked are both cognitively inconsistent and, to reduce this inconsistency, people tend to change their subsequently stated preference in accordance with their past choices. Previously, human neuroimaging studies identified posterior medial frontal cortex (pMFC) as a key brain region involved in cognitive dissonance. However, it remains unknown whether the pMFC plays a causal role in inducing preference change after cognitive dissonance. Here, we demonstrate that 25 min, 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation applied over the pMFC significantly reduces choice-induced preference change compared with sham stimulation or control stimulation over a different brain region, demonstrating a causal role for the pMFC. PMID:25716858

  6. Microglia and astrocyte activation in the frontal cortex of rats with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Chanaday, N L; Roth, G A

    2016-02-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a widely used animal model for the human disease multiple sclerosis (MS), a demyelinating and neurodegenerative pathology of the central nervous system. Both diseases share physiopathological and clinical characteristics, mainly associated with a neuroinflammatory process that leads to a set of motor, sensory, and cognitive symptoms. In MS, gray matter atrophy is related to the emergence of cognitive deficits and contributes to clinical progression. In particular, injury and dysfunction in certain areas of the frontal cortex (FrCx) have been related to the development of cognitive impairments with high incidence, like central fatigue and executive dysfunction. In the present work we show the presence of region-specific microglia and astrocyte activation in the FrCx, during the first hours of acute EAE onset. It is accompanied by the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α, in the absence of detectable leukocyte infiltration. These findings expand previous studies showing presynaptic neural dysfunction occurring at the FrCx and might contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms involved in the genesis and prevalence of common MS symptoms. PMID:26679600

  7. Glutamine synthetase activity and glutamate uptake in hippocampus and frontal cortex in portal hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Gabriela Beatriz; Fernández, María Alejandra; Roselló, Diego Martín; Tomaro, María Luján; Balestrasse, Karina; Lemberg, Abraham

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To study glutamine synthetase (GS) activity and glutamate uptake in the hippocampus and frontal cortex (FC) from rats with prehepatic portal vein hypertension. METHODS: Male Wistar rats were divided into sham-operated group and a portal hypertension (PH) group with a regulated stricture of the portal vein. Animals were sacrificed by decapitation 14 d after portal vein stricture. GS activity was determined in the hippocampus and FC. Specific uptake of radiolabeled L-glutamate was studied using synaptosome-enriched fractions that were freshly prepared from both brain areas. RESULTS: We observed that the activity of GS increased in the hippocampus of PH rats, as compared to control animals, and decreased in the FC. A significant decrease in glutamate uptake was found in both brain areas, and was more marked in the hippocampus. The decrease in glutamate uptake might have been caused by a deficient transport function, significantly and persistent increase in this excitatory neurotransmitter activity. CONCLUSION: The presence of moderate ammonia blood levels may add to the toxicity of excitotoxic glutamate in the brain, which causes alterations in brain function. Portal vein stricture that causes portal hypertension modifies the normal function in some brain regions. PMID:19533812

  8. A multivariate approach to aggression and the orbital frontal cortex in psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Gansler, David A; McLaughlin, Nicole C R; Iguchi, Lisa; Jerram, Matthew; Moore, Dana W; Bhadelia, Rafeeque; Fulwiler, Carl

    2009-03-31

    The association between orbital frontal cortex (OFC) volume and aggression was investigated in an at-risk psychiatric population. Forty-one psychiatric patients were referred for magnetic resonance imaging and a standardized psychometric assessment of aggression (Lifetime History of Aggression-Revised). Nineteen matched controls had lower levels of aggression and greater OFC volume, establishing the appropriateness of the psychiatric group for studying aggression pathophysiology. Consistent with study hypotheses, left OFC gray matter volume predicted 34% of the variance in self-reported aggression ratings. When impulsivity was not controlled for, left OFC gray matter only accounted for 26% of aggression variance, suggesting a complex relationship between impulsivity and OFC-aggression pathophysiology. Contrary to study hypotheses, right OFC gray matter volume did not predict degree of aggressive behavior. Current models do not account for lateralization, yet this may be quite important. Greater consideration should be given to laterality in OFC regulation of social/emotional behavior. Regulatory focus theory, positing two motivational systems, promotion and prevention, lateralized to the left and right hemispheres, respectively, may provide an explanatory framework for these results. Dysregulation of the left hemisphere 'promotion' motivational system may help to explain the aggressive behavior present in psychiatric populations. PMID:19216060

  9. Frontal Cortex Transcriptome Analysis of Mice Exposed to Electronic Cigarettes During Early Life Stages.

    PubMed

    Lauterstein, Dana E; Tijerina, Pamella B; Corbett, Kevin; Akgol Oksuz, Betul; Shen, Steven S; Gordon, Terry; Klein, Catherine B; Zelikoff, Judith T

    2016-01-01

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes), battery-powered devices containing nicotine, glycerin, propylene glycol, flavorings, and other substances, are increasing in popularity. They pose a potential threat to the developing brain, as nicotine is a known neurotoxicant. We hypothesized that exposure to e-cigarettes during early life stages induce changes in central nervous system (CNS) transcriptome associated with adverse neurobiological outcomes and long-term disease states. To test the hypothesis, pregnant C57BL/6 mice were exposed daily (via whole body inhalation) throughout gestation (3 h/day; 5 days/week) to aerosols produced from e-cigarettes either with nicotine (13-16 mg/mL) or without nicotine; following birth, pups and dams were exposed together to e-cigarette aerosols throughout lactation beginning at postnatal day (PND) 4-6 and using the same exposure conditions employed during gestational exposure. Following exposure, frontal cortex recovered from ~one-month-old male and female offspring were excised and analyzed for gene expression by RNA Sequencing (RNA-Seq). Comparisons between the treatment groups revealed that e-cigarette constituents other than nicotine might be partly responsible for the observed biological effects. Transcriptome alterations in both offspring sexes and treatment groups were all significantly associated with downstream adverse neurobiological outcomes. Results from this study demonstrate that e-cigarette exposure during early life alters CNS development potentially leading to chronic neuropathology. PMID:27077873

  10. Sex and the frontal cortex: A developmental CT study in the spotted hyena.

    PubMed

    Arsznov, Bradley M; Lundrigan, Barbara L; Holekamp, Kay E; Sakai, Sharleen T

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine developmental and individual variation in total endocranial volume and regional brain volumes, including the anterior cerebrum, posterior cerebrum and cerebellum/brain stem, in the spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta). The spotted hyena is a highly gregarious animal noted for living in large, hierarchically organized groups. The social lives of male and female spotted hyenas do not differ until after puberty, when males disperse from the natal group, while females remain philopatric. Here we sought to determine whether the divergent life histories of male and female spotted hyenas are linked to differences in brain size or organization. Three-dimensional virtual endocasts were created using computed tomography from 46 spotted hyenas skulls (23 females, 22 males, 1 unknown sex) ranging in age from 1 day to 18 years. Brain volume and skull length were highly correlated (r = 0.91), and both reached asymptotic values by 34 months of age. Analyses of total endocranial volume (relative to skull length) and cerebellum/brain stem volume (relative to total endocranial volume) revealed no sex differences. However, relative anterior cerebrum volume, comprised mainly of frontal cortex, was significantly greater in adult males than adult females, and relative posterior cerebrum volume was greater in adult females than adult males. We hypothesize that the demands of neural processing underlying enhanced social cognition required for successful male transfer between matriarchical social groups at dispersal may be greater than cognitive demands on philopatric females. PMID:21088374

  11. Frontal Cortex Transcriptome Analysis of Mice Exposed to Electronic Cigarettes During Early Life Stages

    PubMed Central

    Lauterstein, Dana E.; Tijerina, Pamella B.; Corbett, Kevin; Akgol Oksuz, Betul; Shen, Steven S.; Gordon, Terry; Klein, Catherine B.; Zelikoff, Judith T.

    2016-01-01

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes), battery-powered devices containing nicotine, glycerin, propylene glycol, flavorings, and other substances, are increasing in popularity. They pose a potential threat to the developing brain, as nicotine is a known neurotoxicant. We hypothesized that exposure to e-cigarettes during early life stages induce changes in central nervous system (CNS) transcriptome associated with adverse neurobiological outcomes and long-term disease states. To test the hypothesis, pregnant C57BL/6 mice were exposed daily (via whole body inhalation) throughout gestation (3 h/day; 5 days/week) to aerosols produced from e-cigarettes either with nicotine (13–16 mg/mL) or without nicotine; following birth, pups and dams were exposed together to e-cigarette aerosols throughout lactation beginning at postnatal day (PND) 4–6 and using the same exposure conditions employed during gestational exposure. Following exposure, frontal cortex recovered from ~one-month-old male and female offspring were excised and analyzed for gene expression by RNA Sequencing (RNA-Seq). Comparisons between the treatment groups revealed that e-cigarette constituents other than nicotine might be partly responsible for the observed biological effects. Transcriptome alterations in both offspring sexes and treatment groups were all significantly associated with downstream adverse neurobiological outcomes. Results from this study demonstrate that e-cigarette exposure during early life alters CNS development potentially leading to chronic neuropathology. PMID:27077873

  12. Shared changes in gene expression in frontal cortex of four genetically modified mouse models of depression.

    PubMed

    Hoyle, D; Juhasz, G; Aso, E; Chase, D; del Rio, J; Fabre, V; Hamon, M; Lanfumey, L; Lesch, K-P; Maldonado, R; Serra, M-A; Sharp, T; Tordera, R; Toro, C; Deakin, J F W

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to identify whether genetic manipulation of four systems implicated in the pathogenesis of depression converge on shared molecular processes underpinning depression-like behaviour in mice. Altered 5HT function was modelled using the 5-HT transporter knock out mouse, impaired glucocorticoid receptor (GR) function using an antisense-induced knock down mouse, disrupted glutamate function using a heterozygous KO of the vesicular glutamate transporter 1 gene, and impaired cannabinoid signalling using the cannabinoid 1 receptor KO mouse. All 4 four genetically modified mice were previously shown to show exaggerated helpless behaviour compared to wild-type controls and variable degrees of anxiety and anhedonic behaviour. mRNA was extracted from frontal cortex and hybridised to Illumina microarrays. Combined contrast analysis was used to identify genes showing different patterns of up- and down-regulation across the 4 models. 1823 genes were differentially regulated. They were over-represented in gene ontology categories of metabolism, protein handling and synapse. In each model compared to wild-type mice of the same genetic background, a number of genes showed increased expression changes of >10%, other genes showed decreases in each model. Most of the genes showed mixed effects. Several previous array findings were replicated. The results point to cellular stress and changes in post-synaptic remodelling as final common mechanisms of depression and resilience. PMID:21030216

  13. CREB5 computational regulation network construction and analysis between frontal cortex of HIV encephalitis (HIVE) and HIVE-control patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Huang, Juxiang; Jiang, Minghu

    2011-07-01

    CREB5 computational regulation network construction and analysis of frontal cortex of HIV encephalitis (HIVE) is very useful to identify novel markers and potential targets for prognosis and therapy. By integration of gene regulatory network infer and the database for annotation, visualization and integrated discovery we identified and constructed significant molecule CREB5 regulation network from 12 frontal cortex of HIVE-control patients and 16 HIVE in the same GEO Dataset GDS1726. Our result verified CREB5 biological regulation module in the upstream of frontal cortex of HIVE-control patients (MAPKAPK3 activation; DGKG, LY96, TNFRSF11B inhibition) and downstream (ATP6V0E1, CFB, DGKG, MX1, TGFBR3 activation; LGALS3BP, RASGRP3, RDX, STAT1 inhibition), whereas in the upstream of frontal cortex of HIVE (BST2, CFB, LCAT, TNFRSF11B activation; CFHR1, LY96 inhibition) and downstream (GAS1, LCAT, LGALS3BP, NFAT5, VEZF1, ZNF652 activation; DGKG, IFITM1, LY96, TNFRSF11B inhibition). Importantly, we datamined that CREB5 regulation cluster of HIVE was involved in inflammatory response, proteolysis, biological adhesion, and negative regulation of biological process (only in HIVE terms) without positive regulation of cellular process, phosphotransferase, kinase, post-translational protein modification, ATP binding, transmembrane protein, calcium ion binding, acetylation, and hydrolase activity (only in HIVE-control patients terms), the condition was vital to inflammation and cognition impairment of HIVE. Our result demonstrated that common terms in both HIVE-control patients and HIVE included biological regulation, phosphoprotein, metabolic process, zinc, biosynthetic process, organelle, signal transduction, defense response, membrane, secreted, signal peptide, and glycoprotein, and these terms were more relative to inflammation and cognition impairment, therefore we deduced the stronger CREB5 regulation network in HIVE consistent with our number computation. It would be

  14. Dissociable contribution of the parietal and frontal cortex to coding movement direction and amplitude

    PubMed Central

    Davare, Marco; Zénon, Alexandre; Desmurget, Michel; Olivier, Etienne

    2015-01-01

    To reach for an object, we must convert its spatial location into an appropriate motor command, merging movement direction and amplitude. In humans, it has been suggested that this visuo-motor transformation occurs in a dorsomedial parieto-frontal pathway, although the causal contribution of the areas constituting the “reaching circuit” remains unknown. Here we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in healthy volunteers to disrupt the function of either the medial intraparietal area (mIPS) or dorsal premotor cortex (PMd), in each hemisphere. The task consisted in performing step-tracking movements with the right wrist towards targets located in different directions and eccentricities; targets were either visible for the whole trial (Target-ON) or flashed for 200 ms (Target-OFF). Left and right mIPS disruption led to errors in the initial direction of movements performed towards contralateral targets. These errors were corrected online in the Target-ON condition but when the target was flashed for 200 ms, mIPS TMS manifested as a larger endpoint spreading. In contrast, left PMd virtual lesions led to higher acceleration and velocity peaks—two parameters typically used to probe the planned movement amplitude—irrespective of the target position, hemifield and presentation condition; in the Target-OFF condition, left PMd TMS induced overshooting and increased the endpoint dispersion along the axis of the target direction. These results indicate that left PMd intervenes in coding amplitude during movement preparation. The critical TMS timings leading to errors in direction and amplitude were different, namely 160–100 ms before movement onset for mIPS and 100–40 ms for left PMd. TMS applied over right PMd had no significant effect. These results demonstrate that, during motor preparation, direction and amplitude of goal-directed movements are processed by different cortical areas, at distinct timings, and according to a specific hemispheric

  15. Pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic modelling of fluvoxamine 5-HT transporter occupancy in rat frontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Geldof, M; Freijer, J I; van Beijsterveldt, L; Langlois, X; Danhof, M

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: The pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic (PK–PD) correlation of fluvoxamine 5-HT transporter (SERT) occupancy was determined in rat frontal cortex ex vivo. Experimental approach: Rats (n=47) with permanent arterial and venous cannulas received a 30 min intravenous infusion of fluvoxamine (1 or 7.3 mg kg−1). At various time points after dosing, brains were collected for determination of fluvoxamine concentration and SERT occupancy. In addition, the time course of fluvoxamine concentration in plasma was determined up to the time of brain collection. In a separate study (n=26), the time course of fluvoxamine concentration in brain extracellular fluid (ECF) and plasma was determined. The results of the investigations were interpreted by nonlinear mixed effects modeling Key results: Highest SERT occupancy was reached at the first time point (10 or 15 min) and maintained for 1.5 and 7 h after 1 and 7.3 mg kg−1, respectively. Thereafter, SERT occupancy decreased linearly at a rate of 8% h−1. SERT occupancy could be directly related to plasma, brain ECF and brain tissue concentrations by a hyperbolic function (Bmax model). Maximal SERT occupancy (Bmax) was 95%. Estimated concentrations at half-maximal SERT occupancy (EC50) in plasma, ECF and brain tissue were 0.48, 0.22 and 14.8 ng mL−1 respectively. The minimum value of the objective function decreased 12 points for ECF and brain tissue concentrations relative to plasma (P<0.01), presumably as a result of nonlinear brain distribution. Conclusions and implications: The proposed PK–PD model constitutes a useful basis for prediction of the time course of ex vivo SERT occupancy in behavioural studies with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. PMID:18493251

  16. Frontal association cortex is engaged in stimulus integration during associative learning.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Daisuke; Baraki, Zohal; Onoue, Kousuke; Ikegaya, Yuji; Matsuki, Norio; Nomura, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The frontal association cortex (FrA) is implicated in higher brain function. Aberrant FrA activity is likely to be involved in dementia pathology. However, the functional circuits both within the FrA and with other regions are unclear. A recent study showed that inactivation of the FrA impairs memory consolidation of an auditory fear conditioning in young mice. In addition, dendritic spine remodeling of FrA neurons is sensitive to paired sensory stimuli that produce associative memory. These findings suggest that the FrA is engaged in neural processes critical to associative learning. Here we characterize stimulus integration in the mouse FrA during associative learning. We experimentally separated contextual fear conditioning into context exposure and shock, and found that memory formation requires protein synthesis associated with both context exposure and shock in the FrA. Both context exposure and shock trigger Arc, an activity-dependent immediate-early gene, expression in the FrA, and a subset of FrA neurons was dually activated by both stimuli. In addition, we found that the FrA receives projections from the perirhinal (PRh) and insular (IC) cortices and basolateral amygdala (BLA), which are implicated in context and shock encoding. PRh and IC neurons projecting to the FrA were activated by context exposure and shock, respectively. Arc expression in the FrA associated with context exposure and shock depended on PRh activity and both IC and BLA activities, respectively. These findings indicate that the FrA is engaged in stimulus integration and contributes to memory formation in associative learning. PMID:25496961

  17. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation of Frontal Cortex Decreases Performance on the WAIS-IV Intelligence Test

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, Kristin K.; Mellin, Juliann M.; Lustenberger, Caroline M.; Boyle, Michael R.; Lee, Won Hee; Peterchev, Angel V.; Frohlich, Flavio

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) modulates excitability of motor cortex. However, there is conflicting evidence about the efficacy of this non-invasive brain stimulation modality to modulate performance on cognitive tasks. Previous work has tested the effect of tDCS on specific facets of cognition and executive processing. However, no randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled study has looked at the effects of tDCS on a comprehensive battery of cognitive processes. The objective of this study was to test if tDCS had an effect on performance on a comprehensive assay of cognitive processes, a standardized intelligence quotient (IQ) test. The study consisted of two substudies and followed a double-blind, between-subjects, sham-controlled design. In total, 41 healthy adult participants completed the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) as a baseline measure. At least one week later, participants in substudy 1 received either bilateral tDCS (anodes over both F4 and F3, cathode over Cz, 2mA at each anode for 20 minutes) or active sham tDCS (2mA for 40 seconds), and participants in substudy 2 received either right or left tDCS (anode over either F4 or F3, cathode over Cz, 2mA for 20 minutes). In both studies, the WAIS-IV was immediately administered following stimulation to assess for performance differences induced by bilateral and unilateral tDCS. Compared to sham stimulation, right, left, and bilateral tDCS reduced improvement between sessions on Full Scale IQ and the Perceptual Reasoning Index. This demonstration that frontal tDCS selectively degraded improvement on specific metrics of the WAIS-IV raises important questions about the often proposed role of tDCS in cognitive enhancement. PMID:25934490

  18. Expression of BDNF and TrkB Phosphorylation in the Rat Frontal Cortex During Morphine Withdrawal are NO Dependent.

    PubMed

    Peregud, Danil I; Yakovlev, Alexander A; Stepanichev, Mikhail Yu; Onufriev, Mikhail V; Panchenko, Leonid F; Gulyaeva, Natalia V

    2016-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) mediates pharmacological effects of opiates including dependence and abstinence. Modulation of NO synthesis during the induction phase of morphine dependence affects manifestations of morphine withdrawal syndrome, though little is known about mechanisms underlying this phenomenon. Neurotrophic and growth factors are involved in neuronal adaptation during opiate dependence. NO-dependent modulation of morphine dependence may be mediated by changes in expression and activity of neurotrophic and/or growth factors in the brain. Here, we studied the effects of NO synthesis inhibition during the induction phase of morphine dependence on the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) as well as their receptors in rat brain regions after spontaneous morphine withdrawal in dependent animals. Morphine dependence in rats was induced within 6 days by 12 injections of morphine in increasing doses (10-100 mg/kg), and NO synthase inhibitor L-N(G)-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME) (10 mg/kg) was given 1 h before each morphine injection. The expression of the BDNF, GDNF, NGF, IGF1, and their receptors in the frontal cortex, striatum, hippocampus, and midbrain was assessed 40 h after morphine withdrawal. L-NAME treatment during morphine intoxication resulted in an aggravation of the spontaneous morphine withdrawal severity. Morphine withdrawal was accompanied by upregulation of BDNF, IGF1, and their receptors TrkB and IGF1R, respectively, on the mRNA level in the frontal cortex, and only BDNF in hippocampus and midbrain. L-NAME administration during morphine intoxication decreased abstinence-induced upregulation of these mRNAs in the frontal cortex, hippocampus and midbrain. L-NAME prevented from abstinence-induced elevation of mature but not pro-form of BDNF polypeptide in the frontal cortex. While morphine abstinence did not affect Trk

  19. Induction of hyperphagia and carbohydrate intake by mu-opioid receptor stimulation in circumscribed regions of frontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Mena, Jesus D.; Sadeghian, Ken; Baldo, Brian A.

    2011-01-01

    Frontal cortical regions are activated by food-associated stimuli, and this activation appears to be dysregulated in individuals with eating disorders. Nevertheless, frontal control of basic unconditioned feeding responses remains poorly understood. Here we show that hyperphagia can be driven by μ-opioid receptor stimulation in restricted regions of ventral medial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and orbitofrontal cortex. In both ad libitum-fed and food-restricted male Sprague-Dawley rats, bilateral infusions of the μ-opioid agonist, DAMGO, markedly increased intake of standard rat chow. When given a choice between palatable fat- versus carbohydrate enriched test diets, intra-vmPFC DAMGO infusions selectively increased carbohydrate intake, even in rats with a baseline fat preference. Rats also exhibited motor hyperactivity characterized by rapid switching between brief bouts of investigatory and ingestive behaviors. Intra-vmPFC DAMGO affected neither water intake nor non-specific oral behavior. Similar DAMGO infusions into neighboring areas of lateral orbital or anterior motor cortex had minimal effects on feeding. Neither stimulation of vmPFC-localized delta-opioid, kappa-opioid, dopaminergic, serotonergic, or noradrenergic receptors, nor antagonism of D1, 5HT1A, or alpha- or beta-adrenoceptors, reproduced the profile of DAMGO effects. Muscimol-mediated inactivation of the vmPFC, and intra-vmPFC stimulation of κ-opioid receptors or blockade of 5HT2A receptors, suppressed motor activity and increased feeding bout duration-a profile opposite to that seen with DAMGO. Hence, μ-opioid-induced hyperphagia and carbohydrate intake can be elicited with remarkable pharmacological and behavioral specificity from discrete subterritories of the frontal cortex. These findings may have implications for understanding affect-driven feeding and loss of restraint in eating disorders. PMID:21368037

  20. Glutamate receptor binding in the frontal cortex and dorsal striatum of aged rats with impaired attentional set-shifting.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, Michelle M; Baxter, Mark G

    2003-12-01

    Aged Long-Evans rats exhibit deficits in attentional set shifting, an aspect of executive function, relative to adult rats. Impairments in set shifting and spatial learning are uncorrelated in aged rats, indicating a possible dissociation of the effects of ageing in prefrontal versus hippocampal systems. Ionotropic glutamate receptor binding was assessed using an in vitro autoradiography method in young and aged rats. The rats had been tested on a set-shifting task that measured attentional set shifts and reversal learning, as well as in a spatial learning task in the Morris water maze. [3H]Kainate, [3H]AMPA and NMDA-displaceable [3H]glutamate receptor binding were quantified in orbital cortex, cingulate cortex, medial frontal cortex, dorsolateral and dorsomedial striatum. Age-related decreases in [3H]kainate binding were apparent in all regions measured. Similarly, NMDA-displaceable [3H]glutamate binding was decreased in the aged rats in all the regions measured except for the medial frontal area where no age effects were observed. [3H]AMPA receptor binding was preserved with age in all the regions measured. Lower levels of [3H]kainate binding in the cingulate cortex were significantly correlated with poorer set-shifting performance, whereas higher levels of NMDA binding in the dorsomedial striatum were correlated with poorer set-shifting performance. There were no significant correlations between the levels of ionotropic glutamate receptors and performance in the reversal task or spatial learning in the Morris water maze. These results indicate that age-related behavioural deficits in attentional set shifting are selectively associated with neurobiological alterations in the cingulate cortex and dorsomedial striatum. PMID:14686906

  1. Rank Signals in Four Areas of Macaque Frontal Cortex During Selection of Actions and Objects in Serial Order

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Carl R.

    2010-01-01

    Neurons in several areas of monkey frontal cortex exhibit ordinal position (rank) selectivity during the performance of serial order tasks. It has been unclear whether rank selectivity or the dependence of rank selectivity on task context varies across the areas of frontal cortex. To resolve this issue, we recorded from neurons in the supplementary motor area (SMA), presupplementary motor area (pre-SMA), supplementary eye field (SEF), and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) as monkeys performed two oculomotor tasks, one requiring the selection of three actions in sequence and the other requiring the selection of three objects in sequence. We found that neurons representing all ranks were present in all areas. Only to a moderate degree did the prevalence and nature of rank selectivity vary from area to area. The two most prominent inter-area differences involved a lower prevalence of rank selectivity in the dlPFC than in the other areas and a higher proportion of neurons preferring late ranks in the SMA and SEF than in the other areas. Neurons in all four areas are rank generalists in the sense of favoring the same rank in both the serial action task and the serial object task. PMID:20445037

  2. Long-range orbitofrontal and amygdala axons show divergent patterns of maturation in the frontal cortex across adolescence.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Carolyn M; Loucks, F Alexandra; Peckler, Hannah; Thomas, A Wren; Janak, Patricia H; Wilbrecht, Linda

    2016-04-01

    The adolescent transition from juvenile to adult is marked by anatomical and functional remodeling of brain networks. Currently, the cellular and synaptic level changes underlying the adolescent transition are only coarsely understood. Here, we use two-photon imaging to make time-lapse observations of long-range axons that innervate the frontal cortex in the living brain. We labeled cells in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and basolateral amygdala (BLA) and imaged their axonal afferents to the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC). We also imaged the apical dendrites of dmPFC pyramidal neurons. Images were taken daily in separate cohorts of juvenile (P24-P28) and young adult mice (P64-P68), ages where we have previously discovered differences in dmPFC dependent decision-making. Dendritic spines were pruned across this peri-adolescent period, while BLA and OFC afferents followed alternate developmental trajectories. OFC boutons showed no decrease in density, but did show a decrease in daily bouton gain and loss with age. BLA axons showed an increase in both bouton density and daily bouton gain at the later age, suggesting a delayed window of enhanced plasticity. Our findings reveal projection specific maturation of synaptic structures within a single frontal region and suggest that stabilization is a more general characteristic of maturation than pruning. PMID:26896859

  3. Downregulation of GABA[Subscript A] Receptor Protein Subunits a6, ß2, d, e, ?2, ?, and ?2 in Superior Frontal Cortex of Subjects with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fatemi, S. Hossein; Reutiman, Teri J.; Folsom, Timothy D.; Rustan, Oyvind G.; Rooney, Robert J.; Thuras, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    We measured protein and mRNA levels for nine gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA[subscript A]) receptor subunits in three brain regions (cerebellum, superior frontal cortex, and parietal cortex) in subjects with autism versus matched controls. We observed changes in mRNA for a number of GABA[subscript A] and GABA[subscript B] subunits and overall…

  4. Issues in localization of brain function: The case of lateralized frontal cortex in cognition, emotion, and psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Gregory A.; Crocker, Laura D.; Spielberg, Jeffrey M.; Infantolino, Zachary P.; Heller, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    The appeal of simple, sweeping portraits of large-scale brain mechanisms relevant to psychological phenomena competes with a rich, complex research base. As a prominent example, two views of frontal brain organization have emphasized dichotomous lateralization as a function of either emotional valence (positive/negative) or approach/avoidance motivation. Compelling findings support each. The literature has struggled to choose between them for three decades, without success. Both views are proving untenable as comprehensive models. Evidence of other frontal lateralizations, involving distinctions among dimensions of depression and anxiety, make a dichotomous view even more problematic. Recent evidence indicates that positive valence and approach motivation are associated with different areas in the left-hemisphere. Findings that appear contradictory at the level of frontal lobes as the units of analysis can be accommodated because hemodynamic and electromagnetic neuroimaging studies suggest considerable functional differentiation, in specialization and activation, of subregions of frontal cortex, including their connectivity to each other and to other regions. Such findings contribute to a more nuanced understanding of functional localization that accommodates aspects of multiple theoretical perspectives. PMID:23386814

  5. Development and Function of the Human Fetal Adrenal Cortex: A Key Component in the Feto-Placental Unit

    PubMed Central

    Ishimoto, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    Continuous efforts have been devoted to unraveling the biophysiology and development of the human fetal adrenal cortex, which is structurally and functionally unique from other species. It plays a pivotal role, mainly through steroidogenesis, in the regulation of intrauterine homeostasis and in fetal development and maturation. The steroidogenic activity is characterized by early transient cortisol biosynthesis, followed by its suppressed synthesis until late gestation, and extensive production of dehydroepiandrosterone and its sulfate, precursors of placental estrogen, during most of gestation. The gland rapidly grows through processes including cell proliferation and angiogenesis at the gland periphery, cellular migration, hypertrophy, and apoptosis. Recent studies employing modern technologies such as gene expression profiling and laser capture microdissection have revealed that development and/or function of the fetal adrenal cortex may be regulated by a panoply of molecules, including transcription factors, extracellular matrix components, locally produced growth factors, and placenta-derived CRH, in addition to the primary regulator, fetal pituitary ACTH. The role of the fetal adrenal cortex in human pregnancy and parturition appears highly complex, probably due to redundant and compensatory mechanisms regulating these events. Mounting evidence indicates that actions of hormones operating in the human feto-placental unit are likely mediated by mechanisms including target tissue responsiveness, local metabolism, and bioavailability, rather than changes only in circulating levels. Comprehensive study of such molecular mechanisms and the newly identified factors implicated in adrenal development should help crystallize our understanding of the development and physiology of the human fetal adrenal cortex. PMID:21051591

  6. Mechanistic model for the acute effect of fluvoxamine on 5-HT and 5-HIAA concentrations in rat frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Geldof, Marian; Freijer, Jan I; Peletier, Lambertus A; van Beijsterveldt, Ludy; Danhof, Meindert

    2008-03-01

    A mechanistic model is proposed to predict the time course of the concentrations of 5-HT and its metabolite 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5-HIAA) in rat frontal cortex following acute administration of SSRIs. In the model, SSRIs increase synaptic 5-HT concentrations by reversible blockade of the SERT in a direct concentration-dependent manner, while the 5-HT response is attenuated by negative feedback via 5-HT autoreceptors. In principle, the model allows for the description of oscillatory patterns in the time course of 5-HT and 5-HIAA concentrations in brain extracellular fluid. The model was applied in a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) investigation on the time course of the microdialysate 5-HT and 5-HIAA response in rat frontal cortex following a 30-min intravenous infusion of 3.7 and 7.3mg/kg fluvoxamine. Directly after administration of fluvoxamine, concentrations of 5-HT were increased to approximately 450-600% of baseline values while 5-HIAA concentrations were decreased. Thereafter 5-HT and 5-HIAA concentrations gradually returned to baseline values in 6-10h, respectively. The PK/PD analysis revealed that inhibition of 5-HT reuptake was directly related to the fluvoxamine concentration in plasma, with 50% inhibition of 5-HT reuptake occurring at a plasma concentration of 1.1ng/ml (EC50). The levels of 5-HT at which 50% of the inhibition of the 5-HT response was reached (IC50) amounted to 272% of baseline. The model was unable to capture the oscillatory patterns in the individual concentration time curves, which appeared to occur randomly. The proposed mechanistic model is the first step in modeling of complex neurotransmission processes. The model constitutes a useful basis for prediction of the time course of median 5-HT and 5-HIAA concentrations in the frontal cortex in behavioral pharmacology studies in vivo. PMID:18207708

  7. Observing accidental and intentional unusual actions is associated with different subregions of the medial frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Desmet, Charlotte; Brass, Marcel

    2015-11-15

    The literature on action observation revealed contradictory results regarding the activation of different subregions of the medial prefrontal cortex when observing unusual behaviour. Error observation research has shown that the posterior part of the medial prefrontal cortex is more active when observing unusual behaviour compared to usual behaviour while action understanding research has revealed some mixed results concerning the role of the anterior part of the medial prefrontal cortex during the observation of unusual actions. Here, we resolve this discrepancy in the literature by showing that different parts of the medial prefrontal cortex are active depending on whether an observed unusual behaviour is intentional or not. While the posterior medial prefrontal cortex is more active when we observe unusual accidental actions compared to unusual intentional actions, a more anterior part of the medial prefrontal cortex is more active when we observe unusual intentional actions compared to unusual accidental actions. PMID:26279209

  8. Increased activity in frontal motor cortex compensates impaired speech perception in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yi; Buchsbaum, Bradley R.; Grady, Cheryl L.; Alain, Claude

    2016-01-01

    Understanding speech in noisy environments is challenging, especially for seniors. Although evidence suggests that older adults increasingly recruit prefrontal cortices to offset reduced periphery and central auditory processing, the brain mechanisms underlying such compensation remain elusive. Here we show that relative to young adults, older adults show higher activation of frontal speech motor areas as measured by functional MRI during a syllable identification task at varying signal-to-noise ratios. This increased activity correlates with improved speech discrimination performance in older adults. Multivoxel pattern classification reveals that despite an overall phoneme dedifferentiation, older adults show greater specificity of phoneme representations in frontal articulatory regions than auditory regions. Moreover, older adults with stronger frontal activity have higher phoneme specificity in frontal and auditory regions. Thus, preserved phoneme specificity and upregulation of activity in speech motor regions provide a means of compensation in older adults for decoding impoverished speech representations in adverse listening conditions. PMID:27483187

  9. Alteration of Rat Fetal Cerebral Cortex Development after Prenatal Exposure to Polychlorinated Biphenyls

    PubMed Central

    Naveau, Elise; Pinson, Anneline; Gérard, Arlette; Nguyen, Laurent; Charlier, Corinne; Thomé, Jean-Pierre; Zoeller, R. Thomas; Bourguignon, Jean-Pierre; Parent, Anne-Simone

    2014-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are environmental contaminants that persist in environment and human tissues. Perinatal exposure to these endocrine disruptors causes cognitive deficits and learning disabilities in children. These effects may involve their ability to interfere with thyroid hormone (TH) action. We tested the hypothesis that developmental exposure to PCBs can concomitantly alter TH levels and TH-regulated events during cerebral cortex development: progenitor proliferation, cell cycle exit and neuron migration. Pregnant rats exposed to the commercial PCB mixture Aroclor 1254 ended gestation with reduced total and free serum thyroxine levels. Exposure to Aroclor 1254 increased cell cycle exit of the neuronal progenitors and delayed radial neuronal migration in the fetal cortex. Progenitor cell proliferation, cell death and differentiation rate were not altered by prenatal exposure to PCBs. Given that PCBs remain ubiquitous, though diminishing, contaminants in human systems, it is important that we further understand their deleterious effects in the brain. PMID:24642964

  10. A hierarchy of timescales explains distinct effects of local inhibition of primary visual cortex and frontal eye fields.

    PubMed

    Cocchi, Luca; Sale, Martin V; L Gollo, Leonardo; Bell, Peter T; Nguyen, Vinh T; Zalesky, Andrew; Breakspear, Michael; Mattingley, Jason B

    2016-01-01

    Within the primate visual system, areas at lower levels of the cortical hierarchy process basic visual features, whereas those at higher levels, such as the frontal eye fields (FEF), are thought to modulate sensory processes via feedback connections. Despite these functional exchanges during perception, there is little shared activity between early and late visual regions at rest. How interactions emerge between regions encompassing distinct levels of the visual hierarchy remains unknown. Here we combined neuroimaging, non-invasive cortical stimulation and computational modelling to characterize changes in functional interactions across widespread neural networks before and after local inhibition of primary visual cortex or FEF. We found that stimulation of early visual cortex selectively increased feedforward interactions with FEF and extrastriate visual areas, whereas identical stimulation of the FEF decreased feedback interactions with early visual areas. Computational modelling suggests that these opposing effects reflect a fast-slow timescale hierarchy from sensory to association areas. PMID:27596931

  11. Time-varying covariance of neural activities recorded in striatum and frontal cortex as monkeys perform sequential-saccade tasks.

    PubMed

    Fujii, N; Graybiel, A M

    2005-06-21

    Cortico-basal ganglia circuits are key parts of the brain's habit system, but little is yet known about how these forebrain pathways function as ingrained habits are performed. We simultaneously recorded spike and local field potential (LFP) activity from regions of the frontal cortex and basal ganglia implicated in visuo-oculomotor control as highly trained macaque monkeys performed sequences of visually guided saccades. The tasks were repetitive, required no new learning, and could be performed nearly automatically. Our findings demonstrate striking differences between the relative timing of striatal and cortical activity during performance of the tasks. At the onset of the visual cues, LFPs in the prefrontal cortex and the oculomotor zone of the striatum showed near-synchronous activation. During the period of sequential-saccade performance, however, peak LFP activity occurred 100-300 msec later in the striatum than in the prefrontal cortex. Peak prefrontal activity tended to be peri-saccadic, whereas peak striatal activity tended to be post-saccadic. This temporal offset was also apparent in pairs of simultaneously recorded prefrontal and striatal neurons. In triple-site recordings, the LFP activity recorded in the supplementary eye field shared temporal characteristics of both the prefrontal and the striatal patterns. The near simultaneity of prefrontal and striatal peak responses at cue onsets, but temporal lag of striatal activity in the movement periods, suggests that the striatum may integrate corollary discharge or confirmatory response signals during sequential task performance. These timing relationships may be signatures of the normal functioning of striatal and frontal cortex during repetitive performance of learned behaviors. PMID:15956185

  12. Time-varying covariance of neural activities recorded in striatum and frontal cortex as monkeys perform sequential-saccade tasks

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, N.; Graybiel, A. M.

    2005-01-01

    Cortico-basal ganglia circuits are key parts of the brain's habit system, but little is yet known about how these forebrain pathways function as ingrained habits are performed. We simultaneously recorded spike and local field potential (LFP) activity from regions of the frontal cortex and basal ganglia implicated in visuo-oculomotor control as highly trained macaque monkeys performed sequences of visually guided saccades. The tasks were repetitive, required no new learning, and could be performed nearly automatically. Our findings demonstrate striking differences between the relative timing of striatal and cortical activity during performance of the tasks. At the onset of the visual cues, LFPs in the prefrontal cortex and the oculomotor zone of the striatum showed near-synchronous activation. During the period of sequential-saccade performance, however, peak LFP activity occurred 100–300 msec later in the striatum than in the prefrontal cortex. Peak prefrontal activity tended to be peri-saccadic, whereas peak striatal activity tended to be post-saccadic. This temporal offset was also apparent in pairs of simultaneously recorded prefrontal and striatal neurons. In triple-site recordings, the LFP activity recorded in the supplementary eye field shared temporal characteristics of both the prefrontal and the striatal patterns. The near simultaneity of prefrontal and striatal peak responses at cue onsets, but temporal lag of striatal activity in the movement periods, suggests that the striatum may integrate corollary discharge or confirmatory response signals during sequential task performance. These timing relationships may be signatures of the normal functioning of striatal and frontal cortex during repetitive performance of learned behaviors. PMID:15956185

  13. Cushing's syndrome and fetal features resurgence in adrenal cortex-specific Prkar1a knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Sahut-Barnola, Isabelle; de Joussineau, Cyrille; Val, Pierre; Lambert-Langlais, Sarah; Damon, Christelle; Lefrançois-Martinez, Anne-Marie; Pointud, Jean-Christophe; Marceau, Geoffroy; Sapin, Vincent; Tissier, Frédérique; Ragazzon, Bruno; Bertherat, Jérôme; Kirschner, Lawrence S; Stratakis, Constantine A; Martinez, Antoine

    2010-06-01

    Carney complex (CNC) is an inherited neoplasia syndrome with endocrine overactivity. Its most frequent endocrine manifestation is primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD), a bilateral adrenocortical hyperplasia causing pituitary-independent Cushing's syndrome. Inactivating mutations in PRKAR1A, a gene encoding the type 1 alpha-regulatory subunit (R1alpha) of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) have been found in 80% of CNC patients with Cushing's syndrome. To demonstrate the implication of R1alpha loss in the initiation and development of PPNAD, we generated mice lacking Prkar1a specifically in the adrenal cortex (AdKO). AdKO mice develop pituitary-independent Cushing's syndrome with increased PKA activity. This leads to autonomous steroidogenic genes expression and deregulated adreno-cortical cells differentiation, increased proliferation and resistance to apoptosis. Unexpectedly, R1alpha loss results in improper maintenance and centrifugal expansion of cortisol-producing fetal adrenocortical cells with concomitant regression of adult cortex. Our data provide the first in vivo evidence that loss of R1alpha is sufficient to induce autonomous adrenal hyper-activity and bilateral hyperplasia, both observed in human PPNAD. Furthermore, this model demonstrates that deregulated PKA activity favors the emergence of a new cell population potentially arising from the fetal adrenal, giving new insight into the mechanisms leading to PPNAD. PMID:20548949

  14. Ginsenoside rb1 modulates level of monoamine neurotransmitters in mice frontal cortex and cerebellum in response to immobilization stress.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Hee; Hur, Jinyoung; Lee, Eunjoo H; Kim, Sun Yeou

    2012-09-01

    Cerebral monoamines play important roles as neurotransmitters that are associated with various stressful stimuli. Some components such as ginsenosides (triterpenoidal glycosides derived from the Ginseng Radix) may interact with monoamine systems. The aim of this study was to determine whether ginsenoside Rb1 can modulate levels of the monoamines such as dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (EP), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), 5-hydorxytryptamine (5-HT), 5-hydroxindole-3-acetic acid (5-HIAA), and 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) in mice frontal cortex and cerebellum in response to immobilization stress. Mice were treated with ginsenoside Rb1 (10 mg/kg, oral) before a single 30 min immobilization stress. Acute immobilization stress resulted in elevation of monoamine levels in frontal cortex and cerebellum. Pretreatment with ginsenoside Rb1 attenuated the stress-induced changes in the levels of monoamines in each region. The present findings showed the anti-stress potential of ginsenoside Rb1 in relation to regulation effects on the cerebral monoaminergic systems. Therefore, the ginsenoside Rb1 may be a useful candidate for treating several brain symptoms related with stress. PMID:24009838

  15. Prenatal Stress Enhances Excitatory Synaptic Transmission and Impairs Long-Term Potentiation in the Frontal Cortex of Adult Offspring Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sowa, Joanna; Bobula, Bartosz; Glombik, Katarzyna; Slusarczyk, Joanna; Basta-Kaim, Agnieszka; Hess, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    The effects of prenatal stress procedure were investigated in 3 months old male rats. Prenatally stressed rats showed depressive-like behavior in the forced swim test, including increased immobility, decreased mobility and decreased climbing. In ex vivo frontal cortex slices originating from prenatally stressed animals, the amplitude of extracellular field potentials (FPs) recorded in cortical layer II/III was larger, and the mean amplitude ratio of pharmacologically-isolated NMDA to the AMPA/kainate component of the field potential—smaller than in control preparations. Prenatal stress also resulted in a reduced magnitude of long-term potentiation (LTP). These effects were accompanied by an increase in the mean frequency, but not the mean amplitude, of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) in layer II/III pyramidal neurons. These data demonstrate that stress during pregnancy may lead not only to behavioral disturbances, but also impairs the glutamatergic transmission and long-term synaptic plasticity in the frontal cortex of the adult offspring. PMID:25749097

  16. Anterior and posterior subareas of the dorsolateral frontal cortex in socially relevant decisions based on masked affect expressions

    PubMed Central

    Prochnow, Denise; Brunheim, Sascha; Kossack, Hannes; Eickhoff, Simon B.; Markowitsch, Hans J.; Seitz, Rüdiger J.

    2015-01-01

    Socially-relevant decisions are based on clearly recognizable but also not consciously accessible affective stimuli. We studied the role of the dorsolateral frontal cortex (DLFC) in decision-making on masked affect expressions using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Our paradigm permitted us to capture brain activity during a pre-decision phase when the subjects viewed emotional expressions below the threshold of subjective awareness, and during the decision phase, which was based on verbal descriptions as the choice criterion. Using meta-analytic connectivity modeling, we found that the preparatory phase of the decision was associated with activity in a right-posterior portion of the DLFC featuring co-activations in the left-inferior frontal cortex. During the subsequent decision a right-anterior and more dorsal portion of the DLFC became activated, exhibiting a different co-activation pattern. These results provide evidence for partially independent sub-regions within the DLFC, supporting the notion of dual associative processes in intuitive judgments. PMID:26236464

  17. Impaired spatial working memory and decreased frontal cortex BDNF protein level in dopamine transporter knock out mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, BingJin; Arime, Yosefu; Hall, F. Scott; Uhl, George R.; Sora, Ichiro

    2010-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), one of the key brain neurotrophins, has been implicated in neuronal plasticity and memory. Recent studies document the importance of BDNF for normal long-term memory functions. However, there are few studies of the roles of BDNF in short term memory. Dopamine is likely to play important roles in BDNF gene expression in specific brain regions, including frontal cortical regions that are implicated in short term working memory processes that include spontaneous alternation. We have thus tested spatial working memory in dopamine transporter knockout (DAT KO) and wild-type mice. Spontaneous alternation in the Y-maze, an index of short-term spatial working memory in mice, was significantly decreased in DAT KO mice compared to wildtype mice. BDNF protein was significantly decreased in frontal cortex, though not in striatum or hippocampus, of the DAT KO mice. The data support the hypothesis that impaired spatial working memory in DAT KO mice may be related to decreased frontal cortical BDNF in these animals, and document apparent roles for BDNF in a short term memory process. PMID:19932884

  18. Infusion of D1 Dopamine Receptor Agonist into Medial Frontal Cortex Disrupts Neural Correlates of Interval Timing

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Krystal L.; Ruggiero, Rafael N.; Narayanan, Nandakumar S.

    2015-01-01

    Medial frontal cortical (MFC) dopamine is essential for the organization of behavior in time. Our prior work indicates that blocking D1 dopamine receptors (D1DR) attenuates temporal processing and low-frequency oscillations by MFC neuronal networks. Here we investigate the effects of focal infusion of the D1DR agonist SKF82958 into MFC during interval timing. MFC D1DR agonist infusion impaired interval timing performance without changing overall firing rates of MFC neurons. MFC ramping patterns of neuronal activity that reflect temporal processing were attenuated following infusion of MFC D1DR agonist. MFC D1DR agonist infusion also altered MFC field potentials by enhancing delta activity between 1 and 4 Hz and attenuating alpha activity between 8 and 15 Hz. These data support the idea that the influence of D1-dopamine signals on frontal neuronal activity adheres to a U-shaped curve, and that cognition requires optimal levels of dopamine in frontal cortex. PMID:26617499

  19. Manic episodes are related to changes in frontal cortex: a longitudinal neuroimaging study of bipolar disorder 1.

    PubMed

    Abé, Christoph; Ekman, Carl-Johan; Sellgren, Carl; Petrovic, Predrag; Ingvar, Martin; Landén, Mikael

    2015-11-01

    Higher numbers of manic episodes in bipolar patients has, in cross-sectional studies, been associated with less grey matter volume in prefrontal brain areas. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine if manic episodes set off progressive cortical changes, or if the association is better explained by premorbid brain conditions that increase risk for mania. We followed patients with bipolar disorder type 1 for 6 years. Structural brain magnetic resonance imaging scans were performed at baseline and follow-up. We compared patients who had at least one manic episode between baseline and follow-up (Mania group, n = 13) with those who had no manic episodes (No-Mania group, n = 18). We used measures of cortical volume, thickness, and area to assess grey matter changes between baseline and follow-up. We found significantly decreased frontal cortical volume (dorsolateral prefrontal and inferior frontal cortex) in the Mania group, but no volume changes in the No-Mania group. Our results indicate that volume decrease in frontal brain regions can be attributed to the incidence of manic episodes. PMID:26373602

  20. Social and emotional functions in three patients with medial frontal lobe damage including the anterior cingulate cortex

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Amee; Dewar, Bonnie-Kate; Critchley, Hugo; Dolan, Ray; Shallice, Tim; Cipolotti, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to explore social and emotional functions in patients with medial frontal damage including the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Methods Three patients with medial frontal lobe lesions primarily involving the ACC performed tasks on motivational decision making, emotional facial expression recognition, and social cognition, including theory of mind (ToM). Their performance on these tasks was compared with age and education matched healthy controls. Results Patient performance on the motivational decision making and social situations tasks did not differ from controls. Selective emotional facial expression recognition impairment for fear was evident in one patient with a unilateral right ACC lesion (patient 3). ToM impairment was present in only one patient with a bilateral ACC lesion (patient 2). In contrast, the two patients with unilateral right ACC lesions had intact ToM (patients 1 and 3). Conclusions These findings suggest that medial frontal lobe lesions primarily involving the ACC do not appear to critically disrupt motivational decision making or social situation processing. The ACC plays a role in processing particular types of emotion (fear). Bilateral ACC damage impairs ToM processing, but unilateral damage to the right ACC is not sufficient to disrupt ToM. PMID:17354076

  1. Left Inferior Frontal Cortex and Syntax: Function, Structure and Behaviour in Patients with Left Hemisphere Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler, Lorraine K.; Marslen-Wilson, William D.; Randall, Billi; Wright, Paul; Devereux, Barry J.; Zhuang, Jie; Papoutsi, Marina; Stamatakis, Emmanuel A.

    2011-01-01

    For the past 150 years, neurobiological models of language have debated the role of key brain regions in language function. One consistently debated set of issues concern the role of the left inferior frontal gyrus in syntactic processing. Here we combine measures of functional activity, grey matter integrity and performance in patients with left…

  2. Agrammatic Comprehension Caused by a Glioma in the Left Frontal Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinno, Ryuta; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Hori, Tomokatsu; Maruyama, Takashi; Kawamura, Mitsuru; Sakai, Kuniyoshi L.

    2009-01-01

    It has been known that lesions in the left inferior frontal gyrus (L. IFG) do not always cause Broca's aphasia, casting doubt upon the specificity of this region. We have previously devised a picture-sentence matching task for a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, and observed that both pars triangularis (L. F3t) of L. IFG…

  3. The role of left inferior frontal cortex during audiovisual speech perception in infants.

    PubMed

    Altvater-Mackensen, Nicole; Grossmann, Tobias

    2016-06-01

    In the first year of life, infants' speech perception attunes to their native language. While the behavioral changes associated with native language attunement are fairly well mapped, the underlying mechanisms and neural processes are still only poorly understood. Using fNIRS and eye tracking, the current study investigated 6-month-old infants' processing of audiovisual speech that contained matching or mismatching auditory and visual speech cues. Our results revealed that infants' speech-sensitive brain responses in inferior frontal brain regions were lateralized to the left hemisphere. Critically, our results further revealed that speech-sensitive left inferior frontal regions showed enhanced responses to matching when compared to mismatching audiovisual speech, and that infants with a preference to look at the speaker's mouth showed an enhanced left inferior frontal response to speech compared to infants with a preference to look at the speaker's eyes. These results suggest that left inferior frontal regions play a crucial role in associating information from different modalities during native language attunement, fostering the formation of multimodal phonological categories. PMID:26946090

  4. Reduced functional connectivity to the frontal cortex during processing of social cues in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Elgin; Brück, Carolin; Kreifelts, Benjamin; Ethofer, Thomas; Wildgruber, Dirk

    2016-08-01

    People diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) characteristically present with severe difficulties in interpreting every-day social signals. Currently it is assumed that these difficulties might have neurobiological correlates in alterations in activation as well as in connectivity in and between regions of the social perception network suggested to govern the processing of social cues. In this study, we conducted functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)-based activation and connectivity analyses focusing on face-, voice-, and audiovisual-processing brain regions as the most important subareas of the social perception network. Results revealed alterations in connectivity among regions involved in the processing of social stimuli in ASD subjects compared to typically developed (TD) controls-specifically, a reduced connectivity between the left temporal voice area (TVA) and the superior and medial frontal gyrus. Alterations in connectivity, moreover, were correlated with the severity of autistic traits: correlation analysis indicated that the connectivity between the left TVA and the limbic lobe, anterior cingulate and the medial frontal gyrus as well as between the right TVA and the frontal lobe, anterior cingulate, limbic lobe and the caudate decreased with increasing symptom severity. As these frontal regions are understood to play an important role in interpreting and mentalizing social signals, the observed underconnectivity might be construed as playing a role in social impairments in ASD. PMID:27094176

  5. The contribution of distinct subregions of the ventromedial frontal cortex to emotion, social behavior, and decision making.

    PubMed

    Rudebeck, P H; Bannerman, D M; Rushworth, M F S

    2008-12-01

    Damage to the ventromedial frontal cortex (VMFC) in humans is associated with deficits in decision making. Decision making, however, often happens while people are interacting with others, where it is important to take the social consequences of a course of action into account. It is well known that VMFC lesions also lead to marked alterations in patients' emotions and ability to interact socially; however, it has not been clear which parts of the VMFC are critical for these changes. Recently, there has been considerable interest in the role of the VMFC in choice behavior during interpersonal exchanges. Here, we highlight recent research that suggests that two areas within or adjacent to the VMFC, the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), may play distinct but complementary roles in mediating normal patterns of emotion and social behavior. Converging lines of evidence from human, macaque, and rat studies now suggest that the OFC may be more specialized for simple emotional responses, such as fear and aggression, through its role in representing primary reinforcement or punishment. By contrast, the ACC may play a distinct role in more complex aspects of emotion, such as social interaction, by virtue of its connections with the discrete parts of the temporal lobe and subcortical structures that control autonomic responses. PMID:19033243

  6. Differences in the mechanisms that increase noradrenaline efflux after administration of d-amphetamine: a dual-probe microdialysis study in rat frontal cortex and hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Géranton, Sandrine M; Heal, David J; Stanford, S Clare

    2003-08-01

    1. The extent to which impulse-independent release of noradrenaline and/or inhibition of its reuptake contribute to the response to d-amphetamine in vivo is unclear. Here, dual-probe microdialysis was used to investigate this question in the rat frontal cortex and hypothalamus. 2. After systemic administration of d-amphetamine (10 mg kg(-1)), or its local infusion (10 micro M), the increase in noradrenaline efflux in the hypothalamus was greater than in the frontal cortex. 3. In contrast, during local infusion of the noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, BTS 54 354 (50 micro M), the noradrenaline response was similar in the frontal cortex and hypothalamus, even after systemic administration of the alpha(2)-antagonist, atipamezole, to block presynaptic inhibition of transmitter release and neuronal firing. 4. In the frontal cortex, but not the hypothalamus, the noradrenaline response to 10 micro M d-amphetamine was constrained by activation of alpha(2)-adrenoceptors. This suggests that, at this concentration, inhibition of reuptake of noradrenaline, following its impulse-dependent release, is evident in the frontal cortex, but that the noradrenaline response in the hypothalamus derives mostly from impulse-independent release (retrotransport). 5. Atipamezole did not affect the noradrenaline response to 100 micro M d-amphetamine in either brain region possibly because, at this higher concentration, retrotransport of noradrenaline masks any compensatory reduction in impulse-evoked release. 6. It is concluded that inhibition of reuptake and retrotransport make different contributions to the noradrenaline response to d-amphetamine in the frontal cortex and hypothalamus and that retrotransport increases with the concentration of d-amphetamine. PMID:12922931

  7. Hidden prenatal malnutrition in the rat: role of β₁-adrenoceptors on synaptic plasticity in the frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Flores, Osvaldo; Pérez, Hernán; Valladares, Luis; Morgan, Carlos; Gatica, Arnaldo; Burgos, Héctor; Olivares, Ricardo; Hernández, Alejandro

    2011-10-01

    Moderate reduction in the protein content of the mother's diet (hidden malnutrition) does not alter body and brain weights of rat pups at birth, but leads to dysfunction of neocortical noradrenaline systems together with impaired long-term potentiation and visuo-spatial memory performance. As β₁-adrenoceptors and downstream protein kinase signaling are critically involved in synaptic long-term potentiation and memory formation, we evaluated the β₁-adrenoceptor density and the expression of cyclic-AMP dependent protein kinase, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase and protein kinase Fyn, in the frontal cortex of prenatally malnourished adult rats. In addition, we also studied if β₁-adrenoceptor activation with the selective β₁ agonist dobutamine could improve deficits of prefrontal cortex long-term potentiation presenting these animals. Prenatally malnourished rats exhibited half of β₁-adrenoceptor binding, together with a 51% and 65% reduction of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase α and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase α expression, respectively, as compared with eutrophic animals. Administration of the selective β₁ agonist dobutamine prior to tetanization completely rescued the ability of the prefrontal cortex to develop and maintain long-term potentiation in the malnourished rats. Results suggest that under-expression of neocortical β₁-adrenoceptors and protein kinase signaling in hidden malnourished rats functionally affects the synaptic networks subserving prefrontal cortex long-term potentiation. β₁-adrenoceptor activation was sufficient to fully recover neocortical plasticity in the PKA- and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-deficient undernourished rats, possibly by producing extra amounts of cAMP and/or by recruiting alternative signaling cascades. PMID:21848869

  8. Connectivity reveals relationship of brain areas for reward-guided learning and decision making in human and monkey frontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Neubert, Franz-Xaver; Mars, Rogier B.; Sallet, Jérôme; Rushworth, Matthew F. S.

    2015-01-01

    Reward-guided decision-making depends on a network of brain regions. Among these are the orbitofrontal and the anterior cingulate cortex. However, it is difficult to ascertain if these areas constitute anatomical and functional unities, and how these areas correspond between monkeys and humans. To address these questions we looked at connectivity profiles of these areas using resting-state functional MRI in 38 humans and 25 macaque monkeys. We sought brain regions in the macaque that resembled 10 human areas identified with decision making and brain regions in the human that resembled six macaque areas identified with decision making. We also used diffusion-weighted MRI to delineate key human orbital and medial frontal brain regions. We identified 21 different regions, many of which could be linked to particular aspects of reward-guided learning, valuation, and decision making, and in many cases we identified areas in the macaque with similar coupling profiles. PMID:25947150

  9. The role of the dorsal medial frontal cortex in central processing limitation: a transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

    PubMed

    Soutschek, Alexander; Taylor, Paul C J; Schubert, Torsten

    2016-09-01

    When humans perform two tasks simultaneously, responses to the second task are increasingly delayed as the interval between the two tasks decreases (psychological refractory period). This delay of the second task is thought to reflect a central processing limitation at the response selection stage. However, the neural mechanisms underlying this central processing limitation remain unclear. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), we examined the role of the dorsal medial frontal cortex (dMFC) in a dual-task paradigm in which participants performed an auditory task 1 and a visual task 2. We found that dMFC TMS, relative to control conditions, reduced the psychological refractory period for task 2 processing, whereas we observed no dMFC TMS effects on task 1 processing. This suggests a causal role of the dMFC in coordinating response selection processes at the central bottleneck. PMID:27083589

  10. Spatially selective representations of voluntary and stimulus-driven attentional priority in human occipital, parietal, and frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Serences, John T; Yantis, Steven

    2007-02-01

    When multiple objects are present in a visual scene, they compete for cortical processing in the visual system; selective attention biases this competition so that representations of behaviorally relevant objects enter awareness and irrelevant objects do not. Deployments of selective attention can be voluntary (e.g., shift or attention to a target's expected spatial location) or stimulus driven (e.g., capture of attention by a target-defining feature such as color). Here we use functional magnetic resonance imaging to show that both of these factors induce spatially selective attentional modulations within regions of human occipital, parietal, and frontal cortex. In addition, the voluntary attentional modulations are temporally sustained, indicating that activity in these regions dynamically tracks the locus of attention. These data show that a convolution of factors, including prior knowledge of location and target-defining features, determines the relative competitive advantage of visual stimuli within multiple stages of the visual system. PMID:16514108

  11. Single exposure to cocaine impairs aspartate uptake in the pre-frontal cortex via dopamine D1-receptor dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sathler, Matheus Figueiredo; Stutz, Bernardo; Martins, Robertta Silva; Dos Santos Pereira, Maurício; Pecinalli, Ney Roner; Santos, Luis E; Taveira-da-Silva, Rosilane; Lowe, Jennifer; de Freitas, Isis Grigorio; de Melo Reis, Ricardo Augusto; Manhães, Alex C; Kubrusly, Regina C C

    2016-08-01

    Dopamine and glutamate play critical roles in the reinforcing effects of cocaine. We demonstrated that a single intraperitoneal administration of cocaine induces a significant decrease in [(3)H]-d-aspartate uptake in the pre-frontal cortex (PFC). This decrease is associated with elevated dopamine levels, and requires dopamine D1-receptor signaling (D1R) and adenylyl cyclase activation. The effect was observed within 10min of cocaine administration and lasted for up to 30min. This rapid response is related to D1R-mediated cAMP-mediated activation of PKA and phosphorylation of the excitatory amino acid transporters EAAT1, EAAT2 and EAAT3. We also demonstrated that cocaine exposure increases extracellular d-aspartate, l-glutamate and d-serine in the PFC. Our data suggest that cocaine activates dopamine D1 receptor signaling and PKA pathway to regulate EAATs function and extracellular EAA level in the PFC. PMID:27208619

  12. Chronic glucocorticoids exposure enhances neurodegeneration in the frontal cortex and hippocampus via NLRP-1 inflammasome activation in male mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wen; Zhang, Yaodong; Wu, Wenning; Yin, Yanyan; Huang, Dake; Wang, Yuchan; Li, Weiping; Li, Weizu

    2016-02-01

    Neuroinflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and depression. Chronic glucocorticoids (GCs) exposure has deleterious effects on the structure and function of neurons and is associated with development and progression of AD. However, little is known about the proinflammatory effects of chronic GCs exposure on neurodegeneration in brain. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of chronic dexamethasone (DEX) treatment (5mg/kg, s.c. for 7, 14, 21 and 28 days) on behavior, neurodegeneration and neuroinflammatory parameters of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor pyrin domain-containing 1 (NLRP-1) inflammasome in male mice. The results showed that DEX treatment for 21 and 28 days significantly reduced the spontaneous motor activity and exploratory behavior of the mice. In addition, these mice showed significant neurodegeneration and a decrease of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) in the frontal cortex and hippocampus CA3. DEX treatment for 7, 14, 21 and 28 days significantly decreased the mRNA and protein expression of glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Moreover, DEX treatment for 21 and 28 days significantly increased the proteins expression of NLRP-1, Caspase-1, Caspase-5, apoptosis associated speck-like protein (ASC), nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), p-NF-κB, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-18 and IL-6 in the frontal cortex and hippocampus brain tissue. DEX treatment for 28 days also significantly increased the mRNA expression levels of NLRP-1, Caspase-1, ASC and IL-1β. These results suggest that chronic GCs exposure may increase brain inflammation via NLRP-1 inflammasome activation and induce neurodegeneration. PMID:26434621

  13. NIRS-based hyperscanning reveals increased interpersonal coherence in superior frontal cortex during cooperation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xu; Bryant, Daniel M; Reiss, Allan L

    2012-02-01

    We used Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) to simultaneously measure brain activity in two people while they played a computer-based cooperation game side by side. Inter-brain activity coherence was calculated between the two participants. We found that the coherence between signals generated by participants' right superior frontal cortices increased during cooperation, but not during competition. Increased coherence was also associated with better cooperation performance. To our knowledge, this work represents the first use of a single NIRS instrument for simultaneous measurements of brain activity in two people. This study demonstrates the use of NIRS-based hyperscanning in studies of social interaction in a naturalistic environment. PMID:21933717

  14. Activities in the frontal cortex and gait performance are modulated by preparation. An fNIRS study.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Mitsuo; Miyai, Ichiro; Ono, Takeshi; Kubota, Kisou

    2008-01-15

    Neural activities in the primary motor cortex and supplementary motor area increase during the preparation as well as execution of voluntary movements of the hand and foot. However, there are few studies concerning preparatory activities of the brain preceding walking performance. We investigated how a verbal instruction "ready" before walking affected cortical activations and walking performances using a functional near-infrared spectroscopy. Seven healthy subjects performed two locomotor tasks on a treadmill with a verbal instruction "ready" before the treadmill was started (prepared walking; PW) and without it (simple walking; SW). Cadence was smaller and stride length was longer in PW than in SW. Increases of oxygenated hemoglobin (oxyHb) in the frontal regions especially in the prefrontal and premotor cortices were greater in PW than in SW both during the preparation and walking periods. These results suggested that preparation for walking cued by a verbal instruction enhanced frontal activations both during the preparation and execution of walking as well as walking performance. PMID:17950626

  15. Evolution of posterior parietal cortex and parietal-frontal networks for specific actions in primates.

    PubMed

    Kaas, Jon H; Stepniewska, Iwona

    2016-02-15

    Posterior parietal cortex (PPC) is an extensive region of the human brain that develops relatively late and is proportionally large compared with that of monkeys and prosimian primates. Our ongoing comparative studies have led to several conclusions about the evolution of this posterior parietal region. In early placental mammals, PPC likely was a small multisensory region much like PPC of extant rodents and tree shrews. In early primates, PPC likely resembled that of prosimian galagos, in which caudal PPC (PPCc) is visual and rostral PPC (PPCr) has eight or more multisensory domains where electrical stimulation evokes different complex motor behaviors, including reaching, hand-to-mouth, looking, protecting the face or body, and grasping. These evoked behaviors depend on connections with functionally matched domains in premotor cortex (PMC) and motor cortex (M1). Domains in each region compete with each other, and a serial arrangement of domains allows different factors to influence motor outcomes successively. Similar arrangements of domains have been retained in New and Old World monkeys, and humans appear to have at least some of these domains. The great expansion and prolonged development of PPC in humans suggest the addition of functionally distinct territories. We propose that, across primates, PMC and M1 domains are second and third levels in a number of parallel, interacting networks for mediating and selecting one type of action over others. PMID:26101180

  16. Arc Regulates Experience-Dependent Persistent Firing Patterns in Frontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Ming; Cao, Vania; Ye, Yizhou; Manji, Husseini K.

    2014-01-01

    The brain encodes information about past experience in specific populations of neurons that communicate with one another by firing action potentials. Studies of experience-dependent neural plasticity have largely focused on individual synaptic changes in response to neuronal input. Indicative of the neuronal output transmitted to downstream neurons, persistent firing patterns are affected by prior experience in selective neuronal populations. However, little is known about the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which experience-related persistent firing patterns are regulated in specific neuronal populations. Using frontal cortical slices prepared from transgenic mice carrying a fluorescent reporter of Arc gene expression, this study investigates how behavioral experience and the activity-regulated Arc gene affect patterns of neuronal firing. We found that motor training increases Arc expression in subsets of excitatory neurons. Those neurons exhibit persistent firing in contrast to Arc-negative neurons from the same mice or neurons from the untrained mice. Furthermore, in mice carrying genetic deletion of Arc, the frontal cortical circuitry is still in place to initiate experience-dependent gene expression, but the level of persistent firing thereafter is diminished. Finally, our results showed that the emergence of persistent activity is associated with Arc-dependent changes in the function of NMDA-type glutamate receptors, rather than changes in AMPA-type receptors or membrane excitability. Our findings therefore reveal an Arc-dependent molecular pathway by which gene–experience interaction regulates the emergence of persistent firing patterns in specific neuronal populations. PMID:24806683

  17. A hierarchy of timescales explains distinct effects of local inhibition of primary visual cortex and frontal eye fields

    PubMed Central

    Cocchi, Luca; Sale, Martin V; L Gollo, Leonardo; Bell, Peter T; Nguyen, Vinh T; Zalesky, Andrew; Breakspear, Michael; Mattingley, Jason B

    2016-01-01

    Within the primate visual system, areas at lower levels of the cortical hierarchy process basic visual features, whereas those at higher levels, such as the frontal eye fields (FEF), are thought to modulate sensory processes via feedback connections. Despite these functional exchanges during perception, there is little shared activity between early and late visual regions at rest. How interactions emerge between regions encompassing distinct levels of the visual hierarchy remains unknown. Here we combined neuroimaging, non-invasive cortical stimulation and computational modelling to characterize changes in functional interactions across widespread neural networks before and after local inhibition of primary visual cortex or FEF. We found that stimulation of early visual cortex selectively increased feedforward interactions with FEF and extrastriate visual areas, whereas identical stimulation of the FEF decreased feedback interactions with early visual areas. Computational modelling suggests that these opposing effects reflect a fast-slow timescale hierarchy from sensory to association areas. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15252.001 PMID:27596931

  18. Effective Connectivity Hierarchically Links Temporoparietal and Frontal Areas of the Auditory Dorsal Stream with the Motor Cortex Lip Area during Speech Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murakami, Takenobu; Restle, Julia; Ziemann, Ulf

    2012-01-01

    A left-hemispheric cortico-cortical network involving areas of the temporoparietal junction (Tpj) and the posterior inferior frontal gyrus (pIFG) is thought to support sensorimotor integration of speech perception into articulatory motor activation, but how this network links with the lip area of the primary motor cortex (M1) during speech…

  19. AGE-RELATED CHANGES IN NEUTRAL SPHINGOMYELIN-SPECIFIC PHOSPHOLIPASE C ACTIVITY IN STRIATUM, HIPPOCAMPUS, AND FRONTAL CORTEX: IMPLICATION FOR SENSITIVITY TO STRESS AND INFLAMMATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies show the enrichment of mammalian brain with neutral sphingomyelin specific phospholipase C (ceramide-phosphocholine phosphodiesterase, EC 3.1.4.12; N-Sase). The objective of this study was to evaluate the subcellular N-Sase activity in striatum, hippocampus, and frontal cortex. Resu...

  20. Investigation of human frontal cortex under noxious thermal stimulation of temporo-mandibular joint using functional near infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yennu, Amarnath; Rawat, Rohit; Manry, Michael T.; Gatchel, Robert; Liu, Hanli

    2013-03-01

    According to American Academy of Orofacial Pain, 75% of the U.S. population experiences painful symptoms of temporo-mandibular joint and muscle disorder (TMJMD) during their lifetime. Thus, objective assessment of pain is crucial for efficient pain management. We used near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) as a tool to explore hemodynamic responses in the frontal cortex to noxious thermal stimulation of temporomadibular joint (TMJ). NIRS experiments were performed on 9 healthy volunteers under both low pain stimulation (LPS) and high pain stimulation (HPS), using a temperature-controlled thermal stimulator. To induce thermal pain, a 16X16 mm2 thermode was strapped onto the right TMJ of each subject. Initially, subjects were asked to rate perceived pain on a scale of 0 to 10 for the temperatures from 41°C to 47°C. For the NIRS measurement, two magnitudes of temperatures, one rated as 3 and another rated as 7, were chosen as LPS and HPS, respectively. By analyzing the temporal profiles of changes in oxy-hemoglobin concentration (HbO) using cluster-based statistical tests, we were able to identify several regions of interest (ROI), (e.g., secondary somatosensory cortex and prefrontal cortex), where significant differences (p<0.05) between HbO responses to LPS and HPS are shown. In order to classify these two levels of pain, a neural-network-based classification algorithm was used. With leave-one-out cross validation from 9 subjects, the two levels of pain were identified with 100% mean sensitivity, 98% mean specificity and 99% mean accuracy to high pain. From the receiver operating characteristics curve, 0.99 mean area under curve was observed.

  1. Electrical stimulation of the frontal cortex enhances slow-frequency EEG activity and sleepiness.

    PubMed

    D'Atri, A; De Simoni, E; Gorgoni, M; Ferrara, M; Ferlazzo, F; Rossini, P M; De Gennaro, L

    2016-06-01

    Our aim was to enhance the spontaneous slow-frequency EEG activity during the resting state using oscillating transcranial direct currents (tDCS) with a stimulation frequency that resembles the spontaneous oscillations of sleep onset. Accordingly, in this preliminary study, we assessed EEG after-effects of a frontal oscillatory tDCS with different frequency (0.8 vs. 5Hz) and polarity (anodal, cathodal, and sham). Two single-blind experiments compared the after effects on the resting EEG of oscillatory tDCS [Exp. 1=0.8Hz, 10 subjects (26.2±2.5years); Exp. 2=5Hz, 10 subjects (27.4±2.4years)] by manipulating its polarity. EEG signals recorded (28 scalp derivations) before and after stimulation [slow oscillations (0.5-1Hz), delta (1-4Hz), theta (5-7Hz), alpha (8-12Hz), beta 1 (13-15Hz) and beta 2 (16-24Hz)] were compared between conditions as a function of polarity (anodal vs. cathodal vs. sham) and frequency of stimulation (0.8 vs. 5Hz). We found a significant relative enhancement of the delta activity after the anodal tDCS at 5Hz compared to that at 0.8Hz. This increase, even though not reaching the statistical significance compared to sham, is concomitant to a significant increase of subjective sleepiness, as assessed by a visual analog scale. These two phenomena are linearly related with a regional specificity, correlations being restricted to cortical areas perifocal to the stimulation site. We have shown that a frontal oscillating anodal tDCS at 5Hz results in an effective change of both subjective sleepiness and spontaneous slow-frequency EEG activity. These changes are critically associated to both stimulation polarity (anodal) and frequency (5Hz). However, evidence of frequency-dependence seems more unequivocal than evidence of polarity-dependence. PMID:26964682

  2. Short theta burst stimulation to left frontal cortex prior to encoding enhances subsequent recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Demeter, Elise; Mirdamadi, Jasmine L; Meehan, Sean K; Taylor, Stephan F

    2016-08-01

    Deep semantic encoding of verbal stimuli can aid in later successful retrieval of those stimuli from long-term episodic memory. Evidence from numerous neuropsychological and neuroimaging experiments demonstrate regions in left prefrontal cortex, including left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), are important for processes related to encoding. Here, we investigated the relationship between left DLPFC activity during encoding and successful subsequent memory with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). In a pair of experiments using a 2-session within-subjects design, we stimulated either left DLPFC or a control region (Vertex) with a single 2-s train of short theta burst stimulation (sTBS) during a semantic encoding task and then gave participants a recognition memory test. We found that subsequent memory was enhanced on the day left DLPFC was stimulated, relative to the day Vertex was stimulated, and that DLPFC stimulation also increased participants' confidence in their decisions during the recognition task. We also explored the time course of how long the effects of sTBS persisted. Our data suggest 2 s of sTBS to left DLPFC is capable of enhancing subsequent memory for items encoded up to 15 s following stimulation. Collectively, these data demonstrate sTBS is capable of enhancing long-term memory and provide evidence that TBS protocols are a potentially powerful tool for modulating cognitive function. PMID:27098772

  3. The origins of thalamic inputs to grasp zones in frontal cortex of macaque monkeys.

    PubMed

    Gharbawie, Omar A; Stepniewska, Iwona; Kaas, Jon H

    2016-07-01

    The hand representation in primary motor cortex (M1) is instrumental to manual dexterity in primates. In Old World monkeys, rostral and caudal aspects of the hand representation are located in the precentral gyrus and the anterior bank of the central sulcus, respectively. We previously reported the organization of the cortico-cortical connections of the grasp zone in rostral M1. Here we describe the organization of thalamocortical connections that were labeled from the same tracer injections. Thalamocortical connections of a grasp zone in ventral premotor cortex (PMv) and the M1 orofacial representation are included for direct comparison. The M1 grasp zone was primarily connected with ventral lateral divisions of motor thalamus. The largest proportion of inputs originated in the posterior division (VLp) followed by the medial and the anterior divisions. Thalamic inputs to the M1 grasp zone originated in more lateral aspects of VLp as compared to the origins of thalamic inputs to the M1 orofacial representation. Inputs to M1 from thalamic divisions connected with cerebellum constituted three fold the density of inputs from divisions connected with basal ganglia, whereas the ratio of inputs was more balanced for the grasp zone in PMv. Privileged access of the cerebellothalamic pathway to the grasp zone in rostral M1 is consistent with the connection patterns previously reported for the precentral gyrus. Thus, cerebellar nuclei are likely more involved than basal ganglia nuclei with the contributions of rostral M1 to manual dexterity. PMID:26254903

  4. Sustaining high acetylcholine levels in the frontal cortex, but not retrosplenial cortex, recovers spatial memory performance in a rodent model of diencephalic amnesia.

    PubMed

    Savage, Lisa M

    2012-04-01

    Although the thalamus and/or mammillary bodies are the primary sites of neuropathology in cases of diencephalic amnesia such as Wernicke Korsakoff Syndrome (WKS), there is also functional deactivation of certain cortical regions that contribute to the cognitive dysfunction. Acetylcholine (ACh) is a key neurotransmitter that modulates neural processing within the cortex and between the thalamus and cortex. In the pyrithiamine-induced thiamine deficiency (PTD) rat model of WKS, there are significant reductions in cholinergic innervation and behaviorally stimulated ACh efflux in the frontal (FC) and retrosplenial (RSC) cortices. In the present study, ACh released levels were site-specifically amplified with physostigmine (0.5 μg, 1.0 μg) in the FC and the RSC, which was confirmed with in vivo microdialysis. Although physostigmine sustained high ACh levels in both cortical regions, the effects on spatial memory, assessed by spontaneous alternation, were different as a function of region (FC, RSC) and treatment (PTD, pair-fed [PF]). Higher ACh levels in the FC recovered the rate of alternation in PTD rats as well as reduced arm-reentry perseverative errors. However, higher ACh levels within the FC of PF rats exacerbated arm-reentry perseverative errors without significantly affecting alternation rates. Maintaining high ACh levels in the RSC had no procognitive effects in PTD rats, but rather impaired alternation behavior in PF rats. These results demonstrate that diverse cortical regions respond differently to intensified ACh levels-and the effects are dependent on thalamic pathology. Thus, pharmacotherapeutics aimed at enhancing cognitive functions must account for the unique features of cortical ACh stimulation and the connective circuitry with the thalamus. PMID:22448856

  5. Sustaining high acetylcholine levels in the frontal cortex, but not retrosplenial cortex, recovers spatial memory performance in a rodent model of diencephalic amnesia

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Lisa M.

    2012-01-01

    Although the thalamus and/or mammillary bodies are the primary sites of neuropathology in cases of diencephalic amnesia such as Wernicke Korsakoff Syndrome (WKS), there is also functional deactivation of certain cortical regions that contribute to the cognitive dysfunction. Acetylcholine (ACh) is a key neurotransmitter that modulates neural processing within the cortex and between the thalamus and cortex. In the pyrithiamine-induced thiamine deficiency (PTD) rat model of WKS there are significant reductions in cholinergic innervation and behaviorally-stimulated ACh efflux in the frontal (FC) and retrosplenial (RSC) cortices. In the present study, ACh released levels were site-specifically amplified with physostigmine (0.5 μg, 1.0 μg) in the FC and the RSC, which was confirmed with in vivo microdialysis. Although physostigmine sustained high ACh levels in both cortical regions, the effects on spatial memory, assessed by spontaneous alternation, were different as a function of region (FC, RSC) and treatment (PTD, pair-fed [PF]). Higher ACh levels in the FC recovered the rate of alternation in PTD rats as well as reduced arm-re-entry preservative errors. However, higher ACh levels within the FC of PF rats exacerbated arm-re-entry preservative errors without significantly affecting alternation rates. Maintaining high ACh levels in the RSC had no procognitive effects in PTD rats, but rather impaired alternation behavior in PF rats. These results demonstrate that diverse cortical regions respond differently to intensified ACh levels—and the effects are dependent on thalamic pathology. Thus, pharmacotherapeutics aimed at enhancing cognitive functions must account for the unique features of cortical ACh stimulation and the connective circuitry with the thalamus. PMID:22448856

  6. Inferior frontal cortex activity is modulated by reward sensitivity and performance variability.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Claramonte, Paola; Ávila, César; Rodríguez-Pujadas, Aina; Costumero, Víctor; Ventura-Campos, Noelia; Bustamante, Juan Carlos; Rosell-Negre, Patricia; Barrós-Loscertales, Alfonso

    2016-02-01

    High reward sensitivity has been linked with motivational and cognitive disorders related with prefrontal and striatal brain function during inhibitory control. However, few studies have analyzed the interaction among reward sensitivity, task performance and neural activity. Participants (N=57) underwent fMRI while performing a Go/No-go task with Frequent-go (77.5%), Infrequent-go (11.25%) and No-go (11.25%) stimuli. Task-associated activity was found in inhibition-related brain regions, with different activity patterns for right and left inferior frontal gyri (IFG): right IFG responded more strongly to No-go stimuli, while left IFG responded similarly to all infrequent stimuli. Reward sensitivity correlated with omission errors in Go trials and reaction time (RT) variability, and with increased activity in right and left IFG for No-go and Infrequent-go stimuli compared with Frequent-go. Bilateral IFG activity was associated with RT variability, with reward sensitivity mediating this association. These results suggest that reward sensitivity modulates behavior and brain function during executive control. PMID:26772873

  7. Alcohol abuse and HIV infection have additive effects on frontal cortex function as measured by auditory evoked potential P3A latency.

    PubMed

    Fein, G; Biggins, C A; MacKay, S

    1995-02-01

    Both alcohol and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection have been shown to produce central nervous system (CNS) morbidity in frontal brain regions. The degree to which the CNS morbidity in HIV infection, as it affects frontal cortex function, may be preferentially increased by alcohol abuse was examined using the auditory P3A evoked potential. The P3A indexes an orienting response, maximal over frontal cortex that occurs when novel nontarget stimuli are presented in the midst of a target detection paradigm. Four groups of subjects were compared: HIV+ alcohol abusers, HIV+ light/nondrinkers, HIV- alcohol abusers, and HIV- light/nondrinkers. The alcohol abuser and light/nondrinker HIV+ groups were matched on percent CD4 lymphocytes, insuring that the results reflected specific CNS effects and were not a result of differences between the groups in the degree of systemic immune suppression. Alcohol abuse and HIV infection had at least additive effects on P3A latency, consistent with alcohol abuse worsening the effect of HIV disease on frontal cortex function. Post-hoc analyses suggested that concomitant alcohol abuse results in the effects of HIV infection on P3A latency becoming manifest earlier in the HIV disease process. PMID:7727627

  8. The development of performance-monitoring function in the posterior medial frontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Kate Dimond; Perkins, Suzanne C.; Angstadt, Mike; Johnson, Timothy; Stern, Emily R.; Welsh, Robert C.; Taylor, Stephan F.

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite its critical role in performance-monitoring, the development of posterior medial prefrontal cortex (pMFC) in goal-directed behaviors remains poorly understood. Performance monitoring depends on distinct, but related functions that may differentially activate the pMFC, such as monitoring response conflict and detecting errors. Developmental differences in conflict- and error-related activations, coupled with age-related changes in behavioral performance, may confound attempts to map the maturation of pMFC functions. To characterize the development of pMFC-based performance monitoring functions, we segregated interference and error-processing, while statistically controlling for performance. Methods Twenty-one adults and 23 youth performed an event-related version of the Multi-Source Interference Task during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Linear modeling of interference and error contrast estimates derived from the pMFC were regressed on age, while covarying for performance. Results Interference- and error-processing were associated with robust activation of the pMFC in both youth and adults. Among youth, interference- and error-related activation of the pMFC increased with age, independent of performance. Greater accuracy associated with greater pMFC activity during error commission in both groups. Discussion Increasing pMFC response to interference and errors occurs with age, likely contributing to the improvement of performance monitoring capacity during development. PMID:19913101

  9. Increase of glucose consumption in basal ganglia, thalamus and frontal cortex of patients with spasmodic torticollis

    SciTech Connect

    Grassi, F.; Bressi, S.; Antoni, M.

    1994-05-01

    The pathophysiology of spasmodic torticollis, a focal dystonia involving neck muscles, is still unclear. Positron emission tomography (PET) studies showed either an increase as well as a decrease of regional cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (rCMRglu) in basal ganglia. In the present study, [18F]FDG and PET was used to measure rCMRglu in 10 patients with spasmodic torticollis (mean age 50.37 {plus_minus} 11.47) and 10 age matched controls. All cases with a short disease duration, were untreated. A factorial analysis of variance revealed a significant bilateral increase of glucose consumption in caudate nucleus and pallidum/putamen complex (p>0.004) and in the cerebellum (p>0.001). The rCMRglu increase in the motor/premotor cortex and in the thalamus reached a trend towards significance (p<0.05). These preliminary data show enhanced metabolism in basal ganglia and cerebellum as the functional correlate of focal dystonia. A recently proposed model suggests that dystonia would be the consequence of a putaminal hyperactivity, leading to the breakdown of the pallidal inhibitory control on thalamus and thalamo-cortical projections.

  10. Laser-induced accurate frontal cortex damage: a new tool for brain study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Gonzalo; Khotiaintsev, Sergei N.; Sanchez-Huerta, Maria L.; Ibanes, Osvaldo; Hernandez, Adan; Silva, Adriana B.; Calderon, Rafael; Ayala, Griselda; Marroquin, Javier; Svirid, Vladimir; Khotiaintsev, Yuri V.

    1999-01-01

    New laser-based technique for anatomical-functional study of the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) of the brain of experimental animals (rats) is presented. The technique is based on making accurate well-controlled lesions to small MPFC and subsequent observing behavioral alterations in the lesioned animals relative to control ones. Laser produces smaller and more accurate lesions in comparison to those obtained by traditional methods, such as: mechanical action, chemical means, and electrical currents. For producing the brain lesions, a 10 W CO2 CW laser is employed for reasons of its sufficiently high power, which is combined with relatively low cost-per-Watt ratio. In our experience, such power rating is sufficient for making MPFC lesions. The laser radiation is applied in a form of pulse series via hollow circular metallic waveguide made of stainless steel. The waveguide is of inner diameter 1.3 mm and 95 mm long. The anesthetized animals are placed in stereotaxic instrument. Via perforations made in the skull bone, the MPFC is exposed to the laser radiation. Several weeks later (after animal recuperation), standard behavioral tests are performed. They reveal behavioral changes, which point to a damage of some small regions of the MPFC. These results correlate with the histological data, which reveal the existence of small and accurate MPFC lesions. The present technique has good prospects for use in anatomical- functional studies of brain by areas. In addition, this technique appears to have considerable promise as a treatment method for some pathologies, e.g. the Parkinson's disease.

  11. In search of the functional neuroanatomy of sociality: MRI subdivisions of orbital frontal cortex and social cognition

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Motoaki; Niznikiewicz, Margaret; Thompson, Elizabeth; Levitt, James J.; Choate, Victoria; Shenton, Martha E.; McCarley, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    We examined social cognition in a sample of healthy participants who had prior magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) gray matter volume studies of the orbital frontal cortex (OFC) that was parcellated into three regions: gyrus rectus, middle orbital gyrus and lateral orbital gyrus. These subjects also completed a self-report measure of Machiavelli personality traits, along with psychometric tests of social comprehension and declarative episodic memory, all of which we used as proxy measures to examine various features of social cognition. The data pointed to distinct functional–anatomical relationships highlighted by strong correlations of left lateral orbital gyrus and Machiavellian scores and right middle orbital gyrus with social comprehension and declarative episodic memory. In addition, hierarchical regression analyses revealed statistical evidence of a double dissociation between Machiavellian scores and left lateral orbital gyrus on one hand, and social comprehension with right middle orbital gyrus, on the other hand. To our knowledge, these findings are the first to show evidence linking normal variation in OFC subregions and different aspects of social cognition. PMID:22345366

  12. Mitochondrial dysfunction and lipid peroxidation in rat frontal cortex by chronic NMDA administration can be partially prevented by lithium treatment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Helena K; Isaacs-Trepanier, Cameron; Elmi, Nika; Rapoport, Stanley I; Andreazza, Ana C

    2016-05-01

    Chronic N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) administration to rats may be a model to investigate excitotoxicity mediated by glutamatergic hyperactivity, and lithium has been reported to be neuroprotective. We hypothesized that glutamatergic hyperactivity in chronic NMDA injected rats would cause mitochondrial dysfunction and lipid peroxidation in the brain, and that chronic lithium treatment would ameliorate some of these NMDA-induced alterations. Rats treated with lithium for 6 weeks were injected i.p. 25 mg/kg NMDA on a daily basis for the last 21 days of lithium treatment. Brain was removed and frontal cortex was analyzed. Chronic NMDA decreased brain levels of mitochondrial complex I and III, and increased levels of the lipid oxidation products, 8-isoprostane and 4-hydroxynonenal, compared with non-NMDA injected rats. Lithium treatment prevented the NMDA-induced increments in 8-isoprostane and 4-hydroxynonenal. Our findings suggest that increased chronic activation of NMDA receptors can induce alterations in electron transport chain complexes I and III and in lipid peroxidation in brain. The NMDA-induced changes may contribute to glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity, which plays a role in brain diseases such as bipolar disorder. Lithium treatment prevented changes in 8-isoprostane and 4-hydroxynonenal, which may contribute to lithium's reported neuroprotective effect and efficacy in bipolar disorder. PMID:26894301

  13. Do Defense Styles of Ego Relate to Volumes of Orbito-Frontal Cortex in Patients with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Hanefi; Koc, Mustafa; Korkmaz, Sevda; Ozler, Sinan; Erenkus, Zehra

    2011-01-01

    Objective Although the importance of orbito-frontal cortex (OFC) is established in the pathogenesis of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), no study have evaluated its relation to the traditional psychodynamic perspective. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the relationship between the defense styles consisting of mature, immature and neurotic defenses and OFC volumes of patients with OCD. Methods Subjects were selected among those of our previous study, and so eighteen patients with OCD and same number of healthy controls were took into the study. The patients and controls had underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In addition, the Defense Style Questionnaire-40 was administered to obtain defense styles of patients and controls. Results No significant relationship was found between the right OFC volumes of both the patient and control groups and their scores of mature, neurotic, or immature defense mechanisms. As for the left OFC volumes, the only significant relationship for the scores of immature defense mechanism was found in the patient group. Conclusion The results of the present study indicated that there was no significant relationship between OFC volumes of the patient group and their scores of mature, neurotic, or immature defense mechanisms, except a significant relation with the scores of immature defense mechanisms. PMID:21852988

  14. Early Alzheimer's disease-type pathology in the frontal cortex of wild mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei).

    PubMed

    Perez, Sylvia E; Sherwood, Chet C; Cranfield, Michael R; Erwin, Joseph M; Mudakikwa, Antoine; Hof, Patrick R; Mufson, Elliott J

    2016-03-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) and tau pathology have been described in the brains of captive aged great apes, but the natural progression of these age-related pathologies from wild great apes, including the gorilla, is unknown. In our previous study of Western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) who were housed in American Zoos and Aquariums-accredited facilities, we found an age-related increase in Aβ-positive plaques and vasculature, tau-positive astrocytes, oligodendrocyte coiled bodies, and neuritic clusters in the neocortex as well as hippocampus in older animals. Here, we demonstrate that aged wild mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei), who spent their entire lives in their natural habitat, also display an age-related increase in amyloid precursor protein (APP) and/or Aβ-immunoreactive blood vessels and plaques, but very limited tau pathology, in the frontal cortex. These results indicate that Aβ and tau lesions are age-related events that occur in the brain of gorillas living in captivity and in the wild. PMID:26923416

  15. Allopregnanolone and progesterone decrease cell death and cognitive deficits after a contusion of the rat pre-frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Djebaili, M; Hoffman, S W; Stein, D G

    2004-01-01

    We compared the effects of three different doses of allopregnanolone (4, 8 or 16 mg/kg), a metabolite of progesterone, to progesterone (16 mg/kg) in adult rats with controlled cortical impact to the pre-frontal cortex. Injections were given 1 h, 6 h and every day for 5 consecutive days after the injury. One day after injury, both progesterone-treated (16 mg/kg) and allopregnanolone (8 or 16 mg/kg)-treated rats showed less caspase-3 activity, and rats treated with allopregnanolone (16 mg/kg) showed less DNA fragmentation in the lesion area, indicating reduced apoptosis. Nineteen days after the injury, rats treated with progesterone and allopregnanolone (8 or 16 mg/kg) showed no difference in necrotic cavity size but had less cell loss in the medio-dorsal nucleus of the thalamus and less learning and memory impairments compared with the injured vehicle-treated rats. On that same day the injured rats treated with progesterone showed more weight gain compared with the injured rats treated with the vehicle. These results can be taken to show that progesterone and allopregnanolone have similar neuroprotective effects after traumatic brain injury, but allopregnanolone appears to be more potent than progesterone in facilitating CNS repair. PMID:14698743

  16. How Two Brains Make One Synchronized Mind in the Inferior Frontal Cortex: fNIRS-Based Hyperscanning During Cooperative Singing

    PubMed Central

    Osaka, Naoyuki; Minamoto, Takehiro; Yaoi, Ken; Azuma, Miyuki; Shimada, Yohko Minamoto; Osaka, Mariko

    2015-01-01

    One form of communication that is common in all cultures is people singing together. Singing together reflects an index of cognitive synchronization and cooperation of human brains. Little is known about the neural synchronization mechanism, however. Here, we examined how two brains make one synchronized behavior using cooperated singing/humming between two people and hyperscanning, a new brain scanning technique. Hyperscanning allowed us to observe dynamic cooperation between interacting participants. We used functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) to simultaneously record the brain activity of two people while they cooperatively sang or hummed a song in face-to-face (FtF) or face-to-wall (FtW) conditions. By calculating the inter-brain wavelet transform coherence between two interacting brains, we found a significant increase in the neural synchronization of the left inferior frontal cortex (IFC) for cooperative singing or humming regardless of FtF or FtW compared with singing or humming alone. On the other hand, the right IFC showed an increase in neural synchronization for humming only, possibly due to more dependence on musical processing. PMID:26635703

  17. Differential Gene Expression in the Nucleus Accumbens and Frontal Cortex of Lewis and Fischer 344 Rats Relevant to Drug Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Higuera-Matas, A; Montoya, G. L; Coria, S.M; Miguéns, M; García-Lecumberri, C; Ambrosio, E

    2011-01-01

    Drug addiction results from the interplay between social and biological factors. Among these, genetic variables play a major role. The use of genetically related inbred rat strains that differ in their preference for drugs of abuse is one approach of great importance to explore genetic determinants. Lewis and Fischer 344 rats have been extensively studied and it has been shown that the Lewis strain is especially vulnerable to the addictive properties of several drugs when compared with the Fischer 344 strain. Here, we have used microarrays to analyze gene expression profiles in the frontal cortex and nucleus accumbens of Lewis and Fischer 344 rats. Our results show that only a very limited group of genes were differentially expressed in Lewis rats when compared with the Fischer 344 strain. The genes that were induced in the Lewis strain were related to oxygen transport, neurotransmitter processing and fatty acid metabolism. On the contrary genes that were repressed in Lewis rats were involved in physiological functions such as drug and proton transport, oligodendrocyte survival and lipid catabolism. These data might be useful for the identification of genes which could be potential markers of the vulnerability to the addictive properties of drugs of abuse. PMID:21886580

  18. How Two Brains Make One Synchronized Mind in the Inferior Frontal Cortex: fNIRS-Based Hyperscanning During Cooperative Singing.

    PubMed

    Osaka, Naoyuki; Minamoto, Takehiro; Yaoi, Ken; Azuma, Miyuki; Shimada, Yohko Minamoto; Osaka, Mariko

    2015-01-01

    One form of communication that is common in all cultures is people singing together. Singing together reflects an index of cognitive synchronization and cooperation of human brains. Little is known about the neural synchronization mechanism, however. Here, we examined how two brains make one synchronized behavior using cooperated singing/humming between two people and hyperscanning, a new brain scanning technique. Hyperscanning allowed us to observe dynamic cooperation between interacting participants. We used functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) to simultaneously record the brain activity of two people while they cooperatively sang or hummed a song in face-to-face (FtF) or face-to-wall (FtW) conditions. By calculating the inter-brain wavelet transform coherence between two interacting brains, we found a significant increase in the neural synchronization of the left inferior frontal cortex (IFC) for cooperative singing or humming regardless of FtF or FtW compared with singing or humming alone. On the other hand, the right IFC showed an increase in neural synchronization for humming only, possibly due to more dependence on musical processing. PMID:26635703

  19. Greater Activity in the Frontal Cortex on Left Curves: A Vector-Based fNIRS Study of Left and Right Curve Driving

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Noriyuki; Yoshino, Kayoko; Yamamoto, Kouji; Takahashi, Hideki; Li, Shuguang; Sugimachi, Toshiyuki; Nakano, Kimihiko; Suda, Yoshihiro; Kato, Toshinori

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In the brain, the mechanisms of attention to the left and the right are known to be different. It is possible that brain activity when driving also differs with different horizontal road alignments (left or right curves), but little is known about this. We found driver brain activity to be different when driving on left and right curves, in an experiment using a large-scale driving simulator and functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Research Design and Methods The participants were fifteen healthy adults. We created a course simulating an expressway, comprising straight line driving and gentle left and right curves, and monitored the participants under driving conditions, in which they drove at a constant speed of 100 km/h, and under non-driving conditions, in which they simply watched the screen (visual task). Changes in hemoglobin concentrations were monitored at 48 channels including the prefrontal cortex, the premotor cortex, the primary motor cortex and the parietal cortex. From orthogonal vectors of changes in deoxyhemoglobin and changes in oxyhemoglobin, we calculated changes in cerebral oxygen exchange, reflecting neural activity, and statistically compared the resulting values from the right and left curve sections. Results Under driving conditions, there were no sites where cerebral oxygen exchange increased significantly more during right curves than during left curves (p > 0.05), but cerebral oxygen exchange increased significantly more during left curves (p < 0.05) in the right premotor cortex, the right frontal eye field and the bilateral prefrontal cortex. Under non-driving conditions, increases were significantly greater during left curves (p < 0.05) only in the right frontal eye field. Conclusions Left curve driving was thus found to require more brain activity at multiple sites, suggesting that left curve driving may require more visual attention than right curve driving. The right frontal eye field was activated under both

  20. Propofol-Induced Frontal Cortex Disconnection: A Study of Resting-State Networks, Total Brain Connectivity, and Mean BOLD Signal Oscillation Frequencies.

    PubMed

    Guldenmund, Pieter; Gantner, Ithabi S; Baquero, Katherine; Das, Tushar; Demertzi, Athena; Boveroux, Pierre; Bonhomme, Vincent; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie; Gosseries, Olivia; Noirhomme, Quentin; Kirsch, Muriëlle; Boly, Mélanie; Owen, Adrian M; Laureys, Steven; Gómez, Francisco; Soddu, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Propofol is one of the most commonly used anesthetics in the world, but much remains unknown about the mechanisms by which it induces loss of consciousness. In this resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study, we examined qualitative and quantitative changes of resting-state networks (RSNs), total brain connectivity, and mean oscillation frequencies of the regional blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal, associated with propofol-induced mild sedation and loss of responsiveness in healthy subjects. We found that detectability of RSNs diminished significantly with loss of responsiveness, and total brain connectivity decreased strongly in the frontal cortex, which was associated with increased mean oscillation frequencies of the BOLD signal. Our results suggest a pivotal role of the frontal cortex in propofol-induced loss of responsiveness. PMID:26650183

  1. Spatiotemporal dynamics of excitation in rat insular cortex: intrinsic corticocortical circuit regulates caudal-rostro excitatory propagation from the insular to frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Fujita, S; Adachi, K; Koshikawa, N; Kobayashi, M

    2010-01-13

    The insular cortex (IC), composing unique anatomical connections, receives multi-modal sensory inputs including visceral, gustatory and somatosensory information from sensory thalamic nuclei. Axonal projections from the limbic structures, which have a profound influence on induction of epileptic activity, also converge onto the IC. However, functional connectivity underlying the physiological and pathological roles characteristic to the IC still remains unclear. The present study sought to elucidate the spatiotemporal dynamics of excitatory propagation and their cellular mechanisms in the IC using optical recording in urethane-anesthetized rats. Repetitive electrical stimulations of the IC at 50 Hz demonstrated characteristic patterns of excitatory propagation depending on the stimulation sites. Stimulation of the granular zone of the IC (GI) and other surrounding cortices such as the motor/primary sensory/secondary sensory cortices evoked round-shaped excitatory propagations, which often extended over the borders of adjacent areas, whereas excitation of the agranular and dysgranular zones in the IC (AI and DI, respectively) spread along the rostrocaudal axis parallel to the rhinal fissure. Stimulation of AI/DI often evoked excitation in the dorsolateral orbital cortex, which exhibited spatially discontinuous topography of excitatory propagation in the IC. Pharmacological manipulations using 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3(1H,4H)-dione (DNQX), a non-NMDA receptor antagonist, D-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (D-APV), an NMDA receptor antagonist, and bicuculline methiodide, a GABA(A) receptor antagonist, indicate that excitatory propagation was primarily regulated by non-NMDA and GABA(A) receptors. Microinjection of lidocaine or incision of the supragranular layers of the rostrocaudally middle part of excitatory regions suppressed excitation in the remote regions from the stimulation site, suggesting that the excitatory propagation in the IC is largely mediated by

  2. Repeated treatment with electroconvulsive seizures induces HDAC2 expression and down-regulation of NMDA receptor-related genes through histone deacetylation in the rat frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Park, Hong Geun; Yu, Hyun Sook; Park, Soyoung; Ahn, Yong Min; Kim, Yong Sik; Kim, Se Hyun

    2014-09-01

    The enzymatic activity of histone deacetylases (HDACs) leads to a histone deacetylation-mediated condensed chromatic structure, resulting in transcriptional repression, which has been implicated in the modifications of neural circuits and behaviors. Repeated treatment with electroconvulsive seizure (ECS) induces changes in histone acetylation, expression of various genes, and intrabrain cellular changes, including neurogenesis. In this study, we examined the effects of repeated ECS on the expression of class I HDACs and related changes in histone modifications and gene expression in the rat frontal cortex. Ten days of repeated ECS treatments (E10X) up-regulated HDAC2 expression at the mRNA and protein levels in the rat frontal cortex compared with sham-treated controls; this was evident in the nuclei of neuronal cells in the prefrontal, cingulate, orbital, and insular cortices. Among the known HDAC2 target genes, mRNA expression of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor signaling-related genes, including early growth response-1 (Egr1), c-Fos, glutamate receptor, ionotropic, N-methyl d-aspartate 2A (Nr2a), Nr2b, neuritin1 (Nrn1), and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha (Camk2α), were decreased, and the histone acetylation of H3 and/or H4 proteins was also reduced by E10X. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that HDAC2 occupancy in the promoters of down-regulated genes was increased significantly. Moreover, administration of sodium butyrate, a HDAC inhibitor, during the course of E10X ameliorated the ECS-induced down-regulation of genes in the rat frontal cortex. These findings suggest that induction of HDAC2 by repeated ECS treatment could play an important role in the down-regulation of NMDA receptor signaling-related genes in the rat frontal cortex through histone modification. PMID:24606669

  3. The enhanced information flow from visual cortex to frontal area facilitates SSVEP response: evidence from model-driven and data-driven causality analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fali; Tian, Yin; Zhang, Yangsong; Qiu, Kan; Tian, Chunyang; Jing, Wei; Liu, Tiejun; Xia, Yang; Guo, Daqing; Yao, Dezhong; Xu, Peng

    2015-01-01

    The neural mechanism of steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEP) is still not clearly understood. Especially, only certain frequency stimuli can evoke SSVEP. Our previous network study reveals that 8 Hz stimulus that can evoke strong SSVEP response shows the enhanced linkage strength between frontal and visual cortex. To further probe the directed information flow between the two cortex areas for various frequency stimuli, this paper develops a causality analysis based on the inversion of double columns model using particle swarm optimization (PSO) to characterize the directed information flow between visual and frontal cortices with the intracranial rat electroencephalograph (EEG). The estimated model parameters demonstrate that the 8 Hz stimulus shows the enhanced directional information flow from visual cortex to frontal lobe facilitates SSVEP response, which may account for the strong SSVEP response for 8 Hz stimulus. Furthermore, the similar finding is replicated by data-driven causality analysis. The inversion of neural mass model proposed in this study may be helpful to provide the new causality analysis to link the physiological model and the observed datasets in neuroscience and clinical researches. PMID:26434769

  4. Changes in regional cerebral blood volume in frontal cortex during mental work with and without caffeine intake: functional monitoring using near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Terumasa; Sone, Yukari; Ogawa, Kanta; Kitamura, Yuri T; Saiki, Kayoko; Sagawa, Setsuko; Yanagida, Toshio; Seiyama, Akitoshi

    2004-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was used to measure frontal regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) in a person whose brain was under the influence of pharmacological agents while the person was performing a complex task. Fourteen healthy participants were administered Uchida-Kraepelin psychodiagnostic (UKP) tests before and after caffeine intake, and the concentration of caffeine in the urine was measured. The average number of answers and the average number of correct answers given by the participants improved significantly following caffeine intake. During the UKP testing, changes in the rCBV in the inferior frontal cortex were continuously measured using NIRS. The volume during the rest periods decreased as a result of caffeine-induced constriction of the cerebral arteriola. The volume increased during the mental work, but the degree of the increase was the same before and after caffeine intake. Although the performance of the mental work improved following caffeine intake, the improvement was not reflected in the rCBV in the inferior frontal cerebral cortex. These results suggest that caffeine helps to protect the brain from excessive hyperemia in addition to activating the neurons in the prefrontal cortex. PMID:15250767

  5. Effects of antipsychotic drugs on the expression of synapse-associated proteins in the frontal cortex of rats subjected to immobilization stress.

    PubMed

    Seo, Mi Kyoung; Lee, Chan Hong; Cho, Hye Yeon; You, Young Sun; Lee, Bong Ju; Lee, Jung Goo; Park, Sung Woo; Kim, Young Hoon

    2015-10-30

    The present study examined the effects of antipsychotic drugs on the expression of synapse-associated proteins in the frontal cortex of rats with and without immobilization stress. Rats were subjected to immobilization stress 6h/day for 3 weeks. The effects of atypical antipsychotic drugs, olanzapine and aripiprazole, on expression of serine(9)-phosphorylated GSK-3β, β-catenin, BDNF, PSD-95, and synaptophysin were determined by Western blotting. A typical antipsychotic drug, haloperidol, was used for comparison. Immobilization stress significantly decreased the expression of these proteins in the frontal cortex. Chronic administration of olanzapine and aripiprazole significantly attenuated the immobilization stress-induced decrease in the levels of these proteins, whereas haloperidol had no such effect. Additionally, olanzapine and aripiprazole significantly increased levels of phosphorylated GSK-3β under normal conditions without stress, and aripiprazole also increased BDNF levels under this condition. These results indicate that olanzapine and aripiprazole, and, haloperidol, differentially regulate the levels of synapse-associated proteins in the rat frontal cortex. These findings may contribute to explain the neurobiological basis of how olanzapine and aripiprazole up-regulated synapse-associated proteins. PMID:26254796

  6. The enhanced information flow from visual cortex to frontal area facilitates SSVEP response: evidence from model-driven and data-driven causality analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Fali; Tian, Yin; Zhang, Yangsong; Qiu, Kan; Tian, Chunyang; Jing, Wei; Liu, Tiejun; Xia, Yang; Guo, Daqing; Yao, Dezhong; Xu, Peng

    2015-01-01

    The neural mechanism of steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEP) is still not clearly understood. Especially, only certain frequency stimuli can evoke SSVEP. Our previous network study reveals that 8 Hz stimulus that can evoke strong SSVEP response shows the enhanced linkage strength between frontal and visual cortex. To further probe the directed information flow between the two cortex areas for various frequency stimuli, this paper develops a causality analysis based on the inversion of double columns model using particle swarm optimization (PSO) to characterize the directed information flow between visual and frontal cortices with the intracranial rat electroencephalograph (EEG). The estimated model parameters demonstrate that the 8 Hz stimulus shows the enhanced directional information flow from visual cortex to frontal lobe facilitates SSVEP response, which may account for the strong SSVEP response for 8 Hz stimulus. Furthermore, the similar finding is replicated by data-driven causality analysis. The inversion of neural mass model proposed in this study may be helpful to provide the new causality analysis to link the physiological model and the observed datasets in neuroscience and clinical researches. PMID:26434769

  7. The enhanced information flow from visual cortex to frontal area facilitates SSVEP response: evidence from model-driven and data-driven causality analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fali; Tian, Yin; Zhang, Yangsong; Qiu, Kan; Tian, Chunyang; Jing, Wei; Liu, Tiejun; Xia, Yang; Guo, Daqing; Yao, Dezhong; Xu, Peng

    2015-10-01

    The neural mechanism of steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEP) is still not clearly understood. Especially, only certain frequency stimuli can evoke SSVEP. Our previous network study reveals that 8 Hz stimulus that can evoke strong SSVEP response shows the enhanced linkage strength between frontal and visual cortex. To further probe the directed information flow between the two cortex areas for various frequency stimuli, this paper develops a causality analysis based on the inversion of double columns model using particle swarm optimization (PSO) to characterize the directed information flow between visual and frontal cortices with the intracranial rat electroencephalograph (EEG). The estimated model parameters demonstrate that the 8 Hz stimulus shows the enhanced directional information flow from visual cortex to frontal lobe facilitates SSVEP response, which may account for the strong SSVEP response for 8 Hz stimulus. Furthermore, the similar finding is replicated by data-driven causality analysis. The inversion of neural mass model proposed in this study may be helpful to provide the new causality analysis to link the physiological model and the observed datasets in neuroscience and clinical researches.

  8. Experimentally-induced maternal hypothyroidism alters crucial enzyme activities in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of the offspring rat.

    PubMed

    Koromilas, Christos; Tsakiris, Stylianos; Kalafatakis, Konstantinos; Zarros, Apostolos; Stolakis, Vasileios; Kimpizi, Despoina; Bimpis, Alexios; Tsagianni, Anastasia; Liapi, Charis

    2015-02-01

    Thyroid hormone insufficiency during neurodevelopment can result into significant structural and functional changes within the developing central nervous system (CNS), and is associated with the establishment of serious cognitive impairment and neuropsychiatric symptomatology. The aim of the present study was to shed more light on the effects of gestational and/or lactational maternal exposure to propylthiouracil (PTU)-induced hypothyroidism as a multilevel experimental approach to the study of hypothyroidism-induced changes on crucial brain enzyme activities of 21-day-old Wistar rat offspring in a brain region-specific manner. This experimental approach has been recently developed and characterized by the authors based on neurochemical analyses performed on newborn and 21-day-old rat offspring whole brain homogenates; as a continuum to this effort, the current study focused on two CNS regions of major significance for cognitive development: the frontal cortex and the hippocampus. Maternal exposure to PTU in the drinking water during gestation and/or lactation resulted into changes in the activities of acetylcholinesterase and two important adenosinetriphosphatases (Na(+),K(+)- and Mg(2+)-ATPase), that seemed to take place in a CNS-region-specific manner and that were dependent upon the PTU-exposure timeframe followed. As these findings are analyzed and compared to the available literature, they: (i) highlight the variability involved in the changes of the aforementioned enzymatic parameters in the studied CNS regions (attributed to both the different neuroanatomical composition and the thyroid-hormone-dependent neurodevelopmental growth/differentiation patterns of the latter), (ii) reveal important information with regards to the neurochemical mechanisms that could be involved in the way clinical hypothyroidism could affect optimal neurodevelopment and, ultimately, cognitive function, as well as (iii) underline the need for the adoption of more consistent

  9. The Effect of Retrieval Focus and Emotional Valence on the Inferior Frontal Cortex Activity during Autobiographical Recollection

    PubMed Central

    Denkova, Ekaterina; Dolcos, Sanda; Dolcos, Florin

    2013-01-01

    Although available evidence points to a role of the inferior frontal cortex (IFC) in both emotion processing and autobiographical memory (AM) recollection, it is unclear what the role of this region is in emotional AM recollection. The present study investigated whether IFC activity can be influenced by manipulations of the retrieval focus (emotional vs. non-emotional) and whether this influence is similar for AMs with positive and negative emotional valence. Participants were asked to focus either on emotional (Emotion condition) or on non-emotional contextual (Context condition) details during the elaboration of positive and negative AMs, while fMRI data were collected. The study yielded two main findings: (1) Focusing on Emotion compared to Context during AM recollection was associated with increased activity in bilateral IFC, for positive AMs, whereas negative AMs produced similarly high IFC activity during Emotion and Context conditions; (2) There was a hemispheric dissociation in the IFC linked to the experiencing of emotion and the focus of AM recollection, such that the left IFC activity correlated positively with the subjective re-experience of emotion during the Emotion condition, whereas the right IFC activity correlated negatively with the subjective re-experience of emotion during the Context condition, for both positive and negative AMs. Overall, the present findings suggest that IFC’s involvement during the recollection of emotional AMs is susceptible to manipulations of the retrieval focus only in the case of positive AMs, and that this region plays a role in both the enhancement and inhibition of emotional experience during AM recollection. PMID:24379766

  10. MicroRNA expression profiling reveals miRNA families regulating specific biological pathways in mouse frontal cortex and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Juhila, Juuso; Sipilä, Tessa; Icay, Katherine; Nicorici, Daniel; Ellonen, Pekka; Kallio, Aleksi; Korpelainen, Eija; Greco, Dario; Hovatta, Iiris

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small regulatory molecules that cause post-transcriptional gene silencing. Although some miRNAs are known to have region-specific expression patterns in the adult brain, the functional consequences of the region-specificity to the gene regulatory networks of the brain nuclei are not clear. Therefore, we studied miRNA expression patterns by miRNA-Seq and microarrays in two brain regions, frontal cortex (FCx) and hippocampus (HP), which have separate biological functions. We identified 354 miRNAs from FCx and 408 from HP using miRNA-Seq, and 245 from FCx and 238 from HP with microarrays. Several miRNA families and clusters were differentially expressed between FCx and HP, including the miR-8 family, miR-182|miR-96|miR-183 cluster, and miR-212|miR-312 cluster overexpressed in FCx and miR-34 family overexpressed in HP. To visualize the clusters, we developed support for viewing genomic alignments of miRNA-Seq reads in the Chipster genome browser. We carried out pathway analysis of the predicted target genes of differentially expressed miRNA families and clusters to assess their putative biological functions. Interestingly, several miRNAs from the same family/cluster were predicted to regulate specific biological pathways. We have developed a miRNA-Seq approach with a bioinformatic analysis workflow that is suitable for studying miRNA expression patterns from specific brain nuclei. FCx and HP were shown to have distinct miRNA expression patterns which were reflected in the predicted gene regulatory pathways. This methodology can be applied for the identification of brain region-specific and phenotype-specific miRNA-mRNA-regulatory networks from the adult and developing rodent brain. PMID:21731767

  11. Conceptual control across modalities: graded specialisation for pictures and words in inferior frontal and posterior temporal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Krieger-Redwood, Katya; Teige, Catarina; Davey, James; Hymers, Mark; Jefferies, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Controlled semantic retrieval to words elicits co-activation of inferior frontal (IFG) and left posterior temporal cortex (pMTG), but research has not yet established (i) the distinct contributions of these regions or (ii) whether the same processes are recruited for non-verbal stimuli. Words have relatively flexible meanings – as a consequence, identifying the context that links two specific words is relatively demanding. In contrast, pictures are richer stimuli and their precise meaning is better specified by their visible features – however, not all of these features will be relevant to uncovering a given association, tapping selection/inhibition processes. To explore potential differences across modalities, we took a commonly-used manipulation of controlled retrieval demands, namely the identification of weak vs. strong associations, and compared word and picture versions. There were 4 key findings: (1) Regions of interest (ROIs) in posterior IFG (BA44) showed graded effects of modality (e.g., words>pictures in left BA44; pictures>words in right BA44). (2) An equivalent response was observed in left mid-IFG (BA45) across modalities, consistent with the multimodal semantic control deficits that typically follow LIFG lesions. (3) The anterior IFG (BA47) ROI showed a stronger response to verbal than pictorial associations, potentially reflecting a role for this region in establishing a meaningful context that can be used to direct semantic retrieval. (4) The left pMTG ROI also responded to difficulty across modalities yet showed a stronger response overall to verbal stimuli, helping to reconcile two distinct literatures that have implicated this site in semantic control and lexical-semantic access respectively. We propose that left anterior IFG and pMTG work together to maintain a meaningful context that shapes ongoing semantic processing, and that this process is more strongly taxed by word than picture associations. PMID:25726898

  12. A role for left inferior frontal and posterior superior temporal cortex in extracting a syntactic tree from a sentence.

    PubMed

    Pattamadilok, Chotiga; Dehaene, Stanislas; Pallier, Christophe

    2016-02-01

    On reading the sentence "the kids who exhausted their parents slept", how do we decide that it is the kids who slept and not the parents? The present behavioral and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study explored the processes underlying the extraction of syntactically organized information from sentences. Participants were presented with sentences whose syntactic complexity was manipulated using either a center-embedded or an adjunct structure. The goal was to vary separately the sentence syntactic structure and the linear distance between the main verb and its subject. Each sentence was followed by a short subject + verb probe, and the participants had to check whether or not it matched a proposition expressed in the sentence. Behavioral and fMRI data showed a significant cost and enhanced activity within left inferior frontal and posterior superior temporal cortex whenever participants processed center-embedded sentences, which required extracting a nontrivial subtree formed by nonadjacent words. This syntactic complexity effect was not observed during online sentence processing but rather during the processing of the probe and only when the verification could not rely on a superficial lexical analysis. Moreover, the manipulation of linear distance affected performance and brain activity mainly when the sentences did not have a center-embedded structure. We did not find evidence suggesting that tree-extraction, a fundamental operation of a core syntax network, takes place during sentence comprehension. The present finding showed that the syntactic complexity effect, which is an outcome of this operation, became detectable later on, whenever we need to extract structural information not obvious in the superficial sequence of words. PMID:26709465

  13. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of frontal cortex decreases performance on the WAIS-IV intelligence test.

    PubMed

    Sellers, Kristin K; Mellin, Juliann M; Lustenberger, Caroline M; Boyle, Michael R; Lee, Won Hee; Peterchev, Angel V; Fröhlich, Flavio

    2015-09-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) modulates excitability of motor cortex. However, there is conflicting evidence about the efficacy of this non-invasive brain stimulation modality to modulate performance on cognitive tasks. Previous work has tested the effect of tDCS on specific facets of cognition and executive processing. However, no randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled study has looked at the effects of tDCS on a comprehensive battery of cognitive processes. The objective of this study was to test if tDCS had an effect on performance on a comprehensive assay of cognitive processes, a standardized intelligence quotient (IQ) test. The study consisted of two substudies and followed a double-blind, between-subjects, sham-controlled design. In total, 41 healthy adult participants were included in the final analysis. These participants completed the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) as a baseline measure. At least one week later, participants in substudy 1 received either bilateral tDCS (anodes over both F4 and F3, cathode over Cz, 2 mA at each anode for 20 min) or active sham tDCS (2 mA for 40 s), and participants in substudy 2 received either right or left tDCS (anode over either F4 or F3, cathode over Cz, 2 mA for 20 min). In both studies, the WAIS-IV was immediately administered following stimulation to assess for performance differences induced by bilateral and unilateral tDCS. Compared to sham stimulation, right, left, and bilateral tDCS reduced improvement between sessions on Full Scale IQ and the Perceptual Reasoning Index. This demonstration that frontal tDCS selectively degraded improvement on specific metrics of the WAIS-IV raises important questions about the often proposed role of tDCS in cognitive enhancement. PMID:25934490

  14. MicroRNA Expression Profiling Reveals MiRNA Families Regulating Specific Biological Pathways in Mouse Frontal Cortex and Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Juhila, Juuso; Sipilä, Tessa; Icay, Katherine; Nicorici, Daniel; Ellonen, Pekka; Kallio, Aleksi; Korpelainen, Eija; Greco, Dario; Hovatta, Iiris

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small regulatory molecules that cause post-transcriptional gene silencing. Although some miRNAs are known to have region-specific expression patterns in the adult brain, the functional consequences of the region-specificity to the gene regulatory networks of the brain nuclei are not clear. Therefore, we studied miRNA expression patterns by miRNA-Seq and microarrays in two brain regions, frontal cortex (FCx) and hippocampus (HP), which have separate biological functions. We identified 354 miRNAs from FCx and 408 from HP using miRNA-Seq, and 245 from FCx and 238 from HP with microarrays. Several miRNA families and clusters were differentially expressed between FCx and HP, including the miR-8 family, miR-182|miR-96|miR-183 cluster, and miR-212|miR-312 cluster overexpressed in FCx and miR-34 family overexpressed in HP. To visualize the clusters, we developed support for viewing genomic alignments of miRNA-Seq reads in the Chipster genome browser. We carried out pathway analysis of the predicted target genes of differentially expressed miRNA families and clusters to assess their putative biological functions. Interestingly, several miRNAs from the same family/cluster were predicted to regulate specific biological pathways. We have developed a miRNA-Seq approach with a bioinformatic analysis workflow that is suitable for studying miRNA expression patterns from specific brain nuclei. FCx and HP were shown to have distinct miRNA expression patterns which were reflected in the predicted gene regulatory pathways. This methodology can be applied for the identification of brain region-specific and phenotype-specific miRNA-mRNA-regulatory networks from the adult and developing rodent brain. PMID:21731767

  15. Downstream targets of methyl CpG binding protein 2 and their abnormal expression in the frontal cortex of the human Rett syndrome brain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Rett Syndrome (RTT) brain displays regional histopathology and volumetric reduction, with frontal cortex showing such abnormalities, whereas the occipital cortex is relatively less affected. Results Using microarrays and quantitative PCR, the mRNA expression profiles of these two neuroanatomical regions were compared in postmortem brain tissue from RTT patients and normal controls. A subset of genes was differentially expressed in the frontal cortex of RTT brains, some of which are known to be associated with neurological disorders (clusterin and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1) or are involved in synaptic vesicle cycling (dynamin 1). RNAi-mediated knockdown of MeCP2 in vitro, followed by further expression analysis demonstrated that the same direction of abnormal expression was recapitulated with MeCP2 knockdown, which for cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 was associated with a functional respiratory chain defect. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis showed that MeCP2 associated with the promoter regions of some of these genes suggesting that loss of MeCP2 function may be responsible for their overexpression. Conclusions This study has shed more light on the subset of aberrantly expressed genes that result from MECP2 mutations. The mitochondrion has long been implicated in the pathogenesis of RTT, however it has not been at the forefront of RTT research interest since the discovery of MECP2 mutations. The functional consequence of the underexpression of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 indicates that this is an area that should be revisited. PMID:20420693

  16. Selective reduction by isolation rearing of 5-HT1A receptor-mediated dopamine release in vivo in the frontal cortex of mice.

    PubMed

    Ago, Y; Sakaue, M; Baba, A; Matsuda, T

    2002-10-01

    Serotonin (5-HT)1A receptors modulate in vivo release of brain monoaminergic neurotransmitters which may be involved in isolation-induced aggressive behavior. The present study examined the effect of isolation rearing on the 5-HT1A receptor-mediated modulation of dopamine (DA), 5-HT and noradrenaline (NA) release in the frontal cortex of mice. The selective 5-HT1A receptor agonist (S)-5-[-[(1,4-benzodioxan-2-ylmethyl)amino]propoxy]-1,3-benzodioxole HCl (MKC-242) increased the release of DA and NA and decreased the release of 5-HT in the frontal cortex of mice. The effect of MKC-242 on DA release was significantly less in isolation-reared mice than in group-reared mice, while effects of the drug on NA and 5-HT release did not differ between both groups. The effect of the other 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin on cortical DA release was also less in isolation-reared mice than in group-reared mice, and that of the drug on cortical 5-HT release did not differ between both groups. In contrast to MKC-242-induced DA release, amphetamine-induced increase in cortical DA release in vivo was greater in isolation-reared mice. The present findings suggest that isolation rearing enhances the activity of cortical dopaminergic neurons and reduces selectively the 5-HT1A receptor-mediated release of DA in the cortex. PMID:12423245

  17. Self-regulation therapy increases frontal gray matter in children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder: evaluation by voxel-based morphometry

    PubMed Central

    Soh, Debra W.; Skocic, Jovanka; Nash, Kelly; Stevens, Sara; Turner, Gary R.; Rovet, Joanne

    2015-01-01

    Children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder show executive function (EF) deficits, particularly in self-regulation skills, and abnormalities in brain regions critical for these skills. None of the validated EF interventions for these children has been evaluated with regards to impacts on brain structure. Twenty-nine children with FASD were assigned to either an immediate-treatment (TX) or delayed-treatment control (DTC) group (DTC). Nineteen typically developing children served as healthy controls (CT). All received a structural MRI scan and baseline neuropsychological testing, following which the TX group underwent 12 weekly 1.5-h sessions of the Alert Program for Self-Regulation®. After treatment or a period of ~14 weeks, all received a repeat scan and post-intervention testing. Whole-brain and region-of-interest analyses using voxel-based morphometry evaluated group differences and changes over time in gray matter (GM). Exploratory analyses revealed significant group changes: (1) At baseline, combined TX and DTC groups demonstrated global GM reductions compared with the CT group. (2) Region-of-interest analysis using a frontal mask, comparing post-intervention to pre-intervention results, showed significantly increased GM in the left middle frontal gyrus (BA10), right frontal pole (BA11), and right anterior cingulate (BA32) in the TX group. Similar results were not found in the DTC or CT groups. (3) At post-intervention, both TX and CT groups showed larger GM volumes than the DTC group in the left superior frontal gyrus (BA9), which was smaller in the FASD group at baseline. These results suggested that Alert led to improvements in post-intervention testing of self-regulation skills and typical brain development in treated children. PMID:25788884

  18. Functional characterization of 5-HT1D autoreceptors on the modulation of 5-HT release in guinea-pig mesencephalic raphe, hippocampus and frontal cortex.

    PubMed Central

    el Mansari, M.; Blier, P.

    1996-01-01

    1. The aims of the present study were (i) to characterize further the pharmacology of 5-HT1D autoreceptors modulating 5-HT release in guinea-pig mesencephalic raphe, hippocampus and frontal cortex; (ii) to determine whether 5-HT1D receptors in the mesencephalic raphe are located on 5-HT neurones; (iii) to determine whether 5-HT1D autoreceptors are coupled to G proteins; and (iv) to assess their sensitivity following long-term 5-HT reuptake blockade and inhibition of type-A monoamine oxidase. 2. In mesencephalic raphe, hippocampus and frontal cortex slices, the 5-HT1D/1B receptor agonist, sumatriptan and the 5-HT1 receptor agonist, 5-methoxytryptamine (5-MeOT) but not the 5-HT1B receptor agonist, CP93129, inhibited electrically the evoked release of [3H]-5-HT in a concentration-dependent manner. This effect was antagonized by the 5-HT1D/1B receptor antagonist GR127935 in the three structures, but not by the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, (+)-WAY100635 in mesencephalic raphe slices. These results confirm the presence of functional 5-HT1D autoreceptors controlling 5-HT release within the mesencephalic raphe as well as in terminal regions. 3. The inhibitory effect of sumatriptan on K(+)-evoked release of [3H]-5-HT was not reduced by the addition of the Na+ channel blocker, tetrodotoxin to the superfusion medium, suggesting that these 5-HT1D receptors in the mesencephalic raphe are located on 5-HT neurones and may be considered autoreceptors. 4. The in vitro treatment with the alkylating agent N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) was used to determine whether these 5-HT1D autoreceptors are coupled to G proteins. The inhibitory effect of sumatriptan on electrically evoked release of [3H]-5-HT was attenuated in NEM-pretreated slices from mesencephalic raphe, hippocampus and frontal cortex, indicating that the 5-HT1D autoreceptors activated by sumatriptan are coupled to G proteins in these three structures. Taken together with our previous results, this suggests that, in addition to the 5

  19. A single dose of vortioxetine, but not ketamine or fluoxetine, increases plasticity-related gene expression in the rat frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    du Jardin, Kristian Gaarn; Müller, Heidi Kaastrup; Sanchez, Connie; Wegener, Gregers; Elfving, Betina

    2016-09-01

    Ketamine is a non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist that has been shown to induce a rapid antidepressant effect in treatment-resistant patients. Vortioxetine is a multimodal-acting antidepressant that exert its therapeutic activity through serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) reuptake inhibition and modulation of several 5-HT receptors. In clinical trials, vortioxetine improves depression symptoms and cognitive dysfunction. Neuroplasticity as well as serotonergic and glutamatergic signaling attain significant roles in depression pathophysiology and antidepressant responses. Here, we investigate the effects of ketamine and vortioxetine on gene expression related to serotonergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission as well as neuroplasticity and compare them to those of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine. Rats were injected with fluoxetine (10mg/kg), ketamine (15mg/kg), or vortioxetine (10mg/kg) at 2, 8, 12, or 27h prior to harvesting of the frontal cortex and hippocampus. mRNA levels were measured by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The main finding was that vortioxetine enhanced plasticity-related gene expression (Mtor, Mglur1, Pkcα, Homer3, Spinophilin, and Synapsin3) in the frontal cortex at 8h after a single dose. Ingenuity pathway analysis of this subset of data identified a biological network that was engaged by vortioxetine and is plausibly associated with neuroplasticity. Transcript levels had returned to baseline levels 12h after injection. Only minor effects on gene expression were found for ketamine or fluoxetine. In conclusion, acute vortioxetine, but not fluoxetine or ketamine, transiently increased plasticity-related gene expression in the frontal cortex. These effects may be ascribed to the direct 5-HT receptor activities of vortioxetine. PMID:27235984

  20. Cocaine-induced Fos expression is detectable in the frontal cortex and striatum of rats under isoflurane but not α-chloralose anesthesia: implications for FMRI

    PubMed Central

    Kufahl, Peter R.; Pentkowski, Nathan S.; Heintzelman, Krista; Neisewander, Janet L.

    2009-01-01

    The ability of intravenous cocaine to induce Fos protein expression in anesthetized rats was tested. Two anesthetic regimens commonly used for in vivo FMRI of animals, i.v. α-chloralose and gaseous isoflurane, were studied in separate cohorts. The first experiment included three groups that received the following treatments: saline i.v. and no anesthetic; 2 mg/kg cocaine i.v. and no anesthetic; and 2 mg/kg cocaine i.v. under 36 mg/kg/h α-chloralose anesthesia. The second experiment had a factorial design of four groups that were either nonanesthetized or isoflurane-treated and were either given saline or cocaine (2 mg/kg, i.v.). Anesthetized rats were maintained for 2 h under 2.5–3.5% isoflurane anesthesia, while nonanesthetized rats were kept in an alternative environment for the same time period. Rats were given 2 mg/kg cocaine or saline i.v., 30 min into the test session. Rats were perfused and their brains were processed for Fos immunohistochemistry 90 min after the i.v. treatment. In both experiments, the frontal cortex and striatum of the cocaine-treated nonanesthetized rats expressed Fos in greater amounts than the saline-treated nonanesthetized rats, as expected. The α-chloralose treatment prevented cocaine-induced Fos expression across all eight subregions of the striatum and frontal cortex that were examined. In contrast, isoflurane only partially attenuated Fos expression in the orbital and Cg2 subregions of frontal cortex. These results suggest a strong advantage for using isoflurane, as opposed to α-chloralose, when studying anesthetized rats for in vivo effects of psychostimulants. PMID:19467261

  1. Cocaine-induced Fos expression is detectable in the frontal cortex and striatum of rats under isoflurane but not alpha-chloralose anesthesia: implications for FMRI.

    PubMed

    Kufahl, Peter R; Pentkowski, Nathan S; Heintzelman, Krista; Neisewander, Janet L

    2009-07-30

    The ability of intravenous cocaine to induce Fos protein expression in anesthetized rats was tested. Two anesthetic regimens commonly used for in vivo FMRI of animals, i.v. alpha-chloralose and gaseous isoflurane, were studied in separate cohorts. The first experiment included three groups that received the following treatments: saline i.v. and no anesthetic; 2 mg/kg cocaine i.v. and no anesthetic; and 2mg/kg cocaine i.v. under 36 mg/kg/h alpha-chloralose anesthesia. The second experiment had a factorial design of four groups that were either nonanesthetized or isoflurane-treated and were either given saline or cocaine (2 mg/kg, i.v.). Anesthetized rats were maintained for 2 h under 2.5-3.5% isoflurane anesthesia, while nonanesthetized rats were kept in an alternative environment for the same time period. Rats were given 2 mg/kg cocaine or saline i.v., 30 min into the test session. Rats were perfused and their brains were processed for Fos immunohistochemistry 90 min after the i.v. treatment. In both experiments, the frontal cortex and striatum of the cocaine-treated nonanesthetized rats expressed Fos in greater amounts than the saline-treated nonanesthetized rats, as expected. The alpha-chloralose treatment prevented cocaine-induced Fos expression across all eight subregions of the striatum and frontal cortex that were examined. In contrast, isoflurane only partially attenuated Fos expression in the orbital and Cg2 subregions of frontal cortex. These results suggest a strong advantage for using isoflurane, as opposed to alpha-chloralose, when studying anesthetized rats for in vivo effects of psychostimulants. PMID:19467261

  2. Patterns of social-experience-related c-fos and Arc expression in the frontal cortices of rats exposed to saccharin or moderate levels of ethanol during prenatal brain development

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Derek A.; Candelaria-Cook, Felicha T.; Akers, Katherine G.; Rice, James P.; Maes, Levi I.; Rosenberg, Martina; Valenzuela, C. Fernando; Savage, Daniel D.

    2010-01-01

    Recent findings from our laboratory indicate that alterations in frontal cortex function, structural plasticity, and related social behaviors are persistent consequences of exposure to moderate levels of ethanol during prenatal brain development [24]. Fetal-ethanol-related reductions in the expression of the immediate early genes (IEGs) c-fos and Arc and alterations in dendritic spine density in ventrolateral and medial aspects of frontal cortex suggest a dissociation reminiscent of that described by Kolb et al. [38] in which these aspects of frontal cortex undergo reciprocal experience-dependent changes. In addition to providing a brief review of the available data on social behavior and frontal cortex function in fetal-ethanol-exposed rats, the present paper presents novel data on social-experience-related IEG expression in four regions of frontal cortex (Zilles LO, VLO, Fr1, Fr2) that are evaluated alongside our prior data from AID and Cg3. Social experience in normal rats was related to a distinct pattern of IEG expression in ventrolateral and medial aspects of frontal cortex, with generally greater expression observed in ventrolateral frontal cortex. In contrast, weaker expression was observed in all aspects of frontal cortex in ethanol-exposed rats, with the exception of an experience-related increase in the medial agranular cortex. Behaviors related to social investigation and wrestling/boxing were differentially correlated with patterns of activity-related IEG expression in the regions under investigation for saccharin- and ethanol-exposed rats. These observations suggest that recruitment and expression of IEGs in frontal cortex following social experience are potentially important for understanding the long-term consequences of moderate prenatal ethanol exposure on frontal cortex function, synaptic plasticity, and related behaviors. PMID:20570698

  3. Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry imaging of white and gray matter iron distribution in Alzheimer's disease frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Hare, Dominic J; Raven, Erika P; Roberts, Blaine R; Bogeski, Mirjana; Portbury, Stuart D; McLean, Catriona A; Masters, Colin L; Connor, James R; Bush, Ashley I; Crouch, Peter J; Doble, Philip A

    2016-08-15

    Iron deposition in the brain is a feature of normal aging, though in several neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, the rate of iron accumulation is more advanced than in age-matched controls. Using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry imaging we present here a pilot study that quantitatively assessed the iron content of white and gray matter in paraffin-embedded sections from the frontal cortex of Alzheimer's and control subjects. Using the phosphorus image as a confirmed proxy for the white/gray matter boundary, we found that increased intrusion of iron into gray matter occurs in the Alzheimer's brain compared to controls, which may be indicative of either a loss of iron homeostasis in this vulnerable brain region, or provide evidence of increased inflammatory processes as a response to chronic neurodegeneration. We also observed a trend of increasing iron within the white matter of the frontal cortex, potentially indicative of disrupted iron metabolism preceding loss of myelin integrity. Considering the known potential toxicity of excessive iron in the brain, our results provide supporting evidence for the continuous development of novel magnetic resonance imaging approaches for assessing white and gray matter iron accumulation in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27233149

  4. Role of the Frontal Cortex in Standing Postural Sway Tasks While Dual-Tasking: A Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study Examining Working Memory Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Hiroyuki; Kasubuchi, Kenji; Wakata, Satoshi; Hiyamizu, Makoto; Morioka, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Posture control during a dual-task involves changing the distribution of attention resources between the cognitive and motor tasks and involves the frontal cortex working memory (WM). The present study aimed to better understand the impact of frontal lobe activity and WM capacity in postural control during a dual-task. High and low WM-span groups were compared using their reading span test scores. High and low WM capacity were compared based on cognitive and balance performance and hemoglobin oxygenation (oxyHb) levels during standing during single (S-S), standing during dual (S-D), one leg standing during single (O-S), and one leg standing during dual (O-D) tasks. For sway pass length, significant difference in only the O-D task was observed between both groups. oxyHb levels were markedly increased in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and supplementary motor area in the high-span group during a dual-task. Therefore, WM capacity influenced the allocation of attentional resources and motor performance. PMID:27034947

  5. Role of the Frontal Cortex in Standing Postural Sway Tasks While Dual-Tasking: A Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study Examining Working Memory Capacity.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Hiroyuki; Kasubuchi, Kenji; Wakata, Satoshi; Hiyamizu, Makoto; Morioka, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Posture control during a dual-task involves changing the distribution of attention resources between the cognitive and motor tasks and involves the frontal cortex working memory (WM). The present study aimed to better understand the impact of frontal lobe activity and WM capacity in postural control during a dual-task. High and low WM-span groups were compared using their reading span test scores. High and low WM capacity were compared based on cognitive and balance performance and hemoglobin oxygenation (oxyHb) levels during standing during single (S-S), standing during dual (S-D), one leg standing during single (O-S), and one leg standing during dual (O-D) tasks. For sway pass length, significant difference in only the O-D task was observed between both groups. oxyHb levels were markedly increased in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and supplementary motor area in the high-span group during a dual-task. Therefore, WM capacity influenced the allocation of attentional resources and motor performance. PMID:27034947

  6. Adolescent testosterone influences BDNF and TrkB mRNA and neurotrophin-interneuron marker relationships in mammalian frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Purves-Tyson, Tertia D; Allen, Katherine; Fung, Samantha; Rothmond, Debora; Noble, Pam L; Handelsman, David J; Shannon Weickert, Cynthia

    2015-11-01

    Late adolescence in males is a period of increased susceptibility for the onset of schizophrenia, coinciding with increased circulating testosterone. The cognitive deficits prevalent in schizophrenia may be related to unhealthy cortical interneurons, which are trophically dependent on brain derived neurotrophic factor. We investigated, under conditions of depleted (monkey and rat) and replaced (rat) testosterone over adolescence, changes in gene expression of cortical BDNF and TrkB transcripts and interneuron markers and the relationships between these mRNAs and circulating testosterone. Testosterone removal by gonadectomy reduced gene expression of some BDNF transcripts in monkey and rat frontal cortices and the BDNF mRNA reduction was prevented by testosterone replacement. In rat, testosterone replacement increased the potential for classical TrkB signalling by increasing the full length to truncated TrkB mRNA ratio, whereas in the monkey cortex, circulating testosterone was negatively correlated with the TrkB full length/truncated mRNA ratio. We did not identify changes in interneuron gene expression in monkey frontal cortex in response to gonadectomy, and in rat, we showed that only somatostatin mRNA was decreased by gonadectomy but not restored by testosterone replacement. We identified complex and possibly species-specific, relationships between BDNF/TrkB gene expression and interneuron marker gene expression that appear to be dependent on the presence of testosterone at adolescence in rat and monkey frontal cortices. Taken together, our findings suggest there are dynamic relationships between BDNF/TrkB and interneuron markers that are dependent on the presence of testosterone but that this may not be a straightforward increase in testosterone leading to changes in BDNF/TrkB that contributes to interneuron health. PMID:26088421

  7. Dopamine receptor signaling in the medial orbital frontal cortex and the acquisition and expression of fructose-conditioned flavor preferences in rats

    PubMed Central

    Malkusz, Danielle C.; Yenko, Ira; Rotella, Francis M.; Banakos, Theodore; Olsson, Kerstin; Dindyal, Trisha; Vig, Vishal; Bodnar, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Systemic dopamine (DA) D1 (SCH23390: SCH) and D2 (raclopride: RAC) antagonists blocked fructose-conditioned flavor preference (CFP) acquisition and expression. Fructose-CFP acquisition was eliminated by medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) SCH and mPFC or amygdala (AMY) RAC. Fructose-CFP expression was reduced following SCH or RAC in AMY or nucleus accumbens (NAc). The present study examined fructose-CFP acquisition and expression following SCH and RAC in the medial orbital frontal cortex (MOFC), another ventral tegmental area DA target. For fructose-CFP acquisition, five groups of rats received vehicle, SCH (24 or 48 nmol) or RAC (24 or 48 nmol) in the MOFC 0.5 h prior to 8 training sessions with one flavor (CS+/Fs) mixed in 8% fructose and 0.2% saccharin, and another flavor (CS-/s) mixed in 0.2% saccharin. In six 2-bottle choice tests in 0.2% saccharin, similar fructose-CFP preferences occurred in groups trained with vehicle (76–77%), SCH24 (69–78%), SCH48(70–74%) and RAC48 (85–92%). RAC24-trained rats displayed significant CS+ preferences during the first (79%) and third (71%), but not second (58%) test pair. For fructose-CFP expression, rats similarly trained with CS+/Fs and CS- solutions received 2-bottle choice tests following MOFC injections of SCH or RAC (12–48 nmol). CS+ preference expression was significantly reduced by RAC (48 nmol: 58%), but not SCH relative to vehicle (78%). A control group receiving RAC in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex displayed fructose-CFP expression similar to vehicle. These data demonstrate differential frontal cortical DA mediation of fructose-CFP with mPFC D1 and D2 signaling exclusively mediating acquisition, and MOFC D2 signaling primarily mediating expression. PMID:25446441

  8. 5-HT2A Receptor Binding in the Frontal Cortex of Parkinson's Disease Patients and Alpha-Synuclein Overexpressing Mice: A Postmortem Study

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Nadja Bredo; Olesen, Mikkel Vestergaard; Plenge, Per; Klein, Anders Bue; Westin, Jenny E.; Fog, Karina

    2016-01-01

    The 5-HT2A receptor is highly involved in aspects of cognition and executive function and seen to be affected in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease and related to the disease pathology. Even though Parkinson's disease (PD) is primarily a motor disorder, reports of impaired executive function are also steadily being associated with this disease. Not much is known about the pathophysiology behind this. The aim of this study was thereby twofold: (1) to investigate 5-HT2A receptor binding levels in Parkinson's brains and (2) to investigate whether PD associated pathology, alpha-synuclein (AS) overexpression, could be associated with 5-HT2A alterations. Binding density for the 5-HT2A-specific radioligand [3H]-MDL 100.907 was measured in membrane suspensions of frontal cortex tissue from PD patients. Protein levels of AS were further measured using western blotting. Results showed higher AS levels accompanied by increased 5-HT2A receptor binding in PD brains. In a separate study, we looked for changes in 5-HT2A receptors in the prefrontal cortex in 52-week-old transgenic mice overexpressing human AS. We performed region-specific 5-HT2A receptor binding measurements followed by gene expression analysis. The transgenic mice showed lower 5-HT2A binding in the frontal association cortex that was not accompanied by changes in gene expression levels. This study is one of the first to look at differences in serotonin receptor levels in PD and in relation to AS overexpression. PMID:27579212

  9. 5-HT2A Receptor Binding in the Frontal Cortex of Parkinson's Disease Patients and Alpha-Synuclein Overexpressing Mice: A Postmortem Study.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Nadja Bredo; Olesen, Mikkel Vestergaard; Brudek, Tomasz; Plenge, Per; Klein, Anders Bue; Westin, Jenny E; Fog, Karina; Wörtwein, Gitta; Aznar, Susana

    2016-01-01

    The 5-HT2A receptor is highly involved in aspects of cognition and executive function and seen to be affected in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease and related to the disease pathology. Even though Parkinson's disease (PD) is primarily a motor disorder, reports of impaired executive function are also steadily being associated with this disease. Not much is known about the pathophysiology behind this. The aim of this study was thereby twofold: (1) to investigate 5-HT2A receptor binding levels in Parkinson's brains and (2) to investigate whether PD associated pathology, alpha-synuclein (AS) overexpression, could be associated with 5-HT2A alterations. Binding density for the 5-HT2A-specific radioligand [(3)H]-MDL 100.907 was measured in membrane suspensions of frontal cortex tissue from PD patients. Protein levels of AS were further measured using western blotting. Results showed higher AS levels accompanied by increased 5-HT2A receptor binding in PD brains. In a separate study, we looked for changes in 5-HT2A receptors in the prefrontal cortex in 52-week-old transgenic mice overexpressing human AS. We performed region-specific 5-HT2A receptor binding measurements followed by gene expression analysis. The transgenic mice showed lower 5-HT2A binding in the frontal association cortex that was not accompanied by changes in gene expression levels. This study is one of the first to look at differences in serotonin receptor levels in PD and in relation to AS overexpression. PMID:27579212

  10. Disrupted Reinforcement Signaling in Orbital Frontal Cortex and Caudate in Youths with Conduct Disorder/Oppositional Defiant Disorder and High Psychopathic Traits

    PubMed Central

    Finger, Elizabeth C.; Marsh, Abigail A.; Blair, Karina S.; Reid, Marguerite. E.; Sims, Courtney; Ng, Pamela; Pine, Daniel S.; Blair, R. James. R.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Dysfunction in amygdala and orbital frontal cortex functioning has been reported in youths and adults with psychopathic traits. However, the specific nature of the computational irregularities within these brain structures remains poorly understood. The current study used the passive avoidance task to examine responsiveness of these systems to early stimulus-reinforcement exposure, when prediction errors are greatest and learning maximized, and to reward in youths with psychopathic traits and comparison youths. METHOD 30 youths (N=15 with conduct disorder or oppositional defiant disorder plus high psychopathic traits and N=15 comparison subjects) completed a 3.0 T fMRI scan while performing a passive avoidance learning task. RESULTS Relative to comparison youth, youths with conduct disorder or oppositional defiant disorder plus psychopathic traits showed reduced orbitofrontal cortex responsiveness both to early stimulus-reinforcement exposure and to rewards, as well as reduced caudate response to early stimulus-reinforcement exposure. Contrary to other predictions, however, there were no group differences in amygdala responsiveness specifically to these two task parameters. However, amygdala responsiveness throughout the task was reduced in the youths with conduct disorder or oppositional defiant disorder plus psychopathic traits. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrates that youths with conduct disorder or oppositional defiant disorder plus psychopathic traits are marked by a compromised sensitivity to early reinforcement information in both orbitofrontal cortex and caudate and to reward outcome information within orbitofrontal cortex. They further suggest that the integrated functioning of the amygdala, caudate and orbitofrontal cortex may be disrupted in individuals with this disorder. PMID:21078707

  11. Characterization of sulpipride-displaceable sup 3 H-YM-09151-2 binding sites in rat frontal cortex and the effects of subchronic treatment with haloperidol on cortical D-2 dopamine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Kazawa, Tetsushi; Higuchi, Teruhiko National Institute of Neuroscience, Tokyo ); Mikuni, Masahiko; Takahshi, Kiyohisa ); Arai, Ichiro; Yamauchi, Toshio )

    1990-01-01

    We investigated the pharmacological properties of the sulpiride-displaceable binding sites labeled by {sup 3}H-YM-09151-2 in rat frontal cortex, compared to those in striatum. The IC{sub 50} value of ketanserin was 486 nM, which was apparently different from its affinity for the 5HT-2 receptor. Various dopamine antagonists showed almost the same inhibitory effects for binding site in frontal cortex and striatum. Sulpiride-displaceable {sup 3}H-YM-09151-2 binding sites were considered to be D-2 dopamine receptors. After subchronic treatment with haloperidol, the D-2 receptor density of frontal cortex increased to the same extent as striatum without significant change in apparent affinity.

  12. Transient Maternal Hypothyroxinemia Potentiates the Transcriptional Response to Exogenous Thyroid Hormone in the Fetal Cerebral Cortex Before the Onset of Fetal Thyroid Function: A Messenger and MicroRNA Profiling Study.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hongyan; You, Seo-Hee; Williams, Andrew; Wade, Mike G; Yauk, Carole L; Thomas Zoeller, R

    2015-07-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is essential for brain development both before and after birth. We have used gene expression microarrays to identify TH-regulated genes in the fetal cerebral cortex prior to the onset of fetal thyroid function to better understand the role of TH in early cortical development. TH levels were transiently manipulated in pregnant mice by treatment with goitrogens from gestational day (GD) 13-16 and/or by injection of TH 12 h before sacrifice on GD 16. The transcriptional response to exogenous TH in the GD 16 fetal cortex was potentiated by transient goitrogen treatment, suggesting that the hypothyroxinemic brain is a different substrate upon which TH can act, or that robust compensatory mechanisms are induced by transient hypothyroxinemia. Several known TH-responsive genes were identified including Klf9, and several novel TH-responsive genes such as Appbp2, Ppap2b, and Fgfr1op2 were identified in which TH response elements were confirmed. We also identified specific microRNAs whose expression in the fetal cortex was affected by TH treatment, and determined that Ppap2b and Klf9 are the target genes of miR-16 and miR-106, respectively. Thus, a complex redundant functional network appears to coordinate TH-mediated gene expression in the developing brain. PMID:24436321

  13. Selective reduction of cerebral cortex GABA neurons in a late gestation model of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Smiley, John F; Saito, Mariko; Bleiwas, Cynthia; Masiello, Kurt; Ardekani, Babak; Guilfoyle, David N; Gerum, Scott; Wilson, Donald A; Vadasz, Csaba

    2015-09-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) are associated with cognitive and behavioral deficits, and decreased volume of the whole brain and cerebral cortex. Rodent models have shown that early postnatal treatments, which mimic ethanol toxicity in the third trimester of human pregnancy, acutely induce widespread apoptotic neuronal degeneration and permanent behavioral deficits. However, the lasting cellular and anatomical effects of early ethanol treatments are still incompletely understood. This study examined changes in neocortex volume, thickness, and cellular organization that persist in adult mice after postnatal day 7 (P7) ethanol treatment. Post mortem brain volumes, measured by both MRI within the skull and by fluid displacement of isolated brains, were reduced 10-13% by ethanol treatment. The cerebral cortex showed a similar reduction (12%) caused mainly by lower surface area (9%). In spite of these large changes, several features of cortical organization showed little evidence of change, including cortical thickness, overall neuron size, and laminar organization. Estimates of total neuron number showed a trend level reduction of about 8%, due mainly to reduced cortical volume but unchanged neuron density. However, counts of calretinin (CR) and parvalbumin (PV) subtypes of GABAergic neurons showed a striking >30% reduction of neuron number. Similar ethanol effects were found in male and female mice, and in C57BL/6By and BALB/cJ mouse strains. Our findings indicate that the cortex has substantial capacity to develop normal cytoarchitectonic organization after early postnatal ethanol toxicity, but there is a selective and persistent reduction of GABA cells that may contribute to the lasting cognitive and behavioral deficits in FASD. PMID:26252988

  14. Abnormal Expression of the GIRK2 Potassium Channel in Hippocampus, Frontal Cortex and Substantia Nigra of Ts65Dn Mouse: A Model of Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Harashima, Chie; Jacobowitz, David M.; Witta, Jassir; Borke, Rosemary C.; Best, Tyler K.; Siarey, Richard J.; Galdzicki, Zygmunt

    2010-01-01

    Ts65Dn, a mouse model of Down syndrome (DS), demonstrates abnormal hippocampal synaptic plasticity and behavioral abnormalities related to spatial learning and memory. The molecular mechanisms leading to these impairments have not been identified. In this study, we focused on the G-protein-activated inwardly rectifying potassium channel 2 (GIRK2) gene that is highly expressed in the hippocampus region. We studied the expression pattern of GIRK subunits in Ts65Dn and found that GIRK2 was over-expressed in all analyzed Ts65Dn brain regions. Interestingly elevated levels of GIRK2 protein in the Ts65Dn hippocampus and frontal cortex correlated with elevated levels of GIRK1 protein. This suggests that heteromeric GIRK1-GIRK2 channels are over-expressed in Ts65Dn hippocampus and frontal cortex, which could impair excitatory input, modulate spike frequency and synaptic kinetics in the affected regions. All GIRK2 splicing isoforms examined were expressed at higher levels in the Ts65Dn in comparison to the diploid hippocampus. The pattern of GIRK2 expression in the Ts65Dn mouse brain revealed by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry was similar to that previously reported in the rodent brain. However, in the Ts65Dn mouse a strong immunofluorescent staining of GIRK2 was detected in the lacunosum molecular layer of the CA3 area of the hippocampus. In addition, tyrosine hydroxylase containing dopaminergic neurons that co-express GIRK2 were more numerous in the substantia nigra compacta and ventral tegmental area in the Ts65Dn compared to diploid controls. In summary, the regional localization and the increased brain levels coupled with known function of the GIRK channel may suggest an important contribution of GIRK2 containing channels to Ts65Dn and thus to DS neurophysiological phenotypes. PMID:16374808

  15. Effects of lisdexamfetamine alone and in combination with s-citalopram on acetylcholine and histamine efflux in the rat pre-frontal cortex and ventral hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Hutson, Peter H; Heins, Mariette S; Folgering, Joost H A

    2015-08-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by poor attention, impulse control and hyperactivity. A significant proportion of ADHD patients are also co-morbid for other psychiatric problems including mood disorders and these patients may be managed with a combination of psychostimulants and anti-depressants. While it is generally accepted that enhanced catecholamine signalling via the action of psychostimulants is likely responsible for the cognitive improvement in ADHD, other neurotransmitters including acetylcholine and histamine may be involved. In the present study, we have examined the effect of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX), an amphetamine pro-drug that is approved for the treatment of ADHD on acetylcholine and histamine efflux in pre-frontal cortex and hippocampus alone and in combination with the anti-depressant s-citalopram. LDX increased cortical acetylcholine efflux, an effect that was not significantly altered by co-administration of s-citalopram. Cortical and hippocampal histamine were markedly increased by LDX, an effect that was attenuated in the hippocampus but not in pre-frontal cortex when co-administered with s-citalopram. Taken together, these results suggest that efflux of acetylcholine and histamine may be involved in the therapeutic effects of LDX and are differentially influenced by the co-administration of s-citalopram. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is characterized by poor attention, impulse control and hyperactivity. Some ADHD patients are also co-morbid for mood disorders and may be managed with psychostimulants (e.g. lisdexamfetamine, LDX) and anti-depressants (e.g. s-citalopram). LDX increased the efflux of acetylcholine and histamine, neurotransmitters involved in cognitive function, which were differentially influenced when co-administered with s-citalopram. Acetylcholine and histamine may be involved in the therapeutic effects of LDX and are differentially

  16. The typical development of posterior medial frontal cortex function and connectivity during task control demands in youth 8-19years old.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanni; Angstadt, Mike; Taylor, Stephan F; Fitzgerald, Kate D

    2016-08-15

    To characterize the development of neural substrate for interference processing and task control, this study examined both linear and non-linear effects of age on activation and connectivity during an interference task designed to engage the posterior medial frontal cortex (pMFC). Seventy-two youth, ages 8-19years, performed the Multi-Source Interference Task (MSIT) during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). With increasing age, overall performance across high-interference incongruent and low-interference congruent trials became faster and more accurate. Effects of age on activation to interference- (incongruent versus congruent conditions), error- (errors versus correct trials during the incongruent condition) and overall task-processing (incongruent plus congruent conditions, relative to implicit baseline) were tested in whole-brain voxel-wise analyses. Age differentially impacted activation to overall task processing in discrete sub-regions of the pMFC: activation in the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) decreased with age, whereas activation in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) followed a non-linear (i.e., U-shaped) pattern in relation to age. In addition, connectivity of pre-SMA with anterior insula/frontal operculum (AI/FO) increased with age. These findings suggest differential development of pre-SMA and dACC sub-regions within the pMFC. Moreover, as children age, decreases in pre-SMA activation may couple with increases in pre-SMA-AI/FO connectivity to support gains in processing speed in response to demands for task control. PMID:27173761

  17. Effects of developmental alcohol exposure vs. intubation stress on BDNF and TrkB expression in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of neonatal rats

    PubMed Central

    Boschen, K.E.; Criss, K.J.; Palamarchouk, V.; Roth, T.L.; Klintsova, A.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Third trimester-equivalent alcohol exposure causes significant deficits in hippocampal and cortical neuroplasticity, resulting in alterations to dendritic arborization, hippocampal adult neurogenesis, and performance on learning tasks. The current study investigated the impact of neonatal alcohol exposure (postnatal days 4–9, 5.25 g/kg/day) on expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and the tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptor in the hippocampal and frontal cortex of infant Long-Evans rats. Levels of BDNF protein were increased in the hippocampus, but not frontal cortex, of alcohol-exposed rats 24 hrs after the last dose, when compared with undisturbed (but not sham-intubated) control animals. BDNF protein levels showed a trend towards increase in hippocampus of sham-intubated animals as well, suggesting an effect of the intubation procedure. TrkB protein was increased in the hippocampus of alcohol-exposed animals compared to sham-intubated pups, indicating an alcohol-specific effect on receptor expression. In addition, expression of bdnf total mRNA in alcohol-exposed and sham-intubated pups was enhanced in the hippocampus; however, there was a differential effect of alcohol and intubation stress on exon I- and IV-specific mRNA transcripts. Further, plasma corticosterone was found to be increased in both alcohol-exposed and sham-intubated pups compared to undisturbed animals. Upregulation of BDNF could potentially represent a neuroprotective mechanism activated following alcohol exposure or stress. The results suggest that alcohol exposure and stress have both overlapping and unique effects on BDNF, and highlight the need for the stress of intubation to be taken into consideration in studies that implement this route of drug delivery. PMID:25805052

  18. Effects of developmental alcohol exposure vs. intubation stress on BDNF and TrkB expression in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Boschen, K E; Criss, K J; Palamarchouk, V; Roth, T L; Klintsova, A Y

    2015-06-01

    Third trimester-equivalent alcohol exposure causes significant deficits in hippocampal and cortical neuroplasticity, resulting in alterations to dendritic arborization, hippocampal adult neurogenesis, and performance on learning tasks. The current study investigated the impact of neonatal alcohol exposure (postnatal days 4-9, 5.25 g/kg/day) on expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and the tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptor in the hippocampal and frontal cortex of infant Long-Evans rats. Levels of BDNF protein were increased in the hippocampus, but not frontal cortex, of alcohol-exposed rats 24h after the last dose, when compared with undisturbed (but not sham-intubated) control animals. BDNF protein levels showed a trend toward increase in hippocampus of sham-intubated animals as well, suggesting an effect of the intubation procedure. TrkB protein was increased in the hippocampus of alcohol-exposed animals compared to sham-intubated pups, indicating an alcohol-specific effect on receptor expression. In addition, expression of bdnf total mRNA in alcohol-exposed and sham-intubated pups was enhanced in the hippocampus; however, there was a differential effect of alcohol and intubation stress on exon I- and IV-specific mRNA transcripts. Further, plasma corticosterone was found to be increased in both alcohol-exposed and sham-intubated pups compared to undisturbed animals. Upregulation of BDNF could potentially represent a neuroprotective mechanism activated following alcohol exposure or stress. The results suggest that alcohol exposure and stress have both overlapping and unique effects on BDNF, and highlight the need for the stress of intubation to be taken into consideration in studies that implement this route of drug delivery. PMID:25805052

  19. Dynamic expression of calretinin in embryonic and early fetal human cortex

    PubMed Central

    González-Gómez, Miriam; Meyer, Gundela

    2014-01-01

    Calretinin (CR) is one of the earliest neurochemical markers in human corticogenesis. In embryos from Carnegie stages (CS) 17 to 23, calbindin (CB) and CR stain opposite poles of the incipient cortex suggesting early regionalization: CB marks the neuroepithelium of the medial boundary of the cortex with the choroid plexus (cortical hem). By contrast, CR is confined to the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral and caudal ganglionic eminences at the pallial-subpallial boundary (PSB, or antihem), from where CR+/Tbr1- neurons migrate toward piriform cortex and amygdala as a component of the lateral cortical stream. At CS 19, columns of CR+ cells arise in the rostral cortex, and contribute at CS 20 to the “monolayer” of horizontal Tbr1+/CR+ and GAD+ cells in the preplate. At CS 21, the “pioneer cortical plate” appears as a radial aggregation of CR+/Tbr1+ neurons, which cover the entire future neocortex and extend the first corticofugal axons. CR expression in early human corticogenesis is thus not restricted to interneurons, but is also present in the first excitatory projection neurons of the cortex. At CS 21/22, the cortical plate is established following a lateral to medial gradient, when Tbr1+/CR- neurons settle within the pioneer cortical plate, and thus separate superficial and deep pioneer neurons. CR+ pioneer neurons disappear shortly after the formation of the cortical plate. Reelin+ Cajal-Retzius cells begin to express CR around CS21 (7/8 PCW). At CS 21–23, the CR+ SVZ at the PSB is the source of CR+ interneurons migrating into the cortical SVZ. In turn, CB+ interneurons migrate from the subpallium into the intermediate zone following the fibers of the internal capsule. Early CR+ and CB+ interneurons thus have different origins and migratory routes. CR+ cell populations in the embryonic telencephalon take part in a complex sequence of events not analyzed so far in other mammalian species, which may represent a distinctive trait of the initial

  20. Alteration in Nuclear Factor-KappaB Pathway and Functionality of Estrogen via Receptors Promote Neuroinflammation in Frontal Cortex after 1-Methyl-4-Phenyl-1,2,3,6-Tetrahydropyridine Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Soham; Ghosh, Nabanita; Sinha, Priyobrata; Chakrabarti, Nilkanta; Bhattacharyya, Arindam

    2015-01-01

    The MPTP mediated neurodegeneration in substantia nigra has been well studied, but not the status of frontal cortex. The novelty of the present study is to explore the sex difference of frontal cortex during MPTP intoxication and to investigate the role of estrogen and its receptors in presence of glial cells in a time chase experiment; to identify which pathway of NF-kappaB exist to proceed the neuroinflammation; to investigate the estrogen binding with its nuclear or cytosolic receptors and whether any direct relation exists between estrogen receptor (ER) -beta and NF-kappaB molecules p65 and RelB. The progression of neurodegeneration occurred with the association of glial cells and functional (via its nuclear and cytosolic receptors) estrogen level. Both the canonical and/or non canonical pathways of NF-kappaB exist in frontal cortex of both the sexes after MPTP treatment. The homodimeric or heterodimeric form of ER-beta binds with NF-kappaB molecules p65 and RelB differently, but the canonical or non canonical pathways of NF-kappaB molecules could not be stopped or may be promoted. The changes in the molecular and cellular pattern in frontal cortex of both sexes during MPTP intoxication depends on the estrogen function via its nuclear or cytosolic estrogen receptors. PMID:26365888

  1. A Combined Metabonomic and Proteomic Approach Identifies Frontal Cortex Changes in a Chronic Phencyclidine Rat Model in Relation to Human Schizophrenia Brain Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Wesseling, Hendrik; Chan, Man K; Tsang, T M; Ernst, Agnes; Peters, Fabian; Guest, Paul C; Holmes, Elaine; Bahn, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Current schizophrenia (SCZ) treatments fail to treat the broad range of manifestations associated with this devastating disorder. Thus, new translational models that reproduce the core pathological features are urgently needed to facilitate novel drug discovery efforts. Here, we report findings from the first comprehensive label-free liquid-mass spectrometry proteomic- and proton nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabonomic profiling of the rat frontal cortex after chronic phencyclidine (PCP) intervention, which induces SCZ-like symptoms. The findings were compared with results from a proteomic profiling of post-mortem prefrontal cortex from SCZ patients and with relevant findings in the literature. Through this approach, we identified proteomic alterations in glutamate-mediated Ca2+ signaling (Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, PPP3CA, and VISL1), mitochondrial function (GOT2 and PKLR), and cytoskeletal remodeling (ARP3). Metabonomic profiling revealed changes in the levels of glutamate, glutamine, glycine, pyruvate, and the Ca2+ regulator taurine. Effects on similar pathways were also identified in the prefrontal cortex tissue from human SCZ subjects. The discovery of similar but not identical proteomic and metabonomic alterations in the chronic PCP rat model and human brain indicates that this model recapitulates only some of the molecular alterations of the disease. This knowledge may be helpful in understanding mechanisms underlying psychosis, which, in turn, can facilitate improved therapy and drug discovery for SCZ and other psychiatric diseases. Most importantly, these molecular findings suggest that the combined use of multiple models may be required for more effective translation to studies of human SCZ. PMID:23942359

  2. β2-adrenoceptor stimulation restores frontal cortex plasticity and improves visuospatial performance in hidden-prenatally-malnourished young-adult rats.

    PubMed

    Sáez-Briones, Patricio; Soto-Moyano, Rubén; Burgos, Héctor; Castillo, Amparo; Valladares, Luis; Morgan, Carlos; Pérez, Hernán; Barra, Rafael; Constandil, Luis; Laurido, Claudio; Hernández, Alejandro

    2015-03-01

    Moderate reduction in dietary protein composition of pregnant rats from 25% to 8% casein, calorically compensated by carbohydrates, has been described as a "hidden malnutrition" because it does not alter body and brain weights of pups at birth. However, this dietary treatment leads to altered central noradrenergic systems, impaired cortical long-term potentiation (LTP) and worsened visuo-spatial memory performance. Given the increasing interest on the role played by β2-adrenoceptors (β2-ARs) on brain plasticity, the present study aimed to address the following in hidden-malnourished and eutrophic control rats: (i) the expression levels of β2-ARs in the frontal cortex determined by immunohistochemistry, and (ii) the effect of the β2 selective agonist clenbuterol on both LTP elicited in vivo in the prefrontal cortex and visuospatial performance measured in an eight-arm radial maze. Our results showed that, prenatally malnourished rats exhibited a significant reduction of neocortical β2-AR expression in adulthood. Concomitantly, they were unable to elicit and maintain prefrontal cortex LTP and exhibited lower visuospatial learning performance. Administration of clenbuterol (0.019, 0.038 and 0.075 mg/kg i.p.) enhanced LTP in malnourished and control animals and restored visuospatial learning performance in malnourished but not in normal rats, in a dose-dependent manner. The results suggest that decreased density of neocortical β2-ARs during postnatal life, subsequent to hidden prenatal malnutrition might affect some synaptic networks required to elicit neocortical LTP and form visuospatial memory, since those neuroplastic deficits were counteracted by β2-AR stimulation. PMID:25464009

  3. Global resting-state fMRI analysis identifies frontal cortex, striatal, and cerebellar dysconnectivity in obsessive-compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Anticevic, Alan; Hu, Sien; Zhang, Sheng; Savic, Aleksandar; Billingslea, Eileen; Wasylink, Suzanne; Repovs, Grega; Cole, Michael W.; Bednarski, Sarah; Krystal, John H.; Bloch, Michael H.; Li, Chiang-shan R.; Pittenger, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Background Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is associated with regional hyperactivity in cortico-striatal circuits. However, the large-scale patterns of abnormal neural connectivity remain uncharacterized. Resting-state functional connectivity (rs-fcMRI) studies have shown altered connectivity within the implicated circuitry, but they have used seed-driven approaches wherein a circuit of interest is defined a priori. This limits their ability to identify network abnormalities beyond the prevailing framework. This limitation is particularly problematic within the prefrontal cortex (PFC), which is large and heterogeneous and where a priori specification of seeds is therefore difficult. A hypothesis-neutral data-driven approach to the analysis of connectivity is vital. Method We analyzed rs-fcMRI data collected at 3T in 27 OCD patients and 66 matched controls using a recently developed data-driven global brain connectivity (GBC) method, both within the PFC and across the whole brain. Results We found clusters of decreased connectivity in the left lateral PFC in both whole-brain and PFC-restricted analyses. Increased GBC was found in the right putamen and left cerebellar cortex. Within ROIs in the basal ganglia and thalamus, we identified increased GBC in dorsal striatum and anterior thalamus, which was reduced in patients on medication. The ventral striatum/nucleus accumbens exhibited decreased global connectivity, but increased connectivity specifically with the ventral anterior cingulate cortex in subjects with OCD. Conclusion These findings identify previously uncharacterized PFC and basal ganglia dysconnectivity in OCD and reveal differentially altered GBC in dorsal and ventral striatum. Results highlight complex disturbances in PFC networks, which could contribute to disrupted cortical-striatal-cerebellar circuits in OCD. PMID:24314349

  4. Frontal cortex and hippocampus neurotransmitter receptor complex level parallels spatial memory performance in the radial arm maze.

    PubMed

    Shanmugasundaram, Bharanidharan; Sase, Ajinkya; Miklosi, András G; Sialana, Fernando J; Subramaniyan, Saraswathi; Aher, Yogesh D; Gröger, Marion; Höger, Harald; Bennett, Keiryn L; Lubec, Gert

    2015-08-01

    Several neurotransmitter receptors have been proposed to be involved in memory formation. However, information on receptor complexes (RCs) in the radial arm maze (RAM) is missing. It was therefore the aim of this study to determine major neurotransmitter RCs levels that are modulated by RAM training because receptors are known to work in homo-or heteromeric assemblies. Immediate early gene Arc expression was determined by immunohistochemistry to show if prefrontal cortices (PFC) and hippocampi were activated following RAM training as these regions are known to be mainly implicated in spatial memory. Twelve rats per group, trained and untrained in the twelve arm RAM were used, frontal cortices and hippocampi were taken, RCs in membrane protein were quantified by blue-native PAGE immunoblotting. RCs components were characterised by co-immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometrical analysis and by the use of the proximity ligation assay. Arc expression was significantly higher in PFC of trained as compared to untrained rats whereas it was comparable in hippocampi. Frontal cortical levels of RCs containing AMPA receptors GluA1, GluA2, NMDA receptors GluN1 and GluN2A, dopamine receptor D1, acetylcholine nicotinic receptor alpha 7 (nAChR-α7) and hippocampal levels of RCs containing D1, GluN1, GluN2B and nAChR-α7 were increased in the trained group; phosphorylated dopamine transporter levels were decreased in the trained group. D1 and GluN1 receptors were shown to be in the same complex. Taken together, distinct RCs were paralleling performance in the RAM which is relevant for interpretation of previous and design of future work on RCs in memory studies. PMID:25930220

  5. From conflict management to reward-based decision making: actors and critics in primate medial frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Silvetti, Massimo; Alexander, William; Verguts, Tom; Brown, Joshua W

    2014-10-01

    The role of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and especially the anterior cingulate cortex has been the subject of intense debate for the last decade. A number of theories have been proposed to account for its function. Broadly speaking, some emphasize cognitive control, whereas others emphasize value processing; specific theories concern reward processing, conflict detection, error monitoring, and volatility detection, among others. Here we survey and evaluate them relative to experimental results from neurophysiological, anatomical, and cognitive studies. We argue for a new conceptualization of mPFC, arising from recent computational modeling work. Based on reinforcement learning theory, these new models propose that mPFC is an Actor-Critic system. This system is aimed to predict future events including rewards, to evaluate errors in those predictions, and finally, to implement optimal skeletal-motor and visceromotor commands to obtain reward. This framework provides a comprehensive account of mPFC function, accounting for and predicting empirical results across different levels of analysis, including monkey neurophysiology, human ERP, human neuroimaging, and human behavior. PMID:24239852

  6. Thyroid hormone regulation of gene expression in the developing rat fetal cerebral cortex: prominent role of the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV pathway.

    PubMed

    Morte, Beatriz; Díez, Diego; Ausó, Eva; Belinchón, Mónica M; Gil-Ibáñez, Pilar; Grijota-Martínez, Carmen; Navarro, Daniela; de Escobar, Gabriella Morreale; Berbel, Pere; Bernal, Juan

    2010-02-01

    Thyroid hormones influence brain development through regulation of gene expression mediated by nuclear receptors. Nuclear receptor concentration increases rapidly in the human fetus during the second trimester, a period of high sensitivity of the brain to thyroid hormones. In the rat, the equivalent period is the last quarter of pregnancy. However, little is known about thyroid hormone action in the fetal brain, and in rodents, most thyroid hormone-regulated genes have been identified during the postnatal period. To identify potential targets of thyroid hormone in the fetal brain, we induced maternal and fetal hypothyroidism by maternal thyroidectomy followed by antithyroid drug (2-mercapto-1-methylimidazole) treatment. Microarray analysis identified differentially expressed genes in the cerebral cortex of hypothyroid fetuses on d 21 after conception. Gene function analysis revealed genes involved in the biogenesis of the cytoskeleton, neuronal migration and growth, and branching of neurites. Twenty percent of the differentially expressed genes were related to each other centered on the Ca(2+) and calmodulin-activated kinase (Camk4) pathway. Camk4 was regulated directly by T(3) in primary cultured neurons from fetal cortex, and the Camk4 protein was also induced by thyroid hormone. No differentially expressed genes were recovered when euthyroid fetuses from hypothyroid mothers were compared with fetuses from normal mothers. Although the results do not rule out a specific contribution from the mother, especially at earlier stages of pregnancy, they indicate that the main regulators of thyroid hormone-dependent, fetal brain gene expression near term are the fetal thyroid hormones. PMID:20056827

  7. Acute Sleep Deprivation Induces a Local Brain Transfer Information Increase in the Frontal Cortex in a Widespread Decrease Context

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Joan F.; Romero, Sergio; Mañanas, Miguel A.; Alcalá, Marta; Antonijoan, Rosa M.; Giménez, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) has adverse effects on mental and physical health, affecting the cognitive abilities and emotional states. Specifically, cognitive functions and alertness are known to decrease after SD. The aim of this work was to identify the directional information transfer after SD on scalp EEG signals using transfer entropy (TE). Using a robust methodology based on EEG recordings of 18 volunteers deprived from sleep for 36 h, TE and spectral analysis were performed to characterize EEG data acquired every 2 h. Correlation between connectivity measures and subjective somnolence was assessed. In general, TE showed medium- and long-range significant decreases originated at the occipital areas and directed towards different regions, which could be interpreted as the transfer of predictive information from parieto-occipital activity to the rest of the head. Simultaneously, short-range increases were obtained for the frontal areas, following a consistent and robust time course with significant maps after 20 h of sleep deprivation. Changes during sleep deprivation in brain network were measured effectively by TE, which showed increased local connectivity and diminished global integration. TE is an objective measure that could be used as a potential measure of sleep pressure and somnolence with the additional property of directed relationships. PMID:27089346

  8. We are more selfish than we think: The endowment effect and reward processing within the human medial-frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Hassall, Cameron D; Silver, Amy; Turk, David J; Krigolson, Olave E

    2016-09-01

    Perceived ownership has been shown to impact a variety of cognitive processes: attention, memory, and-more recently-reward processing. In the present experiment we examined whether or not perceived ownership would interact with the construct of value-the relative worth of an object. Participants completed a simple gambling game in which they gambled either for themselves or for another while electroencephalographic data were recorded. In a key manipulation, gambles for oneself or for another were for either small or large rewards. We tested the hypothesis that value affects the neural response to self-gamble outcomes, but not other-gamble outcomes. Our experimental data revealed that while participants learned the correct response option for both self and other gambles, the reward positivity evoked by wins was impacted by value only when gambling for oneself. Importantly, our findings provide additional evidence for a self-ownership bias in cognitive processing and further demonstrate the insensitivity of the medial-frontal reward system to gambles for another. PMID:26490515

  9. Acute Sleep Deprivation Induces a Local Brain Transfer Information Increase in the Frontal Cortex in a Widespread Decrease Context.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Joan F; Romero, Sergio; Mañanas, Miguel A; Alcalá, Marta; Antonijoan, Rosa M; Giménez, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) has adverse effects on mental and physical health, affecting the cognitive abilities and emotional states. Specifically, cognitive functions and alertness are known to decrease after SD. The aim of this work was to identify the directional information transfer after SD on scalp EEG signals using transfer entropy (TE). Using a robust methodology based on EEG recordings of 18 volunteers deprived from sleep for 36 h, TE and spectral analysis were performed to characterize EEG data acquired every 2 h. Correlation between connectivity measures and subjective somnolence was assessed. In general, TE showed medium- and long-range significant decreases originated at the occipital areas and directed towards different regions, which could be interpreted as the transfer of predictive information from parieto-occipital activity to the rest of the head. Simultaneously, short-range increases were obtained for the frontal areas, following a consistent and robust time course with significant maps after 20 h of sleep deprivation. Changes during sleep deprivation in brain network were measured effectively by TE, which showed increased local connectivity and diminished global integration. TE is an objective measure that could be used as a potential measure of sleep pressure and somnolence with the additional property of directed relationships. PMID:27089346

  10. Early effects of low doses of ionizing radiation on the fetal cerebral cortex in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, S.; Kimler, B.F. )

    1990-11-01

    Pregnant rats were exposed to gamma radiation from a 137Cs irradiator on gestational Day 15. Fetuses that received 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, or 1.0 Gy were examined 24 h after irradiation for changes in the cells of the cerebral mantle of the developing brain. The extent of changes following 0.5 Gy was studied at 3, 6, 12, or 24 h after exposure. Cortical thickness of the cerebral mantle was not significantly altered. The number of pyknotic cells, number of macrophages, nuclear area, and number of mitotic cells were altered in a dose-related way. The number of pyknotic cells was significantly increased at all doses. A positive correlation between the number of pyknotic cells and the number of macrophages developed with time. At 3 h after irradiation about 60% of pyknotic cells were found in the subventricular zone and about 25% in the intermediate zone and cortical plate. The number of such cells in the upper layers of the cortex steadily increased up to 24 h, at which time about 70% of pyknotic cells were in these two layers. The relationship of the movement of pyknotic cells to migration of postmitotic neuroblasts is discussed.

  11. Intracerebroventricular administration of ouabain, a Na/K-ATPase inhibitor, activates mTOR signal pathways and protein translation in the rat frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se Hyun; Yu, Hyun-Sook; Park, Hong Geun; Ha, Kyooseob; Kim, Yong Sik; Shin, Soon Young; Ahn, Yong Min

    2013-08-01

    Intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of ouabain, a specific Na/K-ATPase inhibitor, induces behavioral changes in rats in a putative animal model of mania. The binding of ouabain to Na/K-ATPase affects signaling molecules in vitro, including ERK1/2 and Akt, which promote protein translation. We have also reported that ERK1/2 and Akt in the brain are involved in the ouabain-induced hyperactivity of rats. In this study, rats were given an ICV injection of ouabain, and then their frontal cortices were examined to determine the effects of ouabain on the mTOR/p70S6K/S6 signaling pathway and protein translation, which are important in modifications of neural circuits and behavior. Rats showed ouabain-induced hyperactivity up to 8h following injection, and increased phosphorylation levels of mTOR, p70S6K, S6, eIF4B, and 4E-BP at 1, 2, 4, and 8h following ouabain injection. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that increased p-S6 immunoreactivity in the cytoplasm of neurons by ouabain was evident in the prefrontal, cingulate, and orbital cortex. These findings suggested increased translation initiation in response to ouabain. The rate of protein synthesis was measured as the amount of [(3)H]-leucine incorporation in the cell-free extracts of frontal cortical tissues, and showed a significant increase at 8h after ouabain injection. These results suggest that ICV injection of ouabain induced activation of the protein translation initiation pathway regulated by ERK1/2 and Akt, and prolonged hyperactivity in rats. In conclusion, protein translation pathway could play an important role in ouabain-induced hyperactivity in a rodent model of mania. PMID:23643758

  12. Modulation of the release of norepinephrine by gamma-aminobutyric acid and morphine in the frontal cerebral cortex of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Peoples, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    Agents that enhance gamma-aminobutyric acid, or GABA, neurotransmission modulate certain effects of opioids, such as analgesia. Opioid analgesia is mediated in part by norepinephrine in the forebrain. In this study, the interactions between morphine and GABAergic agents on release of ({sup 3}H) norepinephrine from rat frontal cerebral cortical slices were examined. GABA, 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}-10{sup {minus}3} M, enhanced potassium stimulated ({sup 3}H) norepinephrine release and reversed the inhibitory effect of morphine in a noncompetitive manner. GABA did not enhance release of ({sup 3}H) norepinephrine stimulated by the calcium ionophore A23187. The effect of GABA was reduced by the GABA{sub A} receptor antagonists bicuculline methiodide or picrotoxin, and by the selective inhibitor of GABA uptake SKF 89976A, but was blocked completely only when bicuculline methiodide and SKF 89976A were used in combination. The GABA{sub A} agonist muscimol, 10{sup {minus}4} M, mimicked the effect of GABA, but the GABA{sub B} agonist ({plus minus})baclofen, 10{sup {minus}4} M, did not affect the release of ({sup 3}H) norepinephrine in the absence or the presence of morphine. Thus GABA appears to produce this effect by stimulating GABA uptake and GABA{sub A}, but not GABA{sub B}, receptors. In contrast to the results that would be predicted for an event involving GABA{sub A} receptors, however, the effect of GABA did not desensitize, and benzodiazepine agonists did not enhance the effect of GABA at any concentration tested between 10{sup {minus}8} and 10{sup {minus}4} M. Thus these receptors may constitute a subclass of GABA{sub A} receptors. These results support a role of GABA uptake and GABA{sub A} receptors in enhancing the release of norepinephrine and modulating its inhibition by opioids in the frontal cortex of the rat.

  13. Aerobic Glycolysis in the Frontal Cortex Correlates with Memory Performance in Wild-Type Mice But Not the APP/PS1 Mouse Model of Cerebral Amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Richard A.; Tindale, Lauren; Lone, Asad; Singh, Olivia; Macauley, Shannon L.; Stanley, Molly; Holtzman, David M.; Bartha, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Aerobic glycolysis and lactate production in the brain plays a key role in memory, yet the role of this metabolism in the cognitive decline associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) remains poorly understood. Here we examined the relationship between cerebral lactate levels and memory performance in an APP/PS1 mouse model of AD, which progressively accumulates amyloid-β. In vivo 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed an age-dependent decline in lactate levels within the frontal cortex of control mice, whereas lactate levels remained unaltered in APP/PS1 mice from 3 to 12 months of age. Analysis of hippocampal interstitial fluid by in vivo microdialysis revealed a significant elevation in lactate levels in APP/PS1 mice relative to control mice at 12 months of age. An age-dependent decline in the levels of key aerobic glycolysis enzymes and a concomitant increase in lactate transporter expression was detected in control mice. Increased expression of lactate-producing enzymes correlated with improved memory in control mice. Interestingly, in APP/PS1 mice the opposite effect was detected. In these mice, increased expression of lactate producing enzymes correlated with poorer memory performance. Immunofluorescent staining revealed localization of the aerobic glycolysis enzymes pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase and lactate dehydrogenase A within cortical and hippocampal neurons in control mice, as well as within astrocytes surrounding amyloid plaques in APP/PS1 mice. These observations collectively indicate that production of lactate, via aerobic glycolysis, is beneficial for memory function during normal aging. However, elevated lactate levels in APP/PS1 mice indicate perturbed lactate processing, a factor that may contribute to cognitive decline in AD. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Lactate has recently emerged as a key metabolite necessary for memory consolidation. Lactate is the end product of aerobic glycolysis, a unique form of metabolism that occurs within certain

  14. Same Modulation but Different Starting Points: Performance Modulates Age Differences in Inferior Frontal Cortex Activity during Word-Retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Meinzer, Marcus; Flaisch, Tobias; Seeds, Lauren; Harnish, Stacy; Antonenko, Daria; Witte, Veronica; Lindenberg, Robert; Crosson, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    The neural basis of word-retrieval deficits in normal aging has rarely been assessed and the few previous functional imaging studies found enhanced activity in right prefrontal areas in healthy older compared to younger adults. However, more pronounced right prefrontal recruitment has primarily been observed during challenging task conditions. Moreover, increased task difficulty may result in enhanced activity in the ventral inferior frontal gyrus (vIFG) bilaterally in younger participants as well. Thus, the question arises whether increased activity in older participants represents an age-related phenomenon or reflects task difficulty effects. In the present study, we manipulated task difficulty during overt semantic and phonemic word-generation and used functional magnetic resonance imaging to assess activity patterns in the vIFG in healthy younger and older adults (N = 16/group; mean age: 24 vs. 69 years). Both groups produced fewer correct responses during the more difficult task conditions. Overall, older participants produced fewer correct responses and showed more pronounced task-related activity in the right vIFG. However, increased activity during the more difficult conditions was found in both groups. Absolute degree of activity was correlated with performance across groups, tasks and difficulty levels. Activity modulation (difficult vs. easy conditions) was correlated with the respective drop in performance across groups and tasks. In conclusion, vIFG activity levels and modulation of activity were mediated by performance accuracy in a similar way in both groups. Group differences in the right vIFG activity were explained by performance accuracy which needs to be considered in future functional imaging studies of healthy and pathological aging. PMID:22438970

  15. Same modulation but different starting points: performance modulates age differences in inferior frontal cortex activity during word-retrieval.

    PubMed

    Meinzer, Marcus; Flaisch, Tobias; Seeds, Lauren; Harnish, Stacy; Antonenko, Daria; Witte, Veronica; Lindenberg, Robert; Crosson, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    The neural basis of word-retrieval deficits in normal aging has rarely been assessed and the few previous functional imaging studies found enhanced activity in right prefrontal areas in healthy older compared to younger adults. However, more pronounced right prefrontal recruitment has primarily been observed during challenging task conditions. Moreover, increased task difficulty may result in enhanced activity in the ventral inferior frontal gyrus (vIFG) bilaterally in younger participants as well. Thus, the question arises whether increased activity in older participants represents an age-related phenomenon or reflects task difficulty effects. In the present study, we manipulated task difficulty during overt semantic and phonemic word-generation and used functional magnetic resonance imaging to assess activity patterns in the vIFG in healthy younger and older adults (N = 16/group; mean age: 24 vs. 69 years). Both groups produced fewer correct responses during the more difficult task conditions. Overall, older participants produced fewer correct responses and showed more pronounced task-related activity in the right vIFG. However, increased activity during the more difficult conditions was found in both groups. Absolute degree of activity was correlated with performance across groups, tasks and difficulty levels. Activity modulation (difficult vs. easy conditions) was correlated with the respective drop in performance across groups and tasks. In conclusion, vIFG activity levels and modulation of activity were mediated by performance accuracy in a similar way in both groups. Group differences in the right vIFG activity were explained by performance accuracy which needs to be considered in future functional imaging studies of healthy and pathological aging. PMID:22438970

  16. Effects of Maternal Antenatal Glucocorticoid Treatment on Apoptosis in the Ovine Fetal Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Malaeb, Shadi N.; Hovanesian, Virginia; Sarasin, Matthew D.; Hartmann, Silvia M.; Sadowska, Grazyna B.; Stonestreet, Barbara S.

    2009-01-01

    We examined the effects of single and multiple maternal glucocorticoid courses on apoptosis in the cerebral cortices of ovine fetuses (CC). Ewes received single dexamethasone or placebo courses at 104–106 or 133–135 days or multiple courses between 76–78 and 104–106 days gestation. In the single-course groups, ewes received four 6 mg dexamethasone or placebo injections every 12 hr for 48 hr. Multiple-course groups received the same treatment once per week for 5 weeks. Neuronal and nonneuronal apoptotic cell numbers per square millimeter were determined with TUNEL and NeuN staining and with caspase-3 enzyme activity on CC tissues harvested at 106–108 (70%) or 135–137 (90%) days of gestation. Apoptotic cell numbers and caspase-3 activity were 50% lower (P < 0.02) after single placebo courses at 90% than 70% gestation; 90% of apoptotic cells were (P < 0.01) nonneuronal at both ages. Nonneuronal apoptotic cells and caspase-3 activity were 40% and 20% lower (P < 0.02) after single dexamethasone than placebo courses at 70%, but not 90%, gestation. Caspase-3 activity was 20% lower (P < 0.01) after multiple dexamethasone than placebo courses, but apoptotic cell number did not differ. We conclude that nonneuronal apoptosis represents the major form of apoptosis in the CC at both 70% and 90% of gestation. Apoptosis in nonneuronal cells decreases with maturity and after a single course of dexamethasone at 70%, but not at 90%, gestation and not after multiple courses at 70% gestation. We speculate that a single course of glucocorticoids exerts maturational changes on the rate of apoptosis in the cerebral cortex of preterm ovine fetuses. PMID:18711727

  17. The Role of the Lateral Frontal Cortex in Causal Associative Learning: Exploring Preventative and Super-learning

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Danielle C.; Aitken, Michael R.F.; Shanks, David R.; Sahakian, Barbara J.; Robbins, Trevor W.; Schwarzbauer, Christian; Fletcher, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    Prediction error — a mismatch between expected and actual outcome — is critical to associative accounts of inferential learning. However, it has proven difficult to explore the effects of prediction error using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while excluding the confounding effects of stimulus novelty and incorrect responses. In this event-related fMRI study we used a three-stage experiment generating preventative- and super-learning conditions. In both cases, it was possible to generate prediction error within a causal associative learning experiment while subtracting the effects of novelty and error. We show that right lateral prefrontal cortex (PFC) activation is sensitive to the magnitude of prediction error. Furthermore, super-learning activation in this region of PFC correlates, across subjects, with the amount learned. We thus provide direct evidence for a brain correlate of the surprise-dependent mechanisms proposed by associative accounts of causal learning. We show that activity in right lateral PFC is sensitive to the magnitude, though not the direction, of the prediction error. Furthermore, its activity is not directly explicable in terms of novelty or response errors and appears directly related to the learning that arises out of prediction error. PMID:15054060

  18. The role of the lateral frontal cortex in causal associative learning: exploring preventative and super-learning.

    PubMed

    Turner, Danielle C; Aitken, Michael R F; Shanks, David R; Sahakian, Barbara J; Robbins, Trevor W; Schwarzbauer, Christian; Fletcher, Paul C

    2004-08-01

    Prediction error--a mismatch between expected and actual outcome--is critical to associative accounts of inferential learning. However, it has proven difficult to explore the effects of prediction error using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while excluding the confounding effects of stimulus novelty and incorrect responses. In this event-related fMRI study we used a three-stage experiment generating preventative- and super-learning conditions. In both cases, it was possible to generate prediction error within a causal associative learning experiment while subtracting the effects of novelty and error. We show that right lateral prefrontal cortex (PFC) activation is sensitive to the magnitude of prediction error. Furthermore, super-learning activation in this region of PFC correlates, across subjects, with the amount learned. We thus provide direct evidence for a brain correlate of the surprise-dependent mechanisms proposed by associative accounts of causal learning. We show that activity in right lateral PFC is sensitive to the magnitude, though not the direction, of the prediction error. Furthermore, its activity is not directly explicable in terms of novelty or response errors and appears directly related to the learning that arises out of prediction error. PMID:15054060

  19. Sex-dependent effects of lead and prenatal stress on post-translational histone modifications in frontal cortex and hippocampus in the early postnatal brain.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jay S; Anderson, David W; Kidd, Sarah K; Sobolewski, Marissa; Cory-Slechta, Deborah A

    2016-05-01

    Environmental lead (Pb) exposure and prenatal stress (PS) are co-occurring risk factors for impaired cognition and other disorders/diseases in adulthood and target common biological substrates in the brain. Sex-dependent differences characterize the neurochemical and behavioral responses of the brain to Pb and PS and sexually dimorphic histone modifications have been reported to occur in at-risk brain regions (cortex and hippocampus) during development. The present study sought to examine levels and developmental timing of sexually dimorphic histone modifications (i.e., H3K9/14Ac and H3K9Me3) and the extent to which they may be altered by Pb±PS. Female C57/Bl6 mice were randomly assigned to receive distilled deionized drinking water containing 0 or 100ppm Pb acetate for 2 months prior to breeding and throughout lactation. Half of the dams in each group were exposed to restraint stress (PS, three restraint sessions in plastic cylindrical devices 3×/day at for 30min/day (1000, 1300, and 1600h)) from gestational day 11-19 or no stress (NS). At delivery (PND0) and postnatal day 6 (PND6), pups were euthanized and frontal cortex and hippocampus were removed, homogenized, and assayed for levels of H3K9/14Ac and H3K9Me3. Sex-dependent differences in both levels of histone modifications as well as the developmental trajectory of changes in these levels were observed in both structures and these parameters were differentially affected by Pb±PS in a sex and brain-region-dependent manner. Disruptions of these epigenetic processes by developmental Pb±PS may underlie some of the sex-dependent neurobehavioral differences previously observed in these animals. PMID:27018513

  20. Increases in mature brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein in the frontal cortex and basal forebrain during chronic sleep restriction in rats: possible role in initiating allostatic adaptation.

    PubMed

    Wallingford, J K; Deurveilher, S; Currie, R W; Fawcett, J P; Semba, K

    2014-09-26

    Chronic sleep restriction (CSR) has various negative consequences on cognitive performance and health. Using a rat model of CSR that uses alternating cycles of 3h of sleep deprivation (using slowly rotating activity wheels) and 1h of sleep opportunity continuously for 4 days ('3/1' protocol), we previously observed not only homeostatic but also allostatic (adaptive) sleep responses to CSR. In particular, non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) electroencephalogram (EEG) delta power, an index of sleep intensity, increased initially and then declined gradually during CSR, with no rebound during a 2-day recovery period. To study underlying mechanisms of these allostatic responses, we examined the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is known to regulate NREMS EEG delta activity, during the same CSR protocol. Mature BDNF protein levels were measured in the frontal cortex and basal forebrain, two brain regions involved in sleep and EEG regulation, and the hippocampus, using Western blot analysis. Adult male Wistar rats were housed in motorized activity wheels, and underwent the 3/1 CSR protocol for 27 h, for 99 h, or for 99 h followed by 24h of recovery. Additional rats were housed in either locked wheels (locked wheel controls [LWCs]) or unlocked wheels that rats could rotate freely (wheel-running controls [WRCs]). BDNF levels did not differ between WRC and LWC groups. BDNF levels were increased, compared to the control levels, in all three brain regions after 27 h, and were increased less strongly after 99 h, of CSR. After 24h of recovery, BDNF levels were at the control levels. This time course of BDNF levels parallels the previously reported changes in NREMS delta power during the same CSR protocol. Changes in BDNF protein levels in the cortex and basal forebrain may be part of the molecular mechanisms underlying allostatic sleep responses to CSR. PMID:25010399

  1. Human subthalamic nucleus-medial frontal cortex theta phase coherence is involved in conflict and error related cortical monitoring.

    PubMed

    Zavala, Baltazar; Tan, Huiling; Ashkan, Keyoumars; Foltynie, Thomas; Limousin, Patricia; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Zaghloul, Kareem; Brown, Peter

    2016-08-15

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is thought to control the shift from automatic to controlled action selection when conflict is present or when mistakes have been recently committed. Growing evidence suggests that this process involves frequency specific communication in the theta (4-8Hz) band between the mPFC and the subthalamic nucleus (STN), which is the main target of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson's disease. Key in this hypothesis is the finding that DBS can lead to impulsivity by disrupting the correlation between higher mPFC oscillations and slower reaction times during conflict. In order to test whether theta band coherence between the mPFC and the STN underlies adjustments to conflict and to errors, we simultaneously recorded mPFC and STN electrophysiological activity while DBS patients performed an arrowed flanker task. These recordings revealed higher theta phase coherence between the two sites during the high conflict trials relative to the low conflict trials. These differences were observed soon after conflicting arrows were displayed, but before a response was executed. Furthermore, trials that occurred after an error was committed showed higher phase coherence relative to trials that followed a correct trial, suggesting that mPFC-STN connectivity may also play a role in error related adjustments in behavior. Interestingly, the phase coherence we observed occurred before increases in theta power, implying that the theta phase and power may influence behavior at separate times during cortical monitoring. Finally, we showed that pre-stimulus differences in STN theta power were related to the reaction time on a given trial, which may help adjust behavior based on the probability of observing conflict during a task. PMID:27181763

  2. Effects of Hypertension and Anti-Hypertensive Treatment on Amyloid-β (Aβ) Plaque Load and Aβ-Synthesizing and Aβ-Degrading Enzymes in Frontal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Ashby, Emma L; Miners, James S; Kehoe, Patrick G; Love, Seth

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological data associate hypertension with a predisposition to Alzheimer's disease (AD), and a number of postmortem and in vivo studies also demonstrate that hypertension increases amyloid-β (Aβ) pathology. In contrast, anti-hypertensive medications reportedly improve cognition and decrease the risk of AD, while certain classes of anti-hypertensive drugs are associated with decreased AD-related pathology. We investigated the effects of hypertension and anti-hypertensive treatment on Aβ plaque load in postmortem frontal cortex in AD. Aβ load was significantly increased in hypertensive (n = 20) relative to normotensive cases (n = 62) and was also significantly higher in treated (n = 9) than untreated hypertensives (n = 11). We then looked into mechanisms by which hypertension and treatment might increase Aβ load, focusing on Aβ-synthesizing enzymes, β- and γ-secretase, and Aβ-degrading enzymes, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) and neprilysin. ACE and IDE protein levels were significantly lower in hypertensive (n = 21) than normotensive cases (n = 64), perhaps translating to decreased Aβ catabolism in hypertensives. ACE level was significantly higher in treated (n = 9) than untreated hypertensives (n = 12), possibly reflecting feedback upregulation of the renin-angiotensin system. Prospective studies in larger cohorts stratified according to anti-hypertensive drug class are needed to confirm these initial findings and to elucidate the interactions between hypertension, anti-hypertensive treatments, and Aβ metabolism. PMID:26836178

  3. Endurance training effects on 5-HT(1B) receptors mRNA expression in cerebellum, striatum, frontal cortex and hippocampus of rats.

    PubMed

    Chennaoui, M; Drogou, C; Gomez-Merino, D; Grimaldi, B; Fillion, G; Guezennec, C Y

    2001-07-01

    The 5-HT(1B) receptors are the predominant auto- and heteroreceptors located on serotonergic and non-serotonergic terminals where they regulate the neuronal release of neurotransmitters. The present study investigated the effects of a 7 week period of physical training on the expression of cerebral 5-HT(1B) receptors by measuring corresponding mRNA levels in rat. Using RNase protection assay technique, we have observed no change in 5-HT(1B) receptor mRNA levels in the striatum and in the hippocampus after moderate as well as after intensive training. In contrast, a significant decrease in 5-HT(1B) receptor mRNA levels was observed in cerebellum of intensively trained rats. Moreover, in frontal cortex, a significant decrease in 5-HT(1B) receptors mRNA level occurred in both groups of trained rats. These data suggest the existence of regional differences in the effect of physical exercise on the expression of 5-HT(1B) receptors. PMID:11516568

  4. Maternal separation and early stress cause long-lasting effects on dopaminergic and endocannabinergic systems and alters dendritic morphology in the nucleus accumbens and frontal cortex in rats.

    PubMed

    Romano-López, Antonio; Méndez-Díaz, Mónica; García, Fabio García; Regalado-Santiago, Citlalli; Ruiz-Contreras, Alejandra E; Prospéro-García, Oscar

    2016-08-01

    A considerable amount experimental studies have shown that maternal separation (MS) is associated with adult offspring abnormal behavior and cognition disorder. Accordingly, this experimental procedure has been proposed as a predictor for alcohol and drug dependence based on the neurodevelopmental soon after birth. Endocannabinoid system (eCBs) has been implicated in reward processes, including drug abuse and dependence. MS and associated stress causes changes in the eCBs that seem to facilitate alcohol consumption. In this study, we seek to evaluate potential morphological changes in neurons of the frontal cortex (FCx) and nucleus accumbens (NAcc), in the expression of receptors and enzymes of the endocannabinoid and dopamine systems and in second messengers, such as Akt, in adult rats subjected to MS and early stress (MS + ES; 2 × 180 min daily) vs. nonseparated rats (NMS). Results showed that MS + ES induces higher D2R expression and lower D3R, FAAH, and MAGL expression compared with NMS rats. Alterations in total dendritic length were also detected and were characterized by increases in the NAcc while there were decreases in the FCx. We believe MS + ES-induced changes in the dopaminergic and endocannabinergic systems and in the neuronal microstructure might be contributing to alcohol seeking behavior and, potential vulnerability to other drugs in rats. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 819-831, 2016. PMID:26539755

  5. Reduced C9orf72 protein levels in frontal cortex of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal degeneration brain with the C9ORF72 hexanucleotide repeat expansion☆

    PubMed Central

    Waite, Adrian J.; Bäumer, Dirk; East, Simon; Neal, James; Morris, Huw R.; Ansorge, Olaf; Blake, Derek J.

    2014-01-01

    An intronic G4C2 hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9ORF72 is a major cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Several mechanisms including RNA toxicity, repeat-associated non-AUG translation mediated dipeptide protein aggregates, and haploinsufficiency of C9orf72 have been implicated in the molecular pathogenesis of this disorder. The aims of this study were to compare the use of two different Southern blot probes for detection of repeat expansions in an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration pathological cohort and to determine the levels of C9orf72 transcript variants and protein isoforms in patients versus control subjects. Our Southern blot studies identified smaller repeat expansions (250–1800 bp) that were only detectable with the flanking probe highlighting the potential for divergent results using different Southern blotting protocols that could complicate genotype–phenotype correlation studies. Further, we characterize a new C9orf72 antibody and show for the first time decreased C9orf72 protein levels in the frontal cortex from patients with a pathological hexanucleotide repeat expansion. These data suggest that a reduction in C9orf72 protein may be a consequence of the disease. PMID:24559645

  6. Higher levels of phosphorylated Y1472 on GluN2B subunits in the frontal cortex of aged mice are associated with good spatial reference memory, but not cognitive flexibility.

    PubMed

    Zamzow, Daniel R; Elias, Val; Acosta, Varinia A; Escobedo, Emily; Magnusson, Kathy R

    2016-06-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAr) is particularly vulnerable to aging. The GluN2B subunit of the NMDAr, compared to other NMDAr subunits, suffers the greatest losses of expression in the aging brain, especially in the frontal cortex. While expression levels of GluN2B mRNA and protein in the aged brain are well documented, there has been little investigation into age-related posttranslational modifications of the subunit. In this study, we explored some of the mechanisms that may promote differences in the NMDAr complex in the frontal cortex of aged animals. Two ages of mice, 3 and 24 months, were behaviorally tested in the Morris water maze. The frontal cortex and hippocampus from each mouse were subjected to differential centrifugation followed by solubilization in Triton X-100. Proteins from Triton-insoluble membranes, Triton-soluble membranes, and intracellular membranes/cytosol were examined by Western blot. Higher levels of GluN2B tyrosine 1472 phosphorylation in frontal cortex synaptic fractions of old mice were associated with better reference learning but poorer cognitive flexibility. Levels of GluN2B phosphotyrosine 1336 remained steady, but there were greater levels of the calpain-induced 115 kDa GluN2B cleavage product on extrasynaptic membranes in these old good learners. There was an age-related increase in calpain activity, but it was not associated with better learning. These data highlight a unique aging change for aged mice with good spatial learning that might be detrimental to cognitive flexibility. This study also suggests that higher levels of truncated GluN2B on extrasynaptic membranes are not deleterious to spatial memory in aged mice. PMID:27094400

  7. Amphetamine Up-Regulates AGS1 mRNA and Protein Levels in Rat Frontal Cortex: The Role of Dopamine and Glucocorticoid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Schwendt, Marek; McGinty, Jacqueline F.

    2010-01-01

    Acute and chronic exposure to psychostimulants results in altered function of G-protein-coupled receptors in the forebrain. It is believed that neuroadaptations in G-protein signaling contribute to behavioral sensitivity to psychostimulants that persists over a prolonged drug-free period. Proteins termed activators of G-protein signaling (AGS) have been characterized as potent modulators of both receptor-dependent and receptor-independent G-protein signaling. Nevertheless, the regulation of AGS gene and protein expression by psychostimulants remains poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated amphetamine (AMPH)-induced changes in expression patterns of several forebrain-enriched AGS proteins. A single exposure to AMPH (2.5 mg/kg i.p.) selectively induced gene expression of AGS1, but not Rhes or AGS3 proteins, in the rat prefrontal cortex (PFC) as measured 3h later. Induction of AGS1 mRNA in the PFC by acute AMPH was transient and dose-dependent. Even repeated treatment with AMPH for 5 days did not produce lasting changes in AGS1 mRNA and protein levels in the PFC as measured three weeks post treatment. However, at this time point, a low dose AMPH challenge (1 mg/kg, i.p.) induced a robust behavioral response and up-regulated AGS1 expression in the PFC selectively in animals with an AMPH history. The effects of AMPH on AGS1 expression in the PFC were blocked by a D2, but not D1, dopamine receptor antagonist and partially by a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist. Collectively, the present study suggests that (1) AGS1 represents a regulator of G-protein signaling that is rapidly inducible by AMPH in the frontal cortex, (2) AGS1 regulation in the PFC parallels behavioral activation by acute AMPH in drug-naïve animals and hypersensitivity to AMPH challenge in sensitized animals, and (3) D2 dopamine and glucocorticoid receptors regulate AMPH effects on AGS1 in the PFC. Changes in AGS1 levels in the PFC may result in abnormal receptor-to-G-protein coupling

  8. Gamma-hydroxybutyrate reduces mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation via GABA B receptor activation in mouse frontal cortex and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiuhai; Mody, Istvan

    2003-10-24

    gamma-Hydroxybutyrate (GHB) naturally occurs in the brain, but its exogenous administration induces profound effects on the central nervous system in animals and humans. The intracellular signaling mechanisms underlying its actions remain unclear. In the present study, the effects of GHB on the activation (phosphorylation) of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAP kinases), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), were investigated. Acute administration of GHB (500 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) induced a fast and long lasting inhibition of MAP kinase phosphorylation in both frontal cortex and hippocampus. The reduced MAP kinase phosphorylation was observed in the CA1 and CA3 areas but not in the dentate gyrus. Pretreatment with the specific gamma-aminobutyric acid, type B (GABAB), receptor antagonist CGP56999A (20 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) prevented the action of GHB, and the effect of GHB was mimicked by baclofen, a selective GABAB receptor agonist, whereas the high affinity GHB receptor antagonist NCS-382 (200 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) had no effect on GHB-inhibited MAP kinase phosphorylation. Moreover, the GHB dehydrogenase inhibitor valproate (500 mg/kg, intraperitoneal), which inhibits the conversion of GHB into GABA, failed to block the effect of GHB on MAP kinase phosphorylation. Altogether, these data suggest that GHB, administered in vivo, reduces MAP kinase phosphorylation via a direct activation of GABAB receptors by GHB. In contrast, GHB (10 mm for 15 min) was found ineffective on MAP kinase phosphorylation in brain slices, indicating important differences in the conditions required for the second messenger activating action of GHB. PMID:12923192

  9. Efferents from the lateral frontal cortex to spinomedullary target areas, trigeminal nuclei, and spinally projecting brainstem regions in the hedgehog tenrec.

    PubMed

    Künzle, H; Lotter, G

    1996-08-12

    This study was done in the Madagascan lesser hedgehog tenrec, an insectivore with a very poorly differentiated neocortex. The cortical region, known to give rise to spinal projections, was injected with tracer, and the cortical efferents to brainstem and spinal cord were analyzed. Bulbar reticular fields, in addition, were identified according to their cells of origin and the laterality of their spinal projections after injection of tracer. Only few cortical fibers could be traced from the bulbar pyramid into the ipsilateral spinal cord, particularly to the lateral funiculus. The projections to the dorsal column nuclei and the classical spinally projecting brainstem regions were also weak. Faint projections were demonstrated to the nucleus of the posterior commissure and the nucleus of Darkschewitsch. In comparison to other mammals, there was no evidence that the contralateral cortico-bulbo-spinal pathway was strengthened, substituting for the almost non-existent contralateral corticospinal projection. Unlike the sensorimotor apparatus controlling limb and body movements, the brainstem regions controlling the head and neck received prominent cortical projections. Direct corticotrigeminal projections and indirect pathways were well represented. The projections to the trigeminal nuclei and the lateral reticular fields were clearly bilateral; those to the superior colliculus were predominantly ipsilateral. The corticobulbar fibers left the pyramid along its entire extent; the principal trigeminal nucleus and the dorsolateral pontine tegmentum were supplied by additional fibers of the corticotegmental tract. The lateral frontal cortex also projected densely to the dorsolateral hypothalamus, the periaqueductal gray, and the adjacent mesencephalic tegmentum, components of the emotional motor system. PMID:8841923

  10. A Biphasic Change of Regional Blood Volume in the Frontal Cortex during Non-Rapid Eye Movement Sleep: A Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhongxing; Khatami, Ramin

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Current knowledge on hemodynamics in sleep is limited because available techniques do not allow continuous recordings and mainly focus on cerebral blood flow while neglecting other important parameters, such as blood volume (BV) and vasomotor activity. Design: Observational study. Participants and Settings: Continuous measures of hemodynamics over the left forehead and biceps were performed using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) during nocturnal polysomnography in 16 healthy participants in sleep laboratory. Measurements and Results: Temporal dynamics and mean values of cerebral and muscular oxygenated hemoglobin (HbO2), deoxygenated hemoglobin (HHb), and BV during different sleep stages were compared. A biphasic change of cerebral BV was observed which contrasted a monotonic increase of muscular BV during non-rapid eye movement sleep. A significant decrement in cerebral HbO2 and BV accompanied by an increase of HHb was recorded at sleep onset (Phase I). Prior to slow wave sleep (SWS) HbO2 and BV turned to increase whereas HHb began to decrease in subsequent Phase II suggested increased brain perfusion during SWS. The cerebral HbO2 slope correlated to BV slope in Phase I and II, but it only correlated to HHb slope in Phase II. The occurrence time of inflection points correlated to SWS latencies. Conclusion: Initial decrease of brain perfusion with decreased blood volume (BV) and oxygenated hemoglobin (HbO2) together with increasing muscular BV fit thermoregulation process at sleep onset. The uncorrelated and correlated slopes of HbO2 and deoxygenated hemoglobin indicate different mechanisms underlying the biphasic hemodynamic process in light sleep and slow wave sleep (SWS). In SWS, changes in vasomotor activity (i.e., increased vasodilatation) may mediate increasing cerebral and muscular BV. Citation: Zhang Z, Khatami R. A biphasic change of regional blood volume in the frontal cortex during non-rapid eye movement sleep: a near

  11. Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Differences Between Late-Onset Alzheimer’s Disease and Cognitively Normal Controls in Human Frontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Bakulski, Kelly M.; Dolinoy, Dana C.; Sartor, Maureen A.; Paulson, Henry L.; Konen, John R.; Lieberman, Andrew P.; Albin, Roger L.; Hu, Howard; Rozek, Laura S.

    2013-01-01

    Evidence supports a role for epigenetic mechanisms in the pathogenesis of late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD), but little has been done on a genome-wide scale to identify potential sites involved in disease. This study investigates human postmortem frontal cortex genome-wide DNA methylation profiles between 12 LOAD and 12 cognitively normal age- and gender-matched subjects. Quantitative DNA methylation is determined at 27,578 CpG sites spanning 14,475 genes via the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation27 BeadArray. Data are analyzed using parallel linear models adjusting for age and gender with empirical Bayes standard error methods. Gene-specific technical and functional validation is performed on an additional 13 matched pair samples, encompassing a wider age range. Analysis reveals 948 CpG sites representing 918 unique genes as potentially associated with LOAD disease status pending confirmation in additional study populations. Across these 948 sites the subtle mean methylation difference between cases and controls is 2.9%. The CpG site with a minimum false discovery rate located in the promoter of the gene Transmembrane Protein 59 (TMEM59) is 7.3% hypomethylated in cases. Methylation at this site is functionally associated with tissue RNA and protein levels of the TMEM59 gene product. The TMEM59 gene identified from our discovery approach was recently implicated in amyloid-β protein precursor post-translational processing, supporting a role for epigenetic change in LOAD pathology. This study demonstrates widespread, modest discordant DNA methylation in LOAD-diseased tissue independent from DNA methylation changes with age. Identification of epigenetic biomarkers of LOAD risk may allow for the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic targets. PMID:22451312

  12. Sex differences in myelin-associated protein levels within and density of projections between the orbital frontal cortex and dorsal striatum of adult rats: implications for inhibitory control.

    PubMed

    Bayless, D W; Daniel, J M

    2015-08-01

    Impulsive actions and decisions often lead to undesirable outcomes. Lesion and neuroimaging studies have revealed that the orbital frontal cortex (OFC) and dorsal striatum (dSTR) play key roles in inhibitory control. It has been proposed that greater OFC input into the dSTR reflects enhanced top-down cognitive control and less impulsive responding. We previously reported a sex difference in inhibitory control, such that female rats make fewer impulsive errors than do male rats. The goal of the present study was to investigate differences in the OFC and dSTR of young adult male and female rats. In Experiment 1, we measured levels of two myelin-associated proteins, myelin basic protein (MBP) and myelin proteolipid protein (PLP), in the OFC and dSTR. Western blot data revealed that females had significantly higher levels of both MBP and PLP in the OFC but similar levels in the dSTR as compared to males. In Experiment 2, we infused the anterograde tracer, biotinylated dextran amine (BDA), into the OFC and measured the density of BDA in the dSTR. BDA was visualized using histochemistry followed by light microscopy imaging and densitometry analysis. Density of BDA in the dSTR was significantly greater in females as compared to males indicating that the projections from the OFC to dSTR may be greater in females as compared to males. Our results suggest a potential neuroanatomical sex difference that may contribute to the reported differences in inhibitory control levels of male and female rats. PMID:26002313

  13. Oral administration of curcumin relieves behavioral alterations and oxidative stress in the frontal cortex, hippocampus, and striatum of ovariectomized Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Da Silva Morrone, Maurilio; Schnorr, Carlos Eduardo; Behr, Guilherme Antônio; Gasparotto, Juciano; Bortolin, Rafael Calixto; Moresco, Karla Suzana; Bittencourt, Leonardo; Zanotto-Filho, Alfeu; Gelain, Daniel Pens; Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca

    2016-06-01

    Menopause occurs gradually and is characterized by increased susceptibility to developing mood disorders. Several studies have suggested treatments based on the antioxidant properties of vitamins and herbal compounds as an alternative to hormone replacement therapies, with few or none reporting toxicity. The present study was performed to explore the effects of curcumin oral supplementation on anxiety-like behavior and oxidative stress parameters in different central nervous system (CNS) areas of ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Female Wistar rats were randomly divided into either sham-operated or OVX groups. Sham-operated group (n=8) and an OVX group (n=11) were treated with vehicle, and the other two OVX groups received curcumin at 50 or 100mg/kg/day doses (n=8/group). Elevated plus maze (EPM) test was performed on the 28th day of treatment. On the 30th day, animals were killed and the dissected brain regions were removed and stored at-80°C until analysis. Ovariectomy induced deficit in the locomotor activity and increased anxiety-like behavior. Moreover, OVX rats showed increased lipid oxidized in the frontal cortex and striatum, increased hippocampal and striatal carbonylated protein level, and decreased striatal thiol content of non-protein fraction indicative of a glutathione (GSH) pool. Curcumin oral treatment for 30days reduced oxidative stress in the CNS areas as well as the behavior alterations resulting from ovariectomy. Curcumin supplementation attenuated most of these parameters to sham comparable values, suggesting that curcumin could have positive effects against anxiety-like disturbances and brain oxidative damage due to hormone deprivation. PMID:27142750

  14. Vulnerability versus resilience to prenatal stress in male and female rats; implications from gene expression profiles in the hippocampus and frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Van den Hove, D L A; Kenis, G; Brass, A; Opstelten, R; Rutten, B P F; Bruschettini, M; Blanco, C E; Lesch, K P; Steinbusch, H W M; Prickaerts, J

    2013-10-01

    Adverse life events during pregnancy may impact upon the developing fetus, predisposing prenatally stressed offspring to the development of psychopathology. In the present study, we examined the effects of prenatal restraint stress (PS) on anxiety- and depression-related behavior in both male and female adult Sprague-Dawley rats. In addition, gene expression profiles within the hippocampus and frontal cortex (FC) were examined in order to gain more insight into the molecular mechanisms that mediate the behavioral effects of PS exposure. PS significantly increased anxiety-related behavior in male, but not female offspring. Likewise, depression-related behavior was increased in male PS rats only. Further, male PS offspring showed increased basal plasma corticosterone levels in adulthood, whereas both PS males and females had lower stress-induced corticosterone levels when compared to controls. Microarray-based profiling of the hippocampus and FC showed distinct sex-dependent changes in gene expression after PS. Biological processes and/or signal transduction cascades affected by PS included glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, neurotrophic factor signaling, phosphodiesterase (PDE)/ cyclic nucleotide signaling, glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) signaling, and insulin signaling. Further, the data indicated that epigenetic regulation is affected differentially in male and female PS offspring. These sex-specific alterations may, at least in part, explain the behavioral differences observed between both sexes, i.e. relative vulnerability versus resilience to PS in male versus female rats, respectively. These data reveal novel potential targets for antidepressant and mood stabilizing drug treatments including PDE inhibitors and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors. PMID:23199416

  15. Nitrate and nitrite anion concentration in the intact cerebral cortex of preterm and nearterm fetal sheep: indirect index of in vivo nitric oxide formation.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, J D; Zeballos, G A; Penning, D H; Kimura, K A; Atkins, B; Brien, J F

    1998-04-01

    Pregnant sheep with a microdialysis probe implanted in the fetal cerebral cortex were used to determine if nitrate and nitrite anions (nitrate/nitrite) could be quantitated in the microdialysate as an indirect index of in vivo nitric oxide formation. Pregnant ewes (term, about 147 days) were surgically instrumented at gestational day (GD) 90 (n = 3; preterm) and GD 121 (n = 3; nearterm). Three days later, following an overnight probe equilibration period, five dialysate samples were collected continuously on ice at 1-h intervals (infusion rate of 1 (microl/min). The nitrate/nitrite concentration was determined by reducing a 10-microl aliquot of each dialysate fraction with hot acidic vanadium followed by chemiluminescence quantitation of the nitric oxide product. The lower limit of quantitative sensitivity of the method is 25 picomoles. Nitrate/nitrite concentration was 16.6+/-7.3 microM for the preterm fetus and 19.7+/-1.9 microM for the nearterm fetus. The data demonstrate that nitrate/nitrite, as an index of in vivo nitric oxide formation, can be quantitated in microdialysate samples collected from the intact fetal sheep cerebral cortex. PMID:9741385

  16. Relationship between somatostatin and death receptor expression in the orbital frontal cortex in schizophrenia: a postmortem brain mRNA study

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Dipesh; Catts, Vibeke S; Olaya, Juan C; Shannon Weickert, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recently, we provided evidence showing reductions in GAD67 and Dlx mRNAs in the orbital frontal cortex (OFC) in schizophrenia. It is unknown whether these reductions relate mainly to somatostatin (SST) or parvalbumin (PV) mRNA expression changes, and/or whether these reductions are related to decreased SST mRNA+ interneuron density. Aims: To determine whether inhibitory interneuron deficits in the OFC from people with schizophrenia are greatest for SST or PV mRNAs, and whether any such deficits relate to mRNAs encoding cell death signalling molecules. Methods: Inhibitory interneuron mRNAs (SST; PV: in situ hybridization, quantitative PCR (qPCR)) and death signaling mRNAs [FAS receptor (FASR); TNFSF13: qPCR] were measured in control and schizophrenia subjects (38/38). SST mRNA+ interneuron-like cells were quantified in layer II in the gyrus rectus. Gray matter SST and PV mRNAs were correlated with interstitial white matter neuron (IWMN) density (GAD65/67; NeuN) and death signaling mRNAs. Results: SST mRNA was reduced in OFC layers I–VI in schizophrenia (both in situ and qPCR), with greatest deficit in layer II (67%). Layer II SST mRNA+ neuron density was reduced in schizophrenia (~29%). PV mRNA was reduced in layers III (18%) and IV (31%) with no significant diagnostic difference in PV mRNA measured by qPCR. FASR mRNA was increased in schizophrenia (34%). SST, but not PV, expression correlated negatively with FASR and TNFSF13 expressions and with IWMN density. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates that SST interneurons are predominantly linked to the inhibitory interneuron pathology in the OFC in schizophrenia and that increased death receptor signaling mRNAs relate to prominent laminar deficits in SST mRNA in the OFC in schizophrenia. We suggest that SST interneurons may be more vulnerable to increased death receptor signaling than PV interneurons. PMID:27336026

  17. D-Cycloserine acts via increasing the GluN1 protein expressions in the frontal cortex and decreases the avoidance and risk assessment behaviors in a rat traumatic stress model.

    PubMed

    Sarıdoğan, Gökçe Elif; Aykaç, Aslı; Cabadak, Hülya; Cerit, Cem; Çalışkan, Mecit; Gören, M Zafer

    2015-10-15

    D-cycloserine (DCS), an FDA approved anti-tuberculosis drug has extensively been studied for its cognitive enhancer effects in psychiatric disorders. DCS may enhance the effects of fear extinction trainings in animals during exposure therapy and hence we investigated the effects of DCS on distinct behavioral parameters in a predator odor stress model and tested the optimal duration for repeated daily administrations of the agent. Cat fur odor blocks were used to produce stress and avoidance and risk assessment behavioral parameters were used where DCS or saline were used as treatments in adjunct to extinction trainings. We observed that DCS facilitated extinction training by providing further extinction of avoidance responses, risk assessment behaviors and increased the contact with the cue in a setting where DCS was administered before extinction trainings for 3 days without producing a significant tolerance. In amygdala and hippocampus, GluN1 protein expressions decreased 72h after the fear conditioning in the traumatic stress group suggesting a possible down-regulation of NMDARs. We observed that extinction learning increased GluN1 proteins both in the amygdaloid complex and the dorsal hippocampus of the rats receiving extinction training or extinction training with DCS. Our findings also indicate that DCS with extinction training increased GluN1 protein levels in the frontal cortex. We may suggest that action of DCS relies on enhancement of the consolidation of fear extinction in the frontal cortex. PMID:26225843

  18. Combined omega-3 fatty acids, aerobic exercise and cognitive stimulation prevents decline in gray matter volume of the frontal, parietal and cingulate cortex in patients with mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Köbe, Theresa; Witte, A Veronica; Schnelle, Ariane; Lesemann, Anne; Fabian, Sonja; Tesky, Valentina A; Pantel, Johannes; Flöel, Agnes

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies in older adults suggested beneficial effects of omega-3 fatty acid (FA) supplementation, aerobic exercise, or cognitive stimulation on brain structure and function. However, combined effects of these interventions in patients suffering from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) are unknown. Using a randomized interventional design, we evaluated the effect of combined omega-3 FA supplementation, aerobic exercise and cognitive stimulation (target intervention) versus omega-3 FA supplementation and non-aerobic exercise (control intervention) on cognitive function and gray matter volume in patients with MCI. Moreover, we analyzed potential vascular, metabolic or inflammatory mechanisms underlying these effects. Twenty-two MCI patients (8 females; 60-80years) successfully completed six months of omega-3 FA intake, aerobic cycling training and cognitive stimulation (n=13) or omega-3 FA intake and non-aerobic stretching and toning (n=9). Before and after the interventions, cognitive performance, magnetic resonance imaging of the brain at 3T (n=20), intima-media thickness of the internal carotid artery and serum markers of glucose control, lipid and B-vitamin metabolism, and inflammation were assessed. Intervention-related changes in gray matter volume of Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related brain regions, i.e., frontal, parietal, temporal and cingulate cortex were examined using voxel-based morphometry of high resolution T1-weighted images. After the intervention period, significant differences emerged in brain structure between groups: Gray matter volume decreased in the frontal, parietal and cingulate cortex of patients in the control intervention, while gray matter volume in these areas was preserved or even increased after the target intervention. Decreases in homocysteine levels in the target intervention group were associated with increases in gray matter volume in the middle frontal cortex (p=0.010). No significant differences in cognitive performance or

  19. Comparison of Metabolite Concentrations in the Left Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex, the Left Frontal White Matter, and the Left Hippocampus in Patients in Stable Schizophrenia Treated with Antipsychotics with or without Antidepressants. 1H-NMR Spectroscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Strzelecki, Dominik; Grzelak, Piotr; Podgórski, Michał; Kałużyńska, Olga; Stefańczyk, Ludomir; Kotlicka-Antczak, Magdalena; Gmitrowicz, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Managing affective, negative, and cognitive symptoms remains the most difficult therapeutic problem in stable phase of schizophrenia. Efforts include administration of antidepressants. Drugs effects on brain metabolic parameters can be evaluated by means of proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy. We compared spectroscopic parameters in the left prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), the left frontal white matter (WM) and the left hippocampus and assessed the relationship between treatment and the spectroscopic parameters in both groups. We recruited 25 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia (DSM-IV-TR), with dominant negative symptoms and in stable clinical condition, who were treated with antipsychotic and antidepressive medication for minimum of three months. A group of 25 patients with schizophrenia, who were taking antipsychotic drugs but not antidepressants, was matched. We compared metabolic parameters (N-acetylaspartate (NAA), myo-inositol (mI), glutamatergic parameters (Glx), choline (Cho), and creatine (Cr)) between the two groups. All patients were also assessed with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and the Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS). In patients receiving antidepressants we observed significantly higher NAA/Cr and NAA/Cho ratios within the DLPFC, as well as significantly higher mI/Cr within the frontal WM. Moreover, we noted significantly lower values of parameters associated with the glutamatergic transmission—Glx/Cr and Glx/Cho in the hippocampus. Doses of antipsychotic drugs in the group treated with antidepressants were also significantly lower in the patients showing similar severity of psychopathology. PMID:26501256

  20. Comparison of Metabolite Concentrations in the Left Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex, the Left Frontal White Matter, and the Left Hippocampus in Patients in Stable Schizophrenia Treated with Antipsychotics with or without Antidepressants. ¹H-NMR Spectroscopy Study.

    PubMed

    Strzelecki, Dominik; Grzelak, Piotr; Podgórski, Michał; Kałużyńska, Olga; Stefańczyk, Ludomir; Kotlicka-Antczak, Magdalena; Gmitrowicz, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Managing affective, negative, and cognitive symptoms remains the most difficult therapeutic problem in stable phase of schizophrenia. Efforts include administration of antidepressants. Drugs effects on brain metabolic parameters can be evaluated by means of proton nuclear magnetic resonance (¹H-NMR) spectroscopy. We compared spectroscopic parameters in the left prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), the left frontal white matter (WM) and the left hippocampus and assessed the relationship between treatment and the spectroscopic parameters in both groups. We recruited 25 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia (DSM-IV-TR), with dominant negative symptoms and in stable clinical condition, who were treated with antipsychotic and antidepressive medication for minimum of three months. A group of 25 patients with schizophrenia, who were taking antipsychotic drugs but not antidepressants, was matched. We compared metabolic parameters (N-acetylaspartate (NAA), myo-inositol (mI), glutamatergic parameters (Glx), choline (Cho), and creatine (Cr)) between the two groups. All patients were also assessed with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and the Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS). In patients receiving antidepressants we observed significantly higher NAA/Cr and NAA/Cho ratios within the DLPFC, as well as significantly higher mI/Cr within the frontal WM. Moreover, we noted significantly lower values of parameters associated with the glutamatergic transmission--Glx/Cr and Glx/Cho in the hippocampus. Doses of antipsychotic drugs in the group treated with antidepressants were also significantly lower in the patients showing similar severity of psychopathology. PMID:26501256

  1. Dissociable attentional and inhibitory networks of dorsal and ventral areas of the right inferior frontal cortex: a combined task-specific and coordinate-based meta-analytic fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Alexandra; Jung, Patrick; Neuhoff, Jonathan; Wibral, Michael; Fox, Peter T; Lieb, Klaus; Fries, Pascal; Eickhoff, Simon B; Tüscher, Oliver; Mobascher, Arian

    2016-04-01

    The right inferior frontal cortex (rIFC) is frequently activated during executive control tasks. Whereas the function of the dorsal portion of rIFC, more precisely the inferior frontal junction (rIFJ), is convergingly assigned to the attention system, the functional key role of the ventral portion, i.e., the inferior frontal gyrus (rIFG), is hitherto controversially debated. Here, we used a two-step methodical approach to clarify the differential function of rIFJ and rIFG. First, we used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during a modified stop signal task with an attentional capture condition (acSST) to delineate attentional from inhibitory motor processes (step 1). Then, we applied coordinate-based meta-analytic connectivity modeling (MACM) to assess functional connectivity profiles of rIFJ and rIFG across various paradigm classes (step 2). As hypothesized, rIFJ activity was associated with the detection of salient stimuli, and was functionally connected to areas of the ventral and dorsal attention network. RIFG was activated during successful response inhibition even when controlling for attentional capture and revealed the highest functional connectivity with core motor areas. Thereby, rIFJ and rIFG delineated largely independent brain networks for attention and motor control. MACM results attributed a more specific attentional function to rIFJ, suggesting an integrative role between stimulus-driven ventral and goal-directed dorsal attention processes. In contrast, rIFG was disclosed as a region of the motor control but not attention system, being essential for response inhibition. The current study provides decisive evidence regarding a more precise functional characterization of rIFC subregions in attention and inhibition. PMID:25637472

  2. Effect of Testosterone on Neuronal Morphology and Neuritic Growth of Fetal Lamb Hypothalamus-Preoptic Area and Cerebral Cortex in Primary Culture.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Radhika C; Amodei, Rebecka; Estill, Charles T; Stormshak, Fred; Meaker, Mary; Roselli, Charles E

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone plays an essential role in sexual differentiation of the male sheep brain. The ovine sexually dimorphic nucleus (oSDN), is 2 to 3 times larger in males than in females, and this sex difference is under the control of testosterone. The effect of testosterone on oSDN volume may result from enhanced expansion of soma areas and/or dendritic fields. To test this hypothesis, cells derived from the hypothalamus-preoptic area (HPOA) and cerebral cortex (CTX) of lamb fetuses were grown in primary culture to examine the direct morphological effects of testosterone on these cellular components. We found that within two days of plating, neurons derived from both the HPOA and CTX extend neuritic processes and express androgen receptors and aromatase immunoreactivity. Both treated and control neurites continue to grow and branch with increasing time in culture. Treatment with testosterone (10 nM) for 3 days significantly (P < 0.05) increased both total neurite outgrowth (35%) and soma size (8%) in the HPOA and outgrowth (21%) and number of branch points (33%) in the CTX. These findings indicate that testosterone-induced somal enlargement and neurite outgrowth in fetal lamb neurons may contribute to the development of a fully masculine sheep brain. PMID:26053052

  3. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder-associated depression: evidence for reductions in the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, Kevin K.; Sheema, S.; Paz, Rodrigo D; Samudio-Ruiz, Sabrina L.; Laughlin, Mary H.; Spence, Nathan E.; Roehlk, Michael J; Alcon, Sara N.; Allan, Andrea M.

    2009-01-01

    Prenatal ethanol exposure is associated with an increased incidence of depressive disorders in patient populations. However, the mechanisms that link prenatal ethanol exposure and depression are unknown. Several recent studies have implicated reduced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in the hippocampal formation and frontal cortex as important contributors to the etiology of depression. In the present studies, we sought to determine whether prenatal ethanol exposure is associated with behaviors that model depression, as well as with reduced BDNF levels in the hippocampal formation and/or medial frontal cortex, in a mouse model of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). Compared to control adult mice, prenatal ethanol-exposed adult mice displayed increased learned helplessness behavior and increased immobility in the Porsolt forced swim test. Prenatal ethanol exposure was associated with decreased BDNF protein levels in the medial frontal cortex, but not the hippocampal formation, while total BDNF mRNA and BDNF transcripts containing exon III, IV or VI were reduced in both the medial frontal cortex and the hippocampal formation of prenatal ethanol-exposed mice. These results identify reduced BDNF levels in the medial frontal cortex and hippocampal formation as potential mediators of depressive disorders associated with FASD. PMID:18558427

  4. Dissociable Roles of Right Inferior Frontal Cortex and Anterior Insula in Inhibitory Control: Evidence from Intrinsic and Task-Related Functional Parcellation, Connectivity, and Response Profile Analyses across Multiple Datasets

    PubMed Central

    Ryali, Srikanth; Chen, Tianwen; Li, Chiang-Shan R.

    2014-01-01

    The right inferior frontal cortex (rIFC) and the right anterior insula (rAI) have been implicated consistently in inhibitory control, but their differential roles are poorly understood. Here we use multiple quantitative techniques to dissociate the functional organization and roles of the rAI and rIFC. We first conducted a meta-analysis of 70 published inhibitory control studies to generate a commonly activated right fronto-opercular cortex volume of interest (VOI). We then segmented this VOI using two types of features: (1) intrinsic brain activity; and (2) stop-signal task-evoked hemodynamic response profiles. In both cases, segmentation algorithms identified two stable and distinct clusters encompassing the rAI and rIFC. The rAI and rIFC clusters exhibited several distinct functional characteristics. First, the rAI showed stronger intrinsic and task-evoked functional connectivity with the anterior cingulate cortex, whereas the rIFC had stronger intrinsic and task-evoked functional connectivity with dorsomedial prefrontal and lateral fronto-parietal cortices. Second, the rAI showed greater activation than the rIFC during Unsuccessful, but not Successful, Stop trials, and multivoxel response profiles in the rAI, but not the rIFC, accurately differentiated between Successful and Unsuccessful Stop trials. Third, activation in the rIFC, but not rAI, predicted individual differences in inhibitory control abilities. Crucially, these findings were replicated in two independent cohorts of human participants. Together, our findings provide novel quantitative evidence for the dissociable roles of the rAI and rIFC in inhibitory control. We suggest that the rAI is particularly important for detecting behaviorally salient events, whereas the rIFC is more involved in implementing inhibitory control. PMID:25355218

  5. Correlation between number of type 2 serotonin receptors in the frontal cortex and intensity of serotonin-induced head jerks in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Popova, N.K.; Kulikov, A.V.; Pak, D.F.

    1986-02-01

    This paper shows interlinear differences discovered in the number of S2 receptors in the cerebral cortex and they are compared with the intensity of 5-HT-induced head jerking in mice of inbred lines. The number of S2 receptors was estimated from the quantity of tritium-spiperone, which is specifically bound by brain membrane preparations. Specific binding was assessed as the difference between the quantity of label bound in the absence and in the presence of methylsergide, a drug which specificably blocks S2 receptors. The presence of high correlation be= tween the number of S2 receptors and the number of head jerkings in mice reflects a genetic connection between this form of behavior and the serotonin system, and it in no way signifies that this phenomenon is controlled purely by the serotonin system and cannot be modulated by other mediator systems, for example, the adrenergic system.

  6. Temperament trait Harm Avoidance associates with μ-opioid receptor availability in frontal cortex: a PET study using [(11)C]carfentanil.

    PubMed

    Tuominen, Lauri; Salo, Johanna; Hirvonen, Jussi; Någren, Kjell; Laine, Pauliina; Melartin, Tarja; Isometsä, Erkki; Viikari, Jorma; Raitakari, Olli; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa; Hietala, Jarmo

    2012-07-01

    Harm Avoidance is a temperament trait that associates with sensitivity to aversive and non-rewarding stimuli, higher anticipated threat and negative emotions during stress as well as a higher risk for affective disorders. The neurobiological correlates of interindividual differences in Harm Avoidance are largely unknown. We hypothesized that variability in Harm Avoidance trait would be explained by differences in the activity of μ-opioid system as the opioid system is known to regulate affective states and stress sensitivity. Brain μ-opioid receptor availability was measured in 22 healthy subjects using positron emission tomography and [(11)C]carfentanil, a selective μ-opioid receptor agonist. The subjects were selected from a large Finish population-based cohort (N=2075) on the basis of their pre-existing Temperament and Character Scores. Subjects scoring consistently in the upper (10) and lower (12) quartiles for the Harm Avoidance trait were studied. High Harm Avoidance score associated with high μ-opioid receptor availability (i.e. lower endogenous μ-opioid drive) in anterior cingulate cortex, ventromedial and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices and anterior insular cortex. These associations were driven by two subscales of Harm Avoidance; Shyness with Strangers and Fatigability and Asthenia. In conclusion, higher Harm Avoidance score in healthy subjects is associated with higher μ-opioid availability in regions involved in the regulation of anxiety as well as in the control of emotions, affective component of pain and interoceptive awareness. The results have relevance in the research of vulnerability factors for affective disorders. PMID:22484309

  7. Similarities in the behavior and molecular deficits in the frontal cortex between the neurotensin receptor subtype 1 knockout mice and chronic phencyclidine-treated mice: relevance to schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhimin; Boules, Mona; Williams, Katrina; Gordillo, Andres; Li, Shuhua; Richelson, Elliott

    2010-11-01

    Much evidence suggests that targeting the neurotensin (NT) system may provide a novel and promising treatment for schizophrenia. Our recent work shows that: NTS1 knockout (NTS1(-/-)) mice may provide a potential animal model for studying schizophrenia by investigating the effect of deletion NTS1 receptor on amphetamine-induced hyperactivity and neurochemical changes. The data indicate a hyper-dopaminergic state similar to the excessive striatal DA activity reported in schizophrenia. The present study was done to determine if NTS1(-/-) mice also have similar changes in behavior, in prefrontal neurotransmitters, and in protein expression, as observed in wild type (WT) mice treated with the psychotomimetic phencylclidine (PCP), an animal model for schizophrenia. Our results showed many similarities between untreated NTS1(-/-) mice and WT mice chronically treated with PCP (as compared with untreated WT mice): 1) lower PCP-induced locomotor activity; 2) similar avolition-like behavior in forced-swim test and tail suspension test; 3) lower prefrontal glutamate levels; 4) less PCP-induced dopamine release in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC); and 5) down-regulation of mRNA and protein for DA D(1), DA D(2), and NMDAR2A in mPFC. Therefore, these data strengthen the hypothesis that the NTS1(-/-) mouse is an animal model of schizophrenia, particularly for the dysfunction of the prefrontal cortex. In addition, after chronic PCP administration, the DA D(1) receptor was up-regulated in NTS1(-/-) mice, results which suggest a possible interaction of NTS1/DA D(1) in mPFC contributing to chronic PCP-induced schizophrenia-like signs. PMID:20659557

  8. First evidence of overlaps between HIV-Associated Dementia (HAD) and non-viral neurodegenerative diseases: proteomic analysis of the frontal cortex from HIV+ patients with and without dementia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of HIV-associated dementia (HAD) is poorly understood. To date, detailed proteomic fingerprinting directly from autopsied brain tissues of HAD and HIV non-dementia patients has not been performed. Result Here, we have analyzed total proteins from the frontal cortex of 9 HAD and 5 HIV non-dementia patients. Using 2-Dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2-DIGE) to analyze the brain tissue proteome, 76 differentially expressed proteins (p < 0.05; fold change>1.25) were identified between HAD and HIV non-dementia patients, of which 36 protein spots (based on 3D appearance of spots on the images) were chosen for the mass spectrometry analysis. The large majority of identified proteins were represented in the energy metabolic (mitochondria) and signal transduction pathways. Furthermore, over 90% of the protein candidates are common to both HAD and other non-viral neurodegenerative disease, such as Alzheimer's disease. The data was further validated using specific antibodies to 4 proteins (CA2, GS, CKMT and CRMP2) by western blot (WB) in the same samples used for 2D-DIGE, with additional confirmation by immunohistochemitsry (IHC) using frontal lobe tissue from different HAD and HIV+ non-dementia patients. The validation for all 4 antibodies by WB and IHC was in concordance with the DIGE results, lending further credence to the current findings. Conclusion These results suggest not only convergent pathogenetic pathways for the two diseases but also the possibility of increased Alzheimer's disease (AD) susceptibility in HAD patients whose life expectancy has been significantly increased by highly active antiretroviral therapy. PMID:20573273

  9. Neuregulin-1 (Nrg1) signaling has a preventive role and is altered in the frontal cortex under the pathological conditions of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qiong; Chen, Shuangxi; Hu, Chengliang; Huang, Peizhi; Shen, Huifan; Zhao, Weijiang

    2016-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), one of the neurodegenerative disorders that may develop in the elderly, is characterized by the deposition of β‑amyloid protein (Aβ) and extensive neuronal cell death in the brain. Neuregulin‑1 (Nrg1)‑mediated intercellular and intracellular communication via binding to ErbB receptors regulates a diverse set of biological processes involved in the development of the nervous system. In the present study, a linear correlation was identified between Nrg1 and phosphorylated ErbB (pNeu and pErbB4) receptors in a human cortical tissue microarray. In addition, increased expression levels of Nrg1, but reduced pErbB receptor levels, were detected in the frontal lobe of a patient with AD. Western blotting and immunofluorescence staining were subsequently performed to uncover the potential preventive role of Nrg1 in cortical neurons affected by the neurodegenerative processes of AD. It was observed that the expression of Nrg1 increased as the culture time of the cortical neurons progressed. In addition, H2O2 and Aβ1‑42, two inducers of oxidative stress and neuronal damage, led to a dose‑dependent decrease in Nrg1 expression. Recombinant Nrg1β, however, was revealed to exert a pivotal role in preventing oxidative stress and neuronal damage from occurring in the mouse cortical neurons. Taken together, these results suggest that changes in Nrg1 signaling may influence the pathological development of AD, and exogenous Nrg1 may serve as a potential candidate for the prevention and treatment of AD. PMID:27486021

  10. Neuregulin-1 (Nrg1) signaling has a preventive role and is altered in the frontal cortex under the pathological conditions of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Qiong; Chen, Shuangxi; Hu, Chengliang; Huang, Peizhi; Shen, Huifan; Zhao, Weijiang

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), one of the neurodegenerative disorders that may develop in the elderly, is characterized by the deposition of β-amyloid protein (Aβ) and extensive neuronal cell death in the brain. Neuregulin-1 (Nrg1)-mediated intercellular and intracellular communication via binding to ErbB receptors regulates a diverse set of biological processes involved in the development of the nervous system. In the present study, a linear correlation was identified between Nrg1 and phosphorylated ErbB (pNeu and pErbB4) receptors in a human cortical tissue microarray. In addition, increased expression levels of Nrg1, but reduced pErbB receptor levels, were detected in the frontal lobe of a patient with AD. Western blotting and immunofluorescence staining were subsequently performed to uncover the potential preventive role of Nrg1 in cortical neurons affected by the neurodegenerative processes of AD. It was observed that the expression of Nrg1 increased as the culture time of the cortical neurons progressed. In addition, H2O2 and Aβ1–42, two inducers of oxidative stress and neuronal damage, led to a dose-dependent decrease in Nrg1 expression. Recombinant Nrg1β, however, was revealed to exert a pivotal role in preventing oxidative stress and neuronal damage from occurring in the mouse cortical neurons. Taken together, these results suggest that changes in Nrg1 signaling may influence the pathological development of AD, and exogenous Nrg1 may serve as a potential candidate for the prevention and treatment of AD. PMID:27486021

  11. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Orbital Frontal Cortex in Rats Following Extended Exposure to Caffeine Reveals Extensive Changes to Protein Expression: Implications for Neurological Disease.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Jane L; Mirzaei, Mehdi; Wearne, Travis A; Homewood, Judi; Goodchild, Ann K; Haynes, Paul A; Cornish, Jennifer L

    2016-05-01

    Caffeine is a plant-derived psychostimulant and a common additive found in a wide range of foods and pharmaceuticals. The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) is rapidly activated by flavours, integrates gustatory and olfactory information, and plays a critical role in decision-making, with dysfunction contributing to psychopathologies and neurodegenerative conditions. This study investigated whether long-term consumption of caffeine causes changes to behavior and protein expression in the OFC. Male adult Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 8 per group) were treated for 26 days with either water or a 0.6 g/L caffeine solution. Locomotor behavior was measured on the first and last day of treatment, then again after 9 days treatment free following exposure to a mild stressor. When tested drug free, caffeine-treated animals were hyperactive compared to controls. Two hours following final behavioral testing, brains were rapidly removed and prepared for proteomic analysis of the OFC. Label free shotgun proteomics found 157 proteins differentially expressed in the caffeine-drinking rats compared to control. Major proteomic effects were seen for cell-to-cell communication, cytoskeletal regulation, and mitochondrial function. Similar changes have been observed in neurological disorders including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and schizophrenia. PMID:26941107

  12. Contrasting effects of the imidazol(in)e alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonists, medetomidine, clonidine and UK 14,304 on extraneuronal levels of noradrenaline in the rat frontal cortex: evaluation using in vivo microdialysis and synaptosomal uptake studies.

    PubMed Central

    Dalley, J W; Stanford, S C

    1995-01-01

    1. In vivo microdialysis in halothane-anaesthetized rats and synaptosomal [3H]-noradrenaline uptake studies in vitro were used to evaluate the effects of imidazole (medetomidine) and imidazoline (clonidine and UK 14,304) alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonists on extraneuronal levels of noradrenaline in the frontal cortex. 2. Levels of noradrenaline in the dialysate were increased by a depolarizing concentration of K+ (60 mM for 20 min) and substantially attenuated by reducing Ca2+ supply in the perfusate. These results suggest that spontaneous efflux of noradrenaline in the cortex is regulated predominantly by cation-dependent exocytotic mechanisms. 3. At a low perfusion concentration (0.5 microM), medetomidine, clonidine and UK 14,304 all reduced the level of noradrenaline in cortical dialysates. Continuous perfusion of the selective alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist, atipamezole (0.5 microM) caused a sustained increase in noradrenaline efflux and reversed the inhibitory effects of medetomidine. All these changes are consistent with drug actions at presynaptic alpha 2-adrenoceptors. 4. Higher concentrations of medetomidine (5-50 microM), but not clonidine or UK 14,304, evoked a non-desensitizing increase in noradrenaline efflux. This effect was not antagonized by 0.5 microM atipamezole. 5. The tricyclic noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, desmethylimipramine (0.5-50 microM), increased noradrenaline efflux in a concentration-dependent manner. 6. The specific uptake of [3H]-noradrenaline into cortical synaptosomes was inhibited by medetomidine and desmethylimipramine with IC50 values of approximately 7 microM and 8 microM respectively. Neither clonidine nor UK 14,304 inhibited [3H]-noradrenaline uptake.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7599940

  13. Comparison of effect of sex hormone manipulation during neonatal period, on mRNA expression of Slc9a4, Nr3c2, Htr5b and Mas1 in hippocampus and frontal cortex of male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Karimi, B; Hafidzi, M N; Panandam, J M; Fuzina, N H

    2013-01-01

    It has long been known that spatial memory and the ability to navigate through space are sexually dimorphic traits among mammals, and numerous studies have shown that these traits can be altered by means of sex hormone manipulation. Hippocampus, the main organ involved in this kind of memory, has specific signature genes with high expression level compared to other regions of the brain. Based on their expression levels and the role that products of these genes can play in processes like signal transduction, mediation of hormone effects and long term potentiation, these genes can be considered as genes necessary for routine tasks of hippocampus. Male and female rat pups were injected with estradiol and testosterone respectively. at early stage of their lives to examine the effect of sex hormone manipulation on mRNA expression of Slc9a4, Nr3c2, Htr5b and Mas1 using comparative quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that expressions of these genes are strongly influenced by sex hormones in both the frontal cortex and hippocampus, especially in male hippocampus, in which expression of all genes were up-regulated. Htr5b was the only gene that was affected only in the males. Expression of Mas1 was contrary to expectations, showed stronger changes in its expression in cortex than in hippocampus. Nr3c2 was down regulated in all samples but up regulated in male hippocampus, and Slc9a4 also showed a huge up-regulation in male hippocampus compared to other samples. PMID:24152851

  14. Epigenetic age of the pre-frontal cortex is associated with neuritic plaques, amyloid load, and Alzheimer’s disease related cognitive functioning

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Morgan E.; Lu, Ake T.; Bennett, David A.; Horvath, Steve

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need to develop molecular biomarkers of brain age in order to advance our understanding of age related neurodegeneration. Recently, we developed a highly accurate epigenetic biomarker of tissue age (known as epigenetic clock) which is based on DNA methylation levels. Here we use n=700 dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) samples from Caucasian subjects of the Religious Order Study and the Rush Memory and Aging Project to examine the association between epigenetic age and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) related cognitive decline, and AD related neuropathological markers. Epigenetic age acceleration of DLPFC is correlated with several neuropathological measurements including diffuse plaques (r=0.12, p=0.0015), neuritic plaques (r=0.11, p=0.0036), and amyloid load (r=0.091, p=0.016). Further, it is associated with a decline in global cognitive functioning (β=−0.500, p=0.009), episodic memory (β=−0.411, p=0.009) and working memory (β=−0.405, p=0.011) among individuals with AD. The neuropathological markers may mediate the association between epigenetic age and cognitive decline. Genetic complex trait analysis (GCTA) revealed that epigenetic age acceleration is heritable (h2=0.41) and has significant genetic correlations with diffuse plaques (r=0.24, p=0.010) and possibly working memory (r=−0.35, p=0.065). Overall, these results suggest that the epigenetic clock may lend itself as a molecular biomarker of brain age. PMID:26684672

  15. T’ain’t what you say, it’s the way that you say it – left insula and inferior frontal cortex work in interaction with superior temporal regions to control the performance of vocal impersonations

    PubMed Central

    McGettigan, Carolyn; Eisner, Frank; Agnew, Zarinah K; Manly, Tom; Wisbey, Duncan; Scott, Sophie K

    2014-01-01

    Historically, the study of human identity perception has focused on faces, but the voice is also central to our expressions and experiences of identity (P. Belin, Fecteau, & Bedard, 2004). Our voices are highly flexible and dynamic; talkers speak differently depending on their health, emotional state, and the social setting, as well as extrinsic factors such as background noise. However, to date, there have been no studies of the neural correlates of identity modulation in speech production. In the current fMRI experiment, we measured the neural activity supporting controlled voice change in adult participants performing spoken impressions. We reveal that deliberate modulation of vocal identity recruits the left anterior insula and inferior frontal gyrus, supporting the planning of novel articulations. Bilateral sites in posterior superior temporal/inferior parietal cortex and a region in right mid/anterior superior temporal sulcus showed greater responses during the emulation of specific vocal identities than for impressions of generic accents. Using functional connectivity analyses, we describe roles for these three sites in their interactions with the brain regions supporting speech planning and production. Our findings mark a significant step toward understanding the neural control of vocal identity, with wider implications for the cognitive control of voluntary motor acts. PMID:23691984

  16. Investigation of neural correlates between perception of pain and hemodynamic response measured in the pre-frontal cortex using functional near infra-red spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, Venkatagiri

    Perception of pain is multi-dimensional, comprising three major psychological dimensions: sensory-discriminative, motivational-affective and cognitive-evaluative. This dissertation study investigates the cognitive evaluation of pain, by acquiring functional Near Infra-Red Spectroscopic (fNIRS) measurements from the prefrontal cortex (PFC) areas, during mechanical and thermal pain stimulation induced on the subject's volar forearm. Clustered-wise analysis on the oxy-hemoglobin (HbO) response from specific PFC areas was followed by categorizing the resulting HbO response into early (0.1--12sec) and late (12.1--25sec) phases. For each respective phase, regression analysis was carried between the HbO-derived parameters and behaviorally measured pain rating. The major findings of this study include: (1) across both 41°C and 48°C thermal stimulation, significant DeltaHbO deactivation was observed during the late phase, in the left hemispheric (LH) anterior PFC (aPFC) or Brodmann area 10 (BA 10). (2) Significant correlates of pain rating were observed in the LH prefrontal areas: (a) under mechanical stimulation, early phase HbO-derived peak intensity (PI) from LH aPFC correlated with the pain rating. (b) Under both 41°C and 48°C thermal stimulation, late phase HbO-derived PI from the LH dorsolateral PFC (DLPFC or BA 46) showed correlation with the pain rating. (3) The significant correlates observed from the right hemispheric (RH) PFC were: (a) under mechanical stimulation, early phase HbO-derived FWHM from the RH aPFC correlated with the pain rating. (b) Under 41°C thermal stimulation, late phase HbO-derived PI from the RH DLPFC area correlated with the pain rating. (4) The late phase HbO-derived time to peak from LH aPFC reflected cognitive discrimination of two different pain levels (41°C and 48°C). The observed trend for DeltaHbO activation and deactivation could possibly be due to synaptic-induced vasodilation and vasoconstriction leading to increased or

  17. Sevoflurane Stimulates MAP Kinase Signal transduction through the Activation of PKC α and βII in Fetal Rat Cerebral Cortex Cultured Neuron

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Jun; Takekoshi, Susumu; Nagata, Hidetaka; Osamura, R. Yoshiyuki; Suzuki, Toshiyasu

    2006-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is a key enzyme that participates in various neuronal functions. PKC has also been identified as a target molecule for general anesthetic actions. Raf, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) have been thought to be target effectors of PKC. In the present study, we attempted to evaluate the effect of sevoflurane on PKC/MAPK cascade signaling in cultured fetal rat cerebral ­cortex neurons, prepared from embryonic day 18 fetuses. The effects of sevoflurane on the translocation of 7 PKC isoforms (α, βI, βII, γ, δ, ɛ and ζ) were observed by immunoblotting using isoform-selective antibodies to PKCs. The treatment of neurons with sevoflurane induced the translocation of PKC α and PKC βII species from the cytosol to the membrane fraction, which indicated the activation of these PKC isoforms. In contrast, there was no clear change in the distribution of other PKC isoforms. We next examined whether the specific activation of PKC α and βII by sevoflurane could stimulate the MAP kinase signaling pathway in cultured neurons. Raf phosphorylation was increased by the administration of 0.25 mM sevoflurane. The phosphorylation of Raf proteins reached a maximum at 5–10 min. Subsequently, the phosphorylation of MEK proteins was increased at 10–15 min after sevoflurane treatments. That of ERK proteins was induced at 15–60 min. Moreover, the phosphorylation of ERK induced by sevoflurane was significantly decreased by the treatment of PKC inhibitor (staurosporine) and MEK inhibitor (PD98059). On the other hand, the contents of total Raf, MEK and ERK proteins were relatively constant at all times examined. To examine the ­localization of phosphorylated-ERK protein, immunohistochemical staining of sevoflurane-treated cultured neurons was performed. The phosphorylated-ERK proteins were markedly accumulated in both the cytosol of the cell body and the neurites in the neuronal cells with time after 0

  18. Automated MRI parcellation of the frontal lobe

    PubMed Central

    Ranta, Marin E.; Chen, Min; Crocetti, Deana; Prince, Jerry L.; Subramaniam, Krish; Fischl, Bruce; Kaufmann, Walter E.; Mostofsky, Stewart H.

    2014-01-01

    Examination of associations between specific disorders and physical properties of functionally relevant frontal lobe sub-regions is a fundamental goal in neuropsychiatry. Here we present and evaluate automated methods of frontal lobe parcellation with the programs FreeSurfer(FS) and TOADS-CRUISE(T-C), based on the manual method described in Ranta et al. (2009) in which sulcal-gyral landmarks were used to manually delimit functionally relevant regions within the frontal lobe: i.e., primary motor cortex, anterior cingulate, deep white matter, premotor cortex regions (supplementary motor complex, frontal eye field and lateral premotor cortex) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) regions (medial PFC, dorsolateral PFC, inferior PFC, lateral orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and medial OFC). Dice's coefficient, a measure of overlap, and percent volume difference were used to measure the reliability between manual and automated delineations for each frontal lobe region. For FS, mean Dice's coefficient for all regions was 0.75 and percent volume difference was 21.2%. For T-C the mean Dice's coefficient was 0.77 and the mean percent volume difference for all regions was 20.2%. These results, along with a high degree of agreement between the two automated methods (mean Dice's coefficient = 0.81, percent volume difference = 12.4%) and a proof-of-principle group difference analysis that highlights the consistency and sensitivity of the automated methods, indicate that the automated methods are valid techniques for parcellation of the frontal lobe into functionally relevant sub-regions. Thus, the methodology has the potential to increase efficiency, statistical power and reproducibility for population analyses of neuropsychiatric disorders with hypothesized frontal lobe contributions. PMID:23897577

  19. Dissociations in Hippocampal and Frontal Contributions to Episodic Memory Performance

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Joel H.; Rosen, Howard J.; Du, An-Tao; Schuff, Norbert; Hollnagel, Caroline; Weiner, Michael W.; Miller, Bruce L.; Delis, Dean C.

    2007-01-01

    The hippocampus and frontal lobes both contribute to episodic memory performance. In the present study, the authors evaluated the relative contributions of hippocampus, frontal lobes, anterior temporal cortex, and posterior cortex to memory performance in neurodegenerative patients and normal older controls. Subjects (n = 42) were studied with structural MRI and a memory paradigm that measured delayed recall, semantic clustering during recall, recognition discriminability, and recognition response bias. Data were analyzed with multiple regression. Consistent with the authors’ hypotheses, hippocampal volumes were the best predictor of delayed recall and recognition discriminability, whereas frontal volumes were the best predictor of semantic clustering and response bias. Smaller frontal volumes were associated with less semantic clustering during recall and a more liberal response bias. Results indicate that hippocampal and frontal contributions to episodic memory can be dissociated, with the hippocampus more important for memory accuracy, and frontal structures more important for strategic processing and decision making. PMID:16351355

  20. Common medial frontal mechanisms of adaptive control in humans and rodents

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Michael J.; Laubach, Mark

    2013-01-01

    In this report, we describe how common brain networks within the medial frontal cortex facilitate adaptive behavioral control in rodents and humans. We demonstrate that low frequency oscillations below 12 Hz are dramatically modulated after errors in humans over mid-frontal cortex and in rats within prelimbic and anterior cingulate regions of medial frontal cortex. These oscillations were phase-locked between medial frontal cortex and motor areas in both rats and humans. In rats, single neurons that encoded prior behavioral outcomes were phase-coherent with low-frequency field oscillations particularly after errors. Inactivating medial frontal regions in rats led to impaired behavioral adjustments after errors, eliminated the differential expression of low frequency oscillations after errors, and increased low-frequency spike-field coupling within motor cortex. Our results describe a novel mechanism for behavioral adaptation via low-frequency oscillations and elucidate how medial frontal networks synchronize brain activity to guide performance. PMID:24141310

  1. Human frontal lobes are not relatively large.

    PubMed

    Barton, Robert A; Venditti, Chris

    2013-05-28

    One of the most pervasive assumptions about human brain evolution is that it involved relative enlargement of the frontal lobes. We show that this assumption is without foundation. Analysis of five independent data sets using correctly scaled measures and phylogenetic methods reveals that the size of human frontal lobes, and of specific frontal regions, is as expected relative to the size of other brain structures. Recent claims for relative enlargement of human frontal white matter volume, and for relative enlargement shared by all great apes, seem to be mistaken. Furthermore, using a recently developed method for detecting shifts in evolutionary rates, we find that the rate of change in relative frontal cortex volume along the phylogenetic branch leading to humans was unremarkable and that other branches showed significantly faster rates of change. Although absolute and proportional frontal region size increased rapidly in humans, this change was tightly correlated with corresponding size increases in other areas and whole brain size, and with decreases in frontal neuron densities. The search for the neural basis of human cognitive uniqueness should therefore focus less on the frontal lobes in isolation and more on distributed neural networks. PMID:23671074

  2. Human frontal lobes are not relatively large

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Robert A.; Venditti, Chris

    2013-01-01

    One of the most pervasive assumptions about human brain evolution is that it involved relative enlargement of the frontal lobes. We show that this assumption is without foundation. Analysis of five independent data sets using correctly scaled measures and phylogenetic methods reveals that the size of human frontal lobes, and of specific frontal regions, is as expected relative to the size of other brain structures. Recent claims for relative enlargement of human frontal white matter volume, and for relative enlargement shared by all great apes, seem to be mistaken. Furthermore, using a recently developed method for detecting shifts in evolutionary rates, we find that the rate of change in relative frontal cortex volume along the phylogenetic branch leading to humans was unremarkable and that other branches showed significantly faster rates of change. Although absolute and proportional frontal region size increased rapidly in humans, this change was tightly correlated with corresponding size increases in other areas and whole brain size, and with decreases in frontal neuron densities. The search for the neural basis of human cognitive uniqueness should therefore focus less on the frontal lobes in isolation and more on distributed neural networks. PMID:23671074

  3. Molecular cloning of amyloid cDNA derived from mRNA of the Alzheimer disease brain: coding and noncoding regions of the fetal precursor mRNA are expressed in the cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Zain, S.B.; Salim, M.; Chou, W.G.; Sajdel-Sulkowska, E.M.; Majocha, R.E.; Marotta, C.A.

    1988-02-01

    To gain insight into factors associated with the excessive accumulation of ..beta..-amyloid in the Alzheimer disease (AD) brain, the present studies were initiated to distinguish between a unique primary structure of the AD-specific amyloid precursor mRNA vis a vis other determinants that may affect amyloid levels. Previous molecular cloning experiments focused on amyloid derived from sources other than AD cases. In the present work, the authors cloned and characterized amyloid cDNA derived directly from AD brain mRNA. Poly(A)/sup +/ RNA from AD cortices was used for the preparation of lambdagt11 recombinant cDNA libraries. An insert of 1564 nucleotides was isolated that included the ..beta..-amyloid domain and corresponded to 75% of the coding region and approx. = 70% of the 3'-noncoding region of the fetal precursor amyloid cDNA reported by others. On RNA blots, the AD amyloid mRNA consisted of a doublet of 3.2 and 3.4 kilobases. In control and AD cases, the amyloid mRNA levels were nonuniform and were independent of glial-specific mRNA levels. Based on the sequence analysis data, they conclude that a segment of the amyloid gene is expressed in the AD cortex as a high molecular weight precursor mRNA with major coding and 3'-noncoding regions that are identical to the fetal brain gene product.

  4. Fetal Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, John T.; Sladek, John R.

    1989-11-01

    This article reviews some of the significant contributions of fetal research and fetal tissue research over the past 20 years. The benefits of fetal research include the development of vaccines, advances in prenatal diagnosis, detection of malformations, assessment of safe and effective medications, and the development of in utero surgical therapies. Fetal tissue research benefits vaccine development, assessment of risk factors and toxicity levels in drug production, development of cell lines, and provides a source of fetal cells for ongoing transplantation trials. Together, fetal research and fetal tissue research offer tremendous potential for the treatment of the fetus, neonate, and adult.

  5. The Role of Human Parietal Cortex in Attention Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Shihui; Jiang, Yi; Gu, Hua; Rao, Hengyi; Mao, Lihua; Cui, Yong; Zhai, Renyou

    2004-01-01

    The parietal cortex has been proposed as part of the neural network for guiding spatial attention. However, it is unclear to what degree the parietal cortex contributes to the attentional modulations of activities of the visual cortex and the engagement of the frontal cortex in the attention network. We recorded behavioural performance and…

  6. Fetal development

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002398.htm Fetal development To use the sharing features on this page, ... Cunningham FG, Leveno KJ, Bloom SL, et al. Fetal growth and development. In: Cunningham FG, Leveno KL, Bloom SL, et ...

  7. Fetal endocrinology

    PubMed Central

    Kota, Sunil Kumar; Gayatri, Kotni; Jammula, Sruti; Meher, Lalit Kumar; Kota, Siva Krishna; Krishna, S. V. S.; Modi, Kirtikumar D.

    2013-01-01

    Successful outcome of pregnancy depends upon genetic, cellular, and hormonal interactions, which lead to implantation, placentation, embryonic, and fetal development, parturition and fetal adaptation to extrauterine life. The fetal endocrine system commences development early in gestation and plays a modulating role on the various physiological organ systems and prepares the fetus for life after birth. Our current article provides an overview of the current knowledge of several aspects of this vast field of fetal endocrinology and the role of endocrine system on transition to extrauterine life. We also provide an insight into fetal endocrine adaptations pertinent to various clinically important situations like placental insufficiency and maternal malnutrition. PMID:23961471

  8. Jealousy increased by induced relative left frontal cortical activity.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Nicholas J; Eastwick, Paul W; Harmon-Jones, Eddie; Schmeichel, Brandon J

    2015-10-01

    Asymmetric frontal cortical activity may be one key to the process linking social exclusion to jealous feelings. The current research examined the causal role of asymmetric frontal brain activity in modulating jealousy in response to social exclusion. Transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) over the frontal cortex to manipulate asymmetric frontal cortical activity was combined with a modified version of the Cyberball paradigm designed to induce jealousy. After receiving 15 min of tDCS, participants were excluded by a desired partner and reported how jealous they felt. Among individuals who were excluded, tDCS to increase relative left frontal cortical activity caused greater levels of self-reported jealousy compared to tDCS to increase relative right frontal cortical activity or sham stimulation. Limitations concerning the specificity of this effect and implications for the role of the asymmetric prefrontal cortical activity in motivated behaviors are discussed. PMID:25844975

  9. Fetal Exposure to Maternal Depressive Symptoms is Associated with Cortical Thickness in Late Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Sandman, Curt A.; Buss, Claudia; Head, Kevin; Davis, Elysia Poggi

    2014-01-01

    Background Maternal depression is one of the most common prenatal complications. The consequences of fetal exposure to maternal depression are poorly understood. The aim of this study is to examine the association between fetal exposure to maternal depressive symptoms and cortical thickness in 6–9 year-old children. Methods A prospective, longitudinal study of maternal depressive symptoms at 19, 25 and 31 weeks gestation was followed by acquisition of a structural MRI scan in 81 children (86.1 ± 9.9 months). Results Significant (p<.01) cortical thinning in children primarily in the right frontal lobes was associated with exposure to prenatal maternal depression. The strongest association was at 25 weeks gestation; exposure to maternal depression at 25 gestational weeks was associated with cortical thinning in 19% of the whole cortex and 24% of the frontal lobes, primarily in the right superior, medial orbital and frontal pole regions of the prefrontal cortex (p<.01). The significant association between prenatal maternal depression and child externalizing behavior (p<.05) was mediated by cortical thinning in prefrontal areas of the right hemisphere. Conclusions The pattern of cortical thinning in children exposed to prenatal maternal depression is similar to patterns in depressed patients and in individuals with risk for depression. Exposure to prenatal depression coupled with subsequent cortical thinning was associated with presence of externalizing behavior in preadolescent children and may be prodromal markers of risk for dysphoria. Vulnerability to prenatal influences at 25 gestational weeks may result from the enormous growth and dramatic structural changes in the nervous system. PMID:25129235

  10. Fetal Diagnostics and Fetal Intervention.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Ericka S; Schlosser, Brian A; Border, William L

    2016-03-01

    Advances in ultrasound technology and specialized training have allowed clinicians to diagnose congenital heart disease in utero and counsel families on perinatal outcomes and management strategies, including fetal cardiac interventions and fetal surgery. This article gives a detailed approach to fetal cardiac assessment and provides the reader with accompanying figures and video clips to illustrate unique views and sweeps invaluable to diagnosing congenital heart disease. We demonstrate that using a sequential segmental approach to evaluate cardiac anatomy enables one to decipher the most complex forms of congenital heart disease. Also provided is a review of fetal cardiac intervention and surgery from the fetal cardiologist's perspective. PMID:26876119

  11. Estimation of fetal gestational age from ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salari, Valiollah

    1992-06-01

    Estimation of fetal gestational age, weight, and determination of fetal growth from the measurements of certain parameters of fetal head, abdomen, and femur have been well established in prenatal sonography. The measurements are made from the two dimensional, B- mode, ultrasound images of the fetus. The most common parameters measured are, biparietal diameter, occipital frontal diameter, head circumference, femur diaphysis length, and abdominal circumference. Since the fetal head has an elliptical shape and the femur has a linear shape, fitting the ellipse on the image of the fetal head, a line on the image of the femur are the tasks of image processing which are discussed in this paper.

  12. Fetal ultrasonography.

    PubMed Central

    Garmel, S H; D'Alton, M E

    1993-01-01

    Since its introduction in the 1950s, ultrasonography in pregnancy has been helpful in determining gestational age, detecting multiple pregnancies, locating placentas, diagnosing fetal anomalies, evaluating fetal well-being, and guiding obstetricians with in utero treatment. We review current standards and controversies regarding the indications, safety, accuracy, and limitations of ultrasonography in pregnancy. Images PMID:8236969

  13. Fetal Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Lindsey; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Five cases of fetal abuse by mothers suffering from depression are discussed. Four of the women had unplanned pregnancies and had considered termination of the pregnancy. Other factors associated with fetal abuse include pregnancy denial, pregnancy ambivalence, previous postpartum depression, and difficulties in relationships. Vigilance for…

  14. [Fetal programming].

    PubMed

    Lang, U; Fink, D; Kimmig, R

    2008-01-01

    The intrauterine environment not only influences fetal well-being and behaviour during pregnancy, but also predisposes the fetus in many health aspects of later life. The terms 'fetal programming' and 'developmental origins of health and disease' reflect the enormous impact of pregnancy-related factors on the individual and the health. PMID:19096216

  15. Fetal development

    MedlinePlus

    Cunningham FG, Leveno KJ, Bloom SL, et al. Fetal growth and development. In: Cunningham FG, Leveno KL, Bloom SL, et al, eds. Williams Obstetrics . 23rd ed. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill; ... and fetal physiology. In: Gabbe SG, Niebyl JR, Simpson JL, ...

  16. Specific frontal neural dynamics contribute to decisions to check

    PubMed Central

    Stoll, Frederic M.; Fontanier, Vincent; Procyk, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Curiosity and information seeking potently shapes our behaviour and are thought to rely on the frontal cortex. Yet, the frontal regions and neural dynamics that control the drive to check for information remain unknown. Here we trained monkeys in a task where they had the opportunity to gain information about the potential delivery of a large bonus reward or continue with a default instructed decision task. Single-unit recordings in behaving monkeys reveal that decisions to check for additional information first engage midcingulate cortex and then lateral prefrontal cortex. The opposite is true for instructed decisions. Importantly, deciding to check engages neurons also involved in performance monitoring. Further, specific midcingulate activity could be discerned several trials before the monkeys actually choose to check the environment. Our data show that deciding to seek information on the current state of the environment is characterized by specific dynamics of neural activity within the prefrontal cortex. PMID:27319361

  17. The effect of age on cognitive performance of frontal patients

    PubMed Central

    Cipolotti, Lisa; Healy, Colm; Chan, Edgar; MacPherson, Sarah E.; White, Mark; Woollett, Katherine; Turner, Martha; Robinson, Gail; Spanò, Barbara; Bozzali, Marco; Shallice, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Age is known to affect prefrontal brain structure and executive functioning in healthy older adults, patients with neurodegenerative conditions and TBI. Yet, no studies appear to have systematically investigated the effect of age on cognitive performance in patients with focal lesions. We investigated the effect of age on the cognitive performance of a large sample of tumour and stroke patients with focal unilateral, frontal (n=68), or non-frontal lesions (n=45) and healthy controls (n=52). We retrospectively reviewed their cross sectional cognitive and imaging data. In our frontal patients, age significantly predicted the magnitude of their impairment on two executive tests (Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices, RAPM and the Stroop test) but not on nominal (Graded Naming Test, GNT) or perceptual (Incomplete Letters) task. In our non-frontal patients, age did not predict the magnitude of their impairment on the RAPM and GNT. Furthermore, the exacerbated executive impairment observed in our frontal patients manifested itself from middle age. We found that only age consistently predicted the exacerbated executive impairment. Lesions to specific frontal areas, or an increase in global brain atrophy or white matter abnormalities were not associated with this impairment. Our results are in line with the notion that the frontal cortex plays a critical role in aging to counteract cognitive and neuronal decline. We suggest that the combined effect of aging and frontal lesions impairs the frontal cortical systems by causing its computational power to fall below the threshold needed to complete executive tasks successfully. PMID:26102190

  18. The effect of age on cognitive performance of frontal patients.

    PubMed

    Cipolotti, Lisa; Healy, Colm; Chan, Edgar; MacPherson, Sarah E; White, Mark; Woollett, Katherine; Turner, Martha; Robinson, Gail; Spanò, Barbara; Bozzali, Marco; Shallice, Tim

    2015-08-01

    Age is known to affect prefrontal brain structure and executive functioning in healthy older adults, patients with neurodegenerative conditions and TBI. Yet, no studies appear to have systematically investigated the effect of age on cognitive performance in patients with focal lesions. We investigated the effect of age on the cognitive performance of a large sample of tumour and stroke patients with focal unilateral, frontal (n=68), or non-frontal lesions (n=45) and healthy controls (n=52). We retrospectively reviewed their cross sectional cognitive and imaging data. In our frontal patients, age significantly predicted the magnitude of their impairment on two executive tests (Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices, RAPM and the Stroop test) but not on nominal (Graded Naming Test, GNT) or perceptual (Incomplete Letters) task. In our non-frontal patients, age did not predict the magnitude of their impairment on the RAPM and GNT. Furthermore, the exacerbated executive impairment observed in our frontal patients manifested itself from middle age. We found that only age consistently predicted the exacerbated executive impairment. Lesions to specific frontal areas, or an increase in global brain atrophy or white matter abnormalities were not associated with this impairment. Our results are in line with the notion that the frontal cortex plays a critical role in aging to counteract cognitive and neuronal decline. We suggest that the combined effect of aging and frontal lesions impairs the frontal cortical systems by causing its computational power to fall below the threshold needed to complete executive tasks successfully. PMID:26102190

  19. Prenatal Origins of Temperament: Fetal Growth, Brain Structure, and Inhibitory Control in Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Schlotz, Wolff; Godfrey, Keith M.; Phillips, David I.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Individual differences in the temperamental dimension of effortful control are constitutionally based and have been associated with an adverse prenatal developmental environment, with structural brain alterations presenting a potential mechanism. We investigated this hypothesis for anatomically defined brain regions implicated in cognitive and inhibitory motor control. Methods Twenty-seven 15–16 year old participants with low, medium, or high fetal growth were selected from a longitudinal birth cohort to maximize variation and represent the full normal spectrum of fetal growth. Outcome measures were parent ratings of attention and inhibitory control, thickness and surface area of the orbitofrontal cortex (lateral (LOFC) and medial (MOFC)) and right inferior frontal gyrus (rIFG), and volumetric measures of the striatum and amygdala. Results Lower birth weight was associated with lower inhibitory control, smaller surface area of LOFC, MOFC and rIFG, lower caudate volume, and thicker MOFC. A mediation model found a significant indirect effect of birth weight on inhibitory control via caudate volume. Conclusions Our findings support a neuroanatomical mechanism underlying potential long-term consequences of an adverse fetal developmental environment for behavioral inhibitory control in adolescence and have implications for understanding putative prenatal developmental origins of externalizing behavioral problems and self-control. PMID:24802625

  20. Fetal echocardiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fetal echocardiography is a test that uses sound waves ( ultrasound ) to evaluate the baby's heart for problems ... over the area. The probe sends out sound waves, which bounce off the baby's heart and create ...

  1. MRI volumetry of prefrontal cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheline, Yvette I.; Black, Kevin J.; Lin, Daniel Y.; Pimmel, Joseph; Wang, Po; Haller, John W.; Csernansky, John G.; Gado, Mokhtar; Walkup, Ronald K.; Brunsden, Barry S.; Vannier, Michael W.

    1995-05-01

    Prefrontal cortex volumetry by brain magnetic resonance (MR) is required to estimate changes postulated to occur in certain psychiatric and neurologic disorders. A semiautomated method with quantitative characterization of its performance is sought to reliably distinguish small prefrontal cortex volume changes within individuals and between groups. Stereological methods were tested by a blinded comparison of measurements applied to 3D MR scans obtained using an MPRAGE protocol. Fixed grid stereologic methods were used to estimate prefrontal cortex volumes on a graphic workstation, after the images are scaled from 16 to 8 bits using a histogram method. In addition images were resliced into coronal sections perpendicular to the bicommissural plane. Prefrontal cortex volumes were defined as all sections of the frontal lobe anterior to the anterior commissure. Ventricular volumes were excluded. Stereological measurement yielded high repeatability and precision, and was time efficient for the raters. The coefficient of error was cortex boundaries on 3D images was critical to obtaining accurate measurements. MR prefrontal cortex volumetry by stereology can yield accurate and repeatable measurements. Small frontal lobe volume reductions in patients with brain disorders such as depression and schizophrenia can be efficiently assessed using this method.

  2. Charting the Maturation of the Frontal Lobe: An Electrophysiological Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segalowitz, S. J.; Davies, Patricia L.

    2004-01-01

    Tracking the functional development of specific regions of the prefrontal cortex in children using event-related potentials (ERPs) is challenging for both technical and conceptual reasons. In this paper we outline our strategy for studying frontal lobe development and present preliminary results from children aged 7-17 years and young adults using…

  3. Dynamic Variation in Pleasure in Children Predicts Nonlinear Change in Lateral Frontal Brain Electrical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Light, Sharee N.; Coan, James A.; Frye, Corrina; Goldsmith, H. Hill; Davidson, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Individual variation in the experience and expression of pleasure may relate to differential patterns of lateral frontal activity. Brain electrical measures have been used to study the asymmetric involvement of lateral frontal cortex in positive emotion, but the excellent time resolution of these measures has not been used to capture…

  4. Developmental Alterations of Frontal-Striatal-Thalamic Connectivity in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Kate Dimond; Welsh, Robert C.; Stern, Emily R.; Angstadt, Mike; Hanna, Gregory L.; Abelson, James L.; Taylor, Stephan F.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder is characterized by abnormalities of frontal-striatal-thalamic circuitry that appear near illness onset and persist over its course. Distinct frontal-striatal-thalamic loops through cortical centers for cognitive control (anterior cingulate cortex) and emotion processing (ventral medial frontal…

  5. Frontal delta event-related oscillations relate to frontal volume in mild cognitive impairment and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Yener, Görsev G; Emek-Savaş, Derya Durusu; Lizio, Roberta; Çavuşoğlu, Berrin; Carducci, Filippo; Ada, Emel; Güntekin, Bahar; Babiloni, Claudio C; Başar, Erol

    2016-05-01

    Amnesic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) represents a risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD), but not all MCI subjects progress to dementia of AD type. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cortical and hippocampal atrophy supports early diagnosis of AD in MCI subjects, while frontal event-related oscillations (EROs) at delta frequencies (<4Hz) are appealing markers for this purpose, as they are both cost-effective and largely available. The present study tested the hypothesis that these EROs reflect cortical frontal neurodegeneration in the continuum between normal and amnesic MCI subjects. EROs and volumetric MRI data were recorded in 28 amnesic MCI and in 28 healthy elderly controls (HCs). EROs were collected during a standard visual oddball paradigm including frequent (66.6%) and rare (33.3%; targets to be mentally counted) stimuli. Peak-to-peak amplitude of delta target EROs (<4Hz) was measured. Volume of frontal cortex was estimated from MRIs. Frontal volume was lower in MCI compared to the HC group. Furthermore, widespread delta target EROs were lower in amplitude in the former than in the latter group. Finally, there was a positive correlation between frontal volume and frontal delta target EROs in MCI and HC subjects as a whole group. These results suggest that frontal delta EROs reflect frontal neurodegeneration in the continuum between normal and amnesic MCI subjects. PMID:25660300

  6. Differential frontal involvement in shifts of internal and perceptual attention

    PubMed Central

    Tanoue, Ryan T.; Jones, Kevin T.; Peterson, Dwight J.; Berryhill, Marian E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Perceptual attention enhances the processing of items in the environment, whereas internal attention enhances processing of items encoded in visual working memory. In perceptual and internal attention cueing paradigms, cues indicate the to-be-probed item before (pre-cueing) or after (retro-cueing) the memory display, respectively. Pre- and retro- cues confer similar behavioral accuracy benefits (pre-: 14–19%, retro-: 11–17%) and neuroimaging data show that they activate overlapping frontoparietal networks (1). Yet reports of behavioral and neuroimaging differences suggest that pre- and retro-cueing differentially recruit frontal and parietal cortices (1). Objective/Hypothesis This study examined whether perceptual and internal attention are equally disrupted by neurostimulation to frontal and parietal cortices. We hypothesized that neurostimulation applied to frontal cortex would disrupt internal attention to a greater extent than perceptual attention. Methods Cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) was applied to frontal or parietal cortices. After stimulation, participants completed a change detection task coupled with either pre- or retro- cues. Results Cathodal tDCS across site (frontal, parietal) hindered performance. However, frontal tDCS had a greater negative impact on the retro-cued trials demonstrating greater frontal involvement during shifts of internal attention. Conclusions These results complement the neuroimaging data and provide further evidence suggesting that perceptual and internal attention are not identical processes. We conclude that although internal and perceptual attention are mediated by similar frontoparietal networks, the weight of contribution of these structures differs, with internal attention relying more heavily on the frontal cortex. PMID:23266133

  7. A Novel Role for the Rat Retrosplenial Cortex in Cognitive Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Andrew J. D.; Hindley, Emma L.; Haddon, Josephine E.; Vann, Seralynne D.; Aggleton, John P.

    2014-01-01

    By virtue of its frontal and hippocampal connections, the retrosplenial cortex is uniquely placed to support cognition. Here, we tested whether the retrosplenial cortex is required for frontal tasks analogous to the Stroop Test, i.e., for the ability to select between conflicting responses and inhibit responding to task-irrelevant cues. Rats first…

  8. Frontal Fibrosing Alopecia.

    PubMed

    Holmes, S

    2016-07-01

    Frontal fibrosing alopecia, described just over 20 years ago, has become one of the most frequently seen causes of scarring alopecia at many specialist hair clinics. Considered a clinical variant of lichen planopilaris (LPP), it has distinctive features and associations which distinguish it from LPP. Although largely affecting postmenopausal women, a small but increasing number of men and premenopausal women are affected. The spectrum of the disease has expanded from involvement of the frontal hairline and eyebrows, to potentially affecting the entire hairline, facial and body hair. Genetic and environmental factors have been implicated but the aetiology remains uncertain. A range of treatments have been used in management of the condition, but clinical trials are required to establish effectiveness. PMID:27388531

  9. Frontal Polymerization in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pojman, John A.

    1999-01-01

    Frontal polymerization systems, with their inherent large thermal and compositional gradients, are greatly affected by buoyancy-driven convection. Sounding rocket experiments allowed the preparation of benchmark materials and demonstrated that methods to suppress the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in ground-based research did not significantly affect the molecular weight of the polymer. Experiments under weightlessness show clearly that bubbles produced during the reaction interact very differently than under 1 g.

  10. [Frontal mucocele: open surgery].

    PubMed

    Pia, F; Aluffi, P; Borello, G

    1999-06-01

    This work presents 13 cases of frontal mucoceles, 9 with endo-orbital extension. All were treated with 'open surgery': 11 using a fronto-orbital approach, 2 with a bicoronal Cairns-Unterberger approach. Four patients had recurrent mucoceles 1-20 years after the previous surgery. In one case there was an association with frontal osteoma. In 10 cases, conservative treatment was applied through repermeabilization of the infundibular region through an external, endonasal pathway and positioning of a nasal sinus drainage tube (kept in place for 4 weeks). In the remaining 3 cases, the sinus cavity was obliterated with autologous abdominal fat. This choice was made because of the presence of osteomyelitic foci, in one case mucopioceles, or by the widespread dural exposure encountered during the course of surgery. Two cases of post-operative sinus reinfection were encountered: one underwent surgical revision, the other was an orbital site recurrence arising 7 years after previous surgical obliteration of the frontal sinus. The esthetic result was unsatisfactory in 2 patients treated with a trans-facial approach. Ten patients were disease free after an average 56 months of follow-up. Although functional endoscopic surgery undoubtedly makes it possible to achieve excellent results in the treatment of most sinus mucoceles, open surgery remains a valid procedure in frontal mucoceles with orbital and/or endocranial extension and in cases where the district anatomy is unfavorable for a purely endonasal approach. The indications and limitations of open surgery are critically discussed in the light of personal experience and current literature. PMID:10546373

  11. Developmental consequences of childhood frontal lobe damage.

    PubMed

    Eslinger, P J; Grattan, L M; Damasio, H; Damasio, A R

    1992-07-01

    A 33-year-old woman underwent neurologic and neuropsychological studies 26 years after she sustained damage to the frontal lobe. The findings of the neurologic examination were normal, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a lesion in left prefrontal cortex and deep white matter. Cerebral blood flow studies showed an abnormal pattern in both left and right frontal regions. The patient exhibited striking neuropsychological defects in higher cognition, most notably in self-regulation of emotion and affect and in social behavior. Analysis of her behavioral development failed to yield a pattern of abrupt onset of defect immediately after the lesion occurred. On the contrary, there was a delayed onset of defects, followed by a period of seeming progression, and finally an arrest of development in adolescence. We suggest that this peculiar pattern is the natural consequence of the varied changes that occurred in brain development and social cognition during the patient's formative years. While certain long-term neuropsychological deficits in our case are similar to those following frontal damage in adults, the delayed onset and progression of deficits are different. PMID:1497505

  12. Role of Frontal Alpha Oscillations in Creativity

    PubMed Central

    Lustenberger, Caroline; Boyle, Michael R.; Foulser, A. Alban; Mellin, Juliann M.; Fröhlich, Flavio

    2015-01-01

    Creativity, the ability to produce innovative ideas, is a key higher-order cognitive function that is poorly understood. At the level of macroscopic cortical network dynamics, recent EEG data suggests that cortical oscillations in the alpha frequency band (8 – 12 Hz) are correlated with creative thinking. However, whether alpha oscillations play a fundamental role in creativity has remained unknown. Here we show that creativity is increased by enhancing alpha power using 10 Hz transcranial alternating current stimulation (10Hz-tACS) of the frontal cortex. In a study of 20 healthy participants with a randomized, balanced cross-over design, we found a significant improvement of 7.4% in the Creativity Index measured by the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking, a comprehensive and most frequently used assay of creative potential and strengths. In a second similar study with 20 subjects, 40Hz-tACS was used in instead of 10Hz-tACS to rule out a general “electrical stimulation” effect. No significant change in the Creativity Index was found for such frontal gamma stimulation. Our results suggest that alpha activity in frontal brain areas is selectively involved in creativity; this enhancement represents the first demonstration of specific neuronal dynamics that drive creativity and can be modulated by non-invasive brain stimulation. Our findings agree with the model that alpha recruitment increases with internal processing demands and is involved in inhibitory top-down control, which is an important requirement for creative ideation. PMID:25913062

  13. Frontal and striatal alterations associated with psychopathic traits in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yaling; Narr, Katherine L.; Baker, Laura A.; Joshi, Shantanu H.; Jahanshad, Neda; Raine, Adrian; Thompson, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging research has demonstrated a range of structural deficits in adults with psychopathy, but little is known about structural correlates of psychopathic tendencies in adolescents. Here we examined structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI) data obtained from 14-year-old adolescents (n=108) using tensor-based morphometry (TBM) to isolate global and localized differences in brain tissue volumes associated with psychopathic traits in this otherwise healthy developmental population. We found that greater levels of psychopathic traits were correlated with increased brain tissue volumes in the left putamen, left ansa peduncularis, right superiomedial prefrontal cortex, left inferior frontal cortex, right orbitofrontal cortex, and right medial temporal regions and reduced brain tissues volumes in the right middle frontal cortex, left superior parietal lobule, and left inferior parietal lobule. Post hoc analyses of parcellated regional volumes also showed putamen enlargements to correlate with increased psychopathic traits. Consistent with earlier studies, findings suggest poor decision-making and emotional dysregulation associated with psychopathy may be due, in part, to structural anomalies in frontal and temporal regions whereas striatal structural variations may contribute to sensation-seeking and reward-driven behavior in psychopathic individuals. Future studies will help clarify how disturbances in brain maturational processes might lead to the developmental trajectory from psychopathic tendencies in adolescents to adult psychopathy. PMID:25676553

  14. Fetal electrocardiograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, Heriberto; Andrade, Armando; Puente, Ernestina; Lizana, Pablo R.; Mendoza, Diego

    2002-11-01

    The high intra-uterine death rate is due to failure in appropriately diagnosing some problems in the cardiobreathing system of the fetus during pregnancy. The electrocardiograph is one apparatus which might detect problems at an early stage. With electrodes located near the womb and uterus, in a way similar to the normal technique, the detection of so-called biopotential differences, caused by concentrations of ions, can be achieved. The fetal electrocardiograph is based on an ultrasound technique aimed at detecting intrauterine problems in pregnant women, because it is a noninvasive technique due to the very low level of ultrasound power used. With this system, the following tests can be done: Heart movements from the ninth week onwards; Rapid and safe diagnosis of intrauterine fetal death; Location and size of the placenta. The construction of the fetal electrocardiograph requires instrument level components directly mounted on the printed circuit board, in order to avoid stray capacitance in the cabling which prevents the detection of the E.C.G. activity. The low cost of the system makes it affordable to low budget institutions; in contrast, available commercial systems are priced in U.S. Dollars. (To be presented in Spanish.)

  15. A cluster of protein kinases and phosphatases modulated in fetal Down syndrome (trisomy 21) brain.

    PubMed

    Weitzdoerfer, Rachel; Toran, Nuria; Subramaniyan, Saraswathi; Pollak, Arnold; Dierssen, Mara; Lubec, Gert

    2015-06-01

    Down syndrome (DS; trisomy 21) is the most frequent cause of mental retardation with major cognitive and behavioral deficits. Although a series of aberrant biochemical pathways has been reported, work on signaling proteins is limited. It was, therefore, the aim of the study to test a selection of protein kinases and phosphatases known to be essential for memory and learning mechanisms in fetal DS brain. 12 frontal cortices from DS brain were compared to 12 frontal cortices from controls obtained at legal abortions. Proteins were extracted from brains and western blotting with specific antibodies was carried out. Primary results were used for networking (IntAct Molecular Interaction Database) and individual predicted pathway components were subsequently quantified by western blotting. Levels of calcium-calmodulin kinase II alpha, transforming growth factor beta-activated kinase 1 as well as phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) were reduced in cortex of DS subjects and network generation pointed to interaction between PTEN and the dendritic spine protein drebrin that was subsequently determined and reduced levels were observed. The findings of reduced levels of cognitive-function-related protein kinases and the phosphatase may be relevant for interpretation of previous work and may be useful for the design of future studies on signaling in DS brain. Moreover, decreased drebrin levels may point to dendritic spine abnormalities. PMID:25740605

  16. Auditory connections and functions of prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Plakke, Bethany; Romanski, Lizabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    The functional auditory system extends from the ears to the frontal lobes with successively more complex functions occurring as one ascends the hierarchy of the nervous system. Several areas of the frontal lobe receive afferents from both early and late auditory processing regions within the temporal lobe. Afferents from the early part of the cortical auditory system, the auditory belt cortex, which are presumed to carry information regarding auditory features of sounds, project to only a few prefrontal regions and are most dense in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC). In contrast, projections from the parabelt and the rostral superior temporal gyrus (STG) most likely convey more complex information and target a larger, widespread region of the prefrontal cortex. Neuronal responses reflect these anatomical projections as some prefrontal neurons exhibit responses to features in acoustic stimuli, while other neurons display task-related responses. For example, recording studies in non-human primates indicate that VLPFC is responsive to complex sounds including vocalizations and that VLPFC neurons in area 12/47 respond to sounds with similar acoustic morphology. In contrast, neuronal responses during auditory working memory involve a wider region of the prefrontal cortex. In humans, the frontal lobe is involved in auditory detection, discrimination, and working memory. Past research suggests that dorsal and ventral subregions of the prefrontal cortex process different types of information with dorsal cortex processing spatial/visual information and ventral cortex processing non-spatial/auditory information. While this is apparent in the non-human primate and in some neuroimaging studies, most research in humans indicates that specific task conditions, stimuli or previous experience may bias the recruitment of specific prefrontal regions, suggesting a more flexible role for the frontal lobe during auditory cognition. PMID:25100931

  17. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Read in Chinese What is Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS)? Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) describes changes in ...

  18. Intrapartum fetal resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Cowan, D B

    1980-08-30

    Fetal distress is defined. The pathophysiology of fetal distress is discussed and tretment is recommended. The principles of intrapartum fetal resuscitation are proposed, with particular reference to the inhibition of uterine activity. PMID:7404260

  19. Instrumentation in Frontal Sinus Surgery.

    PubMed

    Tajudeen, Bobby A; Adappa, Nithin D

    2016-08-01

    Frontal recess dissection proposes many challenges to the surgeon. These challenges stem from its highly variable nature, small caliber, difficult visualization, and proximity to vital structures such as the skull base and orbit. As such, delicate mucosal-sparing dissection of the frontal recess with proper instrumentation is paramount to minimize scar formation and ensure patency. Here, the article explores key instrumentation in frontal recess surgery with an emphasis on hand instruments and adjunctive technologies. PMID:27329980

  20. Pediatric frontal mucocele secondary to a bifid frontal sinus septum.

    PubMed

    Plikaitis, Christina M; Purzycki, Adam R; Couture, Daniel; David, Lisa R

    2010-09-01

    A mucocele is a mucus-containing sac lined with epithelium that arises within a sinus when its drainage is compromised. The frontal sinus is the most common location, with frontal mucocele development occurring when the nasofrontal duct becomes obstructed because of polyps, bone tumors, prior surgery, sinusitis, trauma, or anatomic variation. We report an unusual case of a sterile pediatric frontal mucocele presenting as a slowly enlarging forehead mass due to a bifid frontal sinus septum. A 9-year-old girl presented to the craniofacial clinic for evaluation of a right frontal mass that had been slowly growing over the past year. She was otherwise healthy and had no history of previous trauma or sinus infections. Computed tomography (CT) scan results revealed a localized frontal fluid collection with protrusion and thinning of the anterior frontal bone between 2 midline bony septii. Surgical cranialization of the frontal sinus was performed. The anatomy of her lesion seen both on CT scan and intraoperatively likely explains this unusual case presentation. Instead of the usual inciting event of an intact frontal sinus drainage system becoming blocked, this patient seemed to have a primary developmental lack of any drainage system that led to her mucocele. During formation of her frontal sinus, she developed a bifid septum within the midline that excluded a portion of her frontal sinus from the lateral nasofrontal ducts. With mucus-producing epithelium trapped within these bony confines, pressure began to mount with expansion and thinning of the bone both anteriorly and posteriorly. The lack of any infectious symptoms and sterile culture results may support that this space developed primarily and was never in continuity with the external drainage system. Only 4 other patients have been reported with asymptomatic forehead swelling as the only presenting symptom, with the age ranging from 33 to 79 years. This patient represents the first clinical report of a congenital

  1. 1H MRSI of middle frontal gyrus in pediatric ADHD.

    PubMed

    Tafazoli, Sharwin; O'Neill, Joseph; Bejjani, Anthony; Ly, Ronald; Salamon, Noriko; McCracken, James T; Alger, Jeffry R; Levitt, Jennifer G

    2013-04-01

    Neuroimaging studies in multiple modalities have implicated the left or right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (here, middle frontal gyrus) in attentional functions, in ADHD, and in dopamine agonist treatment of ADHD. The far lateral location of this cortex in the brain, however, has made it difficult to study with magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). We used the smaller voxel sizes of the magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) variant of MRS, acquired at a steep coronal-oblique angle to sample bilateral middle frontal gyrus in 13 children and adolescents with ADHD and 13 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Within a subsample of the ADHD patients, aspects of attention were also assessed with the Trail Making Task. In right middle frontal gyrus only, mean levels of N-acetyl-aspartate + N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate (tNAA), creatine + phosphocreatine (Cr), choline-compounds (Cho), and myo-inositol (mI) were significantly lower in the ADHD than in the control sample. In the ADHD patients, lower right middle frontal Cr was associated with worse performance on Trails A and B (focused attention, concentration, set-shifting), while the opposite relationship held true for the control group on Trails B. These findings add to evidence implicating right middle frontal cortex in ADHD. Lower levels of these multiple species may reflect osmotic adjustment to elevated prefrontal cortical perfusion in ADHD and/or a previously hypothesized defect in astrocytic production of lactate in ADHD resulting in decelerated energetic metabolism (Cr), membrane synthesis (Cho, mI), and acetyl-CoA substrate for NAA synthesis. Lower Cr levels may indicate attentional or executive impairments. PMID:23273650

  2. Fetal functional imaging portrays heterogeneous development of emerging human brain networks

    PubMed Central

    Jakab, András; Schwartz, Ernst; Kasprian, Gregor; Gruber, Gerlinde M.; Prayer, Daniela; Schöpf, Veronika; Langs, Georg

    2014-01-01

    The functional connectivity architecture of the adult human brain enables complex cognitive processes, and exhibits a remarkably complex structure shared across individuals. We are only beginning to understand its heterogeneous structure, ranging from a strongly hierarchical organization in sensorimotor areas to widely distributed networks in areas such as the parieto-frontal cortex. Our study relied on the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data of 32 fetuses with no detectable morphological abnormalities. After adapting functional magnetic resonance acquisition, motion correction, and nuisance signal reduction procedures of resting-state functional data analysis to fetuses, we extracted neural activity information for major cortical and subcortical structures. Resting fMRI networks were observed for increasing regional functional connectivity from 21st to 38th gestational weeks (GWs) with a network-based statistical inference approach. The overall connectivity network, short range, and interhemispheric connections showed sigmoid expansion curve peaking at the 26–29 GW. In contrast, long-range connections exhibited linear increase with no periods of peaking development. Region-specific increase of functional signal synchrony followed a sequence of occipital (peak: 24.8 GW), temporal (peak: 26 GW), frontal (peak: 26.4 GW), and parietal expansion (peak: 27.5 GW). We successfully adapted functional neuroimaging and image post-processing approaches to correlate macroscopical scale activations in the fetal brain with gestational age. This in vivo study reflects the fact that the mid-fetal period hosts events that cause the architecture of the brain circuitry to mature, which presumably manifests in increasing strength of intra- and interhemispheric functional macro connectivity. PMID:25374531

  3. Fetal functional imaging portrays heterogeneous development of emerging human brain networks.

    PubMed

    Jakab, András; Schwartz, Ernst; Kasprian, Gregor; Gruber, Gerlinde M; Prayer, Daniela; Schöpf, Veronika; Langs, Georg

    2014-01-01

    The functional connectivity architecture of the adult human brain enables complex cognitive processes, and exhibits a remarkably complex structure shared across individuals. We are only beginning to understand its heterogeneous structure, ranging from a strongly hierarchical organization in sensorimotor areas to widely distributed networks in areas such as the parieto-frontal cortex. Our study relied on the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data of 32 fetuses with no detectable morphological abnormalities. After adapting functional magnetic resonance acquisition, motion correction, and nuisance signal reduction procedures of resting-state functional data analysis to fetuses, we extracted neural activity information for major cortical and subcortical structures. Resting fMRI networks were observed for increasing regional functional connectivity from 21st to 38th gestational weeks (GWs) with a network-based statistical inference approach. The overall connectivity network, short range, and interhemispheric connections showed sigmoid expansion curve peaking at the 26-29 GW. In contrast, long-range connections exhibited linear increase with no periods of peaking development. Region-specific increase of functional signal synchrony followed a sequence of occipital (peak: 24.8 GW), temporal (peak: 26 GW), frontal (peak: 26.4 GW), and parietal expansion (peak: 27.5 GW). We successfully adapted functional neuroimaging and image post-processing approaches to correlate macroscopical scale activations in the fetal brain with gestational age. This in vivo study reflects the fact that the mid-fetal period hosts events that cause the architecture of the brain circuitry to mature, which presumably manifests in increasing strength of intra- and interhemispheric functional macro connectivity. PMID:25374531

  4. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Wataganara, Tuangsit; Ebrashy, Alaa; Aliyu, Labaran Dayyabu; Moreira de Sa, Renato Augusto; Pooh, Ritsuko; Kurjak, Asim; Sen, Cihat; Adra, Abdallah; Stanojevic, Milan

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been increasingly adopted in obstetrics practice in the past three decades. MRI aids prenatal ultrasound and improves diagnostic accuracy for selected maternal and fetal conditions. However, it should be considered only when high-quality ultrasound cannot provide certain information that affects the counseling, prenatal intervention, pregnancy course, and delivery plan. Major indications of fetal MRI include, but are not restricted to, morbidly adherent placenta, selected cases of fetal brain anomalies, thoracic lesions (especially in severe congenital diaphragmatic hernia), and soft tissue tumors at head and neck regions of the fetus. For fetal anatomy assessment, a 1.5-Tesla machine with a fast T2-weighted single-shot technique is recommended for image requisition of common fetal abnormalities. Individual judgment needs to be applied when considering usage of a 3-Tesla machine. Gadolinium MRI contrast is not recommended during pregnancy. MRI should be avoided in the first half of pregnancy due to small fetal structures and motion artifacts. Assessment of fetal cerebral cortex can be achieved with MRI in the third trimester. MRI is a viable research tool for noninvasive interrogation of the fetus and the placenta. PMID:27092644

  5. Fetal syringomyelia.

    PubMed

    Guo, Anne; Chitayat, David; Blaser, Susan; Keating, Sarah; Shannon, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    We explored the prevalence of syringomyelia in a series of 113 cases of fetal dysraphism and hindbrain crowding, of gestational age ranging from 17.5 to 34 weeks with the vast majority less than 26 weeks gestational age. We found syringomyelia in 13 cases of Chiari II malformations, 5 cases of Omphalocele/Exostrophy/Imperforate anus/Spinal abnormality (OEIS), 2 cases of Meckel Gruber syndrome and in a single pair of pyopagus conjoined twins. Secondary injury was not uncommon, with vernicomyelia in Chiari malformations, infarct like histology, or old hemorrhage in 8 cases of syringomyelia. Vernicomyelia did not occur in the absence of syrinx formation. The syringes extended from the sites of dysraphism, in ascending or descending patterns. The syringes were usually in a major proportion anatomically distinct from a dilated or denuded central canal and tended to be dorsal and paramedian or median. We suggest that fetal syringomyelia in Chiari II malformation and other dysraphic states is often established prior to midgestation, has contributions from the primary malformation as well as from secondary in utero injury and is anatomically and pathophysiologically distinct from post natal syringomyelia secondary to hindbrain crowding. PMID:25092126

  6. Fetal nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Franz W.; Turshen, Meredeth

    1970-01-01

    The extensive literature on nutrition in pregnancy is reviewed with special reference to international experience, including observations on nutritional trials in pregnancy, pregnancy during famines caused by war, and studies of birth-weight in relation to pregnancy interval, parity and multiple pregnancies. Recent research on the significance of fetal nutrition suggests that ”small-for-dates” infants, i.e., those that are developmentally retarded in utero, suffer long-term developmental sequelae. A high world-wide incidence of small-for-dates births was reported by the World Health Organization in 1960. Although a definite correlation has been found between socio-economic status and birth-weight, it is not known to what extent the smaller birth-weights observed in the lower socio-economic groups can be improved by specific nutritional measures. In addition to the general advice given on maternal nutrition and family-planning, further studies are needed to determine the precise means of achieving improvement in fetal nutrition and a better outcome of pregnancy. PMID:5314013

  7. Frontal lobe neurology and the creative mind

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Leonardo C.; Guimarães, Henrique C.; Teixeira, Antônio L.; Caramelli, Paulo; Levy, Richard; Dubois, Bruno; Volle, Emmanuelle

    2014-01-01

    Concepts from cognitive neuroscience strongly suggest that the prefrontal cortex (PFC) plays a crucial role in the cognitive functions necessary for creative thinking. Functional imaging studies have repeatedly demonstrated the involvement of PFC in creativity tasks. Patient studies have demonstrated that frontal damage due to focal lesions or neurodegenerative diseases are associated with impairments in various creativity tasks. However, against all odds, a series of clinical observations has reported the facilitation of artistic production in patients with neurodegenerative diseases affecting PFC, such as frontotemporal dementia (FTD). An exacerbation of creativity in frontal diseases would challenge neuroimaging findings in controls and patients, as well as the theoretical role of prefrontal functions in creativity processes. To explore this paradox, we reported the history of a FTD patient who exhibited the emergence of visual artistic productions during the course of the disease. The patient produced a large amount of drawings, which have been evaluated by a group of professional artists who were blind to the diagnosis. We also reviewed the published clinical cases reporting a change in the artistic abilities in patients with neurological diseases. We attempted to reconcile these clinical observations to previous experimental findings by addressing several questions raised by our review. For instance, to what extent can the cognitive, conative, and affective changes following frontal damage explain changes in artistic abilities? Does artistic exacerbation truly reflect increased creative capacities? These considerations could help to clarify the place of creativity—as it has been defined and explored by cognitive neuroscience—in artistic creation and may provide leads for future lesion studies. PMID:25101029

  8. A parallel genome-wide mRNA and microRNA profiling of the frontal cortex of HIV patients with and without HIV-associated dementia shows the role of axon guidance and downstream pathways in HIV-mediated neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background HIV-associated dementia (HAD) is the most common dementia type in young adults less than 40 years of age. Although the neurotoxins, oxidative/metabolic stress and impaired activity of neurotrophic factors are believed to be underlying reasons for the development of HAD, the genomic basis, which ultimately defines the virus-host interaction and leads to neurologic manifestation of HIV disease is lacking. Therefore, identifying HIV fingerprints on the host gene machinery and its regulation by microRNA holds a great promise and potential for improving our understanding of HAD pathogenesis, its diagnosis and therapy. Results A parallel profiling of mRNA and miRNA of the frontal cortex autopsies from HIV positive patients with and without dementia was performed using Illumina Human-6 BeadChip and Affymetrix version 1.0 miRNA array, respectively. The gene ontology and pathway analysis of the two data sets showed high concordance between miRNA and mRNAs, revealing significant interference with the host axon guidance and its downstream signalling pathways in HAD brains. Moreover, the differentially expressed (DE) miRNAs identified in this study, in particular miR-137, 153 and 218, based on which most correlations were built cumulatively targeted neurodegeneration related pathways, implying their future potential in diagnosis, prognosis and possible therapies for HIV-mediated and possibly other neurodegenerative diseases. Furthermore, this relationship between DE miRNAs and DE mRNAs was also reflected in correlation analysis using Bayesian networks by splitting-averaging strategy (SA-BNs), which revealed 195 statistically significant correlated miRNA-mRNA pairs according to Pearson’s correlation test (P<0.05). Conclusions Our study provides the first evidence on unambiguous support for intrinsic functional relationship between mRNA and miRNA in the context of HIV-mediated neurodegeneration, which shows that neurologic manifestation in HIV patients possibly

  9. Prenatal Alcohol Exposure is Associated with Regionally Thinner Cortex During the Preadolescent Period.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Frances C; Narr, Katherine L; Molteno, Christopher D; Jacobson, Joseph L; Jacobson, Sandra W; Meintjes, Ernesta M

    2016-07-01

    Children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) may exhibit craniofacial dysmorphology, neurobehavioral deficits, and reduced brain volume. Studies of cortical thickness in FASD have yielded contradictory findings, with 3 reporting thicker cerebral cortex in frontal and temporal brain regions and 2 showing thinner cortex across multiple regions. All 5 studies included subjects spanning a broad age range, and none have examined continuous measures of prenatal alcohol exposure. We investigated the relation of extent of in utero alcohol exposure to cortical thickness in 78 preadolescent children with FASD and controls within a narrow age range. A whole-brain analysis using FreeSurfer revealed no significant clusters where cortical thickness differed by FASD diagnostic group. However, alcohol dose/occasion during pregnancy was inversely related to cortical thickness in 3 regions-right cuneus/pericalcarine/superior parietal lobe, fusiform/lingual gyrus, and supramarginal/postcentral gyrus. The effect of prenatal alcohol exposure on IQ was mediated by cortical thickness in the right occipitotemporal region. It is noteworthy that a continuous measure of maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy was more sensitive than FASD diagnosis and that the effect on cortical thickness was most evident in relation to a measure of maternal binge drinking. PMID:26088967

  10. Distinct frontal lobe morphology in girls and boys with ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Dirlikov, Benjamin; Shiels Rosch, Keri; Crocetti, Deana; Denckla, Martha B.; Mahone, E. Mark; Mostofsky, Stewart H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study investigated whether frontal lobe cortical morphology differs for boys and girls with ADHD (ages 8–12 years) in comparison to typically developing (TD) peers. Method Participants included 226 children between the ages of 8–12 including 93 children with ADHD (29 girls) and 133 TD children (42 girls) for which 3T MPRAGE MRI scans were obtained. A fully automated frontal lobe atlas was used to generate functionally distinct frontal subdivisions, with surface area (SA) and cortical thickness (CT) assessed in each region. Analyses focused on overall diagnostic differences as well as examinations of the effect of diagnosis within boys and girls. Results Girls, but not boys, with ADHD showed overall reductions in total prefrontal cortex (PFC) SA. Localization revealed that girls showed widely distributed reductions in the bilateral dorsolateral PFC, left inferior lateral PFC, right medial PFC, right orbitofrontal cortex, and left anterior cingulate; and boys showed reduced SA only in the right anterior cingulate and left medial PFC. In contrast, boys, but not girls, with ADHD showed overall reductions in total premotor cortex (PMC) SA. Further localization revealed that in boys, premotor reductions were observed in bilateral lateral PMC regions; and in girls reductions were observed in bilateral supplementary motor complex. In line with diagnostic group differences, PMC and PFC SAs were inversely correlated with symptom severity in both girls and boys with ADHD. Conclusions These results elucidate sex-based differences in cortical morphology of functional subdivisions of the frontal lobe and provide additional evidence of associations among SA and symptom severity in children with ADHD. PMID:25610784

  11. Relative frontal brain asymmetry and cortisol release after social stress: The role of action orientation.

    PubMed

    Düsing, Rainer; Tops, Mattie; Radtke, Elise Leila; Kuhl, Julius; Quirin, Markus

    2016-03-01

    Social evaluation is a potent stressor and consistently leads to an activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal system. Here, we investigated whether individual differences in action orientation influence the relationship between the cortisol response to social-evaluative threat and relative left frontal electroencephalographic (EEG) alpha asymmetry as a brain marker of approach motivation. Forty-nine participants were exposed to a camera-based variant of the Trier Social Stress Task while salivary cortisol and resting EEG frontal alpha asymmetry were assessed before and after stress induction. Higher relative left frontal activity was associated with higher changes in cortisol levels as measured by the area under curve with respect to increase, particularly in individuals low in action orientation. We discuss the role of the left frontal cortex in coping, the potential role of oxytocin, and negative health consequences when the left-frontal coping process becomes overstrained. PMID:26850008

  12. Finding prefrontal cortex in the rat.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Christiana M

    2016-08-15

    The prefrontal cortex of the rat. I. Cortical projection of the mediodorsal nucleus. II. Efferent connections The cortical projection field of the mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus (MD) was identified in the rat using the Fink-Heimer silver technique for tracing degenerating fibers. Small stereotaxic lesions confined to MD were followed by terminal degeneration in the dorsal bank of the rhinal sulcus (sulcal cortex) and the medial wall of the hemisphere anterior and dorsal to the genu of the corpus callosum (medial cortex). No degenerating fibers were traced to the convexity of the hemisphere. The cortical formation receiving a projection from MD is of a relatively undifferentiated type which had been previously classified as juxtallocortex. A study of the efferent fiber connections of the rat׳s MD-projection cortex demonstrated some similarities to those of monkey prefrontal cortex. A substantial projection to the pretectal area and deep layers of the superior colliculus originates in medial cortex, a connection previously reported for caudal prefrontal (area 8) cortex in the monkey. Sulcal cortex projects to basal olfactory structures and lateral hypothalamus, as does orbital frontal cortex in the monkey. The rat׳s MD-projection cortex differs from that in the monkey in that it lacks a granular layer and appears to have no prominent direct associations with temporal and juxtahippocampal areas. Furthermore, retrograde degeneration does not appear in the rat thalamus after damage to MD-projection areas, suggesting that the striatum or thalamus receives a proportionally larger share of the MD-projection in this animal than it does in the monkey. Comparative behavioral investigations are in progress to investigate functional differences between granular prefrontal cortex in the primate and the relatively primitive MD-projection cortex in the rat. © 1969. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:50th Anniversary Issue. PMID:26867704

  13. Subspecialization in the human posterior medial cortex

    PubMed Central

    Bzdok, Danilo; Heeger, Adrian; Langner, Robert; Laird, Angela R.; Fox, Peter T.; Palomero-Gallagher, Nicola; Vogt, Brent A.; Zilles, Karl; Eickhoff, Simon B.

    2014-01-01

    The posterior medial cortex (PMC) is particularly poorly understood. Its neural activity changes have been related to highly disparate mental processes. We therefore investigated PMC properties with a data-driven exploratory approach. First, we subdivided the PMC by whole-brain coactivation profiles. Second, functional connectivity of the ensuing PMC regions was compared by task-constrained meta-analytic coactivation mapping (MACM) and task-unconstrained resting-state correlations (RSFC). Third, PMC regions were functionally described by forward/reverse functional inference. A precuneal cluster was mostly connected to the intraparietal sulcus, frontal eye fields, and right temporo-parietal junction; associated with attention and motor tasks. A ventral posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) cluster was mostly connected to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and middle left inferior parietal cortex (IPC); associated with facial appraisal and language tasks. A dorsal PCC cluster was mostly connected to the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, anterior/posterior IPC, posterior midcingulate cortex, and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex; associated with delay discounting. A cluster in the retrosplenial cortex was mostly connected to the anterior thalamus and hippocampus. Furthermore, all PMC clusters were congruently coupled with the default mode network according to task-constrained but not task-unconstrained connectivity. We thus identified distinct regions in the PMC and characterized their neural networks and functional implications. PMID:25462801

  14. Anesthesia for fetal surgery.

    PubMed

    Cauldwell, Charles B

    2002-03-01

    Fetal surgery is the antenatal treatment of fetal malformations that cannot be adequately corrected after birth. Anesthesia for fetal surgery involves two patients, and issues of maternal safety, avoidance of fetal asphyxia, adequate fetal anesthesia and monitoring, and uterine relaxation are important. Communication with the surgeon to determine the surgical approach and need for uterine relaxation allows the anesthesiologist the ability to vary the anesthetic technique. Lessons learned from fetal surgery may help other neonates with life-threatening anomalies and may help understand the complex issues related to preterm labor. PMID:11892506

  15. Frontal glutamate and reward processing in adolescence and adulthood.

    PubMed

    Gleich, Tobias; Lorenz, Robert C; Pöhland, Lydia; Raufelder, Diana; Deserno, Lorenz; Beck, Anne; Heinz, Andreas; Kühn, Simone; Gallinat, Jürgen

    2015-11-01

    The fronto-limbic network interaction, driven by glutamatergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission, represents a core mechanism of motivated behavior and personality traits. Reward seeking behavior undergoes tremendous changes in adolescence paralleled by neurobiological changes of this network including the prefrontal cortex, striatum and amygdala. Since fronto-limbic dysfunctions also underlie major psychiatric diseases beginning in adolescence, this investigation focuses on network characteristics separating adolescents from adults. To investigate differences in network interactions, the brain reward system activity (slot machine task) together with frontal glutamate concentration (anterior cingulate cortex, ACC) was measured in 28 adolescents and 26 adults employing functional magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy, respectively. An inverse coupling of glutamate concentrations in the ACC and activation of the ventral striatum was observed in adolescents. Further, amygdala response in adolescents was negatively correlated with the personality trait impulsivity. For adults, no significant associations of network components or correlations with impulsivity were found. The inverse association between frontal glutamate concentration and striatal activation in adolescents is in line with the triadic model of motivated behavior stressing the important role of frontal top-down inhibition on limbic structures. Our data identified glutamate as the mediating neurotransmitter of this inhibitory process and demonstrates the relevance of glutamate on the reward system and related behavioral traits like impulsivity. This fronto-limbic coupling may represent a vulnerability factor for psychiatric disorders starting in adolescence but not in adulthood. PMID:25009315

  16. Individuals' and groups' intentions in the medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Chaminade, Thierry; Kawato, Mitsuo; Frith, Chris

    2011-11-16

    Functional MRI signal was recorded while participants perceived stimuli presented using moving dots. In two conditions of interest, the motion of dots depicted intentions: dots representing the joints of an agent performing an action, and dots representing individual agents behaving contingently. The finding of a common cluster in the posterior part of the medial frontal cortex involved in intentional action representation validates the hypothesis that perception of these two conditions requires a similar internal representation. A cluster responding to the behaving group only is found in the anterior medial frontal cortex. These results support a division of the medial frontal cortex according to social stimuli attributes, with anterior areas responding to higher-order group behaviours integrating the action of multiple individual agents. PMID:21897305

  17. Challenge of Fetal Mortality

    MedlinePlus

    ... Death Data File and Linked Birth/Infant Death Data Set, National Vital Statistics System The magnitude of fetal ... Death Data File and Linked Birth/Infant Death Data Set, NVSS. The vital statistics Fetal Death Data File ...

  18. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... alcohol can cause a group of conditions called fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs). Effects can include physical and behavioral problems such ... alcohol syndrome is the most serious type of FASD. People with fetal alcohol syndrome have facial abnormalities, ...

  19. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Daily life skills, such as feeding and bathing Fetal alcohol syndrome is the most serious type of FASD. People with fetal alcohol syndrome have facial abnormalities, including wide-set and narrow ...

  20. Perseverative Interference with Object-in-Place Scene Learning in Rhesus Monkeys with Bilateral Ablation of Ventrolateral Prefrontal Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, Mark G.; Browning, Philip G. F.; Mitchell, Anna S.

    2008-01-01

    Surgical disconnection of the frontal cortex and inferotemporal cortex severely impairs many aspects of visual learning and memory, including learning of new object-in-place scene memory problems, a monkey model of episodic memory. As part of a study of specialization within prefrontal cortex in visual learning and memory, we tested monkeys with…

  1. Point-light biological motion perception activates human premotor cortex.

    PubMed

    Saygin, Ayse Pinar; Wilson, Stephen M; Hagler, Donald J; Bates, Elizabeth; Sereno, Martin I

    2004-07-01

    Motion cues can be surprisingly powerful in defining objects and events. Specifically, a handful of point-lights attached to the joints of a human actor will evoke a vivid percept of action when the body is in motion. The perception of point-light biological motion activates posterior cortical areas of the brain. On the other hand, observation of others' actions is known to also evoke activity in motor and premotor areas in frontal cortex. In the present study, we investigated whether point-light biological motion animations would lead to activity in frontal cortex as well. We performed a human functional magnetic resonance imaging study on a high-field-strength magnet and used a number of methods to increase signal, as well as cortical surface-based analysis methods. Areas that responded selectively to point-light biological motion were found in lateral and inferior temporal cortex and in inferior frontal cortex. The robust responses we observed in frontal areas indicate that these stimuli can also recruit action observation networks, although they are very simplified and characterize actions by motion cues alone. The finding that even point-light animations evoke activity in frontal regions suggests that the motor system of the observer may be recruited to "fill in" these simplified displays. PMID:15240810

  2. Longitudinal progression of frontal and temporal lobe changes in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Cobia, Derin J; Smith, Matthew J; Wang, Lei; Csernansky, John G

    2012-08-01

    Cortical abnormalities are considered a neurobiological characteristic of schizophrenia. However, the pattern of such deficits as they progress over the illness remains poorly understood. The goal of this project was to assess the progression of cortical thinning in frontal and temporal cortical regions in schizophrenia, and determine whether relationships exist between them and neuropsychological and clinical symptom profiles. As part of a larger longitudinal 2-year follow-up study, schizophrenia (n=20) and healthy participants (n=20) group-matched for age, gender, and recent-alcohol use, were selected. Using MRI, estimates of gray matter thickness were derived from primary anatomical gyri of the frontal and temporal lobes using surface-based algorithms. These values were entered into repeated-measures analysis of variance models to determine group status and time effects. Change values in cortical regions were correlated with changes in neuropsychological functioning and clinical symptomatology. Results revealed exaggerated cortical thinning of the middle frontal, superior temporal, and middle temporal gyri in schizophrenia participants. These thickness changes strongly influenced volumetric reductions, but were not related to shrinking surface area. Neuropsychological and clinical symptom profiles were stable in the schizophrenia participants despite these neuroanatomic changes. Overall it appears that ongoing abnormalities in the cerebral cortex continue after initial onset of schizophrenia, particularly the lateral aspects of frontal and temporal regions, and do not relate to neuropsychological or clinical measures over time. Maintenance of neuropsychological performance and clinical stability in the face of changing neuroanatomical structure suggests the involvement of alternative compensatory mechanisms. PMID:22647883

  3. Genetic and Environmental Influences on Frontal EEG Asymmetry and Alpha Power in 9–10 Year Old Twins

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yu; Tuvblad, Catherine; Raine, Adrian; Lozano, Dora I.; Baker, Laura A.

    2008-01-01

    Modest genetic influences on frontal EEG asymmetry have been found in adults, but little is known about its genetic origins in children. Resting frontal asymmetry and alpha power were examined in 951 9–10-year-old twins. Results showed that in both males and females: (1) a modest but significant amount of variance in frontal asymmetry was accounted for by genetic factors (11–27%) with the remainder accounted for by non-shared environmental influences, and (2) alpha power were highly heritable, with 70–85% of the variance accounted for by genetic factors. Results suggest that the genetic architecture of frontal asymmetry and alpha power in late childhood are similar to that in adulthood and that the high non-shared environmental influences on frontal asymmetry may reflect environmentally-influenced individual differences in the maturation of frontal cortex as well as state-dependent influences on specific measurements. PMID:19386046

  4. Role of Medio-Dorsal Frontal and Posterior Parietal Neurons during Auditory Detection Performance in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bohon, Kaitlin S.; Wiest, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    To further characterize the role of frontal and parietal cortices in rat cognition, we recorded action potentials simultaneously from multiple sites in the medio-dorsal frontal cortex and posterior parietal cortex of rats while they performed a two-choice auditory detection task. We quantified neural correlates of task performance, including response movements, perception of a target tone, and the differentiation between stimuli with distinct features (different pitches or durations). A minority of units—15% in frontal cortex, 23% in parietal cortex—significantly distinguished hit trials (successful detections, response movement to the right) from correct rejection trials (correct leftward response to the absence of the target tone). Estimating the contribution of movement-related activity to these responses suggested that more than half of these units were likely signaling correct perception of the auditory target, rather than merely movement direction. In addition, we found a smaller and mostly not overlapping population of units that differentiated stimuli based on task-irrelevant details. The detection-related spiking responses we observed suggest that correlates of perception in the rat are sparsely represented among neurons in the rat's frontal-parietal network, without being concentrated preferentially in frontal or parietal areas. PMID:25479194

  5. [Interneuronal frontal-amygdala interactions in cats trained for the quality of the reinforcement].

    PubMed

    Merzhanova, G Kh; Dolbakian, E E

    1998-01-01

    In eight cats the appetitive instrumental conditioned reflexes to light were elaborated by the method of "active choice" of reinforcement quality: the short-latency bar-pressing responses were reinforced with bread-meat mixture and the delayed responses were reinforced with meat. The animals differed in behavior strategy: six cats preferred the delayed pressings (the so-called "self-control" group), and two cats preferred the pressings with short delay (the so-called "impulsive" group). The multiunit activity in the basolateral amygdala and frontal cortex was recorded by chronically implanted nichrome semimicroelectrodes. The interactions of the neighboring neurons in the basolateral amygdala and the frontal cortex (within the local neuronal networks) and between the amygdalar and cortical neurons (distributed neuronal networks of amygdalar-frontal and fronto-amygdalar directions) were estimated by means of statistical crosscorrelation analysis of spike trains. The interneuronal cross-correlations were studied with delays in the range of 0-100 ms. The number of cross-correlations between the neuronal discharges both in the local and distributed networks was significantly higher in "impulsive" cats, mainly, with delays in the range of 0-30 ms. In both groups of animals the number of correlations was the highest during omissions of conditioned pressings, i.e., in cases of difficult choice of reinforcement. We suggest that the basolateral amygdala, frontal cortex, and amygdalar-frontal distributed neuronal networks are involved in the system of brain structures, which determine the individual features of animal behavior. PMID:9700904

  6. Advances in fetal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pedreira, Denise Araujo Lapa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This paper discusses the main advances in fetal surgical therapy aiming to inform health care professionals about the state-of-the-art techniques and future challenges in this field. We discuss the necessary steps of technical evolution from the initial open fetal surgery approach until the development of minimally invasive techniques of fetal endoscopic surgery (fetoscopy). PMID:27074241

  7. Uptake of (/sup 3/H)testosterone and its metabolites by the brain and pituitary gland of the fetal macaque

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, R.P.; Bonsall, R.W.; Rees, H.D.

    1989-03-01

    Testosterone is secreted by the fetal testis during gestation, and this is thought to influence certain aspects of the brain's subsequent development. To study this action at the neuronal level, nine macaque fetuses were injected with 250 microCi (3H)testosterone via the umbilical vein at about 120 days gestation. After 60 min, samples of brain and peripheral tissue were studied by autoradiography or HPLC. Purified nuclear pellets were prepared, and radioactivity in ether extracts was fractionated by HPLC and identified by coelution with internal standard steroids. Concentrations of radioactivity were significantly higher (P less than 0.05) in the hypothalamus-preoptic area than in amygdala, hippocampus, midbrain, and cerebral and cerebellar cortexes, and most of the radioactivity (75%) in the hypothalamus-preoptic area coeluted with 17 beta-estradiol. Radioactivity coeluting with 17 beta-estradiol was also detected in nuclear fractions from amygdala (44%). In contrast, 80% of the radioactivity extracted from pituitary gland nuclei coeluted with testosterone. Most of the neurons labeled in autoradiograms were located in the hypothalamus and preoptic area, fewer were found in the amygdala, and labeling in the frontal or motor cortex did not exceed chance levels. Results suggested that aromatization and, consequently, estrogen receptors play a role in the effects of testosterone on the hypothalamus and amygdala of the primate fetus at this stage of development.

  8. The relation of hedonic hunger and restrained eating to lateralized frontal activation.

    PubMed

    Winter, S R; Feig, E H; Kounios, J; Erickson, B; Berkowitz, S; Lowe, M R

    2016-09-01

    Asymmetrical alpha activation in the prefrontal cortex (frontal asymmetry) in electroencephalography (EEG) has been related to eating behavior. Prior studies linked dietary restraint with right frontal asymmetry [1] and disinhibition with left frontal asymmetry [2]. The current study simultaneously assessed restrained eating and hedonic hunger (drive for food reward in the absence of hunger) in relation to frontal asymmetry. Resting-state EEG and measures of restrained eating (Revised Restraint Scale; RRS) and hedonic hunger (Power of Food Scale; PFS) were assessed in 61 non-obese adults. Individually, hedonic hunger predicted left asymmetry. However, PFS and RRS were correlated (r=0.48, p<0.05) and there was a significant interaction between PFS and RRS on frontal asymmetry, p<0.01. Results indicated that those high in hedonic hunger exhibited left asymmetry irrespective of RRS scores; among those low in PFS, only those high in RRS showed right asymmetry. Results were consistent with literature linking avoidant behaviors (restraint) with right-frontal asymmetry and approach behaviors (binge eating) with left-frontal asymmetry. It appears that a strong drive toward palatable foods predominates at a neural level even when restraint is high. Findings suggest that lateralized frontal activity is an indicator of motivation both to consume and to avoid consuming highly palatable foods. PMID:27133731

  9. Effects of low-level microwave irradiation on hippocampal and frontal cortical choline uptake are classically conditionable

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Horita, A.; Chou, C.K.; Guy, A.W.

    1987-08-01

    In previous research, we found that sodium-dependent high-affinity choline uptake in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of the rat was lowered after acute (45 min) exposure to low-level 2450-MHz pulsed microwaves (power density 1 mW/cm2; average whole body specific absorption rate, 0.6 W/kg; 2 mu sec pulses, 500 pps). In the present experiment, we investigated developments of tolerance and classical conditioning to these effects of microwaves. Rats were exposed to microwaves in cylindrical waveguides in 10 daily sessions (45 min per session). In an 11th session, we subjected the rats to either microwave (study of tolerance) or sham exposure (study of conditioned effect) for 45 min, and immediately measured choline uptake in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. We found that tolerance, a decrease in response to microwaves, developed to the effect of microwaves on choline uptake in the hippocampus, but not in the frontal cortex. Conditioned effects were also observed: an increase in choline uptake in the hippocampus and a decrease in uptake in the frontal cortex. These data suggest that the effects of microwaves on choline uptake in the hippocampus and frontal cortex are classically conditionable, probably to cues in the exposure environment.

  10. Frontal theta as a mechanism for cognitive control

    PubMed Central

    Cavanagh, James F.; Frank, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advancements in cognitive neuroscience have afforded a description of neural responses in terms of latent algorithmic operations. However, the adoption of this approach to human scalp EEG has been more limited, despite the ability of this methodology to quantify canonical neuronal processes. Here we provide evidence that theta band activities over the mid-frontal cortex appear to reflect a common computation used for realizing the need for cognitive control. Moreover, by virtue of inherent properties of field oscillations, these theta band processes may be used to communicate this need and subsequently implement such control across disparate brain regions. Frontal theta is thus a compelling candidate mechanism by which emergent processes such as ‘cognitive control’ may be biophysically realized. PMID:24835663

  11. Management of Frontal Sinus Tumors.

    PubMed

    Selleck, Anne Morgan; Desai, Dipan; Thorp, Brian D; Ebert, Charles S; Zanation, Adam M

    2016-08-01

    The most common primary tumors of the frontal sinus are osteomas and inverted papillomas, although a variety of other tumors involving this space have been reported. With the advent of new surgical techniques and instrumentation, an endoscopic approach to this region has become feasible. The preoperative assessment and decision making must take into account the complexity of frontal sinus anatomy, tumor type, tumor location, and associated attachments. These procedures allow adequate visualization, tumor removal, and postoperative monitoring, and preserve fairly normal sinus function. Open techniques may also be required and should be in the surgeon's armamentarium. PMID:27450620

  12. Sex-related differences in auditory processing in adolescents with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder: A magnetoencephalographic study

    PubMed Central

    Tesche, Claudia D.; Kodituwakku, Piyadasa W.; Garcia, Christopher M.; Houck, Jon M.

    2014-01-01

    Children exposed to substantial amounts of alcohol in utero display a broad range of morphological and behavioral outcomes, which are collectively referred to as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs). Common to all children on the spectrum are cognitive and behavioral problems that reflect central nervous system dysfunction. Little is known, however, about the potential effects of variables such as sex on alcohol-induced brain damage. The goal of the current research was to utilize magnetoencephalography (MEG) to examine the effect of sex on brain dynamics in adolescents and young adults with FASD during the performance of an auditory oddball task. The stimuli were short trains of 1 kHz “standard” tone bursts (80%) randomly interleaved with 1.5 kHz “target” tone bursts (10%) and “novel” digital sounds (10%). Participants made motor responses to the target tones. Results are reported for 44 individuals (18 males and 26 females) ages 12 through 22 years. Nine males and 13 females had a diagnosis of FASD and the remainder were typically-developing age- and sex-matched controls. The main finding was widespread sex-specific differential activation of the frontal, medial and temporal cortex in adolescents with FASD compared to typically developing controls. Significant differences in evoked-response and time–frequency measures of brain dynamics were observed for all stimulus types in the auditory cortex, inferior frontal sulcus and hippocampus. These results underscore the importance of considering the influence of sex when analyzing neurophysiological data in children with FASD. PMID:26082886

  13. Hemodynamics in fetal arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Sonesson, Sven-Erik; Acharya, Ganesh

    2016-06-01

    Fetal arrhythmias are among the few conditions that can be managed in utero. However, accurate diagnosis is essential for appropriate management. Ultrasound-based imaging methods can be used to study fetal heart structure and function noninvasively and help to understand fetal cardiovascular pathophysiology, and they remain the mainstay of evaluating fetuses with arrhythmias in clinical settings. Hemodynamic evaluation using Doppler echocardiography allows the elucidation of the electrophysiological mechanism and helps to make an accurate diagnosis. It can also be used as a tool to understand fetal cardiac pathophysiology, for assessing fetal condition and monitoring the effect of antiarrhythmic treatment. This narrative review describes Doppler techniques that are useful for evaluating fetal cardiac rhythms to refine diagnosis and provides an overview of hemodynamic changes observed in different types of fetal arrhythmia. PMID:26660845

  14. Premotor and parietal cortex: corticocortical connectivity and combinatorial computations.

    PubMed

    Wise, S P; Boussaoud, D; Johnson, P B; Caminiti, R

    1997-01-01

    The dorsal premotor cortex is a functionally distinct cortical field or group of fields in the primate frontal cortex. Anatomical studies have confirmed that most parietal input to the dorsal premotor cortex originates from the superior parietal lobule. However, these projections arise not only from the dorsal aspect of area 5, as has long been known, but also from newly defined areas of posterior parietal cortex, which are directly connected with the extrastriate visual cortex. Thus, the dorsal premotor cortex receives much more direct visual input than previously accepted. It appears that this fronto-parietal network functions as a visuomotor controller-one that makes computations based on proprioceptive, visual, gaze, attentional, and other information to produce an output that reflects the selection, preparation, and execution of movements. PMID:9056706

  15. Frontal-posterior theta oscillations reflect memory retrieval during sentence comprehension.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Lars; Grigutsch, Maren; Schmuck, Noura; Gaston, Phoebe; Friederici, Angela D

    2015-10-01

    Successful working-memory retrieval requires that items be retained as distinct units. At the neural level, it has been shown that theta-band oscillatory power increases with the number of to-be-distinguished items during working-memory retrieval. Here we hypothesized that during sentence comprehension, verbal-working-memory retrieval demands lead to increased theta power over frontal cortex, supposedly supporting the distinction amongst stored items during verbal-working-memory retrieval. Also, synchronicity may increase between the frontal cortex and the posterior cortex, with the latter supposedly supporting item retention. We operationalized retrieval by using pronouns, which refer to and trigger the retrieval of antecedent nouns from a preceding sentence part. Retrieval demand was systematically varied by changing the pronoun antecedent: Either, it was non-embedded in the preceding main clause, and thus easy-to-retrieve across a single clause boundary, or embedded in the preceding subordinate clause, and thus hard-to-retrieve across a double clause boundary. We combined electroencephalography (EEG), scalp-level time-frequency analysis, source localization, and source-level coherence analysis, observing a frontal-midline and broad left-hemispheric theta-power increase for embedded-antecedent compared to non-embedded-antecedent retrieval. Sources were localized to left-frontal, left-parietal, and bilateral-inferior-temporal cortices. Coherence analyses suggested synchronicity between left-frontal and left-parietal and between left-frontal and right-inferior-temporal cortices. Activity of an array of left-frontal, left-parietal, and bilateral-inferior-temporal cortices may thus assist retrieval during sentence comprehension, potentially indexing the orchestration of item distinction, verbal working memory, and long-term memory. Our results extend prior findings by mapping prior knowledge on the functional role of theta oscillations onto processes genuine to human

  16. Conceptual Models of Frontal Cyclones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eagleman, Joe R.

    1981-01-01

    This discussion of weather models uses maps to illustrate the differences among three types of frontal cyclones (long wave, short wave, and troughs). Awareness of these cyclones can provide clues to atmospheric conditions which can lead toward accurate weather forecasting. (AM)

  17. Collaborative Writing: Online versus Frontal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Passig, David; Schwartz, Gali

    2007-01-01

    Students in higher education, most frequently, use the frontal approach while being asked to collaborate on a writing assignment. However, the difficulty in collaborative writing using conventional technologies such as pen and paper, board or computer is the limited ability to view the work of your peers during the process (Baeker, Glass,…

  18. [Diagnostic dyspraxia and frontal syndrome].

    PubMed

    Donnet, A; Schmitt, A; Poncet, M

    1998-05-01

    A 27-year-old ambidexter woman experienced a clinical and psychometric frontal syndrome associated with a partial callosal syndrome following transcallosal surgery for an intraventricular neurocytoma. She also complained of difficulties with her left hand which realized a particular form of diagnostic dyspraxia: there were specific features of an isolated dysfunction of the control of the realization of a program. PMID:9773062

  19. Oscillatory dynamics coordinating human frontal networks in support of goal maintenance.

    PubMed

    Voytek, Bradley; Kayser, Andrew S; Badre, David; Fegen, David; Chang, Edward F; Crone, Nathan E; Parvizi, Josef; Knight, Robert T; D'Esposito, Mark

    2015-09-01

    Humans have a capacity for hierarchical cognitive control-the ability to simultaneously control immediate actions while holding more abstract goals in mind. Neuropsychological and neuroimaging evidence suggests that hierarchical cognitive control emerges from a frontal architecture whereby prefrontal cortex coordinates neural activity in the motor cortices when abstract rules are needed to govern motor outcomes. We utilized the improved temporal resolution of human intracranial electrocorticography to investigate the mechanisms by which frontal cortical oscillatory networks communicate in support of hierarchical cognitive control. Responding according to progressively more abstract rules resulted in greater frontal network theta phase encoding (4-8 Hz) and increased prefrontal local neuronal population activity (high gamma amplitude, 80-150 Hz), which predicts trial-by-trial response times. Theta phase encoding coupled with high gamma amplitude during inter-regional information encoding, suggesting that inter-regional phase encoding is a mechanism for the dynamic instantiation of complex cognitive functions by frontal cortical subnetworks. PMID:26214371

  20. Transient shifts in frontal and parietal circuits scale with enhanced visual feedback and changes in force variability and error

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Cynthia; Coombes, Stephen A.; Corcos, Daniel M.; Christou, Evangelos A.

    2013-01-01

    When subjects perform a learned motor task with increased visual gain, error and variability are reduced. Neuroimaging studies have identified a corresponding increase in activity in parietal cortex, premotor cortex, primary motor cortex, and extrastriate visual cortex. Much less is understood about the neural processes that underlie the immediate transition from low to high visual gain within a trial. This study used 128-channel electroencephalography to measure cortical activity during a visually guided precision grip task, in which the gain of the visual display was changed during the task. Force variability during the transition from low to high visual gain was characterized by an inverted U-shape, whereas force error decreased from low to high gain. Source analysis identified cortical activity in the same structures previously identified using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Source analysis also identified a time-varying shift in the strongest source activity. Superior regions of the motor and parietal cortex had stronger source activity from 300 to 600 ms after the transition, whereas inferior regions of the extrastriate visual cortex had stronger source activity from 500 to 700 ms after the transition. Force variability and electrical activity were linearly related, with a positive relation in the parietal cortex and a negative relation in the frontal cortex. Force error was nonlinearly related to electrical activity in the parietal cortex and frontal cortex by a quadratic function. This is the first evidence that force variability and force error are systematically related to a time-varying shift in cortical activity in frontal and parietal cortex in response to enhanced visual gain. PMID:23365186

  1. Remodeling of the Fetal Collecting Duct Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Hiatt, Michael J.; Ivanova, Larissa; Toran, Nuria; Tarantal, Alice F.; Matsell, Douglas G.

    2010-01-01

    Congenital urinary tract obstruction induces changes to the renal collecting duct epithelium, including alteration and depletion of intercalated cells. To study the effects of obstruction on the ontogeny of intercalated cell development, we examined normal and obstructed human fetal and postnatal kidneys. In the normal human fetal kidney, intercalated cells originated in the medullary collecting duct at 8 weeks gestation and remained most abundant in the inner medulla throughout gestation. In the cortex, intercalated cells were rare at 18 and 26 weeks gestation and observed at low abundance at 36 weeks gestation. Although early intercalated cells exhibit an immature phenotype, Type A intercalated cells predominated in the inner and outer medullae at 26 and 36 weeks gestation with other intercalated cell subtypes observed rarely. Postnatally, the collecting duct epithelium underwent a remodeling whereby intercalated cells become abundant in the cortex yet absent from the inner medulla. In 18-week obstructed kidneys with mild to moderate injury, the intercalated cells became more abundant and differentiated than the equivalent age-matched normal kidney. In contrast, more severely injured ducts of the late obstructed kidney exhibited a significant reduction in intercalated cells. These studies characterize the normal ontogeny of human intercalated cell development and suggest that obstruction induces premature remodeling and differentiation of the fetal collecting duct epithelium. PMID:20035053

  2. Vocalization Induced CFos Expression in Marmoset Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Cory T.; DiMauro, Audrey; Pistorio, Ashley; Hendry, Stewart; Wang, Xiaoqin

    2010-01-01

    All non-human primates communicate with conspecifics using vocalizations, a system involving both the production and perception of species-specific vocal signals. Much of the work on the neural basis of primate vocal communication in cortex has focused on the sensory processing of vocalizations, while relatively little data are available for vocal production. Earlier physiological studies in squirrel monkeys had shed doubts on the involvement of primate cortex in vocal behaviors. The aim of the present study was to identify areas of common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) cortex that are potentially involved in vocal communication. In this study, we quantified cFos expression in three areas of marmoset cortexfrontal, temporal (auditory), and medial temporal – under various vocal conditions. Specifically, we examined cFos expression in these cortical areas during the sensory, motor (vocal production), and sensory–motor components of vocal communication. Our results showed an increase in cFos expression in ventrolateral prefrontal cortex as well as the medial and lateral belt areas of auditory cortex in the vocal perception condition. In contrast, subjects in the vocal production condition resulted in increased cFos expression only in dorsal premotor cortex. During the sensory–motor condition (antiphonal calling), subjects exhibited cFos expression in each of the above areas, as well as increased expression in perirhinal cortex. Overall, these results suggest that various cortical areas outside primary auditory cortex are involved in primate vocal communication. These findings pave the way for further physiological studies of the neural basis of primate vocal communication. PMID:21179582

  3. Historical evolution of the frontal lobe syndrome.

    PubMed

    Krudop, Welmoed A; Pijnenburg, Yolande A L

    2015-01-01

    The function of the frontal lobes and the related frontal lobe syndrome have not been described in detail until relatively late in history. Slowly, the combination of knowledge from animal models, the detailed examination of symptoms after traumatic frontal lobe injuries, and the rise and fall of psychosurgery has led to increasing insight into frontal lobe function. The frontosubcortical circuits have been described and increasingly related to clinical syndromes, confirmed by the latest developments in functional connectivity networks. PMID:25997476

  4. The Role of the Orbitofrontal Cortex in Human Discrimination Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Henry W.; Clark, Luke; Myers, Catherine E.; Gluck, Mark A.; Sahakian, Barbara J.; Bullmore, Edward T.; Robbins, Trevor W.

    2008-01-01

    Several lines of evidence implicate the prefrontal cortex in learning but there is little evidence from studies of human lesion patients to demonstrate the critical role of this structure. To this end, we tested patients with lesions of the frontal lobe (n = 36) and healthy controls (n = 35) on two learning tasks: the weather prediction task…

  5. Prefrontal Cortex Contributions to Episodic Retrieval Monitoring and Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruse, Damian; Wilding, Edward L.

    2009-01-01

    Although the prefrontal cortex (PFC) plays roles in episodic memory judgments, the specific processes it supports are not understood fully. Event-related potential (ERP) studies of episodic retrieval have revealed an electrophysiological modulation--the right-frontal ERP old/new effect--which is thought to reflect activity in PFC. The functional…

  6. Fetal Health and Development

    MedlinePlus

    ... specific prenatal tests to monitor both the mother's health and fetal health during each trimester. With modern technology, health professionals can Detect birth defects Identify problems that ...

  7. Action selection and action value in frontal-striatal circuits

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Moonsang; Lee, Eunjeong; Averbeck, Bruno B.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The role that frontal-striatal circuits play in normal behavior remains unclear. Two of the leading hypotheses suggest that these circuits are important for action selection or reinforcement learning. To examine these hypotheses we carried out an experiment in which monkeys had to select actions in two different task conditions. In the first (random) condition actions were selected on the basis of perceptual inference. In the second (fixed) condition the animals used reinforcement from previous trials to select actions. Examination of neural activity showed that the representation of the selected action was stronger in lateral prefrontal cortex (lPFC), and occurred earlier in the lPFC than it did in the dorsal striatum (dSTR). In contrast to this, the representation of action values, in both the random and fixed conditions was stronger in the dSTR. Thus, the dSTR contains an enriched representation of action value, but it followed frontal cortex in action selection. PMID:22681697

  8. Frontal photopolymerization for microfluidic applications.

    PubMed

    Cabral, João T; Hudson, Steven D; Harrison, Christopher; Douglas, Jack F

    2004-11-01

    Frontal photopolymerization (FPP) offers numerous advantages for the rapid prototyping of microfluidic devices. Quantitative utilization of this method, however, requires a control of the vertical dimensions of the patterned resist material. To address this fundamental problem, we study the ultraviolet (UV) photopolymerization of a series of multifunctional thiolene resists through a combination of experiments and analytical modeling of the polymerization fronts. We describe this nonlinear spatio-temporal growth process in terms of a "minimal" model involving an order parameter phi(x, t) characterizing the extent of monomer-to-polymer conversion, the optical attenuation T(x, t), and the solid front position h(t). The latter exhibits an induction time (or equivalent critical UV dose) characterizing the onset of frontal propagation. We also observe a novel transition between two logarithmic rates of growth, determined by the Beer-Lambert attenuation constants mu(0) and mu(infinity) of the monomer and fully polymerized material, respectively. The measured frontal kinetics and optical transmission of the thiolene resist materials are consistent with our photopolymerization model, exhibiting both "photodarkening" and "photoinvariant" polymerization. This is apparently the first observation of photodarkening reported in FPP. On the basis of these results, multilevel fluidic devices with controlled height are readily fabricated with modulated illumination. A representative two-level microfluidic device, incorporating a chaotic mixer, a T junction, and a series of controlled flow constrictions, illustrates the practical versatility of this fabrication method. PMID:15518489

  9. Frontal and rostral anterior cingulate (rACC) theta EEG in depression: implications for treatment outcome?

    PubMed

    Arns, Martijn; Etkin, Amit; Hegerl, Ulrich; Williams, Leanne M; DeBattista, Charles; Palmer, Donna M; Fitzgerald, Paul B; Harris, Anthony; deBeuss, Roger; Gordon, Evian

    2015-08-01

    In major depressive disorder (MDD), elevated theta current density in the rostral anterior cingulate (rACC), as estimated by source localization of scalp-recorded electroencenphalogram (EEG), has been associated with response to antidepressant treatments, whereas elevated frontal theta has been linked to non-response. This study used source localization to attempt to integrate these apparently opposite results and test, whether antidepressant response is associated with elevated rACC theta and non-response with elevated frontal theta and whether theta activity is a differential predictor of response to different types of commonly used antidepressants. In the international Study to Predict Optimized Treatment in Depression (iSPOT-D), a multi-center, international, randomized, prospective practical trial, 1008 MDD participants were randomized to escitalopram, sertraline or venlafaxine-XR. The study also recruited 336 healthy controls. Treatment response and remission were established after eight weeks using the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD17). The resting-state EEG was assessed at baseline with eyes closed and source localization (eLORETA) was employed to extract theta from the rACC and frontal cortex. Patients with MDD had elevated theta in both frontal cortex and rACC, with small effect sizes. High frontal and rACC theta were associated with treatment non-response, but not with non-remission, and this effect was most pronounced in a subgroup with previous treatment failures. Low theta in frontal cortex and rACC are found in responders to antidepressant treatments with a small effect size. Future studies should investigate in more detail the role of previous treatment (failure) in the association between theta and treatment outcome. PMID:25936227

  10. Dual streams of auditory afferents target multiple domains in the primate prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Romanski, L. M.; Tian, B.; Fritz, J.; Mishkin, M.; Goldman-Rakic, P. S.; Rauschecker, J. P.

    2009-01-01

    ‘What’ and ‘where’ visual streams define ventrolateral object and dorsolateral spatial processing domains in the prefrontal cortex of nonhuman primates. We looked for similar streams for auditory–prefrontal connections in rhesus macaques by combining microelectrode recording with anatomical tract-tracing. Injection of multiple tracers into physiologically mapped regions AL, ML and CL of the auditory belt cortex revealed that anterior belt cortex was reciprocally connected with the frontal pole (area 10), rostral principal sulcus (area 46) and ventral prefrontal regions (areas 12 and 45), whereas the caudal belt was mainly connected with the caudal principal sulcus (area 46) and frontal eye fields (area 8a). Thus separate auditory streams originate in caudal and rostral auditory cortex and target spatial and non-spatial domains of the frontal lobe, respectively. PMID:10570492

  11. Estimating frontal and parietal involvement in cognitive estimation: a study of focal neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bisbing, Teagan A.; Olm, Christopher A.; McMillan, Corey T.; Rascovsky, Katya; Baehr, Laura; Ternes, Kylie; Irwin, David J.; Clark, Robin; Grossman, Murray

    2015-01-01

    We often estimate an unknown value based on available relevant information, a process known as cognitive estimation. In this study, we assess the cognitive and neuroanatomic basis for quantitative estimation by examining deficits in patients with focal neurodegenerative disease in frontal and parietal cortex. Executive function and number knowledge are key components in cognitive estimation. Prefrontal cortex has been implicated in multilevel reasoning and planning processes, and parietal cortex has been associated with number knowledge required for such estimations. We administered the Biber cognitive estimation test (BCET) to assess cognitive estimation in 22 patients with prefrontal disease due to behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), to 17 patients with parietal disease due to corticobasal syndrome (CBS) or posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) and 11 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Both bvFTD and CBS/PCA patients had significantly more difficulty with cognitive estimation than controls. MCI were not impaired on BCET relative to controls. Regression analyses related BCET performance to gray matter atrophy in right lateral prefrontal and orbital frontal cortices in bvFTD, and to atrophy in right inferior parietal cortex, right insula, and fusiform cortices in CBS/PCA. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that a frontal-parietal network plays a crucial role in cognitive estimation. PMID:26089786

  12. The effects of frontal lobe lesions on goal achievement in the water jug task.

    PubMed

    Colvin, M K; Dunbar, K; Grafman, J

    2001-11-15

    Patients with prefrontal cortex lesions are impaired on a variety of planning and problem-solving tasks. We examined the problem-solving performance of 27 patients with focal frontal lobe damage on the Water Jug task. The Water Jug task has never been used to assess problem-solving ability in neurologically impaired patients nor in functional neuroimaging studies, despite sharing structural similarities with other tasks sensitive to prefrontal cortex function, including the Tower of Hanoi, Tower of London, and Wisconsin Card Sorting Task (WCST). Our results demonstrate that the Water Jug task invokes a unique combination of problem-solving and planning strategies, allowing a more precise identification of frontal lobe lesion patients' cognitive deficits. All participants (patients and matched controls) appear to be utilizing a hill-climbing strategy that does not require sophisticated planning; however, frontal lobe lesion patients (FLLs) struggled to make required "counterintuitive moves" not predicted by this strategy and found within both solution paths. Left and bilateral FLLs were more impaired than right FLLs. Analysis of the left hemisphere brain regions encompassed by the lesions of these patients found that poor performance was linked to left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex damage. We propose that patients with left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex lesions have difficulty making a decision requiring the conceptual comparison of nonverbal stimuli, manipulation of select representations of potential solutions, and are unable to appropriately inhibit a response in keeping with the final goal. PMID:11784450

  13. Fracture of the frontal sinus in children.

    PubMed

    Weber, S C; Cohn, A M

    1977-04-01

    Two juvenile patients, ages 5 and 8, had traumatic fractures of the frontal sinus that included involvement of the nasal-frontal ducts and posterior tables. Principles of management are discussed and the techniques for the operative procedures described. While rare in occurrence in children, it is felt that traumatic involvement of the nasal-frontal ducts or posterior tables of the frontal sinus requires an osteoplastic flap--fat obliteration of the frontal sinus cavity in order to preclude subsequent mucocele development or mucosal ingrowth into the anterior fossa. PMID:849204

  14. Vertical transmission of Zika virus targeting the radial glial cells affects cortex development of offspring mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kong-Yan; Zuo, Guo-Long; Li, Xiao-Feng; Ye, Qing; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Huang, Xing-Yao; Cao, Wu-Chun; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Luo, Zhen-Ge

    2016-06-01

    The recent Zika virus (ZIKV) epidemic in Latin America coincided with a marked increase in microcephaly in newborns. However, the causal link between maternal ZIKV infection and malformation of the fetal brain has not been firmly established. Here we show a vertical transmission of ZIKV in mice and a marked effect on fetal brain development. We found that intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of a contemporary ZIKV strain in pregnant mice led to the infection of radial glia cells (RGs) of dorsal ventricular zone of the fetuses, the primary neural progenitors responsible for cortex development, and caused a marked reduction of these cortex founder cells in the fetuses. Interestingly, the infected fetal mice exhibited a reduced cavity of lateral ventricles and a discernable decrease in surface areas of the cortex. This study thus supports the conclusion that vertically transmitted ZIKV affects fetal brain development and provides a valuable animal model for the evaluation of potential therapeutic or preventative strategies. PMID:27174054

  15. Vertical transmission of Zika virus targeting the radial glial cells affects cortex development of offspring mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kong-Yan; Zuo, Guo-Long; Li, Xiao-Feng; Ye, Qing; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Huang, Xing-Yao; Cao, Wu-Chun; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Luo, Zhen-Ge

    2016-01-01

    The recent Zika virus (ZIKV) epidemic in Latin America coincided with a marked increase in microcephaly in newborns. However, the causal link between maternal ZIKV infection and malformation of the fetal brain has not been firmly established. Here we show a vertical transmission of ZIKV in mice and a marked effect on fetal brain development. We found that intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of a contemporary ZIKV strain in pregnant mice led to the infection of radial glia cells (RGs) of dorsal ventricular zone of the fetuses, the primary neural progenitors responsible for cortex development, and caused a marked reduction of these cortex founder cells in the fetuses. Interestingly, the infected fetal mice exhibited a reduced cavity of lateral ventricles and a discernable decrease in surface areas of the cortex. This study thus supports the conclusion that vertically transmitted ZIKV affects fetal brain development and provides a valuable animal model for the evaluation of potential therapeutic or preventative strategies. PMID:27174054

  16. [Frontal osteoplasty technique. Report of a case of giant frontal osteoma].

    PubMed

    García Rodríguez, M R; Cabanas López, A; Fernández Domínguez, A; García Calleja, J M; García Rodríguez, J F

    1991-01-01

    We present the case of a patient with old frontal headache, who was admitted with frontal acute sinusitis symptoms at the emergency service. The radiology study shows a compatible image with frontal osteoma, which was extirpated as being asymptomatic, by frontal osteoplastic technique. The case is described and it is made a frontal osteoma review and the surgical technique used to do it. PMID:2036264

  17. Fetal Neurobehavioral Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPietro, Janet A.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Investigated the ontogeny of fetal autonomic, motoric, state, and interactive functioning in 31 healthy fetuses from 20 weeks through term. Found that male fetuses were more active than female fetuses, and that greater maternal stress appraisal was associated with reduced fetal heart rate variability. Found that an apparent period of…

  18. Fetal alcohol syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Fetal alcohol syndrome is growth, mental, and physical problems that may occur in a baby when a mother drinks ... A baby with fetal alcohol syndrome may have the following symptoms: Poor growth while the baby is in the womb and after birth Decreased muscle ...

  19. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caley, Linda M.; Kramer, Charlotte; Robinson, Luther K.

    2005-01-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is a serious and widespread problem in this country. Positioned within the community with links to children, families, and healthcare systems, school nurses are a critical element in the prevention and treatment of those affected by fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. Although most school nurses are familiar…

  20. Prestimulus frontal-parietal coherence predicts auditory detection performance in rats

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Linnea; Salehi, Kia; Bohon, Kaitlin S.

    2014-01-01

    Electrophysiology in primates has implicated long-range neural coherence as a potential mechanism for enhancing sensory detection. To test whether local synchronization and long-range neural coherence support detection performance in rats, we recorded local field potentials (LFPs) in frontal and parietal cortex while rats performed an auditory detection task. We observed significantly elevated power at multiple low frequencies (<15 Hz) preceding the target beep when the animal failed to respond to the signal (misses), in both frontal and parietal cortex. In terms of long-range coherence, we observed significantly more frontal-parietal coherence in the beta band (15–30 Hz) before the signal on misses compared with hits. This effect persisted after regressing away linear trends in the coherence values during a session, showing that the excess frontal-parietal beta coherence prior to misses cannot be explained by slow motivational changes during a session. In addition, a trend toward higher low-frequency (<15 Hz) coherence prior to miss trials compared with hits became highly significant when we rereferenced the LFPs to the mean voltage on each recording array, suggesting that the results are specific to our frontal and parietal areas. These results do not support a role for long-range frontal-parietal coherence or local synchronization in facilitating the detection of external stimuli. Rather, they extend to long-range frontal-parietal coherence previous findings that correlate local synchronization of low-frequency (<15 Hz) oscillations with inattention to external stimuli and synchronization of beta rhythms (15–30 Hz) with voluntary or involuntary prolongation of the current cognitive or motor state. PMID:24572093

  1. Biomechanics of frontal skull fracture.

    PubMed

    Delye, Hans; Verschueren, Peter; Depreitere, Bart; Verpoest, Ignaas; Berckmans, Daniel; Vander Sloten, Jos; Van Der Perre, Georges; Goffin, Jan

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether an energy failure level applies to the skull fracture mechanics in unembalmed post-mortem human heads under dynamic frontal loading conditions. A double-pendulum model was used to conduct frontal impact tests on specimens from 18 unembalmed post-mortem human subjects. The specimens were isolated at the occipital condyle level, and pre-test computed tomography images were obtained. The specimens were rigidly attached to an aluminum pendulum in an upside down position and obtained a single degree of freedom, allowing motion in the plane of impact. A steel pendulum delivered the impact and was fitted with a flat-surfaced, cylindrical aluminum impactor, which distributed the load to a force sensor. The relative displacement between the two pendulums was used as a measure for the deformation of the specimen in the plane of impact. Three impact velocity conditions were created: low (3.60+/-0.23 m/sec), intermediate (5.21+/-0.04 m/sec), and high (6.95+/-0.04 m/sec) velocity. Computed tomography and dissection techniques were used to detect pathology. If no fracture was detected, repeated tests on the same specimen were performed with higher impact energy until fracture occurred. Peak force, displacement and energy variables were used to describe the biomechanics. Our data suggests the existence of an energy failure level in the range of 22-24 J for dynamic frontal loading of an intact unembalmed head, allowed to move with one degree of freedom. Further experiments, however, are necessary to confirm that this is a definitive energy criterion for skull fracture following impact. PMID:17970621

  2. Slowly progressive anarthria with late anterior opercular syndrome: a variant form of frontal cortical atrophy syndromes.

    PubMed

    Broussolle, E; Bakchine, S; Tommasi, M; Laurent, B; Bazin, B; Cinotti, L; Cohen, L; Chazot, G

    1996-12-01

    We describe eight patients with slowly progressive speech production deficit combining speech apraxia, dysarthria, dysprosody and orofacial apraxia, and initially no other deficit in other language and non-language neuropsychological domains. Long-term follow-up (6-10 years) in 4 cases showed an evolution to muteness, bilateral suprabulbar paresis with automatic-voluntary dissociation and frontal lobe cognitive slowing without generalised intellectual deterioration. Most disabled patients presented with an anterior opercular syndrome (Foix-Chavany-Marie syndrome), and pyramidal or extrapyramidal signs. CT and MRI findings disclosed asymmetric (left > right) progressive cortical atrophy of the frontal lobes predominating in the posterior inferior frontal region, notably the operculum. SPECT and PET revealed a decreased cerebral blood flow and metabolism, prominent in the left posterior-inferior frontal gyrus and premotor cortex, extending bilaterally in the most advanced cases. Pathological study of two cases showed non-specific neuronal loss, gliosis, and spongiosis of superficial cortical layers, mainly confined to the frontal lobes, with no significant abnormalities in the basal ganglia, thalamus, cerebellum, brain stem (except severe neuronal loss in the substantia nigra in one case), and spinal cord. We propose to call this peculiar syndrome Slowly Progressive Anarthria (SPA), based on its specific clinical presentation, and its metabolic and pathological correlates. SPA represents another clinical expression of focal cortical degeneration syndromes, that may overlap with other similar syndromes, specially primary progressive aphasia and the various frontal lobe dementias. PMID:8994103

  3. The human cerebral cortex flattens during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Alemán-Gómez, Yasser; Janssen, Joost; Schnack, Hugo; Balaban, Evan; Pina-Camacho, Laura; Alfaro-Almagro, Fidel; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Otero, Soraya; Baeza, Immaculada; Moreno, Dolores; Bargalló, Nuria; Parellada, Mara; Arango, Celso; Desco, Manuel

    2013-09-18

    The human cerebral cortex appears to shrink during adolescence. To delineate the dynamic morphological changes involved in this process, 52 healthy male and female adolescents (11-17 years old) were neuroimaged twice using magnetic resonance imaging, approximately 2 years apart. Using a novel morphometric analysis procedure combining the FreeSurfer and BrainVisa image software suites, we quantified global and lobar change in cortical thickness, outer surface area, the gyrification index, the average Euclidean distance between opposing sides of the white matter surface (gyral white matter thickness), the convex ("exposed") part of the outer cortical surface (hull surface area), sulcal length, depth, and width. We found that the cortical surface flattens during adolescence. Flattening was strongest in the frontal and occipital cortices, in which significant sulcal widening and decreased sulcal depth co-occurred. Globally, sulcal widening was associated with cortical thinning and, for the frontal cortex, with loss of surface area. For the other cortical lobes, thinning was related to gyral white matter expansion. The overall flattening of the macrostructural three-dimensional architecture of the human cortex during adolescence thus involves changes in gray matter and effects of the maturation of white matter. PMID:24048830

  4. When anger leads to aggression: induction of relative left frontal cortical activity with transcranial direct current stimulation increases the anger–aggression relationship

    PubMed Central

    Hortensius, Ruud; Schutter, Dennis J. L. G.

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between anger and aggression is imperfect. Based on work on the neuroscience of anger, we predicted that anger associated with greater relative left frontal cortical activation would be more likely to result in aggression. To test this hypothesis, we combined transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the frontal cortex with interpersonal provocation. Participants received insulting feedback after 15 min of tDCS and were able to aggress by administering noise blasts to the insulting participant. Individuals who received tDCS to increase relative left frontal cortical activity behaved more aggressively when they were angry. No relation between anger and aggression was observed in the increase relative right frontal cortical activity or sham condition. These results concur with the motivational direction model of frontal asymmetry, in which left frontal activity is associated with anger. We propose that anger with approach motivational tendencies is more likely to result in aggression. PMID:21421731

  5. When anger leads to aggression: induction of relative left frontal cortical activity with transcranial direct current stimulation increases the anger-aggression relationship.

    PubMed

    Hortensius, Ruud; Schutter, Dennis J L G; Harmon-Jones, Eddie

    2012-03-01

    The relationship between anger and aggression is imperfect. Based on work on the neuroscience of anger, we predicted that anger associated with greater relative left frontal cortical activation would be more likely to result in aggression. To test this hypothesis, we combined transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the frontal cortex with interpersonal provocation. Participants received insulting feedback after 15 min of tDCS and were able to aggress by administering noise blasts to the insulting participant. Individuals who received tDCS to increase relative left frontal cortical activity behaved more aggressively when they were angry. No relation between anger and aggression was observed in the increase relative right frontal cortical activity or sham condition. These results concur with the motivational direction model of frontal asymmetry, in which left frontal activity is associated with anger. We propose that anger with approach motivational tendencies is more likely to result in aggression. PMID:21421731

  6. Behavioral and hormonal reactivity to threat: Effects of selective amygdala, hippocampal or orbital frontal lesions in monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Christopher J.; Bachevalier, Jocelyne

    2008-01-01

    Summary We compared the effects of bilateral amygdala, hippocampal or orbital frontal cortex lesions on emotional and hormonal reactivity in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). Experiment 1 measured behavioral reactivity to an unfamiliar human intruder before and after surgery. Animals with amygdala lesions demonstrated decreases in one passive defensive behavior (freezing), whereas animals with hippocampal lesions showed decreases in a more stimulus-directed defensive behavior (tooth grinding). Orbital frontal cortex lesions also reduced these two defensive behaviors, as well as decreased cage-shaking dominance displays. Animals with amygdala, hippocampal or sham lesions also demonstrated increased tension-related behaviors after surgery, but those with orbital frontal lesions did not. Finally, all three lesions diminished the operated animals' ability to modulate tension-related behaviors depending on the magnitude of threat posed by the human intruder. Experiment 2 measured circulating levels of cortisol and testosterone when a subset of these same animals were at rest and following physical restraint, temporary isolation, exposure to threatening objects and social interactions with an unfamiliar conspecific. None of the lesions impacted on testosterone levels in any condition. Amygdala or orbital frontal lesions blunted cortisol reactivity during isolation from peers, but not during any other condition. Hippocampal lesions did not alter circulating levels of cortisol under any conditions. These results indicate that the amygdala, hippocampus and orbital frontal cortex play distinct, yet complimentary roles in coordinating emotional and hormonal reactivity to threat. PMID:18650022

  7. The fetal urinoma revisited.

    PubMed

    Yitta, Silaja; Saadai, Payam; Filly, Roy A

    2014-01-01

    The fetal urinoma is a rare but important diagnosis, as it indicates substantial underlying obstruction with implications for the functionality of the affected kidney. This case series describes a single center's experience with the diagnosis and management of fetal urinomas. All 25 cases were diagnosed or referred to our medical center over an 11-year period. Most cases were secondary to either posterior urethral valves or ureteropelvic junction obstruction. Fetal interventions, including percutaneous drainage of the urinoma and cystoscopic alleviation of bladder outlet obstruction, were performed in 4 cases. PMID:24371112

  8. Dissociation in prefrontal cortex of affective and attentional shifts.

    PubMed

    Dias, R; Robbins, T W; Roberts, A C

    1996-03-01

    The prefrontal cortex is implicated in such human characteristics as volition, planning, abstract reasoning and affect. Frontal-lobe damage can cause disinhibition such that the behaviour of a subject is guided by previously acquired responses that are inappropriate to the current situation. Here we demonstrate that disinhibition, or a loss of inhibitory control, can be selective for particular cognitive functions and that different regions of the prefrontal cortex provide inhibitory control in different aspects of cognitive processing. Thus, whereas damage to the lateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann's area 9) in monkeys causes a loss of inhibitory control in attentional selection, damage to the orbito-frontal cortex in monkeys causes a loss of inhibitory control in 'affective' processing, thereby impairing the ability to alter behaviour in response to fluctuations in the emotional significance of stimuli. These findings not only support the view that the prefrontal cortex has multiple functions, but also provide evidence for the distribution of different cognitive functions within specific regions of prefrontal cortex. PMID:8598908

  9. Anatomic Considerations in Frontal Sinus Surgery.

    PubMed

    Folbe, Adam J; Svider, Peter F; Eloy, Jean Anderson

    2016-08-01

    Comprehension of the complex anatomic variants comprising the frontal sinus outflow tract is essential for successful surgical intervention. Deviation from sound technique increases the potential for a variety of deleterious sequelae, including recurrent disease as well as catastrophic intracranial and orbital injury. Furthermore, incomplete removal of elements occluding the frontal recess can result in severe stenosis that can increase the difficulty of further interventions. This review covers anatomic considerations that should be kept in mind when performing frontal sinus surgery. PMID:27329978

  10. Overview of Frontal Sinus Pathology and Management.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Alejandro; Baredes, Soly; Setzen, Michael; Eloy, Jean Anderson

    2016-08-01

    The frontal sinus is the most complex of all paranasal sinuses. Given its proximity to the cranial vault and orbit, frontal sinus pathology can progress to involve these structures and lead to significant morbidity, or even mortality. Surgical management of the frontal sinus is technically challenging. Various open and endoscopic surgical techniques are available to the otolaryngologist. This article presents an overview of the major disease entities that affect the frontal sinus, with a special emphasis on treatment principles and surgical management. PMID:27329984

  11. Frontal Midline Theta Reflects Anxiety and Cognitive Control: Meta-Analytic Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Cavanagh, James F.; Shackman, Alexander J.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence from imaging and anatomical studies suggests that the midcingulate cortex (MCC) is a dynamic hub lying at the interface of affect and cognition. In particular, this neural system appears to integrate information about conflict and punishment in order to optimize behavior in the face of action-outcome uncertainty. In a series of meta-analyses, we show how recent human electrophysiological research provides compelling evidence that frontal-midline theta signals reflecting MCC activity are moderated by anxiety and predict adaptive behavioral adjustments. These findings underscore the importance of frontal theta activity to a broad spectrum of control operations. We argue that frontal-midline theta provides a neurophysiologically plausible mechanism for optimally adjusting behavior to uncertainty, a hallmark of situations that elicit anxiety and demand cognitive control. These observations compel a new perspective on the mechanisms guiding motivated learning and behavior and provide a framework for understanding the role of the MCC in temperament and psychopathology. PMID:24787485

  12. Frontal midline theta reflects anxiety and cognitive control: meta-analytic evidence.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, James F; Shackman, Alexander J

    2015-01-01

    Evidence from imaging and anatomical studies suggests that the midcingulate cortex (MCC) is a dynamic hub lying at the interface of affect and cognition. In particular, this neural system appears to integrate information about conflict and punishment in order to optimize behavior in the face of action-outcome uncertainty. In a series of meta-analyses, we show how recent human electrophysiological research provides compelling evidence that frontal-midline theta signals reflecting MCC activity are moderated by anxiety and predict adaptive behavioral adjustments. These findings underscore the importance of frontal theta activity to a broad spectrum of control operations. We argue that frontal-midline theta provides a neurophysiologically plausible mechanism for optimally adjusting behavior to uncertainty, a hallmark of situations that elicit anxiety and demand cognitive control. These observations compel a new perspective on the mechanisms guiding motivated learning and behavior and provide a framework for understanding the role of the MCC in temperament and psychopathology. PMID:24787485

  13. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... drink other beverages instead, such as water, fruit juices or milk. Questions to Ask Your Doctor If your baby was born with fetal alcohol syndrome: What health problems does my baby have? Does my baby ...

  14. Fetal alcohol syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Alcohol in pregnancy; Alcohol-related birth defects; Fetal alcohol effects; FAS ... the baby is in the womb and after birth Decreased muscle tone and ... Heart defects such as ventricular septal defect (VSD) or atrial ...

  15. Fetal Health and Development

    MedlinePlus

    ... fetus grows and develops. There are specific prenatal tests to monitor both the mother's health and fetal health during each trimester. With modern technology, health professionals can Detect birth defects Identify problems ...

  16. Dissociating medial frontal and posterior cingulate activity during self-reflection

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Marcia K.; Raye, Carol L.; Mitchell, Karen J.; Touryan, Sharon R.; Greene, Erich J.; Nolen-Hoeksema, Susan

    2006-01-01

    Motivationally significant agendas guide perception, thought and behaviour, helping one to define a ‘self’ and to regulate interactions with the environment. To investigate neural correlates of thinking about such agendas, we asked participants to think about their hopes and aspirations (promotion focus) or their duties and obligations (prevention focus) during functional magnetic resonance imaging and compared these self-reflection conditions with a distraction condition in which participants thought about non-self-relevant items. Self-reflection resulted in greater activity than distraction in dorsomedial frontal/anterior cingulate cortex and posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus, consistent with previous findings of activity in these areas during self-relevant thought. For additional medial areas, we report new evidence of a double dissociation of function between medial prefrontal/anterior cingulate cortex, which showed relatively greater activity to thinking about hopes and aspirations, and posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus, which showed relatively greater activity to thinking about duties and obligations. One possibility is that activity in medial prefrontal cortex is associated with instrumental or agentic self-reflection, whereas posterior medial cortex is associated with experiential self-reflection. Another, not necessarily mutually exclusive, possibility is that medial prefrontal cortex is associated with a more inward-directed focus, while posterior cingulate is associated with a more outward-directed, social or contextual focus. PMID:18574518

  17. Numerical studies of frontal dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyser, Daniel

    1986-01-01

    Efforts concentrated on the development of a two dimensional primitive equation (PE) model of frontogenesis that simultaneously incorporates the frontagenetical mechanisms of confluence and horizontal shear. Applying this model to study the effects of upper level frontogenesis, it appeared to be dominated by tilting effects associated with cross front variation of vertical motion, in which subsidence is maximized within and to the warm side of the frontal zone. Results suggest that aspects characteristic of three-dimensional baroclinic waves may be abstracted to a significant extent in a two dimensional framework. They also show that upper-level frontogenesis and tropopause folding can occur in the absence of three-dimensional curvature effects, commonly believed to be necessary for realistic upper-level frontogenesis. An implication of the dominant tilting effects is that they may have to be adequately resolved by numerical weather prediction models, thus requiring better horizontal and vertical resolution.

  18. Fetal medicine and treatment.

    PubMed

    Westgren, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    Fetal medicine covers a broad spectrum of conditions that can be diagnosed before birth. Different disorders will require different treatment strategies and there is often an important ontogenetic aspect on how and when treatment can be implemented. Due to the limited availability there is a general lack of knowledge on how pharmacotherapy can be provided in the most efficient way. Until recently most knowledge about how different drugs are transferred and metabolized in the human fetus is based on very limited observational studies on concentrations of drugs in fetal blood and other fetal compartments. It might be that the rapid development of other non-invasive methods for fetal diagnostics such as isolation of fetal DNA and RNA in maternal serum, NMR imaging and other techniques could in the future be explored in fetal pharmacotherapy. Introduction of new treatment strategies are often based on extrapolation from experience in neonates and adults. However some fetal conditions are very specific for this time period in life. This especially entails disturbances in development as malformations, early growth restriction and several congenital disorders. Here it might be required to introduce new treatment strategies without any previous experience in humans. Example of this ethical dilemma is gene therapy for lung growth in severe cases of diaphragmatic hernia and early growth restriction. The risk-benefit issues need to be discussed in all these alternatives. However, it is likely that the concept of the human fetus as a potential patient is still in its infancy and with an improved understanding about fetal patho-physiology there will be a continued need for better knowledge of pharmacotherapy during this crucial time period in life. PMID:21882116

  19. Management of fetal malpresentation.

    PubMed

    Sharshiner, Rita; Silver, Robert M

    2015-06-01

    Fetal malpresentation is an important cause of the high cesarean delivery rate in the United States and around the world. This includes breech, face, brow, and compound presentations as well as transverse lie. Risk factors include multiparity, previously affected pregnancy, polyhydramnios, and fetal and uterine anomalies. Appropriate management can reduce the need for cesarean delivery in some cases. This review discusses management options and focuses specifically on external cephalic version and vaginal breech delivery. PMID:25811125

  20. Frontal preparatory neural oscillations associated with cognitive control: A developmental study comparing young adults and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kai; Ghuman, Avniel S; Manoach, Dara S; Jones, Stephanie R; Luna, Beatriz

    2016-08-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies suggest that age-related changes in the frontal cortex may underlie developmental improvements in cognitive control. In the present study we used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to identify frontal oscillatory neurodynamics that support age-related improvements in cognitive control during adolescence. We characterized the differences in neural oscillations in adolescents and adults during the preparation to suppress a prepotent saccade (antisaccade trials-AS) compared to preparing to generate a more automatic saccade (prosaccade trials-PS). We found that for adults, AS were associated with increased beta-band (16-38Hz) power in the dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), enhanced alpha- to low beta-band (10-18Hz) power in the frontal eye field (FEF) that predicted performance, and increased cross-frequency alpha-beta (10-26Hz) amplitude coupling between the DLPFC and the FEF. Developmental comparisons between adults and adolescents revealed similar engagement of DLPFC beta-band power but weaker FEF alpha-band power, and lower cross-frequency coupling between the DLPFC and the FEF in adolescents. These results suggest that lateral prefrontal neural activity associated with cognitive control is adult-like by adolescence; the development of cognitive control from adolescence to adulthood is instead associated with increases in frontal connectivity and strengthening of inhibition signaling for suppressing task-incompatible processes. PMID:27173759

  1. Medial Prefrontal Cortex Plays a Critical and Selective Role in "Feeling of Knowing" Meta-Memory Judgments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modirrousta, Mandana; Fellows, Lesley K.

    2008-01-01

    The frontal lobes are thought to play a role in the monitoring of memory performance, or "meta-memory," but the specific circuits involved have yet to be definitively established. Medial prefrontal cortex in general and the anterior cingulate cortex in particular, have been implicated in other forms of monitoring, such as error and conflict…

  2. Frontal and Parietal Cortices Show Different Spatiotemporal Dynamics across Problem-solving Stages.

    PubMed

    Tschentscher, Nadja; Hauk, Olaf

    2016-08-01

    Arithmetic problem-solving can be conceptualized as a multistage process ranging from task encoding over rule and strategy selection to step-wise task execution. Previous fMRI research suggested a frontal-parietal network involved in the execution of complex numerical and nonnumerical tasks, but evidence is lacking on the particular contributions of frontal and parietal cortices across time. In an arithmetic task paradigm, we evaluated individual participants' "retrieval" and "multistep procedural" strategies on a trial-by-trial basis and contrasted those in time-resolved analyses using combined EEG and MEG. Retrieval strategies relied on direct retrieval of arithmetic facts (e.g., 2 + 3 = 5). Procedural strategies required multiple solution steps (e.g., 12 + 23 = 12 + 20 + 3 or 23 + 10 + 2). Evoked source analyses revealed independent activation dynamics within the first second of problem-solving in brain areas previously described as one network, such as the frontal-parietal cognitive control network: The right frontal cortex showed earliest effects of strategy selection for multistep procedural strategies around 300 msec, before parietal cortex activated around 700 msec. In time-frequency source power analyses, memory retrieval and multistep procedural strategies were differentially reflected in theta, alpha, and beta frequencies: Stronger beta and alpha desynchronizations emerged for procedural strategies in right frontal, parietal, and temporal regions as function of executive demands. Arithmetic fact retrieval was reflected in right prefrontal increases in theta power. Our results demonstrate differential brain dynamics within frontal-parietal networks across the time course of a problem-solving process, and analyses of different frequency bands allowed us to disentangle cortical regions supporting the underlying memory and executive functions. PMID:27027542

  3. Putting the brakes on inhibitory models of frontal lobe function

    PubMed Central

    Hampshire, Adam

    2015-01-01

    There has been much recent debate regarding the neural basis of motor response inhibition. An influential hypothesis from the last decade proposes that a module within the right inferior frontal cortex (RIFC) of the human brain is dedicated to supporting response inhibition. However, there is growing evidence to support the alternative view that response inhibition is just one prominent example of the many cognitive control processes that are supported by the same set of ‘domain general’ functional networks. Here, I test directly between the modular and network accounts of motor response inhibition by applying a combination of data-driven, event-related and functional connectivity analyses to fMRI data from a variety of attention and inhibition tasks. The results demonstrate that there is no inhibitory module within the RIFC. Instead, response inhibition recruits a functionally heterogeneous ensemble of RIFC networks, which can be dissociated from each other in the context of other task demands. PMID:25818684

  4. Frontal neurons modulate memory retrieval across widely varying temporal scales.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Hua; Williams, Ziv M

    2015-06-01

    Once a memory has formed, it is thought to undergo a gradual transition within the brain from short- to long-term storage. This putative process, however, also poses a unique problem to the memory system in that the same learned items must also be retrieved across broadly varying time scales. Here, we find that neurons in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) of monkeys, an area interconnected with both temporal and frontal associative neocortical regions, signaled the need to alter between retrieval of memories formed at different times. These signals were most closely related to the time interval between initial learning and later retrieval, and did not correlate with task switch demands, novelty, or behavioral response. Consistent with these physiological findings, focal inactivation of the VLPFC led to a marked degradation in retrieval performance. These findings suggest that the VLPFC plays a necessary regulatory role in retrieving memories over different temporal scales. PMID:25979992

  5. Fetal brain hypometabolism during prolonged hypoxaemia in the llama

    PubMed Central

    Ebensperger, Germán; Ebensperger, Renato; Herrera, Emilio A; Riquelme, Raquel A; Sanhueza, Emilia M; Lesage, Florian; Marengo, Juan J; Tejo, Rodrigo I; Llanos, Aníbal J; Reyes, Roberto V

    2005-01-01

    In this study we looked for additional evidence to support the hypothesis that fetal llama reacts to hypoxaemia with adaptive brain hypometabolism. We determined fetal llama brain temperature, Na+ and K+ channel density and Na+–K+-ATPase activity. Additionally, we looked to see whether there were signs of cell death in the brain cortex of llama fetuses submitted to prolonged hypoxaemia. Ten fetal llamas were instrumented under general anaesthesia to measure pH, arterial blood gases, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, and brain and core temperatures. Measurements were made 1 h before and every hour during 24 h of hypoxaemia (n = 5), which was imposed by reducing maternal inspired oxygen fraction to reach a fetal arterial partial pressure of oxygen (Pa,O2) of about 12 mmHg. A normoxaemic group was the control (n = 5). After 24 h of hypoxaemia, we determined brain cortex Na+–K+-ATPase activity, ouabain binding, and the expression of NaV1.1, NaV1.2, NaV1.3, NaV1.6, TREK1, TRAAK and KATP channels. The lack of brain cortex damage was assessed as poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) proteolysis. We found a mean decrease of 0.56°C in brain cortex temperature during prolonged hypoxaemia, which was accompanied by a 51% decrease in brain cortex Na+–K+-ATPase activity, and by a 44% decrease in protein content of NaV1.1, a voltage-gated Na+ channel. These changes occurred in absence of changes in PARP protein degradation, suggesting that the cell death of the brain was not enhanced in the fetal llama during hypoxaemia. Taken together, these results provide further evidence to support the hypothesis that the fetal llama responds to prolonged hypoxaemia with adaptive brain hypometabolism, partly mediated by decreases in Na+–K+-ATPase activity and expression of NaV channels. PMID:16037083

  6. Fetal adrenal capsular cells serve as progenitor cells for steroidogenic and stromal adrenocortical cell lineages in M. musculus

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Michelle A.; Acharya, Asha; Finco, Isabella; Swonger, Jessica M.; Elston, Marlee J.; Tallquist, Michelle D.; Hammer, Gary D.

    2013-01-01

    The lineage relationships of fetal adrenal cells and adrenal capsular cells to the differentiated adrenal cortex are not fully understood. Existing data support a role for each cell type as a progenitor for cells of the adult cortex. This report reveals that subsets of capsular cells are descendants of fetal adrenocortical cells that once expressed Nr5a1. These fetal adrenocortical cell descendants within the adrenal capsule express Gli1, a known marker of progenitors of steroidogenic adrenal cells. The capsule is also populated by cells that express Tcf21, a known inhibitor of Nr5a1 gene expression. We demonstrate that Tcf21-expressing cells give rise to Nr5a1-expressing cells but only before capsular formation. After the capsule has formed, capsular Tcf21-expressing cells give rise only to non-steroidogenic stromal adrenocortical cells, which also express collagen 1a1, desmin and platelet-derived growth factor (alpha polypeptide) but not Nr5a1. These observations integrate prior observations that define two separate origins of adult adrenocortical steroidogenic cells (fetal adrenal cortex and/or the adrenal capsule). Thus, these observations predict a unique temporal and/or spatial role of adult cortical cells that arise directly from either fetal cortical cells or from fetal cortex-derived capsular cells. Last, the data uncover the mechanism by which two populations of fetal cells (fetal cortex derived Gli1-expressing cells and mesenchymal Tcf21-expressing mesenchymal cells) participate in the establishment of the homeostatic capsular progenitor cell niche of the adult cortex. PMID:24131628

  7. Transient global amnesia and left frontal haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Jacome, D. E.; Yanez, G. F.

    1988-01-01

    A patient developed spontaneous, acute, dominant frontal lobe haemorrhage neighbouring on a zone of pre-existing post-traumatic encephalomalacia manifesting clinically as transient global amnesia. Amnesia can be secondary to disease of the frontal lobe, affecting pathways interconnecting the basal forebrain and hippocampus of the temporal lobe. Images Figure 1 PMID:3174526

  8. The surgery of frontal sinus infection.

    PubMed

    Du Preez, S F; Collard, W M; Sellars, S L

    1975-11-01

    A clinical and surgical review of 37 patients treated for acute and chronic frontal sinusitis at Groote Schuur Hospital during the 6-year period 1967-1972, is presented. The mode of clinical presentation of this disease and its complications are discussed, and the surgical management of frontal sinus disease as practised at this hospital is described. PMID:1198214

  9. ALTERATIONS IN MATERNAL-FETAL CELLULAR TRAFFICKING AFTER FETAL SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    Saadai, Payam; Lee, Tzong-Hae; Bautista, Geoanna; Gonzales, Kelly D.; Nijagal, Amar; Busch, Michael P.; Kim, CJ; Romero, Roberto; Lee, Hanmin; Hirose, Shinjiro; Rand, Larry; Miniati, Douglas; Farmer, Diana L.; MacKenzie, Tippi C.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Purpose Bi-directional trafficking of cells between the mother and the fetus is routine in pregnancy and a component of maternal-fetal tolerance. Changes in fetal-to-maternal cellular trafficking have been reported in prenatal complications, but maternal-to-fetal trafficking has never been studied in the context of fetal intervention. We hypothesized that patients undergoing open fetal surgery would have altered maternal-fetal cellular trafficking. Methods Cellular trafficking was analyzed in patients with myelomeningocele (MMC) who underwent open fetal surgical repair (n=5), MMC patients who had routine postnatal repair (n=6), and normal term patients (n=9). As a control for the fetal operation, trafficking was also analyzed in patients who were delivered by an ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) procedure (n=6). Microchimerism in maternal and cord blood was determined using quantitative real-time PCR for non-shared alleles. Results Maternal-to-fetal trafficking was significantly increased in patients who underwent open fetal surgery for MMC compared to normal controls, postnatal MMC repair, and EXIT patients. There were no differences in fetal-to-maternal cell trafficking between groups. Conclusion Patients undergoing open fetal surgery for MMC have elevated levels of maternal microchimerism. These results suggest altered trafficking and/or increased proliferation of maternal cells in fetal blood and may have important implications for preterm labor. PMID:22703775

  10. Co-activation based parcellation of the human frontal pole.

    PubMed

    Ray, K L; Zald, D H; Bludau, S; Riedel, M C; Bzdok, D; Yanes, J; Falcone, K E; Amunts, K; Fox, P T; Eickhoff, S B; Laird, A R

    2015-12-01

    Historically, the human frontal pole (FP) has been considered as a single architectonic area. Brodmann's area 10 is located in the frontal lobe with known contributions in the execution of various higher order cognitive processes. However, recent cytoarchitectural studies of the FP in humans have shown that this portion of cortex contains two distinct cytoarchitectonic regions. Since architectonic differences are accompanied by differential connectivity and functions, the frontal pole qualifies as a candidate region for exploratory parcellation into functionally discrete sub-regions. We investigated whether this functional heterogeneity is reflected in distinct segregations within cytoarchitectonically defined FP-areas using meta-analytic co-activation based parcellation (CBP). The CBP method examined the co-activation patterns of all voxels within the FP as reported in functional neuroimaging studies archived in the BrainMap database. Voxels within the FP were subsequently clustered into sub-regions based on the similarity of their respective meta-analytically derived co-activation maps. Performing this CBP analysis on the FP via k-means clustering produced a distinct 3-cluster parcellation for each hemisphere corresponding to previously identified cytoarchitectural differences. Post-hoc functional characterization of clusters via BrainMap metadata revealed that lateral regions of the FP mapped to memory and emotion domains, while the dorso- and ventromedial clusters were associated broadly with emotion and social cognition processes. Furthermore, the dorsomedial regions contain an emphasis on theory of mind and affective related paradigms whereas ventromedial regions couple with reward tasks. Results from this study support previous segregations of the FP and provide meta-analytic contributions to the ongoing discussion of elucidating functional architecture within human FP. PMID:26254112

  11. Functional role of frontal alpha oscillations in creativity.

    PubMed

    Lustenberger, Caroline; Boyle, Michael R; Foulser, A Alban; Mellin, Juliann M; Fröhlich, Flavio

    2015-06-01

    Creativity, the ability to produce innovative ideas, is a key higher-order cognitive function that is poorly understood. At the level of macroscopic cortical network dynamics, recent electroencephalography (EEG) data suggests that cortical oscillations in the alpha frequency band (8-12 Hz) are correlated with creative thinking. However, whether alpha oscillations play a functional role in creativity has remained unknown. Here we show that creativity is increased by enhancing alpha power using 10 Hz transcranial alternating current stimulation (10 Hz-tACS) of the frontal cortex. In a study of 20 healthy participants with a randomized, balanced cross-over design, we found a significant improvement of 7.4% in the Creativity Index measured by the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking (TTCT), a comprehensive and most frequently used assay of creative potential and strengths. In a second similar study with 20 subjects, 40 Hz-tACS was used instead of 10 Hz-tACS to rule out a general "electrical stimulation" effect. No significant change in the Creativity Index was found for such frontal 40 Hz stimulation. Our results suggest that alpha activity in frontal brain areas is selectively involved in creativity; this enhancement represents the first demonstration of specific neuronal dynamics that drive creativity and can be modulated by non-invasive brain stimulation. Our findings agree with the model that alpha recruitment increases with internal processing demands and is involved in inhibitory top-down control, which is an important requirement for creative ideation. PMID:25913062

  12. Role of the left frontal aslant tract in stuttering: a brain stimulation and tractographic study.

    PubMed

    Kemerdere, Rahsan; de Champfleur, Nicolas Menjot; Deverdun, Jérémy; Cochereau, Jérôme; Moritz-Gasser, Sylvie; Herbet, Guillaume; Duffau, Hugues

    2016-01-01

    The neural correlates of stuttering are to date incompletely understood. Although the possible involvement of the basal ganglia, the cerebellum and certain parts of the cerebral cortex in this speech disorder has previously been reported, there are still not many studies investigating the role of white matter fibers in stuttering. Axonal stimulation during awake surgery provides a unique opportunity to study the functional role of structural connectivity. Here, our goal was to investigate the white matter tracts implicated in stuttering, by combining direct electrostimulation mapping and postoperative tractography imaging, with a special focus on the left frontal aslant tract. Eight patients with no preoperative stuttering underwent awake surgery for a left frontal low-grade glioma. Intraoperative cortical and axonal electrical mapping was used to interfere in speech processing and subsequently provoke stuttering. We further assessed the relationship between the subcortical sites leading to stuttering and the spatial course of the frontal aslant tract. All patients experienced intraoperative stuttering during axonal electrostimulation. On postsurgical tractographies, the subcortical distribution of stimulated sites matched the topographical position of the left frontal aslant tract. This white matter pathway was preserved during surgery, and no patients had postoperative stuttering. For the first time to our knowledge, by using direct axonal stimulation combined with postoperative tractography, we provide original data supporting a pivotal role of the left frontal aslant tract in stuttering. We propose that this speech disorder could be the result of a disconnection within a large-scale cortico-subcortical circuit subserving speech motor control. PMID:26559819

  13. Frontal Lobe Contusion in Mice Chronically Impairs Prefrontal-Dependent Behavior.

    PubMed

    Chou, Austin; Morganti, Josh M; Rosi, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of chronic disability in the world. Moderate to severe TBI often results in damage to the frontal lobe region and leads to cognitive, emotional, and social behavioral sequelae that negatively affect quality of life. More specifically, TBI patients often develop persistent deficits in social behavior, anxiety, and executive functions such as attention, mental flexibility, and task switching. These deficits are intrinsically associated with prefrontal cortex (PFC) functionality. Currently, there is a lack of analogous, behaviorally characterized TBI models for investigating frontal lobe injuries despite the prevalence of focal contusions to the frontal lobe in TBI patients. We used the controlled cortical impact (CCI) model in mice to generate a frontal lobe contusion and studied behavioral changes associated with PFC function. We found that unilateral frontal lobe contusion in mice produced long-term impairments to social recognition and reversal learning while having only a minor effect on anxiety and completely sparing rule shifting and hippocampal-dependent behavior. PMID:26964036

  14. Frontal Lobe Contusion in Mice Chronically Impairs Prefrontal-Dependent Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Rosi, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of chronic disability in the world. Moderate to severe TBI often results in damage to the frontal lobe region and leads to cognitive, emotional, and social behavioral sequelae that negatively affect quality of life. More specifically, TBI patients often develop persistent deficits in social behavior, anxiety, and executive functions such as attention, mental flexibility, and task switching. These deficits are intrinsically associated with prefrontal cortex (PFC) functionality. Currently, there is a lack of analogous, behaviorally characterized TBI models for investigating frontal lobe injuries despite the prevalence of focal contusions to the frontal lobe in TBI patients. We used the controlled cortical impact (CCI) model in mice to generate a frontal lobe contusion and studied behavioral changes associated with PFC function. We found that unilateral frontal lobe contusion in mice produced long-term impairments to social recognition and reversal learning while having only a minor effect on anxiety and completely sparing rule shifting and hippocampal-dependent behavior. PMID:26964036

  15. 21 CFR 884.2900 - Fetal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Fetal stethoscope. (a) Identification. A fetal stethoscope is a device used for listening to fetal heart sounds. It is designed to transmit the fetal heart sounds not only through sound channels by...

  16. 21 CFR 884.2900 - Fetal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Fetal stethoscope. (a) Identification. A fetal stethoscope is a device used for listening to fetal heart sounds. It is designed to transmit the fetal heart sounds not only through sound channels by...

  17. 21 CFR 884.2900 - Fetal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Fetal stethoscope. (a) Identification. A fetal stethoscope is a device used for listening to fetal heart sounds. It is designed to transmit the fetal heart sounds not only through sound channels by...

  18. 21 CFR 884.2900 - Fetal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Fetal stethoscope. (a) Identification. A fetal stethoscope is a device used for listening to fetal heart sounds. It is designed to transmit the fetal heart sounds not only through sound channels by...

  19. 21 CFR 884.2900 - Fetal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Fetal stethoscope. (a) Identification. A fetal stethoscope is a device used for listening to fetal heart sounds. It is designed to transmit the fetal heart sounds not only through sound channels by...

  20. Sulfate in fetal development.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Paul A

    2011-08-01

    Sulfate (SO(4)(2-)) is an important nutrient for human growth and development, and is obtained from the diet and the intra-cellular metabolism of sulfur-containing amino acids, including methionine and cysteine. During pregnancy, fetal tissues have a limited capacity to produce sulfate, and rely on sulfate obtained from the maternal circulation. Sulfate enters and exits placental and fetal cells via transporters on the plasma membrane, which maintain a sufficient intracellular supply of sulfate and its universal sulfonate donor 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) for sulfate conjugation (sulfonation) reactions to function effectively. Sulfotransferases mediate sulfonation of numerous endogenous compounds, including proteins and steroids, which biotransforms their biological activities. In addition, sulfonation of proteoglycans is important for maintaining normal structure and development of tissues, as shown for reduced sulfonation of cartilage proteoglycans that leads to developmental dwarfism disorders and four different osteochondrodysplasias (diastrophic dysplasia, atelosteogenesis type II, achondrogenesis type IB and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia). The removal of sulfate via sulfatases is an important step in proteoglycan degradation, and defects in several sulfatases are linked to perturbed fetal bone development, including mesomelia-synostoses syndrome and chondrodysplasia punctata 1. In recent years, interest in sulfate and its role in developmental biology has expanded following the characterisation of sulfate transporters, sulfotransferases and sulfatases and their involvement in fetal growth. This review will focus on the physiological roles of sulfate in fetal development, with links to human and animal pathophysiologies. PMID:21419855

  1. Magnesium and fetal growth

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, K.

    1988-01-01

    Fetal growth retardation and premature labor are major problems in perinatal medicine today and account for a great deal of the observed fetal morbidity. While the neonatal death rate has steadily declined over the past decade, there has been a lack of concommitant decrease in these two leading problems. Magnesium (Mg/sup ++/) plays a major role in both of these areas of concern. The fact that it is used as a treatment for premature labor has led investigators to look at low Mg/sup ++/ as a possible cause of this poorly understood phenomenon. The second major cause of small for gestational age infants is intrauterine growth retardation, a condition which may be of either fetal or maternal origin. In either case, Mg/sup ++/ may be implicated since it exerts a strong influence on the underlying pathophysiology of placental failure and maternal hypertension. Both of these conditions are mediated by vascular and platelet hyperactivity as well as by and increase in the ration of thromboxane to prostacyclin. Studies in both the human and animal species are beginning to show how Mg/sup ++/ interacts in these conditions to produce such a damaging fetal outcome. The recent use of Doppler velocimetry of the developing fetus has shown reduced fetal vascular and maternal uterine vascular compliance as early as 14 weeks of gestation in those who would be so affected.

  2. White matter lesions impair frontal lobe function regardless of their location

    PubMed Central

    Tullberg, M.; Fletcher, E.; DeCarli, C.; Mungas, D.; Reed, B.R.; Harvey, D.J.; Weiner, M.W.; Chui, H.C.; Jagust, W.J.

    2007-01-01

    Objective To analyze the effect of white matter lesions in different brain regions on regional cortical glucose metabolism, regional cortical atrophy, and cognitive function in a sample with a broad range of cerebrovascular disease and cognitive function. Methods Subjects (n = 78) were recruited for a study of subcortical ischemic vascular disease (SIVD) and Alzheimer disease (AD) contributions to dementia. A new method was developed to define volumes of interest from high-resolution three-dimensional T1-weighted MR images. Volumetric measures of MRI segmented white matter signal hyperintensities (WMH) in five different brain regions were related to regional PET glucose metabolism (rCMRglc) in cerebral cortex, MRI measures of regional cortical atrophy, and neuropsychological assessment of executive and memory function. Results WMH was significantly higher in the prefrontal region compared to the other brain regions. In all subjects, higher frontal and parietal WMH were associated with reduced frontal rCMRglc, whereas occipitotemporal WMH was only marginally associated with frontal rCMRglc. These associations were stronger and more widely distributed in nondemented subjects where reduced frontal rCMRglc was correlated with WMH for all regions measured. In contrast, there was no relationship between WMH in any brain region and rCMRglc in either parietal or occipitotemporal regions. WMHs in all brain regions were associated with low executive scores in nondemented subjects. Conclusions The frontal lobes are most severely affected by SIVD. WMHs are more abundant in the frontal region. Regardless of where in the brain these WMHs are located, they are associated with frontal hypometabolism and executive dysfunction. PMID:15277616

  3. Disruption of attention to novel events after frontal lobe injury in humans

    PubMed Central

    Daffner, K.; Mesulam, M; Holcomb, P.; Calvo, V.; Acar, D.; Chabrerie, A.; Kikinis, R.; Jolesz, F.; Rentz, D.; Scinto, L.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate whether frontal lobe damage in humans disrupts the natural tendency to preferentially attend to novel visual events in the environment.
METHODS—Nine patients with chronic infarctions in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and 23 matched normal controls participated in a study in which subjects viewed repetitive background stimuli, infrequent target stimuli, and novel visual stimuli (for example, fragmented or "impossible" objects). Subjects controlled viewing duration by a button press that led to the onset of the next stimulus. They also responded to targets by pressing a foot pedal. The amount of time spent looking at the different kinds of stimuli, and the target detection accuracy and speed served as dependent variables.
RESULTS—Overall, normal controls spent significantly more time than frontal lobe patients looking at novel stimuli. Analysis of responses across blocks showed that initially frontal lobe patients behaved like normal controls by directing more attention to novel than background stimuli. However, they quickly began to distribute their viewing time evenly between novel and background stimuli, a pattern that was strikingly different from normal controls. By contrast, there were no differences between frontal lobe patients and normal controls for viewing duration devoted to background and target stimuli, target detection accuracy, or reaction time to targets. Frontal lobe patients did not differ from normal controls in terms of age, education, estimated IQ, or mood, but were more apathetic as measured by self report and informants' judgments. Attenuated responses to novel stimuli significantly correlated with degree of apathy.
CONCLUSIONS—This study demonstrates that DLPFC injury selectively impairs the natural tendency to seek stimulation from novel and unusual stimuli. These data provide the first quantitative behavioural demonstration that the human frontal lobes play a critical part in directing and

  4. Bipolar Mood Tendency and Frontal Activation Using a Multichannel Near Infrared Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Uehara, Toru; Ishige, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to examine the association of frontal functioning with subclinical bipolar spectrum by a newly developed convenient method. We investigated subclinical bipolar tendency and frontal lobe activation during word productions using multi-channel near infrared spectroscopy. Participants: 44 healthy university students (mean ages 20.5 years old, and 29 female) gave their written informed consent, and we strictly protected privacy and anonymity was carefully preserved. A 13-items self-report questionnaire (Mood Disorders Questionnaire; MDQ) and a 16-channel near-infrared spectroscopy were used to compare frontal activations between two samples divided by median (4 points) of the total MDQ scores and to analyze correlations between relative changes of cerebral blood volume and bipolarity levels. There was no case suspected as bipolar disorders by MDQ screening (mean 3.4, max 10). Significant differences in lower activations were noted in the right and left pre-frontal cortex (PFC) with higher bipolarity scores using the specific software to analyze the NIRS waveform (P<0.05). Total MDQ were correlated significantly with frontal activation negatively in many channels; therefore, we conducted multiple linear regression to select significant frontal activations using the MDQ as a dependent variable. Stepwise method revealed that activation in left lateral PFC was negatively associated to bipolar tendency, and this regression model was significant (R2=0.10, F=4.5, P=0.04). Differences in frontal functioning suggest that subclinical bipolar tendencies might be related to left lateral PFC activations. It should be confirmed whether the identical pattern can be identified for clinical subjects with bipolar disorders. PMID:26605032

  5. Maternal-fetal thyroid hormone relationships and the fetal brain.

    PubMed

    Morreale de Escobar, G; Obregon, M J; Escobar del Rey, F

    1988-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are transferred from the mother to the fetus. Thus, despite the deiodinating enzymes of the placenta (26), some T4 and T3 is transferred, both before and after onset of fetal thyroid function, at least in those cases where fetal thyroid function is impaired. It is also possible that transfer occurs under normal conditions. Maternal to fetal transfer of T3 and T4 is partially limited. But it might be enough to mitigate severe fetal T4 and T3 deficiencies. However, the mitigating effects of both hormones are not equivalent for all fetal tissues. 1) Maternal T4 mitigates T4 and T3 deficiency of most fetal tissues, the brain included. 2) Maternal T3 mitigates T3 deficiency only in some fetal tissues, the brain being excluded. It does not mitigate cerebral T3 deficiency even at doses which are toxic for the mother, and it does not depress fetal plasma TSH. 3) Normal maternal thyroid function is important for fetal development. Maternal hypothyroxinemia is damaging to the developing fetal brain early in gestation. It might also later have adverse effects in gestation, if the fetal thyroid is impaired. Normal maternal T3 levels might avoid overt hypothyroidism of some fetal tissues, but is of no benefit to the brain. PMID:3176827

  6. Effects of naltrexone on firing activity of rat cortex neurons and its interactions with ethanol.

    PubMed

    Kozhechkin, S N; Mednikova, Yu S; Kolik, L G

    2013-09-01

    Naltrexone dose-dependently decreased neuron firing rate in the rat frontal cortex after intravenous (1-20 mg/kg) and microelectrophoretic administration. Microelectrophoretic applications of naltrexone reduced the excitatory neuronal response of neurons to low doses of ethanol (electroosmotic application) and potentiated depression of firing activity induced by ethanol in high doses. We concluded that opioid peptides take part in generation of spontaneous neuronal activity in the frontal cortex and neuronal excitation caused by ethanol in low doses. Naltrexone acts as a synergist of ethanol in its depressive effect on cortical neurons. PMID:24288728

  7. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASDs)

    MedlinePlus

    ... FASD Cancel Submit Search The CDC Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASDs) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs) are a group of conditions that ...

  8. Source memory and frontal functioning in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Drag, Lauren L.; Bieliauskas, Linas A.; Kaszniak, Alfred W.; Bohnen, Nicolaas I.; Glisky, Elizabeth L.

    2009-01-01

    The most extensively described pathological abnormality in Parkinson's disease (PD) is loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta and the ventral tegmental area, with degeneration of their striatal terminals. Because of the intimate connections between the striatum and the frontal lobes, individuals with PD often demonstrate impairments on those tasks relying on the prefrontal cortex (e.g., tests of executive functioning). Source memory, or memory for context, is believed to rely on the prefrontal cortex and has been previously associated with executive functioning performance, although it has received little attention in the PD literature. Executive functioning and source memory were measured in a group of nondemented PD patients and healthy control participants. Within the PD group, an anti-Parkinson's medication withdrawal manipulation was used to examine whether source memory was affected by phasic changes in dopamine levels. Compared to healthy control participants, PD patients were impaired in source memory (both on- and off-medication) and on a composite measure of executive functioning. Within the PD group, medication administration improved motor performance but did not have a significant effect on source memory. PMID:19402926

  9. Probabilistic functional tractography of the human cortex.

    PubMed

    David, Olivier; Job, Anne-Sophie; De Palma, Luca; Hoffmann, Dominique; Minotti, Lorella; Kahane, Philippe

    2013-10-15

    Single-pulse direct electrical stimulation of cortical regions in patients suffering from focal drug-resistant epilepsy who are explored using intracranial electrodes induces cortico-cortical potentials that can be used to infer functional and anatomical connectivity. Here, we describe a neuroimaging framework that allows development of a new probabilistic atlas of functional tractography of the human cortex from those responses. This atlas is unique because it allows inference in vivo of the directionality and latency of cortico-cortical connectivity, which are still largely unknown at the human brain level. In this technical note, we include 1535 stimulation runs performed in 35 adult patients. We use a case of frontal lobe epilepsy to illustrate the asymmetrical connectivity between the posterior hippocampal gyrus and the orbitofrontal cortex. In addition, as a proof of concept for group studies, we study the probabilistic functional tractography between the posterior superior temporal gyrus and the inferior frontal gyrus. In the near future, the atlas database will be continuously increased, and the methods will be improved in parallel, for more accurate estimation of features of interest. Generated probabilistic maps will be freely distributed to the community because they provide critical information for further understanding and modelling of large-scale brain networks. PMID:23707583

  10. Frontal sinus cholesterol granuloma: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Deep, Nicholas L.; Chaaban, Mohamad R.; Chaudhry, Ajaz L.

    2014-01-01

    A case report of a massive cholesterol granuloma (CG) of the frontal sinus in a 15-year-old male subject treated endoscopically is reported. CGs are slowly expanding, cystic lesions that are rarely observed in the frontal sinus. Frontal sinus CGs characteristically present with proptosis, diplopia, and a unilateral painless expanding mass above the orbit. Patients frequently report a history of chronic nasal obstruction or head trauma. Although the pathogenesis is unclear, it is likely multifactorial in etiology. Surgical resection via endoscopic sinus surgery has been gaining popularity because of the minimally invasive approach and lower rates of recurrence. PMID:24612824

  11. Damage to Left Frontal Regulatory Circuits Produces Greater Positive Emotional Reactivity in Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Virginia E.; Yokoyama, Jennifer S.; Eckart, Janet A.; Zakrzewski, Jessica; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Seeley, William W.; Levenson, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Positive emotions foster social relationships and motivate thought and action. Dysregulation of positive emotion may give rise to debilitating clinical symptomatology such as mania, risk-taking, and disinhibition. Neuroanatomically, there is extensive evidence that the left hemisphere of the brain, and the left frontal lobe in particular, plays an important role in positive emotion generation. Although prior studies have found that left frontal injury decreases positive emotion, it is not clear whether selective damage to left frontal emotion regulatory systems can actually increase positive emotion. We measured happiness reactivity in 96 patients with frontotemporal dementia, a neurodegenerative disease that targets emotion-relevant neural systems and causes alterations in positive emotion (i.e., euphoria and jocularity), and in 34 healthy controls. Participants watched a film clip designed to elicit happiness and a comparison film clip designed to elicit sadness while their facial behavior, physiological reactivity, and self-reported emotional experience were monitored. Whole-brain voxel-based morphometry analyses revealed that atrophy in predominantly left hemisphere fronto-striatal emotion regulation systems including left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, anterior insula, and striatum (pFWE < .05) was associated with greater happiness facial behavior during the film. Atrophy in left anterior insula and bilateral frontopolar cortex was also associated with higher cardiovascular reactivity (i.e., heart rate and blood pressure) but not self-reported positive emotional experience during the happy film (p< .005, uncorrected). No regions emerged as being associated with greater sadness reactivity, which suggests that left-lateralized fronto-striatal atrophy is selectively associated with happiness dysregulation. Whereas previous models have proposed that left frontal injury decreases positive emotional responding, we argue that selective

  12. Damage to left frontal regulatory circuits produces greater positive emotional reactivity in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Virginia E; Yokoyama, Jennifer S; Eckart, Janet A; Zakrzewski, Jessica; Rosen, Howard J; Miller, Bruce L; Seeley, William W; Levenson, Robert W

    2015-03-01

    Positive emotions foster social relationships and motivate thought and action. Dysregulation of positive emotion may give rise to debilitating clinical symptomatology such as mania, risk-taking, and disinhibition. Neuroanatomically, there is extensive evidence that the left hemisphere of the brain, and the left frontal lobe in particular, plays an important role in positive emotion generation. Although prior studies have found that left frontal injury decreases positive emotion, it is not clear whether selective damage to left frontal emotion regulatory systems can actually increase positive emotion. We measured happiness reactivity in 96 patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD), a neurodegenerative disease that targets emotion-relevant neural systems and causes alterations in positive emotion (i.e., euphoria and jocularity), and in 34 healthy controls. Participants watched a film clip designed to elicit happiness and a comparison film clip designed to elicit sadness while their facial behavior, physiological reactivity, and self-reported emotional experience were monitored. Whole-brain voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analyses revealed that atrophy in predominantly left hemisphere fronto-striatal emotion regulation systems including left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, anterior insula, and striatum was associated with greater happiness facial behavior during the film (pFWE < .05). Atrophy in left anterior insula and bilateral frontopolar cortex was also associated with higher cardiovascular reactivity (i.e., heart rate and blood pressure) but not self-reported positive emotional experience during the happy film (p < .005, uncorrected). No regions emerged as being associated with greater sadness reactivity, which suggests that left-lateralized fronto-striatal atrophy is selectively associated with happiness dysregulation. Whereas previous models have proposed that left frontal injury decreases positive emotional responding, we argue that

  13. Cranialization of the Frontal Sinus for Secondary Mucocele Prevention following Open Surgery for Benign Frontal Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Gilad; Amit, Moran; Ben-Ari, Oded; Gil, Ziv; Abergel, Abraham; Margalit, Nevo; Cavel, Oren; Wasserzug, Oshri; Fliss, Dan M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare frontal sinus cranialization to obliteration for future prevention of secondary mucocele formation following open surgery for benign lesions of the frontal sinus. Study Design Retrospective case series. Setting Tertiary academic medical center. Patients Sixty-nine patients operated for benign frontal sinus pathology between 1994 and 2011. Interventions Open excision of benign frontal sinus pathology followed by either frontal obliteration (n = 41, 59%) or frontal cranialization (n = 28, 41%). Main Outcome Measures The prevalence of post-surgical complications and secondary mucocele formation were compiled. Results Pathologies included osteoma (n = 34, 49%), mucocele (n = 27, 39%), fibrous dysplasia (n = 6, 9%), and encephalocele (n = 2, 3%). Complications included skin infections (n = 6), postoperative cutaneous fistula (n = 1), telecanthus (n = 4), diplopia (n = 3), nasal deformity (n = 2) and epiphora (n = 1). None of the patients suffered from postoperative CSF leak, meningitis or pneumocephalus. Six patients, all of whom had previously undergone frontal sinus obliteration, required revision surgery due to secondary mucocele formation. Statistical analysis using non-inferiority test reveal that cranialization of the frontal sinus is non-inferior to obliteration for preventing secondary mucocele formation (P<0.0001). Conclusion Cranialization of the frontal sinus appears to be a good option for prevention of secondary mucocele development after open excision of benign frontal sinus lesions. PMID:24376760

  14. The impact of different aetiologies on the cognitive performance of frontal patients

    PubMed Central

    Cipolotti, Lisa; Healy, Colm; Chan, Edgar; Bolsover, Fay; Lecce, Francesca; White, Mark; Spanò, Barbara; Shallice, Tim; Bozzali, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Neuropsychological group study methodology is considered one of the primary methods to further understanding of the organisation of frontal ‘executive’ functions. Typically, patients with frontal lesions caused by stroke or tumours have been grouped together to obtain sufficient power. However, it has been debated whether it is methodologically appropriate to group together patients with neurological lesions of different aetiologies. Despite this debate, very few studies have directly compared the performance of patients with different neurological aetiologies on neuropsychological measures. The few that did included patients with both anterior and posterior lesions. We present the first comprehensive retrospective comparison of the impact of lesions of different aetiologies on neuropsychological performance in a large number of patients whose lesion solely affects the frontal cortex. We investigated patients who had a cerebrovascular accident (CVA), high (HGT) or low grade (LGT) tumour, or meningioma, all at the post-operative stage. The same frontal ‘executive’ (Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices, Stroop Colour-Word Test, Letter Fluency-S; Trail Making Test Part B) and nominal (Graded Naming Test) tasks were compared. Patients' performance was compared across aetiologies controlling for age and NART IQ scores. Assessments of focal frontal lesion location, lesion volume, global brain atrophy and non-specific white matter (WM) changes were undertaken and compared across the four aetiology. We found no significant difference in performance between the four aetiology subgroups on the ‘frontal’ executive and nominal tasks. However, we found strong effects of premorbid IQ on all cognitive tasks and robust effects of age only on the frontal tasks. We also compared specific aetiology subgroups directly, as previously reported in the literature. Overall we found no significant differences in the performance of CVA and tumour patients, or LGT and HGT

  15. Reduced Numbers of Somatostatin Receptors in the Cerebral Cortex in Alzheimer's Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flint Beal, M.; Mazurek, Michael F.; Tran, Vinh T.; Chattha, Geetinder; Bird, Edward D.; Martin, Joseph B.

    1985-07-01

    Somatostatin receptor concentrations were measured in patients with Alzheimer's disease and controls. In the frontal cortex (Brodmann areas 6, 9, and 10) and temporal cortex (Brodmann area 21), the concentrations of somatostatin in receptors in the patients were reduced to approximately 50 percent of control values. A 40 percent reduction was seen in the hippocampus, while no significant changes were found in the cingulate cortex, postcentral gyrus, temporal pole, and superior temporal gyrus. Scatchard analysis showed a reduction in receptor number rather than a change in affinity. Somatostatin-like immunoreactivity was significantly reduced in both the frontal and temporal cortex. Somatostatin-like immunoreactivity was linearly related to somatostatin-receptor binding in the cortices of Alzheimer's patients. These findings may reflect degeneration of postsynaptic neurons or cortical afferents in the patients' cerebral cortices. Alternatively, decreased somatostatinlike immunoreactivity in Alzheimer's disease might indicate increased release of somatostatin and down regulation of postsynaptic receptors.

  16. Surface vulnerability of cerebral cortex to major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Peng, Daihui; Shi, Feng; Li, Gang; Fralick, Drew; Shen, Ting; Qiu, Meihui; Liu, Jun; Jiang, Kaida; Shen, Dinggang; Fang, Yiru

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is accompanied by atypical brain structure. This study first presents the alterations in the cortical surface of patients with MDD using multidimensional structural patterns that reflect different neurodevelopment. Sixteen first-episode, untreated patients with MDD and 16 matched healthy controls underwent a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. The cortical maps of thickness, surface area, and gyrification were examined using the surface-based morphometry (SBM) approach. Increase of cortical thickness was observed in the right posterior cingulate region and the parietal cortex involving the bilateral inferior, left superior parietal and right paracentral regions, while decreased thickness was noted in the parietal cortex including bilateral pars opercularis and left precentral region, as well as the left rostral-middle frontal regions in patients with MDD. Likewise, increased or decreased surface area was found in five sub-regions of the cingulate gyrus, parietal and frontal cortices (e.g., bilateral inferior parietal and superior frontal regions). In addition, MDD patients exhibited a significant hypergyrification in the right precentral and supramarginal region. This integrated structural assessment of cortical surface suggests that MDD patients have cortical alterations of the frontal, parietal and cingulate regions, indicating a vulnerability to MDD during earlier neurodevelopmental process. PMID:25793287

  17. Surface Vulnerability of Cerebral Cortex to Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Fralick, Drew; Shen, Ting; Qiu, Meihui; Liu, Jun; Jiang, Kaida; Shen, Dinggang; Fang, Yiru

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is accompanied by atypical brain structure. This study first presents the alterations in the cortical surface of patients with MDD using multidimensional structural patterns that reflect different neurodevelopment. Sixteen first-episode, untreated patients with MDD and 16 matched healthy controls underwent a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. The cortical maps of thickness, surface area, and gyrification were examined using the surface-based morphometry (SBM) approach. Increase of cortical thickness was observed in the right posterior cingulate region and the parietal cortex involving the bilateral inferior, left superior parietal and right paracentral regions, while decreased thickness was noted in the parietal cortex including bilateral pars opercularis and left precentral region, as well as the left rostral-middle frontal regions in patients with MDD. Likewise, increased or decreased surface area was found in five sub-regions of the cingulate gyrus, parietal and frontal cortices (e.g., bilateral inferior parietal and superior frontal regions). In addition, MDD patients exhibited a significant hypergyrification in the right precentral and supramarginal region. This integrated structural assessment of cortical surface suggests that MDD patients have cortical alterations of the frontal, parietal and cingulate regions, indicating a vulnerability to MDD during earlier neurodevelopmental process. PMID:25793287

  18. Human Frontal Lobes and AI Planning Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levinson, Richard; Lum, Henry Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Human frontal lobes are essential for maintaining a self-regulating balance between predictive and reactive behavior. This paper describes a system that integrates prediction and reaction based on neuropsychological theories of frontal lobe function. In addition to enhancing our understanding of deliberate action in humans' the model is being used to develop and evaluate the same properties in machines. First, the paper presents some background neuropsychology in order to set a general context. The role of frontal lobes is then presented by summarizing three theories which formed the basis for this work. The components of an artificial frontal lobe are then discussed from both neuropsychological and AI perspectives. The paper concludes by discussing issues and methods for evaluating systems that integrate planning and reaction.

  19. Frontal sinus recognition for human identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falguera, Juan Rogelio; Falguera, Fernanda Pereira Sartori; Marana, Aparecido Nilceu

    2008-03-01

    Many methods based on biometrics such as fingerprint, face, iris, and retina have been proposed for person identification. However, for deceased individuals, such biometric measurements are not available. In such cases, parts of the human skeleton can be used for identification, such as dental records, thorax, vertebrae, shoulder, and frontal sinus. It has been established in prior investigations that the radiographic pattern of frontal sinus is highly variable and unique for every individual. This has stimulated the proposition of measurements of the frontal sinus pattern, obtained from x-ray films, for skeletal identification. This paper presents a frontal sinus recognition method for human identification based on Image Foresting Transform and shape context. Experimental results (ERR = 5,82%) have shown the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  20. Fetal blood testing (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... testing is performed during labor to test the blood pH of the baby which can determine its well- ... puncture is made in the scalp and fetal blood droplets are collected in a thin glass tube. Testing the scalp pH can help your doctor decide if your fetus ...

  1. The Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umbreit, John; Ostrow, Lisa S.

    1980-01-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome is a pattern of altered growth and morphogenesis found in about half the offspring of severely and chronically alcoholic women who continue drinking throughout their pregnancy. Of children studied, mild to moderate mental retardation was the most common disorder, occurring in 44 percent of the cases. (PHR)

  2. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zerrer, Peggy

    The paper reviews Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS), a series of effects seen in children whose mothers drink alcohol to excess during pregnancy. The identification of FAS and its recognition as a major health problem in need of prevention are traced. Characteristics of children with FAS are described and resultant growth retardation, abnormal physical…

  3. Rationale for Management of Frontal Sinus Fractures

    PubMed Central

    BANICA, Bogdan; ENE, Patricia; DABU, Aurelia; ENE, Razvan; CIRSTOIU, Catalin

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The optimal treatment of frontal sinus fractures remains controversial. Multiple treatment options and algorithms have been proposed by multiple specialties throughout the years; however, the optimal method of frontal sinus repair has yet to be discovered. Overwhelming complications such as meningitis, encephalitis or brain abscess are quite uncommon nowadays. Nevertheless, late development of invasive mucoceles is not a rarity and therefore long-term follow-up is mandatory. PMID:24790677

  4. Beyond the sniffer: frontal sinuses in Carnivora.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Abigail A; Van Valkenburgh, Blaire

    2014-11-01

    Paranasal sinuses are some of the most poorly understood features of mammalian cranial anatomy. They are highly variable in presence and form among species, but their function is not well understood. The best-supported explanations for the function of sinuses is that they opportunistically fill mechanically unnecessary space, but that in some cases, sinuses in combination with the configuration of the frontal bone may improve skull performance by increasing skull strength and dissipating stresses more evenly. We used CT technology to investigate patterns in frontal sinus size and shape disparity among three families of carnivores: Canidae, Felidae, and Hyaenidae. We provide some of the first quantitative data on sinus morphology for these three families, and employ a novel method to quantify the relationship between three-dimensional sinus shape and skull shape. As expected, frontal sinus size and shape were more strongly correlated with frontal bone size and shape than with the morphology of the skull as a whole. However, sinus morphology was also related to allometric differences among families that are linked to biomechanical function. Our results support the hypothesis that frontal sinuses most often opportunistically fill space that is mechanically unnecessary, and they can facilitate cranial shape changes that reduce stress during feeding. Moreover, we suggest that the ability to form frontal sinuses allows species to modify skull function without compromising the performance of more functionally constrained regions such as the nasal chamber (heat/water conservation, olfaction), and braincase (housing the brain and sensory structures). PMID:25312364

  5. Apraxia, pantomime and the parietal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Niessen, E.; Fink, G.R.; Weiss, P.H.

    2014-01-01

    Apraxia, a disorder of higher motor cognition, is a frequent and outcome-relevant sequel of left hemispheric stroke. Deficient pantomiming of object use constitutes a key symptom of apraxia and is assessed when testing for apraxia. To date the neural basis of pantomime remains controversial. We here review the literature and perform a meta-analysis of the relevant structural and functional imaging (fMRI/PET) studies. Based on a systematic literature search, 10 structural and 12 functional imaging studies were selected. Structural lesion studies associated pantomiming deficits with left frontal, parietal and temporal lesions. In contrast, functional imaging studies associate pantomimes with left parietal activations, with or without concurrent frontal or temporal activations. Functional imaging studies that selectively activated parietal cortex adopted the most stringent controls. In contrast to previous suggestions, current analyses show that both lesion and functional studies support the notion of a left-hemispheric fronto-(temporal)-parietal network underlying pantomiming object use. Furthermore, our review demonstrates that the left parietal cortex plays a key role in pantomime-related processes. More specifically, stringently controlled fMRI-studies suggest that in addition to storing motor schemas, left parietal cortex is also involved in activating these motor schemas in the context of pantomiming object use. In addition to inherent differences between structural and functional imaging studies and consistent with the dedifferentiation hypothesis, the age difference between young healthy subjects (typically included in functional imaging studies) and elderly neurological patients (typically included in structural lesion studies) may well contribute to the finding of a more distributed representation of pantomiming within the motor-dominant left hemisphere in the elderly. PMID:24967158

  6. Cerebral cortex structure in prodromal Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Nopoulos, Peggy C; Aylward, Elizabeth H; Ross, Christopher A; Johnson, Hans J; Magnotta, Vincent A; Juhl, Andrew R; Pierson, Ronald K; Mills, James; Langbehn, Douglas R; Paulsen, Jane S

    2010-12-01

    Neuroimaging studies of subjects who are gene-expanded for Huntington Disease, but not yet diagnosed (termed prodromal HD), report that the cortex is "spared," despite the decrement in striatal and cerebral white-matter volume. Measurement of whole-cortex volume can mask more subtle, but potentially clinically relevant regional changes in volume, thinning, or surface area. The current study addressed this limitation by evaluating cortical morphology of 523 prodromal HD subjects. Participants included 693 individuals enrolled in the PREDICT-HD protocol. Of these participants, 523 carried the HD gene mutation (prodromal HD group); the remaining 170 were non gene-expanded and served as the comparison group. Based on age and CAG repeat length, gene-expanded subjects were categorized as "Far from onset," "Midway to onset," "Near onset," and "already diagnosed." MRI scans were processed using FreeSurfer. Cortical volume, thickness, and surface area were not significantly different between the Far from onset group and controls. However, beginning in the Midway to onset group, the cortex showed significant volume decrement, affecting most the posterior and superior cerebral regions. This pattern progressed when evaluating the groups further into the disease process. Areas that remained mostly unaffected included ventral and medial regions of the frontal and temporal cortex. Morphologic changes were mostly in thinning as surface area did not substantially change in most regions. Early in the course of HD, the cortex shows changes that are manifest as cortical thinning and are most robust in the posterior and superior regions of the cerebrum. PMID:20688164

  7. Cerebral Cortex Structure in Prodromal Huntington Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nopoulos, Peggy C.; Aylward, Elizabeth H.; Ross, Christopher A.; Johnson, Hans J.; Magnotta, Vincent A.; Juhl, Andrew R.; Pierson, Ronald K.; Mills, James; Langbehn, Douglas R.; Paulsen, Jane S.

    2010-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies of subjects who are gene-expanded for Huntington Disease, but not yet diagnosed (termed prodromal HD), report that the cortex is “spared,” despite the decrement in striatal and cerebral white-matter volume. Measurement of whole-cortex volume can mask more subtle, but potentially clinically relevant regional changes in volume, thinning, or surface area. The current study addressed this limitation by evaluating cortical morphology of 523 prodromal HD subjects. Participants included 693 individuals enrolled in the PREDICT-HD protocol. Of these participants, 523 carried the HD gene mutation (prodromal HD group); the remaining 170 were non gene-expanded and served as the comparison group. Based on age and CAG repeat length, gene-expanded subjects were categorized as “Far from onset,” “Midway to onset,” “Near onset,” and “already diagnosed.” MRI scans were processed using FreeSurfer. Cortical volume, thickness, and surface area were not significantly different between the Far from onset group and controls. However, beginning in the Midway to onset group, the cortex showed significant volume decrement, affecting most the posterior and superior cerebral regions. This pattern progressed when evaluating the groups further into the disease process. Areas that remained mostly unaffected included ventral and medial regions of the frontal and temporal cortex. Morphologic changes were mostly in thinning as surface area did not substantially change in most regions. Early in the course of HD, the cortex shows changes that are manifest as cortical thinning and are most robust in the posterior and superior regions of the cerebrum. PMID:20688164

  8. Verbal suppression and strategy use: a role for the right lateral prefrontal cortex?

    PubMed

    Robinson, Gail A; Cipolotti, Lisa; Walker, David G; Biggs, Vivien; Bozzali, Marco; Shallice, Tim

    2015-04-01

    Verbal initiation, suppression and strategy generation/use are cognitive processes widely held to be supported by the frontal cortex. The Hayling Test was designed to tap these cognitive processes within the same sentence completion task. There are few studies specifically investigating the neural correlates of the Hayling Test but it has been primarily used to detect frontal lobe damage. This study investigates the components of the Hayling Test in a large sample of patients with unselected focal frontal (n = 60) and posterior (n = 30) lesions. Patients and controls (n = 40) matched for education, age and sex were administered the Hayling Test as well as background cognitive tests. The standard Hayling Test clinical measures (initiation response time, suppression response time, suppression errors and overall score), composite errors scores and strategy-based responses were calculated. Lesions were analysed by classical frontal/posterior subdivisions as well as a finer-grained frontal localization method and a specific contrast method that is somewhat analogous to voxel-based lesion mapping methods. Thus, patients with right lateral, left lateral and superior medial lesions were compared to controls and patients with right lateral lesions were compared to all other patients. The results show that all four standard Hayling Test clinical measures are sensitive to frontal lobe damage although only the suppression error and overall scores were specific to the frontal region. Although all frontal patients produced blatant suppression errors, a specific right lateral frontal effect was revealed for producing errors that were subtly wrong. In addition, frontal patients overall produced fewer correct responses indicative of developing an appropriate strategy but only the right lateral group showed a significant deficit. This problem in strategy attainment and implementation could explain, at least in part, the suppression error impairment. Contrary to previous studies

  9. Clinical-physiologic correlates of Alzheimer's disease and frontal lobe dementia

    SciTech Connect

    Jagust, W.J.; Reed, B.R.; Seab, J.P.; Kramer, J.H.; Budinger, T.F. )

    1989-01-01

    Thirty patients with degenerative dementia underwent clinical evaluation, neuropsychological testing, and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with the blood flow tracer ({sup 123}I)-N-isopropyl-p-iodoamphetamine. Five of these patients were clinically and psychologically different from the others, demonstrating predominant behavioral disturbances with relative preservation of memory function. These five patients, who were felt to have a frontal lobe dementia (FLD), showed SPECT perfusion patterns which differed from the remaining 25 patients, who were diagnosed as having Alzheimer's disease (AD), and from 16 healthy control subjects. The FLD patients showed diminished perfusion in orbitofrontal, dorsolateral frontal, and temporal cortex relative to controls, while the AD patients showed lower perfusion in temporal and parietal cortex than controls. The FLD patients also showed hypoperfusion in both frontal cortical regions relative to AD patients. The pattern of performance on neuropsychological testing paralleled these differences in regional perfusion. These results suggest that clinical evaluation and physiological imaging may enable the differentiation of groups of degenerative dementia patients during life.

  10. Cortical surface complexity in frontal and temporal areas varies across subgroups of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Nenadic, Igor; Yotter, Rachel A; Sauer, Heinrich; Gaser, Christian

    2014-04-01

    Schizophrenia is assumed to be a neurodevelopmental disorder, which might involve disturbed development of the cerebral cortex, especially in frontal and medial temporal areas. Based on a novel spherical harmonics approach to measuring complexity of cortical folding, we applied a measure based on fractal dimension (FD) to investigate the heterogeneity of regional cortical surface abnormalities across subgroups of schizophrenia defined by symptom profiles. A sample of 87 patients with DSM-IV schizophrenia was divided into three subgroups (based on symptom profiles) with predominantly negative (n = 31), disorganized (n = 23), and paranoid (n = 33) symptoms and each compared to 108 matched healthy controls. While global FD measures were reduced in the right hemisphere of the negative and paranoid subgroups, regional analysis revealed marked heterogeneity of regional FD alterations. The negative subgroup showed most prominent reductions in left anterior cingulate, superior frontal, frontopolar, as well as right superior frontal and superior parietal cortices. The disorganized subgroup showed reductions in bilateral ventrolateral/orbitofrontal cortices, and several increases in the left hemisphere, including inferior parietal, middle temporal, and midcingulate areas. The paranoid subgroup showed only few changes, including decreases in the right superior parietal and left fusiform region, and increase in the left posterior cingulate cortex. Our findings suggest regional heterogeneity of cortical folding complexity, which might be related to biological subgroups of schizophrenia with differing degrees of altered cortical developmental pathology. PMID:23813686

  11. Aberrant functional connectivity differentiates retrosplenial cortex from posterior cingulate cortex in prodromal Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Dillen, Kim N H; Jacobs, Heidi I L; Kukolja, Juraj; von Reutern, Boris; Richter, Nils; Onur, Özgür A; Dronse, Julian; Langen, Karl-Josef; Fink, Gereon R

    2016-08-01

    The posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) is a key hub of the default mode network, a resting-state network involved in episodic memory, showing functional connectivity (FC) changes in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, PCC is a cytoarchitectonically heterogeneous region. Specifically, the retrosplenial cortex (RSC), often subsumed under the PCC, is an area functionally and microanatomically distinct from PCC. To investigate FC patterns of RSC and PCC separately, we used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging in healthy aging participants, patients with subjective cognitive impairment, and prodromal AD. Compared to the other 2 groups, we found higher FC from RSC to frontal cortex in subjective cognitive impairment but higher FC to occipital cortex in prodromal AD. Conversely, FC from PCC to the lingual gyrus was higher in prodromal AD. Furthermore, data indicate that RSC and PCC are characterized by differential FC patterns represented by hub-specific interactions with memory and attentions scores in prodromal AD compared to cognitively normal individuals, possibly reflecting compensatory mechanisms for RSC and neurodegenerative processes for PCC. Data thus confirm and extend previous studies suggesting that the RSC is functionally distinct from PCC. PMID:27318139

  12. Evaluating Pregnant Occupant Restraints: The Effect of Local Uterine Compression on the Risk of Fetal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Duma, Stefan M.; Moorcroft, David M.; Stitzel, Joel D.; Duma, Greg G.

    2004-01-01

    In order to develop effective restraint systems for the pregnant occupant, injury criteria for determining fetal injury risk must be developed. This study presents computer simulations of a 30 week pregnant occupant that illustrate the importance of local uterine compression on the risk of fetal injury. Frontal impact simulations with a range of velocities and belt positions were used to identify the best correlation between local uterine compression and peak strain measured at the uterine-placental interface. It is suggested that future pregnant dummy development and specifically pregnant injury criteria should be based on local uterine compression relative to the placental attachment location. PMID:15319120

  13. Unraveling the anxious mind: anxiety, worry, and frontal engagement in sustained attention versus off-task processing.

    PubMed

    Forster, Sophie; Nunez Elizalde, Anwar O; Castle, Elizabeth; Bishop, Sonia J

    2015-03-01

    Much remains unknown regarding the relationship between anxiety, worry, sustained attention, and frontal function. Here, we addressed this using a sustained attention task adapted for functional magnetic resonance imaging. Participants responded to presentation of simple stimuli, withholding responses to an infrequent "No Go" stimulus. Dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) activity to "Go" trials, and dorsal anterior cingulate (dACC) activity to "No Go" trials were associated with faster error-free performance; consistent with DLPFC and dACC facilitating proactive and reactive control, respectively. Trait anxiety was linked to reduced recruitment of these regions, slower error-free performance, and decreased frontal-thalamo-striatal connectivity. This indicates an association between trait anxiety and impoverished frontal control of attention, even when external distractors are absent. In task blocks where commission errors were made, greater DLPFC-precuneus and DLPFC-posterior cingulate connectivity were associated with both trait anxiety and worry, indicative of increased off-task thought. Notably, unlike trait anxiety, worry was not linked to reduced frontal-striatal-thalamo connectivity, impoverished frontal recruitment, or slowed responding during blocks without commission errors, contrary to accounts proposing a direct causal link between worry and impoverished attentional control. This leads us to propose a new model of the relationship between anxiety, worry and frontal engagement in attentional control versus off-task thought. PMID:24062316

  14. Interfering with the neural activity of mirror-related frontal areas impairs mentalistic inferences.

    PubMed

    Herbet, Guillaume; Lafargue, Gilles; Moritz-Gasser, Sylvie; Bonnetblanc, François; Duffau, Hugues

    2015-07-01

    According to recently proposed interactive dual-process theories, mentalizing abilities emerge from the coherent interaction between two physically distinct neural systems: (1) the mirror network, coding for the low-level embodied representations involved in pre-reflective sociocognitive processes and (2) the mentalizing network per se, which codes for higher level representations subtending the reflective attribution of psychological states. However, although the latest studies have shown that the core areas forming these two neurocognitive systems do indeed maintain effective connectivity during mentalizing, it is unclear whether an intact mirror system (and, more specifically, its anterior node, namely the posterior inferior frontal cortex) is a prerequisite for accurate mentalistic inferences. Intraoperative brain mapping via direct electrical stimulation offers a unique opportunity to address this issue. Electrical stimulation of the brain creates a "virtual" lesion, which provides functional information on well-defined parts of the cerebral cortex. In the present study, five patients were mapped in real time while they performed a mentalizing task. We found six responsive sites: four in the lateral part of the right pars opercularis and two in the dorsal part of the right pars triangularis. On the subcortical level, two additional sites were located within the white matter connectivity of the pars opercularis. Taken as a whole, our results suggest that the right inferior frontal cortex and its underlying axonal connectivity have a key role in mentalizing. Specifically, our findings support the hypothesis whereby transient, functional disruption of the mirror network influences higher order mentalistic inferences. PMID:24802379

  15. Evidence for inhibitory deficits in the prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Radhu, Natasha; Garcia Dominguez, Luis; Farzan, Faranak; Richter, Margaret A.; Semeralul, Mawahib O.; Chen, Robert; Fitzgerald, Paul B.

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal gamma-aminobutyric acid inhibitory neurotransmission is a key pathophysiological mechanism underlying schizophrenia. Transcranial magnetic stimulation can be combined with electroencephalography to index long-interval cortical inhibition, a measure of GABAergic receptor-mediated inhibitory neurotransmission from the frontal and motor cortex. In previous studies we have reported that schizophrenia is associated with inhibitory deficits in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex compared to healthy subjects and patients with bipolar disorder. The main objective of the current study was to replicate and extend these initial findings by evaluating long-interval cortical inhibition from the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in patients with schizophrenia compared to patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder. A total of 111 participants were assessed: 38 patients with schizophrenia (average age: 35.71 years, 25 males, 13 females), 27 patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (average age: 36.15 years, 11 males, 16 females) and 46 healthy subjects (average age: 33.63 years, 23 females, 23 males). Long-interval cortical inhibition was measured from the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and motor cortex through combined transcranial magnetic stimulation and electroencephalography. In the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, long-interval cortical inhibition was significantly reduced in patients with schizophrenia compared to healthy subjects (P = 0.004) and not significantly different between patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder and healthy subjects (P = 0.5445). Long-interval cortical inhibition deficits in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex were also significantly greater in patients with schizophrenia compared to patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (P = 0.0465). There were no significant differences in long-interval cortical inhibition across all three groups in the motor cortex. These results demonstrate that long-interval cortical inhibition deficits in the

  16. Orbitofrontal Cortex Volume and Brain Reward Response in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Shott, Megan E.; Cornier, Marc-Andre; Mittal, Vijay A.; Pryor, Tamara L.; Orr, Joseph M.; Brown, Mark S.; Frank, Guido K.W.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives What drives overconsumption of food is poorly understood. Alterations in brain structure and function could contribute to increased food seeking. Recently brain orbitofrontal cortex volume has been implicated in dysregulated eating but little is know how brain structure relates to function. Subjects/Methods We examined obese (n=18, age=28.7.4±8.3 years) and healthy control women (n=24, age=27.4±6.3 years) using a multimodal brain imaging approach. We applied magnetic resonance and diffusion tensor imaging to study brain gray and white matter volume as well as white matter integrity, and tested whether orbitofrontal cortex volume predicts brain reward circuitry activation in a taste reinforcement-learning paradigm that has been associated with dopamine function. Results Obese individuals displayed lower gray and associated white matter volumes (p<.05 family wise error (FWE)-small volume corrected) compared to controls in the orbitofrontal cortex, striatum, and insula. White matter integrity was reduced in obese individuals in fiber tracts including the external capsule, corona radiata, sagittal stratum, and the uncinate, inferior fronto-occipital, and inferior longitudinal fasciculi. Gray matter volume of the gyrus rectus at the medial edge of the orbitofrontal cortex predicted functional taste reward-learning response in frontal cortex, insula, basal ganglia, amygdala, hypothalamus and anterior cingulate cortex in control but not obese individuals. Conclusions This study indicates a strong association between medial orbitofrontal cortex volume and taste reinforcement-learning activation in the brain in control but not in obese women. Lower brain volumes in the orbitofrontal cortex and other brain regions associated with taste reward function as well as lower integrity of connecting pathways in obesity may support a more widespread disruption of reward pathways. The medial orbitofrontal cortex is an important structure in the termination of

  17. Mapping the Structural Core of Human Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Hagmann, Patric; Cammoun, Leila; Gigandet, Xavier; Meuli, Reto; Honey, Christopher J; Wedeen, Van J; Sporns, Olaf

    2008-01-01

    Structurally segregated and functionally specialized regions of the human cerebral cortex are interconnected by a dense network of cortico-cortical axonal pathways. By using diffusion spectrum imaging, we noninvasively mapped these pathways within and across cortical hemispheres in individual human participants. An analysis of the resulting large-scale structural brain networks reveals a structural core within posterior medial and parietal cerebral cortex, as well as several distinct temporal and frontal modules. Brain regions within the structural core share high degree, strength, and betweenness centrality, and they constitute connector hubs that link all major structural modules. The structural core contains brain regions that form the posterior components of the human default network. Looking both within and outside of core regions, we observed a substantial correspondence between structural connectivity and resting-state functional connectivity measured in the same participants. The spatial and topological centrality of the core within cortex suggests an important role in functional integration. PMID:18597554

  18. Modulation of inferotemporal cortex activation during verbal working memory maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Fiebach, Christian J.; Rissman, Jesse; D'Esposito, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Summary Regions of the left inferotemporal cortex are involved in visual word recognition and semantics. We utilized functional magnetic resonance imaging to localize an inferotemporal language area and to demonstrate that this area is involved in the active maintenance of visually presented words in working memory. Maintenance activity in this inferotemporal area showed an effect of memory load for words, but not pseudowords. The selective modulation of this language-related inferotemporal area for the maintenance of words, in the absence of visual input, is accompanied by an increased functional connectivity with left prefrontal cortex. These results are the first demonstration of an involvement of inferotemporal cortex in verbal working memory. They provide neurophysiological support for the notion that nonphonological language representations can be recruited in the service of verbal working memory. More generally, they suggest that verbal working memory should be conceptualized as the frontally-guided, sustained activation of pre-existing cortical language representations. PMID:16846859

  19. Frontal Cortical Asymmetry May Partially Mediate the Influence of Social Power on Anger Expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongdong; Wang, Changming; Yin, Qin; Mao, Mengchai; Zhu, Chaozhe; Huang, Yuxia

    2016-01-01

    When irritated by other people, powerful people usually tend to express their anger explicitly and directly, whereas people in less powerful positions are more likely not to show their feelings freely. The neural mechanism behind power and its influence on expression tendency has been scarcely explored. This study recorded frontal EEG activity at rest and frontal EEG activation while participants were engaged in a writing task describing an anger-eliciting event, in which they were irritated by people with higher or lower social power. Participants' anger levels and expression inclination levels were self-reported on nine-point visual analog Likert scales, and also rated by independent raters based on the essays they had written. The results showed that high social power was indeed associated with greater anger expression tendency and greater left frontal activation than low social power. This is in line with the approach-inhibition theory of power. The mid-frontal asymmetric activation served as a partial mediator between social power and expression inclination. This effect may relate to the functions of the prefrontal cortex, which is in charge of information integration and evaluation and the control of motivation direction, as reported by previous studies. PMID:26869972

  20. Frontal and parietal theta burst TMS impairs working memory for visual-spatial conjunctions.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Helen M; Jackson, Margaret C; van Koningsbruggen, Martijn G; Shapiro, Kimron L; Linden, David E J

    2013-03-01

    In tasks that selectively probe visual or spatial working memory (WM) frontal and posterior cortical areas show a segregation, with dorsal areas preferentially involved in spatial (e.g. location) WM and ventral areas in visual (e.g. object identity) WM. In a previous fMRI study [1], we showed that right parietal cortex (PC) was more active during WM for orientation, whereas left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) was more active during colour WM. During WM for colour-orientation conjunctions, activity in these areas was intermediate to the level of activity for the single task preferred and non-preferred information. To examine whether these specialised areas play a critical role in coordinating visual and spatial WM to perform a conjunction task, we used theta burst transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to induce a functional deficit. Compared to sham stimulation, TMS to right PC or left IFG selectively impaired WM for conjunctions but not single features. This is consistent with findings from visual search paradigms, in which frontal and parietal TMS selectively affects search for conjunctions compared to single features, and with combined TMS and functional imaging work suggesting that parietal and frontal regions are functionally coupled in tasks requiring integration of visual and spatial information. Our results thus elucidate mechanisms by which the brain coordinates spatially segregated processing streams and have implications beyond the field of working memory. PMID:22483548

  1. Traumatic brain injury and the frontal lobes: what can we gain with diffusion tensor imaging?

    PubMed

    Zappalà, Giuseppe; Thiebaut de Schotten, Michel; Eslinger, Paul J

    2012-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death in the young population and long-term disability in relation to pervasive cognitive-behavioural disturbances that follow frontal lobe damage. To date, emphasis has been placed primarily on the clinical correlates of frontal cortex damage, whilst identification of the contribution of subjacent white matter lesion is less clear. Our poor understanding of white matter pathology in TBI is primarily due to the low sensitivity of conventional neuroimaging to identify pathological changes in less severe traumatic injury and the lack of methods to localise white matter pathology onto individual frontal lobe connections. In this paper we focus on the potential contribution of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to TBI. Our review of the current literature supports the conclusion that DTI is particularly sensitive to changes in the microstructure of frontal white matter, thus providing a valuable biomarker of the severity of traumatic injury and prognostic indicator of recovery of function. Furthermore we propose an atlas approach to TBI to map white matter lesions onto individual tracts. In the cases presented here we showed a direct correspondence between the clinical manifestations of the patients and the damage to specific white matter tracts. We are confident that in the near future the application of DTI to TBI will improve our understanding of the complex and heterogeneous clinical symptomatology which follows a TBI, especially mild and moderate head injury, which still represents 70-80% of all clinical population. PMID:21813118

  2. Frontal Cortical Asymmetry May Partially Mediate the Influence of Social Power on Anger Expression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongdong; Wang, Changming; Yin, Qin; Mao, Mengchai; Zhu, Chaozhe; Huang, Yuxia

    2016-01-01

    When irritated by other people, powerful people usually tend to express their anger explicitly and directly, whereas people in less powerful positions are more likely not to show their feelings freely. The neural mechanism behind power and its influence on expression tendency has been scarcely explored. This study recorded frontal EEG activity at rest and frontal EEG activation while participants were engaged in a writing task describing an anger-eliciting event, in which they were irritated by people with higher or lower social power. Participants’ anger levels and expression inclination levels were self-reported on nine-point visual analog Likert scales, and also rated by independent raters based on the essays they had written. The results showed that high social power was indeed associated with greater anger expression tendency and greater left frontal activation than low social power. This is in line with the approach-inhibition theory of power. The mid-frontal asymmetric activation served as a partial mediator between social power and expression inclination. This effect may relate to the functions of the prefrontal cortex, which is in charge of information integration and evaluation and the control of motivation direction, as reported by previous studies. PMID:26869972

  3. Persistent fetal circulation.

    PubMed

    Saucier, P H

    1980-01-01

    A review of persistent fetal circulation, which involves the presence of a right to left extrapulmonary shunt that is sustained into neonatal life, is presented. Clinical signs exhibited by the infant often resemble those of respiratory distress. Treatment is accomplished with hyperventilation and/or pharmacologically with tolazoline which, in addition to the usual attention to the overall condition of the infant, requires intensive monitoring by the nurse. PMID:6898712

  4. Passive fetal monitoring sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Hall, Earl T.; Baker, Donald A.; Bryant, Timothy D.

    1992-08-01

    An ambulatory, passive sensor for use in a fetal monitoring system is discussed. The invention is comprised of a piezoelectric polymer film, combined with a metallic mounting plate fastened to a belt, and electrically connected to a signal processing unit by means of a shielded cable. The purpose of the sensor is to receive pressure pulses emitted by a fetus inside an expectant mother. Additionally, the monitor will filter out pressure pulses arising from other sources, such as the maternal heart.

  5. Passive fetal monitoring sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Hall, Earl T. (Inventor); Baker, Donald A. (Inventor); Bryant, Timothy D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An ambulatory, passive sensor for use in a fetal monitoring system is discussed. The invention is comprised of a piezoelectric polymer film, combined with a metallic mounting plate fastened to a belt, and electrically connected to a signal processing unit by means of a shielded cable. The purpose of the sensor is to receive pressure pulses emitted by a fetus inside an expectant mother. Additionally, the monitor will filter out pressure pulses arising from other sources, such as the maternal heart.

  6. [Normal aging of frontal lobe functions].

    PubMed

    Calso, Cristina; Besnard, Jérémy; Allain, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    Normal aging in individuals is often associated with morphological, metabolic and cognitive changes, which particularly concern the cerebral frontal regions. Starting from the "frontal lobe hypothesis of cognitive aging" (West, 1996), the present review is based on the neuroanatomical model developed by Stuss (2008), introducing four categories of frontal lobe functions: executive control, behavioural and emotional self-regulation and decision-making, energization and meta-cognitive functions. The selected studies only address the changes of one at least of these functions. The results suggest a deterioration of several cognitive frontal abilities in normal aging: flexibility, inhibition, planning, verbal fluency, implicit decision-making, second-order and affective theory of mind. Normal aging seems also to be characterised by a general reduction in processing speed observed during neuropsychological assessment (Salthouse, 1996). Nevertheless many cognitive functions remain preserved such as automatic or non-conscious inhibition, specific capacities of flexibility and first-order theory of mind. Therefore normal aging doesn't seem to be associated with a global cognitive decline but rather with a selective change in some frontal systems, conclusion which should be taken into account for designing caring programs in normal aging. PMID:27005339

  7. Maternal-fetal conflict.

    PubMed

    Fasouliotis, S J; Schenker, J G

    2000-03-01

    Advances in prenatal care have brought about a greater understanding as to the special status of the fetus to the point that it is considered a patient in its own regard. Pregnant women generally follow the medical recommendations of their physicians that are intended for the benefit of their baby. Any situation where maternal well-being or wishes contradict fetal benefit constitutes a maternal-fetal conflict. Such situations include a broad range of possible interventions, non-interventions, and coercive influences. In such cases, the attending physician is expected to attain an attitude that involves either the respect of the woman's autonomy and right to privacy, which precludes any approach other than to accept her decision, or to modify this absolute for the beneficence of the fetus. Current ethical viewpoints range from absolute respect for maternal autonomy with no persuasion allowed, to gentle persuasion and to others which permit intervention and overriding of the woman's autonomy. Court-ordered decisions enforcing the pregnant woman to undergo a procedure in order to improve fetal outcome have been criticized as an invasion of a woman's privacy, limitation of her autonomy, and taking away of her right to informed consent. PMID:10733034

  8. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Williams, Janet F; Smith, Vincent C

    2015-11-01

    Prenatal exposure to alcohol can damage the developing fetus and is the leading preventable cause of birth defects and intellectual and neurodevelopmental disabilities. In 1973, fetal alcohol syndrome was first described as a specific cluster of birth defects resulting from alcohol exposure in utero. Subsequently, research unequivocally revealed that prenatal alcohol exposure causes a broad range of adverse developmental effects. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is the general term that encompasses the range of adverse effects associated with prenatal alcohol exposure. The diagnostic criteria for fetal alcohol syndrome are specific, and comprehensive efforts are ongoing to establish definitive criteria for diagnosing the other FASDs. A large and growing body of research has led to evidence-based FASD education of professionals and the public, broader prevention initiatives, and recommended treatment approaches based on the following premises:▪ Alcohol-related birth defects and developmental disabilities are completely preventable when pregnant women abstain from alcohol use.▪ Neurocognitive and behavioral problems resulting from prenatal alcohol exposure are lifelong.▪ Early recognition, diagnosis, and therapy for any condition along the FASD continuum can result in improved outcomes.▪ During pregnancy:◦no amount of alcohol intake should be considered safe;◦there is no safe trimester to drink alcohol;◦all forms of alcohol, such as beer, wine, and liquor, pose similar risk; and◦binge drinking poses dose-related risk to the developing fetus. PMID:26482673

  9. Intrapartum fetal monitoring.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Alison G; Spain, Janine

    2015-06-01

    Intrapartum fetal monitoring to assess fetal well-being during the labor and delivery process has been a central component of intrapartum care for decades. Today, electronic fetal monitoring (EFM) is the most common method used to assess the fetus during labor without substantial evidence to suggest a benefit. A Cochrane review of 13 trials, which included over 37,000 women, found that continuous EFM provided no significant improvement in perinatal death rate [risk ratio (RR) 0.86; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.59-1.23] or cerebral palsy rate (RR 1.75; 95% CI, 0.84-3.63) as compared with intermittent auscultation; however, there was a significant decrease in neonatal seizures (RR 0.50; 95% CI, 0.31-0.80). In addition, there was a significant increase in cesarean delivery (RR 1.63; 95% CI, 1.29-2.07) and operative vaginal delivery (RR 1.15; 95% CI, 1.01-1.33). Despite the lack of scientific support to suggest that EFM reduces adverse neonatal outcomes, its use is almost universal in the hospital setting and very likely has contributed to the rise in cesarean rate. PMID:25811127

  10. “It's Not What You Say, But How You Say it”: A Reciprocal Temporo-frontal Network for Affective Prosody

    PubMed Central

    Leitman, David I.; Wolf, Daniel H.; Ragland, J. Daniel; Laukka, Petri; Loughead, James; Valdez, Jeffrey N.; Javitt, Daniel C.; Turetsky, Bruce I.; Gur, Ruben C.

    2009-01-01

    Humans communicate emotion vocally by modulating acoustic cues such as pitch, intensity and voice quality. Research has documented how the relative presence or absence of such cues alters the likelihood of perceiving an emotion, but the neural underpinnings of acoustic cue-dependent emotion perception remain obscure. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging in 20 subjects we examined a reciprocal circuit consisting of superior temporal cortex, amygdala and inferior frontal gyrus that may underlie affective prosodic comprehension. Results showed that increased saliency of emotion-specific acoustic cues was associated with increased activation in superior temporal cortex [planum temporale (PT), posterior superior temporal gyrus (pSTG), and posterior superior middle gyrus (pMTG)] and amygdala, whereas decreased saliency of acoustic cues was associated with increased inferior frontal activity and temporo-frontal connectivity. These results suggest that sensory-integrative processing is facilitated when the acoustic signal is rich in affective information, yielding increased activation in temporal cortex and amygdala. Conversely, when the acoustic signal is ambiguous, greater evaluative processes are recruited, increasing activation in inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and IFG STG connectivity. Auditory regions may thus integrate acoustic information with amygdala input to form emotion-specific representations, which are evaluated within inferior frontal regions. PMID:20204074

  11. Identification of dopaminergic neurons of nigral and ventral tegmental area subtypes in grafts of fetal ventral mesencephalon based on cell morphology, protein expression, and efferent projections.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Lachlan; Barraud, Perrine; Andersson, Elin; Kirik, Deniz; Björklund, Anders

    2005-07-01

    Transplants of fetal ventral mesencephalic tissue are known to contain a mixture of two major dopamine (DA) neuron types: the A9 neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and the A10 neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Previous studies have suggested that these two DA neuron types may differ in their growth characteristics, but, because of technical limitations, it has so far been difficult to identify the two subtypes in fetal ventral mesencephalon (VM) grafts and trace their axonal projections. Here, we have made use of a transgenic mouse expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the tyrosine hydroxylase promoter. The expression of the GFP reporter allowed for visualization of the grafted DA neurons and their axonal projections within the host brain. We show that the SNpc and VTA neuron subtypes in VM grafts can be identified on the basis of their morphology and location within the graft, and their expression of a G-protein-gated inwardly rectifying K+ channel subunit (Girk2) and calbindin, respectively, and also that the axonal projections of the two DA neuron types are markedly different. By retrograde axonal tracing, we show that dopaminergic innervation of the striatum is derived almost exclusively from the Girk2-positive SNpc cells, whereas the calbindin-positive VTA neurons project to the frontal cortex and probably also other forebrain areas. The results suggest the presence of axon guidance and target recognition mechanisms in the DA-denervated forebrain that can guide the growing axons to their appropriate targets and indicate that cell preparations used for cell replacement in Parkinson's disease will be therapeutically useful only if they contain cells capable of generating the correct nigral DA neuron phenotype. PMID:16000637

  12. Verb generation in patients with focal frontal lesions: A neuropsychological test of neuroimaging findings

    PubMed Central

    Thompson-Schill, Sharon L.; Swick, Diane; Farah, Martha J.; D’Esposito, Mark; Kan, Irene P.; Knight, Robert T.

    1998-01-01

    What are the neural bases of semantic memory? Traditional beliefs that the temporal lobes subserve the retrieval of semantic knowledge, arising from lesion studies, have been recently called into question by functional neuroimaging studies finding correlations between semantic retrieval and activity in left prefrontal cortex. Has neuroimaging taught us something new about the neural bases of cognition that older methods could not reveal or has it merely identified brain activity that is correlated with but not causally related to the process of semantic retrieval? We examined the ability of patients with focal frontal lesions to perform a task commonly used in neuroimaging experiments, the generation of semantically appropriate action words for concrete nouns, and found evidence of the necessity of the left inferior frontal gyrus for certain components of the verb generation task. Notably, these components did not include semantic retrieval per se. PMID:9861060

  13. Theta lingua franca: a common mid-frontal substrate for action monitoring processes.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, James F; Zambrano-Vazquez, Laura; Allen, John J B

    2012-02-01

    We present evidence that a multitude of mid-frontal event-related potential (ERP) components partially reflect a common theta band oscillatory process. Specifically, mid-frontal ERP components in the N2 time range and error-related negativity time range are parsimoniously characterized as reflections of theta band activities. Forty participants completed three different tasks with varying stimulus-response demands. Permutation tests were used to identify the dominant time-frequency responses of stimulus- and response-locked conditions as well as the enhanced responses to novelty, conflict, punishment, and error. A dominant theta band feature was found in all conditions, and both ERP component amplitudes and theta power measures were similarly modulated by novelty, conflict, punishment, and error. The findings support the hypothesis that generic and reactive medial prefrontal cortex processes are parsimoniously reflected by theta band activities. PMID:22091878

  14. Performance on Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery Subtests Sensitive to Frontal Lobe Function in People with Autistic Disorder: Evidence from the Collaborative Programs of Excellence in Autism Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozonoff, Sally; Cook, Ian; Coon, Hilary; Dawson, Geraldine; Joseph, Robert M.; Klin, Ami; McMahon, William M.; Minshew, Nancy; Munson, Jeffrey A.

    2004-01-01

    Recent structural and functional imaging work, as well as neuropathology and neuropsychology studies, provide strong empirical support for the involvement of frontal cortex in autism. The Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) is a computer-administered set of neuropsychological tests developed to examine specific components…

  15. Frontal-subcortical circuitry and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Bonelli, Raphael M.; Cummings, Jeffrey L.

    2007-01-01

    The neuropsychiatric manifestations of neurodegenerative diseases are closely linked to neurocircuitry defects. Frontal-subcortical circuits, in particular, are effector mechanisms that allow the organism to act on its environment In this paper, we present the three main frontal-subcortical circuits: the dorsolateral prefrontal circuit allows the organization of information to facilitate a response; the anterior cingulate circuit is required for motivated behavior; and the orbitofrontal circuit allows the integration of limbic and emotional information into behavioral responses. Impaired executive functions, apathy, and impulsivity are hallmarks of frontal-subcortical circuit dysfunction. A variety of other neuropsychiatrie disorders, such as Tourette's syndrome, Huntington's disease, obsessive-compulsive disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia, and mood disorders may result from disturbances that have a direct or indirect impact on the integrity or functioning of these loops. PMID:17726913

  16. Cephalic aura after frontal lobe resection.

    PubMed

    Kakisaka, Yosuke; Jehi, Lara; Alkawadri, Rafeed; Wang, Zhong I; Enatsu, Rei; Mosher, John C; Dubarry, Anne-Sophie; Alexopoulos, Andreas V; Burgess, Richard C

    2014-08-01

    A cephalic aura is a common sensory aura typically seen in frontal lobe epilepsy. The generation mechanism of cephalic aura is not fully understood. It is hypothesized that to generate a cephalic aura extensive cortical areas need to be excited. We report a patient who started to have cephalic aura after right frontal lobe resection. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) showed interictal spike and ictal change during cephalic aura, both of which were distributed in the right frontal region, and the latter involved much more widespread areas than the former on MEG sensors. The peculiar seizure onset pattern may indicate that surgical modification of the epileptic network was related to the appearance of cephalic aura. We hypothesize that generation of cephalic aura may be associated with more extensive cortical involvement of epileptic activity than that of interictal activity, in at least a subset of cases. PMID:24613491

  17. Frontal-thalamic circuits associated with language

    PubMed Central

    Barbas, Helen; García-Cabezas, Miguel Ángel; Zikopoulos, Basilis

    2012-01-01

    Thalamic nuclei associated with language including the ventral lateral, ventral anterior, intralaminar and mediodorsal form a hub that uniquely receives the output of the basal ganglia and cerebellum, and is connected with frontal (premotor and prefrontal) cortices through two parallel circuits: a thalamic pathway targets the middle frontal cortical layers focally, and the other innervates widely cortical layer 1, poised to recruit other cortices and thalamic nuclei for complex cognitive operations. Return frontal pathways to the thalamus originate from cortical layers 6 and 5. Information through this integrated thalamo-cortical system is gated by the inhibitory thalamic reticular nucleus and modulated by dopamine, representing a specialization in primates. The intricate dialogue of distinct thalamic nuclei with the basal ganglia, cerebellum, and specific dorsolateral prefrontal and premotor cortices associated with language, suggests synergistic roles in the complex but seemingly effortless sequential transformation of cognitive operations for speech production in humans. PMID:23211411

  18. Timing Tasks Synchronize Cerebellar and Frontal Ramping Activity and Theta Oscillations: Implications for Cerebellar Stimulation in Diseases of Impaired Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Krystal L.

    2016-01-01

    Timing is a fundamental and highly conserved mammalian capability, yet the underlying neural mechanisms are widely debated. Ramping activity of single neurons that gradually increase or decrease activity to encode the passage of time has been speculated to predict a behaviorally relevant temporal event. Cue-evoked low-frequency activity has also been implicated in temporal processing. Ramping activity and low-frequency oscillations occur throughout the brain and could indicate a network-based approach to timing. Temporal processing requires cognitive mechanisms of working memory, attention, and reasoning, which are dysfunctional in neuropsychiatric disease. Therefore, timing tasks could be used to probe cognition in animals with disease phenotypes. The medial frontal cortex and cerebellum are involved in cognition. Cerebellar stimulation has been shown to influence medial frontal activity and improve cognition in schizophrenia. However, the mechanism underlying the efficacy of cerebellar stimulation is unknown. Here, we discuss how timing tasks can be used to probe cerebellar interactions with the frontal cortex and the therapeutic potential of cerebellar stimulation. The goal of this theory and hypothesis manuscript is threefold. First, we will summarize evidence indicating that in addition to motor learning, timing tasks involve cognitive processes that are present within both the cerebellum and medial frontal cortex. Second, we propose methodologies to investigate the connections between these areas in patients with Parkinson’s disease, autism, and schizophrenia. Lastly, we hypothesize that cerebellar transcranial stimulation may rescue medial frontal ramping activity, theta oscillations, and timing abnormalities, thereby restoring executive function in diseases of impaired cognition. This hypothesis could inspire the use of timing tasks as biomarkers for neuronal and cognitive abnormalities in neuropsychiatric disease and promote the therapeutic potential of

  19. Neural network underlying ictal pouting ("chapeau de gendarme") in frontal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Souirti, Zouhayr; Landré, Elisabeth; Mellerio, Charles; Devaux, Bertrand; Chassoux, Francine

    2014-08-01

    In order to determine the anatomical neural network underlying ictal pouting (IP), with the mouth turned down like a "chapeau de gendarme", in frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE), we reviewed the video-EEG recordings of 36 patients with FLE who became seizure-free after surgery. We selected the cases presenting IP, defined as a symmetrical and sustained (>5s) lowering of labial commissures with contraction of chin, mimicking an expression of fear, disgust, or menace. Ictal pouting was identified in 11 patients (8 males; 16-48 years old). We analyzed the clinical semiology, imaging, and electrophysiological data associated with IP, including FDG-PET in 10 and SEEG in 9 cases. In 37 analyzed seizures (2-7/patient), IP was an early symptom, occurring during the first 10s in 9 cases. The main associated features consisted of fear, anguish, vegetative disturbances, behavioral disorders (sudden agitation, insults, and fighting), tonic posturing, and complex motor activities. The epileptogenic zone assessed by SEEG involved the mesial frontal areas, especially the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in 8 patients, whereas lateral frontal onset with an early spread to the ACC was seen in the other patient. Ictal pouting associated with emotional changes and hypermotor behavior had high localizing value for rostroventral "affective" ACC, whereas less intense facial expressions were related to the dorsal "cognitive" ACC. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography demonstrated the involvement of both the ACC and lateral cortex including the anterior insula in all cases. We propose that IP is sustained by reciprocal mesial and lateral frontal interactions involved in emotional and cognitive processes, in which the ACC plays a pivotal role. PMID:25108117

  20. The frontal method in hydrodynamics simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    The frontal solution method has proven to be an effective means of solving the matrix equations resulting from the application of the finite element method to a variety of problems. In this study, several versions of the frontal method were compared in efficiency for several hydrodynamics problems. Three basic modifications were shown to be of value: 1. Elimination of equations with boundary conditions beforehand, 2. Modification of the pivoting procedures to allow dynamic management of the equation size, and 3. Storage of the eliminated equations in a vector. These modifications are sufficiently general to be applied to other classes of problems. ?? 1980.

  1. Frontal Polymerization in Microgravity Summary of Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pojman, John A.

    2002-01-01

    The project began with frontal polymerization (FP). We studied many aspects of FP on the ground and performed two successful weeks of flying on the KC-135. The project evolved into the current flight investigation, Transient Interfacial Phenomena in Miscible Polymer Systems (TIPMPS), as we recognized that an essential question could best be studied using a non-frontal approach. We present detailed results from our ground-based work on FP, KC-135 results and the background, justification and numerical work for the TIPMPS project.

  2. [Simple partial frontal nonconvulsive status epilepticus].

    PubMed

    Thomas, P; Mottin, Y

    1997-07-01

    Non convulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) of frontal origin is a rare cause of mental confusion. The present case of possible frontal-onset NCSE proved to have a neuropsychological examination that was suggestive either of a disruption of attentional function or a left prefrontal dysfunction, exhibiting disturbances of immediate memory and logical programmation, perseverations and affective disinhibition. Vigilance was not impaired. This case was therefore, on a nosographic point of view, more consistent with a simple partial status epilepticus with cognitive and affective symptomatology rather than with a complex partial status epilepticus of extra-temporal origin. PMID:9684010