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Sample records for fiber-optic nonlinear endomicroscopy

  1. Scanning all-fiber-optic endomicroscopy system for 3D nonlinear optical imaging of biological tissues

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yicong; Leng, Yuxin; Xi, Jiefeng; Li, Xingde

    2009-01-01

    An extremely compact all-fiber-optic scanning endomicroscopy system was developed for two-photon fluorescence (TPF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging of biological samples. A conventional double-clad fiber (DCF) was employed in the endomicroscope for single-mode femtosecond pulse delivery, multimode nonlinear optical signals collection and fast two-dimensional scanning. A single photonic bandgap fiber (PBF) with negative group velocity dispersion at two-photon excitation wavelength (i.e. ~810 nm) was used for pulse prechirping in replacement of a bulky grating/lens-based pulse stretcher. The combined use of DCF and PBF in the endomicroscopy system made the endomicroscope basically a plug-and-play unit. The excellent imaging ability of the extremely compact all-fiber-optic nonlinear optical endomicroscopy system was demonstrated by SHG imaging of rat tail tendon and depth-resolved TPF imaging of epithelial tissues stained with acridine orange. The preliminary results suggested the promising potential of this extremely compact all-fiber-optic endomicroscopy system for real-time assessment of both epithelial and stromal structures in luminal organs. PMID:19434122

  2. Fiber-optic nonlinear endomicroscopy with focus scanning by using shape memory alloy actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yicong; Zhang, Yuying; Xi, Jiefeng; Li, Ming-Jun; Li, Xingde

    2010-11-01

    A miniature fiber optic endomicroscope with built-in dynamic focus scanning capability is developed for the first time for 3-D two-photon fluorescence (TPF) imaging of biological samples. Fast 2-D lateral beam scanning is realized by resonantly vibrating a double-clad fiber cantilever with a tubular piezoactuator. Slow axial scanning is achieved by moving the distal end of the imaging probe with an extremely compact electrically driven shape memory alloy (SMA). The 10-mm-long SMA allows 150-μm contractions with a driving voltage varying only from 50 to 100 mV. The response of the SMA contraction with the applied voltage is nonlinear, but repeatable and can be accurately calibrated. Depth-resolved imaging of acriflavine-stained biological tissues and unstained white paper with the endomicroscope is performed, and the results demonstrate the feasibility of 3-D nonlinear optical imaging with the SMA-based scanning fiber-optic endomicroscope.

  3. Development of a nonlinear fiber-optic spectrometer for human lung tissue exploration

    PubMed Central

    Peyrot, Donald A.; Lefort, Claire; Steffenhagen, Marie; Mansuryan, Tigran; Ducourthial, Guillaume; Abi-Haidar, Darine; Sandeau, Nicolas; Vever-Bizet, Christine; Kruglik, Sergei G.; Thiberville, Luc; Louradour, Frédéric; Bourg-Heckly, Geneviève

    2012-01-01

    Several major lung pathologies are characterized by early modifications of the extracellular matrix (ECM) fibrillar collagen and elastin network. We report here the development of a nonlinear fiber-optic spectrometer, compatible with an endoscopic use, primarily intended for the recording of second-harmonic generation (SHG) signal of collagen and two-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF) of both collagen and elastin. Fiber dispersion is accurately compensated by the use of a specific grism-pair stretcher, allowing laser pulse temporal width around 70 fs and excitation wavelength tunability from 790 to 900 nm. This spectrometer was used to investigate the excitation wavelength dependence (from 800 to 870 nm) of SHG and 2PEF spectra originating from ex vivo human lung tissue samples. The results were compared with spectral responses of collagen gel and elastin powder reference samples and also with data obtained using standard nonlinear microspectroscopy. The excitation-wavelength-tunable nonlinear fiber-optic spectrometer presented in this study allows performing nonlinear spectroscopy of human lung tissue ECM through the elastin 2PEF and the collagen SHG signals. This work opens the way to tunable excitation nonlinear endomicroscopy based on both distal scanning of a single optical fiber and proximal scanning of a fiber-optic bundle. PMID:22567579

  4. Increased illumination uniformity and reduced photodamage offered by the Lissajous scanning in fiber-optic two-photon endomicroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Wenxuan; Murari, Kartikeya; Zhang, Yuying; Chen, Yongping; Li, Ming-Jun; Li, Xingde

    2012-02-01

    We compare the illumination uniformity and the associated effects of the spiral and Lissajous scanning patterns that are commonly used in an endomicroscope. Theoretical analyses and numerical simulations were first performed to quantitatively investigate the area illumination density in the spiral scanning pattern. The results revealed the potential problem of manifest photodamage due to the very high illumination density in the center of the spiral scan. Similar analyses of the Lissajous scanning pattern, which can be conveniently implemented on the same endomicroscope with no hardware modifications, showed a more uniform illumination density with about an 80-fold reduction in the peak illumination density. To underscore the benefit offered by the improved illumination uniformity, we conducted in vitro two-photon fluorescence imaging of cultured cells stained with a LIVE/DEAD viability assay using our home-built, fiber-optic, two-channel endomicroscopy system. Both the spiral and the Lissajous scans were implemented. Our experimental results showed that cells near the spiral scan center experienced obvious photodamage, whereas cells remained alive over the entire region under the Lissajous beam scanning, confirming the predicted advantage offered by the Lissajous scan over this spiral scan in an endomicroscopy setting.

  5. Pulse Shepherding in Nonlinear Fiber Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, C.; Bergman, L.

    1996-01-01

    In a wavelength division multiplexed fiber system, where pulses on different wavelength beams may co-propagate in a single mode fiber, the cross-phase-modulation (CPM) effects caused by the nonlinearity of the optical fiber are unavoidable. In other words, pulses on different wavelength beams can interact with and affect each other through the intensity dependence of the refractive index of the fiber. Although CPM will not cause energy to be exchanged among the beams, the pulse shapes and locations on these beams can be altered significantly. This phenomenon makes possible the manipulation and control of pulses co-propagating on different wavelength beams through the introduction of a shepherd pulse at a separate wavelength. How this can be accomplished is demonstrated in this paper.

  6. Characterization of fiber ultrashort pulse delivery for nonlinear endomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, A; Poulon, F; Habert, R; Lefort, C; Kudlinski, A; Haidar, D Abi

    2016-06-13

    In this work, we present a detailed characterization of a small-core double-clad photonic crystal fiber, dedicated and approved for in vivo nonlinear imaging endomicroscopy. A numerical and experimental study has been performed to characterize the excitation and collection efficiencies through a 5 m-long optical fiber, including the pulse duration and spectral shape. This was first done without any distal optics, and then the performances of the system were studied by using two kinds of GRIN lenses at the fiber output. These results are compared to published data using commercial double clad fibers and GRIN lenses. PMID:27410272

  7. Femtosecond nonlinear fiber optics in the ionization regime.

    PubMed

    Hölzer, P; Chang, W; Travers, J C; Nazarkin, A; Nold, J; Joly, N Y; Saleh, M F; Biancalana, F; Russell, P St J

    2011-11-11

    By using a gas-filled kagome-style photonic crystal fiber, nonlinear fiber optics is studied in the regime of optically induced ionization. The fiber offers low anomalous dispersion over a broad bandwidth and low loss. Sequences of blueshifted pulses are emitted when 65 fs, few-microjoule pulses, corresponding to high-order solitons, are launched into the fiber and undergo self-compression. The experimental results are confirmed by numerical simulations which suggest that free-electron densities of ∼10(17) cm(-3) are achieved at peak intensities of 10(14) W/cm(2) over length scales of several centimeters. PMID:22181732

  8. Integrability of an inhomogeneous nonlinear Schroedinger equation in Bose-Einstein condensates and fiber optics

    SciTech Connect

    Brugarino, Tommaso; Sciacca, Michele

    2010-09-15

    In this paper, we investigate the integrability of an inhomogeneous nonlinear Schroedinger equation, which has several applications in many branches of physics, as in Bose-Einstein condensates and fiber optics. The main issue deals with Painleve property (PP) and Liouville integrability for a nonlinear Schroedinger-type equation. Solutions of the integrable equation are obtained by means of the Darboux transformation. Finally, some applications on fiber optics and Bose-Einstein condensates are proposed (including Bose-Einstein condensates in three-dimensional in cylindrical symmetry).

  9. Collision of Akhmediev Breathers in Nonlinear Fiber Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisquet, B.; Kibler, B.; Millot, G.

    2013-10-01

    We report here a novel fiber-based test bed using tailored spectral shaping of an optical-frequency comb to excite the formation of two Akhmediev breathers that collide during propagation. We have found specific initial conditions by controlling the phase and velocity differences between breathers that lead, with certainty, to their efficient collision and the appearance of a giant-amplitude wave. Temporal and spectral characteristics of the collision dynamics are in agreement with the corresponding analytical solution. We anticipate that experimental evidence of breather-collision dynamics is of fundamental importance in the understanding of extreme ocean waves and in other disciplines driven by the continuous nonlinear Schrödinger equation.

  10. Nonlinear Signal Processing Using Fiber-Optics Neurograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szu, Harold

    1986-02-01

    A novel optical device for nonlinear signal processing is described based upon the following observations: (a) A phase space for signal processing is identified with a time-frequency joint representation (TFJR) that appears almost everywhere naturally, for example in bats, in music, etc. (b) A sudden slow down mechanism is responsible for the transition from a phase coherent-to-incoherent wavefront and provides us the sharpest tone transduction from a Bekesy traveling wave in a model of the inner ear. The cause of the slowdown is physically identified to be due to three forces. This has been used to derive a cubic deceleration polynomial responsible for a cusp bifurcation phenomenon which occur for every tone transducted along the nonuniform elastic membrane. The liquid-filled inner ear cochlea channel is divided by the membrane into an upper duct that has hair cells for the forward sound-generated flow and the lower duct for the backward balance-return flow.

  11. Multimodal nonlinear endo-microscopy probe design for high resolution, label-free intraoperative imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xu; Xu, Xiaoyun; McCormick, Daniel T; Wong, Kelvin; Wong, Stephen T C

    2015-07-01

    We present a portable, multimodal, nonlinear endo-microscopy probe designed for intraoperative oncological imaging. Application of a four-wave mixing noise suppression scheme using dual wavelength wave plates (DWW) and a polarization-maintaining fiber improves tissue signal collection efficiency, allowing for miniaturization. The probe, with a small 14 mm transversal diameter, includes a customized miniaturized two-axis MEMS (micro-electromechanical system) raster scanning mirror and micro-optics with an illumination laser delivered by a polarization-maintaining fiber. The probe can potentially be integrated into the arms of a surgical robot, such as da Vinci robotic surgery system, due to its minimal cross sectional area. It has the ability to incorporate multiple imaging modalities including CARS (coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering), SHG (second harmonic generation), and TPEF (two-photon excited fluorescence) in order to allow the surgeon to locate tumor cells within the context of normal stromal tissue. The resolution of the endo-microscope is experimentally determined to be 0.78 µm, a high level of accuracy for such a compact probe setup. The expected resolution of the as-built multimodal, nonlinear, endo-microscopy probe is 1 µm based on the calculation tolerance allocation using Monte-Carlo simulation. The reported probe is intended for use in laparoscopic or radical prostatectomy, including detection of tumor margins and avoidance of nerve impairment during surgery. PMID:26203361

  12. Multimodal nonlinear endo-microscopy probe design for high resolution, label-free intraoperative imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xu; Xu, Xiaoyun; McCormick, Daniel T.; Wong, Kelvin; Wong, Stephen T.C.

    2015-01-01

    We present a portable, multimodal, nonlinear endo-microscopy probe designed for intraoperative oncological imaging. Application of a four-wave mixing noise suppression scheme using dual wavelength wave plates (DWW) and a polarization-maintaining fiber improves tissue signal collection efficiency, allowing for miniaturization. The probe, with a small 14 mm transversal diameter, includes a customized miniaturized two-axis MEMS (micro-electromechanical system) raster scanning mirror and micro-optics with an illumination laser delivered by a polarization-maintaining fiber. The probe can potentially be integrated into the arms of a surgical robot, such as da Vinci robotic surgery system, due to its minimal cross sectional area. It has the ability to incorporate multiple imaging modalities including CARS (coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering), SHG (second harmonic generation), and TPEF (two-photon excited fluorescence) in order to allow the surgeon to locate tumor cells within the context of normal stromal tissue. The resolution of the endo-microscope is experimentally determined to be 0.78 µm, a high level of accuracy for such a compact probe setup. The expected resolution of the as-built multimodal, nonlinear, endo-microscopy probe is 1 µm based on the calculation tolerance allocation using Monte-Carlo simulation. The reported probe is intended for use in laparoscopic or radical prostatectomy, including detection of tumor margins and avoidance of nerve impairment during surgery. PMID:26203361

  13. Precluding nonlinear ISI in direct detection long-haul fiber optic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, Norman L.; Shoop, Barry L.; Cioffi, John M.

    1991-01-01

    Long-distance, high-rate fiber optic systems employing directly modulated 1.55-micron single-mode lasers and conventional single-mode fiber suffer severe intersymbol interference (ISI) with a large nonlinear component. A method of reducing the nonlinearity of the ISI, thereby making linear equalization more viable, is investigated. It is shown that the degree of nonlinearity is highly dependent on the choice of laser bias current, and that in some cases the ISI nonlinearity can be significantly reduced by biasing the laser substantially above threshold. Simulation results predict that an increase in signal-to-nonlinear-distortion ratio as high as 25 dB can be achieved for synchronously spaced samples at an optimal sampling phase by increasing the bias current from 1.2 times threshold to 3.5 times threshold. The high SDR indicates that a linear tapped delay line equalizer could be used to mitigate ISI. Furthermore, the shape of the pulse response suggests that partial response precoding and digital feedback equalization would be particularly effective for this channel.

  14. Integration of nonlinearity-management and dispersion-management for pulses in fiber-optic links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driben, Rodislav; Malomed, Boris A.; Mahlab, Uri

    2004-03-01

    We introduce a model of a long-haul fiber-optic link that uses a combination of the nonlinearity- and dispersion-compensation (management) to stabilize nonsoliton pulses. The compensation of the accumulated fiber nonlinearity, and simultaneously pulse reshaping, which helps to suppress the inter-symbol interference (ISI, i.e., blurring of blank spaces between adjacent pulses), are performed by second-harmonic-generating modules, which are periodically inserted together with amplifiers. We demonstrate that the dispersion-management (DM), which was not included in an earlier considered model, drastically improves stability of the pulses. The stable-transmission length for an isolated pulse, which was less than 10 fiber spans with the use of the nonlinearity-management only, becomes indefinitely long. It is demonstrated too that the pulse is quite robust against fluctuations of its initial parameters, and the scheme operates efficiently in a very broad parameter range. The interaction between pulses can be safely suppressed for the transmission distance exceeding 16 spans (≃1000 km). The smallest temporal separation between adjacent pulses, which is necessary to prevent the ISI, attains a minimum in the case of moderate DM, similar to known results for the DM solitons. The mutually-induced distortion of co-propagating pulses being accounted for by the emission of radiation, a plausible way to further increase the stable-transmission limit is to introduce bandpass filters.

  15. Multi-stage perturbation theory for compensating intra-channel nonlinear impairments in fiber-optic links.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaojun; Kumar, Shiva

    2014-12-01

    A recursive perturbation theory to model the fiber-optic system is developed. Using this perturbation theory, a multi-stage compensation technique to mitigate the intra-channel nonlinear impairments is investigated. The technique is validated by numerical simulations of a single-polarization single-channel fiber-optic system operating at 28 Gbaud, 32-quadrature amplitude modulation (32-QAM), and 40 × 80 km transmission distance. It is found that, with 2 samples per symbol, the multi-stage scheme with eight compensation stages increases the Q-factor as compared with linear compensation by 4.5 dB; as compared with single-stage compensation, the computational complexity is reduced by a factor of 1.3 and the required memory for storing perturbation coefficients is decreased by a factor of 13. PMID:25606904

  16. Nonlinear optical signal processing for high-speed, spectrally efficient fiber optic systems and networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo

    The past decade has witnessed astounding boom in telecommunication network traffic. With the emergence of multimedia over Internet, the high-capacity optical transport systems have started to shift focus from the core network towards the end users. This trend leads to diverse optical networks with transparency and reconfigurability requirement. As single channel data rate continues to increase and channel spacing continues to shrink for high capacity, high spectral efficiency, the workload on conventional electronic signal processing elements in the router nodes continues to build up. Performing signal processing functions in the optical domain can potentially alleviate the speed bottleneck if the unique optical properties are efficiently leveraged to assist electronic processing methodologies. Ultra-high bandwidth capability along with the promise for multi-channel and format-transparent operation make optical signal processing an attractive technology which is expected to have great impact on future optical networks. For optical signal processing applications in fiber-optic network and systems, a laudable goal would be to explore the unique nonlinear optical processes in novel photonic devices. This dissertation investigates novel optical signal processing techniques through simulations and experimental demonstrations, analyzes limitations of these nonlinear processing elements and proposes techniques to enhance the system performance or designs for functional photonic modules. Two key signal-processing building blocks for future optical networks, namely slow-light-based tunable optical delay lines and SOA-based high-speed wavelength converters, are presented in the first part of the dissertation. Phase preserving and spectrally efficient slow light are experimentally demonstrated using advanced modulation formats. Functional and novel photonic modules, such as multi-channel synchronizer and variable-bit-rate optical time division multiplexer are designed and

  17. Self-assembled nanomaterials for nonlinear fiber optics and tunable plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashry, Islam; Daengngam, Chalongrat; Kandas, Ishac; Heflin, James; Robinson, Hans; Xu, Yong

    2013-09-01

    As an amorphous material with full inversion symmetry, silica-based microstructures cannot possess significant secondorder nonlinearity. We recently developed a method that can potentially overcome this deficiency by coating a silica fiber taper with layers of radially aligned nonlinear molecules. The coating process can be accomplished through layerby- layer self-assembly, where the alignment of the nonlinear molecules is maintained through electrostatic interaction. As a result, the nonlinear fiber structures are thermodynamically stable and can generate significant second-order nonlinear responses despite their full rotational symmetry. This prediction has been experimentally confirmed through SHG measurements. To further enhance the overall second-order nonlinearity, we have developed an UV-ablation-based approach that can generate second-order nonlinearity that is spatially periodic along the fiber taper. Our preliminary experiments suggest that SHG intensity can be enhanced by such quasi-phase-matching configurations. We can also use the self-assembly approach to construct tunable plasmonic systems. As a proof-of-concept study, we assembled swellable polymer films over a planar Au substrate through layer-by-layer assembly and covered the swellable polymer with a monolayer of quantum dots. After immersing the swellable plasmonic structure in solution and adjusting its pH value, we used a fluorescence lifetime based approach to demonstrate that the thickness of the swellable polymers can be modified by almost 400%. The fluorescence lifetime measurements also confirmed that the plasmonic resonance can be significantly modified by the swellable polymers.

  18. Periodic nonlinear Fourier transform for fiber-optic communications, Part I: theory and numerical methods.

    PubMed

    Kamalian, Morteza; Prilepsky, Jaroslaw E; Le, Son Thai; Turitsyn, Sergei K

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we introduce the periodic nonlinear Fourier transform (PNFT) method as an alternative and efficacious tool for compensation of the nonlinear transmission effects in optical fiber links. In the Part I, we introduce the algorithmic platform of the technique, describing in details the direct and inverse PNFT operations, also known as the inverse scattering transform for periodic (in time variable) nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE). We pay a special attention to explaining the potential advantages of the PNFT-based processing over the previously studied nonlinear Fourier transform (NFT) based methods. Further, we elucidate the issue of the numerical PNFT computation: we compare the performance of four known numerical methods applicable for the calculation of nonlinear spectral data (the direct PNFT), in particular, taking the main spectrum (utilized further in Part II for the modulation and transmission) associated with some simple example waveforms as the quality indicator for each method. We show that the Ablowitz-Ladik discretization approach for the direct PNFT provides the best performance in terms of the accuracy and computational time consumption. PMID:27505799

  19. Periodic nonlinear Fourier transform for fiber-optic communications, Part II: eigenvalue communication.

    PubMed

    Kamalian, Morteza; Prilepsky, Jaroslaw E; Le, Son Thai; Turitsyn, Sergei K

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we propose the design of communication systems based on using periodic nonlinear Fourier transform (PNFT), following the introduction of the method in the Part I. We show that the famous "eigenvalue communication" idea [A. Hasegawa and T. Nyu, J. Lightwave Technol. 11, 395 (1993)] can also be generalized for the PNFT application: In this case, the main spectrum attributed to the PNFT signal decomposition remains constant with the propagation down the optical fiber link. Therefore, the main PNFT spectrum can be encoded with data in the same way as soliton eigenvalues in the original proposal. The results are presented in terms of the bit-error rate (BER) values for different modulation techniques and different constellation sizes vs. the propagation distance, showing a good potential of the technique. PMID:27505800

  20. Fiber Optics Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, William E.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses various applications of fiber optics technology: information systems, industrial robots, medicine, television, transportation, and training. Types of jobs that will be available with fiber optics training (such as electricians and telephone cable installers and splicers) are examined. (CT)

  1. Fiber optic chemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Chuck C.; McCrae, David A.; Saaski, Elric W.

    1998-09-01

    This paper provides a broad overview of the field of fiber optic chemical sensors. Several different types of fiber optic sensors and probes are described, and references are cited for each category discussed.

  2. Fiber Optics Instrumentation Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Patrick Hon Man; Parker, Allen R., Jr.; Richards, W. Lance

    2010-01-01

    This is a general presentation of fiber optics instrumentation development work being conducted at NASA Dryden for the past 10 years and recent achievements in the field of fiber optics strain sensors.

  3. Fully Distributed Fiber Optic Strain Sensor Based on the Kerr Nonlinear Optical Effect, the Photoelastic Effect, and Counterpropagating Optical Pulses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapteyn, Kelvin Lloyd

    1995-01-01

    Since the first fiber optic strain gage was described in 1978, a lot of research effort has been applied to the development of various fiber optic strain measurement schemes. Most of the approaches that have been studied so far measure the total strain from one end of the fiber to the other. Other approaches make "quasi-distributed" measurements based on measuring the change in length of several segments of the fiber. The eventual goal of these quasi-distributed systems is to reduce the segment length or the gage length until a continuous strain distribution could be measured. In this dissertation, a fully distributed fiber optic strain and temperature sensor is developed. This sensor is based on a strong Kerr effect in combination with a greatly increased photoelastic response and short, counterpropagating optical pulses. In combination with much shorter optical pulses, this approach promises great improvements in strain sensitivity and resolution. In addition, this system is capable of separating out strain components in both transverse directions of a polarization maintaining fiber as well as the axial strain component and the temperature at every point along the fiber. The measurement of three dimensional strain data and temperature in a fully distributed sensor is a very significant improvement over any previous system. The sensor should provide a very powerful tool for crack and flaw detection as well as other applications that need a strain distribution. Primary applications are expected to be nondestructive testing and health monitoring of composite structures by embedding the fiber sensor into the composite during manufacture. Such a sensor would be protected from environmental damage and would provide data on the internal integrity of the structure.

  4. Confocal Endomicroscopy: Instrumentation and Medical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Jabbour, Joey M.; Saldua, Meagan A.; Bixler, Joel N.; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2013-01-01

    Advances in fiber optic technology and miniaturized optics and mechanics have propelled confocal endomicroscopy into the clinical realm. This high resolution, non-invasive imaging technology provides the ability to microscopically evaluate cellular and sub-cellular features in tissue in vivo by optical sectioning. Because many cancers originate in epithelial tissues accessible by endoscopes, confocal endomicroscopy has been explored to detect regions of possible neoplasia at an earlier stage by imaging morphological features in vivo that are significant in histopathologic evaluation. This technique allows real-time assessment of tissue which may improve diagnostic yield by guiding biopsy. Research and development continues to reduce the overall size of the imaging probe, increase the image acquisition speed, and improve resolution and field of view of confocal endomicroscopes. Technical advances will continue to enable application to less accessible organs and more complex systems in the body. Lateral and axial resolutions down to 0.5 μm and 3 μm, respectively, field of view as large as 800×450 μm, and objective lens and total probe outer diameters down to 350 μm and 1.25 mm, respectively, have been achieved. We provide a review of the historical developments of confocal imaging in vivo, the evolution of endomicroscope instrumentation, and the medical applications of confocal endomicroscopy. PMID:21994069

  5. The Fiber Optic Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2003-01-01

    Describes the fiber optics programs at the Career and Technical Center in Berlin, Pennsylvania and the Charles S. Monroe Technology Center in Loudoun County, Virginia. Discusses the involvement of the Fiber Optic Association with education, research and development, manufacturing, sales, distribution, installation, and maintenance of fiber optic…

  6. Python fiber optic seal

    SciTech Connect

    Ystesund, K.; Bartberger, J.; Brusseau, C.; Fleming, P.; Insch, K.; Tolk, K.

    1993-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a high security fiber optic seal that incorporates tamper resistance features that are not available in commercial fiber optic seals. The Python Seal is a passive fiber optic loop seal designed to give indication of unauthorized entry. The seal includes a fingerprint feature that provides seal identity information in addition to the unique fiber optic pattern created when the seal is installed. The fiber optic cable used for the seal loop is produced with tamper resistant features that increase the difficulty of attacking that component of a seal. A Seal Reader has been developed that will record the seal signature and the fingerprint feature of the seal. A Correlator software program then compares seal images to establish a match or mismatch. SNL is also developing a Polaroid reader to permit hard copies of the seal patterns to be obtained directly from the seal.

  7. Fiber optic sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, J.; Sohler, W.

    1984-01-01

    A survey of the developments in the field of fiber optics sensor technology is presented along with a discussion of the advantages of optical measuring instruments as compared with electronic sensors. The two primary types of fiber optics sensors, specifically those with multiwave fibers and those with monowave fibers, are described. Examples of each major sensor type are presented and discussed. Multiwave detectors include external and internal fiber optics sensors. Among the monowave detectors are Mach-Zender interferometers, Michelson interferometers, Sagnac interferometers (optical gyroscopes), waveguide resonators, and polarimeter sensors. Integrated optical sensors and their application in spectroscopy are briefly discussed.

  8. Fiber optic communication links

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, R. H.

    1980-01-01

    Fiber optics is a new, emerging technology which offers relief from many of the problems which limited past communications links. Its inherent noise immunity and high bandwidth open the door for new designs with greater capabilities. Being a new technology, certain problems can be encountered in specifying and installing a fiber optic link. A general fiber optic system is discussed with emphasis on the advantages and disadvantages. It is not intended to be technical in nature, but a general discussion. Finally, a general purpose prototype Sandia communications link is presented.

  9. Fiber Optics: No Illusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1983

    1983-01-01

    A campus computer center at Hofstra University (New York) that holds 70 terminals for student use was first a gymnasium, then a language laboratory. Strands of fiber optics are used for the necessary wiring. (MLF)

  10. Fiber optic data transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shreve, Steven T.

    1987-01-01

    The Ohio University Avionics Engineering Center is currently developing a fiber optic data bus transmission and reception system that could eventually replace copper cable connections in airplanes. The original form of the system will transmit information from an encoder to a transponder via a fiber optic cable. An altimeter and an altitude display are connected to a fiber optic transmitter by copper cable. The transmitter converts the altimetry data from nine bit parallel to serial form and send these data through a fiber optic cable to a receiver. The receiver converts the data using a cable similar to that used between the altimeter and display. The transmitting and receiving ends also include a display readout. After completion and ground testing of the data bus, the system will be tested in an airborne environment.

  11. Infrared fiber optic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Robert S.

    1987-01-01

    The development of IR fiber optics for use in astronomical and other space applications is summarized. Candidate materials were sought for use in the 1 to 200 micron and the 200 to 1000 micron wavelength range. Synthesis and optical characterization were carried out on several of these materials in bulk form. And the fabrication of a few materials in single crystal fiber optic form were studied.

  12. Fiber optic monitoring device

    DOEpatents

    Samborsky, James K.

    1993-01-01

    A device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information.

  13. Fiber optics in adverse environments

    SciTech Connect

    Lyous, P.B.

    1982-01-01

    Radiation effects in optical fibers are considered, taking into account recent progress in the investigation of radiation resistant optical fibers, radiation damage in optical fibers, radiation-induced transient absorption in optical fibers, X-ray-induced transient attenuation at low temperatures in polymer clad silica (PCS) fibers, optical fiber composition and radiation hardness, the response of irradiated optical waveguides at low temperatures, and the effect of ionizing radiation on fiber-optic waveguides. Other topics explored are related to environmental effects on components of fiber optic systems, and radiation detection systems using optical fibers. Fiber optic systems in adverse environments are also discussed, giving attention to the survivability of Army fiber optics systems, space application of fiber optics systems, fiber optic wavelength multiplexing for civil aviation applications, a new fiber optic data bus topology, fiber optics for aircraft engine/inlet control, and application of fiber optics in high voltage substations.

  14. Fiber optics for controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seng, Gary T.

    1987-01-01

    The challenge of those involved in control-system hardware development is to accommodate an ever-increasing complexity in aircraft control, while limiting the size and weight of the components and improving system reliability. A technology that displays promise towards this end is the area of fiber optics for controls. The primary advantages of employing optical fibers, passive optical sensors, and optically controlled actuators are weight and volume reduction, immunity from electromagnetic effects, superior bandwidth capabilities, and freedom from short circuits and sparking contacts. Since 1975, NASA Lewis has performed in-house, contract, and grant research in fiber optic sensors, high-temperature electro-optic switches, and fly-by-light control-system architecture. Passive optical sensor development is an essential yet challenging area of work and has therefore received much attention during this period. A major effort to develop fly-by-light control-system technology, known as the Fiber-Optic Control System Integration (FOCSI) program, was initiated in 1985 as a cooperative effort between NASA and DOD. Phase 1 of FOCSI, completed in 1986, was aimed at the design of a fiber-optic integrated propulsion/flight control system. Phase 2, yet to be initiated, will provide subcomponent and system development, and a system engine test. In addition to a summary of the benefits of fiber optics, the FOCSI program, sensor advances, and future directions in the NASA Lewis program will be discussed.

  15. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Chuck C.; Saaski, Elric W.; McCrae, David A.

    1998-09-01

    This paper describes a novel fiber optic-based hydrogen sensor. The sensor consists of a thin-film etalon, constructed on the distal end of a fiber optic. The exterior mirror of the etalon is palladium or a palladium-alloy, which undergoes an optical change upon exposure to hydrogen. Data is presented on fiber optic sensors constructed with palladium and several alloys of palladium. The linearity of the optical response of these sensors to hydrogen is examined. Etalons made with pure palladium are found to be desirable for sensing low concentrations of hydrogen, or for one-time exposure to high concentrations of hydrogen. Etalons made from palladium alloys are found to be more desirable in applications were repeated cycling in high concentrations of hydrogen occurs.

  16. Fiber optic attenuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buzzetti, Mike F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A fiber optic attenuator of the invention is a mandrel structure through which a bundle of optical fibers is wrapped around in a complete circle. The mandrel structure includes a flexible cylindrical sheath through which the bundle passes. A set screw on the mandrel structure impacts one side of the sheath against two posts on the opposite side of the sheath. By rotating the screw, the sheath is deformed to extend partially between the two posts, bending the fiber optic bundle to a small radius controlled by rotating the set screw. Bending the fiber optic bundle to a small radius causes light in each optical fiber to be lost in the cladding, the amount depending upon the radius about which the bundle is bent.

  17. Nonlinear distortion evaluation in a directly modulated distributed feedback laser diode-based fiber-optic cable television transport system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chung-Yi; Ying, Cheng-Ling; Lin, Chun-Yu; Chu, Chien-An

    2015-12-01

    This study evaluated a directly modulated distributed feedback (DFB) laser diode (LD) for cable TV systems with respect to carrier-to-nonlinear distortion of LDs. The second-order distortion-to-carrier ratio is found to be proportional to that of the second-order coefficient-to-first-order coefficient of the DFB laser diode driving current and to the optical modulation index (OMI). Furthermore, the third-order distortion-to-carrier ratio is proportional to that of the third-order coefficient-to-first-order coefficient of the DFB laser diode driving current, and to the OMI2.

  18. Fiber optic interferometric accelerometers

    SciTech Connect

    Vohra, S.T.; Danver, B.; Tveten, A.; Dandridge, A.

    1996-04-01

    Recent progress on the development of flexural disk based fiber optic acceleration sensors is reported. Appropriate geometric considerations have resulted in fiber optic accelerometers with many desirable features including (i) high sensitivity ({approx_gt}20 dB rerad/g), (ii) flat frequency response (200 Hz to {approx_gt}10 kHz), and (iii) low pressure ({lt}{minus}180 dB rerad/{mu}Pa) and transverse sensitivity ({lt}{minus}30 dB). Alternate transducer designs are discussed and preliminary results reported. Various optical multiplexing schemes for accelerometer arrays are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Fiber optic connector

    DOEpatents

    Rajic, S.; Muhs, J.D.

    1996-10-22

    A fiber optic connector and method for connecting composite materials within which optical fibers are imbedded are disclosed. The fiber optic connector includes a capillary tube for receiving optical fibers at opposing ends. The method involves inserting a first optical fiber into the capillary tube and imbedding the unit in the end of a softened composite material. The capillary tube is injected with a coupling medium which subsequently solidifies. The composite material is machined to a desired configuration. An external optical fiber is then inserted into the capillary tube after fluidizing the coupling medium, whereby the optical fibers are coupled. 3 figs.

  20. Fiber optic connector

    DOEpatents

    Rajic, Slobodan; Muhs, Jeffrey D.

    1996-01-01

    A fiber optic connector and method for connecting composite materials within which optical fibers are imbedded. The fiber optic connector includes a capillary tube for receiving optical fibers at opposing ends. The method involves inserting a first optical fiber into the capillary tube and imbedding the unit in the end of a softened composite material. The capillary tube is injected with a coupling medium which subsequently solidifies. The composite material is machined to a desired configuration. An external optical fiber is then inserted into the capillary tube after fluidizing the coupling medium, whereby the optical fibers are coupled.

  1. Fiber optic monitoring device

    DOEpatents

    Samborsky, J.K.

    1993-10-05

    A device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information. 4 figures.

  2. Fiber optic monitoring device

    SciTech Connect

    Samborsky, J.K.

    1992-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information.

  3. Fiber-Optic Sensing Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Milnes, M.; Baylor, L.C.; Bave, S.

    1996-10-24

    This article offers a basic review of fiber-optic sensing technology, or more specifically, fiber-optic sensing technology as applied to the qualitative or quantitative identification of a chemical sample, and how it works,

  4. Fiber optic accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    August, Rudolf R. (Inventor); Strahan, Virgil H. (Inventor); James, Kenneth A. (Inventor); Nichols, Donald K. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An inexpensive, light weight fiber optic accelerometer to convert input mechanical motion (e.g. acceleration) into digitized optical output signals. The output of the accelerometer may be connected directly to data processing apparatus without the necessity of space consuming analog to digital interface means.

  5. Fiber optic accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strahan, Virgil H. (Inventor); James, Kenneth A. (Inventor); Quick, William H. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An inexpensive, light weight fiber optic accelerometer to convert input mechanical motion (e.g. acceleration) into digitized optical output signals. The output of the accelerometer may be connected directly to data processing apparatus without the necessity of space consuming analog to digital interface means.

  6. Fiber optic choline biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong; Cao, Xiaojian; Jia, Ke; Chai, Xueting; Lu, Hua; Lu, Zuhong

    2001-10-01

    A fiber optic fluorescence biosensor for choline is introduced in this paper. Choline is an important neurotransmitter in mammals. Due to the growing needs for on-site clinical monitoring of the choline, much effect has been devoted to develop choline biosensors. Fiber-optic fluorescence biosensors have many advantages, including miniaturization, flexibility, and lack of electrical contact and interference. The choline fiber-optic biosensor we designed implemented a bifurcated fiber to perform fluorescence measurements. The light of the blue LED is coupled into one end of the fiber as excitation and the emission spectrum from sensing film is monitored by fiber-spectrometer (S2000, Ocean Optics) through the other end of the fiber. The sensing end of the fiber is coated with Nafion film dispersed with choline oxidase and oxygen sensitive luminescent Ru(II) complex (Tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)dichlororuthenium(II), hexahydrate). Choline oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of choline to betaine and hydrogen peroxide while consuming oxygen. The fluorescence intensity of oxygen- sensitive Ru(II) are related to the choline concentration. The response of the fiber-optic sensor in choline solution is represented and discussed. The result indicates a low-cost, high-performance, portable choline biosensor.

  7. Fiber optics for controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seng, Gary T.

    1990-01-01

    The design, development, and testing of a fiber optic integrated propulsion/flight control system for an advanced supersonic dash aircraft (flies at supersonic speeds for short periods of time) is the goal of the joint NASA/DOD Fiber Optic Control System Integration (FOCSI) program. Phase 1 provided a comparison of electronic and optical control systems, identified the status of current optical sensor technology, defined the aircraft sensor/actuator environment, proposed architectures for fully optical control systems, and provided schedules for development. Overall, it was determined that there are sufficient continued efforts to develop such a system. It was also determined that it is feasible to build a fiber optic control system for the development of a data base for this technology, but that further work is necessary in sensors, actuators, and components to develop an optimum design, fully fiber optic integrated control system compatible with advanced aircraft environments. Phase 2 is to design, construct, and ground test a fly by light control system. Its first task is to provide a detailed design of the electro-optic architecture.

  8. Fiber Optics and Library Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koenig, Michael

    1984-01-01

    This article examines fiber optic technology, explains some of the key terminology, and speculates about the way fiber optics will change our world. Applications of fiber optics to library systems in three major areas--linkage of a number of mainframe computers, local area networks, and main trunk communications--are highlighted. (EJS)

  9. Buying Fiber-Optic Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fickes, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Describes consortia formed by college and university administrators to buy, manage, and maintain their own fiber-optic networks with the goals of cutting costs of leasing fiber-optic cable and planning for the future. Growth capacity is the real advantage of owning fiber-optic systems. (SLD)

  10. Fiber optics: A research paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drone, Melinda M.

    1987-01-01

    Some basic aspects concerning fiber optics are examined. Some history leading up to the development of optical fibers which are now used in the transmission of data in many areas of the world is discussed. Basic theory of the operation of fiber optics is discussed along with methods for improving performance of the optical fiber through much research and design. Splices and connectors are compared and short haul and long haul fiber optic networks are discussed. Fiber optics plays many roles in the commercial world. The use of fiber optics for communication applications is emphasized.

  11. Fiber optic fluid detector

    DOEpatents

    Angel, S.M.

    1987-02-27

    Particular gases or liquids are detected with a fiber optic element having a cladding or coating of a material which absorbs the fluid or fluids and which exhibits a change of an optical property, such as index of refraction, light transmissiveness or fluoresence emission, for example, in response to absorption of the fluid. The fluid is sensed by directing light into the fiber optic element and detecting changes in the light, such as exit angle changes for example, that result from the changed optical property of the coating material. The fluid detector may be used for such purposes as sensing toxic or explosive gases in the atmosphere, measuring ground water contamination or monitoring fluid flows in industrial processes, among other uses. 10 figs.

  12. Fiber optic fluid detector

    DOEpatents

    Angel, S. Michael

    1989-01-01

    Particular gases or liquids are detected with a fiber optic element (11, 11a to 11j) having a cladding or coating of a material (23, 23a to 23j) which absorbs the fluid or fluids and which exhibits a change of an optical property, such as index of refraction, light transmissiveness or fluoresence emission, for example, in response to absorption of the fluid. The fluid is sensed by directing light into the fiber optic element and detecting changes in the light, such as exit angle changes for example, that result from the changed optical property of the coating material. The fluid detector (24, 24a to 24j) may be used for such purposes as sensing toxic or explosive gases in the atmosphere, measuring ground water contamination or monitoring fluid flows in industrial processes, among other uses.

  13. Fiber optic flocculation sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Lun K.; Stelwagen, Uilke

    1994-02-01

    A fiber optic flocculation sensor based on measuring the intensity of light reflected by solid particles in suspension (i.e. paper pulp) in a well defined measurement volume, was constructed. This sensor is designed for monitoring the flocculation state of paper pulp in the papermaking process. The flocculation determines to a great extent the quality of the final product, the paper. Tests with different types of pulp were performed in both a closed loop system and a small paper machine. In this investigation the flocculation state is expressed as a root mean square flocculation index. The flocculation index delivered by this fiber optic system shows a very high correlation with the flocculation index provided by a camera system `looking at' the same pulp, while the latter has a great resemblance with the human perception of the flocculation.

  14. Fiber optic hydrophone

    DOEpatents

    Kuzmenko, Paul J.; Davis, Donald T.

    1994-01-01

    A miniature fiber optic hydrophone based on the principles of a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The hydrophone, in one embodiment, includes a body having a shaped flexible bladder at one end which defines a volume containing air or suitable gas, and including a membrane disposed adjacent a vent. An optic fiber extends into the body with one end terminating in spaced relation to the membrane. Acoustic waves in the water that impinge on the bladder cause the pressure of the volume therein to vary causing the membrane to deflect and modulate the reflectivity of the Fabry-Perot cavity formed by the membrane surface and the cleaved end of the optical fiber disposed adjacent to the membrane. When the light is transmitted down the optical fiber, the reflected signal is amplitude modulated by the incident acoustic wave. Another embodiment utilizes a fluid filled volume within which the fiber optic extends.

  15. Fiber optic hydrophone

    DOEpatents

    Kuzmenko, P.J.; Davis, D.T.

    1994-05-10

    A miniature fiber optic hydrophone based on the principles of a Fabry-Perot interferometer is disclosed. The hydrophone, in one embodiment, includes a body having a shaped flexible bladder at one end which defines a volume containing air or suitable gas, and including a membrane disposed adjacent a vent. An optical fiber extends into the body with one end terminating in spaced relation to the membrane. Acoustic waves in the water that impinge on the bladder cause the pressure of the volume therein to vary causing the membrane to deflect and modulate the reflectivity of the Fabry-Perot cavity formed by the membrane surface and the cleaved end of the optical fiber disposed adjacent to the membrane. When the light is transmitted down the optical fiber, the reflected signal is amplitude modulated by the incident acoustic wave. Another embodiment utilizes a fluid filled volume within which the fiber optic extends. 2 figures.

  16. Fiber optic detector

    SciTech Connect

    Partin, J.K.; Ward, T.E.; Grey, A.E.

    1990-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a portable fiber optic detector that senses the presence of specific target chemicals by exchanging the target chemical for a fluorescently-tagged antigen that is bound to an antibody which is in turn attached to an optical fiber. Replacing the fluorescently-tagged antigen reduces the fluorescence so that a photon sensing detector records the reduced light level and activates an appropriate alarm or indicator.

  17. Fiber optic detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partin, Judy K.; Ward, Thomas E.; Grey, Alan E.

    1990-04-01

    This invention is comprised of a portable fiber optic detector that senses the presence of specific target chemicals by exchanging the target chemical for a fluorescently-tagged antigen that is bound to an antibody which is in turn attached to an optical fiber. Replacing the fluorescently-tagged antigen reduces the fluorescence so that a photon sensing detector records the reduced light level and activates an appropriate alarm or indicator.

  18. Fiber Optic Attenuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Mike Buzzetti designed a fiber optic attenuator while working at Jet Propulsion Laboratory, intended for use in NASA's Deep Space Network. Buzzetti subsequently patented and received an exclusive license to commercialize the device, and founded Nanometer Technologies to produce it. The attenuator functions without introducing measurable back-reflection or insertion loss, and is relatively insensitive to vibration and changes in temperature. Applications include cable television, telephone networks, other signal distribution networks, and laboratory instrumentation.

  19. Fiber optics welder

    DOEpatents

    Higgins, R.W.; Robichaud, R.E.

    A system is described for welding fiber optic waveguides together. The ends of the two fibers to be joined together are accurately, collinearly aligned in a vertical orientation and subjected to a controlled, diffuse arc to effect welding and thermal conditioning. A front-surfaced mirror mounted at a 45/sup 0/ angle to the optical axis of a stereomicroscope mounted for viewing the junction of the ends provides two orthogonal views of the interface during the alignment operation.

  20. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Homuth, Emil F.

    1991-01-01

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects.

  1. Noncontact fiber optic micrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betancourt Ibarra, F.; Guajardo-Gonzalez, Candelario; Castillo-Guzman, Arturo; Guzman-Ramos, Valentin; Selvas, Romeo

    2010-10-01

    A sensor instrument able to measuring the thickness of different semitransparent objects with a resolution of one micron is described. This is based on a fiber optic reflectometer and a laser autofocus system and permit to measuring the thickness of thin surfaces such as semiconductor films, plastic materials and semitransparent objects. The response time for the measuring was roughly 2 sec and the thickness results were compared with a digital mechanical micrometer and both are in good agreement.

  2. Infrared Fiber Optic Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Successive years of Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts from Langley Research Center to Sensiv Inc., a joint venture between Foster-Miller Inc. and Isorad, Ltd., assisted in the creation of remote fiber optic sensing systems. NASA's SBIR interest in infrared, fiber optic sensor technology was geared to monitoring the curing cycles of advanced composite materials. These funds helped in the fabrication of an infrared, fiber optic sensor to track the molecular vibrational characteristics of a composite part while it is being cured. Foster-Miller ingenuity allowed infrared transmitting optical fibers to combine with Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy to enable remote sensing. Sensiv probes operate in the mid-infrared range of the spectrum, although modifications to the instrument also permits its use in the near-infrared region. The Sensiv needle-probe is built to be placed in a liquid or powder and analyze the chemicals in the mixture. Other applications of the probe system include food processing control; combustion control in furnaces; and maintenance problem solving.

  3. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawatari, Takeo (Inventor); Gaubis, Philip A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A fiber optic temperature sensor uses a light source which transmits light through an optical fiber to a sensor head at the opposite end of the optical fiber from the light source. The sensor head has a housing coupled to the end of the optical fiber. A metallic reflective surface is coupled to the housing adjacent the end of the optical fiber to form a gap having a predetermined length between the reflective surface and the optical fiber. A detection system is also coupled to the optical fiber which determines the temperature at the sensor head from an interference pattern of light which is reflected from the reflective surface.

  4. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawatari, Takeo (Inventor); Gaubis, Philip A. (Inventor); Mattes, Brenton L. (Inventor); Charnetski, Clark J. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A fiber optic temperature sensor uses a light source which transmits light through an optical fiber to a sensor head at the opposite end of the optical fiber from the light source. The sensor head has a housing coupled to the end of the optical fiber. A metallic reflective surface is coupled to the housing adjacent the end of the optical fiber to form a gap having a predetermined length between the reflective surface and the optical fiber. A detection system is also coupled to the optical fiber which determines the temperature at the sensor head from an interference pattern of light which is reflected from the reflective surface.

  5. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Homuth, E.F.

    1991-03-19

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor is described in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figures.

  6. Fiber optic photoplethysmograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokun, Leszek J.; Domanski, Andrzej W.

    1991-07-01

    Using a very well known characteristic of infrared radiation absorbance by human skin versus the length of radiation wave and by application of the newest achievements of radiation detecting techniques and very fast computing techniques - the authors have designed and manufactured the complete computer system for noninvasive diagnosis of blood vessels in legs. As the basic unit in this system, fiber-optic photoplethysmograph was applied. The measurement method used here was very well described by V. Blazek and some other scientists. This article presents photoplethysmograph and all features of the computer system.

  7. Fresnel drag effect in fiber optic gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vali, V.; Berg, M. F.; Shorthill, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    Consideration is given to the development of a low-noise fiber-optic ring interferometer gyroscope. A technique for measuring the Fresnel drag coefficient of optical fibers is described, and the accuracy of the technique is considered. An experiment is performed which allows verification of the Einstein velocity addition theorem to the first nonlinear term. An experimental setup for measuring Fresnel drag is described: it consists of a Sagnac interferometer and a Fresnel drag measurement configuration.

  8. Fiber optic light sensor.

    PubMed

    Chudyk, Wayne; Flynn, Kyle F

    2015-06-01

    We describe a low-cost fiber optic sensor for measuring photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) in turbulent flow. Existing technology was combined in a novel way for probe development addressing the need for a small but durable instrument for use in flowing water. Optical components including fiber optics and a wide-spectrum light detector were used to separate light collection from electronic detection so that measurements could be completed in either the field or laboratory, in air or underwater. Connection of the detector to Arduino open-source electronics and a portable personal computer (PC) enabled signal processing and allowed data to be stored in a spreadsheet for ease of analysis. Calibration to a commercial cosine-corrected instrument showed suitable agreement with the added benefit that the small sensor face allowed measurements in tight spaces such as close to the streambed or within leafy or filamentous plant growth. Subsequently, we applied the probe in a separate study where over 35 experiments were successfully completed to characterize downward light attenuation in filamentous algae in turbulent flow. PMID:26009160

  9. Electrospun Amplified Fiber Optics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    All-optical signal processing is the focus of much research aiming to obtain effective alternatives to existing data transmission platforms. Amplification of light in fiber optics, such as in Erbium-doped fiber amplifiers, is especially important for efficient signal transmission. However, the complex fabrication methods involving high-temperature processes performed in a highly pure environment slow the fabrication process and make amplified components expensive with respect to an ideal, high-throughput, room temperature production. Here, we report on near-infrared polymer fiber amplifiers working over a band of ∼20 nm. The fibers are cheap, spun with a process entirely carried out at room temperature, and shown to have amplified spontaneous emission with good gain coefficients and low levels of optical losses (a few cm–1). The amplification process is favored by high fiber quality and low self-absorption. The found performance metrics appear to be suitable for short-distance operations, and the large variety of commercially available doping dyes might allow for effective multiwavelength operations by electrospun amplified fiber optics. PMID:25710188

  10. Shedding Light on Fiber Optics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunch, Robert M.

    1994-01-01

    Explains the principles of fiber optics as a medium for light-wave communication. Current uses of fiber systems on college campuses include voice, video, and local area network applications. A group of seven school districts in Minnesota are linked via fiber-optic cables. Other uses are discussed. (MLF)

  11. Fiber-optic proximity sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, A. K.; Hermann, W. A.; Primus, H. C.

    1980-01-01

    Proximity sensor for mechanical hand of remote manipulator incorporates fiber optics to conduct signals between light source and light detector. Fiber optics are not prone to noise from electromagnetic interference and radio-frequency interference as are sensors using long electrical cables.

  12. Python fiber-optic seal

    SciTech Connect

    Ystesund, K.; Bartberger, J.; Brusseau, C.; Fleming, P.; Insch, K.; Tolk, K.

    1993-12-31

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has developed a high-security fiber-optic seal that incorporates tamper-resistance features not available in commercial fiber-optic seals. The Python Seal is a passive fiber-optic loop seal designed to give indication of unauthorized entry. The seal includes a fingerprint feature that provides seal identity information in addition to the unique fiber-optic pattern created when the seal is installed. The fiber-optic cable used for the seal loop is produced with tamper-resistant features that increase the difficulty of attacking this component of a seal. A Seal Reader has been developed that records the seal signature and the fingerprint feature of the seal. A Correlator software program compares seal images to establish a match or mismatch. SNL also is developing a Polaroid Reader to permit hard copies of the seal patterns to be obtained directly from the seal.

  13. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, M.A.; Sanchez, R.; Dulleck, G.R.

    1996-05-01

    This report covers the development of fiber optic hydrogen and temperature sensors for monitoring dissolved hydrogen gas in transformer oil. The concentration of hydrogen gas is a measure of the corona and spark discharge within the transformer and reflects the state of health of the transformer. Key features of the instrument include use of palladium alloys to enhance hydrogen sensitivity, a microprocessor controlled instrument with RS-232, liquid crystal readout, and 4-20 ma. current loop interfaces. Calibration data for both sensors can be down loaded to the instrument through the RS-232 interface. This project was supported by the Technology Transfer Initiative in collaboration with J. W. Harley, Inc. through the mechanism of a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA).

  14. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, J.B.; Muhs, J.D.; Tobin, K.W.

    1995-01-10

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity. 2 figures.

  15. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, Joseph B.; Muhs, Jeffrey D.; Tobin, Kenneth W.

    1995-01-01

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity.

  16. Fiber optic TV direct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassak, John E.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the operational television (OTV) technology was to develop a multiple camera system (up to 256 cameras) for NASA Kennedy installations where camera video, synchronization, control, and status data are transmitted bidirectionally via a single fiber cable at distances in excess of five miles. It is shown that the benefits (such as improved video performance, immunity from electromagnetic interference and radio frequency interference, elimination of repeater stations, and more system configuration flexibility) can be realized if application of the proven fiber optic transmission concept is used. The control system will marry the lens, pan and tilt, and camera control functions into a modular based Local Area Network (LAN) control network. Such a system does not exist commercially at present since the Television Broadcast Industry's current practice is to divorce the positional controls from the camera control system. The application software developed for this system will have direct applicability to similar systems in industry using LAN based control systems.

  17. Nonlinear intermodulation distortion suppression in coherent analog fiber optic link using electro-optic polymeric dual parallel Mach-Zehnder modulator.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong-Ku; Liu, Wei; Pei, Qibing; Dalton, Larry R; Fetterman, Harold R

    2011-04-11

    A linearized dual parallel Mach-Zehnder modulator (DPMZM) based on electro-optic (EO) polymer was both fabricated, and experimentally used to suppress the third-order intermodulation distortion (IMD3) in a coherent analog fiber optic link. This optical transmitter design was based on a new EO chromophore called B10, which was synthesized for applications dealing with the fiber-optic communication systems. The chromophore was mixed with amorphous polycarbonate (APC) to form the waveguide's core material. The DPMZM was configured with two MZMs, of different lengths in parallel, with unbalanced input and output couplers and a phase shifter in one arm. In this configuration each of the MZMs carried a different optical power, and imposed a different depth of optical modulation. When the two optical beams from the MZMs were combined to generate the transmitted signal it was possible to set the IMD3 produced by each modulator to be equal in amplitude but 180° out of phase from the other. Therefore, the resulting IMD3 of the DPMZM transmitter was effectively canceled out during two-tone experiments. A reduction of the IMD3 below the noise floor was observed while leaving fifth-order distortion (IMD5) as the dominant IMD product. This configuration has the capability of broadband operation and shot-noise limited operation simultaneously. PMID:21503098

  18. Fiber optic control system integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppel, G. L.; Glasheen, W. M.; Russell, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    A total fiber optic, integrated propulsion/flight control system concept for advanced fighter aircraft is presented. Fiber optic technology pertaining to this system is identified and evaluated for application readiness. A fiber optic sensor vendor survey was completed, and the results are reported. The advantages of centralized/direct architecture are reviewed, and the concept of the protocol branch is explained. Preliminary protocol branch selections are made based on the F-18/F404 application. Concepts for new optical tools are described. Development plans for the optical technology and the described system are included.

  19. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morey, W. W.; Glenn, W. H.; Snitzer, E.

    1983-01-01

    A temperature sensor has been developed that utilizes the temperature dependent absorption of a rare earth doped optical fiber. The temperature measurement is localized at a remote position by splicing a short section of the rare earth fiber into a loop of commercial data communication fiber that sends and returns an optical probe signal to the temperature sensitive section of fiber. The optical probe signal is generated from two different wavelength filtered LED sources. A four port fiber optic coupler combines the two separate wavelength signals into the fiber sensing loop. Time multiplexing is used so that each signal wavelength is present at a different time. A reference signal level measurement is also made from the LED sources and a ratio taken with the sensor signal to produce a transmission measurement of the fiber loop. The transmission is affected differently at each wavelength by the rare earth temperature sensitive fiber. The temperature is determined from a ratio of the two transmission measurements. This method eliminates any ambiguity with respect to changes in signal level in the fiber loop such as mating and unmating optical connectors. The temperature range of the sensor is limited to about 800 C by the temperature limit fo the feed fibers.

  20. Fiber Optics: A Bright Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, James, Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Presents an overview of the impact of fiber optics on telecommunications and its application to information processing and library services, including information retrieval, news services, remote transmission of library services, and library networking. (RAA)

  1. Fiber optic combiner and duplicator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The investigation of the possible development of two optical devices, one to take two images as inputs and to present their arithmetic sum as a single output, the other to take one image as input and present two identical images as outputs is described. Significant engineering time was invested in establishing precision fiber optics drawing capabilities, real time monitoring of the fiber size and exact measuring of fiber optics ribbons. Various assembly procedures and tooling designs were investigated and prototype models were built and evaluated that established technical assurance that the device was feasible and could be fabricated. Although the interleaver specification in its entirety was not achieved, the techniques developed in the course of the program improved the quality of images transmitted by fiber optic arrays by at least an order of magnitude. These techniques are already being applied to the manufacture of precise fiber optic components.

  2. Scintillator fiber optic long counter

    DOEpatents

    McCollum, T.; Spector, G.B.

    1994-03-29

    A flat response position sensitive neutron detector capable of providing neutron spectroscopic data utilizing scintillator fiber optic filaments embedded in a neutron moderating housing having an open end through which neutrons enter to be detected is described. 11 figures.

  3. Scintillator fiber optic long counter

    DOEpatents

    McCollum, Tom; Spector, Garry B.

    1994-01-01

    A flat response position sensitive neutron detector capable of providing neutron spectroscopic data utilizing scintillator fiber optic filaments embedded in a neutron moderating housing having an open end through which neutrons enter to be detected.

  4. Application of Fiber Optic Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, William Lance; Parker, Allen R., Jr.; Ko, William L.; Piazza, Anthony; Chan, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Fiber optic sensing technology has emerged in recent years offering tremendous advantages over conventional aircraft instrumentation systems. The advantages of fiber optic sensors over their conventional counterparts are well established; they are lighter, smaller, and can provide enormous numbers of measurements at a fraction of the total sensor weight. After a brief overview of conventional and fiber-optic sensing technology, this paper presents an overview of the research that has been conducted at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center in recent years to advance this promising new technology. Research and development areas include system and algorithm development, sensor characterization and attachment, and real-time experimentally-derived parameter monitoring for ground- and flight-based applications. The vision of fiber optic smart structure technology is presented and its potential benefits to aerospace vehicles throughout the lifecycle, from preliminary design to final retirement, are presented.

  5. Mobile fiber optic emission spectrograph

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, W.A.; Coleman, C.J.; McCarty, J.E.; Beck, R.S.

    1997-05-01

    Technical Assistance Request HLW/DWPF-TAR-970064 asked SRTC to evaluate the use of a fiber optic coupled emission spectrometer. The spectrometer would provide additional ICP analyses in the DWPF laboratory.

  6. Arc detector uses fiber optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finnegan, E. J.; Leech, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Arc detector for protecting high-power microwave klystron oscillators uses fiber optics connected to remote solid-state light-sensing circuits. Detector is more reliable, smaller, and sensitive than other systems that locate detector in waveguide.

  7. Fiber-optic temperature sensor

    SciTech Connect

    O`Rourke, P.E.; Livingston, R.R.; Jantzen, C.M.; Ramsey, W.G.; Hopkins, C.D.

    1993-10-01

    Researchers at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) have developed a class of fiber-optic temperature sensors based upon temperature induced changes in the absorption spectrum of selected materials. For example, a neodymium (Nd) doped glass sensor can be used over a very broad temperature range ({minus}196 to 500{degree}C) and provide good precision and accuracy ({plus_minus}1{degree}C). This type temperature probe is constructed so that light from a fiber optic cable shines through the Nd glass and is reflected onto a second fiber optic cable. Light from this second fiber optic is measured by a diode array spectrophotometer, and the absorption spectrum of the Nd glass used to compute temperature.

  8. Small Business Innovations (Fiber Optics)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Foster-Miller, Inc. Waltham, MA developed the In-Situ Fiber Optic Polymer Reaction Monitor which could lead to higher yields and lower costs in complex composite manufacturing. The monitor, developed under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract with Langley Research Center, uses an infrared, fiber optic sensor to track the molecular vibrational characteristics of a composite part while it is being cured. It is the first analytical system capable of directly measuring the chemistry of advanced composite materials.

  9. Fiber optic frequency transfer link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Primas, Lori E. (Inventor); Sydnor, Richard L. (Inventor); Lutes, George F. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A reference frequency distribution system is disclosed for transmitting a reference frequency from a reference unit to a remote unit while keeping the reference frequency at the reference unit and the remote unit in phase. A fiber optic cable connects the reference unit to the remote unit. A frequency source at the reference unit produces a reference frequency having an adjustable phase. A fiber optic transmitter at the reference unit modulates a light beam with the reference frequency and transmits the light beam into the fiber optic cable. A 50/50 reflector at the remote unit reflects a first portion of the light beam from the reference unit back into the fiber optic cable to the reference unit. A first fiber optic receiver disposed at the remote unit receives a second portion of the light beam and demodulates the reference frequency to be used at the remote unit. A second fiber optic receiver disposed at the reference unit receives the first portion of the light beam and demodulates a reference frequency component. A phase conjugator is connected to the frequency source for comparing the phase of the reference frequency component to the phase of the reference frequency modulating the light beam being transmitted from the reference unit to maintain a conjugate (anti-symmetric) relationship between the reference frequency component and the reference frequency modulating the light beam where virtually no phase difference exists between the phase of the reference frequency component and the phase of the reference frequency modulating the light beam.

  10. Communications satellites versus fiber optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, A. M., Jr.

    Examples of the interfaces encountered in the provision of intercity, long-distance service in the U.S. are examined, and a comparison is conducted of the costs of the Intercity, Long-Distance portion of a single voice circuit derived from either fixed satellite trunking service or fiber optic bulk capacity. It is estimated that by the end of 1988, fiber optic should span the nation connecting New York and Washington with Los Angeles and San Francisco. It is shown that once fiber connects a given pair of cities, it becomes the least costly transmission medium, especially compared to fixed satellite service. Attention is given to equivalent transmission capacities, six providers of fiber optic capacity, a total satellite capacity comparison, an economic lifetime comparison, satellite and fiber optic network maps, satellite city-pair distance and cost matrices, and fiber optic city-pair distance matrices. It is pointed out that certain future CONUS satellite service applications will be inherently invulnerable to terrestrial fiber optics serving fixed routes.

  11. Fiber optic-based biosensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ligler, Frances S.

    1991-01-01

    The NRL fiber optic biosensor is a device which measures the formation of a fluorescent complex at the surface of an optical fiber. Antibodies and DNA binding proteins provide the mechanism for recognizing an analyze and immobilizing a fluorescent complex on the fiber surface. The fiber optic biosensor is fast, sensitive, and permits analysis of hazardous materials remote from the instrumentation. The fiber optic biosensor is described in terms of the device configuration, chemistry for protein immobilization, and assay development. A lab version is being used for assay development and performance characterization while a portable device is under development. Antibodies coated on the fiber are stable for up to two years of storage prior to use. The fiber optic biosensor was used to measure concentration of toxins in the parts per billion (ng/ml) range in under a minute. Immunoassays for small molecules and whole bacteria are under development. Assays using DNA probes as the detection element can also be used with the fiber optic sensor, which is currently being developed to detect biological warfare agents, explosives, pathogens, and toxic materials which pollute the environment.

  12. Fiber optics: A brief introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Gruchalla, M.E.

    1989-01-01

    A basic introduction into the principles of fiber optics is presented. A review of both the underlying physical principles and the individual elements of typical fiber-optic systems are presented. The optical phenomenon of total internal reflection is reviewed. The basic construction of the optical fiber is presented. Both step-index and graded-index fiber designs are reviewed. Multimode and single-mode fiber constructions are considered and typical performance parameters given. Typical optical-fiber bandwidth and loss characteristics are compared to various common coaxial cables, waveguides, and air transmission. The constructions of optical-fiber cables are reviewed. Both loose-tube and tightly-buffered designs are considered. Several optical connection approaches are presented. Photographs of several representative optical connectors are included. Light Emitting Diode and Laser Diode emitters for fiber-optic applications are reviewed, and some advantages and shortcomings of each are considered. The phenomenon of modal noise is briefly explained. Both PIN and Avalanche photodetectors are reviewed and their performance parameters compared. Methods of data transmission over optical fiber are introduced. Principles of Wavelength, Frequency, and Time Division Multiplexing are briefly presented. The technology of fiber-optic sensors is briefly reviewed with basic principles introduced. The performance of a fiber-optic strain sensor is included as a practical example. 7 refs., 10 figs.

  13. Fiber optic snapshot hyperspectral imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansur, David J.; Rentz Dupuis, Julia; Vaillancourt, Robert

    2012-06-01

    OPTRA is developing a snapshot hyperspectral imager (HSI) employing a fiber optic bundle and dispersive spectrometer. The fiber optic bundle converts a broadband spatial image to an array of fiber columns which serve as multiple entrance slits to a prism spectrometer. The dispersed spatially resolved spectra are then sampled by a two-dimensional focal plane array (FPA) at a greater than 30 Hz update rate, thereby qualifying the system as snapshot. Unlike snapshot HSI systems based on computed tomography or coded apertures, our approach requires only the remapping of the FPA frame into hyperspectral cubes rather than a complex reconstruction. Our system has high radiometric efficiency and throughput supporting sufficient signal to noise for hyperspectral imaging measurements made over very short integration times (< 33 ms). The overall approach is compact, low cost, and contains no moving parts, making it ideal for unmanned airborne surveillance. In this paper we present a preliminary design for the fiber optic snapshot HSI system.

  14. Bidirectional fiber optic cable adapter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linehan, M.; Gee, N. B.; Taylor, R.

    1983-02-01

    The technical objective of the BIFOCS program was to develop, build, and test a full-duplex single fiber, fiber optic link, operating in the 1.0 micron to 1.6 micron region, capable of transmitting 20 Mb/s data (10 to the -9th power BER) over a range of at least 10 km, with a goal of 15 km. The link MTBF goal was 5 X 10 to the 3rd power hours and operation over a temperature range of 0 to 50 C. The fiber optic cable consisted of sections not exceeding 2 km in length joined by commercially available dry fiber optic connectors. The system performed successfully at ambient temperature over 15 km of cable.

  15. Fiber optic diffraction grating maker

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Ward, Michael B.

    1991-01-01

    A compact and portable diffraction grating maker comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent beam splitters, and collimating lenses or mirrors directing the split beam at an appropriate photosensitive material. The collimating optics, the output ends of the fiber optic coupler and the photosensitive plate holder are all mounted on an articulated framework so that the angle of intersection of the beams can be altered at will without disturbing the spatial filter, collimation or beam quality, and assuring that the beams will always intersect at the position of the plate.

  16. Fiber optic diffraction grating maker

    DOEpatents

    Deason, V.A.; Ward, M.B.

    1991-05-21

    A compact and portable diffraction grating maker is comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent beam splitters, and collimating lenses or mirrors directing the split beam at an appropriate photosensitive material. The collimating optics, the output ends of the fiber optic coupler and the photosensitive plate holder are all mounted on an articulated framework so that the angle of intersection of the beams can be altered at will without disturbing the spatial filter, collimation or beam quality, and assuring that the beams will always intersect at the position of the plate. 4 figures.

  17. Fiber Optics: Deregulate and Deploy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suwinski, Jan H.

    1993-01-01

    Describes fiber optic technology, explains its use in education and commercial settings, and recommends regulations and legislation that will speed its use to create broadband information networks. Topics discussed include distance learning; interactive video; costs; and the roles of policy makers, lawmakers, public advocacy groups, and consumers.…

  18. Fiber optics for advanced aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumbick, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    The increased use of composites makes the digital control more susceptible to electromagnetic effects. In order to provide the protection to the digital control additional shielding will be required as well as protective circuitry for the electronics. This results in increased weight and reduced reliability. The advantages that fiber optic technology provides for advanced aircraft applications is recognized. The use of optical signals to carry information between the aircraft and the control module provides immunity from contamination by electromagnetic sources as well as other important benefits such as reduced weight and volume resulting from the elimination of the shielding and the replacement of metal conductors with low weight glass fibers. In 1975 NASA began work to develop passive optical sensors for use with fiber optics in aircraft control systems. The problem now is to choose the best optical sensor concepts and evaluate them for use. In 1985 NASA and DOD entered into a joint program, Fiber Optic Control System Integration (FOCSI), to look at optical technology specifically for use in advanced aircraft systems. The results of this program are discussed. The conclusion of the study indicated that the use of fiber optic technology in advanced aircraft systems is feasible and desirable. The study pointed to a lack of available sensors from vendors capable of operating in the adverse environments of advanced aircraft.

  19. Fiber optics for advanced aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumbick, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    The increased use of composites makes the digital control more susceptible to electromagnetic effects. In order to provide the protection to the digital control additional shielding will be required as well as protective circuitry for the electronics. This results in increased weight and reduced reliability. The advantages that fiber optic technology provides for advanced aircraft applications is recognized. The use of optical signals to carry information between the aircraft and the control module provides immunity from contamination by electromagnetic sources as well as other important benefits such as reduced weight and volume resulting from the elimination of the shielding and the replacement of metal conductors with low weight glass fibers. In 1975 NASA began work to develop passive optical sensors for use with fiber optics in aircraft control systems. The problem now is to choose the best optical sensor concepts and evaluate them for use. In 1985 NASA and DOD entered into a joint program, Fiber Optic Control System Integration (FOCSI), to look at optical technology specifically for use in advanced aircraft systems. The results of this program are discussed. The conclusion of the study indicated that the use of fiber optic technology in advanced aircraft systems is feasible and desirable. The study pointed to a lack of available sensors from vendors capable of operating in the adverse environments of advanced aircraft.

  20. Monolithic fiber optic sensor assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, Scott

    2015-02-10

    A remote sensor element for spectrographic measurements employs a monolithic assembly of one or two fiber optics to two optical elements separated by a supporting structure to allow the flow of gases or particulates therebetween. In a preferred embodiment, the sensor element components are fused ceramic to resist high temperatures and failure from large temperature changes.

  1. Fiber optic refractive index monitor

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan David

    2002-01-01

    A sensor for measuring the change in refractive index of a liquid uses the lowest critical angle of a normal fiber optic to achieve sensitivity when the index of the liquid is significantly less than the index of the fiber core. Another embodiment uses a liquid filled core to ensure that its index is approximately the same as the liquid being measured.

  2. Applications of fiber optics in physical protection

    SciTech Connect

    Buckle, T.H.

    1994-03-01

    The purpose of this NUREG is to provide technical information useful for the development of fiber-optic communications and intrusion detection subsystems relevant to physical protection. There are major sections on fiber-optic technology and applications. Other topics include fiber-optic system components and systems engineering. This document also contains a glossary, a list of standards and specifications, and a list of fiber-optic equipment vendors.

  3. High pressure fiber optic sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Guida, Renato; Xia, Hua; Lee, Boon K; Dekate, Sachin N

    2013-11-26

    The present application provides a fiber optic sensor system. The fiber optic sensor system may include a small diameter bellows, a large diameter bellows, and a fiber optic pressure sensor attached to the small diameter bellows. Contraction of the large diameter bellows under an applied pressure may cause the small diameter bellows to expand such that the fiber optic pressure sensor may measure the applied pressure.

  4. Fiber optic hardware for transport aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, John A.

    Fiber Optic Technology is being developed for aircraft and offers benefits in system performance and manufacturing cost reduction. Thr fiber optic systems have high bandwidths that exceeds all of the new aircraft design requirements and exceptional electromagnetic interference (EMI) immunity. Additionally, fiber optic systems have been installed in production aircraft proving design feasiblity.

  5. Fiber optic hardware for transport aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, John A.

    1994-10-01

    Aircraft manufacturers are developing fiber optic technology to exploit the benefits in system performance and manufacturing cost reduction. The fiber optic systems have high bandwidths and exceptional Electromagnetic Interference immunity that exceeds all new aircraft design requirements. Additionally, aircraft manufacturers have shown production readiness of fiber optic systems and design feasibility.

  6. Overview of Fiber-Optical Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Depaula, Ramon P.; Moore, Emery L.

    1987-01-01

    Design, development, and sensitivity of sensors using fiber optics reviewed. State-of-the-art and probable future developments of sensors using fiber optics described in report including references to work in field. Serves to update previously published surveys. Systems incorporating fiber-optic sensors used in medical diagnosis, navigation, robotics, sonar, power industry, and industrial controls.

  7. Fiber optic sensor and method for making

    DOEpatents

    Vartuli, James Scott; Bousman, Kenneth Sherwood; Deng, Kung-Li; McEvoy, Kevin Paul; Xia, Hua

    2010-05-18

    A fiber optic sensor including a fiber having a modified surface integral with the fiber wherein the modified surface includes an open pore network with optical agents dispersed within the open pores of the open pore network. Methods for preparing the fiber optic sensor are also provided. The fiber optic sensors can withstand high temperatures and harsh environments.

  8. Integrated optics for fiber optic sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minford, W. J.; Depaula, R. P.

    1991-01-01

    Recent progress achieved in the field of fiber-optic sensor applications is discussed with emphasis placed on LiNbO3-based integrated optics (IO). Particular consideration is given to advanced electromagnetic-field sensors, an integrated laser vibrometer system, and a fiber-optic gyroscope system. It is shown that the multifunction IO chips have enabled high perforamance fiber-optic sensors (e.g., fiber-optic gyros), provided advanced and unique signal processing capabilities and advanced architectures, and have a potential of making fiber-optic sensors at low cost.

  9. Enhanced optical nonlinearity and fiber-optical frequency comb controlled by a single atom in a whispering-gallery-mode microtoroid resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiahua; Zhang, Suzhen; Yu, Rong; Zhang, Duo; Wu, Ying

    2014-11-01

    Based on a single atom coupled to a fiber-coupled, chip-based microresonator [B. Dayan et al., Science 319, 1062 (2008), 10.1126/science.1152261], we put forward a scheme to generate optical frequency combs at driving laser powers as low as a few nanowatts. Using state-of-the-art experimental parameters, we investigate in detail the influences of different atomic positions and taper-resonator coupling regimes on optical-frequency-comb generation. In addition to numerical simulations demonstrating this effect, a physical explanation of the underlying mechanism is presented. We find that the combination of the atom and the resonator can induce a large third-order nonlinearity which is significantly stronger than Kerr nonlinearity in Kerr frequency combs. Such enhanced nonlinearity can be used to generate optical frequency combs if driven with two continuous-wave control and probe lasers and significantly reduce the threshold of nonlinear optical processes. The comb spacing can be well tuned by changing the frequency beating between the driving control and probe lasers. The proposed method is versatile and can be adopted to different types of resonators, such as microdisks, microspheres, microtoroids or microrings.

  10. Fiber-optic fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Flusberg, Benjamin A; Cocker, Eric D; Piyawattanametha, Wibool; Jung, Juergen C; Cheung, Eunice L M; Schnitzer, Mark J

    2010-01-01

    Optical fibers guide light between separate locations and enable new types of fluorescence imaging. Fiber-optic fluorescence imaging systems include portable handheld microscopes, flexible endoscopes well suited for imaging within hollow tissue cavities and microendoscopes that allow minimally invasive high-resolution imaging deep within tissue. A challenge in the creation of such devices is the design and integration of miniaturized optical and mechanical components. Until recently, fiber-based fluorescence imaging was mainly limited to epifluorescence and scanning confocal modalities. Two new classes of photonic crystal fiber facilitate ultrashort pulse delivery for fiber-optic two-photon fluorescence imaging. An upcoming generation of fluorescence imaging devices will be based on microfabricated device components. PMID:16299479

  11. Fiber optic accelerometers and seismometers

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.A. |

    1996-04-01

    This paper presents performance and figures-of-merit of fiber optic interferometric accelerometers and seismometers using flexural disk, mandrel, and fluid filled transducers. Flexural disk devices having sensitivities of 50 radians/g and operating bandwidths to 2 kHz have been reported. This sensitivity corresponds to a minimum detectable signal of 20 nano-g/{radical}Hz for a system demodulation noise floor of 1 micro-radian/{radical}Hz. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Needle-based fluorescence endomicroscopy via structured illumination with a plastic, achromatic objective

    PubMed Central

    Kyrish, Matthew; Dobbs, Jessica; Jain, Shalini; Wang, Xiao; Yu, Dihua; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. In order to diagnose cancer, a sample must be removed, prepared, and examined under a microscope, which is expensive, invasive, and time consuming. Fiber optic fluorescence endomicroscopy, where an image guide is used to obtain high-resolution images of tissue in vivo, has shown promise as an alternative to conventional biopsies. However, the resolution of standard endomicroscopy is limited by the fiber bundle sampling frequency and out-of-focus light. A system is presented which incorporates a plastic, achromatic objective to increase the sampling and which provides optical sectioning via structured illumination to reject background light. An image is relayed from the sample by a fiber bundle with the custom 2.1-mm outer diameter objective lens integrated to the distal tip. The objective is corrected for the excitation and the emission wavelengths of proflavine (452 and 515 nm). It magnifies the object onto the fiber bundle to improve the system’s lateral resolution by increasing the sampling. The plastic lenses were fabricated via single-point diamond turning and assembled using a zero alignment technique. Ex vivo images of normal and neoplastic murine mammary tissues stained with proflavine are captured. The system achieves higher contrast and resolves smaller features than standard fluorescence endomicroscopy. PMID:24002190

  13. Photoelastic Fiber-Optic Accelerometers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Wei

    This dissertation introduces a completely new class of fiber-optic accelerometers based on the principles of photoelasticity. Two different types of accelerometers are designed and developed. The first is a general purpose accelerometer which employs a sensing element made from an optically sensitive photoelastic plastic; the unit is designed with a relatively low natural frequency and a high sensitivity. The second is a shock accelerometer which employs a glass GRIN lens as its sensing element; the unit is designed with a relatively high frequency and a wide measurement range. In both cases, a low-cost LED is employed as an incoherent light source; multimode optical fibers having a hard plastic cladding are used to transmit signals between the acceleration transducer and the conditioning electronics. The dissertation includes a brief introduction to accelerometer measurement in which current applications and associated problems are presented; detailed descriptions of the operating principles and design criteria considered when building an accelerometer; prior related research; discussions involving photoelastic fiber-optic transducers; a comprehensive analysis of sensing elements; the designs for the overall measurement systems; and, the results obtained by testing prototypes produced from the final designs. The qualitative and quantitative analyses contained herein represent a unique blend of mechanics, physics and electro-optics. A number of new discoveries are reported especially in conjunction with the analysis of the GRIN lens. Several new definitions are introduced, some of which make it possible to compare the performance of the photoelastic fiber-optic accelerometers to that of their more conventional counterparts. The test results show that both accelerometers meet their design requirements and their performance is comparable to some of the best accelerometers commercially available.

  14. Fiber optic smart structures for aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udd, Eric

    Fiber optic smart structures as applied to aerospace platforms are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on advantages of these structures which include weight saving for equivalent performance, immunity to electromagnetic interference, the ability to multiplex a number of fiber optic sensors along a single line, the inherent high bandwidth of fiber optic sensors and the data links supporting them, the ability to perform in extremely hostile environments at high temperatures, vibration, and shock loadings. It is concluded that fiber optic smart structures have a considerable potential to enhance the value of future aircraft and spacecraft through improved reliability, maintainability, and flight performance augmentation.

  15. Tracheobronchial amyloidosis and confocal endomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Newton, Richard C; Kemp, Samuel V; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Darzi, Ara; Sheppard, Mary N; Shah, Pallav L

    2011-01-01

    Tracheobronchial amyloidosis is one of many causes of endobronchial stenosis and nodularity, the concrete diagnosis of which currently requires the finding of apple-green birefringence from endobronchial biopsies. Bronchoscopic probe-based confocal endomicroscopy (pCLE) is a novel optical biopsy technique which provides real-time images of the lattice structure of the bronchial basement membrane - a finding lost in malignancy. This case study outlines the imperfect, essentially palliative management of this rare disease, and shows for the first time the unusual dappled in vivo pCLE images of amyloid-affected endobronchium. PMID:21430359

  16. Ec-135 Fiber Optic Technology Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Jan R...; Hodges, Harry N.

    1984-10-01

    Fiber optic technology offers many advantages for upgrading nuclear survivability in systems such as the Airborne Command Post EC-135 aircraft, including weight and cost savings, EMI and EMC immunity, high data rates. The greatest advantage seen for nuclear survivable systems, however, is that a fiber optic system's EMP hardness can be maintained more easily with the use of fiber optics than with shielded cables or other protective methods. TRW recently completed a study to determine the feasibility of using fiber optic technology in an EC-135 aircraft environment. Since this study was conducted for a USAF Logistics Command Agency, a feasible system had to be one which could be realistically priced by an integrating contractor. Thus, any fiber optic approach would have to be well developed before it could be considered feasible. During the course of the study problem areas were encountered which are associated with the readiness of the technology for use rather than with the technology itself. These included connectors, standards, fiber radiation resistance, busing, maintenance, and logistics. Because these problems areas have not been resolved, it was concluded that fiber optic technology, despite its advantages, is not ready for directed procurement (i.e., included as a requirement in a prime mission equipment specification). However, offers by a manufacturer to use fiber optic technology in lieu of conventional technology should be considered. This paper treats these problems in more detail, addresses the areas which need further development, and discusses the hardness maintenance advantages of using fiber optic technology.

  17. Fiber-optic liquid level sensor

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    1991-01-01

    A fiber-optic liquid level sensor measures the height of a column of liquid through the hydrostatic pressure it produces. The sensor employs a fiber-optic displacement sensor to detect the pressure-induced displacement of the center of a corrugated diaphragm.

  18. Assessment of fiber optic pressure sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Hashemian, H.M.; Black, C.L.; Farmer, J.P.

    1995-04-01

    This report presents the results of a six-month Phase 1 study to establish the state-of-the-art in fiber optic pressure sensing and describes the design and principle of operation of various fiber optic pressure sensors. This study involved a literature review, contact with experts in the field, an industrial survey, a site visit to a fiber optic sensor manufacturer, and laboratory testing of a fiber optic pressure sensor. The laboratory work involved both static and dynamic performance tests. In addition, current requirements for environmental and seismic qualification of sensors for nuclear power plants were reviewed to determine the extent of the qualification tests that fiber optic pressure sensors may have to meet before they can be used in nuclear power plants. This project has concluded that fiber optic pressure sensors are still in the research and development stage and only a few manufacturers exist in the US and abroad which supply suitable fiber optic pressure sensors for industrial applications. Presently, fiber optic pressure sensors are mostly used in special applications for which conventional sensors are not able to meet the requirements.

  19. Spectrum-Modulating Fiber-Optic Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beheim, Glenn; Fritsch, Klaus

    1989-01-01

    Family of spectrum-modulating fiber-optic sensors undergoing development for use in aircraft-engine control systems. Fiber-optic sensors offer advantages of small size, high bandwidth, immunity to electromagnetic interference, and light weight. Furthermore, they reduce number of locations on aircraft to which electrical power has to be supplied.

  20. Infrared fiber optic focal plane dispersers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    Far infrared transmissive fiber optics as a component in the design of integrated far infrared focal plane array utilization is discussed. A tightly packed bundle of fibers is placed at the focal plane, where an array of infrared detectors would normally reside, and then fanned out in two or three dimensions to individual detectors. Subsequently, the detectors are multiplexed by cryogenic electronics for relay of the data. A second possible application is frequency up-conversion (v sub 1 + v sub 2 = v sub 3), which takes advantage of the nonlinear optical index of refraction of certain infrared transmissive materials in fiber form. Again, a fiber bundle is utilized as above, but now a laser of frequency v sub 1 is mixed with the incoming radiation of frequency v sub 1 within the nonlinear fiber material. The sum, v sub 2 is then detected by near infrared or visible detectors which are more sensitive than those available at v sub 2. Due to the geometrical size limitations of detectors such as photomultipliers, the focal plane dispersal technique is advantageous for imaging up-conversion.

  1. Fiber optic sensors for corrosion detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Alphonso C.

    1993-01-01

    The development of fiber optic sensors for the detection of a variety of material parameters has grown tremendously over the past several years. Additionally, the potential for analytical applications of fiber optic sensors have become more widely used. New pH sensors have also been developed using fiber optic techniques to detect fluorescence characteristics from immobilized fluorogenic reagent chemicals. The primary purpose of this research was to investigate the feasibility of using fiber optic sensors to detect the presence of Al(sup 3+) ions made in the process of environmental corrosion of aluminum materials. The Al(sup 3+) ions plus a variety of other type of metal ions can be detected using analytical techniques along with fiber optic sensors.

  2. Fiber-Optic Chemical and Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sherif, Mahmoud

    In the past 15 years, the fiber-optic communication industry has literally revolutionized the telecommunication industry by providing higher performance and more reliable telecommunication links. In parallel to these developments, and due to the high volume production of fiber-optic components at reasonable performance and costs, other industries associated with fiber optics have been developed like the sensors industry. As component prices have fallen and quality improvements have been made, the ability of fiber-optic sensors to displace conventional sensors have become a reality. A major category in fiber-optic sensors is the chemical and biosensors. These sensors can provide numerous advantages over conventional sensors. These advantages are higher performance, light weight, small and compact size, immunity to electromagnetic interference, remote sensing, ability to be multiplexed, and ability to be embedded into various structures and materials. The sensor's sensitivity and selectivity are enhanced by using optical transducers capable of precise detection of surround changes.

  3. Opportunities for efficient fiber optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, J. M.; Buelow, R. F.; Frankiewicz, G. P.

    2007-09-01

    High efficiency distributed lighting systems for general lighting applications, delivering light comparable to but with an energy saving of 80% or more over traditional sources have recently become available. This remarkable achievement is due to: the development of long lived high efficiency light sources that match the color rendition and warmth of traditional incandescent and fluorescent sources; the creation of a new generation of non-imaging collectors to efficiently collect and direct the light; and the availability of low loss and low cost light pipes to distribute the light. Given these improvements many incandescent, halogen and even fluorescent applications are now best served using fiber optic lighting technology. In achieving practical systems, a number of significant technical problems have been overcome. In this paper we shall review some of these solutions as well as indicate our view of the direction and impact of future advances.

  4. Subsea fiber-optic communications

    SciTech Connect

    High, G.; Wright, P.J.

    1997-05-01

    High-cost and hazardous nature of recovering hydrocarbons offshore have led to the trend towards growth in subsea production control. The extended step-out distances of subsea completions is increasing the volume and complexity of subsea data communications beyond the capacity of conventional systems. Improved reservoir management using intelligent sensors, metering, and process equipment, requiring real-time monitoring and control, dictates the use of wideband communication. Fiber optics offers the necessary volume of data transmission, with the high-noise immunity needed for data integrity and safe operation, under the severe Electro-Magnetic Interference (EMI) environments created where high power motors and power cables are used subsea. The marinizing of optical, opto-electronic communication components for production control, data acquisition of subsea completions for the offshore oil industry are described.

  5. Sensitive fiber-optic immunoassay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, Irene M.; Love, Walter F.; Slovacek, Rudolf E.

    1991-07-01

    The principles of evanescent wave theory were applied to an immunological sensor for detecting the cardiac-specific isoenzyme creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB). The detection of the CK-MB isoenzyme is used in conjunction with the total CK measurement in the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction. The clinical range for CK-MB is from 2-100 ng/ml. Previous work which utilized the fluorophor, Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), was able to discriminate between 0 and 3 ng/ml CK-MB. Use of the fluorophor B-phycoerythrin (BPE) increased the assay sensitivity to 0.1 ng/ml CK-MB. The data was collected for 15 minutes using an optical launch and collection angle of 25 degree(s). This fiber optic based system is homogeneous and requires no subsequent washing, handling, or processing steps after exposure to the sample.

  6. Fiber optic D dimer biosensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, R.S.; Grant, S.A.

    1999-08-17

    A fiber optic sensor for D dimer (a fibrinolytic product) can be used in vivo (e.g., in catheter-based procedures) for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke-related conditions in humans. Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States. It has been estimated that strokes and stroke-related disorders cost Americans between $15-30 billion annually. Relatively recently, new medical procedures have been developed for the treatment of stroke. These endovascular procedures rely upon the use of microcatheters. These procedures could be facilitated with this sensor for D dimer integrated with a microcatheter for the diagnosis of clot type, and as an indicator of the effectiveness, or end-point of thrombolytic therapy. 4 figs.

  7. Fiber optic D dimer biosensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, Robert S.; Grant, Sheila A.

    1999-01-01

    A fiber optic sensor for D dimer (a fibrinolytic product) can be used in vivo (e.g., in catheter-based procedures) for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke-related conditions in humans. Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States. It has been estimated that strokes and stroke-related disorders cost Americans between $15-30 billion annually. Relatively recently, new medical procedures have been developed for the treatment of stroke. These endovascular procedures rely upon the use of microcatheters. These procedures could be facilitated with this sensor for D dimer integrated with a microcatheter for the diagnosis of clot type, and as an indicator of the effectiveness, or end-point of thrombolytic therapy.

  8. A fiber optic damage monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, C. K.; Cielo, P.; Farnell, G. W.; Parker, M.

    A simplified fiber-optic damage monitoring system for on-line assessments of the condition of composite structural materials in F/A-18 fighters is described. Optical fibers are implanted into the composite mesh in a configuration with horizontal and vertical orientations. When light is pumped into the fibers, and failure of transmittance in either the x- or y-coordinates indicates the location of a defect at that coordinate, as revealed by the fiber damage. Attaching photodiodes to the optic fibers and connecting the entire system to a video camera and computer permits on-line monitoring of the mesh-holding panels. Sample results are provided from a system with multimode step index fibers, a VAX 11/780 computer and a video camera with a 488 x 380 cell photodiode array. Image subtraction is an effective means for fast determination of the identities of broken fibers by comparisons of images of arrays of original and damaged fibers.

  9. Fiber optic hydrogen detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi, Alex A.; Larson, David B.; Wuestling, Mark D.

    1999-12-01

    Commercial and military launch vehicles are designed to use hydrogen as the main propellant, which is very volatile, extremely flammable, and highly explosive. Current detection systems uses Teflon transfer tubes at a large number of vehicle locations through which gas samples are drawn and the stream analyzed by a mass spectrometer. A concern with this approach is the high cost of the system. Also, the current system does not provide leak location and is not in real-time. This system is very complex and cumbersome for production and ground support measurement personnel. The fiber optic micromirror sensor under development for cryogenic environment relies on a reversible chemical interaction causing a change in reflectivity of a thin film of coated Palladium. The magnitude of the reflectivity change is correlated to hydrogen concentration. The sensor uses only a tiny light beam, with no electricity whatsoever at the sensor, leading to devices that is intrinsically safe from explosive ignition. The sensor, extremely small in size and weight detects, hydrogen concentration using a passive element consisting of chemically reactive microcoatings deposited on the surface of a glass microlens, which is then bonded to an optical fiber. The system uses a multiplexing technique with a fiber optic driver-receiver consisting of a modulated LED source that is launched into the sensor, and a photodiode detector that synchronously measures the reflected signal. The system incorporates a microprocessor (or PC) to perform the data analysis and storage, as well as trending and set alarm function. As it is a low cost system with a fast response, many more detection sensors can be used that will be extremely helpful in determining leak location for safety of crew and vehicles during launch operations.

  10. Architectures of fiber optic network in telecommunications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasile, Irina B.; Vasile, Alexandru; Filip, Luminita E.

    2005-08-01

    The operators of telecommunications have targeted their efforts towards realizing applications using broad band fiber optics systems in the access network. Thus, a new concept related to the implementation of fiber optic transmission systems, named FITL (Fiber In The Loop) has appeared. The fiber optic transmission systems have been extensively used for realizing the transport and intercommunication of the public telecommunication network, as well as for assuring the access to the telecommunication systems of the great corporations. Still, the segment of the residential users and small corporations did not benefit on large scale of this technology implementation. For the purpose of defining fiber optic applications, more types of architectures were conceived, like: bus, ring, star, tree. In the case of tree-like networks passive splitters (that"s where the name of PON comes from - Passive Optical Network-), which reduce significantly the costs of the fiber optic access, by separating the costs of the optical electronic components. That's why the passive fiber optics architectures (PON represent a viable solution for realizing the access at the user's loop. The main types of fiber optics architectures included in this work are: FTTC (Fiber To The Curb); FTTB (Fiber To The Building); FTTH (Fiber To The Home).

  11. Precision Fiber Optic Sensor Market Forecast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Jeff D.; Glasco, Jon; Dixon, Frank W.

    1986-01-01

    The worldwide market for precision fiber optic sensors is forecasted, 1984-1994. The forecast is based upon o Analysis of fiber optic sensor and related component current technology, and a forecast of technology advancement o Review and projection of demand for precision sensing, and the penetration which fiber optics will make into this market The analysis and projections are based mainly on interviews conducted worldwide with research teams, government agencies, systems contractors, medical and industrial laboratories, component suppliers and others. The worldwide market for precision (interferometric) fiber optic sensing systems is forecasted to exceed $0.8 billion by 1994. The forecast is segmented by geographical region (Europe, Japan and North America) and by function; o Gyroscope o Sonar o Gradiometer/Magnetometer o Other - Chemical Composition - Atmospheric Acoustic - Temperature - Position - Pressure Requirements for components are reviewed. These include special fiber, emitters and detectors, modulators, couplers, switches, integrated optical circuits and integrated optoelectronics. The advancement in component performance is forecasted. The major driving forces creating fiber optic sensor markets are reviewed. These include fiber optic sensor technical and economic advantages, increasingly stringent operational requirements, and technology evolution. The leading fiber optic sensor and related component development programs are reviewed. Component sources are listed. Funding sources for sensor and component development are outlined, and trends forecasted.

  12. Harsh environment fiber optic connectors/testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Douglas A.

    2014-09-01

    Fiber optic systems are used frequently in military, aerospace and commercial aviation programs. There is a long history of implementing fiber optic data transfer for aircraft control, for harsh environment use in local area networks and more recently for in-flight entertainment systems. The advantages of fiber optics include high data rate capacity, low weight, immunity to EMI/RFI, and security from signal tapping. Technicians must be trained particularly to install and maintain fiber systems, but it is not necessarily more difficult than wire systems. However, the testing of the fiber optic interconnection system must be conducted in a standardized manner to assure proper performance. Testing can be conducted with slight differences in the set-up and procedure that produce significantly different test results. This paper reviews various options of interconnect configurations and discusses how these options can affect the performance, maintenance required and longevity of a fiber optic system, depending on the environment. Proper test methods are discussed. There is a review of the essentials of proper fiber optic testing and impact of changing such test parameters as input launch conditions, wavelength considerations, power meter options and the basic methods of testing. This becomes important right from the start when the supplier test data differs from the user's data check upon receiving the product. It also is important in periodic testing. Properly conducting the fiber optic testing will eliminate confusion and produce meaningful test results for a given harsh environment application.

  13. Fiber Optic Connector Polishing Fixture Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolasinski, John R. (Inventor); Moszcziewski, Joseph Roch (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A fiber optic connector polishing fixture assembly for sup- porting a terminus of a fiber optic cable before a polishing surface. The assembly comprises: a fiber optic polishing fixture adapted to support the terminus before the polishing surface; a fixture support connected to the fixture for sup- porting the fixture before the polishing surface; and an adjustable connection between the fixture and the fixture support having user accessible adjustment controls for allowing a user to operate the controls to shift the fixture and fixture support relative to one another for substantially eliminating an apex offset of the terminus with respect to the polishing surface.

  14. Fiber optic sensors for smart taxiways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janzen, Douglas D.; Fuerstenau, Norbert; Goetze, Wolfgang

    1995-09-01

    Fiber-optic sensors could offer advantages in the field of airport ground traffic monitoring: immunity to electromagnetic interference, installation without costly and time consuming airfield closures, and low loss, low noise optical connection between sensors and signal processing equipment. This paper describes fiber-optic sensors developed for airport taxiway monitoring and the first steps toward their installation in an experimental surface movement guidance and control system at the Braunschweig airport. Initial results obtained with fiber- optic light barriers and vibration sensors are reported. The feasibility of employing interferometric strain gauges for this application will be discussed based on sensor characteristics obtained through measurements of strain in an aircraft structure in flight.

  15. Great prospects for fiber optics sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, T. E.

    1983-01-01

    Fiber optic sensors provide noise immunity and galvanic insulation at the measurement point. Interest in such sensors is increasing for these reasons. In the United States sales are expected to increase from 12 million dollars in 1981 to 180 million in 1991. Interferometric sensors based on single modus fibers deliver extremely high sensitivity, while sensors based on multi-modus fibers are more easily manufactured. The fiber optic sensors which are available today are based on point measurements. Development of fiber optic sensors in Norway is being carried out at the Central institute and has resulted in the development of medical manometers which are now undergoing clinical testing.

  16. High-temperature fiber optic pressure sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berthold, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    Attention is given to a program to develop fiber optic methods to measure diaphragm deflection. The end application is intended for pressure transducers capable of operating to 540 C. In this paper are reported the results of a laboratory study to characterize the performance of the fiber-optic microbend sensor. The data presented include sensitivity and spring constant. The advantages and limitations of the microbend sensor for static pressure measurement applications are described. A proposed design is presented for a 540 C pressure transducer using the fiber optic microbend sensor.

  17. Fiber optic gyros: the vision realized

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlath, George A.

    2006-08-01

    Over thirty five years have elapsed since the fiber optic gyro was proposed by Vali and Shorthill. In those decades, fiber gyros have matured. They are competing head to head with existing technologies such as mechanical gyros and RLGs in tactical, navigation and strategic applications and are winning. Northrop Grumman has produced the majority of fiber optic gyros and fiber optic gyro based inertial products in the world. This paper will cover the various Northrop fiber gyro products, the platforms they are used on, as well as production and top level system data.

  18. Fiber optic communication in borehole applications

    SciTech Connect

    Franco, R.J.; Morgan, J.R.

    1997-04-01

    The Telemetry Technology Development Department have, in support of the Advanced Geophysical Technology Department and the Oil Recovery Technology Partnership, developed a fiber optic communication capability for use in borehole applications. This environment requires the use of packaging and component technologies to operate at high temperature (up to 175{degrees}C) and survive rugged handling. Fiber optic wireline technology has been developed by The Rochester Corporation under contract to Sandia National Labs and produced a very rugged, versatile wireline cable. This development has utilized commercial fiber optic component technologies and demonstrated their utility in extreme operating environments.

  19. Fiber optic communication technology; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, August 23, 24, 1984

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleekamp, C. W.

    Fiber optic components are considered, taking into account a review of developments related to optical fibers, a review of fiber optic cable technology, aspects of fiber system testing, fiber optic splices, a critical review of fiber optic connectors, and fiber optic communication technology branching devices. Developments concerning fiber optic systems are also discussed, giving attention to optoelectronic issues in fiber optic communications, digital fiber optic systems, wideband analog fiber optic systems, fiber optic local area networks, and wavelength division multiplexing.

  20. Reliability of fiber optic emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twu, B.; Kung, H.

    1982-08-01

    Over the past few years a number of fiber optic links were introduced by an American company. Various transmitter-fiber-receiver combinations were studied to satisfy different link performance and reliability requirements. Light emitting diodes (LEDs) were generally used in the transmitter mode. Attention is given to the characteristics of four types of LED's which had been developed, GaAsP LEDs were made from epi-layers grown by vapor phase epitaxy on GaAs substrate. The composition of GaAs and GaP was adjusted to achieve light emission at the desired wavelength. The p-n junction was formed by diffusing zinc into n type epi-layers. GaAlAs LEDs were made from epi-layers grown by liquid phase epitaxy on GaAs substrate. Long term reliability of four LEDs was evaluated. GaAsP diodes showed gradual degradation as a whole. GaAlAs emitters showed insignificant gradual degradation, but they exhibited dark line or dark spot related catastrophic degradation.

  1. Remotely readable fiber optic compass

    DOEpatents

    Migliori, Albert; Swift, Gregory W.; Garrett, Steven L.

    1986-01-01

    A remotely readable fiber optic compass. A sheet polarizer is affixed to a magnet rotatably mounted in a compass body, such that the polarizer rotates with the magnet. The optical axis of the sheet polarizer is preferably aligned with the north-south axis of the magnet. A single excitation light beam is divided into four identical beams, two of which are passed through the sheet polarizer and through two fixed polarizing sheets which have their optical axes at right angles to one another. The angle of the compass magnet with respect to a fixed axis of the compass body can be determined by measuring the ratio of the intensities of the two light beams. The remaining ambiguity as to which of the four possible quadrants the magnet is pointing to is resolved by the second pair of light beams, which are passed through the sheet polarizer at positions which are transected by two semicircular opaque strips formed on the sheet polarizer. The incoming excitation beam and the four return beams are communicated by means of optical fibers, giving a remotely readable compass which has no electrical parts.

  2. Remotely readable fiber optic compass

    DOEpatents

    Migliori, A.; Swift, G.W.; Garrett, S.L.

    1985-04-30

    A remotely readable fiber optic compass. A sheet polarizer is affixed to a magnet rotatably mounted in a compass body, such that the polarizer rotates with the magnet. The optical axis of the sheet polarizer is preferably aligned with the north-south axis of the magnet. A single excitation light beam is divided into four identical beams, two of which are passed through the sheet polarizer and through two fixed polarizing sheets which have their optical axes at right angles to one another. The angle of the compass magnet with respect to a fixed axis of the compass body can be determined by measuring the ratio of the intensities of the two light beams. The remaining ambiguity as to which of the four possible quadrants the magnet is pointing to is resolved by the second pair of light beams, which are passed through the sheet polarizer at positions which are transected by two semicircular opaque strips formed on the sheet polarizer. The incoming excitation beam and the four return beams are communicated by means of optical fibers, giving a remotely readable compass which has no electrical parts.

  3. Fiber-Optic Ammonia Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Michael T.

    2003-01-01

    Reversible, colorimetric fiber-optic sensors are undergoing development for use in measuring concentrations of ammonia in air at levels relevant to human health [0 to 50 parts per million (ppm)]. A sensor of this type includes an optical fiber that has been modified by replacing a portion of its cladding with a polymer coat that contains a dye that reacts reversibly with ammonia and changes color when it does so. The change in color is measured as a change in the amount of light transmitted from one end of the fiber to the other. Responses are reversible and proportional to the concentration of ammonia over the range from 9 to 175 ppm and in some cases the range of reversibility extends up to 270 ppm. The characteristic time for the response of a sensor to rise from 10 to 90 percent of full scale is about 25 seconds. These sensors are fully operational in pure carbon dioxide and are not adversely affected by humidity. This work was done by Michael T. Carter

  4. Fiber Optic Network Design Expert System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artz, Timothy J.; Wnek, Roy M.

    1987-05-01

    The Fiber Optic Network Design Expert System (FONDES) is an engineering tool for the specification, design, and evaluation of fiber optic transmission systems. FONDES encompasses a design rule base and a data base of specifications of system components. This package applies to fiber optic design work in two ways, as a design-to-specification tool and a system performance prediction model. The FONDES rule base embodies the logic of design engineering. It can be used to produce a system design given a requirement specification or it can be used to predict system performance given a system design. The periodically updated FONDES data base contains performance specifications, price, and availability data for current fiber optic system components. FONDES is implemented in an artificial intelligence language, TURBO-PROLOG, and runs on an IBM-PC.

  5. Spaceborne Fiber Optic Data Bus (SFODB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bretthauer, Joy W.; Chalfant, Chuck H.; Orlando, Fred J.; Rezek, Ed; Sawyer, Marc

    1998-01-01

    The SFODB is a standardized, gigabit per second, highly reliable, fault tolerant fiber optic network. SFODB was designed to the harsh space environments and real-time, on-board data handling applications of high speed, remote sensing spacecraft.

  6. Fiber optics - Failure modes and mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyle, Richard A., Jr.

    A study was conducted to investigate the frequency and cause of failures of fiber-optic transmitters, waveguides, receivers, connectors, and splices. To accomplish this, quantitative and qualitative data were collected and evaluated to determine why and when failures occurred and to identify design options which can be made to avoid these failure conditions. An understanding of fiber-optic device failure modes and mechanisms is critical to insuring unit reliability, improving the manufacturing process, and allowing design flexibility of the overall fiber-optic system. The author summarizes the specific failure modes uncovered for typical items such as transmitters, receivers, fiber, cable, connectors, and splices. He also discusses fiber-optic performance criteria, design considerations, failure rate data, and failure mode information.

  7. Electromagnetic enviromental effects on shipboard fiber optic installations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucholz, Roger C.

    1991-02-01

    The inherent immunity of fiber optic materials to electromagnetic environmental effects provides numerous opportunities for wide-spread use of fiber optics aboard ship. Federal budget constraints may reduce the development of new fiber optic systems to address military applications. However there are sufficient similarities between industrial and military sensor needs to warrant use of off-the-shelf fiber optic sensor systems.

  8. Fiber optic chemical sensors on Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, M.A.; Ricco, A.J.; Grunthaner, F.J.; Lane, A.L.

    1993-12-31

    A fiber optic chemical sensing instrument is described that will measure the reactivity of the martian soil and atmosphere. The self- contained instrument monitors reflectivity changes in reactive thin films caused by chemical reactions with the martian soil or atmosphere. Data from over 200 separate thin-film-coated optical fibers are recorded simultaneously. This fiber optic sensing technology has many advantages for planetary exploration and monitoring applications on manned spacecraft, in addition to many practical terrestrial uses.

  9. Adjustable Fiber Optic Microwave Transversal Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shadaram, Mehdi; Lutes, George F.; Logan, Ronald T.; Maleki, Lutfollah

    1994-01-01

    Microwave transversal filters implemented as adjustable tapped fiber optic delay lines developed. Main advantages of these filters (in comparison with conventional microwave transversal filters) are small size, light weight, no need for matching of radio-frequency impedances, no need for shielding against electromagnetic radiation at suboptical frequencies, no need for mechanical tuning, high stability of amplitude and phase, and active control of transfer functions. Weights of taps in fiber optic delay lines adjusted.

  10. Improved Microwave Fiber-Optic Link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, Ronald T.; Lutes, George F.

    1995-01-01

    High power output and narrow linewidth of Nd:YAG laser and external modulator combination enable higher stability and higher dynamic range fiber-optic transmission of microwave signals over longer distances. System prototype to test concept of high fidelity transmission of received microwave signals over fiber-optic cables, without need to downconvert microwave signals for transmission. Useful in distribution of future, more stable, frequency reference signals, phased array radar systems, and aircraft landing systems using bistatic radar.

  11. Sealed fiber-optic bundle feedthrough

    DOEpatents

    Tanner, Carol E.

    2002-01-01

    A sealed fiber-optic bundle feedthrough by which a multitude of fiber-optic elements may be passed through an opening or port in a wall or structure separating two environments at different pressures or temperatures while maintaining the desired pressure or temperature in each environment. The feedthrough comprises a rigid sleeve of suitable material, a bundle of individual optical fibers, and a resin-based sealing material that bonds the individual optical fibers to each other and to the rigid sleeve.

  12. Fiber optic sensors for gas turbine control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, Emily Yixie (Inventor); Brown, Dale Marius (Inventor); Petrucco, Louis Jacob (Inventor); Lovett, Jeffery Allan (Inventor); Daum, Wolfgang (Inventor); Dunki-Jacobs, Robert John (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus for detecting flashback occurrences in a premixed combustor system having at least one fuel nozzle includes at least one photodetector and at least one fiber optic element coupled between the at least one photodetector and a test region of the combustor system wherein a respective flame of the fuel nozzle is not present under normal operating conditions. A signal processor monitors a signal of the photodetector. The fiber optic element can include at least one optical fiber positioned within a protective tube. The fiber optic element can include two fiber optic elements coupled to the test region. The optical fiber and the protective tube can have lengths sufficient to situate the photodetector outside of an engine compartment. A plurality of fuel nozzles and a plurality of fiber optic elements can be used with the fiber optic elements being coupled to respective fuel nozzles and either to the photodetector or, wherein a plurality of photodetectors are used, to respective ones of the plurality of photodetectors. The signal processor can include a digital signal processor.

  13. Honeywell FLASH fiber optic motherboard evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stange, Kent

    1996-10-01

    The use of fiber optic data transmission media can make significant contributions in achieving increasing performance and reduced life cycle cost requirements placed on commercial and military transport aircraft. For complete end-to-end fiber optic transmission, photonics technologies and techniques need to be understood and applied internally to the aircraft line replaceable units as well as externally on the interconnecting aircraft cable plant. During a portion of the Honeywell contribution to Task 2A on the Fly- by-Light Advanced System Hardware program, evaluations were done on a fiber optic transmission media implementation internal to a Primary Flight Control Computer (PFCC). The PFCC internal fiber optic transmission media implementation included a fiber optic backplane, an optical card-edge connector, and an optical source/detector coupler/installation. The performance of these optical media components were evaluated over typical aircraft environmental stresses of temperature, vibration, and humidity. These optical media components represent key technologies to the computer end-to-end fiber optic transmission capability on commercial and military transport aircraft. The evaluations and technical readiness assessments of these technologies will enable better perspectives on productization of fly-by-light systems requiring their utilizations.

  14. Fiber optic sensors for gas turbine control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, Emily Yixie (Inventor); Brown, Dale Marius (Inventor); Petrucco, Louis Jacob (Inventor); Lovett, Jeffery Allan (Inventor); Daum, Wolfgang (Inventor); Dunki-Jacobs, Robert John (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus for detecting flashback occurrences in a premixed combustor system having at least one fuel nozzle includes at least one photodetector and at least one fiber optic element coupled between the at least one photodetector and a test region of the combustor system wherein a respective flame of the fuel nozzle is not present under normal operating conditions. A signal processor monitors a signal of the photodetector. The fiber optic element can include at least one optical fiber positioned within a protective tube. The fiber optic element can include two fiber optic elements coupled to the test region. The optical fiber and the protective tube can have lengths sufficient to situate the photodetector outside of an engine compartment. A plurality of fuel nozzles and a plurality of fiber optic elements can be used with the fiber optic elements being coupled to respective fuel nozzles and either to the photodetector or, wherein a plurality of photodetectors are used, to respective ones of the plurality of photodetectors. The signal processor can include a digital signal processor.

  15. Fiber optic sensors for gas turbine control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, Emily Yixie (Inventor); Petrucco, Louis Jacob (Inventor); Daum, Wolfgang (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An apparatus for detecting flashback occurrences in a premixed combustor system having at least one fuel nozzle includes at least one photodetector and at least one fiber optic element coupled between the at least one photodetector and a test region of the combustor system wherein a respective flame of the fuel nozzle is not present under normal operating conditions. A signal processor monitors a signal of the photodetector. The fiber optic element can include at least one optical fiber positioned within a protective tube. The fiber optic element can include two fiber optic elements coupled to the test region. The optical fiber and the protective tube can have lengths sufficient to situate the photodetector outside of an engine compartment. A plurality of fuel nozzles and a plurality of fiber optic elements can be used with the fiber optic elements being coupled to respective fuel nozzles and either to the photodetector or, wherein a plurality of photodetectors are used, to respective ones of the plurality of photodetectors. The signal processor can include a digital signal processor.

  16. Research for Electronic Fiber Optics Technologists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, Ellis E.

    1999-01-01

    The intent of this project was to provide research experiences for socially and economically disadvantaged students in networking via fiber optics. The objectives of this project were: 1) To provide knowledge and skills needed by students to use the tools and equipment essential to networking NASA's and the university's topologies; 2) To provide the student researchers with needed mathematical skills and concepts to progress in fiber optic technology; 3) To afford the principal investigator an opportunity to become certified in fiber optics; 4) To build a transmitter and receiver circuit that will be linked by fiber-optic cable to demonstrate mastery of concepts; and 5) To conduct research for NASA and the University in the fiber-optic system. The research will attempt to develop applications for THUNDER (Thin-layer Composite Unimorph Ferroelectric Driver and Sensor) and LARC-SI (Langley Research Center- Soluble Polyimide), (inventions at NASA/LaRC) and fiber-optic technology that will be beneficial to NASA, the university and the consumer. This research has the potential of improving the nation's manpower in the area of fiberoptic technology. It will allow students the opportunity to participate in visible research at NASA and in industry.

  17. Minutes of the Fiber Optics Standardization Planning Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1983-12-01

    Partial Contents: Report on NATO Allied Publications for Fiber Optics Components, IECSC, International Electro-Technical Commission Subcommittee 46E on Fiber Optics, EIA TR-44, Optical Communications Systems Committee Report, Fiber Optic Technology Center Briefing, Report on Cleaved-Coupled-Cavity (C3), Semiconductor Lasers, EIA P6.7 Fiber Optic Cable Committee Report, and Report on EIA P-6.1 Committee on Fiber Optics.

  18. Fiber-optic currents measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Forman, P.R.; Looney, L.D.; Tabaka, L.J.

    1993-01-01

    Polarization maintaining pigtailed laser diodes have greatly increased the ease with which fiber-optic sensors for Faraday current measurements on large pulsed experiments can be deployed. 670, 830, and 1300 nm units are readily available. Such diode lasers can easily be mounted in an RF shielded box along with the simple electronics and batteries to power them. Our units measure 16.5 [times] 8 [times] 6 cm. and have a single external control; an on off switch. They use two 1.5 volt C'' cell batteries. By using an LT1073 chip in the electronics the batteries are an energy source rather than a voltage source. These units can provide 100 mA drive to a LT015MD laser diode so that 1 mW of 830 nm fight exits the fiber pigtail for up to 23 hours with no detectable droop in power. For the sensor element twisted single mode low birefringence fibers are wrapped around the region of interest. The fiber pigtail is fused to the sensor section so changes in alignment are avoided. The light exiting the fiber sensor section is immediately analyzed by a compact, 3 [times] 3.5 [times] 5 cm, bulk optical unit which outputs quadrature optical signals into two multimode fibers leading to detectors in a screen room. The system is thus completely free of ground loops and is as immune to noise as the screen room. These sensors have the usual advantages claimed for them and the all dielectric feature was the original reason for their use on our experiments. The ease of deployment however is not usually cited. On our Pegasus II experiment the need arose for a total current measurement at the main header of the capacitor banks. A single turn of optical fiber was easily strung in a 6.4 m diameter circle and attached to laser and analyzer in a few hours.

  19. Fiber-optic currents measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Forman, P.R.; Looney, L.D.; Tabaka, L.J.

    1993-03-01

    Polarization maintaining pigtailed laser diodes have greatly increased the ease with which fiber-optic sensors for Faraday current measurements on large pulsed experiments can be deployed. 670, 830, and 1300 nm units are readily available. Such diode lasers can easily be mounted in an RF shielded box along with the simple electronics and batteries to power them. Our units measure 16.5 {times} 8 {times} 6 cm. and have a single external control; an on off switch. They use two 1.5 volt ``C`` cell batteries. By using an LT1073 chip in the electronics the batteries are an energy source rather than a voltage source. These units can provide 100 mA drive to a LT015MD laser diode so that 1 mW of 830 nm fight exits the fiber pigtail for up to 23 hours with no detectable droop in power. For the sensor element twisted single mode low birefringence fibers are wrapped around the region of interest. The fiber pigtail is fused to the sensor section so changes in alignment are avoided. The light exiting the fiber sensor section is immediately analyzed by a compact, 3 {times} 3.5 {times} 5 cm, bulk optical unit which outputs quadrature optical signals into two multimode fibers leading to detectors in a screen room. The system is thus completely free of ground loops and is as immune to noise as the screen room. These sensors have the usual advantages claimed for them and the all dielectric feature was the original reason for their use on our experiments. The ease of deployment however is not usually cited. On our Pegasus II experiment the need arose for a total current measurement at the main header of the capacitor banks. A single turn of optical fiber was easily strung in a 6.4 m diameter circle and attached to laser and analyzer in a few hours.

  20. Polarization pulling in Raman assisted fiber optical parametric amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Wang, S H; Xu, Xinchuan; Wai, P K A

    2016-04-01

    We proposed a theoretical model to investigate the polarization pulling effect in bi-directionally pumped degenerate Raman assisted fiber optical parameter amplifiers (RA-FOPAs) using randomly birefringent fibers. The contributions of chromatic dispersion, polarization mode dispersion (PMD), Raman gain, and nonlinear effects to the phase matching in RA-FOPAs are investigated. We characterize four different states of polarization pulling in RA-FOPAs. We found that broadband polarization attraction can be obtained in the optimum phase-matching state of the bi-directionally pumped RA-FOPAs when the parametric pump power is chosen to avoid deep saturation of the Raman gain. PMID:27136985

  1. Fiber Optic Microswitch For Industrial Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desforges, F. X.; Jeunhomme, L. B.; Graindorge, Ph.; LeBoudec, G.

    1988-03-01

    Process control instrumentation is a large potential market for fiber optic sensors and particulary for fiber optic microswitches. Use of such devices brings a lot of advantages such as lighter cables, E.M. immunity, intrinsic security due to optical measurement, no grounding problems and so on. However, commercially available fiber optic microswitches exhibit high insertion losses as well as non optimal mechanical design. In fact, these drawbacks are due to operation principles which are based on a mobile shutter displaced between two fibers. The fiber optic microswitch we present here, has been specially designed for harsh environments (oil industry). The patented operation principle uses only one fiber placed in front of a retroreflecting material by the mean of a fiber optic connector. The use of this retroreflector material allows an important reduction of the position tolerances required in two fibers devices, as well as easier fabrication and potential mass production of the optical microswitch. Moreover, such a configuration yields good performances in term of reflection coefficient leading to large dynamic range and consequently large distances (up to 250 m) between the optical microswitch and its optoelectronic instrument. Optomechanical design of the microswitch as well as electronic design of the optoelectronic instrument will be examined and discussed.

  2. SAFENET 2 fiber optic implementation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, V. W.; Sevinsky, T. P.; Owens, F. J.

    1991-06-01

    The SAFENET II draft Military Handbook, MCCR-0036-DRAFT, establishes requirements and provides guidance for the implementation of a Survivable Adaptable Fiber Optic Network. SAFENET II. The fiber optics communications channel essentially adopts the ANSI Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) Physical Layer Medium Dependent (PMD) Specification, modified by a requirement for increased transmitter optical output power and decreased minimum receiver optical input power (increased sensitivity) to provide a 21 dB overall optical flux budget between (and including) the equipment fiber optic interface connectors (FOIC). A network of cables, optical bypass switches, and spliced fiber joints is described in the Handbook which permit ring operation through up to 5 bypassed nodes while maintaining a minimum 6 dB link optical power margin.

  3. Fiber optic gyro development at Honeywell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Glen A.; Sanders, Steven J.; Strandjord, Lee K.; Qiu, Tiequn; Wu, Jianfeng; Smiciklas, Marc; Mead, Derek; Mosor, Sorin; Arrizon, Alejo; Ho, Waymon; Salit, Mary

    2016-05-01

    Two major architectures of fiber optic gyroscopes have been under development at Honeywell in recent years. The interferometric fiber optic gyro (IFOG) has been in production and deployment for various high performance space and marine applications. Different designs, offering very low noise, ranging from better than navigation grade to ultra-precise performance have been tested and produced. The resonator fiber optic gyro (RFOG) is also under development, primarily for its attractive potential for civil navigation usage, but also because of its scalability to other performance. New techniques to address optical backscatter and laser frequency noise have been developed and demonstrated. Development of novel, enhanced RFOG architectures using hollow core fiber, silicon optical bench technology, and highly stable multifrequency laser sources are discussed.

  4. Hot Springs-Garrison Fiber Optic Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is proposing to upgrade its operational telecommunications system between the Hot Springs Substation and the Garrison Substation using a fiber optic system. The project would primarily involve installing 190 kilometers (120 miles) of fiber optic cable on existing transmission structures and installing new fiber optic equipment in BPA`s substation yards and control houses. BPA prepared an environmental assessment (EA) evaluating the proposed action. This EA was published in October 1994. The EA identifies a number of minor impacts that might occur as a result of the proposed action, as well as some recommended mitigation measures. This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) identifies specific measures to avoid, minimize, or compensate for impacts identified in the EA.

  5. Hermetic fiber optic modules for avionics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Eric; Kazemi, Alex; Koshinz, Dennis; Soares, Harold; Hager, Harold

    2010-04-01

    In the past, Boeing had successfully developed and produced the hermetic ARINC 636 fiber optic transmitter and receiver modules for the PLANET System in the Boeing 777 commercial airplanes. These hermetic fiber optic modules had demonstrated over 4 millions aggregate flight hours with zero failure; the hermetic fiber seal technology is a key contributor to this outstanding reliability record. Recently, we have investigated failure mechanisms in commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) hermetic mini-dil (dual-in-line) laser diode modules; and developed new hermetic fiber seal process for low cost mini-dil form factor packages. In addition, we are also developing cost effective hermetic multi-channel fiber optic array modules technology for aerospace applications.

  6. Fiber-optic lattice signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moslehi, B.; Goodman, J. W.; Shaw, H. J.; Tur, M.

    1984-07-01

    It is pointed out that fiber-optic signal processing devices can be constructed to perform various functions, such as convolution, correlation, matrix operations, and frequency filtering. Previous studies have concentrated on classical tapped-delay-line forms (transversal filters). The present investigation is concerned with different fiber-optic structures, taking into account lattice (or ladder) forms, which can be used as alternatives for performing optical signal processing. The elements to perform the various signal processing operations are considered along with fiber-optic lattice configurations. Aspects of mathematical analysis are discussed, taking into account Z-transform techniques, transfer-matrix and chain-matrix formulations, modern control theory formulations, and positive optical systems. Attention is given to time-domain signal processing applications, and frequency-domain signal processing applications.

  7. Data acquisition with fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kist, R.

    The advantages of using fiber optic sensors for data acquisition are discussed, and their present utilization in this area is examined. Because of their high cost, these sensors are not likely to be competitive in general metrological applications in the near future. They do, however, provide important advantages in specific areas such as isolation against high voltage and immunity against electromagnetic fields and explosive and/or corrosive environments. They also offer the possibility of miniaturized and compact packaging of the sensing element an application within a broad temperature range. Multimode fiber optic sensors for parameters such as temperature, pressure, and refractive index have more immediate commercial potential than monomode fiber optic sensors, which have higher costs. The latter allow for high precision solutions of metrological tasks under specific conditions, and will be utilized in the foreseeable future.

  8. Lightning vulnerability of fiber-optic cables.

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Leonard E.; Caldwell, Michele

    2008-06-01

    One reason to use optical fibers to transmit data is for isolation from unintended electrical energy. Using fiber optics in an application where the fiber cable/system penetrates the aperture of a grounded enclosure serves two purposes: first, it allows for control signals to be transmitted where they are required, and second, the insulating properties of the fiber system help to electrically isolate the fiber terminations on the inside of the grounded enclosure. A fundamental question is whether fiber optic cables can allow electrical energy to pass through a grounded enclosure, with a lightning strike representing an extreme but very important case. A DC test bed capable of producing voltages up to 200 kV was used to characterize electrical properties of a variety of fiber optic cable samples. Leakage current in the samples were measured with a micro-Ammeter. In addition to the leakage current measurements, samples were also tested to DC voltage breakdown. After the fiber optic cables samples were tested with DC methods, they were tested under representative lightning conditions at the Sandia Lightning Simulator (SLS). Simulated lightning currents of 30 kA and 200 kA were selected for this test series. This paper documents measurement methods and test results for DC high voltage and simulated lightning tests performed at the Sandia Lightning Simulator on fiber optic cables. The tests performed at the SLS evaluated whether electrical energy can be conducted inside or along the surface of a fiber optic cable into a grounded enclosure under representative lightning conditions.

  9. Optical backpropagation for fiber-optic communications using optical phase conjugation at the receiver.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jing; Kumar, Shiva

    2012-08-01

    A fiber-optic system design with optical backpropagation that uses an optical phase conjugator, high-dispersion fibers, and highly nonlinear fibers is investigated. The proposed technique outperforms the midpoint optical phase conjugation and digital backpropagation with the same step size. PMID:22859069

  10. Fiber optic sensor for methane hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Virendra; Chandra, Dinesh

    1999-11-01

    Different types of fiber optic methane sensor, especially for ming application, have been reviewed in this paper. Optical absorption and differential optical absorption techniques for the remote detection of methane gas using low-loss silica fiber have been discussed. IR fiber optic, sol-gel and correlation spectroscopy methods have been described in brief. Another noble technique based on attenuation of evanescent field has been enunciated using D- fiber. Merits and demerits of each technique and its suitability to mining industry have been highlighted. Optical fiber, being a dielectric, non-metallic and non- sparking, is an intrinsically safe media and is ideally suited to the hazardous environment present in mines.

  11. Spaceborne Fiber Optic Data Bus (SFODB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bretthauer, Joy W.; Chalfant, Chuck H.; Orlando, Fred J.; Parkerson, P.; Rezek, Ed; Sawyer, Marc

    1999-01-01

    Spaceborne Fiber Optic Data Bus (SFODB) is an IEEE 1393 compliant, gigabit per second, fiber optic network specifically designed to support the real-time, on-board data handling requirements of remote sensing spacecraft. The network is fault tolerant highly reliable, and capable of withstanding the rigors of launch and the harsh space environment. SFODB achieves this operational and environmental performance while maintaining the small size, light weight, and low power necessary for spaceborne applications. On December 9, 1998, SFODB was successfully demonstrated at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC).

  12. Fiber optic hydrogen sensors: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Minghong; Dai, Jixiang

    2014-12-01

    Hydrogen is one of the next generation energies in the future, which shows promising applications in aerospace and chemical industries. Hydrogen leakage monitoring is very dangerous and important because of its low ignition energy, high combustion efficiency, and smallest molecule. This paper reviews the state-of-art development of the fiber optic hydrogen sensing technology. The main developing trends of fiber optic hydrogen sensors are based on two kinds of hydrogen sensitive materials, i.e. palladium-alloy thin films and Pt-doped WO3 coatings. In this review work, the advantages and disadvantages of these two kinds of sensing technologies will be evaluated.

  13. Characterization of Fiber Optic CMM Probe System

    SciTech Connect

    K.W.Swallow

    2007-05-15

    This report documents a study completed on the fiber optic probe system that is a part of the Werth optical CMM. This study was necessary due to a lack of documentation from the vendor for the proper use and calibration of the fiber probe, and was performed in support of the Lithographie Galvanoformung Abformung (LIGA) development program at the FM&T. As a result of this study, a better understanding of the fiber optic probe has been developed, including guidelines for its proper use and calibration.

  14. Clinical measurements using fiber optic sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Roe, J.N.

    1987-09-01

    The use of fiber optics in clinical measurements for illumination and imaging is widespread, but a more advanced sensing concept can be realized. The attachment of species specific fiber terminations at the distal end of the fiber optic so that in-situ analysis can be made is discussed along with measurement instrumentation. These terminations are called optrodes (optical electrodes), and a group of optrodes are presently under development for the in-vivo and in-vitro identification and quantification of species of interest to the clinician. The current development includes pH, carbon dioxide, potassium, and anti-cancer drugs. 6 refs., 8 figs.

  15. Endomicroscopy and electromyography of neuromuscular junctions in situ

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Rosalind; Dissanayake, Kosala N; Skehel, Paul A; Ribchester, Richard R

    2014-01-01

    Objective Electromyography (EMG) is used routinely to diagnose neuromuscular dysfunction in a wide range of peripheral neuropathies, myopathies, and neuromuscular degenerative diseases including motor neuron diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Definitive neurological diagnosis may also be indicated by the analysis of pathological neuromuscular innervation in motor-point biopsies. Our objective in this study was to preempt motor-point biopsy by combining live imaging with electrophysiological analysis of slow degeneration of neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) in vivo. Methods We combined conventional needle electromyography with fiber-optic confocal endomicroscopy (CEM), using an integrated hand-held, 1.5-mm-diameter probe. We utilized as a test bed, various axotomized muscles in the hind limbs of anaesthetized, double-homozygous thy1.2YFP16: WldS mice, which coexpress the Wallerian-degeneration Slow (WldS) protein and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) in motor neurons. We also tested exogenous vital stains, including Alexa488-α-bungarotoxin; the styryl pyridinium dye 4-Di-2-Asp; and a GFP conjugate of botulinum toxin Type A heavy chain (GFP-HcBoNT/A). Results We show that an integrated EMG/CEM probe is effective in longitudinal evaluation of functional and morphological changes that take place over a 7-day period during axotomy-induced, slow neuromuscular synaptic degeneration. EMG amplitude declined in parallel with overt degeneration of motor nerve terminals. EMG/CEM was safe and effective when nerve terminals and motor endplates were selectively stained with vital dyes. Interpretation Our findings constitute proof-of-concept, based on live imaging in an animal model, that combining EMG/CEM may be useful as a minimally invasive precursor or alternative to motor-point biopsy in neurological diagnosis and for monitoring local administration of potential therapeutics. PMID:25540801

  16. Fiber Optics: A New World of Possibilities in Light.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchinson, John

    1990-01-01

    The background and history of light and fiber optics are discussed. Applications for light passed either directly or indirectly through optical fibers are described. Suggestions for science activities that use fiber optics are provided. (KR)

  17. Fiber optic interferometric sensors for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y. C.

    1994-01-01

    This paper addresses two fiber optic sensor development programs in the Photonics Laboratory, NASA Ames Research Center, one in progress and the other being initiated. The ongoing program involves development of advanced acoustic sensors for wind tunnel applications. The new undertaking involves development of a novel sensor technique for studies of aerodynamic transition from laminar to turbulent flow.

  18. Fiber Optic Communications Technology. A Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, Joseph A.

    Fiber optic communications (communications over very pure glass transmission channels of diameter comparable to a human hair) is an emerging technology which promises most improvements in communications capacity at reasonable cost. The fiber transmission system offers many desirable characteristics representing improvements over conventional…

  19. Hybrid Fiber-Optic/CCD Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goss, W. C.; Janesick, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    Low noise and linearity of charge-coupled devices (CCD's) combined with optical waveguide components in hybrid, integrated chip package. Concept used to measure laser flux in fiber-gyro application using sensing fibers that range from several to several tens of kilometers in length. Potential applications include optical delay measurement and linear detector of light flux emanating from fiber-optic waveguides.

  20. Fiber optic applications for laser polarized targets

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, W.J.; Kowalczyk, R.S.

    1997-10-01

    For the past two years, the laser polarized target group at Argonne has been used multi-mode fiber optic patch cords for a variety of applications. In this paper, the authors describe the design for transporting high power laser beams with optical fibers currently in use at IUCF.

  1. Indium oxide based fiber optic SPR sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Sarika; Sharma, Navneet K.

    2016-05-01

    Surface plasmon resonance based fiber optic sensor using indium oxide layer is presented and theoretically studied. It has been found that with increase in thickness of indium oxide layer beyond 170 nm, the sensitivity of SPR sensor decreases. 170 nm thick indium oxide layer based SPR sensor holds maximum sensitivity.

  2. FIBER OPTIC BIOSENSOR FOR DNA DAMAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes a fiber optic biosensor for the rapid and sensitive detection of radiation-induced or chemically-induced oxidative DNA damage. The assay is based on the hybridization and temperature-induced dissociation (melting curves) of synthetic oligonucleotides. The...

  3. Career Directions--Fiber Optic Installer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tech Directions, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Fiber-optic communication is a method of transmitting information from one place to another by sending pulses of light through an optical fiber that is roughly the diameter of a human hair. The light forms an electromagnetic carrier wave that is modulated to carry information. Each optical fiber is capable of carrying an enormous amount of…

  4. Fiber optics wavelength division multiplexing(components)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Herbert D.

    1985-01-01

    The long term objectives are to develop optical multiplexers/demultiplexers, different wavelength and modulation stable semiconductor lasers and high data rate transceivers, as well as to test and evaluate fiber optic networks applicable to the Space Station. Progress in each of the above areas is briefly discussed.

  5. Laser peening with fiber optic delivery

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, Herbert W.; Ault, Earl R.; Scheibner, Karl F.

    2004-11-16

    A system for processing a workpiece using a laser. The laser produces at least one laser pulse. A laser processing unit is used to process the workpiece using the at least one laser pulse. A fiber optic cable is used for transmitting the at least one laser pulse from the laser to the laser processing unit.

  6. Triboluminescent Fiber-Optic Sensors Measure Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogowski, Robert S.

    1994-01-01

    Triboluminescence exploited in fiber-optic sensor system for measuring changes in pressures, strains, vibrations, and acoustic emissions, in structural members. Sensors embedded in members for in situ monitoring of condition of structure. System passive in sense no source of radiation required to interrogate optical fiber. Technique has potential for wide range of applications in which detection and measurement of structural stress required.

  7. Fiber-Optic Probe For Laser Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, Dana H.; Mcalister, Kenneth W.; Gunter, William D., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Size and weight of optics reduced considerably. Proposed fiber-optic probe in laser velocimeter smaller (and, therefore, lighter in weight and more maneuverable) than previous probe. Proposed configuration is product of calculations and experiments showing virtual waists serve same purpose. Laser-velocimeter lens brought close to transfer lenses to focus on virtual waists, thereby shortening probe head considerably.

  8. Study of fiber optics standardization, reliability, and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The use of fiber optics in space applications is investigated. Manufacturers and users detailed the problems they were having with the use or manufacture of fiber optic components. The general consensus of all the companies/agencies interviewed is that fiber optics is a maturing technology and will definitely have a place in future NASA system designs. The use of fiber optics was found to have two main advantages - weight savings and increased bandwidth.

  9. Broad-Area Laser Diode With Fiber-Optic Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazel, Geoffrey; Mead, Patricia; Davis, Christopher; Cornwell, Donald

    1992-01-01

    Fiber-optic injection-locked broad-area laser diode features single-mode output via fiber-optic injection and serves as compact, rugged, high-power near-infrared source. Useful in free-space and fiber-optic communication links, as communication-receiver preamplifier, and pump source for solid-state lasers.

  10. 21 CFR 872.4620 - Fiber optic dental light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fiber optic dental light. 872.4620 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4620 Fiber optic dental light. (a) Identification. A fiber optic dental light is a device that is a light, usually AC-powered, that consists of glass...

  11. 21 CFR 872.4620 - Fiber optic dental light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fiber optic dental light. 872.4620 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4620 Fiber optic dental light. (a) Identification. A fiber optic dental light is a device that is a light, usually AC-powered, that consists of glass...

  12. 21 CFR 872.4620 - Fiber optic dental light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fiber optic dental light. 872.4620 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4620 Fiber optic dental light. (a) Identification. A fiber optic dental light is a device that is a light, usually AC-powered, that consists of glass...

  13. 21 CFR 872.4620 - Fiber optic dental light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fiber optic dental light. 872.4620 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4620 Fiber optic dental light. (a) Identification. A fiber optic dental light is a device that is a light, usually AC-powered, that consists of glass...

  14. 21 CFR 872.4620 - Fiber optic dental light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fiber optic dental light. 872.4620 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4620 Fiber optic dental light. (a) Identification. A fiber optic dental light is a device that is a light, usually AC-powered, that consists of glass...

  15. Fiber optic and laser sensors VI; Proceedings of the Meeting, Boston, MA, Sept. 6, 7, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Udd, E.; Depaula, R.P.

    1989-01-01

    The papers contained in this volume focus on fiber optic sensor applications, fiber optic sensing techniques, multiplexing, magnetics, acoustic and pressure sensors, rotation sensing and applications of the Sagnac interferometer, and specialized fiber optic sensors. Specific topics discussed include fiber optic sensors for aircraft, recent and current developments in distributed fiber optic sensing for structural monitoring, fiber optic multisensor networks, polarization components for fiber optic sensors, and fiber optic gyro design for guided projectiles.

  16. Method for the continuous processing of hermetic fiber optic components and the resultant fiber optic-to-metal components

    DOEpatents

    Kramer, Daniel P.

    1994-08-09

    Hermetic fiber optic-to-metal components and method for making hermetic fiber optic-to-metal components by assembling and fixturing elements comprising a metal shell, a glass preform, and a metal-coated fiber optic into desired relative positions and then sealing said fixtured elements preferably using a continuous heating process. The resultant hermetic fiber optic-to-metal components exhibit high hermeticity and durability despite the large differences in thermal coefficients of expansion among the various elements.

  17. Fast fiber-optic multi-wavelength pyrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Tairan; Tan, Peng; Pang, Chuanhe; Zhao, Huan; Shen, Yi

    2011-06-01

    A fast fiber-optic multi-wavelength pyrometer was developed for the ultraviolet-visible-near infrared spectra from 200 nm to 1700 nm using a CCD detector and an InGaAs detector. The pyrometer system conveniently and quickly provides the sufficient choices of multiple measurement wavelengths using optical diffraction, which avoids the use of narrow-band filters. Flexible optical fibers are used to transmit the radiation so the pyrometer can be used for temperature measurements in harsh environments. The setup and calibrations (wavelength calibration, nonlinearity calibration, and radiation response calibration) of this pyrometer system were described. Development of the multi-wavelength pyrometer involved optimization of the bandwidth and temperature discrimination of the multiple spectra data. The analysis results showed that the wavelength intervals, ΔλCCD = 30 nm and ΔλInGaAs = 50 nm, are the suitable choices as a tradeoff between the simple emissivity model assumption and the multiple signal discrimination. The temperature discrimination was also quantificationally evaluated for various wavelengths and temperatures. The measurement performance of the fiber-optic multi-wavelength pyrometer was partially verified through measurements with a high-temperature blackbody and actual hot metals. This multi-wavelength pyrometer can be used for remote high-temperature measurements.

  18. Fiber-optic polarimetric strain gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Wojtek J.; Wolinski, Tomasz R.

    A prototype fiber-optic polarimetric strain gauge based on the polarization mode coupling that occurs in highly birefringent optical fibers under the influence of axial strain is presented. Measurement set-up for a bonded strain gauge and its metrological characteristics are discussed together with the interpretation of observed physical effects in terms of changes in beat-length parameter under axial strain. The device is far more sensitive than conventional strain gauges, and can also be readily adjusted to a specified range of strain through an appropriate choice of fiber length and optical signal wavelength. The temperature drift of the device can be compensated in a straightforward procedure. The device is immune to electromagnetic interference, and is intrinsically safe in electrically dangerous, hazardous or explosive environments. Another attraction of this technology is its direct compatibility with fiber-optic telemetry, optical data transmission systems and multiplexing / demultiplexing technology.

  19. Immunoassay procedures for fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligler, Frances S.

    1988-04-01

    There is an increasing need for the development of an ultrasensitive immunoassay for use with fiber optic sensors. These detection systems can be used for such applications as disease diagnosis, detection of chemical and biological warfare agents or drugs of abuse, pollution control, therapeutic monitoring, and explosive detection. This specific program is designed to produce generic chemistries for use with existing fiber optic-based sensors to detect pathogens of particular threat to Army personnel as determined by USAMRIID. The detection system under development involves the attachment of antibodies to an optical fiber at high density. In addition, the immobilization must be achieved in a way which retains the antibody's ability to bind antigen. The functionality of the antibody will be tested through the binding of a labelled antigen. In the future, this assay could incorporate the antibodies developed by the Army for pathogens of particularly military concern.

  20. Fiber-optic interconnection networks for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, Robert S.

    1992-01-01

    The overall goal of this effort was to perform the detailed design, development, and construction of a prototype 8x8 all-optical fiber optic crossbar switch using low power liquid crystal shutters capable of operation in a network with suitable fiber optic transmitters and receivers at a data rate of 1 Gb/s. During the earlier Phase 1 feasibility study, it was determined that the all-optical crossbar system had significant advantages compared to electronic crossbars in terms of power consumption, weight, size, and reliability. The result is primarily due to the fact that no optical transmitters and receivers are required for electro-optic conversion within the crossbar switch itself.

  1. Miniature fiber optic surface plasmon resonance biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavik, Radan; Brynda, Eduard; Homola, Jiri; Ctyroky, Jiri

    1999-01-01

    A novel design of surface plasmon resonance fiber optic sensor is reported which leads to a compact, highly miniaturized sensing element with excellent sensitivity. The sensing device is based on a side-polished single-mode optical fiber with a thin metal overlayer supporting surface plasmon waves. The strength of interaction between a fiber mode and a surface plasmon wave depends strongly on the refractive index near the sensing surface. Therefore, refractive index changes associated with biospecific interaction between antibodies immobilized on the sensor and antigen molecules can be monitored by measuring light intensity variations. Detection of horse radish peroxidase (HRP) of the concentration of 100 ng/ml has been accomplished using the fiber optic sensor with a matrix of monoclonal antibodies against HRP immobilized on the sensor surface.

  2. Fiber optic configurations for local area networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nassehi, M. M.; Tobagi, F. A.; Marhic, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    A number of fiber optic configurations for a new class of demand assignment multiple-access local area networks requiring a physical ordering among stations are proposed. In such networks, the data transmission and linear-ordering functions may be distinguished and be provided by separate data and control subnetworks. The configurations proposed for the data subnetwork are based on the linear, star, and tree topologies. To provide the linear-ordering function, the control subnetwork must always have a linear unidirectional bus structure. Due to the reciprocity and excess loss of optical couplers, the number of stations that can be accommodated on a linear fiber optic bus is severely limited. Two techniques are proposed to overcome this limitation. For each of the data and control subnetwork configurations, the maximum number of stations as a function of the power margin, for both reciprocal and nonreciprocal couplers, is computed.

  3. A photoelastic fiber optic strain gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Wei; Gilbert, John A.; Katsunis, Constantine

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a photoelastic fiber optic strain gage sensitive to transverse strain. The sensing element is made from an epoxy resin which is stress frozen to passively achieve the quadrature condition. Light, emitted from an LED operating at 820 nm, is transmitted to and from the sensing element via multimode fibers and the signal is detected using a dual channel operational photodiode/amplifier. This unique combination of optics and electronics produces a fiber optic sensor having a high signal to noise ratio which is lead-in/out insensitive. Results show that strains on the order of 1 microstrain can be measured over an 800 microstrain range and that dummy gages can be used for temperature compensation.

  4. Robust incoherent fiber optic bundle decoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Hilary E. (Inventor); DePlachett, Charles P. (Inventor); Deason, Brent E. (Inventor); Pilgrim, Robert A. (Inventor); Sanford, Harold S. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Apparatus and method for calibrating an incoherent fiber optic bundle for use in transmitting visual or infrared coherent images. The apparatus includes a computer, a computer video monitor, an objective lens adjacent to the input end of the bundle, a second lens adjacent the output end of the bundle, and a CCD camera. The camera transmits video data to the monitor to produce an illuminated fiber optic image. The coordinates for the center of each fiber is found through an imaging process and the output fibers coordinates are related to the input fiber coordinates and processed in the computer to produce a mapping lookup-table (LUT) unique to the specific fiber bundle. Remapping of the LUT due to changes in the lens focus, CCD camera, or the addition of an infrared filter is accomplished by a software utility in the computer.

  5. Fiber optic sensing of cyanides in solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S.S.; Mackenzie, J.D.; Li, C.Y.; Guerreiro, P.; Peyghambarian, N.

    1996-12-31

    A novel sol-gel technique was used to immobilize malachite green ions (MG{sup +}) in stable, optically transparent, porous silica gel films. A simple and sensitive method was developed for the detection of cyanides in solutions using spectrophotometry to measure changes caused by cyanide ions (CN{sup {minus}}) in the absorption spectra of the green-colored silica gel films. After reaction with cyanide ions, the absorption spectra of the films changed with a typical decrease in absorbance at 620 nm. On the basis of the absorption spectra of the films, a portable and easy to use fiber optic cyanide film sensor was fabricated. Decolorization undergone by the green-colored gel films, as they were exposed to cyanide ions, was detected through a fiber. Preliminary results indicate concentrations on the order of a few ppm are detected using the fiber optic sensor.

  6. Fiber-optic shock position sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, J.D.

    1993-03-01

    This report describes work performed for the development of a fiber-optic shock position sensor used to measure the location of a shock front in the neighborhood of a nuclear explosion. Such a measurement would provide a hydrodynamic determination of nuclear yield. The original proposal was prompted by the Defense Nuclear Agency's interest in replacing as many electrical sensors as possible with their optical counterparts for the verification of a treaty limiting the yield of a nuclear device used in underground testing. Immunity to electromagnetic pulse is the reason for the agency's interest; unlike electrical sensors and their associated cabling, fiber-optic systems do not transmit to the outside world noise pulses from the device containing secret information.

  7. Fiber Optic Tactical Local Network (FOTLAN)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, L. A.; Hartmayer, R.; Wu, W. H.; Cassell, P.; Edgar, G.; Lambert, J.; Mancini, R.; Jeng, J.; Pardo, C.

    1991-01-01

    A 100 Mbit/s FDDI (fiber distributed data interface) network interface unit is described that supports real-time data, voice and video. Its high-speed interrupt-driven hardware architecture efficiently manages stream and packet data transfer to the FDDI network. Other enhancements include modular single-mode laser-diode fiber optic links to maximize node spacing, optic bypass switches for increased fault tolerance, and a hardware performance monitor to gather real-time network diagnostics.

  8. Fiber Optic Detector For Liquid Chemical Leaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luukkala, Mauri; Raatikainen, Pekka; Salo, Olli

    1989-10-01

    This paper describes a simple and economical sensor which employs fiber optics to detect the presence of hazardous liquid chemicals, particularly undiluted hydrocarbons. The device is best suited to monitor the interstitial space of double walled underground storage tanks. Because the sensor is plastic and is situated at the end of a passive and insulating optical fiber the sensor can be considered inherently safe. The optical fiber used for this device can be up to several hundred meters long.

  9. Fiber-Optic Communication Technology Branching Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J. C.

    1985-02-01

    This tutorial review of fiber-optic branching devices covers example uses of branching devices, device types, device-performance characteristics, examples of current technology, and system-design methodology. The discussion is limited to passive single- and multimode devices fabricated from optical fibers or graded-index components. Integrated-optic, wavelength-division-multiplexing, and polarization-selective devices are not specifically addressed.

  10. Fiber optic detector for immuno-testing

    DOEpatents

    Partin, Judy K.; Ward, Thomas E.; Grey, Alan E.

    1992-01-01

    A portable fiber optic detector that senses the presence of specific target chemicals in air or a gas by exchanging the target chemical for a fluoroescently-tagged antigen that is bound to an antibody which is in turn attached to an optical fiber. Replacing the fluorescently-tagged antigen reduces the fluorescence so that a photon sensing detector records the reduced light level and activates an appropriate alarm or indicator.

  11. Fiber optical sensors for aircraft applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechstedt, Ralf D.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper selected fiber optical point sensors that are of potential interest for deployment in aircraft are discussed. The operating principles together with recent measurement results are described. Examples include a high-temperature combined pressure and temperature sensor for engine health, hydraulics and landing gear monitoring, an ultra-high sensitive pressure sensor for oil, pneumatic and fluid aero systems applications and a combined acceleration and temperature sensor for condition monitoring of rotating components.

  12. Carbon Dioxide Laser Fiber Optics In Endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Terry A.

    1982-12-01

    Carbon dioxide laser surgery has been limited to a great extent to surgical application on the integument and accessible cavities such as the cervix, vagina, oral cavities, etc. This limitation has been due to the rigid delivery systems available to all carbon dioxide lasers. Articulating arms (series of hollow tubes connected by articulating mirrors) have provided an effective means of delivery of laser energy to the patient as long as the lesion was within the direct line of sight. Even direct line-of-sight applications were restricted to physical dimension of the articulating arm or associated hand probes, manipulators and hollow tubes. The many attempts at providing straight endoscopic systems to the laser only stressed the need for a fiber optic capable of carrying the carbon dioxide laser wavelength. Rectangular and circular hollow metal waveguides, hollow dielectric waveguides have proven ineffective to the stringent requirements of a flexible surgical delivery system. One large diameter (1 cm) fiber optic delivery system, incorporates a toxic thalliumAbased fiber optic material. The device is an effective alternative to an articulating arm for external or conventional laser surgery, but is too large and stiff to use as a flexible endoscopic tool. The author describes the first highly flexible inexpensive series of fiber optic systems suitable for either conventional or endoscopic carbon dioxide laser surgery. One system (IRFLEX 3) has been manufactured by Medlase, Inc. for surgical uses capable of delivering 2000w, 100 mJ pulsed energy and 15w continuous wave. The system diameter is 0.035 inches in diameter. Surgically suitable fibers as small as 120 um have been manufactured. Other fibers (IRFLEX 142,447) have a variety of transmission characteristics, bend radii, etc.

  13. Fiber optic linear smoke fire detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulakov, Sergei V.; Moskaletz, Oleg D.; Preslenev, Leonid N.; Shabardin, Alexander N.

    2001-11-01

    A global and versatile problem of fire and environmental safety is formulated. It is pointed out that one of the main ways to solve this problem is the development of equipment for early fire detection. The results of the development and study of a smoke fiber optic fire detector are presented. Such detector is absolutely explosion-safe and immune to increased radiation level and aggressive chemical environment.

  14. Low-Cost Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor

    DOEpatents

    Sheem, Sang K.

    2004-05-18

    The size and cost of fabricating fiber optic pressure sensors is reduced by fabricating the membrane of the sensor in a non-planar shape. The design of the sensors may be made in such a way that the non-planar membrane becomes a part of an air-tight cavity, so as to make the membrane resilient due to the air-cushion effect of the air-tight cavity. Such non-planar membranes are easier to make and attach.

  15. Low-Cost Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor

    DOEpatents

    Sheem, Sang K.

    2003-07-22

    The size and cost of fabricating fiber optic pressure sensors is reduced by fabricating the membrane of the sensor in a non-planar shape. The design of the sensors may be made in such a way that the non-planar membrane becomes a part of an air-tight cavity, so as to make the membrane resilient due to the air-cushion effect of the air-tight cavity. Such non-planar membranes are easier to make and attach.

  16. Fiber optics welder having movable aligning mirror

    DOEpatents

    Higgins, Robert W.; Robichaud, Roger E.

    1981-01-01

    A system for welding fiber optic waveguides together. The ends of the two fibers to be joined together are accurately, collinearly aligned in a vertical orientation and subjected to a controlled, diffuse arc to effect welding and thermal conditioning. A front-surfaced mirror mounted at a 45.degree. angle to the optical axis of a stereomicroscope mounted for viewing the junction of the ends provides two orthogonal views of the interface during the alignment operation.

  17. Laser fiber optics ordnance initiation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, L. C.

    1976-01-01

    Recent progress on system development in the laser initiation of explosive devices is summarized. The topics included are: development of compact free-running mode and Q-switched lasers, development of low-loss fiber optic bundles and connectors, study of nuclear radiation effects on the system, characterization of laser initiation sensitivities of insensitive high explosives, and the design methods used to achieve attractive system weight and cost savings. Direction for future work is discussed.

  18. Fiber-optic ground-truth thermometer

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, C.A. Jr.; Forman, P.; Veeser, L.

    1993-07-01

    By making a high accuracy measurement of the optical length of a long fiber optic cable, the authors can determine the absolute temperature averaged over its length and the temperature of a material in contact with it. They describe how to set up such a measurement and use it to determine the average temperature of the surface of the earth over a large enough area to be useful as a ground truth calibration for a satellite imaging system.

  19. Hybrid Piezoelectric/Fiber-Optic Sensor Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Mark; Qing, Xinlin

    2004-01-01

    Hybrid piezoelectric/fiber-optic (HyPFO) sensor sheets are undergoing development. They are intended for use in nondestructive evaluation and long-term monitoring of the integrity of diverse structures, including aerospace, aeronautical, automotive, and large stationary ones. It is anticipated that the further development and subsequent commercialization of the HyPFO sensor systems will lead to economic benefits in the form of increased safety, reduction of life-cycle costs through real-time structural monitoring, increased structural reliability, reduction of maintenance costs, and increased readiness for service. The concept of a HyPFO sensor sheet is a generalization of the concept of a SMART Layer(TradeMark), which is a patented device that comprises a thin dielectric film containing an embedded network of distributed piezoelectric actuator/sensors. Such a device can be mounted on the surface of a metallic structure or embedded inside a composite-material structure during fabrication of the structure. There is has been substantial interest in incorporating sensors other than piezoelectric ones into SMART Layer(TradeMark) networks: in particular, because of the popularity of the use of fiber-optic sensors for monitoring the "health" of structures in recent years, it was decided to incorporate fiber-optic sensors, giving rise to the concept of HyPFO devices.

  20. Renewable Reagent Fiber Optic Based Ammonia Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, Richard J.; Burgess, Lloyd W.

    1990-02-01

    Many fiber optic based chemical sensors have been described which rely on a reagent chemistry fixed at the fiber endface to provide analyte specificity. In such systems, problems involving probe-to-probe reproducibility, reagent photolability and reagent leaching are frequently encountered. As a result, calibration and standardization of these sensors becomes difficult or impossible and thus inhibits their application for long term in situ chemical monitoring. Many of these problems can be addressed and several additional advantages gained by continuously renewing the reagent chemistry. To illustrate this concept, a fiber optic ammonia sensor is described in which the reagent is delivered under direct control to a sensing volume of approximately 400 nanoliters located at the probe tip. Using an acid-base indicator (bromothymol blue) as the reagent, the sample ammonia concentrations are related to modulations in light intensity with a lower limit of detection of 10 ppb. The sensor performance was studied with respect to reagent pH, concentration and reagent delivery rate. Compared with previous fiber optic ammonia sensors, the ability to reproducibly renew the reagent has resulted in improvements with respect to response and return times, probe-to-probe reproducibility, probe lifetime and flexibility of use.

  1. Aircraft fiber optic structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrad, Nezih

    2012-06-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) is a sought after concept that is expected to advance military maintenance programs, increase platform operational safety and reduce its life cycle cost. Such concept is further considered to constitute a major building block of any Integrated Health Management (IHM) capability. Since 65% to 80% of military assets' Life Cycle Cost (LCC) is devoted to operations and support (O&S), the aerospace industry and military sectors continue to look for opportunities to exploit SHM systems, capability and tools. Over the past several years, countless SHM concepts and technologies have emerged. Among those, fiber optic based systems were identified of significant potential. This paper introduces the elements of an SHM system and investigates key issues impeding the commercial implementation of fiber optic based SHM capability. In particular, this paper presents an experimental study of short gauge, intrinsic, spectrometric-based in-fiber Bragg grating sensors, for potential use as a component of an SHM system. Fiber optic Bragg grating sensors are evaluated against resistance strain gauges for strain monitoring, sensitivity, accuracy, reliability, and fatigue durability. Strain field disturbance is also investigated by "embedding" the sensors under a photoelastic coating in order to illustrate sensor intrusiveness in an embedded configuration.

  2. Power system applications of fiber optic sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, A.R.; Jackson, S.P.; Kirkham, H.; Yeh, C.

    1986-06-01

    Three topics are covered: Electric Field Measurement, Fiber Optic Temperature Sensing, and Optical Power Transfer. Work was done on the measurement of ac and dc electric fields. A prototype sensor for measuring alternating fields was made using a very simple electroscope approach. An electronic field mill sensor for dc fields was made using a fiber optic readout, so that the entire probe could be operated isolated from ground. There are several instances in which more precise knowledge of the temperature of electrical power apparatus would be useful. This report describes a number of methods whereby the distributed temperature profile can be obtained using a fiber optic sensor. The ability to energize electronics by means of an optical fiber has the advantage that electrical isolation is maintained at low cost. In order to accomplish this, it is necessary to convert the light energy into electrical form by means of photovoltaic cells. JPL has developed an array of PV cells in gallium arsenide specifically for this purpose. This work is described.

  3. Power system applications of fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, A. R.; Jackson, S. P.; Kirkham, H.; Yeh, C.

    1986-06-01

    This document is a progress report of work done in 1985 on the Communications and Control for Electric Power Systems Project at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. These topics are covered: Electric Field Measurement, Fiber Optic Temperature Sensing, and Optical Power transfer. Work was done on the measurement of ac and dc electric fields. A prototype sensor for measuring alternating fields was made using a very simple electroscope approach. An electronic field mill sensor for dc fields was made using a fiber optic readout, so that the entire probe could be operated isolated from ground. There are several instances in which more precise knowledge of the temperature of electrical power apparatus would be useful. This report describes a number of methods whereby the distributed temperature profile can be obtained using a fiber optic sensor. The ability to energize electronics by means of an optical fiber has the advantage that electrical isolation is maintained at low cost. In order to accomplish this, it is necessary to convert the light energy into electrical form by means of photovoltaic cells. JPL has developed an array of PV cells in gallium arsenide specifically for this purpose. This work is described.

  4. Fiber optic, Faraday rotation current sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Veeser, L.R.; Day, G.W.

    1986-01-01

    At the Second Megagauss Conference in 1979, there were reports of experiments that used the Faraday magneto-optic effect in a glass rod to measure large electric current pulses or magnetic fields. Since then we have seen the development of single-mode optical fibers that can carry polarized light in a closed loop around a current load. A fiber optic Faraday rotation sensor will integrate the flux, instead of sampling it at a discrete point, to get a measurement independent of the current distribution. Early Faraday rotation experiments using optical fibers to measure currents dealt with problems such as fiber birefringence and difficulties in launching light into the tiny fiber cores. We have built on those experiments, working to reduce the effects of shocks and obtaining higher bandwidths, absolute calibration, and computerized recording and data analysis, to develop the Faraday rotation sensors into a routine current diagnostic. For large current pulses we find reduced sensitivity to electromagnetic interference and other backgrounds than for Rogowski loops; often the fiber optic sensors are useful where conductive probes cannot be used at all. In this paper we describe the fiber optic sensors and some practical matters involved in fielding them.

  5. Power system applications of fiber optic sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, A. R.; Jackson, S. P.; Kirkham, H.; Yeh, C.

    1986-01-01

    This document is a progress report of work done in 1985 on the Communications and Control for Electric Power Systems Project at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. These topics are covered: Electric Field Measurement, Fiber Optic Temperature Sensing, and Optical Power transfer. Work was done on the measurement of ac and dc electric fields. A prototype sensor for measuring alternating fields was made using a very simple electroscope approach. An electronic field mill sensor for dc fields was made using a fiber optic readout, so that the entire probe could be operated isolated from ground. There are several instances in which more precise knowledge of the temperature of electrical power apparatus would be useful. This report describes a number of methods whereby the distributed temperature profile can be obtained using a fiber optic sensor. The ability to energize electronics by means of an optical fiber has the advantage that electrical isolation is maintained at low cost. In order to accomplish this, it is necessary to convert the light energy into electrical form by means of photovoltaic cells. JPL has developed an array of PV cells in gallium arsenide specifically for this purpose. This work is described.

  6. Fully automatic fiber optic polarization analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marć, P.; Jaroszewicz, L. R.; Stasiewicz, K.

    2008-04-01

    Since many years one of the topic our research team are multi-parametric fiber optic polarization sensors. In the paper is presented a new version of the Fiber-Optic Interferometric Polarization Analyzer (FOIPA). This system is based on modified Sagnac interferometer and it was equipped with automatic current driven polarization controllers driven by special analog output card and detection system based on data acquisition card and LabVIEW software. This system was called full automatic fiber optic interferometric polarization analyzer. Used in the system automatic, temperature driven polarization controllers allow working in feedback electronic loop with data acquisition system and they function as calibration and stabilization subsystem. Specially developed detection system allow measuring amplitudes of first three tones of the AC parts of two electric signals as well as they DC voltages. That advantages have given possibility replaced an expensive lock-in amplifier and make data performance and polarization parameters calculation more faster and easier. It was necessary to implement special procedure to proper SOP identification In the paper are presented theoretical and experimental analyzes of the uncertainties, also. Finally a comparison with commercially available polarization analyzer is shown.

  7. Research progress of the resonant fiber optic gyroscope technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Linglan; Yan, Yuchao; Ma, Huilian; Jin, Zhonghe

    2015-10-01

    The resonant fiber optic gyro (RFOG) is a high accuracy inertial rotation sensor based on the Sagnac effect. The existence of various noises, including the nonreciprocal noises such as the polarization noise and the Kerr noise as well as the reciprocal circuit noise, limits the performance improvement of the RFOG. An improved scheme by inserting two in-line polarizers in the polarization maintaining fiber transmission-type resonator has been proposed to suppress the polarization-fluctuation induced drift. Furthermore, the adoption of the air-core photonic bandgap fibers (PBFs) offers a novel solution to reduce the optical Kerr effect. In addition, A digital signal processor is designed to reduce the reciprocal noises and detect the rotation information. A minimum actual rotation of 0.001°/s is achieved. The dynamic range is improved by a factor of 7 and the scale factor nonlinearity is decreased by a factor of 60.

  8. Fiber-Optic Chemical Sensors and Fiber-Optic Bio-Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Pospíšilová, Marie; Kuncová, Gabriela; Trögl, Josef

    2015-01-01

    This review summarizes principles and current stage of development of fiber-optic chemical sensors (FOCS) and biosensors (FOBS). Fiber optic sensor (FOS) systems use the ability of optical fibers (OF) to guide the light in the spectral range from ultraviolet (UV) (180 nm) up to middle infrared (IR) (10 µm) and modulation of guided light by the parameters of the surrounding environment of the OF core. The introduction of OF in the sensor systems has brought advantages such as measurement in flammable and explosive environments, immunity to electrical noises, miniaturization, geometrical flexibility, measurement of small sample volumes, remote sensing in inaccessible sites or harsh environments and multi-sensing. The review comprises briefly the theory of OF elaborated for sensors, techniques of fabrications and analytical results reached with fiber-optic chemical and biological sensors. PMID:26437407

  9. Seismic damage identification using multi-line distributed fiber optic sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Jinping; Hou, Shuang

    2005-06-01

    Determination of the actual nonlinear inelastic response mechanisms developed by civil structures such as buildings and bridges during strong earthquakes and post-earthquake damage assessment of these structures represent very difficult challenges for earthquake structural engineers. One of the main reasons is that the traditional sensor can't serve for such a long period to cover an earthquake and the seismic damage location in the structure can't be predicted in advance definitely. It is thought that the seismic damage of reinforced concrete (RC) structure can be related to the maximum response the structure, which can also be related to the cracks on the concrete. A distributed fiber optic sensor was developed to detect the cracks on the reinforced concrete structure under load. Fiber optic couples were used in the sensor system to extend the sensor system's capacity from one random point detection to more. An optical time domain reflectometer (OTDR) is employed for interrogation of the sensor signal. Fiber optic sensors are attached on the surface of the concrete by the epoxy glue. By choosing the strength of epoxy, the damage state of the concrete can be responded to the occurrence of the Fresnel scattering in the fiber optic sensor. Experiments involved monotonic loading to failure. Finally, the experimental results in terms of crack detection capability are presented and discussed.

  10. Fiber-optic push-pull sensor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, David L.; Brown, David A.; Garrett, Steven L.

    1991-01-01

    Fiber-optic push-pull sensors are those which exploit the intrinsically differential nature of an interferometer with concommitant benefits in common-mode rejection of undesired effects. Several fiber-optic accelerometer and hydrophone designs are described. Additionally, the recent development at the Naval Postgraduate School of a passive low-cost interferometric signal demodulator permits the development of economical fiber-optic sensor systems.

  11. 46 CFR 111.60-6 - Fiber optic cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 60332-3-22 (all three standards incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 110.10-1); or (b) Be installed in... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fiber optic cable. 111.60-6 Section 111.60-6 Shipping... REQUIREMENTS Wiring Materials and Methods § 111.60-6 Fiber optic cable. Each fiber optic cable must— (a)...

  12. 46 CFR 111.60-6 - Fiber optic cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 60332-3-22 (all three standards incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 110.10-1); or (b) Be installed in... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fiber optic cable. 111.60-6 Section 111.60-6 Shipping... REQUIREMENTS Wiring Materials and Methods § 111.60-6 Fiber optic cable. Each fiber optic cable must— (a)...

  13. 46 CFR 111.60-6 - Fiber optic cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 60332-3-22 (all three standards incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 110.10-1); or (b) Be installed in... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fiber optic cable. 111.60-6 Section 111.60-6 Shipping... REQUIREMENTS Wiring Materials and Methods § 111.60-6 Fiber optic cable. Each fiber optic cable must— (a)...

  14. 46 CFR 111.60-6 - Fiber optic cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 60332-3-22 (all three standards incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 110.10-1); or (b) Be installed in... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fiber optic cable. 111.60-6 Section 111.60-6 Shipping... REQUIREMENTS Wiring Materials and Methods § 111.60-6 Fiber optic cable. Each fiber optic cable must— (a)...

  15. 46 CFR 111.60-6 - Fiber optic cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 60332-3-22 (all three standards incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 110.10-1); or (b) Be installed in... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fiber optic cable. 111.60-6 Section 111.60-6 Shipping... REQUIREMENTS Wiring Materials and Methods § 111.60-6 Fiber optic cable. Each fiber optic cable must— (a)...

  16. Design of high-capacity fiber-optic transport systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zhi Ming

    2001-08-01

    We study the design of fiber-optic transport systems and the behavior of fiber amplifiers/lasers with the aim of achieving higher capacities with larger amplifier spacing. Solitons are natural candidates for transmitting short pulses for high-capacity fiber-optic networks because of its innate ability to use two of fiber's main defects, fiber dispersion and fiber nonlinearity to balance each other. In order for solitons to retain its dynamic nature, amplifiers must be placed periodically to restore powers to compensate for fiber loss. Variational analysis is used to study the long-term stability of a periodical- amplifier system. A new regime of operation is identified which allows the use of a much longer amplifier spacing. If optical fibers are the blood vessels of an optical communication system, then the optical amplifier based on erbium-doped fiber is the heart. Optical communication systems can avoid the use of costly electrical regenerators to maintain system performance by being able to optically amplify the weakened signals. The length of amplifier spacing is largely determined by the gain excursion experienced by the solitons. We propose, model, and demonstrate a distributed erbium-doped fiber amplifier which can drastically reduce the amount of gain excursion experienced by the solitons, therefore allowing a much longer amplifier spacing and superior stability. Dispersion management techniques have become extremely valuable tools in the design of fiber-optic communication systems. We have studied in depth the advantage of different arnplification schemes (lumped and distributed) for various dispersion compensation techniques. We measure the system performance through the Q factor to evaluate the added advantage of effective noise figure and smaller gain excursion. An erbium-doped fiber laser has been constructed and characterized in an effort to develop a test bed to study transmission systems. The presence of mode-partition noise in an erbium

  17. Fiber Optic Chemical Sensors Using Immobilized Bioreceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walt, David R.; Luo, Shufang; Munkholm, Christiane

    1988-06-01

    Optrodes employing immobilized enzymes were developed using covalent attachment of sensor reagents. This development is an extension of the original application of this sensor technology in which a pH sensor was constructed with the pH sensitive dye fluorescein incorporated into a polymer covalently attached to the fiber tip. This sensor displayed significantly improved response times over previous fiber optic sensors because of reduced diffusion limitations. In addition, the signal intensities were greatly enhanced by the high concentration of fluorescent dye localized at the fiber tip. With the anticipation that these qualities would be preserved, a class of sensors based on the immobilization of biomolecules in the polymer matrix became the next goal. This paper will first describe a fiber optic probe prepared by immobilizing esterase in a crosslinked polyacrylamide matrix. The immobilized esterase converts the nonfluorescent fluoresceindiacetate into fluorescein. Both the steady state level and kinetic generation of fluorescence can be related to the concentration of fluoresceindiacetate. A fiber optic sensor for penicillin has been made by coimmobili zing penicillinase with a pH sensitive fluorescent dye. Penicillinase converts penicillin to penicilloic acid which produces a microenvironmental pH change in the dye-containing polymer matrix resulting in a concommitant change in fluorescence. The change in fluorescence is proportional to the concentration of penicillin and a 95% response is reached in 40-60 seconds. The sensor has a detection limit of 2.5 x 10-4 M. Another class of sensors using immobilized bioreceptors will be based on the principles of fluoroimmunoassay. This paper will discuss some basic principles and problems of 1) fluorescence quenching immunoassays, 2) fluorescence excitation transfer immunoassays, and 3) energy transfer immunoassays for digoxin. Both advantages and inherent problems for these sensor preparations will be addressed.

  18. High-density fiber optic biosensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, Jason R.; Walt, David R.

    2002-02-01

    Novel approaches are required to coordinate the immense amounts of information derived from diverse genomes. This concept has influenced the expanded role of high-throughput DNA detection and analysis in the biological sciences. A high-density fiber optic DNA biosensor was developed consisting of oligonucleotide-functionalized, 3.1 mm diameter microspheres deposited into the etched wells on the distal face of a 500 micrometers imaging fiber bundle. Imaging fiber bundles containing thousands of optical fibers, each associated with a unique oligonucleotide probe sequence, were the foundation for an optically connected, individually addressable DNA detection platform. Different oligonucleotide-functionalized microspheres were combined in a stock solution, and randomly dispersed into the etched wells. Microsphere positions were registered from optical dyes incorporated onto the microspheres. The distribution process provided an inherent redundancy that increases the signal-to-noise ratio as the square root of the number of sensors examined. The representative amount of each probe-type in the array was dependent on their initial stock solution concentration, and as other sequences of interest arise, new microsphere elements can be added to arrays without altering the existing detection capabilities. The oligonucleotide probe sequences hybridize to fluorescently-labeled, complementary DNA target solutions. Fiber optic DNA microarray research has included DNA-protein interaction profiles, microbial strain differentiation, non-labeled target interrogation with molecular beacons, and single cell-based assays. This biosensor array is proficient in DNA detection linked to specific disease states, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP's) discrimination, and gene expression analysis. This array platform permits multiple detection formats, provides smaller feature sizes, and enables sensor design flexibility. High-density fiber optic microarray biosensors provide a fast

  19. Fiber optic temperature sensors for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaafsma, David T.; Palmer, Gail; Bechtel, James H.

    2003-07-01

    Recent developments in fiber-optic sensor technology have demonstrated the utility of fiber-optic sensors for both medical and industrial applications. Fiber sensors based on fluorescent decay of rare earth doped materials allow rapid and accurate temperature measurement in challenging environments. Here we review the principles of operation of these sensors with a rare earth doped probe material and demonstrate why this material is an excellent choice for these types of sensors. The decay time technique allows accurate temperature determination from two measurements of the fluorescence intensity at a well-defined time interval. With this method, all instrumental and extraneous environmental effect will cancel, thus providing an accurate temperature measurement. Stability data will be presented for the fiber-optic probes. For medical applications, new breakthroughs in RF ablation technology and electro-surgical procedures are being introduced as alternative, less invasive treatment for removal of small tumors and for removal of plaque within arteries as a preventive treatment that avoids open heart surgery. The availability of small diameter temperature probes (230 microns or 450 microns in diameter) offers a whole new scope to temperature measurement. Accurate and reliable temperature monitoring during any laser treatment procedure or RF ablation at the surgical site is critical. Precise, NIST traceable reliable results are needed to prevent overheating or underheating during treatment. In addition, how interventional catheters are used in hyperthermia studies and the advantages to having flexible cables and multiple sensors are discussed. Preliminary data is given from an animal study where temperature was monitored in a pig during an RF study.

  20. Fiber optical sensors for enhanced battery safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Jan; Nedjalkov, Antonio; Doering, Alexander; Angelmahr, Martin; Schade, Wolfgang

    2015-05-01

    Over the last years, battery safety becomes more and more important due to the wide spread of high-capacity lithium ion batteries applied in e.g. consumer electronics and electrical power storages for vehicles or stationary energy storage systems. However, for these types of batteries, malfunctions could be highly dangerous and all aspects of safety issues are not sufficiently considered, yet. Therefore, the improvement of the battery safety behavior is one of the most important issues discussed in actual research projects. In this paper the application of fiber optical sensors for enhanced battery safety is presented. The temperature is one of the most critical parameters indicating a failure of the cell, but even state-to-the-art battery management systems (BMS) are not able to monitor and interpret the distributed temperature field of a total battery storage system sufficiently. Furthermore, the volume expansion of the battery cell, which could be monitored by the strain on the cells' surfaces, is one additional parameter not considered up to now. Both parameters could be simultaneous monitored by fiber optical sensor arrays, consisting of discrete fiber Bragg grating (FBG) elements. The FBG sensors are directly attached on the surface of the cell, recording the temperature as well as the strain distribution highly accurate and close-meshed. Failures and malfunction such as overcharging, gassing, and thermal runaway can be early predicted and avoided to extend the battery lifetime and enhance the operational battery safety. Moreover, battery aging effects lead to variations in the volume change behavior which can be detected additionally. Hence, a battery fully equipped with fiber optical sensor arrays in combination with an appropriate BMS enables a safe and continuous utilization of the energy storage system even under harsh conditions like rapid charging.

  1. Fiber-Optic/Photoelastic Flow Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesson, Laurence N.; Cabato, Nellie L.; Brooks, Edward F.

    1995-01-01

    Simple, rugged, lightweight transducers detect periodic vortices. Fiber-optic-coupled transducers developed to measure flows over wide dynamic ranges and over wide temperature ranges in severe environments. Used to measure flows of fuel in advanced aircraft engines. Feasibility of sensors demonstrated in tests of prototype sensor in water flowing at various temperatures and speeds. Particularly attractive for aircraft applications because optical fibers compact and make possible transmission of sensor signals at high rates with immunity from electromagnetic interference at suboptical frequencies. Sensors utilize optical-to-optical conversion via photoelastic effect.

  2. Microbend fiber-optic chemical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2002-01-01

    A microbend fiber-optic chemical sensor for detecting chemicals in a sample, and a method for its use, is disclosed. The sensor comprises at least one optical fiber having a microbend section (a section of small undulations in its axis), for transmitting and receiving light. In transmission, light guided through the microbend section scatters out of the fiber core and interacts, either directly or indirectly, with the chemical in the sample, inducing fluorescence radiation. Fluorescence radiation is scattered back into the microbend section and returned to an optical detector for determining characteristics of the fluorescence radiation quantifying the presence of a specific chemical.

  3. New glass developments for fiber optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higby, Paige L.; Holst, Karen; Tabor, Kevin; James, William; Chase, Elizabeth; Pucilowski, Sally; Gober-Mangan, Elizabeth; Klimek, Ronald; Karetta, Frank; Schreder, Bianca

    2014-02-01

    Fiber optic components for lighting and imaging applications have been in use for decades. Recent requirements such as a need for RoHS compliance, attractive market pricing, or particular optical properties, such as numerical aperture (NA) or transmission, have required SCHOTT to develop and implement new glasses for these applications. From Puravis™ lead-free fibers for lighting applications, to new glasses for digital X-ray imaging and sensor applications, the challenges for SCHOTT scientists are considerable. Pertinent properties of these glasses and methods of determination for suitability will be discussed.

  4. Adaptive Holographic Fiber-Optic Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozhevnikov, Nikolai M.; Lipovskaya, Margarita J.

    1990-04-01

    Interaction of phase-modulated light beams in photorefractive local inertial responce media was analysed. Interaction of this type allows to registrate phase-modulated signals adaptively under low frequency phase disturbtion. The experiments on multimode fiber-optic interferometer with demodulation element based on photorefractive bacteriorhodopsin-doped polimer film are described. As the writing of dynamic phase hologram is an inertial process the signal fluctuations with the frequencies up to 100 Hz can be canceled. The hologram efficiencies are enough to registrate high frequency phase shifts ~10-4 radn.

  5. An encapsulated fiber optic fuel level sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, D.; Sai Shankar, M.; Saidi Reddy, P.; Sai Prasad, R. L. N.; Kamineni, K. S.; Kishore, P.

    2011-05-01

    An encapsulated fiber optic sensor head for the detection of level of fuel in a tank is presented. The design is based on a concentric cam used along with a float and extrinsic intensity modulation of light. The sensor has been tested for its performance to measure a fuel level range of 35cm and a sensitivity of 0.2316 volts/cm was observed during rise in fuel level. The sensitivity and range of level sensing can be varied by varying the length of the connecting rod.

  6. Liquid-crystal fiber-optic switch.

    PubMed

    Soref, R A

    1979-05-01

    An adjustable access coupler for multimode fiber-optic networks has been constructed, based on the voltage-tunable total-internal-reflection effect in nematic liquid crystals. Fibers are coupled via graded-index rod lenses at normal incidence to flint-glass prisms in contact with a 6-microm liquid-crystal layer. The achromatic four-port switch has a 1.6-dB optical insertion loss, a tap ratio controllable from -4.6 to -48 dB, a directionality of 44 dB, and an operating voltage of 5 to 20 V rms. PMID:19687832

  7. Vortex shedding flowmeter with fiber optic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wroblewski, D. J.; Skuratovsky, E.

    Vortex shedding flow meters have proved over the last decade to be suitable for a wide variety of applications. They provide good accuracy, reliable flow measurement in a wide range of flow rates, and low pressure drop. Past performance was limited to operating pressures equivalent to ANSI Class 600 and process temperatures below 400 C. This paper presents a new design of vortex shedding flow meter with a fiber optic sensor capable of operating at pressures equivalent to ANSI Class 2500 and temperatures from -200 to 600 C. This device opens new horizons for vortex shedding flow meters in flow measurements and process control applications.

  8. Fiber Optic Gyro Development at Litton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlath, G. A.

    1987-03-01

    Fiber optic gyro development began, approximately ten years ago with Vali and Shorthill1. Progress has been rapid over these years due to the efforts of a large number of scientists and engineers around the world. Optical noise sources have been identified and reduced. Noise performance of present day fiber gyros is essentially set by shot noise or electronics noise. Many sources of optical bias errors have also been identified and reduced. Currently, scale factor errors, packaging, and environmental ruggedness are being addressed along with cost, reliability, and production issues to turn the fiber gyro from a labora-tory instrument into a product.

  9. Fiber optic gyroscopes for vehicle navigation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, Tatsuya; Soekawa, Hirokazu; Yuhara, Toshiya; Kajioka, Hiroshi; Oho, Shigeru; Sonobe, Hisao

    1994-03-01

    Fiber optic gyroscopes (FOGs) have been developed for vehicle navigation systems and are used in Toyota Motor Corporation models Mark II, Chaser and Cresta in Japan. Use of FOGs in these systems requires high reliability under a wide range of conditions, especially in a temperature range between -40 and 85 degree(s)C. In addition, a high cost-performance ratio is needed. We have developed optical and electrical systems that are inexpensive and can perform well. They are ready to be mass-produced. FOGs have already been installed in luxury automobiles, and will soon be included in more basic vehicles. We have developed more inexpensive FOGs for this purpose.

  10. Fiber optic dosimeter with silicon photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutinho, L. M.; Castro, I. F.; Peralta, L.; Abreu, M. C.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.

    2014-08-01

    A small dimension, real-time readout dosimeter is desirable for specific applications in medical physics as for example, dose measurement in prostate brachytherapy. This particular radiotherapy procedure consists in the permanent deposition of low energy, low-dose and low-dose rate small sized radioactive seeds. We developed a scintillating fiber optic based dosimeter suitable for in-vivo, real-time low dose and low dose rate measurements. Due to the low scintillation light produced in the scintillating fiber, a high sensitive and high gain light detector is required. The Silicon Photomultipliers are an interesting option that allowed us to obtain good results in our studies.