Science.gov

Sample records for field current drive

  1. Bootstrapped tokamak with oscillating field current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Weening, R.H. )

    1993-07-01

    A magnetic helicity conserving mean-field Ohm's law is used to study bootstrapped tokamaks with oscillating field current drive. The Ohm's law leads to the conclusion that the tokamak bootstrap effect can convert the largely alternating current of oscillating field current drive into a direct toroidal plasma current. This plasma current rectification is due to the intrinsically nonlinear nature of the tokamak bootstrap effect, and suggests that it may be possible to maintain the toroidal current of a tokamak reactor by supplementing the bootstrap current with oscillating field current drive. Steady-state tokamak fusion reactors operating with oscillating field current drive could provide an alternative to tokamak reactors operating with external current drive.

  2. Reversed field pinch current drive with oscillating helical fields

    SciTech Connect

    Farengo, Ricardo; Clemente, Roberto Antonio

    2006-04-15

    The use of oscillating helical magnetic fields to produce and sustain the toroidal and poloidal currents in a reversed field pinch (RFP) is investigated. A simple physical model that assumes fixed ions, massless electrons, and uniform density and resistivity is employed. Thermal effects are neglected in Ohm's law and helical coordinates are introduced to reduce the number of coupled nonlinear equations that must be advanced in time. The results show that it is possible to produce RFP-like magnetic field profiles with pinch parameters close to the experimental values. The efficiencies obtained for moderate resistivity, and the observed scaling, indicate that this could be a very attractive method for high temperature plasmas.

  3. Equilibrium evolution in oscillating-field current-drive experiments

    SciTech Connect

    McCollam, K. J.; Anderson, J. K.; Blair, A. P.; Craig, D.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Ebrahimi, F.; O'Connell, R.; Reusch, J. A.; Sarff, J. S.; Stephens, H. D.; Stone, D. R.; Brower, D. L.; Deng, B. H.; Ding, W. X.

    2010-08-15

    Oscillating-field current drive (OFCD) is a proposed method of steady-state toroidal plasma sustainment in which ac poloidal and toroidal loop voltages are applied to produce a dc plasma current. OFCD is added to standard, inductively sustained reversed-field pinch plasmas in the Madison Symmetric Torus [R. N. Dexter et al., Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)]. Equilibrium profiles and fluctuations during a single cycle are measured and analyzed for different relative phases between the two OFCD voltages and for OFCD off. For OFCD phases leading to the most added plasma current, the measured energy confinement is slightly better than that for OFCD off. By contrast, the phase of the maximum OFCD helicity-injection rate also has the maximum decay rate, which is ascribed to transport losses during discrete magnetic-fluctuation events induced by OFCD. Resistive-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the experiments reproduce the observed phase dependence of the added current.

  4. Equilibrium evolution in oscillating-field current-drive experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollam, K. J.; Anderson, J. K.; Blair, A. P.; Craig, D.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Ebrahimi, F.; O'Connell, R.; Reusch, J. A.; Sarff, J. S.; Stephens, H. D.; Stone, D. R.; Brower, D. L.; Deng, B. H.; Ding, W. X.

    2010-08-01

    Oscillating-field current drive (OFCD) is a proposed method of steady-state toroidal plasma sustainment in which ac poloidal and toroidal loop voltages are applied to produce a dc plasma current. OFCD is added to standard, inductively sustained reversed-field pinch plasmas in the Madison Symmetric Torus [R. N. Dexter et al., Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)]. Equilibrium profiles and fluctuations during a single cycle are measured and analyzed for different relative phases between the two OFCD voltages and for OFCD off. For OFCD phases leading to the most added plasma current, the measured energy confinement is slightly better than that for OFCD off. By contrast, the phase of the maximum OFCD helicity-injection rate also has the maximum decay rate, which is ascribed to transport losses during discrete magnetic-fluctuation events induced by OFCD. Resistive-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the experiments reproduce the observed phase dependence of the added current.

  5. Rotating magnetic quadrupole current drive for field-reversed configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Milroy, Richard D.; Guo, H.Y.

    2005-07-15

    In the translation, confinement, and sustainment experiment [A. L. Hoffman, H. Y. Guo, J. T. Slough, S. J. Tobin, L. S. Schrank, W. A. Reass, and G. A. Wurden, Fusion Sci. Technol. 41, 92 (2002)], field-reversed configurations (FRCs) are created and sustained using a rotating magnetic field (RMF). The RMF is usually in the form of a rotating dipole, which in vacuum penetrates uniformly to the axis of symmetry. However, plasma conditions in the FRC normally adjust so that the RMF only partially penetrates the plasma column. We have investigated the possibility of using a rotating quadrupole rather than a rotating dipole magnetic field. The vacuum field from a quadrupole is proportional to radius and cannot penetrate to the axis of symmetry; however, this is not a disadvantage if the current drive is confined to the outer region of the FRC. It was found that the quadrupole drive efficiency is comparable to that of a dipole, but the rotating dipole is more effective at stabilizing the n=2 rotational instability. A strong internal oscillation in B{sub {theta}} is often observed in FRCs sustained by a quadrupole field. The spectral content of the signals indicates that an internal n=1 magnetic structure forms and corotates with the electrons. Similar but much lower amplitude structures can form when a rotating dipole is employed (edge-driven mode)

  6. Oscillating-field current-drive experiments in a reversed field pinch.

    PubMed

    McCollam, K J; Blair, A P; Prager, S C; Sarff, J S

    2006-01-27

    Oscillating-field current drive (OFCD) is a steady-state magnetic helicity injection method to drive net toroidal current in a plasma by applying oscillating poloidal and toroidal loop voltages. OFCD is added to standard toroidal induction to produce about 10% of the total current in the Madison symmetric torus. The dependence of the added current on the phase between the two applied voltages is measured. Maximum current does not occur at the phase of the maximum helicity injection rate. Effects of OFCD on magnetic fluctuations and dissipated power are shown. PMID:16486717

  7. Modifications to the edge current profile with auxiliary edge current drive and improved confinement in a reversed-field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, B.E.; Biewer, T.M.; Chattopadhyay, P.K.; Chiang, C.-S.; Craig, D.J.; Crocker, N.A.; Den Hartog, D.J.; Fiksel, G.; Fontana, P.W.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S.

    2000-09-01

    Auxiliary edge current drive is routinely applied in the Madison Symmetric Torus [R.N. Dexter, D. W. Kerst, T.W. Lovell et.al., Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] with the goal of modifying the parallel current profile to reduce current- driven magnetic fluctuations and the associated particle and energy transport. Provided by an inductive electric field, the current drive successfully reduces energy transport. First-time measurements of the modified edge current profile reveal that, relative to discharges without auxiliary current drive, the edge current density decreases. This decrease is explicable in terms of newly measured reductions in the dynamo (fluctuation-based) electric field and the electrical conductivity. Induced by the current drive, these two changes to the edge plasma play as much of a role in determining the resultant edge current profile as does the current drive itself.

  8. Modifications to the edge current profile with auxiliary edge current drive and improved confinement in a reversed-field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, B. E.; Biewer, T. M.; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Chiang, C.-S.; Craig, D. J.; Crocker, N. A.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Fiksel, G.; Fontana, P. W.; Prager, S. C.

    2000-09-01

    Auxiliary edge current drive is routinely applied in the Madison Symmetric Torus [R. N. Dexter, D. W. Kerst, T. W. Lovell et al., Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] with the goal of modifying the parallel current profile to reduce current-driven magnetic fluctuations and the associated particle and energy transport. Provided by an inductive electric field, the current drive successfully reduces fluctuations and transport. First-time measurements of the modified edge current profile reveal that, relative to discharges without auxiliary current drive, the edge current density decreases. This decrease is explicable in terms of newly measured reductions in the dynamo (fluctuation-based) electric field and the electrical conductivity. Induced by the current drive, these two changes to the edge plasma play as much of a role in determining the resultant edge current profile as does the current drive itself. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  9. Radial current density effects on rotating magnetic field current drive in field-reversed configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Clemente, R. A.; Gilli, M.; Farengo, R.

    2008-10-15

    Steady state solutions, suitable for field-reversed configurations (FRCs) sustained by rotating magnetic fields (RMFs) are obtained by properly including three-dimensional effects, in the limit of large FRC elongation, and the radial component of Ohm's law. The steady electrostatic potential, necessary to satisfy Ohm's law, is considered to be a surface function. The problem is analyzed at the midplane of the configuration and it is reduced to the solution of two coupled nonlinear differential equations for the real and imaginary parts of the phasor associated to the longitudinal component of the vector potential. Additional constraints are obtained by requesting that the steady radial current density and poloidal magnetic flux vanish at the plasma boundary which is set at the time-averaged separatrix. The results are presented in terms of the degree of synchronism of the electrons with the RMF and compared with those obtained when radial current effects are neglected. Three important differences are observed when compared with the case without radial current density. First, at low penetration of the RMF into the plasma there is a significant increase in the driven azimuthal current. Second, the RMF amplitude necessary to access the high synchronism regime, starting from low synchronism, is larger and the difference appears to increase as the separatrix to classical skin depth ratio increases. Third, the minimum RMF amplitude necessary to sustain almost full synchronism is reduced.

  10. Confinement improvement with rf poloidal current drive in the reversed-field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Hokin, S.; Sarff, J.; Sovinec, C.; Uchimoto, E.

    1994-03-08

    External control of the current profile in a reversed-field pinch (RFP), by means such as rf poloidal current drive, may have beneficial effects well beyond the direct reduction of Ohmic input power due to auxiliary heating. Reduction of magnetic turbulence associated with the dynamo, which drives poloidal current in a conventional RFP, may allow operation at lower density and higher electron temperature, for which rf current drive becomes efficient and the RFP operates in a more favorable regime on the n{tau} vs T diagram. Projected parameters for RFX at 2 MA axe studied as a concrete example. If rf current drive allows RFX to operate with {beta} = 10% (plasma energy/magnetic energy) at low density (3 {times} 10{sup 19} m{sup {minus}3}) with classical resistivity (i.e. without dynamo-enhanced power input), 40 ms energy confinement times and 3 keV temperatures will result, matching the performance of tokamaks of similar size.

  11. Fluctuation and transport reduction in a reversed field pinch by inductive poloidal current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Sarff, J.S.; Hokin, S.A.; Ji, H.; Prager, S.C.; Sovinec, C.R.

    1993-12-01

    An auxilliay poloidal inductive electric field applied to a reversed field pinch plasma reduces the current density gradient, slows the growth of m=1 tearing fluctations, suppresses their associated sawteeth, and doubles the energy confinement time. Small sawteeth occur in the improved state but with m=0 precursors. By requiring a change of toroidal flux embedding the plasma, inductive poloidal current profile drive is transient, but the improvement encourages the program of RFP transport suppression using current profile control.

  12. Principal physics of rotating magnetic-field current drive of field reversed configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, A.L.; Guo, H.Y.; Miller, K.E.; Milroy, R.D.

    2006-01-15

    After extensive experimentation on the Translation, Confinement, and Sustainment rotating magnetic-field (RMF)-driven field reversed configuration (FRC) device [A. L. Hoffman et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 41, 92 (2002)], the principal physics of RMF formation and sustainment of standard prolate FRCs inside a flux conserver is reasonably well understood. If the RMF magnitude B{sub {omega}} at a given frequency {omega} is high enough compared to other experimental parameters, it will drive the outer electrons of a plasma column into near synchronous rotation, allowing the RMF to penetrate into the plasma. If the resultant azimuthal current is strong enough to reverse an initial axial bias field B{sub o} a FRC will be formed. A balance between the RMF applied torque and electron-ion friction will determine the peak plasma density n{sub m}{proportional_to}B{sub {omega}}/{eta}{sup 1/2}{omega}{sup 1/2}r{sub s}, where r{sub s} is the FRC separatrix radius and {eta} is an effective weighted plasma resistivity. The plasma total temperature T{sub t} is free to be any value allowed by power balance as long as the ratio of FRC diamagnetic current, I{sup '}{sub dia}{approx_equal}2B{sub e}/{mu}{sub o}, is less than the maximum possible synchronous current, I{sup '}{sub sync}=e{omega}r{sub s}{sup 2}/2. The RMF will self-consistently penetrate a distance {delta}{sup *} governed by the ratio {zeta}=I{sup '}{sub dia}/I{sup '}{sub sync}. Since the FRC is a diamagnetic entity, its peak pressure p{sub m}=n{sub m}kT{sub t} determines its external magnetic field B{sub e}{approx_equal}(2{mu}{sub o}p{sub m}){sup 1/2}. Higher FRC currents, magnetic fields, and poloidal fluxes can thus be obtained, with the same RMF parameters, simply by raising the plasma temperature. Higher temperatures have also been noted to reduce the effective plasma resistivity, so that these higher currents can be supported with surprisingly little increase in absorbed RMF power.

  13. Lower-hybrid poloidal current drive for fluctuation reduction in a reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Uchimoto, E.; Cekic, M.; Harvey, R.W.; Litwin, C.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S.; Sovinec, C.R.

    1994-06-01

    Current drive using the lower-hybrid slow wave is shown to be a promising candidate for improving confinement properties of a reversed field pinch (RFP). Ray-tracing calculations indicate that the wave will make a few poloidal turns while spiraling radially into a target zone inside the reversal layer. The poloidal antenna wavelength of the lower hybrid wave can be chosen so that efficient parallel current drive will occur mostly in the poloidal direction in this outer region. Three-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) computation demonstrates that an additive poloidal current in this region will reduce the magnetic fluctuations and magnetic stochasticity.

  14. Balancing Current Drive and Heating in DIII-D High Noninductive Current Fraction Discharges Through Choice of the Toroidal Field

    SciTech Connect

    Ferron, J.R.; Holcomb, C T; Luce, T.C.; Politzer, P. A.; Turco, F.; DeBoo, J. C.; Doyle, E. J.; In, Y.; La Haye, R.; Murakami, Masanori; Okabayashi, M.; Park, J. M.; Petrie, T W; Petty, C C.; Reimerdes, H.

    2011-01-01

    In order to maintain stationary values of the stored energy and the plasma current in a tokamak discharge with all of the current driven noninductively, the sum of the alpha-heating power and the power required to provide externally driven current must be equal to the power required to maintain the pressure against transport losses. In a study of high noninductive current fraction discharges in the DIII-D tokamak, it is shown that in the case of present-day tokamaks with no alpha-heating, adjustment of the toroidal field strength (B(T)) is a tool to obtain this balance between the required current drive and heating powers with other easily modifiable discharge parameters (beta(N), q(95), discharge shape, n(e)) fixed at values chosen to satisfy specific constraints. With all of the external power sources providing both heating and current drive, and beta(N) and q(95) fixed, the fraction of externally driven current scales with B(T) with little change in the bootstrap current fraction, thus allowing the noninductive current fraction to be adjusted.

  15. THE ROTATING MAGNETIC FIELD OSCILLATOR SYSTEM FOR CURRENT DRIVE IN THE TRANSLATION, CONFINEMENT AND SUSTAINMENT EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    S. TOBIN; ET AL

    2000-12-01

    The experimental setup and test results for the {approximately}125 MW rotating magnetic field current drive system of the Translation, Confinement and Sustainment Experiment at the University of Washington are described. The oscillator system, constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, drives two tank circuits (15 kV{sub peak} potential, 8.5 kA{sub peak} maximum circulating current in each tank to date) operated 90{degree} out of phase to produce a 54 G rotating magnetic field with a frequency of 163 kHz ({omega} = 1.02{sup x} 10{sup {minus}6} s{sup {minus}1}). Programmable waveform generators control ''hot deck'' totem pole drivers that are used to control the grid of 12 Machlett 8618 magnetically beamed triode tubes. This setup allows the current to be turned on or off in less than 100 ns ({approximately}6{degree}). Both tank circuits are isolated from the current source by a 1:1 air core, transmission line transformer. Each tank circuit contains two saddle coils (combined inductance of 1.6 {micro}H) and radio frequency capacitors (580 nF). Test results are presented for three conditions: no external load, a resistive external load and a plasma load. A SPICE model of the oscillator system was created. Comparisons between this model and experimental data are given.

  16. Microturbulence studies of pulsed poloidal current drive discharges in the reversed field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmody, D.; Pueschel, M. J.; Anderson, J. K.; Terry, P. W.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental discharges with pulsed poloidal current drive (PPCD) in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed field pinch are investigated using a semi-analytic equilibrium model in the gyrokinetic turbulence code Gene. PPCD cases, with plasma currents of 500 kA and 200 kA, exhibit a density-gradient-driven trapped electron mode (TEM) and an ion temperature gradient mode, respectively. Relative to expectations of tokamak core plasmas, the critical gradients for the onset of these instabilities are found to be greater by roughly a factor of the aspect ratio. A significant upshift in the nonlinear TEM transport threshold, previously found for tokamaks, is confirmed in nonlinear reversed field pinch simulations and is roughly three times the threshold for linear instability. The simulated heat fluxes can be brought in agreement with measured diffusivities by introducing a small, resonant magnetic perturbation, thus modeling the residual fluctuations from tearing modes. These fluctuations significantly enhance transport.

  17. Microturbulence studies of pulsed poloidal current drive discharges in the reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Carmody, D. Pueschel, M. J.; Anderson, J. K.; Terry, P. W.

    2015-01-15

    Experimental discharges with pulsed poloidal current drive (PPCD) in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed field pinch are investigated using a semi-analytic equilibrium model in the gyrokinetic turbulence code GENE. PPCD cases, with plasma currents of 500 kA and 200 kA, exhibit a density-gradient-driven trapped electron mode (TEM) and an ion temperature gradient mode, respectively. Relative to expectations of tokamak core plasmas, the critical gradients for the onset of these instabilities are found to be greater by roughly a factor of the aspect ratio. A significant upshift in the nonlinear TEM transport threshold, previously found for tokamaks, is confirmed in nonlinear reversed field pinch simulations and is roughly three times the threshold for linear instability. The simulated heat fluxes can be brought in agreement with measured diffusivities by introducing a small, resonant magnetic perturbation, thus modeling the residual fluctuations from tearing modes. These fluctuations significantly enhance transport.

  18. Rotating magnetic field current drive of high-temperature field reversed configurations with high {zeta} scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, H. Y.; Hoffman, A. L.; Milroy, R. D.

    2007-11-15

    Greatly reduced recycling and impurity ingestion in the Translation, Confinement, and Sustainment--Upgrade (TCSU) device has allowed much higher plasma temperatures to be achieved in the field reversed configurations (FRC) under rotating magnetic field (RMF) formation and sustainment. The hotter plasmas have higher magnetic fields and much higher diamagnetic electron rotation rates so that the important ratio of average electron rotation frequency to RMF frequency, called {zeta}, approaches unity, for the first time, in TCSU. A large fraction of the RMF power is absorbed by an as yet unexplained (anomalous) mechanism directly proportional to the square of the RMF magnitude. It becomes of relatively lesser significance as the FRC current increases, and simple resistive heating begins to dominate, but the anomalous absorption is useful for initial plasma heating. Measurements of total absorbed power, and comparisons of applied RMF torque to torque on the electrons due to electron-ion friction under high-{zeta} operation, over a range of temperatures and fields, have allowed the separation of the classical Ohmic and anomalous heating to be inferred, and cross-field plasma resistivities to be calculated.

  19. SnSe2 field-effect transistors with high drive current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yang; Ebrish, Mona A.; Olson, Eric J.; Koester, Steven J.

    2013-12-01

    SnSe2 field-effect transistors fabricated using mechanical exfoliation are reported. Substrate-gated devices with source-to-drain spacing of 0.5 μm have been fabricated with drive current of 160 μA/μm at T = 300 K. The transconductance at a drain-to-source voltage of Vds = 2 V increases from 0.94 μS/μm at 300 K to 4.0 μS/μm at 4.4 K, while the field-effect mobility increases from 8.6 cm2/Vs at 300 K to 28 cm2/Vs at 77 K. The conductance at Vds = 50 mV shows an activation energy of only 5.5 meV, indicating the absence of a significant Schottky barrier at the source and drain contacts.

  20. A mechanism for the dynamo terms to sustain closed-flux current, including helicity balance, by driving current which crosses the magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Jarboe, T. R.; Nelson, B. A.; Sutherland, D. A.

    2015-07-15

    An analysis of imposed dynamo current drive (IDCD) [T.R. Jarboe et al., Nucl. Fusion 52 083017 (2012)] reveals: (a) current drive on closed flux surfaces seems possible without relaxation, reconnection, or other flux-surface-breaking large events; (b) the scale size of the key physics may be smaller than is often computationally resolved; (c) helicity can be sustained across closed flux; and (d) IDCD current drive is parallel to the current which crosses the magnetic field to produce the current driving force. In addition to agreeing with spheromak data, IDCD agrees with selected tokamak data.

  1. Convective Power Loss Measurements in a Field Reversed Configuration with Rotating Magnetic Field Current Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, Paul

    The Translation, Confinement, and Sustainment Upgrade (TCSU) experiment achieves direct formation and sustainment of a field reversed configuration (FRC) plasma through rotating magnetic fields (RMF). The pre-ionized gas necessary for FRC formation is supplied by a magnetized cascade arc source that has been developed for TCSU. To ensure ideal FRC performance, the condition of the vacuum chamber prior to RMF start-up has been characterized with the use of a fast response ion gauge. A circuit capable of gating the puff valves with initial high voltage for quick response and then indefinite operational voltage was also designed. A fully translatable combination Langmuir / Mach probe was also built to measure the electron temperature, electron density, and ion velocity of the FRC. These measurements were also successfully completed in the FRC exhaust jets allowing for an accurate analysis of the FRC power loss through convection.

  2. Current drive by helicon waves

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Manash Kumar; Bora, Dhiraj

    2009-01-01

    Helicity in the dynamo field components of helicon wave is examined during the novel study of wave induced helicity current drive. Strong poloidal asymmetry in the wave magnetic field components is observed during helicon discharges formed in a toroidal vacuum chamber of small aspect ratio. High frequency regime is chosen to increase the phase velocity of helicon waves which in turn minimizes the resonant wave-particle interactions and enhances the contribution of the nonresonant current drive mechanisms. Owing to the strong poloidal asymmetry in the wave magnetic field structures, plasma current is driven mostly by the dynamo-electric-field, which arise due to the wave helicity injection by helicon waves. Small, yet finite contribution from the suppressed wave-particle resonance cannot be ruled out in the operational regime examined. A brief discussion on the parametric dependence of plasma current along with numerical estimations of nonresonant components is presented. A close agreement between the numerical estimation and measured plasma current magnitude is obtained during the present investigation.

  3. Anomalous - viscosity current drive

    DOEpatents

    Stix, Thomas H.; Ono, Masayuki

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus and method for maintaining a steady-state current in a toroidal magnetically confined plasma. An electric current is generated in an edge region at or near the outermost good magnetic surface of the toroidal plasma. The edge current is generated in a direction parallel to the flow of current in the main plasma and such that its current density is greater than the average density of the main plasma current. The current flow in the edge region is maintained in a direction parallel to the main current for a period of one or two of its characteristic decay times. Current from the edge region will penetrate radially into the plasma and augment the main plasma current through the mechanism of anomalous viscosity. In another aspect of the invention, current flow driven between a cathode and an anode is used to establish a start-up plasma current. The plasma-current channel is magnetically detached from the electrodes, leaving a plasma magnetically insulated from contact with any material obstructions including the cathode and anode.

  4. Anomalous-viscosity current drive

    DOEpatents

    Stix, T.H.; Ono, M.

    1986-04-25

    The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for maintaining a steady-state current for magnetically confining the plasma in a toroidal magnetic confinement device using anomalous viscosity current drive. A second aspect of this invention relates to an apparatus and method for the start-up of a magnetically confined toroidal plasma.

  5. Current Drive in Recombining Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    P.F. Schmit and N.J. Fisch

    2012-05-15

    The Langevin equations describing the average collisional dynamics of suprathermal particles in nonstationary plasma remarkably admit an exact analytical solution in the case of recombining plasma. The current density produced by arbitrary particle fluxes is derived including the effect of charge recombination. Since recombination has the effect of lowering the charge density of the plasma, thus reducing the charged particle collisional frequencies, the evolution of the current density can be modified substantially compared to plasma with fixed charge density. The current drive efficiency is derived and optimized for discrete and continuous pulses of current, leading to the discovery of a nonzero "residual" current density that persists indefinitely under certain conditions, a feature not present in stationary plasmas.

  6. Dynamic modeling of lower hybrid current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Ignat, D.W.; Valeo, E.J.; Jardin, S.C.

    1993-10-01

    A computational model of lower hybrid current drive in the presence of an electric field is described and some results are given. Details of geometry, plasma profiles and circuit equations are treated carefully. Two-dimensional velocity space effects are approximated in a one-dimensional Fokker-Planck treatment.

  7. Direct drive field actuator motors

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, A.R.

    1998-03-10

    A positive-drive field actuator motor is described which includes a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately. 62 figs.

  8. Direct drive field actuator motors

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, Allen R.

    1998-01-01

    A positive-drive field actuator motor including a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately.

  9. Driving toroidally asymmetric current through the tokamak scrape-off layer, Part II: Magnetic field structure and spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, I

    2009-04-08

    The structure of the magnetic field perturbations due to non-axisymmetric field-aligned currents in the tokamak scrape-off layer (SOL) are analytically calculated near the X-point. Part I [I. Joseph, et al., submitted to Phys. Plasmas (2008)] demonstrated that biasing divertor target plates in a toroidally asymmetric fashion can generate an appreciable toroidally asymmetric parallel current density in the SOL along the separatrix. Here, the magnetic field perturbation caused by a SOL current channel of finite width and step-wise constant amplitude at the target plate is derived. Flux expansion amplifies the magnetic perturbation near the X-point, while phase interference causes the SOL amplitude to be reduced at large toroidal mode number. Far enough from the current channel, the magnetic field can be approximated as arising from a surface current near the separatrix with differing amplitudes in the SOL and the divertor leg. The perturbation spectrum and resonant components of this field are computed analytically asymptotically close to the separatrix in magnetic flux coordinates. The size of the stochastic layer due to the applied perturbation that would result without self-consistent plasma shielding is also estimated. If enough resonant field is generated, control of the edge pressure gradient may allow stabilization of edge localized modes.

  10. Steady State Tokamak Equilibria without Current Drive

    SciTech Connect

    Shaing, K.C.; Aydemir, A.Y.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Miller, R.L.

    1997-11-01

    Steady state tokamak equilibria without current drive are found. This is made possible by including the potato bootstrap current close to the magnetic axis. Tokamaks with this class of equilibria do not need seed current or current drive, and are intrinsically steady state. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Oscillatory nonhmic current drive for maintaining a plasma current

    DOEpatents

    Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus and method of the invention maintain a plasma current with an oscillatory nonohmic current drive. Each cycle of operation has a generation period in which current driving energy is applied to the plasma, and a relaxation period in which current driving energy is removed. Plasma parameters, such as plasma temperature or plasma average ionic charge state, are modified during the generation period so as to oscillate plasma resistivity in synchronism with the application of current driving energy. The invention improves overall current drive efficiencies.

  12. Oscillatory nonohomic current drive for maintaining a plasma current

    DOEpatents

    Fisch, N.J.

    1984-01-01

    Apparatus and methods are described for maintaining a plasma current with an oscillatory nonohmic current drive. Each cycle of operation has a generation period in which current driving energy is applied to the plasma, and a relaxation period in which current driving energy is removed. Plasma parameters, such as plasma temperature or plasma average ionic charge state, are modified during the generation period so as to oscillate plasma resistivity in synchronism with the application of current driving energy. The invention improves overall current drive efficiencies.

  13. Fast wave current drive in DEMO

    SciTech Connect

    Lerche, E.; Van Eestera, D.; Messiaen, A.; Collaboration: EFDA-PPPT Contributors

    2014-02-12

    The ability to non-inductively drive a large fraction of the toroidal plasma current in magnetically confined plasmas is an essential requirement for steady state fusion reactors such as DEMO. Besides neutral beam injection (NBI), electron-cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) and lower hybrid wave heating (LH), ion-cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) is a promising candidate to drive current, in particular at the high temperatures expected in fusion plasmas. In this paper, the current drive (CD) efficiencies calculated with coupled ICRF wave / CD numerical codes for the DEMO-1 design case (R{sub 0}=9m, B{sub 0}=6.8T, a{sub p}=2.25m) [1] are presented. It will be shown that although promising CD efficiencies can be obtained in the usual ICRF frequency domain (20-100MHz) by shifting the dominant ion-cyclotron absorption layers to the high-field side, operation at higher frequencies (100-300MHz) has a stronger CD potential, provided the parasitic RF power absorption of the alpha particles can be minimized.

  14. Lower Hybrid Heating and Current Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiangrong; Horton, Wendell; Peysson, Yves; Decker, Joan

    2012-10-01

    Lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) is the most robust and efficient method of driving the tokamak current with external radio frequency waves in steady-state tokamak operation. The electron distribution functions in the LHCD experiments contain substantial parallel thermal fluxes with radial gradients that are greater than those in the current and temperature profiles. We re-examine the growth rates of the electron temperature gradient (ETG) modes in these plasmas based on an analytic model for electron distribution function with three temperatures T, T|F, and T|B. The stability and turbulent transport is also analyzed using the electron distribution functions computed with a combined ray tracing/Fokker Planck code (DELPHINE C3P/LUKE). Electron Landau damping is reduced compared to its value in a Maxwell distribution. These potential instability drives are controlled by the magnetic sheared induced electron Landau damping that becomes strong as the fluctuations propagate into regions of large parallel wavenumber away from the mode rational surfaces. The feedback of the ETG turbulence on the propagation of the penetration of RF fields that shape the electron distribution function feeding the ETG growth rate make the problem a complex dynamical system.

  15. Electron cyclotron current drive in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Luce, T.C.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Lohr, J.M.; Petty, C.C.; Politzer, P.A.; Prater, R.; Harvey, R.W.; Giruzzi, G.; Rice, B.W.

    1999-05-01

    Clear measurements of the localized current density driven by electron cyclotron waves have been made on the DIII-D tokamak. Direct evidence of the current drive is seen on the internal magnetic field measurements by motional Stark effect spectroscopy. Comparison with theoretical calculations in the collisionless limit shows the experimental current drive exceeds the predictions by a substantial amount for currents driven near the half radius. In all cases the experimental current density profile is broader than the predicted one.

  16. Microwave heating and current drive in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.I.; Cohen, R.H.; Kerbel, G.D.; Logan, B.G.; Matsuda, Y.; McCoy, M.G.; Nevins, W.M.; Rognlien, T.D.; Smith, G.R.; Harvey, R.W.; Kritz, A.H.; Bonoli, P.T.; Porkolab, M.

    1988-08-23

    The use of powerful microwave sources provide unique opportunities for novel and efficient heating and current-drive schemes in the electron-cyclotron and lower-hybrid ranges of frequencies. Free- electron lasers and relativistic klystrons are new sources that have a number of technical advantages over conventional, lower-intensity sources; their use can lead to improved current-drive efficiencies and better penetration into a reactor-grade plasma in specific cases. This paper reports on modeling of absorption and current drive, in intense-pulse and quasilinear regimes, and on analysis of parametric instabilities and self-focusing. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  17. RMF concept: a rotating-magnetic-field technique for driving steady plasma currents in compact toroid devices

    SciTech Connect

    McKenna, K.F.

    1980-09-01

    The generation and/or sustaining of a Compact Toroid (CT) configuration using the RMF technique is a relatively new and unknown concept. In this report the basic principles, historical development, and current theoretical understanding of this concept are reviewed. Significant experimental and theoretical results, potential problem areas, and recommendations for the direction of future work are discussed. An illustrative analysis of the application of the RMF technique to a CT reactor is presented. The results of a recent experiment, the Rotamak, in which a Spheromak-like CT plasma was produced using the RMF technique, are presented.

  18. ITER equilibrium with bootstrap currents, lower hybrid current drive and fast wave current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D.A.

    1989-03-01

    A current drive system is proposed for the technology phase of ITER which relies on rf power and bootstrap currents. The rf/bootstrap system permits operation at high safety factor, and we consider the axial value to be q/sub a/ approx. = 1.9, which minimizes the need for seed current near the magnetic axis. Lower hybrid power (/approximately/30 MW) provides current density near the surface, ICRF (/approximately/65 MHz, /approximately/30 MW) fast waves generate current near the axis, and high frequency fast waves (/approximately/250 MHz, /approximately/74 MW) supply the remaining current density. The system is not yet optimized but appears to offer great flexibility (ion heating for ignition, current rampup, etc.) with relatively inexpensive and well developed technology. 29 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Electron cyclotron current drive in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Luce, T. C.; Lin-Liu, Y. R.; Harvey, R. W.; Giruzzi, G.; Lohr, J. M.; Petty, C. C.; Politzer, P. A.; Prater, R.; Rice, B. W.

    1999-09-20

    Clear measurements of the localized current density driven by electron cyclotron waves have been made on the DIII-D tokamak. Direct evidence of the current drive is seen on the internal magnetic field measurements by motional Stark effect spectroscopy. Comparison with theoretical calculations in the collisionless limit shows the experimental current drive exceeds the predictions by a substantial amount for currents driven near the half radius. In all cases the experimental current density profile is broader than the predicted one. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  20. Fast wave current drive: Experimental status and reactor prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D.A.

    1988-03-01

    The fast wave is one of the two possible wave polarizations which propagate according to the basic theory of cold plasmas. It is distinguished from the other (slow wave) branch by having an electric field vector which is mainly orthogonal to the confining magnetic field of the plasma. The plasma and fast wave qualitatively assume different behavior depending on the frequency range of the launched wave. The high frequency fast wave (HFFW), with a frequency (..omega..2..pi.. )approximately) GHz) much higher than the ion cyclotron frequency (..cap omega../sub i/), suffers electron Landau damping and drives current by supplying parallel momentum to superthermal electrons in a fashion similar to lower hybrid (slow wave) current drive. In the simple theory the HFFW should be superior to the slow wave and can propagate to very high density and temperature without impediment. Experiments, however, have not conclusively shown that HFFW current drive can be achieved at densities above the slow wave current drive limit, possibly due to conversion of the launched fast waves into slow waves by density fluctuations. Alternatively, the low frequency fast wave (LFFW), with frequencies ()approxreverse arrowlt) 100 MHz) only a few times the ion cyclotron frequency, is damped by electron Landau damping and, in a hot plasma ()approxreverse arrowgt) 10 keV), by electron transit time magnetic pumping; current drive is achieved by pushing superthermal electrons, and efficiency is prediocted to be slightly better than for lower hybrid current drive. Most significantly, the slow wave does not propagate in high density plasma when ..omega.. )approximately) ..cap omega../sub i/, so parasitic coupling to the slow wave can be avoided, and no density and temperture limitations are foreseen. Experiments with fast wve current drive invariably find current drive efficiency as good as obtained in lower hybrid experiments at comparable, low temperatures. 45 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  1. Heating and current drive systems for TPX

    SciTech Connect

    Swain, D.; Goranson, P.; Halle, A. von; Bernabei, S.; Greenough, N.

    1994-05-24

    The heating and current drive (H and CD) system proposed for the TPX tokamak will consist of ion cyclotron, neutral beam, and lower hybrid systems. It will have 17.5 MW of installed H and CD power initially, and can be upgraded to 45 MW. It will be used to explore advanced confinement and fully current-driven plasma regimes with pulse lengths of up to 1,000 s.

  2. Calculation of rf current drive in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.

    2008-11-01

    The toroidal plasma current is a key parameter for controlling MHD stability and fusion performances in tokamaks. Among the various methods for driving current, rf waves are a flexible and powerful tool. Therefore, their role in the design and optimization of advanced scenarios is considerable. The universal ray-tracing code C3PO coupled with the fully implicit linearized 3-D bounce-averaged relativistic electron Fokker-Planck solver LUKE is an illustration of the present day effort for performing fast and realistic calculations of the rf driven plasma current. The versatility of this tool is highlighted by simulations concerning the lower hybrid and electron cyclotron waves.

  3. Neutral Beam Current Drive in Spheromak plasma and plasma stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearlstein, L. D.; Jayakumar, R. J.; Hudson, B.; Hill, D. N.; Lodestro, L. L.; McLean, H. S.; Fowler, T. K.; Casper, T. A.

    2007-11-01

    A key question for the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) is understanding how spheromaks can be sustained by other current drive tools such as neutral beam current drive. Another question is whether the present relationship between current and maximum spheromak magnetic field (plasma beta) is related to Alcator-like ohmic confinement limit or is a stability limit. Using the code CORSICA, the fraction of neutral beam current drive that can be achieved has been calculated for different injection angles with a fixed equilibrium. It is seen that relaxing the equilibrium with this drive simply drives the core safety factor to low values. Other equilibria where the NBI may give aligned current drive are being explored. Free-boundary equilibria calculations are underway to see what hyper-resistivity model gives the observed sustained SSPX performance and include that in the NBI calculations. Work performed under the auspices of the US DOE by University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract W-7405-ENG-48.

  4. Collisional current drive in two interpenetrating plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D. D.; Kugland, N. L.; Park, H.-S.; Pollaine, S. M.; Remington, B. A.; Ross, J. S.

    2011-10-15

    The magnetic field generation in two interpenetrating, weakly collisional plasma streams produced by intense lasers is considered. The generation mechanism is very similar to the neutral beam injection current drive in toroidal fusion devices, with the differences related to the absence of the initial magnetic field, short interaction time, and different geometry. Spatial and temporal characteristics of the magnetic field produced in two counterstreaming jets are evaluated; it is shown that the magnetic field of order of 1 T can be generated for modest jet parameters. Conditions under which this mechanism dominates that of the ''Biermann battery'' are discussed. Other settings where the mechanism of the collisional current drive can be important for the generation of seed magnetic fields include astrophysics and interiors of hohlraums.

  5. Current Sensor Fault Reconstruction for PMSM Drives

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Gang; Luo, Yi-Ping; Zhang, Chang-Fan; He, Jing; Huang, Yi-Shan

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with a current sensor fault reconstruction algorithm for the torque closed-loop drive system of an interior PMSM. First, sensor faults are equated to actuator ones by a new introduced state variable. Then, in αβ coordinates, based on the motor model with active flux linkage, a current observer is constructed with a specific sliding mode equivalent control methodology to eliminate the effects of unknown disturbances, and the phase current sensor faults are reconstructed by means of an adaptive method. Finally, an αβ axis current fault processing module is designed based on the reconstructed value. The feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method are verified by simulation and experimental tests on the RT-LAB platform. PMID:26840317

  6. Current Sensor Fault Reconstruction for PMSM Drives.

    PubMed

    Huang, Gang; Luo, Yi-Ping; Zhang, Chang-Fan; He, Jing; Huang, Yi-Shan

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with a current sensor fault reconstruction algorithm for the torque closed-loop drive system of an interior PMSM. First, sensor faults are equated to actuator ones by a new introduced state variable. Then, in αβ coordinates, based on the motor model with active flux linkage, a current observer is constructed with a specific sliding mode equivalent control methodology to eliminate the effects of unknown disturbances, and the phase current sensor faults are reconstructed by means of an adaptive method. Finally, an αβ axis current fault processing module is designed based on the reconstructed value. The feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method are verified by simulation and experimental tests on the RT-LAB platform. PMID:26840317

  7. RF current drive and plasma fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peysson, Yves; Decker, Joan; Morini, L.; Coda, S.

    2011-12-01

    The role played by electron density fluctuations near the plasma edge on rf current drive in tokamaks is assessed quantitatively. For this purpose, a general framework for incorporating density fluctuations in existing modelling tools has been developed. It is valid when rf power absorption takes place far from the fluctuating region of the plasma. The ray-tracing formalism is modified in order to take into account time-dependent perturbations of the density, while the Fokker-Planck solver remains unchanged. The evolution of the electron distribution function in time and space under the competing effects of collisions and quasilinear diffusion by rf waves is determined consistently with the time scale of fluctuations described as a statistical process. Using the ray-tracing code C3PO and the 3D linearized relativistic bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck solver LUKE, the effect of electron density fluctuations on the current driven by the lower hybrid (LH) and the electron cyclotron (EC) waves is estimated quantitatively. A thin fluctuating layer characterized by electron drift wave turbulence at the plasma edge is considered. The effect of fluctuations on the LH wave propagation is equivalent to a random scattering process with a broadening of the poloidal mode spectrum proportional to the level of the perturbation. However, in the multipass regime, the LH current density profile remains sensitive to the ray chaotic behaviour, which is not averaged by fluctuations. The effect of large amplitude fluctuations on the EC driven current is found to be similar to an anomalous radial transport of the fast electrons. The resulting lower current drive efficiency and broader current profile are in better agreement with experimental observations. Finally, applied to the ITER ELMy H-mode regime, the model predicts a significant broadening of the EC driven current density profile with the fluctuation level, which can make the stabilization of neoclassical tearing mode potentially

  8. Direct-drive field actuator motors

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, Allen R.

    1995-01-01

    A high-torque, low speed, positive-drive field actuator motor including a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately.

  9. Direct-drive field actuator motors

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, A.R.

    1995-07-11

    A high-torque, low speed, positive-drive field actuator motor is disclosed including a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately. 37 figs.

  10. Current drive experiments in the Helicity Injected Torus - II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamp, W. T.; Redd, A. J.; Jarboe, T. R.; Nelson, B. A.; O'Neill, R. G.; Raman, R.; Sieck, P. E.; Smith, R. J.; Mueller, D.

    2006-10-01

    The HIT-II spherical torus (ST) device has demonstrated four toroidal plasma current drive configurations to form and sustain a tokamak: 1) inductive (ohmic) current drive, 2) coaxial helicity injection (CHI) current drive, 3) CHI initiated plasmas with ohmic sustainment (CHI+OH), and 4) ohmically initiated plasmas with CHI edge current drive (OH+ECD). CHI discharges with a sufficiently high ratio of injector current to toroidal field current form a closed flux core, and amplify the injector poloidal flux through magnetic reconnection. CHI+OH plasmas are more robust than unassisted ohmic discharges, with a wider operating space and more efficient use of the transformer Volt-seconds. Finally, edge CHI can enhance the plasma current of an ohmic discharge without significantly degrading the quality of the discharge. Results will be presented for each HIT-II operating regime, including empirical performance scalings, applicable parametric operating spaces, and requirements to produce these discharges. Thomson scattering measurements and EFIT simulations are used to evaluate confinement in several representative plasmas. Finally, we outline extensions to the HIT-II CHI studies that could be performed with NSTX, SUNIST, or other ST devices.

  11. Theory of current-drive in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fisch, N.J.

    1986-12-01

    The continuous operation of a tokamak fusion reactor requires, among other things, a means of providing continuous toroidal current. Such operation is preferred to the conventional pulsed operation, where the plasma current is induced by a time-varying magnetic field. A variety of methods has been proposed to provide continuous current, including methods which utilize particle beams or radio frequency waves in any of several frequency regimes. Currents as large as half a mega-amp have now been produced in the laboratory by such means, and experimentation in these techniques has now involved major tokamak facilities worldwide.

  12. Electric machine and current source inverter drive system

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S

    2014-06-24

    A drive system includes an electric machine and a current source inverter (CSI). This integration of an electric machine and an inverter uses the machine's field excitation coil for not only flux generation in the machine but also for the CSI inductor. This integration of the two technologies, namely the U machine motor and the CSI, opens a new chapter for the component function integration instead of the traditional integration by simply placing separate machine and inverter components in the same housing. Elimination of the CSI inductor adds to the CSI volumetric reduction of the capacitors and the elimination of PMs for the motor further improve the drive system cost, weight, and volume.

  13. Numerical Modeling of HHFW Heating and Current Drive on NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, C. K.; Bell, R. E.; Hosea, J. C.; Leblanc, B. P.; Taylor, G.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Berry, L. A.; Jaeger, E. F.; Ryan, P. M.; Wilgen, J. B.; Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C.; Harvey, R. W.; Yuh, H. Y.

    2008-11-01

    High harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive, at frequencies up to 15 times the fundamental deuterium cyclotron frequency, are being studied on NSTX. Recent experiments indicate that the core heating efficiency depends strongly on the antenna phasing and plasma conditions [1], and improves significantly at higher toroidal magnetic fields. Wave propagation, absorption and current drive characteristics for L-mode and H-mode NSTX discharges have been analyzed using both ray tracing and full wave models. Simulations obtained with the AORSA and TORIC full codes agree reasonably well with Motional Stark Effect measurements of the driven current, and indicate the importance of trapping effects on the driven current profile. Collisional damping effects on the wave absorption, particularly in edge regions, will be considered. [1] J. C. Hosea, et al, Phys. Plasmas 15, 056104 (2008).

  14. TOKAMAK EQUILIBRIA WITH CENTRAL CURRENT HOLES AND NEGATIVE CURRENT DRIVE

    SciTech Connect

    CHU, M.S.; PARKS, P.B.

    2002-06-01

    OAK B202 TOKAMAK EQUILIBRIA WITH CENTRAL CURRENT HOLES AND NEGATIVE CURRENT DRIVE. Several tokamak experiments have reported the development of a central region with vanishing currents (the current hole). Straightforward application of results from the work of Greene, Johnson and Weimer [Phys. Fluids, 3, 67 (1971)] on tokamak equilibrium to these plasmas leads to apparent singularities in several physical quantities including the Shafranov shift and casts doubts on the existence of this type of equilibria. In this paper, the above quoted equilibrium theory is re-examined and extended to include equilibria with a current hole. It is shown that singularities can be circumvented and that equilibria with a central current hole do satisfy the magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium condition with regular behavior for all the physical quantities and do not lead to infinitely large Shafranov shifts. Isolated equilibria with negative current in the central region could exist. But equilibria with negative currents in general do not have neighboring equilibria and thus cannot have experimental realization, i.e. no negative currents can be driven in the central region.

  15. Mode conversion heating and current drive experiments in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Majeski, R.; Rogers, J.H.; Batha, S.H.; Budny, R.; Fredrickson, E.; Grek, B.; Hill, K.; Hosea, J.C.; LeBlanc, B.; Levinton, F.; Murakami, M.; Phillips, C.K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Schilling, G.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J.R.; Zarnstorff, M.C.

    1996-01-01

    The first experimental demonstration that mode conversion from the fast magnetosonic wave to an ion Bernstein wave can efficiently heat electrons and drive current with low field side antennas in a tokamak plasma is reported. Up to 130 kA of current was noninductively driven, on and off axis, and the resultant current profiles were measured in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. In heating experiments, 10 keV peak electron temperatures were produced with 3.3 MW of radio-frequency heating power. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  16. MHD simulation of RF current drive in MST

    SciTech Connect

    Hendries, E. R.; Anderson, J. K.; Forest, C. B.; Reusch, J. A.; Seltzman, A. H.; Sovinec, C. R.; Diem, S.; Harvey, R. W.

    2014-02-12

    Auxiliary heating and current drive using RF waves such as the electron Bernstein wave (EBW) promises to advance the performance of the reversed field pinch (RFP). In previous computational work [1], a hypothetical edge-localized current drive is shown to suppress the tearing activity which governs the macroscopic transport properties of the RFP. The ideal conditions for tearing stabilization include a reduced toroidal induction, and precise width and radial position of the Gaussian-shaped external current drive. In support of the EBW experiment on the Madison Symmetric Torus, an integrated modeling scheme now incorporates ray tracing and Fokker-Plank predictions of auxiliary current into single fluid MHD. Simulations at low Lundquist number (S ∼ 10{sup 4}) generally agree with the previous work; significantly more burdensome simulations at MST-like Lundquist number (S ∼ 3×10{sup 6}) show unexpected results. The effect on nonlinearly saturated current profile by a particular RF-driven external force decreases in magnitude and widens considerably as the Lundquist number increases toward experimental values. Simulations reproduce the periodic current profile relaxation events observed in experiment (sawteeth) in the absence of current profile control. Reduction of the tearing mode amplitudes is still observable; however, reduction is limited to periods between the large bursts of magnetic activity at each sawtooth. The sawtoothing pattern persists with up to 10 MW of externally applied RF power. Periods with prolonged low tearing amplitude are predicted with a combination of external current drive and a reduced toroidal loop voltage, consistent with previous conclusions. Finally, the resistivity profile is observed to have a strong effect on the optimal externally driven current profile for mode stabilization.

  17. Radiofrequency current source (RFCS) drive and decoupling technique for parallel transmit arrays using a high-power metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET).

    PubMed

    Lee, Wonje; Boskamp, Eddy; Grist, Thomas; Kurpad, Krishna

    2009-07-01

    A radiofrequency current source (RFCS) design using a high-power metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) that enables independent current control for parallel transmit applications is presented. The design of an RFCS integrated with a series tuned transmitting loop and its associated control circuitry is described. The current source is operated in a gated class AB push-pull configuration for linear operation at high efficiency. The pulsed RF current amplitude driven into the low impedance transmitting loop was found to be relatively insensitive to the various loaded loop impedances ranging from 0.4 to 10.3 ohms, confirming current mode operation. The suppression of current induced by a neighboring loop was quantified as a function of center-to-center loop distance, and was measured to be 17 dB for nonoverlapping, adjacent loops. Deterministic manipulation of the B(1) field pattern was demonstrated by the independent control of RF phase and amplitude in a head-sized two-channel volume transmit array. It was found that a high-voltage rated RF power MOSFET with a minimum load resistance, exhibits current source behavior, which aids in transmit array design. PMID:19353658

  18. Electron cyclotron current drive experiments on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    James, R.A. ); Giruzzi, G.; Gentile, B. de; Rodriguez, L. ); Fyaretdinov, A.; Gorelov, Yu.; Trukhin, V. ); Harvey, R.; Lohr, J.; Luce, T.C.; Matsuda, K.; Politzer, P.; Prater, R.; Snider, R. (General Atomics, San Di

    1990-05-01

    Electron Cyclotron Current Drive (ECCD) experiments on the DIII-D tokamak have been performed using 60 GHz waves launched from the high field side of the torus. Preliminary analysis indicates rf driven currents between 50 and 100 kA in discharges with total plasma currents between 200 and 500 kA. These are the first ECCD experiments with strong first pass absorption, localized deposition of the rf power, and {tau}{sub E} much longer than the slowing-down time of the rf generated current carriers. The experimentally measured profiles for T{sub e}, {eta}{sub e} and Z{sub eff} are used as input for a 1D transport code and a multiply-ray, 3D ray tracing code. Comparisons with theory and assessment of the influence of the residual electric field, using a Fokker-Planck code, are in progress. The ECH power levels were between 1 and 1.5 MW with pulse lengths of about 500 msec. ECCD experiments worldwide are motivated by issues relating to the physics and technical advantages of the use of high frequency rf waves to drive localized currents. ECCD is accomplished by preferentially heating electrons moving in one toroidal direction, reducing their collisionality and thereby producing a non-inductively driven toroidal current. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  19. An Imposed Dynamo Current Drive Experiment: Demonstration of Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarboe, Thomas; Hansen, Chris; Hossack, Aaron; Marklin, George; Morgan, Kyle; Nelson, Brian; Sutherland, Derek; Victor, Brian

    2014-10-01

    An experiment for studying and developing the efficient sustainment of a spheromak with sufficient confinement (current-drive power heats the plasma to its stability β-limit) and in the keV temperature range is discussed. A high- β spheromak sustained by imposed dynamo current drive (IDCD) is justified because: previous transient experiments showed sufficient confinement in the keV range with no external toroidal field coil; recent results on HIT-SI show sustainment with sufficient confinement at low temperature; the potential of IDCD of solving other fusion issues; a very attractive reactor concept; and the general need for efficient current drive in magnetic fusion. The design of a 0.55 m minor radius machine with the required density control, wall loading, and neutral shielding for a 2 s pulse is presented. Peak temperatures of 1 keV and toroidal currents of 1.35 MA and 16% wall-normalized plasma beta are envisioned. The experiment is large enough to address the key issues yet small enough for rapid modification and for extended MHD modeling of startup and code validation.

  20. On Current Drive and Wave Induced Bootstrap Current in Toroidal Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hellsten, T.; Johnson, T.

    2008-11-01

    A comprehensive treatment of wave-particle interactions in toroidal plasmas including collisional relaxation, applicable to heating or anomalous wave induced transport, has been obtained by using Monte Carlo operators satisfying quasi-neutrality. This approach enables a self-consistent treatment of wave-particle interactions applicable to the banana regime in the neoclassical theory. It allows an extension into a regime with large temperature and density gradients, losses and transport of particles by wave-particle interactions making the method applicable to transport barriers. It is found that at large gradients the relationship between radial electric field, parallel velocity, temperature and density gradient in the neoclassical theory is modified such that coefficient in front of the logarithmic ion temperature gradient, which in the standard neoclassical theory is small and counteracts the electric field caused by the density gradient, now changes sign and contributes to the built up of the radial electric field. The possibility to drive current by absorbing the waves on trapped particles has been studied and how the wave-particle interactions affect the bootstrap current. Two new current drive mechanisms are studied: current drive by wave induced bootstrap current and selective detrapping into passing orbits by directed waves.

  1. Penetration of lower hybrid current drive waves in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, W.; Goniche, M.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.; Ekedahl, A.; Litaudon, X.

    2013-11-15

    Lower hybrid (LH) ray propagation in toroidal plasma is shown to be controlled by combination of the azimuthal spectrum launched by the antenna, the poloidal variation of the magnetic field, and the scattering of the waves by the drift wave fluctuations. The width of the poloidal and radial radio frequency wave spectrum increases rapidly as the rays penetrate into higher density and scatter from the drift waves. The electron temperature gradient (ETG) spectrum is particularly effective in scattering the LH waves due to its comparable wavelengths and phase velocities. ETG turbulence is also driven by the radial gradient of the electron current profile giving rise to an anomalous viscosity spreading the LH driven plasma currents. The LH wave scattering is derived from a Fokker-Planck equation for the distribution of the ray trajectories with diffusivities derived from the drift wave fluctuations. The condition for chaotic diffusion for the rays is derived. The evolution of the poloidal and radial mode number spectrum of the lower hybrid waves are both on the antenna spectrum and the spectrum of the drift waves. Antennas launching higher poloidal mode number spectra drive off-axis current density profiles producing negative central shear [RS] plasmas with improved thermal confinement from ETG transport. Core plasma current drive requires antennas with low azimuthal mode spectra peaked at m = 0 azimuthal mode numbers.

  2. Review of Japanese results on heating and current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watari, T.

    1992-10-01

    This article discusses Japanese contributions in the fields of plasma heating and current drive and, together with other reviews presented at this conference, will serve as a reference for future investigations. The Japanese fusion community has several tokamaks: JAERI (STA) has JT-60 and JFT-2M. TRIAM-1M (Kyushu University), WT-3 (Kyoto University), and JIPP T-2 U (National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS)) belong to the Ministry of Education (MOE). A lot of contributions were made by these devices in heating and current drive in the various frequency ranges: electron cyclotron (EC) frequency range, lower hybrid (LH) frequency range, and ion cyclotron (IC) frequency range. This paper only deals with tokamak results: results on LHCD are described in section 1; ECH is described in section 2; results of high power ICRF heating are given in section 3; IBWH is described in section 4; and finally, FWCD is covered in section 5. Because the Matrix of different machine and different frequency range gives an intractable list of results, sampling will be made in describing the progress, i.e., JT-60 for LHCD, WT-3 for ECH/CD, JIPP T-2 U for IBWH, and JT-60 for higher harmonic ICRF heating. Special attention is given to the investigation of fast wave current drive which has some history in Japan. Results from JIPP T-2 U, JFT-2M, HT-2, and JT-60 are summarized. Aside from the tokamak, MOE has an alternative magnetic fusion program centered around CHS and HELIOTORON-E (Kyoto University). The LHD (Large Helical Device) is a machine under construction in the new site of NIFS. Gamma-10 (Tsukuba University) and HIEI (Kyoto University) are tandem mirror type open end systems. Due to the allotted space, works in this field will not be covered in this review. It should also be noted that there are a lot of contributions in theory which continued to support experiments very strongly through this decade.

  3. Requirements for neutral beam current drive in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Dory, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper contains viewgraphs on the use of neutral beam current drive in future tokamaks. Current profiles, slowing down distributions, beam destabilization of alfven waves and plasma parameters are some items covered in this paper. (DWL)

  4. Electron cyclotron current drive and current profile control in the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Prater, R.; Luce, T.C.; Petty, C.C.

    1998-07-01

    Recent work in many tokamaks has indicated that optimization of the current profile is a key element needed to sustain modes of improved confinement and stability. Generation of localized current through application of electron cyclotron (EC) waves offers a means of accomplishing this. In addition to profile control, electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) is useful for sustaining the bulk current in a steady state manner and for instability suppression. ECCD is particularly well suited for control of the current profile because the location of the driven current can be regulated by external means, through steering of the incident EC waves and setting the magnitude of the toroidal magnetic field. Under most conditions the location of the driven current is insensitive to the plasma parameters. Central ECCD has been studied in a number of tokamaks and found to have characteristics commensurate with theory as expressed through ray tracing and Fokker-Planck computer codes. The present experiments on DIII-D explore central current drive and are the first to test off-axis ECCD. These experiments are unique in using internal measurements of the magnetic field to determine the magnitude and profile of driven current.

  5. High frequency fast wave current drive for DEMO

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, R.; Lerche, E.; Van Eester, D.

    2011-12-23

    A steady-state tokamak reactor (SSTR) requires a high efficiency current drive system, from plug to driven mega-amps. RF systems working in the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) have high efficiency from plug to antenna but a limited current drive (CD) efficiency and centrally peaked CD profiles. The latter feature is not adequate for a SSTR where the current should be sufficiently broad to keep the central safety factor (possibly significantly) above 1. In addition, the fact that the fast wave (FW) is evanescent at the edge limits coupling, requiring high voltage operation, which makes the system dependent on plasma edge properties and prone to arcing, reducing its reliability. A possible way to overcome these weaknesses is to operate at higher frequency (10 times or more the cyclotron frequency). The advantages are: (1) The coupling can be much better (waves propagate in vacuum) if the parallel refractive index n{sub ||} is kept below one, (2) The FW group velocity tends to align to the magnetic field, so the power circumnavigates the magnetic axis and can drive off-axis current, (3) Due to the latter property, n{sub ||} can be upshifted along the wave propagation path, allowing low n{sub ||} launch (hence good coupling, large CD efficiency) with ultimately good electron absorption (which requires higher n{sub ||}. Note however that the n{sub ||} upshift is a self-organized feature, that electron absorption is in competition with {alpha}-particle absorption and that uncoupling of the FW from the lower hybrid resonance at the edge requires n{sub ||} slightly above one. The latter possibly counterproductive features might complicate the picture. The different aspects of this potentially attractive off-axis FWCD scheme are discussed.

  6. Electron heating and current drive by mode converted slow waves

    SciTech Connect

    Majeski, R.; Phillips, C.K.; Wilson, J.R.

    1994-08-01

    An approach to obtaining efficient single pass mode conversion at high parallel wavenumber from the fast magnetosonic wave to the slow ion Bernstein wave, in a two ion species tokamak plasma, is described. The intent is to produce localized electron heating or current drive via the mode converted slow wave. In particular, this technique can be adapted to off-axis current drive for current profile control. Modelling for the case of deuterium-tritium plasmas in TFTR is presented.

  7. Sensorless optimal sinusoidal brushless direct current for hard disk drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soh, C. S.; Bi, C.

    2009-04-01

    Initiated by the availability of digital signal processors and emergence of new applications, market demands for permanent magnet synchronous motors have been surging. As its back-emf is sinusoidal, the drive current should also be sinusoidal for reducing the torque ripple. However, in applications like hard disk drives, brushless direct current (BLDC) drive is adopted instead of sinusoidal drive for simplification. The adoption, however, comes at the expense of increased harmonics, losses, torque pulsations, and acoustics. In this paper, we propose a sensorless optimal sinusoidal BLDC drive. First and foremost, the derivation for an optimal sinusoidal drive is presented, and a power angle control scheme is proposed to achieve an optimal sinusoidal BLDC. The scheme maintains linear relationship between the motor speed and drive voltage. In an attempt to execute the sensorless drive, an innovative power angle measurement scheme is devised, which takes advantage of the freewheeling diodes and measures the power angle through the detection of diode voltage drops. The objectives as laid out will be presented and discussed in this paper, supported by derivations, simulations, and experimental results. The proposed scheme is straightforward, brings about the benefits of sensorless sinusoidal drive, negates the need for current sensors by utilizing the freewheeling diodes, and does not incur additional cost.

  8. Optimized calculation of the synergy conditions between electron cyclotron current drive and lower hybrid current drive on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei; Bo-Jiang, Ding; Y, Peysson; J, Decker; Miao-Hui, Li; Xin-Jun, Zhang; Xiao-Jie, Wang; Lei, Zhang

    2016-01-01

    The optimized synergy conditions between electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) and lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) with normal parameters of the EAST tokamak are studied by using the C3PO/LUKE code based on the understanding of the synergy mechanisms so as to obtain a higher synergistic current and provide theoretical reference for the synergistic effect in the EAST experiment. The dependences of the synergistic effect on the parameters of two waves (lower hybrid wave (LHW) and electron cyclotron wave (ECW)), including the radial position of the power deposition, the power value of the LH and EC waves, and the parallel refractive indices of the LHW (N∥) are presented and discussed. Project supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Grant Nos. 2011GB102000, 2012GB103000, and 2013GB106001), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11175206 and 11305211), the JSPS-NRF-NSFC A3 Foresight Program in the Field of Plasma Physics (Grant No. 11261140328), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (Grant No. JZ2015HGBZ0472).

  9. Co-counter asymmetry in fast wave heating and current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Jaeger, E.F.; Carter, M.D.; Berry, L.A.; Batchelor, D.B.; Forest, C.B.; Weitzner, H.

    1997-04-01

    Full wave ICRF coupling models show differences in plasma response when antenna arrays are phase to drive currents and counter to the plasma current. The source of this difference lies in the natural up- sown asymmetry of the antenna`s radiated power spectrum. This asymmetry is due to Hall terms in the wave equation, and occurs even without a poloidal magnetic field. When a poloidal field is included, the up-down asymmetry acquires a toroidal component. The result is that plasma absorption (i.e. antenna loading) is shifted or skewed toward the co-current drive direction, independent of the direction of the magnetic field. When wave are launched to drive current counter the plasma current , electron heating an current profiles are more peaked on axis, and this peaking becomes more pronounce a lower toroidal magnetic fields.

  10. Observation of Lower-Hybrid Current Drive at High Densities in the Alcator C Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porkolab, M.; Schuss, J. J.; Lloyd, B.; Takase, Y.; Texter, S.; Bonoli, P.; Fiore, C.; Gandy, R.; Gwinn, D.; Lipschultz, B.; Marmar, E.; Pappas, D.; Parker, R.; Pribyl, P.

    1984-07-01

    A quasi-steady-state lower-hybrid current-drive operation is demonstrated in the Alcator C tokamak at densities up to n―e~=1×1014 cm-3. The current-drive efficiency is measured experimentally over a wide range of densities and magnetic fields. The radial distribution of high-energy x rays indicates that the current-carrying electrons peak near the plasma axis.

  11. Plasma heating and current drive using intense, pulsed microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.I.; Cohen, R.H.; Nevins, W.M.; Rognlien, T.D.; Bonoli, P.T.; Porkolab, M.

    1988-01-01

    The use of powerful new microwave sources, e.g., free-electron lasers and relativistic gyrotrons, provide unique opportunities for novel heating and current-drive schemes in the electron-cyclotron and lower-hybrid ranges of frequencies. These high-power, pulsed sources have a number of technical advantages over conventional, low-intensity sources; and their use can lead to improved current-drive efficiencies and better penetration into a reactor-grade plasma in specific cases. The Microwave Tokamak Experiment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will provide a test for some of these new heating and current-drive schemes. This paper reports theoretical progress both in modeling absorption and current drive for intense pulses and in analyzing some of the possible complications that may arise, e.g., parametric instabilities and nonlinear self-focusing. 22 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Fast Wave Current Drive in JET ITB-Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hellsten, T.; Laxaaback, M.; Bergkvist, T.; Johnson, T.; Brzozowski, J.; Rachlew, E.; Tennfors, E.; Mantsinen, M.; Matthews, G.; Tala, T.; Meo, F.; Nguyen, F.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Joffrin, E.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Petty, C.C.; Eester, D. van

    2005-09-26

    Fast wave current drive has been performed in JET plasmas with internal transport barriers, ITBs, and strongly reversed magnetic shear. Although the current drive efficiency of the power absorbed on the electrons is fairly high, only small effects are seen in the central current density. The main reasons are the parasitic absorption of RF power, the strongly inductive nature of the plasma and the interplay between the fast wave driven current and bootstrap current. The direct electron heating in the FWCD experiments is found to be strongly degraded compared to that with the dipole phasing.

  13. Key Aspects of EBW Heating and Current Drive in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Jakub; Decker, Joan; Preinhaelter, Josef; Taylor, Gary; Vahala, Linda; Vahala, George

    2010-11-01

    Electron Bernstein wave (EBW) heating and current drive is modeled by coupled mode conversion, ray-tracing (AMR) and Fokker-Planck (LUKE) codes. Deposition and current drive profiles are determined for EBW with various injection parameters under realistic spherical tokamak conditions. There parameters are varied to investigate the robustness of the applied scenarios. The importance of relativistic corrections to EBW absorption is considered. The differences between various relativistic models are explored.

  14. Decoherence suppression in a resonant driving field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minns, R. S.; Kutteruf, M. R.; Commisso, M. A.; Jones, R. R.

    2008-04-01

    Resonant radio frequency (rf) control fields have been employed to suppress decoherence in single quantum bits (qubits) encoded in the probability amplitudes of np fine-structure states in Li Rydberg atoms. As described previously [1], static electric-field tuning of the spin and orbital angular momentum composition of the fine-structure eigenstates enables qubit storage in an approximate decoherence-free subspace in which phase errors due to small stray electric and magnetic fields are strongly suppressed. In addition, it was found that sequences of short electric field pulses could be utilized in a 'bang-bang' dynamic decoupling scheme to improve coherence times. We now show that a continuous resonant rf field can also suppress decoherence in this system. The rf-dressed fine-structure states form a more robust basis in which the energy splitting between the component qubit levels is locked to the drive frequency, and decoherence is essentially eliminated. Measurements of the operational range of rf frequency and field strength required to achieve decoherence suppression are in agreement with the predictions of a two-level model.

  15. General Linear Rf-Current Drive Calculation in Toroidal Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. P.; Harvey, R. W.; Prater, R.

    2009-04-01

    A new general linear calculation of RF current drive has been implemented in the GENRAY all-frequencies RF ray tracing code. This is referred to as the ADJ-QL package, and is based on the Karney, et al. [1] relativistic Green function calculator, ADJ, generalized to non-circular plasmas in toroidal geometry, and coupled with full, bounce-averaged momentum-space RF quasilinear flux [2] expressions calculated at each point along the RF ray trajectories. This approach includes momentum conservation, polarization effects and the influence of trapped electrons. It is assumed that the electron distribution function remains close to a relativistic Maxwellian function. Within the bounds of these assumptions, small banana width, toroidal geometry and low collisionality, the calculation is applicable for all-frequencies RF electron current drive including electron cyclotron, lower hybrid, fast waves and electron Bernstein waves. GENRAY ADJ-QL calculations of the relativistic momentum-conserving current drive have been applied in several cases: benchmarking of electron cyclotron current drive in ITER against other code results; and electron Bernstein and high harmonic fast wave current drive in NSTX. The impacts of momentum conservation on the current drive are also shown for these cases.

  16. Controlling Casimir force via coherent driving field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Rashid; Abbas, Muqaddar; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Qamar, Sajid

    2016-04-01

    A four level atom-field configuration is used to investigate the coherent control of Casimir force between two identical plates made up of chiral atomic media and separated by vacuum of width d. The electromagnetic chirality-induced negative refraction is obtained via atomic coherence. The behavior of Casimir force is investigated using Casimir-Lifshitz formula. It is noticed that Casimir force can be switched from repulsive to attractive and vice versa via coherent control of the driving field. This switching feature provides new possibilities of using the repulsive Casimir force in the development of new emerging technologies, such as, micro-electro-mechanical and nano-electro-mechanical systems, i.e., MEMS and NEMS, respectively.

  17. Analysis of current driving capability of pentacene TFTs for OLEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Gi Seong; Byun, Hyun Sook; Xu, Yong Xian; Pyo, Kyung Soo; Choe, Ki Beom; Song, Chung Kun

    2005-01-01

    The flexible display and the application of Roll-To-Roll process is difficult because high temperature process of a-Si;H TFT and poly-Si TFT limited the use of plastic substrate. We proposed AMOLED using Pentacene TFT (OTFT) to fabricate flexible display. The first stage for OTFT application to OLED, we analyzed OTFT as driving device of OLED. The process performed on glass and plastic (PET) substrate that is coated ITO and PVP is used for gate insulator. The field effect mobility of the fabricated OTFT is 0.1~0.3cm2/V"sec and Ion/Ioff current ratio is 103~105. OLED is fabricated with two stories structure of TPD and Alq3, and we can observe the light at 5V by the naked eye. The wavelength of observed lights is 530nm ~550nm. We can confirm the driving of OLED due to OTFT using Test panel and observe OLED control by gate voltage of OTFT. Also, we verify designed structure and process, and make a demonstration fabricating 64 by 64 backplane based on Test panel.

  18. Magnetospheric electric fields and currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauk, B. H.; Zanetti, L. J.

    1987-01-01

    The progress made in the years 1983-1986 in understanding the character and operation of magnetospheric electric fields and electric currents is discussed, with emphasis placed on the connection with the interior regions. Special attention is given to determinations of global electric-field configurations, measurements of the response of magnetospheric particle populations to the electric-field configurations, and observations of the magnetospheric currents at high altitude and during northward IMF. Global simulations of current distributions are discussed, and the sources of global electric fields and currents are examined. The topics discussed in the area of impulsive and small-scale phenomena include substorm current systems, impulsive electric fields and associated currents, and field-aligned electrodynamics. A key finding of these studies is that the electric fields and currents are interrelated and cannot be viewed as separate entities.

  19. Fast electron transport in lower-hybrid current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Kupfer, K.; Bers, A.

    1991-01-01

    We generalize the quasilinear-Fokker-Planck formulation for lower-hybrid current drive to include the wave induced radial transport of fast electrons. Toroidal ray tracing shows that the wave fields in the plasma develop a large poloidal component associated with the upshift in k1l and the filling of the "spectral gap". These fields lead to an enhanced radial E x B drift of resonant electrons. Two types of radial flows are obtained: an outward convective flow driven by the asymmetry in the poloidal wave spectrum, and a diffusive flow proportional to the width of the poloidal spectrum. Simulations of Alcator C and JT60, show that the radial convection velocity has a broad maximum of nearly 1 m/sec and is independent of the amplitude of fields. In both cases, the radial diffusion is found to be highly localized near the magnetic axis. For JT60, the peak of the diffusion profile can be quite large, nearly 1 m2/sec.

  20. A thermodynamical analysis of rf current drive with fast electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Bizarro, João P. S.

    2015-08-15

    The problem of rf current drive (CD) by pushing fast electrons with high-parallel-phase-velocity waves, such as lower-hybrid (LH) or electron-cyclotron (EC) waves, is revisited using the first and second laws, the former to retrieve the well-known one-dimensional (1D) steady-state CD efficiency, and the latter to calculate a lower bound for the rate of entropy production when approaching steady state. The laws of thermodynamics are written in a form that explicitly takes care of frictional dissipation and are thus applied to a population of fast electrons evolving under the influence of a dc electric field, rf waves, and collisions while in contact with a thermal, Maxwellian reservoir with a well-defined temperature. Besides the laws of macroscopic thermodynamics, there is recourse to basic elements of kinetic theory only, being assumed a residual dc electric field and a strong rf drive, capable of sustaining in the resonant region, where waves interact with electrons, a raised fast-electron tail distribution, which becomes an essentially flat plateau in the case of the 1D theory for LHCD. Within the 1D model, particularly suited for LHCD as it solely retains fast-electron dynamics in velocity space parallel to the ambient magnetic field, an H theorem for rf CD is also derived, which is written in different forms, and additional physics is recovered, such as the synergy between the dc and rf power sources, including the rf-induced hot conductivity, as well as the equation for electron-bulk heating. As much as possible 1D results are extended to 2D, to account for ECCD by also considering fast-electron velocity-space dynamics in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field, which leads to a detailed discussion on how the definition of an rf-induced conductivity may depend on whether one works at constant rf current or power. Moreover, working out the collisional dissipated power and entropy-production rate written in terms of the fast-electron distribution, it

  1. A thermodynamical analysis of rf current drive with fast electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizarro, João P. S.

    2015-08-01

    The problem of rf current drive (CD) by pushing fast electrons with high-parallel-phase-velocity waves, such as lower-hybrid (LH) or electron-cyclotron (EC) waves, is revisited using the first and second laws, the former to retrieve the well-known one-dimensional (1D) steady-state CD efficiency, and the latter to calculate a lower bound for the rate of entropy production when approaching steady state. The laws of thermodynamics are written in a form that explicitly takes care of frictional dissipation and are thus applied to a population of fast electrons evolving under the influence of a dc electric field, rf waves, and collisions while in contact with a thermal, Maxwellian reservoir with a well-defined temperature. Besides the laws of macroscopic thermodynamics, there is recourse to basic elements of kinetic theory only, being assumed a residual dc electric field and a strong rf drive, capable of sustaining in the resonant region, where waves interact with electrons, a raised fast-electron tail distribution, which becomes an essentially flat plateau in the case of the 1D theory for LHCD. Within the 1D model, particularly suited for LHCD as it solely retains fast-electron dynamics in velocity space parallel to the ambient magnetic field, an H theorem for rf CD is also derived, which is written in different forms, and additional physics is recovered, such as the synergy between the dc and rf power sources, including the rf-induced hot conductivity, as well as the equation for electron-bulk heating. As much as possible 1D results are extended to 2D, to account for ECCD by also considering fast-electron velocity-space dynamics in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field, which leads to a detailed discussion on how the definition of an rf-induced conductivity may depend on whether one works at constant rf current or power. Moreover, working out the collisional dissipated power and entropy-production rate written in terms of the fast-electron distribution, it

  2. Calculations of lower hybrid current drive in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, J.; Peysson, Y.; Hillairet, J.; Artaud, J.-F.; Basiuk, V.; Becoulet, A.; Ekedahl, A.; Goniche, M.; Hoang, G. T.; Imbeaux, F.; Ram, A. K.; Schneider, M.

    2011-07-01

    A detailed study of lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) in ITER is provided, focusing on the wave propagation and current drive mechanisms. A combination of ray-tracing and Fokker-Planck calculations are presented for various plasma scenarios, wave frequency and polarization. The dependence of the driven current and the location of power deposition upon the coupled wave spectrum is systematically determined, in order to set objectives for the antenna design. The respective effects of finite-power levels, magnetic trapping, and detailed antenna spectra are accounted for and quantitatively estimated. The sensitivity of LHCD to density and temperature profiles is calculated. From the simulation results, an optimum value for the parallel index of refraction is proposed as a compromise between efficiency and robustness with respect to those profile variations. The corresponding current drive efficiency is found to be similar for the two frequencies generally considered for ITER, f = 3.7 GHz and f = 5.0 GHz.

  3. Fast wave current drive in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Petty, C.C.; Callis, R.W.; Chiu, S.C.; deGrassie, J.S.; Forest, C.B.; Freeman, R.L.; Gohil, P.; Harvey, R.W.; Ikezi, H.; Lin-Liu, Y.-R.

    1995-02-01

    The non-inductive current drive from fast Alfven waves launched by a directional four-element antenna was measured in the DIII-D tokamak. The fast wave frequency (60 MHz) was eight times the deuterium cyclotron frequency at the plasma center. An array of rf pickup loops at several locations around the torus was used to verify the directivity of the four-element antenna. Complete non-inductive current drive was achieved using a combination of fast wave current drive (FWCD) and electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) in discharges for which the total plasma current was inductively ramped down from 400 to 170 kA. For discharges with steady plasma current, up to 110 kA of FWCD was inferred from an analysis of the loop voltage, with a maximum non-inductive current (FWCD, ECCD, and bootstrap) of 195 out of 310 kA. The FWCD efficiency increased linearly with central electron temperature. For low current discharges, the FWCD efficiency was degraded due to incomplete fast wave damping. The experimental FWCD was found to agree with predictions from the CURRAY ray-tracing code only when a parasitic loss of 4% per pass was included in the modeling along with multiple pass damping.

  4. Electron Cyclotron Current Drive by Radial Transport of Particles in the Continuous Current Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sanghyun

    In the Continuous Current Tokamak at the UCLA, electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) experiments have been conducted in the absence of ohmic heating or any other power input. With X-band source of 30 kW lasting 1 mS launched from the high field side in X-mode, 240 A of plasma current has been generated at the neutral pressure corresponding to the critical density for the wave frequency. The Spitzer resistivity calculated from the L/R decay time of the current yielded an electron temperature of 100 eV. For the interest of mapping out radial profiles of wave and particle parameters, S-band sources at 2.45 GHz, 1.5 kW lasting 8 mS with duty cycle of 50% have been used for quasi-steady state current drive experiments. There are four launching structures; (1) Inside perpendicular, (2) Outside perpendicular, (3) Outside 60^circ, and (4) Outside -60^circ with respect to the toroidal magnetic field. It has been found that the four ways of microwaves give comparable results in plasma current driven. The plasma current measurements as a function of the radial location of the electron cyclotron resonance layer show a I_{rm p}~ -sin(pi r/a) where R_{res} = R_{0} + r for -a >=q r >=q O. The vertical field dependence has been shown to be I_{rm p}~ -x exp(-x^2) where x is a normalized vertical field for -inftycurrent is reversed as the applied vertical field is reversed for all four launch schemes. As a toroidal electric field is applied, the co(counter)-injection with cos^{-1}( k_0 cdot B_{t}) = +(-)60^circ give the same result in plasma current driven. The energy distribution of the current carrying electrons as determined by the biased, two-side Langmuir probe show that the current is carried by the bulk of the plasma electrons whose energy is comparable to the plasma electron temperature, and not by the high energy tail of the distribution as predicted by theories based on the Fokker-Planck equation. The vertical and toroidal field

  5. Currents and electric fields in the ionosphere due to field-aligned auroral currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nisbet, J. S.; Miller, M. J.; Carpenter, L. A.

    1978-01-01

    Birkeland (1908, 1913) did a detailed analysis of the upper atmospheric current system in the high-latitude region, and suggested that field-aligned currents flowing into and out of the auroral ionosphere were the driving mechanism for this current system. In the present paper, static electric field and current patterns due to the field-aligned Birkeland currents are examined, using a model in which currents approximating those reported by Iijima and Potemra (1976) are used as input to a global model of the ionospheric conductivities, in which interhemispheric coupling along field lines is included. The model reproduces the main features of the high-latitude current and voltage system and the penetration of these currents within the plasmasphere.

  6. Fokker-Planck modeling of current penetration during electron cyclotron current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Merkulov, A.; Westerhof, E.; Schueller, F. C.

    2007-05-15

    The current penetration during electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) on the resistive time scale is studied with a Fokker-Planck simulation, which includes a model for the magnetic diffusion that determines the parallel electric field evolution. The existence of the synergy between the inductive electric field and EC driven current complicates the process of the current penetration and invalidates the standard method of calculation in which Ohm's law is simply approximated by j-j{sub cd}={sigma}E. Here it is proposed to obtain at every time step a self-consistent approximation to the plasma resistivity from the Fokker-Planck code, which is then used in a concurrent calculation of the magnetic diffusion equation in order to obtain the inductive electric field at the next time step. A series of Fokker-Planck calculations including a self-consistent evolution of the inductive electric field has been performed. Both the ECCD power and the electron density have been varied, thus varying the well known nonlinearity parameter for ECCD P{sub rf}[MW/m{sup -3}]/n{sub e}{sup 2}[10{sup 19} m{sup -3}] [R. W. Harvey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett 62, 426 (1989)]. This parameter turns out also to be a good predictor of the synergetic effects. The results are then compared with the standard method of calculations of the current penetration using a transport code. At low values of the Harvey parameter, the standard method is in quantitative agreement with Fokker-Planck calculations. However, at high values of the Harvey parameter, synergy between ECCD and E{sub parallel} is found. In the case of cocurrent drive, this synergy leads to the generation of large amounts of nonthermal electrons and a concomitant increase of the electrical conductivity and current penetration time. In the case of countercurrent drive, the ECCD efficiency is suppressed by the synergy with E{sub parallel} while only a small amount of nonthermal electrons is produced.

  7. Electron cyclotron current drive efficiency in general tokamak geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lin-Liu, Y. R.; Chan, V. S.; Prater, R.

    2003-01-01

    Green's-function techniques are used to calculate electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) efficiency in general tokamak geometry in the low-collisionality regime. Fully relativistic electron dynamics is employed in the theoretical formulation. The high-velocity collision model is used to model Coulomb collisions and a simplified quasi-linear rf diffusion operator describes wave-particle interactions. The approximate analytic solutions which are benchmarked with a widely used ECCD model, facilitate time-dependent simulations of tokamak operational scenarios using the non-inductive current drive of electron cyclotron waves.

  8. Simulations of EBW current drive and power deposition in the WEGA Stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Preinhaelter, J.; Urban, J.; Vahala, L.; Vahala, G.

    2009-11-26

    The WEGA stellarator is well suited for fundamental electron Bernstein wave (EBW) studies. Heating and current drive experiments at 2.45 GHz and 28 GHz, carried out in WEGA's low temperature, steady state overdense plasmas, were supported by intensive modelling. We employ our AMR (Antenna-Mode-conversion-Ray-tracing) code to calculate the O-X-EBW conversion efficiency with a full-wave equation solver, while the power deposition and current drive profiles using ray tracing. Several phenomena have been studied and understood. Particularly, EBW current drive was theoretically predicted and experimentally detected at 2.45 GHz. Simulations confirmed the presence of two (cold and hot) electron components and the resonant behaviour of the EBW power deposition and its dependence on the magnetic field configuration. Furthermore, the code is used to predict the 28 GHz heating and current drive performance and to simulate EBW emission spectra.

  9. Numerical modeling of lower hybrid heating and current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Valeo, E.J.; Eder, D.C.

    1986-03-01

    The generation of currents in toroidal plasma by application of waves in the lower hybrid frequency range involves the interplay of several physical phenomena which include: wave propagation in toroidal geometry, absorption via wave-particle resonances, the quasilinear generation of strongly nonequilibrium electron and ion distribution functions, and the self-consistent evolution of the current density in such a nonequilibrium plasma. We describe a code, LHMOD, which we have developed to treat these aspects of current drive and heating in tokamaks. We present results obtained by applying the code to a computation of current ramp-up and to an investigation of the possible importance of minority hydrogen absorption in a deuterium plasma as the ''density limit'' to current drive is approached.

  10. 53. Drive shaft, motors, eddie currents, brakes, and differential gears ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. Drive shaft, motors, eddie currents, brakes, and differential gears in south machinery room (interior of both machinery rooms is identical). Facing east. - Henry Ford Bridge, Spanning Cerritos Channel, Los Angeles-Long Beach Harbor, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. Flux averaged current drive efficiency of electron Bernstein waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGregor, D. E.; Cairns, R. A.; Lashmore Davies, C. N.; O'Brien, M. R.

    2008-01-01

    Electron Bernstein waves are of interest for heating and current drive in spherical tokamaks where the central region of the plasma is not accessible to the ordinary and extraordinary modes. In this paper we adapt an analytical theory of current drive in toroidal geometry developed by Lin-Liu et al (2003 Phys. Plasmas 10 4064) to this system. This involves taking account of the fact that the ratio of the Larmor radius to the perpendicular wavelength is not, in general, small for the Bernstein waves and also including the effects of a non-circular plasma cross section. By comparing the results with those of a full Fokker-Planck code, we demonstrate that the analytical method can yield a good approximation to the current drive efficiency in most regimes of practical interest. Since it is much less computationally demanding than using a Fokker-Planck code we suggest that it could be a useful tool for analysing experiments on Bernstein mode current drive in spherical tokamaks.

  12. Alternating-Current Motor Drive for Electric Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauthamer, S.; Rippel, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    New electric drive controls speed of a polyphase as motor by varying frequency of inverter output. Closed-loop current-sensing circuit automatically adjusts frequency of voltage-controlled oscillator that controls inverter frequency, to limit starting and accelerating surges. Efficient inverter and ac motor would give electric vehicles extra miles per battery charge.

  13. The Effects of Dextromethorphan on Driving Performance and the Standardized Field Sobriety Test.

    PubMed

    Perry, Paul J; Fredriksen, Kristian; Chew, Stephanie; Ip, Eric J; Lopes, Ingrid; Doroudgar, Shadi; Thomas, Kelan

    2015-09-01

    Dextromethorphan (DXM) is abused most commonly among adolescents as a recreational drug to generate a dissociative experience. The objective of the study was to assess driving with and without DXM ingestion. The effects of one-time maximum daily doses of DXM 120 mg versus a guaifenesin 400 mg dose were compared among 40 healthy subjects using a crossover design. Subjects' ability to drive was assessed by their performance in a driving simulator (STISIM® Drive driving simulator software) and by conducting a standardized field sobriety test (SFST) administered 1-h postdrug administration. The one-time dose of DXM 120 mg did not demonstrate driving impairment on the STISIM® Drive driving simulator or increase SFST failures compared to guaifenesin 400 mg. Doses greater than the currently recommended maximum daily dose of 120 mg are necessary to perturb driving behavior. PMID:26294136

  14. The current status of the psychoanalytic theory of instinctual drives. I: Drive concept, classification, and development.

    PubMed

    Compton, A

    1983-07-01

    The evolution of Freud's theory of instinctual drives, with the accompanying models of a mental apparatus, is remarkable for its tenacious adherence to addressing the fundamental problems of human psychology, here phrased as the problems of body-mind-environment relationships. The concept of instinctual drives continues to be one of the most pervasive concepts of psychoanalysis, weathering considerable attack over the last several decades, although losing some clarity in the process. I have cited and discussed as basic issues of the concept of instinctual drives: the relationship of observational data and theoretical constructs in psychology; whether our construct of drives is or should be or can be purely psychological; the problem of conceptualizing the ontogenetic origin of mind; the issues of the "force-meaning conjunction" and the problem of psychic energy in psychoanalytic constructs; and the relation of our concept of instinctual drives to the concept of instincts in general. It seems that progress with these fundamental issues might be made by utilizing models that are more homologous with present knowledge in related fields than is Freud's reflex arc model of the nervous system, in order to build a better drive construct within the framework of psychoanalysis. The classification of instinctual drives remains a problem. Clinically, aggression seems to be a factor in conflict, very much like sexuality. Despite widespread acceptance of the idea of aggression as simply parallel to sexuality in all respects, there are major discrepancies. Perhaps aggression cannot be viewed as a drive after all; perhaps our drive construct needs to be modified to accommodate aggression. Certainly, controversy in this area has interfered with the production of good clinical studies which could begin to increase our understanding of aggression and its place in the human personality. The psychoanalytic theory of drive development has probably undergone less change in the last

  15. Modeling of high harmonic fast wave current drive on EAST tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J. C.; Gong, X. Y. Li, F. Y.; Dong, J. Q.; Gao, Q. D.; Zhang, N.

    2015-10-15

    High harmonic fast waves (HHFW) are among the candidates for non-inductive current drive (CD), which is essential for long-pulse or steady-state operation of tokamaks. Current driven with HHFW in EAST tokamak plasmas is numerically studied. The HHFW CD efficiency is found to increase non-monotonically with the wave frequency, and this phenomenon is attributed to the multi-pass absorption of HHFW. The sensitivity of CD efficiency to the value of the parallel refraction index of the launched wave is confirmed. The quasilinear effects, assessed as significant in HHFW current drive with the GENRAY/CQL3D package, cause a significant increase in CD efficiency as RF power is increased, which is very different from helicon current drive. Simulations for a range of toroidal dc electric fields, in combination with a range of fast wave powers, are also presented and indicate that the presence of the DC field can also enhance the CD efficiency.

  16. Modeling of high harmonic fast wave current drive on EAST tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. C.; Gong, X. Y.; Dong, J. Q.; Gao, Q. D.; Zhang, N.; Li, F. Y.

    2015-10-01

    High harmonic fast waves (HHFW) are among the candidates for non-inductive current drive (CD), which is essential for long-pulse or steady-state operation of tokamaks. Current driven with HHFW in EAST tokamak plasmas is numerically studied. The HHFW CD efficiency is found to increase non-monotonically with the wave frequency, and this phenomenon is attributed to the multi-pass absorption of HHFW. The sensitivity of CD efficiency to the value of the parallel refraction index of the launched wave is confirmed. The quasilinear effects, assessed as significant in HHFW current drive with the GENRAY/CQL3D package, cause a significant increase in CD efficiency as RF power is increased, which is very different from helicon current drive. Simulations for a range of toroidal dc electric fields, in combination with a range of fast wave powers, are also presented and indicate that the presence of the DC field can also enhance the CD efficiency.

  17. Modification of the Current Profile in DIII-D by Off-Axis Electron Cyclotron Current Drive

    SciTech Connect

    Luce, T.C.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Harvey, R.W.; Giruzzi, G.; Lohr, J.M.; Petty, C.C.; Politzer, P.A.; Prater, R.; Rice, B.W.

    1999-07-01

    Localized non-inductive currents due to electron cyclotron wave absorption have been measured on the DIII-D tokamak. Clear evidence of the non-inductive currents is seen on the internal magnetic field measurements by motional Stark effect spectroscopy. The magnitude and location of the non-inductive current is evaluated by comparing the total and Ohmic current profiles of discharges with and without electron cyclotron wave power. The measured current agrees with Fokker-Planck calculations near the magnetic axis, but exceeds the predicted value as the location of the current drive is moved to the half radius.

  18. Measurement of helicon wave coupling for current drive and anticipated role for high beta KSTAR plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S. J.; Kim, H. J.; Joung, M.; Jeong, J. H.; Kim, J. H.; Bae, Y. S.; Kwak, J. G.; Wi, H. H.; Kim, H.-S.

    2015-11-01

    Helicon wave current drive has been suggested for efficient off-axis current drive in high electron beta tokamak plasmas. Fast wave drives centrally peaking current in the frequency range up to several ion cyclotron harmonics in the present tokamaks, such as KSTAR. Increasing fast wave frequency up to LH resonance frequency at the plasma edge, the spiral propagation of wave at the outer region of plasma lengthens the wave path to the plasma center. Also, optical thickness increases with frequency. It is expected that these effects produce efficient off-axis power deposition depending on the electron beta and magnetic field pitch. A low power TWA for helicon wave was installed and tested in KSTAR tokamak which is aiming for the steady-state high beta plasma requiring off-axis current drive. The power coupling properties of TWA at various plasma conditions will be presented. In addition to the coupling efficiency, issues such as load sensitivity and unwanted slow wave coupling will be addressed. Also, the simulation of plasma performance with the combination of helicon wave current drive and other conventional heating and current drive power in KSTAR will be discussed. This work was supported by the Korean Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning and by R&D Program through the National Fusion Research Institute of Korea (NFRI) funded by the Government funds.

  19. Current-Drive Efficiency in a Degenerate Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    S. Son and N.J. Fisch

    2005-11-01

    a degenerate plasma, the rates of electron processes are much smaller than the classical model would predict, affecting the efficiencies of current generation by external non-inductive means, such as by electromagnetic radiation or intense ion beams. For electron-based mechanisms, the current-drive efficiency is higher than the classical prediction by more than a factor of 6 in a degenerate hydrogen plasma, mainly because the electron-electron collisions do not quickly slow down fast electrons. Moreover, electrons much faster than thermal speeds are more readily excited without exciting thermal electrons. In ion-based mechanisms of current drive, the efficiency is likewise enhanced due to the degeneracy effects, since the electron stopping power on slow ion beams is significantly reduced.

  20. Current drive at plasma densities required for thermonuclear reactors.

    PubMed

    Cesario, R; Amicucci, L; Cardinali, A; Castaldo, C; Marinucci, M; Panaccione, L; Santini, F; Tudisco, O; Apicella, M L; Calabrò, G; Cianfarani, C; Frigione, D; Galli, A; Mazzitelli, G; Mazzotta, C; Pericoli, V; Schettini, G; Tuccillo, A A

    2010-01-01

    Progress in thermonuclear fusion energy research based on deuterium plasmas magnetically confined in toroidal tokamak devices requires the development of efficient current drive methods. Previous experiments have shown that plasma current can be driven effectively by externally launched radio frequency power coupled to lower hybrid plasma waves. However, at the high plasma densities required for fusion power plants, the coupled radio frequency power does not penetrate into the plasma core, possibly because of strong wave interactions with the plasma edge. Here we show experiments performed on FTU (Frascati Tokamak Upgrade) based on theoretical predictions that nonlinear interactions diminish when the peripheral plasma electron temperature is high, allowing significant wave penetration at high density. The results show that the coupled radio frequency power can penetrate into high-density plasmas due to weaker plasma edge effects, thus extending the effective range of lower hybrid current drive towards the domain relevant for fusion reactors. PMID:20975718

  1. PHYSICS OF ELCTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE ON DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    PETTY,CC; PRATER,R; LUCE,TC; ELLIS,RA; HARVEY,RW; KINSEY,JE; LAO,LL; LOHR,J; MAKOWSKI,MA

    2002-09-01

    OAK A271 PHYSICS OF ELCTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE ON DIII-D. Recent experiments on the DIII-D tokamak have focused on determining the effect of trapped particles on the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) efficiency. The measured ECCD efficiency increases as the deposition location is moved towards the inboard midplane or towards smaller minor radius for both co and counter injection. The measured ECCD efficiency also increases with increasing electron density and/or temperature. The experimental ECCD is compared to both the linear theory (Toray-GA) as well as a quasilinear Fokker-Planck model (CQL3D). The experimental ECCD is found to be in better agreement with the more complete Fokker-Planck calculation, especially for cases of high rf power density and/or loop voltage. The narrow width of the measured ECCD profile is consistent with only low levels of radial transport for the current carrying electrons.

  2. Fivefold confinement time increase in the Madison Symmetric Torus using inductive poloidal current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Stoneking, M.R.; Lanier, N.E.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S.; Sinitsyn, D.

    1996-12-01

    Current profile control is employed in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed field pinch to reduce the magnetic fluctuations responsible for anomalous transport. An inductive poloidal electric field pulse is applied in the sense to flatten the parallel current profile, reducing the dynamo fluctuation amplitude required to sustain the equilibrium. This technique demonstrates a substantial reduction in fluctuation amplitude (as much as 50%), and improvement in energy confinement (from 1 ms to 5 ms); a record low fluctuation (0.8%) and record high temperature (615 eV) for this device were observed simultaneously during current drive experiments. Plasma beta increases by 50% and the Ohmic input power is three times lower. Particle confinement improves and plasma impurity contamination is reduced. The results of the transient current drive experiments provide motivation for continuing development of steady-state current profile control strategies for the reversed field pinch.

  3. PHYSICS OF ELECTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE ON DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    PETTY,CC; PRATER,R; LUCE,TC; ELLIS,RA; HARVEY,RW; KINSEY,JE; LAO,LL; LOHR,J; MAKOWSKI,MA

    2002-11-01

    OAK A271 PHYSICS OF ELECTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE ON DIII-D. Recent experiments on the DIII-D tokamak have focused on determining the effect of trapped particles on the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) efficiency. The measured ECCD efficiency increases as the deposition location is moved towards the inboard midplane or towards smaller minor radius for both co and counter injection. The measured ECCD efficiency also increases with increasing electron density and/or temperature. The experimental ECCD is compared to both the linear theory (Toray-GA) as well as a quasilinear Fokker-Planck model (CQL3D). The experimental ECCD is found to be in better agreement with the more complete Fokker-Planck calculation, especially for cases of high rf power density and/or loop voltage.

  4. Lower hybrid current drive favoured by electron cyclotron radiofrequency heating

    SciTech Connect

    Cesario, R.; Cardinali, A.; Castaldo, C.; Marinucci, M.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Giruzzi, G.; Napoli, F.; Schettini, G.

    2014-02-12

    The important goal of adding to the bootstrap a fraction of non-inductive plasma current, which would be controlled for obtaining and optimizing steady-state profiles, can be reached by using the Current Drive produced by Lower Hybrid waves (LHCD). FTU (Frascati Tokamak Upgrade) experiments demonstrated, indeed, that LHCD is effective at reactor-graded high plasma density, and the LH spectral broadening is reduced, operating with higher electron temperature in the outer region of plasma column (T{sub e-periphery}). This method was obtained following the guidelines of theoretical predictions indicating that the broadening of launched spectrum produced by parametric instability (PI) should be reduced, and the LHCD effect at high density consequently enabled, under higher (T{sub e-periphery}). In FTU, the temperature increase in the outer plasma region was obtained by operating with reduced particle recycling, lithized walls and deep gas fuelling by means of fast pellet. Heating plasma periphery with electron cyclotron resonant waves (ECRH) will provide a further tool for achieving steady-state operations. New FTU experimental results are presented here, demonstrating that temperature effect at the plasma periphery, affecting LH penetration, occurs in a range of plasma parameters broader than in previous work. New information is also shown on the modelling assessing frequencies and growth rates of the PI coupled modes responsible of spectral broadening. Finally, we present the design of an experiment scheduled on FTU next campaign, where ECRH power is used to slightly increase the electron temperature in the outer plasma region of a high-density discharge aiming at restoring LHCD. Consequent to model results, by operating with a toroidal magnetic field of 6.3 T, useful for locating the electron cyclotron resonant layer at the periphery of the plasma column (r/a∼0.8, f{sub 0}=144 GHz), an increase of T{sub e} in the outer plasma (from 40 eV to 80 eV at r/a∼0.8) is

  5. Current drive for stability of thermonuclear plasma reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amicucci, L.; Cardinali, A.; Castaldo, C.; Cesario, R.; Galli, A.; Panaccione, L.; Paoletti, F.; Schettini, G.; Spigler, R.; Tuccillo, A.

    2016-01-01

    To produce in a thermonuclear fusion reactor based on the tokamak concept a sufficiently high fusion gain together stability necessary for operations represent a major challenge, which depends on the capability of driving non-inductive current in the hydrogen plasma. This request should be satisfied by radio-frequency (RF) power suitable for producing the lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) effect, recently demonstrated successfully occurring also at reactor-graded high plasma densities. An LHCD-based tool should be in principle capable of tailoring the plasma current density in the outer radial half of plasma column, where other methods are much less effective, in order to ensure operations in the presence of unpredictably changes of the plasma pressure profiles. In the presence of too high electron temperatures even at the periphery of the plasma column, as envisaged in DEMO reactor, the penetration of the coupled RF power into the plasma core was believed for long time problematic and, only recently, numerical modelling results based on standard plasma wave theory, have shown that this problem should be solved by using suitable parameter of the antenna power spectrum. We show here further information on the new understanding of the RF power deposition profile dependence on antenna parameters, which supports the conclusion that current can be actively driven over a broad layer of the outer radial half of plasma column, thus enabling current profile control necessary for the stability of a reactor.

  6. Overview of recent results on Heating and Current Drive in JET

    SciTech Connect

    Ongena, J.; Durodie, F.; Lerche, E.; Eester, D. van; Vrancken, M.; Baranov, Yu.; Challis, C. D.; Jacquet, Ph.; Jenkins, I.; Kiptily, V.; Kirov, K.; Mailloux, J.; Mayoral, M. L.; Monakhov, I.; Nightingale, M.; Walden, A.; Bobkov, V.; Lennholm, M.; Colas, L.; Ekedahl, A.

    2007-09-28

    Recent progress on heating and current drive on JET is reported. Topics discussed are: high power coupling of ICRF/LH at ITER relevant antenna/launcher-separatrix distances, succesfull demonstration of 3 dB couplers for ELM tolerance of the ICRF system, influence of ICRF on LH operation, rotation studies in plasma without external momentum with standard and enhanced JET toriodal field ripple, studies of different ICRF heating schemes and of NTM avoidance schemes using Ion Cyclotron Current Drive. A brief outlook on future plans for experiments at JET is given.

  7. Effects of MHD instabilities on neutral beam current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Podestà, M.; Gorelenkova, M.; Darrow, D. S.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Gerhardt, S. P.; White, R. B.

    2015-04-17

    One of the primary tools foreseen for heating, current drive (CD) and q-profile control in future fusion reactors such as ITER and a Fusion Nuclear Science Facility is the neutral beam injection (NBI). However, fast ions from NBI may also provide the drive for energetic particle-driven instabilities (e.g. Alfvénic modes (AEs)), which in turn redistribute fast ions in both space and energy, thus hampering the control capabilities and overall efficiency of NB-driven current. Based on experiments on the NSTX tokamak (M. Ono et al 2000 Nucl. Fusion 40 557), the effects of AEs and other low-frequency magneto-hydrodynamic instabilities on NB-CD efficiency are investigated. When looking at the new fast ion transport model, which accounts for particle transport in phase space as required for resonant AE perturbations, is utilized to obtain consistent simulations of NB-CD through the tokamak transport code TRANSP. It is found that instabilities do indeed reduce the NB-driven current density over most of the plasma radius by up to ~50%. Moreover, the details of the current profile evolution are sensitive to the specific model used to mimic the interaction between NB ions and instabilities. Finally, implications for fast ion transport modeling in integrated tokamak simulations are briefly discussed.

  8. Effects of MHD instabilities on neutral beam current drive

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Podestà, M.; Gorelenkova, M.; Darrow, D. S.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Gerhardt, S. P.; White, R. B.

    2015-04-17

    One of the primary tools foreseen for heating, current drive (CD) and q-profile control in future fusion reactors such as ITER and a Fusion Nuclear Science Facility is the neutral beam injection (NBI). However, fast ions from NBI may also provide the drive for energetic particle-driven instabilities (e.g. Alfvénic modes (AEs)), which in turn redistribute fast ions in both space and energy, thus hampering the control capabilities and overall efficiency of NB-driven current. Based on experiments on the NSTX tokamak (M. Ono et al 2000 Nucl. Fusion 40 557), the effects of AEs and other low-frequency magneto-hydrodynamic instabilities on NB-CDmore » efficiency are investigated. When looking at the new fast ion transport model, which accounts for particle transport in phase space as required for resonant AE perturbations, is utilized to obtain consistent simulations of NB-CD through the tokamak transport code TRANSP. It is found that instabilities do indeed reduce the NB-driven current density over most of the plasma radius by up to ~50%. Moreover, the details of the current profile evolution are sensitive to the specific model used to mimic the interaction between NB ions and instabilities. Finally, implications for fast ion transport modeling in integrated tokamak simulations are briefly discussed.« less

  9. An anomalous current drive mechanism in low collisionality plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDevitt, Chris; Tang, Xianzhu; Guo, Zehua

    2013-10-01

    Steady state tokamak operation requires non-inductive current drive, of which the neoclassical bootstrap current is the most economic option. Here we report a novel mechanism through which a bootstrap current may be driven even in a collisionless plasma. In analogy with the neoclassical mechanism, in which the collisional equilibrium established between trapped and passing electrons produces a steady state current, we show that resonant scattering of electrons by drift wave microturbulence provides an additional means of determining the equilibrium between trapped and passing electrons. The resulting collisionless equilibrium is shown to produce a mean current whose magnitude scales with the thermodynamic forces. Employing a linearized Fokker-Planck collision operator, the plasma current in the presence of both collisions and resonant electron scattering is computed as a function of collisionality. It is found that while the volume integrated electron current is only modestly affected by the turbulent fluctuations, the radial distribution of electron current is significantly modified in low collisionality plasmas. This work was supported by DOE OFES.

  10. Remote field eddy current inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Atherton, D.L.

    1995-11-01

    The Remote Field Eddy Current (RFEC) technique uses an internal probe to inspect conducting tubes nondestructively. A coaxial solenoidal exciter, energized with low frequency AC, and detector coils near the inside of the pipe wall are separated by about two pipe diameters to obtain through wall transmission and equal sensitivity to defects on the outside or inside of the pipe wall. Calculation methods are outlined and the voltage plane polar plot signal representation for defect measurement is described. Slit defect interactions in ferromagnetic and non-ferromagnetic tubes are discussed. Defect-induced anomalous fields are interpreted in terms of anomalous source eddy current and missing magnetization defect models. The use of computer animations to represent the time variations of high resolution field measurements and calculations is described.

  11. Fluid equations in the presence of electron cyclotron current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, Thomas G.; Kruger, Scott E.

    2012-12-15

    Two-fluid equations, which include the physics imparted by an externally applied radiofrequency source near electron cyclotron resonance, are derived in their extended magnetohydrodynamic forms using the formalism of Hegna and Callen [Phys. Plasmas 16, 112501 (2009)]. The equations are compatible with the closed fluid/drift-kinetic model developed by Ramos [Phys. Plasmas 17, 082502 (2010); 18, 102506 (2011)] for fusion-relevant regimes with low collisionality and slow dynamics, and they facilitate the development of advanced computational models for electron cyclotron current drive-induced suppression of neoclassical tearing modes.

  12. Lower hybrid heating and current drive on PLT

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, J.E.; Bernabei, S.; Bitter, M.

    1983-03-01

    800 MHz lower hybrid waves have been launched into PLT with a six waveguide coupler. Recent improvements have allowed powers up to 400 kW to be launched with good coupling (R approx. 10 to 25%). Experiments at low density (anti n/sub e/ < 7 x 10/sup 12/ cm/sup -3/, i.e., ..omega../..omega../sub LH/ > 2) have demonstrated current drive and plasma heating. Experiments at higher densities have produced hot-ion tails, but so far have shown inefficient body heating. To date, only a limited parameters space has been investigated at high power.

  13. FLANDERS FIELDS MEMORIAL IN TRAFFIC ISLAND ON EAST DRIVE. VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FLANDERS FIELDS MEMORIAL IN TRAFFIC ISLAND ON EAST DRIVE. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Rock Island National Cemetery, Rock Island Arsenal, 0.25 mile north of southern tip of Rock Island, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  14. Driving magnetic skyrmions with microwave fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weiwei; Beg, Marijan; Zhang, Bin; Kuch, Wolfgang; Fangohr, Hans

    2015-07-01

    We show theoretically by numerically solving the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation with a classical spin model on a two-dimensional system that both magnetic skyrmions and skyrmion lattices can be moved with microwave magnetic fields. The mechanism is enabled by breaking the axial symmetry of the skyrmion, for example, through application of a static in-plane external field. The net velocity of the skyrmion depends on the frequency and amplitude of the microwave fields as well as the strength of the in-plane field. The maximum velocity is found where the frequency of the microwave coincides with the resonance frequency of the breathing mode of the skyrmions.

  15. Current drive with fast waves, electron cyclotron waves, and neutral injection in the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Prater, R.; Petty, C.C.; Pinsker, R.I.; Chiu, S.C.; deGrassie, J.S.; Harvey, R.W.; Ikel, H.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Luce, T.C. ); James, R.A. ); Porkolab, M. ); Baity, F.W.; Goulding, R.H.; Hoffmann, D.J. ); Kawash

    1992-09-01

    Current drive experiments have been performed on the DIII-D tokamak using fast waves, electron cyclotron waves, and neutral injection. Fast wave experiments were performed using a 4-strap antenna with 1 MW of power at 60 MHz. These experiments showed effective heating of electrons, with a global heating efficiency equivalent to that of neutral injection even when the single pass damping was calculated to be as small as 5%. The damping was probably due to the effect of multiple passes of the wave through the plasma. Fast wave current drive experiments were performed with a toroidally directional phasing of the antenna straps. Currents driven by fast wave current drive (FWCD) in the direction of the main plasma current of up to 100 kA were found, not including a calculated 40 kA of bootstrap current. Experiments with FWCD in the counter current direction showed little current drive. In both cases, changes in the sawtooth behavior and the internal inductance qualitatively support the measurement of FWCD. Experiments on electron cyclotron current drive have shown that 100 kA of current can be driven by 1 MW of power at 60 GHz. Calculations with a Fokker-Planck code show that electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) can be well predicted when the effects of electron trapping and of the residual electric field are included. Experiments on driving current with neutral injection showed that effective current drive could be obtained and discharges with full current drive were demonstrated. Interestingly, all of these methods of current drive had about the same efficiency, 0.015 {times} 10{sup 20} MA/MW/m{sup 2}.

  16. Spectral Effects on Fast Wave Core Heating and Current Drive

    SciTech Connect

    C.K. Phillips, R.E. Bell, L.A. Berry, P.T. Bonoli, R.W. Harvey, J.C. Hosea, E.F. Jaeger, B.P. LeBlanc, P.M. Ryan, G. Taylor, E.J. Valeo, J.R. Wilson, J.C. Wright, H. Yuh, and the NSTX Team

    2009-05-11

    Recent results obtained with high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive (CD) on NSTX strongly support the hypothesis that the onset of perpendicular fast wave propagation right at or very near the launcher is a primary cause for a reduction in core heating efficiency at long wavelengths that is also observed in ICRF heating experiments in numerous tokamaks. A dramatic increase in core heating efficiency was first achieved in NSTX L-mode helium majority plasmas when the onset for perpendicular wave propagation was moved away from the antenna and nearby vessel structures. Efficient core heating in deuterium majority L mode and H mode discharges, in which the edge density is typically higher than in comparable helium majority plasmas, was then accomplished by reducing the edge density in front of the launcher with lithium conditioning and avoiding operational points prone to instabilities. These results indicate that careful tailoring of the edge density profiles in ITER should be considered to limit rf power losses to the antenna and plasma facing materials. Finally, in plasmas with reduced rf power losses in the edge regions, the first direct measurements of high harmonic fast wave current drive were obtained with the motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic. The location and radial dependence of HHFW CD measured by MSE are in reasonable agreement with predictions from both full wave and ray tracing simulations.

  17. Recent experimental results of KSTAR RF heating and current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S. J.; Kim, J.; Jeong, J. H.; Kim, H. J.; Joung, M.; Bae, Y. S.; Kwak, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    The overview of KSTAR activities on ICRH, LHCD and ECH/CD including the last experimental results and future plan aiming for long-pulse high-beta plasma will be presented. Recently we achieved reasonable coupling of ICRF power to H-mode plasma through several efforts to increase system reliability. Power balance will be discussed on this experiment. LHCD is still struggling in the low power regime. Review of antenna spectrum for the higher coupling in H-mode plasma will be tried. ECH/CD provides 41 sec, 0.8 MW of heating power to support high-performance long-pulse discharge. Also, 170 GHz ECH system is integrated with the Plasma Control System (PCS) for the feedback controlling of NTM. Status and plan of ECH/CD will be discussed. Finally, helicon current drive is being prepared for the next stage of KSTAR operation. The hardware preparation and the calculation results of helicon current drive in KSTAR plasma will be discussed.

  18. Recent experimental results of KSTAR RF heating and current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S. J. Kim, J.; Jeong, J. H.; Kim, H. J.; Joung, M.; Bae, Y. S.; Kwak, J. G.

    2015-12-10

    The overview of KSTAR activities on ICRH, LHCD and ECH/CD including the last experimental results and future plan aiming for long-pulse high-beta plasma will be presented. Recently we achieved reasonable coupling of ICRF power to H-mode plasma through several efforts to increase system reliability. Power balance will be discussed on this experiment. LHCD is still struggling in the low power regime. Review of antenna spectrum for the higher coupling in H-mode plasma will be tried. ECH/CD provides 41 sec, 0.8 MW of heating power to support high-performance long-pulse discharge. Also, 170 GHz ECH system is integrated with the Plasma Control System (PCS) for the feedback controlling of NTM. Status and plan of ECH/CD will be discussed. Finally, helicon current drive is being prepared for the next stage of KSTAR operation. The hardware preparation and the calculation results of helicon current drive in KSTAR plasma will be discussed.

  19. Technology of fast-wave current drive antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.J.; Baity, F.W.; Goulding, R.H.; Haste, G.R.; Ryan, P.M.; Taylor, D.J.; Swain, D.W.; Mayberry, M.J.; Yugo, J.J.; General Atomics, San Diego, CA; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1989-01-01

    The design of fast-wave current drive (FWCD) antennas combines the usual antenna considerations (e.g., the plasma/antenna interface, disruptions, high currents and voltages, and thermal loads) with new requirements for spectral shaping and phase control. The internal configuration of the antenna array has a profound effect on the spectrum and the ability to control phasing. This paper elaborates on these considerations, as epitomized by a proof-of-principle (POP) experiment designed for the DIII-D tokamak. The extension of FWCD for machines such as the International Thermonuclear Engineering Reactor (ITER) will require combining ideas implemented in the POP experiment with reactor-relevant antenna concepts, such as the folded waveguide. 6 refs., 8 figs.

  20. Current profile modification with electron cyclotron current drive in the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Luce, T.C.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Lohr, J.M.

    1998-11-01

    Proof-of-principle experiments on the suitability of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) for active current profile control are reported. Experiments with second harmonic extraordinary mode absorption at power levels near 1 MW have demonstrated ability to modify the current profile. This modification is manifested in changes in the internal inductance and the time at which sawteeth appear. Measurements of the local current density and internal loop voltage using high resolution motional Stark effect spectroscopy to half of the minor radius in discharges with localized deposition clearly demonstrate localized off-axis ECCD at the predicted location. Comparison with theory indicates the detrimental effect of trapped electrons on the current drive efficiency is less than predicted. Modification of the theory for finite collisionality is the leading candidate to explain the observations.

  1. Noninductive plasma generation and current drive in the Globus-M spherical tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    D'yachenko, V. V.; Gusev, V. K.; Larionov, M. M.; Mel'nik, A. D.; Novokhatskii, A. N.; Petrov, Yu. V.; Rozhdestvenskii, V. V.; Sakharov, N. V.; Stepanov, A. Yu.; Khitrov, S. A.; Khromov, N. A.; Chernyshev, F. V.; Shevelev, A. E.; Shcherbinin, O. N.; Bender, S. E.; Kavin, A. A.; Lobanov, K. M.

    2013-03-15

    Experimental results on the generation and maintenance of the toroidal current in the Globus-M spherical tokamak by using waves in the lower hybrid frequency range without applying an inductive vortex electric field are presented. For this purpose, the original ridge guide antennas forming a field distribution similar to that produced by multiwaveguide grills were used. The high-frequency field (900 MHz) was used for both plasma generation and current drive. The magnitude of the generated current reached 21 kA, and its direction depended on the direction of the vertical magnetic field. Analysis of the experimental results indicates that the major fraction of the current is carried by the suprathermal electron beam.

  2. Simulation Study of Current Drive Efficiency for KSTAR 5 GHz LHCD

    SciTech Connect

    Aria, A. K.; Bae, Y. S.; Yang, H. L.; Kwon, M.; Do, H. J.; Namkung, W.; Cho, M. H.; Park, H.

    2011-12-23

    Theoretical 5 GHz lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) efficiency using power spectrum given by 0-D Brambilla code and Lower Hybrid Simulation Code (LSC) have been studied for KSTAR. In LSC simulation, RF-driven current and current drive efficiency has been found to be deeply dependent on the profiles of the plasma density and temperature as well as on current profile in order to obtain hollow current profile favorable for advance tokamak operation mode and steady state operation. The peaked density and broad temperature profile control has been found to be efficient in current drive with maximum RF-driven current larger than 400 kA/MW with very high efficiency when the peak plasma density is ranged from 0.2 to 2.0x1020 m-3, and the peak electron temperature range of 2-20 keV together with toroidal field 2-3.5 T and Ip = 0.5-2 MA. The on-/off-axis current profile controllability is also investigated through parametric scan, and small negative magnetic shear is seen at the narrow region of the off-axis for very high temperature regime and for high BT and I{sub p}. In order to achieve the same for lower temperature regime Ip has to be lower and also for higher LH-power compromising with CD efficiency in this case.

  3. Electron cyclotron heating and current drive results from the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Luce, T.C.; Harvey, R.; Lohr, J.; Prater, R.; Snider, R.; Stallard, B.; Stockdale, R. ); James, R.A.; deHaas, J. ); Fyaretdinov, A.; Gorelov, Yu; Trukhin, V. ); de Gentile, B.; Giruzzi, G.; Rodriguez, L. (CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (Fra

    1990-11-01

    Auxiliary heating experiments with electron cyclotron heating have been carried out in the DIII-D tokamak. Waves at 60 GHz have been launched at power levels up to 1.4 MW from both the high-field and low-field side with the appropriate polarization for damping at the fundamental resonance (2.14 T). Confinement was studied in L-mode and H-mode plasmas for a single-null, open divertor geometry. For L-mode discharges, the energy confinement scaling agrees well with the ITER-89 power law or offset linear scaling relations. With strong off-axis heating, the electron temperature profile remains peaked, and power balance analysis indicates that the transport cannot be described by a purely diffusive model. In H-mode confinement plasmas, the magnitude and scaling of the confinement time are equal to that of plasmas heated by neutral beam injection (NBI), if the energy stored in the fast ions is removed in the NBI cases. A major issue for steady-state H-mode plasmas is control of the edge-localized mode (ELM) behavior. By moving the resonance location {plus minus}5 cm around the separatrix, the frequency of giant ELMs can be changed by a factor of three. Non-inductive current drive with electron cyclotron waves has also been investigated. Driven currents up to 70 kA have been observed, but the current drive is enhanced by the residual dc electric field. Currents aiding and opposing the Ohmic current have been measured. The magnitude of the current for co-current drive is greater than expected from modeling which includes trapped particle effects, but no electric field. Preliminary calculations including the residual dc electric field can account for the observed enhancement.

  4. Off-axis Neutral Beam Current Drive for Advanced Scenario Development in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, M; Park, J; Petty, C; Luce, T; Heidbrink, W; Osborne, T; Wade, M; Austin, M; Brooks, N; Budny, R; Challis, C; DeBoo, J; deGrassie, J; Ferron, J; Gohil, P; Hobirk, J; Holcomb, C; Hollmann, E; Hong, R; Hyatt, A; Lohr, J; Lanctot, M; Makowski, M; McCune, D; Politzer, P; Prater, R; John, H S; Suzuki, T; West, W; Unterberg, E; Van Zeeland, M; Yu, J

    2008-10-13

    Modification of the two existing DIII-D neutral beam lines is proposed to allow vertical steering to provide off-axis neutral beam current drive (NBCD) as far off-axis as half the plasma radius. New calculations indicate very good current drive with good localization off-axis as long as the toroidal magnetic field, B{sub T}, and the plasma current, I{sub p}, are in the same direction (for a beam steered downward). The effects of helicity can be large: e.g., ITER off-axis NBCD can be increased by more than 20% if the B{sub T} direction is reversed. This prediction has been tested by an off-axis NBCD experiment using reduced size plasmas that are vertically shifted with the existing NBI on DIII-D. The existence of off-axis NBCD is evident in sawtooth and internal inductance behavior. By shifting the plasma upward or downward, or by changing the sign of the toroidal field, measured off-axis NBCD profiles, determined from MSE data, are consistent with predicted differences (40%-45%) arising from the NBI orientation with respect to the magnetic field lines. Modification of the DIII-D NB system will strongly support scenario development for ITER and future tokamaks as well as providing flexible scientific tools for understanding transport, energetic particles and heating and current drive.

  5. Particle pinch with fully noninductive lower hybrid current drive in Tore Supra.

    PubMed

    Hoang, G T; Bourdelle, C; Pégourié, B; Schunke, B; Artaud, J F; Bucalossi, J; Clairet, F; Fenzi-Bonizec, C; Garbet, X; Gil, C; Guirlet, R; Imbeaux, F; Lasalle, J; Loarer, T; Lowry, C; Travère, J M; Tsitrone, E

    2003-04-18

    Recently, plasmas exceeding 4 min have been obtained with lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) in Tore Supra. These LHCD plasmas extend for over 80 times the resistive current diffusion time with zero loop voltage. Under such unique conditions the neoclassical particle pinch driven by the toroidal electric field vanishes. Nevertheless, the density profile remains peaked for more than 4 min. For the first time, the existence of an inward particle pinch in steady-state plasma without toroidal electric field, much larger than the value predicted by the collisional neoclassical theory, is experimentally demonstrated. PMID:12732041

  6. Integrated Plasma Simulation of Lower Hybrid Current Drive in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C.; Harvey, R. W.; Batchelor, D. B.; Berry, L. A.; Kessel, C. E.; Jardin, S. C.

    2012-03-01

    It has been shown in Alcator C-Mod that the onset time for sawteeth can be delayed significantly (up to 0.5 s) relative to ohmically heated plasmas, through the injection of off-axis LH current drive power [1]. We are simulating these experiments using the Integrated Plasma Simulator (IPS) [2], where the driven LH current density profiles are computed using a ray tracing component (GENRAY) and Fokker Planck code (CQL3D) [3] that are run in a tightly coupled time advance. The background plasma is evolved using the TSC transport code with the Porcelli sawtooth model [4]. Predictions of the driven LH current profiles will be compared with simpler ``reduced'' models for LHCD such as the LSC code which is implemented in TSC and which is also invoked within the IPS. [4pt] [1] C. E. Kessel et al, Bull. of the Am. Phys. Soc. 53, Poster PP6.00074 (2008). [0pt] [2] D. Batchelor et al, Journal of Physics: Conf. Series 125, 012039 (2008). [0pt] [3] R. W. Harvey and M. G. McCoy, Proc. of the IAEA Tech. Comm. Meeting on Simulation and Modeling of Therm. Plasmas, Montreal, Canada (1992). [0pt] [4] S. C. Jardin et al, J. Comp. Phys. 66, 481 (1986).

  7. A survey of the current experimental database for lower hybrid current-drive and heating

    SciTech Connect

    Blackfield, D.T.

    1988-02-10

    The proposed ITER design may rely heavily on Lower Hybrid waves to provide heating, current drive, MHD stabilization through current profile modification and transformer recharging. This paper presents a detailed survey of recent LH experimental results from PLT, Alcator C, ASDEX, Petula-B, FT and JT-60. Current drive and heating efficiencies are given, as well as regimes where sawteeth and m = 1 and 2 oscillations are stabilized. In addition, in ASDEX and JT-60, LH waves in combination with neutral beams, (a possible ITER scenario) experiments are examined. Finally, the current drive efficiency for ITER is obtained by extrapolating from the LHCD database. Assuming 12 MW of LH power, approximately 4.5 to 5.6 MA of current could be driven in ITER. However, the high density (/ovr /n///sub e/ = 8 /times/ 10/sup 19/ m/sup /minus/3/) and high temperature (/ovr/T///sub e/ = 21 keV) will preclude wave penetration to the center. Assuming a narrow N/sub /parallel// spectrum (1.2 /approx lt/ N/sub /parallel// /approx lt/ 2) the LH waves should be absorbed within the outer half of the plasma. 43 refs., 18 figs., 10 tabs.

  8. Lower Hybrid Current Drive Experiments in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    J.R. Wilson, S. Bernabei, P. Bonoli, A. Hubbard, R. Parker, A. Schmidt, G. Wallace, J. Wright, and the Alcator C-Mod Team

    2007-10-09

    A Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) system has been installed on the Alcator C-MOD tokamak at MIT. Twelve klystrons at 4.6 GHz feed a 4x22 waveguide array. This system was designed for maximum flexibility in the launched parallel wave-number spectrum. This flexibility allows tailoring of the lower hybrid deposition under a variety of plasma conditions. Power levels up to 900 kW have been injected into the tokomak. The parallel wave number has been varied over a wide range, n|| ~ 1.6–4. Driven currents have been inferred from magnetic measurements by extrapolating to zero loop voltage and by direct comparison to Fisch-Karney theory, yielding an efficiency of n20IR/P ~ 0.3. Modeling using the CQL3D code supports these efficiencies. Sawtooth oscillations vanish, accompanied with peaking of the electron temperature (Te0 rises from 2.8 to 3.8 keV). Central q is inferred to rise above unity from the collapse of the sawtooth inversion radius, indicating off-axis cd as expected. Measurements of non-thermal x-ray and electron cyclotron emission confirm the presence of a significant fast electron population that varies with phase and plasma density. The x-ray emission is observed to be radialy broader than that predicted by simple ray tracing codes. Possible explanations for this broader emission include fast electron diffusion or broader deposition than simple ray tracing predictions (perhaps due to diffractive effects).

  9. Lower hybrid counter current drive for edge current density modification in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Fenstermacher, M.E.; Nevins, W.M.; Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P.T.; Harvey, R.W.

    1993-07-01

    Each of the Advanced Tokamak operating modes in DIII-D is thought to have a distinctive current density profile. So far these modes have only been achieved transiently through experiments which ramp the plasma current and shape. Extension of these modes to steady state requires non-inductive current profile control, e.g. with lower hybrid current drive (LHCD). Calculations of LHCD have been done for DIII-D using the ACCOME and CQL3D codes, showing that counter driven current at the plasma edge can cancel some of the undesirable edge bootstrap current and potentially extend the VH-mode. Results are presented for scenarios using 2.45 GHz LH waves launched from both the midplane and off-axis ports. The sensitivity of the results to injected power, n{sub e} and T{sub e}, and launched wave spectrum is also shown.

  10. Lower-hybrid counter current drive for edge current density modification in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Fenstermacher, M.E.; Nevins, W.M. ); Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P.T. ); Harvey, R.W. )

    1994-10-15

    Each of the Advanced Tokamak operating modes in DIII-D is thought to have a distinctive current density profile. So far these modes have only been achieved transiently through experiments which ramp the plasma current and shape. Extension of these modes to steady state requires non-inductive current profile control, e.g., with lower hybrid current drive (LHCD). Calculations of LHCD have been done for DIII-D using the ACCOME and CQL3D codes, showing that counter driven current at the plasma edge can cancel some of the undesirable edge bootstrap current and potentially extend the VH-mode. Results will be presented for scenarios using 2.45 GHz LH waves launched from both the midplane and off-axis ports. The sensitivity of the results to injected power, [ital n][sub [ital e

  11. D Helicity Injection Studies on the Current Drive Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrow, Douglass Sterling

    A tokamak-like plasma has been created and sustained in the CDX device solely by means of an electron beam. The poloidal field structure observed is that of a tokamak and the density and temperatures seen are larger than in previous types of plasmas generated in this device. A plasma current scaling consistent with the helicity balance equation is observed and about 40% of the injected helicity appears in the tokamak plasma. Rapid transport of current from the region of injection to the center produces a peaked current profile. Plasmas with beta in the neighborhood of the Troyon-Sykes limit may be generated by this technique. In high-beta plasmas, a coherent fluctuation is seen which has its largest amplitude in a region of unfavorable curvature. The mode is absent below a certain density and plasma current, corresponding to a threshold beta. When present, the mode has an m = 4 structure and it propagates in the ion diamagnetic direction. These properties identify it as a ballooning mode. A significant radial electric field alters the observed frequency and dispersion of the mode.

  12. Determination of the Electron Cyclotron Current Drive Profile

    SciTech Connect

    Luce, T.C.; Petty, C.C.; Schuster, D.I.; Makowski, M.A.

    1999-11-01

    Evaluation of the profile of non-inductive current density driven by absorption of electron cyclotron waves (ECCD) using time evolution of the poloidal flux indicated a broader profile than predicted by theory. To determine the nature of this broadening, a 1-1/2 D transport calculation of current density evolution was used to generate the signals which the DIII-D motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic would measure in the event that the current density evolution followed the neoclassical Ohm's law with the theoretical ECCD profile. Comparison with the measured MSE data indicates the experimental data is consistent with the ECCD profile predicted by theory. The simulations yield a lower limit on the magnitude of the ECCD which is at or above the value found in Fokker-Planck calculations of the ECCD including quasilinear and parallel electric field effects.

  13. On the efficiency of electrical submersible pumps equipped with variable frequency drives: A field study

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, M.M.

    1996-02-01

    A field study was conducted on 18 electrical-submersible-pump- (ESP-) equipped wells operating in the Williston basin. Fifteen of these wells were run with variable frequency drives (VFD`s). The purpose of the study was to determine the efficiency and operating characteristics of ESP`s operating with VFD`s and compare them to those without. Voltage, current, power, and frequency were measured at the drive input, the drive output, and ESP input. Production data were recorded and power and efficiency were calculated at all measurement locations and compared to published data.

  14. Current ramp-up with lower hybrid current drive in EAST

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, B. J.; Li, M. H.; Li, J. G.; Kong, E. H.; Zhang, L.; Wei, W.; Li, Y. C.; Wang, M.; Xu, H. D.; Gong, X. Z.; Shen, B.; Liu, F. K.; Shan, J. F.; Fisch, N. J.; Qin, H.; Wilson, J. R.; Collaboration: EAST Team

    2012-12-15

    More economical fusion reactors might be enabled through the cyclic operation of lower hybrid current drive. The first stage of cyclic operation would be to ramp up the plasma current with lower hybrid waves alone in low-density plasma. Such a current ramp-up was carried out successfully on the EAST tokamak. The plasma current was ramped up with a time-averaged rate of 18 kA/s with lower hybrid (LH) power. The average conversion efficiency P{sub el}/P{sub LH} was about 3%. Over a transient phase, faster ramp-up was obtained. These experiments feature a separate measurement of the L/R time at the time of current ramp up.

  15. Lower hybrid current drive for edge current density modification in DIII-D: Final status report

    SciTech Connect

    Fenstermacher, M.E.; Porkolab, M.

    1993-08-04

    Application of Lower Hybrid (LH) Current Drive (CD) in the DIII-D tokamak has been studied at LLNL, off and on, for several years. The latest effort began in February 1992 in response to a letter from ASDEX indicating that the 2.45 GHz, 3 MW system there was available to be used on another device. An initial assessment of the possible uses for such a system on DIII-D was made and documented in September 1992. Multiple meetings with GA personnel and members of the LH community nationwide have occurred since that time. The work continued through the submission of the 1995 Field Work Proposals in March 1993 and was then put on hold due to budget limitations. The purpose of this document is to record the status of the work in such a way that it could fairly easily be restarted at a future date. This document will take the form of a collection of Appendices giving both background and the latest results from the FY 1993 work, connected by brief descriptive text. Section 2 will describe the final workshop on LHCD in DIII-D held at GA in February 1993. This was an open meeting with attendees from GA, LLNL, MIT and PPPL. Summary documents from the meeting and subsequent papers describing the results will be included in Appendices. Section 3 will describe the status of work on the use of low frequency (2.45 GHZ) LH power and Parametric Decay Instabilities (PDI) for the special case of high dielectric in the edge regions of the DIII-D plasma. This was one of the critical issues identified at the workshop. Other potential issues for LHCD in the DIII-D scenarios are: (1) damping of the waves on fast ions from neutral beam injection, (2) runaway electrons in the low density edge plasma, (3) the validity of the WKB approximation used in the ray-tracing models in the steep edge density gradients.

  16. Spectral effects on fast wave core heating and current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Cynthia; Bell, R. E.; Berry, Lee; Jaeger, Erwin Frederick; Ryan, Philip Michael; Wilgen, John B

    2009-01-01

    Recent results obtained with high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive (CD) on NSTX strongly support the hypothesis that the onset of perpendicular fast wave propagation right at or very near the launcher is a primary cause for a reduction in core heating efficiency at long wavelengths that is also observed in ICRF heating experiments in numerous tokamaks. A dramatic increase in core heating efficiency was first achieved in NSTX L-mode helium majority plasmas when the onset for perpendicular wave propagation was moved away from the antenna and nearby vessel structures. Efficient core heating in deuterium majority L-mode and H-mode discharges, in which the edge density is typically higher than in comparable helium majority plasmas, was then accomplished by reducing the edge density in front of the launcher with lithium conditioning and avoiding operational points prone to instabilities. These results indicate that careful tailoring of the edge density profiles in ITER should be considered to limit radio frequency (rf) power losses to the antenna and plasma facing materials. Finally, in plasmas with reduced rf power losses in the edge regions, the first direct measurements of HHFW CD were obtained with the motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic. The location and radial dependence of HHFW CD measured by MSE are in reasonable agreement with predictions from both full wave and ray tracing simulations.

  17. EBW Current Drive and Heating for Fusion/Fission Hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Jakub; Preinhaelter, Josef; Vahala, George; Vahala, Linda; Decker, Joan; Ram, Abhay

    2011-10-01

    From the RF requirements for spherical tokamak and the need to reduce antenna exposure to neutron bombardment, EBW are an important source for both heating and current drive (CD). ICRF, LH, HHFW antennas are subject to significant neutron damage (as are NBI) because of their very large size and necessary proximity to the plasma. Recently Mahajan et. al. have studied other important uses of fusion neutrons - in particular their use in the efficient breeding of fission reactor fuel as well as in the ``rapid'' destruction of nuclear waste using their Compact High Power Density Fast Neutron Source (CFNS). For overdense plasmas the standard electromagnetic O- and X- mode experience cutoffs. EBW can propagate and be absorbed in such plasmas but its characteristics are strongly dependent on the plasma parameters with important variations in the parallel wave number. If the required temperatures in CFNS are around 35 KeV, then one will may need to revisit the electrostatic approximation and incorporate relativistic effects for EBW rays.

  18. On the current drive capability of low dimensional semiconductors: 1D versus 2D

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhu, Y.; Appenzeller, J.

    2015-10-29

    Low-dimensional electronic systems are at the heart of many scaling approaches currently pursuit for electronic applications. Here, we present a comparative study between an array of one-dimensional (1D) channels and its two-dimensional (2D) counterpart in terms of current drive capability. Lastly, our findings from analytical expressions derived in this article reveal that under certain conditions an array of 1D channels can outperform a 2D field-effect transistor because of the added degree of freedom to adjust the threshold voltage in an array of 1D devices.

  19. Summary and viewgraphs from the Q-121 US/Japan advanced current drive concepts workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Bonoli, P.; Porkolab, M. ); Chan, V.; Pinsker, R.; Politzer, P. ); Darrow, D. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Ehst, D. ); Fukuyama, Atsushi ); Imai, Tsuyoshi; Watari, Tetsuo ); Itoh, Satoshi; Naka

    1990-03-09

    With the emphasis placed on current drive by ITER, which requires steady state operation in its engineering phase, it is important to bring theory and experiment in agreement for each of the schemes that could be used in that design. Both neutral beam and lower hybrid (LH) schemes are in excellent shape in that regard. Since the projected efficiency of all schemes is marginal it is also important to continue our search for more efficient processes. This workshop featured experimental and theoretical work in each processes. This workshop featured experimental and theoretical work in each of these areas, that is, validation of theory and the search for better ideas. There were a number of notable results to report, the most striking again (as with last year) the long pulse operation of TRIAM-1M. A low current was sustained for over 1 hour with LH waves, using new hall-effect sensors in the equilibrium field circuit to maintain position control. In JT-60, by sharpening the wave spectrum the current drive efficiency was improved to 0.34 {times} 10{sup 20}m{sup -2}A/W and 1.5 MA of current was driven entirely by the lower hybrid system. Also in that machine, using two different LH frequencies, the H-mode was entered. Finally, by using the LH system for startup they saved 2.5 resistive volt-sec of flux, which if extrapolated to ITER would save 40 volt-sec there. For the first time, and experiment on ECH current drive showed reasonable agreement with theory. Those experiments are reported here by James (LLNL) on the D3-D machine. Substantially lower ECH current drive than expected theoretically was observed on WT-3, but if differed by being in a low absorption regime. Nonetheless, excellent physics results were achieved in the WT-3 experiments, notably in having careful measurements of the parallel velocity distributions.

  20. Advances in modeling of lower hybrid current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.; Nilsson, E.; Artaud, J.-F.; Ekedahl, A.; Goniche, M.; Hillairet, J.; Ding, B.; Li, M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Shiraiwa, S.; Madi, M.

    2016-04-01

    First principle modeling of the lower hybrid (LH) current drive in tokamak plasmas is a longstanding activity, which is gradually gaining in accuracy thanks to quantitative comparisons with experimental observations. The ability to reproduce simulatenously the plasma current and the non-thermal bremsstrahlung radial profiles in the hard x-ray (HXR) photon energy range represents in this context a significant achievement. Though subject to limitations, ray tracing calculations are commonly used for describing wave propagation in conjunction with Fokker-Planck codes, as it can capture prominent features of the LH wave dynamics in a tokamak plasma-like toroidal refraction. This tool has been validated on several machines when the full absorption of the LH wave requires the transfer of a small fraction of power from the main lobes of the launched power spectrum to a tail at a higher parallel refractive index. Conversely, standard modeling based on toroidal refraction only becomes more challenging when the spectral gap is large, except if other physical mechanisms may dominate to bridge it, like parametric instabilities, as suggested for JET LH discharges (Cesario et al 2004 Phys. Rev. Lett. 92 175002), or fast fluctuations of the launched power spectrum or ‘tail’ LH model, as shown for Tore Supra (Decker et al 2014 Phys. Plasma 21 092504). The applicability of the heuristic ‘tail’ LH model is investigated for a broader range of plasma parameters as compared to the Tore Supra study and with different LH wave characteristics. Discrepancies and agreements between simulations and experiments depending upon the different models used are discussed. The existence of a ‘tail’ in the launched power spectrum significantly improves the agreement between modeling and experiments in plasma conditions for which the spectral gap is large in EAST and Alcator C-Mod tokamaks. For the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, the experimental evolution of the HXR profiles with density suggests

  1. Plasma Heating and Current Drive for Fusion Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtkamp, Norbert

    2010-02-01

    ITER (in Latin ``the way'') is designed to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy. Fusion is the process by which two light atomic nuclei combine to form a heavier one and thus release energy. In the fusion process two isotopes of hydrogen - deuterium and tritium - fuse together to form a helium atom and a neutron. Thus fusion could provide large scale energy production without greenhouse effects; essentially limitless fuel would be available all over the world. The principal goals of ITER are to generate 500 megawatts of fusion power for periods of 300 to 500 seconds with a fusion power multiplication factor, Q, of at least 10. Q >= 10 (input power 50 MW / output power 500 MW). In a Tokamak the definition of the functionalities and requirements for the Plasma Heating and Current Drive are relevant in the determination of the overall plant efficiency, the operation cost of the plant and the plant availability. This paper summarise these functionalities and requirements in perspective of the systems under construction in ITER. It discusses the further steps necessary to meet those requirements. Approximately one half of the total heating will be provided by two Neutral Beam injection systems at with energy of 1 MeV and a beam power of 16 MW into the plasma. For ITER specific test facility is being build in order to develop and test the Neutral Beam injectors. Remote handling maintenance scheme for the NB systems, critical during the nuclear phase of the project, will be developed. In addition the paper will give an overview over the general status of ITER. )

  2. Electron-cyclotron-current-drive experiments in the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    James, R.A. ); Giruzzi, G.; de Gentile, B.; Rodriguez, L. ); Harvey, R.; Lohr, J.; Luce, T.C.; Matsuda, K.; Moeller, C.P.; Prater, R.; Snider, R. ); Fyakhretdinov, A.; Gorelov, Y.; Trukhin, V. ); Janz, S. )

    1992-06-15

    Electron-cyclotron-current-drive (ECCD) experiments performed in the DIII-D tokamak have produced rf-driven currents of up to 100 kA. The experimental results, which exceed predictions using linear theory, are enhanced by the presence of a residual, toroidal dc electric field. These ECCD experiments are performed with plasma conditions sufficient to result in strong localized deposition of the rf power and good confinement of the rf-generated current carriers. These improved conditions permit a test of theory under reactor relevant conditions. Theoretical predictions obtained using a Fokker-Planck code are in good agreement with the experimental results when effects due to electron trapping and the residual dc electric field are included.

  3. First results on fast wave current drive in advanced tokamak discharges in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Prater, R.; Cary, W.P.; Baity, F.W.

    1995-07-01

    Initial experiments have been performed on the DIII-D tokamak on coupling, direct electron heating, and current drive by fast waves in advanced tokamak discharges. These experiments showed efficient central heating and current drive in agreement with theory in magnitude and profile. Extrapolating these results to temperature characteristic of a power plant (25 keV) gives current drive efficiency of about 0.3 MA/m{sup 2}.

  4. Low frequency RF current drive. Final report, January 1, 1988--May 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Hershkowitz, N.

    1999-05-01

    This report starts with a summary of research done on the Phaedrus Tandom Mirror concept and how this research led to the design and construction of the Phaedrus-T Tokamak. Next it gives a more detailed description of the results from the last four years of research, which include the following areas: (1) first experimental demonstration of AWCD (Alfven Wave Current Drive); (2) current drive location and loop voltage response; (3) trapping and current drive efficiency; and (4) reflectometry.

  5. 60 MHz fast wave current drive experiments for DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Mayberry, M.J.; Chiu, S.C.; Porkolab, M.; Chan, V.; Freeman, R.; Harvey, R.; Pinsker, R.

    1989-05-01

    Non-inductive current drive is an essential element of the ITER program because it enhances high fluence nuclear testing during the technology phase of operations. By using fast waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF), current drive efficiencies comparable to lower-hybrid current drive can be obtained with good penetration of wave power to the high temperature plasma core. An additional advantage of the low frequency scheme is its technological simplicity due to the present availability of efficient, multi-megawatt rf sources in the ICRF. The DIII-D facility provides an excellent opportunity to test the feasibility of the low frequency FWCD approach. By combining with high power (2 MW) ECH injection at 60 GHz, it should be possible to generate plasmas with central electron temperatures of T/sub e0/ approx. = 4 keV, and by operating at a reduced toroidal field (B = 1T) to increase the electron ..beta.., strong single-pass absorption (/eta//sub abs/ greater than or equal to 0.3) can be achieved. The availability of a wide port recess (1m toroidal by 0.5m poloidal) will enable a travelling wave spectrum to be launched with N/sub parallel/ approx. = 5--7 at 60 MHz, which should be optimum for strong electron interaction. The resulting current drive efficiency should be sufficiently high to demonstrate FWCD at the /approximately/ 0.25--0.5 MA level at moderate densities (/bar n/ approx. = 1.3 /times/ 10/sup 19/ m/sup /minus/3/) using the existing 2 MW ICRF transmitter. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  6. HHFW Heating and Current Drive Progress on NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, P. M.; Jaeger, E. F.; Wilgen, J. B.; Hosea, J. C.; Wilson, J. R.; Bell, R. E.; Bernabei, S.; Leblanc, B. P.; Phillips, C. K.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Tritz, K.; Sabbagh, S.; Yuh, H.

    2007-11-01

    Operation of NSTX at BT(0) = 0.55 T has increased the core power deposition and heating efficiency of the 30 MHz High Harmonic Fast Waves (HHFW) compared to previous BT(0) <= 0.45 T operation, particularly when launching longer parallel wavelengths. This improvement is attributed in part to moving the onset density at which the fast waves begin to propagate into the plasma to a point further from the wall [1]. At this field strength the HHFW power deposition at k|| = 7 m-1 is comparable to that of k|| = 14 m-1, and core heating at k|| = 3 m-1 is now seen, albeit at lower efficiency. Comparisons with power deposition from full-wave models (AORSA) will be made and MSE measurements of driven current will be presented. [1] see Invited Talk by J. Hosea, this conference.

  7. Angular distribution of the bremsstrahlung emission during lower-hybrid current drive on PLT

    SciTech Connect

    von Goeler, S.; Stevens, J.; Bernabei, S.; Bitter, M.; Chu, T.K.; Efthimion, P.; Fisch, N.; Hooke, W.; Hill, K.; Hosea, J.

    1985-06-01

    The bremsstrahlung emission from the PLT tokamak during lower-hybrid current drive has been measured as a function of angle between the magnetic field and the emission direction. The emission is peaked strongly in the forward direction, indicating a strong anisotropy of the electron-velocity distribution. The data demonstrate the existence of a nearly flat tail of the velocity distribution, which extends out to approximately 500 keV and which is interpreted as the plateau created by Landau damping of the lower-hybrid waves.

  8. Beat wave current drive experiment on the Davis Diverted Tokamak (DDT). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, D.Q.; Horton, R.D.; Rogers, J.H. |

    1993-12-31

    The beatwave current drive experiment is summarized. The first phase of the experiment was the construction of the microwave sources and the diagnostics needed to demonstrate the beat wave effects, i.e. the measurement of the electrostatic plasma wave produced by the beating of two high intensity electromagnetic waves. In order to keep the cost of the experiments to a minimum, a low density filament plasma source (10{sup 8}) to (10{sup 10} particles cm{sup {minus}3}) was employed and the magnetic field in the toroidal plasma was produced by a dc power supply.

  9. Influence of driving frequency on discharge modes in a dielectric-barrier discharge with multiple current pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Weiman; Tang, Jie; Wang, Yishan; Zhao, Wei; Duan, Yixiang

    2013-07-15

    A one-dimensional self-consistent fluid model was employed to investigate the effect of the driving frequency on the discharge modes in atmospheric-pressure argon discharge with multiple current pulses. The discharge mode was discussed in detail not only at current peaks but also between two adjacent peaks. The simulation results show that different transitions between the Townsend and glow modes during the discharge take place with the driving frequency increased. A complicated transition from the Townsend mode, through glow, Townsend, and glow, and finally back to the Townsend one is found in the discharge with the driving frequency of 8 kHz. There is a tendency of transition from the Townsend to glow mode for the discharge both at the current peaks and troughs with the increasing frequency. The discharge in the half period can all along operate in the glow mode with the driving frequency high enough. This is resulted from the preservation of more electrons in the gas gap and acquisition of more electron energy from the swiftly varying electric field with the increase in driving frequency. Comparison of the spatial and temporal evolutions of the electron density at different driving frequencies indicates that the increment of the driving frequency allows the plasma chemistry to be enhanced. This electrical characteristic is important for the applications, such as surface treatment and biomedical sterilization.

  10. Analysis of Wave Fields induced by Offshore Pile Driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhnau, M.; Heitmann, K.; Lippert, T.; Lippert, S.; von Estorff, O.

    2015-12-01

    Impact pile driving is the common technique to install foundations for offshore wind turbines. With each hammer strike the steel pile - often exceeding 6 m in diameter and 80 m in length - radiates energy into the surrounding water and soil, until reaching its targeted penetration depth. Several European authorities introduced limitations regarding hydroacoustic emissions during the construction process to protect marine wildlife. Satisfying these regulations made the development and application of sound mitigation systems (e.g. bubble curtains or insulation screens) inevitable, which are commonly installed within the water column surrounding the pile or even the complete construction site. Last years' advances have led to a point, where the seismic energy tunneling the sound mitigation systems through the soil and radiating back towards the water column gains importance, as it confines the maximum achievable sound mitigation. From an engineering point of view, the challenge of deciding on an effective noise mitigation layout arises, which especially requires a good understanding of the soil-dependent wave field. From a geophysical point of view, the pile acts like a very unique line source, generating a characteristic wave field dominated by inclined wave fronts, diving as well as head waves. Monitoring the seismic arrivals while the pile penetration steadily increases enables to perform quasi-vertical seismic profiling. This work is based on datasets that have been collected within the frame of three comprehensive offshore measurement campaigns during pile driving and demonstrates the potential of seismic arrivals induced by pile driving for further soil characterization.

  11. Advanced Tokamak Regimes in Alcator C-Mod with Lower Hybrid Current Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, R.; Bonoli, P.; Gwinn, D.; Hutchinson, I.; Porkolab, M.; Ramos, J.; Bernabei, S.; Hosea, J.; Wilson, R.

    1999-11-01

    Alcator C-Mod has been proposed as a test-bed for developing advanced tokamak scenarios owing to its strong shaping, relatively long pulse length capability at moderate field, e.g. t ~ L/R at B = 5T and T_eo ~ 7keV, and the availability of strong ICRF heating. We plan to exploit this capability by installing up to 4 MW RF power at 4.6 GHz for efficient off-axis current drive by lower hybrid waves. By launching LH waves with a grill whose n_xx spectrum can be dynamically controlled over the range 2 < n_xx < 3.5, the driven current profile can be modified so that, when combined with bootstrap current in high ɛβ_pol regimes, q_min > 2. Such reversed or nearly zero shear regimes have already been proposed as the basis of an advanced tokamak burning-plasma experiment-ATBX (M. Porkolab et al, IAEA-CN-69/FTP/13, IAEA,Yokohama 1998.), and could provide the basis for a demonstration power reactor. Theoretical and experimental basis for this advanced tokamak research program on C-Mod, including design of the lower hybrid coupler, its spectrum and current drive capabilities will be presented.

  12. Shadows, currents, and AdS fields

    SciTech Connect

    Metsaev, R. R.

    2008-11-15

    Conformal totally symmetric arbitrary spin currents and shadow fields in flat space-time of dimension greater than or equal to four are studied. A gauge invariant formulation for such currents and shadow fields is developed. Gauge symmetries are realized by involving the Stueckelberg fields. A realization of global conformal boost symmetries is obtained. Gauge invariant differential constraints for currents and shadow fields are obtained. AdS/CFT correspondence for currents and shadow fields and the respective normalizable and non-normalizable solutions of massless totally symmetric arbitrary spin AdS fields are studied. The bulk fields are considered in a modified de Donder gauge that leads to decoupled equations of motion. We demonstrate that leftover on shell gauge symmetries of bulk fields correspond to gauge symmetries of boundary currents and shadow fields, while the modified de Donder gauge conditions for bulk fields correspond to differential constraints for boundary conformal currents and shadow fields. Breaking conformal symmetries, we find interrelations between the gauge invariant formulation of the currents and shadow fields, and the gauge invariant formulation of massive fields.

  13. Relationships between the Birkeland currents, ionospheric currents, and electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleuler, E.; Li, C. H.; Nisbet, J. S.

    1982-01-01

    Currents and electric fields in the ionosphere are calculated using a global model of the electron density including conjugate coupling along field lines. Incoherent scatter and rocket measurements of high-latitude electron densities are used to derive realistic variations of the polar conductivities as a function of magnetic activity. The Birkeland currents are specified in terms of three indices, and the relationship between these parameters and the auroral electrojets indices is examined along with the polar cap potential and the electric field at lower latitudes. A mathematical model of the currents, electric fields, and energy inputs produced by field aligned currents is developed, which is consistent with and specifiable in terms of measured geophysical indices.

  14. Driving difficulties among military veterans: clinical needs and current intervention status.

    PubMed

    Possis, Elizabeth; Bui, Thao; Gavian, Margaret; Leskela, Jennie; Linardatos, Effie; Loughlin, Jennifer; Strom, Thad

    2014-06-01

    Military personnel deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan often develop mental health difficulties, which may manifest as problematic driving behavior. Veterans may be more likely to engage in risky driving and to subsequently be involved in motor vehicle accidents and fatalities. This article reviews literature on driving difficulties among military veterans and evaluates available research on the potential pathways that underlie risky driving behavior. Current interventions for problematic driving behaviors are considered, and the necessity of modifying these interventions to address the unique difficulties encountered by military veterans is highlighted. The review concludes with a discussion of clinical implications of these findings and identification of possible avenues for future research and intervention. PMID:24902130

  15. Fast wave current drive in neutral beam heated plasmas on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Petty, C.C.; Forest, C.B.; Pinsker, R.I.

    1997-04-01

    The physics of non-inductive current drive and current profile control using the fast magnetosonic wave has been demonstrated on the DIII-D tokamak. In non-sawtoothing discharges formed by neutral beam injection (NBI), the radial profile of the fast wave current drive (FWCD) was determined by the response of the loop voltage profile to co, counter, and symmetric antenna phasings, and was found to be in good agreement with theoretical models. The application of counter FWCD increased the magnetic shear reversal of the plasma and delayed the onset of sawteeth, compared to co FWCD. The partial absorption of fast waves by energetic beam ions at high harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency was also evident from a build up of fast particle pressure near the magnetic axis and a correlated increase in the neutron rate. The anomalous fast particle pressure and neutron rate increased with increasing NBI power and peaked when a harmonic of the deuterium cyclotron frequency passed through the center of the plasma. The experimental FWCD efficiency was highest at 2 T where the interaction between the fast waves and the beam ions was weakest; as the magnetic field strength was lowered, the FWCD efficiency decreased to approximately half of the maximum theoretical value.

  16. Electron-cyclotron wave propagation, absorption and current drive in the presence of neoclassical tearing modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isliker, Heinz; Chatziantonaki, Ioanna; Tsironis, Christos; Vlahos, Loukas

    2012-09-01

    We analyze the propagation of electron-cyclotron waves, their absorption and current drive when neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs), in the form of magnetic islands, are present in a tokamak plasma. So far, the analysis of the wave propagation and power deposition in the presence of NTMs has been performed mainly in the frame of an axisymmetric magnetic field, ignoring any effects from the island topology. Our analysis starts from an axisymmetric magnetic equilibrium, which is perturbed such as to exhibit magnetic islands. In this geometry, we compute the wave evolution with a ray-tracing code, focusing on the effect of the island topology on the efficiency of the absorption and current drive. To increase the precision in the calculation of the power deposition, the standard analytical flux-surface labeling for the island region has been adjusted from the usual cylindrical to toroidal geometry. The propagation up to the O-point is found to be little affected by the island topology, whereas the power absorbed and the driven current are significantly enhanced, because the resonant particles are bound to the small volumes in between the flux surfaces of the island. The consequences of these effects on the NTM evolution are investigated in terms of the modified Rutherford equation.

  17. ELECTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE IN DIII-D: EXPERIMENT AND THEORY

    SciTech Connect

    PRATER,R; PETTY,CC; LUCE,TC; HARVEY,RW; CHOI,M; LAHAYE,RJ; LIN-LIU,Y-R; LOHR,J; MURAKAMI,M; WADE,MR; WONG,K-L

    2003-07-01

    A271 ELECTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE IN DIII-D: EXPERIMENT AND THEORY. Experiments on the DIII-D tokamak in which the measured off-axis electron cyclotron current drive has been compared systematically to theory over a broad range of parameters have shown that the Fokker-Planck code CQL3D provides an excellent model of the relevant current drive physics. This physics understanding has been critical in optimizing the application of ECCD to high performance discharges, supporting such applications as suppression of neoclassical tearing modes and control and sustainment of the current profile.

  18. Current drive due to localized electron cyclotron power deposition in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R. W.; Lin-Liu, Y. R.; Sauter, O.; Smirnov, A. P.; Luce, T. C.; Prater, R.

    1999-09-20

    Due to spatial localization of electron cyclotron wave injection in DIII-D, electrons heated in an off-axis region must toroidally transit the tokamak 25-50 times before re-entering the heating region. This distance is of the order of the mean free path. The effect of such RF localization is simulated with a time-dependent Fokker-Planck code which is 2D-in-velocity, 1D-in-space-along-B, and periodic in space. An effective parallel electric field arises to maintain continuity of the driven current. Somewhat suprisingly, the localized current drive efficiency remains equal to that for a uniform medium. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  19. Increased confinement and beta by inductive poloidal current drive in the RFP

    SciTech Connect

    Sarff, J.S.; Lanier, N.E.; Prager, S.C.; Stoneking, M.R.

    1996-10-01

    Progress in understanding magnetic-fluctuation-induced transport in the reversed field pinch (RFP) has led to the idea of current profile control to reduce fluctuations and transport. With the addition of inductive poloidal current drive in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST), the magnetic fluctuation amplitude is halved, leading to a four- to five-fold increase in the energy confinement time to {tau}{sub E}{approximately}5 ms as a result of both decreased plasma resistance and increased stored thermal energy. The record low fluctuation amplitude coincides with a record high electron temperature of {approximately}600 eV (for MST), and beta {beta} = 2{mu}{sub 0}

    / B(a){sup 2} increases from 6% to 8% compared with conventional MST RFP plasmas. Other improvements include increased particle confinement and impurity reduction. 19 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Broadband sidebands generated by parametric instability in lower hybrid current drive experiments on EAST

    SciTech Connect

    Amicucci, L. Castaldo, C.; Cesario, R.; Giovannozzi, E.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Ding, B. J.; Li, M. H.

    2015-12-10

    Modern research on nuclear fusion energy, based on the tokamak concept, has strong need of tools for actively driving non-inductive current especially at the periphery of plasma column, where tools available so far have poor efficiency. This is essential for solving one of the most critical problems for thermonuclear reactor, consisting in how to achieve the figure of fusion gain in the context of sufficient stability. The lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) effect has the potential capability of driving current at large radii of reactor plasma with high efficiency [1]. Experiments recently carried out on EAST showed that a strong activity of LH sideband waves (from the RF probe spectra), accompanied by weak core penetration of the coupled LH power, is present when operating at relatively high plasma densities. Previous theoretical results, confirmed by experiments on FTU, showed that the LH sideband phenomenon is produced by parametric instability (PI), which are mitigated by higher plasma edge temperatures. This condition is thus useful for enabling the LH power propagation when operating with profiles having high plasma densities even at the edge. In the present work, we show new PI modeling of EAST plasmas data, obtained in condition of higher plasma edge temperature due to chamber lithisation. The obtained trend of the PI frequencies and growth rates is consistent with data of RF probe spectra, available in different regimes of lithisated and not lithisated vessel. Moreover, these spectra are interpreted as PI effect occurring at the periphery of plasma column, however in the low field side where the LH power is coupled.

  1. Broadband sidebands generated by parametric instability in lower hybrid current drive experiments on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amicucci, L.; Ding, B. J.; Castaldo, C.; Cesario, R.; Giovannozzi, E.; Li, M. H.; Tuccillo, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    Modern research on nuclear fusion energy, based on the tokamak concept, has strong need of tools for actively driving non-inductive current especially at the periphery of plasma column, where tools available so far have poor efficiency. This is essential for solving one of the most critical problems for thermonuclear reactor, consisting in how to achieve the figure of fusion gain in the context of sufficient stability. The lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) effect has the potential capability of driving current at large radii of reactor plasma with high efficiency [1]. Experiments recently carried out on EAST showed that a strong activity of LH sideband waves (from the RF probe spectra), accompanied by weak core penetration of the coupled LH power, is present when operating at relatively high plasma densities. Previous theoretical results, confirmed by experiments on FTU, showed that the LH sideband phenomenon is produced by parametric instability (PI), which are mitigated by higher plasma edge temperatures. This condition is thus useful for enabling the LH power propagation when operating with profiles having high plasma densities even at the edge. In the present work, we show new PI modeling of EAST plasmas data, obtained in condition of higher plasma edge temperature due to chamber lithisation. The obtained trend of the PI frequencies and growth rates is consistent with data of RF probe spectra, available in different regimes of lithisated and not lithisated vessel. Moreover, these spectra are interpreted as PI effect occurring at the periphery of plasma column, however in the low field side where the LH power is coupled.

  2. Temporal behavior of the plasma current distribution in the ASDEX tokamak during lower-hybrid current drive

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, K.; Soeldner, F.X.; Eckhartt, D.; Leuterer, F.; Murmann, H.; Derfler, H.; Eberhagen, A.; Gehre, O.; Gernhardt, J.; Gierke, G.v.; and others

    1987-02-02

    Measurements of the time evolution of the current-density distribution in ASDEX show that lower-hybrid current drive leads to broader profiles, whereby q increases from qapprox. <1 to q>1 in the plasma central region. Simultaneously, the electron temperature is observed to peak, thus demonstrating that the lower-hybrid--driven current distribution is decoupled from the classical conductivity profile.

  3. Novel current drive experiments on the CDX-U, HIT, and DIII-D Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, M.; Forest, C.B.; Hwang, Y.S.; Armstrong, R.J.; Choe, W.; Darrow, D.S.; Greene, G.; Jones, T. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Jarboe, T.R.; Martin, A.; Nelson, B.A.; Orvis, D.; Painter, C.; Zhou, L.; Rogers, J.A. ); Schaffer, M.J.; Hyatt, A.W.; Pinsker, R.I.; Staebler, G.M.; Stambaugh, R.D.; Strait, E.J.; Greene, K.L.; Leuer, J.A.; Lohr, J.

    1992-01-01

    Two types of novel, non-inductive current drive concepts for starting-up and maintaining tokamak discharges have been developed on the CDX-U, HIT, and DIII-D Tokamaks. On CDX-U, a new, non-inductive current drive technique utilizing fully internally generated pressure driven currents has been demonstrated. The measured current density profile shows a non-hollow profile which agrees with a modeling calculation including helicity conserving non-classical current transport providing the seed current''. Another current drive concept, dc-helicity injection, has been investigated on, CDX-U, HIT and DIII-D. This method utilizes injection of magnetic helicity via low energy electron currents, maintaining the plasma current through helicity conserving relaxiation. In these experiments, non-ohmic tokamak plasmas were formed and maintained in the tens of kA range.

  4. Novel current drive experiments on the CDX-U, HIT, and DIII-D Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, M.; Forest, C.B.; Hwang, Y.S.; Armstrong, R.J.; Choe, W.; Darrow, D.S.; Greene, G.; Jones, T.; Jarboe, T.R.; Martin, A.; Nelson, B.A.; Orvis, D.; Painter, C.; Zhou, L.; Rogers, J.A.; Schaffer, M.J.; Hyatt, A.W.; Pinsker, R.I.; Staebler, G.M.; Stambaugh, R.D.; Strait, E.J.; Greene, K.L.; Leuer, J.A.; Lohr, J.M.

    1992-10-01

    Two types of novel, non-inductive current drive concepts for starting-up and maintaining tokamak discharges have been developed on the CDX-U, HIT, and DIII-D Tokamaks. On CDX-U, a new, non-inductive current drive technique utilizing fully internally generated pressure driven currents has been demonstrated. The measured current density profile shows a non-hollow profile which agrees with a modeling calculation including helicity conserving non-classical current transport providing the ``seed current``. Another current drive concept, dc-helicity injection, has been investigated on, CDX-U, HIT and DIII-D. This method utilizes injection of magnetic helicity via low energy electron currents, maintaining the plasma current through helicity conserving relaxiation. In these experiments, non-ohmic tokamak plasmas were formed and maintained in the tens of kA range.

  5. Lower hybrid current drive in the PLT tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Bernabei, S.; Daughney, C.; Efthimion, P.

    1982-07-01

    Order of magnitude improvements in the level and duration of current driven by lower hybrid waves have been achieved in the PLT tokamak. Steady currents up to 175 kA have been maintained for three seconds and 400 kA for 0.3 sec by the rf power alone. The principal current carrier appears to be a high energy (approx. 100 keV) electron component, concentrated in the central 20 to 40 cm diameter core of the 80 cm PLT discharge.

  6. The underwater sound field from vibratory pile driving.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Peter H; Dall'Osto, David R; Farrell, Dara M

    2015-06-01

    Underwater noise from vibratory pile driving was observed using a vertical line array placed at range 16 m from the pile source (water depth 7.5 m), and using single hydrophones at range 417 m on one transect, and range 207 and 436 m on another transect running approximately parallel to a sloping shoreline. The dominant spectral features of the underwater noise are related to the frequency of the vibratory pile driving hammer (typically 15-35 Hz), producing spectral lines at intervals of this frequency. The mean-square pressure versus depth is subsequently studied in third-octave bands. Depth and frequency variations of this quantity observed at the vertical line array are well modeled by a field consisting of an incoherent sum of sources distributed over the water column. Adiabatic mode theory is used to propagate this field to greater ranges and model the observations made along the two depth-varying transects. The effect of shear in the seabed, although small, is also included. Bathymetric refraction on the transect parallel to the shoreline reduced mean-square pressure levels at the 436-m measurement site. PMID:26093441

  7. Plasma Heating and Current Drive by Stochastic Acceleration of Relativistic Electrons at the WEGA Stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laqua, Heinrich; Chlechowitz, Enrico; Fuchs, Vladimir; Otte, Matthias; Stange, Torsten

    2013-10-01

    Relativistic electrons with parallel energies of up to 2 MeV have been continuously (10 s) generated by a stochastic interaction with the rf-field (6-26kW) of a 2.45 GHz open waveguide antenna without any loop voltage. These ``run-away'' electrons have been detected by their synchrotron, x- and γ-ray emission and have also generated a toroidal plasma current in the kA range. They are perfectly confined in the stellarator magnetic field of 0.5 T. The particle trajectories form their own nested drift surfaces which are shrunken inward and shifted outward with respect to the magnetic flux surfaces. This geometrical effect connects the antenna region, where the electrons are accelerated, with the plasma core, where a low temperature (20eV, 0.2-5 1018m3) bulk plasma is generated. The acceleration process was modelled by a random walk diffusion model and a Fermi Ulan map Monte-Carlo simulation. Both calculations show similar results for the heating and current drive efficiencies. They also reproduce the temporal behaviour of the plasma current and the synchrotron radiation, when the RF-power is modulated and show the need for a random phase interaction between the relativistic electrons and the antenna field.

  8. Electromagnetic currents induced by color fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanji, Naoto

    2015-12-01

    The quark production in classical color fields is investigated with a focus on the induction of an electromagnetic current by produced quarks. We show that the color SU(2) and the SU(3) theories lead significantly different results for the electromagnetic current. In uniform SU(2) color fields, the net electromagnetic current is not generated, while in SU(3) color fields the net current is induced depending on the color direction of background fields. Also the numerical study of the quark production in inhomogeneous color fields is done. Motivated by gauge field configurations provided by the color glass condensate framework, we introduce an ensemble of randomly distributed color electric fluxtubes. The spectrum of photons emitted from the quarks by a classical process is shown.

  9. Bearing currents and their relationship to PWM drives

    SciTech Connect

    Busse, D.; Erdman, J.; Kerkman, J.; Schlegel, D.; Skibinski, G.

    1997-03-01

    This paper examines ac motor shaft voltages and the resulting bearing currents when operated under pulse width modulation (PWM) voltage source inverters. The paper reviews the mechanical and electrical characteristics of the bearings and motor in relation to shaft voltages and bearing currents. A brief review of previous work is addressed, including the system model and experimental results. The theory of electric discharge machining (EDM) is presented, including component calculations of the system elements. The effect of system elements on shaft voltages and bearing currents are evaluated experimentally and the results compared to theory. A design calculation is proposed that provides the relative potential for EDM. Finally, the paper will present quantitative results on one solution to the shaft voltage and bearing current problem.

  10. Field-aligned currents and large scale magnetospheric electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dangelo, N.

    1980-01-01

    D'Angelo's model of polar cap electric fields (1977) was used to visualize how high-latitude field-aligned currents are driven by the solar wind generator. The region 1 and region 2 currents of Iijima and Potemra (1976) and the cusp field-aligned currents of Wilhjelm et al. (1978) and McDiarmid et al. (1978) are apparently driven by different generators, although in both cases the solar wind is their ultimate source.

  11. Transient analysis of electromagnets with emphasis on solid components, eddy currents, and driving circuitry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batdorff, Mark A.

    Valves are commonly used in fluid power systems to control pressure and flow. The emerging field of digital hydraulics demands high-speed, low cost, on/off valves with improved performance. Electromagnets, or solenoids, are commonly used to actuate valves due to their low cost, high reliability, and moderate performance. This work develops a dynamic model for a solid steel electromagnet that can be used for design and optimization, and unveils design tradeoffs with geometry and driving circuitry that are often overlooked. This work develops an accurate, computationally efficient, nonlinear, coupled, dynamic, axisymmetric, high fidelity magnetic equivalent circuit (HFMEC) electromagnet model capable of predicting force, inductance, dynamic response, and energy consumption. The model is intended for applications where both accuracy and solution time are critical. Axisymmetric magnetic fringing and leakage permeances were derived in order to capture nonlinear magnetic field phenomena that affect force and inductance. The tradeoffs between solid-center and hollow-center electromagnets were investigated. It was shown with both simulation and measurement that a hollow-center electromagnet has a 37.7% shorter useful stroke due to increased magnetic fringing and leakage (from 4.0mm to 2.5mm). However, it was also shown that the hollow-center electromagnet has a 70% improved turn-off response (from 617ms to 362ms). A single objective optimization study was performed demonstrating that hollow-center electromagnets are advantageous and can up to 204% increased dynamic response for systems where dynamics are dominated by eddy current lag. Electromagnets experience dynamic lag when turning on and off due to inductance and eddy currents. Coil driving methods, such as peak-and-hold, are often used to minimize turn-on lag by using high initial voltages and currents. However, circuits often do not address turn-off lag, which can be significant. This work investigates the effects of

  12. Direct-current-like Phase Space Manipulation Using Chirped Alternating Current Fields

    SciTech Connect

    P.F. Schmit and N.J. Fisch

    2010-02-01

    Waves in plasmas can accelerate particles that are resonant with the wave. A dc electric field also accelerates particles, but without a resonance discrimination, which makes the acceleration mechanism profoundly different. Whereas wave-particle acceleration mechanisms have been widely discussed in the literature, this work discusses the direct analogy between wave acceleration and dc field acceleration in a particular parameter regime explored in previous works. Apart from the academic interest of this correspondence, there may be practical advantages in using waves to mimic dc electric fields, for example, in driving plasma current with high efficiency.

  13. Conserved currents of double field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, Chris D. A.

    2016-04-01

    We find the conserved current associated to invariance under generalised diffeomorphisms in double field theory. This can be used to define a generalised Komar integral. We comment on its applications to solutions, in particular to the fundamental string/pp-wave. We also discuss the current in the context of Scherk-Schwarz compactifications. We calculate the current for both the original double field theory action, corresponding to the NSNS sector alone, and for the RR sector.

  14. Modeling of Trapped Electron Effects on Electron Cyclotron Current Drive for Recent DIII-D Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Sauter, O.; Harvey, R.W.; Chan, V.S.; Luce, T.C.; Prater, R.

    1999-08-01

    Owing to its potential capability of generating localized non-inductive current, especially off-axis, Electron Cyclotron Current Drive (ECCD) is considered a leading candidate for current profile control in achieving Advanced Tokamak (AT) operation. In recent DIII-D proof-of-principle experiments [1], localized off-axis ECCD has been clearly demonstrated for first time. The measured current drive efficiency near the magnetic axis agrees well with predictions of the bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck theory [2,3]. However, the off-axis current drive efficiency was observed to exceed the theoretical results, which predict significant degradation of the current drive efficiency due to trapped electron effects. The theoretical calculations have been based on an assumption that the effective collision frequency is much smaller than the bounce frequency such that the trapped electrons are allowed to complete the banana orbit at all energies. The assumption might be justified in reactor-grade tokamak plasmas, in which the electron temperature is sufficiently high or the velocity of resonant electrons is much larger than the thermal velocity, so that the influence of collisionality on current drive efficiency can be neglected. For off-axis deposition in the present-day experiments, the effect of high density and low temperature is to reduce the current drive efficiency, but the increasing collisionality reduces the trapping of current-carrying electrons, leading to compensating increases in the current drive efficiency. In this work, we use the adjoint function formulation [4] to examine collisionality effects on the current drive efficiency.

  15. Review of the experimental papers at the IAEA conference on noninductive current drive, Culham, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Motley, R.W.

    1983-10-01

    Three types of noninductive current drive experiments have been reported at this conference: (1) neutral beam (2) rf current drive, and (3) relativistic electron beams (REB). If we compare the effort to develop current drive to a horse race, the neutral beam horse was first out of the gates, but it quickly found greener pastures (heating) and has dropped temporarily out of the race. The lower hybrid horse now has a big lead at the first furlong (200 m), but the bulk of the race remains to be run. The fast wave and REB horses have yet to get up speed.

  16. Overview of Recent Results on Heating and Current Drive in the JET tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Mayoral, M.-L.; Baranov, Yu.; Blackman, T.; Graham, M.; Jacquet, Ph.; Kiptily, V.; Kirov, K.; Mailloux, J.; Monakhov, I.; Nightingale, M.; Whitehurst, A.; Wooldridge, E.; Argouarch, A.; Colas, L.

    2009-11-26

    In this paper, significant results in the heating and current drive domains obtained at JET in the past few years following systems upgrade and dedicated experimental time, will be reviewed. Firstly, an overview of the new Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) heating capabilities will be presented i.e. results from the ITER-Like ICRF antenna (ILA), the use of External Conjugate-T and 3dB hybrid couplers to increase the ICRF power during ELMy H-mode. Furthermore, experiments to study the influence of the phasing of the ICRF antenna on power absorption and coupling will be described. Looking at Low Hybrid (LH) issues for ITER, the effect of the location of gas injection on the LH coupling improvement at large launcher-separatrix distances will be discussed as the possibility to operate at ITER-relevant power densities. Experiments to characterise the LH power losses in the Scrape-Off-Layer (SOL) and to determine the LH wave absorption and current drive using power modulation will be shown. Finally, plasma rotation studies in the presence of ICRF heating with standard and enhanced JET toroidal field ripple will be presented.

  17. Simulations of fast-wave current drive in pulsed and steady-state DEMO designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilato, R.; Brambilla, M.; Fable, E.

    2014-11-01

    Electromagnetic waves in the ion-cyclotron (IC) range of frequencies are presently investigated as possible current drive (CD) systems in fusion reactors. Among many physical and technical issues, an accurate description of radio-frequency (RF) power absorption by fusion- born alpha particles is of special importance, since RF heating of these particles is not only detrimental for the CD efficiency, but might worsen the operative conditions by increasing their prompt losses. The capability of the full-wave TORIC code has been recently augmented to account for RF absorption by fusion-born alpha particles, calculated to all-orders in finite Larmor radius and with a realistic distribution function. Here, we present simulation with TORIC addressing the sensitivity of current drive efficiency on the design of a future reactor, in particular density and temperature profiles, magnetic field intensity, and plasma dimensions. For this purpose, we have investigated possible frequency windows for CD for two proposed versions of the DEMO reactor, namely its pulsed and its more ambitious steady-state design. The important role of the antenna for a realistic estimate of the CD efficiency is pointed out.

  18. The Plasma Physics Processes that Drive Ring Current Enhancements during Geomagnetic Storms and Substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cash, Michele Diane

    Geomagnetic storms result when energetic particles of solar and ionospheric origin fill Earth's inner magnetosphere and create a strong westward current, known as the ring current. This dissertation presents results from investigating the plasma dynamics that contribute to the development of Earth's ring current from ionospheric outflow of H+ and O+ ions, and the role of ring current enhancements in the generation of geomagnetic storms and substorms. Modeling was carried via a combined multifluid and particle approach, which enables us to resolve the small-scale dynamics that are key to particle energization within the context of the global magnetosphere. The results presented in this dissertation substantially contribute to our understanding of the development and composition of the ring current during geomagnetic storms and substorms, and offer insight into the ionospheric sources regions for ring current ions, as well as the processes through which these particles are energized, injected, and trapped within the inner magnetosphere. This thesis presents results that show how small-scale particle dynamics within the current sheet, boundary layers, and reconnection regions drive the acceleration of ring current particles within the larger global context of the magnetosphere. Small-scale structures within the magnetotail are shown to be more important in determining when particles are accelerated than the time after particles are initialized in the ionosphere. It is also found that after a period of southward IMF, in which particle energization is observed, a northerly turning of the IMF is necessary in order to trap energetic particles in orbit around the Earth and form a symmetric ring current. Asymmetries in the acceleration mechanisms between ionospheric H+ and O + ions were observed with oxygen ions convecting duskward according to the cross-tail current and gaining more energy than protons, which moved earthward on reconnecting field lines and were accelerated

  19. Current-Produced Magnetic Field Effects on Current Collection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, George V.; Stone, N. H.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Current collection by an infinitely long, conducting cylinder in a magnetized plasma, taking into account the magnetic field of the collected current, is discussed. A region of closed magnetic surfaces disconnects the cylinder from infinity. Due to this, the collected current depends on the ratio between this region and the plasma sheath region and, under some conditions, current reduction arises. The current collection along a realistic "bare wire" space tether is considered. A number of factors are taken into account, including the resistance of the wire and shielding resulting from the current-induced magnetic field produced by current flow in the tether. The plasma density, tether length and radius, the geomagnetic field strength and angle to the orbital velocity vector were all used as parameters in the study. It is shown that magnetic shielding for certain tether system configurations, when combined with particular values of the governing parameters, significantly reduces the collected current. Specifically, it is shown that an electrodynamic tether in the "thruster" mode suffers greater reduction from magnetic shielding than a tether with the same characteristics deployed in the "generator" mode. We find that, for both modes, current-induced magnetic shielding becomes more significant as plasma density and wire radius increase. The same is true for the dependence on the angle of the geomagnetic field to the orbital velocity vector and the motion-induced electric field for the generator mode For the thruster mode, the effect is larger for smaller angles. In both operating modes, the shielding is more important for smaller angles between the tether and magnetic field. In addition to the above dependencies, the effect for the thruster mode essentially depends on the tether length. In general, any parametric change that increases tether current, relative to the strength of the electric field between the tether and the ambient plasma, will increase the shielding

  20. MHD Modeling in Complex 3D Geometries: Towards Predictive Simulation of SIHI Current Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Christopher James

    The HIT-SI experiment studies Steady Inductive Helicity Injection (SIHI) for the purpose of forming and sustaining a spheromak plasma. A spheromak is formed in a nearly axisymmetric flux conserver, with a bow tie cross section, by means of two semi-toroidal injectors. The plasma-facing surfaces of the device, which are made of copper for its low resistivity, are covered in an insulating coating in order to operate in a purely inductive manner. Following formation, the spheromak flux and current are increased during a quiescent period marked by a decrease in the global mode activity. A proposed mechanism, Imposed Dynamo Current Drive (IDCD), is expected to be responsible for this phase of quiescent current drive. Due to the geometric complexity of the experiment, previous numerical modeling efforts have used a simplified geometry that excludes the injector volumes from the simulated domain. The effect of helicity injection is then modeled by boundary conditions on this reduced plasma volume. The work presented here has explored and developed more complete computational models of the HIT-SI device. This work is separated into 3 distinct but complementary areas: 1) Development of a 3D MHD equilibrium code that can incorporate the non-axisymmetric injector fields present in HIT-SI and investigation of equilibria of interest during spheromak sustainment. 2) A 2D axisymmetric MHD equilibrium code that was used to explore reduced order models for mean-field evolution using equations derived from IDCD theory including coupling to 3D equilibria. 3) A 3D time-dependent non-linear MHD code that is capable of modeling the entire plasma volume including dynamics within the injectors. Although HIT-SI was the motivation for, and experiment studied in this research, the tools and methods developed are general --- allowing their application to a broad range of magnetic confinement experiments. These tools constitute a significant advance for modeling plasma dynamics in devices with

  1. Current drive with the second ECR harmonic on T-10

    SciTech Connect

    Alikaev, V.V.; Bagdasarov, A.A.; Borshegovskij, A.A.; Dremin, M.M.; Esipchuk, Y.V.; Gorelov, Y.A.; Ivanov, N.V.; Kislov, A.Y.; Kuznetsova, L.K.; Notkin, G.E.; Pavlov, Y.D.; Razumova, K.A.; Roy, I.N.; Vasin, N.L.; Vershkov, V.A. , Moscow ); Forest, C.B.; Lohr, J.; Luce, T.C.; Harvey, R.W. ); The T-10 Team

    1994-10-15

    The experiments on ECCD on the second harmonic were done. Current about 35 kA was generated. The efficiency of ECCD and its dependencies on plasma parameters were measured. Not all observed phenomena may be explained by the predictions of linear theory.

  2. Field and Current Amplification in the SSPX Spheromak

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, D N; Blumer, R H; Cohen, B I; Hooper, E B; McLean, H S; Moller, J; Pearlstein, L D; Ryutov, D D; Stallard, B W; Wood, R D; Woodruff, S; Holcomb, C T; Jarboe, T; Bellan, P; Romero-Talamas, C

    2002-10-08

    Results are presented from experiments relating to magnetic field generation and current amplification in the SSPX spheromak. The SSPX spheromak plasma is driven by DC coaxial helicity injection using a 2MJ capacitor bank. Peak toroidal plasma currents of up to 0.7MA and peak edge poloidal fields of 0.3T are produced; lower current discharges can be sustained up to 3.5msec. When edge magnetic fluctuations are reduced below 1% by driving the plasma near threshold, it is possible to produce plasmas with Te > 150eV, <{beta}{sub e}>-4% and core {chi}{sub e} {approx} 30m{sup 2}/s. Helicity balance for these plasmas suggests that sheath dissipation can be significant, pointing to the importance of maximizing the voltage on the coaxial injector. For most operational modes we find a stiff relationship between peak spheromak field and injector current, and little correlation with plasma temperature, which suggests that other processes than ohmic dissipation may limit field amplification. However, slowing spheromak buildup by limiting the initial current pulse increases the ratio of toroidal current to injected current and points to new operating regimes with more favorable current amplification.

  3. Full-wave calculation of fast-wave current drive in tokamaks including k sub parallel variations

    SciTech Connect

    Jaeger, E.F; Batchelor, D.B.

    1991-01-01

    When fast waves propagate inward from the edge of a tokamak toward the plasma center, the k{perpendicular} spectrum produced by the antenna is not maintained but is shifted and deformed due to the presence of the finite poloidal magnetic field. This k{perpendicular} shift causes a variation in the parallel phase speed of the wave and can therefore have a strong effect on electron damping and current drive efficiency. In this paper, we include this effect in a new full-wave calculation (PICES) which represents the wave fields as a superposition of poloidal modes, thereby reducing k{perpendicular} to an algebraic operator. The wave equation is solved in general flux coordinates, including a full (non-perturbative) solution for E{perpendicular} and a reduced-order dielectric formulation to eliminate short-wavelength ion Bernstein modes. A simplified current drive model which includes particle trapping is used to estimate the effect of the k{perpendicular} shift on current drive efficiency in ITER and D3-D. Results suggest that when single-pass absorption is weak, reflected power may drive current nearly as efficiently as that absorbed on the first pass. 15 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Driving mechanism for plunger pumps in oil field installations

    SciTech Connect

    Gazarov, R.E.; Zaslavskii, Yu.V.

    1995-07-01

    Mobile oil field pumping installations of up to 1600 kW power at a pressure up to 140 MPa are widely used in hydraulic fracturing of beds, acid treatment of the near-face zone, cementation of wells, and other flushing and pressure operations. Equipment in these installations, which include high-pressure plunger pumps of high unit capacity, are mounted on mobile bases of limited lifting capacity (KrAZ automobile chassis, T-130 tractors, etc.). Very strict demands are made on the reliability, durability, and mass/size characteristics of the pumps and on all the equipment of the mobile installations. In modern pumps, an axial load of up to 100 tons or more, which is transmitted to the crankshaft, acts on each plunger. The engine of the installation rotates the crankshaft through a multiple-speed transmission and the transmission shaft of the pump. The forces acting on the elements of the driving part of a pump with a connecting rod - crank drive and a single-reduction tooth gear are described.

  5. Isotopic effect in experiments on lower hybrid current drive in the FT-2 tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Lashkul, S. I. Altukhov, A. B.; Gurchenko, A. D. Gusakov, E. Z.; D’yachenko, V. V.; Esipov, L. A.; Irzak, M. A. Kantor, M. Yu.; Kouprienko, D. V.; Saveliev, A. N.; Stepanov, A. Yu.; Shatalin, S. V.

    2015-12-15

    To analyze factors influencing the limiting value of the plasma density at which lower hybrid (LH) current drive terminates, the isotopic factor (the difference in the LH resonance densities in hydrogen and deuterium plasmas) was used for the first time in experiments carried out at the FT-2 tokamak. It is experimentally found that the efficiency of LH current drive in deuterium plasma is appreciably higher than that in hydrogen plasma. The significant role of the parametric decay of the LH pumping wave, which hampers the use of the LH range of RF waves for current drive at high plasma densities, is confirmed. It is demonstrated that the parameters characterizing LH current drive agree well with the earlier results obtained at large tokamaks.

  6. Heating and current drive on NSTX and HHFW experiments on CDX-U

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.R.; Hosea, J.; Grisham, L.

    1998-07-01

    The NSTX (National Spherical Torus Experiment) device to be built at Princeton is a low-aspect-ratio toroidal device that has the achievement of high toroidal beta ({approximately} 45%) and noninductive operation as two of its main research goals. To achieve these goals, significant auxiliary-heating and current-drive systems are required. Present plans include ECH (electron cyclotron heating) for preionized and start-up assist, HHFW (high harmonic fast wave) for heating and current drive, and, eventually, NBI (neutral-beam injection) for heating, current drive and plasma rotation. In support of the NSTX program, experimental tests of HHFW physics have been performed on the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U).

  7. Coupling of α-channeling to |k∥| upshift in lower hybrid current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Ochs, I. E.; Bertelli, N.; Fisch, N. J.

    2014-08-26

    Although lower hybrid waves have been shown to be effective in driving plasma current in present-day tokamaks, they are predicted to strongly interact with the energetic α particles born from fusion reactions in eventual tokamak reactors.

  8. HEATING AND CURRENT DRIVE IN NSTX WITH ELECTRON BERNSTEIN WAVES AND HIGH HARMONIC FAST WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Ram, Abhay K

    2010-06-14

    A suitable theoretical and computational framework for studying heating and current drive by electron Bernstein waves in the National Spherical Torus Experiment has been developed. This framework can also be used to study heating and current drive by electron Bernstein waves in spherical tori and other magnetic confinement devices. It is also useful in studying the propagation and damping of electron cyclotron waves in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

  9. A theory for LH heating and current drive experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Canobbio, E.; Croci, R.

    1985-07-01

    The relevant nonlinear partial differential equation for the amplitude E of a LH wave in a uniform plasma half-space is solved for E's which exclude solitary wave formation. The original k-spectrum of the field of a resonance cone is found to decay substantially as a result of a secular (in space) effect. This is instrumental in solving the spectral gap problem. Also, even for smooth E-profiles at the plasma boundary, there is a surface of discontinuity of grad E (wave breaking). The minimum distance of such a surface from the plasma boundary is a measure of the maximum penetration depth of a LH pump.

  10. Control of plasma profiles and stability through localised Electron Cyclotron Current Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkulov, Oleksiy

    2006-06-01

    The work presented in this thesis addresses several topics from the physics of the magnetically confined plasma inside a tokamak. At the moment, the tokamak is the most successful concept for becoming a future thermonuclear reactor. However, there are plenty of physics and engineering problems to surpass before the prototype can become an economically and environmentally feasible device. The plasma in the tokamak experiences periodic oscillations of the central temperature and density when the safety factor, q, drops below unity on-axis. These oscillations are called the sawtooth instability and are the subject of the first part of this thesis. The sawtooth oscillations are characterised by the relatively slow rise phase, when the central temperature increases, and a following crash phase, when the central temperature drops. The energy, particles and plasma current are redistributed during the sawtooth crash. Obviously, this leads to a confinement degradation and moreover, the sawtooth instability can trigger potentially other more dangerous instabilities, such as a neoclassical tearing mode. The sawtooth period control is realised on the basis of the sawtooth trigger model, derived by Porcelli. The main idea of this model is that the sawtooth crash is triggered when the magnetic shear at the q=1 surface, s1, reaches a critical value which depends on the local plasma parameters. The magnetic shear, s, is a measure for the rate of change in the direction of the field line as a function of the position in the plasma. The sawtooth period can be changed by affecting the evolution of s1. The effects of the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) on the shear evolution are studied with a simple model for the poloidal field evolution. The results of the model are summarised in a form of a criterion for the amount of the non-inductive current drive required for sawtooth period control. The effects of the ECCD have been studied in the TEXTOR tokamak in order to confirm the

  11. Integrated modelling of steady-state scenarios and heating and current drive mixes for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Masanori; Park, Jin Myung

    2011-01-01

    Recent progress on ITER steady-state (SS) scenario modelling by the ITPA-IOS group is reviewed. Code-to-code benchmarks as the IOS group's common activities for the two SS scenarios (weak shear scenario and internal transport barrier scenario) are discussed in terms of transport, kinetic profiles, and heating and current drive (CD) sources using various transport codes. Weak magnetic shear scenarios integrate the plasma core and edge by combining a theory-based transport model (GLF23) with scaled experimental boundary profiles. The edge profiles (at normalized radius rho = 0.8-1.0) are adopted from an edge-localized mode-averaged analysis of a DIII-D ITER demonstration discharge. A fully noninductive SS scenario is achieved with fusion gain Q = 4.3, noninductive fraction f(NI) = 100%, bootstrap current fraction f(BS) = 63% and normalized beta beta(N) = 2.7 at plasma current I(p) = 8MA and toroidal field B(T) = 5.3 T using ITER day-1 heating and CD capability. Substantial uncertainties come from outside the radius of setting the boundary conditions (rho = 0.8). The present simulation assumed that beta(N)(rho) at the top of the pedestal (rho = 0.91) is about 25% above the peeling-ballooning threshold. ITER will have a challenge to achieve the boundary, considering different operating conditions (T(e)/T(i) approximate to 1 and density peaking). Overall, the experimentally scaled edge is an optimistic side of the prediction. A number of SS scenarios with different heating and CD mixes in a wide range of conditions were explored by exploiting the weak-shear steady-state solution procedure with the GLF23 transport model and the scaled experimental edge. The results are also presented in the operation space for DT neutron power versus stationary burn pulse duration with assumed poloidal flux availability at the beginning of stationary burn, indicating that the long pulse operation goal (3000s) at I(p) = 9 MA is possible. Source calculations in these simulations have been

  12. The Driving Magnetic Field and Reconnection in CME/Flare Eruptions and Coronal Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.

    2010-01-01

    Signatures of reconnection in major CME (coronal mass ejection)/flare eruptions and in coronal X-ray jets are illustrated and interpreted. The signatures are magnetic field lines and their feet that brighten in flare emission. CME/flare eruptions are magnetic explosions in which: 1. The field that erupts is initially a closed arcade. 2. At eruption onset, most of the free magnetic energy to be released is not stored in field bracketing a current sheet, but in sheared field in the core of the arcade. 3. The sheared core field erupts by a process that from its start or soon after involves fast "tether-cutting" reconnection at an initially small current sheet low in the sheared core field. If the arcade has oppositely-directed field over it, the eruption process from its start or soon after also involves fast "breakout" reconnection at an initially small current sheet between the arcade and the overarching field. These aspects are shown by the small area of the bright field lines and foot-point flare ribbons in the onset of the eruption. 4. At either small current sheet, the fast reconnection progressively unleashes the erupting core field to erupt with progressively greater force. In turn, the erupting core field drives the current sheet to become progressively larger and to undergo progressively greater fast reconnection in the explosive phase of the eruption, and the flare arcade and ribbons grow to become comparable to the pre-eruption arcade in lateral extent. In coronal X-ray jets: 1. The magnetic energy released in the jet is built up by the emergence of a magnetic arcade into surrounding unipolar "open" field. 2. A simple jet is produced when a burst of reconnection occurs at the current sheet between the arcade and the open field. This produces a bright reconnection jet and a bright reconnection arcade that are both much smaller in diameter that the driving arcade. 3. A more complex jet is produced when the arcade has a sheared core field and undergoes an

  13. Current Research Activities in Drive System Technology in Support of the NASA Rotorcraft Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Zakrajsek, James J.

    2006-01-01

    Drive system technology is a key area for improving rotorcraft performance, noise/vibration reduction, and reducing operational and manufacturing costs. An overview of current research areas that support the NASA Rotorcraft Program will be provided. Work in drive system technology is mainly focused within three research areas: advanced components, thermal behavior/emergency lubrication system operation, and diagnostics/prognostics (also known as Health and Usage Monitoring Systems (HUMS)). Current research activities in each of these activities will be presented. Also, an overview of the conceptual drive system requirements and possible arrangements for the Heavy Lift Rotorcraft program will be reviewed.

  14. Electric field induced spin-polarized current

    DOEpatents

    Murakami, Shuichi; Nagaosa, Naoto; Zhang, Shoucheng

    2006-05-02

    A device and a method for generating an electric-field-induced spin current are disclosed. A highly spin-polarized electric current is generated using a semiconductor structure and an applied electric field across the semiconductor structure. The semiconductor structure can be a hole-doped semiconductor having finite or zero bandgap or an undoped semiconductor of zero bandgap. In one embodiment, a device for injecting spin-polarized current into a current output terminal includes a semiconductor structure including first and second electrodes, along a first axis, receiving an applied electric field and a third electrode, along a direction perpendicular to the first axis, providing the spin-polarized current. The semiconductor structure includes a semiconductor material whose spin orbit coupling energy is greater than room temperature (300 Kelvin) times the Boltzmann constant. In one embodiment, the semiconductor structure is a hole-doped semiconductor structure, such as a p-type GaAs semiconductor layer.

  15. Changing Chilean coastal currents could drive aquatic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2012-01-01

    For invertebrate and fish species that spend most of their lives in rich coastal waters rather than migrating freely throughout the open ocean, the formation of island populations and the associated risk of genetic diversity loss are threats to long-term population health. Many species cope through a spawning mechanism whereby larvae are released en masse into near-shore ocean currents, like pollen adrift in the wind. The larvae are viable in open waters from days to months, but only those that find their way back to shore can settle and develop. To increase their chances, different species' larvae often use particular swimming behaviors, for example, varying their depth in the water column throughout the day.

  16. Intervening to decrease the probability of alcohol-impaired driving: Impact of novel field sobriety tests.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ryan C; Robinson, Zechariah; Bazdar, Alexandra; Geller, E Scott

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of novel field sobriety tests to predict breath alcohol content (BAC) and perceptions of driving risk was evaluated. Participants (N = 210) were passersby at two downtown locations near local bars and one on-campus location near a late-night dining facility between the hours of 10:00 p.m. and 2:00 a.m. Participants gave ratings of their perceived risk to drive at their current level of intoxication, then completed three sobriety tests (a hand-pat, tracing test, and Romberg test), and finally provided new ratings of their perceived risk to drive. After completing the final set of questions, participants were administered a Lifeloc FC20 breath alcohol test (±.005 g/dL). Each of the sobriety tests performed better than chance at predicting participant intoxication, but the performance feedback did not enhance awareness of one's risk to drive at a given BAC. Actually, after the sobriety tests, Greek-life females perceived themselves to be less at-risk to drive. PMID:27309028

  17. Dayside Pi 2 Pulsations Associated with Ionospheric Currents Produced By Oscillating Nightside Field-Aligned Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imajo, S.; Yoshikawa, A.; Uozumi, T.; Ohtani, S.; Nakamizo, A.; Yumoto, K.

    2014-12-01

    Pi 2 pulsations are defined as transient dumping oscillations of geomagnetic fields with period between 40 and 150 sec. The source (or energy source) of Pi 2s is believed to be located in the magnetotail because they mainly occur accompanied with onset of nightside auroral intensifications. Pi 2 pulsations are even observed on the day side ground, which means they can propagate to the dayside region from the nightside region. The latitudinal profiles of amplitude and phase difference of dayside H-component Pi 2s supported that electric fields from high-latitude region penetrate equatorward, and then drives the zonal ionospheric current enhanced at the dayside equator due to the Cowling effect. However, it is unclear how the dayside zonal ionospheric current are connected with the source electric field to ensure current continuity. In this study, we investigated the distribution of equivalent ionospheric currents associated with Pi 2 fluctuations on the day side using magnetic data from globally distributed ground-based stations. The equivalent current vectors were determined by rotating the filtered horizontal magnetic field vector by an angle of 90 degrees clockwise. Oscillating equivalent currents flowed equatorward (poleward) in the prenoon sector and poleward (equatorward) in the postnoon sector. Around the noon, the equivalent current flows in the zonal direction. The meridional component of equivalent currents in the prenoon sector is larger than in the postnoon sector and configuration of currents appears to be asymmetric. We also numerically estimated the distribution of ionospheric currents produced by the SCW-like pair of FACs around the midnight. The distribution of the simulated ionospheric current is consistent with that of equivalent currents derived from observed magnetic fields. We conclude that the oscillating ionospheric current system driven by nightside FAC oscillations is the dominant source of dayside Pi 2 pulsations.

  18. Noninductive current drive experiments on DIII-D, and future plans

    SciTech Connect

    Prater, R.; Austin, M.E.; Baity, F.W.

    1994-02-01

    Experiments on DIII-D (and other tokamaks) have shown that improved performance can follow from optimization of the current density profile. Increased confinement of energy and a higher limit on beta have both been found in discharges in which the current density profile is modified through transient means, such as ramping of current or elongation. Peaking of the current distribution to obtain discharges with high internal inductance {ell}{sub i} has been found to be beneficial. Alternatively, discharges with broader profiles, as in the VH-mode or with high beta poloidal, have shown improved performance. Noninductive current drive is a means to access these modes of improved confinement on a steady state basis. Accordingly, experiments on noninductive current drive are underway on the DIII-D tokamak using fast waves, electron cyclotron waves. Recent experiments on fast wave current drive have demonstrated the ability to drive up to 180 kA of noninductive current using 1.5 MW of power at 60 MHz, including the contribution from 1 MW of ECCD and the bootstrap current. Higher power rf current drive systems are needed to strongly affect the current profile on DIII-D. An upgrade to the FWCD system is underway to increase the total power to 6 MW, using two additional antennas and two new 30 to 120 MHz transmitters. Additionally, a 1 MW prototype ECH system at 110 GHz is being developed (with eventual upgrade to 10 MW). With these systems, noninductive current drive at the 1 MA level will be available for experiments on profile control in DIII-D.

  19. NIMROD Simulation of multipulsed edge-current drive in SSPX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodestro, L. L.; Cohen, B. I.; Hooper, E. B.; McLean, H. S.; Wood, R. D.

    2009-11-01

    Flux amplification (A)---the ratio of poloidal magnetic flux enclosed by a spheromak's toroidal core to an applied edge flux---is a critical parameter for an economic spheromak-based fusion reactor. In [1], measurements of A in SSPX and NIMROD simulations [2] were found to be in good agreement over a range of discharge parameters while A<3. Experiments to study A performed subsequently with the modular capacitor bank gave some indication that |dIgun/dt| played a role and that increasing it might build magnetic field more efficiently, but were limited by gun discharge circuit inductance. In [3], multipulsed gun injection was investigated numerically and the results compared to SSPX. Here we report the continuation of those simulations to longer times. We find trends on timescales much longer than could be studied in SSPX, negligible effect on A of multipulsed injection at frequencies smaller than the fundamental SSPX reconnection frequency, and small increases in A for large frequencies.[4pt] [1] B. Hudson et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 056112 (2008).[0pt] [2] E.B. Hooper et al., Nucl. Fusion 47, 1064 (2007).[0pt] [3] L.L. LoDestro et al., 50^th DPP, TP6-93 (2008).

  20. Progress on the heating and current drive systems for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquinot, J.; Beaumont, Bertrand; Bora, D.; Campbell, D.; Darbos, Caroline; Decamps, H.; Graceffa, J.; Gassmann, T.; Hemsworth, R.; Henderson, Mark; Kobayashi, N.; Lamalle, Philippe; Schunke, B.; Tanaka, M.; Tanga, A.; Albajar, F.; Bonicelli, T.; Saibene, G.; Sartori, R.; Becoulet, A.; Hoang, G. T.; Inoue, T.; Sakamoto, K.; Takahashi, K.; Watanabe, K.; Goulding, Richard Howell; Rasmussen, David A; Swain, David W; Chakraborty, A.; Mukherjee, A.; Rao, S. L.; Denisov, G.; Nightingale, M.

    2009-06-01

    The electron cyclotron (EC), ion cyclotron (IC), heating-neutral beam (H-NB) and, although not in the day 1 baseline, lower hybrid (LH) systems intended for ITER have been reviewed in 2007/2008 in light of progress of physics and technology in the field. Although the overall specifications are unchanged, notable changes have been approved. Firstly, it has been emphasized that the H&CD systems are vital for the ITER programme. Consequently, the full 73 MW should be commissioned and available on a routine basis before the D/T phase. Secondly, significant changes have been approved at system level, most notably: the possibility to operate the heating beams at full power during the hydrogen phase requiring new shine through protection; the possibility to operate IC with 2 antennas with increased robustness (no moving parts); the possible increase to 2 MW of key components of the EC transmission systems in order to provide an easier upgrading of the EC power as may be required by the project; the addition of a building dedicated to the RF power sources and to a testing facility for acceptance of diagnostics and heating port plugs. Thirdly, the need of a plan for developing, in time for the active phase, a CD system such as LH suitable for very long pulse operation of ITER was recognised. The review describes these changes and their rationale.

  1. Laboratory simulation of field-aligned currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessel, Frank J.; Rostoker, Norman

    1993-01-01

    A summary of progress during the period Apr. 1992 to Mar. 1993 is provided. Objectives of the research are (1) to simulate, via laboratory experiments, the three terms of the field-aligned current equation; (2) to simulate auroral-arc formation processes by configuring the boundary conditions of the experimental chamber and plasma parameters to produce highly localized return currents at the end of a field-aligned current system; and (3) to extrapolate these results, using theoretical and computational techniques, to the problem of magnetospheric-ionospheric coupling and to compare them with published literature signatures of auroral-arc phenomena.

  2. Field-aligned currents and ionospheric electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasuhara, F.; Akasofu, S.-I.

    1977-01-01

    It is shown that the observed distribution of the ionospheric electric field can be deduced from an equation combining Ohm's law with the current continuity equation by using the 'observed' distribution of field-aligned currents as the boundary condition for two models of the ionosphere. The first model has one conductive annular ring representing the quiet-time auroral precipitation belt; the second has two conductive annular rings that simulate the discrete and diffuse auroral regions. An analysis is performed to determine how well the electric-field distribution can be reproduced. The results indicate that the first model reproduces the Sq(p)-type distribution, the second model reproduces reasonably well a substorm-type potential and ionospheric current patterns together with the Harang discontinuity, and that the distribution of field-aligned currents is the same for both models.

  3. A DEMO relevant fast wave current drive high harmonic antenna exploiting the high impedance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanesio, D.; Maggiora, R.

    2015-12-01

    Ion Cyclotron (IC) antennas are routinely adopted in most of the existing nuclear fusion experiments, even though their main goal, i.e. to couple high power to the plasma (MW), is often limited by rather severe drawbacks due to high fields on the antenna itself and on the unmatched part of the feeding lines. In addition to the well exploited auxiliary ion heating during the start-up phase, some non-ohmic current drive (CD) at the IC range of frequencies may be explored in view of the DEMO reactor. In this work, we suggest and describe a compact high frequency DEMO relevant antenna, based on the high impedance surfaces concept. High-impedance surfaces are periodic metallic structures (patches) usually displaced on top of a dielectric substrate and grounded by means of vertical posts embedded inside the dielectric, in a mushroom-like shape. These structures present a high impedance, within a given frequency band, such that the image currents are in-phase with the currents of the antenna itself, thus determining a significant efficiency increase. After a general introduction on the properties of high impedance surfaces, we analyze, by means of numerical codes, a dielectric based and a full metal solution optimized to be tested and benchmarked on the FTU experiment fed with generators at 433MHz.

  4. A DEMO relevant fast wave current drive high harmonic antenna exploiting the high impedance technique

    SciTech Connect

    Milanesio, D. Maggiora, R.

    2015-12-10

    Ion Cyclotron (IC) antennas are routinely adopted in most of the existing nuclear fusion experiments, even though their main goal, i.e. to couple high power to the plasma (MW), is often limited by rather severe drawbacks due to high fields on the antenna itself and on the unmatched part of the feeding lines. In addition to the well exploited auxiliary ion heating during the start-up phase, some non-ohmic current drive (CD) at the IC range of frequencies may be explored in view of the DEMO reactor. In this work, we suggest and describe a compact high frequency DEMO relevant antenna, based on the high impedance surfaces concept. High-impedance surfaces are periodic metallic structures (patches) usually displaced on top of a dielectric substrate and grounded by means of vertical posts embedded inside the dielectric, in a mushroom-like shape. These structures present a high impedance, within a given frequency band, such that the image currents are in-phase with the currents of the antenna itself, thus determining a significant efficiency increase. After a general introduction on the properties of high impedance surfaces, we analyze, by means of numerical codes, a dielectric based and a full metal solution optimized to be tested and benchmarked on the FTU experiment fed with generators at 433MHz.

  5. Non-Inductive Current Drive Modeling Extending Advanced Tokamak Operation to Steady State

    SciTech Connect

    Casper, T.A.; Lodestro, L.L.; Pearlstein, L.D.; Porter, G.D.; Murakami, M.; Lao, L.L.; Lin-Lui, Y.R.; St. John, H.E.

    2000-06-06

    A critical issue for sustaining high performance, negative central shear (NCS) discharges is the ability to maintain current distributions that are maximum off axis. Sustaining such hollow current profiles in steady state requires the use of non-inductively driven current sources. On the DIII-D experiment, a combination of neutral beam current drive (NBCD) and bootstrap current have been used to create transient NCS discharges. The electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and current drive (ECCD) system is currently being upgraded from three gyrotrons to six to provide more than 3MW of absorbed power in long-pulse operation to help sustain the required off-axis current drive. This upgrade SuPporrs the long range goal of DIII-D to sustain high performance discharges with high values of normalized {beta}, {beta}{sub n} = {beta}/(I{sub p}/aB{sub T}), confinement enhancement factor, H, and neutron production rates while utilizing bootstrap current fraction, f{sub bs}, in excess of 50%. At these high performance levels, the likelihood of onset of MHD modes that spoil confinement indicates the need to control plasma profiles if we are to extend this operation to long pulse or steady state. To investigate the effectiveness of the EC system and to explore operating scenarios to sustain these discharges, we use time-dependent simulations of the equilibrium, transport and stability. We explore methods to directly alter the safety factor profile, q, through direct current drive or by localized electron heating to modify the bootstrap current profile. Time dependent simulations using both experimentally determined [1] and theory-based [2] energy transport models have been done. Here, we report on simulations exploring parametric dependencies of the heating, current drive, and profiles that affect our ability to sustain stable discharges.

  6. Study of lower hybrid current drive towards long-pulse operation with high performance in EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, B. J.; Li, M. H.; Li, Y. C.; Wang, M.; Shan, J. F.; Liu, F. K.; Wang, S. L.; Wei, W.; Xu, H. D.; Zhao, L. M.; Hu, H. C.; Jia, H.; Cheng, M.; Yang, Y.; Liu, L.; Xu, G. S.; Zang, Q.; Zhao, H. L.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.; Goniche, M.; Cesario, R.; Amicucci, L.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Baek, G. S.; Parker, R.; Bonoli, P. T.; Yang, C.; Zhao, Y. P.; Qian, J. P.; Gong, X. Z.; Hu, L. Q.; Li, J. G.; Wan, B. N.

    2015-12-01

    High density experiments with 2.45 GHz lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) in EAST are analyzed by means of simulation and modeling, showing that parametric instabilities (PI), collisional absorption and density fluctuations in the edge region could be responsible for the low CD efficiency at high density. In addition, recent LHCD results with 4.6 GHz are presented, showing that lower hybrid wave can be coupled to plasma with low reflection coefficient, drive plasma current and modify the current profile, and heat plasma effectively. The related results between two systems (2.45 GHz and 4.6 GHz) are also compared, including CD efficiency and PI behavior.

  7. The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator high current photocathode, gun and drive linac

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Chojnacki, E.; Cox, G.

    1995-06-01

    The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) is a new facility for advanced accelerator research. A major component of the AWA is its drive linac, consisting of a unique high current short pulse L-Band photocathode based gun and special standing wave preaccelerator designed to produce 100 nC, 30 ps electron bunches at 20 MeV. Commissioning on the drive linac is now underway. We report on our initial operating experience with this novel machine, including bunch length and emittance measurements.

  8. Modeling of the electron distribution based on bremsstrahlung emission during lower hybrid current drive on PLT

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, J.E.; von Goeler, S.; Bernabei, S.; Bitter, M.; Chu, T.K.; Efthimion, P.; Fisch, N.; Hooke, W.; Hosea, J.; Jobes, F.

    1985-03-01

    Lower hybrid current drive requires the generation of a high energy electron tail anisotropic in velocity. Measurements of bremsstrahlung emission produced by this tail are compared with the calculated emission from reasonable model distributions. The physical basis and the sensitivity of this modeling process are described and the plasma properties of current driven discharges which can be derived from the model are discussed.

  9. On the second harmonic electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive experiments on T-10 and DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Lohr, J.; Forest, C.B.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Luce, T.C.; Harvey, R.W. ); Downs, E.A. Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY ); James, R.A. Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA ); Bagdasarov, A.A.; Borshegovskii, A.A.; Chistyakov, V.V.; Dremin, M.M.; Gors

    1993-02-01

    Studies of electron cyclotron current drive at the second harmonic resonance have been performed both on the DIII-D and T-10 tokamaks at injected power levels of approximately 0.5 MW. The DIII-D experiment used high held launch of the extraordinary mode at an angle of 15[degree] to the radial. In this experiment, with pulse lengths [approx equal] 500 msec, a loop voltage difference, compared to the value expected from the measured profiles, of [approx equal] 50 mV was ascribed to approximately 50 kA of rf-driven current. When dc electric field and trapped particle effects were considered, this was consistent with theoretical predictions. T-10 experiments planned for the fall of 1992 will use low field launch of the extraordinary mode and an injection angle of 21[degree] off-radial. In preliminary experiments with relatively poor machine conditions and pulse lengths [approx equal] 400 msec, rf current drive was not observed despite the fact that driven currents as low as 10 kA, corresponding to a loop voltage difference for co- versus counter-injection of 20 mV, could have been detected. In this paper we examine the T-10 experiments using ray tracing and transport calculations in an attempt to understand the results. The dependence of the current drive efficiency on discharge parameters, flux penetration, and non-linear effects will be discussed. The results show that the launching geometry can have a significant effect on the observation of electron cyclotron current drive using the loop voltage as a diagnostic. In addition, predictions for the next series of experiments on T-10, for which greater than 2 MW of high frequency power should be available, will be presented.

  10. On the second harmonic electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive experiments on T-10 and DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Lohr, J.; Forest, C.B.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Luce, T.C.; Harvey, R.W.; Downs, E.A. |; James, R.A. |; Bagdasarov, A.A.; Borshegovskii, A.A.; Chistyakov, V.V.; Dremin, M.M.; Gorshkov, A.V.; Gorelov, Y.A.; Esipchuk, Y.V.; Ivanov, N.V.; Kislov, A.Y.; Kislov, D.A.; Lysenko, S.E.; Medvedev, A.A.; Mirenskii, V.Y.; Notkin, G.E.; Parail, V.V.; Pavlov, Y.D.; Razumova, K.A.; Roi, I.N.; Savrukhin, P.V.; Sannikov, V.V.; Sushkov, A.V.; Trukhin, V.M.; Vasin, N.L.; Volkov, V.V.; Denisov, G.G.; Petelin, M.I.; Flyagin, V.A.

    1993-02-01

    Studies of electron cyclotron current drive at the second harmonic resonance have been performed both on the DIII-D and T-10 tokamaks at injected power levels of approximately 0.5 MW. The DIII-D experiment used high held launch of the extraordinary mode at an angle of 15{degree} to the radial. In this experiment, with pulse lengths {approx_equal} 500 msec, a loop voltage difference, compared to the value expected from the measured profiles, of {approx_equal} 50 mV was ascribed to approximately 50 kA of rf-driven current. When dc electric field and trapped particle effects were considered, this was consistent with theoretical predictions. T-10 experiments planned for the fall of 1992 will use low field launch of the extraordinary mode and an injection angle of 21{degree} off-radial. In preliminary experiments with relatively poor machine conditions and pulse lengths {approx_equal} 400 msec, rf current drive was not observed despite the fact that driven currents as low as 10 kA, corresponding to a loop voltage difference for co- versus counter-injection of 20 mV, could have been detected. In this paper we examine the T-10 experiments using ray tracing and transport calculations in an attempt to understand the results. The dependence of the current drive efficiency on discharge parameters, flux penetration, and non-linear effects will be discussed. The results show that the launching geometry can have a significant effect on the observation of electron cyclotron current drive using the loop voltage as a diagnostic. In addition, predictions for the next series of experiments on T-10, for which greater than 2 MW of high frequency power should be available, will be presented.

  11. The Effect of Solar Wind Dynamic Pressure on the Physical Processes that Drive the Storm-time Ring Current Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemon, C.; Chen, M. W.; Guild, T. B.

    2011-12-01

    Statistical studies suggest that the solar wind dynamic pressure influences the development of the storm-time ring current, with increased dynamic pressure leading to increased ring current energy. But physical understanding of that relationship is lacking. While magnetospheric compressions drive adiabatic energization of plasma and thereby directly increase the ring current energy, this effect should be reversible, and dynamic pressure can vary rapidly in either direction during magnetic storms. Rather, the process of plasma transport from the plasma sheet to the ring current is affected by magnetopause currents that perturb the background field in the magnetosphere. This perturbation will affect both convective transport and gradient/curvature drift of plasma, which will subsequently further perturb the magnetic and electric fields. Using the Rice Convection Model with a force-equilibrated magnetic field (the RCM-E), we are able to simulate the ring current development in response to varying upstream conditions. This study contrasts the development of the ring current in response to different solar wind dynamic pressure inputs: sustained low dynamic pressure, sustained high dynamic pressure, and low dynamic pressure with a superposed pressure pulse. We quantitatively account for the processes that lead to variations in ring current development during these different upstream driving scenarios. These processes include the effect of the magnetopause currents (and ring and tail currents) on plasma drift paths, modifications of the convection electric field due to adiabatic energization of plasma (electric shielding), and the induction electric fields caused by changes in the magnetopause, ring, and tail currents. Our simulations separately investigate the extent to which ring current enhancements are driven by 1) the impact of the magnetopause currents on the magnetic and (indirectly) electric fields of the inner magnetosphere, 2) the coupling of the plasma sheet to

  12. Direct electron heating and current drive with fast waves in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R.I.; Petty, C.C.; Callis, R.W.; Cary, W.P.; Chiu, S.C.; Freeman, R.L.; deGrassie, J.S.; Harvey, R.W.; Luce, T.C.; Mayberry, M.J.; Prater, R.; Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P.T.; Baity, F.W.; Goulding, R.H.; Hoffmann, D.J.; James, R.A.; Kawashima, H.

    1992-09-01

    Experiments on the DIII-D tokamak have been performed to evaluate noninductive current drive with direct electron absorption of the fast Alfven wave (FW) in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. These experiments have employed a 2 MW 60 NM transmitter connected to a four-element toroidally phased array of loop antennas located at the outside midplane of the DIII-D vacuum vessel. Efficient direct electron heating was obtained with (0, {pi}, 0, {pi}) antenna phasing; H-mode confinement was obtained with direct electron absorption of the fast wave as the sole source of auxiliary heating. Current drive experiments were performed with (0,{pi}/2,{pi},3{pi}/2) antenna phasing at fast wave power levels up to 1.2 MW. Preheating with 60 GHz ECH was used to increase the single-pass absorption of the fast wave with a directive spectrum. When the fast wave is lunched in the direction that aids the inductively driven current (co-current drive), up to 40% of the 0.4 MA plasma current is sustained noninductively. Counter-current drive strongly affects the sawtoothing behavior, and results in highly peaked electron temperature profiles (T{sub e}(0) {approx_lt} 6 keV) but much smaller driven currents.

  13. Direct electron heating and current drive with fast waves in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R.I.; Petty, C.C.; Callis, R.W.; Cary, W.P.; Chiu, S.C.; Freeman, R.L.; deGrassie, J.S.; Harvey, R.W.; Luce, T.C.; Mayberry, M.J.; Prater, R. ); Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P.T. ); Baity, F.W.; Goulding, R.H.; Hoffmann, D.J. ); James, R.A. (Lawrence Livermor

    1992-09-01

    Experiments on the DIII-D tokamak have been performed to evaluate noninductive current drive with direct electron absorption of the fast Alfven wave (FW) in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. These experiments have employed a 2 MW 60 NM transmitter connected to a four-element toroidally phased array of loop antennas located at the outside midplane of the DIII-D vacuum vessel. Efficient direct electron heating was obtained with (0, [pi], 0, [pi]) antenna phasing; H-mode confinement was obtained with direct electron absorption of the fast wave as the sole source of auxiliary heating. Current drive experiments were performed with (0,[pi]/2,[pi],3[pi]/2) antenna phasing at fast wave power levels up to 1.2 MW. Preheating with 60 GHz ECH was used to increase the single-pass absorption of the fast wave with a directive spectrum. When the fast wave is lunched in the direction that aids the inductively driven current (co-current drive), up to 40% of the 0.4 MA plasma current is sustained noninductively. Counter-current drive strongly affects the sawtoothing behavior, and results in highly peaked electron temperature profiles (T[sub e](0) [approx lt] 6 keV) but much smaller driven currents.

  14. A Novel Current Angle Control Scheme in a Current Source Inverter Fed Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor Drive for Automotive Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Lixin; Su, Gui-Jia

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a novel speed control scheme to operate a current source inverter (CSI) driven surface-mounted permanent magnet synchronous machine (SPMSM) for hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) applications. The idea is to use the angle of the current vector to regulate the rotor speed while keeping the two dc-dc converter power switches on all the time to boost system efficiency. The effectiveness of the proposed scheme was verified with a 3 kW CSI-SPMSM drive prototype.

  15. Field Stability of Piezoelectric Shear Properties in PIN-PMN-PT Crystals Under Large Drive Field

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shujun; Li, Fei; Luo, Jun; Xia, Ru; Hackenberger, Wesley; Shrout, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    The coercive fields (EC) of Pb(In0.5Nb0.5)O3-Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 (PIN-PMN-PT) ternary single crystals were found to be 5 kV/cm, double the value of binary Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 (PMNT) crystals, further increased to 6 to 9 kV/cm using Mn modifications. In addition to an increased EC, the acceptor modification resulted in the developed internal bias (Eint), on the order of ~1 kV/cm. The piezoelectric shear properties of unmodified and Mn-modified PIN-PMN-PT crystals with various domain configurations were investigated. The shear piezoelectric coefficients and electromechanical coupling factors for different domain configurations were found to be >2000 pC/N and >0.85, respectively, with slightly reduced properties observed in Mn-modified tetragonal crystals. Fatigue/cycling tests performed on shear-mode samples as a function of ac drive field level demonstrated that the allowable ac field levels (the maximum applied ac field before the occurrence of depolarization) were only ~2 kV/cm for unmodified crystals, less than half of their coercive field. Allowable ac drive levels were on the order of 4 to 6 kV/cm for Mn-modified crystals with rhombohedral/orthorhombic phase, further increased to 5 to 8 kV/cm in tetragonal crystals, because of their higher coercive fields. It is of particular interest that the allowable ac drive field level for Mn-modified crystals was found to be ≥60% of their coercive fields, because of the developed Eint, induced by the acceptor-oxygen vacancy defect dipoles. PMID:21342812

  16. Spontaneous emission with a cascaded driving field in the same transition channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ronggang; Liu, Tong

    2015-11-01

    We study the spontaneous emission spectrum of a driven four-level atom in both Markovian reservoir and non-Markovian reservoir, in which the two driving fields are applied to the same transition channel. It is very interesting that the increase of the Rabi frequency of the first driving field leads to the emission spectrum enhancement in Markovian reservoir, but the increase of the second one can suppress the emission spectrum significantly. The phenomenon originates from the dressed states variation induced by the first driving field. For non-Markovian reservoir case, the rich spectrum behavior is due to a strong coupling between driving fields and modified reservoir.

  17. Lower hybrid current drive at plasma densities required for thermonuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Cesario, R.; Cardinali, A.; Castaldo, C.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Amicucci, L.

    2011-12-23

    Driving current in high-density plasmas is essential for the progress of thermonuclear fusion energy research based on the tokamak concept. The lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) effect, is potentially the most suitable tool for driving current at large plasma radii, consistent with the needs of ITER steady state scenario. Unfortunately, experiments at reactor grade high plasma densities with kinetic profiles approaching those required for ITER, have shown problems in penetration of the LH power into the core plasma. These plasmas represent a basic reference for designing possible methods useful for assessing the LHCD concept in ITER. On the basis of the phenomenology observed during LHCD experiments carried out in different machines, and model of the spectral broadening effect due to parametric instability, an interpretation and possible solution of the related important problem is presented.

  18. Electron Energy Confinement For HHFW Heating and Current Drive Phasing on NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Hosea, J.C.; Bernabei, S.; Biewer, T.; LeBlanc, B.; Phillips, C.K.; Wilson, J.R.; Stutman, D.; Ryan, P.; Swain, D.W.

    2005-09-26

    Thomson scattering laser pulses are synchronized relative to modulated HHFW power to permit evaluation of the electron energy confinement time during and following HHFW pulses for both heating and current drive antenna phasing. Profile changes resulting from instabilities require that the total electron stored energy, evaluated by integrating the midplane electron pressure Pe(R) over the magnetic surfaces prescribed by EFIT analysis, be used to derive the electron energy confinement time. Core confinement is reduced during a sawtooth instability but, although the electron energy is distributed outward by the sawtooth, the bulk electron energy confinement time is essentially unaffected. The radial deposition of energy into the electrons is noticeably more peaked for current drive phasing (longer wavelength excitation) relative to that for heating phasing (shorter wavelength excitation) as is expected theoretically. However, the power delivered to the core plasma is reduced considerably for the current drive phasing, indicating that surface/peripheral damping processes play a more important role for this case.

  19. Modeling Results for 28 GHz Heating and Current Drive in the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G.; Bertelli, N.; Ellis, R. A.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Harvey, R. W.; Hosea, J. C.; Poli, F.; Raman, R.; Smirnov, A. P.

    2013-10-01

    A megawatt-level, 28 GHz electron heating system is being planned to heat non-inductive (NI) start-up plasmas and to provide radially localized electron heating and current drive during H-mode discharges in NSTX-U. NSTX-U will operate at axial toroidal fields of up to 1 T and plasma currents, Ip, up to 2 MA. Development of fully NI plasmas is a critical long-term NSTX-U research goal that supports the design of a Fusion Nuclear Science Facility. 0.6 MW of 28 GHz electron cyclotron (EC) heating is predicted to increase the central electron temperature (Te(0)) of low density NI plasmas generated by Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) in NSTX-U from 10 eV to 400 eV in about 20 ms. The increased Te(0) will significantly reduce the plasma current decay rate of CHI plasmas, allowing the coupling of fast wave heating and neutral beam injection. Eventually 28 GHz electron Bernstein wave (EBW) heating and current drive will be used during the Ip flat top in NSTX-U H-mode discharges when the plasma is overdense. This paper will present numerical RF simulation results for 28 GHz EC and EBW heating and current drive for NSTX-U discharges and a conceptual design for the 28 GHz heating system. Work supported by USDOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  20. Interhemispheric Field-Aligned Currents: Simulation Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyatsky, Sonya

    2016-04-01

    We present simulation results of the 3-D magnetosphere-ionosphere current system including the Region 1, Region 2, and interhemispheric (IHC) field-aligned currents flowing between the Northern and Southern conjugate ionospheres in the case of asymmetry in ionospheric conductivities in two hemispheres (observed, for instance, during the summer-winter seasons). We also computed the maps of ionospheric and equivalent ionospheric currents in two hemispheres. The IHCs are an important part of the global 3-D current system in high-latitude ionospheres. These currents are especially significant during summer and winter months. In the winter ionosphere, they may be comparable and even exceed both Region 1 and Region 2 field-aligned currents. An important feature of these interhemispheric currents is that they link together processes in two hemispheres, so that the currents observed in one hemisphere can provide us with information about the currents in the opposite hemisphere. Despite the significant role of these IHCs in the global 3-D current system, they have not been sufficiently studied yet. The main results of our research may be summarized as follows: 1) In winter hemisphere, the IHCs may significantly exceed and be a substitute for the local Region 1 and Region 2 currents; 2) The IHCs may strongly affect the magnitude, location, and direction of the ionospheric and equivalent ionospheric currents (especially in the nightside winter auroral ionosphere). 3) The IHCs in winter hemisphere may be, in fact, an important (and sometimes even major) source of the Westward Auroral Electrojet, observed in both hemispheres during substorm activity. The study of the contribution from the IHCs into the total global 3-D current system allows us to improve the understanding and forecasting of geomagnetic, auroral, and ionospheric disturbances in two hemispheres. The results of our studies of the Interhemispheric currents are presented in papers: (note: for publications my last

  1. Comparison between the electron cyclotron current drive experiments on DIII-D and predictions for T-10

    SciTech Connect

    Lohr, J.; Harvey, R.W.; Luce, T.C.; Matsuda, Kyoko; Moeller, C.P.; Petty, C.C.; Prater, R. ); James, R.A. ); Giruzzi, G. ); Gorelov, Y. ); DeHaas, J. (Joint European Torus Un

    1990-11-01

    Electron cyclotron current drive has been demonstrated on the DIII-D tokamak in an experiment in which {approximately}1 MW of microwave power generated {approximately}50 kA of non-inductive current. The rf-generated portion was about 15% of the total current. On the T-10 tokamak, more than 3 MW of microwave power will be available for current generation, providing the possibility that all the plasma current could be maintained by this method. Fokker-Planck calculations using the code CQL3D and ray tracing calculations using TORAY have been performed to model both experiments. For DIII-D the agreement between the calculations and measurements is good, producing confidence in the validity of the computational models. The same calculations using the T-10 geometry predict that for n{sub e}(0) {approximately} 1.8 {times} 10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}3}, and T{sub e}(0) {approximately} 7 keV, 1.2 MW, that is, the power available from only three gyrotrons, could generate as much as 150 kA of non-inductive current. Parameter space scans in which temperature, density and resonance location were varied have been performed to indicate the current drive expected under different experimental conditions. The residual dc electric field was considered in the DIII-D analysis because of its nonlinear effect on the electron distribution, which complicates the interpretation of the results. A 110 GHz ECH system is being installed on DIII-D. Initial operations, planned for late 1991, will use four gyrotrons with 500 kW each and 10 second output pulses. Injection will be from the low field side from launchers which can be steered to heat at the desired location. These launchers, two of which are presently installed, are set at 20 degrees to the radial and rf current drive studies are planned for the initial operation. 8 refs., 10 figs.

  2. Remote Field Eddy Current Transition Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Joseph Maurice Stephane

    1992-01-01

    The Remote Field Eddy Current (RFEC) technique is a non-destructive inspection technique used for anomaly detection in tubulars. The RFEC technique uses exciter and detector coils, both located inside the pipe, to detect interior and exterior corrosion with approximately equal sensitivity. The presence of both direct and indirect electromagnetic coupling paths distinguishes the RFEC technique from conventional reflected impedance eddy current techniques. The RFEC pipe inspection technique normally operates with the detector coil in the remote field region at distances of two or more pipe diameters from the internal exciter coil. At this spacing, the direct coupled field, dominant near the exciter (less than 1 pipe ID), is strongly attenuated and is overshadowed by the indirect field generated by an indirect energy transmission path which diffuses outwardly at the exciter coil location and tends to be guided by the pipe wall. In the remote field region, the field energy is greater outside than inside the pipe and some of the energy diffuses back inside the pipe. In the intermediate region (from 1 to 2 pipe diameters), called the transition zone, direct and indirect fields interact. The transition zone interaction produces a resultant field which is very sensitive to variations in pipe properties or wall thickness. The effect is maximal at the point where the indirect and direct fields have equal magnitudes and opposite phases. Small variations in the indirect field at this crossover point produce large changes in the resultant field. Experimental examples of the resultant axial magnetic field are presented to demonstrate the transition zone characteristics. An improved understanding of the effects of localized inner and outer wall defects and of pipe wall thinning on the direct and indirect field components in the transition zone is needed to better exploit the RFEC technique. Operating the RFEC probe in the transition zone with carefully selected frequency and

  3. Status of KSTAR 170 GHz, 1 MW Electron Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joung, M.; Bae, Y. S.; Jeong, J. H.; Park, S.; Kim, H. J.; Yang, H. L.; Park, H.; Cho, M. H.; Namkung, W.; Hosea, J.; Ellis, R.; Sakamoto, K.; Kajiwara, K.; Doane, J.

    2011-12-01

    A 170 GHz Electron Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive (ECH/CD) system on KSTAR is designed to launch total 2.4 MW of power for up to 300 sec into the plasma. At present the first 1 MW ECH/CD system is under installation and commissioning for 2011 KSTAR campaign. The 170 GHz, 1 MW, 300 sec gyrotron and the matching optics unit (MOU) will be provided from JAEA under collaboration between NFRI and JAEA. The transmission line consists of MOU and 70 m long 63.5 mm ID corrugated waveguides with the eight miter bends. The 1 MW, 10 sec launcher is developed based on the existing two-mirror front-end launcher in collaboration with Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and Pohang University of Science and Technology, and is installed on the low field side in the KSTAR equatorial plane. The mirror pivot is located at 30 cm below from the equatorial plane. 3.6 MVA power supply system is manufactured and now is under commissioning to meet the triode gun operation of JAEA gyrotron. The power supply consists of 66 kV/55 A cathode power supply, mode-anode system, and 50 kV/160 mA body power supply. In this paper, the current status of KSTAR 170 GHz, 1 MW ECH/CD system will be presented as well as the experimental plan utilizing 170 GHz new ECH/CD system.

  4. Status of KSTAR 170 GHz, 1 MW Electron Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive System

    SciTech Connect

    Joung, M.; Bae, Y. S.; Jeong, J. H.; Park, S.; Kim, H. J.; Yang, H. L.; Park, H.; Cho, M. H.; Namkung, W.; Hosea, J.; Ellis, R.; Sakamoto, K.; Kajiwara, K.; Doane, J.

    2011-12-23

    A 170 GHz Electron Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive (ECH/CD) system on KSTAR is designed to launch total 2.4 MW of power for up to 300 sec into the plasma. At present the first 1 MW ECH/CD system is under installation and commissioning for 2011 KSTAR campaign. The 170 GHz, 1 MW, 300 sec gyrotron and the matching optics unit (MOU) will be provided from JAEA under collaboration between NFRI and JAEA. The transmission line consists of MOU and 70 m long 63.5 mm ID corrugated waveguides with the eight miter bends. The 1 MW, 10 sec launcher is developed based on the existing two-mirror front-end launcher in collaboration with Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and Pohang University of Science and Technology, and is installed on the low field side in the KSTAR equatorial plane. The mirror pivot is located at 30 cm below from the equatorial plane. 3.6 MVA power supply system is manufactured and now is under commissioning to meet the triode gun operation of JAEA gyrotron. The power supply consists of 66 kV/55 A cathode power supply, mode-anode system, and 50 kV/160 mA body power supply. In this paper, the current status of KSTAR 170 GHz, 1 MW ECH/CD system will be presented as well as the experimental plan utilizing 170 GHz new ECH/CD system.

  5. Fast wave current drive experiment on the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Petty, C.C.; Pinsker, R.I.; Chiu, S.C.; deGrassie, J.S.; Harvey, R.W.; Lohr, J.; Luce, T.C.; Mayberry, M.J.; Prater, R. ); Porkolab, M. ); Baity, F.W.; Goulding, R.H.; Hoffman, J.D. ); James, R.A. ); Kawash

    1992-06-01

    One method of radio-frequency heating which shows theoretical promise for both heating and current drive in tokamak plasmas is the direct absorption by electrons of the fast Alfven wave (FW). Electrons can directly absorb fast waves via electron Landau damping and transit-time magnetic pumping when the resonance condition {omega} {minus} {kappa}{sub {parallel}e}{upsilon}{sup {parallel}e} = O is satisfied. Since the FW accelerates electrons traveling the same toroidal direction as the wave, plasma current can be generated non-inductively by launching FW which propagate in one toroidal direction. Fast wave current drive (FWCD) is considered an attractive means of sustaining the plasma current in reactor-grade tokamaks due to teh potentially high current drive efficiency achievable and excellent penetration of the wave power to the high temperature plasma core. Ongoing experiments on the DIII-D tokamak are aimed at a demonstration of FWCD in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF). Using frequencies in the ICRF avoids the possibility of mode conversion between the fast and slow wave branches which characterized early tokamak FWCD experiments in the lower hybrid range of frequencies. Previously on DIII-D, efficient direct electron heating by FW was found using symmetric (non-current drive) antenna phasing. However, high FWCD efficiencies are not expected due to the relatively low electron temperatures (compared to a reactor) in DIII-D.

  6. Particle simulation of intense electron cyclotron heating and beat-wave current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.I.

    1987-10-12

    High-power free-electron lasers make new methods possible for heating plasmas and driving current in toroidal plasmas with electromagnetic waves. We have undertaken particle simulation studies with one and two dimensional, relativistic particle simulation codes of intense pulsed electron cyclotron heating and beat-wave current drive. The particle simulation methods here are conventional: the algorithms are time-centered, second-order-accurate, explicit, leap-frog difference schemes. The use of conventional methods restricts the range of space and time scales to be relatively compact in the problems addressed. Nevertheless, experimentally relevant simulations have been performed. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Effects of magnetic shear on toroidal rotation in tokamak plasmas with lower hybrid current drive.

    PubMed

    Rice, J E; Podpaly, Y A; Reinke, M L; Mumgaard, R; Scott, S D; Shiraiwa, S; Wallace, G M; Chouli, B; Fenzi-Bonizec, C; Nave, M F F; Diamond, P H; Gao, C; Granetz, R S; Hughes, J W; Parker, R R; Bonoli, P T; Delgado-Aparicio, L; Eriksson, L-G; Giroud, C; Greenwald, M J; Hubbard, A E; Hutchinson, I H; Irby, J H; Kirov, K; Mailloux, J; Marmar, E S; Wolfe, S M

    2013-09-20

    Application of lower hybrid (LH) current drive in tokamak plasmas can induce both co- and countercurrent directed changes in toroidal rotation, depending on the core q profile. For discharges with q(0) <1, rotation increments in the countercurrent direction are observed. If the LH-driven current is sufficient to suppress sawteeth and increase q(0) above unity, the core toroidal rotation change is in the cocurrent direction. This change in sign of the rotation increment is consistent with a change in sign of the residual stress (the divergence of which constitutes an intrinsic torque that drives the flow) through its dependence on magnetic shear. PMID:24093268

  8. Modeling of electron cyclotron current drive experiments on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Chan, V.S.; Luce, T.C.; Prater, R.; Sauter, O.; Harvey, R.W.

    1999-05-01

    Electron Cyclotron Current Drive (ECCD) is considered a leading candidate for current profile control in Advanced Tokamak (AT) operation. Localized ECCD has been clearly demonstrated in recent proof-of-principle experiments on DIII-D. The measured ECCD efficiency near the magnetic axis agrees well with standard theoretical predictions. However, for off-axis current drive the normalized experimental efficiency does not decrease with minor radius as expected from the standard theory; the observed reduction of ECCD efficiency due to trapped electron effects in the off-axis cases is smaller than theoretical predictions. The standard approach of modeling ECCD in tokamaks has been based on the bounce-average calculations, which assume the bounce frequency is much larger than the effective collision frequency for trapped electrons at all energies. The assumption is clearly invalid at low energies. Finite collisionality will effectively reduce the trapped electron fraction, hence, increase current drive efficiency. Here, a velocity-space connection formula is proposed to estimate the collisionality effect on electron cyclotron current drive efficiency. The collisionality correction gives modest improvement in agreement between theoretical and recent DIII-D experimental results.

  9. Lower Hybrid Heating and Current Drive on the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    R. Wilson, R. Parker, M. Bitter, P.T. Bonoli, C. Fiore, R.W. Harvey, K. Hill, A.E. Hubbard, J.W. Hughes, A. Ince-Cushman, C. Kessel, J.S. Ko, O. Meneghini, C.K. Phillips, M. Porkolab, J. Rice, A.E. Schmidt, S. Scott,S. Shiraiwa, E. Valeo, G.Wallace, J.C. Wright and the Alcator C-Mod Team

    2009-11-20

    On the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) is being used to modify the current profile with the aim of obtaining advanced tokamak (AT) performance in plasmas with parameters similar to those that would be required on ITER. To date, power levels in excess of 1 MW at a frequency of 4.6 GHz have been coupled into a variety of plasmas. Experiments have established that LHCD on C-Mod behaves globally as predicted by theory. Bulk current drive efficiencies, n20IlhR/Plh ~ 0.25, inferred from magnetics and MSE are in line with theory. Quantitative comparisons between local measurements, MSE, ECE and hard x-ray bremsstrahlung, and theory/simulation using the GENRAY, TORIC-LH CQL3D and TSC-LSC codes have been performed. These comparisons have demonstrated the off-axis localization of the current drive, its magnitude and location dependence on the launched n|| spectrum, and the use of LHCD during the current ramp to save volt-seconds and delay the peaking of the current profile. Broadening of the x-ray emission profile during ICRF heating indicates that the current drive location can be controlled by the electron temperature, as expected. In addition, an alteration in the plasma toroidal rotation profile during LHCD has been observed with a significant rotation in the counter current direction. Notably, the rotation is accompanied by peaking of the density and temperature profiles on a current diffusion time scale inside of the half radius where the LH absorption is taking place.

  10. Stabilization of Neoclassical Tearing Modes in Tokamaks by Radio Frequency Current Drive

    SciTech Connect

    La Haye, R. J.

    2007-09-28

    Resistive neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) will be the principal limit on stability and performance in the ITER standard scenario as the resulting islands break up the magnetic surfaces that confine the plasma. Drag from rotating island-induced eddy current in the resistive wall can also slow the plasma rotation, produce locking to the wall, and cause loss of high confinement H-mode and disruption. The NTMs are maintained by helical perturbations to the pressure-gradient driven 'bootstrap' current. Thus, this is a high beta instability even at the modest beta for ITER. A major line of research on NTM stabilization is the use of radio frequency (rf) current drive at the island rational surface. While large, broad current drive from lower hybrid waves has been shown to be stabilizing (COMPASS-D), most research is directed to small, narrow current drive from electron cyclotron waves (ECCD); ECCD stabilization and/or preemptive prevention is successful in ASDEX Upgrade, DIII-D and JT-60U, for example, with as little as a few percent of the total plasma current if the ECCD is kept sufficiently narrow so that the peak off-axis ECCD is comparable to the local bootstrap current.

  11. Modeling of electron cyclotron current drive experiments on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Lin-Liu, Y. R.; Chan, V. S.; Luce, T. C.; Prater, R.; Sauter, O.; Harvey, R. W.

    1999-09-20

    A velocity-space connection formula is proposed to estimate the collisionality effect on electron cyclotron current drive efficiency. The collisionality correction gives modest improvement in agreement between theoretical and recent DIII-D experimental results (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  12. 60 MHz fast wave current drive experiment for DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Mayberry, M.J.; Chiu, S.C.; Porkolab, M.; Chan, V.; Freeman, R.; Harvey, R.; Pinsker, R. )

    1989-07-01

    The DIII-D facility provides an opportunity to test fast wave current drive appoach. Efficient FWCD is achieved by direct electron absorption due to Landa damping and transit time magnetic pumping. To avoid competing damping mechamisms we seek to maximize the single-pass asorption of the fast waves by electrons. (AIP)

  13. Multiscale field-aligned current analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunescu, C.; Marghitu, O.; Constantinescu, D.; Narita, Y.; Vogt, J.; Blǎgǎu, A.

    2015-11-01

    The magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling is achieved, essentially, by a superposition of quasi-stationary and time-dependent field-aligned currents (FACs), over a broad range of spatial and temporal scales. The planarity of the FAC structures observed by satellite data and the orientation of the planar FAC sheets can be investigated by the well-established minimum variance analysis (MVA) of the magnetic perturbation. However, such investigations are often constrained to a predefined time window, i.e., to a specific scale of the FAC. The multiscale field-aligned current analyzer, introduced here, relies on performing MVA continuously and over a range of scales by varying the width of the analyzing window, appropriate for the complexity of the magnetic field signatures above the auroral oval. The proposed technique provides multiscale information on the planarity and orientation of the observed FACs. A new approach, based on the derivative of the largest eigenvalue of the magnetic variance matrix with respect to the length of the analysis window, makes possible the inference of the current structures' location (center) and scale (thickness). The capabilities of the FAC analyzer are explored analytically for the magnetic field profile of the Harris sheet and tested on synthetic FAC structures with uniform current density and infinite or finite geometry in the cross-section plane of the FAC. The method is illustrated with data observed by the Cluster spacecraft on crossing the nightside auroral region, and the results are cross checked with the optical observations from the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms ground network.

  14. Modeling of the influences of electron cyclotron current drive on neoclassical tearing modes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Long; Liu, Jinyuan; Sun, Jizhong; Sun, Guanglan; Duan, Ping

    2015-05-15

    Influences of external current drive on neoclassical tearing modes are studied numerically with a set of compressible magnetohydrodynamics equations. By considering the effects of driven current parameters and its deposition timing, and by examining the relationship between driven current and the missing bootstrap current, the basic requirements of deposition width and external current density for effectively suppressing neoclassical tearing modes are investigated. When the driven current density is able to compensate the missing bootstrap current and the deposition region is comparable with the saturated island, the suppression results are notable. Meanwhile, the pre-emptive strategy of current deposition reported experimentally is also evaluated, and the results agree with the experimental ones that early current deposition can enhance suppression effectiveness greatly. In addition, the deficiencies of continuous driven current are discussed when the plasma rotation has been taken into account, and the application of modulated current drive, which is synchronized in phase with the rotating island, can restore the stabilizing role under some conditions. The favorable parameters of modulation such as duty cycle are also addressed.

  15. Numerical study on the stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes by electron cyclotron current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wu, Bin; Zhu, Sizheng; Hu, Yemin

    2015-02-15

    It is well known that electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) around the o-point of magnetic island along the plasma current direction can stabilize neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) in tokamak devices. The effects of the radial misalignment between the island and the driven current, the phase misalignment, and the on-duty ratio for modulated current drive on NTM stabilization are studied numerically in this paper. A small radial misalignment is found to significantly decrease the stabilizing effect. When a sufficiently large phase misalignment occurs for the modulated ECCD, the stabilization effect is also reduced a lot. The optimal on-duty ratio of modulated ECCD to stabilize NTMs is found to be in the range of 60%–70%. A larger on-duty ratio than 50% could also mitigate the effect of phase misalignment if it is not too large. There is no benefit from modulation if the phase misalignment is larger than a threshold.

  16. Numerical study on the stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes by electron cyclotron current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wu, Bin; Zhu, Sizheng; Hu, Yemin

    2015-02-01

    It is well known that electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) around the o-point of magnetic island along the plasma current direction can stabilize neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) in tokamak devices. The effects of the radial misalignment between the island and the driven current, the phase misalignment, and the on-duty ratio for modulated current drive on NTM stabilization are studied numerically in this paper. A small radial misalignment is found to significantly decrease the stabilizing effect. When a sufficiently large phase misalignment occurs for the modulated ECCD, the stabilization effect is also reduced a lot. The optimal on-duty ratio of modulated ECCD to stabilize NTMs is found to be in the range of 60%-70%. A larger on-duty ratio than 50% could also mitigate the effect of phase misalignment if it is not too large. There is no benefit from modulation if the phase misalignment is larger than a threshold.

  17. Remote-field eddy current signal representation

    SciTech Connect

    Atherton, D.L.; Mackintosh, D.D.; Sullivan, S.P.; Dubois, J.M.S.; Schmidt, T.R. . Dept. of Physics.)

    1993-07-01

    While conventional reflected impedance eddy current testing (ET) techniques are limited by skin depth considerations to near surface defects, the RFEC (remote field eddy current) technique exploits skin effects. The RFEC method is a through-wall inspection technique. Only the field which has made a double transit of the pipe wall is detected. The skin depth equation can be used to predict the approximate effect of metal loss on the RFEC signal. Metal loss effectively reduces the shielding so that the attenuation and phase lag of the field is less. A method of analyzing RFEC defect signals is therefore to compare the signals with the phase and amplitude in uncorroded pipe. RFEC probes are used for inspecting ferromagnetic and nonferromagnetic tubulars for corrosion and, since eddy current detectors are generally well suited to crack detection, there is considerable interest in their potential to detect stress corrosion cracking in pipelines. Here the authors first of all summarize the impedance plane representation and scope monitor displays customarily used for conventional exploring coil ET probes in tubes. They then present the normalized voltage plane and monitor displays that are most appropriate for RFEC probes. They discuss the similarities and differences between the preferred monitor displays.

  18. RF Heating and Current Drive in Magnetically Confined Plasma: a Historical Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Porkolab, Miklos

    2007-09-28

    The history of high power RF waves injected into magnetically confined plasma for the purposes of heating to fusion relevant temperatures spans nearly five decades. The road to success demanded the development of the theory of wave propagation in high temperature plasma in complex magnetic field geometries, development of antenna structures and transmission lines capable of handling high RF powers, and the development of high power RF (microwave) sources. In the early days, progress was hindered by the lack of good confinement of energetic particles formed by high power RF wave-plasma interactions. For example, in the ion cyclotron resonance frequency regime (ICRF) ions with energies in the multi-100keV, or even MeV range may be formed due to the presence of efficient 'minority species' absorption. Electrons with similar energies can be formed upon the injection of RF waves in the electron cyclotron resonance (ECRH) or lower hybrid range of frequencies (LHRF) because of quasi-linear Landau (cyclotron) interactions between waves and particles. In this paper a summary of four decades of historical evolution of wave heating and current drive results will be given.

  19. Investigations of LHW-plasma coupling and current drive at high density related to H-mode experiments in EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, B. J.; Li, Y. C.; Zhang, L.; Li, M. H.; Wei, W.; Kong, E. H.; Wang, M.; Xu, H. D.; Wang, S. L.; Xu, G. S.; Zhao, L. M.; Hu, H. C.; Jia, H.; Cheng, M.; Yang, Y.; Liu, L.; Zhao, H. L.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.; Goniche, M.; Amicucci, L.; Cesario, R.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Baek, S. G.; Parker, R.; Bonoli, P. T.; Paoletti, F.; Yang, C.; Shan, J. F.; Liu, F. K.; Zhao, Y. P.; Gong, X. Z.; Hu, L. Q.; Gao, X.; Wan, B. N.; Li, J. G.; the EAST Team

    2015-09-01

    Two important issues in achieving lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) high confinement plasma in EAST are to improve lower hybrid wave (LHW)-plasma coupling and to drive the plasma current at a high density. Studies in different configurations with different directions of toroidal magnetic field (Bt) show that the density near the antenna is affected by both the radial electric field induced by plasma without a LHW (Er_plasma) in the scrape off layer (SOL), and the radial electric field induced by LHW power (Er_LH) near the grill. Investigations indicate that Er  ×  Bt in the SOL leads to a different effect of configuration on the LHW-plasma coupling and Er_LH  ×  Bt accounts for the asymmetric density behaviour in the SOL observed in the experiments, where Er is the total radial electric field in the SOL. Modelling of parametric instability (PI), collisional absorption (CA) and scattering from density fluctuations (SDF) in the edge region, performed considering the parameters of high density LHCD experiments in EAST, has shown that these mechanisms could be responsible for the low current drive (CD) efficiency at high density. Radiofrequency probe spectra, useful for documenting PI occurrence, show sidebands whose amplitude in the case of the lithiated vacuum chamber is smaller than in the case of poor lithiation, consistently with growth rates from PI modeling of the respective reference discharges. Since strong lithiation is also expected to diminish the parasitic effect on the LHCD of the remaining possible mechanisms, this appears to be a useful method for improving LHCD efficiency at a high density.

  20. Fast wave heating and current drive in tokamak plasmas with negative central shear

    SciTech Connect

    Forest, C.B.; Petty, C.C.; Baity, F.W.

    1996-07-01

    Fast waves provide an excellent tool for heating electrons and driving current in the central region of tokamak plasmas. In this paper, we report the use of centrally peaked electron heating and current drive to study transport in plasmas with negative central shear (NCS). Tokamak plasmas with NCS offer the potential of reduced energy transport and improved MHD stability properties, but will require non-inductive current drive to maintain the required current profiles. Fast waves, combined with neutral beam injection, provide the capability to change the central current density evolution and independently vary {ital T{sub e}}, and {ital T{sub i}} for transport studies in these plasmas. Electron heating also reduces the collisional heat exchange between electrons and ions and reduces the power deposition from neutral beams into electrons, thus improving the certainty in the estimate of the electron heating. The first part of this paper analyzes electron and ion heat transport in the L-mode phase of NCS plasmas as the current profile resistively evolves. The second part of the paper discusses the changes that occur in electron as well as ion energy transport in this phase of improved core confinement associated with NCS.

  1. Modeling of Optimization and Control of EBW Heating and Current Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Jakub; Decker, Joan; Peysson, Yves; Preinhaelter, Josef; Taylor, Gary; Vahala, Linda; Vahala, George

    2009-11-01

    We present a modeling of Electron Bernstein waves (EBWs) by recently coupled AMR (Antenna---Mode-conversion---Ray-tracing) and LUKE (3D Fokker-Planck) codes. The electrostatic EBW is a promising candidate for localized heating and current drive in high-β plasmas, where the standard electron cyclotron O- and X-waves are cutoff. EBW heating and current drive is simulated here in spherical tokamak conditions, particularly in typical NSTX and MAST equilibria and also in equilibria predicted by transport modeling. The EBW injection parameters are varied in order to find optimized scenarios and a possible way to control the deposition location and the driven current. This task is rather challenging because EBW ray trajectories and N spectra are strongly dependent on the plasma parameters.

  2. Electric Circuit Model Suitable for Common Mode Current Paths Distributing in the Motor Drive System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutoh, Nobuyoshi; Ogata, Mitsukatsu; Harashima, Fumio

    Experimental date are used to analyze conducted EMI noises which are produced in a motor drive system with power converters comprised of a converter and an inverter. The processes are investigated in which common mode noises (voltages and currents) are strongly influenced by voltage fluctuations occurring due to switching operations. It is found that the common mode currents are resonance currents which appear in series resonance circuits distributed in the motor drive system. The circuits have various kinds of resonance frequencies related to voltage fluctuations produced by switching operations and micro-surge voltages generated at the terminal of machines such as an ac rector or a motor. Thus, parameters of the distributed series resonance circuits are estimated using the transient waveforms obtained by separating the common mode current into waves analyzed by the FFT method. It is proved through simulations and experiments that the proposed circuit models closely represent actual electric circuits for common mode current paths distributed in the motor drive system.

  3. Self field triggered superconducting fault current limiter

    DOEpatents

    Tekletsadik, Kasegn D.

    2008-02-19

    A superconducting fault current limiter array with a plurality of superconductor elements arranged in a meanding array having an even number of supconductors parallel to each other and arranged in a plane that is parallel to an odd number of the plurality of superconductors, where the odd number of supconductors are parallel to each other and arranged in a plane that is parallel to the even number of the plurality of superconductors, when viewed from a top view. The even number of superconductors are coupled at the upper end to the upper end of the odd number of superconductors. A plurality of lower shunt coils each coupled to the lower end of each of the even number of superconductors and a plurality of upper shunt coils each coupled to the upper end of each of the odd number of superconductors so as to generate a generally orthoganal uniform magnetic field during quenching using only the magenetic field generated by the superconductors.

  4. Radial transport and electron-cyclotron-current drive in the TCV and DIII-D tokamaks.

    PubMed

    Harvey, R W; Sauter, O; Prater, R; Nikkola, P

    2002-05-20

    Calculation of electron-cyclotron-current drive (ECCD) with the comprehensive CQL3D Fokker-Planck code for a TCV tokamak shot gives 550 kA of driven toroidal current, in marked disagreement with the 100-kA experimental value. Published ECCD efficiencies calculated with CQL3D in the much larger, higher-confinement DIII-D tokamak are in excellent agreement with experiment. The disagreement is resolved by including in the calculations electrostatic-type radial transport at levels given by global energy confinement in tokamaks. The radial transport of energy and toroidal current are in agreement. PMID:12005571

  5. Closure of the single fluid magnetohydrodynamic equations in presence of electron cyclotron current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerhof, E.; Pratt, J.; Ayten, B.

    2015-03-01

    In the presence of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD), the Ohm's law of single fluid magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is modified as E + v × B = η(J - JECCD). This paper presents a new closure relation for the EC driven current density appearing in this modified Ohm's law. The new relation faithfully represents the nonlocal character of the EC driven current and its main origin in the Fisch-Boozer effect. The closure relation is validated on both an analytical solution of an approximated Fokker-Planck equation as well as on full bounce-averaged, quasi-linear Fokker-Planck code simulations of ECCD inside rotating magnetic islands.

  6. Numerical study on the influence of electron cyclotron current drive on tearing mode

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Long; Liu, Jinyuan; Mao, Aohua; Sun, Jizhong; Duan, Ping

    2014-10-15

    Controlling tearing modes by localized current drive is explored by using numerical simulation with a set of compressible magnetohydrodynamics equations. By examining the effects of different characteristics of driven current, such as density distribution, duration time, and deposition location, it is found that a driven current with larger magnitude and more focused deposition region shows a better suppression effect on the tearing modes. Meanwhile destabilizing effects are also observed when a driven current over a certain magnitude is applied continuously. In comparison with those on the X-point of the magnetic island, the results are better when the current deposition is targeted on the O-point. In addition, the timing control of the current deposition will be also addressed.

  7. Compact antenna for two-dimensional beam scan in the JT-60U electron cyclotron heating/current drive system

    SciTech Connect

    Moriyama, S.; Kajiwara, K.; Takahashi, K.; Kasugai, A.; Seki, M.; Ikeda, Y.; Fujii, T.

    2005-11-15

    A compact antenna system was designed and fabricated to enable millimeter-wave beam scanning in the toroidal and poloidal directions of the JT-60U tokamak for electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) experiments. The antenna consists of a fast movable flat mirror mounted on the tokamak vacuum vessel and a rotary focusing mirror attached at the end of the waveguide that is supported from outside the vacuum vessel. This separate support concept enables a compact structure inside a shallow port (0.68x0.54x0.2 m) that is shared with a subport for an independent diagnostic system. During a plasma shot, the flat mirror is driven by a servomotor with a 3-m-long drive shaft to reduce the influence of the high magnetic field on the motor. The focusing mirror is rotated by a simple mechanism utilizing a push rod and an air cylinder. The antenna has been operated reliably for 3 years after a small improvement to the rotary drive mechanism. It has made significant contributions to ECH and ECCD experiments, especially the current profile control in JT-60U.

  8. Calculations of Alfvén wave driving forces, plasma flow, and current drive in the Tokamak Chauffage Alfvén wave experiment in Brazil (TCABR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amarante-Segundo, G.; Elfimov, A. G.; Galvão, R. M. O.; Ross, D. W.; Nascimento, I. C.

    2001-01-01

    The current and plasma flows driven by ponderomotive forces are calculated for tokamak plasmas, using a kinetic code in the Alfvén range of frequencies. The rf (radio frequency) ponderomotive force is expressed as a sum of a gradient part and of a wave momentum transfer force, which is proportional to wave dissipation (electron Landau damping and transit time magnetic pumping). Finally, the rf force is balanced by the viscous force in the fluid momentum response to the rf fields in the plasma. The relative magnitudes of the different forces for kinetic and global Alfvén waves with low phase velocities are explicitly calculated. It is shown that, dissipating in electrons, Alfvén waves can drive ion flow via the gradient force, which is dominated in m=0-sideband harmonic resonance induced by toroidal mode coupling. Estimates of power requirements to drive substantial poloidal flow in the Tokamak Chauffage Alfvén wave heating experiment in Brazil (TCABR) [L. Ruchko, M. C. Andrade, R. M. O. Galvão, Nucl. Fusion 30, 503 (1996)] are made.

  9. Ray-tracing code TRAVIS for ECR heating, EC current drive and ECE diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marushchenko, N. B.; Turkin, Y.; Maassberg, H.

    2014-01-01

    A description of the recently developed ray-tracing code TRAVIS is given together with the theoretical background, results of benchmarking and examples of application. The code is written for electron cyclotron studies with emphasis on heating, current drive and ECE diagnostic. The code works with an arbitrary 3D magnetic equilibrium being applicable for both stellarators and tokamaks. The equations for ray tracing are taken in the weakly relativistic approach, i.e. with thermal effects taken into account, while the absorption, current drive and emissivity are calculated in the fully relativistic approach. For the calculation of ECCD, an adjoint technique with parallel momentum conservation is applied. The code is controlled through a specially designed graphical user interface, which allows the preparation of the input parameters and viewing the results in convenient (2D and 3D) form.

  10. A current-source inverter fed induction motor drive system with reduced losses

    SciTech Connect

    Espinoza, J.R.; Joos, G.

    1995-12-31

    Standard low and medium induction power motor drives are based on the PWM voltage source inverter (VSI) fed from a diode rectifier. The dual topology, based on the current source inverter/rectifier structure is used in medium and high power applications. This paper addresses some of the drawbacks of this approach compared to the voltage source approach. The proposed drive features: (a) an on-line operated PWM inverter, using instantaneous output capacitor voltage control based on space vector modulation; (b) a line-synchronized PWM rectifier, with dc bus current control; (c) an additional inverter modulation index control loop, ensuring a constant inverter modulation index. The resulting advantages include: (a) ruggedness and inherent continuous regeneration capability; (b) near unity global input power factor; (c) reduced motor voltage distortion; (d) reduced dc bus inductor and switch conduction losses; (e) fast motor dynamic response; (f) elimination of motor circuit resonances. Simulated and experimental results based on a DSP implementation are given.