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Sample records for field evolution isotopic

  1. Shape evolution and energy spectra of Pt isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kun, Yu; Zhou, Xianrong; Cui, Jiwei

    2016-02-01

    The shapes and low-energy spectra of 176-194Pt isotopes are discussed by a nonrelativistic Skyrme-Hartree-Fock (SHF) approach plus a density-dependent pairing in the BCS approximation. Two different Skyrme parameters SLy5 and SGII are used to perform constrained triaxial mean-field calculations of energy surface. The calculations beyond mean field are introduced by a projection of mean-field intrinsic wave functions onto good angular momentum. Theoretical calculations exhibit the evolution of shapes from triaxial in light Pt isotopes to γ soft for medium Pt isotopes, and finally oblate shapes in heavy isotopes. In particular, the calculated excitation spectra are in good agreement with available data and the trend of experimental B(E2) is reproduced. The mean-field calculations indicate a stable shape evolution with SLy5 and SGII interactions, respectively. In the present SHF approach, the lighter nuclei Pt isotopes present a slightly triaxial shapes.

  2. Isotopic anomalies - Chemical memory of Galactic evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, Donald D.

    1988-01-01

    New mechanisms for the chemical memory of isotopic anomalies are proposed which are based on the temporal change during the chemical evolution of the Galaxy of the isotopic composition of the mean ejecta from stars. Because of the differing temporal evolution of primary and secondary products of nucleosynthesis, the isotopic composition of the bulk interstellar medium changes approximately linearly with time, and thus any dust component having an age different from that of average dust will be isotopically anomalous. Special attention is given to C, O, Mg, Si, and isotopically heavy average-stellar condensates of SiC.

  3. Nonperturbative Quantum Field Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xingbo; Ilderton, Anton; Maris, Pieter; Vary, James P.

    2014-06-01

    We introduce a nonperturbative, first-principles approach to time-dependent problems in quantum field theory. In this approach, the time-evolution of quantum field configurations is calculated in real time and at the amplitude level. This method is particularly suitable for treating systems interacting with a time-dependent background field. As a test problem, we apply this approach to QED and study electron acceleration and the associated photon emission in a time- and space-dependent electromagnetic background field.

  4. The seawater Sr isotopic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, A. B.; Gorokhov, I. M.; Semikhatov, M. A.; Maslov, A. V.; Krupenin, M. T.; Melnikov, N. N.

    2003-04-01

    Progress toward a reconstruction of the 87Sr/86Sr variations in Proterozoic seawater is still deficient compared to the Phanerozoic. There is no universally recognized curve, and some of its versions are in conflict. The construction of a reference curve should be based on: (1) the study of several thick carbonate-bearing successions within single paleobasin, (2) the reliable isotope dating of these successions, (3) the geochemical screening of least-altered carbonate samples, (4) a selective dissolution of samples to enrich them in primary carbonate generations. This approach was applied to study Late Proterozoic marine carbonate successions of the South Urals and East Siberia. Three comprehensive fragments of 87Sr/86Sr seawater curve were obtained: (1) the descending trend from 0.70562-0.70596 to 0.70519-0.70523 at 1050-1000 Ma, (2) the ascending trend from 0.70525-0.70535 to 0.70611-70625 at 850-750 Ma, and (3) the area of minor fluctuations from 0.70540 to 0.70610 at 680-660 Ma. The Sr- and C-isotope data for the South Urals allow us to revise the current stratigraphic correlations and impose some constraints on the age of the classic Upper Proterozoic successions of North Canada (Shaler Gr) and Svalbard (Akademikerbreen Gr): (1) the carbonate formations in middle part of the Shaler Gr appear to have been deposited after 800 Ma, (2) the rate of sedimentation of the Akademikerbreen succession was likely to be higher than it was proposed. The data from East Siberia postulate predominance of the low 87Sr/86Sr ratio during culmination stage of the Grenville orogenic cycle and decrease in this ratio in post-Grenvillian ocean. This fact markedly distinguishes the Grenville orogeny from the Pan-African orogeny which resulted in rise of seawater 87Sr/86Sr ratio up to 0.7085. The following factors were responsible for the low 87Sr/86Sr ratio in Grenvillian and post-Grenvillian oceans: a high role of mantle rocks in the exhumed orogens, a sea-level rise and partial

  5. Oxygen isotope evolution of the Lake Owyhee volcanic field, Oregon, and implications for low-δ18O magmas of the Snake River Plain - Yellowstone hotspot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, T.; Kitajima, K.; Nakashima, D.; Valley, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    The Snake River Plain - Yellowstone (SRP-Y) hotspot trend is one of the largest known low-δ18O magmatic provinces, yet the timing and distribution of hydrothermal alteration relative to hotspot magmatism remains incompletely understood. Existing models for SRP-Y low-δ18O magma genesis differ regarding the timing of protolith alteration (e.g. Eocene vs. present), depth at which alteration occurs (e.g. 15 km vs. <5 km), and physical controls on the extent of alteration (e.g. caldera collapse, crustal scale fluid flow, etc.). We expand the existing oxygen isotope data set for zircon in the Lake Owyhee volcanic field (LOVF) of east central Oregon to further identify magmatic oxygen isotope trends within the field. These data offer insight into the timing of alteration and the extent of the greater SRP-Y low-δ18O province, as well as the conditions that generate large low-δ18O provinces. 16-14 Ma silicic volcanism in the LOVF is linked to the pre-14 Ma SRP-Y hotspot, with volcanism partially overlapping extension in the north-south trending Oregon-Idaho Graben (OIG). Ion microprobe analyses of zircons from 16 LOVF silicic lavas and tuffs reveal homogeneous zircons on both the single grain and hand sample scales: individual samples have 2 S.D. for δ18O ranging from 0.27 to 0.96‰ (SMOW), and sample averages ranging from 1.8 to 6.0‰, excluding texturally chaotic and/or porous zircons which have δ18O values as low as 0.0‰. All low-δ18O LOVF magmas, including the caldera-forming Tuff of Leslie Gulch and Tuff of Spring Creek, are confined to the OIG, although not all zircons from within the OIG have low δ18O values. The presence and sequence of low-δ18O magmas in the LOVF and adjacent central Snake River Plain (CSRP) cannot be explained by existing caldera subsidence or pre-hotspot source models. These data, however, combined with volumetrically limited low-δ18O material in the adjacent Idaho Batholith and Basin and Range, are consistent with low-δ18O magmas

  6. Isotopic and trace element compositions of upper mantle and lower crustal xenoliths, Cima volcanic field, California: Implications for evolution of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mukasa, S.B.; Wilshire, H.G.

    1997-01-01

    Ultramafic and mafic xenoliths from the Cima volcanic field, southern California, provide evidence of episodic modification of the upper mantle and underplating of the crust beneath a portion of the southern Basin and Range province. The upper mantle xenoliths include spinel peridotite and anhydrous and hydrous pyroxenite, some cut by igneous-textured pyroxenite-gabbro veins and dikes and some by veins of amphibole ?? plagioclase. Igneous-textured pyroxenites and gabbros like the dike rocks also occur abundantly as isolated xenoliths inferred to represent underplated crust. Mineral and whole rock trace element compositions among and within the different groups of xenoliths are highly variable, reflecting multiple processes that include magma-mantle wall rock reactions, episodic intrusion and it filtration of basaltic melts of varied sources into the mantle wall rock, and fractionation. Nd, Sr, and Pb isotopic compositions mostly of clinopyroxene and plagioclase mineral separates show distinct differences between mantle xenoliths (??Nd = -5.7 to +3.4; 87Sr/86Sr = 0.7051 - 0.7073; 206Pb/204Pb = 19.045 - 19.195) and the igneous-textured xenoliths (??Nd = +7.7 to +11.7; 87Sr/86Sr = 0.7027 - 0.7036 with one carbonate-affected outlier at 0.7054; and 206Pb/204Pb = 18.751 - 19.068), so that they cannot be related. The igneous-textured pyroxenites and gabbros are similar in their isotopic compositions to the host basaltic rocks, which have ??Nd of+5.1 to +9.3; 87Sr/86Sr of 0.7028 - 0.7050, and 206Pb/204Pb of 18.685 - 21.050. The igneous-textured pyroxenites and gabbros are therefore inferred to be related to the host rocks as earlier cogenetic intrusions in the mantle and in the lower crust. Two samples of peridotite, one modally metasomatized by amphibole and the other by plagioclase, have isotopic compositions intermediate between the igneous-textured xenoliths and the mantle rock, suggesting mixing, but also derivation of the metasomatizing magmas from two separate and

  7. H, O, Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope geochemistry of the Latir volcanic field and cogenetic intrusions, New Mexico, and relations between evolution of a continental magmatic center and modifications of the lithosphere

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, C.M.; Lipman, P.W.; Czamanske, G.K.

    1990-01-01

    Over 200 H, O, Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope analyses, in addition to geologic and petrologic constraints, document the magmatic evolution of the 28.5-19 Ma Latir volcanic field and associated intrusive rocks, which includes multiple stages of crustal assimilation, magma mixing, protracted crystallization, and open- and closed-system evolution in the upper crust. In contrast to data from younger volcanic centers in northern New Mexico, relatively low and restricted primary ??18O values (+6.4 to +7.4) rule out assimilation of supracrustal rocks enriched in 18O. Initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.705 to 0.708), ??18O values (-2 to-7), and 206Pb/204Pb ratios (17.5 to 18.4) of metaluminous precaldera volcanic rocks and postcaldera plutonic rocks suggest that most Latir rocks were generated by fractional crystallization of substantial volumes of mantle-derived basaltic magma that had near-chondritic Nd isotope ratios, accompanied by assimilation of crustal material in two main stages: 1) assimilation of non-radiogenic lower crust, followed by 2) assimilation of middle and upper crust by inter-mediate-composition magmas that had been contaminated during the first stage. Magmatic evolution in the upper crust peaked with eruption of the peralkaline Amalia Tuff (???26 Ma), which evolved from metaluminous parental magmas. A third stage of late, roofward assimilation of Proterozoic rocks in the Amalia Tuff magma is indicated by trends in initial 87Sr/86Sr and 206Pb/204Pb ratios from 0.7057 to 0.7098 and 19.5 to 18.8, respectively, toward the top of the pre-eruptive magma chamber. Highly evolved postcaldera plutons are generally fine grained and are zoned in initial 87Sr/86Sr and 206Pb/204Pb ratios, varying from 0.705 to 0.709 and 17.8 to 18.6, respectively. In contrast, the coarser-grained Cabresto Lake (???25 Ma) and Rio Hondo (???21 Ma) plutons have relatively homogeneous initial 87Sr/86Sr and 206Pb/204Pb ratios of approximately 0.7053 and 17.94 and 17.55, respectively. ??18O values for

  8. Martian stable isotopes: volatile evolution, climate change and exobiological implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakosky, B. M.

    1999-01-01

    Measurements of the ratios of stable isotopes in the martian atmosphere and crust provide fundamental information about the evolution of the martian volatile and climate system. Current best estimates of the isotope ratios indicate that there has been substantial loss of gases to space and exchange of gases between the atmosphere and the crust throughout geologic time; exchange may have occurred through circulation of water in hydrothermal systems. Processes of volatile evolution and exchange will fractionate the isotopes in a manner that complicates the possible interpretation of isotopic data in terms of any fractionation that may have been caused by martian biota, and must be understood first. Key measurements are suggested that will enhance our understanding of the non-biological fractionation of the isotopes and of the evolution of the martian volatile system.

  9. Carbon Monoxide Isotopes: On the Trail of Galactic Chemical Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, W.

    1995-01-01

    From the early days of the discovery of radio emission from carbon monoxide it was realized that it offered unusual potential for under- standing the chemical evolution of the Galaxy and external galaxies through measurements of molecular isotopes. These results bear on stellar nucleosynthesis, star formation, and gases in the interstellar medium. Progress in isotopic radio measurements will be reviewed.

  10. Shape evolution with angular momentum in Lu isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kardan, Azam; Sayyah, Sepideh

    2016-06-01

    The nuclear potential energies of Lu isotopes with neutron number N = 90 ‑ 98 up to high spins are computed within the framework of the unpaired cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky method. The potential and the macroscopic Lublin-Strasbourg drop (LSD) energy-surface diagrams are analyzed in terms of quadrupole deformation and triaxiality parameter. The shape evolution of these isotopes with respect to angular momentum, as well as the neutron number is studied.

  11. Uranium isotope ratio measurements in field settings

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, R.W.; Barshick, C.M.; Young, J.P.; Ramsey, J.M.

    1997-06-01

    The authors have developed a technique for uranium isotope ratio measurements of powder samples in field settings. Such a method will be invaluable for environmental studies, radioactive waste operations, and decommissioning and decontamination operations. Immediate field data can help guide an ongoing sampling campaign. The measurement encompasses glow discharge sputtering from pressed sample hollow cathodes, high resolution laser spectroscopy using conveniently tunable diode lasers, and optogalvanic detection. At 10% {sup 235}U enrichment and above, the measurement precision for {sup 235}U/({sup 235}U+{sup 238}U) isotope ratios was {+-}3%; it declined to {+-}15% for 0.3% (i.e., depleted) samples. A prototype instrument was constructed and is described.

  12. Stable isotope paleoaltimetry and the evolution of landscapes and life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulch, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    circulation and associated teleconnections in the global climate system that affect δ18O or δD of precipitation; (2) Evaluating on a case-by-case basis if temporal and spatial changes in isotope lapse rates influence interpretations of paleoelevation; (3) Interfacing with phylogenetic techniques to evaluate competing hypotheses with respect to the timing of surface uplift and the diversification of lineages; (4) Characterizing feedbacks between changes in surface elevation and atmospheric circulation as these are likely to be equally important to the diversification of lineages than changes in surface elevation alone. Tackling these challenges will benefit from the accelerating pace of improved data-model comparisons and rapidly evolving geochemical techniques for reconstructing precipitation patterns. Most importantly, stable isotope paleoaltimetry has the potential to develop into a truly interdisciplinary field if innovative tectonic/paleoclimatic and evolutionary biology/phylogenetic approaches are integrated into a common research framework. It therefore, opens new avenues to study the long-term evolution of landscapes and life.

  13. Mars volatile evolution - Evidence from stable isotopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakosky, Bruce M.

    1991-01-01

    In the most strongly favored of the scenarios presently considered for Martian atmospheric evolution, oxygen fractionation by escape into space is diluted by exchange by a nonatmospheric reservoir as polar ice-water deposits exchange with atmospheric water over geologic time. The exchange of oxygen between atmospheric CO2 and H2O may account for the fractionation observed between those two species. Observations and numerical modeling efforts that may test the present results are suggested.

  14. Crustal evolution reflected in seawater Sr and Nd isotope records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peucker-Ehrenbrink, B.

    2013-12-01

    Radiogenic isotope ratios record time-integrated parent-daughter ratios, and are thus sensitive to chemical composition and time. The oceans recieve the integrated runoff from the continental surface and preserve these signals in marine sedimentary records. Radiogenic isotope records of seawater and marine sediments have been reconstructed over the past five decades for many of the radiogenic isotope systems. For some systems (Sr) excellent records do exist that integrate seawater signals for the entire ocean. In contrast, globally averaged records of radiogenic isotopes with short marine residence times (Nd, Pb) are much more difficult to establish. Here, I attempt to link long-term (Phanerozoic) records of marine radiogenic isotope systems to records of the evolution of the continental surface that interacts with the hydrologic cycle. For the present we can show that the dissolved and particulate loads from the continents integrate different portions of the continental surface (Peucker-Ehrenbrink et al., 2010, G-cubed 11, doi: 10.1029/2009GC002869). For instance, the areas generating the dissolved load are characterized by significantly older bedrock (~400 Myr) than those generating the particulate load (~320 Myr). The fact that both are younger than the mean bedrock age of the non-glaciated, exorheic portion of the continental surface (~450 Myr) reflects the disproportionate role active margins, high-standing ocean island, and weathering and erosion of young sedimentary strata play in exporting dissolved matter and sedimnent to the oceans. Using present-day systematics as a guide, I argue that the first-order trough-like shape of the Phanerozoic marine Sr isotope record reflects the rejuvenation of the continental surface involved in exporting Sr to the ocean from the early Phanerozoic to the mid Jurassic that is followed by an 'aging' that continues into the Quaternary. This long-term evolution of the continental surface is mirrored by a similar - though more

  15. Archean Pb Isotope Evolution: Implications for the Early Earth.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vervoort, J. D.; Thorpe, R.; Albarede, F.; Blichert-Toft, J.

    2008-12-01

    The U-Pb isotope system provides us with a powerful tool for understanding the chemical evolution of the Earth. Pb isotopes in Archean rocks, however, have not been widely utilized because U mobility makes initial Pb isotope ratios from old silicate rocks difficult, if not impossible, to determine. Galenas in syngenetic volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits, however, provide snapshots of initial Pb ratios because their Pb isotopic composition is time invariant at their formation (U/Pb=0). The Pb isotopic record from galenas from rocks of all age have been utilized for over 70 years to answer a wide range of scientific problems beginning with Al Nier's pioneering work analyzing Pb isotopes in the 1930's but are no longer widely used by the isotopic community because they have been produced by older TIMS techniques. We have begun a re-examination of Archean Pb by an extensive analysis of over 100 galena samples from Archean VMS deposits throughout the Superior and Slave Provinces in Canada as well as from other VMS deposits in Finland, South Africa and Western Australia. The goal of this work is to provide modern, high precision measurements and update an old, but venerable, Pb isotopic data set. We feel these data provide important constraints on not only the Pb isotopic evolution of the Earth, but planetary differentiation and recycling processes operating in the first 2 b.y. of Earth's history. Our analytical techniques include dissolving the Pb sulfide minerals, purifying them with ion chromatography, and analyzing them using MC-ICPMS at both Washington State University (Neptune) and Ecole Normale Superieure in Lyon, France (Nu). All Pb solutions are doped with Tl in order to correct for mass fractionation. In this abstract we report preliminary galena Pb isotope data from 6 VMS deposits in the Abitibi greenstone belt: Chibougamu, Matagami, Noranda, Normetal, Timmins, and Val d"Or. These deposits are all approximately 2.7 Ga in age but in detail vary from 2

  16. Adding geochemical and isotope tracers to models of hillslope evolution: valuable constraints or monumental headache?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudd, S. M.; Yoo, K.; Hurst, M. D.; Weinman, B. A.; Maher, K.

    2011-12-01

    Landscapes evolve through time, both in terms of their geomorphology and their geochemistry. Past studies have highlighted that topography suffers from the problem of equifinality: the topographic configuration of landscapes can be the result of many different, yet equally plausible, erosion histories. In hillslope soils the properties and chemistry of the soils themselves could provide additional constraints on landscape evolution. Here we present results from a combination of modelling and field studies that seek to quantify the co-evolution of hillslope morphology and the solid state chemistry of hillslope soils. The models follow large numbers of individual particles as they are entrained into a physically mobile soil layer, weathered, and accumulate isotopes such as 10Be and 21Ne. We demonstrate that multiple hillslope properties mitigate (but do not eliminate) the problem of equifinality and demonstrate the importance of accounting for individual particle residence times and ages in interpretation of both isotope and weathering data.

  17. Pb Isotopic Evolution of Koolau Volcano (Oahu, Hawaii)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fekiacova, Z.; Abouchami, W.

    2003-12-01

    High precision Pb isotopes in Hawaiian shield lavas have revealed the existence of source heterogeneities between volcanoes, as well as within a single volcano during its temporal evolution, e.g. Mauna Kea [1, 2]. The Koolau Scientific Drilling Project (KSDP) was initiated in order to evaluate the long-term evolution of Koolau volcano (Oahu), whose subaerial Makapuu stage lavas define the isotopically enriched endmember of Hawaiian shield lavas. We report Pb triple spike data on KSDP main shield-stage lavas (depth range: 304-632 mbsl) and post-erosional Honolulu volcanics. KSDP lavas show a small range of Pb isotopic compositions (206Pb/204Pb=18.02-18.15; 207Pb/204Pb=15.44-15.46; 208Pb/204Pb=37.82-37.87). Pb isotope ratios increase with depth until ˜450 m and then decrease again to a depth of 616 m. Superimposed on this "bell" trend, 206Pb/204Pb ratios oscillate at depth intervals of ˜10m. The Honolulu volcanics display, at a given 206Pb/204Pb ratio, similar 207Pb/204Pb but lower 208Pb/204Pb ratios than KSDP lavas. In 208Pb/204Pb-206Pb/204Pb space, KSDP and Honolulu lavas define two distinct linear arrays which converge at the radiogenic end. However, in 207Pb/204Pb-206Pb/204Pb space, KSDP and Honolulu lavas form a single array, with Honolulu lying at the radiogenic end of the array. While KSDP lavas have more radiogenic Pb isotopic compositions than Makapuu stage lavas [1], they show close resemblance to Nuuanu 1 and Nuuanu 2 landslide blocks [3]. The distinct Pb isotopic features of subaerial, main-shield and post-erosional lavas reflect compositional source changes during the growth of Koolau volcano. The mixing lines defined by KSDP and Honolulu lavas in 208Pb-206Pb space require the presence of three distinct Pb isotopic components. While the enriched "Koolau" component is predominantly sampled during the subaerial stage, its contribution during the main shield building stage has been waxing and waning. The radiogenic Pb endmember common to Honolulu and KSDP

  18. Mapping the Evolution of Scientific Fields

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Mark; Roberts, David C.; Gulbahce, Natali

    2010-01-01

    Despite the apparent cross-disciplinary interactions among scientific fields, a formal description of their evolution is lacking. Here we describe a novel approach to study the dynamics and evolution of scientific fields using a network-based analysis. We build an idea network consisting of American Physical Society Physics and Astronomy Classification Scheme (PACS) numbers as nodes representing scientific concepts. Two PACS numbers are linked if there exist publications that reference them simultaneously. We locate scientific fields using a community finding algorithm, and describe the time evolution of these fields over the course of 1985–2006. The communities we identify map to known scientific fields, and their age depends on their size and activity. We expect our approach to quantifying the evolution of ideas to be relevant for making predictions about the future of science and thus help to guide its development. PMID:20463949

  19. Evolution of Shell Structure in Neutron-Rich Calcium Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, G.; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Machleidt, R; Papenbrock, T.

    2012-01-01

    We employ interactions from chiral effective field theory and compute the binding energies and low-lying excitations of calcium isotopes with the coupled-cluster method. Effects of three-nucleon forces are included phenomenologically as in-medium two-nucleon interactions, and the coupling to the particle continuum is taken into account using a Berggren basis. The computed ground-state energies and the low-lying J =2+ states for the isotopes 42,48,50,52Ca are in good agreement with data, and we predict the excitation energy of the first J =2+ state in 54Ca at 1.9 MeV, displaying only a weak subshell closure. In the odd-mass nuclei 53,55,61Ca we find that the positive parity states deviate strongly from the naive shell model.

  20. Stable isotope evolution and paleolimnology of ancient Lake Creede

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rye, Robert O.; Bethke, Philip M.; Finkelstein, David B.

    2000-01-01

    The lacustrine carbonate and travertine (tufa) deposits of ancient Lake Creede preserve a remarkable record of the isotopic evolution of the lake. That record indicates that the δ18O of the lake water, and by analogy its salinity, evolved through evaporation. Limited ans less reliable data on hydrous minerals and fluid inclusions in early diagenetic carbonates indicate that the δD of the lake waters also evolved through evaporation. The isotope data place restrictions on models of the physical limnology of the lake and its evolution. The closed-basin Lake Creede formed shortly after collapse of the 26.9 Ma Creede caldera. Throughout most of its history it occupied the northern three quarters of the moat between the resurgent dome and wall of the caldera. The Creede Formation was deposited in the basin, dominantly as lacustrine sediments. Travertine mounds interfinger with Creede Formation sediments along the inner and outer margins of the lake basin. An estimated one-half of the original thickness of the Creede Formation has been lost mainly to erosion although scattered remnants of the upper portion remain on the caldera walls. Two diamond core holes (CCM-1 and CCM-2) sampled the uneroded portion of the Creede Formation as part of the U.S. Continental Drilling Program. Volcaniclastic material, including tuff units deposited directly into the lake and ash washed in from the watershed, compose the main lithologies of the Creede Formation. These volcaniclastic strata were produced by episodic ring-fracture volcanism. Lacustrine carbonates make up about 15% of the section sampled by drill core. They occur as 1 mm to 2 cm low-Mg calcite laminar alternating with siliciclastic laminar in scattered intervals throughout the preserved section. The carbonate laminar are accumulations of 5-20 μm crystallites (microparites) and brine shrimmp fecal pellets (peloids) composed mainly of microparasite particles. Low-Mg calcite also occurs as an early diagenetic replacement of

  1. Plutonium isotopes in the atmosphere of Central Europe: Isotopic composition and time evolution vs. circulation factors.

    PubMed

    Kierepko, Renata; Mietelski, Jerzy W; Ustrnul, Zbigniew; Anczkiewicz, Robert; Wershofen, Herbert; Holgye, Zoltan; Kapała, Jacek; Isajenko, Krzysztof

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports evidence of Pu isotopes in the lower part of the troposphere of Central Europe. The data were obtained based on atmospheric aerosol fraction samples collected from four places in three countries (participating in the informal European network known as the Ring of Five (Ro5)) forming a cell with a surface area of about 200,000km(2). We compared our original data sets from Krakow (Poland, 1990-2007) and Bialystok (Poland, 1991-2007) with the results from two other locations, Prague (Czech Republic; 1997-2004) and Braunschweig (Germany; 1990-2003) to find time evolution of the Pu isotopes. The levels of the activity concentration for (238)Pu and for ((239+240))Pu were estimated to be a few and some tens of nBqm(-3), respectively. However, we also noted some results were much higher (even about 70 times higher) than the average concentration of (238)Pu in the atmosphere. The achieved complex data sets were used to test a new approach to the problem of solving mixing isotopic traces from various sources (here up to three) in one sample. Results of our model, supported by mesoscale atmospheric circulation parameters, suggest that Pu from nuclear weapon accidents or tests and nuclear burnt-up fuel are present in the air. PMID:27450248

  2. Possible observation of the isotope effect during field evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubev, O. L.; Blashenkov, N. M.

    2016-01-01

    The field evaporation of tungsten at high temperatures (T ~ 2000 K) has been studied using a magnetic mass spectrometer equipped with a field ion source. Only low-charge ions (W+2 and W+) have been observed in the course of evaporation for all tungsten isotopes. For singly charged ions only, the number of ions of the heaviest isotope, 186W+, was about one order of magnitude lower than that corresponding to the standard isotope ratio for natural tungsten. An explanation of this anomalous phenomenon is proposed.

  3. Modeling the evolution of galactic magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Yar-Mukhamedov, D.

    2015-04-15

    An analytic model for evolution of galactic magnetic fields in hierarchical galaxy formation frameworks is introduced. Its major innovative components include explicit and detailed treatment of the physics of merger events, mass gains and losses, gravitational energy sources and delays associated with formation of large-scale magnetic fields. This paper describes the model, its implementation, and core results obtained by its means.

  4. Os isotopes in SNC meteorites and their implications to the early evolution of Mars and Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagoutz, E.; Luck, J. M.; Othman, D. Ben; Wanke, H.

    1993-01-01

    A new development on the measurement of the Os isotopic composition by mass spectrometry using negative ions opened a new field of applications. The Re-Os systematic provides time information on the differentiation of the nobel metals. The nobel metals are strongly partitioned into metal and sulphide phases, but also the generation of silicate melts might fractionate the Re-Os system. Compared to the other isotopic systems which are mainly dating the fractionation of the alkalis and alkali-earth elements, the Re-Os system is expected to disclose entirely new information about the geochemistry. Especially the differentiation and early evolution of the planets such as the formation of the core will be elucidated with this method.

  5. Magnetar Field Evolution and Crustal Plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lander, S. K.

    2016-06-01

    The activity of magnetars is believed to be powered by colossal magnetic energy reservoirs. We sketch an evolutionary picture in which internal field evolution in magnetars generates a twisted corona, from which energy may be released suddenly in a single giant flare, or more gradually through smaller outbursts and persistent emission. Given the ages of magnetars and the energy of their giant flares, we suggest that their evolution is driven by a novel mechanism: magnetic flux transport/decay due to persistent plastic flow in the crust, which would invalidate the common assumption that the crustal lattice is static and evolves only under Hall drift and Ohmic decay. We estimate the field strength required to induce plastic flow as a function of crustal depth, and the viscosity of the plastic phase. The star’s superconducting core may also play a role in magnetar field evolution, depending on the star’s spindown history and how rotational vortices and magnetic fluxtubes interact.

  6. Modeling spatio-temporal field evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borštnik Bračič, A.; Grabec, I.; Govekar, E.

    2009-06-01

    Prediction of spatio-temporal field evolution is based on the extraction of a physical law from joint experimental data. This extraction is usually described by a set of differential equations. If the only source of information is a field record, a method of field generators based on nonparametric modeling by conditional average can successfully replace differential equations. In this article we apply the method of field generators to a two-dimensional chaotic field record that describes the asynchronous motion of high-amplitude striations. We show how to choose the model structure in order to optimize the quality of the prediction process.

  7. Isotopic constraints on open system evolution of the Laacher See magma chamber (Eifel, West Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wörner, G.; Staudigel, H.; Zindler, A.

    1985-09-01

    The Laacher See phonolite tephra sequence (11,000 years B.P.) of the Quaternary East Eifel volcanic field (West Germany) represents an inverted, chemically zoned magma column. Mafic and differentiated phonolites, respectively, represent the lowermost and uppermost erupted portion of the Laacher See magma chamber. Sr and Nd isotopic compositions of whole rocks, matrices and phenocrysts have been analyzed in order to provide constraints for open versus closed system evolution of the Laacher See magma chamber. 87Sr/ 86Sr isotope ratios of mafic phonolites and their phenocrysts are slightly more radiogenic than parental East Eifel basanite magmas. Bulk rock samples show a drastic increase in 87Sr/ 86Sr from mafic towards the most differentiated compositions that were erupted from the top of the magma chamber. Glass matrix separates show a parallel, but less pronounced, increase in 87Sr/ 86Sr . Phenocrysts, in contrast, show a narrow range in 87Sr/ 86Sr with a slight, but significant, increase towards the top of the magma chamber. Phenocrysts from the uppermost portion of the magma column were not in isotopic (or chemical) equilibrium with their host matrices. 143Nd/ 144Nd isotope ratios for whole rocks, matrices, and phenocrysts fall within a restricted range similar to that of East Eifel mafic magmas. A representative suite of crustal rocks (lower crustal granulites, quartzo-feldspathic gneisses, mica schists, Devonian slates and graywacke) was also analyzed in order to permit an evaluation of possible assimilation models. Our results are consistent with chemical evolution of the zoned Laacher See magma chamber mainly through crystal fractionation accompanied by minor amounts of assimilation. Slight contamination of the magma system may have involved (a) the assimilation of gneisses (?) and mica schists during the initial stage of magma chamber evolution (basanite-mafic phonolite), (b) combined assimilation-fractional crystallization (AFC) concurrent with the second

  8. A Portable, Field-Deployable Analyzer for Isotopic Water Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, E. S.; Gupta, M.; Huang, Y. W.; Lacelle, D.; McKay, C. P.; Fortson, S.

    2015-12-01

    Water stable isotopes have for many years been used to study the hydrological cycle, catchment hydrology, and polar climate among other applications. Typically, discrete water samples are collected and transported to a laboratory for isotope analysis. Due to the expense and labor associated with such sampling, isotope studies have generally been limited in scope and time-resolution. Field sampling of water isotopes has been shown in recent years to provide dense data sets with the increased time resolution illuminating substantially greater short term variability than is generally observed during discrete sampling. A truly portable instrument also opens the possibility to utilize the instrument as a tool for identifying which water samples would be particularly interesting for further laboratory investigation. To make possible such field measurements of liquid water isotopes, Los Gatos Research has developed a miniaturized, field-deployable liquid water isotope analyzer. The prototype miniature liquid water isotope analyzer (mini-LWIA) uses LGR's patented Off-Axis ICOS (Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy) technology in a rugged, Pelican case housing for easy transport and field operations. The analyzer simultaneously measures both δ2H and δ18O from liquid water, with both manual and automatic water introduction options. The laboratory precision for δ2H is 0.6 ‰, and for δ18O is 0.3 ‰. The mini-LWIA was deployed in the high Arctic during the summer of 2015 at Inuvik in the Canadian Northwest Territories. Samples were collected from Sachs Harbor, on the southwest coast of Banks Island, including buried basal ice from the Lurentide Ice Sheet, some ice wedges, and other types of ground ice. Methodology and water analysis results from this extreme field deployment will be presented.

  9. Development of a Field-Deployable Methane Carbon Isotope Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Feng; Baer, Douglas

    2010-05-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, whose atmospheric surface mixing ratio has almost doubled compared with preindustrial values. Methane can be produced by biogenic processes, thermogenic processes or biomass, with different isotopic signatures. As a key molecule involved in the radiative forcing in the atmosphere, methane is thus one of the most important molecules linking the biosphere and atmosphere. Therefore precise measurements of mixing ratios and isotopic compositions will help scientists to better understand methane sources and sinks. To date, high precision isotope measurements have been exclusively performed with conventional isotope ratio mass spectrometry, which involves intensive labor and is not readily field deployable. Optical studies using infrared laser spectroscopy have also been reported to measure the isotopic ratios. However, the precision of optical-based analyses, to date, is typically unsatisfactory without pre-concentration procedures. We present characterization of the performance of a portable Methane Carbon Isotope Analyzer (MCIA), based on cavity enhanced laser absorption spectroscopy technique, that provides in-situ measurements of the carbon isotope ratio (13C/12C or del_13C) and methane mixing ratio (CH4). The sample is introduced to the analyzer directly without any requirement for pretreatment or preconcentration. A typical precision of less than 1 per mill (< 0.1%) with a 10-ppm methane sample can be achieved in a measurement time of less than 100 seconds. The MCIA can report carbon isotope ratio and concentration measurements over a very wide range of methane concentrations. Results of laboratory tests and field measurements will be presented.

  10. Magnetic field evolution in interacting galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drzazga, R. T.; Chyży, K. T.; Jurusik, W.; Wiórkiewicz, K.

    2011-09-01

    Aims: Violent gravitational interactions can change the morphologies of galaxies and, by means of merging, transform them into elliptical galaxies. We aim to investigate how they affect the evolution of galactic magnetic fields. Methods: We selected 16 systems of interacting galaxies with available VLA archive radio data at 4.86 and 1.4 GHz and compared their radio emission and estimated magnetic field strengths with their star-forming activity, far-infrared emission, and the stage of tidal interaction. Results: The estimated mean of total magnetic field strength for our sample of interacting galaxies is 14 ± 5 μG, which is larger than for the non-interacting objects. The field regularity (of 0.27 ± 0.09) is lower than in typical spirals and indicates enhanced production of random magnetic fields in the interacting objects. We find a general evolution of magnetic fields: for weak interactions the strength of magnetic field is almost constant (10-15 μG) as interaction advances, then it increases up to 2× , peaks at the nuclear coalescence (25 μG), and decreases again, down to 5-6 μG, for the post-merger remnants. The main production of magnetic fields in colliding galaxies thus terminates somewhere close to the nuclear coalescence, after which magnetic field diffuses. The magnetic field strength for whole galaxies is weakly affected by the star formation rate (SFR), while the dependence is higher for galactic centres. We show that the morphological distortions visible in the radio total and polarized emission do not depend statistically on the global or local SFRs, while they do increase (especially in the polarization) with the advance of interaction. The constructed radio-far-infrared relations for interacting and non-interacting galaxies display a similar balance between the generation of cosmic rays, magnetic fields, and the production of the thermal energy and dust radiation. Conclusions: The regular magnetic fields are much more sensitive to

  11. Magnetic isotope and magnetic field effects on the DNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Buchachenko, Anatoly L.; Orlov, Alexei P.; Kuznetsov, Dmitry A.; Breslavskaya, Natalia N.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic isotope and magnetic field effects on the rate of DNA synthesis catalysed by polymerases β with isotopic ions 24Mg2+, 25Mg2+ and 26Mg2+ in the catalytic sites were detected. No difference in enzymatic activity was found between polymerases β carrying 24Mg2+ and 26Mg2+ ions with spinless, non-magnetic nuclei 24Mg and 26Mg. However, 25Mg2+ ions with magnetic nucleus 25Mg were shown to suppress enzymatic activity by two to three times with respect to the enzymatic activity of polymerases β with 24Mg2+ and 26Mg2+ ions. Such an isotopic dependence directly indicates that in the DNA synthesis magnetic mass-independent isotope effect functions. Similar effect is exhibited by polymerases β with Zn2+ ions carrying magnetic 67Zn and non-magnetic 64Zn nuclei, respectively. A new, ion–radical mechanism of the DNA synthesis is suggested to explain these effects. Magnetic field dependence of the magnesium-catalysed DNA synthesis is in a perfect agreement with the proposed ion–radical mechanism. It is pointed out that the magnetic isotope and magnetic field effects may be used for medicinal purposes (trans-cranial magnetic treatment of cognitive deceases, cell proliferation, control of the cancer cells, etc). PMID:23851636

  12. Modeling nuclear field shift isotope fractionation in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauble, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    In this study nuclear field shift fractionations in solids (and chemically similar liquids) are estimated using calibrated density functional theory calculations. The nuclear field shift effect is a potential driver of mass independent isotope fractionation(1,2), especially for elements with high atomic number such as Hg, Tl and U. This effect is caused by the different shapes and volumes of isotopic nuclei, and their interactions with electronic structures and energies. Nuclear field shift isotope fractionations can be estimated with first principles methods, but the calculations are computationally difficult, limiting most theoretical studies so far to small gas-phase molecules and molecular clusters. Many natural materials of interest are more complex, and it is important to develop ways to estimate field shift effects that can be applied to minerals, solutions, in biomolecules, and at mineral-solution interfaces. Plane-wave density functional theory, in combination with the projector augmented wave method (DFT-PAW), is much more readily adapted to complex materials than the relativistic all-electron calculations that have been the focus of most previous studies. DFT-PAW is a particularly effective tool for studying crystals with periodic boundary conditions, and may also be incorporated into molecular dynamics simulations of solutions and other disordered phases. Initial calibrations of DFT-PAW calculations against high-level all-electron models of field shift fractionation suggest that there may be broad applicability of this method to a variety of elements and types of materials. In addition, the close relationship between the isomer shift of Mössbauer spectroscopy and the nuclear field shift isotope effect makes it possible, at least in principle, to estimate the volume component of field shift fractionations in some species that are too complex even for DFT-PAW models, so long as there is a Mössbauer isotope for the element of interest. Initial results

  13. Connecting laboratory behavior to field function through stable isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Glon, Mael G; Larson, Eric R; Pangle, Kevin L

    2016-01-01

    Inherent difficulties of tracking and observing organisms in the field often leave researchers with no choice but to conduct behavioral experiments under laboratory settings. However, results of laboratory experiments do not always translate accurately to natural conditions. A fundamental challenge in ecology is therefore to scale up from small area and short-duration laboratory experiments to large areas and long durations over which ecological processes generally operate. In this study, we propose that stable isotope analysis may be a tool that can link laboratory behavioral observations to past field interactions or function of individual organisms. We conducted laboratory behavioral assays to measure dominance of invasive rusty crayfish, Orconectes rusticus, and used stable isotope analysis to hindcast trophic positions of these crayfish under preceding natural conditions. We hypothesized that more dominant crayfish in our assays would have higher trophic positions if dominance were related to competitive ability or willingness to pursue high-risk, high-reward prey. We did not find a relationship between crayfish dominance and trophic position, and therefore infer that laboratory dominance of crayfish may not necessarily relate to their ecology in the field. However, this is to our knowledge the first attempt to directly relate laboratory behavior to field performance via stable isotope analysis. We encourage future studies to continue to explore a possible link between laboratory and field behavior via stable isotope analysis, and propose several avenues to do so. PMID:27077010

  14. Connecting laboratory behavior to field function through stable isotope analysis

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Eric R.; Pangle, Kevin L.

    2016-01-01

    Inherent difficulties of tracking and observing organisms in the field often leave researchers with no choice but to conduct behavioral experiments under laboratory settings. However, results of laboratory experiments do not always translate accurately to natural conditions. A fundamental challenge in ecology is therefore to scale up from small area and short-duration laboratory experiments to large areas and long durations over which ecological processes generally operate. In this study, we propose that stable isotope analysis may be a tool that can link laboratory behavioral observations to past field interactions or function of individual organisms. We conducted laboratory behavioral assays to measure dominance of invasive rusty crayfish, Orconectes rusticus, and used stable isotope analysis to hindcast trophic positions of these crayfish under preceding natural conditions. We hypothesized that more dominant crayfish in our assays would have higher trophic positions if dominance were related to competitive ability or willingness to pursue high-risk, high-reward prey. We did not find a relationship between crayfish dominance and trophic position, and therefore infer that laboratory dominance of crayfish may not necessarily relate to their ecology in the field. However, this is to our knowledge the first attempt to directly relate laboratory behavior to field performance via stable isotope analysis. We encourage future studies to continue to explore a possible link between laboratory and field behavior via stable isotope analysis, and propose several avenues to do so. PMID:27077010

  15. Magnetic field and angular momentum evolution models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallet, F.

    2013-11-01

    The magnetic field in young stellar object is clearly the most important component when one dealing with the angular momentum evolution of solar-like stars. It controls this latter one from the pre-main sequence, during the ``disk locking'' phase where the stars magnetically interact with their surrounding disk, to the main-sequence through powerful stellar winds that remove angular momentum from the stellar surface. We present new models for the rotational evolution of solar-like stars between 1 Myr and 10 Gyr with the aim to reproduce the distributions of rotational periods observed for star forming regions and young open clusters within this age range. Our simulations are produced by a recent model dedicated to the study of the angular momentum evolution of solar-type stars. This model include a new wind braking law based on recent numerical simulations of magnetized stellar winds and a specific dynamo and mass-loss prescription are used to link the angular momentum loss-rate to angular velocity evolution. The model additionally allows for a core/envelope decoupling with an angular momentum transfer between these two regions. Since this former model didn't include any physical star/disk interaction description, two star/disk interaction processes are eventually added to it in order to reproduce the apparent small angular velocities to which the stellar surface is subject during the disk accretion phase. We have developed rotational evolution models for slow, median and fast rotators including two star/disk interaction scenarios that are the magnetospheric ejection and the accretion powered stellar winds processes. The models appear to fail at reproducing the rotational behaviour of solar-type stars except when a more intense magnetic field is used during the disk accretion phase.

  16. Stable Isotope Analysis of Precipitation Samples Obtained via Crowdsourcing Reveals the Spatiotemporal Evolution of Superstorm Sandy

    PubMed Central

    Good, Stephen P.; Mallia, Derek V.; Lin, John C.; Bowen, Gabriel J.

    2014-01-01

    Extra-tropical cyclones, such as 2012 Superstorm Sandy, pose a significant climatic threat to the northeastern United Sates, yet prediction of hydrologic and thermodynamic processes within such systems is complicated by their interaction with mid-latitude water patterns as they move poleward. Fortunately, the evolution of these systems is also recorded in the stable isotope ratios of storm-associated precipitation and water vapor, and isotopic analysis provides constraints on difficult-to-observe cyclone dynamics. During Superstorm Sandy, a unique crowdsourced approach enabled 685 precipitation samples to be obtained for oxygen and hydrogen isotopic analysis, constituting the largest isotopic sampling of a synoptic-scale system to date. Isotopically, these waters span an enormous range of values (21‰ for O, 160‰ for H) and exhibit strong spatiotemporal structure. Low isotope ratios occurred predominantly in the west and south quadrants of the storm, indicating robust isotopic distillation that tracked the intensity of the storm's warm core. Elevated values of deuterium-excess (25‰) were found primarily in the New England region after Sandy made landfall. Isotope mass balance calculations and Lagrangian back-trajectory analysis suggest that these samples reflect the moistening of dry continental air entrained from a mid-latitude trough. These results demonstrate the power of rapid-response isotope monitoring to elucidate the structure and dynamics of water cycling within synoptic-scale systems and improve our understanding of storm evolution, hydroclimatological impacts, and paleo-storm proxies. PMID:24618882

  17. The temporal evolution of Hf and Nd isotopes of rhyolites from the Long Valley Caldera System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, J. I.; Depaolo, D. J.; Weis, D.; Renne, P. R.; Mundil, R.

    2008-12-01

    Early investigations of magma evolution at Long Valley are based on crystal model ages in which protracted periods of closed system behavior are assumed. Recent studies imply that precaldera rhyolitic extrusions at Long Valley tap discrete magmas that include a mixture of several source components and evolve by open system behavior. In order to track the potentially changing source components of Long Valley magmas, we performed zircon Hf and whole rock Hf and Nd analyses from select rhyolites erupted over the ~2 Ma history of the volcanic field. New Ar/Ar dating of alkali feldspar and obsidian help refine, when necessary, the eruptive history previously provided by K-Ar dating (e.g., Bailey 1989). The radioisotopic tracers, coupled with this improved geochronology, yield a high-resolution temporal record of magma sources before and after caldera collapse. High precision (±0.1 epsilon) isotopic measurements of Hf separated from single large (~10 μg) and multiple size-sorted aliquots of smaller (≤4 to ~0.3 μg) zircon crystals were analyzed by MC-ICPMS. High precision (±0.1 epsilon) isotopic analyses of Hf and Nd separated from whole rock samples were performed by MC-ICPMS and TIMS, respectively. Zircons contained in the ~1712 ka precaldera Glass Mountain rhyolite (OD) exhibit 176Hf/177Hf values ranging from 0.28270 to 0.28278, whereas zircons from pumice in the ~777 ka Bishop Tuff exhibit values from 0.28278 to 0.28285. These zircon separates come from samples in which feldspar and glass Pb isotopic compositions have recently (Simon et al., 2007) been used as evidence for a secular change towards increasing mantle contribution in younger magmas. The ~2.5 epsilon unit increase in ɛHf (i.e., towards more mantle signatures) between the average zircon Hf isotopic compositions of OD and the Bishop Tuff are consistent with the ~2.0 epsilon unit increases in ɛHf and ɛNd between the whole rock values of the two rhyolites found here. Collectively, data from a

  18. Isotopic Evolution of Saline Lakes in the Low-Latitude and Polar Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Horita, Juske

    2009-01-01

    Isotopic fractionations associated with two primary processes (evaporation and freezing of water) are discussed, which are responsible for the formation and evolution of saline lakes in deserts from both low-latitude and the Polar regions. In an evaporative system, atmospheric parameters (humidity and isotopic composition of water vapor) have strong influence on the isotopic behavior of saline lakes, and in a freezing system, salinity build-up largely controls the extent of freezing and associated isotope fractionation. In both systems, salinity has a direct impact on the isotopic evolution of saline lakes. It is proposed that a steady-state 'terminal lake' model with short-term hydrologic and environmental perturbations can serve as a useful framework for investigating both evaporative and freezing processes of perennial saline lakes. Through re-assessment of own work and literature data for saline lakes, it was demonstrated that effective uses of the isotope activity compositions of brines and salinity-chemistry data could reveal dynamic changes and evolution in the isotopic compositions of saline lakes in response to hydrologic and environmental changes. The residence time of isotopic water molecules in lakes determines the nature of responses in the isotopic compositions following perturbations in the water and isotope balances (e.g., dilution by inflow, water deficit by increased evaporation, and/or reduction in inflow). The isotopic profiles of some saline lakes from the Polar regions show that they switched the two contrasting modes of operation between evaporative and freezing systems, in response to climate and hydrological changes in the past.

  19. Isotopic evolution of saline lakes in the low-latitude and polar regions

    SciTech Connect

    Horita, Juske

    2009-01-01

    Isotopic fractionations associated with two primary processes (evaporation and freezing of water) are discussed, which are responsible for the formation and evolution of saline lakes in deserts from both low-latitude and the Polar regions. In an evaporative system, atmospheric parameters (humidity and isotopic composition of water vapor) have strong influence on the isotopic behavior of saline lakes, and in a freezing system, salinity build-up largely controls the extent of freezing and associated isotope fractionation. In both systems, salinity has a direct impact on the isotopic evolution of saline lakes. It is proposed that a steady-state terminal lake model with short-term hydrologic and environmental perturbations can serve as a useful framework for investigating both evaporative and freezing processes of perennial saline lakes. Through re-assessment of own work and literature data for saline lakes, it was demonstrated that effective uses of the isotope activity compositions of brines and salinity-chemistry data could reveal dynamic changes and evolution in the isotopic compositions of saline lakes in response to hydrologic and environmental changes. The residence time of isotopic water molecules in lakes determines the nature of responses in the isotopic compositions following perturbations in the water and isotope balances (e.g., dilution by inflow, water deficit by increased evaporation, and/ or reduction in inflow). The isotopic profiles of some saline lakes from the Polar regions show that they switched the two contrasting modes of operation between evaporative and freezing systems, in response to climate and hydrological changes in the past.

  20. Evolution of the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McComas, D. J.

    Remote observations of magnetic field topologies in the solar corona and in situ observations of the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) in interplanetary space are used to examine the temporal evolution of the spatial distribution of open and closed field regions emanating from the Sun. The simple 'open' configuration of inward and outward pointing sectors in the IMF is periodically disrupted by magnetically distinct coronal mass ejections (CME's) which erupt from previously closed magnetic field regions in the corona into interplanetary space. At 1 AU, CME's contain counterstreaming halo electrons which indicate their distinct magnetic topologies. This topology is generally thought to be one of the following: plasmoids that are completely disconnected from the Sun; magnetic 'bottles,' still tied to the corona at both ends; or flux ropes which are only partially disconnected. Fully disconnected plasmoids would have no long term effect on the amount of open flux; however, both in situ observations of details of the halo electron distributions and remote coronagraph observations of radial fields following CME's indicate that CME's generally do retain at least partial attached to the Sun. Both the magnetic-bottle and flux rope geometries require some mitigating process to close off previously open fields in order to avoid a flux catastrophe. In addition, the average amount of magnetic flux observed in interplanetary space varies over the solar cycle, also indicating that there must be ways in which new flux is opened and previously open flux is closed off. The most likely scenario for closing off open magnetic fields is for reconnection to occur above helmet streamers, where oppositely directed field regions are juxtaposed in the corona. These events would serve to return closed field arches to the Sun and release open, U-shaped structures into the solar wind.

  1. Evolution of the interplanetary magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    McComas, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    Remote observations of magnetic field topologies in the solar corona and in situ observations of the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) in interplanetary space are used to examine the temporal evolution of the spatial distribution of open and closed field regions emanating from the Sun. The simple open'' configuration of inward and outward pointing sectors in the IMF is periodically disrupted by magnetically distinct coronal mass ejections (CMEs) which erupt from previously closed magnetic field regions in the corona into interplanetary space. At 1 AU, CMEs contain counterstreaming halo electrons which indicate their distinct magnetic topologies. This topology is generally thought to be: plasmoids that are completely disconnected from the Sun; magnetic bottles,'' still tied to the corona at both ends; or flux ropes which are only partially disconnected. Fully disconnected plasmoids would have no long term effect on the amount of open flux; however, both in situ observations of details of the halo electron distributions and remote coronagraph observations of radial fields following CMEs indicate that CMEs generally do retain at least partial attached to the Sun. Both the magnetic-bottle and flux rope geometries require some mitigating process to close off previously open fields in order to avoid a flux catastrophe. In addition, the average amount of magnetic flux observed in interplanetary space varies over the solar cycle, also indicating that there must be ways in which new flux is opened and previously open flux is closed off. The most likely scenario for closing off open magnetic fields is for reconnection to occurs above helmet streamers, where oppositely directed field regions are juxtaposed in the corona. These events would serve to return closed field arches to the Sun and release open, U-shaped structures into the solar wind.

  2. Evolution of the interplanetary magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    McComas, D.J.

    1993-05-01

    Remote observations of magnetic field topologies in the solar corona and in situ observations of the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) in interplanetary space are used to examine the temporal evolution of the spatial distribution of open and closed field regions emanating from the Sun. The simple ``open`` configuration of inward and outward pointing sectors in the IMF is periodically disrupted by magnetically distinct coronal mass ejections (CMEs) which erupt from previously closed magnetic field regions in the corona into interplanetary space. At 1 AU, CMEs contain counterstreaming halo electrons which indicate their distinct magnetic topologies. This topology is generally thought to be: plasmoids that are completely disconnected from the Sun; magnetic ``bottles,`` still tied to the corona at both ends; or flux ropes which are only partially disconnected. Fully disconnected plasmoids would have no long term effect on the amount of open flux; however, both in situ observations of details of the halo electron distributions and remote coronagraph observations of radial fields following CMEs indicate that CMEs generally do retain at least partial attached to the Sun. Both the magnetic-bottle and flux rope geometries require some mitigating process to close off previously open fields in order to avoid a flux catastrophe. In addition, the average amount of magnetic flux observed in interplanetary space varies over the solar cycle, also indicating that there must be ways in which new flux is opened and previously open flux is closed off. The most likely scenario for closing off open magnetic fields is for reconnection to occurs above helmet streamers, where oppositely directed field regions are juxtaposed in the corona. These events would serve to return closed field arches to the Sun and release open, U-shaped structures into the solar wind.

  3. Mean-Field Evolution of Fermionic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedikter, Niels; Porta, Marcello; Schlein, Benjamin

    2014-11-01

    The mean field limit for systems of many fermions is naturally coupled with a semiclassical limit. This makes the analysis of the mean field regime much more involved, compared with bosonic systems. In this paper, we study the dynamics of initial data close to a Slater determinant, whose reduced one-particle density is an orthogonal projection ω N with the appropriate semiclassical structure. Assuming some regularity of the interaction potential, we show that the evolution of such an initial data remains close to a Slater determinant, with reduced one-particle density given by the solution of the Hartree-Fock equation with initial data ω N . Our result holds for all (semiclassical) times, and gives effective bounds on the rate of the convergence towards the Hartree-Fock dynamics.

  4. The isotopic evolution of a raindrop through the critical zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshun, J.; Dietrich, W. E.; Dawson, T. E.; Rempe, D.; Fung, I. Y.

    2015-12-01

    The use of stable isotopes of water (O18 and D) to determine the pathway of water through a hilslope, and source water for vegetation generally assumes that isotopic composition is conserved through the shallow evaporative front. Frequent sampling through the entire critical zone at Rivendell, a 32° hillslope in a mixed conifer forest, reveals a structured heterogeneity in the isotopic composition of subsurface water. We demonstrate that the moisture held in the soil, saprolite, and weathered bedrock is isotopically light relative to both the average meteoric water, and to the mobile water in the shallow subsurface and saturated zone. Weathered argillite, the dominant rock type, retains moisture that is isotopically more negative than neighboring sandstone. These differences in isotopic composition are persistent, suggesting subsurface fractionation and/or filtration processes. Different species of vegetation collocated on the same hillslope use different subsurface reservoirs. Throughout the year, Douglas-fir xylem water occupies a region of dual isotope space that differs from hardwoods (madrone, live oak, and tanoak) Whereas Douglas-firs use non-evaporatively enriched, deep bulk soil moisture, and unsaturated zone rock moisture throughout year, hardwoods switch their source water from shallow mobile water, to bulk soil moisture, to unsaturated zone rock moisture depending on subsurface water availability.
Furthermore, Douglas-fir roots transport water that is more negative than collocated madrone roots. At no time do trees use groundwater. Collectively, these discoveries suggest that a deep and frequent sampling campaign is required to capture the structured heterogeneity in the critical zone, as well as the species-specific and seasonal variability of vegetative water use.

  5. Aleutian lead isotopic data: additional evidence for the evolution of lithospheric plumbing systems

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, J.D.; Marsh, B.D.

    1987-07-01

    Lead isotopic ratios and concentrations have been measured in lavas from the Aleutian volcanic centers of Adak (12) and Atka (12). Lead contents in lavas from Atka increase four-fold over the compositional range of the volcanic suite. In contrast, Adak lavas have concentration levels of 0.6-13 ppm and display no simple correlation with SiO/sub 2/. The lead isotopic data alone can be explained by three different processes. Model 1 assigns lead isotopic differences to original magma source heterogeneity. According to Model 2, the isotopic ratios of a primary, non-radiogenic component from the mantle are elevated by the addition of an isotopically enriched slab-derived component. In contrast, Model 3 assumes a primary radiogenic magma produced by melting of the slab is contaminated by a non-radiogenic lithospheric component during conduit formation. Because these models all adequately explain the lead isotopic data, supplementary geologic, petrographic, geochemical and isotopic data must be used to select the most likely model. Careful consideration of the evidence suggests Model 3 best explains their extensive lead isotopic data as well as other characteristics of Aleutian lavas. The authors study suggests detailed isotopic studies of individual volcanic centers can be extremely useful in understanding the complex processes of magma generation, extraction, ascent and evolution.

  6. Magnetic field structure evolution in rotating magnetic field plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, Yuri; Yang Xiaokang; Huang, T.-S.

    2008-07-15

    A study of magnetic field structure evolution during 40-ms plasma discharge has been performed in a new device with 80 cm long/40 cm diameter cylindrical chamber, in which a plasma current I{sub p}{approx_equal}2 kA was driven and sustained by a rotating magnetic field. The main focus of the experiments is on how the changes in externally applied magnetic field affect the current profile and magnetic field in plasma. During plasma discharge, a pulse current was briefly fed to a magnetic coil located at the midplane (middle coil). The magnetic field in cross section of plasma was scanned with pickup probes. Two regimes were studied: without and with an external toroidal field (TF) produced by axial I{sub z} current. With a relatively small current (I{sub m} {<=} 600 A) in the middle coil, the plasma current is boosted up to 5 kA. The magnetic flux surfaces become extended along the axial Z direction, sometimes with the formation of doublet shape plasma. The regime without TF appears to be less stable, presumably due to the reversal of plasma current in central area of plasma column.

  7. Strontium isotopic variations of Neoproterozoic seawater: Implications for crustal evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Asmerom, Y.; Jacobsen, S.B.; Knoll, A.H.; Butterfield, N.J. ); Swett, K. )

    1991-10-01

    The authors report high precision Sr isotopic data on carbonates from the Neoproterozoic Shaler Group, Victoria Island, Northwest Territories, Canada. Samples with low {sup 87}Rb/{sup 86}Sr ratios (<0.01) were selected for Sr isotopic analysis. {delta}{sup 18}O, Mn, Ca, Mg, and Sr data were used to recognize altered samples. The altered samples are characterized by high Mn/Sr ({ge}2) and variable {delta}{sup 18}O; most are dolomites. The data indicate that between ca. 790-850 Ma the {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio of seawater varied between 0.70676 and 0.70561. The samples show smooth and systematic variation, with the lowest {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr value of 0.70561 at ca. 830 Ma. The low {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio of carbonates from the lower parts of the section is similar to a value reported for one sample from the Adrar of Mauritania ({approx}900 Ma), West African Craton. Isotopic ratios from the upper part of the Shaler section are identical to values from the lower part of the Neoproterozoic Akademikerbreen Group, Spitsbergen. Although a paucity of absolute age determinations hinders attempts at the precise correlation of Neoproterozoic successions, it is possible to draw a broad outline of the Sr isotopic composition of seawater for this period. Data from this study and the literature are used to construct a curve of the {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio of Neoproterozoic seawater. The Sr isotope composition of seawater reflects primarily the balance between continental Sr input through river input and mantle input via hydrothermal circulation of seawater through mid-ocean ridges. Coupling of Nd and Sr isotopic systems allows the authors to model changes in seafloor spreading rates (or hydrothermal flux) and continental erosion. The Sr hydrothermal flux and the erosion rate (relative to present-day value) are modeled for the period 500-900 Ma.

  8. Evolution of turbulent fields in explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A.L.; Bell, J.B.; Ferguson, R.E.; Chien, K.Y.; Collins, J.P.; Lyons, M.L.

    1993-12-01

    Explosions always contain turbulent mixing regions, e.g.: boundary layers, shear layers, wall jets and unstable interfaces. The inherent unsteadiness of turbulent mixing in explosions, and the lack of sufficient data, pose insurmountable difficulties for turbulence modeling of such flows. Proposed here is a direct numerical simulation approach-where the three-dimensional (3-D) conservation laws are integrated via a high-order Godunov method. Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) is used to Capture the convective mixing processes on the computational grid. Then, an azimuthal-averaging operator is applied to the 3-D solution-in order to extract the instantaneous mean and fluctuating components of the turbulent field. This methodology is applied to the numerical simulation of the turbulent wall jet and dusty boundary layer flow induced by a point explosion above a ground surface. Principal results include the evolution of the turbulent velocity field near the surface. During the wall jet phase, the mean profiles resemble our previous two-dimensional calculations, while the velocity fluctuation profiles and Reynolds stress profiles are qualitatively similar to measurements of self-preserving wall jets. During the boundary layer phase, the mean velocity profile evolved with time, e.g.: initially it agreed with measurements of a dusty boundary layer behind a shock; at intermediate times it resembled the dusty boundary layer profiles measured in a wind tunnel; while at late times, it approached a l/7 power-law profile. Velocity fluctuation profiles were qualitatively similar to those measured for a turbulent boundary layer on a fiat plate. The methodology can be used to predict the evolution of other turbulent fields such as dust clouds, axisymmetric jets, fireball instabilities, and dusty boundary layers in shock tube and wind tunnel flows.

  9. Trace element and isotopic constraints on magmatic evolution at Lassen volcanic center

    SciTech Connect

    Bullen, T.D.; Clynne, M.A. )

    1990-11-10

    Magmatic evolution at the Lassen volcanic center (LVC) is characterized by a transition from predominantly andesitic to predominantly silicic volcanism with time. Magmas of the adesitic, or Brokeoff phase of volcanism range in composition from basaltic andesite to dacite, whereas those of silicic, or Lassen phase range in composition from basaltic andesite to rhyolite. The distinctive mixing-dominated arrays for each volcanic phase manifest the generation and evolution of two physically distinct, but genetically related magma systems. The LVC magmas have Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope characteristics that approximate two-component mixing arrays. One isotopic component is similar in composition to that of NE Pacific Ocean ridge and seamount basalts (MORB component), the other to mafic Mesozoic granitoids sampled from the neighboring Klamath and Sierra Nevada provinces (KSN component). The lack of a correlation between the major element and isotopic compositions of LVC magmas seriously limits any model for magmatic evolution that relies on assimilation of old middle to upper crust by isotopically homogeneous mafic magmas during their ascent through the crust. Alternatively, the isotopic and geochemical uniformity of the most silicic magmas of the Brokeoff and Lassen phases suggests that they are well-homogenized partial melts. The likely source region for these silicic melts is the lower crust, which the authors envision to consist primarily of mafic igneous rocks that are similar in geochemical and isotopic diversity to the regional mafic lavas.

  10. Strontium isotopic variations of Neoproterozoic seawater - Implications for crustal evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asmerom, Yemane; Jacobsen, Stein B.; Knoll, Andrew H.; Butterfield, Nicholas J.; Swett, Keene

    1991-01-01

    High-precision Sr isotopic data were obtained on carbonate samples from the Neoproterozoic Shaler Group, Victoria Island (Canada). Results indicate that, between ca. 790 and 850 Ma, the Sr-87/Sr-86 ratio of seawater varied betweeen 0.70676 and 0.70561, with the minimum value at about 830 Ma. A curve of the Sr-87/Sr-86 seawater ratio vs. age showed that the new data substantially improve the existing isotopic record of Sr in seawater for the period 790-850 Ma. The Sr isotopic system data were coupled with data for the Nd isotopic system to model changes in the seafloor spreading rates (hydrothermal flux) and the continental erosion for the period 500-900 Ma. Results indicate that hydrothermal flux reached a maximum value at ca. 830 Ma, while a maximum in erosion rate occurred at ca. 570 Ma. These peaks are considered to be related to the developments in the Pan-African and related orogenic events.

  11. Magnetic field evolution in superconducting neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graber, Vanessa; Andersson, Nils; Glampedakis, Kostas; Lander, Samuel K.

    2015-10-01

    The presence of superconducting and superfluid components in the core of mature neutron stars calls for the rethinking of a number of key magnetohydrodynamical notions like resistivity, the induction equation, magnetic energy and flux-freezing. Using a multifluid magnetohydrodynamics formalism, we investigate how the magnetic field evolution is modified when neutron star matter is composed of superfluid neutrons, type-II superconducting protons and relativistic electrons. As an application of this framework, we derive an induction equation where the resistive coupling originates from the mutual friction between the electrons and the vortex/fluxtube arrays of the neutron and proton condensates. The resulting induction equation allows the identification of two time-scales that are significantly different from those of standard magnetohydrodynamics. The astrophysical implications of these results are briefly discussed.

  12. Strontium isotopic variations of Neoproterozoic seawater: implications for crustal evolution.

    PubMed

    Asmerom, Y; Jacobsen, S B; Knoll, A H; Butterfield, N J; Swett, K

    1991-01-01

    We report high precision Sr isotopic data on carbonates from the Neoproterozoic Shaler Group, Victoria Island, Northwest Territories, Canada. Lithostratigraphic correlations with the relatively well-dated Mackenzie Mountains Supergroup constrain Shaler deposition to approximately 770-880 Ma, a range corroborated by 723 +/- 3 Ma lavas that disconformably overlie Shaler carbonates and by Late Riphean microfossils within the section. Samples with low 87Rb/86Sr ratios (<0.01) were selected for Sr isotopic analysis. Delta 18O, Mn, Ca, Mg, and Sr data were used to recognize altered samples. The altered samples are characterized by high Mn/Sr (> or = 2) and variable delta 18O; most are dolomites. The data indicate that between ca. 790-850 Ma the 87Sr/86Sr ratio of seawater varied between 0.70676 and 0.70561. The samples show smooth and systematic variation, with the lowest 87Sr/86Sr value of 0.70561 at ca. 830 Ma. The low 87Sr/86Sr ratio of carbonates from the lower parts of our section is similar to a value reported for one sample from the Adrar of Mauritania (approximately 900 Ma), West African Craton. Isotopic ratios from the upper part of the Shaler section are identical to values from the lower part of the Neoproterozoic Akademikerbreen Group, Spitsbergen. Although a paucity of absolute age determinations hinders attempts at the precise correlation of Neoproterozoic successions, it is possible to draw a broad outline of the Sr isotopic composition of seawater for this period. Indeed, the Sr isotope data themselves provide a stratigraphic tool of considerable potential. Data from this study and the literature are used to construct a curve of the 87Sr/86Sr ratio of Neoproterozoic seawater. The new data reported in this study substantially improve the isotopic record of Sr in seawater for the period 790-850 Ma. The Sr isotope composition of seawater reflects primarily the balance between continental Sr input through river input and mantle input via hydrothermal

  13. Stable Isotope Paleoaltimetry: Linking Tectonics to the Evolution of Landscapes and Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulch, A.; Chamberlain, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    Stable isotope paleoaltimetry exploits systematic changes in the oxygen or hydrogen isotopic composition of precipitation that occur when lifting of moist air masses over topography induces orographic precipitation. Stable isotope-based reconstructions of topography, therefore, have greatly expanded what used to be very sparse global paleoaltimetric information. The topography of mountain ranges and plateaus, however, not only reflects the geodynamic processes that shape the Earth's surface; it also represents a key control for continental moisture transport, atmospheric circulation and the distribution of biomes and biodiversity. The challenge now lies in disentangling the surface uplift component from the impact of long-term climate change on paleoaltimetry records. The robustness of stable isotope paleoaltimetry reconstructions can be greatly enhanced when high-elevation isotope proxy data are referenced against low-elevation records that track climate-modulated oxygen and hydrogen isotopes in precipitation through time. In addition, evaluating the record of precipitation upstream of the orogen reduces commonly encountered complexities such as topographic threshold conditions to atmospheric circulation, variable moisture recharge to the atmosphere through evapotranspiration over the continents or the impact of hemispheric-scale atmospheric teleconnections; all of which may conspire in setting the isotopic composition of precipitation.Here, we highlight some of these challenges a) by using stable isotope paleoaltimetry data from the central Andes to show how differences in oxygen isotopes in precipitation between high and low elevation sites may enhance the robustness of Andean stable isotope paleoaltimetry, and b) by linking a large set of spatially distributed isotope and biological proxy data to evaluate the impact of Palaeogene surface uplift on mammalian evolution in western North America prior and during the Eocene-Oligocene transition.

  14. FUEL CYCLE ISOTOPE EVOLUTION BY TRANSMUTATION DYNAMICS OVER MULTIPLE RECYCLES

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel Bays; Steven Piet; Amaury Dumontier

    2010-06-01

    Because all actinides have the ability to fission appreciably in a fast neutron spectrum, these types of reactor systems are usually not associated with the buildup of higher mass actinides: curium, berkelium and californium. These higher actinides have high specific decay heat power, gamma and neutron source strengths, and are usually considered as a complication to the fuel manufacturing and transportation of fresh recycled transuranic fuel. This buildup issue has been studied widely for thermal reactor fuels. However, recent studies have shown that the transmutation physics associated with "gateway isotopes" dictates Cm-Bk-Cf buildup, even in fast burner reactors. Assuming a symbiotic fuel relationship with light water reactors (LWR), Pu-242 and Am-243 are formed in the LWRs and then are externally fed to the fast reactor as part of its overall transuranic fuel supply. These isotopes are created much more readily in a thermal than in fast spectrum systems due to the differences in the fast fission (i.e., above the fission threshold for non-fissile actinides) contribution. In a strictly breeding fast reactor this dependency on LWR transuranics would not exist, and thus avoids the introduction of LWR derived gateway isotopes into the fast reactor system. However in a transuranic burning fast reactor, the external supply of these gateway isotopes behaves as an external driving force towards the creation and build-up of Cm-Bk-Cf in the fuel cycle. It was found that though the Cm-Bk-Cf concentration in the equilibrium fuel cycle is dictated by the fast neutron spectrum, the time required to reach that equilibrium concentration is dictated by recycle, transmutation and decay storage dynamics.

  15. Are sulfur isotope ratios sufficient to determine the antiquity of sulfate reduction. [implications for chemical evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashendorf, D.

    1980-01-01

    Possible limitations on the use of sulfur isotope ratios in sedimentary sulfides to infer the evolution of microbial sulfate reduction are discussed. Current knowledge of the ways in which stable sulfur isotope ratios are altered by chemical and biological processes is examined, with attention given to the marine sulfur cycle involving various microbial populations, and sulfur reduction processes, and it is noted that satisfactory explanations of sulfur isotope ratios observed in live organisms and in sediments are not yet available. It is furthermore pointed out that all members of the same genus of sulfate reducing bacteria do not always fractionate sulfur to the same extent, that the extent of sulfur fractionation by many sulfate-reducing organisms has not yet been determined, and that inorganic processes can also affect sulfur isotope fractionation values. The information currently available is thus concluded to be insufficient to determine the time of initial appearance of biological sulfate reduction.

  16. The isotopic and chemical evolution of Mount St. Helens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halliday, A.N.; Fallick, A.E.; Dickin, A.P.; Mackenzie, A.B.; Stephens, W.E.; Hildreth, W.

    1983-01-01

    Isotopic and major and trace element analysis of nine samples of eruptive products spanning the history of the Mt. St. Helens volcano suggest three different episodes; (1) 40,000-2500 years ago: eruptions of dacite with ??{lunate}Nd = +5, ??{lunate}Sr = -10, variable ??18O, 206Pb/204Pb ??? 18.76, Ca/Sr ??? 60, Rb/Ba ??? 0.1, La/Yb ??? 18, (2) 2500-1000 years ago: eruptions of basalt, andesite and dacite with ??{lunate}Nd = +4 to +8, ??{lunate}Sr = -7 to -22, variable ??18O (thought to represent melting of differing mantle-crust reservoirs), 206Pb/204Pb = 18.81-18.87, variable Ca/Sr, Rb/Ba, La/Yb and high Zr, (3) 1000 years ago to present day: eruptions of andesite and dacite with ??{lunate}Nd = +6, ??{lunate}Sr = -13, ??18O ???6???, variable 206Pb/204Pb, Ca/Sr ??? 77, Rb/Ba = 0.1, La/Yb ??? 11. None of the products exhibit Eu anomalies and all are LREE enriched. There is a strong correlation between 87Sr/86Sr and differentiation indices. These data are interpreted in terms of a mantle heat source melting young crust bearing zircon and garnet, but not feldspar, followed by intrusion of this crustal reservoir by mantle-derived magma which caused further crustal melting and contaminated the crustal magma system with mafic components. Since 1000 years ago all the eruptions have been from the same reservoir which has displayed a much more gradual re-equilibration of Pb isotopic compositions than other components suggesting that Pb is being transported via a fluid phase. The Nd and Sr isotopic compositions lie along the mantle array and suggest that the mantle underneath Mt. St. Helens is not as depleted as MORB sources. There is no indication of seawater involvement in the source region. ?? 1983.

  17. Field Galaxy Evolution with the MUNICS Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drory, Niv; Feulner, Georg; Hopp, Ulrich; Snigula, Jan; Bender, Ralf

    The Munich Near-IR Cluster Survey (MUNICS) is a K'-selected survey uniformly covering 1 square degree in the J and K' near-IR bands. The survey area consists of 8 13.2 × 26.2 arcmin randomly selected fields at high galactic latitude, as well as 13 7 × 7 arcmin fields targeted towards 0.6 < z <1.5 QSOs. The 3 σ detection limits for a point source are 19.5 in the K'-band and 21.5 in the J-band. The data have been acquired at the 3.5m telescope at Calar Alto Observatory using the Ω - Prime camera. Optical photometry in the V, R, and I bands was obtained for a subsample of the survey fields covering 0.35 square degrees in total. These data have been obtained at the 2.2m telescope at Calar Alto Observatory and the 2.7m telescope at McDonald Observatory. These data enable us to determine photometric redshifts for the galaxies and thus are of great importance in selecting and confirming cluster candidates as well as individual galaxies for follow-up spectroscopy. The project has two main scientific aims, namely - the identification of galaxy clusters at redshifts around unity, and - the selection of a fair sample of field early-type galaxies at similar redshifts for evolutionary studies. Near-IR selection is an efficient tool for tracing the massive galaxy population at redshifts around unity because of its high sensitivity for evolved stellar populations even in the presence of moderate star formation activity. The formation and evolution of the population of massive galaxies is still a matter of lively and controversial debate. While models of hierarchical galaxy formation consistently predict a steep decline in the number density of massive spheroidals, they have a rather large number of free parameters, some of which involve ill-understood processes. Observation has not yet been successful in constraining the ranges of the involved model parameters tightly enough, so that comparisons between theory and experiment are difficult to interpret.

  18. Evolution of carbon isotopes, agglutinates, and the lunar regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desmarais, D. J.; Basu, A.; Hayes, J. M.; Meinschein, W. G.

    1975-01-01

    Apollo 17 light-mantle soils and Apollo 15 Apennine Front soils are compared with respect to isotopic enrichment of C-13 and the maturity of the site. Analyses of soil-size fractions indicate that while the carbon concentration on particle surfaces remains relatively constant with increasing soil maturity, total surface-correlated carbon increases due to increasing total soil surface area. The role of agglutinates in the incorporation of surface-correlated carbon into aggregate grains is examined; agglutinates contain a major percentage of the carbon found in mature soil, and the volume-correlated carbon component in agglutinates apparently continues to increase after the surface-correlated carbon concentrations have reached a constant value. Constraints that may limit the carbon concentration in lunar soils to a value not greater than 300 micrograms/g are considered.

  19. Trace Element and Pb Isotope Constraints on Dynamic Evolution of Earth Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collerson, K.; Kamber, B.

    2001-12-01

    Advances in interpretation of Pb isotope systematics provide constraints for modelling Earth evolution. Such improved understanding of Pb isotope systematics has coincided with advances in techniques for accurate Pb isotope ratio measurement by MC-ICPMS. Continental growth since 3.75 Ga has occurred at convergent margins via dehydration of subducted slabs and supra-subduction zone melting. Nb is preferentially retained in slabs relative to U and Th, which are lost to escaping fluids. Over time, the depleted upper mantle (DM) lost U and Th relative to Nb. Thus Nb/Th and Nb/U of UM mirror amount of continental crust present. Because Nb, Th and U are similarly incompatible during MORB melting, temporal Nb-Th-U systematics of mantle can be reconstructed from uncontaminated, depleted-mantle derived rocks1. Excellent agreement exists between crustal growth curve based on Nb/Th and those based on Pb isotope systematics2 and geophysics 3. Temporal variation of Nb/U reflects crustal extraction until 2 Ga. It then reflects preferential U recycling into DM, constraining timing of preservation of a pandemic oxygenated atmosphere. Increase in atmospheric O2 explains the second Pb paradox and refines understanding of DM evolution. Key to understanding mantle Pb isotope evolution is the realization that DM has highly dynamic U/Pb and Th/U ratios relative to undegassed lower mantle (LM). Thus, so-called OIB EM-1 reservoir could reflect LM4. Pb data for Phanerozoic and Proterozoic Gp 2 kimberlites from South Africa plot in thorogenic and uranogenic Pb space consistent with a LM source [4]. Mineralogically, chemically and isotopically different Gp 1 kimberlites, which are readily discernable in plots of PM normalized Ta/U and Nb/Th have very radiogenic 206Pb/204Pb and 208Pb/204Pb but relatively unradiogenic 207Pb/204Pb, compositions identical to HIMU OIB's. We have suggested in [4] that the HIMU isotopic composition can be derived from EM-1 during a transient <100 Ma stage of strong

  20. A Model of Isotope Separation in Cells at the Early Stages of Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melkikh, A. V.; Bokunyaeva, A. O.

    2016-03-01

    The separation of the isotopes of certain ions can serve as an important criterion for the presence of life in the early stages of its evolution. A model of the separation of isotopes during their transport through the cell membrane is constructed. The dependence of the selection coefficient on various parameters is found. In particular, it is shown that the maximum efficiency of the transport of ions corresponds to the minimum enrichment coefficient. At the maximum enrichment, the efficiency of the transport system approaches ½. Calculated enrichment coefficients are compared with experimentally obtained values for different types of cells, and the comparison shows a qualitative agreement between these quantities.

  1. Evolution of helium isotopes in the Earth's mantle.

    PubMed

    Class, Cornelia; Goldstein, Steven L

    2005-08-25

    Degassing of the Earth's mantle through magmatism results in the irreversible loss of helium to space, and high (3)He/(4)He ratios observed in oceanic basalts have been considered the main evidence for a 'primordial' undegassed deep mantle reservoir. Here we present a new global data compilation of ocean island basalts, representing upwelling 'plumes' from the deep mantle, and show that island groups with the highest primordial signal (high (3)He/(4)He ratios) have striking chemical and isotopic similarities to mid-ocean-ridge basalts. We interpret this as indicating a common history of mantle trace element depletion through magmatism. The high (3)He/(4)He in plumes may thus reflect incomplete degassing of the deep Earth during continent and ocean crust formation. We infer that differences between plumes and the upper-mantle source of ocean-ridge basalts reflect isolation of plume sources from the convecting mantle for approximately 1-2 Gyr. An undegassed, primordial reservoir in the mantle would therefore not be required, thus reconciling a long-standing contradiction in mantle dynamics. PMID:16121171

  2. Isotopic composition of lead in oceanic basalt and its implication to mantle evolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tatsumoto, M.

    1978-01-01

    New data are given in this report for (1) Pb isotopic compositions and U, Th, and Pb concentrations of basalts from the island of Hawaii; (2) redetermined Pb isotopic compositions of some abyssal tholeiites; and (3) U, Th, and Pb concentrations of altered and fresh abyssal basalts, and basalt genesis and mantle evolution are discussed. The Th U ratios of abyssal and Japanese tholeiites are distinctly lower than those of tholeiites and alkali basalts from other areas. It is thought that these low values reflect a part of the mantle depleted in large ionic lithophile elements. Thus a mantle evolution model is presented, in which Th U ratios of the depleted zone in the mantle have decreased to ???2, and U Pb ratios have increased, showing an apparent ???1.5-b.y. isochron trend in the 207Pb/204Pb vs. 206Pb/204Pb plot. The Pb isotopic compositions of basalts from the island of Hawaii are distinct for each of the five volcanoes, and within each volcano, Pb's of tholeiites and alkali basalts are similar. An interaction between partially melted material (hot plume?) of the asthenosphere and the lithosphere is suggested to explain the trend in the Pb isotopic compositions of Hawaiian basalts. ?? 1978.

  3. Strontium isotope evolution of Late Permian and Triassic seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korte, Christoph; Kozur, Heinz W.; Bruckschen, Peter; Veizer, Ján

    2003-01-01

    The 87Sr/ 86Sr values based on brachiopods and conodonts define a nearly continuous record for the Late Permian and Triassic intervals. Minor gaps in measurements exist only for the uppermost Brahmanian, lower part of the Upper Olenekian, and Middle Norian, and only sparse data are available for the Late Permian. These 219 measurements include 67 brachiopods and 114 conodont samples from the Tethyan realm as well as 37 brachiopods and one conodont sample from the mid-European Middle Triassic Muschelkalk Sea. The Late Permian/Lower Triassic interval is characterized by a steep 1.3 × 10 -3 rise, from 0.7070 at the base of the Dzhulfian to 0.7082 in the late Olenekian, a rate of change comparable to that in the Cenozoic. In the mid-Triassic (Anisian and Ladinian), the isotope values fall to 0.7075, followed again by a rise to 0.7081 in the Middle/Late Norian. The 87Sr/ 86Sr values decline again in the Late Norian (Sevatian) and Rhaetian to 0.7076. The sharp rise in the 87Sr/ 86Sr values during the Late Permian/Early Triassic was coincident with widespread clastic sedimentation. Because of the paucity of tectonic uplifts, the enhanced erosion may have been due to intermittent humid phases, during mainly an arid interval, coupled with the absence of a dense protective land plant cover following the mass extinction during the latest Permian. The apex of the 87Sr/ 86Sr curve at the Olenekian/Anisian boundary coincides with cessation of the large-scale clastic sedimentation and also marks the final recovery of land vegetation, as indicated by the renewed onset of coal formation in the Middle Triassic. The rising 87Sr/ 86Sr values from the Middle Carnian to the Late Norian coincide with the uplift and erosion of the Cimmeride-Indosinian orogens marking the closure of the Palaeotethys. The subsequent Rhaetian decline that continues into Jurassic (Pliensbachian/Toarcian boundary), on the other hand, coincides with the opening of the Vardar Ocean and its eastern continuation

  4. Titan's Carbon Isotopic Ratio: A Clue To Atmospheric Evolution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, C. A.; Jennings, D. E.; Romani, P. N.; Jolly, A.; Teanby, N. A.; Irwin, P. G.; Bézard, B.; Vinatier, S.; Coustenis, A.; Flasar, F. M.

    2009-12-01

    In this presentation we describe the latest results to come from Cassini CIRS and ground-based telescopic measurements of Titan's 12C/13C ratio in atmospheric molecules, focusing on hydrocarbons. Previously, the Huygens GCMS instrument measured 12CH4/13CH4 to be 82±1 (Niemann et al., Nature, 438, 779-784, 2005), substantially and significantly lower than the VPDB inorganic Earth standard of 89.4. It is also at odds with measurements for the giant planets. Cassini CIRS infrared spectra have confirmed this enhancement in 13CH4, but also revealed that the ratio in ethane, the major photochemical product of methane photolysis, does not appear enhanced (90±7) (Nixon et al.. Icarus, 195, 778-791, 2008) and is compatible with the terrestrial and combined giant planet value (88±7, Sada et al., Ap. J., 472, p. 903-907, 1996). Recently-published results from spectroscopy using the McMath-Pierce telescope at Kitt Pitt (Jennings et al., JCP, 2009, in press) have confirmed this deviation between methane and ethane, and an explanation has been proposed. This invokes a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) in the abstraction of methane by ethynyl, a major ethane formation pathway, to preferentially partition 12C into ethane and leave an enhancement in atmospheric 13CH4 relative to the incoming flux from the reservoir. Modeling shows that a steady-state solution exists where the 12C/13C methane is decreased from the reservoir value by exactly the KIE factor (the ratio of 12CH4 to 13CH4 abstraction reaction rates): which is plausibly around 1.08, very close to the observed amount. However, a second solution exists in which we are observing Titan about ~1 methane lifetime after a major injection of methane into the atmosphere which is rapidly being eliminated. Updated measurements by Cassini CIRS of both the methane and ethane 12C/13C ratios will be presented, along with progress in interpreting this ratio. In addition, we summarize the 12C/13C measurements by CIRS in multiple other Titan

  5. Evolution of the pygmy dipole resonance in Sn isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toft, H. K.; Larsen, A. C.; Bürger, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Görgen, A.; Nyhus, H. T.; Renstrøm, T.; Siem, S.; Tveten, G. M.; Voinov, A.

    2011-04-01

    Nuclear level density and γ-ray strength functions of Sn121,122 below the neutron separation energy are extracted with the Oslo method using the (He3,He3'γ) and (He3,αγ) reactions. The level densities of Sn121,122 display steplike structures, interpreted as signatures of neutron pair breaking. An enhancement in both strength functions, compared to standard models for radiative strength, is observed in our measurements for Eγ≳5.2 MeV. This enhancement is compatible with pygmy resonances centered at ≈8.4(1) and ≈8.6(2) MeV, respectively, and with integrated strengths corresponding to ≈1.8-5+1% of the classical Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule. Similar resonances were also seen in Sn116-119. Experimental neutron-capture cross reactions are well reproduced by our pygmy resonance predictions, while standard strength models are less successful. The evolution as a function of neutron number of the pygmy resonance in Sn116-122 is described as a clear increase of centroid energy from 8.0(1) to 8.6(2) MeV, but with no observable difference in integrated strengths.

  6. Importance of the Lu-Hf isotopic system in studies of planetary chronology and chemical evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patchett, P. J.

    1983-01-01

    The Lu-176-Hf-176 isotope method and its applications in earth sciences are discussed with regard to planetary-evolution studies. From new data on basalts from oceanic islands, Hf-176/Hf-177 and Nd-143/Nd-144 are found to display a single linear isotopic variation in the suboceanic mantle, whereas considerable divergences occur in Hf-176/Hf-177-Sr-87/Sr-86 and Nd-143/Nd-144-Sr87/Sr-86 diagrams. With the acquisition of further Hf-Sr-Nd isotopic data, these discordant Sr-87/Sr-86 relationships may allow a distinction between processes such as mantle metasomatism, influence of sea-water altered material in the magma source, or recycling of sediments into the mantle. The best quality Hf isotope data are obtained from granitoid or zircons, and are most suitable for studying ancient terrestrial Hf isotopic variations. Lu-Hf is shown to be a viable method for dating ancient terrestrial and extraterrestrial samples, but is unlikely to find wide application in pure chronological studies because it offers little advantage over existing methods.

  7. Evolution of field line helicity during magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, A. J. B. Hornig, G.; Wilmot-Smith, A. L.; Yeates, A. R.

    2015-03-15

    We investigate the evolution of field line helicity for magnetic fields that connect two boundaries without null points, with emphasis on localized finite-B magnetic reconnection. Total (relative) magnetic helicity is already recognized as an important topological constraint on magnetohydrodynamic processes. Field line helicity offers further advantages because it preserves all topological information and can distinguish between different magnetic fields with the same total helicity. Magnetic reconnection changes field connectivity and field line helicity reflects these changes; the goal of this paper is to characterize that evolution. We start by deriving the evolution equation for field line helicity and examining its terms, also obtaining a simplified form for cases where dynamics are localized within the domain. The main result, which we support using kinematic examples, is that during localized reconnection in a complex magnetic field, the evolution of field line helicity is dominated by a work-like term that is evaluated at the field line endpoints, namely, the scalar product of the generalized field line velocity and the vector potential. Furthermore, the flux integral of this term over certain areas is very small compared to the integral of the unsigned quantity, which indicates that changes of field line helicity happen in a well-organized pairwise manner. It follows that reconnection is very efficient at redistributing helicity in complex magnetic fields despite having little effect on the total helicity.

  8. The evolution of coronal magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priest, E. R.; Forbes, T. G.

    1990-01-01

    Slow photospheric motions can produce flow speeds in the corona which are fast enough to violate quasi-static evolution. Therefore, high-speed flows observed in the corona are not necessarily due to a loss of equilibrium or stability. This paper presents an example where the flow speed increases indefinitely with height while the coronal magnetic energy increases quadratically with time.

  9. The Evolution of the Earth's Magnetic Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloxham, Jeremy; Gubbins, David

    1989-01-01

    Describes the change of earth's magnetic field at the boundary between the outer core and the mantle. Measurement techniques used during the last 300 years are considered. Discusses the theories and research for explaining the field change. (YP)

  10. Carbon Retention and Isotopic Evolution in Deeply Subducted Sediments: Evidence from the Italian Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook-Kollars, J.; Bebout, G. E.; Agard, P.; Angiboust, S.

    2012-12-01

    increasing grade, metapelitic carbonaceous matter shows an increase in δ13CVPDB, ranging from about -25‰ in low-grade Schistes Lustres samples to -16‰ in the highest-grade Cignana samples. Carbonate in the entire suite shows decrease in δ18OSMOW, from marine carbonate values > 25‰ to values of 17-22‰ independent of the carbonate content of the rocks. This shift could possibly be explained by isotopic exchange with silicate phases in the same rocks [Henry et al. (1996), Chem. Geol.]. Metapelitic rocks in this suite experienced moderate amounts of dehydration (20-50%) largely related to breakdown of chlorite and carpholite [Bebout et al. (in press), Chem. Geol. (abstract in this session); Angiboust and Agard (2010), Lithos], conceivably providing a source for infiltrating H2O-rich fluids producing negative shifts in calcite δ18O in interlayered metacarbonates. These results indicate that relatively little decarbonation occurred in carbonate-bearing sediments subducted to depths greater than 100 km, arguing against any model of extensive decarbonation driven by infiltration of the sediments by H2O-rich fluids released from mafic and ultramafic parts of the underlying subducting slab. This study provides field evidence for the efficient retention of C in subducting shale-carbonate sequences through forearc depths, potentially affecting the C budget and isotopic evolution of the deeper mantle.

  11. Historical Evolution of the Field View and Textbook Accounts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pocovi, M. Cecilia; Finley, Fred N.

    2003-01-01

    Analyzes how two electromagnetism textbooks approach the concept of electric field. Uses historical evolution of the field representation. Indicates that one textbook mixes up the historical and pedagogical reasons for the introduction of the concept of field while the other one presents a sketch that might lead students to understand the field…

  12. Relativistic self-consistent mean-field description of Sm isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, Afaque; Ahmad, Shakeb

    2015-12-01

    The evolution of the shape from the spherical to the axially deformed shapes of the neutron-rich, even-even Sm-164144 transitional nuclei is investigated. The investigations are performed with explicit density-dependent meson-nucleon and point-coupling models within the framework of the covariant density functional theory. A nonlinear meson-nucleon coupling model represented by the NL3* parametrization of the relativistic mean-field Lagrangian has also been used. The bulk and the microscopic properties of these nuclei have been investigated to analyze the phase-transition region and the critical-point behavior. The microscopic and self-consistent quadrupole deformation-constrained calculations show a clear shape change for even-even Sm isotopes with N =82 -102 . The potential energy surfaces for 148Sm,150Sm , and 152Sm obtained using different interactions are found to be relatively flat, which may be the possible critical-point nuclei. By examining the single-particle spectra, it is found that these nuclei distribute more uniformly as compared to other isotopes. Investigations also support the proposed shell-closure properties of 162Sm. Overall good agreement is found within the different models used and between the calculated and experimental results wherever available.

  13. Late Miocene evolution of the Black Sea: insights from palynology and strontium isotope ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grothe, Arjen; van Baak, Christiaan; Vasiliev, Iuliana; Sangiorgi, Francesca; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Stoica, Marius; Krijgsman, Wout

    2016-04-01

    During the late Miocene, the connection(s) between the Mediterranean Basin and the Atlantic Ocean deteriorated, which ultimately culminated in thick evaporite deposits and a water level drop in the Mediterranean Basin during the so-called Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC, 5.97 - 5.33 Ma). It has been claimed that Black Sea, in response to the MSC, also desiccated but these claims have been proven incorrectly. Here we present palynological (dinoflagellate cysts and pollen) and strontium isotope ratios from two Black Sea records: the Zheleznyi Rog outcrop section and Deep Sea Drilling Project Hole 380A. Organic walled cyst-producing dinoflagellates are highly sensitive to even small changes in surface waters and strontium isotope ratios are excellent recorders of changing connectivity. Our records provide therefore more insights in the sensitivity of the Black Sea to Messinian Salinity Crisis and the general evolution of the late Miocene Black Sea.

  14. Trace element and isotopic constraints on magmatic evolution at Lassen Volcanic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullen, Thomas D.; Clynne, Michael A.

    1990-11-01

    Magmatic evolution at the Lassen volcanic center (LVC) is characterized by a transition from predominantly andesitic to predominantly silicic volcanism with time. Magmas of the andesitic, or "Brokeoff phase" of volcanism range in composition from basaltic andesite io dacite, whereas those of silicic, or "Lassen phase" range in composition from basaltic andesite to rhyolite. The compositions of magmas from each phase define well organized but distinct variation trends. Compared with Brokeoff-phase magmas of similar SiO2 content, most Lassen-phase magmas contain lower concentrations of most incompatible minor and trace elements. Based on the behavior of both incompatible and compatible trace elements, the geochemical trends defined by the Brokeoff-phase magmas cannot be ascribed merely to fractional crystallization from a single or multiple mafic parental magmas, Moreover, the Lassen-phase magmas cannot be derived from the Brokeoff-phase magmas by fractional crystallization. Rather, the geochemical trends that characterize each volcanic phase define arrays that primarily indicate mixing between well-homogenized silicic and heterogeneous mafic magmas. The distinctive mixing-dominated arrays for each volcanic phase manifest the generation and evolution of two physically distinct, but genetically related magma systems. The LVC magmas have Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic characteristics that approximate two-component mixing arrays. One isotopic component is similar in composition to that of NE Pacific Ocean ridge and seamount basalts ("MORB" component), the other to mafic Mesozoic granitoids sampled from the neighboring KSamath and Sierra Nevada provinces ("KSN" component). The isotopic compositions of the most silicic LVC magmas lie within the ranges defined by the more mafic LVC magmas, which in turn lie within broad ranges defined by primitive mafic lavas sampled from the Lassen region. The lack of a correlation between the major element and isotopic compositions of LVC

  15. Sr, Nd, Pb Isotope geochemistry and magma evolution of the potassic volcanic rocks, Wudalianchi, Northeast China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Junwen, W.; Guanghong, X.; Tatsumoto, M.; Basu, A.R.

    1989-01-01

    Wudalianchi volcanic rocks are the most typical Cenozoic potassic volcanic rocks in eastern China. Compositional comparisons between whole rocks and glasses of various occurrences indicate that the magma tends to become rich in silica and alkalis as a result of crystal differentiation in the course of evolution. They are unique in isotopic composition with more radiogenic Sr but less radiogenic Pb.87Sr /86 Sr is higher and143Nd/144Nd is lower than the undifferentiated global values. In comparison to continental potash volcanic rocks, Pb isotopes are apparently lower. These various threads of evidence indicate that the rocks were derived from a primary enriched mantle which had not been subjected to reworking and shows no sign of incorporation of crustal material. The correlation between Pb and Sr suggests the regional heterogeneity in the upper mantle in terms of chemical composition. ?? 1989 Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  16. Mg Isotope Evolution During Water-Rock Interaction in a Carbonate Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Jacobson, A. D.; Lundstrom, C. C.; Huang, F.

    2008-12-01

    To better understand how Mg isotopes behave during weathering and aqueous transport, we used a Nu Plasma MC-ICP-MS to measure δ26Mg values (relative to DSM-3) in water samples along a 236 km flow path in the Madison aquifer of South Dakota, a confined carbonate aquifer recharging in the igneous Black Hills. We also analyzed local granite and dolomite samples to characterize the Mg isotope composition of source rocks constituting the recharge zone and aquifer, respectively. Repeated analyses of Mg standard solutions yielded external precisions (2σ) better than 0.1 permil for δ26Mg(CAM-1, - 2.584±0.071, n=13; UIMg-1, -2.217±0.087, n=9.). The Madison aquifer provides a unique opportunity to quantify Mg isotope effects during water-rock interaction because (1) fluids and rock have chemically equilibrated over a much longer timescale (up to ~15 kyr) than can be simulated in laboratory experiments and (2) previous studies have determined the rates and mass-balances of de- dolomitization and other geochemical reactions controlling solute evolution along the flow path. Reactions important for changing the concentration and isotope composition of Mg include dolomite dissolution, Mg-for- Na ion exchange, calcite precipitation, and isotope exchange. δ26Mg values within the recharge region (0-17 km along flow path) vary between -1.08 and -1.63 permil, and then remain essentially constant at -1.408±0.010 permil(1σ, 5 samples) from 17 to 189 km. A final sample at 236 km shows an increase to -1.09 permil. Either mixing between different recharge waters or rapid isotope exchange between infiltrating waters and dolomite could control δ26Mg variability between 0 and 17 km. Likewise, reactive transport modeling suggests that preferential uptake of 24Mg during Mg-for-Na ion exchange might cause an increase in δ26Mg between 189 and 236 km. However, unchanging δ26Mg values observed throughout most of the aquifer clearly demonstrate that Mg isotopes are not fractionated during

  17. Isotopic Constraints on the Chemical Evolution of Geothermal Fluids, Long Valley, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Shaun; Kennedy, Burton; DePaolo, Donald; Evans, William

    2008-08-01

    A spatial survey of the chemical and isotopic composition of fluids from the Long Valley hydrothermal system was conducted. Starting at the presumed hydrothermal upwelling zone in the west moat of the caldera, samples were collected from the Casa Diablo geothermal field and a series of monitoring wells defining a nearly linear, ~;;14 km long, west-to-east trend along the proposed fluid flow path (Sorey et al., 1991). Samples were analyzed for the isotopes of water, Sr, Ca, and noble gases, the concentrations of major cations and anions and total CO2. Our data confirm earlier models in which the variations in water isotopes along the flow path reflect mixing of a single hydrothermal fluid with local groundwater. Variations in Sr data are poorly constrained and reflect fluid mixing, multiple fluid-pathways or water-rock exchange along the flow path as suggested by Goff et al. (1991). Correlated variations among total CO2, noble gases and the concentration and isotopic composition of Ca suggest progressive fluid degassing (loss of CO2, noble gases) driving calcite precipitation as the fluid flows west-to-east across the caldera. This is the first evidence that Ca isotopes may trace and provide definitive evidence of calcite precipitation along fluid flow paths in geothermal systems.

  18. Centennial evolution of the atmospheric methane budget: what do the carbon isotopes tell us?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassey, K. R.; Etheridge, D. M.; Lowe, D. C.; Smith, A. M.; Ferretti, D. F.

    2007-05-01

    Little is known about how the methane source inventory and sinks have evolved over recent centuries. New and detailed records of methane mixing ratio and isotopic composition (12CH4, 13CH4 and 14CH4) from analyses of air trapped in polar ice and firn can enhance this knowledge. We use existing bottom-up constructions of the source history, including "EDGAR"-based constructions, as inputs to a model of the evolving global budget for methane and for its carbon isotope composition through the 20th century. By matching such budgets to atmospheric data, we examine the constraints imposed by isotope information on those budget evolutions. Reconciling both 12CH4 and 13CH4 budgets with EDGAR-based source histories requires a combination of: a greater proportion of emissions from biomass burning and/or of fossil methane than EDGAR constructions suggest; a greater contribution from natural such emissions than is commonly supposed; and/or a significant role for active chlorine or other highly-fractionating tropospheric sink as has been independently proposed. Examining a companion budget evolution for 14CH4 exposes uncertainties in inferring the fossil-methane source from atmospheric 14CH4 data. Specifically, methane evolution during the nuclear era is sensitive to the cycling dynamics of "bomb 14C" (originating from atmospheric weapons tests) through the biosphere. In addition, since ca. 1970, direct production and release of 14CH4 from nuclear-power facilities is influential but poorly quantified. Atmospheric 14CH4 determinations in the nuclear era have the potential to better characterize both biospheric carbon cycling, from photosynthesis to methane synthesis, and the nuclear-power source.

  19. Isotope separation by selective charge conversion and field deflection

    DOEpatents

    Hickman, Robert G.

    1978-01-01

    A deuterium-tritium separation system wherein a source beam comprised of positively ionized deuterium (D.sup.+) and tritium (T.sup.+) is converted at different charge-exchange cell sections of the system to negatively ionized deuterium (D.sup.-) and tritium (T.sup.-). First, energy is added to the beam to accelerate the D.sup.+ ions to the velocity that is optimum for conversion of the D.sup.+ ions to D.sup.- ions in a charge-exchange cell. The T.sup.+ ions are accelerated at the same time, but not to the optimum velocity since they are heavier than the D.sup.+ ions. The T.sup.+ ions are, therefore, not converted to T.sup.- ions when the D.sup.+ ions are converted to D.sup.- ions. This enables effective separation of the beam by deflection of the isotopes with an electrostatic field, the D.sup.- ions being deflected in one direction and the T.sup.+ ions being deflected in the opposite direction. Next, more energy is added to the deflected beam of T.sup.+ ions to bring the T.sup.+ ions to the optimum velocity for their conversion to T.sup.- ions. In a particular use of the invention, the beams of D.sup.- and T.sup.- ions are separately further accelerated and then converted to energetic neutral particles for injection as fuel into a thermonuclear reactor. The reactor exhaust of D.sup.+ and T.sup.+ and the D.sup.+ and T.sup.+ that was not converted in the respective sections is combined with the source beam and recycled through the system to increase the efficiency of the system.

  20. Shape evolution at high spin states in Kr and Br isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Trivedi, T.; Palit, R.; Naik, Z.; Jain, H. C.; Negi, D.; Kumar, R.; Singh, R. P.; Muralithar, S.; Pancholi, S. C.; Bhowmik, R. K.; Yang, Y.-C.; Sun, Y.; Sheikh, J. A.; Raja, M. K.; Kumar, S.; Choudhury, D.; Jain, A. K.; Mehrotra, I.

    2014-08-14

    The high spin states in A = 75, Kr and Br isotopes have been populated via fusion-evaporation reaction at an incident beam energy of 90 MeV. The de-exciting γ-rays were detected utilizing the Indian National Gamma Array (INGA). Lifetime of these excited high spin states were determined by Doppler-shift attenuation method. Experimental results obtained from lifetime measurement are interpreted in the frame work of projected shell-model to get better insight into the evolution of collectivity. Comparison of the calculations of the model with transitional quadrupole moments Q{sub t} of the positive and negative parity bands firmly established their configurations.

  1. Chemical and Isotopic Evolution of the Solar Nebula and Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Dmitry; Chakraborty, Subrata; Thiemens, Mark

    2010-02-01

    In this chapter we review recent advances in our understanding of the chemical and isotopic evolution of protoplanetary disks and the solar nebula. Current observational and meteoritic constraints on physical conditions and chemical composition of gas and dust in these systems are presented. A variety of chemical and photochemical processes that occur in planet-forming zones and beyond, in both gas phase and on grain surfaces, are overviewed. The discussion is based upon radio-interferometric, meteoritic, space-born, and laboratory-based observations,measurements and theories. Linkage between cosmochemical and astrochemical data are presented, and interesting research puzzles are discussed.

  2. Lithospheric evolution of the Northern Arabian Shield: Chemical and isotopic evidence from basalts, xenoliths and granites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, M.

    1988-01-01

    The evolution of the upper-mantle and the lower-crust (the conteinental lithosphere), is the area of Israel and Sinai was studied, using the chemical composition and the Nd-Sr isotopic systematics from mantle and crustal nodules, their host basalts, and granites. The magmatism and the metasomatism making the lithosphere are related to uprise of mantle diapirs in the uppermost mantle of the area. These diapirs heated the base of the lithosphere, eroded, and replaced it with new hot material. It caused a domal uplift of the lithosphere (and the crust). The doming resulted in tensional stresses that in turn might develop transport channels for the basalt.

  3. Detrital zircon evidence for Hf isotopic evolution of granitoid crust and continental growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, Tsuyoshi; Komiya, Tsuyoshi; Rino, Shuji; Maruyama, Shigenori; Hirata, Takafumi

    2010-04-01

    We have determined U-Pb ages, trace element abundances and Hf isotopic compositions of approximately 1000 detrital zircon grains from the Mississippi, Congo, Yangtze and Amazon Rivers. The U-Pb isotopic data reveal the lack of >3.3 Ga zircons in the river sands, and distinct peaks at 2.7-2.5, 2.2-1.9, 1.7-1.6, 1.2-1.0, 0.9-0.4, and <0.3 Ga in the accumulated age distribution. These peaks correspond well with the timing of supercontinent assembly. The Hf isotopic data indicate that many zircons, even those having Archean U-Pb ages, crystallized from magmas involving an older crustal component, suggesting that granitoid magmatism has been the primary agent of differentiation of the continental crust since the Archean era. We calculated Hf isotopic model ages for the zircons to estimate the mean mantle-extraction ages of their source materials. The oldest zircon Hf model ages of about 3.7 Ga for the river sands suggest that some crust generation had taken place by 3.7 Ga, and that it was subsequently reworked into <3.3 Ga granitoid continental crust. The accumulated model age distribution shows peaks at 3.3-3.0, 2.9-2.4, and 2.0-0.9 Ga. The striking attribute of our new data set is the non-uniformitarian secular change in Hf isotopes of granitoid crusts; Hf isotopic compositions of granitoid crusts deviate from the mantle evolution line from about 3.3 to 2.0 Ga, the deviation declines between 2.0 and 1.3 Ga and again increases afterwards. Consideration of mantle-crust mixing models for granitoid genesis suggests that the noted isotopic trends are best explained if the rate of crust generation globally increased in two stages at around (or before) 3.3 and 1.3 Ga, whereas crustal differentiation was important in the evolution of the continental crust at 2.3-2.2 Ga and after 0.6 Ga. Reconciling the isotopic secular change in granitoid crust with that in sedimentary rocks suggests that sedimentary recycling has essentially taken place in continental settings rather than

  4. Genesis and evolution of water in a two-mica pluton: A hydrogen isotope study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brigham, R.H.; O'Neil, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements were made of the hydrogen isotope composition of 74 samples of muscovite, biotite, vein quartz and whole rocks from the Papoose Flat pluton, eastern California, U.S.A., and adjacent metamorphic and sedimentary rocks in order to elucidate the genesis and evolution of water and hydrous minerals in a two-mica granodiorite. Electron microprobe analyses were made of all micas so that the Suzuoki-Epstein equation could be used in evaluating the data. Based on experimental, theoretical and textural evidence of mica paragenesis, a model of hydrogen isotope fractionation between an aqueous vapor and a magma during crystallization has been constructed. This model accounts for the observed hydrogen isotope relations and implies that primary hydrogen isotope compositions have been preserved in a large portion of the pluton. The ?? D-values of biotites vary widely over the range -103 to -66% with most values lying between -90 and -70??? Muscovites, on the other hand, are isotopically more uniform and have ?? D-values of -61 to -41??? with most values lying between -50 and -46??? These data are consistent with the interpretation that biotite formed over a long period of crystallization whereas muscovite formed in a narrow interval, presumably during the final stages of crystallization when alumina and water contents were at their highest. Only 8 of the 21 muscovite-biotite pairs analyzed are in hydrogen isotope equilibrium as calculated from the Suzuoki-Epstein equation. Biotites in the western half of the pluton have relatively low ?? D-values of around -85???, whereas those in the eastern half have higher values of up to -66??? This pattern is a consequence of a loss of permeability associated with the syn-intrusive deformation of the western margin of the pluton. This loss of permeability enhanced the preservation of primary hydrogen isotope relations there by diverting water evolved from the magma out through the eastern half of the pluton where some deuteric

  5. Medical internet ethics: a field in evolution.

    PubMed

    Dyer, K A; Thompson, C D

    2001-01-01

    As in any new field, the merger of medicine, e-commerce and the Internet raises many questions pertaining to ethical conduct. Key issues include defining the essence of the patient-provider relationship, establishing guidelines and training for practicing online medicine and therapy, setting standards for ethical online research, determining guidelines for providing quality healthcare information and requiring ethical conduct for medical and health websites. Physicians who follow their professional code of ethics are obligated not to exploit the relationship they have with patients, nor allow anyone else working with them to do so. Physicians and therapists are obligated to serve those who place trust in them for treatment, whether in face-to-face or online Internet encounters with patients or clients. This ethical responsibility to patients and clients is often in direct conflict with the business model of generating profits. Healthcare professionals involved in Medical Internet Ethics need to define the scope of competent medical and healthcare on the Internet. The emerging ethical issues facing medicine on the Internet, the current state of medical ethics on the Internet and questions for future directions of study in this evolving field are reviewed in this paper. PMID:11604935

  6. Oxygen Isotope Character of the Lake Owyhee Volcanic Field, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, T.; Strickland, A.; Valley, J. W.

    2012-12-01

    Oxygen isotope analyses of zircons from lavas and tuffs from the Lake Owyhee Volcanic Field (LOVF) of east central Oregon unequivocally demonstrate the presence of mid-Miocene low-δ18O magmas (δ18Ozrc<4.7 ‰). Despite the growing data set of low-δ18O melts within, and proximal to, the Snake River Plain (SRP) Large Igneous Province, debate persists regarding both the mechanisms for low-δ18O magma petrogenesis, and their relative influence in the SRP. The LOVF is associated with widespread silicic volcanism roughly concurrent with the eruption of the Steens-Columbia River Basalt Group between ~17-15Ma. Silicic activity in the LOVF is limited to 16-15Ma, when an estimated 1100km3 of weakly peralkaline to metaluminous rhyolitic lavas and ignimbrites erupted from a series of fissures and calderas. Geographically, the LOVF overlaps the Oregon-Idaho Graben (OIG), and straddles the 87Sr/86Sr= 0.704 line which, together with the 0.706 line to the east, delineate the regional transition from the North American Precambrian continental crust to the east to younger Phanerozoic accreted terranes to the west. Here we report high accuracy ion microprobe analyses of δ18O in zircons using a 10-15μm spot, with average spot-to-spot precision ±0.28‰ (2SD), to investigate intra-grain and intra-unit δ18Ozrc trends for LOVF rhyolites. Due to its high closure temperature, chemical and physical resistance, and slow oxygen diffusion rates, zircon offers a robust record of magmatic oxygen isotope ratios during crystallization and provides constraints on the petrogenesis of Snake River Plain (SRP) low-δ18O melts. Individual zircons from LOVF rhyolites show no evidence of core-rim δ18O zoning, and populations exhibit ≤0.42‰ (2SD) intra-unit variability. Unit averages range from 2.2 to 4.3‰, with the lowest values in caldera-forming ignimbrites, but all units show evidence of crystallization from low-δ18O melts. Quartz and feldspar analyses by laser fluorination (precision

  7. Evolution of the dipole geomagnetic field. Observations and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetnyak, M. Yu.; Pavlov, V. E.

    2016-01-01

    The works on paleomagnetic observations of the dipole geomagnetic field, its variations, and reversals in the last 3.5 billion years have been reviewed. It was noted that characteristic field variations are related to the evolution of the convection processes in the liquid core due to the effect of magnetic convection and solid core growth. Works on the geochemistry and energy budget of the Earth's core, the effect of the solid core on convection and the generation of the magnetic field, dynamo models are also considered. We consider how core growth affects the magnetic dipole generation and variations, as well as the possibility of magnetic field generation up to the appearance of the solid core. We also pay attention to the fact that not only the magnetic field but also its configuration and time variations, which are caused by the convection evolution in the core on geological timescales, are important factors for the biosphere.

  8. Isotopic constraints on anorthosite genesis and implications for crust-mantle evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwal, L.D.

    1985-01-01

    Crystallization ages of anorthosite massifs, determined from whole-rock and internal Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr isochrons range between about 1.1 and 1.6 Ga, arguing against a discrete anorthosite event. Metamorphic ages of some massifs are as much as 200-300 Ma younger, indicating that the Grenville orogeny was not a causative factor in anorthosite genesis. Variable crustal contamination effects are evident in many massifs, particularly in border zones. In some late-stage ferrogabbros, mafic silicates and/or Fe-Ti oxides are not in isotopic equilibrium with plagioclase, suggesting that crystallization took place both before and after contamination. The most isotopically primitive materials are Al-rich opx megacrysts. Isotopic data to date are compatible with a two-stage model involving (1) emplacement of basaltic magma into lower crustal chambers where fractionation and accumulation of olivine and Al-rich opx, and eventually plagioclase took place, and (2) detachment and ascent of buoyant anorthositic mushes to upper crustal emplacement sites. Besides being useful as indicators of Proterozoic mantle evolution, anorthosites can be used as tracers to map our basement types through which they were emplaced.

  9. Tracing the secular evolution of the UCC using the iron isotope composition of ancient glacial diamictites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X. M.; Gaschnig, R. M.; Rudnick, R. L.; Hazen, R. M.; Shahar, A.

    2015-12-01

    Iron is the fourth most abundant element in the continental crust and influences global climate and biogeochemical cycles in the ocean1. Continental inputs, including river waters, sediments and atmospheric dust are dominant sources (>95%) of iron into the ocean2. Therefore, understanding how continental inputs may have changed through time is important in understanding the secular evolution of the marine Fe cycle. We analysed the Fe isotopic composition of twenty-four glacial diamictite composites, upper continental crust (UCC) proxies, with ages ranging from the Mesoarchean to the Paleozoic eras to characterize the secular evolution of the UCC. The diamictites all have elevated chemical index of alteration (CIA) and other characteristics of weathered regolith (e.g., strong depletion in soluble elements such as Sr), which they inherited from their upper crustal source region3. δ56Fe in the diamictite composites range from -0.59 to +0.23‰, however, most diamictites cluster with an average δ56Fe of 0.11± 0.20 (2s), overlapping juvenile continental material such as island arc basalts (IABs), which show a narrow range in δ56Fe from -0.04 to +0.14 ‰4. There is no obvious correlation between δ56Fe of the glacial diamictites and the CIA, except that the diamictite with the lowest δ56Fe at -0.59 ‰ also has the highest CIA = 89 (the Paleoproterozoic Makganyene Fm.). The data suggest that the Fe isotope compositions in the upper continental crust did not vary throughout Earth history. Interestingly, chemical weathering and sedimentary transport likely play only a minor role in producing Fe isotope variations in the upper continental crust. Anoxic weathering pre-GOE (Great Oxidation Event) does not seem to generate different Fe isotopic signatures from the post-GOE oxidative weathering environment in the upper continental crust. Therefore, large Fe isotopic fractionations observed in various marine sedimentary records are likely due to other processes occurring

  10. Tracing the secular evolution of the UCC using the iron isotope composition of ancient glacial diamictites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X. M.; Gaschnig, R. M.; Rudnick, R. L.; Hazen, R. M.; Shahar, A.

    2014-12-01

    Iron is the fourth most abundant element in the continental crust and influences global climate and biogeochemical cycles in the ocean1. Continental inputs, including river waters, sediments and atmospheric dust are dominant sources (>95%) of iron into the ocean2. Therefore, understanding how continental inputs may have changed through time is important in understanding the secular evolution of the marine Fe cycle. We analysed the Fe isotopic composition of twenty-four glacial diamictite composites, upper continental crust (UCC) proxies, with ages ranging from the Mesoarchean to the Paleozoic eras to characterize the secular evolution of the UCC. The diamictites all have elevated chemical index of alteration (CIA) and other characteristics of weathered regolith (e.g., strong depletion in soluble elements such as Sr), which they inherited from their upper crustal source region3. δ56Fe in the diamictite composites range from -0.59 to +0.23‰, however, most diamictites cluster with an average δ56Fe of 0.11± 0.20 (2s), overlapping juvenile continental material such as island arc basalts (IABs), which show a narrow range in δ56Fe from -0.04 to +0.14 ‰4. There is no obvious correlation between δ56Fe of the glacial diamictites and the CIA, except that the diamictite with the lowest δ56Fe at -0.59 ‰ also has the highest CIA = 89 (the Paleoproterozoic Makganyene Fm.). The data suggest that the Fe isotope compositions in the upper continental crust did not vary throughout Earth history. Interestingly, chemical weathering and sedimentary transport likely play only a minor role in producing Fe isotope variations in the upper continental crust. Anoxic weathering pre-GOE (Great Oxidation Event) does not seem to generate different Fe isotopic signatures from the post-GOE oxidative weathering environment in the upper continental crust. Therefore, large Fe isotopic fractionations observed in various marine sedimentary records are likely due to other processes occurring

  11. STRONTIUM ISOTOPE EVOLUTION OF PORE WATER AND CALCITE IN THE TOPOPAH SPRING TUFF, YUCCA MOUNTAIN , NEVADA

    SciTech Connect

    B.D. Marshall; K. Futa

    2001-02-07

    Yucca Mountain, a ridge of Miocene volcanic rocks in southwest Nevada, is being characterized as a site for a potential high-level radioactive waste repository. One issue of concern for the future performance of the potential repository is the movement of water in and around the potential repository horizon. Past water movement in this unsaturated zone is indicated by fluid inclusions trapped in calcite coatings on fracture footwall surfaces and in some lithophysal cavities. Some of the fluid inclusions have homogenization temperatures above the present-day geotherm (J.F. Whelan, written communication), so determining the ages of the calcite associated with those fluid inclusions is important in understanding the thermal history of the potential repository site. Calcite ages have been constrained by uranium-lead dating of silica polymorphs (opal and chalcedony) that are present in most coatings. The opal and chalcedony ages indicate that deposition of the calcite and opal coatings in the welded part of the Topopah Spring Tuff (TSw hydrogeologic unit) spanned nearly the entire history of the 12.8-million-year-old rock mass at fairly uniform overall long-term rates of deposition (within a factor of five). Constraining the age of a layer of calcite associated with specific fluid inclusions is complicated. Calcite is commonly bladed with complex textural relations, and datable opal or chalcedony may be millions of years older or younger than the calcite layer or may be absent from the coating entirely. Therefore, a more direct method of dating the calcite is presented in this paper by developing a model for strontium evolution in pore water in the TSw as recorded by the strontium coprecipitated with calcium in the calcite. Although the water that precipitated the calcite in fractures and cavities may not have been in local isotopic equilibrium with the pore water, the strontium isotope composition of all water in the TSw is primarily controlled by water

  12. Ordovician carbonate formation waters in the Illinois Basin: Chemical and isotopic evolution beneath a regional aquitard

    SciTech Connect

    Stueber, A.M. ); Walter, L.M. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    Formation waters from carbonate reservoirs in the upper Ordovician Galena Group of the Illinois Basin have been analyzed geochemically to study origin of salinity, chemical and isotopic evolution, and relation to paleohydrologic flow systems. These carbonate reservoirs underlie the Maquoketa Shale Group of Cincinnatian age, which forms a regional aquitard. Cl-Br relations and Na/Br-Cl/Br systematics indicate that initial brine salinity resulted from subaerial evaporation of seawater to a point not significantly beyond halite saturation. Subsequent dilution in the subsurface by meteoric waters is supported by delta D-delta O-18 covariance. Systematic relations between Sr-87/Sr-86 and 1/Sr suggest two distinct mixing events: introduction of a Sr-87 enriched fluid from a siliciclastic source, and a later event which only affected reservoir waters from the western shelf of the basin. The second mixing event is supported by covariance between Sr-87/Sr-86 and concentrations of cations and anions; covariance between Sr and O-D isotopes suggests that the event is related to meteoric water influx. Systematic geochemical relations in ordovician Galena Group formation waters have been preserved by the overlying Maquoketa shale aquitard. Comparison with results from previous studies indicates that waters from Silurian-Devonian carbonate strata evolved in a manner similar to yet distinct from that of the Ordovician carbonate waters, whereas waters from Mississippian-Pennsylvanian strata that overlie the New Albany Shale Group regional aquitard are marked by fundamentally different Cl-Br-Na and Sr isotope systematics. Evolution of these geochemical formation-water regimes apparently has been influenced significantly by paleohydrologic flow systems.

  13. CAN GALACTIC CHEMICAL EVOLUTION EXPLAIN THE OXYGEN ISOTOPIC VARIATIONS IN THE SOLAR SYSTEM?

    SciTech Connect

    Lugaro, Maria; Liffman, Kurt; Maddison, Sarah T.

    2012-11-01

    A number of objects in primitive meteorites have oxygen isotopic compositions that place them on a distinct, mass-independent fractionation line with a slope of one on a three-isotope plot. The most popular model for describing how this fractionation arose assumes that CO self-shielding produced {sup 16}O-rich CO and {sup 16}O-poor H{sub 2}O, where the H{sub 2}O subsequently combined with interstellar dust to form relatively {sup 16}O-poor solids within the solar nebula. Another model for creating the different reservoirs of {sup 16}O-rich gas and {sup 16}O-poor solids suggests that these reservoirs were produced by Galactic chemical evolution (GCE) if the solar system dust component was somewhat younger than the gas component and both components were lying on the line of slope one in the O three-isotope plot. We argue that GCE is not the cause of mass-independent fractionation of the oxygen isotopes in the solar system. The GCE scenario is in contradiction with observations of the {sup 18}O/{sup 17}O ratios in nearby molecular clouds and young stellar objects. It is very unlikely for GCE to produce a line of slope one when considering the effect of incomplete mixing of stellar ejecta in the interstellar medium. Furthermore, the assumption that the solar system dust was younger than the gas requires unusual timescales or the existence of an important stardust component that is not theoretically expected to occur nor has been identified to date.

  14. Cenozoic climate evolution in Asian region and its influence on isotopic composition of precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botsyun, Svetlana; Donnadieu, Yannick; Sepulchre, Pierre; Risi, Camille; Fluteau, Frédéric

    2015-04-01

    The evolution of Asian climate during the Cenozoic as well as the onset of monsoon systems in this area is highly debated. Factors that control climate include the geographical position of continents, the land-sea distribution and altitude of orogens. In tern, several climatic parameters such as air temperature, precipitation amount and isotopic fractionation through mass-dependent processes impact precipitation δ18O lapse rate. Stable oxygen paleoaltimetry is considered to be a very efficient and widely applied technique, but the link between stable oxygen composition of precipitation and climate is not well established. To quantify the influence of paleogeography changes on climate and precipitation δ18O over Asia, the atmospheric general circulation model LMDZ-iso, with embedded stable oxygen isotopes, was used. For more realistic experiments, sea surface temperatures were calculated with the fully coupled model FOAM. Various scenarios of TP growth have been applied together with Paleocene, Eocene, Oligocene and Miocene boundary conditions. The results of our numerical modelling show a significant influence of paleogeography changes on the Asian climate. The retreat of the Paratethys ocean, the changes in latitudinal position of India, and the height of the Tibetan Plateau most likely control precipitation patterns over Asia and cause spatial and temporal isotopic variations linked with the amount effect. Indian Ocean currents restructuring during the Eocene induces a substantial warming over Asian continent. The adiabatic and non-adiabatic temperature effects explain some of δ18O signal variations. We highlight the importance of these multiple factor on paleoelevations estimates derived using oxygen stable isotopes.

  15. Importance of the Lu-Hf isotopic system in studies of planetary chronology and chemical evolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patchett, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    The 176Lu-176Hf isotope method and its applications in earth sciences are discussed. Greater fractionation of Lu/Hf than Sm/Nd in planetary magmatic processes makes 176Hf 177Hf a powerful geochemical tracer. In general, proportional variations of 176Hf 177Hf exceed those of 143Nd l44Nd by factors of 1.5-3 in terrestrial and lunar materials. Lu-Hf studies therefore have a major contribution to make in understanding of terrestrial and other planetary evolution through time, and this is the principal importance of Lu-Hf. New data on basalts from oceanic islands show unequivocally that whereas considerable divergences occur in 176Hf 177Hf- 87Sr 86Sr and 143Nd l44Nd- 87Sr 86Sr diagrams, 176Hf 177Hf and 143Nd 144Nd display a single, linear isotopic variation in the suboceanic mantle. These discordant 87Sr 86Sr relationships may allow, with the acquisition of further Hf-Nd-Sr isotopic data, a distinction between processes such as mantle metasomatism, influence of seawater-altered material in the magma source, or recycling of sediments into the mantle. In order to evaluate the Hf-Nd isotopic correlation in terms of mantle fractionation history, there is a need for measurements of Hf distribution coefficients between silicate minerals and liquids, and specifically for a knowledge of Hf behavior in relation to rareearth elements. For studying ancient terrestrial Hf isotopic variations, the best quality Hf isotope data are obtained from granitoid rocks or zircons. New data show that very U-Pb discordant zircons may have upwardly-biased 176Hf 177Hf, but that at least concordant to slightly discordant zircons appear to be reliable carriers of initial 176Hf 177Hf. Until the controls on addition of radiogenic Hf to zircon are understood, combined zircon-whole rock studies are recommended. Lu-Hf has been demonstrated as a viable tool for dating of ancient terrestrial and extraterrestrial samples, but because it offers little advantage over existing methods, is unlikely to find

  16. The origin, evolution and signatures of primordial magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2016-07-01

    The universe is magnetized on all scales probed so far. On the largest scales, galaxies and galaxy clusters host magnetic fields at the micro Gauss level coherent on scales up to ten kpc. Recent observational evidence suggests that even the intergalactic medium in voids could host a weak  ∼  10‑16 Gauss magnetic field, coherent on Mpc scales. An intriguing possibility is that these observed magnetic fields are a relic from the early universe, albeit one which has been subsequently amplified and maintained by a dynamo in collapsed objects. We review here the origin, evolution and signatures of primordial magnetic fields. After a brief summary of magnetohydrodynamics in the expanding universe, we turn to magnetic field generation during inflation and phase transitions. We trace the linear and nonlinear evolution of the generated primordial fields through the radiation era, including viscous effects. Sensitive observational signatures of primordial magnetic fields on the cosmic microwave background, including current constraints from Planck, are discussed. After recombination, primordial magnetic fields could strongly influence structure formation, especially on dwarf galaxy scales. The resulting signatures on reionization, the redshifted 21 cm line, weak lensing and the Lyman-α forest are outlined. Constraints from radio and γ-ray astronomy are summarized. Astrophysical batteries and the role of dynamos in reshaping the primordial field are briefly considered. The review ends with some final thoughts on primordial magnetic fields.

  17. The origin, evolution and signatures of primordial magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2016-07-01

    The universe is magnetized on all scales probed so far. On the largest scales, galaxies and galaxy clusters host magnetic fields at the micro Gauss level coherent on scales up to ten kpc. Recent observational evidence suggests that even the intergalactic medium in voids could host a weak  ∼  10(-16) Gauss magnetic field, coherent on Mpc scales. An intriguing possibility is that these observed magnetic fields are a relic from the early universe, albeit one which has been subsequently amplified and maintained by a dynamo in collapsed objects. We review here the origin, evolution and signatures of primordial magnetic fields. After a brief summary of magnetohydrodynamics in the expanding universe, we turn to magnetic field generation during inflation and phase transitions. We trace the linear and nonlinear evolution of the generated primordial fields through the radiation era, including viscous effects. Sensitive observational signatures of primordial magnetic fields on the cosmic microwave background, including current constraints from Planck, are discussed. After recombination, primordial magnetic fields could strongly influence structure formation, especially on dwarf galaxy scales. The resulting signatures on reionization, the redshifted 21 cm line, weak lensing and the Lyman-α forest are outlined. Constraints from radio and γ-ray astronomy are summarized. Astrophysical batteries and the role of dynamos in reshaping the primordial field are briefly considered. The review ends with some final thoughts on primordial magnetic fields. PMID:27243368

  18. Can the evolution of nitrogen cycle be traced by the N isotopic composition in mica?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinti, D. L.; Hashizume, K.

    2011-12-01

    A significant portion of nitrogen present in sedimentary rocks has a biological origin, trapped either in organic form, or as ammonium ion substituting potassium in mica. Mica might preserve biological N isotopic signatures (δ15N) in the geological record, allowing the evolution of the N cycle to be traced. However, diagenetic or metamorphic events can modify the pristine N isotopic signature leading to inaccurate interpretations. For example, devolatilization of the rock leads to a reduction in the N abundance and a contemporary increase of the δ15N because 14N escapes faster than 15N. We measured N isotopic compositions in whole rock, mica and feldspars separates from two Archean suites of cherts: 3.5 Ga Kitty's Gap and North Pole sequences in Pilbara, Western Australia and from the 3.45 Ga Hooggenoeg Fm, Barberton Greenstone Belt, South Africa. N was compared with the argon elemental and isotopic composition, because a relation between NH4+, which replaces K+ and radiogenic 40Ar*, which is produced by electron capture of K+ is expected. Both Pilbara and Barberton cherts show a clear correlation between N and 40Ar*, confirming the occurrence of a common speciation. K-Ar dating of the Hooggenoeg Formation mica and feldspars give ages of 2.1 and 1.1 Ga, respectively, indicating that loosely-bounded noble gas 40Ar* is lost from the host mineral during known metamorphic events. Observed correlations between 40Ar* and N suggests that nitrogen, although more strongly bounded as ammonium is also lost, possibly leading to isotopic fractionation. Measured δ15N values, however, are relatively constant (+8.1±0.6% for whole rock and +10.9±1.2% for mica) and do not display an inverse correlation with N abundances. This suggests either 1) that isotopic fractionation is not produced during N loss or; 2) that a process other than devolatilization fractionate N isotopes. Measured δ15N values are at levels far greater than those expected for Early Archean kerogens (0±2

  19. Global-scale modelling of melting and isotopic evolution of Earth's mantle: melting modules for TERRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Heck, Hein J.; Davies, J. Huw; Elliott, Tim; Porcelli, Don

    2016-04-01

    Many outstanding problems in solid-Earth science relate to the geodynamical explanation of geochemical observations. Currently, extensive geochemical databases of surface observations exist, but satisfying explanations of underlying mantle processes are lacking. One way to address these problems is through numerical modelling of mantle convection while tracking chemical information throughout the convective mantle. We have implemented a new way to track both bulk compositions and concentrations of trace elements in a finite-element mantle convection code. Our approach is to track bulk compositions and trace element abundances via particles. One value on each particle represents bulk composition and can be interpreted as the basalt component. In our model, chemical fractionation of bulk composition and trace elements happens at self-consistent, evolving melting zones. Melting is defined via a composition-dependent solidus, such that the amount of melt generated depends on pressure, temperature and bulk composition of each particle. A novel aspect is that we do not move particles that undergo melting; instead we transfer the chemical information carried by the particle to other particles. Molten material is instantaneously transported to the surface layer, thereby increasing the basalt component carried by the particles close to the surface and decreasing the basalt component in the residue. The model is set to explore a number of radiogenic isotopic systems, but as an example here the trace elements we choose to follow are the Pb isotopes and their radioactive parents. For these calculations we will show (1) the evolution of the distribution of bulk compositions over time, showing the buildup of oceanic crust (via melting-induced chemical separation in bulk composition), i.e. a basalt-rich layer at the surface, and the transportation of these chemical heterogeneities through the deep mantle; (2) the amount of melt generated over time; (3) the evolution of the

  20. Global scale modeling of melting and isotopic evolution of Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Heck, H. J.; Davies, J. H.; Elliott, T.; Porcelli, D.

    2015-11-01

    Many outstanding problems in solid Earth science relate to the geodynamical explanation of geochemical observations. Currently, extensive geochemical databases of surface observations exist, but satisfying explanations of underlying mantle processes are lacking. One way to address these problems is through numerical modelling of mantle convection while tracking chemical information throughout the convective mantle. We have implemented a new way to track both bulk compositions and concentrations of trace elements in a finite element mantle convection code. Our approach is to track bulk compositions and trace element abundances via particles. One value on each particle represents bulk composition, and can be interpreted as the basalt component. In our model, chemical fractionation of bulk composition and trace elements happens at self-consistent, evolving melting zones. Melting is defined via a composition-dependent solidus, such that the amount of melt generated depends on pressure, temperature and bulk composition of each particle. A novel aspect is that we do not move particles that undergo melting; instead we transfer the chemical information carried by the particle to other particles. Molten material is instantaneously transported to the surface layer, thereby increasing the basalt component carried by the particles close to the surface, and decreasing the basalt component in the residue. The model is set to explore a number of radiogenic isotopic systems but as an example here the trace elements we choose to follow are the Pb isotopes and their radioactive parents. For these calculations we will show: (1) The evolution of the distribution of bulk compositions over time, showing the build up of oceanic crust (via melting-induced chemical separation in bulk composition); i.e. a basalt-rich layer at the surface, and the transportation of these chemical heterogeneities through the deep mantle. (2) The amount of melt generated over time. (3) The evolution of the

  1. Magnetic field evolution in white dwarfs: The hall effect and complexity of the field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muslimov, A. G.; Van Horn, H. M.; Wood, M. A.

    1995-01-01

    We calculate the evolution of the magnetic fields in white dwarfs, taking into account the Hall effect. Because this effect depends nonlinearly upon the magnetic field strength B, the time dependences of the various multipole field components are coupled. The evolution of the field is thus significantly more complicated than has been indicated by previous investigations. Our calculations employ recent white dwarf evolutionary sequences computed for stars with masses 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, and 1.0 solar mass. We show that in the presence of a strong (up to approximately 10(exp 9) G) internal toroidal magnetic field; the evolution of even the lowest order poloidal modes can be substantially changed by the Hall effect. As an example, we compute the evolution of an initially weak quadrupole component, which we take arbitrarily to be approximately 0.1%-1% of the strength of a dominant dipole field. We find that coupling provided by the Hall effect can produce growth of the ratio of the quadrupole to the dipole component of the surface value of the magnetic field strength by more than a factor of 10 over the 10(exp 9) to 10(exp 10) year cooling lifetime of the white dwarf. Some consequences of these results for the process of magnetic-field evolution in white dwarfs are briefly discussed.

  2. Combining experimental evolution and field population assays to study the evolution of host range breadth.

    PubMed

    Fellous, S; Angot, G; Orsucci, M; Migeon, A; Auger, P; Olivieri, I; Navajas, M

    2014-05-01

    Adapting to specific hosts often involves trade-offs that limit performance on other hosts. These constraints may either lead to narrow host ranges (i.e. specialists, able to exploit only one host type) or wide host ranges often leading to lower performance on each host (i.e. generalists). Here, we combined laboratory experiments on field populations with experimental evolution to investigate the impact of adaptation to the host on host range evolution and associated performance over this range. We used the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae, a model organism for studies on the evolution of specialization. Field mite populations were sampled on three host plant species: tomato, citrus tree and rosebay (Nerium oleander). Testing these populations in the laboratory revealed that tomato populations of mites could exploit tomato only, citrus populations could exploit citrus and tomato whereas Nerium populations could exploit all three hosts. Besides, the wider niche ranges of citrus and Nerium populations came at the cost of low performance on their non-native hosts. Experimental lines selected to live on the same three host species exhibited similar patterns of host range and relative performance. This result suggests that adaptation to a new host species may lead to wider host ranges but at the expense of decreased performance on other hosts. We conclude that experimental evolution may reliably inform on evolution in the field. PMID:24689448

  3. Zircon Hf isotopic constraints on the magmatic evolution in Iran: Implications of the Phanerozoic continental growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, H.; Chung, S.; Zarrinkoub, M. H.; Lee, H.; Pang, K.; Mohammadi, S. S.; Khatib, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    Combined LA-ICPMS analyses of zircon U-Pb and Hf isotope compositions for magmatic rocks from major domains of Iran allow us to better understand the magmatic evolution regarding the development of the Tethys oceans in the regions. In addition to 79 igneous rocks from Iran, 12 others were also collected from Armenia for isotopic studies. Two major episodes of magmatism were identified in the late Neoproterozoic to Cambrian and the Late Triassic. While the former represents the depleted mantle-derived magma and has associated with the magmatic events that produced the peri-Gondwanan terranes and the Arabian-Nubian Shield, the latter shows the continental crust-type zircon Hf isotopic characteristic and is attributed to the subduction and closing of the Paleotethys ocean. The Neotethyan subduction-related magmatism started from the Jurassic period as granitoids that now exposed along the Sanandaj-Sirjan structural zone (SSZ) and in the central part of the Urumieh-Dokhtar magmatic arc (UDMA), and exhibit heterogeneous isotopic affinities of variable zircon ɛHf(T) values between +12 and -5. The igneous activities migrated inland in the southeastern segment of the UDMA from which the Late Cretaceous granitoids occurred in the Jiroft and Bazman areas with zircon ɛHf(T) values from +15 to +11 and from +5 to -9, respectively, implying the remarkable involvement of crustal material in the Bazman magma. Then, the most widespread magmatic activities which took place during the Eocene to Miocene in the UDMA, Armenia, the SSZ and the Alborz yielded mainly positive zircon ɛHf(T) values from +17 to -1. However, the Eocene intrusive rocks from the Central Iran, in the Saghand area have less radiogenic zircon Hf isotopes of ɛHf(T) values between +6 and -7. Magmatic zircons with juvenile signatures, ɛHf(T) values from +17 to 0, were also found during the Oligocene to Quaternary in the southern Sistan suture zone and the Makran region. Significantly, the positive ɛHf(T) values

  4. Effect of parent body evolution on equilibrium and kinetic isotope fractionation: a combined Ni and Fe isotope study of iron and stony-iron meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernonozhkin, Stepan M.; Goderis, Steven; Costas-Rodríguez, Marta; Claeys, Philippe; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2016-08-01

    Various iron and stony-iron meteorites have been characterized for their Ni and Fe isotopic compositions using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) after sample digestion and chromatographic separation of the target elements in an attempt to further constrain the planetary differentiation processes that shifted these isotope ratios and to shed light on the formational history and evolution of selected achondrite parent body asteroids. Emphasis was placed on spatially resolved isotopic analysis of iron meteorites, known to be inhomogeneous at the μm to mm scale, and on the isotopic characterization of adjacent metal and silicate phases in main group pallasites (PMG), mesosiderites, and the IIE and IAB complex silicate-bearing iron meteorites. In a 3-isotope plot of 60/58Ni versus62/58Ni, the slope of the best-fitting straight line through the laterally resolved Ni isotope ratio data for iron meteorites reveals kinetically controlled isotope fractionation (βexper = 1.981 ± 0.039, 1 SD), predominantly resulting from sub-solidus diffusion (with the fractionation exponent β connecting the isotope fractionation factors, as α62/58 =α60/58β). The observed relation between δ56/54Fe and Ir concentration in the metal fractions of PMGs and in IIIAB iron meteorites indicates a dependence of the bulk Fe isotopic composition on the fractional crystallization of an asteroidal metal core. No such fractional crystallization trends were found for the corresponding Ni isotope ratios or for other iron meteorite groups, such as the IIABs. In the case of the IIE and IAB silicate-bearing iron meteorites, the Fe and Ni isotopic signatures potentially reflect the influence of impact processes, as the degree of diffusion-controlled Ni isotope fractionation is closer to that of Fe compared to what is observed for magmatic iron meteorite types. Between the metal and olivine counterparts of pallasites, the Fe and Ni isotopic compositions show clearly

  5. A parameterized model for the evolution of isotopic heterogeneities in a convecting system. [for earth mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, F. M.; Daly, S. F.; Nataf, H.-C.

    1982-01-01

    It is experimentally shown that, although steady convective flows are efficient means to heterogeneity within a single cell, they do not produce a dispersal of heterogeneous material over scales that are large by comparison to their depth, which requires that the flow be time-dependent on a time scale comparable to the overturn time. Convection in an internally heated layer does possess this property, and numerical solutions are presently used to study the way in which it disperses a set of neutrally bouyant particles initially confined to a small space. The derived concept of effective diffusivity is applied to the isotopic evolution of the Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr systems, with spatial variations generated by horizontal variations in degree of melting 1.8 billion years ago.

  6. Isotope Fractionation and Atmospheric Oxygen: Implications for Phanerozoic O2 Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berner, R. A.; Petsch, S. T.; Lake, J. A.; Beerling, D. J.; Popp, B. N.; Lane, R. S.; Laws, E. A.; Westley, M. B.; Cassar, N.; Woodward, F. I.; Quick, W. P.

    2000-03-01

    Models describing the evolution of the partial pressure of atmospheric oxygen over Phanerozoic time are constrained by the mass balances required between the inputs and outputs of carbon and sulfur to the oceans. This constraint has limited the applicability of proposed negative feedback mechanisms for maintaining levels of atmospheric O2 at biologically permissable levels. Here we describe a modeling approach that incorporates O2-dependent carbon and sulfur isotope fractionation using data obtained from laboratory experiments on carbon-13 discrimination by vascular land plants and marine plankton. The model allows us to calculate a Phanerozoic O2 history that agrees with independent models and with biological and physical constraints and supports the hypothesis of a high atmospheric O2 content during the Carboniferous (300 million years ago), a time when insect gigantism was widespread.

  7. Re Os isotope constraints on subcontinental lithospheric mantle evolution of southern South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, Manuel Enrique; Carlson, Richard Walter; Conceição, Rommulo Vieira; Dantas, Celine; Bertotto, Gustavo Walter; Koester, Edinei

    2008-04-01

    We present Re-Os isotopic data for widely dispersed mantle xenoliths carried to the surface of southern South America (36°-52° S) by Eocene to recent alkaline magmatism. Our hypothesis is that the lithospheric mantle sections formed as the roots of southern South America reflect the history of crust formation and amalgamation at different periods of time and so present a complimentary picture of continent growth in South America by sampling deeper sections of continental lithosphere than provided by crustal rocks from the area. The Re-Os isotopic system gives unique chronological information about the time of mantle depletion that is associated with lithosphere formation. Our data show coherent model ages for the lithospheric mantle that can be correlated with some hypotheses for crustal evolution of this region. Most samples show Os isotopic values similar to the present suboceanic mantle, suggesting a relatively recent lithospheric mantle formation from the convecting mantle. Xenoliths from Agua Poca and Prahuaniyeu represent fragments of an ancient depleted lithosphere, probably corresponding to the roots of the Cuyania terrane inferred to be a fragment derived from Laurentia and formed during the Mesoproterozoic. Alternatively, all or parts of the recognized ancient lithosphere are relicts of other known ancient continental blocks, such as the Pampia terrane or the Río de la Plata craton. Samples erupted in the southwest corner of the Deseado Massif give Proterozoic depletion ages (1.34 to 2.11 Ga) that are considerably older than previous radiogenic formation ages obtained for the very few basements rocks of this continental block. We propose that Deseado Massif is Proterozoic in age, probably related to the Malvinas/Falkland Islands and plateau and so should be considered for the reconstruction of the supercontinent of Rodinia.

  8. Catastrophic isotopic modification of rhyolitic magma at times of caldera subsidence, Yellowstone plateau volcanic field.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hildreth, W.; Christiansen, R.L.; O'Neil, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    This Wyoming volcanic field has undergone repeated eruption of rhyolitic magma strongly depleted in 18O. Large calderas subsided 2.0, 1.3 and 0.6 m.y. ago on eruption of ash-flow sheets. More than 60 other rhyolite lavas and tuffs permit reconstruction of the long-term chemical and isotopic evolution of the silicic system. Narrow delta 18O ranges in the ash-flow sheets contrast with wide delta 18O variation in post-caldera lavas. The earliest post-collapse lavas are 3-6per mille lighter than the preceding ash-flow sheets. The 18O depletions were short-lived events that immediately followed caldera subsidence and sequences of post-caldera lavas record partial recovery toward pre-caldera delta 18O values. Contemporaneous extra-caldera rhyolites show no effects of the repeated depletions. Although some contamination by foundering roof rocks seems to be required, water was probably the predominant contaminant.-W.H.B.

  9. Evolution of the magnetic field inclination in a forming penumbra

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, P.; Guglielmino, S. L.; Cristaldi, A.; Falco, M.; Zuccarello, F.; Ermolli, I.

    2014-03-20

    We describe the evolution of the magnetic and velocity fields in the annular zone around a pore a few hours before the formation of its penumbra. We detected the presence of several patches at the edge of the annular zone, with a typical size of about 1''. These patches are characterized by a rather vertical magnetic field with polarity opposite to that of the pore. They correspond to regions of plasma upflow up to 2.5 km s{sup –1} and are characterized by radially outward displacements with horizontal velocities up to 2 km s{sup –1}. We interpret these features as portions of the pore magnetic field lines returning beneath the photosphere being progressively stretched and pushed down by the overlying magnetic fields. Our results confirm that the penumbra formation results from changes in the inclination of the field lines in the magnetic canopy overlying the pore, until they reach the photosphere.

  10. The evolution of climatically driven weathering inputs into the western Arctic Ocean since the late Miocene: Radiogenic isotope evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dausmann, Veit; Frank, Martin; Siebert, Christopher; Christl, Marcus; Hein, James R.

    2015-06-01

    We present the first continuous records of dissolved radiogenic neodymium, hafnium, and lead isotope compositions of deep waters in the western Arctic Ocean, spanning the time from the late Miocene to the present. The data were obtained from three hydrogenetic ferromanganese (Fe-Mn) crusts recovered from seamounts along the northernmost edge of the Northwind Ridge in the Canada Basin from water depths of 2200, 2400, and 3600 m. Dating the crusts using cosmogenic 10Be documents undisturbed present-day growth surfaces and yields growth rates between 27 and 2.2 mm/Myr. The Nd (Hf) isotope time series of the three crusts show similar evolutions from εNd (εHf) of -8.5 (+4) in the oldest parts to -11.5 (-4) at the surfaces and a pronounced trend to less radiogenic values starting at ∼4 Ma. This coincided with a trend of the Pb isotope evolution towards more radiogenic 206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb, and 208Pb/204Pb. It is inferred that climatically controlled changes in weathering regime and sediment transport along the North American continent were responsible for the major change of the radiogenic isotope composition of the Arctic Deep Water (ADW) in the Canada Basin. Based on these records we conclude that weathering inputs from the North American continent linked to enhanced glacial conditions started to increase and to influence the radiogenic isotope composition of ADW ∼4 million years ago and were further intensified at ∼1 Ma. These new time series differ markedly from the radiogenic isotope evolution of Arctic Intermediate Water recorded on the Lomonosov Ridge and suggest that much larger isotopic differences between the water masses of the Arctic Ocean than today prevailed in the past.

  11. Carbon-Isotope Fractionations of Autotrophic Bacteria: Relevance to Primary Production and Microbial Evolution in Hot Springs and Hydrothermal Vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C. L.; Romanek, C. S.; Mills, G.

    2004-12-01

    Terrestrial hot springs and marine hydrothermal vents are often dominated by autotrophic microorganisms. Species of the Bacteria Domain in these environments are known to use different pathways for CO2 fixation. These may include the Calvin cycle, the Acetyl CoA pathway, the reverse TCA cycle, and the 3-HP pathway. Each cycle or pathway may be characterized by distinct patterns of carbon isotope fractionation. This presentation will summarize isotope fractionation patterns associated with known autotrophic bacteria and to use these patterns for interpreting natural isotopic variations. Examples will include hot springs from the Yellowstone National Park and Nevada desert, USA and Kamchatka, Russia, and hydrothermal vents from the East Pacific Rise. An attempt will be made to discuss isotopic variations within a particular pathway in the context of species evolution through horizontal gene transfer.

  12. Chemical Evolution of the Izu-Bonin Arc Recorded by Chlorine Stable Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, J. D.; Straub, S. M.

    2008-12-01

    δ37Cl values were determined for Izu-Bonin arc magmas erupted 0-44 Ma in order to better understand the time-dependent processing of volatiles in subduction zones. Pristine ash-sized particles (glass, pumice, scoria, and rock fragments) were handpicked from tephra drilled at ODP Site 782. δ37Cl values for these particles span a large range from -4.9 to +1.1‰ (error < ±0.4‰) vs. SMOC (Standard Mean Ocean Chloride, defined as 0‰). Different components from individual samples (pumices separated from amphibole or from scoria) were analyzed independently. In both samples, the pumice separate had a lower Cl isotope ratio (by 2.3-2.7‰) than the coexisting phase. This may be due to crystal fractionation enriching 37Cl in the crystallizing phases or to degassing of a phase enriched in 37Cl. The temporal data overlap with previously reported δ37Cl values of -2.6 to +0.4‰ for bulk ash and -5.4 to -0.1‰ for volcanic gases from the Quaternary Izu-Bonin-Mariana volcanic front (Barnes et al., in press). This range is considered to reflect the diversity of the trench input. However, the temporal data indicate a time-progressive evolution, as Eocene and Oligocene magmas generally have lighter δ37Cl (-2.7±1.4 ‰, n= 9) than the Neogene magmas (-0.5±0.9‰; n=8). We speculate whether this may be due to a trench input that became isotopically heavier with time, which might reflect the lack of an isotopically positive serpentinite component during the early history of the arc. This hypothesis can be tested by analyzing material from the earliest Izu-Bonin-Mariana arc (~45-50 Ma) preserved in the forearc. Additional work is also needed to assess potential artifacts from alteration or crustal differentiation, as well as the extent of crustal differentiation, such as crystallization or degassing, on Cl isotope fractionation.

  13. The evolution of the global selenium cycle: Secular trends in Se isotopes and abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stüeken, E. E.; Buick, R.; Bekker, A.; Catling, D.; Foriel, J.; Guy, B. M.; Kah, L. C.; Machel, H. G.; Montañez, I. P.; Poulton, S. W.

    2015-08-01

    The Earth's surface has undergone major transitions in its redox state over the past three billion years, which have affected the mobility and distribution of many elements. Here we use Se isotopic and abundance measurements of marine and non-marine mudrocks to reconstruct the evolution of the biogeochemical Se cycle from ∼3.2 Gyr onwards. The six stable isotopes of Se are predominantly fractionated during redox reactions under suboxic conditions, which makes Se a potentially valuable new tool for identifying intermediate stages from an anoxic to a fully oxygenated world. δ82/78Se shows small fractionations of mostly less than 2‰ throughout Earth's history and all are mass-dependent within error. In the Archean, especially after 2.7 Gyr, we find an isotopic enrichment in marine (+0.37 ± 0.27‰) relative to non-marine samples (-0.28 ± 0.67‰), paired with increasing Se abundances. Student t-tests show that these trends are statistically significant. Although we cannot completely rule out the possibility of volcanic Se addition, these trends may indicate the onset of oxidative weathering on land, followed by non-quantitative reduction of Se oxyanions during fluvial transport. The Paleoproterozoic Great Oxidation Event (GOE) is not reflected in the marine δ82/78Se record. However, we find a major inflection in the secular δ82/78Se trend during the Neoproterozoic, from a Precambrian mean of +0.42 ± 0.45‰ to a Phanerozoic mean of -0.19 ± 0.59‰. This drop probably reflects the oxygenation of the deep ocean at this time, stabilizing Se oxyanions throughout the water column. Since then, reduction of Se oxyanions has likely been restricted to anoxic basins and diagenetic environments in sediments. In light of recent Cr isotope data, it is likely that oxidative weathering before the Neoproterozoic produced Se oxyanions in the intermediate redox state SeIV, whereas the fully oxidized species SeVI became more abundant after the Neoproterozoic rise of

  14. Tectonic Evolution of Chingshui Geothermal Field Inferred from Evidence of Quartz and Calcite Veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y. C.; Song, S. R.; Wang, P. L.; Liu, C. M.; Yeh, E. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Chingshui geothermal field is located in the valley of Chingshui stream, where is about 27 km SW of Ilan, northeastern Taiwan. It is a tectonically complex area occurred by the Philippine Plate subducting beneath the Eurasian plate in the south with Okinawa Trough opening in the Ilan Plain. Owing to complicated geological structure, the heat source of Chingshui geothermal field is still controversial. For understanding hot fluid sources and tectonic evolution, this study focuses on field survey of veins and scaling in the Chingshui geothermal field, and the results inferred from the data of SEM, XRD, carbon and oxygen isotope, and Uranium-thorium dating. The Chingshui hot fluid contains both high concentrations of SiO­2 and HCO3-, therefore, temperature and pressure both drop when the hot fluids inject into shallower fractures, and calcite and quartz both could be precipitated with competition or simultaneously. In Chilukeng River, many euhedral quartz crystals occurred in large damage zone of Xioananao fault that indicated the temperature drop played the dominated role when the hot fluids injected into the shallow. It inferred that the quartz crystal precipitated under compression stress, evidenced by the Xioananao thrust fault with no surface rupture. Whiles, there are gouges in normal fault with abundant calcite or calcite with quartz veins cropped out in the confluence of Chingshui River and Chilukeng River. The results indicate that those veins occurred in more recent period by U-Th dating data, because of degassing CO2 occurred in open fractures by normal faulting or the stress changing from compression to extension. The standard oxygen isotopes range from 1.29 to 20.73 permil of SMOW and the clumped isotope of Δ47 outcrop is 0.385 in calcite veins, suggest that the highest temperature of thermal fulids with calcite precipitations is 222℃±9℃ by calibrated equation of Passey and Henkes 2012. Meanwhile, it also indicates that the oxygen isotope of

  15. Early Universe evolution in presence of magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado Gaspar, I.; Pérez Martínez, A.; Piccinelli, G.; Sussman, R. A.

    2015-11-01

    We analyse the evolution of a magnetised Universe in a stage between the leptonic era and the beginning of the radiation-dominated epoch using an anisotropic Bianchi I model. In our description the cosmic fluid is made of primordial radiation, neutrinos, magnetic field, non-interacting already decoupled dark matter (WIMPS), baryons, electrons, and positrons. The interaction of the field with the electron-positron gas is taken into account, resulting in anisotropic equations of state for these constituents. Numerical simulations reveal some differences between the behaviour of magnetised Bianchi I Universes and that of first order perturbations on an FLRW background.

  16. Magnetic field effects on plant growth, development, and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Maffei, Massimo E.

    2014-01-01

    The geomagnetic field (GMF) is a natural component of our environment. Plants, which are known to sense different wavelengths of light, respond to gravity, react to touch and electrical signaling, cannot escape the effect of GMF. While phototropism, gravitropism, and tigmotropism have been thoroughly studied, the impact of GMF on plant growth and development is not well-understood. This review describes the effects of altering magnetic field (MF) conditions on plants by considering plant responses to MF values either lower or higher than those of the GMF. The possible role of GMF on plant evolution and the nature of the magnetoreceptor is also discussed. PMID:25237317

  17. Simulation of the Magnetic Field Evolution in Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyos, J.; Reisenegger, A.; Valdivia, J. A.

    Using a numerical simulation, we study the effects of ambipolar diffusion and ohmic diffusion on the magnetic field evolution in the interior of an isolated neutron star (Goldreich & Reisenegger 1992; Reisenegger et al. 2005; Hoyos et al. 2007). We are interested in the behavior of the magnetic field on a long time scale, over which all Alfven and sound waves have been damped. We model the stellar interior as an electrically neutral plasma composed of neutrons, protons and electrons, which can interact with each other through collisions and electromagnetic forces. Weak interactions convert neutrons and charged particles into each other, erasing chemical imbalances. As a first step, we assume that the magnetic field points in one fixed Cartesian direction but can vary along an orthogonal direction. We start with a uniform-density background threaded by a homogeneous magnetic field and study the evolution of a magnetic perturbation as well as the density fluctuations it induces in the particles. We show that the system evolves through different quasi-equilibrium states and estimate the characteristic time scales on which these quasi-equilibria occur as a function of the magnetic field intensity, the collisional strength between the particles, the weak interaction rate, and the ohmic resistivity. We intend in a near future to extend this simulation to two dimensions in order to study an axially symmetric star geometry.

  18. Energetics and Control of Ultracold Isotope-Exchange Reactions between Heteronuclear Dimers in External Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomza, Michał

    2015-08-01

    We show that isotope-exchange reactions between ground-state alkali-metal, alkaline-earth-metal, and lanthanide heteronuclear dimers consisting of two isotopes of the same atom are exothermic with an energy change in the range of 1-8000 MHz, thus resulting in cold or ultracold products. For these chemical reactions, there are only one rovibrational and at most several hyperfine possible product states. The number and energetics of open and closed reactive channels can be controlled by the laser and magnetic fields. We suggest a laser-induced isotope- and state-selective Stark shift control to tune the exothermic isotope-exchange reactions to become endothermic, thus providing the ground for testing models of the chemical reactivity. The present proposal opens the way for studying the state-to-state dynamics of ultracold chemical reactions beyond the universal limit with a meaningful control over the quantum states of both reactants and products.

  19. Energetics and Control of Ultracold Isotope-Exchange Reactions between Heteronuclear Dimers in External Fields.

    PubMed

    Tomza, Michał

    2015-08-01

    We show that isotope-exchange reactions between ground-state alkali-metal, alkaline-earth-metal, and lanthanide heteronuclear dimers consisting of two isotopes of the same atom are exothermic with an energy change in the range of 1-8000 MHz, thus resulting in cold or ultracold products. For these chemical reactions, there are only one rovibrational and at most several hyperfine possible product states. The number and energetics of open and closed reactive channels can be controlled by the laser and magnetic fields. We suggest a laser-induced isotope- and state-selective Stark shift control to tune the exothermic isotope-exchange reactions to become endothermic, thus providing the ground for testing models of the chemical reactivity. The present proposal opens the way for studying the state-to-state dynamics of ultracold chemical reactions beyond the universal limit with a meaningful control over the quantum states of both reactants and products. PMID:26296115

  20. Light-front time evolution in intense fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guangyao; Zhao, Xingbo; Li, Yang; Maris, Pieter; Tuchin, Kirill; Vary, James

    2016-03-01

    We report on the influence of strong electromagnetic fields generated by an ultra-relativistic heavy ion on the quantized field of a charged fermion particle using the time-dependent basis light-front quantization (tBLFQ) approach. We calculate transitions of the charged fermion and find agreement with light-front perturbation theory at small coupling. We then present non-perturbative effects, such as the real-time evolution of the momentum distribution and the helicity configuration of the fermion in strong fields. We will discuss prospects for applying the tBLFQ formalism to time-dependent QED and QCD fields in heavy ion collisions and electron-ion collisions. This work is supported by DOE Grants DE-FG02-87ER40371 & DESC0008485.

  1. Long-term evolution of crustal neutron star magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urpin, V. A.; Chanmugam, G.; Sang, Yeming

    1994-01-01

    We have derived an analytic solution to the asymptotic behavior of dipolar magnetic fields that are generated in the crusts of neutron stars. We show that if the conductivity is due to impurity scattering, as expected for late stages of evolution, the surface field strength at the magnetic pole declines with the power law B(sub p) approximately = (t/t(sub 0))(exp -2/3). The results are shown to be qualitatively consistent with detailed numerical calculations. These latter results are consistent with some recent analyses of pulsar statistics and the magnetic fields of several binary pulsars with white dwarf companions whose ages have been determined. The dependence of the surface magnetic field on spin period of the pulsar is derived.

  2. Conceptual models of the evolution of transgressive dune field systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesp, Patrick A.

    2013-10-01

    This paper examines the evolutionary paths of some transgressive dune fields that have formed on different coasts of the world, and presents some initial conceptual models of system dynamics for transgressive dune sheets and dune fields. Various evolutionary pathways are conceptualized based on a visual examination of dune fields from around the world. On coasts with high sediment supply, dune sheets and dune fields tend to accumulate as large scale barrier systems with little colonization of vegetation in arid-hyper to arid climate regimes, and as multiple, active discrete phases of dune field and deflation plain couplets in temperate to tropical environments. Active dune fields tend to be singular entities on coasts with low to moderate sediment supply. Landscape complexity and vegetation richness and diversity increases as dune fields evolve from simple active sheets and dunes to single and multiple deflation plains and basins, precipitation ridges, nebkha fields and a host of other dune types associated with vegetation (e.g. trailing ridges, slacks, remnant knobs, gegenwalle ridges and dune track ridges, 'tree islands' and 'bush pockets'). Three principal scenarios of transgressive dune sheet and dune field development are discussed, including dune sheets or dune fields evolving directly from the backshore, development following foredune and/or dune field erosion, and development from the breakdown or merging of parabolic dunes. Various stages of evolution are outlined for each scenario. Knowledge of evolutionary patterns and stages in coastal dune fields is very limited and caution is urged in attempts to reverse, change and/or modify dune fields to 'restore' some perceived loss of ecosystem or dune functioning.

  3. Conceptual models of the evolution of transgressive dune field systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A. Hesp, Patrick

    2013-10-01

    This paper examines the evolutionary paths of some transgressive dune fields that have formed on different coasts of the world, and presents some initial conceptual models of system dynamics for transgressive dune sheets and dune fields. Various evolutionary pathways are conceptualized based on a visual examination of dune fields from around the world. On coasts with high sediment supply, dune sheets and dune fields tend to accumulate as large scale barrier systems with little colonization of vegetation in arid-hyper to arid climate regimes, and as multiple, active discrete phases of dune field and deflation plain couplets in temperate to tropical environments. Active dune fields tend to be singular entities on coasts with low to moderate sediment supply. Landscape complexity and vegetation richness and diversity increases as dune fields evolve from simple active sheets and dunes to single and multiple deflation plains and basins, precipitation ridges, nebkha fields and a host of other dune types associated with vegetation (e.g. trailing ridges, slacks, remnant knobs, gegenwalle ridges and dune track ridges, ‘tree islands' and ‘bush pockets'). Three principal scenarios of transgressive dune sheet and dune field development are discussed, including dune sheets or dune fields evolving directly from the backshore, development following foredune and/or dune field erosion, and development from the breakdown or merging of parabolic dunes. Various stages of evolution are outlined for each scenario. Knowledge of evolutionary patterns and stages in coastal dune fields is very limited and caution is urged in attempts to reverse, change and/or modify dune fields to ‘restore' some perceived loss of ecosystem or dune functioning.

  4. The evolution of Phanerozoic seawater - Isotope paleothermometry finds consensus on Early Paleozoic warmth and constant seawater δ18O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, E. L.; Henkes, G. A.; Passey, B. H.; Shenton, B.; Yancey, T. E.; Perez-Huerta, A.

    2015-12-01

    Evolution of metazoan life is closely linked to the Phanerozoic evolution of ocean temperatures and chemistry. Oxygen isotopic evidence for early Phanerozoic paleotemperatures has been equivocal, with decreasing δ18O values with age being interpreted as warmer early oceans, decreasing seawater δ18O with age, or increasing diagenetic alteration in older samples. Here we compare an updated compilation of oxygen isotope data for carbonate and phosphate fossils and microfossils (Grossman, 2012, Geol. Time Scale, Elsevier, 195-220) with a compilation of new and existing clumped isotope data. Importantly, these data are curated based on sample preservation with special consideration given to screening techniques, and tectonic and burial history. Burial history is critical in the preservation of carbonate clumped isotope temperatures in particular, which can undergo reordering in the solid state. We use a model derived for reordering kinetics (Henkes et al., 2014, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 139:362-382) to screen clumped isotope data for the effects of solid-state burial alteration. With minor but significant exceptions (Late Cretaceous, Early Triassic), average δ18O values (4 m.y. window, 2 m.y. steps) for post-Devonian brachiopods, belemnites, and foraminifera, representing tropical-subtropical surface ocean conditions, yield average isotopic temperatures below 30°C (assuming a seawater δ18O value [ -1‰ VSMOW] of an "ice-free" world). In contrast, Ordovician to Devonian data show sustained temperatures of 35-40°C. Likewise, isotopic paleotemperatures from conodont apatite, known to be resistant to isotopic exchange, follow the same pattern. Clumped isotope data derived from Paleozoic brachiopod shells that experienced minimal burial (< 100 °C) and <1% reordering according to the taxon-specific clumped isotope reordering model yield typical temperatures of 25-30°C for the Carboniferous, and 35-40°C for the Ordovician-Silurian. Inserting clumped temperatures and

  5. Hadean crustal evolution revisited: New constraints from Pb-Hf isotope systematics of the Jack Hills zircons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, A. I. S.; Wilde, S. A.; Hawkesworth, C. J.; Coath, C. D.; Nemchin, A.; Pidgeon, R. T.; Vervoort, J. D.; DuFrane, S. A.

    2010-07-01

    Detrital zircon crystals from the Jack Hills metasedimentary belt, Western Australia, are the only surviving vestiges of Hadean crust and represent an extraordinary archive into the nature of the early Earth. We report the results of an in situ isotopic study of 68 Jack Hills zircons in which the Hf and Pb isotope ratios were measured concurrently, allowing a better integration of isotope tracer information ( 176Hf/ 177Hf) with crystallization age ( 207Pb/ 206Pb). These data are augmented by Hf isotope data from zircons of the surrounding Narryer gneisses (3.65-3.30 Ga) and from Neoarchaean granites that intrude the Jack Hills belt. The detrital zircons define a subchondritic ɛHf-time array that attests to a far simpler evolution for the Hadean Earth than claimed by recent studies. This evolution is consistent with the protracted intra-crustal reworking of an enriched, dominantly mafic protolith that was extracted from primordial mantle at 4.4-4.5 Ga, perhaps during the solidification of a terrestrial magma ocean. There is no evidence for the existence of strongly depleted Hadean mantle, or for juvenile input into the parental magmas to the Jack Hills zircons. This simple Hf isotope evolution is difficult to reconcile with modern plate tectonic processes. Strongly unradiogenic Hf isotope compositions of zircons from several Archaean gneiss terranes, including the Narryer and Acasta gneisses, suggest that Hadean source reservoirs were tapped by granitic magmas throughout the Archaean. This supports the notion of a long-lived and globally extensive Hadean protocrust that may have comprised the nuclei of some Archaean cratons.

  6. Magmatic Evolution in the Los Tuxtlas Volcanic Field, Veracruz, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koster, A.; Kobs-Nawotniak, S. E.

    2012-12-01

    Magma evolution within the Los Tuxtlas Volcanic Field (LTVF) is poorly understood. The LTVF is a basaltic, monogenetic field in Veracruz, Mexico, that contains approximately 400 vents and has been active for the last 7 Ma, including a sub-Plinian eruption in 1793. The field is structurally controlled, with cones forming NW-SE lines consistent with local extension. By understanding magmatic evolution through ascent, storage, and mixing, it is possible to more accurately predict future trends in the system. Samples from two alignments of cinder cones located between San Martin Tuxtlas volcano and Laguna Catemaco were analyzed petrographically and geochemically. Geochemical data were plotted in Fenner and Harker diagrams to identify trends, including fractional crystallization and magma recharge. Mineral modes were calculated via point counting in thin sections, and micro-textural variations were noted. Cone morphometry was used as a rough proxy for age along with field relationships to develop an approximate order of events along the alignments. Preliminary data suggest that the aligned vents are part of a linked magmatic plumbing system undergoing periodic recharge.

  7. The sources and time-integrated evolution of diamond-forming fluids - Trace elements and isotopic evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein-BenDavid, Ofra; Pearson, D. Graham; Nowell, Geoff M.; Ottley, Chris; McNeill, John C. R.; Logvinova, Alla; Sobolev, Nikolay V.

    2014-01-01

    Sub-micrometer inclusions in fibrous diamond growth zones carry high-density fluids (HDF) from which the host diamonds have precipitated. The chemistry of these fluids is our best opportunity of characterizing the diamond-forming environment. The major and trace element patterns of diamond-forming fluids vary widely. Such elemental signatures can be easily modified by a variety of mantle processes whereas radiogenic isotopes give a clear fingerprint of the time-integrated evolution of the fluid source region. Thus, the combination of elemental and isotope data is a powerful tool in constraining the origin of fluids from which diamonds precipitate. Here we present combined trace element composition (34 diamonds) and Sr isotopic data (23 diamonds) for fluid-rich diamonds from six worldwide locations. The Nd and Pb isotopic composition of two of the diamonds were also obtained. Several of the samples were analyzed in at least 2 locations to investigate variations in the fluid during diamond growth. The data was acquired using an off-line laser sampling technique followed by solution ICPMS and TIMS analysis. The Sr isotopic compositions of diamond fluids from the different suites range between convecting mantle values for Udachnaya (87Sr/86Sr363 = 0.70300 ± 16 to 0.70361 ± 4), to highly enriched values, up to 87Sr/86Sr = 0.72330 ± 3, for a diamond from Congo. No isochronous relationships were observed in any of the suites. The lowest Nd isotopic composition recorded so far in a diamond is from Congo (εNd71 = -40.4), which also contains the most radiogenic Sr isotopic composition. In contrast, a less enriched but still rather unradiogenic Nd isotope composition (εNd540 = -11) was obtained for a diamond from Snap Lake, which has moderately radiogenic Sr isotopic enrichment (87Sr/86Sr540 = 0.70821 ± 1). The Pb isotopic system measured in one diamond indicates a complex evolution for the fluid source, with extreme 207Pb/204Pb ratio (15.810 ± 3) and moderate

  8. The Triggering and Evolution of AGN in Cluster Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Steven

    It is now well established that the evolution of super-massive black holes (SMBHs) is closely linked to that of their host galaxies. However, the detailed causal connections behind this relationship remain largely unknown. This is due in part to the complex diversity of active galactic nuclei (AGN) properties, the differing time-scales for AGN and star-forming processes, and a variety of observational selection effects. Physically, a prerequisite for both AGN activity and the formation of new stars in the host galaxy is the availability of gas. Environmental processes in galaxy clusters can strongly and rapidly affect gas reservoirs. Observations of star-forming galaxies in clusters have shown that the cluster environment drives evolution at a different rate than in the field. We here propose to make new measurements of the distribution of X-ray selected AGN, within cluster fields, and of their infrared (IR) and ultra-violet (UV) host galaxy properties to better understand the AGN triggering process, and the physical links between the SMBHs and their host galaxies. With a combination of superb spatial resolution and excellent sensitivity, Chandra X-ray observations have revolutionised studies of AGN evolution. The X-ray waveband is optimally suited for AGN surveys suffering little contamination from the host galaxy and only modest absorption bias, down to luminosities of 10^43 erg/s and across a wide range of source redshifts, providing direct access to a significant fraction of the total accretion power in the Universe (Brandt & Alexander 2015). However, two significant challenges exist that limit current studies of X-ray AGN in clusters: 1) the expense of optical follow-up of X-ray point source targets in order to confirm cluster membership; and 2) the low number of X-ray AGN that reside in clusters (typically 2-3 per cluster) relative to the background population (9,800 deg^2 in the deepest Chandra fields). In Ehlert et al. (2013, 2014 and 2015) we presented a

  9. Evolution of the magnetic field structure of the Crab pulsar.

    PubMed

    Lyne, Andrew; Graham-Smith, Francis; Weltevrede, Patrick; Jordan, Christine; Stappers, Ben; Bassa, Cees; Kramer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Pulsars are highly magnetized rotating neutron stars and are well known for the stability of their signature pulse shapes, allowing high-precision studies of their rotation. However, during the past 22 years, the radio pulse profile of the Crab pulsar has shown a steady increase in the separation of the main pulse and interpulse components at 0.62° ± 0.03° per century. There are also secular changes in the relative strengths of several components of the profile. The changing component separation indicates that the axis of the dipolar magnetic field, embedded in the neutron star, is moving toward the stellar equator. This evolution of the magnetic field could explain why the pulsar does not spin down as expected from simple braking by a rotating dipolar magnetic field. PMID:24179221

  10. Anisotropies in magnetic field evolution and local Lyapunov exponents

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, X.Z.; Boozer, A.H.

    2000-01-13

    The natural occurrence of small scale structures and the extreme anisotropy in the evolution of a magnetic field embedded in a conducting flow is interpreted in terms of the properties of the local Lyapunov exponents along the various local characteristic (un)stable directions for the Lagrangian flow trajectories. The local Lyapunov exponents and the characteristic directions are functions of Lagrangian coordinates and time, which are completely determined once the flow field is specified. The characteristic directions that are associated with the spatial anisotropy of the problem, are prescribed in both Lagrangian and Eulerian frames. Coordinate transformation techniques are employed to relate the spatial distributions of the magnetic field, the induced current density, and the Lorentz force, which are usually followed in Eulerian frame, to those of the local Lyapunov exponents, which are naturally defined in Lagrangian coordinates.

  11. Evolution of carbon isotope signatures during reactive transport of hydrocarbons in heterogeneous aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höyng, Dominik; Prommer, Henning; Blum, Philipp; Grathwohl, Peter; Mazo D'Affonseca, Fernando

    2015-03-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of organic pollutants has become a well-established tool for assessing the occurrence and extent of biodegradation processes in contaminated aquifers. However, the precision of CSIA is influenced by the degree to which assumptions underlying CSIA data interpretation hold under realistic field-scale conditions. For the first time this study demonstrates how aquifer analogs combined with reactive transport models offer an underexplored way to develop generic process understanding, evaluate monitoring and quantification strategies in highly heterogeneous subsurface settings. Data from high-resolution aquifer analogs were used in numerical experiments to track the propagation of a representative oxidizable organic compound (toluene) within a variety of realistic heterogeneous aquifers and to investigate its detailed fate. The simulations were used to analyze (1) the effects of physical aquifer heterogeneities on spatiotemporal patterns of contaminant concentrations and isotope signatures, (2) the performance of the commonly applied Rayleigh equation and (3) the applicability of an extension of the Rayleigh equation for complex hydrogeological conditions. The results indicate that if field-derived enrichment factors are applied without corrections for dilution, the conventional Rayleigh equation is inaccurate and estimates for biodegradation are typically overestimated and unreliable in heterogeneous aquifers. Underestimations can occur due to the partial source zone depletion. In contrast, if dilution can be accurately accounted for, field-derived enrichment factors comprise a suitable alternative to laboratory-derived and redox-specific enrichment factors. The study also examines to what extent variations in monitoring/sampling strategies influence the obtained results. Especially measurements from long-screened wells (> 1 m) reveal to be inappropriate for the application of the Rayleigh equation in the investigated aquifer

  12. Evolution of carbon isotope signatures during reactive transport of hydrocarbons in heterogeneous aquifers.

    PubMed

    Höyng, Dominik; Prommer, Henning; Blum, Philipp; Grathwohl, Peter; D'Affonseca, Fernando Mazo

    2015-03-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of organic pollutants has become a well-established tool for assessing the occurrence and extent of biodegradation processes in contaminated aquifers. However, the precision of CSIA is influenced by the degree to which assumptions underlying CSIA data interpretation hold under realistic field-scale conditions. For the first time this study demonstrates how aquifer analogs combined with reactive transport models offer an underexplored way to develop generic process understanding, evaluate monitoring and quantification strategies in highly heterogeneous subsurface settings. Data from high-resolution aquifer analogs were used in numerical experiments to track the propagation of a representative oxidizable organic compound (toluene) within a variety of realistic heterogeneous aquifers and to investigate its detailed fate. The simulations were used to analyze (1) the effects of physical aquifer heterogeneities on spatiotemporal patterns of contaminant concentrations and isotope signatures, (2) the performance of the commonly applied Rayleigh equation and (3) the applicability of an extension of the Rayleigh equation for complex hydrogeological conditions. The results indicate that if field-derived enrichment factors are applied without corrections for dilution, the conventional Rayleigh equation is inaccurate and estimates for biodegradation are typically overestimated and unreliable in heterogeneous aquifers. Underestimations can occur due to the partial source zone depletion. In contrast, if dilution can be accurately accounted for, field-derived enrichment factors comprise a suitable alternative to laboratory-derived and redox-specific enrichment factors. The study also examines to what extent variations in monitoring/sampling strategies influence the obtained results. Especially measurements from long-screened wells (>1 m) reveal to be inappropriate for the application of the Rayleigh equation in the investigated aquifer

  13. Cosmological evolution with the cubic order field derivative coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamitsuji, Masato

    2016-03-01

    We investigate cosmological evolution in the scalar-tensor theory with the field derivative coupling to the double-dual of the Riemann tensor (the cubic-type theory). The theory can be seen as the straightforward extension of the scalar-tensor with the quadratic order field derivative coupling to the Einstein tensor (the quadratic-type theory). Both the field derivative couplings to the Einstein tensor and the double-dual of the Riemann tensor have been argued in terms of the successful realization of the self-tuning of the cosmological constant within the Horndeski theory. Assuming the constant potential given by the sum of the cosmological constant and the quantum vacuum energy, the shift symmetry for the scalar field and no matter fields, in the spatially-flat Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker spacetime, we can reduce the set of the field equations to the first-order ordinary nonlinear differential equation for the Hubble parameter, showing the existence of the self-tuned and runaway de Sitter solutions, in addition to the standard de Sitter solutions in general relativity and the finite Hubble singularities which can be reached within the finite time. We then argue the possible cosmological evolution in terms of the values of the effective cosmological constant, the kinetic coupling constants and the initial Hubble parameter. Although the behavior of the universe around each of the de Sitter solutions as well as the finite time singularities is very similar in both theories, we find that the crucial difference appears in terms of no bounce or turnaround behavior across the vanishing Hubble parameter as well as no limitation for the range of the Hubble parameter in the cubic-type theory.

  14. Chiral three-nucleon forces and the evolution of correlations along the oxygen isotopic chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipollone, A.; Barbieri, C.; Navrátil, P.

    2015-07-01

    Background: Three-nucleon forces (3NFs) have nontrivial implications on the evolution of correlations at extreme proton-neutron asymmetries. Recent ab initio calculations show that leading-order chiral interactions are crucial to obtain the correct binding energies and neutron driplines along the O, N, and F chains [A. Cipollone, C. Barbieri, and P. Navrátil, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 062501 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.062501]. Purpose: Here we discuss the impact of 3NFs along the oxygen chain for other quantities of interest, such has the spectral distribution for attachment and removal of a nucleon, spectroscopic factors, and radii. The objective is to better delineate the general effects of 3NFs on nuclear correlations. Methods: We employ self-consistent Green's function (SCGF) theory which allows a comprehensive calculation of the single-particle spectral function. For the closed subshell isotopes, 14O, 16O, 22O, 24O, and 28O, we perform calculations with the Dyson-ADC(3) method, which is fully nonperturbative and is the state of the art for both nuclear physics and quantum chemistry applications. The remaining open-shell isotopes are studied using the newly developed Gorkov-SCGF formalism up to second order. Results: We produce complete plots for the spectral distributions. The spectroscopic factors for the dominant quasiparticle peaks are found to depend very little on the leading-order (NNLO) chiral 3NFs. The latter have small impact on the calculated matter radii, which, however, are consistently obtained smaller than experiment. Similarly, single-particle spectra tend to be too spread with respect to the experiment. This effect might hinder, to some extent, the onset of correlations and screen the quenching of calculated spectroscopic factors. The most important effect of 3NFs is thus the fine tuning of the energies for the dominant quasiparticle states, which governs the shell evolution and the position of driplines. Conclusions: Although present chiral

  15. Electromagnetic field evolution in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Voronyuk, V.; Toneev, V. D.; Cassing, W.; Bratkovskaya, E. L.; Konchakovski, V. P.; Voloshin, S. A.

    2011-05-15

    The hadron string dynamics (HSD) model is generalized to include the creation and evolution of retarded electromagnetic fields as well as the influence of the magnetic and electric fields on the quasiparticle propagation. The time-space structure of the fields is analyzed in detail for noncentral Au + Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV. It is shown that the created magnetic field is highly inhomogeneous, but in the central region of the overlapping nuclei it changes relatively weakly in the transverse direction. For the impact parameter b=10 fm, the maximal magnetic field - perpendicularly to the reaction plane - is obtained of order eB{sub y}/m{sub {pi}}{sup 2}{approx}5 for a very short time {approx}0.2 fm/c, which roughly corresponds to the time of a maximal overlap of the colliding nuclei. We find that at any time, the location of the maximum in the eB{sub y} distribution correlates with that of the energy density of the created particles. In contrast, the electric field distribution, being also highly inhomogeneous, has a minimum in the center of the overlap region. Furthermore, the field characteristics are presented as a function of the collision energy and the centrality of the collisions. To explore the effect of the back reaction of the fields on hadronic observables, a comparison of HSD results with and without fields is exemplified. Our actual calculations show no noticeable influence of the electromagnetic fields--created in heavy-ion collisions--on the effect of the electric charge separation with respect to the reaction plane.

  16. Evolution of protoplanetary disks with dynamo magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reyes-Ruiz, M.; Stepinski, Tomasz F.

    1994-01-01

    The notion that planetary systems are formed within dusty disks is certainly not a new one; the modern planet formation paradigm is based on suggestions made by Laplace more than 200 years ago. More recently, the foundations of accretion disk theory where initially developed with this problem in mind, and in the last decade astronomical observations have indicated that many young stars have disks around them. Such observations support the generally accepted model of a viscous Keplerian accretion disk for the early stages of planetary system formation. However, one of the major uncertainties remaining in understanding the dynamical evolution of protoplanetary disks is the mechanism responsible for the transport of angular momentum and subsequent mass accretion through the disk. This is a fundamental piece of the planetary system genesis problem since such mechanisms will determine the environment in which planets are formed. Among the mechanisms suggested for this effect is the Maxwell stress associated with a magnetic field treading the disk. Due to the low internal temperatures through most of the disk, even the question of the existence of a magnetic field must be seriously studied before including magnetic effects in the disk dynamics. On the other hand, from meteoritic evidence it is believed that magnetic fields of significant magnitude existed in the earliest, PP-disk-like, stage of our own solar system's evolution. Hence, the hypothesis that PP disks are magnetized is not made solely on the basis of theory. Previous studies have addressed the problem of the existence of a magnetic field in a steady-state disk and have found that the low conductivity results in a fast diffusion of the magnetic field on timescales much shorter than the evolutionary timescale. Hence the only way for a magnetic field to exist in PP disks for a considerable portion of their lifetimes is for it to be continuously regenerated. In the present work, we present results on the self

  17. Quantum corrections to the cosmological evolution of conformally coupled fields

    SciTech Connect

    Cembranos, Jose A.R.; Olive, Keith A.; Peloso, Marco; Uzan, Jean-Philippe E-mail: olive@physics.umn.edu E-mail: uzan@iap.fr

    2009-07-01

    Because the source term for the equations of motion of a conformally coupled scalar field, such as the dilaton, is given by the trace of the matter energy momentum tensor, it is commonly assumed to vanish during the radiation dominated epoch in the early universe. As a consequence, such fields are generally frozen in the early universe. Here we compute the finite temperature radiative correction to the source term and discuss its consequences on the evolution of such fields in the early universe. We discuss in particular, the case of scalar tensor theories of gravity which have general relativity as an attractor solution. We show that, in some cases, the universe can experience an early phase of contraction, followed by a non-singular bounce, and standard expansion. This can have interesting consequences for the abundance of thermal relics; for instance, it can provide a solution to the gravitino problem. We conclude by discussing the possible consequences of the quantum corrections to the evolution of the dilaton.

  18. Evolution of star clusters in a cosmological tidal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, Steven; Ishiyama, Tomoaki; Langelaan, Paul; Makino, Junichiro; McMillan, Stephen L. W.; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    2013-12-01

    We present a method to couple N-body star cluster simulations to a cosmological tidal field, using AMUSE (Astrophysical Multipurpose Software Environment). We apply this method to star clusters embedded in the CosmoGrid dark matter only Lambda cold dark matter simulation. Our star clusters are born at z = 10 (corresponding to an age of the universe of about 500 Myr) by selecting a dark matter particle and initializing a star cluster with 32 000 stars on its location. We then follow the dynamical evolution of the star cluster within the cosmological environment. We compare the evolution of star clusters in two Milky Way size haloes with a different accretion history. The mass-loss of the star clusters is continuous irrespective of the tidal history of the host halo, but major merger events tend to increase the rate of mass-loss. From the selected two dark matter haloes, the halo that experienced the larger number of mergers tends to drive a smaller mass-loss rate from the embedded star clusters, even though the final masses of both haloes are similar. We identify two families of star clusters: native clusters, which become part of the main halo before its final major merger event, and the immigrant clusters, which are accreted upon or after this event; native clusters tend to evaporate more quickly than immigrant clusters. Accounting for the evolution of the dark matter halo causes immigrant star clusters to retain more mass than when the z = 0 tidal field is taken as a static potential. The reason for this is the weaker tidal field experienced by immigrant star clusters before merging with the larger dark matter halo.

  19. Magnetic Field and Early Evolution of Circumstellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukamoto, Yusuke

    2016-03-01

    The magnetic field plays a central role in the formation and evolution of circumstellar disks. The magnetic field connects the rapidly rotating central region with the outer envelope and extracts angular momentum from the central region during gravitational collapse of the cloud core. This process is known as magnetic braking. Both analytical and multidimensional simulations have shown that disk formation is strongly suppressed by magnetic braking in moderately magnetised cloud cores in the ideal magnetohydrodynamic limit. On the other hand, recent observations have provided growing evidence of a relatively large disk several tens of astronomical units in size existing in some Class 0 young stellar objects. This introduces a serious discrepancy between the theoretical study and observations. Various physical mechanisms have been proposed to solve the problem of catastrophic magnetic braking, such as misalignment between the magnetic field and the rotation axis, turbulence, and non-ideal effect. In this paper, we review the mechanism of magnetic braking, its effect on disk formation and early evolution, and the mechanisms that resolve the magnetic braking problem. In particular, we emphasise the importance of non-ideal effects. The combination of magnetic diffusion and thermal evolution during gravitational collapse provides a robust formation process for the circumstellar disk at the very early phase of protostar formation. The rotation induced by the Hall effect can supply a sufficient amount of angular momentum for typical circumstellar disks around T Tauri stars. By examining the combination of the suggested mechanisms, we conclude that the circumstellar disks commonly form in the very early phase of protostar formation.

  20. Rhyolite magma evolution recorded in isotope and trace element composition of zircon from Halle Volcanic Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Słodczyk, E.; Pietranik, A.; Breitkreuz, C.; Fanning, C. M.; Anczkiewicz, R.; Ehling, B.-C.

    2016-04-01

    Voluminous felsic volcanic magmas were formed in Central Europe at the Carboniferous/Permian boundary in numerous pull-apart basins; one of which is the Saale Basin, which holds the Halle Volcanic Complex (HVC), the focus of this study. The rhyolites in the HVC formed laccoliths and scarce lavas, and occur in two different textural types: fine and coarse porphyritic. Zircon isotope and trace element composition was analysed in four units, two per each textural type. Zircon from the different units shows similar ranges in εHf (- 4.1 to - 8.1) and δ18O values (6.51-8.26), indicating similar sources and evolution processes for texturally diverse rhyolites from the HVC. Scarce inherited zircon ranges from ~ 315 Ma to ~ 2100 Ma with the major groupings around 315-550 Ma. These ages are typical for Devonian arc magmatic activity (350-400 Ma) and Cadomian igneous rocks (500-600 Ma), which occur in the basement presently underlying the HVC. Therefore, the source of the rhyolites was multicomponent and probably represented by a basement composed of various crystalline rocks. Trace elements in zircon show similar distributions in all analysed samples, which is broadly consistent with zircon cores crystallizing in a less evolved magma undergoing limited fractional crystallization, whilst the zircon rims crystallized from a magma undergoing extensive fractional crystallization of major and accessory minerals. Interestingly, comparison of the zircon composition in HVC rhyolites and other rhyolites worldwide shows that the observed trends are similar in such rhyolites despite the values being different. This may suggest that most of the zircon in rhyolites crystallizes at a similar stage in the rhyolite magma evolution, from magmas undergoing extensive crystallization of major phases and apatite. The implication is that most of the zircon represents late stage crystallization, but also that antecrystic component may be present and preserve information on the development of

  1. Non-conformal evolution of magnetic fields during reheating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzetta, Esteban; Kandus, Alejandra

    2015-03-01

    We consider the evolution of electromagnetic fields coupled to conduction currents during the reheating era after inflation, and prior to the establishing of the proton-electron plasma. We assume that the currents may be described by second order causal hydrodynamics. The resulting theory is not conformally invariant. The expansion of the Universe produces temperature gradients which couple to the current and generally oppose Ohmic dissipation. Although the effect is not strong, it suggests that the unfolding of hydrodynamic instabilities in these models may follow a different pattern than in first order theories, and even than in second order theories on non expanding backgrounds.

  2. Evolution of Field Spiral Galaxies up to Redshifts z = 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhm, Asmus; Ziegler, Bodo L.

    2007-10-01

    We have gained intermediate-resolution spectroscopy with the FORS instruments of the Very Large Telescope (VLT) and high-resolution imaging with the Advanced Camera for Surveys aboard HST for a sample of 220 distant field spiral galaxies within the FORS Deep Field and William Herschel Deep Field. Spatially resolved rotation curves were extracted and fitted with synthetic velocity fields that take into account all geometric and observational effects, such as blurring due to the slit width and seeing influence. Using these fits, the maximum rotation velocity Vmax could be determined for 124 galaxies that cover the redshift range 0.1evolution of the TFR scatter, we hence find no strong evidence for a mass- or luminosity-dependent evolution of disk galaxies. On the other hand, we derive stellar mass-to-luminosity ratios (M/L) that indicate a luminosity-dependent evolution in the sense that distant low-luminosity disks have much lower M/L than their local counterparts, while high-luminosity disks barely evolved in M/L over the covered redshift range. This could be the manifestation of the ``downsizing'' effect, i.e., the successive shift of the peak of star formation from high-mass to low-mass galaxies toward lower redshifts. This trend might be canceled out in the TF diagram due to the simultaneous evolution of multiple parameters. We also estimate the ratios

  3. Compound specific isotope analysis to investigate pesticide degradation in lysimeter experiments at field conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabenko, Evgenia; Elsner, Martin; Bakkour, Rani; Hofstetter, Thomas; Torrento, Clara; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    The frequent detection of organic micropollutants such as pesticides, consumer care products or pharmaceuticals in water is an increasing concern for human and ecosystem health. Degradation analysis of these compounds can be challenging in complex systems due to the fact that metabolites are not always found and mass balances frequently cannot be closed. Many abiotic and biotic degradation pathways cause, however, distinct isotope fractionation, where light isotopes are transferred preferentially from the reactant to the product pool (normal isotope fractionation). Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of multiple elements is a particularly powerful method to evaluate organic micropollutant transformation, because it can even give pathway-specific isotope fractionation (1,2). Available CSIA field studies, however, have focused almost exclusively on volatile petroleum and chlorinated hydrocarbons, which are present in high concentrations in the environment and can be extracted easily from water for GC-IRMS analysis. In the case of micropollutants, such as pesticides, CSIA in more challenging since it needs to be conducted at lower concentrations and requires pre-concentration, purification and high chromatographic performance (3). In this study we used lysimeters experiments to analyze transformation of atrazine, acetochlor, metolachlor and chloridazone by studying associated isotope fractionation. The project combines a) analytical method development for CSIA, b) identification of pathways of micropollutant degradation and c) quantification of transformation processes under field condition. The pesticides were applied both, at the soil surface and below the top soil under field-relevant concentrations in May 2014. After typical irrigation of the lysimeters, seepage water was collected in 50L bottles and stored for further SPE and CSIA. Here we present the very first result of a) analytical method development, b) improvement of SPE methods for complex pesticide

  4. Processes and time scales of magmatic evolution as revealed by Fe-Mg chemical and isotopic zoning in natural olivines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oeser, Martin; Dohmen, Ralf; Horn, Ingo; Schuth, Stephan; Weyer, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we applied high-precision in situ Fe and Mg isotope analyses by femtosecond laser ablation (fs-LA) MC-ICP-MS on chemically zoned olivine xeno- and phenocrysts from intra-plate volcanic regions in order to investigate the magnitude of Fe and Mg isotope fractionation and its suitability to gain information on magma evolution. Our results show that chemical zoning (i.e., Mg#) in magmatic olivines is commonly associated with significant zoning in δ56Fe and δ26Mg (up to 1.7‰ and 0.7‰, respectively). We explored different cases of kinetic fractionation of Fe and Mg isotopes by modeling diffusion in the melt or olivine and simultaneous growth or dissolution. Combining the information of chemical and isotopic zoning in olivine allows to distinguish between various processes that may occur during magma evolution, namely diffusive Fe-Mg exchange between olivine and melt, rapid crystal growth, and Fe-Mg inter-diffusion simultaneous to crystal dissolution or growth. Chemical diffusion in olivine appears to be the dominant process that drives isotope fractionation in magmatic olivine. Simplified modeling of Fe and Mg diffusion is suitable to reproduce both the chemical and the isotopic zoning in most of the investigated olivines and, additionally, provides time information about magmatic processes. For the Massif Central (France), modeling of diffusive re-equilibration of mantle olivines in basanites revealed a short time span (<2 years) between the entrainment of a mantle xenolith in an intra-plate basaltic magma and the eruption of the magma. Furthermore, we determined high cooling rates (on the order of a few tens to hundreds of °C per year) for basanite samples from a single large outcrop in the Massif Central, which probably reflects the cooling of a massive lava flow after eruption. Results from the modeling of Fe and Mg isotope fractionation in olivine point to a systematic difference between βFe and βMg (i.e., βFe/βMg ≈ 2), implying that the

  5. Model of macroeconomic evolution in stable regionally dependent economic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ausloos, M.; Clippe, P.; Pekalski, A.

    2004-06-01

    We develop a model for the evolution of economic entities within a geographical type of framework. On a square symmetry lattice made of three (economic) regions, firms, described by a scalar fitness, are allowed to move, adapt, merge or create spin-offs under predetermined rules, in a space- and time-dependent economic environment. We only consider here one timely variation of the “external economic field condition”. For the firm fitness evolution, we take into account a constraint such that the disappearance of a firm modifies the fitness of nearest-neighboring ones, as in Bak-Sneppen population fitness evolution model. The concentration of firms, the averaged fitness, the regional distribution of firms, and fitness for different time moments, the number of collapsed, merged and new firms as a function of time have been recorded and are discussed. Also the asymptotic values of the number of firms present in the three regions together with their average fitness, as well as the number of respective births and collapses in the three regions are examined. It appears that a sort of critical selection pressure exists. A power-law dependence, signature of self-critical organization is seen in the birth and collapse asymptotic values for a high selection pressure only. A lack of self-organization is also seen at region borders.

  6. Magmatic Fluid Source of the Chingshui Geothermal Field: Evidence of Carbonate Isotope data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, S. R.; Lu, Y. C.; Wang, P. L.; John, C. M.; MacDonald, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Chingshui geothermal field is located at the northern tip of the Miocene Lushan Slate Formation, which was part of the Eurasian continental margin subject to the Plio-Pleistocene collision associated with the Luzon Arc. The remnant heat of the Taiwan orogeny has long been considered to drive the circulation of hydrothermal fluids in the Chingshui geothermal field. However, recent studies based on magnetic anomalies and helium isotopic ratios suggest that the heat might instead be derived from igneous bodies. By examining isotope data of calcite veins and scaling in geothermal wells, this study aimed to clarify the fluid origin and possible heat source accounting for the geothermal fluids in the Chingshui geothermal field. Carbon and oxygen isotope analyses indicate that veins from outcrops and scalings in geothermal wells have high and low d values, respectively. Data for veins in drilled cores fall in between outcrop veins and scalings values. Such an isotopic pattern could be interpreted as the mixing of two end member fluids. The clumped isotope analysis of calcite veins from the outcrops yielded precipitation temperatures of up to 232 ± 16 ℃ and a reconstructed d18O fluid value of 9.5 ‰(magmatic fluid: 6-11 ‰; metamorphic fluid: 5-28 ‰ by Taylor, 1974). The inferred d18O values of hot fluids for the vein formation are significantly different from that of meteoric water in Chingshui area (around -5.4 ‰) as well as the scaling in geothermal wells (around -7.6 ‰). Previous study of magnetotelluric image demonstrated two possible fluid reservoirs at different depths (Chen et al. 2012). Our isotope data combined with these lines of evidence suggest that the scaling in geothermal wells could be derived from fluids originating from the shallower reservoir. In contrast, the veins present at outcrops could have been formed from 18O-enriched, deeply-sourced fluids related to either metamorphic dehydration or magmatic processes.

  7. Laws of the oxidation of carbon isotopes in plasma processes under magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myshkin, V. F.; Bespala, E. V.; Khan, V. A.; Makarevich, S. V.

    2016-06-01

    From law of quantum mechanics it follows that spin precession phase of unpaired electron in external magnetic field cannot be determined. It uncertainty necessary take into account in different physical and chemical processes. The expression of the rate constant of a chemical reaction based on the number of discrete spin states was obtained. The equations of chemical kinetics of plasma oxidation of carbon isotopes in the magnetic field were given.

  8. Evolution of E. coli on [U-13C]Glucose Reveals a Negligible Isotopic Influence on Metabolism and Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, Troy E.; Long, Christopher P.; Gonzalez, Jacqueline E.; Feist, Adam M.; Antoniewicz, Maciek R.; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2016-01-01

    13C-Metabolic flux analysis (13C-MFA) traditionally assumes that kinetic isotope effects from isotopically labeled compounds do not appreciably alter cellular growth or metabolism, despite indications that some biochemical reactions can be non-negligibly impacted. Here, populations of Escherichia coli were adaptively evolved for ~1000 generations on uniformly labeled 13C-glucose, a commonly used isotope for 13C-MFA. Phenotypic characterization of these evolved strains revealed ~40% increases in growth rate, with no significant difference in fitness when grown on either labeled (13C) or unlabeled (12C) glucose. The evolved strains displayed decreased biomass yields, increased glucose and oxygen uptake, and increased acetate production, mimicking what is observed after adaptive evolution on unlabeled glucose. Furthermore, full genome re-sequencing revealed that the key genetic changes underlying these phenotypic alterations were essentially the same as those acquired during adaptive evolution on unlabeled glucose. Additionally, glucose competition experiments demonstrated that the wild-type exhibits no isotopic preference for unlabeled glucose, and the evolved strains have no preference for labeled glucose. Overall, the results of this study indicate that there are no significant differences between 12C and 13C-glucose as a carbon source for E. coli growth. PMID:26964043

  9. Study of shape transitions in N{approx}90 isotopes with beyond mean field calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Tomas R.; Egido, J. L.

    2009-01-28

    We study the spherical to prolate-deformed shape transition in {sup 144-158}Sm and {sup 146-160}Gd isotopes with modern calculations beyond the mean field with the Gogny D1S force. We compare the results with the shape-phase transition predicted by the collective Hamiltonian model and with the experimental data. Our calculations do not support the existence of a first order phase transition in these isotopic chains in the viewpoint of the Bohr Hamiltonian neither the interpretation of the nuclei N = 90 as critical points.

  10. Systematic study of Bh isotopes in a relativistic mean field formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, M. S.; Raj, B. K.; Patra, S. K.; Gupta, Raj K.

    2002-10-01

    The binding energy, charge radius, and quadrupole deformation parameter for the isotopic chain of the superheavy element bohrium (107Bh), from proton to neutron drip line, are calculated by using an axially deformed relativistic mean field model. The potential energy surfaces for some of the selected nuclei are plotted and the various possible shapes are investigated. The rms radii, density distributions, and two-neutron separation energies are also evaluated and the single-particle energies for some illustrative cases are analyzed to see the magic structures. Furthermore, the α-decay rates are calculated and compared with the available experimental data for the recently observed new isotopes 266,267Bh.

  11. Sr isotopic characteristics in two small watersheds draining typical silicate and carbonate rocks: implication for the studies on seawater Sr isotopic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W. H.; Zheng, H. B.; Yang, J. D.

    2013-06-01

    drainage area have extremely high 87Sr/86Sr ratios with an average of over 0.8. Therefore, a few silicate components contained in carbonate rocks obviously increases the Sr isotopic compositions of the river water, and results in a positive effect on the rise of 87Sr/86Sr ratio of seawater. Therefore, the relation between Sr isotope evolution of seawater and continental weathering rate is complex, 87Sr/86Sr ratios of underlying bedrock in catchment could be an important controlling factors.

  12. Solar-Cycle Evolution of Subsurface Flows and Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosovichev, Alexander G.; Zhao, Junwei

    2016-05-01

    Local helioseismology and magnetic field measurements from the HMI instrument on SDO provide unique high-resolution data that allow us to investigate detailed dynamics of the upper convection zone and its relation to the magnetic field evolution during the first five years of the current solar cycle. This study is focused on the understanding the role of the near-surface shear layer (NSSL) in the dynamo process, generation, emergence and transport of the solar magnetic flux. The helioseismology data represent 3D flow maps in the depth range of 0-20 Mm, obtained uninterruptedly every 8 hours for almost the whole solar disk with the spatial sampling of two arcsec. We calculate the flow characteristics (such as divergence, vorticity and kinetic helicity) on different spatio-temporal scales from supergranulation to global-scale zonal and meridional flows. We investigate the multi-scale organization of the subsurface flows, including the inflows into active regions, the hemispheric `flip-flop’ asymmetry of variations of the meridional flows, the structure and dynamics of torsional oscillations, and compare the flow behavior with the evolution of the observed magnetic activity of the current cycle.

  13. Strontium isotopic, chemical, and sedimentological evidence for the evolution of Lake Lisan and the Dead Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, M.; Starinsky, A.; Katz, A.; Goldstein, S. L.; Machlus, M.; Schramm, A.

    1997-09-01

    Precise strontium isotope ratios, combined with chemical analyses and sedimentological information, are used to monitor the water sources and the evolution of the Dead Sea and its late Pleistocene precursor, Lake Lisan (70-18 kyr B.P.). The materials analyzed include bulk aragonite, water-leached soluble salts, and residual aragonite and gypsum from the Lisan Formation in the Perazim Valley (near the SW shore of the Dead Sea). The residual aragonite and the associated soluble salts display systematic fluctuations in 17Sr/86Sr ratios between 0.70803 and 0.70806 and from 0.70805 to 0.70807, respectively. In individual soluble salt-residual aragonite pairs, the soluble salt displays a higher 87Sr/86Sr ratio. Gypsum samples yield 17Sr/86Sr ratios similar to the soluble salts from adjacent layers in the section. This shows that, in individual samples, the source of Sr in aragonite was distinct from that in soluble salts and the gypsum. The sterility of the Lisan sediments, their strictly nonbioturbated fine lamination, and their high content of chloride salts indicate that Lake Lisan was a saline, or even hypersaline water body. In the absence of alternative sources of HCO 3- and S0 42- the abundance of primary aragonite and gypsum in the Lisan column reflects an import of very large volumes of freshwater into the otherwise saline lake, resulting in a density stratification of this water body. The history of the upper water layer and that of the lower brine is reflected in the chemical and strontium isotope composition of the aragonite and in that of the associated soluble salts and in the gypsum samples, respectively. Whereas the bicarbonate and much of the Ca 2+ required for aragonite crystallization were supplied by the freshwater, the complementary Ca 2+ (and Sr 2+) were added by the lower brine. The upper water layer of Lake Lisan acted as a SO 42- capacitor during the lake's rise periods. It was removed therefrom, as prominent gypsum beds, upon climatic

  14. Lead and strontium isotopes in rocks of the Absaroka volcanic field, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterman, Z.E.; Doe, B.R.; Prostka, H.J.

    1970-01-01

    The Absaroka volcanic field is comprised of predominant andesitic volcaniclastic rocks and less abundant potassium-rich mafic lavas (shoshonites and absarokites). Strontium and lead isotopic variations preclude a simple derivation from an isotopically uniform source: Sr87/Sr86, 0.7042 to 0.7090; Pb206/Pb204, 16.31 to 17.30; Pb208/Pb204, 36.82 to 37.64. We postulate that these rocks were derived from a lower crust or upper mantle which underwent a preferential loss of uranium relative to lead approximately 2800??200 m.y. ago. Variations in lead and strontium isotopic compositions are thought to reflect small inhomogeneities in U/Pb and Rb/Sr ratios in the source. ?? 1970 Springer-Verlag.

  15. Chemical and isotopic evolution of a layered eastern U.S. snowpack and its relation to stream-water composition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanley, J.B.; Kendall, C.; Albert, M.R.; Hardy, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    The chemical, isotopic, and morphologic evolution of a layered snowpack was investigated during the winter of 1993-94 at Sleepers River Research Watershed in Danville, Vermont. The snowpack was monitored at two small basins: a forested basin at 525 m elevation, and an agricultural basin at 292 m elevation. At each site, the snowpack morphology was characterized and individual layers were sampled seven times during the season. Nitrate and 8d18O profiles in the snowpack remained relatively stable until peak accumulation in mid-March, except near the snow surface, where rain-on-snow events caused water and nitrate movement down to impeding ice layers. Subsequently, water and nitrate moved more readily through the ripening snowpack. As the snowpack evolved, combined processes of preferential ion elution, isotopic fractionation, and infiltration of isotopically heavy rainfall caused the pack to become depleted in solutes and isotopically enriched. The release of nitrate and isotopically depleted water was reflected in patterns of nitrate concentrations and ??18O of meltwater and stream water. Results supported data from the previous year which suggested that streamflow in the forested basin during snowmelt was dominated by groundwater discharge.

  16. Evolution of Auroral Electric Fields Observed By Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marklund, G.; Cluster Auroral Team

    Cluster observations on nightside auroral field lines are used to study the existence and temporal evolution of quasi-static electric field structures on time scales of min- utes. Results are presented for two events characterized by intense and narrow-scale divergent electric fields. These were encountered at the boundary between the Cen- tral Plasma Sheet and the Plasma Sheet Boundary Layer associated with a large-scale plasma density gradient and a downward field-aligned current. The structures main- tain their bipolar shape but increase in magnitude and width between the crossings by the four spacecraft, each separated by a few minutes in a plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. The perpendicular electric potential calculated for the first event in- creased for about 200 s, following closely the increase in the characteristic energy of the upgoing electron beam. At the time of the last satellite crossing the structure had faded, the energy of the beam was much reduced, and the downward current, main- taining a constant total value throughout the Cluster crossings, was distributed over a much wider region than initially. In this way access was given to a wide collection area of return current electrons. For the other event, the electric field increase was accompanied by a deepening of a density cavity superposed on a larger scale density gradient and a downward field-aligned current that remained roughly constant during the crossings. The divergent structures are likely to represent the high-altitude exten- sion of quasi-static positive potential structures developing on a time scale of several hundred seconds which is comparable to the evacuation time for the return current electrons in the E- and lower F-region. The evolving potential structure and associated hole formation represent a growing load in the return current leg of the auroral current circuit with possible direct impact on the aurora.

  17. Modelling feedback and magnetic fields in radio galaxy evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huarte-Espinosa, Martin

    2012-08-01

    The intra-cluster medium (ICM) in galaxy clusters contains magnetic fields on Mpc scales. The main probe of these cluster magnetic fields (CMFs) is the Faraday rotation of the polarized emission from radio sources that are either embedded in, or behind the ICM. Several questions are open concerning the structure and evolution of the magnetic fields in both the ICM and the radio sources. We present three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical numerical simulations to study randomly tangled magnetic fields in the core of a cluster under the effects of light and hypersonic AGN jets. We investigate the power of the jets and carry out synthetic observations to explore the observational signatures of our model radio sources. Our polarization maps agree with the observations, and show that the magnetic structure inside the sources is shaped by the backflow of the jets. Filaments in the synthetic synchrotron emissivity maps suggest that turbulence develops in evolved sources. The polarimetry statistics correlate with time, with the viewing angle and with the jet-to-ambient density contrast. As the sources expand, the linear polarization fraction decreases and the magnetic structure inside thin sources seems more uniform than inside fat ones. Moreover, we see that the jets distort and amplify the CMFs especially at the head of the jets and that this effect correlates with the power and evolution of the jets. We find good agreement with the RM fluctuations of Hydra A. One of the most important results is that the jet-produced RM enhancements may lead to an overestimate of the strength of the CMFs by a factor of about 70%. The physics of radio source expansion may explain the flattening of the RM structure functions at large scales. The advection of metals from a central active galaxy to the ICM in a cool-core cluster is also investigated with an additional suite of hydrodynamical simulations. These metals provide information about the ICM dynamical history and of the CMFs as well

  18. Partioning the evapotranspiration flux from a maize field using stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, Patrick; Oismueller, Markus; Parajka, Juraj

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge of the components of evapotranspiration (ET) is important for SVAT modelling and also agriculture, particularly for irrigation efficiency and crop productivity. Measurements of transpiration (T) and soil evaporation (E) can have significant errors due to upscaling, caused by heterogeneities within the vegetation and environment. The stable isotope method can be used to estimate the ratio of evaporation to transpiration and when combined with eddy covariance measurements can be used to measure the values of evaporation and transpiration at a field scale. During the summer of 2014 the concentration and isotopic ratios of water vapour in the ecosystem boundary layer of a growing maize field at the HOAL catchment was measured using a Picarro field sampling device and in conjunction with isotope samples from the soil and maize plants this data was used to calculate the E:T ratio using the Keeling plot method. A tripod mounted eddy covariance device was used to calculate the ET value for the field with control measurements for the evaporation and transpiration being provided by sets of micro-lysimeters and sap flow devices respectively. These results along with supporting energy balance and meteorological data will be used to analyse the performance of the HYDRUS 1-D model in partitioning the ET for a crop field.

  19. The Yanaurcu volcano (Western Cordillera, Ecuador): A field, petrographic, geochemical, isotopic and geochronological study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béguelin, Paul; Chiaradia, Massimo; Beate, Bernardo; Spikings, Richard

    2015-03-01

    The Yanaurcu volcanic center in the Ecuadorian frontal arc is characterized by several epochs of activity from the Early Pliocene to approx. 61 ka, with important changes in geochemistry and isotope ratio values throughout its history. Most of its units have high Sr/Y and La/Yb signatures. We present a comprehensive study of this volcano involving morphological and stratigraphical observations, sampling, petrography, whole rock and in situ geochemistry, whole rock radiogenic isotope analysis and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. We identify three magmatic series: (1) Early Pliocene andesitic and dacitic volcanics, (2) Pliocene andesitic flows (~ 3.6 Ma), and (3) two Pleistocene andesitic domes (~ 172 ka and ~ 61 ka). Radiogenic isotope data suggest an increasing amount of basement assimilation through the evolution of Yanaurcu, as well as lower rates of ascent and increasing recharge at upper crustal levels, with the Pleistocene domes representing a thermally more mature state of the crust (deep and mid-crust becoming warmer with time when fluxed by a continuous magmatic supply). We also investigate the deep and mid-crustal magma evolution of Yanaurcu by modeling REE + Sr + Y with the Monte Carlo approach in order to get constraints on the fractionating assemblage. We highlight the importance of fractionating garnet in the development of high Sr/Y and La/Yb signatures, and propose a changing regional stress to modify the depth of magma evolution, and therefore the stability of garnet in the fractionating assemblage. Switches from transtensional to compressional regimes in Ecuador have been highlighted by various studies based on tectonic and thermochronological evidences. We conclude that (1) Yanaurcu high Sr/Y and La/Yb ratios can be fully explained by crustal processes and do not need an enriched mantle source nor slab melting, and (2) local thermal maturation of the crust is responsible for an enrichment of incompatible elements through time via recharge processes

  20. Lead Isotopes in Olivine-Phyric Shergottite Tissint: Implications for the Geochemical Evolution of the Shergottite Source Mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moriwaki, R.; Usui, T.; Simon, J. I.; Jones, J. H.; Yokoyama, T.

    2015-01-01

    Geochemically-depleted shergottites are basaltic rocks derived from a martian mantle source reservoir. Geochemical evolution of the martian mantle has been investigated mainly based on the Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, and Lu-Hf isotope systematics of the shergottites [1]. Although potentially informative, U-Th- Pb isotope systematics have been limited because of difficulties in interpreting the analyses of depleted meteorite samples that are more susceptible to the effects of near-surface processes and terrestrial contamination. This study conducts a 5-step sequential acid leaching experiment of the first witnessed fall of the geochemically-depleted olivinephyric shergottite Tissint to minimize the effect of low temperature distrubence. Trace element analyses of the Tissint acid residue (mostly pyroxene) indicate that Pb isotope compositions of the residue do not contain either a martian surface or terrestrial component, but represent the Tissint magma source [2]. The residue has relatively unradiogenic initial Pb isotopic compositions (e.g., 206Pb/204Pb = 10.8136) that fall within the Pb isotope space of other geochemically-depleted shergottites. An initial µ-value (238U/204Pb = 1.5) of Tissint at the time of crystallization (472 Ma [3]) is similar to a time-integrated mu- value (1.72 at 472 Ma) of the Tissint source mantle calculated based on the two-stage mantle evolution model [1]. On the other hand, the other geochemically-depleted shergottites (e.g., QUE 94201 [4]) have initial µ-values of their parental magmas distinctly lower than those of their modeled source mantle. These results suggest that only Tissint potentially reflects the geochemical signature of the shergottite mantle source that originated from cumulates of the martian magma ocean

  1. Mantle evolution in the Variscides of SW England: Geochemical and isotopic constraints from mafic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuis, Nicolle E.; Murphy, J. Brendan; Braid, James A.; Shail, Robin K.; Nance, R. Damian

    2016-06-01

    The geology of SW England has long been interpreted to reflect Variscan collisional processes associated with the closure of the Rhenohercynian Ocean and the formation of Pangea. The Cornish peninsula is composed largely of Early Devonian to Late Carboniferous volcanosedimentary successions that were deposited in pre- and syn-collisional basins and were subsequently metamorphosed and deformed during the Variscan orogeny. Voluminous Early Permian granitic magmatism (Cornubian Batholith) is broadly coeval with the emplacement of ca. 280-295 Ma lamprophyric dykes and flows. Although these lamprophyres are well mapped and documented, the processes responsible for their genesis and their relationship with regional Variscan tectonic events are less understood. Pre- to syn-collisional basalts have intra-continental alkalic affinities, and have REE profiles consistent with derivation from the spinel-garnet lherzolite boundary. εNd values for the basalts range from + 0.37 to + 5.2 and TDM ages from 595 Ma to 705 Ma. The lamprophyres are extremely enriched in light rare earth elements, large iron lithophile elements, and are depleted in heavy rare earth elements, suggesting a deep, garnet lherzolite source that was previously metasomatised. They display εNd values ranging from - 1.4 to + 1.4, initial Sr values of ca. 0.706, and TDM ages from 671 Ma to 1031 Ma, suggesting that metasomatism occurred in the Neoproterozoic. Lamprophyres and coeval granite batholiths of similar chemistry to those in Cornwall occur in other regions of the Variscan orogen, including Iberia and Bohemia. By using new geochemical and isotopic data to constrain the evolution of the mantle beneath SW England and the processes associated with the formation of these post-collisional rocks, we may be able to gain a more complete understanding of mantle processes during the waning stages of supercontinent formation.

  2. Groundwater processes and landscape evolution in Saharan Africa: Remote sensing, isotopic and geophysical constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farag, A. Z.; Sultan, M.; El Kadiri, R.; Mohamed, L.

    2013-12-01

    Paleoclimatic regimes of the North African Sahara Desert alternated between dry and wet periods throughout the Pleistocene Epoch and it is during these wet periods that the fossil aquifers in North Africa were recharged. The largest of these aquifer systems is the Nubian Sandstone Aquifer System (NSAS; area: 2.2 million km2) in Egypt, Libya, Sudan and Chad and the North Western Sahara Aquifer (NWSA; area: 1 million km2) in Algeria, Tunisia and Libya. These aquifers have similar stratigraphic and hydrogeologic settings: (1) the main aquifer is composed largely of older clastic sediments (NAS: Nubian Sandstone; CI: Continental Intercalaire Aquifer) that is overlain by non-clastic carbonates with intercalations of clays and marls ( PNAS: Post Nubian Aquifer System, CT: Complexe Terminal) (2) unconfined conditions in the south that give way to confined conditions in the north, and (3) during wet periods, the NAS and the CI were recharged, groundwater levels rose, and groundwater flowed from the south to the north. In this study we present evidences (remote sensing, field, geophysical, isotopic) to support the hypothesis that in wet periods: (1) groundwater under high hydrostatic pressures access deep seated deep structures and discharge at the near surface causing sapping features and in the overlying carbonate sequences causing karstic features, and (2) many of the present topographic features including natural depressions across the NSAS and the NWSA were largely controlled by the groundwater system processes in previous wet climatic features. Evidences include: (1) Stubby-looking channels with U- shaped valley floors and theater-like valley heads indicative of sapping processes were mapped (using high spatial resolution IKONOS images, ASTER Digital Elevation Model (DEM), slope, hill shade and Landsat mosaics) along scarps in Egypt and Libya (scarp length: 2190 km) and in Algeria (scarp length: 400 km), (2) many of the mapped channel networks (length up to 50 km

  3. Violent galaxy evolution in the Frontier Fields clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebeling, Harald; McPartland, Conor; Blumenthal, Kelly; Roediger, Elke

    2015-08-01

    In a recent study we used customized morphological selection criteria to identify potential ram-pressure stripping events in shallow HST images of MACS clusters at z=0.3-0.7 and found tantalising evidence of such violent evolution (a) being at least partly triggered by galaxy mergers and (b) causing extensive star formation and thus brightening of the affected galaxies. Due to the limited depth of the HST data used, our project focused (by design and necessity) on the brightest galaxies. We here present results of a similar survey for “jellyfish” galaxies conducted using the much deeper, multi-passband imaging data of the Frontier Fields clusters that allow us to probe much farther into the luminosity function of ram-pressure stripping in some of the most massive and most dynamically disturbed clusters known.

  4. Hydrogen chloride 37Cl/35Cl isotopic ratio field analyzer for the investigation of volcanic plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amato, Francesco; Burton, Mike; Chiarugi, Antonio; Viciani, Silvia

    2015-04-01

    We present a new analyzer for the in-field measurement of the isotopic ratio 37Cl/35Cl in the hydrogen chloride emitted by volcanoes, developed within the frame of the ERC Project CO2Volc (Grant 279802). The Project aims to the measurement of several molecular species in the volcanic plumes. The analyzer is based on molecular spectroscopy. The volcanic plume interacts in a multipass cell with two laser beams at suitable wavelengths. From the absorptions of the two beams by the two isotopologues the isotopic ratio is retrieved. We report here the results of the laboratory checks of the instrument, and the results of a measurement campaign carried out on Etna and Vulcano. The campaign aimed to verify not only the in-field performances of the analyzer but also to assess its robustness in such a hostile environment.

  5. Detailed record of the Neogene Sr isotopic evolution of seawater from DSDP Site 590B. [Deep Sea Drilling Project

    SciTech Connect

    DePaolo, D.J.

    1986-02-01

    A detailed study of strontium isotope variations in Neogene marine carbonate sediments from Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 590B, using techniques that allow the /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratio to be determined to better than +/- 0.000 01, gives a high-resolution record of the Sr isotopic evolution of seawater. The data show that the rate of change of the marine /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratio has varied significantly even on time scales as short as 1 m.y. Periods of particularly rapid growth appear to follow major marine regressions and probably reflect an increase in the delivery of radiogenic Sr from the continents coupled with a decreased submarine carbonate dissolution rate (greater carbonate compensation depth). Periods of relatively slowly changing /sup 97/Sr//sup 86/Sr follow major marine transgressions. On the basis of correlations with the marine oxygen isotope record and the times of major continental glacier growth, it is inferred that the effects of sea-level variations are modified by climatic factors that affect the intensity of continental weathering and runoff. The effects of sea-floor generation rate variations are not discernible for the Neogene. The maximum attainable stratigraphic resolution using Sr isotopes is between 0.1 and 2 m.y. for this time period. 24 references.

  6. Compound-Specific Carbon and Hydrogen Isotope Analysis - Field Evidence of MTBE Bioremediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuder, T.; Kolhatkar, R. V.; Philp, P.; Wilson, J. T.; Landmeyer, J. E.; Allen, J.

    2002-12-01

    Compound-specific stable isotope analysis allows opportunity to determine the isotopic ratios of individual contaminants. The technique has been applied to confirm biodegradation in studies of chlorinated solvents and recently BTEX, MTBE and TBA. Chemical reactions (including bio- and inorganic degradation) tend to favor molecules with the lighter isotopic species (e.g., 12C, 1H), resulting with enrichment of the unreacted substrate in the heavier isotopic species (13C, D), referred to as kinetic isotopic fractionation, so that the extent of fractionation may be used as a proxy for biodegradation. Processes such as volatilization, sorption etc., result in minimal degree of fractionation and do not interfere with the isotopic signal due to biodegradation. The results presented here show the first successful applications of compound-specific isotope analysis to understanding MTBE biodegradation in the field, at both aerobic and anaerobic sites. Observed fractionations suggest that two different biodegradation pathways may be involved. At a number of anaerobic locations major fractionation effects were observed for both C and H; enrichment factors Ÿnfor both elements were approaching or exceeding -10. A laboratory microcosm study using an enrichment culture yielded similar results (C data only). A characteristic feature of these sites was the presence of high concentrations of TBA. Conversely, at a number of sites, the C composition remained stable with little fractionation and stayed within the analytical precision range or changed minimally, while H displayed significant fractionation in excess of 60 per mil. Moderate agreement of the data with Rayleigh fractionation model was observed, suggesting that biodegradation effect was distorted by variability at the source or the plume was not homogeneous. The enrichment factor calculated for these data is similar to the one Ÿnpublished for aerobic microcosm of MTBE-degrading culture from Vandenberg AFB by Gray et al

  7. Preliminary isotopic studies of fluids from the Cerro Prieto geothermal field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Truesdell, A.H.; Rye, R.O.; Pearson, F.J., Jr.; Olson, E.R.; Nehring, N.L.; Whelan, J.F.; Huebner, M.A.; Coplen, T.B.

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary isotopic studies of Cerro Prieto geothermal fluids and earlier studies of Mexicali Valley ground waters suggest local recharge of the geothermal system from the area immediately to the west. Oxygen isotope exchange of water with reservoir rock minerals at temperatures increasing with depth has produced fluids with oxygen-18 contents increasing with depth, and pressure drawdown in the southeastern part of the field has allowed lower oxygen-18 fluids to invade the production aquifer from above. The contents of tritium and carbon-14 in the fluid suggest only that the age of the fluid is between 50 and 10,000 years. The isotopic compositions of carbon and sulfur are consistent with a magmatic origin of these elements but a mixed sedimentary-organic origin appears more likely for carbon and is also possible for sulfur. Investigations of the isotopic compositions of geothermal and cold ground waters continue and are being expanded as fluids become available and as separation and analysis methods are improved. ?? 1979.

  8. Scalar field evolution in Gauss-Bonnet black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Abdalla, E.; Konoplya, R.A.; Molina, C.

    2005-10-15

    It is presented a thorough analysis of scalar perturbations in the background of Gauss-Bonnet, Gauss-Bonnet-de Sitter and Gauss-Bonnet-anti-de Sitter black hole spacetimes. The perturbations are considered both in frequency and time domain. The dependence of the scalar field evolution on the values of the cosmological constant {lambda} and the Gauss-Bonnet coupling {alpha} is investigated. For Gauss-Bonnet and Gauss-Bonnet-de Sitter black holes, at asymptotically late times either power-law or exponential tails dominate, while for Gauss-Bonnet-anti-de Sitter black hole, the quasinormal modes govern the scalar field decay at all times. The power-law tails at asymptotically late times for odd-dimensional Gauss-Bonnet black holes does not depend on {alpha}, even though the black hole metric contains {alpha} as a new parameter. The corrections to quasinormal spectrum due to Gauss-Bonnet coupling is not small and should not be neglected. For the limit of near extremal value of the (positive) cosmological constant and pure de Sitter and anti-de Sitter modes in Gauss-Bonnet gravity we have found analytical expressions.

  9. The Pb isotopic compositions of lower crustal xenoliths and the evolution of lower crustal Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnick, Roberta L.; Goldstein, Steven L.

    1990-05-01

    Pb isotopic compositions for three suites of well-characterized granulite facies xenoliths from a diversity of crustal settings (the Chudleigh and McBride volcanic provinces, Queensland, Australia and the Eifel volcanics, West Germany) are presented here. All three suites plot to the right of the 4.57 Ga geochron, similar to the published Pb results of other mafic granulite xenoliths. Correlations between Sr, Nd and Pb isotopes in the three suites measured here point to an origin by mixing of mantle-derived basaltic magmas with lower crust at the time of basaltic underplating (i.e., < 100 Ma for Chudleigh, ˜ 300 Ma for McBride, ˜ 450 Ma for Eifel). Because the Pb concentration of the continental crust is much greater than that of mantle-derived basaltic magmas, the Pb isotopic compositions of the magmas are shifted dramatically by the mixing, allowing delineation of the isotopic characteristics of the lower crust. In all three cases, this lower crust had radiogenic Pb and Sr isotopic compositions and unradiogenic Nd isotopic compositions, yielding Proterozoic Nd model ages. Such radiogenic lower crust contrasts markedly with the Pb isotopic characteristics of most Precambrian granulite facies terrains. Whereas the Nd isotopes reflect the average age of crust formation, the Pb isotopic characteristics of the lower crust appear to be a function of the tectonothermal age of the crust: unradiogenic Pb can only develop in regions which have remained stable for long time periods (e.g., cratons), whereas in areas where orogenies have occurred subsequent to crustal formation, the Pb isotopic composition of the lower crust is "rejuvenated" through mixing with radiogenic Pb from upper crust and mantle-derived magmas. Thus, after orogeny, the Pb isotopic composition of the lower crust resembles that of the upper crust. On the basis of this proposed orogenic age-Pb isotope correlation, we estimate the Pb isotopic composition of the lower crust using the data for granulite

  10. High-precision sulfur isotope composition of enstatite meteorites and implications of the formation and evolution of their parent bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defouilloy, C.; Cartigny, P.; Assayag, N.; Moynier, F.; Barrat, J.-A.

    2016-01-01

    In order to better understand the formation and evolution of their parent bodies, the three isotope ratios of sulfur were analyzed in 33 enstatite meteorites (24 enstatite chondrites and 9 aubrites). The results show that on average all enstatite chondrite groups are enriched in the lightest isotopes compared to other chondrite groups, with means of δ34S of -0.28 ± 0.22‰ for EH3/4, -0.16 ± 0.16‰ for EH5, -0.32 ± 0.15‰ for EL3, -0.67 ± 0.16‰ for EL6 and -0.64 ± 0.00‰ for EL7 (all 1σ). Aubrites show a larger isotope variability in their composition, with a δ34S varying from -1.350‰ to +0.154‰. Contrary to previously published results, our data show a distinct composition for EL6 compared to other enstatite chondrites. This could be related to an impact-induced loss of isotopically heavy oldhamite (δ34S = by 3.62 ± 3.02‰ (1σ)) on the EL parent body. Although the bulk sulfur in both enstatite meteorites and aubrites does not show any significant Δ33S and Δ36S, the oldhamite fraction shows clear evidence of mass independent fractionation on the 36S/32S ratio (in 3 out of 9 analyzes, Δ36S up to +2.2‰), a signal that is not correlated to any 33S/32S anomaly (in 1 out of 9 analyzes, Δ33S down to -0.085‰). Though a nebular or photochemical origin cannot be ruled out, the most plausible mechanism to produce such isolated non-mass dependent 36S/32S anomalies would be a contribution of FeCl2 containing excesses of 36S due to the decay of 36Cl to the leached oldhamite fraction. Even though the sulfur isotopic composition measured in enstatite meteorites is distinct from the Bulk Silicate Earth (BSE), the isotopically lightest samples of EL6, EL7 and aubrites are approaching the isotopic composition of the BSE and enstatite meteorites remain the meteorites with the sulfur isotopic composition the closest to the terrestrial one.

  11. Calcium isotope fractionation in groundwater: Molecular scale processes influencing field scale behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druhan, Jennifer L.; Steefel, Carl I.; Williams, Kenneth H.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2013-10-01

    It is the purpose of this study to demonstrate that the molecular scale reaction mechanisms describing calcite precipitation and calcium isotope fractionations under highly controlled laboratory conditions also reproduce field scale measurements of δ44Ca in groundwater systems. We present data collected from an aquifer during active carbonate mineral precipitation and develop a reactive transport model capturing the observed chemical and isotopic variations. Carbonate mineral precipitation and associated fluid δ44Ca data were measured in multiple clogged well bores during organic carbon amended biogenic reduction of a uranium contaminated aquifer in western Colorado, USA. Secondary mineral formation induced by carbonate alkalinity generated during the biostimulation process lead to substantial permeability reduction in multiple electron-donor injection wells at the field site. These conditions resulted in removal of aqueous calcium from a background concentration of 6 mM to <1 mM while δ44Ca enrichment ranged from 1‰ to greater than 2.5‰. The relationship between aqueous calcium removal and isotopic enrichment did not conform to Rayleigh model behavior. Explicit treatment of the individual isotopes of calcium within the CrunchFlow reactive transport code demonstrates that the system did not achieve isotopic reequilibration over the time scale of sample collection. Measured fluid δ44Ca values are accurately reproduced by a linear rate law when the Ca2+:CO32- activity ratio remains substantially greater than unity. Variation in the measured δ44Ca between wells is shown to originate from a difference in carbonate alkalinity generated in each well bore. The influence of fluid Ca2+:CO32- ratio on the precipitation rate and δ44Ca is modeled by coupling the CrunchFlow reactive transport code to an ion by ion growth model. This study presents the first coupled ion-by-ion and reactive transport model for isotopic enrichment and demonstrates that reproducing field

  12. Sulfur isotopes in coal constrain the evolution of the Phanerozoic sulfur cycle

    PubMed Central

    Canfield, Donald E.

    2013-01-01

    Sulfate is the second most abundant anion (behind chloride) in modern seawater, and its cycling is intimately coupled to the cycling of organic matter and oxygen at the Earth’s surface. For example, the reduction of sulfide by microbes oxidizes vast amounts of organic carbon and the subsequent reaction of sulfide with iron produces pyrite whose burial in sediments is an important oxygen source to the atmosphere. The concentrations of seawater sulfate and the operation of sulfur cycle have experienced dynamic changes through Earth’s history, and our understanding of this history is based mainly on interpretations of the isotope record of seawater sulfates and sedimentary pyrites. The isotope record, however, does not give a complete picture of the ancient sulfur cycle. This is because, in standard isotope mass balance models, there are more variables than constraints. Typically, in interpretations of the isotope record and in the absence of better information, one assumes that the isotopic composition of the input sulfate to the oceans has remained constant through time. It is argued here that this assumption has a constraint over the last 390 Ma from the isotopic composition of sulfur in coal. Indeed, these compositions do not deviate substantially from the modern surface-water input to the oceans. When applied to mass balance models, these results support previous interpretations of sulfur cycle operation and counter recent suggestions that sulfate has been a minor player in sulfur cycling through the Phanerozoic Eon. PMID:23650346

  13. Sulfur isotopes in coal constrain the evolution of the Phanerozoic sulfur cycle.

    PubMed

    Canfield, Donald E

    2013-05-21

    Sulfate is the second most abundant anion (behind chloride) in modern seawater, and its cycling is intimately coupled to the cycling of organic matter and oxygen at the Earth's surface. For example, the reduction of sulfide by microbes oxidizes vast amounts of organic carbon and the subsequent reaction of sulfide with iron produces pyrite whose burial in sediments is an important oxygen source to the atmosphere. The concentrations of seawater sulfate and the operation of sulfur cycle have experienced dynamic changes through Earth's history, and our understanding of this history is based mainly on interpretations of the isotope record of seawater sulfates and sedimentary pyrites. The isotope record, however, does not give a complete picture of the ancient sulfur cycle. This is because, in standard isotope mass balance models, there are more variables than constraints. Typically, in interpretations of the isotope record and in the absence of better information, one assumes that the isotopic composition of the input sulfate to the oceans has remained constant through time. It is argued here that this assumption has a constraint over the last 390 Ma from the isotopic composition of sulfur in coal. Indeed, these compositions do not deviate substantially from the modern surface-water input to the oceans. When applied to mass balance models, these results support previous interpretations of sulfur cycle operation and counter recent suggestions that sulfate has been a minor player in sulfur cycling through the Phanerozoic Eon. PMID:23650346

  14. Noble Gas Isotopic Evidence for Primordial Evolution of the Earth's Atmosphere in Three Distinct Stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, C. L., Jr.; Jacobsen, S. B.

    1995-09-01

    The deep Earth is the key to understanding the primordial evolution of the Earth's atmosphere. However the atmosphere was not derived by degassing of the Earth, as widely held. Isotopic characterization of mantle noble gases and modeling based on this information [1] suggests the atmosphere experienced a 3-stage early history. This follows from 5 basic observations: (i) Ne in the mantle is solar-like, with light (high) 20Ne/22Ne relative to the atmosphere [2]; (ii) mantle Xe has higher 128Xe/130Xe than the atmosphere [3], which carries an extreme heavy isotope enriched mass fractionation signature of >3%/amu (iii) most of the radiogenic Xe from l29I and 244Pu decay in the Earth is not present either in the mantle or in the atmosphere; (iv) the inferred abundances of noble gases in the deep Earth "plume source" are insufficient to generate the present atmospheric abundances, even for whole mantle degassing; and (v) mantle noble gases indicate a 2 component structure, with solar light gases (He and Ne) and planetary heavy gases [4]. The present day noble gas budgets (and likely also N2) must derive from late accretion of a volatile-rich "veneer." This is stage III. Stage II is a naked (no atmosphere) epoch indicated by evidence for Hadean degassing of 244Pu (T1/2 = 80 Ma) fission Xe from the whole mantle, which was not retained in the present atmosphere. The naked stage must have lasted for more than ~200 Ma, and was supported by the early intense solar EUV luminosity. Stage I, a massive solar-composition protoatmosphere, occurred during the Earth's early accretion phase. Its existence is indicated by the presence of the solar gas component in the Earth. This is not attributable to subduction of solar wind rich cosmic dust, or solar wind irradiation of coagulating objects. It is best explained by accretion of a solar composition atmosphere from the nebula. This provided a thermal blanket supporting a magma ocean in which solar gases dissolved. Under these conditions

  15. Neutron Star Magnetic Field Evolution, Crust Movement, and Glitches: Erratum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruderman, Malvin; Zhu, Tianhua; Chen, Kaiyou

    1998-08-01

    In the paper "Neutron Star Magnetic Field Evolution, Crust Movement, and Glitches" by Malvin Ruderman, Tianhua Zhu, and Kaiyou Chen (ApJ, 492, 267 [1998]), the following corrections should be made: Four lines below equation (24), "with v_phi still the same as that of the Vela" should be replaced by "with each vortex line-flux-tube intersection force still the same as that in Vela." Just after equation (25), "as long as 3 - n is less than 1, but 3 - n = 1 otherwise" should be inserted. There is no change in Table 1. The authors also note that a new analysis of observations of the period history of PSR 0540-69 gives a most probable spin-down index n = 2.5 (S. Eikenberg, G. Fazio, and S. Ransom, ApJ, 492, 754 [1998]), which removes the major discrepancy between the observed and model spin-down indices and makes the remarks about it below equation (25) no longer relevant.

  16. Necessary and sufficient condition for quantum adiabatic evolution by unitary control fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen-Yu; Plenio, Martin B.

    2016-05-01

    We decompose the quantum adiabatic evolution as the products of gauge invariant unitary operators and obtain the exact nonadiabatic correction in the adiabatic approximation. A necessary and sufficient condition that leads to adiabatic evolution with geometric phases is provided, and we determine that in the adiabatic evolution, while the eigenstates are slowly varying, the eigenenergies and degeneracy of the Hamiltonian can change rapidly. We exemplify this result by the example of the adiabatic evolution driven by parametrized pulse sequences. For driving fields that are rotating slowly with the same average energy and evolution path, fast modulation fields can have smaller nonadiabatic errors than obtained under the traditional approach with a constant amplitude.

  17. Isotopic effects of nitrate photochemistry in snow: A field study at Dome C, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berhanu, T. A.; Erbland, J.; Savarino, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    Nitrate (NO3-) is the end product of NOx (NO+NO2) oxidation in the atmosphere and one of the most abundant anions present in the Antarctic snow pack. The comprehensive isotopic composition of nitrate (δ18O, Δ17O and δ15N) obtained from deep ice-cores may provide valuable information regarding the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere and could provide constraints on the global NOx budget. Nitrogen stable isotope ratios are typically thought to trace NOx sources while oxygen isotope ratios convey quantitative information regarding the oxidation pathways leading to nitrate formation. However, nitrate deposited at low accumulation sites in Polar Regions such as Dome C, Antarctica, is exposed to post depositional processes that modify its original isotopic composition. Among these processes, photolysis has been identified as the most significant mechanism leading to large nitrate mass loss and isotopic fractionation. Emission of NOx and OH from photolysis of nitrate, as well as formation of by-products such as HONO, can have a significant impact on the overlying boundary layer chemistry of polar regions. The quantitative effect of photolysis on the isotopic signature of nitrate is presently not well constrained and previous experimental and modelling studies have resulted in differing conclusions regarding the role of photolysis in the post processing of nitrate deposited to snow. In order to quantify the effect of photolysis on the isotopic composition of nitrate in snow, we have conducted a field study at Dome C, Antarctica. In this study, two snow sampling fields (1m wide, 2m long and 0.5m deep) within close proximity of each other were studied for the effect of UV light using a plexi glass filter experiment. The two fields were filled with wind blown snow at the beginning of December 2011 and then covered with plexi glass sheets. One of these sheets was equipped with a UV filter. Sampling was conducted every 10 days at a 2-5 cm depth resolution during the period

  18. Time Constraints on Soil Evolution from Uranium-series Isotopes in the South-eastern Australian Highlands: Evidences for a Coupling Between Soil Erosion and Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puthiyaveetil Othayoth, S.; Dosseto, A.; Hesse, P. P.; Handley, H. K.

    2011-12-01

    samples of profile F1 and from 15 to 34 kyr for leached samples of profile F3. A linear relationship is observed between soil depth and calculated residence times (modeled from U-series or using muscovite content), and can be used to infer soil production rates, which range between 10 and 24 mm/kyr. This compares with denudation rates previously determined at this site (Heimsath et al., 2001) and demonstrates the balance between soil production and loss, expressed in the landscape by soil-mantled hill slopes. Reference: Dosseto, A., Turner, S. P. and Chappell, J., 2008. The evolution of weathering profiles through time: New insights from uranium-series isotopes. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 274: 359-371 Heimsath, A. M., Chappell, J., Dietrich, W. E., Nishiizumi, K., and Finkel, R. C., 2001. Late Quaternary erosion in southeastern Australia: a field example using cosmogenic nuclides. Quaternary International 83-85, 169-185.

  19. The evolution of Carbon isotopes in calcite in the presence of cyanobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, Christian; Mavromatis, Vasileios; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Oelkers, Eric H.

    2016-04-01

    Stable isotopic compositions in carbonates are widely used as indicators of environmental conditions prevailing during mineral formation. This reconstruction is substantially based on the assumption that there is no change in the mineral composition over geological time. However, recent experimental studies have shown that carbon and magnesium isotopes in hydrous Mg-carbonates undergo continuous re-equilibration with the ambient solution even after mineral precipitation stopped ([1] and [2], respectively). To verify whether this holds true for anhydrous Ca-bearing carbonates which readily form at earth's surface environments, a series of batch system calcite precipitation experiments were performed in the presence of actively growing cyanobacteria Synechococcus sp. The bacteria were grown at ambient temperature in a BG11 culture medium (SIGMA C3061) and continuous stirring, air-bubbling and illumination. Calcite precipitation was initiated by the addition of 8.5mM CaCl2 and 0-50 mM NaHCO3 or NaHCO3-Na2CO3 mixtures. The presence of cyanobacteria is on one hand promoting CaCO3 formation due to increasing pH resulting from photosynthesis. On the other hand, actively growing cyanobacteria drastically change carbon isotope signature of the aqueous fluid phase by preferably incorporating the lighter 12C isotope into biomass [1]. This study explores the effect of continuously changing carbon isotope compositions in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) on precipitated calcite which is in chemical equilibrium with the ambient fluid phase. [1] Mavromatis et al. (2015). The continuous re-equilibration of carbon isotope compositions of hydrous Mg-carbonates in the presence of cyanobacteria. Chem. Geol. 404, 41-51 [2] Mavromatis et al. (2012). Magnesium isotope fractionation during hydrous magnesium carbonate precipitation with and without cyanobacteria. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 76, 161-174

  20. Barium isotope abundances in meteorites and their implications for early Solar System evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermingham, K. R.; Mezger, K.; Scherer, E. E.; Horan, M. F.; Carlson, R. W.; Upadhyay, D.; Magna, T.; Pack, A.

    2016-02-01

    Several nucleosynthetic processes contributed material to the Solar System, but the relative contributions of each process, the timing of their input into the solar nebula, and how well these components were homogenized in the solar nebula remain only partially constrained. The Ba isotope system is particularly useful in addressing these issues because Ba isotopes are synthesized via three nucleosynthetic processes (s-, r-, p-process). In this study, high precision Ba isotope analyses of 22 different whole rock chondrites and achondrites (carbonaceous chondrites, ordinary chondrites, enstatite chondrites, Martian meteorites, and eucrites) were performed to constrain the distribution of Ba isotopes on the regional scale in the Solar System. A melting method using aerodynamic levitation and CO2-laser heating was used to oxidize SiC, a primary carrier of Ba among presolar grains in carbonaceous chondrites. Destruction of these grains during the fusion process enabled the complete digestion of these samples. The Ba isotope data presented here are thus the first for which complete dissolution of the bulk meteorite samples was certain. Enstatite chondrites, ordinary chondrites, and all achondrites measured here possess Ba isotope compositions that are not resolved from the terrestrial composition. Barium isotope anomalies are evident in most of the carbonaceous chondrites analyzed, but the 135Ba anomalies are generally smaller than previously reported for similarly sized splits of CM2 meteorites. Variation in the size of the 135Ba anomaly is also apparent in fused samples from the same parent body (e.g., CM2 meteorites) and in different pieces from the same meteorite (e.g., Orgueil, CI). Here, we investigate the potential causes of variability in 135Ba, including the contribution of radiogenic 135Ba from the decay of 135Cs and incomplete homogenization of the presolar components on the <0.8 g sample scale.

  1. Isotopic and geochemical studies of fluid-rock interactions and the chemical evolution of the oceans

    SciTech Connect

    Derry, L.A.

    1989-01-01

    The isotopic compositions of Sr and Nd, and the abundances of rare earth elements (REE) are used to study various types of fluid-rock interactions in the Earth's crust. The isotopic compositions of Sr and Nd and REE patterns in marine chemical sediments of Precambrian age are used to estimate the relative importance of continental weathering versus submarine hydrothermal activity in determining the chemical mass balance of the Precambrian oceans. Major and trace element abundances and Sr and Nd isotopes are used to quantify the degree of interaction of a carbonatite fluid-magmatic system with felsic crust, and to constrain the isotopic characteristics of the mantle source region. The isotopic composition of Sr is reported from a well characterized sequence of Upper Proterozoic carbonates from Svalbard and east Greenland. A simple model of carbonate recycling and isotopic mass balance calculations illustrate that sedimentary recycling can have a strong influence on Sr in the oceans. REE patterns from Precambrian banded iron formations (BIFs) are very similar to modern metalliferous sediments, and imply that the overall REE pattern of Precambrian seawater was similar to today. The mantle-like {var epsilon}{sub Nd} values and positive Eu anomalies imply that the source of the REE in the BIFs was submarine hydrothermal activity. The implications of a large hydrothermal flux of reduced Fe on the redox controls of the Precambrian atmosphere are explored, and a testable hypothesis is developed. The mass balance of Eu in the oceans is affected by preferential scavenging at hydrothermal sites. Data from the Cherry Hill, CA mineralizing system imply a complex plumbing system and a long residence time for the water. Isotopic data from the Fen alkaline complex, Norway, define mixing trends between mantle derived magmas or magmatic fluids and old crust.

  2. Formation, evolution and properties of isolated field elliptical galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemi, Sami-Matias; Heinämäki, Pekka; Nurmi, Pasi; Saar, Enn

    2010-06-01

    We study the properties, evolution and formation mechanisms of isolated field elliptical (IfE) galaxies. We create a `mock' catalogue of IfE galaxies from the Millennium Simulation Galaxy Catalogue, and trace their merging histories. The formation, identity and assembly redshifts of simulated isolated and non-isolated elliptical galaxies are studied and compared. Observational and numerical data are used to compare age, mass and the colour-magnitude relation. Our results, based on simulation data, show that almost 7 per cent of all elliptical galaxies brighter than -19mag in B band can be classified as IfE galaxies. Results also show that isolated elliptical galaxies have a rather flat luminosity function; a number density of ~3 × 10-6h3Mpc-3mag-1, throughout their B-band magnitudes. IfE galaxies show bluer colours than non-isolated elliptical galaxies and they appear younger, in a statistical sense, according to their mass-weighted age. IfE galaxies also form and assemble at lower redshifts compared to non-isolated elliptical galaxies. About 46 per cent of IfE galaxies have undergone at least one major merging event in their formation history, while the same fraction is only ~33 per cent for non-isolated ellipticals. Almost all (~98 per cent) isolated elliptical galaxies show merging activity during their evolution, pointing towards the importance of mergers in the formation of IfE galaxies. The mean time of the last major merging is at z ~ 0.6 or 6Gyr ago for isolated ellipticals, while non-isolated ellipticals experience their last major merging significantly earlier at z ~ 1.1 or 8Gyr ago. After inspecting merger trees of simulated IfE galaxies, we conclude that three different, yet typical, formation mechanisms can be identified: solitude, coupling and cannibalism. Our results also predict a previously unobserved population of blue, dim and light galaxies that fulfil observational criteria to be classified as IfE galaxies. This separate population comprises

  3. The Pb isotopic evolution of the Martian mantle constrained by initial Pb in Martian meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellucci, J. J.; Nemchin, A. A.; Whitehouse, M. J.; Snape, J. F.; Bland, P.; Benedix, G. K.

    2015-12-01

    The Pb isotopic compositions of maskelynite and pyroxene grains were measured in ALH84001 and three enriched shergottites (Zagami, Roberts Massif 04262, and Larkman Nunatuk 12011) by secondary ion mass spectrometry. A maskelynite-pyroxene isochron for ALH84001 defines a crystallization age of 4089 ± 73 Ma (2σ). The initial Pb isotopic composition of each meteorite was measured in multiple maskelynite grains. ALH84001 has the least radiogenic initial Pb isotopic composition of any Martian meteorite measured to date (i.e., 206Pb/204Pb = 10.07 ± 0.17, 2σ). Assuming an age of reservoir formation for ALH84001 and the enriched shergottites of 4513 Ma, a two-stage Pb isotopic model has been constructed. This model links ALH84001 and the enriched shergottites by their similar μ value (238U/204Pb) of 4.1-4.6 from 4.51 Ga to 4.1 Ga and 0.17 Ga, respectively. The model employed here is dependent on a chondritic μ value (~1.2) from 4567 to 4513 Ma, which implies that core segregation had little to no effect on the μ value(s) of the Martian mantle. The proposed Pb isotopic model here can be used to calculate ages that are in agreement with Rb-Sr, Lu-Hf, and Sm-Nd ages previously determined in the meteorites and confirm the young (~170 Ma) ages of the enriched shergottites and ancient, >4 Ga, age of ALH84001.

  4. Organosulfur Compounds: Molecular and Isotopic Evolution from Biota to Oil and Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amrani, Alon

    2014-05-01

    Organosulfur compounds (OSCs) play important roles in the formation, preservation, and thermal degradation of sedimentary organic matter and the associated petroleum generation. Improved analytical techniques for S isotope analysis have recently enhanced our understanding of the mechanisms for OSC formation and maturation and their associated S isotope distributions. The close interaction of OSCs with inorganic S species throughout their formation and maturation affects their 34S/32S isotopic ratio (δ34S), forming specific signatures for distinct sources and processes. Ultimately, thermal maturation homogenizes the δ34S values of different fractions and individual compounds. Reservoir processes such as thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) introduce exogenous and isotopically distinct S into hydrocarbons and can significantly change the δ34S of petroleum or kerogen. Specific OSCs react at different rates and thus can be used to evaluate the extent of processes such as TSR. This article reviews factors that affect the 34S/32S isotopic distribution of OSCs along pathways of formation, diagenesis, and thermal alteration.

  5. Laboratory and Field Measurements of the Nitrogen Isotopic Composition of NOx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fibiger, D. L.; Miller, D. J.; Dahal, B. R.; Lew, A. F.; Peltier, R.; Hastings, M. G.

    2014-12-01

    The nitrogen isotopic composition of nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) has been measured from several NOx emissions sources in prior studies. These measurements have utilized a variety of methods for collecting the NOx as nitrate or nitrite for isotopic analysis, but none of these methods have been verified for complete conversion of NOx. Less than 100% conversion can result in isotopic fractionations. We present a method for accurately measuring the nitrogen isotopic composition of NOx using a .25 M KMnO4 and 0.5 M NaOH solution. Based on laboratory tests, this technique has been found to collect all NOx passed through under a variety of conditions (e.g., air flow rate, NOx concentration, temperature, humidity), allowing for diagnosis of δ15N-NOx without correction for fractionation. The precision across the entire analytic technique is 1.5‰. This active collection method is advantageous for collecting NOx over short time scales in environments with highly variable NOx sources and concentrations. The major drawback of the NaOH/KMnO4 method is a significant nitrate background found in the KMnO4, but this background is consistent and can be easily accounted for. We aim to use this method to provide more robust constraints on the isotopic signatures of NOx emissions from different sources. Initial results will be presented from lab- and field-based collections of NOx emissions. Emissions from a diesel engine were measured in a laboratory smog chamber and yielded δ15N values with a mean of -18.0‰ (n = 5, 1σ = 0.97‰). Measurements of δ15N-NOx were also made on a rooftop between two highways in Providence, RI. The values ranged from -7.7 to -0.63‰ for different time periods sampled, with excellent reproducibility in side-by-side collections. Additionally, the NaOH/KMnO4 was deployed in a laboratory study of biomass burning (FLAME4) to analyze the nitrogen isotopic composition of NOx produced from the burning of variety of materials (e.g. trees, agricultural

  6. Chronologic and isotopic framework for Early Proterozoic crustal evolution in the eastern Mojave Desert region, SE California

    SciTech Connect

    Wooden, J.L.; Miller, D.M. )

    1990-11-10

    The Early Proterozoic geologic evolution of the eastern Mojave Desert region, as defined by characteristics of its supracrustal rocks, granitoids, metamorphism, structural history, and Pb and Nd isotopic signature, contrasts sharply with other Proterozoic provinces of the southwestern US. The oldest supracrustal rocks of the Mojave Desert region contain zircons over 2.0 Ga, corroborating Nd isotopic evidence for a much older crust here than elsewhere in the southwestern US. Granitoids widely emplaced within these supracrustal rocks range from 1.76 to 1.64 Ga. The earlier plutons and surrounding supracrustal rocks were metamorphosed to granulite and high amphibolite facies throughout the province at about 1,705 Ma in a migmatite-producing event that the authors term (informally) the Ivanpah orogeny. Subsequent granitoids, emplaced from 1.69 to 1.67 Ga, were voluminous along a north trending belt in the middle of the Mojave province. Younger plutons were emplaced at about 1.66 Ga in several places and at about 1.64 Ga along the extreme southern part of the province. Commonalities between the Proterozoic evolutions of the Mojave and Arizona crustal provinces do not conclusively establish the time that the provinces were juxtaposed; the data only suggest that the juxtaposition occurred about 1.76 and 1.64 Ga.

  7. Osmium isotope variations accompanying the eruption of a single lava flow field in the Columbia River Flood Basalt Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vye-Brown, C.; Gannoun, A.; Barry, T. L.; Self, S.; Burton, K. W.

    2013-04-01

    Geochemical interpretations of continental flood basalts usually assume that individual lava flows represent compositionally homogenous and rapidly erupted products of large well-mixed magma reservoirs. However, inflated pāhoehoe lavas may develop over considerable periods of time and preserve chemical variations that can be temporally linked through flow formation to eruption sequence thus providing an understanding of magma evolution over the timescale of a single eruption. This study presents comprehensive major, trace element and Re-Os isotope data for a single eruption that formed the 2660 km3 Sand Hollow flow field in the Columbia River Basalt Province, USA. Major and trace element variations accompanying flow emplacement (e.g. MgO 3.09-4.55 wt%, Ni 17.5-25.6 ppm) are consistent with fractional crystallisation, but other petrogenetic processes or variable sources cannot be distinguished. However, there is a systematic shift in the initial 187Os/188Os isotope composition of the magma (age corrected to 15.27 Ma), from 0.174 (lava core) to 1.444 (lava crust) within a single 35 m thick sheet lobe. Lava crust values are more radiogenic than any known mantle source, consistent with previous data indicating that neither an enriched reservoir nor the sub-continental lithospheric mantle are likely to have sourced these basalts. Rather, these data indicate that lavas emplaced during the earliest stages of eruption have higher degrees of crustal contamination. These results highlight the limitations of applying chemostratigraphic correlation across continental flood basalt provinces, the use of single data points to define melt sources and magmatic processes, and the dangers of using conventional isochron techniques in such basalt sequences for absolute chronology.

  8. Strontium isotopic signatures of oil-field waters: Applications for reservoir characterization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnaby, R.J.; Oetting, G.C.; Gao, G.

    2004-01-01

    The 87Sr/86Sr compositions of formation waters that were collected from 71 wells producing from a Pennsylvanian carbonate reservoir in New Mexico display a well-defined distribution, with radiogenic waters (up to 0.710129) at the updip western part of the reservoir, grading downdip to less radiogenic waters (as low as 0.708903 to the east. Salinity (2800-50,000 mg/L) displays a parallel trend; saline waters to the west pass downdip to brackish waters. Elemental and isotopic data indicate that the waters originated as meteoric precipitation and acquired their salinity and radiogenic 87Sr through dissolution of Upper Permian evaporites. These meteoric-derived waters descended, perhaps along deeply penetrating faults, driven by gravity and density, to depths of more than 7000 ft (2100 m). The 87 Sr/86Sr and salinity trends record influx of these waters along the western field margin and downdip flow across the field, consistent with the strong water drive, potentiometric gradient, and tilted gas-oil-water contacts. The formation water 87Sr/86Sr composition can be useful to evaluate subsurface flow and reservoir behavior, especially in immature fields with scarce pressure and production data. In mature reservoirs, Sr Sr isotopes can be used to differentiate original formation water from injected water for waterflood surveillance. Strontium isotopes thus provide a valuable tool for both static and dynamic reservoir characterization in conjunction with conventional studies using seismic, log, core, engineering, and production data. Copyright ??2004. The American Association of Petroleum Geologist. All rights reserved.

  9. Isotopic evolution of Mauna Kea volcano: Results from the initial phase of the Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lassiter, J.C.; DePaolo, D.J.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1996-01-01

    We have examined the Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic compositions of Mauna Kea lavas recovered by the first drilling phase of the Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project. These lavas, which range in age from ???200 to 400 ka, provide a detailed record of chemical and isotopic changes in basalt composition during the shied/postshield transition and extend our record of Mauna Kea volcanism to a late-shield period roughly equivalent to the last ???100 ka of Mauna Loa activity. Stratigraphic variations in isotopic composition reveal a gradual shift over time toward a more depleted source composition (e.g., higher 143Nd/144Nd, lower 87Sr/86Sr, and lower 3He/4He). This gradual evolution is in sharp contrast with the abrupt appearance of alkalic lavas at ???240 ka recorded by the upper 50 m of Mauna Kea lavas from the core. Intercalated tholeiitic and alkalic lavas from the uppermost Mauna Kea section are isotopically indistinguishable. Combined with major element evidence (e.g., decreasing SiO2 and increasing FeO) that the depth of melt segregation increased during the transition from tholeiitic to alkalic volcanism, the isotopic similarity of tholeiitic and alkalic lavas argues against significant lithosphere involvement during melt generation. Instead, the depleted isotopic signatures found in late shield-stage lavas are best explained by increasing the proportion of melt generated from a depleted upper mantle component entrained and heated by the rising central plume. Direct comparison of Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa lavas erupted at equivalent stages in these volcanoes' life cycles reveals persistent chemical and isotopic differences independent of the temporal evolution of each volcano. The oldest lavas recovered from the drillcore are similar to modern Kilauea lavas, but are distinct from Mauna Loa lavas. Mauna Kea lavas have higher 143Nd/144Nd and 206Pb/204Pb and lower 87Sr/86Sr. Higher concentrations of incompatible trace elements in primary magmas, lower SiO2, and higher FeO also

  10. The multiple sulfur isotopic composition of iron meteorites: Implications for nebular evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonelli, Michael Ariel

    2013-12-01

    Multiple sulfur isotopic measurements of troilite from 61 different iron meteorites were undertaken in order to test for sulfur isotopic homogeneity within (and between) 8 different iron meteorite groups. It was found that different members within a given group of iron meteorites have homogeneous Delta 33S compositions, but that these Delta33S compositions differ between groups. This thesis shows that iron meteorites from the groups IC, IIAB, IIIAB, IIIF, and IVA have small yet resolvable enrichments or depletions in Delta33S relative to Canyon Diablo Troilite (CDT) and troilite from other non-magmatic (IAB and IIE) iron meteorites. The observed anomalous sulfur isotopic compositions in magmatic iron meteorites are most consistent with Lyman-alpha photolysis of H2S, pointing towards inheritance of an unexpected photolytically-derived sulfur component in magmatic iron meteorite groups which is absent in non-magmatic iron meteorites, chondrites, and the Earth-Moon System.

  11. U and Th Concentration and Isotopic Composition of Hydrothermal Fluids at the Lost City Hydrothermal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, K. A.; Shen, C.; Cheng, H.; Edwards, R.; Kelley, D. S.; Butterfield, D. A.

    2006-12-01

    Uranium and Th concentration and isotopic composition of hydrothermal fluids at the Lost City Hydrothermal Field (LCHF) were determined using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP- MS). The LCHF is an off-axis, serpentinite-hosted hydrothermal system located at 30°N near the Mid- Atlantic Ridge. Carbonate chimneys reaching 60 m in height vent alkaline (pH~10), calcium-rich fluids at 40- 91°C and the towers are home to dense microbial communities. Vent fluid and seawater U and Th concentration and isotopic composition data provide critical information for constraining U-Th chimney ages. The increased sensitivity (1-2%) of MC-ICP-MS combined with an Aridus nebulization system allows the precise measurement of small quantities of sample (~150 ml) with low concentrations (<<1ng/g) of U and Th. In this study, we have developed MC-ICP-MS techniques to measure the U and Th concentration and isotopic composition (234U, 238U, 230Th, and 232Th) of eight hydrothermal fluid samples. Endmember fluids with ~1mmol/kg Mg have ~0.02 ng/g U, confirming that end-member fluids contain near-zero values of both Mg and U. Thorium concentrations of fluids are close to deep seawater values. U and Th isotopic compositions are reported at the permil level. These data may provide new insights into the role of serpentinite-hosted hydrothermal systems in the budgets of U and Th in the ocean. Techniques presented in this study may be applied to other hydrothermal and seep environments.

  12. Strontium isotopes evolution of groundwater in a floodplain, Rio Icacos, Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, X.; Sharma, M.; Landis, J. D.; Gazis, C.; Posmentier, E.; McDowell, W. H.

    2005-12-01

    Major element and Sr concentrations and 87Sr/86Sr ratios were measured in groundwater, rainwater and stream samples collected in2004 from Luquillo Experimental Forest (LEF), Puerto Rico. The groundwater was obtained from wells augured across a ~20 m wide floodplain, which lies between a tributary of Rio Iacos and upslope forest (McDowell et al., Biogeochem 18:53, 1992). The Sr isotope data were also obtained on archived samples collected from the same sites in 1989-1991. The purpose of this study was to investigate (a) controls on the evolution of Sr2+ and their variation between 1989-91 and 2004 and (b) the extent to which floodplain weathering governs the 87Sr/86Sr ratio of the stream. The subsurface water at this site flows through a deep layer of coarse sand and the water table has a gradient of ~0.25. A subset of the data is given below; 1989-91 data are weighted averages of the analyzed samples. % Table generated by Excel2LaTeX from sheet 'Sheet1' \\begin{tabular}{lllll} \\hline Sample & 2004 & 2004 & 1989-91 & 1989-92 & [Sr], ppb & 87Sr/86Sr & [Sr], ppb & 87Sr/86Sr \\hline Rainwater & 4.6 & 0.7101 & & Well (I-9, =4.3 m) & 10.1 & 0.71351 & 1.2 & 0.70875 Well (I-2,d =3.0m) & 18.8 & 0.71035 & & Well (I-4, d= 3.0 m) & 18.1 & 0.70879 & 9.4 & 0.70523 Stream (I-0) & 16.8 & 0.7063 & 15.5 & 0.70512 Downstream of I-0 & 21.5 & 0.70536 & & \\hline The rainwater sample is highly enriched in Sr and has an 87Sr/86Sr ratio higher than seawater; the latter possibly reflects a contribution from Saharan dust. Extreme gradients in 87Sr/86Sr are present in waters from both 2004 and 1989-91 with the samples becoming less radiogenic towards the stream. This is accompanied by a 2 to 5 fold increase in the Sr content. It is evident that most of the stream water Sr is derived from subsurface water, which is significantly modified within the floodplain. The floodplain soil is derived from alteration of quartz diorite bedrock containing biotite, hornblende, plagioclase and quartz

  13. Isotope effects in the harmonic response from hydrogenlike muonic atoms in strong laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Shahbaz, Atif; Mueller, Carsten; Buervenich, Thomas J.

    2010-07-15

    High-order harmonic generation from hydrogenlike muonic atoms exposed to ultraintense high-frequency laser fields is studied. Systems of low nuclear-charge number Z are considered where a nonrelativistic description applies. By comparing the radiative response for different isotopes, we demonstrate characteristic signatures of the finite nuclear mass and size in the harmonic spectra. In particular, for Z>1, an effective muon charge appears in the Schroedinger equation for the relative particle motion, which influences the position of the harmonic cutoff. Cutoff energies in the million-electron-volt domain can be achieved, offering prospects for the generation of ultrashort coherent {gamma}-ray pulses.

  14. Stable isotope paleoaltimetry: Tectonics and the evolution of landscapes and life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulch, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Stable isotope paleoaltimetry exploits systematic changes in the oxygen (δ18O) or hydrogen (δD) isotopic composition of precipitation when lifting of moist air masses over topography induces orographic precipitation. The past 10 years have witnessed rapidly expanding research activities in stable isotope paleoaltimetry that resulted in a broad array of fascinating tectonic studies many of which concentrated on the elevation histories of continental plateau regions. Stable isotope based reconstructions of topography, therefore, have greatly expanded what used to be very sparse global paleoaltimetric information. The topography of mountain ranges and plateaus, however, not only reflects the geodynamic processes that shape the Earth's surface; it also represents a key element in controlling continental moisture transport, atmospheric circulation and the distribution of biomes and biodiversity. The challenge now lies in disentangling the surface uplift component from the inevitable impact of climate change on long-term records of δ18O and δD in precipitation that accompanies surface uplift. The robustness of stable isotope paleoaltimetry reconstructions can be greatly enhanced when high-elevation δ18O or δD proxy data are referenced against low-elevation records that track climate-modulated δ18O or δD of precipitation through time. In addition, evaluating δ18O or δD of precipitation upstream of the orogen/continental plateau region reduces commonly encountered complexities such as topographic threshold conditions to atmospheric circulation, variable moisture recharge to the atmosphere through evapotranspiration over the continents or the impact of hemispheric-scale atmospheric teleconnections; all of which may conspire in setting δ18O or δD of precipitation. Here, I present examples where stable isotope paleoaltimetry data successfully track topographic thresholds to changes in atmospheric circulation and precipitation with a particular focus on the effect

  15. Carbon isotope stratigraphy of the upper Kharaib and Shuaiba formations: Implications for the Early Cretaceous evolution of the Arabian Gulf Region

    SciTech Connect

    Vahrenkamp, V.C.

    1996-05-01

    The carbon isotope profiles of shallow-marine carbonates from the Barremian-Aptian Kharaib and Shuaiba formations of the Arabian Gulf region range between 0.5 and 7{per_thousand} {delta}{sup 13}C PDB (Peedee belemnite). Systematic variations can be correlated with isotope profiles reported from Tethyan pelagic limestone sequences. The detailed correspondence between the isotopic signature of the relatively well-dated pelagic limestones and the poorly dated shallow-water limestones from the Arabian Gulf region suggests that global marine carbon isotope changes apparently affected deep-sea and shallow-water carbonate sediments similarly and at a similar time resolution. Although oxygen isotopes have been reset during diagenesis, carbon isotopes appear to have maintained their primary marine signature through time. No evidence has been found to connect carbon isotope trends to subaerial exposure or later meteoric diagenesis. In combination with other data, the investigated carbon isotope profiles can be used for basin-to-platform and regional correlations beyond the current resolution of biostratigraphy in shallow-water limestones. Carbon isotope stratigraphy confirms significant hiatuses in the investigated shallow-water carbonate sequences. Using carbon isotope trends as a proxy for sea level fluctuations, the carbon isotope cycles of the late Early Cretaceous of the Arabian Gulf region may represent four cycles of rising and falling sea level with a duration corresponding to that of third-order sea level fluctuations. Regional correlations derived from isotope trends provide a scenario for the larger scale stratigraphic evolution of the Arabian peninsula during the end of the Early Cretaceous.

  16. Experimental study of the Mg and Sr isotopic evolution of seawater interacting with basalt between 150 and 300 ° C.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Martin; Pearce, Christopher R.; Oelkers, Eric H.

    2016-04-01

    the potential for combined radiogenic and stable isotope analysis to track solid-fluid reactions in the oceanic crust. Further characterisation of the extent of isotopic fractionation in these systems will help establish how such processes have affected the long-term chemical evolution of the oceans. [1] H. Elderfield and A. Schultz, "Mid-Ocean Ridge Hydrothermal Fluxes and the Chemical Composition of the Ocean," Annu Rev Earth Planet Sci, vol. 24, pp. 191-224, 1996. [2] W. E. Seyfried Jr and J. L. Bischoff, "Experimental seawater-basalt interaction at 300° C, 500 bars, chemical exchange, secondary mineral formation and implications for the transport of heavy metals," Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, vol. 45, no. 2, pp. 135-147, 1981. [3] J. A. Higgins and D. P. Schrag, "The Mg isotopic composition of Cenozoic seawater - evidence for a link between Mg-clays, seawater Mg/Ca, and climate," Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., vol. 416, pp. 73-81, 2015.

  17. The isotopic and chemical evolution of planets: Mars as a missing link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Depaolo, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    The study of planetary bodies has advanced to a stage where it is possible to contemplate general models for the chemical and physical evolution of planetary interiors, which might be referred to as UMPES (Unified Models of Planetary Evolution and Structure). UMPES would be able to predict the internal evolution and structure of a planet given certain input parameters such as mass, distance from the sun, and a time scale for accretion. Such models are highly dependent on natural observations because the basic material properties of planetary interiors, and the processes that take place during the evolution of planets are imperfectly understood. The idea of UMPES was particularly unrealistic when the only information available was from the earth. However, advances have been made in the understanding of the general aspects of planetary evolution now that there is geochemical and petrological data available for the moon and for meteorites.

  18. Hydrogen isotope evidence for the origin and evolution of the carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiler, John M.; Kitchen, Nami

    2004-03-01

    We present new hydrogen isotope data for separated matrix, hydrated chondrules, and other hydrated coarse silicate fragments from nine carbonaceous chondrites. These data were generated using a micro-analytical method involving stepped combustion of tens to hundreds of micrograms of hydrous solids. We also re-evaluate hydrogen isotope data from previous conventional stepped combustion experiments on these and other carbonaceous chondrites. Hydrogen isotope compositions of matrix and whole-rock samples of CM chondrites are correlated with oxygen isotope indices, major and minor-element abundances, and abundance and isotope ratios of other highly volatile elements. These correlations include a monotonic decrease in δD with increasing extent of aqueous alteration and decreasing abundances of highly volatile elements (including C, N and Ar), between extremes of ˜0‰ (least altered, most volatile rich) and -200‰ (most altered, least volatile rich). In plots involving only abundances and/or isotope ratios of highly volatile elements, CI chondrites fall on the high-δD, volatile rich end of the trends defined by CM chondrites; i.e., CI chondrites resemble the least altered CM chondrites in these respects. These trends suggest the protoliths of the CM chondrites (i.e., before aqueous alteration) contained an assemblage of volatiles having many things in common with those in the CI chondrites. If so, then the volatile-element inventory of the CI chondrites was a more widespread component of early solar system objects than suggested by the scarcity of recognized CI meteorites. Differences in volatile-element chemistry between the CI and average CM chondrites can be attributed to aqueous alteration of the latter. Previous models of carbonaceous chondrite aqueous alteration have suggested: (1) the protoliths of the CM chondrites are volatile poor objects like the CO or CV chondrites; and (2) the CI chondrites are more altered products of the same process producing the CM

  19. Isotopic effects of nitrate photochemistry in snow: a field study at Dome C, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berhanu, T. A.; Savarino, J.; Erbland, J.; Vicars, W. C.; Preunkert, S.; Martins, J. F.; Johnson, M. S.

    2015-10-01

    Stable isotope ratios of nitrate preserved in deep ice cores are expected to provide unique and valuable information regarding paleoatmospheric processes. However, due to the post-depositional loss of nitrate in snow, this information may be erased or significantly modified by physical or photochemical processes before preservation in ice. We investigated the role of solar UV photolysis in the post-depositional modification of nitrate mass and stable isotope ratios at Dome C, Antarctica, during the austral summer of 2011/2012. Two 30 cm snow pits were filled with homogenized drifted snow from the vicinity of the base. One of these pits was covered with a plexiglass plate that transmits solar UV radiation, while the other was covered with a different plexiglass plate having a low UV transmittance. Samples were then collected from each pit at a 2-5 cm depth resolution and a 10-day frequency. At the end of the season, a comparable nitrate mass loss was observed in both pits for the top-level samples (0-7 cm) attributed to mixing with the surrounding snow. After excluding samples impacted by the mixing process, we derived an average apparent nitrogen isotopic fractionation (15ϵapp) of -67.8 ± 12 ‰ for the snow nitrate exposed to solar UV using the nitrate stable isotope ratios and concentration measurements. For the control samples in which solar UV was blocked, an apparent average 15ϵapp value of -12.0 ± 1.7 ‰ was derived. This difference strongly suggests that solar UV photolysis plays a dominant role in driving the isotopic fractionation of nitrate in snow. We have estimated a purely photolytic nitrogen isotopic fractionation (15ϵphoto) of -55.8 ± 12.0 ‰ from the difference in the derived apparent isotopic fractionations of the two experimental fields, as both pits were exposed to similar physical processes except exposure to solar UV. This value is in close agreement with the 15ϵphoto value of -47.9 ± 6.8

  20. The influence of photochemical fractionation on the evolution of the nitrogen isotope ratios - detailed analysis of current photochemical loss rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandt, K. E.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Westlake, J.; Magee, B.; Liang, M. C.; Bell, J.

    2012-04-01

    Tracking the evolution of molecular nitrogen over geologic time scales requires an understanding of the loss rates of both isotopologues (14N2 and 14N15N) as a function of time (e.g. Mandt et al., 2009). The relative loss rates, if different, “fractionate” the isotopes so that the ratios change as a function of time, and rate at which the ratio changes due to a loss process is determined by the “fractionation factor.” Photochemistry is known to fractionate the nitrogen isotopes in Titan’s atmosphere by preferentially removing the heavy isotope from the molecular nitrogen inventory and increasing the ratio (heavy/light) in one of the primary photochemical products, HCN. This fractionation occurs due to a selective shielding during photodissociation where the photons that dissociate 14N15N penetrate deeper into the atmosphere (Liang et al., 2007) than the photons that dissociate 14N14N. Two methods can be used to determine the photochemical fractionation factor, f. The first approach for calculating f is based on the isotopic ratios of the photochemical source and product, as measured by the Huygens Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) (Niemann et al., 2010) and the Cassini Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) (Vinatier et al., 2007), respectively. The second method uses the loss rates and the ratio of the source and requires detailed photochemical modeling to ensure that the loss rates are calculated accurately. We compare these two methods for calculating the photochemical fractionation factor for N2 by using measurements of the isotopic ratios of N2 and HCN combined with an updated coupled ion-neutral-thermal model (De la Haye et al., 2008). We find that accurate magnetospheric electron fluxes and a rotating model that accounts for diurnal variations are essential for accurate calculations of the HCN densities and for determination of the fractionation factor through photochemical modeling. References: De La Haye, V., J. H. Waite, Jr., T. E. Cravens, I. P

  1. N-C isotopic investigation of a zeolite-amended agricultural field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferretti, Giacomo; Natali, Claudio; Faccini, Barbara; Di Giuseppe, Dario; Bianchini, Gianluca; Coltorti, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a C and N isotopic investigation in the soil-plant system of the ZeoLIFE project experimental field have been carried out. Since many years, natural and NH4-enriched zeolites have been used as soil amendant in agricultural context in order to reduce N losses, increase NUE (Nitrogen Use Efficiency) and crop yield. Nevertheless up to now there are no studies that, using the stable isotopes approach, highlighted the interaction between zeolites and plants in agricultural systems. The main aims of this study is to verify if natural zeolites amendment can enhance chemical fertilization efficiency and if N transfer from NH4-enriched zeolites to plants really occurs. Plants grown following traditional cultivation methods (with no zeolite addition) and plants grown on soils amended with natural and NH4-enriched zeolites (the latter obtained after mixing with pig-slurry with a very high 15N) were compared for two cultivation cycles (maize and wheat). As widely known, plants grown under conventional farming systems (use of chemical fertilizers as urea) and plants grown under organic farming can be discriminated by the isotopic signatures of plant tissues. For both years the main results of the study reveals that plants grown on plots amended with natural zeolites generally have their nitrogen isotopic signature more similar to that of the chemical fertilizers employed during the cultivation with respect to the plants cultivated in the non-amended plot. This suggests an enhanced N uptake by the plant from this specific N source with respect to the non-amended plot. On the other hand, plants grown on NH4-enriched zeolites registered a higher 15N, approaching the pig-slurry isotopic signature, confirming that this material can constitute an N pool for plants at least for two cultivation cycles. The distinct agricultural practices seem to be reflected in the plant physiology as recorded by the carbon discrimination factor (13C) which generally increases

  2. Reexamination of magnetic isotope and field effects on adenosine triphosphate production by creatine kinase

    PubMed Central

    Crotty, Darragh; Silkstone, Gary; Poddar, Soumya; Ranson, Richard; Prina-Mello, Adriele; Wilson, Michael T.; Coey, J. M. D.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of isotopically enriched magnesium on the creatine kinase catalyzed phosphorylation of adenosine diphosphate is examined in two independent series of experiments where adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentrations were determined by a luciferase-linked luminescence end-point assay or a real-time spectrophotometric assay. No increase was observed between the rates of ATP production with natural Mg, 24Mg, and 25Mg, nor was any significant magnetic field effect observed in magnetic fields from 3 to 1,000 mT. Our results are in conflict with those reported by Buchachenko et al. [J Am Chem Soc 130:12868–12869 (2008)], and they challenge these authors’ general claims that a large (two- to threefold) magnetic isotope effect is “universally observable” for ATP-producing enzymes [Her Russ Acad Sci 80:22–28 (2010)] and that “enzymatic phosphorylation is an ion-radical, electron-spin-selective process” [Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 101:10793–10796 (2005)]. PMID:22198842

  3. Influence of nuclear spin on chemical reactions: Magnetic isotope and magnetic field effects (A Review)

    PubMed Central

    Turro, Nicholas J.

    1983-01-01

    The course of chemical reactions involving radical pairs may depend on occurrence and orientation of nuclear spins in the pairs. The influence of nuclear spins is maximized when the radical pairs are confined to a space that serves as a cage that allows a certain degree of independent diffusional and rotational motion of the partners of the pair but that also encourages reencounters of the partners within a period which allows the nuclear spins to operate on the odd electron spins of the pair. Under the proper conditions, the nuclear spins can induce intersystem crossing between triplet and singlet states of radical pairs. It is shown that this dependence of intersystem crossing on nuclear spin leads to a magnetic isotope effect on the chemistry of radical pairs which provides a means of separating isotopes on the basis of nuclear spins rather than nuclear masses and also leads to a magnetic field effect on the chemistry of radical pairs which provides a means of influencing the course of polymerization by the application of weak magnetic fields. PMID:16593273

  4. Quasi-static evolution of sheared force-free fields and the solar flare problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aly, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    Some new results are given showing the possible evolution of a two-dimensional force-free field in the half-space z greater than 0 toward an open field. This evolution is driven by shearing motions applied to the feet of the field lines on the boundary z = 0. The consequences of these results for a model of the two-ribbon solar flare are discussed.

  5. Lead isotope variability of fine-grained river sediments in Tibetan Plateau water catchments: Implications for geochemical provinces and crustal evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Hongbing; Chen, Jun; Rao, Wenbo; Yang, Jiedong; Ji, Junfeng; Chivas, Allan R.

    2014-03-01

    The crustal structure of the Tibetan Plateau records the dynamic processes of several terranes that underwent disaggregation, aggregation, and amalgamation. The dynamic evolution of continental crusts is best understood from these three processes. However, the detailed geochemical province division of the Tibetan Plateau and the palaeo-tectonic affinity or evolution of terranes remains unclear. In this paper, the acid-insoluble fraction of fine-grained river sediments from catchments in the whole Tibetan Plateau was measured for lead isotopes and trace elements. This study aims to reveal lead isotopic characteristics, to delineate different lead isotope geochemical provinces, and to trace and uncover the tectonic affinities of various terranes in the Tibetan Plateau. Results show that by weak acid chemical treatment, the characteristics of the Pb isotopes of fine-grained river sediments can be utilized to represent and discriminate geochemical provinces. The characteristics of Pb isotopes enable the identification of different geochemical provinces and the palaeo-affinity of various tectonic units. Constrained by tectonic evolution, the Tibetan Plateau tectonic units can be divided into the following five Pb isotope geochemical provinces: 1) Qilian Terrane; 2) Northern Tibetan Plateau geochemical province, including Eastern Kunlun-Qaidam, Songpan-Ganzi and Eastern Qiangtang Terrane; 3) Northern Lhasa Terrane; 4) Southern Lhasa Terrane, and 5) Himalaya Terrane. In relation to the controversy concerning the palaeo-affinity of the Qilian and Songpan-Ganzi Terranes, the Pb isotopic compositions of fine-grained river sediments suggest that they were much more likely separated from the Yangtze Craton than from the North China Craton. The characteristics of Pb isotopes and trace elements of the Eastern Kunlun-Qaidam and Eastern Qiangtang Terrane show some similarities with the Songpan-Ganzi Terrane, which indicate that they also possibly originated from the disaggregation

  6. Compilation of gas geochemistry and isotopic analyses from The Geysers geothermal field: 1978-1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Janik, Cathy; Fahlquist, Lynne; Johnson, Linda S.

    1999-01-01

    We present 45 chemical and isotopic analyses from well discharges at The Geysers geothermal field and summarize the most notable geochemical trends. H2 and H2S concentrations are highest in the Southeast Geysers, where steam samples have δD and δ18O values that reflect replenishment by meteoric water. In the Northwest Geysers, samples are enriched in gas/steam, CO2, CH4, and N2/Ar relative to the rest of the field, and contain steam that is elevated in δD and δ18O, most likely due to substantial contributions from Franciscan-derived fluids. The δ13C of CO2, trends in CH4 vs. N2, and abundance of NH3 indicate that the bulk of the non-condensable gases are derived from thermal breakdown of organic materials in Franciscan meta-sediments.

  7. Nd and Pb isotope evolution of the Indian Ocean during Termination 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, D. J.; Piotrowski, A. M.; Galy, A.

    2009-12-01

    Neodymium isotopes in the modern oceans appear to behave as a quasi-conservative tracer for water mass sourcing and mixing. Therefore, temporal changes in water mass geometry can potentially be reconstructed from time series of ɛNd recovered from the authigenic component of marine sediments [1]. We use this approach to investigate glacial to interglacial changes in water mass sources to the deep Indian Ocean, focusing on Termination 1. One important consideration is the reliable recovery of a seawater signal, which we address using coretop and downcore tests on both sediment leachates and foraminifera. In addition, recent studies have suggested that boundary exchange [2] and/or reversible scavenging [3] may be important in controlling the ɛNd distribution in the modern oceans, which could complicate reconstructions of past water mass mixing. We test this using coupled neodymium and lead isotope measurements. Since Pb has a shorter deepwater residence time (50-400 years) than Nd (500-1000 years), its isotopic composition should be more sensitive to local boundary exchange and water mass mixing over shorter path lengths, whereas Nd isotopes respond to longer path length circulation and more distal inputs. Western Indian Ocean sediment core WIND 28K (10°S, 52°E, 4157m depth, [4]) is situated within the deep western boundary current and is therefore well placed to provide a record of deep water inflow. A decrease of around 3 ɛNd units through the deglaciation as well as millennial variability could be interpreted in terms of changing export of North Atlantic Deep Water into the Southern Ocean and hence Indian Ocean, in support of the recent Central Equatorial Indian Ocean ɛNd record [5]. Deglacial changes in the Pb isotope record can be described by two component mixing which might indicate water mass mixing or a change in the continental sources of Pb. We also consider the incongruent weathering mechanism which has been proposed to explain a similar pattern of

  8. Isotope selective photodissociation of N2 by the interstellar radiation field and cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heays, Alan N.; Visser, Ruud; Gredel, Roland; Ubachs, Wim; Lewis, Brenton R.; Gibson, Stephen T.; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    2014-02-01

    Context. Photodissociation of 14N2 and 14N 15N occurs in interstellar clouds, circumstellar envelopes, protoplanetary discs, and other environments due to ultraviolet radiation originating from stellar sources and the presence of cosmic rays. This source of N atoms initiates the formation of more complex N-bearing species and may influence their isotopic composition. Aims: We study the photodissociation rates of 14N 15N by ultraviolet continuum radiation and both isotopologues in a field of cosmic ray induced photons. To determine the effect of these on the isotopic composition of more complex molecules. Methods: High-resolution theoretical photodissociation cross sections of N2 are used from an accurate and comprehensive quantum-mechanical model of the molecule based on laboratory experiments. A similarly high-resolution spectrum of H2 emission following interactions with cosmic rays has been constructed. The spectroscopic data are used to calculate photodissociation rates which are then input into isotopically differentiated chemical models, describing an interstellar cloud and a protoplanetary disc. Results: The photodissociation rate of 14N 15N in a Draine field assuming 30 K excitation is 1.73 × 10-10 s-1, within 4% of the rate for 14N2, and the rate due to cosmic ray induced photons assuming an H2 ionisation rate of ζ = 10-16 s-1 is about 10-15 s-1, with up to a factor of 10 difference between isotopologues. Shielding functions for 14N15N by 14N2, H2, and H are presented. Incorporating these into an interstellar cloud model, an enhancement of the atomic 15N/14N ratio over the elemental value is obtained due to the self-shielding of external radiation at an extinction of about 1.5 mag. This effect is larger where assumed grain growth has reduced the opacity of dust to ultraviolet radiation. The transfer of photolytic isotopic fractionation of N and N2 to other molecules is demonstrated to be significant in a protoplanetary disc model with grain growth, and

  9. Evolution of Nd and Pb isotopes in Central Pacific seawater from ferromanganese crusts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ling, H.F.; Burton, K.W.; O'Nions, R. K.; Kamber, B.S.; Von Blanckenburg, F.; Gibb, A.J.; Hein, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    Hydrogenetic ferromanganese crusts incorporate elements from ambient seawater during their growth on seamounts. By analysing Nd, Pb and Be isotope profiles within crusts it is possible to reconstruct seawater tracer histories. Depth profiles of 10Be/9Be ratios in three Pacific ferromanganese crusts have been used to obtain growth rates which are between 1.4 and 3.8 mm/Ma. Nd and Pb isotopes provide intact records of isotopic variations in Pacific seawater over the last 20 Ma or more. There were only small changes in Pb isotope composition in the last 20 Ma. This indicates a constant Pb composition for the erosional sources and suggests further that erosional Nd inputs may have been uniform too. ??ND values vary considerably with time and most probably reflect changes in ocean circulation. The ??ND values of the crusts not only vary as a function of age but also as a function of water depth. From 25 to 0 Ma, crust VA13/2 from 4.8 km water depth has a similar pattern of ??ND variation to the two shallower crusts from 1.8 and 2.3 km, but about 1.0 to 1.5 units more negative. This suggests that ??ND stratification in Pacific seawater, as demonstrated for the present day, has been maintained for at least 20 Ma. Each crust shows a decrease in ??ND from 3-5 Ma to the present, which is interpreted in terms of an increase in the NADW component present in the Pacific. From 10 to 3-5 Ma ago the crusts show an increase in ??ND. This suggests a decreasing role for a deep water source with ??ND less than circum-Pacific sources. In this regard the Panamanian gateway restriction from ???10 Ma with final closure at 3-5 Ma may have played an important role in reducing access of Atlantic-derived Nd to the Pacific.

  10. Trace sulfate in mid-Proterozoic carbonates and the sulfur isotope record of biospheric evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gellatly, Anne M.; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2005-08-01

    Concentrations of oceanic and atmospheric oxygen have varied over geologic time as a function of sulfur and carbon cycling at or near the Earth's surface. This balance is expressed in the sulfur isotope composition of seawater sulfate. Given the near absence of gypsum in pre-Phanerozoic sediments, trace amounts of carbonate-associated sulfate (CAS) within limestones or dolostones provide the best available constraints on the isotopic composition of sulfate in Precambrian seawater. Although absolute CAS concentrations, which range from those below detection to ˜120 ppm sulfate in this study, may be compromised by diagenesis, the sulfur isotope compositions can be buffered sufficiently to retain primary values. Stratigraphically controlled δ 34S measurements for CAS from three mid-Proterozoic carbonate successions (˜1.2 Ga Mescal Limestone, Apache Group, Arizona, USA; ˜1.45-1.47 Ga Helena and Newland formations, Belt Supergroup, Montana, USA; and ˜1.65 Ga Paradise Creek Formation, McNamara Group, NW Queensland, Australia) show large isotopic variability (+9.1‰ to +18.9‰, -1.1‰ to +27.3‰, and +14.1‰ to +37.3‰, respectively) over stratigraphic intervals of ˜50 to 450 m. This rapid variability, ranging from scattered to highly systematic, and overall low CAS abundances can be linked to sulfate concentrations in the mid-Proterozoic ocean that were substantially lower than those of the Phanerozoic but higher than values inferred for the Archean. Results from the Belt Supergroup specifically corroborate previous arguments for seawater contributions to the basin. Limited sulfate availability that tracks the oxygenation history of the early atmosphere is also consistent with the possibility of extensive deep-ocean sulfate reduction, the scarcity of bedded gypsum, and the stratigraphic δ 34S trends and 34S enrichments commonly observed for iron sulfides of mid-Proterozoic age.

  11. Nutrient cycling in the Atlantic basin: The evolution of nitrate isotope signatures in water masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuerena, R. E.; Ganeshram, R. S.; Geibert, W.; Fallick, A. E.; Dougans, J.; Tait, A.; Henley, S. F.; Woodward, E. M. S.

    2015-10-01

    A basin-wide transect of nitrate isotopes (δ15NNO3, δ18ONO3), across the UK GEOTRACES 40°S transect in the South Atlantic is presented. This data set is used to investigate Atlantic nutrient cycling and the communication pathways of nitrogen cycling processes in the global ocean. Intermediate waters formed in the subantarctic are enriched in δ15NNO3 and δ18ONO3 from partial utilization of nitrate by phytoplankton and distant denitrification processes, transporting heavy isotope signatures to the subtropical Atlantic. Water mass modification through the Atlantic is investigated by comparing data from 40°S (South Atlantic) and 30°N (North Atlantic). This reveals that nitrate in the upper intermediate waters is regenerated as it transits through the subtropical Atlantic, as evidenced by decreases in δ18ONO3. We document diazotrophy-producing high N:P particle ratios (18-21:1) for remineralization, which is further confirmed by a decrease in δ15NNO3 through the subtropical Atlantic. These modifications influence the isotopic signatures of the North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) which is subsequently exported from the Atlantic to the Southern Ocean. This study reveals the dominance of recycling processes and diazotrophy on nitrate cycling in the Atlantic. These processes provide a source of low δ15NNO3 to the Southern Ocean via the NADW, to counteract enrichment in δ15NNO3 from water column denitrification in the Indo/Pacific basins. We hence identify the Southern Ocean as a key hub through which denitrification and N2 fixation communicate in the ocean through deepwater masses. Therefore, the balancing of the oceanic N budget and isotopic signatures require time scales of oceanic mixing.

  12. Osmium and neodymium isotopic constraints on the temporal and spatial evolution of Siberian flood basalt sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horan, M.F.; Walker, R.J.; Fedorenko, V.A.; Czamanske, G.K.

    1995-01-01

    Picrites from the Gudchikhinsky suite, the oldest rocks examined, have ??Os of +5.3 to +6.1 and ??Nd of +3.7 to +4.0. The osmium and neodymium isotopic compositions of these rocks are similar to some modern ocean-island basalts (OIB), consistent with their derivation from an mantle plume. Picrites from the stratigraphically higher Tuklonsky suite have similar ??Os of +3.4 to +6.5, but ??Nd of -0.9 to -2.6. The similar ??Os, but lower ??Nd , suggest that some magmas from the same OIB-type, mantle source were contaminated by lithospheric components. A differentiated ankaramite flow, associated with the top of the stratigraphically higher Morongovsky suite, has ??Os of +9.8 to +10.2 and ??Nd of +1.3 to +1.4. The higher ??Os may indicate that the plume source was heterogeneous with respect to osmium isotopic composition, consistent with osmium isotopic measurements in rocks from other plume sources. Mg-rich, alkaline rocks (meymechites) from the Guli area that erupted much nearer the end of the flood-basalt event have ??Os of -1.2 to -2.6 and ??Nd of +3.7 to +4.9. These rocks were probably produced by low degrees of partial melting of mantle after the main stages of flood-basalt production. -from Authors

  13. Isotopic effects of nitrate photochemistry in snow: a field study at Dome C, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berhanu, T. A.; Savarino, J.; Erbland, J.; Vicars, W. C.; Preunkert, S.; Martins, J. F.; Johnson, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    Stable isotope ratios of nitrate preserved in deep ice cores are expected to provide unique and valuable information regarding paleo-atmospheric processes. However, due to the post-depositional loss of nitrate in snow, this information may be erased or significantly modified by physical or photochemical processes before preservation in ice. We have investigated the role of solar UV photolysis in the post-depositional modification of nitrate mass and stable isotope ratios at Dome C, Antarctica during the austral summer of 2011/12. Two 30 cm snow pits were filled with homogenized drifted snow from the vicinity of the base. One of these pits was covered with a plexiglass plate that transmits solar UV radiation, while the other was covered with a different plexiglass plate having a low UV transmittance. Samples were then collected from each pit at a 2-5 cm depth resolution and a 10 day frequency. At the end of the season, a comparable nitrate mass loss was observed in both pits for the top-level samples (0-7 cm). At deeper levels (7-30 cm), a significant nitrate mass loss (ca. 30%) was observed in the UV-exposed pit relative to the control field. From the nitrate stable isotope ratios and concentration losses measured in the snow nitrate exposed to solar UV, we have derived average apparent isotopic fractionations (15ϵ,18ϵ and 17E) of -67.8 ± 12‰, 12.5 ± 6.7‰ and 2.2 ± 1.4‰ for δ15N, δ18O, and Δ17O, respectively. These values are fairly stable throughout the season and are in close agreement with the apparent fractionations measured in natural snow at Dome C. Meanwhile, for the control samples in which solar UV was blocked, an apparent average 15ϵ value of -12.0 ± 1.7‰ was derived. The difference in the apparent 15ϵ values obtained for the two experimental fields strongly suggests that solar UV photolysis plays a dominant role in driving observed nitrate mass loss and resulting isotopic fractionation. We have

  14. Analysing the isotopic evolution of Silicon in the weathering zone by numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georg, B.; Opfergelt, S.

    2010-12-01

    The role of plant biological activity for the continental silicon cycle has been extensively discussed, and the overall consensus is that biological processes in terrestrial ecosystems play an important role in global Si mass balances. Biologically recycled Si fluxes are supposed to rival or in some cases exceed Si fluxes that stem from the dissolution of primary silicates (ALEXANDRE et al., 1997; DERRY et al., 2005). Discrepancies between Si weathering rates and denudation are mostly ascribed to the lock-up of Si in biogenic silica. However, for most settings it can be found that biological turnover is rather fast, and only a small proportion of biogenic Si is stored in long-term sinks, such as ‘old’ phytolith assemblages in soils (ALEXANDRE et al., 1997). The gross of the annually produced biogenic silica is returned to the topsoil as litter fall and subsequently re-dissolved during organic matter degradation. Previous models balanced the mass-fluxes between different Si pools. However, by only using Si fluxes, it is not possible to actually trace the material flux through various pools. In recent years a growing number of Si isotope data for weathering systems became available, and thus a new level of information is available to trace the reaction pathways of Si in the soil-biosphere-river system. Numerical models can be used to simulate matter exchange between pools and to simulate the isotopic fractionation and distribution in such an interlinked system in a temporal context. Preliminary results show that the formation of secondary minerals is the main process driving positive isotope composition in rivers. Although more Si is recycled through the biosphere, a fast turnover means that any significant isotope fractionation is counterbalanced when biogenic silica is returned to the soil system. The clay-pool is isotopically the lightest pool, followed by biosphere and finally dissolved Si in rivers. Once the biological cycle is in steady-state, it is mostly

  15. Field calibration of stable isotopes (δ18O) in coccoliths : Toward an accurate carbonate record-based reconstruction of the photic zone temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candelier, Y.; Minoletti, F.; Hermoso, M.; Probert, I.

    2010-12-01

    representative of the natural environment. This integrated approach coupling culture and field calibration enables getting reliable “correcting isotopic factors”, which may be applied on monospecific Neogene coccoliths to refine the evolution of SSTs or improve our knowledge of the behaviour of the thermocline in the past. Dudley, W. C et al. (1986), Mar Micropal, 10: 1-8. Minoletti, F. et al. (2009), Nat. Prot, 4. doi: 10.1038/nprot.2008.200 Ziveri, P., et al. (2003), Earth Planet Sc Lett, 210: 137-149.

  16. Corrigendum to "Coupled thermochemical, isotopic evolution and heat transfer simulations in highly irradiated UO2 nuclear fuel"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piro, M. H. A.; Banfield, J.; Clarno, K.; Simunovic, S.; Besmann, T. M.; Lewis, B. J.; Thompson, W. T.

    2016-09-01

    Figs. 7-9 in "Coupled thermochemical, isotopic evolution and heat transfer simulations in highly irradiated UO2 nuclear fuel" [1] have a consistent error corresponding to the relative proportions of iodine. Reported concentrations of iodine in the original manuscript are approximately ten times higher than expected, and are comparable in atomic proportions to cesium. One would expect that the amount of cesium would be about one order of magnitude greater than iodine based on the difference in fission yields of 235U and 239Pu. A practical consequence of this error would affect the predicted quantity and chemical composition of iodine on the fuel surface, which is related to iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking [2].

  17. Effect of aridification on carbon isotopic variation and ecologic evolution at 5.3 Ma in the Asian interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jimin; Lü, Tongyan; Gong, Yingzeng; Liu, Weiguo; Wang, Xu; Gong, Zhijun

    2013-10-01

    The Cenozoic era is marked by dramatic climatic and ecological changes. The timing of the emergence and the subsequent expansions of C4 grasses are prominent biological events on Earth. In China, thick Cenozoic deposits in the Tarim and Junggar Basins, which are located in the Asian interior, provide important geological archives for studying paleoenvironmental changes. Here we use carbon isotope compositions of organic matter to reconstruct the history of ecologic evolution during the late Cenozoic in the Tarim and Junggar Basins. The results show that there is a shift to slightly higher δ13C values at 5.3 Ma indicating a change in terrestrial ecosystems in the Asian interior driven by an increased regional aridity rather than decreasing atmospheric pCO2 levels. The weakened water vapor transportation related to the retreat of Paratethys Ocean and the enhanced rain shadow effect of mountain uplift during the latest Miocene mostly triggered this event.

  18. Shape evolution in the neutron-rich osmium isotopes: Prompt γ-ray spectroscopy of Os196

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, P. R.; Modamio, V.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.; Mengoni, D.; Lunardi, S.; Rodríguez, T. R.; Bazzacco, D.; Gadea, A.; Wheldon, C.; Alexander, T.; de Angelis, G.; Ashwood, N.; Barr, M.; Benzoni, G.; Birkenbach, B.; Bizzeti, P. G.; Bizzeti-Sona, A. M.; Bottoni, S.; Bowry, M.; Bracco, A.; Browne, F.; Bunce, M.; Camera, F.; Cederwall, B.; Corradi, L.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Désesquelles, P.; Eberth, J.; Farnea, E.; Fioretto, E.; Görgen, A.; Gottardo, A.; Grebosz, J.; Grente, L.; Hess, H.; Jungclaus, A.; Kokalova, Tz.; Korichi, A.; Korten, W.; Kuşoǧlu, A.; Lenzi, S.; Leoni, S.; Ljungvall, J.; Maron, G.; Meczynski, W.; Melon, B.; Menegazzo, R.; Michelagnoli, C.; Mijatović, T.; Million, B.; Molini, P.; Montagnoli, G.; Montanari, D.; Napoli, D. R.; Nolan, P.; Oziol, Ch.; Podolyák, Zs.; Pollarolo, G.; Pullia, A.; Quintana, B.; Recchia, F.; Reiter, P.; Roberts, O. J.; Rosso, D.; Şahin, E.; Salsac, M.-D.; Scarlassara, F.; Sferrazza, M.; Simpson, J.; Söderström, P.-A.; Stefanini, A. M.; Stezowski, O.; Szilner, S.; Theisen, Ch.; Ur, C. A.; Walshe, J.

    2014-08-01

    The shape transition in the neutron-rich Os isotopes is studied by investigating the neutron-rich 196Os nucleus through in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy using a two-proton transfer reaction from a 198Pt target to a 82Se beam. The beam-like recoils were detected and identified with the large-acceptance magnetic spectrometer PRISMA, and the coincident γ rays were measured with the advanced gamma tracking array (AGATA) demonstrator. The de-excitation of the low-lying levels of the yrast-band of 196Os were identified for the first time. The results are compared with state-of-the-art beyond-mean-field calculations, performed for the even-even 188-198Os isotopes. The new results suggest a smooth transition in the Os isotopes from a more axial rotational behavior towards predominately vibrational nuclei through triaxial configurations. An almost perfect γ-unstable/triaxial rotor yrast band is predicted for 196Os which is in agreement with the experimentally measured excited states.

  19. Chronologic and isotopic framework for early Proterozoic crustal evolution in the eastern Mojave Desert region, SE California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wooden, J.L.; Miller, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    The Early Proterozoic geologic evolution of the region, as defined by characteristics of its supracrustal rocks, granitoids, metamorphism, structural history, and Pb and Nd isotopic signature, contrasts sharply with other Proterozoic provinces of the southwestern US. The oldest supracrustal rocks contain zircons over 2.0 Ga, corroborating Nd isotopic evidence for a much older crust here. Granitoids widely emplaced within these supracrustal rocks range from 1.76 to 1.64 Ga. The earlier plutons and surrounding supracrustal rocks were metamorphosed to granulite and high amphibolite facies throughout the province at about 1705 Ma in a migmatite-producing event that we term (informally) the Ivanpah orogeny. Subsequent granitoids, emplaced from 1.69 to 1.67 Ga, were voluminous along a north trending belt in the middle of the Mojave province. Younger plutons were emplaced at about 1.66 Ga in several places and at about 1.64 Ga along the extreme southern part of the province. -from Authors

  20. Pore water evolution during sediment burial from isotopic and mineral chemistry of calcite, dolomite and siderite concretions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, C. D.; Coleman, M. L.; Love, L. G.

    1986-10-01

    Coal measures often contain concretions; segregations of diagenetic minerals originally formed within unconsolidated sediments. Three different types (calcite/pyrite, dolomite/pyrite and siderite) occurring spatially quite close together in the Central Pennine Region of England vary widely in carbon isotope composition (+10.35%. > δ13C > -21.49%.) and in major cation chemistry (Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn). Within some siderite concretions, very high Mn/Fe ratios were found in central subsamples; these were also most enriched in 13C. The Fe/Mg ratio decreases systematically from centre to edge (early, shallow to deeper, later precipitation). The calcite/pyrite and dolomite/pyrite concretions developed completely prior to significant burial. Both have high Mn/Fe ratios but negative δ 13C values (calcite -21.49%., dolomite -8.67 to -10.48%.). All of these patterns can be equated precisely with theories of pore water evolution developed on the basis of geochemical investigations of modem sediments. Microbial processes (sulphate reduction, methanogenesis) contributed significantly, as did thermal decarboxylation (to siderite precipitated at considerable burial depth). Mn(IV) and Fe(III) acted differentially as oxidants; producing CO 2 and increasing alkalinity. The interplay of fresh and marine depositional waters is seen most obviously in the presence or absence of sulphate reduction. This controlled mineral type (iron sulphide or carbonate) as well as isotopic and mineral chemistry.

  1. Faculty Development in Medicine: A Field in Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skeff, Kelley M.; Stratos, Georgette A.; Mount, Jane F. S.

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on the evolution of faculty development in medicine. Of note, improving teaching in medical education is not a new concept. At a minimum, it was seriously discussed by pioneers like George Miller and Steve Abrahamson as early as the 1950s [Simpson & Bland (2002). Stephen Abrahamson, PhD, ScD, educationist: A stranger in a kind…

  2. Partitioning evapotranspiration - Testing the Craig and Gordon model with field measurements of oxygen isotope ratios of evaporative fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubbert, Maren; Cuntz, Matthias; Piayda, Arndt; Maguás, Cristina; Werner, Christiane

    2013-07-01

    Stable oxygen isotopes of water provide a valuable tracer for water movements within ecosystems and are used to estimate the contribution of transpiration to total ecosystem evapotranspiration (ft). We tested the Craig and Gordon equation against continuous field measurements of isotopic composition of evaporation and assessed the impact for partitioning evapotranspiration. Therefore, evaporation (E) and its isotopic signature (δ18OE) on bare soil plots, as well as evapotranspiration (ET) and its corresponding isotopic composition of (δ18OET) of an herbaceous layer was measured with a cavity ring-down spectrometer connected to a soil chamber on a field site in central Portugal. We quantified the variation in δ18OE arising from uncertainties in the determination of environmental input variables to the Craig and Gordon equation: the isotope signature (δ18Oe) and the temperature at the evaporating site (Te), and the kinetic fractionation factor (αk). We could hence quantify ft based on measured δ18OET, modeled δ18OE from observed soil water isotopic composition at the evaporating site (δ18Oe), and modeled δ18O of transpiration (δ18OT) from observed total soil water isotopic composition. Our results demonstrate that predicting δ18OE using the Craig and Gordon equation leads to good agreement with measured δ18OE given that the temperature and 18O isotope profiles of the soil are thoroughly characterized. However, modeled δ18OE is highly sensitive to changes in Te and δ18Oe as well as αk. This markedly affected the partition results of transpiration and evaporation from the total ET flux: The fraction of transpiration (ft) varied strongly using different formulations for αk and assuming steady or non-steady state transpiration. These findings provide a first comparison of laser-based and modeled isotopic compositions of evaporation based on the Craig and Gordon equation under field conditions. This is of special interest for studies using stable isotopes

  3. Applications of stable isotopes in hydrological studies of Mt. Apo geothermal field, Philippines

    SciTech Connect

    Salonga, N.D.; Aragon, G.M.; Nogara, J.B.; Sambrano, B.G.

    1996-12-31

    The local precipitation in Mt. Apo is depleted of heavy isotopes owing to high elevation and landward location of the field. Rainwaters infiltrate the shallow grounds, circulate in short distances with almost no interaction with the host bed rocks, and effuse in the surface as cold springs. Lakes and rivers are affected by surface evaporation while the acid SO{sub 4} springs are affected by both evaporation and steam-heating. Only the neutral-pH Cl springs have the signature of the deep thermal fluids. The parent fluids of the deep thermal brine contain Cl of 4,800 to 5,000 mg/kg, {delta}{sup 18}O of -4.62 to -4.13 {per_thousand} and {delta}{sup 2}H of -60.0 to -57.8 {per_thousand}. Inside the Sandawa Collapse, boiling of the parent fluids resulted in a two-phase reservoir with lighter isotope contents. The thermal fluids laterally flow towards the west where they are affected by cooling and mixing of cold waters. Deep water recharge has {delta}{sup 18}O of -10.00 {per_thousand} and {delta}{sup 2}H = -61.20 {per_thousand} which come from the upper slopes of Sandawa Collapse (1580-1700 mASL).

  4. Isotope evolution in the HIMU reservoir beneath St. Helena: Implications for the mantle recycling of U and Th

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanyu, Takeshi; Kawabata, Hiroshi; Tatsumi, Yoshiyuki; Kimura, Jun-Ichi; Hyodo, Hironobu; Sato, Keiko; Miyazaki, Takashi; Chang, Qing; Hirahara, Yuka; Takahashi, Toshiro; Senda, Ryoko; Nakai, Shun'ichi

    2014-10-01

    HIMU (high-μ; 238U/204Pb) is a mantle reservoir that has been thought to form by subduction and subsequent storage of ancient oceanic crust and lithosphere in the mantle. In order to constrain the processes that acted on subducted materials over several billion years, we present precise Pb-Sr-Nd-Hf-He isotopic data together with 40Ar/39Ar and K/Ar ages of HIMU lavas from St. Helena in the Atlantic. Clinopyroxene separates were analyzed together with whole-rock samples to better describe the geochemical characteristics of the HIMU component. Although isotopic variations are small in the St. Helena lavas (20.6-21.0 for 206Pb/204Pb) between 12 and 8 Ma, the younger lavas have more HIMU-like isotopic compositions than the older lavas. The mixing arrays defined by these lavas are remarkably similar to those observed in HIMU lavas from Austral Islands in the Pacific, suggesting that the two HIMU reservoirs located in different mantle domains are characterized by similar isotopic compositions with radiogenic 206Pb/204Pb and 208Pb/204Pb, enriched Nd and Hf isotopes, depleted Sr isotopes, and radiogenic 3He/4He. However, there is a significant difference between the St. Helena and Austral Islands lavas in 207Pb/204Pb. The St. Helena lavas show systematically higher 207Pb/204Pb for a given 206Pb/204Pb. Lead isotope evolution models suggest that both HIMU reservoirs formed around 2 Ga; however, the HIMU reservoir for St. Helena is about 0.3 Ga older than that for Austral Islands. The relation between 206Pb/204Pb and 208Pb/204Pb could reflect the time-integrated κ (232Th/238U) in the components. The HIMU components for St. Helena and Austral Islands have κ values between 3.3 and 3.7, which are intermediate between the present-day fresh mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB; 2.6-3.2) and the chondritic silicate Earth (∼4). This is consistent with the model that the HIMU precursor is subducted oceanic crust created around 2 Ga from depleted upper mantle, in which κ monotonously

  5. Evolution of nuclear ground-state properties of neutron-deficient isotopes around Z =82 from precision mass measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhm, Ch.; Borgmann, Ch.; Audi, G.; Beck, D.; Blaum, K.; Breitenfeldt, M.; Cakirli, R. B.; Cocolios, T. E.; Eliseev, S.; George, S.; Herfurth, F.; Herlert, A.; Kowalska, M.; Kreim, S.; Lunney, D.; Manea, V.; Minaya Ramirez, E.; Naimi, S.; Neidherr, D.; Rosenbusch, M.; Schweikhard, L.; Stanja, J.; Wang, M.; Wolf, R. N.; Zuber, K.

    2014-10-01

    High-precision mass measurements of neutron-deficient Tl (A =184, 186, 190, 193-195, 198) isotopes as well as Pb (A =202,208), Fr (A =207,208), and Ra (A =224) are performed with the Penning-trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN. The improved precision of the mass data now allows the study of subtle odd-even effects. The gradual development of collectivity with the removal of protons from the magic Z =82 core is analyzed by combining the new mass results with nuclear charge-radii data and mean-field model predictions.

  6. Application of relativistic mean field and effective field theory densities to scattering observables for Ca isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuyan, M.; Panda, R. N.; Routray, T. R.; Patra, S. K.

    2010-12-01

    In the framework of relativistic mean field (RMF) theory, we have calculated the density distribution of protons and neutrons for Ca40,42,44,48 with NL3 and G2 parameter sets. The microscopic proton-nucleus optical potentials for p+Ca40,42,44,48 systems are evaluated from the Dirac nucleon-nucleon scattering amplitude and the density of the target nucleus using relativistic-Love-Franey and McNeil-Ray-Wallace parametrizations. We have estimated the scattering observables, such as the elastic differential scattering cross section, analyzing power and the spin observables with the relativistic impulse approximation (RIA). The results have been compared with the experimental data for a few selective cases and we find that the use of density as well as the scattering matrix parametrizations are crucial for the theoretical prediction.

  7. Application of relativistic mean field and effective field theory densities to scattering observables for Ca isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Bhuyan, M.; Panda, R. N.; Routray, T. R.; Patra, S. K.

    2010-12-15

    In the framework of relativistic mean field (RMF) theory, we have calculated the density distribution of protons and neutrons for {sup 40,42,44,48}Ca with NL3 and G2 parameter sets. The microscopic proton-nucleus optical potentials for p+{sup 40,42,44,48}Ca systems are evaluated from the Dirac nucleon-nucleon scattering amplitude and the density of the target nucleus using relativistic-Love-Franey and McNeil-Ray-Wallace parametrizations. We have estimated the scattering observables, such as the elastic differential scattering cross section, analyzing power and the spin observables with the relativistic impulse approximation (RIA). The results have been compared with the experimental data for a few selective cases and we find that the use of density as well as the scattering matrix parametrizations are crucial for the theoretical prediction.

  8. Re-Os Isotopic Constraints on the Chemical Evolution and Differentiation of the Martian Mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, Alan D.; Walker, Richard J.

    2002-01-01

    The (187)Re-187Os isotopic systematics of SNC meteorites, thought to be from Mars, provide valuable information regarding the chemical processes that affected the Martian mantle, particularly with regard to the relative abundances of highly siderophile elements (HSE). Previously published data (Birck and Allegre 1994, Brandon et al. 2000), and new data obtained since these studies, indicate that the HSE and Os isotopic composition of the Martian mantle was primarily set in its earliest differentiation history. If so, then these meteorites provide key constraints on the processes that lead to variation in HSE observed in not only Mars, but also Earth, the Moon and other rocky bodies in the Solar System. Processes that likely have an effect on the HSE budgets of terrestrial mantles include core formation, magma ocean crystallization, development of juvenile crust, and the addition of a late veneer. Each of these processes will result in different HSE variation and the isotopic composition of mantle materials and mantle derived lavas. Two observations on the SNC data to present provide a framework for which to test the importance of each of these processes. First, the concentrations of Re and Os in SNC meteorites indicate that they are derived from a mantle that has similar concentrations to the Earth's mantle. Such an observation is consistent with a model where a chondritic late veneer replenished the Earth and Martian mantles subsequent to core formation on each planet. Alternative models to explain this observation do exist, but will require additional data to test the limitations of each. Second, Re-Os isotopic results from Brandon et al. (2000) and new data presented here, show that initial yos correlates with variations in the short-lived systems of (182)Hf- (182)W and (142)Sm-142Nd in the SNC meteorites (epsilon(sub W) and epsilon(sub 142Nd)). These systematics require an isolation of mantle reservoirs during the earliest differentiation history of Mars, and

  9. Trace element and isotopic constraints on magmatic evolution at Lassen volcanic center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bullen, T.D.; Clynne, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    Magmatic evolution at the Lassen volcanic center (LVC) is characterized by a transition from predominantly andesitic to predominantly silicic volcanism with time. Magmas of the andesitic, or "Brokeoff phase' of volcanism range in composition from basaltic andesite to dacite, whereas those of silicic, or "Lassen phase' range in composition from basaltic andesite to rhyolite. The compositions of magmas from each phase define well organized but distinct variation trends. Magmatic evolution at LVC can be viewed in terms of a series of mantle melting events that subsequently stimulated melting in a progressively increasing volume of the lower crust. -from Authors

  10. Geochemical and isotopic perspectives on the origin and evolution of the Siletzia Terrane.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, B. A.; Weis, D.; Mullen, E.; Kerr, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Siletzia terrane, located in the Cascadia forearc region of Oregon, Washington and Vancouver Island, consists of a series of accreted basaltic pillow lavas, massive flows and intrusive sheets. It represents a late Paleocene-Eocene oceanic large igneous province (LIP), previously proposed to represent an accreted oceanic plateau, hotspot island chain, backarc basin, island arc, or a sequence of slab window volcanics formed by ridge subduction. A province-wide geochemical reassessment of the terrane, including new high precision Sr-Pb-Nd-Hf isotope data on basaltic samples, has been used to assess the validity of the proposed tectonomagmatic models for Siletzia. The trace element data show REE patterns that are flat to LREE enriched with an absence of any arc signatures. These features are comparable to other oceanic plateaus such as the Ontong Java and the Caribbean and so therefore support a mantle plume origin. Initial isotope ratios range from 206Pb/204Pb = 18.869 - 19.673, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.527 - 15.609, 208Pb/204Pb = 38.551 - 39.220, ɛHf = +9.0 - 14.8, ɛNd = +5.0 - 8.0 and 87Sr/86Sr = 0.70304 - 0.70397. The isotope signatures become more varied southward across the terrane and reveal two trends: i) HIMU-DMM and ii) another extending from DMM towards the Imnaha component, thought to represent the mantle plume source of the Columbia River Basalts and Yellowstone 1,2. The data may support the previously proposed idea that the volcanism of the Siletzia terrane represents initial melting of the mantle plume head of the Yellowstone hotspot 3,4,5. Other evidence indicating a LIP origin includes the relatively rapid eruption/intrusion of an estimated magma volume of 2.6 x 106 km3 6 between ~56-49 Ma 5, which, in conjunction with our new elemental and isotopic data, indicates that the Siletzia terrane most likely represents an accreted oceanic plateau. 1. Wolff et al., (2008) Nature Geoscience 1, 177-180. 2. Jean et al., (2014) EPSL 389, 119-131 3. Duncan (1982

  11. Evolution of Cenozoic seawater lithium isotopes: Coupling of global denudation regime and shifting seawater sinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gaojun; West, A. Joshua

    2014-09-01

    The Li isotopic record of seawater shows a dramatic increase of ∼9‰ over the past ∼60 million years. Here we use a model to explore what may have caused this change. We focus particularly on considering how changes in the “reverse weathering” sinks that remove Li from seawater can contribute to explain the observed increase. Our interpretation is based on dividing the oceanic sink, which preferentially removes light Li, into two components: (i) removal into marine authigenic clays in sediments at low temperatures, with associated high fractionation factors, and (ii) removal into altered oceanic basalt at higher temperatures and resulting lower fractionation factors. We suggest that increases in the flux of degraded continental material delivered to the oceans over the past 60 Ma could have increased removal of Li into sedimentary authigenic clays versus altered basalt. Because altered basalt is associated with a smaller isotopic fractionation, an increasing portion of the lower temperature (authigenic clay-associated) sink could contribute to the rise of the seawater Li isotope value. This effect would moderate the extent to which the isotopic value of continental inputs must have changed in order to explain the seawater record over the Cenozoic. Nonetheless, unless the magnitude of fractionation during removal differs significantly from current understanding, substantial change in the δLi7 of inputs from continental weathering must have occurred. Our modeling suggests that dissolved riverine fluxes in the early Eocene were characterized by δLi7 of ∼0 to +13‰, with best estimates of 6.6-12.6‰; these values imply increases over the past 60 Myrs of between 10 and 24‰, and we view a ∼13‰ increase as a likely scenario. These changes would have been accompanied by increases in both the dissolved Li flux from continental weathering and the removal flux from seawater into marine authigenic clays. Increases in δLi7 of continental input are

  12. Massive sulfide deposits and hydrothermal solutions: incremental reaction modeling of mineral precipitation and sulfur isotopic evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Janecky, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Incremental reaction path modeling of chemical and sulfur isotopic reactions occurring in active hydrothermal vents on the seafloor, in combination with chemical and petrographic data from sulfide samples from the seafloor and massive sulfide ore deposits, allows a detailed examination of the processes involved. This paper presents theoretical models of reactions of two types: (1) adiabatic mixing between hydrothermal solution and seawater, and (2) reaction of hydrothermal solution with sulfide deposit materials. In addition, reaction of hydrothermal solution with sulfide deposit minerals and basalt in feeder zones is discussed.

  13. Crustal contamination and crystal entrapment during polybaric magma evolution at Mt. Somma Vesuvius volcano, Italy: Geochemical and Sr isotope evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piochi, Monica; Ayuso, Robert A.; De Vivo, Benedetto; Somma, Renato

    2006-02-01

    New major and trace element analyses and Sr-isotope determinations of rocks from Mt. Somma-Vesuvius volcano produced from 25 ky BP to 1944 AD are part of an extensive database documenting the geochemical evolution of this classic region. Volcanic rocks include silica undersaturated, potassic and ultrapotassic lavas and tephras characterized by variable mineralogy and different crystal abundance, as well as by wide ranges of trace element contents and a wide span of initial Sr-isotopic compositions. Both the degree of undersaturation in silica and the crystal content increase through time, being higher in rocks produced after the eruption at 472 AD (Pollena eruption). Compositional variations have been generally thought to reflect contributions from diverse types of mantle and crust. Magma mixing is commonly invoked as a fundamental process affecting the magmas, in addition to crystal fractionation. Our assessment of geochemical and Sr-isotopic data indicates that compositional variability also reflects the influence of crustal contamination during magma evolution during upward migration to shallow crustal levels and/or by entrapment of crystal mush generated during previous magma storage in the crust. Using a variant of the assimilation fractional crystallization model (Energy Conservation-Assimilation Fractional Crystallization; [Spera and Bohrson, 2001. Energy-constrained open-system magmatic processes I: General model and energy-constrained assimilation and fractional crystallization (EC-AFC) formulation. J. Petrol. 999-1018]; [Bohrson, W.A. and Spera, F.J., 2001. Energy-constrained open-system magmatic process II: application of energy-constrained assimilation-fractional crystallization (EC-AFC) model to magmatic systems. J. Petrol. 1019-1041]) we estimated the contributions from the crust and suggest that contamination by carbonate rocks that underlie the volcano (2 km down to 9-10 km) is a fundamental process controlling magma compositions at Mt. Somma

  14. Evolution of views on the structure of the ambipolar electric field in toroidal magnetic confinement systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kovrizhnykh, L. M.

    2015-12-15

    Various methods of determining the ambipolar electric field in toroidal magnetic systems (predominantly, in stellarators) and the evolution of views on this problem are discussed. Paradoxes encountered in solving this problem are analyzed, and ways of resolving them are proposed.

  15. Testing Models of Magnetic Field Evolution of Neutron Stars with the Statistical Properties of their Spin Evolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuang-Nan; Xie, Yi

    2012-10-01

    We test models for the evolution of neutron star (NS) magnetic fields (B). Our model for the evolution of the NS spin is taken from an analysis of pulsar timing noise presented by Hobbs et al.. We first test the standard model of a pulsar's magnetosphere in which B does not change with time and magnetic dipole radiation is assumed to dominate the pulsar's spin-down. We find that this model fails to predict both the magnitudes and signs of the second derivatives of the spin frequencies (\\ddot{\

  16. Fluid flow in the Rotorua geothermal field derived from isotopic and chemical data

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, M.K.; Lyon, G.L.; Robinson, B.W. ); Glover, R.B. )

    1992-04-01

    A wide variety of isotopic and chemical measurements on geothermal fluids from shallow wells at Rotorua have given the following interpretations: The Rotorua field comprises one geothermal system; a primary upflow of (outgassed) alkali chloride water extends from northeast Whakarewarewa to Ngapuna and under Lake Rotorua (east side of the system). At the southern end a secondary upflow discharges dilute alkali chloride water; a second major upflow at Kuirau-Ohinmutu discharges chloride-bicarbonate waters formed by dilution of the primary water and reaction with rock; boiling primary water flows from the eastern upflow zone under confining sediments into aquifers in Rotorua Rhyolite containing chloride-bicarbonate waters in the central region; tritium-bearing groundwater penetrates from overlying aquifers in the sediment into the saddle area between the rhyolite domes or along the crest of the southern rhyolite dome and flows northeast into the northern dome.

  17. Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada: preliminary interpretations of chemical and isotopic data

    SciTech Connect

    Counce, D; Dunlap, C; Goff, F; Huebner, M; Janik, C; Johnson, S; Nimz, G

    1999-08-16

    Chemical and isotopic analyses of Dixie Valley regional waters indicate several distinct groups ranging in recharge age from Pleistocene (<20 ka) to recent (<50a). Valley groundwater is older than water from perennial springs and artesian wells in adjacent ranges, with Clan Alpine range (east) much younger (most <50a) than Stillwater range (west; most >1000a). Geothermal field fluids ({approximately}12-14 ka) appear derived from water similar in composition to non-thermal groundwater observed today in valley artesian wells (also -14 ka). Geothermal fluid interaction with mafic rocks (Humboldt Lopolith) appears to be common, and significant reaction with granodiorite may also occur. Despite widespread occurrence of carbonate rocks, large scale chemical interaction appears minor. Age asymmetry of the ranges, more extensive interaction with deep-seated waters in the west, and distribution of springs and artesian wells suggest the existence of a regional upward hydrologic gradient with an axis in proximity to the Stillwater range.

  18. Formation and Evolution of the Continental Lithospheric Mantle: Perspectives From Radiogenic Isotopes of Silicate and Sulfide Inclusions in Macrodiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirey, S. B.; Richardson, S. H.

    2007-12-01

    Silicate and sulfide inclusions that occur in diamonds comprise the oldest (>3 Ga), deepest (>140 km) samples of mantle-derived minerals available for study. Their relevance to the evolution of the continental lithosphere is clear because terrestrial macrodiamonds are confined to regions of the Earth with continental lithospheric mantle keels. The goals of analytical work on inclusions in diamond are to obtain paragenesis constraints, radiogenic ages, and initial isotopic compositions. The purpose is to place diamond formation episodes into the broader framework of the geological processes that create and modify the continental lithosphere and to relate the source of the C and N in diamond-forming fluids to understanding the Earth's C and N cycles in the Archean. Although sulfide and silicate inclusions rarely occur in the same diamond, they both can be grouped according to their geochemical similarity with the chief rock types that comprise the mantle keel: peridotite and eclogite. Silicate inclusions are classified as harzburgitic (depleted; olivine > Fo91, garnet Cr2O3 > 3 wt% and CaO from 0 to 5 wt%), lherzolitic (fertile), or eclogitic (basaltic; garnet Cr2O3 < 2 wt% and CaO from 3 to 15 wt%, clinopyroxene with higher Na2O, Al2O3, and FeO); they are amenable for trace element study by SIMS and for Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr analysis by conventional P-TIMS after grouping by mineralogical similarity. Sulfide inclusions (chiefly FeS with lesser Ni, Cu, and Co) are classified as peridotitic (Ni > 14 wt%; Os > 2 ppm) versus eclogitic (Ni < 10 wt%; Os < 200 ppb); single sulfides are amenable for S isotopic study by SIMS or TIMS, and Re-Os analysis by N-TIMS. Work on inclusions in diamonds depends on the distribution of mined, diamond-bearing kimberlites, and the generosity of mining companies because of the extreme rarity of inclusions in suites of mostly gem-quality diamonds. Most isotopic work has been on the Kaapvaal-Zimbabwe craton with lesser work on the Slave, Siberian

  19. COMPOUND-SPECIFIC CARBON AND HYDROGEN ISOTOPE ANALYSIS-FIELD EVIDENCE OF MTBE BIOREMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical reactions (including bio- and abiotic degradation) tend to favor molecules with the lighter isotopic species (e.g., 12C, 1H), resulting in enrichment of the heavier isotopic species (13C, D) in the unreacted substrate, referred to as isotopic fractionation. On the other ...

  20. Stable isotope evidence for an amphibious phase in early proboscidean evolution

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Alexander G. S. C.; Seiffert, Erik R.; Simons, Elwyn L.

    2008-01-01

    The order Proboscidea includes extant elephants and their extinct relatives and is closely related to the aquatic sirenians (manatees and dugongs) and terrestrial hyracoids (hyraxes). Some analyses of embryological, morphological, and paleontological data suggest that proboscideans and sirenians shared an aquatic or semiaquatic common ancestor, but independent tests of this hypothesis have proven elusive. Here we test the hypothesis of an aquatic ancestry for advanced proboscideans by measuring δ18O in tooth enamel of two late Eocene proboscidean genera, Barytherium and Moeritherium, which are sister taxa of Oligocene-to-Recent proboscideans. The combination of low δ18O values and low δ18O standard deviations in Barytherium and Moeritherium matches the isotopic pattern seen in aquatic and semiaquatic mammals, and differs from that of terrestrial mammals. δ13C values of these early proboscideans suggest that both genera are likely to have consumed freshwater plants, although a component of C3 terrestrial vegetation cannot be ruled out. The simplest explanation for the combined evidence from isotopes, dental functional morphology, and depositional environments is that Barytherium and Moeritherium were at least semiaquatic and lived in freshwater swamp or riverine environments, where they grazed on freshwater vegetation. These results lend new support to the hypothesis that Oligocene-to-Recent proboscideans are derived from amphibious ancestors. PMID:18413605

  1. Stable isotope evidence for an amphibious phase in early proboscidean evolution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Alexander G S C; Seiffert, Erik R; Simons, Elwyn L

    2008-04-15

    The order Proboscidea includes extant elephants and their extinct relatives and is closely related to the aquatic sirenians (manatees and dugongs) and terrestrial hyracoids (hyraxes). Some analyses of embryological, morphological, and paleontological data suggest that proboscideans and sirenians shared an aquatic or semiaquatic common ancestor, but independent tests of this hypothesis have proven elusive. Here we test the hypothesis of an aquatic ancestry for advanced proboscideans by measuring delta(18)O in tooth enamel of two late Eocene proboscidean genera, Barytherium and Moeritherium, which are sister taxa of Oligocene-to-Recent proboscideans. The combination of low delta(18)O values and low delta(18)O standard deviations in Barytherium and Moeritherium matches the isotopic pattern seen in aquatic and semiaquatic mammals, and differs from that of terrestrial mammals. delta(13)C values of these early proboscideans suggest that both genera are likely to have consumed freshwater plants, although a component of C(3) terrestrial vegetation cannot be ruled out. The simplest explanation for the combined evidence from isotopes, dental functional morphology, and depositional environments is that Barytherium and Moeritherium were at least semiaquatic and lived in freshwater swamp or riverine environments, where they grazed on freshwater vegetation. These results lend new support to the hypothesis that Oligocene-to-Recent proboscideans are derived from amphibious ancestors. PMID:18413605

  2. A lab in the field: real-time measurements of water quality and stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, J. W.; von Freyberg, J.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrological and bio-geochemical processes in catchments are largely determined by the flow pathways of water through the subsurface. While the properties of the input (precipitation) and the output (streamflow) can be monitored with relatively low expenditure, subsurface flow processes and travel times remain difficult to quantify. A comprehensive understanding of these physical mechanisms is, however, crucial for a sustainable management of water resources. Natural tracers, such as stable isotopes of water (18O and 2H), in combination with other water quality parameters allows for studying various hydrological and associated processes in great detail. To follow the dynamics in rapidly changing hydrologic systems, high temporal resolution measurements of water isotopes and other constituents is required. Here, we present first results from an extensive field experiment in Switzerland where rain- and river water samples are sampled and analyzed directly in the field every 30 minutes. With this, sample degradation during storage and transportation can be minimized. At the same time, errors due to the collection and handling of numerous water samples are avoided. The fully automated monitoring system is comprised of the newly developed Continuous Water Sampler Module (CoWS), which was coupled to a Picarro L2130-i Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer (Picarro Inc., USA), to continuously measure 18O and 2H. Optical and electrochemical sensors together with a spectrometer probe monitor NO3-, DOC and physico-chemical parameters, such as oxygen content, pH, electrical conductivity (s::can Messtechnik GmbH, Vienna). An ion chromatograph (Metrohm, Switzerland) allows for precise measurements of the major anions and cations. For quality control, additional water samples are taken automatically at the same frequency and analyzed in the laboratory.

  3. A field and laboratory method for monitoring the concentration and isotopic composition of soil CO2.

    PubMed

    Breecker, Dan; Sharp, Zachary D

    2008-01-01

    The stable isotope composition of nmol size gas samples can be determined accurately and precisely using continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). We have developed a technique that exploits this capability in order to measure delta13C and delta18O values and, simultaneously, the concentration of CO2 in sub-mL volume soil air samples. A sampling strategy designed for monitoring CO2 profiles at particular locations of interest is also described. This combined field and laboratory technique provides several advantages over those previously reported: (1) the small sample size required allows soil air to be sampled at a high spatial resolution, (2) the field setup minimizes sampling times and does not require powered equipment, (3) the analytical method avoids the introduction of air (including O2) into the mass spectrometer thereby extending filament life, and (4) pCO2, delta13C and delta18O are determined simultaneously. The reproducibility of measurements of CO2 in synthetic tank air using this technique is: +/-0.08 per thousand (delta13C), +/-0.10 per thousand (delta18O), and +/-0.7% (pCO2) at 5550 ppm. The reproducibility for CO2 in soil air is estimated as: +/-0.06 per thousand (delta13C), +/-0.06 per thousand (delta18O), and +/-1.6% (pCO2). Monitoring soil CO2 using this technique is applicable to studies concerning soil respiration and ecosystem gas exchange, the effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 (e.g. free air carbon dioxide enrichment) on soil processes, soil water budgets including partitioning evaporation from transpiration, pedogenesis and weathering, diffuse solid-earth degassing, and the calibration of speleothem and pedogenic carbonate delta13C values as paleoenvironmental proxies. PMID:18186546

  4. Identifying diffused nitrate sources in a stream in an agricultural field using a dual isotopic approach.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jingtao; Xi, Beidou; Gao, Rutai; He, Liansheng; Liu, Hongliang; Dai, Xuanli; Yu, Yijun

    2014-06-15

    Nitrate (NO3(-)) pollution is a severe problem in aquatic systems in Taihu Lake Basin in China. A dual isotope approach (δ(15)NNO3(-) and δ(18)ONO3(-)) was applied to identify diffused NO3(-) inputs in a stream in an agricultural field at the basin in 2013. The site-specific isotopic characteristics of five NO3(-) sources (atmospheric deposition, AD; NO3(-) derived from soil organic matter nitrification, NS; NO3(-) derived from chemical fertilizer nitrification, NF; groundwater, GW; and manure and sewage, M&S) were identified. NO3(-) concentrations in the stream during the rainy season [mean±standard deviation (SD)=2.5±0.4mg/L] were lower than those during the dry season (mean±SD=4.0±0.5mg/L), whereas the δ(18)ONO3(-) values during the rainy season (mean±SD=+12.3±3.6‰) were higher than those during the dry season (mean±SD=+0.9±1.9‰). Both chemical and isotopic characteristics indicated that mixing with atmospheric NO3(-) resulted in the high δ(18)O values during the rainy season, whereas NS and M&S were the dominant NO3(-) sources during the dry season. A Bayesian model was used to determine the contribution of each NO3(-) source to total stream NO3(-). Results showed that reduced N nitrification in soil zones (including soil organic matter and fertilizer) was the main NO3(-) source throughout the year. M&S contributed more NO3(-) during the dry season (22.4%) than during the rainy season (17.8%). AD generated substantial amounts of NO3(-) in May (18.4%), June (29.8%), and July (24.5%). With the assessment of temporal variation of diffused NO3(-) sources in agricultural field, improved agricultural management practices can be implemented to protect the water resource and avoid further water quality deterioration in Taihu Lake Basin. PMID:24686140

  5. Anomalous resistivity and the evolution of magnetic field topology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. N.

    1993-01-01

    This paper explores the topological restructuring of a force-free magnetic field caused by the hypothetical sudden onset of a localized region of strong anomalous resistivity. It is shown that the topological complexity increases, with the primitive planar force-free field with straight field lines developing field lines that wrap half a turn around each other, evidently providing a surface of tangential discontinuity in the wraparound region. It is suggested that the topological restructuring contributes to the complexity of the geomagnetic substorm, the aurora, and perhaps some of the flare activity on the sun, or other star, and the Galactic halo.

  6. Rotation and Magnetic Fields: the Evil Twins of Stellar Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonneau, P.

    In this paper I give an overview of the numerous ways in which rotation and magnetic fields can interact under stellar interior conditions. I first provide “tutorial” examples of how magnetic fields can (1) alter existing stellar internal flows, (2) generate internal flows, and of how rotation can (3) amplify or (4) destroy magnetic fields. The upshot of all this is that treating rotation or magnetic fields in isolation of one another, as intermediate steps towards the “full picture”, may yield a situation that can only be applied meaningfully under very limited and specific astrophysical circumstances, if any.

  7. Can We Determine Temperatures Associated with Critical Transitions During the Evolution of Metazoan life? Application of 'Clumped' Isotope Thermometry to the Neoproterozoic and Paleozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defliese, W.; Gutierrez, M.; Flores, S.; Retallack, G.; Tripati, A.

    2015-12-01

    The evolution and development of metazoan life during the Neoproterozoic and Paleozoic was one of the largest and monumental events in Earth history. Conditions surrounding these events are uncertain, as there remain many questions about the types of environment transitions such as the development of multicellular life, evolution of hard shells, and the transitions of life to land took place in. While mass-47 clumped isotope signatures are prone to thermal resetting and diagenesis, it remains the best tool for reconstructing temperatures in uncertain regimes, and can be integrated along with traditional tools such as textural petrography and cathodoluminescence to screen for diagenetic alteration. In this context, we analyze suites of Neoproterozoic and Paleozoic sediments and brachiopods for clumped isotope temperatures, and combine with microscopy and stratigraphic data to infer diagenetic and burial histories of these rocks. Samples judged to be unaltered will be further analyzed for the conditions prevalent during critical transitions during the evolution of metazoan life.

  8. Evolution of magnetic field inclination in a forming penumbra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurčák, Jan; Bello González, Nazaret; Schlichenmaier, Rolf; Rezaei, Reza

    2014-12-01

    As a sunspot penumbra forms, the magnetic field vector at the outer boundary of the protospot undergoes a transformation. We study the changes of the magnetic field vector at this boundary as a penumbral segment forms. We analyze a set of spectropolarimetric maps covering 2 hr during the formation of a sunspot in NOAA 11024. The data were recorded with the GFPI instrument attached to the German VTT. We observe a stationary umbra/quiet Sun boundary, where the magnetic field becomes more horizontal with time. The magnetic field inclination increases by 5°, reaching a maximum value of about 59°. The maximum inclination coincides with the onset of filament formation. In time, the penumbra filaments become longer and the penumbral bright grains protrude into the umbra, where the magnetic field is stronger and more vertical. Consequently, we observe a decrease in the magnetic field inclination at the boundary as the penumbra grows. In summary, in order to initiate the formation of the penumbra, the magnetic field at the umbral (protospot) boundary becomes more inclined. As the penumbra grows, the umbra/penumbra boundary migrates inwards, and at this boundary the magnetic field turns more vertical again, while it remains inclined in the outer penumbra.

  9. Strontium isotope evolution of pore water and calcite in the Topopah Spring Tuff, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Brian D.; Futa, Kiyoto

    2001-04-29

    Pore water in the Topopah Spring Tuff has a narrow range of {delta}{sup 87}Sr values that can be calculated from the {delta}{sup 87}Sr values of the rock considering advection through and reaction with the overlying nonwelded tuffs of the PTn. This model can be extended to estimate the variation of {delta}{sup 87}Sr in the pore water through time; this approximates the variation of {delta}{sup 87}Sr measured in calcite fracture coatings. In samples of calcite where no silica can be dated by other methods, strontium isotope data may be the only method to determine ages. In addition, other Sr-bearing minerals in the calcite and opal coatings, such as fluorite, may be dated using the same model.

  10. Chemical and isotopic evolution of ground water in the Midwestern Basins and Arches region

    SciTech Connect

    Lesney, L.L. )

    1992-01-01

    Aquifers in Pleistocene glacial deposits and underlying Devonian and Silurian carbonate rocks in the Midwestern Basins and Arches region are being studied as part of the US Geological Survey's Regional Aquifer Systems Analysis program. Water samples were collected from 20 wells in glacial and bedrock aquifers in northwestern Ohio and central Indiana coincident with directions of regional ground-water flow to determine chemical and isotopic changes that occur as ground water travels from regional recharge to discharge areas. The samples were analyzed for major and minor cations and anions, tritium, delta O-18, delta D; delta C-13, C-14; delta S-34; and delta Sr-87. The results of the isotropic analyses show that the regional ground-water-flow system dominates in northwestern Ohio, whereas local and intermediate ground-water-flow systems dominate in central Indiana.

  11. Sr-isotopic, paleomagnetic, and biostratigraphic calibration of horse evolution: Evidence from the Miocene of Florida

    SciTech Connect

    MacFadden, B.J.; Bryant, J.D.; Mueller, P.A. )

    1991-03-01

    During the middle Miocene an explosive adaptive radiation resulted in the advent of grazing horses with high-crowned teeth in North America. New Sr isotopic, paleomagnetic, and biostratigrahic evidence from the Miocene marine and nonmarine sequence of the Florida panhandle calibrates the base of this adaptive radiation. The transition from the primitive outgroup species 'Parahippus' leonensis to the most primitive high-crowned horse, 'Merychippus' gunteri occured after about 17.7 Ma. After this event, the lowest known stratigraphic level at which diversification (i.e., presence of two or more sympatric species) of grazing merychippine horses occurs is about 16.2 Ma, or within the early part of Chron C5BR. Although this currently is the only sequence where the parahippine-merychippine transition is directly calibrated, biochronologic evidence from other important, contemporaneous localities in Texas, Nebraska, and California indicate that diversification occured rapidly throughout North America between 15 and 16 Ma.

  12. Isotopic and chemical constraints on the petrogenesis of Blackburn Hills volcanic field, western Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Moll-Stalcup, E.J.; Arth, J.G. )

    1991-12-01

    The Blackburn Hills volcanic field is one of several Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary (75-50 Ma) volcanic fields in western Alaska that comprise a vast magmatic province extending from the Arctic Circle to Bristol Bay. It consists of andesite flows, rhyolite domes, a central granodiorite to quartz monzonite pluton, and small intrusive rhyolite porphyries, overlain by basalt and alkali-rhyolites. Most of the field consists of andesite flows which can be divided into two groups on the basis of elemental and isotopic composition: a group having lower ({sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr){sub i}, higher ({sup 143}Nd/{sup 144}Nd){sub i}, and moderate LREE and HREE contents (group 1), and a group having higher ({sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr){sub i}, lower ({sup 143}Nd/{sup 144}Nd){sub i}, and lower HREE contents. Basalts are restricted to the top of the stratigraphic section, comprise the most primitive part of group 1 (({sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr){sub i} = 0.7033; ({sup 143}Nd/{sup 144}Nd){sub i} = 0.5129), and have trace-element ratios that are similar to those of oceanic island basalts (OIBs). Although some workers have suggested that the volcanic field is underlain by old continental crust, none of the data require the presence of Paleozoic or Precambrian continental middle or upper crust under this part of the volcanic field. However, the ultimate source of some of the rocks in the Yukon-Koyukuk province that have high {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr and low {sup 143}Nd/{sup 144}Nd ratios may be old sub-continental mantle and/or lower crust, which was previously subducted beneath the Yukon-Koyukuk province during Early Cretaceous arc-continent collision.

  13. Earth-atmosphere evolution based on new determination of Devonian atmosphere Ar isotopic composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, Finlay M.; Mark, Darren F.; Gandanger, Pierre; McConville, Paul

    2016-07-01

    The isotopic composition of the noble gases, in particular Ar, in samples of ancient atmosphere trapped in rocks and minerals provides the strongest constraints on the timing and rate of Earth atmosphere formation by degassing of the Earth's interior. We have re-measured the isotopic composition of argon in the Rhynie chert from northeast Scotland using a high precision mass spectrometer in an effort to provide constraints on the composition of Devonian atmosphere. Irradiated chert samples yield 40Ar/36Ar ratios that are often below the modern atmosphere value. The data define a 40Ar/36Ar value of 289.5 ± 0.4 at K/36Ar = 0. Similarly low 40Ar/36Ar are measured in un-irradiated chert samples. The simplest explanation for the low 40Ar/36Ar is the preservation of Devonian atmosphere-derived Ar in the chert, with the intercept value in 40Ar-39Ar-36Ar space representing an upper limit. In this case the Earth's atmosphere has accumulated only 3% (5.1 ± 0.4 ×1016 mol) of the total 40Ar inventory since the Devonian. The average accumulation rate of 1.27 ± 0.09 ×108 mol40Ar/yr overlaps the rate over the last 800 kyr. This implies that there has been no resolvable temporal change in the outgassing rate of the Earth since the mid-Palaeozoic despite the likely episodicity of Ar degassing from the continental crust. Incorporating the new Devonian atmosphere 40Ar/36Ar into the Earth degassing model of Pujol et al. (2013) provides the most precise constraints on atmosphere formation so far. The atmosphere formed in the first ∼100 Ma after initial accretion during a catastrophic degassing episode. A significant volume of 40Ar did not start to accumulate in the atmosphere until after 4 Ga which implies that stable K-rich continental crust did not develop until this time.

  14. Evolution of the stable carbon isotope composition of atmospheric CO2 over the last glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggleston, S.; Schmitt, J.; Bereiter, B.; Schneider, R.; Fischer, H.

    2016-03-01

    We present new δ13C measurements of atmospheric CO2 covering the last glacial/interglacial cycle, complementing previous records covering Terminations I and II. Most prominent in the new record is a significant depletion in δ13C(atm) of 0.5‰ occurring during marine isotope stage (MIS) 4, followed by an enrichment of the same magnitude at the beginning of MIS 3. Such a significant excursion in the record is otherwise only observed at glacial terminations, suggesting that similar processes were at play, such as changing sea surface temperatures, changes in marine biological export in the Southern Ocean (SO) due to variations in aeolian iron fluxes, changes in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, upwelling of deep water in the SO, and long-term trends in terrestrial carbon storage. Based on previous modeling studies, we propose constraints on some of these processes during specific time intervals. The decrease in δ13C(atm) at the end of MIS 4 starting approximately 64 kyr B.P. was accompanied by increasing [CO2]. This period is also marked by a decrease in aeolian iron flux to the SO, followed by an increase in SO upwelling during Heinrich event 6, indicating that it is likely that a large amount of δ13C-depleted carbon was transferred to the deep oceans previously, i.e., at the onset of MIS 4. Apart from the upwelling event at the end of MIS 4 (and potentially smaller events during Heinrich events in MIS 3), upwelling of deep water in the SO remained reduced until the last glacial termination, whereupon a second pulse of isotopically light carbon was released into the atmosphere.

  15. Neogene marine isotopic evolution and the erosion of Lesser Himalayan strata: Implications for Cenozoic tectonic history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myrow, Paul M.; Hughes, Nigel C.; Derry, Louis A.; Ryan McKenzie, N.; Jiang, Ganqing; Webb, A. Alexander G.; Banerjee, Dhiraj M.; Paulsen, Timothy S.; Singh, Birendra P.

    2015-05-01

    An extensive, northward deepening blanket of Neoproterozoic and Cambrian sedimentary rocks once extended from the Himalayan margin far onto the Indian craton. Cambrian deposits of this "upper Lesser Himalayan" succession, which include deposits of the "outer" Lesser Himalaya tectonic unit, are enriched in radiogenic 187Os. They make up part of a proximal marine facies belt that extends onto the craton and along strike from India to Pakistan. By contrast, age-equivalent facies in the Tethyan Himalaya are more distal in nature. Neoproterozoic to Cambrian strata of the upper Lesser Himalayan succession are now missing in much of the Lesser Himalaya, with their erosion exposing older Precambrian Lesser Himalayan strata. We suggest that exhumation and weathering of the upper Lesser Himalaya and related strata caused dramatic changes in the 187Os/188Os and 87Sr/86Sr Neogene record of seawater starting at ∼ 16 Ma. First-order estimates for the volume of upper Himalayan strata, as well as the volume of all LH rock eroded since this time, and geochemical box modeling, support this idea. Exhumation at 16 Ma is a fundamental event in the evolution of the Himalayan orogeny and the geochemical evolution of the oceans, and will be a critical part of the construction of future models of Himalayan thrust belt evolution.

  16. Evolution of ring-field systems in microlithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, David M.

    1998-09-01

    Offner's ring-field all-reflecting triplet was the first successful projection system used in microlithography. It evolved over several generations, increasing NA and field size, reducing the feature sizes printed from three down to one micron. Because of its relative simplicity, large field size and broad spectral bandwidth it became the dominant optical design used in microlithography until the early 1980's, when the demise of optical lithography was predicted. Rumours of the death of optics turned out to be exaggerated; what happened instead was a metamorphosis to more complex optical designs. A reduction ring-field system was developed, but the inevitable loss of concentricity led to a dramatic increase in complexity. Higher NA reduction projection optics have therefore been full-field, either all-refracting or catadioptric using a beamsplitter and a single mirror. At the present time, the terminal illness of optical lithography is once again being prognosed, but now at 0.1 micro feature sizes early in the next millenium. If optics has a future beyond that, it lies at wavelengths below the practical transmission cut-off of all refracting materials. Scanning all-reflecting ring-field systems are therefore poised for a resurgence, based on their well-established advantage of rotational symmetry and consequent small aberration variations over a small, annular field. This paper explores some such designs that potentially could take optical lithography down to the region of 0.025 micron features.

  17. Isotopic and chemical constraints on the petrogenesis of Blackburn Hills volcanic field, western Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moll-Stalcup, E. J.; Arth, Joseph G.

    1991-01-01

    The Blackburn Hills volcanic field is one of several Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary (75-50 Ma) volcanic fields in western Alaska that comprise a vast magmatic province extending from the Arctic Circle to Bristol Bay. It consists of andesite flows, rhyolite domes, a central granodiorite to quartz monzonite pluton, and small intrusive rhyolite porphyries, overlain by basalt and alkali-rhyolites. Most of the field consists of andesite flows which can be divided into two groups on the basis of elemental and isotopic composition: a group having lower ( 87Sr 86Sr)i, higher ( 143Nd 144Nd)i, and moderate LREE and HREE contents (group 1), and a group having higher ( 87Sr 86Sr)i, lower ( 143Sr 144Sr)i, and lower HREE contents. Basalts are restricted to the top of the stratigraphic section, comprise the most primitive part of group 1 [( 87Sr 86Sr)i = 0.7033; ( 143Nd 144Nd)i = 0.5129], and have trace-element ratios that are similar to those of oceanic island basalts (OIBs). In contrast to the basalts, group 1 andesites have higher ( 87Sr 86Sr)i and lower ( 143Nd 144Nd)i, and represent interaction of mantle-derived magmas with the lower crust of Koyukuk terrane. Group 2 andesites have ( 87Sr 86Sr)i and ( 143Nd 144Nd)i that are near bulk-earth values and probably formed by partial melting of the lower crust of Koyukuk terrane. The central pluton and rhyolite porphyries are isotopically uniform ( 87Sr 86Sr)i ??? 0.704, ( 143Nd 144Nd)i ??? 0.51275, and are interpreted to have formed by melting of young mafic to intermediate crustal rocks or by fractionation of group 1 andesites. The rhyolite domes have an isotopic range similar to that of the basalts and andesites [( 87Sr 86Sr)i = 0.70355-0.70499; ( 143Nd 144Nd)i = 0.51263-0.51292], which suggests they formed by fractionation of the and site and basalt magmas. Although some workers have suggested that the volcanic field is underlain by old continental crust, none of the data require the presence of Paleozoic or Precambrian

  18. Evolution of the soil cover of soccer fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belobrov, V. P.; Zamotaev, I. V.

    2014-04-01

    A soccer field can be considered a soil-like technogenic formation (STF). According to the theory of soil cover patterns, the artificially constructed (anthropogenic) soil cover of a soccer field is an analogue of a relatively homogeneous elementary soil area. However, the spatial homogeneity of the upper part (50-80 cm) of the STF of soccer fields is unstable and is subjected to gradual transformation under the impact of pedogenetic processes, agrotechnical loads, and mechanical loads during the games. This transformation is favored by the initial heterogeneity of the deep (buried) parts of the STF profile. The technogenic factors and elementary pedogenetic processes specify the dynamic functioning regime of the STF. In 50-75 years, the upper part of the STF is transformed into soil-like bodies with properties close to those in zonal soils. Certain micro- and nanopatterns of the soil cover are developed within the field creating its spatial heterogeneity.

  19. Geologic evolution of the Lost City Hydrothermal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denny, Alden R.; Kelley, Deborah S.; Früh-Green, Gretchen L.

    2016-02-01

    The Lost City Hydrothermal Field (LCHF) is a novel serpentinite-hosted vent field located on the Atlantis Massif southern wall. Results of 2 m resolution bathymetry, side scan, and video and still imagery, integrated with direct submersible observations provide the first high-resolution geologic map of the LCHF. These data form the foundation for an evolutionary model for the vent system over the past >120,000 years. The field is located on a down-dropped bench 70 m below the summit of the massif. The bench is capped by breccia and pelagic carbonate deposits underlain by variably deformed and altered serpentinite and gabbroic rocks. Hydrothermal activity is focused at the 60 m tall, 100 m across, massive carbonate edifice "Poseidon," which is venting 91°C fluid. Hydrothermal activity declines south and west of the Poseidon complex and dies off completely at distances greater than 200 m. East of Poseidon, the most recent stage of hydrothermal flow is characterized by egress of diffuse fluids from narrow fissures within a low-angle, anastomosing mylonite zone. South of the area of current hydrothermal activity, there is evidence of two discrete previously unrecognized relict fields. Active venting sites defined by carbonate-filled fissures that cut the carbonate cap rock at the summit of the massif mark the present-day northernmost extent of venting. These spatial relationships reflect multiple stages of field development, the northward migration of venting over time, and the likely development of a nascent field at the massif summit.

  20. Evolution of Palaeoproterozoic mafic intrusions located within the thermal aureole of the Sudbury Igneous Complex, Canada: Isotopic, geochronological and geochemical evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prevec, Stephen A.; Baadsgaard, Halfdan

    2005-07-01

    Impact cratering and their resultant geological phenomena are recognised as significant factors in the lithological and biologic evolution of the earth. Age-dating of impact events is critical in correlating cause and effects for these catastrophic processes. The Falconbridge and Drury Township (Twp) intrusions were emplaced at the contact between Neoarchaean basement and Palaeoproterozoic volcanosedimentary rocks, and also lie at the southeast and southwest edges of the Sudbury Igneous Complex (SIC), within its thermal contact aureole. The Falconbridge Twp intrusion is dated at 2441 ± 3 Ma by U-Pb zircon, with evidence of Archaean inheritance from its host granitoids. Granitoids from the southernmost Abitibi Subprovince are dated here between 2670 ± 11 Ma for an undeformed Algoman granite, and 2696 ± 18 Ma for a foliated granitoid, consistent with existing data from the Abitibi Greenstone Belt and from the Wawa Subprovince. Major and trace element geochemical evidence, common-Pb isotopic compositions, and ɛNd2440 values between 0 and -1 are all consistent with a Palaeoproterozoic origin for the Falconbridge Twp intrusion, and support inclusion in the East Bull Lake-type suite of leucogabbroic plutons and sills. In contrast, the Drury Twp intrusion gives a U-Pb zircon age of 1859 ± 13 Ma, coincident with the date of SIC-emplacement. While the major and trace element compositions are comparable to the Falconbridge data, the Drury displays significant heterogeneity in ɛNd2440, with values ranging from +3.7 to -0.1, and contains more radiogenic Pb isotopic compositions. Field, geochemical and isotopic evidence clearly distinguishes this intrusion from constituents of the SIC itself, and indicates that the Drury too is a Palaeoproterozoic intrusion. This requires that apparently unshocked, undeformed magmatic-looking zircon has been grown or reset in a postmagmatic setting. This has significant implications for the identification of mantle-derived magmas and

  1. Evolution of granitoids in the Catalina metamorphic core complex, southeastern Arizona: U-Pb, Nd, and Hf isotopic constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornash, Katherine F.; Patchett, P. Jonathan; Gehrels, George E.; Spencer, Jon E.

    2013-06-01

    The Santa Catalina Mountains, SE Arizona, was one of the first metamorphic core complexes to be described. Despite its status as a type example, relatively little is known about precise ages and origins of the intrusive rocks that make up most of the crystalline core. U-Pb and Hf isotopic data by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry from zircons and Nd isotopic results from whole rocks were obtained for 12 granitoids ranging from 1,440 to 26 Ma. Results confirm that the 1.44-Ga Oracle Granite extends through the Catalina Range as variably mylonitic granite and banded gneiss. Laramide intrusions (67-73 Ma) display initial ɛNd values -5 to -8 and ɛHf from -7.5 to -9. Magmatic ages for the prominent white granite sills of the Wilderness suite are 46-57 Ma, in agreement with Terrien (2012), and these granites have initial ɛNd values -8 to -10 and ɛHf from -7 to -14. Lastly, the undeformed Catalina Granite has an age of 26 Ma, with an initial ɛNd and ɛHf of -6 and -8, respectively. Our Nd results agree with limited results from Farmer and DePaolo (89:10141-10160, 1984). Although the Catalina Granite seems to have a significant juvenile component based on Nd and Hf, most of the Laramide and Wilderness intrusions contain Nd and Hf compositions lying close to the evolution of 1.44-Ga Oracle Granites, a fact that is confirmed by the U-Pb data, which show both 1.7- and 1.4-Ga zircon cores in these samples, with 1.4 Ga as the dominant core age. In order to become the dominant source of most of the 72-45-Ma magmas, the Oracle pluton must not only extend across the whole Catalina region, but also have abundant deep-seated equivalents to provide magma sources.

  2. Carbon isotope geochemistry of hydrocarbons in the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, Baja California Norte, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Des Marais, D. J.; Stallard, M. L.; Nehring, N. L.; Truesdell, A. H.

    1988-01-01

    Hydrocarbon abundances and stable-isotopic compositions were measured in wells M5, M26, M35 and M102, which represent a range of depths (1270-2000 m) and temperatures (275-330 degrees C) in the field. In order to simulate the production of the geothermal hydrocarbons, gases were collected from the pyrolysis of lignite in the laboratory. This lignite was obtained from a well which sampled rock strata which are identical to those occurring in the field, but which have experienced much lower subsurface temperatures. In both the well and the laboratory observations, high-temperature environments favored higher relative concentrations of methane, ethane and benzene and generally higher delta 13C-values in the individual hydrocarbons. The best correlation between the laboratory and well data is obtained when laboratory-produced gases from experiments conducted at lower (400 degrees C) and higher (600 degrees C) temperatures are mixed. This improved correlation suggests that the wells are sampling hydrocarbons produced from a spectrum of depths and temperatures in the sediments.

  3. Isotopic evidence for the origin of Cenozoic volcanic rocks in the Pinacate volcanic field, northwestern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, D. J.; Musselman, T. E.; Gutmann, J. T.; Patchett, P. J.

    1993-02-01

    Six volcanic rocks, reconnaissance samples representing most of the temporal and compositional variation in the Pinacate volcanic field of Sonora and Arizona, are characterized for major element and NdSr isotopic compositions. The samples consist of basanite through trachyte of an early shield volcano, and alkali basalts and a tholeiite from later craters and cinder cones. With the exception of the trachyte sample, which has increased 87Sr/ 86Sr due to crustal effects, all 87Sr/ 86Sr values fall between 0.70312 and 0.70342, while ɛNd values are all between + 5.0 and + 5.7. Clinopyroxene in a rare spinel-lherzolite nodule derived from the uppermost mantle beneath the field has 87Sr/ 86Sr of 0.70320 but ɛNd of + 8.8, three ɛNd units higher than the volcanic rocks. Both the volcanic rocks and the nodule record the presence of asthenospheric, rather than enriched lithospheric mantle beneath Pinacate. This is consistent with one or both of (a) proximity of Pinacate to the Gulf of California spreading center and (b) presence of similar asthenospheric mantle signatures in volcanic rocks over a wide contiguous area of the southwestern USA. We consider the comparison to other southwestern USA magma sources as the more relevant alternative, although a definite conclusion is not possible at this stage.

  4. Improved field methods to quantify methane oxidation in landfill cover materials using stable carbon isotopes.

    PubMed

    Chanton, J P; Powelson, D K; Abichou, T; Hater, G

    2008-02-01

    Stable carbon isotopes provide a robust approach toward quantification of methanotrophic activity in landfill covers. The field method often applied to date has compared the delta13C of emitted to anaerobic zone CH4. Recent laboratory mass balance studies have indicated thatthis approach tends to underestimate CH4 oxidation. Therefore, we examined the CH4-delta13C at various soil depths in field settings and compared these values to emitted CH4. At 5-10 cm depth, we observed the most enrichment in CH4-delta13C (-46.0 to -32.1 per thousand). Emitted CH4-delta13C was more negative, ranging from -56.5 to -43.0 per thousand. The decrease in CH4-delta13C values from the shallow subsurface to the surface is the result of processes that result in selective emission of 12CH4 and selective retention of 13CH4 within the soil. Seasonal percent oxidation was calculated at seven sites representing four cover materials. Probe samples averaged greater (21 +/- 2%, p < 0.001, n = 7) oxidation than emitted CH4 data. We argue that calculations of fraction oxidized based on soil derived CH4 should yield upper limit values. When considered with emitted CH4 values, this combined approach will more realistically bracket the actual oxidation value. Following this guideline, we found the percent oxidation to be 23 +/- 3% and 38 +/- 16% for four soil and three compost covers, respectively. PMID:18323085

  5. Carbon isotope geochemistry of hydrocarbons in the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, Baja California Norte, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Des Marais, D.J.; Stallard, M.L.; Nehring, N.L.; Truesdell, A.H.

    1988-01-01

    Hydrocarbon abundances and stable-isotopic compositions were measured in wells M5, M26, M35 and M102, which represent a range of depths (1270-2000 m) and temperatures (275-330??C) in the field. In order to simulate the production of the geothermal hydrocarbons, gases were collected from the pyrolysis of lignite in the laboratory. This lignite was obtained from a well which sampled rock strata which are identical to those occurring in the field, but which have experienced much lower subsurface temperatures. In both the well and the laboratory observations, high-temperature environments favored higher relative concentrations of methane, ethane and benzene and generally higher ??13C-values in the individual hydrocarbons. The best correlation between the laboratory and well data is obtained when laboratory-produced gases from experiments conducted at lower (400??C) and higher (600??C) temperatures are mixed. This improved correlation suggests that the wells are sampling hydrocarbons produced from a spectrum of depths and temperatures in the sediments. ?? 1988.

  6. Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayr, Ernst

    1978-01-01

    Traces the history of evolution theory from Lamarck and Darwin to the present. Discusses natural selection in detail. Suggests that, besides biological evolution, there is also a cultural evolution which is more rapid than the former. (MA)

  7. Evolution of Modes in Magnetically Insulated Crossed Field Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeall, S.; Greenwood, A.; Cartwright, K.; Fleming, T.; Mardahl, P.; Lau, Y. Y.; Roderick, N.

    2006-10-01

    The time-dependent behavior of electron sheaths in a magnetically insulated B>BHull anode-cathode gap with crossed electric and magnetic fields is studied. The crossed-field, space-charge limited diode is modeled for various magnetic fields by means of multidimensional (1d and 2d), self consistent, electromagnetic, particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations in both cylindrical and planar geometries. The transient behavior of the system is examined in detail and is divided into three separate stages: cycloidal flow, collapse of cycloidal flow and sheared (near-Brillouin) flow. Our 2d electromagnetic PIC simulations (both planar and cylindrical) show that cycloidal flow also collapses into a perturbed flow that is dominated by the E cross B drift, but is neither steady nor stable. This observed cycloidal flow instability is a kinetic mode, not a fluid mode such as the magnetron or diocotron instability. The growth of the kinetic mode is faster than that of either of the above mentioned fluid instabilities. After the kinetic mode saturates, the fastest growing fluid mode grows to dominate the system. The SWS is added by three different methods to separate the RF effects from the DC electric field effects created by the SWS. The first method is to add a circuit to the anode that does not effect the DC electric fields, the second is to add the SWS by placing a thin dielectric (with and unphysical large dielectric constant), and last is to add the geometric SWS.

  8. Early Earth evolution: new insight from Sm and Nd isotopes in meteoritic inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvier, A.; Boyet, M.

    2014-12-01

    The interpretation of Sm-Nd systematics for the early Earth relies on knowing the composition of the silicate Earth and the 146Sm decay constant. We have measured both 146Sm-142Nd and 147Sm-143Nd internal systematics of four individual Calcium, Aluminum-rich Inclusions (CAIs), the first solids formed in the Solar System [1], from 3 different carbonaceous chondrites from the CV3 group: Allende, Northwest Africa (NWA) 2364 and NWA 6991. Results obtained on NWA 6991 plot on a well-defined mineral and bulk isochron with a Solar System initial 146Sm/144Sm ratio of 0.0070 ±0.0024. This ratio is more consistent with the ratio defined from internal isochrons of differentiated meteorites using the half-life of 103 Ma for 146Sm [2], instead of the value obtained considering the half-life of 68 Ma [3]. On the basis of nucleosynthethic anomalies in Sm and Nd isotopes [4], the ordinary (O) and enstatite (E) chondrites remain potential candidates for the Earth's building blocks. OC have an average deficit of -18±3 ppm relative to modern terrestrial 142Nd/144Nd, whereas EC range from the OC to the terrestrial values [4-6]. Sm stable isotope compositions of the analyzed CAIs indicate that galactic cosmic rays did not affect the 142Nd/144Nd compositions, but deficits are found in the pure p-process 144Sm nuclide (-240 to -290 ppm/ standard). These deficits may translate to 142Nd deficits of a few ppm. NWA 6991 CAI 146Sm-142Nd internal isochron passes through a 142Nd/144Nd ratio of -6 ±6 ppm relative to the terrestrial standard at a chondritic 147Sm/144Nd of 0.1960. We note that this value is identical to the enstatite chondrite average and the 142Nd/144Nd ratio of the lunar mantle, as defined recently by [7] using a chondritic Sm/Nd and Lu/Hf for the bulk Moon. While the determination of the Sm-Nd reference parameters for the bulk Earth is still contentious, the difference in 142Nd/144Nd between modern terrestrial rocks and meteorites analyzed so far is <10ppm. [1] Bouvier and

  9. Mg Isotope variations of Marinoan Cap Carbonates: implications for the chemical evolution of Neoproterozoic Ocean after snowball earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Macdonald, F. A.; Raub, T.; Wang, Z.; Evans, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    We report Mg isotope profiles of two cap-carbonates: Nuccaleena formation from south Australia (mostly dolostones) and Tsagaan Oloom Formation from southwest Mongolia (including dolostones, aragonite crystal fans, and lime-mudstones). These data provide additional constraints on the chemical evolution of Neoproterozoic Oceans after the Marinoan deglaciation. An incremental leaching technique using ammonium acetate and various concentrations of acetic acid and hydrochloric acid was applied to separate metals in various forms from cap-carbonates (including surface adsorbed phases, calcite, dolomite and clay minerals). The leachates were then passed through chromatographic columns to extract pure Mg and Sr, which were then analyzed for their isotopic compositions by MC-ICP-MS (Neptune) at Yale University. Elemental ratios (Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca) in each leaching steps were also measured. Our results show that small variations of δ26MgDSM3 with leaching steps were observed in most dolostone samples when secondary calcite is absent. In contrast, large Mg isotope variations (up to 1.5 per mil) were shown in the leaching steps of limestone and crystal fans. The primary δ26MgDSM3 value of each sample was chosen from the leachate that has the lowest 87Sr/86Sr ratios. The δ26MgDSM3 value of Nuccaleena dolostone increases from -2.2‰ at the basal part of the section to -1.7‰ in the middle, and then turns back to -2.0‰ on the top, with a positive correlation between 26Mg/24Mg and 87Sr/86Sr ratios, implying that the high δ26MgDSM3 values may be caused by alteration or inherit from continental-derived fluids. In contrast, small δ26MgDSM3 variations in Tsagaan Oloom dolostones were exhibited in different leaching steps or cross the section (~-1.7‰), with high 87Sr/86Sr ratios (~0.7090), resembling cap dolostones from middle part of Nuccaleena dolostone, implying that they are formed in a similar environment. However, the δ26MgDSM3 value of upper lime-mudstones and crystal

  10. Tectonics, climate, and landscape evolution of the southern-central Andes revealed by leaf wax stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrmann, A.; Sachse, D.; Mulch, A.; Pingel, H.; Nieto-Moreno, V.; Alonso, R. N.; Strecker, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    Orogenic plateaus and their flanking ranges strongly impact regional and global hydrology, vegetation, and erosion patterns. In the last decade, reconstructions of the topographic evolution of plateaus and mountain belts have increasingly relied on leaf wax hydrogen isotope data (δDwax), a paleo-hydrology proxy obtained from organic material in sedimentary rocks. Today, the isotopic composition of precipitation and leaf waxes is influenced by orography, and sedimentary strata deposited during topographic growth in the geologic past may record this relationship. We use a multi-isotope-proxy approach with δDwax and δ13Cwax from the 4-km-high Andean Plateau (Pastos Grandes Basin - PGB, 24°38' S, 66°40' W) and a 2-km-high intermontane basin (Angastaco Basin, 25°41' S, 66°04' W) located farther east in the E Cordillera to separate potential influences and to decipher spatiotemporal patterns of (eco) hydrological changes during Tertiary topographic growth. The PGB hosts folded sediments that span 9 to 2 Ma, and it has been an integral part of the Andean Plateau since at least 15 Ma. δDwax values in the PGB sediments record a decrease from -125 to -203 ‰ between 8.5 and 7.6 Ma, which coincides with the disappearance of red beds and evaporites. A similar, but less pronounced D-depletion from -107 to -144 ‰ is recorded by the Angastaco Basin sediments over the same time interval. We suggest that this regional signal may reflect the onset of moisture transport into this inherently dry region via the South American Low-Level Jet. Concurrently, δ13Cwax values on the plateau increased from -32.5 to -27.5 ‰ and reflect (eco) hydrological changes, while no such changes are observed in the Angastaco Basin. Subsequent folding of PGB strata documents continuous intrabasinal deformation until 2 Ma, with potential elevation gain within the plateau. δDwax values from the plateau increase from -218 to -152 ‰ over this time interval. Our observations suggest enhanced

  11. Re-Os isotopic constraints on the evolution of the Bangong-Nujiang Tethyan oceanic mantle, Central Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qi-Shuai; Shi, Ren-Deng; O'Reilly, Suzanne Y.; Griffin, William L.; Zhang, Ming; Liu, De-Liang; Zhang, Xiao-Ran

    2015-05-01

    Geochemical (including Re-Os isotopic) studies of the mantle rocks of ophiolites in the Bangong-Nujiang suture zone in central Tibet have provided a coherent picture of the evolution of the Bangong-Nujiang Tethyan oceanic mantle from mid-ocean ridge (MOR) to subduction-zone (SSZ) settings. Clinopyroxene (cpx)-harzburgites and lherzolites in the Bangong Lake ophiolite were formed in a MOR setting, as demonstrated by the Cr# of spinels (< 0.60) and whole-rock LREE-depleted patterns. Suprachondritic 187Re/188Os ratios (up to 1.833) of cpx-harzburgites and their spinels can be explained by interaction with melts derived from high Re/Os sources. Re-depletion (TRD) model ages (0.48-0.55 Ga) suggest these rocks may represent a Pan-African domain beneath the Gondwana continent. High TiO2 contents of spinels and whole-rock samples imply that the lherzolites were formed through a refertilization process. Similarly, Re-Os isotopic systematics of sulfides in the lherzolites (187Re/188Os: 0.173-1.717, 187Os/188Os: 0.12646-0.17340) demonstrate that they are mixtures of primary and secondary sulfides. 187Os/188Os ratios (0.1211-0.1226) of whole-rock lherzolites give TRD ages of 0.73-0.97 Ga, indicating the presence of Neoproterozoic lithospheric mantle under the spreading ridges. Mantle rocks in the SSZ-type ophiolites from Bangong Lake, Dongqiao and Nagqu reflect the complex evolution of the Bangong-Nujiang oceanic mantle during the SSZ stage. Most harzburgites from the Bangong Lake ophiolite give TRD ages of 1.0-1.5 Ga, possibly representing relics of a Mesoproterozoic lithospheric mantle. However, three samples have both high Os contents (1.32-4.45 ppb) and near-chondritic 187Os/188Os (0.1260-0.1297), and may represent Mesozoic oceanic lithospheric mantle. 187Os/188Os ratios of dunites and harzburgites from the Dongqiao and Nagqu ophiolites vary from 0.1174 to 0.1316 and give TRD ages up to 1.43 Ga, also suggesting the existence of a Mesoproterozoic lithospheric mantle which

  12. Stable Isotope Evidence for a Complex Fluid Evolution of the Northwestern British Columbia Coast Ranges Related to Terrane Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moertle, J.; Holk, G. J.

    2015-12-01

    Stable isotope geochemistry reveals a complex fluid evolution for the Western Metamorphic Belt (WMB), Coast Ranges Batholith (CRB), Central Gneiss Complex (CGC) and Coast Ranges Megalineament (CRM). These fluids are a product of a complex tectonic history related to terrane accretion that includes oblique convergence, metamorphism, magmatism, and orogenic collapse. From W-to-E, these fluid systems are as follows. High-pressure greenschist-to-amphibolite facies metasedimentary rocks of the WMB record variable mineral δD (-61 to -104‰) and δ18O (e.g., quartz +9.6 to +13.4‰) values with multiple minerals in apparent isotopic equilibrium (T ~ 450-550°C) suggest a low W/R system dominated by metamorphic fluids. Variable and non-equilibrium δD (-53 to -143‰) and δ18O (e.g., biotite +2.3 to +5.3‰) values from diorites of the Quottoon pluton affected by the ductile CRM suggest a complex evolution that involved both metamorphic and meteoric-hydrothermal fluids in this dextral shear zone; these results differ from those 300 km along strike to the north that documented only metamorphic fluids in the CRM (Goldfarb et al., 1988). Our data and those of Magaritz and Taylor (1976) from granulite facies metasediments of the CGC and plutons of the western CRB reveal homogeneous δD values (-62 to -78‰) and a restricted range of δ18O values (e.g., quartz +8.5 to +11.5‰) with all minerals in equilibrium at T > 570°C indicate a system dominated by magmatic fluids. Calculated whole-rock δ18O values (~ +7‰) for the Quottoon pluton and CRB intrusive rocks suggest a mantle origin for these magmas. Reinterpretation of very low δD (< -150‰) and quartz-feldspar δ18O pairs that display extreme disequilibrium (feldspar δ18O values as low as -5‰) from the Ponder pluton, eastern CRB, and Hazelton Group point reveals that the major meteoric-hydrothermal system that affected these rocks was related to Eocene detachment faulting along the Shames Lake fault system, a

  13. The effect of normal electric field on the evolution of immiscible Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tofighi, Nima; Ozbulut, Murat; Feng, James J.; Yildiz, Mehmet

    2016-04-01

    Manipulation of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability using an external electric field has been the subject of many studies. However, most of these studies are focused on early stages of the evolution. In this work, the long-term evolution of the instability is investigated, focusing on the forces acting on the interface between the two fluids. To this end, numerical simulations are carried out at various electric permittivity and conductivity ratios as well as electric field intensities using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method. The electric field is applied in parallel to gravity to maintain unstable evolution. The results show that increasing top-to-bottom permittivity ratio increases the rising velocity of the bubble while hindering the spike descent. The opposite trend is observed for increasing top-to-bottom conductivity ratio. These effects are amplified at larger electric field intensities, resulting in narrower structures as the response to the excitation is non-uniform along the interface.

  14. Evolution of quantum field, particle content, and classicality in the three stage universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Suprit; Modak, Sujoy Kumar; Padmanabhan, T.

    2013-12-01

    We study the evolution of a quantum scalar field in a toy universe which has three stages of evolution, viz., (i) an early (inflationary) de Sitter phase (ii) radiation-dominated phase and (iii) late-time (cosmological constant dominated) de Sitter phase. Using the Schrödinger picture, the scalar field equations are solved separately for the three stages and matched at the transition points. The boundary conditions are chosen so that field modes in the early de Sitter evolves from the Bunch-Davies vacuum state. We determine the (time-dependent) particle content of this quantum state for the entire evolution of the universe and describe the various features both numerically and analytically. We also describe the quantum to classical transition in terms of a classicality parameter which tracks the particle creation and its effect on phase space correlation of the quantum field.

  15. The evolution of the electric field at a nonstationary perpendicular shock

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z. W.; Lu, Q. M.; Wang, S.

    2009-12-15

    Particle-in-cell simulations evidenced that supercritical, quasiperpendicular shocks are nonstationary and may suffer a self-reformation on the ion gyroscale. In this brief communication, we investigate the evolution of the electric field at a nonstationary, supercritial perpendicular shock. The contributions of the ion Lorentz, Hall, and electron pressure terms to the electric field are analyzed. During the evolution of the perpendicular shock, a new ramp may be formed in front of the old ramp, and its amplitude becomes larger and larger. At last, the new ramp exceeds the old one, and such a nonstationary process can be formed periodically. When the new ramp begins to be formed in front of the old ramp, the Hall term becomes more and more important. The electric field E{sub x} is dominated by the Hall term when the new ramp exceeds the old one. The significance of the evolution of the electric field on shock acceleration is also discussed.

  16. Functional morphology, stable isotopes, and human evolution: a model of consilience.

    PubMed

    Yeakel, Justin D; Dominy, Nathaniel J; Koch, Paul L; Mangel, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Foraging is constrained by the energy within resources and the mechanics of acquisition and assimilation. Thick molar enamel, a character trait differentiating hominins from African apes, is predicted to mitigate the mechanical costs of chewing obdurate foods. The classic expression of hyperthick enamel together with relatively massive molars, termed megadontia, is most evident in Paranthropus, a lineage of hominins that lived about 2.7-1.2 million years ago. Among contemporary primates, thicker molar enamel corresponds with the consumption of stiffer, deformation-resistant foods, possibly because thicker enamel can better resist cracking under high compressive loads. Accordingly, plant underground storage organs (USOs) are thought to be a central food resource for hominins such as Paranthropus due to their abundance, isotopic composition, and mechanical properties. Here, we present a process-based model to investigate foraging constraints as a function of energetic demands and enamel wear among human ancestors. Our framework allows us to determine the fitness benefits of megadontia, and to explore under what conditions stiff foods such as USOs are predicted to be chosen as fallback, rather than preferred, resources. Our model predictions bring consilience to the noted disparity between functional interpretations of megadontia and microwear evidence, particularly with respect to Paranthropus boisei. PMID:24372604

  17. Canadian Network for Isotopes in Precipitation (CNIP)and Isotope Climatology and Hydroclimatology in Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birks, S. J.; Edwards, T. W.; Gibson, J. J.

    2002-12-01

    The distribution of stable isotopes in precipitation provides fundamental information about the partitioning of the global atmospheric water budget, and hence about key aspects of Earth's climate, that cannot be discerned using other means. Although continuing demand exists for monitoring of isotopes in precipitation to define isotopic input functions for local hydrologic studies or for calibration of isotopic indicators of paleoclimate, based on longterm averages and climatological norms, awareness is also growing of the significant value of the monthly snapshots of the precipitation isotope field provided by the IAEA/WMO Global Network for Isotopes in Precipitation and its affiliated national networks as benchmark maps of the ongoing and dynamic evolution of the global water cycle. An initiative within the Canadian Network for Isotopes in Precipitation program includes development of a spatial and temporal database incorporating Canadian data to create a gridded isotope overlay compatible with gridded pressure and flux field data from the NCAR/CDAS Re-analysis Project. This database includes interpolated fields of our current best approximations of climatological isotopic means in addition to the original monthly data for the period 1997-2000. Studies are underway to test the sensitivity of the isotope-climate signal in precipitation to changes in these parameters utilizing perturbations in local climate arising from the El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Intriguing results have been obtained from preliminary studies incorporating pressure and flux field data for the 1997-98 El Nino with CNIP isotope overlays. The strongest climate anomalies were found during the winter following the 1997 El Nino event, consistent with the expected strengthening of the Pacific North American pattern during this period. Comparisons of the isotopic fields with climate fields illustrate the complexity and dynamic nature of isotope climate not evident in time-series of data from

  18. Helium isotope study of geothermal features in Chile with field and laboratory data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dobson, Patrick

    2013-02-11

    Helium isotope and stable isotope data from the El Tatio, Tinginguirica, Chillan, and Tolhuaca geothermal systems, Chile. Data from this submission are discussed in: Dobson, P.F., Kennedy, B.M., Reich, M., Sanchez, P., and Morata, D. (2013) Effects of volcanism, crustal thickness, and large scale faulting on the He isotope signatures of geothermal systems in Chile. Proceedings, 38th Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University, Feb. 11-13, 2013

  19. Kinematic and Structural Evolution of Field and Cluster Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, B. L.; Kutdemir, E.; Da Rocha, C.; Böhm, A.; Peletier, R. F.; Verdugo, M.

    2010-10-01

    To understand the processes that build up galaxies we investigate the stellar structure and gas kinematics of spiral and irregular galaxies out to redshift 1. We target 92 galaxies in four cluster ( z = 0.3 & 0.5 ) fields to study the environmental influence. Their stellar masses derived from multiband VLT/FORS photometry are distributed around but mostly below the characteristic Schechter-fit mass. From HST/ACS images we determine morphologies and structural parameters like disk length, position angle and ellipticity. Combining the spectra of three slit positions per galaxy using the MXU mode of VLT/FORS2 we construct the two-dimensional velocity field from gas emission lines for 16 cluster members and 33 field galaxies. The kinematic position angle and flatness are derived by a Fourier expansion of elliptical velocity profiles. To trace possible interaction processes, we define three irregularity indicators based on an identical analysis of local galaxies from the SINGS project. Our distant sample displays a higher fraction of disturbed velocity fields with varying percentages (10%, 30% and 70%) because they trace different features. While we find far fewer candidates for major mergers than the SINS sample at z ˜ 2, our data are sensitive enough to trace less violent processes. Most irregular signatures are related to star formation events and less massive disks are affected more than Milky-Way type objects. We detect similarly high fractions of irregular objects both for the distant field and cluster galaxies with similar distributions. We conclude that we may witness the building-up of disk galaxies still at redshifts z ˜ 0.5 via minor mergers and gas accretion, while some cluster members may additionally experience stripping, evaporation or harassment interactions.

  20. Geochemical and isotopic insights into the assembly, evolution and disruption of a magmatic plumbing system before and after a cataclysmic caldera-collapse eruption at Ischia volcano (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, R. J.; Civetta, L.; Arienzo, I.; D'Antonio, M.; Moretti, R.; Orsi, G.; Tomlinson, E. L.; Albert, P. G.; Menzies, M. A.

    2014-09-01

    New geochemical and isotopic data on volcanic rocks spanning the period ~75-50 ka BP on Ischia volcano, Italy, shed light on the evolution of the magmatic system before and after the catastrophic, caldera-forming Monte Epomeo Green Tuff (MEGT) eruption. Volcanic activity during this period was influenced by a large, composite and differentiating magmatic system, replenished several times with isotopically distinct magmas of deep provenance. Chemical and isotopic variations highlight that the pre-MEGT eruptions were fed by trachytic/phonolitic magmas from an isotopically zoned reservoir that were poorly enriched in radiogenic Sr and became progressively less radiogenic with time. Just prior to the MEGT eruption, the magmatic system was recharged by an isotopically distinct magma, relatively more enriched in radiogenic Sr with respect to the previously erupted magmas. This second magma initially fed several SubPlinian explosive eruptions and later supplied the climactic, phonolitic-to-trachytic MEGT eruption(s). Isotopic data, together with erupted volume estimations obtained for MEGT eruption(s), indicate that >5-10 km3 of this relatively enriched magma had accumulated in the Ischia plumbing system. Geochemical modelling indicates that it accumulated at shallow depths (4-6 km), over a period of ca. 20 ka. After the MEGT eruption, volcanic activity was fed by a new batch of less differentiated (trachyte-latite) magma that was slightly less enriched in radiogenic Sr. The geochemical and Sr-Nd-isotopic variations through time reflect the upward flux of isotopically distinct magma batches, variably contaminated by Hercynian crust at 8-12 km depth. The deep-sourced latitic to trachytic magmas stalled at shallow depths (4-6 km depth), differentiated to phonolite through crystal fractionation and assimilation of a feldspar-rich mush, or ascended directly to the surface and erupted.

  1. Constraints on Phanerozoic paleotemperature and seawater oxygen isotope evolution from the carbonate clumped isotope compositions of Late Paleozoic marine fossils (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkes, G. A.; Passey, B. H.; Grossman, E. L.; Pérez-Huerta, A.; Shenton, B.; Yancey, T. E.

    2013-12-01

    A long-standing geoscience controversy has been the interpretation of the observed several per mil increase in the oxygen isotope compositions of marine calcites over the Phanerozoic Eon. Explanations for this trend have included decreasing seawater paleotemperatures, increasing seawater oxygen isotope values, and post-depositional calcite alteration. Carbonate clumped isotope paleothermometry is a useful geochemical tool to test these hypotheses because of its lack of dependence on the bulk isotopic composition of the water from which carbonate precipitated. This technique is increasingly applied to ancient marine invertebrate shells, which can be screened for diagenesis using chemical and microstructural approaches. After several years of clumped isotope analysis of these marine carbonates in a handful of laboratories, a long-term temperature and isotopic trend is emerging, with the results pointing to relatively invariant seawater δ18O and generally decreasing seawater temperatures through the Phanerozoic. Uncertainties remain, however, including the effects of reordering of primary clumped isotope compositions via solid-state diffusion of C and O through the mineral lattice at elevated burial temperatures over hundred million year timescales. To develop a quantitative understanding of such reordering, we present data from laboratory heating experiments of late Paleozoic brachiopod calcite. When combined with kinetic models of the reordering reaction, the results of these experiments suggest that burial temperatures less than ~120 °C allow for preservation of primary brachiopod clumped isotope compositions over geological timescales. Analyses of well-preserved Carboniferous and Permian brachiopods reinforce these results by showing that shells with apparent clumped isotope temperatures of ~150 °C are associated with deep sedimentary burial (>5 km), whereas those with putatively primary paleotemperatures in the 10-30 °C range experienced no more than ~1.5 km

  2. Fluid-Rock Interaction in the Basement of the Lost City Vent Field: Insights from Stable and Radiogenic Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delacour, A.; Frueh-Green, G. L.; Frank, M.; Bernasconi, S. M.; Boschi, C.; Kelley, D. S.

    2004-12-01

    The Lost City Hydrothermal Vent Field (LCVF), with its characteristic carbonate-brucite chimneys, is located on a terrace, at a water depth of 750 to 850m on the southern escarpment of the Atlantis Massif (Mid-Atlantic Ridge 30oN). The Atlantis Massif, an oceanic core complex, consists of peridotites and gabbroic rocks that have undergone several phases of serpentinization, talc-metasomatism and carbonate precipitation related to progressive deformation and interaction with seawater during a long-lived exhumation history. We present stable and radiogenic isotope data from the serpentinized peridotites and gabbros that provide constraints on the history of seawater-rock interaction and the role of serpentinization in methane-production and sulfide mineral precipitation. Early phases of serpentinization and metasomatism occurred at temperatures up to ˜250oC, as indicated by depleted bulk-rock O-isotope compositions of the serpentinites and gabbros. Sr- and Nd-isotope data allow modelling and quantification of seawater-rock interaction. The isotopic compositions of the gabbros show heterogeneity, likely related to variable interaction/exchange with hydrothermal fluids. The serpentinites have Sr- and Nd-isotope compositions close to seawater values and correspond to high water/rock ratios (from 1.53 x 103 to 3.65 x 106), indicating large volumes of seawater circulating through the massif during serpentinization. In contrast, the serpentine-talc schists, resulting from high strain and focused fluid flow of Si-rich fluids during detachment faulting and exhumation, exhibit variable but low fluid/rock ratios (from 10 to 150). Analyses of bulk-rock carbon contents and carbon isotope compositions show total non-carbonate carbon contents of <600 ppm with C-isotope compositions of -29 to -22‰ (VPDB). The negative δ 13C values are likely linked to processes of fluid-rock interaction during serpentinization. C- and O-isotope compositions of carbonate-rich serpentinites and

  3. Carbon isotope discrimination during branch photosynthesis of Fagus sylvatica: field measurements using laser spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gentsch, Lydia; Sturm, Patrick; Hammerle, Albin; Siegwolf, Rolf; Wingate, Lisa; Ogée, Jérôme; Baur, Thomas; Plüss, Peter; Barthel, Matti; Buchmann, Nina; Knohl, Alexander

    2014-04-01

    On-line measurements of photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination ((13)Δ) under field conditions are sparse. Hence, experimental verification of the natural variability of instantaneous (13)Δ is scarce, although (13)Δ is, explicitly and implicitly, used from leaf to global scales for inferring photosynthetic characteristics. This work presents the first on-line field measurements of (13)Δ of Fagus sylvatica branches, at hourly resolution, using three open branch bags and a laser spectrometer for CO₂ isotopologue measurements (QCLAS-ISO). Data from two August/September field campaigns, in 2009 and 2010, in a temperate forest in Switzerland are shown. Diurnal variability of (13)Δ was substantial, with mean diurnal amplitudes of ~9‰ and maximum diurnal amplitudes of ~20‰. The highest (13)Δ were generally observed during early morning and late afternoon, and the lowest (13)Δ during midday. An assessment of propagated standard deviations of (13)Δ demonstrated that the observed diurnal variation of (13)Δ was not a measurement artefact. Day-to-day variations of (13)Δ were summarized with flux-weighted daily means of (13)Δ, which ranged from 15‰ to 23‰ in 2009 and from 18‰ to 29‰ in 2010, thus displaying a considerable range of 8-11‰. Generally, (13)Δ showed the expected negative relationship with intrinsic water use efficiency. Diurnal and day-to-day variability of (13)Δ was, however, always better predicted by that of net CO₂ assimilation, especially in 2010 when soil moisture was high and vapour pressure deficit was low. Stomatal control of leaf gas exchange, and consequently (13)Δ, could only be identified under drier conditions in 2009. PMID:24676031

  4. Nitrogen use efficiency evaluation of aerobic rice under field capacity water potential using 15N isotopic tracer technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahid, Ahmad Nazrul Abd; Rahim, Sahibin Abd; Rahim, Khairuddin Abdul; Harun, Abdul Rahim

    2015-09-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the efficiency use of the nitrogen fertilizer on aerobic rice varieties MR219-4 and MR219-9 which were grown aerobically under field capacity water potential at the controlled environment area or shield house. Direct 15N isotope tracer method was used in this study, whereby the 15N isotope was utilized as a tracer for nitrogen nutrient uptake. 15N isotope presence in the samples is determined by using emission spectrometer analysis and percentage of total nitrogen is determined by using Kjeldahl method. 15N atom access value contained in the sample will be used in determining the effectiveness of the use of nitrogen in fertilizers through the specific calculation formulas. In this work, the data several data of nitrogen derived from fertilizer (Ndff), total nitrogen, nitrogen uptake and nitrogen use efficiency was obtained.

  5. Nitrogen use efficiency evaluation of aerobic rice under field capacity water potential using {sup 15}N isotopic tracer technique

    SciTech Connect

    Wahid, Ahmad Nazrul Abd; Rahim, Sahibin Abd; Rahim, Khairuddin Abdul; Harun, Abdul Rahim

    2015-09-25

    This study was carried out to evaluate the efficiency use of the nitrogen fertilizer on aerobic rice varieties MR219-4 and MR219-9 which were grown aerobically under field capacity water potential at the controlled environment area or shield house. Direct {sup 15}N isotope tracer method was used in this study, whereby the {sup 15}N isotope was utilized as a tracer for nitrogen nutrient uptake. {sup 15}N isotope presence in the samples is determined by using emission spectrometer analysis and percentage of total nitrogen is determined by using Kjeldahl method. {sup 15}N atom access value contained in the sample will be used in determining the effectiveness of the use of nitrogen in fertilizers through the specific calculation formulas. In this work, the data several data of nitrogen derived from fertilizer (Ndff), total nitrogen, nitrogen uptake and nitrogen use efficiency was obtained.

  6. Equilibrium evolution in oscillating-field current-drive experiments

    SciTech Connect

    McCollam, K. J.; Anderson, J. K.; Blair, A. P.; Craig, D.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Ebrahimi, F.; O'Connell, R.; Reusch, J. A.; Sarff, J. S.; Stephens, H. D.; Stone, D. R.; Brower, D. L.; Deng, B. H.; Ding, W. X.

    2010-08-15

    Oscillating-field current drive (OFCD) is a proposed method of steady-state toroidal plasma sustainment in which ac poloidal and toroidal loop voltages are applied to produce a dc plasma current. OFCD is added to standard, inductively sustained reversed-field pinch plasmas in the Madison Symmetric Torus [R. N. Dexter et al., Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)]. Equilibrium profiles and fluctuations during a single cycle are measured and analyzed for different relative phases between the two OFCD voltages and for OFCD off. For OFCD phases leading to the most added plasma current, the measured energy confinement is slightly better than that for OFCD off. By contrast, the phase of the maximum OFCD helicity-injection rate also has the maximum decay rate, which is ascribed to transport losses during discrete magnetic-fluctuation events induced by OFCD. Resistive-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the experiments reproduce the observed phase dependence of the added current.

  7. Equilibrium evolution in oscillating-field current-drive experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollam, K. J.; Anderson, J. K.; Blair, A. P.; Craig, D.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Ebrahimi, F.; O'Connell, R.; Reusch, J. A.; Sarff, J. S.; Stephens, H. D.; Stone, D. R.; Brower, D. L.; Deng, B. H.; Ding, W. X.

    2010-08-01

    Oscillating-field current drive (OFCD) is a proposed method of steady-state toroidal plasma sustainment in which ac poloidal and toroidal loop voltages are applied to produce a dc plasma current. OFCD is added to standard, inductively sustained reversed-field pinch plasmas in the Madison Symmetric Torus [R. N. Dexter et al., Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)]. Equilibrium profiles and fluctuations during a single cycle are measured and analyzed for different relative phases between the two OFCD voltages and for OFCD off. For OFCD phases leading to the most added plasma current, the measured energy confinement is slightly better than that for OFCD off. By contrast, the phase of the maximum OFCD helicity-injection rate also has the maximum decay rate, which is ascribed to transport losses during discrete magnetic-fluctuation events induced by OFCD. Resistive-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the experiments reproduce the observed phase dependence of the added current.

  8. Cosmic Evolution of Scalar Fields with Multiple Vacua: Generalized DBI and Quintessence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Changjun; Shen, You-Gen

    2016-06-01

    We find a method to rewrite the equations of motion of scalar fields, generalized DBI field and quintessence, in the autonomous form for arbitrary scalar potentials. With the aid of this method, we explore the cosmic evolution of generalized DBI field and quintessence with the potential of multiple vacua. Then we find that the scalars are always frozen in the false or true vacuum in the end. Compared to the evolution of quintessence, the generalized DBI field has more times of oscillations around the vacuum of the potential. The reason for this point is that, with the increasing of speed dot {φ }, the friction term of generalized DBI field is greatly decreased. Thus the generalized DBI field acquires more times of oscillations.

  9. Structure and evolution of the heliospheric magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdos, Geza

    Global structure of the heliospheric magnetic field is investigated through several solar cycles. The study includes magnetic field measurements by space probes located in various spaces in the heliosphere. The latitudinal extent of the heliospheric current sheet is determined from the off-ecliptic observation by Ulysses during the declining phase of solar cycles 22 and 23. The results are compared to the latitudinal excursion of the neutral line on the source surface maps, the deviations are interpreted in relation with the characteristics of the solar cycles. The open magnetic flux of the sun, as determined from interplanetary measurements is best characterized by the radial component of the magnetic field. It is shown that the distribution of the radial component is a complex function of the location in the heliosphere, of the type of solar wind (i.e., slow or fast), and of the phase of the solar cycle. We demonstrate that this complexity is due to fluctuations of the magnetic field, the effect of which can be largely reduced by exploiting the symmetry features of the waves. Two methods are presented for the corrections of the interplanetary flux measurements. It is shown that the corrected magnetic flux density measured by the Ulysses around its solar polar orbit from 1990 to 2009 matches that calculated from the OMNI in-ecliptic, 1 AU data set over the same interval. This result shows that the sun's magnetic flux is generally distributed uniformly in the heliosphere and depends only on the total open magnetic flux of the sun. We calculate the open magnetic flux of the sun from the OMNI data base covering four solar cycles and the values are compared to the total open magnetic flux of the sun as determined from source surface models. The match is fairly good except for the raising phase of the solar cycles. The possible reasons are discussed.

  10. Evolution of Modes in Magnetically Insulated Crossed-Field Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, Keith

    2005-10-01

    The time-dependent behavior of electron sheaths in a magnetically insulated B>BHull anode-cathode gap with crossed electric and magnetic fields is studied. The crossed-field, diode is modeled for various magnetic fields by means of multidimensional (1d and 2d), self-consistent, electromagnetic, particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The transient behavior of the system is examined in detail and is divided into three separate stages: cycloidal flow, collapse of cycloidal flow and sheared (near-Brillouin) flow. It has been shown in 1d planar geometry that the cycloidal flows collapse into a steady, near-Brillouin flow. Our 2d electromagnetic PIC simulations (both planar and cylindrical) show that cycloidal flows also collapses into a flow that is dominated by the E cross B drift, but is neither steady nor stable. The growth of the kinetic mode is faster than that of either magnetron or diocotron fluid instability. After the kinetic mode saturates, the fastest growing fluid mode grows to dominate the system. A slow wave structure (SWS) is added to the anode that matches the wavelength and frequency of the fastest growing fluid instability. The SWS is then perturbed so that wavelength and/or frequency does not match the smooth bore diode growth rate and the region of `lock-in' to the SWS is found. This work is supported by a grant from AFOSR.

  11. Evolution of Arbitrary States under Fock—Darwin Hamiltonian and a Time-Dependent Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiao-Fei; Yang, Tao; Zhai, Zhi-Yuan; Pan, Xiao-Yin

    2012-01-01

    The method of path integral is employed to calculate the time evolution of the eigenstates of a charged particle under the Fock—Darwin (FD) Hamiltonian subjected to a time-dependent electric field in the plane of the system. An exact analytical expression is established for the evolution of the eigenstates. This result then provides a general solution to the time-dependent Schrödinger equation.

  12. Field evidence of beach profile evolution toward equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludka, B. C.; Guza, R. T.; O'Reilly, W. C.; Yates, M. L.

    2015-11-01

    An equilibrium framework is used to describe the evolution of the cross-shore profile of five beaches (medium grain size sand) in southern California. Elevations were observed quarterly on cross-shore transects extending from the back beach to 8 m depth, for 3-10 years. Transects spaced 100 m in the alongshore direction are alongshore averaged into nineteen 700-900 m long sections. Consistent with previous observations, changes about the time average profile in many sections are captured by the first mode empirical orthogonal function (EOF). The first EOF poorly describes sections with hard substrate (less than roughly 80% sandy bottom) and also fails near the head of a submarine canyon and adjacent to an inlet. At the 12 well-described sections, the time-varying amplitude of the first EOF, the beach state A, describes the well-known seasonal sand exchange between the shoreline and offshore (roughly between 4 and 7 m depth). We show that the beach state change rate dA/dt depends on the disequilibrium between the present state A and wave conditions, consistent with the equilibrium concepts of Wright and Short (1984) and Wright et al. (1985). Empirically determined, optimal model coefficients using the framework of Yates et al. (2009a, 2011) vary between sections, but a single set of globally optimized values performs almost as well. The model implements equilibrium concepts using ad hoc assumptions and empirical parameter values. The similarity with observed profile change at five southern California beaches supports the underlying model equilibrium hypotheses, but for unknown reasons the model fails at Duck, NC.

  13. Implications for the evolution of continental crust from Hf isotope systematics of detrital zircons in Archean sandstones

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, R.K.

    1989-01-01

    The fractionation of zircons by sedimentary processes into continental margin sandstone deposits results in a biased preservation of pre-existing continental crust in the form of zircon in those sequences. This provides a unique opportunity to distinguish between the contrasting theories of episodic growth versus constant volume of continental crust over geologic time through Hf isotope ratios of detrital zircons. {sup 176}Hf/{sup 177}Hf ratios were determined for detrital zircon fractions from 2.6-3.0 Ga old sedimentary sequences from the Canadian Shield, North Atlantic, Wyoming, and Kaapvaal Cratons. The data strongly suggest inheritance of pre-3.0 Ga zircons only in areas where pre-3.0 Ga old crust exists today, and imply that the quantity of continental crust prior to 3.0 Ga ago was not much greater in extent than the pre-3.0 Ga crust exposed today. Small amounts of continental crust prior to 3.0 Ga ago and rapid addition of continental crust between 2.5 and 3.0 Ga ago are consistent with the episodic growth theory of crustal evolution.

  14. Lead isotope systematics in Polytrichum formosum: An example from a biomonitoring field study with mosses

    SciTech Connect

    Kunert, M.; Friese, K.; Weckert, V.; Markert, B.

    1999-10-15

    With the aid of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), {sup 206/207}Pb isotope ratios were determined in 34 moss samples (Polytrichum formosum) taken from the Hoerner Bruch area near Osnabrueck (FRG) in the years 1987--1996. The goal was to distinguish different sources of atmospheric lead pollution by the investigation of lead isotope ratios. Reproducibility tests were carried out to ensure the reliability of analyzing Pb isotope ratios in moss samples by means of quadrupole ICP-MS. The reproducibility of the isotope ratios for one digested sample and the day-to-day reproducibility were determined. In all the moss samples analyzed, relative standard deviations of < 0.26% for five replicate measurements of one digested sample were achieved for the {sup 206/207}Pb isotope ratios. On the basis of the {sup 206/207}Pb isotope ratio, it was possible to establish that the sources of man-made atmospheric inputs of lead have changed over the 10-year period investigated. In the moss samples analyzed, the {sup 206/207}Pb isotope ratio was found to have risen significantly from 1.131 in 1987 to 1.154 in 1996. This increase in the {sup 206/207}Pb isotope ratio can be attributed to a reduction of atmospheric inputs of lead from petrol.

  15. Enabling Continuous, Field-Based Isotope and Greenhouse Gas Measurements with WS-CRDS-based Analyzers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rella, C.; van Pelt, A.

    2009-04-01

    When new instrumentation becomes widely available, it has the power to fundamentally change how measurements are made. In particular, technology developments that enable measurements to be done more simply, at lower cost, by a greater number of scientists, moving information-rich, laboratory-quality measurements from the lab out into the field -- these are the innovations that can aid in moving the science forward. Here we describe how the application of a novel cavity-enhanced spectroscopic technique called wavelength scanned cavity ring down spectroscopy (WS-CRDS) has been pivotal in developing gas an isotope analyzers capable of being deployed in the field, unattended, for long periods of time. This particular implementation of the traditional cavity ring down technique employs several additional key aspects of control and design to achieve highly sensitive, highly stable measurements. WS-CRDS owes its high sensitivity to an extremely long optical interaction pathlengh, as well as to its complete immunity to laser noise since the laser is actually off during the measurement. To stabilize the spectroscopic line itself, the temperature and pressure of the gas are tightly controlled. The analyzer's optical cavity, gas handling system and analog electronics are themselves also tightly temperature controlled. The heart of the WS-CRDS technique is, however, the wavelength monitor which further ensures the stability of the measurement by continuously measuring and tightly controlling the laser wavelength. A key design aspect of the WS-CRDS analyzer is its three-mirror, traveling-wave cavity which allows optical backreflections to be avoided and further adds to the inherent stability of the optical train. The analyzer owes its ease of use to the design requirement that it be field-deployable, in locations without personnel, with the ability to restart itself and automatically resume collecting data even after a power failure. Beyond the design aspects of the analyzer

  16. Model for the Coupled Evolution of Subsurface and Coronal Magnetic Fields in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ballegooijen, A. A.; Mackay, D. H.

    2007-04-01

    According to Babcock's theory of the solar dynamo, bipolar active regions are Ω-shaped loops emerging from a toroidal field located near the base of the convection zone. In this paper, a mean field model for the evolution of a twisted Ω-loop is developed. The model describes the coupled evolution of the magnetic field in the convection zone and the corona after the loop has fully emerged into the solar atmosphere. Such a coupled evolution is required to fully understand what happens to the coronal and subsurface fields as magnetic flux cancels at polarity inversion lines on the photosphere. The jump conditions for the magnetic field at the photosphere are derived from the magnetic stress balance between the convection zone and corona. The model reproduces the observed spreading of active region magnetic flux over the solar surface. At polarity inversion lines, magnetic flux submerges below the photosphere, but the component of magnetic field along the inversion line cannot submerge, because the field in the upper convection zone is nearly radial. Therefore, magnetic shear builds up in the corona above the inversion line, which eventually leads to a loss of equilibrium of the coronal fields and the ``lift-off'' of a coronal flux rope. Fields that submerge are transported back to the base of the convection zone, leading to the repair of the toroidal flux rope. Following Martens and Zwaan, interactions between bipoles are also considered.

  17. Evolution of continental crust and mantle heterogeneity: Evidence from Hf isotopes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jonathan, Patchett P.; Kouvo, O.; Hedge, C.E.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1982-01-01

    We present initial 176Hf/177 Hf ratios for many samples of continental crust 3.7-0.3 Gy old. Results are based chiefly on zircons (1% Hf) and whole rocks: zircons are shown to be reliable carriers of essentially the initial Hf itself when properly chosen on the basis of U-Pb studies. Pre-3.0 Gy gneisses were apparently derived from an unfractionated mantle, but both depleted and undepleted mantle are evident as magma sources from 2.9 Gy to present. This mantle was sampled mainly from major crustal growth episodes 2.8, 1.8 and 0.7 Gy ago, all of which show gross heterogeneity of 176Hf/177Hf in magma sources from ??Hf=0 to +14, or about 60% of the variability of the present mantle. The approximate ??Hf=2??Nd relationship in ancient and modern igneous rocks shows that 176Lu/177Hf fractionates in general twice as much as 147Sm/144Nd in mantle melting processes. This allows an estimation of the relative value of the unknown bulk solid/liquid distribution coefficient for Hf. DLu/DHf=??? 2.3 holds for most mantle source regions. For garnet to be an important residual mantle phase, it must hold Hf strongly in order to preserve Hf-Nd isotopic relationships. The ancient Hf initials are consistent with only a small proportion of recycled older cratons in new continental crust, and with quasi-continuous, episodic growth of the continental crust with time. However, recycling of crust less than 150 My old cannot realistically be detected using Hf initials. The mantle shows clearly the general positive ??Hf resulting from a residual geochemical state at least back to 2.9 Gy ago, and seems to have repeatedly possessed a similar degree of heterogeneity, rather than a continuously-developing depletion. This is consistent with a complex dynamic disequilibrium model for the creation, maintenance and destruction of heterogeneity in the mantle. ?? 1981 Springer-Verlag.

  18. TESTING MODELS OF MAGNETIC FIELD EVOLUTION OF NEUTRON STARS WITH THE STATISTICAL PROPERTIES OF THEIR SPIN EVOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Shuangnan; Xie Yi

    2012-10-01

    We test models for the evolution of neutron star (NS) magnetic fields (B). Our model for the evolution of the NS spin is taken from an analysis of pulsar timing noise presented by Hobbs et al.. We first test the standard model of a pulsar's magnetosphere in which B does not change with time and magnetic dipole radiation is assumed to dominate the pulsar's spin-down. We find that this model fails to predict both the magnitudes and signs of the second derivatives of the spin frequencies ({nu}-double dot). We then construct a phenomenological model of the evolution of B, which contains a long-term decay (LTD) modulated by short-term oscillations; a pulsar's spin is thus modified by its B-evolution. We find that an exponential LTD is not favored by the observed statistical properties of {nu}-double dot for young pulsars and fails to explain the fact that {nu}-double dot is negative for roughly half of the old pulsars. A simple power-law LTD can explain all the observed statistical properties of {nu}-double dot. Finally, we discuss some physical implications of our results to models of the B-decay of NSs and suggest reliable determination of the true ages of many young NSs is needed, in order to constrain further the physical mechanisms of their B-decay. Our model can be further tested with the measured evolutions of {nu}-dot and {nu}-double dot for an individual pulsar; the decay index, oscillation amplitude, and period can also be determined this way for the pulsar.

  19. A comparison of force fields and calculation methods for vibration intervals of isotopic H3(+) molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carney, G. D.; Adler-Golden, S. M.; Lesseski, D. C.

    1986-04-01

    This paper reports (1) improved values for low-lying vibration intervals of H3(+), H2D(+), D2H(+), and D3(+) calculated using the variational method and Simons-Parr-Finlan (1973) representations of the Carney-Porter (1976) and Dykstra-Swope (1979) ab initio H3(+) potential energy surfaces, (2) quartic normal coordinate force fields for isotopic H3(+) molecules, (3) comparisons of variational and second-order perturbation theory, and (4) convergence properties of the Lai-Hagstrom internal coordinate vibrational Hamiltonian. Standard deviations between experimental and ab initio fundamental vibration intervals of H3(+), H2D(+), D2H(+), and D3(+) for these potential surfaces are 6.9 (Carney-Porter) and 1.2/cm (Dykstra-Swope). The standard deviations between perturbation theory and exact variational fundamentals are 5 and 10/cm for the respective surfaces. The internal coordinate Hamiltonian is found to be less efficient than the previously employed 't' coordinate Hamiltonian for these molecules, except in the case of H2D(+).

  20. Phylomemetic patterns in science evolution--the rise and fall of scientific fields.

    PubMed

    Chavalarias, David; Cointet, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-01

    We introduce an automated method for the bottom-up reconstruction of the cognitive evolution of science, based on big-data issued from digital libraries, and modeled as lineage relationships between scientific fields. We refer to these dynamic structures as phylomemetic networks or phylomemies, by analogy with biological evolution; and we show that they exhibit strong regularities, with clearly identifiable phylomemetic patterns. Some structural properties of the scientific fields - in particular their density -, which are defined independently of the phylomemy reconstruction, are clearly correlated with their status and their fate in the phylomemy (like their age or their short term survival). Within the framework of a quantitative epistemology, this approach raises the question of predictibility for science evolution, and sketches a prototypical life cycle of the scientific fields: an increase of their cohesion after their emergence, the renewal of their conceptual background through branching or merging events, before decaying when their density is getting too low. PMID:23408947

  1. The role of rotation in the evolution of dynamo-generated magnetic fields in Super Earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuluaga, Jorge I.; Cuartas, Pablo A.

    2012-01-01

    Planetary magnetic fields could impact the evolution of planetary atmospheres and have a role in the determination of the required conditions for the emergence and evolution of life (planetary habitability). We study here the role of rotation in the evolution of dynamo-generated magnetic fields in massive Earth-like planets, Super Earths (1-10 M⊕). Using the most recent thermal evolution models of Super Earths (Gaidos, E., Conrad, C.P., Manga, M., Hernlund, J. [2010]. Astrophys. J. 718, 596-609; Tachinami, C., Senshu, H., Ida, S. [2011]. Astrophys. J. 726, 70) and updated scaling laws for convection-driven dynamos, we predict the evolution of the local Rossby number. This quantity is one of the proxies for core magnetic field regime, i.e. non-reversing dipolar, reversing dipolar and multipolar. We study the dependence of the local Rossby number and hence the core magnetic field regime on planetary mass and rotation rate. Previous works have focused only on the evolution of core magnetic fields assuming rapidly rotating planets, i.e. planets in the dipolar regime. In this work we go further, including the effects of rotation in the evolution of planetary magnetic field regime and obtaining global constraints to the existence of intense protective magnetic fields in rapidly and slowly rotating Super Earths. We find that the emergence and continued existence of a protective planetary magnetic field is not only a function of planetary mass but also depend on rotation rate. Low-mass Super Earths ( M ≲ 2 M⊕) develop intense surface magnetic fields but their lifetimes will be limited to 2-4 Gyrs for rotational periods larger than 1-4 days. On the other hand and also in the case of slowly rotating planets, more massive Super Earths ( M ≳ 2 M⊕) have weak magnetic fields but their dipoles will last longer. Finally we analyze tidally locked Super Earths inside and outside the habitable zone of GKM stars. Using the results obtained here we develop a classification of

  2. Sulphur Cycling at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge: Isotopic Evidence From the Logatchev and Turtle Pits Hydrothermal Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eickmann, B.; Strauss, H.; Koschinsky, A.; Kuhn, T.; Petersen, S.; Schmidt, K.

    2005-12-01

    Mid-ocean ridges and associated hydrothermal vent systems represent a unique scenario in which the interaction of hydrosphere, lithosphere and biosphere and the related element cycling can be studied. Sulphur participates in inorganic and microbially driven processes and plays, thus, an important role at these vent sites. The sulphur isotopic compositions of different sulphur-bearing minerals as well as dissolved sulphur compounds provide a tool for identifying the sulphur source and pertinent processes of sulphur cycling. Here, we present sulphur isotope data from an ongoing study of the Logatchev hydrothermal field at 14°45' N and the Turtle Pits hydrothermal field at 4°48' S. The former is located in 2900 to 3060 m water depth, hosted by ultramafic rocks, while the latter is situated in 2990 m water depth, hosted by basaltic rocks. Different metal sulphides (chalcopyrite, pyrite, pyrrhotite, various copper sulphides), either particles from the emanating hot fluid itself or pieces of active and inactive black smokers, display δ34S values between +2 and +9 ‰. So far, no significant difference is discernible between mineral precipitates from both hydrothermal fields. However, differences exist between different generations of sulphide precipitates. Based on respective data from other sites of hydrothermal activity at mid-ocean ridges, this sulphur isotope range suggests that sulphur in the hydrothermal fluid and mineral precipitates represents a mixture between mantle sulphur and reduced seawater sulphate. Anhydrite precipitates from hydrothermal chimneys, located inside sulphide conduits, and obvious late stage gypsum needles from voids, yielded sulphur isotope values between +17.5 and +20.0 ‰. This clearly identifies seawater sulphate as the principal sulphur source. Variable, but generally low abundances of sulphide and sulphate in differently altered mafic and ultramafic rocks point to a complex fluid-rock interaction. Sulphur isotope values for total

  3. Preferential flow pathways revealed by field based stable isotope analysis of CO2 by mid-infrared laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Geldern, Robert; Nowak, Martin; Zimmer, Martin; Szizybalski, Alexandra; Myrttinen, Anssi; Barth, Johannes A. C.; Jost, Hj

    2016-04-01

    A newly developed and commercially available isotope ratio laser spectrometer for CO2 analyses has been tested during a 10-day field monitoring campaign at the Ketzin pilot site for CO2 storage in northern Germany. The laser instrument is based on tunable laser direct absorption in the mid-infrared. The instrument recorded a continuous 10-day carbon stable isotope data set with 30 minutes resolution directly on-site in a field-based laboratory container during a tracer experiment. To test the instruments performance and accuracy the monitoring campaign was accompanied by daily CO2 sampling for laboratory analyses with isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). The carbon stable isotope ratios measured by conventional IRMS technique and by the new mid-infrared laser spectrometer agree remarkably well within 2σ analytical precision (<0.3 ‰). This proves the capability of the new mid-infrared direct absorption technique to measure high precision and accurate real-time table isotope data directly in the field. The injected CO2 tracer had a distinct δ13C value that was largely different from the reservoir background value. The laser spectroscopy data revealed a prior to this study unknown, intensive dynamic with fast changing δ13C values. The arrival pattern of the tracer suggest that the observed fluctuations were probably caused by migration along separate and distinct preferential flow paths between injection well and observation well. The new technique might contribute to a better tracing of the migration of the underground CO2 plume and help to ensure the long-term integrity of the reservoir.

  4. The redshift evolution of clustering in the Hubble Deep Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magliocchetti, M.; Maddox, S. J.

    1999-07-01

    We present a correlation function analysis for the catalogue of photometric redshifts obtained from the Hubble Deep Field image by Fernandez-Soto, Lanzetta & Yahil. By dividing the catalogue into redshift bins of width Deltaz=0.4 we measured the angular correlation function w(theta) as a function of redshift up to z~4.8. From these measurements we derive the trend of the correlation length r_0. We find that r_0(z) is roughly constant with look-back time up to z~=2, and then increases to higher values at z>~2.4. We estimate the values of r_0, assuming xi(r,z)=[rr_0(z)]^-gamma, gamma=1.8 and various geometries. For Omega_0=1 we find r_0(z=3)~=7.00+/-4.87h^-1Mpc, in good agreement with the values obtained from analysis of the Lyman break galaxies.

  5. Phase-field study of spacing evolution during transient growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurevich, Sebastian; Amoorezaei, Morteza; Provatas, Nikolas

    2010-11-01

    The primary spacing of a dendritic array grown under transient growth conditions displays a distribution of wavelengths. The average primary spacing is shown, both experimentally and numerically, to evolve between characteristic incubation periods during which the distribution of wavelengths remains essentially stable. Our primary spacing results display a gradual transition period from one spacing range to another, consistent with the fact that the abrupt doubling of spacing predicted by Warren and Langer for an idealized periodic array affects different wavelengths of the distribution at different times. This transition is shown to depend on the rate of change in growth speed using phase-field simulations of directional solidification where the pulling speed is ramped at different rates. In particular, for high rates of change of the pulling speed we observe temporary marginally stable array configurations separated by relatively short lived transitions, while for lower rates of change of the pulling speed the distinction between incubation and transition periods disappears.

  6. Hg Isotopic Compositions of Chimneys and Pelagic Sediments at Active Submarine Hydrothermal Field in the Okinawa Trough, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, A.; Marumo, K.; Tomiyasu, T.; Yamamoto, M.; Komuro, K.

    2012-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a globally distributed and highly toxic pollutant in the environment. It is known that a submarine hydrothermal activity is one of the natural processes to emit Hg to marine environment. In order to estimate the degree to which the Hg found in the marine environment is from anthropogenic versus natural sources, it is important to characterize the Hg from the hydrothermal vents. Samples of chimneys and a ~20 cm sediment core, collected by a deep-sea remotely operated vehicle, from Iheya North hydrothermal field in Okinawa Trough, Japan, were analyzed for Hg concentrations and Hg isotopic compositions. Total Hg concentrations of chimneys range between 8.2 and 16.9 mg/kg, whereas seafloor sediment total Hg concentrations are from 3.8 to 34.8 mg/kg. Approximately 0.4 to 1.1 μg/kg of monomethyl Hg (MMHg) was detected in the top 6 cm sediment cores. Hg isotopic compositions (δ202Hg) of chimneys are between -0.30 and -0.96 ‰, whereas δ202Hg values of sediment samples range from -0.85 to -1.60 ‰. Neither chimneys nor sediment samples exhibit the significant mass independent fractionations in Hg isotopes (Δ201Hg > ± 0.10). The chimney δ202Hg values are slightly higher than the δ202Hg values of sediments. This may indicate that the heavier Hg isotopes tend to be incorporated with mercury-bearing sulfides in chimneys, and the lighter isotopes tend to be remained in the hydrothermal fluid and distributed in the surrounding sediments. Also, the sediment samples from the upper portion of cores demonstrate approximately 0.4 - 0.5 ‰ lower δ202Hg values than those from the lower part. This isotopic fractionation may be resulted from a demethylated process of MMHg by microbes. Several studies have previously demonstrated the rapid demethylation of MMHg by microbes in Hg-contaminated aquatic sediments, and range of the isotopic fractionation is similar to that of the experimentally determined isotopic fractionation of MMHg by bacterial reduction

  7. Tertiary stress field evolution in Sistan (Eastern Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Jentzer; Marc, Fournier; Philippe, Agard; Jafar, Omrani

    2016-04-01

    The Sistan orogenic belt in eastern Iran, near the boundary with Afghanistan, results from the closure of a branch of the Neo-Thethys: the Sistan Ocean. It was divided by Tirrul et al. (1983) in five main units: the Lut (1) and Afghan (2) continental blocks where basement is exposed; the Neh (3) and Ratuk (4) complexes which display ophiolitic rocks weakly and highly (HP-BT) metamorphosed, respectively, and the Sefidabeh basin lying over these complexes and interpreted as a fore-arc basin. Sistan is bordered by the Makran and Zagros (formed by the closure of the Neo-Tethys) to the south and by the Kopet Dagh (formed by the closure of Paleo-Tethys) to the North. The aim of this study is to fill the gap between preliminary studies about the overall structure of the Sistan Suture Zone and recent investigations of active tectonics in the region (e.g., Walker et al., 2004 and 2006 a and b). Questions herein addressed are: (1) how are stresses transfered throughout Iran from the Zagros to the Sistan belts? (2) Did the Zagros, Makran and Sistan belts evolve independently through time, or were they mechanically coupled? In order to answer these questions, we have determined paleostress evolution in the Sistan, using a direct inversion method for 42 microtectonic sites in almost all lithologies of the Neh complex and the Sefidabeh basin. We find three successive directions of compression: (1) 87°N for the oldest deformation stage dated of the Late Miocene, (2) 59°N for the intermediate stage probably dated of the Early Pliocene, and (3) 26°N for the youngest stage dated of the Plio-Quaternary. A counterclockwise rotation of about 60° of the main stress (σ1) in less than 10 Ma is therefore documented in Sistan. These same three stages of deformation were also documented by several microtectonic studies in Iran, especially in Makran and Zagros. The direction of the youngest compression is very homogeneous indicating that the mountain belts and continental blocks of Iran

  8. Identifying the origin and geochemical evolution of groundwater using hydrochemistry and stable isotopes in Subei Lake Basin, Ordos energy base, Northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, F.; Song, X.; Yang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Han, D.; Ma, Y.; Bu, H.

    2014-05-01

    A hydrochemical and isotopic study was conducted in Subei Lake Basin, northwestern China, to identify the origin and geochemical evolution of groundwater. Water samples were collected, major ions and stable isotopes (δ18O, δ D) were analyzed. In terms of hydrogeological conditions in study area, groundwater can be classified into three types: the Quaternary groundwater, the shallow Cretaceous groundwater, the deep Cretaceous groundwater. Piper diagram and correlation analysis were used to reveal the hydrochemical characteristics of water resources. The dominant water type of lake water was Na-Cl type, which was controlled by strong evaporation and recharge from overland flow and groundwater; the predominant hydrochemical types for groundwater were Ca-HCO3, Na-HCO3, and mixed Ca · Na · Mg-HCO3 types, the groundwater chemistry is mainly controlled by dissolution/precipitation of anhydrite, gypsum, halite and calcite. The dedolomitization and cation exchange are also important factors. Rock weathering is confirmed to play a leading role in the mechanisms responsible for the chemical compositions of groundwater. The stable isotopic values of oxygen and hydrogen in groundwater are close to the local meteoric water line, showing that groundwater is of meteoric origin. The deep Cretaceous groundwater is depleted in heavy isotopes, compared to shallow Cretaceous groundwater. The hydrogen and oxygen isotopes signatures in deep Cretaceous groundwater may show a paleorecharge effect that the deep Cretaceous groundwater was recharged during a geologic period when the climate was wetter and colder than today. Due to strong evaporation effect and dry climatic conditions, heavy isotopes are more enriched in lake water than groundwater. The hydrochemical and isotopic information of utmost importance has been provided to decision-makers by the present study so that a sustainable water resources management policy could be designed for the Ordos energy base.

  9. Petrology and Sr and Nd isotopic characteristics of five late Cretaceous-early Tertiary volcanic fields in western Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Moll-Stalcup, E.J.

    1987-01-01

    Chemical and Sr and Nd isotopic characteristics were studied in an attempt to determine if old continental crust having high /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr (SIR) and low /sup 143/Nd//sup 144/Nd (NIR) underlies the Yukon-Koyukuk province. The Blackburn Hills, Yukon River, and Kanuti fields lie within the Yukon-Koyukuk province and the Sischu and Nowitna fields overlie Paleozoic and Precambrian metamorphic terranes to the southeast. The Nowitna field is chiefly andesite having SIR = 0.7044-0.7051 and NIR = 0.51256-0.51257. The Sischu field is chiefly rhyolite and dacite having high SIR (0.7079-0.7140) and low NIR (0.51246-0.51252), which suggests that old continental crust was involved in their genesis, either by direct partial melting or by large degrees of assimilation. The Blackburn Hills field consists of medium-K basalt, andesite, and rhyolite intruded by a small granodiorite pluton and has SIR = 0.7033-0.7052 and NIR = 0.51253-51290. The Yukon River field is basalt, andesite, dacite, and rhyolite having SIR = 0.70374-0.70511 and NIR = 0.51270-0.51284, and much of its isotopic variation can be modeled by assimilation of seawater-altered oceanic crust during fractionation of basalt. Isotopic compositions of most felsic rocks from the Blackburn Hills field (SIR = 0.7038-0.7041) and dacites from the Kanuti volcanic field (SIR = 0.7043-0.7048) require little or no old continental crust in their genesis, suggesting that ancient crust does not extend beneath this part of the Yukon-Koyukuk province. However, the ultimate source of the shoshonitic lower crust of the Koyukuk terrane (SIR = 0.705, NIR = 0.5125) may be continental mantle, which may have been thrust under this part of the Yukon-Koyukuk province during arc-continent collision in the early Cretaceous.

  10. A Nd and Sr isotopic study of the Trinity peridotite Implications for mantle evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobsen, S. B.; Quick, J. E.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1984-01-01

    Field evidence is reported which indicates that the Trinity peridotite in Northern California was partially melted during its rise as part of the upwelling convecting mantle at a spreading center. A Sm-Nd mineral isochron for a plagioclase Iherzolite yielded an age of about 427 Ma which is significantly higher than that expected for depleted mantle during this period. The age is interpreted as the time of crystallization of trapped melt in the plagioclase Iherzolite P-T field, and probably represents the time when the massif was incorporated as a part of the oceanic lithosphere. The Sm-Nd model age of the plagioclase Iherzolite total rock is 3.4 AE. This suggests that the peridotite was derived from a mantle that was depleted early in earth history. Although most available data indicate that the depleted upper mantle has been relatively well stirred through time, the Trinity data suggest that very ancient Nd isotropic values are preserved and chemical and physical heterogeneities are sometimes preserved in the depleted source of midocean ridge basalts as well as the oceanic lithosphere which they intrude.

  11. Rapid evolution of analog circuits configured on a field programmable transistor array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoica, A.; Ferguson, M. I.; Zebulum, R. S.; Keymeulen, D.; Duong, V.; Daud, T.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to illustrate evolution of analog circuits on a stand-alone board-level evolvable system (SABLES). SABLES is part of an effort to achieve integrated evolvable systems. SABLES provides autonomous, fast (tens to hundreds of seconds), on-chip circuit evolution involving about 100,000 circuit evaluations. Its main components are a JPL Field Programmable Transistor Array (FPTA) chip used as transistor-level reconfigurable hardware, and a TI DSP that implements the evolutionary algorithm controlling the FPTA reconfiguration. The paper details an example of evolution on SABLES and points out to certain transient and memory effects that affect the stability of solutions obtained reusing the same piece of hardware for rapid testing of individuals during evolution.

  12. Real-Time Field-Based Water Vapor Isotope Measurements with a CRDS Analyzer: Probing Cropland Evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Pelt, Aaron; Williams, David; Mayr, Leo; Sun, Wei

    2010-05-01

    While stable isotope techniques have been previously applied to partition evapotranspiration (ET) fluxes in crops, it has only recently become possible to take in-situ, long-term, continuous (every 10 seconds) measurements of stable water vapor isotopologues. A Picarro water vapor isotope analyzer based on cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS) was recently deployed at China's National Experimental Station for Precision Agriculture during the FAO/IAEA 2nd Research Coordination Meeting of a five-year Coordinated Research Project on "Managing Irrigation Water to Enhance Crop Productivity under Water-Limiting Conditions using Nuclear Techniques" involving the participation of 15 participants from 15 different countries. Measurements were conducted continuously over several days, sampling from five different heights above a corn field. The continuous measurements by the Picarro analyzer were complimented by additional measurements from the same sampling points, wherein the vapor was cryogenically trapped for later laboratory quantification of the water isotopologues. Stable isotope measurements were taken concurrently with conventional ET flux measurements. The isotope analyses can allow the partitioning of ET into its components: soil evaporation and leaf transpiration. Once daily, during the vapor measurements, liquid water isotope standards were measured by the Picarro analyzer using its included autosampler and subsequently used to calibrate the vapor-phase data. This presentation will describe the analyzer and sampling system in detail as well as discuss important factors that were incorporated into the data analysis to ensure accuracy. Field data will be presented along with these accuracy estimates as well as comparison of the vapor-phase results with the off-line liquid analysis of the cryogenically-trapped vapor.

  13. Application of Phase-field Method in Predicting Gas Bubble Microstructure Evolution in Nuclear Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Shenyang Y.; Li, Yulan; Sun, Xin; Gao, Fei; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Henager, Charles H.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2010-04-30

    Fission product accumulation and gas bubble microstructure evolution in nuclear fuels strongly affect thermo-mechanical properties such as thermal conductivity, gas release, volumetric swelling and cracking, and hence the fuel performance. In this paper, a general phase-field model is developed to predict gas bubble formation and evolution. Important materials processes and thermodynamic properties including the generation of gas atoms and vacancies, sinks for vacancies and gas atoms, the elastic interaction among defects, gas re-solution, and inhomogeneity of elasticity and diffusivity are accounted for in the model. The simulations demonstrate the potential application of the phase-field method in investigating 1) heterogeneous nucleation of gas bubbles at defects; 2) effect of elastic interaction, inhomogeneity of material properties, and gas re-solution on gas bubble microstructures; and 3) effective properties from the output of phase-field simulations such as distribution of defects, gas bubbles, and stress fields.

  14. Isotopic and trace element constraints on the petrogenesis of lavas from the Mount Adams volcanic field, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jicha, B.R.; Hart, G.L.; Johnson, C.M.; Hildreth, W.; Beard, B.L.; Shirey, S.B.; Valley, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Strontium, Nd, Pb, Hf, Os, and O isotope compositions for 30 Quaternary lava flows from the Mount Adams stratovolcano and its basaltic periphery in the Cascade arc, southern Washington, USA indicate a major component from intraplate mantle sources, a relatively small subduction component, and interaction with young mafic crust at depth. Major- and trace-element patterns for Mount Adams lavas are distinct from the rear-arc Simcoe volcanic field and other nearby volcanic centers in the Cascade arc such as Mount St. Helens. Radiogenic isotope (Sr, Nd, Pb, and Hf) compositions do not correlate with geochemical indicators of slab-fluids such as (Sr/P)n and Ba/Nb. Mass-balance modeling calculations, coupled with trace-element and isotopic data, indicate that although the mantle source for the calc-alkaline Adams basalts has been modified with a fluid derived from subducted sediment, the extent of modification is significantly less than what is documented in the southern Cascades. The isotopic and trace-element compositions of most Mount Adams lavas require the presence of enriched and depleted mantle sources, and based on volume-weighted chemical and isotopic compositions for Mount Adams lavas through time, an intraplate mantle source contributed the major magmatic mass of the system. Generation of basaltic andesites to dacites at Mount Adams occurred by assimilation and fractional crystallization in the lower crust, but wholesale crustal melting did not occur. Most lavas have Tb/Yb ratios that are significantly higher than those of MORB, which is consistent with partial melting of the mantle in the presence of residual garnet. ??18O values for olivine phenocrysts in Mount Adams lavas are within the range of typical upper mantle peridotites, precluding involvement of upper crustal sedimentary material or accreted terrane during magma ascent. The restricted Nd and Hf isotope compositions of Mount Adams lavas indicate that these isotope systems are insensitive to crustal

  15. Gases and water isotopes in a geochemical section across the Larderello, Italy, geothermal field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Truesdell, A.H.; Nehring, N.L.

    1978-01-01

    Steam samples from six wells (Colombaia, Pineta, Larderello 57, Larderello 155, Gabbro 6, and Gabbro 1) in a south to north section across the Larderello geothermal field have been analyzed for inorganic and hydrocarbon gases and for oxygen-18 and deuterium of steam. The wells generally decrease in depth and increase in age toward the south. The steam samples are generally characterized by (1) Total gas contents increasing south to north from 0.003 to 0.05 mole fraction; (2) Constant CO2 (95??2 percent); near constant H2S (1.6??0.8), N2 (1.2??0.8), H2 (2??1), CH4 (1.2??1), and no O2 in the dry gas; (3) Presence of numerous, straight chain and branched C2 to C6 hydrocarbons plus benzene in amounts independent of CH4 contents with highest concentrations in the deeper wells; (4) Oxygen-18 contents of steam increasing south to north from -5.0??? to -0.4??? with little change in deuterium (-42??2???). These observations are interpreted as showing: (1) Decreasing gas contents with amount of production because the proportion of steam boiled from liquid water increases with production; (2) Synthesis of CH4 from H2 and CO2 with CO2 and H2 produced by thermal metamorphism and rock-water reactions; (3) Extraction of C2 to C6 hydrocarbons from rock organic matter; (4) Either oxygen isotope exchange followed by distillation of steam from the north toward the south (2 plates at ???220??C) or mixture of deeper more-exchange waters from the north with shallow, less-exchanged recharging waters from the south. ?? 1978 Birkha??user Verlag.

  16. Ca, Sr, O and D isotope approach to defining the chemical evolution of hydrothermal fluids: example from Long Valley, CA, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Shaun T.; Kennedy, B. Mack; DePaolo, Donald J.; Hurwitz, Shaul; Evans, William C.

    2013-01-01

    We present chemical and isotopic data for fluids, minerals and rocks from the Long Valley meteoric-hydrothermal system. The samples encompass the presumed hydrothermal upwelling zone in the west moat of the caldera, the Casa Diablo geothermal field, and a series of wells defining a nearly linear, ∼16 km long, west-to-east trend along the likely fluid flow path. Fluid samples were analyzed for the isotopes of water, Sr, and Ca, the concentrations of major cations and anions, alkalinity, and total CO2. Water isotope data conform to trends documented in earlier studies, interpreted as indicating a single hydrothermal fluid mixing with local groundwater. Sr isotopes show subtle changes along the flow path, which requires rapid fluid flow and minimal reaction between the channelized fluids and the wallrocks. Sr and O isotopes are used to calculate fracture spacing using a dual porosity model. Calculated fracture spacing and temperature data for hydrothermal fluids indicate the system is (approximately) at steady-state. Correlated variations among total CO2, and the concentration and isotopic composition of Ca suggest progressive fluid degassing (loss of CO2), which drives calcite precipitation as the fluid flows west-to-east and cools. The shifts in Ca isotopes require that calcite precipitated at temperatures of 150–180 °C is fractionated by ca. −0.3‰ to −0.5‰ relative to aqueous species. Our data are the first evidence that Ca isotopes undergo kinetic fractionation at high temperatures (>100 °C) and can be used to trace calcite precipitation along hydrothermal fluid flow paths.

  17. Evolution of isotopic composition of reprocessed uranium during the multiple recycling in light water reactors with natural uranium feed

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, A. Yu. Sulaberidze, G. A.; Alekseev, P. N.; Dudnikov, A. A.; Nevinitsa, V. A. Proselkov, V. N.; Chibinyaev, A. V.

    2012-12-15

    A complex approach based on the consistent modeling of neutron-physics processes and processes of cascade separation of isotopes is applied for analyzing physical problems of the multiple usage of reprocessed uranium in the fuel cycle of light water reactors. A number of scenarios of multiple recycling of reprocessed uranium in light water reactors are considered. In the process, an excess absorption of neutrons by the {sup 236}U isotope is compensated by re-enrichment in the {sup 235}U isotope. Specific consumptions of natural uranium for re-enrichment of the reprocessed uranium depending on the content of the {sup 232}U isotope are obtained.

  18. A constraint-free phase field model for ferromagnetic domain evolution

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Min; Xu, Bai-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    A continuum constraint-free phase field model is proposed to simulate the magnetic domain evolution in ferromagnetic materials. The model takes the polar and azimuthal angles (ϑ1,ϑ2), instead of the magnetization unit vector m(m1,m2,m3), as the order parameters. In this way, the constraint on the magnetization magnitude can be exactly satisfied automatically, and no special numerical treatment on the phase field evolution is needed. The phase field model is developed from a thermodynamic framework which involves a configurational force system for ϑ1 and ϑ2. A combination of the configurational force balance and the second law of thermodynamics leads to thermodynamically consistent constitutive relations and a generalized evolution equation for the order parameters (ϑ1,ϑ2). Beneficial from the constraint-free model, the three-dimensional finite-element implementation is straightforward, and the degrees of freedom are reduced by one. The model is shown to be capable of reproducing the damping-dependent switching dynamics, and the formation and evolution of domains and vortices in ferromagnetic materials under the external magnetic or mechanical loading. Particularly, the calculated out-of-plane component of magnetization in a vortex is verified by the corresponding experimental results, as well as the motion of the vortex under a magnetic field. PMID:25383036

  19. A constraint-free phase field model for ferromagnetic domain evolution.

    PubMed

    Yi, Min; Xu, Bai-Xiang

    2014-11-01

    A continuum constraint-free phase field model is proposed to simulate the magnetic domain evolution in ferromagnetic materials. The model takes the polar and azimuthal angles (ϑ 1,ϑ 2), instead of the magnetization unit vector m(m 1,m 2,m 3), as the order parameters. In this way, the constraint on the magnetization magnitude can be exactly satisfied automatically, and no special numerical treatment on the phase field evolution is needed. The phase field model is developed from a thermodynamic framework which involves a configurational force system for ϑ 1 and ϑ 2. A combination of the configurational force balance and the second law of thermodynamics leads to thermodynamically consistent constitutive relations and a generalized evolution equation for the order parameters (ϑ 1,ϑ 2). Beneficial from the constraint-free model, the three-dimensional finite-element implementation is straightforward, and the degrees of freedom are reduced by one. The model is shown to be capable of reproducing the damping-dependent switching dynamics, and the formation and evolution of domains and vortices in ferromagnetic materials under the external magnetic or mechanical loading. Particularly, the calculated out-of-plane component of magnetization in a vortex is verified by the corresponding experimental results, as well as the motion of the vortex under a magnetic field. PMID:25383036

  20. Semilinear degenerate evolution inequalities with singular potential constructed from the generalized Greiner vector fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zixia; Niu, Pengcheng

    2007-03-01

    We study the existence and nonexistence of global solutions to the degenerate evolution inequalities with singular potential constructed from the generalized Greiner vector fields. For the proof of the existence results, we use the method of supersolution and the modified Bessel function. The nonexistence results are established by the test function method.

  1. Long-term evolution of high-frequency ingredients of the core surface radial geomagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demetrescu, C.; Dobrica, V.; Stefan, C.

    2012-12-01

    Our previous research, based on observatory and main field models data, revealed the presence of high-frequency ingredients, at time scales of 22 and ~80 years, both in the Earth's surface field and in the core surface radial field. The results indicate that the ~80-year variation entirely accounts for the field with time-averaged axisymmetric component subtracted and high-pass-filtered with cutoff period 400 years of Finlay and Jackson (2003). The long-term evolution of the ~80-year variation of the core surface field, covering a time-span of about 320 years as given by gufm1 main field model, is illustrated and discussed in terms of displacements on the core surface of the field patterns and of their first two time-derivatives.

  2. Field-Scale Stable-Isotope Probing of Active Methanotrophs in a Landfill-Cover Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroth, M. H.; Henneberger, R.; Chiri, E.

    2012-12-01

    The greenhouse gas methane (CH4) is an important contributor to global climate change. While its atmospheric concentration is increasing, a large portion of produced CH4 never reaches the atmosphere, but is consumed by aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB). The latter are ubiquitous in soils and utilize CH4 as sole source of energy and carbon. Among other methods, MOB may be differentiated based on characteristic phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA). Stable-isotope probing (SIP) on PLFA has been widely applied to identify active members of MOB communities in laboratory incubation studies, but results are often difficult to extrapolate to the field. Thus, novel field-scale approaches are needed to link activity and identity of MOB in their natural environment. We present results of field experiments in which we combined PLFA-SIP with gas push-pull tests (GPPTs) to label active MOB at the field-scale while simultaneously quantifying CH4 oxidation activity. During a SIP-GPPT, a mixture of reactive (here 13CH4, O2) and non-reactive tracer gases (e.g., Ar, Ne, He) is injected into the soil at a location of interest. Thereafter, gas flow is reversed and the gas mixture diluted with soil air is extracted from the same location and sampled periodically. Rate constants for CH4 oxidation can be calculated by analyzing breakthrough curves of 13CH4 and a suitable non-reactive tracer gas. SIP-GPPTs were performed in a landfill-cover soil, and feasibility of this novel approach was tested at several locations along a gradient of MOB activity and soil temperature. Soil samples were collected before and after SIP-GPPTs, total PLFA were extracted, and incorporation of 13C in the polar lipid fraction was analyzed. Potential CH4 oxidation rates derived from SIP-GPPTs were similar to those derived from regular GPPTs (using unlabeled CH4) performed at the same locations prior to SIP-GPPTs, indicating that application of 13CH4 did not adversely affect bacterial CH4 oxidation rates. Rates

  3. Hydrogeochemical and isotopic characteristics of Kavak (Seydişehir-Konya) geothermal field, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozdağ, Ayla

    2016-09-01

    The Kavak geothermal field is located 13 km north of Seydişehir town, about 90 km southwest of Konya Province in the Central Anatolia, Turkey. This study was carried out to determine the origin, chemical characteristics, and isotopic composition of Kavak thermal waters. The measured temperatures of thermal and mineral waters range from 21.5 to 26 °C with a discharge of 0.8 l/s in springs, and from 30 to 45.8 °C with a discharge of 185 l/s in wells. Thermal and/or mineralized spring and well waters are of Casbnd Nasbnd HCO3 types with electrical conductivity ranging from 2530 to 4150 μS/cm while cold groundwater is mainly of Casbnd HCO3 and Casbnd Mgsbnd HCO3 types with electrical conductivity ranging from 446 to 668 μS/cm. Kavak thermal waters have not reached complete chemical re-equilibrium possibly as a result of mixing with cold water during upward flow. Assessments from quartz geothermometers and fluid-mineral equilibria calculations suggest that reservoir temperature of Kavak geothermal field ranges from 68 to 105 °C. Thermal waters are oversaturated at discharge temperatures for calcite, dolomite, and aragonite minerals corresponding to travertine precipitation in the discharge area. Gypsum and anhydrite minerals are undersaturated in all the thermal waters. The δ18O and δ2H compositions of Kavak thermal and cold waters point to a meteoric origin. Meteoric waters infiltrate the reservoir rocks along faults and fracture zones. After being heated at depth with the high geothermal gradient, they move up to the surface along faults and fractures that act as pathways. Additionally, δ18O and δ2H values suggest that thermal waters are recharged from higher elevations in comparison with cold waters. Long-term circulation of meteoric waters within the basement rocks is indicated by low tritium (<2 TU) values in the thermal waters, although the fluids do not achieve thermodynamic equilibrium. Based on the δ13C values, carbon in thermal waters is considered

  4. Coronal Hole and Solar Global Magnetic Field Evolution in 1976 - 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilenko, Irina A.; Tavastsherna, Ksenia S.

    2016-08-01

    We study the spatial-temporal evolution of a coronal hole and compare it with that of the solar global magnetic field in Cycles 21 - 23 (1976 - 2012). We also analyze the latitude-longitude distribution dynamics of coronal holes and the regularities in the global magnetic field associated with the solar polar field reversal. Polar and non-polar coronal hole populations are considered. The investigation reveals some temporal and spatial regularities in coronal hole distributions that match the global magnetic-field cycle evolution well. The results show that the non-polar coronal hole longitudinal distribution follows all configuration changes in the global magnetic-field structure. Reorganizations of the global magnetic field and coronal hole distributions occur simultaneously during a time interval of a few solar rotations. The cycle evolution of the non-polar coronal holes reflects the transition of the solar global magnetic field from the zonal structure to sectorial and vice versa. Two different types of waves of non-polar coronal holes are revealed from their latitudinal distribution. The first are short poleward waves. They trace the poleward motion of the unipolar photospheric magnetic fields from approximately 35° to the associated pole in each hemisphere and the redevelopment of a new-polarity polar CH. Although they start the poleward movement before the change of the polar magnetic field in the associated hemisphere, they reach the pole after the polar reversal. The other type of non-polar CH wave forms two sinusoidal branches associated with the positive- and negative-polarity magnetic fields. The complete period of the wave is equal to ≈268 CRs (22 years). These wave CHs arrive at high latitudes during declining phases when the new-polarity polar CHs are already completely formed.

  5. Use of radium isotopes to determine the age and origin of radioactive barite at oil-field production sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zielinski, R.A.; Otton, J.K.; Budahn, J.R.

    2001-01-01

    Radium-bearing barite (radiobarite) is a common constituent of scale and sludge deposits that form in oil-field production equipment. The barite forms as a precipitate from radium-bearing, saline formation water that is pumped to the surface along with oil. Radioactivity levels in some oil-field equipment and in soils contaminated by scale and sludge can be sufficiently high to pose a potential health threat. Accurate determinations of radium isotopes (226Ra+228Ra) in soils are required to establish the level of soil contamination and the volume of soil that may exceed regulatory limits for total radium content. In this study the radium isotopic data are used to provide estimates of the age of formation of the radiobarite contaminant. Age estimates require that highly insoluble radiobarite approximates a chemically closed system from the time of its formation. Age estimates are based on the decay of short-lived 228Ra (half-life=5.76 years) compared to 226Ra (half-life=1600 years). Present activity ratios of 228Ra/226Ra in radiobarite-rich scale or highly contaminated soil are compared to initial ratios at the time of radiobarite precipitation. Initial ratios are estimated by measurements of saline water or recent barite precipitates at the site or by considering a range of probable initial ratios based on reported values in modern oil-field brines. At sites that contain two distinct radiobarite sources of different age, the soils containing mixtures of sources can be identified, and mixing proportions quantified using radium concentration and isotopic data. These uses of radium isotope data provide more description of contamination history and can possibly address liability issues. Copyright ?? 2000 .

  6. Evolution, Abundance and Biocalcification of Calcareous Nannoplankton During the Aptian (Early Cretaceous): Causes and Consequences for C Isotopic Anomalies, Climate Changes and the Carbon Cycle.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erba, E.

    2005-12-01

    The mid Cretaceous is marked by extreme greenhouse conditions, coeval with emplacement of large igneous provinces, C isotopic anomalies, major changes in structure and composition of the oceans, and accelerated rates in the evolutionary history of calcareous plankton. The Aptian is a crucial interval to decipher links between biotic evolution and environmental pressure: it is appealing for understanding nannofloral biocalcification and feedbacks in the carbonate system and in the global carbon cycle. Ontong Java, Manihiki and Kerguelen Plateaus formed in the Aptian affecting the ocean-atmosphere system with excess CO2, changes in Ca2+ and Mg2+ concentrations, and varying nutrient cycling. Two large C isotopic anomalies are associated with episodes of prolonged high primary productivity, changes in alkality, global warming and cooling, anoxia, speciations and extinctions in planktonic communities. Nannofossil diversity, abundance and biocalcification are quantified in continuous, complete, pelagic sections to derive biosphere-geosphere interactions at short and long time scales. The early Aptian C isotopic anomaly interrupts a speciation episode in calcareous nannoplankton paralleled by a drastic reduction in nannofossil paleofluxes culminating in the nannoconid crisis preceding the Oceanic Anoxic Event 1a and the negative C isotopic spike linked to clathrate melting presumably triggered by the thermal maximum at the onset of the mid Cretaceous greenhouse climate. No extinctions are recorded. In the early late Aptian resumption of nannoconid production and appearance of several taxa are coeval with a return to normal C isotopic values. The occurrence of calpionellids and diversified planktonic foraminifers indicate successful biocalcification and restoration of the thermocline. In the late Aptian a drop in nannofossil abundance and accelerated extinction rates are associated with another C isotopic excursion under cool conditions possibly due to a prolonged volcanic

  7. Regolith production rates calculated with Uranium-series isotopes at Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory: implications on chemical weathering and landscape evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, L.; Chabaux, F. J.; Pelt, E.; Blaes, E.; Jin, L.; Brantley, S. L.

    2009-12-01

    It is essential to understand the rates and mechanisms of regolith formation as it contributes to important Critical Zone processes such as nutrient cycling, carbon sequestration, erosion, and acid rain mitigation. Over the long term, the rates of weathering and erosion also combine to control the evolution of landscapes. Uranium-series isotopes offer a powerful tool to investigate regolith production rates and residence times within a weathering system because of their well-documented fractionation behavior during chemical weathering and transport by water. Here, we present a study of U-series isotopes (238U, 234U and 230Th) in soils developed on shale bedrock at the Shale Hills catchment in central Pennsylvania. (234U/238U) and (230Th/238U) activity ratios in samples collected from soil profiles along a planar hillslope in the catchment range from 0.934 to 1.072 and from 0.920 to 1.096, respectively. These values show significant U-series disequilibrium and are explained by a dual process of U-series isotopes during weathering: a loss of 234U, 238U, and 230Th during water-rock interactions and a gain of 234U and 238U as U precipitated from circulating soil water. Regolith production rates calculated with U-series isotopes for these soil profiles range from ~15 to 45 m/Myr and decrease systematically with increasing distance from the ridge top to the middle slope and to the valley floor. Soil residence times within these profiles increase from the ridge to the valley floor. The regolith production rates at Shale Hills vary as an exponential function of soil thickness, similar to the soil production functions derived from many other studies. With the local soil production function at Shale Hills, a hillslope soil transport model is used to predict the landscape evolution and change of soil thickness along the planar transect. The simulation results suggest that both the landscape and soil thickness along the planar hillscope at Shale Hills are currently at a

  8. Production waters associated with the Ferron coalbed methane fields, central Utah: Chemical and isotopic composition and volumes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rice, C.A.

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated the composition of water co-produced with coalbed methane (CBM) from the Upper Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone Member of the Mancos Shale in east-central Utah to better understand coalbed methane reservoirs. The Ferron coalbed methane play currently has more than 600 wells producing an average of 240 bbl/day/well water. Water samples collected from 28 wellheads in three fields (Buzzards Bench, Drunkards Wash, and Helper State) of the northeast-southwest trending play were analyzed for chemical and stable isotopic composition.Water produced from coalbed methane wells is a Na-Cl-HCO3 type. Water from the Drunkards Wash field has the lowest total dissolved solids (TDS) (6300 mg/l) increasing in value to the southeast and northeast. In the Helper State field, about 6 miles northeast, water has the highest total dissolved solids (43,000 mg/l), and major ion abundance indicates the possible influence of evaporite dissolution or mixing with a saline brine. In the southern Buzzards Bench field, water has variable total dissolved solids that are not correlated with depth or spatial distance. Significant differences in the relative compositions are present between the three fields implying varying origins of solutes and/or different water-rock interactions along multiple flow paths.Stable isotopic values of water from the Ferron range from +0.9??? to -11.4??? ?? 18O and -32??? to -90??? ?? 2H and plot below the global meteoric water line (GMWL) on a line near, but above values of present-day meteoric water. Isotopic values of Ferron water are consistent with modification of meteoric water along a flow path by mixing with an evolved seawater brine and/or interaction with carbonate minerals. Analysis of isotopic values versus chloride (conservative element) and total dissolved solids concentrations indicates that recharge water in the Buzzards Bench area is distinct from recharge water in Drunkards Wash and is about 3 ??C warmer. These variations in

  9. Quantum field as a quantum cellular automaton: The Dirac free evolution in one dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Bisio, Alessandro; D’Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Tosini, Alessandro

    2015-03-15

    We present a quantum cellular automaton model in one space-dimension which has the Dirac equation as emergent. This model, a discrete-time and causal unitary evolution of a lattice of quantum systems, is derived from the assumptions of homogeneity, parity and time-reversal invariance. The comparison between the automaton and the Dirac evolutions is rigorously set as a discrimination problem between unitary channels. We derive an exact lower bound for the probability of error in the discrimination as an explicit function of the mass, the number and the momentum of the particles, and the duration of the evolution. Computing this bound with experimentally achievable values, we see that in that regime the QCA model cannot be discriminated from the usual Dirac evolution. Finally, we show that the evolution of one-particle states with narrow-band in momentum can be efficiently simulated by a dispersive differential equation for any regime. This analysis allows for a comparison with the dynamics of wave-packets as it is described by the usual Dirac equation. This paper is a first step in exploring the idea that quantum field theory could be grounded on a more fundamental quantum cellular automaton model and that physical dynamics could emerge from quantum information processing. In this framework, the discretization is a central ingredient and not only a tool for performing non-perturbative calculation as in lattice gauge theory. The automaton model, endowed with a precise notion of local observables and a full probabilistic interpretation, could lead to a coherent unification of a hypothetical discrete Planck scale with the usual Fermi scale of high-energy physics. - Highlights: • The free Dirac field in one space dimension as a quantum cellular automaton. • Large scale limit of the automaton and the emergence of the Dirac equation. • Dispersive differential equation for the evolution of smooth states on the automaton. • Optimal discrimination between the

  10. Evolution of the Magnetic Field Line Diffusion Coefficient and Non-Gaussian Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snodin, A. P.; Ruffolo, D.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    2016-08-01

    The magnetic field line random walk (FLRW) plays an important role in the transport of energy and particles in turbulent plasmas. For magnetic fluctuations that are transverse or almost transverse to a large-scale mean magnetic field, theories describing the FLRW usually predict asymptotic diffusion of magnetic field lines perpendicular to the mean field. Such theories often depend on the assumption that one can relate the Lagrangian and Eulerian statistics of the magnetic field via Corrsin’s hypothesis, and additionally take the distribution of magnetic field line displacements to be Gaussian. Here we take an ordinary differential equation (ODE) model with these underlying assumptions and test how well it describes the evolution of the magnetic field line diffusion coefficient in 2D+slab magnetic turbulence, by comparisons to computer simulations that do not involve such assumptions. In addition, we directly test the accuracy of the Corrsin approximation to the Lagrangian correlation. Over much of the studied parameter space we find that the ODE model is in fairly good agreement with computer simulations, in terms of both the evolution and asymptotic values of the diffusion coefficient. When there is poor agreement, we show that this can be largely attributed to the failure of Corrsin’s hypothesis rather than the assumption of Gaussian statistics of field line displacements. The degree of non-Gaussianity, which we measure in terms of the kurtosis, appears to be an indicator of how well Corrsin’s approximation works.

  11. Structure and evolution of the large scale solar and heliospheric magnetic fields. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoeksema, J. T.

    1984-01-01

    Structure and evolution of large scale photospheric and coronal magnetic fields in the interval 1976-1983 were studied using observations from the Stanford Solar Observatory and a potential field model. The solar wind in the heliosphere is organized into large regions in which the magnetic field has a componenet either toward or away from the sun. The model predicts the location of the current sheet separating these regions. Near solar minimum, in 1976, the current sheet lay within a few degrees of the solar equator having two extensions north and south of the equator. Soon after minimum the latitudinal extent began to increase. The sheet reached to at least 50 deg from 1978 through 1983. The complex structure near maximum occasionally included multiple current sheets. Large scale structures persist for up to two years during the entire interval. To minimize errors in determining the structure of the heliospheric field particular attention was paid to decreasing the distorting effects of rapid field evolution, finding the optimum source surface radius, determining the correction to the sun's polar field, and handling missing data. The predicted structure agrees with direct interplanetary field measurements taken near the ecliptic and with coronameter and interplanetary scintillation measurements which infer the three dimensional interplanetary magnetic structure. During most of the solar cycle the heliospheric field cannot be adequately described as a dipole.

  12. Mercury isotopic composition of hydrothermal systems in the Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field and Guaymas Basin sea-floor rift

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherman, L.S.; Blum, J.D.; Nordstrom, D.K.; McCleskey, R.B.; Barkay, T.; Vetriani, C.

    2009-01-01

    To characterize mercury (Hg) isotopes and isotopic fractionation in hydrothermal systems we analyzed fluid and precipitate samples from hot springs in the Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field and vent chimney samples from the Guaymas Basin sea-floor rift. These samples provide an initial indication of the variability in Hg isotopic composition among marine and continental hydrothermal systems that are controlled predominantly by mantle-derived magmas. Fluid samples from Ojo Caliente hot spring in Yellowstone range in δ202Hg from - 1.02‰ to 0.58‰ (± 0.11‰, 2SD) and solid precipitate samples from Guaymas Basin range in δ202Hg from - 0.37‰ to - 0.01‰ (± 0.14‰, 2SD). Fluid samples from Ojo Caliente display mass-dependent fractionation (MDF) of Hg from the vent (δ202Hg = 0.10‰ ± 0.11‰, 2SD) to the end of the outflow channel (&delta202Hg = 0.58‰ ± 0.11‰, 2SD) in conjunction with a decrease in Hg concentration from 46.6pg/g to 20.0pg/g. Although a small amount of Hg is lost from the fluids due to co-precipitation with siliceous sinter, we infer that the majority of the observed MDF and Hg loss from waters in Ojo Caliente is due to volatilization of Hg0(aq) to Hg0(g) and the preferential loss of Hg with a lower δ202Hg value to the atmosphere. A small amount of mass-independent fractionation (MIF) was observed in all samples from Ojo Caliente (Δ199Hg = 0.13‰ ±1 0.06‰, 2SD) but no significant MIF was measured in the sea-floor rift samples from Guaymas Basin. This study demonstrates that several different hydrothermal processes fractionate Hg isotopes and that Hg isotopes may be used to better understand these processes.

  13. Mercury stable isotopic compositions in coals from major coal producing fields in China and their geochemical and environmental implications.

    PubMed

    Yin, Runsheng; Feng, Xinbin; Chen, Jiubin

    2014-05-20

    Total mercury (Hg) concentrations (THg) and stable mercury isotopic compositions were measured in coal samples (n = 61) from major coal producing fields in China. The THg concentrations in coals ranged from 0.05 to 0.78 μg g(-1), with a geometric mean of 0.22 μg g(-1). Hg isotopic compositions in coals showed large variations both in mass-dependent fractionation (MDF, δ(202)Hg: -2.36 to -0.14‰) and mass-independent fractionation (MIF, Δ(199)Hg: -0.44 to +0.38‰). The MIF signatures in coals may reveal important information on the coal-forming conditions (e.g., humic and sapropelic). The Δ(199)Hg/Δ(201)Hg of ∼1 determined in coals indicated that a portion of Hg has been subjected to photoreduction process prior to being incorporated to coals. On the basis of THg, Hg isotopic signatures, and other geological factors (e.g., total ash content and total sulfur content), the potential sources of Hg in coals from different coal producing regions were estimated. The main source of Hg in coals from southwestern China and eastern part of northern China is likely geogenic Hg, whereas the source of Hg in coals from other parts of northern China is mainly biogenic Hg. Finally, we estimated that Hg emission from coal combustion in China is characterized by diagnostic Hg isotopic signatures (δ(202)Hg: ∼-0.70‰ and Δ(199)Hg: ∼-0.05‰). The present study demonstrates that Hg isotopes can serve as a tool in understanding the sources and transformation of Hg in coals and may also be used as a tracer to quantify Hg emissions from coal combustion. PMID:24742360

  14. Real-time field measurements of stable isotopes in water and CO2 by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Griffith, David W T; Jamie, Ian; Esler, Michael; Wilson, Stephen R; Parkes, Stephen D; Waring, Christopher; Bryant, Glenn W

    2006-03-01

    Continuous records of isotope behaviour in the environment are invaluable to understanding mass and energy fluxes. Although techniques such as isotope ratio mass spectrometry provide high precision data, they are not well suited to the analysis of a large number of samples and are currently restricted to use in the laboratory. Fourier transform infrared spectrometers are relatively cheap and sufficiently portable and robust to be taken into the field to collect continuous records of gas-phase isotope behaviour. Several examples of the application of this technique will be presented. One data set provides half-hourly determinations of vertical profiles of D/H in water vapour above agricultural fields over a 3-week period; the same infrared spectra can also be used to determine 13C/12C in CO2. The technique has also been applied to the study of CO2 in ambient air and in a limestone cave system. Some of the features and complications associated with the method will also be considered. PMID:16500751

  15. Collective aspects of microscopic mean-field evolution along the fission path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimura, Yusuke; Lacroix, Denis; Scamps, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new method to extract the collective masses and momenta associated with a given set of collective coordinates, along a dynamical microscopic mean-field evolution. We apply our method to the symmetric fission of 258Fm nucleus, and analyze the dynamical evolution of the system in the collective space. We compare, between the dynamical and the adiabatic paths, the force acting on the quadrupole degree of freedom, which is closely related to the relative distance between fragments. It is shown that dynamical effects beyond the adiabatic limit are important for formation and scission of the neck between emitted fragments.

  16. The evolution of large-scale magnetic fields in the ionosphere of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cravens, T. E.; Shinagawa, H.; Nagy, A. F.

    1984-03-01

    Large-scale magnetic fields are often observed in the ionosphere of Venus by the magnetometer on the Pioneer Venus Orbiter, especially near the subsolar point or when the solar wind dynamic pressure is high. An equation for the time evolution of the magnetic field is derived which includes both a term representing the time rate of change of the field due to the convection of magnetic flux by plasma motions, and a magnetic diffusion/dissipation term. The ionospheric plasma velocities required by these equations were obtained by numerically solving the momentum equation. Numerical solutions to the magnetic field equation indicate that large-scale magnetic fields, which are not being actively maintained, decay with time scales ranging from tens of minutes to several hours. The vertical convection of magnetic flux enables magnetic field structures deep within the ionosphere to persist longer than would otherwise be expected. This vertical convection also explains the shape of these structures.

  17. Time-Asymptotic Evolution of Spatially Uniform Gaussian Vlasov Fluctuation Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancellotti, Carlo

    2016-05-01

    We consider Vlasov fluctuations from a spatially uniform, infinitely extended plasma equilibrium and derive the appropriate Braun-Hepp evolution equations (with regularized potential). Assuming a Gaussian initial fluctuation field (of the form associated with the relevant central limit theorem), we show that at long times the fluctuating force field converges in law to a stationary Gaussian process. We also illustrate how the time-asymptotic fluctuating force field is formally associated with the diffusion matrix and drift vector for the Balescu-Guernsey-Lenard kinetic equation.

  18. Evolution of completion and fracture stimulation practices in the Jonah field, Sublette County, WY

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, R.W.; Skees, J.L.; Aud, W.W.

    1996-12-31

    This case history discusses the evolution of the completion strategies and fracture stimulation techniques that have turned a large marginal gas resource in the Jonah field, WY into a commercially viable field. Completion practices have evolved from single zone, high-quality nitrogen foam fracture stimulations to multiple zone completions utilizing crosslinked borate fluid systems. Using these new techniques, total field production has increased approximately 180%. A normalized comparison of productivity (q/{Delta}P) per foot of gross clean sand indicates the new completion and stimulation techniques yield shallower decline rates with initial production equal to or higher than the earlier foam treatments.

  19. The carbon isotope biogeochemistry of methane production in anoxic sediments. 1: Field observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, Neal E.; Boehme, Susan E.; Carter, W. Dale, Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The natural abundance C-13/C-12 ratio of methane from anoxic marine and freshwater sediments in temperate climates varies seasonally. Carbon isotopic measurements of the methanogenic precursors, acetate and dissolved inorganic carbon, from the marine sediments of Cape Lookout Bight, North Carolina were used to determine the sources of the seasonal variations at that site. Movement of the methanogenic zone over an isotopic gradient within the dissolved CO2 pool appears to be the dominant control of the methane C-13/C-12 ratio from February to June. The onset of acetoclastic methane-production is a second important controlling process during mid-summer. An apparent temperature dependence on the fractionation factor for CO2-reduction may have a significant influence on the isotopic composition of methane throughout the year.

  20. Boundary-value problem for a counterrotating electrical discharge in an axial magnetic field. [plasma centrifuge for isotope separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, S. H.; Wilhelm, H. E.

    1978-01-01

    An electrical discharge between two ring electrodes embedded in the mantle of a cylindrical chamber is considered, in which the plasma in the anode and cathode regions rotates in opposite directions under the influence of an external axial magnetic field. The associated boundary-value problem for the coupled partial differential equations describing the azimuthal velocity and radial current-density fields is solved in closed form. The velocity, current density, induced magnetic induction, and electric fields are presented for typical Hartmann numbers, magnetic Reynolds numbers, and geometry parameters. The discharge is shown to produce anodic and cathodic plasma sections rotating at speeds of the order 1,000,000 cm/sec for conventional magnetic field intensities. Possible application of the magnetoactive discharge as a plasma centrifuge for isotope separation is discussed.

  1. Magma evolution and ascent at the Craters of the Moon and neighboring volcanic fields, southern Idaho, USA: implications for the evolution of polygenetic and monogenetic volcanic fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Putirka, Keith D.; Kuntz, Mel A.; Unruh, Daniel M.; Vaid, Nitin

    2009-01-01

    The evolution of polygenetic and monogenetic volcanic fields must reflect differences in magma processing during ascent. To assess their evolution we use thermobarometry and geochemistry to evaluate ascent paths for neighboring, nearly coeval volcanic fields in the Snake River Plain, in south-central Idaho, derived from (1) dominantly Holocene polygenetic evolved lavas from the Craters of the Moon lava field (COME) and (2) Quaternary non-evolved, olivine tholeiites (NEOT) from nearby monogenetic volcanic fields. These data show that NEOT have high magmatic temperatures (1205 + or - 27 degrees C) and a narrow temperature range (50 degrees C). Prolonged storage of COME magmas allows them to evolve to higher 87Sr/86Sr and SiO2, and lower MgO and 143Nd/144Nd. Most importantly, ascent paths control evolution: NEOT often erupt near the axis of the plain where high-flux (Yellowstone-related), pre-Holocene magmatic activity replaces granitic middle crust with basaltic sills, resulting in a net increase in NEOT magma buoyancy. COME flows erupt off-axis, where felsic crustal lithologies sometimes remain intact, providing a barrier to ascent and a source for crustal contamination. A three-stage ascent process explains the entire range of erupted compositions. Stage 1 (40-20 km): picrites are transported to the middle crust, undergoing partial crystallization of olivine + or - clinopyroxene. COME magmas pass through unarmored conduits and assimilate 1% or less of ancient gabbroic crust having high Sr and 87Sr/86Sr and low SiO2. Stage 2 (20-10 km): magmas are stored within the middle crust, and evolve to moderate MgO (10%). NEOT magmas, reaching 10% MgO, are positively buoyant and migrate through the middle crust. COME magmas remain negatively buoyant and so crystallize further and assimilate middle crust. Stage 3 (15-0 km): final ascent and eruption occurs when volatile contents, increased by differentiation, are sufficient (1-2 wt % H2O) to provide magma buoyancy through the

  2. Stable and radioactive carbon in forest soils of Chhattisgarh, Central India: Implications for tropical soil carbon dynamics and stable carbon isotope evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskar, A. H.; Yadava, M. G.; Ramesh, R.

    2016-06-01

    Soils from two sites viz. Kotumsar and Tirathgarh, located ∼5 km apart in a tropical reserve forest (18°52‧N, 81°56‧E) in central India, have been explored for soil organic carbon (SOC) content, its mean residence time (MRT) and the evolution of stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C). SOC stocks in the upper 30 cm of soil layers are ∼5.3 kg/m2 and ∼3.0 kg/m2; in the upper 110 m are ∼10.7 kg/m2 and ∼7.8 kg/m2 at Kotumsar and Tirathgarh, respectively. SOC decreases with increasing depth. Bomb carbon signature is observed in the upper ∼10 cm. Organic matters in the top soil layers (0-10 cm) have MRTs of the order of a century which increases gradually with depths, reaching 3500-5000 yrs at ∼100 cm. δ13C values of SOC increase with depth, the carbon isotopic fractionation is obtained to be -1.2‰ and -3‰ for soils at Kotumsar and Tirathgarh, respectively, confirmed using Rayleigh isotopic fractionation model. The evolution of δ13C in soils was also studied using a modified Rayleigh fractionation model incorporating a continuous input into the reservoir: the depth profiles of δ13C for SOC show that the input organic matter from surface into the deeper soil layers is either insignificant or highly labile and decomposes quite fast in the top layers, thus making little contribution to the residual biomasses of the deeper layers. This is an attempt to understand the distillation processes that take place in SOC, assess the extent of decomposition by microbes and effect of percolation of fresh organic matter into dipper soil layers which are important for stable isotope based paleoclimate and paleovegetation reconstruction and understanding the dynamics of organic carbon in soils.

  3. A portable automated system for trace gas sampling in the field and stable isotope analysis in the laboratory.

    PubMed

    Theis, Daniel E; Saurer, Matthias; Blum, Herbert; Frossard, Emmanuel; Siegwolf, Rolf T W

    2004-01-01

    A computer-controllable mobile system is presented which enables the automatic collection of 33 air samples in the field and the subsequent analysis for delta13C and delta18O stable isotope ratios of a carbon-containing trace gas in the laboratory, e.g. CO2, CO or CH4. The system includes a manifold gas source input for profile sampling and an infrared gas analyzer for in situ CO2 concentration measurements. Measurements of delta13C and delta18O of all 33 samples can run unattended and take less than six hours for CO2. Laboratory tests with three gases (compressed air with different pCO2 and stable isotope compositions) showed a measurement precision of 0.03 per thousand for delta13C and 0.02 per thousand for delta18O of CO2 (standard error (SE), n = 11). A field test of our system, in which 66 air samples were collected within a 24-hour period above grassland, showed a correlation of 0.99 (r2) between the inverse of pCO2 and delta13C of CO2. Storage of samples until analysis is possible for about 1 week; this can be an important factor for sampling in remote areas. A wider range of applications in the field is open with our system, since sampling and analysis of CO and CH4 for stable isotope composition is also possible. Samples of compressed air had a measurement precision (SE, n = 33) of 0.03 per thousand for delta13C and of 0.04 per thousand for delta18O on CO and of 0.07 per thousand for delta13C on CH4. Our system should therefore further facilitate research of trace gases in the context of the carbon cycle in the field, and opens many other possible applications with carbon- and possibly non-carbon-containing trace gases. PMID:15317047

  4. Surface Flux Transport and the Evolution of the Sun's Polar Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.-M.

    2016-04-01

    The evolution of the polar fields occupies a central place in flux transport (Babcock-Leighton) models of the solar cycle. We discuss the relationship between surface flux transport and polar field evolution, focusing on two main issues: the latitudinal profile of the meridional flow and the axial tilts of active regions. Recent helioseismic observations indicate that the poleward flow speed peaks at much lower latitudes than inferred from magnetic feature tracking, which includes the effect of supergranular diffusion and thus does not represent the actual bulk flow. Employing idealized simulations, we demonstrate that flow profiles that peak at mid latitudes give rise to overly strong and concentrated polar fields. We discuss the differences between magnetic and white-light measurements of tilt angles, noting the large uncertainties inherent in the sunspot group measurements and their tendency to underestimate the actual tilts. We find no clear evidence for systematic cycle-to-cycle variations in Joy's law during cycles 21-23. Finally, based on the observed evolution of the Sun's axial dipole component and polar fields up to the end of 2015, we predict that cycle 25 will be similar in amplitude to cycle 24.

  5. APPLICATION OF STABLE CARBON AND HYDROGEN ISOTOPIC TECHNIQUES FOR MONITORING BIODEGRADATION OF MTBE IN THE FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory


    A significant challenge in environmental studies is to determine the onset and extent of MTBE bioremediation at an affected site, which may involve indirect approaches such as microcosm verification of microbial activities at a given site. Stable isotopic fractionation is cha...

  6. OXYGEN ISOTOPES IN ATMOSPHERIC SULFATES, SULFUR DIOXIDE, AND WATER VAPORS FIELD MEASUREMENTS, JULY 1975

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxygen isotope ratios were determined for atmospheric samples of sulfate aerosols, sulfur dioxide, and water vapor collected simultaneously during a six-day period in July, 1975, at St. Louis, MO; Auburn, IL; and Glasgow, IL. The collection sites were located about 100km apart. C...

  7. The evolution of the North Atlantic Oscillation for the last 700 years inferred from D/H isotopes in the sedimentary record of Lake Azul (Azores archipelago, Portugal).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio de Ingles, Maria Jesus; Shanahan, Timothy M.; Sáez, Alberto; José Pueyo, Juan; Raposeiro, Pedro M.; Gonçalves, Vitor M.; Hernández, Armand; Trigo, Ricardo; Sánchez López, Guiomar; Francus, Pierre; Giralt, Santiago

    2015-04-01

    The δD plant leaf wax variations provide insights on precipitation and evaporation evolution through time. This proxy has been used to reconstruct the temporal evolution of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) climate mode since this mode rules most of the climate variability in the central North Atlantic area. A total lipid extraction preparation and the correspondent analyses in the IRMS have been done for 100 samples from the uppermost 1.5 m of the sedimentary infill of Lake Azul (Azores archipelago, Portugal). According to the chronological model, established by 210Pb profile and 4 AMS 14C dates, this record contains the environmental history of the last 730 years. The reconstructed precipitation variations obtained from D/H isotope values, suggest that this area has suffered significant changes in its distribution and intensity rainfall patterns through time. The end of the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA, 1100- 1300 AD) is characterized by a progressive enrichmentof D/H isotope values which meant decreasing arid conditions. These rainfalls' increase might be interpreted by a shift from positive to negative dominance of the NAO. The Little Ice Age (LIA, 1300 - 1850 AD) was characterized by two humid periods (1300- 1550 AD and 1650 - 1850 AD) separated by a relatively dry period. These precipitation oscillations are clearly visible by marked changes in the D/H isotope values. The LIA was followed by the persistence of the positive NAO mode, exhibited by the depletion of the D/H isotope signal, which indicated an overall decrease of the precipitation in the central North Atlantic area. Surprisingly, the D/H of the last 100 years, characterized by the present global warming and a persistent positive NAO mode, display large fluctuations most possibly linked to an enhancement of the storminess which is in concordance with the data fluctuations observed in the instrumental record for the last 80 years in the archipelago. This climatic evolution is in accordance with

  8. Field Evolution of Coexisting Superconducting and Magnetic Orders in CeCoIn5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutroulakis, G.; Stewart, M. D., Jr.; Mitrović, V. F.; Horvatić, M.; Berthier, C.; Lapertot, G.; Flouquet, J.

    2010-02-01

    We present nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements on the three distinct In sites of CeCoIn5 with a magnetic field applied in the [100] direction. We identify the microscopic nature of the long range magnetic order (LRO) stabilized at low temperatures in fields above 10.2 T while still in the superconducting (SC) state. We infer that the ordered moment is oriented along the c^ axis and map its field evolution. The study of the field dependence of the NMR shift for the different In sites indicates that the LRO likely coexists with a modulated SC phase, possibly that predicted by Fulde, Ferrell, Larkin, and Ovchinnikov. Furthermore, we discern a field region dominated by strong spin fluctuations where static LRO is absent and propose a revised phase diagram.

  9. Evolution of the magnetic field generated by the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability

    SciTech Connect

    Modestov, M.; Bychkov, V.; Brodin, G.; Marklund, M.; Brandenburg, A.

    2014-07-15

    The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in an ionized plasma is studied with a focus on the magnetic field generation via the Biermann battery (baroclinic) mechanism. The problem is solved by using direct numerical simulations of two counter-directed flows in 2D geometry. The simulations demonstrate the formation of eddies and their further interaction and merging resulting in a large single vortex. In contrast to general belief, it is found that the instability generated magnetic field may exhibit significantly different structures from the vorticity field, despite the mathematically identical equations controlling the magnetic field and vorticity evolution. At later stages of the nonlinear instability development, the magnetic field may keep growing even after the hydrodynamic vortex strength has reached its maximum and started decaying due to dissipation.

  10. Magma generation and evolution processes of calc-alkalic and tholeiitic suites in Azuma volcano, NE Japan - Sr isotope micro-analysis study of plagioclase phenocrysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, T.; Hirahara, Y.; Kimura, J.; Chang, Q.; Tatsumi, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Magma generation and evolution processes of island-arc tholeiitic (TH) and calc-alkalic (CA) suites in the NE Japan arc have been thought that the former is produced by fractional crystallization from mantle-derived basalt magma and the latter is formed by magma mixing between basic and felsic magmas. However, based on Sr isotope micro-analyses of plagioclase phenocrysts in basalt and andesite lavas from Zao volcano, Tatsumi et al. (2008) argued that TH basalt was formed by melting of lower-crustal amphibolite, and CA was formed by magma mixing between mantle-derived basalt magma and the crust-derived basaltic andesite to dacite magmas. We present another example from Azuma volcano in the NE Japan arc which verifies our model. Sr isotope micro-analyses were performed by laser ablation multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-MC-ICPMS, NEPTUNE coupled to 193nm excimer laser system) and the combined method of micro-milling and thermal ionization mass spectrometry (MM-TIMS, micro-mill system and TRITON). The sampling crater size of LA-ICP-MS and MM-TIMS are 0.2mm and 0.27mm in both diameter and depth, respectively. Inner part of plagioclase phenocrysts in TH basalts have narrow range in An% and Sr isotope ratios (80 ~ 95% and 0.7058 ~ 0.7062). In contrast, plagioclases in CA basalts and andesites have widely ranges in An% and Sr isotope ratio (48 ~ 94%, 0.7039 ~ 0.7056). This observed variations are similar to that found in Zao samples, except that Sr isotope ratio is overall higher than that in Zao (Zao TH: 0.7043 ~ 0.7045, Zao CA: 0.7035 ~ 0.7045). We conclude that the magma generation and evolution model proposed by Tatsumi et al. (2008) is applicable to the Azuma TH and CA suites. Difference in the Sr isotope ratio of plagioclase between Azuma and Zao, particularly found in each TH suite lavas, can be explained by the difference in crust composition beneath the volcanoes.

  11. 3D Loops Evolutions (Twists And Expansions) And Magnetic Fields Interactions Studied With SOHO/EIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portier-Fozzani, Fabrice

    1999-10-01

    I will present some results from my PHD/Thesis. With SOHO/EIT, 3D Technics such as stereovision and "vision by shape" were developped to study coronal structures evolution. To discribe loops morphology, we adapted with M. Aschwanden a torus fit which include twist evolution. On a quick magnetic flux emergence (August 5th 1997), the twist were decreasing while the loop expand. During a long time evolution (July - August 1996), flaring activities were well correlated with sudden decrease in the twist. These 2 results correspond to the evolution expected with the Parker's formula (1977). Magnetic field lines interactions were also analyzed. From multi-wavelengths observations, we had studied some morphological and topological changes which can be interpreted as interactions between open and closed field lines (ie between Coronal Holes and Active Region Loops). Then, relationship between CME/Flares formation and our different instabilities studied were analyzed in the aim to find, in the futur, good criteria concerning space weather.

  12. Evolution of Biomass Burning Aerosol Optical Properties in the Near Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlacek, A. J., III; Arnott, W. P.; Chand, D.; Fortner, E.; Freedman, A.; Kleinman, L. I.; Onasch, T. B.; Shilling, J. E.; Springston, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    Biomass burning (BB) events are known to produce chemically rich environments that can impact the evolution of primary aerosols and influence secondary aerosols production rates. With their increasing in frequency, BB events are expected to exert an ever-increasing impact on climate due to aerosol radiative forcing processes. One area that is still poorly understood is the evolution of these smoke aerosols in the near field. Recent literature suggests that BB aerosols undergo a rapid evolution near their source that is then followed by a slower aging phase. During the summer of 2013, the Department of Energy-sponsored an aircraft field campaign called the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) that specifically targeted the evolution of smoke aerosols in the near field (< 2 hours). Results examining the evolution of BB optical and microphysical properties will be presented. To probe these properties, the BBOP field campaign deployed a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) to probe the mixing state of refractory black carbon (rBC) and a Soot Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS) to investigate the composition of both non-refractory and rBC-containing particles. Aerosol optical properties were measured in situ using a 355 nm Photoacoustic spectrometer (PAS), a 532 nm photo thermal interferometer (PTI), a 630 nm cavity Attenuation Phase Shifted (CAPS) spectrometer, a 3-λ nephelometer, and a 3-λ PSAP. The BBOP study represented the maiden aircraft deployment for the SP-AMS, the 355 nm PAS and 532 nm PTI. Discussion will be on the near-field evolution of particle mixing state and morphology, chemical composition, and microphysical processes that determine aerosol size distributions and single scattering albedo (SSA) of light absorbing aerosols. In the cases studied, increases in the coating thickness of refractive black carbon (rBC) particles, organic aerosol/rBC ratio, scattering/CO ratio, and aerosol size distributions have been observed. Results will be

  13. Cyclic Evolution of Coronal Fields from a Coupled Dynamo Potential-Field Source-Surface Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikpati, Mausumi; Suresh, Akshaya; Burkepile, Joan

    2016-02-01

    The structure of the Sun's corona varies with the solar-cycle phase, from a near spherical symmetry at solar maximum to an axial dipole at solar minimum. It is widely accepted that the large-scale coronal structure is governed by magnetic fields that are most likely generated by dynamo action in the solar interior. In order to understand the variation in coronal structure, we couple a potential-field source-surface model with a cyclic dynamo model. In this coupled model, the magnetic field inside the convection zone is governed by the dynamo equation; these dynamo-generated fields are extended from the photosphere to the corona using a potential-field source-surface model. Assuming axisymmetry, we take linear combinations of associated Legendre polynomials that match the more complex coronal structures. Choosing images of the global corona from the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory at each Carrington rotation over half a cycle (1986 - 1991), we compute the coefficients of the associated Legendre polynomials up to degree eight and compare with observations. We show that at minimum the dipole term dominates, but it fades as the cycle progresses; higher-order multipolar terms begin to dominate. The amplitudes of these terms are not exactly the same for the two limbs, indicating that there is a longitude dependence. While both the 1986 and the 1996 minimum coronas were dipolar, the minimum in 2008 was unusual, since there was a substantial departure from a dipole. We investigate the physical cause of this departure by including a North-South asymmetry in the surface source of the magnetic fields in our flux-transport dynamo model, and find that this asymmetry could be one of the reasons for departure from the dipole in the 2008 minimum.

  14. The δ13C evolution of cave drip water along discreet flow paths in a central Texas cave: Quantifying kinetic isotope fractionation factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickler, P. J.; Carlson, P. E.; Banner, J.; Breecker, D.; Stern, L. A.; Baseman, A.

    2015-12-01

    Gaps remain in our understanding of in-cave processes that influence cave water chemistry during speleothem formation. Quantifying environmental controls on the isotopic and chemical evolution of karst groundwater would improve the accuracy of speleothem-based paleoclimate reconstructions. In this study, drip water chemical evolution along flow paths was sampled monthly at two locations in Inner Space Cavern, Texas, over a period of 8 months. In each of the two locations, cave water drips off a stalactite, flows along a flowstone and subsequently drips off a lower stalactite, allowing cave water to be sampled at two points, 1-2 meters apart, along each flow path. The chemical and isotopic evolution of drip water along its flow path shows seasonality, where 1) summer months (high cave-air pCO2) have small variations in δ13C values along the flow paths, high and relatively invariant DIC and Ca values,; and 2) winter months (low cave-air pCO2) generally have large increases in DIC δ13C values along the flow paths, lower DIC and Ca values. The magnitude of the increase in DIC δ13C values along the flow paths, <~1‰ to ~4‰, is controlled by the extent of DIC loss to CO2 degassing and calcite precipitation which is controlled by the pCO2 gradient between drip water and cave air. If the DIC loss is less than 15%, then the evolution of the δ13C value of the DIC reservoir can be modelled using a Rayleigh distillation model and equilibrium fractionation factors between (CO2(g)-HCO3-(aq)) and (CaCO3-HCO3-(aq)). As the loss of the DIC reservoir increases above 15% the DIC δ13C values become progressively higher such that the ɛ (CO2(g)-HCO3-(aq)) values needed to model the observed results change from equilibrium values of ~8‰ to non-equilibrium values up to ~25‰. The variance in magnitude of carbon isotope fractionation during CO2 degassing cannot be attributed to changes in temperature, and thus we infer significant kinetic isotope effects at higher rates of DIC

  15. Deformation-induced spatiotemporal fluctuation, evolution and localization of strain fields in a bulk metallic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yuan; Bei, Hongbin; Wang, Yanli; Lu, Zhaoping; George, Easo P.; Gao, Yanfei

    2015-05-16

    Deformation behavior and local strain evolutions upon loading and unloading of a bulk metallic glass (BMG) were systematically investigated by in situ digital image correlation (DIC). Distinct fluctuations and irreversible local strains were observed before the onset of macroscopic yielding. Statistical analysis shows that these fluctuations might be related to intrinsic structural heterogeneities, and that the evolution history and characteristics of local strain fields play an important role in the subsequent initiation of shear bands. Effects of sample size, pre-strain, and loading conditions were systematically analyzed in terms of the probability distributions of the resulting local strain fields. It is found that a higher degree of local shear strain heterogeneity corresponds to a more ductile stressestrain curve. Implications of these findings are discussed for the design of new materials.

  16. Deformation-induced spatiotemporal fluctuation, evolution and localization of strain fields in a bulk metallic glass

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wu, Yuan; Bei, Hongbin; Wang, Yanli; Lu, Zhaoping; George, Easo P.; Gao, Yanfei

    2015-05-16

    Deformation behavior and local strain evolutions upon loading and unloading of a bulk metallic glass (BMG) were systematically investigated by in situ digital image correlation (DIC). Distinct fluctuations and irreversible local strains were observed before the onset of macroscopic yielding. Statistical analysis shows that these fluctuations might be related to intrinsic structural heterogeneities, and that the evolution history and characteristics of local strain fields play an important role in the subsequent initiation of shear bands. Effects of sample size, pre-strain, and loading conditions were systematically analyzed in terms of the probability distributions of the resulting local strain fields. It ismore » found that a higher degree of local shear strain heterogeneity corresponds to a more ductile stressestrain curve. Implications of these findings are discussed for the design of new materials.« less

  17. Lagrangian model for the evolution of turbulent magnetic and passive scalar fields

    SciTech Connect

    Hater, T.; Grauer, R.; Homann, H.

    2011-01-15

    In this Brief Report we present an extension of the recent fluid deformation (RFD) closure introduced by Chevillard and Meneveau [L. Chevillard and C. Meneveau, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 174501 (2006)] which was developed for modeling the time evolution of Lagrangian fluctuations in incompressible Navier-Stokes turbulence. We apply the RFD closure to study the evolution of magnetic and passive scalar fluctuations. This comparison is especially interesting since the stretching term for the magnetic field and for the gradient of the passive scalar are similar but differ by a sign such that the effect of stretching and compression by the turbulent velocity field is reversed. Probability density functions (PDFs) of magnetic fluctuations and fluctuations of the gradient of the passive scalar obtained from the RFD closure are compared against PDFs obtained from direct numerical simulations.

  18. Phase-field modeling of void evolution and swelling in materials under irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Sun, Xin; Gao, Fei; Henager, Charles H.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-05-01

    Void swelling is an important phenomenon observed in both nuclear fuels and cladding materials in operating nuclear reactors. In this work we developed a phase-field model to simulate the void nucleation, growth, and the change of void volume fraction. Important material processes including the generation of defects such as vacancies and self-interstitials, their diffusion and annihilation, and void nucleation and evolution have been taken into account in our phase-field model. The thermodynamic and kinetic properties such as chemical free energy, interfacial energy, vacancy mobility, and annihilation rate of vacancies and interstitials are generally expressed as functions of the temperature. The developed model enables one to parametrically study critical void nucleus size, void growth kinetics, and void volume fraction evolutions. Our simulations demonstrated that the volume swelling displays a quasi-bell shape distribution with temperature that was often observed in experiments.

  19. Isotopic and chemical evidence concerning the genesis and contamination of basaltic and rhyolitic magma beneath the Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hildreth, W.; Halliday, A.N.; Christiansen, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    Since 2.2 Ma, the Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field has produced ~6000 km3 of rhyolite tuffs and lavas in >60 separate eruptions, as well as ~100 km3 of tholeiitic basalt from >50 vents peripheral to the silicic focus. Intermediate eruptive products are absent. Early postcollapse rhyolites show large shifts in Nd, Sr, Pb, and O isotopic composition caused by assimilation of roof rocks and hydrothermal brines during collapse and resurgence. Younger intracaldera rhyolite lavas record partial isotopic recovery toward precaldera ratios. Thirteen extracaldera rhyolites show none of these effects and have sources independent of the subcaldera magma system. Contributions from the Archaean crust have extreme values and wide ranges of Nd-, Sr, and Pb-isotope ratios, but Yellowstone rhyolites have moderate values and limited ranges. This requires their deep-crustal sources to have been pervasively hybridized by distributed intrusion of Cenozoic basalt, most of which was probably contemporaneous with the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanism. Most Yellowstone basalts had undergone cryptic clinopyroxene fractionation in the lower crust or crust-mantle transition zone and, having also ascended through or adjacent to crustal zones of silicic-magma generation, most underwent some crustal contamination. -from Authors

  20. Application of evolution strategies for the solution of an inverse problem in near-field optics.

    PubMed

    Macías, Demetrio; Vial, Alexandre; Barchiesi, Dominique

    2004-08-01

    We introduce an inversion procedure for the characterization of a nanostructure from near-field intensity data. The method proposed is based on heuristic arguments and makes use of evolution strategies for the solution of the inverse problem as a nonlinear constrained-optimization problem. By means of some examples we illustrate the performance of our inversion method. We also discuss its possibilities and potential applications. PMID:15330475

  1. Sulfur Isotopes as Indicators of Bacterial Sulfate Reduction Processes Influencing Field Scale Uranium Bioremediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druhan, J. L.; Conrad, M. E.; Williams, K. H.; N'guessan, L.; Long, P. E.; Hubbard, S. S.

    2007-12-01

    An in-situ acetate amendment at a DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) site near Rifle, CO demonstrated successful reduction of aqueous U(VI), to less soluble U(IV) through stimulated microbial activity. U(VI) reduction rates were highest during iron reduction and decreased with the onset of sulfate reduction. However, sustained U(IV) attenuation was observed following subsequent termination of the acetate amendment. These findings illustrate the importance of the transition between iron and sulfate reducing conditions in stimulating bioreduction of uranium. The sulfur isotope compositions of sulfate and sulfide were measured through this transition in order to explore the utility of these data in tracking the extent of microbial sulfate reduction and to assess the stability of sulfide precipitates. Samples for isotopic analyses and aqueous measurements of sulfate, ferrous iron, U(VI) and acetate were collected in one background well and three monitoring wells down-gradient of the acetate injection. Results show an increase of up to 7‰ in the δ34S of sulfate at the onset of sulfate reduction, followed by a return to background δ34S values of -8‰ following cessation of the acetate amendment. The δ34S values of sulfide increased from roughly -20‰ at the onset of sulfate reduction to a maximum of -0.8‰ during peak sulfate removal, followed by a gradual return to values of roughly -28‰ upon cessation of the acetate amendment. These data present a unique perspective on the processes governing the bioreduction experiment in that the sulfate isotopes are a function of both transport and mixing processes, whereas the sulfide isotopes represent biogenic sulfide that is rapidly removed from the aqueous phase. Thus a comparable enrichment in sulfate isotopic data noted in the closest and furthest wells from the injection gallery suggest bioreduction in both of these locations, while a larger increase in sulfide isotopic values in the closest well

  2. Identifying the origin and geochemical evolution of groundwater using hydrochemistry and stable isotopes in the Subei Lake basin, Ordos energy base, Northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, F.; Song, X.; Yang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Han, D.; Ma, Y.; Bu, H.

    2015-01-01

    A series of changes in groundwater systems caused by groundwater exploitation in energy base have been of great concern to hydrogeologists. The research aims to identify the origin and geochemical evolution of groundwater in the Subei Lake basin under the influence of human activities. Water samples were collected, and major ions and stable isotopes (δ18O, δD) were analyzed. In terms of hydrogeological conditions and the analytical results of hydrochemical data, groundwater can be classified into three types: the Quaternary groundwater, the shallow Cretaceous groundwater and the deep Cretaceous groundwater. Piper diagram and correlation analysis were used to reveal the hydrochemical characteristics of water resources. The dominant water type of the lake water was Cl-Na type, which was in accordance with hydrochemical characteristics of inland salt lakes; the predominant hydrochemical types for groundwater were HCO3-Ca, HCO3-Na and mixed HCO3-Ca-Na-Mg types. The groundwater chemistry is mainly controlled by dissolution/precipitation of anhydrite, gypsum, halite and calcite. The dedolomitization and cation exchange are also important factors. Rock weathering is confirmed to play a leading role in the mechanisms responsible for the chemical composition of groundwater. The stable isotopic values of oxygen and hydrogen in groundwater are close to the local meteoric water line, indicating that groundwater is of modern local meteoric origin. Unlike significant differences in isotopic values between shallow groundwater and deep groundwater in the Habor Lake basin, shallow Cretaceous groundwater and deep Cretaceous groundwater have similar isotopic characteristics in the Subei Lake basin. Due to the evaporation effect and dry climatic conditions, heavy isotopes are more enriched in lake water than in groundwater. The low slope of the regression line of δ18O and δD in lake water could be ascribed to a combination of mixing and evaporation under conditions of low humidity

  3. EVOLUTION OF X-RAY AND FAR-ULTRAVIOLET DISK-DISPERSING RADIATION FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Ingleby, Laura; Calvet, Nuria; Miller, Jon; Bergin, Edwin; Hartmann, Lee; Hernandez, Jesus; Briceno, Cesar; Espaillat, Catherine E-mail: ncalvet@umich.edu E-mail: ebergin@umich.edu E-mail: jesush@cida.ve E-mail: cespaillat@cfa.harvard.edu

    2011-04-15

    We present new X-ray and far-ultraviolet (FUV) observations of T Tauri stars covering the age range 1-10 Myr. Our goals are to observationally constrain the intensity of radiation fields responsible for evaporating gas from the circumstellar disk and to assess the feasibility of current photoevaporation models, focusing on X-ray and UV radiation. We greatly increase the number of 7-10 Myr old T Tauri stars observed in X-rays by including observations of the well-populated 25 Ori aggregate in the Orion OB1a subassociation. With these new 7-10 Myr objects, we confirm that X-ray emission remains constant from 1 to 10 Myr. We also show, for the first time, observational evidence for the evolution of FUV radiation fields with a sample of 56 accreting and non-accreting young stars spanning 1 Myr to 1 Gyr. We find that the FUV emission decreases on timescales consistent with the decline of accretion in classical T Tauri stars until reaching the chromospheric level in weak T Tauri stars and debris disks. Overall, we find that the observed strength of high-energy radiation is consistent with that required by photoevaporation models to dissipate the disks in timescales of approximately 10 Myr. Finally, we find that the high-energy fields that affect gas evolution are not similarly affecting dust evolution; in particular, we find that disks with inner clearings, transitional disks, have similar levels of FUV emission as full disks.

  4. Evolution of perturbations in distinct classes of canonical scalar field models of dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Jassal, H. K.

    2010-04-15

    Dark energy must cluster in order to be consistent with the equivalence principle. The background evolution can be effectively modeled by either a scalar field or by a barotropic fluid. The fluid model can be used to emulate perturbations in a scalar field model of dark energy, though this model breaks down at large scales. In this paper we study evolution of dark energy perturbations in canonical scalar field models: the classes of thawing and freezing models. The dark energy equation of state evolves differently in these classes. In freezing models, the equation of state deviates from that of a cosmological constant at early times. For thawing models, the dark energy equation of state remains near that of the cosmological constant at early times and begins to deviate from it only at late times. Since the dark energy equation of state evolves differently in these classes, the dark energy perturbations too evolve differently. In freezing models, since the equation of state deviates from that of a cosmological constant at early times, there is a significant difference in evolution of matter perturbations from those in the cosmological constant model. In comparison, matter perturbations in thawing models differ from the cosmological constant only at late times. This difference provides an additional handle to distinguish between these classes of models and this difference should manifest itself in the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect.

  5. Field-Based Stable Isotope Probing Reveals the Identities of Benzoic Acid-Metabolizing Microorganisms and Their In Situ Growth in Agricultural Soil▿

    PubMed Central

    Pumphrey, Graham M.; Madsen, Eugene L.

    2008-01-01

    We used a combination of stable isotope probing (SIP), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based respiration, isolation/cultivation, and quantitative PCR procedures to discover the identity and in situ growth of soil microorganisms that metabolize benzoic acid. We added [13C]benzoic acid or [12C]benzoic acid (100 μg) once, four times, or five times at 2-day intervals to agricultural field plots. After monitoring 13CO2 evolution from the benzoic acid-dosed soil, field soils were harvested and used for nucleic acid extraction and for cultivation of benzoate-degrading bacteria. Exposure of soil to benzoate increased the number of culturable benzoate degraders compared to unamended soil, and exposure to benzoate shifted the dominant culturable benzoate degraders from Pseudomonas species to Burkholderia species. Isopycnic separation of heavy [13C]DNA from the unlabeled fraction allowed terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analyses to confirm that distinct 16S rRNA genes were localized in the heavy fraction. Phylogenetic analysis of sequenced 16S rRNA genes revealed a predominance (15 of 58 clones) of Burkholderia species in the heavy fraction. Burkholderia sp. strain EBA09 shared 99.5% 16S rRNA sequence similarity with a group of clones representing the dominant RFLP pattern, and the T-RFLP fragment for strain EBA09 and a clone from that cluster matched the fragment enriched in the [13C]DNA fraction. Growth of the population represented by EBA09 during the field-dosing experiment was demonstrated by using most-probable-number-PCR and primers targeting EBA09 and the closely related species Burkholderia hospita. Thus, the target population identified by SIP not only actively metabolized benzoic acid but reproduced in the field upon the addition of the substrate. PMID:18469130

  6. Silicon isotope fractionation during silica precipitation from hot-spring waters: Evidence from the Geysir geothermal field, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geilert, Sonja; Vroon, Pieter Z.; Keller, Nicole S.; Gudbrandsson, Snorri; Stefánsson, Andri; van Bergen, Manfred J.

    2015-09-01

    This study aims to explore the extent and controls of silicon isotope fractionation in hot spring systems of the Geysir geothermal area (Iceland), a setting where sinter deposits are actively formed. The δ30Si values of dissolved silica measured in the spring water and sampling sites along outflowing streams, covering a temperature range between 20 and 100 °C, were relatively constant around +0.2‰, whereas the δ30Si signatures of associated opaline sinters from the streambeds were between -0.1‰ and -4.0‰, becoming progressively more negative in the downstream parts of the aprons. Here, the deposited sinters represent some of the most 30Si depleted abiotically produced terrestrial materials documented to date. Compared to the data reported for Icelandic basalts, considered to be the source of the silicon, the δ30Si values of the fluids and sinter deposits are higher and lower, respectively. The resulting values for apparent solid-water isotope fractionation (Δ30Sisolid-water) decreased with decreasing temperature from ca. -0.7‰ at ∼80 °C to -3.7‰ at ∼20 °C, locally down to -4.4‰. This temperature relationship was reproducible in each of the investigated hot spring systems and is qualitatively consistent with recent findings in laboratory experiments on kinetic fractionation for a flowing fluid. However, the apparent fractionation magnitudes observed in the field are ca. -2‰ more negative and thus significantly larger. We infer that solid-water silicon isotope fractionation during deposition of amorphous silica from a flowing fluid correlates inversely with temperature, but is essentially a function of the precipitation rate, such that the fractionation factor decreases with increasing rate. As an important corollary, the effective fractionation behavior during precipitation of silica from saturated solutions is a system-dependent feature, which should be taken into account when using silicon isotopes for paleo-environmental reconstructions.

  7. Magnetic-field effects in transitions of X Li molecules (X: even isotopes of group II atoms)

    SciTech Connect

    Gopakumar, Geetha; Abe, Minori; Hada, Masahiko; Kajita, Masatoshi

    2011-10-15

    We analyze the Zeeman shift in the (v,N)=(0,0){yields}(1,0) transition frequency of X Li molecules (X: even isotopes of group II atoms), which is of interest in metrology. The Zeeman shift in the transition frequency between stretching states is found to be less than 1 mHz with a magnetic field of 1 G. X {sup 6}Li molecules are more advantageous than X {sup 7}Li molecules for measuring the transition frequency without the Zeeman shift because of the smaller g factor of the Li nuclear spin.

  8. The period and magnetic field distributions of cataclysmic variables - Implications for their evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, G. D.; Liebert, J.

    1987-01-01

    Comparison of the period distributions of various classes of CVs confirms an extreme bias of the synchronous AM Her systems toward short orbital periods, while the DQ Her systems do not differ significantly from the distribution of nonmagnetic systems. This suggests either strong selection effects or enhanced evolution of the AM Her systems. There is as yet no obvious bimodality in either the magnetic field distributions of isolated white dwarfs or of CV primaries. However, clear differences between the two exist: the strongest being that magnetic primaries are overrepresented among short period CVs by more than an order of magnitude in comparison to the field white dwarfs.

  9. Environment-Assisted Speed-up of the Field Evolution in Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Cimmarusti, A. D.; Yan, Z.; Patterson, B. D.; Corcos, L. P.; Orozco, L. A.; Deffner, S.

    2015-06-11

    We measure the quantum speed of the state evolution of the field in a weakly-driven optical cavity QED system. To this end, the mode of the electromagnetic field is considered as a quantum system of interest with a preferential coupling to a tunable environment: the atoms. By controlling the environment, i.e., changing the number of atoms coupled to the optical cavity mode, an environment assisted speed-up is realized: the quantum speed of the state re-population in the optical cavity increases with the coupling strength between the optical cavity mode and this non-Markovian environment (the number of atoms).

  10. Environment-Assisted Speed-up of the Field Evolution in Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Cimmarusti, A D; Yan, Z; Patterson, B D; Corcos, L P; Orozco, L A; Deffner, S

    2015-06-12

    We measure the quantum speed of the state evolution of the field in a weakly driven optical cavity QED system. To this end, the mode of the electromagnetic field is considered as a quantum system of interest with a preferential coupling to a tunable environment: the atoms. By controlling the environment, i.e., changing the number of atoms coupled to the optical cavity mode, an environment-assisted speed-up is realized: the quantum speed of the state repopulation in the optical cavity increases with the coupling strength between the optical cavity mode and this non-Markovian environment (the number of atoms). PMID:26196802

  11. Phase-field model for compositional and morphological evolution studies in thin film heteroepitaxial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Nitin

    A computational tool based on a diffuse-interface approach has been developed to simulate coupled evolution of film surface morphology and compositional evolution during thin film growth. It is well known from numerous experiments especially in Si/Ge and InGaAs/InP thin film systems that relaxation of elastic energy influences the surface morphology during growth. Strain relaxation via composition modulation is also of particular importance in the theory of spinodal decomposition. In this computational model, the influence of coherency stresses, both due to compositional strains (due to the atomic size mismatch of the constituent species) and epitaxial strains on the coupled evolution of composition and morphology of a thin film is considered. The model consists of a film on a substrate system which is in contact with vapor. The film-vapor interface and the compositional interfaces are diffuse in nature, so that it is not necessary to track these interfaces explicitly at each step during evolution. Using a modeling approach that eliminates the need to track sharp interfaces at each step during evolution, not only reduces the computational burden, but also allows for the incorporation of complex physical interaction in the model. The initial focus of the dissertation is on the development of a diffuse-interface model for simulating microstructural evolution in a InxGa 1-xAsySb1-y alloy thin film-substrate system. The regions of instability are mapped on the phase diagram using the regular solution model. The influence of compositional strain and epitaxial strains on microstructure evolution is investigated. The model is further extended to simulate surface morphological evolution and coupled morphology-composition effects. The strain energy in the system is calculated by solving the Cauchy-Navier equations for equilibrium using a linear multigrid method. Generalized nonlinear Cahn-Hilliard equations are used to describe the evolution of the phase-field variables

  12. Transmitted light relaxation and microstructure evolution of ferrofluids under gradient magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yan; Li, Decai; Li, Feng; Zhu, Quanshui; Xie, Yu

    2015-03-01

    Using light transmission experiments and optical microscope observations with a longitudinal gradient magnetic field configuration, the relationship between the behavior of the transmitted light relaxation and the microstructure evolution of ionic ferrofluids in the central region of an axisymmetric field is investigated. Under a low-gradient magnetic field, there are two types of relaxation process. When a field is applied, the transmitted light intensity decreases to a minimum within a time on the order of 101-102 s. It is then gradually restored, approaching its initial value within a time on the order of 102 s. This is type I relaxation, which corresponds to the formation of magnetic columns. After the transmission reaches this value, it either increases or decreases slowly, stabilizing within a time on the order of 103 s, according to the direction of the field gradient. This is a type II relaxation, which results from the shadowing effect, corresponding to the motion of the magnetic columns under the application of a gradient force. Under a magnetic field with a centripetal high-gradient (magnetic materials subjected to a force pointing toward the center of the axisymmetric field), the transmitted light intensity decreases monotonously and more slowly than that under a low-gradient field. Magnetic transport and separation resulted from magnetophoresis under high-gradient fields, changing the formation dynamics of the local columns and influencing the final state of the column system.

  13. Phase-Field Simulation of Microstructure Evolution in Industrial A2214 Alloy During Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ming; Tang, Ying; Zhang, Lijun; Sun, Weihua; Du, Yong

    2015-07-01

    By linking to the thermodynamic and atomic mobility databases in Al alloys well established in our research group, the microstructure evolution in industrial A2214 alloy (Al-4.5Cu-0.5Mg-1.0Si, in wt pct) during solidification process was studied by means of two-dimensional phase-field simulation via MICRostructure Evolution Simulation Software in the framework of the multi-phase-field formalism. The thermophysical parameters including interfacial energies and interfacial mobilities were carefully chosen for reproducing the experimental features. The solidification sequence due to the present phase-field simulation conforms to both equilibrium calculation and Scheil simulation. The predicted microstructure reproduces the experimental data very well. These facts indicate that a quantitative phase-field simulation was achieved in the present work. Moreover, the mechanisms of characteristic patterns and microstructure formation were revealed with the aid of the phase-field simulation. In addition, the effect of cooling rate on the secondary dendrite arm spacing and microsegregation was also investigated through comprehensive comparison with the experimental data.

  14. Evolution of a magmatic system during continental extension: The Mount Taylor volcanic field, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, F.V. ); Baldridge, W.S. ); DePaolo, D.J. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., Berkeley, CA ); Shafiqullah, M. )

    1990-11-10

    In this paper the authors present geologic mapping, K-Ar chronology, major and trace element data, mineral chemistry, and Nd, Sr, and O isotopic data for volcanic rocks of the Mount Taylor volcanic field (MTVF). The MTVF lies on the tectonic boundary between the Basin and Range province and the southeastern Colorado Plateau and is dominated by Mount Taylor, a composite volcano active from {approx}3 to 1.5 m.y. ago. Growth of the volcano began with eruption of rhyolite, followed by quartz latite and finally latite. Basalts erupted throughout the lifetime of the volcano. Rare mixing of evolved hy-hawaiite and rhyolite produced a few intermediate magmas, primarily in the early history of the field. Mixing may have occurred when rhyolite magmas in the lower crust ascended to upper crustal levels and were injected into the bases of mafic magma chambers. Small amounts of crustal assimilation accompanied fractional crystallization and affected all the evolved MTVF rocks. Assimilation/fractional crystallization occurred primarily in the lower crust as hy-hawaiite differentiated to mugearite or latite. Early in the history of the field, evolved lower crustal magmas ascended into the upper crust, where density filtering and a reduced tensional stress field inhibited further ascent until magmas evolved to rhyolite or quartz latite. Later in the history of the field, latite magmas ascended directly from the lower crust and erupted without further significant differentiation because of increased crustal extension.

  15. Carbon Isotope Environmental Forensics: Fingerprinting Gas From Domestic Water Wells From petroleum Fields of Alberta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muehlenbachs, K.; Tilley, B.

    2008-12-01

    Sixty years of petroleum development has resulted in over 500,000 petroleum wells drilled in the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin, many in agricultural areas that rely on groundwater (GW). The impact on GW quality by petroleum development is increasingly becoming a societal and regulatory concern triggered by intensive, recent CBM development. To protect GW the production tubing of a resource well is encased by a larger diameter surface casing (SCV) that is set deeper than the depth of potable water. Because of poor cementing the SCVs and soils near the wells often contain gas heightening concern for integrity of GW. Carbon isotope analyses of thousands of SCV gases shows them only rarely to be sourced from the target zone of the resource well, but rather from an intermediate depth. It has long been known that many water wells produce methane and traces of ethane and it needs to be determined if the water wells have been impacted. Alberta now requires all water wells to be tested prior to drilling of nearby resource wells. Carbon isotope analyses are mandated on a proportion of all gases produced by water wells and many hundreds of gas analyses will be placed in a public data base. Carbon isotope values of gases vary within the basin and can be used to quantify natural gas contamination of GW. Two case studies will be presented where landowners have filed complaints about gas contamination of their water wells. Attributing specific contaminant sources to a given resource well has proven to be difficult in areas where there is ongoing CBM development. However, in one area, the problem gas can be attributed to previous conventional petroleum development rather than the current CBM drilling and production. Carbon isotope analyses of water wells in another area suggest a few per cent of CBM contamination in water wells. Unfortunately, lack of pre-drilling background water data prevents reliable quantification of the contamination.

  16. EVOLUTION OF A CORONAL MASS EJECTION AND ITS MAGNETIC FIELD IN INTERPLANETARY SPACE

    SciTech Connect

    Kunkel, V.; Chen, J.

    2010-06-01

    This Letter presents the first theoretical study of the dynamics of a coronal mass ejection (CME) observed by STEREO-A/B. The CME was continuously tracked by SECCHI-A, providing position-time data from eruption to 1 AU. The ejecta was intersected by STEREO-B at 1 AU, where the magnetic field and plasma parameters were measured. The observed CME trajectory and the evolution of the CME magnetic field are modeled using the semianalytic erupting flux-rope model. It is shown that the best-fit theoretical solution is in good agreement-within 1% of the measured CME trajectory in the 1 AU field of view-and is consistent with the in situ magnetic field and plasma data at 1 AU.

  17. Nitrogen-isotope ratios of nitrate in ground water under fertilized fields, Long Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flipse, W.J., Jr.; Bonner, F.T.

    1985-01-01

    Ground-water samples from two heavily fertilized sites in Suffolk County, New York, were collected through the 1978 growing season and analyzed for nitrate-N concentrations and nitrogen-isotope ratios. Six wells were at a potato farm; six were on a golf course. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the 15N/14N ratios (??15N values) of fertilizer are increased during transit from land surface to ground water to an extent which would preclude use of this ratio to distinguish agricultural from animal sources of nitrate in ground water. Ground water at both sites contained a greater proportion of 15N than the fertilizers being applied. At the potato farm, the average ??15N value of the fertilizers was 0.2???; the average ??15N value of the ground-water nitrate was 6.2???. At the golf course, the average ??15N value of the fertilizers was -5.9???, and that of ground-water nitrate was 6.5???. The higher ??15N values of ground-water nitrate are probably caused by isotopic fractionation during the volatile loss of ammonia from nitrogen applied in reduced forms (NH4+ and organic-N). The ??15N values of most ground-water samples from both areas were less than 10???, the upper limit of the range characteristic of agricultural sources of nitrate; these sources include both fertilizer nitrate and nitrate derived from increased mineralization of soil nitrogen through cultivation. Previous studies have shown that the ??15N values of nitrate derived from human or animal waste generally exceed 10???. The nitrogen-isotope ratios of fertilizer-derived nitrate were not altered to an extent that would make them indistinguishable from animal-waste-derived nitrates in ground water.Ground-water samples from two heavily fertilized sites in Suffolk County, New York, were collected through the 1978 growing season and analyzed for nitrate-N concentrations and nitrogen-isotope ratios. Six wells were at a potato farm; six were on a golf course. The purpose of this study was to

  18. Stable carbon isotope discrimination in rice field soil during acetate turnover by syntrophic acetate oxidation or acetoclastic methanogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Ralf; Klose, Melanie

    2011-03-01

    Rice fields are an important source for the greenhouse gas methane. In Italian rice field soil CH 4 is produced either by hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic methanogenesis, or by hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis and syntrophic acetate oxidation when temperatures are below and above about 40-45 °C, respectively. In order to see whether these acetate consumption pathways differently discriminate the stable carbon isotopes of acetate, we measured the δ 13C of total acetate and acetate-methyl as well as the δ 13C of CO 2 and CH 4 in rice field soil that had been pre-incubated at 45 °C and then shifted to different temperatures between 25 and 50 °C. Acetate transiently accumulated to about 6 mM, which is about one-third of the amount of CH 4 produced, irrespective of the incubation temperature and the CH 4 production pathway involved. However, the patterns of δ 13C of the CH 4 and CO 2 produced were different at low (25, 30, 35 °C) versus high (40, 45, 50 °C) temperatures. These patterns were consistent with CH 4 being exclusively formed by hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis at high temperatures, and by a combination of acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis at low temperatures. The patterns of δ 13C of total acetate and acetate-methyl were also different at high versus low temperatures, indicating the involvement of different pathways of production and consumption of acetate at the two temperature regimes. Isotope fractionation during consumption of the methyl group of acetate was more pronounced at low ( α = 1.010-1.025) than at high ( α = 1.0-1.01) temperatures indicating that acetoclastic methanogenesis exhibits a stronger isotope effect than syntrophic acetate oxidation. Small amounts of propionate also transiently accumulated and were analyzed for δ 13C. The δ 13C values slightly increased (by about 10‰) during production and consumption of propionate, but were not affected by incubation temperature. Collectively, our results showed distinct

  19. High-spin states in {sup 156}Yb and structure evolutions at large angular momenta in even-A Yb isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z. Y.; Hua, H.; Wang, S. Y.; Meng, J.; Li, Z. H.; Li, X. Q.; Xu, F. R.; Liu, H. L.; Zhang, S. Q.; Ye, Y. L.; Jiang, D. X.; Zheng, T.; Ma, L. Y.; Lu, F.; Fan, F. Y.; Han, L. Y.; Wang, H.; Xiao, J.; Chen, D.; Fang, X.

    2008-06-15

    High-spin states of {sup 156}Yb have been studied via the {sup 144}Sm({sup 16}O,4n){sup 156}Yb fusion-evaporation reaction at beam energy 102 MeV. The positive-parity yrast band and negative-parity cascade have been extended up to higher-spin states, respectively. In the present work, the negative-parity sequence above the 25{sup -} state was found to be irregular and fragment into many parallel branches. This pattern may related to the excitation from the nucleon in the Z=64,N=82 core. The characteristics of alignment plot and E-GOS curve for the positive-parity yrast sequence in {sup 156}Yb indicate that this nucleus may undergo an evolution from quasivibrational to quasirotational structure with increasing angular momentum. Based on a systematic summary of the available experimental alignments for the even-A {sup 156,158,160,162,164}Yb isotopes, the structural evolutions induced by the increase in angular momentum, as well as by the change in neutron numbers, in these even-A Yb isotopes have been discussed in comparison with the cranked Woods-Saxon-Strutinsky calculations by means of total-Routhian-surface (TRS) methods.

  20. Elemental and Sr Nd Pb isotopic geochemistry of Late Paleozoic volcanic rocks beneath the Junggar basin, NW China: Implications for the formation and evolution of the basin basement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jianping; Sun, Min; Zhao, Guochun; Robinson, Paul T.; Wang, Fangzheng

    2007-03-01

    The basement beneath the Junggar basin has been interpreted either as a micro-continent of Precambrian age or as a fragment of Paleozoic oceanic crust. Elemental and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions and zircon Pb-Pb ages of volcanic rocks from drill cores through the paleo-weathered crust show that the basement is composed mainly of late Paleozoic volcanic rock with minor shale and tuff. The volcanic rocks are mostly subalkaline with some minor low-K rocks in the western Kexia area. Some alkaline lavas occur in the central Luliang uplift and northeastern Wulungu depression. The lavas range in composition from basalts to rhyolites and fractional crystallization played an important role in magma evolution. Except for a few samples from Kexia, the basalts have low La/Nb (<1.4), typical for oceanic crust derived from asthenospheric melts. Zircon Pb-Pb ages indicate that the Kexia andesite, with a volcanic arc affinity, formed in the early Carboniferous (345 Ma), whereas the Luliang rhyolite and the Wucaiwan dacite, with syn-collisional to within-plate affinities, formed in the early Devonian (395 and 405 Ma, respectively). Positive ɛNd( t) values (up to +7.4) and low initial 87Sr/ 86Sr isotopic ratios of the intermediate-silicic rocks suggest that the entire Junggar terrain may be underlain by oceanic crust, an interpretation consistent with the juvenile isotopic signatures of many granitoid plutons in other parts of the Central Asia Orogenic Belt. Variation in zircon ages for the silicic rocks, different Ba, P, Ti, Nb or Th anomalies in the mafic rocks, and variable Nb/Y and La/Nb ratios across the basin, suggest that the basement is compositionally heterogeneous. The heterogeneity is believed to reflect amalgamation of different oceanic blocks representing either different evolution stages within a single terrane or possibly derivation from different terranes.

  1. Strontium isotope systematics of mixing groundwater and oil-field brine at Goose Lake in northeastern Montana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterman, Zell E.; Thamke, Joanna N.; Futa, Kiyoto; Preston, Todd

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater, surface water, and soil in the Goose Lake oil field in northeastern Montana have been affected by Cl−-rich oil-field brines during long-term petroleum production. Ongoing multidisciplinary geochemical and geophysical studies have identified the degree and local extent of interaction between brine and groundwater. Fourteen samples representing groundwater, surface water, and brine were collected for Sr isotope analyses to evaluate the usefulness of 87Sr/86Sr in detecting small amounts of brine. Differences in Sr concentrations and 87Sr/86Sr are optimal at this site for the experiment. Strontium concentrations range from 0.13 to 36.9 mg/L, and corresponding 87Sr/86Sr values range from 0.71097 to 0.70828. The local brine has 168 mg/L Sr and a 87Sr/86Sr value of 0.70802. Mixing relationships are evident in the data set and illustrate the sensitivity of Sr in detecting small amounts of brine in groundwater. The location of data points on a Sr isotope-concentration plot is readily explained by an evaporation-mixing model. The model is supported by the variation in concentrations of most of the other solutes.

  2. A Hydrogeologic Field Area Encourages Learning of Isotope Hydrology, Geologic Imprint on Water Quality, and Trace Element Hydrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibbs, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Santa Monica Mountains of Southern California affords an excellent opportunity for training students on geologic imprints on stream and groundwater quality. With salinity varying from 500 mg/L TDS in streams fed from groundwater in low solubility sandstones, to 4000 mg/L TDS in streams fed from high solubility and gypsum bearing siltstones and mudstones, the role of geology on natural stream and groundwater chemistry is profound. Use of imported water from Northern California on urban landscapes that is isotopically distinct from locally sourced "native" waters provides an opportunity for students to trace and quantify the percentage of imported versus native water sources in the Santa Monica Mountains streams using stable water isotopes. Furthermore, the presence of natural selenium and uranium in certain types of strata and higher oxidation potential created by anthropogenic nitrate in groundwater provides students with opportunities to learn of trace element hydrochemistry and redox potential in natural and nutrient-contaminated strata. Teams of students have evaluated these processes in this exceptional natural hydrogeological laboratory in our Watershed Analysis, Field Methods, and Water Quality courses. The opportunities for learning hydrogeological processes in this natural field laboratory prepare students for careers in water resources in Southern California and elsewhere.

  3. Methanogenic Bacteria from the Bondyuzhskoe Oil Field: General Characterization and Analysis of Stable-Carbon Isotopic Fractionation

    PubMed Central

    Belyaev, S. S.; Wolkin, R.; Kenealy, W. R.; DeNiro, M. J.; Epstein, S.; Zeikus, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    Selective enrichment culture techniques were employed to obtain mixed cultures of methanogenic rods and sarcina from surface flooding waters and deep subsurface (∼1650 m) oil-bearing sedimentary rocks and formation waters sampled from an old oil field in the U.S.S.R. previously reported to display active biological methanogenesis. The methanogens were selectively isolated as colonies on agar petri dishes that were incubated in a novel container. The general cellular and growth features of three Methanobacterium isolates were determined. These strains grew optimally at 37 to 45°C in anaerobic pressure tube cultures with a doubling time of 16 to 18 h on H2-CO2 and proliferated as autotrophs. Acetate addition significantly enhanced the final cell yield. Growth of these strains was completely inhibited by either 0.6 g of sodium sulfide per liter or 31.0 of sodium chloride per liter, but growth was not inhibited by either 0.3 g of sodium sulfide per liter or 1.0 g of sodium sulfate per liter. One novel isolate, Methanobacterium sp. strain ivanov, was grown on H2-CO2, and the stable-carbon isotopic fractionations that occurred during synthesis of methane, cell carbon, and lipids were determined. The results of this study were used to examine the anomalous relationship between the isotopic and chemical compositions of natural gas occurring in the deep subsurface environment of the oil field. Images PMID:16346216

  4. Geochemical and stable isotopic evolution of the Guarani Aquifer System in the state of São Paulo, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sracek, Ondra; Hirata, Ricardo

    2002-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to explain geochemical and stable isotopes trends in the Brazilian unit of the Guarani Aquifer System (Botucatu and Piramboia aquifers) in São Paulo State, Brazil. Trends of dissolved species concentrations and geochemical modeling indicated a significant role of cation exchange and dissolution of carbonates in downgradient evolution of groundwater chemistry. Loss of calcium by the exchange for sodium drives dissolution of carbonates and results in Na-HCO3 type of groundwater. The cation-exchange front moves downgradient at probably much slower rate compared to the velocity of groundwater flow and at present is located near to the cities of Sertãozinho and Águas de Santa Barbara (wells PZ-34 and PZ-148, respectively) in a shallow confined area, 50-70 km from the recharge zone. Part of the sodium probably enters the Guarani Aquifer System. together with chloride and sulfate from the underlying Piramboia Formation by diffusion related to the dissolution of evaporates like halite and gypsum. High concentrations of fluorine (up to 13.3 mg/L) can be explained by dissolution of mineral fluoride also driven by cation exchange. However, it is unclear if the dissolution takes place directly in the Guarani Aquifer System or in the overlying basaltic Serra Geral Formation. There is depletion in δ2H and δ18O values in groundwater downgradient. Values of δ13C(DIC) are enriched downgradient, indicating dissolution of calcite under closed system conditions. Values of δ13C(DIC) in deep geothermal wells are very high (>-6.0‰) and probably indicate isotopic exchange with carbonates with δ13C about -3.0‰. Future work should be based on evaluation of vertical fluxes and potential for penetration of contamination to the Guarani Aquifer System. Résumé. Cet article a pour objet d'expliquer l'évolution de la géochimie et des isotopes stables dans l'unité brésilienne du système aquifère du Guarani (aquifères de Botucatu et Piramboia), dans

  5. Calcium isotope (δ 44/40Ca) fractionation along hydrothermal pathways, Logatchev field (Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 14°45'N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Marghaleray; Eisenhauer, Anton; Böhm, Florian; Fietzke, Jan; Bach, Wolfgang; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter; Rosner, Martin; Bock, Barbara; Lackschewitz, Klas S.; Hauff, Folkmar

    2008-08-01

    We investigate the Logatchev Hydrothermal Field at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 14°45'N to constrain the calcium isotope hydrothermal flux into the ocean. During the transformation of seawater to a hydrothermal solution, the Ca concentration of pristine seawater ([Ca] SW) increases from about 10 mM to about 32 mM in the hydrothermal fluid endmember ([Ca] HydEnd) and thereby adopts a δ 44/40Ca HydEnd of -0.95 ± 0.07‰ relative to seawater (SW) and a 87Sr/ 86Sr isotope ratio of 0.7034(4). We demonstrate that δ 44/40Ca HydEnd is higher than that of the bedrock at the Logatchev field. From mass balance calculations, we deduce a δ 44/40Ca of -1.17 ± 0.04‰ (SW) for the host-rocks in the reaction zone and -1.45 ± 0.05‰ (SW) for the isotopic composition of the entire hydrothermal cell of the Logatchev field. The values are isotopically lighter than the currently assumed δ 44/40Ca for Bulk Earth of -0.92 ± 0.18‰ (SW) [Skulan J., DePaolo D. J. and Owens T. L. (1997) Biological control of calcium isotopic abundances in the global calcium cycle. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta61,(12) 2505-2510] and challenge previous assumptions of no Ca isotope fractionation between hydrothermal fluid and the oceanic crust [Zhu P. and Macdougall J. D. (1998) Calcium isotopes in the marine environment and the oceanic calcium cycle. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta62,(10) 1691-1698; Schmitt A. -D., Chabeaux F. and Stille P. (2003) The calcium riverine and hydrothermal isotopic fluxes and the oceanic calcium mass balance. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 6731, 1-16]. Here we propose that Ca isotope fractionation along the fluid flow pathway of the Logatchev field occurs during the precipitation of anhydrite. Two anhydrite samples from the Logatchev Hydrothermal Field show an average fractionation of about Δ 44/40Ca = -0.5‰ relative to their assumed parental solutions. Ca isotope ratios in aragonites from carbonate veins from ODP drill cores indicate aragonite precipitation directly from seawater at low

  6. Spatio-temporal evolution of a dispersed magmatic system and its implications for volcano growth, Jeju Island Volcanic Field, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenna, Marco; Cronin, Shane J.; Smith, Ian E. M.; Sohn, Young Kwan; Maas, Roland

    2012-09-01

    Jeju Island is the emergent portion of a basaltic volcanic field developed over the last c. 1.8 Ma on continental crust. Initial volcanism comprised dispersed, small-volume (< 0.01 km3) alkali basaltic eruptions that incrementally constructed a tuff pile. Lavas and scoria from continuing small-scaled monogenetic volcanism capped this foundation. From c. 0.4 Ma large-volume (> 1 km3) eruptions began, with lavas building a composite shield. Three magma suites can be recognized: Early Pleistocene high-Al alkali (HAA), and Late Pleistocene to Holocene low-Al alkali (LAA) and subalkali (SA). The chemical similarity between small-volume and primitive large-volume eruptions suggests analogous parent magmas and fractionation histories that are independent of erupted volumes. The large-volume magmas evolved to trachyte, which erupted in two distinct episodes: the HAA Sanbangsan suite at c. 750 ka and the LAA Hallasan suite at c. 25 ka. Sr and Nd isotopes indicate that the early trachytes were contaminated by upper crustal material, whereas the later magmas were not. Both suites bear a Nd isotope signature indicative of lower crustal interaction. Sub-suites transitional between HAA and LAA, and between LAA and SA, indicate that melting occurred in discrete, but adjacent, mantle domains. Throughout the evolution of this volcano, each magma batch erupted separately, and a centralized plumbing system was never created. The Island's central peak (Mt. Halla 1950 m a.s.l.) is therefore not a sensu stricto stratovolcano, but marks the point of peak magma output in a distributed magmatic system. Jeju's shape and topography thus represent the spatial variation of fertility of the mantle below it. An increase in melt production in the Late Pleistocene was related to a deepening of the melting zone due to regional tectonic rearrangements. Temporal coincidences between magmatic pulses on Jeju and large-scale caldera eruptive events along the nearest subduction system in Kyushu, Japan

  7. Os, Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope systematics of southern African peridotite xenoliths - Implications for the chemical evolution of subcontinental mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. J.; Carlson, R. W.; Shirey, S. B.; Boyd, F. R.

    1989-01-01

    Isotope analyses of Os, Sr, Nd, and Pb elements were caried out on twelve peridotite xenoliths from the Jagersfontein, Letseng-la-terae, Thaba Patsoa, Mothae, and Premier kimberlites of southern Africa, to investigate the timing and the nature of melt extraction from the continental lithosphere and its relation to the continent formation and stabilization. The distinct Os and Pb isotopic characteristics found in these samples suggested that both the low- and the high-temperature peridotites reside in an ancient stable lithospheric 'keel' to the craton that has been isolated from chemical exchange with the sublithospheric mantle for time periods in excess of 2 Ga.

  8. Marked spatial gradient in the topographic evolution of the Andes spanning the Chilean flat-slab transition: evidence from stable isotope paleoaltimetry and zircon double dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoke, G. D.; McPhillips, D. F.; Giambiagi, L.; Garzione, C. N.; Mahoney, J. B.; Strecker, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    The major changes in the subduction angle of the Nazca plate are often hypothesized to have important consequences for the tectonic evolution of the Andes. Temporal and spatial patterns of topographic growth and exhumation are indicators that should help elucidate any linkages to subduction angle. Here, we combine observations from stable isotope paleoaltimetry with detrital zircon double dating between 30 and 35°S to demonstrate a consistent increase in surface and rock uplift in the Andes south of 32°S. The stable isotope data are from Miocene pedogenic carbonates collected from seven different basin sequences spanning different tectonic and topographic positions in the range. Paleoelevations between 1 km and 1.9 km are calculated using modern local isotope-elevation gradients along with carbonate-formation temperatures determined from clumped isotope studies in modern soils. Present day, low elevation foreland localities were at their present elevations during the Miocene, while three of the intermontane basins experienced up to 2 km of surface uplift between the end of deposition during the late Miocene and present. Detrital zircon (U-Th-Sm)/He and U-Pb double dating in three modern drainage basins (Tunuyán, Arroyo Grande and Río de los Patos) reveals clear Miocene exhumation signals south of the flat slab with no recent exhumation apparent at 32°S. The exhumation pattern is consistent with paleoaltimetry results. Interestingly, the maximum inferred surface uplift is greatest where the crust is thinnest, and the timing of the observed changes in elevation and exhumation has not been linked to any documented episodes of large-magnitude crustal shortening in the eastern half of the range. The spatial pattern of surface uplift and exhumation seems to mimic the Pampean flat slab's geometry, however, it could be equally well explained by eastward migration of a crustal root via ductile deformation in the lower crust and is not related to flat-slab subduction.

  9. The oxygen isotope evolution of parent body aqueous solutions as recorded by multiple carbonate generations in the Lonewolf Nunataks 94101 CM2 carbonaceous chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M. R.; Sofe, M. R.; Lindgren, P.; Starkey, N. A.; Franchi, I. A.

    2013-11-01

    The CM2 carbonaceous chondrite LON 94101 contains aragonite and two generations of calcite that provide snapshots of the chemical and isotopic evolution of aqueous solutions during parent body alteration. Aragonite was the first carbonate to crystallize. It is rare, heterogeneously distributed within the meteorite matrix, and its mean oxygen isotope values are δ18O 39.9 ± 0.6‰, Δ17O -0.3 ± 1.0‰ (1σ). Calcite precipitated soon afterwards, and following a fall in solution Mg/Ca ratios, to produce small equant grains with a mean oxygen isotope value of δ18O 37.5 ± 0.7‰, Δ17O 1.4 ± 1.1‰ (1σ). These grains were partially or completely replaced by serpentine and tochilinite prior to precipitation of the second generation of calcite, which occluded an open fracture to form a millimetre-sized vein, and replaced anhydrous silicates within chondrules and the matrix. The vein calcite has a mean composition of δ18O 18.4 ± 0.3‰, Δ17O -0.5 ± 0.5‰ (1σ). Petrographic and isotopic results therefore reveal two discrete episodes of mineralisation that produced calcite generations with contrasting δ18O, and mean Δ17O values. The aragonite and equant calcite crystallized over a relatively brief period early in the aqueous alteration history of the parent body, and from static fluids that were evolving chemically in response to mineral dissolution and precipitation. The second calcite generation crystallized from solutions of a lower Δ17O, and a lower δ18O and/or higher temperature. As two generations of calcite whose petrographic characteristics and oxygen isotopic compositions are similar to those in LON 94101 occur in at least one other CM2, multiphase carbonate mineralisation could be the typical outcome of the sequence of chemical reactions during parent body aqueous alteration. It is equally possible however that the second generation of calcite formed in response to an event such as impact fracturing and concomitant fluid mobilisation that affected

  10. Evolution of the African continental crust as recorded by U-Pb, Lu-Hf and O isotopes in detrital zircons from modern rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, Tsuyoshi; Campbell, Ian H.; Allen, Charlotte M.; Gill, James B.; Maruyama, Shigenori; Makoka, Frédéric

    2013-04-01

    To better understand the evolutionary history of the African continental crust, a combined U-Pb, Lu-Hf and O isotopic study has been carried out by in situ analyses of approximately 450 detrital zircon grains from the Niger, Nile, Congo, Zambezi and Orange Rivers. The U-Pb isotopic data show age peaks at ca. 2.7, 2.1-1.8, 1.2-1.0, ca. 0.8, 0.7-0.5 and ca. 0.3 Ga. These peaks, with the exception of the one at ca. 0.8 Ga, correspond with the assembly of supercontinents. Furthermore, the detrital zircons that crystallized during these periods of supercontinent assembly have dominantly non-mantle-like O and Hf isotopic signatures, in contrast to the ca. 0.8 Ga detrital zircons which have juvenile characteristics. These data can be interpreted as showing that continental collisions during supercontinent assembly resulted in supermountain building accompanied by remelting of older continental crust, which in turn led to significant erosion of young igneous rocks with non-mantle-like isotopic signatures. Alternatively, the data may indicate that the major mode of crustal development changed during the supercontinent cycle: the generation of juvenile crust in extensional settings was dominant during supercontinent fragmentation, whereas the stabilization of the generated crust via crustal accretion and reworking was important during supercontinent assembly. The Lu-Hf and O isotope systematics indicate that terreigneous sediments could attain elevated 18O/16O via prolonged sediment-sediment recycling over long crustal residence time, and also that reworking of carbonate and chert which generally have elevated 18O/16O and low Hf contents is minor in granitoid magmatism. The highest 18O/16O in detrital zircon abruptly increased at ca. 2.1 Ga and became nearly constant thereafter. This indicates that reworking of mature sediments increased abruptly at that time, probably as a result of a transition in the dynamics of either granitoid crust formation or sedimentary evolution

  11. Minimalist coupled evolution model for stellar X-ray activity, rotation, mass loss, and magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackman, Eric G.; Owen, James E.

    2016-05-01

    Late-type main-sequence stars exhibit an X-ray to bolometric flux ratio that depends on {tilde{R}o}, the ratio of rotation period to convective turnover time, as {tilde{R}o}^{-ζ } with 2 ≤ ζ ≤ 3 for {tilde{R}o} > 0.13, but saturates with |ζ| < 0.2 for {tilde{R}o} < 0.13. Saturated stars are younger than unsaturated stars and show a broader spread of rotation rates and X-ray activity. The unsaturated stars have magnetic fields and rotation speeds that scale roughly with the square root of their age, though possibly flattening for stars older than the Sun. The connection between faster rotators, stronger fields, and higher activity has been established observationally, but a theory for the unified time-evolution of X-ray luminosity, rotation, magnetic field and mass loss that captures the above trends has been lacking. Here we derive a minimalist holistic framework for the time evolution of these quantities built from combining a Parker wind with new ingredients: (1) explicit sourcing of both the thermal energy launching the wind and the X-ray luminosity via dynamo produced magnetic fields; (2) explicit coupling of X-ray activity and mass-loss saturation to dynamo saturation (via magnetic helicity build-up and convection eddy shredding); (3) use of coronal equilibrium to determine how magnetic energy is divided into wind and X-ray contributions. For solar-type stars younger than the Sun, we infer conduction to be a subdominant power loss compared to X-rays and wind. For older stars, conduction is more important, possibly quenching the wind and reducing angular momentum loss. We focus on the time evolution for stars younger than the Sun, highlighting what is possible for further generalizations. Overall, the approach shows promise towards a unified explanation of all of the aforementioned observational trends.

  12. Evolution of Ore Deposits and Technology Transfer Project: Isotope and Chemical Methods in Support of the U.S. Geological Survey Science Strategy, 2003-2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rye, Robert O.; Johnson, Craig A.; Landis, Gary P.; Hofstra, Albert H.; Emsbo, Poul; Stricker, Craig A.; Hunt, Andrew G.; Rusk, Brian G.

    2010-01-01

    Principal functions of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Resources Program are providing assessments of the location, quantity, and quality of undiscovered mineral deposits, and predicting the environmental impacts of exploration and mine development. The mineral and environmental assessments of domestic deposits are used by planners and decisionmakers to improve the stewardship of public lands and public resources. Assessments of undiscovered mineral deposits on a global scale reveal the potential availability of minerals to the United States and other countries that manufacture goods imported to the United States. These resources are of fundamental relevance to national and international economic and security policy in our globalized world economy. Performing mineral and environmental assessments requires that predictions be made of the likelihood of undiscovered deposits. The predictions are based on geologic and geoenvironmental models that are constructed for the diverse types of mineral deposits from detailed descriptions of actual deposits and detailed understanding of the processes that formed them. Over the past three decades the understanding of ore-forming processes has benefited greatly from the integration of laboratory-based geochemical tools with field observations and other data sources. Under the aegis of the Evolution of Ore Deposits and Technology Transfer Project (referred to hereinafter as the Project), a 5-year effort that terminated in 2008, the Mineral Resources Program provided state-of-the-art analytical capabilities to support applications of several related geochemical tools to ore-deposit-related studies. The analytical capabilities and scientific approaches developed within the Project have wide applicability within Earth-system science. For this reason the Project Laboratories represent a valuable catalyst for interdisciplinary collaborations of the type that should be formed in the coming years for the United States to meet

  13. Gas and Isotope Geochemistry of 81 Steam Samples from Wells in The Geysers Geothermal Field, Sonoma and Lake Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Janik, Cathy J.; Fahlquist, Lynne; Johnson, Linda S.

    1999-01-01

    The Geysers geothermal field in northern California, with about 2000-MW electrical capacity, is the largest geothermal field in the world. Despite its importance as a resource and as an example of a vapor-dominated reservoir, very few complete geochemical analyses of the steam have been published (Allen and Day, 1927; Truesdell and others, 1987). This report presents data from 90 steam, gas, and condensate samples from wells in The Geysers geothermal field in northern California. Samples were collected between 1978 and 1991. Well attributes include sampling date, well name, location, total depth, and the wellhead temperature and pressure at which the sample was collected. Geochemical characteristics include the steam/gas ratio, composition of noncondensable gas (relative proportions of CO2, H2S, He, H2, O2, Ar, N2, CH4, and NH3), and isotopic values for deltaD and delta18O of H2O, delta13C of CO2, and delta34S of H2S. The compilation includes 81 analyses from 74 different production wells, 9 isotopic analyses of steam condensate pumped into injection wells, and 5 complete geochemical analyses on gases from surface fumaroles and bubbling pools. Most samples were collected as saturated steam and plot along the liquid-water/steam boiling curve. Steam-togas ratios are highest in the southeastern part of the geothermal field and lowest in the northwest, consistent with other studies. Wells in the Northwest Geysers are also enriched in N2/Ar, CO2 and CH4, deltaD, and delta18O. Well discharges from the Southeast Geysers are high in steam/gas and have isotopic compositions and N2/Ar ratios consistent with recharge by local meteoric waters. Samples from the Central Geysers show characteristics found in both the Southeast and Northwest Geysers. Gas and steam characteristics of well discharges from the Northwest Geysers are consistent with input of components from a high-temperature reservoir containing carbonrich gases derived from the host Franciscan rocks. Throughout the

  14. Hydrocarbon degassing of the earth and origin of oil-gas fields (isotope-geochemical and geodynamic aspects)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valyaev, Boris; Dremin, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    More than half a century ago, Academician PN Kropotkin substantiated the relationship of the formation and distribution of oil and gas fields with the processes of emanation hydrocarbon degassing of the Earth. Over the years, the concept of PN Kropotkin received further development and recognition of studies based on new factual material. Of particular importance are the following factors: a) the results of studies on global and regional uneven processes of traditional oil and gas and the role of deep faults in controlling the spread of oil and gas fields; b) the results of the research on gigantic volumes and localization of the discharges of hydrocarbon fluids (mud volcanoes, seeps) on land and into the atmosphere and through the bottom of the World ocean; c) the results of the studies on grand volumes of the spread of unconventional hydrocarbon resources in their non-traditional fields, especially on near-surface interval of unconventional oil and gas accumulation with gas hydrates, heavy oil and bitumen, as well as extraordinary resources of oil and gas in the shale and tight rocks. Deep mantle-crust nature of oil and gas in traditional and nontraditional deposits thus received further substantiation of geological and geophysical data and research results. However, isotopic and geochemical data are still interpreted in favor of the concept of the genesis of oil and gas in the processes of thermal catalytic conversion of organic matter of sedimentary rocks, at temperatures up to 200°C. In this report an alternative interpretation of the isotope carbon-hydrogen system (δ13C-δD) for gas and of oil deposits, isotope carbon system for methane and carbon dioxide (δ13C1-δ13C0) will be presented. An alternative interpretation will also be presented for the data on carbon-helium isotope geochemical system for oil and gas fields, volcanoes and mud volcanoes. These constructions agree with the geological data on the nature of deep hydrocarbon fluids involved in the

  15. Magnetic field evolution in magnetar crusts through three-dimensional simulations.

    PubMed

    Gourgouliatos, Konstantinos N; Wood, Toby S; Hollerbach, Rainer

    2016-04-12

    Current models of magnetars require extremely strong magnetic fields to explain their observed quiescent and bursting emission, implying that the field strength within the star's outer crust is orders of magnitude larger than the dipole component inferred from spin-down measurements. This presents a serious challenge to theories of magnetic field generation in a proto-neutron star. Here, we present detailed modeling of the evolution of the magnetic field in the crust of a neutron star through 3D simulations. We find that, in the plausible scenario of equipartition of energy between global-scale poloidal and toroidal magnetic components, magnetic instabilities transfer energy to nonaxisymmetric, kilometer-sized magnetic features, in which the local field strength can greatly exceed that of the global-scale field. These intense small-scale magnetic features can induce high-energy bursts through local crust yielding, and the localized enhancement of Ohmic heating can power the star's persistent emission. Thus, the observed diversity in magnetar behavior can be explained with mixed poloidal-toroidal fields of comparable energies. PMID:27035962

  16. TEMPORAL EVOLUTION OF VELOCITY AND MAGNETIC FIELD IN AND AROUND UMBRAL DOTS

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Hiroko; Bellot Rubio, Luis R.; De la Cruz Rodriguez, Jaime; Rouppe van der Voort, Luc

    2012-09-20

    We study the temporal evolution of umbral dots (UDs) using measurements from the CRISP imaging spectropolarimeter at the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope. Scans of the magnetically sensitive 630 nm iron lines were performed under stable atmospheric conditions for 71 minutes with a cadence of 63 s. These observations allow us to investigate the magnetic field and velocity in and around UDs at a resolution approaching 0.''13. From the analysis of 339 UDs, we draw the following conclusions: (1) UDs show clear hints of upflows, as predicted by magnetohydrodynamic simulations. By contrast, we could not find systematic downflow signals. Only in very deep layers, we detect localized downflows around UDs, but they do not persist in time. (2) We confirm that UDs exhibit weaker and more inclined fields than their surroundings, as reported previously. However, UDs that have strong fields above 2000 G or are in the decay phase show enhanced and more vertical fields. (3) There are enhanced fields at the migration front of UDs detached from penumbral grains, as if their motion were impeded by the ambient field. (4) Long-lived UDs travel longer distances with slower proper motions. Our results appear to confirm some aspects of recent numerical simulations of magnetoconvection in the umbra (e.g., the existence of upflows in UDs), but not others (e.g., the systematic weakening of the magnetic field at the position of UDs).

  17. Magnetic field evolution in magnetar crusts through three-dimensional simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourgouliatos, Konstantinos N.; Wood, Toby S.; Hollerbach, Rainer

    2016-04-01

    Current models of magnetars require extremely strong magnetic fields to explain their observed quiescent and bursting emission, implying that the field strength within the star’s outer crust is orders of magnitude larger than the dipole component inferred from spin-down measurements. This presents a serious challenge to theories of magnetic field generation in a proto-neutron star. Here, we present detailed modeling of the evolution of the magnetic field in the crust of a neutron star through 3D simulations. We find that, in the plausible scenario of equipartition of energy between global-scale poloidal and toroidal magnetic components, magnetic instabilities transfer energy to nonaxisymmetric, kilometer-sized magnetic features, in which the local field strength can greatly exceed that of the global-scale field. These intense small-scale magnetic features can induce high-energy bursts through local crust yielding, and the localized enhancement of Ohmic heating can power the star’s persistent emission. Thus, the observed diversity in magnetar behavior can be explained with mixed poloidal-toroidal fields of comparable energies.

  18. Evolution of volcanic rocks and associated ore deposits in the Marysvale volcanic field, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, Charles G.; Steven, Thomas A.; Rowley, Peter D.; Naeser, Charles W.; Mehnert, Harald H.; Hedge, Carl E.; Ludwig, Kenneth R.

    1994-01-01

    A geological account on the igneous activity and associated mineral deposition in the volcanic field of Marysvale in Utah is presented. Three episodes (34-22 Ma, 22-14 Ma and 9-5 Ma) involved in the volcanic rock eruption and associated mineralization are described. The first episode is believed to have occurred during the time of tectonic convergence when two contrasting suites of rocks, Mount Dutton Formation and Bullion Canyon Volcanics, erupted concurrently. Mineralization during this period was sparse. In the second episode, change from intermediate to bimodal volcanism occurred. During the third episode, basaltic compositions did not change. Although major element constituent had rhyolites similar to that of the second episode, rhyolites had a marked radiogenic isotope characteristic difference.

  19. Quantum field as a quantum cellular automaton: The Dirac free evolution in one dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisio, Alessandro; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Tosini, Alessandro

    2015-03-01

    We present a quantum cellular automaton model in one space-dimension which has the Dirac equation as emergent. This model, a discrete-time and causal unitary evolution of a lattice of quantum systems, is derived from the assumptions of homogeneity, parity and time-reversal invariance. The comparison between the automaton and the Dirac evolutions is rigorously set as a discrimination problem between unitary channels. We derive an exact lower bound for the probability of error in the discrimination as an explicit function of the mass, the number and the momentum of the particles, and the duration of the evolution. Computing this bound with experimentally achievable values, we see that in that regime the QCA model cannot be discriminated from the usual Dirac evolution. Finally, we show that the evolution of one-particle states with narrow-band in momentum can be efficiently simulated by a dispersive differential equation for any regime. This analysis allows for a comparison with the dynamics of wave-packets as it is described by the usual Dirac equation. This paper is a first step in exploring the idea that quantum field theory could be grounded on a more fundamental quantum cellular automaton model and that physical dynamics could emerge from quantum information processing. In this framework, the discretization is a central ingredient and not only a tool for performing non-perturbative calculation as in lattice gauge theory. The automaton model, endowed with a precise notion of local observables and a full probabilistic interpretation, could lead to a coherent unification of a hypothetical discrete Planck scale with the usual Fermi scale of high-energy physics.

  20. Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Ulmschneider

    When we are looking for intelligent life outside the Earth, there is a fundamental question: Assuming that life has formed on an extraterrestrial planet, will it also develop toward intelligence? As this is hotly debated, we will now describe the development of life on Earth in more detail in order to show that there are good reasons why evolution should culminate in intelligent beings.

  1. Photospheric and coronal magnetic fields in six magnetographs. I. Consistent evolution of the bashful ballerina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virtanen, Ilpo; Mursula, Kalevi

    2016-06-01

    Aims: We study the long-term evolution of photospheric and coronal magnetic fields and the heliospheric current sheet (HCS), especially its north-south asymmetry. Special attention is paid to the reliability of the six data sets used in this study and to the consistency of the results based on these data sets. Methods: We use synoptic maps constructed from Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO), Mount Wilson Observatory (MWO), Kitt Peak (KP), SOLIS, SOHO/MDI, and SDO/HMI measurements of the photospheric field and the potential field source surface (PFSS) model. Results: The six data sets depict a fairly similar long-term evolution of magnetic fields and the heliospheric current sheet, including polarity reversals and hemispheric asymmetry. However, there are time intervals of several years long, when first KP measurements in the 1970s and 1980s, and later WSO measurements in the 1990s and early 2000s, significantly deviate from the other simultaneous data sets, reflecting likely errors at these times. All of the six magnetographs agree on the southward shift of the heliospheric current sheet (the so-called bashful ballerina phenomenon) in the declining to minimum phase of the solar cycle during a few years of the five included cycles. We show that during solar cycles 20-22, the southward shift of the HCS is mainly due to the axial quadrupole term, reflecting the stronger magnetic field intensity at the southern pole during these times. During cycle 23 the asymmetry is less persistent and mainly due to higher harmonics than the quadrupole term. Currently, in the early declining phase of cycle 24, the HCS is also shifted southward and is mainly due to the axial quadrupole as for most earlier cycles. This further emphasizes the special character of the global solar field during cycle 23.

  2. Field driven ferromagnetic phase evolution originating from the domain boundaries in antiferromagnetically coupled perpendicular anitsotropy films

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Juanita; Hauet, Thomas; Gunther, Christian; Hovorka, Ondrej; Berger, Andreas; Im, Mi-Young; Fischer, Peter; Hellwig, Olav

    2008-05-01

    Strong perpendicular anisotropy systems consisting of Co/Pt multilayer stacks that are antiferromagnetically coupled via thin Ru or NiO layers have been used as model systems to study the competition between local interlayer exchange and long-range dipolar interactions [1,2]. Magnetic Force Microscopy (MFM) studies of such systems reveal complex magnetic configurations with a mix of antiferromagnetic (AF) and ferromagnetic (FM) phases. However, MFM allows detecting surface stray fields only and can interact strongly with the magnetic structure of the sample, thus altering the original domain configuration of interest [3,4]. In the current study they combine magnetometry and state-of-the-art soft X-ray transmission microscopy (MXTM) to investigate the external field driven FM phase evolution originating from the domain boundaries in such antiferromagnetically coupled perpendicular anisotropy films. MXTM allows directly imaging the perpendicular component of the magnetization in an external field at sub 100 nm spatial resolution without disturbing the magnetic state of the sample [5,6]. Here they compare the domain evolution for two similar [Co(4{angstrom})/Pt(7{angstrom})]x-1/{l_brace}Co(4{angstrom})/Ru(9{angstrom})/[Co(4{angstrom})/Pt(7{angstrom})]x-1{r_brace}16 samples with slightly different Co/Pt stack thickness, i.e. slightly different strength of internal dipolar fields. After demagnetization they obtain AF domains with either sharp AF domain walls for the thinner multilayer stacks or 'tiger-tail' domain walls (one dimensional FM phase) for the thicker stacks. When increasing the external field strength the sharp domain walls in the tinner stack sample transform into the one-dimensional FM phase, which then serves as nucleation site for further FM stripe domains that spread out into all directions to drive the system towards saturation. Energy calculations reveal the subtle difference between the two samples and help to understand the observed transition, when

  3. Triple oxygen and multiple sulfur isotope constraints on the evolution of the post-Marinoan sulfur cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crockford, Peter W.; Cowie, Benjamin R.; Johnston, David T.; Hoffman, Paul F.; Sugiyama, Ichiko; Pellerin, Andre; Bui, Thi Hao; Hayles, Justin; Halverson, Galen P.; Macdonald, Francis A.; Wing, Boswell A.

    2016-02-01

    Triple oxygen isotopes within post-Marinoan barites have played an integral role in our understanding of Cryogenian glaciations. Reports of anomalous Δ17O values within cap carbonate hosted barites however have remained restricted to South China and Mauritania. Here we extend the Δ17O anomaly to northwest Canada with our new measurements of barites from the Ravensthroat cap dolostone with a minimum Δ17O value of - 0.75 ‰. For the first time we pair triple oxygen with multiple sulfur isotopic data as a tool to identify the key processes that controlled the post-Marinoan sulfur cycle. We argue using a dynamic 1-box model that the observed isotopic trends both in northwest Canada and South China can be explained through the interplay between sulfide weathering, microbial sulfur cycling and pyrite burial. An important outcome of this study is a new constraint placed on the size of the post-Marinoan sulfate reservoir (≈0.1% modern), with a maximum concentration of less than 10% modern. Through conservative estimates of sulfate fluxes from sulfide weathering and under a small initial sulfate reservoir, we suggest that observed isotopic trends are the product of a dynamic sulfur cycle that saw both the addition and removal of the Δ17O anomaly over four to five turnovers of the post-Marinoan marine sulfate reservoir.

  4. Possible in situ tests of the evolution of elemental and isotopic abundances in the solar convection zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turcotte, S.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.

    2002-12-01

    Helioseismology has shown that the chemical composition of the Sun has changed over its lifetime. The surface abundance of helium and heavy elements is believed to have decreased by up to 10% in relation to their initial values. However, this reduction is too small to be tested by direct observations of the photospheric chemical composition. Here we compare the predicted variations in the solar photospheric composition with precise measurements of abundances in meteorites and the solar wind composition. Although elemental composition ratios can vary by roughly a percent (e.g., for Ca/Mg and Ca/Fe) over the Sun's lifetime, their measurements are rife with uncertainties related to uncertainties in the interpretation of meteoritic measurements, photospheric determinations, and the complex fractionation processes occurring between the upper photosphere and lower chromosphere and the corona. On the other hand, isotopic ratios can be measured much more accurately and are not expected to be affected as much by extrasolar processes, although more work is required to quantify their effect. As the isotopic ratios evolve in the Sun proportionally to the mass ratios of the isotopes, light elements yield the highest variations in isotopic ratios. They are predicted to reach as high as 0.6% for 18O/16O and are only slightly lower in the cases of 26Mg/24Mg and 30Si/28Si. Such a value should be well within the sensitivity of new missions such as Genesis.

  5. Stable isotope fractionation at a glacial hydrothermal field: implications for biogeochemistry and biosignatures on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousins, C.; Bowden, R.; Fogel, M.; Cockell, C.; Crawford, I.; Gunn, M.; Karlsson, M. T.; Thorsteinsson, T.

    2012-12-01

    Hydrothermal environments that arise through the interaction between volcanogenic heat and glacial ice are ideal sites for understanding microbial biogeochemical processes on Earth, and also potentially on Mars where similar volcano-cryosphere interactions are thought to have occurred in the past. The Kverkfjöll subglacial basaltic volcano in central Iceland is geographically isolated, with little influence from flora, fauna, and human activity. Major environmental inputs include geothermal heat, meltwater from ice and snow, and outgassing of CO2, H2S, and SO2. Large physiochemical gradients exist, from steaming fumaroles and boiling hydrothermal pools, to frozen geothermal ground and glacial ice. Stable isotope measurements of total organic carbon, total sulphur, and total nitrogen were coupled with metagenomic analysis of the residing microbial communities, with the aim to identify biogeochemical relationships and processes operating within the Kverkfjöll geothermal environment, and also to identify any isotopic biosignatures that could be preserved within geothermal sediments. This study focused on a variety of samples taken along a hot spring stream that fed into a large ice-confined geothermal lake. Samples analysed range from unconsolidated hot spring sediments, well-developed microbial mats, and dissolved sulphate from hot spring fluids. From the anoxic spring source, the stream water increases in dissolved oxygen, decreases in temperature, yet maintains a pH of ~4. The spring environment is dominated by dissolved sulphate (~2.3 mM), with lower levels of nitrate (~50 μM), phosphorus (~5μM), and ammonium (~1.5 μM). Stable S isotope analysis reveals a fractionation of ~3.2 ‰ between sediment sulphide (as pyrite; δ34S ~0‰), and dissolved water sulphate (δ34S ~3.2 ‰) consistently along the hot spring stream, indicating the presence of an active sulphur cycle, although not one dominated by sulphate reduction (e.g. very negative sulphide δ34S). This

  6. Pb, Sr, and Nd isotopic compositions of a suite of Late Archean, igneous rocks, eastern Beartooth Mountains: implications for crust-mantle evolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wooden, J.L.; Mueller, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    A series of compositionally diverse, Late Archean rocks (2.74-2.79 Ga old) from the eastern Beartooth Mountains, Montana and Wyoming, U.S.A., have the same initial Pb, Sr, and Nd isotopic ratios. Lead and Sr initial ratios are higher and Nd initial ratios lower than would be expected for rocks derived from model mantle sources and strongly indicate the involvement of an older crustal reservoir in the genesis of these rocks. Crustal contamination during emplacement can be ruled out for a variety of reasons. Instead a model involving subduction of continental detritus and contamination of the overlying mantle as is often proposed for modern subduction environments is preferred. This contaminated mantle would have all the isotopic characteristics of mantle enriched by internal mantle metasomatism but would require no long-term growth or changes in parent to daughter element ratios. This contaminated mantle would make a good source for some of the Cenozoic mafic volcanics of the Columbia River, Snake River Plain, and Yellowstone volcanic fields that are proposed to come from ancient, enriched lithospheric mantle. The isotopic characteristics of the 2.70 Ga old Stillwater Complex are a perfect match for the proposed contaminated mantle which provides an alternative to crustal contamination during emplacement. The Pb isotopic characteristics of the Late Archean rocks of the eastern Beartooth Mountains are similar to those of other Late Archean rocks of the Wyoming Province and suggest that Early Archean, upper crustal rocks were common in this terrane. The isotopic signatures of Late Archean rocks in the Wyoming Province are distinctive from those of other Archean cratons in North America which are dominated by a MORB-like, Archean mantle source (Superior Province) and/or a long-term depleted crustal source (Greenland). ?? 1988.

  7. Quantifying regolith production rates with Uranium-series isotopes at Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory: implications for chemical weathering and landscape evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lin; Chabaux, Francois; Pelt, Eric; Blaes, Estelle; Jin, Lixin; Brantley, Susan

    2010-05-01

    Quantifying regolith production rates is essential in understanding many important Earth's surface processes such as nutrient cycling, carbon sequestration, erosion, and acid rain mitigation. Over the long term, the rates of weathering and erosion also combine to control the evolution of surface landscapes. Uranium-series isotopes offer a powerful tool to investigate regolith production rates and weathering timescales within a weathering system because of their well-documented fractionation behavior during chemical weathering and transport by water. To quantify regolith formation rates on shale lithology, we measured U-series isotopes (238U, 234U, and 230Th) in three weathering soil profiles along a planar north-facing hillslope at the Susquehanna Shale Hills Observatory (SSHO) in central Pennsylvania. All regolith samples show significant U-series disequilibrium: (234U/238U) and (230Th/238U) activity ratios range from 0.934 to 1.072 and from 0.903 to 1.096, respectively. These values display depth trends that are consistent with fractionation of U-series isotopes during chemical weathering, i.e., the relative mobility decreases in the order 234U > 238U >> 230Th. The activity ratios observed in the soils are explained by i) loss of U-series isotopes during water-rock interactions and ii) re-precipitation of 234U and 238U downslope. Regolith production rates calculated with U-series isotopes for these soil profiles decrease systematically with increasing distance from the ridge: from ~45 m/Myr at the ridge top, the highest point along the hillslope, to ~26 m/Myr at the middle slope site, and to ~15 m/Myr at the valley floor. Soil weathering timescales within these profiles range from 7 kyr to 45 kyr, increasing from the ridge to the valley floor. Given that the SSHO experienced peri-glacial climate ~15 ky ago, we conclude that the hillslope retains regolith formed before that glacial period and that the hillslope is not at geomorphological steady state. The regolith

  8. Effect of cubic phase evolution on field emission properties of boron nitride island films

    SciTech Connect

    Teii, Kungen; Yamao, Ryota; Matsumoto, Seiichiro

    2009-12-01

    Field emission performance of boron nitride (BN) island films is studied in terms of cubic phase evolution in plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Fine-grained island films with large surface roughness can be grown for initial sp{sup 2}-bonded BN and subsequent cubic BN (cBN) phases by using low-energy (approx20 eV) ion bombardment. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that the electron affinity is as low as 0.3 eV for both sp{sup 2}-bonded BN and cBN phases. The evolution of cBN islands reduces the turn-on field down to around 9 V/mum and increases the current density up to 10{sup -4} A/cm{sup 2}. The emission is facilitated by the larger field enhancement due to the larger roughness and the higher conduction of cBN islands. The potential barrier height is estimated to be about 3.4 eV for emission from the Fermi level, while it is only about 0.3 eV for 'conduction band emission'.

  9. MODEL OF THE FIELD LINE RANDOM WALK EVOLUTION AND APPROACH TO ASYMPTOTIC DIFFUSION IN MAGNETIC TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Snodin, A. P.; Ruffolo, D.; Matthaeus, W. H. E-mail: david.ruf@mahidol.ac.th

    2013-01-01

    The turbulent random walk of magnetic field lines plays an important role in the transport of plasmas and energetic particles in a wide variety of astrophysical situations, but most theoretical work has concentrated on determination of the asymptotic field line diffusion coefficient. Here we consider the evolution with distance of the field line random walk using a general ordinary differential equation (ODE), which for most cases of interest in astrophysics describes a transition from free streaming to asymptotic diffusion. By challenging theories of asymptotic diffusion to also describe the evolution, one gains insight on how accurately they describe the random walk process. Previous theoretical work has effectively involved closure of the ODE, often by assuming Corrsin's hypothesis and a Gaussian displacement distribution. Approaches that use quasilinear theory and prescribe the mean squared displacement ({Delta}x {sup 2}) according to free streaming (random ballistic decorrelation, RBD) or asymptotic diffusion (diffusive decorrelation, DD) can match computer simulation results, but only over specific parameter ranges, with no obvious 'marker' of the range of validity. Here we make use of a unified description in which the ODE determines ({Delta}x {sup 2}) self-consistently, providing a natural transition between the assumptions of RBD and DD. We find that the minimum kurtosis of the displacement distribution provides a good indicator of whether the self-consistent ODE is applicable, i.e., inaccuracy of the self-consistent ODE is associated with non-Gaussian displacement distributions.

  10. Evolution of localized blobs of swirling or buoyant fluid with and without an ambient magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, P. A.; Sreenivasan, Binod; Aspden, A. J.

    2007-02-15

    We investigate the evolution of localized blobs of swirling or buoyant fluid in an infinite, inviscid, electrically conducting fluid. We consider the three cases of a strong imposed magnetic field, a weak imposed magnetic field, and no magnetic field. For a swirling blob in the absence of a magnetic field, we find, in line with others, that the blob bursts radially outward under the action of the centrifugal force, forming a thin annular vortex sheet. A simple model of this process predicts that the vortex sheet thins exponentially fast and that it moves radially outward with constant velocity. These predictions are verified by high-resolution numerical simulations. When an intense magnetic field is applied, this phenomenon is suppressed, with the energy and angular momentum of the blob now diffusing axially along the magnetic field lines, converting the blob into a columnar structure. For modest or weak magnetic fields, there are elements of both types of behavior, with the radial bursting dominating over axial diffusion for weak fields. However, even when the magnetic field is very weak, the flow structure is quite distinct to that of the nonmagnetic case. In particular, a small but finite magnetic field places a lower bound on the thickness of the annular vortex sheet and produces an annulus of counter-rotating fluid that surrounds the vortex core. The behavior of the buoyant blob is similar. In the absence of a magnetic field, it rapidly develops the mushroomlike shape of a thermal, with a thin vortex sheet at the top and sides of the mushroom. Again, a simple model of this process predicts that the vortex sheet at the top of the thermal thins exponentially fast and rises with constant velocity. These predictions are consistent with earlier numerical simulations. Curiously, however, it is shown that the net vertical momentum associated with the blob increases linearly in time, despite the fact that the vertical velocity at the front of the thermal is constant

  11. Self-consistent evolution of plasma discharge and electromagnetic fields in a microwave pulse compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Shlapakovski, A. S.; Beilin, L.; Krasik, Ya. E.; Hadas, Y.; Schamiloglu, E.

    2015-07-15

    Nanosecond-scale evolution of plasma and RF electromagnetic fields during the release of energy from a microwave pulse compressor with a plasma interference switch was investigated numerically using the code MAGIC. The plasma was simulated in the scope of the gas conductivity model in MAGIC. The compressor embodied an S-band cavity and H-plane waveguide tee with a shorted side arm filled with pressurized gas. In a simplified approach, the gas discharge was initiated by setting an external ionization rate in a layer crossing the side arm waveguide in the location of the electric field antinode. It was found that with increasing ionization rate, the microwave energy absorbed by the plasma in the first few nanoseconds increases, but the absorption for the whole duration of energy release, on the contrary, decreases. In a hybrid approach modeling laser ignition of the discharge, seed electrons were set around the electric field antinode. In this case, the plasma extends along the field forming a filament and the plasma density increases up to the level at which the electric field within the plasma decreases due to the skin effect. Then, the avalanche rate decreases but the density still rises until the microwave energy release begins and the electric field becomes insufficient to support the avalanche process. The extraction of the microwave pulse limits its own power by terminating the rise of the plasma density and filament length. For efficient extraction, a sufficiently long filament of dense plasma must have sufficient time to be formed.

  12. Self-consistent evolution of plasma discharge and electromagnetic fields in a microwave pulse compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlapakovski, A. S.; Beilin, L.; Hadas, Y.; Schamiloglu, E.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2015-07-01

    Nanosecond-scale evolution of plasma and RF electromagnetic fields during the release of energy from a microwave pulse compressor with a plasma interference switch was investigated numerically using the code MAGIC. The plasma was simulated in the scope of the gas conductivity model in MAGIC. The compressor embodied an S-band cavity and H-plane waveguide tee with a shorted side arm filled with pressurized gas. In a simplified approach, the gas discharge was initiated by setting an external ionization rate in a layer crossing the side arm waveguide in the location of the electric field antinode. It was found that with increasing ionization rate, the microwave energy absorbed by the plasma in the first few nanoseconds increases, but the absorption for the whole duration of energy release, on the contrary, decreases. In a hybrid approach modeling laser ignition of the discharge, seed electrons were set around the electric field antinode. In this case, the plasma extends along the field forming a filament and the plasma density increases up to the level at which the electric field within the plasma decreases due to the skin effect. Then, the avalanche rate decreases but the density still rises until the microwave energy release begins and the electric field becomes insufficient to support the avalanche process. The extraction of the microwave pulse limits its own power by terminating the rise of the plasma density and filament length. For efficient extraction, a sufficiently long filament of dense plasma must have sufficient time to be formed.

  13. Effects of twin boundary mobility on domain microstructure evolution in magnetic shape memory alloys: Phase field simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Yongmei M.

    2009-02-09

    Effects of twin boundary mobility on domain microstructure evolution during magnetic field-induced deformation in magnetic shape memory alloys are studied by phase field micromagnetic microelastic modeling. The simulations show that different twin boundary mobilities lead to drastically different domain microstructures and evolution pathways, yielding very different magnetization and strain responses, even with opposite signs. The study also reveals complex domain phenomena in magnetic shape memory alloys.

  14. The questa magmatic system: Petrologic, chemical and isotopic variations in cogenetic volcanic and plutonic rocks of the latir volcanic field and associated intrusives, northern New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.M.

    1986-01-01

    Field, chemical and isotopic data demonstrate that nearly all igneous rocks at Questa resulted from interactions between mantle-derived parental magmas and the crust. Strontium, neodymium and lead isotope ratios of early andesites to rhyolites (28 to 26 Ma) indicate that these magmas assimilated > 25% lower crust. Injection of basaltic magmas extensively modified the strontium and neodymium but not the lead isotope compositions of the lower crust. Eruption of comendite magmas and the peralkaline Amalia Tuff 26 Ma is correlated with inception of regional extension. Lead isotope ratios identify different sources for the metaluminous granites and the peralkaline rocks. 26 Ma metaluminous granite to granodiorite intrusions have chemical and isotopic compositions to those of the precaldera intermediate-composition rocks, and are interpreted as representing the solidified equivalents of the precaldera magmatic episode. However, both conventional and ion-microprobe isotopic data prohibit significant assimilation of crustal rocks at the level of exposure, suggesting that the plutons were emplaced a relatively crystal-rich mushes which did not have sufficient heat to assimilate country rocks. This suggest that in some cases plutonic rocks are better than volcanic rocks in representing the isotopic compositions of their source regions, because the assimilation potential of crystal-rich magmas is significantly less than that of largely liquid magmas.

  15. A quantum cascade laser infrared spectrometer for CO2 stable isotope analysis: Field implementation at a hydrocarbon contaminated site under bio-remediation.

    PubMed

    Guimbaud, Christophe; Noel, Cécile; Chartier, Michel; Catoire, Valéry; Blessing, Michaela; Gourry, Jean Christophe; Robert, Claude

    2016-02-01

    Real-time methods to monitor stable isotope ratios of CO2 are needed to identify biogeochemical origins of CO2 emissions from the soil-air interface. An isotope ratio infra-red spectrometer (IRIS) has been developed to measure CO2 mixing ratio with δ(13)C isotopic signature, in addition to mixing ratios of other greenhouse gases (CH4, N2O). The original aspects of the instrument as well as its precision and accuracy for the determination of the isotopic signature δ(13)C of CO2 are discussed. A first application to biodegradation of hydrocarbons is presented, tested on a hydrocarbon contaminated site under aerobic bio-treatment. CO2 flux measurements using closed chamber method is combined with the determination of the isotopic signature δ(13)C of the CO2 emission to propose a non-intrusive method to monitor in situ biodegradation of hydrocarbons. In the contaminated area, high CO2 emissions have been measured with an isotopic signature δ(13)C suggesting that CO2 comes from petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation. This first field implementation shows that rapid and accurate measurement of isotopic signature of CO2 emissions is particularly useful in assessing the contribution of contaminant degradation to the measured CO2 efflux and is promising as a monitoring tool for aerobic bio-treatment. PMID:26969546

  16. Fractionation of Cu and Mo isotopes caused by vapor-liquid partitioning, evidence from the Dahutang W-Cu-Mo ore field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Junming; Mathur, Ryan; Sun, Weidong; Song, Weile; Chen, Huayong; Mutti, Laurence; Xiang, Xinkui; Luo, Xiaohong

    2016-05-01

    The study presents δ65Cu and δ97Mo isotope values from cogenetic chalcopyrite and molybdenite found in veins and breccias of the Dahutang W-Cu-Mo ore field in China. The samples span a 3-4 km range. Both isotopes show a significant degree of fractionation. Cu isotope values in the chalcopyrite range from -0.31‰ to +1.48‰, and Mo isotope values in the molybdenite range from -0.03‰ to +1.06‰. For the cogenetic sulfide veined samples, a negative slope relationship exists between δ65Cu and δ97Mo values, which suggest a similar fluid history. Rayleigh distillation models the vein samples' change in isotope values. The breccia samples do not fall on the trend, thus indicating a different source mineralization event. Measured fluid inclusion and δD and δ18O data from cogenetic quartz indicate changes in temperature, and mixing of fluids do not appear to cause the isotopic shifts measure. Related equilibrium processes associated with the partitioning of metal between the vapor-fluid in the hydrothermal system could be the probable cause for the relationship seen between the two isotope systems.

  17. ISOTOPE SEPARATORS

    DOEpatents

    Bacon, C.G.

    1958-08-26

    An improvement is presented in the structure of an isotope separation apparatus and, in particular, is concerned with a magnetically operated shutter associated with a window which is provided for the purpose of enabling the operator to view the processes going on within the interior of the apparatus. The shutier is mounted to close under the force of gravity in the absence of any other force. By closing an electrical circuit to a coil mouated on the shutter the magnetic field of the isotope separating apparatus coacts with the magnetic field of the coil to force the shutter to the open position.

  18. Remanent magnetism of HED meteorites: Implications for their evolution and ancient magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collinson, D. W.; Morden, S. J.

    1993-01-01

    The magnetic properties of extraterrestrial materials, in particular natural remanent magnetization (NRM), is a potentially useful study for detecting ancient Solar System magnetic fields and for elucidating meteorite evolutionary processes. Results are presented for the following: howardites--Kapoeta, Petersburg, Le Teilleul, and EET 87503; eucrites--Sioux County and Millbillillie; and diogenites--Shalka and Johnstown. Significant features of their magnetism are within-sample in homogeneity of NRM directions in several of the meteorites and within-sample uniformity of axes of an isotropy of magnetic susceptibility. Both these phenomena bear on the meteorites' evolution and the timing of the magnetization process.

  19. Evolution of a magnetic field in a differentially rotating radiative zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaurat, M.; Jouve, L.; Lignières, F.; Gastine, T.

    2015-08-01

    Context. Recent spectropolarimetric surveys of main-sequence intermediate-mass stars have exhibited a dichotomy in the distribution of the observed magnetic field between the kG dipoles of Ap/Bp stars and the sub-Gauss magnetism of Vega and Sirius. Aims: We would like to test whether this dichotomy is linked to the stability versus instability of large-scale magnetic configurations in differentially rotating radiative zones. Methods: We computed the axisymmetric magnetic field obtained from the evolution of a dipolar field threading a differentially rotating shell. A full parameter study including various density profiles and initial and boundary conditions was performed with a 2D numerical code. We then focused on the ratio between the toroidal and poloidal components of the magnetic field and discuss the stability of the configurations dominated by the toroidal component using local stability criteria and insights from recent 3D numerical simulations. Results: The numerical results and a simple model show that the ratio between the toroidal and the poloidal magnetic fields is highest after an Alfvén crossing time of the initial poloidal field. For high density contrasts, this ratio converges towards an asymptotic value that can thus be extrapolated to realistic stellar cases. We then consider the stability of the magnetic configurations to non-axisymmetric perturbations and find that configurations dominated by the toroidal component are likely to be unstable if the shear strength is significantly higher than the poloidal Alfvén frequency. An expression for the critical poloidal field below which magnetic fields are likely to be unstable is found and is compared to the lower bound of Ap/Bp magnetic fields.

  20. Strain field evolution during creep on ice. Impact of dynamic recrystallization mechanisms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauve, Thomas; Montagnat, Maurine; Barou, Fabrice; Hidas, Karoly; Tommasi, Andréa; Vacher, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Discontinuous Dynamic Recrystallization (DDRX) occurs in minerals, metals, ice and impacts on texture and microstructure evolution during deformation. It therefore impacts on large scale mechanisms as seismic anisotropy, mechanical properties inside the Earth mantle, material forming and anisotropic flow in polar ice sheet, for instance. In this frame, ice can be considered as a model material due to a strong viscoplastic anisotropy inducing strong deformation heterogeneities, that are precursors of recrystallization. During creep deformation at high temperature in the laboratory, DDRX occurs from 1% strain and involves grain nucleation and grain boundary migration. As DDRX induces an evolution of microstructure and texture, it strongly affects the mechanical behavior (1,2), and it is expected to modify the strain field at the grain and/or the sample scale. Compressive creep test (σ=0.5-0.8 MPa) were performed at high temperature (T/Tf 0,98) on granular polycrystalline ice (grains size 1mm) and columnar polycrystalline ice (microstructure 2D 1/2 in plane grain size 10mm) up to 18 % strain. Columnar ice provides interesting feature as it contains only one grain through the thickness and the columns are parallel. Post-deformation texture analyses with an Automatic Ice Texture Analyzer (AITA) and with EBSD (CrystalProbe MEB of Geoscience Montpellier) were used to investigate DDRX mechanisms at high resolution, and deduce their impact on texture and microstructure, at different scales. During the experiment, local strain field is measured on the surface of the sample by Digital Image Correlation (DIC) (3) with a spatial resolution between 0.2 and 0.5 mm, and a strain resolution between 0.2% to 1%. Grain size being large, we obtain a relatively good intra-granular resolution of the strain field. Thanks to the 2D configuration of the columnar ice samples, we can superimpose the initial microstructure to the strain field measured by DIC. We will present an overview of

  1. The evolution of field early-type galaxies in the FDF and WHDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Alexander; Böhm, Asmus; Ziegler, Bodo L.

    2009-03-01

    We explore the properties of 24 field early-type galaxies in the redshift range 0.20 < z < 0.75 down to MB <= -19.30 in a sample extracted from the FORS Deep Field and the William Herschel Deep Field. Target galaxies were selected on the basis of a combination of luminosity, spectrophotometric type, morphology and photometric redshift or broad-band colours. High signal-to-noise ratio intermediate-resolution spectroscopy has been acquired at the Very Large Telescope, complemented by deep high-resolution imaging with the Advanced Camera for Surveys onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and additional ground-based multiband photometry. All galaxy spectra were observed under subarcsecond conditions and allow us to derive accurate kinematics and stellar population properties of the galaxies. To clarify the low level of star formation detected in some galaxies, we identify the amount of active galactic nuclei (AGN) activity in our sample using archive data of Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray surveys. None of the galaxies in our sample was identified as secure AGN source based on their X-ray emission. The rest-frame B- and K-band scaling relations of the Faber-Jackson relation and the Fundamental Plane display a moderate evolution for the field early-type galaxies. Lenticular (S0) galaxies feature on average a stronger luminosity evolution and bluer rest-frame colours which can be explained that they comprise more diverse stellar populations compared to elliptical galaxies. The evolution of the FP can be interpreted as an average change in the dynamical (effective) mass-to-light ratio of our galaxies as <Δlog(M/LB)/z> = -0.74 +/- 0.08. The M/L evolution of these field galaxies suggests a continuous mass assembly of field early-type galaxies during the last 5 Gyr, which gets supported by recent studies of field galaxies up to z ~ 1. Independent evidence for recent star formation activity is provided by spectroscopic ([OII] emission, Hδ) and photometric (rest-frame broad

  2. Vent Field Distribution and Evolution Along the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, D. S.; Delaney, J. R.; Lilley, M. D.; Butterfield, D. A.

    2001-12-01

    Five major vent fields have now been discovered along the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. From the north to the south they include Sasquatch, Salty Dawg, High Rise, Main Endeavour, and Mothra. Spacing between the distinct, high-temperature fields increases from the north to the south. For example Sasquatch is located 1.6 km north of Salty Dawg and Mothra is 2.7 km south of the Main Endeavour Field. In addition to changes in spacing of the vent fields along axis there are also dramatic changes in the style, intensity, and thermal-chemical characteristics of venting. The newly discovered Sasquatch field extends for >200 m in length, and venting is limited to a few isolated, small structures that reach 284° C. Active venting is confined to the northern portion of the field. In contrast, extinct, massive sulfide edifices and oxidized sulfide talus can be followed continuously for over 200 m along a 25-30 m wide, 020 trending ridge indicating that this field was very active in the past. In contrast to the delicate active structures, older extinct structures reach at least 25 m in height and the aspect ratios are similar to active pillars in the Mothra Field 7.5 km, to the south. It is unclear if venting at this site represents rejuvenation of the field, or whether it is in a waning stage. Within Salty Dawg, vent fluid temperatures reach 296° C and vigorous venting is constrained to a few, multi-flanged edifices that reach 25 m in height and 25 m in length. The field hosts over 25 structures, oxidized sulfide is abundant, and diffuse flow is dominant. Fluid compositions and temperatures are consistent with Salty Dawg being in a waning stage of evolution. Venting intensity and incidence of venting increase dramatically at High Rise where numerous multi-flanged structures are active; temperatures reach 343° C. The most intense and active of the fields is the Main Endeavour, with at least 21 actively venting, multi-flanged edifices that contain at least 100

  3. U-Th-Pb and 230Th/ 238U disequilibrium isotope systematics: Precise accessory mineral chronology and melt evolution tracing in the Alpine Bergell intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberli, Felix; Meier, Martin; Berger, Alfons; Rosenberg, Claudio L.; GierÉ, Reto

    2004-06-01

    In order to investigate the potential of combined Th-U-Pb isotope and 230Th/ 238U disequilibrium systematics for tracing magmatic crystallization and melt evolution, conventional high-resolution single-crystal TIMS techniques have been applied to zircon, titanite and fragments of geochemically characterized growth zones of allanite. These minerals were extracted from a single tonalite specimen collected from the feeder zone of the Tertiary Bergell pluton (Southern Steep Belt, S Switzerland/N Italy). The isotopic results document an extended history of crystallization and melt evolution of at least 5 Ma, with well-resolved zircon ages defining an early interval of 33.0 to 32.0 Ma, followed by crystallization of zoned allanite from 32.0 to 28.0 Ma and formation of magmatic epidote possibly as late as 26 Ma. Trace and major element patterns in zoned allanite closely mirror melt evolution, characterized by increase of U concentration and sharp decrease of Th and LREE, reflecting early crystallization of phases low in U and, in particular, the dominating control by allanite precipitation. Preservation of substantial quantities of excess 206Pb derived from initial excess 230Th in all analyzed allanite grains indicates that their isotopic systems have not been reset by loss of radiogenic Pb during prolonged residence at magmatic conditions and regional-metamorphic cooling, and that the measured sequence of 208Pb/ 232Th dates translates into a real age sequence. Major loss of radiogenic Pb from compositionally zoned allanite by volume diffusion would have resulted in a data pattern grossly different from the observed one, as demonstrated by numerical modeling of 232Th- 208Pb- 238U- 230Th- 206Pb isotopic evolution. The results therefore suggest closure temperatures ≥700°C for magmatic allanite. Quantification of 230Th/ 238U disequilibrium relationships reveals a smooth, initially steep decrease of Th/U in the magma from values of 2.9 at 32.0 Ma to < 0.1 at 28.0 Ma in

  4. Testing the Craig and Gordon model with field measurements of oxygen isotope ratios of evaporative fluxes in a Mediterranean oak savannah to partition evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubbert, Maren; Matthias, Cuntz; Arndt, Piayda; Christane, Werner

    2013-04-01

    Stable oxygen isotopes of water provide a valuable tracer for water movements within ecosystems and are used to estimate the contribution of transpiration to total ecosystem evapotranspiration (ft). We tested the Craig and Gordon equation against continuous field measurements of isotopic composition of evaporation and assessed the impact for partitioning evapotranspiration. Therefore, evaporation (E) and its isotopic signature (δ18OE) on bare soil plots, as well as evapotranspiration (ET) and its corresponding isotopic composition of (δ18OET) of an herbaceous understory layer was measured with a cavity ring-down spectrometer connected to a soil chamber on a field site in central Portugal. We quantified the variation in δ18OE arising from uncertainties in the determination of environmental input variables to the Craig and Gordon equation: the isotope signature at the evaporating site (δ18Oe), the temperature at the evaporating site (Te), and the kinetic fractionation factor (αk). We could hence quantify ft based on measured δ18OET, modeled δ18OE from observed soil water isotopic composition at the evaporating site (δ18Oe), and modeled δ18O of transpiration (δ18OT) from observed total soil water isotopic composition. Our results demonstrate that predicting δ18OE using the Craig and Gordon equation leads to good agreement with measured δ18OE given that the temperature and isotope profiles of the soil are thoroughly characterized. However, modeled δ18OE is highly sensitive to changes in Te and δ18Oe as well as αk. This markedly affected the partition results of transpiration and evaporation from the total ET flux: The fraction of transpiration (ft) varied strongly using different formulations for αk and assuming steady or non-steady state transpiration. These findings provide a first comparison of laser-based and modeled isotopic compositions of evaporation based on the Craig and Gordon equation under field conditions. This is of special interest for

  5. Sedimentary records of mangrove evolution during the past one hundred years based on stable carbon isotope and pollen evidences in Maowei, SW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Peng; Meng, Xianwei; Li, Zhen; Feng, Aiping

    2016-06-01

    Mangroves accumulate sedimentary sequences, where cores can provide historical records of mangrove evolution with past climate change and human activity. The study traced the history of mangrove evolution during the past one hundred years in a mangrove swamp of Maowei Sea, SW China. The sedimentation rates (0.38-0.95 cm yr-1) were calculated on the basis of ln (210Pbxs/Al) and mass depth in the core sediments. Chemical tracers, such as δ13Corg and C:N values, were utilized to trace the contribution of mangrove-derived organic matter using a ternary mixing model. Because of potential diagenetic alteration and / or overlap in the isotopic signatures of different components, simultaneous use of mangrove pollen diagrams can help to supplement some of these limitations. Combined with mangrove pollen, mangrove evolution was reconstructed and could be divided into three stages: flourishment (1886-1905 AD), slight degradation (1905-1949 AD) and rapid degradation period (1949-2007 AD), which was consistent with previous reports. The reclamation of mangrove swamps to shrimp ponds was the major reason for rapid degradation of mangrove ecosystems in recent years, rather than climate change in the region.

  6. Phase field modeling of microstructure evolution of electrocatalyst-infiltrated solid oxide fuel cell cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Linyun; Li, Qun; Hu, Jiamian; Lee, Shiwoo; Gerdes, Kirk; Chen, Long-Qing

    2015-02-01

    A phase field model is developed to examine microstructural evolution of an infiltrated solid oxide fuel cell cathode. It is employed to generate the three-phase backbone microstructures and morphology of infiltrate nano-particles [La1-xSrxMnO3 (LSM)]. Two-phase Y2O3 + ZrO2 and LSM backbones composed of 0.5-1 μm particles are first generated and then seeded with infiltrate, and evolution is compared for starting infiltrate particle diameters of 5 nm and 10 nm. The computed lifetime triple phase boundary (3PB) density of the infiltrated cathode is then compared to the cathode backbone. Results indicate that initial coarsening of infiltrate nano-particles is the primary evolution process, and infiltrate coarsening is the majority contributor to 3PB reduction. However, at all times, the infiltrated cathode possesses significantly greater 3PB length than even the uncoarsened backbone. Infiltrate particle size effects indicate that the smaller particle size produces greater 3PB length for the same infiltration amount, consistent with intuition. A maximum 3PB enhancement is reached when increasing infiltrate particle loading, and the maximum enhancement depends on infiltrate particle size. It is found that architectural degradation modes will insignificantly affect the lifetime performance of infiltrated cathodes. This work suggests that lifetime optimized particle size/loading combinations are identifiable, and can be precise if additional fundamental data become available.

  7. Evolution of chemical and isotopic composition of inorganic carbon in a complex semi-arid zone environment: Consequences for groundwater dating using radiocarbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, K. T.; Han, L. F.; Hollins, S. E.; Cendón, D. I.; Jacobsen, G. E.; Baker, A.

    2016-09-01

    Estimating groundwater age is important for any groundwater resource assessment and radiocarbon (14C) dating of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) can provide this information. In semi-arid zone (i.e. water-limited environments), there are a multitude of reasons why 14C dating of groundwater and traditional correction models may not be directly transferable. Some include; (1) the complex hydrological responses of these systems that lead to a mixture of different ages in the aquifer(s), (2) the varied sources, origins and ages of organic matter in the unsaturated zone and (3) high evaporation rates. These all influence the evolution of DIC and are not easily accounted for in traditional correction models. In this study, we determined carbon isotope data for; DIC in water, carbonate minerals in the sediments, sediment organic matter, soil gas CO2 from the unsaturated zone, and vegetation samples. The samples were collected after an extended drought, and again after a flood event, to capture the evolution of DIC after varying hydrological regimes. A graphical method (Han et al., 2012) was applied for interpretation of the carbon geochemical and isotopic data. Simple forward mass-balance modelling was carried out on key geochemical processes involving carbon and agreed well with observed data. High values of DIC and δ13CDIC, and low 14CDIC could not be explained by a simple carbonate mineral-CO2 gas dissolution process. Instead it is suggested that during extended drought, water-sediment interaction leads to ion exchange processes within the top ∼10-20 m of the aquifer which promotes greater calcite dissolution in saline groundwater. This process was found to contribute more than half of the DIC, which is from a mostly 'dead' carbon source. DIC is also influenced by carbon exchange between DIC in water and carbonate minerals found in the top 2 m of the unsaturated zone. This process occurs because of repeated dissolution/precipitation of carbonate that is dependent on

  8. Abnormal carbon and hydrogen isotopes of alkane gases from the Qingshen gas field, Songliao Basin, China, suggesting abiogenic alkanes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Quanyou; Dai, Jinxing; Jin, Zhijun; Li, Jian; Wu, Xiaoqi; Meng, Qingqiang; Yang, Chun; Zhou, Qinghua; Feng, Zihui; Zhu, Dongya

    2016-01-01

    It is great debate that the alkane gases of abiogenic origin would constitute a major portion of the commercial accumulation of the Qingshen gas field, Songliao Basin, China. In this study, abiogenic gases characterized by heavy δ13C1 values, reversal of the usual carbon isotopic trend of C1-C5 alkanes, very narrow variation in δ2HC1 values, and low CH4/3He ratios associated with high R/Ra values (>1) were identified. The hydrocarbon gas in the Qingshen gas field is a mixture of thermogenic alkanes derived from Cretaceous mudstone (type I kerogen) or Jurassic coal (type III kerogen) and abiogenic alkanes (mainly CH4) from mantle degassing. A quantitative estimation of abiogenic alkanes contribution to the Qingshen gas field is made based on a δ13C1 vs. δ13C2 plot: about 30-40% of alkane gases in the Qingshen gas field, along with its helium, are estimated to be derived from the mantle via magmatic activity. Particularly, the abiogenic formation of CH4 generated from the reduction of CO2 by hydrothermal activity may contribute. Our study suggests that abiogenic alkane gases in certain geological settings could be more widespread than previously thought, and may accumulate into economic reservoirs.

  9. Models of magnetic field evolution and effective viscosity in weakly collisional extragalactic plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogavero, Federico; Schekochihin, Alexander A.

    2014-06-01

    In weakly collisional plasmas such as the intracluster medium (ICM), the viscous stress and the rate of change of the magnetic energy are proportional to the local pressure anisotropy, so subject to constraints imposed by the pressure-anisotropy-driven microinstabilities (mirror and firehose) and controlled by the local instantaneous plasma β. The dynamics of such plasmas can be dramatically different from a conventional magnetohydrodynamic fluid. The plasma is expected to stay locally marginal with respect to the instabilities, but how it does this remains an open question. Two models of magnetic field evolution are investigated. In the first, marginality is achieved via suppression of the rate of change of the field. In the second, the instabilities give rise to anomalous collisionality, reducing pressure anisotropy to marginal - at the same time decreasing viscosity and so increasing the turbulent rate of strain. Implications of these two models are studied in a simplified zero-dimensional setting. In the first model, the field grows explosively but on a time-scale that scales with the initial β, while in the second, dynamical field strength can be reached in one large-scale turbulence turnover time regardless of the initial seed. Both models produce very intermittent fields. Both also suffer from fairly strong constraints on their applicability: for typical cluster-core conditions, scale separation between the fluid motions (with account of suppressed viscous stress) and the miscoscale fluctuations break down at β ˜ 104-105. At larger β (weaker fields), a fully collisionless plasma dynamo theory is needed to justify field growth from a tiny primordial seed. However, the models discussed here are appropriate for studying the structure of the currently observed field as well as large-scale dynamics and thermodynamics of the magnetized ICM or similarly dilute astrophysical plasmas.

  10. Temporal Evolution of Magnetic Field and Intensity Properties of Photospheric Pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorotovič, I.; Rybanský, M.; Sobotka, M.; Lorenc, M.; Barandas, M.; Fonseca, J. M.

    2016-04-01

    We describe conditions of pore formation in relation to the configuration and intensity of magnetic field, using observations of the SDO/HMI instrument, which observes the photosphere in the visible continuum and simultaneously the magnetic field with a spatial resolution of better than 1''. An area with a diameter of 35'' containing 6 pores during the period from October 10, 2013, 22:01:30 UT to October 11, 2013, 20:01:30 UT is selected from the HMI full-disk images. We analyze the temporal evolution of the area and brightness of the pores (time step 15 minutes), their statistics, and in parallel a time-sequence of the line-of-sight magnetic field intensity and its correlation with the area and brightness. We find that the pores become visible when their intensity decreases below 0.85 of the photospheric surrounding intensity and the magnetic field increases to 650 G in the HMI measurements. We determine the mean synodical rotational speed of the pores to be 14.44°/24 hours, which is 1° more than the tabular value. Positions of maximum magnetic field precede the positions of the pores in the direction of rotation for the positive polarity and lag behind it for the negative polarity.

  11. Lead and strontium isotopes and related trace elements as genetic tracers in the Upper Cenozoic rhyolite-basalt association of the Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doe, B.R.; Leeman, W.P.; Christiansen, R.L.; Hedge, C.E.

    1982-01-01

    Pb, U, Th, Rb and Sr contents and Pb- and Sr-isotopic compositions, together with field and petrological data, are consistent with the hypothesis of derivation of the basaltic and rhyolitic magmas of this volcanic field from source regions in the upper mantle and lower crust, respectively. It is suggested that the isotopic signatures of the basalts were inherited from a 2600 m.y.-old mantle 'keel' attached to the continental crust and were essentially unaffected by passage of the magma through the latter.R.J.P.

  12. Theory of gel electrophoresis in high fields: Evolution of a population of hernias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Didier; Viovy, Jean-Louis

    1997-02-01

    We consider long polyelectrolytes that are initially at rest in a gel and suddenly submitted to a strong electric field. The evolution of the conformation regime is described up to the final disengagement from the initial tube. Just after the field has been applied, the chain adopts a comb-like conformation with several “hernias”, which evolve in competition with each other. As long as the conformation has many hernias, the distribution of their size follows a self-similar law, first described by Deutsch. The number of hernias decreases, and ultimately the chain disengages from its initial tube. Various predictions for the conformation of the chain in this last stage and for time constants are proposed. In particular, the disengagement times are found to follow a self-similar law in the size of the chains.

  13. Phase-field Modeling of Gas Bubbles and Thermal Conductivity Evolution in Nuclear Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Shenyang Y.; Henager, Charles H.; Heinisch, Howard L.; Stan, Marius; Baskes, Michael I.; Valone, Steven

    2009-07-15

    The major factors that influence the thermal conductivity of the ceramics and metals are temperature, stoichiometry, microstructure, porosity, and point defects. Nuclear fuels and structure materials are subject to a severe radiation environment and their properties, including thermal conductivity change significantly with time and irradiation level. In particular, the accumulation of fission products and the formation of He bubbles can decrease the heat transfer, leading to overheating of the fuel element. In this work, we use the phase-field method to study the effect of microstructural changes on thermal conductivity. We developed a phase-field model to simulate the He bubble formation and growth in a single/polycrystalline material with defects. The model takes into account the generation of gas atoms and defects, gas atom diffusivity inhomogeneity, gas atom segregation, and gas bubble nucleation. With the model, we simulated the gas bubble and temperature evolution, and calculated the effect of gas bubble volume fraction on effective thermal conductivity.

  14. Stable isotope evidence for the petrogenesis and fluid evolution in the Proterozoic Harney Peak leucogranite, Black Hills, South Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Nabelek, P.I. Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Orleans ); Russ-Nabelek, C.; Haeussler, G.T. )

    1992-01-01

    Oxygen and hydrogen isotope systematics of the Proterozoic Harney Peak Granite were examined in order to constrain its petrogenesis and to examine the role of fluids in a peraluminous granite-pegmatite magmatic system. It is shown that fractional crystallization or subsolidus interaction of the Harney Peak Granite with the magmatic fluid or a fluid derived from the schist cannot explain the difference between the {delta}{sup 18}O values of the core and perimeter granites. Although some oxygen isotope heterogeneity in the granite could be explained by assimilation of the country rocks, assimilation cannot explain all of the difference between the two granite types. Instead, it is proposed that intrusion of the magma which led to the biotite granites in the core of the pluton at the culmination of regional metamorphism initiated melting of the schists at a depth somewhat greater than the present level of erosion. The melts were emplaced into the overlying schist and differentiated into the many tourmaline-rich granite-pegmatite sills and dikes comprising much of the perimeter of the Harney Peak Granite and its satellite plutons. Alternatively, the different melts may have resulted from melting along an isotopically heterogeneous vertical section of the crust in response to the ascent of a thermal pulse.

  15. VISCOUS EVOLUTION AND PHOTOEVAPORATION OF CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS DUE TO EXTERNAL FAR ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Kassandra R.; Adams, Fred C.; Calvet, Nuria

    2013-09-01

    This paper explores the effects of FUV radiation fields from external stars on circumstellar disk evolution. Disks residing in young clusters can be exposed to extreme levels of FUV flux from nearby OB stars, and observations show that disks in such environments are being actively photoevaporated. Typical FUV flux levels can be factors of {approx}10{sup 2}-10{sup 4} higher than the interstellar value. These fields are effective in driving mass loss from circumstellar disks because they act at large radial distance from the host star, i.e., where most of the disk mass is located, and where the gravitational potential well is shallow. We combine viscous evolution (an {alpha}-disk model) with an existing FUV photoevaporation model to derive constraints on disk lifetimes, and to determine disk properties as functions of time, including mass-loss rates, disk masses, and radii. We also consider the effects of X-ray photoevaporation from the host star using an existing model, and show that for disks around solar-mass stars, externally generated FUV fields are often the dominant mechanism in depleting disk material. For sufficiently large viscosities, FUV fields can efficiently photoevaporate disks over the entire range of parameter space. Disks with viscosity parameter {alpha} = 10{sup -3} are effectively dispersed within 1-3 Myr; for higher viscosities ({alpha} = 10{sup -2}) disks are dispersed within {approx}0.25-0.5 Myr. Furthermore, disk radii are truncated to less than {approx}100 AU, which can possibly affect the formation of planets. Our model predictions are consistent with the range of observed masses and radii of proplyds in the Orion Nebula Cluster.

  16. CHROMOSPHERIC RAPID BLUESHIFTED EXCURSIONS OBSERVED WITH IBIS AND THEIR ASSOCIATION WITH PHOTOSPHERIC MAGNETIC FIELD EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Na; Chen, Xin; Liu, Chang; Jing, Ju; Wang, Shuo; Wang, Haimin; Tritschler, Alexandra; Reardon, Kevin P.; Lamb, Derek A.; Deforest, Craig E.; Denker, Carsten; Liu, Rui

    2015-02-01

    Chromospheric rapid blueshifted excursions (RBEs) are suggested to be the disk counterparts of type II spicules at the limb and believed to contribute to the coronal heating process. Previous identification of RBEs was mainly based on feature detection using Dopplergrams. In this paper, we study RBEs on 2011 October 21 in a very quiet region at the disk center, which were observed with the high-cadence imaging spectroscopy of the Ca II 8542 Å line from the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer (IBIS). By using an automatic spectral analysis algorithm, a total of 98 RBEs are identified during an 11 minute period. Most of these RBEs have either a round or elongated shape, with an average area of 1.2 arcsec{sup 2}. The detailed temporal evolution of spectra from IBIS makes possible a quantitative determination of the velocity (∼16 km s{sup –1}) and acceleration (∼400 m s{sup –2}) of Ca II 8542 RBEs, and reveals an additional deceleration (∼–160 m s{sup –2}) phase that usually follows the initial acceleration. In addition, we also investigate the association of RBEs with the concomitant photospheric magnetic field evolution, using coordinated high-resolution and high-sensitivity magnetograms made by Hinode. Clear examples are found where RBEs appear to be associated with the preceding magnetic flux emergence and/or the subsequent flux cancellation. However, further analysis with the aid of the Southwest Automatic Magnetic Identification Suite does not yield a significant statistical association between these RBEs and magnetic field evolution. We discuss the implications of our results in the context of understanding the driving mechanism of RBEs.

  17. Kinetic Effects on the Stability Properties of Field-reversed Configurations: II. Nonlinear Evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Elena V. Belova; Ronald C. Davidson; Hantao Ji; Masaaki Yamada

    2003-11-25

    Results of three-dimensional hybrid simulations of the field-reversed configuration (FRC) are presented. Emphasis of this work is on the nonlinear evolution of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities in kinetic FRCs. A wide range of ''bar s'' values is considered, where the ''bar s'' is the FRC kinetic parameter, which measures the number of ion gyroradii in the configuration. The linear and nonlinear stability of MHD modes with toroidal mode numbers n greater than or equal to 1 is investigated, including the effects of ion rotation, finite electron pressure, and weak toroidal field. Low-''bar s'' simulations show nonlinear saturation of the n = 1 tilt mode. The n greater than or equal to 2 rotational modes are observed to grow during the nonlinear phase of the tilt instability due to ion spin-up in the toroidal direction. Large-''bar s'' simulations show no saturation of the tilt mode, and there is a slow nonlinear evolution of the instability after the initial fast linear growth. Overall, the hybrid simulations demonstrate the importance of nonlinear effects, which are responsible for the saturation of instabilities in low-''bar s'' configurations, and also for the increase in FRC life-time compared to MHD models in high-''bar s'' configurations.

  18. Gully evolution in field crops on vertic soils under conventional agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Carlos; Pérez, Rafael; Mora, Jose; Gómez, Jose A.

    2015-04-01

    Gully erosion is a major process contributing to soil degradation on cultivated areas. Its effects are especially intense in farms under conventional agriculture characterised by the use of heavy machinery for land levelling and herbicides leading to the depletion of natural vegetation in valley locations. When the soil (e.g. vertic soils) and parent material conditions (e.g. soft erodible marls) are favourable to incision, gully features may present large dimensions, producing the loss of significant proportions of productive land. This study evaluates the evolution of several gully networks located in Córdoba (Spain) within the Campiña area (a rolling landscape on Miocene marls) with conventional agriculture and gully filling operations as the predominant farm practices. The area of the catchments ranged from 10 to 100 ha, they were covered by field crops (mostly bean, sunflower and wheat) on vertic soils. Firstly, we carried out a historical analysis of the gully development during the last six decades by aerial image interpretation. Secondly, a number of field surveys were conducted to characterise the evolution of the gully morphology in a period of five years (2010-2014). For this purpose, a range of measurement techniques were used: pole and tape, differential GPS and 3D photo-reconstruction. Finally, the influence of topography (slope and drainage area) on gully dimensions along the longitudinal profile was assessed.

  19. Gravitational field of a hedgehog and the evolution of vacuum bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guendelman, E. I.; Rabinowitz, A.

    1991-11-01

    The gravitational field produced by a spherically symmetric ``hedgehog'' configuration in scalar field theories with global SO(3) symmetry (or higher) is studied in the limit in which these models become nonlinear σ models. The same gravitational effect can be generated by a set of cosmic strings intersecting at a point, in the limit that one considers a continuous distribution of such intersecting strings in a spherically symmetric configuration (to be referred to as the ``string hedgehog''). When the energy densities associated with the hedgehog are small, we obtain a static geometry, but for higher values, the resulting geometry is that of an anisotropic cosmology. The evolution of bubbles joining two phases, one of which contains a hedgehog (as defined above) is investigated. The role of such configurations in processes that lead to classical false-vacuum destabilization and in the evolution of inflationary bubbles is discussed. The generalization of our results to the gauged case, i.e., to magnetic-monopole hedgehogs, is discussed.

  20. Gravitational field of a hedgehog and the evolution of vacuum bubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Guendelman, E.I. ); Rabinowitz, A. )

    1991-11-15

    The gravitational field produced by a spherically symmetric hedgehog'' configuration in scalar field theories with global SO(3) symmetry (or higher) is studied in the limit in which these models become nonlinear {sigma} models. The same gravitational effect can be generated by a set of cosmic strings intersecting at a point, in the limit that one considers a continuous distribution of such intersecting strings in a spherically symmetric configuration (to be referred to as the string hedgehog''). When the energy densities associated with the hedgehog are small, we obtain a static geometry, but for higher values, the resulting geometry is that of an anisotropic cosmology. The evolution of bubbles joining two phases, one of which contains a hedgehog (as defined above) is investigated. The role of such configurations in processes that lead to classical false-vacuum destabilization and in the evolution of inflationary bubbles is discussed. The generalization of our results to the gauged case, i.e., to magnetic-monopole hedgehogs, is discussed.

  1. Isotope effects and bond softening in intense-laser-field multiphoton dissociation of H[sub 2][sup +

    SciTech Connect

    Miret-Artes, S. ); Atabek, O. )

    1994-02-01

    Isotope effects in the H[sub 2][sup +-]D[sub 2][sup +] fragmentation by intense laser fields offer the possibility of a multiphoton interpretation of the bond-softening mechanism. Surprisingly, the calculations indicate that the one-photon dissociation of D[sub 2][sup +] is favored with respect to that of H[sub 2][sup +]. This cannot be understood, as has previously been done, by a single-photon mechanism following tunneling through a lowered potential barrier, obviously more transparent for the lighter H[sub 2][sup +]. It is rather a competition between this single-photon mechanism and a five-photon mechanism which is suggested for a more realistic interpretation.

  2. New insights into the Glacial to Holocene climatic evolution of Southern Patagonia from lacustrine lipid biomarker isotope records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockun, K.; Mollenhauer, G.; Sachse, D.; Schefuß, E.

    2015-12-01

    Southern Patagonia is a key region for paleoclimatic reconstructions in the Southern Hemisphere as it is the only landmass located in the Southern Hemisphere westerly wind (SHW) belt. Within the framework of the ICDP drilling campaign PASADO ("Potrok Aike Maar Lake Sediment Archive Drilling Project"), a high resolution sediment record was recovered from Laguna Potrok Aike (LPTA, 51°58´S, 70°23´W). In order to identify the sources of organic matter contributions to the sedimentary archive, we investigated long-chain n-alkanes as tracers for terrestrial and aquatic plants. We analysed n-alkane distributions and their compound-specific hydrogen (δD) and stable carbon (δ13C) isotopic composition in various sample types such as soils, dust, aquatic and terrestrial plants and lake surface sediments. Based on two different model approaches, one using the n-alkane distributions and the other the compound-specific isotope values, we traced the origin of mid- (n-C23) and long- (n-C29) chain n-alkanes into modern lake sediments. Both models yield similar results: around 70% of the n-C23 originates from aquatic plants and more than 80% of the n-C29 is delivered from dust and terrestrial plants to the sediment. These results provide the basis for a robust paleo-environmental reconstruction of the lipid biomarker isotope records from LPTA. Compound-specific δD and δ13C records for the last 55,000 years from the PASADO core are interpreted in the framework of these findings. Here, δD of the n-C23 alkane serves as proxy for lake water isotopic changes driven by the precipitation-evaporation balance, moisture sources and water column stratification. In contrast, we interpret changes in δD of the n-C29 alkane to reflect dust source area changes and therefore, the intensity of the SHW. A 50‰ shift in the δD record of the n-C23 alkane between 10.000 to 8.000 years age indicates a major hydrological change affecting the lake level while isotopic changes in the n-C29 alkane

  3. Spatial and temporal evolution of lead isotope ratios in the North Atlantic Ocean between 1981 and 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Dominik; Boyle, Edward A.; Wu, Jingfeng; Chavagnac, ValéRie; Michel, Anna; Reuer, Matthew K.

    2003-10-01

    Lead concentrations and isotope ratios were measured in North Atlantic surface water samples collected in 1981 (29°-79°N, 6°E-49°W) and in 1989 (23°-39°N, 29°-68°W). In the early 1980s, 206Pb/207Pb ratios in the North African Basin averaged 1.193 ± 0.005 (1 σ). Similar radiogenic ratios within the level of analytical precision (average 0.29%) were found in the Labrador and Iceland Basins (1.198 ± 0.006) and in the Norwegian Sea (1.196 ± 0.008). These radiogenic mixed layer signatures along with atmospheric global lead emission patterns suggest that most North Atlantic lead in the early 1980s was derived from North American leaded gasoline. Samples in the East Iberian Basin near Portugal and France showed lower 206Pb/207Pb ratios, between 1.167 and 1.182, indicating a significant influence of less radiogenic atmospheric lead transported from Europe and possibly the influence of the Rio Tinto acid mine drainage very close to shore in the Gulf of Cadiz. [Pb] across the entire North Atlantic Basin ranged between 54 and 145 pmol/kg, with the lowest values (54-74 pmol/kg) found at high latitudes (>65°N). In the late 1980s, surface waters in the western subtropical North Atlantic (North American Basin/Sargasso Sea, >47°W) and in the eastern subtropical North Atlantic (North African Basin/Central Iberian Basin, <45°W) showed very similar 206Pb/207Pb signatures with little zonal variation, ranging from 1.177 to 1.192. Lead concentrations ranged between 47 and 137 pmol/kg, increasing slightly from west to east. South of 25°N in the equatorial North Atlantic, crossing the subtropical/tropical surface water boundary, the 206Pb/207Pb seawater signatures were significantly less radiogenic (1.170-1.175) and concentrations were lower (≤51 pmol/kg). This difference suggests a relative increase in the atmospheric lead supply from the western Mediterranean/North African continent via Trade Easterlies and illustrates the effective barrier between the subtropical

  4. O(6)-symmetry breaking in the {gamma}-soft nucleus {sup 126}Xe and its evolution in the light stable xenon isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Coquard, L.; Pietralla, N.; Leske, J.; Moeller, O.; Moeller, T.; Rainovski, G.; Ahn, T.; Bettermann, L.; Rother, W.; Carpenter, M. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Lister, C. J.; Zhu, S.; Werner, V.

    2011-04-15

    Low-lying collective states in {sup 126}Xe have been investigated via the {sup 12}C({sup 126}Xe,{sup 126}Xe{sup *}) projectile Coulomb excitation reaction at 399 MeV. The {gamma} decays were detected with the Gammasphere array. Coulomb excitation cross sections relative to the 2{sub 1}{sup +} state were obtained. Twenty-two absolute E2 transition strengths have been deduced. An sd- interacting boson model (IBM-1) fit agrees well with the new experimental data. This makes a quantitative test of O(6)-symmetry breaking in {sup 126}Xe possible. The measured absolute B(E2) values indicate a preservation of O(5) symmetry, while the O(6) symmetry is broken. The evolution of O(6)-symmetry breaking and of O(5)-symmetry conservation in the {sup 124,126,128}Xe isotopic chain is discussed.

  5. Phase-field model simulation of ferroelectric/antiferroelectric materials microstructure evolution under multiphysics loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingyi

    Ferroelectric (FE) and closely related antiferroelectric (AFE) materials have unique electromechanical properties that promote various applications in the area of capacitors, sensors, generators (FE) and high density energy storage (AFE). These smart materials with extensive applications have drawn wide interest in the industrial and scientific world because of their reliability and tunable property. However, reliability issues changes its paradigms and requires guidance from detailed mechanism theory as the materials applications are pushed for better performance. A host of modeling work were dedicated to study the macro-structural behavior and microstructural evolution in FE and AFE material under various conditions. This thesis is focused on direct observation of domain evolution under multiphysics loading for both FE and AFE material. Landau-Devonshire time-dependent phase field models were built for both materials, and were simulated in finite element software Comsol. In FE model, dagger-shape 90 degree switched domain was observed at preexisting crack tip under pure mechanical loading. Polycrystal structure was tested under same condition, and blocking effect of the growth of dagger-shape switched domain from grain orientation difference and/or grain boundary was directly observed. AFE ceramic model was developed using two sublattice theory, this model was used to investigate the mechanism of energy efficiency increase with self-confined loading in experimental tests. Consistent results was found in simulation and careful investigation of calculation results gave confirmation that origin of energy density increase is from three aspects: self-confinement induced inner compression field as the cause of increase of critical field, fringe leak as the source of elevated saturation polarization and uneven defects distribution as the reason for critical field shifting and phase transition speed. Another important affecting aspect in polycrystalline materials is the

  6. Sr-Nd isotope data of basement rocks from the northernmost argentine Precordillera and its implications for the early Paleozoic evolution of SW Gondwana margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martina, Federico; Astini, Ricardo A.; Pimentel, Marcio M.

    2014-12-01

    The Precordillera terrane (Cuyania) in western Argentina is commonly accepted as an exotic fragment derived from Laurentia in the Early Paleozoic. Evidence supporting such an interpretation is manly based on similarities in the sedimentary cover successions and their paleontological content. Little is known about the basement of the Precordillera terrane. Its isotopic characterization is essential to better constrain the present areal distribution of the terrane and it may provide more insight into the pre-rifting evolution of the Precordillera terrane along the Iapetan margin of Laurentia. We present new Sr and Nd isotope data of pre-Late Ordovician meta-igneous rocks from the Río Bonete region in NW Argentina, interpreted as the northernmost extent of the Precordillera. The Nd systematics of the Río Bonete basement rocks including greenschists and metagabbros (ɛNd(470) = +2.14--0.19; TDM = 0.99-1.2 Ga), a garnet-amphibolite (ɛNd(470) = -0.53; TDM = 1.32 Ga) and a quartz-phyllite (ɛNd(470) = -3.83; TDM = 1.55 Ga), are similar to other pre-Ordovician meta-igneous rocks from Sierra de Umango, Pie de Palo and the Ullum xenoliths, usually interpreted as the basement of the Precordillera terrane. Nd model ages around 1.2 Ga are also typical from the Mesoproterozoic Grenvillian basement of southern North America, currently exposed in the Llano region. In addition, the greenschists and metagabbros show a robust correlation with the Late Neoproterozoic Catoctin volcanics in the central Appalachians. The Sr isotope data (when not disturbed) also supports this novel interpretation and suggests the presence of the Blue Ridge rifting event in Precordillera. According to our interpretation, some lithotypes included within the basement complex of the Río Bonete area belonged to the basement of the Precordillera terrane supporting previous correlation between both regions.

  7. Lipid Biomarkers and Carbon Isotope Ratios of Lipids Isolated from Acid Mine Drainage Biofilms: Dual Biosignatures for Eukaryotic Evolution and Oxygenation of Primitive Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, S.; Fang, J.; Zhang, L.; Li, J.

    2012-12-01

    Lipid analysis and carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) of lipids in biofilms in an acid mine drainage site (AMD) site in western Indiana revealed unique biogeochemical signatures of microeukaryotes, never recorded before. Dominance of photosynthetic microeukaryote Euglena was indicated by the detection of abundant phytadiene, phytol, phytanol, polyunsaturated n-alkenes, polyunsaturated fatty acids, short-chain (C25-32) wax esters (WE), ergosterol, and tocopherols. The WE were probably synthesized in mitochondria under anoxic conditions by the reverse β-oxidation pathway, whereas the sterols (ergosterol and ergosta-7,22-dien-3β-ol) were likely synthesized in the cytosol in the presence of molecular oxygen. The dual aerobic and anaerobic biosynthetic pathways of Euglena may be a response to survive the recurring anoxic and oxic conditions in primitive Earth, whereby microeukaryotes retained this mechanism of conserved compartmentalization within their physiology to evolve and diversify in extreme conditions. Hydrocarbons, including n-alkenes, phytadienes, and wax esters showed heavy δ13C values than usual. The primary cause for the 13C-enrichment can be attributed to a CO2-limiting system that exists in the AMD, which is further regulated by the pH of the AMD. Floating biofilms BF2, 4, and 6 showed more depleted δ13C values for phytadienes and n-alkenes (average of -23.6‰) as compared to benthic biofilm BF5 (average of -20.8‰), indicating that physiology plays an important role in isotopic discrimination. 13C-enriched values of the esters could result from kinetic isotope effects at two branch points (pyruvate and/or acetyl CoA) in the biosynthetic pathway. Our understanding of biogeochemical conditions in this AMD environment would allow us to identify unique sets of biosignatures that can act as a proxy in deciphering the links between eukaryotic evolutions, oxygenation of the early atmosphere, formation of BIF, and possibly iron-rich extraterrestrial

  8. Radiogenic p-isotopes from type Ia supernova, nuclear physics uncertainties, and galactic chemical evolution compared with values in primitive meteorites

    SciTech Connect

    Travaglio, C.; Gallino, R.; Rauscher, T.; Dauphas, N.; Röpke, F. K.; Hillebrandt, W. E-mail: claudia.travaglio@b2fh.org

    2014-11-10

    The nucleosynthesis of proton-rich isotopes is calculated for multi-dimensional Chandrasekhar-mass models of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) with different metallicities. The predicted abundances of the short-lived radioactive isotopes {sup 92}Nb, {sup 97,} {sup 98}Tc, and {sup 146}Sm are given in this framework. The abundance seeds are obtained by calculating s-process nucleosynthesis in the material accreted onto a carbon-oxygen white dwarf from a binary companion. A fine grid of s-seeds at different metallicities and {sup 13}C-pocket efficiencies is considered. A galactic chemical evolution model is used to predict the contribution of SN Ia to the solar system p-nuclei composition measured in meteorites. Nuclear physics uncertainties are critical to determine the role of SNe Ia in the production of {sup 92}Nb and {sup 146}Sm. We find that, if standard Chandrasekhar-mass SNe Ia are at least 50% of all SN Ia, they are strong candidates for reproducing the radiogenic p-process signature observed in meteorites.

  9. Radiogenic p-isotopes from Type Ia Supernova, Nuclear Physics Uncertainties, and Galactic Chemical Evolution Compared with Values in Primitive Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travaglio, C.; Gallino, R.; Rauscher, T.; Dauphas, N.; Röpke, F. K.; Hillebrandt, W.

    2014-11-01

    The nucleosynthesis of proton-rich isotopes is calculated for multi-dimensional Chandrasekhar-mass models of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) with different metallicities. The predicted abundances of the short-lived radioactive isotopes 92Nb, 97, 98Tc, and 146Sm are given in this framework. The abundance seeds are obtained by calculating s-process nucleosynthesis in the material accreted onto a carbon-oxygen white dwarf from a binary companion. A fine grid of s-seeds at different metallicities and 13C-pocket efficiencies is considered. A galactic chemical evolution model is used to predict the contribution of SN Ia to the solar system p-nuclei composition measured in meteorites. Nuclear physics uncertainties are critical to determine the role of SNe Ia in the production of 92Nb and 146Sm. We find that, if standard Chandrasekhar-mass SNe Ia are at least 50% of all SN Ia, they are strong candidates for reproducing the radiogenic p-process signature observed in meteorites.

  10. CARBON AND OXYGEN ISOTOPIC ANALYSIS: BUG, CHEROKEE, AND PATTERSON CANYON FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH

    SciTech Connect

    David E. Eby; Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; Kevin McClure; Craig D. Morgan; Stephen T. Nelson

    2003-12-01

    Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

  11. Application of {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr, {delta}{sup 18}O and {delta}{sup 13}C Isotopes to diagenesis, correlation and connectivity of a fractured chalk reservoir, the Sidi El Kilani Field Tunisia

    SciTech Connect

    Mearns, E.W.; Mcbride, J.J.; Bramwell, M.

    1995-08-01

    Strontium Stratigraphy Analysis of the primary matrix chalk of the Abiod Formation reservoir in the Sidi El Kilani Field indicate a Campanian to Maastrichtian age (Upper Cretaceous). A resolution of {+-}1Ma has been achieved and results suggest that there are no major stratigraphic breaks in the studied sequences. Sr-O-C isotope data from early fracture-filling calcite cements suggest they may have formed by the redistribution of CaCO{sub 3} from underlying carbonate sequences and may have precipitated at temperatures in the region of 35-55{degrees}C. The {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr isotope ratios of formation waters determined by residual salt analysis (SrRSA) suggest that the chemical evolution of waters during reservoir filling was controlled by the influx of basinal waters as opposed to in situ water-rock interaction. Late, fracture-filling dolomite and barite cements have Sr-O-C isotope characteristics consistent with precipitation from these migrating basinal fluids at temperatures similar to current reservoir conditions (70-75{degrees}C). Sr RSA results suggest that the reservoir section in two of the wells may have been in direct lateral communication at the time of oil emplacement. These wells however are separated by a strike-slip fault. The SrRSA results therefore suggest that the fault is a partial barrier which has restricted pressure equilibration in the relatively short timescale of oil production, but which may have allowed homogenization of Sr isotope ratios in formation water.

  12. Intercolony variability of skeletal oxygen and carbon isotope ratios of corals: temperature-controlled tank experiment and field observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)