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Sample records for fever small lung

  1. Lung cancer - small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC ...

  2. Lung cancer - small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  3. Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kalemkerian, Gregory P.; Akerley, Wallace; Bogner, Paul; Borghaei, Hossein; Chow, Laura QM; Downey, Robert J.; Gandhi, Leena; Ganti, Apar Kishor P.; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Grecula, John C.; Hayman, James; Heist, Rebecca Suk; Horn, Leora; Jahan, Thierry; Koczywas, Marianna; Loo, Billy W.; Merritt, Robert E.; Moran, Cesar A.; Niell, Harvey B.; O’Malley, Janis; Patel, Jyoti D.; Ready, Neal; Rudin, Charles M.; Williams, Charles C.; Gregory, Kristina; Hughes, Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors account for approximately 20% of lung cancers; most (≈15%) are small cell lung cancer (SCLC). These NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for SCLC focus on extensive-stage SCLC because it occurs more frequently than limited-stage disease. SCLC is highly sensitive to initial therapy; however, most patients eventually die of recurrent disease. In patients with extensive-stage disease, chemotherapy alone can palliate symptoms and prolong survival in most patients; however, long-term survival is rare. Most cases of SCLC are attributable to cigarette smoking; therefore, smoking cessation should be strongly promoted. PMID:23307984

  4. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Smoking causes most cases (around 90%) of lung cancer. The risk depends on the number of cigarettes ...

  5. Treatment Option Overview (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  6. Stages of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  7. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Smoking causes most cases (around 90%) of lung cancer. The risk ... day and for how long you have smoked. Being around the smoke ...

  8. [Fever and lung abscesses in anorexia nervosa after infusion therapy].

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, J; Herzum, M; Maisch, B

    1994-06-01

    A 26 year old female patient was admitted to our hospital because of septic temperatures and chills. In the patient's history renal insufficiency has been known for several years due to agenesia of the right and pyelonephritic renal congestion of the left kidney. Long lasting anorexia nervosa had been treated by psychotherapeutical interventions for years and when failing it necessitated repeated intravenous nutrition by central venous lines. The prominent symptom of the intravenously treated young woman was fever up to 39.7 degrees C and pneumonia, which was considered by the first treating clinic to be caused directly by diminished immunoreactivity in malnutrition and preuremia. The chest X-ray confirmed pneumonia and revealed multiple abscesses in both lungs (Figure 1). After being transferred to our intensive care unit the pathophysiological context became obvious. From inspection (positive jugular pulsation), from auscultation (holosystolic murmur at the left parasternal border) tricuspid incompetence due to infective endocarditis was suspected. This was confirmed immediately by TM and two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography, which showed a large vegetation on the anterior tricuspid valve leaflet (Figures 2a and 2b). Tricuspid regurgitation was also ascertained by color flow echocardiography (Figure 2c). Several blood cultures were positive for staphylococcus aureus. Clinical and laboratory recovery was achieved by antibiotic therapy with vancomycin and cephtazidim for 3 months.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7927123

  9. General Information about Small Cell Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  10. Fever

    MedlinePlus

    A fever is a body temperature that is higher than normal. It is not an illness. It is part of your body's defense against infection. Most bacteria ... cause infections do well at the body's normal temperature (98.6 F). A slight fever can make ...

  11. Fever

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    Measurement of body temperature remains one of the most common ways to assess health. An increase in temperature above what is considered to be a normal value is inevitably regarded as a sure sign of disease and referred to with one simple word: fever. In this review, we summarize how research on fever allowed the identification of the exogenous and endogenous molecules and pathways mediating the fever response. We also show how temperature elevation is common to different pathologies and how the molecular components of the fever-generation pathway represent drug targets for antipyretics, such as acetylsalicylic acid, the first “blockbuster drug”. We also show how fever research provided new insights into temperature and energy homeostasis, and into treatment of infection and inflammation. PMID:20305990

  12. Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... of charts. A fever is defined as a temperature 1° or more above the normal 98.6°. Minor infections may cause mild or short-term temperature elevations. Temperatures of 103° and above are considered ...

  13. Surgery for small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    de Hoyos, Alberto; DeCamp, Malcolm M

    2014-11-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) comprises approximately 14% of all lung cancer cases. Most patients present with locally advanced or metastatic disease and are therefore treated nonoperatively with chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or both. A small subset of patients with SCLC present with early-stage disease and will benefit from surgical resection plus chemotherapy. The rationale for radiotherapy in these patients remains controversial. PMID:25441133

  14. Treatment Options by Stage (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  15. Acute lung injury after platelet transfusion in a patient with dengue fever

    PubMed Central

    Karoli, Ritu; Bhat, Sanjay; Fatima, Jalees; Verma, Pankaj

    2014-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a serious clinical syndrome associated with the transfusion of plasmacontaining blood components. Recently, TRALI has come to be recognized as the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality. This complication typically presents as shortness of breath, hypoxemia, hypotension, fever, and non cardiogenic pulmonary edema, occurring within 6 h after transfusion. Although the mechanism of TRALI has not been exactly known, it has been associated with human leukocyte antigen antibodies and with biologically active mediators in stored cellular blood components. We, hereby, present a case of a patient with dengue fever who developed acute lung injury (ALI), presumably TRALI, after transfusion of platelet concentrates. He was treated with supportive measures and mechanical ventilation. Greater knowledge and increased awareness especially amongst the clinicians regarding TRALI is needed for prevention and treatment of this potentially severe complication of blood/component transfusion. PMID:25161356

  16. Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... serious medical illness, such as a heart problem, sickle cell anemia, diabetes, or cystic fibrosis Recently had an immunization ... serious medical illness, such as a heart problem, sickle cell anemia, diabetes, cystic fibrosis, COPD, or other chronic lung ...

  17. Fever Is Associated with Delayed Ventilator Liberation in Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Dowdy, David W.; Harrington, Thelma; Chandolu, Satish; Dinglas, Victor D.; Shah, Nirav G.; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro A.; Shanholtz, Carl; Hasday, Jeffrey D.; Needham, Dale M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Acute lung injury (ALI) is characterized by inflammation, leukocyte activation, neutrophil recruitment, endothelial dysfunction, and epithelial injury, which are all affected by fever. Fever is common in the intensive care unit, but the relationship between fever and outcomes in ALI has not yet been studied. We evaluated the association of temperature dysregulation with time to ventilator liberation, ventilator-free days, and in-hospital mortality. Methods: Analysis of a prospective cohort study, which recruited consecutive patients with ALI from 13 intensive care units at four hospitals in Baltimore, Maryland. The relationship of fever and hypothermia with ventilator liberation was assessed with a Cox proportional hazards model. We evaluated the association of temperature during the first 3 days after ALI with ventilator-free days, using multivariable linear regression models, and the association with mortality was evaluated by robust Poisson regression. Measurements and Main Results: Of 450 patients, only 12% were normothermic during the first 3 days after ALI onset. During the first week post-ALI, each additional day of fever resulted in a 33% reduction in the likelihood of successful ventilator liberation (95% confidence interval [CI] for adjusted hazard ratio, 0.57 to 0.78; P < 0.001). Hypothermia was independently associated with decreased ventilator-free days (hypothermia during each of the first 3 d: reduction of 5.58 d, 95% CI: –9.04 to –2.13; P = 0.002) and increased mortality (hypothermia during each of the first 3 d: relative risk, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.06 to 2.66; P = 0.03). Conclusions: Fever and hypothermia are associated with worse clinical outcomes in ALI, with fever being independently associated with delayed ventilator liberation. PMID:24024608

  18. Obstructive jaundice in small cell lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mokhtar Pour, Ali; Masir, Noraidah; Isa, Mohd Rose

    2015-08-01

    Small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) commonly metastasizes to distant organs. However, metastasis to the pancreas is not a common event. Moreover, obstructive jaundice as a first clinical presentation of SCLC is extremely unusual. This case reports a 51-year-old male with SCLC, manifesting with obstructive jaundice as the initial clinical presentation. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatograghy (ERCP) and abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan showed a mass at the head of the pancreas. The patient underwent pancreatoduodenectomy (Whipple procedure). Histopathology revealed a chromogranin- A-positive poorly-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma of the pancreas. No imaging study of the lung was performed before surgery. A few months later, a follow-up CT revealed unilateral lung nodules with ipsilateral hilar nodes. A lung biopsy was done and histopathology reported a TTF- 1-positive, chromogranin A-positive, small cell carcinoma of the lung. On review, the pancreatic tumour was also TTF-1-positive. He was then treated with combination chemotherapy (cisplatin, etoposide). These findings highlight that presentation of a mass at the head of pancreas could be a manifestation of a metastatic tumour from elsewhere such as the lung, and thorough investigations should be performed before metastases can be ruled out. PMID:26277673

  19. Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Improving Lung Function in Patients With Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Undergoing Chemoradiation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-17

    Cachexia; Fatigue; Pulmonary Complications; Radiation Toxicity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  20. Fever and multilobular mass of the right lung in a young adult with asthma

    PubMed Central

    Sotiriou, Adamantia; Koulouris, Nikolaos; Bakakos, Petros

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 37-year-old mild asthmatic male presenting with fever, productive cough and chest pain. The chest x-ray showed a multilobular perihilar shadow of the right lung with a mass-like appearance, confirmed by the CT-scan. He was diagnosed with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA). ABPA usually manifests as chronic asthma, recurrent pulmonary infiltrates and bronchiectasis. However, it can rarely be seen in patients with mild asthma and with an unusual radiological presentation of a solid mass. PMID:26858931

  1. Pemetrexed (Alimta) in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Socinski, Mark A

    2005-04-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) comprises approximately 13% of all lung cancers. In limited stage (LS)-SCLC, combined-modality therapy represents the standard of care. Therapy should be approached curatively in fit patients with a good performance status because 5-year survival rates approach 26% in aggressively treated patients. In contrast, cure is not possible in extensive stage (ES)-SCLC with median 2-year survival rates with current therapy remaining at less than 10%. Pemetrexed (Alimta; Eli Lilly and Co, Indianapolis, IN) is a novel, multi-targeted antifolate that inhibits several folate-dependent enzymes involved in purine and pyrimidine synthesis, and is active as a single-agent or in combination with a platinum in both non-small cell lung cancer and malignant pleural mesothelioma. Pemetrexed/platinum combinations appear active in ES-SCLC based on objective response rates observed in a randomized phase II trial. However, no survival data is yet available from this trial. The toxicity profile of both cisplatin and carboplatin in combination with pemetrexed was extremely favorable, as was the ability to deliver full doses of each of the component drugs. Given the limited options available for patients in the relapsed setting, the activity of single-agent pemetrexed is interesting. Also, preliminary data indicates that full doses of carboplatin/pemetrexed can be administered with thoracic radiation therapy, supporting a future clinical trial initiative in LS-SCLC. PMID:15818532

  2. Divers' lung function: small airways disease?

    PubMed Central

    Thorsen, E; Segadal, K; Kambestad, B; Gulsvik, A

    1990-01-01

    Pulmonary function was measured in 152 professional saturation divers and in a matched control group of 106 subjects. Static lung volumes, dynamic lung volumes and flows, transfer factor for carbon monoxide (T1CO), transfer volume per unit alveolar volume (KCO), delta-N2, and closing volume (CV) were measured and compared with reference values from recent Scandinavian studies, British submariners, and the European Community for Coal and Steel (ECCS) recommended reference values. Diving exposure was assessed as years of diving experience, total number of days in saturation and depth, and as the product of days in saturation and mean depth. Divers had significantly lower values for forced expired volume in one second (FEV1), FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC) ratio, FEF25-75%, FEF75-85%, FEF50%, FEF75%, T1CO, and KCO compared with the controls and a significantly higher CV. There was a positive correlation between diving exposure and CV, whereas the other variables had negative correlations with diving exposure. Values for the control group were not different from the predictive values of Scandinavian reference studies or British submariners, although the ECCS standard predicted significantly lower values for the lung function variables both in divers and the control group. The pattern of the differences in lung function variables between the divers and controls is consistent with small airways dysfunction and with the transient changes in lung function found immediately after a single saturation dive. The association between reduced pulmonary function and previous diving exposure further indicates the presence of cumulative long term effects of diving on pulmonary function. PMID:2393630

  3. General Information about Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... most patients with non-small cell lung cancer, current treatments do not cure the cancer. If lung ... professional versions have detailed information written in technical language. The patient versions are written in easy-to- ...

  4. Dengue Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... away from areas that have a dengue fever epidemic, the risk of contracting dengue fever is small for international travelers./p> Reviewed by: Elana Pearl Ben-Joseph, ... Nile Virus First Aid: Vomiting Are Insect Repellents With DEET ...

  5. Combination Chemotherapy, Radiation Therapy, and Gefitinib in Treating Patients With Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-04

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  6. Treatment of small cell lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Zöchbauer-Müller, S; Pirker, R; Huber, H

    1999-01-01

    Small cell lung cancers, comprising approximately 20% of lung cancers, are rapidly growing and disseminating carcinomas which are initially chemosensitive but acquire drug resistance during the course of disease. Thus, outcome is poor with median survival of 10-16 months for patients with limited and 7-11 months for patients with extensive disease. Polychemotherapy with established drugs (platins, etoposide, anthracyclines, cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide and Vinca alkaloids) plays the major role in the treatment of this disease and results in overall response rates between 80%-95% for limited disease and 60%-80% for extensive disease. Dose-intensified chemotherapy and high-dose chemotherapy with peripheral blood progenitor cell support were tested in several trials but their exact impact on outcome remains to be determined. New drugs including the taxanes (paclitaxel, docetaxel), the topoisomerase I inhibitors (topotecan, irinotecan), vinorelbine and gemcitabine are currently evaluated in clinical trials. In limited disease, thoracic radiotherapy improves survival and prophylactic cranial irradiation should be administered to those with a reasonable chance of cure. PMID:10676558

  7. Low-Dose Acetylsalicylic Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  8. Novel therapies in small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Induru, Raghava; Jalal, Shadia I.

    2015-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive neuroendocrine tumor of the lung with a tendency to metastasize widely early in the course of the disease. The VA staging system classifies the disease into limited stage (LS) which is confined to one hemithorax and can be included into one radiation field or extensive stage (ES) which extends beyond one hemithorax. Current standard of care is concurrent chemoradiation for LS disease and chemotherapy alone for ES disease. Only a quarter of patients with LS disease will be cured with current standard treatments and majority of the patients ultimately succumb to their disease. A very complex genetic landscape of SCLC accounts for its resistance to conventional therapy and a high recurrence rate, however, at the same time this complexity can form the basis for effective targeted therapy for the disease. In recent years, several different therapeutic strategies and targeted agents have been under investigation for their potential role in SCLC. Several of them including EGFR TKIs, BCR-ABL TKIs, mTOR inhibitors, and VEGF inhibitors have been unsuccessful in showing a survival advantage in this disease. Several others including DNA repair inhibitors, cellular developmental pathway inhibitors, antibody drug conjugates (ADCs), as well as immune therapy with vaccines, immunomodulators, and immune checkpoint inhibitors are being tested. So far, none of these agents are approved for use in SCLC and the majority are in phase I/II clinical trials, with immune checkpoint inhibitors being the most promising therapeutic strategy. In this article, we will discuss these novel therapeutic agents and currently available data in SCLC. PMID:26629422

  9. Cisplatin and Etoposide With or Without Veliparib in Treating Patients With Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer or Metastatic Large Cell Neuroendocrine Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-01

    Carcinoma of Unknown Primary Origin; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Newly Diagnosed Carcinoma of Unknown Primary Origin; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  10. Spotted fever group Rickettsia in small rodents from areas of low endemicity for Brazilian spotted fever in the eastern region of Minas Gerais State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Milagres, Bruno S; Padilha, Amanda F; Montandon, Carlos E; Freitas, Renata N; Pacheco, Richard; Walker, David H; Labruna, Marcelo B; Mafra, Cláudio L; Galvão, Márcio A M

    2013-05-01

    We investigated the humoral immune response against different species of Rickettsia in serum samples from small rodents collected in two areas of a silent focus for Brazilian spotted fever in the eastern region of Minas Gerais State, Brazil. Sera samples were analyzed by indirect immunofluorescence assay using antigens from Rickettsia species of the spotted fever, ancestral, and transition groups. Titers ≥ 1:64 were considered positive. In Santa Cruz do Escalvado, 94% (30 of 32) of the samples collected from Rattus rattus, 22% (5 of 23) from Nectomys squamipes, and 80% (4 of 5) from Akodon sp., reacted by indirect immunofluorescence assay with Rickettsia antigens of the spotted fever group. In the municipality of Pingo D'Água, 84% (26 of 31) of the samples collected from R. rattus, 86% (6 of 7) of the samples from Oryzomys subflavus, 86% (6 of 7) from N. squamipes, and 100% (1 of 1) from Bolomys sp. contained antibodies that reacted with rickettsial antigens of the spotted fever group. These results demonstrated the previous exposure of small rodents to spotted fever group Rickettsia, suggesting the participation of these animals in the natural history of these rickettsiae in this region. PMID:23509125

  11. Spotted Fever Group Rickettsia in Small Rodents from Areas of Low Endemicity for Brazilian Spotted Fever in the Eastern Region of Minas Gerais State, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Milagres, Bruno S.; Padilha, Amanda F.; Montandon, Carlos E.; Freitas, Renata N.; Pacheco, Richard; Walker, David H.; Labruna, Marcelo B.; Mafra, Cláudio L.; Galvão, Márcio A. M.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the humoral immune response against different species of Rickettsia in serum samples from small rodents collected in two areas of a silent focus for Brazilian spotted fever in the eastern region of Minas Gerais State, Brazil. Sera samples were analyzed by indirect immunofluorescence assay using antigens from Rickettsia species of the spotted fever, ancestral, and transition groups. Titers ≥ 1:64 were considered positive. In Santa Cruz do Escalvado, 94% (30 of 32) of the samples collected from Rattus rattus, 22% (5 of 23) from Nectomys squamipes, and 80% (4 of 5) from Akodon sp., reacted by indirect immunofluorescence assay with Rickettsia antigens of the spotted fever group. In the municipality of Pingo D'Água, 84% (26 of 31) of the samples collected from R. rattus, 86% (6 of 7) of the samples from Oryzomys subflavus, 86% (6 of 7) from N. squamipes, and 100% (1 of 1) from Bolomys sp. contained antibodies that reacted with rickettsial antigens of the spotted fever group. These results demonstrated the previous exposure of small rodents to spotted fever group Rickettsia, suggesting the participation of these animals in the natural history of these rickettsiae in this region. PMID:23509125

  12. Personalized Therapy of Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Bryan J; Kalemkerian, Gregory P

    2016-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive, poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma with distinct clinical, pathological and molecular characteristics. Despite robust responses to initial chemotherapy and radiation, the prognosis of patients with SCLC remains poor with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 10 %. Despite the fact that numerous molecularly targeted approaches have thus far failed to demonstrate clinical utility in SCLC, further advances will rely on better definition of the biological pathways that drive survival, proliferation and metastasis. Recent next-generation, molecular profiling studies have identified many new therapeutic targets in SCLC, as well as extreme genomic instability which explains the high degree of resistance. A wide variety of anti-angiogenic agents, growth factor inhibitors, pro-apoptotic agents, and epigenetic modulators have been evaluated in SCLC and many studies of these strategies are on-going. Perhaps the most promising approaches involve agents targeting cancer stem cell pathways and immunomodulatory drugs that interfere with the PD1 and CTLA-4 pathways. SCLC offers many barriers to the development of successful therapy, including limited tumor samples, inadequate preclinical models, high mutational burden, and aggressive tumor growth which impairs functional status and hampers enrollment on clinical trials. PMID:26703804

  13. How to target small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Gerhard; Rath, Barbara; Ulsperger, Ernst

    2015-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly malignant disease with dismal prognosis. Although great progress has been made in investigating genetic aberrations and putative drivers of this tumor entity, the mechanisms of rapid dissemination and acquisition of drug resistance are not clear. The majority of SCLC cases are characterized by inactivation of the tumor suppressors p53 and retinoblastoma (Rb) and, therefore, interchangeable drivers will be difficult to target successfully. Access to pure cultures of SCLC circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and study of their tumor biology has revealed a number of new potential targets. Most important, expression of chitinase-3-like-1/YKL-40 (CHI3L1) which controls expression of vascular epithelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) was newly described in these cells. The process switching CHI3L1-negative SCLC cells to CHI3L1-positive CTCs seems to be associated with cytokines released by inflammatory immune cells. Furthermore, these CTCs were found to promote monocyte-macrophage differentiation, most likely of the M2 tumor-promoting type, recently described to express PD-1 immune checkpoint antigen in SCLC. In conclusion, dissemination of SCLC seems to be linked to conversion of regular tumor cells to highly invasive CHI3L1-positive CTCs, which are protected by immune system suppression. Besides the classical targets VEGF, MMP-9 and PD-1, CHI3L1 constitutes a new possibly drugable molecule to retard down dissemination of SCLC cells, which may be similarly relevant for glioblastoma and other tumor entities. PMID:26425658

  14. Serological and molecular evidence of Q fever among small ruminant flocks in Algeria.

    PubMed

    Khaled, H; Sidi-Boumedine, K; Merdja, S; Dufour, P; Dahmani, A; Thiéry, R; Rousset, E; Bouyoucef, A

    2016-08-01

    Q fever, a commonly reported zoonosis worldwide, is caused by infection with Coxiella burnetii, an obligate intracellular bacterium. The infection is often asymptomatic in ruminants, but it can lead to reproductive disorders with bacterial shedding into the environment. Between 2011 and 2013, a study was undertaken in small ruminant flocks in different regions of Algeria. A total of 35 flocks were visited and 227 sera and 267 genital swabs were collected from females after abortions or the lambing period to investigate Q fever infection. Indirect ELISA was used to detect specific antibodies against C. burnetii and real-time PCR for detecting bacterial DNA. Our survey indicated that 58% (95% CI=40-76%) of flocks had at least one positive animal (17 seropositive flocks) and individual seroprevalence was estimated at 14.1% (95% CI=11.8-16.4%) (32 seropositive animals). Bacterial excretion was observed in 21 flocks (60%), and 57 females showed evidence of C. burnetii shedding (21.3%). These results suggest that C. burnetii distribution is high at the flock level and that seropositive and infected (shedder) animals can be found all over the country. Further studies are needed in other regions and on different animal species to better understand the distribution and incidence of Q fever, as well as human exposure, and to develop an adequate prophylaxis program. PMID:27477503

  15. Radiation Therapy, Chemotherapy, and Soy Isoflavones in Treating Patients With Stage IIIA-IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-08

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  16. EF5 in Measuring Tumor Hypoxia in Patients With Stage I-III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-10

    Stage IA Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIA Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  17. Taste thresholds in patients with small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ovesen, L; Hannibal, J; Sørensen, M

    1991-01-01

    Recognition thresholds for the four basic tastes (salt, sour, sweet and bitter) were tested by the forced-choice technique in 27 patients with small-cell lung cancer, and 22 weight-matched control patients with non-malignant diseases. No significant differences in threshold concentrations could be demonstrated. When patients who were losing weight were compared with weight-stable patients, significantly lower taste thresholds for bitter substances were found in weight losing groups in both cancer and control patients. Small-cell lung cancer patients who responded to therapy had obtained an increased threshold for bitter taste at the time of reevaluation than at the time of diagnosis, an effect that may be explained by the chemotherapeutic regimen. The results suggest that in patients with small-cell lung cancer it is not the cancer disease per se but the weight loss that often accompanies it that causes an increased taste sensitivity for bitter substances. PMID:1847701

  18. Combination Chemotherapy, Radiation Therapy, and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-26

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  19. Thoracoscopic Lobectomy for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gaudet, Matthew A; D'Amico, Thomas A

    2016-07-01

    Lobectomy is the gold standard treatment in operable patients with surgically resectable non-small cell lung cancer. Thoracoscopic lobectomy has emerged as an option for surgeons facile with the technique. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) is used for a variety of indications, but its efficacy as a reliable oncologic procedure makes it appealing in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. Fewer postoperative complications and decreased postoperative pain associated with VATS procedures can lead to shorter lengths of stay and lower overall costs. Thoracoscopic surgery continues to evolve, and uniportal, robot-assisted, and awake thoracoscopic procedures have all shown promising results. PMID:27261912

  20. Phylogenetic relationships among sandfly fever group viruses (Phlebovirus: Bunyaviridae) based on the small genome segment.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fangling; Chen, Hongli; Travassos da Rosa, Amelia P A; Tesh, Robert B; Xiao, Shu-Yuan

    2007-08-01

    The phleboviruses are more diverse in terms of arthropod vectors and antigenic relationships than most other genera of arthropod-borne viruses. In this study, 30 sandfly fever group viruses from the Naples, Sicilian, Punta Toro, Icoaraci and Frijoles serocomplexes were sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses were performed based on the sequence of the open reading frame for the nucleoprotein (N) and non-structural (NSs) protein genes of the small (S) segment. The five resultant genotypic lineages correlated with the serological grouping and were similar to analysis of M segment sequences. The sequence identity for N and NSs genes within the Sicilian, Naples, Punta Toro, Icoaraci and Frijoles serocomplexes was determined. The results indicated that genetic divergence for the S segment is lower than that for the M segment, suggesting that the S segment is more stable during evolution. PMID:17622637

  1. Personalized Therapy of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC).

    PubMed

    Gadgeel, Shirish M

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the most common cause of cancer related deaths in both men and women in the United States and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for over 85 % of all lung cancers. Survival of these patients has not significantly altered in over 30 years. This chapter initially discusses the clinical presentation of lung cancer patients. Most patients diagnosed with lung cancer due to symptoms have advanced stage cancer. Once diagnosed, lung cancer patients need imaging studies to assess the stage of the disease before decisions regarding therapy are finalized. The most important prognostic factors are stage of the disease and performance status and these factors also determine therapy. The chapter subsequently discusses management of each stage of the disease and the impact of several pathologic, clinical factors in personalizing therapy for each individual patient. Transition from chemotherapy for every patient to a more personalized approach based on histology and molecular markers has occurred in the management of advanced stage NSCLC. It is expected that such a personalized approach will extend to all stages of NSCLC and will likely improve the outcomes of all NSCLC patients. PMID:26703806

  2. Advances in immunotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Reckamp, Karen L

    2015-12-01

    In most patients, lung cancer presents as advanced disease with metastases to lymph nodes and/or distant organs, and survival is poor. Lung cancer is also a highly immune-suppressing malignancy with numerous methods to evade antitumor immune responses, including deficiencies in antigen processing and presentation, release of immunomodulatory cytokines, and inhibition of T-cell activation. Advances in understanding the complex interactions of the immune system and cancer have led to novel therapies that promote T-cell activation at the tumor site, resulting in prolonged clinical benefit. Immune checkpoint inhibitors, specifically programmed death receptor 1 pathway antibodies, have demonstrated impressively durable responses and improved survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer. This article will review the recent progress made in immunotherapy for lung cancer with data from trials evaluating programmed death receptor 1 and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 monoclonal antibodies in addition to cancer vaccines. The review will focus on studies that have been published and the latest randomized trials exploring immune therapy in lung cancer. These results form the framework for a new direction in the treatment of lung cancer toward immunotherapy. PMID:27058851

  3. Survivorship Care Planning in Patients With Colorectal or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-16

    Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  4. Hedgehog Pathway Inhibition Radiosensitizes Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jing; Aziz, Khaled; Chettiar, Sivarajan T.; Aftab, Blake T.; Armour, Michael; Gajula, Rajendra; Gandhi, Nishant; Salih, Tarek; Herman, Joseph M.; Wong, John; Rudin, Charles M.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Hales, Russell K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Despite improvements in chemoradiation, local control remains a major clinical problem in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The Hedgehog pathway has been implicated in tumor recurrence by promoting survival of tumorigenic precursors and through effects on tumor-associated stroma. Whether Hedgehog inhibition can affect radiation efficacy in vivo has not been reported. Methods and Materials We evaluated the effects of a targeted Hedgehog inhibitor (HhAntag) and radiation on clonogenic survival of human non-small cell lung cancer lines in vitro. Using an A549 cell line xenograft model, we examined tumor growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and gene expression changes after concomitant HhAntag and radiation. In a transgenic mouse model of KrasG12D-induced and Twist1-induced lung adenocarcinoma, we assessed tumor response to radiation and HhAntag by serial micro-computed tomography (CT) scanning. Results In 4 human lung cancer lines in vitro, HhAntag showed little or no effect on radio-sensitivity. By contrast, in both the human tumor xenograft and murine inducible transgenic models, HhAntag enhanced radiation efficacy and delayed tumor growth. By use of the human xenograft model to differentiate tumor and stromal effects, mouse stromal cells, but not human tumor cells, showed significant and consistent downregulation of Hedgehog pathway gene expression. This was associated with increased tumor cell apoptosis. Conclusions Targeted Hedgehog pathway inhibition can increase in vivo radiation efficacy in lung cancer preclinical models. This effect is associated with pathway suppression in tumor-associated stroma. These data support clinical testing of Hedgehog inhibitors as a component of multimodality therapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. PMID:23182391

  5. Hedgehog Pathway Inhibition Radiosensitizes Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Jing; Aziz, Khaled; Chettiar, Sivarajan T.; Aftab, Blake T.; Armour, Michael; Gajula, Rajendra; Gandhi, Nishant; Salih, Tarek; Herman, Joseph M.; Wong, John; Rudin, Charles M.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Hales, Russell K.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Despite improvements in chemoradiation, local control remains a major clinical problem in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The Hedgehog pathway has been implicated in tumor recurrence by promoting survival of tumorigenic precursors and through effects on tumor-associated stroma. Whether Hedgehog inhibition can affect radiation efficacy in vivo has not been reported. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the effects of a targeted Hedgehog inhibitor (HhAntag) and radiation on clonogenic survival of human non-small cell lung cancer lines in vitro. Using an A549 cell line xenograft model, we examined tumor growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and gene expression changes after concomitant HhAntag and radiation. In a transgenic mouse model of Kras{sup G12D}-induced and Twist1-induced lung adenocarcinoma, we assessed tumor response to radiation and HhAntag by serial micro-computed tomography (CT) scanning. Results: In 4 human lung cancer lines in vitro, HhAntag showed little or no effect on radiosensitivity. By contrast, in both the human tumor xenograft and murine inducible transgenic models, HhAntag enhanced radiation efficacy and delayed tumor growth. By use of the human xenograft model to differentiate tumor and stromal effects, mouse stromal cells, but not human tumor cells, showed significant and consistent downregulation of Hedgehog pathway gene expression. This was associated with increased tumor cell apoptosis. Conclusions: Targeted Hedgehog pathway inhibition can increase in vivo radiation efficacy in lung cancer preclinical models. This effect is associated with pathway suppression in tumor-associated stroma. These data support clinical testing of Hedgehog inhibitors as a component of multimodality therapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

  6. Application of proteomics in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Cho, William C S

    2016-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a heterogeneous disease with diverse pathological features. Clinical proteomics allows the discovery of molecular markers and new therapeutic targets for this most prevalent type of lung cancer. Some of them may be used to detect early lung cancer, while others may serve as predictive markers of resistance to different therapies. Therapeutic targets and prognostic markers in NSCLC have also been discovered. These proteomics biomarkers may help to pair the individual NSCLC patient with the best treatment option. Despite the fact that implementation of these biomarkers in the clinic appears to be scarce, the recently launched Precision Medicine Initiative may encourage their translation into clinical practice. PMID:26577456

  7. Hyponatremia of non-small cell lung cancer: Indian experience

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Chinmoy K.; Dey, Subhashis; Mukhopadhyay, Ashis

    2011-01-01

    Background: Hyponatremia is a hazardous complication of lung cancer and its treatment. It is seen at presentation in approximately 15% of patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) and 1% of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Platinum compounds used as first-line agents along with taxols frequently cause hyponatremia. Till date there is no data on its prevalence in patients with advanced lung cancer in the Indian subcontinent. Aim: This study was undertaken to find out its incidence before and after institution of chemotherapy and to observe the results of treatment of hyponatremia in a group of lung cancer patient. Materials and Methods: Forty patients with advanced lung cancer (25 patients with stage III disease and 15 with stage IV disease) were included in the study. Variables looked at included, but were not limited to, serum sodium, serum albumin, serum alkaline phosphatase, serum lactate dehydrogenase, and hemoglobin. These variables were measured as per the standard clinical laboratory procedure. No ethics approval was required as these parameters are routinely measured in such patients. Results: In the chemo-naïve state, one out of five cases with SCLC (20%) had hyponatremia at presentation; among the 35 cases of NSCLC, 7 patients (20%) had hyponatremia at presentation, which is in sharp contrast to earlier reports of 1% prevalence of hyponatremia in this group. Among the 27 cases who died within 6 months, 11 had hyponatremia; this finding was statistically highly significant. Conclusion: In India, NSCLC patients are at high risk of having hyponatremia at presentation and this is significantly associated with a worse outcome. PMID:22557779

  8. Personalizing Therapy in Advanced Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Villaruz, Liza C.; Burns, Timothy F.; Ramfidis, Vasilis S.; Socinski, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    The recognition that non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is not a single disease entity, but rather a collection of distinct molecularly driven neoplasms, has permanently shifted the therapeutic landscape of NSCLC to a personalized approach. This personalization of NSCLC therapy is typified by the dramatic response rates seen in EGFR mutant NSCLC when treated with targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy and in ALK translocation–driven NSCLC when treated with ALK inhibitors. Targeted therapeutic approaches in NSCLC necessitate consideration of more invasive biopsy techniques aimed at providing sufficient tissue for both histological determination and molecular profiling in all patients with stage IV disease both at the time of diagnosis and at the time of disease progression. Comprehensive genotyping efforts have identified oncogenic drivers in 62% lung adenocarcinomas and an increasing proportion of squamous cell carcinomas of the lung. The identification of these oncogenic drivers and the triage of patients to clinical trials evaluating novel targeted therapeutic approaches will increasingly mold a landscape of personalized lung cancer therapy where each genotype has an associated targeted therapy. This review outlines the state of personalized lung cancer therapy as it pertains to individual NSCLC genotypes. PMID:24258572

  9. Immunotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Ronan J.; Gulley, James L.; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Developing effective immunotherapy for lung cancer is a daunting but hugely attractive challenge. Until recently, non-small cell lung cancer was thought of as a non-immunogenic tumor, but there is now evidence highlighting the integral role played by both inflammatory and immunological responses in lung carcinogenesis. Despite recent encouraging preclinical and phase I/II data, there is a paucity of phase III trials showing a clear clinical benefit for vaccines in lung cancer. There are many difficulties to overcome prior to the development of a successful therapy. Perhaps a measurable immune response may not translate into a clinically meaningful or radiological response. Patient selection may also be a problem for ongoing clinical studies. The majority of trials for lung cancer vaccines are focused on patients with advanced-stage disease, while the ideal candidates may be patients with a lower tumor burden stage I or II disease. Selecting the exact antigens to target is also difficult. It will likely require multiple epitopes of a diverse set of genes restricted to multiple haplotypes to generate a truly effective vaccine that is able to overcome the various immunologic escape mechanisms that tumors employ. This review discusses active immunotherapy employing protein/peptide vaccines, whole cell vaccines, and dendritic cell vaccines and examines the current data on some novel immunomodulating agents. PMID:20630824

  10. Veliparib With or Without Radiation Therapy, Carboplatin, and Paclitaxel in Patients With Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-31

    Bronchioloalveolar Carcinoma; Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma, Mixed Subtype; Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  11. [Immune Checkpoint Therapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer].

    PubMed

    Miyauchi, Eisaku; Inoue, Akira

    2016-06-01

    Nivolumab is an anti-PD-1 antibody that has recently been approved in Japan, and has shown high response rates and more favorable safety profiles in 2 phase III clinical trials. Accordingly, immune checkpoint therapy has now been included as a new standard treatment for non-small-cell lung cancer. These immune checkpoints are receptors expressed on T cells that regulate the immune response. The PD-1/PD-L1 signal inhibits cytotoxic T lymphocyte proliferation and survival, induces apoptosis of infiltrative T cells, and increases the amount of regulatory T cells in the tumor microenvironment. Therefore, severe immune-related adverse event(irAE)have been observed, including enterocolitis, neuropathies, and endocrinopathies. There are different management approaches to irAEs with conventional cytotoxic drugs. This article reviews the available data regarding immune checkpoint therapy for patients with non-small-cell lung cancer. PMID:27306803

  12. Somatostatin Analog Therapy in Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tartarone, Alfredo; Lerose, Rosa; Aieta, Michele

    2016-05-01

    Chemotherapy represents the cornerstone of treatment for patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC); however, standard therapy has reached a plateau in improving patient survival with overall disappointing results. The demonstration that SCLC expresses neuroendocrine markers, such as somatostatin (SST) receptors, has led to use SST analogs or radiolabeled SST analogs in the treatment of SCLC patients. In the current review, we would focus on the possible role of SST analogs in SCLC. PMID:27067504

  13. Short course prophylactic cranial irradiation for small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Feld, R.; Clamon, G.H.; Blum, R.; Moran, E.; Weiner, R.; Kramer, B.; Evans, W.K.; Herman, J.G.; Hoffman, F.; Burmeister, L.

    1985-10-01

    Ninety-one patients with small cell carcinoma of the lung were given a shortened, intensive course of prophylactic cranial irradiation consisting of 2,000 rad in five fractions. The CNS relapse rate was 21%, but in only one of 91 patients was the brain the first and only site of relapse. Acute toxicities consisting of headache (16%) and nausea and vomiting (15%) were observed. Results are compared with previous results from other studies of cranial irradiation.

  14. Sirolimus and Gold Sodium Thiomalate in Treating Patients With Advanced Squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-12-13

    Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  15. Therapeutic strategy for small-sized lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Hisashi

    2016-08-01

    Minimizing the volume of lung resection without diminishing curability has recently become an important issue in primary lung cancer. In this review, we will discuss the current state of the feasibility of sublobar resection and specific issues for a segmentectomy procedure. A previous randomized controlled trial showed that lobectomy must still be considered the standard surgical procedure compared with sublobar resection for T1N0 non-small cell lung cancer with a tumor less than 3 cm in size. Since then, supporting studies for segmentectomy of lung cancer with a tumor less than 2 cm in size were reported. In addition, segmentectomy seems to be feasible for clinical stage I adenocarcinoma less than 2 cm in size, in women younger than 70 years old, with a low tumor 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) standardized uptake value (SUV) from propensity-matching studies. In a meta-analysis of sublobar resection vs. lobectomy, intentionally performed sublobar resection showed equivalent outcomes to lobectomy. In the near future, two ongoing prospective, randomized trials will report results. As specific issues for the surgical procedure of segmentectomy, achieving a sufficient surgical margin is an important issue for preventing loco-regional recurrence. More studies regarding the regional lymph node dissection area for segmentectomy are needed. Sublobar resection has the potential to become the standard procedure for peripheral small-sized lung cancer less than 2 cm. However, more information is needed about the characteristics of this cancer and the surgical procedure, including nodal dissection. PMID:27300350

  16. Methoxyamine, Pemetrexed Disodium, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IIIA-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-05

    Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Brain; Stage IIIA Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Lung Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Lung Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IV Lung Adenocarcinoma; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  17. Phase 3 Study of Bavituximab Plus Docetaxel Versus Docetaxel Alone in Patients With Late-stage Non-squamous Non-small-cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-01

    Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Stage IIIB; Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Stage IV; Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Metastatic; Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung; Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Non-Small-Cell Lung Carcinoma; Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

  18. Telomerase activity in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dobija-Kubica, Katarzyna; Bruliński, Krzysztof; Rogoziński, Paweł; Wiczkowski, Andrzej; Gawrychowska, Agata; Gawrychowski, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction High telomerase activity has been detected in the majority of malignant neoplasms including lung cancer. The purpose of the study was to attempt to use telomerase activity as a prognostic factor in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Material and methods Telomerase activity was analyzed in 47 tissue specimens taken from patients with NSCLC. The control group consisted of 30 specimens of non-cancerous lung parenchyma. Telomerase activity was measured by means of the telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP). Results Telomerase activity in the neoplastic tissue was significantly higher than in the lung parenchyma that was free from neoplastic infiltration. There was no significant association between telomerase activity and age, gender, tobacco smoking, histological type of the tumor, or staging (pTNM). No association was found between the level of telomerase activity in NSCLC specimens and the two-year survival rate of patients (p = 0.326). A higher level of telomerase activity in poorly differentiated tumors (G3) as compared to moderately differentiated tumors (G2) was detected (p = 0.008). A positive association was identified between telomerase activity in pulmonary parenchyma free from tumor infiltration and the presence of leukocyte infiltration (p = 0.0001). Conclusions No association was found between the level of telomerase activity in NSCLC specimens and the two-year survival rate of patients. The study has revealed a positive association between telomerase activity and the grade of differentiation (G) in NSCLC. PMID:27212973

  19. Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy With or Without Metformin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    Adenosquamous Lung Carcinoma; Bronchioloalveolar Carcinoma; Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma; Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  20. Targeted drugs in small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Daffinà, Maria Grazia; Karachaliou, Niki; González-Cao, Maria; Lazzari, Chiara; Altavilla, Giuseppe; Rosell, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), few advances have been made in systemic treatment of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) in recent years. Most patients are diagnosed with extensive stage disease and are commonly treated with platinum-based chemotherapy which, although attaining high initial objective responses, has a limited impact on survival. Due to the dismal prognosis of SCLC, novel and more effective treatment strategies are urgently needed. A deeper characterization of the genomic landscape of SCLC has led to the development of rational and promising targeted agents. However, despite a large number of clinical trials, results have been disappointing and there are still no approved targeted drugs for SCLC. Recent comprehensive genomic studies suggest SCLC is a heterogeneous disease, characterized by genomic alterations targeting a broad variety of genes, including those involved in transcription regulation and chromatin modification which seem to be a hallmark of this specific lung cancer subtype. Current research efforts are focusing on further understanding of the cellular and molecular abnormalities underlying SCLC development, progression and resistance to chemotherapy. Unraveling the genomic complexity of SCLC could be the key to optimize existing treatments, including chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and for identifying those patients most likely to benefit from selected targeted therapeutic approaches. PMID:26958493

  1. Targeted therapies in small cell lung cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Abidin, Aidalena Z.; Garassino, Marina C.; Califano, Raffaele; Harle, Amelie; Blackhall, Fiona

    2010-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive form of lung cancer that is characterized by a rapid doubling time, early onset of dissemination and high sensitivity to chemotherapy. Despite the potential for cure in patients with limited disease with concurrent chemoradiation and an initial good response to chemotherapy in extensive disease, there is a high chance of disease relapse with an overall poor median survival for both stages. With increasing translational research and a better understanding of the molecular basis of cancer, a number of molecular targets have been identified in various preclinical studies. This review summarizes potentially viable targets and new agents that have been developed and employed in recent, ongoing and future clinical trials to attempt to improve clinical outcomes in this disease. PMID:21789124

  2. [Therapy of Metastatic Non-small Cell Lung Cancer].

    PubMed

    Reinmuth, N; Gröschel, A; Schumann, C; Sebastian, M; Wiewrodt, R; Reck, M

    2016-09-01

    Lung cancer accounts for the leading cause of cancer deaths in Germany and is characterized by early metastasis formation. The majority of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) will receive systemic therapy for treatment of their disease. Importantly together with the identification of targetable oncogenic alterations, systemic treatment of NSCLC has dramatically changed in recent years with the implementation of various new agents such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors, anti angiogenic agents, and immune modulating drugs. However, these new therapeutic options also challenge the treating physician since molecular, histologic, and clinical factors need to be considered for the clinical decision-making. Moreover, supportive therapy including bronchoscopic therapy has evolved. The following therapy recommendations will summarize the up-to date treatment strategies for metastatic NSCLC. PMID:27603945

  3. Diagnosis of Lung Cancer in Small Biopsies and Cytology

    PubMed Central

    Travis, William D.; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Noguchi, Masayuki; Nicholson, Andrew G.; Geisinger, Kim; Yatabe, Yasushi; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Wistuba, Ignacio; Flieder, Douglas B.; Franklin, Wilbur; Gazdar, Adi; Hasleton, Philip S.; Henderson, Douglas W.; Kerr, Keith M.; Petersen, Iver; Roggli, Victor; Thunnissen, Erik; Tsao, Ming

    2015-01-01

    The new International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society lung adenocarcinoma classification provides, for the first time, standardized terminology for lung cancer diagnosis in small biopsies and cytology; this was not primarily addressed by previous World Health Organization classifications. Until recently there have been no therapeutic implications to further classification of NSCLC, so little attention has been given to the distinction of adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma in small tissue samples. This situation has changed dramatically in recent years with the discovery of several therapeutic options that are available only to patients with adenocarcinoma or NSCLC, not otherwise specified, rather than squamous cell carcinoma. This includes recommendation for use of special stains as an aid to diagnosis, particularly in the setting of poorly differentiated tumors that do not show clear differentiation by routine light microscopy. A limited diagnostic workup is recommended to preserve as much tissue for molecular testing as possible. Most tumors can be classified using a single adenocarcinoma marker (eg, thyroid transcription factor 1 or mucin) and a single squamous marker (eg, p40 or p63). Carcinomas lacking clear differentiation by morphology and special stains are classified as NSCLC, not otherwise specified. Not otherwise specified carcinomas that stain with adenocarcinoma markers are classified as NSCLC, favor adenocarcinoma, and tumors that stain only with squamous markers are classified as NSCLC, favor squamous cell carcinoma. The need for every institution to develop a multidisciplinary tissue management strategy to obtain these small specimens and process them, not only for diagnosis but also for molecular testing and evaluation of markers of resistance to therapy, is emphasized. PMID:22970842

  4. Neoadjuvant Therapy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yifan; Jaklitsch, Michael T; Bueno, Raphael

    2016-07-01

    Locally advanced (stage IIIA) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is confined to the chest, but requires more than surgery to maximize cure. Therapy given preoperatively is termed neoadjuvant, whereas postoperative therapy is termed adjuvant. Trimodality therapy (chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery) has become the standard treatment regimen for resectable, locally advanced NSCLC. During the past 2 decades, several prospective, randomized, and nonrandomized studies have explored various regimens for preoperative treatment of NSCLC. The evaluation of potential candidates with NSCLC for neoadjuvant therapy as well as the currently available therapeutic regimens are reviewed. PMID:27261916

  5. Genetic polymorphisms and non-small-cell lung cancer: future paradigms

    PubMed Central

    de Mello, Ramon Andrade Bezerra

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses some current issues about genetic polymorphisms studied in the non-small-cell lung cancer translational field. Furthermore, it discusses about new potential biomarkers regarding lung cancer risk and prognosis. PMID:25628210

  6. Palliative Care Intervention in Improving Symptom Control and Quality of Life in Patients With Stage II-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer and Their Family Caregivers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-06

    Caregiver; Psychological Impact of Cancer and Its Treatment; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  7. PET-Adjusted Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-10

    Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Brain; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIA Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  8. Anthropometric measurements in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferrigno, D; Buccheri, G

    2001-10-01

    There is evidence that malnutrition is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in lung cancer patients and may have an impact on the clinical course of disease. The simplest way to assess nutritional status at the patient's bedside remains recourse to anthropometric measurements. This study was carried out in order to assess the clinical and prognostic significance of triceps skinfold thickness (TST), arm circumference (AC), and wrist circumference (WC) in lung cancer. The patient population was a consecutive series of 388 patients seen for a newly diagnosed primary non-small-cell lung cancer during the last 4 years. A set of 22 anthropometric, clinical, physical, laboratory, radiological, and pathological variables was prospectively recorded for all patients. Patients were carefully followed up, and their subsequent clinical course was recorded. The median values of TST, WC and AC were 8 mm (range 2-25 mm), 18 cm (range 10-27 cm), and 25 cm (range 15-35 cm), respectively. In 107 patients (27.6% of the total) TST values were below the reference value, and 37 of these patients also had a pathologically low small circumference. In all, AC was below the normality range in 60 of the 388 subjects (15.5%). Among the three variables, the strongest relationships were those between AC and WC (r(s)=0.541), and between TST and AC (r(s)=0.521). Univariate analyses of survival showed that TST was strongly predictive of a better prognosis (P<0.001), while WC was unrelated to outcome (P=0.101). Patients with higher values of AC had significantly longer survival than patients with lower values (P<0.018). The multivariate model, in contrast, did not confirm the prognostic capability of any of the anthropometric measures. These data indicate that the anthropometric measures may be significant predictors of survival, although not independently of the other prognostic factors. PMID:11680832

  9. Comparison of Two Therapeutic Strategies in Patients With Non-squamous Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) With Asymptomatic Brain Metastases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-29

    Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Metastatic; Non Epidermoid; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Adenocarcinoma of Lung Metastatic to Brain; Cerebral Metastases; Cerebral Radiotherapy; Brain Radiotherapy; Bevacizumab

  10. Gene expression profiles of small-cell lung cancers: molecular signatures of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Taniwaki, Masaya; Daigo, Yataro; Ishikawa, Nobuhisa; Takano, Atsushi; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Yasui, Wataru; Inai, Kouki; Kohno, Nobuoki; Nakamura, Yusuke

    2006-09-01

    To characterize the molecular mechanisms involved in the carcinogenesis and progression of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) and identify molecules to be applied as novel diagnostic markers and/or for development of molecular-targeted drugs, we applied cDNA microarray profile analysis coupled with purification of cancer cells by laser-microbeam microdissection (LMM). Expression profiles of 32,256 genes in 15 SCLCs identified 252 genes that were commonly up-regulated and 851 transcripts that were down-regulated in SCLC cells compared with non-cancerous lung tissue cells. An unsupervised clustering algorithm applied to the expression data easily distinguished SCLC from the other major histological type of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and identified 475 genes that may represent distinct molecular features of each of the two histological types. In particular, SCLC was characterized by altered expression of genes related to neuroendocrine cell differentiation and/or growth such as ASCL1, NRCAM, and INSM1. We also identified 68 genes that were abundantly expressed both in advanced SCLCs and advanced adenocarcinomas (ADCs), both of which had been obtained from patients with extensive chemotherapy treatment. Some of them are known to be transcription factors and/or gene expression regulators such as TAF5L, TFCP2L4, PHF20, LMO4, TCF20, RFX2, and DKFZp547I048 as well as those encoding nucleotide-binding proteins such as C9orf76, EHD3, and GIMAP4. Our data provide valuable information for better understanding of lung carcinogenesis and chemoresistance. PMID:16865272

  11. Genetically Modified T Cells in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer or Mesothelioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-02

    Advanced Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; HLA-A*0201 Positive Cells Present; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; Stage III Pleural Mesothelioma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Pleural Mesothelioma

  12. Differential expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α in non-small cell lung cancer and small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Karetsi, Eleni; Ioannou, Maria G.; Kerenidi, Theodora; Minas, Markos; Molyvdas, Paschalis A.; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos I.; Paraskeva, Efrosyni

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to compare the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α and vascular endothelial growth factor in small cell lung cancer and subtypes of non-small cell lung cancer and examine their relationships with clinicopathologic factors, response to treatment and survival. METHODS: We examined samples obtained by bronchial endoscopic biopsy from 55 patients with inoperable lung cancer (16 with adenocarcinoma, 17 with squamous cell carcinoma, and 22 with small cell lung cancer). Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α and vascular endothelial growth factor were detected using immunohistochemistry. The diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of patients were conducted according to the standard practice. RESULTS: A significant difference (p = 0.022) in hypoxia-inducible factor 1α expression was observed between non-small cell lung cancer (75.8% positive) and small cell lung cancer (45.5% positive). The frequency of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α nuclear expression was 88.2% in squamous cell carcinoma, 62.5% in adenocarcinoma, and 45.5% in small cell lung cancer. A significant correlation was observed between hypoxia-inducible factor 1α and vascular endothelial growth factor expression (Fisher's exact test, p = 0.001) when all types of lung cancer were examined, either collectively or separately. CONCLUSIONS: The expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α differs significantly between subtypes of lung cancer. These findings could help elucidate the biology of the different types of non-operable lung carcinomas and have implications for the design of new therapeutic approaches for lung cancer. PMID:23295589

  13. Adoptive immunotherapy combined chemoradiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Qian, Haili; Wang, Haijuan; Guan, Xiuwen; Yi, Zongbi; Ma, Fei

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacies between adoptive immunotherapy combined chemoradiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy alone in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The databases PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane database were searched to identify eligible clinical trials. Data analyses were carried out using a comprehensive meta-analysis program, version 2 software. A total of seven articles were finally included in the analysis. Meta-analyses showed that compared with chemoradiotherapy alone, adoptive immunotherapy combined with chemoradiotherapy could improve the 2-year overall survival [odds ratio (OR)=2.45, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.60-3.75, P<0.001], but not 2-year progression-free survival (OR=1.81, 95% CI: 0.61-5.36, P=0.284). Specifically, early (OR=3.32, 95% CI: 1.38-7.95, P<0.01) but not advanced (OR=3.75, 95% CI: 0.96-14.68, P=0.057) NSCLC patients were likely to gain a large benefit from the adoptive immunotherapy. Most of the adoptive immunotherapy-induced adverse effects were self-limited, mainly including fever, shiver, nausea, fatigue, etc. and severe toxicities were not observed. Adoptive immunotherapy combined with chemoradiotherapy can delay the recurrence of NSCLC and improve survival in patients, where the benefits are even more significant in patients with early-stage NSCLC. PMID:26872311

  14. Targeting Angiogenesis in Squamous Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Merla, Amartej; Perez-Soler, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common type of lung cancer, and can be further classified as nonsquamous carcinoma (including adenocarcinoma, which accounts for 50% of NSCLCs) and squamous NSCLC, which makes up 30% of NSCLC cases. The emergence of inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptors, anaplastic lymphoma kinase, and vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF) in the last decade has resulted in steady improvement in clinical outcome for patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma. However, improvements in the survival of patients with squamous NSCLC have remained elusive, presenting an urgent need for understanding and investigating therapeutically relevant molecular targets specifically in squamous NSCLC. Although anti-VEGF therapy has been studied in squamous NSCLC, progress has been slow, in part due to issues related to pulmonary hemorrhage. In addition to these safety concerns, several phase III trials that initially included patients with squamous NSCLC failed to demonstrate improved overall survival (primary endpoint) with the addition of antiangiogenic therapy to chemotherapy compared with chemotherapy alone. Angiogenesis is an established hallmark of tumor progression and metastasis, and the role of VEGF signaling in angiogenesis is well established. However, some studies suggest that while inhibiting VEGF signaling may be beneficial, prolonged exposure to VEGF/VEGF receptor (VEGFR) inhibitors may allow tumor cells to utilize alternative angiogenic mechanisms and become resistant. As a result, agents that target multiple angiogenic pathways simultaneously are also under evaluation. This review focuses on current and investigational antiangiogenic targets in squamous NSCLC, including VEGF/VEGFRs, fibroblast growth factor receptors, platelet-derived growth factor receptors, and angiopoietin. Additionally, clinical trials investigating VEGF- and multi-targeted antiangiogenic therapies are discussed. PMID:24578213

  15. Small-scale pig farmers’ behavior, silent release of African swine fever virus and consequences for disease spread

    PubMed Central

    Costard, Solenne; Zagmutt, Francisco J.; Porphyre, Thibaud; Pfeiffer, Dirk Udo

    2015-01-01

    The expanding distribution of African swine fever (ASF) is threatening the pig industry worldwide. Most outbreaks occur in backyard and small-scale herds, where poor farmers often attempt to limit the disease’s economic consequences by the emergency sale of their pigs. The risk of African swine fever virus (ASFV) release via this emergency sale was investigated. Simulation modeling was used to study ASFV transmission in backyard and small-scale farms as well as the emergency sale of pigs, and the potential impact of improving farmers and traders’ clinical diagnosis ability–its timeliness and/or accuracy–was assessed. The risk of ASFV release was shown to be high, and improving farmers’ clinical diagnosis ability does not appear sufficient to effectively reduce this risk. Estimates obtained also showed that the distribution of herd size within the backyard and small-scale sectors influences the relative contribution of these farms to the risk of release of infected pigs. These findings can inform surveillance and control programs. PMID:26610850

  16. Bromodomain and hedgehog pathway targets in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurmeet; Reinhart, Russell A; Monks, Anne; Evans, David; Morris, Joel; Polley, Eric; Teicher, Beverly A

    2016-02-28

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an extremely aggressive cancer that frequently recurs. Twenty-three human SCLC lines were selected representing varied Myc status. Gene expression of lung cancer, stem-like, hedgehog pathway, and notch pathway genes were determined by RT(2)-PCR array and Exon 1.0 ST array. Etoposide and topotecan concentration response was examined. The IC50's for etoposide and topotecan ranged over nearly 3 logs upon 96 hrs exposure to the drugs. Myc status, TOP2A, TOP2B and TOP1 mRNA expression or topoisomerase 1 and topoisomerase 2 protein did not account for the range in the sensitivity to the drugs. γ-secretase inhibitors, RO429097 and PF-03084014, had little activity in the SCLC lines over ranges covering the clinical Cmax concentrations. MYC amplified lines tended to be more sensitive to the bromodomain inhibitor JQ1. The Smo antagonists, erismodegib and vismodegib and the Gli antagonists, HPI1 and SEN-450 had a trend toward greater sensitivity of the MYC amplified line. Recurrent SCLC is among the most recalcitrant cancers and drug development efforts in this cancer are a high priority. PMID:26683772

  17. Chemotherapy advances in small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Chan, Bryan A; Coward, Jermaine I G

    2013-10-01

    Although chemotherapeutic advances have recently been heralded in lung adenocarcinomas, such success with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) has been ominously absent. Indeed, the dismal outlook of this disease is exemplified by the failure of any significant advances in first line therapy since the introduction of the current standard platinum-etoposide doublet over 30 years ago. Moreover, such sluggish progress is compounded by the dearth of FDA-approved agents for patients with relapsed disease. However, over the past decade, novel formulations of drug classes commonly used in SCLC (e.g. topoisomerase inhibitors, anthracyclines, alkylating and platinum agents) are emerging as potential alternatives that could effectively add to the armamentarium of agents currently at our disposal. This review is introduced with an overview on the historical development of chemotherapeutic regimens used in this disease and followed by the recent encouraging advances witnessed in clinical trials with drugs such as amrubicin and belotecan which are forging new horizons for future treatment algorithms. PMID:24163749

  18. Cancer stem cells in small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Verlicchi, Alberto; Rosell, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is one of the most aggressive lung tumors, with poor survival rates. Although patients may initially respond to treatment, this is followed by rapid development of drug resistance and disease progression. SCLC patients often present with metastasis at time of diagnosis, ruling out surgery as a treatment option. Currently, treatment options for this disease remain limited and platinum-based chemotherapy is the treatment of choice. A better understanding of the biology of SCLC could allow us to identify new therapeutic targets. Cancer stem cell (CSC) theory is currently crucial in cancer research and could provide a viable explanation for the heterogeneity, drug resistance, recurrence and metastasis of several types of tumors. Some characteristics of SCLC, such as aggressiveness, suggest that this kind of tumor could be enriched in CSCs, and drug resistance in SCLC could be attributable to the existence of a CSC subpopulation in SCLC. Herein we summarize current understanding of CSC in SCLC, including the evidence for CSC markers and signaling pathways involved in stemness. We also discuss potential ongoing strategies and areas of active research in SCLC, such as immunotherapy, that focus on inhibition of signaling pathways and targeting molecules driving stemness. Understanding of signaling pathways and the discovery of new therapeutic markers specific to CSCs will lead to new advances in therapy and improvements in prognosis of SCLC patients. Therefore, evaluation of these CSC-specific molecules and pathways may become a routine part of SCLC diagnosis and therapy. PMID:26958490

  19. Resected small cell lung cancer-time for more?

    PubMed

    Marr, Alissa S; Zhang, Chi; Ganti, Apar Kishor

    2016-08-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) often presents with either regional or systemic metastases, but approximately 4% of patients present with a solitary pulmonary nodule. Surgical resection can be an option for these patients and is endorsed by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines. There are no prospective randomized clinical trials evaluating the role of adjuvant systemic therapy in these resected SCLC patients. A recent National Cancer Database analysis found that the receipt of adjuvant chemotherapy alone [hazard ratio (HR), 0.78; 95% CI, 0.63-0.95] or with brain radiation (HR, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.36-0.75) was associated with significantly improved survival as compared to surgery alone. As it is unlikely that a randomized prospective clinical trial addressing this question will be completed, these data should assist with decision making in these patients. PMID:27620199

  20. Resected small cell lung cancer—time for more?

    PubMed Central

    Marr, Alissa S.; Zhang, Chi

    2016-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) often presents with either regional or systemic metastases, but approximately 4% of patients present with a solitary pulmonary nodule. Surgical resection can be an option for these patients and is endorsed by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines. There are no prospective randomized clinical trials evaluating the role of adjuvant systemic therapy in these resected SCLC patients. A recent National Cancer Database analysis found that the receipt of adjuvant chemotherapy alone [hazard ratio (HR), 0.78; 95% CI, 0.63–0.95] or with brain radiation (HR, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.36–0.75) was associated with significantly improved survival as compared to surgery alone. As it is unlikely that a randomized prospective clinical trial addressing this question will be completed, these data should assist with decision making in these patients. PMID:27620199

  1. [Maintenance therapy for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Saruwatari, Koichi; Yoh, Kiyotaka

    2014-08-01

    Maintenance therapy is a new treatment strategy for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer(NSCLC), and it consists of switch maintenance and continuation maintenance.Switch maintenance is the introduction of a different drug, not included as part of the induction therapy, immediately after completion of 4 cycles of first-line platinum-based chemotherapy.Continuation maintenance is a continuation of at least one of the drugs used in the induction therapy in the absence of disease progression.Several phase III trials have reported survival benefits with continuation maintenance of pemetrexed and switch maintenance of pemetrexed or erlotinib.Therefore, maintenance therapy has become a part of the standard first-line treatment for advanced NSCLC.However, further research is needed to elucidate the selection criteria of patients who may benefit the most from maintenance therapy. PMID:25132023

  2. Genetic Testing in Screening Patients With Stage IB-IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer That Has Been or Will Be Removed by Surgery (The ALCHEMIST Screening Trial)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-30

    Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma; Stage IB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IB Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIA Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIA Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIB Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma

  3. Genomic landscape of small cell carcinoma of the breast contrasted to small cell carcinoma of the lung.

    PubMed

    McCullar, Brennan; Pandey, Manjari; Yaghmour, George; Hare, Felicia; Patel, Kruti; Stein, Matthew; Feldman, Rebecca; Chandler, Jason C; Martin, Michael G

    2016-07-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the breast is a rare, aggressive form of breast cancer that is associated with extremely poor outcomes [1]. In an effort to identify possible targets for treatment, we utilized comprehensive genomic profiling in small cell carcinoma of the breast. Under an IRB approved protocol, we identified patients with small cell carcinoma of the breast and small cell carcinoma of the lung profiled by Caris Life Sciences between 2007 and 2015. Tumors were assessed with up to 25 immunohistochemical stains, in situ hybridization of cMET, EGFR, HER2, PIK3CA, and TOP2A, and next generation sequencing as well as Sanger sequencing of 47 genes. 19 patients with small cell carcinoma of the breast were identified, median age was 58 years (range 37-79) and 42 % had metastatic disease at presentation; for comparison, 58 patients with small cell carcinoma of the lung were identified (66 [36-86], 65 % metastatic). By immunohistochemistry, 31 % of small cell carcinoma of the breast patients expressed ER, 13 % expressed PR, and 16 % expressed AR; small cell carcinoma of the lung patients expressed ER 0 %, PR 2 %, and AR 6 %. Small cell carcinoma of the breast and small cell carcinoma of the lung patients had similar patterns of other immunohistochemical expression (0 v 0 % PDL1, 50 v 42 % PD1, and 77 v 95 % TOP2A, respectively). All small carcinoma of the breast and small cell carcinoma of the lung patients were negative for HER2 and cMET amplification by in situ hybridization. Next generation sequencing revealed TP53 mutations in 75 % of patients both with small cell carcinoma of the breast and small cell carcinoma of the lung and PIK3CA mutations in 33 % of small cell carcinoma of the breast patients but no small cell carcinoma of the lung patients (Fisher's exact test p = 0.005, OR 0.02 [0.00-0.52]). No other mutations were found in small cell carcinoma of the breast patients and no other mutation occurred in over 10 % of small cell carcinoma of the

  4. Treatment Option Overview (Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... lung cancer include a cough that doesn't go away and shortness of breath. Sometimes lung cancer ... discomfort or pain. A cough that doesn’t go away or gets worse over time. Trouble breathing. ...

  5. Treatment Options by Stage (Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... lung cancer include a cough that doesn't go away and shortness of breath. Sometimes lung cancer ... discomfort or pain. A cough that doesn’t go away or gets worse over time. Trouble breathing. ...

  6. Stages of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... lung cancer include a cough that doesn't go away and shortness of breath. Sometimes lung cancer ... discomfort or pain. A cough that doesn’t go away or gets worse over time. Trouble breathing. ...

  7. Image-Guided Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Boost and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-07

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  8. PET/CT in the Staging of the Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Fangfang; Zhang, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is a common disease and the leading cause of cancer-related death in many countries. Precise staging of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer plays an important role in determining treatment strategy and prognosis. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT), combining anatomic information of CT and metabolic information of PET, is emerging as a potential diagnosis and staging test in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The purpose of this paper is to discuss the value of integrated PET/CT in the staging of the non-small-cell lung cancer and its health economics. PMID:22577296

  9. PDGFR-{beta} expression in small cell lung cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Shinohara, Eric T.; Gonzalez, Adriana; Massion, Pierre P.; Olson, Sandra J.; Albert, Jeffrey M.; Shyr, Yu; Carbone, David P.; Johnson, David H.; Hallahan, Dennis E.; Lu Bo . E-mail: bo.lu@vanderbilt.edu

    2007-02-01

    Background: Platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) and PDGFR-{beta} are expressed and have been found to have prognostic value in several human cancers. Data in non-small-cell cancer cell lines have suggested that PDGFR is a therapeutic target for drug development. In the current study PDGFR-{beta} expression and prognostic value in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) was investigated. Methods and Materials: Paraffin-embedded tissue blocks from 53 patients with limited and extensive stage SCLC were obtained for immunohistochemical staining. Tumors from each patient were sampled 3 times and stained with PDGFR-{beta} specific antibody. Patients were divided into low and high staining groups based on intensity. Results: There was high intensity PDGFR-{beta} staining in 20 patients with SCLC. Another 29 expressed low intensity PDGFR-{beta} staining, with only 4 patients showing no PDGFR-{beta} staining. There was no statistically significant difference in 5 year overall survival between patients with low levels of PDGFR-{beta} staining vs. those with high level staining SCLC tumors (p = 0.538). Conclusions: The present study found that the majority of SCLC patients express, at least, a low level of PDGF-{beta}. However, the level of PDGFR-{beta} expression was not a statistically significant predictor of 5 year overall survival in SCLC.

  10. Expression of a phosphorylated form of ATF4 in lung and non-small cell lung cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chui-Feng; Miao, Yuan; Lin, Xu-Yong; Zhang, Di; Wang, En-Hua

    2014-01-01

    ATF4 is a member of the cAMP-responsive element-binding protein family of basic zipper-containing proteins, a family of transcription factors phosphorylated at serines residues by protein kinase A. The family has been proved to be able to stimulate the transcription of the genes containing CRE elements. Elevated ATF4 expression was detected in some tumors including breast carcinoma compared to their corresponding nontumor tissues. p-ATF4 (ser 245), a phosphorylated form of ATF4 protein at serine 245 site, was believed to be an active type of this protein. However, its expression and clinical significance in malignant tumors including non-small cell lung cancer were not reported up to date. In the current study, we investigate the expression of p-ATF4 (ser 245) in non-small cell lung cancer using tissue microarray and immunohistochemistry. p-ATF4 (ser 245) immunostaining was detected in nucleus and cytoplasm in cancer cells and normal lung epithelial cells. Compared to bronchial epithelium and submucosal glands (total positive rate, 14.6% (12/82)), there was increased expression of p-ATF4 (ser 245) in non-small cell lung cancer cells (total positive rate, 42.7% (35/82)) (p < 0.05). In addition, increased expression of p-ATF4 (ser 245) was associated with lymph node metastasis and advanced TNM stages (III and IV) in non-small cell lung cancer (p < 0.05). Immunofluorescent staining confirmed nuclear and cytoplasmic expression of p-ATF4 (ser 245) in lung and cancer tissues, and also in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines including NCI-H157 and LTE cells. These results indicate that increased expression of p-ATF4 (ser 245) may contribute to cancer development of non-small cell lung cancer and may be a potential cancer marker. PMID:23975372

  11. Non-small cell lung carcinoma metastasis to the anus.

    PubMed

    Dhandapani, Ramya Gowri; Anosike, Chinedum; Ganguly, Akash

    2016-01-01

    A 70-year-old man presenting with a lung mass was investigated and treated with pneumonectomy for adenocarcinoma of the lung. He re-presented 3 months later with a large perianal abscess and mass. Subsequent investigations and biopsies showed disseminated metastases from the lung primary. Immunohistochemical staining confirmed the nature of the anal metastasis from the lung adenocarcinoma. Lung cancer is notorious for metastases, hence it is important to be aware of the uncommon modes of spread, which will help obtain early diagnosis and optimise treatment. PMID:27130556

  12. Protein signature for non-small cell lung cancer prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Wu, Yong; Wang, Libo; Gao, Ling; Wang, Yingping; Liu, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Kai; Song, Jena; Wang, Hongxia; Bayer, Thomas A; Glaser, Laurel; Sun, Yezhou; Zhang, Weijia; Cutaia, Michael; Zhang, David Y; Ye, Fei

    2014-01-01

    Background: Current histopathological classification and TNM staging have limited accuracy in predicting survival and stratifying patients for appropriate treatment. The goal of the study is to determine whether the expression pattern of functionally important regulatory proteins can add additional values for more accurate classification and prognostication of non-small lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: The expression of 108 proteins and phosphoproteins in 30 paired NSCLC samples were assessed using Protein Pathway Array (PPA). The differentially expressed proteins were further confirmed using a tissue microarray (TMA) containing 94 NSCLC samples and were correlated with clinical data and survival. Results: Twelve of 108 proteins (p-CREB(Ser133), p-ERK1/2(Thr202/Tyr204), Cyclin B1, p-PDK1(Ser241), CDK4, CDK2, HSP90, CDC2p34, β-catenin, EGFR, XIAP and PCNA) were selected to build the predictor to classify normal and tumor samples with 97% accuracy. Five proteins (CDC2p34, HSP90, XIAP, CDK4 and CREB) were confirmed to be differentially expressed between NSCLC (n=94) and benign lung tumor (n=19). Over-expression of CDK4 and HSP90 in tumors correlated with a favorable overall survival in all NSCLC patients and the over-expression of p-CREB(Ser133) and CREB in NSCLC correlated with a favorable survival in smokers and those with squamous cell carcinoma, respectively. Finally, the four proteins (CDK4, HSP90, p-CREB and CREB) were used to calculate the risk score of each individual patient with NSCLC to predict survival. Conclusion: In summary, our data demonstrated a broad disturbance of functionally important regulatory proteins in NSCLC and some of these can be selected as clinically useful biomarkers for diagnosis, classification and prognosis. PMID:24959380

  13. Small cell lung cancer in never-smokers.

    PubMed

    Torres-Durán, María; Ruano-Ravina, Alberto; Kelsey, Karl T; Parente-Lamelas, Isaura; Provencio, Mariano; Leiro-Fernández, Virginia; Abal-Arca, José; Montero-Martínez, Carmen; Vidal-Garcia, Iria; Pena, Carolina; Castro-Añón, Olalla; Golpe-Gómez, Antonio; Martínez, Cristina; Guzmán-Taveras, Rosirys; Mejuto-Martí, María José; Fernández-Villar, Alberto; Barros-Dios, Juan Miguel

    2016-03-01

    Our aim was to describe the characteristics of a case-series of never-smoker small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cases.Cases of SCLC were selected from a prospective, multicenter, hospital-based case-control study performed in Spain. Participants were never-smokers older than 30 years with an anatomo-pathological confirmation of primary lung cancer. We collected clinical and epidemiological variables according to the study's protocol.We included 19 SCLC cases, 18 females (94.7%), median age 75 years (interquartile range (IQR) 70-80 years). Median residential radon concentration was 195 Bq·m(-3) (IQR 130-229 Bq·m(-3)). 10 patients had limited disease and nine had extended disease. Median survival was 242 days (IQR 94-496 days); 1- and 2-year survival were 36.8% and 17.6%, respectively. Survival was much higher for individuals with limited disease than for those with extended disease (median 336 versus 235 days; 1-year survival 50% versus 22.2% and 2-year survival 27% versus 0%, respectively). Performance status at diagnosis was closely related to survival.SCLC is an infrequent, highly aggressive disease in never-smokers. Survival is poor, even for limited disease. Age at diagnosis in SCLC is higher than that observed for never-smokers with adenocarcinoma. Residential radon exposure is higher than the action levels recommended by the World Health Organization. PMID:26699724

  14. Recent advances in the treatment of non-small cell and small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E

    2014-01-01

    Recent presentations at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting from 30 May to 3 June, 2014, will impact routine clinical care and the development of clinical trials in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and extensive stage small cell lung cancer (ES-SCLC). Patients with activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations, defined as exon 19 and exon 21 L858R point mutations, experience a high objective response rate and prolonged progression-free survival with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. However, inevitably, patients experience disease progression and the most common mechanism of acquired resistance is an EGFR exon 20 T790M mutation. Several agents (AZD9291, CO-1686 and HM61713) have demonstrated impressive activity in patients with T790M resistance mutations. Additional data on the efficacy of first-line therapy with afatinib and the combination of erlotinib and bevacizumab for patients with EGFR mutant NSCLC were presented. The results of a phase III trial of crizotinib compared to platinum-pemetrexed in the first-line setting, and a phase I trial and expansion cohort of ceritinib, provided additional efficacy and toxicity data for patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearranged NSCLC. A phase III trial of cisplatin and gemcitabine, with and without necitumumab, revealed an improvement in overall survival with the addition of necitumumab in patients with squamous NSCLC. In the second-line setting, a phase III trial of docetaxel with ramucirumab or placebo revealed an improvement in overall survival with the addition of ramucirumab. In extensive stage small cell lung cancer phase III trials of consolidative thoracic radiation therapy and prophylactic cranial radiation failed to reveal an improvement in overall survival. PMID:25580271

  15. KRAS Mutation in Small Cell Lung Carcinoma and Extrapulmonary Small Cell Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kodaz, Hilmi; Taştekin, Ebru; Erdoğan, Bülent; Hacıbekiroğlu, İlhan; Tozkır, Hilmi; Gürkan, Hakan; Türkmen, Esma; Demirkan, Bora; Uzunoğlu, Sernaz; Çiçin, İrfan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer is one of the most lethal cancers. It is mainly classified into 2 groups: non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Extrapulmonary small cell carcinomas (EPSCC) are very rare. The Ras oncogene controls most of the cellular functions in the cell. Overall, 21.6% of human cancers contain a Kirsten Ras (KRAS) mutation. SCLC and EPSCC have several similar features but their clinical course is different. Aims: We investigated the KRAS mutation status in SCLC and EPSCC. Study design: Mutation research. Methods: Thirty-seven SCLC and 15 EPSCC patients were included in the study. The pathological diagnoses were confirmed by a second pathologist. KRAS analysis was performed in our medical genetic department. DNA isolation was performed with primary tumor tissue using the QIAamp DNA FFPE Tissue kit (Qiagen; Hilden, Germany) in all patients. The therascreen KRAS Pyro Kit 24 V1 (Qiagen; Hilden, Germany) was used for KRAS analyses. Results: Thirty-four (91.9%) of the SCLC patients were male, while 11 (73.3%) of the EPSCC l patients were female. SCLC was more common in males, and EPSCC in females (p=0.001). A KRAS mutation was found in 6 (16.2%) if SCLC patients. The most common mutation was Q61R (CAA>CGA). Among the 15 EPSCC patients, 2 had a KRAS mutation (13.3%). When KRAS mutant and wild type patients were compared in the SCLC group, no difference was found for overall survival (p=0.6). Conclusion: In previous studies, the incidence of KRAS mutation in SCLC was 1–3%; however, it was 16.2% in our study. Therefore, there may be ethnic and geographical differences in the KRAS mutations of SCLC. As a result, KRAS mutation should not be excluded in SCLC.

  16. Alectinib for choroidal metastasis in a patient with crizotinib-resistant ALK rearranged positive non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Okuma, Yusuke; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Kamei, Tina; Hosomi, Yukio; Okamura, Tatsuru

    2015-01-01

    Choroidal metastasis is rare in cancer patients. Small molecules of molecular targeted agents for lung cancer with actionable mutations were reported to be palliated for symptoms caused by choroidal metastasis. Visual disturbance by choroidal metastasis significantly decreases quality of life during the patient's remaining lifespan; therefore, radiotherapy or laser photocoagulation is proposed with consensus. However, improvement in survival with matched molecular targeted agents for oncogenic driver mutations reminds us to also be concerned with late treatment toxicities. A 30-year-old female patient previously treated with crizotinib harboring ALK rearranged non-small cell lung cancer complained of visual disturbance, fever, and bone pains undergoing anti-PD-1 antibody treatment. A decreased proportion of ALK fusion was demonstrated by fluorescence in situ hybridization in liver metastasis compared to the primary site in a chemo-naïve state. She was diagnosed with low vision, choroidal metastasis and retinal detachment. Therefore, she started alectinib treatment and both her ocular and systemic symptoms were palliated in a week. Later, she temporarily discontinued alectinib because of skin rash although the choroidal metastasis and retinal detachment resolved and she regained low vision completely at 2 weeks. She obtained partial response with alectinib for more than 5 months after recovering from skin rash. PMID:26082648

  17. Erlotinib Hydrochloride With or Without Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-29

    Adenosquamous Lung Carcinoma; Bronchioloalveolar Carcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma; Malignant Pericardial Effusion; Malignant Pleural Effusion; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  18. Integrated molecular portrait of non-small cell lung cancers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), a leading cause of cancer deaths, represents a heterogeneous group of neoplasms, mostly comprising squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), adenocarcinoma (AC) and large-cell carcinoma (LCC). The objectives of this study were to utilize integrated genomic data including copy-number alteration, mRNA, microRNA expression and candidate-gene full sequencing data to characterize the molecular distinctions between AC and SCC. Methods Comparative genomic hybridization followed by mutational analysis, gene expression and miRNA microarray profiling were performed on 123 paired tumor and non-tumor tissue samples from patients with NSCLC. Results At DNA, mRNA and miRNA levels we could identify molecular markers that discriminated significantly between the various histopathological entities of NSCLC. We identified 34 genomic clusters using aCGH data; several genes exhibited a different profile of aberrations between AC and SCC, including PIK3CA, SOX2, THPO, TP63, PDGFB genes. Gene expression profiling analysis identified SPP1, CTHRC1and GREM1 as potential biomarkers for early diagnosis of the cancer, and SPINK1 and BMP7 to distinguish between AC and SCC in small biopsies or in blood samples. Using integrated genomics approach we found in recurrently altered regions a list of three potential driver genes, MRPS22, NDRG1 and RNF7, which were consistently over-expressed in amplified regions, had wide-spread correlation with an average of ~800 genes throughout the genome and highly associated with histological types. Using a network enrichment analysis, the targets of these potential drivers were seen to be involved in DNA replication, cell cycle, mismatch repair, p53 signalling pathway and other lung cancer related signalling pathways, and many immunological pathways. Furthermore, we also identified one potential driver miRNA hsa-miR-944. Conclusions Integrated molecular characterization of AC and SCC helped identify clinically relevant markers

  19. [Diagnosis and surgical treatment for small-sized peripheral lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Iyoda, A; Fujisawa, T; Moriya, Y

    2004-01-01

    Small-sized peripheral lung cancers have been detected more frequently as a result of recent developments in diagnostic imaging including high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Although the diagnosis of small-sized peripheral lung cancers is difficult, it makes an adequate diagnosis possible using transbronchial fine needle aspiration cytology or a new thin-type bronchoscope. Surgical treatment using mini-thoracotomy or video-assisted thoracic surgery is effective for early stage small-sized peripheral lung cancers. Lesser resection of lung cancer may provide many benefits to patients, such as preserving vital lung tissue and providing the chance for further resection if a second primary lung cancer develops, however, lobectomy with systematic hilar and mediastinal lymph node dissection should remain the standard surgical treatment, and an intentional limited resection should be adopted for very limited patients with a definitive early stage because of recurrence rates. PMID:14733091

  20. Mediastinal Staging in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gamliel, Ziv

    2016-07-01

    In the absence of distant metastases, lung cancer treatment is determined by the results of mediastinal lymph node staging. Occult mediastinal lymph node metastases can be missed by radiologic and needle-based staging methods. Aggressive staging of mediastinal lymph nodes improves staging accuracy. Improved accuracy of mediastinal lymph node staging results in more appropriate lung cancer treatment. Improved accuracy of mediastinal lymph node staging can improve stage-specific survival from lung cancer. PMID:27261911

  1. Small non-coding RNA biomarkers in sputum for lung cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Su, Yun; Guarnera, Maria A; Fang, HongBin; Jiang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The early detection of lung cancer can reduce the mortality. However, there is no effective means in clinical settings for noninvasively detecting lung cancer. We previously developed 3 sputum miRNA biomarkers and 2 sputum small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA) biomarkers that can potentially be used for noninvasively diagnosing lung cancer. Here we evaluate the individual and combined applications of the two types of biomarkers in different sets of lung cancer patients and controls. Combined analysis of the miRNAs and snoRNAs has a synergistic effect with 89 % sensitivity and 89 % specificity, and may provide a useful tool for lung cancer early detection. PMID:27176474

  2. [Serotonin syndrome in a patient with small cell lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Chieko; Goto, Emi; Taira, Sachiko; Kataoka, Noriaki; Nishihara, Masami; Katsumata, Takahiro; Goto, Isao; Takiuchi, Hiroya

    2013-08-01

    The patient was a 67-year-old male who had been treated for several years with 150 mg fluvoxamine maleate due to depression. He visited our hospital with primary symptoms of swelling of the right upper extremity and dyspnea in August, XXXX. As a result of examinations, he was diagnosed with stage IIIB extended small cell lung cancer(T4N3M0). One course of carboplatin/etoposide(CBDCA/VP-16)therapy was started on October 1. Since the tumor size was reduced, thoracic effusion disappeared, and superior vena cava syndrome was alleviated, the therapy was changed to cisplatin/irinotecan (CDDP/CPT-11)on October 23, and the 3rd course was initiated on November 22. Anxiety and tremor appeared on the 4th day of the 3rd course and because they were exacerbated, and myoclonus appeared, a diagnosis of serotonin syndrome was made on the 38th day, and the administration of fluvoxamine maleate was discontinued. The symptoms were alleviated after the discontinuation, and the 4th course could be implemented. In this patient, serotonin syndrome was considered to have been induced by serotonin secretion promoted by the CDDP administration, and by serotonin in the brain increasing abnormally due to the SSRI. PMID:23986051

  3. Comprehensive genomic profiles of small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    George, Julie; Lim, Jing Shan; Jang, Se Jin; Cun, Yupeng; Ozretić, Luka; Kong, Gu; Leenders, Frauke; Lu, Xin; Fernández-Cuesta, Lynnette; Bosco, Graziella; Müller, Christian; Dahmen, Ilona; Jahchan, Nadine S; Park, Kwon-Sik; Yang, Dian; Karnezis, Anthony N; Vaka, Dedeepya; Torres, Angela; Wang, Maia Segura; Korbel, Jan O; Menon, Roopika; Chun, Sung-Min; Kim, Deokhoon; Wilkerson, Matt; Hayes, Neil; Engelmann, David; Pützer, Brigitte; Bos, Marc; Michels, Sebastian; Vlasic, Ignacija; Seidel, Danila; Pinther, Berit; Schaub, Philipp; Becker, Christian; Altmüller, Janine; Yokota, Jun; Kohno, Takashi; Iwakawa, Reika; Tsuta, Koji; Noguchi, Masayuki; Muley, Thomas; Hoffmann, Hans; Schnabel, Philipp A; Petersen, Iver; Chen, Yuan; Soltermann, Alex; Tischler, Verena; Choi, Chang-min; Kim, Yong-Hee; Massion, Pierre P; Zou, Yong; Jovanovic, Dragana; Kontic, Milica; Wright, Gavin M; Russell, Prudence A; Solomon, Benjamin; Koch, Ina; Lindner, Michael; Muscarella, Lucia A; la Torre, Annamaria; Field, John K; Jakopovic, Marko; Knezevic, Jelena; Castaños-Vélez, Esmeralda; Roz, Luca; Pastorino, Ugo; Brustugun, Odd-Terje; Lund-Iversen, Marius; Thunnissen, Erik; Köhler, Jens; Schuler, Martin; Botling, Johan; Sandelin, Martin; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montserrat; Salvesen, Helga B; Achter, Viktor; Lang, Ulrich; Bogus, Magdalena; Schneider, Peter M; Zander, Thomas; Ansén, Sascha; Hallek, Michael; Wolf, Jürgen; Vingron, Martin; Yatabe, Yasushi; Travis, William D; Nürnberg, Peter; Reinhardt, Christian; Perner, Sven; Heukamp, Lukas; Büttner, Reinhard; Haas, Stefan A; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Peifer, Martin; Sage, Julien; Thomas, Roman K

    2015-08-01

    We have sequenced the genomes of 110 small cell lung cancers (SCLC), one of the deadliest human cancers. In nearly all the tumours analysed we found bi-allelic inactivation of TP53 and RB1, sometimes by complex genomic rearrangements. Two tumours with wild-type RB1 had evidence of chromothripsis leading to overexpression of cyclin D1 (encoded by the CCND1 gene), revealing an alternative mechanism of Rb1 deregulation. Thus, loss of the tumour suppressors TP53 and RB1 is obligatory in SCLC. We discovered somatic genomic rearrangements of TP73 that create an oncogenic version of this gene, TP73Δex2/3. In rare cases, SCLC tumours exhibited kinase gene mutations, providing a possible therapeutic opportunity for individual patients. Finally, we observed inactivating mutations in NOTCH family genes in 25% of human SCLC. Accordingly, activation of Notch signalling in a pre-clinical SCLC mouse model strikingly reduced the number of tumours and extended the survival of the mutant mice. Furthermore, neuroendocrine gene expression was abrogated by Notch activity in SCLC cells. This first comprehensive study of somatic genome alterations in SCLC uncovers several key biological processes and identifies candidate therapeutic targets in this highly lethal form of cancer. PMID:26168399

  4. Limited-disease small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Frank B; Bamberg, Michael; Molls, Michael; Jeremic, Branislav

    2003-01-01

    Substantial improvements in treatment outcome for limited-disease small-cell lung cancer (LD SCLC) have been achieved in the last two decades owing to the introduction of chemotherapy (CHT) consisting of cisplatin and etoposide (PE), and the understanding that thoracic radiation therapy (TRT) is an essential component in improving treatment outcome. In addition, a recent metaanalysis confirmed the importance of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in general treatment plans for patients who show a complete response to treatment. However, numerous questions remain unanswered regarding this disease. While TRT/PE/PCI is considered to be the standard treatment in the majority of centers worldwide, the emergence of new and effective drugs (e.g., topoisomerase I inhibitors and paclitaxel) for the treatment of LD SCLC will likely affect therapy strategies in the near future. Important issues regarding optimal doses and fractionation regimens, as well as the timing of TRT, remain to be resolved. While most centers currently use b.i.d. fractionation as a result of the Intergroup findings, high-dose standard TRT may also be beneficial. TRT volumes are also considered an important issue, since they likely relate to the incidence of both local failure and toxicity. Finally, the optimization of PCI (total dose, fractionation regimen, and timing) is already under way. The value of surgery is limited to peripheral tumors and poorly responding cancer, and to confirm histology or improve local control and survival. PMID:14508848

  5. Autophagy in non-small cell lung carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Shuan; Yang, Heng; Penninger, Josef M; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-01-01

    In a mouse model of non-small cell lung carcinogenesis, we recently found that the inactivation of the essential autophagy gene Atg5 causes an acceleration of the early phases of oncogenesis. Thus, hyperplastic lesions and adenomas are more frequent at early stages after adenoviral delivery of Cre recombinase via inhalation, when Cre—in addition to activating the KRasG12D oncogene—inactivates both alleles of the Atg5 gene. The accelerated oncogenesis of autophagy-deficient tumors developing in KRas;Atg5fl/fl mice (as compared with autophagy-competent KRas;Atg5fl/+ control tumors) correlates with an increased infiltration by FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). Depletion of such Tregs by means of specific monoclonal antibodies inhibits the accelerated oncogenesis of autophagy-deficient tumors down to the level observed in autophagy-competent controls. Subsequent analyses revealed that the combination of KRas activation and Atg5 inactivation favors the expression of ENTPD1/CD39, an ecto-ATPase that initiates the conversion of extracellular ATP, which is immunostimulatory, into adenosine, which is immunosuppressive. Pharmacological inhibition of ENTPD1 or blockade of adenosinergic receptors reduces the infiltration of KRas;Atg5fl/fl tumors by Tregs and reverses accelerated oncogenesis. Altogether these data favor a model according to which autophagy deficiency favors oncogenesis via changes in the tumor microenvironment that ultimately entail the Treg-mediated inhibition of anticancer immunosurveillance. PMID:24413089

  6. Comprehensive genomic profiles of small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    George, Julie; Lim, Jing Shan; Jang, Se Jin; Cun, Yupeng; Ozretić, Luka; Kong, Gu; Leenders, Frauke; Lu, Xin; Fernández-Cuesta, Lynnette; Bosco, Graziella; Müller, Christian; Dahmen, Ilona; Jahchan, Nadine S.; Park, Kwon-Sik; Yang, Dian; Karnezis, Anthony N.; Vaka, Dedeepya; Torres, Angela; Wang, Maia Segura; Korbel, Jan O.; Menon, Roopika; Chun, Sung-Min; Kim, Deokhoon; Wilkerson, Matt; Hayes, Neil; Engelmann, David; Pützer, Brigitte; Bos, Marc; Michels, Sebastian; Vlasic, Ignacija; Seidel, Danila; Pinther, Berit; Schaub, Philipp; Becker, Christian; Altmüller, Janine; Yokota, Jun; Kohno, Takashi; Iwakawa, Reika; Tsuta, Koji; Noguchi, Masayuki; Muley, Thomas; Hoffmann, Hans; Schnabel, Philipp A.; Petersen, Iver; Chen, Yuan; Soltermann, Alex; Tischler, Verena; Choi, Chang-min; Kim, Yong-Hee; Massion, Pierre P.; Zou, Yong; Jovanovic, Dragana; Kontic, Milica; Wright, Gavin M.; Russell, Prudence A.; Solomon, Benjamin; Koch, Ina; Lindner, Michael; Muscarella, Lucia A.; la Torre, Annamaria; Field, John K.; Jakopovic, Marko; Knezevic, Jelena; Castaños-Vélez, Esmeralda; Roz, Luca; Pastorino, Ugo; Brustugun, Odd-Terje; Lund-Iversen, Marius; Thunnissen, Erik; Köhler, Jens; Schuler, Martin; Botling, Johan; Sandelin, Martin; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montserrat; Salvesen, Helga B.; Achter, Viktor; Lang, Ulrich; Bogus, Magdalena; Schneider, Peter M.; Zander, Thomas; Ansén, Sascha; Hallek, Michael; Wolf, Jürgen; Vingron, Martin; Yatabe, Yasushi; Travis, William D.; Nürnberg, Peter; Reinhardt, Christian; Perner, Sven; Heukamp, Lukas; Büttner, Reinhard; Haas, Stefan A.; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Peifer, Martin; Sage, Julien; Thomas, Roman K.

    2016-01-01

    We have sequenced the genomes of 110 small cell lung cancers (SCLC), one of the deadliest human cancers. In nearly all the tumours analysed we found bi-allelic inactivation of TP53 and RB1, sometimes by complex genomic rearrangements. Two tumours with wild-type RB1 had evidence of chromothripsis leading to overexpression of cyclin D1 (encoded by the CCND1 gene), revealing an alternative mechanism of Rb1 deregulation. Thus, loss of the tumour suppressors TP53 and RB1 is obligatory in SCLC. We discovered somatic genomic rearrangements of TP73 that create an oncogenic version of this gene, TP73Δex2/3. In rare cases, SCLC tumours exhibited kinase gene mutations, providing a possible therapeutic opportunity for individual patients. Finally, we observed inactivating mutations in NOTCH family genes in 25% of human SCLC. Accordingly, activation of Notch signalling in a pre-clinical SCLC mouse model strikingly reduced the number of tumours and extended the survival of the mutant mice. Furthermore, neuroendocrine gene expression was abrogated by Notch activity in SCLC cells. This first comprehensive study of somatic genome alterations in SCLC uncovers several key biological processes and identifies candidate therapeutic targets in this highly lethal form of cancer. PMID:26168399

  7. Polymer fume fever.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Taro; Hamada, Osamu; Sasaki, Akinori; Ikeda, Mari

    2012-01-01

    A 29-year-old Japanese man presented with fever, dyspnoea and non-productive cough after massive inhalation of evaporant from a polytetrafluoroethylene-coated cooking pan. Chest CT scan showed diffuse interstitial infiltration in both lungs. Based on the patient history, images and the pan he brought to the hospital, polymer fume fever was strongly suspected. His symptoms dramatically improved over the following 2 days after admission. PMID:23230259

  8. Yellow Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... tropical and subtropical areas in South America and Africa. The virus is transmitted to people by the ... fever Maps of Yellow fever endemic areas in Africa and South America Yellow fever vaccination Prevention Vaccine ...

  9. Q fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... fever is antibiotics. For early-stage Q fever, doxycycline is the recommended antibiotic. If you have the ... fever. Your health care provider may prescribe both doxycycline and hydroxychloroquine. You may need to take antibiotics ...

  10. Pemetrexed for advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients with interstitial lung disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD) need to be approached carefully given the high incidence of pulmonary toxicity. Pemetrexed (PEM) is the key drug for the treatment of NSCLC. However, its safety, especially with respect to the exacerbation of ILD, and efficacy in NSCLC patients with ILD have yet to be established. Method We investigated the safety and efficacy of PEM monotherapy in NSCLC patients with or without idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIPs). The medical charts of these patients were retrospectively reviewed. Results Twenty-five patients diagnosed as having IIPs (IIPs group) and 88 patients without ILD (non-ILD group) were treated with PEM monotherapy at Juntendo University Hospital between 2009 and 2013. In the IIPs group, 12 patients were found to have usual interstitial pneumonitis (UIP) on chest computed tomography (CT) (UIP group) and the other 13 patients showed a non-UIP pattern on chest CT (non-UIP IIPs group). Three patients in the IIPs group (2 in the UIP group and 1 in the non-UIP IIPs group) and 1 in the non-ILD group developed pulmonary toxicity during treatment (3.5% overall, 12.0% in the IIPs group versus 1.1% in the non-ILD group). Moreover, all 3 patients in the IIPs group died of pulmonary toxicity. Overall survival tended to be longer in the non-ILD group than in the IIPs group (p = 0.08). Multivariate analyses demonstrated that IIPs was the only significant independent risk factor for PEM-related pulmonary toxicity. Conclusion We found that the incidence of PEM-related pulmonary toxicity was significantly higher amongst NSCLC patients with IIPs than among those without IIPs. Particular care must be taken when administering PEM to treat NSCLC patients with IIPs. PMID:25012241

  11. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Metastatic Breast Cancer, Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, or Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    Male Breast Carcinoma; Prostate Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  12. Small Rho GTPases and Cholesterol Biosynthetic Pathway Intermediates in African Swine Fever Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Quetglas, Jose I.; Hernáez, Bruno; Galindo, Inmaculada; Muñoz-Moreno, Raquel; Cuesta-Geijo, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    The integrity of the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway is required for efficient African swine fever virus (ASFV) infection. Incorporation of prenyl groups into Rho GTPases plays a key role in several stages of ASFV infection, since both geranylgeranyl and farnesyl pyrophosphates are required at different infection steps. We found that Rho GTPase inhibition impaired virus morphogenesis and resulted in an abnormal viral factory size with the accumulation of envelope precursors and immature virions. Furthermore, abundant defective virions reached the plasma membrane, and filopodia formation in exocytosis was abrogated. Rac1 was activated at early ASFV infection stages, coincident with microtubule acetylation, a process that stabilizes microtubules for virus transport. Rac1 inhibition did not affect the viral entry step itself but impaired subsequent virus production. We found that specific Rac1 inhibition impaired viral induced microtubule acetylation and viral intracellular transport. These findings highlight that viral infection is the result of a carefully orchestrated modulation of Rho family GTPase activity within the host cell; this modulation results critical for virus morphogenesis and in turn, triggers cytoskeleton remodeling, such as microtubule stabilization for viral transport during early infection. PMID:22114329

  13. Changes in Functional Lung Regions During the Course of Radiation Therapy and Their Potential Impact on Lung Dosimetry for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Xue; Frey, Kirk; Matuszak, Martha; Paul, Stanton; Ten Haken, Randall; Yu, Jinming; Kong, Feng-Ming

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To study changes in functional activity on ventilation (V)/perfusion (Q) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) during radiation therapy (RT) and explore the impact of such changes on lung dosimetry in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Fifteen NSCLC patients with centrally located tumors were enrolled. All patients were treated with definitive RT dose of ≥60 Gy. V/Q SPECT-CT scans were performed prior to and after delivery of 45 Gy of fractionated RT. SPECT images were used to define temporarily dysfunctional regions of lung caused by tumor or other potentially reversible conditions as B3. The functional lung (FL) was defined on SPECT by 2 separate approaches: FL1, a threshold of 30% of the maximum uptake of the patient's lung; and FL2, FL1 plus B3 region. The impact of changes in FL between initiation of RT and delivery of 45 Gy on lung dosimetry were analyzed. Results: Fourteen patients (93%) had larger FL2 volumes than FL1 pre-RT (P<.001). Dysfunctional lung became functional in 11 patients (73%) on V SPECT and in 10 patients (67%) on Q SPECT. The dosimetric parameters generated from CT-based anatomical lung had significantly lower values in FL1 than FL2, with a median reduction in the volume of lung receiving a dose of at least 20 Gy (V{sub 20}) of 3%, 5.6%, and mean lung dose of 0.95 and 1.55 on V and Q SPECT respectively. Conclusions: Regional ventilation and perfusion function improve significantly during RT in centrally located NSCLC. Lung dosimetry values vary notably between different definitions of functional lung.

  14. Phase contrast x-ray velocimetry of small animal lungs: optimising imaging rates

    PubMed Central

    Murrie, R. P.; Paganin, D. M.; Fouras, A.; Morgan, K. S.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic lung diseases affect a vast portion of the world’s population. One of the key difficulties in accurately diagnosing and treating chronic lung disease is our inability to measure dynamic motion of the lungs in vivo. Phase contrast x-ray imaging (PCXI) allows us to image the lungs in high resolution by exploiting the difference in refractive indices between tissue and air. Combining PCXI with x-ray velocimetry (XV) allows us to track the local motion of the lungs, improving our ability to locate small regions of disease under natural ventilation conditions. Via simulation, we investigate the optimal imaging speed and sequence to capture lung motion in vivo in small animals using XV on both synchrotron and laboratory x-ray sources, balancing the noise inherent in a short exposure with motion blur that results from a long exposure. PMID:26819819

  15. Markerless tracking of small lung tumors for stereotactic radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sörnsen de Koste, John R. van Dahele, Max; Senan, Suresh; Slotman, Ben J.; Verbakel, Wilko F. A. R.; Mostafavi, Hassan; Sloutsky, Alex

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: (1) To validate retrospective markerless tracking software for small lung tumors by comparing tracked motion in 4-dimensional planning computed tomography (4DCT) derived kV projection images and known tumor motion in the same 4DCT. (2) To evaluate variability of tumor motion using kV projection images from cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans acquired on different days. Methods: Nonclinical tumor tracking software (TTS) used a normalized cross correlation algorithm to track the tumor on enhanced kV projection images (e.g., from a CBCT scan). The reference dataset consisted of digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) from one phase of a planning 4DCT. TTS matches two in-plane coordinates and obtains the out-of-plane coordinate by triangulating with match results from other projections. (1) To validate TTS, tracking results were compared with known 4DCT tumor motion for two patients (A and B). Projection images (1 image/1°) were digitally reconstructed for each 4DCT phase. From these, kV projection series were composed simulating full breathing cycles every 20° of gantry rotation [breathing period = 20°/(6°/s) = 3.33 s]. Reference templates were 360 “tumor enhanced” DRRs from the 4DCT expiration phase. TTS-derived tumor motion was compared to known tumor motion on 4DCT. (2) For five patients, TTS-assessed motion during clinical CBCT acquisition was compared with motion on the planning 4DCT, and the motion component in the Y (cranio–caudal)-direction was compared with the motion of an external marker box (RPM, real-time position management). Results: (1) Validation results: TTS for case A (tumor 6.2 cm{sup 3}, 32 mm axial diameter) over 360° showed mean motion X (medial–lateral) = 3.4, Y = 11.5, and Z (ventral–dorsal) = 4.9 mm (1 SD < 1.0 mm). Corresponding 4DCT motion was X = 3.1, Y = 11.3, and Z = 5.1 mm. Correlation coefficients between TTS tumor motion and displacement of the tumor’s center of mass (CoM) on 4DCT were 0.64, 0

  16. Therapeutic vaccines in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Socola, Francisco; Scherfenberg, Naomi; Raez, Luis E

    2013-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) unfortunately carries a very poor prognosis. Patients usually do not become symptomatic, and therefore do not seek treatment, until the cancer is advanced and it is too late to employ curative treatment options. New therapeutic options are urgently needed for NSCLC, because even current targeted therapies cure very few patients. Active immunotherapy is an option that is gaining more attention. A delicate and complex interplay exists between the tumor and the immune system. Solid tumors utilize a variety of mechanisms to evade immune detection. However, if the immune system can be stimulated to recognize the tumor as foreign, tumor cells can be specifically eliminated with little systemic toxicity. A number of vaccines designed to boost immunity against NSCLC are currently undergoing investigation in phase III clinical trials. Belagenpumatucel-L, an allogeneic cell vaccine that decreases transforming growth factor (TGF-β) in the tumor microenvironment, releases the immune suppression caused by the tumor and it has shown efficacy in a wide array of patients with advanced NSCLC. Melanoma-associated antigen A3 (MAGE-A3), an antigen-based vaccine, has shown promising results in MAGE-A3+ NSCLC patients who have undergone complete surgical resection. L-BLP25 and TG4010 are both antigenic vaccines that target the Mucin-1 protein (MUC-1), a proto-oncogene that is commonly mutated in solid tumors. CIMAVax is a recombinant human epidermal growth factor (EGF) vaccine that induces anti-EGF antibody production and prevents EGF from binding to its receptor. These vaccines may significantly improve survival and quality of life for patients with an otherwise dismal NSCLC prognosis. This review is intended to give an overview of the current data and the most promising studies of active immunotherapy for NSCLC.

  17. High-dose chemotherapy in small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Pasini, F; Durante, E; De Manzoni, D; Rosti, G; Pelosi, G

    2002-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is highly sensitive both to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Given its high chemo sensitivity, even two decades ago, SCLC was one of the first malignancies deemed suitable for maximising the dose and dose intensity with the support of autologous bone marrow (ABMT). On the whole, results were disappointing and the procedure was practically abandoned. Nowadays some interest is again emerging due to improvements in supportive care, such as the availability of hematopoietic growth factors and the peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC). Data of 505 patients included in 26 studies were reviewed. About two thirds of these patients had LD (limited disease). Late intensification protocols were used in 311 patients who, however, represented only the 30% of the population initially given conventional chemotherapy. Of the patients not achieving complete remission (CR) after induction, high-dose induced a CR in 39% of the cases. The use of early intensification was reported in 8 studies including 194 patients. The CR rate was 51.5%. Overall, the probability of achieving the CR was 2-3 times higher in LD than in ED (extensive disease). Relapses occurred at the site of the primary in more than half of the cases, showing that the course of the disease was not modified by the use of high-dose chemotherapy. Toxic deaths occurred in 7% of the treated patients, without difference in the two treatment methods. Though the schedules were too variable to draw firm conclusions, the ICE (ifosfamide, carboplatin, etoposide) and the CBP (cyclophosphamide, cisplatin, carmustine) regimens apparently provided better results, with a 2-year survival rate of 30-50% in the LD subset. An european multicenter randomized trial is ongoing. At the present time high-dose chemotherapy is still to be considered experimental treatment, since major problems such as the selection of the patients, doses and timing of chemotherapy and radiotherapy remain unsolved. PMID:12552940

  18. Wnt signaling pathway in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Stewart, David J

    2014-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin alterations are prominent in human malignancies. In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), β-catenin and APC mutations are uncommon, but Wnt signaling is important in NSCLC cell lines, and Wnt inhibition reduces proliferation. Overexpression of Wnt-1, -2, -3, and -5a and of Wnt-pathway components Frizzled-8, Dishevelled, Porcupine, and TCF-4 is common in resected NSCLC and is associated with poor prognosis. Conversely, noncanonical Wnt-7a suppresses NSCLC development and is often downregulated. Although β-catenin is often expressed in NSCLCs, it was paradoxically associated with improved prognosis in some series, possibly because of E-cadherin interactions. Downregulation of Wnt inhibitors (eg, by hypermethylation) is common in NSCLC tumor cell lines and resected samples; may be associated with high stage, dedifferentiation, and poor prognosis; and has been reported for AXIN, sFRPs 1-5, WIF-1, Dkk-1, Dkk-3, HDPR1, RUNX3, APC, CDX2, DACT2, TMEM88, Chibby, NKD1, EMX2, ING4, and miR-487b. AXIN is also destabilized by tankyrases, and GSK3β may be inactivated through phosphorylation by EGFR. Preclinically, restoration of Wnt inhibitor function is associated with reduced Wnt signaling, decreased cell proliferation, and increased apoptosis. Wnt signaling may also augment resistance to cisplatin, docetaxel, and radiotherapy, and Wnt inhibitors may restore sensitivity. Overall, available data indicate that Wnt signaling substantially impacts NSCLC tumorigenesis, prognosis, and resistance to therapy, with loss of Wnt signaling inhibitors by promoter hypermethylation or other mechanisms appearing to be particularly important. Wnt pathway antagonists warrant exploration clinically in NSCLC. Agents blocking selected specific β-catenin interactions and approaches to increase expression of downregulated Wnt inhibitors may be of particular interest. PMID:24309006

  19. Spotlight on gefitinib in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Frampton, James E; Easthope, Stephanie E

    2005-01-01

    Gefitinib (Iressa), the first commercially available epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase (EGFR-TK) inhibitor, is indicated in the management of patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, approved uses differ between countries; in most markets, gefitinib is approved for third-line use only (e.g. the US, Canada and Switzerland), although in some it is approved for both second- and third-line use (e.g. Japan and Australia) and, additionally, in patients considered unsuitable for chemotherapy (e.g. Indonesia and the Philippines). Few third-line treatment options exist for patients with inoperable advanced NSCLC who have failed both docetaxel and platinum-based chemotherapy regimens. Gefitinib represents a significant advance in the treatment of this population; a once-daily oral dosage of 250 mg/day was well tolerated, produced objective tumour responses and disease stabilization, and improved disease-related symptoms and quality of life. It also produced overall survival outcomes that compared favorably with historical outcomes in a similar group of patients treated with three or four different chemotherapy regimens. These findings have been supported by observations from a global compassionate-use program. Ongoing or planned clinical trials are designed to confirm and/or further define the role of the drug in the above and other clinical settings. Preliminary data demonstrate the presence of activating mutations in EGFR-TK among patients whose disease was highly responsive to treatment with gefitinib, although such mutations have not been correlated to all patients who benefit from the drug. Further studies are needed to fully elucidate the clinical implications of EGFR mutations and to identify patients likely to benefit from EGFR-targeted therapy. PMID:15813676

  20. The role of ifosfamide in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Loehrer, P J

    1996-06-01

    The emergence of chemotherapy has dramatically improved both quality of life and survival in patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Nonetheless, achieving long-term survival in SCLC patients has been a problem. Early studies of combination chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide/doxorubicin/vincristine (CAV) and cyclophosphamide/methotrexate/lomustine/vincristine (CMCV) reported impressive response rates in patients with SCLC. Ifosfamide, an analogue of cyclophosphamide, has demonstrated single-agent activity against SCLC, achieving overall response rates ranging from 5.6% to 76.5%. Because of this, and because of the agent's proven synergism in combination chemotherapy for recurrent testicular cancer and its relative non-myelosuppressive qualities (compared with cyclophosphamide), the incorporation of ifosfamide into combination chemotherapy for SCLC was rational. The Hoosier Oncology Group reported high response rates with VIP (ifosfamide combined with etoposide/cisplatin) in SCLC patients and proved the superiority of VIP over etoposide/cisplatin in patients with extensive disease. Presently, this group is evaluating the role of chronic oral etoposide as maintenance chemotherapy for patients with extensive SCLC that responds to initial VIP treatment. Salvage treatment with daily oral etoposide has also produced encouraging results, leading the Hoosier Oncology Group to incorporate oral etoposide as part of the VIP regimen (VoIP). It is currently unclear whether combination chemotherapy containing daily oral etoposide will have a major impact on survival. Further trials of combination chemotherapy with newer active agents like paclitaxel and topotecan, as well as with proven single agents like ifosfamide, are clearly warranted to improve the outcome of patients with SCLC. PMID:8711501

  1. Inhibitor-Sensitive FGFR1 Amplification in Human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dutt, Amit; Ramos, Alex H.; Hammerman, Peter S.; Mermel, Craig; Cho, Jeonghee; Sharifnia, Tanaz; Chande, Ajit; Tanaka, Kumiko Elisa; Stransky, Nicolas; Greulich, Heidi; Gray, Nathanael S.; Meyerson, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Background Squamous cell lung carcinomas account for approximately 25% of new lung carcinoma cases and 40,000 deaths per year in the United States. Although there are multiple genomically targeted therapies for lung adenocarcinoma, none has yet been reported in squamous cell lung carcinoma. Methodology/Principal Findings Using SNP array analysis, we found that a region of chromosome segment 8p11-12 containing three genes–WHSC1L1, LETM2, and FGFR1–is amplified in 3% of lung adenocarcinomas and 21% of squamous cell lung carcinomas. Furthermore, we demonstrated that a non-small cell lung carcinoma cell line harboring focal amplification of FGFR1 is dependent on FGFR1 activity for cell growth, as treatment of this cell line either with FGFR1-specific shRNAs or with FGFR small molecule enzymatic inhibitors leads to cell growth inhibition. Conclusions/Significance These studies show that FGFR1 amplification is common in squamous cell lung cancer, and that FGFR1 may represent a promising therapeutic target in non-small cell lung cancer. PMID:21666749

  2. Crizotinib for Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from an international phase III clinical trial that compared crizotinib versus chemotherapy in previously treated patients with advanced lung cancer whose tumors have an EML4-ALK fusion gene.

  3. Relationship of small airway chymase-positive mast cells and lung function in severe asthma.

    PubMed

    Balzar, Silvana; Chu, Hong Wei; Strand, Matthew; Wenzel, Sally

    2005-03-01

    Distal lung inflammation may be important in asthma pathophysiology. The goal of this study was to measure cellular inflammation in the large airway and four distal lung regions (small airway inner and outer wall, alveolar attachments, and peripheral alveolar tissue) and to correlate the specific inflammatory cells with several lung function parameters. Sections of concurrently obtained endobronchial and transbronchial/surgical biopsy tissue from 20 individuals with severe asthma were immunostained for T-lymphocyte, eosinophil, monocyte/macrophage, neutrophil, and two mast cell markers (tryptase and chymase). Specific cell distributions were determined and correlated with lung function measures. The number of inflammatory cells generally increased toward the periphery, but the percentage of T-lymphocytes, eosinophils, monocytes/macrophages, and neutrophils remained similar or decreased from large to small airways. In contrast, mast cell number, percentage, and the chymase-positive phenotype increased in small airway regions. After the analysis was adjusted for multiple comparisons, only chymase-positive mast cells significantly and positively correlated with lung function. Such a relationship was seen only in the small airway/alveolar attachments lung region (r(s) = 0.61-0.89; p small airway outer wall/alveolar attachments region, may be protective for lung function in severe asthma. PMID:15563633

  4. Small animal lung imaging with an in-line X-ray phase contrast benchtop system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garson, A. B.; Gunsten, S.; Guan, H.; Vasireddi, S.; Brody, S.; Anastasio, M. A.

    2015-03-01

    We present the results from a benchtop X-ray phase-contrast (XPC) method for lung imaging that represents a paradigm shift in the way small animal lung imaging is performed. In our method, information regarding airway microstructure that is encoded within speckle texture of a single XPC radiograph is decoded to spatially resolve changes in lung properties such as microstructure sizes, air volumes, and compliance, to name a few. Such functional information cannot be derived from conventional lung radiography or any other 2D imaging modality. By computing these images at different time points within a breathing cycle, dynamic functional imaging can be potentially achieved without the need for tomography.

  5. Pneumonia carcinomatosa from small cell undifferentiated carcinoma of the lung presenting as reverse radiation pneumonitis

    SciTech Connect

    Adelstein, D.J.; Padhya, T.; Tomashefski, J.F. Jr.; Park, C.

    1988-01-01

    We describe a patient with recurrent small cell undifferentiated lung carcinoma after chemotherapy and mediastinal radiation therapy who presented with peripheral pulmonary infiltrates on chest radiograph. At autopsy the patient was found to have carcinomatous pneumonia confined to the radiographically abnormal lung. The descriptive term reverse radiation pneumonitis is applied in view of the striking nonsegmental distribution of these pulmonary infiltrates, which occurred only outside the irradiated field. In this patient, radiation therapy successfully controlled disease in the treated lung parenchyma, thus accounting for this unusual radiologic and histologic picture. Pneumonia carcinomatosa, occurring after lung irradiation, can therefore be added to the differential diagnosis of radiographic peripheral pulmonary infiltrates.

  6. A comparison of conventional surfactant treatment and partial liquid ventilation on the lung volume of injured ventilated small lungs.

    PubMed

    Proquitté, Hans; Hartenstein, Sebastian; Koelsch, Uwe; Wauer, Roland R; Rüdiger, Mario; Schmalisch, Gerd

    2013-08-01

    As an alternative to surfactant therapy (ST), partial liquid ventilation (PLV) with perfluorocarbons (PFC) has been considered as a treatment for acute lung injury (ALI) in newborns. The instilled PFC is much heavier than the instilled surfactant and the aim of this study was to investigate whether PLV, compared to ST, increases the end-expiratory volume of the lung (VL). Fifteen newborn piglets (age <12 h, mean weight 678 g) underwent saline lung lavage to achieve a surfactant depletion. Thereafter animals were randomized to PLV (n = 8), receiving PFC PF5080 (3M, Germany) at 30 mL kg(-1), and ST (n = 7) receiving 120 mg Curosurf®. Blood gases, hemodynamics and static compliance were measured initially (baseline), immediately after ALI, and after 240 min mechanical ventilation with either technique. Subsequently all piglets were killed; the lungs were removed in toto and frozen in liquid N2. After freeze-drying the lungs were cut into lung cubes (LCs) with edge lengths of 0.7 cm, to calculate VL. All LCs were weighed and the density of the dried lung tissue was calculated. No statistically significant differences between treatment groups PLV and ST (means ± SD) were noted in body weight (676 ± 16 g versus 679 ± 17 g; P = 0.974) or lung dry weight (1.64 ± 0.29 g versus 1.79 ± 0.48 g; P = 0.48). Oxygenation index and ventilatory efficacy index did not differ significantly between both groups at any time. VL (34.28 ± 6.13 mL versus 26.22 ± 8.1 mL; P < 0.05) and the density of the dried lung tissue (48.07 ± 5.02 mg mL(-1) versus 69.07 ± 5.30 mg mL(-1); P < 0.001), however, differed significantly between the PLV and ST groups. A 4 h PLV treatment of injured ventilated small lungs increased VL by 30% and decreased lung density by 31% compared to ST treatment, indicating greater lung distension after PLV compared to ST. PMID:23893018

  7. Role of small colony variants in persistence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in cystic fibrosis lungs

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Jacob G

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that predominates during the later stages of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung infections. Over many years of chronic lung colonization, P. aeruginosa undergoes extensive adaptation to the lung environment, evolving both toward a persistent, low virulence state and simultaneously diversifying to produce a number of phenotypically distinct morphs. These lung-adapted P. aeruginosa strains include the small colony variants (SCVs), small, autoaggregative isolates that show enhanced biofilm formation, strong attachment to surfaces, and increased production of exopolysaccharides. Their appearance in the sputum of CF patients correlates with increased resistance to antibiotics, poor lung function, and prolonged persistence of infection, increasing their relevance as a subject for clinical investigation. The evolution of SCVs in the CF lung is associated with overproduction of the ubiquitous bacterial signaling molecule cyclic-di-GMP, with increased cyclic-di-GMP levels shown to be responsible for the SCV phenotype in a number of different CF lung isolates. Here, we review the current state of research in clinical P. aeruginosa SCVs. We will discuss the phenotypic characteristics underpinning the SCV morphotype, the clinical implications of lung colonization with SCVs, and the molecular basis and clinical evolution of the SCV phenotype in the CF lung environment. PMID:26251621

  8. Immunotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer: current concepts and clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Mayor, Marissa; Yang, Neng; Sterman, Daniel; Jones, David R; Adusumilli, Prasad S

    2016-05-01

    Recent successes in immunotherapeutic strategies are being investigated to combat cancers that have less than ideal responses to standard of care treatment, such as non-small-cell lung cancer. In this paper, we summarize concepts and the current status of immunotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer, including salient features of the major categories of immunotherapy-monoclonal antibody therapy, immune checkpoint blockade, immunotoxins, anticancer vaccines, and adoptive cell therapy. PMID:26516195

  9. Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Current Clinical Evidence and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Abigail T.; St. James, Sara; Rengan, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cancer cause of death in the United States. Radiotherapy is an essential component of the definitive treatment of early-stage and locally-advanced lung cancer, and the palliative treatment of metastatic lung cancer. Proton beam therapy (PBT), through its characteristic Bragg peak, has the potential to decrease the toxicity of radiotherapy, and, subsequently improve the therapeutic ratio. Herein, we provide a primer on the physics of proton beam therapy for lung cancer, present the existing data in early-stage and locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as well as in special situations such as re-irradiation and post-operative radiation therapy. We then present the technical challenges, such as anatomic changes and motion management, and future directions for PBT in lung cancer, including pencil beam scanning. PMID:26147335

  10. Vaccine therapy in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Albright, Carol; Garst, Jennifer

    2007-07-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death from cancer worldwide. First-line therapy is based on stage at diagnosis and can include chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery. Despite advances, the prognosis for advanced-stage lung cancer is very poor. Vaccines with the capability to activate the host immune system may have a role in second-line therapy. Advances in the understanding of cellular and molecular immunology are forming the basis for improving vaccine therapy. Most trials to date have demonstrated safety but inconsistent efficacy. Further research is needed to enhance this potential. PMID:17588347

  11. The First Case of Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis With Small Cell Lung Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hiraki, Tsubasa; Goto, Yuko; Kitazono, Ikumi; Tasaki, Takashi; Higashi, Michiyo; Hatanaka, Kazuhito; Tanimoto, Akihide

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare pulmonary disease characterized by alveolar accumulation of surfactant lipids and proteins. It is usually autoimmune and secondary to hematologic malignancy or infection. To date, only 5 case reports of PAP associated with lung cancers, including 2 cases of squamous cell carcinoma and 3 cases of adenocarcinoma, have been published. To the best of our knowledge, no case of PAP with small cell lung carcinoma has been reported thus far. We herein report the first case of PAP associated with small cell lung carcinoma. PMID:26519525

  12. Viremia and antibody response of small African and laboratory animals to Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus infection.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, A J; Leman, P A; Swanepoel, R

    1989-05-01

    Eleven species of small African wild mammals, laboratory rabbits, guinea pigs, and Syrian hamsters were infected with Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) virus. Low-titered viremia followed by development of antibody was observed in scrub hares (Lepus saxatilis), Cape ground squirrels (Xerus inauris), red veld rats (Aethomys chrysophilus), white tailed rats (Mystromys albicaudatus), bushveld gerbils (Tatera leucogaster), striped mice (Rhabdomys pumilio), and guinea pigs. The maximum viremic titer in 4 scrub hares was 10(1.7-4.2) 50% mouse lethal doses/ml. Viremia was detected in 1/17 infected laboratory rabbits. Antibody response was only detected in South African hedgehogs (Atelerix frontalis), highveld gerbils (T. brantsii), Namaqua gerbils (Desmodillus auricularis), 2 species of multimammate mouse (Mastomys natalensis and M. coucha), and Syrian hamsters. The results of the study indicate that a proportion of infected scrub hares develop CCHF viremia of an intensity shown in the Soviet Union to be sufficient for infection of feeding immature ixodid ticks, but that South African hedgehogs and wild rodents are unlikely to be of importance as maintenance hosts of the virus in southern Africa. PMID:2499205

  13. Seroprevalence of Q Fever (Coxiellosis) in Small Ruminants of Two Districts in Punjab, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Zahid, Muhammad Usman; Hussain, Muhammad Hammad; Saqib, Muhammad; Neubauer, Heinrich; Abbas, Ghazanfar; Khan, Iahtasham; Mansoor, Muhammad Khalid; Asi, Muhammad Nadeem; Ahmad, Tanveer; Muhammad, Ghulam

    2016-07-01

    Coxiellosis caused by Coxiella burnetii is a cosmopolitan zoonosis, which causes significant losses through abortions and stillbirths in small ruminants. A cross-sectional seroprevalence study was conducted in two major sheep and goat farming districts of Punjab (Layyah and Muzaffargarh), Pakistan. In total, 542 small ruminants (271 sheep and goats each) of both sexes (60 males and 482 females) of different age groups from 104 flocks (52 flocks of either species) were randomly selected for the collection of sera and related epidemiological information. The sampling plan was devised at the expected prevalence of 50%, confidence interval (CI) of 95%, and error margin of 5%. A commercial indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (iELISA; ID Vet) was used to test the samples for the presence of both phase I and II antibodies. A high herd level prevalence (73.1%, 95% CI 63.5-81.3) was recorded in the studied districts. Individual level seroprevalence was recorded as 30.8% (95% CI 26.9-34.9). Higher value was recorded in females (32%) when compared with males (21.7%). Higher prevalence (34.8%, 95% CI 21.4-50.2) was observed in animals of 1 year (nulliparous) than to primiparous (24.8%, 95% CI 17.4-33.5) and multiparous (32.3%, 95% CI 27.6-37.3) animals. Univariable analysis indicated that caprine species (odds ratio [OR] 1.96, p = 0.22), females (OR = 1.70, p = 0.104), infestation with ticks (OR = 234.39, p < 0.001), abortion history (OR 1.96, p = 0.14), retention of fetal membranes (OR 1.50, p = 0.35), keeping a single breed in a herd (OR 1.50, p = 0.56), and mixed feeding management (OR 1.37, p = 0.33) were the variables found associated with high prevalence of antibodies to C. burnetii. The study indicates that seroprevalence of coxiellosis was high in the studied small ruminant population and further studies are required to discern its epidemiology more precisely. PMID:27172109

  14. Radiation-induced lung fibrosis after treatment of small cell carcinoma of the lung with very high-dose cyclophosphamide

    SciTech Connect

    Trask, C.W.; Joannides, T.; Harper, P.G.; Tobias, J.S.; Spiro, S.G.; Geddes, D.M.; Souhami, R.L.; Beverly, P.C.

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-five previously untreated patients with small cell carcinoma of the lung were treated with cyclophosphamide 160 to 200 mg/kg (with autologous bone marrow support) followed by radiotherapy (4000 cGy) to the primary site and mediastinum. No other treatment was given until relapse occurred. Nineteen patients were assessable at least 4 months after radiotherapy; of these, 15 (79%) developed radiologic evidence of fibrosis, which was symptomatic in 14 (74%). The time of onset of fibrosis was related to the volume of lung irradiated. A retrospective analysis was made of 20 consecutive patients treated with multiple-drug chemotherapy and an identical radiotherapy regimen as part of a randomized trial. Radiologic and symptomatic fibrosis was one half as frequent (35%) as in the high-dose cyclophosphamide group. Very high-dose cyclophosphamide appears to sensitize the lung to radiotherapy and promotes the production of fibrosis.

  15. Analysis of small nucleolar RNAs in sputum for lung cancer diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Guarnera, Maria A.; Zhan, Min; Fang, HongBin; Stass, Sanford A.; Jiang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Molecular analysis of sputum presents a noninvasive approach for diagnosis of lung cancer. We have shown that dysregulation of small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) plays a vital role in lung tumorigenesis. We have also identified six snoRNAs whose changes are associated with lung cancer. Here we investigated if analysis of the snoRNAs in sputum could provide a potential tool for diagnosis of lung cancer. Using qRT-PCR, we determined expressions of the six snoRNAs in sputum of a training set of 59 lung cancer patients and 61 cancer-free smokers to develop a biomarker panel, which was validated in a testing set of 67 lung cancer patients and 69 cancer-free smokers for the diagnostic performance. The snoRNAs were robustly measurable in sputum. In the training set, a panel of two snoRNA biomarkers (snoRD66 and snoRD78) was developed, producing 74.58% sensitivity and 83.61% specificity for identifying lung cancer. The snoRNA biomarkers had a significantly higher sensitivity (74.58%) compared with sputum cytology (45.76%) (P < 0.05). The changes of the snoRNAs were not associated with stage and histology of lung cancer (All P >0.05). The performance of the biomarker panel was confirmed in the testing cohort. We report for the first time that sputum snoRNA biomarkers might be useful to improve diagnosis of lung cancer. PMID:26246471

  16. Intracardiac Metastasis From Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Vivek; Talmon, Geoffrey A.; Zhen, Weining K.

    2015-01-01

    A 56-year-old female with history of stage IIA adenosquamous lung carcinoma treated 13 months prior to presentation with lobectomy, mediastinal lymph node dissection, and adjuvant chemotherapy, presented for several weeks of worsening dyspnea. Exam was non-focal aside from tachycardia. Computed tomography of the chest revealed a large 4 cm × 5 cm mass in the bilateral ventricular myocardium. There was also evidence of metastatic disease elsewhere in the body, including a supraclavicular lymph node that was positive for metastatic adenosquamous lung carcinoma. She started whole heart radiotherapy and was to commence chemotherapy but passed away. This report discusses important aspects of diagnosis of this not uncommon condition that many oncologists may come across. We also discuss differential diagnosis of an isolated intracardiac mass as first-diagnosis presentations, and discuss the great importance of multidisciplinary cardio-oncologic management and clinical prioritization. PMID:26258073

  17. Small RNA deep sequencing identifies viral microRNAs during malignant catarrhal fever induced by alcelaphine herpesvirus 1.

    PubMed

    Sorel, Océane; Tuddenham, Lee; Myster, Françoise; Palmeira, Leonor; Kerkhofs, Pierre; Pfeffer, Sébastien; Vanderplasschen, Alain; Dewals, Benjamin G

    2015-11-01

    Alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1) is a c-herpesvirus (c-HV) carried asymptomatically by wildebeest. Upon cross-species transmission, AlHV-1 induces a fatal lymphoproliferative disease named malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) in many ruminants, including cattle, and the rabbit model. Latency has been shown to be essential for MCF induction. However, the mechanisms causing the activation and proliferation of infected CD8+T cells are unknown. Many c-HVs express microRNAs (miRNAs). These small non-coding RNAs can regulate expression of host or viral target genes involved in various pathways and are thought to facilitate viral infection and/or mediate activation and proliferation of infected lymphocytes. The AlHV-1 genome has been predicted to encode a large number of miRNAs. However, their precise contribution in viral infection and pathogenesis in vivo remains unknown. Here, using cloning and sequencing of small RNAs we identified 36 potential miRNAs expressed in a lymphoblastoid cell line propagated from a calf infected with AlHV-1 and developing MCF. Among the sequenced candidate miRNAs, 32 were expressed on the reverse strand of the genome in two main clusters. The expression of these 32 viral miRNAs was further validated using Northern blot and quantitative reverse transcription PCR in lymphoid organs of MCF developing calves or rabbits. To determine the concerted contribution in MCF of 28 viralmiRNAs clustered in the non-protein-coding region of the AlHV-1 genome, a recombinant virus was produced. The absence of these 28 miRNAs did not affect viral growth in vitro or MCF induction in rabbits, indicating that the AlHV-1 miRNAs clustered in this non-protein-coding genomic region are dispensable for MCF induction. PMID:26329753

  18. Identification of potential erythrocyte phospholipid fatty acid biomarkers of advanced lung adenocarcinoma, squamous cell lung carcinoma, and small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Rodríguez, Patricia; Rodríguez, Marina C; Sánchez-Yagüe, Jesús

    2015-07-01

    New biomarkers for lung cancer would be valuable. Our aim was to analyze the fatty acid profiles of the main phospholipid species in erythrocytes from patients with advanced squamous cell lung carcinoma (SCC), lung adenocarcinoma (ADC), and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and benign lung diseases (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma) to determine the fatty acids that could be use as lung cancer markers. Twenty-eight, 18, 14, 16, and 15 patients with, respectively, SCC, ADC, SCLC, asthma, and COPD and 50 healthy subjects were enrolled in the study. Fatty acid profiles were investigated using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry followed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. The fatty acid profiles changed significantly in the different pathologies analyzed. Based on the diagnostic yields and operating characteristics, the most significant fatty acids that might be used as biomarkers were as follows: ADC--arachidonic acid (20:4n6) in phosphatidylcholine and oleic acid (18:1n9) in phosphatidylethanolamine (PE); SCC--eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n3) in PE and palmitic acid (16:0) in phosphatidylserine + phosphatidylinositol (PS+PI); SCLC--eicosadienoic acid (20:2n6) in PS+PI and lignoceric acid (24:0) in sphingomyelin. In conclusion, fatty acids from erythrocyte phospholipid species might serve as biomarkers in the diagnosis, and probably in other aspects related to clinical disease management, of ADC, SCC, and SCLC. PMID:25702090

  19. Non-small cell lung cancer: current treatment and future advances

    PubMed Central

    Zappa, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer has a poor prognosis; over half of people diagnosed with lung cancer die within one year of diagnosis and the 5-year survival is less than 18%. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for the majority of all lung cancer cases. Risk factors for developing NSCLC have been identified, with cigarette smoking being a major factor along with other environmental and genetic risk factors. Depending on the staging of lung cancer, patients are eligible for certain treatments ranging from surgery to radiation to chemotherapy as well as targeted therapy. With the advancement of genetics and biomarkers testing, specific mutations have been identified to better target treatment for individual patients. This review discusses current treatments including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and immunotherapy as well as how biomarker testing has helped improve survival in patients with NSCLC. PMID:27413711

  20. Targeted therapies and immunotherapy in non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cortinovis, D; Abbate, M; Bidoli, P; Capici, S; Canova, S

    2016-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer is still considered a difficult disease to manage because of its aggressiveness and resistance to common therapies. Chemotherapy remains the gold standard in nearly 80% of lung cancers, but clinical outcomes are discouraging, and the impact on median overall survival (OS) barely reaches 12 months. At the end of the last century, the discovery of oncogene-driven tumours completely changed the therapeutic landscape in lung cancers, harbouring specific gene mutations/translocations. Epidermal growth factors receptor (EGFR) common mutations first and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) translocations later led new insights in lung cancer biology knowledge. The use of specific tyrosine kinases inhibitors overturned the biological behaviour of EGFR mutation positive tumours and became a preclinical model to understand the heterogeneity of lung cancers and the mechanisms of drug resistance. In this review, we summarise the employment of targeted agents against the most representative biomolecular alterations and provide some criticisms of the therapeutic strategies. PMID:27433281

  1. CXCR4/CXCL12 in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Metastasis to the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Cavallaro, Sebastiano

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer represents the leading cause of cancer-related mortality throughout the world. Patients die of local progression, disseminated disease, or both. At least one third of the people with lung cancer develop brain metastases at some point during their disease, even often before the diagnosis of lung cancer is made. The high rate of brain metastasis makes lung cancer the most common type of tumor to spread to the brain. It is critical to understand the biologic basis of brain metastases to develop novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. This review will focus on the emerging data supporting the involvement of the chemokine CXCL12 and its receptor CXCR4 in the brain metastatic evolution of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and the pharmacological tools that may be used to interfere with this signaling axis. PMID:23322021

  2. Valley Fever

    MedlinePlus

    Valley Fever is a disease caused by a fungus (or mold) called Coccidioides. The fungi live in the soil ... from person to person. Anyone can get Valley Fever. But it's most common among older adults, especially ...

  3. Rheumatic fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... an ASO test) Complete blood count (CBC) Electrocardiogram (EKG) Sedimentation rate (ESR -- a test that measures inflammation ... criteria include: Fever High ESR Joint pain Abnormal EKG You'll likely be diagnosed with rheumatic fever ...

  4. Dengue Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Button Leading research to understand, treat, and prevent infectious, immunologic, and allergic diseases NIAID Home Health & ... NIAID News & Events Volunteer NIAID > Health & Research Topics > Dengue Fever > Understanding Dengue Fever Understanding Cause Transmission Symptoms ...

  5. Hemorrhagic Fevers

    MedlinePlus

    ... by four families of viruses. These include the Ebola and Marburg, Lassa fever, and yellow fever viruses. ... Some VHFs cause mild disease, but some, like Ebola or Marburg, cause severe disease and death. VHFs ...

  6. GTI-2040 and Docetaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent, Metastatic, or Unresectable Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Prostate Cancer, or Other Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  7. Small cell lung cancer with metastasis to the thyroid in a patient with toxic multinodular goiter.

    PubMed

    Ozgu, Eylem Sercan; Gen, Ramazan; Ilvan, Ahmet; Ozge, Cengiz; Polat, Ayşe; Vayisoglu, Yusuf

    2012-11-01

    Thyroid metastasis of lung cancer is rarely observed in clinical practice. The primary cancers which metastasize to the thyroid gland are mostly renal cell carcinoma, lung cancer, and breast cancer. Transient destructive thyrotoxicosis is caused by massive metastasis of extrathyroid tumors. We herein present a case report of a patient with small cell carcinoma of lung with metastasis to the thyroid and thyrotoxicosis due to toxic multinodular goiter. A 66-year-old man complained of swelling around the right side of the neck, dyspnea, progressive weight loss, and palpitation starting since 3 months before his admission. The patient was diagnosed with small cell carcinoma of lung with metastasis to the thyroid and thyrotoxicosis due to toxic multinodular goiter. The case report presented here illustrates the challenge of making a definitive and adequate diagnosis, particularly if the patient presents with 2 potential causes of thyrotoxicosis. Thyroid scintigraphy is an important tool for differential diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis. PMID:23172496

  8. AKAP4 is a circulating biomarker for non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gumireddy, Kiranmai; Li, Anping; Chang, David H.; Liu, Qin; Kossenkov, Andrew V.; Yan, Jinchun; Korst, Robert J.; Nam, Brian T.; Xu, Hua; Zhang, Lin; Ganepola, Ganepola A.P.; Showe, Louise C.; Huang, Qihong

    2015-01-01

    Cancer testis antigens (CTAs) are widely expressed in tumor tissues, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and in cancer derived exosomes that are frequently engulfed by lymphoid cells. To determine whether tumor derived CTA mRNAs could be detected in RNA from purified peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, we assayed for the expression of 116 CTAs in PBMC RNA in a discovery set and identified AKAP4 as a potential NSCLC biomarker. We validated AKAP4 as a highly accurate biomarker in a cohort of 264 NSCLCs and 135 controls from 2 different sites including a subset of controls with high risk lung nodules. When all (264) lung cancers were compared with all (135) controls the area under the ROC curve (AUC) was 0.9714. When 136 stage I NSCLC lung cancers are compared with all controls the AUC is 0.9795 and when all lung cancer patients were compared to 27 controls with histologically confirmed benign lung nodules, a comparison of significant clinical importance, the AUC was 0.9825. AKAP4 expression increases significantly with tumor stage, but independent of age, gender, smoking history or cancer subtype. Follow-up studies in a small number of resected NSCLC patients revealed a decrease of AKAP4 expression post-surgical resection that remained low in patients in remission and increased with tumor recurrence. AKAP4 is a highly accurate biomarker for the detection of early stage lung cancer. PMID:26160834

  9. [Advances in Bevacizumab Therapy for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer 
with Brain Metastases].

    PubMed

    Qu, Liyan; Geng, Rui; Song, Xia

    2016-08-20

    Brain metastases are frequently encountered in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Antiangiogenesis therapy plays a major role in the management of brain metastases in lung cancer. Bevacizumab have become the novel method for the treatment of lung cancer with brain metastases beyond the whole brain radiation therapy, stereotactic radiosurgery and chemotherapy. Recently, more and more studies and trials laid emphasis on the bevacizumab for NSCLC with brain metastases treatment. The key point is the efficacy and safety. In this review, bevacizumab therapy of NSCLC with brain metastases were summarized. PMID:27561800

  10. A case of small intestinal hemorrhage secondary to metastatic lung cancer in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Bangchao; Wang, Chun; Cao, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal metastasis from primary lung cancer is rare. In the present study, we report the case of a 78-year-old male who was admitted to the emergency department with acute bleeding of the digestive tract. During evaluation, he was found to have lung adenocarcinoma metastasis in the small bowel leading to hemorrhage. A jejunum wedge resection was carried out and bleeding was controlled. However, 2 months after the operation, the patient died from severe pulmonary infection. We also review the published literature of primary lung cancer with gastrointestinal metastasis. PMID:25941442

  11. Q fever.

    PubMed

    Tissot-Dupont, Hervé; Raoult, Didier

    2008-09-01

    Q fever is a worldwide zoonosis caused by the pathogen Coxiella burnetii causing acute and chronic clinical manifestations. The name "Q fever" derives from "Query fever" and was given in 1935 following an outbreak of febrile illness in an abattoir in Queensland, Australia. C burnetii is considered a potential agent of bioterrorism (class B by the Centers for Disease Control). PMID:18755387

  12. Epidermal growth factor receptor in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Following the identification of a group of patients in the initial tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) trials for lung cancer, there has been detailed focus on which patients may benefit from inhibitor therapy. This article reviews the background, genetics and prevalence of epidermal growth factor mutations in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Additionally, the prevalence in unselected patients is compared against various other reviews. PMID:25870793

  13. Thermal ablation of stage I non-small cell lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ridge, Carol A; Solomon, Stephen B; Thornton, Raymond H

    2014-06-01

    Ablation options for the treatment of localized non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) include radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, and cryotherapy. Irreversible electroporation is a novel ablation method with the potential of application to lung tumors in risky locations. This review article describes the established and novel ablation techniques used in the treatment of localized NSCLC, including mechanism of action, indications, potential complications, clinical outcomes, postablation surveillance, and use in combination with other therapies. PMID:25053863

  14. CD133 is a temporary marker of cancer stem cells in small cell lung cancer, but not in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Cui, Fei; Wang, Jian; Chen, Duan; Chen, Yi-Jiang

    2011-03-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Current investigations in the field of cancer research have intensively focused on the 'cancer stem cell' or 'tumor-initiating cell'. While CD133 was initially considered as a stem cell marker only in the hematopoietic system and the nervous system, the membrane antigen also identifies tumorigenic cells in certain solid tumors. In this study, we investigated the human lung cancer cell lines A549, H157, H226, Calu-1, H292 and H446. The results of real-time PCR analysis after chemotherapy drug selection and the fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis showed that CD133 only functioned as a marker in the small cell lung cancer line H446. The sorted CD133+ subset presented stem cell-like features, including self-renewal, differentiation, proliferation and tumorigenic capacity in subsequent assays. Furthermore, a proportion of the CD133+ cells had a tendency to remain stable, which may explain the controversies arising from previous studies. Therefore, the CD133+ subset should provide an enriched source of tumor-initiating cells among H446 cells. Moreover, the antigen could be used as an investigative marker of the tumorigenic process and an effective treatment for small cell lung cancer. PMID:21174061

  15. Lung Radiofrequency Ablation for the Treatment of Unresectable Recurrent Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer After Surgical Intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Kodama, Hiroshi Yamakado, Koichiro; Takaki, Haruyuki; Kashima, Masataka; Uraki, Junji; Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro; Takao, Motoshi; Taguchi, Osamu; Yamada, Tomomi; Takeda, Kan

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: A retrospective evaluation was done of clinical utility of lung radiofrequency (RF) ablation in recurrent non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) after surgical intervention. Methods: During May 2003 to October 2010, 44 consecutive patients (26 male and 18 female) received curative lung RF ablation for 51 recurrent NSCLC (mean diameter 1.7 {+-} 0.9 cm, range 0.6 to 4.0) after surgical intervention. Safety, tumor progression rate, overall survival, and recurrence-free survival were evaluated. Prognostic factors were evaluated in multivariate analysis. Results: A total of 55 lung RF sessions were performed. Pneumothorax requiring pluerosclerosis (n = 2) and surgical suture (n = 1) were the only grade 3 or 4 adverse events (5.5%, 3 of 55). During mean follow-up of 28.6 {+-} 20.3 months (range 1 to 98), local tumor progression was found in 5 patients (11.4%, 5 of 44). The 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rates were 97.7, 72.9, and 55.7%, respectively. The 1- and 3-year recurrence-free survival rates were 76.7 and 41.1%, respectively. Tumor size and sex were independent significant prognostic factors in multivariate analysis. The 5-year survival rates were 73.3% in 18 women and 60.5% in 38 patients who had small tumors measuring {<=}3 cm. Conclusion: Our results suggest that lung RF ablation is a safe and useful therapeutic option for obtaining long-term survival in treated patients.

  16. Lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Aisner, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Pathology of Lung Cancer; Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Cancer of the Lung; Chemotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; Immunotherapy in the Management of Lung Cancer; Preoperative Staging and Surgery for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; and Prognostic Factors in Lung Cancer.

  17. Effective avoidance of a functional spect-perfused lung using intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): an update of a planning study.

    PubMed

    Lavrenkov, Konstantin; Singh, Shalini; Christian, Judith A; Partridge, Mike; Nioutsikou, Elena; Cook, Gary; Bedford, James L; Brada, Michael

    2009-06-01

    IMRT and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3-DCRT) plans of 25 patients with non-small cell lung (NSCLC) were compared in terms of planning target volume (PTV) coverage and sparing of functional lung (FL) defined by a SPECT perfusion scan. IMRT resulted in significant reduction of functional V(20) and mean lung dose in stage III patients with inhomogeneous hypoperfusion. If the dose to FL is shown to be the determinant of lung toxicity, IMRT would allow for effective dose escalation by specific avoidance of functional lung. PMID:18995919

  18. Bevacizumab‐induced chronic interstitial pneumonia during maintenance therapy in non‐small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sekimoto, Yasuhito; Shukuya, Takehiko; Koyama, Ryo; Nagaoka, Tetsutaro; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bevacizumab is a monoclonal antibody targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and a key drug for advanced non‐small cell lung cancer. There are few reports describing bevacizumab‐induced chronic interstitial pneumonia. A 62‐year‐old man with advanced non‐small cell lung cancer was admitted to our hospital with dyspnea. He previously received four courses of carboplatin plus paclitaxel with bevacizumab combination therapy and thereafter received four courses of maintenance bevacizumab monotherapy. A chest‐computed tomography scan on admission revealed diffuse ground glass opacity. He had not received any other drugs and did not have pneumonia. Thus, he was diagnosed with bevacizumab‐induced chronic interstitial pneumonia and was treated with a high dose of corticosteroids. After steroid treatment, his dyspnea and radiological findings improved. This case report is the first description of bevacizumab‐induced chronic interstitial pneumonia during maintenance therapy in a patient with non‐small cell lung cancer. PMID:27081491

  19. Pleural Small Cell Lung Carcinoma: An Unusual Culprit in Pleural Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Adejorin, Oluwaseyi D.; Sodhi, Amik; Hare, Felicia A.; Headley, Arthur S.; Murillo, Luis C.; Kadaria, Dipen

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 77 Final Diagnosis: Pleural small cell carcinoma Symptoms: Chest pain • shortness of breath Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Thoracocentesis Specialty: Pulmonology Objective: Rare disease Background: Small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) usually presents as lung or mediastinal lesions. It is very rare for SCLC to present primarily as an isolated pleural effusion with no lung or mediastinal lesions. Case Report: We report the case of a 77-year-old white male with a 60-pack year history of smoking, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (stage IV), and asbestos exposure who presented with shortness of breath and left lateral chest pain for 7 days. On physical examination, he was very short of breath, with a prolonged expiratory phase on chest auscultation. Laboratory results were normal except for leukocytosis and chest radiograph revealing left-sided pleural effusion. Computerized tomography (CT) scanning of the chest with IV contrast showed left-sided pleural effusion without any lung or mediastinal lesions. Thoracentesis was performed and fluid was sent for analysis. Repeat CT chest/abdomen/pelvis, done immediately following thoracocentesis, did not show any masses or lymphadenopathy. Fluid analysis, including cytology and immunostain pattern, was consistent with small cell carcinoma. Conclusions: Small cell lung cancer presenting as an isolated pleural effusion is extremely rare. It requires close attention to cytology and immunohistochemistry of pleural fluid samples. It also has implications for management and should be managed as limited-stage SCLC. PMID:26714576

  20. Is fever beneficial?

    PubMed Central

    Kluger, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    Fever, the regulation of body temperature at an elevated level, is a common response to infection throughout the vertebrates, as well as in many species of invertebrate animals. It is probable that fever evolved as an adaptive response to infection hundreds of millions of years ago. Many components of the nonspecific and specific host response to infection are enhanced by small elevations in temperature. Perhaps more important, studies of bacterial- and viral-infected animals have shown that, in general, moderate fevers decrease morbidity and increase survival rate. PMID:3488621

  1. APPROACHES TO LUNG FUNCTION ASSESSMENT IN SMALL MAMMALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The review chapter of pulmonary function assessment in small mammals first discusses basic principles and methods such as assessment of various pressures, volumes and flows. The three types of plethysmographs (pressure, flow and barometric) used by animal physiologists are evalua...

  2. Left behind? Drug discovery in extensive-stage small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Riess, Jonathan W; Lara, Primo N

    2014-03-01

    Systemic therapy and subsequent survival for patients with extensive-stage small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) are poor and have remained unchanged in the past quarter century. To improve outcomes in these patients, a new drug development paradigm must be adopted that moves away from empiricism and instead focuses on tumor biology and heterogeneity as a means to increase target and drug class diversity. By incorporating tools that have led to new diagnostic and treatment options in non-small-cell lung cancer, there could be hope yet for the future of SCLC therapeutics. PMID:24529447

  3. Normal adrenal glands in small cell lung carcinoma: CT-guided biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    Pagani, J.J.

    1983-05-01

    Twenty-four small cell lung carcinoma patients with morphologically normal adrenal glands by computed tomographic (CT) criteria underwent percutaneous thin-needle biopsy of their adrenal glands. Of 43 glands biopsied, 29 had adequate cellular material for interpretation. Five (17%) of the 29 glands were positive for metastases; the rest had negative biopsies. This series indicates an approximate 17% false-negative diagnosis rate by CT when staging the adrenal glands in patients with small cell lung carcinoma. It also demonstrates the utility of percutaneous needle biopsy as an investigational tool to further evaluate normal-sized adrenal glands in the oncologic patient.

  4. 76 FR 35450 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Clinical Trial Endpoints for the Approval of Non-Small Cell Lung...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-17

    .... This guidance does not address endpoints for drugs to prevent or decrease the incidence of lung cancer... the Approval of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Drugs and Biologics; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug... Cell Lung Cancer Drugs and Biologics.'' This draft guidance provides recommendations to applicants...

  5. Radiofrequency ablation in primary non-small cell lung cancer: What a radiologist needs to know

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Shivank; Pereira, Keith; Mohan, Prasoon; Narayanan, Govindarajan; Wangpaichitr, Medhi; Savaraj, Niramol

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer continues to be one of the leading causes of death worldwide. In advanced cases of lung cancer, a multimodality approach is often applied, however with poor local control rates. In early non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), surgery is the standard of care. Only 15-30% of patients are eligible for surgical resection. Improvements in imaging and treatment delivery systems have provided new tools to better target these tumors. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has evolved as the next best option. The role of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is also growing. Currently, it is a third-line option in stage 1 NSCLC, when SBRT cannot be performed. More recent studies have demonstrated usefulness in recurrent tumors and some authors have also suggested combination of RFA with other modalities in larger tumors. Following the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), screening by low-dose computed tomography (CT) has demonstrated high rates of early-stage lung cancer detection in high-risk populations. Hence, even considering the current role of RFA as a third-line option, in view of increasing numbers of occurrences detected, the number of potential RFA candidates may see a steep uptrend. In view of all this, it is imperative that interventional radiologists be familiar with the techniques of lung ablation. The aim of this article is to discuss the procedural technique of RFA in the lung and review the current evidence regarding RFA for NSCLC. PMID:27081229

  6. Targeting Aromatase and Estrogen Signaling in Human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Márquez-Garbán, Diana C.; Chen, Hsiao-Wang; Goodglick, Lee; Fishbein, Michael C.; Pietras, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Lung cancer has become increasingly common in women, and gender differences in the physiology and pathogenesis of the disease have suggested a role for estrogens. In the lung recent data have shown local production of estrogens from androgens via the action of aromatase enzyme and higher levels of estrogen in tumor tissue as compared with surrounding normal lung tissue. High levels of aromatase expression are also maintained in metastases as compared with primary tumors. Consistent with these findings, clinical studies suggest that aromatase expression may be a useful predictive biomarker for prognosis in the management of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the most common form of lung malignancy. Low levels of aromatase associate with a higher probability of long-term survival in older women with early stage NSCLC. Treatment of lung NSCLC xenografts in vivo with an aromatase inhibitor (exemestane) alone or combined with standard cisplatin chemotherapy elicits a significant reduction in tumor progression as compared to paired controls. Further, lung cancer progression is also governed by complex interactions between estrogen and growth factor signaling pathways to stimulate the growth of NSCLC as well as tumor-associated angiogenesis. We find that combination therapy with the multitargeted growth factor receptor inhibitor vandetanib and the estrogen receptor antagonist fulvestrant inhibit tumor growth more effectively than either treatment administered alone. Thus, incorporation of antiestrogen treatment strategies in standard antitumor therapies for NSCLC may contribute to improved patient outcome, an approach that deserves to be tested in clinical trials. PMID:19250205

  7. Identification of somatic mutations in non-small cell lung carcinomas using whole-exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengyuan; Morrison, Carl; Wang, Liang; Xiong, Donghai; Vedell, Peter; Cui, Peng; Hua, Xing; Ding, Feng; Lu, Yan; James, Michael; Ebben, John D; Xu, Haiming; Adjei, Alex A; Head, Karen; Andrae, Jaime W; Tschannen, Michael R; Jacob, Howard; Pan, Jing; Zhang, Qi; Van den Bergh, Francoise; Xiao, Haijie; Lo, Ken C; Patel, Jigar; Richmond, Todd; Watt, Mary-Anne; Albert, Thomas; Selzer, Rebecca; Anderson, Marshall; Wang, Jiang; Wang, Yian; Starnes, Sandra; Yang, Ping; You, Ming

    2012-07-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death, with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) being the predominant form of the disease. Most lung cancer is caused by the accumulation of genomic alterations due to tobacco exposure. To uncover its mutational landscape, we performed whole-exome sequencing in 31 NSCLCs and their matched normal tissue samples. We identified both common and unique mutation spectra and pathway activation in lung adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas, two major histologies in NSCLC. In addition to identifying previously known lung cancer genes (TP53, KRAS, EGFR, CDKN2A and RB1), the analysis revealed many genes not previously implicated in this malignancy. Notably, a novel gene CSMD3 was identified as the second most frequently mutated gene (next to TP53) in lung cancer. We further demonstrated that loss of CSMD3 results in increased proliferation of airway epithelial cells. The study provides unprecedented insights into mutational processes, cellular pathways and gene networks associated with lung cancer. Of potential immediate clinical relevance, several highly mutated genes identified in our study are promising druggable targets in cancer therapy including ALK, CTNNA3, DCC, MLL3, PCDHIIX, PIK3C2B, PIK3CG and ROCK2. PMID:22510280

  8. Small Molecular TRAIL Inducer ONC201 Induces Death in Lung Cancer Cells: A Preclinical Study.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yuan; Zhou, Jihong; Li, Zhanhua; Jiang, Ying; Zhou, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) selectively targets cancer cells. The present preclinical study investigated the anti-cancer efficiency of ONC201, a first-in-class small molecule TRAIL inducer, in lung cancer cells. We showed that ONC201 was cytotoxic and anti-proliferative in both established (A549 and H460 lines) and primary human lung cancer cells. It was yet non-cytotoxic to normal lung epithelial cells. Further, ONC201 induced exogenous apoptosis activation in lung cancer cells, which was evidenced by TRAIL/death receptor-5 (DR5) induction and caspase-8 activation. The caspase-8 inhibitor or TRAIL/DR5 siRNA knockdown alleviated ONC201's cytotoxicity against lung cancer cells. Molecularly, ONC201 in-activated Akt-S6K1 and Erk signalings in lung cancer cells, causing Foxo3a nuclear translocation. For the in vivo studies, intraperitoneal injection of ONC201 at well-tolerated doses significantly inhibited xenografted A549 tumor growth in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. Further, ONC201 administration induced TRAIL/DR5 expression, yet inactivated Akt-S6K1 and Erk in tumor tissues. These results of the study demonstrates the potent anti-lung cancer activity by ONC201. PMID:27626799

  9. Loss of expression of BAP1 is very rare in non-small cell lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Andrici, Juliana; Parkhill, Thomas R; Jung, Jason; Wardell, Kathryn L; Verdonk, Brandon; Singh, Arjun; Sioson, Loretta; Clarkson, Adele; Watson, Nicole; Sheen, Amy; Farzin, Mahtab; Toon, Christopher W; Gill, Anthony J

    2016-06-01

    Germline mutations of the BAP1 gene have been implicated in a cancer predisposition syndrome which includes mesothelioma, uveal melanoma, cutaneous melanocytic lesions, renal cell carcinoma, and possibly other malignancies. Double hit inactivation of BAP1 with subsequent loss of expression of the BAP1 protein also occurs in approximately 50% of mesotheliomas. The link between BAP1 mutation and lung cancer is yet to be fully explored. We sought to assess BAP1 expression in a large cohort of lung cancers undergoing surgery with curative intent. We searched the Anatomical Pathology database of our institution for lung cancer patients undergoing surgery with curative intent between 2000 and 2010. Immunohistochemistry for BAP1 was then performed in tissue microarray format. Our cohort included 257 lung cancer patients, of which 155 (60%) were adenocarcinomas and 72 (28%) were squamous cell carcinomas, with no other subtype comprising more than 3%. BAP1 loss of expression was found in only one lung cancer. We conclude that BAP1 mutation occurs very infrequently (0.4%) in non-small cell lung cancer. Given that the pathological differential diagnosis between lung carcinoma and mesothelioma may sometimes be difficult, this finding increases the specificity of loss of expression for BAP1 for the diagnosis of mesothelioma. PMID:27114369

  10. A new design for high stability pressure-controlled ventilation for small animal lung imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitchen, M. J.; Habib, A.; Fouras, A.; Dubsky, S.; Lewis, R. A.; Wallace, M. J.; Hooper, S. B.

    2010-02-01

    We have developed a custom-designed ventilator to deliver a stable pressure to the lungs of small animals for use in imaging experiments. Our ventilator was designed with independent pressure vessels to separately control the Peak Inspiratory Pressure (PIP) and Positive End Expiratory Pressure (PEEP) to minimise pressure fluctuations during the ventilation process. The ventilator was computer controlled through a LabVIEW interface, enabling experimental manipulations to be performed remotely whilst simultaneously imaging the lungs in situ. Mechanical ventilation was successfully performed on newborn rabbit pups to assess the most effective ventilation strategies for aerating the lungs at birth. Highly stable pressures enabled reliable respiratory gated acquisition of projection radiographs and a stable prolonged (15 minute) breath-hold for high-resolution computed tomography of deceased rabbit pups at different lung volumes.

  11. Advances in the diagnosis and treatment of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Rathi N; Ramalingam, Suresh S

    2014-03-01

    The diagnostic and therapeutic landscape of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has changed dramatically in the past 50 years since the Surgeon General's report on smoking and lung cancer. Early detection is now a reality for lung cancer. The use of low-dose computed tomography scans for early detection decreases mortality and is beginning to be used in routine clinical practice. Technological advances such as positron emission tomography and endobronchial ultrasound have improved the accuracy of NSCLC staging. The cure rate for early-stage NSCLC has improved as a result of multimodality treatment approaches. The role of systemic therapy has also expanded to earlier stages of the disease. In recent years, the initial steps toward personalized medicine by utilization of targeted treatments based on tumor genotype have been undertaken. Emerging technological advances and greater insights into tumor biology are poised to greatly reduce the burden of lung cancer in the years to come. PMID:24516099

  12. ‘Dancing eyes, dancing feet syndrome’ in small cell lung carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Chandramohan; Acharya, Mihir; Kumawat, Bansi Lal; Kochar, Abhishek

    2014-01-01

    A 60-year-old man presented with a 25-day history of acute onset instability of gait, tremulousness of limbs and involuntary eye movements. Examination revealed presence of opsoclonus, myoclonus and ataxia, without any loss of motor power in the limbs. Prompt investigations were directed towards identifying an underlying malignancy which is often associated with this type of clinical scenario. CT of the brain was normal and cerebrospinal fluid examination showed lymphocytic pleocytosis. A cavitatory lesion was found in the right lung base on the high-resolution CT of the chest and histopathological examination of this lung mass showed small cell lung carcinoma. The patient was managed symptomatically with levetiracetam and baclofen and referred to oncology department for resection of the lung mass. PMID:24759364

  13. ARVCF expression is significantly correlated with the malignant phenotype of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Di; Tang, Na; Liu, Yang; Wang, En-Hua

    2015-06-01

    Armadillo repeat gene deleted in velo-cardio-facial syndrome (ARVCF) is a member of the p120 catenin (p120ctn) family; it contains nine central Armadillo repeats and binds to the juxtamembrane domain of E-cadherin. We used immunohistochemistry to measure ARVCF expression in 121 patients with NSCLC and western blotting to examine differences in ARVCF expression between lung cancer and adjacent normal lung tissues. We interfered with ARVCF expression in two lung cancer cell lines and measured its effects on invasion and proliferation. ARVCF expression correlated with the malignant phenotype and poor prognosis. We also observed ARVCF-dependent changes in small GTPase (mainly RhoA) activity in lung cancer cells. We confirmed that ARVCF plays an important role in the malignant phenotype. PMID:25683624

  14. Role of positron emission tomography-computed tomography in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Singh, Saurabh Kumar; Prakash, Gaurav; Jakhetiya, Ashish; Pandey, Durgatosh

    2016-03-26

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Non-small cell carcinoma and small cell carcinoma are the main histological subtypes and constitutes around 85% and 15% of all lung cancer respectively. Multimodality treatment plays a key role in the successful management of lung cancer depending upon the histological subtype, stage of disease, and performance status. Imaging modalities play an important role in the diagnosis and accurate staging of the disease, in assessing the response to neoadjuvant therapy, and in the follow-up of the patients. Last decade has witnessed voluminous upsurge in the use of positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT); role of PET-CT has widened exponentially in the management of lung cancer. The present article reviews the role of 18-fluoro-deoxyglucose PET-CT in the management of non small cell lung cancer with emphasis on staging of the disease and the assessment of response to neoadjuvant therapy based on available literature. PMID:27018223

  15. Role of positron emission tomography-computed tomography in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Singh, Saurabh Kumar; Prakash, Gaurav; Jakhetiya, Ashish; Pandey, Durgatosh

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Non-small cell carcinoma and small cell carcinoma are the main histological subtypes and constitutes around 85% and 15% of all lung cancer respectively. Multimodality treatment plays a key role in the successful management of lung cancer depending upon the histological subtype, stage of disease, and performance status. Imaging modalities play an important role in the diagnosis and accurate staging of the disease, in assessing the response to neoadjuvant therapy, and in the follow-up of the patients. Last decade has witnessed voluminous upsurge in the use of positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT); role of PET-CT has widened exponentially in the management of lung cancer. The present article reviews the role of 18-fluoro-deoxyglucose PET-CT in the management of non small cell lung cancer with emphasis on staging of the disease and the assessment of response to neoadjuvant therapy based on available literature. PMID:27018223

  16. Development and dosimetry of a small animal lung irradiation platform

    PubMed Central

    McGurk, Ross; Hadley, Caroline; Jackson, Isabel L.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko

    2015-01-01

    Advances in large scale screening of medical counter measures for radiation-induced normal tissue toxicity are currently hampered by animal irradiation paradigms that are both inefficient and highly variable among institutions. Here, we introduce a novel high-throughput small animal irradiation platform for use in orthovoltage small animal irradiators. We used radiochromic film and metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor detectors to examine several parameters, including 2D field uniformity, dose rate consistency, and shielding transmission. We posit that this setup will improve efficiency of drug screens by allowing for simultaneous, targeted irradiation of multiple animals, improving efficiency within a single institution. Additionally, we suggest that measurement of the described parameters in all centers conducting counter measure studies will improve the translatability of findings among institutions. We also investigated the use of tissue equivalent phantoms in performing dosimetry measurements for small animal irradiation experiments. Though these phantoms are commonly used in dosimetry, we recorded a significant difference in both the entrance and target tissue dose rates between euthanized rats and mice with implanted detectors and the corresponding phantom measurement. This suggests that measurements using these phantoms may not provide accurate dosimetry for in vivo experiments. Based on these measurements, we propose that this small animal irradiation platform can increase the capacity of animal studies by allowing for more efficient animal irradiation. We also suggest that researchers fully characterize the parameters of whatever radiation setup is in use in order to facilitate better comparison among institutions. PMID:23091878

  17. IL-23/IL-17/G-CSF pathway is associated with granulocyte recruitment to the lung during African swine fever.

    PubMed

    Karalyan, Z; Voskanyan, H; Ter-Pogossyan, Z; Saroyan, D; Karalova, E

    2016-10-15

    The interleukin (IL)-23/IL-17 pathway plays a crucial role in various forms of inflammation but its function in acute African swine fever (ASF) is not well understood. Thus, in this study, we aimed to find out whether IL-23/IL-17/G-CSF is released in acute ASF and what function it may have. The present study revealed that the production of IL-17 and IL-23 were significantly increased in the sera of ASFV infected pigs. Using ELISA, we found that the serum levels of IL-23 and IL-17 have overexpressed in ASF virus infected pigs compared with healthy controls. The levels of IL-17 and IL-23 increase in the early stages and the levels of G-CSF and C - reactive protein in the later stages of ASF. Simultaneously, with the increase of the levels of IL-23/IL-17 extravasation of granular leukocytes in the tissue (diapedesis) is observed. Diapedesis can explain the neutropenia that we identified previously in the terminal stages of ASF. The increase in serum levels of IL-23/IL-17 is preceded by enhanced migration of neutrophils in tissues, and the last one is preceded by neutropenia. The increase in serum levels of G-CSF has compensatory nature, directed on stimulation of proliferation of granulocytes. Taken together, our results revealed an overexpression of the IL-23/IL-17 axis in the ASF virus infected pigs, suggesting that it may be a crucial pathway in the diapedesis at ASF. PMID:27590426

  18. Non small-cell lung cancer with metastasis to thigh muscle and mandible: two case reports

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in Europe and the US. Isolated metastases to skeletal muscle and the mandible are very uncommon. Case presentation This report presents two cases. Case 1 concerns a 45-year-old Caucasian woman affected by muscle metastasis of the right thigh from non-small-cell lung cancer. Case 2 concerns a 61-year-old Caucasian man affected by mandible metastasis from non-small-cell lung cancer. Both metastases were detected by diagnostic imaging studies. Both patients were treated with radiation therapy with palliative and antalgic intent. Conclusion Radiation therapy was effective and well tolerated in both cases. Both our patients are alive, with follow-up of 18 months and five months, respectively. PMID:23566415

  19. Small cell mesothelioma: A rare entity and diagnostic pitfall mimicking small cell lung carcinoma on fine-needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanhong; Afify, Alaa; Gandour-Edwards, Regina F; Bishop, John W; Huang, Eric C

    2016-06-01

    Small cell mesothelioma (SCM) is an extremely rare variant of epithelioid mesothelioma that can be mistaken for other forms of small round blue cell tumors, particularly small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC). Here, we describe a fine-needle aspiration (FNA) from a pleural lesion in a 75-year-old man with a history of known asbestos exposure. The FNA revealed cohesive clusters of uniform small round blue cells with high nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio, finely powdery chromatin, small inconspicuous nucleoli, and scant amount of cytoplasm. Mitoses were infrequent and nuclear molding was absent. Immunochemical profile supported a mesothelial origin, which was later confirmed by pleurectomy with a diagnosis of SCM. This report demonstrates the difficulties in cytologic evaluation of lung FNAs in differentiating SCM from SCLC or other small round blue cell tumors. As therapy differs for SCM, early recognition of the cytologic features is essential in making the correct diagnosis needed for appropriate clinical management. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2016;44:526-529. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26952387

  20. Primary therapy for small cell lung cancer reversing the Eaton-Lambert syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kalter, S.; Dhingra, H.M.; Farha, P.

    1985-02-01

    A case report is presented of a patient with small cell carcinoma of the lung associated with the classic Eaton-Lambert syndrome. He received intermittent anticholinesterase therapy, with minimal improvement. Combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy for the primary neoplasm produced considerable improvement, with normal EMG findings after complete remission was achieved. 7 references, 1 table.

  1. Local Therapy Indications in the Management of Patients with Oligometastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Miller, Douglas A; Krasna, Mark J

    2016-07-01

    Advances in surgical, radiation, and interventional radiology therapies carry a reduction in morbidity associated with therapy. Aggressive management of patients with oligometastatic non-small cell lung cancer offers the potential for improved disease-free survival and quality of life compared with traditional systemic therapy alone. PMID:27261919

  2. Hope and Disappointment: Covalent Inhibitors to Overcome Drug Resistance in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Engel, Julian; Lategahn, Jonas; Rauh, Daniel

    2016-01-14

    In the last five years, the detailed understanding of how to overcome T790M drug resistance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has culminated in the development of a third-generation of covalent EGFR inhibitors with excellent clinical outcomes. However, the emergence of a newly discovered acquired drug resistance challenges the concept of small molecule targeted cancer therapy in NSCLC. PMID:26819655

  3. Targeting the KRAS variant for treatment of non-small cell lung cancer: potential therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Ricciuti, Biagio; Leonardi, Giulia Costanza; Metro, Giulio; Grignani, Francesco; Paglialunga, Luca; Bellezza, Guido; Baglivo, Sara; Mencaroni, Clelia; Baldi, Alice; Zicari, Daniela; Crinò, Lucio

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide, with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounting for 80% of all lung cancers. Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) is one of the deadliest cancer-related proteins and plays a pivotal role in the most aggressive and lethal human cancers, including lung adenocarcinoma where it represents one of the most frequently mutated oncogene. Although therapeutic progresses have made an impact over the last decade, median survival for patients with advanced lung cancer remains disappointing, with a 5-year worldwide survival rate of <15%. For more than 20 years it has been recognized that constitutively active signaling downstream of KRAS is a fundamental driver of lung tumorigenesis. However, years of pursuit have failed to yield a drug that can safely curb KRAS activity; up to now no approved therapies exist for KRAS-mutant NSCLC. The aim of this review is to discuss the current knowledge of KRAS-mutated NSCLC, touching upon KRAS clinical relevance as a prognostic and predictive biomarker, with an emphasis on novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of KRAS-variant NSCLC. PMID:26714748

  4. TASK-1 Regulates Apoptosis and Proliferation in a Subset of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers.

    PubMed

    Leithner, Katharina; Hirschmugl, Birgit; Li, Yingji; Tang, Bi; Papp, Rita; Nagaraj, Chandran; Stacher, Elvira; Stiegler, Philipp; Lindenmann, Jörg; Olschewski, Andrea; Olschewski, Horst; Hrzenjak, Andelko

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide; survival times are poor despite therapy. The role of the two-pore domain K+ (K2P) channel TASK-1 (KCNK3) in lung cancer is at present unknown. We found that TASK-1 is expressed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines at variable levels. In a highly TASK-1 expressing NSCLC cell line, A549, a characteristic pH- and hypoxia-sensitive non-inactivating K+ current was measured, indicating the presence of functional TASK-1 channels. Inhibition of TASK-1 led to significant depolarization in these cells. Knockdown of TASK-1 by siRNA significantly enhanced apoptosis and reduced proliferation in A549 cells, but not in weakly TASK-1 expressing NCI-H358 cells. Na+-coupled nutrient transport across the cell membrane is functionally coupled to the efflux of K+ via K+ channels, thus TASK-1 may potentially influence Na+-coupled nutrient transport. In contrast to TASK-1, which was not differentially expressed in lung cancer vs. normal lung tissue, we found the Na+-coupled nutrient transporters, SLC5A3, SLC5A6, and SLC38A1, transporters for myo-inositol, biotin and glutamine, respectively, to be significantly overexpressed in lung adenocarcinomas. In summary, we show for the first time that the TASK-1 channel regulates apoptosis and proliferation in a subset of NSCLC. PMID:27294516

  5. TASK-1 Regulates Apoptosis and Proliferation in a Subset of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Leithner, Katharina; Hirschmugl, Birgit; Li, Yingji; Tang, Bi; Papp, Rita; Nagaraj, Chandran; Stacher, Elvira; Stiegler, Philipp; Lindenmann, Jörg; Olschewski, Andrea; Olschewski, Horst; Hrzenjak, Andelko

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide; survival times are poor despite therapy. The role of the two-pore domain K+ (K2P) channel TASK-1 (KCNK3) in lung cancer is at present unknown. We found that TASK-1 is expressed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines at variable levels. In a highly TASK-1 expressing NSCLC cell line, A549, a characteristic pH- and hypoxia-sensitive non-inactivating K+ current was measured, indicating the presence of functional TASK-1 channels. Inhibition of TASK-1 led to significant depolarization in these cells. Knockdown of TASK-1 by siRNA significantly enhanced apoptosis and reduced proliferation in A549 cells, but not in weakly TASK-1 expressing NCI-H358 cells. Na+-coupled nutrient transport across the cell membrane is functionally coupled to the efflux of K+ via K+ channels, thus TASK-1 may potentially influence Na+-coupled nutrient transport. In contrast to TASK-1, which was not differentially expressed in lung cancer vs. normal lung tissue, we found the Na+-coupled nutrient transporters, SLC5A3, SLC5A6, and SLC38A1, transporters for myo-inositol, biotin and glutamine, respectively, to be significantly overexpressed in lung adenocarcinomas. In summary, we show for the first time that the TASK-1 channel regulates apoptosis and proliferation in a subset of NSCLC. PMID:27294516

  6. Spinal cord metastasis in small cell carcinoma of the lung

    SciTech Connect

    Holoye, P.; Libnoch, J.; Cox, J.; Kun, L.; Byhardt, R.; Almagro, U.; McCelland, S.; Chintapali, K.

    1984-03-01

    Among 50 patients with small cell bronchogenic carcinoma who were placed on a protocol of combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy, seven patients developed recurrence in the spinal cord. Five cases terminated in paraplegia and death. One patient with pontine recurrence recovered with local radiation therapy. One patient, diagnosed early, responded to local radiation therapy and is ambulatory. Methods of diagnosis were myelogram, computerized axial tomography, cerebro spinal fluid, chemistry and cytologies. The poor prognosis and the difficulty of diagnosis suggest that prophylactic therapy of the entire cranio-spinal axis should be evaluated.

  7. Treatment with HIF-1α Antagonist PX-478 Inhibits Progression and Spread of Orthotopic Human Small Cell Lung Cancer and Lung Adenocarcinoma in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, Jörg J.; Erez, Baruch; Korshunova, Maria V.; Williams, Ryan R.; Furutani, Kazuhisa; Takahashi, Osamu; Kirkpatrick, Lynn; Lippman, Scott M.; Powis, Garth; O’Reilly, Michael S.; Herbst, Roy S.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction PX-478 is a potent small-molecule inhibitor of HIF-1α. In preclinical studies, it had antitumor activity against various solid tumors in subcutaneous xenografts but had no measurable activity against a non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) xenograft. To determine the effectiveness of PX-478 against lung tumors, we investigated HIF-1α expression in several lung cancer cell lines, both in vitro and in vivo, and treated orthotopic mouse models of human lung cancer with PX-478. Methods Cells from two human lung adenocarcinoma cell models (PC14-PE6 and NCI-H441) or two human small cell lung cancer (SCLC) models (NCI-H187 and NCI-N417) were injected into the left lungs of nude mice and were randomized 16 to 18 days after injection with daily oral treatment with PX-478 or vehicle for 5 days. Results In the PC14-PE6 NSCLC model, treatment with 20 mg/kg PX-478 significantly reduced the median primary lung tumor volume by 87% (p = 0.005) compared with the vehicle-treated group. PX-478 treatment also markedly reduced mediastinal metastasis and prolonged survival. Similar results were obtained in a second NSCLC model. In SCLC models, PX-478 was even more effective. In the NCI-H187 model, the median primary lung tumor volume was reduced by 99% (p = 0.0001). The median survival duration was increased by 132%. In the NCI-N417 model, the median primary lung tumor volume was reduced by 97% (p = 0.008). Conclusions We demonstrated that the PX-478, HIF-1α inhibitor, had significant antitumor activity against two orthotopic models of lung adenocarcinomas and two models of SCLC. These results suggest the inclusion of lung cancer patients in phase I clinical trials of PX-478. PMID:20512076

  8. Overexpression of TRPV3 Correlates with Tumor Progression in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaolei; Zhang, Qianhui; Fan, Kai; Li, Baiyan; Li, Huifeng; Qi, Hanping; Guo, Jing; Cao, Yonggang; Sun, Hongli

    2016-01-01

    (1) Background: Transient receptor potential vanilloid 3 (TRPV3) is a member of the TRP channels family of Ca2+-permeant channels. The proteins of some TRP channels are highly expressed in cancer cells. This study aimed to assess the clinical significance and biological functions of TRPV3 in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC); (2) Methods: Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of TRPV3 in NSCLC tissues and adjacent noncancerous lung tissues. Western blot was used to detect the protein expressions of TRPV3, CaMKII, p-CaMKII, CyclinA, CyclinD, CyclinE1, CDK2, CDK4, and P27. Small interfering RNA was used to deplete TRPV3 expression. A laser scanning confocal microscope was used to measure intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). Flow cytometry was used to analyze cell cycle; (3) Results: TRPV3 was overexpressed in 65 of 96 (67.7%) human lung cancer cases and correlated with differentiation (p = 0.001) and TNM stage (p = 0.004). Importantly, TRPV3 expression was associated with short overall survival. In addition, blocking or knockdown of TRPV3 could inhibit lung cancer cell proliferation. Moreover, TRPV3 inhibition could decrease [Ca2+]i of lung cancer cells and arrest cell cycle at the G1/S boundary. Further results revealed that TRPV3 inhibition decreased expressions of p-CaMKII, CyclinA, CyclinD1, CyclinE, and increased P27 level; (4) Conclusions: Our findings demonstrate that TRPV3 was overexpressed in NSCLC and correlated with lung cancer progression. TRPV3 activation could promote proliferation of lung cancer cells. TRPV3 might serve as a potential companion drug target in NSCLC. PMID:27023518

  9. Overexpression of TRPV3 Correlates with Tumor Progression in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaolei; Zhang, Qianhui; Fan, Kai; Li, Baiyan; Li, Huifeng; Qi, Hanping; Guo, Jing; Cao, Yonggang; Sun, Hongli

    2016-01-01

    (1) BACKGROUND: Transient receptor potential vanilloid 3 (TRPV3) is a member of the TRP channels family of Ca(2+)-permeant channels. The proteins of some TRP channels are highly expressed in cancer cells. This study aimed to assess the clinical significance and biological functions of TRPV3 in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC); (2) METHODS: Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of TRPV3 in NSCLC tissues and adjacent noncancerous lung tissues. Western blot was used to detect the protein expressions of TRPV3, CaMKII, p-CaMKII, CyclinA, CyclinD, CyclinE1, CDK2, CDK4, and P27. Small interfering RNA was used to deplete TRPV3 expression. A laser scanning confocal microscope was used to measure intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i). Flow cytometry was used to analyze cell cycle; (3) RESULTS: TRPV3 was overexpressed in 65 of 96 (67.7%) human lung cancer cases and correlated with differentiation (p = 0.001) and TNM stage (p = 0.004). Importantly, TRPV3 expression was associated with short overall survival. In addition, blocking or knockdown of TRPV3 could inhibit lung cancer cell proliferation. Moreover, TRPV3 inhibition could decrease [Ca(2+)]i of lung cancer cells and arrest cell cycle at the G1/S boundary. Further results revealed that TRPV3 inhibition decreased expressions of p-CaMKII, CyclinA, CyclinD1, CyclinE, and increased P27 level; (4) CONCLUSIONS: Our findings demonstrate that TRPV3 was overexpressed in NSCLC and correlated with lung cancer progression. TRPV3 activation could promote proliferation of lung cancer cells. TRPV3 might serve as a potential companion drug target in NSCLC. PMID:27023518

  10. Curcumin-ER Prolonged Subcutaneous Delivery for the Treatment of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Amalendu P; Mukerjee, Anindita; Gdowski, Andrew; Helson, Lawrence; Bouchard, Annie; Majeed, Muhammed; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K

    2016-04-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer therapy is a challenge due to poor prognosis and low survival rate. There is an acute need for advanced therapies having higher drug efficacy, low immunogenicity and fewer side effects which will markedly improve patient compliance and quality of life of cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to develop a novel hybrid curcumin nanoformulation (Curcumin-ER) and evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of this formulation on a non-small cell lung cancer xenograft model. Use of curcumin, a natural anticancer agent, is majorly limited due to its poor aqueous solubility and hence it's low systemic bioavailability. In this paper, we carried out the nanoformulation of Curcumin-ER, optimized the formulation process and determined the anticancer effects of Curcumin-ER against human A549 non-small cell lung cancer using in vitro and in vivo studies. Xenograft tumors in nude mice were treated with 20 mg/kg subcutaneous injection of Curcumin-ER and liposomal curcumin (Lipocurc) twice a week for seven weeks. Results showed that tumor growth was suppressed by 52.1% by Curcumin-ER treatment and only 32.2% by Lipocurc compared to controls. Tumor sections were isolated from murine xenografts and histology and immunohistochemistry was performed. A decrease in expression of NFκB-p65 subunit and proliferation marker, Ki-67 was observed in treated tumors. In addition, a potent anti-angiogenic effect, characterized by reduced expression of annexin A2 protein, was observed in treated tumors. These results establish the effectiveness of Curcumin-ER in regressing human non-small cell lung cancer growth in the xenograft model using subcutaneous route of administration. The therapeutic efficacy of Curcumin-ER highlights the potential of this hybrid nanoformulation in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer. PMID:27301194

  11. Epigenetics in non-small cell lung cancer: from basics to therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Junaid; El-Osta, Hazem

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the number one cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide with 221,200 estimated new cases and 158,040 estimated deaths in 2015. Approximately 80% of cases are non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The diagnosis is usually made at an advanced stage where the prognosis is poor and therapeutic options are limited. The evolution of lung cancer is a multistep process involving genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factor interactions that result in the dysregulation of key oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, culminating in activation of cancer-related signaling pathways. The past decade has witnessed the discovery of multiple molecular aberrations that drive lung cancer growth, among which are epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations and translocations involving the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene. This has translated into therapeutic agent developments that target these molecular alterations. The absence of targetable mutations in 50% of NSCLC cases and targeted therapy resistance development underscores the importance for developing alternative therapeutic strategies for treating lung cancer. Among these strategies, pharmacologic modulation of the epigenome has been used to treat lung cancer. Epigenetics approaches may circumvent the problem of tumor heterogeneity by affecting the expression of multiple tumor suppression genes (TSGs), halting tumor growth and survival. Moreover, it may be effective for tumors that are not driven by currently recognized druggable mutations. This review summarizes the molecular pathology of lung cancer epigenetic aberrations and discusses current efforts to target the epigenome with different pharmacological approaches. Our main focus will be on hypomethylating agents, histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, microRNA modulations, and the role of novel epigenetic biomarkers. Last, we will address the challenges that face this old-new strategy in treating lung cancer. PMID:27186511

  12. Epigenetics in non-small cell lung cancer: from basics to therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Junaid; Shackelford, Rodney E; El-Osta, Hazem

    2016-04-01

    Lung cancer remains the number one cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide with 221,200 estimated new cases and 158,040 estimated deaths in 2015. Approximately 80% of cases are non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The diagnosis is usually made at an advanced stage where the prognosis is poor and therapeutic options are limited. The evolution of lung cancer is a multistep process involving genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factor interactions that result in the dysregulation of key oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, culminating in activation of cancer-related signaling pathways. The past decade has witnessed the discovery of multiple molecular aberrations that drive lung cancer growth, among which are epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations and translocations involving the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene. This has translated into therapeutic agent developments that target these molecular alterations. The absence of targetable mutations in 50% of NSCLC cases and targeted therapy resistance development underscores the importance for developing alternative therapeutic strategies for treating lung cancer. Among these strategies, pharmacologic modulation of the epigenome has been used to treat lung cancer. Epigenetics approaches may circumvent the problem of tumor heterogeneity by affecting the expression of multiple tumor suppression genes (TSGs), halting tumor growth and survival. Moreover, it may be effective for tumors that are not driven by currently recognized druggable mutations. This review summarizes the molecular pathology of lung cancer epigenetic aberrations and discusses current efforts to target the epigenome with different pharmacological approaches. Our main focus will be on hypomethylating agents, histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, microRNA modulations, and the role of novel epigenetic biomarkers. Last, we will address the challenges that face this old-new strategy in treating lung cancer. PMID:27186511

  13. Mast cells and histamine enhance the proliferation of non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Stoyanov, Evgeniy; Uddin, Mohib; Mankuta, David; Dubinett, Steven M; Levi-Schaffer, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common form of lung cancer with an extremely low survival rate. It is characterized by a chronic inflammatory process with intense mast cell infiltrate that is associated with reduced survival. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that mast cells have an enhancing effect on NSCLC proliferation. To assess the tumor-promoting potential of mast cells, we used the human alveolar basal adenocarcinoma (A549) and the mouse Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cell lines, umbilical cord blood-derived mast cells (CBMC) and the mast cell-deficient mouse Sash model. The proliferation rate of A549/LLC cells was markedly increased by mast cells and histamine. Histamine proliferating activity was mediated via H(1), H(2) and H(4) receptors and caused ERK phosphorylation. LLC induced in Sash mice or in wild-type mice treated with the mast cell stabilizer nedocromil sodium displayed an accelerated growth (number of metastic colonies in the lungs, total lung area and lung/total mice weight ratio). In summary, we have shown a significant effect of mast cells and histamine in enhancing NSCLC/LLCX growth in vitro, while in a mouse LLC model in vivo we have found that mast cells are important negative regulators of cancer development. Therefore our results would indicate a pro-tumorogenic effect of the mast cells in vitro on established lung tumor cell lines, and anti-tumorogenic effect in mice at lung cancer induction. In conclusion, mast cell/anti-histamine targeted therapies should carefully consider this dual effect. PMID:21733595

  14. A Highly Efficient Gene Expression Programming (GEP) Model for Auxiliary Diagnosis of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Si, Hongzong; Liu, Shihai; Li, Xianchao; Gao, Caihong; Cui, Lianhua; Li, Chuan; Yang, Xue; Yao, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is an important and common cancer that constitutes a major public health problem, but early detection of small cell lung cancer can significantly improve the survival rate of cancer patients. A number of serum biomarkers have been used in the diagnosis of lung cancers; however, they exhibit low sensitivity and specificity. Methods We used biochemical methods to measure blood levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), C-reactive protein (CRP), Na+, Cl-, carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA), and neuron specific enolase (NSE) in 145 small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients and 155 non-small cell lung cancer and 155 normal controls. A gene expression programming (GEP) model and Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves incorporating these biomarkers was developed for the auxiliary diagnosis of SCLC. Results After appropriate modification of the parameters, the GEP model was initially set up based on a training set of 115 SCLC patients and 125 normal controls for GEP model generation. Then the GEP was applied to the remaining 60 subjects (the test set) for model validation. GEP successfully discriminated 281 out of 300 cases, showing a correct classification rate for lung cancer patients of 93.75% (225/240) and 93.33% (56/60) for the training and test sets, respectively. Another GEP model incorporating four biomarkers, including CEA, NSE, LDH, and CRP, exhibited slightly lower detection sensitivity than the GEP model, including six biomarkers. We repeat the models on artificial neural network (ANN), and our results showed that the accuracy of GEP models were higher than that in ANN. GEP model incorporating six serum biomarkers performed by NSCLC patients and normal controls showed low accuracy than SCLC patients and was enough to prove that the GEP model is suitable for the SCLC patients. Conclusion We have developed a GEP model with high sensitivity and specificity for the auxiliary diagnosis of SCLC. This GEP model has the potential for the wide use

  15. Safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the ML29 reassortant vaccine for Lassa fever in small non-human primates✩

    PubMed Central

    Lukashevich, Igor S.; Carrion, Ricardo; Salvato, Maria S.; Mansfield, Keith; Brasky, Kathleen; Zapata, Juan; Cairo, Cristiana; Goicochea, Marco; Hoosien, Gia E.; Ticer, Anysha; Bryant, Joseph; Davis, Harry; Hammamieh, Rasha; Mayda, Maria; Jett, Marti; Patterson, Jean

    2008-01-01

    A single injection of ML29 reassortant vaccine for Lassa fever induces low, transient viremia, and low or moderate levels of ML29 replication in tissues of common marmosets depending on the dose of the vaccination. The vaccination elicits specific immune responses and completely protects marmosets against fatal disease by induction of sterilizing cell-mediated immunity. DNA array analysis of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy donors exposed to ML29 revealed that gene expression patterns in ML29-exposed PBMC and control, media-exposed PBMC, clustered together confirming safety profile of the ML29 in non-human primates. The ML29 reassortant is a promising vaccine candidate for Lassa fever. PMID:18692539

  16. Safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the ML29 reassortant vaccine for Lassa fever in small non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Lukashevich, Igor S; Carrion, Ricardo; Salvato, Maria S; Mansfield, Keith; Brasky, Kathleen; Zapata, Juan; Cairo, Cristiana; Goicochea, Marco; Hoosien, Gia E; Ticer, Anysha; Bryant, Joseph; Davis, Harry; Hammamieh, Rasha; Mayda, Maria; Jett, Marti; Patterson, Jean

    2008-09-26

    A single injection of ML29 reassortant vaccine for Lassa fever induces low, transient viremia, and low or moderate levels of ML29 replication in tissues of common marmosets depending on the dose of the vaccination. The vaccination elicits specific immune responses and completely protects marmosets against fatal disease by induction of sterilizing cell-mediated immunity. DNA array analysis of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy donors exposed to ML29 revealed that gene expression patterns in ML29-exposed PBMC and control, media-exposed PBMC, clustered together confirming safety profile of the ML29 in non-human primates. The ML29 reassortant is a promising vaccine candidate for Lassa fever. PMID:18692539

  17. Genomic signatures in non-small-cell lung cancer: targeting the targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Dressman, Holly K; Bild, Andrea; Garst, Jennifer; Harpole, David; Potti, Anil

    2006-07-01

    Despite major developments in targeted biologic agents, patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer have a poor prognosis. Recent development of targeted biologic agents have given us insight into possibilities of matching therapy with disease; however, the success of these agents has been marginal. In this article, we discuss the use of genomic signatures that have been developed to identify unique aspects of individual lung tumors and provide insight on how novel strategies can be used to identify populations susceptible to specific targeted agents. PMID:17254524

  18. [Stereotactic radiotherapy is established treatment in localized non-small cell lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Sailas, Liisa; Virsunen, Heli

    2016-01-01

    Surgery has been the standard treatment in localized non-small cell lung cancer. Some of the early stage lung cancer patients are not suitable for surgery owing to associated diseases or refusing surgery. Ninety percent of untreated patients die within five years. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy is a technique in which highly focused radiation treatment is given at a couple of high single doses to the tumor region. The treatment results in an average of 90% local control of the cancer, and the adverse effects are minor. Treatment outcome is equivalent to those of surgical therapy and is better than obtained with conventional external radiation therapy. PMID:27132296

  19. Opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome associated with non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Karasaki, Takahiro; Tanaka, Makoto

    2015-11-01

    A 68-year-old man developed progressive vertigo, saccadic eye movements, and tremors. Computed tomography showed multiple lung nodules. Surgery was performed and the pathological diagnosis was large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma in the left upper lobe with ipsilobar metastases, and adenocarcinoma in the left lower lobe. The neurological symptoms resolved dramatically after complete resection of the tumors. Opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome associated with non-small-cell lung carcinoma is extremely rare. Surgery should not be delayed if a complete resection is expected. PMID:26038602

  20. [Targeted Therapy and Immunotherapy for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer 
with Brain Metastasis].

    PubMed

    Song, Qi; Jiao, Shunchang; Li, Fang

    2016-08-20

    Brain metastasis, a common complication of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with an incidence rate of 30%-50%, significantly affects the patients' quality of life. The prognosis of patients of NSCLC with brain metastasis is extremely poor, the average median survival is only 1 m-2 m without treatment. The targeted therapy based on lung cancer driven gene is a new treatment. Besides, the immunotherapy which can enhance the effect of anti-cancer by simulating the immune system is a new approach. The combination of targeted therapy and immunotherapy can greatly benefit patients in clinical work. PMID:27561803

  1. [Treatment of non-small cell lung carcinoma in early stages].

    PubMed

    Meneses, José Carlos; Avila Martínez, Régulo J; Ponce, Santiago; Zuluaga, Mauricio; Bartolomé, Adela; Gámez, Pablo

    2013-12-01

    Treatment of lung carcinoma is multidisciplinary. There are different therapeutic strategies available, although surgery shows the best results in those patients with lung carcinoma in early stages. Other options such as stereotactic radiation therapy are relegated to patients with small tumors and poor cardiopulmonary reserve or to those who reject surgery. Adjuvant chemotherapy is not justified in patients with stage i of the disease and so double adjuvant chemotherapy should be considered. This adjuvant chemotherapy should be based on cisplatin after surgery in those patients with stages ii and IIIA. PMID:23829961

  2. New and emerging targeted treatments in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Fred R; Suda, Kenichi; Wiens, Jacinta; Bunn, Paul A

    2016-09-01

    Targeted therapies are substantially changing the management of lung cancers. These treatments include drugs that target driver mutations, those that target presumed important molecules in cancer cell proliferation and survival, and those that inhibit immune checkpoint molecules. This area of research progresses day by day, with novel target discoveries, novel drug development, and use of novel combination treatments. Researchers and clinicians have also extensively investigated the predictive biomarkers and the molecular mechanisms underlying inherent or acquired resistance to these targeted therapies. We review recent progress in the development of targeted treatments for patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, especially focusing on data from published clinical trials. PMID:27598681

  3. MOLECULARLY TARGETED THERAPIES IN NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER ANNUAL UPDATE 2014

    PubMed Central

    Morgensztern, Daniel; Campo, Meghan J.; Dahlberg, Suzanne E.; Doebele, Robert C.; Garon, Edward; Gerber, David E.; Goldberg, Sarah B.; Hammerman, Peter S.; Heist, Rebecca; Hensing, Thomas; Horn, Leora; Ramalingam, Suresh S.; Rudin, Charles M.; Salgia, Ravi; Sequist, Lecia; Shaw, Alice T.; Simon, George R.; Somaiah, Neeta; Spigel, David R.; Wrangle, John; Johnson, David; Herbst, Roy S.; Bunn, Paul; Govindan, Ramaswamy

    2015-01-01

    There have been significant advances in the understanding of the biology and treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) over the past few years. A number of molecularly targeted agents are in the clinic or in development for patients with advanced NSCLC (Table 1). We are beginning to understand the mechanisms of acquired resistance following exposure to tyrosine kinase inhibitors in patients with oncogene addicted NSCLC. The advent of next generation sequencing has enabled to study comprehensively genomic alterations in lung cancer. Finally, early results from immune checkpoint inhibitors are very encouraging. This review summarizes recent advances in the area of cancer genomics, targeted therapies and immunotherapy. PMID:25535693

  4. Inoperable stage III non-small cell lung cancer: Current treatment and role of vinorelbine

    PubMed Central

    Provencio, Mariano; Isla, Dolores; Sánchez, Antonio; Cantos, Blanca

    2011-01-01

    Most lung cancer patients are diagnosed with a non-resectable disease; and around 40% in advanced stages. Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a heterogeneous disease with great variations in its clinical extent which presents a major therapeutic challenge. Although chemo-radiotherapy treatment has become the most widely used, there is currently no consensus on the best standard treatment and the experience of the therapy team plays an important role in the decision taking. We review the treatment of inoperable stage III NSCLC and the role of concomitant vinorelbine in this clinical scenario. PMID:22263088

  5. Secondary osteosarcoma developing 10 years after chemoradiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Yagishita, Shigehiro; Horinouchi, Hidehito; Yorozu, Takashi; Kitazono, Satoru; Mizugaki, Hidenori; Kanda, Shintaro; Fujiwara, Yutaka; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Noboru; Mori, Taisuke; Tsuta, Koji; Sumi, Minako; Tamura, Tomohide

    2014-02-01

    A 53-year-old female patient was admitted with pain and a progressively enlarging mass in the right upper chest. Chest computed tomography revealed a mass lesion in the region of the right upper ribs. Ten years prior to this admission, the patient had undergone right lobectomy for lung adenocarcinoma. One year after the surgery, follow-up computed tomography had revealed tumor recurrence in the mediastinal and supraclavicular lymph nodes, and the patient had been treated by chemoradiotherapy. Thereafter, regular follow-up had revealed no evidence of recurrence of the non-small-cell lung cancer. Histopathological findings revealed proliferation of spindle-shaped malignant tumor cells in a background of osteoid, consistent with the diagnosis of osteosarcoma. The location of the tumor was consistent with the radiation field. Based on the clinicopathological findings, the patient was diagnosed as having secondary osteosarcoma occurring as a result of the chemoradiotherapy administered previously for the recurrent non-small-cell lung cancer. Unfortunately, the patient died of rapid progression of the osteosarcoma within a week of admission to the hospital. The autopsy revealed contiguous invasion by the tumor of the heart, with massive thrombus formation. The peripheral pulmonary arteries were diffusely occluded by metastatic tumors. Our case serves to highlight the risk of development of secondary sarcoma as a life-threatening late complication after chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, even after complete cure of the primary tumor. PMID:24338556

  6. A rare case of non-small cell carcinoma of lung presenting as miliary mottling.

    PubMed

    Jayaram Subhashchandra, Ballaekere; Ismailkhan, Mohammed; Chikkaveeraiah Shashidhar, Kuppegala; Gopalakrishna Narahari, Moda

    2013-03-01

    Miliary mottling on chest radiography is seen in miliary tuberculosis, certain fungal infections, sarcoidosis, coal miner's pneumoconiosis, silicosis, hemosiderosis, fibrosing alveolitis, acute extrinsic allergic alveolitis, pulmonary eosinophilic syndrome, pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, and rarely in hematogenous metastases from the primary cancers of the thyroid, kidney, trophoblasts, and some sarcomas. Although very infrequent, miliary mottling can be seen in primary lung cancers. Herein, we report the case of a 28-year-old female with chest X-ray showing miliary mottling. Thoracic computed tomography (CT) features were suggestive of tuberculoma with miliary tuberculosis. CT-guided fine needle aspiration cytology confirmed the diagnosis as lower-lobe, left lung non-small cell carcinoma (adenocarcinoma). It is rare for the non-small cell carcinoma of the lung to present as miliary mottling. The rarity of our case lies in the fact that a young, non-smoking female with miliary mottling was diagnosed with non-small cell carcinoma of the lung. PMID:23645961

  7. Itraconazole inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aftab, Blake T.; Dobromilskaya, Irina; Liu, Jun O.; Rudin, Charles M.

    2011-01-01

    The anti-angiogenic agent bevacizumab has been approved for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer, although the survival benefit associated with this agent is marginal, and toxicities and cost are substantial. A recent screen for selective inhibitors of endothelial cell proliferation identified the oral anti-fungal drug itraconazole as a novel agent with potential anti-angiogenic activity. Here we define and characterize the anti-angiogenic and anti-cancer activities of itraconazole in relevant preclinical models of angiogenesis and lung cancer. Itraconazole consistently demonstrated potent, specific, and dose-dependent inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and tube formation in response to both vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)- and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-mediated angiogenic stimulation. In vivo, using primary xenograft models of human non-small cell lung cancer, oral itraconazole showed single agent growth-inhibitory activity associated with induction of tumor HIF1α expression and marked inhibition of tumor vascularity. Itraconazole significantly enhanced the anti-tumor efficacy of the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin in the same model systems. Taken together, these data suggest that itraconazole has potent and selective inhibitory activity against multiple key aspects of tumor-associated angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo, and strongly support clinical translation of its use. Based on these observations we have initiated a randomized phase II study comparing the efficacy of standard cytotoxic therapy with or without daily oral itraconazole in patients with recurrent metastatic non-small cell lung cancer. PMID:21896639

  8. The significance of PIWI family expression in human lung embryogenesis and non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Alfons; Tejero, Rut; Viñolas, Nuria; Cordeiro, Anna; Marrades, Ramon M.; Fuster, Dolors; Caritg, Oriol; Moises, Jorge; Muñoz, Carmen; Molins, Laureano; Ramirez, Josep; Monzo, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    The expression of Piwi-interacting RNAs, small RNAs that bind to PIWI proteins, was until recently believed to be limited to germinal stem cells. We have studied the expression of PIWI genes during human lung embryogenesis and in paired tumor and normal tissue prospectively collected from 71 resected non-small-cell lung cancer patients. The mRNA expression analysis showed that PIWIL1 was highly expressed in 7-week embryos and downregulated during the subsequent weeks of development. PIWIL1 was expressed in 11 of the tumor samples but in none of the normal tissue samples. These results were validated by immunohistochemistry, showing faint cytoplasmic reactivity in the PIWIL1-positive samples. Interestingly, the patients expressing PIWIL1 had a shorter time to relapse (TTR) (p = 0.006) and overall survival (OS) (p = 0.0076) than those without PIWIL1 expression. PIWIL2 and 4 were downregulated in tumor tissue in comparison to the normal tissue (p < 0.001) and the patients with lower levels of PIWIL4 had shorter TTR (p = 0.048) and OS (p = 0.033). In the multivariate analysis, PIWIL1 expression emerged as an independent prognostic marker. Using 5-Aza-dC treatment and bisulfite sequencing, we observed that PIWIL1 expression could be regulated in part by methylation. Finally, an in silico study identified a stem-cell expression signature associated with PIWIL1 expression. PMID:25742785

  9. Advances in molecular biology of lung disease: aiming for precision therapy in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Rooney, Claire; Sethi, Tariq

    2015-10-01

    Lung cancer is the principal cause of cancer-related mortality in the developed world, accounting for almost one-quarter of all cancer deaths. Traditional treatment algorithms have largely relied on histologic subtype and have comprised pragmatic chemotherapy regimens with limited efficacy. However, because our understanding of the molecular basis of disease in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has improved exponentially, it has become apparent that NSCLC can be radically subdivided, or molecularly characterized, based on recurrent driver mutations occurring in specific oncogenes. We know that the presence of such mutations leads to constitutive activation of aberrant signaling proteins that initiate, progress, and sustain tumorigenesis. This persistence of the malignant phenotype is referred to as "oncogene addiction." On this basis, a paradigm shift in treatment approach has occurred. Rational, targeted therapies have been developed, the first being tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), which entered the clinical arena > 10 years ago. These were tremendously successful, significantly affecting the natural history of NSCLC and improving patient outcomes. However, the benefits of these drugs are somewhat limited by the emergence of adaptive resistance mechanisms, and efforts to tackle this phenomenon are ongoing. A better understanding of all types of oncogene-driven NSCLC and the occurrence of TKI resistance will help us to further develop second- and third-generation small molecule inhibitors and will expand our range of precision therapies for this disease. PMID:26182407

  10. A Specific Interaction of Small Molecule Entry Inhibitors with the Envelope Glycoprotein Complex of the Junín Hemorrhagic Fever Arenavirus*

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Celestine J.; Casquilho-Gray, Hedi E.; York, Joanne; DeCamp, Dianne L.; Dai, Dongcheng; Petrilli, Erin B.; Boger, Dale L.; Slayden, Richard A.; Amberg, Sean M.; Sprang, Stephen R.; Nunberg, Jack H.

    2011-01-01

    Arenaviruses are responsible for acute hemorrhagic fevers worldwide and are recognized to pose significant threats to public health and biodefense. Small molecule compounds have recently been discovered that inhibit arenavirus entry and protect against lethal infection in animal models. These chemically distinct inhibitors act on the tripartite envelope glycoprotein (GPC) through its unusual stable signal peptide subunit to stabilize the complex against pH-induced activation of membrane fusion in the endosome. Here, we report the production and characterization of the intact transmembrane GPC complex of Junín arenavirus and its interaction with these inhibitors. The solubilized GPC is antigenically indistinguishable from the native protein and forms a homogeneous trimer in solution. When reconstituted into a lipid bilayer, the purified complex interacts specifically with its cell-surface receptor transferrin receptor-1. We show that small molecule entry inhibitors specific to New World or Old World arenaviruses bind to the membrane-associated GPC complex in accordance with their respective species selectivities and with dissociation constants comparable with concentrations that inhibit GPC-mediated membrane fusion. Furthermore, competitive binding studies reveal that these chemically distinct inhibitors share a common binding pocket on GPC. In conjunction with previous genetic studies, these findings identify the pH-sensing interface of GPC as a highly vulnerable target for antiviral intervention. This work expands our mechanistic understanding of arenavirus entry and provides a foundation to guide the development of small molecule compounds for the treatment of arenavirus hemorrhagic fevers. PMID:21159779

  11. Nintedanib Compared With Placebo in Treating Against Radiation-Induced Pneumonitis in Patients With Non-small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery and Are Undergoing Chemoradiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-27

    Radiation-Induced Pneumonitis; Stage IIA Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  12. Effect of synchronous solitary bone metastasectomy and lung cancer resection on non-small cell lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, TIANCHENG; GAO, ZONGLI; WU, WEIMING; HE, WEIWEI; YANG, YI

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most frequent cause of cancer-associated mortality among men and women globally. The skeleton is one of the most common metastatic sites. The majority of patients exhibiting bone metastases are treated using systemic therapy or symptom-based palliative approaches without surgery. The present study attempted to improve the therapeutic effects of synchronous surgeries in resectable non-small cell lung cancer patients exhibiting solitary bone metastasis. A total of 5 patients underwent synchronous lung cancer resections and solitary bone metastasectomies between October 2009 and November 2011 in the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Shanghai Sixth People's Hospital (Shanghai, China). All patients had received fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography or bone scintigraphy to demonstrate the presence of solitary bone metastasis and to exclude the presence of metastases at alternative sites. The patients received standard lung cancer and mediastinal lymph node resections. In addition, bone lesions were assessed by orthopedists and operated on synchronously with standard procedures. Following surgery, all patients were administered standard chemotherapeutic regimens. Perioperative indicators, including time for thoracic drainage, length of hospital stay, incidence of post-operative complications and progression-free survival (PFS) time, were observed. The average time for post-operative drainage was 4.6±1.1 days, and the average length of post-operative hospitalization was 8.8±2.2 days. All procedures were performed safely with no serious complications. The PFS of the patients was 13.2±7.7 months. While 2 patients presenting with spinal metastases succumbed at ~1 year post-surgery, the remaining 3 patients presenting with limb bone metastases survived for >16 months post-surgery, and were alive at the last follow-up. In conclusion, the present study indicated that a synchronous metastasectomy and lung tumor resection is

  13. [Postoperative radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer: Efficacy, target volume, dose].

    PubMed

    Dupic, G; Bellière-Calandry, A

    2016-04-01

    The rate of local failure of stage IIIA-N2 non-small cell lung cancer is 20 to 40%, even if they are managed with surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. Postoperative radiotherapy improves local control, but its benefit on global survival remains to be demonstrated. Considered for many years as an adjuvant treatment option for pN2 cancers, it continues nevertheless to be deemed too toxic. What is the current status of postoperative radiotherapy? The Lung Adjuvant Radiotherapy Trial (Lung ART) phase III trial should give us a definitive, objective response on global survival, but inclusion of patients is difficult. The results are consequently delayed. The aim of this review is to show all the results about efficacy and tolerance of postoperative radiotherapy and to define the target volume and dose to prescribe. PMID:26996789

  14. Challenges in molecular testing in non-small-cell lung cancer patients with advanced disease.

    PubMed

    Hiley, Crispin T; Le Quesne, John; Santis, George; Sharpe, Rowena; de Castro, David Gonzalez; Middleton, Gary; Swanton, Charles

    2016-09-01

    Lung cancer diagnostics have progressed greatly in the previous decade. Development of molecular testing to identify an increasing number of potentially clinically actionable genetic variants, using smaller samples obtained via minimally invasive techniques, is a huge challenge. Tumour heterogeneity and cancer evolution in response to therapy means that repeat biopsies or circulating biomarkers are likely to be increasingly useful to adapt treatment as resistance develops. We highlight some of the current challenges faced in clinical practice for molecular testing of EGFR, ALK, and new biomarkers such as PDL1. Implementation of next generation sequencing platforms for molecular diagnostics in non-small-cell lung cancer is increasingly common, allowing testing of multiple genetic variants from a single sample. The use of next generation sequencing to recruit for molecularly stratified clinical trials is discussed in the context of the UK Stratified Medicine Programme and The UK National Lung Matrix Trial. PMID:27598680

  15. The role of videomediastinoscopy in staging of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Bacić, Ivan; Skarica, Rade; Sulen, Nina; Zadro, Zvonko; Lisica-Sikić, Natasa; Karlo, Robert; Petani, Barbara

    2012-12-01

    Lung cancer is the most frequent malignant disease and the leading cause of death from malignant diseases in the world and its incidence is increasing. At the time when diagnosis is established most patients have advanced disease and are not candidates for radical surgical treatment. Patients without distant metastases are subjected to various diagnostic methods to detect metastases in mediastinal lymph nodes that make up the path of lymph drainage from the lungs. The most reliable invasive diagnostic procedures for detecting metastases in mediastinal lymph nodes are videomediastinoscopy and endobronchial ultrasound with transtracheal puncture. In the absence of mediastinal lymph node metastases surgery is the treatment of choice. If mediastinal lymph nodes are positive for metastases multimodal treatment is implemented. At the Department of Thoracic Surgery, Zadar General Hospital, videomediastinoscopy for the staging of primary non-small cell lung cancer has been performed routinely since September 2009. PMID:23390847

  16. Identification and Targeting of Long-Term Tumor-Propagating Cells in Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jahchan, Nadine S; Lim, Jing Shan; Bola, Becky; Morris, Karen; Seitz, Garrett; Tran, Kim Q; Xu, Lei; Trapani, Francesca; Morrow, Christopher J; Cristea, Sandra; Coles, Garry L; Yang, Dian; Vaka, Dedeepya; Kareta, Michael S; George, Julie; Mazur, Pawel K; Nguyen, Thuyen; Anderson, Wade C; Dylla, Scott J; Blackhall, Fiona; Peifer, Martin; Dive, Caroline; Sage, Julien

    2016-07-19

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a neuroendocrine lung cancer characterized by fast growth, early dissemination, and rapid resistance to chemotherapy. We identified a population of long-term tumor-propagating cells (TPCs) in a mouse model of SCLC. This population, marked by high levels of EpCAM and CD24, is also prevalent in human primary SCLC tumors. Murine SCLC TPCs are numerous and highly proliferative but not intrinsically chemoresistant, indicating that not all clinical features of SCLC are linked to TPCs. SCLC TPCs possess a distinct transcriptional profile compared to non-TPCs, including elevated MYC activity. Genetic and pharmacological inhibition of MYC in SCLC cells to non-TPC levels inhibits long-term propagation but not short-term growth. These studies identify a highly tumorigenic population of SCLC cells in mouse models, cell lines, and patient tumors and a means to target them in this most fatal form of lung cancer. PMID:27373157

  17. Current Concepts on the Molecular Pathology of Non-small Cell Lung Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Junya; Wistuba, Ignacio I.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of the complex biology of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), particularly activation of oncogenes by mutation, translocation and amplification, have provided new treatment targets for this disease, and allowed the identification of subsets of NSCLC tumors, mostly with adenocarcinoma histology, having unique molecular profiles that can predict response to targeted therapy. The identification of a specific genetic and molecular targetable abnormalities using tumor tissue and cytology specimens followed by the administration of a specific inhibitor to the target, are the basis of personalized lung cancer treatment. In this new paradigm, the role of a precise pathology diagnosis of lung cancer and the proper handling of tissue and cytology samples for molecular testing is becoming increasingly important. These changes have posed multiple new challenges for pathologists to adequately integrate routine histopathology analysis and molecular testing into the clinical pathology practice for tumor diagnosis and subsequent selection of the most appropriate therapy. PMID:25239274

  18. Obstructive jaundice at the initial presentation in small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ochi, Nobuaki; Takigawa, Nagio; Yasugi, Masayuki; Ishida, Etsuji; Kawamoto, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Akihiko; Harada, Daijiro; Hayashi, Eiko; Toda, Hiroko; Yanai, Hiroyuki; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2010-01-01

    Obstructive jaundice sometimes may develop in association with advanced small-cell lung cancer (SCLC); however, SCLC initially presenting with obstructive jaundice is rare. This report presents the cases of two SCLC patients with obstructive jaundice at the initial diagnosis. A 64-year-old male presented with obstructive jaundice due to a tumor at the head of the pancreas. He was diagnosed with SCLC by transbronchial biopsy from a lung tumor in the left upper lobe. Another 74-year-old male was admitted with jaundice due to a tumor in the porta hepatis. He was also diagnosed with SCLC by a fine-needle aspiration biopsy of a lung tumor in the left lower lobe. Both cases were successfully treated with systemic chemotherapy after endoscopic retrograde biliary drainage. PMID:23754881

  19. Beyond "second-line" in non-small cell lung cancer: therapy and supportive care.

    PubMed

    Martins, Renato G; Reynolds, Craig H; Riely, Gregory J

    2015-01-01

    Although there once was a single algorithm for the treatment of patients with advanced lung cancer, the modern treatment of advanced lung cancer has multiple treatment pathways that depend on multiple factors, including histology and molecular subtype of disease. New molecular targets, targeted agents, and modes of therapy for patients, including immunotherapy, are being identified at an accelerating pace. These advances are changing outcomes and the treatment landscape, but they also highlight situations with inadequate data to support the use of cytotoxic chemotherapy. In this article, we provide an overview of data regarding cytotoxic chemotherapy and targeted therapy and their value after second line, review the critical role of supportive care and palliative care, and emphasize the importance of advance care planning with our patients. Although this article focuses primarily on NSCLC, the comments about palliative care and advanced care planning also apply to patients with small cell lung cancer. PMID:25993204

  20. Dengue hemorrhagic fever

    MedlinePlus

    Hemorrhagic dengue; Dengue shock syndrome; Philippine hemorrhagic fever; Thai hemorrhagic fever; Singapore hemorrhagic fever ... Four different dengue viruses are known to cause dengue hemorrhagic fever. Dengue hemorrhagic fever occurs when a person is bitten by ...

  1. ABCC4 is required for cell proliferation and tumorigenesis in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaoting; Guo, Yinan; Yue, Wentao; Zhang, Lina; Gu, Meng; Wang, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Background Multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4), also known as ATP-cassette binding protein 4 (ABCC4), is a member of the MRP/ABCC subfamily of ATP-binding cassette transporters, which are capable of pumping a wide variety of drugs out of the cell. However, little is known about the function of ABCC4 in the proliferation of lung cancer cells. Methods ABCC4 mRNA and protein levels in lung cancer cell lines were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot, respectively. A lentivirus-mediated RNA interference technique was used to inhibit ABCC4 mRNA expression in A549 and 801D cells. The function of ABCC4 in cell growth was investigated by MTS and colony formation assays. The role of ABCC4 in cell cycle progression was evaluated by flow cytometry and Western blot analysis. ABCC4 mRNA levels in 30 pairs of tumors and corresponding matched adjacent normal tissues from non-small cell lung cancer patients were detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results ABCC4 was highly expressed in lung cancer cell lines. ABCC4 expression was markedly downregulated in A549 and 801D cells using the RNA interference technique. Suppression of ABCC4 expression inhibited cell growth. The percentage of cells in G1 phase was increased when ABCC4 expression was suppressed. Phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein was weakened, originating in the downregulation of ABCC4. ABCC4 mRNA was highly expressed in lung cancer tissue and lung cancer cell lines. Conclusion ABCC4 may play an important role in the control of A549 and 801D cell growth. ABCC4 is a potential target for lung cancer therapy. PMID:24591841

  2. Transcription factor FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network in non-small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Sang-Min; An, Joo-Hee; Kim, Chul-Hong; Kim, Jung-Woong Choi, Kyung-Hee

    2015-08-07

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-mediated death. Although various therapeutic approaches are used for lung cancer treatment, these mainly target the tumor suppressor p53 transcription factor, which is involved in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. However, p53-targeted therapies have limited application in lung cancer, since p53 is found to be mutated in more than half of lung cancers. In this study, we propose tumor suppressor FOXA2 as an alternative target protein for therapies against lung cancer and reveal a possible FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network by identifying new target genes and binding partners of FOXA2 by using various screening techniques. The genes encoding Glu/Asp-rich carboxy-terminal domain 2 (CITED2), nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 2 (NR0B2), cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1) and BCL2-associated X protein (BAX) were identified as putative target genes of FOXA2. Additionally, the proteins including highly similar to heat shock protein HSP 90-beta (HSP90A), heat shock 70 kDa protein 1A variant (HSPA1A), histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) and HDAC3 were identified as novel interacting partners of FOXA2. Moreover, we showed that FOXA2-dependent promoter activation of BAX and p21 genes is significantly reduced via physical interactions between the identified binding partners and FOXA2. These results provide opportunities to understand the FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network and novel therapeutic targets to modulate this network in p53-deficient lung cancer. - Highlights: • Identification of new target genes of FOXA2. • Identifications of novel interaction proteins of FOXA2. • Construction of FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulatory network in non-small cell lung cancer.

  3. Chlorin e6 – polyvinylpyrrolidone mediated photosensitization is effective against human non-small cell lung carcinoma compared to small cell lung carcinoma xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Chin, William WL; Heng, Paul WS; Olivo, Malini

    2007-01-01

    Background Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an effective local cancer treatment that involves light activation of a photosensitizer, resulting in oxygen-dependent, free radical-mediated cell death. Little is known about the comparative efficacy of PDT in treating non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) and small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC), despite ongoing clinical trials treating lung cancers. The present study evaluated the potential use of chlorin e6 – polyvinylpyrrolidone (Ce6-PVP) as a multimodality photosensitizer for fluorescence detection and photodynamic therapy (PDT) on NSCLC and SCLC xenografts. Results Human NSCLC (NCI-H460) and SCLC (NCI-H526) tumor cell lines were used to establish tumor xenografts in the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model as well as in the Balb/c nude mice. In the CAM model, Ce6-PVP was applied topically (1.0 mg/kg) and fluorescence intensity was charted at various time points. Tumor-bearing mice were given intravenous administration of Ce6-PVP (2.0 mg/kg) and laser irradiation at 665 nm (fluence of 150 J/cm2 and fluence rate of 125 mW/cm2). Tumor response was evaluated at 48 h post PDT. Studies of temporal fluorescence pharmacokinetics in CAM tumor xenografts showed that Ce6-PVP has a selective localization and a good accuracy in demarcating NSCLC compared to SCLC from normal surrounding CAM after 3 h post drug administration. Irradiation at 3 h drug-light interval showed greater tumor necrosis against human NSCLC xenografts in nude mice. SCLC xenografts were observed to express resistance to photosensitization with Ce6-PVP. Conclusion The formulation of Ce6-PVP is distinctly advantageous as a diagnostic and therapeutic agent for fluorescence diagnosis and PDT of NSCLC. PMID:18053148

  4. EZH2 promotes progression of small cell lung cancer by suppressing the TGF-β-Smad-ASCL1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Murai, Fumihiko; Koinuma, Daizo; Shinozaki-Ushiku, Aya; Fukayama, Masashi; Miyaozono, Kohei; Ehata, Shogo

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) induces apoptosis in many types of cancer cells and acts as a tumor suppressor. We performed a functional analysis of TGF-β signaling to identify a molecular mechanism that regulated survival in small cell lung cancer cells. Here, we found low expression of TGF-β type II receptor (TβRII) in most small cell lung cancer cells and tissues compared to normal lung epithelial cells and normal lung tissues, respectively. When wild-type TβRII was overexpressed in small cell lung cancer cells, TGF-β suppressed cell growth in vitro and tumor formation in vivo through induction of apoptosis. Components of polycomb repressive complex 2, including enhancer of zeste 2 (EZH2), were highly expressed in small cell lung cancer cells; this led to epigenetic silencing of TβRII expression and suppression of TGF-β-mediated apoptosis. Achaete-scute family bHLH transcription factor 1 (ASCL1; also known as ASH1), a Smad-dependent target of TGF-β, was found to induce survival in small cell lung cancer cells. Thus, EZH2 promoted small cell lung cancer progression by suppressing the TGF-β-Smad-ASCL1 pathway.

  5. A crucial requirement for Hedgehog signaling in small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kwon-Sik; Martelotto, Luciano G; Peifer, Martin; Sos, Martin L; Karnezis, Anthony N; Mahjoub, Moe R; Bernard, Katie; Conklin, Jamie F; Szczepny, Anette; Yuan, Jing; Guo, Ribo; Ospina, Beatrice; Falzon, Jeanette; Bennett, Samara; Brown, Tracey J; Markovic, Ana; Devereux, Wendy L; Ocasio, Cory A; Chen, James K; Stearns, Tim; Thomas, Roman K; Dorsch, Marion; Buonamici, Silvia; Watkins, D Neil; Peacock, Craig D; Sage, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive neuroendocrine subtype of lung cancer for which there is no effective treatment1,2. Using a mouse model in which deletion of Rb1 and Trp53 in the lung epithelium of adult mice induces SCLC3,4, we found that the Hedgehog signaling pathway is activated in SCLC cells independently of the lung microenvironment. Constitutive activation of the Hedgehog signaling molecule Smoothened (Smo) promoted the clonogenicity of human SCLC in vitro and the initiation and progression of mouse SCLC in vivo. Reciprocally, deletion of Smo in Rb1 and Trp53-mutant lung epithelial cells strongly suppressed SCLC initiation and progression in mice. Furthermore, pharmacological blockade of Hedgehog signaling inhibited the growth of mouse and human SCLC, most notably following chemotherapy. These findings show a crucial cell-intrinsic role for Hedgehog signaling in the development and maintenance of SCLC and identify Hedgehog pathway inhibition as a therapeutic strategy to slow the progression of disease and delay cancer recurrence in individuals with SCLC. PMID:21983857

  6. Targeting DDX3 with a small molecule inhibitor for lung cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bol, Guus M; Vesuna, Farhad; Xie, Min; Zeng, Jing; Aziz, Khaled; Gandhi, Nishant; Levine, Anne; Irving, Ashley; Korz, Dorian; Tantravedi, Saritha; Heerma van Voss, Marise R; Gabrielson, Kathleen; Bordt, Evan A; Polster, Brian M; Cope, Leslie; van der Groep, Petra; Kondaskar, Atul; Rudek, Michelle A; Hosmane, Ramachandra S; van der Wall, Elsken; van Diest, Paul J; Tran, Phuoc T; Raman, Venu

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common malignancy worldwide and is a focus for developing targeted therapies due to its refractory nature to current treatment. We identified a RNA helicase, DDX3, which is overexpressed in many cancer types including lung cancer and is associated with lower survival in lung cancer patients. We designed a first-in-class small molecule inhibitor, RK-33, which binds to DDX3 and abrogates its activity. Inhibition of DDX3 by RK-33 caused G1 cell cycle arrest, induced apoptosis, and promoted radiation sensitization in DDX3-overexpressing cells. Importantly, RK-33 in combination with radiation induced tumor regression in multiple mouse models of lung cancer. Mechanistically, loss of DDX3 function either by shRNA or by RK-33 impaired Wnt signaling through disruption of the DDX3–β-catenin axis and inhibited non-homologous end joining—the major DNA repair pathway in mammalian somatic cells. Overall, inhibition of DDX3 by RK-33 promotes tumor regression, thus providing a compelling argument to develop DDX3 inhibitors for lung cancer therapy. PMID:25820276

  7. Genetic Polymorphism, Telomere Biology and Non-Small Lung Cancer Risk.

    PubMed

    Wei, Rongrong; DeVilbiss, Frank T; Liu, Wanqing

    2015-10-20

    Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified a number of chromosomal regions associated with the risk of lung cancer. Of these regions, single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), especially rs2736100 located in the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene show unique and significant association with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a few subpopulations including women, nonsmokers, East Asians and those with adenocarcinoma. Recent studies have also linked rs2736100 with a longer telomere length and lung cancer risk. In this review, we seek to summarize the relationship between these factors and to further link the underlying telomere biology to lung cancer etiology. We conclude that genetic alleles combined with environmental (e.g., less-smoking) and physiological factors (gender and age) that confer longer telomere length are strong risk factors for NSCLC. This linkage may be particularly relevant in lung adenocarcinoma driven by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations, as these mutations have also been strongly linked to female gender, less-smoking history, adenocarcinoma histology and East Asian ethnicity. By establishing this connection, a strong argument is made for further investigating of the involvement of these entities during the tumorigenesis of NSCLC. PMID:26554909

  8. Lung carcinoma: survey of 2286 cases with emphasis on small cell type.

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, J D; Ewing, H P; Neely, W A; Stauss, H K; Vance, R B

    1981-01-01

    Lung carcinoma is the commonest major malignancy in men in the United States and its incidence is increasing rapidly in women. It is estimated that there will have been 117,000 new cases and 101,300 deaths in 1980. The 2286 patients with lung carcinoma admitted to the Hospital of the University of Mississippi from 1955 to 1980 were reviewed by decades of chronology and of life, with respect to age, cell type, sex and racial incidence. The greatest age incidence was in the sixth and seventh decades; cell types overall were epidermoid (45% of the patients), adenocarcinoma (12% of the patients), small (oat) cell (21% of the patients), and others (22% of the patients). There was a steady increase in the incidence of disease in females, adjusted for total hospital admissions, and a less certain increase among black patients. Twenty-eight per cent of 250 patients with small cell carcinoma so studied exhibited some feature of the paraneoplastic or paraendocrine syndromes. In 41 patients with small cell carcinoma treated with multiple drug chemotherapy, there was an overall response rate of 50% and an additional "stable disease" rate of 28%. Mean survival period in this group was 52 weeks, compared with 12 weeks in patients whose diseases went untreated. Clearly, definite progress is being made, not only in our knowledge of the biology of lung carcinoma, in general, but in the treatment of small cell carcinoma in particular. Images Fig. 4. PMID:6263195

  9. Selection of chemotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer is facilitated by new therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhehai

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, advanced non-small cell lung cancer is still an incurable disease. Recent researches have led to considerable progress in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. This article reviews the main studies on chemotherapy on non-small cell lung cancer and discusses the new therapeutic strategies available to date. Stable disease (SD) is necessary in chemotherapy for tumor. The proportion of population with responders or SD basically maintained similar regardless of regimens. The overall survival after chemotherapy for patients with SD was lower than patients with responders, and higher than patients with progressive disease. Greater benefits could be achieved in patients with effective induction chemotherapy using chemotherapeutic agents for maintenance therapy, whereas the benefits were relatively small for patients with SD. It has been found that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status had certain correlation with the efficacy of chemotherapy. First-line chemotherapy has shown advantages in effective rate and progression free survival on EGFR mutant. EGFR mutation produced significant effects on the efficacy of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. Patients with EGFR mutation had a higher effective rate than wild-type EGFR patients, and patients with responders had a greater benefit in progression free survival from maintenance therapy. However, it is still necessary to carry out more careful and deeper studies and analyses on traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy, to further optimize cytotoxic chemotherapy and to use molecular targeted agents with different mechanisms. PMID:25550891

  10. Third CECOG consensus on the systemic treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Brodowicz, T; Ciuleanu, T; Crawford, J; Filipits, M; Fischer, J R; Georgoulias, V; Gridelli, C; Hirsch, F R; Jassem, J; Kosmidis, P; Krzakowski, M; Manegold, Ch; Pujol, J L; Stahel, R; Thatcher, N; Vansteenkiste, J; Minichsdorfer, C; Zöchbauer-Müller, S; Pirker, R; Zielinski, C C

    2012-05-01

    The current third consensus on the systemic treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) builds upon and updates similar publications on the subject by the Central European Cooperative Oncology Group (CECOG), which has published such consensus statements in the years 2002 and 2005 (Zielinski CC, Beinert T, Crawford J et al. Consensus on medical treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer--update 2004. Lung Cancer 2005; 50: 129-137). The principle of all CECOG consensus is such that evidence-based recommendations for state-of-the-art treatment are given upon which all participants and authors of the manuscript have to agree (Beslija S, Bonneterre J, Burstein HJ et al. Third consensus on medical treatment of metastatic breast cancer. Ann Oncol 2009; 20 (11): 1771-1785). This is of particular importance in diseases in which treatment options depend on very particular clinical and biologic variables (Zielinski CC, Beinert T, Crawford J et al. Consensus on medical treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer--update 2004. Lung Cancer 2005; 50: 129-137; Beslija S, Bonneterre J, Burstein HJ et al. Third consensus on medical treatment of metastatic breast cancer. Ann Oncol 2009; 20 (11): 1771-1785). Since the publication of the last CECOG consensus on the medical treatment of NSCLC, a series of diagnostic tools for the characterization of biomarkers for personalized therapy for NSCLC as well as therapeutic options including adjuvant treatment, targeted therapy, and maintenance treatment have emerged and strongly influenced the field. Thus, the present third consensus was generated that not only readdresses previous disease-related issues but also expands toward recent developments in the management of NSCLC. It is the aim of the present consensus to summarize minimal quality-oriented requirements for individual patients with NSCLC in its various stages based upon levels of evidence in the light of a rapidly expanding array of individual therapeutic options. PMID:21940784

  11. Epidermal growth factor receptors in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Veale, D.; Ashcroft, T.; Marsh, C.; Gibson, G. J.; Harris, A. L.

    1987-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor is homologous to the oncogene erb-beta and is the receptor for a class of tumour growth factors (TGF-alpha). The clinical correlations with its expression were studied in 77 non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). They were stained for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr) by means of an indirect immunoperoxidase technique using a monoclonal antibody against the receptor. Normal lung tissue and normal bronchus were stained for comparison. Cancer tissue showed significantly increased staining compared to normal lung (P less than 0.05). Staining for EGFr in 40 squamous carcinomas was significantly stronger than in 37 specimens of other types of NSCLC (P less than 0.05), and staining in stage three NSCLC was stronger than in stage 1 and 2 (P less than 0.05). These results suggest that the presence of a high intensity of staining for EGF receptor is associated with spread of human non-small cell lung cancer and this receptor may be a suitable target for therapy. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:3038157

  12. Cell-free DNA levels in plasma of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer and inflammatory lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Szpechcinski, A; Chorostowska-Wynimko, J; Struniawski, R; Kupis, W; Rudzinski, P; Langfort, R; Puscinska, E; Bielen, P; Sliwinski, P; Orlowski, T

    2015-01-01

    Background: The analysis of plasma cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is expected to provide useful biomarkers for early diagnosis of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, it remains unclear whether the intense release of cfDNA into the bloodstream of NSCLC patients results from malignancy or chronic inflammatory response. Consequently, the current diagnostic utility of plasma cfDNA quantification has not been thoroughly validated in subjects with chronic respiratory inflammation. Here we assess the effect of chronic respiratory inflammation on plasma cfDNA levels and evaluate the potential clinical value of this phenomenon as an early lung cancer diagnostic tool. Methods: We measured plasma cfDNA concentrations in 50 resectable NSCLC patients, 101 patients with chronic respiratory inflammation (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, sarcoidosis, or asthma) and 40 healthy volunteers using real-time PCR. Results: We found significantly higher plasma cfDNA levels in NSCLC patients than in subjects with chronic respiratory inflammation and healthy individuals (P<0.0001). There were no significant differences in plasma cfDNA levels between patients with chronic respiratory inflammation and healthy volunteers. The cutoff point of >2.8 ng ml−1 provided 90% sensitivity and 80.5% specificity in discriminating NSCLC from healthy individuals (area under the curve (AUC)=0.90). The receiver-operating characteristics curve distinguishing NSCLC patients from subjects with chronic respiratory inflammation indicated 56% sensitivity and 91% specificity at the >5.25-ng ml−1 cutoff (AUC=0.76). Conclusions: We demonstrated that elevated plasma cfDNA levels in NSCLC resulted primarily from tumour development rather than inflammatory response, raising the potential clinical implications for lung cancer screening and early diagnosis. Further research is necessary to better characterise and identify factors and processes regulating cfDNA levels in the blood under normal and

  13. Recombinant Interleukin-15 in Treating Patients With Advanced Melanoma, Kidney Cancer, Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, or Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-05

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Skin Carcinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  14. [A case of non-small cell lung cancer with hemodialysis which responded to docetaxel monotherapy].

    PubMed

    Abe, Yumiko; Tanaka, Kentaro; Matsumoto, Koichiro; Takayama, Koichi; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Izumi, Miiru; Inoue, Hiromasa; Nakanishi, Yoichi

    2010-10-01

    A 56-year-old man receiving hemodialysis treatment was hospitalized for examination of a mass in the right middle lobe. Chest computed tomography showed a right hilar mass shadow accompanied by pleural effusion. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was diagnosed by cytological examination of the pleural effusion. No epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation was found. He was treated with 6 courses of docetaxel as first-line chemotherapy. Docetaxel was administered on the same day as hemodialysis. Adverse events, including hematotoxicity, were managed safely and no delay in administration occurred. This chemotherapy resulted in a partial response. Because docetaxel is metabolized in the liver and does not affect renal function, it can be administered as a standard regimen. This suggests that docetaxel monotherapy is an efficient therapy for non-small cell lung cancer patients receiving hemodialysis. PMID:21066867

  15. Role of immunotherapy in the treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Rijavec, Erika; Genova, Carlo; Alama, Angela; Barletta, Giulia; Sini, Claudio; Pronzato, Paolo; Coco, Simona; Dal Bello, Maria Giovanna; Savarino, Graziana; Truini, Anna; Boccardo, Francesco; Grossi, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    After several decades of modest results with nonspecific immune stimulants, immunotherapy has become an exciting approach in the treatment of cancer. Although non-small-cell lung cancer has not been considered an immunogenic disease for very long, a better understanding of tumor immunology and the identification of new targets have led to the development of many clinical trials of immune-based therapies for this neoplasm. Promising results from many clinical trials suggest that immunotherapy could be an effective strategy in the management of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer. Further studies are required to help clinicians in the selection of patients who are more likely to benefit from immunotherapy strategies by the identification of biomarkers and to understand when the combination of immunotherapy with other agents should be recommended. PMID:24328411

  16. Pazopanib diminishes non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) growth and metastases in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Honglin; Yang, Fan; Shen, Wang; Wang, Yuli; Li, Xuebing; You, Jiacong; Zhou, Qinghua

    2015-01-01

    Background Anti-angiogenesis has been demonstrated to have a critical role in lung cancer pathogenesis. Here, we characterized the effect of the small-molecule angiogenesis inhibitor pazopanib on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Methods NSCLC cells were tested for viability and migration after incubation with varying concentrations of pazopanib. Further, the phosphorylation status of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, protein kinase B, and MEK were assessed in vitro. For in vivo testing, mice grafted with NSCLC cell lines L9981 and A549 were treated orally with pazopanib. Results Pazopanib inhibits signaling pathways in tumor cells, thus blocking NSCLC cell growth and migration in vitro and inducing tumor cell arrest at G0/G1 phase. We show that pazopanib could inhibit tumor cell growth, decrease metastases, and prolong survival in two mouse xenograft models of human NSCLC. Conclusion These preclinical studies of pazopanib show the possibility of clinical application and, ultimately, improvement in patient outcome. PMID:26273349

  17. Migration Suppression of Small Cell Lung Cancer by Polysaccharides from Nostoc commune Vaucher.

    PubMed

    Guo, Min; Ding, Guo-Bin; Yang, Peng; Zhang, Lichao; Wu, Haili; Li, Hanqing; Li, Zhuoyu

    2016-08-17

    Nostoc commune Vauch., classified into cyanobacteria, has been always well appreciated as a healthy food and medicine worldwide owing to its rich nutrition and potent bioactivities. Nevertheless, the inhibitory effect of polysaccharides from N. commune Vauch. (NVPS) against cancer cell progression and metastasis is still being unraveled. The results in this study showed that NVPS remarkably suppressed cell migration through blocking the epithelial-mesenchymal transition program in NCI-H446 and NCI-H1688 human small cell lung cancer cells. The inhibitory effects were attributed to the suppression of integrin β1/FAK signaling through regulating cell-matrix adhesion. Furthermore, NVPS treatment could increase E-cadherin expression, but down-regulate N-cadherin, Vimentin, and MMP-9 expression, which resulted in the blockage of STAT3 nuclear translocation and JAK1 signaling. These findings suggest that NVPS may be a good candidate for development as a possible antitumor agent against small cell lung cancer. PMID:27465400

  18. ROS1 rearranged non-small cell lung cancer brain metastases respond to low dose radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lukas, Rimas V; Hasan, Yasmin; Nicholas, Martin K; Salgia, Ravi

    2015-12-01

    We present a young woman with ROS1 gene rearranged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with brain metastases. ROS is a proto-oncogene tyrosine protein kinase. The patient received a partial course of whole brain radiation therapy and experienced a sustained partial response in the brain. We hypothesize that ROS1 rearranged NSCLC brain metastases may be particularly sensitive to radiation therapy. PMID:26159887

  19. Computational discovery of pathway-level genetic vulnerabilities in non-small-cell lung cancer | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Novel approaches are needed for discovery of targeted therapies for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that are specific to certain patients. Whole genome RNAi screening of lung cancer cell lines provides an ideal source for determining candidate drug targets. Unsupervised learning algorithms uncovered patterns of differential vulnerability across lung cancer cell lines to loss of functionally related genes. Such genetic vulnerabilities represent candidate targets for therapy and are found to be involved in splicing, translation and protein folding.

  20. Alectinib in RET-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer—Another progress in precision medicine?

    PubMed Central

    Filipits, Martin

    2015-01-01

    RET fusions have been recognized as potential therapeutic targets in advanced non-small cell lung cancer. RET fusion proteins are detected in about 2% of lung adenocarcinomas. Alectinib, a second generation ALK inhibitor, was shown to block growth of cells with RET fusions. Thus alectinib should be further evaluated within clinical trials in patients with RET fusion-positive adenocarcinomas of the lung. PMID:26798590

  1. Hay Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... and throat. This can trigger a type of allergy called hay fever. Symptoms can include Sneezing, often ... to use distilled or sterilized water with saline. Allergy shots can help make you less sensitive to ...

  2. Typhoid fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... most commonly caused due to a bacteria called Salmonella typhi ( S typhi ). Causes S typhi is spread through contaminated ... as food handlers. Alternative Names Enteric fever Images Salmonella typhi organism Fly Digestive system organs References Harris ...

  3. Rheumatic Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... always tell your doctor or dentist about your history of rheumatic fever before you have a surgical or dental procedure. Such procedures may cause bacteria to enter the bloodstream and infect your heart ...

  4. Lassa Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... an acute viral illness that occurs in west Africa. The illness was discovered in 1969 when two ... Lassa fever is endemic in parts of west Africa including Sierra Leone, Liberia, Guinea and Nigeria; however, ...

  5. Dengue fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... by the bite of mosquitoes, most commonly the mosquito Aedes aegypti , which is found in tropic and ... Clothing, mosquito repellent, and netting can help reduce the risk of mosquito bites that can spread dengue fever and ...

  6. Veliparib, Cisplatin, and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Advanced Biliary, Pancreatic, Urothelial, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-01

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  7. Target genes regulated by transcription factor E2F1 in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Zun-Ling; Jiao, Fei; Ma, Ying; Yue, Zhen; Kong, Li-Jun

    2016-06-25

    Previously, we have reported that transcription factor E2F1 expression is up-regulated in approximately 95% of small cell lung cancer tissue samples and closely associated with invasion and metastasis, but few studies have investigated specific target genes regulated by E2F1 in this disease. The aim of this study was to clarify the target genes controlled by E2F1 in the small cell lung cancer cell line H1688. The results of chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) showed that total 5 326 potential target genes were identified, in which 4 700 were structural genes and 626 long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). Gene Ontology (GO) and enrichment map analysis results indicated that these target genes were associated with three main functions: (1) cell cycle regulation, (2) chromatin and histone modification, and (3) protein transport. MEME4.7.0 software was used to identify the E2F1 binding DNA motif, and six motifs were discovered for coding genes and lncRNAs. These results clarify the target genes of E2F1, and provide the experimental basis for further exploring the roles of E2F1 in tumorigenesis, development, invasion and metastasis, recurrence, and drug resistance in small cell lung cancer. PMID:27350200

  8. Q Fever

    PubMed Central

    Maurin, M.; Raoult, D.

    1999-01-01

    Q fever is a zoonosis with a worldwide distribution with the exception of New Zealand. The disease is caused by Coxiella burnetii, a strictly intracellular, gram-negative bacterium. Many species of mammals, birds, and ticks are reservoirs of C. burnetii in nature. C. burnetii infection is most often latent in animals, with persistent shedding of bacteria into the environment. However, in females intermittent high-level shedding occurs at the time of parturition, with millions of bacteria being released per gram of placenta. Humans are usually infected by contaminated aerosols from domestic animals, particularly after contact with parturient females and their birth products. Although often asymptomatic, Q fever may manifest in humans as an acute disease (mainly as a self-limited febrile illness, pneumonia, or hepatitis) or as a chronic disease (mainly endocarditis), especially in patients with previous valvulopathy and to a lesser extent in immunocompromised hosts and in pregnant women. Specific diagnosis of Q fever remains based upon serology. Immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG antiphase II antibodies are detected 2 to 3 weeks after infection with C. burnetii, whereas the presence of IgG antiphase I C. burnetii antibodies at titers of ≥1:800 by microimmunofluorescence is indicative of chronic Q fever. The tetracyclines are still considered the mainstay of antibiotic therapy of acute Q fever, whereas antibiotic combinations administered over prolonged periods are necessary to prevent relapses in Q fever endocarditis patients. Although the protective role of Q fever vaccination with whole-cell extracts has been established, the population which should be primarily vaccinated remains to be clearly identified. Vaccination should probably be considered in the population at high risk for Q fever endocarditis. PMID:10515901

  9. Inhibitory effect of Disulfiram/copper complex on non-small cell lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Lincan; Shen, Hongmei; Zhao, Guangqiang; Yang, Runxiang; Cai, Xinyi; Zhang, Lijuan; Jin, Congguo; Huang, Yunchao

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Disulfiram and copper synergistically inhibit lung cancer cell proliferation. • Lung cancer cell colony formation ability is inhibited by Disulfiram/copper. • Disulfiram/copper increases the sensitivity of cisplatin to lung cancer cells. • Lung cancer stem cells are specifically targeted by Disulfiram/copper complex. - Abstract: Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common cause of cancer-related death in both men and women worldwide. Recently, Disulfiram has been reported to be able to inhibit glioblastoma, prostate, or breast cancer cell proliferation. In this study, the synergistic effect of Disulfiram and copper on NSCLC cell growth was investigated. Inhibition of cancer cell proliferation was detected by 1-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-3,5-diphenylformazan (MTT) assay and cell cycle analysis. Liquid colony formation and tumor spheroid formation assays were used to evaluate their effect on cancer cell clonogenicity. Real-time PCR was performed to test the mRNA level of cancer stem cell related genes. We found that Disulfiram or copper alone did not potently inhibit NSCLC cell proliferation in vitro. However, the presence of copper significantly enhanced inhibitory effect of Disulfiram on NSCLC cell growth, indicating a synergistic effect between Disulfiram and copper. Cell cycle analysis showed that Disulfiram/copper complex caused NSCLC cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase. Furthermore, Disulfiram/copper significantly increased the sensitivity of cisplatin in NSCLC cells tested by MTT assay. Liquid colony formation assay revealed that copper dramatically increased the inhibitory effect of Disulfiram on NSCLC cell colony forming ability. Disulfiram combined with copper significantly attenuated NSCLC cell spheroid formation and recuded the mRNA expression of lung cancer stem cell related genes. Our data suggest that Disulfiram/copper complex alone or combined with other chemotherapy is a potential therapeutic strategy for NSCLC patients.

  10. Tumor and host factors that may limit efficacy of chemotherapy in non-small cell and small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Stewart, David J

    2010-09-01

    While chemotherapy provides useful palliation, advanced lung cancer remains incurable since those tumors that are initially sensitive to therapy rapidly develop acquired resistance. Resistance may arise from impaired drug delivery, extracellular factors, decreased drug uptake into tumor cells, increased drug efflux, drug inactivation by detoxifying factors, decreased drug activation or binding to target, altered target, increased damage repair, tolerance of damage, decreased proapoptotic factors, increased antiapoptotic factors, or altered cell cycling or transcription factors. Factors for which there is now substantial clinical evidence of a link to small cell lung cancer (SCLC) resistance to chemotherapy include MRP (for platinum-based combination chemotherapy) and MDR1/P-gp (for non-platinum agents). SPECT MIBI and Tc-TF scanning appears to predict chemotherapy benefit in SCLC. In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the strongest clinical evidence is for taxane resistance with elevated expression or mutation of class III beta-tubulin (and possibly alpha tubulin), platinum resistance and expression of ERCC1 or BCRP, gemcitabine resistance and RRM1 expression, and resistance to several agents and COX-2 expression (although COX-2 inhibitors have had minimal impact on drug efficacy clinically). Tumors expressing high BRCA1 may have increased resistance to platinums but increased sensitivity to taxanes. Limited early clinical data suggest that chemotherapy resistance in NSCLC may also be increased with decreased expression of cyclin B1 or of Eg5, or with increased expression of ICAM, matrilysin, osteopontin, DDH, survivin, PCDGF, caveolin-1, p21WAF1/CIP1, or 14-3-3sigma, and that IGF-1R inhibitors may increase efficacy of chemotherapy, particularly in squamous cell carcinomas. Equivocal data (with some positive studies but other negative studies) suggest that NSCLC tumors with some EGFR mutations may have increased sensitivity to chemotherapy, while K-ras mutations