Science.gov

Sample records for field evaluation due

  1. Comments on "Evaluation of interactions of electric fields due to electrostatic discharge with human tissue".

    PubMed

    Seaman, Ronald L; Comeaux, James A

    2006-06-01

    Attention is drawn to recent paper by Rogers et al. (Aug., 2004) in which ultra-wideband pulses are applied to an isolated muscle as part of deriving a strength-duration curve for threshold stimulation. The paper extends the strength-duration threshold curve for unipolar pulses down to a pulse duration of about 1 ns, on the order of 1000 times shorter than previously studied. Results of the work justify use of traditional mathematical models of the strength-duration curve for nanosecond pulses, as done recently for the electric field resulting from electrostatic discharge through the body (Dawson, et al., 2004). PMID:16761853

  2. Development of an algorithm for evaluating personal doses due to photon fields in terms of operational quantities for TLD badge system in India.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, S M; Sneha, C; Chourasiya, G; Adtani, M M; Tripathi, S M; Singh, S K

    2009-09-01

    In order to evaluate and report the personal doses in terms of personal dose equivalent, the performance of the CaSO(4):Dy based thermoluminescence dosemeter (TLD) badge used for countrywide personnel monitoring in India is investigated using monoenergetic and narrow spectrum radiation qualities equivalent to those given in ISO standards. Algorithms suitable for evaluating H(p)(10) and H(p)(0.07) within +/- 30 % are developed from the responses of dosemeter elements/discs under different filters for normal as well as angular irradiation conditions using these beams. The algorithm is tested for TLD badges irradiated to mixtures of low- and high-energy ((137)Cs) beams in various proportions. The paper concludes with the results of test of algorithm by evaluation of badges used in the IAEA/RCA intercomparison studies and discussion on inherent limitations. PMID:19755432

  3. Anisotropy in MHD turbulence due to a mean magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, J. V.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Montgomery, D.

    1982-01-01

    The development of anisotropy in an initially isotropic spectrum is studied numerically for two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. The anisotropy develops due to the combined effects of an externally imposed dc magnetic field and viscous and resistive dissipation at high wave numbers. The effect is most pronounced at high mechanical and magnetic Reynolds numbers. The anisotropy is greater at the higher wave numbers.

  4. Flow damping due to stochastization of the magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Ida, K.; Yoshinuma, M.; Tsuchiya, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Suzuki, C.; Yokoyama, M.; Shimizu, A.; Nagaoka, K.; Inagaki, S.; Itoh, K.; Akiyama, T.; Emoto, M.; Evans, T.; Dinklage, A.; Du, X.; Fujii, K.; Goto, M.; Goto, T.; Hasuo, M.; Hidalgo, C.; Ichiguchi, K.; Ishizawa, A.; Jakubowski, M.; Kamiya, K.; Kasahara, H.; Kawamura, G.; Kato, D.; Kobayashi, M.; Morita, S.; Mukai, K.; Murakami, I.; Murakami, S.; Narushima, Y.; Nunami, M.; Ohdach, S.; Ohno, N.; Osakabe, M.; Pablant, N.; Sakakibara, S.; Seki, T.; Shimozuma, T.; Shoji, M.; Sudo, S.; Tanaka, K.; Tokuzawa, T.; Todo, Y.; Wang, H.; Yamada, H.; Takeiri, Y.; Mutoh, T.; Imagawa, S.; Mito, T.; Nagayama, Y.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Ashikawa, N.; Chikaraishi, H.; Ejiri, A.; Furukawa, M.; Fujita, T.; Hamaguchi, S.; Igami, H.; Isobe, M.; Masuzaki, S.; Morisaki, T.; Motojima, G.; Nagasaki, K.; Nakano, H.; Oya, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Sakamoto, R.; Sakamoto, M.; Sanpei, A.; Takahashi, H.; Tokitani, M.; Ueda, Y.; Yoshimura, Y.; Yamamoto, S.; Nishimura, K.; Sugama, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Idei, H.; Isayama, A.; Kitajima, S.; Masamune, S.; Shinohara, K.; Bawankar, P. S.; Bernard, E.; von Berkel, M.; Funaba, H.; Huang, X. L.; Ii, T.; Ido, T.; Ikeda, K.; Kamio, S.; Kumazawa, R.; Moon, C.; Muto, S.; Miyazawa, J.; Ming, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Nishimura, S.; Ogawa, K.; Ozaki, T.; Oishi, T.; Ohno, M.; Pandya, S.; Seki, R.; Sano, R.; Saito, K.; Sakaue, H.; Takemura, Y.; Tsumori, K.; Tamura, N.; Tanaka, H.; Toi, K.; Wieland, B.; Yamada, I.; Yasuhara, R.; Zhang, H.; Kaneko, O.; Komori, A.

    2015-01-01

    The driving and damping mechanism of plasma flow is an important issue because flow shear has a significant impact on turbulence in a plasma, which determines the transport in the magnetized plasma. Here we report clear evidence of the flow damping due to stochastization of the magnetic field. Abrupt damping of the toroidal flow associated with a transition from a nested magnetic flux surface to a stochastic magnetic field is observed when the magnetic shear at the rational surface decreases to 0.5 in the large helical device. This flow damping and resulting profile flattening are much stronger than expected from the Rechester–Rosenbluth model. The toroidal flow shear shows a linear decay, while the ion temperature gradient shows an exponential decay. This observation suggests that the flow damping is due to the change in the non-diffusive term of momentum transport. PMID:25569268

  5. Alignment of atmospheric mineral dust due to electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulanowski, Z.; Bailey, J.; Lucas, P. W.; Hough, J. H.; Hirst, E.

    2007-12-01

    Optical polarimetry observations on La Palma, Canary Islands, during a Saharan dust episode show dichroic extinction indicating the presence of vertically aligned particles in the atmosphere. Modelling of the extinction together with particle orientation indicates that the alignment could have been due to an electric field of the order of 2 kV/m. Two alternative mechanisms for the origin of the field are examined: the effect of reduced atmospheric conductivity and charging of the dust layer, the latter effect being a more likely candidate. It is concluded that partial alignment may be a common feature of Saharan dust layers. The modelling indicates that the alignment can significantly alter dust optical depth. This "Venetian blind effect" may have decreased optical thickness in the vertical direction by as much as 10% for the case reported here. It is also possible that the alignment and the electric field modify dust transport.

  6. Biological effects due to weak magnetic field on plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyavskaya, N. A.

    2004-01-01

    Throughout the evolution process, Earth's magnetic field (MF, about 50 μT) was a natural component of the environment for living organisms. Biological objects, flying on planned long-term interplanetary missions, would experience much weaker magnetic fields, since galactic MF is known to be 0.1-1 nT. However, the role of weak magnetic fields and their influence on functioning of biological organisms are still insufficiently understood, and is actively studied. Numerous experiments with seedlings of different plant species placed in weak magnetic field have shown that the growth of their primary roots is inhibited during early germination stages in comparison with control. The proliferative activity and cell reproduction in meristem of plant roots are reduced in weak magnetic field. Cell reproductive cycle slows down due to the expansion of G 1 phase in many plant species (and of G 2 phase in flax and lentil roots), while other phases of cell cycle remain relatively stabile. In plant cells exposed to weak magnetic field, the functional activity of genome at early pre-replicate period is shown to decrease. Weak magnetic field causes intensification of protein synthesis and disintegration in plant roots. At ultrastructural level, changes in distribution of condensed chromatin and nucleolus compactization in nuclei, noticeable accumulation of lipid bodies, development of a lytic compartment (vacuoles, cytosegresomes and paramural bodies), and reduction of phytoferritin in plastids in meristem cells were observed in pea roots exposed to weak magnetic field. Mitochondria were found to be very sensitive to weak magnetic field: their size and relative volume in cells increase, matrix becomes electron-transparent, and cristae reduce. Cytochemical studies indicate that cells of plant roots exposed to weak magnetic field show Ca 2+ over-saturation in all organelles and in cytoplasm unlike the control ones. The data presented suggest that prolonged exposures of plants to weak

  7. Lower Atmospheric Electric Field due to Cloud Charge Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Suman; Haldar, Dilip kumar; Sundar De, Syam; Ghosh, Abhijit; Hazra, Pranab; Bandyopadhyay, Bijoy

    2016-07-01

    The distributions of electric charge in the electrified clouds introduce important effects in the ionosphere and into the region between the ionosphere and the Earth. The electrical properties of the medium are changed greatly between thundercloud altitudes and the magnetosphere. A model for the penetration of DC thundercloud electric field between the Earth's upper and lower atmosphere has been presented here. The model deals with the electromagnetic responses of the atmosphere simulated through Maxwell's equations together with a time-varying source charge distribution. The modified ellipsoidal-Gaussian profile has been taken for the charge distribution of the electrified cloud. The conductivity profile of the medium is taken to be isotropic below 70 km height and anisotropic above 70 km. The Earth's surface is considered to be perfectly conducting. A general form of equation representing the thundercloud electric field component is deduced. In spite of assumptions for axial symmetry of thundercloud charge distribution considered in the model, the results are obtained giving the electric field variation in the upper atmosphere. The vertical component of the electric field would relate the global electric circuit while the radial component showed the electrical coupling between the lower atmosphere and the ionized Earth's environment. The variations of the values of field components for different heights as well as Maxwell's current have been evaluated. Coupling between the troposphere and the ionosphere is critically dependent on the height variations of electrical conductivity. Field-aligned electron density irregularities in the ionosphere may be investigated through the present analyses.

  8. On the Vertigo Due to Static Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Mian, Omar S.; Li, Yan; Antunes, Andre; Glover, Paul M.; Day, Brian L.

    2013-01-01

    Vertigo is sometimes experienced in and around MRI scanners. Mechanisms involving stimulation of the vestibular system by movement in magnetic fields or magnetic field spatial gradients have been proposed. However, it was recently shown that vestibular-dependent ocular nystagmus is evoked when stationary in homogenous static magnetic fields. The proposed mechanism involves Lorentz forces acting on endolymph to deflect semicircular canal (SCC) cupulae. To investigate whether vertigo arises from a similar mechanism we recorded qualitative and quantitative aspects of vertigo and 2D eye movements from supine healthy adults (n = 25) deprived of vision while pushed into the 7T static field of an MRI scanner. Exposures were variable and included up to 135s stationary at 7T. Nystagmus was mainly horizontal, persisted during long-exposures with partial decline, and reversed upon withdrawal. The dominant vertiginous perception with the head facing up was rotation in the horizontal plane (85% incidence) with a consistent direction across participants. With the head turned 90 degrees in yaw the perception did not transform into equivalent vertical plane rotation, indicating a context-dependency of the perception. During long exposures, illusory rotation lasted on average 50 s, including 42 s whilst stationary at 7T. Upon withdrawal, perception re-emerged and reversed, lasting on average 30 s. Onset fields for nystagmus and perception were significantly correlated (p<.05). Although perception did not persist as long as nystagmus, this is a known feature of continuous SSC stimulation. These observations, and others in the paper, are compatible with magnetic-field evoked-vertigo and nystagmus sharing a common mechanism. With this interpretation, response decay and reversal upon withdrawal from the field, are due to adaptation to continuous vestibular input. Although the study does not entirely exclude the possibility of mechanisms involving transient vestibular stimulation

  9. Alignment of atmospheric mineral dust due to electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulanowski, Z.; Bailey, J.; Lucas, P. W.; Hough, J. H.; Hirst, E.

    2007-09-01

    Optical polarimetry observations on La Palma, Canary Islands, during a Saharan dust episode show dichroic extinction consistent with the presence of vertically aligned particles in the atmosphere. Modelling of the extinction together with particle orientation indicates that the alignment could have been due to an electric field of the order of 2 kV/m. Two alternative mechanisms for the origin of the field are examined: the effect of reduced atmospheric conductivity and charging of the dust layer, the latter effect being a more likely candidate. It is concluded that partial alignment may be a common feature of Saharan dust layers. The modelling also indicates that the alignment can significantly alter dust optical depth. This "Venetian blind effect" may have decreased optical thickness in the vertical direction by as much as 10% for the case reported here.

  10. Coherent Excited States in Superconductors due to a Microwave Field.

    PubMed

    Semenov, A V; Devyatov, I A; de Visser, P J; Klapwijk, T M

    2016-07-22

    We describe theoretically the depairing effect of a microwave field on diffusive s-wave superconductors. The ground state of the superconductor is altered qualitatively in analogy to the depairing due to a dc current. In contrast to dc depairing, the density of states acquires, for microwaves with frequency ω_{0}, steps at multiples of the photon energy Δ±nℏω_{0} and shows an exponential-like tail in the subgap regime. We show that this ac depairing explains the measured frequency shift of a superconducting resonator with microwave power at low temperatures. PMID:27494495

  11. Gravitational vacuum polarization phenomena due to the Higgs field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onofrio, Roberto

    2012-05-01

    In the standard model the mass of elementary particles is considered as a dynamical property emerging from their interaction with the Higgs field. We show that this assumption implies peculiar deviations from the law of universal gravitation in its distance and mass dependence, as well as from the superposition principle. The experimental observation of the predicted deviations from the law of universal gravitation seems out of reach. However, we argue that a new class of experiments aimed at studying the influence of surrounding masses on the gravitational force—similar to the ones performed by Quirino Majorana almost a century ago—could be performed to test the superposition principle and to give direct limits on the presence of nonminimal couplings between the Higgs field and the spacetime curvature. From the conceptual viewpoint, the violation of the superposition principle for gravitational forces due to the Higgs field creates a conflict with the notion that gravitational potentials, as assumed in Newtonian gravitation or in post-Newtonian parameterizations of metric theories, are well-defined concepts to describe gravity in their non-relativistic limit.

  12. Report of Field Test Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Regional Instructional Materials Center for Handicapped Children and Youth.

    Reported by the Great Lakes Region Special Education Instructional Materials Center are field test evaluation of 18 auditory instructional materials for use with handicapped children who learn best through the auditory modality. Among materials evaluated are a taped program on use of the abacus and a cassette audiotape on bird habits and sounds.…

  13. Biological effects due to weak magnetic fields on plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyavskaya, N.

    In the evolution process, living organisms have experienced the action of the Earth's magnetic field (MF) that is a natural component of our environment. It is known that a galactic MF induction does not exceed 0.1 nT, since investigations of weak magnetic field (WMF) effects on biological systems have attracted attention of biologists due to planning long-term space flights to other planets where the magnetizing force is near 10-5 Oe. However, the role of WMF and its influence on organisms' functioning are still insufficiently investigated. A large number of experiments with seedlings of different plant species placed in WMF has found that the growth of their primary roots is inhibited during the early terms of germination in comparison with control. The proliferation activity and cell reproduction are reduced in meristem of plant roots under WMF application. The prolongation of total cell reproductive cycle is registered due to the expansion of G phase in1 different plant species as well as of G phase in flax and lentil roots along with2 relative stability of time parameters of other phases of cell cycle. In plant cells exposed to WMF, the decrease in functional activity of genome at early prereplicate period is shown. WMF causes the intensification in the processes of proteins' synthesis and break-up in plant roots. Qualitative and quantitative changes in protein spectrum in growing and differentiated cells of plant roots exposed to WMF are revealed. At ultrastructural level, there are observed such ultrastructural peculiarities as changes in distribution of condensed chromatin and nucleolus compactization in nuclei, noticeable accumulation of lipid bodies, development of a lytic compartment (vacuoles, cytosegresomes and paramural bodies), and reduction of phytoferritin in plastids in meristem cells of pea roots exposed to WMF. Mitochondria are the most sensitive organelle to WMF application: their size and relative volume in cells increase, matrix is electron

  14. Evaluating cotton stripper field performance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton strippers are used primarily in the Southern High Plains due to the specific cotton varieties grown. Typically, cotton strippers cost about two-thirds the price of a cotton picker and range from one-half to one-fourth the horsepower. A cotton stripper also has a higher field and harvesting ef...

  15. Evaluating and minimizing noise impact due to aircraft flyover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, I. D.

    1980-01-01

    The results of a study on the evaluation and reduction of noise impact to a community due to aircraft landing and takeoff operations are presented. The case of multiple aircrafts flying on several trajectories, for either approach/landings or takeoffs was examined. An extremely realistic model of the flight path was developed. The annoyance criterion used was the noise impact index (NII). The algorithm was applied to Patrick Henry International Airport.

  16. Students drop out of STEM fields due to poor grades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2013-09-01

    College students planning to major in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields often drop out of those fields because of poorer than expected grades, according to a recent study. Conducted by Ralph Stinebrickner of Berea College in Kentucky and Todd Stinebrickner of the University of Western Ontario, the study is a National Bureau of Economic Research working paper published in June 2013.

  17. Currents and electric fields in the ionosphere due to field-aligned auroral currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nisbet, J. S.; Miller, M. J.; Carpenter, L. A.

    1978-01-01

    Birkeland (1908, 1913) did a detailed analysis of the upper atmospheric current system in the high-latitude region, and suggested that field-aligned currents flowing into and out of the auroral ionosphere were the driving mechanism for this current system. In the present paper, static electric field and current patterns due to the field-aligned Birkeland currents are examined, using a model in which currents approximating those reported by Iijima and Potemra (1976) are used as input to a global model of the ionospheric conductivities, in which interhemispheric coupling along field lines is included. The model reproduces the main features of the high-latitude current and voltage system and the penetration of these currents within the plasmasphere.

  18. V-fields due latest monitoring, control technology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-29

    Conoco (U.K.) Ltd. this spring begins the installation phase of its V-fields project in the southern basin of the British North Sea. A feature of the $1.25 billion project to develop the Vulcan, North and South Valiant, and Vanguard fields will be one of the most sophisticated control and monitoring systems in the North Sea. The Calcam system (Computer Assisted Logic Control and Monitoring) was designed, developed, and manufactured by Conoco U.K.'s southern offshore operations division. Calcam was first operated successfully on Conoco's Victor and Viking facilities in 1984. The V-fields are about 15 miles west of the Victor and Viking developments. Conoco is installing a central gas gathering complex which will handle the output from two unmanned satellite wellhead drilling platforms on the Vulcan field, two on North Valiant, and one each of Vanguard and South Valiant. The three fields have combined reserves of about 1.4 tcf. Gas will be delivered to Conoco's existing reception terminal on the coast of Lincolnshire at Theddlethorpe which handles gas from the Viking and Victor fields.

  19. Enhanced nucleation fields due to dipolar interactions in nanocomposite magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischbacher, Johann; Bance, Simon; Exl, Lukas; Gusenbauer, Markus; Oezelt, Harald; Reichel, Franz; Schrefl, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    One approach to construct powerful permanent magnets while using less rare-earth elements is to combine a hard magnetic material having a high coercive field with a soft magnetic material having a high saturation magnetization at the nanometer scale and create so-called nanocomposite magnets. If both materials are strongly coupled, exchange forces will form a stable magnet. We use finite element micromagnetics simulations to investigate the changing hysteresis properties for varying arrays of soft magnetic spherical inclusions in a hard magnetic body. We show that the anisotropy arising from dipolar interactions between soft magnetic particles in a hard magnetic matrix can enhance the nucleation field by more than 10% and strongly depends on the arrangement of the inclusions.

  20. Evaluation Model of Life Loss Due to Dam Failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Dongjing

    2016-04-01

    Dam failure poses a serious threat to human life, however there is still lack of systematic research on life loss which due to dam failure in China. From the perspective of protecting human life, an evaluation model for life loss caused by dam failure is put forward. The model building gets three progressive steps. Twenty dam failure cases in China are preferably chosen as the basic data, considering geographical location and construction time of dams, as well as various conditions of dam failure. Then twelve impact factors of life loss are selected, including severity degree of flood, population at risk, understanding of dam failure, warning time, evacuation condition, number of damaged buildings, water temperature, reservoir storage, dam height, dam type, break time and distance from flood area to dam. And through principal component analysis, it gets four principal components consisting of the first flood character principle component, the second warning system principle component, the third human character principle component and the fourth space-time impact principle component. After multivariate nonlinear regression and ten-fold validation in combination, the evaluation model for life loss is finally established. And the result of the proposed model is closer to the true value and better in fitting effect in comparison with the results of RESCDAM method and M. Peng method. The proposed model is not only applied to evaluate life loss and its rate under various kinds of dam failure conditions in China, but also provides reliable cause analysis and prediction approach to reduce the risk of life loss.

  1. Evaluation of workers exposure to magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canova, A.; Freschi, F.; Repetto, M.

    2010-11-01

    Following ICNIRP Guidelines of 1998, European Parliament in 2004 has stated the reference levels for workers exposure to electromagnetic fields. In low frequency regime, due to the nature of the basic mechanism of short term interaction, the exposure limits are based on the values of induced eddy currents inside human body, thus electromagnetic simulation is an important tool for the assessment of electromagnetic field exposure. This paper presents a method for computing eddy currents inside human body and applies the method to the evaluation of eddy currents induced by a resistance spot welding system. A comparison between results obtained with two different models of human body and with different discretization levels is performed and results are discussed.

  2. Aerodynamic sound generation due to vortex-aerofoil interaction. Part 2: Analysis of the acoustic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parasarathy, R.; Karamcheti, K.

    1972-01-01

    The Lighthill method was the basic procedure used to analyze the sound field associated with a vortex of modified strength interacting with an airfoil. A free vortex interacting with an airfoil in uniform motion was modeled in order to determine the sound field due to all the acoustic sources, not only on the airfoil surfaces (dipoles), but also the ones distributed on the perturbed flow field (quadrupoles) due to the vortex-airfoil interaction. Because inviscid flow is assumed in the study of the interaction, the quadrupoles considered in the perturbed flow field are entirely due to an unsteady flow field. The effects of airfoil thickness on the second radiation are examined by using a symmetric Joukowski airfoil for the vortex-airfoil interaction. Sound radiation in a plane, far field simplification, and computation of the sound field are discussed.

  3. Ground penetrating radar field evaluation in Angola

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, Richard; Brown, Todd; Clodfelter, Fred; Coors, Jeff; Laudato, Stephen; Lauziere, Steve; Patrikar, Ajay; Poole, Michael; Price, Mike

    2006-05-01

    Deminers around the globe are still using handheld metal detectors that lack the capability to distinguish mines from clutter, detect mines containing very little metal, or find mines buried at deeper depths. In the southern African country of Angola, many areas and roads are impassable due to the threat of anti-tank landmines. Some of these mines are undetectable using current metal detector technology. The US Army has funded the development of the NIITEK ground penetrating radar (GPR) for detection of anti-tank (AT) landmines. This radar detects metal and plastic mines as well as mines that are buried too deep for handheld metal detectors to find. The US Department of Defense Humanitarian Demining (HD) Research & Development Program focuses on developing, testing, demonstrating, and validating new technology for immediate use in humanitarian demining operations around the globe. The HD team provided funding and guidance to NIITEK Incorporated for development of a prototype system called Mine Stalker - a relatively light-weight, remote-controlled vehicle outfitted with the NIITEK GPR, detection algorithms, and a marking system. Individuals from the HD team, NIITEK Inc, and the non-governmental organization Meschen Gegen Minen (MgM) participated in a field evaluation of the Mine Stalker in Angola. The primary aim was to evaluate the effectiveness and reliability of the NIITEK GPR under field conditions. The Mine Stalker was extremely reliable during the evaluation with no significant maintenance issues. All AT mines used to verify GPR performance were detected, even when buried to depths as deep as 25-33cm.

  4. Evaluating and minimizing noise impact due to aircraft flyover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, I. D.; Cook, G.

    1979-01-01

    Existing techniques were used to assess the noise impact on a community due to aircraft operation and to optimize the flight paths of an approaching aircraft with respect to the annoyance produced. Major achievements are: (1) the development of a population model suitable for determining the noise impact, (2) generation of a numerical computer code which uses this population model along with the steepest descent algorithm to optimize approach/landing trajectories, (3) implementation of this optimization code in several fictitious cases as well as for the community surrounding Patrick Henry International Airport, Virginia.

  5. Field Evaluation of Programmable Thermostats

    SciTech Connect

    Sachs, O.; Tiefenbeck, V.; Duvier, C.; Qin, A.; Cheney, K.; Akers, C.; Roth, K.

    2012-12-01

    Prior research suggests that poor programmable thermostats usability may prevent their effective use to save energy. We hypothesized that home occupants with a high-usability thermostats would be more likely to use them to save energy than people with a basic thermostat. We randomly installed a high-usability thermostat in half the 77 apartments of an affordable housing complex, installing a basic thermostat in the other half. During the heating season, we collected space temperature and furnace on-off data to evaluate occupant interaction with the thermostats, foremost nighttime setbacks. We found that thermostat usability did not influence energy-saving behaviors, finding no significant difference in temperature maintained among apartments with high- and low-usability thermostats.

  6. Evaluating small-body landing hazards due to blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, C.; Rodgers, D.; Barnouin, O.; Murchie, S.; Chabot, N.

    2014-07-01

    Introduction: Landed missions represent a vital stage of spacecraft exploration of planetary bodies. Landed science allows for a wide variety of measurements essential to unraveling the origin and evolution of a body that are not possible remotely, including but not limited to compositional measurements, microscopic grain characterization, and the physical properties of the regolith. To date, two spacecraft have performed soft landings on the surface of a small body. In 2001, the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) mission performed a controlled descent and landing on (433) Eros following the completion of its mission [1]; in 2005, the Hayabusa spacecraft performed two touch-and-go maneuvers at (25143) Itokawa [2]. Both landings were preceded by rendezvous spacecraft reconnaissance, which enabled selection of a safe landing site. Three current missions have plans to land on small bodies (Rosetta, Hayabusa 2, and OSIRIS-REx); several other mission concepts also include small-body landings. Small-body landers need to land at sites having slopes and block abundances within spacecraft design limits. Due to the small scale of the potential hazards, it can be difficult or impossible to fully characterize a landing surface before the arrival of the spacecraft at the body. Although a rendezvous mission phase can provide global reconnaissance from which a landing site can be chosen, reasonable a priori assurance that a safe landing site exists is needed to validate the design approach for the spacecraft. Method: Many robotic spacecraft have landed safely on the Moon and Mars. Images of these landing sites, as well as more recent, extremely high-resolution orbital datasets, have enabled the comparison of orbital block observations to the smaller blocks that pose hazards to landers. Analyses of the Surveyor [3], Viking 1 and 2, Mars Pathfinder, Phoenix, Spirit, Opportunity, and Curiosity landing sites [4--8] have indicated that for a reasonable difference in size (a factor

  7. Near-field induction heating of metallic nanoparticles due to infrared magnetic dipole contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapuis, Pierre-Olivier; Laroche, Marine; Volz, Sebastian; Greffet, Jean-Jacques

    2008-03-01

    We revisit the electromagnetic heat transfer between a metallic nanoparticle and a highly conductive metallic semi-infinite substrate, commonly studied using the electric dipole approximation. For infrared and microwave frequencies, we find that the magnetic polarizability of the particle is larger than the electric one. We also find that the local density of states in the near field is dominated by the magnetic contribution. As a consequence, the power absorbed by the particle in the near field is due to dissipation by fluctuating eddy currents. These results show that a number of near-field effects involving metallic particles should be affected by the fluctuating magnetic fields.

  8. Field evaluation of a humic product in Iowa corn fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The benefit to corn production of a humic product derived from lignite was evaluated for three years under otherwise conventional crop management in Iowa farmers’ fields. Humic material was applied as a liquid extract at a rate of 3 pints acre-1 (0.57 L ha-1), generally as a foliar spray along with ...

  9. Dielectrophoretic sphere-wall repulsion due to a uniform electric field.

    PubMed

    Yariv, Ehud

    2016-07-20

    When a zero-net-charge particle is placed under a uniform electric field, the decay of the Maxwell stress with the third power of distance ensures a nil electric force. A nonzero force may nonetheless be generated in the presence of a planar wall due to a mechanism which resembles conventional dielectrophoresis under nonuniform fields. In the prototypical case of a spherical particle this force acts perpendicular to the wall; its magnitude depends upon the pertinent boundary conditions governing the electric potential. When a particle is suspended in an electrolyte solution, where the double-layer structure ensures zero net charge, these conditions are electrokinetic in nature; they involve a balance between bulk conduction and diffusion, represented by normal derivatives, and an effective surface-conduction mechanism, represented by surface-Laplacian terms whose magnitude is quantified by appropriate Dukhin numbers. The dimensionless force depends upon the particle and wall Dukhin numbers as well as the ratio λ of the size of the particle to its distance from the wall. The remote-particle limit λ ≪ 1 is addressed using successive reflections. Calculation of the first few terms in the asymptotic expansion of the force only requires the evaluation of a single reflection from the wall. The leading-order term, scaling as λ(4), is repulsive, with a magnitude that varies non-monotonically with the particle Dukhin number and is independent of the wall Dukhin number. Surface conditions on the wall enter only at the O(λ(5)) leading-order correction. PMID:27384257

  10. Evaluation of near-field earthquake effects

    SciTech Connect

    Shrivastava, H.P.

    1994-11-01

    Structures and equipment, which are qualified for the design basis earthquake (DBE) and have anchorage designed for the DBE loading, do not require an evaluation of the near-field earthquake (NFE) effects. However, safety class 1 acceleration sensitive equipment such as electrical relays must be evaluated for both NFE and DBE since they are known to malfunction when excited by high frequency seismic motions.

  11. ANALYSIS OF HIGH FIELD NON-LINEAR LOSSES ON SRF SURFACES DUE TO SPECIFIC TOPOGRAPHIC ROUGHNESS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xu,Charles Reece,Michael Kelley

    2012-07-01

    The high-field performance of SRF cavities will eventually be limited by the realization of fundamental material limits, whether it is Hc1 or Hsh, or some derivative thereof, at which the superconductivity is lost. Before reaching this fundamental field limit at the macro level, it must be encountered at localized, perhaps microscopic, sites of field enhancement due to local topography. If such sites are small enough, they may produce thermally stabilized normal-conducting regions which contribute non-linear losses when viewed from the macro resonant field perspective, and thus produce degradation in Q0. We have undertaken a calculation of local surface magnetic field enhancement from specific fine topographic structure by conformal mapping method and numerically. A solution of the resulting normal conducting volume has been derived and the corresponding RF Ohmic loss simulated.

  12. Deformation of a nearly hemispherical conducting drop due to an electric field: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corson, L. T.; Tsakonas, C.; Duffy, B. R.; Mottram, N. J.; Sage, I. C.; Brown, C. V.; Wilson, S. K.

    2014-12-01

    We consider, both theoretically and experimentally, the deformation due to an electric field of a pinned nearly hemispherical static sessile drop of an ionic fluid with a high conductivity resting on the lower substrate of a parallel-plate capacitor. Using both numerical and asymptotic approaches, we find solutions to the coupled electrostatic and augmented Young-Laplace equations which agree very well with the experimental results. Our asymptotic solution for the drop interface extends previous work in two ways, namely, to drops that have zero-field contact angles that are not exactly π/2 and to higher order in the applied electric field, and provides useful predictive equations for the changes in the height, contact angle, and pressure as functions of the zero-field contact angle, drop radius, surface tension, and applied electric field. The asymptotic solution requires some numerical computations, and so a surprisingly accurate approximate analytical asymptotic solution is also obtained.

  13. Modeling Long-Term Soil Losses on Agricultural Fields Due to Ephemeral Gully Erosion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is now recognized worldwide that soil erosion on agricultural fields due to ephemeral gullies may be greater than those losses attributed to sheet and rill erosion processes. Yet it is not known whether the common practice of repairing or obliterating these gullies during annual tillage activitie...

  14. Melt Motion Due to Peltier Marking During Bridgman Crystal Growth with an Axial Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, C. C.; Walker, John S.; Szofran, Frank R.; Motakef, Shariar

    2000-01-01

    This paper treats a liquid-metal flow inside an electrically insulating cylinder with electrically conducting solids above and below the liquid region. There is a uniform axial magnetic field, and there is an electric current through the liquid and both solids. Since the lower liquid-solid interface is concave into the solid and since the liquid is a better electrical conductor than the adjacent solid, the electric current is locally concentrated near the centerline. The return to a uniform current distribution involves a radial electric current which interacts with the axial magnetic field to drive an azimuthal flow. The axial variation of the centrifugal force due to the azimuthal velocity drives a meridional circulation with radial and axial velocities. This problem models the effects of Peltier marking during the vertical Bridgman growth of semiconductor crystals with an externally applied magnetic field, where the meridional circulation due to the Peltier Current may produce important mixing in the molten semiconductor.

  15. Surface potential at a ferroelectric grain due to asymmetric screening of depolarization fields

    SciTech Connect

    Genenko, Yuri A. Hirsch, Ofer; Erhart, Paul

    2014-03-14

    Nonlinear screening of electric depolarization fields, generated by a stripe domain structure in a ferroelectric grain of a polycrystalline material, is studied within a semiconductor model of ferroelectrics. It is shown that the maximum strength of local depolarization fields is rather determined by the electronic band gap than by the spontaneous polarization magnitude. Furthermore, field screening due to electronic band bending and due to presence of intrinsic defects leads to asymmetric space charge regions near the grain boundary, which produce an effective dipole layer at the surface of the grain. This results in the formation of a potential difference between the grain surface and its interior of the order of 1 V, which can be of either sign depending on defect transition levels and concentrations. Exemplary acceptor doping of BaTiO{sub 3} is shown to allow tuning of the said surface potential in the region between 0.1 and 1.3 V.

  16. Field evaluation of Bemisia parasitoids in Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two methods were employed to assess the potential of candidate parasitoid species/strains to parasitize B. tabaci under field conditions in Texas. Sleeve cage evaluations were conducted in kale, cantaloupe melons, and cotton in 1994–1995. In kale, the highest parasitism rates were observed for two s...

  17. Electric field variations due to resonance between ground velocity and ions motion in the Earth's magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushima, M.; Honkura, Y.; Kuriki, M.; Ogawa, Y.

    2011-12-01

    We have so far observed clear electric field variations coincident with the passage of seismic waves. Circular polarization of electric field is the distinguishing feature in this phenomenon which can be interpreted in terms of the so-called seismic dynamo effect proposed by Honkura et al. (2009). That is, circularly polarized electric field is caused by resonance-like motion of ion in groundwater under the Earth's magnetic field. Therefore, left-handed and right-handed circular polarizations, if seen towards the direction of the magnetic field, are associated with anions with negative charge and cations with positive charge, respectively. Such polarization may be inconsistent with seismoelectric signals due to the electrokinetic mechanism, because they are mainly found in the direction of transmission of seismic compressional waves, as pointed out by Strahser et al. (2007) who examined polarization of seismoelectric signals by recording the three components of electric field. However, even such circular polarization of electric field is somehow interpreted in terms of the electrokinetic mechanism. Therefore, further convincing evidence is required to support the seismic dynamo effect. On 25-26 July 2011, an experiment for studies of crustal seismic structure was made in central Japan. We carried out simultaneous observations of ground velocity and electric field on this occasion at three sites near a blasting point using 50 kg of dynamite; about 280 m east-southeast, about 190 m east, and about 360 m northwest from the blasting point. Taking into account typical frequencies of ground velocity for artificial earthquakes by blasting higher than those for natural earthquakes, we used data loggers with sampling rate of 1 kHz and could obtain the waveforms of ground velocity and electric field very clearly. We show characteristics of electric field variations, their dependence of azimuth angle with respect to the blasting point, and frequency response functions.

  18. Evaluation of military field-water quality

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, J.I.; Gallegos, G.M.

    1990-05-01

    This is the first and summary volume of the nine-volume study entitled Evaluation of Military Field-Water Quality. This study is a comprehensive assessment of the chemical, radiological, and biological constituents of field-water supplied that could pose health risks to military personnel around the world; it also provides a detailed evaluation of the field-water-treatment capability of the US Armed Forces. This study identifies as being of concern three physical properties, i.e., turbidity, color, and total dissolved solids; seven chemical constituents, i.e., chloride, magnesium, sulfate, arsenic, cyanide, lindane, and metabolites of algae and associated aquatic bacteria; and over twenty types of water-related pathogenic microorganisms. It also addresses five threat agents, i.e., hydrogen cyanide, radioactivity, organophosphorous nerve agents, the trichotecene mycotoxin T-2, and lewisite. An overview of the criteria and recommendations for standards for these constituents for short- term and long-term exposure periods are presented in this volume, as are health-effects summaries for assessing the potential soldier performance degradation when recommended standards are exceeded. In addition, the existing military field-water-treatment capability is reviewed, and an abbreviated discussion is presented of the general physical, chemical, and biological qualities of field waters in geographic regions worldwide, representing potential theaters of operation for US military forces. Finally, research recommendations are outlined. 18 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Dynamical Effects Due to Fringe Field of the Magnets in Circular Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Nosochkov, Yu.; /SLAC

    2005-05-16

    The leading Lie generators, including the chromatic effects, due to hard-edge fringe field of single multipole and solenoid are derived from the vector potentials within a Hamiltonian system. These nonlinear generators are applied to the interaction region of PEP-II to analyze the linear errors due to the feed-down from the off-centered quadrupoles and solenoid. The nonlinear effects of tune shifts at large amplitude, the synchro-betatron sidebands near half integer and their impacts on the dynamic aperture are studied in the paper.

  20. Frequency shifts in NIST Cs primary frequency standards due to transverse rf field gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashby, Neil; Barlow, Stephan; Heavner, Thomas; Jefferts, Steven

    2015-03-01

    A single-particle Green's function (propagator) is introduced to study the deflection of laser-cooled cesium atoms in an atomic fountain due to microwave magnetic field gradients in the Ramsey TE011 cavity. The deflection results in a state-dependent loss of atoms at apertures in the physics package, resulting in a frequency bias. A model accounting only for motion in one dimension transverse to the symmetry axis of the fountain is discussed in detail and then generalized to two transverse dimensions. Results for fractional frequency shifts due to transverse field gradients are computed for NIST-F1 and NIST-F2 cesium fountains. The shifts are found to be negligible except in cases of higher rf power applied to the cavities.

  1. The magnetic field inside a layered anisotropic spherical conductor due to internal sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieminen, Jaakko O.; Stenroos, Matti

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in neuronal current imaging using magnetic resonance imaging and in invasive measurement of neuronal magnetic fields have given a need for methods to compute the magnetic field inside a volume conductor due to source currents that are within the conductor. In this work, we derive, verify, and demonstrate an analytical expression for the magnetic field inside an anisotropic multilayer spherically symmetric conductor due to an internal current dipole. We casted an existing solution for electric field to vector spherical harmonic (VSH) form. Next, we wrote an ansatz for the magnetic field using toroidal-poloidal decomposition that uses the same VSHs. Using properties of toroidal and poloidal components and VSHs and applying magnetic scalar potential, we then formulated a series expression for the magnetic field. The convergence of the solution was accelerated by formulating the solution using an addition-subtraction method. We verified the resulting formula against boundary-element method. The verification showed that the formulas and implementation are correct; 99th percentiles of amplitude and angle differences between the solutions were below 0.5% and 0.5°, respectively. As expected, the addition-subtraction model converged faster than the unaccelerated model; close to the source, 250 terms gave relative error below 1%, and the number of needed terms drops fast, as the distance to the source increases. Depending on model conductivities and source position, field patterns inside a layered sphere may differ considerably from those in a homogeneous sphere. In addition to being a practical modeling tool, the derived solution can be used to verify numerical methods, especially finite-element method, inside layered anisotropic conductors.

  2. Field collapse due to band-tail charge in amorphous silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qi; Crandall, R.S.; Schiff, E.A.

    1996-05-01

    It is common for the fill factor to decrease with increasing illumination intensity in hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells. This is especially critical for thicker solar cells, because the decrease is more severe than in thinner cells. Usually, the fill factor under uniformly absorbed red light changes much more than under strongly absorbed blue light. The cause of this is usually assumed to arise from space charge trapped in deep defect states. The authors model this behavior of solar cells using the Analysis of Microelectronic and Photonic Structures (AMPS) simulation program. The simulation shows that the decrease in fill factor is caused by photogenerated space charge trapped in the band-tail states rather than in defects. This charge screens the applied field, reducing the internal field. Owing to its lower drift mobility, the space charge due to holes exceeds that due to electrons and is the main cause of the field screening. The space charge in midgap states is small compared with that in the tails and can be ignored under normal solar-cell operating conditions. Experimentally, the authors measured the photocapacitance as a means to probe the collapsed field. They also explored the light intensity dependence of photocapacitance and explain the decrease of FF with the increasing light intensity.

  3. Entry control technology biometric field evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, J.R.; Ahrens, J.S.; Lowe, D.L.

    1995-07-01

    Throughout the years, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has performed various laboratory evaluations of entry control devices, including biometric identity verifiers. The reports which resulted from this testing have been very well received by the physical security community. This same community now requires equally informative field study data. To meet this need we have conducted a field study in an effort to develop the tools and methods which our customers can use to translate laboratory data into operational field performance. The field testing described in this report was based on the Recognition Systems Inc.`s (RSI) model ID3D HandKey biometric verifier. This device was selected because it is referenced in DOE documents such as the Guide for Implementation of the DOE Standard Badge and is the de facto biometric standard for the DOE. The ID3D HandKey is currently being used at several DOE sites such as Hanford, Rocky Flats, Pantex, Savannah River, and Idaho Nuclear Engineering Laboratory. The ID3D HandKey was laboratory tested at SNL. It performed very well during this test, exhibiting an equal error point of 0.2 percent. The goals of the field test were to identify operational characteristics and design guidelines to help system engineers translate laboratory data into field performance. A secondary goal was to develop tools which could be used by others to evaluate system effectiveness or improve the performance of their systems. Operational characteristics were determined by installing a working system and studying its operation over a five month period. Throughout this test we developed tools which could be used by others to similarly gauge system effectiveness.

  4. Enhancement of the thermoelectric figure of merit in a quantum dot due to external ac field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qiao; Wang, Zhi-yong; Xie, Zhong-Xiang

    2013-08-01

    We investigate the figure of merit of a quantum dot (QD) system irradiated with an external microwave filed by nonequilibrium Green's function (NGF) technique. Results show that the frequency of microwave field influence the figure of merit ZT significantly. At low temperature, a sharp peak can be observed in the figure of merit ZT as the frequency of ac field increases. As the frequency varies, several zero points and resonant peaks emerge in the figure of merit ZT. By adjusting the frequency of the microwave field, we can obtain high ZT. The figure of merit ZT increases with the decreasing of linewidth function Γ. In addition, Wiedemann-Franz law does not hold, particularly in the low frequency region due to multi-photon emission and absorption. Some novel thermoelectric properties are also found in two-level QD system.

  5. Plasma heating at collisionless shocks due to the kinetic cross-field streaming instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winske, D.; Quest, K. B.; Tanaka, M.; Wu, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    Heating at collisionless shocks due to the kinetic cross-field streaming instability, which is the finite beta (ratio of plasma to magnetic pressure) extension of the modified two stream instability, is studied. Heating rates are derived from quasi-linear theory and compared with results from particle simulations to show that electron heating relative to ion heating and heating parallel to the magnetic field relative to perpendicular heating for both the electrons and ions increase with beta. The simulations suggest that electron dynamics determine the saturation level of the instability, which is manifested by the formation of a flattop electron distribution parallel to the magnetic field. As a result, both the saturation levels of the fluctuations and the heating rates decrease sharply with beta. Applications of these results to plasma heating in simulations of shocks and the earth's bow shock are described.

  6. Field site evaluation for seismic mine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, James S.; Larson, Gregg D.; Rogers, Peter H.; Scott, Waymond R., Jr.; McCall, George S., II

    2002-11-01

    A system has been developed that uses audio-frequency surface seismic waves for the detection and imaging of buried landmines. The system is based on the measurement of seismic displacements immediately above buried mines using noncontacting vibrometers that interrogate the surface motion with either radar or ultrasonic signals. In laboratory tests and limited field tests the system has demonstrated the ability to detect a variety of inert antipersonnel and antitank mines with background contrast in excess of 20 dB. Current work on the system is focused on the transition from the laboratory into the field. To facilitate this, a series of experiments has been undertaken to measure the characteristics of several field test sites. The tradeoff between image contrast and scanning speed is of primary concern in evaluating the features of these sites. The field experiments have investigated the nature of ambient seismic noise, input impedance at the seismic source (a ground contacting shaker), modal content of the seismic interrogation signal, and the nature of the nonlinearities in the soil. Observed nonlinear phenomena have included harmonic generation, phase speed slowing, dispersion and spall. Although interesting, the differences between the field sites and the laboratory model do not appear to pose problems for seismic mine detection.

  7. Evaluating Differences in Landscape Interpretation between Webcam and Field-Based Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolivras, Korine N.; Luebbering, Candice R.; Resler, Lynn M.

    2012-01-01

    Field trips have become less common due to issues including budget constraints and large class sizes. Research suggests that virtual field trips can substitute for field visits, but the role of webcams has not been evaluated. To investigate the potential for webcams to substitute for field trips, participants viewed urban and physical landscapes…

  8. Increase in Phi X174 DNA radiation sensitivity due to electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    McCormack, Percival D.; Swenberg, Charles E.

    1985-01-01

    The object of this research was to establish whether or not orientation of DNA in electric fields would result in a significant increase in its sensitivity to damage by ionizing radiation. The application of an external electric field simultaneously with gamma irradiation to an aqueous suspension of Phi X 174 (in the RFI form) is shown to increase significantly the number of strand breaks. Tritiated DNA allowed the number of single-strand breaks to be estimated from changes in the scintillation of electrophoretic gel band associated with the fastest mobility moiety. At 400 V ( approx. 2400 V/cm) the corrected increase (corrected for phoresis of DNA on the stainless steel plates) in the G-value yield is 38%. The increase in damage with field strength appears to follow the increase in reduced dichroism. Dichroism results correspond at 400 V to approximately 10% of the maximum orientation. These results support the conjecture that this significant increase in DNA-radiation interaction with an electric field is due to field-induced conformation changes in the molecule. Keywords: Polyelectrolytes, Polynucleotides, Polypeptides, Birefringence, Dipole, and Moments.

  9. Revealing giant internal magnetic fields due to spin fluctuations in magnetically doped colloidal nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Rice, William D; Liu, Wenyong; Baker, Thomas A; Sinitsyn, Nikolai A; Klimov, Victor I; Crooker, Scott A

    2016-02-01

    Strong quantum confinement in semiconductors can compress the wavefunctions of band electrons and holes to nanometre-scale volumes, significantly enhancing interactions between themselves and individual dopants. In magnetically doped semiconductors, where paramagnetic dopants (such as Mn(2+), Co(2+) and so on) couple to band carriers via strong sp-d spin exchange, giant magneto-optical effects can therefore be realized in confined geometries using few or even single impurity spins. Importantly, however, thermodynamic spin fluctuations become increasingly relevant in this few-spin limit. In nanoscale volumes, the statistical fluctuations of N spins are expected to generate giant effective magnetic fields Beff, which should dramatically impact carrier spin dynamics, even in the absence of any applied field. Here we directly and unambiguously reveal the large Beff that exist in Mn(2+)-doped CdSe colloidal nanocrystals using ultrafast optical spectroscopy. At zero applied magnetic field, extremely rapid (300-600 GHz) spin precession of photoinjected electrons is observed, indicating Beff ∼ 15 -30 T for electrons. Precession frequencies exceed 2 THz in applied magnetic fields. These signals arise from electron precession about the random fields due to statistically incomplete cancellation of the embedded Mn(2+) moments, thereby revealing the initial coherent dynamics of magnetic polaron formation, and highlighting the importance of magnetization fluctuations on carrier spin dynamics in nanomaterials. PMID:26595331

  10. Highly Effective Conductance Modulation in Planar Silicene Field Effect Devices Due to Buckling

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dirini, Feras; Hossain, Faruque M.; Mohammed, Mahmood A.; Nirmalathas, Ampalavanapillai; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2015-01-01

    Silicene is an exciting two-dimensional material that shares many of graphene’s electronic properties, but differs in its structural buckling. This buckling allows opening a bandgap in silicene through the application of a perpendicular electric field. Here we show that this buckling also enables highly effective modulation of silicene’s conductance by means of an in-plane electric field applied through silicene side gates, which can be realized concurrently within the same silicene monolayer. We illustrate this by using silicene to implement Self-Switching Diodes (SSDs), which are two-dimensional field effect nanorectifiers realized within a single silicene monolayer. Our quantum simulation results show that the atomically-thin silicene SSDs, with sub-10 nm dimensions, achieve a current rectification ratio that exceeds 200, without the need for doping, representing a 30 fold enhancement over graphene SSDs. We attribute this enhancement to a bandgap opening due to the in-plane electric field, as a consequence of silicene’s buckling. Our results suggest that silicene is a promising material for the realization of planar field effect devices. PMID:26441200

  11. On the gravitational potential and field anomalies due to thin mass layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ockendon, J. R.; Turcotte, D. L.

    1977-01-01

    The gravitational potential and field anomalies for thin mass layers are derived using the technique of matched asymptotic expansions. An inner solution is obtained using an expansion in powers of the thickness and it is shown that the outer solution is given by a surface distribution of mass sources and dipoles. Coefficients are evaluated by matching the inner expansion of the outer solution with the outer expansion of the inner solution. The leading term in the inner expansion for the normal gravitational field gives the Bouguer formula. The leading term in the expansion for the gravitational potential gives an expression for the perturbation to the geoid. The predictions given by this term are compared with measurements by satellite altimetry. The second-order terms in the expansion for the gravitational field are required to predict the gravity anomaly at a continental margin. The results are compared with observations.

  12. Field evaluation of a VOST sampling method

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, M.D.; Johnson, L.D.; Fuerst, R.G.; McGaughey, J.F.; Bursey, J.T.; Merrill, R.G.

    1994-12-31

    The VOST (SW-846 Method 0030) specifies the use of Tenax{reg_sign} and a particular petroleum-based charcoal (SKC Lot 104, or its equivalent), that is no longer commercially available. In field evaluation studies of VOST methodology, a replacement petroleum-based charcoal has been used: candidate replacement sorbents for charcoal were studied, and Anasorb{reg_sign} 747, a carbon-based sorbent, was selected for field testing. The sampling train was modified to use only Anasorb{reg_sign} in the back tube and Tenax{reg_sign} in the two front tubes to avoid analytical difficulties associated with the analysis of the sequential bed back tube used in the standard VOST train. The standard (SW-846 Method 0030) and the modified VOST methods were evaluated at a chemical manufacturing facility using a quadruple probe system with quadruple trains. In this field test, known concentrations of the halogenated volatile organic compounds, that are listed in the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, Title 3, were introduced into the VOST train and the modified VOST train, using the same certified gas cylinder as a source of test compounds. Statistical tests of the comparability of methods were performed on a compound-by-compound basis. For most compounds, the VOST and modified VOST methods were found to be statistically equivalent.

  13. Evaluation of PV Module Field Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, John; Silverman, Timothy; Miller, David C.; McNutt, Peter; Kempe, Michael; Deceglie, Michael

    2015-06-14

    This paper describes an effort to inspect and evaluate PV modules in order to determine what failure or degradation modes are occurring in field installations. This paper will report on the results of six site visits, including the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) Hedge Array, Tucson Electric Power (TEP) Springerville, Central Florida Utility, Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC), the TEP Solar Test Yard, and University of Toledo installations. The effort here makes use of a recently developed field inspection data collection protocol, and the results were input into a corresponding database. The results of this work have also been used to develop a draft of the IEC standard for climate and application specific accelerated stress testing beyond module qualification. TEP Solar Test Yard, and University of Toledo installations. The effort here makes use of a recently developed field inspection data collection protocol, and the results were input into a corresponding database. The results of this work have also been used to develop a draft of the IEC standard for climate and application specific accelerated stress testing beyond module qualification. TEP Solar Test Yard, and University of Toledo installations. The effort here makes use of a recently developed field inspection data collection protocol, and the results were input into a corresponding database. The results of this work have also been used to develop a draft of the IEC standard for climate and application specific accelerated stress testing beyond module qualification.

  14. Platform evaluation of an offshore field

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, K.L.; Saleri, N.G.; Al-Khowaiter, A.O.

    1995-10-01

    A numerical study of an offshore field was performed to evaluate the relative performance of horizontal versus conventional wells, and various well completion/placement/production scenarios for a six-well platform. The results presented in this paper are found to be counterintuitive. While horizontal/high slant wells showed delayed gas and/or water breakthroughs, the overall platform performance remained largely insensitive to well configuration (horizontal versus conventional). Well placement, completion interval, and production strategy after breakthrough were identified to be the critical parameters in determining the performance of the platform. The study results favor conventional completions for this particular six-well platform.

  15. Field and laboratory tests on risk of slope failure due to weathering of rock materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, M. U.; Towhata, I.; Yamada, S.; Aziz, M.

    2009-04-01

    Authors set out the challenge to explore the mechanism of rock weathering and its effects to the geotechnical hazards. Any natural or human induced disturbances to the natural slopes speed up their weathering process. So, exploration of both disturbed and undisturbed slopes is necessary for robust understanding. Various regions in Asia were explored to experience variety of environmental and climatic conditions. Field exploration on the thickness and in-situ mechanical property was carried out by performing seismic refraction surveys, dynamic cone penetration tests and Schmidt hammer tests at various sites in Japan and Pakistan. In laboratory change in mechanical property of soft rocks due to weathering has been observed and slake durability tests were conducted on various rocks. Field exploration indicated that the thickness of weathered layer is 1 meter or its roundabouts and having S-wave velocity of 200-300 m/s. Laboratory testing differentiated the slaking potential and mechanical property degradation of various rocks. Moreover sensible correlations had been observed in thickness calculated by seismic refraction or dynamic cone penetration in field. Slake durability index showed good correlation with Schmidt hammer hardness and mechanical property. A general agreement was also observed when strength and S-wave velocities from laboratory tests were compared with the field exploration. Authors believed that the study provides the useful information on the long term prediction and assessment of landslide risk.

  16. Resonance tuning due to Coulomb interaction in strong near-field coupled metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Roy Chowdhury, Dibakar; Xu, Ningning; Zhang, Weili; Singh, Ranjan

    2015-07-14

    Coulomb's law is one of the most fundamental laws of physics that describes the electrostatic interaction between two like or unlike point charges. Here, we experimentally observe a strong effect of Coulomb interaction in tightly coupled terahertz metamaterials where the split-ring resonator dimers in a unit cell are coupled through their near fields across the capacitive split gaps. Using a simple analytical model, we evaluated the Coulomb parameter that switched its sign from negative to positive values indicating the transition in the nature of Coulomb force from being repulsive to attractive depending upon the near field coupling between the split ring resonators. Apart from showing interesting effects in the strong coupling regime between meta-atoms, Coulomb interaction also allows an additional degree of freedom to achieve frequency tunable dynamic metamaterials.

  17. Resonance tuning due to Coulomb interaction in strong near-field coupled metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy Chowdhury, Dibakar; Xu, Ningning; Zhang, Weili; Singh, Ranjan

    2015-07-01

    Coulomb's law is one of the most fundamental laws of physics that describes the electrostatic interaction between two like or unlike point charges. Here, we experimentally observe a strong effect of Coulomb interaction in tightly coupled terahertz metamaterials where the split-ring resonator dimers in a unit cell are coupled through their near fields across the capacitive split gaps. Using a simple analytical model, we evaluated the Coulomb parameter that switched its sign from negative to positive values indicating the transition in the nature of Coulomb force from being repulsive to attractive depending upon the near field coupling between the split ring resonators. Apart from showing interesting effects in the strong coupling regime between meta-atoms, Coulomb interaction also allows an additional degree of freedom to achieve frequency tunable dynamic metamaterials.

  18. Small scale changes of geochemistry and flow field due to transient heat storage in aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S.; Boockmeyer, A.; Li, D.; Beyer, C.

    2013-12-01

    Heat exchangers in the subsurface are increasingly installed for transient heat storage due to the need of heating or cooling of buildings as well as the interim storage of heat to compensate for the temporally fluctuating energy production by wind or solar energy. For heat storage to be efficient, high temperatures must be achieved in the subsurface. Significant temporal changes of the soil and groundwater temperatures however effect both the local flow field by temperature dependent fluid parameters as well as reactive mass transport through temperature dependent diffusion coefficients, geochemical reaction rates and mineral equilibria. As the use of heat storage will be concentrated in urban areas, the use of the subsurface for (drinking) water supply and heat storage will typically coincide and a reliable prognosis of the processes occurring is needed. In the present work, the effects of a temporal variation of the groundwater temperature, as induced by a local heat exchanger introduced into a groundwater aquifer, are studied. For this purpose, the coupled non-isothermal groundwater flow, heat transport and reactive mass transport is simulated in the near filed of such a heat exchanger. By explicitly discretizing and incorporating the borehole, the borehole cementation and the heat exchanger tubes, a realistic geometrical and process representation is obtained. The numerical simulation code OpenGeoSys is used in this work, which incorporates the required processes of coupled groundwater flow, heat and mass transport as well as temperature dependent geochemistry. Due to the use of a Finite Element Method, a close representation of the geometric effects can be achieved. Synthetic scenario simulations for typical settings of salt water formations in northern Germany are used to investigate the geochemical effects arising from a high temperature heat storage by quantifying changes in groundwater chemistry and overall reaction rates. This work presents the

  19. Pineal melatonin level disruption in humans due to electromagnetic fields and ICNIRP limits.

    PubMed

    Halgamuge, Malka N

    2013-05-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classifies electromagnetic fields (EMFs) as 'possibly carcinogenic' to humans that might transform normal cells into cancer cells. Owing to high utilisation of electricity in day-to-day life, exposure to power-frequency (50 or 60 Hz) EMFs is unavoidable. Melatonin is a natural hormone produced by pineal gland activity in the brain that regulates the body's sleep-wake cycle. How man-made EMFs may influence the pineal gland is still unsolved. The pineal gland is likely to sense EMFs as light but, as a consequence, may decrease the melatonin production. In this study, more than one hundred experimental data of human and animal studies of changes in melatonin levels due to power-frequency electric and magnetic fields exposure were analysed. Then, the results of this study were compared with the International Committee of Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) limit and also with the existing experimental results in the literature for the biological effect of magnetic fields, in order to quantify the effects. The results show that this comparison does not seem to be consistent despite the fact that it offers an advantage of drawing attention to the importance of the exposure limits to weak EMFs. In addition to those inconsistent results, the following were also observedfrom this work: (i) the ICNIRP recommendations are meant for the well-known acute effects, because effects of the exposure duration cannot be considered and (ii) the significance of not replicating the existing experimental studies is another limitation in the power-frequency EMFs. Regardless of these issues, the above observation agrees with our earlier study in which it was confirmed that it is not a reliable method to characterise biological effects by observing only the ratio of AC magnetic field strength to frequency. This is because exposure duration does not include the ICNIRP limit. Furthermore, the results show the significance of

  20. Estimation of Surface Roughness due to Electrode Erosion in Field-Distortion Gas Switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xuandong; Wang, Hu; Li, Xiaoang; Zhang, Qiaogen; Wei, Jin; Qiu, Aici

    2013-08-01

    Field distortion gas switch is one of the crucial elements in a Marx generator, fast linear transformer driver and other pulsed power installations. The performance of the gas switch, which is dramatically affected by the surface roughness due to electrode erosion during the discharge process, directly influences the output parameters, stability and reliability of the pulsed power system. In this paper, an electrode surface roughness (ESR) calculation model has been established based on a great deal of experimental data under operating current. The discharge current waveform, the peak height of the burr, the radius and the depth of etch pits in the electrode erosion region were used to predict the ESR. Also, experimental results indicate that this calculation model can effectively estimate the ESR of the test gas switch.

  1. Field evaluation of prototype electrofibrous filters

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, W.D.; Bergman, W.; Biermann, A.H.; Lum, B.Y.

    1982-09-30

    New prototype electrofibrous filters were designed, built and evaluated in laboratory tests and in field installations. Two prototypes were designed for use in nuclear ventilation ducts as prefilters to HEPA filters. One prototype is designed to be a permanent component of the ventilation system while the other is a disposable unit. The disposable electrofibrous prefilter was installed in the exhaust stream of a glove box in which barrels of uranium turnings are burned. Preliminary tests show the disposal prefilter is effectively prolonging the HEPA filter life. An earlier prototype of the rolling prefilter was upgraded to meet the increased requirements for installation in a nuclear facility. This upgraded prototype was evaluated in the fire test facility at LLNL and shown to be effective in protecting HEPA filters from plugging under the most severe smoke conditions. The last prototype described in this report is a recirculating air filter. After demonstrating a high performance in laboratory tests the unit was shipped to Savannah River where it is awaiting installation in a Pu fuel fabrication facility. An analysis of the particulate problem in Savannah River indicates that four recirculating air filter will save $172,000 per year in maintenance costs.

  2. Laboratory and field evaluation of an underwater sand height gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, D. J. P.; Mcgrath, D. G.

    1972-01-01

    An underwater sand height gage was investigated. This instrument consisted of two transducers, one screened and one unscreened. Laboratory experimentation included static and dynamic tests with three test sands--fine, medium, and coarse. Field tests were conducted at Rudee Inlet, Virginia Beach, Virginia. Test results showed a linear response to up to 10 inches of sand loading. Deviation observed in identical tests appeared to be due to variation in the density of sand. Density differences reflected varying packing styles which, in turn, were a consequence of grain size and flow regime. Further evaluations of the sand height gage reflect this instrument's potential.

  3. Characterising oil and water in porous media using decay due to diffusion in the internal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Rhiannon T.; Djurhuus, Ketil; Seland, John Georg

    2015-10-01

    In the method Decay due to Diffusion in the Internal Field (DDIF), the diffusion behaviour of water molecules in the internal magnetic field makes it possible to determine a distribution of pore sizes in a sample. The DDIF experiment can also be extended to a DDIF-Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (DDIF-CPMG) experiment to measure correlations between the pore size and the transverse relaxation time, T2 . In this study we have for the first time applied the DDIF experiment and the DDIF-CPMG experiment to porous materials saturated with both water and oil. Because of the large difference in diffusion rates between water and oil molecules, the DDIF experiment will act as a filter for the signal from oil, and we are left with the DDIF-signal from water only. This has been verified in model systems consisting of glass beads immersed in separate layers of water and oil, and in a sandstone sample saturated with water and oil. The results show that the DDIF and DDIF-CPMG experiments enable the determination of the confining geometry of the water phase, and how this geometry is correlated to T2 . Data obtained in the sandstone sample saturated with water and oil also show that with the exception of the smallest pores there is no clear correlation between pore size and the relaxation time of water.

  4. The field-dependent shock profiles of a magnetorhelogical damper due to high impact: an experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hwan-Choong; Oh, Jong-Seok; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2015-02-01

    This work proposes a new damper featuring magnetorheological fluid (MR damper) and presents its field-dependent damping forces due to high impact. To achieve this goal, a large MR damper, which can produce a damping force of 100 kN at 6 A, is designed and manufactured based on the analysis of the magnetic flux intensity of the damper. After identifying the field-dependent damping force levels of the manufactured MR damper, a hydraulic horizontal shock tester is established. This shock testing system consists of a velocity generator, impact mass, shock programmer, and test mass. The MR damper is installed at the end of the wall in the shock tester and tested under four different experimental conditions. The shock profile characteristics of the MR damper due to different impact velocities are investigated at various input current levels. In addition, the inner pressure of the MR damper during impact, which depends on the input’s current level, is evaluated at two positions that can represent the pressure drop that generates the damping force of the MR damper. It is demonstrated from this impact testing that the shock profiles can be changed by the magnitude of the input current applied to the MR damper. It directly indicates that a desired shock profile can be achieved by installing the MR damper associated with appropriate control logics to adjust the magnitude of the input current.

  5. Blending vocal music with a given sound field due to the characteristics of the running autocorrelation function of singing voices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Kosuke; Fujii, Kenji; Kawai, Keiji; Ando, Yoichi; Yano, Takashi

    2001-05-01

    This is a study to meet music and the opera house acoustics. It is said that singers adjust their interpretation style according to the acoustical condition of the sound field in a room. However, this mechanism of blending of musical performance with the sound field is unknown. In order to obtain a method of performance blending of opera house acoustics, we attempted to develop evaluation criteria for a singing voice in terms of the minimum value of the effective duration of the running autocorrelation function (r-ACF), (te)min, of sound source signals. This temporal factor has shown to have close correlation with the subjective response of both listeners and performers to sound fields [Y. Ando, Architectural Acoustics (AIP Press/Springer-Verlag, New York, 1998)]. As example for the control of (te)min due to performing style, effects of singing style, kind of vowel, relative pitch, vibrato extent, and intonation on the values of (te)min are demonstrated. In addition, the fine structure of the r-ACF is discussed with regard to the identification of vowels of singing voice. a)Now at 1-10-27 Yamanokami, Kumamoto, Japan.

  6. Acoustic Radiation Force on a Finite-Sized Particle due to an Acoustic Field in a Viscous Compressible Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annamalai, Subramanian; Parmar, Manoj; Balachandar, S.

    2013-11-01

    Particles when subjected to acoustic waves experience a time-averaged second-order force known as the acoustic radiation force, which is of prime importance in the fields of microfluidics and acoustic levitation. Here, the acoustic radiation force on a rigid spherical particle in a viscous compressible medium due to progressive and standing waves is considered. The relevant length scales include: particle radius (a), acoustic wavelength (λ) and viscous penetration depth (δ). While a / λ and a / δ are arbitrary, δ << λ . A farfield derivation approach has been used in determining the radiated force. Expressing the flow-field as a sum of the incident and scattered fields, an analytical expression for the force is obtained as a summation over infinite series (monopole, dipole and higher sources). These results indicate that the contributions from monopole, dipole and their cross-interaction are sufficient to describe the acoustic radiation force. Subsequently, the monopole and dipole strengths are represented in terms of the particle surface and volume averages of the incoming velocity. This generalization allows one to evaluate the radiation force for an incoming wave of any functional form. However acoustic streaming effects are neglected.

  7. Modelling and Evaluation of Environmental Impact due to Continuous Emissions of the Severonickel Plant (Kola Peninsula)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahura, A.; Gonzalez-Aparicio, I.; Nuterman, R.; Baklanov, A.

    2012-04-01

    In this study, evaluation of potential impact - through concentration, deposition and loadings patterns - on population and environment due to continuous anthropogenic emissions (on example of sulfates) of the Cu-Ni smelters of the Russian North is given. To estimate impact, the Danish Emergency Response Model for Atmosphere (DERMA) was employed to perform long-term simulations of air concentration, time integrated air concentration (TIAC), dry (DD) and wet (WD) deposition patterns resulting from continuous emissions of the Severonickel smelters located on the Kola Peninsula (Murmansk region, Russia). To perform such simulations the 3D meteorological fields (from the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, ECMWF) for the year 2000 were used as input. For simplicity, it has been assumed that normalized releases of sulfates from smelters location occurred at a constant rate every day. For each daily release the atmospheric transport, dispersion, dry and wet deposition due to removal processes were estimated during 10 day interval. Output from these long-term simulations is an essential input for evaluation of impact, doses, risks, and short- and long-term consequences, etc. Detailed analyses of simulated concentration and deposition fields allowed evaluating the spatial and temporal variability of resulted patterns on different scales. Temporal variability of both wet and dry deposition as well as their contribution into total deposition have been estimated. On an annual scale, the concentration and deposition patterns were estimated for the most populated cities of the North-West Russia. The modeled annual fields were also integrated into GIS environment as well as layers with population density (from the Center for International Earth Science Information Network, CIESIN) and standard administrative division of the North-West Russia and bordering countries. Furthermore, the estimation of deposited amounts (loadings) of sulfates for selected regions of

  8. Hazardous gas model evaluation with field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, S. R.; Chang, J. C.; Strimaitis, D. G.

    Fifteen hazardous gas models were evaluated using data from eight field experiments. The models include seven publicly available models (AFTOX, DEGADIS, HEGADAS, HGSYSTEM, INPUFF, OB/DG and SLAB), six proprietary models (AIRTOX, CHARM, FOCUS, GASTAR, PHAST and TRACE), and two "benchmark" analytical models (the Gaussian Plume Model and the analytical approximations to the Britter and McQuaid Workbook nomograms). The field data were divided into three groups—continuous dense gas releases (Burro LNG, Coyote LNG, Desert Tortoise NH 3-gas and aerosols, Goldfish HF-gas and aerosols, and Maplin Sands LNG), continuous passive gas releases (Prairie Grass and Hanford), and instantaneous dense gas releases (Thorney Island freon). The dense gas models that produced the most consistent predictions of plume centerline concentrations across the dense gas data sets are the Britter and McQuaid, CHARM, GASTAR, HEGADAS, HGSYSTEM, PHAST, SLAB and TRACE models, with relative mean biases of about ±30% or less and magnitudes of relative scatter that are about equal to the mean. The dense gas models tended to overpredict the plume widths and underpredict the plume depths by about a factor of two. All models except GASTAR, TRACE, and the area source version of DEGADIS perform fairly well with the continuous passive gas data sets. Some sensitivity studies were also carried out. It was found that three of the more widely used publicly-available dense gas models (DEGADIS, HGSYSTEM and SLAB) predicted increases in concentration of about 70% as roughness length decreased by an order of magnitude for the Desert Tortoise and Goldfish field studies. It was also found that none of the dense gas models that were considered came close to simulating the observed factor of two increase in peak concentrations as averaging time decreased from several minutes to 1 s. Because of their assumption that a concentrated dense gas core existed that was unaffected by variations in averaging time, the dense gas

  9. Is mudflow in Sidoarjo, East Java due to the pumping mechanism of hot air bubbles? : Laboratory simulations and field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurhandoko, Bagus Endar B.

    2015-09-01

    Extraordinary mudflow has happened in Sidoarjo, East Java, Indonesia since 2006. This mud comes from the giant crater that is located close to the BJP - 01. Thousands of homes have been submerged due to mudflow. Till today this giant mud crater is still has great strength despite the mud flowing over 8 years. This is a very rare phenomenon in the world. This mud flow mechanism raises big questions, because it has been going on for years, naturally the mudflow will stop by itself because the pressure should be reduced. This research evaluates all aspects of integrated observations, laboratory tests and field observations since the beginning of this ongoing mudflow. Laboratory tests were done by providing hot air bubbles into the fluid inside the inverted funnel showed that the fluid can flow with a high altitude. It is due to the mechanism of buoyant force from air bubbles to the water where the contrast density of the water and the air is quite large. Quantity of air bubbles provides direct effect to the debit of fluid flow. Direct observation in the field, in 2006 and 2007, with TIMNAS and LPPM ITB showed the large number of air bubbles on the surface of the mud craters. Temperature observation on the surface of mud crater is around 98 degree C whereas at greater depth shows the temperature is increasingly rising. This strengthens the hypothesis or proves that the mud pumping mechanism comes from buoyant force of hot air bubbles. Inversion gravity images show that the deep subsurface of main crater is close to volcanic layers or root of Arjuna mountain. Based on the simulation laboratory and field observation data, it can be concluded that the geothermal factor plays a key role in the mudflow mechanism.

  10. Parametric Study of Preferential Ion Heating Due to Intermittent Magnetic Fields in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbajal Gomez, L.; Chapman, S. C.; Dendy, R. O.; Watkins, N. W.

    2014-12-01

    In situ observations and remote measurements of the solar wind show strong preferential heating of ions along the ambient magnetic field. Understanding the mechanism for this heating process is an open problem. The observed broad-band spectrum of Alfven waves permeating the fast solar wind provide a candidate mechanism for this preferential heating through wave-particle interactions on ion kinetic scales. Previous analytical and numerical studies have considered a single pump wave [1, 2] or a turbulent, broad-band spectra of Alfven waves [3, 4, 5] to drive the ion heating. The latter studies investigated the effects on ion heating due to different initial 1/fγpower spectral exponents and number of modes and the signals were random phase. However, the observed solar wind fluctuations are intermittent so that the phases of the modes comprising the power spectrum are not random. Non-Gaussian fluctuations are seen both on scales identified with the inertial range of Alfvenic turbulence [6], and on longer scales typified by '1/f' spectra [7]. We present results of the first parametric numerical simulations on the effects of different levels of intermittency of the broad-band spectra of Alfven waves on the preferential heating of ions in the solar wind. We performed hybrid simulations for the local heating of the solar wind, which resolves the full kinetic physics of the ions and treats the electrons as a charge-neutralizing fluid. Our simulations evolve the full vector velocities and electromagnetic fields in one configuration space coordinate and in time.We compare the efficiency of different levels of intermittency of the initial turbulent fields and their effect on the efficiency of the wave-particle interactions which are a mechanism for driving preferential ion heating in the solar wind. [1] J. A. Araneda, E. Marsh, A. F. Viñas, J. Geophys. Res. 112, A04104 (2007). [2] J. A. Araneda, E. Marsh, A. F. Viñas, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 125003 (2008) [3] Y. G. Maneva, A

  11. Relaxation of virtual cathode oscillations due to transverse effects in a crossed-field diode

    SciTech Connect

    Cartwright, K.L.; Verboncoeur, J.P.; Gopinath, V.P.; Birdsall, C.K.

    1996-12-31

    Recent studies of cylindrical and planar cross-field diodes indicate the transverse dimension plays a role in delaying the onset of virtual cathode oscillations for currents injected above the theoretical limiting current. For 1d and 2d planar devices, the limiting current for the magnetized and unmagnetized diodes is examined for cold and thermal injection. A significant difference between the 1d and 2d smooth diodes is that the transverse direction gives an extra degree of freedom which is found to warm the electrons rapidly. The mechanism of this warming appears to be an instability in the transverse direction. The simulations show three different states; laminar flow, virtual cathode oscillation and warm flow. Warm flow occurs when the electron has a spread of energy, either due to an instability or by thermal injection, when they pas through the potential minimum. Birdsall and Bridges showed that a small thermal spread of injected electrons damps virtual cathode oscillations. This warming effect allows warm flow to exist on the 2d state diagram which is not found on the 1d state diagram for cold emission. Parameter space is explored on these state diagrams for B = 0 and B = B{sub Hull} for J near state transitions (J {approx_equal} J{sub C}).

  12. Modeling surface deformation due to CO2 injection at an enhanced oil recovery field in Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q.; Abdollahzadeh, M.; Dixon, T. H.; Malservisi, R.; Hosseini, S.

    2013-12-01

    The Geodesy Laboratory at the University of South Florida has operated 3 C-GPS stations at an enhanced oil recovery field in Texas since October 2011. Our GPS sites recorded vertical uplift during the injection phase when the reservoir was initially pressurized, and localized subsidence in phase with reservoir pressure after oil extraction started. In this study, we use analytical and numerical models to better understand the small-scale surface deformation observed by GPS due to CO2 injection. First, we use an analytical model of a pressurized horizontal circular crack in an elastic half-space to fit the surface deformation data. Then, constrained by the analytical modeling results, we develop a poroelastic Finite Element Model (FEM) to investigate the influence of reservoir geometry and overlying stratigraphy on surface displacement. A sensitivity study is carried out to understand the effects of realistic geometry and material properties on surface deformation. Our preliminary results show that a poroelastic FEM can explain the location-dependant time delay between the injection and surface response.

  13. Field evaluations of marine oil spill bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Swannell, R P; Lee, K; McDonagh, M

    1996-06-01

    Bioremediation is defined as the act of adding or improving the availability of materials (e.g., nutrients, microorganisms, or oxygen) to contaminated environments to cause an acceleration of natural biodegradative processes. The results of field experiments and trials following actual spill incidents have been reviewed to evaluate the feasibility of this approach as a treatment for oil contamination in the marine environment. The ubiquity of oil-degrading microorganisms in the marine environment is well established, and research has demonstrated the capability of the indigenous microflora to degrade many components of petroleum shortly after exposure. Studies have identified numerous factors which affect the natural biodegradation rates of oil, such as the origin and concentration of oil, the availability of oil-degrading microorganisms, nutrient concentrations, oxygen levels, climatic conditions, and sediment characteristics. Bioremediation strategies based on the application of fertilizers have been shown to stimulate the biodegradation rates of oil in aerobic intertidal sediments such as sand and cobble. The ratio of oil loading to nitrogen concentration within the interstitial water has been identified to be the principal controlling factor influencing the success of this bioremediation strategy. However, the need for the seeding of natural environments with hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria has not been clearly demonstrated under natural environmental conditions. It is suggested that bioremediation should now take its place among the many techniques available for the treatment of oil spills, although there is still a clear need to set operational limits for its use. On the basis of the available evidence, we have proposed preliminary operational guidelines for bioremediation on shoreline environments. PMID:8801437

  14. Field evaluations of marine oil spill bioremediation.

    PubMed Central

    Swannell, R P; Lee, K; McDonagh, M

    1996-01-01

    Bioremediation is defined as the act of adding or improving the availability of materials (e.g., nutrients, microorganisms, or oxygen) to contaminated environments to cause an acceleration of natural biodegradative processes. The results of field experiments and trials following actual spill incidents have been reviewed to evaluate the feasibility of this approach as a treatment for oil contamination in the marine environment. The ubiquity of oil-degrading microorganisms in the marine environment is well established, and research has demonstrated the capability of the indigenous microflora to degrade many components of petroleum shortly after exposure. Studies have identified numerous factors which affect the natural biodegradation rates of oil, such as the origin and concentration of oil, the availability of oil-degrading microorganisms, nutrient concentrations, oxygen levels, climatic conditions, and sediment characteristics. Bioremediation strategies based on the application of fertilizers have been shown to stimulate the biodegradation rates of oil in aerobic intertidal sediments such as sand and cobble. The ratio of oil loading to nitrogen concentration within the interstitial water has been identified to be the principal controlling factor influencing the success of this bioremediation strategy. However, the need for the seeding of natural environments with hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria has not been clearly demonstrated under natural environmental conditions. It is suggested that bioremediation should now take its place among the many techniques available for the treatment of oil spills, although there is still a clear need to set operational limits for its use. On the basis of the available evidence, we have proposed preliminary operational guidelines for bioremediation on shoreline environments. PMID:8801437

  15. Evaluation Field Building in South Asia: Reflections, Anecdotes, and Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hay, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    This article examines evaluation field building in South Asia and the role of international collaboration in this field building. The article explores aspects of the supply and demand of development evaluation and the political, historical, and systemic factors that bridge or block evaluation use. The article calls for and suggests elements to…

  16. Compression and Cavitation of Externally Applied Magnetic Field on a Hohlraum due to Non-Local Heat Flow Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joglekar, Archis; Thomas, Alec; Ridgers, Chris; Kingham, Rob

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we present full-scale 2D kinetic modeling of externally imposed magnetic fields on hohlraums with laser heating. We observe magnetic field cavitation and compression due to thermal energy transport. Self-consistent modeling of the electron momentum equation allows for a complete treatment of the heat flow equation and Ohm's Law. A complete Ohm's Law contains magnetic field advection through the Nernst mechanism that arises due to the heat flow. Magnetic field amplification by a factor of 3 occurs due to magnetic flux pile-up from Nernst convection. The magnetic field cavitates towards the hohlraum axis over a 0.5 ns time scale due to Nernst convection. This results in significantly different magnetic field profiles and slower cavitation than can be expected due to the plasma bulk flow. Non-local electrons contribute to the heat flow down the density gradient resulting in an augmented Nernst convection mechanism that is included self-consistently through kinetic modeling. In addition to showing the prevalence of non-local heat flows, we show effects such as anomalous heat flow up the density gradient induced by inverse bremsstrahlung heating. This research was supported by the DOE through Grant No. DE SC0010621 and in part through computational resources and services provided by Advanced Research Computing at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

  17. Evaluation of military field-water quality

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, J.I.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Layton, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to develop drinking-water standards for field water for selected threat agents of concern, including radioactivity. The threat agents of concern in addition to radioactivity are the classical chemical-warfare compounds hydrogen cyanide, organophosphorus nerve agents, and lewisite, as well as a fungal metabolite identified only recently as a possible threat agent, the trichothecene mycotoxin. The recommended standards are applicable only to military personnel deployed in the field, and they are meant to protect against performance-degrading effects resulting from the ingestion of the substances in field water. 25 refs., 11 figs., 19 tabs.

  18. Primary beam steering due to field leakage from superconducting SHMS magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Michael H.; Waidyawansa, Buddhini P.; Covrig, Silviu; Carlini, Roger; Benesch, Jay

    2014-11-05

    In this study, simulations of the magnetic fields from the Super High Momentum Spectrometer in Hall C at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility show significant field leakage into the region of the primary beam line between the target and the beam dump. Without mitigation, these remnant fields will steer the unscattered beam enough to limit beam operations at small scattering angles. Presented here are magnetic field simulations of the spectrometer magnets and a solution using optimal placement of a minimal amount of shielding iron around the beam line.

  19. Inner Core Anisotropy Due to the Magnetic Field--induced Preferred Orientation of Iron.

    PubMed

    Karato, S

    1993-12-10

    Anisotropy of the inner core of the Earth is proposed to result from the lattice preferred orientation of anisotropic iron crystals during their solidification in the presence of a magnetic field. The resultant seismic anisotropy is related to the geometry of the magnetic field in the core. This hypothesis implies that the observed anisotropy (fast velocity along the rotation axis) indicates a strong toroidal field in the core, which supports a strong field model for the geodynamo if the inner core is made of hexagonal close-packed iron. PMID:17781788

  20. Primary beam steering due to field leakage from superconducting SHMS magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, M. H.; Waidyawansa, B. P.; Covrig, S.; Carlini, R.; Benesch, J.

    2014-11-01

    Simulations of the magnetic fields from the Super High Momentum Spectrometer in Hall C at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility show significant field leakage into the region of the primary beam line between the target and the beam dump. Without mitigation, these remnant fields will steer the unscattered beam enough to limit beam operations at small scattering angles. Presented here are magnetic field simulations of the spectrometer magnets and a solution using optimal placement of a minimal amount of shielding iron around the beam line.

  1. Electomagnetic field due to a non-axisymmetric current loop around Kerr blackhole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, U. S.; Dubey, G. S.

    1983-12-01

    The authors derive expressions for the electromagnetic field of a non-axisymmetric current loop around a Kerr blackhole. Complete solution for the "inside" as well as the "outside" regions of the current loop are determined using vacuum solutions of King (1977). A particular solution, the electromagnetic field of an equatorial current loop, is explicitly derived.

  2. Flute stabilization due to ponderomotive force created by an rf field with a variable gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Yasaka, Y.; Itatani, R.

    1986-06-30

    An rf-stabilization experiment was performed in the axisymmetric single-mirror device HIEI by controlling the radial-gradient scale length of the rf field with the aid of an azimuthally phased antenna array. The flute stability depends sensitively on the scale length of the perpendicular rf electric field, which shows that rf stabilization is caused by the ponderomotive force for ions.

  3. Heating in the MRI environment due to superparamagnetic fluid suspensions in a rotating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantillon-Murphy, P.; Wald, L. L.; Adalsteinsson, E.; Zahn, M.

    2010-03-01

    In the presence of alternating-sinusoidal or rotating magnetic fields, magnetic nanoparticles will act to realign their magnetic moment with the applied magnetic field. The realignment is characterized by the nanoparticle's time constant, τ. As the magnetic field frequency is increased, the nanoparticle's magnetic moment lags the applied magnetic field at a constant angle for a given frequency, Ω, in rad/s. Associated with this misalignment is a power dissipation that increases the bulk magnetic fluid's temperature which has been utilized as a method of magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia, particularly suited for cancer in low-perfusion tissue (e.g., breast) where temperature increases of between 4 and 7 degree Centigrade above the ambient in vivo temperature cause tumor hyperthermia. This work examines the rise in the magnetic fluid's temperature in the MRI environment which is characterized by a large DC field, B0. Theoretical analysis and simulation is used to predict the effect of both alternating-sinusoidal and rotating magnetic fields transverse to B0. Results are presented for the expected temperature increase in small tumors (approximately 1 cm radius) over an appropriate range of magnetic fluid concentrations (0.002-0.01 solid volume fraction) and nanoparticle radii (1-10 nm). The results indicate that significant heating can take place, even in low-field MRI systems where magnetic fluid saturation is not significant, with careful selection of the rotating or sinusoidal field parameters (field frequency and amplitude). The work indicates that it may be feasible to combine low-field MRI with a magnetic hyperthermia system using superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

  4. Heating in the MRI environment due to superparamagnetic fluid suspensions in a rotating magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Wald, L.L.; Adalsteinsson, E.; Zahn, M.

    2009-01-01

    In the presence of alternating-sinusoidal or rotating magnetic fields, magnetic nanoparticles will act to realign their magnetic moment with the applied magnetic field. The realignment is characterized by the nanoparticle’s time constant, τ. As the magnetic field frequency is increased, the nanoparticle’s magnetic moment lags the applied magnetic field at a constant angle for a given frequency, Ω, in rad/s. Associated with this misalignment is a power dissipation that increases the bulk magnetic fluid’s temperature which has been utilized as a method of magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia, particularly suited for cancer in low-perfusion tissue (e.g., breast) where temperature increases of between 4°C and 7°C above the ambient in vivo temperature cause tumor hyperthermia. This work examines the rise in the magnetic fluid’s temperature in the MRI environment which is characterized by a large DC field, B0. Theoretical analysis and simulation is used to predict the effect of both alternating-sinusoidal and rotating magnetic fields transverse to B0. Results are presented for the expected temperature increase in small tumors (~1 cm radius) over an appropriate range of magnetic fluid concentrations (0.002 to 0.01 solid volume fraction) and nanoparticle radii (1 to 10 nm). The results indicate that significant heating can take place, even in low-field MRI systems where magnetic fluid saturation is not significant, with careful selection of the rotating or sinusoidal field parameters (field frequency and amplitude). The work indicates that it may be feasible to combine low-field MRI with a magnetic hyperthermia system using superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. PMID:20161608

  5. Field Evaluation of Low-E Storm Windows

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, S. Craig; Kohler, Christian; Minen, Stefanie

    2007-07-11

    A field evaluation comparing the performance of low emittance (low-e) storm windows with both standard clear storm windows and no storm windows was performed in a cold climate. Six homes with single-pane windows were monitored over the period of one heating season. The homes were monitored with no storm windows and with new storm windows. The storm windows installed on four of the six homes included a hard coat, pyrolitic, low-e coating while the storm windows for the other two homeshad traditional clear glass. Overall heating load reduction due to the storm windows was 13percent with the clear glass and 21percent with the low-e windows. Simple paybacks for the addition of the storm windows were 10 years for the clear glass and 4.5 years forthe low-e storm windows.

  6. Fresh and evolutionary-type field-aligned irregularities generated near sunrise terminator due to overshielding electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulasi Ram, S.; Ajith, K. K.; Yamamoto, M.; Otsuka, Y.; Yokoyama, T.; Niranjan, K.; Gurubaran, S.

    2015-07-01

    The unusual evolution of fresh and intense field-aligned irregularities (FAI) near sunrise terminator which further sustained for more than 90 min of postsunrise period was observed by Equatorial Atmosphere Radar at Kototabang during a minor geomagnetic storm period. These FAI echoes were initially observed around 250-350 km altitudes, growing upward under eastward polarization electric fields indicating the plasma bubbles that are fully depleted along the flux tube. The background low-latitude F layer dynamics that lead to the development of these dawn time FAI have been investigated from two ionosondes at near magnetic conjugate low-latitude locations. A minor geomagnetic storm was in progress which did not appear to cause any large electric field perturbations at preceding postsunset to midnight period over Indonesian sector. However, the prompt penetration of overshielding electric fields associated with sudden northward turning of interplanetary magnetic field Bz caused spectacular ascent of F layer and development of fresh, intense, and upward evolutionary plasma bubbles near sunrise terminator.

  7. Transient electric field at high altitudes due to lightning: Possible role of induction field in the formation of elves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Gaopeng

    2006-01-01

    Space and time behaviors of electric field perturbation vector at high altitudes driven by lightning return stroke are examined in terms of its three individual components (i.e., electrostatic, induction, and radiation) with transmission line model, by specifying the current form in a return stroke channel, which is presumed to be vertically oriented. The result shows that at 90 km altitude, the induction E-field dominates in a small region with a radius of ˜11 km (depending on the speed of return stroke) directly above the lightning region, with a magnitude comparable to radiation field and a relatively longer timescale. We conclude that in addition to the radiation field considered in previous theoretical modeling, the induction component in lightning E-field is likely one new energy source for the creation of elves. This might be able to explain the observed pancake shape of some elves with a luminous central part, while the more complete modeling including the formation mechanism of elves is required.

  8. Kilotesla Magnetic Field due to a Capacitor-Coil Target Driven by High Power Laser

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Shinsuke; Zhang, Zhe; Ishihara, Kazuhiro; Shigemori, Keisuke; Hironaka, Youichiro; Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Sunahara, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Naoji; Nakashima, Hideki; Watanabe, Tsuguhiro; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory generation of strong magnetic fields opens new frontiers in plasma and beam physics, astro- and solar-physics, materials science, and atomic and molecular physics. Although kilotesla magnetic fields have already been produced by magnetic flux compression using an imploding metal tube or plasma shell, accessibility at multiple points and better controlled shapes of the field are desirable. Here we have generated kilotesla magnetic fields using a capacitor-coil target, in which two nickel disks are connected by a U-turn coil. A magnetic flux density of 1.5 kT was measured using the Faraday effect 650 μm away from the coil, when the capacitor was driven by two beams from the GEKKO-XII laser (at 1 kJ (total), 1.3 ns, 0.53 or 1 μm, and 5 × 1016 W/cm2). PMID:23378905

  9. Primary Beam Steering Due To Field Leakage From Superconducting SHMS Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Michael; Covrig, Silviu; Carlini, Roger; Waidyawansa, Buddhini; Benesch, Jay

    2014-03-01

    The Super High Momentum Spectrometer (SHMS) was designed for the 12 GeV/c physics program in Hall C at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator (JLab). At JLab an electron beam impinges on a fixed target and scattered particles are analyzed with magnetic spectrometers. The SHMS angular acceptance is 5 .5° <= θ <=40° . When positioned at θ = 5 .5° and full field strength the external fields from the magnets are large enough to steer the unscattered primary beam away from the beam dump window located 51.8 m from the target. The effects of these magnetic fields on the primary beam line downstream of the target are studied using Opera 3-D and TOSCA. A solution is presented that uses passive elements to shape these fields and assure that the primary beam is steered onto the beam dump window.

  10. Computation of induced electric field and temperature elevation in human due to lightning current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, T.; Hirata, A.

    2010-05-01

    The present study investigated induced electric field and temperature elevation in specific tissues/organs of an anatomically based human body model for the lightning current. The threshold amplitude of the current inducing ventricular fibrillation and skin burning are estimated from computed induced electric field and temperature elevation with formulas for electrical stimulation and thermal damage. The computational results obtained herein were reasonably consistent with clinical observation.

  11. Alignment of Iron Nanoparticles in a Magnetic Field Due to Shape Anisotropy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam; Nicholson, Don M; Eisenbach, Markus; Ludtka, Gerard Michael; Rios, Orlando; Parish, Chad M

    2015-07-09

    During high magnetic field processing there is evidence for alignment of non-spherical metallic particles above the Curie temperature in alloys with negligible magneto-crystalline anisotropy. The main driving force for alignment is the magnetic shape anisotropy. Current understanding of the phenomenon is not adequate to quantify the effect of particle size, aspect ratio, temperature and the magnetic field on particle alignment. We demonstrate a Monte Carlo approach coupled with size scaling to show the conditions under which alignment is possible.

  12. Simulations of magnetic field gradients due to micro-magnets on a triple quantum dot circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulin-Lamarre, G.; Bureau-Oxton, C.; Kam, A.; Zawadzki, P.; Studenikin, S.; Aers, G.; Pioro-Ladrière, M.; Sachrajda, A. S.

    2013-12-01

    To quantify the effects of local magnetic fields on triple quantum dots, the Heisenberg Hamiltonian has been diagonalized for three electrons coupled via the exchange interaction. In particular, we have investigated different geometries of micro-magnets located on top of the triple dot in order to optimize the field gradient characteristics. In this paper, we focus on two geometries which are candidates for an addressable EDSR triple quantum dot device.

  13. Simulations of magnetic field gradients due to micro-magnets on a triple quantum dot circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Poulin-Lamarre, G.; Bureau-Oxton, C.; Kam, A.; Zawadzki, P.; Aers, G.; Studenikin, S.; Pioro-Ladrière, M.; Sachrajda, A. S.

    2013-12-04

    To quantify the effects of local magnetic fields on triple quantum dots, the Heisenberg Hamiltonian has been diagonalized for three electrons coupled via the exchange interaction. In particular, we have investigated different geometries of micro-magnets located on top of the triple dot in order to optimize the field gradient characteristics. In this paper, we focus on two geometries which are candidates for an addressable EDSR triple quantum dot device.

  14. Field Evaluation of a General Purpose Simulator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spangenberg, Ronald W.

    The use of a general purpose simulator (GPS) to teach Air Force technicians diagnostic and repair procedures for specialized aircraft radar systems is described. An EC II simulator manufactured by Educational Computer Corporation was adapted to resemble the actual configuration technicians would encounter in the field. Data acquired in the…

  15. Phase shifts in precision atom interferometry due to the localization of atoms and optical fields

    SciTech Connect

    Wicht, A.; Sarajlic, E.; Hensley, J.M.; Chu, S.

    2005-08-15

    We discuss details of momentum transfer in the interaction between localized atoms and localized optical fields which are relevant to precision atom interferometry. Specifically, we consider a {lambda}-type atom coherently driven between its ground states by a bichromatic optical field. We assume that the excited state can be eliminated adiabatically from the time evolution. It is shown that the average recoil momentum is given by the phase gradient of the two-photon field at the 'position' of the atom, provided that the optical field can be described by a function which is separable in position and time and that the atomic wave function is symmetric and well localized within the optical field envelope. The result does not require the optical fields to have a Gaussian spatial dependence. Our discussion provides the basis for the analysis of systematic errors in precision atom interferometry arising from optical wave-front curvature, wave-front distortion, and the Gouy phase shift of Gaussian beams. We apply our result to the atom interferometer experiment of Chu and co-workers which measures the fine-structure constant.

  16. Evaluation of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation as a Treatment of Neck Pain due to Musculoskeletal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Maayah, Mikhled; Al-Jarrah, Mohammed

    2010-01-01

    Background This study was designed to evaluate transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) as a treatment for neck pain due to musculoskeletal disorders within the context of a physiotherapy treatment. Methods Thirty subjects with neck pain were randomly allocated to two groups, treated with either TENS (n = 15) or placebo (n = 15). Each subject received one session for one hour. All subjects were evaluated before, during treatment, after switch off and again a week after by using Myometer machine. All subjects completed the follow-up assessment. Subjects referred for out-subjects' physiotherapy department, fulfilling the inclusion and exclusion criteria, took part in the study. Results The assessments were compared and used to measure outcome treatment. Improvement in their condition was measured in terms of a reduction in the individual's level of pain during the week after the end of the first session. At the end of the first session, the study showed that 11 subjects (73%) in the treatment and 7 subjects (43%) in the control groups had gained marked improvement. These results are statistically highly significant, (P = 0.01) at the end of the follow-up assessment. Conclusions A conclusion could be drawn that a single intense TENS treatment is an effective treatment for neck pain due to musculoskeletal disorders. On the other hand, TENS showed an effective pain relief with subjects who have a mild neck pain rather than those with severe symptoms. Keywords Musculoskeletal disorders; Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation; Neck pain PMID:21629525

  17. Noise due to field- and current instabilities in CdS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böer, Karl W.

    1999-04-01

    In this review paper, we summerize the field and current instabilities that occur when the conductivity decreases more than linearly with increasing field, or increases sufficient steeply with increased current density. In both cases well defined transition ranges exist that causes a chaotic development of field-or current-inhomogeneities, respectively. These are the ranges in which substantial additional low-frequency electronic noise is generated that shows a typical 1/f behavior. Field instabilities occur in a range of an N-shaped current-voltage characteristic that result in high-field domains which can be stationary or move through the device and cause a stationary or oscillating reduction in current. The latter, as the Gunn effect, enjoys technical application as an ac generator. In CdS the negative differential conductivity regime is trap-controlled and thereby kinetic effects are slowed down so that they can be observed visually, using the Franz-Keldysh effect. During such observation, chaotic effects can be seen before the periodic oscillations are organized, and cause a substantial increase in low-frequency noise. The chaotic initiation of well organized periodically moving high-field domains are discussed in a phase-portrait analysis of the nonlinear dynamics for pattern formation in semiconductor devices. Also in an S-shaped characteristic that is initiated by substantial Joule's heating and yields current channel formation, current instabilities can occur that lead to low frequency noise. The related phenomena are briefly summerized in this review. The experimental evidence of these chaotic developments of field- and current-instabilities is shown during the oral presentation in a movie, using electro-optical or electro-thermo-optical effects for visualization.

  18. Evaluating 6 ricin field detection assays.

    PubMed

    Slotved, Hans-Christian; Sparding, Nadja; Tanassi, Julia Tanas; Steenhard, Nina R; Heegaard, Niels H H

    2014-01-01

    This study presents data showing the performance of 6 commercial detection assays against ricin around concentrations specified as detection limits by the producers. A 2-fold dilution series of 20 ng/ml ricin was prepared and used for testing the lateral-flow kits: BADD, Pro Strips™, ENVI, RAID DX, Ricin BioThreat Alert, and IMASS™ device. Three of the 6 tested field assays (IMASS™ device, ENVI assay, and the BioThreat Alert assay) were able to detect ricin, although differences in the measured detection limits compared to the official detection limits and false-negative results were observed. We were not able to get the BADD, Pro Strips™, and RAID assays to function in our laboratory. We conclude that when purchasing a field responder assay, there is large variation in the specificity of the assays, and a number of in-house tests must be performed to ensure functionality. PMID:24978020

  19. Condensing Hybrid Water Heater Monitoring Field Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Maguire, J.; Earle, L.; Booten, C.; Hancock, C. E.

    2011-10-01

    This paper summarizes the Mascot home, an abandoned property that was extensively renovated. Several efficiency upgrades were integrated into this home, of particular interest, a unique water heater (a Navien CR240-A). Field monitoring was performed to determine the in-use efficiency of the hybrid condensing water heater. The results were compared to the unit's rated efficiency. This unit is Energy Star qualified and one of the most efficient gas water heaters currently available on the market.

  20. Effect of Combined Loading Due to Bending and Internal Pressure on Pipe Flaw Evaluation Criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Naoki; Sakai, Shinsuke

    Considering a rule for the rationalization of maintenance of Light Water Reactor piping, reliable flaw evaluation criteria are essential for determining how a detected flaw will be detrimental to continuous plant operation. Ductile fracture is one of the dominant failure modes that must be considered for carbon steel piping and can be analyzed by elastic-plastic fracture mechanics. Some analytical efforts have provided various flaw evaluation criteria using load correction factors, such as the Z-factors in the JSME codes on fitness-for-service for nuclear power plants and the section XI of the ASME boiler and pressure vessel code. The present Z-factors were conventionally determined, taking conservativity and simplicity into account; however, the effect of internal pressure, which is an important factor under actual plant conditions, was not adequately considered. Recently, a J-estimation scheme, LBB.ENGC for the ductile fracture analysis of circumferentially through-wall-cracked pipes subjected to combined loading was developed for more accurate prediction under more realistic conditions. This method explicitly incorporates the contributions of both bending and tension due to internal pressure by means of a scheme that is compatible with an arbitrary combined-loading history. In this study, the effect of internal pressure on the flaw evaluation criteria was investigated using the new J-estimation scheme. The Z-factor obtained in this study was compared with the presently used Z-factors, and the predictability of the current flaw evaluation criteria was quantitatively evaluated in consideration of the internal pressure.

  1. Formation of electric dipoles in pea stem tissue due to an electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Fatemeh; Farahani, Elham

    2016-07-01

    For examining the effect of an electrical field (DC) on pea seed, we exposed the pea seeds to electric fields with intensities 1, 4 and 7 kV/cm for 30, 230, 430 and 630 seconds. The tests were repeated three times, and each iteration had 5 seeds. Then, the seeds were moved to packaged plates. Finally, microscopic observation of the pea stem tissue showed that the application of a DC electrical field caused a deformation in the pea stem tissue. The results led us to examine the deformation of the tissue theoretically and to address that deformation as an electrostatic problem. In this regard, we modeled the pea stem based on the formation of electric dipoles. Then, theoretically, we calculated the force acting on each xylem section by coding, and the results were consistent with the experimental data.

  2. Decrease of electron spin lifetime in external electric field due to intervalley phonon scattering in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Lan; Dery, Hanan; Li, Jing; Appelbaum, Ian

    2012-02-01

    We derive a simple approximate expression of the spin lifetime of drifting electrons in silicon. This expression agrees well with elaborate Monte Carlo simulations of the charge transport and spin relaxation of conduction electrons heated by the electric field. Already at low temperatures, the drifting electrons become hot enough to undergo f-processes (scattering between valleys of different crystal axes following emission of a shortwave phonon). Such a process involves a direct coupling of valence and conduction bands and dominates the spin relaxation. A sharp decrease of spin lifetime can then be expected in intermediate electric fields in between ˜100 V/cm and ˜1 kV/cm. When electrons are transported between a spin injector and a spin-resolved detector, the decrease of both transit time and spin lifetime results in a non-monotonic behavior of the detected spin polarization with the electric field. The theory shows excellent agreement with empirical results.

  3. Neoclassical Drift of Circulating Orbits Due toToroidal Electric Field in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Qin; Guan, Xiaoyin; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2011-07-19

    In tokamaks, Ware pinch is a well known neoclassical effect for trapped particles in response to a toroidal electric field. It is generally believed that there exists no similar neoclassical effect for circulating particles without collisions. However, this belief is erroneous, and misses an important effect. We show both analytically and numerically that under the influence of a toroidal electric field parallel to the current, the circulating orbits drift outward toward the outer wall with a characteristic velocity O ({var_epsilon}{sup -1}) larger than the E x B velocity, where {var_epsilon} is the inverse aspect-ratio of a tokamak. During a RF overdrive, the toroidal electric field is anti-parallel to the current. As a consequence, all charged particles, including backward runaway electrons, will drift inward towards the inner wall.

  4. A platform to study magnetic field amplification of laser driven shocks due to induced turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinecke, Jena; Doyle, Hugo; Bell, A. R.; Crowston, Robert; Drake, Paul; Fatenejad, M.; Hartley, Nick; Koenig, Michel; Kuramitsu, Y.; Kuranz, Carolyn; Lamb, Don; MacDonald, Mike; Miniati, F.; Murphy, Chris; Pelka, Alex; Ravasio, Alessandra; Reville, Brian; Sakawa, Y.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Scopatz, Anthony; Tzeferacos, Petros; Wan, Wesley; Woolsey, Nigel; Gregori, Gianluca

    2012-10-01

    Misaligned pressure and temperature gradients associated with asymmetrical shock waves generate currents which seed magnetic fields (Biermann battery process). These fields could then be further amplified by increasing particle gyration driven by vorticity and turbulence. Studies of such phenomena have been conducted at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and scaled to astrophysical conditions (e.g., protogalacitc structure formation) using magnetohydrodynamic scaling techniques. Shock waves were driven in a 1 mbar Argon gas filled chamber from ablation of 500 micron Carbon rods using 300 J of 527 nm, 1 ns pulse light. A plastic grid was positioned 1 cm from the target to drive turbulence with outer scale ˜1 mm (the size of the grid opening). An induction coil, located 2 cm from the grid, was used to measure the magnetic field while optical diagnostics were used to track the fluid flow. Preliminary results and comparisons with hydrodynamic codes will be shown.

  5. Magnetic Field Due to a Finite Length Current-Carrying Wire Using the Concept of Displacement Current

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buschauer, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In undergraduate E&M courses the magnetic field due to a finite length, current-carrying wire can be calculated using the Biot-Savart law. However, to the author's knowledge, no textbook presents the calculation of this field using the Ampere-Maxwell law: ?B [multiplied by] dl = µ[subscript 0] (I + e[subscript 0] dF/dt) [multiplied by] 1

  6. SEISMIC PERFORMANCE OF RC BRIDGE COLUMNS UNDER VARYING AXIAL FORCE DUE TO NEAR-FIELD VERTICAL GROUND MOTIONS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Kumagai, Yuji; Kawashima, Kazuhiko

    Recently, high acceleration and high frequency near-field vertical ground motions were recorded at several sites. The extreme vertical ground motions can induce high frequency varying axial force which develop even tensile force in reinforced concrete bridge columns. Cyclic loading experiments of RC columns were conducted to clarify the seismic performance of RC bridge columns under near-field vertical ground motions. It is shown that core concrete is crushed extensively due to varying axial force after longitudinal bars buckle.

  7. Transient particle acceleration in strongly magnetized neutron stars. II - Effects due to a dipole field geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fatuzzo, Marco; Melia, Fulvio

    1991-01-01

    Sheared Alfven waves generated by nonradial crustal disturbances above the polar cap of a strongly magnetized neutron star induce an electric field component parallel to B. An attempt is made to determine the manner in which the strong radial dependence of B affects the propagation of these sheared Alfven waves, and whether this MHD process is still an effective particle accelerator. It is found that although the general field equation is quite complicated, a simple wavelike solution can still be obtained under the conditions of interest for which the Alfven phase velocity decouples from the wave equation. The results may be applicable to gamma-ray burst sources.

  8. Poloidal electric field due to ICRH and its effect on neoclassical transport

    SciTech Connect

    Vacca, L. )

    1994-10-15

    We study the transport of a plasma in which a minority ion species is heated by fast Alfven waves. The strong anisotropy of the minority distribution function gives origin to a poloidal electric field. We calculate the poloidal dependence of the electric potential by numerically integrating the leading order minority distribution function. When the amplitude of this field is such that electrostatic trapping is not negligible in comparison to the magnetic trapping then neoclassical transport can be enhanced as found in previous work. The linearized kinetic equations are solved using a variational method in the banana regime. Approximate analytic expressions for the transport coefficients are given.

  9. Electro-elastic fields due to a point charge in a flexoelectric medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Rajdeep

    2015-10-01

    Flexoelectricity provides a two-way connection between strain gradients and polarization that is pronounced at the nanoscale for isotropic materials which cannot link electromechanically via piezoelectricity. In this paper, the general equations for an isotropic, flexoelectric material were formulated, with contributions from strain gradients included. The electromechanical fields associated with a point charge in an infinite medium were derived, and results for GaAs were obtained. Our formulation yields two electromechanical length-scales, instead of one obtained from previous theories, and enables us to capture local fields accurately. Results from this paper provide insight into the electro-mechanical behavior of materials with charged defects.

  10. Calculating the electromagnetic field on the earth due to an electrodynamic tethered system in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, Robert D.

    1989-01-01

    A method is presented for calculating the electromagnetic wave field on the earth's surface associated with the operation of an electrodynamic tethered satellite system of constant or slowly varying current in the upper ionosphere. The wave field at the ionospheric boundary and on the earth's surface is obtained by numerical integration. The results suggest that the ionospheric waves do not propagate into the atmosphere and that the image of the Alfven wings from a steady-current tether should be greatly broadened on the earth's surface.

  11. Non-locality in quantum field theory due to general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calmet, Xavier; Croon, Djuna; Fritz, Christopher

    2015-12-01

    We show that general relativity coupled to a quantum field theory generically leads to non-local effects in the matter sector. These non-local effects can be described by non-local higher dimensional operators which remarkably have an approximate shift symmetry. When applied to inflationary models, our results imply that small non-Gaussianities are a generic feature of models based on general relativity coupled to matter fields. However, these effects are too small to be observable in the cosmic microwave background.

  12. Evidence of stochastic diffusion across a cross-field sheath due to Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, S.E.; Xu, X.Q.; Lichtenberg, A.J.; Birdsall, C.K. )

    1992-03-15

    We identify mechanisms for particle transport across a cross-field sheath. We present a study of {bold E}{times}{bold B} drift motion in a vortex in which the ion drifts are perturbed by their finite gyroradii and electron drifts are perturbed by one or more traveling waves. Large-scale vortices, which are the result of nonlinear saturation of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability resulting from shear in the {bold E}{times}{bold B} drift velocity, have been observed in plasma simulations of the cross-field sheath (K. Theilhaber and C. K. Birdsall, Phys. Rev. Lett. 62, 772 (1989); Phys. Fluids B 1, 2241 (1989); 1, 2260 (1989)). Small-scale turbulence is also present, and ions and electrons are transported across the sheath. A vortex alone does not allow for the observed electron transport because the electron drift orbits simply circulate. On the other hand, the ion motion can be stochastic from resonant interaction between harmonics of the drift motion and the gyromotion, independent of the background turbulence. The fluctuations in the ion density would then give rise to a small-amplitude wave spectrum. The combined action of the vortex fields and traveling-wave fields on the electron motion can then lead to stochastic electron diffusion. We study these effects, showing that the values of vortex fields observed in the simulation are sufficient to lead to both ion and electron stochasticity. Furthermore, the rate of the resulting diffusion is sufficient to account for the diffusion observed in the simulation.

  13. Relativistic electron loss process by pitch angle scattering due to field curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. J.; Parks, G. K.; Lee, E.; McCarthy, M. P.; Min, K.; Kim, H.; Park, J.; Hwang, J.

    2006-12-01

    Relativistic electron dropout (RED) events are characterized by fast electron flux decrease at the geostationary orbit. It is known that the main loss process is non adiabatic and more effective for the high energy particles. RED events generally start to occur at midnight sector and propagate to noon sector and are correlated with magnetic field stretching. We discuss this kind of event can be caused from pitch angle diffusion induced when the gyro radius of the electrons is comparable to the radius of curvature of the magnetic field and the magnetic moment is not conserved any more. While this process has been studied theoretically, the question is whether electron precipitation could be explained with this process for the real field configuration. This paper will show that this process can successfully explain the precipitation that occurred on June 14, 2004 observed by the low-altitude (680 km) polar orbiting Korean satellite, STSAT-1. In this precipitation event, the energy dispersion showed higher energy electron precipitation occurred at lower L values. This feature is a good indicator that precipitation was caused by the magnetic moment scattering in the geomagnetic tail. This interpretation is supported by the geosynchronous satellite GOES observations that showed significant magnetic field distortion occurred on the night side accompanying the electron flux depletion. Tsyganenko-01 model also shows the magnetic moment scattering could occur under the geomagnetic conditions existing at that time. We suggest the pitch angle scattering by field curvature violating the first adiabatic invariant as a possible candidate for loss mechanism of relativistic electrons in radiation belt.

  14. Field-Based Concerns about Fourth-Generation Evaluation Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Morris K.

    Some aspects of fourth generation evaluation procedures that have been advocated by E. G. Guba and Y. S. Lincoln were examined empirically, with emphasis on areas where there have been discrepancies between theory and field-based experience. In fourth generation evaluation, the product of an evaluation is not a set of conclusions, recommendations,…

  15. Field Evaluation of an Online Foster Parent Training System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buzhardt, Jay; Heitzman-Powell, Linda

    2006-01-01

    The authors developed and evaluated an online foster parent training system designed specifically for low-bandwidth Internet connections and individuals with limited Internet/computer experience. After preliminary onsite evaluations, a 2-week field test was conducted to evaluate the following dimensions: foster parents' pre- to post-test scores on…

  16. The effect of space charge fields due to finite length electron beams in the free-electron laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, C.-M.; Sprangle, P.; Freund, H.; Colson, W.

    1982-01-01

    The space charge electric field of a finite length electron beam in the free electron laser amplifier with a tapered wiggler is analyzed. In the free drift region between the accelerator and laser, expressions for the increase of energy spread due to the self field are presented. In the FEL interaction region, the general conditions on the importance of the self electric field in the equations of motion is obtained. A numerical example of the FEL experiment at 10.6 microns is given.

  17. Enhanced excitonic photoconductivity due to built-in internal electric field in TlGaSe{sub 2} layered semiconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Seyidov, MirHasan Yu. Suleymanov, Rauf A.; Şale, Yasin; Balaban, Ertan

    2014-12-07

    The strong enhancement, by several orders of magnitude, of the excitonic peak within the photoconductivity spectrum of TlGaSe{sub 2} semiconductor was observed. The samples were polarized in external dc electric field, which was applied prior to the measurements. Due to the accumulation of charges near the surface, an internal electric field was formed. Electron-hole pairs that were created after the absorption of light are fallen in and then separated by the built-in electric field, which prevents radiative recombination process.

  18. Finding the Shadows: Local Variations in the Stress Field due to Large Magnitude Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latimer, C.; Tiampo, K.; Rundle, J.

    2009-05-01

    Stress shadows, regions of static stress decrease associated with large magnitude earthquake have typically been described through several characteristics or parameters such as location, duration, and size. These features can provide information about the physics of the earthquake itself, as static stress changes are dependent on the following parameters: the regional stress orientations, the coefficient of friction, as well as the depth of interest (King et al, 1994). Areas of stress decrease, associated with a decrease in the seismicity rate, while potentially stable in nature, have been difficult to identify in regions of high rates of background seismicity (Felzer and Brodsky, 2005; Hardebeck et al., 1998). In order to obtain information about these stress shadows, we can determine their characteristics by using the Pattern Informatics (PI) method (Tiampo et al., 2002; Tiampo et al., 2006). The PI method is an objective measure of seismicity rate changes that can be used to locate areas of increases and/or decreases relative to the regional background rate. The latter defines the stress shadows for the earthquake of interest, as seismicity rate changes and stress changes are related (Dieterich et al., 1992; Tiampo et al., 2006). Using the data from the PI method, we can invert for the parameters of the modeled half-space using a genetic algorithm inversion technique. Stress changes will be calculated using coulomb stress change theory (King et al., 1994) and the Coulomb 3 program is used as the forward model (Lin and Stein, 2004; Toda et al., 2005). Changes in the regional stress orientation (using PI results from before and after the earthquake) are of the greatest interest as it is the main factor controlling the pattern of the coulomb stress changes resulting from any given earthquake. Changes in the orientation can lead to conclusions about the local stress field around the earthquake and fault. The depth of interest and the coefficient of friction both

  19. Heat flux due to poloidal electric field in the banana regime

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, M. )

    1992-02-01

    The heat flux due to poloidally varying electrostatic potential is calculated in the banana regime. This electrostatic potential determined self-consistently from charge neutrality is shown to increase the electron heat flux by a factor {radical}{ital m}{sub {ital i}}/{ital m}{sub {ital e}} compared with that when this potential is neglected, where {ital m}{sub {ital e}} and {ital m}{sub {ital i}} are the masses of electron and ion, respectively.

  20. Time-convoluted hotspot temperature field on a metal skin due to sustained arc stroke heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, T. S.; Su, W. Y.

    A previously developed time-convoluted heat-conduction theory is applied to the case of a metal plate whose heat source is sustained over time. Integral formulas are formally derived, and their utilization in practical arc-heating work is examined. The results are compared with experimental ones from titanium and aluminum plates subjected to sustained heating due to step switch-on dc arc sources, and reasonable agreement is found.

  1. Field evaluation of an electromagnetic current meter based vertical profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamblin, P. F.; Marmoush, Y. M. R.; Boyce, F. M.; Smith, A. A.

    1987-10-01

    A current profiler consisting of a vertical array of three electromagnetic current meters has been evaluated through an intercomparison of the three sensors, with reference to nearby current and wave data and by comparison to recent laboratory performance tests (Aubrey and Trowbridge, 1985). Mean flow estimates are too uncertain and variable to allow bottom boundary layer shear stress to be estimated by the conventional logarithmic law method. As well as unexplained sudden shifts in the mean speed response, the comparison with vector-averaged current meter data indicates possible long-term reduction in response due to fouling of the sensors by biological growth. The directional response was less sensitive to fouling effects. The oscillatory response on one occasion after field deployment for 17 days indicates a reduction in response from 41 to 45% at a period of oscillation of 3 s in a combined steady and oscillatory flow field. This study demonstrates that despite careful laboratory calibration, electromagnetic current meters are not at present suitable for quantitative study of dynamics of sediment resuspension in near-bottom shallow-water environments.

  2. Modelling of 3D fields due to ferritic inserts and test blanket modules in toroidal geometry at ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yueqiang; Äkäslompolo, Simppa; Cavinato, Mario; Koechl, Florian; Kurki-Suonio, Taina; Li, Li; Parail, Vassili; Saibene, Gabriella; Särkimäki, Konsta; Sipilä, Seppo; Varje, Jari

    2016-06-01

    Computations in toroidal geometry are systematically performed for the plasma response to 3D magnetic perturbations produced by ferritic inserts (FIs) and test blanket modules (TBMs) for four ITER plasma scenarios: the 15 MA baseline, the 12.5 MA hybrid, the 9 MA steady state, and the 7.5 MA half-field helium plasma. Due to the broad toroidal spectrum of the FI and TBM fields, the plasma response for all the n  =  1–6 field components are computed and compared. The plasma response is found to be weak for the high-n (n  >  4) components. The response is not globally sensitive to the toroidal plasma flow speed, as long as the latter is not reduced by an order of magnitude. This is essentially due to the strong screening effect occurring at a finite flow, as predicted for ITER plasmas. The ITER error field correction coils (EFCC) are used to compensate the n  =  1 field errors produced by FIs and TBMs for the baseline scenario for the purpose of avoiding mode locking. It is found that the middle row of the EFCC, with a suitable toroidal phase for the coil current, can provide the best correction of these field errors, according to various optimisation criteria. On the other hand, even without correction, it is predicted that these n  =  1 field errors will not cause substantial flow damping for the 15 MA baseline scenario.

  3. Spinmotive force due to motion of magnetic bubble arrays driven by magnetic field gradient

    PubMed Central

    Yamane, Yuta; Hemmatiyan, Shayan; Ieda, Jun'ichi; Maekawa, Sadamichi; Sinova, Jairo

    2014-01-01

    Interaction between local magnetization and conduction electrons is responsible for a variety of phenomena in magnetic materials. It has been recently shown that spin current and associated electric voltage can be induced by magnetization that depends on both time and space. This effect, called spinmotive force, provides for a powerful tool for exploring the dynamics and the nature of magnetic textures, as well as a new source for electromotive force. Here we theoretically demonstrate the generation of electric voltages in magnetic bubble array systems subjected to a magnetic field gradient. It is shown by deriving expressions for the electric voltages that the present system offers a direct measure of phenomenological parameter β that describes non-adiabaticity in the current induced magnetization dynamics. This spinmotive force opens a door for new types of spintronic devices that exploit the field-gradient. PMID:25365971

  4. Flow and acoustic field due to an inclined plate with a downstream splitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, C. M.; Conlisk, A. T.

    1993-01-01

    In the present work, the high Reynolds number flow past an inclined plate with a splitter plate placed in its wake is considered numerically. A numerical conformal mapping technique is employed to transform the two-plate system into the same number of cylinders: the flow field is assumed to be two-dimensional. The vortex shedding from the inclined plate is modelled using the discrete vortex method. It is shown that the splitter plate has a profound effect on the development of the flow over a range of values of a suitably defined offset parameter and for a range of positions of the leading edge of the splitter plate. The acoustic field is also calculated and the spectrum reflects the flow results.

  5. Alignment of iron nanoparticles in a magnetic field due to shape anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, B.; Nicholson, D. M.; Eisenbach, M.; Parish, C.; Ludtka, G. M.; Rios, O.

    2015-11-01

    During high magnetic field solidification processing there is evidence for the alignment of nanoscale metallic particles with elongated morphologies that nucleate from a liquid metal. Such alignment occurs well above the Curie temperature of the particle where the magneto-crystalline anisotropy energy and exchange energy contributions are negligible. The main driving force for alignment is the magnetic shape anisotropy. Current understanding of the phenomenon is not adequate to quantify the effect of particle size, aspect ratio, temperature and the magnetic field on particle alignment. We demonstrate a Monte Carlo approach coupled with a scaling law for the dipole-dipole interaction energy as a function of the particle size to identify the conditions under which such alignment is possible.

  6. Velocity-Space Diffusion Coefficients Due to Full-Wave ICRF Fields in Toroidal Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R.W.; Jaeger, F.; Berry, L.A.; Batchelor, D.B.; D'Azevedo, E.; Carter, M.D.; Ershov, N.M.; Smirnov, A.P.; Bonoli, P.; Wright, J.C.; Smithe, D.N.

    2005-09-26

    Jaeger et al. have calculated bounce-averaged QL diffusion coefficients from AORSA full-wave fields, based on non-Maxwellian distributions from CQL3D Fokker-Planck code. A zero banana-width approximation is employed. Complementing this calculation, a fully numerical calculation of ion velocity diffusion coefficients using the full-wave fields in numerical tokamak equilibria has been implemented to determine the finite orbit width effects. The un-approximated Lorentz equation of motion is integrated to obtain the change in velocity after one complete poloidal transit of the tokamak. Averaging velocity changes over initial starting gyro-phase and toroidal angle gives bounce-averaged diffusion coefficients. The coefficients from the full-wave and Lorentz orbit methods are compared for an ITER DT second harmonic tritium ICRF heating case: the diffusion coefficients are similar in magnitude but reveal substantial finite orbit effects.

  7. Ultrasonic propagation velocity in magnetic and magnetorheological fluids due to an external magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Bramantya, M A; Motozawa, M; Sawada, T

    2010-08-18

    Ultrasonic propagation velocity in a magnetic fluid (MF) and magnetorheological fluid (MRF) changes with the application of an external magnetic field. The formation of clustering structures inside the MF and MRF clearly has an influence on the ultrasonic propagation velocity. Therefore, we propose a qualitative analysis of these structures by measuring properties of ultrasonic propagation. Since MF and MRF are opaque, non-contact inspection using the ultrasonic technique can be very useful for analyzing the inner structures of MF and MRF. In this study, we measured ultrasonic propagation velocity in a hydrocarbon-based MF and MRF precisely. Based on these results, the clustering structures of these fluids are analyzed experimentally in terms of elapsed time dependence and the effect of external magnetic field strength. The results reveal hysteresis and anisotropy in the ultrasonic propagation velocity. We also discuss differences of ultrasonic propagation velocity between MF and MRF. PMID:21386478

  8. Superdiffusion of two-dimensional Yukawa liquids due to a perpendicular magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yan; Goree, J; Liu, Bin; Intrator, T P; Murillo, M S

    2014-07-01

    Stochastic transport of a two-dimensional (2D) dusty plasma liquid with a perpendicular magnetic field is studied. Superdiffusion is found to occur especially at higher magnetic fields with β of order unity. Here, β = ω(c)/ω(pd) is the ratio of the cyclotron and plasma frequencies for dust particles. The mean-square displacement MSD = 4D(α)t(α) is found to have an exponent α > 1, indicating superdiffusion, with α increasing monotonically to 1.1 as β increases to unity. The 2D Langevin molecular dynamics simulation used here also reveals that another indicator of random particle motion, the velocity autocorrelation function, has a dominant peak frequency ω(peak) that empirically obeys ω(peak)(2) = ω(c)(2) + ω(pd)(2)/4. PMID:25122399

  9. New experimental method of visualizing the electric field due to surface charges on circuit elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Rebecca; de Salazar, Alex; Nassar, Antonio

    2010-12-01

    Although static surface charges on circuit elements are of enormous interest, recent papers and textbooks have only discussed the problem theoretically using analytical or numerical approaches. The only well-known experimental method to visualize the structure of electric fields around circuit elements was reported by Jefimenko almost half a century ago. In our paper, we report on a simple method to visualize the electric field produced by static surface charges on current-carrying circuit elements. Our method uses a mixture of PTFE (Teflon) sealant and mineral oil, a copper wire placed in the mixture's container, and two 6 kV power supplies. We believe that our new method can be used directly in the classroom.

  10. Particle acceleration due to shocks in the interplanetary field: High time resolution data and simulation results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessel, R. L.; Armstrong, T. P.; Nuber, R.; Bandle, J.

    1985-01-01

    Data were examined from two experiments aboard the Explorer 50 (IMP 8) spacecraft. The Johns Hopkins University/Applied Lab Charged Particle Measurement Experiment (CPME) provides 10.12 second resolution ion and electron count rates as well as 5.5 minute or longer averages of the same, with data sampled in the ecliptic plane. The high time resolution of the data allows for an explicit, point by point, merging of the magnetic field and particle data and thus a close examination of the pre- and post-shock conditions and particle fluxes associated with large angle oblique shocks in the interplanetary field. A computer simulation has been developed wherein sample particle trajectories, taken from observed fluxes, are allowed to interact with a planar shock either forward or backward in time. One event, the 1974 Day 312 shock, is examined in detail.

  11. VISCOUS EVOLUTION AND PHOTOEVAPORATION OF CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS DUE TO EXTERNAL FAR ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Kassandra R.; Adams, Fred C.; Calvet, Nuria

    2013-09-01

    This paper explores the effects of FUV radiation fields from external stars on circumstellar disk evolution. Disks residing in young clusters can be exposed to extreme levels of FUV flux from nearby OB stars, and observations show that disks in such environments are being actively photoevaporated. Typical FUV flux levels can be factors of {approx}10{sup 2}-10{sup 4} higher than the interstellar value. These fields are effective in driving mass loss from circumstellar disks because they act at large radial distance from the host star, i.e., where most of the disk mass is located, and where the gravitational potential well is shallow. We combine viscous evolution (an {alpha}-disk model) with an existing FUV photoevaporation model to derive constraints on disk lifetimes, and to determine disk properties as functions of time, including mass-loss rates, disk masses, and radii. We also consider the effects of X-ray photoevaporation from the host star using an existing model, and show that for disks around solar-mass stars, externally generated FUV fields are often the dominant mechanism in depleting disk material. For sufficiently large viscosities, FUV fields can efficiently photoevaporate disks over the entire range of parameter space. Disks with viscosity parameter {alpha} = 10{sup -3} are effectively dispersed within 1-3 Myr; for higher viscosities ({alpha} = 10{sup -2}) disks are dispersed within {approx}0.25-0.5 Myr. Furthermore, disk radii are truncated to less than {approx}100 AU, which can possibly affect the formation of planets. Our model predictions are consistent with the range of observed masses and radii of proplyds in the Orion Nebula Cluster.

  12. False vacuum bubble nucleation due to a nonminimally coupled scalar field

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Wonwoo; Park, Chanyong; Lee, Bum-Hoon; Lee, Chul H.

    2006-12-15

    We study the possibility of forming the false vacuum bubble nucleated within the true vacuum background via the true-to-false vacuum phase transition in curved spacetime. We consider a semiclassical Euclidean bubble in the Einstein theory of gravity with a nonminimally coupled scalar field. In this paper we present the numerical computations as well as the approximate analytical computations. We mention the evolution of the false vacuum bubble after nucleation.

  13. False vacuum bubble nucleation due to a nonminimally coupled scalar field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wonwoo; Lee, Bum-Hoon; Lee, Chul H.; Park, Chanyong

    2006-12-01

    We study the possibility of forming the false vacuum bubble nucleated within the true vacuum background via the true-to-false vacuum phase transition in curved spacetime. We consider a semiclassical Euclidean bubble in the Einstein theory of gravity with a nonminimally coupled scalar field. In this paper we present the numerical computations as well as the approximate analytical computations. We mention the evolution of the false vacuum bubble after nucleation.

  14. Undulation instability in a bilayer lipid membrane due to electric field interaction with lipid dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, Richard J.; Olmsted, Peter D.; Smye, Stephen W.

    2010-05-01

    Bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) are an essential component of all biological systems, forming a functional barrier for cells and organelles from the surrounding environment. The lipid molecules that form membranes contain both permanent and induced dipoles, and an electric field can induce the formation of pores when the transverse field is sufficiently strong (electroporation). Here, a phenomenological free energy is constructed to model the response of a BLM to a transverse static electric field. The model contains a continuum description of the membrane dipoles and a coupling between the headgroup dipoles and the membrane tilt. The membrane is found to become unstable through buckling modes, which are weakly coupled to thickness fluctuations in the membrane. The thickness fluctuations, along with the increase in interfacial area produced by membrane buckling, increase the probability of localized membrane breakdown, which may lead to pore formation. The instability is found to depend strongly on the strength of the coupling between the dipolar headgroups and the membrane tilt as well as the degree of dipolar ordering in the membrane.

  15. The onset of layer undulations in smectic A liquid crystals due to a strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, A.; Garcia-Azpeitia, C.; García-Cervera, C. J.; Joo, S.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the effect of a strong magnetic field on a three dimensional smectic A liquid crystal. We identify a critical field above which the uniform layered state loses stability; this is associated to the onset of layer undulations. In a previous work García-Cervera and Joo (2012 Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal. 203 1–43), García-Cervera and Joo considered the two dimensional case and analyzed the transition to the undulated state via a simple bifurcation. In dimension n  =  3 the situation is more delicate because the first eigenvalue of the corresponding linearized problem is not simple. We overcome the difficulties inherent to this higher dimensional setting by identifying the irreducible representations for natural actions on the functional that take into account the invariances of the problem thus allowing for reducing the bifurcation analysis to a subspace with symmetries. We are able to describe at least two bifurcation branches, highlighting the richer landscape of energy critical states in the three dimensional setting. Finally, we analyze a reduced two dimensional problem, assuming the magnetic field is very strong, and are able to relate this to a model in micromagnetics studied in Alouges et al (2002 ESAIM Control Optim. Calc. Var. 8 31–68), from where we deduce the periodicity property of minimizers.

  16. Field evaluation of two commonly used slipmeters.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen-Ruey; Cotnam, John P; Matz, Simon

    2003-01-01

    A variety of slipmeters have been used to assess the slipperiness of floor surfaces. International standards for the operation of slipmeters describe the protocol for a single measurement. These standards usually do not cover some of the critical elements in safety assessment such as methods for the selection of measurement locations and the necessary number of repeated measurements at each location. Furthermore, most of the slipmeters were evaluated in laboratory settings with new floor surfaces and artificial contaminants. Two commonly used slipmeters, the Brungraber Mark II and the English XL, were evaluated at actual worksites in this experiment. Four floor tiles in each of four different work areas in the kitchens of 18 fast food restaurants were selected for repeated measurements with these two slipmeters. The results indicated that sanding of footwear materials has a significant effect on the outcomes of friction measurements, and the tile-to-tile variations in friction in the same areas of restaurants were also mostly statistically significant. Significant local variation in friction among tiles in the same area could potentially increase the chances of slip and fall incidents. Both slipmeters used in this experiment could potentially have problems in the areas with grease, such as grill and fryer areas, since the build-up of grease during repeated strikes could alter the outcome of friction measured. PMID:12523805

  17. An evaluation of an empirical model for stall delay due to rotation for HAWTS

    SciTech Connect

    Tangler, J L; Selig, M S

    1997-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the Corrigan and Schillings stall delay model for predicting rotor performance for horizontal axis wind turbines. Two-dimensional (2D) wind tunnel characteristics with and without stall delay were used in the computer program PROP93 to predict performance for the NREL Combined Experiment Rotor (CER) and a lower solidity commercial machine. For the CER, predictions were made with a constant-chord/twisted blade and a hypothetical tapered/twisted blade. Results for the constant-chord/twisted blade were compared with CER data. Predicted performance using this empirical stall-delay method provided significant increases in peak power over 2D post-stall airfoil characteristics. The predicted peak power increase due to stall delay for the CER was found to be quite large (20% to 30%) as a result of its high blade solidity. For a more typical, lower-solidity commercial blade the predicted peak power increase was 15% to 20%. As described in the paper, correlation with test data was problematic due to factors not related to the stall-delay model.

  18. Estimating the change in asymptotic direction due to secular changes in the geomagnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flueckiger, E. O.; Smart, D. F.; Shea, M. A.; Gentile, L. C.; Bathurat, A. A.

    1985-01-01

    The concept of geomagnetic optics, as described by the asymptotic directions of approach, is extremely useful in the analysis of cosmic radiation data. However, when changes in cutoff occur as a result of evolution in the geomagnetic field, there are corresponding changes in the asymptotic cones of acceptance. A method is introduced of estimating the change in the asymptotic direction of approach for vertically incident cosmic ray particles from a reference set of directions at a specific epoch by considering the change in the geomagnetic cutoff.

  19. EVALUATION OF RADIONUCLIDE ACCUMULATION IN SOIL DUE TO LONG-TERM IRRIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    De Wesley Wu

    2006-04-16

    Radionuclide accumulation in soil due to long-term irrigation is an important part of the model for predicting radiation dose in a long period of time. The model usually assumes an equilibrium condition in soil with a constant irrigation rate, so that radionuclide concentration in soil does not change with time and can be analytically solved. This method is currently being used for the dose assessment in the Yucca Mountain project, which requires evaluating radiation dose for a period of 10,000 years. There are several issues associated with the method: (1) time required for the equilibrium condition, (2) validity of constant irrigation rate, (3) agricultural land use for a long period of time, and (4) variation of a radionuclide concentration in water. These issues are evaluated using a numerical method with a simple model built in the GoldSim software. Some key radionuclides, Tc-99, Np-237, Pu-239, and Am-241 are selected as representative radionuclides. The results indicate that the equilibrium model is acceptable except for a radionuclide that requires long time to accumulate in soil and that its concentration in water changes dramatically with time (i.e. a sharp peak). Then the calculated dose for that radionuclide could be overestimated using the current equilibrium method.

  20. Incorporating uncertainty of distribution parameters due to sampling errors in flood-damage-reduction project evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Hsin-Ting; Tung, Yeou-Koung

    2013-03-01

    Epistemic uncertainty is a result of knowledge deficiency about the system. Sampling error exists when limited amounts of hydrologic data are used to estimate a T year event quantile. Both the natural randomness of hydrologic data and the sampling error in design quantile estimation contribute to the uncertainty in flood damage estimation. This paper presents a framework for evaluating a flood-damage-mitigation project in which both the hydrologic randomness and epistemic uncertainty due to sampling error are considered in flood damage estimation. Different risk-based decision-making criteria are used to evaluate project merits based on the mean, standard deviation, and probability distribution of the project net benefits. The results show that the uncertainty of the project net benefits is quite significant. Ignoring the data sampling error will underestimate the potential risk of each project. It can be clearly shown that adding data to existing sample observations leads to improved quality of information, enhanced reliability of the estimators, and reduced sampling error and uncertainty in the project net benefits. Through the proposed framework, the proper length of the extended record for risk reduction can be determined to achieve the required level of acceptable risk.

  1. Evaluation of military field-water quality

    SciTech Connect

    Selleck, R.E.; Ungun, Z.; Chesler, G.; Diyamandoglu, V.; Marinas, B. . Sanitary Engineering and Environmental Health Research Lab.); Daniels, J.I. )

    1990-05-01

    A comparison is made between the performances of the 600-gph Reverse Osmosis Water Purification Unit (ROWPU) operated in the bypass mode and the Mobile Water Purification Unit (MWPU, frequently referred to as an ERDLATOR because the equipment was developed at the Engineer Research and Development Laboratory at Fort Belvoir, VA.) Generally, the performance of the MWPU is significantly better than the pretreatment units of the ROWPU in terms of removing both turbidity and pathogenic organisms. It is recommended that the practice of bypassing the reverse osmosis (RO) components of the ROWPU be avoided unless it can be demonstrated clearly that the cartridge filters will remove the cysts of infectious organisms effectively and reliably. If the ROWPU must be operated in the bypass mode, it is recommended that the dose of disinfectant used be made equal to that currently employed in the field for untreated raw water. The analytical methods used to determine total dissolved solids (TDS) and residual free chlorine with the new Water-Quality Monitor (WQM) are also reviewed briefly. The limitations of the methods used to calibrate the TDS and free-chlorine probes of the new WQM are discussed. 98 refs., 19 figs., 16 tabs.

  2. Screening of external magnetic perturbation fields due to sheared plasma flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Liu, Y. Q.; Liang, Y.; Wang, N.; Luan, Q.; Zhong, F. C.; Liu, Y.

    2016-09-01

    Within the single fluid resistive magnetohydrodynamic model, systematic toroidal modelling efforts are devoted to investigate the plasma response induced screening of the applied external 3D magnetic field perturbations in the presence of sheared toroidal flow. One particular issue of interest is addressed, when the local flow speed approaches zero at the perturbation rational surface inside the plasma. Subtle screening physics, associated with the favourable averaged toroidal curvature effect (the GGJ effect (Glasser et al 1975 Phys. Fluids 7 875)), is found to play an essential role during slow flow near the rational surface by enhancing the screening at reduced flow. A strong cancellation effect between different terms of Ohm’s law is discovered, leading to different screening physics in the GGJ regime, as compared to that of conventional screening of the typical resistive-inertial regime occurring at faster flow. These modelling results may be applicable to interpret certain mode locking experiments, as well as type-I edge localized mode suppression experiments, with resonant magnetic field perturbations being applied to tokamak plasmas at low input toroidal torque.

  3. Electron residual energy due to stochastic heating in field-ionized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalilzadeh, Elnaz; Yazdanpanah, Jam; Jahanpanah, Jafar; Chakhmachi, Amir; Yazdani, Elnaz

    2015-11-01

    The electron residual energy originated from the stochastic heating in under-dense field-ionized plasma is investigated here. Initially, the optical response of plasma is modeled by using two counter-propagating electromagnetic waves. In this case, the solution of motion equation of a single electron indicates that by including the ionization, the electron with higher residual energy compared with that without ionization could be obtained. In agreement with chaotic nature of the motion, it is found that the electron residual energy will be significantly changed by applying a minor change in the initial conditions. Extensive kinetic 1D-3V particle-in-cell simulations have been performed in order to resolve full plasma reactions. In this way, two different regimes of plasma behavior are observed by varying the pulse length. The results indicate that the amplitude of scattered fields in a proper long pulse length is high enough to act as a second counter-propagating wave and trigger the stochastic electron motion. On the contrary, the analyses of intensity spectrum reveal the fact that the dominant scattering mechanism tends to Thomson rather than Raman scattering by increasing the pulse length. A covariant formalism is used to describe the plasma heating so that it enables us to measure electron temperature inside and outside of the pulse region.

  4. Vibroacoustic Response of Residential Housing due to Sonic Boom Exposure: A Summary of two Field Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klos, Jacob; Buehrle, Ralph; Sullivan, Brenda; Gavin, Joseph; Salamone, Joseph; Haering, Edward A., jr.; Miller, Denise M.

    2008-01-01

    Two experiments have been performed to measure the vibroacoustic response of houses exposed to sonic booms. In 2006, an old home in the base housing area of Edwards Air Force Base, built around 1960 and demolished in 2007, was instrumented with 288 transducers. During a 2007 follow-on test, a newer home in the base housing area, built in 1997, was instrumented with 112 transducers. For each experiment, accelerometers were placed on walls, windows and ceilings in bedrooms of the house to measure the vibration response of the structure. Microphones were placed outside and inside the house to measure the excitation field and resulting interior sound field. The vibroacoustic response of each house was measured for sonic boom amplitudes spanning from 2.4 to 96 Pa (0.05 to 2 lbf/sq ft). The boom amplitudes were systematically varied using a unique dive maneuver of an F/A-18 airplane. In total, the database for both houses contains vibroacoustic response data for 154 sonic booms. In addition, several tests were performed with mechanical shaker excitation of the structure to characterize the forced response of the houses. The purpose of this paper is to summarize all the data from these experiments that are available to the research community, and to compare and contrast the vibroacoustic behavior of these two dissimilar houses.

  5. Excessive magnetic field flux density distribution from overhead isolated powerline conductors due to neutral line current.

    PubMed

    Netzer, Moshe

    2013-06-01

    Overhead isolated powerline conductors (hereinafter: "OIPLC") are the most compact form for distributing low voltage currents. From the known physics of magnetic field emission from 3-phase power lines, it is expected that excellent symmetry of the 120° shifted phase currents and where compact configuration of the 3-phase+neutral line exist, the phase current vectorial summation of the magnetic field flux density (MFFD) is expected to be extremely low. However, despite this estimation, an unexpectedly very high MFFD was found in at least three towns in Israel. This paper explains the reasons leading to high MFFD emissions from compact OIPLC and the proper technique to fix it. Analysis and measurement results had led to the failure hypothsis of neutral line poor connection design and poor grounding design of the HV-LV utility transformers. The paper elaborates on the low MFFD exposure level setup by the Israeli Environmental Protection Office which adopted a rather conservative precaution principal exposure level (2 mG averaged over 24 h). PMID:23675630

  6. Excitation of dayside chorus waves due to magnetic field line compression in response to interplanetary shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chen; Li, Wen; Thorne, Richard M.; Bortnik, Jacob; Ma, Qianli; An, Xin; Zhang, Xiao-jia; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Ni, Binbin; Gu, Xudong; Fu, Song; Zhao, Zhengyu

    2015-10-01

    The excitation of magnetospheric whistler-mode chorus in response to interplanetary (IP) shocks is investigated using wave data from the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) spacecraft. As an example, we show a typical chorus wave excitation following an IP shock event that was observed by THEMIS in the postnoon sector near the magnetopause on 3 August 2010. We then analyze characteristic changes during this event and perform a survey of similar events during the period 2008-2014 using the THEMIS and OMNI data set. Our statistical analysis demonstrates that the chorus wave excitation/intensification in response to IP shocks occurs only at high L shells (L > 8) on the dayside. We analyzed the variations of magnetic curvature following the arrival of the IP shock and found that IP shocks lead to more homogeneous background magnetic field configurations in the near-equatorial dayside magnetosphere; and therefore, the threshold of nonlinear chorus wave growth is likely to be reduced, favoring chorus wave generation. Our results provide the observational evidence to support the concept that the geomagnetic field line configuration plays a key role in the excitation of dayside chorus.

  7. Mobility overestimation due to gated contacts in organic field-effect transistors

    PubMed Central

    Bittle, Emily G.; Basham, James I.; Jackson, Thomas N.; Jurchescu, Oana D.; Gundlach, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Parameters used to describe the electrical properties of organic field-effect transistors, such as mobility and threshold voltage, are commonly extracted from measured current–voltage characteristics and interpreted by using the classical metal oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistor model. However, in recent reports of devices with ultra-high mobility (>40 cm2 V−1 s−1), the device characteristics deviate from this idealized model and show an abrupt turn-on in the drain current when measured as a function of gate voltage. In order to investigate this phenomenon, here we report on single crystal rubrene transistors intentionally fabricated to exhibit an abrupt turn-on. We disentangle the channel properties from the contact resistance by using impedance spectroscopy and show that the current in such devices is governed by a gate bias dependence of the contact resistance. As a result, extracted mobility values from d.c. current–voltage characterization are overestimated by one order of magnitude or more. PMID:26961271

  8. Global Simulation of Proton Precipitation Due to Field Line Curvature During Substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilson, M. L.; Raeder, J.; Donovan, E.; Ge, Y. S.; Kepko, L.

    2012-01-01

    The low latitude boundary of the proton aurora (known as the Isotropy Boundary or IB) marks an important boundary between empty and full downgoing loss cones. There is significant evidence that the IB maps to a region in the magnetosphere where the ion gyroradius becomes comparable to the local field line curvature. However, the location of the IB in the magnetosphere remains in question. In this paper, we show simulated proton precipitation derived from the Field Line Curvature (FLC) model of proton scattering and a global magnetohydrodynamic simulation during two substorms. The simulated proton precipitation drifts equatorward during the growth phase, intensifies at onset and reproduces the azimuthal splitting published in previous studies. In the simulation, the pre-onset IB maps to 7-8 RE for the substorms presented and the azimuthal splitting is caused by the development of the substorm current wedge. The simulation also demonstrates that the central plasma sheet temperature can significantly influence when and where the azimuthal splitting takes place.

  9. SOI detector with drift field due to majority carrier flow - an alternative to biasing in depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Trimpl, M.; Deptuch, G.; Yarema, R.; /Fermilab

    2010-11-01

    This paper reports on a SOI detector with drift field induced by the flow of majority carriers. It is proposed as an alternative method of detector biasing compared to standard depletion. N-drift rings in n-substrate are used at the front side of the detector to provide charge collecting field in depth as well as to improve the lateral charge collection. The concept was verified on a 2.5 x 2.5 mm{sup 2} large detector array with 20 {micro}m and 40 {micro}m pixel pitch fabricated in August 2009 using the OKI semiconductor process. First results, obtained with a radioactive source to demonstrate spatial resolution and spectroscopic performance of the detector for the two different pixel sizes will be shown and compared to results obtained with a standard depletion scheme. Two different diode designs, one using a standard p-implantation and one surrounded by an additional BPW implant will be compared as well.

  10. Electron residual energy due to stochastic heating in field-ionized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Khalilzadeh, Elnaz; Yazdanpanah, Jam Chakhmachi, Amir; Jahanpanah, Jafar; Yazdani, Elnaz

    2015-11-15

    The electron residual energy originated from the stochastic heating in under-dense field-ionized plasma is investigated here. Initially, the optical response of plasma is modeled by using two counter-propagating electromagnetic waves. In this case, the solution of motion equation of a single electron indicates that by including the ionization, the electron with higher residual energy compared with that without ionization could be obtained. In agreement with chaotic nature of the motion, it is found that the electron residual energy will be significantly changed by applying a minor change in the initial conditions. Extensive kinetic 1D-3V particle-in-cell simulations have been performed in order to resolve full plasma reactions. In this way, two different regimes of plasma behavior are observed by varying the pulse length. The results indicate that the amplitude of scattered fields in a proper long pulse length is high enough to act as a second counter-propagating wave and trigger the stochastic electron motion. On the contrary, the analyses of intensity spectrum reveal the fact that the dominant scattering mechanism tends to Thomson rather than Raman scattering by increasing the pulse length. A covariant formalism is used to describe the plasma heating so that it enables us to measure electron temperature inside and outside of the pulse region.

  11. Mobility overestimation due to gated contacts in organic field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Bittle, Emily G; Basham, James I; Jackson, Thomas N; Jurchescu, Oana D; Gundlach, David J

    2016-01-01

    Parameters used to describe the electrical properties of organic field-effect transistors, such as mobility and threshold voltage, are commonly extracted from measured current-voltage characteristics and interpreted by using the classical metal oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor model. However, in recent reports of devices with ultra-high mobility (>40 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)), the device characteristics deviate from this idealized model and show an abrupt turn-on in the drain current when measured as a function of gate voltage. In order to investigate this phenomenon, here we report on single crystal rubrene transistors intentionally fabricated to exhibit an abrupt turn-on. We disentangle the channel properties from the contact resistance by using impedance spectroscopy and show that the current in such devices is governed by a gate bias dependence of the contact resistance. As a result, extracted mobility values from d.c. current-voltage characterization are overestimated by one order of magnitude or more. PMID:26961271

  12. Mobility overestimation due to gated contacts in organic field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittle, Emily G.; Basham, James I.; Jackson, Thomas N.; Jurchescu, Oana D.; Gundlach, David J.

    2016-03-01

    Parameters used to describe the electrical properties of organic field-effect transistors, such as mobility and threshold voltage, are commonly extracted from measured current-voltage characteristics and interpreted by using the classical metal oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor model. However, in recent reports of devices with ultra-high mobility (>40 cm2 V-1 s-1), the device characteristics deviate from this idealized model and show an abrupt turn-on in the drain current when measured as a function of gate voltage. In order to investigate this phenomenon, here we report on single crystal rubrene transistors intentionally fabricated to exhibit an abrupt turn-on. We disentangle the channel properties from the contact resistance by using impedance spectroscopy and show that the current in such devices is governed by a gate bias dependence of the contact resistance. As a result, extracted mobility values from d.c. current-voltage characterization are overestimated by one order of magnitude or more.

  13. Oscillation of electron mobility in parabolic double quantum well structure due to applied electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Sahoo, Narayan; Sahu, Trinath

    2014-12-15

    We show that oscillation of low temperature electron mobility μ can be obtained by applying an electric field F along the growth direction of the asymmetrically barrier delta doped Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As parabolic double quantum well structure. The drastic changes in the subband Fermi energies and distributions of subband wave functions as a function of F yield nonmonotonic intra- and intersubband scattering rate matrix elements mediated by intersubband effects. The oscillatory enhancement of μ, which is attributed to the subband mobilities governed by the ionized impurity scattering, magnifies with increase in well width and decrease in height of the parabolic structure potential. The results can be utilized for nanoscale low temperature device applications.

  14. Variations of Mars gravitational field and rotation due to seasonal CO2 exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, B. Fong; Rubincam, David Parry

    1990-01-01

    About a quarter of the Martian atmospheric mass is exchanged between the atmosphere and the polar caps in the course of a Martian year: CO2 condenses to form (or add to) the polar caps in winter and sublimes into the atmosphere in summer. This paper studies the effect of this CO2 mass redistribution on Martian rotation and gravitational field. Two mechanisms are examined: (1) the waxing and waning of solid CO2 in the polar caps and (2) the geographical distribution of gaseous CO2 in the atmosphere. In particular, the net peak-to-peak changes in J2 and J3 over a Martian year are both found to be as much as about 6 x 10 to the -9th. A simulation suggests that these changes may be detected by the upcoming Mars Observer under favorable but realistic conditions.

  15. Mean force on a finite-sized spherical particle due to an acoustic field in a viscous compressible medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annamalai, Subramanian; Balachandar, S.; Parmar, Manoj K.

    2014-05-01

    An analytical expression to evaluate the second-order mean force (acoustic radiation force) on a finite-sized, rigid, spherical particle due to an acoustic wave is presented. The medium in which the particle is situated is taken to be both viscous and compressible. A far-field derivation approach has been used in determining the force, which is a function of the particle size, acoustic wavelength, and viscous boundary-layer thickness. It is assumed that the viscous length scale is negligibly small compared to the acoustic wavelength. The force expression presented here (i) reduces to the correct inviscid behavior (for both small- and finite-sized particles) and (ii) is identical to recent viscous results [M. Settnes and H. Bruus, Phys. Rev. E 85, 016327 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevE.85.016327] for small-sized particles. Further, the computed force qualitatively matches the computational fluid dynamics (finite-element) results [D. Foresti, M. Nabavi, and D. Poulikakos, J. Fluid Mech. 709, 581 (2012), 10.1017/jfm.2012.350] for finite-sized particles. Additionally, the mean force is interpreted in terms of a multipole expansion. Subsequently, considering the fact that the force expansion is an infinite series, the number of terms that are required or adequate to capture the force to a specified accuracy is also provided as a function of the particle size to acoustic wavelength ratio. The dependence of the force on particle density, kinematic viscosity, and bulk viscosity of the fluid is also investigated. Here, both traveling and standing waves are considered.

  16. FIELD ANALYTICAL SCREENING PROGRAM: PCP METHOD - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This innovative technology evaluation report (ITER) presents information on the demonstration of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 7 Superfund Field Analytical Screening Program (FASP) method for determining pentachlorophenol (PCP) contamination in soil and wa...

  17. FIELD ANALYTICAL SCREENING PROGRAM PCB METHOD: INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This innovative technology evaluation report (ITER) presents information on the demonstration of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 7 Superfund Field Analytical Screening Program (FASP) method for determining polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) contamination in soil...

  18. Electromagnetic Fields Due to a Loop Current in a CasedBorehole Surrounded by Uniform Whole Space

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.H.; Song, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Precise evaluation of electromagnetic (EM) response in steel-cased borehole is an essential first step towards developing techniques for casing parameter evaluation, which would ultimately help evaluating the formation response. In this report we demonstrate a numerical scheme for accurately computing EM responses in cased borehole environment. For improved numerical accuracy we use explicit representations of the electromagnetic spectra inside the borehole, in the casing, and in the formation. Instead of conventional Hankel transform, FFT is used to improve the numerical accuracy. The FFT approach allows us to compute fields at positions very close to the source loop, including the center of the transmitter loop.

  19. Experimental observation of increased threshold electric field for runaway generation due to synchrotron radiation losses in the FTU tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Martin-Solis, Jose Ramon; Sanchez, Raul; Esposito, Basilio

    2010-01-01

    The threshold electric field for runaway generation has been investigated during runaway suppression experiments by means of electron-cyclotron-resonance heating in the flattop phase of FTU discharges. Runaway suppression has been experimentally found to occur at electric fields substantially larger than those predicted by the relativistic collisional theory of runaway generation, E{sub R} = n{sub e}e{sup 3}ln{Lambda}/4{pi}{var_epsilon}{sub 0}{sup 2}m{sub e}c{sup 2}. These experimental results are consistent with an increase of the critical electric field due to the electron synchrotron radiation losses. No runaway electrons are found in FTU experiments below the radiation threshold. These results support evidence for a new threshold electric field for runaway generation that accounts for the effect of the synchrotron losses, and which should be considered when making predictions on runaway generation and mitigation in devices such as ITER.

  20. Microstructural changes in a cementitious membrane due to the application of a DC electric field.

    PubMed

    Covelo, Alba; Diaz, Belen; Freire, Lorena; Novoa, X Ramon; Perez, M Consuelo

    2008-07-01

    The use of electromigration techniques to accelerate chloride ions motion is commonly employed to characterise the permeability of cementitious samples to chlorides, a relevant parameter in reinforced concrete corrosion. This paper is devoted to the study of microstructure's changes occurring in mortar samples when submitted to natural diffusion and migration experiments. The application of an electric field reduces testing time in about one order of magnitude with respect to natural diffusion experiments. Nevertheless, the final sample's microstructure differs in both tests. Impedance Spectroscopy is employed for real time monitoring of microstructural changes. During migration experiments the global impedance undergoes important increase in shorter period of time compared to natural diffusion tests. So, the forced motion of ions through the concrete membrane induces significant variations in the porous structure, as confirmed by Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry. After migration experiments, an important increase in the capillary pore size (10-100 nm) was detected. Conversely, no relevant variations are found after natural diffusion tests. Results presented in this work cast doubt on the significance of diffusion coefficient values obtained under accelerated conditions. PMID:18569312

  1. Enhanced O2+ loss at Mars due to an ambipolar electric field from electron heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ergun, R. E.; Andersson, L. A.; Fowler, C. M.; Woodson, A. K.; Weber, T. D.; Delory, G. T.; Andrews, D. J.; Eriksson, A. I.; McEnulty, T.; Morooka, M. W.; Stewart, A. I. F.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2016-05-01

    Recent results from the MAVEN Langmuir Probe and Waves instrument suggest higher than predicted electron temperatures (Te) in Mars' dayside ionosphere above ~180 km in altitude. Correspondingly, measurements from Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer indicate significant abundances of O2+ up to ~500 km in altitude, suggesting that O2+ may be a principal ion loss mechanism of oxygen. In this article, we investigate the effects of the higher Te (which results from electron heating) and ion heating on ion outflow and loss. Numerical solutions show that plasma processes including ion heating and higher Te may greatly increase O2+ loss at Mars. In particular, enhanced Te in Mars' ionosphere just above the exobase creates a substantial ambipolar electric field with a potential (eΦ) of several kBTe, which draws ions out of the region allowing for enhanced escape. With active solar wind, electron, and ion heating, direct O2+ loss could match or exceed loss via dissociative recombination of O2+. These results suggest that direct loss of O2+ may have played a significant role in the loss of oxygen at Mars over time.

  2. Scavenging of rodent carcasses following simulated mortality due to field applications of anticoagulant rodenticide.

    PubMed

    Montaz, Julie; Jacquot, Marion; Coeurdassier, Michaël

    2014-11-01

    Worldwide, agricultural uses of anticoagulant rodenticides (ARs) cause poisonings of non-target wildlife as observed in France where bromadiolone is used to control water vole outbreaks. Following bromadiolone field application, a part of the vole population may die aboveground of the treated plots and thus, can represent an important risk of secondary poisoning for scavengers. In this study, water voles were trapped in a non-treated area and their carcasses were placed aboveground in plots located in an area where a vole outbreak occurred. Then, the environmental persistence, the diurnal and nocturnal scavenging rates of water vole carcasses were assessed in autumn 2011 and in spring 2012. The diurnal scavenger species were also identified. The environmental persistence of the carcasses to reach at least a scavenging rate of 87.5 % was 0.5-1.5 day. The average rates of diurnal and nocturnal scavenging ranged from 67 to 100 % and 5 to 100 %, respectively. They depended on the composition of the scavenger community present near the monitored plots; diurnal scavenging rates being higher with corvids than with raptors. In autumn, the red kite and the common buzzard were the main scavengers in one of the plots, what suggests a high risk of poisoning for these raptors during post-nuptial migration. So, the collection of vole carcasses after treatments and the limitations of bromadiolone applications when high densities of predators/scavengers are observed could be implemented to mitigate the risks of secondary poisoning. PMID:25147048

  3. Experimental investigation of heating phenomena in linac mechanical interfaces due to RF field penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Fazio, M.V.; Reid, D.W.; Potter, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    In a high duty-factor, high-current, drift-tube linear accelerator, a critical interface exists between the drift-tube stem and the tank wall. This interface must provide vacuum integrity and RF continuity, while simultaneously allowing alignment flexibility. Because of past difficulties with RF heating of vacuum bellows and RF joints encountered by others, a paucity of available information, and the high reliability requirement for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) accelerator, a program was initiated to study the problem. Because RF heating is the common failure mode, an attempt was made to find a correlation between the drift-tube-stem/linac-tank interface geometry and RF field penetration from the tank into the interface region. Experiments were performed at 80 MHz on an RF structure designed to simulate the conditions to which a drift-tube stem and vacuum bellows are exposed in a drift-tube linac. Additional testing was performed on a 367-MHz model of the FMIT prototype drift-tube linac. Experimental results, and a method to predict excessive RF heating, is presented. An experimentally tested solution to the problem is discussed.

  4. Near-Field Scattering due to Topography and Lateral Velocity Heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imperatori, Walter; Mai, Martin

    2014-05-01

    The scattering of seismic waves traveling in the Earth is not only caused by velocity heterogeneity, but also by rough surface topography. Both factors are known to play an important role on ground motion complexity even at short distances from the source. In this study, we simulate ground motion with a 3D finite-difference wave propagation solver in the frequency band 0-5 Hz using different rough topography models and realistic heterogeneous media characterized by Von Karman correlation functions. We analyze the characteristics of the scattered wave-field, focusing in particular on coda waves. Our study shows that topography and velocity heterogeneity scattering generate coda waves with different characteristics. We notice that, while coda waves originated by velocity heterogeneity have a more diffusive nature presenting envelope broadening as a result of forward scattering, coda waves caused by topography scattering are composed of more coherent body and surface waves reflected and diffracted by irregular topography surface. Results indicate that, for shallow sources, topography scattering can generate more intense early-coda waves at short and intermediate distances from the source. As distance increases, velocity heterogeneity scattering starts to dominate. However results show a rather high degree of variability as topography scattering is very sensitive to source position and features of the topography model. On the other hand, velocity perturbations generate more intense late-coda waves We conclude that topography scattering cannot be used as a proxy for velocity heterogeneity scattering.

  5. Difficulties in applying numerical simulations to an evaluation of occupational hazards caused by electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Zradziński, Patryk

    2015-01-01

    Due to the various physical mechanisms of interaction between a worker's body and the electromagnetic field at various frequencies, the principles of numerical simulations have been discussed for three areas of worker exposure: to low frequency magnetic field, to low and intermediate frequency electric field and to radiofrequency electromagnetic field. This paper presents the identified difficulties in applying numerical simulations to evaluate physical estimators of direct and indirect effects of exposure to electromagnetic fields at various frequencies. Exposure of workers operating a plastic sealer have been taken as an example scenario of electromagnetic field exposure at the workplace for discussion of those difficulties in applying numerical simulations. The following difficulties in reliable numerical simulations of workers' exposure to the electromagnetic field have been considered: workers' body models (posture, dimensions, shape and grounding conditions), working environment models (objects most influencing electromagnetic field distribution) and an analysis of parameters for which exposure limitations are specified in international guidelines and standards. PMID:26323781

  6. Difficulties in applying numerical simulations to an evaluation of occupational hazards caused by electromagnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Zradziński, Patryk

    2015-01-01

    Due to the various physical mechanisms of interaction between a worker's body and the electromagnetic field at various frequencies, the principles of numerical simulations have been discussed for three areas of worker exposure: to low frequency magnetic field, to low and intermediate frequency electric field and to radiofrequency electromagnetic field. This paper presents the identified difficulties in applying numerical simulations to evaluate physical estimators of direct and indirect effects of exposure to electromagnetic fields at various frequencies. Exposure of workers operating a plastic sealer have been taken as an example scenario of electromagnetic field exposure at the workplace for discussion of those difficulties in applying numerical simulations. The following difficulties in reliable numerical simulations of workers’ exposure to the electromagnetic field have been considered: workers’ body models (posture, dimensions, shape and grounding conditions), working environment models (objects most influencing electromagnetic field distribution) and an analysis of parameters for which exposure limitations are specified in international guidelines and standards. PMID:26323781

  7. Ferrofluid flow due to a rotating disk in the presence of a non-uniform magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhandari, A.; Kumar, V.

    2016-05-01

    The flow of a ferrofluid due to a rotating disk in the presence of a non-uniform magnetic field in the axial direction is studied through mathematical modeling of the problem. Contour and surface plots in the presence of 10 kilo-ampere/meter, 100 kilo-ampere/meter magnetization force are presented here for radial, tangential and axial velocity profiles, and results are also drawn for the magnetic field intensity. These results are compared with the ordinary case where magnetization force is absent.

  8. DISPOSAL OF FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION WASTES: EPA SHAWNEE FIELD EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes results of the flue gas desulfurization (FGD) waste disposal field evaluation project sponsored by EPA at TVA's Shawnee steam plant, Paducah, KY. This pilot-scale project, initiated in 1974 and completed in September 1980, evaluated methods and costs for dis...

  9. Field evaluation of rice varieties for resistance to major diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The development and use of improved disease resistant rice varieties remains of foremost importance to rice producers, with field evaluation under local environments essential. In this study, we evaluated new and existing varieties, potential releases, and Texas elite breeding lines for resistance t...

  10. Evaluation of Activity Concentration Values and Doses due to the Transport of Low Level Radioactive Material

    SciTech Connect

    Rawl, Richard R; Scofield, Patricia A; Leggett, Richard Wayne; Eckerman, Keith F

    2010-04-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) initiated an international Coordinated Research Project (CRP) to evaluate the safety of transport of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). This report presents the United States contribution to that IAEA research program. The focus of this report is on the analysis of the potential doses resulting from the transport of low level radioactive material. Specific areas of research included: (1) an examination of the technical approach used in the derivation of exempt activity concentration values and a comparison of the doses associated with the transport of materials included or not included in the provisions of Paragraph 107(e) of the IAEA Safety Standards, Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, Safety Requirements No. TS-R-1; (2) determination of the doses resulting from different treatment of progeny for exempt values versus the A{sub 1}/A{sub 2} values; and (3) evaluation of the dose justifications for the provisions applicable to exempt materials and low specific activity materials (LSA-I). It was found that the 'previous or intended use' (PIU) provision in Paragraph 107(e) is not risk informed since doses to the most highly exposed persons (e.g., truck drivers) are comparable regardless of intended use of the transported material. The PIU clause can also have important economic implications for co-mined ores and products that are not intended for the fuel cycle but that have uranium extracted as part of their industrial processing. In examination of the footnotes in Table 2 of TS-R-1, which identifies the progeny included in the exempt or A1/A2 values, there is no explanation of how the progeny were selected. It is recommended that the progeny for both the exemption and A{sub 1}/A{sub 2} values should be similar regardless of application, and that the same physical information should be used in deriving the limits. Based on the evaluation of doses due to the transport of low-level NORM

  11. Evaluation of counting error due to colony masking in bioaerosol sampling.

    PubMed

    Chang, C W; Hwang, Y H; Grinshpun, S A; Macher, J M; Willeke, K

    1994-10-01

    Colony counting error due to indistinguishable colony overlap (i.e., masking) was evaluated theoretically and experimentally. A theoretical model to predict colony masking was used to determine colony counting efficiency by Monte Carlo computer simulation of microorganism collection and development into CFU. The computer simulation was verified experimentally by collecting aerosolized Bacillus subtilis spores and examining micro- and macroscopic colonies. Colony counting efficiency decreased (i) with increasing density of collected culturable microorganisms, (ii) with increasing colony size, and (iii) with decreasing ability of an observation system to distinguish adjacent colonies as separate units. Counting efficiency for 2-mm colonies, at optimal resolution, decreased from 98 to 85% when colony density increased from 1 to 10 microorganisms cm-2, in contrast to an efficiency decrease from 90 to 45% for 5-mm colonies. No statistically significant difference (alpha = 0.05) between experimental and theoretical results was found when colony shape was used to estimate the number of individual colonies in a CFU. Experimental colony counts were 1.2 times simulation estimates when colony shape was not considered, because of nonuniformity of actual colony size and the better discrimination ability of the human eye relative to the model. Colony surface densities associated with high counting accuracy were compared with recommended upper plate count limits and found to depend on colony size and an observation system's ability to identify overlapped colonies. Correction factors were developed to estimate the actual number of collected microorganisms from observed colony counts.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7986046

  12. Bioremediation of hazardous wastes. Research, development, and field evaluations, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Kremer, F.

    1995-09-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Office of Research and Development (ORD) hosted the eighth annual Symposium on Bioremediation of Hazardous Wastes: Research, Development, and Field Evaluations in Rye Brook, New York, August 8-10, 1995. In this document, abstracts of paper and poster presentations from the symposium are organized within five key research and program areas: Bioremediation Field Initiative; Field research; Performance evaluation; Pilot-scale research; and Process research. The last section of the document includes abstracts of presentations on bioremediation research performed as part of the Hazardous Substance Research Center (HSRC) program.

  13. Piezophotonic Switching Due to Local Field Effects in a Coherently Prepared Medium of Three-Level Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manka, Aaron S.; Dowling, Jonathan P.; Bowden, Charles M.; Fleischhauer, Michael

    1994-09-01

    We study the effect of near dipole-dipole interactions on the electric susceptibility of a coherently prepared three-level Λ system. We discuss the influence of atomic nonlinearities on the recently predicted enhancement of the absorptionless index of refraction and inversionless gain due to local field effects [J.P. Dowling and C.M. Bowden,

    Phys. Rev. Lett. 70 1421 1993
    ] and predict a density dependent, or piezophotonic, switching between absorption and amplification.

  14. Use of element model to evaluate transmissibility reduction due to barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Svanes, T.; South, D.; Dronen, O.M.

    1997-08-01

    Water breakthrough has been observed a year earlier than expected in the productive Oseberg Formation in the Veslefrikk Field. Production data revealed extensive water override, whereas the opposite situation was expected based on a homogeneous and coarse flow simulation model. A new model was developed to include geological heterogeneities using a simple upscaling method. The Oseberg Fm. consists of an upper homogeneous unit (zone 2) and a lower unit containing thin barriers of shale and calcite cemented sandstone (zone 1). The barrier content varies laterally. When barriers are distributed in a complex 3D pattern, they reduce the upscaled horizontal transmissibility more than what is obtained by multiplying the sand permeability by the net-to-gross ratio (N/G). However, the transmissibility reduction strongly depends on the spatial distribution of barriers and their geometry. Therefore, a fine scale element model was used to derive the average transmissibility reduction as a function of N/G for alternative geological descriptions of the barriers. A geo-statistical method called General Marked Point Process was used to generate the fine scale descriptions. This work has resulted in a simple upscaling routine for horizontal transmissibility, which represents an effective bridge between geological evaluation of uncertainties and fluid flow simulation. The method combines geo-statistical and deterministic modelling in an elegant manner, recognising that most often these methods complement one another.

  15. Evaluation of Vulnerable Zones in Puerto Vallarta due to a Local Tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trejo, E.; Nuñez Cornu, F. J., II; Ortiz, M.

    2015-12-01

    Based in the high possibility of occurrence of a tsunamigenic earthquake of magnitude 8.0Mw offshore from the northern coast of Jalisco and Bahía de Banderas, Mexico. The vulnerability of Puerto Vallarta to a direct flood hazard associated to the tsunami is evaluated. Assuming a simplified model of the seismic source a numerical method is used to calculate the tsunami run-up and the extent of flooding in Puerto Vallarta area. Floods heights and arrival times in the first ten hours after the earthquake and flood boundaries in different watersheds were estimated. This method was previously testing, modeling the October 9, 1995, Jalisco Earthquake and Tsunami, the results obtained were similar to the field observations and testimonies performed in 20 sites along 100 km on the coast of Jalisco, related to the height and flood extension reached during the tsunami. To estimate the vulnerability the following variables were considered: distribution of population density, population by age or physical limitation, housing characteristics, level of education, cost of goods in the affected area, location of key facilities, cost of cleaning the affected area, and change of land use policy in the Puerto Vallarta area. The study indicates that the vulnerability is very high in the Salado basin, and high in the Pitillal and Mascota-Ameca basins.

  16. Superior bit error rate and jitter due to improved switching field distribution in exchange spring magnetic recording media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suess, D.; Fuger, M.; Abert, C.; Bruckner, F.; Vogler, C.

    2016-06-01

    We report two effects that lead to a significant reduction of the switching field distribution in exchange spring media. The first effect relies on a subtle mechanism of the interplay between exchange coupling between soft and hard layers and anisotropy that allows significant reduction of the switching field distribution in exchange spring media. This effect reduces the switching field distribution by about 30% compared to single-phase media. A second effect is that due to the improved thermal stability of exchange spring media over single-phase media, the jitter due to thermal fluctuation is significantly smaller for exchange spring media than for single-phase media. The influence of this overall improved switching field distribution on the transition jitter in granular recording and the bit error rate in bit-patterned magnetic recording is discussed. The transition jitter in granular recording for a distribution of Khard values of 3% in the hard layer, taking into account thermal fluctuations during recording, is estimated to be a = 0.78 nm, which is similar to the best reported calculated jitter in optimized heat-assisted recording media.

  17. Superior bit error rate and jitter due to improved switching field distribution in exchange spring magnetic recording media.

    PubMed

    Suess, D; Fuger, M; Abert, C; Bruckner, F; Vogler, C

    2016-01-01

    We report two effects that lead to a significant reduction of the switching field distribution in exchange spring media. The first effect relies on a subtle mechanism of the interplay between exchange coupling between soft and hard layers and anisotropy that allows significant reduction of the switching field distribution in exchange spring media. This effect reduces the switching field distribution by about 30% compared to single-phase media. A second effect is that due to the improved thermal stability of exchange spring media over single-phase media, the jitter due to thermal fluctuation is significantly smaller for exchange spring media than for single-phase media. The influence of this overall improved switching field distribution on the transition jitter in granular recording and the bit error rate in bit-patterned magnetic recording is discussed. The transition jitter in granular recording for a distribution of Khard values of 3% in the hard layer, taking into account thermal fluctuations during recording, is estimated to be a = 0.78 nm, which is similar to the best reported calculated jitter in optimized heat-assisted recording media. PMID:27245287

  18. Superior bit error rate and jitter due to improved switching field distribution in exchange spring magnetic recording media

    PubMed Central

    Suess, D.; Fuger, M.; Abert, C.; Bruckner, F.; Vogler, C.

    2016-01-01

    We report two effects that lead to a significant reduction of the switching field distribution in exchange spring media. The first effect relies on a subtle mechanism of the interplay between exchange coupling between soft and hard layers and anisotropy that allows significant reduction of the switching field distribution in exchange spring media. This effect reduces the switching field distribution by about 30% compared to single-phase media. A second effect is that due to the improved thermal stability of exchange spring media over single-phase media, the jitter due to thermal fluctuation is significantly smaller for exchange spring media than for single-phase media. The influence of this overall improved switching field distribution on the transition jitter in granular recording and the bit error rate in bit-patterned magnetic recording is discussed. The transition jitter in granular recording for a distribution of Khard values of 3% in the hard layer, taking into account thermal fluctuations during recording, is estimated to be a = 0.78 nm, which is similar to the best reported calculated jitter in optimized heat-assisted recording media. PMID:27245287

  19. An evaluation of recent internal field models. [of earth magnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mead, G. D.

    1979-01-01

    The paper reviews the current status of internal field models and evaluates several recently published models by comparing their predictions with annual means of the magnetic field measured at 140 magnetic observatories from 1973 to 1977. Three of the four models studied, viz. AWC/75, IGS/75, and Pogo 8/71, were nearly equal in their ability to predict the magnitude and direction of the current field. The fourth model, IGRF 1975, was significantly poorer in its ability to predict the current field. All models seemed to be able to extrapolate predictions quite well several years outside the data range used to construct the models.

  20. ¹⁴N Quadrupole Resonance line broadening due to the earth magnetic field, occuring only in the case of an axially symmetric electric field gradient tensor.

    PubMed

    Aissani, Sarra; Guendouz, Laouès; Marande, Pierre-Louis; Canet, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    As demonstrated before, the application of a weak static B0 magnetic field (less than 10 G) may produce definite effects on the ¹⁴N Quadrupole Resonance line when the electric field gradient tensor at the nitrogen nucleus level is of axial symmetry. Here, we address more precisely the problem of the relative orientation of the two magnetic fields (the static field and the radio-frequency field of the pure NQR experiment). For a field of 6G, the evolution of the signal intensity, as a function of this relative orientation, is in very good agreement with the theoretical predictions. There is in particular an intensity loss by a factor of three when going from the parallel configuration to the perpendicular configuration. By contrast, when dealing with a very weak magnetic field (as the earth field, around 0.5 G), this effect drops to ca. 1.5 in the case Hexamethylenetetramine (HMT).This is explained by the fact that the Zeeman shift (due to the very weak magnetic field) becomes comparable to the natural line-width. The latter can therefore be determined by accounting for this competition. Still in the case of HMT, the estimated natural line-width is half the observed line-width. The extra broadening is thus attributed to earth magnetic field. The latter constitutes therefore the main cause of the difference between the natural transverse relaxation time (T₂) and the transverse relaxation time derived from the observed line-width (T₂(⁎)). PMID:25910551

  1. The Evaluation Principles of Ralph W. Tyler: Rationale for the Field of Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vernazza, Martha Elin

    There is a need for a set of organizing principles that will provide a clear rationale for the field of program evaluation. It is contended that the concept of evaluation promoted by Ralph W. Tyler, pioneer in the field, suggests such a set of principles. Data were derived from a two-year prescriptive case study of Tyler's contributions through…

  2. [Unilateral visual field defect due to optic nerve compression by sclerotic internal carotid artery: a case report].

    PubMed

    Uchino, M; Nemoto, M; Ohtsuka, T; Kuramitsu, T; Isobe, Y

    1999-02-01

    A case of unilateral visual field defect due to optic nerve compression by a sclerotic internal carotid artery was reported. A 71-year-old woman was admitted to our department because of constricted visual field of the right eye. MRI showed elevation of the right optic nerve compressed by an internal carotid artery. The right carotid angiography revealed elevation and distortion of the C1-2 portion. Frontal craniotomy was carried out and the optic nerve was visualized on this side. The right optic nerve was found to have been compressed by the sclerotic internal carotid artery. The optic canal was then unroofed. The post-operative course was uneventful. The visual field was improved. When last seen 6 months after surgery, her visual field remained in the improved condition. Nasal field abnormalities are most frequently encountered in retinal and anterior optic nerve pathology. Our success in improving the visual field disturbance may be accounted for by the fact that the preoperative period was short and the operation was performed before atrophy of ocular fundi occurred. Nasal field loss caused by intracranial lesions of the optic pathway is rare. It is probably impossible to determine degree of the symptomatology caused by direct-pressure compression as opposed to that caused by ischemia secondary to occlusion of small arterial supply branches. Vascular compressive neuropathy of optic nerve should not be diagnosed simply by the radiological finding of the optic nerve dislocation. However, optic nerve compression by surrounding arteries should be remembered as one of the possible causes of visual field defect which needs to be treated surgically. PMID:10065453

  3. FIELD EVALUATION OF LOW-EMISSION COAL BURNER TECHNOLOGY ON UTILITY BOILERS VOLUME III. FIELD EVALUATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of field tests conducted to determine the emission characteristics of a Babcock and Wilcox Circular burner and Dual Register burner (DRB). The field tests were performed at two utility boilers, generally comparable in design and size except for the burner...

  4. FIELD EVALUATION OF LOW-EMISSION COAL BURNER TECHNOLOGY ON UTILITY BOILERS; VOLUME III. FIELD EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of field tests conducted to determine the emission characteristics of a Babcock and Wilcox Circular burner and Dual Register burner (DRB). The field tests were performed at two utility boilers, generally comparable in design and size except for the burner...

  5. Experimental Evaluation of the Change in Fracture Geometry and Permeability Due to Shearing.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crandall, D.; Gill, M.; Moore, J.; Tennant, B.; Bromhal, G. S.

    2014-12-01

    Fractures often provide the preferential flow paths through geologic media. As such, an understanding of what influences fracture permeability is critically important to describing sub-surface flows. Numerous studies have been reported which illustrate the importance of rock fracture geometry on the permeability of fractures, in particular the influence of zero aperture locations within the fracture aperture. increasing the tortuosity of flow through a fracture and subsequently decreasing the fracture permeability. Fractures and faults can shear due to increased transverse stresses, or an increase of fluid pressure within a fracture reducing the effective forces stopping fracture slippage. This behavior has been widely observed in many seismic events. How small scale shearing events influence the permeability of fracture is not well known though, as few experimental tests have been performed that enable the dynamic change in a fractured rock position while simultaneously measuring the permeability across the fracture. This talk describes resent research at the National Energy Technology Laboratory in Morgantown, West Virginia where fractured rock cores have been experimentally sheared and the permeability through the fracture has been measured. In addition, these fractured cores were imaged with computed tomography scanning to understand what geometric alterations to the fracture structure influence the shearing induced changes to fracture permeability. Both shale and sandstone fractured cores have been evaluated with this unique core flow apparatus, and relationships between the shearing distance, rock type, and initial fracture geometry are being developed to provide guidance on understanding and modeling sheared fracture permeability changes in CO2 sequestration and other sub-surface activities.

  6. Shock formation processes due to interactions of two plasmas in a magnetic field and modified two-stream instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Toida, Mieko; Uragami, Tatsunori

    2013-11-15

    The study of interactions of exploding and surrounding plasmas in an external magnetic field [K. Yamauchi and Y. Ohsawa, Phys. Plasmas 14, 053110 (2007)] is verified with two-dimensional (2D) electromagnetic particle simulations, for a case in which the initial velocity of the exploding plasma is perpendicular to the external magnetic field. The 2D simulations show essentially the same shock-formation processes as those in the previous one-dimensional simulation, including penetration of exploding ions into surrounding plasma, formation of a strong magnetic-field pulse due to deceleration of the exploding ions, ion reflection by the pulse, and subsequent splitting of the pulse into two magnetosonic pulses which then develop into forward and reverse shock waves. Furthermore, the 2D structure of electromagnetic fields in the region, where the exploding and surrounding ions overlap, is investigated with particular attention to the linear and nonlinear evolution of modified two-stream instabilities in the magnetic field that is being gradually compressed. The effects of these instabilities on ion reflection and on 2D magnetic fluctuations in the two generated pulses are also discussed.

  7. Evaluation of different field methods for measuring soil water infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pla-Sentís, Ildefonso; Fonseca, Francisco

    2010-05-01

    Soil infiltrability, together with rainfall characteristics, is the most important hydrological parameter for the evaluation and diagnosis of the soil water balance and soil moisture regime. Those balances and regimes are the main regulating factors of the on site water supply to plants and other soil organisms and of other important processes like runoff, surface and mass erosion, drainage, etc, affecting sedimentation, flooding, soil and water pollution, water supply for different purposes (population, agriculture, industries, hydroelectricity), etc. Therefore the direct measurement of water infiltration rates or its indirect deduction from other soil characteristics or properties has become indispensable for the evaluation and modelling of the previously mentioned processes. Indirect deductions from other soil characteristics measured under laboratory conditions in the same soils, or in other soils, through the so called "pedo-transfer" functions, have demonstrated to be of limited value in most of the cases. Direct "in situ" field evaluations have to be preferred in any case. In this contribution we present the results of past experiences in the measurement of soil water infiltration rates in many different soils and land conditions, and their use for deducing soil water balances under variable climates. There are also presented and discussed recent results obtained in comparing different methods, using double and single ring infiltrometers, rainfall simulators, and disc permeameters, of different sizes, in soils with very contrasting surface and profile characteristics and conditions, including stony soils and very sloping lands. It is concluded that there are not methods universally applicable to any soil and land condition, and that in many cases the results are significantly influenced by the way we use a particular method or instrument, and by the alterations in the soil conditions by the land management, but also due to the manipulation of the surface

  8. Technical Evaluation of the NASA Model for Cancer Risk to Astronauts Due to Space Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    At the request of NASA, the National Research Council's (NRC's) Committee for Evaluation of Space Radiation Cancer Risk Model reviewed a number of changes that NASA proposes to make to its model for estimating the risk of radiation-induced cancer in astronauts. The NASA model in current use was last updated in 2005, and the proposed model would incorporate recent research directed at improving the quantification and understanding of the health risks posed by the space radiation environment. NASA's proposed model is defined by the 2011 NASA report Space Radiation Cancer Risk Projections and Uncertainties 2010 (Cucinotta et al., 2011). The committee's evaluation is based primarily on this source, which is referred to hereafter as the 2011 NASA report, with mention of specific sections or tables cited more formally as Cucinotta et al. (2011). The overall process for estimating cancer risks due to low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation exposure has been fully described in reports by a number of organizations. They include, more recently: (1) The "BEIR VII Phase 2" report from the NRC's Committee on Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) (NRC, 2006); (2) Studies of Radiation and Cancer from the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR, 2006), (3) The 2007 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), ICRP Publication 103 (ICRP, 2007); and (4) The Environmental Protection Agency s (EPA s) report EPA Radiogenic Cancer Risk Models and Projections for the U.S. Population (EPA, 2011). The approaches described in the reports from all of these expert groups are quite similar. NASA's proposed space radiation cancer risk assessment model calculates, as its main output, age- and gender-specific risk of exposure-induced death (REID) for use in the estimation of mission and astronaut-specific cancer risk. The model also calculates the associated uncertainties in REID. The general approach for

  9. Technical Evaluation of the NASA Model for Cancer Risk to Astronauts Due to Space Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    At the request of NASA, the National Research Council's (NRC's) Committee for Evaluation of Space Radiation Cancer Risk Model1 reviewed a number of changes that NASA proposes to make to its model for estimating the risk of radiation-induced cancer in astronauts. The NASA model in current use was last updated in 2005, and the proposed model would incorporate recent research directed at improving the quantification and understanding of the health risks posed by the space radiation environment. NASA's proposed model is defined by the 2011 NASA report Space Radiation Cancer Risk Projections and Uncertainties--2010 . The committee's evaluation is based primarily on this source, which is referred to hereafter as the 2011 NASA report, with mention of specific sections or tables. The overall process for estimating cancer risks due to low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation exposure has been fully described in reports by a number of organizations. The approaches described in the reports from all of these expert groups are quite similar. NASA's proposed space radiation cancer risk assessment model calculates, as its main output, age- and gender-specific risk of exposure-induced death (REID) for use in the estimation of mission and astronaut-specific cancer risk. The model also calculates the associated uncertainties in REID. The general approach for estimating risk and uncertainty in the proposed model is broadly similar to that used for the current (2005) NASA model and is based on recommendations by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. However, NASA's proposed model has significant changes with respect to the following: the integration of new findings and methods into its components by taking into account newer epidemiological data and analyses, new radiobiological data indicating that quality factors differ for leukemia and solid cancers, an improved method for specifying quality factors in terms of radiation track structure concepts as

  10. Evaluation of field dental equipment in a deployment environment.

    PubMed

    Charlton, David G; Ehrlich, A Dale; Ragain, James C; Lyles, Mark B; Roberts, Howard W

    2006-03-01

    Dental officers and technicians must have reliable, durable, well-performing field dental equipment to enable them to provide dental care to deployed troops in operational environments. Unfortunately, no organized program exists to test such equipment before its purchase and use in the field. This article presents the results of a project conducted by the Naval Institute for Dental and Biomedical Research and the Air Force Dental Evaluation and Consultation Service to evaluate commercially available field dental equipment through laboratory testing and clinical-user evaluations in theater. The purpose of this 2-year project was to identify the best-performing and most cost-effective field dental equipment for possible future procurement. Initial laboratory testing was performed at the Naval Institute for Dental and Biomedical Research, and the equipment was then shipped to Kuwait for in-theater environmental and clinical-user testing. A seven-member scientific team of military dental officers and technicians was deployed for 1 month to perform in-theater testing under regional environmental conditions and to coordinate clinical-user evaluations. The testing provided beneficial results by identifying equipment that performed properly and equipment that exhibited shortcomings serious enough to render it inadequate for operational use. It is recommended that the project serve as a model for future testing and evaluation of medical/dental equipment by all of the military services. PMID:16602527

  11. Highly localized strain fields due to planar defects in epitaxial SrBi2Nb2O9 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulle, A.; Guinebretière, R.; Dauger, A.

    2005-04-01

    Thin films of (00l) oriented SrBi2Nb2O9 epitaxially grown on SrTiO3 by sol-gel spin coating have been studied by means of high-resolution x-ray diffraction reciprocal space mapping. It is shown that these materials contain highly localized heterogeneous strain fields due to imperfect stacking faults (i.e., faults that do not propagate throughout the crystallites building up the film). In the film plane, the strain fields are confined to 11 nm wide regions and characterized by a vertical displacement of 0.18c (where c is the cell parameter) showing that the stacking faults are mainly composed of one additional (or missing) perovskite layer. Prolonged thermal annealing at 700 °C strongly reduces the density of stacking faults and yields a more uniform strain distribution within the film volume without inducing significant grain growth.

  12. Exploration of Quench Initiation Due to Intentional Geometrical Defects in a High Magnetic Field Region of an SRF Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    J. Dai, K. Zhao, G.V. Eremeev, R.L. Geng, A.D. Palczewski; Dai, J.; Palczewski, A. D.; Eremeev, G. V.; Geng, R. L.; Zhao, K.

    2011-07-01

    A computer program which was used to simulate and analyze the thermal behaviors of SRF cavities has been developed at Jefferson Lab using C++ code. This code was also used to verify the quench initiation due to geometrical defects in high magnetic field region of SRF cavities. We built a CEBAF single cell cavity with 4 artificial defects near equator, and this cavity has been tested with T-mapping. The preheating behavior and quench initiation analysis of this cavity will be presented here using the computer program.

  13. Formulas Pertinent to the Calculation of Flow-Field Effects at Supersonic Speeds Due to Wing Thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, Kenneth; Elliott, Miriam H.

    1959-01-01

    Expressions based on linearized supersonic-flow theory are derived for the perturbation velocity potential in space due to wing thickness for rectangular wings with biconvex airfoil sections and for arrow, delta, and quadrilateral wings with wedge-type airfoil sections. The complete range of supersonic speeds is considered subject to a minor aspect-ratio-Mach number restriction for the rectangular plan form and to the condition that the trailing edge is supersonic for the sweptback wings. The formulas presented can be utilized in determining the induced-flow characteristics at any point in the field and are readily adaptable for either numerical computation or analytical determination of any velocity components desired.

  14. First in situ evidence of electron pitch angle scattering due to magnetic field line curvature in the Ion diffusion region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. C.; Shen, C.; Marchaudon, A.; Rong, Z. J.; Lavraud, B.; Fazakerley, A.; Yao, Z.; Mihaljcic, B.; Ji, Y.; Ma, Y. H.; Liu, Z. X.

    2016-05-01

    Theory predicts that the first adiabatic invariant of a charged particle may be violated in a region of highly curved field lines, leading to significant pitch angle scattering for particles whose gyroradius are comparable to the radius of the magnetic field line curvature. This scattering generates more isotropic particle distribution functions, with important impacts on the presence or absence of plasma instabilities. Using magnetic curvature analysis based on multipoint Cluster spacecraft observations, we present the first investigation of magnetic curvature in the vicinity of an ion diffusion region where reconnected field lines are highly curved. Electrons at energies > 8 keV show a clear pitch angle ordering between bidirectional and trapped distribution in surrounding regions, while we show that in the more central part of the ion diffusion region electrons above such energies become isotropic. By contrast, colder electrons (~1 keV) retain their bidirectional character throughout the diffusion regions. The calculated adiabatic parameter K2 for these electrons is in agreement with theory. This study provides the first observational evidence for particle pitch angle scattering due to magnetic field lines with well characterized curvature in a space plasma.

  15. Evaluation of different enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for the diagnosis of brucellosis due to Brucella melitensis in sheep.

    PubMed

    García-Bocanegra, Ignacio; Allepuz, Alberto; Pérez, Julio José; Alba, Anna; Giovannini, Armando; Arenas, Antonio; Candeloro, Luca; Pacios, Alberto; Saez, José Luís; González, Miguel Ángel

    2014-03-01

    Six serological assays for the diagnosis of ovine brucellosis, due to Brucella melitensis were evaluated. Reference serum samples from sheep of known B. melitensis infection status (n=118) were assessed using the Rose Bengal test (RBT), complement fixation test (CFT) and four commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), including two indirect ELISAs (iELISAs), one competitive ELISA (cELISA) and one blocking ELISA (bELISA). The highest differential positive rates (DPR) were obtained with the cELISA and bELISA, while the lowest DPR was estimated using iELISAs. A latent class analysis was performed to estimate the accuracy of the CFT, RBT and bELISA using 1827 sera from sheep undergoing testing as part of a surveillance and control programme. Lower sensitivity and specificity were obtained for the three serological tests when the field samples were used. A higher DPR was achieved by the CFT, compared to bELISA and RBT. The results suggest that ELISAs, and particularly the bELISA, might be suitable for inclusion in the European Union legislation on intra-community trade for diagnosing B. melitensis infection in sheep, as it has a similar test performance compared to the RBT. PMID:24456797

  16. EVALUATION OF TEMPORAL VARIATIONS IN HYDRAULIC CAPTURE DUE TO CHANGING FLOW PATTERNS USING MAPPING AND MODELING TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect

    SPILIOTOPOULOS AA; SWANSON LC; SHANNON R; TONKIN MJ

    2011-04-07

    Robust performance evaluation represents one of the most challenging aspects of groundwater pump-and-treat (P&T) remedy implementation. In most cases, the primary goal of the P&T system is hydraulic containment, and ultimately recovery, of contaminants to protect downgradient receptors. Estimating the extent of hydraulic containment is particularly challenging under changing flow patterns due to variable pumping, boundaries and/or other conditions. We present a systematic approach to estimate hydraulic containment using multiple lines of evidence based on (a) water-level mapping and (b) groundwater modeling. Capture Frequency Maps (CFMs) are developed by particle tracking on water-level maps developed for each available water level data set using universal kriging. In a similar manner, Capture Efficiency Maps (CEMs) are developed by particle tracking on water-levels calculated using a transient groundwater flow model: tracking is undertaken independently for each stress period using a very low effective porosity, depicting the 'instantaneous' fate of each particle each stress period. Although conceptually similar, the two methods differ in their underlying assumptions and their limitations: their use together identifies areas where containment may be reliable (i.e., where the methods are in agreement) and where containment is uncertain (typically, where the methods disagree). A field-scale example is presented to illustrate these concepts.

  17. Evaluation of Brine Migration Risks Due to CO2 Injection - an Integrated Natural and Social Science Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noack, V.; Kissinger, A.; Class, H.; Knopf, S.; Konrad, W.; Scheer, D.

    2014-12-01

    Evaluation of possible risks for shallow groundwater systems caused by brine displacement due to CO2 injection requires an investigation of possible vertical pathways in regional-scale structural settings. The project CO2BRIM investigates this crucial issue in collaboration with external stakeholders to integrate expert feedback on migration scenarios. To evaluate possible brine displacement scenarios we construct a regional-scale 3D structural model based on data which represent a typical geological setting of the North German Basin. The model has a horizontal size of 39 km times 58 km and includes 11 geological layers from the Permian Zechstein salt up to the Quaternary. It comprises an anticlinal structure on top of a salt pillow and an elongated salt wall that dissect the overburden. For the risk scenarios we include discontinuities in the regionally important Rupelian aquitard (Tertiary) and a transition zone along the salt flank as such discontinuities are supposed to provide permeable pathways for brines which could reach shallow drinking water horizons. Based on this model we develop scenarios in which we vary for example hydro-geological parameters of the geological discontinuities, the injection rate and the initial state of the system in terms of the salinity distribution. Furthermore we compare different levels of model complexity with regard to the physical processes considered and their effects on our results. During the process of scenario development, external experts were invited to participate and share knowledge and concerns on both brine migration risks and possible migration paths and mechanisms. The results may help in site selection as they provide improved knowledge of pressure build-up in the reservoir and the overburden for such complex geological systems. Additionally, we want to identify the level of model complexity which is sufficient for this kind of setting with regard to the limited data availability at hand for the far field.

  18. FIELD EVALUATION OF A HIGH-VOLUME DICHOTOMOUS SAMPLER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study presents the field evaluation of a high-volume dichotomous sampler that collects coarse (PM10-2.5) and fine (PM2.5) particulate matter. The key feature of this device is the utilization of a round-nozzle virtual impactor with a 50% cutpoint at 2.5 5m to split PM10 into...

  19. Evaluation of electrical fields inside a biological structure.

    PubMed Central

    Drago, G. P.; Ridella, S.

    1982-01-01

    A digital computer simulation has been carried out of exposure of a cell, modelled as a multilayered spherical structure, to an alternating electrical field. Electrical quantities of possible biological interest can be evaluated everywhere inside the cell. A strong frequency selective behaviour in the range 0-10 MHz has been obtained. PMID:6279135

  20. Evaluation in the Field: The Need for Site Visit Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Michael Quinn

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of programs is enhanced when trained, skilled, and observant evaluators go "into the field"--the real world where programs are conducted--paying attention to what's going on, systematically documenting what they see, and reporting what they learn. The article opens by presenting and illustrating twelve reasons for…

  1. Montana CETA Field Learning Program. Fiscal Year 1980. Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wooden, Richard E.

    Evaluation of the CETA/EBCE (Comprehensive Employment and Training Act/Experience Based Career Education) Field Learning Program at eight sites in Montana showed the program to be successful in helping high school students explore careers. The system was generally successful in achieving program outcome objectives: varied types of students were…

  2. EVALUATING THE SUCCESS OF PHOSPHORUS MANAGEMENT FROM FIELD TO WATERSHED

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies have demonstrated some phosphorus (P) loss reduction following implementation of remedial strategies at field scales. However, there has been little coordinated evaluation of Best Management Practices (BMPs) on a watershed scale to show where, when, and which work most effectively. Thus, i...

  3. Evaluation of the Magnetic Fields and Mutual Inductance between Circular Coils Arbitrarily Positioned in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anele, A. O.; Hamam, Y.; Chassagne, L.; Linares, J.; Alayli, Y.; Djouani, K.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents the evaluation of the magnetic fields and mutual inductance between circular coils arbitrarily positioned in space. Firstly, based on an advanced and relevant model available in the literature, MATLAB code is implemented to evaluate the mutual inductance between circular coils arbitrarily positioned with respect to each other. The computed results are compared with the numerical results previously published in the literature and a detailed clarification regarding the huge computational errors made are presented. In the second part, a complex and relevant model available in the literature for evaluating the magnetic fields due to a circular coil is presented. Based on the useful information, the model for computing the magnetic fields between two circular coils is formulated. The computed results are validated with experimental measurements. The comparison of the results shows that the developed model and the experimental measurements conducted are accurate and effective.

  4. Performance evaluation of infrared imaging system in field test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chensheng; Guo, Xiaodong; Ren, Tingting; Zhang, Zhi-jie

    2014-11-01

    Infrared imaging system has been applied widely in both military and civilian fields. Since the infrared imager has various types and different parameters, for system manufacturers and customers, there is great demand for evaluating the performance of IR imaging systems with a standard tool or platform. Since the first generation IR imager was developed, the standard method to assess the performance has been the MRTD or related improved methods which are not perfect adaptable for current linear scanning imager or 2D staring imager based on FPA detector. For this problem, this paper describes an evaluation method based on the triangular orientation discrimination metric which is considered as the effective and emerging method to evaluate the synthesis performance of EO system. To realize the evaluation in field test, an experiment instrument is developed. And considering the importance of operational environment, the field test is carried in practical atmospheric environment. The test imagers include panoramic imaging system and staring imaging systems with different optics and detectors parameters (both cooled and uncooled). After showing the instrument and experiment setup, the experiment results are shown. The target range performance is analyzed and discussed. In data analysis part, the article gives the range prediction values obtained from TOD method, MRTD method and practical experiment, and shows the analysis and results discussion. The experimental results prove the effectiveness of this evaluation tool, and it can be taken as a platform to give the uniform performance prediction reference.

  5. On evaluation of nonplanar diagrams in noncommutative field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yi

    2005-05-01

    This is a technical work about how to evaluate loop integrals appearing in one loop nonplanar (NP) diagrams in noncommutative (NC) field theory. The conventional wisdom says that, barring the ultraviolet/infrared (UV/IR) mixing problem, NP diagrams whose planar counterparts are UV divergent are rendered finite by NC phases that couple the loop momentum to the external ones p through an NC momentum ρ=θp. We show that this is generally not the case. We find that subtleties arise already in the simpler case of Euclidean spacetime. The situation is even worse in Minkowski spacetime due to its indefinite metric. We compare different prescriptions that may be used to evaluate loop integrals in ordinary theory. They are equivalent in the sense that they always yield identical results. However, in NC theory there is no a priori reason that these prescriptions, except for the defining one that is built in the Feynman propagator, are physically justified even when they seem mathematically meaningful. Employing them can lead to ambiguous results, which are also different from those obtained according to the defining prescription. For ρ>0, the NC phase can worsen the UV property of loop integrals instead of always improving it in high dimensions. We explain how this surprising phenomenon comes about from the indefinite metric. This lends a strong support to the point of view that the naive approach is not well-founded when time does not commute with space. For ρ<0, the NC phase improves the UV property and softens the quadratic UV divergence in ordinary theory to a bounded but indefinite UV oscillation. We employ a cut-off method to quantify the new UV nonregular terms. For ρ>0, these terms are generally complex and thus also harm unitarity in addition to those found previously. As the new terms for both cases are not available in the Lagrangian and in addition can be non-Hermitian when time does not commute with space, our result casts doubts on previous demonstrations

  6. Field Artillery Ammunition Processing System (FAAPS) concept evaluation study

    SciTech Connect

    Kring, C.T.; Babcock, S.M.; Watkin, D.C.; Oliver, R.P.

    1992-06-01

    The Field Artillery Ammunition Processing System (FAAPS) is an initiative to introduce a palletized load system (PLS) that is transportable with an automated ammunition processing and storage system for use on the battlefield. System proponents have targeted a 20% increase in the ammunition processing rate over the current operation while simultaneously reducing the total number of assigned field artillery battalion personnel by 30. The overall objective of the FAAPS Project is the development and demonstration of an improved process to accomplish these goals. The initial phase of the FAAPS Project and the subject of this study is the FAAPS concept evaluation. The concept evaluation consists of (1) identifying assumptions and requirements, (2) documenting the process flow, (3) identifying and evaluating technologies available to accomplish the necessary ammunition processing and storage operations, and (4) presenting alternative concepts with associated costs, processing rates, and manpower requirements for accomplishing the operation. This study provides insight into the achievability of the desired objectives.

  7. Transmitted sound field due to an impulsive line acoustic source bounded by a plate followed by a vortex sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miura, T.; Chao, C. C.

    1980-01-01

    The propagation of sound due to a line acoustic source in the moving stream across a semiinfinite vortex sheet which trails from a rigid plate is examined in a linear theory for the subsonic case. A solution for the transmitted sound field is obtained with the aid of multiple integral transforms and the Wiener-Hopf technique for both the steady state (time harmonic) and initial value (impulsive source) situations. The contour of inverse transform and hence the decomposition of the functions are determined through causality and radiation conditions. The solution obtained satisfies causality and the full Kutta conditions. The transmitted sound field is composed of two waves in both the stady state and initial value problems. One is the wave scattered from the edge of the plate which is associated with the bow wave and the instability wave. These waves exist in the downstream sectors. The other is the wave transmitted through the vortex sheet which is also associated with the instability wave. Regional divisions of the transmitted sound field are identified.

  8. Failure of Femoral Access to Electrophysiological Evaluation Due to Aplasia of the Inferior Vena Cava

    PubMed Central

    Parahuleva, Mariana S.; Burgazli, Mehmet; Soydan, Nedim; Franzen, Wolfgang; Güttler, Norbert; Erdogan, Ali

    2016-01-01

    We report an interesting case of a man with a persistent left superior vena cava (PLSVC) with left azygos vein who underwent electrophysiological evaluation. Further evaluation revealed congenital dilated azygos vein, while a segment connecting the inferior vena cava (IVC) to the hepatic vein and right atrium was missing. The azygos vein drained into the superior vena cava, and the hepatic veins drained directly into the right atrium. The patient did not have congenital anomalies of the remaining thoracoabdominal vasculature. PMID:27257399

  9. Effects of plasmonic field due to gold nanoparticles and magnetic field on photocurrents of zinc porphyrin-viologen linked compound-gold nanoparticle composite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonemura, Hiroaki; Niimi, Tomoki; Yamada, Sunao

    2016-03-01

    Composite films of zinc-porphyrin-viologen (ZnP-V2+) linked compound containing six methylene group [ZnP(6)V]-gold nanoparticles (AuNP) were fabricated by combining electrostatic layer-by-layer adsorption and the Langmuir-Blodgett method. The anodic photocurrents of the ZnP(6)V-AuNP composite films are higher than those of the ZnP(6)V films. The large photocurrents in ZnP(6)V-AuNP composite films are most likely attributable to the combination of localized surface plasmon resonance due to AuNP and photoinduced intramolecular electron transfer from excited state of ZnP to V2+. The photocurrents of the ZnP(6)V-AuNP composite films increase in the presence of magnetic field. The photocurrents increase with low magnetic fields (B ≤ 150 mT) and are almost constant under high magnetic fields (B ≥ 150 mT). Magnetic field effects (MFEs) were clearly observed for both ZnP(6)V-AuNP composite films and ZnP(6)V films. The MFEs can be explained by a radical pair mechanism.

  10. Seismic fragility analysis of typical pre-1990 bridges due to near- and far-field ground motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosleh, Araliya; Razzaghi, Mehran S.; Jara, José; Varum, Humberto

    2016-03-01

    Bridge damages during the past earthquakes caused several physical and economic impacts to transportation systems. Many of the existing bridges in earthquake prone areas are pre-1990 bridges and were designed with out of date regulation codes. The occurrences of strong motions in different parts of the world show every year the vulnerability of these structures. Nonlinear dynamic time history analyses were conducted to assess the seismic vulnerability of typical pre-1990 bridges. A family of existing concrete bridge representative of the most common bridges in the highway system in Iran is studied. The seismic demand consists in a set of far-field and near-field strong motions to evaluate the likelihood of exceeding the seismic capacity of the mentioned bridges. The peak ground accelerations (PGAs) were scaled and applied incrementally to the 3D models to evaluate the seismic performance of the bridges. The superstructure was assumed to remain elastic and the nonlinear behavior in piers was modeled by assigning plastic hinges in columns. In this study the displacement ductility and the PGA are selected as a seismic performance indicator and intensity measure, respectively. The results show that pre-1990 bridges subjected to near-fault ground motions reach minor and moderate damage states.

  11. Evanescent Field Based Photoacoustics: Optical Property Evaluation at Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Goldschmidt, Benjamin S; Rudy, Anna M; Nowak, Charissa A; Tsay, Yowting; Whiteside, Paul J D; Hunt, Heather K

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present a protocol to estimate material and surface optical properties using the photoacoustic effect combined with total internal reflection. Optical property evaluation of thin films and the surfaces of bulk materials is an important step in understanding new optical material systems and their applications. The method presented can estimate thickness, refractive index, and use absorptive properties of materials for detection. This metrology system uses evanescent field-based photoacoustics (EFPA), a field of research based upon the interaction of an evanescent field with the photoacoustic effect. This interaction and its resulting family of techniques allow the technique to probe optical properties within a few hundred nanometers of the sample surface. This optical near field allows for the highly accurate estimation of material properties on the same scale as the field itself such as refractive index and film thickness. With the use of EFPA and its sub techniques such as total internal reflection photoacoustic spectroscopy (TIRPAS) and optical tunneling photoacoustic spectroscopy (OTPAS), it is possible to evaluate a material at the nanoscale in a consolidated instrument without the need for many instruments and experiments that may be cost prohibitive. PMID:27500652

  12. Field evaluation of ventilation system performance in enclosed parking garages

    SciTech Connect

    Ayari, A.M.; Grot, D.A.; Krarti, M.

    2000-07-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a field study to determine the ventilation requirements and the contaminant levels in existing enclosed parking garages. The testing was conducted in seven parking garages with different sizes, traffic flow patterns, vehicle types, and locations. In particular, the study compares the actual ventilation rates measured using the tracer gas technique with the ventilation requirements of ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62-1989. In addition, the field test evaluated the effectiveness of the existing ventilation systems in maintaining acceptable contaminant levels within enclosed parking garages.

  13. Evaluation of Rotordynamic Stability of a Steam Turbine Due to Labyrinth Seal Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Toshio; Sasaki, Takashi; Sakakida, Hitoshi; Uchida, Tatsuro; Tsutsui, Masaji; Ikeda, Kazunori

    This paper describes the evaluation of unstable vibration caused by the seal force, which is known as "Steam Whirl" in a steam turbine. Stability of a steam turbine is evaluated by complex eigenvalue analysis of rotordynamics model considering the dynamics of seals, rotor, bearings and pedestals. A commercial CFD program is employed to estimate the dynamic coefficients of labyrinth seal. The labyrinth seal of a large scales steam turbine is taken as an object of analysis and a 3D model with eccentric rotor is solved to obtain the rotordynamic force components. The rotordynamic force is derived by integrating the pressure on the rotor surface. Evaluation formula is formed from the results of numerical calculation, which is used to predict the dynamic coefficient of each seal in a steam turbine. Then rotordynamics model of total system including seal is constructed and stability is evaluated by complex eigenvalue analysis. This procedure is applied to the design of steam turbines and enables the optimization of the turbine structure considering the efficiency and stability.

  14. Spatiotemporal splitting of global eigenmodes due to cross-field coupling via vortex dynamics in drift wave turbulence.

    PubMed

    Brandt, C; Thakur, S C; Light, A D; Negrete, J; Tynan, G R

    2014-12-31

    Spatiotemporal splitting events of drift wave (DW) eigenmodes due to nonlinear coupling are investigated in a cylindrical helicon plasma device. DW eigenmodes in the radial-azimuthal cross section have been experimentally observed to split at radial locations and recombine into the global eigenmode with a time shorter than the typical DW period (t≪fDW(-1)). The number of splits correlates with the increase of turbulence. The observed dynamics can be theoretically reproduced by a Kuramoto-type model of a network of radially coupled azimuthal eigenmodes. Coupling by E×B-vortex convection cell dynamics and ion gyro radii motion leads to cross-field synchronization and occasional mode splitting events. PMID:25615346

  15. Quantum corrections to the gravitational potentials of a point source due to conformal fields in de Sitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröb, Markus B.; Verdaguer, Enric

    2016-03-01

    We derive the leading quantum corrections to the gravitational potentials in a de Sitter background, due to the vacuum polarization from loops of conformal fields. Our results are valid for arbitrary conformal theories, even strongly interacting ones, and are expressed using the coefficients b and b' appearing in the trace anomaly. Apart from the de Sitter generalization of the known flat-space results, we find two additional contributions: one which depends on the finite coefficients of terms quadratic in the curvature appearing in the renormalized effective action, and one which grows logarithmically with physical distance. While the first contribution corresponds to a rescaling of the effective mass, the second contribution leads to a faster fall-off of the Newton potential at large distances, and is potentially measurable.

  16. Enhanced Valley Zeeman Splitting in MoS2 /EuS due to interfacial exchange field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chuan; Scrace, Thomas; Taheri, Payam; Zhang, Peiyao; Norden, Tenzin; Blizzard, Brett; Petrou, Athos; Zeng, Hao; Zhao, Puqin; Kioseoglou, George

    A monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides such as MoS2 with broken inversion symmetry possesses two degenerate yet inequivalent valleys that can be selectively excited by circularly polarized light. The ability to manipulate valley degrees of freedom with light or external magnetic field makes them attractive for optoelectronic and spintronic applications. On the other hand, it has been demonstrated recently that a magnetic insulator such as EuS can induce magnetic exchange field (MEF) on graphene through proximity effect. Thus, construction of a magnetic insulator/TMDC heterostructure may induce large MEF on TMDC, which may lead to giant valley Zeeman splitting. In this work, we report the observation of valley Zeeman splitting in monolayer MoS2 and other TMDCs due to the MEF from EuS substrates. Using magneto-reflectivity, we measured a Zeeman splitting of valley exciton of 2 meV at 7 tesla and 4 K, for monolayer MoS2 on a SiO2 substrate. This is consistent with values reported in monolayer WSe2. However, when EuS is used as the substrate, we observed an increase of valley splitting from 2 to 10 meV. We attribute this enhanced valley splitting to the MEF from the EuS substrate. Utilizing MEF of a magnetic insulator can induce magnetic ordering and giant Zeeman splitting in 2D TMDCs, which might enable novel spintronics applications.

  17. Pulmonary Hypertension Due to Common Respiratory Conditions: Classification, Evaluation and Management Strategies.

    PubMed

    Fein, Daniel G; Zaidi, Ali N; Sulica, Roxana

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) due to chronic respiratory disease and/or hypoxia is classified as World Health Organization (WHO) Group III pulmonary hypertension. The patients most commonly encountered in clinical practice with group III PH include those with chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD), diffuse parenchymal lung disease, and sleep-disordered breathing. The purpose of this review is to outline the variable clinical significance of pulmonary hypertension in the most common pulmonary disease states and how a clinician may approach the management of these patients. PMID:27571110

  18. A Method for Evaluating Volt-VAR Optimization Field Demonstrations

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Kevin P.; Weaver, T. F.

    2014-08-31

    In a regulated business environment a utility must be able to validate that deployed technologies provide quantifiable benefits to the end-use customers. For traditional technologies there are well established procedures for determining what benefits will be derived from the deployment. But for many emerging technologies procedures for determining benefits are less clear and completely absent in some cases. Volt-VAR Optimization is a technology that is being deployed across the nation, but there are still numerous discussions about potential benefits and how they are achieved. This paper will present a method for the evaluation, and quantification of benefits, for field deployments of Volt-VAR Optimization technologies. In addition to the basic methodology, the paper will present a summary of results, and observations, from two separate Volt-VAR Optimization field evaluations using the proposed method.

  19. Evaluation of short-interfering RNAs treatment in experimental rabies due to wild-type virus.

    PubMed

    Appolinario, Camila Michele; Allendorf, Susan Dora; Peres, Marina Gea; Fonseca, Clovis Reynaldo; Vicente, Acacia Ferreira; Antunes, João Marcelo Azevedo de Paula; Pantoja, José Carlos Figueiredo; Megid, Jane

    2015-01-01

    We have evaluated the efficacy of short-interfering RNAs targeting the nucleoprotein gene and also the brain immune response in treated and non-treated infected mice. Mice were inoculated with wild-type virus, classified as dog (hv2) or vampire bat (hv3) variants and both groups were treated or left as controls. No difference was observed in the lethality rate between treated and non-treated groups, although clinical evaluation of hv2 infected mice showed differences in the severity of clinical disease (p=0.0006). Evaluation of brain immune response 5 days post-inoculation in treated hv2 group showed no difference among the analyzed genes, whereas after 10 days post-inoculation there was increased expression of 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase 1, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 12, interferon gamma, and C-X-C motif chemokine 10 associated with higher expression of N gene in the same period (p<0.0001). In hv2 non-treated group only higher interferon beta expression was found at day 5. The observed differences in results of the immune response genes between treated and non-treated groups is not promising as they had neither impact on mortality nor even a reduction in the expression of N gene in siRNA treated animals. This finding suggests that the use of pre-designed siRNA alone may not be useful in rabies treatment. PMID:26254692

  20. Evaluation of asphalt-rubber membrane field performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuler, S.; Gallaway, B. M.; Epps, J. A.

    1982-05-01

    This report presents a record of asphalt-rubber membrane field performance in Texas. An evaluation of performance is presented for forty-five separate projects in thirteen state highway districts. Approximately 850 lane miles of highways are represented by materials constructed as stress absorbing membranes (asphalt-rubber seal coats beneath asphalt concrete overlay). All projects reviewed were constructed between June, 1976 and September, 1981.

  1. Field evaluation of a modified intervention for overhead drilling.

    PubMed

    Rempel, David; Star, Demetra; Barr, Alan; Blanco, Marco Mendoza; Janowitz, Ira

    2010-04-01

    Drilling holes into concrete or metal ceilings is one of the most physically demanding tasks performed in construction. The work is done overhead with rotary impact hammer drills that weigh up to 40 N. The task is associated with pain and musculoskeletal disorders at the wrist, forearm, shoulder, and back. The mechanism of injury is thought to be the high forces and non-neutral shoulder and wrist postures applied during drilling. Previously, we described a field study of a foot lever and inverted drill press intervention devices that received poor usability ratings compared with the usual method for overhead drilling based on problems with mobility and productivity. Using a participatory intervention model, feedback from construction workers (N = 13) was used to develop a new intervention design that incorporated a wheeled tripod base and a unique method of aligning the drilling column to vertical. A different group of construction workers (N = 23) evaluated usability and fatigue of the new device during their regular overhead drilling in comparison with the usual method. Four of 12 usability ratings were significantly better with the intervention device compared with the usual method. Subjective shoulder fatigue was less with the new intervention (1.1 vs. 3.3; scale 0 to 5; p < 0.001). This difference was supported by objective outcome measures; the mean hand forces during drilling were 26 N with the intervention compared with 245 N with the usual method. The percentage of time with the shoulder flexed or abducted to more than 60 degrees was less with the intervention compared with the usual method (21 vs. 40%; p = 0.007). There was significantly less head extension with the intervention compared with the usual method. There were no significant differences in overall productivity between the two methods. This study demonstrates that a new intervention device for overhead drilling has improved usability and subjective fatigue ratings compared with the usual method

  2. Evaluating Field Spectrometer Performance with Transmission Standards: Examples from the USGS Spectral Library and Research Databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoefen, T. M.; Kokaly, R. F.; Swayze, G. A.; Livo, K. E.

    2015-12-01

    Collection of spectroscopic data has expanded with the development of field-portable spectrometers. The most commonly available spectrometers span one or several wavelength ranges: the visible (VIS) and near-infrared (NIR) region from approximately 400 to 1000 nm, and the shortwave infrared (SWIR) region from approximately 1000-2500 nm. Basic characteristics of spectrometer performance are the wavelength position and bandpass of each channel. Bandpass can vary across the wavelength coverage of an instrument, due to spectrometer design and detector materials. Spectrometer specifications can differ from one instrument to the next for a given model and between manufacturers. The USGS Spectroscopy Lab in Denver has developed a simple method to evaluate field spectrometer wavelength accuracy and bandpass values using transmission measurements of materials with intense, narrow absorption features, including Mylar* plastic, praseodymium-doped glass, and National Institute of Standards and Technology Standard Reference Material 2035. The evaluation procedure has been applied in laboratory and field settings for 19 years and used to detect deviations from cited manufacturer specifications. Tracking of USGS spectrometers with transmission standards has revealed several instances of wavelength shifts due to wear in spectrometer components. Since shifts in channel wavelengths and differences in bandpass between instruments can impact the use of field spectrometer data to calibrate and analyze imaging spectrometer data, field protocols to measure wavelength standards can limit data loss due to spectrometer degradation. In this paper, the evaluation procedure will be described and examples of observed wavelength shifts during a spectrometer field season will be presented. The impact of changing wavelength and bandpass characteristics on spectral measurements will be demonstrated and implications for spectral libraries will be discussed. *Any use of trade, firm, or product names

  3. Permeability enhancement due to cold water injection: A Case Study at the Los Azufres Geothermal Field, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, S.M.; Daggett, J.; Ortiz, J.; Iglesias, E.; Comision Federal de Electricidad, Morelia; Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca )

    1989-04-01

    Pressure transient buildup and falloff data from 3 wells at the Los Azufres geothermal field have been evaluated to determine the extent to which cold water infection increases the permeability of the near-bore reservoir formation. Simultaneous analysis of the buildup and falloff data provides estimates of the permeability-thickness of the reservoir, the skin factor of the well, and the degree of permeability enhancement in the region behind the thermal front. Estimates of permeability enhancement range from a factor of 4 to 9, for a temperature change of about 150{degree}C. The permeability enhancement is attributed to thermally induced contraction and stress-cracking of the formation. 9 refs., 18 figs.

  4. Evaluation of physical health effects due to volcanic hazards: human studies

    SciTech Connect

    Buist, A.S.; Bernstein, R.S.; Johnson, L.R.; Vollmer, W.M.

    1986-03-01

    Despite certain gaps in the knowledge that has been gained from the studies done in the aftermath of Mount St. Helens and following previous major volcanic eruptions, we can be confident that the health effects of both short- and long-term exposures to the relatively low levels of airborne volcanic ash that are typical following such a volcanic eruption are minor. These effects seem to relate more to the irritating effect of the ash on mucous membranes and airway epithelia than to the potential of the ash (due to its free crystalline silica content) to initiate a fibrotic response. Nevertheless, common sense dictates that exposures should be minimized whenever possible by use of appropriate preventive measures, such as wetting the sedimented ash before disturbing it, and using commercially available disposable paper masks meeting NIOSH code TC-23 for dusts for light exposures and industrial half- and full-faced respirator and goggles for more extensive and heavy exposure.

  5. Evaluations of effects due to low-frequency noise in a low demanding work situation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengtsson, J.; Persson Waye, K.; Kjellberg, A.

    2004-11-01

    Noise sources with a dominating content of low frequencies (20-200 Hz) are found in many occupational environments. This study aimed to evaluate effects of moderate levels of low-frequency noise on attention, tiredness and motivation in a low demanding work situation. Two ventilation noises at the same A-weighted sound pressure level of 45 dB were used: one of a low-frequency character and one of a flat frequency character (reference noise). Thirty-eight female subjects worked with six performance tasks for 4 h in the noises in a between-subject design. Most of the tasks were monotonous and routine in character. Subjective reports were collected using questionnaires and cortisol levels were measured in saliva. The major finding in this study was that low-frequency noise negatively influenced performance on two tasks sensitive to reduced attention and on a proof-reading task. Performances of tasks aimed at evaluating motivation were not significantly affected. The difference in work performance was not reflected by the subjective reports. No effect of noise was found on subjective stress or cortisol levels.

  6. Severe metabolic alkalosis due to pyloric obstruction: case presentation, evaluation, and management.

    PubMed

    McCauley, Meredith; Gunawardane, Manjula; Cowan, Mark J

    2006-12-01

    A 46-year-old man presented to the emergency room with severe metabolic alkalosis, hypokalemia, and respiratory failure requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation. The cause of his acid-base disorder was initially unclear. Although alkalosis is common in the intensive care unit, metabolic alkalosis of this severity is unusual, carries a very high mortality rate, and requires careful attention to the pathophysiology and differential diagnosis to effectively evaluate and treat the patient. A central concept in the diagnosis of metabolic alkalosis is distinguishing chloride responsive and chloride nonresponsive states. Further studies are then guided by the history and physical examination in most cases. By using a systematic approach to the differential diagnosis, we were able to determine that a high-grade gastric outlet obstruction was the cause of the patients' alkalosis and to offer effective therapy for his condition. A literature review and algorithm for the diagnosis and management of metabolic alkalosis are also presented. PMID:17170625

  7. Dynamic evaluation of environmental impact due to tritium accidental release from the fusion reactor.

    PubMed

    Nie, Baojie; Ni, Muyi; Jiang, Jieqiong; Wu, Yican

    2015-10-01

    As one of the key safety issues of fusion reactors, tritium environmental impact of fusion accidents has attracted great attention. In this work, the dynamic tritium concentrations in the air and human body were evaluated on the time scale based on accidental release scenarios under the extreme environmental conditions. The radiation dose through various exposure pathways was assessed to find out the potential relationships among them. Based on this work, the limits of HT and HTO release amount for arbitrary accidents were proposed for the fusion reactor according to dose limit of ITER. The dynamic results aim to give practical guidance for establishment of fusion emergency standard and design of fusion tritium system. PMID:26164282

  8. Evaluation of Astrometry Errors due to the Optical Surface Distortions in Adaptive Optics Systems and Science Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellerbroek, Brent; Herriot, Glen; Suzuki, Ryuji; Matthias, Schoeck

    2013-12-01

    The objectives for high precision astrometry on ELTs will be challenging, with requirements in the range from 10 to 50 micro-arc-seconds for some instruments and science cases. Reducing and correctly calibrating the systematic and quasi-static errors introduced by optical surface distortions will be an important part of meeting these goals. In a recently submitted paper, we described an analytical Fourier domain model for evaluating these effects as the sum of three terms: (i) under-sampling errors, due to measuring the effects of static surface distortions using a finite number of discrete reference sources; (ii) unknown beam wander across the static surface distortions due to line-of-sight jitter or boresighting errors, and (iii) quasi-static errors due to slowly varying surface distortions. In this paper, we apply these methods to evaluating this term in the astrometry error budgets for the TMT Infrared Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) and the facility AO system, NFIRAOS. The inputs to this exercise include the original top-down allocations for this error term, the original optical surface specifications for IRIS and NFIRAOS as derived earlier on the basis of wavefront error requirements, our assessment of the feasible density and positioning accuracy for an array of calibration sources, and the expected beam wander due to tip/tilt jitter and bore-sighting errors between NFIRAOS and IRIS. The astrometry error computed for these initial parameters was considerably larger than the top-down allocation due to the contributions from the NFIRAOS double-pane entrance window, which is close to the system's input focal plane. The error can be reduced to fall within the allocation by defining tighter, but still feasible, specifications for these elements. We also evaluated the astrometry errors due to quasi-static drift of the figures of the NFIRAOS deformable mirrors, and determined that they are acceptable for RMS wavefront distortions of up to about 30 nm RMS.

  9. Field tests for evaluating the aerobic work capacity of firefighters.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Ann-Sofie; Oksa, Juha; Gavhed, Désirée; Malm, Christer

    2013-01-01

    Working as a firefighter is physically strenuous, and a high level of physical fitness increases a firefighter's ability to cope with the physical stress of their profession. Direct measurements of aerobic capacity, however, are often complicated, time consuming, and expensive. The first aim of the present study was to evaluate the correlations between direct (laboratory) and indirect (field) aerobic capacity tests with common and physically demanding firefighting tasks. The second aim was to give recommendations as to which field tests may be the most useful for evaluating firefighters' aerobic work capacity. A total of 38 subjects (26 men and 12 women) were included. Two aerobic capacity tests, six field tests, and seven firefighting tasks were performed. Lactate threshold and onset of blood lactate accumulation were found to be correlated to the performance of one work task (r(s) = -0.65 and -0.63, p<0.01, respectively). Absolute (mL · min(-1)) and relative (mL · kg(-1) · min(-1)) maximal aerobic capacity was correlated to all but one of the work tasks (r(s) = -0.79 to 0.55 and -0.74 to 0.47, p<0.01, respectively). Aerobic capacity is important for firefighters' work performance, and we have concluded that the time to row 500 m, the time to run 3000 m relative to body weight (s · kg(-1)), and the percent of maximal heart rate achieved during treadmill walking are the most valid field tests for evaluating a firefighter's aerobic work capacity. PMID:23844153

  10. Molecular Evaluation of a Case of Visceral Leishmaniasis Due to Leishmania tropica in Southwestern Iran

    PubMed Central

    SARKARI, Bahador; BAVARSAD AHMADPOUR, Niloofar; MOSHFE, Abdolali; HAJJARAN, Homa

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) due to Leishmania tropica in a 50-year-old Iranian man lived in a VL-endemic area in southwest of Iran. The patient presented with a 3-month history of fever and splenomegaly. Clinical signs and serological findings were suggestive of VL. Spleen biopsy was taken from the patient and intracellular forms of Leishmania amastigotes was seen in Giemsa stained smears. The patient was treated with pentavalent antimonial compound with complete resolution of his systemic signs and symptoms. DNA was extracted from the microscopic slides of the spleen biopsy and the nagt (N-Acetylglucosamine-1-Phosphate Transferase) gene of Leishmania was PCR-amplified. Sequence analysis of the PCR product demonstrated that the case has 99% identity with those of available sequences of L. tropica. Intra-species variation within isolate was 0–0.1%; whereas, inter-species differences of the isolate with those of L. major and L. infantum was significantly higher. PMID:27095980

  11. Laboratory or field tests for evaluating firefighters' work capacity?

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Ann-Sofie; Oksa, Juha; Malm, Christer

    2014-01-01

    Muscle strength is important for firefighters work capacity. Laboratory tests used for measurements of muscle strength, however, are complicated, expensive and time consuming. The aims of the present study were to investigate correlations between physical capacity within commonly occurring and physically demanding firefighting work tasks and both laboratory and field tests in full time (N = 8) and part-time (N = 10) male firefighters and civilian men (N = 8) and women (N = 12), and also to give recommendations as to which field tests might be useful for evaluating firefighters' physical work capacity. Laboratory tests of isokinetic maximal (IM) and endurance (IE) muscle power and dynamic balance, field tests including maximal and endurance muscle performance, and simulated firefighting work tasks were performed. Correlations with work capacity were analyzed with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rs). The highest significant (p<0.01) correlations with laboratory and field tests were for Cutting: IE trunk extension (rs = 0.72) and maximal hand grip strength (rs = 0.67), for Stairs: IE shoulder flexion (rs = -0.81) and barbell shoulder press (rs = -0.77), for Pulling: IE shoulder extension (rs = -0.82) and bench press (rs = -0.85), for Demolition: IE knee extension (rs = 0.75) and bench press (rs = 0.83), for Rescue: IE shoulder flexion (rs = -0.83) and bench press (rs = -0.82), and for the Terrain work task: IE trunk flexion (rs = -0.58) and upright barbell row (rs = -0.70). In conclusion, field tests may be used instead of laboratory tests. Maximal hand grip strength, bench press, chin ups, dips, upright barbell row, standing broad jump, and barbell shoulder press were strongly correlated (rs≥0.7) with work capacity and are therefore recommended for evaluating firefighters work capacity. PMID:24614596

  12. FDTD analysis of temperature elevation in the lens of human and rabbit models due to near-field and far-field exposures at 2.45 GHz.

    PubMed

    Oizumi, Takuya; Laakso, Ilkka; Hirata, Akimasa; Fujiwara, Osamu; Watanabe, Soichi; Taki, Masao; Kojima, Masami; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Kazuyuki

    2013-07-01

    The eye is said to be one of the most sensitive organs to microwave heating. According to previous studies, the possibility of microwave-induced cataract formation has been experimentally investigated in rabbit and monkey eyes, but not for the human eye due to ethical reasons. In the present study, the temperature elevation in the lens, the skin around the eye and the core temperature of numerical human and rabbit models for far-field and near-field exposures at 2.45 GHz are investigated. The temperature elevations in the human and rabbit models were compared with the threshold temperatures for inducing cataracts, thermal pain in the skin and reversible health effects such as heat exhaustion or heat stroke. For plane-wave exposure, the core temperature elevation is shown to be essential both in the human and in the rabbit models as suggested in the international guidelines and standards. For localised exposure of the human eye, the temperature elevation of the skin was essential, and the lens temperature did not reach its threshold for thermal pain. On the other hand, the lens temperature elevation was found to be dominant for the rabbit eye. PMID:23390146

  13. Evaluation of the uncertainty due to land cover observation and conversion into plant functional types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgievski, Goran; Hartley, Andrew; MacBean, Natasha; Hagemann, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Land surface processes represented in the latest generation of climate models (IPCC AR5) use the concept of Plant Functional Types (PFTs) to group different vegetation types and species according to similar physiological, biochemical and structural characteristics. The 5th IPCC Assessment Report recognizes the role of the Land Surface Models (LSMs) as one of the key contributors to uncertainty in climate change impacts projections. In the frame of the European Space Agency (ESA) Climate Change Initiative (CCI), a new global land cover (LC) data set was derived. We aim to investigate two sources of uncertainties in LSMs and their ranges: (i) uncertainty of ESA-CCI state of the art satellite observation of LC classes, and (ii) uncertainty due to LC conversion ("cross-walking (CW) procedure") into PFTs. Therefore, we have derived 5 perturbations of PFTs maps: (i) reference map (REF), (ii) map that minimizes biomass in LC observation and CW procedure (MinLC MinCW), (iii) map that minimizes biomass in LC observation with reference CW procedure (MinLC RefCW), (iv) map that maximizes biomass in LC observation with reference CW procedure (MaxLC RefCW), and (v) map that maximizes biomass in LC observation and CW procedure (MaxLC MaxCW). Our analysis demonstrates that there is still considerable uncertainty in the methods used to convert LC classes into the PFTs used by LSMs. Furthermore, uncertainty in the labelling of LC classes has an equal magnitude compared to the cross-walking uncertainty. In the next phase, we aim to quantify the sensitivity of the carbon, hydrological and energy cycles to LC and CW uncertainty with 3 LSMs (JSBACH, JULES, and ORHCIDEE). This work will enable us to both advice the land cover mapping community about the accuracy requirements for land cover maps, and to provide insights to the earth system modelling community on the implications of decisions taken when converting from land cover classes to PFTs.

  14. Evaluation of the tapered PMMA fiber sensor response due to the ionic interaction within electrolytic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batumalay, M.; Rahman, H. A.; Kam, W.; Ong, Y. S.; Ahmad, F.; Zakaria, R.; Harun, S. W.; Ahmad, H.

    2014-01-01

    A tapered plastic multimode fiber (PMMA) optical sensor is proposed and demonstrated for continuous monitoring of solutions based on different concentration of sodium chloride and glucose in deionized water The tapered PMMA fiber was fabricated using an etching method involving deionized water and acetone to achieve a waist diameter and length of 0.45 mm and 10 mm, respectively, and was used to investigate the effect of straight, U-shape, and knot shape against concentration for both sodium chloride and glucose. The results show that there is a strong dependence of the electrolytic and non-electrolytic nature of the chemical solutions on the sensor output. It is found that the sensitivity of the sodium chloride concentration sensor with the straight tapered fiber probe was 0.0023 mV/%, which was better than the other probe arrangements of U-shape and knot. Meanwhile, the glucose sensor performs with the highest sensitivity of 0.0026 mV/wt % with the knot-shaped tapered fiber probe. In addition, a tapered PMMA probe which was coated by silver film was fabricated and demonstrated using calcium hypochlorite (G70) solution. The working mechanism of such a device is based on the observed increment in the transmission of the sensor that is immersed in solutions of higher concentration. As the concentration varies from 0 ppm to 6 ppm, the output voltage of the sensor increases linearly from 3.61 mV to 4.28 mV with a sensitivity of 0.1154 mV/ppm and a linearity of more than 99.47%. The silver film coating increases the sensitivity of the proposed sensor due to the effective cladding refractive index, which increases with the coating and thus allows more light to be transmitted from the tapered fiber.

  15. Evaluation of dermal and eye irritation and skin sensitization due to carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ema, Makoto; Matsuda, Akitaka; Kobayashi, Norihiro; Naya, Masato; Nakanishi, Junko

    2011-12-01

    The present paper summarizes the results of our studies on dermal and eye irritation and skin sensitization due to carbon nanotubes (CNTs), whose potential applications and uses are wide and varied, including CNT-enhanced plastics, electromagnetic interference/radio-frequency (EMI/RFI) shielding, antistatic material, flexible fibers and advanced polymers, medical and health applications, and scanning probe microscopy. Skin and eyes have the highest risk of exposure to nanomaterials, because deposition of nanomaterials to the surficial organs has the potential to be a major route of exposure during the manufacturing, use, and disposal of nanomaterials. Two products composed of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and two products composed of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were tested regarding acute dermal and acute eye irritation using rabbits, and skin sensitization using guinea pigs. The concentrations of the CNTs in the substances were the maximum allowable for administration. The two products of SWCNTs and one of the products of MWCNTs were not irritants to the skin or eyes. The other product of MWCNTs caused very slight erythema at 24h, but not at 72h, after patch removal in the dermal irritation experiments and conjunctival redness and blood vessel hyperemia at 1h, but not at 24h, in eye irritation experiments. These findings showed that one product of MWCNTs was a very weak acute irritant to the skin and eyes. No products of SWCNTs and MWCNTs exhibited skin-sensitization effects. Our knowledge of the toxicological effects of CNTs is still limited. Further information is needed to clarify the potential for irritation and sensitization given the complex nature of CNTs. PMID:21893152

  16. Cinephotogrammetric Evaluation Of Thoracic Deformation Due To Safety Belt Action During A Crash Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verriest, J. P.

    1983-07-01

    In order to estimate the thoracic injury tolerance of a belted automobile occupant and to get a better knowledge about the mechanical behaviour of the belt/torso system, the dynamic deformation of the thorax is evaluated under the action of a safety belt load. Therefore, during the whole duration of a crash test (about 120 ms) the relative displacement of a set of points drawn on the thorax surface is measured by cinephotogrammetry. Five 16 mm cine-photo cameras (3 fix around the impact area and 2 on board the sled) filming at 500 frames per second permit to cover the whole trunk surface. Synchronization of film data is done by interpolating on a common time base. The three-dimensional coordinates of the measurement points enable the reconstruction of the thorax surface as a set of contiguous triangular plane facets which can be projected on various reference planes for display purposes. For clarity of drawings, an algorithm determines hidden lines not to be plotted. Cuts parallel to the projection plane are performed. By changing the orientation of this plane and the number and the pace of the cuts, either contour maps or transversal cuts are obtained providing a visualization of deformation which can then be related to compressive forces and resulting injuries.

  17. Stochastic Modeling Approach for the Evaluation of Backbreak due to Blasting Operations in Open Pit Mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sari, Mehmet; Ghasemi, Ebrahim; Ataei, Mohammad

    2014-03-01

    Backbreak is an undesirable side effect of bench blasting operations in open pit mines. A large number of parameters affect backbreak, including controllable parameters (such as blast design parameters and explosive characteristics) and uncontrollable parameters (such as rock and discontinuities properties). The complexity of the backbreak phenomenon and the uncertainty in terms of the impact of various parameters makes its prediction very difficult. The aim of this paper is to determine the suitability of the stochastic modeling approach for the prediction of backbreak and to assess the influence of controllable parameters on the phenomenon. To achieve this, a database containing actual measured backbreak occurrences and the major effective controllable parameters on backbreak (i.e., burden, spacing, stemming length, powder factor, and geometric stiffness ratio) was created from 175 blasting events in the Sungun copper mine, Iran. From this database, first, a new site-specific empirical equation for predicting backbreak was developed using multiple regression analysis. Then, the backbreak phenomenon was simulated by the Monte Carlo (MC) method. The results reveal that stochastic modeling is a good means of modeling and evaluating the effects of the variability of blasting parameters on backbreak. Thus, the developed model is suitable for practical use in the Sungun copper mine. Finally, a sensitivity analysis showed that stemming length is the most important parameter in controlling backbreak.

  18. Evaluation of edge effect due to phase contrast imaging for mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuo, Satoru; Katafuchi, Tetsuro; Tohyama, Keiko; Morishita, Junji; Yamada, Katsuhiko; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2005-08-15

    It is well-known that the edge effect produced by phase contrast imaging results in the edge enhancement of x-ray images and thereby sharpens those images. It has recently been reported that phase contrast imaging using practical x-ray tubes with small focal spots has improved image sharpness as observed in the phase contrast imaging with x-ray from synchrotron radiation or micro-focus x-ray tubes. In this study, we conducted the phase contrast imaging of a plastic fiber and plant seeds using a customized mammography equipment with a 0.1 mm focal spot, and the improvement of image sharpness was evaluated in terms of spatial frequency response of the images. We observed that the image contrast of the plastic fiber was increased by edge enhancement, and, as predicted elsewhere, spectral analysis revealed that as the spatial frequencies of the x-ray images increased, so did the sharpness gained through phase contrast imaging. Thus, phase contrast imaging using a practical molybdenum anode tube with a 0.1 mm-focal spot would benefit mammography, in which the morphological detectability of small species such as micro-calcifications is of great concern. And detectability of tumor-surrounded glandular tissues in dense breast would be also improved by the phase contrast imaging.

  19. Evaluation of Potential pH-Driven Metal Release Due to Elevated Groundwater CO2 Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinnacher, R. M.; Varadharajan, C.; Zheng, L.; Spycher, N.; Birkholzer, J. T.; Trautz, R. C.; Pugh, J. D.; Esposito, R.; Nico, P. S.

    2012-12-01

    The injection of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from industrial sources into deep geologic formations is a potential option for the control of CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere. While the risk of CO2 migration from the storage reservoir into potable groundwater is low considering the safeguards of site characterization and permitting, it is important to understand what type of potential impacts could occur and how to identify these impacts. Elevated CO2 concentrations may potentially lead to a decrease in groundwater pH and the subsequent release of metals and ions from natural sediments into the groundwater solution. In this risk scenario, potential metal release processes, such as enhanced mineral dissolution, metal desorption and/or ion exchange reactions, may be driven by changes in groundwater pH, the presence of carbonate ligands in solution or a combination of the two. However, a detailed understanding and a distinction of pH-driven and carbonate-driven metal release reactions are important for the development of site monitoring plans and remediation strategies, required by regulations in the unlikely event of a release. Hence, in this study we characterized metal release from natural sediments into synthetic groundwater solutions at two pH conditions in order to mimic the native groundwater pH (pH ~8.5) and the low pH conditions expected in the event of elevated CO2 concentrations (pH~5). In addition, results are compared between tests performed in the presence and absence of elevated CO2. Metal release was investigated in lab-scale sequential leaching experiments using two sediment types with different organic carbon contents over a time-frame of 25 days. Supernatant solutions were monitored for pH and characterized in terms of metal concentrations (ICP-MS), total inorganic carbon (TIC) and anion composition. Furthermore, experimental results were compared with data from a field study involving the controlled release of groundwater containing dissolved

  20. Antibiotic Treatment of Infections Due to Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae: Systematic Evaluation of the Available Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Lourida, Panagiota; Poulikakos, Panagiotis; Rafailidis, Petros I.; Tansarli, Giannoula S.

    2014-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the effectiveness of the antibiotic treatment administered for infections caused by carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae. The PubMed and Scopus databases were systematically searched. Articles reporting the clinical outcomes of patients infected with carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae according to the antibiotic treatment administered were eligible. Twenty nonrandomized studies comprising 692 patients who received definitive treatment were included. Almost all studies reported on Klebsiella spp. In 8 studies, the majority of infections were bacteremia, while pneumonia and urinary tract infections were the most common infections in 12 studies. In 10 studies, the majority of patients were critically ill. There are methodological issues, including clinical heterogeneity, that preclude the synthesis of the available evidence using statistical analyses, including meta-analysis. From the descriptive point of view, among patients who received combination treatment, mortality was up to 50% for the tigecycline-gentamicin combination, up to 64% for tigecycline-colistin, and up to 67% for carbapenem-colistin. Among the monotherapy-treated patients, mortality was up to 57% for colistin and up to 80% for tigecycline. Certain regimens were administered to a small number of patients in certain studies. Three studies reporting on 194 critically ill patients with bacteremia showed individually significantly lower mortality in the combination arm than in the monotherapy arm. In the other studies, no significant difference in mortality was recorded between the compared groups. Combination antibiotic treatment may be considered the optimal option for severely ill patients with severe infections. However, well-designed randomized studies of specific patient populations are needed to further clarify this issue. PMID:24080646

  1. Dust mobilization due to density currents in the Atlas region: Observations from the Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment 2006 field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knippertz, P.; Deutscher, C.; Kandler, K.; Müller, T.; Schulz, O.; Schütz, L.

    2007-11-01

    Evaporation of precipitation is a ubiquitous feature of dry and hot desert environments. The resulting cooling often generates density currents with strong turbulent winds along their leading edges, which can mobilize large amounts of dust. Mountains support this process by triggering convection, by downslope acceleration of the cool air, and by fostering the accumulation of fine-grained sediments along their foothills through the action of water. For the Sahara, the world's largest dust source, this mechanism has been little studied because of the lack of sufficiently high resolution observational data. The present study demonstrates the frequent occurrence of density currents along the Sahara side of the Atlas Mountain chain in southern Morocco using the unique data set collected during the Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment (SAMUM) field campaign in May/June 2006. The density currents are related to convection over the mountains in the afternoon hours and have lifetimes on the order of 10 h. The passage of the sharp leading edge that sometimes reaches several hundred kilometers in length is usually associated with a marked increase in dew point and wind speed, a change in wind direction, and a decrease in temperature and visibility due to suspended dust. It is conceivable that this mechanism is relevant for other mountainous regions in northern Africa during the warm season. This would imply that simulations of the dust cycle with numerical models need a reliable representation of moist convective processes in order to generate realistic dust emissions from the Sahara.

  2. DUE PERMAFROST: A Circumpolar Remote Sensing Service for Permafrost - Evaluation Case Studies and Intercomparison with Regional Climate Model Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heim, Birgit; Bartsch, Annett; Elger, Kirsten; Rinke, Annette; Klehmet, Katharina; Matthes, Heidrun; Gellhorn, Catrin; Buchhorn, Marcel; Soliman, Aiman; Duguay, Claude

    2013-04-01

    The ESA Data User Element (DUE) Permafrost project provides a Circumpolar remote sensing service for permafrost-related applications. The data products are freely downloadable (http://www.ipf.tuwien.ac.at/permafrost) and published at the PANGAEA World Data Centre (DUE Permafrost Project Consortium, 2012). Remote sensing products are land surface temperature, surface soil moisture, ground frozen/non frozen state, terrain parameters, land cover parameters, and surface waters. Snow parameters (snow extent and snow water equivalent) can be derived from the DUE project GlobSnow (http://www.globsnow.info). The time series of Circumpolar land surface temperature and surface soil moisture offer weekly and monthly averaged data products from 2007 to 2010, Circumpolar ground frozen/non frozen state is provided as daily dataset. The ongoing service will also include the time series of 2011 and 2012. The Circumpolar terrain and land cover products are static, e.g. the first Circumpolar Digital Elevation Model (DEM) north of 55° N with a spatial resolution of 100 m (S. Maurizio & T. Strozzi, 2012). Evaluation is crucial to test the scientific validity of the DUE Permafrost data products for high-latitude permafrost landscapes. The primary programme providing ground data is the Global Terrestrial Network for Permafrost (GTN-P) initiated by the International Permafrost Association (IPA) in the 1990s. The involvement of scientific stakeholders and the IPA, and the ongoing evaluation of the remote sensing derived products make the DUE Permafrost products widely accepted by the scientific community. Evaluation case studies of DUE Permafrost remote-sensing derived products (e.g., land surface temperature and ground frozen/non frozen state) show good agreement with ground data from GTN-P monitoring sites in Alaska and Siberia. The Helmholtz Climate Initiative REKLIM (Regionale Klimaänderungen/Regional climate change) is a climate research program where regional observations and

  3. Experiments evaluating subsidence generated within a subaqueous deformable substrate due to varying differential sediment loading patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foreman, B.; Chatmas, E. S.; Abeyta, A.; Paola, C.

    2013-12-01

    The intraslope areas of many passive margins display a complex bathymetry of topographic depressions and crests that form series of minibasins. These minibasins are linked to the deformation of subsurface salt layers and act as localized sediment traps. Many mechanisms have been proposed for the initiation of minibasins, including tectonic forces (both extensional and contractional), regional gravitational sliding, density inversion between salt layers and overburden, and differential sediment loading. Regardless of initiation mechanism, it is widely recognized that synkinematic deposition plays a active role in determining subsidence patterns and sediment routing within and among the minibasins. We undertook a series of simplified 1-D and 2-D experiments 1) to evaluate the feasibility of developing a series of well-defined minibasins created exclusively by differential sediment loading and 2) to quantitatively determine the effects of substrate thickness, density contrast, and sedimentation rate on the resultant subsidence pattern. We also present an initial non-dimensionalized formulation of the problem that relates density contrasts, clinoform thickness, substrate thickness, progradation rate, and viscosity of the deformable substrate. Two sets of experiments were performed. The first set (1-D) vertically loaded a subaqueous corn syrup substrate (capturing the rheology of subsurface salt as a Newtonian fluid) with walnut sand. The second set (2-D) of experiments prograded a walnut sediment clinoform across a corn syrup substrate. We systematically varied sedimentation rate, substrate thickness, and, in the case of the prograding clinoform, base level. In no cases did we successfully reproduce a series of minibasins similar to those observed in natural settings. Instead the substrate was simply displaced laterally as sediment was deposited, forming a single depression. High sedimentation rates tended to produce wider zones of subsidence, however, if given

  4. Improved field experimental designs and quantitative evaluation of aquatic ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, D.H.; Thomas, J.M.

    1984-05-01

    The paired-station concept and a log transformed analysis of variance were used as methods to evaluate zooplankton density data collected during five years at an electrical generation station on Lake Michigan. To discuss the example and the field design necessary for a valid statistical analysis, considerable background is provided on the questions of selecting (1) sampling station pairs, (2) experimentwise error rates for multi-species analyses, (3) levels of Type I and II error rates, (4) procedures for conducting the field monitoring program, and (5) a discussion of the consequences of violating statistical assumptions. Details for estimating sample sizes necessary to detect changes of a specified magnitude are included. Both statistical and biological problems with monitoring programs (as now conducted) are addressed; serial correlation of successive observations in the time series obtained was identified as one principal statistical difficulty. The procedure reduces this problem to a level where statistical methods can be used confidently. 27 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  5. Evaluation of near field rock treatment during constructions (LADSfeature #22)

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas

    1998-11-24

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the effect of near-field rock treatment by injection of reactive material (calcite) above the drift for the purpose of decreasing postclosure drift seepage. The method used for the calculation was a coupled reaction-transport numerical model for gas-water-rock interaction. This includes the mass conservation of heat, liquid and gas for thermohydrological calculations, of aqueous and gaseous species for advective and diffusive transport, and the kinetics of mineral-water reactions.

  6. Evaluation of flow field approximations for transonic compressor stages

    SciTech Connect

    Dorney, D.J.; Sharma, O.P.

    1997-07-01

    The flow through gas turbine compressors is often characterized by unsteady, transonic, and viscous phenomena. Accurately predicting the behavior of these complex multi-blade-row flows with unsteady rotor-stator interacting Navier-Stokes analyses can require enormous computer resources. In this investigation, several methods for predicting the flow field, losses, and performance quantities associated with axial compressor stages are presented. The methods studied include: (1) the unsteady fully coupled blade row technique, (2) the steady coupled blade row method, (3) the steady single blade row technique, and (4) the loosely coupled blade row method. The analyses have been evaluated in terms of accuracy and efficiency.

  7. Evaluation of abutment scour prediction equations with field data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benedict, S.T.; Deshpande, N.; Aziz, N.M.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with FHWA, compared predicted abutment scour depths, computed with selected predictive equations, with field observations collected at 144 bridges in South Carolina and at eight bridges from the National Bridge Scour Database. Predictive equations published in the 4th edition of Evaluating Scour at Bridges (Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18) were used in this comparison, including the original Froehlich, the modified Froehlich, the Sturm, the Maryland, and the HIRE equations. The comparisons showed that most equations tended to provide conservative estimates of scour that at times were excessive (as large as 158 ft). Equations also produced underpredictions of scour, but with less frequency. Although the equations provide an important resource for evaluating abutment scour at bridges, the results of this investigation show the importance of using engineering judgment in conjunction with these equations.

  8. Evaluating alternative exposure indices in epidemiologic studies on extremely low-frequency magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Juutilainen, J.; Hatfield, T.; Laeaerae, E.

    1996-05-01

    Choosing the right exposure index for epidemiological studies on 50--60 Hz magnetic fields is difficult due to the lack of knowledge about critical exposure parameters for the biological effects of magnetic fields. This paper uses data from a previously published epidemiological investigation on early pregnancy loss (EPL) to study the methods of evaluating the exposure-response relationship of 50 Hz magnetic fields. Two approaches were used. The first approach was to apply generalized additive modeling to suggest the functional form of the relationship between EPL data with eight alternative exposure indices: the 24 h average of magnetic field strength, three indices measuring the proportion of time above specified thresholds, and four indices measuring the proportion of time within specified intensity windows. Because the original exposure data included only spot measurements, estimates for the selected exposure indices were calculated indirectly form the spot measurements using empirical nonlinear equations derived from 24 h recording in 60 residences. The results did not support intensity windows, and a threshold-type dependence on field strength appeared to be more plausible than a linear relationship. In addition, the study produced data suggesting that spot measurements may be used as surrogates for other exposure indices besides the time average field strength. No final conclusions should be drawn from this study alone, but the authors hope that this exercise stimulates evaluation of alternative exposure indices in other planned and ongoing epidemiological studies.

  9. Statistical characterization of bed roughness due to bed forms: A field study in the Elbe River at Aken, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aberle, J.; Nikora, V.; Henning, M.; Ettmer, B.; Hentschel, B.

    2010-03-01

    Bed form geometry and dynamics in a straight section of the Elbe River in Germany is analyzed considering the measured bed surfaces as two-dimensional random fields of bed elevations. Statistically derived roughness parameters are evaluated from high-resolution digital elevation models, which were available for a range of flow rates from low flows to floods. The key results relate to the identification of characteristic scaling regions in the bed surface spectra, and to observed relationships between water discharge and both the standard deviation and a factor of the "-3" spectral law of bed elevations. Two-dimensional second-order structure functions of bed elevations are also analyzed to gain further insight into the spatial structure of sand wave beds. In addition, the interrelations between flow rate hysteresis and the statistical structure of bed forms, as well as effects of channel modification by groynes, are highlighted and discussed. The reported results demonstrate that statistical parameters of bed forms may be used for characterization and prediction of flow-dependent sand bed roughness.

  10. Field observations of seismic velocity changes caused by shaking-induced damage and healing due to mesoscopic nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gassenmeier, M.; Sens-Schönfelder, C.; Eulenfeld, T.; Bartsch, M.; Victor, P.; Tilmann, F.; Korn, M.

    2016-03-01

    To investigate temporal seismic velocity changes due to earthquake related processes and environmental forcing in Northern Chile, we analyse 8 yr of ambient seismic noise recorded by the Integrated Plate Boundary Observatory Chile (IPOC). By autocorrelating the ambient seismic noise field measured on the vertical components, approximations of the Green's functions are retrieved and velocity changes are measured with Coda Wave Interferometry. At station PATCX, we observe seasonal changes in seismic velocity caused by thermal stress as well as transient velocity reductions in the frequency range of 4-6 Hz. Sudden velocity drops occur at the time of mostly earthquake-induced ground shaking and recover over a variable period of time. We present an empirical model that describes the seismic velocity variations based on continuous observations of the local ground acceleration. The model assumes that not only the shaking of large earthquakes causes velocity drops, but any small vibrations continuously induce minor velocity variations that are immediately compensated by healing in the steady state. We show that the shaking effect is accumulated over time and best described by the integrated envelope of the ground acceleration over the discretization interval of the velocity measurements, which is one day. In our model, the amplitude of the velocity reduction as well as the recovery time are proportional to the size of the excitation. This model with two free scaling parameters fits the data of the shaking induced velocity variation in remarkable detail. Additionally, a linear trend is observed that might be related to a recovery process from one or more earthquakes before our measurement period. A clear relationship between ground shaking and induced velocity reductions is not visible at other stations. We attribute the outstanding sensitivity of PATCX to ground shaking and thermal stress to the special geological setting of the station, where the subsurface material

  11. Evaluation of sound field systems in elementary school classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigeant, Michelle C.; Kruger, Kelly

    2003-10-01

    Our primary purpose in this study was to determine the relevant ergonomic issues associated with daily use of sound field systems in elementary school classrooms, in order to develop a purchasing guideline and technical specification. The secondary purpose was to evaluate these systems to identify if one or more acoustical parameters could be used to determine the quality and effectiveness of a system. Six sound field systems, with varying numbers and types of speakers, were chosen as a cross-section of available systems on the market. Six representative classrooms, currently in use, were selected based on a range of reverberation times and background noise levels. All systems were installed for two weeks in each classroom. Student speech intelligibility (SI) tests using phonetically balanced word lists were conducted, as well as teacher interviews. The acoustical parameters measured were clarity ratios C50 and C80, speech transmission indices STI and R(rapid)STI, sound pressure level (SPL) uniformity and frequency response. An improvement in SI was found for all systems. Only SPL uniformity and frequency response were found to be useful distinguishing performance parameters between systems. Ergonomic design aspects of sound field systems had a significant influence on the acceptance and usage in the classroom.

  12. Laboratory or Field Tests for Evaluating Firefighters' Work Capacity?

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Ann-Sofie; Oksa, Juha; Malm, Christer

    2014-01-01

    Muscle strength is important for firefighters work capacity. Laboratory tests used for measurements of muscle strength, however, are complicated, expensive and time consuming. The aims of the present study were to investigate correlations between physical capacity within commonly occurring and physically demanding firefighting work tasks and both laboratory and field tests in full time (N = 8) and part-time (N = 10) male firefighters and civilian men (N = 8) and women (N = 12), and also to give recommendations as to which field tests might be useful for evaluating firefighters' physical work capacity. Laboratory tests of isokinetic maximal (IM) and endurance (IE) muscle power and dynamic balance, field tests including maximal and endurance muscle performance, and simulated firefighting work tasks were performed. Correlations with work capacity were analyzed with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rs). The highest significant (p<0.01) correlations with laboratory and field tests were for Cutting: IE trunk extension (rs = 0.72) and maximal hand grip strength (rs = 0.67), for Stairs: IE shoulder flexion (rs = −0.81) and barbell shoulder press (rs = −0.77), for Pulling: IE shoulder extension (rs = −0.82) and bench press (rs = −0.85), for Demolition: IE knee extension (rs = 0.75) and bench press (rs = 0.83), for Rescue: IE shoulder flexion (rs = −0.83) and bench press (rs = −0.82), and for the Terrain work task: IE trunk flexion (rs = −0.58) and upright barbell row (rs = −0.70). In conclusion, field tests may be used instead of laboratory tests. Maximal hand grip strength, bench press, chin ups, dips, upright barbell row, standing broad jump, and barbell shoulder press were strongly correlated (rs≥0.7) with work capacity and are therefore recommended for evaluating firefighters work capacity. PMID:24614596

  13. Subjective and objective evaluations of a scattered sound field in a scale model opera house.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jong Kwan; Jeon, Jin Yong

    2008-09-01

    Scattered sound fields in an opera house were objectively and subjectively evaluated through acoustical measurements in a 1:10 scale model and through auditory preference tests. Acoustical characteristics were measured in the stalls area with and without diffusers, both on the sidewalls close to the proscenium and in the soffit of the side balcony. Installed diffusers reduced the initial time delay gap and amplitude of the first reflected sound, and decreased sound pressure level (SPL), reverberation time (RT), and early decay time (EDT) at most seats due to the increased scattering and absorption. After diffuser installation, C(80) and 1-IACC(E3) increased at the front seats and decreased at the rear seats. Subjective evaluations showed that the preference of scattered sound fields correlates highly with loudness and reverberance. It was also found that EDT and SPL are dominant parameters describing subjective preference for scattered sounds in this experimental condition. PMID:19045645

  14. Evaluation of Alternative Field Buses for Lighting ControlApplications

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Ed; Rubinstein, Francis

    2005-03-21

    The Subcontract Statement of Work consists of two major tasks. This report is the Final Report in fulfillment of the contract deliverable for Task 1. The purpose of Task 1 was to evaluate existing and emerging protocols and standards for interfacing sensors and controllers for communicating with integrated lighting control systems in commercial buildings. The detailed task description follows: Task 1. Evaluate alternative sensor/field buses. The objective of this task is to evaluate existing and emerging standards for interfacing sensors and controllers for communicating with integrated lighting control systems in commercial buildings. The protocols to be evaluated will include at least: (1) 1-Wire Net, (2) DALI, (3) MODBUS (or appropriate substitute such as EIB) and (4) ZigBee. The evaluation will include a comparative matrix for comparing the technical performance features of the different alternative systems. The performance features to be considered include: (1) directionality and network speed, (2) error control, (3) latency times, (4) allowable cable voltage drop, (5) topology, and (6) polarization. Specifically, Subcontractor will: (1) Analyze the proposed network architecture and identify potential problems that may require further research and specification. (2) Help identify and specify additional software and hardware components that may be required for the communications network to operate properly. (3) Identify areas of the architecture that can benefit from existing standards and technology and enumerate those standards and technologies. (4) Identify existing companies that may have relevant technology that can be applied to this research. (5) Help determine if new standards or technologies need to be developed.

  15. Evaluation of membrane filter field monitors for microbiological air sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, N. D.; Oxborrow, G. S.; Puleo, J. R.; Herring, C. M.

    1974-01-01

    Due to area constraints encountered in assembly and testing areas of spacecraft, the membrane filter field monitor (MF) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration-accepted Reyniers slit air sampler were compared for recovery of airborne microbial contamination. The intramural air in a microbiological laboratory area and a clean room environment used for the assembly and testing of the Apollo spacecraft was studied. A significantly higher number of microorganisms was recovered by the Reyniers sampler. A high degree of consistency between the two sampling methods was shown by a regression analysis, with a correlation coefficient of 0.93. The MF samplers detected 79% of the concentration measured by the Reyniers slit samplers. The types of microorganisms identified from both sampling methods were similar.

  16. Microbial Community Shifts due to Hydrofracking: Observations from Field-Scale Observations and Laboratory-Scale Incubations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouser, P. J.; Ansari, M.; Hartsock, A.; Lui, S.; Lenhart, J.

    2012-12-01

    The use of fluids containing chemicals and variable water sources during the hydrofracking of unconventional shale is the source of considerable controversy due to perceived risks from altered subsurface biogeochemistry and the potential for contaminating potable water supplies. Rapid shifts in subsurface biogeochemistry are often driven by available macronutrients combined with the abundance and metabolic condition of the subsurface microbiota. While the depth that fracturing occurs in the Marcellus formation is reasonably deep to pose little risk to groundwater supplies, no published studies have systematically characterized the indigenous microbial population and how this community is altered through variable fluid management practices (e.g., chemical composition, source water makeup). In addition, limited information is available on how shallower microbial communities and geochemical conditions might be affected through the accidental release of these fluids to groundwater aquifers. Our measurements indicate field-applied and laboratory-generated fracking fluids contain levels of organic carbon greater than 300 mg/l and nitrogen concentrations greater than 80 mg/l that may differentially stimulate microbial growth in subsurface formations. In contrast to certain inorganic constituents (e.g., chloride) which increase in concentration through the flowback period; dissolved organic carbon levels decrease with time after the fracturing process through multiple attenuation processes (dilution, sorption, microbial utilization). Pyrosequencing data of the 16S rRNA gene indicate a shift from a more diverse source water microbial community to a less diverse community typical of a brine formation as time after fracturing increases. The introduction of varying percentages of a laboratory-generated fracking fluid to microcosm bottles containing groundwater and aquifer media stimulated biogeochemical changes similar to the introduction of landfill leachate, another

  17. Evaluation Case Studies and Intercomparison with Regional Climate Model Simulations based on the DUE PERMAFROST Circumpolar Remote Sensing Service for Permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heim, Birgit; Bartsch, Annett; Elger, Kirsten; Rinke, Annette; Matthes, Heidrun; Zhou, Xu; Klehmet, Katharina; Buchhorn, Marcel; Duguay, Claude

    2014-05-01

    Permafrost is a subsurface phenomenon. However, monitoring from Earth Observation (EO) platforms can provide spatio-temporal data sets on permafrost-related indicators and geophysical parameters used in modelling and monitoring. The ESA Data User Element (DUE) Permafrost project (2009-2012) developed a suite of EO satellite-derived products: Land Surface Temperature (LST), Surface Soil Moisture (SSM), Surface Frozen and Thawed State (Freeze/Thaw), Terrain, Land Cover, and Surface Water. The satellite-derived products are weekly and monthly averages of the bio- and geophysical terrestrial parameters and static circum-Arctic maps. The final DUE Permafrost products cover the years 2007 to 2011 with a circum-Arctic coverage (north of 50°N). The products were released in 2012, and updated in 2013. Further information is available at geo.tuwien.ac.at/permafrost/. The remote sensing service also supports the EU-FP7 funded project PAGE21 - Changing Permafrost in the Arctic and its Global Effects in the 21st Century (www.page21.eu). The Global Terrestrial Network for Permafrost (GTN-P), initiated by the International Permafrost Association (IPA), is the prime program concerned with monitoring of permafrost. It provides an important database for the evaluation of EO-derived products and climate and permafrost models. GTN-P ground data ranges from air-, ground-, and borehole temperature data to active layer monitoring, soil moisture measurements, and the description of landform and vegetation. The involvement of scientific stakeholders and the IPA, and the ongoing evaluation of the satellite-derived products make the DUE Permafrost products relevant to the scientific community. The Helmholtz Climate Initiative REKLIM (Regionale KlimaAnderungen/Regional Climate Change) is a climate research program where regional observations and process studies are coupled with model simulations (http://www.reklim.de/en/home/). ESA DUE Permafrost User workshops initiated the use of EO

  18. ESA Data User Element DUE PERMAFROST Circumpolar Remote Sensing Service for Permafrost - Evaluation Case Studies and Intercomparison with Regional Climate Model Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heim, Birgit; Bartsch, Annett; Elger, Kirsten; Rinke, Annette; Matthes, Heidrun; Zhou, Xu; Klehmet, Katharina; Rockel, Burkhardt; Lantuit, Hugues; Duguay, Claude

    2015-04-01

    Permafrost is a subsurface phenomenon. However, monitoring from Earth Observation (EO) platforms can provide spatio-temporal data sets on permafrost-related indicators and quantities used in modelling and monitoring. The ESA Data User Element (DUE) Permafrost project (2009-2012) developed a suite of EO satellite-derived products: Land Surface Temperature (LST), Surface Soil Moisture (SSM), Surface Frozen and Thawed State (Freeze/Thaw), Terrain, Land Cover, and Surface Water. The satellite-derived products are weekly and monthly averages of the bio- and geophysical terrestrial parameters and static circum-Arctic maps. The final DUE Permafrost products cover the years 2007 to 2011, some products up to 2013, with a circum-Arctic coverage (north of 50°N). The products were released in 2012, and updated in 2013 and 2014. Further information is available at geo.tuwien.ac.at/permafrost/. The remote sensing service also supports the EU-FP7 funded project PAGE21 - Changing Permafrost in the Arctic and its Global Effects in the 21st Century (www.page21.eu). The Global Terrestrial Network for Permafrost (GTN-P), initiated by the International Permafrost Association (IPA), is the prime program concerned with monitoring of permafrost. It provides an important database for the evaluation of EO-derived products and climate and permafrost models. GTN-P ground data ranges from air-, ground-, and borehole temperature data to active layer monitoring, soil moisture measurements, and the description of landform and vegetation. The involvement of scientific stakeholders and the IPA, and the ongoing evaluation of the satellite-derived products make the DUE Permafrost products relevant to the scientific community. The Helmholtz Climate Initiative REKLIM (Regionale KlimaAnderungen/Regional Climate Change) is a climate research program where regional observations and process studies are coupled with model simulations (http://www.reklim.de/en/home/). ESA DUE Permafrost User workshops

  19. Spectrally Enhanced Lighting Program Implementation for Energy Savings: Field Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Kelly L.; Sullivan, Gregory P.; Armstrong, Peter R.; Richman, Eric E.; Matzke, Brett D.

    2006-08-22

    This report provides results from an evaluation PNNL conducted of a spectrally enhanced lighting demonstration project. PNNL performed field measurements and occupant surveys at three office buildings in California before and after lighting retrofits were made in August and December 2005. PNNL measured the following Overhead lighting electricity demand and consumption, Light levels in the workspace, Task lighting use, and Occupant ratings of satisfaction with the lighting. Existing lighting, which varied in each building, was replaced with lamps with correlated color temperature (CCT) of 5000 Kelvin, color rendering index (CRI) of 85, of varying wattages, and lower ballast factor electronic ballasts. The demonstrations were designed to decrease lighting power loads in the three buildings by 22-50 percent, depending on the existing installed lamps and ballasts. The project designers hypothesized that this reduction in electrical loads could be achieved by the change to higher CCT lamps without decreasing occupant satisfaction with the lighting.

  20. Evaluation of neutron radiation field in carbon ion therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jun-Kui; Su, You-Wu; Li, Wu-Yuan; Yan, Wei-Wei; Chen, Xi-Meng; Mao, Wang; Pang, Cheng-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Carbon ions have significant advantages in tumor therapy because of their physical and biological properties. In view of the radiation protection, the safety of patients is the most important issue in therapy processes. Therefore, the effects of the secondary particles produced by the carbon ions in the tumor therapy should be carefully considered, especially for the neutrons. In the present work, the neutron radiation field induced by carbon ions was evaluated by using the FLUKA code. The simulated results of neutron energy spectra and neutron dose was found to be in good agreement with the experiment data. In addition, energy deposition of carbon ions and neutrons in tissue-like media was studied, it is found that the secondary neutron energy deposition is not expected to exceed 1% of the carbon ion energy deposition in a typical treatment.

  1. Evaluation of an electric field sensor for nondestructive material inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalyanasundaram, Kayatri; Arunachalam, Kavitha

    2013-01-01

    An electric field sensor is fabricated on a 125 micron thick flexible dielectric substrate for electromagnetic (EM) nondestructive material inspection at 915 MHz. The sensor consists of an electrically short dipole antenna and a radio frequency (RF) diode detector connected to a pair of high impedance screen printed carbon lines. The DC component of the rectified diode voltage conveyed across the high impedance lines is measured using a data acquisition circuit. Sensor measurements are validated with simulated data for a conformal patch antenna operating at 915 MHz. Sensor performance for EM nondestructive testing (NDT) is evaluated using phantom defects in low loss dielectric slabs. Preliminary results indicate sensor utility for EM NDT and support further testing on realistic defects.

  2. Medium and Heavy Duty Vehicle Field Evaluations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Walkowicz, K.

    2014-06-01

    This presentation discusses field evaluations of medium- and heavy-duty vehicles performed by NREL. The project provides medium-duty (MD) and heavy-duty (HD) test results, aggregated data, and detailed analysis, including 3rd party unbiased data (data that would not normally be shared by industry in an aggregated and detailed manner). Over 5.6 million miles of advanced technology MD and HD truck data have been collected, documented, and analyzed on over 240 different vehicles since 2002. Data, analysis, and reports are shared within DOE, national laboratory partners, and industry for R&D planning and strategy. The results help guide R&D for new technology development, help define intelligent usage of newly developed technology, and help fleets/users understand all aspects of advanced technology.

  3. Field evaluations of hearing protection devices at surface mining environments

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of circumaural hearing protection devices and their predictability when they were being worn by mine employees performing normal work duties. The method employed relied on a physical measurement of the noise reduction of the hearing protectors by utilizing two FM-wireless transmitting and receiving systems. One system measured the outside hearing protector noise level, the second system measured the inside hearing protector noise level. The noise level data of both systems was transmitted back to the corresponding receivers and was recorded onto a two-channel tape recorder. Three methods of evaluating hearing protector performance were explored and compared to the Environmental Protection Agency, Noise Reduction Rating (EPA NRR) values. They were, (1) predicted National Institute for occupational Safety and Health`s (NIOSH) method No. 1 values, (2) field-calculated NIOSH No. 1 values, and (3) measured dBA reduction values, which was the arithmetic A-weighted differences between both microphone locations. The majority of the data was obtained on operators of mobile strip equipment, such as bulldozers, front-end-loaders, and overburden drills. A total of 107 individual tests were conducted using 11 different hearing protectors. The results indicate that the amount of protection, which can vary significantly, is related either to the spectrum shape of the noise, or the C-weighted minus the A-weighted (C-A) value. This is consistent with other researchers. The field measured noise reductions were equivalent to the EPA NRR values when the C-A values were negative or approaching zero. When the C-A values increased, the measured noise reductions significantly decreased.

  4. Evaluation of Field-in-Field Technique for Total Body Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Onal, Cem; Sonmez, Aydan; Arslan, Gungor; Sonmez, Serhat; Efe, Esma; Oymak, Ezgi

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical use of a field-in-field (FIF) technique for total body irradiation (TBI) using a treatment-planning system (TPS) and to verify TPS results with in vivo dose measurements using metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) detectors. Methods and Materials: Clinical and dosimetric data of 10 patients treated with TBI were assessed. Certain radiation parameters were measured using homogenous and regular phantoms at an extended distance of 380 cm, and the results were compared with data from a conventional standard distance of 100 cm. Additionally, dosimetric validation of TPS doses was performed with a Rando phantom using manual calculations. A three-dimensional computed tomography plan was generated involving 18-MV photon beams with a TPS for both open-field and FIF techniques. The midline doses were measured at the head, neck, lung, umbilicus, and pelvis for both open-field and FIF techniques. Results: All patients received planned TBI using the FIF technique with 18-MV photon energies and 2 Gy b.i.d. on 3 consecutive days. The difference in tissue maximum ratios between the extended and conventional distances was <2%. The mean deviation of manual calculations compared with TPS data was +1.6% (range, 0.1-2.4%). A homogenous dose distribution was obtained with 18-MV photon beams using the FIF technique. The mean lung dose for the FIF technique was 79.2% (9.2 Gy; range, 8.8-9.7 Gy) of the prescribed dose. The MOSFET readings and TPS doses in the body were similar (percentage difference range, -0.5% to 2.5%) and slightly higher in the shoulder and lung (percentage difference range, 4.0-5.5%). Conclusion: The FIF technique used for TBI provides homogenous dose distribution and is feasible, simple, and spares time compared with more-complex techniques. The TPS doses were similar to the midline doses obtained from MOSFET readings.

  5. Field evaluation of an avian risk assessment model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vyas, N.B.; Spann, J.W.; Hulse, C.S.; Borges, S.L.; Bennett, R.S.; Torrez, M.; Williams, B.I.; Leffel, R.

    2006-01-01

    We conducted two laboratory subacute dietary toxicity tests and one outdoor subacute dietary toxicity test to determine the effectiveness of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's deterministic risk assessment model for evaluating the potential of adverse effects to birds in the field. We tested technical-grade diazinon and its D Z N- 50W (50% diazinon active ingredient wettable powder) formulation on Canada goose (Branta canadensis) goslings. Brain acetylcholinesterase activity was measured, and the feathers and skin, feet. and gastrointestinal contents were analyzed for diazinon residues. The dose-response curves showed that diazinon was significantly more toxic to goslings in the outdoor test than in the laboratory tests. The deterministic risk assessment method identified the potential for risk to birds in general, but the factors associated with extrapolating from the laboratory to the field, and from the laboratory test species to other species, resulted in the underestimation of risk to the goslings. The present study indicates that laboratory-based risk quotients should be interpreted with caution.

  6. Experimental evaluation of radiosity for room sound-field prediction.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Murray; Nosal, Eva-Marie

    2006-08-01

    An acoustical radiosity model was evaluated for how it performs in predicting real room sound fields. This was done by comparing radiosity predictions with experimental results for three existing rooms--a squash court, a classroom, and an office. Radiosity predictions were also compared with those by ray tracing--a "reference" prediction model--for both specular and diffuse surface reflection. Comparisons were made for detailed and discretized echograms, sound-decay curves, sound-propagation curves, and the variations with frequency of four room-acoustical parameters--EDT, RT, D50, and C80. In general, radiosity and diffuse ray tracing gave very similar predictions. Predictions by specular ray tracing were often very different. Radiosity agreed well with experiment in some cases, less well in others. Definitive conclusions regarding the accuracy with which the rooms were modeled, or the accuracy of the radiosity approach, were difficult to draw. The results suggest that radiosity predicts room sound fields with some accuracy, at least as well as diffuse ray tracing and, in general, better than specular ray tracing. The predictions of detailed echograms are less accurate, those of derived room-acoustical parameters more accurate. The results underline the need to develop experimental methods for accurately characterizing the absorptive and reflective characteristics of room surfaces, possible including phase. PMID:16938969

  7. Field Evaluation of Broadband Electrical Impedance Tomography Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelter, M.; Huisman, J. A.; Zimmermann, E.; Treichel, A.; Kemna, A.; Vereecken, H.

    2014-12-01

    Laboratory measurements of the complex electrical conductivity in a broad frequency range (i.e. mHz to kHz) using spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements have shown great promise to characterize important hydrological properties (e.g. hydraulic conductivity) and biogeochemical processes. However, translating these findings to field applications remains challenging, and significant improvements in spectral electrical impedance tomography (EIT) are still required to obtain images of the complex electrical conductivity with sufficient accuracy in the field. The aim of this study is to present recent improvements in the inversion and processing of broadband field EIT measurements, and to evaluate the accuracy and spectral consistency of the obtained images of the real and imaginary part of the electrical conductivity. In a first case study, time-lapse surface EIT measurements were performed during an infiltration experiment to investigate the spectral complex electrical conductivity as a function of water content. State-of-the-art data processing and inversion approaches were used to obtain images of the complex electrical conductivity in a frequency range of 100 mHz to 1 kHz, and integral parameters were obtained using Debye decomposition. Results showed consistent spectral and spatial variation of the phase of the complex electrical conductivity in a broad frequency range, and a complex dependence on water saturation that was reasonably consistent with laboratory EIT measurements. In a second case study, borehole EIT measurements were made in a well-characterized aquifer. These measurements were inverted to obtain broadband images of the complex conductivity after correction for inductive and capacitive coupling using recently developed procedures. The results showed good correspondence with reference laboratory SIP measurements in a broad frequency bandwidth up to 1 kHz only after application of the correction procedures.

  8. Handheld standoff mine detection system (HSTAMIDS) field evaluation in Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doheny, Robert C.; Burke, Sean; Cresci, Roger; Ngan, Peter; Walls, Richard; Chernoff, Jeff

    2006-05-01

    The Humanitarian Demining Research and Development Program of the US Army RDECOM CERDEC Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD), under the direction of the Office of Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations and Low-Intensity Conflict (OASD SO/LIC) and with participation from the International Test and Evaluation Program (ITEP) for humanitarian demining, conducted an in-country field evaluation of the Handheld Standoff Mine Detection System (HSTAMIDS) in the southern African country of Namibia. Participants included the US Humanitarian Demining Team of NVESD; ITEP personnel from several member countries; deminers from two non-governmental organizations in Angola, Menschen Gegen Minen (MgM) and HALO Trust; and CyTerra Corporation. The primary objectives were to demonstrate the performance of the U.S. Army's newest handheld multisensor mine detector, the HSTAMIDS, to the performance of the metal detector being used by local demining organizations and also to assess the performance of deminers using the HSTAMIDS after limited experience and training.

  9. Development of a field test for evaluating aerobic fitness.

    PubMed

    Mikawa, K; Yano, Y; Senjyu, H

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the reproducibility and utility of a standardised and externally paced field test (15-m Incremental Shuttle Walk and Run Test [15 mISWRT]) to assess aerobic fitness in middle-aged adults. 14 middle-aged participants performed the 15-m ISWRT 3 times within one week (Test 1, Test 2, Test 3). Reproducibility of the 15-m ISWRT was tested by comparing 15-m ISWRT performance (distance completed), HRmax, and VO 2max for each test. The utility of the 15-m ISWRT for evaluating VO 2max over a wide range in middle-aged adults was tested by comparing the range of VO 2max obtained from the portable expired gas analyzer with the VO 2max reference values and ranges for health promotion published by Japan's Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. A multiple comparison of distance completed in the 15-m ISWRT Test 1, Test 2, and Test 3 found no significant difference between Test 2 and Test 3. The ICC was 0.99 for Test 2 vs. Test 3. VO 2max measured from the 15-m ISWRT in Test 3 had a minimum value of 22.8 ml/kg/min and a maximum value of 38.7 ml/kg/min. In conclusion, the 15-m ISWRT is reliable and useful for evaluating VO 2max in middle-aged adults. PMID:22377946

  10. Application of PCR-Denaturing-Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) Method to Examine Microbial Community Structure in Asparagus Fields with Growth Inhibition due to Continuous Cropping

    PubMed Central

    Urashima, Yasufumi; Sonoda, Takahiro; Fujita, Yuko; Uragami, Atsuko

    2012-01-01

    Growth inhibition due to continuous cropping of asparagus is a major problem; the yield of asparagus in replanted fields is low compared to that in new fields, and missing plants occur among young seedlings. Although soil-borne disease and allelochemicals are considered to be involved in this effect, this is still controversial. We aimed to develop a technique for the biological field diagnosis of growth inhibition due to continuous cropping. Therefore, in this study, fungal community structure and Fusarium community structure in continuously cropped fields of asparagus were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction/denaturing-gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). Soil samples were collected from the Aizu region of Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. Soil samples were taken from both continuously cropped fields of asparagus with growth inhibition and healthy neighboring fields of asparagus. The soil samples were collected from the fields of 5 sets in 2008 and 4 sets in 2009. We were able to distinguish between pathogenic and non-pathogenic Fusarium by using Alfie1 and Alfie2GC as the second PCR primers and PCR-DGGE. Fungal community structure was not greatly involved in the growth inhibition of asparagus due to continuous cropping. By contrast, the band ratios of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. asparagi in growth-inhibited fields were higher than those in neighboring healthy fields. In addition, there was a positive correlation between the band ratios of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. asparagi and the ratios of missing asparagus plants. We showed the potential of biological field diagnosis of growth inhibition due to continuous cropping of asparagus using PCR-DGGE. PMID:22200640

  11. Evaluation of the field-in-field technique with lung blocks for breast tangential radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hidekazu; Hayashi, Shinya; Kajiura, Yuichi; Kitahara, Masashi; Matsuyama, Katsuya; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2015-08-01

    Several studies have reported the advantages of the field-in-field (FIF) technique in breast radiotherapy, including dose reduction in the lungs by using lung field blocks. We evaluated the FIF technique with lung blocks for breast tangential radiotherapy. Sixteen patients underwent free breathing (FB) computed tomography (CT), followed by two CT procedures performed during breath hold after light inhalation (IN) and light exhalation (EX). Three radiotherapy plans were created using the FIF technique based on the FB-CT images: one without lung blocks (LB0) and two with lung blocks whose monitor units (MUs) were 5 (LB5) and 10 (LB10), respectively. These plans were copied to the IN-CT and EX-CT images. V20Gy, V30Gy, and V40Gy of the ipsilateral lung and V100%, V95%, and the mean dose (Dmean) to the planning target volume (PTV) were analyzed. The extent of changes in these parameters on the IN-plan and EX-plan compared with the FB-plan was evaluated. V20Gy, V30Gy, and V40Gy were significantly smaller for FB-LB5 and FB-LB10 than for FB-LB0; similar results were obtained for the IN-plan and EX-plan. V100%, V95%, and Dmean were also significant smaller for FB-LB5 and FB-LB10 than for FB-LB0. The extent of changes in V20Gy, V30Gy, and V40Gy on the IN-plan and EX-plan compared with the FB-plan was not statistically significant. Lung blocks were useful for dose reduction in the lung and a simultaneous PTV decrease. This technique should not be applied in the general population. PMID:26412879

  12. Evaluation of the field-in-field technique with lung blocks for breast tangential radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hidekazu; Hayashi, Shinya; Kajiura, Yuichi; Kitahara, Masashi; Matsuyama, Katsuya; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several studies have reported the advantages of the field-in-field (FIF) technique in breast radiotherapy, including dose reduction in the lungs by using lung field blocks. We evaluated the FIF technique with lung blocks for breast tangential radiotherapy. Sixteen patients underwent free breathing (FB) computed tomography (CT), followed by two CT procedures performed during breath hold after light inhalation (IN) and light exhalation (EX). Three radiotherapy plans were created using the FIF technique based on the FB-CT images: one without lung blocks (LB0) and two with lung blocks whose monitor units (MUs) were 5 (LB5) and 10 (LB10), respectively. These plans were copied to the IN-CT and EX-CT images. V20Gy, V30Gy, and V40Gy of the ipsilateral lung and V100%, V95%, and the mean dose (Dmean) to the planning target volume (PTV) were analyzed. The extent of changes in these parameters on the IN-plan and EX-plan compared with the FB-plan was evaluated. V20Gy, V30Gy, and V40Gy were significantly smaller for FB-LB5 and FB-LB10 than for FB-LB0; similar results were obtained for the IN-plan and EX-plan. V100%, V95%, and Dmean were also significant smaller for FB-LB5 and FB-LB10 than for FB-LB0. The extent of changes in V20Gy, V30Gy, and V40Gy on the IN-plan and EX-plan compared with the FB-plan was not statistically significant. Lung blocks were useful for dose reduction in the lung and a simultaneous PTV decrease. This technique should not be applied in the general population. PMID:26412879

  13. Rotation dependence of a phase delay between plasma edge electron density and temperature fields due to a fast rotating, resonant magnetic perturbation field

    SciTech Connect

    Stoschus, H.; Schmitz, O.; Frerichs, H.; Unterberg, B.; Abdullaev, S. S.; Clever, M.; Coenen, J. W.; Kruezi, U.; Schega, D.; Samm, U.; Jakubowski, M. W.

    2010-06-15

    Measurements of the plasma edge electron density n{sub e} and temperature T{sub e} fields during application of a fast rotating, resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) field show a characteristic modulation of both, n{sub e} and T{sub e} coherent to the rotation frequency of the RMP field. A phase delay PHI between the n{sub e}(t) and T{sub e}(t) waveforms is observed and it is demonstrated that this phase delay PHI is a function of the radius with PHI(r) depending on the relative rotation of the RMP field and the toroidal plasma rotation. This provides for the first time direct experimental evidence for a rotation dependent damping of the external RMP field in the edge layer of a resistive high-temperature plasma which breaks down at low rotation and high resonant field amplitudes.

  14. Neutron star deformation due to poloidal-toroidal magnetic fields of arbitrary multipole order: a new analytic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastrano, A.; Suvorov, A. G.; Melatos, A.

    2015-03-01

    A recipe is presented to construct an analytic, self-consistent model of a non-barotropic neutron star with a poloidal-toroidal field of arbitrary multipole order, whose toroidal component is confined in a torus around the neutral curve inside the star, as in numerical simulations of twisted tori. The recipe takes advantage of magnetic field aligned coordinates to ensure continuity of the mass density at the surface of the torus. The density perturbation and ellipticity of such a star are calculated in general and for the special case of a mixed dipole-quadrupole field as a worked example. The calculation generalizes previous work restricted to dipolar, poloidal-toroidal and multipolar, poloidal-only configurations. The results are applied, as an example, to magnetars whose observations (e.g. spectral features and pulse modulation) indicate that the internal magnetic fields may be at least one order of magnitude stronger than the external fields, as inferred from their spin-downs, and are not purely dipolar.

  15. Acceleration of the charged particles due to chaotic scattering in the combined black hole gravitational field and asymptotically uniform magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuchlík, Zdeněk; Kološ, Martin

    2016-01-01

    To test the role of large-scale magnetic fields in accretion processes, we study the dynamics of the charged test particles in the vicinity of a black hole immersed into an asymptotically uniform magnetic field. Using the Hamiltonian formalism of the charged particle dynamics, we examine chaotic scattering in the effective potential related to the black hole gravitational field combined with the uniform magnetic field. Energy interchange between the translational and oscillatory modes of the charged particle dynamics provides a mechanism for charged particle acceleration along the magnetic field lines. This energy transmutation is an attribute of the chaotic charged particle dynamics in the combined gravitational and magnetic fields only, the black hole rotation is not necessary for such charged particle acceleration. The chaotic scatter can cause a transition to the motion along the magnetic field lines with small radius of the Larmor motion or vanishing Larmor radius, when the speed of the particle translational motion is largest and it can be ultra-relativistic. We discuss the consequences of the model of ionization of test particles forming a neutral accretion disc, or heavy ions following off-equatorial circular orbits, and we explore the fate of heavy charged test particles after ionization where no kick of heavy ions is assumed and only the switch-on effect of the magnetic field is relevant. We demonstrate that acceleration and escape of the ionized particles can be efficient along the Kerr black hole symmetry axis parallel to the magnetic field lines. We show that a strong acceleration of the ionized particles to ultra-relativistic velocities is preferred in the direction close to the magnetic field lines. Therefore, the process of ionization of Keplerian discs around the Kerr black holes can serve as a model of relativistic jets.

  16. RF heating due to conductive wires during MRI depends on the phase distribution of the transmit field.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Christopher J; Susil, Robert C; Atalar, Ergin

    2002-12-01

    In many studies concerning wire heating during MR imaging, a "resonant wire length" that maximizes RF heating is determined. This may lead to the nonintuitive conclusion that adding more wire, so as to avoid this resonant length, will actually improve heating safety. Through a theoretical analysis using the method of moments, we show that this behavior depends on the phase distribution of the RF transmit field. If the RF transmit field has linear phase, with slope equal to the real part of the wavenumber in the tissue, long wires always heat more than short wires. In order to characterize the intrinsic safety of a device without reference to a specific body coil design, this maximum-tip heating phase distribution must be considered. Finally, adjusting the phase distribution of the electric field generated by an RF transmit coil may lead to an "implant-friendly" coil design. PMID:12465125

  17. A bench-scale biotreatability methodology to evaluate field bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Saberiyan, A.G.; MacPherson, J.R. Jr.; Moore, R.; Pruess, A.J.; Andrilenas, J.S.

    1995-12-31

    A bench-scale biotreatability methodology was designed to assess field bioremediation of petroleum contaminated soil samples. This methodology was performed successfully on soil samples from more than 40 sites. The methodology is composed of two phases, characterization and experimentation. The first phase is physical, chemical, and biological characterization of the contaminated soil sample. This phase determines soil parameters, contaminant type, presence of indigenous contaminant-degrading bacteria, and bacterial population size. The second phase, experimentation, consists of a respirometry test to measure the growth of microbes indirectly (via generation of CO{sub 2}) and the consumption of their food source directly (via contaminant loss). Based on a Monod kinetic analysis, the half-life of a contaminant can be calculated. Abiotic losses are accounted for based on a control test. The contaminant molecular structure is used to generate a stoichiometric equation. The stoichiometric equation yields a theoretical ratio for mg of contaminant degraded per mg of CO{sub 2} produced. Data collected from the respirometry test are compared to theoretical values to evaluate bioremediation feasibility.

  18. The Effects of an Induced Electric Dipole Moment due to Earth's Electric Field on the Artificial Satellites Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilmann, Armando; Ferreira, Luiz Danilo Damasceno; Dartora, Cesar Augusto

    2012-04-01

    The orbits of artificial satellites are very sensitive to a large number of disturbances, whose effects add to the main force exerted by Earth's gravitational field. The most important perturbations, caused by solar radiation pressure, the Moon and the Sun gravitational fields, have been extensively discussed in the literature, and must be taken into account in order to correct the orbital motion, to prevent collisions between satellites in close orbits. In this paper we consider an additional source of acceleration arising from an electric dipole moment induced by the high altitude Earth electric field in a metallic satellite of spherical shape. The order of magnitude of such effect is estimated to be in the range of 10 - 23m/s2. It is emphasized that the electric dipole moment effect(EDME) is dependent on the satellite shape and geometry and proportional to E_0 v/r^4. The Earth electric field E 0 is largely influenced by atmospheric electromagnetic phenomena, such as whistler waves and thunderstorms.

  19. Field Survey of Tsunami Effects in Sri Lanka due to the Sumatra-Andaman Earthquake of December 26, 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Shusaku; Wijeyewickrema, Anil C.; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Miura, Hiroyuki; Gunaratna, Priyantha; Madurapperuma, Manoj; Sekiguchi, Toru

    2007-03-01

    The December 26, 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake that registered a moment magnitude (M w ) of 9.1 was one of the largest earthquakes in the world since 1900. The devastating tsunami that resulted from this earthquake caused more casualties than any previously reported tsunami. The number of fatalities and missing persons in the most seriously affected countries were Indonesia - 167,736, Sri Lanka - 35,322, India - 18,045 and Thailand - 8,212. This paper describes two field visits to assess tsunami effects in Sri Lanka by a combined team of Japanese and Sri Lankan researchers. The first field visit from December 30, 2004 January 04, 2005 covered the western and southern coasts of Sri Lanka including the cities of Moratuwa, Beruwala, Bentota, Pereliya, Hikkaduwa, Galle, Talpe, Matara, Tangalla and Hambantota. The objectives of the first field visit were to investigate the damage caused by the tsunami and to obtain eyewitness information about wave arrival times. The second field visit from March 10 18, 2005 covered the eastern and southern coasts of Sri Lanka and included Trincomalee, Batticaloa, Arugam Bay, Yala National Park and Kirinda. The objectives of the second visit were mainly to obtain eyewitness information about wave arrival times and inundation data, and to take relevant measurements using GPS instruments.

  20. Storm time equatorial plasma bubble zonal drift reversal due to disturbance Hall electric field over the Brazilian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. M.; Abdu, M. A.; Souza, J. R.; Sobral, J. H. A.; Batista, I. S.; Denardini, C. M.

    2016-06-01

    The dynamics of equatorial ionospheric plasma bubbles over Brazilian sector during two magnetic storm events are investigated in this work. The observations were made at varying phases of magnetic disturbances when the bubble zonal drift velocity was found to reverse westward from its normally eastward velocity. Calculation of the zonal drift based on a realistic low-latitude ionosphere modeled by the Sheffield University Plasmasphere-Ionosphere Model showed on a quantitative basis a clear competition between vertical Hall electric field and disturbance zonal winds on the variations observed in the zonal velocity of the plasma bubble. The Hall electric field arising from enhanced ratio of field line-integrated conductivities, ΣH/ΣP, is most often generated by an increase in the integrated Hall conductivity, arising from enhanced energetic particle precipitation in the South American Magnetic Anomaly region for which evidence is provided from observation of anomalous sporadic E layers over Cachoeira Paulista and Fortaleza. Such sporadic E layers are also by themselves evidence for the development of the Hall electric field that modifies the zonal drift.

  1. Health risks of electromagnetic fields. Part I: Evaluation and assessment of electric and magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Habash, Riadh W Y; Brodsky, Lynn M; Leiss, William; Krewski, Daniel; Repacholi, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Exposure to electric and magnetic fields (EMF) emanating from the generation, distribution, and utilization of electricity is widespread. The major debate in recent years has focused on the possibility that exposure to EMF may result in adverse health consequences, including the development of cancer. This article provides a review and evaluation of potential health risks associated with residential and occupational exposure to EMF. In addition to reviewing data from laboratory, epidemiology, and clinical studies, we examine exposure data from field measurement surveys and exposure guidelines that have been established for EMF. Currently, the evidence in support of an association between EMF and childhood cancer is limited, although this issue warrants further investigation. Evidence of an association between EMF exposure and adult cancers, derived largely from occupational settings, is inconsistent, precluding clear conclusions. There is little evidence of an association between EMF and noncancer health effects. Epidemiological studies of EMF and population health are limited by exposure measurement error and the lack of a clear dose/response relationship in studies suggesting possible health risks. Further research is needed to clarify the ambiguous findings from present studies and to determine if EMF exposure poses a health risk. PMID:15018215

  2. Measuring frequency changes due to microwave power variations as a function of C-field setting in a rubidium frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarosy, E. B.; Johnson, Walter A.; Karuza, Sarunas K.; Voit, Frank J.

    1992-01-01

    It has been shown in previous studies that in some cesium frequency standards there exist certain C-field settings that minimize frequency changes that are due to variations in the microwave power. In order to determine whether similar results could be obtained with rubidium (Rb) frequency standards (clocks), we performed a similar study, using a completely automated measurement system, on a commercial Rb standard. From our measurements we found that changing the microwave power to the filter cell resulted in significant changes in frequency, and that the magnitude of these frequency changes at low C-field levels went to zero and decreased as the C-field was increased.

  3. Multicomponent seismic monitoring of stress arching in the overburden due to hydraulic fracturing in the Montney Shale at Pouce Coupe Field, Alberta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinal, Irene

    Recent studies have shown convincing evidence that time-lapse changes in seismic data occur not only within the reservoir interval but also in the overburden. Observations that production at the reservoir level and subsequent decrease in pore pressure lead to modifications in the stress field and variations in the overburden have been documented (Hatchell et al., 2003; Hudson et al., 2005). The study of the opposite case, that is, the analysis of the effect in the overburden of an increase in pore pressure in the reservoir has not been so well documented yet and is the focus of this work; the possibility that the hydraulic fracturing process causes seismically detectable changes in the overburden in a time-lapse sense is studied at Pouce Coupe Field, Alberta, and the results are shown. The analysis is performed using multicomponent data from three seismic surveys acquired to evaluate the hydraulic stimulations of two horizontal wells in the Montney Shale. The time-lapse time shifts between the data of the two monitor surveys and the baseline have been calculated and constitute the main tool to study the injection-induced changes above the reservoir interval. The hypothesis is that the increase in the reservoir pressure due to the hydraulic well treatment might produce upward overburden compaction, leading to an increase in stresses that would be translated into an increase in the seismic velocities and therefore, into positive time shifts (considering monitor data subtracted from baseline data) if a time window for the overburden is analyzed. The study shows strong differences in the magnitude of the PS response to the stimulations compared to that of the PP data. The fact that mode-converted (PS) waves are more sensitive to azimuthal anisotropy than compressional waves explains the stronger character of the response observed in PS data, allowing for a more detailed interpretation of the stress-arching distribution. The time-lapse time shifts in the overburden

  4. Accidental Strangulation Due to Entrapment of Saree in Crop Thrasher Machine in an Elderly Women Working at Agricultural Field.

    PubMed

    Parchake, Manoj Bhausaheb; Kumre, Vikas; Kachare, Rajesh V

    2016-09-01

    Strangulation is generally considered as homicidal death and in accidental strangulation circumstantial evidence alone can point toward the accidental nature of incidence. In present case, a 71-year-old woman, wearing a saree (garment worn by traditional women in India) working in agricultural field, got entangled in the crop thrasher machine and got strangled. Immediately, she was taken to the nearest hospital, where she survived for 6 to 8 hours and then died. The autopsy reveals cross ribbon-shaped ligature mark on neck and anterior chest along with 1 puncture wound at the right lateral aspect of the neck. A lack of proper precaution and safety measures at agricultural field are other contributing factors. Accidental strangulation by saree is extremely rare, hence, this case is presented for its rarity and pattern of injury. PMID:27311083

  5. Force field analysis suggests a lowering of diffusion barriers in atomic manipulation due to presence of STM tip.

    PubMed

    Emmrich, Matthias; Schneiderbauer, Maximilian; Huber, Ferdinand; Weymouth, Alfred J; Okabayashi, Norio; Giessibl, Franz J

    2015-04-10

    We study the physics of atomic manipulation of CO on a Cu(111) surface by combined scanning tunneling microscopy and atomic force microscopy at liquid helium temperatures. In atomic manipulation, an adsorbed atom or molecule is arranged on the surface using the interaction of the adsorbate with substrate and tip. While previous experiments are consistent with a linear superposition model of tip and substrate forces, we find that the force threshold depends on the force field of the tip. Here, we use carbon monoxide front atom identification (COFI) to characterize the tip's force field. Tips that show COFI profiles with an attractive center can manipulate CO in any direction while tips with a repulsive center can only manipulate in certain directions. The force thresholds are independent of bias voltage in a range from 1 to 10 mV and independent of temperature in a range of 4.5 to 7.5 K. PMID:25910137

  6. Variation of Magnetic Fluctuation due to Gas Puffing in Edge Region of Reversed-Field Pinch Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Hirano, Yoichi; Sakakita, Hajime; Koguchi, Haruhisa

    2016-09-01

    We measured the variation of magnetic and electrostatic fluctuations observed during the gas puffing in the edge region of the toroidal pinch experiment-reversed experiment (TPE-RX) reversed-field pinch plasma. In the short period in which the electron density increased slowly just after the gas puffing, the confinement of fast electrons in the core region was maintained by the decrease in the fast radial magnetic fluctuation with the deepening of the reversal of the toroidal field. During the following period in which the electron density increased rapidly, the radial gradient of electron density decreased, and the loss of fast electrons from the core region increased owing to the increase in the toroidal and radial magnetic fluctuations in the high-frequency band, although the poloidal magnetic fluctuation decreased. Therefore, the confinement of fast electrons would be maintained by keeping the radial gradient of plasma thermal pressure with a moderate neutral particle supply of small quantity in a short time.

  7. Localization Errors in MR Spectroscopic Imaging due to the Drift of the Main Magnetic Field and their Correction

    PubMed Central

    Tal, Assaf; Gonen, Oded

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE To analyze the effect of B0 field drift on multi voxel MR spectroscopic imaging and to propose an approach for its correction. THEORY AND METHODS It is shown, both theoretically and in a phantom, that for ~30 minute acquisitions a linear B0 drift (~0.1 ppm/hour) will cause localization errors that can reach several voxels (centimeters) in the slower varying phase encoding directions. An efficient and unbiased estimator is proposed for tracking the drift by interleaving short (~T2*), non-localized acquisitions on the non-suppressed water each TR, as shown in 10 volunteers at 1.5 and 3 T. RESULTS The drift is shown to be predominantly linear in both the phantom and the volunteers at both fields. The localization errors are observed and quantified in the phantom. The unbiased estimator is shown to reliably track the instantaneous frequency in-vivo despite only using a small portion of the FID. CONCLUSION Contrary to single-voxel MR spectroscopy, where it leads to line broadening, field drift can lead to localization errors in the longer chemical shift imaging experiments. Fortunately, this drift can be obtained at a negligible cost to sequence timing, and corrected for in post processing. PMID:23165750

  8. Dc to ac field conversion due to leaky-wave excitation in a plasma slab behind an ionization front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostin, V. A.; Vvedenskii, N. V.

    2015-03-01

    We present a way for generating coherent tunable electromagnetic radiation through dc to ac field conversion by an ionization front. The conversion is caused by the excitation of leaky waves behind the transversely limited ionization front propagating in a uniform electrostatic field. This differs significantly from the well-known dc-to-ac-radiation-converter models which consider Doppler-like frequency conversion by a transversely unlimited ionization front propagating in a spatially periodic electric field. We explore the dispersion properties and excitation of these leaky waves radiated through the transverse plasma boundary at the Cherenkov angle to the direction of propagation of a superluminal ionization front as dependent on the parameters of the plasma produced and on the speed of the ionization front. It is shown that not only the center frequency but also the duration and waveform of the generated pulse may significantly depend on the speed of the ionization front. The results indicate the possibility of using such converters based on planar photoconductive antennas to create sources of microwave and terahertz radiation with controllable waveforms that are transformed from video to radio pulse when the angle of incident ionizing radiation is tuned.

  9. Helical modulation of the electrostatic plasma potential due to edge magnetic islands induced by resonant magnetic perturbation fields at TEXTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Ciaccio, G. Spizzo, G.; Schmitz, O. Frerichs, H.; Abdullaev, S. S.; Evans, T. E.; White, R. B.

    2015-10-15

    The electrostatic response of the edge plasma to a magnetic island induced by resonant magnetic perturbations to the plasma edge of the circular limiter tokamak TEXTOR is analyzed. Measurements of plasma potential are interpreted by simulations with the Hamiltonian guiding center code ORBIT. We find a strong correlation between the magnetic field topology and the poloidal modulation of the measured plasma potential. The ion and electron drifts yield a predominantly electron driven radial diffusion when approaching the island X-point while ion diffusivities are generally an order of magnitude smaller. This causes a strong radial electric field structure pointing outward from the island O-point. The good agreement found between measured and modeled plasma potential connected to the enhanced radial particle diffusivities supports that a magnetic island in the edge of a tokamak plasma can act as convective cell. We show in detail that the particular, non-ambipolar drifts of electrons and ions in a 3D magnetic topology account for these effects. An analytical model for the plasma potential is implemented in the code ORBIT, and analyses of ion and electron radial diffusion show that both ion- and electron-dominated transport regimes can exist, which are known as ion and electron root solutions in stellarators. This finding and comparison with reversed field pinch studies and stellarator literature suggest that the role of magnetic islands as convective cells and hence as major radial particle transport drivers could be a generic mechanism in 3D plasma boundary layers.

  10. Evaluation of Aqua-Ammonia Chiller Technologies and Field Site Installation

    SciTech Connect

    Zaltash, Abdolreza

    2007-09-01

    The Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center (NFESC) has sponsored Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to review, select, and evaluate advanced, gas-fired, 5-ton, aqua-ammonia, chiller technologies. The selection criteria was that units have COP values of 0.67 or better at Air-conditioning and Refrigeration Institute (ARI) 95 F outdoor rating conditions, an active refrigerant flow control, and a variable-speed condenser fan. These features are expected to allow these units to operate at higher ambient temperatures (up to the maximum operating temperature of 110 F) with minimal degradation in performance. ORNL evaluated three potential manufacturers of advanced, gas-fired, 5-ton, aqua-ammonia chillers-Robur, Ambian, and Cooling Technologies. Unfortunately, Robur did not meet the COP requirements and Cooling Technologies could not deliver a unit to be tested at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-ORNL environmental chamber testing facility for thermally activated heat pumps. This eliminated these two technologies from further consideration, leaving only the Ambian chillers for evaluation. Two Ambian chillers were evaluated at the DOE-ORNL test facility. Overall these chillers operated well over a wide range of ambient conditions with minimal degradation in performance due to several control strategies used such as a variable speed condenser fan, a modulating burner, and active refrigerant flow control. These Ambian pre-commercial units were selected for installation and field testing at three federal facilities. NFESC worked with ORNL to assist with the site selection for installation and evaluation of these chillers. Two sites (ORNL and Naval Surface Warfare Center [NSWC] Corona) had a single chiller unit installed; and at one site (Naval Amphibious Base [NAB] Little Creek), two 5-ton chillers linked together were installed to provide 10 tons of cooling. A chiller link controller developed under this project was evaluated in the field test at Little Creek.

  11. Evaluating the Field Emission Characteristics of Aluminum for DC High Voltage Photo-Electron Guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taus, Rhys; Poelker, Matthew; Forman, Eric; Mamun, Abdullah

    2014-03-01

    High current photoguns require high power laser light, but only a small portion of the laser light illuminating the photocathode produces electron beam. Most of the laser light (~ 65%) simply serves to heat the photocathode, which leads to evaporation of the chemicals required to create the negative electron affinity condition necessary for photoemission. Photocathode cooling techniques have been employed to address this problem, but active cooling of the photocathode is complicated because the cooling apparatus must float at high voltage. This work evaluates the field emission characteristics of cathode electrodes manufactured from materials with high thermal conductivity: aluminum and copper. These electrodes could serve as effective heat sinks, to passively cool the photocathode that resides within such a structure. However, literature suggests ``soft'' materials like aluminum and copper are ill suited for photogun applications, due to excessive field emission when biased at high voltage. This work provides an evaluation of aluminum and copper electrodes inside a high voltage field emission test stand, before and after coating with titanium nitride (TiN), a coating that enhances surface hardness. National Science Foundation Award Number: 1062320 and the Department of Defence ASSURE program.

  12. Evaluation of SAR in a human body model due to wireless power transmission in the 10 MHz band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laakso, Ilkka; Tsuchida, Shogo; Hirata, Akimasa; Kamimura, Yoshitsugu

    2012-08-01

    This study discusses a computational method for calculating the specific absorption rate (SAR) due to a wireless power transmission system in the 10 MHz frequency band. A two-step quasi-static method comprised of the method of moments and the scalar potential finite-difference method are proposed. The applicability of the quasi-static approximation for localized exposure in this frequency band is discussed by comparing the SAR in a lossy dielectric cylinder computed with a full-wave electromagnetic analysis and the quasi-static approximation. From the computational results, the input impedance of the resonant coils was affected by the existence of the cylinder. On the other hand, the magnetic field distribution in free space and considering the cylinder and an impedance matching circuit were in good agreement; the maximum difference in the amplitude of the magnetic field was 4.8%. For a cylinder-coil distance of 10 mm, the difference between the peak 10 g averaged SAR in the cylinder computed with the full-wave electromagnetic method and our quasi-static method was 7.8%. These results suggest that the quasi-static approach is applicable for conducting the dosimetry of wireless power transmission in the 10 MHz band. With our two-step quasi-static method, the SAR in the anatomically based model was computed for different exposure scenarios. From those computations, the allowable input power satisfying the limit of a peak 10 g averaged SAR of 2.0 W kg-1 was 830 W in the worst case exposure scenario with a coil positioned at a distance of 30 mm from the chest.

  13. [Clinical evaluation of faropenem against infections in pediatric fields].

    PubMed

    Sunakawa, K; Satoh, Y; Iwata, S; Terashima, I; Meguro, H; Kusumoto, Y; Kato, T; Akita, H; Goshima, T; Yokota, T; Toyonaga, Y; Ishihara, T; Kanemura, H; Iwai, N; Nakamura, H; Nakashima, M

    1997-09-01

    The recent increases in the prevalence of penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae becomes a point at issue clinically. We carried out a clinical study in 40 cases in the pediatrics department, as faropenem (FRPM) was proved to have an excellent antimicrobial activity against penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae. The study was planned to investigate in detail the movement of stools that had been a problem in a clinical development studies out before. In this study, an observation of the daily movement of stools was one of the principal evaluation items, hence the patients were divided into two groups. One group (S-group) were administered FRPM only, the other group (E-group) were administered FRPM in combination with a medicine for intestinal disorders (Enteronon-R). An observed frequencies of any loose bowel movements were 94.7% in S-group, and 63.2% in E-group, hence the study suggested that the combination drug was effective. The patients observed higher frequencies of development of the movement of stools, all of them were recovered from in the course of administration or within 4 days after administration, however whether or not being treated symptomatic therapy. Clinical efficacy rates of FRPM on mainly respiratory infections were 94.6%. In this study, 4 strains (patients) of penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae were isolated. Against penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, FRPM demonstrated more potent antibacterial activity than the oral penicillins and cephems tested here except cefditoren. Clinical efficacies was deemed effective in all of the 4 cases, and bacteriologically, 3 organisms were eradicated. As for side effects including diarrhea and loose stool, no serious side effects were observed. Based on the above results, FRPM is effective against most infections in the pediatric field which Streptococcus pneumoniae are isolated at high frequencies highly, and is considered to cases in be useful an attention will have to be

  14. Field Evaluation of the Pedostructure-Based Model (Kamel®)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study involves a field evaluation of the pedostructure-based model Kamel and comparisons between Kamel and the Hydrus-1D model for predicting profile soil moisture. This paper also presents a sensitivity analysis of Kamel with an evaluation field site used as the base scenario. The field site u...

  15. Linearly polarized radiation from astrophysical masers due to magnetic fields when the rate for stimulated emission exceeds the Zeeman frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deguchi, Shuji; Watson, William D.

    1990-01-01

    The results are presented of reformulating the treatment of polarized maser radiation in the presence of magnetic fields in a way that seems somewhat more convenient for calculations with masing states having angular momenta greater than J = 1 and 0. Calculations are then performed for the case of small Zeeman splitting using idealizations which are equivalant to those made previously in calculations for a J = 1-0 transition. The results provide a complete, general description of the polarization characteristics of astrophysical maser radiation involving states of higher angular momentum of closed-shell molecules.

  16. Static magnetic field effect on the arterial baroreflex-mediated control of microcirculation: implications for cardiovascular effects due to environmental magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Gmitrov, Juraj

    2007-08-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that time-varying and static magnetic fields in the environment might affect the cardiovascular system. To explore the underlying physiology, the effect of static magnetic fields (SMFs) on the carotid baroreflex control of microcirculation was studied. Twenty-four hemodynamic monitorings were performed in rabbits sedated by pentobarbital infusion (5 mg/kg/h) during experiments that lasted 120 min. Mean femoral artery blood pressure, heart rate, and ear lobe skin microcirculatory blood flow, measured by microphotoelectric plethysmogram (MPPG), were simultaneously recorded before and after a 40 min exposure of the sinocarotid baroreceptors to Nd(2)-Fe(14)-B alloy magnets (n = 14) or sham magnets (n = 10, control series). The local SMF field was 350 mT, at the baroreceptors' site. Arterial baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was estimated from heart rate/blood pressure response to intravenous bolus injections of nitroprusside and phenylephrine. A significant positive correlation was found between the SMF-induced increase in BRS (DeltaBRS = BRS(afterSMF) - BRS(priorSMF)) and the increment in microvascular blood flow (DeltaMPPG = MPPG(afterSMF) - MPPG(priorSMF)) (r = 0.66, p < 0.009). The SMF probably modulated the arterial baroreflex-mediated microcirculatory control. This could represent one possible mechanism how environmental magnetic fields act on the cardiovascular system, and a method how to complexly adjust macro- and microcirculation with potential clinical implementation. PMID:17530271

  17. High-field measurement of the 129Xe-Rb spin-exchange rate due to binary collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jau, Yuan-Yu; Kuzma, Nicholas N.; Happer, William

    2002-11-01

    We have measured the binary spin-exchange rate coefficient for collisions between Rb and 129Xe atoms at a magnetic field B=9.4 T and in the temperature range 160field and large gas pressures used in this work, the contribution of 129Xe-Rb molecules to the spin-exchange rate was less than 0.1% of the binary-collision rate. The Rb atomic number density [Rb] was measured directly from the large Faraday rotation of the polarization of near-resonant light passing through the sample cells. The rate coefficient is κ=d(1/T1)/d [Rb]=(1.75+/-0.12)×10-16 cm3/s.

  18. Enhanced mobility in organic field-effect transistors due to semiconductor/dielectric interface control and very thin single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ji; Yu, Peng; Atika Arabi, Syeda; Wang, Jiawei; He, Jun; Jiang, Chao

    2016-07-01

    A perfect organic crystal while keeping high quality semiconductor/dielectric interface with minimal defects and disorder is crucial for the realization of high performance organic single crystal field-effect transistors (OSCFETs). However, in most reported OSCFET devices, the crystal transfer processes is extensively used. Therefore, the semiconductor/dielectric interface is inevitably damaged. Carrier traps and scattering centers are brought into the conduction channel, so that the intrinsic high mobility of OSCFET devices is entirely disguised. Here, very thin pentacene single crystal is grown directly on bare SiO2 by developing a ‘seed-controlled’ pentacene single crystal method. The interface quality is controlled by an in situ fabrication of OSCFETs. The interface is kept intact without any transfer process. Furthermore, we quantitatively analyze the influence of crystal thickness on device performance. With a pristine interface and very thin crystal, we have achieved the highest mobility: 5.7 cm2 V‑1 s‑1—more than twice the highest ever reported pentacene OSCFET mobility on bare SiO2. This study may provide a universal route for the use of small organic molecules to achieve high performance in lamellar single crystal field-effect devices.

  19. Forces on neutral atoms due to electromagnetic fields. Annual summary report, 1 September 1986-31 August 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Pritchard, D.E.

    1987-09-01

    The construction of the superconducting magnetic trap was completed and, as a major breakthrough in the field, was used to trap approx. 10/sup 9/ of neutral sodium atoms for periods of several minutes. This represented an advance of several orders of magnitude compared to previous neutral-trapping experiments, both in numbers of trapped atoms, and in trapping times achieved. The continuous loading process pioneered in this experiment has represented an important advance over previous pulsed loading schemes, as it has permitted the accumulation of much larger numbers of atoms in the trap. The fluorescence spectra of the trapped atoms is studied using a weak-probe laser beam (I =(I sub sat/10,000), which does not affect the trapped atoms appreciably. Doppler cooling of the trapped atoms is studied using this spectrum to measure the temperature of the atomic sample. Observed, for the first time, is the effect of gravity on trapped atoms: the trapped atoms do not accumulate at the minimum of the magnetic field, but at the minimum of the total mechanical potential obtained when including the effect of gravity. RF resonance will be used to study the trapped atoms, and optical-RF cyclic cooling of the atoms will be used to attempt to achieve sample temperatures < or = .000001 K.

  20. On Ambition, Learning, and Co-Evolution: Building Evaluation as a Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sridharan, Sanjeev; De Silva, Soma

    2010-01-01

    The papers in this dialogue help develop evaluation as a field (both in South Asia and other regions). What comes through in all of the papers is both humility of where evaluation is as a field and imagination and ambition of where evaluators could be in the near future. Reading the papers in this forum makes them enthusiastic about being…

  1. Documenting the Impact of Multisite Evaluations on the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roseland, Denise; Greenseid, Lija O.; Volkov, Boris B.; Lawrenz, Frances

    2011-01-01

    This chapter discusses the impact that four multisite National Science Foundation (NSF) evaluations had on the broader field of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education and evaluation. Three approaches were used to investigate the broader impact of these evaluations on the field: (a) a citation analysis, (b) an on-line survey,…

  2. Focusing, Situating, and Grounding Micro-Level Evaluation Field Experiences: An Instructional Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skolits, Gary J.; Woodard, Thelma; Morrow, Jennifer Ann; Kaesbauer, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Evaluator training field experiences seek to reinforce applicable content knowledge and promote applied skills. For students, even a small-scale field experience focusing on limited components of a larger evaluation process can seem particularly challenging. Students often do not recognize the relevance of established evaluation resources capable…

  3. Watching the wind: seismic data contamination at long-periods due to atmospheric pressure-field-induced tilting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, S.; Bodin, P.; Hagel, K.; Fletcher, D.

    2010-12-01

    Long-period noise generated by the elastic response of the Earth to atmospheric pressure fluctuations has long been recognized as a limiting factor for seismic investigations. The quality of seismic data recorded by sensitive, near-surface broadband seismometers can be severely corrupted by this effect. During the recent installation of a new broadband site on the Olympic Peninsula in Washington, the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network recorded and investigated elevated daytime noise levels at periods exceeding 30 seconds. Substantial power spectral density variations of the background noise field, 15-20 dB, were observed in the horizontal component seismograms. The pattern of the long-period noise exhibited striking correlations with local fluctuations of the air temperature and wind speed as measured nearby the seismic station by the National Weather Service Forecast Office, Seattle, Washington, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Several past studies have demonstrated that local wind systems may lead to variations of the atmospheric pressure field that deform the ground and perturb seismograms. The rotational component of this motion is detected by horizontal-component seismometers because at periods longer than the sensor’s low corner frequency the sensor is acting essentially as a tiltmeter. We obtained a transfer function that describes the response of the broadband seismometer to a tilt step change and estimated the amplitude of tilt noise to be on the order of 10-9 - 10-8 radians. Within the seismic pass-band of the sensor, it is not possible to remove the tilt signal from the observed seismograms because the details of the tilting depend on the pressure field variations, the compliance of the near surface to pressure variations, and the design and construction of the seismometer vault itself. At longer periods, using the seismic data to recover tilts of tectonic origin is made challenging because of the needed instrument correction

  4. Field and laboratory evaluation of a diffusive emitter for semipassive release of PCE to an aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Arildskov, N.P.; Devlin, J.F.

    2000-02-01

    In controlled field experiments or model aquifers, it is sometimes desirable to introduce solutes below the water table without perturbing the flow system. Diffusive emitters offer a means of achieving that goal. In this study, two laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate nylon tubing as a diffusive emitter for tetrachloroethene (PCE). The initial approach was to pump a saturated aqueous PCE solution through a piece of nylon tubing immersed in a flow-through contractor vessel. Millipore water was pumped through the contractor vessel at a constant rate. Due to PCE diffusion through the nylon, a steady-state concentration in the contractor vessel eventually developed. The process was well described by a computer model that accounted for retarded diffusion through the nylon. In a second experiment, pieces of nylon tubing were exposed to a relatively low concentration of PCE in water for 10 days in gently rotated hypovials. With the aid of a second diffusion model, the bulk diffusion coefficient was obtained from the concentration history of the solution. With the different experimental conditions taken into account, there was reasonably good agreement between the bulk diffusion coefficients in the two experiments. The results were used in the field design of a semipassive release system. Evaluation of this system showed a lower than expected steady-state concentration of PCE inside the releasing wells. The difference is likely due to lower temperature, variable PCE concentrations in the nylon tubing, and nonideal mixing in the wells. The work has shown that laboratory derived diffusion coefficients for polymeric materials are likely to be larger than, but within an order of magnitude of, the effective diffusion coefficients exhibited by emitters in the field. Nevertheless, with temperature corrections taken into account and proper well development, these values could be used to design emitters that would suit most practical applications.

  5. Elastic Softening in HoFe2Al10 due to the Quadrupole Interaction under an Orthorhombic Crystal Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamikawa, Shuhei; Ishii, Isao; Noguchi, Yoshihito; Goto, Hiroki; Fujita, Takahiro K.; Nakagawa, Fumiya; Tanida, Hiroshi; Sera, Masafumi; Suzuki, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    To investigate 4f electronic states in HoFe2Al10 under an orthorhombic crystal electric field (CEF), we measured the specific heat, magnetic susceptibility, magnetization, and elastic modulus of single-crystalline samples. We found elastic softening of the transverse elastic moduli C55 and C66 below 20 and 130 K, respectively. With further decreasing temperature, C66 shows further elastic softening below 5 K. We observed two Schottky peaks in the specific heat at 2.2 and 20 K and small anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility and magnetization in the paramagnetic region. By analyzing these experimental data, we obtained the CEF parameters of HoFe2Al10. From the analysis, we clarified that the softening of C55 and C66 originates from indirect quadrupole interactions of Ozx and Oxy, and propose that the overall CEF splitting is about 85 K.

  6. Field measurements and modeling of wave propagation and subsequent weak layer failure in snow due to explosive loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simioni, Stephan; Sidler, Rolf; Dual, Jürg; Schweizer, Jürg

    2015-04-01

    Avalanche control by explosives is among the key temporary preventive measures. Yet, little is known about the mechanism involved in releasing avalanches by the effect of an explosion. Here, we test the hypothesis that the stress induced by acoustic waves exceeds the strength of weak snow layers. Consequently the snow fails and the onset of rapid crack propagation might finally lead to the release of a snow slab avalanche. We performed experiments with explosive charges over a snowpack. We installed microphones above the snowpack to measure near-surface air pressure and accelerometers within three snow pits. We also recorded pit walls of each pit with high speed cameras to detect weak layer failure. Empirical relationships and a priori information from ice and air were used to characterize a porous layered model from density measurements of snow profiles in the snow pits. This model was used to perform two-dimensional numerical simulations of wave propagation in Biot-type porous material. Locations of snow failure were identified in the simulation by comparing the axial and deviatoric stress field of the simulation to the corresponding snow strength. The identified snow failure locations corresponded well with the observed failure locations in the experiment. The acceleration measured in the snowpack best correlated with the modeled acceleration of the fluid relative to the ice frame. Even though the near field of the explosion is expected to be governed by non-linear effects as for example the observed supersonic wave propagation in the air above the snow surface, the results of the linear poroelastic simulation fit well with the measured air pressure and snowpack accelerations. The results of this comparison are an important step towards quantifying the effectiveness of avalanche control by explosives.

  7. Evaluation of stress distribution due to shearing in non-oriented electrical steel by using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaizen, Yoshiaki; Omura, Takeshi; Fukumura, Masaru; Senda, Kunihiro; Toda, Hiroaki

    2016-05-01

    The influence of the shearing process on the iron loss of non-oriented electrical steels with grain sizes of 10 μm-150 μm was investigated. The deterioration ratio of iron loss was clearly smaller in sample with small grain sizes. The droop height, reflecting the amount of plastic deformation, displayed a good relationship with the deterioration of iron loss under the effect of the material grain size. To clarify the strain distribution around the sheared edge, the elastic strain in a sheet sample with the thickness of 0.30 mm and grain size of 10 μm was evaluated by using synchrotron radiation. The width of the region of elastic strain due to shearing was two or three times of the material thickness. The results of the plastic strain distribution obtained by the measurements were then used to estimate the iron loss deterioration rate in 5 mm width sheared samples. The estimated loss deteriotation coincided with the actual measured iron loss.

  8. Self-contained self-rescuer long term field evaluation: combined eighth and ninth phase results

    SciTech Connect

    2006-10-15

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) National Personal Protective Technology Laboratory (NPPTL) and the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) conduct a Long Term Field Evaluation (LTFE) program to evaluate deployed self-contained self rescuers (SCSRs). The objective of the program is to evaluate how well SCSRs endure the underground coal mining environment with regard to both physical damage and aging when they are deployed in accordance with Federal regulations (30 CFR 75.1714). This report presents findings of the combined eighth and ninth phases of the LTFE. For these phases, over four hundred SCSRs were evaluated. The units tested include the CSE SR-100, Draeger Oxy K-Plus, MSA Life-saver 60, and the OCENCO EBA 6.5. The OCENCO 20 was evaluated only in Phase 9. Testing was performed between December 2000 and April 2004. Results of the evaluation indicate that all SCSRs experience some performance degradation due to the mining environment. Observed degradation varies from elevated levels of carbon dioxide, high breathing resistance, and reduced capacity. Mechanical degradation to the SCSR components included breathing hoses, chemical beds, outer cases and seals. The LTFE tests discussed in this report are different from tests performed for SCSR certification to the requirements of 42 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 84 (42 CFR, Part 84). LTFE tests reported here are conducted to an end point, oxygen depletion, to enable comparison of the duration of new and deployed SCSRs. The method for obtaining deployed SCSRs for this evaluation was not a random selection from the deployed population of SCSRs. Although the results of these tests are useful for observing performance of the tested SCSRs, they are not representative of all deployed SCSRs. 9 refs., 10 figs., 9 tabs., 3 apps.

  9. FIELD INVESTIGATION AND EVALUATION OF LAND TREATING TANNERY SLUDGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Land treatment of wastewater sludges from tannery processes has been investigated during a five-year field plot study. The experimental design included eight field test plots receiving selected applications of three types of tannery sludges over a three-year period. The five-year...

  10. Experimental Evaluation of Field Trips on Instruction in Vocational Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaslin, Norval L.

    To determine the effect of field trips on student achievement in each of four subject matter areas in vocational agriculture, 12 schools offering approved programs were randomly selected and divided into a treatment group and a control group. Uniform teaching outlines and reference materials were provided to each group. While no field trips were…

  11. EVALUATION OF SAMPLING AND FIELD FILTRATION METHODS FOR THE ANALYSIS OF TRACE METALS IN GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Selected groundwater sampling and filtering methods were evaluated to determine their effects on field parameters and trace metal concentrations in samples collected under several types of field conditions. he study focused on sampling in conventional standpipe monitoring wells u...

  12. Field evaluation of hazardous waste site bioassessment protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.M.; Cline, J.F.; Cushing, C.E.; McShane, M.C.; Rogers, J.E.; Rogers, L.E.; Simpson, J.C.; Skalski, J.R.

    1983-04-01

    The goals were: (1) determine the variability (both within and between laboratories) for the various bioassay procedures using contaminated soil samples from the Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA); (2) assess variability within and between plots for several assessment techniques (for sampling small mammals, plants, insects including honeybees and microarthropods) so that field studies could be designed to detect a defined biotic change; (3) establish three field plant transects which are apparently (a) contaminated, (b) appear contaminated and (c) could serve as a control; (4) assess the feasibility (in the laboratory) of using Basin F water to contaminate RMA soil artificially, and to supply information for the design of a field plot study in 1983; (5) attempt to obtain preliminary data on any promising field or laboratory bioassessment techniques not currently mentioned in the statement of work; and (6) obtain field data to assess the ecological status of RMA lakes and compare these observations to results from bioassessment testing.

  13. Rapid estimation of chromosomal damage in yeast due to the effects of environmental chemicals using pulsed field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, J; Tosch, M; AlBaz, I; Lochmann, E R

    1991-10-01

    We present a procedure to rapidly estimate the damage to yeast chromosomes by toxic chemicals. This procedure employs the following steps: incubation of yeast cells with the chemicals, DNA preparation in an agarose matrix, separation of chromosome-sized DNA molecules into reproducible band patterns by pulsed field gel electrophoresis, and quantification of the intensity of chromosomal bands by densitometry. Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells have been treated with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) and cis-Platinum(II) diamminedichloride (cisPT), both of which are known to interact with DNA, and trichlorethylen (TCE), for which such an effect has not been shown in yeast. Treatment of cells with MNNG and cisPt led to an impairment of the intensity of the band pattern to an extent dependent on the concentration of the chemicals applied. For TCE a similar effect could not be discerned. This procedure will be useful as a screening test for the estimation of the biological hazards of toxic chemicals. PMID:1769347

  14. Preliminary Evaluation of a Field and Non-Field Based Social Studies Preservice Teacher Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napier, John D.; Vansickle, Ronald L.

    1978-01-01

    Comparison of pre-service social studies teachers in field and non-field based methods courses indicated no significant differences with regard to teaching skills, attitudes, or behaviors teachers should exhibit in the classroom. (Author/DB)

  15. Characterization of carbonate reservoir property changes due to dissolution for far-field conditions of CO2 storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangane, P. O.; Gouze, P.; Luquot, L.

    2012-12-01

    Geological storage of CO2 in reservoir pore fluid (e.g. deep saline aquifers), is one of the diverse technologies being explored for deacreasing atmospheric CO2 concentration. After injecting the CO2 as a supercritical fluid at depth, it will slowly dissolve into the pore water producing low pH fluids with a high capacity for dissolving carbonates and consequently changing irreversibly the hydrodynamical properties of the reservoir. Characterizing these changes is essential for modelling flow and CO2 transport during and after the CO2 injection. Here we report experimental results from the injection of the CO2-saturated brine into two distinct limestone cores (a bioclastic carbonate and an oolitic carbonate) of 9 mm diameter, 18 mm length. 3D high-resolution X-ray microtomography (XRMT) of the rock sample have been performed before and after the experiments. The experiments were performed using in-situ sequestration conditions (P = 12MPa and T = 100°C), and notably, under chemical conditions given at the position far away from the well injection site (i.e area where the volume of dissolved CO2 into the brine is low, due to CO2 consumption by the dissolution processes occured during its transport from the well injection site). Permeability k is calculated from the pressure drop across the sample and porosity Φ is deduced from chemical concentration of the outlet fluid. The change of the pore structure is analysed in terms of connectivity, tortuosity and fluid-rock interface from processing the XRMT images. These experiments show that far from the well injection site, dissolution processes are characterized by slow mass tranfer including, in the case of carbonate rock, transport of fine particles, which locally clog the porous space. Then, that leads to the damage of the carbonate reservoir both in terms of connectivity of the porous space and CO2 hydrodynamical storage capacity. In fact, the results of the two experiments show that the porosity decreased locally

  16. Parameterisation, evaluation and comparison of pesticide leaching models to data from a Bologna field site, Italy.

    PubMed

    Garratt, James A; Capri, Ettore; Trevisan, Marco; Errera, Giuseppe; Wilkins, Richard M

    2003-01-01

    Effective prediction of pesticide fate using mathematical models requires good process descriptions in the models and good choice of parameter values by the user. This paper examines the ability of seven pesticide leaching models (LEACHP, MACRO, PELMO, PESTLA, PLM, PRZM and VARLEACH) to describe an arable field environment where sunflowers are grown in the Po Valley, northern Italy. Two pesticides were considered, aclonifen and ethoprophos. The models were evaluated in terms of their ability to reproduce field data of soil water content and pesticide residues in the soil and ground water. The evaluation was based on a combination of calibrated and uncalibrated runs. The results from the models were compared with each other to explore the differences between the models. The models varied in their ability to predict soil water content in the summer: the capacity models PRZM, PELMO and VARLEACH predicted less drying than MACRO, PESTLA, PLM and LEACHP. The models varied in their ability to simulate the persistence of the pesticides in the soil. Differences in the simulated pesticide degradation rate were observed between the models, due to variations in the simulated soil water content and soil temperature, and also differences in the equation linking degradation rate to soil water content. There were large differences among the predictions of the models for the mean leaching depth of ethoprophos. PRZM, PELMO, PESTLA and LEACHP all showed similar mean leaching depth to each other, whereas VARLEACH predicted lower ethoprophos mobility and PLM and MACRO predicted greater mobility. All the models overpredicted dispersion of ethoprophos through the soil profile, as compared to the field data. None of the models was able to simulate the field data of rapid leaching of pesticide to ground water except PLM after calibration of the percentage of macropores in the mobile pore space. More work is required in the parameterisation of macropore flow for those models that include

  17. An Evaluation of Tropical Cyclogenesis Theories through Intercomparison of Field Experiment Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helms, C. N.; Hart, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    The process by which tropical cyclones evolve from loosely organized convective clusters into well organized systems is still poorly understood. A number of theories have been proposed to explain this evolution based on vortex dynamics, adiabatic processes, and diabatic processes. Due to the data sparse location in which many of these systems develop, many studies of tropical cyclogenesis theory are limited to either a few case studies or are forced to rely on simulations to critically evaluate the theories. The recent PREDICT and GRIP field experiments have provided a new opportunity to examine these theories using unusually dense observations. The present study aims at using this new data in conjunction with data from previous field experiments, such as NAMMA, GATE, and TOGA COARE, to evaluate three existing theories: top-down vortex merger (Ritchie and Holland, 1997; Simpson et al., 1997), top-down shower-head (Emanuel, 1993; Bister and Emanuel, 1997), and bottom-up vortex merger (Montgomery and Enagonio, 1998; Enagonio and Montgomery, 2001). Additionally, these observations are used to briefly examine the newer marsupial framework for tropical cyclogenesis in African easterly waves (Dunkerton et al. 2009). The processes associated with each of these theories create unique signatures in wind, vorticity, potential temperature, and humidity fields. Timelines of these fields, created from composited mean dropsonde soundings, are used to determine the system-wide evolution. Further, the temporal evolution of sub-system processes, which are minimized or removed as a result of the compositing process, are identified in isobaric surface plot series. While previous studies have shown that no theory completely explains tropical cyclogenesis, it is hoped that a thorough analysis of these data sets will highlight both consistencies and inconsistencies between theory and observation.

  18. Uncertainties in Eddy Covariance fluxes due to post-field data processing: a multi-site, full factorial analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbatini, S.; Fratini, G.; Arriga, N.; Papale, D.

    2012-04-01

    Eddy Covariance (EC) is the only technologically available direct method to measure carbon and energy fluxes between ecosystems and atmosphere. However, uncertainties related to this method have not been exhaustively assessed yet, including those deriving from post-field data processing. The latter arise because there is no exact processing sequence established for any given situation, and the sequence itself is long and complex, with many processing steps and options available. However, the consistency and inter-comparability of flux estimates may be largely affected by the adoption of different processing sequences. The goal of our work is to quantify the uncertainty introduced in each processing step by the fact that different options are available, and to study how the overall uncertainty propagates throughout the processing sequence. We propose an easy-to-use methodology to assign a confidence level to the calculated fluxes of energy and mass, based on the adopted processing sequence, and on available information such as the EC system type (e.g. open vs. closed path), the climate and the ecosystem type. The proposed methodology synthesizes the results of a massive full-factorial experiment. We use one year of raw data from 15 European flux stations and process them so as to cover all possible combinations of the available options across a selection of the most relevant processing steps. The 15 sites have been selected to be representative of different ecosystems (forests, croplands and grasslands), climates (mediterranean, nordic, arid and humid) and instrumental setup (e.g. open vs. closed path). The software used for this analysis is EddyPro™ 3.0 (www.licor.com/eddypro). The critical processing steps, selected on the basis of the different options commonly used in the FLUXNET community, are: angle of attack correction; coordinate rotation; trend removal; time lag compensation; low- and high- frequency spectral correction; correction for air density

  19. Nonprofits and Evaluation: Empirical Evidence from the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carman, Joanne G.; Fredericks, Kimberly A.

    2008-01-01

    The authors explore what evaluation looks like, in practice, among today's nonprofit organizations on the basis of their survey results. The types of evaluation activities nonprofit organizations are engaging in on a regular basis, as well as the types of data they are collecting and how they are using these data, are described. How nonprofits…

  20. Field evaluation of hazardous waste site bioassessment protocols. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.M.; Cline, J.F.; Gano, K.A.; McShane, M.C.; Rogers, J.E.; Rogers, L.E.; Simpson, J.C.; Skalski, J.R.

    1984-04-01

    The overall goal of the plan was to demonstrate that honeybees could be used in detecting likely areas of chemical pollution, to demonstrate the usefulness of microbial and plant phytoassays, and to demonstrate a relationship between laboratory derived phytotoxicity results and field observations of plant community structure and diversity. Field studies were conducted through a cooperative arrangement with the US Army arsenal in Commerce City, Colorado.

  1. Evaluation of the denitrification rate of terraced paddy fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onishi, Takeo; Nakamura, Kimihito; Horino, Haruhiko; Adachi, Toru; Mitsuno, Toru

    2012-05-01

    SummaryRice is one of the most important staple foods in the world. Lowland paddy fields are well known for functioning as denitrification areas, but few studies have been conducted of paddy fields situated on hill slopes (terraced paddy fields). These terraced paddy fields have a characteristic artificial stepped shape, and this unique shape and periodic ponding from rice production may configure unique hydrological properties that might be different from lowland paddy fields. The shape and hydrological properties may also affect transport of nutrients such as nitrogen. This study is particularly focused on the denitrification rate in terraced paddy fields. To understand the hydrological properties of terraced paddy fields, a detailed water budget including the subsurface flow components was calculated. Combining the water budget components and chemical measurements of surface and subsurface water, a nitrogen budget was calculated. The results showed that about 10% of the total nitrogen input, mainly from fertilizers, was lost, suggesting the occurrence of denitrification in the area. The average denitrification rate of the study site was estimated at about 0.53-0.67 g N m-2 year-1. Spatial variations in the measured groundwater nitrate concentration suggest that denitrification is important in both the plough layer and the sloping area. The denitrification rate in the sloping area was estimated at 0.67-0.78 g N m-2 year-1, which is slightly higher than the estimates of denitrification rate in paddy lots, i.e., 0.56-0.61 g N m-2 year-1. The result indicates the importance of sloping areas for denitrification in terraced paddy fields.

  2. Evaluation of the relative rates of bone mineral content loss in postmenopause due to both estrogen deficiency and ageing.

    PubMed

    Gnudi, S; Mongiorgi, R; Figus, E; Bertocchi, G

    1990-12-01

    To evaluate the relative rates of bone mineral content loss in postmenopause due to both estrogen deficiency and ageing, three groups of women were studied by computerized bone densitometry at the radius mid-point and at the distal point, modified according to the Abwrey technique. All women were in apparent good health and never had estrogen therapy. In the first group there were 64 women aged between 30 and 50 who were ovariectomized between 25 and 35 years of age. The second group was made up of 309 women between 50 and 55 years. In the third group there were 136 women aged 30-50 with normal ovaric function. The ordinary functions of linear polynomial regression were used to describe the variations in density with age. The percentage of postmenopausal bone loss was determined by calculating the BMC value at the start of the menopause and again twenty years later, according to the linear regression equation of postmenopausal period of each group of women in the study. The women who had natural menopause showed an average bone loss per year of 1.63% at the mid radius and 1.0% at the distal point. The ovariectomized women had an average loss of 0.85% at the mid point and 0.66% at the distal point. No significant decrease of bone mass was found before menopause. From a comparison between the two groups of women with analogous periods of menopause, it comes out that, during the first 20 years of natural menopause, estrogen deficiency is responsible for 52.5%-66.4% of the bone mineral loss, the remaining amount being attributable to other causes, connected with ageing. Estrogen deficiency is therefore, the principal factor causing bone mineral loss in natural menopause. PMID:2100526

  3. Evaluation of the effectiveness and safety of glucocorticoids intravitreal implant therapy in macular edema due to retinal vein occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Michalska-Małecka, Katarzyna; Gaborek, Aneta; Nowak, Mariusz; Halat, Tomasz; Pawłowska, Mariola; Śpiewak, Dorota

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of intravitreal dexamethasone implant (Ozurdex) on macular morphology and functions in eyes with macular edema (ME) secondary to retinal vein occlusion. Efficacy outcomes of the treatment were best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and central retinal thickness (CRT). Safety outcomes were intraocular pressure and cornea endothelial cell density. The study was conducted by the prospective analysis on 36 patients (17 women and 19 men) aged 28–77 years (the average age was 58±15 years) treated with the injection of dexamethasone implant because of the persistent ME at the Department of Ophthalmology and Ophthalmology Outpatient Clinic of the University Centre of Ophthalmology and Oncology in Katowice. The studied group included 16 patients with central retinal vein occlusion (16 eyes), and 20 patients with branch retinal vein occlusion (20 eyes). We found a significant increase of BCVA after first, second, and third month of treatment. Six months after the treatment, BCVA decreased, although not significantly compared with the value obtained in the third month. Two months after the intravitreal implantation of dexamethasone delivery system, CRT was 338±163 μm and was significantly lower compared with pretreatment value. Between third and sixth month after the treatment, we found insignificant increase of CRT compared with thickness observed in second month. Two months after the treatment, we found an increase in intraocular pressure in 36% of cases and a further decrease during the final visit 6 months after the treatment. During the treatment, there were no significant differences in endothelial cell density in branch retinal vein occlusion and central retinal vein occlusion. We found the intravitreal dexamethasone implant to be safe, well tolerated, and likely to lead to fast morphological and functional improvement of the macula and visual rehabilitation in patients with ME due to retinal vein occlusion. PMID

  4. Investigation of MR signal modulation due to magnetic fields from neuronal currents in the adult human optic nerve and visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Chow, Li Sze; Cook, Greg G; Whitby, Elspeth; Paley, Martyn N J

    2006-07-01

    Neuronal currents produce weak transient magnetic fields, and the hypothesis being investigated here is that the components of these parallel to the B0 field can potentially modulate the MR signal, thus providing a means of direct detection of nerve impulses. A theory for the phase and amplitude changes of the MR signal over time due to an external magnetic field has been developed to predict this modulation. Experimentally, a fast gradient-echo EPI sequence (TR = 158 ms, TE = 32.4 ms) was employed in an attempt to directly detect these neuronal currents in the adult human optic nerve and visual cortex using a 280-mm quadrature head coil at 1.5 T. A symmetrical intravoxel field distribution, which can be plausibly hypothesized for the axonal fields in the optic nerve and visual cortex, would result in phase cancellation within a voxel, and hence, only amplitude changes would be expected. On the other hand, an asymmetrical intravoxel field distribution would produce both phase and amplitude changes. The in vivo magnitude image data sets show a significant nerve firing detection rate of 56%, with zero detection using the phase image data sets. The percentage magnitude signal changes relative to the fully relaxed equilibrium signal fall within a predicted RMS field range of 1.2-2.1 nT in the optic nerve and 0.4-0.6 nT in the visual cortex, according to the hypothesis that the axonal fields create a symmetrical Lorentzian field distribution within the voxel. PMID:16824962

  5. A method for evaluating personal dosemeters in workplace with neutron fields.

    PubMed

    de Freitas Nascimento, Luana; Cauwels, Vanessa; Vanhavere, Filip

    2012-04-01

    Passive detectors, as albedo or track-etch, still dominate the field of neutron personal dosimetry, mainly due to their low-cost, high-reliability and elevated throughput. However, the recent appearance in the market of electronic personal dosemeters for neutrons presents a new option for personal dosimetry. In addition to passive detectors, electronic personal dosemeters necessitate correction factors, concerning their energy and angular response dependencies. This paper reports on the results of a method to evaluate personal dosemeters for workplace where neutrons are present. The approach here uses few instruments and does not necessitate a large mathematical workload. Qualitative information on the neutron energy spectrum is acquired using a simple spectrometer (Nprobe), reference values for H*(10) are derived from measurements with ambient detectors (Studsvik, Berthold and Harwell) and angular information is measured using personal dosemeters (electronic and bubbles dosemeters) disposed in different orientations on a slab phantom. PMID:21565843

  6. Changes in switching fields of CoCrPt-SiO2 perpendicular recording media due to Ru intermediate layer under low and high gas pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Weixing; Murakami, Yasukazu; Shindo, Daisuke; Takahashi, Migaku

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that the deposition of an intermediate Ru layer under high Ar pressure during the fabrication of CoCrPt-SiO2 perpendicular recording media is effective in improving the magnetic properties of the upper CoCrPt-SiO2 layer. The change in the switching fields of the CoCrPt-SiO2 recording layer resulting from the presence of the high-pressure Ru layer is investigated through experiments and computer simulation. The monotonous increase in the magnetic anisotropy Ku and the decrease in the intergranular exchange coupling of the CoCrPt grains due to the presence of the high-pressure Ru layer result in a slight increase in the nucleation field, a significant increase in the coercivity and the saturation field, and a decrease in the slope of the hysteresis loop.

  7. FIELD EVALUATION OF DNAPL EXTRACTION TECHNOLOGIES: PROJECT OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Five DNAPL remediation technologies were evaluated at the Dover National Test Site, Dover AFB, Delaware. The technologies were cosolvent solubilization, cosolvent mobilization, surfactant solubilization, complex sugar flushing and air sparging/soil vapor extraction. The effectiv...

  8. Field evaluation of gelled acid for carbonate formations

    SciTech Connect

    Church, D.C.; Quisenberry, J.L.; Fox, K.B.

    1981-12-01

    A new gelled acid was evaluated in the west Texas, southeast New Mexico, and Oklahoma areas. The purpose of this evaluation was to determine how successful a gelled acid, prepared from xanthan polymer, would be in several carbonate formations. Several types of acidizing techniques were employed. These treatments vary from one to nine stages, with and without diverting agents. More than 20 treatments are summarized. Production figures for the wells treated are discussed, as well as pertinent related information. 5 refs.

  9. Mars Pathfinder Near-Field Rock Distribution Re-Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haldemann, A. F. C.; Golombek, M. P.

    2003-01-01

    We have completed analysis of a new near-field rock count at the Mars Pathfinder landing site and determined that the previously published rock count suggesting 16% cumulative fractional area (CFA) covered by rocks is incorrect. The earlier value is not so much wrong (our new CFA is 20%), as right for the wrong reason: both the old and the new CFA's are consistent with remote sensing data, however the earlier determination incorrectly calculated rock coverage using apparent width rather than average diameter. Here we present details of the new rock database and the new statistics, as well as the importance of using rock average diameter for rock population statistics. The changes to the near-field data do not affect the far-field rock statistics.

  10. Engineers evaluate submersible pumps in North Sea field

    SciTech Connect

    Way, A.R.; Hewett, M.A.

    1982-07-01

    Experimentation with several different electric submersible pump designs and installations in the UK's Montrose field, whose oil production has been hindered by increasing water cuts and highly deviated wells turning up marginal amounts of sand is described. Gas lift is a possible alternative to the pumps since there is platform space for facilities to be installed, and sufficient gas production during the major part of the field life. Submersible pumps as artificial lifts require a continuing operating cost to pull and regularly replace failed units.

  11. FIELD EVALUATION OF EVAPO-TRANSPIRATION (ET) CAPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field study was conducted to assess the ability of landfill covers to control percolation into the waste. Performance of one conventional cover was compared to that of two evapotranspiration (ET) tree covers, using large (7 x 14 m) lined lysimeters at the Leon County Solid W...

  12. Developing Mathematical Processes (DMP). Field Test Evaluation, 1972-1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schall, William E.; And Others

    The field test of the Developing Mathematical Processes (DMP) program was conducted jointly by the Falconer Central School, St. Mary's Elementary School in Dunkirk, New York, and the Teacher Education Research Center at the State University College in Fredonia, New York. DMP is a research-based, innovative, process-oriented elementary mathematics…

  13. Developing Mathematical Processes (DMP). Field Test Evaluation, 1973-1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schall, William; And Others

    The Developing Mathematical Processes (DMP) program was field-tested in the kindergarten and first three grades of one parochial and five public schools. DMP is an activity-based program developed around a comprehensive list of behavioral objectives. The program is concerned with the development of intuitive geometric concepts as well as…

  14. BIOREMEDIATION FIELD EVALUATION - HILL AIR FORCE BASE, UTAH

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1990, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established the Bioremediation Field Initiative as part of its overall strategy to increase the use of bioremediation to treat hazardous wastes at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liabil- ity Act (C...

  15. Long term field evaluation reveals HLB resistance in Citrus relatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus huanglongbing (HLB) is a destructive disease with no known cure. To identify sources of HLB resistance in the subfamily Aurantioideae to which citrus belongs, we conducted a six-year field trial under natural disease challenge conditions in an HLB endemic region. The study included 65 Citrus ...

  16. FIELD ANALYTICAL SCREENING PROGRAM: PCP METHOD - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Field Analytical Screening Program (FASP) pentachlorophenol (PCP) method uses a gas chromatograph (GC) equipped with a megabore capillary column and flame ionization detector (FID) and electron capture detector (ECD) to identify and quantify PCP. The FASP PCP method is design...

  17. Evaluation Report: Early Childhood Education Program, 1969 Field Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appalachia Educational Lab., Charleston, WV.

    Reported are findings from the first year's field test of the home-oriented Appalachia Educational Laboratory (AEL) Early Childhood Education Program for 3-, 4-, and 5-year-olds. The program consists of a 30-minute daily television lesson, a weekly home visit by a paraprofessional, and group instruction once a week in a mobile classroom. The…

  18. Field scale evaluation of spray drift reduction technologies from ground and aerial application systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this work is to evaluate a proposed Test Plan for the validation testing of pesticide spray drift reduction technologies for row and field crops, focusing on the testing of ground and aerial application systems under full-scale field evaluations. The measure of performance for a gi...

  19. Evaluation of the Field Test of Project Information Packages: Volume III--Resource Cost Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Salam, Nabeel; And Others

    The third of three volumes evaluating the first year field test of the Project Information Packages (PIPs) provides a cost analysis study as a key element in the total evaluation. The resource approach to cost analysis is explained and the specific resource methodology used in the main cost analysis of the 19 PIP field-test projects detailed. The…

  20. BIOREMEDIATION FIELD EVALUATION: EIELSON AIR FORCE BASE, ALASKA (EPA/540/R-95/533)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This publication, one of a series presenting the findings of the Bioremediation Field Initiatives bioremediation field evaluations, provides a detailed summary of the evaluation conducted at the Eielson Air Force Base (AFB) Superfund site in Fairbanks, Alaska. At this site, the ...

  1. A Comment on "Evaluation Field Building in South Asia: Reflections, Anecdotes, and Questions"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, A. K. Shiva

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the author's comment on "Evaluation Field Building in South Asia: Reflections, Anecdotes, and Questions" by Katherine Hay. Hay raises a number of extremely relevant issues relating to evaluation field building in South Asia. In this paper, the author aims to underscore the importance of three priorities for initiating public…

  2. Evaluation of Specific Absorption Rate as a Dosimetric Quantity for Electromagnetic Fields Bioeffects

    PubMed Central

    Panagopoulos, Dimitris J.; Johansson, Olle; Carlo, George L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate SAR as a dosimetric quantity for EMF bioeffects, and identify ways for increasing the precision in EMF dosimetry and bioactivity assessment. Methods We discuss the interaction of man-made electromagnetic waves with biological matter and calculate the energy transferred to a single free ion within a cell. We analyze the physics and biology of SAR and evaluate the methods of its estimation. We discuss the experimentally observed non-linearity between electromagnetic exposure and biological effect. Results We find that: a) The energy absorbed by living matter during exposure to environmentally accounted EMFs is normally well below the thermal level. b) All existing methods for SAR estimation, especially those based upon tissue conductivity and internal electric field, have serious deficiencies. c) The only method to estimate SAR without large error is by measuring temperature increases within biological tissue, which normally are negligible for environmental EMF intensities, and thus cannot be measured. Conclusions SAR actually refers to thermal effects, while the vast majority of the recorded biological effects from man-made non-ionizing environmental radiation are non-thermal. Even if SAR could be accurately estimated for a whole tissue, organ, or body, the biological/health effect is determined by tiny amounts of energy/power absorbed by specific biomolecules, which cannot be calculated. Moreover, it depends upon field parameters not taken into account in SAR calculation. Thus, SAR should not be used as the primary dosimetric quantity, but used only as a complementary measure, always reporting the estimating method and the corresponding error. Radiation/field intensity along with additional physical parameters (such as frequency, modulation etc) which can be directly and in any case more accurately measured on the surface of biological tissues, should constitute the primary measure for EMF exposures, in spite of similar uncertainty to predict

  3. An Internal Evaluation of a Field-Based Training Component for School Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Licata, Joseph W.

    Project ROME-FOCUS (Field-Oriented Competency Utilization System), a competency-based, field-oriented, training program for school administrators was field tested at Valdosta State College, Valdosta, Georgia, January - May, 1976. An internal evaluation conducted by the instructional staff suggested that principals preferred ROME-FOCUS training to…

  4. ESTIMATING SAMPLE REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD EVALUATIONS OF PESTICIDE LEACHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method is presented for estimating the number of samples needed to evaluate pesticide leaching threats to ground water at a desired level of precision. Sample size projections are based on desired precision (exhibited as relative tolerable error), level of confidence (90 or 95%...

  5. Field Evaluation of a Near Zero Energy Home in Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hendron, R.; Hancock, E.; Barker, G.; Reeves, P.

    2008-08-01

    The authors evaluated a zero energy home built by Ideal Homes in Edmond, Oklahoma, that included an extensive package of energy-efficient technologies and a photovoltaic array for site electricity generation. The home was part of a Building America research project in partnership with the Building Science Consortium to exhibit high efficiency technologies while keeping costs within the reach of average home buyers.

  6. Field Test Evaluation of "Family Connections," Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childers, Robert D.; Penn, Patricia

    This document evaluates a series of weekly activity guides developed for families of at-risk preschool children. The purpose of the guides was to increase communication between teachers and families, the amount of time families spent with their children on developmentally appropriate learning activities, and parental understanding of…

  7. Comparison and Evaluation of Laboratory and Field Measured Bioaccumulation Endpoints

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of bioaccumulation endpoints on a fugacity basis allows provides a framework to assess the biomagnification potential of a chemical and assess data deficiencies, i.e., uncertainties and lack of data. In addition, it is suggested that additional guidance is needed in o...

  8. FIELD EVALUATION OF A UTILITY DRY SCRUBBING SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of the first independent evaluation of a full-scale utility spray-dryer/baghouse dry flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. The system treats flue gas from a nominal 100 MW of coal-fired power generation. The test program, conducted during July-October 19...

  9. COMPREHENSIVE EVALUATION OF A FIELD TEST KIT FOR LEAD

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Hach Lead-Trak(R) test kit for lead in water was tested in a laboratory evaluation. onsidered were: perator bias, precision, accuracy, linear calibration range, and potential drinking water interferences. nterferences tested were realistic levels off: a, Mg, Ni, Sb, Mn, Cd, C...

  10. Field Evaluation of an Avian Risk Assessment Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    We conducted two laboratory subacute dietary toxicity tests and one outdoor subacute dietary toxicity test to determine the effectiveness of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's deterministic risk assessment model for evaluating the potential of adverse effects to birds in ...

  11. Target Group Analysis: Aids for Evaluation. Field Paper 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giammatteo, Michael C.

    To develop a systematic evaluation system, a planning team should initially identify the needs of target groups. Needs which can be met are defined as behavioral objectives. Once the behavioral objectives and those specific elements essential to achieving them (enabling objectives) are defined and classified, performance measures can be…

  12. Evaluation of downscaled daily precipitation for FIELD scale hydrologic applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrologic and agronomic applications often require a reliable representation of precipitation sequence as well as physical consistency of precipitation series for climate change impact assessment. Herein, we evaluate the daily sequence of the state –of –art downscaled Bias Corrected Constructed Ana...

  13. All-optical control in metal nanocomposites due to a reversible transition between local field enhancement and local field depression upon irradiation by ultrashort control-pulses of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Song-Jin; Ho, Gum-Song

    2014-04-01

    We theoretically study the non-perturbative effective nonlinear responses of metal nanocomposites based on the intrinsic third-order nonlinear response of metal nanoparticles. The large intrinsic third-order nonlinear susceptibility of metal nanoparticles and irradiation by an ultrashort control pulse of light with a sufficiently high peak intensity and moderate fluence can induce a local field depression and saturated plasmon bleaching in the metal nanoparticles. If the control pulse is on, the metal nanocomposites behave like a dielectric due to the local field depression, while if the control pulse is off, they behave like a metal, showing a high absorption due to the local field enhancement at the plasmon resonance. This phenomenon can be applied to the ultrafast and remote control of light in metal nanocomposites.

  14. Evaluation in context: ATC automation in the field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwood, Kelly; Sanford, Beverly

    1994-01-01

    The process for incorporating advanced technologies into complex aviation systems is as important as the final product itself. This paper described a process that is currently being applied to the development and assessment of an advanced ATC automation system, CTAS. The key element of the process is field exposure early in the system development cycle. The process deviates from current established practices of system development -- where field testing is an implementation endpoint -- and has been deemed necessary by the FAA for streamlining development and bringing system functions to a level of stability and usefulness. Methods and approaches for field assessment are borrowed from human factors engineering, cognitive engineering, and usability engineering and are tailored for the constraints of an operational ATC environment. To date, the focus has been on the qualitative assessment of the match between TMA capabilities and the context for their use. Capturing the users' experience with the automation tool and understanding tool use in the context of the operational environment is important, not only for developing a tool that is an effective problem-solving instrument but also for defining meaningful operational requirements. Such requirements form the basis for certifying the safety and efficiency of the system. CTAS is the first U.S. advanced ATC automation system of its scope and complexity to undergo this field development and assessment process. With the rapid advances in aviation technologies and our limited understanding of their impact on system performance, it is time we opened our eyes to new possibilities for developing, validating, and ultimately certifying complex aviation systems.

  15. Magnetic field exposure and arrythmic risk: evaluation in railway drivers.

    PubMed

    Santangelo, L; Di Grazia, M; Liotti, F; De Maria, E; Calabró, R; Sannolo, N

    2005-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that professional exposure to Extremely Low Frequency-Electro Magnetic Field (ELF-EMF) can increase the risk of sudden cardiac death. Aim of our work was to find predictive parameters of arrhythmic risk in a population of 28 railways drivers exposed to ELF-EMF. Our findings were that the exposure did not reduce HRV and did not increase the risk of arrhythmias. PMID:15750820

  16. BOBCAT Personal Radiation Detector Field Test and Evaluation Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Hodge

    2008-03-01

    Following the success of the Anole test of portable detection system, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Domestic Nuclear Detection Office organized a test and evaluation campaign for personal radiation detectors (PRDs), also known as “Pagers.” This test, “Bobcat,” was conducted from July 17 to August 8, 2006, at the Nevada Test Site. The Bobcat test was designed to evaluate the performance of PRDs under various operational scenarios, such as pedestrian surveying, mobile surveying, cargo container screening, and pedestrian chokepoint monitoring. Under these testing scenarios, many operational characteristics of the PRDs, such as gamma and neutron sensitivities, positive detection and false alarm rates, response delay times, minimum detectable activities, and source localization errors, were analyzed. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies used to test this equipment for the DHS.

  17. Field Evaluation of Anti-Biofouling Compounds on Optical Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLean, Scott; Schofield, Bryan; Zibordi, Giuseppe; Lewis, Marlon; Hooker, Stanford; Weidemann, Alan

    1997-01-01

    Biofouling has been a serious question in the stability of optical measurements in the ocean, particularly in moored and drifting buoy applications. Many investigators coat optical surfaces with various compounds to reduce the amount of fouling; to our knowledge, however, there are no objective, in-situ comparative testing of these compounds to evaluate their effectiveness with respect to optical stability relative to untreated controls. We have tested a wide range of compounds at in-situ locations in Halifax Harbour and in the Adriatic Sea on passive optical sensors. Compounds tested include a variety of TBT formulations, antifungal agents, and low-friction silicone-based compounds; time-scales of up to four months were evaluated. The results of these experiments are discussed.

  18. Personal Radiation Detector Field Test and Evaluation Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Chris A. Hodge, Ding Yuan, Raymond P. Keegan, Michael A. Krstich

    2007-07-09

    Following the success of the Anole test of portable detection system, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Domestic Nuclear Detection Office organized a test and evaluation campaign for personal radiation detectors (PRDs), also known as 'Pagers'. This test, 'Bobcat', was conducted from July 17 to August 8, 2006, at the Nevada Test Site. The Bobcat test was designed to evaluate the performance of PRDs under various operational scenarios, such as pedestrian surveying, mobile surveying, cargo container screening, and pedestrian chokepoint monitoring. Under these testing scenarios, many operational characteristics of the PRDs, such as gamma and neutron sensitivities, positive detection and false alarm rates, response delay times, minimum detectable activities, and source localization errors, were analyzed. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies used to test this equipment for the DHS.

  19. Field evaluation of gelled acid for carbonate formations

    SciTech Connect

    Church, D.C.; Quisenberry, J.L.; Fox, K.B.

    1981-01-01

    A new gelled acid was evaluated in W. Texas, S.E. New Mexico, and Oklahoma. The evaluation determined how successful a gelled acid, prepared from xanthan polymer, would be in the following formations: Ellenburger, Blinebry, San Andres, Clearfork, Canyon Lime, Strawn Lime, Grayburg, Devonian, Drinkard Dolomite, Viola and Chester. Treatment depths vary from 4000 to 22,000 ft. Treatment temperatures vary from 70 to 310 F. Treatments were performed on both oil and gas wells. The age of the wells stimulated varies from new to 30 yr old. The concentration of gelled acid remained constant at 15% HCl. The concentration of gelling agent remained constant at 60 lb/1000 gal. The size of the treatments varied from 5000 to 80,000 gal of gelled acid. More than 20 treatments are summarized. Production figures for the well treated are summarized. Production figures for the wells treated are discussed, as well as pertinent related information.

  20. Forest health monitoring: 1991 Georgia indicator evaluation and field study

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, S.A.; Baldwin, M.; Bechtold, W.A.; Cassell, D.L.; Cline, S.

    1994-03-01

    The pilot study was designed to test methods for quantifying vegetation structure, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), dendrochronology, and selected root fungi. Testing the methods included comparing different data collection procedures for individual indicators, estimating sampling efficiency (both of the sampling design and the sampling unit design), and evaluating spatial variability. In addition, the accuracy and precision of tree height instruments were determined as part of the pilot study.

  1. Field evaluation of personal sampling methods for multiple bioaerosols.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chi-Hsun; Chen, Bean T; Han, Bor-Cheng; Liu, Andrew Chi-Yeu; Hung, Po-Chen; Chen, Chih-Yong; Chao, Hsing Jasmine

    2015-01-01

    Ambient bioaerosols are ubiquitous in the daily environment and can affect health in various ways. However, few studies have been conducted to comprehensively evaluate personal bioaerosol exposure in occupational and indoor environments because of the complex composition of bioaerosols and the lack of standardized sampling/analysis methods. We conducted a study to determine the most efficient collection/analysis method for the personal exposure assessment of multiple bioaerosols. The sampling efficiencies of three filters and four samplers were compared. According to our results, polycarbonate (PC) filters had the highest relative efficiency, particularly for bacteria. Side-by-side sampling was conducted to evaluate the three filter samplers (with PC filters) and the NIOSH Personal Bioaerosol Cyclone Sampler. According to the results, the Button Aerosol Sampler and the IOM Inhalable Dust Sampler had the highest relative efficiencies for fungi and bacteria, followed by the NIOSH sampler. Personal sampling was performed in a pig farm to assess occupational bioaerosol exposure and to evaluate the sampling/analysis methods. The Button and IOM samplers yielded a similar performance for personal bioaerosol sampling at the pig farm. However, the Button sampler is more likely to be clogged at high airborne dust concentrations because of its higher flow rate (4 L/min). Therefore, the IOM sampler is a more appropriate choice for performing personal sampling in environments with high dust levels. In summary, the Button and IOM samplers with PC filters are efficient sampling/analysis methods for the personal exposure assessment of multiple bioaerosols. PMID:25799419

  2. Field Evaluation of Personal Sampling Methods for Multiple Bioaerosols

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chi-Hsun; Chen, Bean T.; Han, Bor-Cheng; Liu, Andrew Chi-Yeu; Hung, Po-Chen; Chen, Chih-Yong; Chao, Hsing Jasmine

    2015-01-01

    Ambient bioaerosols are ubiquitous in the daily environment and can affect health in various ways. However, few studies have been conducted to comprehensively evaluate personal bioaerosol exposure in occupational and indoor environments because of the complex composition of bioaerosols and the lack of standardized sampling/analysis methods. We conducted a study to determine the most efficient collection/analysis method for the personal exposure assessment of multiple bioaerosols. The sampling efficiencies of three filters and four samplers were compared. According to our results, polycarbonate (PC) filters had the highest relative efficiency, particularly for bacteria. Side-by-side sampling was conducted to evaluate the three filter samplers (with PC filters) and the NIOSH Personal Bioaerosol Cyclone Sampler. According to the results, the Button Aerosol Sampler and the IOM Inhalable Dust Sampler had the highest relative efficiencies for fungi and bacteria, followed by the NIOSH sampler. Personal sampling was performed in a pig farm to assess occupational bioaerosol exposure and to evaluate the sampling/analysis methods. The Button and IOM samplers yielded a similar performance for personal bioaerosol sampling at the pig farm. However, the Button sampler is more likely to be clogged at high airborne dust concentrations because of its higher flow rate (4 L/min). Therefore, the IOM sampler is a more appropriate choice for performing personal sampling in environments with high dust levels. In summary, the Button and IOM samplers with PC filters are efficient sampling/analysis methods for the personal exposure assessment of multiple bioaerosols. PMID:25799419

  3. Field evaluation of Bacillus thuringiensis H-14 against Aedes mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y W; Zairi, J

    2006-06-01

    Studies were carried out on the residual efficacy of Bacillus thuringiensis H-14 (water dispersible granule, VectoBac ABG 6511) as direct application in the control of Aedes larvae in the field. Field Aedes sp populations in the earthen and glass jars were predetermined before initiation of the trial. On confirmation of the presence of Aedes species in the designated area, Sungai Nibong Kecil, Penang Island, Malaysia, Bti was introduced in the 55L earthen and 3L glass jars). Two test designs were carried out. The first design had treated water replenished daily with 6L of seasoned water and the second design is without the replenishment of water but evaporated water was replenished. Bti was effective in the field for at least 35 days with more than 80% reduction in the Aedes larvae in the treated containers. For earthen jars with daily replenishment of water, 100% reduction was recorded for the first 3 days, while more than 80% reduction was recorded up to day 40. At day 60, Bti still provided an efficacy of 54.32 +/- 4.61 (%) of reduction. Whilst for earthen jars without daily replenishment of water, 100% reduction was recorded for the first 5 days, while more than 80% of reduction was recorded up to day 40. For the glass jars studied, similar efficacy was observed. In jars with daily replenishment of water a better larval control was observed. Percentage of reduction from day 50 to 60 for replenishment of water was between 50 to 70% compared to without replenishment of water with less than 40%. PMID:17041550

  4. Evaluation of Spray Drift from Tea Field during Pesticides Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumikawa, Osamu; Miyama, Daisuke; Araki, Takuya

    Spray drift from tea field was measured by using water-sensitive papers(WSP). 1)Automated thresholding by "ImageJ", which is an open architecture image analysis program, was able to apply for extracting deposits on WSP. In order to analyze spot size of deposits and percent area coverage on WSP, the command of analyze particle was used. However, the stain area obtained by automated thresholding was larger than one by optimal threshold. The correction factor was 0.7411. 2)Although the spraying method and the nozzle type were different, 99% of the number of droplets was less than 200μm in the diameter and 80% was less than 125μm. 3)Among all nozzle treatments by manual spraying and by a riding type boom sprayer,bigger droplet size nozzles decreased drift, but there was no difference in droplet density on tea leaves. 4)Hydraulic application by a riding type boom sprayer was less spray drift than manual spraying, because a riding type boom sprayer can keep the distance from tea hedge canopy to a boom nozzle shorter than manual spraying. 5)Although the anti-drift cover for a riding type boom sprayer reduced drift when smallerdroplet size nozzle was used, bigger droplet size nozzle was recommended to use for avoiding drift risk. 6)Since the distance from tea hedge canopy to a boom nozzle can be short, the drift value (total droplet volume par unit area / sprayed volume par unit area) obtained in tea field was only 1/10 of the data reported by drift assessment in vegetable field.

  5. Field evaluation of environmental sanitation measures against cholera*

    PubMed Central

    Azurin, J. C.; Alvero, M.

    1974-01-01

    Data obtained in a controlled field study over 5 years in 4 communities showed that the provision of sanitary facilities for human waste disposal can reduce the incidence of cholera by as much as 68%, while the provision of a safe water supply can decrease it by 73%. Where both toilets and water supplies are provided, the incidence can be reduced by as much as 76%. There was evidence that cholera infection gaining access to communities with these facilities tends to spread less and produce fewer secondary cases than in a community where such facilities are not provided. PMID:4549038

  6. Field evaluation of environmental sanitation measures against cholera.

    PubMed

    Azurin, J C; Alvero, M

    1974-01-01

    Data obtained in a controlled field study over 5 years in 4 communities showed that the provision of sanitary facilities for human waste disposal can reduce the incidence of cholera by as much as 68%, while the provision of a safe water supply can decrease it by 73%. Where both toilets and water supplies are provided, the incidence can be reduced by as much as 76%. There was evidence that cholera infection gaining access to communities with these facilities tends to spread less and produce fewer secondary cases than in a community where such facilities are not provided. PMID:4549038

  7. Cobra sealing system; From field evaluation to practical safeguards application

    SciTech Connect

    Vodrazka, P.; Cermak, L. )

    1991-01-01

    After a successful conclusion of the Cobra seal IAEA field trials, the Cobra Seal System was installed in two Canadian facilities. The seals permit on-site verification without needing to replace them in extreme weather conditions, thus allowing a substantial time reduction for inspectors as well as minimizing intrusiveness of these activities. The paper describes experiences with practical installations of almost sixty Cobra seals including the selection of environmental conduits and housing. Examples of the results of the first several inspections utilizing a new version of the Cobra seal verifier are also included. Possible future outdoor applications of Cobra seals are described and some suggested improvements are outlined.

  8. Strong deviations from Fowler-Nordheim behavior for field emission from individual SiC nanowires due to restricted bulk carrier generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choueib, M.; Ayari, A.; Vincent, P.; Bechelany, M.; Cornu, D.; Purcell, S. T.

    2009-02-01

    We report here field-emission (FE) studies of individual single-crystal SiC nanowires that showed several distinct I/V regimes including strong saturation resulting in highly nonlinear Fowler-Nordheim plots. The saturation is due to the formation of a depletion layer near the nanowire ends as predicted for FE from semiconductors and appears after in situ control of the surface cleanliness. This work opens the door to improving the uniformity, stability, and photon control of mass-produced planar nanowire FE cathodes and shows how FE can be used for transport measurements on individual semiconducting nanowires.

  9. Evaluation of nonuniform field exposures with coupling factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunohara, Tetsu; Hirata, Akimasa; Laakso, Ilkka; De Santis, Valerio; Onishi, Teruo

    2015-10-01

    In this study, the safety compliance for nonuniform field exposures is discussed using coupling factor concepts. The coupling factor, which is defined in the International Electrotechnical Commission 62311 standard, is extended to consider the effects of harmonics and also to apply to the specific absorption rate (for frequencies up to 30 MHz). The proposed compliance procedure is applied to and demonstrated for a prototype wireless power transfer (WPT) system with induction coupling operating at the fundamental frequency in 140 kHz band. First, measurements confirm that the perturbation of the external magnetic field strength and S11 parameter of a one-loop antenna by a human-equivalent phantom are sufficiently small, suggesting the applicability of the magneto-quasi-static approximation to frequencies up to 30 MHz. Then, the frequency characteristics of the coupling factor are derived for the WPT system. For the prototype system that is not optimized for commercial usage, the maximum allowable transmitting power is relaxed by a factor of 23 with the proposed procedure. The contribution of the harmonics decreased the allowable transmitting power by 39%, indicating their importance for safety compliance.

  10. Evaluation of nonuniform field exposures with coupling factors.

    PubMed

    Sunohara, Tetsu; Hirata, Akimasa; Laakso, Ilkka; De Santis, Valerio; Onishi, Teruo

    2015-10-21

    In this study, the safety compliance for nonuniform field exposures is discussed using coupling factor concepts. The coupling factor, which is defined in the International Electrotechnical Commission 62311 standard, is extended to consider the effects of harmonics and also to apply to the specific absorption rate (for frequencies up to 30 MHz). The proposed compliance procedure is applied to and demonstrated for a prototype wireless power transfer (WPT) system with induction coupling operating at the fundamental frequency in 140 kHz band. First, measurements confirm that the perturbation of the external magnetic field strength and S11 parameter of a one-loop antenna by a human-equivalent phantom are sufficiently small, suggesting the applicability of the magneto-quasi-static approximation to frequencies up to 30 MHz. Then, the frequency characteristics of the coupling factor are derived for the WPT system. For the prototype system that is not optimized for commercial usage, the maximum allowable transmitting power is relaxed by a factor of 23 with the proposed procedure. The contribution of the harmonics decreased the allowable transmitting power by 39%, indicating their importance for safety compliance. PMID:26439390

  11. Differences of the Plasma Drift and Upper Thermospheric Wind Behaviour in the Northern and Southern Polar Regions due to the Geomagnetic Field Asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foerster, M.; Cnossen, I.; Haaland, S.

    2013-12-01

    The non-dipolar portions of Earth's main magnetic field constitute substantial differences between the geomagnetic field configurations of both hemispheres. They cause in particular different magnetic field flux densities in the opposite polar regions and different offsets of the invariant poles with respect to the rotation axis of the Earth. The offset is presently considerable larger (factor ~2) in the Southern Hemisphere compared to the Northern, which has substantial implications for the coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere system under the influence of external drivers. Recent observations have shown that the ionospheric/thermospheric response to solar wind and IMF dependent processes in the magnetosphere can be very dissimilar in the Northern and Southern Hemisphere. We present statistical studies of both the high-latitude ionospheric convection and the upper thermospheric circulation patterns obtained from almost a decade of measurements starting in 2001 of the electron drift instrument (EDI) on board the Cluster satellites and an accelerometer on board the CHAMP spacecraft, respectively. Using the Coupled Magnetosphere-Ionosphere-Thermosphere (CMIT) model, on the other hand, we simulated a 20-day spring equinox interval of low solar activity with both symmetric dipole and realistic (IGRF) geomagnetic field configurations to prove the importance of the hemispheric differences for the plasma and neutral wind dynamics. The survey of both the numerical simulation and the statistical observation results show some prominent asymmetries between the two hemispheres, which are likely due to the different geographic-geomagnetic offset, or even due to different patterns of geomagnetic flux densities. Plasma drift differences can partly be attributed to differing ionospheric conductivities. The forthcoming Swarm satellite mission will provide valuable observations for further detailed analyses of the North-South asymmetries of plasma convection and neutral

  12. Joint use of laboratory bioassays and field-collected invertebrates to evaluate toxicity and contaminant bioaccumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Long, S.P.; Byron, E.R.; Ohlendorf, H.M.

    1995-12-31

    Soil toxicity tests using earthworms (Eisenia andrei) were conducted using soil samples collected as part of ecological risk assessments for several sites at two facilities in California. At some sites, earthworms or other terrestrial invertebrates were collected in the field for chemical analysis. Ecological concerns focused on exposures to soil invertebrates and their secondary consumers, such as birds and small mammals. The toxicity tests were used to assess potential exposures to a variety of site-specific contaminants including organochlorine pesticides, PCBs, PAHs, petroleum hydrocarbons, heavy metals, and other inorganic substances. Site soils were combined with clean control soils to produce toxicity test soil dilutions containing 100%, 75%, 50%, 25%, and 0% site soils. Earthworm mortality and other observations were made at day 0, 7, 14, 21 and 28. Toxicity test results were combined with soil chemical analytical results and physical characteristics to establish NOAELs and LOAELs. Bioaccumulation in the laboratory earthworms and field-collected invertebrates was evaluated by comparing whole-body contaminant to soil contaminant concentrations. Allometric equations and sublethal toxicity data were used to predict potential effects on birds and small mammals. Earthworm toxicity tests indicated a wide range of sensitivity to on-site contaminants and showed the importance of considering potential confounding influences due to soil parameters other than contaminant concentration.

  13. A Study toward the Evaluation of ALOS Images for LAI Estimation in Rice Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi Hashjin, Sh.; Darvishzadeh, R.; Khandan, R.

    2013-10-01

    For expanding and managing agricultural sources, satellite data have a key role in determining required information about different factors in plants Including Leaf Area Index (LAI).This paper has studied the potential of spectral indices in estimating rice canopy LAI in Amol city as one of the main sources of rice production in Iran. Due to its importance in provision of food and calorie of a major portion of population, rice product was chosen for study. A field campaign was conducted when rice was in the max growth stage (late of June). Also, two satellite images from ALOS-AVNIR-2 were used (simultaneous with conducted field works) to extract and determine vegetation indices. Then the Regression between measured data and vegetation indices, derived from combination of different bands, was evaluated and after that suitable vegetation indices were realized. Finally, statistics and calculations for introduction of a suitable model were presented. After examination of models, the results showed that RDVI and SAVI2, by determination coefficient and RMSE of 0.12-0.59 and 0.24-0.62, have more accuracy in LAI estimation. Results of present study demonstrated the potential of ALOS images, for LAI estimation and their significant role in monitoring and managing the rice plant.

  14. Inhibitor evaluations and correlation of laboratory and field data in CO{sub 2} environments

    SciTech Connect

    Abayarathna, D.; Naraghi, A.; Grahmann, N.; Buchholz, B.; Blumer, D.J.

    1999-11-01

    In oil and gas production environments, one of the techniques utilized for the corrosion control of carbon steel is the application of corrosion inhibitors. The corrosion inhibitors, which are formulated specifically for given field conditions, undergo rigorous qualification and performance evaluations at the laboratory before being submitted for a field application. At the field, the selected chemicals are evaluated in stages, at various production locations before being applied in the main production lines. The corrosion monitoring programs implemented in the production field provide not only the evaluations of chemicals in use but also the overall success of the corrosion control program. Successful corrosion control programs demand cost effective corrosion inhibitors with optimized performance. This paper describes the selection process of a performance optimized cost effective corrosion inhibitor. Various chemical evaluation techniques utilized in the laboratory and the field are discussed and the correlation of these data is presented.

  15. Preliminary field evaluation of high efficiency steel filters

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Larsen, G.; Lopez, R.

    1995-02-01

    We have conducted an evaluation of two high efficiency steel filters in the exhaust of an uranium oxide grit blaster at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge Tennessee. The filters were installed in a specially designed filter housing with a reverse air-pulse cleaning system for automatically cleaning the filters in-place. Previous tests conducted on the same filters and housing at LLNL under controlled conditions using Arizona road dust showed good cleanability with reverse air pulses. Two high efficiency steel filters, containing 64 pleated cartridge elements housed in the standard 2` x 2` x 1` HEPA frame, were evaluated in the filter test housing using a 1,000 cfm slip stream containing a high concentration of depleted uranium oxide dust. One filter had the pleated cartridges manufactured to our specifications by the Pall Corporation and the other by Memtec Corporation. Test results showed both filters had a rapid increase in pressure drop with time, and reverse air pulses could not decrease the pressure drop. We suspected moisture accumulation in the filters was the problem since there were heavy rains during the evaluations, and the pressure drop of the Memtec filter decreased dramatically after passing clean, dry air through the filter and after the filter sat idle for one week. Subsequent laboratory tests on a single filter cartridge confirmed that water accumulation in the filter was responsible for the increase in filter pressure drop and the inability to lower the pressure drop by reverse air pulses. No effort was made to identify the source of the water accumulation and correct the problem because the available funds were exhausted.

  16. Preliminary field evaluation of high efficiency steel filters

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Larsen, G.; Lopez, R.; Wilson, K.; Simon, K.; Frye, L.

    1994-11-01

    The authors have conducted an evaluation of two high efficiency steel filters in the exhaust of an uranium oxide grit blaster at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge Tennessee. The filters were installed in a specially designed filter housing with a reverse air-pulse cleaning system for automatically cleaning the filters in-place. Previous tests conducted on the same filters and housing at LLNL under controlled conditions using Arizona road dust showed good cleanability with reverse air pulses. Two high efficiency steel filters, containing 64 pleated cartridge elements housed in the standard 2{prime} x 2{prime} {times} l{prime} HEPA frame, were evaluated in the filter test housing using a 1,000 cfm slip stream containing a high concentration of depleted uranium oxide dust. One filter had the pleated cartridges manufactured to the authors specifications by the Pall Corporation and the other by Memtec Corporation. Test results showed both filters had a rapid increase in pressure drop with time, and reverse air pulses could not decrease the pressure drop. The authors suspected moisture accumulation in the filters was the problem since there were heavy rains during the evaluations, and the pressure drop of the Memtec filter decreased dramatically after passing clean, dry air through the filter and after the filter sat idle for one week. Subsequent laboratory tests on a single filter cartridge confirmed that water accumulation in the filter was responsible for the increase in filter pressure drop and the inability to lower the pressure drop by reverse air pulses. No effort was made to identify the source of the water accumulation and correct the problem because the available funds were exhausted.

  17. Field evaluation of hydrogen fluoride continuous monitoring systems

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, V.V.M.; Dunder, T.

    1997-12-31

    This paper presents the results of a comparative study of commercially available hydrogen fluoride (HF) continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMSs). The evaluation was conducted at a primary aluminum smelting plant. Three CEMSs-one infrared (IR) absorption analyzer and two ion mobility spectroscopy (IMS) analyzers-gathered data continuously over a 12-day time frame. Manual sampling trains were run concurrently with the CEMSs. All three monitoring systems provided time-averaged emissions estimates within 0.5 parts per million of each other. CEMS data were comparable to data gathered by manual sampling techniques.

  18. Evaluation of field development plans using 3-D reservoir modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Seifert, D.; Lewis, J.J.M.; Newbery, J.D.H.

    1997-08-01

    Three-dimensional reservoir modelling has become an accepted tool in reservoir description and is used for various purposes, such as reservoir performance prediction or integration and visualisation of data. In this case study, a small Northern North Sea turbiditic reservoir was to be developed with a line drive strategy utilising a series of horizontal producer and injector pairs, oriented north-south. This development plan was to be evaluated and the expected outcome of the wells was to be assessed and risked. Detailed analyses of core, well log and analogue data has led to the development of two geological {open_quotes}end member{close_quotes} scenarios. Both scenarios have been stochastically modelled using the Sequential Indicator Simulation method. The resulting equiprobable realisations have been subjected to detailed statistical well placement optimisation techniques. Based upon bivariate statistical evaluation of more than 1000 numerical well trajectories for each of the two scenarios, it was found that the wells inclinations and lengths had a great impact on the wells success, whereas the azimuth was found to have only a minor impact. After integration of the above results, the actual well paths were redesigned to meet external drilling constraints, resulting in substantial reductions in drilling time and costs.

  19. Demonstration and Field Evaluation of Streambank Stabilization with Submerged Vanes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitman, H.; Hoopes, J.; Poggi, D.; Fitzpatrick, F.; Walz, K.

    2001-01-01

    The effectiveness of submerged vanes for reducing bank erosion and improving aquatic habitat is being evaluated at a site on North Fish Creek, a Lake Superior tributary. Increased runoff from agricultural areas with clayey soils has increased flood magnitudes and the erosion potential/transport capacity of the stream. Most of the creek's sediment load originates from the erosion of 17 large bluffs. This creek contains important recreational fisheries that are potentially limited by the loss of aquatic habitat from deposition of sediment on spawning beds. Submerged vanes are a cost effective and environmentally less intrusive alternative to traditional structural stabilization measures. Submerged vanes protrude from a channel bed, are oriented at an angle to the local velocity, and are distributed along a portion of channel. They induce a transverse force and torque on the flow along with longitudinal vortexes that alter the cross sectional shape and alignment of the channel. Submerged vanes were installed at a bluff/bend site in summer and fall 2000. The number, size, and layout of the vanes were based upon the channel morphology under estimated bankfull conditions. The effectiveness of the vanes will be evaluated by comparing surveys of the bluff face, streamflow, and channel conditions for several years after installation of the submerged vanes with surveys before and immediately after their installation.

  20. Field Evaluation of Seepage Meters in the Coastal Marine Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cable, J. E.; Burnett, W. C.; Chanton, J. P.; Corbett, D. R.; Cable, P. H.

    1997-09-01

    The response of seepage meters was evaluated in a nearshore marine environment where water motion effects are more pronounced than in lake settings, where these meters have been used traditionally. Temporal and spatial variations of seepage, as well as potential artifacts, were evaluated using empty and 1000-ml pre-filled bag measurements. Time-series measurements confirmed earlier observations that anomalously high fluxes occur during the early stages (≤10 min) of collection. As deployment times increased (30-60 min), measured flow rates stabilized at a level thought to represent the actual seepage flux. Pre-filling the plastic measurement bags effectively alleviated this anomalous, short-term influx. Reliable seepage measurements required deployment times sufficient to allow a net volume of at least 150 ml into the collection bag. Control experiments, designed by placing seepage meters inside sand-filled plastic swimming pools, served as indicators of external effects on these measurements, i.e. they served as seepage meter blanks. When winds were under 15 knots, little evidence was found that water motion caused artifacts in the seepage measurements. Tidal cycle influences on seepage rates were negligible in the present study area, but long-term temporal variations (weeks to months) proved substantial. Observed long-term changes in groundwater flux into the Gulf of Mexico correlated with water table elevation at a nearby monitoring well.

  1. Subjective preference evaluation of sound fields by performing singers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noson, Dennis

    2003-08-01

    A model of the auditory process is proposed for performing singers, which incorporates the added signal from bone conduction, as well as the psychological distance for subjective preference of the performer from the acoustic sound field of the stage. The explanatory power of previous scientific studies of vocal stage acoustics has been limited by a lack of an underlying theory of performer preference. Ando's theory, using the autocorrelation function (ACF) for parametrizing temporal factors, was applied to interpretation of singer sound field preference determined by the pair comparison method. Melisma style singing (no lyrics) was shown to increase the preferred delay time of reflections from a mean of 14 ms with lyrics to 23 ms without (p<0.05). The extent of the shift in preferred time delay was shown to be directly related to minima of the effective duration of the running ACF, (τe)min, calculated from each singer's voice. Voice matching experiments for singers demonstrated a strong overestimate of the voice outside the head compared with the singer's own voice (22.4 dB overestimate, p<0.01). Individual singer melisma singing delay preferences were compared for ``ah'' versus ``hum'' syllables, and the increased delay preference (41 ms) was shown to be correlated with (τe)min (r2<0.68, p<0.01). When the proposed bone conduction model was applied, using the measured overestimate of sound level of the singer's own voice for each singer (9.9 dB mean overestimate difference between ``ah'' and ``hum,'' p<0.01), the relationship of singer preference to (τe)min was improved (r2=0.97, p<0.01). Thesis advisor: Yoichi Ando Copies of this thesis are available from the author by inquiry at BRC Acoustics, 1741 First Avenue South, Seattle, WA 98134 USA. E-mail address: dnoson@brcacoustics.com

  2. Optical surface pressure measurements: Accuracy and application field evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukov, A.; Mosharov, V.; Orlov, A.; Pesetsky, V.; Radchenko, V.; Phonov, S.; Matyash, S.; Kuzmin, M.; Sadovskii, N.

    1994-07-01

    Optical pressure measurement (OPM) is a new pressure measurement method rapidly developed in several aerodynamic research centers: TsAGI (Russia), Boeing, NASA, McDonnell Douglas (all USA), and DLR (Germany). Present level of OPM-method provides its practice as standard experimental method of aerodynamic investigations in definite application fields. Applications of OPM-method are determined mainly by its accuracy. The accuracy of OPM-method is determined by the errors of three following groups: (1) errors of the luminescent pressure sensor (LPS) itself, such as uncompensated temperature influence, photo degradation, temperature and pressure hysteresis, variation of the LPS parameters from point to point on the model surface, etc.; (2) errors of the measurement system, such as noise of the photodetector, nonlinearity and nonuniformity of the photodetector, time and temperature offsets, etc.; and (3) methodological errors, owing to displacement and deformation of the model in an airflow, a contamination of the model surface, scattering of the excitation and luminescent light from the model surface and test section walls, etc. OPM-method allows getting total error of measured pressure not less than 1 percent. This accuracy is enough to visualize the pressure field and allows determining total and distributed aerodynamic loads and solving some problems of local aerodynamic investigations at transonic and supersonic velocities. OPM is less effective at low subsonic velocities (M less than 0.4), and for precise measurements, for example, an airfoil optimization. Current limitations of the OPM-method are discussed on an example of the surface pressure measurements and calculations of the integral loads on the wings of canard-aircraft model. The pressure measurement system and data reduction methods used on these tests are also described.

  3. User Perspectives of Characteristics of Improved Cookstoves from a Field Evaluation in Western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Loo, Jennifer D; Hyseni, Lirije; Ouda, Rosebel; Koske, Selline; Nyagol, Ronald; Sadumah, Ibrahim; Bashin, Michelle; Sage, Mike; Bruce, Nigel; Pilishvili, Tamara; Stanistreet, Debbi

    2016-02-01

    Over half of the world's population uses biomass fuels; these households cook on open fires indoors, increasing their risk of adverse health effects due to household air pollution (HAP) from biomass combustion. This study evaluated six improved cookstoves (ICS) for effectiveness and acceptability in a rural community in Western Kenya. This paper describes women's views on each ICS compared to the traditional three-stone fire. Views on stove characteristics, fuel consumption, health effects and acceptability were assessed through structured interviews and focus group discussions. Data were coded and analyzed using a thematic approach. In total, 262 interviews and 11 focus groups were conducted from 43 women. Overall, women preferred the ICS over the traditional three-stone fire for various reasons including ease of use, efficiency, fuel efficiency and perceived reduction in smoke and improved health. However, there were clear preferences for specific ICS with almost half of women preferring a Philips stove. Despite acceptance and use of ICS, women used multiple stoves to meet their daily needs. Qualitative studies are essential to field evaluations to provide insight into user perspectives and acceptability of ICS and to inform research and development of technologies that are both effective in reducing HAP and practical in use. PMID:26828505

  4. Evaluation and selection of soil amendments for field testing to reduce P losses

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, G.A.; Brinton, S.; Silveira, M.L.

    2005-07-01

    The effectiveness of chemical amendments in reducing P losses from manure impacted Florida soil was evaluated using a variety of protocols, including total elemental analysis, short-term laboratory equilibrations, column leaching experiments, and simulated rainfall studies. Amendments used included: two Fe-humates (a Fe-water treatment residual (WTR) and a titanium-mine waste), two Al-WTRs, one Ca-WTR, a coal combustion slag, a Si-rich material (Pro-Sil), a Leonardite material (dinoSoil), and two agricultural materials (lime and gypsum). In equilibration studies, Al-WTRs were the most effective at sorbing P, while Fe-humate sorbed the least P of all treatments. Other amendments effectively reduced soluble P, but increased suspension pH and electrical conductivity (EC) to an extent expected to adversely affect plant growth. Gypsum was the most effective amendment in reducing P leaching in small column studies. DinoSoil treatment significantly altered the soil hydraulic properties, yielding the greatest runoff volumes in a simulated rainfall study. Total P loss (runoff + leachate) was largely determined by the leaching component, and was essentially all soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) for both bare and grassed soil surfaces. AD treatments reduced runoff SRP compared to the control. Amendment effects in the grassed rainfall study (dominated by leaching) were inconsistent with results from the small column leaching study, possibly due to the different hydraulic conditions and kinetic factors involved in the two studies. The Al-WTRs amendments were recommended for field evaluation.

  5. User Perspectives of Characteristics of Improved Cookstoves from a Field Evaluation in Western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Jennifer D.; Hyseni, Lirije; Ouda, Rosebel; Koske, Selline; Nyagol, Ronald; Sadumah, Ibrahim; Bashin, Michelle; Sage, Mike; Bruce, Nigel; Pilishvili, Tamara; Stanistreet, Debbi

    2016-01-01

    Over half of the world’s population uses biomass fuels; these households cook on open fires indoors, increasing their risk of adverse health effects due to household air pollution (HAP) from biomass combustion. This study evaluated six improved cookstoves (ICS) for effectiveness and acceptability in a rural community in Western Kenya. This paper describes women’s views on each ICS compared to the traditional three-stone fire. Views on stove characteristics, fuel consumption, health effects and acceptability were assessed through structured interviews and focus group discussions. Data were coded and analyzed using a thematic approach. In total, 262 interviews and 11 focus groups were conducted from 43 women. Overall, women preferred the ICS over the traditional three-stone fire for various reasons including ease of use, efficiency, fuel efficiency and perceived reduction in smoke and improved health. However, there were clear preferences for specific ICS with almost half of women preferring a Philips stove. Despite acceptance and use of ICS, women used multiple stoves to meet their daily needs. Qualitative studies are essential to field evaluations to provide insight into user perspectives and acceptability of ICS and to inform research and development of technologies that are both effective in reducing HAP and practical in use. PMID:26828505

  6. Practical method for evaluating the sound field radiated from a waveguide.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xuelei; Shen, Yong; Chen, Simiao; Zhao, Ye

    2015-01-01

    This letter presents a simple and practical method for evaluating the sound field radiated from a waveguide. By using the proposed method, detailed information about the radiated sound field can be obtained by measuring the sound field in the mouth of the baffled waveguide. To examine this method's effectiveness, the radiated sound pressure distribution in space was first evaluated by using the proposed method, and then it was measured directly for comparison. Experiments using two different waveguides showed good agreement between the evaluated and the measured radiated sound pressure distributions. PMID:25618097

  7. Evaluation of multidimensional transport through a field-scale compacted soil liner

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Willingham, T.W.; Werth, C.J.; Valocchi, A.J.; Krapac, I.G.; Toupiol, C.; Stark, T.D.; Daniel, D.E.

    2004-01-01

    A field-scale compacted soil liner was constructed at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and Illinois State Geological Survey in 1988 to investigate chemical transport rates through low permeability compacted clay liners (CCLs). Four tracers (bromide and three benzoic acid tracers) were each added to one of four large ring infiltrometers (LRIs) while tritium was added to the pond water (excluding the infiltrometers). Results from the long-term transport of Br- from the localized source zone of LRI are presented in this paper. Core samples were taken radially outward from the center of the Br- LRI and concentration depth profiles were obtained. Transport properties were evaluated using an axially symmetric transport model. Results indicate that (1) transport was diffusion controlled; (2) transport due to advection was negligible and well within the regulatory limits of ksat???1 ?? 10-7 cm/s; (3) diffusion rates in the horizontal and vertical directions were the same; and (4) small positioning errors due to compression during soil sampling did not affect the best fit advection and diffusion values. The best-fit diffusion coefficient for bromide was equal to the molecular diffusion coefficient multiplied by a tortuosity factor of 0.27, which is within 8% of the tortuosity factor (0.25) found in a related study where tritium transport through the same liner was evaluated. This suggests that the governing mechanisms for the transport of tritium and bromide through the CCL were similar. These results are significant because they address transport through a composite liner from a localized source zone which occurs when defects or punctures in the geomembrane of a composite system are present. ?? ASCE.

  8. Near-field co-seismic ionospheric response due to the northern Chile Mw 8.1 Pisagua earthquake on April 1, 2014 from GPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, C. D.; Sunil, A. S.; González, G.; Shrivastava, Mahesh N.; Moreno, Marcos

    2015-11-01

    Large earthquakes can induce near and far-field ionospheric perturbations by direct/secondary acoustic and gravity waves through Lithosphere-Atmosphere-Ionosphere (LAI) coupling. We analyze co-seismic induced ionospheric TEC perturbations following the northern Chile Mw 8.1 Pisagua earthquake occurred on April 1, 2014. The continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) data at 15 sites from the Integrated Plate Boundary Observatory Chile (IPOC) and International GPS Service (IGS) GPS networks have been used in the present study. The nearest GPS site iqqe, ~98 km away from the epicenter, recorded the ionospheric disturbance 12 min after the event. The maximum co-seismic induced peak-to-peak TEC amplitude is ~1.25 TECU (1TECU=1016 electrons/m2), and the perturbations are confined to less than 1000 km radius around the epicenter. The observed horizontal velocity of TEC perturbations has been determined as ~1180 m/s. We could also discern the signatures of acoustic gravity waves (AGW) with velocity~650 m/s and frequency~2 mHz. The ionospheric signal components due to Rayleigh and/or Tsunami waves could not be observed. This contribution presents characteristics of near-field co-seismic ionospheric response due to the 2014 Pisagua earthquake.

  9. Development of a Visual Inspection Checklist for Evaluation of Fielded PV Module Condition (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Packard, C. E; Wohlgemuth, J. H.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-03-01

    A visual inspection checklist for the evaluation of fielded photovoltaic (PV) modules has been developed to facilitate collection of data describing the field performance of PV modules. The proposed inspection checklist consists of 14 sections, each documenting the appearance or properties of a part of the module. This tool has been evaluated through the inspection of over 60 PV modules produced by more than 20 manufacturers and fielded at two different sites for varying periods of time. Aggregated data from a single data collection tool such as this checklist has the potential to enable longitudinal studies of module condition over time, technology evolution, and field location for the enhancement of module reliability models.

  10. Monte Carlo simulations of patient dose perturbations in rotational-type radiotherapy due to a transverse magnetic field: A tomotherapy investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y. M.; Geurts, M.; Smilowitz, J. B.; Bednarz, B. P.; Sterpin, E.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Several groups are exploring the integration of magnetic resonance (MR) image guidance with radiotherapy to reduce tumor position uncertainty during photon radiotherapy. The therapeutic gain from reducing tumor position uncertainty using intrafraction MR imaging during radiotherapy could be partially offset if the negative effects of magnetic field-induced dose perturbations are not appreciated or accounted for. The authors hypothesize that a more rotationally symmetric modality such as helical tomotherapy will permit a systematic mediation of these dose perturbations. This investigation offers a unique look at the dose perturbations due to homogeneous transverse magnetic field during the delivery of Tomotherapy{sup ®} Treatment System plans under varying degrees of rotational beamlet symmetry. Methods: The authors accurately reproduced treatment plan beamlet and patient configurations using the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. This code has a thoroughly benchmarked electromagnetic particle transport physics package well-suited for the radiotherapy energy regime. The three approved clinical treatment plans for this study were for a prostate, head and neck, and lung treatment. The dose heterogeneity index metric was used to quantify the effect of the dose perturbations to the target volumes. Results: The authors demonstrate the ability to reproduce the clinical dose–volume histograms (DVH) to within 4% dose agreement at each DVH point for the target volumes and most planning structures, and therefore, are able to confidently examine the effects of transverse magnetic fields on the plans. The authors investigated field strengths of 0.35, 0.7, 1, 1.5, and 3 T. Changes to the dose heterogeneity index of 0.1% were seen in the prostate and head and neck case, reflecting negligible dose perturbations to the target volumes, a change from 5.5% to 20.1% was observed with the lung case. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that the effect of external magnetic fields can

  11. Monte Carlo simulations of patient dose perturbations in rotational-type radiotherapy due to a transverse magnetic field: A tomotherapy investigation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Y. M.; Geurts, M.; Smilowitz, J. B.; Sterpin, E.; Bednarz, B. P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Several groups are exploring the integration of magnetic resonance (MR) image guidance with radiotherapy to reduce tumor position uncertainty during photon radiotherapy. The therapeutic gain from reducing tumor position uncertainty using intrafraction MR imaging during radiotherapy could be partially offset if the negative effects of magnetic field-induced dose perturbations are not appreciated or accounted for. The authors hypothesize that a more rotationally symmetric modality such as helical tomotherapy will permit a systematic mediation of these dose perturbations. This investigation offers a unique look at the dose perturbations due to homogeneous transverse magnetic field during the delivery of Tomotherapy® Treatment System plans under varying degrees of rotational beamlet symmetry. Methods: The authors accurately reproduced treatment plan beamlet and patient configurations using the Monte Carlo code geant4. This code has a thoroughly benchmarked electromagnetic particle transport physics package well-suited for the radiotherapy energy regime. The three approved clinical treatment plans for this study were for a prostate, head and neck, and lung treatment. The dose heterogeneity index metric was used to quantify the effect of the dose perturbations to the target volumes. Results: The authors demonstrate the ability to reproduce the clinical dose–volume histograms (DVH) to within 4% dose agreement at each DVH point for the target volumes and most planning structures, and therefore, are able to confidently examine the effects of transverse magnetic fields on the plans. The authors investigated field strengths of 0.35, 0.7, 1, 1.5, and 3 T. Changes to the dose heterogeneity index of 0.1% were seen in the prostate and head and neck case, reflecting negligible dose perturbations to the target volumes, a change from 5.5% to 20.1% was observed with the lung case. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that the effect of external magnetic fields can be

  12. An evaluation of RAMS radiation schemes by field measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, S; Doran, J C

    1994-02-01

    At present, two radiation schemes are used in RAMS: the Mahrer and Pielke (M-P) scheme and the Chen and Cotton (C-C) scheme. The M-P scheme requires little computational expense, but does not include the radiative effects of liquid water or ice; the C-C scheme accounts for the radiative effects of liquid water and ice but is fairly expensive computationally. For simulations with clouds, the C-C scheme is obviously a better choice, but for clear sky conditions, RAMS users face a decision regarding which radiation scheme to use. It has been noted that the choice of radiation scheme may result in significantly different results for the same case. To examine the differences in the radiative fluxes and the boundary-layer structure corresponding to the two radiation schemes in RAMS we have carried out a study where Rams was used to simulate the same case with two different radiation schemes. The modeled radiative fluxes by the two schemes were then compared with the field measurements. A description of the observations and the case study, a comparison and discussion of the results, and a summary and conclusions follow.

  13. Detection of microwave emission due to rock fracture as a new tool for geophysics: A field test at a volcano in Miyake Island, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Tadashi; Maeda, Takashi; Miki, Yoji; Akatsuka, Sayo; Hattori, Katsumi; Nishihashi, Masahide; Kaida, Daishi; Hirano, Takuya

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes a field test to verify a newly discovered phenomenon of microwave emission due to rock fracture in a volcano. The field test was carried out on Miyake Island, 150 km south of Tokyo. The main objective of the test was to investigate the applicability of the phenomenon to the study of geophysics, volcanology, and seismology by extending observations of this phenomenological occurrence from the laboratory to the natural field. We installed measuring systems for 300 MHz, 2 GHz, and 18 GHz-bands on the mountain top and mountain foot in order to discriminate local events from regional and global events. The systems include deliberate data subsystems that store slowly sampled data in the long term, and fast sampled data when triggered. We successfully obtained data from January to February 2008. During this period, characteristic microwave pulses were intermittently detected at 300 MHz. Two photographs taken before and after this period revealed that a considerably large-scale collapse occurred on the crater cliff. Moreover, seismograms obtained by nearby observatories strongly suggest that the crater subsidence occurred simultaneously with microwave signals on the same day during the observation period. For confirmation of the microwave emission caused by rock fracture, these microwave signals must be clearly discriminated from noise, interferences, and other disturbances. We carefully discriminated the microwave data taken at the mountaintop and foot, checked the lightning strike data around the island, and consequently concluded that these microwave signals could not be attributed to lightning. Artificial interferences were discriminated by the nature of their waveforms. Thus, we inferred that the signals detected at 300 MHz were due to rock fractures during cliff collapses. This result may provide a useful new tool for geoscientists and for the mitigation of natural hazards.

  14. Evaluation of mine fires due to spontaneous combustion in the mechanized faces of Middle Anatolian Lignite mine (OAL), case studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gueyagueler, T.; Karaman, H.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper fires due to spontaneous combustion in Middle Anatolian Lignite mine (OAL) which is the first fully mechanized underground lignite mine in Turkey, are studied. Since the installation of mechanization, due to spontaneous heating, four panel fires namely, AO1, AO2, AO3 and AO4 have broken out. During these fires, the concentrations of carbon monoxide, methane and the velocity of air are measured continuously by the Micro Minos Environmental monitoring system. For each fire, the environment where fire has started is examined and the possible causes of the fire are investigated. Also the precautions taken to extinguish the fire at different stages are described and the importance of the early detection of mine fire are discussed together with the limitations of the monitoring system the practical difficulties observed during the fire.

  15. Field evaluation of cable bolts for coal mine roof support

    SciTech Connect

    McDonnell, J.P.; Tadolini, S.C.; DiGrado, P.E.

    1995-09-01

    Cable supports offer several advantages over traditional secondary support methods by enhancing stress redistribution to pillars and gob areas, minimizing or eliminating timbers and cribs that reduce ventilation, eradicating material-handling injuries related to placement of crib supports, and providing a cost-effective alternative to secondary support. The US Bureau of Mines, in researching alternatives to traditional roof support methods, designed and installed high-strength cable supports to improve the stability of longwall gate road and bleeder entries in a Western US coal mine. With the cooperation of industry, methods were developed to install cable supports in a tailgate and bleeder entry test area using traditional resin cartridges. Resin-grouted cable bolts were also installed and evaluated in additional longwall gate road and bleeder entry systems at the study mine. The cable-bolted areas successfully maintained roof support throughout the tailgate and bleeder entries. Cable supports replaced wood cribbing as secondary support in the bleeder entry system and minimized the use of cribbing in the longwall tailgate entries. This report describes the theory, application, and advantages of cable supports and presents mine measurements made to assess the cable performance during the retreat process of longwall mining.

  16. Radiation Isotope Identification Device (RIIDs) Field Test and Evaluation Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Hodge, Raymond Keegan

    2007-08-01

    Handheld, backpack, and mobile sensors are elements of the Global Nuclear Detection System for the interdiction and control of illicit radiological and nuclear materials. They are used by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and other government agencies and organizations in various roles for border protection, law enforcement, and nonproliferation monitoring. In order to systematically document the operational performance of the common commercial off-the-shelf portable radiation detection systems, the DHS Domestic Nuclear Detection Office conducted a test and evaluation campaign conducted at the Nevada Test Site from January 18 to February 27, 2006. Named 'Anole', it was the first test of its kind in terms of technical design and test complexities. The Anole test results offer users information for selecting appropriate mission-specific portable radiation detection systems. The campaign also offered manufacturers the opportunity to submit their equipment for independent operationally relevant testing to subsequently improve their detector performance. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies of the DHS Anole portable radiation detection system test campaign.

  17. ANOLE Portable Radiation Detection System Field Test and Evaluation Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Chris A. Hodge

    2007-07-12

    Handheld, backpack, and mobile sensors are elements of the Global Nuclear Detection System for the interdiction and control of illicit radiological and nuclear materials. They are used by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and other government agencies and organizations in various roles for border protection, law enforcement, and nonproliferation monitoring. In order to systematically document the operational performance of the common commercial off-the-shelf portable radiation detection systems, the DHS Domestic Nuclear Detection Office conducted a test and evaluation campaign conducted at the Nevada Test Site from January 18 to February 27, 2006. Named “Anole,” it was the first test of its kind in terms of technical design and test complexities. The Anole test results offer users information for selecting appropriate mission-specific portable radiation detection systems. The campaign also offered manufacturers the opportunity to submit their equipment for independent operationally relevant testing to subsequently improve their detector performance. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies of the DHS Anole portable radiation detection system test campaign.

  18. Evaluation of Cottonwood Creek field complex, Bighorn basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Inden, R.; Anderson, R.

    1986-08-01

    Most of the 83 million bbl of oil produced from Cottonwood Creek and associated fields (Worland, Rattlesnake, South Frisby) is from a suite of peritidal dolomite facies that were deposited in and on the flanks of an ancient estuarine system. Isopach and facies maps suggest that the Tensleep fault and related northwest-southeast-oriented basement fault blocks, controlled the formation of this estuary during Late Pennsylvanian/Early Permian time and the pattern of late Ervay deposition within the estuary. Upper Ervay pisolitic and algal-laminated units, along with intraclast grainstones, map as thick (40 to 90 ft), 1 to 2-mi wide and 2 to 5-mi long pods that represent a northwest-southeast peninsular system of islands. The thickest (i.e., central and highest) portions of these islands are made up of extensively altered pisolitic, brecciated units whose porosity systems were destroyed by aragonite and calcite cementation during periodically low sea level stands. The thinner margins of these island pods are made up of reservoir-quality peritidal fenestral fabric, algal-laminated units, and intraclast grainstones that were subjected to significantly less cementation because of less-frequent exposure. Permeability in these units may be enhanced by preferential fracturing because they were deposited along paleostructural zones of weakness. As a result of these depositional, diagenetic, and fracture patterns, cumulative production is commonly much higher (> 200,000 bbl/well) from the flank positions of these pods. Lagoonal dolomite mudstones and red-bed/evaporite sequences were deposited between and behind these islands, respectively, and form the major updip hydrocarbon seals.

  19. Development of a Characterized Radiation Field for Evaluating Sensor Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, D.M.; Coggins, T.L.; Marsh, J.; Mann, St.D.; Waggoner, Ch.A.

    2008-07-01

    Numerous efforts are funded by US agencies (DOE, DoD, DHS) for development of novel radiation sensing and measurement systems. An effort has been undertaken to develop a flexible shielding system compatible with a variety of sources (beta, X-ray, gamma, and neutron) that can be highly characterized using conventional radiation detection and measurement systems. Sources available for use in this system include americium-beryllium (AmBe), plutonium-beryllium (PuBe), strontium-90 (Sr-90), californium-252 (Cf-252), krypton-85 (Kr-85), americium-241 (Am-241), and depleted uranium (DU). Shielding can be varied by utilization of materials that include lexan, water, oil, lead, and polyethylene. Arrangements and geometries of source(s) and shielding can produce symmetrical or asymmetrical radiation fields. The system has been developed to facilitate accurately repeatable configurations. Measurement positions are similarly capable of being accurately re-created. Stand-off measurement positions can be accurately re-established using differential global positioning system (GPS) navigation. Instruments used to characterize individual measurement locations include a variety of sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) (3 x 3 inch, 4 x 4 x 16 inch, Fidler) and lithium iodide (LiI(Eu)) detectors (for use with multichannel analyzer software) and detectors for use with traditional hand held survey meters such as boron trifluoride (BF{sub 3}), helium-3 ({sup 3}He), and Geiger-Mueller (GM) tubes. Also available are Global Dosimetry thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), CR39 neutron chips, and film badges. Data will be presented comparing measurement techniques with shielding/source configurations. The system is demonstrated to provide a highly functional process for comparison/characterization of various detector types relative to controllable radiation types and levels. Particular attention has been paid to use of neutron sources and measurements. (authors)

  20. Evaluation of the electromagnetic effects due to direct lighting to nuclear explosive areas at Pantex. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Merewether, K.O.; Chen, K.C.

    1993-11-01

    This report summarizes the effort to quantify the electromagnetic environments in the nuclear explosive areas at Pantex due to direct lightning. The fundamental measure of the threat to nuclear safety is assumed to be the maximum voltage between any two points in an assembly area, which is then available for producing arcing or for driving current into critical subsystems of a nuclear weapon. This maximum voltage has been computed with simple analytical models and with three-dimensional finite-difference computer codes.

  1. Evaluating Potential Exposures to Ecological Receptors Due to Transport of Hydrophobic Organic Contaminants in Subsurface Systems (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This technical paper recommends several types of screening assessments to evaluate site conditions for the potential to enhance transport of HOCs, as well as site artifacts that result from inadequate well installation and sampling procedures within a ground-water monitoring netw...

  2. Design and Evaluation of a Research-Based Teaching Sequence: The Superposition of Electric Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viennot, L.; Rainson, S.

    1999-01-01

    Illustrates an approach to research-based teaching strategies and their evaluation. Addresses a teaching sequence on the superposition of electric fields implemented at the college level in an institutional framework subject to severe constraints. Contains 28 references. (DDR)

  3. CAPSULE REPORT: DISPOSAL OF FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION WASTES: SHAWNEE FIELD EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This capsule report describes activities and results of the Shawnee FGD Field Disposal Evaluation Project, located near Paducah, KY. valuated in this report are FGD wastes that were either chemically treated, left untreated, or force-oxidized to gypsum.

  4. Effects of temperature on bacterial transport and destruction in bioretention media: Field and laboratory evaluations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microbial activities (such as metabolism, predation, and proliferation) are significantly influenced by temperature. This study investigated the effects of temperature on the capture and destruction of bacteria from urban stormwater runoff in bioretention media using 2-yr field evaluations coupled ...

  5. Evaluation of the potential in radiation dose reduction for full-field digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasch, Kay-Uwe; Moftah, Belal A.

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluates the image quality for different radiation doses in full-field digital mammography (FFDM). The potential of dose reductions is evaluated for both, the transition from screen-film mammography (SFM) to FFDM as well as within FFDM due to the optimization of exposure parameters. Exposures of a 4.5 cm breast phantom rendering different contrasts as well as bar patterns were made using a FFDM system (GE Senographe 2000D). For different kVp and mAs settings as well as different target/filter combinations chosen for the above exposures, average glandular dose (AGD), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and modulation transfer function (MTF) were determined. To benchmark the results, relative change of AGD was evaluated against SNR, CNR and MTF. Eventually, the results were normalized to AGD's rendered by settings typically used in today's clinical routine. For standard settings (automatic mode), both FFDM and SFM deliver approximately the same AGD of about 2.2 mGy. From that, AGD reduction can be substantial in FFDM if only SNR and high contrast CNR are considered. In this case, reduction of up to 40% can be achieved in a wide kVp range if switching from the standard target/filter combination Mo/Rh to Rh/Rh. However, if low contrast CNR is to remain unchanged, dose reduction is practically impossible. The change of peak voltage and target/filter material had no influence on MTF. Assuming current CNR requirements as standards, significant dose reduction in FFDM cannot be achieved. Only by compromising low contrast CNR levels AGD of up to 40% can be saved at current standards of SNR and high contrast CNR.

  6. Dynamic evaluation of the CMAQv5.0 modeling system: Assessing the model’s ability to simulate ozone changes due to NOx emission reductions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Regional air quality models are frequently used for regulatory applications to predict changes in air quality due to changes in emissions or changes in meteorology. Dynamic model evaluation is thus an important step in establishing credibility in the model predicted pollutant re...

  7. Evaluation of Representations and Response Models for Polarizable Force Fields

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    For classical simulations of condensed-phase systems, such as organic liquids and biomolecules, to achieve high accuracy, they will probably need to incorporate an accurate, efficient model of conformation-dependent electronic polarization. Thus, it is of interest to understand what determines the accuracy of a polarizable electrostatics model. This study approaches this problem by breaking polarization models down into two main components: the representation of electronic polarization and the response model used for mapping from an inducing field to the polarization within the chosen representation. Among the most common polarization representations are redistribution of atom-centered charges, such as those used in the fluctuating charge model, and atom-centered point dipoles, such as those used in a number of different polarization models. Each of these representations has been combined with one or more response models. The response model of fluctuating charge, for example, is based on the idea of electronegativity equalization in the context of changing electrostatic potentials (ESPs), whereas point-dipole representations typically use a response model based on point polarizabilities whose induced dipoles are computed based on interaction with other charges and dipoles. Here, we decouple polarization representations from their typical response models to analyze the strengths and weaknesses of various polarization approximations. First, we compare the maximal possible accuracies achievable by the charge redistribution and point-dipole model representations, by testing their ability to replicate quantum mechanical (QM) ESPs around small molecules polarized by external inducing charges. Perhaps not surprisingly, the atom-centered dipole model can yield higher accuracy. Next, we test two of the most commonly used response functions used for the point-dipole representations, self-consistent and direct (or first-order) inducible point polarizabilities, where the

  8. A comprehensive microbiological evaluation of fifty-four patients undergoing revision surgery due to prosthetic joint loosening.

    PubMed

    Bjerkan, Geir; Witsø, Eivind; Nor, Anne; Viset, Trond; Løseth, Kirsti; Lydersen, Stian; Persen, Leif; Bergh, Kåre

    2012-04-01

    The diagnosis of a chronic prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is challenging, and no consensus exists regarding how best to define the criteria required for microbiological identification. A general view is that culture of periprosthetic biopsies suffers from inadequate sensitivity. Recently, molecular analyses have been employed in some studies but the specificity of molecular analyses has been questioned, mainly due to contamination issues. In a prospective study of 54 patients undergoing revision surgery due to prosthetic joint loosening, we focused on two aspects of microbiological diagnosis of chronic PJI. First, by collecting diagnostic specimens in a highly standardized manner, we aimed at investigating the adequacy of various specimens by performing quantitative bacteriological culture. Second, we designed and performed real-time 16S rRNA gene PCR analysis with particular emphasis on minimizing the risk of false-positive PCR results. The specimens analysed included synovial fluid, periprosthetic biopsies from the joint capsule and the interface membrane, and specimens from the surface of the explanted prosthesis rendered accessible by scraping and sonication. No antibiotics were given prior to specimen collection. Based on five diagnostic criteria recently suggested, we identified 18 PJIs, all of which fulfilled the criterion of ≥2 positive cultures of periprosthetic specimens. The rate of culture-positive biopsies from the interface membrane was higher compared to specimens from the joint capsule and synovial fluid, and the interface membrane contained a higher bacterial load. Interpretational criteria were applied to differentiate a true-positive PCR from potential bacterial DNA contamination derived from the reagents used for DNA extraction and amplification. The strategy to minimize the risk of false-positive PCR results was successful as only two PCR results were false-positive out of 216 negative periprosthetic specimens. Although the PCR assays

  9. Evaluation of DC electric field distribution of PPLP specimen based on the measurement of electrical conductivity in LN2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jae-Sang; Seong, Jae-Kyu; Shin, Woo-Ju; Lee, Jong-Geon; Cho, Jeon-Wook; Ryoo, Hee-Suk; Lee, Bang-Wook

    2013-11-01

    High temperature superconducting (HTS) cable has been paid much attention due to its high efficiency and high current transportation capability, and it is also regarded as eco-friendly power cable for the next generation. Especially for DC HTS cable, it has more sustainable and stable properties compared to AC HTS cable due to the absence of AC loss in DC HTS cable. Recently, DC HTS cable has been investigated competitively all over the world, and one of the key components of DC HTS cable to be developed is a cable joint box considering HVDC environment. In order to achieve the optimum insulation design of the joint box, analysis of DC electric field distribution of the joint box is a fundamental process to develop DC HTS cable. Generally, AC electric field distribution depends on relative permittivity of dielectric materials but in case of DC, electrical conductivity of dielectric material is a dominant factor which determines electric field distribution. In this study, in order to evaluate DC electric field characteristics of the joint box for DC HTS cable, polypropylene laminated paper (PPLP) specimen has been prepared and its DC electric field distribution was analyzed based on the measurement of electrical conductivity of PPLP in liquid nitrogen (LN2). Electrical conductivity of PPLP in LN2 has not been reported yet but it should be measured for DC electric field analysis. The experimental works for measuring electrical conductivity of PPLP in LN2 were presented in this paper. Based on the experimental works, DC electric field distribution of PPLP specimen was fully analyzed considering the steady state and the transient state of DC. Consequently, it was possible to determine the electric field distribution characteristics considering different DC applying stages including DC switching on, DC switching off and polarity reversal conditions.

  10. Evaluation of Signature Erosion in Ebola Virus Due to Genomic Drift and Its Impact on the Performance of Diagnostic Assays

    PubMed Central

    Sozhamannan, Shanmuga; Holland, Mitchell Y.; Hall, Adrienne T.; Negrón, Daniel A.; Ivancich, Mychal; Koehler, Jeffrey W.; Minogue, Timothy D.; Campbell, Catherine E.; Berger, Walter J.; Christopher, George W.; Goodwin, Bruce G.; Smith, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Genome sequence analyses of the 2014 Ebola Virus (EBOV) isolates revealed a potential problem with the diagnostic assays currently in use; i.e., drifting genomic profiles of the virus may affect the sensitivity or even produce false-negative results. We evaluated signature erosion in ebolavirus molecular assays using an in silico approach and found frequent potential false-negative and false-positive results. We further empirically evaluated many EBOV assays, under real time PCR conditions using EBOV Kikwit (1995) and Makona (2014) RNA templates. These results revealed differences in performance between assays but were comparable between the old and new EBOV templates. Using a whole genome approach and a novel algorithm, termed BioVelocity, we identified new signatures that are unique to each of EBOV, Sudan virus (SUDV), and Reston virus (RESTV). Interestingly, many of the current assay signatures do not fall within these regions, indicating a potential drawback in the past assay design strategies. The new signatures identified in this study may be evaluated with real-time reverse transcription PCR (rRT-PCR) assay development and validation. In addition, we discuss regulatory implications and timely availability to impact a rapidly evolving outbreak using existing but perhaps less than optimal assays versus redesign these assays for addressing genomic changes. PMID:26090727

  11. Evaluation of Signature Erosion in Ebola Virus Due to Genomic Drift and Its Impact on the Performance of Diagnostic Assays.

    PubMed

    Sozhamannan, Shanmuga; Holland, Mitchell Y; Hall, Adrienne T; Negrón, Daniel A; Ivancich, Mychal; Koehler, Jeffrey W; Minogue, Timothy D; Campbell, Catherine E; Berger, Walter J; Christopher, George W; Goodwin, Bruce G; Smith, Michael A

    2015-06-01

    Genome sequence analyses of the 2014 Ebola Virus (EBOV) isolates revealed a potential problem with the diagnostic assays currently in use; i.e., drifting genomic profiles of the virus may affect the sensitivity or even produce false-negative results. We evaluated signature erosion in ebolavirus molecular assays using an in silico approach and found frequent potential false-negative and false-positive results. We further empirically evaluated many EBOV assays, under real time PCR conditions using EBOV Kikwit (1995) and Makona (2014) RNA templates. These results revealed differences in performance between assays but were comparable between the old and new EBOV templates. Using a whole genome approach and a novel algorithm, termed BioVelocity, we identified new signatures that are unique to each of EBOV, Sudan virus (SUDV), and Reston virus (RESTV). Interestingly, many of the current assay signatures do not fall within these regions, indicating a potential drawback in the past assay design strategies. The new signatures identified in this study may be evaluated with real-time reverse transcription PCR (rRT-PCR) assay development and validation. In addition, we discuss regulatory implications and timely availability to impact a rapidly evolving outbreak using existing but perhaps less than optimal assays versus redesign these assays for addressing genomic changes. PMID:26090727

  12. Development and evaluation of a field-based high-throughput phenotyping platform

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physiological and developmental traits that vary over time are difficult to phenotype under relevant growing conditions. In response to this challenge, we developed a novel system for phenotyping dynamic traits in the field. System performance was evaluated on a field experiment of 25 Pima cotton cu...

  13. A Field Training Model for Creative Arts Therapies: Report from a 3-Year Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orkibi, Hod

    2012-01-01

    Clinical field training is an essential component of educating future therapists. This article discusses a creative arts therapies field training model in Israel as designed and modified from 3 years of program evaluation in a changing regulatory context. A clinical seminar structure puts beginning students in the role of participant-observer in…

  14. FIELD-SCALE EVALUATION OF IN SITU COSOLVENT FLUSHING FOR ENCHANCED AQUIFER REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A comprehensive, field-scale evaluation of in situ cosolvent flushing for enhanced remediation of nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL)-contaminated aquifers was performed in a hydraulically isolated test cell (about 4.3 m x 3.6 m) constructed at a field site at Hill Air Force Base, Uta...

  15. Me and My Environment Formative Evaluation Report 1. Arranging Field Tests: Characteristics of Sites and Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Joe M.

    The first in a series of evaluation reports gives characteristics of sites and approximately 500 students in field tests of Me and My Environment, a 3-year life science curriculum for 13- to 16-year-old educable mentally handicapped (EMH) adolescents. Described are the field test design, which involves 14 data gathering approaches, and the…

  16. Edge-of-field evaluation of the Ohio phosphorus risk index

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Phosphorus Index (PI) has been the cornerstone for phosphorus (P)-based management and planning over the past twenty years; yet, field-scale evaluation of many state PIs has been limited. In this study, measured P loads in surface runoff and tile discharge from 40 agricultural fields in Ohio wit...

  17. Evaluation of One- and Two-Day Forestry Field Programs for Elementary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Amy L.

    2004-01-01

    The methods and findings from a program evaluation of a forestry field visit for second grade students are detailed in this article. A pretest, posttest methodology was used to determine changes in students' (n = 133) attitudes and knowledge before and after the field experience(s). Interviews and surveys were conducted with students, teachers (n…

  18. Evaluation of electrical capacitance tomography sensor based on the coupling of fluid field and electrostatic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jiamin; Wang, Haigang; Yang, Wuqiang

    2016-07-01

    Electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) is based on capacitance measurements from electrode pairs mounted outside of a pipe or vessel. The structure of ECT sensors is vital to image quality. In this paper, issues with the number of electrodes and the electrode covering ratio for complex liquid–solids flows in a rotating device are investigated based on a new coupling simulation model. The number of electrodes is increased from 4 to 32 while the electrode covering ratio is changed from 0.1 to 0.9. Using the coupling simulation method, real permittivity distributions and the corresponding capacitance data at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 5, and 8 s with a rotation speed of 96 rotations per minute (rpm) are collected. Linear back projection (LBP) and Landweber iteration algorithms are used for image reconstruction. The quality of reconstructed images is evaluated by correlation coefficient compared with the real permittivity distributions obtained from the coupling simulation. The sensitivity for each sensor is analyzed and compared with the correlation coefficient. The capacitance data with a range of signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of 45, 50, 55 and 60 dB are generated to evaluate the effect of data noise on the performance of ECT sensors. Furthermore, the SNRs of experimental data are analyzed for a stationary pipe with permittivity distribution. Based on the coupling simulation, 16-electrode ECT sensors are recommended to achieve good image quality.

  19. Field evaluation of fungicides for control of Ascochyta blight of chickpea, 2006.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To evaluate foliar fungicides against Ascochyta bligt of chickpea caused by Ascochyta rabiei, field plots were set up at Pullman, WA and Genesee, ID. The fungicides evaluated were Bravo, Headline, Proline, Quadris opti, and Tanos. Disease pressure was higher at the Pullman location than the Genese...

  20. Field Test Evaluation of Educational Software: A Description of One Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tovar, Mariela; Barker, Nicholas

    1986-01-01

    The summative evaluation of a courseware program designed to assist in writing the lower-case alphabet is described to demonstrate the effectiveness of a field test for answering specific evaluation questions, collecting maximum evidence on which to base conclusions of instructional effectiveness, and being flexible enough for use in normal…

  1. Training for Cooperating Teachers and University Supervisors in Their Role as Evaluators in Early Field Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramanathan, Hema; Wilkins-Canter, Elizabeth

    This study investigated perceptions of cooperating teachers, university supervisors, and early field experience directors who were involved in supervising and evaluating preservice elementary teachers. It also addressed whether cooperating teachers and university supervisors were properly trained to be evaluators. Eight cooperating teachers, eight…

  2. The Evaluation of Courses and Other Educational Offering in the Field of Documentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancaster, F. W.

    Based on the author's Guidelines for the Evaluation of Training Courses, Workshops, and Seminars in Scientific and Technical Information and Documentation (UNESCO, 1975), this paper describes various approaches to both the summative and the formative evaluation of educational programs in the field of scientific documentation. Procedures are…

  3. DISPOSAL OF FLUE GAS CLEANING WASTES: EPA SHAWNEE FIELD EVALUATION - THIRD ANNUAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes progress made on a field evaluation project being conducted by the EPA to assess techniques for disposing of power plant flue gas cleaning (FGC) wastes. The evaluation site is at TVA's Shawnee steam plant in Paducah, KY. Two prototype scrubbers, using lime an...

  4. DISPOSAL OF FLUE GAS CLEANING WASTES: EPA SHAWNEE FIELD EVALUATION. SECOND ANNUAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes progress made during the first two years of a field evaluation of treated and untreated ponding techniques for the disposal of power plant flue gas desulfurization sludges. The evaluation used two 10 MW lime and limestone flue gas scrubbers of TVA's Shawnee P...

  5. Evaluation Field Building in South Asia: Insights from the Rear View Mirror

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grob, George F.

    2010-01-01

    The author enjoyed reading Katharine Hay's ambitious and humbling visions for evaluation field building in South Asia. She has successfully positioned herself on a high mountain with a wonderful set of binoculars that enable her to see the entire evaluation landscape of South Asia. She magically sees and describes significant historical forces and…

  6. Evaluating the Evaluator: Development, Field Testing, and Implications of a Client-Based Method for Assessing Evaluator Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowell, Kathleen; Haley, Jean; Doino-Ingersoll, Jo Ann

    2006-01-01

    Improved services and client satisfaction are key aspects of independent evaluation consultants' practices. For evaluators to deliver the highest quality services possible, they should regularly monitor their performance as evaluators, as well as the satisfaction of their clients. The client feedback form (CFF) was developed to gather performance…

  7. Application of digital interferogram evaluation techniques to the measurement of 3-D flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Friedhelm; Yu, Yung H.

    1987-01-01

    A system for digitally evaluating interferograms, based on an image processing system connected to a host computer, was implemented. The system supports one- and two-dimensional interferogram evaluations. Interferograms are digitized, enhanced, and then segmented. The fringe coordinates are extracted, and the fringes are represented as polygonal data structures. Fringe numbering and fringe interpolation modules are implemented. The system supports editing and interactive features, as well as graphic visualization. An application of the system to the evaluation of double exposure interferograms from the transonic flow field around a helicopter blade and the reconstruction of the three dimensional flow field is given.

  8. Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAnany, Emile G.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Two lead articles set the theme for this issue devoted to evaluation as Emile G. McAnany examines the usefulness of evaluation and Robert C. Hornik addresses four widely accepted myths about evaluation. Additional articles include a report of a field evaluation done by the Accion Cultural Popular (ACPO); a study of the impact of that evaluation by…

  9. Laboratory and field scale evaluation of geochemical controls on groundwater transport of nitroaromatic ammunition residues

    SciTech Connect

    Weissmahr, K.W.; Schwarzenbach, R.P.; Haderlein, S.B. ); Hildenbrand, M. )

    1999-08-01

    Sorption to soils and sediments of nitroaromatic explosives may be due to interactions with natural organic matter (NOM) or complex formation with clays, which strongly depends on the type of exchangeable cations, i.e., the base saturation of the clays. The authors examined the relative importance of these two processes for NAC sorption at aquifer material and evaluated the potential of decreasing or enhancing the mobility of NACs in contaminated aquifers by stimulated cation exchange. Generally, sorption on NOM of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and related nitroaromatic compounds (NACs) was low compared to sorption at clays, and no evidence for specific interactions with NOM was found. Adsorbed NOM hardly affected the complex formation of NACs with clays. NAC sorption at pure clays and at aquifer material depended on the K[sup +]-saturation of these materials. Typical aquifer material containing [le]1% NOM and 3-5% clays exhibited similar sorption features than pure clay minerals, suggesting that NAC sorption to the bulk aquifer matrix was dominated by complex formation with clays. They applied these laboratory findings in a two-step field test designed to control the groundwater transport of NACs by the injection of electrolytes. 4-Nitrotoluene (4-NT) and KCI were injected into a sandy aquifer, and their groundwater transport was monitored at an extraction well. Subsequent injection of CaCl[sub 2] remobilized the previously adsorbed 4-NT due to ion exchange of Ca[sup 2+] for K[sup +] at clays present in the aquifer matrix. The susceptibility of NAC sorption to the composition of exchangeable cations at clays was confirmed for TNT and related NACs. Controlling the base saturation of the aquifer matrix by electrolyte injections thus opens new perspectives for gentle remediation of sites contaminated with nitroaromatic explosives.

  10. Evaluation of accelerated H/sup +/ applications in predicting soil chemical and microbial changes due to acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Killham, K.; Firestone, M.K.

    1982-01-01

    A comparison was made between three acidified, simulated rain treatments which have been used to assess the impact of acid rain on soil chemical and microbial processes. There were significant differences in effects on chemical and microbial characteristics of soil exposed to the three treatments due to differences in the rate of H/sup +/ ion application, even though the total quantity of protons supplied was the same in each case. An input of 30 cm of simulated rain of pH 3.0 over 6 months increased microbial activity and caused only slight changes in soil pH and soil nitrogen status. Treatments in which the rate of H/sup +/ input was accelerated by increasing solution volume, or acidity, inhibited microbial activity and caused soil chemical changes in excess of those produced by the more gradual yet equivalent H/sup +/ loading. We conclude that the effects of short-term, accelerated acid treatments cannot be used to realistically forecast long-term impacts of acid rain. The results of such experiments may be useful in identifying processes or parameters for studies of longer duration.

  11. An evaluation of near-field host rock temperatures for a spent fuel repository

    SciTech Connect

    Altenhofen, M.K.; Lowery, P.S.

    1988-11-01

    A repository heat transfer analysis has been performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy's Performance Assessment Scientific Support Program. The objective of this study was to evaluate the near-field thermal environmental conditions for a spent fuel repository system. A spent fuel logistics analysis was performed using a waste management system simulation model, WASTES-II, to evaluate the thermal characteristics of spent fuel received at the repository. A repository-scale thermal analysis was performed using a finite difference heat transfer code, TEMPEST, to evaluate the near-field host rock temperature. The calculated temporal and spatial distributions of near-field host rock temperatures provide input to the repository source term model in evaluations of engineered barrier system performance. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Evaluation of contrast loss introduced by scattering effects at optical mounts: field dependence in the IR region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizarro, C.; Blanco, P.; Arasa, J.; Cifuentes, A. F.

    2005-09-01

    The reduction of contrast due to scattering by optical mounts and buffers was studied, especially for the systems that must work in the infrared region. When a particular optical system is optimized [1,2] up a specified field value the scattering effects introduced by optical mounts and buffers must be taken into account. The scattering effect plays an important role in the IR region where the influence of off-field effects is important. The contrast reduction due to scattering effects is not uniform with the object position, in other words the influence of scattering effects has field dependence. The scattering model used is based on the classical point of view of the scattering electromagnetic wave and it is adapted for optical evaluation using ray-tracing techniques. In order to test the validity of our scattering model we calculated the distribution of illumination produced for a laser beam in a plane-parallel plate with perfect scattering properties at the back surface. The comparison between the results obtained form our model and the analytical models permit us to extrapolate the use of our model in systems that involve more complex geometry. The model was applied in a four element IR objective with germanium and silicon lenses. In all the situations the contrast as a function of the field value was calculated, with and without the scattering effects. By contemplating the contrast loss, a better choice of materials, geometries and buffer positions can be made possible.

  13. [Evaluation of the quality of drinking water in Senigallia (Italy), including the presence of asbestos fibres, and of morbidity and mortality due to gastrointestinal tumours].

    PubMed

    Fiorenzuolo, Giovanni; Moroni, Vania; Cerrone, Tiziana; Bartolucci, Elena; Rossetti, Siro; Tarsi, Riccardo

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate the organoleptic quality of drinking water conducted in asbestos cement piping, in eleven towns in the Marche region (Italy) and the presence of asbestos fibres. A descriptive survey was also conducted to assess possible health effects in the population, in particular morbidity and mortality due to gastrointestinal (GI) cancer. Study results show a very low concentration of free asbestos fibres in water samples examined. No differences in mortality and morbidity due to GI cancers were detected compared to the national population. PMID:23903037

  14. Evaluating Attitudes towards Changes in Rural Landscape by Grazing Cattle on Abandoned Paddy Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuhito, Kitai; Toshihiro, Hattori; Hiroshi, Takahashi

    The appearance of cattle grazing abandoned paddy fields can be used to evaluate attitudes towards this land-use change. The semantic differential (SD) method was used families of a university student to evaluate and compare attitudes towards five types of rural landscape: pasture, pasture grazed by cattle, rice paddy field, abandoned paddy field converted to pasture and abandoned paddy field converted to pasture grazed by cattle. Cattle grazing abandoned paddy fields were determined to have a positive effect on the landscape. However, all grazing cattle created a negative attitude because of the unclean appearance of the landscape. Grazing cattle at high stocking rates in small areas could create a negative attitude because of the oppressive appearance of the landscape. The acceptance of grazing cattle was lower if the animals ware newly introduced to the landscape.

  15. Evaluation of bacteriophages for prevention and treatment of diarrhea due to experimental enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli O149 infection of pigs.

    PubMed

    Jamalludeen, Nidham; Johnson, Roger P; Shewen, Patricia E; Gyles, Carlton L

    2009-04-14

    The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of selected phages individually and in combination in prevention and treatment of diarrhea due to experimental O149:H10:F4 enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) in weaned pigs. For prophylaxis, the phages were administered orally shortly after challenge, and for therapeutic use, were given 24h after challenge, following the onset of diarrhea. The parameters used to assess outcomes were weight change, duration of diarrhea, severity of diarrhea, composite diarrhea score, and extent of shedding of the challenge ETEC over 6 days. Six phages that were tested individually in a prophylactic mode were effective as determined by a significant change in each of the parameters, although the phages were not present at titres greater than 10(3)PFU/g of feces. A modified protocol involving pre-treatment of the pigs with florfenicol and oral administration of sodium bicarbonate prior to the ETEC challenge and phage administration resulted in high levels of phages in the feces. Using this protocol, a combination of three phages that was tested in the prophylactic mode significantly reduced the severity of diarrhea and the composite diarrhea score. A mixture of two phages given therapeutically significantly improved each of the outcome parameters, without perturbation of the total fecal E. coli flora. Enumeration of phages in feces after treatment indicated that the phages were replicating to high titres in the intestinal tract of ETEC infected pigs within 1-2 days before declining progressively. These findings indicate that the selected phages were effective in moderating the course of experimental O149:H10:F4 ETEC diarrhea in weaned pigs when given prophylactically or therapeutically. PMID:19058927

  16. Evaluating variation in human gut microbiota profiles due to DNA extraction method and inter-subject differences

    PubMed Central

    Wagner Mackenzie, Brett; Waite, David W.; Taylor, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    The human gut contains dense and diverse microbial communities which have profound influences on human health. Gaining meaningful insights into these communities requires provision of high quality microbial nucleic acids from human fecal samples, as well as an understanding of the sources of variation and their impacts on the experimental model. We present here a systematic analysis of commonly used microbial DNA extraction methods, and identify significant sources of variation. Five extraction methods (Human Microbiome Project protocol, MoBio PowerSoil DNA Isolation Kit, QIAamp DNA Stool Mini Kit, ZR Fecal DNA MiniPrep, phenol:chloroform-based DNA isolation) were evaluated based on the following criteria: DNA yield, quality and integrity, and microbial community structure based on Illumina amplicon sequencing of the V4 region of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes. Our results indicate that the largest portion of variation within the model was attributed to differences between subjects (biological variation), with a smaller proportion of variation associated with DNA extraction method (technical variation) and intra-subject variation. A comprehensive understanding of the potential impact of technical variation on the human gut microbiota will help limit preventable bias, enabling more accurate diversity estimates. PMID:25741335

  17. Finite Element Analysis of Deformation Due to Ball Indentation and Evaluation of Tensile Properties of Tempered P92 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbadikar, Dipika R.; Ballal, A. R.; Peshwe, D. R.; Mathew, M. D.

    2015-08-01

    Ball indentation (BI) technique has been effectively used to evaluate the tensile properties with minimal volume of material. In the present investigation, BI test carried out on P92 steel (9Cr-0.5Mo-1.8W), using 0.76 mm diameter silicon nitride ball indenter was modeled using finite element (FE) method and analyzed. The effect of test temperature [300 K and 923 K (27 °C and 650 °C)], tempering temperature [1013 K, 1033 K, and 1053 K (740 °C, 760 °C, and 780 °C)], and coefficient of friction of steel (0.0 to 0.5) on the tensile strength and material pile-up was investigated. The stress and strain distributions underneath the indenter and along the top elements of the model have been studied to understand the deformation behavior. The tensile strength was found to decrease with increase in tempering and test temperatures. The increased pile-up around the indentation was attributed to the decrease in strain hardening exponent ( n) with increase in the test temperature. The pile-up height determined from profilometry studies and FE analysis as well as the load depth curve from BI and FE analysis was in agreement. The maximum strain location below the indentation changes with the test temperature. Stress-strain curves obtained by conventional tensile, BI test, and representative stress-strain concepts of FE model were found exactly matching.

  18. Evaluation of Bax and Bcl-2 Proteins Expression in the Rat Hippocampus due to Childhood Febrile Seizure

    PubMed Central

    SAEEDI BORUJENI, Mohammad Javad; HAMI, Javad; HAGHIR, Hossein; RASTIN, Maryam; SAZEGAR, Ghasem

    2016-01-01

    Objective Simple Febrile Seizure (SFS) is the most common seizure disorder in childhood, and is frequently described as inoffensive disorder. Nevertheless, there is evidence suggesting the association between neonatal febrile seizures and hippocampal abnormalities in adulthood. This study was conducted at evaluating the hippocampal expression of pro-apoptotic Bax and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins following SFS induction in rat neonates. Materials & Methods Febrile seizure was modeled by hyperthermia-induced seizure in 22-dayold male rats by a hot water bath. The animals were divided into two groups based on the presence or absence of seizure behaviors: Hyperthermia without seizure (n=10) and hyperthermia with seizure (n=10). To control the effects of environmental stress a sham-control group was also added (n=10). The rats’ hippocampi were dissected 2 or 15 days after hyperthermia. The expression of Bax and Bcl-2 proteins were measured using Western Blotting technique. Results The hippocampal expression of Bcl-2 protein was significantly lower in the hyperthermia with seizure animals than that of the sham-control and hyperthermia without seizure groups. The expression of pro-apoptotic Bax protein also significantly increased in the hippocampus of hyperthermia with seizure group rats compared to the sham-control and hyperthermia without seizure animals. Conclusion The simple febrile seizure markedly disturbed the hippocampal expression of both Bcl2 and Bax proteins, resulting in apoptosis promotion in hippocampi of juvenile rats, which were measurable for at least 15 days. PMID:27057189

  19. Evaluating variation in human gut microbiota profiles due to DNA extraction method and inter-subject differences.

    PubMed

    Wagner Mackenzie, Brett; Waite, David W; Taylor, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    The human gut contains dense and diverse microbial communities which have profound influences on human health. Gaining meaningful insights into these communities requires provision of high quality microbial nucleic acids from human fecal samples, as well as an understanding of the sources of variation and their impacts on the experimental model. We present here a systematic analysis of commonly used microbial DNA extraction methods, and identify significant sources of variation. Five extraction methods (Human Microbiome Project protocol, MoBio PowerSoil DNA Isolation Kit, QIAamp DNA Stool Mini Kit, ZR Fecal DNA MiniPrep, phenol:chloroform-based DNA isolation) were evaluated based on the following criteria: DNA yield, quality and integrity, and microbial community structure based on Illumina amplicon sequencing of the V4 region of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes. Our results indicate that the largest portion of variation within the model was attributed to differences between subjects (biological variation), with a smaller proportion of variation associated with DNA extraction method (technical variation) and intra-subject variation. A comprehensive understanding of the potential impact of technical variation on the human gut microbiota will help limit preventable bias, enabling more accurate diversity estimates. PMID:25741335

  20. Aerosol size distribution retrievals from sunphotometer measurements: Theoretical evaluation of errors due to circumsolar and related effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocifaj, Miroslav; Gueymard, Christian A.

    2012-05-01

    The uncertainty in particle size distribution retrievals is analyzed theoretically and numerically when using aerosol optical depth (AOD) data affected by three distinct error-inducing effects. Specifically, circumsolar radiation (CS), optical mass (OM), and solar disk's brightness distribution (BD) effects are taken into consideration here. Because of these effects, the theoretical AOD is affected by an error, ∂AOD, that consequently translates into errors in the determined (apparent) particle size distribution (PSD). Through comparison of the apparent and the true size distributions, the relative error, ∂PSD, is calculated here as a function of particle radius for various instrument's fields of view (aperture) and solar zenith angles. It is shown that, in general, the CS effect overestimates the number of submicron-sized particles, and that the significance of this effect increases with the aperture. In case of maritime aerosols, the CS effect may also lead to an underestimation of the number concentration of large micron-sized particles. The BD and OM effects become important, and possibly predominant, when AOD is low. Assuming large particles dominate in the atmosphere, the BD effect tends to underestimate the concentration of the smallest aerosol particles. In general, the PSD(apparent)/PSD(true) ratio is affected by the CS effect equally over all particle sizes. The relative errors in PSD are typically smaller than 40-60%, but can exceptionally exceed 100%, which means that the apparent PSD may then be twice as large as the true PSD. This extreme situation typically occurs with maritime aerosols under elevated humidity conditions. Recent instruments tend to be designed with smaller apertures than ever before, which lower the CS-induced errors to an acceptable level in most cases.

  1. Evaluation of uncertainties due to hydrogeological modeling and groundwater flow analysis: Steady flow, transient flow, and thermal studies

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, Christine; Karasaki, Kenzi

    2002-12-11

    Starting with regional geographic, geologic, surface and subsurface hydrologic, and geophysical data for the Tono area in Gifu, Japan, we develop an effective continuum model to simulate subsurface flow and transport in a 4 km by 6 km by 3 km thick fractured granite rock mass overlain by sedimentary layers. Individual fractures are not modeled explicitly. Rather, continuum permeability and porosity distributions are assigned stochastically, based on well-test data and fracture density measurements. Lithologic layering and one major fault, the Tsukiyoshi Fault, are assigned deterministically. We conduct three different studies: (1) the so-called base case, in which the model simulates the steady-state groundwater flow through the site, and then stream trace analysis is used to calculate travel times to the model boundary from specified release points; (2) simulations of transient flow during long term pump tests (LTPT) using the base-case model; and (3) thermal studies in which coupled heat flow and fluid flow are modeled, to examine the effects of the geothermal gradient on groundwater flow. The base-case study indicates that the choice of open or closed lateral boundaries has a strong influence on the regional groundwater flow patterns produced by the models, but no field data exist that can be used to determine which boundary conditions are more realistic. The LTPT study cannot be used to distinguish between the alternative boundary conditions, because the pumping rate is too small to produce an analyzable pressure response at the model boundaries. In contrast, the thermal study shows that the temperature distributions produced by the open and closed models differ greatly. Comparison with borehole temperature data may be used to eliminate the closed model from further consideration.

  2. The evaluation of cost-of-illness due to use of cost-of-illness-based chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jiyeon; Lee, Yongjin; Lee, Geonwoo; Lee, Hanseul; Yang, Jiyeon

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study is conducted to estimate the cost paid by the public suffering from disease possibly caused by chemical and to examine the effect on public health. Methods Cost-benefit analysis is an important factor in analysis and decision-making and is an important policy decision tool in many countries. Cost-of-illness (COI), a kind of scale-based analysis method, estimates the potential value lost as a result of illness as a monetary unit and calculates the cost in terms of direct, indirect and psychological costs. This study estimates direct medical costs, transportation fees for hospitalization and outpatient treatment, and nursing fees through a number of patients suffering from disease caused by chemicals in order to analyze COI, taking into account the cost of productivity loss as an indirect cost. Results The total yearly cost of the diseases studied in 2012 is calculated as 77 million Korean won (KRW) per person. The direct and indirect costs being 52 million KRW and 23 million KRW, respectively. Within the total cost of illness, mental and behavioral disability costs amounted to 16 million KRW, relevant blood immunological parameters costs were 7.4 million KRW, and disease of the nervous system costs were 6.7 million KRW. Conclusions This study reports on a survey conducted by experts regarding diseases possibly caused by chemicals and estimates the cost for the general public. The results can be used to formulate a basic report for a social-economic evaluation of the permitted use of chemicals and limits of usage. PMID:26206367

  3. Field to thermo-field to thermionic electron emission: A practical guide to evaluation and electron emission from arc cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benilov, M. S.; Benilova, L. G.

    2013-08-01

    This work is concerned with devising a method of evaluation of electron emission in the framework of the Murphy-Good theory, which would be as simple and computationally efficient as possible while being accurate in the full range of conditions of validity of the theory. The method relies on Padé approximants. A comparative study of electron emission from cathodes of arcs in ambient gas and vacuum arcs is performed with the use of this method. Electron emission from cathodes of arcs in ambient gas is of thermionic nature even for extremely high gas pressures characteristic of projection and automotive arc lamps and is adequately described by the Richardson-Schottky formula. The electron emission from vaporizing (hot) cathodes of vacuum arcs is of thermo-field nature and is adequately described by the Hantzsche fit formula. Since no analytical formulas are uniformly valid for field to thermo-field to thermionic emission, a numerical evaluation of the Murphy-Good formalism is inevitable in cases where a unified description of the full range of conditions is needed, as is the general case of plasma-cathode interaction in vacuum arcs, and the technique proposed in this work may be the method of choice to this end.

  4. Evaluation of models proposed for the 1991 revision of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peddie, N.W.

    1992-01-01

    The 1991 revision of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) comprises a definitive main-field model for 1985.0, a main-field model for 1990.0, and a forecast secular-variation model for the period 1990-1995. The five 1985.0 main-field models and five 1990.0 main-field models that were proposed have been evaluated by comparing them with one another, with magnetic observatory data, and with Project MAGNET aerial survey data. The comparisons indicate that the main-field models proposed by IZMIRAN, and the secular-variation model proposed jointly by the British Geological Survey and the US Naval Oceanographic Office, should be assigned relatively lower weight in the derivation of the new IGRF models. -Author

  5. Study of microdosimetric energy deposition patterns in tissue-equivalent medium due to low-energy neutron fields using a graphite-walled proportional counter.

    PubMed

    Waker, A J; Aslam

    2011-06-01

    To improve radiation protection dosimetry for low-energy neutron fields encountered in nuclear power reactor environments, there is increasing interest in modeling neutron energy deposition in metrological instruments such as tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPCs). Along with these computational developments, there is also a need for experimental data with which to benchmark and test the results obtained from the modeling methods developed. The experimental work described in this paper is a study of the energy deposition in tissue-equivalent (TE) medium using an in-house built graphite-walled proportional counter (GPC) filled with TE gas. The GPC is a simple model of a standard TEPC because the response of the counter at these energies is almost entirely due to the neutron interactions in the sensitive volume of the counter. Energy deposition in tissue spheres of diameter 1, 2, 4 and 8 µm was measured in low-energy neutron fields below 500 keV. We have observed a continuously increasing trend in microdosimetric averages with an increase in neutron energy. The values of these averages decrease as we increase the simulated diameter at a given neutron energy. A similar trend for these microdosimetric averages has been observed for standard TEPCs and the Rossi-type, TE, spherical wall-less counter filled with propane-based TE gas in the same energy range. This implies that at the microdosimetric level, in the neutron energy range we employed in this study, the pattern of average energy deposited by starter and insider proton recoil events in the gas is similar to those generated cumulatively by crosser and stopper events originating from the counter wall plus starter and insider recoil events originating in the sensitive volume of a TEPC. PMID:21476858

  6. Field Evaluation of a Prototype Paper-Based Point-of-Care Fingerstick Transaminase Test

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Nira R.; McGray, Sarah; Colby, Donn J.; Noubary, Farzad; Nguyen, Huyen; Nguyen, The Anh; Khormaee, Sariah; Jain, Sidhartha; Hawkins, Kenneth; Kumar, Shailendra; Rolland, Jason P.; Beattie, Patrick D.; Chau, Nguyen V.; Quang, Vo M.; Barfield, Cori; Tietje, Kathy; Steele, Matt; Weigl, Bernhard H.

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring for drug-induced liver injury (DILI) via serial transaminase measurements in patients on potentially hepatotoxic medications (e.g., for HIV and tuberculosis) is routine in resource-rich nations, but often unavailable in resource-limited settings. Towards enabling universal access to affordable point-of-care (POC) screening for DILI, we have performed the first field evaluation of a paper-based, microfluidic fingerstick test for rapid, semi-quantitative, visual measurement of blood alanine aminotransferase (ALT). Our objectives were to assess operational feasibility, inter-operator variability, lot variability, device failure rate, and accuracy, to inform device modification for further field testing. The paper-based ALT test was performed at POC on fingerstick samples from 600 outpatients receiving HIV treatment in Vietnam. Results, read independently by two clinic nurses, were compared with gold-standard automated (Roche Cobas) results from venipuncture samples obtained in parallel. Two device lots were used sequentially. We demonstrated high inter-operator agreement, with 96.3% (95% C.I., 94.3–97.7%) agreement in placing visual results into clinically-defined “bins” (<3x, 3–5x, and >5x upper limit of normal), >90% agreement in validity determination, and intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.89 (95% C.I., 0.87–0.91). Lot variability was observed in % invalids due to hemolysis (21.1% for Lot 1, 1.6% for Lot 2) and correlated with lots of incorporated plasma separation membranes. Invalid rates <1% were observed for all other device controls. Overall bin placement accuracy for the two readers was 84% (84.3%/83.6%). Our findings of extremely high inter-operator agreement for visual reading–obtained in a target clinical environment, as performed by local practitioners–indicate that the device operation and reading process is feasible and reproducible. Bin placement accuracy and lot-to-lot variability data identified specific targets for

  7. Field evaluation of a prototype paper-based point-of-care fingerstick transaminase test.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Nira R; McGray, Sarah; Colby, Donn J; Noubary, Farzad; Nguyen, Huyen; Nguyen, The Anh; Khormaee, Sariah; Jain, Sidhartha; Hawkins, Kenneth; Kumar, Shailendra; Rolland, Jason P; Beattie, Patrick D; Chau, Nguyen V; Quang, Vo M; Barfield, Cori; Tietje, Kathy; Steele, Matt; Weigl, Bernhard H

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring for drug-induced liver injury (DILI) via serial transaminase measurements in patients on potentially hepatotoxic medications (e.g., for HIV and tuberculosis) is routine in resource-rich nations, but often unavailable in resource-limited settings. Towards enabling universal access to affordable point-of-care (POC) screening for DILI, we have performed the first field evaluation of a paper-based, microfluidic fingerstick test for rapid, semi-quantitative, visual measurement of blood alanine aminotransferase (ALT). Our objectives were to assess operational feasibility, inter-operator variability, lot variability, device failure rate, and accuracy, to inform device modification for further field testing. The paper-based ALT test was performed at POC on fingerstick samples from 600 outpatients receiving HIV treatment in Vietnam. Results, read independently by two clinic nurses, were compared with gold-standard automated (Roche Cobas) results from venipuncture samples obtained in parallel. Two device lots were used sequentially. We demonstrated high inter-operator agreement, with 96.3% (95% C.I., 94.3-97.7%) agreement in placing visual results into clinically-defined "bins" (<3x, 3-5x, and >5x upper limit of normal), >90% agreement in validity determination, and intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.89 (95% C.I., 0.87-0.91). Lot variability was observed in % invalids due to hemolysis (21.1% for Lot 1, 1.6% for Lot 2) and correlated with lots of incorporated plasma separation membranes. Invalid rates <1% were observed for all other device controls. Overall bin placement accuracy for the two readers was 84% (84.3%/83.6%). Our findings of extremely high inter-operator agreement for visual reading-obtained in a target clinical environment, as performed by local practitioners-indicate that the device operation and reading process is feasible and reproducible. Bin placement accuracy and lot-to-lot variability data identified specific targets for device

  8. Evaluation of pesticide toxicity at their field recommended doses to honeybees, Apis cerana and A. mellifera through laboratory, semi-field and field studies.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Johnson; Sah, Khushboo; Jain, S K; Bhatt, J C; Sushil, S N

    2015-01-01

    A series of experiments were carried out to determine the acute toxicity of pesticides in the laboratory, toxicity through spray on flowering plants of mustard (Tier II evaluation) and field on both Apis cerana and A. mellifera bees. The overall mortality of honey bees through topical (direct contact) were found significantly higher than that of indirect filter paper contamination assays. Insecticides viz., chlorpyriphos, dichlorvos, malathion, profenofos, monocrotophos and deltamethrin when exposed directly or indirectly at their field recommended doses caused very high mortality up to 100% to both the bees at 48 HAT. The insecticides that caused less mortality through filter paper contamination viz., flubendiamide, methyl demeton, imidacloprid and thiamethoxam caused very high morality through direct exposure. Apart from all the fungicides tested, carbendazim, mancozeb, chlorothalonil and propiconazole, insecticides acetamiprid and endosulfan were found safer to both the bees either by direct or indirect exposures. Tier II evaluation by spray of pesticides at their field recommended doses on potted mustard plants showed monocrotophos as the highly toxic insecticide with 100% mortality even with 1h of exposure followed by thiamethoxam, dichlorvos, profenofos and chlorpyriphos which are not to be recommended for use in pollinator attractive flowering plants. Acetamiprid and endosulfan did not cause any repellent effect on honey bees in the field trials endorse the usage of acetamiprid against sucking pest in flowering plants. PMID:25150969

  9. Field evaluation of soybean lines from a new souorce of resistance to Phomopsis seed decay, 2013

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phomopsis seed decay (PSD) is an important disease which causes large soybean quality losses when environmental conditions favor its growth, and harvest is delayed due to wet field conditions. High humidity, free water and warm temperatures during pod development favor PSD development and are commo...

  10. Field evaluation of soybean lines from a new source of resistance to Cercospora kikuchii, 2013

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purple seed stain, which is caused by the fungus Cercospora kikuchii, is an important seed disease which causes soybean seed quality losses when environmental conditions favor its growth, and harvest is delayed due to wet field conditions. Frogeye leaf spot caused by the fungus Cercospora sojina is...

  11. Evaluation of Pre-emergence Herbicides in Stone Fruit Field Nurseries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Open field production of fruit and nut tree nursery stock depends upon preplant soil fumigation, extensive tillage, and hand labor throughout the growing season for adequate weed control. Because methyl bromide, the favored fumigant, is being phased out due to environmental concerns and the costs of...

  12. Field evaluations of soybean lines from a new source of resistance to Phomopsis seed decay, 2012

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phomopsis seed decay (PSD) is an important disease which causes large soybean quality losses when environmental conditions favor its growth, and harvest is delayed due to wet field conditions. High humidity, free water and warm temperatures during pod development favor PSD development and are commo...

  13. Evaluation of Near Field Atmospheric Dispersion Around Nuclear Facilities Using a Lorentzian Distribution Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkley, Gavin

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric dispersion modeling within the near field of a nuclear facility typically applies a building wake correction to the Gaussian plume model, whereby a point source is modeled as a plane source. The plane source results in greater near field dilution and reduces the far field effluent concentration. However, the correction does not account for the concentration profile within the near field. Receptors of interest, such as the maximally exposed individual, may exist within the near field and thus the realm of building wake effects. Furthermore, release parameters and displacement characteristics may be unknown, particularly during upset conditions. Therefore, emphasis is placed upon the need to analyze and estimate an enveloping concentration profile within the near field of a release. This investigation included the analysis of 64 air samples collected over 128 wk. Variables of importance were then derived from the measurement data, and a methodology was developed that allowed for the estimation of Lorentzian-based dispersion coefficients along the lateral axis of the near field recirculation cavity; the development of recirculation cavity boundaries; and conservative evaluation of the associated concentration profile. The results evaluated the effectiveness of the Lorentzian distribution methodology for estimating near field releases and emphasized the need to place air-monitoring stations appropriately for complete concentration characterization. Additionally, the importance of the sampling period and operational conditions were discussed to balance operational feedback and the reporting of public dose.

  14. Development of a Visual Inspection Data Collection Tool for Evaluation of Fielded PV Module Condition

    SciTech Connect

    Packard, C. E.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-08-01

    A visual inspection data collection tool for the evaluation of fielded photovoltaic (PV) modules has been developed to facilitate describing the condition of PV modules with regard to field performance. The proposed data collection tool consists of 14 sections, each documenting the appearance or properties of a part of the module. This report instructs on how to use the collection tool and defines each attribute to ensure reliable and valid data collection. This tool has been evaluated through the inspection of over 60 PV modules produced by more than 20 manufacturers and fielded at two different sites for varying periods of time. Aggregated data from such a single data collection tool has the potential to enable longitudinal studies of module condition over time, technology evolution, and field location for the enhancement of module reliability models.

  15. Influence of Bone Marrow Composition on Measurements of Trabecular Microstructure using Decay due to Diffusion in the Internal Field (DDIF) MRI: Simulations and Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sprinkhuizen, Sara M.; Ackerman, Jerome L.; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Decay due to Diffusion in the Internal Field (DDIF) MRI allows for measurements of microstructures of porous materials at low spatial resolution and thus has potential for trabecular bone quality measurements. In trabecular bone, solid bone changes (osteoporosis) as well as changes in bone marrow composition occur. The influence of such changes on DDIF MRI was studied by simulations and in vivo measurements. Methods Monte Carlo simulations of DDIF in various trabecular bone models were conducted. Changes in solid bone and marrow composition were simulated with numerical bone erosion and marrow susceptibility variations. Additionally, in vivo measurements were performed in the lumbar spine of healthy volunteers of ages 23 to 62 years. Results Simulations and in vivo results yielded that 1) DDIF decay times decrease with increasing marrow fat and 2) the marrow fat percentage needs to be incorporated in the DDIF analysis to discriminate between healthy and osteoporotic solid bone structures. Conclusions Bone marrow composition plays an important role in DDIF MRI: incorporation of marrow fat percentage into DDIF MRI allowed for differentiation of young and old age groups (in vivo experiments). DDIF MRI may develop into a means of assessing osteoporosis and disorders that affect marrow composition. PMID:24382681

  16. Evaluation of field and laboratory research on scour at bridge piers in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, David S.; Jones, J. Sterling

    1997-01-01

    The Federal Highway Administration sponsored a laboratory research at Colorado State University and field data collection with the US Geological Survey, to evaluate the effects of bed material on the depth of scour. Correction factors are compared to include the effect of bed material in the HEC-18 equation. The HEC-18 equation tends to overpredict the observed scour for streams with coarse bed material. The field-based correction factor K4 causes underprediction associated with data collected from other countries.

  17. Photovoice as an evaluation tool for student learning on a field trip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrendt, Marc; Machtmes, Krisanna

    2016-05-01

    Background: Photovoice is one method that enables an educator to view an experience from a student's perspective. This study examined how teachers might use photovoice during an informal learning experience to understand the students' experiences and experiential gain. Design and methods: Participants in this study consisted of six students, three male and three female, ranging from ninth through twelfth grade at a rural Ohio high school, who attended a field trip to a biological field station for a four-day immersive science experience. Students were provided cameras to photograph what they believed was important, interesting, or significant during an immersive four-day science trip to a biological field station, individualizing their observations in ways meaningful to them, and enabling them to assimilate or accommodate the experiences to their schema. Results: Analysis identified five positive benefits to use photovoice as an evaluation tool: teachers were provided qualitative evidence to evaluate student interaction on the field trip; teachers could evaluate the students' photographs and captions to determine if the field trip met the learning objectives; students were empowered to approach the goals and objectives of the field trip by making the field trip personally relevant; students assimilated and accommodated the new observations and experiences to their own schema; students automatically reflected upon the learning experience as they captioned the photos. Conclusions: Through photovoice, the teachers were enabled to qualitatively assess each student's experience and learning from the field trip by illustrating what the students experienced and thought was significant; providing the teachers a method to evaluate all participating students, including those who are secretive or do not normally contribute to class discussions.

  18. Estimating electric field enhancement factors on an aircraft utilizing a small scale model: A method evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easterbrook, Calvin C.; Rudolph, Terence; Easterbrook, Kevin

    1988-01-01

    A method for obtaining field enhancement factors at specific points on an aircraft utilizing a small scale model was evaluated by measuring several canonical shapes. Comparison of the form factors obtained by analytical means with measurements indicate that the experimental method has serious flaws. Errors of 200 to 300 percent were found between analytical values and measured values. As a result of the study, the analytical method is not recommended for calibration of field meters located on aircraft, and should not be relied upon in any application where the local spatial derivatives of the electric field on the model are large over the dimensions of the sensing probe.

  19. Field programmable gate arrays: Evaluation report for space-flight application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandoe, Mike; Davarpanah, Mike; Soliman, Kamal; Suszko, Steven; Mackey, Susan

    1992-01-01

    Field Programmable Gate Arrays commonly called FPGA's are the newer generation of field programmable devices and offer more flexibility in the logic modules they incorporate and in how they are interconnected. The flexibility, the number of logic building blocks available, and the high gate densities achievable are why users find FPGA's attractive. These attributes are important in reducing product development costs and shortening the development cycle. The aerospace community is interested in incorporating this new generation of field programmable technology in space applications. To this end, a consortium was formed to evaluate the quality, reliability, and radiation performance of FPGA's. This report presents the test results on FPGA parts provided by ACTEL Corporation.

  20. Sedimentation and resuspendability evaluation of pharmaceutical suspensions by low-field one dimensional pulsed field gradient NMR profilometry.

    PubMed

    Wuxin, Zhu; Martins, José; Saveyn, Pieter; Govoreanu, Ruxandra; Verbruggen, Katrien; Ariën, Tina; Verliefde, Arne; Van der Meeren, Paul

    2013-01-01

    In order to study the sedimentation of pharmaceutical suspensions using low-field one dimensional pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (1D pfg NMR) profilometry, the accuracy of signal acquisition as well as the spatial resolution of a commercial spectrometer operating at 23.4 MHz was investigated. The use of a solid Teflon spacer revealed that the accuracy of signal acquisition was independent of spatial position (height). The standard deviation of distance determinations was less than 150 µm, whereas the accuracy of water content determination was within 2% in the central part of the detection zone and deteriorated to 4% in the outer parts. The study of aqueous paramagnetic MnCl2 solutions indicated an exponential relationship between the relative signal intensity and the transverse relaxation decay constant. From this relationship, the relative water content of suspensions could be derived from their signal intensity relative to that of water. Using concentrated paliperidone palmitate dispersions as model suspensions, low-field 1D pfg NMR profilometry has been proven to be suitable for the evaluation of both the sedimentation and resuspendability behavior of viscous, opaque suspensions, for which visual detection of homogeneity may be difficult. PMID:21961765

  1. Evaluation of the Geomagnetic Field Models based on Magnetometer Measurements for Satellite's Attitude Determination System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cilden, Demet; Kaymaz, Zerefsan; Hajiyev, Chingiz

    2016-07-01

    Magnetometers are common attitude determination sensors for small satellites at low Earth orbit; therefore, magnetic field model of the Earth is necessary to estimate the satellite's attitude angles. Difference in the components of the magnetic field vectors -mostly used as unit vector. Therefore the angle between them (model and measurement data) affects the estimation accuracy of the satellite's attitude. In this study, geomagnetic field models are compared with satellite magnetic field observations in order to evaluate the models using the magnetometer results with high accuracy. For attitude determination system, IGRF model is used in most of the cases but the difference between the sensor and model increases when the geomagnetic activity occurs. Hence, several models including the empirical ones using the external variations in the Earth's geomagnetic field resulting from the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field are of great importance in determination of the satellite's attitude correctly. IGRF model describes the internal-part of the geomagnetic field, on the other hand candidate models to IGRF, such as recently developed POMME-6 model based on Champ data, CHAOS-5 (CHAmp, Oersted, Swarm), T89 (Tsyganenko's model), include simple parameterizations of external fields of magnetospheric sources in addition to the internal field especially for low Earth orbiting satellites. Those models can be evaluated to see noticeable difference on extraterrestrial field effects on satellite's attitude determination system changing with its height. The comparisons are made between the models and observations and between the models under various magnetospheric activities. In this study, we will present our preliminary results from the comparisons and discuss their implications from the satellite attitude perspective.

  2. Quantitative real-time PCR detection of Zika virus and evaluation with field-caught Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Zika virus (ZIKV), a mosquito borne flavivirus is a pathogen affecting humans in Asia and Africa. ZIKV infection diagnosis relies on serology–which is challenging due to cross-reactions with other flaviviruses and/or absence or low titer of IgM and IgG antibodies at early phase of infection- virus isolation, which is labor intensive, time consuming and requires appropriate containment. Therefore, real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR) is an appealing option as a rapid, sensitive and specific method for detection of ZIKV in the early stage of infection. So far, only one rRT-PCR assay has been described in the context of the outbreak in Micronesia in 2007. In this study, we described a one step rRT-PCR for ZIKV which can detect a wider genetic diversity of ZIKV isolates from Asia and Africa. Results The NS5 protein coding regions of African ZIKV isolates were sequenced and aligned with representative flaviviruses sequences from GenBank to design primers and probe from conserved regions. The analytical sensitivity of the assay was evaluated to be 32 genome-equivalents and 0.05 plaque forming unit (pfu). The assay was shown to detect 37 ZIKV isolates covering a wide geographic in Africa and Asia over 36 years but none of the 31 other flaviviruses tested showing high analytical specificity. The rRT-PCR could be performed in less than 3 hours. This method was used successfully to detect ZIKV strains from field-caught mosquitoes. Conclusion We have developed a rapid, sensitive and specific rRT – PCR for detection of ZIKV. This assay is a useful tool for detection of ZIKV infection in regions where a number of other clinically indistinguishable arboviruses like dengue or chikungunya co-circulate. Further studies are needed to validate this assay in clinical positive samples collected during acute ZIKV infection. PMID:24148652

  3. Electric and Magnetic Fields (EMF) RAPID Program Engineering Project 8: FINAL REPORT, Evaluation of Field Reduction Technologies, Volume 1 (Report) and Volume 2 (Appendices)

    SciTech Connect

    Commonwealth Associates, Inc.; IIT Research Institute

    1997-08-01

    This draft report consists of two volumes. Volume 1, the main body, contains an introducto~ sectionj an overview of magnetic fields sectio~ and field reduction technology evaluation section. Magnetic field reduction methods are evalpated for transmission lines, distribution Iines,sulxtations, building wiring applkmd machinery, and transportation systems. The evaluation considers effectiveness, co% and other ftiors. Volume 2 contains five appendices, Append~ A presents magnetic field shielding information. Appendices B and C present design assumptions and magnetic field plots for transmission and distribution lines, respectively. Appendices D and E present cost estimate details for transmission and distribution limes, respectively.

  4. Energy Conservation Field Projects. Phase 2: External Evaluation. Document II: Appendices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley Associates, Edmonton (Alberta).

    Provided are appendices which contain supporting documentation related to an external evaluation of the Phase 2: Energy Conservation Field Projects. Objectives of this program were to: test the generalizability of the energy conservations measures outlined in "Guidelines for Conserving Energy in Alberta Schools" and augment these guidelines as…

  5. An Evaluation of "Choice" as a Selection Tool in the Field of Western History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boisvert, Marianne

    A study was undertaken to determine the extent to which "Choice" provides librarians with an adequate evaluation of the best books in the field of western American history in a reasonable amount of time. To assess the overall coverage, the titles of all the books reviewed in "Western Historical Quarterly" from 1970 to 1974 were searched in…

  6. Evaluating the potential of mycorrhizal fungi to boost yields in field grown leeks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    UMaine Cooperative Extension faculty collaborated with a local organic grower and the USDA-ARS Research Center in Wyndmoor, PA to evaluate the potential of mycorrhizal fungi to boost yields in field grown leeks using both commercially available mycorrhizal inocula and a “farm raised” mycorrhizal ino...

  7. FIELD EVALUATION OF LIGNIN-DEGRADING FUNGI TO TREAT CREOSOTE-CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field study to determine the ability of selected lignin-degrading fungi to remediate soil contaminated with pentachlorophenol and creosote was performed at a wood treating facility in south central Mississippi in the Autumn of 1991. he study was designed to evaluate 7 fungal tr...

  8. Program Evaluation and Review Technique (PERT): A Planning and Control Tool for Occupational Field Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemphill, John M., Jr.; And Others

    Program Evaluation and Review Technique (PERT) is used in the U.S. Marine Corps task analysis program for occupational field studies. Scheduling sequential tasks, estimating time requirements, determining staffing needs, and locating checkpoints for control all can be accomplished using PERT. Examples of operational aspects of PERT, PERT…

  9. Field evaluation of fungicides in controlling chickpea Ascochyta blight in Washington, 2011

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field evaluation of five fungicides of different fungicide classes showed that the fungicides can reduce disease severity and increase yield of chickpea. Alternative fungicides to traditional strobilurin fungicides were identified, and can be used to prevent development of strobilurin resistance in...

  10. Field evaluation of a dyed food marking technique for Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A method of marking adult Cx. quinquefasciatus Say by feeding the larvae commercial hog chow dyed with methylene blue, Giemsa, and crystal violet was evaluated under field conditions. Larvae were offered the dyed food in outdoor basins containg a mixture of dairy effluent and fresh water. Newly emer...

  11. An Evaluation of Student Proficiency in Field Estimation of Soil Texture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, S. J.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Compared are the estimates of students and professional field soil scientists. Results indicate that with three weeks of practice and the availability of good reference samples, students can attain a level of proficiency comparable to professional soil scientists. Suggestions for grading evaluations are provided. (Author/CW)

  12. Production and Evaluation of Biodiesel from Field Pennycress (Thlaspi Arvense L.) Oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field pennycress (Thlaspi arvense L.) oil is evaluated for the first time as a potential feedstock for biodiesel production. Biodiesel was obtained in 82 wt % yield by a standard transesterification procedure with methanol and sodium methoxide catalyst at 60 deg C and an alcohol to oil ratio of 6:1...

  13. FIELD EVALUATION OF A SWIRL DEGRITTER AT TAMWORTH, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This field evaluation program was initiated with the overall objective of providing information on the behaviour of a full scale swirl degritter designed and constructed in accordance with the shapes and proportions developed during model studies. The swirl degritter was designed...

  14. Field Evaluation of Apple Rootstocks for Orchard Performance and Fire Blight Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2002, apple rootstock trials using three scion cultivars were established at Geneva, NY to evaluate 64 apple (Malus X domestica) rootstocks for horticultural performance and fire blight resistance. Field trials compared several elite Geneva® apple rootstocks, which were bred for tolerance to fir...

  15. Preliminary Technical and Legal Evaluation of Disposing of Nonhazardous Oil Field Waste into Salt Caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Ayers, Robert C.; Caudle, Dan; Elcock, Deborah; Raivel, Mary; Veil, John; and Grunewald, Ben

    1999-01-21

    This report presents an initial evaluation of the suitability, feasibility, and legality of using salt caverns for disposal of nonhazardous oil field wastes. Given the preliminary and general nature of this report, we recognize that some of our findings and conclusions maybe speculative and subject to change upon further research on this topic.

  16. Evaluation of GSt 250/350, Project-Oriented Field Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunneborg, Patricia W.; Mitchell, Sandra K.

    This report evaluates the effectiveness of an experiential field study course at the University of Washington. The course, titled GST 250/350, has different goals from a traditional volunteer program in that the student's education and experience are paramount; the services he provides are secondary. The student's motivation also differs somewhat…

  17. LABORATORY AND FIELD EVALUATION OF THE SEMI-VOST (SEMI-VOLATILE ORGANIC SAMPLING TRAIN) METHOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory studies and a second field evaluation have been completed to assess the performance of the Semi-Volatile Organic Sampling Train (Semi-VOST) method for measuring concentrations of principal organic hazardous constituents (POHCs) with boiling points greater than 100 deg ...

  18. MULTI-SITE FIELD EVALUATION OF CANDIDATE SAMPLERS FOR MEASURING COARSE-MODE PM

    EPA Science Inventory

    In response to expected changes to the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for particulate matter, comprehensive field studies were conducted to evaluate the performance of sampling methods for measuring coarse mode aerosols (i.e. PMc). Five separate PMc sampling approaches w...

  19. Paradigms of Evaluation in Natural Language Processing: Field Linguistics for Glass Box Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Kevin Bretonnel

    2010-01-01

    Although software testing has been well-studied in computer science, it has received little attention in natural language processing. Nonetheless, a fully developed methodology for glass box evaluation and testing of language processing applications already exists in the field methods of descriptive linguistics. This work lays out a number of…

  20. Evaluating MEDLINE on CD-ROM: An Overview of Field Tests in Library and Clinical Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapp, Barbara A.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Presents an overview of the National Library of Medicine's 1988 field test and evaluation project on the use of MEDLINE products on CD-ROM. Results are summarized in the areas of user characteristics, search characteristics, user satisfaction, product features and costs, and impact on online searching. (10 references) (LRW)

  1. Surface profile and stress field evaluation using digital gradient sensing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, C.; Sundaram, B. M.; Huang, L.; Tippur, H. V.

    2016-09-01

    Shape and surface topography evaluation from measured orthogonal slope/gradient data is of considerable engineering significance since many full-field optical sensors and interferometers readily output such a data accurately. This has applications ranging from metrology of optical and electronic elements (lenses, silicon wafers, thin film coatings), surface profile estimation, wave front and shape reconstruction, to name a few. In this context, a new methodology for surface profile and stress field determination based on a recently introduced non-contact, full-field optical method called digital gradient sensing (DGS) capable of measuring small angular deflections of light rays coupled with a robust finite-difference-based least-squares integration (HFLI) scheme in the Southwell configuration is advanced here. The method is demonstrated by evaluating (a) surface profiles of mechanically warped silicon wafers and (b) stress gradients near growing cracks in planar phase objects.

  2. Using simulated rainfall to evaluate field and indoor surface runoff phosphorus relationships.

    PubMed

    Guidry, A R; Schindler, F V; German, D R; Gelderman, R H; Gerwing, J R

    2006-01-01

    While numerous studies have evaluated the efficacy of outdoor rainfall simulations to predict P concentrations in surface runoff, few studies have linked indoor rainfall simulations to P concentrations in surface runoff from agricultural fields. The objective of this study was to evaluate the capacity of indoor rainfall simulation to predict total dissolved P concentrations [TP(<0.45)] in field runoff for four dominant agricultural soils in South Dakota. Surface runoff from 10 residue-free field plots (2 m wide by 2 m long, 2-3% slope) and packed soil boxes (1 m long by 20 cm wide by 7.5 cm high, 2-3% slope) was compared. Surface runoff was generated via rainfall simulation at an intensity of 65 mm h(-1) and was collected for 30 min. Packed boxes produced approximately 24% more runoff (range = 2.8-3.4 cm) than field plots (range = 2.3-2.7 cm) among all soils. No statistical differences in either TP(<0.45) concentration or TP(<0.45) loss was observed in runoff from packed boxes and field plots among soil series (0.17 < P < 0.83). Three of four soils showed significantly more total P lost from packed boxes than field plots. The TP(<0.45) concentration in surface runoff from field plots can be predicted from TP(<0.45) concentration in surface runoff from the packed boxes (0.68 < r(2) < 0.94). A single relationship was derived to predict field TP(<0.45) concentration in surface runoff using surface runoff TP(<0.45) concentration from packed boxes. Evidence is provided that indoor runoff can adequately predict TP(<0.45) concentration in field surface runoff for select soils. PMID:17071894

  3. A topological evaluation procedure to assess the integrity of a PIV vector field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foss, J. F.; Hedden, M.; Barros, J. M.; Christensen, K. T.

    2016-09-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) provides a field of discrete vectors to represent a continuum velocity field. Various methods have been adopted to evaluate the integrity of the discrete vectors. In contrast, the present communication provides a systematic technique whereby the integrity of the measured field can be assessed using basic topological principles. Starting with the recognition that PIV provides a vector field overlaid on a planar surface, the analyst can identify the holes (to be punched through the surface of a sphere) and the handles (to be added to the sphere’s surface) that will represent the appropriate surface for the topological analysis. These operations define the a priori Euler characteristic (χ A ) for the subject PIV image. The experimental Euler characteristic (χ E ) will be known from the properties of the measured vector field: nodes, saddles, etc. A necessary condition for the integrity of the measured vector field is that χ E   =  χ A . The topological bases for the integrity evaluation, including the important constraint of ensuring a smooth collapsed sphere, are carefully explained and described with examples.

  4. The {open_quotes}INVERSE PROBLEM{close_quotes} to the evaluation of the magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Helm, M.; Laslett, L.J.

    1995-06-01

    In the design of superconducting magnet elements, such as may be required to guide and focus ions in a particle accelerator, one frequently premises some particular current distribution and then proceeds to compute the consequent magnetic field through use of the laws of Blot and Savart or of Ampere. When working in this manner one of course may need to revise frequently the postulated current distribution before arriving at a resulting magnetic field of acceptable field quality. It therefore is of interest to consider an alternative ({open_quotes}inverse{close_quotes}) procedure in which one specifies a desired character for the field required in the region interior to the winding and undertakes then to evaluate the current distribution on the specified winding surface that would provide this desired field. By evaluating the specified potential in the region interior to the winding along the interface, the authors have determined that a relaxation solution to the potential in the region outside the winding can be converged and used to calculate wire location. They have demonstrated this method by applying a slightly modified version of the program POISSON to a periodic alternating sinusoidal quadrupole field.

  5. Evaluation of wind fields used in Grand Canyon Visibility Transport Commission analyses.

    PubMed

    Green, M C; Pai, P; Ashbaugh, L; Farber, R J

    2000-05-01

    The Grand Canyon Visibility Transport Commission (GCVTC) was established by the U.S. Congress to assess the potential impacts of projected growth on atmospheric visibility at Grand Canyon National Park and to make recommendations to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on what measures could be taken to avoid such adverse impacts. A critical input to the assessment tool used by the commission was three-dimensional model-derived wind fields used to transport the emissions. This paper describes the evaluation of the wind fields used at various stages in the assessment. Wind fields evaluated included those obtained from the Colorado State University Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS), the National Meteorological Center's Nested Grid Model (NGM), and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Atmospheric Transport and Dispersion (ATAD) trajectory model. The model-derived wind fields were evaluated at multiple vertical levels at several locations in the southwestern United States by determining differences between model predicted winds and winds that were measured using radiosonde and radar wind profiler data. Model-derived winds were also evaluated by determining the percent of time that they were within acceptable differences from measured winds. All models had difficulties, generally meeting the acceptable criteria for less than 50% of the predictions. The RAMS model had a persistent bias toward southwesterly winds at the expense of other directions, especially failing to represent channeling by north-south mountain ranges in the lower levels. The NGM model exhibited a substantial bias in the summer months by extending northwesterly winds in the eastern Pacific Ocean well inland, in contrast to the observed southwesterlies at inland locations. The simpler ATAD trajectory model performed somewhat better than the other models, probably because of its use of more upper air sites. The results of the evaluation indicated that these wind fields

  6. Field Artillery Ammunition Processing System (FAAPS) concept evaluation study. Ammunition Logistics Program

    SciTech Connect

    Kring, C.T.; Babcock, S.M.; Watkin, D.C.; Oliver, R.P.

    1992-06-01

    The Field Artillery Ammunition Processing System (FAAPS) is an initiative to introduce a palletized load system (PLS) that is transportable with an automated ammunition processing and storage system for use on the battlefield. System proponents have targeted a 20% increase in the ammunition processing rate over the current operation while simultaneously reducing the total number of assigned field artillery battalion personnel by 30. The overall objective of the FAAPS Project is the development and demonstration of an improved process to accomplish these goals. The initial phase of the FAAPS Project and the subject of this study is the FAAPS concept evaluation. The concept evaluation consists of (1) identifying assumptions and requirements, (2) documenting the process flow, (3) identifying and evaluating technologies available to accomplish the necessary ammunition processing and storage operations, and (4) presenting alternative concepts with associated costs, processing rates, and manpower requirements for accomplishing the operation. This study provides insight into the achievability of the desired objectives.

  7. Evaluation of magnetic refocusing in linear-beam microwave tubes. [using optimal magnetic field configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stankiewicz, N.

    1974-01-01

    Magnetic field configurations in which the axial component of the field decays linearly to a constant plateau field are evaluated for use in refocusing the output beam of linear beam microwave tubes. The slope of the decay and the value of the plateau field are parameters in this study. A uniform beam with a space charge force only in the radial direction is assumed, and the electron trajectories are computed for various classes. For a given magnetic configuration (slope and plateau value) the plateau length is calculated for a specified class and the rms deviation of the output angles for all classes is computed at the end of this plateau length. A minimum condition for a refocused beam is defined to be one in which the rms value of the output angles is less than the rms input. Many of the configurations satisfied this criteria and successfully reduced the rms value by half.

  8. Thiokol/Wasatch installation evaluation of the redesigned field joint protection system (concepts 1 and 3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, M.

    1989-01-01

    The procedures, performance, and results obtained from the Thiokol Corporation/Wasatch Redesigned Field Joint Protection System (FJPS) Installation Evaluation are documented. The purpose of the evaluation was to demonstrate and develop the procedures required to install two different concepts (referred to as Concepts 1 and 3) of the redesigned FJPS. The processing capability of each configuration was then evaluated and compared. The FJPS is installed on redesigned solid rocket motors (RSRM) to protect the field joints from rain intrusion and to maintain the joint temperature sensor measurement between 85 and 122 F while the boosters are on the launch pad. The FJPS is being redesigned to reduce installation timelines at KSC and to simplify or eliminate installation processing problems related to the present design of an EPDM moisture seal/extruded cork combination. Several installation techniques were evaluated, and a preferred method of application was developed for each concept. The installations were performed with the test article in the vertical (flight) position. Comparative timelines between the two concepts were also developed. An additional evaluation of the Concept 3 configuration was performed with the test article in the horizontal position, to simulate an overhead installation on a technical evaluation motor (TEM).

  9. Evaluation of using ferrofluid as an interface material for a field-reversible thermal connector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousif, Ahmed S.

    The electrical functionality of an avionics chassis is limited due to heat dissipation limits. The limits arise due to the fact that components in an avionic computer boxes are packed very compactly, with the components mounted onto plug-in cards, and the harsh environment experienced by the chassis limits how heat can be dissipated from the cards. Convective and radiative heat transfer to the ambient are generally not possible. Therefore it is necessary to have heat transferred from the components conducted to the edge of the plug-in cards. The heat then needs to conduct from the card edge to a cold block that not only holds the card in place, but also removes the generated heat by some heat transfer fluid that is circulated through the cold block. The interface between the plug-in card and the cold block typically has a high thermal resistance since it is necessary for the card to have the capability to be re-workable, meaning that the card can be removed and then returned to the chassis. Reducing the thermal resistance of the interface is the objective of the current study and the topic of this thesis. The current design uses a pressure interface between the card and cold block. The contact pressure is increased through the addition of a wedgelock, which is a field-reversible mechanical connector. To use a wedgelock, the cold block has channels milled on the surface with widths that are larger than the thickness of the plug-in card and the un-expanded wedgelock. The card edge is placed in the channel and placed against one of the channel walls. A wedgelock is then placed between the card and the other channel wall. The wedgelock is then expanded by using either a screw or a lever. As the wedgelock expands it fills in the remaining channel gap and bears against the other face of the plug-in card. The majority of heat generated by the components on the plug-in card is forced to conduct from the card into the wall of the cold block, effectively a single sided, dry

  10. Calculated SAR distributions in a human voxel phantom due to the reflection of electromagnetic fields from a ground plane between 65 MHz and 2 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Findlay, R. P.; Dimbylow, P. J.

    2008-05-01

    If an electromagnetic field is incident normally onto a perfectly conducting ground plane, the field is reflected back into the domain. This produces a standing wave above the ground plane. If a person is present within the domain, absorption of the field in the body may cause problems regarding compliance with electromagnetic guidelines. To investigate this, the whole-body averaged specific energy absorption rate (SAR), localised SAR and ankle currents in the voxel model NORMAN have been calculated for a variety of these exposures under grounded conditions. The results were normalised to the spatially averaged field, a technique used to determine a mean value for comparison with guidelines when the field varies along the height of the body. Additionally, the external field values required to produce basic restrictions for whole-body averaged SAR have been calculated. It was found that in all configurations studied, the ICNIRP reference levels and IEEE MPEs provided a conservative estimate of these restrictions.

  11. Remote-Sensing-Based Evaluation of Relative Consumptive Use Between Flood- and Drip-Irrigated Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez Baquero, G. F.; Jordan, D. L.; Whittaker, A. T.; Allen, R. G.

    2013-12-01

    Governments and water authorities are compelled to evaluate the impacts of agricultural irrigation on economic development and sustainability as water supply shortages continue to increase in many communities. One of the strategies commonly used to reduce such impacts is the conversion of traditional irrigation methods towards more water-efficient practices. As part of a larger effort by the New Mexico Interstate Stream Commission to understand the environmental and economic impact of converting from flood irrigation to drip irrigation, this study evaluates the water-saving effectiveness of drip irrigation in Deming, New Mexico, using a remote-sensing-based technique combined with ground data collection. The remote-sensing-based technique used relative temperature differences as a proxy for water use to show relative differences in crop consumptive use between flood- and drip-irrigated fields. Temperature analysis showed that, on average, drip-irrigated fields were cooler than flood-irrigated fields, indicating higher water use. The higher consumption of water by drip-irrigated fields was supported by a determination of evapotranspiration (ET) from all fields using the METRIC Landsat-based surface energy balance model. METRIC analysis yielded higher instantaneous ET for drip-irrigated fields when compared to flood-irrigated fields and confirmed that drip-irrigated fields consumed more water than flood-irrigated fields planted with the same crop. More water use generally results in more biomass and hence higher crop yield, and this too was confirmed by greater relative Normalized Difference Vegetation Index for the drip irrigated fields. Results from this study confirm previous estimates regarding the impacts of increased efficiency of drip irrigation on higher water consumption in the area (Ward and Pulido-Velazquez, 2008). The higher water consumption occurs with drip because, with the limited water supplies and regulated maximum limits on pumping amounts, the

  12. Implementation and Evaluation of the Virtual Fields Method: Determining Constitutive Model Parameters From Full-Field Deformation Data.

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, Sharlotte Lorraine Bolyard; Scherzinger, William M.

    2014-09-01

    The Virtual Fields Method (VFM) is an inverse method for constitutive model parameter identication that relies on full-eld experimental measurements of displacements. VFM is an alternative to standard approaches that require several experiments of simple geometries to calibrate a constitutive model. VFM is one of several techniques that use full-eld exper- imental data, including Finite Element Method Updating (FEMU) techniques, but VFM is computationally fast, not requiring iterative FEM analyses. This report describes the im- plementation and evaluation of VFM primarily for nite-deformation plasticity constitutive models. VFM was successfully implemented in MATLAB and evaluated using simulated FEM data that included representative experimental noise found in the Digital Image Cor- relation (DIC) optical technique that provides full-eld displacement measurements. VFM was able to identify constitutive model parameters for the BCJ plasticity model even in the presence of simulated DIC noise, demonstrating VFM as a viable alternative inverse method. Further research is required before VFM can be adopted as a standard method for constitu- tive model parameter identication, but this study is a foundation for ongoing research at Sandia for improving constitutive model calibration.

  13. A comparison between maritime field observations and photosimulation for developing and validating visible signature evaluation tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culpepper, Joanne B.; Wheaton, Vivienne C.; Shao, Q. T.; Furnell, Alistair

    2015-10-01

    Over the past 50 years, the majority of detection models used to assess visible signatures have been developed and validated using static imagery. Some of these models are the German developed CAMAELEON (CAMou age Assessment by Evaluation of Local Energy Spatial Frequency and OrieNtation) model and the U.S. Army's Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) ACQUIRE and TTP (Targeting Task Performance) models. All these models gathered the necessary human observer data for development and validation from static images in photosimulation experiments. In this paper, we compare the results of a field observation trial to a static photosimulation experiment. The probability of detection obtained from the field observation trial was compared to the detection probability obtained from the static photosimulation trial. The comparison showed good correlation between the field trial and the static image photosimulation detection probabilities, where a Spearman correlation coefficient of 0.59 was calculated. The photosimulation detection task was found to be significantly harder than the field observation detection task, suggesting that to use static image photosimulation to develop and validate maritime visible signature evaluation tools may need correction to represent detection in field observations.

  14. Dermoscopy and methyl aminolevulinate: A study for detection and evaluation of field cancerization.

    PubMed

    Rossi, A; Garelli, V; Pranteda, G; Cardone, M; Anzalone, A; Fortuna, M C; Di Nunno, D; Mari, E; De Vita, G; Carlesimo, M

    2016-09-01

    Actinic keratosis (AK) is a keratinocyte intraepidermal neoplasia UV light-induced that frequently appears in sun-exposed areas of the skin. Although historically AK was defined as "precancerous", actually it is considered as the earliest stage of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in situ. Since AKs can progress into invasive SCC, their treatment is recommended. AKs rarely develop as a single lesion; usually multiple lesions commonly affect an entire area of chronically actinic damaged skin. This has led to the concept of "field cancerization", an area chronically sun-exposed that surrounds peripherally visible lesions, in which are individualized subclinical alterations. One of the main principles endpoint in the management of AKs is the evaluation and the treatment of field cancerization. In this view, in order to detect and quantify field cancerization, we employed a method based on the topical application of methyl aminolevulinate (MAL) and the detection of the fluorescence emitted by its metabolite Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX); then, considering the extension and the intensity of measured fluorescence, we create a score of field cancerization. The results show that patients underwent to daylight PDT had a reduction of total score, from T0 to T2. Whereas in the group untreated we observed a stability of total score or a slightly worse. So, the method and the score used allows to evaluate with a good approximation the dimension of field cancerization and show the modification of it after treatment. PMID:27344021

  15. Preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil field waste into salt caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J.; Elcock, D.; Raivel, M.; Caudle, D.; Ayers, R.C. Jr.; Grunewald, B.

    1996-06-01

    Caverns can be readily formed in salt formations through solution mining. The caverns may be formed incidentally, as a result of salt recovery, or intentionally to create an underground chamber that can be used for storing hydrocarbon products or compressed air or disposing of wastes. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the feasibility, suitability, and legality of disposing of nonhazardous oil and gas exploration, development, and production wastes (hereafter referred to as oil field wastes, unless otherwise noted) in salt caverns. Chapter 2 provides background information on: types and locations of US subsurface salt deposits; basic solution mining techniques used to create caverns; and ways in which salt caverns are used. Later chapters provide discussion of: federal and state regulatory requirements concerning disposal of oil field waste, including which wastes are considered eligible for cavern disposal; waste streams that are considered to be oil field waste; and an evaluation of technical issues concerning the suitability of using salt caverns for disposing of oil field waste. Separate chapters present: types of oil field wastes suitable for cavern disposal; cavern design and location; disposal operations; and closure and remediation. This report does not suggest specific numerical limits for such factors or variables as distance to neighboring activities, depths for casings, pressure testing, or size and shape of cavern. The intent is to raise issues and general approaches that will contribute to the growing body of information on this subject.

  16. Biochemical and hormonal evaluation of pineal glands exposed in vitro to magnetic fields. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.E.; Leung, F.C.; Miller, D.L.

    1998-11-01

    It has been reported that exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields can significantly alter pineal melatonin metabolism in vivo. However, whether such changes are due to direct or indirect effects of field exposure has not been clearly demonstrated. The objective of this research project was to examine the effects of magnetic fields on melatonin metabolism in pineal glands in vitro. Chicken pineal glands were cultured in a modified incubator encircled by a magnetic field exposure system. The incubator, that was remote from but attached to a standard laboratory incubator, contained a regulated light source for modulation of the light/dark cycle (12:12 L/D). Pineal glands from 4--6 week old chickens were maintained under 95% O{sub 2}, 5% CO{sub 2} in a static culture system. Because of problems due to contamination and loss of viability of such a system, a perfusion system was developed for EMF studies. Both single and multiple chicken pineal glands were used in the perfusion studies and were kept viable in the perfusion chamber by a continuous flow of medium at 39 C for up to 8 days. Perfusate samples were collected into a fraction collector and were subsequently kept frozen at {minus} 20 C until assays were performed. Melatonin secreted by the cultured pineal glands and released into the medium was measured by a melatonin double antibody radioimmunoassay (RIA) using {sup 125}I-melatonin as the label.

  17. Flowpath evaluation and reconnaissance by remote field Eddy current testing (FERRET)

    SciTech Connect

    Smoak, A.E.; Zollinger, W.T.

    1993-12-31

    This document describes the design and development of FERRET (Flowpath Evaluation and Reconnaisance by Remote-field Eddy current Testing). FERRET is a system for inspecting the steel pipes which carry cooling water to underground nuclear waste storage tanks. The FERRET system has been tested in a small scale cooling pipe mock-up, an improved full scale mock-up, and in flaw detection experiments. Early prototype designs of FERRET and the FERRET launcher (a device which inserts, moves, and retrieves probes from a piping system) as well as the field-ready design are discussed.

  18. A new parameter to evaluate the quality of fiber count data of slides with relocatable fields.

    PubMed

    Pang, Thomas

    2007-02-01

    Asbestos reference slides with relocatable fields are effective in determining the fiber counting errors and evaluating intercounter precision and accuracy. The process is time consuming and expensive as it requires (a) the analysts to record the number and the positions of the fibers and (b) an experienced microscopist to determine the errors. A new parameter based on the discrepancies between the reported fibers and the verified fibers is being investigated for monitoring the quality of fiber counts. The discrepancies are related to the fiber counting errors. The new process requires the analysts to report only the fibers in each field examined. PMID:17249148

  19. Beam profile measurement and evaluation of far field high energy laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Pengling; Feng, Guobin; Wang, Zhenbao; Wang, Ping; Wu, Yong; Zhang, Jianmin; Cheng, Shaowu; Feng, Gang; Wang, Fei; Shao, Bibo

    2015-05-01

    The far field beam profile is of significant importance to the analysis of the atmospheric propagation effect and evaluation of the beam control capability, tracking and aiming precision of laser system. In the paper, technology of laser beam measurement such as mid-infrared laser detection at wide temperature range, power density attenuation, photoelectric and calorimetric compound method for laser measurement, synchronous detecting of multi-channel pulsed signal are introduced. A series of instrumented target with detector array are developed for laser beam power density distribution measurement at far field. The power in the bucket, strehl ratio, centroid and jitter of beam can be calculated from the measured results.

  20. Comprehensive evaluation of attitude and orbit estimation using real earth magnetic field data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutschmann, Julie; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack

    1997-01-01

    A single, augmented extended Kalman filter (EKF) which simultaneously and autonomously estimates spacecraft attitude and orbit was developed and tested with simulated and real magnetometer and rate data. Since the earth's magnetic field is a function of time and position, and since time is accurately known, the differences between the computed and measured magnetic field components, as measured by the magnetometers throughout the entire spacecraft's orbit, are a function of orbit and attitude errors. These differences can be used to estimate the orbit and attitude. The test results of the EKF with magnetometer and gyro data from three NASA satellites are presented and evaluated.