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Sample records for field asymmetric ion

  1. Mass spectrometric characterization of a high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purves, Randy W.; Guevremont, Roger; Day, Stephen; Pipich, Charles W.; Matyjaszczyk, Matthew S.

    1998-12-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has become an important method for the detection of many compounds because of its high sensitivity and amenability to miniaturization for field-portable monitoring; applications include detection of narcotics, explosives, and chemical warfare agents. High-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) differs from IMS in that the electric fields are applied using a high-frequency periodic asymmetric waveform, rather than a dc voltage. Furthermore, in FAIMS the compounds are separated by the difference in the mobility of ions at high electric field relative to low field, rather than by compound to compound differences in mobility at low electric field (IMS). We report here the first cylindrical-geometry-FAIMS interface with mass spectrometry (FAIMS-MS) and the MS identification of the peaks observed in a FAIMS compensation voltage (CV) spectrum. Using both an electrometer-based-FAIMS (FAIMS-E) and FAIMS-MS, several variables that affect the sensitivity of ion detection were examined for two (polarity reversed) asymmetric waveforms (modes 1 and 2) each of which yields a unique spectrum. An increase in the dispersion voltage (DV) was found to improve the sensitivity and separation observed in the FAIMS CV spectrum. This increase in sensitivity and the unexpected dissimilarity in modes 1 and 2 suggest that atmospheric pressure ion focusing is occurring in the FAIMS analyzer. The sensitivity and peak locations in the CV spectra were affected by temperature, gas flow rates, operating pressure, and analyte concentration.

  2. Control of Ion Distortion in Field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry via Variation of Dispersion Field and Gas Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Errol W.; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-10-01

    Field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) has emerged as an analytical tool of broad utility, especially in conjunction with mass spectrometry. Of particular promise is the use of FAIMS and 2-D ion mobility methods that combine it with conventional IMS to resolve and characterize protein and other macromolecular conformers. However, FAIMS operation requires high electric fields and ions are inevitably heated by above-thermal collisions with buffer gas molecules. This may induce ion isomerization and dissociation that distort separation properties determined by FAIMS and subsequent stages and/or reduce instrumental sensitivity. As FAIMS employs a periodic waveform, the ion temperature can be characterized at the maximum or average field intensity (E). Which method is most applicable to temperature sensitive ions, such as protein ions, has been debated. Here we address this issue by measuring the unfolding of compact ubiquitin ion geometries as a function of waveform amplitude (dispersion field, ED) and gas temperature, T. The field heating is quantified by matching the dependences of structural transitions on ED and T. Increasing ED from 12 to 16 or from 16 to 20 kV/cm is equivalent to heating the (N2) gas by ~15 - 25 oC. The magnitude of field heating for any E can be calculated using the two-temperature theory, and raising ED by 4 kV/cm augments heating by ~15 - 30 oC for maximum and ~4 - 8 oC for average E in the FAIMS cycle. Hence, isomerization of ions in FAIMS appears to be governed by the maximum internal temperature at waveform peaks.

  3. Measurement of Asymmetric Optical Pumping of Ions Accelerating in a Magnetic-field Gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Xuan Sun; Earl Scime; Mahmood Miah; Samuel Cohen; Frederick Skiff

    2004-10-28

    We report observations of asymmetric optical pumping of argon ions accelerating in a magnetic field gradient. The signature is a difference in the laser-induced-fluorescence (LIF) emission amplitude from a pair of Zeeman-split states. A model that reproduces the dependence of the asymmetry on magnetic-field and ion-velocity gradients is described. With the model, the fluorescence intensity ratio provides a new method of measuring ion collisionality. This phenomenon has implications for interpreting stellar plasma spectroscopy data which often exhibit unequal Zeeman state intensities.

  4. Control of Ion Distortion in Field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry via Variation of Dispersion Field and Gas Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Errol W.; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) has emerged as an analytical tool of broad utility, especially in conjunction with mass spectrometry. Of particular promise is the use of FAIMS and 2-D ion mobility methods that combine FAIMS with conventional IMS to resolve and characterize protein and other macromolecular conformers. However, FAIMS operation requires a strong electric field and ions are inevitably heated by energetic collisions with buffer gas molecules. This may induce ion isomerization or dissociation that distort the separation properties of FAIMS (and subsequent stages) and/or reduce instrumental sensitivity. As FAIMS employs a periodic waveform, whether those processes are controlled by ion temperature at maximum or average field intensity has been debated. Here we address this issue by measuring the unfolding of compact ubiquitin ion geometries as a function of waveform amplitude (dispersion field, ED) and gas temperature, T. The field heating is quantified by matching the dependences of structural transitions on ED and T: increasing ED from 12 to 16 or from 16 to 20 kV/cm is equivalent to heating the (N2) gas by ∼15 – 25 °C. The magnitude of field heating for any ED can be estimated using the two-temperature theory, and raising ED by 4 kV/cm augments heating by ∼15 – 30 °C for maximum and ∼4 – 8 °C for average field in the FAIMS cycle. Hence, isomerization of ions in FAIMS appears to be determined by the excitation at waveform peaks. PMID:18729473

  5. Asymmetric Ion-Pairing Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Brak, Katrien

    2014-01-01

    Charged intermediates and reagents are ubiquitous in organic transformations. The interaction of these ionic species with chiral neutral, anionic, or cationic small molecules has emerged as a powerful strategy for catalytic, enantioselective synthesis. This review describes developments in the burgeoning field of asymmetric ion-pairing catalysis with an emphasis on the insights that have been gleaned into the structural and mechanistic features that contribute to high asymmetric induction. PMID:23192886

  6. Asymmetric ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Barlow, Stephan E.; Alexander, Michael L.; Follansbee, James C.

    1997-01-01

    An ion trap having two end cap electrodes disposed asymmetrically about a center of a ring electrode. The inner surface of the end cap electrodes are conformed to an asymmetric pair of equipotential lines of the harmonic formed by the application of voltages to the electrodes. The asymmetry of the end cap electrodes allows ejection of charged species through the closer of the two electrodes which in turn allows for simultaneously detecting anions and cations expelled from the ion trap through the use of two detectors charged with opposite polarity.

  7. Micro-machined planar field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometer as a gas chromatographic detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiceman, G. A.; Nazarov, E. G.; Miller, R. A.; Krylov, E. V.; Zapata, A. M.

    2002-01-01

    A planar high field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometer (PFAIMS) with a micro-machined drift tube was characterized as a detector for capillary gas chromatography. The performance of the PFAIMS was compared directly to that of a flame ionization detector (FID) for the separation of a ketone mixture from butanone to decanone. Effluent from the column was continuously sampled by the detector and mobility scans could be obtained throughout the chromatographic analysis providing chemical inforrmation in mobility scans orthogonal to retention time. Limits of detection were approximately I ng for measurement of positive ions and were comparable or slightly better than those for the FID. Direct comparison of calibration curves for the FAIMS and the FID was possible over four orders of magnitude with a semi-log plot. The concentration dependence of the PFAIMS mobility scans showed the dependence between ion intensity and ion clustering, evident in other mobility spectrometers and atmospheric pressure ionization technologies. Ions were identified using mass spectrometry as the protonated monomer and the proton bound dimer of the ketones. Residence time for column effluent in the PFAIMS was calculated as approximately 1 ms and a 36% increase in extra-column broadening versus the FID occurred with the PFAIMS.

  8. Peak deconvolution in high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) to characterize macromolecular conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Errol W.; Sellon, Rachel E.; Williams, Evan R.

    2007-01-01

    Protonated poly(ethylene glycol), produced by electrospray ionization (ESI), with molecular weights ranging from 0.3 to 5 kDa and charge states from 1+ to 7+ were characterized using high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS). Results for all but some of the 3+ and 4+ charge states are consistent with a single gas-phase conformer or family of unresolved conformers for each of these charge states. The FAIMS compensation voltage scans resulted in peaks that could be accurately fit with a single Gaussian for each peak. The peak widths increase linearly with compensation voltage for maximum ion transmission but do not depend on m/z or molecular weight. Fitting parameters obtained from the poly(ethylene glycol) data were used to analyze conformations of oxidized and reduced lysozyme formed from different solutions. For oxidized lysozyme formed from a buffered aqueous solution, a single conformer (or group of unresolved conformers) was observed for the 7+ and 8+ charge states. Two conformers were observed for the 9+ and 10+ charge states formed from more denaturing solutions. Data for the fully reduced form indicate the existence of up to three different conformers for each charge state produced directly by ESI and a general progression from a more extended to a more folded structure with decreasing charge state. These results are consistent with those obtained previously by proton-transfer reactivity and drift tube ion mobility experiments, although more conformers were identified for the fully reduced form of lysozyme using FAIMS.

  9. Enhancing Biological Analyses with Three Dimensional Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility, Low Field Drift Time Ion Mobility and Mass Spectrometry (µFAIMS/IMS-MS) Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xing; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Kyle, Jennifer E.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Smith, Richard D.; Baker, Erin Shammel

    2015-06-30

    We report the first evaluation of a platform coupling a high speed field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry microchip (µFAIMS) with drift tube ion mobility and mass spectrometry (IMS-MS). The µFAIMS/IMS-MS platform was used to analyze biological samples and simultaneously acquire multidimensional information of detected features from the measured FAIMS compensation fields and IMS drift times, while also obtaining accurate ion masses. These separations thereby increase the overall separation power, resulting increased information content, and provide more complete characterization of more complex samples. The separation conditions were optimized for sensitivity and resolving power by the selection of gas compositions and pressures in the FAIMS and IMS separation stages. The resulting performance provided three dimensional separations, benefitting both broad complex mixture studies and targeted analyses by e.g. improving isomeric separations and allowing detection of species obscured by “chemical noise” and other interfering peaks.

  10. Developing Fieldable Systems for Chemical Sensing Using Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectrometry and Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Kyle, Stephan Weeks, R. Trainham

    2008-03-01

    Currently, there is an urgent need for field-rugged and field-programmable sensor systems that provide highly selective, universal monitoring of vapors and aerosols at detectable levels from persons or areas involved with illicit chemical/biological/explosives (CBE) production. These devices must be portable, low cost, robust, and provide accurate measurements to avoid both false positive and negative results. Furthermore, the information provided by the devices must be received in a timely manner so that informed decisions can be immediately made and the appropriate actions taken. Two technologies that are unparalleled in their sensitivity, selectivity, and trace-level detection capabilities are field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) and mass spectrometry. Here, we will show progress that has been made toward developing fieldable FAIMS systems and mass spectrometers. Working in collaboration with Sionex Corporation, the microDMx detector was equipped with a continuous air sampling system to develop selective methods for the analysis of compounds of interest. A microdiaphragm pump (KNF Neuberger, Inc.) is used to pull in gas-phase analytes directly from the air for separation and detection with the FAIMS system. The FAIMS evaluation platform (SVAC) unit currently measures 9.8-inch x 4.6-inch x 3.2-inch, weighs 3.1 lb, and utilizes a {sup 63}Ni source to ionize incoming compounds. Analytes entering the unit are separated and identified by their characteristic response to the compensation voltage (V{sub c}) at a given rf field strength (V{sub rf}). This response has been observed to be unique for a wide range of substances studied. If additional verification were required or a targeted analyte present in a complex chemical matrix, a FAIMS unit equipped with a fast gas chromatography column has been evaluated. The unit combines the separation capabilities of gas chromatography with the selectivity of FAIMS. It measures 9.5-inch x 5.25-inch x 3.5-inch

  11. Asymmetrical field emitter

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, J.G.; Smith, B.K.

    1995-10-10

    A method is disclosed for providing a field emitter with an asymmetrical emitter structure having a very sharp tip in close proximity to its gate. One preferred embodiment of the present invention includes an asymmetrical emitter and a gate. The emitter having a tip and a side is coupled to a substrate. The gate is connected to a step in the substrate. The step has a top surface and a side wall that is substantially parallel to the side of the emitter. The tip of the emitter is in close proximity to the gate. The emitter is at an emitter potential, and the gate is at a gate potential such that with the two potentials at appropriate values, electrons are emitted from the emitter. In one embodiment, the gate is separated from the emitter by an oxide layer, and the emitter is etched anisotropically to form its tip and its asymmetrical structure. 17 figs.

  12. Liquid extraction surface analysis field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry mass spectrometry for the analysis of dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Rian L; Dexter, Alex; Creese, Andrew J; Cooper, Helen J

    2015-10-21

    Liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA) is a surface sampling technique that allows electrospray mass spectrometry analysis of a wide range of analytes directly from biological substrates. Here, we present LESA mass spectrometry coupled with high field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) for the analysis of dried blood spots on filter paper. Incorporation of FAIMS in the workflow enables gas-phase separation of lipid and protein molecular classes, enabling analysis of both haemoglobin and a range of lipids (phosphatidylcholine or phosphatidylethanolamine, and sphingomyelin species) from a single extraction sample. The work has implications for multiplexed clinical assays of multiple analytes. PMID:26198596

  13. Separation of Opiate Isomers Using Electrospray Ionization and Paper Spray Coupled to High-Field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manicke, Nicholas E.; Belford, Michael

    2015-05-01

    One limitation in the growing field of ambient or direct analysis methods is reduced selectivity caused by the elimination of chromatographic separations prior to mass spectrometric analysis. We explored the use of high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), an ambient pressure ion mobility technique, to separate the closely related opiate isomers of morphine, hydromorphone, and norcodeine. These isomers cannot be distinguished by tandem mass spectrometry. Separation prior to MS analysis is, therefore, required to distinguish these compounds, which are important in clinical chemistry and toxicology. FAIMS was coupled to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer, and ionization was performed using either a pneumatically assisted heated electrospray ionization source (H-ESI) or paper spray, a direct analysis method that has been applied to the direct analysis of dried blood spots and other complex samples. We found that FAIMS was capable of separating the three opiate structural isomers using both H-ESI and paper spray as the ionization source.

  14. Decreased Gap Width in a Cylindrical High-Field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry Device Improves Protein Discovery.

    PubMed

    Swearingen, Kristian E; Winget, Jason M; Hoopmann, Michael R; Kusebauch, Ulrike; Moritz, Robert L

    2015-12-15

    High-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) is an atmospheric pressure ion mobility technique that separates gas phase ions according to their characteristic dependence of ion mobility on electric field strength. FAIMS can be implemented as a means of automated gas-phase fractionation in liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) experiments. We modified a commercially available cylindrical FAIMS device by enlarging the inner electrode, thereby narrowing the gap and increasing the effective field strength. This modification provided a nearly 4-fold increase in FAIMS peak capacity over the optimally configured unmodified device. We employed the modified FAIMS device for on-line fractionation in a proteomic analysis of a complex sample and observed major increases in protein discovery. NanoLC-FAIMS-MS/MS of an unfractionated yeast tryptic digest using the modified FAIMS device identified 53% more proteins than were identified using an unmodified FAIMS device and 98% more proteins than were identified with unaided nanoLC-MS/MS. We describe here the development of a nanoLC-FAIMS-MS/MS protocol that provides automated gas-phase fractionation for proteomic analysis of complex protein digests. We compare this protocol against prefractionation of peptides with isoelectric focusing and demonstrate that FAIMS fractionation yields comparable protein recovery while significantly reducing the amount of sample required and eliminating the need for additional sample handling. PMID:26560994

  15. Enhancement of mass spectrometry performance for proteomic analyses using high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS).

    PubMed

    Bonneil, Eric; Pfammatter, Sibylle; Thibault, Pierre

    2015-11-01

    Remarkable advances in mass spectrometry sensitivity and resolution have been accomplished over the past two decades to enhance the depth and coverage of proteome analyses. As these technological developments expanded the detection capability of mass spectrometers, they also revealed an increasing complexity of low abundance peptides, solvent clusters and sample contaminants that can confound protein identification. Separation techniques that are complementary and can be used in combination with liquid chromatography are often sought to improve mass spectrometry sensitivity for proteomics applications. In this context, high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), a form of ion mobility that exploits ion separation at low and high electric fields, has shown significant advantages by focusing and separating multiply charged peptide ions from singly charged interferences. This paper examines the analytical benefits of FAIMS in proteomics to separate co-eluting peptide isomers and to enhance peptide detection and quantitative measurements of protein digests via native peptides (label-free) or isotopically labeled peptides from metabolic labeling or chemical tagging experiments. PMID:26505763

  16. High-Field Asymmetric-Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry and Electron Detachment Dissociation of Isobaric Mixtures of Glycosaminoglycans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kailemia, Muchena J.; Park, Melvin; Kaplan, Desmond A.; Venot, Andre; Boons, Geert-Jan; Li, Lingyun; Linhardt, Robert J.; Amster, I. Jonathan

    2013-11-01

    High-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) is shown to be capable of resolving isomeric and isobaric glycosaminoglycan negative ions and to have great utility for the analysis of this class of molecules when combined with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry. Electron detachment dissociation (EDD) and other ion activation methods for tandem mass spectrometry can be used to determine the sites of labile sulfate modifications and for assigning the stereochemistry of hexuronic acid residues of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). However, mixtures with overlapping mass-to-charge values present a challenge, as their precursor species cannot be resolved by a mass analyzer prior to ion activation. FAIMS is shown to resolve two types of mass-to-charge overlaps. A mixture of chondroitin sulfate A (CSA) oligomers with 4-10 saccharides units produces ions of a single mass-to-charge by electrospray ionization, as the charge state increases in direct proportion to the degree of polymerization for these sulfated carbohydrates. FAIMS is shown to resolve the overlapping charge. A more challenging type of mass-to-charge overlap occurs for mixtures of diastereomers. FAIMS is shown to separate two sets of epimeric GAG tetramers. For the epimer pairs, the complexity of the separation is reduced when the reducing end is alkylated, suggesting that anomers are also resolved by FAIMS. The resolved components were activated by EDD and the fragment ions were analyzed by FTICR-MS. The resulting tandem mass spectra were able to distinguish the two epimers from each other.

  17. Analysis of Supramolecular Complexes of 3-Methylxanthine with Field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry Combined with Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, Kayleigh L.; Eiceman, Gary A.; Reynolds, James C.; Creaser, Colin S.

    2016-05-01

    Miniaturised field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), combined with mass spectrometry (MS), has been applied to the study of self-assembling, noncovalent supramolecular complexes of 3-methylxanthine (3-MX) in the gas phase. 3-MX forms stable tetrameric complexes around an alkali metal (Na+, K+) or ammonium cation, to generate a diverse array of complexes with single and multiple charge states. Complexes of (3-MX)n observed include: singly charged complexes where n = 1-8 and 12 and doubly charged complexes where n = 12-24. The most intense ions are those associated with multiples of tetrameric units, where n = 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24. The effect of dispersion field on the ion intensities of the self-assembled complexes indicates some fragmentation of higher order complexes within the FAIMS electrodes (in-FAIMS dissociation), as well as in-source collision induced dissociation within the mass spectrometer. FAIMS-MS enables charge state separation of supramolecular complexes of 3-MX and is shown to be capable of separating species with overlapping mass-to-charge ratios. FAIMS selected transmission also results in an improvement in signal-to-noise ratio for low intensity complexes and enables the visualization of species undetectable without FAIMS.

  18. Analysis of Supramolecular Complexes of 3-Methylxanthine with Field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry Combined with Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Kayleigh L; Eiceman, Gary A; Reynolds, James C; Creaser, Colin S

    2016-05-01

    Miniaturised field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), combined with mass spectrometry (MS), has been applied to the study of self-assembling, noncovalent supramolecular complexes of 3-methylxanthine (3-MX) in the gas phase. 3-MX forms stable tetrameric complexes around an alkali metal (Na(+), K(+)) or ammonium cation, to generate a diverse array of complexes with single and multiple charge states. Complexes of (3-MX)n observed include: singly charged complexes where n = 1-8 and 12 and doubly charged complexes where n = 12-24. The most intense ions are those associated with multiples of tetrameric units, where n = 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24. The effect of dispersion field on the ion intensities of the self-assembled complexes indicates some fragmentation of higher order complexes within the FAIMS electrodes (in-FAIMS dissociation), as well as in-source collision induced dissociation within the mass spectrometer. FAIMS-MS enables charge state separation of supramolecular complexes of 3-MX and is shown to be capable of separating species with overlapping mass-to-charge ratios. FAIMS selected transmission also results in an improvement in signal-to-noise ratio for low intensity complexes and enables the visualization of species undetectable without FAIMS. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26914231

  19. Analysis of Supramolecular Complexes of 3-Methylxanthine with Field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry Combined with Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, Kayleigh L.; Eiceman, Gary A.; Reynolds, James C.; Creaser, Colin S.

    2016-02-01

    Miniaturised field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), combined with mass spectrometry (MS), has been applied to the study of self-assembling, noncovalent supramolecular complexes of 3-methylxanthine (3-MX) in the gas phase. 3-MX forms stable tetrameric complexes around an alkali metal (Na+, K+) or ammonium cation, to generate a diverse array of complexes with single and multiple charge states. Complexes of (3-MX)n observed include: singly charged complexes where n = 1-8 and 12 and doubly charged complexes where n = 12-24. The most intense ions are those associated with multiples of tetrameric units, where n = 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24. The effect of dispersion field on the ion intensities of the self-assembled complexes indicates some fragmentation of higher order complexes within the FAIMS electrodes (in-FAIMS dissociation), as well as in-source collision induced dissociation within the mass spectrometer. FAIMS-MS enables charge state separation of supramolecular complexes of 3-MX and is shown to be capable of separating species with overlapping mass-to-charge ratios. FAIMS selected transmission also results in an improvement in signal-to-noise ratio for low intensity complexes and enables the visualization of species undetectable without FAIMS.

  20. Nontarget analysis of urine by electrospray ionization-high field asymmetric waveform ion mobility-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Beach, Daniel G; Gabryelski, Wojciech

    2011-12-01

    Nearly a decade after first commercialization, high field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) has yet to find its place in routine chemical analysis. Prototypes have been used to demonstrate the utility of this separation technique combined with mass spectrometry (MS). Unfortunately, first generation commercial FAIMS instruments have gone practically unused by early adopters. Here, we show this to be due to poor ion transmission in the FAIMS-MS source interface. We present simple instrumental modifications and optimization of experimental conditions to achieve good performance from the first generation commercial FAIMS device (the Ionalytics Selectra) coupled to a high resolution Q-TOF-MS. In combination with nanospray ionization, we demonstrate for the first time the nontarget analysis of urine by FAIMS with minimal sample preparation. We show the unique suitability of electrospray ionization (ESI)-FAIMS-MS for identification of low abundance species such as urinary biomarkers of damage of nucleic acids in a complex biological matrix. The elimination of electrospray noise and matrix components by FAIMS and the continuous flow of analytes through FAIMS for accurate and tandem mass analysis produce high quality spectral data suitable for structural identification of unknowns. These characteristics make ESI-FAIMS-MS ideal for nontarget identification, even when compared to high efficiency LC-ESI-MS. PMID:21978137

  1. Large-scale analysis of peptide sequence variants: the case for high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Creese, Andrew J; Smart, Jade; Cooper, Helen J

    2013-05-21

    Large scale analysis of proteins by mass spectrometry is becoming increasingly routine; however, the presence of peptide isomers remains a significant challenge for both identification and quantitation in proteomics. Classes of isomers include sequence inversions, structural isomers, and localization variants. In many cases, liquid chromatography is inadequate for separation of peptide isomers. The resulting tandem mass spectra are composite, containing fragments from multiple precursor ions. The benefits of high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) for proteomics have been demonstrated by a number of groups, but previously work has focused on extending proteome coverage generally. Here, we present a systematic study of the benefits of FAIMS for a key challenge in proteomics, that of peptide isomers. We have applied FAIMS to the analysis of a phosphopeptide library comprising the sequences GPSGXVpSXAQLX(K/R) and SXPFKXpSPLXFG(K/R), where X = ADEFGLSTVY. The library has defined limits enabling us to make valid conclusions regarding FAIMS performance. The library contains numerous sequence inversions and structural isomers. In addition, there are large numbers of theoretical localization variants, allowing false localization rates to be determined. The FAIMS approach is compared with reversed-phase liquid chromatography and strong cation exchange chromatography. The FAIMS approach identified 35% of the peptide library, whereas LC-MS/MS alone identified 8% and LC-MS/MS with strong cation exchange chromatography prefractionation identified 17.3% of the library. PMID:23646896

  2. Analysis of paralytic shellfish toxins using high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Beach, Daniel G; Melanson, Jeremy E; Purves, Randy W

    2015-03-01

    The analysis of paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry remains a challenge because of their high polarity, large number of analogues and the complex matrix in which they occur. Here we investigate the potential utility of high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) as a gas-phase ion separation tool for analysis of PSTs by mass spectrometry. We investigate the separation of PSTs using FAIMS with two divergent goals: using FAIMS as a primary separation tool for rapid screening by electrospray ionization (ESI)-FAIMS-MS or combined with LC in a multidimensional LC-ESI-FAIMS-MS separation. First, a survey of the parameters that affect the sensitivity and selectivity of PST analysis by FAIMS was carried out using ESI-FAIMS-MS. In particular, the use of acetonitrile as a gas additive in the carrier gas flow offered good separation of all PST epimeric pairs. A second set of FAIMS conditions was also identified, which focussed PSTs to a relatively narrow CV range allowing development of an LC-ESI-FAIMS-MS method for analysis of PST toxins in complex mussel tissue extracts. The quantitative capabilities of this method were evaluated by analysing a PST containing mussel tissue matrix material. Results compared favourably with analysis by an established LC-post-column oxidation-fluorescence method with recoveries ranging from 70 to 106%, although sensitivity was somewhat reduced. The current work represents the first successful separation of PST isomers using ion mobility and shows the promise of FAIMS as a tool for analysis of algal biotoxins in complex samples and outlines some critical requirements for its future improvement. PMID:25619987

  3. Detection of potato storage disease via gas analysis: a pilot study using field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rutolo, Massimo; Covington, James A; Clarkson, John; Iliescu, Daciana

    2014-01-01

    Soft rot is a commonly occurring potato tuber disease that each year causes substantial losses to the food industry. Here, we explore the possibility of early detection of the disease via gas/vapor analysis, in a laboratory environment, using a recent technology known as FAIMS (Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectrometry). In this work, tubers were inoculated with a bacterium causing the infection, Pectobacterium carotovorum, and stored within set environmental conditions in order to manage disease progression. They were compared with controls stored in the same conditions. Three different inoculation time courses were employed in order to obtain diseased potatoes showing clear signs of advanced infection (for standard detection) and diseased potatoes with no apparent evidence of infection (for early detection). A total of 156 samples were processed by PCA (Principal Component Analysis) and k-means clustering. Results show a clear discrimination between controls and diseased potatoes for all experiments with no difference among observations from standard and early detection. Further analysis was carried out by means of a statistical model based on LDA (Linear Discriminant Analysis) that showed a high classification accuracy of 92.1% on the test set, obtained via a LOOCV (leave-one out cross-validation). PMID:25171118

  4. Detection of Potato Storage Disease via Gas Analysis: A Pilot Study Using Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Rutolo, Massimo; Covington, James A.; Clarkson, John; Iliescu, Daciana

    2014-01-01

    Soft rot is a commonly occurring potato tuber disease that each year causes substantial losses to the food industry. Here, we explore the possibility of early detection of the disease via gas/vapor analysis, in a laboratory environment, using a recent technology known as FAIMS (Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectrometry). In this work, tubers were inoculated with a bacterium causing the infection, Pectobacterium carotovorum, and stored within set environmental conditions in order to manage disease progression. They were compared with controls stored in the same conditions. Three different inoculation time courses were employed in order to obtain diseased potatoes showing clear signs of advanced infection (for standard detection) and diseased potatoes with no apparent evidence of infection (for early detection). A total of 156 samples were processed by PCA (Principal Component Analysis) and k-means clustering. Results show a clear discrimination between controls and diseased potatoes for all experiments with no difference among observations from standard and early detection. Further analysis was carried out by means of a statistical model based on LDA (Linear Discriminant Analysis) that showed a high classification accuracy of 92.1% on the test set, obtained via a LOOCV (leave-one out cross-validation). PMID:25171118

  5. Solitary waves in asymmetric electron-positron-ion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ding; Li, Zi-Liang; Xie, Bai-Song

    2015-10-01

    > By solving the coupled equations of the electromagnetic field and electrostatic potential, we investigate solitary waves in an asymmetric electron-positron plasma and/or electron-positron-ion plasmas with delicate features. It is found that the solutions of the coupled equations can capture multipeak structures of solitary waves in the case of cold plasma, which are left out by using the long-wavelength approximation. By considering the effect of ion motion with respect to non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic temperature plasmas, we find that the ions' mobility can lead to larger-amplitude solitary waves; especially, this becomes more obvious for a high-temperature plasma. The effects of asymmetric temperature between electrons and positrons and the ion fraction on the solitary waves are also studied and presented. It is shown that the amplitudes of solitary waves decrease with positron temperature in asymmetric temperature electron-positron plasmas and decrease also with ion concentration.

  6. ASYMMETRIC SOLAR POLAR FIELD REVERSALS

    SciTech Connect

    Svalgaard, Leif; Kamide, Yohsuke

    2013-01-20

    The solar polar fields reverse because magnetic flux from decaying sunspots moves toward the poles, with a preponderance of flux from the trailing spots. If there is a strong asymmetry, in the sense that most activity is in the northern hemisphere, then that excess flux will move toward the north pole and reverse that pole first. If there is more activity in the south later on, then that flux will help to reverse the south pole. In this way, two humps in the solar activity and a corresponding difference in the time of reversals develop (in the ideal case). Such a difference was originally noted in the very first observation of polar field reversal just after the maximum of the strongly asymmetric solar cycle 19, when the southern hemisphere was most active before sunspot maximum and the south pole duly reversed first, followed by the northern hemisphere more than a year later, when that hemisphere became most active. Solar cycles since then have had the opposite asymmetry, with the northern hemisphere being most active before solar maximum. We show that polar field reversals for these cycles have all happened in the north first, as expected. This is especially noteworthy for the present solar cycle 24. We suggest that the association of two or more peaks of solar activity when separated by hemispheres with correspondingly different times of polar field reversals is a general feature of the cycle, and that asymmetric polar field reversals are simply a consequence of the asymmetry of solar activity.

  7. Field reversals in electrically asymmetric capacitively coupled radio-frequency discharges in hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, Sebastian; Schüngel, Edmund; Schulze, Julian; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we present a simulation study of electrically asymmetric capacitively coupled radio-frequency hydrogen discharges using the hybrid plasma equipment model operated at the combined frequencies of 10 and 20 MHz. We find that, in such discharges, field reversals cause ionization near the electrodes during the sheath collapse. In the case of the investigated asymmetric voltage waveforms, the field reversals are asymmetrically distributed over the sheaths, which causes asymmetric ionization and density profiles. The asymmetry of these profiles can be controlled by the phase angle between the two frequencies. As a result, the possibility to control the ion energy independently from the ion flux via the electrical asymmetry effect (EAE) is reduced in discharges displaying strong field reversals, as the asymmetric field reversals compensate the electrically induced asymmetry. The reason for this is understood by an analytical model. Furthermore, we demonstrate, that the EAE can be restored by the addition of specific gases to a pure hydrogen discharge.

  8. Polarization dependent switching of asymmetric nanorings with a circular field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Nihar R.; Tuominen, Mark T.; Aidala, Katherine E.

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally investigated the switching from onion to vortex states in asymmetric cobalt nanorings by an applied circular field. An in-plane field is applied along the symmetric or asymmetric axis of the ring to establish domain walls (DWs) with symmetric or asymmetric polarization. A circular field is then applied to switch from the onion state to the vortex state, moving the DWs in the process. The asymmetry of the ring leads to different switching fields depending on the location of the DWs and direction of applied field. For polarization along the asymmetric axis, the field required to move the DWs to the narrow side of the ring is smaller than the field required to move the DWs to the larger side of the ring. For polarization along the symmetric axis, establishing one DW in the narrow side and one on the wide side, the field required to switch to the vortex state is an intermediate value.

  9. Field reversed ion rings

    SciTech Connect

    Sudan, R.N.; Omelchenko, Y.A.

    1995-09-01

    In typical field-reversed ion ring experiments, an intense annular ion beam is injected across a plasma-filled magnetic cusp region into a neutral gas immersed in a ramped solenoidal magnetic field. Assuming the characteristic ionization time is much shorter than the long ({ital t}{approx_gt}2{pi}/{Omega}{sub {ital i}}) beam evolution time scale, we investigate the formation of an ion ring in the background plasma followed by field reversal, using a 21/2-D hybrid, PIC code FIRE, in which the beam and background ions are treated as particles and the electrons as a massless fluid. We show that beam bunching and trapping occurs downstream in a ramped magnetic field for an appropriate set of experimental parameters. We find that a compact ion ring is formed and a large field reversal {zeta}={delta}{ital B}/{ital B}{approx_gt}1 on axis develops. We also observe significant deceleration of the ring on reflection due to the transfer of its axial momentum to the background ions, which creates favorable trapping conditions. {copyright} {ital 1995 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. A mean-field theory on the differential capacitance of asymmetric ionic liquid electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yining; Huang, Shanghui; Yan, Tianying

    2014-07-01

    The size of ions significantly influences the electric double layer structure of room temperature ionic liquid (IL) electrolytes and their differential capacitance (Cd). In this study, we extended the mean-field theory (MFT) developed independently by Kornyshev (2007J. Phys. Chem. B 111 5545-57) and Kilic, Bazant, and Ajdari (2007 Phys. Rev. E 75 021502) (the KKBA MFT) to take into account the asymmetric 1:1 IL electrolytes by introducing an additional parameter ξ for the anion/cation volume ratio, besides the ionic compressibility γ in the KKBA MFT. The MFT of asymmetric ions becomes KKBA MFT upon ξ = 1, and further reduces to Gouy-Chapman theory in the γ → 0 limit. The result of the extended MFT demonstrates that the asymmetric ILs give rise to an asymmetric Cd, with the higher peak in Cd occurring at positive polarization for the smaller anionic size. At high potential, Cd decays asymptotically toward KKBA MFT characterized by γ for the negative polarization, and characterized by ξγ for the positive polarization, with inverse-square-root behavior. At low potential, around the potential of zero charge, the asymmetric ions cause a higher Cd, which exceeds that of Gouy-Chapman theory.

  11. A mean-field theory on the differential capacitance of asymmetric ionic liquid electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Han, Yining; Huang, Shanghui; Yan, Tianying

    2014-07-16

    The size of ions significantly influences the electric double layer structure of room temperature ionic liquid (IL) electrolytes and their differential capacitance (Cd). In this study, we extended the mean-field theory (MFT) developed independently by Kornyshev (2007J. Phys. Chem. B 111 5545-57) and Kilic, Bazant, and Ajdari (2007 Phys. Rev. E 75 021502) (the KKBA MFT) to take into account the asymmetric 1:1 IL electrolytes by introducing an additional parameter ξ for the anion/cation volume ratio, besides the ionic compressibility γ in the KKBA MFT. The MFT of asymmetric ions becomes KKBA MFT upon ξ = 1, and further reduces to Gouy-Chapman theory in the γ → 0 limit. The result of the extended MFT demonstrates that the asymmetric ILs give rise to an asymmetric Cd, with the higher peak in Cd occurring at positive polarization for the smaller anionic size. At high potential, Cd decays asymptotically toward KKBA MFT characterized by γ for the negative polarization, and characterized by ξγ for the positive polarization, with inverse-square-root behavior. At low potential, around the potential of zero charge, the asymmetric ions cause a higher Cd, which exceeds that of Gouy-Chapman theory. PMID:24920102

  12. Linac head scatter factor for asymmetric radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soubra, Mazen Ahmed

    1997-11-01

    the contributing to scatter. However this role was significantly reduced off- axis and other head components, such as the electron beam stopper and the primary collimator, became more important. The role of the mirror and ion chamber was relatively minor. Scatter from the secondary collimators was shown to be a function of the filed size and the position of the collimators in the treatment head. They were also found to play a dual role, both as a scatter source and as an attenuator for scatter produced upstream in the linac head. A closed form model, based on the work of Yu and Slobada, was developed to estimate head scatter factors for on- and off-axis asymmetric fields. The model requires three parameters to fit the measured data. The first, a constant c, has a physical significance and is independent of energy and off-axis distance. The second, g, shows a small variation with the energy and OAD while the third parameter, the primary-to-scatter ratio, is strongly dependent on energy and off-axis distance. Comparison of Sh, predicted by the model, to measurement for a large range of symmetric and asymmetric fields showed excellent agreement. A maximum of 0.7% discrepancy was observed at 12 cm OAD.

  13. Polarization Dependent Switching of Asymmetric Nanorings with a Circular field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Nihar; Tuominen, Mark; Aidala, Katherine

    2012-02-01

    We present experimental switching from the onion to vortex states in asymmetric cobalt nanorings in an applied circular field. We initialize the onion state in two polarizations, along the symmetric or asymmetric axes. We apply a circular field by passing current through a solid metal AFM tip positioned at the center of the ring [1]. The asymmetry of the ring leads to different switching fields depending on the location of the domain walls (DWs) and direction of applied field. For polarization along the asymmetric axis, the field required to move the DWs to the narrow side of the ring is smaller than moving the DWs to the larger side of the ring. The direction of the DW motion is controlled by the circular field. When polarizing the ring along the symmetric axis, establishing one DW in the narrow side and one on the wide side, the field required to switch to the vortex state is an intermediate value. We will be presenting detail of the switching field of cobalt nanoring by circular field with two different direction of polarization. (1) T. Yang, N. R. Pradhan, A. Goldman, A. Licht, Y. Li, M. T. Tuominen and K. E. Aidala, Applied Physics Letter, 98, 242505, (2011)

  14. Asymmetric ion transport through ion-channel-mimetic solid-state nanopores.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Tian, Ye; Jiang, Lei

    2013-12-17

    Both scientists and engineers are interested in the design and fabrication of synthetic nanofluidic architectures that mimic the gating functions of biological ion channels. The effort to build such structures requires interdisciplinary efforts at the intersection of chemistry, materials science, and nanotechnology. Biological ion channels and synthetic nanofluidic devices have some structural and chemical similarities, and therefore, they share some common features in regulating the traverse ionic flow. In the past decade, researchers have identified two asymmetric ion transport phenomena in synthetic nanofluidic structures, the rectified ionic current and the net diffusion current. The rectified ionic current is a diode-like current-voltage response that occurs when switching the voltage bias. This phenomenon indicates a preferential direction of transport in the nanofluidic system. The net diffusion current occurs as a direct product of charge selectivity and is generated from the asymmetric diffusion through charged nanofluidic channels. These new ion transport phenomena and the elaborate structures that occur in biology have inspired us to build functional nanofluidic devices for both fundamental research and practical applications. In this Account, we review our recent progress in the design and fabrication of biomimetic solid-state nanofluidic devices with asymmetric ion transport behavior. We demonstrate the origin of the rectified ionic current and the net diffusion current. We also identify several influential factors and discuss how to build these asymmetric features into nanofluidic systems by controlling (1) nanopore geometry, (2) surface charge distribution, (3) chemical composition, (4) channel wall wettability, (5) environmental pH, (6) electrolyte concentration gradient, and (7) ion mobility. In the case of the first four features, we build these asymmetric features directly into the nanofluidic structures. With the final three, we construct

  15. Asymmetric explosion of clusters in intense laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kundu, M.

    2012-08-15

    We examine asymmetric expansion of argon clusters illuminated by 800 nm laser pulses of duration Almost-Equal-To 23fs, using three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. For this short pulse duration, laser energy absorption by cluster electrons is dominated by the nonlinear resonance (NLR) absorption process [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 123401 (2006)]. In this work, we concentrate, particularly, on the ionic outcome in the NLR regime and show that higher charge states of argon ions are produced along the laser polarization than in the transverse directions leading to the anisotropy (asymmetry) in the ion energy distribution. This anisotropy already established during the short pulse duration (or in the early duration of a long pulse) may contribute to the anisotropic ion emission reported in cluster experiments with pulse duration longer than 100 fs. Our PIC results are compared with a charged-sphere model showing that cluster explosion is mainly due to Coulomb repulsion between the cluster ions.

  16. Dipolophoresis of dielectric spheroids under asymmetric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankel, Itzchak; Yossifon, Gilad; Miloh, Touvia

    2012-01-01

    Non-spherical particles are common in colloidal science. Spheroidal shapes are particularly convenient for the analysis of the pertinent electrostatic and hydrodynamic problems and are thus widely used to model the manipulation of biological cells as well as deformed drops and bubbles. We study the rotary motion of a dielectric spheroidal micro-particle which is freely suspended in an unbounded electrolyte solution in the presence of a uniform applied electric field, assuming a thin Debye layer. For the common case of a uniform distribution of the native surface-charge density, the rotary motion of the particle is generated by the contributions of the induced-charge electro-osmotic (ICEO) slip and the dielectrophoresis associated with the distribution of the Maxwell stress, respectively. Series solutions are obtained by using spheroidal (prolate or oblate) coordinates. Explicit results are presented for the angular velocity of particles spanning the entire spectrum from rod-like to disk-like shapes. These results demonstrate the non-monotonic variation of the angular speed with the eccentricity of particle shape and the singularity of the multiple limits corresponding to conducting (ideally polarizable) particles of extreme eccentricity (e ≈ 1). The non-monotonic variation of the angular speed with the particle dielectric permittivity is related to the induced-charge contribution. We apply these results to describe the motion of particles subject to a uniform field rotating in the plane. For a sufficiently slow rotation rate, prolate particles eventually become "locked" to the external field with their stationary relative orientation in the plane of rotation being determined by the particle eccentricity and dielectric constant. This effect may be of potential use in the manipulation of poly-disperse suspensions of dielectric non-spherical particles. Oblate spheroids invariably approach a uniform orientation with their symmetry axes directed normal to the external-field

  17. Feasibility of Higher-Order Differential Ion Mobility Separations Using New Asymmetric Waveforms

    PubMed Central

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Mashkevich, Stefan V.; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    Technologies for separating and characterizing ions based on their transport properties in gases have been around for three decades. The early method of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) distinguished ions by absolute mobility that depends on the collision cross section with buffer gas atoms. The more recent technique of field asymmetric waveform IMS (FAIMS) measures the difference between mobilities at high and low electric fields. Coupling IMS and FAIMS to soft ionization sources and mass spectrometry (MS) has greatly expanded their utility, enabling new applications in biomedical and nanomaterials research. Here, we show that time-dependent electric fields comprising more than two intensity levels could, in principle, effect an infinite number of distinct differential separations based on the higher-order terms of expression for ion mobility. These analyses could employ the hardware and operational procedures similar to those utilized in FAIMS. Methods up to the 4th or 5th order (where conventional IMS is 1st order and FAIMS is 2nd order) should be practical at field intensities accessible in ambient air, with still higher orders potentially achievable in insulating gases. Available experimental data suggest that higher-order separations should be largely orthogonal to each other and to FAIMS, IMS, and MS. PMID:16494377

  18. Digital field ion microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sijbrandij, S.J.; Russell, K.F.; Miller, M.K.; Thomson, R.C.

    1998-01-01

    Due to environmental concerns, there is a trend to avoid the use of chemicals needed to develop negatives and to process photographic paper, and to use digital technologies instead. Digital technology also offers the advantages that it is convenient, as it enables quick access to the end result, allows image storage and processing on computer, allows rapid hard copy output, and simplifies electronic publishing. Recently significant improvements have been made to the performance and cost of camera-sensors and printers. In this paper, field ion images recorded with two digital cameras of different resolution are compared to images recorded on standard 35 mm negative film. It should be noted that field ion images exhibit low light intensity and high contrast. Field ion images were recorded from a standard microchannel plate and a phosphor screen and had acceptance angles of {approximately} 60{degree}. Digital recordings were made with a Digital Vision Technologies (DVT) MICAM VHR1000 camera with a resolution of 752 x 582 pixels, and a Kodak DCS 460 digital camera with a resolution of 3,060 x 2,036 pixels. Film based recordings were made with Kodak T-MAX film rated at 400 ASA. The resolving power of T-MAX film, as specified by Kodak, is between 50 and 125 lines per mm, which corresponds to between 1,778 x 1,181 and 4,445 x 2,953 pixels, i.e. similar to that from the DCS 460 camera. The intensities of the images were sufficient to be recorded with standard fl:1.2 lenses with exposure times of less than 2 s. Many digital cameras were excluded from these experiments due to their lack of sensitivity or the inability to record a full frame image due to the fixed working distance defined by the vacuum system. The digital images were output on a Kodak Digital Science 8650 PS dye sublimation color printer (300 dpi). All field ion micrographs presented were obtained from a Ni-Al-Be specimen.

  19. Electro-responsive asymmetric nanopores in polyimide with stable ion-current signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siwy, Z.; Dobrev, D.; Neumann, R.; Trautmann, C.; Voss, K.

    For the preparation of a single asymmetrically shaped nanopore in a polyimide membrane, Kapton foils were irradiated with single heavy ions and subsequently etched from one side in sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). The other side of the membrane was protected from etching by a stopping medium containing a reducing agent for hypochlorite ions (OCl-). The resulting conical nanopore rectified ion current and exhibited a stable ion-current flow.

  20. Asymmetric field-aligned currents in the conjugate hemispheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reistad, J. P.; Ostgaard, N.; Oksavik, K.; Laundal, K. M.

    2012-12-01

    Earlier studies using simultaneous imaging from space of the Aurora Borealis (Northern Hemisphere) and Aurora Australis (Southern Hemisphere) have revealed that the aurora can experience a high degree of asymmetry between the two hemispheres. Using 19 hours of simultaneous global imaging from both hemispheres (IMAGE satellite in north and Polar satellite in south) in conjunction with the entire IMAGE WIC database, we investigate the importance of various mechanisms thought to generate the asymmetries seen in global imaging. In terms of asymmetric or interhemispheric field-aligned currents, three candidate mechanisms have been suggested: 1) Hemispheric differences in solar wind dynamo efficiency mainly controlled by IMF Bx leading to asymmetric region 1 currents; 2) conductivity differences in conjugate areas; and 3) penetration of IMF By into the closed magnetosphere possibly generating a pair of oppositely directed interhemispheric currents. From the 19 hour conjugate dataset we find that the solar wind dynamo is likely to be the most important controlling mechanism for asymmetric bright aurora in the polar part of the nightside oval. Here we present statistical analyses of candidates 1) and 3). Using the entire IMAGE WIC database, a statistical analysis of the auroral brightness distribution along and across the Northern Hemisphere oval is carried out. For each candidate, two extreme cases (+/- IMF Bx for 1) and +/- IMF By for 3)) are compared during times non-favorable for the other two mechanisms. Our results indicate that solar wind dynamo induced currents play an important role for the nightside auroral brightness in an average sense. Also, signatures of interhemispheric currents due to IMF By penetration are seen in our statistics, although this effect is somehow weaker.

  1. Asymmetric line shapes for medium energy H and He ions undergoing a large-angle collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazama, M.; Kitsudo, Y.; Nishimura, T.; Hoshino, Y.; Grande, P. L.; Schiwietz, G.; Kido, Y.

    2008-11-01

    Asymmetric line shapes for medium energy H and He ions backscattered from topmost adatoms such as Si(111)-3×3-Sb and Ni(111)-2×2-O are measured by a toroidal electrostatic analyzer with an excellent energy resolution. The spectra exhibit a pronounced asymmetric nature and are well fitted by an exponentially modified Gaussian profile. It is found that the nonperturbative coupled-channel calculations reproduce well the observed asymmetric line shapes for He+ impact on different materials, although slightly overestimate the asymmetry for H+ impact on Au. On the other hand, the CASP 3.2 program (involving additional approximations) gives large underestimates for He ions and overestimates for H ions. This problem has been partially solved by modifying the order of the implementation of the shell corrections and higher-order effects in the CASP model.

  2. Asymmetric Reconnection With a Guide Field: the Saga Continues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesse, M.; Aunai, N.; Liu, Y. H.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Birn, J.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection at the Earth's magnetopause facilitates the transfer of mass, energy, and momentum from the solar wind into the Earth's magnetosphere. Owing to the variability of the solar wind plasma and magnetic field, the reconnection process typically involves different conditions on both inflow sides, but occasionally more symmetric conditions are encountered as well. Based on prior research we now know that the structure of the reconnection diffusion region depends substantially on the symmetry (or lack thereof) of the inflowing plasmas and magnetic fields. It is therefore of considerable interest to investigate the transition of one scenario to the other - in particular for the purpose of understanding the role of plasma mixing, heating, and of features such as pressure nongyrotropies. This presentation will involve recent theory and modeling results pertaining to these topics, and it will illuminate the means by which these kinetic processes play a role in determining the reconnection rate. Specific emphasis will be on the structure of the reconnection region, when both inflow regions are asymmetric and reconnection occurs at shear angles other than 180 degrees.

  3. Concentrating membrane proteins using asymmetric traps and AC electric fields.

    PubMed

    Cheetham, Matthew R; Bramble, Jonathan P; McMillan, Duncan G G; Krzeminski, Lukasz; Han, Xiaojun; Johnson, Benjamin R G; Bushby, Richard J; Olmsted, Peter D; Jeuken, Lars J C; Marritt, Sophie J; Butt, Julea N; Evans, Stephen D

    2011-05-01

    Membrane proteins are key components of the plasma membrane and are responsible for control of chemical ionic gradients, metabolite and nutrient transfer, and signal transduction between the interior of cells and the external environment. Of the genes in the human genome, 30% code for membrane proteins (Krogh et al. J. Mol. Biol.2001, 305, 567). Furthermore, many FDA-approved drugs target such proteins (Overington et al. Nat. Rev. Drug Discovery 2006, 5, 993). However, the structure-function relationships of these are notably sparse because of difficulties in their purification and handling outside of their membranous environment. Methods that permit the manipulation of membrane components while they are still in the membrane would find widespread application in separation, purification, and eventual structure-function determination of these species (Poo et al. Nature 1977, 265, 602). Here we show that asymmetrically patterned supported lipid bilayers in combination with AC electric fields can lead to efficient manipulation of charged components. We demonstrate the concentration and trapping of such components through the use of a "nested trap" and show that this method is capable of yielding an approximately 30-fold increase in the average protein concentration. Upon removal of the field, the material remains trapped for several hours as a result of topographically restricted diffusion. Our results indicate that this method can be used for concentrating and trapping charged membrane components while they are still within their membranous environment. We anticipate that our approach could find widespread application in the manipulation and study of membrane proteins. PMID:21476549

  4. Ion track symmetric and asymmetric nanopores in polyethylene terephthalate foils for versatile applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apel, P. Yu.; Blonskaya, I. V.; Dmitriev, S. N.; Orelovich, O. L.; Sartowska, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this report we present several fabrication methods which allow production of ion track nanopore membranes with different pore configurations. Polymer foils, typically polyethylene terephthalate with a thickness of 5-23 μm, are irradiated with accelerated heavy ions (energy of 1-10 MeV/u) and then subjected to different physico-chemical treatments. Depending on the procedure, symmetric or asymmetric pores with nanoscale-sized narrowing are obtained. The asymmetric configurations include conical, funnel-like and bullet-like shapes. In electrolyte solutions the asymmetric nanopores exhibit diode-like properties which strongly depend on the pore shape. The peculiar features of such pores provide a basis for various applications.

  5. Counter-Ions Between or at Asymmetrically Charged Walls: 2D Free-Fermion Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šamaj, Ladislav; Trizac, Emmanuel

    2014-09-01

    This work contributes to the problem of determining effective interaction between asymmetrically (likely or oppositely) charged objects whose total charge is neutralized by mobile pointlike counter-ions of the same charge, the whole system being in thermal equilibrium. The problem is formulated in two spatial dimensions with logarithmic Coulomb interactions. The charged objects correspond to two parallel lines at distance , with fixed line charge densities. Two versions of the model are considered: the standard "unconstrained" one with particles moving freely between the lines and the "constrained" one with particles confined to the lines. We solve exactly both systems at the free-fermion coupling and compare the results for the pressure (i.e. the force between the lines per unit length of one of the lines) with the mean-field Poisson-Boltzmann solution. For the unconstrained model, the large- asymptotic behaviour of the free-fermion pressure differs from that predicted by the mean-field theory. For the constrained model, the asymptotic pressure coincides with the attractive van der Waals-Casimir fluctuational force. For both models, there are fundamental differences between the cases of likely-charged and oppositely-charged lines, the latter case corresponding at large distances to a capacitor.

  6. An analytical method to calculate equivalent fields to irregular symmetric and asymmetric photon fields

    SciTech Connect

    Tahmasebi Birgani, Mohamad J.; Chegeni, Nahid; Zabihzadeh, Mansoor; Hamzian, Nima

    2014-04-01

    Equivalent field is frequently used for central axis depth-dose calculations of rectangular- and irregular-shaped photon beams. As most of the proposed models to calculate the equivalent square field are dosimetry based, a simple physical-based method to calculate the equivalent square field size was used as the basis of this study. The table of the sides of the equivalent square or rectangular fields was constructed and then compared with the well-known tables by BJR and Venselaar, et al. with the average relative error percentage of 2.5 ± 2.5% and 1.5 ± 1.5%, respectively. To evaluate the accuracy of this method, the percentage depth doses (PDDs) were measured for some special irregular symmetric and asymmetric treatment fields and their equivalent squares for Siemens Primus Plus linear accelerator for both energies, 6 and 18 MV. The mean relative differences of PDDs measurement for these fields and their equivalent square was approximately 1% or less. As a result, this method can be employed to calculate equivalent field not only for rectangular fields but also for any irregular symmetric or asymmetric field.

  7. Asymmetric dynamics of ion channel forming proteins - Hepatitis C virus (HCV) p7 bundles.

    PubMed

    Kalita, Monoj Mon; Fischer, Wolfgang B

    2016-07-01

    Protein p7 of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a short 63 amino acid membrane protein which homo-oligomerises in the lipid membrane to form ion and proton conducting bundles. Two different genotypes (GTs) of p7, 1a and 5a, are used to simulate hexameric bundles of the protein embedded in a fully hydrated lipid bilayer during 400ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Whilst the bundle of GT 1a is based on a fully computational derived structure, the bundle of GT 5a is based on NMR spectroscopic data. Results of a full correlation analysis (FCA) reveal that albeit structural differences both bundles screen local minima during the simulation. The collective motion of the protein domains is asymmetric. No 'breathing-mode'-like dynamics is observed. The presence of divalent ions, such as Ca-ions affects the dynamics of especially solvent exposed parts of the protein, but leaves the asymmetric domain motion unaffected. PMID:27079148

  8. New method of asymmetric flow field measurement in hypersonic shock tunnel.

    PubMed

    Yan, D P; He, A Z; Ni, X W

    1991-03-01

    In this paper a method of large aperture (?500 mm) high sensitivity moire deflectometry is used to obtain multidirectional deflectograms of the asymmetric flow field in hypersonic (M = 10.29) shock tunnel. At the same time, a 3-D reconstructive method of the asymmetric flow field is presented which is based on the integration of the moire deflective angle and the double-cubic many-knot interpolating splines; it is used to calculate the 3-D density distribution of the asymmetric flow field. PMID:20582058

  9. Asymmetric Functional Conversion of Eubacterial Light-driven Ion Pumps.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Keiichi; Nomura, Yurika; Kandori, Hideki

    2016-05-01

    In addition to the well-known light-driven outward proton pumps, novel ion-pumping rhodopsins functioning as outward Na(+) and inward Cl(-) pumps have been recently found in eubacteria. They convert light energy into transmembrane electrochemical potential difference, similar to the prototypical archaeal H(+) pump bacteriorhodopsin (BR) and Cl(-) pump halorhodopsin (HR). The H(+), Na(+), and Cl(-) pumps possess the conserved respective DTE, NDQ, and NTQ motifs in the helix C, which likely serve as their functional determinants. To verify this hypothesis, we attempted functional interconversion between selected pumps from each category by mutagenesis. Introduction of the proton-pumping motif resulted in successful Na(+) → H(+) functional conversion. Introduction of the respective characteristic motifs with several additional mutations leads to successful Na(+) → Cl(-) and Cl(-) → H(+) functional conversions, whereas remaining conversions (H(+) → Na(+), H(+) → Cl(-), Cl(-) → Na(+)) were unsuccessful when mutagenesis of 4-6 residues was used. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that a H(+) pump is the common ancestor of all of these rhodopsins, from which Cl(-) pumps emerged followed by Na(+) pumps. We propose that successful functional conversions of these ion pumps are achieved exclusively when mutagenesis reverses the evolutionary amino acid sequence changes. Dependence of the observed functional conversions on the direction of evolution strongly suggests that the essential structural mechanism of an ancestral function is retained even after the gain of a new function during natural evolution, which can be evoked by a few mutations. By contrast, the gain of a new function needs accumulation of multiple mutations, which may not be easily reproduced by limited mutagenesis in vitro. PMID:26929409

  10. Ion size effects on the osmotic pressure and electrocapillarity in a nanoslit: Symmetric and asymmetric ion sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajni; Oh, J. M.; Kang, I. S.

    2016-06-01

    We analyze the effect of asymmetric finite ion size in nanoconfinement in the view of osmotic pressure and electrocapillarity. When the confinement width becomes comparable with the Debye length, the overlapped electric double layer is significantly deformed by the steric effects. We derive the osmotic pressure from the modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation in a nanoslit to examine the deviation from the ideal osmotic pressure and the repulsive force on the wall considering the asymmetry of ion sizes. Then the electrocapillarity due to the steric effect is investigated under constant potential condition with the flat interface assumption. Later, the deformation by the electrocapillarity is also considered in the first order approximation.

  11. Ion size effects on the osmotic pressure and electrocapillarity in a nanoslit: Symmetric and asymmetric ion sizes.

    PubMed

    Rajni; Oh, J M; Kang, I S

    2016-06-01

    We analyze the effect of asymmetric finite ion size in nanoconfinement in the view of osmotic pressure and electrocapillarity. When the confinement width becomes comparable with the Debye length, the overlapped electric double layer is significantly deformed by the steric effects. We derive the osmotic pressure from the modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation in a nanoslit to examine the deviation from the ideal osmotic pressure and the repulsive force on the wall considering the asymmetry of ion sizes. Then the electrocapillarity due to the steric effect is investigated under constant potential condition with the flat interface assumption. Later, the deformation by the electrocapillarity is also considered in the first order approximation. PMID:27415363

  12. Generation of circularly polarized attosecond pulses by intense ultrashort laser pulses from extended asymmetric molecular ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Kai-Jun; Bandrauk, André D.

    2011-08-01

    We present a method for generation of single circularly polarized attosecond pulses in extended asymmetric HHe2+ molecular ions. By employing an intense ultrashort circularly polarized laser pulse with intensity 4.0×1014 W/cm2, wavelength 400 nm, and duration 10 optical cycles, molecular high-order-harmonic generation (MHOHG) spectra with multiple plateaus exhibit characters of circular polarization. Using a classical laser-induced collision model, double collisions of continuum electrons first with neighboring ions and then second with parent ions are presented at a particular internuclear distance and confirmed from numerical solutions of a time-dependent Schrödinger equation. We analyze the MHOHG spectra with a Gabor time window and find that, due to the asymmetry of HHe2+, a single collision trajectory of continuum electrons with ions can produce circularly polarized harmonics, leading to single circularly polarized attosecond pulses for specific internuclear distances.

  13. Generation of circularly polarized attosecond pulses by intense ultrashort laser pulses from extended asymmetric molecular ions

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Kai-Jun; Bandrauk, Andre D.

    2011-08-15

    We present a method for generation of single circularly polarized attosecond pulses in extended asymmetric HHe{sup 2+} molecular ions. By employing an intense ultrashort circularly polarized laser pulse with intensity 4.0x10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}, wavelength 400 nm, and duration 10 optical cycles, molecular high-order-harmonic generation (MHOHG) spectra with multiple plateaus exhibit characters of circular polarization. Using a classical laser-induced collision model, double collisions of continuum electrons first with neighboring ions and then second with parent ions are presented at a particular internuclear distance and confirmed from numerical solutions of a time-dependent Schroedinger equation. We analyze the MHOHG spectra with a Gabor time window and find that, due to the asymmetry of HHe{sup 2+}, a single collision trajectory of continuum electrons with ions can produce circularly polarized harmonics, leading to single circularly polarized attosecond pulses for specific internuclear distances.

  14. Detection, identification, and occurrence of thiotetronic acids in drinking water from underground sources by electrospray ionization-high field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry-quadrupole time-of-flight-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lyczko, Jadwiga; Beach, Daniel; Gabryelski, Wojciech

    2015-10-01

    This paper demonstrates that electrospray ionization (ESI) with differential ion mobility spectroscopy (FAIMS) and "soft" mass spectrometry (MS) provide unique analytical capabilities that led to the discovery of sulfur-containing polar congeners of thiotetronic acid (TA) in drinking water from underground sources in Canada and the United States. Polar TAs accumulate in underground aquifers and appear to be the most abundant class of organic compounds in bottled water but cannot be detected by conventional mass spectrometry methods. We show that normally stable TAs are converted into very reactive ions in ESI which have to be analyzed using special conditions in ESI-FAIMS-MS to avoid extensive dissociation and ion/molecule reactions. De novo identification of 10 TAs was accomplished by the comparative tandem mass spectrometry analysis of authentic TA derivatives from groundwater samples and synthetic TA analogues prepared for this study. We present highlights of gas phase ion chemistry of polar TAs to explain their unique properties and reactivity. TA derivatives were originally isolated from soil bacteria and are of interest in the pharmaceutical industry due to their potent activity against a broad spectrum of pathogenic bacteria and negligible toxicity to mammals. We suspect that TAs are natural disinfection agents protecting groundwater from bacterial contamination, but these compound undergo modifications or decompose during an ozonation water treatment. PMID:26340067

  15. Improving the field-effect performance of Bi2S3 single nanowires by an asymmetric device fabrication.

    PubMed

    Lu, Fangyuan; Li, Renxiong; Li, Yan; Huo, Nengjie; Yang, Juehan; Li, Yongtao; Li, Bo; Yang, Shengxue; Wei, Zhongming; Li, Jingbo

    2015-01-12

    High-quality Bi2 S3 nanowires are synthesized by chemical vapor deposition and their intrinsic photoresponsive and field-effect characteristics are explored in detail. Among the studied Au-Au, Ag-Ag, and Au-Ag electrode pairs, the device with stepwise band alignment of asymmetric Au-Ag electrodes has the highest mobility. Furthermore, it is shown that light can cause a sevenfold decrease of the on/off ratio. This can be explained by the photoexcited charge carriers that are more beneficial to the increase of Ioff than Ion . The photoresponsive properties of the asymmetric Au-Ag electrode devices were also explored, and the results show a photoconductive gain of seven with a rise time of 2.9 s and a decay time of 1.6 s. PMID:25294685

  16. Implosion and explosion of electrostatic cylindrical and spherical shocks in asymmetric pair-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Masood, W.; Rizvi, H.

    2011-04-15

    Nonlinear electrostatic shock waves are studied in unmagnetized, dissipative pair-ion plasmas. The dissipation in the system is taken into account by considering the effect of kinematic viscosity of both positive and negative ions in plasmas. The system of fluid equations for asymmetric pair-ion plasma is reduced to Korteweg-deVries-Burgers equation in the limit of small amplitude perturbation. It is observed that the system under consideration admits rarefactive shocks. Keeping in view the practical applications, the nonlinear propagation of both the exploding and imploding shocks is investigated and the differences are expounded in detail. The present study may have relevance in the study of the formation of electrostatic shocks in laser-induced implosion devices, star formation, supernovae explosion, etc.

  17. Constraints on the asymmetric equation of state from heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yennello, Sherry; McIntosh, Alan; Heilborn, Lauren

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear matter is one of the most fascinating materials that exists.Therefore elucidating the equation-of-state of nuclear matter is a fundamentally interesting question. Additionally, the nuclear equationof-state has impacts on astrophysical observables. One important means of constraining the nuclear equation-of-state is through studying heavy-ion collisions. Nuclear material has two components - neutrons and protons - the ratio of which impacts the equation-of-state. Measurements of fragments emitted from reactions of nuclei with different ratios of neutrons and protons - and comparison to simulations based on various underlying interactions - have placed constraints on both the symmetric and asymmetric parts of the equation of state.

  18. Using heavy-ion collisions to elucidate the asymmetric equation-of-state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yennello, Sherry; McIntosh, Alan

    2016-06-01

    The nuclear equation-of-state impacts a number of nuclear properties as well as astrophysical processes. The asymmetric term of the equation-of-state, which describes the behavior away from N=Z, has significant uncertainty. Giant resonances and nuclear masses can elucidate the asymmetry energy for cold normal-density nuclei. Heavy-ion collisions can be used to probe nuclear matter at higher temperatures and densities away from saturation density. The temperatures that are attained in these nuclear collisions are predicted to depend on the isospin asymmetry. In this work we present evidence of the asymmetry dependence of the nuclear caloric curve.

  19. Three-Dimensional Quantitative Optical Measurement of Asymmetrically Focused Ultrasound Pressure Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazaki, Yuta; Harigane, Soichiro; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2012-07-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is used for the treatment of tumors such as prostate cancer. In the development of this technique, an accurate and fast measurement of the HIFU pressure field is important. A hydrophone is generally used for the measurement, but it might disturb the pressure field and scanning it in the field takes a long time. On the other hand, optical ultrasonic field mapping has the advantages of speed and its nature of not by interfering with the acoustic field. In this study, we reconstructed an asymmetric ultrasound field by optical measurement using a computed tomography (CT) algorithm. The asymmetric field was generated by a focused transducer with four elements. Also, the absolute measurement of ultrasonic pressure was checked by measuring the center of the field of the charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. The results showed overall agreement with those of hydrophone measurement.

  20. Asymmetric error field interaction with rotating conducting walls

    SciTech Connect

    Paz-Soldan, C.; Brookhart, M. I.; Hegna, C. C.; Forest, C. B.

    2012-07-15

    The interaction of error fields with a system of differentially rotating conducting walls is studied analytically and compared to experimental data. Wall rotation causes eddy currents to persist indefinitely, attenuating and rotating the original error field. Superposition of error fields from external coils and plasma currents are found to break the symmetry in wall rotation direction. The vacuum and plasma eigenmodes are modified by wall rotation, with the error field penetration time decreased and the kink instability stabilized, respectively. Wall rotation is also predicted to reduce error field amplification by the marginally stable plasma.

  1. The Asymmetric Polar Field Reversal - Long Term Observations from WSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeksema, J. T.

    2012-12-01

    The Sun's polar field above 55 degrees in the northern hemisphere is reversing and the southern field may be beginning to weaken. This asymmetry is not unusual and is related to the poleward transport of flux that emerged in the active region bands earlier in the cycle. In the declining phase of Cycle 23 the poles were fairly equal, but the northern field began to decay in early 2009. Prior cycles have behaved differently, as observed by the Wilcox Solar Observatory and elsewhere.

  2. Interaction of toluene with two-color asymmetric laser fields: Controlling the directional emission of molecular hydrogen fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Kaziannis, S.; Kotsina, N.; Kosmidis, C.

    2014-09-14

    The interaction of toluene with strong asymmetric two-color laser irradiation of 40 fs duration is studied by means of Time of flight mass spectrometry. Highly energetic H{sub 2}{sup +} and H{sub 3}{sup +} fragment ions are produced through an isomerization process taking place within transient multiply charged parent ions. Comparative study of deuterium labeled toluene isotopes enables the discrimination between molecular hydrogen fragments formed exclusively within the CH{sub 3}- part from those that require hydrogen atom exchange between the former and the phenyl moiety. It is demonstrated that by manipulating the relative phase of the ω/2ω field components the selective ionization of oriented toluene molecules can be used as a tool to control the directional emission of the H{sub 2}{sup +}, H{sub 3}{sup +} species.

  3. Interaction of toluene with two-color asymmetric laser fields: Controlling the directional emission of molecular hydrogen fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaziannis, S.; Kotsina, N.; Kosmidis, C.

    2014-09-01

    The interaction of toluene with strong asymmetric two-color laser irradiation of 40 fs duration is studied by means of Time of flight mass spectrometry. Highly energetic H2+ and H3+ fragment ions are produced through an isomerization process taking place within transient multiply charged parent ions. Comparative study of deuterium labeled toluene isotopes enables the discrimination between molecular hydrogen fragments formed exclusively within the CH3- part from those that require hydrogen atom exchange between the former and the phenyl moiety. It is demonstrated that by manipulating the relative phase of the ω/2ω field components the selective ionization of oriented toluene molecules can be used as a tool to control the directional emission of the H2+, H3+ species.

  4. Interaction of toluene with two-color asymmetric laser fields: controlling the directional emission of molecular hydrogen fragments.

    PubMed

    Kaziannis, S; Kotsina, N; Kosmidis, C

    2014-09-14

    The interaction of toluene with strong asymmetric two-color laser irradiation of 40 fs duration is studied by means of Time of flight mass spectrometry. Highly energetic H2(+) and H3(+) fragment ions are produced through an isomerization process taking place within transient multiply charged parent ions. Comparative study of deuterium labeled toluene isotopes enables the discrimination between molecular hydrogen fragments formed exclusively within the CH3- part from those that require hydrogen atom exchange between the former and the phenyl moiety. It is demonstrated that by manipulating the relative phase of the ω/2ω field components the selective ionization of oriented toluene molecules can be used as a tool to control the directional emission of the H2(+), H3(+) species. PMID:25217928

  5. Digital Holographic setup for Measurement of Asymmetric Temperature Field and Tomographic Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doleček, R.; Kopecký, V.; Psota, P.; Lédl, V.

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a digital holographic multidirectional interferometric method for measurement of periodic asymmetric temperature fields. This method uses a modified Twymann-Green setup having double sensitivity. The setup employs one precisely synchronized and triggered CCD camera with a measured coherent phenomenon. That allows a large number of the phenomenon's different projections capturing which are used for 3D tomographic reconstruction..

  6. Ion flux's pressure dependence in an asymmetric capacitively coupled rf discharge in NF3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateev, Emil; Zhelyazkov, Ivan

    2004-03-01

    Starting from an analytical macroscopic/phenomenological model yielding the self-bias voltage as a function of the absorbed radio-frequency (rf) power of an asymmetric capacitively coupled discharge in NF3 this paper studies the dependence of the ion flux onto the powered electrode on the gas pressure. An essential feature of the model is the assumption that the ions' drift velocity in the sheath near the powered electrode is proportional to E α, where E=-ΔU (U being the self-bias potential), and α is a coefficient depending on the gas pressure and cross section of elastic ion-neutral collisions. The model also considers the role of γ-electrons, stochastic heating as well as the contribution of the active electron current to the global discharge power balance. Numerically solving the model's basic equations one can extract the magnitude of the ion flux (at three different gas pressures) in a technological etching device (Alcatel GIR 220) by using easily measurable quantities, notably the self-bias voltage and absorbed rf power.

  7. Adapting military field water supplies to the asymmetric battlefield.

    PubMed

    Lundquist, Arthur H; White, George H; Bonilla, Alejandro; Richards, Todd E; Richards, Stephen C

    2011-01-01

    Army transformation to a brigade-centric force has created a distributed battlefield, challenging the surveillance and logistical supply of field water. The daily requirement of up to 15 gal of potable water per person per day from bulk water supplies has been achievable for many years using currently fielded ROWPUs. However, the need to reduce the transport of water and move towards a sustainable force has created a gap in materiel capable of producing safe water at the individual and unit level. While materiel development is slow, the PM community, tasked with doctrine development and battlefield oversight of field water, is beginning to address the requirements of field water on the changed battlefield. In addition to materiel gaps, the transformed battlefield has created a lack of trained personnel for water production and oversight. Without trained operators and PM oversight, to what level of health risk are consumers of this water exposing themselves? Currently PM is unable to answer this question but is working diligently with the RDT&E community to develop materiel solutions, and with the medical community to provide interim guidance to reduce the potential health risks to using such equipment. PMID:21805456

  8. Design of vortex fluid amplifiers with asymmetrical flow fields.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawley, T. J.; Price, D. C.

    1972-01-01

    Variation of geometric parameters, including supply area, control area, chamber length, and outlet diameter, of a large scale, modular design vortex fluid amplifier with single supply and control jets, has confirmed and extended a previously published design method, developed for vortex amplifiers with symmetric flow fields. This allows application of the method to devices which are more representative of practical, production type components.

  9. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    SciTech Connect

    Kanesue, Takeshi Okamura, Masahiro; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Kotaro

    2014-11-10

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. The laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 μs which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 × 10{sup 11}, which was provided by a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator.

  10. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    SciTech Connect

    Kanesue, Takeshi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Kotaro; Okamura, Masahiro

    2014-11-12

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. In this study, the laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 μs which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 × 1011, which was provided by a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator.

  11. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kanesue, Takeshi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Kotaro; Okamura, Masahiro

    2014-11-12

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. In this study, the laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 μs which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 × 1011, whichmore » was provided by a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator.« less

  12. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanesue, Takeshi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Kotaro; Okamura, Masahiro

    2014-11-01

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. The laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 μs which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 × 1011, which was provided by a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator.

  13. Self-assembled asymmetric membrane containing micron-size germanium for high capacity lithium ion batteries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Byrd, Ian; Chen, Hao; Webber, Theron; Li, Jianlin; Wu, Ji

    2015-10-23

    We report the formation of novel asymmetric membrane electrode containing micron-size (~5 μm) germanium powders through a self-assembly phase inversion method for high capacity lithium ion battery anode. 850 mA h g-1 capacity (70%) can be retained at a current density of 600 mA g-1 after 100 cycles with excellent rate performance. Such a high retention rate has rarely been seen for pristine micron-size germanium anodes. Moreover, scanning electron microscope studies reveal that germanium powders are uniformly embedded in a networking porous structure consisting of both nanopores and macropores. It is believed that such a unique porous structure can efficientlymore » accommodate the ~260% volume change during germanium alloying and de-alloying process, resulting in an enhanced cycling performance. Finally, these porous membrane electrodes can be manufactured in large scale using a roll-to-roll processing method.« less

  14. Self-assembled asymmetric membrane containing micron-size germanium for high capacity lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, Ian; Chen, Hao; Webber, Theron; Li, Jianlin; Wu, Ji

    2015-10-23

    We report the formation of novel asymmetric membrane electrode containing micron-size (~5 μm) germanium powders through a self-assembly phase inversion method for high capacity lithium ion battery anode. 850 mA h g-1 capacity (70%) can be retained at a current density of 600 mA g-1 after 100 cycles with excellent rate performance. Such a high retention rate has rarely been seen for pristine micron-size germanium anodes. Moreover, scanning electron microscope studies reveal that germanium powders are uniformly embedded in a networking porous structure consisting of both nanopores and macropores. It is believed that such a unique porous structure can efficiently accommodate the ~260% volume change during germanium alloying and de-alloying process, resulting in an enhanced cycling performance. Finally, these porous membrane electrodes can be manufactured in large scale using a roll-to-roll processing method.

  15. Dynamics of a reconnection-driven runaway ion tail in a reversed field pinch plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J. K.; Kim, J.; Bonofiglo, P. J.; Capecchi, W.; Eilerman, S.; Nornberg, M. D.; Sarff, J. S.; Sears, S. H.

    2016-05-01

    While reconnection-driven ion heating is common in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas, the underlying mechanisms for converting magnetic to kinetic energy remain not fully understood. Reversed field pinch discharges are often characterized by rapid ion heating during impulsive reconnection, generating an ion distribution with an enhanced bulk temperature, mainly perpendicular to magnetic field. In the Madison Symmetric Torus, a subset of discharges with the strongest reconnection events develop a very anisotropic, high energy tail parallel to magnetic field in addition to bulk perpendicular heating, which produces a fusion neutron flux orders of magnitude higher than that expected from a Maxwellian distribution. Here, we demonstrate that two factors in addition to a perpendicular bulk heating mechanism must be considered to explain this distribution. First, ion runaway can occur in the strong parallel-to-B electric field induced by a rapid equilibrium change triggered by reconnection-based relaxation; this effect is particularly strong on perpendicularly heated ions which experience a reduced frictional drag relative to bulk ions. Second, the confinement of ions varies dramatically as a function of velocity. Whereas thermal ions are governed by stochastic diffusion along tearing-altered field lines (and radial diffusion increases with parallel speed), sufficiently energetic ions are well confined, only weakly affected by a stochastic magnetic field. High energy ions traveling mainly in the direction of toroidal plasma current are nearly classically confined, while counter-propagating ions experience an intermediate confinement, greater than that of thermal ions but significantly less than classical expectations. The details of ion confinement tend to reinforce the asymmetric drive of the parallel electric field, resulting in a very asymmetric, anisotropic distribution.

  16. Improvement of infrared near-field spectrum by asymmetric interferometer configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikemoto, Yuka; Okamura, Hidekazu; Moriwaki, Taro; Suto, Hitoshi; Kinoshita, Toyohiko

    2015-08-01

    Infrared synchrotron radiation (IR-SR) is a highly brilliant white light source. We are developing an infrared near-field spectroscopy system with an IR-SR light source. The near-field spectroscopy system previously reported comprised an atomic force microscope (AFM) and a commercial Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. In the present study, the configuration of the FTIR interferometer has been modified to an asymmetric one. In the asymmetric interferometer, one beam split by a beamsplitter is focused onto the tip of an AFM probe, and the other beam goes to a movable mirror. The scattered light from the probe and the light reflected by the movable mirror interfere with each other. The near-field signal is extracted by a modulation method with an AFM oscillation frequency. The signal-to-noise ratio has been improved 6-fold and the signal-to-background ratio is improved 8-fold compared with those observed in the previous system.

  17. Numerical simulation of mass injection for the formation of prominence magnetic field configurations. I - Asymmetric injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    An, Chang-Hyuk; Bao, J. J.; Wu, S. T.

    1988-01-01

    A two-dimensional ideal MHD numerical model is used to investigate chromospheric mass injection into an overlying coronal dipole magnetic field. Such injection is shown to produce magnetic field deformations conducive to the formation of active region prominences. The results support a model in which an absorptive strand is formed by chromospheric asymmetric mass injection into the overlying coronal magnetic field. A necessary condition for the accumulation of the strands is that the mass injection forms a Kippenhahn-Schluter-type (1957) field configuration.

  18. Assessing Adaptation with Asymmetric Climate Information: evidence from water bargaining field experiments in Northeast Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfaff, A.; Velez, M.; Taddei, R.; Broad, K.

    2011-12-01

    We assess how asymmetric climate information affects bargaining -- an adaptation institution. As often observed in the field, some actors lack information. This yields vulnerability, despite participation. We examine the loss for a participant from being uncertain about water quantity when bargaining with a fully informed participant in an ultimatum game in Northeast Brazil. When all are fully informed, our field populations in the capital city and an agricultural valley produce a typical 60-40 split between those initiating and responding in one-shot bargaining. With asymmetric information, when initiators know the water quantity is low they get 80%. Thus even within bargaining, i.e. given strong participation, better integrating climate science into water management via greater effort to communicate relevant information to all involved can help to avoid inequities that could arise despite all of the stakeholders being 'at the table', as may well occur within future water allocation along a large new canal in the case we study.

  19. Asymmetric catalytic formation of quaternary carbons by iminium ion trapping of radicals.

    PubMed

    Murphy, John J; Bastida, David; Paria, Suva; Fagnoni, Maurizio; Melchiorre, Paolo

    2016-04-14

    An important goal of modern organic chemistry is to develop new catalytic strategies for enantioselective carbon-carbon bond formation that can be used to generate quaternary stereogenic centres. Whereas considerable advances have been achieved by exploiting polar reactivity, radical transformations have been far less successful. This is despite the fact that open-shell intermediates are intrinsically primed for connecting structurally congested carbons, as their reactivity is only marginally affected by steric factors. Here we show how the combination of photoredox and asymmetric organic catalysis enables enantioselective radical conjugate additions to β,β-disubstituted cyclic enones to obtain quaternary carbon stereocentres with high fidelity. Critical to our success was the design of a chiral organic catalyst, containing a redox-active carbazole moiety, that drives the formation of iminium ions and the stereoselective trapping of photochemically generated carbon-centred radicals by means of an electron-relay mechanism. We demonstrate the generality of this organocatalytic radical-trapping strategy with two sets of open-shell intermediates, formed through unrelated light-triggered pathways from readily available substrates and photoredox catalysts--this method represents the application of iminium ion activation (a successful catalytic strategy for enantioselective polar chemistry) within the realm of radical reactivity. PMID:27075098

  20. Asymmetric catalytic formation of quaternary carbons by iminium ion trapping of radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, John J.; Bastida, David; Paria, Suva; Fagnoni, Maurizio; Melchiorre, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    An important goal of modern organic chemistry is to develop new catalytic strategies for enantioselective carbon–carbon bond formation that can be used to generate quaternary stereogenic centres. Whereas considerable advances have been achieved by exploiting polar reactivity, radical transformations have been far less successful. This is despite the fact that open-shell intermediates are intrinsically primed for connecting structurally congested carbons, as their reactivity is only marginally affected by steric factors. Here we show how the combination of photoredox and asymmetric organic catalysis enables enantioselective radical conjugate additions to β,β-disubstituted cyclic enones to obtain quaternary carbon stereocentres with high fidelity. Critical to our success was the design of a chiral organic catalyst, containing a redox-active carbazole moiety, that drives the formation of iminium ions and the stereoselective trapping of photochemically generated carbon-centred radicals by means of an electron-relay mechanism. We demonstrate the generality of this organocatalytic radical-trapping strategy with two sets of open-shell intermediates, formed through unrelated light-triggered pathways from readily available substrates and photoredox catalysts—this method represents the application of iminium ion activation (a successful catalytic strategy for enantioselective polar chemistry) within the realm of radical reactivity.

  1. Asymmetric kinetic equilibria: Generalization of the BAS model for rotating magnetic profile and non-zero electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorville, Nicolas; Belmont, Gérard; Aunai, Nicolas; Dargent, Jérémy; Rezeau, Laurence

    2015-09-01

    Finding kinetic equilibria for non-collisional/collisionless tangential current layers is a key issue as well for their theoretical modeling as for our understanding of the processes that disturb them, such as tearing or Kelvin Helmholtz instabilities. The famous Harris equilibrium [E. Harris, Il Nuovo Cimento Ser. 10 23, 115-121 (1962)] assumes drifting Maxwellian distributions for ions and electrons, with constant temperatures and flow velocities; these assumptions lead to symmetric layers surrounded by vacuum. This strongly particular kind of layer is not suited for the general case: asymmetric boundaries between two media with different plasmas and different magnetic fields. The standard method for constructing more general kinetic equilibria consists in using Jeans theorem, which says that any function depending only on the Hamiltonian constants of motion is a solution to the steady Vlasov equation [P. J. Channell, Phys. Fluids (1958-1988) 19, 1541 (1976); M. Roth et al., Space Sci. Rev. 76, 251-317 (1996); and F. Mottez, Phys. Plasmas 10, 1541-1545 (2003)]. The inverse implication is however not true: when using the motion invariants as variables instead of the velocity components, the general stationary particle distributions keep on depending explicitly of the position, in addition to the implicit dependence introduced by these invariants. The standard approach therefore strongly restricts the class of solutions to the problem and probably does not select the most physically reasonable. The BAS (Belmont-Aunai-Smets) model [G. Belmont et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 022108 (2012)] used for the first time the concept of particle accessibility to find new solutions: considering the case of a coplanar-antiparallel magnetic field configuration without electric field, asymmetric solutions could be found while the standard method can only lead to symmetric ones. These solutions were validated in a hybrid simulation [N. Aunai et al., Phys. Plasmas (1994-present) 20

  2. Asymmetric kinetic equilibria: Generalization of the BAS model for rotating magnetic profile and non-zero electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Dorville, Nicolas Belmont, Gérard; Aunai, Nicolas; Dargent, Jérémy; Rezeau, Laurence

    2015-09-15

    Finding kinetic equilibria for non-collisional/collisionless tangential current layers is a key issue as well for their theoretical modeling as for our understanding of the processes that disturb them, such as tearing or Kelvin Helmholtz instabilities. The famous Harris equilibrium [E. Harris, Il Nuovo Cimento Ser. 10 23, 115–121 (1962)] assumes drifting Maxwellian distributions for ions and electrons, with constant temperatures and flow velocities; these assumptions lead to symmetric layers surrounded by vacuum. This strongly particular kind of layer is not suited for the general case: asymmetric boundaries between two media with different plasmas and different magnetic fields. The standard method for constructing more general kinetic equilibria consists in using Jeans theorem, which says that any function depending only on the Hamiltonian constants of motion is a solution to the steady Vlasov equation [P. J. Channell, Phys. Fluids (1958–1988) 19, 1541 (1976); M. Roth et al., Space Sci. Rev. 76, 251–317 (1996); and F. Mottez, Phys. Plasmas 10, 1541–1545 (2003)]. The inverse implication is however not true: when using the motion invariants as variables instead of the velocity components, the general stationary particle distributions keep on depending explicitly of the position, in addition to the implicit dependence introduced by these invariants. The standard approach therefore strongly restricts the class of solutions to the problem and probably does not select the most physically reasonable. The BAS (Belmont-Aunai-Smets) model [G. Belmont et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 022108 (2012)] used for the first time the concept of particle accessibility to find new solutions: considering the case of a coplanar-antiparallel magnetic field configuration without electric field, asymmetric solutions could be found while the standard method can only lead to symmetric ones. These solutions were validated in a hybrid simulation [N. Aunai et al., Phys. Plasmas (1994-present

  3. Field-free molecular alignment of asymmetric top molecules using elliptically polarized laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouzée, A.; Guérin, S.; Faucher, O.; Lavorel, B.

    2008-04-01

    We show theoretically that a short specific elliptically polarized laser pulse driving an asymmetric top molecule can induce postpulse revivals of three-dimensional (3D) alignment. By choosing the field ellipticity resulting in the best compromise between the alignment of two molecular axes, we demonstrate that efficient 3D alignment can be achieved at low temperature. In the experiment, the field-free alignment of moderately cool ethylene molecules is probed by using a technique based on the optical Kerr effect. Control of 3D field-free alignment opens the door to a large range of applications in chemistry as well as in molecular optics.

  4. Determination of the functioning parameters in asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation with an exponential channel.

    PubMed

    Déjardin, P

    2013-08-30

    The flow conditions in normal mode asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation are determined to approach the high retention limit with the requirement d≪l≪w, where d is the particle diameter, l the characteristic length of the sample exponential distribution and w the channel height. The optimal entrance velocity is determined from the solute characteristics, the channel geometry (exponential to rectangular) and the membrane properties, according to a model providing the velocity fields all over the cell length. In addition, a method is proposed for in situ determination of the channel height. PMID:23885667

  5. Meeting in Florida: Using Asymmetric Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) to Determine C60 Colloidal Size Distributions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study of nanomaterials in environmental systems requires robust and specific analytical methods. Analytical methods which discriminate based on particle size and molecular composition are not widely available. Asymmetric Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) is a separation...

  6. Asymmetric inhibition of spicule formation in sea urchin embryos with low concentrations of gadolinium ion.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Motoshi; Kuroda, Ritsu; Muranaka, Yoshinori; Uto, Norihiko; Murai, Junko; Kuroda, Hideyo

    2010-12-01

    As gastrulation proceeds during sea urchin embryogenesis, primary mesenchyme cells (PMCs) fuse to form syncytial cables, within which calcium is deposited as CaCO₃, and a pair of spicules is formed. Earlier studies suggested that calcium, previously sequestered by primary mesenchyme cells, is secreted and incorporated into growing spicules. We examined the effects of gadolinium ion (Gd(3+)), a Ca(2+) channel blocker, on spicule formation. Gd(3+) did not lead to a retardation of embryogenesis prior to the initiation of gastrulation and did not inhibit the ingression of PMCs from the blastula wall or their migration along the inner blastocoel surface. However, when embryos were raised in seawater containing submicromolar to a few micromolar Gd(3+), of which levels are considered to be insufficient to block Ca(2+) channels, a pair of triradiate spicules was formed asymmetrically. At 1-3 μmol/L Gd(3+), many embryos formed only one spicule on either the left or right side, or embryos formed a very small second spicule. Induction of the spicule abnormality required the presence of Gd(3+) specifically during late blastula stage prior to spicule formation. An accumulation or adsorption of Gd(3+) was not detected anywhere in the embryos by X-ray microanalysis, which suggests that Ca(2+) channels were not inhibited. These results suggest that Gd(3+) exerts an inhibitory effect on spicule formation through a mechanism that does not involve inhibition of Ca(2+) channels. PMID:21158753

  7. Experimental implementation of a strong two-color asymmetric laser field in the mid-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaziannis, S.; Danakas, S.; Kotsina, N.; Kosmidis, C.

    2016-05-01

    We report the experimental implementation of a strong two-color (ω/2ω) asymmetric laser field in the mid-infrared regime (MIR) consisting of a fs pulse centered at 1400 nm and its second harmonic (700 nm). Control of the temporal delay between the two pulses with sub-cycle accuracy and, therefore, the two-color field phase is based on the use of a birefringent calcite plate. The experimental methodology is described in detail for the 1400/700 nm case, while its applicability is discussed for a broader wavelength range, nowadays accessible by optical parametric amplifiers. The validity of the proposed methodology is further supported by the application of the asymmetric 1400/700 nm field on the dissociative ionization of carbon monoxide, which is considered to be a benchmark target in the field of coherent control of strong laser‑matter interaction. It is demonstrated that efficient control on the directional emission of the CO ionic fragments is achieved by varying the relative phase of the 1400 and 700 nm field components.

  8. Temporally asymmetric laser pulse for magnetic-field generation in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Mamta; Gopal, Krishna; Gupta, Devki Nandan

    2016-04-01

    Of particular interest in this article, the case study of an asymmetric laser pulse interaction with a plasma for magnetic field enhancement has been investigated. The strong ponderomotive force due to the short leading edge of the propagating laser pulse drives a large nonlinear current, producing a stronger quasistatic magnetic field. An analytical expression for the magnetic field is derived and the strength of the magnetic field is estimated for the current laser-plasma parameters. The theoretical results are validated through the particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations and are in very close agreement with the simulation based estimations. This kind of magnetic field can be useful in the plasma based accelerators as well as in the laser-fusion based experiments.

  9. On the Electron Diffusion Region in Asymmetric Reconnection with a Guide Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael; Liu, Yi-Hsin; Chen, Li-Jen; Bessho, Naoki; Kuznetsova, Masha; Birn, Joachim; Burch, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Particle-in-cell simulations in a 2.5-D geometry and analytical theory are employed to study the electron diffusion region in asymmetric reconnection with a guide magnetic field. The analysis presented here demonstrates that similar to the case without guide field, in-plane flow stagnation and null of the in-plane magnetic field are well separated. In addition, it is shown that the electric field at the local magnetic X point is again dominated by inertial effects, whereas it remains dominated by nongyrotropic pressure effects at the in-plane flow stagnation point. A comparison between local electron Larmor radii and the magnetic gradient scale lengths predicts that distribution should become nongyrotropic in a region enveloping both field reversal and flow stagnation points. This prediction is verified by an analysis of modeled electron distributions, which show clear evidence of mixing in the critical region.

  10. Dosimetric considerations of symmetric and asymmetric 60Co teletherapy split fields.

    PubMed

    Wrede, D E; Givens, S B

    1977-01-01

    Split fields are commonly used for a variety of treatments for which local shielding is desired; a single field is split into two fields by means of lead blocks placed in the beam. The condition for assuming independence of the two fields is investigated by using the area over perimeter calculational method and comparing this to experimental depth-dose data measured in a water phantom using a Shonka ionization chamber. Two principal variations affecting dose distributions are examined: block width and position of the block expressed as the fractional perpendicular distance between the central ray of the overall field and the center of the block. An intercomparison between calculation and experimental data shows that the right and left sides of the split field behave as independent fields giving TAR values in agreement with experimental data to within +/-1%. If the fields are asymmetric and if the larger field is less than 70% of the total area including the blocked part, then the dosimetry should be based on average TARs, off-center ratios, and backscatter factors for the two fields. If the larger area is greater than 70% of the total area, then the treatment time can be calculated from the larger field only. PMID:904593

  11. Selective charge asymmetric distribution in heteronuclear diatomic molecules in strong laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Wei; Guo, Chunlei

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we study double-ionization-induced charge asymmetric dissociation (CAD) in heteronuclear diatomic molecules. In CO we find a selective charge distribution in two CAD channels, i.e., C2 ++O is abundantly produced but C +O2 + is nearly nonexistent. This cannot be explained by the ionization energy difference between the two channels alone. Our study shows that the C2 ++O channel is sequentially formed through an intermediate state C++O and the selective charge distribution is the result of electron distribution in CO when exposed to intense laser fields.

  12. Adiabatic Field-Free Alignment of Asymmetric Top Molecules with an Optical Centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobenko, A.; Milner, V.

    2016-05-01

    We use an optical centrifuge to align asymmetric top SO2 molecules by adiabatically spinning their most polarizable O-O axis. The effective centrifugal potential in the rotating frame confines the sulfur atoms to the plane of the laser-induced rotation, leading to the planar molecular alignment that persists after the molecules are released from the centrifuge. The periodic appearance of the full three-dimensional alignment, typically observed only with linear and symmetric top molecules, is also detected. Together with strong in-plane centrifugal forces, which bend the molecules by up to 10 deg, permanent field-free alignment offers new ways of controlling molecules with laser light.

  13. Graphene field effect transistors with niobium contacts and asymmetric transfer characteristics.

    PubMed

    Bartolomeo, Antonio Di; Giubileo, Filippo; Romeo, Francesco; Sabatino, Paolo; Carapella, Giovanni; Iemmo, Laura; Schroeder, Thomas; Lupina, Grzegorz

    2015-11-27

    We fabricate back-gated field effect transistors using niobium electrodes on mechanically exfoliated monolayer graphene and perform electrical characterization in the pressure range from atmospheric down to 10(-4) mbar. We study the effect of room temperature vacuum degassing and report asymmetric transfer characteristics with a resistance plateau in the n-branch. We show that weakly chemisorbed Nb acts as p-dopant on graphene and explain the transistor characteristics by Nb/graphene interaction with unpinned Fermi level at the interface. PMID:26535591

  14. Three dimensional imaging technique suitable for the measurements of the internal energies of asymmetrical diatomic molecular ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauza, J. B.; Panchenko, D. I.; Duot, A. C.; Strom, R. A.; Andrianarijaona, V. M.

    2015-05-01

    We propose a three dimensional imaging technique that could be used to measure the internal energy of asymmetrical diatomic molecular ions such as HeH+ and CO+. The detection scheme is similar to the one used for symmetrical diatomic molecular ions, which accesses the internal energy of the ion through the kinetic energy release in a resonant dissociative charge transfer (see for instance). In that technique, the fragments hit two detectors which send the positions of the impacts along with the difference between the times of impacts to a computer. The computed kinetic energy release is related to the vibrational excitation level of the initial molecular ion. In the case of an asymmetrical ion, the lighter fragment has a higher recoil velocity and goes further away transversally from the center of mass direction. The heavier fragment would not hit the first detector if the beam is judiciously misaligned. Therefore, we make distinction between the two particles. Details of the technique will be presented. Authors wish to give special thanks to Pacific Union College Student Senate for their financial support.

  15. Surface potential at a ferroelectric grain due to asymmetric screening of depolarization fields

    SciTech Connect

    Genenko, Yuri A. Hirsch, Ofer; Erhart, Paul

    2014-03-14

    Nonlinear screening of electric depolarization fields, generated by a stripe domain structure in a ferroelectric grain of a polycrystalline material, is studied within a semiconductor model of ferroelectrics. It is shown that the maximum strength of local depolarization fields is rather determined by the electronic band gap than by the spontaneous polarization magnitude. Furthermore, field screening due to electronic band bending and due to presence of intrinsic defects leads to asymmetric space charge regions near the grain boundary, which produce an effective dipole layer at the surface of the grain. This results in the formation of a potential difference between the grain surface and its interior of the order of 1 V, which can be of either sign depending on defect transition levels and concentrations. Exemplary acceptor doping of BaTiO{sub 3} is shown to allow tuning of the said surface potential in the region between 0.1 and 1.3 V.

  16. Asymmetrical response of dayside ion precipitation to a large rotation of the IMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berchem, J.; Richard, R. L.; Escoubet, C. P.; Wing, S.; Pitout, F.

    2016-01-01

    We have carried out global magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations together with large-scale kinetic simulations to investigate the response of the dayside magnetospheric ion precipitation to a large rotation (135°) of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The study uses simplified global MHD model (no dipole tilt and constant ionospheric conductance) and idealized solar wind conditions where the IMF rotates smoothly from a southward toward a northward direction (BX = 0) to clearly identify the effects of the impact of the discontinuity on the magnetopause. Results of the global simulations reveal that a strong north-south asymmetry develops in the pattern of precipitating ions during the interaction of the IMF rotation with the magnetopause. For a counterclockwise IMF rotation from its original southward direction (BY < 0), a spot of high-energy particle injections occurs in the Northern Hemisphere but not in the Southern Hemisphere. The spot moves poleward and dawnward as the interacting field rotates. In that case, reconnection is found close to the poleward edge of the northern cusp, while it occurs farther tailward in the Southern Hemisphere. Tracing magnetic field lines shows an asymmetry in the tilt of the cusps and indicates that the draping and subsequent double reconnection of newly opened field lines from the Southern Hemisphere over the dayside magnetosphere cause the symmetry breaking. The reverse north-south asymmetry is found for a clockwise IMF rotation from its original southward direction (BY > 0). Trends observed in the ion dispersions predicted from the simulations are in good agreement with Cluster observations of the midaltitude northern cusp, which motivated the study.

  17. Control of photoelectron interference in asymmetric momentum distributions using two-color laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xu; Liu, Ming-Ming; Xie, Hui; Ge, Peipei; Li, Min; Liu, Yunquan

    2015-11-01

    We theoretically study the control of photoelectron interference of atoms ionized by a two-color laser field with parallel polarizations. Based on both the quantum-trajectory Monte Carlo model and an ab initio simulation with numerically solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, we show that the photoelectron angular distributions can be controlled by changing the relative phase of the two frequency components. The high-energy and low-energy photoelectrons show different modulations with respect to the relative phase. Tracing back to the initial coordinates (the ionization time with respect to the laser phase and the initial momentum) of photoelectrons, we have studied the physical origin of the asymmetric structure in photoelectron angular distributions and the dynamics of controlling photoelectron emission using the two-color laser fields. We show that the long tail of the Coulomb potential plays a minor role in the position of the high-energy cutoff in the backward scattering, whereas it is of great importance in the formation of the asymmetric structures of the low-energy photoelectrons.

  18. Particle Diffusion in Chaotic Magnetic Fields Generated by Asymmetric Current Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, A. K.; Dasgupta, B.

    2008-12-01

    The observed cross-field diffusion of charged particles in cosmic rays is assumed to be due to the chaotic nature of the interplanetary/intergalactic magnetic fields. Among the classic works on this subject have been those of Parker [1] and Jokipii [2]. Parker considered the passage of cosmic ray particles and energetic solar particles in a large scale magnetic field containing small scale irregularities. In the context of cosmic ray propagation, Jokipii considered a small fluctuating component, added on to a uniform magnetic field, to study the spatial transport of particles. In these studies the irregular component of the magnetic field is prescribed in an ad hoc fashion. In contrast, we consider asymmetric, nonlinear, steady-state magnetic fields, in three spatial dimensions, generated by currents flowing in circular loops and straight lines [3]. These magnetic fields are completely deterministic and, for certain range of parameters, chaotic. We will present analytical and numerical studies on the spatial characteristics of these fields. The motion of charged particles in the nonlinear and chaotic magnetic fields is determined using the Lorentz equation. A particle moving in a deterministic chaotic magnetic field superposed on a uniform background magnetic field is found to undergo spatial transport. This shows that chaotic magnetic fields generated by simple current configurations can produce cross-field diffusion. A detailed analysis of particle motion and diffusion along with application to space plasmas will be presented. [1] E.N. Parker, Planet. Space Sci. 13, 9 (1965). [2] J.R. Jokipii, Astrophys. J. 146, 480 (1966), and J.R. Jokipii, Astrophys. J. 149, 405 (1967). [3] A.K. Ram and B. Dasgupta, Eos Trans. AGU 87 (52), Fall Meet. Suppl. Abstract NG31B-1593 (2006); and Eos Trans. AGU 88 (52), Fall Meet. Suppl. Abstract NG21B-0522 (2007).

  19. Ions in a binary asymmetric dipolar mixture: Mole fraction dependent Born energy of solvation and partial solvent polarization structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashyap, Hemant K.; Biswas, Ranjit

    2007-11-01

    Mean spherical approximation (MSA) for electrolyte solution has been extended to investigate the role of partial solvent polarization densities around an ion in a completely asymmetric binary dipolar mixture. The differences in solvent diameters, dipole moments, and ionic size are incorporated systematically within the MSA framework in the present theory for the first time. In addition to the contributions due to difference in dipole moments, the solvent-solvent and ion-solvent size ratios are found to significantly affect the nonideality in binary dipolar mixtures. Subsequently, the theory is used to investigate the role of ion-solvent and solvent-solvent size ratios in determining the nonideality in Born free energy of solvation of a unipositive rigid ion in alcohol-water and dimethyl sulfoxide-acetonitrile mixtures, where the solvent components are represented only by their molecular diameters and dipole moments. Nonideality in Born free energy of solvation in such simplified mixtures is found to be stronger for smaller ions. The slope of the nonideality for smaller alkali metal ions in methanol-water mixture is found to be opposite to that for larger ion, such as quaternary tertiary butyl ammonium ion. For ethanol-water mixtures, the slopes are in the same direction for all the ions studied here. These results are in qualitative agreement with experiments, which is surprising as the present MSA approach does not include the hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions present in the real mixtures. The calculated partial polarization densities around a unipositive ion also show the characteristic deviation from ideality and reveal the microscopic origin of the ion and solvent size dependent preferential solvation. Also, the excess free energy of mixing (in the absence of any ion) for these binary mixtures has been calculated and a good agreement between theory and experiment has been found.

  20. Dielectrophoretic field-flow method for separating particle populations in a chip with asymmetric electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Iliescu, Ciprian; Tresset, Guillaume; Xu, Guolin

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a field-flow method for separating particle populations in a dielectrophoretic (DEP) chip with asymmetric electrodes under continuous flow. The structure of the DEP device (with one thick electrode that defines the walls of the microfluidic channel and one thin electrode), as well as the fabrication and characterization of the device, was previously described. A characteristic of this structure is that it generates an increased gradient of electric field in the vertical plane that can levitate the particles experiencing negative DEP. The separation method consists of trapping one population to the bottom of the microfluidic channel using positive DEP, while the other population that exhibits negative DEP is levitated and flowed out. Viable and nonviable yeast cells were used for testing of the separation method. PMID:20216966

  1. Selective ionization/dissociation of oriented N2O molecules by asymmetric fs laser field.

    PubMed

    Kotsina, N; Kaziannis, S; Danakas, S; Kosmidis, C

    2013-09-14

    We report on the selective ionization of oriented nitrous oxide (N2O) molecules in gas phase by the use of an intense asymmetric two-color ω/2ω 40 fs laser field. By means of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer the induced N2O mass spectra have been recorded as a function of the relative phase of the two-color laser fields. It is found that the applied method facilitates the distinction of different dissociation channels that result in fragments with the same mass and kinetic energy. Thus, the potential of the employed technique for phase control of the molecular excitation for the case of N2O is explored. PMID:24050350

  2. Selective ionization/dissociation of oriented N2O molecules by asymmetric fs laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsina, N.; Kaziannis, S.; Danakas, S.; Kosmidis, C.

    2013-09-01

    We report on the selective ionization of oriented nitrous oxide (N2O) molecules in gas phase by the use of an intense asymmetric two-color ω/2ω 40 fs laser field. By means of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer the induced N2O mass spectra have been recorded as a function of the relative phase of the two-color laser fields. It is found that the applied method facilitates the distinction of different dissociation channels that result in fragments with the same mass and kinetic energy. Thus, the potential of the employed technique for phase control of the molecular excitation for the case of N2O is explored.

  3. The non-dominance of counterions in charge-asymmetric electrolytes: non-monotonic precedence of electrostatic screening and local inversion of the electric field by multivalent coions.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-García, Guillermo Iván; González-Tovar, Enrique; Quesada-Pérez, Manuel; Martín-Molina, Alberto

    2016-08-01

    The asymptotic convergence of the thermodynamic and structural properties of unequally-sized charge-symmetric ions in strong electric fields was postulated more than thirty years ago by Valleau and Torrie as the dominance of counterions via the non-linear Poisson-Boltzmann theory [Valleau and Torrie, J. Chem. Phys., 1982, 76, 4623]. According to this mean field prescription, the properties of the electrical double layer near a highly charged electrode immersed in a size-asymmetric binary electrolyte converge to those of a size-symmetric electrolyte if the properties of counterions are the same in both instances. On the other hand, some of the present authors have shown that, in fact, counterions do not dominate the electrical properties of a spherical macroion in the presence of unequally-sized ions, symmetric in valence, if ion correlations and ionic excluded volume effects are taken into account consistently. These ingredients are neglected in the classical Poisson-Boltzmann picture. In the present work, we show the occurrence of the non-dominance of counterions in the opposite scenario, that is, when ions are equally-sized but asymmetric in valence. This is performed in the presence of highly charged colloidal surfaces of spherical and planar geometries for different ionic volume fractions. In addition to the phenomenon of non-dominance of counterions, our simulations and theoretical data also exhibit a non-monotonic order or precedence in the mean electrostatic potential, or electrostatic screening, at the Helmholtz plane of a charged colloid. This interesting behaviour is analyzed as a function of the coion's valence, the ionic volume fraction, and the charge and size of the colloidal particle. All these phenomena are explained in terms of the decay of the electric field near the colloidal surface, and by the appearance of a local inversion of both the electric field and the integrated surface charge density of the colloidal particle in the presence of

  4. Rational strategy for characterization of nanoscale particles by asymmetric-flow field flow fractionation: a tutorial.

    PubMed

    Gigault, Julien; Pettibone, John M; Schmitt, Charlène; Hackley, Vincent A

    2014-01-27

    This tutorial proposes a comprehensive and rational measurement strategy that provides specific guidance for the application of asymmetric-flow field flow fractionation (A4F) to the size-dependent separation and characterization of nanoscale particles (NPs) dispersed in aqueous media. A range of fractionation conditions are considered, and challenging applications, including industrially relevant materials (e.g., metal NPs, asymmetric NPs), are utilized in order to validate and illustrate this approach. We demonstrate that optimization is material dependent and that polystyrene NPs, widely used as a reference standard for retention calibration in A4F, in fact represent a class of materials with unique selectivity, recovery and optimal conditions for fractionation; thus use of these standards to calibrate retention for other materials must be validated a posteriori. We discuss the use and relevance of different detection modalities that can potentially yield multi-dimensional and complementary information on NP systems. We illustrate the fractionation of atomically precise nanoclusters, which are the lower limit of the nanoscale regime. Conversely, we address the upper size limit for normal mode elution in A4F. The protocol for A4F fractionation, including the methods described in the present work is proposed as a standardized strategy to realize interlaboratory comparability and to facilitate the selection and validation of material-specific measurement parameters and conditions. It is intended for both novice and advanced users of this measurement technology. PMID:24418128

  5. Design and fabrication of a holographic head-up display with asymmetric field of view.

    PubMed

    Peng, Haichao; Cheng, Dewen; Han, Jian; Xu, Chen; Song, Weitao; Ha, Liuzhu; Yang, Jian; Hu, Quanxing; Wang, Yongtian

    2014-10-10

    It is difficult to design and fabricate a head-up display (HUD) with a large asymmetric field of view (FOV) while maintaining a good image quality. In this paper, we design and develop such a holographic HUD system. To improve luminance and enhance the environmental adaptability of the HUD, we use a liquid crystal display with high brightness as well as a holographic reflection element. The vertical FOV is tilted to an angle of -7°, which is consistent with the actual view of the pilot. The decentration and tilt of the optical relay system effectively compensate for the distortion and off-axis aberration due to the asymmetric FOV and tilted, curved combiner. The transition plates used in the mechanical structure significantly decrease the difficulty in fabrication and alignment, and virtual prototyping greatly reduces the risk and shortens the development cycle. Experimental results demonstrate that this prototype achieves a total FOV of 30° (horizontal) ×24° (vertical), a resolution of 1280×1024, and a 5% distortion. PMID:25322417

  6. Measurement of the Charge Reduction and Asymmetrical Interaction Force Created by the Ion Wakefield in a Dusty Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mudi; Yousefi, Razieh; Kong, Jie; Qiao, Ke; Carmona-Reyes, Jorge; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2014-10-01

    The manner in which the ion wakefield forms has strong implications on the structure, stability and dynamics of a complex plasma. The majority of vertically aligned, ordered dust particle structures observed in a complex plasma result from a combination of the ion wakefield and the external confinement. The ion wakefield is also responsible for other interesting phenomena, such as the reduction in charge seen for a down-stream particle in a vertically aligned dust particle chain and the asymmetrical interaction force between the up-stream and down-stream particles. Unfortunately, few experimental measurements of these phenomena are available. In this experiment, one dimensional (1-D) dust particle structures (i.e., particle chains) are formed in a GEC RF reference cell within a glass box sitting on the powered, lower electrode. The charge reduction on the downstream particle and the asymmetric interaction force are examined using an externally produced DC bias applied to the lower electrode and a diode pumped solid state laser (Coherent VERDI) for perturbation.

  7. The influence of intense electric fields on three-dimensional asymmetric magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Pritchett, P. L.

    2013-06-15

    A three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation of magnetic reconnection in an asymmetric configuration without a guide field and with temperature ratio T{sub i}/T{sub e}>1 demonstrates that intense perpendicular electric fields are produced on the low-density side of the current layer where there is a strong gradient in the plasma density. The simulation shows that the 3-D reconnection rate is unaffected by these intense electric fields, that the electron current layer near the X line remains coherent and does not break up, but that localized regions of strong energy dissipation exist along the low-density separatrices. Near the X line the dominant term in the generalized Ohm's law for the reconnection electric field remains the off-diagonal electron pressure gradient ∂P{sub exy}/∂x. On the low-beta separatrix, however, the anomalous drag −<δnδE{sub y}>/ makes an equally important contribution to that of the pressure gradient to the average E{sub y} field.

  8. The Electric Fields of Radio Pulsars with Asymmetric Nondipolar Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantor, E. M.; Tsygan, A. I.

    2003-07-01

    The effect of the curvature of open magnetic field lines on the generation of electric fields in radio pulsars is considered in the framework of a Goldreich-Julian model, for both a regime with a free outflow of electrons from the neutron-star surface and the case of a small thermoemission current. An expression for the electron thermoemission current in a strong magnetic field is derived. The electric field associated with the curvature of the magnetic flux tubes is comparable to the field generated by the relativistic dragging of the inertial frames.

  9. Nanoparticle separation with a miniaturized asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation cartridge.

    PubMed

    Müller, David; Cattaneo, Stefano; Meier, Florian; Welz, Roland; de Mello, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Asymmetrical Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) is a separation technique applicable to particles over a wide size range. Despite the many advantages of AF4, its adoption in routine particle analysis is somewhat limited by the large footprint of currently available separation cartridges, extended analysis times and significant solvent consumption. To address these issues, we describe the fabrication and characterization of miniaturized AF4 cartridges. Key features of the down-scaled platform include simplified cartridge and reagent handling, reduced analysis costs and higher throughput capacities. The separation performance of the miniaturized cartridge is assessed using certified gold and silver nanoparticle standards. Analysis of gold nanoparticle populations indicates shorter analysis times and increased sensitivity compared to conventional AF4 separation schemes. Moreover, nanoparticulate titanium dioxide populations exhibiting broad size distributions are analyzed in a rapid and efficient manner. Finally, the repeatability and reproducibility of the miniaturized platform are investigated with respect to analysis time and separation efficiency. PMID:26258119

  10. Nanoparticle separation with a miniaturized asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation cartridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, David; Cattaneo, Stefano; Meier, Florian; Welz, Roland; deMello, Andrew

    2015-07-01

    Asymmetrical Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) is a separation technique applicable to particles over a wide size range. Despite the many advantages of AF4, its adoption in routine particle analysis is somewhat limited by the large footprint of currently available separation cartridges, extended analysis times and significant solvent consumption. To address these issues, we describe the fabrication and characterization of miniaturized AF4 cartridges. Key features of the scale-down platform include simplified cartridge and reagent handling, reduced analysis costs and higher throughput capacities. The separation performance of the miniaturized cartridge is assessed using certified gold and silver nanoparticle standards. Analysis of gold nanoparticle populations indicates shorter analysis times and increased sensitivity compared to conventional AF4 separation schemes. Moreover, nanoparticulate titanium dioxide populations exhibiting broad size distributions are analyzed in a rapid and efficient manner. Finally, the repeatability and reproducibility of the miniaturized platform are investigated with respect to analysis time and separation efficiency.

  11. Adiabatic Field-Free Alignment of Asymmetric Top Molecules with an Optical Centrifuge.

    PubMed

    Korobenko, A; Milner, V

    2016-05-01

    We use an optical centrifuge to align asymmetric top SO_{2} molecules by adiabatically spinning their most polarizable O-O axis. The effective centrifugal potential in the rotating frame confines the sulfur atoms to the plane of the laser-induced rotation, leading to the planar molecular alignment that persists after the molecules are released from the centrifuge. The periodic appearance of the full three-dimensional alignment, typically observed only with linear and symmetric top molecules, is also detected. Together with strong in-plane centrifugal forces, which bend the molecules by up to 10 deg, permanent field-free alignment offers new ways of controlling molecules with laser light. PMID:27203318

  12. Nanoparticle separation with a miniaturized asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation cartridge

    PubMed Central

    Müller, David; Cattaneo, Stefano; Meier, Florian; Welz, Roland; de Mello, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Asymmetrical Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) is a separation technique applicable to particles over a wide size range. Despite the many advantages of AF4, its adoption in routine particle analysis is somewhat limited by the large footprint of currently available separation cartridges, extended analysis times and significant solvent consumption. To address these issues, we describe the fabrication and characterization of miniaturized AF4 cartridges. Key features of the down-scaled platform include simplified cartridge and reagent handling, reduced analysis costs and higher throughput capacities. The separation performance of the miniaturized cartridge is assessed using certified gold and silver nanoparticle standards. Analysis of gold nanoparticle populations indicates shorter analysis times and increased sensitivity compared to conventional AF4 separation schemes. Moreover, nanoparticulate titanium dioxide populations exhibiting broad size distributions are analyzed in a rapid and efficient manner. Finally, the repeatability and reproducibility of the miniaturized platform are investigated with respect to analysis time and separation efficiency. PMID:26258119

  13. Factors affecting measurement of channel thickness in asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Dou, Haiyang; Jung, Euo Chang; Lee, Seungho

    2015-05-01

    Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) has been considered to be a useful tool for simultaneous separation and characterization of polydisperse macromolecules or colloidal nanoparticles. AF4 analysis requires the knowledge of the channel thickness (w), which is usually measured by injecting a standard with known diffusion coefficient (D) or hydrodynamic diameter (dh). An accurate w determination is a challenge due to its uncertainties arising from the membrane's compressibility, which may vary with experimental condition. In the present study, influence of factors including the size and type of the standard on the measurement of w was systematically investigated. The results revealed that steric effect and the particles-membrane interaction by van der Waals or electrostatic force may result in an error in w measurement. PMID:25817708

  14. Standard and nonstandard nematic electrohydrodynamic convection in the presence of asymmetric ac electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, Jonathan; Hogan, S. John

    2008-10-01

    In planar nematic electrohydrodynamic convection (EHC), a microscopic liquid crystal cell is driven by a homogeneous ac electric field, which, if strong enough, causes the fluid to destabilize into a regular pattern-forming state. We consider asymmetric electric fields E(t)=E(t+T)≠-E(t+T/2) , which leads to the possibility of three different types of instabilities at onset: conductive, dielectric, and subharmonic. The first two are already well known as they are easily produced when the system is driven by symmetric electric fields; the third can only occur when the electric field symmetry is broken. We present theoretical results on EHC using linear stability analysis and Floquet theory. We consider rigid and free boundary conditions, extending the model to two Fourier modes in the vertical plane, the inclusion of flexoelectricity, and using standard (nematic electric conductivity σa>0 and dielectric anisotorpy γa<0 ) and nonstandard (σa<0) material parameters. We make full use of a three-dimensional linear model where two mutually perpendicular planar wave numbers q and p can be varied. Our results show that there is a qualitative difference between the boundary conditions used, which is also dependent on how many vertical Fourier modes were used in the model. We have obtained threshold values favoring oblique rolls in subharmonic and dielectric regimes in parameter space. For the nonstandard EHC parameter values, both conduction and subharmonic regimes disappear and only the dielectric threshold exists.

  15. Bashful Ballerina: The asymmetric global solar magnetic field viewed from the heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mursula, K.

    2008-05-01

    Long-term observations of the heliospheric magnetic field (HMF) at 1 AU have depicted interesting systematic hemispheric and longitudinal asymmetries that have far-reaching implications for the understanding of solar magnetism. It has been found that the HMF sector of the northern solar hemisphere dominates the observed HMF sector occurrence in the heliosphere for about three years during the late declining to minimum phase of the solar cycle. This leads to a persistent southward shift or coning of the heliospheric current sheet at these times, which has been described by the concept of the bashful ballerina. Measurements of the solar surface fields have verified that, at these times, the average field intensity is smaller and the area larger in the northern than in the southern solar hemisphere. They have also shown that a persistent global quadrupole moment, oppositely oriented with respect to the dipole moment, appears at these times. Long-term observations of the geomagnetic field can yield information on the HMF sector structure in the pre- satellite era, and show that the ballerina was bashful at least since 1930s. In addition to the hemispheric asymmetries, the Sun is systematically asymmetric in longitude. The HMF has persistent active longitudes whose dominance depicts an oscillation with a period of about 3.2 years. Similar flip-flopping is also seen in the longitudinal distribution of sunspots and stellar observations show that this is a general pattern for sun-like cool stars. We describe these phenomena and discuss their theoretical implications.

  16. Bashful Ballerina: The asymmetric global solar magnetic field viewed from the heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mursula, Kalevi

    Long-term observations of the heliospheric magnetic field (HMF) at 1 AU have depicted interesting systematic hemispheric and longitudinal asymmetries that have far-reaching implications for the understanding of solar magnetism. It has been found that the HMF sector of the northern solar hemisphere dominates the observed HMF sector occurrence in the heliosphere for about three years during the late declining to minimum phase of the solar cycle. This leads to a persistent southward shift or coning of the heliospheric current sheet at these times, which has been described by the concept of the bashful ballerina. Measurements of the solar surface fields have verified that, at these times, the average field intensity is smaller and the area larger in the northern than in the southern solar hemisphere. They have also shown that a persistent global quadrupole moment, oppositely oriented with respect to the dipole moment, appears at these times. Long-term observations of the geomagnetic field can yield information on the HMF sector structure in the pre-satellite era, and show that the ballerina was bashful at least since 1930s. In addition to the hemispheric asymmetries, the Sun is systematically asymmetric in longitude. The HMF has persistent active longitudes whose dominance depicts an oscillation with a period of about 3.2 years. Similar flip-flopping is also seen in the longitudinal distribution of sunspots and stellar observations show that this is a general pattern for sun-like cool stars. We describe these phenomena and discuss their theoretical implications.

  17. Dynamical simulation of energy dissipation in asymmetric heavy-ion induced fission of {sup 200}Pb, {sup 213}Fr, and {sup 251}Es

    SciTech Connect

    Mirfathi, S. M.; Pahlavani, M. R.

    2008-12-15

    The dynamical model based on the asymmetric mass division has been applied to calculate pre-scission neutron multiplicity from heavy-ion induced fusion-fission reactions. Links between the pre-scission neutron multiplicity, excitation energy, and asymmetric mass distribution are clarified based on the Monte Carlo simulation and Langevin dynamics. The pre-scission neutron multiplicity is calculated and compared with the respective experimental data over a wide range of excitation energy and nonconstant viscosity. The analysis indicates a different effect for the application of asymmetric mass division in different energy regions of such processes.

  18. 0114 + 074 - A very asymmetric galaxy in the field of an intermediate-redshift QSO

    SciTech Connect

    Akujor, C.E. Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Bonn )

    1989-10-01

    New radio-continuum observations of 0114 + 074 (4C 07.4) are presented. It is shown that this radio source consists of two distinct objects: a point source identified with an 18.0 mag QSO and a highly asymmetric 18.5 mag galaxy. The patently asymmetric structure of the galaxy is most plausibly due to intrinsically asymmetric energy funding of the lobes by the central machine or nucleus, rather than external influences. 41 refs.

  19. An IST Model of the Formation of Magnetic Depressions from Rotationally Asymmetric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, R.; Jovanovich, P.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic holes have been observed in the solar wind from 0.3 AU to 17 AU, in the magnetosheath of comet Halley, in the heliosheath and also at high heliocentric latitudes. It has been reported that only about 30% of magnetic holes have a small change in the direction of the magnetic field across them. This case had previously been modeled [DOI: 10.1029/2008JA013582] using the 1D-DNLS equation including the effects of dissipation which showed that any profile with a nonlinear component will inevitably lead to the formation of a train of so-called one-parameter dark solitons with a corresponding decrease in field strength. We report on an extension of this earlier work to the rotationally asymmetric case. The magnetic field structure for 'solitons' in this case has not been developed in the literature, but we have found that the direct scattering problem shows the same dynamics as the symmetric case. Connections between these results and magnetic decreases observed in our numerical simulations will be presented.

  20. Evidence for a sedimentary fingerprint of an asymmetric flow field surrounding a short seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnewitsch, Robert; Reyss, Jean-Louis; Chapman, David C.; Thomson, John; Lampitt, Richard S.

    2004-06-01

    Physical oceanographic modeling and field studies have shown that kilometer-scale seafloor elevations of comparable breadth and width (abyssal hills, knolls, seamounts) are surrounded by complex flow fields. Asymmetric flow fields, reversed flow and closed streamlines around the topographic feature (Taylor caps), and resonantly amplified tidal currents around the seamount rim potentially control near-bottom particle dynamics, particle deposition at the seafloor and, consequently, the formation of the sedimentary record. We combine numerical modeling and field data to study how such topographically controlled flow-field features are reflected in the sedimentary record. Sediment deposition on a topographically isolated abyssal knoll (height: 900 m) on the Porcupine Abyssal Plain in the Northeast Atlantic (water depth above the abyssal plain: 4850 m) was studied, (1) by comparing the spatial distribution of 210Pb fluxes, calculated from inventories of sedimentary excess 210Pb, with 210Pb input from the water column as recorded by sediment traps; and (2) by comparing sedimentary grain-size distributions and Zr/Al ratios (an indicator for contents of the heavy mineral zircon) at slope, summit and far-field sites. Given Rossby numbers ≥0.23, a fractional seamount height of ˜0.2, and the absence of diurnal tides it is concluded that an asymmetric flow field without Taylor cap and without amplified tidal currents around the seamount rim is the principal flow-field feature at this knoll. The results and conclusions are as follows: (1) Geochemical and grain-size patterns in the sedimentary record largely agree with the predicted pattern of flow intensity around the topographic elevation: with increasing current strength (erosiveness) there is evidence for a growing discrepancy between water column-derived and sediment-derived 210Pb fluxes, and for increasing contents of larger and heavier particles. The topographically controlled flow field distorts a homogeneous particle

  1. Misfit strain-temperature phase diagrams and domain stability of asymmetric ferroelectric capacitors: Thermodynamic calculation and phase-field simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W. J.; Zheng, Yue Wu, C. M.; Wang, B. Ma, D. C.

    2014-03-07

    Thermodynamic calculation and phase-field simulation have been conducted to investigate the misfit strain-temperature phase diagrams, dielectric property, and domain stability of asymmetric ferroelectric capacitors (FCs), with considering the effects of dissimilar screening properties and work function steps at the two interfaces. The distinct features of asymmetric FCs from their symmetric counterparts have been revealed and discussed. Polar states with nonzero out-of-plane polarization in parallel with the built-in field are found preferential to form in asymmetric FCs. Meanwhile, the built-in field breaks the degeneracy of states with out-of-plane polarization in anti-directions. This leads to the necessity of redefining phases according to the bistability of out-of-plane polarization. Moreover, the phase stability as well as the dielectric behavior can be significantly controlled by the properties of electrodes, misfit strain, and temperature. The phase-field simulation result also shows that polydomain instability would happen in asymmetric FCs as the equivalence of domain stability in anti-directions is destroyed.

  2. Determining Aqueous Fullerene Particle Size Distributions by Asymmetric Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) without Surfactants

    EPA Science Inventory

    To determine the behavior of nanoparticles in environmental systems, methods must be developed to measure nanoparticle size. Asymmetric Flow Field Flow Fractionation (AF4) is an aqueous compatible size separation technique which is able to separate particles from 1 nm to 10 µm in...

  3. Dynamics of a reconnection-driven runaway ion tail in a reversed field pinch plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Jay

    2015-11-01

    Non-collisional heating and energization of ions is a powerful process in reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasmas and in many astrophysical settings. Tearing activity in the RFP (including linearly and nonlinearly driven modes which span the plasma column) saturates through dynamo-like feedback on the current density profile, rapidly releasing magnetic energy and inducing a strong impulsive, parallel-to-B electric field as poloidal magnetic flux is converted to toroidal flux. The global reconnection leads to strong ion heating with a known anisotropy in temperature (T⊥ >T| |), suggestive of a perpendicular bulk heating mechanism. In the subset of strongest reconnection events, multiple mechanisms combine to create a most interesting ion distribution. Runaway of the reduced-friction naturally-heated ions generates an asymmetric ion tail with E|| >>E⊥ . The tail is reinforced by a confinement asymmetry where runaway ions approach the limit of classical cross-field transport despite magnetic stochasticity from the broad spectrum of tearing modes. Confinement is lower in other regions of the v⊥ /v| | plane and reduces to Rechester-Rosenbluth-like transport experienced by thermal particles. Experiments with neutral beam injection elegantly confirm the ion runaway process and fast ion confinement characteristics in MST. Neutral particle analyzers measure an unrestricted parallel acceleration of the fast test particle distribution during the reconnection event. The energy gain is larger for higher initial ion energy (reduced drag), and deceleration is observed with reversed electric field (counter-current injection) according to runaway dynamics and confirmed with Fokker-Planck modeling. Full orbit test particle tracing in the 3D time evolving electric and magnetic fields (from visco-resistive MHD simulations) corroborates the understanding of fast ion confinement. Work supported by by US DoE and NSF.

  4. Integrated field emission array for ion desorption

    DOEpatents

    Resnick, Paul J; Hertz, Kristin L; Holland, Christopher; Chichester, David; Schwoebel, Paul

    2013-09-17

    An integrated field emission array for ion desorption includes an electrically conductive substrate; a dielectric layer lying over the electrically conductive substrate comprising a plurality of laterally separated cavities extending through the dielectric layer; a like plurality of conically-shaped emitter tips on posts, each emitter tip/post disposed concentrically within a laterally separated cavity and electrically contacting the substrate; and a gate electrode structure lying over the dielectric layer, including a like plurality of circular gate apertures, each gate aperture disposed concentrically above an emitter tip/post to provide a like plurality of annular gate electrodes and wherein the lower edge of each annular gate electrode proximate the like emitter tip/post is rounded. Also disclosed herein are methods for fabricating an integrated field emission array.

  5. Integrated field emission array for ion desorption

    DOEpatents

    Resnick, Paul J; Hertz, Kristin L.; Holland, Christopher; Chichester, David

    2016-08-23

    An integrated field emission array for ion desorption includes an electrically conductive substrate; a dielectric layer lying over the electrically conductive substrate comprising a plurality of laterally separated cavities extending through the dielectric layer; a like plurality of conically-shaped emitter tips on posts, each emitter tip/post disposed concentrically within a laterally separated cavity and electrically contacting the substrate; and a gate electrode structure lying over the dielectric layer, including a like plurality of circular gate apertures, each gate aperture disposed concentrically above an emitter tip/post to provide a like plurality of annular gate electrodes and wherein the lower edge of each annular gate electrode proximate the like emitter tip/post is rounded. Also disclosed herein are methods for fabricating an integrated field emission array.

  6. Ion beam probing of electrostatic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Persson, H.

    1979-01-01

    The determination of a cylindrically symmetric, time-independent electrostatic potential V in a magnetic field B with the same symmetry by measurements of the deflection of a primary beam of ions is analyzed and substantiated by examples. Special attention is given to the requirements on canonical angular momentum and total energy set by an arbitrary, nonmonotone V, to scaling laws obtained by normalization, and to the analogy with ionospheric sounding. The inversion procedure with the Abel analysis of an equivalent problem with a one-dimensional fictitious potential is used in a numerical experiment with application to the NASA Lewis Modified Penning Discharge. The determination of V from a study of secondary beams of ions with increased charge produced by hot plasma electrons is also analyzed, both from a general point of view and with application to the NASA Lewis SUMMA experiment. Simple formulas and geometrical constructions are given for the minimum energy necessary to reach the axis, the whole plasma, and any point in the magnetic field. The common, simplifying assumption that V is a small perturbation is critically and constructively analyzed; an iteration scheme for successively correcting the orbits and points of ionization for the electrostatic potential is suggested.

  7. Asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation of superferrimagnetic iron oxide multicore nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dutz, Silvio; Kuntsche, Judith; Eberbeck, Dietmar; Müller, Robert; Zeisberger, Matthias

    2012-09-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are very useful for various medical applications where each application requires particles with specific magnetic properties. In this paper we describe the modification of the magnetic properties of magnetic multicore nanoparticles (MCNPs) by size dependent fractionation. This classification was carried out by means of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4). A clear increase of the particle size with increasing elution time was confirmed by multi-angle laser light scattering coupled to the AF4 system, dynamic light scattering and Brownian diameters determined by magnetorelaxometry. In this way 16 fractions of particles with different hydrodynamic diameters, ranging between around 100 and 500 nm, were obtained. A high reproducibility of the method was confirmed by the comparison of the mean diameters of fractions of several fractionation runs under identical conditions. The hysteresis curves were measured by vibrating sample magnetometry. Starting from a coercivity of 1.41 kA m(-1) for the original MCNPs the coercivity of the particles in the different fractions varied from 0.41 to 3.83 kA m(-1). In our paper it is shown for the first time that fractions obtained from a broad size distributed MCNP fluid classified by AF4 show a strong correlation between hydrodynamic diameter and magnetic properties. Thus we state that AF4 is a suitable technology for reproducible size dependent classification of magnetic multicore nanoparticles suspended as ferrofluids. PMID:22875740

  8. Effect of asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation channel geometry on separation efficiency.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Ji Yeon; Kim, Ki Hun; Lee, Ju Yong; Williams, P Stephen; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2010-06-11

    The separation efficiencies of three different asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) channel designs were evaluated using polystyrene latex standards. Channel breadth was held constant for one channel (rectangular profile), and was reduced either linearly (trapezoidal profile) or exponentially (exponential profile) along the length for the other two. The effective void volumes of the three channel types were designed to be equivalent. Theoretically, under certain flow conditions, the mean channel flow velocity of the exponential channel could be arranged to remain constant along the channel length, thereby improving separation in AF4. Particle separation obtained with the exponential channel was compared with particle separation obtained with the trapezoidal and rectangular channels. We demonstrated that at a certain flow rate condition (outflow/inflow rate=0.2), the exponential channel design indeed provided better performance with respect to the separation of polystyrene nanoparticles in terms of reducing band broadening. While the trapezoidal channel exhibited a little poorer performance than the exponential, the strongly decreasing mean flow velocity in the rectangular channel resulted in serious band broadening, a delay in retention time, and even failure of larger particles to elute. PMID:20439106

  9. Simple functionalization strategies for enhancing nanoparticle separation and recovery with asymmetric flow field flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Mudalige, Thilak K; Qu, Haiou; Sánchez-Pomales, Germarie; Sisco, Patrick N; Linder, Sean W

    2015-02-01

    Due to the increasing use of engineered nanomaterials in consumer products, regulatory agencies and other research organizations have determined that the development of robust, reliable, and accurate methodologies to characterize nanoparticles in complex matrices is a top priority. Of particular interest are methods that can separate and determine the size of nanomaterials in samples that contain polydisperse and/or multimodal nanoparticle populations. Asymmetric-flow field flow fractionation (AF4) has shown promise for the separation of nanoparticles with wide size range distributions; however, low analyte recoveries and decreased membrane lifetimes, due to membrane fouling, have limited its application. Herein, we report straightforward strategies to minimize membrane fouling and improve nanoparticle recovery by functionalizing the surface of the nanoparticles, as well as that of the AF4 membranes. Gold nanoparticles (AuNP) were stabilized through functionalization with a phosphine molecule, whereas the surface of the membranes was coated with a negatively charged polystyrenesulfonate polymer. Improved nanoparticle separation, recoveries of 99.1 (±0.5) %, and a detection limit of 6 μg/kg were demonstrated by analyzing AuNP reference materials of different sizes (e.g., 10, 30, and 60 nm), obtained from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Furthermore, the stability of the polymer coating and its specificity toward minimizing membrane fouling were demonstrated. PMID:25556296

  10. Size characterization and quantification of exosomes by asymmetrical-flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Sitar, Simona; Kejžar, Anja; Pahovnik, David; Kogej, Ksenija; Tušek-Žnidarič, Magda; Lenassi, Metka; Žagar, Ema

    2015-09-15

    In the past few years extracellular vesicles called exosomes have gained huge interest of scientific community since they show a great potential for human diagnostic and therapeutic applications. However, an ongoing challenge is accurate size characterization and quantification of exosomes because of the lack of reliable characterization techniques. In this work, the emphasis was focused on a method development to size-separate, characterize, and quantify small amounts of exosomes by asymmetrical-flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) technique coupled to a multidetection system (UV and MALS). Batch DLS (dynamic light-scattering) and NTA (nanoparticle tracking analysis) analyses of unfractionated exosomes were also conducted to evaluate their shape and internal structure, as well as their number density. The results show significant influence of cross-flow conditions and channel thickness on fractionation quality of exosomes, whereas the focusing time has less impact. The AF4/UV-MALS and DLS results display the presence of two particles subpopulations, that is, the larger exosomes and the smaller vesicle-like particles, which coeluted in AF4 together with impurities in early eluting peak. Compared to DLS and AF4-MALS results, NTA somewhat overestimates the size and the number density for larger exosome population, but it discriminates the smaller particle population. PMID:26291637

  11. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation for the analysis of PEG-asparaginase.

    PubMed

    John, C; Herz, T; Boos, J; Langer, K; Hempel, G

    2016-01-01

    Monomethoxypolyethylene glycol L-asparaginase (PEG-ASNASE) is the PEGylated version of the enzyme L-asparaginase (ASNASE). Both are used for remission induction in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). The treatment control is generally carried out by performing activity assays, though methods to determine the actual enzyme rather than its activity are rare. Using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) offered the chance to develop a method capable of simultaneously measuring PEG-ASNASE and PEG. A method validation was performed in accordance with FDA guidelines for PEG-ASNASE from non-biological solutions. The method unfolded a linearity of 15-750 U/mL with coefficients of correlation of r(2)>0.99. The coefficients of variation (CV) for within-run and between-run variability were 1.18-10.15% and 2.43-8.73%, respectively. Furthermore, the method was used to perform stability tests of the product Oncaspar® (PEG-ASNASE) and estimation of the molecular weight by multi-angle light scattering (MALS) of stressed samples to correlate them with the corresponding activity. The findings indicate that Oncaspar® stock solution should not be stored any longer than 24 h at room temperature and cannot be frozen in pure aqueous media. The validated method might be useful for the pharmaceutical industry and its quality control of PEG-ASNASE production. PMID:26695272

  12. Study on beam emittance evolution in a nonlinear plasma wake field accelerator with mobile plasma ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Weiming; Joshi, Chan; Mori, Warren; Lu, Wei

    2014-10-01

    We study the electron beam evolution in a nonlinear blowout PWFA when the accelerated beam has a very small matched spot size that can cause the plasma ions collapsing towards the beam. Contrary to the common belief, very small emittance growth of the accelerated electron beam is found when the plasma ion collapsing destroys the perfect linear focusing force in the plasma wake field. The improved quasi-static PIC code QuickPIC also allows us to use very high resolution and to model asymmetric spot sizes. Simulation results show that the accelerated beam will reach a steady state after several cm propagation in the plasma (which is why we can do simulations and not let the drive beam evolve). We find that for round beams the ion density (which is Li+) enhancement is indeed by factors of 100, but that the emittance only grows by around 20 percent. For asymmetric spot sizes, the ion collapse is less and emittance growth is zero in the plane with the largest emittance and about 20 percent in the other plane.

  13. Helium in chirped laser fields as a time-asymmetric atomic switch

    SciTech Connect

    Kaprálová-Žďánská, Petra Ruth; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2014-07-07

    Tuning the laser parameters exceptional points in the spectrum of the dressed laser helium atom are obtained. The weak linearly polarized laser couples the ground state and the doubly excited P-states of helium. We show here that for specific chirped laser pulses that encircle an exceptional point one can get the time-asymmetric phenomenon, where for a negative chirped laser pulse the ground state is transformed into the doubly excited auto-ionization state, while for a positive chirped laser pulse the resonance state is not populated and the neutral helium atoms remains in the ground state as the laser pulse is turned off. Moreover, we show that the results are very sensitive to the closed contour we choose. This time-asymmetric state exchange phenomenon can be considered as a time-asymmetric atomic switch. The optimal time-asymmetric switch is obtained when the closed loop that encircles the exceptional point is large, while for the smallest loops, the time-asymmetric phenomenon does not take place. A systematic way for studying the effect of the chosen closed contour that encircles the exceptional point on the time-asymmetric phenomenon is proposed.

  14. Polycrystalline silicon ion sensitive field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, F.; Estrela, P.; Mo, Y.; Migliorato, P.; Maeda, H.; Inoue, S.; Shimoda, T.

    2005-01-01

    We report the operation of polycrystalline silicon ion sensitive field effect transistors. These devices can be fabricated on inexpensive disposable substrates such as glass or plastics and are, therefore, promising candidates for low cost single-use intelligent multisensors. In this work we have developed an extended gate structure with a Si3N4 sensing layer. Nearly ideal pH sensitivity (54mV /pH) and stable operation have been achieved. Temperature effects have been characterized. A penicillin sensor has been fabricated by functionalizing the sensing area with penicillinase. The sensitivity to penicillin G is about 10mV/mM, in solutions with concentration lower than the saturation value, which is about 7 mM.

  15. Electrical conductivity and asymmetric material changes upon irradiation of Mg-doped lithium niobate crystals with low-mass, high-energy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Jentjens, L.; Raeth, N. L.; Peithmann, K.; Maier, K.

    2011-06-15

    Radiation damage in magnesium-doped lithium niobate crystals, created by low-mass, high-energy ions which have transmitted the entire crystal thickness, leads to an enhanced electrical dark conductivity as well as an enhanced photoconductivity. Experimental results on the electrical properties after ion exposure are given, and an asymmetric dependence of the conductivity as well as refractive index changes on the irradiation geometry with respect to the ferroelectric axis is revealed.

  16. Experimental study of the asymmetric charge transfer reaction between Ar+ ions and Fe atoms.

    PubMed

    Korolov, I; Bánó, G; Donkó, Z; Derzsi, A; Hartmann, P

    2011-02-14

    We investigate the Ar(+)-Fe asymmetric charge transfer (ACT) reaction using a combination of plasma diagnostics methods and a kinetic model of the afterglow plasma, which allow monitoring of the temporal evolution of the densities of different species. The iron vapor is created inside a discharge cell by cathode sputtering; its density is measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The rate coefficient of the reaction is evaluated from the emission intensity decay of Fe(+)∗ lines pumped by the ACT process in the He-Ar-Fe and Ar-Fe afterglow plasmas. The measurements yield a rate coefficient k = 7.6( ± 3.0) × 10(-9) cm(3) s(-1) at T = 300 K. PMID:21322681

  17. Ion heating perpendicular to the magnetic field. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Andre, M.; Chang, T.

    1994-03-28

    Several theories of ion heating perpendicular to the geomagnetic field are briefly reviewed and assessed. Perpendicular heating of ions leading to the formation of ion conics is common in the ionosphere and magnetosphere. Ion conics at altitudes above a few thousand kilometers are often associated with waves around the ion gyrofrequency. It is concluded that the majority of these ion conics that are locally heated or generated over extended altitude regimes, may be best explained by ion cyclotron resonance heating. At lower altitudes, particularly in the region of discrete auroras, energization by turbulence around the lower hybrid frequency seems to be an important heating mechanism.

  18. Asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation of manufactured silver nanoparticles spiked into soil solution.

    PubMed

    Koopmans, G F; Hiemstra, T; Regelink, I C; Molleman, B; Comans, R N J

    2015-05-01

    Manufactured metallic silver nanoparticles (AgNP) are intensively utilized in consumer products and this will inevitably lead to their release to soils. To assess the environmental risks of AgNP in soils, quantification of both their concentration and size in soil solution is essential. We developed a methodology consisting of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) in combination with on-line detection by UV-vis spectroscopy and off-line HR-ICP-MS measurements to quantify the concentration and size of AgNP, coated with either citrate or polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), in water extracts of three different soils. The type of mobile phase was a critical factor in the fractionation of AgNP by AF4. In synthetic systems, fractionation of a series of virgin citrate- and PVP-coated AgNP (10-90 nm) with reasonably high recoveries could only be achieved with ultrahigh purity water as a mobile phase. For the soil water extracts, 0.01% (w:v) sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) at pH 8 was the key to a successful fractionation of the AgNP. With SDS, the primary size of AgNP in all soil water extracts could be determined by AF4, except for PVP-coated AgNP when clay colloids were present. The PVP-coated AgNP interacted with colloidal clay minerals, leading to an overestimation of their primary size. Similar interactions between PVP-coated AgNP and clay colloids can take place in the environment and facilitate their transport in soils, aquifers, and surface waters. In conclusion, AF4 in combination with UV-vis spectroscopy and HR-ICP-MS measurements is a powerful tool to characterize AgNP in soil solution if the appropriate mobile phase is used. PMID:25798868

  19. Optimization and evaluation of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Loeschner, Katrin; Navratilova, Jana; Legros, Samuel; Wagner, Stephan; Grombe, Ringo; Snell, James; von der Kammer, Frank; Larsen, Erik H

    2013-01-11

    Asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF(4)) in combination with on-line optical detection and mass spectrometry is one of the most promising methods for separation and quantification of nanoparticles (NPs) in complex matrices including food. However, to obtain meaningful results regarding especially the NP size distribution a number of parameters influencing the separation need to be optimized. This paper describes the development of a separation method for polyvinylpyrrolidone-stabilized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in aqueous suspension. Carrier liquid composition, membrane material, cross flow rate and spacer height were shown to have a significant influence on the recoveries and retention times of the nanoparticles. Focus time and focus flow rate were optimized with regard to minimum elution of AgNPs in the void volume. The developed method was successfully tested for injected masses of AgNPs from 0.2 to 5.0 μg. The on-line combination of AF(4) with detection methods including ICP-MS, light absorbance and light scattering was helpful because each detector provided different types of information about the eluting NP fraction. Differences in the time-resolved appearance of the signals obtained by the three detection methods were explained based on the physical origin of the signal. Two different approaches for conversion of retention times of AgNPs to their corresponding sizes and size distributions were tested and compared, namely size calibration with polystyrene nanoparticles (PSNPs) and calculations of size based on AF(4) theory. Fraction collection followed by transmission electron microscopy was performed to confirm the obtained size distributions and to obtain further information regarding the AgNP shape. Characteristics of the absorbance spectra were used to confirm the presence of non-spherical AgNP. PMID:23261297

  20. Quantum dot agglomerates in biological media and their characterization by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Moquin, Alexandre; Neibert, Kevin D; Maysinger, Dusica; Winnik, Françoise M

    2015-01-01

    The molecular composition of the biological environment of nanoparticles influences their physical properties and changes their pristine physicochemical identity. In order to understand, or predict, the interactions of cells with specific nanoparticles, it is critical to know their size, shape, and agglomeration state not only in their nascent state but also in biological media. Here, we use asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) with on-line multiangle light scattering (MALS), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and UV-Visible absorption detections to determine the relative concentration of isolated nanoparticles and agglomerates in the case of three types of semi-conductor quantum dots (QDs) dispersed in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Media (DMEM) containing 10% of fetal bovine serum (DMEM-FBS). AF4 analysis also yielded the size and size distribution of the agglomerates as a function of the time of QDs incubation in DMEM-FBS. The preferred modes of internalization of the QDs are assessed for three cell-types, N9 microglia, human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) and human embryonic kidney cells (Hek293), by confocal fluorescence imaging of live cells, quantitative determination of the intracellular QD concentration, and flow cytometry. There is an excellent correlation between the agglomeration status of the three types of QDs in DMEM-FBS determined by AF4 analysis and their preferred mode of uptake by the three cell lines, which suggests that AF4 yields an accurate description of the nanoparticles as they encounter cells and advocates its use as a means to characterize particles under evaluation. PMID:25542679

  1. Quantifying uranium complexation by groundwater dissolved organic carbon using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranville, James F.; Hendry, M. Jim; Reszat, Thorsten N.; Xie, Qianli; Honeyman, Bruce D.

    2007-05-01

    The long-term mobility of actinides in groundwaters is important for siting nuclear waste facilities and managing waste-rock piles at uranium mines. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) may influence the mobility of uranium, but few field-based studies have been undertaken to examine this in typical groundwaters. In addition, few techniques are available to isolate DOC and directly quantify the metals complexed to it. Determination of U-organic matter association constants from analysis of field-collected samples compliments laboratory measurements, and these constants are needed for accurate transport calculations. The partitioning of U to DOC in a clay-rich aquitard was investigated in 10 groundwater samples collected between 2 and 30 m depths at one test site. A positive correlation was observed between the DOC (4-132 mg/L) and U concentrations (20-603 μg/L). The association of U and DOC was examined directly using on-line coupling of Asymmetrical Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AsFlFFF) with UV absorbance (UVA) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) detectors. This method has the advantages of utilizing very small sample volumes (20-50 μL) as well as giving molecular weight information on U-organic matter complexes. AsFlFFF-UVA results showed that 47-98% of the DOC (4-136 mg C/L) was recovered in the AsFlFFF analysis, of which 25-64% occurred in the resolvable peak. This peak corresponded to a weight-average molecular weight of about 900-1400 Daltons (Da). In all cases, AsFlFFF-ICP-MS suggested that ≤ 2% of the U, likely present as U(VI), was complexed with the DOC. This result was in good agreement with the U speciation modeling performed on the sample taken from the 2.3 m depth, which predicted approximately 3% DOC-complexed U. This good agreement suggests that the AsFlFFF-ICP-MS method may be very useful for determining U-organic matter association in small volume samples. Because the pH (7.0-8.1) and carbonate concentrations of these waters

  2. Field applications of ion-mobility spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Patricia A.

    1997-02-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is an excellent tool for detection of controlled substances under field conditions. Plasmagrams and tables showing the results of field applications will be discussed. Residues of drugs, such as cocaine and heroin, can be left anywhere including vehicles, boats, and houses. In houses, the carpets, walls, and floors are good locations for residues to adhere. Individual clothing can also be contaminated with drug residue. Vehicles that are suspected of having previously smuggled illegal substances can be vacuumed and screened. Tablets that look similar and respond the same when screened with the Marquis reagent can be differentiated by IMS. With Southern California being the 'methamphetamine capital of the world' and the resurgence of phencyclidine, IMS has proven extremely valuable in the screening of abandoned clandestine laboratory sites and vehicles in which the clandestine laboratories; chemicals and glassware were transported. IMS is very responsive to ephedrine/pseudophedrine, a precursor of methamphetamine and 1-piperidinocyclohexanecarbonitrile, an intermediate of phencyclidine. Once residues are detected, vacuum samples, and/or methanol wipes are collected and analyzed at the DEA Laboratory for confirmation of the suspected substance using GC-IRD or Mass Spectrometry.

  3. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR TRAPPING IONS IN A MAGNETIC FIELD

    DOEpatents

    Luce, J.S.

    1962-04-17

    A method and apparatus are described for trapping ions within an evacuated container and within a magnetic field utilizing dissociation and/or ionization of molecular ions to form atomic ions and energetic neutral particles. The atomic ions are magnetically trapped as a result of a change of charge-to- mass ratio. The molecular ions are injected into the container and into the path of an energetic carbon arc discharge which dissociates and/or ionizes a portion of the molecular ions into atomic ions and energetic neutrals. The resulting atomic ions are trapped by the magnetic field to form a circulating beam of atomic ions, and the energetic neutrals pass out of the system and may be utilized in a particle accelerator. (AEC)

  4. Retention ratio and nonequilibrium bandspreading in asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Williams, P Stephen

    2015-06-01

    In asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (As-FlFFF), only the membrane-covered accumulation wall is permeable to fluid; the opposite channel wall is impermeable. Fluid enters the channel at the inlet and exits partly through the membrane-covered accumulation wall and partly through the channel outlet. This means that not only does the volumetric channel flow rate decrease along the channel length as fluid exits through the membrane but also the cross-channel component to fluid velocity must approach zero at the impermeable wall. This dependence of cross-channel fluid velocity on distance across the channel thickness influences the equilibrium concentration profile for the sample components introduced to the channel. The concentration profile departs from the exponential profile predicted for the ideal model of field-flow fractionation. This influences both the retention ratio and the principal contribution to bandspreading--the nonequilibrium contribution. The derivation of an equation for the nonequilibrium bandspreading parameter χ in As-FlFFF is presented, and its numerical solution graphed. At high retention, it is shown that the solutions for both retention ratio R and χ converge on those for the ideal model, as expected. At lower levels of retention, the departures from the ideal model are significant, particularly for bandspreading. For example, at a level of retention corresponding to a retention parameter λ of 0.05, R is almost 4% higher than for the ideal model (0.28047 as compared to 0.27000) but the value of χ is almost 60% higher. The equations presented for both R and χ include a first-order correction for the finite size of the particles--the steric exclusion correction. These corrections are shown to be significant for particle sizes eluting well before steric inversion. For example, particles of half the inversion diameter are predicted to elute 25% slower and to show almost 40% higher bandspreading when steric effects are not accounted

  5. Intense laser effects on the optical properties of asymmetric GaAs double quantum dots under applied electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejan, Doina; Niculescu, Ecaterina Cornelia

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the combined effects of a non-resonant intense laser field and a static electric field on the electronic structure and the nonlinear optical properties (absorption, optical rectification) of a GaAs asymmetric double quantum dot under a strong probe field excitation. The calculations were performed within the compact density-matrix formalism under steady state conditions using the effective mass approximation. Our results show that: (i) the electronic structure and optical properties are sensitive to the dressed potential; (ii) under applied electric fields, an increase of the laser intensity induces a redshift of the optical absorption and rectification spectra; (iii) the augment of the electric field strength leads to a blueshift of the spectra; (iv) for high electric fields the optical spectra show a shoulder-like feature, related with the occurrence of an anti-crossing between the two first excited levels.

  6. Electron jet of asymmetric reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; Graham, D. B.; Norgren, C.; Eriksson, E.; Li, W.; Johlander, A.; Vaivads, A.; André, M.; Pritchett, P. L.; Retinò, A.; Phan, T. D.; Ergun, R. E.; Goodrich, K.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; Marklund, G. T.; Le Contel, O.; Plaschke, F.; Magnes, W.; Strangeway, R. J.; Russell, C. T.; Vaith, H.; Argall, M. R.; Kletzing, C. A.; Nakamura, R.; Torbert, R. B.; Paterson, W. R.; Gershman, D. J.; Dorelli, J. C.; Avanov, L. A.; Lavraud, B.; Saito, Y.; Giles, B. L.; Pollock, C. J.; Turner, D. L.; Blake, J. D.; Fennell, J. F.; Jaynes, A.; Mauk, B. H.; Burch, J. L.

    2016-06-01

    We present Magnetospheric Multiscale observations of an electron-scale current sheet and electron outflow jet for asymmetric reconnection with guide field at the subsolar magnetopause. The electron jet observed within the reconnection region has an electron Mach number of 0.35 and is associated with electron agyrotropy. The jet is unstable to an electrostatic instability which generates intense waves with E∥ amplitudes reaching up to 300 mV m-1 and potentials up to 20% of the electron thermal energy. We see evidence of interaction between the waves and the electron beam, leading to quick thermalization of the beam and stabilization of the instability. The wave phase speed is comparable to the ion thermal speed, suggesting that the instability is of Buneman type, and therefore introduces electron-ion drag and leads to braking of the electron flow. Our observations demonstrate that electrostatic turbulence plays an important role in the electron-scale physics of asymmetric reconnection.

  7. Driving toroidally asymmetric current through the tokamak scrape-off layer, Part II: Magnetic field structure and spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, I

    2009-04-08

    The structure of the magnetic field perturbations due to non-axisymmetric field-aligned currents in the tokamak scrape-off layer (SOL) are analytically calculated near the X-point. Part I [I. Joseph, et al., submitted to Phys. Plasmas (2008)] demonstrated that biasing divertor target plates in a toroidally asymmetric fashion can generate an appreciable toroidally asymmetric parallel current density in the SOL along the separatrix. Here, the magnetic field perturbation caused by a SOL current channel of finite width and step-wise constant amplitude at the target plate is derived. Flux expansion amplifies the magnetic perturbation near the X-point, while phase interference causes the SOL amplitude to be reduced at large toroidal mode number. Far enough from the current channel, the magnetic field can be approximated as arising from a surface current near the separatrix with differing amplitudes in the SOL and the divertor leg. The perturbation spectrum and resonant components of this field are computed analytically asymptotically close to the separatrix in magnetic flux coordinates. The size of the stochastic layer due to the applied perturbation that would result without self-consistent plasma shielding is also estimated. If enough resonant field is generated, control of the edge pressure gradient may allow stabilization of edge localized modes.

  8. High-Resolution Differential Ion Mobility Separations Using Planar Analyzers at Elevated Dispersion Field

    PubMed Central

    Prior, David C.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    The ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) methods are grouped into conventional IMS, based on the absolute ion mobility, and differential or field asymmetric waveform IMS (FAIMS), based on the mobility difference in strong and weak electric fields. A key attraction of FAIMS is substantial orthogonality to mass spectrometry (MS). Although several FAIMS/MS platforms were commercialized, their utility was limited by FAIMS resolving power, typically ∼10 - 20. Recently, gas mixtures comprising up to 75% He has enabled resolving power >100 that permits separation of numerous heretofore “co-eluting” isomers. This performance opens major new proteomic and other biological applications. Here, we show that raising the separation field by ∼35% over the previous 21 kV/cm provides similar or better resolution (with resolving powers of >200 for multiply-charged peptides) using only 50% He, which avoids problems due to elevated pressure and He content in the mass spectrometer. The heating of ions by the separation field in this regime exceeds that at higher He content but weaker field, inducing greater izomerization of labile species. PMID:20666414

  9. Chip-type asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation channel coupled with mass spectrometry for top-down protein identification.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Hun; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2011-11-15

    A chip-type design asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) channel has been developed for high-speed separation of proteins and top-down proteomic analysis using online coupled electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The new miniaturized AF4 channel was assembled by stacking multilayer thin stainless steel (SS, 1.5 mm each) plates embedded with an SS frit in such a way that the total thickness of the channel assembly was about 6 mm. The efficiency of the miniaturized AF4 channel at different channel lengths was examined with the separation of protein standards by adjusting flow rates in which an identical effective channel flow rate or an identical void time can be maintained at different channels. Detection limit, overloading effect, reproducibility, and influence of channel membrane materials on separation efficiency were investigated. Desalting and purification of proteins achieved during the AF4 operation by the action of an exiting crossflow and the use of aqueous mass-spectrometry-compatible (MS-compatible) buffer were advantageous for online coupling of the chip-type AF4 with ESI-MS. The direct coupling of AF4 and ESI-MS capabilities was demonstrated for the high-speed separation and identification of carbonic anhydrase (29 kDa) and transferrin (78 kDa) by full scan MS and for the first top-down identification of proteins with AF4-ESI-MS-MS using collision-induced fragmentation (CID). The presence of intact dimers (156 kDa) of transferrin was confirmed by AF4-ESI-MS via size separation of the dimers from monomers, followed by multiply charged ion spectral analysis of the dimers and molecular mass determinations. It was also found from these experiments that AF4-ESI-MS analysis of transferrin exhibited an increased signal-to-noise ratio compared to that of direct ESI-MS analysis due to online purification of the protein sample and size separation of dimers with AF4. PMID:21981549

  10. Energetic-particle-driven instabilities and induced fast-ion transport in a reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Anderson, J. K.; Capecchi, W.; Eilerman, S.; Forest, C. B.; Koliner, J. J.; Nornberg, M. D.; Reusch, J.; Sarff, J. S.; Liu, D.

    2014-05-15

    Multiple bursty energetic-particle (EP) driven modes with fishbone-like structure are observed during 1 MW tangential neutral-beam injection in a reversed field pinch (RFP) device. The distinguishing features of the RFP, including large magnetic shear (tending to add stability) and weak toroidal magnetic field (leading to stronger drive), provide a complementary environment to tokamak and stellarator configurations for exploring basic understanding of EP instabilities. Detailed measurements of the EP mode characteristics and temporal-spatial dynamics reveal their influence on fast ion transport. Density fluctuations exhibit a dynamically evolving, inboard-outboard asymmetric spatial structure that peaks in the core where fast ions reside. The measured mode frequencies are close to the computed shear Alfvén frequency, a feature consistent with continuum modes destabilized by strong drive. The frequency pattern of the dominant mode depends on the fast-ion species. Multiple frequencies occur with deuterium fast ions compared to single frequency for hydrogen fast ions. Furthermore, as the safety factor (q) decreases, the toroidal mode number of the dominant EP mode transits from n=5 to n=6 while retaining the same poloidal mode number m=1. The transition occurs when the m=1, n=5 wave-particle resonance condition cannot be satisfied as the fast-ion safety factor (q{sub fi}) decreases. The fast-ion temporal dynamics, measured by a neutral particle analyzer, resemble a classical predator-prey relaxation oscillation. It contains a slow-growth phase arising from the beam fueling followed by a rapid drop when the EP modes peak, indicating that the fluctuation-induced transport maintains a stiff fast-ion density profile. The inferred transport rate is strongly enhanced with the onset of multiple EP modes.

  11. On the Electrons Dynamics during Rapid Island Coalescence in Asymmetric Magnetic Reconnection: Case With and With No Guide Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzola, E.; Innocenti, M. E.; Markidis, S.; Goldman, M. V.; Newman, D. L.; Lapenta, G.

    2015-12-01

    We present a set of fully kinetic 2.5D simulations of electron dynamics during rapid magnetic islands coalescence in asymmetric conditions. Simulations are performed using the massively parallel fully kinetic implicit moment method code iPIC3D (Markidis et al. 2010). The domain is a double periodic box with two current sheets initially representing two different reconnection conditions with the same asymmetric ratio. In the upper sheet the conventional hyperbolic continuous functions for magnetic field and density are initialised across the layer (e.g. Pritchett 2008). In the lower layer the same asymmetric conditions are used the presence of an extremely steep gradient describing a pure tangential discontinuity.Cases with and without guide field are compared. While the upper layer shows the typical reconnection evolution of an asymmetric configuration, the lower layer very soon develops not-uniformly distributed multiple reconnection points which rapidly evolve in a series of magnetic islands. Quick islands coalescence follows. Even though the electrons dynamics during island merging has been studied in both symmetric and asymmetric conditions (e.g. Pritchett 2007, 2008b, Drake et al. 2006, Oka et al. 2010, Huang et al. 2014), these simulations show new interesting features such as the presence of three distinct regions, here named X, M and D, with very different properties. Regions X and M manifest typical signatures of ongoing reconnection, distinguishable thanks to the direct comparison with the outcomes of the upper layer. In particular, M-type regions are different because reconnection occurs between two merging islands in a vertical fashion with respect to the direction of the current sheets initially set. In contrast, regions D present a quite diverse features, not showing the typical signatures of a occurring reconnection. The present work is supported by the NASA MMS Grant NNX08AO84G. Additional support for the KULeuven team is provided by the European

  12. A field evaporation deuterium ion source for neutron generators

    SciTech Connect

    Reichenbach, Birk; Solano, I.; Schwoebel, P. R.

    2008-05-01

    Proof-of-principle experiments have demonstrated an electrostatic field evaporation based deuterium ion source for use in compact, high-output deuterium-tritium neutron generators. The ion source produces principally atomic deuterium and titanium ions. More than 100 ML of deuterated titanium thin film can be removed and ionized from a single tip in less than 20 ns. The measurements indicate that with the use of microfabricated tip arrays the deuterium ion source could provide sufficient ion current to produce 10{sup 9}-10{sup 10} n/cm{sup 2} of tip array area.

  13. A field evaporation deuterium ion source for neutron generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichenbach, Birk; Solano, I.; Schwoebel, P. R.

    2008-05-01

    Proof-of-principle experiments have demonstrated an electrostatic field evaporation based deuterium ion source for use in compact, high-output deuterium-tritium neutron generators. The ion source produces principally atomic deuterium and titanium ions. More than 100 ML of deuterated titanium thin film can be removed and ionized from a single tip in less than 20 ns. The measurements indicate that with the use of microfabricated tip arrays the deuterium ion source could provide sufficient ion current to produce 109-1010 n/cm2 of tip array area.

  14. Membrane curvature generated by asymmetric depletion layers of ions, small molecules, and nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Różycki, Bartosz; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2016-08-21

    Biomimetic and biological membranes consist of molecular bilayers with two leaflets that are typically exposed to different aqueous solutions. We consider solutions of "particles" that experience effectively repulsive interactions with these membranes and form depletion layers in front of the membrane leaflets. The particles considered here are water-soluble, have a size between a few angstrom and a few nanometers as well as a rigid, more or less globular shape, and do neither adsorb onto the membranes nor permeate these membranes. Examples are provided by ions, small sugar molecules, globular proteins, or inorganic nanoparticles with a hydrophilic surface. We first study depletion layers in a hard-core system based on ideal particle solutions as well as hard-wall interactions between these particles and the membrane. For this system, we obtain exact expressions for the coverages and tensions of the two leaflets as well as for the spontaneous curvature of the bilayer membrane. All of these quantities depend linearly on the particle concentrations. The exact results for the hard-core system also show that the spontaneous curvature can be directly deduced from the planar membrane geometry. Our results for the hard-core system apply both to ions and solutes that are small compared to the membrane thickness and to nanoparticles with a size that is comparable to the membrane thickness, provided the particle solutions are sufficiently dilute. We then corroborate the different relationships found for the hard-core system by extensive simulations of a soft-core particle system using dissipative particle dynamics. The simulations confirm the linear relationships obtained for the hard-core system. Both our analytical and our simulation results show that the spontaneous curvature induced by a single particle species can be quite large. When one leaflet of the membrane is exposed, e.g., to a 100 mM solution of glucose, a lipid bilayer can acquire a spontaneous curvature of ±1

  15. Analysis of the light-field intensity dependence of catastrophic optical damage in high-power AlGaInP lasers using an asymmetrical tapered laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bou Sanayeh, Marwan

    2016-04-01

    Catastrophic optical damage (COD) in semiconductor lasers is a major limiting effect for high-power operation. Several techniques like microphotoluminescence (μPL) mapping, focused ion beam (FIB) microscopy, and micro- Raman spectroscopy were employed to reveal the physics behind catastrophic optical damage, its related temperature dynamics, as well as associated defect and near-field patterns. High-resolution μPL images demonstrated that during COD, nonradiative dark line defects (DLDs) originate from the front mirror of the laser and propagate deep inside the cavity. Furthermore, FIB microscopy identified the epitaxial layers affected by COD, revealing that the DLDs are confined to the active region. In addition, deep-etching uncovered the DLDs by making them visible, and showed that they are composed of complex dislocation networks. Lasers that underwent a spontaneous breakdown where also studied. One missing piece to complete the characterization of COD is to analyze if the DLDs actually follow certain crystal direction lines inside the laser cavity, which are in general perpendicular to the output facet, or follow the path of the light-field intensity-maximum. Using a specially designed innovative device, namely an asymmetrical AlGaInP tapered laser, it is proven in this study that the COD is strongly dependent on the light-field intensity inside the laser cavity and not on certain crystal direction lines.

  16. Measurement of ultra-low ion energy of decelerated ion beam using a deflecting electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thopan, P.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Tippawan, U.; Yu, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    In investigation on ultra-low-energy ion bombardment effect on DNA, an ion beam deceleration lens was developed for high-quality ultra-low-energy ion beam. Measurement of the ion energy after deceleration was necessary to confirm the ion beam really decelerated as theoretically predicted. In contrast to conventional methods, this work used a simple deflecting electrostatic field after the deceleration lens to bend the ion beam. The beam bending distance depended on the ion energy and was described and simulated. A system for the measurement of the ion beam energy was constructed. It consisted of a pair of parallel electrode plates to generate the deflecting electrical field, a copper rod measurement piece to detect ion beam current, a vernier caliper to mark the beam position, a stepping motor to translate the measurement rod, and a webcam-camera to read the beam bending distance. The entire system was installed after the ion-beam deceleration lens inside the large chamber of the bioengineering vertical ion beam line. Moving the measurement rod across the decelerated ion beam enabled to obtain beam profiles, from which the beam bending distance could be known and the ion beam energy could be calculated. The measurement results were in good agreement with theoretical and simulated results.

  17. Dissociation Dynamics of Molecular Ions in High dc Electric Field.

    PubMed

    Blum, Ivan; Rigutti, Lorenzo; Vurpillot, François; Vella, Angela; Gaillard, Aurore; Deconihout, Bernard

    2016-05-26

    In an atom probe, molecular ions can be field evaporated from the analyzed material and, then, can dissociate under the very intense electric field close to the field emitter. In this work, field evaporation of ZnO reveals the emission of Zn2O2(2+) ions and their dissociation into ZnO(+) ions. It is shown that the repulsion between the produced ZnO(+) ions is large enough to have a measurable effect on both the ion trajectories and times of flight. Comparison with numerical simulations of the ion trajectories gives information on the lifetime of the parent ions, the energy released by the dissociation and repulsion, and also the dissociation direction. This study not only opens the way to a new method to obtain information on the behavior of molecular ions in high electric fields by using an atom probe, but also opens up the interesting perspective to apply this technique to a wide class of materials and molecules. PMID:27136453

  18. Test ion transport in a collisional, field-reversed configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, T.; McWilliams, R.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Bolte, N.; Garate, E. P.; Morehouse, M.; Slepchenkov, M.; Wessel, F.

    2014-08-01

    Diffusion of test-ions in a flux-coil generated, collisional, field-reversed configuration is measured via time-resolved tomographic reconstruction of Ar+ optical emission in the predominantly nitrogen plasma. Azimuthal test ion diffusion across magnetic field lines is found to be classical during the stable period of the discharge. Test ion radial confinement is enhanced by a radial electric field, reducing the observed outward radial transport rate below predictions based solely on classical cross-field diffusion rates. Test ion diffusion is ˜500 m2 s-1 during the stable period of the discharge. The electric field inferred from plasma potential measurements and from equilibrium calculations is consistent with the observed reduction in argon transport.

  19. Effects of H+, He+ ion reflection at the lunar surface and pickup ion dynamics in case of oblique/quasi-parallel magnetic field: 3-D hybrid kinetic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Cooper, J. F.; Sittler, E. C.; Hartle, R. E.; Sarantos, M.

    2013-12-01

    The hybrid kinetic model used here supports comprehensive simulation of the interaction between different spatial and energetic elements of the moon-solar wind-magnetosphere of the Earth system. This involves variable upstream magnetic field and solar wind plasma, including energetic ions, electrons, and neutral atoms. This capability is critical to improved interpretation of existing measurements for surface and atmospheric composition from previous missions and planning future missions. Recently, MAP-PAGE-IMA (Plasma energy Angle and Composition Experiment, and Ion Mass Analyzer) onboard Japanese lunar orbiter SELENE (KAGUYA) detected Moon originating ions at 100 km altitude. Ion species of H+, He++, He+, C+, O+, Na+, K+, and Ar+ were definitively identified. The first portion of our modeling devotes to a study of the H+, H2+, He+, Na+ pickup ion dynamics in cases of flow with a oblique and quasi-parallel magnetic field. In the second series of modeling we also take into account collisions between ions and the surface of the moon and further sputtering of fragments from the surface of the moon. The ion reflection at the lunar surface is also responsible for wave activity in the upstream flow. The solar wind parameters are chosen from ARTEMIS observations. The hybrid kinetic model allows us to take into account the finite gyroradius effects of pickup ions and to estimate correctly the ions velocity distribution and the fluxes along the magnetic field. Modeling shows the asymmetric Mach cone, pickup and reflected ion tails, and presents another type of lunar-solar wind interaction. Our simulation may be also important for the study of the interaction between the solar wind and very weak comets, Mercury and Pluto.

  20. Ion recognition: application of symmetric and asymmetric schiff bases and their complexes for the fabrication of cationic and anionic membrane sensors to determine ions in real samples.

    PubMed

    Faridbod, Farnoush; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Dinarvand, Rassoul; Norouzi, Parviz

    2007-08-01

    Schiff base compounds refer to the branch of supra-molecules and can be used as sensing material in the construction of potentiometric ion selective electrodes (ISEs). This relatively modern field has been subject to extensive research in the period of 1999-2007 when more than 100 ISEs employing Schiff bases were constructed. The quantitative high-throughput detection of 29 cations and 7 anions has been demonstrated in various scientific branches, such as biomedicine, pharmacy, biochemistry, pharmacology, environmental chemistry, food technology, and agriculture. This review discusses Schiff base compounds and their applications in the design and development of ion selective sensors and microsensors. PMID:17979636

  1. Exciton-related nonlinear optical properties in cylindrical quantum dots with asymmetric axial potential: combined effects of hydrostatic pressure, intense laser field, and applied electric field.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Alejandro; Acosta, Ruben E; Mora-Ramos, Miguel E; Duque, Carlos A

    2012-01-01

    : The exciton binding energy of an asymmetrical GaAs-Ga1-xAlxAs cylindrical quantum dot is studied with the use of the effective mass approximation and a variational calculation procedure. The influence on this quantity of the application of a direct-current electric field along the growth direction of the cylinder, together with that of an intense laser field, is particularly considered. The resulting states are used to calculate the exciton-related nonlinear optical absorption and optical rectification, whose corresponding resonant peaks are reported as functions of the external probes, the quantum dot dimensions, and the aluminum molar fraction in the potential barrier regions. PMID:22971418

  2. Combination of Metal Coordination Tetrahedra and Asymmetric Coordination Geometries of Sb(III) in the Organically Directed Chalcogenidometalates: Structural Diversity and Ion-exchange Properties.

    PubMed

    Feng, Mei-Ling; Wang, Kai-Yao; Huang, Xiao-Ying

    2016-04-01

    Chalcogenidometalates exhibit rich and diverse structures and properties applicable to ion exchange, thermoelectrics, photocatalysis, nonlinear optics, and so on. This personal account summarizes our recent progress in constructing chalcogenidometalates by combining metal coordination tetrahedra and the asymmetric coordination geometries of Sb(3+) in the presence of organic species (typically organic amines and metal-organic amine complexes), which has been demonstrated as an effective strategy for synthesizing chalcogenidometalates with diversified structures and interesting properties. The linkage modes of asymmetric SbQn (n = 3, 4) geometries and group 13 (or 14) metal coordination tetrahedra are analyzed, and the secondary building units (SBUs), with different compositions and architectures, are clarified. The crucial role and function of organic species in the formation of chalcogenidometalates are explored, with an emphasis on their powerful structure-directing features. In particular, some chalcogenidometalates in this family exhibit excellent ion-exchange properties for Cs(+) and/or Sr(2+) ions; the factors affecting ion-exchange properties are discussed to understand the underlying ion-exchange mechanism. PMID:26809360

  3. Comment on "Effects of Magnetic Field Gradient on Ion Beam Current in Cylindrical Hall Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Raitses, Y.; Smirnov A.; Fisch, N.J.

    2008-08-29

    It is argued that the key difference of the cylindrical Hall thruster (CHT) as compared to the end-Hall ion source cannot be exclusively attributed to the magnetic field topology [Tang et al. J. Appl. Phys., 102, 123305 (2007)]. With a similar mirror-type topology, the CHT configuration provides the electric field with nearly equipotential magnetic field surfaces and a better suppression of the electron cross-field transport, as compared to both the end-Hall ion source and the cylindrical Hall ion source of Tang et al.

  4. Quantum Simulation of Quantum Field Theories in Trapped Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Casanova, J.; Lamata, L.; Egusquiza, I. L.; Gerritsma, R.; Roos, C. F.; Garcia-Ripoll, J. J.; Solano, E.

    2011-12-23

    We propose the quantum simulation of fermion and antifermion field modes interacting via a bosonic field mode, and present a possible implementation with two trapped ions. This quantum platform allows for the scalable add up of bosonic and fermionic modes, and represents an avenue towards quantum simulations of quantum field theories in perturbative and nonperturbative regimes.

  5. Role of ions in a crossed-field diode.

    PubMed

    Lau, Y Y; Luginsland, J W; Cartwright, K L; Haworth, M D

    2007-01-01

    The effect of ions in a magnetically insulated crossed-field gap is studied using a single particle orbit model, shear flow model, and particle-in-cell simulation. It is found that, in general, the presence of ions in a crossed-field gap always increases the electrons' excursion toward the anode region, regardless of the location of the ions. Thus, the rate at which the electrons migrate toward the anode, which is a measure of the diode closure rate, is related to the rate at which ions are introduced into the crossed-field gap. This anode migration of electrons is unrelated to crossed-field ambipolar diffusion. The implications of these findings are explored, such as pulse shortening in relativistic magnetrons and bipolar flows in pulsed-power systems. PMID:17358481

  6. High electric field deuterium ion sources for neutron generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichenbach, Birk

    Active interrogation systems for highly enriched uranium require improved fieldable neutron sources. The target technology for deuterium-tritium neutron generators is well understood and the most significant improvement can be achieved by improving the deuterium ion source through increased output and, in some cases, lifetime of the ion source. We are developing a new approach to a deuterium ion sources based upon the field desorption/evaporation of deuterium from the surfaces of metal tips. Electrostatic field desorption (EFD) desorbs previously adsorbed deuterium as ions under the influence of high electric fields (several V/A), without removing tip material. Single etched wire tip experiments have been performed and have shown that this is difficult but can be achieved with molybdenum and tungsten tips. Electrostatic field evaporation (EFE) evaporates ultra thin deuterated titanium films as ions. It has been shown that several 10s of atomic layers can be removed within a few nanoseconds from etched tungsten tips. In the course of these studies titanium deposition and deuteration methods were studied and new detection methods developed. Space charge effects resulting from the large ion currents were identified to be the most likely cause of some unusual ion emission characteristics. In addition, on W < 110 > oriented substrates a surprising body-centered cubic crystal structure of the titanium film was found and studied. The ion currents required for neutron generator applications can be achieved by microfabrication of metal tip arrays. Field desorption studies of microfabricated field emitter tip arrays have been conducted for the first time. Maximum fields of 3 V/A have been applied to the array tip surfaces to date, although fields of ˜ 2 V/A to ˜ 2.5 V/A are more typical. Desorption of atomic deuterium ions has been observed at fields of roughly 2 V/A at room temperature. The desorption of common surface adsorbates, such as hydrogen, carbon, water, and

  7. Separation and characterization of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) latex particles by asymmetric flow field flow fractionation with light-scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Collins, Melissa E; Soto-Cantu, Erick; Cueto, Rafael; Russo, Paul S

    2014-04-01

    Poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) latex particles have been analyzed and sorted according to size using asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (AF4) coupled with multiple-angle light scattering (MALS). Characterization of fractions by regular and depolarized dynamic light scattering confirmed that smaller particles elute prior to larger ones, as expected for field flow fractionation. The measured radii of the optically and geometrically anisotropic particles are consistent with those determined from transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A certain amount of heterogeneity remains in the fractions, but their uniformity for use as diffusion probes is improved. Full characterization of PTFE colloids will require a difficult assessment of the distribution, even within fractions, of the optical anisotropy. A general method to obtain number versus size distributions is presented. This approach is valid even when an online concentration detector is not available or ineffective. The procedure is adaptable to particles of almost any regular shape. PMID:24635125

  8. Influence of electrical fields and asymmetric application of mucilage on curvature of primary roots of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcum, H.; Moore, R.

    1990-01-01

    Primary roots of Zea mays cv. Yellow Dent growing in an electric field curve towards the anode. Roots treated with EDTA and growing in electric field do not curve. When root cap mucilage is applied asymmetrically to tips of vertically-oriented roots, the roots curve toward the mucilage. Roots treated with EDTA curve toward the side receiving mucilage and toward blocks containing 10 mM CaCl2, but not toward "empty" agar blocks or the cut surfaces of severed root tips. These results suggest that 1) free calcium (Ca) is necessary for root electrotropism, 2) mucilage contains effector(s) that induce gravitropiclike curvature, and 3) mucilage can replace gravitropic effectors chelated by EDTA. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the downward movement of gravitropic effectors to the lower sides of tips of horizontally-oriented roots occurs at least partially in the apoplast.

  9. Electric field by pick-up ions and electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Masatoshi; Behar, Etienne; Nilsson, Hans; Holmstrom, Mats

    2016-04-01

    Observations by the Rosetta Plasma Consortium (RPC) showed increasing distortion of the solar wind flow as Rosetta approached the Sun, i.e., as the density of the newly born ions increased. This indicates azimuthal momentum transfer from the solar wind to the newly born ions because they are displaced by the solar wind electric field up to the ion gyroradius this the solar wind velocity, and conservation of the momentum (center of the mass) makes the solar wind to azimuthally shift by "counter action" of these pick-up ion motions. To understand this azimuthal momentum transfer, it is inevitable to model the electric field by the displacement of these pick-up ions and electrons. Although the E×B drift does not make charge separation when the scale size is larger than the ion gyroradius, ions and electrons move in the opposite direction to each other within the short distance up to a gyroradius, and therefore, the charge separation occurs. Thus, the newly-ionized neutrals (ion-electron pairs) create the electric field in the opposite (shielding) direction to the solar wind electric field (like the ionopause of Venus and Mars). However, such a newly induced "shielding" electric field will simultaneously be weakened by the solar wind electrons because the solar wind is also moved by this shielding electric field to reduce it, in the same way as the plasma oscillation (time scale of about 10‑4 s). In other words, the solar wind tries to maintain the solar wind electric field as far as the momentum allows. These two opposite effects must be combined when modelling the azimuthal electric field, and resultant ion/electron motions within a gyroradius, like the case for ROSETTA. Furthermore, the effect of the induced electric field by the pick-up ions and electrons will be different when the newly born ions are created as the result of photo-ionization and of the charge exchange because the electron effect is different between them. In the presentation, we model the

  10. Linear electric field time-of-flight ion mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Funsten, Herbert O.; Feldman, William C.

    2008-06-10

    A linear electric field ion mass spectrometer having an evacuated enclosure with means for generating a linear electric field located in the evacuated enclosure and means for injecting a sample material into the linear electric field. A source of pulsed ionizing radiation injects ionizing radiation into the linear electric field to ionize atoms or molecules of the sample material, and timing means determine the time elapsed between ionization of atoms or molecules and arrival of an ion out of the ionized atoms or molecules at a predetermined position.

  11. Electromagnetic instabilities attributed to a cross-field ion drift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. L.; Wong, H. K.; Wu, C. S.

    1990-01-01

    Instabilities due to a cross-field ion flow are reexamined by including the electromagnetic response of the ions, which has been ignored in existing discussions. It is found that this effect can lead to significant enhancement of the growth rate. Among the new results, a purely growing, electromagnetic unstable mode with a wave vector k parallel to the ambient magnetic field is found. The plasma configuration under consideration is similar to that used in the discussion of the well-known modified-two-stream instability. This instability has a growth rate faster than the ion cyclotron frequency, and is not susceptible to high-plasma-beta stabilization.

  12. Zero-field optical manipulation of magnetic ions in semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Myers, R C; Mikkelsen, M H; Tang, J-M; Gossard, A C; Flatté, M E; Awschalom, D D

    2008-03-01

    Controlling and monitoring individual spins is desirable for building spin-based devices, as well as implementing quantum information processing schemes. As with trapped ions in cold gases, magnetic ions trapped on a semiconductor lattice have uniform properties and relatively long spin lifetimes. Furthermore, diluted magnetic moments in semiconductors can be strongly coupled to the surrounding host, permitting optical or electrical spin manipulation. Here we describe the zero-field optical manipulation of a few hundred manganese ions in a single gallium arsenide quantum well. Optically created mobile electron spins dynamically generate an energy splitting of the ion spins and enable magnetic moment orientation solely by changing either photon helicity or energy. These polarized manganese spins precess in a transverse field, enabling measurements of the spin lifetimes. As the magnetic ion concentration is reduced and the manganese spin lifetime increases, coherent optical control and readout of single manganese spins in gallium arsenide should be possible. PMID:18278049

  13. The Effects of Ion heating in Martian Magnetic Crustal Fields: Particle Tracing and Ion Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, C. M.; Andersson, L.

    2014-12-01

    Ion heating is a process that may allow low energy ions within the Martian ionosphere to be accelerated and escape. Ion heating can be especially efficient if the ions stay in the heating region for long time durations. With this in mind, the magnetic crustal field regions on Mars are particularly interesting. We focus on ions present within these regions, where changes in magnetic field strength and direction can heat these ions. Since crustal magnetic fields can maintain a trapped particle population it is unclear how efficiently plasma can be built up that can later escape to space. We investigate here two drivers: rotation of the planet and the solar wind pressure. As crustal fields rotate from the wake of the planet to the sub solar point and back, they experience compression and expansion over time scales of ~24 hours. The solar wind pressure on the other hand can cause variations over much shorter time scales (minutes). The effect of these two drivers using a particle tracing simulation that solves the Lorentz force is presented. O+ ions are seeded within the simulation box. The magnetic environment is a linear sum of a dipole field and a solar wind magnetic field. The dipole field represents the magnetic crustal field and the dipole strength is chosen to be consistent with MGS magnetometer observations of Martian crustal field regions. By increasing the solar wind strength the magnetic dipole is compressed. Decreasing solar wind strength allows the dipole to expand. Small magnitude, short time scale variations can be imposed over the top of this larger variation to represent short time scale solar wind variations. Since the purpose of this analysis is to understand the changes of the ion distribution inside the crustal field, simplistic assumptions of the field outside the crustal field can be made. Initial results are presented, with the focus on two main questions: (a) can low energy ions be heated and escape the closed dipole field lines as a result of

  14. Ion Beam Neutralization Using FEAs and Mirror Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaescu, Dan; Sakai, Shigeki; Gotoh, Yasuhito; Ishikawa, Junzo

    2011-01-01

    Advanced implantation systems used for semiconductor processing require transportation of ion beams which are quasi-parallel and have low energy, such as (11B+,31P+,75As+) with energy in the range Eion = 200-1000 eV. Compensation of ion beam divergence may be obtained through electron injection and confinement in regions of non-uniform magnetic fields. Field emitter arrays with special properties are used as electron sources. The present study shows that electron confinement takes place in regions of gradient magnetic field, such as nearby analyzing, collimator and final energy magnets of the ion beam line. Modeling results have been obtained using Opera3D/Tosca/Scala. In regions of gradient magnetic field, electrons have helical trajectories which are confined like a cloud inside curved "magnetic bottles". An optimal range of positions with respect to the magnet for placing electron sources in gradient magnetic field has been shown to exist.

  15. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, K.F.; Miller, M.K.

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a bibliography for 1991 on the following topics: Atom probe field ion microscopy; field desorption mass spectrometry; field emission; field ion microscopy; and field emission theory.

  16. Critical current density and trapped field in HTS with asymmetric magnetization loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokhfeld, D.

    2016-03-01

    Applications of the extended critical state model are considered. The trapped magnetic field, the penetration field and the field dependence of the critical current density are analysed. The critical current density and the trapped field in superconducting grains depend on the grain size. Asymmetry of the hysteresis curves relative to the M = 0 axis is related to the scale of the current circulation.

  17. Generation of periodic ultrashort electron bunches and strongly asymmetric ion Coulomb explosion in nanometer foils interacting with ultra-intense laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Tian Youwei; Yu Wei; Xu Han; Lei Anle; Shen Baifei; Wang Xin; Lu Peixiang; Senecha, Vinod

    2008-05-15

    The interaction of a linearly polarized intense laser pulse with an ultrathin nanometer plasma layer is investigated to understand the physics of the ion acceleration. It is shown by the computer simulation that the plasma response to the laser pulse comprises two steps. First, due to the vxB effect, electrons in the plasma layer are extracted and periodic ultrashort relativistic electron bunches are generated every half of a laser period. Second, strongly asymmetric Coulomb explosion of ions in the foil occurs due to the strong electrostatic charge separation, once the foil is burnt through. Followed by the laser accelerated electron bunch, the ion expansion in the forward direction occurs along the laser beam that is much stronger as compared to the backward direction.

  18. Measuring Fast Ion Losses in a Reversed Field Pinch Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonofiglo, P. J.; Anderson, J. K.; Almagri, A. F.; Kim, J.; Clark, J.; Capecchi, W.; Sears, S. H.

    2015-11-01

    The reversed field pinch (RFP) provides a unique environment to study fast ion confinement and transport. The RFP's weak toroidal field, strong magnetic shear, and ability to enter a 3D state provide a wide range of dynamics to study fast ions. Core-localized, 25 keV fast ions are sourced into MST by a tangentially injected hydrogen/deuterium neutral beam. Neutral particle analysis and measured fusion neutron flux indicate enhanced fast ion transport in the plasma core. Past experiments point to a dynamic loss of fast ions associated with the RFP's transition to a 3D state and with beam-driven, bursting magnetic modes. Consequently, fast ion transport and losses in the RFP have garnered recent attention. Valuable information on fast-ion loss, such as energy and pitch distributions, are sought to provide a better understanding of the transport mechanisms at hand. We have constructed and implemented two fast ion loss detectors (FILDs) for use on MST. The FILDs have two, independent, design concepts: collecting particles as a function of v⊥ or with pitch greater than 0.8. In this work, we present our preliminary findings and results from our FILDs on MST. This research is supported by US DOE.

  19. Field evaporation ion source with possible application to electrostatic propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weizer, V. G.

    1971-01-01

    Field evaporation of solid metal electrodes has been proposed as an ion source for an electrostatic propulsion device. The chief advantage over existing ion sources is the prospect of 100 percent fuel utilization efficiency. This advantage arises as a result of the elimination of the need for a gaseous precursor state for propellant ionization. The attainment of required high surface field strengths is achieved through field-induced extrusion of the electrode geometry at elevated temperatures. Contributions of both surface and bulk transport mechanisms are taken into account.

  20. Cusped magnetic field mercury ion thruster. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beattie, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    The importance of a uniform current density profile in the exhaust beam of an electrostatic ion thruster is discussed in terms of thrust level and accelerator system lifetime. A residence time approach is used to explain the nonuniform beam current density profile of the divergent magnetic field thruster. Mathematical expressions are derived which relate the thruster discharge power loss, propellant utilization, and double to single ion density ratio to the geometry and plasma properties of the discharge chamber. These relationships are applied to a cylindrical discharge chamber model of the thruster. Experimental results are presented for a wide range of the discharge chamber length. The thruster designed for this investigation was operated with a cusped magnetic field as well as a divergent field geometry, and the cusped field geometry is shown to be superior from the standpoint of beam profile uniformity, performance, and double ion population.

  1. Multiple ion species plasmas with thermal ions in an oblique magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Hatami, M. M.

    2013-08-15

    Using a three-fluid model, the combined effects of an oblique magnetic field and finite temperature of positive ion species on the characteristics of the sheath region of multi-component plasmas are investigated numerically. It is assumed that the ion species are singly charged and have different masses. In the presence of an external magnetic field, it is shown that the density distribution of positive ion species (especially the lighter ion species) begins to fluctuate and does not decrease monotonically towards the wall. Also, it is shown that by increasing the magnetic field, the amplitude of fluctuation increases and its position moves towards the sheath edge. Moreover, it is illustrated that the presence of the magnetic field affects the sheath width and by increasing the magnetic field, the sheath width decreases. In addition, the results show that in the presence of the magnetic field, the increase of temperature of positive ion species has an infinitesimal effect on the sheath width and density distribution of positive ion species.

  2. Asymmetric fluorocyclizations of alkenes.

    PubMed

    Wolstenhulme, Jamie R; Gouverneur, Véronique

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: The vicinal fluorofunctionalization of alkenes is an attractive transformation that converts feedstock olefins into valuable cyclic fluorinated molecules for application in the pharmaceutical, agrochemical, medical, and material sectors. The challenges associated with asymmetric fluorocyclizations induced by F(+) reagents are distinct from other types of halocyclizations. Processes initiated by the addition of an F(+) reagent onto an alkene do not involve the reversible formation of bridged fluoronium ions but generate acyclic β-fluorocationic intermediates. This mechanistic feature implies that fluorocyclizations are not stereospecific. A discontinuity exists between the importance of this class of fluorocyclization and the activation modes currently available to implement successful catalysis. Progress toward fluorocyclization has been achieved by investing in neutral and cationic [NF] reagent development. The body of work on asymmetric fluorination using chiral cationic [NF](+) reagents prepared by fluorine transfer from the dicationic [NF](2+) reagent Selectfluor to quinuclidines, inspired the development of asymmetric F(+)-induced fluorocyclizations catalyzed by cinchona alkaloids; for catalysis, the use of N-fluorobenzenesulfonimide, which is less reactive than Selectfluor, ensures that the achiral F(+) source remains unreactive toward the alkene. These organocatalyzed enantioselective fluorocyclizations can be applied to indoles to install the fluorine on a quaternary benzylic stereogenic carbon center and to afford fluorinated analogues of natural products featuring the hexahydropyrrolo[2,3-b]indole or the tetrahydro-2H-furo[2,3-b]indole skeleton. In an alternative approach, the poor solubility of dicationic Selectfluor bis(tetrafluoroborate) in nonpolar solvent was exploited with anionic phase transfer catalysis as the operating activation mode. Exchange of the tetrafluoroborate ions of Selectfluor with bulky lipophilic chiral anions (e

  3. Sharpening of field emitter tips using high-energy ions

    DOEpatents

    Musket, Ronald G.

    1999-11-30

    A process for sharpening arrays of field emitter tips of field emission cathodes, such as found in field-emission, flat-panel video displays. The process uses sputtering by high-energy (more than 30 keV) ions incident along or near the longitudinal axis of the field emitter to sharpen the emitter with a taper from the tip or top of the emitter down to the shank of the emitter. The process is particularly applicable to sharpening tips of emitters having cylindrical or similar (e.g., pyramidal) symmetry. The process will sharpen tips down to radii of less than 12 nm with an included angle of about 20 degrees. Because the ions are incident along or near the longitudinal axis of each emitter, the tips of gated arrays can be sharpened by high-energy ion beams rastered over the arrays using standard ion implantation equipment. While the process is particularly applicable for sharpening of arrays of field emitters in field-emission flat-panel displays, it can be effectively utilized in the fabrication of other vacuum microelectronic devices that rely on field emission of electrons.

  4. Evaluation of neutron radiation field in carbon ion therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jun-Kui; Su, You-Wu; Li, Wu-Yuan; Yan, Wei-Wei; Chen, Xi-Meng; Mao, Wang; Pang, Cheng-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Carbon ions have significant advantages in tumor therapy because of their physical and biological properties. In view of the radiation protection, the safety of patients is the most important issue in therapy processes. Therefore, the effects of the secondary particles produced by the carbon ions in the tumor therapy should be carefully considered, especially for the neutrons. In the present work, the neutron radiation field induced by carbon ions was evaluated by using the FLUKA code. The simulated results of neutron energy spectra and neutron dose was found to be in good agreement with the experiment data. In addition, energy deposition of carbon ions and neutrons in tissue-like media was studied, it is found that the secondary neutron energy deposition is not expected to exceed 1% of the carbon ion energy deposition in a typical treatment.

  5. Quantifying vorticity in magnetic particle suspensions driven by symmetric and asymmetric multiaxial fields.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, James E.; Solis, Kyle Jameson

    2015-08-07

    We recently reported two methods of inducing vigorous fluid vorticity in magnetic particle suspensions. The first method employs symmetry-breaking rational fields. These fields are comprised of two orthogonal ac components whose frequencies form a rational number and an orthogonal dc field that breaks the symmetry of the biaxial ac field to create the parity required to induce deterministic vorticity. The second method is based on rational triads, which are fields comprised of three orthogonal ac components whose frequency ratios are rational (e.g., 1 : 2 : 3). For each method a symmetry theory has been developed that enables the prediction of the direction and sign of vorticity as functions of the field frequencies and phases. However, this theory has its limitations. It only applies to those particular phase angles that give rise to fields whose Lissajous plots, or principal 2-d projections thereof, have a high degree of symmetry. Nor can symmetry theory provide a measure of the magnitude of the torque density induced by the field. In this paper a functional of the multiaxial magnetic field is proposed that not only is consistent with all of the predictions of the symmetry theories, but also quantifies the torque density. This functional can be applied to fields whose Lissajous plots lack symmetry and can thus be used to predict a variety of effects and trends that cannot be predicted from the symmetry theories. These trends include the dependence of the magnitude of the torque density on the various frequency ratios, the unexpected reversal of flow with increasing dc field amplitude for certain symmetry-breaking fields, and the existence of off-axis vorticity for rational triads, such as 1 : 3 : 5, that do not have the symmetry required to analyze by symmetry theory. As a result, experimental data are given that show the degree to which this functional is successful in predicting observed trends.

  6. Quantifying vorticity in magnetic particle suspensions driven by symmetric and asymmetric multiaxial fields.

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Martin, James E.; Solis, Kyle Jameson

    2015-08-07

    We recently reported two methods of inducing vigorous fluid vorticity in magnetic particle suspensions. The first method employs symmetry-breaking rational fields. These fields are comprised of two orthogonal ac components whose frequencies form a rational number and an orthogonal dc field that breaks the symmetry of the biaxial ac field to create the parity required to induce deterministic vorticity. The second method is based on rational triads, which are fields comprised of three orthogonal ac components whose frequency ratios are rational (e.g., 1 : 2 : 3). For each method a symmetry theory has been developed that enables the predictionmore » of the direction and sign of vorticity as functions of the field frequencies and phases. However, this theory has its limitations. It only applies to those particular phase angles that give rise to fields whose Lissajous plots, or principal 2-d projections thereof, have a high degree of symmetry. Nor can symmetry theory provide a measure of the magnitude of the torque density induced by the field. In this paper a functional of the multiaxial magnetic field is proposed that not only is consistent with all of the predictions of the symmetry theories, but also quantifies the torque density. This functional can be applied to fields whose Lissajous plots lack symmetry and can thus be used to predict a variety of effects and trends that cannot be predicted from the symmetry theories. These trends include the dependence of the magnitude of the torque density on the various frequency ratios, the unexpected reversal of flow with increasing dc field amplitude for certain symmetry-breaking fields, and the existence of off-axis vorticity for rational triads, such as 1 : 3 : 5, that do not have the symmetry required to analyze by symmetry theory. As a result, experimental data are given that show the degree to which this functional is successful in predicting observed trends.« less

  7. Asymmetric neutrino production in magnetized proto-neutron stars in fully relativistic mean-field approach

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Tomoyuki; Kajino, Toshitaka; Hidaka, Jun; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Yasutake, Nobutoshi; Kuroda, Takami; Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Ryu, Chung-Yeol; Mathews, Grant J.

    2014-05-02

    We calculate the neutrino production cross-section in the proto-neutron-star matter under a strong magnetic field in the relativistic mean-field approach. We introduce a new parameter-set which can reproduce the 1.96 solar mass neutron star. We find that the production process increases emitted neutrinos along the direction parallel to the magnetic field and decrease those along its opposite direction. It means that resultant asymmetry due to the neutrino absorption and scattering process in the magnetic field becomes larger by the addition of the neutrino production process.

  8. Spherical probes at ion saturation in E × B fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patacchini, Leonardo; Hutchinson, Ian H.

    2010-03-01

    The ion saturation current to a spherical probe in the entire range of ion magnetization is computed with SCEPTIC3D, a new three-dimensional version of the kinetic code SCEPTIC designed to study transverse plasma flows. Results are compared with prior two-dimensional calculations valid in the magnetic-free regime (Hutchinson 2002 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 44 1953), and with recent semi-analytic solutions to the strongly magnetized transverse Mach probe problem (Patacchini and Hutchinson 2009 Phys. Rev. E 80 036403). At intermediate magnetization (ion Larmor radius close to the probe radius) the plasma density profiles show a complex three-dimensional structure that SCEPTIC3D can fully resolve, and, contrary to intuition, the ion current peaks provided the ion temperature is low enough. Our results are conveniently condensed in a single factor Mc, function of ion temperature and magnetic field only, providing the theoretical calibration for a transverse Mach probe with four electrodes placed at 45° to the magnetic field in a plane of flow and magnetic field.

  9. Effect of magnetic field inhomogeneity on ion cyclotron motion coherence at high magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Vladimirov, Gleb; Kostyukevich, Yury; Hendrickson, Christopher L; Blakney, Greg T; Nikolaev, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    A three-dimensional code based on the particle-in-cell algorithm modified to account for the inhomogeneity of the magnetic field was applied to determine the effect of Z(1), Z(2), Z(3), Z(4), X, Y, ZX, ZY, XZ(2) YZ(2), XY and X(2)-Y(2) components of an orthogonal magnetic field expansion on ion motion during detection in an FT-ICR cell. Simulations were performed for magnetic field strengths of 4.7, 7, 14.5 and 21 Tesla, including experimentally determined magnetic field spatial distributions for existing 4.7 T and 14.5 T magnets. The effect of magnetic field inhomogeneity on ion cloud stabilization ("ion condensation") at high numbers of ions was investigated by direct simulations of individual ion trajectories. Z(1), Z(2), Z(3) and Z(4) components have the largest effect (especially Z(1)) on ion cloud stability. Higher magnetic field strength and lower m/z demand higher relative magnetic field homogeneity to maintain cloud coherence for a fixed time period. The dependence of mass resolving power upper limit on Z(1) inhomogeneity is evaluated for different magnetic fields and m/z. The results serve to set the homogeneity requirements for various orthogonal magnetic field components (shims) for future FT-ICR magnet design. PMID:26307725

  10. Linear and nonlinear optical properties in an asymmetric double quantum well under intense laser field: Effects of applied electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesilgul, U.; Al, E. B.; Martínez-Orozco, J. C.; Restrepo, R. L.; Mora-Ramos, M. E.; Duque, C. A.; Ungan, F.; Kasapoglu, E.

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, the effects of electric and magnetic fields on the linear and third-order nonlinear optical absorption coefficients and relative change of the refractive index in asymmetric GaAs/GaAlAs double quantum wells under intense laser fields are theoretically investigated. The electric field is oriented along the growth direction of the heterostructure while the magnetic field is taken in-plane. The intense laser field is linear polarization along the growth direction. Our calculations are made using the effective-mass approximation and the compact density-matrix approach. Intense laser effects on the system are investigated with the use of the Floquet method with the consequent change in the confinement potential of heterostructures. Our results show that the increase of the electric and magnetic fields blue-shifts the peak positions of the total absorption coefficient and of the total refractive index while the increase of the intense laser field firstly blue-shifts the peak positions and later results in their red-shifting.

  11. Mechanism of DNA Trapping in Nanoporous Structures during Asymmetric Pulsed-Field Electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ya; Harrison, D. Jed

    2014-03-01

    DNA molecules (>100kbp) are trapped in separation sieves when high electric fields are applied in pulsed field electrophoresis, seriously limiting the speed of separation. Using crystalline particle arrays, to generate interstitial pores for molecular sieving, allows higher electric fields than in gels, (e.g 40 vs 5 V/cm), however trapping still limits the field strength. Using reverse pulses, which release DNA from being fully-stretched, allows higher fields (140 V/cm). We investigate the trapping mechanism of individual DNA molecules in ordered nanoporous structures. Two prerequisites for trapping are revealed by the dynamics of single trapped DNA, hernia formation and fully-stretched U/J shapes. Fully stretched DNA has longer unhooking times than expected by simple models. We propose a dielectrophoretic (DEP) force reduces the mobility of segments at the apex of the U or J, where field gradients are highest, based on simulations. A modified model for unhooking time is obtained after the DEP force is introduced. The new model explains the unhooking time data by predicting an infinite trapping time when the ratio of arm length differences (of the U or J) to molecule length Δx / L < β . β is a DEP parameter that is found to strongly increase with electric field. The work was supported by grant from Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) and the National Institute for Nanotechnology (NINT).

  12. Effects of 3D Toroidally Asymmetric Magnetic Field on Tokamak Magnetic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lao, L. L.

    2005-10-01

    The effects of 3D error magnetic field on magnetic surfaces are investigated using the DIII-D internal coils (I-Coils). Slowly rotating n=1 traveling waves at 5 Hz and various amplitudes were applied to systematically perturb the edge surfaces by programming the I-Coil currents. The vertical separatrix location difference between EFIT magnetic reconstructions that assumes toroidal symmetry and Thomson scattering Te measurements responds in phase to the applied perturbed field. The oscillation amplitudes increase with the strength of the applied field but are much smaller than those expected from the applied field alone. The results indicate that plasma response is important. Various plasma response models based on results from the MHD codes MARS and GATO are being developed and compared to the experimental observations. To more accurately evaluate the effects of magnetic measurement errors, a new form of the magnetic uncertainty matrix is also being implemented into EFIT. Details will be presented.

  13. Near-surface density profiling of Fe ion irradiated Si (100) using extremely asymmetric x-ray diffraction by variation of the wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Khanbabaee, B. Pietsch, U.; Facsko, S.; Doyle, S.

    2014-10-20

    In this work, we report on correlations between surface density variations and ion parameters during ion beam-induced surface patterning process. The near-surface density variations of irradiated Si(100) surfaces were investigated after off-normal irradiation with 5 keV Fe ions at different fluences. In order to reduce the x-ray probing depth to a thickness below 5 nm, the extremely asymmetrical x-ray diffraction by variation of wavelength was applied, exploiting x-ray refraction at the air-sample interface. Depth profiling was achieved by measuring x-ray rocking curves as function of varying wavelengths providing incidence angles down to 0°. The density variation was extracted from the deviations from kinematical Bragg angle at grazing incidence angles due to refraction of the x-ray beam at the air-sample interface. The simulations based on the dynamical theory of x-ray diffraction revealed that while a net near-surface density decreases with increasing ion fluence which is accompanied by surface patterning, there is a certain threshold of ion fluence to surface density modulation. Our finding suggests that the surface density variation can be relevant with the mechanism of pattern formation.

  14. A Systematic Investigation of Quaternary Ammonium Ions as Asymmetric Phase Transfer Catalysts. Synthesis of Catalyst Libraries and Evaluation of Catalyst Activity

    PubMed Central

    Denmark, Scott E.; Gould, Nathan D.; Wolf, Larry M.

    2011-01-01

    Despite over three decades of research into asymmetric phase transfer catalysis (APTC), a fundamental understanding of the factors that affect the rate and stereoselectivity of this important process are still obscure. This paper describes the initial stages of a long-term program aimed at elucidating the physical organic foundations of APTC employing a chemoinformatic analysis of the alkylation of a protected glycine imine with a libraries of enantiomerically enriched quaternary ammonium ions. The synthesis of the quaternary ammonium ions follows a diversity oriented approach wherein the tandem inter[4+2]/intra[3+2] cycloaddition of nitroalkenes serves as the key transformation. A two part synthetic strategy comprised of: (1) preparation of enantioenriched scaffolds and (2) development of parallel synthesis procedures is described. The strategy allows for the facile introduction of four variable groups in the vicinity of a stereogenic quaternary ammonium ion. The quaternary ammonium ions exhibited a wide range of activity and to a lesser degree enantioselectivity. Catalyst activity and selectivity are rationalized in a qualitative way based on the effective positive potential of the ammonium ion. PMID:21446721

  15. Electron-ion collision operator in strong electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraiman, Gennadiy; Balakin, Alexey

    2012-10-01

    The pair electron-ion collision operator is found for the kinetic equation describing the one-particle drift distribution in strong electromagnetic fields [1]. The pair collisions are studied under the conditions when the oscillation velocity of an electron driven by an external electromagnetic wave is much larger than the electron drift velocity. The operator is presented in the Boltzmann form and describes collisions with both small and large changes of the particle momentum. In contrast with the Landau collision operator, which describes diffusion in the momentum space, the collision operator that we propose describes a new and very important effect, namely, Coulomb attraction of a wave-driven oscillating electron to an ion due to multiple returns of the electron to the same ion. This effect leads to a large increase of the collision cross-section of electron-ion collisions in strong laser fields, to increased efficiency of the Joule heating in plasma, to the generation of fast electrons through e-i collisions, etc. [4pt] [1] A. A. Balakin and G. M. Fraiman, Electron-ion collision operator in strong electromagnetic fields, EPL 93, 35001 (2011).

  16. Ion transferring in polyelectrolyte networks in electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Honghao; Erbas, Aykut; Zwanikken, Jos; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica

    Ion-conducting polyelectrolyte gels have drawn the attention of many researchers in the last few decades as they have wide applications not only in lithium batteries but also as stretchable, transparent ionic conductor or ionic cables devices. However, ion dynamics in polyelectrolyte gels has been much less studied analytically or computationally due to the complicated interplay of long-range electrostatic and short-range interactions. Here we propose a coarse-grained non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation to study the ion dynamics in polyelectrolyte gels under external electric fields. We found a nonlinear response region where the molar conductivity of polyelectrolyte gels increases with external fields. We propose counterion redistribution under electric fields as the driving mechanism. We also found the ionic conductivity to be modulated by changing polylelectrolyte network topology such as the chain length. Our discovery reveals the essential difference of ion dynamics between electrolytes and polyelectrolyte gels. These results will expand our understanding in charged polymeric systems and help in designing ion-conducting devices with higher conductivity.

  17. Strain evolution in Si substrate due to implantation of MeV ion observed by extremely asymmetric x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Emoto, T.; Ghatak, J.; Satyam, P. V.; Akimoto, K.

    2009-08-15

    We studied the strain introduced in a Si(111) substrate due to MeV ion implantation using extremely asymmetric x-ray diffraction and measured the rocking curves of asymmetrical 113 diffraction for the Si substrates implanted with a 1.5 MeV Au{sup 2+} ion at fluence values of 1x10{sup 13}, 5x10{sup 13}, and 1x10{sup 14}/cm{sup 2}. The measured curves consisted of a bulk peak and accompanying subpeak with an interference fringe. The positional relationship of the bulk peak to the subpeak and the intensity variation of those peaks with respect to the wavelengths of the x rays indicated that crystal lattices near the surface were strained; the lattice spacing of surface normal (111) planes near the surface was larger than that of the bulk. Detailed strain profiles along the depth direction were successfully estimated using a curve-fitting method based on Darwin's dynamical diffraction theory. Comparing the shapes of resultant strain profiles, we found that a strain evolution rapidly occurred within a depth of approx300 nm at fluence values between 1x10{sup 13} and 5x10{sup 13}/cm{sup 2}. This indicates that formation of the complex defects progressed near the surface when the fluence value went beyond a critical value between 1x10{sup 13} and 5x10{sup 13}/cm{sup 2} and the defects brought a large strain to the substrate.

  18. Spin wave mode coexistence: A consequence of the Oersted field induced asymmetric energy landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumas, Randy; Iacocca, Ezio; Bonetti, Stefano; Sani, Sohrab; Mohseni, Majid; Eklund, Anders; Persson, Johan; Heinonen, Olle; Akerman, Johan

    2013-03-01

    The emerging field of magnonics relies on the systematic generation, manipulation, and detection of spin waves (SWs). Nanocontact spin torque oscillators (NC-STOs) provide an ideal platform to study spin transfer torque induced SW emission. In analogy to two species competing for the same food supply it has been argued that only one SW mode can survive in the steady state. However, as evidenced in many experiments clear signatures of mode-hopping are often observed. We present a third possibility, namely that under the correct experimental conditions, mode coexistence can be realized. Micromagnetic simulations reveal that the SW modes are spatially separated under the NC. Mode coexistence is facilitated by the local field asymmetries induced by the spatially inhomogeneous Oersted field in the vicinity of the NC and further promoted by SW localization. Finally, both simulation and experiment reveal a weak low frequency signal exactly at the difference of the mode frequencies, consistent with inter-modulation of two coexistent modes.

  19. The influence of stray magnetic fields on ion beam neutralization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Y.-C.; Wilbur, P. J.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental investigation is described of a comparison between the ion beam neutralization characteristics of a local neutralizer (within approximately 5 cm of the beam edge) and those associated with a distant one (approximately 1 meter away from the thruster). The influence of magnetic fields in the vicinity of the neutralizer cathode orifice which are either parallel or normal to the neutralizer axis is assessed. The plasma property profiles which reflect the influence of the magnetic fields are measured. The results suggest that magnetic fields at the region of a neutralizer cathode orifice influence its ability to couple to the ion beam. They reveal that there is a potential jump from the neutralizer cathode orifice to the plasma which exists close to the orifice. This potential drop is found to increase as the axial component of magnetic flux density increases. A magnetic field perpendicular to the neutralizer axis induces a potential rise a few centimeters downstream from the neutralizer cathode.

  20. Phase transition and critical end point driven by an external magnetic field in asymmetric quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Pedro; Ferreira, Márcio; Hansen, Hubert; Menezes, Débora P.; Providência, Constança

    2014-03-01

    The location of the critical end point (CEP) in the QCD phase diagram is determined under different scenarios. The effect of strangeness, isospin/charge asymmetry and an external magnetic field is investigated. The discussion is performed within the 2+1 flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with Polyakov loop. It is shown that isospin asymmetry shifts the CEP to larger baryonic chemical potentials and smaller temperatures. At large asymmetries the CEP disappears. However, a strong enough magnetic field drives the system into a first order phase transition.

  1. In-situ phase transformation in the field ion microscope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. K.; Russell, K. F.

    1991-04-01

    Many materials undergo an athermal martensite transformation when cooled. This transformation has been observed in the Tishomingo meteorite during cooling to cryogenic temperatures. The meteorite is unstable when cooled to the cryogenic temperatures (40 - 85K) suitable for field ion imaging since the martensite start temperature of this material (Fe-32.5 wt%Ni) is approximately 235K.

  2. Electrostatic ion acceleration across a diverging magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichihara, D.; Uchigashima, A.; Iwakawa, A.; Sasoh, A.

    2016-08-01

    Electrostatic ion acceleration across a diverging magnetic field, which is generated by a solenoid coil, permanent magnets, and a yoke between an upstream ring anode and a downstream off-axis hollow cathode, is investigated. The cathode is set in an almost magnetic-field-free region surrounded by a cusp. Inside the ring anode, an insulating wall is set to form an annular slit through which the working gas is injected along the anode inner surface, so the ionization of the working gas is enhanced there. By supplying 1.0 Aeq of argon as working gas with a discharge voltage of 225 V, the ion beam energy reached about 60% of a discharge voltage. In spite of this unique combination of electrodes and magnetic field, a large electrical potential drop is formed almost in the axial direction, located slightly upstream of the magnetic-field-free region. The ion beam current almost equals the equivalent working gas flow rate. These ion acceleration characteristics are useful for electric propulsion in space.

  3. Manipulating electron-ion recollision in a midinfrared laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yinghui; Diao, Hanhu; Zeng, Zhinan; Ge, Xiaochun; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2015-09-01

    As one of the most important physical processes of strong-field laser-matter interaction, laser-driven electron-ion recollision depends sensitively on the polarization of the laser field and can be effectively manipulated via an orthogonally polarized two-color (OTC) laser field. Here we present an extension of recollision manipulation in an OTC field to the midinfrared laser field regime, and demonstrate that only a few recollisions occur in a multicycle 1800 /900 nm OTC laser field. The number of recollisions can be controlled by simply tuning the relative delay of the two-color laser pulses, and this manipulation process can be visualized by measuring the high-order harmonic spectra. When the intensity of a midinfrared OTC field is further increased, a single recollision can be correlated to one hump in the harmonic spectrum, which will help to increase the measurement accuracy of time-resolved dynamics in atoms and molecules.

  4. Solar wind control of the low-latitude asymmetric magnetic disturbance field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauer, C. R.; Mcpherron, R. L.; Searls, C.

    1983-01-01

    The extent to which the low latitude dawn-dusk magnetic asymmetry is controlled by the dawn-dusk solar wind motional electric field VBs and/or substorm processes measured by the westward auroral electrojet index AL is studied using the technique of empirical linear prediction filters. A new index, (ASYM), defined as the difference between dawn and dusk deviations in the X (geomagnetic Northward) magnetic field component, is used to measure the dawn-dusk asymmetry. Quantitative information which characterizes the coupling processes are provided by the empirically determined filters obtained from this analysis. Results indicate that some currents are directly driven by the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction and that their magnetic perturbations contribute to both the AL and ASYM indices. However, a portion of the AL index that is uncorrelated with VBs is correlated with ASYM which suggests that internal magnetospheric processes also contribute to AL and ASYM.

  5. Origin of Asymmetric Solvation Effects for Ions in Water and Organic Solvents Investigated Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations: The Swain Acity-Basity Scale Revisited.

    PubMed

    Reif, Maria M; Hünenberger, Philippe H

    2016-08-25

    The asymmetric solvation of ions can be defined as the tendency of a solvent to preferentially solvate anions over cations or cations over anions, at identical ionic charge magnitudes and effective sizes. Taking water as a reference, these effects are quantified experimentally for many solvents by the relative acity (A) and basity (B) parameters of the Swain scale. The goal of the present study is to investigate the asymmetric solvation of ions using molecular dynamics simulations, and to connect the results to this empirical scale. To this purpose, the charging free energies of alkali and halide ions, and of their hypothetical oppositely charged counterparts, are calculated in a variety of solvents. In a first set of calculations, artificial solvent models are considered that present either a charge or a shape asymmetry at the molecular level. The solvation asymmetry, probed by the difference in charging free energy between the two oppositely charged ions, is found to encompass a term quadratic in the ion charge, related to the different solvation structures around the anion and cation, and a term linear in the ion charge, related to the solvation structure around the uncharged ion-sized cavity. For these simple solvent models, the two terms are systematically counteracting each other, and it is argued that only the quadratic term should be retained when comparing the results of simulations involving physical solvents to experimental data. In a second set of calculations, 16 physical solvents are considered. The theoretical estimates for the acity A are found to correlate very well with the Swain parameters, whereas the correlation for B is very poor. Based on this observation, the Swain scale is reformulated into a new scale involving an asymmetry parameter Σ, positive for acitic solvents and negative for basitic ones, and a polarity parameter Π. This revised scale has the same predictive power as the original scale, but it characterizes asymmetry in an

  6. ac-Field-induced fluid pumping in microsystems with asymmetric temperature gradients.

    PubMed

    Holtappels, Moritz; Stubbe, Marco; Gimsa, Jan

    2009-02-01

    We present two different designs of electrohydrodynamic micropumps for microfluidic systems. The micropumps have no movable parts, and their simple design allows for fabrication by microsystems technology. The pumps are operated by ac voltages from 1 to 60 V and were tested with aqueous solutions in the conductivity range of 1-112 mS m(-1). The pump effect is induced by an ac electric field across a fluid medium with an inhomogeneous temperature distribution. It is constant over a wide range of the ac field frequency with a conductivity-dependent drop-off at high frequencies. The temperature-dependent conductivity and permittivity distributions in the fluid induce space charges that interact with the electric field and induce fluid motion. The temperature distribution can be generated either by Joule heating in the medium or by external heating. We present experimental results obtained with two prototypes featuring Joule heating and external heating by a heating filament. Experimental and numerical results are compared with an analytical model. PMID:19391842

  7. Magnetic Field Would Reduce Electron Backstreaming in Ion Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.

    2003-01-01

    The imposition of a magnetic field has been proposed as a means of reducing the electron backstreaming problem in ion thrusters. Electron backstreaming refers to the backflow of electrons into the ion thruster. Backstreaming electrons are accelerated by the large potential difference that exists between the ion-thruster acceleration electrodes, which otherwise accelerates positive ions out of the engine to develop thrust. The energetic beam formed by the backstreaming electrons can damage the discharge cathode, as well as other discharge surfaces upstream of the acceleration electrodes. The electron-backstreaming condition occurs when the center potential of the ion accelerator grid is no longer sufficiently negative to prevent electron diffusion back into the ion thruster. This typically occurs over extended periods of operation as accelerator-grid apertures enlarge due to erosion. As a result, ion thrusters are required to operate at increasingly negative accelerator-grid voltages in order to prevent electron backstreaming. These larger negative voltages give rise to higher accelerator grid erosion rates, which in turn accelerates aperture enlargement. Electron backstreaming due to accelerator-gridhole enlargement has been identified as a failure mechanism that will limit ionthruster service lifetime. The proposed method would make it possible to not only reduce the electron backstreaming current at and below the backstreaming voltage limit, but also reduce the backstreaming voltage limit itself. This reduction in the voltage at which electron backstreaming occurs provides operating margin and thereby reduces the magnitude of negative voltage that must be placed on the accelerator grid. Such a reduction reduces accelerator- grid erosion rates. The basic idea behind the proposed method is to impose a spatially uniform magnetic field downstream of the accelerator electrode that is oriented transverse to the thruster axis. The magnetic field must be sufficiently

  8. Ion temperature fluctuation measurements using a retarding field analyzer.

    PubMed

    Nedzelskiy, I S; Silva, C; Duarte, P; Fernandes, H

    2011-04-01

    The retarding field analyzer (RFA) is a widely used diagnostic tool for the ion temperature measurement in the scrape-off-layer (SOL) of the thermonuclear plasma devices. However, the temporal resolution in the standard RFA application is restricted to the ms timescale. In this paper, a dc operation of the RFA is considered, which allows for the measurement of the plasma ion temperature fluctuations. The method is based on the relation for the RFA current-voltage (I-V) characteristic resulted from a common RFA model of shifted Maxwellian distribution of the analyzed ions, and the measurements of two points on the exponentially decaying region of the I-V characteristic with two differently dc biased RFA electrodes. The method has been tested and compared with conventional RFA measurements of the ion temperature in the tokamak ISTTOK SOL plasma. An ion temperature of T(i) = 17 eV is obtained near the limiter position. The agreement between the results of the two methods is within ∼25%. The amplitude of the ion temperature fluctuations is found to be around 5 eV at this location. The method has been validated by taking into account the effect of fluctuations in the plasma potential and the noise contamination, proving the reliability of the results obtained. Finally, constrains to the method application are discussed that include a negligible electron emission from the RFA grids and the restriction to operate in the exponentially decaying region of the I-V characteristic. PMID:21529006

  9. Asymmetric photoelectron momentum distribution driven by two-color XUV fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wan-Yang; He, Feng

    2016-02-01

    The photoionization of He+ in two-color XUV fields is studied by numerically solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. He+ may be ionized by directly absorbing one high-energetic photon or by absorbing two photons sequentially by mediating an excited state. The interference of these two pathways results in either enhancement or suppression of photoionization, depending on the propagating direction of the photoelectron and the relative phase of two pulses. The two-pathway interference also induces the split of photoelectron momenta. This study shows that the participation of intermediate states may substantially change photoionization processes.

  10. Near field properties in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Fries, Rainer; Kapusta, Joseph

    2006-04-01

    We study the properties of the soft gluon field produced in relativistic heavy ion collisions. In the spirit of McLerran-Venugopalan model, we write the field potential in a power series of the proper time τ and solve the Yang-Mills equation along with color current conservation equations simultaneously. We find that the classical gluon field at small τ, i.e., the near field, is mainly longitudinal. We also calculate the energy-momentum tensor of the field. This gluon field will decay and thermalize into a quark gluon plasma. Our results can be used as the initial conditions for the consequent relativistic hydrodynamic description of the dense parton matter.

  11. Ion Thruster Discharge Performance Per Magnetic Field Topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirz, Richard E.; Goebel, Dan

    2006-01-01

    DC-ION is a detailed computational model for predicting the plasma characteristics of rain-cusp ion thrusters. The advanced magnetic field meshing algorithm used by DC-ION allows precise treatment of the secondary electron flow. This capability allows self-consistent estimates of plasma potential that improves the overall consistency of the results of the discharge model described in Reference [refJPC05mod1]. Plasma potential estimates allow the model to predict the onset of plasma instabilities, and important shortcoming of the previous model for optimizing the design of discharge chambers. A magnetic field mesh simplifies the plasma flow calculations, for both the ions and the secondary electrons, and significantly reduces numerical diffusion that can occur with meshes not aligned with the magnetic field. Comparing the results of this model to experimental data shows that the behavior of the primary electrons, and the precise manner of their confinement, dictates the fundamental efficiency of ring-cusp. This correlation is evident in simulations of the conventionally sized NSTAR thruster (30 cm diameter) and the miniature MiXI thruster (3 cm diameter).

  12. Electron and ion kinetics and anode plasma formation in two applied Br field ion diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, D. J.; Quintenz, J. P.; Sweeney, M. A.

    1985-02-01

    Two magnetically insulated ion diodes that utilize a radial applied-B field are described. Both diodes generate an annular beam that is extracted along the diode axis. The first diode operated at 1.2 MV and 600 kA for 25 ns and generated a 300-kA ion beam. The second operated at 300 kV, 100 kA and generated 15 kA of ion current. The first diode was used to study diode performance as a function of inner and outer anode-cathode gaps, the applied-B field, and transmission line current ratios. The second diode was used to study anode plasma formation. The diodes were operated below Bcrit, resulting in electron leakage to the anode, especially near the outer cathode. A definition of Bcrit applicable to extraction diodes is given and methods of improving ion production efficiency in these diodes are suggested. The strong correlation of ion production with visible light emission suggests, however, that the electron loss played an important role in anode turn-on. The breakdown of neutral gas desorbed by electron impact is thought to be the anode plasma production mechanism. The grazing incidence leakage electrons affect the breakdown by significantly enhancing space-charge-induced electric fields in the dielectric-filled anode grooves.

  13. Observations of asymmetric velocity fields and gas cooling in the NGC 4636 galaxy group X-ray halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahoranta, Jussi; Finoguenov, Alexis; Pinto, Ciro; Sanders, Jeremy; Kaastra, Jelle; de Plaa, Jelle; Fabian, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Aims: This study aims to probe the thermodynamic properties of the hot intragroup medium (IGM) plasma in the core regions of the NGC 4636 galaxy group by detailed measurements of several emission lines and their relative intensities. Methods: We analyzed deep XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) data in five adjacent spectral regions in the central parts of the NGC 4636 galaxy group. We examined the suppression of the Fe xvii resonance line (15.01 Å) as compared to the forbidden lines of the same ion (17.05 Å and 17.10 Å). The presence and radial dependence of the cooling flow was investigated through spectral modeling. Parallel analysis with deep Chandra Advances CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) data was conducted to gain additional information about the thermodynamical properties of the IGM. Results: The plasma at the group center to the north shows efficient Fe xvii ion resonant scattering, yielding (Iλ17.05 + Iλ17.10) /Iλ15.01 line ratios up to 2.9 ± 0.4, corresponding toabout twice the predicted line ratio. In contrast, no resonant scattering was detected at the south side. The regions featuring resonant scattering coincide with those embodying large amounts of cool (kT ≲ 0.4 keV) gas phases, and the spectral imprints of cooling gas with a total mass deposition rate of ~0.8 M⊙ yr-1 within the examined region of 2.4' × 5.0'. Conclusions: We interpret the results as possible evidence of asymmetric turbulence distribution in the NGC 4636 IGM: turbulence dominates the gas dynamics to the south, while collective gas motions characterize the dynamics to the north. X-ray images show imprints of energetic AGN at both sides, yet we find evidence of turbulence heating at the south and gas cooling at the north of the core. We infer that the observed asymmetry may be the result of the specific observation angle to the source, or arise from the turbulence driven by core sloshing at south side.

  14. Study on steric transition in asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation and application to characterization of high-energy material.

    PubMed

    Dou, Haiyang; Lee, Yong-Ju; Jung, Euo Chang; Lee, Byung-Chul; Lee, Seungho

    2013-08-23

    In field-flow fractionation (FFF), there is the 'steric transition' phenomenon where the sample elution mode changes from the normal to steric/hyperlayer mode. Accurate analysis by FFF requires understanding of the steric transition phenomenon, particularly when the sample has a broad size distribution, for which the effect by combination of different modes may become complicated to interpret. In this study, the steric transition phenomenon in asymmetrical flow FFF (AF4) was studied using polystyrene (PS) latex beads. The retention ratio (R) gradually decreases as the particle size increases (normal mode) and reaches a minimum (Ri) at diameter around 0.5μm, after which R increases with increasing diameter (steric/hyperlayer mode). It was found that the size-based selectivity (Sd) tends to increase as the channel thickness (w) increases. The retention behavior of cyclo-1,3,5-trimethylene-2,4,6-trinitramine (commonly called 'research department explosive' (RDX)) particles in AF4 was investigated by varying experimental parameters including w and flow rates. AF4 showed a good reproducibility in size determination of RDX particles with the relative standard deviation of 4.1%. The reliability of separation obtained by AF4 was evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). PMID:23871284

  15. Characterization of sodium hyaluronate blends using frit inlet asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation and multiangle light scattering.

    PubMed

    Ali, Muhammad; Hwang, Euijin; Cho, Il-Hwan; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2012-01-01

    We characterized ultrahigh molecular weight sodium hyaluronate (NaHA) and blended pharmaceutical products containing NaHA using flow field-flow fractionation and multiangle light scattering-differential refractive index (FlFFF-MALS-DRI). NaHA is a water-soluble polysaccharide with a range of molecular weights (MW; 10(5)~10(8) Da) that is found in body fluids and tissues. NaHA is also used commercially in pharmaceutical and cosmetic applications. We used a frit inlet asymmetrical FlFFF channel to separate aqueous polymers according to their hydrodynamic size, and we used on-line measurements of light scattering to obtain the MW distribution (MWD) as well as structural information about NaHA in aqueous solution. In this study, we investigated NaHA and anti-adhesive blend mixtures of NaHA (a commercial NaHA blend mixture containing sodium carboxymethyl cellulose and a new blend with hydroxyethyl starch (HES)) to determine the molecular weight distribution MWD of NaHA and the blend mixtures and to obtain structural information about these compounds in aqueous solution. We also examined the characteristics of NaHA-HES-polylactic-co-glycolic acid film products exposed to gamma radiation for sterilization purposes. PMID:22101460

  16. Aggregation behavior of fullerenes in aqueous solutions: a capillary electrophoresis and asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation study.

    PubMed

    Astefanei, Alina; Núñez, Oscar; Galceran, Maria Teresa; Kok, Wim Th; Schoenmakers, Peter J

    2015-10-01

    In this work, the electrophoretic behavior of hydrophobic fullerenes [buckminsterfullerene (C60), C70, and N-methyl-fulleropyrrolidine (C60-pyrr)] and water-soluble fullerenes [fullerol (C60(OH)24); polyhydroxy small gap fullerene, hydrated (C120(OH)30); C60 pyrrolidine tris acid (C60-pyrr tris acid); and (1,2-methanofullerene C60)-61-carboxylic acid (C60CHCOOH)] in micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MECC) was evaluated. The aggregation behavior of the water-soluble compounds in MECC at different buffer and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) concentrations and pH values of the background electrolyte (BGE) was studied by monitoring the changes observed in the electrophoretic pattern of the peaks. Broad and distorted peaks that can be attributed to fullerene aggregation were obtained in MECC which became narrower and more symmetric by working at low buffer and SDS concentrations (below the critical micelle concentration, capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) conditions). For the characterization of the suspected aggregates formed (size and shape), asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used. The results showed that the increase in the buffer concentration promoted the aggregation of the particles, while the presence of SDS micelles revealed multiple peaks corresponding to particles of different aggregation degrees. Furthermore, MECC has been applied for the first time for the analysis of C60 in two different cosmetic products (i.e., anti-aging serum and facial mask). PMID:26314484

  17. Study on aggregation behavior of Cytochrome C-conjugated silver nanoparticles using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Tae; Lee, Yong-Ju; Hwang, Yu-Sik; Lee, Seungho

    2015-01-01

    In this study, 40 nm silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were synthesized using the citrate reduction method and then the surface of AgNPs was modified by conjugating Cytochrome C (Cyto C) to improve stability and to enhance bioactivity and biocompatibility of AgNPs. It is known that Cyto C may undergo conformational changes under various conditions of pH, temperature, ionic strength, etc., resulting in aggregation of the particles. These parameters also affect the size and size distribution of Cyto C-conjugated AgNPs (Cyto C-AgNP). ζ-potential measurement revealed that the adsorption of Cyto C on the surface of AgNPs is saturated at the molar ratio [Cyto C]/[AgNPs] above about 300. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AsFlFFF) analysis showed that hydrodynamic diameter of AgNPs increases by about 4 nm when the particle is saturated by Cyto C. The aggregation behavior of Cyto C-AgNP at various conditions of pH, temperature and ionic strength were investigated using AsFlFFF and UV-vis spectroscopy. It was found that the aggregation of Cyto C-AgNP increases with decreasing pH, increasing temperature and ionic strength due to denaturation of Cyto C on AgNPs and reduction in the thickness of electrostatic double layer on the surface of Cyto C-AgNP. PMID:25476400

  18. Development and evaluation of methods for starch dissolution using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation. Part II: Dissolution of amylose.

    PubMed

    Perez-Rea, Daysi; Bergenståhl, Björn; Nilsson, Lars

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate whether dissolution in water under autoclaving conditions (140 °C, 20 min) or in dimethyl sulfoxide, DMSO (100 °C, 1 h), is preferable for characterization of amylose. Two types of amylose, potato and maize, were dissolved either in water using an autoclave or in DMSO. On the aqueous solutions obtained, the extent of molecular dissolution of the sample (referred to as the dissolution yield) was determined by enzymatic analysis as well as the molecular properties, such as molar mass and root-mean-square radius, obtained with asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation coupled to multi-angle light scattering and differential refractive index detection (AF4-MALS-dRI). The results showed that both dissolution methods are efficient at dissolving amylose. However, AF4-MALS-dRI analysis revealed substantial differences. Amylose aqueous solutions obtained by dissolution in DMSO were relatively stable over time, but the dissolution method in autoclave caused some degradation of the molecules, and their solutions display a high tendency to retrograde. PMID:26232931

  19. Development and evaluation of methods for starch dissolution using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation. Part I: Dissolution of amylopectin.

    PubMed

    Perez-Rea, Daysi; Bergenståhl, Björn; Nilsson, Lars

    2015-06-01

    We have investigated methods of starch dissolution with the aim of finding an optimum method to completely dissolve starch granules to form a molecularly dissolved starch solution without degradation of the polymers. Glycogen was used as a model molecule for amylopectin, to identify the dissolution conditions under which the degradation of the polymers was limited or not present. Dissolution was performed in water with temperatures up to 200 °C, facilitated by the use of heating in an autoclave or a microwave oven, or in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) at 100 °C. Waxy maize starch was chosen due to its high content of amylopectin and very low content of amylose. The degree of starch dissolution under different conditions was determined enzymatically. The effect of different dissolution conditions on the molar mass and root-mean-square radius of the polymers was determined with asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation coupled to multi-angle light scattering and differential refractive index (AF4-MALS-dRI) detectors under aqueous conditions. The results suggest that reliable and accurate size separation and characterization of amylopectin can be obtained by dissolution of starch granules in an aqueous environment at 140 °C by autoclaving or in DMSO at 100 °C. The results also clearly show an upper limit for heat treatment of starch, above which degradation cannot be avoided. PMID:25925852

  20. Dipole Field Effects on Ion Ejections from a Paul Ion Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacAskill, J. A.; Chutjian, A.

    2011-01-01

    Attempts at improving the quality of mass spectra obtained from a Paul trap mass spectrometer prompted an investigation of the effects of additional fields to supplement the primary rf quadrupole trapping field. Reported here are the results of the first in a series of tests that focuses on the application of a single dipole field to augment the trapping and subsequent ejections of ions stored within a Paul trap. Measurements are presented for a fixed quadrupole frequency with varying dipole frequencies. The presence of the dipole field during the quadrupole trapping phase causes ion ejections of single m/z species at discrete dipole frequencies. During the mass analysis phase, the varying dipole frequency produces a complex set of resonant structures that impact ejection time (mass range), as well as mass spectral peak intensity and width

  1. Pulsed magnetic field-electron cyclotron resonance ion source operation

    SciTech Connect

    Muehle, C.; Ratzinger, U.; Joest, G.; Leible, K.; Schennach, S.; Wolf, B.H.

    1996-03-01

    The pulsed magnetic field (PuMa)-electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source uses a pulsed coil to improve the peak current by opening the magnetic bottle along the beam axis. After demonstration of the principle of the pulsed magnetic extraction, the ion source was tested with different gases. We received promising results from helium to krypton. The influence of the current in the pulsed coil on the analyzed ion current was measured. With increased current levels within the pulsed coil not only the pulse height of the PuMa pulse, but the pulse length can also be controlled. By using the pulsed coil the maximum of the charge state distribution can be shifted to higher charge states. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Density Fluctuation in Asymmetric Nozzle Plumes and Correlation with Far Field Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, J.; Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    2001-01-01

    A comparative experimental study of air density fluctuations in the unheated plumes of a circular, 4-tabbed-circular, chevron-circular and 10-lobed rectangular nozzles was performed at a fixed Mach number of 0.95 using a recently developed Rayleigh scattering based technique. Subsequently, the flow density fluctuations are cross-correlated with the far field sound pressure fluctuations to determine sources for acoustics emission. The nearly identical noise spectra from the baseline circular and the chevron nozzles are found to be in agreement with the similarity in spreading, turbulence fluctuations, and flow-sound correlations measured in the plumes. The lobed nozzle produced the least low frequency noise, in agreement with the weakest overall density fluctuations and flow-sound correlation. The tabbed nozzle took an intermediate position in the hierarchy of noise generation, intensity of turbulent fluctuation and flow-sound correlation. Some of the features in the 4-tabbed nozzle are found to be explainable in terms of splitting of the jet in a central large core and 4 side jetlets.

  3. Asymmetric dipolar ring

    DOEpatents

    Prosandeev, Sergey A.; Ponomareva, Inna V.; Kornev, Igor A.; Bellaiche, Laurent M.

    2010-11-16

    A device having a dipolar ring surrounding an interior region that is disposed asymmetrically on the ring. The dipolar ring generates a toroidal moment switchable between at least two stable states by a homogeneous field applied to the dipolar ring in the plane of the ring. The ring may be made of ferroelectric or magnetic material. In the former case, the homogeneous field is an electric field and in the latter case, the homogeneous field is a magnetic field.

  4. Characterization of colloidal phosphorus species in drainage waters from a clay soil using asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Regelink, Inge C; Koopmans, Gerwin F; van der Salm, Caroline; Weng, Liping; van Riemsdijk, Willem H

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorus transport from agricultural land contributes to eutrophication of surface waters. Pipe drain and trench waters from a grassland field on a heavy clay soil in the Netherlands were sampled before and after manure application. Phosphorus speciation was analyzed by physicochemical P fractionation, and the colloidal P fraction in the dissolved fraction (<0.45 μm) was analyzed by asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled to high-resolution inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and ultraviolet diode array detector. When no manure was applied for almost 7 mo, total P (TP) concentrations were low (<21 μmol L), and TP was almost evenly distributed among dissolved reactive P (DRP), dissolved unreactive P (DUP), and particulate P (PP). Total P concentrations increased by a factor of 60 and 4 when rainfall followed shortly after application of cattle slurry or its solid fraction, respectively. Under these conditions, DRP contributed 50% or more to TP. The P speciation within the DUP and PP fractions varied among the different sampling times. Phosphorus associated with dissolved organic matter, probably via cation bridging, comprised a small fraction of DUP at all sampling times. Colloidal P coeluted with clay particles when P application was withheld for almost 7 mo and after application of the solid cattle slurry fraction. At these sampling times, PP correlated well with particulate Fe, Al, and Si, indicating that P is associated with colloidal clay particles. After cattle slurry application, part of DUP was probably present as phospholipids. Physicochemical fractionation combined with AF4 analysis is a promising tool to unravel the speciation of colloidal P in environmental water samples. PMID:23673839

  5. Models for asymmetric hybrid brane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazeia, D.; Marques, M. A.; Menezes, R.

    2015-10-01

    We deal with relativistic models described by a single real scalar field, searching for topological structures that behave asymmetrically, connecting minima with a distinct profile. We use such features to build a new braneworld scenario, in which the source scalar field contributes to generate asymmetric hybrid brane.

  6. Laser measurement of H{sup -} ions in a field-effect-transistor based radio frequency ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, N.; Matsuno, T.; Funaoi, T.; Ando, A.; Tauchi, Y.; Nakano, H.; Tsumori, K.; Takeiri, Y.

    2012-02-15

    Hydrogen negative ion density measurements are required to clarify the characteristics of negative ion production and ion source performance. Both of laser photodetachment and cavity ring down (CRD) measurements have been implemented to a field-effect-transistor based radio-frequency ion source. The density ratio of negative hydrogen ions to electrons was successfully measured by laser photodetachment and effect of magnetic filter field on negative ion density was confirmed. The calculated CRD signal showed that CRD mirrors with >99.990% reflectivity are required and loss of reflectivity due to cesium contamination should be minimized.

  7. Optomechanical Entanglement Between an Ion and an Optical Cavity Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacherjee, Aranya B.

    2016-04-01

    I study an optomechanical system in which the mechanical motion of a single trapped ion is coupled to a cavity field for the realization of a strongly quantum correlated two-mode system. I show that for large pump intensities the steady state photon number exhibits bistable behaviour. I further analyze the occurrence of normal mode splitting (NMS) due to mixing of the fluctuations of the cavity field and the fluctuations of the ion motion which indicates a coherent energy exchange. I also find that in the parameter regime where NMS exists, the steady state of the system shows continuous variable entanglement. Such a two-mode optomechanical system can be used for the realization of continuous variable quantum information interfaces and networks.

  8. Field-free junctions for surface electrode ion traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordens, Robert; Schmied, R.; Blain, M. G.; Leibfried, D.; Wineland, D.

    2015-05-01

    Intersections between transport guides in a network of RF ion traps are a key ingredient to many implementations of scalable quantum information processing with trapped ions. Several junction architectures demonstrated so far are limited by varying radial secular frequencies, a reduced trap depth, or a non-vanishing RF field along the transport channel. We report on the design and progress in implementing a configurable microfabricated surface electrode Y-junction that employs switchable RF electrodes. An essentially RF-field-free pseudopotential guide between any two legs of the junction can be established by applying RF potential to a suitable pair of electrodes. The transport channel's height above the electrodes, its depth and radial curvature are constant to within 15%. Supported by IARPA, Sandia, NSA, ONR, and the NIST Quantum Information Program.

  9. Cubic zero-field splitting of a 6state ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wan-Lun

    1989-01-01

    The zero-field splitting of a 6state ion in a cubic field has been studied in detail within the d5 configuration. It is found that the splitting arises mainly from the coupling among the excited states 4T1, 2T2, and 2E and the ground state 6A1 via the spin-orbit interaction. The splitting parameter a can be expressed approximately as F0ζ4+F1ζ5, where F0 and F1 are independent of the spin-orbit coupling constant ζ and have a property ||F0||>>||F1||. Analytical formulas of F0 and F1 are derived by a perturbation calculation with the help of the procedure suggested by Macfarlane. Based on this, a very simple expression of a is obtained semiempirically. Calculations are carried out for the splittings of Fe3+ and Mn2+ ions substituted as impurities in several octahedrally coordinated lattices and for the splitting parameter dependences on pressure for Fe3+ and Mn2+ in MgO crystals. The results are in good agreement with the values observed experimentally, indicating a successful interpretation of the crystal-field theory for the cubic zero-field splittings of 6state ions in octahedral coordinations. The power law a~R-m has been investigated on a theoretical basis. This is indicated to be able to reasonably account for the observed data for a system that has Dq or a values close to each other. In particular, a reasonable value m=12+/-2 is expected for Mn2+ ions having Dq<~B.

  10. Magnetic field measurement techniques with heavy ion beam probes

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley, T.P.

    1988-08-01

    Spatially (0.1 cm/sup 3/) and temporally (1 ..mu..s) resolved magnetic field measurement techniques using a heavy ion beam probe as a test particle source are described. The measurement of both steady-state and time-varying fields is discussed. The plasma flux function can be determined by measuring the toroidal velocity of the beam ion in an axisymmetric device, because the canonical angular momentum of a particle, P/sub phi/ = qpsi+M..nu../sub phi/R, is conserved in an axisymmetric system. Corrections due to nonaxisymmetry can be significant in tokamaks and must be taken into account for the current profile and fluctuation measurements. The requirements and design of a toroidal velocity detector are discussed. The signals expected in experiments using the Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT) heavy ion beam probe with a velocity detector have been calculated, and they are at least two orders of magnitude higher than the amplifier noise for dc measurements of poloidal and ergodic magnetic limiter fields and for sawtooth and MHD oscillations. Low-level turbulence is expected to produce signals below the noise level.

  11. Galactic heavy-ion shielding using electrostatic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.

    1984-01-01

    The shielding of spacecraft against galactic heavy ions, particularly high-energy Fe(56) nuclei, by electrostatic fields is analyzed for an arrangement of spherical concentric shells. Vacuum breakdown considerations are found to limit the minimum radii of the spheres to over 100 m. This limitation makes it impractical to use the fields for shielding small spacecraft. The voltages necessary to repel these Fe(56) nuclei exceed present electrostatic generating capabilities by over 2 orders of magnitude and render the concept useless as an alternative to traditional bulk-material shielding methods.

  12. Synthetic gauge fields for vibrational excitations of trapped ions.

    PubMed

    Bermudez, Alejandro; Schaetz, Tobias; Porras, Diego

    2011-10-01

    The vibrations of a collection of ions in a microtrap array can be described in terms of tunneling phonons. We show that the vibrational couplings may be tailored by using a gradient of the trap frequencies together with a periodic driving of the trapping potentials. These ingredients allow us to induce effective gauge fields on the vibrational excitations, such that phonons mimic the behavior of charged particles in a magnetic field. In particular, microtrap arrays are well suited to realize a quantum simulator of the famous Aharonov-Bohm effect and observe the paradigmatic edge states typical from quantum-Hall samples and topological insulators. PMID:22107274

  13. Ion-Sensitive Field-Effect Transistor for Biological Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Soo; Kim, Sang Kyu; Kim, Moonil

    2009-01-01

    In recent years there has been great progress in applying FET-type biosensors for highly sensitive biological detection. Among them, the ISFET (ion-sensitive field-effect transistor) is one of the most intriguing approaches in electrical biosensing technology. Here, we review some of the main advances in this field over the past few years, explore its application prospects, and discuss the main issues, approaches, and challenges, with the aim of stimulating a broader interest in developing ISFET-based biosensors and extending their applications for reliable and sensitive analysis of various biomolecules such as DNA, proteins, enzymes, and cells. PMID:22423205

  14. Characterization of Silver Nanoparticles under Environmentally Relevant Conditions Using Asymmetrical Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4)

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Min-Hee; Lee, Seungho; Hwang, Yu Sik

    2015-01-01

    The development of methods to monitor manufactured nanomaterials in the environment is one of the crucial areas for the assessment of their risk. More specifically, particle size analysis is a key element, because many properties of nanomaterial are size dependent. The sizing of nanomaterials in real environments is challenging due to their heterogeneity and reactivity with other environmental components. In this study, the fractionation and characterization of a mixture of polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated silver nanoparticles (PVP-AgNPs) of three different sizes were investigated using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled with UV-Vis spectrophotometry. In particular, the effects of electrolyte composition and natural organic matter (NOM) on the particle size and stability were evaluated. The fractogram peaks (i.e., stability) of three different AgNPs decreased in the presence of both 10 mM NaCl and 10mM CaCl2, while increased with increasing concentration of humic acid (HA). In addition, the hydrodynamic diameters of AgNPs in both electrolytes slightly increased with an increase of HA concentration, suggesting the adsorption (coating) of HA onto the particle surface. It is also interesting to note that an increase in the particle size depended on the types of electrolyte, which could be explained by the conformational characteristics of the adsorbed HA layers. Consistent these results, AgNPs suspended in lake water containing relatively high concentration of organic carbon (TOC) showed higher particle stability and larger particle size (i.e., by approximately 4nm) than those in river water. In conclusion, the application of AF4 coupled with highly sensitive detectors could be a powerful method to characterize nanoparticles in natural waters. PMID:26575993

  15. Characterization of Silver Nanoparticles under Environmentally Relevant Conditions Using Asymmetrical Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4).

    PubMed

    Jang, Min-Hee; Lee, Seungho; Hwang, Yu Sik

    2015-01-01

    The development of methods to monitor manufactured nanomaterials in the environment is one of the crucial areas for the assessment of their risk. More specifically, particle size analysis is a key element, because many properties of nanomaterial are size dependent. The sizing of nanomaterials in real environments is challenging due to their heterogeneity and reactivity with other environmental components. In this study, the fractionation and characterization of a mixture of polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated silver nanoparticles (PVP-AgNPs) of three different sizes were investigated using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled with UV-Vis spectrophotometry. In particular, the effects of electrolyte composition and natural organic matter (NOM) on the particle size and stability were evaluated. The fractogram peaks (i.e., stability) of three different AgNPs decreased in the presence of both 10 mM NaCl and 10 mM CaCl2, while increased with increasing concentration of humic acid (HA). In addition, the hydrodynamic diameters of AgNPs in both electrolytes slightly increased with an increase of HA concentration, suggesting the adsorption (coating) of HA onto the particle surface. It is also interesting to note that an increase in the particle size depended on the types of electrolyte, which could be explained by the conformational characteristics of the adsorbed HA layers. Consistent these results, AgNPs suspended in lake water containing relatively high concentration of organic carbon (TOC) showed higher particle stability and larger particle size (i.e., by approximately 4 nm) than those in river water. In conclusion, the application of AF4 coupled with highly sensitive detectors could be a powerful method to characterize nanoparticles in natural waters. PMID:26575993

  16. Fractionating power and outlet stream polydispersity in asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation. Part I: isocratic operation.

    PubMed

    Williams, P Stephen

    2016-05-01

    Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (As-FlFFF) has become the most commonly used of the field-flow fractionation techniques. However, because of the interdependence of the channel flow and the cross flow through the accumulation wall, it is the most difficult of the techniques to optimize, particularly for programmed cross flow operation. For the analysis of polydisperse samples, the optimization should ideally be guided by the predicted fractionating power. Many experimentalists, however, neglect fractionating power and rely on light scattering detection simply to confirm apparent selectivity across the breadth of the eluted peak. The size information returned by the light scattering software is assumed to dispense with any reliance on theory to predict retention, and any departure of theoretical predictions from experimental observations is therefore considered of no importance. Separation depends on efficiency as well as selectivity, however, and efficiency can be a strong function of retention. The fractionation of a polydisperse sample by field-flow fractionation never provides a perfectly separated series of monodisperse fractions at the channel outlet. The outlet stream has some residual polydispersity, and it will be shown in this manuscript that the residual polydispersity is inversely related to the fractionating power. Due to the strong dependence of light scattering intensity and its angular distribution on the size of the scattering species, the outlet polydispersity must be minimized if reliable size data are to be obtained from the light scattering detector signal. It is shown that light scattering detection should be used with careful control of fractionating power to obtain optimized analysis of polydisperse samples. Part I is concerned with isocratic operation of As-FlFFF, and part II with programmed operation. Graphical abstract The dash-dotted blue curve describes an assumed log-normal sample molecular weight distribution (right axis

  17. Behavior of molecules and molecular ions near a field emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gault, Baptiste; Saxey, David W.; Ashton, Michael W.; Sinnott, Susan B.; Chiaramonti, Ann N.; Moody, Michael P.; Schreiber, Daniel K.

    2016-03-01

    The cold emission of particles from surfaces under intense electric fields is a process which underpins a variety of applications including atom probe tomography (APT), an analytical microscopy technique with near-atomic spatial resolution. Increasingly relying on fast laser pulsing to trigger the emission, APT experiments often incorporate the detection of molecular ions emitted from the specimen, in particular from covalently or ionically bonded materials. Notably, it has been proposed that neutral molecules can also be emitted during this process. However, this remains a contentious issue. To investigate the validity of this hypothesis, a careful review of the literature is combined with the development of new methods to treat experimental APT data, the modeling of ion trajectories, and the application of density-functional theory simulations to derive molecular ion energetics. It is shown that the direct thermal emission of neutral molecules is extremely unlikely. However, neutrals can still be formed in the course of an APT experiment by dissociation of metastable molecular ions. This work is a partial contribution of the US Government and therefore is not subject to copyright in the United States.

  18. Electrostatic ion-cyclotron waves in a nonuniform magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cartier, S. L.; Dangelo, N.; Merlino, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    The properties of electrostatic ion-cyclotron waves excited in a single-ended cesium Q machine with a nonuniform magnetic field are described. The electrostatic ion-cyclotron waves are generated in the usual manner by drawing an electron current to a small exciter disk immersed in the plasma column. The parallel and perpendicular (to B) wavelengths and phase velocities are determined by mapping out two-dimensional wave phase contours. The wave frequency f depends on the location of the exciter disk in the nonuniform magnetic field, and propagating waves are only observed in the region where f is approximately greater than fci, where fci is the local ion-cyclotron frequency. The parallel phase velocity is in the direction of the electron drift. From measurements of the plasma properties along the axis, it is inferred that the electron drift velocity is not uniform along the entire current channel. The evidence suggests that the waves begin being excited at that axial position where the critical drift velocity is first exceeded, consistent with a current-driven excitation mechanism.

  19. Novel symmetric diimine-Schiff bases and asymmetric triimine-Schiff bases as chemosensors for the detection of various metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdemir, Özlem

    2016-12-01

    In this study, two symmetric diimine-Schiff bases (D1, D2) containing nitro group were synthesized by a simple one-pot condensation of 4-nitro-o-phenylenediamine with substituted-salicylaldehyde (5-Cl, 5-CH3) in 1:2 ratio. After the selective reduction of nitro group to amino group by using sodium dithionite and forming the new imine bond by adding substituted-salicylaldehyde or 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde, four asymmetric triimine-Schiff bases (T1s, T1n, T2s, and T2n) were obtained. Results of the newly synthesized compounds established by elemental analyses, FT-IR, UV-vis, 2D NMR (HMQC), 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR and TOF-mass spectroscopic experiments were consistent with their chemical structures. The tautomeric equilibria were also studied. The sensor properties of all Schiff bases were examined upon addition of the metal ions, such as Cr3+, Fe2+, Fe3+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, and Pb2+. The interactions between receptors and ions are easily monitored by UV-vis method. The receptor D2 showed colour changes from yellow to intense deep orange colour for Cu2+, a orange colour for Co2+ and dark yellow colour for other ions. Although metal ions caused no change in colour of T2s, the main absorption band of receptor shifted from 351 nm to 343-372 nm T2n underwent colour changes from yellow to light yellow on gradual addition of Fe3+.

  20. Field Emitter Arrays and Displays Produced by Ion Tracking Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Felter, T E; Musket, R G; Bernhardt, A F

    2004-12-28

    When ions of sufficient electronic energy loss traverse a dielectric film or foil, they alter the chemical bonding along their nominally straight path within the material. A suitable etchant can quickly dissolve these so-called latent tracks leaving holes of small diameter ({approx}10nm) but long length - several microns. Continuing the etching process gradually increases the diameter reproducibly and uniformly. The trackable medium can be applied as a uniform film onto large substrates. The small, monodisperse holes produced by this track etching can be used in conjunction with additional thin film processing to create functional structures attached to the substrate. For example, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Candescent Technologies Corporation (CTC) co-developed a process to make arrays of gated field emitters ({approx}100nm diameter electron guns) for CTC's ThinCRT{trademark} displays, which have been fabricated to diagonal dimensions > 13. Additional technological applications of ion tracking lithography will be briefly covered.

  1. A critical evaluation of an asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation system for colloidal size characterization of natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhengzhen; Guo, Laodong

    2015-06-19

    Colloidal retention characteristics, recovery and size distribution of model macromolecules and natural dissolved organic matter (DOM) were systematically examined using an asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AFlFFF) system under various membrane size cutoffs and carrier solutions. Polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) standards with known molecular weights (MW) were used to determine their permeation and recovery rates by membranes with different nominal MW cutoffs (NMWCO) within the AFlFFF system. Based on a ≥90% recovery rate for PSS standards by the AFlFFF system, the actual NMWCOs were determined to be 1.9 kDa for the 0.3 kDa membrane, 2.7 kDa for the 1 kDa membrane, and 33 kDa for the 10 kDa membrane, respectively. After membrane calibration, natural DOM samples were analyzed with the AFlFFF system to determine their colloidal size distribution and the influence from membrane NMWCOs and carrier solutions. Size partitioning of DOM samples showed a predominant colloidal size fraction in the <5 nm or <10 kDa size range, consistent with the size characteristics of humic substances as the main terrestrial DOM component. Recovery of DOM by the AFlFFF system, as determined by UV-absorbance at 254 nm, decreased significantly with increasing membrane NMWCO, from 45% by the 0.3 kDa membrane to 2-3% by the 10 kDa membrane. Since natural DOM is mostly composed of lower MW substances (<10 kDa) and the actual membrane cutoffs are normally larger than their manufacturer ratings, a 0.3 kDa membrane (with an actual NMWCO of 1.9 kDa) is highly recommended for colloidal size characterization of natural DOM. Among the three carrier solutions, borate buffer seemed to provide the highest recovery and optimal separation of DOM. Rigorous calibration with macromolecular standards and optimization of system conditions are a prerequisite for quantifying colloidal size distribution using the flow field-flow fractionation technique. In addition, the coupling of AFlFFF with fluorescence

  2. Solenoidal Fields for Ion Beam Transport and Focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Edward P.; Leitner, Matthaeus

    2007-11-01

    In this report we calculate time-independent fields of solenoidal magnets that are suitable for ion beam transport and focusing. There are many excellent Electricity and Magnetism textbooks that present the formalism for magnetic field calculations and apply it to simple geometries [1-1], but they do not include enough relevant detail to be used for designing a charged particle transport system. This requires accurate estimates of fringe field aberrations, misaligned and tilted fields, peak fields in wire coils and iron, external fields, and more. Specialized books on magnet design, technology, and numerical computations [1-2] provide such information, and some of that is presented here. The AIP Conference Proceedings of the US Particle Accelerator Schools [1-3] contain extensive discussions of design and technology of magnets for ion beams - except for solenoids. This lack may be due to the fact that solenoids have been used primarily to transport and focus particles of relatively low momenta, e.g. electrons of less than 50 MeV and protons or H- of less than 1.0 MeV, although this situation may be changing with the commercial availability of superconducting solenoids with up to 20T bore field [1-4]. Internal reports from federal laboratories and industry treat solenoid design in detail for specific applications. The present report is intended to be a resource for the design of ion beam drivers for Inertial Fusion Energy [1-5] and Warm Dense Matter experiments [1-6], although it should also be useful for a broader range of applications. The field produced by specified currents and material magnetization can always be evaluated by solving Maxwell's equations numerically, but it is also desirable to have reasonably accurate, simple formulas for conceptual system design and fast-running beam dynamics codes, as well as for general understanding. Most of this report is devoted to such formulas, but an introduction to the Tosca{copyright} code [1-7] and some numerical

  3. Pencil lead tips: A field ion and field electron emission microscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khairnar, Rajendra S.; Dharmadhikari, C. V.; Joag, Dilip S.

    1989-06-01

    Pencil lead tips composed of graphite flakes were subjected to field ion and field emission microscopic investigations. The ion micrographs showed elongated images of ledge atoms of the graphite flakes due to uneven magnification over the layers of the flake. The gross features of the field evaporated tip surface were observed by scanning electron microscopy. The field emission pattern showed emitting lobes which displayed intensity fluctuations consisting of a combination of emission spots turning on and off randomly and a localized flicker of individual spots. These effects gave rise to noise in the emission current involving isolated spikes of rapid rise time and trains of digital pulses of constant height. The variation of noise with residual gas pressure, emission current, and temperature has also been investigated. The results are discussed in view of the microtopography of the pencil lead tips and the nature of the emitting sites on the surface.

  4. Electromagnetic field evolution in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Voronyuk, V.; Toneev, V. D.; Cassing, W.; Bratkovskaya, E. L.; Konchakovski, V. P.; Voloshin, S. A.

    2011-05-15

    The hadron string dynamics (HSD) model is generalized to include the creation and evolution of retarded electromagnetic fields as well as the influence of the magnetic and electric fields on the quasiparticle propagation. The time-space structure of the fields is analyzed in detail for noncentral Au + Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV. It is shown that the created magnetic field is highly inhomogeneous, but in the central region of the overlapping nuclei it changes relatively weakly in the transverse direction. For the impact parameter b=10 fm, the maximal magnetic field - perpendicularly to the reaction plane - is obtained of order eB{sub y}/m{sub {pi}}{sup 2}{approx}5 for a very short time {approx}0.2 fm/c, which roughly corresponds to the time of a maximal overlap of the colliding nuclei. We find that at any time, the location of the maximum in the eB{sub y} distribution correlates with that of the energy density of the created particles. In contrast, the electric field distribution, being also highly inhomogeneous, has a minimum in the center of the overlap region. Furthermore, the field characteristics are presented as a function of the collision energy and the centrality of the collisions. To explore the effect of the back reaction of the fields on hadronic observables, a comparison of HSD results with and without fields is exemplified. Our actual calculations show no noticeable influence of the electromagnetic fields--created in heavy-ion collisions--on the effect of the electric charge separation with respect to the reaction plane.

  5. Experimental studies on ion acceleration and stream line detachment in a diverging magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Terasaka, K.; Yoshimura, S.; Ogiwara, K.; Aramaki, M.; Tanaka, M. Y.

    2010-01-01

    The flow structure of ions in a diverging magnetic field has been experimentally studied in an electron cyclotron resonance plasma. The flow velocity field of ions has been measured with directional Langmuir probes calibrated with the laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. For low ion-temperature plasmas, it is concluded that the ion acceleration due to the axial electric field is important compared with that of gas dynamic effect. It has also been found that the detachment of ion stream line from the magnetic field line takes place when the parameter |fciLB∕Vi| becomes order unity, where fci, LB, and Vi are the ion cyclotron frequency, the characteristic scale length of magnetic field inhomogeneity, and the ion flow velocity, respectively. In the detachment region, a radial electric field is generated in the plasma and the ions move straight with the E×B rotation driven by the radial electric field. PMID:20838424

  6. Simulation of Ions Confined by Quadrupole Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, Michael David

    Computer simulations are routinely used to develop physical insight into ionic systems confined by static and time-varying quadrupole electric fields. However, after nearly 30 years of numerical exploration, three questions remain: which numerical techniques produce accurate simulations for the least computational expense? How can thermal equilibrium initial conditions be generated? How should temperature be calculated? Trapped ion simulations generally employ molecular dynamics techniques, where ion trajectories are numerically calculated at discrete points in time. While many numerical methods have been applied to these systems, it is unclear which technique is fastest or what time-step is required. In this work, the computational speed of and time-step for 11 commonly used techniques are assessed through analysis of four numerical error components. The most rapid method and required step-size depend strongly on the system parameters, with any one of the Beeman, Gear6, 5th-order Adams-Bashforth-Moulton, or 4th-order Runge-Kutta algorithms proving most appropriate. The 11 algorithms are then applied to a realistic multi-ion system and verify that the four tests accurately predict the required step size. When equilibrium properties are desired, simulations should commence from initial conditions that conform closely to thermal equilibrium; however little has been published on initial condition generation and assessment for the multi-ion system. A method is presented for generating thermal equilibrium via laser cooling and recoil heating, a ramp-down stage, where the heating and cooling are gradually reduced, and an equilibration phase where the ensemble is evolved under only the trapping forces. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that thermal equilibrium can be assessed using well-known tests of distribution normality. When time-varying fields are present, temperature calculation becomes difficult, as the ion motion contains both thermal and nonthermal components. The

  7. Asymmetric magnetoimpedance effect in CoFeSiB amorphous ribbons by combination of field and current annealing for sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajiali, Mohammadreza; Mohseni, S. Majid; Roozmeh, S. Ehsan; Moradi, Mehrdad

    2016-08-01

    The roles of applied magnetic field during the current annealing of Co68.15Fe4.35Si12.5B15 soft magnetic amorphous ribbons are studied. Samples heat treated by Joule heating effect in open air and simultaneously in the present of longitudinal external magnetic field showed asymmetric magnetoimpedance (AMI) behavior. The AMI profile can be related to the exchange bias interaction between the soft magnetic amorphous material and a harder magnetic crystalline phase formed on the surface of the ribbon. This effect stems from thermal effect, the transverse Oe field generated from the annealing current which is thickness dependent and the longitudinal external field. The single peak AMI with the field sensitivity of 101%/Oe for DC annealing current is achieved. Our results could address a simple way to achieve the AMI response toward developing high sensitive magnetic field sensors.

  8. Ground-state zero-field splitting for the Fe3+ ion in a cubic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao-Yu, Kuang; Zhong-Hou, Chen

    1987-07-01

    At present the parameter a of the Fe3+ ion in a crystal has still not been determined. In this paper we discuss this problem by diagonalizing the complete matrices for a ligand-field spin-orbit-coupling perturbation. The results obtained are in good agreement with experimental findings. Furthermore, possible resonances for the difference between our results and previous ones are given.

  9. Direct analysis of un-derivatized asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and L-arginine from plasma using mixed-mode ion-exchange liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Michael J; Crow, Brian; Norton, Dean; Paliakov, Ekaterina; George, Joe; Bralley, J A

    2007-11-15

    A high-throughput analytical method was developed for the measurement of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and L-arginine (ARG) from plasma using LC/MS/MS. The sample preparation was simple and only required microfiltration prior to analysis. ADMA and ARG were assayed using mixed-mode ion-exchange chromatography which allowed for the retention of the un-derivatized compounds. The need for chromatographic separation of ADMA from symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) was avoided by using an ADMA specific product ion. As a result, the analytical method only required a total run time of 2 min. The method was validated by linearity, with r2>or=0.995 for both compounds, and accuracy, with no more than 7% deviation from the theoretical value. The estimated limit of detection and limit of quantification were suitable for clinical evaluations. The mean values of plasma ADMA and ARG taken from healthy volunteers (n=15) were 0.66+/-0.12 and 87+/-35 microM, respectively; the mean molar ratio of ARG to ADMA was 142+/-81. PMID:17931984

  10. Ion pump using cylindrically symmetric spindle magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, M. H.

    2012-11-01

    For all accelerators and many research and industries, excellent vacuum conditions are required and the highest possible pumping rates are necessary. For most applications the standard ion sputtering pump (ISP) meets these requirements and is optimal for financial point of view also. The physical principle of the ISP is well known and many companies manufacture variety of ISP. Most of them use dipole magnetic field produced by permanent magnet and electric dipole field between the electrodes in which tenuous plasma is created because of interaction of between the relatively fast electrons slow residual gas atoms. Performance of an ISP depends basically on the electron cloud density in between the titanium electrodes but in the available present configurations no consideration has been given to electron confinement which needs a mirror magnetic field. If this is incorporated it will make a robust ISP surely; furthermore, the requirement of constant feeding of high voltage to electrodes for supplying sufficient number of electrons will be reduced too. A study has been performed to create sufficient rotationally symmetric spindle magnetic field (SMF) with inherent presence of magnetic mirror effect to electron motion to confine them for longer time for enhancing the density of electron cloud between the electrodes. It will lessen the electric power feeding the electrodes and lengthen their life-time. Construction of further compact and robust ISP is envisaged herein. The field simulation using the commercially available permanent magnet together with simulation of electron motion in such field will be presented and discussed in the paper.