Science.gov

Sample records for field large bore

  1. Design of HQ -- a High Field Large Bore Nb3Sn Quadrupole Magnet for LARP

    SciTech Connect

    Felice, H.; Ambrosio, G.; Anerella, M.; Bossert, R.; Caspi, S.; Cheng, D.; Dietderich, D.; Ferracin, P.; Ghosh, A. K.; Hafalia, R.; Hannaford, C. R.; Kashikhin, V.; Schmalze, J.; Prestemon, S.; Sabbi, G. L.; Wanderer, P.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2008-08-17

    In support of the Large Hadron Collider luminosity upgrade, a large bore (120 mm) Nb{sub 3}Sn quadrupole with 15 T peak coil field is being developed within the framework of the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP). The 2-layer design with a 15 mm wide cable is aimed at pre-stress control, alignment and field quality while exploring the magnet performance limits in terms of gradient, forces and stresses. In addition, HQ will determine the magnetic, mechanical, and thermal margins of Nb{sub 3}Sn technology with respect to the requirements of the luminosity upgrade at the LHC.

  2. Behavior of a Field-Reversed Configuration Translated into a Large-Bore Confinement Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Jun'ichi; Asai, Tomohiko; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Ando, Hirotoshi; Inomoto, Michiaki; Takahashi, Toshiki; Steinhauer, Loren C.

    To demonstrate additional heating and control methods a new field-reversed configuration (FRC) machine called FAT (FRC Amplification via Translation) has begun operations. FAT has a field-reversed theta-pinch (FRTP) plasma source and a large-bore confinement chamber. In the initial experiments on FAT, fast FRC translation and trapping with the translation speeds 70 to 210 km/s has been performed successfully. The typical elongation of the trapped FRC is approximately 3. Disruptive global instability, such as tilt, is not observed.

  3. Bore-sight calibration of the profile laser scanner using a large size exterior calibration field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koska, Bronislav; Křemen, Tomáš; Štroner, Martin

    2014-10-01

    The bore-sight calibration procedure and results of a profile laser scanner using a large size exterior calibration field is presented in the paper. The task is a part of Autonomous Mapping Airship (AMA) project which aims to create s surveying system with specific properties suitable for effective surveying of medium-wide areas (units to tens of square kilometers per a day). As is obvious from the project name an airship is used as a carrier. This vehicle has some specific properties. The most important properties are high carrying capacity (15 kg), long flight time (3 hours), high operating safety and special flight characteristics such as stability of flight, in terms of vibrations, and possibility to flight at low speed. The high carrying capacity enables using of high quality sensors like professional infrared (IR) camera FLIR SC645, high-end visible spectrum (VIS) digital camera and optics in the visible spectrum and tactical grade INSGPS sensor iMAR iTracerRT-F200 and profile laser scanner SICK LD-LRS1000. The calibration method is based on direct laboratory measuring of coordinate offset (lever-arm) and in-flight determination of rotation offsets (bore-sights). The bore-sight determination is based on the minimization of squares of individual point distances from measured planar surfaces.

  4. Large-bore pipe decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Ebadian, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    The decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of 1200 buildings within the US Department of Energy-Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Complex will require the disposition of miles of pipe. The disposition of large-bore pipe, in particular, presents difficulties in the area of decontamination and characterization. The pipe is potentially contaminated internally as well as externally. This situation requires a system capable of decontaminating and characterizing both the inside and outside of the pipe. Current decontamination and characterization systems are not designed for application to this geometry, making the direct disposal of piping systems necessary in many cases. The pipe often creates voids in the disposal cell, which requires the pipe to be cut in half or filled with a grout material. These methods are labor intensive and costly to perform on large volumes of pipe. Direct disposal does not take advantage of recycling, which could provide monetary dividends. To facilitate the decontamination and characterization of large-bore piping and thereby reduce the volume of piping required for disposal, a detailed analysis will be conducted to document the pipe remediation problem set; determine potential technologies to solve this remediation problem set; design and laboratory test potential decontamination and characterization technologies; fabricate a prototype system; provide a cost-benefit analysis of the proposed system; and transfer the technology to industry. This report summarizes the activities performed during fiscal year 1997 and describes the planned activities for fiscal year 1998. Accomplishments for FY97 include the development of the applicable and relevant and appropriate regulations, the screening of decontamination and characterization technologies, and the selection and initial design of the decontamination system.

  5. Large Bore Powder Gun Qualification (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Rabern, Donald A.; Valdiviez, Robert

    2012-04-02

    A Large Bore Powder Gun (LBPG) is being designed to enable experimentalists to characterize material behavior outside the capabilities of the NNSS JASPER and LANL TA-55 PF-4 guns. The combination of these three guns will create a capability to conduct impact experiments over a wide range of pressures and shock profiles. The Large Bore Powder Gun will be fielded at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) U1a Complex. The Complex is nearly 1000 ft below ground with dedicated drifts for testing, instrumentation, and post-shot entombment. To ensure the reliability, safety, and performance of the LBPG, a qualification plan has been established and documented here. Requirements for the LBPG have been established and documented in WE-14-TR-0065 U A, Large Bore Powder Gun Customer Requirements. The document includes the requirements for the physics experiments, the gun and confinement systems, and operations at NNSS. A detailed description of the requirements is established in that document and is referred to and quoted throughout this document. Two Gun and Confinement Systems will be fielded. The Prototype Gun will be used primarily to characterize the gun and confinement performance and be the primary platform for qualification actions. This gun will also be used to investigate and qualify target and diagnostic modifications through the life of the program (U1a.104 Drift). An identical gun, the Physics Gun, will be fielded for confirmatory and Pu experiments (U1a.102D Drift). Both guns will be qualified for operation. The Gun and Confinement System design will be qualified through analysis, inspection, and testing using the Prototype Gun for the majority of process. The Physics Gun will be qualified through inspection and a limited number of qualification tests to ensure performance and behavior equivalent to the Prototype gun. Figure 1.1 shows the partial configuration of U1a and the locations of the Prototype and Physics Gun/Confinement Systems.

  6. Ultrasonic Phased Array Sound Field Mapping Through Large-Bore Coarse Grained Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel (CASS) Piping Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Hathaway, John E.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2012-04-16

    A sound field beam mapping exercise was conducted to further understand the effects of coarse grained microstructures found in CASS materials on phased array ultrasonic wave propagation. Laboratory measurements were made on three CASS specimens with different microstructures; the specimens were polished and etched to reveal measurable grain sizes, shapes and orientations. Three longitudinal, phased array probes were fixed on a specimen's outside diameter with the sound field directed toward one end (face) of the pipe segment over a fixed range of angles. A point receiver was raster scanned over the surface of the specimen face generating a sound field image. A slice of CASS material was then removed from the specimen end and the beam mapping exercise repeated. The sound fields acquired were analyzed for spot size, coherency, and beam redirection. Analyses were conducted between the resulting sound fields and the microstructural characteristics of each specimen.

  7. Phased Array Ultrasonic Sound Field Mapping through Large-Bore Coarse Grained Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel (CASS) Components

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Susan L.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Coble, Jamie B.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2012-09-01

    A sound field beam mapping exercise was conducted to assist in understanding the effects of coarse-grained microstructures found in cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) materials on acoustic longitudinal wave propagation. Ultrasonic laboratory measurements were made on three specimens representing four different grain structures. Phased array (PA) probes were fixed on each specimen surface and excited in the longitudinal mode at specific angles while a point receiver was scanned in a raster pattern over the end of the specimen, generating a transmitted sound field image. Three probes operating at nominal frequencies of 0.5, 0.8, and 1.0 MHz were used. A 6.4 mm (0.25-in.) thick slice was removed from the specimen end and beam mapping was repeated three times, yielding four full sets of beam images. Data were collected both with a constant part path for each configuration (probe, specimen and slice, angle, etc.) and with a variable part path (fixed position on the surface). The base specimens and slices were then polished and etched to reveal measureable grain microstructures that were compared to the sound field interactions and scattering effects seen in the collected data.

  8. DETAIL VIEW OF LARGE BORE HOLE, SHOWING TRIANGULAR SHAPE FORMED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF LARGE BORE HOLE, SHOWING TRIANGULAR SHAPE FORMED BY CHISEL METHOD OF DRILLING - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 3, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  9. VIEW OF PARALLEL LINE OF LARGE BORE HOLES IN NORTHERN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF PARALLEL LINE OF LARGE BORE HOLES IN NORTHERN QUARRY AREA, FACING NORTHEAST - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 2, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  10. DETAIL OF TWO LARGE BORE HOLES ON TOP OF SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF TWO LARGE BORE HOLES ON TOP OF SOUTH QUARRY WALL, FACING NORTH - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 1, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  11. View of four large bore holes on top of quarry ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of four large bore holes on top of quarry wall, facing northeast - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 4, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  12. Conceptual design of large-bore superconducting quadrupoles with active magnetic shielding for the AHF

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimir Kashikhin et al.

    2003-06-09

    The Advanced Hydrotest Facility, under study by LANL, uses large-bore superconducting quadrupole magnets. In the paper we discuss the conceptual design of such quadrupoles using active shielding. The magnets are specified to achieve gradients of up to 24 T/m with a 28-cm warm bore and to have 0.01% field quality. Concepts for quench protection and the magnet cryosystems are also briefly discussed to confirm the viability of the proposed design.

  13. Mechanical design of a large bore quadrupole triplet magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, S.; Caylor, R.; Fong, E.; Tanabe, J.

    1987-03-01

    The mechanical design and construction of a 1 meter bore, low gradient quadrupole triplet is described. The magnet will be used for focussing a proton beam in accelerator studies of neutral particle at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. A significant feature of this magnet design is the precision location of the coil conductors within the steel yoke tube. Each of the quadrupole coils have been fabricated from water cooled aluminum conductor, wound in a cosine 2-theta geometry. The conductor bundles have been wound to a positional accuracy within +-0.050 cm which was required to reduce the harmonic content to less than 0.04% of the quadrupole field. Important aspects of the design, construction and assembly are described.

  14. In-bore instrumentation/diagnostics for large-bore EMLs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Michael J.; Ager, Scott A.; Hudson, Roger D.

    1991-01-01

    A program has been initiated to determine the feasibility of making measurement of EML (electromagnetic launcher) parameters onboard a projectile. This technique utilizes off-the-shelf components in a configuration that has been proven effective in measuring projectile acceleration in the bore of propellant-driven guns. The goals of the in-bore instrumentation/diagnostics (IBID) testing program are to demonstrate the feasibility of instrumenting EML projectiles with a high-shock accelerometer (200 kgee), a high-shock recorder (100 kgee), and batteries (to power the onboard memory), while obtaining direct, continuous, and reliable acceleration profiles. From these, accurate projectile velocity may be obtained by integration for any position in the barrel. Another goal is to demonstrate instrumentation and recorded data survivability at as high an acceleration and velocity as possible. Having established feasibility, the technique could easily be extended to other EML parameters.

  15. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF NOX CONTROL ON A SPARK-IGNITED LARGE BORE RECIPROCATING INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE. VOLUME 2. DATA SUPPLEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volume II of the report is a compendium of detailed emission and test data from field tests of a large-bore, spark-ignited reciprocating engine and laboratory analyses of collected samples. The engine was tested in two operating modes: a baseline (normal) operation, and with incr...

  16. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF NOX CONTROL ON A COMPRESSION IGNITION LARGE BORE RECIPROCATING INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE. VOLUME 1. TECHNICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volume I of the report gives emission results from field tests of the exhaust gas from a large-bore, compression-ignition reciprocating engine burning diesel fuel. An objective of the tests was to evaluate the operating efficiency of the engine with combustion modification NOx co...

  17. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF NOX CONTROL ON A COMPRESSION IGNITION LARGE BORE RECIPROCATING INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE. VOLUME 2. DATA SUPPLEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volume II of the report is a compendium of detailed emission and test data from field tests of a large-bore, compression-ignition reciprocating engine burning diesel fuel. The engine was tested during two operating modes: at baseline (normal operation), and with fuel injection re...

  18. Ion beams extraction and measurements of plasma parameters on a multi-frequencies microwaves large bore ECRIS with permanent magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Nozaki, Dai; Kiriyama, Ryutaro; Takenaka, Tomoya; Kurisu, Yosuke; Yano, Keisuke; Sato, Fuminobu; Kato, Yushi; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2012-11-06

    We have developed an all-permanent magnet large bore electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) for broad ion beam processing. The cylindrically comb-shaped magnetic field configuration is adopted for efficient plasma production and good magnetic confinement. To compensate for disadvantages of fixed magnetic configuration, a traveling wave tube amplifier (TWTA) is used. In the comb-shaped ECRIS, it is difficult to achieve controlling ion beam profiles in the whole inside the chamber by using even single frequency-controllable TWTA (11-13GHz), because of large bore size with all-magnets. We have tried controlling profiles of plasma parameters and then those of extracted ion beams by launching two largely different frequencies simultaneously, i.e., multi-frequencies microwaves. Here we report ion beam profiles and corresponding plasma parameters under various experimental conditions, dependence of ion beams against extraction voltages, and influence of different electrode positions on the electron density profile.

  19. Development of the large-bore powder gun for the Nevada Test Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esparza, James; Jensen, Brian

    2009-06-01

    Past fundamental work at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) U1a complex has been performed using explosively-driven flyer plates which provide high-pressure loading at the expense of some shock. In contrast, plate-impact experiments on single stage guns provide very planar loading conditions suitable for studying complex phenomena such as phase transitions and material strength, and provide important data useful for constraining and validating predictive models. The objective of the current work was to develop a large-bore powder gun capable of accelerating projectiles to moderately high velocity for impact experiments at NTS. This gun will span a performance gap between existing gun facilities and provide a means of examining phenomena over a wide range of stresses and time-scales. Advantages of the large-bore gun include the capability to load multiple samples simultaneously, the use of large diameter samples that significantly extend the time duration of the experiment, and minimal tilt. This new capability required the development of a disposable confinement system that used an explosively driven closure method to prevent contamination from moving up into the gun system. Experimental results of the qualification testing of the large-bore gun, the confinement system, and the explosively driven valve will be presented.

  20. Modeling of propellant flow and explosively-driven valve for the Large-Bore Powder Gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Kin

    2013-06-01

    The Large-Bore Powder Gun, with a 3.5-inch bore, is being developed to provide dynamic experiments on physics samples at the Nevada Test Site with impact velocities exceeding 2 km/s. A confinement system is required to seal the target chamber from the gun system to keep it free of hazardous materials from the impact event. A key component of the confinement system is an explosively driven valve (EDV), which uses a small amount of explosive (PBX 9501) to drive an aluminum piston perpendicular to the barrel axis into a tapered hole. The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of the EDV design via computational simulations using models validated with prototype experiments. We first established the gun performance characteristics using an interior ballistics code. Then an energy source model capable of generating the kinematics (i.e., pressure, velocity and displacement profiles) as predicted by the interior ballistic code is used in the hydrodynamics code CTH to calculate the M14 propellant gas expansion as the projectile travels down the gun barrel with the goal of obtaining the lateral (stagnation) pressure load on the EDV piston as it is inserted into the bore. A model of the EDV operation validated against stand-alone experiments is also developed. The gas flow and EDV models are combined to simulate integrated tests as well as the operating conditions specified for qualification. Results from these simulations and those involving design modifications to improve the confinement will be presented.

  1. Developing of the large-bore powder gun for the Nevada test site

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Brian J; Esparza, James S

    2009-01-01

    Plate-impact experiments on single stage guns provide very planar loading conditions suitable for studying complex phenomena such as phase transitions and material strength, and provide important data useful for constraining and validating predictive models. The objective of the current work was to develop a large-bore (3.5-inches or greater) powder gun capable of accelerating projectiles to moderately high velocities (greater than 2.25 km/s) for impact experiments at Nevada Test Site. This gun will span a performance gap between existing gun facilities and provide a means of examining phenomena over a wide range of stresses and time-scales. Advantages of the large-bore gun include the capability to load multiple samples simultaneously, the use of large diameter samples that significantly extend the time duration of the experiment, and minimal tilt (no bow). This new capability required the development of a disposable confinement system that used an explosively driven closure method to prevent contamination from moving up into the gun system. Experimental results for both the gun system and the explosive valve are presented.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF THE LARGE-BORE POWDER GUN FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, B.J.; Esparza, J.

    2009-12-28

    Plate-impact experiments on single stage guns provide very planar loading conditions suitable for studying complex phenomena such as phase transitions and material strength, and provide important data useful for constraining and validating predictive models. The objective of the current work was to develop a large-bore (3.5'' or greater) powder gun capable of accelerating projectiles to moderately high velocities (greater than 2.25 km/s) for impact experiments at Nevada Test Site. This gun will span a performance gap between existing gun facilities and provide a means of examining phenomena over a wide range of stresses and time-scales. Advantages of the large-bore gun include the capability to load multiple samples simultaneously, the use of large diameter samples that significantly extend the time duration of the experiment, and minimal tilt (no bow). This new capability required the development of a disposable confinement system that used an explosively driven closure method to prevent contamination from moving up into the gun system. Experimental results for both the gun system and the explosive valve are presented.

  3. Design of a Large Bore 60-T Pulse Magnet for Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    LESCH,B.; LI,L.; PERNAMBUCO-WISE,P.; ROVANG,DEAN C.; SCHNEIDER-MUNTAU,H.J.

    1999-09-23

    The design of a new pulsed magnet system for the generation of intense electron beams is presented. Determined by the required magnetic field profile along the axis, the magnet system consists of two coils (Coil No.1 and No.2) separated by a 32-mm axial gap. Each coil is energized independently. Both coils are internally reinforced with HIM Zylon fiber/epoxy composite. Coil No.1 made with AI-15 Glidcop wire has a bore of 110-mm diameter and is 200-mm long; it is energized by a 1.3-MJ, 13-kV capacitor bank. The magnetic field at the center of this coil is 30 T. Coil No.2 made with CuNb wire has a bore of 45 mm diameter, generates 60 T with a pulse duration of 60 ms, and is powered by a 4.0-MJ, 17.7-kV capacitor bank. We present design criteria, the coupling of the magnets, and the normal and the fault conditions during operation.

  4. Report on the development of the large-bore powder gun for the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    B.J. Jensen

    2009-03-01

    Experiments are needed to locate phase boundaries and to provide both Hugoniot data and off-Hugoniot data (such as principle isentrope, refreezing, dynamic strength, etc.) achieved through complex loading paths. The objective of the current work was to de- velop a large bore (3.5 inch or greater) powder gun capable of accelerating projectiles to moderately high velocities exceeding 2 km/s for impact experiments. A total of 24 ex- periments were performed to measure the projectile velocity, breech strain, and projectile tilt to demonstrate the performance of the gun up to the maximum breech capacity of 16 pounds of propellant. Physics experiments using a multislug method were performed to obtain sound speed and Hugoniot for shocked cerium metal and to demonstrate the ability of the large bore gun to conduct well-defined, plate-impact experiments. In addition, six experiments were performed on the prototype containment system to examine the ability of the launcher and containment system to withstand the impact event and contain the propellant gases and impact debris postshot. The data presented here were essential for qualification of the launcher for experiments to be conducted at the U1a complex of the Nevada Test Site.

  5. Simple method for the generation of multiple homogeneous field volumes inside the bore of superconducting magnets

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Ching-Yu; Ferrage, Fabien; Aubert, Guy; Sakellariou, Dimitris

    2015-01-01

    Standard Magnetic Resonance magnets produce a single homogeneous field volume, where the analysis is performed. Nonetheless, several modern applications could benefit from the generation of multiple homogeneous field volumes along the axis and inside the bore of the magnet. In this communication, we propose a straightforward method using a combination of ring structures of permanent magnets in order to cancel the gradient of the stray field in a series of distinct volumes. These concepts were demonstrated numerically on an experimentally measured magnetic field profile. We discuss advantages and limitations of our method and present the key steps required for an experimental validation. PMID:26182891

  6. Atmospheric noise of a breaking tidal bore.

    PubMed

    Chanson, Hubert

    2016-01-01

    A tidal bore is a surge of waters propagating upstream in an estuary as the tidal flow turns to rising and the flood tide propagates into a funnel-shaped system. Large tidal bores have a marked breaking roller. The sounds generated by breaking tidal bores were herein investigated in the field (Qiantang River) and in laboratory. The sound pressure record showed two dominant periods, with some similarity with an earlier study [Chanson (2009). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 125(6), 3561-3568]. The two distinct phases were the incoming tidal bore when the sound amplitude increased with the approaching bore, and the passage of the tidal bore in front of the microphone when loud and powerful noises were heard. The dominant frequency ranged from 57 to 131 Hz in the Qiantang River bore. A comparison between laboratory and prototype tidal bores illustrated both common features and differences. The low pitch sound of the breaking bore had a dominant frequency close to the collective oscillations of bubble clouds, which could be modeled with a bubble cloud model using a transverse dimension of the bore roller. The findings suggest that this model might be over simplistic in the case of a powerful breaking bore, like that of the Qiantang River. PMID:26827000

  7. Predicted and experimental performance of large-bore high-speed ball and roller bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, H. H.

    1983-01-01

    The values of inner and outer race temperature, cage speed, and heat transferred to the lubricant or bearing power loss, calculated using the computer programs Shaberth and Cybean, with the corresponding experimental data for the large bore ball and roller bearings were compared. After the development of computer program, it is important that values calculated using such program are compared with actual bearing performance data to assess the programs predictive capability. Several comprehensive computer programs currently in use are capable of predicting rolling bearing operating and performance characteristics. These programs accept input data of bearing internal geometry, bearing material and lubricant properties, and bearing operating conditions. The programs solve several sets of equations that characterize rolling element bearings. The output produced typically consists of rolling element loads and Hertz stresses, operating contact angles, component speed, heat generation, local temperatures, bearing fatigue life, and power loss. Two of these programs, Shaberth and Cybean were developed.

  8. Optimizing power cylinder lubrication on a large bore natural gas engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luedeman, Matthew R.

    More than 6000 integral compressors, located along America's natural gas pipelines, pump natural gas across the United States. These compressors are powered by 2-stroke, large bore natural gas burning engines. Lowering the operating costs, reducing the emissions, and ensuring that these engines remain compliant with future emission regulations are the drivers for this study. Substantial research has focused on optimizing efficiency and reducing the fuel derived emissions on this class of engine. However, significantly less research has focused on the effect and reduction of lubricating oil derived emissions. This study evaluates the impact of power cylinder lubricating oil on overall engine emissions with an emphasis on reducing oxidation catalyst poisoning. A traditional power cylinder lubricator was analyzed; power cylinder lubricating oil was found to significantly impact exhaust emissions. Lubricating oil was identified as the primary contributor of particulate matter production in a large bore natural gas engine. The particulate matter was determined to be primarily organic carbon, and most likely direct oil carryover of small oil droplets. The particulate matter production equated to 25% of the injected oil at a nominal power cylinder lubrication rate. In addition, power cylinder friction is considered the primary contributor to friction loss in the internal combustion engine. This study investigates the potential for optimizing power cylinder lubrication by controlling power cylinder injection to occur at the optimal time in the piston cycle. By injecting oil directly into the ring pack, it is believed that emissions, catalyst poisoning, friction, and wear can all be reduced. This report outlines the design and theory of two electronically controlled lubrication systems. Experimental results and evaluation of one of the systems is included.

  9. A methodology for laser diagnostics in large-bore marine two-stroke diesel engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hult, J.; Mayer, S.

    2013-04-01

    Large two-stroke diesel engines for marine propulsion offer several challenges to successful implementation of the laser diagnostic techniques applied extensively in smaller automotive engines. For this purpose a fully operational large-bore engine has been modified to allow flexible optical access, through 24 optical ports with clear diameters of 40 mm. By mounting the entire optical set-up directly to the engine, effects of the vigorous vibrations and thermal drifts on alignment can be minimized. Wide-angle observation and illumination, as well as relatively large aperture detection, is made possible through mounting of optical modules and relays inside optical ports. This allows positioning of the last optical element within 10 mm from the cylinder wall. Finally, the implementation on a multi-cylinder engine allows for flexible and independent operation of the optically accessible cylinder for testing purposes. The performance of the integrated optical engine and imaging system developed is demonstrated through laser Mie scattering imaging of fuel jet structures, from which information on liquid penetration and spray angles can be deduced. Double pulse laser-sheet imaging of native in-cylinder structures is also demonstrated, for the purpose of velocimetry.

  10. SU-E-I-20: Comprehensive Quality Assurance Test of Second Generation Toshiba Aquilion Large Bore CT Simulator Based On AAPM TG-66 Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: AAPM radiation therapy committee task group No. 66 (TG-66) published a report which described a general approach to CT simulator QA. The report outlines the testing procedures and specifications for the evaluation of patient dose, radiation safety, electromechanical components, and image quality for a CT simulator. The purpose of this study is to thoroughly evaluate the performance of a second generation Toshiba Aquilion Large Bore CT simulator with 90 cm bore size (Toshiba, Nasu, JP) based on the TG-66 criteria. The testing procedures and results from this study provide baselines for a routine QA program. Methods: Different measurements and analysis were performed including CTDIvol measurements, alignment and orientation of gantry lasers, orientation of the tabletop with respect to the imaging plane, table movement and indexing accuracy, Scanogram location accuracy, high contrast spatial resolution, low contrast resolution, field uniformity, CT number accuracy, mA linearity and mA reproducibility using a number of different phantoms and measuring devices, such as CTDI phantom, ACR image quality phantom, TG-66 laser QA phantom, pencil ion chamber (Fluke Victoreen) and electrometer (RTI Solidose 400). Results: The CTDI measurements were within 20% of the console displayed values. The alignment and orientation for both gantry laser and tabletop, as well as the table movement and indexing and scanogram location accuracy were within 2mm as specified in TG66. The spatial resolution, low contrast resolution, field uniformity and CT number accuracy were all within ACR’s recommended limits. The mA linearity and reproducibility were both well below the TG66 threshold. Conclusion: The 90 cm bore size second generation Toshiba Aquilion Large Bore CT simulator that comes with 70 cm true FOV can consistently meet various clinical needs. The results demonstrated that this simulator complies with the TG-66 protocol in all aspects including electromechanical component

  11. Design of an RF Antenna for a Large0Bore, High Power, Steady State Plasma Processing Chamber for Material Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, D.A.; Freeman, R.L.

    2001-11-07

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC, (Contractor), and Archimedes Technology Group, (Participant) is to evaluate the design of an RF antenna for a large-bore, high power, steady state plasma processing chamber for material separation. Criteria for optimization will be to maximize the power deposition in the plasma while operating at acceptable voltages and currents in the antenna structure. The project objectives are to evaluate the design of an RF antenna for a large-bore, high power, steady state plasma processing chamber for material separation. Criteria for optimization will be to maximize the power deposition in the plasma while operating at acceptable voltages and currents in the antenna structure.

  12. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, paleomagnetism, and evolution of the Boring volcanic field, Oregon and Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleck, Robert J.; Hagstrum, Jonathan T.; Calvert, Andrew T.; Evarts, Russell C.; Conrey, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    The 40Ar/39Ar investigations of a large suite of fine-grained basaltic rocks of the Boring volcanic field (BVF), Oregon and Washington (USA), yielded two primary results. (1) Using age control from paleomagnetic polarity, stratigraphy, and available plateau ages, 40Ar/39Ar recoil model ages are defined that provide reliable age results in the absence of an age plateau, even in cases of significant Ar redistribution. (2) Grouping of eruptive ages either by period of activity or by composition defines a broadly northward progression of BVF volcanism during latest Pliocene and Pleistocene time that reflects rates consistent with regional plate movements. Based on the frequency distribution of measured ages, periods of greatest volcanic activity within the BVF occurred 2.7–2.2 Ma, 1.7–0.5 Ma, and 350–50 ka. Grouped by eruptive episode, geographic distributions of samples define a series of northeast-southwest–trending strips whose centers migrate from south-southeast to north-northwest at an average rate of 9.3 ± 1.6 mm/yr. Volcanic activity in the western part of the BVF migrated more rapidly than that to the east, causing trends of eruptive episodes to progress in an irregular, clockwise sense. The K2O and CaO values of dated samples exhibit well-defined temporal trends, decreasing and increasing, respectively, with age of eruption. Divided into two groups by K2O, the centers of these two distributions define a northward migration rate similar to that determined from eruptive age groups. This age and compositional migration rate of Boring volcanism is similar to the clockwise rotation rate of the Oregon Coast Range with respect to North America, and might reflect localized extension on the trailing edge of that rotating crustal block.

  13. Measurements of an ion beam diameter extracted into air through a large-bore metal capillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Y.; Umigishi, M.; Ishii, K.; Ogawa, H.

    2015-07-01

    To extract an ion beam into air, the technique using a single macro-capillary has been paid attention. We have expanded the bore of the metal capillary up to 500 μm∅ inlet diameter to increase the beam intensity and have measured the intensity distributions of the extracted 3 MeV proton beam. Furthermore, we have tilted the capillary angle and measured the intensity distributions of the ion beam. In this article, we will present the experimental results together with the simulation which takes the tilt angles of the capillary into account.

  14. Lubrication of high-speed, large bore tapered-roller bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Signer, H. R.

    1978-01-01

    The performance of 120.65-mm bore tapered-roller bearings was investigated at shaft speeds up to 15,000 rpm. Temperature distribution and bearing heat generation were determined as a function of shaft speed, radial and thrust loads, lubricant flow rate, and lubricant inlet temperature. Lubricant was supplied either by jets or by a combination of holes through the cone directly to the cone-rib contact and jets at the roller small-end side. Cone-rib lubrication significantly improved high-speed tapered-roller bearing performance, yielding lower cone-face temperatures and lower power loss and allowing lower lubricant flow rates for a given speed condition. Bearing temperatures increased with increased shaft speed and decreased with increased lubricant flow rate. Bearing power loss increased with increased shaft speed and increased lubricant flow rate.

  15. Lubrication of high-speed, large bore tapered-roller bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Signer, H. R.

    1977-01-01

    The performance of 120.65-mm- (4.75-in.-) bore tapered-roller bearings was investigated at shaft speeds up to 15,000 rpm (18,000 DN). Temperature distribution and bearing heat generation were determined as a function of shaft speed, radial and thrust loads, lubricant flow rate, and lubricant inlet temperature. Lubricant was supplied either by jets or by a combination of holes through the cone directly to the cone-rib contact and jets at the roller small-end side. Cone-rib lubrication significantly improved high-speed tapered-roller bearing performance, yielding lower cone-face temperatures and lower power loss and allowing lower lubricant flow rates for a given speed condition. Bearing temperatures increased with increased shaft speed and decreased with increased lubricant flow rate. Bearing power loss increased with increased shaft speed and increased lubricant flow rate.

  16. Large-bore tapered-roller bearing performance and endurance to 2.4 million DN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    The operating characteristics and experimental life estimates for 120.65 mm bore tapered roller bearings of two designs under combined radial and thrust loads were determined. A modified standard bearing design was tested at speeds up to 15,000 rpm. A computer optimized, high speed design was tested at speeds up to 20,000 rpm. Both designs were tested at a combined load of 26,700 N (6000 lb) radial load and and 53,400 N (12,000 lb) thrust load. Advanced helicopter transmissions which require the higher-speed capability of tapered-roller bearings also require higher temperature capability (ref. 2). Thus, materials with temperature capabilities higher than the conventional carburizing steels are required.

  17. Arrangement for measuring the field angle of a magnetic field as a function of axial position within a magnet bore tube

    DOEpatents

    Pidcoe, Stephen V.; Zink, Roger A.; Boroski, William N.; McCaw, William R.

    1993-01-01

    An arrangement for measuring the field angle of a magnetic field as a function of axial position within a magnet bore tube of a magnet such as is used with the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). The arrangement includes a magnetic field alignment gauge that is carried through the magnet bore tube by a positioning shuttle in predetermined increments. The positioning shuttle includes an extensible body assembly which is actuated by an internal piston arrangement. A pair of spaced inflatable cuffs are carried by the body assembly and are selectively actuated in cooperation with pressurizing of the piston to selectively drive the positioning shuttle in an axial direction. Control of the shuttle is provided by programmed electronic computer means located exteriorly of the bore tube and which controls valves provided pressurized fluid to the inflatable cuss and the piston arrangement.

  18. Endurance tests with large-bore tapered-roller bearings to 2.2 million DN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Signer, H. R.; Pinel, S. I.

    1981-01-01

    Endurance life tests were run with standard design and optimized high-speed design 120.65-mm-(4.750-in.-) bore tapered-roller bearings at shaft speeds of 12,500 and 18,500 rpm, respectively. Standard design bearings of vacuum melted AISI 4320 and CBS-1000M, and high-speed design bearings of CBS-1000M and through-hardened AISI M-50 were run under heavy combined radial and thrust load until fatigue failure or until a preset cutoff time of 1100 hours was reached. Standard design bearings made from CBS 1000M material ran to a 10 percent life approximately six times rated catalog life. Twelve identical bearings of AISI 4320 material ran to ten times rated catalog life without failure. Cracking and fracture of the cones of AISI M-50 high-speed design bearings occurred at 18,500 rpm due to high tensile hoop stresses. Four CBS 1000M high-speed design bearings ran to twenty-four times rated catalog life without any spalling, cracking or fracture failures.

  19. Multi-Frequency Microwaves Plasma Production for Active Profile Control of Ion Beams on a Large Bore ECR Ion Source with Permanent Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Naoki; Kato, Yushi; Kiriyama, Ryutaro; Takenaka, Tomoya; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2011-01-07

    A new concept on magnetic field of plasma production and confinement by using permanent magnets, i.e. cylindrically comb-shaped magnets, has been proposed to enhance efficiency of an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma for broad and dense ion beam source under the low pressure and also the low microwave power. The resonance zones corresponding to the fundamental ECR for 2.45 GHz and 11-13 GHz frequency are constructed at different positions. The profiles of the plasma parameters in the ECR ion source are different from each frequency of microwave. Large bore extractor is set at the opposite side against the microwave feeds. It is found that differences of their profiles also appear at those of ion beam profiles. We conducted to launch simultaneously multiplex frequency microwaves controlled individually, and tried to control the profiles of the plasma parameters and then those of extracted ion beam.

  20. Bores In The Mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. M.

    Bores are a special type of propagating hydraulic jump. They are a relatively common wave phenomenon in the Earth's oceans, rivers and lower atmosphere but they have been observed only rarely in the mesosphere. We will review the mesospheric bore phenomenon and present wide-field imaging observations of one particularly bright bore event seen at two widely-spaced (500 km) locations in the south-western United States: McDonald Observatory (MDO), Texas and the Starfire Optical Range (SOR), New Mexico. The measurements were supplemented with radar wind measurements, also made at the SOR, and by Na resonance lidar temperature measurements made at Fort Collins, Colorado, approximately 1100 km to the north of MDO. The multi- diagnostic observations provided evidence that mesospheric bores are associated with ducting regions in the mesosphere which allow them to travel distances of over 1500 km and exhibit lifetimes of over 6 hours.

  1. NOx Reduction with Natural Gas for Lean Large-Bore Engine Applications Using Lean NOx Trap Aftertreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, JE

    2005-02-11

    Large-bore natural gas engines are used for distributed energy and gas compression since natural gas fuel offers a convenient and reliable fuel source via the natural gas pipeline and distribution infrastructure. Lean engines enable better fuel efficiency and lower operating costs; however, NOx emissions from lean engines are difficult to control. Technologies that reduce NOx in lean exhaust are desired to enable broader use of efficient lean engines. Lean NOx trap catalysts have demonstrated greater than 90% NOx reduction in lean exhaust from engines operating with gasoline, diesel, and natural gas fuels. In addition to the clean nature of the technology, lean NOx traps reduce NOx with the fuel source of the engine thereby eliminating the requirement for storage and handling of secondary fuels or reducing agents. A study of lean NOx trap catalysts for lean natural gas engines is presented here. Testing was performed on a Cummins C8.3G (CG-280) engine on a motor dynamometer. Lean NOx trap catalysts were tested for NOx reduction performance under various engine operating conditions, and the utilization of natural gas as the reductant fuel source was characterized. Engine test results show that temperature greatly affects the catalytic processes involved, specifically methane oxidation and NOx storage on the lean NOx trap. Additional studies on a bench flow reactor demonstrate the effect of precious metal loading (a primary cost factor) on lean NOx trap performance at different temperatures. Results and issues related to the potential of the lean NOx trap technology for large-bore engine applications will be discussed.

  2. Surgical Versus Percutaneous Femoral Access for Delivery of Large-Bore Cardiovascular Devices (from the PARTNER Trial).

    PubMed

    McCabe, James M; Huang, Pei-Hsiu; Cohen, David J; Blackstone, Eugene H; Welt, Frederick G P; Davidson, Michael J; Kaneko, Tsuyoshi; Eng, Marvin H; Allen, Keith B; Xu, Ke; Lowry, Ashley M; Lei, Yang; Rajeswaran, Jeevanantham; Brown, David L; Mack, Michael J; Webb, John G; Smith, Craig R; Leon, Martin B; Eisenhauer, Andrew C

    2016-05-15

    It is unclear if surgical exposure confers a risk advantage compared with a percutaneous approach for patients undergoing endovascular procedures requiring large-bore femoral artery access. From the randomized controlled Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valve trials A and B and the continued access registries, a total of 1,416 patients received transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve replacement, of which 857 underwent surgical, and 559 underwent percutaneous access. Thirty-day rates of major vascular complications and quality of life scores were assessed. Propensity matching was used to adjust for unmeasured confounders. Overall, there were 116 major vascular complications (8.2%). Complication rates decreased dramatically during the study period. In unadjusted analysis, major vascular complications were significantly less common in the percutaneous access group (35 [6.3%] vs 81 [9.5%] p = 0.032). However, among 292 propensity-matched pairs, there was no difference in major vascular complications (22 [7.5%] vs 28 [9.6%], p = 0.37). Percutaneous access was associated with fewer total in-hospital vascular complications (46 [16%] vs 66 [23%], p = 0.036), shorter median procedural duration (97 interquartile range [IQR 68 to 166] vs 121 [IQR 78 to 194] minutes, p <0.0001), and median length of stay (4 [IQR 2 to 8] vs 6 [IQR 3 to 10] days, p <0.0001). There were no significant differences in quality of life scores at 30 days. Surgical access for large-bore femoral access does not appear to confer any advantages over percutaneous access and may be associated with more minor vascular complications. PMID:27036077

  3. Assembly and Test of HD2, a 36 mm bore high field Nb3Sn Dipole Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Ferracin, P.; Bingham, B.; Caspi, S.; Cheng, D. W,.; Dietderich, D. R.; Felice, H.; Godeke, A.; Hafalia, A. R.; Hannaford, C. R.; Joseph, J.; Lietzke, A. F.; Lizarazo, J.; Sabbi, G.; Trillaud, F.; Wang, X.

    2008-08-17

    We report on the fabrication, assembly, and test of the Nb{sub 3}Sn dipole magnet HD2. The magnet, aimed at demonstrating the application of Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductor in high field accelerator-type dipoles, features a 36 mm clear bore surrounded by block-type coils with tilted ends. The coil design is optimized to minimize geometric harmonics in the aperture and the magnetic peak field on the conductor in the coil ends. The target bore field of 15 T at 4.3 K is consistent with critical current measurements of extracted strands. The coils are horizontally pre-stressed during assembly using an external aluminum shell pre-tensioned with water-pressurized bladders. Axial pre-loading of the coil ends is accomplished through two end plates and four aluminum tension rods. The strain in coil, shell, and rods is monitored with strain gauges during assembly, cool-down and magnet excitation, and compared with 3D finite element computations. Magnet's training performance, quench locations, and ramp-rate dependence are then analyzed and discussed.

  4. Observations of large-amplitude cross-shore internal bores near the shelf break, Santa Monica Bay, CA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noble, M.A.; Xu, J. P.

    2003-01-01

    Two sets of moorings were deployed along a cross-shelf transect in central Santa Monica bay for four months in the winter of 1998-1999. Both sites had an array of instruments attached to tripods set on the seafloor to monitor currents over the entire water column, surface waves, near-bed temperature, water clarity and suspended sediment. A companion mooring had temperature sensors spaced approximately 10 m apart to measure temperature profiles between the surface and the seafloor. One array was deployed in 70 m of water at a site adjacent to the shelf break, just northwest of a major ocean outfall. The other was deployed on the mid shelf in 35 m of water approximately 6 km from the shelf break site. The subtidal currents in the region flowed parallel to the isobaths with fluctuating time scales around 10 days, a typical coastal-ocean pattern. However, during the falling phase of the barotropic spring tide, sets of large-amplitude, sheared cross-shore current pulses with a duration of 2-5 h were observed at the shelf break site. Currents in these pulses flowed exclusively offshore in a thin layer near the bed with amplitudes reaching 30-40 cm/s. Simultaneously, currents with amplitudes around 15-20 cm/s flowed exclusively onshore in the thicker layer between the offshore flow layer and the sea surface. The net offshore transport was about half the onshore transport. Near-surface isotherms were depressed 30-40 m. These pulses were likely internal bores generated by tidal currents. Bed stresses associated with these events exceeded 3 dynes/cm2. These amplitudes are large enough to resuspend and transport not only fine-grained material, but also medium to coarse sands from the shelf toward the slope. Consequently, the seafloor over the shelf break was swept clear of fine sediments. The data suggest that the internal bores dissipate and are reduced in amplitude as they propagate across this relatively narrow shelf. There is evidence that they reach the 35 m site, but

  5. Conditions for tidal bore formation in convergent alluvial estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonneton, Philippe; Filippini, Andrea Gilberto; Arpaia, Luca; Bonneton, Natalie; Ricchiuto, Mario

    2016-04-01

    Over the last decade there has been an increasing interest in tidal bore dynamics. However most studies have been focused on small-scale bore processes. The present paper describes the first quantitative study, at the estuary scale, of the conditions for tidal bore formation in convergent alluvial estuaries. When freshwater discharge and large-scale spatial variations of the estuary water depth can be neglected, tide propagation in such estuaries is controlled by three main dimensionless parameters: the nonlinearity parameter ε0 , the convergence ratio δ0 and the friction parameter ϕ0. In this paper we explore this dimensionless parameter space, in terms of tidal bore occurrence, from a database of 21 estuaries (8 tidal-bore estuaries and 13 non tidal-bore estuaries). The field data point out that tidal bores occur for convergence ratios close to the critical convergence δc. A new proposed definition of the friction parameter highlights a clear separation on the parameter plane (ϕ0,ε0) between tidal-bore estuaries and non tidal-bore estuaries. More specifically, we have established that tidal bores occur in convergent estuaries when the nonlinearity parameter is greater than a critical value, εc , which is an increasing function of the friction parameter ϕ0. This result has been confirmed by numerical simulations of the two-dimensional Saint Venant equations. The real-estuary observations and the numerical simulations also show that, contrary to what is generally assumed, tide amplification is not a necessary condition for tidal bore formation. The effect of freshwater discharge on tidal bore occurrence has been analyzed from the database acquired during three long-term campaigns carried out on the Gironde/Garonne estuary. We have shown that in the upper estuary the tidal bore intensity is mainly governed by the local dimensionless tide amplitude ε. The bore intensity is an increasing function of ε and this relationship does not depend on freshwater

  6. BORE II

    SciTech Connect

    2015-08-01

    Bore II, co-developed by Berkeley Lab researchers Frank Hale, Chin-Fu Tsang, and Christine Doughty, provides vital information for solving water quality and supply problems and for improving remediation of contaminated sites. Termed "hydrophysical logging," this technology is based on the concept of measuring repeated depth profiles of fluid electric conductivity in a borehole that is pumping. As fluid enters the wellbore, its distinct electric conductivity causes peaks in the conductivity log that grow and migrate upward with time. Analysis of the evolution of the peaks enables characterization of groundwater flow distribution more quickly, more cost effectively, and with higher resolution than ever before. Combining the unique interpretation software Bore II with advanced downhole instrumentation (the hydrophysical logging tool), the method quantifies inflow and outflow locations, their associated flow rates, and the basic water quality parameters of the associated formation waters (e.g., pH, oxidation-reduction potential, temperature). In addition, when applied in conjunction with downhole fluid sampling, Bore II makes possible a complete assessment of contaminant concentration within groundwater.

  7. BORE II

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-08-01

    Bore II, co-developed by Berkeley Lab researchers Frank Hale, Chin-Fu Tsang, and Christine Doughty, provides vital information for solving water quality and supply problems and for improving remediation of contaminated sites. Termed "hydrophysical logging," this technology is based on the concept of measuring repeated depth profiles of fluid electric conductivity in a borehole that is pumping. As fluid enters the wellbore, its distinct electric conductivity causes peaks in the conductivity log that grow and migratemore » upward with time. Analysis of the evolution of the peaks enables characterization of groundwater flow distribution more quickly, more cost effectively, and with higher resolution than ever before. Combining the unique interpretation software Bore II with advanced downhole instrumentation (the hydrophysical logging tool), the method quantifies inflow and outflow locations, their associated flow rates, and the basic water quality parameters of the associated formation waters (e.g., pH, oxidation-reduction potential, temperature). In addition, when applied in conjunction with downhole fluid sampling, Bore II makes possible a complete assessment of contaminant concentration within groundwater.« less

  8. Surface-Treated versus Untreated Large-Bore Catheters as Vascular Access in Hemodialysis and Apheresis Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Bambauer, Rolf; Schiel, Ralf; Bambauer, Carolin; Latza, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    Background. Catheter-related infections, thrombosis, and stenosis are among the most frequent complications associated with catheters, which are inserted in vessels. Surface treatment processes of the outer surface, such as ion-beam-assisted deposition, can be used to mitigate such complications. Methods. This retrospective study (1992–2007) evaluated silver-coated (54 patients) and noncoated (105 patients) implanted large-bore catheters used for extracorporeal detoxification. The catheters were inserted into the internal jugular or subclavian veins. After removal, the catheters were cultured for bacterial colonization using standard microbiologic assays. They also were examined using scanning electron microscope. Results. The silver coated catheters showed a tendency towards longer in situ time. The microbiologic examinations of the catheter tips were in both catheter types high positive, but not significant. Conclusion. The silver-coated catheters showed no significantly reduction in infection rate by evaluation of all collected data in this retrospective study. There was no association between both catheters in significantly reducing savings in treatment costs and in reducing patient discomfort. Other new developed catheter materials such as the microdomain-structured inner and outer surface are considered more biocompatible because they mimic the structure of natural biological surface. PMID:22577548

  9. Improvement of microwave feeding on a large bore ECRIS with permanent magnets by using coaxial semi-dipole antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Kurisu, Yosuke; Sakamoto, Naoki; Kiriyama, Ryutaro; Takenaka, Tomoya; Nozaki, Dai; Yano, Keisuke; Sato, Fuminobu; Kato, Yushi; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2012-11-06

    We are constructing a tandem type electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source (ECRIS). The first stage of this ECRIS has a large-bore with cylindrically comb-shaped permanent magnets. 2.45GHz and 11-13GHz microwaves can be supplied individually and simultaneously to the plasma chamber. For 2.45GHz, a coaxial semi-dipole antenna is used to feed the microwaves. In previous experiments, there were two problems encountered when running the 2.45GHz microwaves. High incident power was necessary to keep ECR discharge at low operating pressure because of high reflected microwave power. The surface of a support insulator between the inner and the outer electrodes of coaxial semi-dipole antenna was easily metalized by sputtering of the metal wall inside the chamber. The purpose of this study was to solve these problems. Performing several simulation experiments supports the hypothesis that the position of the support insulator is significant for microwave power efficiency. The end result was the ability to sustain ECR discharges at extremely low incident microwave power, several tens of watts, by optimized matching of the position and shape of the insulator.

  10. Assay of glyceryl trinitrate, isosorbide dinitrate, and their metabolites in plasma by large-bore capillary column gas-liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Booth, B P; Bennett, B M; Brien, J F; Elliott, D A; Marks, G S; McCans, J L; Nakatsu, K

    1990-11-01

    Two large-bore capillary columns, one with dimethyl polysiloxane (HP-1) as the stationary phase and the other with phenyl (50 per cent) methyl (50 per cent) polysiloxane (DB-17), were used to develop gas-liquid chromatographic (GLC) assays for measuring isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN), glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), and their metabolites. ISDN, isosorbide-2-mononitrate (2-ISMN), and isosorbide-5-mononitrate (5-ISMN) in plasma, ranging in concentration from 1 to 300 nM, and GTN, glyceryl-1,2-dinitrate (1,2-GDN), and glyceryl-1,3-dinitrate (1,3-GDN), ranging in concentration from 3 to 60 nM in plasma, were analysed on both columns. GLC analysis yielded baseline resolution of the analytes. The method using the dimethyl polysiloxane column gave a lower limit of detectability for GTN of 0.75 nM (signal/noise (s/n) = 2), and the procedure using the phenyl-methyl column provided a lower limit of detectability for ISDN of 81 pM (s/n = 2). The large-bore column GLC procedures exhibited shorter retention times for both ISDN and GTN than those previously reported for capillary-column assays. The chromatographic resolution of analytes and column efficiency of the large-bore capillary columns were comparable to the results previously found using capillary-column GC. The assays for ISDN and GTN have been shown to be appropriate for pharmacokinetic studies in volunteers and patients. We determined that the HP-1 column is appropriate for the analysis of GTN and metabolites, and the DB-17 column is suitable for analysis of ISDN and its metabolites. We conclude that the use of large-bore capillary columns provides rapid and reliable GLC assays for organic nitrates. PMID:2125512

  11. Ultra-wide bore 900 MHz high-resolution NMR at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, R.; Brey, W. W.; Shetty, K.; Gor'kov, P.; Saha, S.; Long, J. R.; Grant, S. C.; Chekmenev, E. Y.; Hu, J.; Gan, Z.; Sharma, M.; Zhang, F.; Logan, T. M.; Brüschweller, R.; Edison, A.; Blue, A.; Dixon, I. R.; Markiewicz, W. D.; Cross, T. A.

    2005-11-01

    Access to an ultra-wide bore (105 mm) 21.1 T magnet makes possible numerous advances in NMR spectroscopy and MR imaging, as well as novel applications. This magnet was developed, designed, manufactured and tested at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory and on July 21, 2004 it was energized to 21.1 T. Commercial and unique homebuilt probes, along with a standard commercial NMR console have been installed and tested with many science applications to develop this spectrometer as a user facility. Solution NMR of membrane proteins with enhanced resolution, new pulse sequences for solid state NMR taking advantage of narrowed proton linewidths, and enhanced spatial resolution and contrast leading to improved animal imaging have been documented. In addition, it is demonstrated that spectroscopy of single site 17O labeled macromolecules in a hydrated lipid bilayer environment can be recorded in a remarkably short period of time. 17O spectra of aligned samples show the potential for using this data for orientational restraints and for characterizing unique details of cation binding properties to ion channels. The success of this NHMFL magnet illustrates the potential for using a similar magnet design as an outsert for high temperature superconducting insert coils to achieve an NMR magnet with a field >25 T.

  12. An assessment of image distortion and CT number accuracy within a wide-bore CT extended field of view.

    PubMed

    Beeksma, B; Truant, D; Holloway, L; Arumugam, S

    2015-06-01

    Although wide bore computed tomography (CT) scanners provide increased space for patients, the scan field of view (sFOV) remains considerably smaller than the bore size. Consequently, patient anatomy which spans beyond the sFOV is truncated and the information is lost. As a solution, some manufacturers provide the capacity to reconstruct CT images from a partial dataset at an extended field of view (eFOV). To assess spatial distortion within this eFOV three phantoms were considered a 30 × 30 × 20 cm(3) slab of solid water, the Gammex electron density CT phantom and a female anthropomorphic phantom. For each phantom, scans were taken centrally within the sFOV as a reference image and with the phantom edge extended at 1 cm intervals from 0 to 5 cm beyond the sFOV into the eFOV. To assess CT number accuracy various tissue equivalent materials were scanned in the eFOV and resulting CT numbers were compared to inserts scanned within the sFOV. For all phantom geometries, objects within the eFOV were geometrically overestimated with elongation of phantom shapes into the eFOV. The percentage increase in size ranged from 0.22 to 15.94 % over all phantoms considered. The difference between eFOV and sFOV CT numbers was dependent upon insert density. The eFOV underestimated CT numbers in the range of -127 to -230 HU for soft tissue densities and -278 to -640 for bone densities. This trend reversed for low tissue densities with the CT numbers in the eFOV being overestimated by 100-130 HU for lung equivalent inserts. Initial correlation between eFOV and sFOV CT numbers was seen and a correction function was successfully applied to better estimate the CT number representative of that seen within the sFOV. PMID:26048719

  13. Comparison of predicted and experimental performance of large-bore roller bearing operating to 3.0 million DN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, H. H.; Huller, F. T.

    1980-01-01

    Bearing inner and outer race temperatures and the amount of heat transferred to the lubricant were calculated by using the computer program CYBEAN. The results obtained were compared with previously reported experimental data for a 118 mm bore roller bearing that operated at shaft speeds to 25,500 rpm, radial loads to 8,900 N (2000 lb), and total lubricant flow rates to 0.0102 cu m/min (2.7 gal/min). The calculated results compared well with the experimental data.

  14. Operating characteristics of a three-piece-inner-ring large-bore roller bearing to speeds of 3 million DN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuller, F. T.

    1984-01-01

    A 118 mm bore roller bearing with a three piece inner ring ran successfully at 300,000 DN for 20 hr. Provisions were made for lubrication and cooling through the inner ring. In some tests the outer ring was also cooled. Power loss within the bearing increased with both speed and total oil flow rate to the inner ring. Outer ring temperature decreased by as much as 22 K (40 F) when outer ring cooling was employed whereas inner ring temperature remained essentially constant. Cage slip was greatly reduced or even eliminated by using a bearing with a very tight clearance at operating speed. A three piece inner ring bearing had higher inner ring temperatures and less temperature difference between the inner and outer rings than a conventional one piece inner ring bearing.

  15. Inflating with large effective fields

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, C.P.; Cicoli, M.; Quevedo, F.; Williams, M. E-mail: mcicoli@ictp.it E-mail: mwilliams@perimeterinsititute.ca

    2014-11-01

    We re-examine large scalar fields within effective field theory, in particular focussing on the issues raised by their use in inflationary models (as suggested by BICEP2 to obtain primordial tensor modes). We argue that when the large-field and low-energy regimes coincide the scalar dynamics is most effectively described in terms of an asymptotic large-field expansion whose form can be dictated by approximate symmetries, which also help control the size of quantum corrections. We discuss several possible symmetries that can achieve this, including pseudo-Goldstone inflatons characterized by a coset G/H (based on abelian and non-abelian, compact and non-compact symmetries), as well as symmetries that are intrinsically higher dimensional. Besides the usual trigonometric potentials of Natural Inflation we also find in this way simple large-field power laws (like V ∝ φ{sup 2}) and exponential potentials, V(φ) = ∑{sub k}V{sub x}e{sup −kφ/M}. Both of these can describe the data well and give slow-roll inflation for large fields without the need for a precise balancing of terms in the potential. The exponential potentials achieve large r through the limit |η| || ε and so predict r ≅ (8/3)(1-n{sub s}); consequently n{sub s} ≅ 0.96 gives r ≅ 0.11 but not much larger (and so could be ruled out as measurements on r and n{sub s} improve). We examine the naturalness issues for these models and give simple examples where symmetries protect these forms, using both pseudo-Goldstone inflatons (with non-abelian non-compact shift symmetries following familiar techniques from chiral perturbation theory) and extra-dimensional models.

  16. Enhanced production of electron cyclotron resonance plasma by exciting selective microwave mode on a large-bore electron cyclotron resonance ion source with permanent magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Daiju Kurisu, Yosuke; Nozaki, Dai; Yano, Keisuke; Imai, Youta; Kumakura, Sho; Sato, Fuminobu; Kato, Yushi; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2014-02-15

    We are constructing a tandem type ECRIS. The first stage is large-bore with cylindrically comb-shaped magnet. We optimize the ion beam current and ion saturation current by a mobile plate tuner. They change by the position of the plate tuner for 2.45 GHz, 11–13 GHz, and multi-frequencies. The peak positions of them are close to the position where the microwave mode forms standing wave between the plate tuner and the extractor. The absorbed powers are estimated for each mode. We show a new guiding principle, which the number of efficient microwave mode should be selected to fit to that of multipole of the comb-shaped magnets. We obtained the excitation of the selective modes using new mobile plate tuner to enhance ECR efficiency.

  17. Enantioselective column coupled electrophoresis employing large bore capillaries hyphenated with tandem mass spectrometry for ultra-trace determination of chiral compounds in complex real samples.

    PubMed

    Piešťanský, Juraj; Maráková, Katarína; Kovaľ, Marián; Havránek, Emil; Mikuš, Peter

    2015-12-01

    A new multidimensional analytical approach for the ultra-trace determination of target chiral compounds in unpretreated complex real samples was developed in this work. The proposed analytical system provided high orthogonality due to on-line combination of three different methods (separation mechanisms), i.e. (1) isotachophoresis (ITP), (2) chiral capillary zone electrophoresis (chiral CZE), and (3) triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (QqQ MS). The ITP step, performed in a large bore capillary (800 μm), was utilized for the effective sample pretreatment (preconcentration and matrix clean-up) in a large injection volume (1-10 μL) enabling to obtain as low as ca. 80 pg/mL limits of detection for the target enantiomers in urine matrices. In the chiral CZE step, the different chiral selectors (neutral, ionizable, and permanently charged cyclodextrins) and buffer systems were tested in terms of enantioselectivity and influence on the MS detection response. The performance parameters of the optimized ITP - chiral CZE-QqQ MS method were evaluated according to the FDA guidance for bioanalytical method validation. Successful validation and application (enantioselective monitoring of renally eliminated pheniramine and its metabolite in human urine) highlighted great potential of this chiral approach in advanced enantioselective biomedical applications. PMID:26377388

  18. Enhanced production of ECR plasma by using pulse mode microwaves on a large bore ECRIS with permanent magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Yushi; Kiriyama, Ryutaro; Takenaka, Tomoya; Kurisu, Yosuke; Nozaki, Dai; Yano, Keisuke; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2012-11-06

    In order to enhance the efficiency of an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma for a broad and dense ion beam source at low pressure, the magnetic field configuration is constructed by all permanent magnets. By using the pulse mode, we aim at the generation of plasma with parameters that cannot be achieved in the CW mode at microwave frequencies of 11-13GHz, under the constraint of the same average incident microwave powers. It is found that the total beam currents are increased by the pulse mode operation compared with the case of the CW mode. According to probe measurements of the ECR plasma, it is found that the electron density in the pulse mode is larger than that in the CW mode, while the electron temperatures in the pulse mode are lower than that in the CW mode. These results are discussed from the viewpoint of relaxation times obtained on plasma parameters and ECR efficiency. The cause of the beam current increment and operational windows spread due to the pulse mode are also discussed on these parameters suitable to production of molecular/cluster ions.

  19. Three ways to bore under roads, railroads and canals

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, K.G.

    1983-06-01

    Dry boring, wet boring, and tunneling are three generally accepted ways for crossing under roads, railroads, and canals. Dry boring is the major method for installing lengthy, large-diameter pipelines under roads or railroads. Smaller diameter pipe crossings are implemented by means of wet boring. Tunneling is an effective means of crossing under roads and railroads when rock is encountered or the working space is too limited to accommodate conventional boring equipment. It can be used only on crossings large enough for a man to enter the pipe and physically remove the soil or rock.

  20. Double diameter boring tool

    DOEpatents

    Ashbaugh, F.A.; Murry, K.R.

    1986-02-10

    A boring tool and a method of operation are provided for boring two concentric holes of precision diameters and depths in a single operation. The boring tool includes an elongated tool body, a shank for attachment to a standard adjustable boring head which is used on a manual or numerical control milling machine and first and second diametrically opposed cutting flutes formed for cutting in opposite directions. The diameter of the elongated tool body is substantially equal to the distance from the first flute tip to the axis of rotation plus the distance from the second flute tip to the axis of rotation. The axis of rotation of the tool is spaced from the tool centerline a distance substantially equal to one-half the distance from the second flute tip to the axis of rotation minus one-half the distance from the first flute tip to the axis of rotation. The method includes the step of inserting the boring tool into the boring head, adjusting the distance between the tool centerline and the tool axis of rotation as described above and boring the two concentric holes.

  1. Double diameter boring tool

    DOEpatents

    Ashbaugh, Fred N.; Murry, Kenneth R.

    1988-12-27

    A boring tool and a method of operation are provided for boring two concentric holes of precision diameters and depths in a single operation. The boring tool includes an elongated tool body, a shank for attachment to a standard adjustable boring head which is used on a manual or numerical control milling machine and first and second diametrically opposed cutting edges formed for cutting in opposite directions. The diameter of the elongated tool body is substantially equal to the distance from the first cutting edge tip to the axis of rotation plus the distance from the second cutting edge tip to the axis of rotation. The axis of rotation of the tool is spaced from the tool centerline a distance substantially equal to one-half the distance from the second cutting edge tip to the axis of rotation minus one-half the distance from the first cutting edge tip to the axis of rotation. The method includes the step of inserting the boring tool into the boring head, adjusting the distance between the tool centerline and the tool axis of rotation as described above and boring the two concentric holes.

  2. Slime thickness evaluation of bored piles by electrical resistivity probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Ok-Hyun; Yoon, Hyung-Koo; Park, Min-Chul; Lee, Jong-Sub

    2014-09-01

    The bottoms of bored piles are generally stacked with soil particles, both while boreholes are being drilled, and afterward. The stacked soils are called slime, and when loads are applied on the pile, increase the pile settlement. Thus to guarantee the end bearing capacity of bored piles, the slime thickness should be precisely detected. The objective of this study is to suggest a new method for evaluating the slime thickness, using temperature compensated electrical resistivity. Laboratory studies are performed in advance, to estimate and compare the resolution of the electrical resistivity probe (ERP) and time domain reflectometry (TDR). The electrical properties of the ERP and TDR are measured using coaxial type electrodes and parallel type two-wire electrodes, respectively. Penetration tests, conducted in the fully saturated sand-clay mixtures, demonstrate that the ERP produces a better resolution of layer detection than TDR. Thus, field application tests using the ERP with a diameter of 35.7 mm are conducted for the investigation of slime thickness in large diameter bored piles. Field tests show that the slime layers are clearly identified by the ERP: the electrical resistivity dramatically increases at the interface between the slurry and slime layer. The electrical resistivity in the slurry layer inversely correlates with the amount of circulated water. This study suggests that the new electrical resistivity method may be a useful method for the investigation of the slime thickness in bored piles.

  3. Guided earth boring tool

    SciTech Connect

    Mc Donald, W.J.; Pittard, G.T.; Maurer, W.C.; Wasson, M.R.; Herben, W.C.

    1987-09-22

    A controllable tool for drilling holes in the earth is described comprising a hollow elongated rigid supporting drill pipe having a forward end for entering the earth, means supporting the drill pipe for earth boring or piercing movement, including means for moving the drill pipe longitudinally for penetrating the earth, the drill pipe moving means being constructed to permit addition and removal of supporting drill pipe during earth penetrating operation, a boring mole supported on the forward end of the hollow low drill pipe comprising a cylindrical housing supported on and open to the forward end of the drill pipe, a first means on the front end for applying a boring force to the soil comprising an anvil having a striking surface inside the housing and a boring surface outside the housing, a second means comprising a reciprocally movable hammer positioned in the housing to apply a percussive force to the anvil striking surface for transmitting a percussive force to the boring force applying means, and means permitting introduction of air pressure supplied through the hollow pipe into the housing for operating the hammer and for discharging spent air from the housing to the hole being bored, and the tool being operable to penetrate the earth upon longitudinal movement of the drill rod by the longitudinal rod moving means and operation of the mole by reciprocal movement of the hammer.

  4. THE DESIGN OF AN RF ANTENNA FOR A LARGE-BORE, HIGH POWER, STEADY STATE PLASMA PROCESSING CHAMBER FOR MATERIAL SEPARATION - CRADA FINAL REPORT for CRADA Number ORNL00-0585

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, D. A.; Freeman, R. L.

    2001-11-07

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC, (Contractor), and Archimedes Technology Group, (Participant) is to evaluate the design of an RF antenna for a large-bore, high power, steady state plasma processing chamber for material separation. Criteria for optimization will be to maximize the power deposition in the plasma while operating at acceptable voltages and currents in the antenna structure. The project objectives are to evaluate the design of an RF antenna for a large-bore, high power, steady state plasma processing chamber for material separation. Criteria for optimization will be to maximize the power deposition in the plasma while operating at acceptable voltages and currents in the antenna structure.

  5. Tunnel boring machine

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, L. L.

    1985-07-09

    A tunnel boring machine for controlled boring of a curvilinear tunnel including a rotating cutter wheel mounted on the forward end of a thrust cylinder assembly having a central longitudinal axis aligned with the cutter wheel axis of rotation; the thrust cylinder assembly comprising a cylinder barrel and an extendable and retractable thrust arm received therein. An anchoring assembly is pivotally attached to the rear end of the cylinder barrel for anchoring the machine during a cutting stroke and providing a rear end pivot axis during curved cutting strokes. A pair of laterally extending, extendable and retractable arms are fixedly mounted at a forward portion of the cylinder barrel for providing lateral displacement in a laterally curved cutting mode and for anchoring the machine between cutting strokes and during straight line boring. Forward and rear transverse displacement and support assemblies are provided to facilitate cutting in a transversely curved cutting mode and to facilitate machine movement between cutting strokes.

  6. Curvaton in large field inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Tomohiro; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Yokoyama, Shuichiro E-mail: kawasaki@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-09-01

    We comprehensively explore the quadratic curvaton models in the chaotic inflation. In the light of the BICEP2 result r ≈ 0.2, all model parameters and relevant observables are computed. It is found the curvaton field value is constrained into a narrow range, σ{sub *} = O(10{sup −2}–10{sup −1}) and the running of the spectral index is n{sub s}'∼>−10{sup −3}. We show that if the curvaton is added, the models are heavily degenerated on the n{sub s} - r plane. However, introducing a new plane, the degeneracy can be resolved. To distinguish the curvaton models, precise measurements of not only r but also n{sub s}' and the tensor tilt n{sub T} are required.

  7. Through-transmission equations for remote-field eddy current inspection o small-bore ferromagnetic tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Mackintosh, D.D.; Atherton, D.L.; Puhach, P.A. . Dept. of Physics)

    1993-06-01

    The remote-field eddy current (RFEC) method is widely used for nondestructive testing of ferromagnetic tubes such as those found in heat exchangers. An exciter coil generates an electromagnetic field that diffuses through the pipe wall, axially along the outside of the pipe, and back through the pipe wall to a detector coil. Phase and amplitude readings can be interpreted to characterize pipe defects. Skin depth theory is commonly used to calculate through-transmission for a cylindrical wave impinging on a conducting tube. The cylindrical through-transmission equations agree well with RFEC data. The application of the new equations to RFEC defect signal analysis is discussed. A case study of an RFEC scan of a metal loss defect is described. The through-transmission equations were found to hold at the defect. However, the RFEC scan data deviated slightly from the value predicted by the through-transmission equations. The deviation was attributed to a perturbation of the field on the outside of the pipe caused by the defect, an effect not considered in a through-transmission analysis.

  8. Fast ignition without hole boring.

    PubMed

    Hain, S; Mulser, P

    2001-02-01

    A fast-ignitor scheme for inertial confinement fusion is proposed which works without hole boring. It is shown that a thermonuclear burn wave starts from the pellet corona when an adequate amount of energy (typically 10 kJ) is deposited in the critical layer by a petawatt laser ("coronal ignition"). Burn efficiencies as high as predicted for standard central spark ignition are achieved. In addition, the scheme is surprisingly insensitive to large deviations from spherical precompression symmetry. It may open a new prospect for direct drive. PMID:11177998

  9. Tidal Bore detection in the Garonne River using high frequency GNSS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frappart, Frédéric; Roussel, Nicolas; Darrozes, José; Bonneton, Philippe; Bonneton, Natalie; Detandt, Guillaume; Perosanz, Felix; Loyer, Sylvain

    2016-04-01

    A tidal bore is a positive surge propagating upstream that may form when a rising tide with significant amplitude enters shallow, gently sloping and narrowing rivers. Tidal bores have a significant impact on the river ecosystem behavior, especially in terms of sediment transport. Most of the existing field studies were limited to visual observations. Only a few field experiments have been devoted to a quantitative study of the tidal bore dynamics. We carried out a field study in August, 2015, using a GNSS buoy to measure the tidal bore in the Garonne River (France) at Podensac located 140 km upstream of the estuary mouth. Precise Point Positioning and Differential GNSS techniques were used to determine the river surface height variations with a 20 Hz sampling rate. This site was selected owing to the presence of well-developed undular tidal bores and also because of the absence of any significant curvature of the river at this location, which limits the complexity of the tidal bore structure. The Gironde estuary is located in the Bay of Biscay, on the southwest coast of France, and is formed from the meeting of the rivers Dordogne and Garonne. In the Gironde mouth, the mean neap tidal range and mean spring tidal range is 2.5 m and 5 m, respectively. As the tide propagates upstream a marked ebbflood asymmetry occurs in the upper reaches of the estuary and the wave is amplified. This large amplitude tidal wave propagates in the Garonne and Dordogne rivers up to 160 km from the estuary mouth. Both GNSS buoy and reference station use a Leica AR10 antenna and GR25 receiver. Both stations (reference and buoy) acquired data with a 20 Hz sampling rate. GNSS data were processed using RTKLib. Results allowed to detect the the wave train of the tidal bore that caused an elevation of the surface of around 1.5 m. Comparisons were performed using acoustic data showing a good agreement between both sources of data.

  10. Low-cost boring mill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibdon, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Portable unit and special fixture serve as boring mill. Machine, fabricated primarily from scrap metal, was designed and set up in about 12 working days. It has reduced setup and boring time by 66 percent as compared with existing boring miles, thereby making latter available for other jobs. Unit can be operated by one man.

  11. Improved Large-Field Focusing Schlieren System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Leonard M.

    1993-01-01

    System used to examine complicated two- and three-dimensional flows. High-brightness large-field focusing schlieren system incorporates Fresnel lens instead of glass diffuser. In system with large field of view, image may also be very large. Relay optical subsystem minifies large image while retaining all of light. Facilities candidates for use of focusing schlieren include low-speed wind and water tunnels. Heated or cooled flow tracers or injected low- or high-density tracers used to make flows visible for photographic recording.

  12. Well bore tools

    SciTech Connect

    Burge, E.V.

    1984-08-28

    Well bore tools configured as centralizers/stabilizers, well bore reamers, and keyseat wipers each of which includes an elongate tubular body having a generally cylindrical outer surface and a diameter approximately equal to the diameter of the borehole being drilled are disclosed. Each tool affords an improved mode of drilling a borehole by increasing downhole directional control and stability, increasing tool wear reliability, and reducing return mud flow resistance. The outer surface of each tool has a plurality of longitudinal passages formed in pairs of upright intersecting right and left hand helicies or spirals about the exterior of said tool and extending from one end to the other end thereof. The intersecting right and left hand helical or spiral channels form raised pad areas therebetween to provide 360/sup 0/ contiguous well bore contact by each tool for enhanced stability and efficiency. In addition, the intersecting right and left hand helical channels afford greater surficial engagement area while providing unobstructed return mud flow paths between each tool and the wall of the borehole. The raised pad areas may have wear resistant surfaces which are arranged in a configuration for affording constant 360/sup 0/ contiguous contact with the wall of the borehole. Preferably, the wear resistance surfaces are provided by replaceable inserts mounted in recesses in the pad areas.

  13. Large electric fields in the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mozer, F. S.; Boehm, M. H.; Cattell, C. A.; Temerin, M.; Wygant, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    The Langmuir solitonlike structures which contain plasma frequency oscillations of 500 mV/m and parallel electric fields of about 100 mV/m, observed in the auroral zone below 1000 km, are studied. The characteristics of electrostatic shocks that contain perpendicular fields of 1000 mV/m and parallel fields of 100 mV/m, and of double layers that have parallel fields of 10 mV/m are described. Observations of the geomagnetic tail reveal the presence of 100 mV/m turbulent electric fields and 5-10 mV/m quasi-static fields in the high latitude boundary of the plasma sheet, and inside the plasma sheet fields of 5-10 mV/m are detected. The large amplitude quasi-static electric field fluctuations of 100 mV/m and the dc fields of approximately 5 mV/m observed in the bow shock are examined.

  14. Testing Large Structures in the Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, George; Carne, Thomas G.

    2009-01-01

    Field testing large structures creates unique challenges such as limited choices for boundary conditions and the fact that natural excitation sources cannot be removed. Several critical developments in field testing of large structures are reviewed, including: step relaxation testing which has been developed into a useful technique to apply large forces to operational systems by careful windowing; the capability of large structures testing with free support conditions which has been expanded by implementing modeling of the support structure; natural excitation which has been developed as a viable approach to field testing; and the hybrid approach which has been developed to allow forces to be estimated in operating structures. These developments have increased the ability to extract information from large structures and are highlighted in this presentation.

  15. Ultratrace liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis of large peptides with post-translational modifications using narrow-bore poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) monolithic columns and extended range proteomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Wu, Shiaw-Lin; Kim, Jeongkwon; Karger, Barry L.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes approaches to optimize the chromatographic performance for our recently developed LC-MS platform, extended range proteomic analysis (ERPA), for comprehensive protein characterization at the ultratrace level. Large digested peptide fragments up to 10 kDa (e.g. from lysyl endopeptidase digestion) with or without modifications were well separated with high resolution using narrow bore (20 and 50 μm I.D.) poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) (PS-DVB) monolithic columns constructed by in situ solution polymerization. Importantly, the macroporous structure of the monolithic columns facilitated mass transport of large peptides with improved recovery relative to small pore size reversed-phase packings. High sequence coverage (>95 %), including identification of phosphorylated and glycosylated particles was achieved for β-casein and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) at the 4 fmol and 20 fmol levels per injection, respectively, using the 20 μm I.D. PS-DVB monolithic column. For peptides with greater ionization efficiency, the detection limit could be lowered to ~ 400 zmol. Typically, the separation system produced a peak capacity of ~200 for a 10 cm column. This paper demonstrates that narrow-bore monolithic columns are suitable for high sensitivity and high resolution separation of large peptide fragments by LC-MS analysis. PMID:17442327

  16. Performance of large-bore tapered-roller bearings under combined radial and thrust load at shaft speeds to 15,000 rpm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Signer, H. R.

    1977-01-01

    The performance of 120.65-mm bore tapered roller bearings was investigated at shaft speeds up to 15,000 rpm. Temperature distribution and bearing heat generation were determined as a function of shaft speed, radial and thrust loads, lubricant flow rate, and lubricant inlet temperature. Lubricant was supplied by either jets or by a combination of holes through the cone directly to the cone-rib contact and jets at the roller small-end side. Cone-rib lubrication significantly improved high-speed tapered-roller bearing performance, yielding lower cone-face temperatures and lower power loss and allowing lower lubricant flow rates for a given speed condition. Bearing temperatures increased with increased shaft speed and decreased with increased lubricant flow rate. Bearing power loss increased with increased shaft speed and increased lubricant flow rate.

  17. Operating characteristics of a large-bore roller bearing to speeds of 3 times 10 to the 6th power DN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuller, F. T.

    1979-01-01

    A 118-millimeter-bore roller bearing was studied parametrically at speeds from 10,000 to 25,500 rpm. The bearing had a round outer ring (not preloaded), and provisions were made for lubrication and cooling through the inner ring. In some tests the outer ring was also cooled. The bearing ran successfully at 300,00 DN with very small evidence of cage slip. Load, which was varied from 2200 to 8900 newtons (500 to 2000 lb), had no effect on bearing temperature or cage slip over the speed range tested. Bearing temperature varied inversely with cage slip for all test conditions. Cooling the outer ring decreased its temperature but increased the inner-ring temperature. Heat rejected to the lubricant (power loss within the bearing) increased with both shaft speed and total oil flow rate to the inner ring.

  18. Bore hole navigator

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, G.J.

    1987-09-29

    A bore hole navigator is described comprising a two axis platform for lowering down a bore hole on a cable with its longitudinal axis parallel to the local bore hole direction. The two axis platform has an outer gimbal, bearing supported on the outer gimbal axis for rotation about the longitudinal axis of the platform, and an inner gimbal axis orthogonal the the outer gimbal axis. The inner gimbal axis has multiple axis segments spaced along the longitudinal axis of the platform and each bearing supported on the outer gimbal. The inner gimbal axis segment has a two axis gyro mounted thereon with its spin axis orthogonal to the respective inner gimbal axis segment, a first gyro sensitive axis parallel to the respective inner gimbal axis segment and a second gyro sensitive axis orthogonal to the spin axis. The second inner gimbal axis segment has a pitch torquer thereon operative to provide a controllable torque about the respective inner gimbal axis segment. The third inner gimbal axis segment has a pitch resolver thereon operative to measure rotation of the respective inner gimbal axis segment with respect to the outer gimbal. The first, second and third inner gimbal axis segments are coupled to rotate together. The outer gimbal has a yaw torquer thereon to provide a controllable torque about the outer gimbal axis, and a yaw resolver thereon to measure rotation of the outer gimbal about the outer gimbal axis. The outer gimbal also has a single axis accelerometer therein having its sensitive axis orthogonal to the outer gimbal axis and the inner gimbal axis segments.

  19. Maneuvering impact boring head

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W.T.; Reutzel, E.W.

    1998-08-18

    An impact boring head may comprise a main body having an internal cavity with a front end and a rear end. A striker having a head end and a tail end is slidably mounted in the internal cavity of the main body so that the striker can be reciprocated between a forward position and an aft position in response to hydraulic pressure. A compressible gas contained in the internal cavity between the head end of the striker and the front end of the internal cavity returns the striker to the aft position upon removal of the hydraulic pressure. 8 figs.

  20. Maneuvering impact boring head

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W. Thor; Reutzel, Edward W.

    1998-01-01

    An impact boring head may comprise a main body having an internal cavity with a front end and a rear end. A striker having a head end and a tail end is slidably mounted in the internal cavity of the main body so that the striker can be reciprocated between a forward position and an aft position in response to hydraulic pressure. A compressible gas contained in the internal cavity between the head end of the striker and the front end of the internal cavity returns the striker to the aft position upon removal of the hydraulic pressure.

  1. Large field inflation from D-branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar, Dagoberto; Landete, Aitor; Marchesano, Fernando; Regalado, Diego

    2016-04-01

    We propose new large field inflation scenarios built on the framework of F-term axion monodromy. Our setup is based on string compactifications where D-branes create potentials for closed string axions via F-terms. Because the source of the axion potential is different from the standard sources of moduli stabilization, it is possible to lower the inflaton mass as compared to other massive scalars. We discuss a particular class of models based on type IIA flux compactifications with D6-branes. In the small field regime they describe supergravity models of quadratic chaotic inflation with a stabilizer field. In the large field regime the inflaton potential displays a flattening effect due to Planck suppressed corrections, allowing us to easily fit the cosmological parameters of the model within current experimental bounds.

  2. RHIC warm-bore systems

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, K.M.

    1994-07-01

    Pressure profiles, in time, are calculated as a consequence of anticipated outgassing of various beam components (e.g., rf cavities, etc.) and warm-bore beam pipes. Gold beam lifetimes and transverse beam emittance growth are given for calculated average pressures. Examples of undesirable warm-bore conditions are presented such as contaminated experimental beam pipes and warm-bore magnets (i.e., DX). These examples may prove instructive. The methods used in making these calculations are presented in Section 2. They are applicable to all linear systems. The calculations given apply to the RHIC accelerator and more specifically to warm-bore regions of the machine.

  3. Updated constraints on large field hybrid inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clesse, Sébastien; Rekier, Jérémy

    2014-10-01

    We revisit the status of hybrid inflation in the light of Planck and recent BICEP2 results, taking care of possible transient violations of the slow-roll conditions as the field passes from the large field to the vacuum dominated phase. The usual regime where observable scales exit the Hubble radius in the vacuum dominated phase predicts a blue scalar spectrum, which is ruled out. But whereas assuming slow-roll one expects this regime to be generic, by solving the exact dynamics we identify the parameter space for which the small field phase is naturally avoided due to slow-roll violations at the end of the large field phase. When the number of e -folds generated at small field is negligible, the model predictions are degenerated with those of a quadratic potential. There exists also a transitory case for which the small field phase is sufficiently long to affect importantly the observable predictions. Interestingly, in this case the spectral index and the tensor to scalar ratio agree respectively with the best fit of Planck and BICEP2. This results in a Δ χ2≃5.0 in favor of hybrid inflation for Planck+BICEP 2 (Δ χ2≃0.9 for Planck only). The last considered regime is when the critical point at which inflation ends is located in the large field phase. It is constrained to be lower than about ten times the reduced Planck mass. The analysis has been conducted with the use of Markov-chain-Monte-Carlo Bayesian method, in a reheating consistent way, and we present the posterior probability distributions for all the model parameters.

  4. Optical design for large depth of field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yang; Wang, Hu; Yue, Pan; Xue, Yaoke; Liu, Jie; Ye, Shuifu

    2016-01-01

    Optical system with large depth of field and large field of view has been designed. To enforce optical system with focal length of 6 mm to imaging the object with object length of 200mmm-1200mm, accord to the equation of depth of field, in case of the CCD sensor with pixel of 5.5umx 5.5um square area, the entrance pupil diameter to ideal imaging will be 0.423mm. To enlarge the modulation transfer function (MTF) at spatial frequency of 90 lp/mm, the entrance pupil diameter is enlarged to 1mm.After design and optimization, with field of view of 80°, within object length of 200mm - 1200mm, the optical system can imaging well, the modulation transfer function (MTF) at spatial frequency of 90lp/mm is larger than 0.1, the distortion of full field of viewed is less than 3%.The optical system can be widely used in machine vision, surveillance cameras, etc.

  5. Large field inflation and gravitational entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaloper, Nemanja; Kleban, Matthew; Lawrence, Albion; Sloth, Martin S.

    2016-02-01

    Large field inflation can be sensitive to perturbative and nonperturbative quantum corrections that spoil slow roll. A large number N of light species in the theory, which occur in many string constructions, can amplify these problems. One might even worry that in a de Sitter background, light species will lead to a violation of the covariant entropy bound at large N . If so, requiring the validity of the covariant entropy bound could limit the number of light species and their couplings, which in turn could severely constrain axion-driven inflation. Here we show that there is no such problem when we correctly renormalize models with many light species, taking the physical Planck scale to be Mpl 2≳N MUV2 , where MUV is the cutoff for the quantum field theory coupled to semiclassical quantum gravity. The number of light species then cancels out of the gravitational entropy of de Sitter or near-de Sitter backgrounds at leading order. Working in detail with N scalar fields in de Sitter space, renormalized to one loop order, we show that the gravitational entropy automatically obeys the covariant entropy bound. Furthermore, while the axion decay constant is a strong coupling scale for the axion dynamics, we show that it is not in general the cutoff of 4d semiclassical gravity. After renormalizing the two point function of the inflaton, we note that it is also controlled by scales much below the cutoff. We revisit N -flation and Kachru-Kallosh-Linde-Trivedi-type compactifications in this light, and show that they are perfectly consistent with the covariant entropy bound. Thus, while quantum gravity might yet spoil large field inflation, holographic considerations in the semiclassical theory do not obstruct it.

  6. Observations of large transient magnetospheric electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggson, T. L.; Heppner, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    Transient electric field events were observed with the long, double probe instrumentation carried by the IMP-6 satellite. Nine, clearly defined, exceptionally large amplitude events are presented here. The events are observed in the midnight sector at geocentric distances 3.5 to .5.5 R sub e at middle latitudes within a magnetic L-shell range of 4.8 to 7.5. They usually have a total duration of one to several minutes, with peak power spectra amplitudes occurring at a frequency of about 0.3 Hz. The events occur under magnetically disturbed conditions, and in most cases they can be associated with negative dH/dt excursions at magnetic observatories located near the foot of the magnetic field line intersecting IMP-6. The magnetospheric motions calculated for these electric fields indicated a quasi-stochastical diffusive process rather than the general inward magnetospheric collapsing motion expected during the expansive phases of auroral substorm activity.

  7. Tunnel boring machine

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, J.

    1985-10-22

    A tunnel boring machine including the following elements: a full face rotary cutterhead; a cutterhead support on which the cutterhead is mounted; a gripper system carried by a gripper support frame for reacting thrust, steering, roll correction, and torque forces; a conveyor system for transporting muck from behind the rotary cutterhead to a dump point rearwardly of the machine; primary propel cylinders for advancing the cutterhead which are mounted between the gripper support frame and the cutterhead support, the primary propel cylinders consisting of a series of at least three pairs of double acting hydraulic cylinders arranged annularly in equally spaced apart locations and in a series of V-shaped configurations between the gripper support frame and the cutterhead support, each such pair of primary propel cylinders having an included angle between the cylinders of about 15/sup 0/ and 60/sup 0/ and with a line bisecting the included angle between the cylinders extending generally parallel to the longitudinal centerline of the machine; and a hydraulic control system for controlling the pairs of primary propel cylinders to effect axial forward thrust on the cutterhead by simultaneous actuation of all the primary propel cylinders while transmitting the reaction torque exerted on the cutterhead support by rotation of the cutterhead, steering of the cutterhead support and the cutterhead by selective actuation of only a portion of the primary propel cylinders, and roll corrections of the cutterhead support and the cutterhead by selective actuation of alternate members of the primary propel cylinders.

  8. A numerical study of the energy flux in internal bores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borden, Zachary; Meiburg, Eckart

    2009-11-01

    Internal bores, or hydraulic jumps, arise in many atmospheric and oceanographic phenomena. The classic single-layer hydraulic jump model accurately predicts a bore's behavior when the density difference between the expanding and contracting layer is large (i.e. water and air), but fails in the Boussinesq limit. A two-layer model, where mass is conserved separately in each layer and momentum is conserved globally, does a much better job but requires for closure an assumption about the loss of energy across a bore. It is widely agreed that assuming all the energy loss occurs entirely in one of the layers puts bounds on a bore's propagation speed. However, under some circumstances, both assumptions over-predict the propagation speed, implying an energy gain in the expanding layer. We directly examine the flux of energy within internal bores using 2D direct numerical simulations. We find that although there is a global loss of energy across the bore, there is a transfer of energy from the contracting to the expanding layer causing a net energy gain in that layer. The transfer is largely the result of the horizontal pressure gradient caused by a difference in hydrostatic pressure across the bore.

  9. Large field inflation from axion mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiu, Gary; Staessens, Wieland; Ye, Fang

    2015-06-01

    We study the general multi-axion systems, focusing on the possibility of large field inflation driven by axions. We find that through axion mixing from a non-diagonal metric on the moduli space and/or from Stückelberg coupling to a U(1) gauge field, an effectively super-Planckian decay constant can be generated without the need of "alignment" in the axion decay constants. We also investigate the consistency conditions related to the gauge symmetries in the multi-axion systems, such as vanishing gauge anomalies and the potential presence of generalized Chern-Simons terms. Our scenario applies generally to field theory models whose axion periodicities are intrinsically sub-Planckian, but it is most naturally realized in string theory. The types of axion mixings invoked in our scenario appear quite commonly in D-brane models, and we present its implementation in type II superstring theory. Explicit stringy models exhibiting all the characteristics of our ideas are constructed within the frameworks of Type IIA intersecting D6-brane models on and Type IIB intersecting D7-brane models on Swiss-Cheese Calabi-Yau orientifolds.

  10. Profiles of ion beams and plasma parameters on a multi-frequencies microwaves large bore electron cyclotron resonance ion source with permanent magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Yushi; Sakamoto, Naoki; Kiriyama, Ryutaro; Takenaka, Tomoya; Kurisu, Yosuke; Nozaki, Dai; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2012-02-15

    In order to contribute to various applications of plasma and beams based on an electron cyclotron resonance, a new concept on magnetic field with all magnets on plasma production and confinement has been proposed with enhanced efficiency for broad and dense ion beam. The magnetic field configuration consists of a pair of comb-shaped magnet surrounding plasma chamber cylindrically. Resonance zones corresponding for 2.45 GHz and 11-13 GHz frequencies are positioned at spatially different positions. We launch simultaneously multiplex frequencies microwaves operated individually, try to control profiles of the plasma parameters and the extracted ion beams, and to measure them in detail.

  11. Integrated test plan for directional boring

    SciTech Connect

    Volk, B.W.

    1993-02-10

    This integrated test plan describes the field testing of the DITCH WITCH Directional Boring System. DITCH WITCH is a registered trademark of The Charles Machine Works, Inc., Perry, Oklahoma. The test is being conducted as a coordinated effort between Charles Machine Works (CMW), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). Funding for the WHC portion of the project is through the Volatile Organic Compound-Arid Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID). The purpose of the test is to evaluate the performance of the directional boring system for possible future use on environmental restoration projects at Hanford and other Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The test will be conducted near the 200 Areas Fire Station located between the 200 East and 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The directional boring system will be used to drill and complete (with fiberglass casing) two horizontal boreholes. A third borehole will be drilled to test sampling equipment but will not be completed with casing.

  12. Measurement of Antenna Bore-Sight Gain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortinberry, Jarrod; Shumpert, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The absolute or free-field gain of a simple antenna can be approximated using standard antenna theory formulae or for a more accurate prediction, numerical methods may be employed to solve for antenna parameters including gain. Both of these methods will result in relatively reasonable estimates but in practice antenna gain is usually verified and documented via measurements and calibration. In this paper, a relatively simple and low-cost, yet effective means of determining the bore-sight free-field gain of a VHF/UHF antenna is proposed by using the Brewster angle relationship.

  13. Dynamics of Magnetic Insulation Violation in Smooth-bore Magnetrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agafonov, A. V.; Fedorov, V. M.; Tarakanov, V. P.

    1997-05-01

    The efficiency of large and high-power magnetrons of GW power levels is less than 30% and an inherent pulse-length and repetition rate limitations seems to exist because of use of explosive field emission. Another approach is the development of low voltage high-efficiency magnetrons utilizing a secondary emission magnetron array with high repetition rate. The numerical model of nonstationary nonuniform secondary electron emission from a cathode surface has been developed. The results of the first steps in computer simulations of an electron cloud formation inside a smooth-bore magnetron under the condition of the back-bombardement instability (BBI) are presented. A mechanism of the violation of the magnetic insulation are considered. Calculations have been performed for a coaxial smooth-bore magnetron and for magnetrons with different types of azimuthal inhomogeneities which could help the grow of BBI, and for magnetrons of different aspect ratios. The results of computer simulation are compared with experimental data. The main calculations of the beam dynamics were carried out with PIC-code KARAT.

  14. The evolution of a breaking mesospheric bore wave packet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockwell, R. G.; Taylor, M. J.; Nielsen, K.; Jarvis, M. J.

    2011-10-01

    All-sky CCD observations of mesospheric gravity waves have been made from Halley Station Antarctica (75.5°S, 26.7°W) as part of a collaborative research program between British Antarctic Survey, U.K. and Utah State University, USA. A mesospheric bore event was observed in the nightglow emissions over a period of several hours on the 27th of May, 2001. Two dimensional S-Transform (ST) analysis is applied to the airglow images of this bore event. This local spectral technique allows one to calculate the wave parameters as a function of time and space. It is observed that the horizontal phase speed and wavelength decrease over time as the amplitude attenuates. Simultaneously with this wave event the background wind experiences a large acceleration in the direction of the wave propagation. Mesospheric bore theory calculations are used to estimate the bore duct depth and it is shown that as the wave packet evolves, the bore duct collapses (decreasing in its vertical extent). As the bore duct shrinks, the wave's group velocity decelerates, the amplitude attenuates, and the wave dissipates.

  15. Tsunami Bores in Kitakami River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolkova, Elena; Tanaka, Hitoshi

    2016-07-01

    The 2011 Tohoku tsunami entered the Kitakami river and propagated there as a train of shock waves, recorded with a 1-min interval at water level stations at Fukuchi, Iino, and the weir 17.2 km from the mouth, where the bulk of the wave was reflected back. The records showed that each bore kept its shape and identity as it traveled a 10.9-km-path Fukuchi-Iino-weir-Iino. Shock handling based on the cross-river integrated classical shock conditions was applied to reconstruct the flow velocity time histories at the measurement sites, to estimate inflow into the river at each site, to evaluate the wave heights of incident and reflected tsunami bores near the weir, and to estimate propagation speed of the individual bores. Theoretical predictions are verified against the measurements. We discuss experiences of exercising the shock conditions with actual tsunami measurements in the Kitakami river, and test applicability of the shallow-water approximation for describing tsunami bores with heights ranging from 0.3 to 4 m in a river segment with a depth of 3-4 m.

  16. Water jet assisted tunnel boring

    SciTech Connect

    Ozdemir, L.

    1984-06-21

    Mechanical tunnel boring has experienced significant growth over the last two decades. Improved machine design and performance coupled with a better understanding of factors affecting boreability have contributed to a dramatic increase in the number of machine bored tunnels. Today, tunnel boring machines (TBMs) are finding widespread application in various sectors of underground construction industry, both civil and mining. Most of the hard rock formations considered unsuited to mechanical boring only a few years ago are now excavated with TBMs with favorable economics compared to conventional drill and blast methods. Despite the advancements accomplished, TBMs need further improvements in design and operation to exend their capabilities and to reduce excavation costs, particularly in hard, abrasive rocks. The design of TBMs has presently reached a state where no additional major breakthroughs are anticipated in the near future. The cutter material appears to be the major obstacle to achieving further performance improvements. The amount of load which the cutters can sustain with acceptable levels of wear is the limiting factor determining the magnitude of the power that can be placed on a TBM. In fact, most present day TBMs can generate more thrust and torque than the individual cutters are capable of supporting.

  17. Field-aligned currents and large scale magnetospheric electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dangelo, N.

    1980-01-01

    D'Angelo's model of polar cap electric fields (1977) was used to visualize how high-latitude field-aligned currents are driven by the solar wind generator. The region 1 and region 2 currents of Iijima and Potemra (1976) and the cusp field-aligned currents of Wilhjelm et al. (1978) and McDiarmid et al. (1978) are apparently driven by different generators, although in both cases the solar wind is their ultimate source.

  18. Transformations among large c conformal field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankiewicz, Marcin; Kephart, Thomas W.

    2006-06-01

    We show that there is a set of transformations that relates all of the 24 dimensional even self-dual (Niemeier) lattices, and also leads to non-lattice objects some of which can perhaps be interpreted as a basis for the construction of holomorphic conformal field theory. In the second part of this paper, we extend our observations to higher-dimensional conformal field theories build on extremal partition functions, where we generate c=24k theories. We argue that there exists generalizations of the c=24 models based on Niemeier lattices and of the non-Niemeier spin-1 theories. The extremal cases have spectra decomposable into the irreducible representations of the Fischer-Griess Monster. This additional symmetry leads us to conjecture that these extremal theories, as well as the higher-dimensional analogs of the group lattice bases Niemeiers, will eventually yield to a full construction of their associated CFTs. We observe interesting periodicities in the coefficients of extremal partition functions and characters of the extremal vertex operator algebras.

  19. Large-scale electric fields in post-flare loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinata, Satoshi

    1987-01-01

    As the electrical conductivity along the magnetic field in the solar atmosphere is large, parallel electric fields have been neglected in most investigations. The importance of such fields is demonstrated for post-flare loops, and a model for them is introduced which takes into account the effect of parallel electric fields. The electric field calculated from the model is consistent with the electric field observed by Foukal et al. (1983).

  20. Fast magnetic reconnection with large guide fields

    SciTech Connect

    Stanier, A.; Simakov, Andrei N.; Chacón, L.; Daughton, W.

    2015-01-09

    Here, we demonstrate using two-fluid simulations that low-βmagnetic reconnection remains fast, regardless of the presence of fast dispersive waves, which have been previously suggested to play a critical role. In order to understand these results, a discrete model is constructed that offers scaling relationships for the reconnection rate and dissipation region (DR) thickness in terms of the upstream magnetic field and DR length. We verify these scalings numerically and show how the DR self-adjusts to process magnetic flux at the same rate that it is supplied to a larger region where two-fluid effects become important. Ultimately, the rate is independent of the DR physics and is in good agreement with kinetic results.

  1. Fast magnetic reconnection with large guide fields

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stanier, A.; Simakov, Andrei N.; Chacón, L.; Daughton, W.

    2015-01-09

    Here, we demonstrate using two-fluid simulations that low-βmagnetic reconnection remains fast, regardless of the presence of fast dispersive waves, which have been previously suggested to play a critical role. In order to understand these results, a discrete model is constructed that offers scaling relationships for the reconnection rate and dissipation region (DR) thickness in terms of the upstream magnetic field and DR length. We verify these scalings numerically and show how the DR self-adjusts to process magnetic flux at the same rate that it is supplied to a larger region where two-fluid effects become important. Ultimately, the rate is independentmore » of the DR physics and is in good agreement with kinetic results.« less

  2. Site study plan for Exploratory shaft facilities design foundation boreholes (shaft surface facility foundation borings), Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Surface-based geotechnical field program: Preliminary draft

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    This site study plan describes the Exploratory Shaft Facilities (ESF) Design Foundation Boreholes field activities to be conducted during early stages of Site Characterization at the Deaf Smith County, Texas, site. The field program has been designed to provide data useful in addressing information/data needs resulting from federal/state/local regulations, and repository program requirements. Approximately 50 foundation boreholes will be drilled within the ESP location to provide data necessary for design of the ESF and to satisfy applicable shaft permitting requirements. Soils and subsurface rock will be sampled as the foundation boreholes are advanced. Soil samples or rock core will be taken through the Blackwater Draw and Ogallala Formations and the Dockum Group. Hydrologic testing will be performed in boreholes that penetrates the water table. In-situ elastic properties will be determined from both the soil strata and rock units along the length of the boreholes. Field methods/tests are chosen that provide the best or only means of obtaining the required data. The Salt Repository Project (SRP) Networks specify the schedule under which the program will operate. Drilling will not begin until after site ground water baseline conditions have been established. The Technical Field Services Contractor is responsible for conducting the field program of drilling and testing. Samples and data will be handled and reported in accordance with established SRP procedures. A quality assurance program will be utilized to assure that activities affecting quality are performed correctly and that the appropriate documentation is maintained. 25 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. Rectangular-bore, high-gain laser plasma tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mollo, R. A.

    1969-01-01

    Rectangular-bore tube improves population inversion obtained from upper and terminal laser states, resulting in a significant increase in unsaturated gain factor. Radial field produces efficient pumping of upper laser state. Narrow tube dimensions cause increased diffusion flow of neon is metastable states to tube walls.

  4. Cam-controlled boring bar

    DOEpatents

    Glatthorn, Raymond H.

    1986-01-01

    A cam-controlled boring bar system (100) includes a first housing (152) which is rotatable about its longitudinal axis (154), and a second housing in the form of a cam-controlled slide (158) which is also rotatable about the axis (154) as well as being translatable therealong. A tool-holder (180) is mounted within the slide (158) for holding a single point cutting tool. Slide (158) has a rectangular configuration and is disposed within a rectangularly configured portion of the first housing (152). Arcuate cam slots (192) are defined within a side plate (172) of the housing (152), while cam followers (194) are mounted upon the cam slide (158) for cooperative engagement with the cam slots (192). In this manner, as the housing (152) and slide (158) rotate, and as the slide (158) also translates, a through-bore (14) having an hourglass configuration will be formed within a workpiece (16) which may be, for example, a nuclear reactor steam generator tube support plate.

  5. PERMANENT MAGNET DESIGNS WITH LARGE VARIATIONS IN FIELD STRENGTH.

    SciTech Connect

    GUPTA,R.

    2004-01-21

    The use of permanent magnets has been investigated as an option for electron cooling ring for the proposed luminosity upgrade of RHIC. Several methods have been developed that allow a large variation in field strength. These design concepts were verified with computer simulations using finite element codes. It will be shown that the field uniformity is maintained while the field strength is mechanically adjusted.

  6. Large Field, High Resolution Full-Field Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Assayag, Osnath; Antoine, Martine; Sigal-Zafrani, Brigitte; Riben, Michael; Harms, Fabrice; Burcheri, Adriano; Grieve, Kate; Dalimier, Eugénie; Le Conte de Poly, Bertrand; Boccara, Claude

    2014-01-01

    We present a benchmark pilot study in which high-resolution Full-Field Optical Coherence Tomography (FF-OCT) was used to image human breast tissue and is evaluated to assess its ability to aid the pathologist’s management of intra-operative diagnoses. FF-OCT imaging safety was investigated and agreement between FF-OCT and routinely prepared histopathological images was evaluated. The compact setup used for this study provides 1 µm3 resolution and 200 µm imaging depth, and a 2.25 cm2 specimen is scanned in about 7 minutes. 75 breast specimens were imaged from 22 patients (21 women, 1 man) with a mean age of 58 (range: 25-83). Pathologists blind diagnosed normal/benign or malignant tissue based on FF-OCT images alone, diagnosis from histopathology followed for comparison. The contrast in the FF-OCT images is generated by intrinsic tissue scattering properties, meaning that no tissue staining or preparation is required. Major architectural features and tissue structures of benign breast tissue, including adipocytes, fibrous stroma, lobules and ducts were characterized. Subsequently, features resulting from pathological modification were characterized and a diagnosis decision tree was developed. Using FF-OCT images, two breast pathologists were able to distinguish normal/benign tissue from lesional with a sensitivity of 94% and 90%, and specificity of 75% and 79% respectively. PMID:24000981

  7. Wide-bore monolithic column for electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ruijuan; Ding, Guosheng; Guo, Yugao; Liu, Danning; Bao, James J

    2007-06-01

    A new wide-bore electrophoresis (WE) system adopting an inner cooling device was set up to perform electrochromatography. In this system, a quartz tube of 1.2 mm inner diameter was used as the separation channel. The Joule heat generated during electrophoresis was removed timely through the outer surface of the quartz tube and a cooling capillary inserted into the quartz tube. A proper coolant passed through the cooling capillary to further improve the cooling efficiency. In the primary research, a polyacrylamide monolithic column was successfully prepared in this quartz tube. Then it was evaluated in the electrochromatographic mode. An electric field strength as high as 625 V/cm can be applied to this system without obvious deviation of the current from the linear curve of the Ohm plot. Sample volume as high as 1 microL was injected into the WE system and reasonable efficiency was obtained for separation of the test compounds. PMID:17480039

  8. High performance projectile seal development for non perfect railgun bores

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, T.R.; Vine, F.E. Le; Riedy, P.E.; Panlasigui, A.; Hawke, R.S.; Susoeff, A.R.

    1997-01-01

    The sealing of high pressure gas behind an accelerating projectile has been developed over centuries of use in conventional guns and cannons. The principal concern was propulsion efficiency and trajectory accuracy and repeatability. The development of guns for use as high pressure equation-of-state (EOS) research tools, increased the importance of better seals to prevent gas leakage from interfering with the experimental targets. The development of plasma driven railguns has further increased the need for higher quality seals to prevent gas and plasma blow-by. This paper summarizes more than a decade of effort to meet these increased requirements. In small bore railguns, the first improvement was prompted by the need to contain the propulsive plasma behind the projectile to avoid the initiation of current conducting paths in front of the projectile. The second major requirements arose from the development of a railgun to serve as an EOS tool where it was necessary to maintain an evacuated region in front of the projectile throughout the acceleration process. More recently, the techniques developed for the small bore guns have been applied to large bore railguns and electro-thermal chemical guns in order to maximize their propulsion efficiency. Furthermore, large bore railguns are often less rigid and less straight than conventional homogeneous material guns. Hence, techniques to maintain seals in non perfect, non homogeneous material launchers have been developed and are included in this paper.

  9. Boring crustaceans damage polystyrene floats under docks polluting marine waters with microplastic.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Timothy M

    2012-09-01

    Boring isopods damage expanded polystyrene floats under docks and, in the process, expel copious numbers of microplastic particles. This paper describes the impacts of boring isopods in aquaculture facilities and docks, quantifies and discusses the implications of these microplastics, and tests if an alternate foam type prevents boring. Floats from aquaculture facilities and docks were heavily damaged by thousands of isopods and their burrows. Multiple sites in Asia, Australia, Panama, and the USA exhibited evidence of isopod damage. One isopod creates thousands of microplastic particles when excavating a burrow; colonies can expel millions of particles. Microplastics similar in size to these particles may facilitate the spread of non-native species or be ingested by organisms causing physical or toxicological harm. Extruded polystyrene inhibited boring, suggesting this foam may prevent damage in the field. These results reveal boring isopods cause widespread damage to docks and are a novel source of microplastic pollution. PMID:22763283

  10. Feasibility study of detection of chatter by using FBG during boring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, P. Y.; Peng, W.; Yuan, L.; Hu, Z. J.

    2013-10-01

    A novel real-time monitoring system based on Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensor has been developed to detect chatter in boring process. In the system, a boring bar with large length-to-diameter ratio (FSTUP3225R/L-16S) was the test subject. The FBG sensor was installed on the surface of the boring bar with the length of 225mm. A classical strain gauge was employed to measure the vibratory strain and compare the results with the ones from FBG sensor. The measurements were carried out using various cutting parameters to obtain the desired chatter phenomenon. The analysis of the experimental data was verified the chatter happened during the deep hole boring. Comparison between the experimental results from two kinds of sensors demonstrated that the measurement technique could be used to detect the dynamic strain, as well as the permitting one to research the method to identify boring chatter on-line be using optical fiber sensor system.

  11. DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF A 15 T, 120 MM BORE IR QUADRUPOLE MAGNET FOR LARP

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Cheng, D.; Dietderich, D.; Felice, H.; Ferracin, P.; Hafalia, R.; Hannaford, R.; Sabbi, G. S.; Anerella, M.; Ghosh, A.; Schmalzle, J.; Wanderer, P.; Ambrosio, G.; Bossert, R.; Kashikhin, V.; Pasholk, D.; Zlobin, A.

    2009-05-04

    Pushing accelerator magnets beyond 10 T holds a promise of future upgrades to machines like the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Nb{sub 3}Sn conductor is at the present time the only practical superconductor capable of generating fields beyond 10 T. In support of the LHC Phase-II upgrade, the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) is developing a large bore (120 mm) IR quadrupole (HQ) capable of reaching 15 T at its conductor peak field and a peak gradient of 219 T/m at 1.9 K. While exploring the magnet performance limits in terms of gradient, forces and stresses the 1 m long two-layer coil will demonstrate additional features such as alignment and accelerator field quality. In this paper we summarize the design and report on the magnet construction progress.

  12. Connecting wind-driven upwelling and offshore stratification to nearshore internal bores and oxygen variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Ryan K.; Woodson, C. Brock; Leary, Paul R.; Monismith, Stephen G.

    2014-06-01

    This study utilizes field observations in southern Monterey Bay, CA, to examine how regional-scale upwelling and changing offshore (shelf) conditions influence nearshore internal bores. We show that the low-frequency wind forcing (e.g., upwelling/relaxation time scales) modifies the offshore stratification and thermocline depth. This in turn alters the strength and structure of observed internal bores in the nearshore. An internal bore strength index is defined using the high-pass filtered potential energy density anomaly in the nearshore. During weak upwelling favorable conditions and wind relaxations, the offshore thermocline deepens. In this case, both the amplitude of the offshore internal tide and the strength of the nearshore internal bores increase. In contrast, during strong upwelling conditions, the offshore thermocline shoals toward the surface, resulting in a decrease in the offshore internal tide amplitude. As a result, cold water accumulates in the nearshore (nearshore pooling), and the internal bore strength index decreases. Empirical orthogonal functions are utilized to support the claim that the bore events contribute to the majority of the variance in cross-shelf exchange and transport in the nearshore. Observed individual bores can drive shock-like drops in dissolved oxygen (DO) with rapid onset times, while extended upwelling periods with reduced bore activity produce longer duration, low DO events.

  13. Quality Designed Twin Wire Arc Spraying of Aluminum Bores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Johannes; Lahres, Michael; Methner, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    After 125 years of development in combustion engines, the attractiveness of these powerplants still gains a great deal of attention. The efficiency of engines has been increased continuously through numerous innovations during the last years. Especially in the field of motor engineering, consequent friction optimization leads to cost-effective fuel consumption advantages and a CO2 reduction. This is the motivation and adjusting lever of NANOSLIDE® from Mercedes-Benz. The twin wire arc-spraying process of the aluminum bore creates a thin, iron-carbon-alloyed coating which is surface-finished through honing. Due to the continuous development in engines, the coating strategies must be adapted in parallel to achieve a quality-conformed coating result. The most important factors to this end are the controlled indemnification of a minimal coating thickness and a homogeneous coating deposition of the complete bore. A specific system enables the measuring and adjusting of the part and the central plunging of the coating torch into the bore to achieve a homogeneous coating thickness. Before and after measurement of the bore diameter enables conclusions about the coating thickness. A software tool specifically developed for coating deposition can transfer this information to a model that predicts the coating deposition as a function of the coating strategy.

  14. When size matters: changing opinion in the management of pleural space—the rise of small-bore pleural catheters

    PubMed Central

    Sandri, Alberto; Guerrera, Francesco; Ferraris, Andrea; Marchisio, Filippo; Bora, Giulia; Costardi, Lorena; Solidoro, Paolo; Ruffini, Enrico; Oliaro, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Tube thoracostomy is usually the first step to treat several thoracic/pleural conditions such as pneumothorax, pleural effusions, haemothorax, haemo-pneumothorax and empyema. Today, a wide range of drains is available, ranging from small to large bore ones. Indications for an appropriate selection remains yet matter of debate, especially regarding the use of small bore catheters. Through this paper, we aimed to retrace the improvements of drains through the years and to review the current clinical indications for chest drain placement in pleural/thoracic diseases, comparing the effectiveness of small-bore drains vs. large-bore ones. PMID:27499983

  15. Observational Analysis of a Gust Front to Bore to Solitary Wave Transition within an Evolving Nocturnal Boundary Layer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knupp, Kevin

    2006-08-01

    The evolution of a gust front to bore to solitary wave transition, and comprehensive information on the evolving nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) associated with this change, are described with analysis of radar and profiler measurements. The observations were obtained on 21 June 2002 in the Oklahoma panhandle during the International H2O Project. The evolution of this system, from a strong bore (initiated by a vigorous gust front) to a solitary wave, was observed over a 4-h period with Doppler radar and surface measurements. Detailed information on the mature bore structure was obtained by a cluster of profiling instruments including two boundary layer wind profilers, a lidar ceilometer, and a microwave profiling radiometer.A strong bore was initiated by an extensive gust front that perturbed an incipient NBL whose development (prior to sunset) was enhanced by shading from the parent mesoscale convective system. At the time of bore formation, the NBL was about 300 m deep and exhibited a surface temperature about 4 K less than the afternoon maximum. Initially, the bore assumed kinematic properties similar to those of a gust front. As the NBL stabilized, the bore matured and exhibited undular formations over 30 60-km segments along the bore axis. A 30-km-wide cloud field accompanied the mature bore system within three hours of its formation. System-relative airflow within the cloud field was front-to-rear and exhibited a primary hydraulic jump updraft (4 5 m s-1 magnitude) within the bore core. The bore core exhibited a low, smooth cloud base, a cloud depth of 2.5 km, nearly adiabatic liquid water content, and pronounced turbulence. The maximum parcel displacements within the bore were about 2 km (sufficient for marginal convective initiation), and the net parcel displacement from before to after bore passage was 0.6 0.9 km.


  16. Magnetic Helicity and Large Scale Magnetic Fields: A Primer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackman, Eric G.

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic fields of laboratory, planetary, stellar, and galactic plasmas commonly exhibit significant order on large temporal or spatial scales compared to the otherwise random motions within the hosting system. Such ordered fields can be measured in the case of planets, stars, and galaxies, or inferred indirectly by the action of their dynamical influence, such as jets. Whether large scale fields are amplified in situ or a remnant from previous stages of an object's history is often debated for objects without a definitive magnetic activity cycle. Magnetic helicity, a measure of twist and linkage of magnetic field lines, is a unifying tool for understanding large scale field evolution for both mechanisms of origin. Its importance stems from its two basic properties: (1) magnetic helicity is typically better conserved than magnetic energy; and (2) the magnetic energy associated with a fixed amount of magnetic helicity is minimized when the system relaxes this helical structure to the largest scale available. Here I discuss how magnetic helicity has come to help us understand the saturation of and sustenance of large scale dynamos, the need for either local or global helicity fluxes to avoid dynamo quenching, and the associated observational consequences. I also discuss how magnetic helicity acts as a hindrance to turbulent diffusion of large scale fields, and thus a helper for fossil remnant large scale field origin models in some contexts. I briefly discuss the connection between large scale fields and accretion disk theory as well. The goal here is to provide a conceptual primer to help the reader efficiently penetrate the literature.

  17. Large Field Visualization with Demand-Driven Calculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Patrick J.; Henze, Chris

    1999-01-01

    We present a system designed for the interactive definition and visualization of fields derived from large data sets: the Demand-Driven Visualizer (DDV). The system allows the user to write arbitrary expressions to define new fields, and then apply a variety of visualization techniques to the result. Expressions can include differential operators and numerous other built-in functions, ail of which are evaluated at specific field locations completely on demand. The payoff of following a demand-driven design philosophy throughout becomes particularly evident when working with large time-series data, where the costs of eager evaluation alternatives can be prohibitive.

  18. Performance of a 14-T CuNb/Nb3Sn Rutherford coil with a 300 mm wide cold bore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguro, Hidetoshi; Watanabe, Kazuo; Awaji, Satoshi; Hanai, Satoshi; Ioka, Shigeru; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Tsubouchi, Hirokazu

    2016-08-01

    A large-bore 14-T CuNb/Nb3Sn Rutherford coil was developed for a 25 T cryogen-free superconducting magnet. The magnet consisted of a low-temperature superconducting (LTS) magnet of NbTi and Nb3Sn Rutherford coils, and a high-temperature superconducting magnet. The Nb3Sn Rutherford coil was fabricated by the react-and-wind method for the first time. The LTS magnet reached the designed operation current of 854 A without a training quench at a 1 h ramp rate. The central magnetic field generated by the LTS magnet was measured by a Hall sensor to be 14.0 T at 854 A in a 300 mm cold bore.

  19. Attitude Estimation for Large Field-of-View Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Yang; Crassidis, John L.; Markley, F. Landis

    2005-01-01

    The QUEST measurement noise model for unit vector observations has been widely used in spacecraft attitude estimation for more than twenty years. It was derived under the approximation that the noise lies in the tangent plane of the respective unit vector and is axially symmetrically distributed about the vector. For large field-of-view sensors, however, this approximation may be poor, especially when the measurement falls near the edge of the field of view. In this paper a new measurement noise model is derived based on a realistic noise distribution in the focal-plane of a large field-of-view sensor, which shows significant differences from the QUEST model for unit vector observations far away from the sensor boresight. An extended Kalman filter for attitude estimation is then designed with the new measurement noise model. Simulation results show that with the new measurement model the extended Kalman filter achieves better estimation performance using large field-of-view sensor observations.

  20. SU-E-J-03: Characterization of the Precision and Accuracy of a New, Preclinical, MRI-Guided Focused Ultrasound System for Image-Guided Interventions in Small-Bore, High-Field Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Ellens, N; Farahani, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) has many potential and realized applications including controlled heating and localized drug delivery. The development of many of these applications requires extensive preclinical work, much of it in small animal models. The goal of this study is to characterize the spatial targeting accuracy and reproducibility of a preclinical high field MRgFUS system for thermal ablation and drug delivery applications. Methods: The RK300 (FUS Instruments, Toronto, Canada) is a motorized, 2-axis FUS positioning system suitable for small bore (72 mm), high-field MRI systems. The accuracy of the system was assessed in three ways. First, the precision of the system was assessed by sonicating regular grids of 5 mm squares on polystyrene plates and comparing the resulting focal dimples to the intended pattern, thereby assessing the reproducibility and precision of the motion control alone. Second, the targeting accuracy was assessed by imaging a polystyrene plate with randomly drilled holes and replicating the hole pattern by sonicating the observed hole locations on intact polystyrene plates and comparing the results. Third, the practicallyrealizable accuracy and precision were assessed by comparing the locations of transcranial, FUS-induced blood-brain-barrier disruption (BBBD) (observed through Gadolinium enhancement) to the intended targets in a retrospective analysis of animals sonicated for other experiments. Results: The evenly-spaced grids indicated that the precision was 0.11 +/− 0.05 mm. When image-guidance was included by targeting random locations, the accuracy was 0.5 +/− 0.2 mm. The effective accuracy in the four rodent brains assessed was 0.8 +/− 0.6 mm. In all cases, the error appeared normally distributed (p<0.05) in both orthogonal axes, though the left/right error was systematically greater than the superior/inferior error. Conclusions: The targeting accuracy of this device is sub-millimeter, suitable for many

  1. Large amplitude middle atmospheric electric fields - Fact or fiction?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, M. C.; Siefring, C. L.; Pfaff, R. F., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    An analysis of the measurements of large apparent dc fields in the middle atmosphere, previously gathered by two sounding rockets, shows these fields to be spurious. In the case of one of the rockets, the evidence presented suggests that the measured electric fields, aligned with the rocket's velocity vector, may be due to a negatively charged wake. A comparison of measurements made by various electric field booms also suggests that the insulating boom coatings in one experiment may have affected the results obtained. It is recommended that insulating coatings should not be used at mesospheric altitudes, because of the detrimental effects that frictional charging may have.

  2. Hole-boring through clouds for laser power beaming

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinski, R.J.; Walter, R.F.

    1994-12-31

    Power beaming to satellites with a ground-based laser can be limited by clouds. Hole-boring through the clouds with a laser has been proposed as a way to overcome this obstacle. This paper reviews the past work on laser hole-boring and concludes that hole-boring for direct beaming to satellites is likely to require 10--100 MW. However, it may be possible to use an airborne relay mirror at 10--25 km altitude for some applications in order to extend the range of the laser (e.g., for beaming to satellites near the horizon). In these cases, use of the relay mirror also would allow a narrow beam between the laser and the relay, as well as the possibility of reducing the crosswind if the plane matched speed with the cloud temporarily. Under these conditions, the power requirement to bore a hole through most cirrus and cirrostratus clouds might be only 500-kW if the hole is less than 1 m in diameter and if the crosswind speed is less than 10 m/s. Overcoming cirrus and cirrostratus clouds would reduce the downtime due to weather by a factor of 2. However, 500 kW is a large laser, and it may be more effective instead to establish a second power beaming site in a separate weather zone. An assessment of optimum wavelengths for hole boring also was made, and the best options were found to be 3.0--3.4 {mu}m and above 10 {mu}m.

  3. Tunnel boring waste test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Patricio, J.G. . Rockwell Hanford Operations)

    1984-03-01

    The test plan has been prepared in anticipation of the need to excavate certain repository openings by relying upon mechanical excavation techniques. The test plan proposes that specific technical issues can be resolved and key design parameters defined by excavating openings in basalt near the surface, utilizing a full face tunnel boring machine (TBM). The purpose and objective of this type of testing will define the overall feasibility and attributes of mechanical excavation in basalt. The test plan recognizes that although this technology is generally available for underground construction for some geologic settings, the current state of technology for excavation in basalt is limited and the potential for improvement is considerable. The test plan recommends that it is economically advantageous to conduct additional testing in the laboratory to allow refinement of this plan based on the laboratory results. Thus, this test plan is considered preliminary in nature, with respect to detailed testing recommendations. However, the gross design attributes and resource requirements of a near-surface TBM demonstration are considered to be valid. 15 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. High resolution, large dynamic range field map estimation

    PubMed Central

    Dagher, Joseph; Reese, Timothy; Bilgin, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We present a theory and a corresponding method to compute high resolution field maps over a large dynamic range. Theory and Methods We derive a closed-form expression for the error in the field map value when computed from two echoes. We formulate an optimization problem to choose three echo times which result in a pair of maximally distinct error distributions. We use standard field mapping sequences at the prescribed echo times. We then design a corresponding estimation algorithm which takes advantage of the optimized echo times to disambiguate the field offset value. Results We validate our method using high resolution images of a phantom at 7T. The resulting field maps demonstrate robust mapping over both a large dynamic range, and in low SNR regions. We also present high resolution offset maps in vivo using both, GRE and MEGE sequences. Even though the proposed echo time spacings are larger than the well known phase aliasing cutoff, the resulting field maps exhibit a large dynamic range without the use of phase unwrapping or spatial regularization techniques. Conclusion We demonstrate a novel 3-echo field map estimation method which overcomes the traditional noise-dynamic range trade-off. PMID:23401245

  5. Large field excursions from a few site relaxion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, N.; de Lima, L.; Machado, C. S.; Matheus, R. D.

    2016-07-01

    Relaxion models are an interesting new avenue to explain the radiative stability of the Standard Model scalar sector. They require very large field excursions, which are difficult to generate in a consistent UV completion and to reconcile with the compact field space of the relaxion. We propose an N -site model which naturally generates the large decay constant needed to address these issues. Our model offers distinct advantages with respect to previous proposals: the construction involves non-Abelian fields, allowing for controlled high-energy behavior and more model building possibilities, both in particle physics and inflationary models, and also admits a continuum limit when the number of sites is large, which may be interpreted as a warped extra dimension.

  6. Osedax borings in fossil marine bird bones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiel, Steffen; Kahl, Wolf-Achim; Goedert, James L.

    2011-01-01

    The bone-eating marine annelid Osedax consumes mainly whale bones on the deep-sea floor, but recent colonization experiments with cow bones and molecular age estimates suggesting a possible Cretaceous origin of Osedax indicate that this worm might be able grow on a wider range of substrates. The suggested Cretaceous origin was thought to imply that Osedax could colonize marine reptile or fish bones, but there is currently no evidence that Osedax consumes bones other than those of mammals. We provide the first evidence that Osedax was, and most likely still is, able to consume non-mammalian bones, namely bird bones. Borings resembling those produced by living Osedax were found in bones of early Oligocene marine flightless diving birds (family Plotopteridae). The species that produced these boreholes had a branching filiform root that grew to a length of at least 3 mm, and lived in densities of up to 40 individuals per square centimeter. The inclusion of bird bones into the diet of Osedax has interesting implications for the recent suggestion of a Cretaceous origin of this worm because marine birds have existed continuously since the Cretaceous. Bird bones could have enabled this worm to survive times in the Earth's history when large marine vertebrates other than fish were rare, specifically after the disappearance of large marine reptiles at the end-Cretaceous mass extinction event and before the rise of whales in the Eocene.

  7. Osedax borings in fossil marine bird bones.

    PubMed

    Kiel, Steffen; Kahl, Wolf-Achim; Goedert, James L

    2011-01-01

    The bone-eating marine annelid Osedax consumes mainly whale bones on the deep-sea floor, but recent colonization experiments with cow bones and molecular age estimates suggesting a possible Cretaceous origin of Osedax indicate that this worm might be able grow on a wider range of substrates. The suggested Cretaceous origin was thought to imply that Osedax could colonize marine reptile or fish bones, but there is currently no evidence that Osedax consumes bones other than those of mammals. We provide the first evidence that Osedax was, and most likely still is, able to consume non-mammalian bones, namely bird bones. Borings resembling those produced by living Osedax were found in bones of early Oligocene marine flightless diving birds (family Plotopteridae). The species that produced these boreholes had a branching filiform root that grew to a length of at least 3 mm, and lived in densities of up to 40 individuals per square centimeter. The inclusion of bird bones into the diet of Osedax has interesting implications for the recent suggestion of a Cretaceous origin of this worm because marine birds have existed continuously since the Cretaceous. Bird bones could have enabled this worm to survive times in the Earth's history when large marine vertebrates other than fish were rare, specifically after the disappearance of large marine reptiles at the end-Cretaceous mass extinction event and before the rise of whales in the Eocene. PMID:21103978

  8. THE LARGE-SCALE MAGNETIC FIELDS OF THIN ACCRETION DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Xinwu; Spruit, Hendrik C. E-mail: henk@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2013-03-10

    Large-scale magnetic field threading an accretion disk is a key ingredient in the jet formation model. The most attractive scenario for the origin of such a large-scale field is the advection of the field by the gas in the accretion disk from the interstellar medium or a companion star. However, it is realized that outward diffusion of the accreted field is fast compared with the inward accretion velocity in a geometrically thin accretion disk if the value of the Prandtl number P{sub m} is around unity. In this work, we revisit this problem considering the angular momentum of the disk to be removed predominantly by the magnetically driven outflows. The radial velocity of the disk is significantly increased due to the presence of the outflows. Using a simplified model for the vertical disk structure, we find that even moderately weak fields can cause sufficient angular momentum loss via a magnetic wind to balance outward diffusion. There are two equilibrium points, one at low field strengths corresponding to a plasma-beta at the midplane of order several hundred, and one for strong accreted fields, {beta} {approx} 1. We surmise that the first is relevant for the accretion of weak, possibly external, fields through the outer parts of the disk, while the latter one could explain the tendency, observed in full three-dimensional numerical simulations, of strong flux bundles at the centers of disk to stay confined in spite of strong magnetororational instability turbulence surrounding them.

  9. Red Galaxy Structures Toward a Large Quasar Group Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williger, Gerard M.; Feil, E. C.; Haberzettl, L.; Clowes, R.; Campusano, L.; Haines, C. P.; Valls-Gabaud, D.; Lehnert, M.; Nesvadba, N.; LQG Team

    2014-01-01

    We present data from deep FUV-NUV-griz images toward a 2 sq degree region in the Clowes-Campusano Large Quasar Group field, which contains structures of quasars on the >100 Mpc scale at 0.8 and 1.2. Large Quasar Groups may be the signal posts for galaxy structures analogous to superclusters at high redshift. Using the six band photometry, we calculate photometric redshifts for red-selected galaxies to identify supercluster-size structures, and compare their locations with the quasars in the field.

  10. A large-field laser holographic focusing schilieren system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, Glen P.; Chokani, N.

    1992-01-01

    A large-field laser holographic focusing schlieren system for high-speed flow visualization has been built and evaluated. This system is based on a recently improved large-field focusing schlieren technique and is combined with laser holography methods to record three-dimensional flows. A coordinated experimental and computational study of supersonic flows over wedge, cone, and sphere geometries was conducted to evaluate the capabilities and limitations of the system. The ability of the system to focus on planes normal to its optical axis is demonstrated. The sharpness of focus of the present system was found to be limited. Issues regarding obtaining quantitative measurements of the density gradient are discussed.

  11. Design considerations for a large aperture high field superconducting dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Harfoush, F.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Harrison, M.; Kerby, J.; Koepke, K.; Mantsch, P.; Nicol, T.; Riddiford, A.; Theilacker, J.

    1989-03-01

    The final phase of the Fermilab upgrade proposal calls for a new ring of superconducting magnets to be placed in the existing Main Accelerator tunnel. The goal of this design study is to specify a high field dipole (HFD) that is capable of supporting fixed target operation (ramping, resonant extraction) at a field of 6.6T (1.5 Tev) and colliding beam physics at 8.0T (1.8 Tev). The magnetic field quality at high field is set by the large amplitude orbits associated with resonant extraction. The field quality must therefore be at least as good as the existing Tevatron magnets which fulfill these criteria. The high fields and large aperture of this magnet result in large forces on the coil and collar assemblies. Therefore, the cold mass design must be able to sustain these forces while providing sufficient cooling to the coils during 4.2 K fixed target operation, and a minimum heat load during 1.8 K collider operation. The design work is still in progress but a cosine-theta, cold-iron dipole with a 70mm inner diameter coil has been tentatively adopted. This report presents details on the conductor and cable parameters, coil cross-section, projected manufacturing tolerances, iron yoke design, and cold mass assembly. 4 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. An artificial compound eye system for large field imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Shi, Lifang; Shi, Ruiying; Dong, Xiaochun; Deng, Qiling; Du, Chunlei

    2012-11-01

    With the rapid development of science and technology, optical imaging system has been widely used, and the performance requirements are getting higher and higher such as lighter weight, smaller size, larger field of view and more sensitive to the moving targets. With the advantages of large field of view, high agility and multi-channels, compound eye is more and more concerned by academia and industry. In this work, an artificial spherical compound eye imaging system is proposed, which is formed by several mini cameras to get a large field of view. By analyzing the relationship of the view field between every single camera and the whole system, the geometric arrangement of cameras is studied and the compound eye structure is designed. By using the precision machining technology, the system can be manufactured. To verify the performance of this system, experiments were carried out, where the compound eye was formed by seven mini cameras which were placed centripetally along a spherical surface so that each camera points in a different direction. Pictures taken by these cameras were mosaiced into a complete image with large field of view. The results of the experiments prove the validity of the design method and the fabrication technology. By increasing the number of the cameras, larger view field even panoramic imaging can be realized by using this artificial compound eye.

  13. Small diameter, deep bore optical inspection system

    DOEpatents

    Lord, David E.; Petrini, Richard R.; Carter, Gary W.

    1981-01-01

    An improved rod optic system for inspecting small diameter, deep bores. The system consists of a rod optic system utilizing a curved mirror at the end of the rod lens such that the optical path through the system is bent 90.degree. to minimize optical distortion in examining the sides of a curved bore. The system is particularly useful in the examination of small bores for corrosion, and is capable of examining 1/16 inch diameter and up to 4 inch deep drill holes, for example. The positioning of the curved mirror allows simultaneous viewing from shallow and right angle points of observation of the same artifact (such as corrosion) in the bore hole. The improved rod optic system may be used for direct eye sighting, or in combination with a still camera or a low-light television monitor; particularly low-light color television.

  14. Small diameter, deep bore optical inspection system

    DOEpatents

    Lord, D.E.; Petrini, R.R.; Carter, G.W.

    An improved rod optic system for inspecting small diameter, deep bores is described. The system consists of a rod optic system utilizing a curved mirror at the end of the rod lens such that the optical path through the system is bent 90/sup 0/ to minimize optical distortion in examing the sides of a curved bore. The system is particularly useful in the examination of small bores for corrosion, and is capable if examing 1/16 inch diameter and up to 4-inch deep drill holes, for example. The positioning of the curved mirror allows simultaneous viewing from shallow and righ angle points of observation of the same artifact (such as corrosion) in the bore hole. The improved rod optic system may be used for direct eye sighting, or in combination with a still camera or a low-light television monitor; particularly low-light color television.

  15. High temperature well bore cement slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Nahm, J.J.W.; Vinegar, H.J.; Karanikas, J.M.; Wyant, R.E.

    1993-07-13

    A low density well bore cement slurry composition is described suitable for cementing well bores with high reservoir temperatures comprising: (a) a high alumina cement in an amount of about 40 pounds per barrel of slurry or greater: (b) graphite in an amount greater than about one quarter, by volume, of the solids in the cement slurry; and (c) and a carrier fluid comprising drilling mud.

  16. Scalable Parallel Distance Field Construction for Large-Scale Applications.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongfeng; Xie, Jinrong; Ma, Kwan-Liu; Kolla, Hemanth; Chen, Jacqueline H

    2015-10-01

    Computing distance fields is fundamental to many scientific and engineering applications. Distance fields can be used to direct analysis and reduce data. In this paper, we present a highly scalable method for computing 3D distance fields on massively parallel distributed-memory machines. A new distributed spatial data structure, named parallel distance tree, is introduced to manage the level sets of data and facilitate surface tracking over time, resulting in significantly reduced computation and communication costs for calculating the distance to the surface of interest from any spatial locations. Our method supports several data types and distance metrics from real-world applications. We demonstrate its efficiency and scalability on state-of-the-art supercomputers using both large-scale volume datasets and surface models. We also demonstrate in-situ distance field computation on dynamic turbulent flame surfaces for a petascale combustion simulation. Our work greatly extends the usability of distance fields for demanding applications. PMID:26357251

  17. Scalable parallel distance field construction for large-scale applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Hongfeng; Xie, Jinrong; Ma, Kwan -Liu; Kolla, Hemanth; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2015-10-01

    Computing distance fields is fundamental to many scientific and engineering applications. Distance fields can be used to direct analysis and reduce data. In this paper, we present a highly scalable method for computing 3D distance fields on massively parallel distributed-memory machines. Anew distributed spatial data structure, named parallel distance tree, is introduced to manage the level sets of data and facilitate surface tracking overtime, resulting in significantly reduced computation and communication costs for calculating the distance to the surface of interest from any spatial locations. Our method supports several data types and distance metrics from real-world applications. We demonstrate its efficiency and scalability on state-of-the-art supercomputers using both large-scale volume datasets and surface models. We also demonstrate in-situ distance field computation on dynamic turbulent flame surfaces for a petascale combustion simulation. In conclusion, our work greatly extends the usability of distance fields for demanding applications.

  18. An improved large-field focusing schlieren system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Leonard M.

    1991-01-01

    The analysis and performance of a high-brightness large-field focusing schlieren system is described. The system can be used to examine complex two- and three-dimensional flows. Techniques are described to obtain focusing schlieren through distorting optical elements, to use multiple colors in a time multiplexing technique, and to use diffuse screen holography for three-dimensional photographs.

  19. Large Scale Field Campaign Contributions to Soil Moisture Remote Sensing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Large-scale field experiments have been an essential component of soil moisture remote sensing for over two decades. They have provided test beds for both the technology and science necessary to develop and refine satellite mission concepts. The high degree of spatial variability of soil moisture an...

  20. Lateral stirring of large-scale tracer fields by altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dencausse, Guillaume; Morrow, Rosemary; Rogé, Marine; Fleury, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Ocean surface fronts and filaments have a strong impact on the global ocean circulation and biogeochemistry. Surface Lagrangian advection with time-evolving altimetric geostrophic velocities can be used to simulate the submesoscale front and filament structures in large-scale tracer fields. We study this technique in the Southern Ocean region south of Tasmania, a domain marked by strong meso- to submesoscale features such as the fronts of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). Starting with large-scale surface tracer fields that we stir with altimetric velocities, we determine `advected' fields which compare well with high-resolution in situ or satellite tracer data. We find that fine scales are best represented in a statistical sense after an optimal advection time of ˜2 weeks, with enhanced signatures of the ACC fronts and better spectral energy. The technique works best in moderate to high EKE regions where lateral advection dominates. This technique may be used to infer the distribution of unresolved small scales in any physical or biogeochemical surface tracer that is dominated by lateral advection. Submesoscale dynamics also impact the subsurface of the ocean, and the Lagrangian advection at depth shows promising results. Finally, we show that climatological tracer fields computed from the advected large-scale fields display improved fine-scale mean features, such as the ACC fronts, which can be useful in the context of ocean modelling.

  1. Weak gravity strongly constrains large-field axion inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidenreich, Ben; Reece, Matthew; Rudelius, Tom

    2015-12-01

    Models of large-field inflation based on axion-like fields with shift symmetries can be simple and natural, and make a promising prediction of detectable primordial gravitational waves. The Weak Gravity Conjecture is known to constrain the simplest case in which a single compact axion descends from a gauge field in an extra dimension. We argue that the Weak Gravity Conjecture also constrains a variety of theories of multiple compact axions including N-flation and some alignment models. We show that other alignment models entail surprising consequences for how the mass spectrum of the theory varies across the axion moduli space, and hence can be excluded if further conjectures hold. In every case that we consider, plausible assumptions lead to field ranges that cannot be parametrically larger than M Pl. Our results are strongly suggestive of a general inconsistency in models of large-field inflation based on compact axions, and possibly of a more general principle forbidding super-Planckian field ranges.

  2. CONSTRAINING PRIMORDIAL MAGNETIC FIELDS THROUGH LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Kahniashvili, Tina; Natarajan, Aravind; Battaglia, Nicholas; Maravin, Yurii; Tevzadze, Alexander G.

    2013-06-10

    We study primordial magnetic field effects on the matter perturbations in the universe. We assume magnetic field generation prior to the big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN), i.e., during the radiation-dominated epoch of the universe expansion, but do not limit analysis by considering a particular magnetogenesis scenario. Contrary to previous studies, we limit the total magnetic field energy density and not the smoothed amplitude of the magnetic field at large (of the order of 1 Mpc) scales. We review several cosmological signatures, such as halo abundance, thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, and Ly{alpha} data. For a cross-check, we compare our limits with that obtained through the cosmic microwave background faraday rotation effect and BBN. The limits range between 1.5 nG and 4.5 nG for n{sub B} in (- 3; -1.5).

  3. Modeling emergent large-scale structures of barchan dune fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worman, S. L.; Murray, A. B.; Littlewood, R.; Andreotti, B.; Claudin, P.

    2013-10-01

    In nature, barchan dunes typically exist as members of larger fields that display striking, enigmatic structures that cannot be readily explained by examining the dynamics at the scale of single dunes, or by appealing to patterns in external forcing. To explore the possibility that observed structures emerge spontaneously as a collective result of many dunes interacting with each other, we built a numerical model that treats barchans as discrete entities that interact with one another according to simplified rules derived from theoretical and numerical work and from field observations: (1) Dunes exchange sand through the fluxes that leak from the downwind side of each dune and are captured on their upstream sides; (2) when dunes become sufficiently large, small dunes are born on their downwind sides (`calving'); and (3) when dunes collide directly enough, they merge. Results show that these relatively simple interactions provide potential explanations for a range of field-scale phenomena including isolated patches of dunes and heterogeneous arrangements of similarly sized dunes in denser fields. The results also suggest that (1) dune field characteristics depend on the sand flux fed into the upwind boundary, although (2) moving downwind, the system approaches a common attracting state in which the memory of the upwind conditions vanishes. This work supports the hypothesis that calving exerts a first-order control on field-scale phenomena; it prevents individual dunes from growing without bound, as single-dune analyses suggest, and allows the formation of roughly realistic, persistent dune field patterns.

  4. Modeling emergent large-scale structures of barchan dune fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worman, S. L.; Murray, A.; Littlewood, R. C.; Andreotti, B.; Claudin, P.

    2013-12-01

    In nature, barchan dunes typically exist as members of larger fields that display striking, enigmatic structures that cannot be readily explained by examining the dynamics at the scale of single dunes, or by appealing to patterns in external forcing. To explore the possibility that observed structures emerge spontaneously as a collective result of many dunes interacting with each other, we built a numerical model that treats barchans as discrete entities that interact with one another according to simplified rules derived from theoretical and numerical work, and from field observations: Dunes exchange sand through the fluxes that leak from the downwind side of each dune and are captured on their upstream sides; when dunes become sufficiently large, small dunes are born on their downwind sides ('calving'); and when dunes collide directly enough, they merge. Results show that these relatively simple interactions provide potential explanations for a range of field-scale phenomena including isolated patches of dunes and heterogeneous arrangements of similarly sized dunes in denser fields. The results also suggest that (1) dune field characteristics depend on the sand flux fed into the upwind boundary, although (2) moving downwind, the system approaches a common attracting state in which the memory of the upwind conditions vanishes. This work supports the hypothesis that calving exerts a first order control on field-scale phenomena; it prevents individual dunes from growing without bound, as single-dune analyses suggest, and allows the formation of roughly realistic, persistent dune field patterns.

  5. Numerically modelling the large scale coronal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panja, Mayukh; Nandi, Dibyendu

    2016-07-01

    The solar corona spews out vast amounts of magnetized plasma into the heliosphere which has a direct impact on the Earth's magnetosphere. Thus it is important that we develop an understanding of the dynamics of the solar corona. With our present technology it has not been possible to generate 3D magnetic maps of the solar corona; this warrants the use of numerical simulations to study the coronal magnetic field. A very popular method of doing this, is to extrapolate the photospheric magnetic field using NLFF or PFSS codes. However the extrapolations at different time intervals are completely independent of each other and do not capture the temporal evolution of magnetic fields. On the other hand full MHD simulations of the global coronal field, apart from being computationally very expensive would be physically less transparent, owing to the large number of free parameters that are typically used in such codes. This brings us to the Magneto-frictional model which is relatively simpler and computationally more economic. We have developed a Magnetofrictional Model, in 3D spherical polar co-ordinates to study the large scale global coronal field. Here we present studies of changing connectivities between active regions, in response to photospheric motions.

  6. Edge field emission of large-area single layer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleshch, Victor I.; Bandurin, Denis A.; Orekhov, Anton S.; Purcell, Stephen T.; Obraztsov, Alexander N.

    2015-12-01

    Field electron emission from the edges of large-area (∼1 cm × 1 cm) graphene films deposited onto quartz wafers was studied. The graphene was previously grown by chemical vapour deposition on copper. An extreme enhancement of electrostatic field at the edge of the films with macroscopically large lateral dimensions and with single atom thickness was achieved. This resulted in the creation of a blade type electron emitter, providing stable field emission at low-voltage with linear current density up to 0.5 mA/cm. A strong hysteresis in current-voltage characteristics and a step-like increase of the emission current during voltage ramp up were observed. These effects were explained by the local mechanical peeling of the graphene edge from the quartz substrate by the ponderomotive force during the field emission process. Specific field emission phenomena exhibited in the experimental study are explained by a unique combination of structural, electronic and mechanical properties of graphene. Various potential applications ranging from linear electron beam sources to microelectromechanical systems are discussed.

  7. A wind tunnel application of large-field focusing schlieren

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponton, Michael K.; Seiner, John M.; Mitchell, L. K.; Manning, James C.; Jansen, Bernard J.; Lagen, Nicholas T.

    1992-01-01

    A large-field focusing schlieren apparatus was installed in the NASA Lewis Research Center 9 by 15 foot wind tunnel in an attempt to determine the density gradient flow field of a free jet issuing from a supersonic nozzle configuration. The nozzle exit geometry was designed to reduce acoustic emissions from the jet by enhancing plume mixing. Thus, the flow exhibited a complex three-dimensional structure which warranted utilizing the sharp focusing capability of this type of schlieren method. Design considerations concerning tunnel limitations, high-speed photography, and video tape recording are presented in the paper.

  8. Large N correlation functions in superconformal field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Gomez, Diego; Russo, Jorge G.

    2016-06-01

    We compute correlation functions of chiral primary operators in mathcal{N}=2 super-conformal theories at large N using a construction based on supersymmetric localization recently developed by Gerchkovitz et al. We focus on mathcal{N}=4 SYM as well as on supercon-formal QCD. In the case of mathcal{N}=4 we recover the free field theory results as expected due to non-renormalization theorems. In the case of superconformal QCD we study the planar expansion in the large N limit. The final correlators admit a simple generalization to a finite N formula which exactly matches the various small N results in the literature.

  9. Large scale meteorological influence during the Geysers 1979 field experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, S.

    1980-01-01

    A series of meteorological field measurements conducted during July 1979 near Cobb Mountain in Northern California reveals evidence of several scales of atmospheric circulation consistent with the climatic pattern of the area. The scales of influence are reflected in the structure of wind and temperature in vertically stratified layers at a given observation site. Large scale synoptic gradient flow dominates the wind field above about twice the height of the topographic ridge. Below that there is a mixture of effects with evidence of a diurnal sea breeze influence and a sublayer of katabatic winds. The July observations demonstrate that weak migratory circulations in the large scale synoptic meteorological pattern have a significant influence on the day-to-day gradient winds and must be accounted for in planning meteorological programs including tracer experiments.

  10. Short, shaped pulses in a large magnetic field gradient.

    PubMed

    Coarna, C; Newling, B

    2009-02-01

    A number of materials MR developments require that measurements be made in a large magnetic field gradient, including unilateral (single-sided) magnet designs for portability and open access. In such cases, all radiofrequency (RF) pulses are slice selective. Typically, little effort is made to tailor the shape of the selected slice, because shaped RF excitations are viewed as too lengthy in duration to be useful in materials MRI, where signal lifetimes are mostly less than 1 ms. We compare measured magnetization responses to various standard shaped pulses under extreme conditions of application (approximately 30 micros duration, offset frequencies up to 0.3 MHz, and in the presence of a 13 T/m permanent magnetic field gradient). We discuss the feasibility of their implementation for materials MRI in a large gradient, including the difficulty of choosing optimized pulse area, and propose viable solutions. PMID:19038562

  11. Fuel injection valve having a burnished guide bore and seat

    SciTech Connect

    Sasao, I.; Takaoka, Y.

    1987-03-24

    A method is described of producing a fuel injection valve which comprises a main fuel injection valve body; a valve rod slidable in the body and having an end with a valve body; and a valve seat-forming member attached to the main fuel injection valve body with the valve rod guidably received therein; the valve seat forming member having an interior including a guide bore for guiding opening and closing displacements of the valve rod. The guide bore has a uniform diameter throughout its entire length. A valve seat connected to the guide bore by an intermediate connecting portion, the valve seat having a smaller diameter than that of the guide bore and a fuel discharge port formed in continuation of the valve seat. The method comprises: forming a starting bore in the valve seat-forming member by boring, the starting bore having a straight, rectilinear bore portion leading into a lower tapered bore portion, and thereafter concurrently forming the guide bore and the valve seat from the starting bore by simultaneously subjecting the surfaces of the straight, rectilinear portion of the lower tapered bore portion of the starting bore to a burnishing operation by a single and common burnishing tool. This leaves a non-barnished portion between the burnished guide bore and the burnished valve seat, the non-burnished portion forming the intermediate connecting portion which provides a smoothly stepped configuration from the guide bore to the valve seat.

  12. A multidiagnostic investigation of the mesospheric bore phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Steven M.; Taylor, Michael J.; Swenson, Gary R.; She, Chiao-Yao; Hocking, Wayne; Baumgardner, Jeffrey; Mendillo, Michael

    2003-02-01

    Imaging measurements of a bright wave event in the nighttime mesosphere were made on 14 November 1999 at two sites separated by over 500 km in the southwestern United States. The event was characterized by a sharp onset of a series of extensive wavefronts that propagated across the entire sky. The waves were easily visible to the naked eye, and the entire event was observed for at least 5? hours. The event was observed using three wide-angle imaging systems located at the Boston University field station at McDonald Observatory (MDO), Fort Davis, Texas, and the Starfire Optical Range (SOR), Albuquerque, New Mexico. The spaced imaging measurements provided a unique opportunity to estimate the physical extent and time history of the disturbance. Simultaneous radar neutral wind measurements in the 82 to 98 km altitude region were also made at the SOR which indicated that a strong vertical wind shear of 19.5 ms-1km-1 occurred between 80 and 95 km just prior to the appearance of the disturbance. Simultaneous lidar temperature and density measurements made at Fort Collins, Colorado, ˜1100 km north of MDO, show the presence of a large (˜50 K) temperature inversion layer at the time of the wave event. The observations indicated that the event was most probably due to an undular mesospheric bore, a relatively uncommon disturbance which has only recently been reported [, 1995a]. Evidence is also shown to suggest that a large east-west tropospheric frontal system lying over the northern United States was the origin of the disturbance.

  13. Large non-Gaussian halo bias from single field inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Agullo, Ivan; Shandera, Sarah E-mail: shandera@gravity.psu.edu

    2012-09-01

    We calculate Large Scale Structure observables for non-Gaussianity arising from non-Bunch-Davies initial states in single field inflation. These scenarios can have substantial primordial non-Gaussianity from squeezed (but observable) momentum configurations. They generate a term in the halo bias that may be more strongly scale-dependent than the contribution from the local ansatz. We also discuss theoretical considerations required to generate an observable signature.

  14. Large field inflation models from higher-dimensional gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuuchi, Kazuyuki; Koyama, Yoji

    2015-02-01

    Motivated by the recent detection of B-mode polarization of CMB by BICEP2 which is possibly of primordial origin, we study large field inflation models which can be obtained from higher-dimensional gauge theories. The constraints from CMB observations on the gauge theory parameters are given, and their naturalness are discussed. Among the models analyzed, Dante's Inferno model turns out to be the most preferred model in this framework.

  15. Relic vector field and CMB large scale anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xingang; Wang, Yi E-mail: yw366@cam.ac.uk

    2014-10-01

    We study the most general effects of relic vector fields on the inflationary background and density perturbations. Such effects are observable if the number of inflationary e-folds is close to the minimum requirement to solve the horizon problem. We show that this can potentially explain two CMB large scale anomalies: the quadrupole-octopole alignment and the quadrupole power suppression. We discuss its effect on the parity anomaly. We also provide analytical template for more detailed data comparison.

  16. Large field inflation models from higher-dimensional gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Furuuchi, Kazuyuki; Koyama, Yoji

    2015-02-23

    Motivated by the recent detection of B-mode polarization of CMB by BICEP2 which is possibly of primordial origin, we study large field inflation models which can be obtained from higher-dimensional gauge theories. The constraints from CMB observations on the gauge theory parameters are given, and their naturalness are discussed. Among the models analyzed, Dante’s Inferno model turns out to be the most preferred model in this framework.

  17. Fast catadioptric optics with large field of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, N.; Doucet, M.; Desnoyers, N.; Le Noc, L.; Bergeron, A.

    2009-08-01

    High resolution is in demand for the new applications based on the use of infrared technology. For observation task, high resolution provides more information either under the form of better resolving power or larger field-of-view. Various solutions can be envisioned to achieve high resolution imaging. In this paper, a combination of high resolution detector and microscanning system is proposed. This strategy results in higher resolution and reduced aliasing. A catadioptric configuration is preferred when a microscan is required to increase the spatial sampling frequency. Among the catadioptric configurations, the Schmidt-Cassegrain has wide angle capability due to its aspherical entrance window. However, when the system is used in harsh environment, this compensator window may have to be replaced often. In this case, a flat window would be preferred because it can be removed or easily replaced at reasonable cost. The reduction of the aberrations to an acceptable level without compensator window requires that the mirrors of the telescope be aspherized. In this paper, we present a modified Cassegrain telescope with two aspherical mirrors and one field lens. Due to the large obscuration of the secondary mirror, the effective F/1.05 necessitates a larger working F-number of 0.75. The spectral band ranges from 7.0 to 14.0 microns and the focal length is 50mm. The system is designed for the ULIS UL04171 microbolometer detector with 640 x 480 pixels and 25 microns pixel pitch. With this sensor, the total field of view of the system is 22.6 degrees, which is very large for a catadioptric system. A microscan increases the system maximal spatial sampling frequency from 20 to 40 cycles per millimeter. Despite of the compactness, there is enough room between the field lens and the detector to insert a shutter. A baffle extending ahead of the device is needed in this large field of view design to avoid undesired rays reaching the detector.

  18. Large-scale magnetic fields, dark energy, and QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Federico R.; Zhitnitsky, Ariel R.

    2010-08-15

    Cosmological magnetic fields are being observed with ever increasing correlation lengths, possibly reaching the size of superclusters, therefore disfavoring the conventional picture of generation through primordial seeds later amplified by galaxy-bound dynamo mechanisms. In this paper we put forward a fundamentally different approach that links such large-scale magnetic fields to the cosmological vacuum energy. In our scenario the dark energy is due to the Veneziano ghost (which solves the U(1){sub A} problem in QCD). The Veneziano ghost couples through the triangle anomaly to the electromagnetic field with a constant which is unambiguously fixed in the standard model. While this interaction does not produce any physical effects in Minkowski space, it triggers the generation of a magnetic field in an expanding universe at every epoch. The induced energy of the magnetic field is thus proportional to cosmological vacuum energy: {rho}{sub EM{approx_equal}}B{sup 2{approx_equal}}(({alpha}/4{pi})){sup 2{rho}}{sub DE}, {rho}{sub DE} hence acting as a source for the magnetic energy {rho}{sub EM}. The corresponding numerical estimate leads to a magnitude in the nG range. There are two unique and distinctive predictions of our proposal: an uninterrupted active generation of Hubble size correlated magnetic fields throughout the evolution of the Universe; the presence of parity violation on the enormous scales 1/H, which apparently has been already observed in CMB. These predictions are entirely rooted into the standard model of particle physics.

  19. Large viewing field wavefront sensing by using a lightfield system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Yang; Zhang, Xuanzhe; Ma, Haotong; Ning, Yu; Wang, Rui; Xu, Xiaojun

    2013-09-01

    To overcome the shortcomings of Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, we developed a lightfield wavefront detection system, which is able to complete the large field of view, multi-perspective wavefront detection in a single photographic exposure. The lightfield wavefront detection system includes an imaging primary mirror, a lenslet array and a photosensitive device. The lenslet array is located on the imaging plane of the imaging primary mirror and the photosensitive device is located on the focal plane of the lenslet array. In this system, each lenslet reimages the aperture and forms a low-resolution image of the aperture. Compared with the Shack-Hartmann sensor, this lightfield measuring method can obtain imaging arrays in different perspectives. By comparing the array information with the standard information, we can obtain the slope matrix of the wavefront in different perspectives and restore the wavefront in a large field of view. Based on Fourier optics, we built the corresponding theoretical model and simulation system. By busing Meade telescope, turbulent phase screen, lenslet array and CCD camera, we founded the experimental lightfield wavefront measuring system. Numerical simulation results and experimental results show that this wavefront measuring method can effectively achieve the wavefront aberration information. This wavefront measurement method can realize the multi-perspective wavefront measurement, which is expected to solve the problem of large viewing field wavefront detection, and can be used for adaptive optics in giant telescopes.

  20. Magnetospheric observation of large sub-auroral electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, N. C.; Aggson, T. L.; Heppner, J. P.

    1980-01-01

    An example of large subauroral poleward electric fields similar to those observed on OGO-6, S3-2 and AE-C (SAID) has been found in the magnetosphere near L = 4 and 2300 MLT using ISEE-1 electric field data. The event is located adjacent to and outside the plasmapause and occurs 1 1/2 hours into a substorm. The event is accompaned by a significant penetration of the convection electric field inside the plasmasphere. Data from similar regions on the next orbit occurring near the beginning of a substorm did not exhibit these effects. Recent theoretical models predict SAID to occur in the trough regions, where substorm dynamics force currents to flow in regions of low conductivity. These models provide a first-order interpretation of this phenomena; however, the overal picture is more complex.

  1. Large trispectrum in two-field slow-roll inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliston, Joseph; Alabidi, Laila; Huston, Ian; Mulryne, David; Tavakol, Reza

    2012-09-01

    We calculate the conditions required to produce a large local trispectrum during two-field slow-roll inflation. This is done by extending and simplifying the 'heat-map' approach developed by Byrnes et al. The conditions required to generate a large trispectrum are broadly the same as those that can produce a large bispectrum. We derive a simple relation between τNL and fNL for models with separable potentials, and furthermore show that gNL and τNL can be related in specific circumstances. Additionally, we interpret the heatmaps dynamically, showing how they can be used as qualitative tools to understand the evolution of non-Gaussianity during inflation. We also show how fNL, τNL and gNL are sourced by generic shapes in the inflationary potential, namely ridges, valleys and inflection points.

  2. Large scale magnetic fields in galaxies at high redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernet, M. L.; Miniati, F.; Lilly, S. J.; Kronberg, P. P.; Dessauges-Zavadsky, M.

    2012-09-01

    In a recent study we have used a large sample of extragalactic radio sources to investigate the redshift evolution of the Rotation Measure (RM) of polarized quasars up to z ≈ 3.0. We found that the dispersion in the RM distribution of quasars increases at higher redshifts and hypothesized that MgII intervening systems were responsible for the observed trend. To test this hypothesis, we have recently obtained high-resolution UVES/VLT spectra for 76 quasars in our sample and in the redshift range 0.6 < z < 2.0. We found a clear correlation between the presence of strong MgII systems and large RMs. This implies that normal galaxies at z ≈ 1 already had large-scale magnetic fields comparable to those seen today.

  3. Large trispectrum in two-field slow-roll inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Elliston, Joseph; Huston, Ian; Mulryne, David; Tavakol, Reza; Alabidi, Laila E-mail: laila@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp E-mail: d.mulryne@qmul.ac.uk

    2012-09-01

    We calculate the conditions required to produce a large local trispectrum during two-field slow-roll inflation. This is done by extending and simplifying the 'heat-map' approach developed by Byrnes et al. The conditions required to generate a large trispectrum are broadly the same as those that can produce a large bispectrum. We derive a simple relation between τ{sub NL} and f{sub NL} for models with separable potentials, and furthermore show that g{sub NL} and τ{sub NL} can be related in specific circumstances. Additionally, we interpret the heatmaps dynamically, showing how they can be used as qualitative tools to understand the evolution of non-Gaussianity during inflation. We also show how f{sub NL}, τ{sub NL} and g{sub NL} are sourced by generic shapes in the inflationary potential, namely ridges, valleys and inflection points.

  4. Improved RF performance of travelling wave MR with a high permittivity dielectric lining of the bore.

    PubMed

    Andreychenko, A; Bluemink, J J; Raaijmakers, A J E; Lagendijk, J J W; Luijten, P R; van den Berg, C A T

    2013-09-01

    Application of travelling wave MR to human body imaging is restricted by the limited peak power of the available RF amplifiers. Nevertheless, travelling wave MR advantages like a large field of view excitation and distant location of transmit elements would be desirable for whole body MRI. In this work, improvement of the B1+ efficiency of travelling wave MR is demonstrated. High permittivity dielectric lining placed next to the scanner bore wall effectively reduces attenuation of the travelling wave in the longitudinal direction and at the same time directs the radial power flow toward the load. First, this is shown with an analytical model of a metallic cylindrical waveguide with the dielectric lining next to the wall and loaded with a cylindrical phantom. Simulations and experiments also reveal an increase of B1+ efficiency in the center of the bore for travelling wave MR with a dielectric lining. Phantom experiments show up to a 2-fold gain in B1+ with the dielectric lining. This corresponds to a 4-fold increase in power efficiency of travelling wave MR. In vivo experiments demonstrate an 8-fold signal-to-noise ratio gain with the dielectric lining. Overall, it is shown that dielectric lining is a constructive method to improve efficacy of travelling wave MR. PMID:23044511

  5. Penetration of Large Scale Electric Field to Inner Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. H.; Fok, M. C. H.; Sibeck, D. G.; Wygant, J. R.; Spence, H. E.; Larsen, B.; Reeves, G. D.; Funsten, H. O.

    2015-12-01

    The direct penetration of large scale global electric field to the inner magnetosphere is a critical element in controlling how the background thermal plasma populates within the radiation belts. These plasma populations provide the source of particles and free energy needed for the generation and growth of various plasma waves that, at critical points of resonances in time and phase space, can scatter or energize radiation belt particles to regulate the flux level of the relativistic electrons in the system. At high geomagnetic activity levels, the distribution of large scale electric fields serves as an important indicator of how prevalence of strong wave-particle interactions extend over local times and radial distances. To understand the complex relationship between the global electric fields and thermal plasmas, particularly due to the ionospheric dynamo and the magnetospheric convection effects, and their relations to the geomagnetic activities, we analyze the electric field and cold plasma measurements from Van Allen Probes over more than two years period and simulate a geomagnetic storm event using Coupled Inner Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Model (CIMI). Our statistical analysis of the measurements from Van Allan Probes and CIMI simulations of the March 17, 2013 storm event indicate that: (1) Global dawn-dusk electric field can penetrate the inner magnetosphere inside the inner belt below L~2. (2) Stronger convections occurred in the dusk and midnight sectors than those in the noon and dawn sectors. (3) Strong convections at multiple locations exist at all activity levels but more complex at higher activity levels. (4) At the high activity levels, strongest convections occur in the midnight sectors at larger distances from the Earth and in the dusk sector at closer distances. (5) Two plasma populations of distinct ion temperature isotropies divided at L-Shell ~2, indicating distinct heating mechanisms between inner and outer radiation belts. (6) CIMI

  6. String cosmology — Large-field inflation in string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphal, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    This is a short review of string cosmology. We wish to connect string-scale physics as closely as possible to observables accessible to current or near-future experiments. Our possible best hope to do so is a description of inflation in string theory. The energy scale of inflation can be as high as that of Grand Unification (GUT). If this is the case, this is the closest we can possibly get in energy scales to string-scale physics. Hence, GUT-scale inflation may be our best candidate phenomenon to preserve traces of string-scale dynamics. Our chance to look for such traces is the primordial gravitational wave, or tensor mode signal produced during inflation. For GUT-scale inflation this is strong enough to be potentially visible as a B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Moreover, a GUT-scale inflation model has a trans-Planckian excursion of the inflaton scalar field during the observable amount of inflation. Such large-field models of inflation have a clear need for symmetry protection against quantum corrections. This makes them ideal candidates for a description in a candidate fundamental theory like string theory. At the same time the need of large-field inflation models for UV completion makes them particularly susceptible to preserve imprints of their string-scale dynamics in the inflationary observables, the spectral index ns and the fractional tensor mode power r. Hence, we will focus this review on axion monodromy inflation as a mechanism of large-field inflation in string theory.

  7. Low-Field, Large-Area Helicon Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, F. F.; Evans, J. D.; Jiang, X.; Tynan, G.

    1996-10-01

    Previous experiments footnote F.F. Chen and G. Chevalier, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 10, 1389 (1992). with helicon discharges in both 1- and 2-inch diam tubes have shown a density peak at magnetic fields B between 10 and 40 G and that this peak appears only with RF powers >1kW. Theory indicates that the Trivelpiece-Gould branch of the dispersion relation is important at low B, but it is not clear whether the density rise is due to increased absorption or simply to impurities from the wall. Multiple discharges of this type can be used to create a large-area plasma source for industrial applications. Two devices have been constructed to test this idea. Device 1 has a 2-in diam tube, 6-in long, with a right-hand helical antenna and a 0-100 G field, injecting plasma into a large B = 0 region. RF power at 13.56 and 27.12 MHz is applied up to 600W. The plasma density falls off with increasing B-field and is highest at 0 G. With a 12-in long tube, this fall-off is eliminate! d.! De vice 2 has 7 tubes of the same type arranged in a honeycomb pattern on the top plate of a large chamber with multi-dipole confinement. By careful matching, discharges can be struck in all 7 tubes simultaneously. Density uniformity data is not available at the time of this abstract. These devices unfortunately cannot be used to verify the theory, since the magnetic fields are nonuniform.

  8. Scalable parallel distance field construction for large-scale applications

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yu, Hongfeng; Xie, Jinrong; Ma, Kwan -Liu; Kolla, Hemanth; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2015-10-01

    Computing distance fields is fundamental to many scientific and engineering applications. Distance fields can be used to direct analysis and reduce data. In this paper, we present a highly scalable method for computing 3D distance fields on massively parallel distributed-memory machines. Anew distributed spatial data structure, named parallel distance tree, is introduced to manage the level sets of data and facilitate surface tracking overtime, resulting in significantly reduced computation and communication costs for calculating the distance to the surface of interest from any spatial locations. Our method supports several data types and distance metrics from real-world applications. We demonstrate itsmore » efficiency and scalability on state-of-the-art supercomputers using both large-scale volume datasets and surface models. We also demonstrate in-situ distance field computation on dynamic turbulent flame surfaces for a petascale combustion simulation. In conclusion, our work greatly extends the usability of distance fields for demanding applications.« less

  9. Large scale reconstruction of the solar coronal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amari, T.; Aly, J.-J.; Chopin, P.; Canou, A.; Mikic, Z.

    2014-10-01

    It is now becoming necessary to access the global magnetic structure of the solar low corona at a large scale in order to understand its physics and more particularly the conditions of energization of the magnetic fields and the multiple connections between distant active regions (ARs) which may trigger eruptive events in an almost coordinated way. Various vector magnetographs, either on board spacecraft or ground-based, currently allow to obtain vector synoptic maps, composite magnetograms made of multiple interactive ARs, and full disk magnetograms. We present a method recently developed for reconstructing the global solar coronal magnetic field as a nonlinear force-free magnetic field in spherical geometry, generalizing our previous results in Cartesian geometry. This method is implemented in the new code XTRAPOLS, which thus appears as an extension of our active region scale code XTRAPOL. We apply our method by performing a reconstruction at a specific time for which we dispose of a set of composite data constituted of a vector magnetogram provided by SDO/HMI, embedded in a larger full disk vector magnetogram provided by the same instrument, finally embedded in a synoptic map provided by SOLIS. It turns out to be possible to access the large scale structure of the corona and its energetic contents, and also the AR scale, at which we recover the presence of a twisted flux rope in equilibrium.

  10. Large-scale magnetic fields in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Alexakis, Alexandros

    2013-02-22

    High Reynolds number magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the presence of zero-flux large-scale magnetic fields is investigated as a function of the magnetic field strength. For a variety of flow configurations, the energy dissipation rate [symbol: see text] follows the scaling [Symbol: see text] proportional U(rms)(3)/ℓ even when the large-scale magnetic field energy is twenty times larger than the kinetic energy. A further increase of the magnetic energy showed a transition to the [Symbol: see text] proportional U(rms)(2) B(rms)/ℓ scaling implying that magnetic shear becomes more efficient at this point at cascading the energy than the velocity fluctuations. Strongly helical configurations form nonturbulent helicity condensates that deviate from these scalings. Weak turbulence scaling was absent from the investigation. Finally, the magnetic energy spectra support the Kolmogorov spectrum k(-5/3) while kinetic energy spectra are closer to the Iroshnikov-Kraichnan spectrum k(-3/2) as observed in the solar wind. PMID:23473153

  11. Infrared-temperature variability in a large agricultural field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millard, J. P.; Goettelman, R. C.; Leroy, M. J.

    1981-01-01

    Dunnigan Agro-Meteorological Experiment airborne thermal scanner images of a large varying-terrain barley field are acquired and analyzed. Temperature variability that may occur within instantaneous fields of view (IFOV) is defined (coefficient of variation: standard deviation/mean temperature in degrees C), and the percentage of the area within various IFOV's within + or - 1, 2, 3, and 5 degrees of the mean is determined. With the exception of very rugged terrain, over 80% of the area within 4, 16, 65 and 258 ha cells was at temperatures within + or - 3 C of the mean cell temperature. Remote measurements of field temperature appeared to be slightly influenced by pixel size in the range 4 ha to 259 ha, and the area percentage within any pixel which contributes within + or - 1, 2, 3, and 5 degrees C of the mean, is nominally the same. In conclusion, no great advantage is found in utilizing a small IFOV instead of a large one for remote sensing of crop temperature.

  12. The effective field theory of cosmological large scale structures

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasco, John Joseph M.; Hertzberg, Mark P.; Senatore, Leonardo

    2012-09-20

    Large scale structure surveys will likely become the next leading cosmological probe. In our universe, matter perturbations are large on short distances and small at long scales, i.e. strongly coupled in the UV and weakly coupled in the IR. To make precise analytical predictions on large scales, we develop an effective field theory formulated in terms of an IR effective fluid characterized by several parameters, such as speed of sound and viscosity. These parameters, determined by the UV physics described by the Boltzmann equation, are measured from N-body simulations. We find that the speed of sound of the effective fluid is c2s ≈ 10–6c2 and that the viscosity contributions are of the same order. The fluid describes all the relevant physics at long scales k and permits a manifestly convergent perturbative expansion in the size of the matter perturbations δ(k) for all the observables. As an example, we calculate the correction to the power spectrum at order δ(k)4. As a result, the predictions of the effective field theory are found to be in much better agreement with observation than standard cosmological perturbation theory, already reaching percent precision at this order up to a relatively short scale k ≃ 0.24h Mpc–1.

  13. Polymer dynamics in repton model at large fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.; Drzewiński, Andrzej

    2004-04-01

    Polymer dynamics at large fields in Rubinstein-Duke repton model is investigated theoretically. Simple diagrammatic approach and analogy with asymmetric simple exclusion models are used to analyze the reptation dynamics of polymers. It is found that for polyelectrolytes the drift velocity decreases exponentially as a function of the external field with an exponent depending on polymer size and parity, while for polyampholytes the drift velocity is independent of polymer chain size. However, for polymers, consisting of charged and neutral blocks, the drift velocity approaches the constant limit which is determined by the size of the neutral block. The theoretical arguments are supported by extensive numerical calculations by means of density-matrix renormalization group techniques.

  14. Influence of the Earth's magnetic field on large area photomultipliers

    SciTech Connect

    Leonora, E.; Aiello, S.; Leotta, G.

    2011-07-01

    The influence of the Earth's magnetic field on large area photomultipliers proposed for a future deep sea neutrino telescope was studied under the EU-funded KM3NeT design study. The aims were to evaluate variations in PMT performance in the Earth's magnetic field and to decide whether the use of magnetic shielding is necessary. Measurements were performed on three Hamamatsu PMTs: two 8-inch R5912 types, one of these with super-bi-alkali photocathode, and a 10-inch R7081 type with a standard bi-alkali photocathode. The various characteristics of the PMTs were measured while varying the PMT orientations with respect to the Earth's magnetic field, both with and without a mu-metal cage as magnetic shield. In the 8-inch PMTs the impact of the magnetic field was found to be smaller than that on the 10-inch PMT. The increased quantum efficiency in the 8 super-bi-alkali PMT almost compensated its smaller detection surface compared to the 10' PMT. No significant effects were measured upon transit time and the fraction of spurious pulses. (authors)

  15. Large perturbation flow field analysis and simulation for supersonic inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varner, M. O.; Martindale, W. R.; Phares, W. J.; Kneile, K. R.; Adams, J. C., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    An analysis technique for simulation of supersonic mixed compression inlets with large flow field perturbations is presented. The approach is based upon a quasi-one-dimensional inviscid unsteady formulation which includes engineering models of unstart/restart, bleed, bypass, and geometry effects. Numerical solution of the governing time dependent equations of motion is accomplished through a shock capturing finite difference algorithm, of which five separate approaches are evaluated. Comparison with experimental supersonic wind tunnel data is presented to verify the present approach for a wide range of transient inlet flow conditions.

  16. Hadron Structures from Large Momentum Effective Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Xiaonu

    2016-08-01

    The large momentum effective field theory (LaMET) is aiming to calculate parton distributions directly on lattice. In this approach a class of so-called quasi distributions are defined as pure spatial correlations in a finite momentum frame and they are directly calculated on lattice. The light-cone distributions are extracted from the quasi distributions by perturbative matching conditions. We present the application of LaMET on parton distribution functions and generalized parton distributions. Besides, heavy meson's quasi and light-cone distribution amplitudes are studied under nonrelativistic QCD (NRQCD) factorization framework.

  17. Tomographic Measurement Of Laser-Bored Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willenberg, James D.; Roy, Jack; Spiegel, Lyle B.

    1992-01-01

    Nondestructive technique detects internal variations in arrays of small holes. Inspection method checks laser-bored holes for accuracy. Combines computed tomography and digital laminography. Both types of views made at many parallel planes within plate. System prints out tables of measured and standard deviation of diameter at all planes for each hole.

  18. Particle-Image Velocimeter Having Large Depth of Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bos, Brent

    2009-01-01

    An instrument that functions mainly as a particle-image velocimeter provides data on the sizes and velocities of flying opaque particles. The instrument is being developed as a means of characterizing fluxes of wind-borne dust particles in the Martian atmosphere. The instrument could also adapted to terrestrial use in measuring sizes and velocities of opaque particles carried by natural winds and industrial gases. Examples of potential terrestrial applications include monitoring of airborne industrial pollutants and airborne particles in mine shafts. The design of this instrument reflects an observation, made in field research, that airborne dust particles derived from soil and rock are opaque enough to be observable by use of bright field illumination with high contrast for highly accurate measurements of sizes and shapes. The instrument includes a source of collimated light coupled to an afocal beam expander and an imaging array of photodetectors. When dust particles travel through the collimated beam, they cast shadows. The shadows are magnified by the beam expander and relayed to the array of photodetectors. Inasmuch as the images captured by the array are of dust-particle shadows rather of the particles themselves, the depth of field of the instrument can be large: the instrument has a depth of field of about 11 mm, which is larger than the depths of field of prior particle-image velocimeters. The instrument can resolve, and measure the sizes and velocities of, particles having sizes in the approximate range of 1 to 300 m. For slowly moving particles, data from two image frames are used to calculate velocities. For rapidly moving particles, image smear lengths from a single frame are used in conjunction with particle- size measurement data to determine velocities.

  19. Spin Chain in Magnetic Field: Limitations of the Large-N Mean-Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlfeld, K.; Chen, Cheng-Chien; van Veenendaal, M. ; Devereaux, T. P.

    2015-02-01

    Motivated by the recent success in describing the spin and orbital spectrum of a spin-orbital chain using a large-N mean-field approximation [Phys. Rev. B 91, 165102 (2015)], we apply the same formalism to the case of a spin chain in the external magnetic field. It occurs that in this case, which corresponds to N=2 in the approximation, the large-N mean-field theory cannot qualitatively reproduce the spin excitation spectra at high magnetic fields, which polarize more than 50% of the spins in the magnetic ground state. This, rather counterintuitively, shows that the physics of a spin chain can under some circumstances be regarded as more complex than the physics of a spin-orbital chain.

  20. Spin Chain in Magnetic Field: Limitations of the Large-N Mean-Field Theory

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wohlfeld, K.; Chen, Cheng-Chien; van Veenendaal, M.; Devereaux, T. P.

    2015-02-01

    Motivated by the recent success in describing the spin and orbital spectrum of a spin-orbital chain using a large-N mean-field approximation [Phys. Rev. B 91, 165102 (2015)], we apply the same formalism to the case of a spin chain in the external magnetic field. It occurs that in this case, which corresponds to N=2 in the approximation, the large-N mean-field theory cannot qualitatively reproduce the spin excitation spectra at high magnetic fields, which polarize more than 50% of the spins in the magnetic ground state. This, rather counterintuitively, shows that the physics of a spin chain can under some circumstancesmore » be regarded as more complex than the physics of a spin-orbital chain.« less

  1. CCD mosaic technique for large-field digital mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Jalink, A.; McAdoo, J.; Halama, G.; Liu, H.

    1996-06-01

    The authors present a novel technique for large-field digital mammography. The instrument uses a mosaic of electronic digital imaging [charge coupled device (CCD)] arrays, novel area scanning, and a radiation exposure and scatter reducing mechanism. The imaging arrays are mounted on a carrier platform in a checker-board pattern mosaic. To fill in the gaps between array-active areas the platform is repositioned three times and four X-ray exposures are made. The multiple image areas are then recombined by a digital computer to produce a composite image of the entire region. To reduce X-ray scatter and exposure, a lead aperture plate is interposed between X-ray source and patient. The aperture plate has a mosaic of square holes in alignment with the imaging array pattern and the plate is repositioned in synchronism with the carrier platform. The authors discuss proof-of-concept testing demonstrating technical feasibility of their approach. The instrument should be suitable for incorporation into standard mammography units. Unique features of the new technique are: large field coverage (18 x 24 cm); high spatial resolution (14--17 lp/mm); scatter rejection; and excellent contrast characteristics and lesion detectability under clinical conditions.

  2. Large Field Photogrammetry Techniques in Aircraft and Spacecraft Impact Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littell, Justin D.

    2010-01-01

    The Landing and Impact Research Facility (LandIR) at NASA Langley Research Center is a 240 ft. high A-frame structure which is used for full-scale crash testing of aircraft and rotorcraft vehicles. Because the LandIR provides a unique capability to introduce impact velocities in the forward and vertical directions, it is also serving as the facility for landing tests on full-scale and sub-scale Orion spacecraft mass simulators. Recently, a three-dimensional photogrammetry system was acquired to assist with the gathering of vehicle flight data before, throughout and after the impact. This data provides the basis for the post-test analysis and data reduction. Experimental setups for pendulum swing tests on vehicles having both forward and vertical velocities can extend to 50 x 50 x 50 foot cubes, while weather, vehicle geometry, and other constraints make each experimental setup unique to each test. This paper will discuss the specific calibration techniques for large fields of views, camera and lens selection, data processing, as well as best practice techniques learned from using the large field of view photogrammetry on a multitude of crash and landing test scenarios unique to the LandIR.

  3. Field-omics—understanding large-scale molecular data from field crops

    PubMed Central

    Alexandersson, Erik; Jacobson, Dan; Vivier, Melané A.; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Andreasson, Erik

    2014-01-01

    The recent advances in gene expression analysis as well as protein and metabolite quantification enable genome-scale capturing of complex biological processes at the molecular level in crop field trials. This opens up new possibilities for understanding the molecular and environmental complexity of field-based systems and thus shedding light on the black box between genotype and environment, which in agriculture always is influenced by a multi-stress environment and includes management interventions. Nevertheless, combining different types of data obtained from the field and making biological sense out of large datasets remain challenging. Here we highlight the need to create a cross-disciplinary platform for innovative experimental design, sampling and subsequent analysis of large-scale molecular data obtained in field trials. For these reasons we put forward the term field-omics: “Field-omics strives to couple information from genomes, transcriptomes, proteomes, metabolomes and metagenomes to the long-established practice in crop science of conducting field trials as well as to adapt current strategies for recording and analysing field data to facilitate integration with ‘-omics’ data.” PMID:24999347

  4. Nonlinear density fluctuation field theory for large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Miao, Hai-Xing

    2009-05-01

    We develop an effective field theory of density fluctuations for a Newtonian self-gravitating N-body system in quasi-equilibrium and apply it to a homogeneous universe with small density fluctuations. Keeping the density fluctuations up to second order, we obtain the nonlinear field equation of 2-pt correlation ξ(r), which contains 3-pt correlation and formal ultra-violet divergences. By the Groth-Peebles hierarchical ansatz and mass renormalization, the equation becomes closed with two new terms beyond the Gaussian approximation, and their coefficients are taken as parameters. The analytic solution is obtained in terms of the hypergeometric functions, which is checked numerically. With one single set of two fixed parameters, the correlation ξ(r) and the corresponding power spectrum P(κ) simultaneously match the results from all the major surveys, such as APM, SDSS, 2dfGRS, and REFLEX. The model gives a unifying understanding of several seemingly unrelated features of large scale structure from a field-theoretical perspective. The theory is worth extending to study the evolution effects in an expanding universe.

  5. Rapid topography mapping of scalar fields: Large molecular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeole, Sachin D.; López, Rafael; Gadre, Shridhar R.

    2012-08-01

    An efficient and rapid algorithm for topography mapping of scalar fields, molecular electron density (MED) and molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) is presented. The highlight of the work is the use of fast function evaluation by Deformed-atoms-in-molecules (DAM) method. The DAM method provides very rapid as well as sufficiently accurate function and gradient evaluation. For mapping the topography of large systems, the molecular tailoring approach (MTA) is invoked. This new code is tested out for mapping the MED and MESP critical points (CP's) of small systems. It is further applied to large molecular clusters viz. (H2O)25, (C6H6)8 and also to a unit cell of valine crystal at MP2/6-31+G(d) level of theory. The completeness of the topography is checked by extensive search as well as applying the Poincaré-Hopf relation. The results obtained show that the DAM method in combination with MTA provides a rapid and efficient route for mapping the topography of large molecular systems.

  6. Large-scale velocity fields. [of solar rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Robert F.; Kichatinov, L. L.; Bogart, Richard S.; Ribes, Elizabeth

    1991-01-01

    The present evaluation of recent observational results bearing on the nature and characteristics of solar rotation gives attention to the status of current understanding on such large-scale velocity-field-associated phenomena as solar supergranulation, mesogranulation, and giant-scale convection. Also noted are theoretical suggestions reconciling theory and observations of giant-scale solar convection. The photosphere's global meridional circulation is suggested by solar rotation models requiring pole-to-equator flows of a few m/sec, as well as by the observed migration of magnetic activity over the solar cycle. The solar rotation exhibits a latitude and cycle dependence which can be understood in terms of a time-dependent convective toroidal roll pattern.

  7. A new large field inflation constrained by Planck 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferricha-Alami, M.; Mounzi, Z.; Chakir, H.; Bennai, M.

    2016-05-01

    In this work we propose a new large field inflation model, parametrized by a parameter β sharing the same features with T-Model. We apply the slow-roll approximation to investigate the inflationary parameters, and we found that they depend on some value of β and the e-folds number Ne. In this context, we have computed and discussed the perturbation of the scalar curvature and determined the energy scale V0, which we found to be in the GUT regime. We also showed that, in our scenario, the various inflationary spectrum perturbation parameters, the spectral index ns, the ratio of tensor to scalar perturbations r and the running d ns/d ln k, perfectly agree with the recent experimental observations in the event β > 0.5 and Ne˜ 45-60. As a result we have reproduced successfully the main part, ns-r, consistent with Planck data.

  8. Field-aligned currents and large-scale magnetospheric electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dangelo, N.

    1979-01-01

    The existence of field-aligned currents (FAC) at northern and southern high latitudes was confirmed by a number of observations, most clearly by experiments on the TRIAD and ISIS 2 satellites. The high-latitude FAC system is used to relate what is presently known about the large-scale pattern of high-latitude ionospheric electric fields and their relation to solar wind parameters. Recently a simplified model was presented for polar cap electric fields. The model is of considerable help in visualizing the large-scale features of FAC systems. A summary of the FAC observations is given. The simplified model is used to visualize how the FAC systems are driven by their generators.

  9. Large field of view multiphoton microscopy of human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balu, Mihaela; Mikami, Hideharu; Hou, Jue; Potma, Eric O.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2016-03-01

    Clinical examination crucially relies on the ability to quickly examine large tissue areas and rapidly zoom in to regions of interest. Skin lesions often show irregularity in color and appearance in general, especially when they start to progress towards malignancy. Large field of view (FOV) and automatic translation of the imaging area are critical in the assessment of the entire lesion. Imaging of limited FOVs of the lesion can easily result in false negative diagnosis. We present a multiphoton microscope based on two-photon excited fluorescence and second-harmonic generation that images FOVs of about 0.8 mm2 (without stitching adjacent FOVs) at speeds of 10 frames/second (800 x 800 pixels) with lateral and axial resolutions of 0.5 μm and 2.5 μm, respectively. The main novelty of this instrument is the design of the scan head, which includes a fast galvanometric scanner, relay optics, a beam expander and a high NA objective lens. We optimized the system based on the Olympus 25x, 1.05NA water immersion lens, that features a long working distance of 1 mm. Proper tailoring of the beam expander, which consists of the scan and tube lens elements, enables scaling of the FOV. The design criteria include a flat wavefront of the beam, minimum field curvature, and suppressed spherical aberrations. All aberrations in focus are below the Marechal criterion of 0.07λ rms for diffraction-limited performance. We demonstrate the practical utility of this microscope by ex-vivo imaging of wide FOVs in normal human skin.

  10. The magnetic fields of large Virgo cluster spirals. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weżgowiec, M.; Urbanik, M.; Beck, R.; Chyży, K. T.; Soida, M.

    2012-09-01

    Context. The Virgo cluster of galaxies provides excellent conditions for studying interactions of galaxies with the cluster environment. Both the high-velocity tidal interactions and effects of ram pressure stripping by the intracluster gas can be investigated in detail. Aims: We extend our systematic search for possible anomalies in the magnetic field structures of Virgo cluster spirals in order to characterize a variety of effects and attribute them to different disturbing agents. Methods: Six angularly large Virgo cluster spiral galaxies (NGC 4192, NGC 4302, NGC 4303, NGC 4321, NGC 4388, and NGC 4535) were targets of a sensitive total power and polarization study using the 100-m radio telescope in Effelsberg at 4.85 GHz and 8.35 GHz (except for NGC 4388 observed only at 4.85 GHz, and NGC 4535 observed only at 8.35 GHz). The presented two-frequency studies allow Faraday rotation analysis. Results: Magnetic field structures distorted to various extent are found in all galaxies. Three galaxies (NGC 4302, NGC 4303, and NGC 4321) show some signs of possible tidal interactions, while NGC 4388 and NGC 4535 have very likely experienced strong ram-pressure and shearing effects, respectively, visible as distortions and asymmetries of polarized intensity distributions. As in our previous study, even strongly perturbed galaxies closely follow the radio-far-infrared correlation. In NGC 4303 and NGC 4321, we observe symmetric spiral patterns of the magnetic field and in NGC 4535 an asymmetric pattern. Conclusions: The cluster environment clearly affects the evolution of its member galaxies via various effects. Magnetic fields allow us to trace even weak interactions that are difficult to detect with other observations. Our results show that the degree of distortions of a galaxy is not a simple function of the distance to the cluster center but reflects also the history of its interactions. The angle Θ between the velocity vector v and the rotation vector Ω of a galaxy may

  11. A large field CCD system for quantitative imaging of microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, G.; Brown, N.; Oseroff, V.; Huey, B.; Segraves, R.; Sudar, D.; Kumler, J.; Albertson, D.; Pinkel, D.

    2006-01-01

    We describe a charge-coupled device (CCD) imaging system for microarrays capable of acquiring quantitative, high dynamic range images of very large fields. Illumination is supplied by an arc lamp, and filters are used to define excitation and emission bands. The system is linear down to fluorochrome densities ≪1 molecule/µm2. The ratios of the illumination intensity distributions for all excitation wavelengths have a maximum deviation ∼±4% over the object field, so that images can be analyzed without computational corrections for the illumination pattern unless higher accuracy is desired. Custom designed detection optics produce achromatic images of the spectral region from ∼ 450 to ∼750 nm. Acquisition of a series of images of multiple fluorochromes from multiple arrays occurs under computer control. The version of the system described in detail provides images of 20 mm square areas using a 27 mm square, 2K × 2K pixel, cooled CCD chip with a well depth of ∼105 electrons, and provides ratio measurements accurate to a few percent over a dynamic range in intensity >1000. Resolution referred to the sample is 10 µm, sufficient for obtaining quantitative multicolor images from >30 000 array elements in an 18 mm × 18 mm square. PMID:16670425

  12. Two-level systems driven by large-amplitude fields

    SciTech Connect

    Ashhab, S.; Johansson, J. R.; Zagoskin, A. M.; Nori, Franco

    2007-06-15

    We analyze the dynamics of a two-level system subject to driving by large-amplitude external fields, focusing on the resonance properties in the case of driving around the region of avoided level crossing. In particular, we consider three main questions that characterize resonance dynamics: (1) the resonance condition (2) the frequency of the resulting oscillations on resonance, and (3) the width of the resonance. We identify the regions of validity of different approximations. In a large region of the parameter space, we use a geometric picture in order to obtain both a simple understanding of the dynamics and quantitative results. The geometric approach is obtained by dividing the evolution into discrete time steps, with each time step described by either a phase shift on the basis states or a coherent mixing process corresponding to a Landau-Zener crossing. We compare the results of the geometric picture with those of a rotating wave approximation. We also comment briefly on the prospects of employing strong driving as a useful tool to manipulate two-level systems.

  13. Design of HD2: a 15 T Nb3Sn dipole with a 35 mm bore

    SciTech Connect

    Sabbi, G.; Bartlett, S. E.; Caspi, S.; Dietderich, D. R.; Ferracin, P.; Gourlay, S. A.; Hannaford, C. R.; Hafalia, A. R.; Lietzke, A. F.; Mattafirri, S.; McInturff, A. D.; Scanlan, R.

    2005-06-01

    The Nb{sub 3}Sn dipole HD1, recently fabricated and tested at LBNL, pushes the limits of accelerator magnet technology into the 16 T field range, and opens the way to a new generation of HEP colliders. HD1 is based on a flat racetrack coil configuration and has a 10 mm bore. These features are consistent with the HD1 goals: exploring the Nb{sub 3}Sn conductor performance limits at the maximum fields and under high stress. However, in order to further develop the block-coil geometry for future high-field accelerators, the bore size has to be increased to 30-50 mm. With respect to HD1, the main R&D challenges are: (a) design of the coil ends, to allow a magnetically efficient cross-section without obstructing the beam path; (b) design of the bore, to support the coil against the pre-load force; (c) correction of the geometric field errors. HD2 represents a first step in addressing these issues, with a central dipole field above 15 T, a 35 mm bore, and nominal field harmonics within a fraction of one unit. This paper describes the HD2 magnet design concept and its main features, as well as further steps required to develop a cost-effective block-coil design for future high-field, accelerator-quality dipoles.

  14. Non-Boussinesq internal bores: Bridging the gap between the single layer, and boussinesq cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borden, Zachary; Koblitz, Tilman; Meiburg, Eckart

    2011-11-01

    Internal bores, or hydraulic jumps, arise in many atmospheric and oceanographic phenomena. The classic single-layer hydraulic jump model accurately predicts a bore's behavior when the density difference between the expanding and contracting layer is large (i.e. water and air), but fails in the Boussinesq limit. A two-layer model, where mass is conserved separately in each layer and momentum is conserved globally, does a much better job but requires for closure an assumption about the loss of energy across a bore. Our previous study used 2D direct numerical simulations in order to directly examine the energy fluxes within a bore, and was able to provide us with an appropriate closure relation in the Boussinesq case. Now, we have extended our simulations to non-Boussinesq bores in order to generate an analytical model that bridges the gap between single, and two-layer models. We also perform 3D large eddy simulations to confirm that our model and results generalize to three dimensions, and higher Reynolds numbers.

  15. Conductor system for well bore data transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Galle, E.M.

    1990-04-03

    This patent describes an improved electrical transmission system for use in a fluid filled well bore. It comprises: a tubular member with threaded ends for connection in a drill string in a wellbore, having a transmitting end adapted for transmitting data signals, and a receiving end adapted for receiving data signals; a partition releasably carried by the transmitting end of the tubular member for mating with the tubular member; a compartment bounded in part by the partition and in part by the tubular member; a transmitter disposed in the compartment of the tubular member; seal means for sealing the compartment where the partition mates with the tubular member to protect the transmitter from the fluid in the well bore; and a flexible planar conductor.

  16. Experimental stiffness of tapered bore seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, D. P.

    1985-01-01

    The stiffness of tapered-bore ring seals was measured with air as the sealed fluid. Static stiffness agreed fairly well with results of a previous analysis. Cross-coupled stiffness due to shaft rotation was much less than predicted. It is suggested that part of the disparity may be due to simplifying assumptions in the analysis; however, these do not appear to account for the entire difference observed.

  17. Earth boring tool with improved inserts

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, H.; Scales, S.

    1980-07-08

    A description is given of an improved earth boring tool of the type having at least one sintered tungsten carbide insert with a substantially cylindrical retaining surface interferringly secured to the wall of a retaining hole, the improvement comprising said retaining surface roughened such that in any lineal increment of at least 010 inch, there are at least three asperities at least 0.001 in ch long and at least 0.00005 inch deep when measured with a stylus point with a 0.00005 inch radius. An improved method of retaining tungsten carbide inserts in an earth boring tool, said method comprising the steps of: drilling and reaming a plurality of holes in selected locations on the earth boring tool; sintering a plurality of tungsten carbide inserts with a binder selected from the group consisting of cobalt, nickel or iron; grinding a substantially cylindrical wall surface on the inserts that are nominally larger in diameter than the drilled and reamed holes; roughening the wall surface of the inserts such that any lineal increment of at least 0.010 inch has at least three asperities which are at least 0.001 inch long and at least 00005 inch deep when measured with a stylus point with a 0.00005 inch radius; and forcing the inserts interferringly into the mating drilled and reamed holes.

  18. The biomechanics of burrowing and boring.

    PubMed

    Dorgan, Kelly M

    2015-01-15

    Burrowers and borers are ecosystem engineers that alter their physical environments through bioturbation, bioirrigation and bioerosion. The mechanisms of moving through solid substrata by burrowing or boring depend on the mechanical properties of the medium and the size and morphology of the organism. For burrowing animals, mud differs mechanically from sand; in mud, sediment grains are suspended in an organic matrix that fails by fracture. Macrofauna extend burrows through this elastic mud by fracture. Sand is granular and non-cohesive, enabling grains to more easily move relative to each other, and macrofaunal burrowers use fluidization or plastic rearrangement of grains. In both sand and mud, peristaltic movements apply normal forces and reduce shear. Excavation and localized grain compaction are mechanisms that plastically deform sediments and are effective in both mud and sand, with bulk excavation being used by larger organisms and localized compaction by smaller organisms. Mechanical boring of hard substrata is an extreme form of excavation in which no compaction of burrow walls occurs and grains are abraded with rigid, hard structures. Chemical boring involves secretion to dissolve or soften generally carbonate substrata. Despite substantial differences in the mechanics of the media, similar burrowing behaviors are effective in mud and sand. PMID:25609781

  19. Undular bore theory for the Gardner equation.

    PubMed

    Kamchatnov, A M; Kuo, Y-H; Lin, T-C; Horng, T-L; Gou, S-C; Clift, R; El, G A; Grimshaw, R H J

    2012-09-01

    We develop modulation theory for undular bores (dispersive shock waves) in the framework of the Gardner, or extended Korteweg-de Vries (KdV), equation, which is a generic mathematical model for weakly nonlinear and weakly dispersive wave propagation, when effects of higher order nonlinearity become important. Using a reduced version of the finite-gap integration method we derive the Gardner-Whitham modulation system in a Riemann invariant form and show that it can be mapped onto the well-known modulation system for the Korteweg-de Vries equation. The transformation between the two counterpart modulation systems is, however, not invertible. As a result, the study of the resolution of an initial discontinuity for the Gardner equation reveals a rich phenomenology of solutions which, along with the KdV-type simple undular bores, include nonlinear trigonometric bores, solibores, rarefaction waves, and composite solutions representing various combinations of the above structures. We construct full parametric maps of such solutions for both signs of the cubic nonlinear term in the Gardner equation. Our classification is supported by numerical simulations. PMID:23031043

  20. Instrumentation concepts for the Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, G. William

    2000-11-01

    Instrumentation concepts for the Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) are discussed. Different design concepts for the VLHC result in substantially different instrumentation layouts. High field, cold bore magnets have instrumentation requirements very similar to the SSC and LHC. In contrast, the low field warm bore "transmission line" magnets have very sparse instrumentation and the long magnet length allows the cable plant to be preinstalled on the magnets. Specialized beam instrumentation concepts including permanently sealed semi-rigid coax BLMs and distributed coupled-bunch damping systems are discussed.

  1. Volumetric thermoacoustic imaging over large fields of view.

    PubMed

    Roggenbuck, M A; Walker, R D; Catenacci, J W; Patch, S K

    2013-01-01

    The thermoacoustic (TA) contrast mechanism relies on rapid tissue heating and subsequent thermal expansion. TA computerized tomography (TCT) is therefore inverse source imaging. The TA contrast mechanism provides information complementary to that revealed by current diagnostic imaging techniques, but has been limited to just a few centimeters depth penetration. In this article, whole organ TCT is demonstrated on a large swine kidney. TA sinograms show that TA signal generated by high-power, very high frequency (VHF) electromagnetic pulses is detectable after travel through 6 cm of soft tissue. Reconstructed images provide resolution sufficient to track progression of calyces throughout the kidney. Because VHF electromagnetic energy can easily penetrate the abdomen of large adults, our results indicate that whole organ TA imaging is feasible in vivo, provided an ultrasound array can be placed near the region of interest. Pulses of 22 to 25 kW with carrier frequency 108 MHz and 900 ns pulse width were applied at a 100-Hz pulse repetition frequency to generate a 13-kV/m electric field and TA signal. Only 2 to 5 mJ was absorbed in the kidney per pulse, causing temperature and pressure jumps of only 5e-6°C and 4 Pa averaged throughout the 141-g specimen. TA pulses were detected by focused, single-element transducers (V306, Panametrics), amplified by 54 dB and averaged 64 times to reduce electronic noise. Data were measured over a cylindrical measurement aperture of radius 5 cm and length 6 cm, by rotating the specimen 1.8 degrees between tomographic views and translating 2 mm between slices. Reconstruction via filtered backprojection yields in-plane resolution better than 5 mm, but suffers significant blurring between planes. Both in-plane resolution and slice sensitivity profile could be improved by applying shorter irradiation pulsewidths and using less directional transducers. Both hardware changes would be recommended for a clinical prototype. PMID:23287507

  2. Bias in the effective field theory of large scale structures

    SciTech Connect

    Senatore, Leonardo

    2015-11-05

    We study how to describe collapsed objects, such as galaxies, in the context of the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures. The overdensity of galaxies at a given location and time is determined by the initial tidal tensor, velocity gradients and spatial derivatives of the regions of dark matter that, during the evolution of the universe, ended up at that given location. Similarly to what was recently done for dark matter, we show how this Lagrangian space description can be recovered by upgrading simpler Eulerian calculations. We describe the Eulerian theory. We show that it is perturbatively local in space, but non-local in time, and we explain the observational consequences of this fact. We give an argument for why to a certain degree of accuracy the theory can be considered as quasi time-local and explain what the operator structure is in this case. Furthermore, we describe renormalization of the bias coefficients so that, after this and after upgrading the Eulerian calculation to a Lagrangian one, the perturbative series for galaxies correlation functions results in a manifestly convergent expansion in powers of k/kNL and k/kM, where k is the wavenumber of interest, kNL is the wavenumber associated to the non-linear scale, and kM is the comoving wavenumber enclosing the mass of a galaxy.

  3. Bias in the effective field theory of large scale structures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Senatore, Leonardo

    2015-11-05

    We study how to describe collapsed objects, such as galaxies, in the context of the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures. The overdensity of galaxies at a given location and time is determined by the initial tidal tensor, velocity gradients and spatial derivatives of the regions of dark matter that, during the evolution of the universe, ended up at that given location. Similarly to what was recently done for dark matter, we show how this Lagrangian space description can be recovered by upgrading simpler Eulerian calculations. We describe the Eulerian theory. We show that it is perturbatively local inmore » space, but non-local in time, and we explain the observational consequences of this fact. We give an argument for why to a certain degree of accuracy the theory can be considered as quasi time-local and explain what the operator structure is in this case. Furthermore, we describe renormalization of the bias coefficients so that, after this and after upgrading the Eulerian calculation to a Lagrangian one, the perturbative series for galaxies correlation functions results in a manifestly convergent expansion in powers of k/kNL and k/kM, where k is the wavenumber of interest, kNL is the wavenumber associated to the non-linear scale, and kM is the comoving wavenumber enclosing the mass of a galaxy.« less

  4. Improvements in Monte Carlo Simulation of Large Electron Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Faddegon, Bruce A.; Perl, Joseph; Asai, Makoto; /SLAC

    2007-11-28

    Two Monte Carlo systems, EGSnrc and Geant4, were used to calculate dose distributions in large electron fields used in radiotherapy. Source and geometry parameters were adjusted to match calculated results with measurement. Both codes were capable of accurately reproducing the measured dose distributions of the 6 electron beams available on the accelerator. Depth penetration was matched to 0.1 cm. Depth dose curves generally agreed to 2% in the build-up region, although there is an additional 2-3% experimental uncertainty in this region. Dose profiles matched to 2% at the depth of maximum dose in the central region of the beam, out to the point of the profile where the dose begins to fall rapidly. A 3%/3mm match was obtained outside the central region except for the 6 MeV beam, where dose differences reached 5%. The discrepancy observed in the bremsstrahlung tail in published results that used EGS4 is no longer evident. The different systems required different source energies, incident beam angles, thicknesses of the exit window and primary foils, and distance between the primary and secondary foil. These results underscore the requirement for an experimental benchmark of electron scatter for beam energies and foils relevant to radiotherapy.

  5. Bias in the effective field theory of large scale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senatore, Leonardo

    2015-11-01

    We study how to describe collapsed objects, such as galaxies, in the context of the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures. The overdensity of galaxies at a given location and time is determined by the initial tidal tensor, velocity gradients and spatial derivatives of the regions of dark matter that, during the evolution of the universe, ended up at that given location. Similarly to what was recently done for dark matter, we show how this Lagrangian space description can be recovered by upgrading simpler Eulerian calculations. We describe the Eulerian theory. We show that it is perturbatively local in space, but non-local in time, and we explain the observational consequences of this fact. We give an argument for why to a certain degree of accuracy the theory can be considered as quasi time-local and explain what the operator structure is in this case. We describe renormalization of the bias coefficients so that, after this and after upgrading the Eulerian calculation to a Lagrangian one, the perturbative series for galaxies correlation functions results in a manifestly convergent expansion in powers of k/kNL and k/kM, where k is the wavenumber of interest, kNL is the wavenumber associated to the non-linear scale, and kM is the comoving wavenumber enclosing the mass of a galaxy.

  6. Telecentric large-field lenses using Fresnel optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Norbert; Schoenheit, Thomas

    2002-02-01

    The practical application of Fresnel lenses in imaging systems is very much disputed. However, in large field, object side, telecentric lenses, conditions are such that the advantages of lightness, cheap production, and short construction length dominate the disadvantages. These disadvantages concern the reduced image quality. Starting from any paraxial relations, we present analytic equations which are useful in estimating the changes in the aberration balance, when a well compensated glass lens front group is replaced by a Fresnel lens singlet. The comparison of a pair of telecentric lenses with the same basic parameters, built with a glass lens front group and with a Fresnel singlet front group, confirms these equations. The reduced image quality, using a Fresnel singlet as front group in an object side telecentric lens, is caused by noncompensated lateral chromatic aberration, increased distortion values, higher stray light levels and reduced resolving power. For inspection purposes, the distortion is often not so important. If the work pieces are illuminated with monochromatic light, then chromatic aberrations become unimportant. Therefore, for machine vision inspection purposes, the object side telecentric ray path can be straightforwardly achieved using a Fresnel lens front group. This is an alternative to the well known, but expensive, glass front lens solutions.

  7. The persistence of large-scale blowouts in largely vegetated coastal dune fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Fernandez, Irene; Smyth, Thomas; Jackson, Derek; Davidson-Arnott, Robin; Smith, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Coastal dunes move through natural phases of stability and instability during their evolution, displaying various temporal and spatial patterns across the dune field. Recent observations, however, have shown exceptionally rapid rates of stability through increased vegetative growth. This progressive vegetation colonisation and consequent loss of bare sand on coastal dune systems has been noted worldwide. Percentage reductions in bare sand of as much as 80% within just a few decades can been seen in examples from South Africa, Canada and Brazil as well as coastal dune sites across NW Europe. Despite these dramatic trends towards dune stabilisation, it is not uncommon to find particular examples of large-scale active blowouts and parabolic dunes within largely vegetated coastal dunes. While turbulence and airflow dynamics within features such as blowouts and other dune forms has been studied in detail within recent years, there is a lack of knowledge about what maintains dune mobility at these specific points in otherwise largely stabilized dune fields. This work explores the particular example of the 'Devil's Hole' blowout, Sefton Dunes, NW England. Approximately 300 m long by 100 m wide, its basin is below the water-table which leads to frequent flooding. Sefton Dunes in general have seen a dramatic loss of bare sand since the 1940s. However, and coinciding with this period of dune stabilisation, the 'Devil's Hole' has not only remained active but also grown in size at a rate of 4.5 m year-1 along its main axis. An exploration of factors controlling the maintenance of open bare sand areas at this particular location is examined using a variety of techniques including Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) airflow modelling and in situ empirical measurements of (short-term experiments) of wind turbulence and sand transport. Field measurements of wind parameters and transport processes were collected over a 2 week period during October 2015. Twenty three 3D ultrasonic

  8. Internal bores: An improved model via a detailed analysis of the energy budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borden, Zachary; Koblitz, Tilman; Meiburg, Eckart

    2010-11-01

    Internal bores, or hydraulic jumps, arise in many atmospheric and oceanographic phenomena. The classic single-layer hydraulic jump model accurately predicts a bore's behavior when the density difference between the expanding and contracting layer is large (i.e. water and air), but fails in the Boussinesq limit. A two-layer model, where mass is conserved separately in each layer and momentum is conserved globally, does a much better job but requires for closure an assumption about the loss of energy across a bore. Through the use of 2D direct numerical simulations, we show that there is a transfer of energy from the contracting to the expanding layer due to viscous stresses at the interface. Based on the simulation results, we propose a two-layer model that provides an accurate bore velocity as function of all geometrical parameters, as well as the Reynolds and Schmidt numbers. We also extend our analysis to non-Boussinesq internal bores to bridge the gap between the single and two-layer models.

  9. SU-E-J-233: A Facility for Radiobiological Experiments in a Large Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Carlone, M; Heaton, R; Keller, H; Wouters, B; Jaffray, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: There is considerable interest in developing medical linear accelerators with integrated image guidance by MRI. Less work has been done on the fundamental biology of cell survival in the presence of a strong magnetic field. The purpose of this work is to describe an experimental system capable of measuring cell survival response in the types of MRI-linac systems currently under development. Methods: We have integrated a cobalt irradiator with a solenoid magnet. The solenoid magnet has inner diameter of 10 cm. To enable measurement of the biological effects as a function of depth, we are utilizing the sliced gel technique, in which cells are embedded and fixed within a gelatin matrix. Irradiated cells at defined positions (sub mm resolution) can subsequently be recovered and assessed for cell survival or other biological effects. Results: The magnetic field profile in the solenoid has a peak magnetic field 36 cm below the top edge of the magnet bore and can be placed at and SAD of 100 cm. At a solenoid current of 35 A, the peak magnetic field is 0.25 T. The dose rate of the cobalt irradiator is 16 cGy/min at 100 cm SAD. EBT3 film was used to demonstrate the system functionality. It was irradiated at 1 cm depth at 100 cm SSD with a 4×4 field to 1.5 Gy in a 0.25 T magnetic field. The dose profile was similar between this film and the control exposure without magnetic field. Conclusion: Integrating a cobalt irradiator with a high field magnet is demonstrated. The magnetic field at the cobalt defining head was minimal and did not interfere with the functioning of this unit. Cell survival experiments can be reproduced exactly in the presence or absence of a magnetic field since a resistive magnet is used.

  10. Large-scale properties of the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, K. H.

    1972-01-01

    Early theoretical work of Parker is presented along with the observational evidence supporting his Archimedes spiral model. Variations present in the interplanetary magnetic field from the spiral angle are related to structures in the solar wind. The causes of these structures are found to be either nonuniform radial solar wind flow or the time evolution of the photospheric field. Coronal magnetic models are related to the connection between the solar magnetic field and the interplanetary magnetic field. Direct extension of the solar field-magnetic nozzle controversy is discussed along with the coronal magnetic models. Effects of active regions on the interplanetary magnetic field is discussed with particular reference to the evolution of interplanetary sectors. Interplanetary magnetic field magnitude variations are shown throughout the solar cycle. The percentage of time the field magnitude is greater than 10 gamma is shown to closely parallel sunspot number. The sun's polar field influence on the interplanetary field and alternative views of the magnetic field structure out of the ecliptic plane are presented. In addition, a variety of significantly different interplanetary field structures are discussed.

  11. Large area mode field photonic crystal fiber design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shuqin; An, Wensheng; Wang, Kang; Zhu, Guangxin; Le, Zichun

    2005-11-01

    A novel design method about photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with large area model field (LAMF) is demonstrated. Different from ordinarily design that the core of PCF formed by missing one air holes in the center of section, many air holes distributed in heartland all together come into being the core region. Air holes are arranged regularly in core region and outer cladding regions according to different periodical character, respectively. The effective refractive index (n eff ) of core region should be higher than cladding region because of total internal reflection (TIR) requirement. In this paper, two kinds of typical scheme are offered to realize LAMF-PCF. First, Λ, the spacing of neighboring air holes in whole section is fixed, once the radius of air holes in the core region r c is smaller than the cladding air holes r cla, LAMF-PCF will be formed. The modal area only lessens a little as r c is reduced. Especially, optimal size of r c can nearly make MFA insensitive to wavelength. On the contrary, dispersion parameter of PCF will take place visible change along with r c reduced, and ultra-flattened dispersion character can be realized when r c is optimized. Another method of designing LAMF-PCF is keeping all air holes uniform in the whole section of PCF, but the space of neighboring air holes in the core region Λ c is longer than the cladding region Λ cla, so n eff of core region is higher than the cladding region and TIR can take place.

  12. Catalog of worldwide tidal bore occurrences and characteristics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartsch-Winkler, S.; Lynch, David K.

    1988-01-01

    Documentation of tidal bore phenomena occurring throughout the world aids in defining the typical geographical setting of tidal bores and enables prediction of their occurrence in remote areas. Tidal bores are naturally occurring, tidally generated, solitary, moving water waves up to 6 meters in height that form upstream in estuaries with semidiurnal or nearly semidiurnal tide ranges exceeding 4 meters. Estuarine settings that have tidal bores typically include meandering fluvial systems with shallow gradients. Bores are well defined, having amplitudes greater than wind- or turbulence-caused waves, and may be undular or breaking. Formation of a bore is dependent on depth and velocity of the incoming tide and river outflow. Bores may occur in series (in several channels) or in succession (marking each tidal pulse). Tidal bores propagate up tidal estuaries a greater distance than the width of the estuary and most occur within 100 kilometers upstream of the estuary mouth. Because they are dynamic, bores cause difficulties in some shipping ports and are targets for eradication. Tidal bores are known to occur, or to have occurred in the recent past, in at least 67 localities in 16 countries at all latitudes, including every continent except Antarctica. Parts of Argentina, Canada, Central America, China, Mozambique, Madagascar, Northern Europe, North and South Korea, the United Kingdom, and the U.S.S.R. probably have additional undiscovered or unreported tidal bores. In Turnagain Arm estuary in Alaska, bores cause an abrupt increase in salinity, suspended sediment, surface character, and bottom pressure, a decrease in illumination of the water column, and a change in water temperature. Tidal bores occurring in Turnagain Arm, Alaska, have the

  13. Numerical Modeling of Tsunami Bore Attenuation and Extreme Hydrodynamic Impact Forces Using the SPH Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piche, Steffanie

    Understanding the impact of coastal forests on the propagation of rapidly advancing onshore tsunami bores is difficult due to complexity of this phenomenon and the large amount of parameters which must be considered. The research presented in the thesis focuses on understanding the protective effect of the coastal forest on the forces generated by the tsunami and its ability to reduce the propagation and velocity of the incoming tsunami bore. Concern for this method of protecting the coast from tsunamis is based on the effectiveness of the forest and its ability to withstand the impact forces caused by both the bore and the debris carried along by it. The devastation caused by the tsunami has been investigated in recent examples such as the 2011 Tohoku Tsunami in Japan and the Indian Ocean Tsunami which occurred in 2004. This research examines the reduction of the spatial extent of the tsunami bore inundation and runup due to the presence of the coastal forest, and attempts to quantify the impact forces induced by the tsunami bores and debris impact on the structures. This research work was performed using a numerical model based on the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method which is a single-phase three-dimensional model. The simulations performed in this study were separated into three sections. The first section focused on the reduction of the extent of the tsunami inundation and the magnitude of the bore velocity by the coastal forest. This section included the analysis of the hydrodynamic forces acting on the individual trees. The second section involved the numerical modeling of some of the physical laboratory experiments performed by researchers at the University of Ottawa, in cooperation with colleagues from the Ocean, Coastal and River Engineering Lab at the National Research Council, Ottawa, in an attempt to validate the movement and impact forces of floating driftwood on a column. The final section modeled the movement and impact of floating debris

  14. A New Approach to Reduce Number of Split Fields in Large Field IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chen-Chiao; Wu, Andrew; Garg, Madhur; Mutyala, Subhakar; Kalnicki, Shalom; Sayed, Gary; Mah, Dennis

    2011-04-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has been applied for treatments of primary head with neck nodes, lung with supraclavicular nodes, and high-risk prostate cancer with pelvis wall nodes, all of which require large fields. However, the design of the Varian multileaf collimator requires fields >14 cm in width to be split into 2 or more carriage movements. With the split-field technique, both the number of monitor units (MUs) and total treatment time are significantly increased. Although many different approaches have been investigated to reduce the MU, including introducing new leaf segmentation algorithms, none have resulted in widespread success. In addition, for most clinics, writing such algorithms is not a feasible solution, particularly with commercial treatment planning systems. We introduce a new approach that can minimize the number of split fields and reduce the total MUs, thereby reducing treatment time. The technique is demonstrated on the Eclipse planning system V7.3, but could be generalized to any other system.

  15. A comparison of dedicated 1.0 T extremity MRI vs. large-bore 1.5 T MRI for semiquantitative whole organ assessment of osteoarthritis: the MOST study

    PubMed Central

    Roemer, F.W.; Lynch, J.A.; Niu, J.; Zhang, Y.; Crema, M.D.; Tolstykh, I.; El-Khoury, G.Y.; Felson, D.T.; Lewis, C.E.; Nevitt, M.C.; Guermazi, A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To date semiquantitative whole-organ scoring of knee osteoarthritis (OA) relies on 1.5 T MRI systems. Less costly 1.0 T extremity systems have been introduced that offer superior patient comfort, but may have limitations concerning field-of-view and image quality. The aim of this study was to compare SQ scoring on a 1.0 T system using 1.5 T MRI as the standard of reference. Methods The Multicenter Osteoarthritis (MOST) Study is a longitudinal study of individuals who have or are at high risk for knee OA. A sample of 53 knees was selected in which MRI was performed on a 1.0 T extremity system as well as on a 1.5 T scanner applying a comparable sequence protocol. MRIs were read according to the Whole Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score (WORMS) score. Agreement was determined using weighted kappa statistics. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were assessed using the 1.5 T readings as the reference standard. In addition the number of non-readable features was assessed. Results Agreement (w-kappa) for 7 main WORMS features (cartilage, bone marrow lesions, osteophytes, meniscal damage and extrusion, synovitis, effusion) ranged between 0.54 (synovitis) and 0.75 (cartilage). Sensitivity ranged between 68.1% (meniscal damage) and 88.1% (effusion). Specificity ranged between 63.6% (effusion) and 96.4% (bone marrow lesions). Although the overall rate of non-readable features was very low, it was higher for the 1.0 T system (1.9% vs 0.2%). Conclusions Semiquantitative whole organ scoring can be performed using a 1.0 T peripheral scanner with a moderate to high degree of agreement and accuracy compared to SQ assessment using a 1.5 T whole body scanner. Our results are comparable to the published inter- and intra observer exercises obtained from 1.5 T systems. Sensitivity to change of longitudinal scoring was not evaluated in this cross-sectional design and should be investigated in future validation studies. PMID:19766580

  16. Design of a machine to bore and line a long horizontal hole in tuff: Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project

    SciTech Connect

    Friant, J.E.; Dowden, P.B.

    1987-09-01

    This report describes an engineering design for equipment capable of simultaneously drilling and lining deep horizontal bore holes. The ultimate use of the equipment is to bore up to 600 ft long, 3 ft diameter emplacement holes for a nuclear waste repository. The specific system designed is referred to as a Development Prototype Boring Machine (DPBM) which will be used to demonstrate the drilling/lining capability in field development tests. The system utilizes as in-hole electric drive and a vacuum chip removal and handling system. The drilling unit is capable of active directional control and uses laser-type alignment equipment. The system combines the features of a small steerable tunnel boring machine, combined with a horizontally-oriented raise drill, thereby utilizing current technology. All elements of the system are compact and mobile as required for a shaft entry, underground mining environment. 3 refs., 35 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Limitations for the trapped field in large grain YBCO superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisterer, M.; Haindl, S.; Zehetmayer, M.; Gonzalez-Arrabal, R.; Weber, H. W.; Litzkendorf, D.; Zeisberger, M.; Habisreuther, T.; Gawalek, W.; Shlyk, L.; Krabbes, G.

    2006-07-01

    The actual limitations for the trapped field in YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) monoliths are discussed. The influence of the sample geometry and of the critical current density on the trapped field is investigated by numerical calculations. The field dependence of the critical current density strongly influences the trapped field. A nonlinear relationship between the sample size, the critical current density and the resulting trapped field is derived. The maximum achievable trapped field in YBCO at 77 K is found to be around 2.5 T. This limit is obtained for reasonable geometries and high but realistic critical current densities. Such high fields have not been reached experimentally so far, due to non-optimized flux pinning and material inhomogeneities. These inhomogeneities can be directly assessed by the magnetoscan technique, and their influence is discussed. Significant differences between the a- and the c-growth sectors were found. Limitations due to cracks and non-superconducting inclusions (e.g. 211 particles) are estimated and found to be candidates for variations of Jc on a millimetre length scale, as observed in experiments.

  18. Dosimetric impact of image artifact from a wide-bore CT scanner in radiotherapy treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Vincent; Podgorsak, Matthew B.; Tran, Tuan-Anh; Malhotra, Harish K.; Wang, Iris Z.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Traditional computed tomography (CT) units provide a maximum scan field-of-view (sFOV) diameter of 50 cm and a limited bore size, which cannot accommodate a large patient habitus or an extended simulation setup in radiation therapy (RT). Wide-bore CT scanners with increased bore size were developed to address these needs. Some scanners have the capacity to reconstruct the CT images at an extended FOV (eFOV), through data interpolation or extrapolation, using projection data acquired with a conventional sFOV. Objects that extend past the sFOV for eFOV reconstruction may generate image artifacts resulting from truncated projection data; this may distort CT numbers and structure contours in the region beyond the sFOV. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dosimetric impact of image artifacts from eFOV reconstruction with a wide-bore CT scanner in radiotherapy (RT) treatment planning. Methods: Testing phantoms (i.e., a mini CT phantom with equivalent tissue inserts, a set of CT normal phantoms and anthropomorphic phantoms of the thorax and the pelvis) were used to evaluate eFOV artifacts. Reference baseline images of these phantoms were acquired with the phantom centrally positioned within the sFOV. For comparison, the phantoms were then shifted laterally and scanned partially outside the sFOV, but still within the eFOV. Treatment plans were generated for the thoracic and pelvic anthropomorphic phantoms utilizing the Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) to study the potential effects of eFOV artifacts on dose calculations. All dose calculations of baseline and test treatment plans were carried out using the same MU. Results: Results show that both body contour and CT numbers are altered by image artifacts in eFOV reconstruction. CT number distortions of up to -356 HU for bone tissue and up to 323 HU for lung tissue were observed in the mini CT phantom. Results from the large body normal phantom, which is close to a clinical patient size, show

  19. Leak-off tests help determine well bore compressibility

    SciTech Connect

    Hazov, V.A.; Hurshudov, V.A. )

    1993-11-29

    Well bore compressibility and hydraulically formed fractures can contribute to elastic well bore deformation in unstable shale formations. During leak-off tests in a basin near the Terek River in eastern North Caucasus in the former Soviet Union, the mud and well bores had anomalous, high compressibilities. Subsequent analyses indicated the system compressibility was related to elastic hydrofracture behavior, with the fracture being open without additional pressure applied at the surface. The paper discusses fluid compressibility, well bore deformation, the leak-off tests, and similar problems which occurred in the Maikop shales in the eastern North Caucasus.

  20. Large-field-strength short-period undulator design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varfolomeev, A. A.; Ivanchenkov, S. N.; Khlebnikov, A. S.; Pellegrini, C.; Baranov, G. A.; Michailov, V. I.

    1992-07-01

    A high-quality strong-field hybrid undulator has been designed for an infrared FEL project to be performed at UCLA. The primary magnetic flux is provided by C-shaped vanadium-permendur yokes and SmCo5 magnets. An additional magnetic flux is supplied by thin NdFeB magnet blocks placed between the yoke poles. This magnet geometry provides a high saturation limit for the magnetic field in the gap area. With the 15 mm period and 5 mm gap a peak on-axis field of 7.3 kG has been achieved. The undulator contains 40 periods. The high accuracy of the yoke poles alignment along with the ability to move the thin permanent magnet blocks provides an on-axis magnetic field accuracy better than 0.5%.

  1. Imprints of massive primordial fields on large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimastrogiovanni, Emanuela; Fasiello, Matteo; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2016-02-01

    Attention has focussed recently on models of inflation that involve a second or more fields with a mass near the inflationary Hubble parameter H, as may occur in supersymmetric theories if the supersymmetry-breaking scale is not far from H. Quasi-single-field (QsF) inflation is a relatively simple family of phenomenological models that serve as a proxy for theories with additional fields with masses m~ H. Since QsF inflation involves fields in addition to the inflaton, the consistency conditions between correlations that arise in single-clock inflation are not necessarily satisfied. As a result, correlation functions in the squeezed limit may be larger than in single-field inflation. Scalar non-Gaussianities mediated by the massive isocurvature field in QsF have been shown to be potentially observable. These are especially interesting since they would convey information about the mass of the isocurvature field. Here we consider non-Gaussian correlators involving tensor modes and their observational signatures. A physical correlation between a (long-wavelength) tensor mode and two scalar modes (tss), for instance, may give rise to local departures from statistical isotropy or, in other words, a non-trivial four-point function. The presence of the tensor mode may moreover be inferred geometrically from the shape dependence of the four-point function. We compute tss and stt (one soft curvature mode and two hard tensors) bispectra in QsF inflation, identifying the conditions necessary for these to "violate" the consistency relations. We find that while consistency conditions are violated by stt correlations, they are preserved by the tss in the minimal QsF model. Our study of primordial correlators which include gravitons in seeking imprints of additional fields with masses m~ H during inflation can be seen as complementary to the recent ``cosmological collider physics'' proposal.

  2. Deep bore hole instrumentation along San Francisco Bay Bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Bakun, W.; Bowman, J.; Clymer, R.; Foxall, W.; Hipley, P.; Hollfelder, J.; Hutchings, L.; Jarpe, S.; Kasameyer, P.; McEvilly, T.; Mualchin, L.; Palmer, M.

    1998-10-01

    The Bay Bridges down hole network consists of sensors in bore holes that are drilled 100 ft. into bedrock around and in the San Francisco Bay. Between 2 and 8 instruments have been spaced along the Dumbarton, San Mateo, Bay, and San Rafael bridges. The instruments will provide multiple use data that is important to geotechnical, structural engineering, and seismological studies. The holes are between 100 and 1000 ft deep and were drilled by Caltrans. There are twenty- one sensor packages at fifteen sites. Extensive financial support is being contributed by Caltrans, UCB, LBL, LLNL-LDRD, U.C. Campus/Laboratory Collaboration (CLC) program, and USGS. The down hole instrument package contains a three component HS-1 seismometer and three orthogonal Wilcox 73 1 accelerometers, and is capable of recording a micro g from local M = 1.0 earthquakes to 0.5 g strong ground motion form large Bay Area earthquakes.

  3. Catastrophes of large diameter pipelines. The role of hydrogen fields

    SciTech Connect

    Polyakov, V.N.

    1995-09-01

    Fracture statistics on transmission pipelines is presented. Fractures of large-diameter pipelines are regarded as catastrophes. Fracture accidents of other pipes are less dangerous. Hydrogen makes outer layers of pipes brittle. Therefore, critical crack lengths for pipes have been calculated by a linear fracture mechanics technique. It was found that a crack of any length may be critical. The opposite opinion on reliable operation of large-diameter pipes (diameter 1420 mm) is discussed.

  4. Large Scale High-Latitude Ionospheric Electrodynamic Fields and Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Gang

    2016-07-01

    This paper provides an overview as well as the application of the Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics (AMIE) procedure. AMIE synthesizes observations from various ground-based and space-born instruments to derive global patterns of ionospheric conductance, electric fields, ionospheric equivalent current, horizontal currents, field-aligned currents, and other related electrodynamic fields simultaneously. Examples are presented to illustrate the effects of the different data inputs on the AMIE outputs. The AMIE patterns derived from ground magnetometer data are generally similar to those derived from satellite magnetometer data. But ground magnetometer data yield a cross-polar potential drop that is about 15-45 % smaller than that derived from satellite magnetometer data. Ground magnetometers also grossly underestimate the magnetic perturbations in space when compared with the in situ satellite magnetometer data. However, when satellite magnetometer data are employed, AMIE is able to replicate the observed magnetic perturbations along the satellite tracks with a mean root-mean-square (RMS) error of 17-21 %. In addition to derive snapshots of ionospheric electrodynamic fields, the utility of AMIE can be easily expanded to obtain the average distributions of these fields along with their associated variability. Such information should be valuable to the analysis and interpretation of the Swarm observations.

  5. Advanced wide-field broad-passband refracting field correctors for large telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epps, H. W.; Angel, J. R. P.; Anderson, E.

    1984-01-01

    Design objectives, constraints, and optical data are presented for specific corrector designs under consideration for several large telescope projects. These include a preliminary 30-arcmin prime focus (f/2.0) refracting field corrector system for the University of California Ten-Meter Telescope (UC TMT); a compact 40-arcmin internal Cassegrain (f/1.75 hyperbola to f/5.0) broad-passband (3300 A to 1.0 micron) corrector suitable for imaging and multi-object spectroscopy at the UC TMT; three 60-arcmin Cassegrain correctors for 300-inch f/1.8 and f/2.0 parabolic primary mirrors suitable for a Fifteen-Meter NNTT/MMT; and a 300-inch 40-arcmin external Cassegrain (f/1.0 parabola to f/4.0) broad-passband (3300 A to 1.0 micron) corrector with ADC.

  6. Large-area Overhead Manipulator for Access of Fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multi-axis, cable-driven manipulators have evolved over many years providing large area suspended platform access, programmability, relatively rigid and flexibly-positioned platform control and full six degree of freedom (DOF) manipulation of sensors and tools. We describe innovations for a new six...

  7. Earth boring bit with eccentric seal boss

    SciTech Connect

    Helmick, J.E.

    1981-07-21

    A rolling cone cutter earth boring bit is provided with a sealing system that results in the seal being squeezed uniformly around the seal circumference during drilling. The bearing pin seal surface is machined eccentrically to the bearing pin by an amount equal to the radial clearance of the bearing. The bearing pin seal surface is machined about an axis that is offset from the central axis of the bearing pin in the direction of the unloaded side of the bearing pin. When the bit is drilling and the bearing pin is loaded the seal will run on an axis concentric with the axis of the seal surfaces of the bearing pin and the rolling cutter and will see uniform squeeze around its circumference.

  8. The magnetic field of the Large Magellanic Cloud revealed through Faraday rotation.

    PubMed

    Gaensler, B M; Haverkorn, M; Staveley-Smith, L; Dickey, J M; McClure-Griffiths, N M; Dickel, J R; Wolleben, M

    2005-03-11

    We have measured the Faraday rotation toward a large sample of polarized radio sources behind the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) to determine the structure of this galaxy's magnetic field. The magnetic field of the LMC consists of a coherent axisymmetric spiral of field strength approximately 1 microgauss. Strong fluctuations in the magnetic field are also seen on small (<0.5 parsec) and large (approximately 100 parsecs) scales. The large bursts of recent star formation and supernova activity in the LMC argue against standard dynamo theory, adding to the growing evidence for rapid field amplification in galaxies. PMID:15761149

  9. Poloidal rotation in tokamaks with large electric field gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, F.L.; Kim, Y.

    1995-01-01

    The ion poloidal flow velocity near the plasma edge in a tokamak has been calculated by extending neoclassical theory to include orbit squeezing, which is the reduction of the ion banana widths due to radial electric field shear. The pressure gradient-driven ion parallel flow is reduced by orbit squeezing, and then no longer cancels the diamagnetic flow in its contribution to poloidal flow. This allows the poloidal flow velocity to be a significant fraction of the ion diamagnetic velocity, which can be much larger than the standard neoclassical value (proportional to the ion temperature gradient). Equations for determining the poloidal flow and radial electric field profiles self-consistently are given. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  10. Lower hybrid accessibility in a large, hot reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Dziubek, R.A.; Harvey, R.W.; Hokin, S.A.; Uchimoto, E.

    1995-11-01

    Accessibility and damping of the slow wave in a reversed field pinch (RFP) plasma is investigated theoretically, using projected Reversed Field Experiment (RFX) plasma parameters. By numerically solving the hot plasma dispersion relation, regions of propagation are found and the possibility of mode conversion is analyzed. If the parallel index of refraction of the wave is chosen judiciously at the edge of the plasma, the slow wave is accessible to a target region located just inside the reversal surface without mode conversion. Landau damping is also optimized in this region. A representative fast electron population is then added in order to determine its effect on accessibility and damping. The presence of these electrons, whose parameters were estimated by extrapolation of Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) data, does not affect the accessibility of the wave. However, the initial phase velocity of the wave needs to be increased somewhat in order to maintain optimal damping in the target zone.

  11. Laser Plasma Particle Accelerators: Large Fields for Smaller Facility Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Esarey, Eric H.; Schroeder, Carl B.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Leemans, Wim P.; Bruhwiler, David L.; Cary, John R.; Cowan, Ben; Durant, Marc; Hamill, Paul; Messmer, Peter; Mullowney, Paul; Nieter, Chet; Paul, Kevin; Shasharina, Svetlana; Veitzer, Seth; Weber, Gunther; Rubel, Oliver; Ushizima, Daniela; Bethel, Wes; Wu, John

    2009-03-20

    Compared to conventional particle accelerators, plasmas can sustain accelerating fields that are thousands of times higher. To exploit this ability, massively parallel SciDAC particle simulations provide physical insight into the development of next-generation accelerators that use laser-driven plasma waves. These plasma-based accelerators offer a path to more compact, ultra-fast particle and radiation sources for probing the subatomic world, for studying new materials and new technologies, and for medical applications.

  12. Virtually distortion-free imaging system for large field, high resolution lithography

    DOEpatents

    Hawryluk, A.M.; Ceglio, N.M.

    1993-01-05

    Virtually distortion free large field high resolution imaging is performed using an imaging system which contains large field distortion or field curvature. A reticle is imaged in one direction through the optical system to form an encoded mask. The encoded mask is then imaged back through the imaging system onto a wafer positioned at the reticle position.

  13. Virtually distortion-free imaging system for large field, high resolution lithography

    DOEpatents

    Hawryluk, Andrew M.; Ceglio, Natale M.

    1993-01-01

    Virtually distortion free large field high resolution imaging is performed using an imaging system which contains large field distortion or field curvature. A reticle is imaged in one direction through the optical system to form an encoded mask. The encoded mask is then imaged back through the imaging system onto a wafer positioned at the reticle position.

  14. Localizing a large-dimensional field of sonobuoys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collison, Nicole E.; Dosso, Stan E.

    2003-04-01

    For target localization, multistatic sonar systems require an adequate knowledge of both the source and receiver positions. In this paper, we use a regularized acoustic inversion method on measured direct-arrival times from several impulsive sources to track a freely drifting sonobuoy field. The shallow-water experiment involved 11 sonobuoys within a 6×8 km field, with 6 sources over approximately 70 min. Regularization allows prior information to be built into the inversion, which in this case consists of estimates (with associated uncertainties) of the source and initial sonobuoy drop positions determined from the GPS position of the aircraft at the instant of drop, as well as a model for smooth sonobuoy tracks. Closely spaced sonobuoys move along similar tracks, although there is considerable movement in different directions over the entire field (260-700 m). Positioning uncertainties are estimated using a Monte Carlo appraisal procedure to be approximately 100 m (absolute) and 65 m (relative). Submitted for the Signal Processing Young Presenter Award.

  15. Formulating entompathogens for control of boring beetles in avocado orchards

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A foam formulation of Beauveria bassiana was adapted to control boring beetles in avocado orchards. The two geographically independent avocado growing areas in the United States are threatened by emerging diseases vectored by boring beetles. In the California growing region, Fusarium dieback is vect...

  16. 6. VIEW OF BORING MILL. Chuck action of locomotive wheel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF BORING MILL. Chuck action of locomotive wheel Wheel weight 1200 pounds, 3'-0' diameter. Table 53' in diameter Wheel is 48'. Largest hole that can be bored is 9-1/2' plus (GE axle is 10'). - Juniata Shops, Erecting Shop & Machine Shop, East of Fourth Avenue, between Fourth & Fifth Streets, Altoona, Blair County, PA

  17. ASSEMBLY AND TEST OF A 120 MM BORE 15 T NB3SN QUADRUPOLE FOR THE LHC UPGRADE

    SciTech Connect

    Felice, H.; Caspi, S.; Cheng, D.; Dietderich, D.; Ferracin, P.; Hafalia, R.; Joseph, J.; Lizarazo, J.; Sabbi, G. L.; Wang, X.; Anerella, M.; Ghosh, A. K.; Schmalzle, J.; Wanderer, P.; Ambrosio, G.; Bossert, R.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2010-05-23

    In support of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade, the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) has been developing a 1-meter long, 120 mm bore Nb{sub 3}Sn IR quadrupole magnet (HQ). With a design short sample gradient of 219 T/m at 1.9 K and a peak field approaching 15 T, one of the main challenges of this magnet is to provide appropriate mechanical support to the coils. Compared to the previous LARP Technology Quadrupole and Long Quadrupole magnets, the purpose of HQ is also to demonstrate accelerator quality features such as alignment and cooling. So far, 8 HQ coils have been fabricated and 4 of them have been assembled and tested in HQ01a. This paper presents the mechanical assembly and test results of HQ01a.

  18. Data assimilation in large time-varying multidimensional fields.

    PubMed

    Asif, A; Moura, J F

    1999-01-01

    In the physical sciences, e.g., meteorology and oceanography, combining measurements with the dynamics of the underlying models is usually referred to as data assimilation. Data assimilation improves the reconstruction of the image fields of interest. Assimilating data with algorithms like the Kalman-Bucy filter (KBf) is challenging due to their computational cost which for two-dimensional (2-D) fields is of O(I(6)) where I is the linear dimension of the domain. In this paper, we combine the block structure of the underlying dynamical models and the sparseness of the measurements (e.g., satellite scans) to develop four efficient implementations of the KBf that reduce its computational cost to O(I(5)) in the case of the block KBf and the scalar KBf, and to O(I(4)) in the case of the local block KBf (lbKBf) and the local scalar KBf (lsKBf). We illustrate the application of the IbKBf to assimilate altimetry satellite data in a Pacific equatorial basin. PMID:18267434

  19. Relating Berkovits and A ∞ superstring field theories; large Hilbert space perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erler, Theodore

    2016-02-01

    We lift the dynamical field of the A ∞ superstring field theory to the large Hilbert space by introducing a gauge invariance associated with the eta zero mode. We then provide a field redefinition which relates the lifted field to the dynamical field of Berkovits' superstring field theory in the large Hilbert space. This generalizes the field redefinition in the small Hilbert space described in earlier works, and gives some understanding of the relation between the gauge symmetries of the theories. It also provides a new perspective on the algebraic structure underlying gauge invariance of the Wess-Zumino-Witten-like action.

  20. On the response of large systems to electrostatic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Springborg, Michael; Kirtman, Bernard

    2015-01-22

    By modifying the surfaces of a macroscopic regular system it is possible to modify the dipole moment per unit by an amount equal to a lattice vector times the elementary charge. Alternatively, we may ignore the surfaces and treat the system as being infinite and periodic. In that event the dipole moment per unit is determined only up to an additive term equal to a lattice vector times the elementary charge. Beyond mathematical arguments we show, through model calculations, that the two cases are completely equivalent, even though the origin of the additive term is very different. The response of extended systems to electrostatic fields — including internal structure, piezoelectricity, bulk charge density, and (hyper)polarizabilities — depends upon this term and is, thereby, surface-dependent. The case of piezoelectricity is analyzed in some detail.

  1. Camera relative orientation in large field of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Dong, Mingli; Li, Wei; Sun, Peng

    2016-01-01

    A new relative orientation w local parameter optimization method of the essential matrix for the large scale close range photogrammetry is presented in this paper to improve the accuracy and stability of the measurement system. For the matched images, according to the closed-loop polynomial algorithm, the essential matrix is initialized, and an iterative algorithm based on local parameter optimization is proposed. Then the relative exterior orientation parameters are solved from the essential matrix, and only one correct solution is determined by the Cheirality constraints. The orientation experiment of the expandable truss microwave antenna profile measurement is carried out to verify the accuracy and reliability of the new method. Compared with the traditional methods, this new method has minimum projection error and the least iterations, and it will play a key role in the performance improvement of the whole system.

  2. Controlled synthesis of large-scale, uniform, vertically standing graphene for high-performance field emitters.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lili; Yang, Tianzhong; Liu, Fei; Dong, Jing; Yao, Zhaohui; Shen, Chengmin; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng; Liu, Yunqi; Gao, Hong-Jun

    2013-01-11

    Large-scale, uniform, vertically standing graphene with atomically thin edges are controllably synthesized on copper foil using a microwave-plasma chemical vapor deposition system. A growth mechanism for this system is proposed. This film shows excellent field-emission properties, with low turn-on field of 1.3 V μm(-1) , low threshold field of 3.0 V μm(-1) and a large field-enhancement factor more than 10 000. PMID:23135968

  3. Single-field consistency relations of large scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Creminelli, Paolo; Noreña, Jorge; Simonović, Marko; Vernizzi, Filippo E-mail: jorge.norena@icc.ub.edu E-mail: filippo.vernizzi@cea.fr

    2013-12-01

    We derive consistency relations for the late universe (CDM and ΛCDM): relations between an n-point function of the density contrast δ and an (n+1)-point function in the limit in which one of the (n+1) momenta becomes much smaller than the others. These are based on the observation that a long mode, in single-field models of inflation, reduces to a diffeomorphism since its freezing during inflation all the way until the late universe, even when the long mode is inside the horizon (but out of the sound horizon). These results are derived in Newtonian gauge, at first and second order in the small momentum q of the long mode and they are valid non-perturbatively in the short-scale δ. In the non-relativistic limit our results match with [1]. These relations are a consequence of diffeomorphism invariance; they are not satisfied in the presence of extra degrees of freedom during inflation or violation of the Equivalence Principle (extra forces) in the late universe.

  4. The design of a large aperture high field dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Harfoush, F.; Harrison, M.; Kerby, J.; Koepke, K.; Mantsch, P.; Nicol, T.; Riddiford, A.; Theilacker, J.

    1989-12-01

    The impetus for this design report originated in the Snowmass 88 meeting where the subject of higher energies within the constraints of the existing Tevatron tunnel enclosure was investigated. It was determined that beam transport to the fixed target experimental areas was possible up to an energy of {approximately}1.5 Tev. Collider operation was feasible at somewhat higher energies (1.8 Tev), primarily limited by the ability to design a single turn beam abort system within the constraints of the straight section length. A new accelerator in the existing tunnel would, of necessity, have a similar though not identical lattice and straight section layout to the present Tevatron. Thus when issues arose in the magnet design requiring input from the accelerator standpoint we have assumed a Tevatron like machine. The possibility of using these high field magnets as elements in the existing Tevatron to create new warm space,' for another Interaction Region for example, also emphasizes compatibility with the present machine. 16 refs., 62 figs., 23 tabs.

  5. Revisiting resolution in hydrodynamic countercurrent chromatography: tubing bore effect.

    PubMed

    Berthod, A; Faure, K

    2015-04-17

    A major challenge in countercurrent chromatography (CCC), the technique that works with a support-free biphasic liquid system, is to retain the liquid stationary phase inside the CCC column (Sf parameter). Two solutions are commercially available: the hydrostatic CCC columns, also called centrifugal partition chromatographs (CPC), with disks of interconnected channels and rotary seals, and the hydrodynamic CCC columns with bobbins of coiled open tube and no rotary seals. It was demonstrated that the amount of liquid stationary phase retained by a coiled tube was higher with larger bore tubing than with small bore tubes. At constant column volume, small bore tubing will be longer producing more efficiency than larger bore tube that will better retain the liquid stationary phase. Since the resolution equation in CCC is depending on both column efficiency and stationary phase retention ratio, the influence of the tubing bore should be studied. This theoretical work showed that there is an optimum tubing bore size depending on solute partition coefficient and mobile phase flow rate. The interesting result of the theoretical study is that larger tubing bores allow for dramatically reduced experiment durations for all solutes: in reversed phase CCC (polar mobile phase), hydrophobic solutes are usually highly retained. These apolar solutes can be separated by the same coil at high flow rates and reduced Sf with similar retention times as polar solutes separated at smaller flow rates and much higher Sf. PMID:25747666

  6. Tunnel boring machine performance in sedimentary rock

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, P.

    1983-01-01

    Full-face tunnel boring machine (TBM) performance during the excavation of six tunnels is considered in terms of utilization, penetration rate, and cutter wear. Construction records for over 75,000 ft (22,860m) of tunnel in sedimentary rock are analyzed, and the results are used to investigate factors affecting TBM performance. Machine utilization is strongly affected by site specific conditions, including geology, construction planning, and contractor practice. The relative importance of each of 21 downtime causes is discussed, and recommendations are made for modifications in excavation system design which could help to reduce delays. Effects of machine operation rate were investigated. The interrelationship among penetration, thrust, and rolling force is analyzed with a three-dimensional model which provides a rational basis for explaining variations in cutter forces and penetration rate as a function of rock type. The most useful rock index for estimating TBM performance in sedimentary rock is shown to be a combination of Schmidt Hammer rebound and abrasion hardness. Variation in cutter wear is considered as a function of position on the cutterhead and the rock type being excavated. Rolling distances for center cutters are less sensitive to rock type than for other positions. A fracture mechanics approach, of use in modeling the process chip formation, is proposed. The use of fracture material properties for empirical prediction of TBM performance is reported. Recommendations are made for future work, and observations and records required for future performance evaluations are summarized.

  7. Description of work for vadose borings in support of 200-UP-2 Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Kelty, G.G.

    1993-08-27

    This description of work (DOW) details the field activities associated with the vadose zone drilling and soil sampling in the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit (Task 2, 3, and 5) and will serve as a field guide for those performing the work. It will be used in conjunction with the 200-UP-2 RCRA Facility Investigation/Corrective Measures Study (DOE-RL 1993a,[LFI]) and Site Characterization Manual (WHC 1988a). Vadose zone borings are being constructed to characterize the vertical and horizontal extent of contaminants in sediments within and beneath the cribs. The locations for the proposed borings are presented in Figure 1. The contaminants of concern for the project are presented in Table 1.

  8. Method and apparatus for drilling laterally from a well bore

    SciTech Connect

    Boyadjieff, G.I.; Campbell, A.B.

    1982-12-28

    A hole is drilled laterally from a main well bore by lowering a drilling unit into the bore in a position of extension essentially longitudinally thereof, and then swinging the unit to a position of extension transversely of the well bore to drill the lateral hole. The drilling unit is desirably held by a carrier as the drilling unit and carrier are lowered into the well, and preferably is of a self-propelling character adapted to move entirely out of the carrier and grip the wall of the lateral hole in a manner transmitting the reactive forces of the drilling operation directly to the earth formation.

  9. Development of an active boring bar for increased chatter immunity

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond, J.; Barney, P.; Smith, D.

    1997-03-01

    The development and initial evaluation of a prototype boring bar featuring active vibration control for increased chatter immunity is described. The significance of active damping both normal and tangential to the workpiece surface is evaluated, indicating the need for two axis control to ensure adequate performance over expected variations in tool mounting procedures. The prototype tool features a commercially available boring bar modified to accommodate four PZT stack actuators for two axis bending control. Measured closed-loop dynamics are combined with a computer model of the boring process to simulate increased metal removal rate and improved workpiece surface finish through active control.

  10. The large-scale magnetic field in the solar wind. [interplanetary magnetic fields/solar activity effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.

    1975-01-01

    A large-scale, three dimensional magnetic field in the interplanetary medium with an expected classical spiral pattern to zeroth order is discussed. Systematic and random deviations which are expected are treated. The sector structure which should be evident at high latitudes is examined. Interplanetary streams are discussed as determining the patterns of magnetic field intensity. It was proposed that the large-scale spiral field can induce a meridional flow which might alter the field geometry somewhat. The nonuniformities caused by streams will probably significantly influence the motion of solar and galactic particles. It was concluded that knowledge of the 3-dimensional field and its dynamical effects can be obtained by in situ measurements by a probe which goes over the sun's poles. Diagrams of the magnetic fields are given.

  11. Large strain under a low electric field in lead-free bismuth-based piezoelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, Aman; Won Ahn, Chang; Ullah, Amir; Won Kim, Ill

    2013-07-01

    In this letter, the composition and electric field dependent strain behavior of (1 - x)Bi0.5(Na0.78K0.22)0.5TiO3-xBi(Mg0.5Ti0.5)O3 (BNKT-BMT) were investigated to develop lead-free piezoelectric materials with a large strain response at a low driving field for actuator applications. A large strain of 0.35% (Smax/Emax = 636 pm/V) at an applied field of 55 kV/cm was obtained with a composition of 4 mol. % BMT. In particular, the electric field required to deliver large strains was reduced to a level that revealed not only a large Smax/Emax of 542 pm/V at a driving field as low as 35 kV/cm, but also remarkably suppressed the large hysteresis.

  12. BORED AND ASSEMBLED GATE VALVES RECEIVING PROTECTIVE COATING IN THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BORED AND ASSEMBLED GATE VALVES RECEIVING PROTECTIVE COATING IN THE VALVE PAINT BOOTH OF THE VALVE ASSEMBLY BUILDING. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Valve Assembly Building, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  13. 39. TUNNEL BORE UNDER CONSTRUCTION. VIEW SHOWS LIGHT CONSTRUCTION RAILWAY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. TUNNEL BORE UNDER CONSTRUCTION. VIEW SHOWS LIGHT CONSTRUCTION RAILWAY FOR HAULING MUCK AND SPOIL - Zion-Mount Carmel Highway, Tunnel, Two miles east of Zion Canyon Scenic Drive, Springdale, Washington County, UT

  14. Rectangular tunnel boring machine and method

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, L.L.

    1984-12-04

    A machine for boring a tunnel having an end face wall, a roof wall, a bottom wall, and opposite side walls. The machine comprises a rotatable cutting wheel means having an annular peripheral wall supporting a plurality of cutting devices and a generally convex-shaped upper wall supporting a plurality of cutting devices. The cutting wheel means is rotatable about an axis of rotation which is inclined in a forward direction relative to a plane perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the tunnel for simultaneously cutting the tunnel face along two intersecting surfaces defined by the cutting devices on the annular peripheral wall and the cutting devices on the convex-shape upper wall. Support shoe means are mounted beneath the cutting wheel means for movably supporting the cutting wheel means on the tunnel floor. Drive motor means are mounted on the support shoe means and are operatively associated with the cutting wheel means for causing rotation of the cutting wheel means relative to the tunnel face and the support shoe means. Thrust means are connected to the support shoe means for advancing the cutting wheel means and the support shoe means toward the tunnel face. Gripping means are associated with the thrust means for gripping engagement with the opposite tunnel side walls to prevent axial rearward movement as the cutting wheel means and the support shoe means are advanced toward the tunnel face. Vertical and horizontal steering means for changing the direction of advance of the machine are described. Paddle means and conveyor means for removing rock cuttings from the end face of the tunnel are disclosed. Shield means for shielding workers from dust and debris and for containing the cuttings are also described.

  15. Scanning and Measuring Device for Diagnostic of Barrel Bore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvan, Ales; Hajek, Josef; Vana, Jan; Dvorak, Radim; Drahansky, Martin; Jankovych, Robert; Skvarek, Jozef

    The article discusses the design, mechanical design, electronics and software for robot diagnosis of barrels with caliber of 120 mm to 155 mm. This diagnostic device is intended primarily for experimental research and verification of appropriate methods and technologies for the diagnosis of the main bore guns. Article also discusses the design of sensors and software, the issue of data processing and image reconstruction obtained by scanning of the surface of the bore.

  16. Low frequency magnetic field suppression in an atomic spin co-magnetometer with a large electron magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jiancheng; Chen, Yao; Zou, Sheng; Liu, Xuejing; Hu, Zhaohui; Quan, Wei; Yuan, Heng; Ding, Ming

    2016-03-01

    In a K-Rb-21Ne co-magnetometer, the Rb electron magnetic field which is experienced by the nuclear spin is about 100 times larger than that of the K in a K-3He co-magnetometer. The large electron magnetic field which is neglected in the K-3He co-magnetometer coupled Bloch equations model is considered here in the K-Rb-21Ne co-magnetometer to study the low frequency magnetic field suppression effect. Theoretical analysis and experimental results shows that in the K-Rb-21Ne spin co-magnetometer, not only the nuclear spin but also the large electron spin magnetic field compensate the external magnetic field noise. By comparison, only the 3He nuclear spins mainly compensate the external magnetic field noise in a K-3He co-magnetometer. With this study, in addition to just increasing the magnetic field of the nuclear spins, we can suppress the magnetic field noise by increasing the density of the electron spin. We also studied how the magnetic field suppression effect relates to the scale factor of the K-Rb-21Ne co-magnetometer and we compared the scale factor with that of the K-3He co-magnetometer. Lastly, we show the sensitivity of our co-magnetometer. The magnetic field noise, the air density fluctuation noise and pumping power optimization are studied to improve the sensitivity of the co-magnetometer.

  17. Generation of large-scale magnetic fields by small-scale dynamo in shear flows

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Squire, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-10-20

    We propose a new mechanism for a turbulent mean-field dynamo in which the magnetic fluctuations resulting from a small-scale dynamo drive the generation of large-scale magnetic fields. This is in stark contrast to the common idea that small-scale magnetic fields should be harmful to large-scale dynamo action. These dynamos occur in the presence of a large-scale velocity shear and do not require net helicity, resulting from off-diagonal components of the turbulent resistivity tensor as the magnetic analogue of the "shear-current" effect. Furthermore, given the inevitable existence of nonhelical small-scale magnetic fields in turbulent plasmas, as well as the generic naturemore » of velocity shear, the suggested mechanism may help explain the generation of large-scale magnetic fields across a wide range of astrophysical objects.« less

  18. Generation of large-scale magnetic fields by small-scale dynamo in shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Squire, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-10-20

    We propose a new mechanism for a turbulent mean-field dynamo in which the magnetic fluctuations resulting from a small-scale dynamo drive the generation of large-scale magnetic fields. This is in stark contrast to the common idea that small-scale magnetic fields should be harmful to large-scale dynamo action. These dynamos occur in the presence of a large-scale velocity shear and do not require net helicity, resulting from off-diagonal components of the turbulent resistivity tensor as the magnetic analogue of the "shear-current" effect. Furthermore, given the inevitable existence of nonhelical small-scale magnetic fields in turbulent plasmas, as well as the generic nature of velocity shear, the suggested mechanism may help explain the generation of large-scale magnetic fields across a wide range of astrophysical objects.

  19. Generation of Large-Scale Magnetic Fields by Small-Scale Dynamo in Shear Flows.

    PubMed

    Squire, J; Bhattacharjee, A

    2015-10-23

    We propose a new mechanism for a turbulent mean-field dynamo in which the magnetic fluctuations resulting from a small-scale dynamo drive the generation of large-scale magnetic fields. This is in stark contrast to the common idea that small-scale magnetic fields should be harmful to large-scale dynamo action. These dynamos occur in the presence of a large-scale velocity shear and do not require net helicity, resulting from off-diagonal components of the turbulent resistivity tensor as the magnetic analogue of the "shear-current" effect. Given the inevitable existence of nonhelical small-scale magnetic fields in turbulent plasmas, as well as the generic nature of velocity shear, the suggested mechanism may help explain the generation of large-scale magnetic fields across a wide range of astrophysical objects. PMID:26551120

  20. Field Stability of Piezoelectric Shear Properties in PIN-PMN-PT Crystals Under Large Drive Field

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shujun; Li, Fei; Luo, Jun; Xia, Ru; Hackenberger, Wesley; Shrout, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    The coercive fields (EC) of Pb(In0.5Nb0.5)O3-Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 (PIN-PMN-PT) ternary single crystals were found to be 5 kV/cm, double the value of binary Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 (PMNT) crystals, further increased to 6 to 9 kV/cm using Mn modifications. In addition to an increased EC, the acceptor modification resulted in the developed internal bias (Eint), on the order of ~1 kV/cm. The piezoelectric shear properties of unmodified and Mn-modified PIN-PMN-PT crystals with various domain configurations were investigated. The shear piezoelectric coefficients and electromechanical coupling factors for different domain configurations were found to be >2000 pC/N and >0.85, respectively, with slightly reduced properties observed in Mn-modified tetragonal crystals. Fatigue/cycling tests performed on shear-mode samples as a function of ac drive field level demonstrated that the allowable ac field levels (the maximum applied ac field before the occurrence of depolarization) were only ~2 kV/cm for unmodified crystals, less than half of their coercive field. Allowable ac drive levels were on the order of 4 to 6 kV/cm for Mn-modified crystals with rhombohedral/orthorhombic phase, further increased to 5 to 8 kV/cm in tetragonal crystals, because of their higher coercive fields. It is of particular interest that the allowable ac drive field level for Mn-modified crystals was found to be ≥60% of their coercive fields, because of the developed Eint, induced by the acceptor-oxygen vacancy defect dipoles. PMID:21342812

  1. An Empirical Relation between the Large-scale Magnetic Field and the Dynamical Mass in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabatabaei, F. S.; Martinsson, T. P. K.; Knapen, J. H.; Beckman, J. E.; Koribalski, B.; Elmegreen, B. G.

    2016-02-01

    The origin and evolution of cosmic magnetic fields as well as the influence of the magnetic fields on the evolution of galaxies are unknown. Though not without challenges, the dynamo theory can explain the large-scale coherent magnetic fields that govern galaxies, but observational evidence for the theory is so far very scarce. Putting together the available data of non-interacting, non-cluster galaxies with known large-scale magnetic fields, we find a tight correlation between the integrated polarized flux density, SPI, and the rotation speed, vrot, of galaxies. This leads to an almost linear correlation between the large-scale magnetic field \\bar{B} and vrot, assuming that the number of cosmic-ray electrons is proportional to the star formation rate, and a super-linear correlation assuming equipartition between magnetic fields and cosmic rays. This correlation cannot be attributed to an active linear α-Ω dynamo, as no correlation holds with global shear or angular speed. It indicates instead a coupling between the large-scale magnetic field and the dynamical mass of the galaxies, \\bar{B}˜ \\{M}{{dyn}}0.25-0.4. Hence, faster rotating and/or more massive galaxies have stronger large-scale magnetic fields. The observed \\bar{B}-{v}{{rot}} correlation shows that the anisotropic turbulent magnetic field dominates \\bar{B} in fast rotating galaxies as the turbulent magnetic field, coupled with gas, is enhanced and ordered due to the strong gas compression and/or local shear in these systems. This study supports a stationary condition for the large-scale magnetic field as long as the dynamical mass of galaxies is constant.

  2. Large-scale magnetic fields at high Reynolds numbers in magnetohydrodynamic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotta, H.; Rempel, M.; Yokoyama, T.

    2016-03-01

    The 11-year solar magnetic cycle shows a high degree of coherence in spite of the turbulent nature of the solar convection zone. It has been found in recent high-resolution magnetohydrodynamics simulations that the maintenance of a large-scale coherent magnetic field is difficult with small viscosity and magnetic diffusivity (≲1012square centimenters per second). We reproduced previous findings that indicate a reduction of the energy in the large-scale magnetic field for lower diffusivities and demonstrate the recovery of the global-scale magnetic field using unprecedentedly high resolution. We found an efficient small-scale dynamo that suppresses small-scale flows, which mimics the properties of large diffusivity. As a result, the global-scale magnetic field is maintained even in the regime of small diffusivities—that is, large Reynolds numbers.

  3. Nonlinear Generation of shear flows and large scale magnetic fields by small scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aburjania, G.

    2009-04-01

    EGU2009-233 Nonlinear Generation of shear flows and large scale magnetic fields by small scale turbulence in the ionosphere by G. Aburjania Contact: George Aburjania, g.aburjania@gmail.com,aburj@mymail.ge

  4. A survey of near-field testing methods for large aperture antennas and future trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newell, A. C.

    1983-01-01

    In recent years, a near-field antenna measurements have progressed from theoretical concepts to a wide variety of operational measurement systems. The current status of this work is summarized and its possible application to large space antennas is discussed.

  5. Large-scale magnetic fields at high Reynolds numbers in magnetohydrodynamic simulations.

    PubMed

    Hotta, H; Rempel, M; Yokoyama, T

    2016-03-25

    The 11-year solar magnetic cycle shows a high degree of coherence in spite of the turbulent nature of the solar convection zone. It has been found in recent high-resolution magnetohydrodynamics simulations that the maintenance of a large-scale coherent magnetic field is difficult with small viscosity and magnetic diffusivity (≲10 (12) square centimenters per second). We reproduced previous findings that indicate a reduction of the energy in the large-scale magnetic field for lower diffusivities and demonstrate the recovery of the global-scale magnetic field using unprecedentedly high resolution. We found an efficient small-scale dynamo that suppresses small-scale flows, which mimics the properties of large diffusivity. As a result, the global-scale magnetic field is maintained even in the regime of small diffusivities-that is, large Reynolds numbers. PMID:27013727

  6. SHG as a new modality for large field of view imaging to monitor tissue collagen network.

    PubMed

    Dumas, D; Hupont, S; Huselstein, C; de Isla, N; Rousseau, M; Werkmeister, E; Magdalou, J; Menu, P; Stoltz, J-F

    2012-01-01

    For this study, we have considered a new large field of view imaging dedicated to matrix collagen (no stained samples). To integrate a multidimensional scale (non-sliced samples), a femtosecond oscillator (two photon excitation laser) has been coupled with a large field optical setup to collect SHG signal. We introduced an index (F-SHG) based on decay time response measured by TCSPC for, respectively, Fluorescence (F) and Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) values. For samples where protein collagen is the major component of extracellular matrix (skin) or not (nacre), we compared the index distribution (from 2 to 12) obtained with large field optical setup. In this work, we showed for the first time that multiscale large field imaging combined to multimodality approaches (SHG-TCSPC) could be an innovative and non invasive technique to detect and identify some biological interest molecules (collagen) in biomedical topics. PMID:22766715

  7. Speed of field-driven domain walls in nanowires with large transverse magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depassier, M. C.

    2015-07-01

    Recent analytical and numerical work on field-driven domain wall propagation in nanowires and thin films has shown that for large transverse anisotropy and sufficiently large applied fields the Walker profile becomes unstable before the breakdown field, giving way to a domain wall whose speed increases at a slower rate with the applied field. We perform an asymptotic expansion of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation for large transverse magnetic anisotropy and show that the asymptotic dynamics reproduces this behavior. The appearance of a different regime in the asymptotic dynamics is due to a transition from a pushed to a pulled front of a reaction diffusion equation in which the speed of the domain wall increases with the square root of the applied field

  8. Simplified field-in-field technique for a large-scale implementation in breast radiation treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier-Bidoz, Nathalie; Kirova, Youlia M.; Campana, Francois; Dendale, Remi; Fourquet, Alain

    2012-07-01

    We wanted to evaluate a simplified 'field-in-field' technique (SFF) that was implemented in our department of Radiation Oncology for breast treatment. This study evaluated 15 consecutive patients treated with a simplified field in field technique after breast-conserving surgery for early-stage breast cancer. Radiotherapy consisted of whole-breast irradiation to the total dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions, and a boost of 16 Gy in 8 fractions to the tumor bed. We compared dosimetric outcomes of SFF to state-of-the-art electronic surface compensation (ESC) with dynamic leaves. An analysis of early skin toxicity of a population of 15 patients was performed. The median volume receiving at least 95% of the prescribed dose was 763 mL (range, 347-1472) for SFF vs. 779 mL (range, 349-1494) for ESC. The median residual 107% isodose was 0.1 mL (range, 0-63) for SFF and 1.9 mL (range, 0-57) for ESC. Monitor units were on average 25% higher in ESC plans compared with SFF. No patient treated with SFF had acute side effects superior to grade 1-NCI scale. SFF created homogenous 3D dose distributions equivalent to electronic surface compensation with dynamic leaves. It allowed the integration of a forward planned concomitant tumor bed boost as an additional multileaf collimator subfield of the tangential fields. Compared with electronic surface compensation with dynamic leaves, shorter treatment times allowed better radiation protection to the patient. Low-grade acute toxicity evaluated weekly during treatment and 2 months after treatment completion justified the pursuit of this technique for all breast patients in our department.

  9. Spatial distribution of large-scale solar magnetic fields and their relation to the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, R. H.

    1979-01-01

    The spatial organization of the observed photospheric magnetic field as well as its relation to the polarity of the IMF have been studied using high resolution magnetograms from the Kitt Peak National Observatory. Systematic patterns in the large scale field are due to contributions from both concentrated flux and more diffuse flux. The polarity of the photospheric field, determined on various spatial scales, correlates with the polarity of the IMF. Analyses based on several spatial scales in the photosphere suggest that new flux in the interplanetary medium is often due to relatively small photospheric features which appear in the photosphere up to one month before they are manifest at the earth.

  10. The Decay of a Weak Large-scale Magnetic Field in Two-dimensional Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondić, Todor; Hughes, David W.; Tobias, Steven M.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the decay of a large-scale magnetic field in the context of incompressible, two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. It is well established that a very weak mean field, of strength significantly below equipartition value, induces a small-scale field strong enough to inhibit the process of turbulent magnetic diffusion. In light of ever-increasing computer power, we revisit this problem to investigate fluids and magnetic Reynolds numbers that were previously inaccessible. Furthermore, by exploiting the relation between the turbulent diffusion of the magnetic potential and that of the magnetic field, we are able to calculate the turbulent magnetic diffusivity extremely accurately through the imposition of a uniform mean magnetic field. We confirm the strong dependence of the turbulent diffusivity on the product of the magnetic Reynolds number and the energy of the large-scale magnetic field. We compare our findings with various theoretical descriptions of this process.

  11. On the nature of large auroral zone electric fields at 1-R/E/ altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shawhan, S. D.; Falthammar, C.-G.; Block, L. P.

    1978-01-01

    Mechanisms that may support magnetic-field-aligned electric fields in collisionless plasma are discussed in the light of recent magnetospheric observations, which for the first time allow a quantitative test of the theoretical models. Data from barium ion releases which indicate large field-aligned potential drops and direct electric field probe measurements at high altitude which reveal electric fields of several hundred millivolts per meter are discussed. It is concluded that the large field strengths observed (1) cannot be explained by anomalous resistivity or thermoelectric effects based on wave-particle interaction, (2) are much larger than required merely to balance the local mirror forces, and (3) are compatible with electric double layers of the same nature as those observed in the laboratory.

  12. The evolution of large-scale magnetic fields in the ionosphere of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cravens, T. E.; Shinagawa, H.; Nagy, A. F.

    1984-03-01

    Large-scale magnetic fields are often observed in the ionosphere of Venus by the magnetometer on the Pioneer Venus Orbiter, especially near the subsolar point or when the solar wind dynamic pressure is high. An equation for the time evolution of the magnetic field is derived which includes both a term representing the time rate of change of the field due to the convection of magnetic flux by plasma motions, and a magnetic diffusion/dissipation term. The ionospheric plasma velocities required by these equations were obtained by numerically solving the momentum equation. Numerical solutions to the magnetic field equation indicate that large-scale magnetic fields, which are not being actively maintained, decay with time scales ranging from tens of minutes to several hours. The vertical convection of magnetic flux enables magnetic field structures deep within the ionosphere to persist longer than would otherwise be expected. This vertical convection also explains the shape of these structures.

  13. Observations of large scale steady magnetic fields in the dayside Venus ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Elphic, R. C.; Russell, C. T.; Mihalov, J. D.; Wolfe, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    Although the dayside ionosphere of Venus is often field-free except for fine-scale features, large-scale steady ionospheric magnetic fields with magnitudes sometimes exceeding 100 gammas are occasionally observed by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter magnetometer. These fields are mainly horizontal and can assume any angle in the horizontal plane. The orientation of the field may change along the spacecraft trajectory. The field magnitude in the upper ionosphere usually shows a distinct minimum near approximately 200 km altitude, but the altitude profile is otherwise arbitrary. With few exceptions, the observations of these large scale fields occur when periapsis is at solar zenith angles less than 50 deg. The occurrence of large-scale fields is often coincident with the observation of high solar wind dynamic pressures by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter plasma analyzer closely following the ionosphere encounter. However, the detection of this phenomenon even during some orbits for which the dynamic pressure is not extraordinarily high suggests that other factors, such as hysteresis effects, must also play a role in determining the occurrence frequency of large-scale magnetic fields in the dayside Venus ionosphere.

  14. NOTE: Intraoperative radiation therapy using a mobile electron linear accelerator: field matching for large-field electron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beddar, A. S.; Briere, T. M.; Ouzidane, M.

    2006-09-01

    Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) consists of delivering a large, single-fraction dose of radiation to a surgically exposed tumour or tumour bed at the time of surgery. With the availability of a mobile linear accelerator in the OR, IORT procedures have become more feasible for medical centres and more accessible to cancer patients. Often the area requiring irradiation is larger than what the treatment applicators will allow, and therefore, two or more adjoining fields are used. Unfortunately, the divergence and scattering of the electron beams may cause significant dose variations in the region of the field junction. Furthermore, because IORT treatments are delivered in a large single fraction, the effects of underdosing or overdosing could be more critical when compared to fractionated external beam therapy. Proper matching of the fields is therefore an important technical aspect of treatment delivery. We have studied the matching region using the largest flat applicator available for three different possibilities: abutting the fields, leaving a small gap or creating an overlap. Measurements were done using film dosimetry for the available energies of 4, 6, 9 and 12 MeV. Our results show the presence of clinically significant cold spots for the low-energy beams when the fields are either gapped or abutted, suggesting that the fields should be overlapped. No fields should be gapped. The results suggest that an optimal dose distribution may be obtained by overlapping the fields at 4 and 6 MeV and simply abutting the fields at 9 and 12 MeV. However, due to uncertainties in the placement of lead shields during treatment delivery, one may wish to consider overlapping the higher energy fields as well.

  15. Wear analysis of disc cutters of full face rock tunnel boring machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaohuang; Meng, Liang; Sun, Fei

    2014-11-01

    Wear is a major factor of disc cutters' failure. No current theory offers a standard for the prediction of disc cutter wear yet. In the field the wear prediction method commonly used is based on the excavation length of tunnel boring machine(TBM) to predict the disc cutter wear and its wear law, considering the location number of each disc cutter on the cutterhead(radius for installation); in theory, there is a prediction method of using arc wear coefficient. However, the preceding two methods have their own errors, with their accuracy being 40% or so and largely relying on the technicians' experience. Therefore, radial wear coefficient, axial wear coefficient and trajectory wear coefficient are defined on the basis of the operating characteristics of TBM. With reference to the installation and characteristics of disc cutters, those coefficients are modified according to penetration, which gives rise to the presentation of comprehensive axial wear coefficient, comprehensive radial wear coefficient and comprehensive trajectory wear coefficient. Calculation and determination of wear coefficients are made with consideration of data from a segment of TBM project(excavation length 173 m). The resulting wear coefficient values, after modification, are adopted to predict the disc cutter wear in the follow-up segment of the TBM project(excavation length of 5621 m). The prediction results show that the disc cutter wear predicted with comprehensive radial wear coefficient and comprehensive trajectory wear coefficient are not only accurate(accuracy 16.12%) but also highly congruous, whereas there is a larger deviation in the prediction with comprehensive axial wear coefficient(accuracy 41%, which is in agreement with the prediction of disc cutters' life in the field). This paper puts forth a new method concerning prediction of life span and wear of TBM disc cutters as well as timing for replacing disc cutters.

  16. Study on boring hardened materials dryly by ultrasonic vibration cutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiangzhong; Zhang, Heng; Zhang, Yue

    2011-05-01

    It has been one of the difficulties that high-precision hole on hardened materials is machined. The supersonic vibration boring acoustic system in the lathe in which supersonic wave energy is applied on tool is introduced to create pulse power on the cutting process. The separation vibration cutting is achieved by the pulse force. The comparative tests on boring accuracy and surface quality are carried. The quality of surface machined by this method is compared to that by grinding. This cutting is the green cutting. The boring process system is stability. Under the condition that the cutting speed is less than or equal to 1/3 the tool vibration speed, the cutting force is pulse force and the Cutting energy is of high concentration in time, space and direction. The pulse energy effects on the cutting unit in less than one ten-thousandth second. Traditional cutting of irregular movement elastic compression are eliminated. The cutting force is greatly reduced. The cutting temperature is at room temperature. The tool life is greatly increased. Shape precision and surface quality is greatly improved. The regulations of the ultrasonic vibration boring dry cutting of hardened material are also summarized. The test results show that the ultrasonic vibration cutting tool boring is of very superior cutting mechanism and is a high-precision deep-hole machining of hardened materials, efficient cutting methods.

  17. Study on boring hardened materials dryly by ultrasonic vibration cutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiangzhong; Zhang, Heng; Zhang, Yue

    2010-12-01

    It has been one of the difficulties that high-precision hole on hardened materials is machined. The supersonic vibration boring acoustic system in the lathe in which supersonic wave energy is applied on tool is introduced to create pulse power on the cutting process. The separation vibration cutting is achieved by the pulse force. The comparative tests on boring accuracy and surface quality are carried. The quality of surface machined by this method is compared to that by grinding. This cutting is the green cutting. The boring process system is stability. Under the condition that the cutting speed is less than or equal to 1/3 the tool vibration speed, the cutting force is pulse force and the Cutting energy is of high concentration in time, space and direction. The pulse energy effects on the cutting unit in less than one ten-thousandth second. Traditional cutting of irregular movement elastic compression are eliminated. The cutting force is greatly reduced. The cutting temperature is at room temperature. The tool life is greatly increased. Shape precision and surface quality is greatly improved. The regulations of the ultrasonic vibration boring dry cutting of hardened material are also summarized. The test results show that the ultrasonic vibration cutting tool boring is of very superior cutting mechanism and is a high-precision deep-hole machining of hardened materials, efficient cutting methods.

  18. Twin mesospheric bores observed over Brazilian equatorial region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medeiros, A. F.; Paulino, I.; Taylor, M. J.; Fechine, J.; Takahashi, H.; Buriti, R. A.; Lima, L. M.; Wrasse, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Two consecutive mesospheric bores were observed simultaneously by two all-sky cameras on 19 December 2006. The observations were carried out in the northeast of Brazil at two different stations: São João do Cariri (36.5° W, 7.4° S) and Monteiro (37.1° W, 7.9° S), which are by about 85 km apart. The mesospheric bores were observed within an interval of ˜ 3 h in the NIR OH and OI557.7 nm airglow emissions. Both bores propagated to the east and showed similar characteristics. However, the first one exhibited a dark leading front with several trailing waves behind and progressed into a brighter airglow region, while the second bore, observed in the OH layer, was comprised of several bright waves propagating into a darker airglow region. This is the first paper to report events like these, called twin mesospheric bores. The background of the atmosphere during the occurrence of these events was studied by considering the temperature profiles from the TIMED/SABER satellite and wind from a meteor radar.

  19. Large-scale negative polarity magnetic fields on the sun and particle-emitting flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bumba, V.

    1972-01-01

    Some observational facts about the large-scale patterns formed by solar negative polarity magnetic fields during the 19th and 20th cycles of solar activity are presented. The close relation of the position of occurrence of very large flares accompanied by cosmic ray and PCA events as well as other phenomena of solar activity during the declining part of the 19th cycle of the regularities in the internal structure of large scale negative polarity features are demonstrated.

  20. Gridless simulations of splashing processes and near-shore bore propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landrini, M.; Colagrossi, A.; Greco, M.; Tulin, M. P.

    The generation and evolution of two-dimensional bores in water of uniform depth and on sloping beaches are simulated through numerical solution of the Euler equations using the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method, wherein particles are followed in Lagrangian fashion, avoiding the need for computational grids. In water of uniform depth, a piston wavemaker produces cyclically breaking bores in the Froude number range 1.37-1.82, which were shown to move at time-averaged speeds in very good agreement with the requirements of global mass and momentum conservation. A single Strouhal number for the breaking period was discovered. Complex repetitive splashing patterns are observed and described, involving forward jet formation growth, impact and ricochet, and similarly, backward jet formation and impact. Observed consequences were the creation of vortical regions of both signs, dipole creation through pairing, large-scale transport of surface water downward and high tangential scouring velocities on the bed, which are quantified. These bores are further allowed to rise on linear slopes to the shoreline, where they are seen to collapse into a tongue-like flow resembling dam-break evolution.This essentially inviscid calculation is able to reproduce the development of a highly vortical flow in excellent agreement with experimental observations and theoretical concepts. The turbulent flow behaviour is partially described by the numerical solution.

  1. Solar large-scale positive polarity magnetic fields and geomagnetic disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bumba, V.

    1972-01-01

    Unlike the negative polarity solar magnetic field large-scale regular features that correlate with enhanced solar activity regions, the positive polarity regular formations formed in the weak and old background magnetic fields seem to correlate well with geomagnetically enhanced periods of time (shifted for 4 days), which means that they seem to be the source of the quiet solar wind. This behavior of the large intervals of heliographic longitude with prevailing positive polarity fields may be followed to the end of the 18th cycle, during the declining part of the 19th cycle, and during the first half of the present 20th cycle of solar activity.

  2. What controls the large-scale magnetic fields of M dwarfs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastine, T.; Morin, J.; Duarte, L.; Reiners, A.; Christensen, U.; Wicht, J.

    2014-08-01

    Observations of active M dwarfs show a broad variety of large-scale magnetic fields encompassing dipole-dominated and multipolar geometries. We detail the analogy between some anelastic dynamo simulations and spectropolarimetric observations of 23 M stars. In numerical models, the relative contribution of inertia and Coriolis force -estimated by the so-called local Rossby number- is known to have a strong impact on the magnetic field geometry. We discuss the relevance of this parameter in setting the large-scale magnetic field of M dwarfs.

  3. Boring sponges, an increasing threat for coral reefs affected by bleaching events

    PubMed Central

    Carballo, José L; Bautista, Eric; Nava, Héctor; Cruz-Barraza, José A; Chávez, Jesus A

    2013-01-01

    Coral bleaching is a stress response of corals induced by a variety of factors, but these events have become more frequent and intense in response to recent climate-change-related temperature anomalies. We tested the hypothesis that coral reefs affected by bleaching events are currently heavily infested by boring sponges, which are playing a significant role in the destruction of their physical structure. Seventeen reefs that cover the entire distributional range of corals along the Mexican Pacific coast were studied between 2005/2006, and later between 2009/2010. Most of these coral reefs were previously impacted by bleaching events, which resulted in coral mortalities. Sponge abundance and species richness was used as an indicator of bioerosion, and coral cover was used to describe the present condition of coral reefs. Coral reefs are currently highly invaded (46% of the samples examined) by a very high diversity of boring sponges (20 species); being the coral reef framework the substrate most invaded (56%) followed by the rubbles (45%), and the living colonies (36%). The results also indicated that boring sponges are promoting the dislodgment of live colonies and large fragments from the framework. In summary, the eastern coral reefs affected by bleaching phenomena, mainly provoked by El Niño, present a high diversity and abundance of boring sponges, which are weakening the union of the colony with the reef framework and promoting their dislodgment. These phenomena will probably become even more intense and severe, as temperatures are projected to continue to rise under the scenarios for future climate change, which could place many eastern coral reefs beyond their survival threshold. PMID:23610632

  4. Analytical Prediction of Temperature Distribution in Cylinder Liner during Various Boring Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yulong; Sasahara, Hiroyuki

    During the boring process of the engine cylinder liner in automotive manufacturing, the heat at the cutting point flows into the cylinder liner and causes it to thermally expand, which is an inescapable machining issue. This affects the machining accuracy of the machined liner. However, the thermal expansion can be minimized under suitable cutting conditions and boring operations. The boring operation of an engine cylinder liner usually has two stages, semi-finishing boring and finishing. Different from the conventional boring operation, a new boring operation which can perform semi-finishing boring and finishing boring in one stage is explored in this paper. By this boring operation, the influence of the thermal expansion of the machined liner can be minimized. This boring operation is called a “simultaneous boring operation” in this paper. To prove the validity of the simultaneous boring operation, a finite element method (FEM) model was developed to predict the thermal behavior in the cylinder liner during the simultaneous boring operation/conventional boring operation. The results show that the machining errors caused by the thermal expansion of the cylinder liner during the simultaneous boring operation are smaller than those of the cylinder liner during the conventional boring operation. To investigate the influence of the cutting conditions on temperature distribution in the cylinder liner during simultaneous boring operation, FEM analysis of the temperature and thermal expansion on the cylinder liner under three levels of cutting speeds (300,600, and 900m/min) combined with two types of cutting fluid (dry, wet) during simultaneous boring was performed. The results showed that the temperature rise of the cylinder liner during a high-speed, wet simultaneous boring operation is small.

  5. Pervasive large-scale magnetic fields in the Venus nightside ionosphere and their implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luhmann, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    When the solar wind dynamic pressure at Venus was extraordinarily high during the primary mission of the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO), 'disappearing ionospheres' occurred on the nightside, with accompanying pervasive near-periapsis magnetic fields of tens of nanoteslas. These nightside counterparts of the generally horizontal large-scale magnetic fields in the dayside ionosphere are found to exhibit some dependence of field magnitude on the solar wind pressure but not on solar zenith angle. Their statistical behavior suggests a global configuration in which the low-altitude field wraps around the planet, while the field at higher altitudes is draped like the induced magnetotail field. The toroidal low-altitude field geometry implies the possible existence of magnetic x points in the low-altitude wake.

  6. High-field QCPMG NMR of large quadrupolar patterns using resistive magnets.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ivan; Shetty, Kiran; Ellis, Paul D; Brey, William W; Gan, Zhehong

    2009-12-01

    Spectroscopy in a high magnetic field reduces second-order quadrupolar shift while increasing chemical shift. It changes the scale between quadrupolar and chemical shift of half-integer quadrupolar spins. The application of QCPMG multiple echo for acquiring large quadrupolar pattern under the high magnetic field of a 25 T resistive magnet is presented for acquiring large quadrupolar patterns. It shows that temporal field fluctuations and spatial homogeneity of the Keck magnet at the NHMFL contribute about +/- 20 ppm in line broadening. NMR patterns which have breadths of hundreds to thousands of kilohertz can be efficiently recorded using a combination of QCPMG and magnetic field stepping with negligible hindrance from the inhomogeneity and field fluctuations of powered magnets. PMID:19913391

  7. Structure and evolution of the large scale solar and heliospheric magnetic fields. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoeksema, J. T.

    1984-01-01

    Structure and evolution of large scale photospheric and coronal magnetic fields in the interval 1976-1983 were studied using observations from the Stanford Solar Observatory and a potential field model. The solar wind in the heliosphere is organized into large regions in which the magnetic field has a componenet either toward or away from the sun. The model predicts the location of the current sheet separating these regions. Near solar minimum, in 1976, the current sheet lay within a few degrees of the solar equator having two extensions north and south of the equator. Soon after minimum the latitudinal extent began to increase. The sheet reached to at least 50 deg from 1978 through 1983. The complex structure near maximum occasionally included multiple current sheets. Large scale structures persist for up to two years during the entire interval. To minimize errors in determining the structure of the heliospheric field particular attention was paid to decreasing the distorting effects of rapid field evolution, finding the optimum source surface radius, determining the correction to the sun's polar field, and handling missing data. The predicted structure agrees with direct interplanetary field measurements taken near the ecliptic and with coronameter and interplanetary scintillation measurements which infer the three dimensional interplanetary magnetic structure. During most of the solar cycle the heliospheric field cannot be adequately described as a dipole.

  8. Large-scale geometry and temporal variability of the Martian external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittelholz, A.; Johnson, C. L.; Langlais, B.

    2014-12-01

    The martian magnetic field is unique among the terrestrial planets, as it results from the interaction of fields caused by crustal remnant magnetization and a planetary ionosphere with the solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field. Internal fields of crustal origin have been subject to extensive studies, whereas the focus of our work deals with average spatial structure and time variability in the martian external magnetic field. We use the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) vector magnetic field data to investigate the large-scale geometry and magnitude of such external fields. We analyze the day-time and night-time magnetic signature for the duration of the MGS mission in mapping orbit (2000-2006). We use along-track vector field measurements to estimate the day-time and night-time external fields after the subtraction of predicted crustal magnetic fields at spacecraft altitudes. We also examine day/night differences (i.e., the daily variation) in external fields; these are independent of crustal fields. Because the external fields are modified by the crustal fields, we investigate their structure as a function of latitude in the local time frame and as a function of both latitude and longitude in the body-fixed frame. In the body-fixed-frame BΘis generally dominant in magnitude with a day/night variation described to first order by a zonal degree-2 spherical harmonic structure. Br is strongly correlated with the crustal magnetic field. BΦ shows variable spatial behaviour during both night and day. Seasonal variations are observed as stronger average magnetic fields in the hemisphere pointing towards the sun. Additional shorter time scale variations in the global external field structure are observed.

  9. Lunar surface magnetic field concentrations antipodal to young large impact basins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.; Anderson, K. A.; Hood, L. L.

    1988-01-01

    Planetary electron reflection magnetometry data of the Apollo 15 and 16 subsatellites indicate the presence of major regions of strong surface magnetic fields near the antipodes of four large, young, ringed impact basins. While mechanisms yielding surface magnetic field concentrations antipodal to impact basins are not yet clear, the present results' indicated period of strong lunar magnetic fields, at between about 3.85 and 3.6 aeons, is consistent with lunar paleomagnetic sample data. The origin of the strong surface magnetic fields is discussed.

  10. Generation of large-scale magnetic fields from inflation in teleparallelism

    SciTech Connect

    Bamba, Kazuharu; Geng, Chao-Qiang; Luo, Ling-Wei E-mail: geng@phys.nthu.edu.tw

    2012-10-01

    We explore the generation of large-scale magnetic fields from inflation in teleparallelism, in which the gravitational theory is described by the torsion scalar instead of the scalar curvature in general relativity. In particular, we examine the case that the conformal invariance of the electromagnetic field during inflation is broken by a non-minimal gravitational coupling between the torsion scalar and the electromagnetic field. It is shown that for a power-law type coupling, the magnetic field on 1 Mpc scale with its strength of ∼ 10{sup −9} G at the present time can be generated.

  11. Grinding tool for making hemispherical bores in hard materials

    DOEpatents

    Duran, E.L.

    1985-04-03

    A grinding tool for forming hemispherical bores in hard materials such as boron carbide. The tool comprises a hemicircular grinding bit, formed of a metal bond diamond matrix, which is mounted transversely on one end of a tubular tool shaft. The bit includes a spherically curved outer edge surface which is the active grinding surface of the tool. Two coolant fluid ports on opposite sides of the bit enable introduction of coolant fluid through the bore of the tool shaft so as to be emitted adjacent the opposite sides of the grinding bit, thereby providing optimum cooling of both the workpiece and the bit.

  12. Continuous measurements of in-bore projectile velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Asay, J.R.; Konrad, C.H.; Hall, C.A.; Shahinpoor, M.; Hickman, R.

    1988-01-01

    The application of velocity interferometry to the continuous measurement of in-bore projectile velocity in a small-bore three-stage railgun is described. These measurements are useful for determining projectile acceleration and for evaluating gun performance. The launcher employed in these studies consists of a two-stage light gas gun used to inject projectiles into a railgun for additional acceleration. Results obtained for projectile velocities to 7.4 km/s with the two-stage injector are reported and potential improvements for railgun applications are discussed. 12 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Continuous measurements of in-bore projectile velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Asay, J.R.; Konrad, C.H.; Hall, C.A. ); Shahinpoor, M. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Hickman, R. )

    1989-01-01

    The application of velocity interferometry to the continuous measurement of in-bore projectile velocity in a small-bore three-stage railgun is described. These measurements are useful for determining projectile acceleration and for evaluating gun performance. The launcher employed in these studies consists of a two-stage light gas gun used to inject projectiles into a railgun for additional acceleration. Results obtained for projectile velocities to 7.4 km/s with the two-stage injector are reported and potential improvements for railgun applications are discussed.

  14. Seismic source characterisation of a Tunnel Boring Machine (TBM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreutzer, Ingrid; Brückl, Ewald; Radinger, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    The Tunnel Seismic While Drilling (TSWD) method aims at predicting continuously the geological situation ahead of the tunnel without disturbing the construction work. Thereby the Tunnel Boring Machine (TBM) itself is used as seismic source. The cutting process generates seismic waves radiating into the rock mass and vibrations propagating to the main bearing of the cutter head. These vibrations are monitored and used as pilot signal. For the processing and interpretation it was hypothesized so far that the TBM acts like a single force. To prove this assumption the radiation pattern of several TBM's under construction were investigated. Therefore 3-components geophones were installed at the surface, which were situated directly above the tunnel axes and also with lateral offset. Additional, borehole geophones were placed in the wall of one tube of a two-tube tunnel. The geophones collected the forward and backward radiated wave field, as the TBM, operating in the other tube, passed their positions. The obtained seismic data contains continuous records over a range of 600 m of the TBM position. The offsets vary from 25 m to 400 m and the frequency ranges from 20-250 Hertz. The polarisation of the p-wave and the s-wave and their amplitude ratio were determined and compared with modelled seismograms with different source mechanism. The results show that the description of the source mechanism by a single force can be used as a first order approximation. More complex radiation pattern including tensile forces and several source locations like the transmission of reaction forces over the gripper to the tunnel wall are further tested and addressed.

  15. A statistical study of large electric field events in the earth's magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, S.; Whitley, K.; Mozer, F. S.

    1983-01-01

    A statistical study of large electric field events, measured on ISEE 1 at geocentric distances of 3 to 23 earth radii, has been performed in order to determine the occurrence frequency and spatial distribution of such events. Large electric fields were seen at all altitudes, with the lowest altitude events occurring on auroral field lines and the higher altitude events occurring on the high latitude boundary of the plasma sheet. The largest events had amplitudes that were approximately proportional to the square root of the local magnetic field strength, in agreement with expectations of a simple mapping model. The apparent concentration of big field events near local midnight is caused, at least in part, by a nonuniform frequency of satellite crossings through the plasma sheet boundary as a function of local time. Thus, the spatial distribution and amplitudes of the large field events are not inconsistent with the mapping of low-altitude electrostatic shocks to the plasma sheet boundary along equipotential magnetic field lines.

  16. Time scales for the decay of induced large-scale magnetic fields in the Venus ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Russell, C. T.; Elphic, R. C.

    1984-01-01

    Observations made with the aid of a magnetometer on the Pioneer Venus Orbiter have shown large-scale horizontal magnetic fields in the dayside ionosphere of Venus. According to Cloutier and Daniell (1981), the observed magnetic structures may be quasi-steady features produced by an ionospheric current system driven by solar wind interaction. Russell et al. (1983) have suggested that the altitude profiles of the horizontal field on different orbits exhibit a pattern which can be interpreted as phases in the temporal evolution of an initial state in which the ionosphere was permeated with magnetosheath-like fields. The present investigation is concerned with the argument in favor of a temporal versus spatial explanation for some of the observed field structure. A calculation indicates that the diffusion time for ionospheric fields is long enough to justify attributing the observed fields to the 'memory' of the Venus ionosphere in certain regions.

  17. Finite element modeling and analysis of piezo-integrated composite structures under large applied electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, M. N.; Tarun, S.; Schmidt, R.; Schröder, K.-U.

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we focus on static finite element (FE) simulation of piezoelectric laminated composite plates and shells, considering the nonlinear constitutive behavior of piezoelectric materials under large applied electric fields. Under the assumptions of small strains and large electric fields, the second-order nonlinear constitutive equations are used in the variational principle approach, to develop a nonlinear FE model. Numerical simulations are performed to study the effect of material nonlinearity for piezoelectric bimorph and laminated composite plates as well as cylindrical shells. In comparison to the experimental investigations existing in the literature, the results predicted by the present model agree very well. The importance of the present nonlinear model is highlighted especially in large applied electric fields, and it is shown that the difference between the results simulated by linear and nonlinear constitutive FE models cannot be omitted.

  18. The concentration of the large-scale solar magnetic field by a meridional surface flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devore, C. R.; Boris, J. P.; Sheeley, N. R., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Analytical and numerical solutions to the magnetic flux transport equation in the absence of new bipolar sources of flux are calculated for several meridional flow profiles and a range of peak flow speeds. It is found that a poleward flow with a broad profile and a nominal 10 m/s maximum speed concentrates the large-scale field into very small caps of less than 15 deg half-angle, with average field strengths of several tens of gauss, contrary to observations. A flow which reaches its peak speed at a relatively low latitude and then decreases rapidly to zero at higher latitudes leads to a large-scale field pattern which is consistent with observations. For such a flow, only lower latitude sunspot groups can contribute to interhemispheric flux annihilation and the resulting decay and reversal of the polar magnetic fields.

  19. Large-scale perturbations from the waterfall field in hybrid inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Fonseca, José; Wands, David; Sasaki, Misao E-mail: misao@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2010-09-01

    We estimate large-scale curvature perturbations from isocurvature fluctuations in the waterfall field during hybrid inflation, in addition to the usual inflaton field perturbations. The tachyonic instability at the end of inflation leads to an explosive growth of super-Hubble scale perturbations, but they retain the steep blue spectrum characteristic of vacuum fluctuations in a massive field during inflation. The power spectrum thus peaks around the Hubble-horizon scale at the end of inflation. We extend the usual δN formalism to include the essential role of these small fluctuations when estimating the large-scale curvature perturbation. The resulting curvature perturbation due to fluctuations in the waterfall field is second-order and the spectrum is expected to be of order 10{sup −54} on cosmological scales.

  20. Effects of Large-scale Non-axisymmetric Perturbations in the Mean-field Solar Dynamo.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pipin, V. V.; Kosovichev, A. G.

    2015-11-01

    We explore the response of a nonlinear non-axisymmetric mean-field solar dynamo model to shallow non-axisymmetric perturbations. After a relaxation period, the amplitude of the non-axisymmetric field depends on the initial condition, helicity conservation, and the depth of perturbation. It is found that a perturbation that is anchored at 0.9 R⊙ has a profound effect on the dynamo process, producing a transient magnetic cycle of the axisymmetric magnetic field, if it is initiated at the growing phase of the cycle. The non-symmetric, with respect to the equator, perturbation results in a hemispheric asymmetry of the magnetic activity. The evolution of the axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric fields depends on the turbulent magnetic Reynolds number Rm. In the range of Rm = 104-106 the evolution returns to the normal course in the next cycle, in which the non-axisymmetric field is generated due to a nonlinear α-effect and magnetic buoyancy. In the stationary state, the large-scale magnetic field demonstrates a phenomenon of “active longitudes” with cyclic 180° “flip-flop” changes of the large-scale magnetic field orientation. The flip-flop effect is known from observations of solar and stellar magnetic cycles. However, this effect disappears in the model, which includes the meridional circulation pattern determined by helioseismology. The rotation rate of the non-axisymmetric field components varies during the relaxation period and carries important information about the dynamo process.

  1. Reduction of the field-aligned potential drop in the polar cap during large geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, N.; Seki, K.; Nishimura, Y.; Hori, T.; Terada, N.; Ono, T.; Strangeway, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    We have studied photoelectron flows and the inferred field-aligned potential drop in the polar cap during 5 large geomagnetic storms that occurred in the periods when the photoelectron observations in the polar cap were available near the apogee of the FAST satellite (~4000 km) at solar maximum, and the footprint of the satellite paths in the polar cap was under sunlit conditions most of the time. In contrast to the ~20 V potential drop during geomagnetically quiet periods at solar maximum identified by Kitamura et al. [JGR, 2012], the field-aligned potential drop frequently became smaller than ~5 V during the main and early recovery phases of the large geomagnetic storms. Because the potential acts to inhibit photoelectron escape, this result indicates that the corresponding acceleration of ions by the field-aligned potential drop in the polar cap and the lobe region is smaller during the main and early recovery phases of large geomagnetic storms compared to during geomagnetically quiet periods. Under small field-aligned current conditions, the number flux of outflowing ions should be nearly equal to the net escaping electron number flux. Since ions with large flux originating from the cusp/cleft ionosphere convect into the polar cap during geomagnetic storms [e.g., Kitamura et al., JGR, 2010], the net escaping electron number flux should increase to balance the enhanced ion outflows. The magnitude of the field-aligned potential drop would be reduced to let a larger fraction of photoelectrons escape.

  2. A Retrospective Look at the Collected Results on the Large Scale Ionospheric Magnetic Fields at Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Ma, Y.-J.; Villarreal, M.; Russell, C. T.; Zhang, T.-L.; Alvarez, K.

    2015-10-01

    We revisit the collected large scale ionospheric magnetic field results obtained by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) and Venus Express (VEX) missions to ask how much we really understand about that field's global structure. To assist in this assessment we make use of several previously described MHD simulations of the solar wind interaction that reproduce its other observed features. These comparisons help to support our conceptual pictures in some cases, and to raise questions in others.

  3. The Large Scale Structure of the Galactic Magnetic Field and High Energy Cosmic Ray Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Muñiz, Jaime; Stanev, Todor

    2006-10-01

    Measurements of the magnetic field in our Galaxy are complex and usually difficult to interpret. A spiral regular field in the disk is favored by observations, however the number of field reversals is still under debate. Measurements of the parity of the field across the Galactic plane are also very difficult due to the presence of the disk field itself. In this work we demonstrate that cosmic ray protons in the energy range 1018 to 1019eV, if accelerated near the center of the Galaxy, are sensitive to the large scale structure of the Galactic Magnetic Field (GMF). In particular if the field is of even parity, and the spiral field is bi-symmetric (BSS), ultra high energy protons will predominantly come from the Southern Galactic hemisphere, and predominantly from the Northern Galactic hemisphere if the field is of even parity and axi-symmetric (ASS). There is no sensitivity to the BSS or ASS configurations if the field is of odd parity.

  4. Daily and seasonal Viking observations of Martian bore wave systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, G. E.; Pickersgill, A. O.; James, P. B.; Evans, N.

    1981-01-01

    A Martian atmospheric phenomenon called a bore wave has been observed by the Viking imaging system during late spring and early summer of two Martian years, in the Tharsis Ridge region of the planet. The observational data are presented, and a tentative explanation is offered for the occurrence of this feature, formed by airflow and which behaves like a thermally induced diurnal katabatic breeze.

  5. 4. VIEW OF VERTICAL BORING MACHINE. (Bullard) Vertical turning lathe ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW OF VERTICAL BORING MACHINE. (Bullard) Vertical turning lathe (VTL). Machining the fixture for GE Turboshroud. G.S. O'Brien, operator. - Juniata Shops, Machine Shop No. 1, East of Fourth Avenue at Third Street, Altoona, Blair County, PA

  6. 2. GENERAL VIEW OF HYDRAULIC 48' BORING MILL. Manufactured by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. GENERAL VIEW OF HYDRAULIC 48' BORING MILL. Manufactured by Simmons Machine Tool Corporation, Albany, New York, and Betts Company, a division of Niles Tool Company, Hamilton, Ohio. - Juniata Shops, Erecting Shop & Machine Shop, East of Fourth Avenue, between Fourth & Fifth Streets, Altoona, Blair County, PA

  7. Boring and Drilling Tools. Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 1 Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane Community Coll., Eugene, OR.

    This self-paced student training module on boring and drilling tools is one of a number of modules developed for Pre-apprenticeship Phase 1 Training. Purpose of the module is to enable students to identify, select, and understand the proper use of many common awls, bits, and drilling tools. The module may contain some or all of the following: a…

  8. THE AGE-METALLICITY RELATIONSHIP OF THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD FIELD STAR POPULATION FROM WIDE-FIELD WASHINGTON PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Piatti, Andres E.; Geisler, Doug

    2013-01-01

    We analyze age and metallicity estimates for an unprecedented database of some 5.5 million stars distributed throughout the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) main body, obtained from CCD Washington CT{sub 1} photometry, reported on in Piatti et al. We produce a comprehensive field star age-metallicity relationship (AMR) from the earliest epoch until {approx}1 Gyr ago. This AMR reveals that the LMC has not evolved chemically as either a closed-box or bursting system, exclusively, but as a combination of both scenarios that have varied in relative strength over the lifetime of the galaxy, although the bursting model falls closer to the data in general. Furthermore, while old and metal-poor field stars have been preferentially formed in the outer disk, younger and more metal-rich stars have mostly been formed in the inner disk, confirming an outside-in formation. We provide evidence for the formation of stars between 5 and 12 Gyr, during the cluster age gap, although chemical enrichment during this period was minimal. We find no significant metallicity gradient in the LMC. We also find that the range in the metallicity of an LMC field has varied during the lifetime of the LMC. In particular, we find only a small range of the metal abundance in the outer disk fields, whereas an average range of {Delta}[Fe/H] = +0.3 {+-} 0.1 dex appears in the inner disk fields. Finally, the cluster and field AMRs show a satisfactory match only for the last 3 Gyr, while for the oldest ages (>11 Gyr), the cluster AMR is a remarkable lower envelope to the field AMR. Such a difference may be due to the very rapid early chemical evolution and lack of observed field stars in this regime, whereas the globular clusters are easily studied. This large difference is not easy to explain as coming from stripped ancient Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) clusters, although the field SMC AMR is on average {approx}0.4 dex more metal-poor at all ages than that of the LMC but otherwise very similar.

  9. Test Results of 15 T Nb3Sn Quadrupole Magnet HQ01 with a 120 mm Bore for the LHC Luminosity Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Schmalzle, J.; Ambrosio, G.; Anerella, M.; Barzi, E.; Bingham, B.; Bossert, R.; Cheng, D.W.; Chlachidze, G.; Dietderich, D.R.; Felice, H.; Ferracin, P.; Ghosh, A.; Hafalia, A.R.; Hannaford, C.R.; Joseph, J.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Sabbi, G.L.; Schmalzle, J.; Wanderer,; P.l Xiaorong, W.; Zlobin, A.V.

    2011-08-03

    In support of the luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) has been developing a 1-meter long, 120 mm bore Nb{sub 3}Sn IR quadrupole magnet (HQ). With a short sample gradient of 219 T/m at 1.9 K and a conductor peak field of 15 T, the magnet will operate under higher forces and stored-energy levels than that of any previous LARP magnet models. In addition, HQ has been designed to incorporate accelerator quality features such as precise coil alignment and adequate cooling. The first 6 coils (out of the 8 fabricated so far) have been assembled and used in two separate tests-HQ01a and HQ01b. This paper presents design parameters, summary of the assemblies, the mechanical behavior as well as the performance of HQ01a and HQ01b.

  10. Generation and Properties of Large-Scale Non-axisymmetric Magnetic Fields by Solar Dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pipin, Valery; Kosovichev, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    Large-scale non-axisymmetric magnetic fields generated by the solar dynamo, and presumably responsible for the phenomenon of "active longitudes", play an important role in the distribution of solar activity and flares. By calculating 3D mean-field dynamo models, we show that nonlinear coupling between axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric modes, e.g. due to the magnetic feedback on the alpha-effect (see, e.g., [1]), can maintain a large-scale non-axisymmetric dynamo process. Non-axisymmetric random fluctuations of dynamo parameters can be another source for the non-axisymmetric magnetic fields on the Sun. Such fluctuations can provide a mechanism of the magnetic energy transfer from the global field to the non-axisymmetric modes. It is shown that the rotational periods of the non-axisymmetric field correspond to the dynamo process operating in the subsurface shear layer which is located in the range of depths 0.85-0.95R. We find that the magnetic helicity conservation quenches generation of the non-axisymmetric dynamo modes as well as it does for the axisymmetric dynamo. It is concluded that the 3D mean-field non-axisymmetric dynamo models can potentially explain the observed distribution of the solar magnetic activity.1. Moss, D.,Non-axisymmetric solar magnetic fields, 1999, MNRAS, 306, 300On 3/18/2015 2:29 PM, Valery Pipin wrote:

  11. The characteristics of quasistatic electric field perturbations observed by DEMETER satellite before large earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Shen, X.; Zhao, S.; Yao, Lu; Ouyang, X.; Qian, J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents new results after processing the ULF electric field (DC-15 Hz) observed by DEMETER satellite (h = 660-710 km). Typical perturbations were picked up in quasistatic electric field around some large earthquakes in 2010 at first. And then, 27 earthquakes were selected to be analyzed on quasistatic electric field in two seismic regions of Indonesia and Chile at equatorial and middle latitude area respectively. Three-component electric field data related to earthquakes were collected along all the up-orbits (in local nighttime) in a limited distance of 2000 km to the epicenters during 9 days with 7 days before and 1 day after those cases, and totally 57 perturbations were found around them. All the results show that the amplitude of quasistatic electric field perturbations varies from 1.5 to 16 mV/m in the upper ionosphere, mostly smaller than 10 mV/m. And the perturbations were mainly located just over the epicentral area or at the end of seismic faults constructed by a series of earthquakes where electromagnetic emissions may be easily formed during preparation and development processes of seismic sequences. Among all 27 cases, there are 10 earthquakes with perturbations occurring just one day before, which demonstrates the close correlation in time domain between quasistatic electric field in ionosphere and large earthquakes. Finally, combined with in situ observation of plasma parameters, the coupling mechanism of quasistatic electric field in different earth spheres was discussed.

  12. Internal bore seasonality and tidal pumping of subthermocline waters at the head of the Monterey submarine canyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Ryan K.; Phelan, P. Joe

    2016-03-01

    This study utilizes more than a year of observations made in shallow waters (~30 m) at the head of the Monterey Submarine Canyon to assess variability in the physical environment and internal bore field. The interaction of the internal tide with the canyon rim results in a semidiurnal tidal period pumping of cold-water masses (subthermocline waters) onto the adjacent shelf (i.e., internal bores). These internal bores are shown to be significantly coherent with the local sea surface height with minimal spatial variability when comparing two sites near the canyon head region. During the summer months, and periods of strong regional wind-driven upwelling and shoaling of the offshore thermocline, the canyon rim sites display elevated semidiurnal temperature variance. This semidiurnal variability reaches its annual minimum during the winter months when the regional upwelling favorable winds subside and the offshore thermocline deepens. Additionally, the observed internal bores show a distinct asymmetry between the leading (gradual cooling with velocities directed onto the shelf) and trailing edges (sharp warming with velocities directed into the canyon). It appears that the semidiurnal internal tide at the canyon head is a first-order control on the delivery of subthermocline waters to the nearshore coastal environment at this location.

  13. Internal Bore Seasonality and Tidal Pumping of Subthermocline Waters at the Head of the Monterey Submarine Canyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, R. K.; Phelan, J.

    2015-12-01

    This study utilizes more than a year of observations made in shallow waters (~30 m) at the head of the Monterey Submarine Canyon to assess variability in the physical environment and internal bore field. The interaction of the internal tide with the canyon rim results in a semidiurnal tidal period pumping of cold water intrusions (subthermocline waters) onto the adjacent shelf (i.e., internal bores). These internal bores are shown to be significantly coherent with the surface (barotropic) tide with minimal spatial variability when comparing two sites on opposite sides of the canyon head. During the summer months, and periods of strong regional wind-driven upwelling and shoaling of the offshore thermocline, the canyon rim sites display elevated semidiurnal temperature variance. The semidiurnal variability reaches its annual minimum during the winter months when the regional upwelling favorable winds subside and the offshore thermocline deepens. Additionally, the observed internal bores show a distinct asymmetry between the leading (gradual cooling with velocities directed onto the shelf) and trailing edges (sharp warming with velocities directed into the canyon). It appears that the semidiurnal internal tide at the canyon head is a first-order control on the delivery of subthermocline waters to the nearshore coastal environment at this location.

  14. Large tensor-to-scalar ratio in small-field inflation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Takahashi, Tomo

    2013-06-01

    We show that density perturbations seeded by the inflaton can be suppressed when having additional light degrees of freedom contributing to the production of perturbations. The inflaton fluctuations affect the light field dynamics by modulating the length of the inflationary period and, hence, produce additional density perturbations in the postinflationary era. Such perturbations can cancel those generated during inflation as both originate from the same inflaton fluctuations. This allows production of large gravitational waves from small-field inflation, which is normally forbidden by the Lyth bound on the inflaton field excursion. We also find that the field bound is taken over by the light scalar when the inflaton-induced perturbations are suppressed and, thus, present a generalized form of the Lyth bound that applies to the total field space. The novel mechanism allows violation of the usual consistency relation r≤-8n(T) for the tensor spectral index. PMID:25167480

  15. Field line and Particle orbit Analysis in the Periphery of the Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Yutaka; Oikawa, Shun-ichi; Watanabe, Tsuguhiro

    2002-07-01

    Magnetic field lines and particle orbits were analyzed in the periphery of the Large Helical Device (LHD), which is called the chaotic field line region in this paper. The widths of the chaotic field line region were numerically identified for the standard LHD configuration with the magnetic axis position Rax = 3.75 m and for an improved confinement configuration with Rax = 3.6 m. It was found that the reflected particles include of what we have named chaotic particles and non-chaotic particles. Most of the reflected particles are mirror-confined with strong adiabaticity in the chaotic field line region. The remaining reflected particles, named type-A and type-B particles, are harmful to confinement. We found by detailed analysis of the vacuum magnetic field in the LHD that there exist loss canals that are the open intersections of |\\mbi{B}| = const. and \\mbi{B} \\cdot \

  16. Design, construction, and validation of a large capacity rodent magnetic field exposure laboratory.

    PubMed

    Gauger, J R; Johnson, T R; Stangel, J E; Patterson, R C; Williams, D A; Harder, J B; McCormick, D L

    1999-01-01

    A magnetic field exposure laboratory has been constructed to support National Toxicology Program studies for the evaluation of the toxicity and carcinogenicity of pure, linearly polarized, 60 Hz magnetic fields in rodents. This dual corridor, controlled access facility can support the simultaneous exposure of 1200 rats and 1200 mice. The facility contains fully redundant electrical and environmental control systems and was constructed using non-metallic materials to maintain low levels of background (ambient), stray, and cross-talk magnetic fields. The exposure module design provides for large uniform exposure volumes with good control of stray and cross-talk fields, while allowing the use of roll-around cage racks for simplified animal husbandry. Stray fields and cross-talk have been further reduced by the inclusion of "steering coils" in each exposure module. Ambient 60 Hz fields (less cross-talk) in all exposure rooms are <0.1 microT (1 mG), and static magnetic fields have been mapped extensively. Magnetic field strength, waveform, temperature, relative humidity, light intensity, noise level, vibration, and air flow in all animal holding areas are tightly regulated, and are monitored continuously during all studies. Field uniformity in the animal exposure volumes is better than -/+l0%; a systematic program of cage, rack, and room rotation controls for possible positional effects within the exposure system. Magnetic fields are turned on and off over multiple cycles to prevent the induction of transients associated with abrupt field level changes. Total harmonic distortion is <3% at all field strengths. The facility has been used to study magnetic field bioeffects in rodent model systems in experiments ranging in duration from 8 weeks to 2 years. PMID:9915589

  17. Merged interaction regions and large-scale magnetic field fluctuations during 1991: Voyager 2 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.

    1994-01-01

    This paper analyzes Voyager 2 observations of the magnetic field between 33.6 AU and 36.2 AU during 1991 when extraordinary events were observed on the Sun and in the heliosphere. The magnetic field strength signal B(t) has the unusual form of two large transient merged interaction regions (MIRs) on a fluctuating background. The two MIRs moved past the spacecraft in 32 days and 18 days, respectively. The mean field strength in each transient MIR was approx. equals 2.6 times the mean field during the remaining part of the year (0.11 nT). Each of the MIRs is related to a fast stream. The magnetic field is strong throughout each stream, suggesting that the strong fields are carried by the streams as well as produced by shock and stream compression. The fluctuations in B(t) during 1991 are not multifractal, and the MIRs cannot be approximated as multifractal clusters of intense magnetic fields. The distribution of the hour-averaged magnetic field strengths is approximately lognormal over 90% of its intermediate range, and it has an exponential tail for B greater than the average magnetic field strength. The elevation angles of B have a normal distribution with a standard deviation of 16 deg +/- 4 deg. The distributions of the azimuthal angles of B in the ranges 1 deg - 180 deg and 180 deg - 360 deg are approximately normal over a more limited range, and non-Gaussian tails associated with nearly radial magnetic fields; the standard deviations are approx. equal to 40 deg. Individual sectors are present throughout most of the interval, even in the MIRs, but there is no recurrent sector pattern. A model of the large-scale fluctuations in 1991 will have to include both determinaistic and statistical factors.

  18. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF EMERGING PIPE WALL INTEGRITY ASSESSMENT TECHNOLOGIES FOR LARGE CAST IRON WATER MAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sponsored a large-scale field demonstration of innovative leak detection/location and condition assessment technologies on a 76-year old, 2,500-ft long, cement-lined, 24-in. cast iron water main in Louisville, KY from July through Septembe...

  19. Field Demonstration of Emerging Pipe Wall Integrity Assessment Technologies for Large Cast Iron Water Mains - Paper

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sponsored a large-scale field demonstration of innovative leak detection/location and condition assessment technologies on a 76-year old, 2,000-ft long, cement-lined, 24-in. cast-iron water main in Louisville, KY from July through Se...

  20. Insecticide treated and untreated Bt and conventional cottons under high insect pressure in large field cages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Early maturing Bt cottons (DP0912 and PHY375), early maturing conventional cottons (ARK48 and DP121), a full season Bt cotton (DP1048) and full season conventional cottons (MD25 and DP174) were grown in large field cages and exposed to high densities of bollworm and tobacco budworm moths over a thr...

  1. Destruction of large-scale magnetic field in non-linear simulations of the shear dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teed, Robert J.; Proctor, Michael R. E.

    2016-05-01

    The Sun's magnetic field exhibits coherence in space and time on much larger scales than the turbulent convection that ultimately powers the dynamo. In the past the α-effect (mean-field) concept has been used to model the solar cycle, but recent work has cast doubt on the validity of the mean-field ansatz under solar conditions. This indicates that one should seek an alternative mechanism for generating large-scale structure. One possibility is the recently proposed `shear dynamo' mechanism where large-scale magnetic fields are generated in the presence of a simple shear. Further investigation of this proposition is required, however, because work has been focused on the linear regime with a uniform shear profile thus far. In this paper we report results of the extension of the original shear dynamo model into the non-linear regime. We find that whilst large-scale structure can initially persist into the saturated regime, in several of our simulations it is destroyed via large increase in kinetic energy. This result casts doubt on the ability of the simple uniform shear dynamo mechanism to act as an alternative to the α-effect in solar conditions.

  2. Ultrahigh energy cosmic ray probes of large scale structure and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigl, Günter; Miniati, Francesco; Enßlin, Torsten A.

    2004-08-01

    We study signatures of a structured universe in the multi-pole moments, auto-correlation function, and cluster statistics of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays above 1019 eV. We compare scenarios where the sources are distributed homogeneously or according to the baryon density distribution obtained from a cosmological large scale structure simulation. The influence of extragalactic magnetic fields is studied by comparing the case of negligible fields with fields expected to be produced along large scale shocks with a maximal strength consistent with observations. We confirm that strongly magnetized observers would predict considerable anisotropy on large scales, which is already in conflict with current data. In the best fit scenario only the sources are strongly magnetized, although deflection can still be considerable, of order 20° up to 1020 eV, and a pronounced GZK cutoff is predicted. We then discuss signatures for future large scale full-sky detectors such as the Pierre Auger and EUSO projects. Auto-correlations are sensitive to the source density only if magnetic fields do not significantly affect propagation. In contrast, for a weakly magnetized observer, degree scale auto-correlations below a certain level indicate magnetized discrete sources. It may be difficult even for next generation experiments to distinguish between structured and unstructured source distributions.

  3. Identification of large masses of citrus fruit and rice fields in eastern Spain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desagredo, F. L.; Salinas, F. G.

    1973-01-01

    ERTS-1 imagery has been successfully used for the identification of large areas of citrus groves and rice fields in the Valencia region of Eastern Spain. Results are encouraging and will facilitate the elaboration of a land use map with a fair degree of definition once methods prove to be fully operational.

  4. SU-E-T-404: Simple Field-In-Field Technique for Total Body Irradiation in Large Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, P; Pinnix, C; Dabaja, B; Wang, C; Aristophanous, M; Tung, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A simple Field-in-Field technique for Total Body Irradiation (TBI) was developed for traditional AP/PA TBI treatments to improve dosimetric uniformity in patients with large separation. Methods: TBI at our institution currently utilizes an AP/PA technique at an extended source-to-surface distance (SSD) of 380cm with patients in left decubitus position during the AP beam and in right decubitus during the PA beam. Patients who have differences in thickness (separation) between the abdomen and head greater than 10cm undergo CT simulation in both left and right decubitus treatment positions. One plan for each CT is generated to evaluate dose to patient midline with both AP and PA fields, but only corresponding AP fields will be exported for treatment for patient left decubitus position and PA fields for patient right decubitus position. Subfields are added by collimating with the x-ray jaws according to separation changes at 5–7% steps to minimize hot regions to less than 10%. Finally, the monitor units (MUs) for the plans are verified with hand calculation and water phantom measurements. Results: Dose uniformity (+/−10%) is achieved with field-in-field using only asymmetric jaws. It is dosimetrically robust with respect to minor setup/patient variations inevitable due to patient conditions. MUs calculated with Pinnacle were verified in 3 clinical cases and only a 2% difference was found compared to homogeneous calculation. In-vivo dosimeters were also used to verify doses received by each patient with and confirmed dose variations less than 10%. Conclusion: We encountered several cases with separation differences that raised uniformity concerns — based on a 1% dose difference per cm separation difference assumption. This could Resultin an unintended hot spot, often in the head/neck, up to 25%. This method allows dose modulation without adding treatment complexity nor introducing radiobiological variations, providing a reasonable solution for this unique

  5. Constraining Large-Scale Solar Magnetic Field Models with Optical Coronal Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uritsky, V. M.; Davila, J. M.; Jones, S. I.

    2015-12-01

    Scientific success of the Solar Probe Plus (SPP) and Solar Orbiter (SO) missions will depend to a large extent on the accuracy of the available coronal magnetic field models describing the connectivity of plasma disturbances in the inner heliosphere with their source regions. We argue that ground based and satellite coronagraph images can provide robust geometric constraints for the next generation of improved coronal magnetic field extrapolation models. In contrast to the previously proposed loop segmentation codes designed for detecting compact closed-field structures above solar active regions, we focus on the large-scale geometry of the open-field coronal regions located at significant radial distances from the solar surface. Details on the new feature detection algorithms will be presented. By applying the developed image processing methodology to high-resolution Mauna Loa Solar Observatory images, we perform an optimized 3D B-line tracing for a full Carrington rotation using the magnetic field extrapolation code presented in a companion talk by S.Jones at al. Tracing results are shown to be in a good qualitative agreement with the large-scalie configuration of the optical corona. Subsequent phases of the project and the related data products for SSP and SO missions as wwll as the supporting global heliospheric simulations will be discussed.

  6. Probing the large-scale velocity field with clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahcall, Neta A.; Cen, Renyue; Gramann, Mirt

    1994-01-01

    What is the role of clusters of galaxies in probing the large-scale velocity field of the universe? We investigate the distribution of peculiar velocities of clusters of galaxies in the popular low-density (omega = 0.3) flat cold dark matter (CDM) cosmological model, which best fits many large-scale structure observations. An omega = 1 CDM model is also studied for comparison. We find that clusters of galaxies are efficient tracers of the large-scale velocity field. The clusters exhibit a Maxwellian distribution of peculiar velocities, as expected from Gaussian initial density fluctuations. The cluster three-dimensional velocity distribution for the omega = 0.3 model peaks at nu approximately greater than 400 km/s and extends to high velocities of nu approximately 1200 km/s. The rms peculiar velocity of the clusters is 440 km/s. Approximately 10% of all model clusters move with high peculiar velocities nu greater or equal to 700 km/s. The observed velocity distribution of clusters of galaxies is compared with the predictions from cosmological models. The observed data exhibit a larger velocity tail than seen in the model simulations; however, due to the large observational uncertainties, the data are consistent at approximately equal to 3 sigma level with the odel predictions, and with a Gaussian initial density field. The large peculiar velocities reported for some clusters of galaxies (nu approximately greater than 3000 km/s) are likely to be overestimated, if the current model is viable.

  7. Large-scale solar magnetic fields and H-alpha patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintosh, P. S.

    1972-01-01

    Coronal and interplanetary magnetic fields computed from measurements of large-scale photospheric magnetic fields suffer from interruptions in day-to-day observations and the limitation of using only measurements made near the solar central meridian. Procedures were devised for inferring the lines of polarity reversal from H-alpha solar patrol photographs that map the same large-scale features found on Mt. Wilson magnetograms. These features may be monitored without interruption by combining observations from the global network of observatories associated with NOAA's Space Environment Services Center. The patterns of inferred magnetic fields may be followed accurately as far as 60 deg from central meridian. Such patterns will be used to improve predictions of coronal features during the next solar eclipse.

  8. Background-oriented schlieren for the study of large flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trolinger, James D.; Buckner, Ben; L'Esperance, Drew

    2015-09-01

    Modern digital recording and processing techniques combined with new lighting methods and relatively old schlieren visualization methods move flow visualization to a new level, enabling a wide range of new applications and a possible revolution in the visualization of very large flow fields. This paper traces the evolution of schlieren imaging from Robert Hooke, who, in 1665, employed candles and lenses, to modern digital background oriented schlieren (BOS) systems, wherein image processing by computer replaces pure optical image processing. New possibilities and potential applications that could benefit from such a capability are examined. Example applications include viewing the flow field around full sized aircraft, large equipment and vehicles, monitoring explosions on bomb ranges, cooling systems, large structures and even buildings. Objectives of studies include aerodynamics, aero optics, heat transfer, and aero thermal measurements. Relevant digital cameras, light sources, and implementation methods are discussed.

  9. Optical system of large relative aperture and wide field using aspheric corrector for detecting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Ming; Wang, Jianli; Zhang, Jingxu

    2009-05-01

    The magnitude requirement of space target detecting determines that the image of detecting telescope should have several performances: small spots, small 80% encircled energy diameter and good MTF(Modulation transfer function). So the aperture and field of view of optical system have some demands accordingly. The larger aperture, the more energy that telescope collects and higher magnitude the telescope detects; the wider field of view, the more extensive range which the telescope searches. Now most of ground telescopes whose apertures are from 500mm to 1000mm is on-axis optical system, so wide field of view becomes the most importance problem. To obtain large relative aperture and wide field of view, the paper introduces a catadioptric telescope with small aperture aspheric refractive corrector, whose conic surface will be used to remove the aberrations due to large relative aperture and wide field of view. As to the optical system, there is only one aspheric refractive corrector, and it is relatively easy for manufacturing because of its concave figure and normal material. The paper gives the example, and optimizes this optical system with ZEMAX program. And then the paper provides a specific analysis program for testing the aspheric refractive corrector. The aperture of this optical system is 750mm, and its relative aperture is 0.82, and the field of view is 3.6° diameter(diagonal). Its structure is simple and the image quality is also very good.

  10. Not a load of rubbish: simulated field trials in large-scale containers.

    PubMed

    Hohmann, M; Stahl, A; Rudloff, J; Wittkop, B; Snowdon, R J

    2016-09-01

    Assessment of yield performance under fluctuating environmental conditions is a major aim of crop breeders. Unfortunately, results from controlled-environment evaluations of complex agronomic traits rarely translate to field performance. A major cause is that crops grown over their complete lifecycle in a greenhouse or growth chamber are generally constricted in their root growth, which influences their response to important abiotic constraints like water or nutrient availability. To overcome this poor transferability, we established a plant growth system comprising large refuse containers (120 L 'wheelie bins') that allow detailed phenotyping of small field-crop populations under semi-controlled growth conditions. Diverse winter oilseed rape cultivars were grown at field densities throughout the crop lifecycle, in different experiments over 2 years, to compare seed yields from individual containers to plot yields from multi-environment field trials. We found that we were able to predict yields in the field with high accuracy from container-grown plants. The container system proved suitable for detailed studies of stress response physiology and performance in pre-breeding populations. Investment in automated large-container systems may help breeders improve field transferability of greenhouse experiments, enabling screening of pre-breeding materials for abiotic stress response traits with a positive influence on yield. PMID:27144906

  11. Large Eddy Simulations of Double-Ruler Electromagnetic Field Effect on Transient Flow During Continuous Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ramnik; Thomas, Brian G.; Vanka, Surya P.

    2014-06-01

    Transient flow during nominally steady conditions is responsible for many intermittent defects during the continuous casting of steel. The double-ruler electromagnetic field configuration, or "FC-Mold EMBr," is popular in commercial slab casting as it provides independent control of the applied static field near the jet and free surface regions of the mold. In the current study, transient flow in a typical commercial caster is simulated in the absence and in the presence of a double-ruler magnetic field, with rulers of equal strengths. Large eddy simulations with the in-house code CU-FLOW resolve the important transient behavior, using grids of over five million cells with a fast parallel solver. In the absence of a magnetic field, a double-roll pattern is observed, with transient unbalanced behavior, high surface velocities (~0.5 m/s), surface vortex formation, and very large surface-level fluctuations (~±12 mm). Applying the magnetic field suppresses the unbalanced behavior, producing a more complex mold flow pattern, but with much lower surface velocities (~0.1 m/s), and a flat surface level with small level fluctuations (<±1 mm). Nail board measurements taken at this commercial caster, in the absence of the field, matched reasonably well with the calculated results, both quantitatively and qualitatively.

  12. Canyon drainage induced mixing over a large basin

    SciTech Connect

    Stalker, J.

    2000-05-01

    Complex terrain surrounding urbanized basins around the world has long been recognized to strongly affect the characteristics of vertical transport and mixing of pollutants. The Department of Energy's Vertical Transport and Mixing (VTMX) program will investigate mixing processes within night-time boundary layers over large urban basins. The program will launch several field experiments within the Salt Lake City basin in the coming years. This modeling study, like many other studies being undertaken by the participants of the VTMX programs, is intended to complement the proposed field experiments by numerically examining some of the flow interactions known to occur in large basins. Using idealized simulations, we particularly investigate drainage flows from deep canyons similar to those along the Wasatch Front into the Salt Lake City basin. Literature shows that under favorable conditions, drainage flows can generate bore waves that may propagate ahead of the density current (e.g., Simpson 1969; Simpson 1982; Crook and Miller 1985). Existence and frequency of such bore waves can profoundly influence the spatial and temporal variability of vertical transport and mixing within large basins. If bore waves do occur on a regular basis within the Salt Lake City basin (a task for the upcoming experiments to determine), then understanding the basin-scale conditions under which these waves are produced and how they may propagate and interact with the city's buildings will be of great importance in characterizing transport and mixing processes within the basin.

  13. Constrained realizations of Gaussian fields - Reconstruction of the large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganon, Galit; Hoffman, Yehuda

    1993-09-01

    The method of constrained realization (CR) of Gaussian random fields is applied to reconstruct our 'local' universe. A large observational data set is sampled and used as constraints imposed on realizations of an assumed primordial Gaussian perturbation field. To illustrate the method, the velocity potential as obtained by the POTENT algorithm from the observed velocity field is sampled at 181 different positions within a sphere of 40/h Mpc radius around us. Numerical realizations of the standard cold dark matter (CDM) model are constructed to yield the actual sampled values. These realizations do reconstruct the density perturbation field of the nearby universe. With only 181 constraints, the CR algorithm recovers the main features of POTENT's density field and, in particular, the Great Attractor region. The 12/h Mpc smoothed potential, which depends on the very long wavelengths of the underlying perturbation field, is used to constrain high-resolution (5/h Mpc smoothing) realizations. Thus, given an assumed model, high-resolution fields are created subject to low-resolution data. The method is easily applicable to the general case where any variable which depends linearly on the Gaussian field can be used to set the constraints.

  14. Large-volume lava flow fields on Venus: Dimensions and morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancaster, M. G.; Guest, J. E.; Roberts, K. M.; Head, James W., III

    1992-01-01

    Of all the volcanic features identified in Magellan images, by far the most extensive and really important are lava flow fields. Neglecting the widespread lava plains themselves, practically every C1-MIDR produced so far contains several or many discrete lava flow fields. These range in size from a few hundred square kilometers in area (like those fields associated with small volcanic edifices for example), through all sizes up to several hundred thousand square kilometers in extent (such as many rift related fields). Most of these are related to small, intermediate, or large-scale volcanic edifices, coronae, arachnoids, calderas, fields of small shields, and rift zones. An initial survey of 40 well-defined flow fields with areas greater than 50,000 sq km (an arbitrary bound) has been undertaken. Following Columbia River Basalt terminology, these have been termed great flow fields. This represents a working set of flow fields, chosen to cover a variety of morphologies, sources, locations, and characteristics. The initial survey is intended to highlight representative flow fields, and does not represent a statistical set. For each flow field, the location, total area, flow length, flow widths, estimated flow thicknesses, estimated volumes, topographic slope, altitude, backscatter, emissivity, morphology, and source has been noted. The flow fields range from about 50,000 sq km to over 2,500,000 sq km in area, with most being several hundred square kilometers in extent. Flow lengths measure between 140 and 2840 km, with the majority of flows being several hundred kilometers long. A few basic morphological types have been identified.

  15. Magnetospheric Multiscale Observations of the Electron Diffusion Region of Large Guide Field Magnetic Reconnection.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, S; Wilder, F D; Ergun, R E; Schwartz, S J; Cassak, P A; Burch, J L; Chen, L-J; Torbert, R B; Phan, T D; Lavraud, B; Goodrich, K A; Holmes, J C; Stawarz, J E; Sturner, A P; Malaspina, D M; Usanova, M E; Trattner, K J; Strangeway, R J; Russell, C T; Pollock, C J; Giles, B L; Hesse, M; Lindqvist, P-A; Drake, J F; Shay, M A; Nakamura, R; Marklund, G T

    2016-07-01

    We report observations from the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) satellites of a large guide field magnetic reconnection event. The observations suggest that two of the four MMS spacecraft sampled the electron diffusion region, whereas the other two spacecraft detected the exhaust jet from the event. The guide magnetic field amplitude is approximately 4 times that of the reconnecting field. The event is accompanied by a significant parallel electric field (E_{∥}) that is larger than predicted by simulations. The high-speed (∼300  km/s) crossing of the electron diffusion region limited the data set to one complete electron distribution inside of the electron diffusion region, which shows significant parallel heating. The data suggest that E_{∥} is balanced by a combination of electron inertia and a parallel gradient of the gyrotropic electron pressure. PMID:27419573

  16. Experimental analysis of crack tip fields in rubber materials under large deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xia; Song, Hai-Peng; Kang, Yi-Lan; Li, Xiao-Lei; Tan, Xiao-Hua; Tan, Hao-Yun

    2012-04-01

    A three-nested-deformation model is proposed to describe crack-tip fields in rubber-like materials with large deformation. The model is inspired by the distribution of the measured in-plane and out-of-plane deformation. The inplane displacement of crack-tip fields under both Mode I and mixed-mode (Mode I-II) fracture conditions is measured by using the digital Moiré method. The deformation characteristics and experimental sector division mode are investigated by comparing the measured displacement fields under different fracture modes. The out-of-plane displacement field near the crack tip is measured using the three-dimensional digital speckle correlation method.

  17. Tracking a large pseudostreamer to pinpoint the southern polar magnetic field reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachmeler, Laurel; Guennou, Chloé; Seaton, Daniel B.; Gibson, Sarah; Auchère, Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    The reversal of the solar polar magnetic field is notoriously hard to pin down due to the extreme viewing angle of the pole. In Cycle 24, the southern polar field reversal can be pinpointed with high accuracy due to a large-scale pseudostreamer that formed over the pole and persisted for approximately a year. We tracked the size and shape of this structure with multiple observations and analysis techniques including PROBA2/SWAP EUV images, AIA EUV images, CoMP data, and 3D tomographic reconstructions. We find that the heliospheric field reversed polarity in February 2014, whereas in the photosphere the last vestiges of the previous polar field polarity remained until March 2015.

  18. Control of light trapping in a large atomic system by a static magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skipetrov, S. E.; Sokolov, I. M.; Havey, M. D.

    2016-07-01

    We propose to control light trapping in a large ensemble of cold atoms by an external, static magnetic field. For an appropriate choice of frequency and polarization of the exciting pulse, the field is expected to speed up the fluorescence of a dilute atomic system. In a dense ensemble, the field does not affect the early-time superradiant signal but amplifies intensity oscillations at intermediate times and induces a very slow, nonexponential long-time decay. The slowing down of fluorescence is due to the excitation of spatially localized collective atomic states that appear only under a strong magnetic field and have exponentially long lifetimes. Our results therefore pave a way towards experimental observation of the disorder-induced localization of light in cold atomic systems.

  19. Effects of large-scale magnetic fields in the Venus ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Elphic, R. C.; Russell, C. T.; Brace, L. H.; Hartle, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical models of the ionosphere of Venus have been constructed in the past without due consideration of the fact that the ionosphere is sometimes magnetized. This paper examines some differences between the magnetized and unmagnetized dayside Venus ionosphere using the Pioneer Venus Orbiter Langmuir probe and magnetometer data. Particular attention is given to the evaluation of the altitude profiles of the thermal electron heating and comparison of the magnitude of the magnetic force with other forces in the ionosphere. Several examples illustrate how heating profiles are different in the magnetized ionosphere with effective heating below 200 km altitude reduced by orders of magnitude compared to the field-free ionosphere. The force associated with the magnetic field is comparable to other forces in the magnetized ionosphere. The measured plasma density, electron temperature and magnetic field thus suggest that large-scale magnetic fields should be included in future ionosphere models.

  20. Observations of large scale steady magnetic fields in the nightside Venus ionosphere and near wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Elphic, R. C.; Russell, C. T.; Slavin, J. A.; Mihalov, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    Based on an analysis of a large sample of Pioneer Venus Orbiter magnetometer data, characteristics of the magnetic fields near nightside periapsis are discussed. The observations generally indicate a weak average field of less than 10 gammas between 200 km and the periapsis altitude of 150 km, except when (1) the local solar wind dynamic pressure is high or (2) the spacecraft is in a 70 deg wide solar zenith angle range, which includes the midnight meridian and is centered west of it at 1 hr local time. The presence of radial field of alternating sign at low altitudes and in the nightside ionosphere suggests that the antiparallel magnetotail fields can terminate very close to the planet.

  1. Magnetospheric Multiscale Observations of the Electron Diffusion Region of Large Guide Field Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, S.; Wilder, F. D.; Ergun, R. E.; Schwartz, S. J.; Cassak, P. A.; Burch, J. L.; Chen, L.-J.; Torbert, R. B.; Phan, T. D.; Lavraud, B.; Goodrich, K. A.; Holmes, J. C.; Stawarz, J. E.; Sturner, A. P.; Malaspina, D. M.; Usanova, M. E.; Trattner, K. J.; Strangeway, R. J.; Russell, C. T.; Pollock, C. J.; Giles, B. L.; Hesse, M.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; Drake, J. F.; Shay, M. A.; Nakamura, R.; Marklund, G. T.

    2016-07-01

    We report observations from the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) satellites of a large guide field magnetic reconnection event. The observations suggest that two of the four MMS spacecraft sampled the electron diffusion region, whereas the other two spacecraft detected the exhaust jet from the event. The guide magnetic field amplitude is approximately 4 times that of the reconnecting field. The event is accompanied by a significant parallel electric field (E∥ ) that is larger than predicted by simulations. The high-speed (˜300 km /s ) crossing of the electron diffusion region limited the data set to one complete electron distribution inside of the electron diffusion region, which shows significant parallel heating. The data suggest that E∥ is balanced by a combination of electron inertia and a parallel gradient of the gyrotropic electron pressure.

  2. Large Granular Lymphocytic (LGL) Leukemia in Rats Exposed to Intermittent 60 Hz Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Larry E.); Morris, James E.); Miller, Douglas L.); Ebi, K L.; Sasser, Lyle B.)

    2001-04-01

    An animal model for large granular lymphocytic (LGL) leukemia in male Fischer 344 rats utilized to determine whether magnetic field exposure can be shown to influence the progression of leukemia. We previously reported that exposure to continuous 60 Hz 1 mT magnetic fields did not significantly alter the clinical progression of LGL leukemia in young male rats following inspection of spleen cells from donor leukemic rats. Results presented here extend those studies with the objectives to (1) replicate the previous study of continuous 60-Hz magnetic field exposures but using fewer LGL cells in the inoculum, and (2) determine if intermittent 60-Hz magnetic fields can alter the clinical progression of leukemia.

  3. 30 CFR 18.22 - Boring-type machines equipped for auxiliary face ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Boring-type machines equipped for auxiliary... AND ACCESSORIES Construction and Design Requirements § 18.22 Boring-type machines equipped for auxiliary face ventilation. Each boring-type continuous-mining machine that is submitted for approval...

  4. 30 CFR 18.22 - Boring-type machines equipped for auxiliary face ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Boring-type machines equipped for auxiliary... AND ACCESSORIES Construction and Design Requirements § 18.22 Boring-type machines equipped for auxiliary face ventilation. Each boring-type continuous-mining machine that is submitted for approval...

  5. 30 CFR 18.22 - Boring-type machines equipped for auxiliary face ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Boring-type machines equipped for auxiliary... AND ACCESSORIES Construction and Design Requirements § 18.22 Boring-type machines equipped for auxiliary face ventilation. Each boring-type continuous-mining machine that is submitted for approval...

  6. 30 CFR 18.22 - Boring-type machines equipped for auxiliary face ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Boring-type machines equipped for auxiliary... AND ACCESSORIES Construction and Design Requirements § 18.22 Boring-type machines equipped for auxiliary face ventilation. Each boring-type continuous-mining machine that is submitted for approval...

  7. 30 CFR 18.22 - Boring-type machines equipped for auxiliary face ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Boring-type machines equipped for auxiliary... AND ACCESSORIES Construction and Design Requirements § 18.22 Boring-type machines equipped for auxiliary face ventilation. Each boring-type continuous-mining machine that is submitted for approval...

  8. UV absorption of the in-bore plasma emission from an EML using polycarbonate insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clothiaux, Eugene J.

    1991-01-01

    The in-bore continuum emission spectrum, laced by absorption lines, is observed to be completely cut off for wavelengths shorter than about 3000 A. This cutoff wavelength is seen to occur at longer wavelengths as the plasma armature moves down the launcher bore. A mechanism for the absorption of shortwave radiation by ablated and evaporated bore materials is given.

  9. A solar origin for the large lunar magnetic field at 4.0 billion yr ago

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjee, S. K.; Mellema, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    A new method (Shaw, 1974) for paleointensity determination has been applied to three subsamples of one polymict breccia, 72215 (of age 4.0 billion yr) to yield an average paleointensity of 0.41 Oe at the Taurus-Littrow region of the moon around the time of breccia formation. Of the present models for lunar magnetism, only the Sonett and Runcorn (1974) model of a central iron core dynamo can explain the presence of such a large field in early lunar history. However, because of the similarity in size of this field and that for the early solar system deduced from carbonaceous chondrites, we draw attention to an apparently little-considered possibility: that the large magnetic field in early lunar history was external and solar in origin, and emanated from a pre-main sequence T-Tauri stage sun. Therefore, there should be no record of such a large magnetic field in lunar rocks younger than approximately 4.0 billion yr.

  10. Step-Controllable Electric-Field-Assisted Nanoimprint Lithography for Uneven Large-Area Substrates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunhui; Shao, Jinyou; Tian, Hongmiao; Li, Xiangming; Ding, Yucheng; Li, Ben Q

    2016-04-26

    Large-area nanostructures are widely used in various fields, but fabrication on large-area uneven substrates poses a significant challenge. This study demonstrates a step-controllable electric-field-assisted nanoimprint lithography (e-NIL) method that can achieve conformal contact with uneven substrates for high fidelity nanostructuring. Experiments are used to demonstrate the method where a substrate coated with liquid resist is brought into contact with a flexible template driven by the applied electric field. Theoretical analysis based on the elasticity theory and electro-hydrodynamic theory is carried out. Effective voltage range and the saturation voltage are also discussed. A step-controllable release of flexible template is proposed and demonstrated to ensure the continuous contact between the template and an uneven substrate. This prevents formation of air traps and allows large area conformal contact to be achieved. A combination of Vacuum-electric field assisted step-controllable e-NIL is implemented in the developed prototype. Finally, photonic crystal nanostructures are successfully fabricated on a 4 in., 158 μm bow gallium nitride light-emitting diode epitaxial wafer using the proposed method, which enhance the light extraction property. PMID:27015525

  11. Large Field of View Particle-Image Velocimetry (LF-PIV): Design and Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pol, Suhas; Hoffman, John; Balasubramaniam, Balakumar; P-23, LANL Team

    2011-11-01

    We discuss the challenges and limitations associated with the development of a Large Field of View Particle Image Velocimetry (LF-PIV) diagnostic that is capable of resolving large scale motions (3m x 1m per camera) in gas phase laboratory experiments. While this diagnostic is developed for the measurement of wakes and local inflow conditions around research wind turbines, the design considerations provided here are also relevant for the application of LF-PIV to atmospheric boundary layer, rotorcraft dynamics and large-scale wind tunnel flows. Scaling laws associated with LF-PIV systems are presented along with the performance analysis of low-density, large diameter Expancel particles that appear to be promising candidates for LF-PIV seeding. Comparison of data obtained by LF-PIV measurements (2MP camera) and regular format sized PIV measurements show an agreement of within 1% for mean velocity and 8% for turbulent statistics respectively. Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM, USA.

  12. A Method for Observing Soil Re-Deposition and Soil Loss Rates in Large Field Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Y. P.; Bugna, G. C.; Nemours, D.

    2014-12-01

    The lack of quality soil erosion field data, which is required for the verification and calibration of soil erosion models, has been one of the serious problems in the soil conservation modeling today. Observing soil erosion of a relatively large field under truly unobstructed runoff conditions has rarely been done and doccumented. Report here is the results of our observation of soil erosion in a 7.3 ha peanut-cotton cropping system in the Mears Farm of Grand Ridge, FL. We used the mesh-pad method to quantify soil loss from the field and soil re-deposition in the field over the cropping season of 2010. The main slope (1-3 %) of the field is about 210 m long. We show that the amount of soil re-deposition was 50-150 times of the soil loss from the slope. The corresponding organic matter, nitrogen, phosphorous and silt and clay contents of the lost soil, however, were 20.9%, 21%, 17.6% and 14.2%, respectively, of the total amounts re-deposited on the slope. The amounts of soil loss predicted by a SWAT model was 10-20 times greater than our observed values. Soil erosion process was quite heterogeneous, as shown by the mesh-pad method, even on a seemingly uniform cultivated field. Soil erosion models need to be verified and calibrated by extensive quality field data in order to improve their performance.

  13. Crystallization of insulin and lysozyme under reduced convection condition in a large gradient magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, D. C.; Wakayama, N. I.; Fujiwara, M.; Harata, K.; Xue, X. P.; Fu, Z. X.; Zhang, S. W.; Shang, P.; Tanimoto, Y.

    The crystallization of protein from solution is governed by the process of transport phenomenon Any reason affecting the process of solute transport will impose effects on the crystallization process thus further affects the crystal quality Recent advancement in superconducting magnet technology makes it possible to provide a low cost long-time durable low effective gravity environment for the control of convection which is similar to the environment in the space As an ideal means to damp natural convection in a non-conductive solution on the Earth it may find applications in the field of protein crystallization In this presentation the authors investigated the crystallization of orthorhombic lysozyme crystals tetragonal lysozyme crystals and insulin crystals in a large gradient magnetic field Three effective gravity levels were used milli-gravity around 0G normal gravity 1G and hypergravity 1 8G Comparisons of the crystal quality obtained inside and outside the magnetic field showed that both the magnetic field and the effective gravity could affect the crystal quality But the effect also depends on the crystal and protein type For lysozyme crystals in tetragonal form the magnetic field and effective gravity showed no obvious effect on the quality whereas for the crystals in orthorhombic form both the magnetic field and effective gravity improved the crystal quality For insulin crystal which is highly symmetrical magnetic field and effective gravity showed no strong effect on the crystal quality It is well known that

  14. Mechanisation of large-scale agricultural fields in developing countries - a review.

    PubMed

    Onwude, Daniel I; Abdulstter, Rafia; Gomes, Chandima; Hashim, Norhashila

    2016-09-01

    Mechanisation of large-scale agricultural fields often requires the application of modern technologies such as mechanical power, automation, control and robotics. These technologies are generally associated with relatively well developed economies. The application of these technologies in some developing countries in Africa and Asia is limited by factors such as technology compatibility with the environment, availability of resources to facilitate the technology adoption, cost of technology purchase, government policies, adequacy of technology and appropriateness in addressing the needs of the population. As a result, many of the available resources have been used inadequately by farmers, who continue to rely mostly on conventional means of agricultural production, using traditional tools and equipment in most cases. This has led to low productivity and high cost of production among others. Therefore this paper attempts to evaluate the application of present day technology and its limitations to the advancement of large-scale mechanisation in developing countries of Africa and Asia. Particular emphasis is given to a general understanding of the various levels of mechanisation, present day technology, its management and application to large-scale agricultural fields. This review also focuses on/gives emphasis to future outlook that will enable a gradual, evolutionary and sustainable technological change. The study concludes that large-scale-agricultural farm mechanisation for sustainable food production in Africa and Asia must be anchored on a coherent strategy based on the actual needs and priorities of the large-scale farmers. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:26940194

  15. Field Test Results of Automated Demand Response in a Large Office Building

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Junqiao; Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

    2008-10-20

    Demand response (DR) is an emerging research field and an effective tool that improves grid reliability and prevents the price of electricity from rising, especially in deregulated markets. This paper introduces the definition of DR and Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR). It describes the Auto-DR technology utilized at a commercial building in the summer of 2006 and the methodologies to evaluate associated demand savings. On the basis of field tests in a large office building, Auto-DR is proven to be a reliable and credible resource that ensures a stable and economical operation of the power grid.

  16. A photonic-crystal optical antenna for extremely large local-field enhancement.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hyun-Joo; Kim, Se-Heon; Lee, Yong-Hee; Kartalov, Emil P; Scherer, Axel

    2010-11-01

    We propose a novel design of an all-dielectric optical antenna based on photonic-band-gap confinement. Specifically, we have engineered the photonic-crystal dipole mode to have broad spectral response (Q~70) and well-directed vertical-radiation by introducing a plane mirror below the cavity. Considerably large local electric-field intensity enhancement~4,500 is expected from the proposed design for a normally incident planewave. Furthermore, an analytic model developed based on coupled-mode theory predicts that the electric-field intensity enhancement can easily be over 100,000 by employing reasonably high-Q (~10,000) resonators. PMID:21164762

  17. Development and field trial of a FBG-based magnetic sensor for large hydrogenerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fracarolli, João. P. V.; Rosolem, João. B.; Tomiyama, Elias K.; Floridia, Claudio; Penze, Rivael S.; Peres, Rodrigo; Dini, Danilo C.; Hortencio, Claudio A.; Dilli, Paulo I. G.; da Silva, Erlon V.; dos Santos, Marcéu. C.; Fruett, Fabiano

    2016-05-01

    We propose a passive optical sensor for online magnetic field monitoring in large hydrogenerators, based on FBG (Fiber Bragg Grating) technology and a magnestostrictive material (Terfenol-D). The objective of this sensor is to detect faults in the rotor windings due to inter turn short-circuits. This device is packaged in a novel rod-shaped enclosure, allowing it to be easily installed on the ventilation ducts of the stator of the machine. This sensor was developed and tested in laboratory and it has been evaluated in a field test on a 200 MVA, 60 poles hydrogenerator.

  18. Exact asymptotics of the current in boundary-driven dissipative quantum chains in large external fields.

    PubMed

    Lenarčič, Zala; Prosen, Tomaž

    2015-03-01

    A boundary-driven quantum master equation for a general inhomogeneous (nonintegrable) anisotropic Heisenberg spin-1/2 chain, or an equivalent nearest neighbor interacting spinless fermion chain, is considered in the presence of a strong external field f. We present an exact closed form expression for large f asymptotics of the current in the presence of a pure incoherent source and sink dissipation at the boundaries. In application, we demonstrate an arbitrary large current rectification in the presence of the interaction. PMID:25871030

  19. Central Limit Theorems and Uniform Laws of Large Numbers for Arrays of Random Fields

    PubMed Central

    Jenish, Nazgul; Prucha, Ingmar R.

    2009-01-01

    Over the last decades, spatial-interaction models have been increasingly used in economics. However, the development of a sufficiently general asymptotic theory for nonlinear spatial models has been hampered by a lack of relevant central limit theorems (CLTs), uniform laws of large numbers (ULLNs) and pointwise laws of large numbers (LLNs). These limit theorems form the essential building blocks towards developing the asymptotic theory of M-estimators, including maximum likelihood and generalized method of moments estimators. The paper establishes a CLT, ULLN, and LLN for spatial processes or random fields that should be applicable to a broad range of data processes. PMID:20161289

  20. A bi-axial active boring tool for chatter mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond, J.M.; Barney, P.S.

    1998-08-01

    This paper summarizes results of metal cutting tests using an actively damped boring bar to suppress regenerative chatter. PZT stack actuators were integrated into a commercially available two-inch diameter boring bar to suppress bending vibrations. Since the modified tool requires no specialized mounting hardware, it can be readily mounted on a variety of machines. A cutting test using the prototype bar to remove metal from a hardened steel workpiece verifies that the authors actively damped tool yields significant vibration reduction and improved surface finish as compared to the open-loop case. In addition, the overall performance of the prototype bar is compared to that of an unmodified bar of pristine geometry, revealing that a significant enlargement of the stable machining envelope is obtained through application of feedback control.

  1. Large Eddy Simulation and Field Experiments of Pollen Transport in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamecki, M.; Meneveau, C.; Parlange, M. B.; van Hout, R.

    2006-12-01

    Dispersion of airborne pollen by the wind has been a subject of interest for botanists and allergists for a long time. More recently, the development of genetically modified crops and questions about cross-pollination and subsequent contamination of natural plant populations has brought even more interest to this field. A critical question is how far from the source field pollen grains will be advected. Clearly the answer depends on the aerodynamic properties of the pollen, geometrical properties of the field, topography, local vegetation, wind conditions, atmospheric stability, etc. As a consequence, field experiments are well suited to provide some information on pollen transport mechanisms but are limited to specific field and weather conditions. Numerical simulations do not have this drawback and can be a useful tool to study pollen dispersal in a variety of configurations. It is well known that the dispersion of particles in turbulent fields is strongly affected by the large scale coherent structures. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is a technique that allows us to study the typical distances reached by pollen grains and, at the same time, resolve the larger coherent structures present in the atmospheric boundary layer. The main objective of this work is to simulate the dispersal of pollen grains in the atmospheric surface layer using LES. Pollen concentrations are simulated by an advection-diffusion equation including gravitational settling. Of extreme importance is the specification of the bottom boundary conditions characterizing the pollen source over the canopy and the deposition process everywhere else. In both cases we make use of the theoretical profile for suspended particles derived by Kind (1992). Field experiments were performed to study the applicability of the theoretical profile to pollen grains and the results are encouraging. Airborne concentrations as well as ground deposition from the simulations are compared to experimental data to validate the

  2. Electrodiffusiophoresis of a large-zeta-potential particle in weak fields.

    PubMed

    Tricoli, Vincenzo; Orsini, Gabriele

    2015-10-21

    The electrodiffusiophoresis of a large-zeta-potential (ζ) particle in weak fields is investigated. In this large-ζ regime, Debye-layer kinetics determines O(1) perturbations to the electric- and concentration fields in the surrounding electroneutral solution. Taking these effects into account, the expressions of the slip-flow coefficient and the effective surface boundary-conditions for the electric- and concentration fields are derived. For binary and symmetric electrolyte where only one ion species carries the current in the electroneutral domain, the far-field salt gradient as related to the electric field is determined. The electrodiffusiophoretic mobility is obtained for three particle geometries: sphere, cylinder and spheroid arbitrarily oriented with respect to the externally applied field. Strong departure from Smoluchowskian behavior is found. If co-ion is the current carrier, the mobility is independent of ζ, regardless of the body shape. Also, the hydrodynamic flow-field is irrotational. If counter-ion is the current carrier, the problem formulated in terms of a properly-defined scalar field (Ω), which embodies both the electric potential (Ψ) and the salt concentration, becomes formally identical to the one addressed in our previous work, concerning the small-ζ regime, with negligible salt gradients. Then, all the results obtained in that study are extended and applied even to the large-ζ regime considered here, provided the new expressions now derived for the surface boundary conditions and the slip-flow coefficient are employed and Ω is used in place of Ψ. The present results are discussed also in comparison with the classical studies of Dukhin et al and O'Brien et al concerning electrophoresis of highly charged particles with no salt gradient at infinity, and with recent studies of electrodiffusiophoresis, which, however, neglected the fields perturbations caused by Debye-layer kinetics. It is found that the effects addressed and incorporated

  3. Development of a Large Field of View Shadowgraph System for a 16 Ft. Transonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talley, Michael A.; Jones, Stephen B.; Goodman, Wesley L.

    2000-01-01

    A large field of view shadowgraph flow visualization system for the Langley 16 ft. Transonic Tunnel (16 ft.TT) has been developed to provide fast, low cost, aerodynamic design concept evaluation capability to support the development of the next generation of commercial and military aircraft and space launch vehicles. Key features of the 16 ft. TT shadowgraph system are: (1) high resolution (1280 X 1024) digital snap shots and sequences; (2) video recording of shadowgraph at 30 frames per second; (3) pan, tilt, & zoom to find and observe flow features; (4) one microsecond flash for freeze frame images; (5) large field of view approximately 12 X 6 ft; and (6) a low maintenance, high signal/noise ratio, retro-reflective screen to allow shadowgraph imaging while test section lights are on.

  4. Transferred large area single crystal MoS2 field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Choong Hee; McCulloch, William; Lee, Edwin W.; Ma, Lu; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Hwang, Jinwoo; Wu, Yiying; Rajan, Siddharth

    2015-11-01

    Transfer of epitaxial, two-dimensional (2D) MoS2 on sapphire grown via synthetic approaches is a prerequisite for practical device applications. We report centimeter-scale, single crystal, synthesized MoS2 field effect transistors (FETs) transferred onto SiO2/Si substrates, with a field-effect mobility of 4.5 cm2 V-1 s-1, which is among the highest mobility values reported for the transferred large-area MoS2 transistors. We demonstrate simple and clean transfer of large-area MoS2 films using deionized water, which can effectively avoid chemical contamination. The transfer method reported here allows standard i-line stepper lithography process to realize multiple devices over the entire film area.

  5. Sub-slab pressure field extension in schools and other large buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, D. B.; Craig, A. B.; Leovic, K. W.

    1991-09-01

    The experiences of EPA are discussed in using pressure field extension (PFE) to design active subslab depressurization (ASD) systems to reduce radon levels in old and new schools, including instances where the data collected resulted in the installation of smaller systems than expected and selection of high vacuum fans instead of normal mitigation fans. A central collection system for use under very large slabs is discussed and PFE data are given for a hospital under construction. The most direct method of projecting or measuring the performance of an ASD system is to measure the strength and extent of the pressure field established under the slab. The PFE can be determined (during diagnostics) to help design an ASD system and (following installation) to ascertain system performance. In schools and other large buildings, these data are invaluable to provide a system that will mitigate the building without undue cost escalation.

  6. Fossils from bore holes on the Eastern Shore Peninsula, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Todd, Ruth; Gardner, Julia A.; Sohn, I.G.

    1955-01-01

    This report lists Foraminifera, Mollusca, and Ostracoda in five bore holes that penetrated a maximum of 445 feet of section in sediments of Pleistocene and Miocene age, and discusses the paleoecologic and stratigraphic significance of the fossils. It includes the contents of references 6, 16, and 18 of Virginia Division of Geology Mineral Resources Circular No. 2, dealing with the geology and groundwater resources of the Eastern Shore peninsula.

  7. Active chatter control system for long-overhang boring bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, Douglas R.; Golioto, Igor; Thompson, Norman B.

    1997-05-01

    Some machining processes, such as boring, have been historically limited by excessive bar vibration, often resulting in poor surface finish and reduced tool life. A unique boring bar system has been developed to suppress bar vibration, or chatter, during machining using active control technology. Metal cutting test programs have shown proven, repeatable performance on hard-to-cut, aircraft industry high-temperature nickel alloys as well as more easily cut carbon steels. Critical bar length-to-diameter (L/D) ratios, depths-of-cuts, feed rates and cutting speeds far exceed those attainable from the best available passively-damped boring bars. This industry-ready system consists of three principle subsystems: active clamp, instrumented bar, and control electronics. The active clamp is a lathe-mountable body capable of supporting bars of varying sizes and articulating them in orthogonal directions from the base of the bar shank. The instrumented bar consists of a steel shank, standard insert head and imbedded accelerometers. Wire harnesses from both the bar and clamp connect to control electronics comprised of highly-efficient switched- capacitor amplifiers that drive the piezoelectric actuators, sensor signal conditioning, a PC-based program manager and two 32-bit floating-point DSPs. The program manager code runs on the host PC and distributes system identification and control functions to the two DSPs. All real-time signal processing is based on the principles of adaptive filter minimization. For the described system, cutting performance has extended existing chatter thresholds (cutting parameter combinations) for nickel alloys by as much as 400% while maintaining precision surface finish on the machined part. Bar L/D ratios as high as 11 have enabled deep boring operations on nickel workpieces that otherwise could not be performed free of chatter.

  8. Primordial magnetic fields in the f2FF model in large field inflation under de Sitter and power law expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlMuhammad, A. S.; Lopez-Mobilia, R.

    2016-03-01

    We use the f2FF model to study the generation of primordial magnetic fields (PMF) in the context of large field inflation (LFI), described by the potential, V ˜ M φp. We compute the magnetic and electric spectra for all possible values of the model parameters under de Sitter and power law expansion. We show that scale invariant PMF are not obtained in LFI to first order in the slow roll approximation, if we impose the constraint V(φ=0)˜ 0. Alternatively, if these constraints are relaxed, the scale invariant PMF can be generated. The associated electric field energy can fall below the energy density of inflation, ρInf for the ranges of comoving wavenumbers, k > 8 × 10-7 Mpc-1 and k > 4 × 10-6 Mpc-1 in de Sitter and power law (PL) expansion. Further, it can drop below ρInf on the ranges, e-foldings N > 51, p<1.66, p >2.03, l_0 > 3 × 105 MPl-1 (H_i < 3.3 × 10-6 MPl), and M > 2.8 × 10-3 MPl. All of the above ranges fit with the observational constraints.

  9. Analysis of stresses at the bore of a drilled ball operating in a high-speed bearing. [with stiffening web

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, H. H.; Lynch, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    Three-dimensional stress distributions were calculated for both a regular drilled ball with a stiffening web. The balls were 20.6 mm (0.8125 in.) in diameter and had a 12.6 mm (0.496 in.) diameter concentric hole. The stiffening web was 1.5 mm (0.06 in.) thick. The calculations showed that a large reversing tangential stress at the hole bore was reduced by one-half by the addition of the web.

  10. Estimating field-of-view loss in bathymetric lidar: application to large-scale simulations.

    PubMed

    Carr, Domenic; Tuell, Grady

    2014-07-20

    When designing a bathymetric lidar, it is important to study simulated waveforms for various combinations of system and environmental parameters. To predict a system's ranging accuracy, it is often necessary to analyze thousands of waveforms. In these large-scale simulations, estimating field-of-view loss is a challenge because the calculation is complex and computationally intensive. This paper describes a new procedure for quickly approximating this loss, and illustrates how it can be used to efficiently predict ranging accuracy. PMID:25090208

  11. Ocean acoustic field simulations for monitoring large-scale ocean structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, E. C.; Wang, Y. Y.

    1991-04-01

    Substantial numerical simulations of low-frequency acoustic field under different ocean models have been carried out on the CYBER-205 at WPL/NOAA. The purpose of these numerical simulations is to investigate our potential ability to monitor large-scale ocean structures by using modal ocean acoustic tomography (MOAT). For example, the possibility of monitoring El Niño by using MOAT has been illustrated.

  12. LUMINOUS RED GALAXY HALO DENSITY FIELD RECONSTRUCTION AND APPLICATION TO LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURE MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Beth A.; Spergel, David N.; Bode, Paul E-mail: dns@astro.princeton.edu

    2009-09-01

    The nontrivial relationship between observations of galaxy positions in redshift space and the underlying matter field complicates our ability to determine the linear theory power spectrum and extract cosmological information from galaxy surveys. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) luminous red galaxy (LRG) catalog has the potential to place powerful constraints on cosmological parameters. LRGs are bright, highly biased tracers of large-scale structure. However, because they are highly biased, the nonlinear contribution of satellite galaxies to the galaxy power spectrum is large and fingers-of-God (FOGs) are significant. The combination of these effects leads to a {approx}10% correction in the underlying power spectrum at k = 0.1 h Mpc{sup -1} and {approx}40% correction at k = 0.2 h Mpc{sup -1} in the LRG P(k) analysis of Tegmark et al., thereby compromising the cosmological constraints when this potentially large correction is left as a free parameter. We propose an alternative approach to recovering the matter field from galaxy observations. Our approach is to use halos rather than galaxies to trace the underlying mass distribution. We identify FOGs and replace each FOG with a single halo object. This removes the nonlinear contribution of satellite galaxies, the one-halo term. We test our method on a large set of high-fidelity mock SDSS LRG catalogs and find that the power spectrum of the reconstructed halo density field deviates from the underlying matter power spectrum at the {<=}1% level for k {<=} 0.1 h Mpc{sup -1} and {<=}4% at k = 0.2 h Mpc{sup -1}. The reconstructed halo density field also removes the bias in the measurement of the redshift space distortion parameter {beta} induced by the FOG smearing of the linear redshift space distortions.

  13. Bore support assembly and a method of laser construction

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz, M.V.; Shull, W.A.

    1989-09-12

    This patent describes a bore support assembly for use in a laser. It comprises: a joiner ring having radially spaced outer and inner peripheries, the outer periphery being capable of rigid attachment to an outer envelope of a laser at the interior thereof. The inner periphery defining a first central opening of a first size adapting the ring to receive an inner bore tube of the laser therethrough; and a spider structure positioned on one side of the joiner ring and extending generally along the central opening thereof. The spider structure having an outer peripheral portion rigidly attached to the inner periphery of the joiner ring, an inner peripheral portion spaced radially inwardly from the outer peripheral portion and defining a second central opening of a second size smaller than the first size of the first central opening of the joiner ring and adapting the inner peripheral portion of the spider structure to receive the bore tube of the laser therethrough and be rigidly interconnected therewith, and a plurality of flexible members extending radially between and interconnecting the outer and inner peripheral portions of the spider structure.

  14. A PILOT FOR A VERY LARGE ARRAY H I DEEP FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Ximena; Van Gorkom, J. H.; Schiminovich, David; Hess, Kelley M.; Pisano, D. J.; Kreckel, Kathryn; Momjian, Emmanuel; Popping, Attila; Oosterloo, Tom; Chomiuk, Laura; Verheijen, M. A. W.; Henning, Patricia A.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Wilcots, Eric M.; Scoville, Nick

    2013-06-20

    High-resolution 21 cm H I deep fields provide spatially and kinematically resolved images of neutral hydrogen at different redshifts, which are key to understanding galaxy evolution across cosmic time and testing predictions of cosmological simulations. Here we present results from a pilot for an H I deep field done with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). We take advantage of the newly expanded capabilities of the telescope to probe the redshift interval 0 < z < 0.193 in one observation. We observe the COSMOS field for 50 hr, which contains 413 galaxies with optical spectroscopic redshifts in the imaged field of 34' Multiplication-Sign 34' and the observed redshift interval. We have detected neutral hydrogen gas in 33 galaxies in different environments spanning the probed redshift range, including three without a previously known spectroscopic redshift. The detections have a range of H I and stellar masses, indicating the diversity of galaxies we are probing. We discuss the observations, data reduction, results, and highlight interesting detections. We find that the VLA's B-array is the ideal configuration for H I deep fields since its long spacings mitigate radio frequency interference. This pilot shows that the VLA is ready to carry out such a survey, and serves as a test for future H I deep fields planned with other Square Kilometer Array pathfinders.

  15. Indirect interband transition induced by optical near fields with large wave numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Maiku; Nobusada, Katsuyuki

    2016-05-01

    Optical near fields (ONFs) have Fourier components with large wave numbers that are two or three orders of magnitude larger than those of far-field propagating light owing to their nonuniformity in space. By utilizing these large wave numbers, the ONF is expected to induce an indirect interband transition between Bloch states having different wave numbers and directly generate an electron-hole pair without electron-phonon coupling. We perform time-dependent dynamics calculations of a one-dimensional periodic potential with an indirect band-gap structure and demonstrate that the ONF definitely induces an indirect interband transition. Instead of using the general Bloch boundary condition, which is usually imposed in conventional band structure calculations, we adopt an alternative boundary condition, the Born-von Kármán boundary condition, to appropriately treat indirect interband transitions. The calculated absorption spectra for the far-field and ONF excitations show different absorption edges and spectral patterns. We argue that this difference can be experimentally measured as evidence of the effects of the large wave numbers of the ONF.

  16. Compact optical gimbal as a conformal beam director for large field-of-regard lasercom applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesner, Jessica E.; Hinrichs, Keith M.; Narkewich, Lawrence E.; Stephens, Timothy

    2015-03-01

    Laser communication offers advantages over traditional RF communication, including reduced size, weight, and power, higher data rates, and resistance to jamming. However, existing beam directors used for large field-of-regard lasercom terminals have limitations. Traditional gimbals require either domes or large conformal windows to achieve large fields of regard. Risley prism-based beam directors have temperature- and wavelength-dependent pointing necessitating tight temperature control and pointing correction techniques. Other methods, like liquid crystal optical phased array beam directors, have low transmittance and low technology readiness levels (TRLs). This paper presents a detailed design and preliminary performance results of a prototype Compact Optical Gimbal (COG) beam director that provides a 2 inch beam over a +/- 65o field-of-regard through a small (~12 inch) flat window. The COG differs from the traditional gimbal in that it includes three-axis steering with off-axis elevation and dither control, and a folded refractive afocal telescope incorporated into the body of the gimbal to minimize size. The COG's optical system does not have the pointing challenges characteristic of Risley prisms, and it utilizes high TRL components, including many commercial off-theshelf parts, to simplify implementation. The compact size and performance support a variety of beam steering applications and platforms.

  17. Long-term average non-dipole fields; how large or how small?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Der Voo, R.; Domeier, M. M.; Torsvik, T. H.

    2012-12-01

    Paul Louis Mercanton suggested already in the late 1920's that paleomagnetism might provide a test of continental drift. However, the absence of an adequate understanding of the ancient (!) geomagnetic field structure hampered such a test until some 25 years later. But then, the results of the paleomagnetic study of Neogene Icelandic lavas by Hospers in the early 1950's, provided a breakthrough. Two very important findings were: (1) that the field in the Neogene was predominantly dipolar, implying that higher-order fields (quadrupoles, octupoles) averaged to near-zero, and (2) that the dipole axis remained on average aligned with the rotation axis, during normal- as well as reversed-polarity fields intervals. The last conclusion prompted Creer, Irving, and Runcorn to remark that "The coincidence of the magnetic and rotation axes [ . . .] covering many reversals is explained by the dominance of the Coriolis force". The geocentric axial dipole (GAD) hypothesis remained ever after the main guiding principle of paleomagnetic analysis, allowing declination anomalies to be interpreted as rotations and inclinations as representative of paleolatitudes. It is generally agreed upon that the long-term averaged field structure is largely, but not perfectly, dipolar. The critical question about non-dipole fields is "how large" (or, perhaps, "how small"). Analysis of the magnitude of non-dipole fields is restricted to zonal fields of degree (n) two or three, i.e., axial quadrupole and octupole fields, characterized by Gaussian coefficient ratios (Gn) where G is the ratio of the appropriate higher-order field coefficient and the axial dipole field coefficient. For the last 5 million years G2 and G3 are small, but not zero (Johnson et al., 2008, G-cubed), and for earlier geological times (Permian, Triassic) some speculations by some of us have considered values up to 0.2, on the basis of inclination patterns. The underlying assumption that inclination anomalies were attributable

  18. Large-scale magnetic fields can explain the baryon asymmetry of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Tomohiro; Kamada, Kohei

    2016-04-01

    Helical hypermagnetic fields in the primordial Universe can produce the observed amount of baryon asymmetry through the chiral anomaly without any ingredients beyond the standard model of particle physics. While they generate no B -L asymmetry, the generated baryon asymmetry survives the spharelon washout effect, because the generating process remains active until the electroweak phase transition. Solving the Boltzmann equation numerically and finding an attractor solution, we show that the baryon asymmetry of our Universe can be explained, if the present large-scale magnetic fields indicated by the blazar observations have a negative helicity and existed in the early Universe before the electroweak phase transition. We also derive the upper bound on the strength of the helical magnetic field, which is tighter than the cosmic microwave background constraint, to avoid the overproduction of baryon asymmetry.

  19. Pulsed-Field Electrophoresis: Application of a Computer Model to the Separation of Large DNA Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalande, Marc; Noolandi, Jaan; Turmel, Chantal; Rousseau, Jean; Slater, Gary W.

    1987-11-01

    The biased reptation theory has been applied to the pulsed-field electrophoresis of DNA in agarose gels. A computer simulation of the theoretical model that calculates the mobility of large DNA molecules as a function of agarose pore size, DNA chain properties, and electric field conditions has been used to generate mobility curves for DNA molecules in the size range of the larger yeast chromosomes. Pulsed-field electrophoresis experiments resulting in the establishment of an electrophoretic karyotype for yeast, where the mobility of the DNA fragments is a monotonic function of molecular size for the entire size range that is resolved (200-2200 kilobase pairs), has been compared to the theoretical mobility curves generated by the computer model. The various physical mechanisms and experimental conditions responsible for band inversion and improved electrophoretic separation are identified and discussed in the framework of the model.

  20. Mantle convection and the large scale structures of the Earth's gravitational field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peltier, W. R.

    1985-01-01

    The connection between the observed large scale structure of the Earths' gravitational field, as represented by the GEM10 model, and the surface kinematic manifestations of plate tectonics, as represented by the absolute plate motion model of Minster and Jordan, is explored using a somewhat novel method of analysis. Two scalar derivatives of the field of surface plate velocities, namely the horizontal divergence and the radial vorticity, are computed from the plate motion data. These two scalars are respectively determined by the poloidal and toroidal scalars in terms of which any essentially solenoidal vector field may be completely represented. They provide a compact summary of the observed plate boundary types in nature, with oceanic ridges and trenches being essentially boundaries of divergence, and transform faults being essentially boundaries of vorticity.

  1. Infrared-temperature variability in a large agricultural field. [Dunnigan, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millard, J. P.; Goettelman, R. C.; Leroy, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The combined effect of water carved gullies, varying soil color, moisture state of the soil and crop, nonuniform phenology, and bare spots was measured for commercially grown barley planted on varying terrain. For all but the most rugged terrain, over 80% of the area within 4, 16, 65, and 259 ha cells was at temperatures within 3 C of the mean cell temperature. The result of using relatively small, 4 ha instantaneous field of views for remote sensing applications is that either the worst or the best of conditions is often observed. There appears to be no great advantage in utilizing a small instantaneous field of view instead of a large one for remote sensing of crop canopy temperatures. The two alternatives for design purposes are then either a very high spatial resolution, of the order of a meter or so, where the field is very accurately temperature mapped, or a low resolution, where the actual size seems to make little difference.

  2. Large-scale well aligned carbon nitride nanotube films: Low temperature growth and electron field emission

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Dingyong; Liu, Shuang; Zhang, Guangyu; Wang, E. G.

    2001-06-01

    Large-scale well aligned carbon nitride nanotube films (6 cm in diameter), which are easily processed and show potential for nanomanipulation, have been synthesized by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition at a relatively low temperature of 550{degree}C. The characterization, using transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy, shows that the nanotubes are polymerized by nanobells with nitrogen concentration of 10%. We propose a push-out growth mechanism for the formation of the special polymerized nanobell structure. A turn-on field of electron emission as low as 0.8 V/{mu}m is obtained. Fowler{endash}Nordheim, consisting of two straight lines with a gentle slope at low field and a steep one at relatively high field, are interpreted based on a top side emission mechanism related to the nanobell structures. No current saturation is found in the films. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  3. Flow dynamics at a river confluence on Mississippi River: field measurement and large eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Trung; Khosronejad, Ali; Bartelt, Nicole; Woldeamlak, Solomon; Peterson, Bonnie; Dewall, Petronella; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory, University of Minnesota Team; Minnesota Department of Transportation Team

    2015-11-01

    We study the dynamics of a river confluence on Mississippi River branch in the city of Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States. Field measurements by Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler using on-board GPS tracking were carried out for five campaigns in the summer of 2014 and 2015 to collect both river bed elevation data and flow fields. Large Eddy Simulation is carried out to simulate the flow field with the total of 100 million grid points for the domain length of 3.2 km. The simulation results agree well with field measurements at measured cross-sections. The results show the existence of wake mode on the mixing interface of two branches near the upstream junction corner. The mutual interaction between the shear layers emanating from the river banks leading to the formation of large scale energetic structures that leads to ``switching'' side of the flow coherent structures. Our result here is a feasibility study for the use of eddy-resolving simulations in predicting complex flow dynamics in medium-size natural rivers. This work is funded by Minnesota Dept. Transportation and Minnesota Institute of Supercomputing.

  4. Thermal and mechanical effects on large field dielectric loss in lanthanum-doped lead zirconate titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, John A.; Jo, Hwan Ryul; Lynch, Christopher S.

    2013-04-01

    Ferroelectric material losses in devices ranging from sonar transducers to energy harvesters result in the conversion of energy to heat. Under small amplitude sinusoidal drive, either electrical or mechanical, the losses are expressed in terms of a loss tangent. This study addressed the effects of temperature and bias stress on large field dielectric loss in the presence of thermal and mechanical loading in lanthanum-doped lead zirconate titanate, Pb0.92La0.08(Zr0.65Ti0.35)0.98O3 (PLZT 8/65/35). This loss is associated with domain wall motion. Large field dielectric loss was experimentally measured using a technique that matches the area within a unipolar electric displacement - electric field hysteresis loop to an equivalent area ellipse-shaped hysteresis loop. The results indicate that the dependence of dielectric loss on bias stress changes with the onset of a thermally induced transition to slim loop behavior. Stress causes the dielectric loss to increase at low temperature and decrease at high temperature. This is consistent with changes in remnant polarization and saturation of the unipolar electric field - electric displacement hysteresis loops.

  5. High-Resolution Hα Velocity Fields of Nearby Spiral Galaxies with the Southern African Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Carl; Williams, Ted; Spekkens, Kristine; Lee-Waddell, Karen; Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; Sellwood, Jerry

    2016-01-01

    In an effort to test ΛCDM predictions of galaxy mass distributions, we have obtained spectrophotometric observations of several nearby spiral galaxies with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) Fabry-Pérot (FP) interferometer as part of the RSS Imaging spectroscopy Nearby Galaxy Survey. Utilizing the SALT FP's 8 arcmin field of view and 2 arcsec angular resolution, we have derived 2D velocity fields of the Hα emission line to high spatial resolution at large radii. We have modeled these velocity fields with the DiskFit software package and found them to be in good agreement with lower-resolution velocity fields of the HI 21 cm line for the same galaxies. Here we present our Hα kinematic map of the barred spiral galaxy NGC 578. At the distance to this galaxy (22 Mpc), our kinematic data has a spatial resolution of 185 pc and extends to galactocentric radii of 13 kpc. The high spatial resolution of this data allows us to resolve the inner rising part of the rotation curves, which is compromised by beam smearing in lower-resolution observations. We are using these Hα kinematic data, combined with HI 21 cm kinematics and broadband photometric observations, to place constraints on NGC 578's mass distribution.

  6. An improved method for field extraction and laboratory analysis of large, intact soil cores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tindall, J.A.; Hemmen, K.; Dowd, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    Various methods have been proposed for the extraction of large, undisturbed soil cores and for subsequent analysis of fluid movement within the cores. The major problems associated with these methods are expense, cumbersome field extraction, and inadequate simulation of unsaturated flow conditions. A field and laboratory procedure is presented that is economical, convenient, and simulates unsaturated and saturated flow without interface flow problems and can be used on a variety of soil types. In the field, a stainless steel core barrel is hydraulically pressed into the soil (30-cm diam. and 38 cm high), the barrel and core are extracted from the soil, and after the barrel is removed from the core, the core is then wrapped securely with flexible sheet metal and a stainless mesh screen is attached to the bottom of the core for support. In the laboratory the soil core is set atop a porous ceramic plate over which a soil-diatomaceous earth slurry has been poured to assure good contact between plate and core. A cardboard cylinder (mold) is fastened around the core and the empty space filled with paraffin wax. Soil cores were tested under saturated and unsaturated conditions using a hanging water column for potentials ???0. Breakthrough curves indicated that no interface flow occurred along the edge of the core. This procedure proved to be reliable for field extraction of large, intact soil cores and for laboratory analysis of solute transport.

  7. CMB temperature anisotropy at large scales induced by a causal primordial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Bonvin, Camille; Caprini, Chiara E-mail: camille.bonvin@cea.fr

    2010-05-01

    We present an analytical derivation of the Sachs Wolfe effect sourced by a primordial magnetic field. In order to consistently specify the initial conditions, we assume that the magnetic field is generated by a causal process, namely a first order phase transition in the early universe. As for the topological defects case, we apply the general relativistic junction conditions to match the perturbation variables before and after the phase transition which generates the magnetic field, in such a way that the total energy momentum tensor is conserved across the transition and Einstein's equations are satisfied. We further solve the evolution equations for the metric and fluid perturbations at large scales analytically including neutrinos, and derive the magnetic Sachs Wolfe effect. We find that the relevant contribution to the magnetic Sachs Wolfe effect comes from the metric perturbations at next-to-leading order in the large scale limit. The leading order term is in fact strongly suppressed due to the presence of free-streaming neutrinos. We derive the neutrino compensation effect dynamically and confirm that the magnetic Sachs Wolfe spectrum from a causal magnetic field behaves as l(l+1) C{sup B}{sub l}∝l{sup 2} as found in the latest numerical analyses.

  8. Development of a Large Scale Field PIV System For Wake Measurement in a Wind Farm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, Larry; Castillo, Luciano; Sheng, Jian

    2014-11-01

    Efficient utilization of wind energy requires detailed field measurements. Conventional techniques such as LIDAR and sonic anemometers can only provide low resolution point-wise measurement. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is widely used in laboratory scale studies, however, has considerable difficulties for application in the field. The issues mainly arise due to the presence of background sunlight and the requirement of a large seeding volume. To address these issues, a novel, large-format, field PIV system is developed in this study. The PIV system is capable of measuring 2D velocity in a 1 m × 1 m field of view with 0.2 mm spatial resolution and 7.6 mm vector spacing. The instrument achieves a three-decade measurement range, which enables the quantification of wide spectrum of wake structures as well as those in ABL. It can be applied to assess inflow conditions and to identify coherent structures in turbine wakes. The paper will present the principle of measurement and the development of optical, electrical and mechanical systems, as well as the preliminary measurement in an experimental wind farm.

  9. Large electric-field control of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in strained [Co/Ni] / PZT heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopman, Daniel; Dennis, Cindi; Chen, P. J.; Iunin, Yury; Shull, Robert

    We present a piezoelectric/ferromagnetic heterostructure with PMA - a Co/Ni multilayer sputtered directly onto a Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT) substrate. Chemical-mechanical polishing was used to reduce the roughness of PZT plates to below 2 nm rms, enabling optimal magnetoelectric coupling via the direct interface between PZT and sputtered Co/Ni films with large PMA (Keff = (95 +/-9 kJ/m3)) . We grew the following layer stack: Ta(3)/Pt(2)/[Co(0.15)/Ni(0.6)]x4/Co(0.15)/Pt(2)/Ta(3); numbers in parentheses indicate thicknesses in nm. Applied electric fields up to +/- 2 MV/m to the PZT generated 0.05% in-plane compression in the Co/Ni multilayer, enabling a large electric-field reduction of the PMA (ΔKeff >= 103 J/m3) and of the coercive field (35%). Our results demonstrate that: (i) heterostructures combining PZT and [Co/Ni] exhibit larger PMA (Keff ~105 J/m3) than previous magnetoelectric heterostructures based on Co/Pt and CoFeB, enabling thermally stable hybrid magnetoelectric/spintronic devices only tens of nm in diameter and (ii) electric-field control of the PMA is promising for more energy efficient switching of spintronic devices.

  10. Large-field inflation with multiple axions and the weak gravity conjecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junghans, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    In this note, we discuss the implications of the weak gravity conjecture (WGC) for general models of large-field inflation with a large number of axions N. We first show that, from the bottom-up perspective, such models admit a variety of different regimes for the enhancement of the effective axion decay constant, depending on the amount of alignment and the number of instanton terms that contribute to the scalar potential. This includes regimes of no enhancement, power-law enhancement and exponential enhancement with respect to N. As special cases, we recover the Pythagorean enhancement of N-flation, the N and N 3/2 enhancements derived by Bachlechner, Long and McAllister and the exponential enhancement by Choi, Kim and Yun. We then analyze which top-down constraints are put on such models from the requirement of consistency with quantum gravity. In particular, the WGC appears to imply that the enhancement of the effective axion decay constant must not grow parametrically with N for N ≫ 1. On the other hand, recent works proposed that axions might be able to violate this bound under certain circumstances. Our general expression for the enhancement allows us to translate this possibility into a condition on the number of instantons that couple to the axions. We argue that, at large N , models consistent with quantum gravity must either allow super-Planckian field excursions or have an enormous, possibly even exponentially large, number of dominant instanton terms in the scalar potential.

  11. Compact and large depth of field image scanner for auto document feeder with compound eye system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Tatsuki; Matsuzawa, Taku; Nakajima, Hajime; Makita, Junko; Toyoda, Yoshitaka; Funakura, Tetsuo; Nakanishi, Takahito; Kunieda, Tatsuya; Minobe, Tadashi

    2013-03-01

    We designed a compact and large depth of field image scanner targeted for auto document feeders (ADF) by using a compound eye system design with plural optical units in which the ray paths are folded by a reflective optics. Though we have previously proposed the principle concept, we advance the design using a free-form surface mirror to reduce the F-number for less illumination energy and to shrink its optical track width to 40 mm. We achieved large depth of field (DOF) of 1.2 mm, defined as a range exceeding 30% modulation transfer function (MTF) at 300 dpi, which is about twice as large as a conventional gradient index (GRIN) lens array contact image sensor (CIS). The aperture stop has a rectangular-shaped aperture, where one side length is as large as 4.0mm for collecting much light, and another side length is as small as 1.88mm for avoiding interference of folded ray paths.

  12. Design considerations for large field particle image velocimetery (LF-PIV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pol, S. U.; Balakumar, B. J.

    2013-02-01

    We discuss the challenges and limitations associated with the development of a large field of view particle image velocimetry (LF-PIV) diagnostic, capable of resolving large-scale motions (>1 m per camera) in gas phase laboratory and field experiments. While this diagnostic is developed for the measurement of wakes and local inflow conditions around research wind turbines, the design considerations provided here are also relevant for the application of LF-PIV to atmospheric boundary layer, rotorcraft dynamics and large-scale wind tunnel flows. Measurements over an area of 0.75 m × 1.0 m on a confined vortex were obtained using a standard 2MP camera, with the potential for increasing this area significantly using 11MP cameras. The cameras in this case were oriented orthogonal to the measurement plane receiving only the side-scattered component of light from the particles. Scaling laws associated with LF-PIV systems are also presented along with the performance analysis of low-density, large diameter Expancel particles, that appear to be promising candidates for LF-PIV seeding.

  13. North American Lauraceae: terpenoid emissions, relative attraction and boring preferences of redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus (coleoptera: curculionidae: scolytinae).

    PubMed

    Kendra, Paul E; Montgomery, Wayne S; Niogret, Jerome; Pruett, Grechen E; Mayfield, Albert E; MacKenzie, Martin; Deyrup, Mark A; Bauchan, Gary R; Ploetz, Randy C; Epsky, Nancy D

    2014-01-01

    The invasive redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus, is the primary vector of Raffaelea lauricola, a symbiotic fungus and the etiologic agent of laurel wilt. This lethal disease has caused severe mortality of redbay (Persea borbonia) and swampbay (P. palustris) trees in the southeastern USA, threatens avocado (P. americana) production in Florida, and has potential to impact additional New World species. To date, all North American hosts of X. glabratus and suscepts of laurel wilt are members of the family Lauraceae. This comparative study combined field tests and laboratory bioassays to evaluate attraction and boring preferences of female X. glabratus using freshly-cut bolts from nine species of Lauraceae: avocado (one cultivar of each botanical race), redbay, swampbay, silkbay (Persea humilis), California bay laurel (Umbellularia californica), sassafras (Sassafras albidum), northern spicebush (Lindera benzoin), camphor tree (Cinnamomum camphora), and lancewood (Nectandra coriacea). In addition, volatile collections and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) were conducted to quantify terpenoid emissions from test bolts, and electroantennography (EAG) was performed to measure olfactory responses of X. glabratus to terpenoids identified by GC-MS. Significant differences were observed among treatments in both field and laboratory tests. Silkbay and camphor tree attracted the highest numbers of the beetle in the field, and lancewood and spicebush the lowest, whereas boring activity was greatest on silkbay, bay laurel, swampbay, and redbay, and lowest on lancewood, spicebush, and camphor tree. The Guatemalan cultivar of avocado was more attractive than those of the other races, but boring response among the three was equivalent. The results suggest that camphor tree may contain a chemical deterrent to boring, and that different cues are associated with host location and host acceptance. Emissions of α-cubebene, α-copaene, α-humulene, and calamenene were

  14. North American Lauraceae: Terpenoid Emissions, Relative Attraction and Boring Preferences of Redbay Ambrosia Beetle, Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    PubMed Central

    Kendra, Paul E.; Montgomery, Wayne S.; Niogret, Jerome; Pruett, Grechen E.; Mayfield, Albert E.; MacKenzie, Martin; Deyrup, Mark A.; Bauchan, Gary R.; Ploetz, Randy C.; Epsky, Nancy D.

    2014-01-01

    The invasive redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus, is the primary vector of Raffaelea lauricola, a symbiotic fungus and the etiologic agent of laurel wilt. This lethal disease has caused severe mortality of redbay (Persea borbonia) and swampbay (P. palustris) trees in the southeastern USA, threatens avocado (P. americana) production in Florida, and has potential to impact additional New World species. To date, all North American hosts of X. glabratus and suscepts of laurel wilt are members of the family Lauraceae. This comparative study combined field tests and laboratory bioassays to evaluate attraction and boring preferences of female X. glabratus using freshly-cut bolts from nine species of Lauraceae: avocado (one cultivar of each botanical race), redbay, swampbay, silkbay (Persea humilis), California bay laurel (Umbellularia californica), sassafras (Sassafras albidum), northern spicebush (Lindera benzoin), camphor tree (Cinnamomum camphora), and lancewood (Nectandra coriacea). In addition, volatile collections and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) were conducted to quantify terpenoid emissions from test bolts, and electroantennography (EAG) was performed to measure olfactory responses of X. glabratus to terpenoids identified by GC-MS. Significant differences were observed among treatments in both field and laboratory tests. Silkbay and camphor tree attracted the highest numbers of the beetle in the field, and lancewood and spicebush the lowest, whereas boring activity was greatest on silkbay, bay laurel, swampbay, and redbay, and lowest on lancewood, spicebush, and camphor tree. The Guatemalan cultivar of avocado was more attractive than those of the other races, but boring response among the three was equivalent. The results suggest that camphor tree may contain a chemical deterrent to boring, and that different cues are associated with host location and host acceptance. Emissions of α-cubebene, α-copaene, α-humulene, and calamenene were

  15. Turbulent mixing and wave radiation in non-Boussinesq internal bores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borden, Zac; Koblitz, Tilman; Meiburg, Eckart

    2012-08-01

    Bores, or hydraulic jumps, appear in many natural settings and are useful in many industrial applications. If the densities of the two fluids between which a bore propagates are very different (i.e., water and air), the less dense fluid can be neglected when modeling a bore analytically—a single-layer hydraulic model will accurately predict a bore's speed of propagation. A two-layer model is required, however, if the densities are more similar. Mass is conserved separately in each layer and momentum is conserved globally, but the model requires for closure an assumption about the loss of energy across a bore. In the Boussinesq limit, it is known that there is a decrease of the total energy flux across a bore, but in the expanding layer, turbulent mixing at the interface entrains high speed fluid from the contracting layer, resulting in an increase in the flux of kinetic energy across the expanding layer of a bore. But it is unclear if this finding will extend to non-Boussinesq bores. We directly examine the flux of energy within non-Boussinesq bores using two-dimensional direct numerical simulations and find that a gain of energy across the expanding layer only occurs for bores where the density ratio, defined as the ratio of the density of the lighter fluid to the heavier fluid, is greater than approximately one half. For smaller density ratios, undular waves generated at the bore's front dominate over the effects of turbulent mixing, and the expanding layer loses energy across the bore. Based on our results, we show that if one can predict the amount of energy radiated by bores through undular waves, it is possible to derive an accurate model for the propagation of non-Boussinesq bores.

  16. Simulating daily rainfall fields over large areas for collective risk estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serinaldi, Francesco; Kilsby, Chris G.

    2014-05-01

    Large scale rainfall models are needed for collective risk estimation in flood insurance, infrastructure networks and water resource management applications. There is a lack of models which can provide simulations over large river basins (potentially multi-national) at appropriate spatial resolution (e.g., 5-25 km) that preserve both the local properties of rainfall (i.e., marginal distributions and temporal correlation) and the spatial structure of the field (i.e., the spatial dependence structure). In this study we describe a methodology which merges meta-Gaussian random fields and generalized additive models to simulate realistic rainfall fields at daily time scale over large areas. Unlike other techniques previously proposed in the literature, the suggested approach does not split the rainfall occurrence and intensity processes and resorts to a unique discrete-continuous distribution to reproduce the local properties of rainfall. This choice allows the use of a unique meta-Gaussian spatio-temporal random field substrate that is devised to reproduce the spatial properties and the short term temporal characteristics of the observed precipitation. The model is calibrated and tested on a 25 km gridded daily rainfall data set covering the 817 000 km2 of the Danube basin. Standard and ad hoc diagnostics highlight the overall good performance over the whole range of rainfall values at multiple scales of spatio-temporal aggregation with particular attention to extreme values. Moreover, the modular structure of the model allows for refinements, adaptation to different areas and the introduction of exogenous forcing variables, thus making it a valuable tool for classical hydrologic analyses as well as for new challenges of network and reinsurance risk assessment over extensive areas.

  17. PARTICLE ACCELERATION BY COLLISIONLESS SHOCKS CONTAINING LARGE-SCALE MAGNETIC-FIELD VARIATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, F.; Jokipii, J. R.; Kota, J. E-mail: jokipii@lpl.arizona.ed

    2010-12-10

    Diffusive shock acceleration at collisionless shocks is thought to be the source of many of the energetic particles observed in space. Large-scale spatial variations of the magnetic field have been shown to be important in understanding observations. The effects are complex, so here we consider a simple, illustrative model. Here we solve numerically the Parker transport equation for a shock in the presence of large-scale sinusoidal magnetic-field variations. We demonstrate that the familiar planar-shock results can be significantly altered as a consequence of large-scale, meandering magnetic lines of force. Because the perpendicular diffusion coefficient {kappa}{sub perpendicular} is generally much smaller than the parallel diffusion coefficient {kappa}{sub ||}, the energetic charged particles are trapped and preferentially accelerated along the shock front in the regions where the connection points of magnetic field lines intersecting the shock surface converge, and thus create the 'hot spots' of the accelerated particles. For the regions where the connection points separate from each other, the acceleration to high energies will be suppressed. Further, the particles diffuse away from the 'hot spot' regions and modify the spectra of downstream particle distribution. These features are qualitatively similar to the recent Voyager observations in the Heliosheath. These results are potentially important for particle acceleration at shocks propagating in turbulent magnetized plasmas as well as those which contain large-scale nonplanar structures. Examples include anomalous cosmic rays accelerated by the solar wind termination shock, energetic particles observed in propagating heliospheric shocks, galactic cosmic rays accelerated by supernova blast waves, etc.

  18. Acoustic characterization of high intensity focused ultrasound fields generated from a transmitter with a large aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tao; Fan, Tingbo; Zhang, Wei; Qiu, Yuanyuan; Tu, Juan; Guo, Xiasheng; Zhang, Dong

    2014-03-01

    Prediction and measurement of the acoustic field emitted from a high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is essential for the accurate ultrasonic treatment. In this study, the acoustic field generated from a strongly focused HIFU transmitter was characterized by a combined experiment and simulation method. The spheroidal beam equation (SBE) was utilized to describe the nonlinear sound propagation. The curve of the source pressure amplitude versus voltage excitation was determined by fitting the measured ratio of the second harmonic to the fundamental component of the focal waveform to the simulation result; finally, the acoustic pressure field generated by the strongly focused HIFU transmitter was predicted by using the SBE model. A commercial fiber optic probe hydrophone was utilized to measure the acoustic pressure field generated from a 1.1 MHz HIFU transmitter with a large half aperture angle of 30°. The maximum measured peak-to-peak pressure was up to 72 MPa. The validity of this combined approach was confirmed by the comparison between the measured results and the calculated ones. The results indicate that the current approach might be useful to describe the HIFU field. The results also suggest that this method is not valid for low excitations owing to low sensitivity of the second harmonic.

  19. Acoustic characterization of high intensity focused ultrasound fields generated from a transmitter with a large aperture

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Tao; Fan, Tingbo; Zhang, Wei; Qiu, Yuanyuan; Tu, Juan E-mail: dzhang@nju.edu.cn; Guo, Xiasheng; Zhang, Dong E-mail: dzhang@nju.edu.cn

    2014-03-21

    Prediction and measurement of the acoustic field emitted from a high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is essential for the accurate ultrasonic treatment. In this study, the acoustic field generated from a strongly focused HIFU transmitter was characterized by a combined experiment and simulation method. The spheroidal beam equation (SBE) was utilized to describe the nonlinear sound propagation. The curve of the source pressure amplitude versus voltage excitation was determined by fitting the measured ratio of the second harmonic to the fundamental component of the focal waveform to the simulation result; finally, the acoustic pressure field generated by the strongly focused HIFU transmitter was predicted by using the SBE model. A commercial fiber optic probe hydrophone was utilized to measure the acoustic pressure field generated from a 1.1 MHz HIFU transmitter with a large half aperture angle of 30°. The maximum measured peak-to-peak pressure was up to 72 MPa. The validity of this combined approach was confirmed by the comparison between the measured results and the calculated ones. The results indicate that the current approach might be useful to describe the HIFU field. The results also suggest that this method is not valid for low excitations owing to low sensitivity of the second harmonic.

  20. DYNAMICAL FRICTION IN A GASEOUS MEDIUM WITH A LARGE-SCALE MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Salcedo, F. J.

    2012-02-01

    The dynamical friction force experienced by a massive gravitating body moving through a gaseous medium is modified by sufficiently strong large-scale magnetic fields. Using linear perturbation theory, we calculate the structure of the wake generated by, and the gravitational drag force on, a body traveling in a straight-line trajectory in a uniformly magnetized medium. The functional form of the drag force as a function of the Mach number ({identical_to} V{sub 0}/c{sub s} , where V{sub 0} is the velocity of the body and c{sub s} is the sound speed) depends on the strength of the magnetic field and on the angle between the velocity of the perturber and the direction of the magnetic field. In particular, the peak value of the drag force is not near Mach number {approx}1 for a perturber moving in a sufficiently magnetized medium. As a rule of thumb, we may state that for supersonic motion, magnetic fields act to suppress dynamical friction; for subsonic motion, they tend to enhance dynamical friction. For perturbers moving along the magnetic field lines, the drag force at some subsonic Mach numbers may be stronger than at supersonic velocities. We also mention the relevance of our findings to black hole coalescence in galactic nuclei.

  1. Deep blank-field catalogue for medium- and large-sized telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez Esteban, F. M.; Cabrera Lavers, A.; Cardiel, N.; Alacid, J. M.

    2012-11-01

    The observation of blank fields, defined as regions of the sky that are devoid of stars down to a given threshold magnitude, constitutes one of the most relevant calibration procedures required for the proper reduction of astronomical data obtained following typical observing strategies. In this work, we have used Delaunay triangulation to search for deep blank fields throughout the whole sky, with a minimum size of 10 arcmin in diameter and an increasing threshold magnitude from 15 to 18 in the R band of the USNO-B Catalog of the United States Naval Observatory. The result is a catalogue with the deepest blank fields known so far. A short sample of these regions has been tested with the 10.4-m Gran Telescopio Canarias, and it has been shown to be extremely useful for medium- and large-sized telescopes. Because some of the regions found could also be suitable for new extragalactic studies, we have estimated the galactic extinction in the direction of each deep blank field. This catalogue is accessible through the virtual observatory tool TESELA, and the user can retrieve - and visualize using ALADIN - the deep blank fields available near a given position in the sky.

  2. Coronal structure of the large scale magnetic field and its influence on stellar rotation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Réville, Victor; Brun, Allan Sacha; Matt, Sean; Strugarek, Antoine; Bouvier, Jérôme

    2015-08-01

    The braking of magnetic stars through the extraction of angular momentum by stellar winds has been studied for decades, leading to several formulations as functions of stellar parameters. We recently demonstrated that the dependency of the braking law on the coronal magnetic field topology can be taken into account through a simple scalar parameter : the open magnetic flux. This parameter can be integrated anywhere beyond the last closed coronal loop in steady-state. The Zeeman-Doppler Imaging technique has brought the community a reliable and precise description of the surface magnetic field of distant stars. However reconstruction of the coronal structure of the large scale magnetic field without running costly numerical simulations of the stellar wind is not trivial. An alternative is to use the classical analytical potential field extrapolation to describe the opening of the field lines by the magnetized wind but this technique relies on knowing the so-called radius of the surface source term which must vary from star to star. To resolve this issue, we use our extended set of 2.5D wind simulations published in 2015, to provide a criteria for the field lines opening as well as a simple tool to assess the surface source term radius and the open magnetic flux. This allows us to derive the magnetic torque applied to the star by the wind from any spectropolarimetric observations. We conclude our talk by discussing the case of 3D wind simulations of the BCool sample ; whose surface magnetic field has been obtained by ZDI and to discuss how non-axisymmetry modifies or not our recent findings.

  3. RADIAL TRANSPORT OF LARGE-SCALE MAGNETIC FIELDS IN ACCRETION DISKS. II. RELAXATION TO STEADY STATES

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Taku; Okuzumi, Satoshi

    2014-12-20

    We study the time evolution of a large-scale magnetic flux threading an accretion disk. The induction equation of the mean poloidal field is solved under the standard viscous disk model. Magnetic flux evolution is controlled by two timescales: one is the timescale of the inward advection of the magnetic flux, τ{sub adv}. This is induced by the dragging of the flux by the accreting gas. The other is the outward diffusion timescale of the magnetic flux τ{sub dif}. We consider diffusion due to the Ohmic resistivity. These timescales can be significantly different from the disk viscous timescale τ{sub disk}. The behaviors of the magnetic flux evolution are quite different depending on the magnitude relationship of the timescales τ{sub adv}, τ{sub dif}, and τ{sub disk}. The most interesting phenomena occur when τ{sub adv} << τ{sub dif}, τ{sub disk}. In such a case, the magnetic flux distribution approaches a quasi-steady profile much faster than the viscous evolution of the gas disk, and the magnetic flux has also been tightly bundled to the inner part of the disk. In the inner part, although the poloidal magnetic field becomes much stronger than the interstellar magnetic field, the field strength is limited to the maximum value that is analytically given by our previous work. We also find a condition for the initial large magnetic flux, which is a fossil of the magnetic field dragging during the early phase of star formation that survives for a duration in which significant gas disk evolution proceeds.

  4. Large-field-of-view laser-scanning OR-PAM using a fibre optic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, T. J.; Zhang, E.; Beard, P. C.

    2015-03-01

    Laser-Scanning-Optical-Resolution Photoacoustic Microscopy (LSOR-PAM) requires an ultrasound detector with a low noise equivalent pressure (NEP) and a large angular detection aperture in order to image a large field of view (FOV). It is however challenging to meet these requirements when using piezoelectric receivers since using a small sensing element size (<100μm) in order to achieve a large angular detection aperture will inevitability reduce the sensitivity of the detector as it scales with decreasing element size. Fibre optic ultrasound sensors based on a Fabry Perot cavity do not suffer from this limitation and can provide high detection sensitivity (NEP<0.1kPa over a 20 MHz measurement bandwidth) with a large angular detection aperture due to their small active element size (~10μm). A LSOR-PAM system was developed and combined with this type of fibre optic ultrasound sensor. A set of phantom studies were undertaken. The first study demonstrated that a high resolution image over a large field of view (Ø11mm) could be obtained with a sampledetector separation of only 1.6mm. In the second study, a 12μm diameter tube filled with methylene blue whose absorption coefficient was similar to that of blood was visualised demonstrating that the fibre optic sensor could provide sufficient SNR for in-vivo microvascular OR-PAM imaging. These preliminary results suggest that the fibre optic sensor has the potential to outperform piezoelectric detectors for Laser-Scanning Optical Resolution Photoacoustic Microscopy (LSOR-PAM).

  5. Field Line Resonance Measurements in the Inner Magnetosphere During Large Storms: Implications for Convection and Depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, J.; Jorgensen, A. M.; Zesta, E.; Boudouridis, A.; Chi, P. J.; Moldwin, M.

    2011-12-01

    Field Line Resonances (FLRs) have been shown to be an effective way to remote sense plasmaspheric mass density. In the outer plasmasphere the mass density is modeled well by a power-law distribution and solutions have been tabulated that allow the direct conversion between resonance frequency and mass density. In the inner plasmasphere, for L<3, plasma density is not modeled by a power law and the resonance equation must be solved directly using a model plasma density. We use the time-dependent Field Line Interhemispheric Plasma (FLIP) model and solve the resonance equation with a finite element method. We compare the solutions with FLR measurements from several magnetometer chains in both the northern and southern hemisphere in the American sector, South American Meridional B-field Array (SAMBA), Magnetometers along the Eastern Atlantic Seaboard for Undergraduate Research and Education (MEASURE), and Mid-continent Magnetoseismic Chain (McMAC). During quiet periods the FLIP model and the observations are in good agreement. During a large storm we find significant differences between the FLIP model and observations. We attribute this difference to the fact that the FLIP model does not automatically incorporate the effects of strong convection, such as a change in flux tube volume (and location), nor the depletion of plasma from the flux tube. In the present study we incorporate these effects realistically and use comparison with observations to estimate their importance in driving the inner plasmasphere during large storms.

  6. Effects of the galactic magnetic field upon large scale anisotropies of extragalactic cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Harari, D.; Mollerach, S.; Roulet, E. E-mail: mollerach@cab.cnea.gov.ar

    2010-11-01

    The large scale pattern in the arrival directions of extragalactic cosmic rays that reach the Earth is different from that of the flux arriving to the halo of the Galaxy as a result of the propagation through the galactic magnetic field. Two different effects are relevant in this process: deflections of trajectories and (de)acceleration by the electric field component due to the galactic rotation. The deflection of the cosmic ray trajectories makes the flux intensity arriving to the halo from some direction to appear reaching the Earth from another direction. This applies to any intrinsic anisotropy in the extragalactic distribution or, even in the absence of intrinsic anisotropies, to the dipolar Compton-Getting anisotropy induced when the observer is moving with respect to the cosmic rays rest frame. For an observer moving with the solar system, cosmic rays traveling through far away regions of the Galaxy also experience an electric force coming from the relative motion (due to the rotation of the Galaxy) of the local system in which the field can be considered as being purely magnetic. This produces small changes in the particles momentum that can originate large scale anisotropies even for an isotropic extragalactic flux.

  7. Alignments of Dark Matter Halos with Large-scale Tidal Fields: Mass and Redshift Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sijie; Wang, Huiyuan; Mo, H. J.; Shi, Jingjing

    2016-07-01

    Large-scale tidal fields estimated directly from the distribution of dark matter halos are used to investigate how halo shapes and spin vectors are aligned with the cosmic web. The major, intermediate, and minor axes of halos are aligned with the corresponding tidal axes, and halo spin axes tend to be parallel with the intermediate axes and perpendicular to the major axes of the tidal field. The strengths of these alignments generally increase with halo mass and redshift, but the dependence is only on the peak height, ν \\equiv {δ }{{c}}/σ ({M}{{h}},z). The scaling relations of the alignment strengths with the value of ν indicate that the alignment strengths remain roughly constant when the structures within which the halos reside are still in a quasi-linear regime, but decreases as nonlinear evolution becomes more important. We also calculate the alignments in projection so that our results can be compared directly with observations. Finally, we investigate the alignments of tidal tensors on large scales, and use the results to understand alignments of halo pairs separated at various distances. Our results suggest that the coherent structure of the tidal field is the underlying reason for the alignments of halos and galaxies seen in numerical simulations and in observations.

  8. Optimizing the soil sample collection strategy to identify maximum volatile organic compound concentrations in soil borings

    SciTech Connect

    Siebenmann, K. )

    1993-10-01

    The primary focus of the initial stages of a remedial investigation is to collect useful data for source identification and determination of the extent of soil contamination. To achieve this goal, soil samples should be collected at locations where the maximum concentration of contaminants exist. This study was conducted to determine the optimum strategy for selecting soil sample locations within a boring. Analytical results from soil samples collected during the remedial investigation of a Department of Defense Superfund site were used for the analysis. Trichloroethene (TCE) and tetrachloroethene (PCE) results were compared with organic vapor monitor (OVM) readings, lithologies, and organic carbon content to determine if these parameters can be used to choose soil sample locations in the field that contain the maximum concentration of these analytes within a soil boring or interval. The OVM was a handheld photoionization detector (PID) for screening the soil core to indicate areas of VOC contamination. The TCE and PCE concentrations were compared across lithologic contacts and within each lithologic interval. The organic content used for this analysis was visually estimated by the geologist during soil logging.

  9. Coronal holes, large-scale magnetic field, and activity complexes in solar cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavastsherna, K. S.; Polyakow, E. V.

    2014-12-01

    A correlation among coronal holes (CH), a large-scale magnetic field (LMF), and activity complexes (AC) is studied in this work for 1997-2007 with the use of a coronal hole series obtained from observations at the Kitt Peak Observatory in the HeI 10830 Å line in 1975-2003 and SOHO/EIT-195 Å in 1996-2012 (Tlatov et al., 2014), synoptic Hα charts from Kislovodsk Mountain Astonomical Station, and the catalog of AC cores (Yazev, 2012). From the imposition of CH boundaries on Hα charts, which characterize the positions of neutral lines of the radial components of a large-scale solar magnetic field, it turns out that 70% of CH are located in unipolar regions of their sign during the above period, 10% are in the region of an opposite sign, and 20% are mainly very large CH, which are often crossed by the neutral lines of several unipolar regions. Data on mutual arrangement of CH and AC cores were obtained. It was shown that only some activity comples cores have genetic relationships with CH.

  10. Data Compression Algorithm Architecture for Large Depth-of-Field Particle Image Velocimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bos, Brent; Memarsadeghi, Nargess; Kizhner, Semion; Antonille, Scott

    2013-01-01

    A large depth-of-field particle image velocimeter (PIV) is designed to characterize dynamic dust environments on planetary surfaces. This instrument detects lofted dust particles, and senses the number of particles per unit volume, measuring their sizes, velocities (both speed and direction), and shape factors when the particles are large. To measure these particle characteristics in-flight, the instrument gathers two-dimensional image data at a high frame rate, typically >4,000 Hz, generating large amounts of data for every second of operation, approximately 6 GB/s. To characterize a planetary dust environment that is dynamic, the instrument would have to operate for at least several minutes during an observation period, easily producing more than a terabyte of data per observation. Given current technology, this amount of data would be very difficult to store onboard a spacecraft, and downlink to Earth. Since 2007, innovators have been developing an autonomous image analysis algorithm architecture for the PIV instrument to greatly reduce the amount of data that it has to store and downlink. The algorithm analyzes PIV images and automatically reduces the image information down to only the particle measurement data that is of interest, reducing the amount of data that is handled by more than 10(exp 3). The state of development for this innovation is now fairly mature, with a functional algorithm architecture, along with several key pieces of algorithm logic, that has been proven through field test data acquired with a proof-of-concept PIV instrument.

  11. Characteristics of the meltwater field from a large Antarctic iceberg using δ18O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helly, John J.; Vernet, Maria; Murray, Alison E.; Stephenson, Gordon R.

    2015-03-01

    Large tabular icebergs represent a disruptive influence on a stable water column when drifting in the open ocean. This is a study of one iceberg, C18A, encountered in the Powell Basin in the Weddell Sea in March 2009, formed from iceberg C18 (76×7 km) originating from the Ross Ice Shelf in May 2002. C18A was lunate in shape with longest dimensions of 31 km×7 km×184 m. The meltwater field from C18A was characterized using δ18O from water samples collected near C18A (Near-field, 0.4-2 km) and contrasted with a Far-field comprised of samples from an Away site (19 km from C18A), a Control site (70 km away), and a region populated with small icebergs (Iceberg Alley, 175 km away). The in-sample fractions of meteoric water were calculated relative δ18O in iceberg ice and Weddell Deep Water and converted to meteoric water height (m) and a percentage within 100 m depth bins. The Near-field and Far-field difference from surface to 200 m was 0.51±0.28%. The concentration of meteoric water dropped to approximately half that value below 200 m, approximate keel depth of the iceberg, although detectable to 600 m. From surface to 600 m, the overall difference was statistically significant (P<0.0001). From this, we estimate the Near-field volume astern of the iceberg (0.16 km3d-1) as a continuous source of meteoric water.

  12. Large-scale fluctuations in the number density of galaxies in independent surveys of deep fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirokov, S. I.; Lovyagin, N. Yu.; Baryshev, Yu. V.; Gorokhov, V. L.

    2016-06-01

    New arguments supporting the reality of large-scale fluctuations in the density of the visible matter in deep galaxy surveys are presented. A statistical analysis of the radial distributions of galaxies in the COSMOS and HDF-N deep fields is presented. Independent spectral and photometric surveys exist for each field, carried out in different wavelength ranges and using different observing methods. Catalogs of photometric redshifts in the optical (COSMOS-Zphot) and infrared (UltraVISTA) were used for the COSMOS field in the redshift interval 0.1 < z < 3.5, as well as the zCOSMOS (10kZ) spectroscopic survey and the XMM-COSMOS and ALHAMBRA-F4 photometric redshift surveys. The HDFN-Zphot and ALHAMBRA-F5 catalogs of photometric redshifts were used for the HDF-N field. The Pearson correlation coefficient for the fluctuations in the numbers of galaxies obtained for independent surveys of the same deep field reaches R = 0.70 ± 0.16. The presence of this positive correlation supports the reality of fluctuations in the density of visible matter with sizes of up to 1000 Mpc and amplitudes of up to 20% at redshifts z ~ 2. The absence of correlations between the fluctuations in different fields (the correlation coefficient between COSMOS and HDF-N is R = -0.20 ± 0.31) testifies to the independence of structures visible in different directions on the celestial sphere. This also indicates an absence of any influence from universal systematic errors (such as "spectral voids"), which could imitate the detection of correlated structures.

  13. Generation of large scale field-aligned density irregularities in ionospheric heating experiments. [electromagnetic wave decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fejer, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    Threshold and growth rate for stimulated Brillouin scattering are calculated for a uniform magnetoplasma. These are then compared with the threshold and growth rate of a new thermal instability in which the nonlinear Lorentz force felt by the electrons at the beat frequency of the two electromagnetic waves is replaced by a pressure force due to differential heating in the interference pattern of the pump wave and the generated electromagnetic wave. This thermal instability, which is still essentially stimulated Brillouin scattering, has a threshold which is especially low when the propagation vector of the beat wave is almost normal to the magnetic field. The threshold is then considerably lower than the threshold for normal stimulated Brillouin scattering and therefore this new instability is probably responsible for the generation of large scale field aligned irregularities and ionospheric spread F.

  14. The structure of the white-light corona and the large-scale solar magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sime, D. G.; Mccabe, M. K.

    1990-01-01

    The large-scale density structure of the white-light solar corona is compared to the organization of the solar magnetic field as identified by the appearance of neutral lines in the photosphere to examine whether any consistent relationship exists between the two. During the period covering Carrington rotations 1717 to 1736 brightness enhancements in the low corona tend to lie over the global neutral sheet identified in the photospheric magnetic field. The brightest of these enhancements are associated with neutral lines throguh active regions. These associations are not 1-1, but do hold both in stable and evolving conditions of the corona. A significant number of long-lived neutral lines is found, including filaments seen in H-alpha, for which there are not coronal enhancements.

  15. Large amplitude spin torque vortex oscillations at zero external field using a perpendicular spin polarizer

    SciTech Connect

    Dussaux, A.; Rache Salles, B.; Jenkins, A. S.; Bortolotti, P.; Grollier, J.; Cros, V.; Fert, A.; Khvalkovskiy, A. V.; Kubota, H.; Fukushima, A.; Yakushiji, K.; Yuasa, S.

    2014-07-14

    We investigate the microwave response of a spin transfer vortex based oscillator in a magnetic tunnel junction with an in-plane reference layer combined with a spin valve with an out-of-plane magnetization spin polarizing layer. The main advantage of this perpendicular spin polarizer is to induce a large spin transfer force even at zero magnetic field, thus leading to a record emitted power (up to 0.6 μW) associated to a very narrow spectral linewidth of a few hundreds of kHz. The characteristics of this hybrid vortex based spin transfer nano-oscillator obtained at zero field and room temperature are of great importance for applications based on rf spintronic devices as integrated and tunable microwave source and/or microwave detector.

  16. Rotation of the Large-Scale Solar Magnetic Fields in the Equatorial Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latushko, S.

    1996-07-01

    A study is made of the rotation of large-scale magnetic fields using the synoptic maps from the Kitt Peak National Observatory for the time interval 1976 1985. The auto-correlation method and the mass-centers method of magnetic structures was applied to infer mean differential rotation profiles and rotation profiles separately for each magnetic field polarity. It has been found that in both hemispheres the leading polarity rotates faster than the following polarity at all latitudes by about 0.04° day-1. The maximum rotation rate of the leading polarity is reached at about 6° latitude. In the mean profile for both polarities, this brings about two angular velocity maxima at 6° latitudes in both hemispheres. Such a profile appears as to have a ‘dimple’ on the equator.

  17. Further Aspects of Large Eddy Simulation Model Statistics and Inconsistencies with Field Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agee, Ernest; Gluhovsky, Alexander

    1999-08-01

    This study has employed the concept of bandpass filtering of aircraft field data that are obtained within convective planetary boundary layers, for the purpose of comparing the characteristic turbulence statistics with the results of large eddy simulation (LES) models. Field data from Project LESS (10 January 1984) conducted over Lake Michigan in wintertime cold air outbreaks have been used to demonstrate the validity of the concept presented. These results show excellent agreement in variance statistics for LESS filtered data and LES model simulations; however, agreement in the skewness statistics is unsatisfactory. This is attributed to either the authors' inability to design a proper bandpass filter or the lack of an adequate dataset for computing third-moment statistics.

  18. Seeking large-scale magnetic fields in a pure-disk dwarf galaxy NGC 2976

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drzazga, R. T.; Chyży, K. T.; Heald, G. H.; Elstner, D.; Gallagher, J. S.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: It is still unknown how magnetic field-generation mechanisms could operate in low-mass dwarf galaxies. Here, we present a detailed study of a nearby pure-disk dwarf galaxy NGC 2976. Unlike previously observed dwarf objects, this galaxy possesses a clearly defined disk. We also discuss whether NGC 2976 could serve as a potential source of the intergalactic magnetic field. Methods: For the purpose of our studies, we performed deep multi-frequency polarimetric observations of NGC 2976 with the VLA and Effelsberg radio telescopes. Additionally, we supplement them with re-imaged data from the WSRT-SINGS survey for which a rotation measure (RM) synthesis was performed. A new weighting scheme for the RM synthesis algorithm, consisting of including information about the quality of data in individual frequency channels, was proposed and investigated. Application of this new weighting to the simulated data, as well as to the observed data, results in an improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio in the Faraday depth space. Results: The magnetic field morphology discovered in NGC 2976 consists of a southern polarized ridge. This structure does not seem to be due to just a pure large-scale dynamo process (possibly cosmic-ray driven) at work in this object, as indicated by the RM data and dynamo number calculations. Instead, the field of NGC 2976 is modified by past gravitational interactions and possibly also by ram pressure inside the M 81 galaxy group environment. The estimates of total (7 μG) and ordered (3 μG) magnetic field strengths, as well as degree of field order (0.46), which is similar to those observed in spirals, suggest that tidally generated magnetized gas flows can further enhance dynamo action in the object. NGC 2976 is apparently a good candidate for the efficient magnetization of its neighbourhood. It is able to provide an ordered (perhaps also regular) magnetic field into the intergalactic space up to a distance of about 5 kpc. Conclusions: Tidal

  19. Modeling an unmitigated thermal quench event in a large field magnet in a DEMO reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, Brad J.

    2015-03-25

    The superconducting magnet systems of future fusion reactors, such as a Demonstration Power Plant (DEMO), will produce magnetic field energies in the 10 s of GJ range. The release of this energy during a fault condition could produce arcs that can damage the magnets of these systems. The public safety consequences of such events must be explored for a DEMO reactor because the magnets are located near the DEMO's primary radioactive confinement barrier, the reactor's vacuum vessel (VV). Great care will be taken in the design of DEMO's magnet systems to detect and provide a rapid field energy dump to avoid any accidents conditions. During an event when a fault condition proceeds undetected, the potential of producing melting of the magnet exists. If molten material from the magnet impinges on the walls of the VV, these walls could fail, resulting in a pathway for release of radioactive material from the VV. A model is under development at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) called MAGARC to investigate the consequences of this accident in a large toroidal field (TF) coil. Recent improvements to this model are described in this paper, along with predictions for a DEMO relevant event in a toroidal field magnet.

  20. Reconstruction of the solar coronal magnetic field, from active region to large scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amari, T.; Canou, A.; Delyon, F.; Aly, J. J.; Frey, P.; Alauzet, F.

    2011-12-01

    The low solar corona is dominated by the magnetic field which is created inside the sun by a dynamo process and then emerges into the atmosphere. This magnetic field plays an important role in most structures and phenomena observed at various wavelengths such as prominences, small and large scale eruptive events, and continuous heating of the plasma, and therefore it is important to understand its three-dimensional properties in order to elaborate efficient theoretical models. Unfortunately, the magnetic field is difficult to measure locally in the hot and tenuous corona. But this can be done at the level of the cooler and denser photosphere, and several instruments with high resolution vector magnetographs are currently available (THEMIS, Imaging Vector Magnetograph (IVM), the Advanced Stokes Polarimeter (ASP), SOLIS, HINODE, Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), or will be shortly available by future telescopes such as EST and solar missions as SOLAR-ORBITER. This has lead solar physicists to develop an approach which consists in " reconstructing" the coronal magnetic field from boundary data given on the photosphere. We will discuss some of the issues encountered in solving this problem as well our recent progress and results at the scale of active region scales or the larger one such as full sun scale.

  1. Modeling an unmitigated thermal quench event in a large field magnet in a DEMO reactor

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Merrill, Brad J.

    2015-03-25

    The superconducting magnet systems of future fusion reactors, such as a Demonstration Power Plant (DEMO), will produce magnetic field energies in the 10 s of GJ range. The release of this energy during a fault condition could produce arcs that can damage the magnets of these systems. The public safety consequences of such events must be explored for a DEMO reactor because the magnets are located near the DEMO's primary radioactive confinement barrier, the reactor's vacuum vessel (VV). Great care will be taken in the design of DEMO's magnet systems to detect and provide a rapid field energy dump tomore » avoid any accidents conditions. During an event when a fault condition proceeds undetected, the potential of producing melting of the magnet exists. If molten material from the magnet impinges on the walls of the VV, these walls could fail, resulting in a pathway for release of radioactive material from the VV. A model is under development at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) called MAGARC to investigate the consequences of this accident in a large toroidal field (TF) coil. Recent improvements to this model are described in this paper, along with predictions for a DEMO relevant event in a toroidal field magnet.« less

  2. Development of Dynamic Flow Field Pressure Probes Suitable for Use in Large Scale Supersonic Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porro, A. Robert

    2000-01-01

    A series of dynamic flow field pressure probes were developed for use in large-scale supersonic wind tunnels at NASA Glenn Research Center. These flow field probes include pitot, static, and five-hole conical pressure probes that are capable of capturing fast acting flow field pressure transients that occur on a millisecond time scale. The pitot and static probes can be used to determine local Mach number time histories during a transient event. The five-hole conical pressure probes are used primarily to determine local flow angularity, but can also determine local Mach number. These probes were designed, developed, and tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center. They were also used in a NASA Glenn 10-by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT) test program where they successfully acquired flow field pressure data in the vicinity of a propulsion system during an engine compressor staff and inlet unstart transient event. Details of the design, development, and subsequent use of these probes are discussed in this report.

  3. Improved confinement region without large magnetohydrodynamic activity in TPE-RX reversed-field pinch plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Hirano, Yoichi; Sakakita, Hajime; Koguchi, Haruhisa

    2014-11-15

    We found that spontaneous improved confinement was brought about depending on the operating region in the Toroidal Pinch Experiment-Reversed eXperiment (TPE-RX) reversed-field pinch plasma [Y. Yagi et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 45, 421 (1999)]. Gradual decay of the toroidal magnetic field at plasma surface B{sub tw} reversal makes it possible to realize a prolonged discharge, and the poloidal beta value and energy confinement time increase in the latter half of the discharge, where reversal and pinch parameters become shallow and low, respectively. In the latter half of the discharge, the plasma current and volume-averaged toroidal magnetic field 〈B{sub t}〉 increase again, the electron density slowly decays, the electron temperature and soft X-ray radiation intensity increase, and the magnetic fluctuations are markedly reduced. In this period of improved confinement, the value of (〈B{sub t}〉-B{sub tw})/B{sub pw}, where B{sub pw} is the poloidal magnetic field at the plasma surface, stays almost constant, which indicates that the dynamo action occurs without large magnetohydrodynamic activities.

  4. Out-of-Core Compression and Decompression of Large n-Dimensional Scalar Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarria, L; Lindstrom, P; Rossignac, J; Szymczak, A

    2003-05-07

    We present a simple method for compressing very large and regularly sampled scalar fields. Our method is particularly attractive when the entire data set does not fit in memory and when the sampling rate is high relative to the feature size of the scalar field in all dimensions. Although we report results for R{sup 3} and R{sup 4} data sets, the proposed approach may be applied to higher dimensions. The method is based on the new Lorenzo predictor, introduced here, which estimates the value of the scalar field at each sample from the values at processed neighbors. The predicted values are exact when the n-dimensional scalar field is an implicit polynomial of degree n-1. Surprisingly, when the residuals (differences between the actual and predicted values) are encoded using arithmetic coding, the proposed method often outperforms wavelet compression in an L{infinity} sense. The proposed approach may be used both for lossy and lossless compression and is well suited for out-of-core compression and decompression, because a trivial implementation, which sweeps through the data set reading it once, requires maintaining only a small buffer in core memory, whose size barely exceeds a single n-1 dimensional slice of the data.

  5. Improved confinement region without large magnetohydrodynamic activity in TPE-RX reversed-field pinch plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Hirano, Yoichi; Sakakita, Hajime; Koguchi, Haruhisa

    2014-11-01

    We found that spontaneous improved confinement was brought about depending on the operating region in the Toroidal Pinch Experiment-Reversed eXperiment (TPE-RX) reversed-field pinch plasma [Y. Yagi et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 45, 421 (1999)]. Gradual decay of the toroidal magnetic field at plasma surface Btw reversal makes it possible to realize a prolonged discharge, and the poloidal beta value and energy confinement time increase in the latter half of the discharge, where reversal and pinch parameters become shallow and low, respectively. In the latter half of the discharge, the plasma current and volume-averaged toroidal magnetic field increase again, the electron density slowly decays, the electron temperature and soft X-ray radiation intensity increase, and the magnetic fluctuations are markedly reduced. In this period of improved confinement, the value of (-Btw)/Bpw, where Bpw is the poloidal magnetic field at the plasma surface, stays almost constant, which indicates that the dynamo action occurs without large magnetohydrodynamic activities.

  6. Far-field pattern of a coherently combined beam from large-scale laser diode arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwon, Jin H.; Lee, Ja H.; Williams, Michael D.

    1991-01-01

    The far-field pattern of a large-scale amplifier array (LSAA) consisting of a large number (2000) of diode laser amplifiers is numerically simulated, and the power collection efficiencies are determined. Random distributions of phase mismatches, misorientations, and element failures in the LSAA system are considered. Phase mismatches and misorientations of the element amplifiers are found to be the most critical parameters of those affecting the power-collection efficiency. Errors of 0.2 wavelength and 25 percent for phase and diffraction angle, respectively, cause a 10 percent reduction in power-collection efficiency. The results are used to evaluate the concept of space-laser power transmission. It is found that an overall transmission efficiency of 80 percent could be realized with a 5-m-diam. receiver at a distance of 10,000 km when an LSAA transmitter 6 m in diam. is aimed with state-of-the-art pointing accuracy.

  7. Ultra-large field-of-view two-photon microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Philbert S; Mateo, Celine; Field, Jeffrey J; Schaffer, Chris B; Anderson, Matthew E; Kleinfeld, David

    2015-06-01

    We present a two-photon microscope that images the full extent of murine cortex with an objective-limited spatial resolution across an 8 mm by 10 mm field. The lateral resolution is approximately 1 µm and the maximum scan speed is 5 mm/ms. The scan pathway employs large diameter compound lenses to minimize aberrations and performs near theoretical limits. We demonstrate the special utility of the microscope by recording resting-state vasomotion across both hemispheres of the murine brain through a transcranial window and by imaging histological sections without the need to stitch. PMID:26072755

  8. Ultra-large field-of-view two-photon microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Philbert S.; Mateo, Celine; Field, Jeffrey J.; Schaffer, Chris B.; Anderson, Matthew E.; Kleinfeld, David

    2015-01-01

    We present a two-photon microscope that images the full extent of murine cortex with an objective-limited spatial resolution across an 8 mm by 10 mm field. The lateral resolution is approximately 1 µm and the maximum scan speed is 5 mm/ms. The scan pathway employs large diameter compound lenses to minimize aberrations and performs near theoretical limits. We demonstrate the special utility of the microscope by recording resting-state vasomotion across both hemispheres of the murine brain through a transcranial window and by imaging histological sections without the need to stitch. PMID:26072755

  9. Large-Scale Field Study of Landfill Covers at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, S.F.

    1998-09-01

    A large-scale field demonstration comparing final landfill cover designs has been constructed and is currently being monitored at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Two conventional designs (a RCRA Subtitle `D' Soil Cover and a RCRA Subtitle `C' Compacted Clay Cover) were constructed side-by-side with four alternative cover test plots designed for dry environments. The demonstration is intended to evaluate the various cover designs based on their respective water balance performance, ease and reliability of construction, and cost. This paper presents an overview of the ongoing demonstration.

  10. The two-dimensional three-body problem in the large magnetic field limit is integrable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botero, A.; Leyvraz, F.

    2016-06-01

    The problem of N particles interacting through pairwise central forces is notoriously intractable for N ≥ 3. Some remarkable specific cases have been solved in one dimension. Here we show that the guiding center approximation-valid for charges moving in two dimensions in the limit of large constant magnetic fields-simplifies the three-body problem for an arbitrary interparticle interaction invariant under rotations and translations, making it solvable by quadratures. A spinorial representation for the system is introduced, which allows a visualization of its phase space as the corresponding Bloch sphere. Finally, a discussion of the quantization of the problem is presented.

  11. Large amplitude free vibrations of Timoshenko beams at higher modes using coupled displacement field method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Bhaskar, K.; Meera Saheb, K.

    2015-12-01

    A simple but accurate continuum solution for the shear flexible beam problem using the energy method involves in assuming suitable single term admissible functions for the lateral displacement and total rotation. This leads to two non-linear temporal differential equations in terms of the lateral displacement and the total rotation and are difficult, if not impossible, to solve to obtain the large amplitude fundamental frequencies of beams as a function of the amplitude and slenderness ratios of the vibrating beam. This situation can be avoided if one uses the concept of coupled displacement field where in the fields for lateral displacement and the total rotation are coupled through the static equilibrium equation. In this paper the lateral displacement field is assumed and the field for the total rotation is evaluated through the coupling equation. This approach leads to only one undetermined coefficient which can easily be used in the principle of conservation of total energy of the vibrating beam at a given time, neglecting damping. Finally, through a number of algebraic manipulations, one gets a nonlinear equation of Duffing type which can be solved using any standard method. To demonstrate the simplicity of the method discussed above the problem of large amplitude free vibrations of a uniform shear flexible hinged beam at higher modes with ends immovable to move axially has been solved. The numerical results obtained from the present formulation are in very good agreement with those obtained through finite element and other continuum methods for the fundamental mode, thus demonstrating the efficacy of the proposed method. Also some interesting observations are made with variation of frequency Vs amplitude at different modes.

  12. The IR-resummed Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Senatore, Leonardo; Zaldarriaga, Matias E-mail: matiasz@ias.edu

    2015-02-01

    We present a new method to resum the effect of large scale motions in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures. Because the linear power spectrum in ΛCDM is not scale free the effects of the large scale flows are enhanced. Although previous EFT calculations of the equal-time density power spectrum at one and two loops showed a remarkable agreement with numerical results, they also showed a 2% residual which appeared related to the BAO oscillations. We show that this was indeed the case, explain the physical origin and show how a Lagrangian based calculation removes this differences. We propose a simple method to upgrade existing Eulerian calculations to effectively make them Lagrangian and compare the new results with existing fits to numerical simulations. Our new two-loop results agrees with numerical results up to k∼ 0.6 h Mpc{sup −1} to within 1% with no oscillatory residuals. We also compute power spectra involving momentum which is significantly more affected by the large scale flows. We show how keeping track of these velocities significantly enhances the UV reach of the momentum power spectrum in addition to removing the BAO related residuals. We compute predictions for the real space correlation function around the BAO scale and investigate its sensitivity to the EFT parameters and the details of the resummation technique.

  13. Liver acquisition with volume acceleration flex on 70-cm wide-bore and 60-cm conventional-bore 3.0-T MRI.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shigeyoshi; Tanaka, Keiko; Hashido, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to compare the uniformity of fat suppression and image quality between liver acquisition with volume acceleration flex (LAVA-Flex) and LAVA on 60-cm conventional-bore and 70-cm wide-bore 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The uniformity of fat suppression by LAVA-Flex and LAVA was assessed as the efficiency of suppression of superficial fat at the levels of the liver dome, porta, and renal hilum. Percentage standard deviation (%SD) was calculated using the following equation: %SD (%) = 100 × SD of the regions of interest (ROIs)/mean value of the signal intensity (SI) in the ROIs. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast ratio (CR) were calculated. In the LAVA sequence, the %SD in all slices on wide-bore 3.0-T MRI was significantly higher than that on conventional-bore 3.0-T MRI (P < 0.01). However, there was no significant difference in fat signal uniformity between the conventional and wide-bore scanners when LAVA-Flex was used. In the liver, there were no significant differences in SNR between the two sequences. However, the SNR in the pancreas was lower for the wide-bore scanner than for the conventional-bore scanner for both sequences (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in CR for the liver and fat between LAVA-Flex and LAVA in both scanners. The CR in the LAVA-Flex images obtained by wide-bore MRI was significantly higher than that in the LAVA-Flex images recorded by conventional-bore MRI (P < 0.001). LAVA-Flex offers more homogenous fat suppression in the upper abdomen than LAVA for both conventional and wide-bore 3.0-T MRI. PMID:26739299

  14. Earth boring bit with pressure compensating rigid face seal

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, B. H.

    1985-05-14

    An earth boring bit having a cantilevered bearing shaft and a compensator system to equalize the pressure of the lubricant with the hydrostatic pressure of the drilling fluid surrounding the bit. A rigid face seal assembly, positioned between the cutter and bearing shaft of the bit, moves axially in response to, and to compensate for, dynamic pressure changes in the lubricant adjacent the seal. This is accomplished by the positioning and sizing of resilient energizer rings in relationship to the geometries of the mating grooves between the cutter and shaft and the rigid sealing rings of the face seal assembly.

  15. Grouting guidelines for Hanford Tanks Initiative cone penetrometer borings

    SciTech Connect

    Iwatate, D.F.

    1998-05-18

    Grouting of an open cone penetrometer (CP) borehole is done to construct a barrier that prevents the vertical migration of fluids and contaminants between geologic units and aquifers intersected by the boring. Whether to grout, the types of grout, and the method of deployment are functions of the site-specific conditions. This report recommends the strategy that should be followed both before and during HTI [Hanford Tanks Initiative] CP deployment to decide specific borehole grouting needs at Hanford SST farms. Topics discussed in this report that bear on this strategy include: Regulatory guidance, hydrogeologic conditions, operational factors, specific CP grouting deployment recommendations.

  16. System safety analysis of the Yucca Mountain tunnel boring machine

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.G.; Booth, L.; Eisler, L.

    1995-12-01

    The purpose of this analysis was to systematically identify and evaluate hazards related to the tunnel boring machine to be used at Yucca Mountain. This analysis required three steps to complete the risk evaluation: hazard/scenario identification, consequence assessment, and frequency assessment. The result was a `risk evaluation` of the scenarios identified in this analysis in accordance with MIL-STD-882C. The risk assessment in this analysis characterized the accident scenarios associated with the TBM in terms of relative risk and included recommendations for mitigating all identified risks.

  17. Small bore ceramic laser tube inspection light table

    DOEpatents

    Updike, Earl O.

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus for inspecting small bore ceramic laser tubes, which includes a support base with one or more support rollers. A fluorescent light tube is inserted within the laser tube and the laser tube is supported by the support rollers so that a gap is maintained between the laser tube and the fluorescent tube to enable rotation of the laser tube. In operation, the ceramic tube is illuminated from the inside by the fluorescent tube to facilitate visual inspection. Centering the tube around the axial light of the fluorescent tube provides information about straightness and wall thickness of the laser tube itself.

  18. Feasibility Study of Large Combined Function Magnets for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Brindza P. D.; LeRose J. J.; Leung E. M.

    2005-05-01

    The 12 GeV upgrade at Jefferson Lab has identified two new large spectrometers as Physics detectors for the project. The first is a 7.5 Gev/c 35 m-sr. spectrometer that requires a pair of identical Combined Function Superconducting Magnets (CFSM) that can simultaneously produce 1.5 T dipole fields and 4.5 T/m quadrupole fields inside a warm bore of 120 cm. The second is an 11 GeV/c 2 m-sr. spectrometer that requires a CFSM that simultaneously produces a dipole field of 4.0 T and a quadruple field of 3.0 T/m in a 60 cm warm bore. Magnetic designs using TOSCA 3D have been performed to realize the magnetic requirements, provide 3d fields for optics analysis and produce field and force information for the engineering feasibility of the magnets. A two-sector cos(theta)/cos(2theta) design with a low nominal current density, warm bore and warm iron design has been selected and analyzed. These low current densities are consistent with the limits for a cryostable winding. The current paper will summarize the requirement definition of these two magnets. The conceptual design arrived at during the feasibility study involving the choice of conductors, thermal and structural analyses will be presented. A discussion of the manufacturing approach and challenges will be provided.

  19. Generation of large field SEM image by panorama composition technology for nano-order measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Atsushi; Hojyo, Yutaka

    2016-02-01

    Semiconductor manufacturing has a pressing need for a method to accurately evaluate the global shape deformation of a photomask pattern. We thus propose a novel composition technique for a large field panorama image of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The proposed method optimises the arrangement of segmented imaging regions (SIRs), which are components of a panorama image, on the basis of the design data of the photomask pattern layout. The quantity of the line pattern segment, which is a clue to the connection in an overlapping region between adjoining SIRs and the connectability of any two SIRs, is evaluated. As a result of the optimisation, it is guaranteed that all SIR images can be connected theoretically. For 30 evaluation points, the maximum connection error of the SIR images was 1.5 nm in a simulation using pseudo-SEM images. The maximum total measurement error, which includes the connection error and CD measurement error from the panorama image, is estimated at 2.5 nm. This error was equivalent to about 1.4% of the photomask line width (target: 3%). The experiments using real SEM images demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. It was visually confirmed that a large field, high-resolution and seamless panorama image can be generated.

  20. A large field of view two-photon mesoscope with subcellular resolution for in vivo imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sofroniew, Nicholas James; Flickinger, Daniel; King, Jonathan; Svoboda, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Imaging is used to map activity across populations of neurons. Microscopes with cellular resolution have small (<1 millimeter) fields of view and cannot simultaneously image activity distributed across multiple brain areas. Typical large field of view microscopes do not resolve single cells, especially in the axial dimension. We developed a 2-photon random access mesoscope (2p-RAM) that allows high-resolution imaging anywhere within a volume spanning multiple brain areas (∅ 5 mm x 1 mm cylinder). 2p-RAM resolution is near diffraction limited (lateral, 0.66 μm, axial 4.09 μm at the center; excitation wavelength = 970 nm; numerical aperture = 0.6) over a large range of excitation wavelengths. A fast three-dimensional scanning system allows efficient sampling of neural activity in arbitrary regions of interest across the entire imaging volume. We illustrate the use of the 2p-RAM by imaging neural activity in multiple, non-contiguous brain areas in transgenic mice expressing protein calcium sensors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14472.001 PMID:27300105

  1. Large Upper Critical Field of Superconductivity in the Single Crystal U6Co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Dai; Nakamura, Ai; Honda, Fuminori; Li, DeXin; Homma, Yoshiya

    2016-07-01

    We grew single crystals of U6Co by the self-flux method and measured the magnetic susceptibility, resistivity, and specific heat. The magnetic susceptibility shows very small anisotropy and weak temperature dependence, indicating small spin-susceptibility. Superconductivity was clearly observed in the resistivity, susceptibility, and specific heat at Tc ˜ 2.3 K. The upper critical field was remarkably large, 7.9 and 6.6 T for H || [001] and [110], respectively, in the tetragonal structure, indicating that the ellipsoidal Fermi surface is slightly suppressed along the [001] direction according to the effective mass model. The specific heat shows a large jump at Tc with ΔC/γTc = 1.58, and the field dependence of the specific heat at low temperatures shows an almost linear increase. These experimental results are well explained by the BCS model in the dirty limit condition. U6Co is most likely a conventional s-wave superconductor with a full superconducting gap.

  2. Photometric Calibration and Image Stitching for a Large Field of View Multi-Camera System.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yu; Wang, Keyi; Fan, Gongshu

    2016-01-01

    A new compact large field of view (FOV) multi-camera system is introduced. The camera is based on seven tiny complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor sensor modules covering over 160° × 160° FOV. Although image stitching has been studied extensively, sensor and lens differences have not been considered in previous multi-camera devices. In this study, we have calibrated the photometric characteristics of the multi-camera device. Lenses were not mounted on the sensor in the process of radiometric response calibration to eliminate the influence of the focusing effect of uniform light from an integrating sphere. Linearity range of the radiometric response, non-linearity response characteristics, sensitivity, and dark current of the camera response function are presented. The R, G, and B channels have different responses for the same illuminance. Vignetting artifact patterns have been tested. The actual luminance of the object is retrieved by sensor calibration results, and is used to blend images to make panoramas reflect the objective luminance more objectively. This compensates for the limitation of stitching images that are more realistic only through the smoothing method. The dynamic range limitation of can be resolved by using multiple cameras that cover a large field of view instead of a single image sensor with a wide-angle lens. The dynamic range is expanded by 48-fold in this system. We can obtain seven images in one shot with this multi-camera system, at 13 frames per second. PMID:27077857

  3. The Ginzburg-Landau theory for a thin superconducting loop in a large magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shieh, Tien-Tsan

    When a temperature is lower than a certain critical value, a superconducting sample undergoes a phase transition from a normal state to a superconducting state. This onset process of superconductivity can be studied as a Rayleigh quotient under the framework of the Ginzburg-Landau theory. In particular, I study the onset problem for a thin superconducting loop in a large magnetic field. This double limit problem was first carried out by Richardson and Rubinstein by using formal asymptotic expansions. I rigorously show that a one-dimensional Rayleigh quotient in the spirit of Gamma-convergence. The full Gamma-convergence of the Ginzburg-Landau functional for a thin domain and a large field is also obtained. The rigorous analysis in this thesis shows the validity of Richardson and Rubinstein's formal results. It is also shown that the Rayleigh quotient related to this onset problem has a periodic variation with a parabolic background. The parabolic background effect can be explained by a non-ignorable effect if finite-width cross-section of a thin superconducting sample. This illustrate the observation of the Little-Parks experiment.

  4. Effects of larval density in Ambystoma opacum: An experiment in large-scale field enclosures

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, D.E. )

    1990-02-01

    This experiment was designed to measure the effects of larval density on larval traits in the salamander Ambystoma opacum, and to ascertain whether previous studies conducted at smaller spatial scales or higher densities produced artifactual results. Density effects on larval growth, body size at metamorphosis, length of larval period, and survival to metamorphosis were studied in A. opacum in large-scale (41 m{sup 2} and 23 m{sup 2}) field enclosures in two temporary ponds. Each enclosure contained indigenous populations of prey (zooplankton and insects) and predators, as well as the range of microhabitats present in these natural ponds. Initial larval densities were chosen to represent high and low levels of naturally occurring mean densities. The results suggest that, in natural ponds, the importance of intraspecific competition is dependent upon hydroperiod, and the intensity of competition influences predation risk. Thus, both density-dependent and density-independent factors affect body size and recruitment of larval A. opacum into the adult population. The use of large-scale field enclosures has advantages and disadvantages: it allows the examination of density-dependent processes under natural conditions and provides high statistical power because of low variability in larval traits; however, experimental designs must be simple and underlying mechanisms are difficult to identify.

  5. The significance of large variations in oil properties of the Dai Hung field, Vietnam

    SciTech Connect

    Behrenbruch, P.; Du, P.Q.

    1995-10-01

    The Dai Hung Oil field, offshore Vietnam, is comprised of a complex subsurface structure containing stacked reservoir sequences typically found in many other Southeast Asian fields. Combined with areal fault compartmentalization, this situation has led to the observed, large variations in oil properties. Furthermore, the depositional environment in terms of burial history has created a unique overpressure situation which also had an affect, particularly on the crude saturation conditions of individual reservoirs. For commercial and technical reasons, this situation required a detailed analysis, both in terms of variation in crude assay and live oil properties. For whole crude properties: gravity, K factor, wax content and pour point-graphs were drawn up using a large data base of worldwide crudes against which the Dai Hung data could be validated. In case of PVT properties (bubble point and formation volume factor) existing industry correlations were examined. It could be concluded that the sweet, medium gravity and moderately waxy Dai Hung crude has whole crude properties which are comparable to other, similar crudes. The general framework of crude properties established is suitable to type other crudes, even if limited information is available. Of the existing PVT correlations tested, it was found that Standing`s correlation for the oil formation volume factor and the Kartoatmodjo-Schmidt correlation for the bubble point fitted the Dai Hung crude data the best. For the lower shrinkage Dai Hung crudes the Malaysian oil formation volume factor correlation by Omar-Todd gave the best data fit.

  6. Photometric Calibration and Image Stitching for a Large Field of View Multi-Camera System

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yu; Wang, Keyi; Fan, Gongshu

    2016-01-01

    A new compact large field of view (FOV) multi-camera system is introduced. The camera is based on seven tiny complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor sensor modules covering over 160° × 160° FOV. Although image stitching has been studied extensively, sensor and lens differences have not been considered in previous multi-camera devices. In this study, we have calibrated the photometric characteristics of the multi-camera device. Lenses were not mounted on the sensor in the process of radiometric response calibration to eliminate the influence of the focusing effect of uniform light from an integrating sphere. Linearity range of the radiometric response, non-linearity response characteristics, sensitivity, and dark current of the camera response function are presented. The R, G, and B channels have different responses for the same illuminance. Vignetting artifact patterns have been tested. The actual luminance of the object is retrieved by sensor calibration results, and is used to blend images to make panoramas reflect the objective luminance more objectively. This compensates for the limitation of stitching images that are more realistic only through the smoothing method. The dynamic range limitation of can be resolved by using multiple cameras that cover a large field of view instead of a single image sensor with a wide-angle lens. The dynamic range is expanded by 48-fold in this system. We can obtain seven images in one shot with this multi-camera system, at 13 frames per second. PMID:27077857

  7. A Systematic Search for Low-mass Field Stars with Large Infrared Excesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theissen, Christopher; West, Andrew A.

    2016-06-01

    We present a systematic search for low-mass field stars exhibiting extreme infrared (IR) excesses. One potential cause of the IR excess is the collision of terrestrial worlds. Our input stars are from the Motion Verified Red Stars (MoVeRS) catalog. Candidate stars are then selected based on large deviations (3σ) between their measured Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) 12 μm flux and their expected flux (as estimated from stellar models). We investigate the stellar mass and time dependence for stars showing extreme IR excesses, using photometric colors from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and Galactic height as proxies for mass and time, respectively. Using a Galactic kinematic model, we estimate the completeness for our sample as a function of line-of-sight through the Galaxy, estimating the number of low-mass stars that should exhibit extreme IR excesses within a local volume. The potential for planetary collisions to occur over a large range of stellar masses and ages has serious implications for the habitability of planetary systems around low-mass stars.

  8. Virtually distortion-free imaging system for large field, high resolution lithography using electrons, ions or other particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Hawryluk, A.M.; Ceglio, N.M.

    1993-01-12

    Virtually distortion free large field high resolution imaging is performed using an imaging system which contains large field distortion or field curvature. A reticle is imaged in one direction through the optical system to form an encoded mask. The encoded mask is then imaged back through the imaging system onto a wafer positioned at the reticle position. Particle beams, including electrons, ions and neutral particles, may be used as well as electromagnetic radiation.

  9. Virtually distortion-free imaging system for large field, high resolution lithography using electrons, ions or other particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Hawryluk, Andrew M.; Ceglio, Natale M.

    1993-01-01

    Virtually distortion free large field high resolution imaging is performed using an imaging system which contains large field distortion or field curvature. A reticle is imaged in one direction through the optical system to form an encoded mask. The encoded mask is then imaged back through the imaging system onto a wafer positioned at the reticle position. Particle beams, including electrons, ions and neutral particles, may be used as well as electromagnetic radiation.

  10. Virtually distortion-free imaging system for large field, high resolution lithography using electrons, ions or other particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, A.M.; Ceglio, N.M.

    1991-04-10

    Virtually distortion free large field high resolution imaging is performed using an imaging system which contains large field distortion or field curvature. A reticle is imaged in one direction through the optical system to form an encoded mask. The encoded mask is then imaged back through the imaging system onto a wafer positioned at the reticle position. Particle beams, including electrons, ions and neutral particles, may be used as well as electromagnetic radiation.

  11. Calculation of large scale relative permeabilities from stochastic properties of the permeability field and fluid properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lenormand, R.; Thiele, M.R.

    1997-08-01

    The paper describes the method and presents preliminary results for the calculation of homogenized relative permeabilities using stochastic properties of the permeability field. In heterogeneous media, the spreading of an injected fluid is mainly sue to the permeability heterogeneity and viscosity fingering. At large scale, when the heterogeneous medium is replaced by a homogeneous one, we need to introduce a homogenized (or pseudo) relative permeability to obtain the same spreading. Generally, is derived by using fine-grid numerical simulations (Kyte and Berry). However, this operation is time consuming and cannot be performed for all the meshes of the reservoir. We propose an alternate method which uses the information given by the stochastic properties of the field without any numerical simulation. The method is based on recent developments on homogenized transport equations (the {open_quotes}MHD{close_quotes} equation, Lenormand SPE 30797). The MHD equation accounts for the three basic mechanisms of spreading of the injected fluid: (1) Dispersive spreading due to small scale randomness, characterized by a macrodispersion coefficient D. (2) Convective spreading due to large scale heterogeneities (layers) characterized by a heterogeneity factor H. (3) Viscous fingering characterized by an apparent viscosity ration M. In the paper, we first derive the parameters D and H as functions of variance and correlation length of the permeability field. The results are shown to be in good agreement with fine-grid simulations. The are then derived a function of D, H and M. The main result is that this approach lead to a time dependent . Finally, the calculated are compared to the values derived by history matching using fine-grid numerical simulations.

  12. Emplacement mechanism of off-axis large submarine lava field from the Oman Ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umino, Susumu

    2012-11-01

    Large submarine lava flows with thicknesses >100 m and volumes exceeding a few km3are not uncommon volcanic constructs of mid-ocean ridges and around Hawaii Islands, yet details of the physical processes of eruption of these large lava flows are poorly understood. The V3 unit of the Oman Ophiolite extruded onto pelagic sediment far off the paleospreading axis as thick lava flows with an areal extent of >11 km by 1.5 km and the maximum thickness >270 m, yielding an estimated volume >1.2 km3. The feeder dike for the V3 flow field has an unusual thickness up to 60 m, striking at a high angle to the paleospreading axis. The skewed variation in thickness suggests an intrusion at the apparent level of neutral buoyancy in off-axis crust. The thick sheet flows consist of massive core and columnar jointed crust. Finer-grained, finely jointed layers and lenses embedded in coarser-grained, roughly jointed lava show a complex cooling and growth history of the lava crust. In the periphery of the flow field, sheet flows lack developed core textures and change laterally into compound flows of pillow and subaqueous pahoehoe lobes, which are occasionally intermingled with pelagic shale. On the other hand, core lacks fine columnar joints and shows a typical doleritic texture. We conclude that the V3 flow field formed by extrusion of lava at low to moderate rates onto a subhorizontal seafloor covered with thick pelagic sediment, burying topographic relief >100 m of abyssal hills and fault grabens.

  13. Electron contamination modeling and reduction in a 1 T open bore inline MRI-linac system

    SciTech Connect

    Oborn, B. M.; Kolling, S.; Metcalfe, P. E.; Crozier, S.; Litzenberg, D. W.; Keall, P. J.

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: A potential side effect of inline MRI-linac systems is electron contamination focusing causing a high skin dose. In this work, the authors reexamine this prediction for an open bore 1 T MRI system being constructed for the Australian MRI-Linac Program. The efficiency of an electron contamination deflector (ECD) in purging electron contamination from the linac head is modeled, as well as the impact of a helium gas region between the deflector and phantom surface for lowering the amount of air-generated contamination. Methods: Magnetic modeling of the 1 T MRI was used to generate 3D magnetic field maps both with and without the presence of an ECD located immediately below the MLC’s. Forty-seven different ECD designs were modeled and for each the magnetic field map was imported into Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations including the linac head, ECD, and a 30 × 30 × 30 cm{sup 3} water phantom located at isocenter. For the first generation system, the x-ray source to isocenter distance (SID) will be 160 cm, resulting in an 81.2 cm long air gap from the base of the ECD to the phantom surface. The first 71.2 cm was modeled as air or helium gas, with the latter encased between two windows of 50 μm thick high density polyethlyene. 2D skin doses (at 70 μm depth) were calculated across the phantom surface at 1 × 1 mm{sup 2} resolution for 6 MV beams of field size of 5 × 5, 10 × 10, and 20 × 20 cm{sup 2}. Results: The skin dose was predicted to be of similar magnitude as the generic systems modeled in previous work, 230% to 1400% ofD {sub max} for 5 × 5 to 20 × 20 cm{sup 2}, respectively. Inclusion of the ECD introduced a nonuniformity to the MRI imaging field that ranged from ∼20 to ∼140 ppm while the net force acting on the ECD ranged from ∼151 N to ∼1773 N. Various ECD designs were 100% efficient at purging the electron contamination into the ECD magnet banks; however, a small percentage were scattered back into the beam and continued to the phantom

  14. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures at two loops

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasco, John Joseph M.; Foreman, Simon; Green, Daniel; Senatore, Leonardo E-mail: sfore@stanford.edu E-mail: senatore@stanford.edu

    2014-07-01

    Large scale structure surveys promise to be the next leading probe of cosmological information. It is therefore crucial to reliably predict their observables. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS) provides a manifestly convergent perturbation theory for the weakly non-linear regime of dark matter, where correlation functions are computed in an expansion of the wavenumber k of a mode over the wavenumber associated with the non-linear scale k{sub NL}. Since most of the information is contained at high wavenumbers, it is necessary to compute higher order corrections to correlation functions. After the one-loop correction to the matter power spectrum, we estimate that the next leading one is the two-loop contribution, which we compute here. At this order in k/k{sub NL}, there is only one counterterm in the EFTofLSS that must be included, though this term contributes both at tree-level and in several one-loop diagrams. We also discuss correlation functions involving the velocity and momentum fields. We find that the EFTofLSS prediction at two loops matches to percent accuracy the non-linear matter power spectrum at redshift zero up to k∼ 0.6 h Mpc{sup −1}, requiring just one unknown coefficient that needs to be fit to observations. Given that Standard Perturbation Theory stops converging at redshift zero at k∼ 0.1 h Mpc{sup −1}, our results demonstrate the possibility of accessing a factor of order 200 more dark matter quasi-linear modes than naively expected. If the remaining observational challenges to accessing these modes can be addressed with similar success, our results show that there is tremendous potential for large scale structure surveys to explore the primordial universe.

  15. Observations of Energetic High Magnetic Field Pulsars with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parent, D.; Kerr, M.; DenHartog, P. R.; Baring, M. G.; DeCesar, M. E.; Espinoza, C. M.; Harding, A. K.; Romani, R. W.; Stappers, B. W.; Watters, K.; Weltevrde, P.; Abdo, A. A.; Craig, H. A.; Kramer, M.; Lyne, A. G.

    2011-01-01

    We report the detection of gamma-ray pulsations from the high-magnetic-field rotation-powered pulsar PSR J1119.6127 using data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope. The gamma-ray light curve of PSR J1119.6127 shows a single, wide peak offset from the radio peak by 0.43 +/- 0.02 in phase. Spectral analysis suggests a power law of index 1.0 +/- 0.3(+0.4 -0.2) with an energy cut-off at 0.8 +/- 0.2(+2.0 -0.5) GeV. The first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. We discuss the emission models of PSR J1119.6127 and demonstrate that despite the object's high surface magnetic field--near that of magnetars -- the field strength and structure in the gamma-ray emitting zone are apparently similar to those of typical young pulsars. Additionally, we present upper limits on the gamma-ray pulsed emission for the magnetically active PSR J1846.0258 in the supernova remnant Kesteven 75 and two other energetic high-Beta pulsars, PSRs J1718.3718 and J1734.3333. We explore possible explanations for the non-detection of these three objects, including peculiarities in their emission geometry.

  16. Primordial Magnetic Field Effects on the CMB and Large-Scale Structure

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yamazaki, Dai G.; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Kajino, Toshitaka; Mathews, Grant J.

    2010-01-01

    Mmore » agnetic fields are everywhere in nature, and they play an important role in every astronomical environment which involves the formation of plasma and currents. It is natural therefore to suppose that magnetic fields could be present in the turbulent high-temperature environment of the big bang. Such a primordial magnetic field (PMF) would be expected to manifest itself in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and polarization anisotropies, and also in the formation of large-scale structure. In this paper, we summarize the theoretical framework which we have developed to calculate the PMF power spectrum to high precision. Using this formulation, we summarize calculations of the effects of a PMF which take accurate quantitative account of the time evolution of the cutoff scale. We review the constructed numerical program, which is without approximation, and an improvement over the approach used in a number of previous works for studying the effect of the PMF on the cosmological perturbations. We demonstrate how the PMF is an important cosmological physical process on small scales. We also summarize the current constraints on the PMF amplitude B λ and the power spectral index n B which have been deduced from the available CMB observational data by using our computational framework.« less

  17. Electric field measurements at the magnetopause. I Observation of large convective velocities at rotational magnetopause discontinuities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggson, T. L.; Maynard, N. C.; Gambardella, P. J.

    1983-01-01

    Large convective electric fields of the order of 10 mV/m (sometimes as high as 22 mV/m) are observed at rotational magnetopause discontinuities. These observations were made with the long cylindrical (179-m base line) probes carried on the ISEE 1 satellite. These electric field observations yield convective velocity magnitudes (equal to the cross product of the vector E and the vector B, the latter divided by the square of the magnitude of B) of the order of 150 km/s. In this format for the convective velocity magnitudes, some of these observations are similar to the high speed plasma velocity observations that were made at the magnetopause with the plasma experiment carried on the ISEE 1 satellite. It is shown that, for many of these magnetopause crossings, there exists a special moving coordinate system where the observed electric fields vanish. Such a unique reference system is often used in theoretical studies of magnetic discontinuities. This special coordinate system does not move at the local plasma velocity but moves instead at a velocity intermediate between the convective velocity and the local Alfven velocity. It is used here as a diagnostic tool for the experimental investigation of rotational discontinuities at the magnetopause.

  18. Large magnetic field effects in electrochemically doped organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Reenen, S.; Kersten, S. P.; Wouters, S. H. W.; Cox, M.; Janssen, P.; Koopmans, B.; Bobbert, P. A.; Kemerink, M.

    2013-09-01

    Large negative magnetoconductance (MC) of ˜12% is observed in electrochemically doped polymer light-emitting diodes at sub-band-gap bias voltages (Vbias). Simultaneously, a positive magnetoefficiency (Mη) of 9% is observed at Vbias = 2 V. At higher bias voltages, both the MC and Mη diminish while a negative magnetoelectroluminescence (MEL) appears. The negative MEL effect is rationalized by triplet-triplet annihilation that leads to delayed fluorescence, whereas the positive Mη effect is related to competition between spin mixing and exciton formation leading to an enhanced singlet:triplet ratio at nonzero magnetic field. The resultant reduction in triplet exciton density is argued to reduce detrapping of polarons in the recombination zone at low-bias voltages, explaining the observed negative MC. Regarding organic magnetoresistance, this study provides experimental data to verify existing models describing magnetic field effects in organic semiconductors, which contribute to better understanding hereof. Furthermore, we present indications of strong magnetic field effects related to interactions between trapped carriers and excitons, which specifically can be studied in electrochemically doped organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Regarding light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs), this work shows that delayed fluorescence from triplet-triplet annihilation substantially contributes to the electroluminescence and the device efficiency.

  19. Electric fields and large-scale undulations in the evening sector of the diffuse auroral zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baishev, D. G.; Barkova, E. S.; Stepanov, A. E.; Rich, F.; Yumoto, K.

    2010-02-01

    The synchronous observations of strong electric fields and large-scale undulations observed on December 12, 2004, in the evening sector of the diffuse auroral zone 0900-1000 UT (~1700-1800 MLT) have been analyzed. The appearance of strong northward electric field at ~0900 UT was almost simultaneously registered at Tixie Bay ionospheric station (71.6° N, 128.9° E, L =, 5.6) and on the DMSP F15 satellite. At 0910-1000 UT, the all-sky TV camera at Tixie Bay and the DMSP satellites (F13, F14, and F15) registered eight undulations propagating westward at a velocity of 0.7—0.8 km/s. The undulation parameters registered during the TV observations agree with the satellite measurements. The distinctive feature of the analyzed event consists in that an intense electric field and undulations were localized within the diffuse zone in the region of increased precipitation of keV electrons. A comparison of the ground-based and satellite measurements made it possible to draw the conclusion on the necessary conditions for formation of diffuse undulations.

  20. Modelling of Field-Reversed Configuration Experiment with Large Safety Factor

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhauer, L; Guo, H; Hoffman, A; Ishida, A; Ryutov, D D

    2005-11-28

    The Translation-Confinement-Sustainment facility has been operated in the 'translation-formation' mode in which a plasma is ejected at high-speed from a {theta}-pinch-like source into a confinement chamber where it settles into a field-reversed-configuration state. Measurements of the poloidal and toroidal field have been the basis of modeling to infer the safety factor. It is found that the edge safety factor exceeds two, and that there is strong forward magnetic shear. The high-q arises because the large elongation compensates for the modest ratio of toroidal-to-poloidal field in the plasma. This is the first known instance of a very high-{beta} plasma with a safety factor greater than unity. Two-fluid modeling of the measurements also indicate several other significant features: a broad 'transition layer' at the plasma boundary with probable line-tying effects, complex high-speed flows, and the appearance of a two-fluid minimum-energy state in the plasma core. All these features may contribute to both the stability and good confinement of the plasma.

  1. Bore tube assembly for steam cooling a turbine rotor

    SciTech Connect

    DeStefano, Thomas Daniel; Wilson, Ian David

    2002-01-01

    An axial bore tube assembly for a turbine is provided to supply cooling steam to hot gas components of the turbine wheels and return the spent cooling steam. A pair of inner and outer tubes define a steam supply passage concentric about an inner return passage. The forward ends of the tubes communicate with an end cap assembly having sets of peripheral holes communicating with first and second sets of radial tubes whereby cooling steam from the concentric passage is supplied through the end cap holes to radial tubes for cooling the buckets and return steam from the buckets is provided through the second set of radial tubes through a second set of openings of the end cap into the coaxial return passage. A radial-to-axial flow transitioning device, including anti-swirling vanes is provided in the end cap. A strut ring adjacent the aft end of the bore tube assembly permits axial and radial thermal expansion of the inner tube relative to the outer tube.

  2. Tunnel boring machine and method of operating same

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, L.L.

    1983-02-01

    A tunneling machine adapted to cut tunnels on a continuous basis and to apply continuous pressure on the tunnel face even during repositioning of the gripping legs is disclosed. The machine includes at least two supporting frames having a plurality of extendible feet which are adapted to grip the tunnel wall. The support frames are provided with axial bores therethrough, and a hollow piston extends through all of the bores for longitudinal movement along the axis of the tunnel. In accordance with the method, a tunneling operation is carried out by extending at least one pair of extendible feet against the walls of the tunnel to securely hold at least one of the support frames relative to the tunnel wall. The piston chamber of each support frame which is clamped to the wall is pressurized to drive the cutter head against the face of the tunnel. While the cutter head is being advanced in this manner, unclamped support feet are moved forward to a clamping position to take over when the first-mentioned support feet reach the end of their effective stroke. This operation is repeated to apply continuous thrust pressure to the cutting head.

  3. Gun bore flaw image matching based on improved SIFT descriptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Luan; Xiong, Wei; Zhai, You

    2013-01-01

    In order to increase the operation speed and matching ability of SIFT algorithm, the SIFT descriptor and matching strategy are improved. First, a method of constructing feature descriptor based on sector area is proposed. By computing the gradients histogram of location bins which are parted into 6 sector areas, a descriptor with 48 dimensions is constituted. It can reduce the dimension of feature vector and decrease the complexity of structuring descriptor. Second, it introduce a strategy that partitions the circular region into 6 identical sector areas starting from the dominate orientation. Consequently, the computational complexity is reduced due to cancellation of rotation operation for the area. The experimental results indicate that comparing with the OpenCV SIFT arithmetic, the average matching speed of the new method increase by about 55.86%. The matching veracity can be increased even under some variation of view point, illumination, rotation, scale and out of focus. The new method got satisfied results in gun bore flaw image matching. Keywords: Metrology, Flaw image matching, Gun bore, Feature descriptor

  4. Four large-scale field-aligned current systems in the dayside high-latitude region

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtani, S.; Potemra, T.A.; Newell, P.T.

    1995-01-01

    A system of four current sheets of large-scale field-aligned currents (FACs) was discovered in the data set of simultaneous Viking and DMSP-F7 crossings of the dayside high-latitude region. This paper reports four examples of this system that were observed in the prenoon sector. The flow polarities of FACs are upward, downward, upward, and downward, from equatorward to poleward. The lowest-latitude upward current is flowing mostly in the CPS precipitation region, often overlapping with the BPS at its poleward edge, and is interpreted as a region 2 current. The pair of downward and upward FACs in the middle of the structure are collocated with structured electron precipitation. The precipitation of high-energy (>1 keV) electrons is more intense in the lower-latitude downward current sheet. The highest-latitude downward flowing current sheet is located in a weak, low-energy particle precipitation region, suggesting that this current is flowing on open field lines. Simultaneous observations in the postnoon local time sector reveal the standard three-sheet structure of FACs, sometimes described as region 2, region 1, and mantle (referred to the midday region 0) currents. A high correlation was found between the occurrence of the four FAC sheet structure and negative interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B{sub Y}. The authors discuss the FAC structure in terms of three types of convection cells: the merging, viscous, and lobe cells. During strongly negative IMF B{sub Y}, two convection reversals exist in the prenoon sector; one is inside the viscous cell, and the other is between the viscous cell and the lobe cell. This structure of convection flow is supported by the Viking electric field and auroral UV image data. Based on the convection pattern, the four FAC sheet structure is interpreted as the latitudinal overlap of midday and morning FAC systems. 47 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Finding the Shadows: Local Variations in the Stress Field due to Large Magnitude Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latimer, C.; Tiampo, K.; Rundle, J.

    2009-05-01

    Stress shadows, regions of static stress decrease associated with large magnitude earthquake have typically been described through several characteristics or parameters such as location, duration, and size. These features can provide information about the physics of the earthquake itself, as static stress changes are dependent on the following parameters: the regional stress orientations, the coefficient of friction, as well as the depth of interest (King et al, 1994). Areas of stress decrease, associated with a decrease in the seismicity rate, while potentially stable in nature, have been difficult to identify in regions of high rates of background seismicity (Felzer and Brodsky, 2005; Hardebeck et al., 1998). In order to obtain information about these stress shadows, we can determine their characteristics by using the Pattern Informatics (PI) method (Tiampo et al., 2002; Tiampo et al., 2006). The PI method is an objective measure of seismicity rate changes that can be used to locate areas of increases and/or decreases relative to the regional background rate. The latter defines the stress shadows for the earthquake of interest, as seismicity rate changes and stress changes are related (Dieterich et al., 1992; Tiampo et al., 2006). Using the data from the PI method, we can invert for the parameters of the modeled half-space using a genetic algorithm inversion technique. Stress changes will be calculated using coulomb stress change theory (King et al., 1994) and the Coulomb 3 program is used as the forward model (Lin and Stein, 2004; Toda et al., 2005). Changes in the regional stress orientation (using PI results from before and after the earthquake) are of the greatest interest as it is the main factor controlling the pattern of the coulomb stress changes resulting from any given earthquake. Changes in the orientation can lead to conclusions about the local stress field around the earthquake and fault. The depth of interest and the coefficient of friction both

  6. Large Eddy Simulation of Transonic Flow Field in NASA Rotor 37

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hah, Chunill

    2009-01-01

    The current paper reports on numerical investigations on the flow characteristics in a transonic axial compressor, NASA Rotor 37. The flow field was used previously as a CFD blind test case conducted by American Society of Mechanical Engineers in 1994. Since the CFD blind-test exercise, many numerical studies on the flow field in the NASA Rotor 37 have been reported. Although steady improvements have been reported in both numerical procedure and turbulence closure, it is believed that all the important aspects of the flow field have not been fully explained with numerical studies based on the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solution. Experimental data show large dip in total pressure distribution near the hub at downstream of the rotor at 100% rotor speed. Most original numerical solutions from the blind test exercise did not predict this total pressure deficit correctly. This total pressure deficit at the rotor exit was attributed to a hub corner flow separation by the author. Several subsequent numerical studies with different turbulence closure model also calculated this dip in total pressure rise. Also, several studies attributed this total pressure deficit to a small leakage flow coming from the hub in the test article. As the experimental study cannot be repeated, either explanation cannot be validated. The primary purpose of the current investigation is to investigate the transonic flow field with both RANS and a Large Eddy Simulation (LES). The RANS approach gives similar results presented at the original blind test exercise. Although the RANS calculates higher overall total pressure rise, the total pressure deficit near the hub is calculated correctly. The numerical solution shows that the total pressure deficit is due to a hub corner flow separation. The calculated pressure rise from the LES agrees better with the measured total pressure rise especially near the casing area where the passage shock interacts with the tip clearance vortex and flow

  7. The trispectrum in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolini, Daniele; Schutz, Katelin; Solon, Mikhail P.; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2016-06-01

    We compute the connected four point correlation function (the trispectrum in Fourier space) of cosmological density perturbations at one-loop order in Standard Perturbation Theory (SPT) and the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structure (EFT of LSS). This paper is a companion to our earlier work on the non-Gaussian covariance of the matter power spectrum, which corresponds to a particular wavenumber configuration of the trispectrum. In the present calculation, we highlight and clarify some of the subtle aspects of the EFT framework that arise at third order in perturbation theory for general wavenumber configurations of the trispectrum. We consistently incorporate vorticity and non-locality in time into the EFT counterterms and lay out a complete basis of building blocks for the stress tensor. We show predictions for the one-loop SPT trispectrum and the EFT contributions, focusing on configurations which have particular relevance for using LSS to constrain primordial non-Gaussianity.

  8. Accidents at work and costs analysis: a field study in a large Italian company.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Massimo; Frey, Marco; Passetti, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    Accidents at work are still a heavy burden in social and economic terms, and action to improve health and safety standards at work offers great potential gains not only to employers, but also to individuals and society as a whole. However, companies often are not interested to measure the costs of accidents even if cost information may facilitate preventive occupational health and safety management initiatives. The field study, carried out in a large Italian company, illustrates technical and organisational aspects associated with the implementation of an accident costs analysis tool. The results indicate that the implementation (and the use) of the tool requires a considerable commitment by the company, that accident costs analysis should serve to reinforce the importance of health and safety prevention and that the economic dimension of accidents is substantial. The study also suggests practical ways to facilitate the implementation and the moral acceptance of the accounting technology. PMID:24869894

  9. Accidents at Work and Costs Analysis: A Field Study in a Large Italian Company

    PubMed Central

    BATTAGLIA, Massimo; FREY, Marco; PASSETTI, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    Accidents at work are still a heavy burden in social and economic terms, and action to improve health and safety standards at work offers great potential gains not only to employers, but also to individuals and society as a whole. However, companies often are not interested to measure the costs of accidents even if cost information may facilitate preventive occupational health and safety management initiatives. The field study, carried out in a large Italian company, illustrates technical and organisational aspects associated with the implementation of an accident costs analysis tool. The results indicate that the implementation (and the use) of the tool requires a considerable commitment by the company, that accident costs analysis should serve to reinforce the importance of health and safety prevention and that the economic dimension of accidents is substantial. The study also suggests practical ways to facilitate the implementation and the moral acceptance of the accounting technology. PMID:24869894

  10. Cooldown performance of an inner vertical field coil for the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Takahata, K.; Mito, T.; Satow, T.

    1996-07-01

    A single cooldown test of an Inner Vertical (IV) field coil for the Large Helical Device (LHD) was started on February 1 of 1995, and the superconducting transition of the coil was confirmed on February 23. The coil is a forced-flow type using a cable-in-conduit (CIC) conductor and weighing about 16 tons. The total cooldown time was about 250 hours, not including suspended time. Pressure drop characteristics were measured during the cooldown, and the same results were obtained as the R and D coil previously tested. The cooldown time could be reduced by indirect cooling using stainless steel sleeves with cooling pipes. The indirect cooling is effective for the CIC conductor which has no subchannel because otherwise an adequate mass flow cannot be obtained due to a high pressure drop in the high temperature region. The temperature distribution in the vertical direction was also examined during the indirect cooling.

  11. Large Field of View PIV Measurements of Air Entrainment by SLS SMAT Water Sound Suppression System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegmeir, Matthew; Pothos, Stamatios; Bissell, Dan

    2015-11-01

    Water-based sound suppressions systems have been used to reduce the acoustic impact of space vehicle launches. Water flows at a high rate during launch in order to suppress Engine Generated Acoustics and other potentially damaging sources of noise. For the Space Shuttle, peak flow rates exceeded 900,000 gallons per minute. Such large water flow rates have the potential to induce substantial entrainment of the surrounding air, affecting the launch conditions and generating airflow around the launch vehicle. Validation testing is necessary to quantify this impact for future space launch systems. In this study, PIV measurements were performed to map the flow field above the SMAT sub-scale launch vehicle scaled launch stand. Air entrainment effects generated by a water-based sound suppression system were studied. Mean and fluctuating fluid velocities were mapped up to 1m above the test stand deck and compared to simulation results. Measurements performed with NASA MSFC.

  12. LASER-driven fast electron dynamics in gaseous media under the influence of large electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batani, D.; Baton, S. D.; Manclossi, M.; Piazza, D.; Koenig, M.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Popescu, H.; Rousseaux, C.; Borghesi, M.; Cecchetti, C.; Schiavi, A.

    2009-03-01

    We present the results of experiments performed at the LULI laboratory, using the 100 TW laser facility, on the study of the propagation of fast electrons in gas targets. The implemented diagnostics included chirped shadowgraphy and proton imaging. Proton images showed the presence of very large fields in the gas (produced by charge separation). In turn, these imply a strong inhibition of propagation, and a slowing down of the fast electron cloud as it penetrates in the gas. Indeed chirped shadowgraphy images show a reduction in time of the velocity of the electron cloud from the initial value, of the order of a fraction of c, over a time scale of a few picoseconds.

  13. Radial transport of large-scale magnetic fields in accretion disks. I. Steady solutions and an upper limit on the vertical field strength

    SciTech Connect

    Okuzumi, Satoshi; Takeuchi, Taku; Muto, Takayuki

    2014-04-20

    Large-scale magnetic fields are key ingredients of magnetically driven disk accretion. We study how large-scale poloidal fields evolve in accretion disks, with the primary aim of quantifying the viability of magnetic accretion mechanisms in protoplanetary disks. We employ a kinematic mean-field model for poloidal field transport and focus on steady states where inward advection of a field balances with outward diffusion due to effective resistivities. We analytically derive the steady-state radial distribution of poloidal fields in highly conducting accretion disks. The analytic solution reveals an upper limit on the strength of large-scale vertical fields attainable in steady states. Any excess poloidal field will diffuse away within a finite time, and we demonstrate this with time-dependent numerical calculations of the mean-field equations. We apply this upper limit to large-scale vertical fields threading protoplanetary disks. We find that the maximum attainable strength is about 0.1 G at 1 AU, and about 1 mG at 10 AU from the central star. When combined with recent magnetic accretion models, the maximum field strength translates into the maximum steady-state accretion rate of ∼10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, in agreement with observations. We also find that the maximum field strength is ∼1 kG at the surface of the central star provided that the disk extends down to the stellar surface. This implies that any excess stellar poloidal field of strength ≳ kG can be transported to the surrounding disk. This might in part resolve the magnetic flux problem in star formation.

  14. Large-scale dynamic compaction demonstration using WIPP salt: Fielding and preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, E.H.; Hansen, F.D.

    1995-10-01

    Reconsolidation of crushed rock salt is a phenomenon of great interest to programs studying isolation of hazardous materials in natural salt geologic settings. Of particular interest is the potential for disaggregated salt to be restored to nearly an impermeable state. For example, reconsolidated crushed salt is proposed as a major shaft seal component for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project. The concept for a permanent shaft seal component of the WIPP repository is to densely compact crushed salt in the four shafts; an effective seal will then be developed as the surrounding salt creeps into the shafts, further consolidating the crushed salt. Fundamental information on placement density and permeability is required to ensure attainment of the design function. The work reported here is the first large-scale compaction demonstration to provide information on initial salt properties applicable to design, construction, and performance expectations. The shaft seals must function for 10,000 years. Over this period a crushed salt mass will become less permeable as it is compressed by creep closure of salt surrounding the shaft. These facts preclude the possibility of conducting a full-scale, real-time field test. Because permanent seals taking advantage of salt reconsolidation have never been constructed, performance measurements have not been made on an appropriately large scale. An understanding of potential construction methods, achievable initial density and permeability, and performance of reconsolidated salt over time is required for seal design and performance assessment. This report discusses fielding and operations of a nearly full-scale dynamic compaction of mine-run WIPP salt, and presents preliminary density and in situ (in place) gas permeability results.

  15. A WASHINGTON PHOTOMETRIC SURVEY OF THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD FIELD STAR POPULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Piatti, Andres E.; Geisler, Doug; Mateluna, Renee

    2012-10-01

    We present photometry for an unprecedented database of some 5.5 million stars distributed throughout the Large Magellanic Cloud main body, from 21 fields covering a total area of 7.6 deg{sup 2}, obtained from Washington CT{sub 1} T{sub 2} CTIO 4 m MOSAIC data. Extensive artificial star tests over the whole mosaic image data set and the observed behavior of the photometric errors with magnitude demonstrate the accuracy of the morphology and clearly delineate the position of the main features in the color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs). The representative T{sub 1}(MS TO) mags are on average {approx}0.5 mag brighter than the T{sub 1} mags for the 100% completeness level of the respective field, allowing us to derive an accurate age estimate. We have analyzed the CMD Hess diagrams and used the peaks in star counts at the main sequence turnoff and red clump (RC) locations to age date the most dominant sub-population (or 'representative' population) in the stellar population mix. The metallicity of this representative population is estimated from the locus of the most populous red giant branch track. We use these results to derive age and metallicity estimates for all of our fields. The analyzed fields span age and metallicity ranges covering most of the galaxy's lifetime and chemical enrichment, i.e., ages and metallicities between {approx}1 and 13 Gyr and {approx}-0.2 and -1.2 dex, respectively. We show that the dispersions associated with the mean ages and metallicities represent in general a satisfactory estimate of the age/metallicity spread ({approx}1-3 Gyr/0.2-0.3 dex), although a few subfields have a slightly larger age/metallicity spread. Finally, we revisit the study of the vertical structure (VS) phenomenon, a striking feature composed of stars that extend from the bottom, bluest end of the RC to {approx}0.45 mag fainter. We confirm that the VS phenomenon is not clearly seen in most of the studied fields and suggest that its occurrence is linked to some other

  16. Laws of Large Numbers and Langevin Approximations for Stochastic Neural Field Equations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we consider limit theorems for microscopic stochastic models of neural fields. We show that the Wilson–Cowan equation can be obtained as the limit in uniform convergence on compacts in probability for a sequence of microscopic models when the number of neuron populations distributed in space and the number of neurons per population tend to infinity. This result also allows to obtain limits for qualitatively different stochastic convergence concepts, e.g., convergence in the mean. Further, we present a central limit theorem for the martingale part of the microscopic models which, suitably re-scaled, converges to a centred Gaussian process with independent increments. These two results provide the basis for presenting the neural field Langevin equation, a stochastic differential equation taking values in a Hilbert space, which is the infinite-dimensional analogue of the chemical Langevin equation in the present setting. On a technical level, we apply recently developed law of large numbers and central limit theorems for piecewise deterministic processes taking values in Hilbert spaces to a master equation formulation of stochastic neuronal network models. These theorems are valid for processes taking values in Hilbert spaces, and by this are able to incorporate spatial structures of the underlying model. Mathematics Subject Classification (2000): 60F05, 60J25, 60J75, 92C20. PMID:23343328

  17. Measurement and modeling of polarized specular neutron reflectivity in large magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Maranville, Brian B.; Kirby, Brian J.; Grutter, Alexander J.; Kienzle, Paul A.; Majkrzak, Charles F.; Liu, Yaohua; Dennis, Cindi L.

    2016-01-01

    The presence of a large applied magnetic field removes the degeneracy of the vacuum energy states for spin-up and spin-down neutrons. For polarized neutron reflectometry, this must be included in the reference potential energy of the Schrödinger equation that is used to calculate the expected scattering from a magnetic layered structure. For samples with magnetization that is purely parallel or antiparallel to the applied field which defines the quantization axis, there is no mixing of the spin states (no spin-flip scattering) and so this additional potential is constant throughout the scattering region. When there is non-collinear magnetization in the sample, however, there will be significant scattering from one spin state into the other, and the reference potentials will differ between the incoming and outgoing wavefunctions, changing the angle and intensities of the scattering. The theory of the scattering and recommended experimental practices for this type of measurement are presented, as well as an example measurement. PMID:27504074

  18. Measurement and modeling of polarized specular neutron reflectivity in large magnetic fields

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Maranville, Brian B.; Kirby, Brian J.; Grutter, Alexander J.; Kienzle, Paul A.; Majkrzak, Charles F.; Liu, Yaohua; Dennis, Cindi L.

    2016-06-09

    The presence of a large applied magnetic field removes the degeneracy of the vacuum energy states for spin-up and spin-down neutrons. For polarized neutron reflectometry, this must be included in the reference potential energy of the Schrödinger equation that is used to calculate the expected scattering from a magnetic layered structure. For samples with magnetization that is purely parallel or antiparallel to the applied field which defines the quantization axis, there is no mixing of the spin states (no spin-flip scattering) and so this additional potential is constant throughout the scattering region. When there is non-collinear magnetization in the sample,more » however, there will be significant scattering from one spin state into the other, and the reference potentials will differ between the incoming and outgoing wavefunctions, changing the angle and intensities of the scattering. In conclusion, the theory of the scattering and recommended experimental practices for this type of measurement are presented, as well as an example measurement.« less

  19. The Lagrangian-space Effective Field Theory of large scale structures

    SciTech Connect

    Porto, Rafael A.; Zaldarriaga, Matias; Senatore, Leonardo E-mail: senatore@stanford.edu

    2014-05-01

    We introduce a Lagrangian-space Effective Field Theory (LEFT) formalism for the study of cosmological large scale structures. Unlike the previous Eulerian-space construction, it is naturally formulated as an effective field theory of extended objects in Lagrangian space. In LEFT the resulting finite size effects are described using a multipole expansion parameterized by a set of time dependent coefficients and organized in powers of the ratio of the wavenumber of interest k over the non-linear scale k{sub NL}. The multipoles encode the effects of the short distance modes on the long-wavelength universe and absorb UV divergences when present. There are no IR divergences in LEFT. Some of the parameters that control the perturbative approach are not assumed to be small and can be automatically resummed. We present an illustrative one-loop calculation for a power law universe. We describe the dynamics both at the level of the equations of motion and through an action formalism.

  20. Resonant Scanning with Large Field of View Reduces Photobleaching and Enhances Fluorescence Yield in STED Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yong; Wu, Xundong; Lu, Rong; Zhang, Jin; Toro, Ligia; Stefani, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Photobleaching is a major limitation of superresolution Stimulated Depletion Emission (STED) microscopy. Fast scanning has long been considered an effective means to reduce photobleaching in fluorescence microscopy, but a careful quantitative study of this issue is missing. In this paper, we show that the photobleaching rate in STED microscopy can be slowed down and the fluorescence yield be enhanced by scanning with high speed, enabled by using large field of view in a custom-built resonant-scanning STED microscope. The effect of scanning speed on photobleaching and fluorescence yield is more remarkable at higher levels of depletion laser irradiance, and virtually disappears in conventional confocal microscopy. With ≥6 GW∙cm−2 depletion irradiance, we were able to extend the fluorophore survival time of Atto 647N and Abberior STAR 635P by ~80% with 8-fold wider field of view. We confirm that STED Photobleaching is primarily caused by the depletion light acting upon the excited fluorophores. Experimental data agree with a theoretical model. Our results encourage further increasing the linear scanning speed for photobleaching reduction in STED microscopy. PMID:26424175

  1. Fish navigation of large dams emerges from their modulation of flow field experience

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, R. Andrew; Politano, Marcela; Garvin, Justin W.; Nestler, John M.; Hay, Duncan; Anderson, James J.; Weber, Larry J.; Dimperio, Eric; Smith, David L.; Timko, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Navigating obstacles is innate to fish in rivers, but fragmentation of the world’s rivers by more than 50,000 large dams threatens many of the fish migrations these waterways support. One limitation to mitigating the impacts of dams on fish is that we have a poor understanding of why some fish enter routes engineered for their safe travel around the dam but others pass through more dangerous routes. To understand fish movement through hydropower dam environments, we combine a computational fluid dynamics model of the flow field at a dam and a behavioral model in which simulated fish adjust swim orientation and speed to modulate their experience to water acceleration and pressure (depth). We fit the model to data on the passage of juvenile Pacific salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) at seven dams in the Columbia/Snake River system. Our findings from reproducing observed fish movement and passage patterns across 47 flow field conditions sampled over 14 y emphasize the role of experience and perception in the decision making of animals that can inform opportunities and limitations in living resources management and engineering design. PMID:24706826

  2. Optimization of the electric field distribution in a large volume tissue-equivalent proportional counter.

    PubMed

    Verma, P K; Waker, A J

    1992-10-01

    Large volume tissue-equivalent proportional counters are of interest in radiation protection metrology, as the sensitivity in terms of counts per unit absorbed dose in these devices increases as the square of the counter diameter. Conventional solutions to the problem of maintaining a uniform electric field within a counter result in sensitive volume to total volume ratios which are unacceptably low when counter dimensions of the order of 15 cm diameter are considered and when overall compactness is an important design criterion. This work describes the design and optimization of an arrangement of field discs set at different potentials which enable sensitive volume to total volume ratios to approach unity. The method has been used to construct a 12.7 cm diameter right-cylindrical tissue-equivalent proportional counter in which the sensitive volume accounts for over 95% of the total device volume and the gas gain uniformity is maintained to within 3% along the entire length of the anode wire. PMID:1438550

  3. Curling probe measurement of large-volume pulsed plasma confined by surface magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Anil; Sakakibara, Wataru; Matsuoka, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Keiji; Sugai, Hideo; Chubu University Team; DOWA Thermotech Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    Curling probe (CP) has recently been developed which enables the local electron density measurement even in plasma for non-conducting film CVD. The electron density is obtained from a shift of resonance frequency of spiral antenna in discharge ON and OFF monitored by a network analyzer (NWA). In case of a pulsed glow discharge, synchronization of discharge pulse with frequency sweep of NWA must be established. In this paper, we report time and space-resolved CP measurement of electron density in a large volume plasma (80 cm diameter, 110 cm length) confined by surface magnetic field (multipole cusp field ~0.03 T). For plasma-aided modification of metal surface, the plasma is produced by 1 kV glow discharge at pulse frequency of 0.3 - 25 kHz with various duty ratio in gas (Ar, N2, C2H2) at pressure ~ 1 Pa. A radially movable CP revealed a remarkable effect of surface magnetic confinement: detach of plasma from the vessel wall and a fairly uniform plasma in the central region. In afterglow phase, the electron density was observed to decrease much faster in C2H2 discharge than in Ar discharge.

  4. Single-field consistency relations of large scale structure part II: resummation and redshift space

    SciTech Connect

    Creminelli, Paolo; Gleyzes, Jérôme; Vernizzi, Filippo; Simonović, Marko E-mail: jerome.gleyzes@cea.fr E-mail: filippo.vernizzi@cea.fr

    2014-02-01

    We generalize the recently derived single-field consistency relations of Large Scale Structure in two directions. First, we treat the effect of the long modes (with momentum q) on the short ones (with momentum k) non-perturbatively, by writing resummed consistency relations which do not require k/q⋅δ{sub q} << 1. These relations do not make any assumptions on the short-scales physics and are extended to include (an arbitrary number of) multiple long modes, internal lines with soft momenta and soft loops. We do several checks of these relations in perturbation theory and we verify that the effect of soft modes always cancels out in equal-time correlators. Second, we write the relations directly in redshift space, without assuming the single-stream approximation: not only the long mode affects the short scales as a homogeneous gravitational field, but it also displaces them by its velocity along the line-of-sight. Redshift space consistency relations still vanish when short modes are taken at equal time: an observation of a signal in the squeezed limit would point towards multifield inflation or a violation of the equivalence principle.

  5. Prototyping a large field size IORT applicator for a mobile linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Rogier W J; Faddegon, Bruce A; Dries, Wim J F

    2008-04-21

    The treatment of large tumors such as sarcomas with intra-operative radiotherapy using a Mobetron is often complicated because of the limited field size of the primary collimator and the available applicators (max Ø100 mm). To circumvent this limitation a prototype rectangular applicator of 80 x 150 mm(2) was designed and built featuring an additional scattering foil located at the top of the applicator. Because of its proven accuracy in modeling linear accelerator components the design was based on the EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulation code BEAMnrc. First, the Mobetron treatment head was simulated both without an applicator and with a standard 100 mm applicator. Next, this model was used to design an applicator foil consisting of a rectangular Al base plate covering the whole beam and a pyramid of four stacked cylindrical slabs of different diameters centered on top of it. This foil was mounted on top of a plain rectangular Al tube. A prototype was built and tested with diode dosimetry in a water tank. Here, the prototype showed clinically acceptable 80 x 150 mm(2) dose distributions for 4 MeV, 6 MeV and 9 MeV, obviating the use of complicated multiple irradiations with abutting field techniques. In addition, the measurements agreed well with the MC simulations, typically within 2%/1 mm. PMID:18369280

  6. Fish navigation of large dams emerges from their modulation of flow field experience.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, R Andrew; Politano, Marcela; Garvin, Justin W; Nestler, John M; Hay, Duncan; Anderson, James J; Weber, Larry J; Dimperio, Eric; Smith, David L; Timko, Mark

    2014-04-01

    Navigating obstacles is innate to fish in rivers, but fragmentation of the world's rivers by more than 50,000 large dams threatens many of the fish migrations these waterways support. One limitation to mitigating the impacts of dams on fish is that we have a poor understanding of why some fish enter routes engineered for their safe travel around the dam but others pass through more dangerous routes. To understand fish movement through hydropower dam environments, we combine a computational fluid dynamics model of the flow field at a dam and a behavioral model in which simulated fish adjust swim orientation and speed to modulate their experience to water acceleration and pressure (depth). We fit the model to data on the passage of juvenile Pacific salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) at seven dams in the Columbia/Snake River system. Our findings from reproducing observed fish movement and passage patterns across 47 flow field conditions sampled over 14 y emphasize the role of experience and perception in the decision making of animals that can inform opportunities and limitations in living resources management and engineering design. PMID:24706826

  7. Resonant Scanning with Large Field of View Reduces Photobleaching and Enhances Fluorescence Yield in STED Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yong; Wu, Xundong; Lu, Rong; Zhang, Jin; Toro, Ligia; Stefani, Enrico

    2015-10-01

    Photobleaching is a major limitation of superresolution Stimulated Depletion Emission (STED) microscopy. Fast scanning has long been considered an effective means to reduce photobleaching in fluorescence microscopy, but a careful quantitative study of this issue is missing. In this paper, we show that the photobleaching rate in STED microscopy can be slowed down and the fluorescence yield be enhanced by scanning with high speed, enabled by using large field of view in a custom-built resonant-scanning STED microscope. The effect of scanning speed on photobleaching and fluorescence yield is more remarkable at higher levels of depletion laser irradiance, and virtually disappears in conventional confocal microscopy. With ≥6 GW•cm-2 depletion irradiance, we were able to extend the fluorophore survival time of Atto 647N and Abberior STAR 635P by ~80% with 8-fold wider field of view. We confirm that STED Photobleaching is primarily caused by the depletion light acting upon the excited fluorophores. Experimental data agree with a theoretical model. Our results encourage further increasing the linear scanning speed for photobleaching reduction in STED microscopy.

  8. Large-scale sensor systems based on graphene electrolyte-gated field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Mackin, Charles; Palacios, Tomás

    2016-04-25

    This work reports a novel graphene electrolyte-gated field-effect transistor (EGFET) array architecture along with a compact, self-contained, and inexpensive measurement system that allows DC characterization of hundreds of graphene EGFETs as a function of VDS and VGS within a matter of minutes. We develop a reliable graphene EGFET fabrication process capable of producing 100% yield for a sample size of 256 devices. Large sample size statistical analysis of graphene EGFET electrical performance is performed for the first time. This work develops a compact piecewise DC model for graphene EGFETs that is shown capable of fitting 87% of IDSvs. VGS curves with a mean percent error of 7% or less. The model is used to extract variations in device parameters such as mobility, contact resistance, minimum carrier concentration, and Dirac point. Correlations in variations are presented. Lastly, this work presents a framework for application-specific optimization of large-scale sensor designs based on graphene EGFETs. PMID:26788552

  9. Dark-field microscopic image stitching method for surface defects evaluation of large fine optics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Wang, Shitong; Cao, Pin; Li, Lu; Cheng, Zhongtao; Gao, Xin; Yang, Yongying

    2013-03-11

    One of the challenges in surface defects evaluation of large fine optics is to detect defects of microns on surfaces of tens or hundreds of millimeters. Sub-aperture scanning and stitching is considered to be a practical and efficient method. But since there are usually few defects on the large aperture fine optics, resulting in no defects or only one run-through line feature in many sub-aperture images, traditional stitching methods encounter with mismatch problem. In this paper, a feature-based multi-cycle image stitching algorithm is proposed to solve the problem. The overlapping areas of sub-apertures are categorized based on the features they contain. Different types of overlapping areas are then stitched in different cycles with different methods. The stitching trace is changed to follow the one that determined by the features. The whole stitching procedure is a region-growing like process. Sub-aperture blocks grow bigger after each cycle and finally the full aperture image is obtained. Comparison experiment shows that the proposed method is very suitable to stitch sub-apertures that very few feature information exists in the overlapping areas and can stitch the dark-field microscopic sub-aperture images very well. PMID:23482166

  10. Fencing in the swampland: quantum gravity constraints on large field inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Jon; Cottrell, William; Shiu, Gary; Soler, Pablo

    2015-10-01

    In this note we show that models of natural inflation based on closed string axions are incompatible with the weak gravity conjecture (WGC). Specifically, we use T- duality in order to map the bounds on the charge-to-mass ratio of particles imposed by the WGC, to constraints on the ratio between instanton actions and axion decay constants. We use this connection to prove that if the WGC holds, even when multiple axions are present and mix with each other, one cannot have large axion decay constants while remaining in a regime of perturbative control. We also discuss the extension of the WGC to discrete symmetries and its possible impact on models with axion monodromy, and the distinction between the strong and mild versions of the WGC. We argue that, if the strong version is violated, the constraints on large field inflation can be evaded while still satisfying the mild one. Finally, we offer some speculations regarding the import of these results to the general theory of inflation.

  11. Simulating observations with HARMONI: the integral field spectrograph for the European Extremely Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieleniewski, Simon; Thatte, Niranjan; Kendrew, Sarah; Houghton, Ryan; Tecza, Matthias; Clarke, Fraser; Fusco, Thierry; Swinbank, Mark

    2014-07-01

    With the next generation of extremely large telescopes commencing construction, there is an urgent need for detailed quantitative predictions of the scientific observations that these new telescopes will enable. Most of these new telescopes will have adaptive optics fully integrated with the telescope itself, allowing unprecedented spatial resolution combined with enormous sensitivity. However, the adaptive optics point spread function will be strongly wavelength dependent, requiring detailed simulations that accurately model these variations. We have developed a simulation pipeline for the HARMONI integral field spectrograph, a first light instrument for the European Extremely Large Telescope. The simulator takes high-resolution input data-cubes of astrophysical objects and processes them with accurate atmospheric, telescope and instrumental effects, to produce mock observed cubes for chosen observing parameters. The output cubes represent the result of a perfect data reduc- tion process, enabling a detailed analysis and comparison between input and output, showcasing HARMONI's capabilities. The simulations utilise a detailed knowledge of the telescope's wavelength dependent adaptive op- tics point spread function. We discuss the simulation pipeline and present an early example of the pipeline functionality for simulating observations of high redshift galaxies.

  12. The Origin of Large-scale Primordial Magnetic Fields in the Big Bang Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greyber, Howard D.

    2007-12-01

    Applying the well-known physics of plasma and the theory of first order phase transitions, in particular the known physics of the instability called Spinodal Decomposition, a unique "Strong" Magnetic Field physical model (SMF) explains the origin of a large-scale primordial magnetic field in each DeVaucoleurs Supercluster. The strength of the long-range Electromotive Force is about 10exp40 times stronger than Gravity. Thus, the existence of observed magnetic fields in clusters of galaxies, galaxies, quasars, stars is explained. SMF processes occur at and soon after Combination Time, when the CMB (cosmic microwave background) appears, in the Big Bang model of the Universe. SMF leads to a physical model (Astro-ph0509223) where Gravity continues to attract matter into relatively thin sheets of matter around huge voids, which matches the famous observations of John Huchra and Margaret Geller (Harvard/SAO). Eventually, at some local volume, critical density for gravitational collapse of a cloud along the Supercluster's "shell" is reached and galaxies/quasars begin forming. SMF argues for a new classification of galaxies/quasars by the ratio of magnetic energy to rotational energy in the particular object. However the activity we observe is also a function of the matter accretion rate at the particular time observed. Also, applying SMF, a specific physical model (with an electric current Storage Ring) for the "Central Engine" (AGN) of galaxies, relevant to the formation of galactic spiral arms, jets and gamma ray bursts, is created. SMF embodies two novel concepts used in Nature for the production of electric current, both different from the Faraday/Henry discovery that powers our electric civilization. SMF agrees fully with the comment by Sir Martin Rees that "the phenomena of quasars and radio galaxies cannot be understood until they are placed in the general context of galactic evolution".

  13. VERTICAL STRUCTURE OF STATIONARY ACCRETION DISKS WITH A LARGE-SCALE MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S.; Lovelace, R. V. E. E-mail: RVL1@cornell.edu

    2012-05-10

    In earlier works we pointed out that the disk's surface layers are non-turbulent and thus highly conducting (or non-diffusive) because the hydrodynamic and/or magnetorotational instabilities are suppressed high in the disk where the magnetic and radiation pressures are larger than the plasma thermal pressure. Here, we calculate the vertical profiles of the stationary accretion flows (with radial and azimuthal components), and the profiles of the large-scale, magnetic field taking into account the turbulent viscosity and diffusivity and the fact that the turbulence vanishes at the surface of the disk. Also, here we require that the radial accretion speed be zero at the disk's surface and we assume that the ratio of the turbulent viscosity to the turbulent magnetic diffusivity is of order unity. Thus, at the disk's surface there are three boundary conditions. As a result, for a fixed dimensionless viscosity {alpha}-value, we find that there is a definite relation between the ratio R of the accretion power going into magnetic disk winds to the viscous power dissipation and the midplane plasma-{beta}, which is the ratio of the plasma to magnetic pressure in the disk. For a specific disk model with R of order unity we find that the critical value required for a stationary solution is {beta}{sub c} Almost-Equal-To 2.4r/({alpha}h), where h is the disk's half thickness. For weaker magnetic fields, {beta} > {beta}{sub c}, we argue that the poloidal field will advect outward while for {beta} < {beta}{sub c} it will advect inward. Alternatively, if the disk wind is negligible (R<<1), there are stationary solutions with {beta} >> {beta}{sub c}.

  14. Study of shape evaluation for mask and silicon using large field of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Ryoichi; Mito, Hiroaki; Shinoda, Shinichi; Toyoda, Yasutaka

    2010-09-01

    We have developed a highly integrated method of mask and silicon metrology. The aim of this integration is evaluating the performance of the silicon corresponding to Hotspot on a mask. It can use the mask shape of a large field, besides. The method adopts a metrology management system based on DBM (Design Based Metrology). This is the high accurate contouring created by an edge detection algorithm used in mask CD-SEM and silicon CD-SEM. Currently, as semiconductor manufacture moves towards even smaller feature size, this necessitates more aggressive optical proximity correction (OPC) to drive the super-resolution technology (RET). In other words, there is a trade-off between highly precise RET and mask manufacture, and this has a big impact on the semiconductor market that centers on the mask business. As an optimal solution to these issues, we provide a DFM solution that extracts 2-dimensional data for a more realistic and error-free simulation by reproducing accurately the contour of the actual mask, in addition to the simulation results from the mask data. On the other hand, there is roughness in the silicon form made from a mass-production line. Moreover, there is variation in the silicon form. For this reason, quantification of silicon form is important, in order to estimate the performance of a pattern. In order to quantify, the same form is equalized in two dimensions. And the method of evaluating based on the form is popular. In this study, we conducted experiments for averaging method of the pattern (Measurement Based Contouring) as two-dimensional mask and silicon evaluation technique. That is, observation of the identical position of a mask and a silicon was considered. The result proved its detection accuracy and reliability of variability on two-dimensional pattern (mask and silicon) and is adaptable to following fields of mask quality management. •Discrimination of nuisance defects for fine pattern. •Determination of two-dimensional variability of

  15. Closed-bore XMR (CBXMR) systems for aortic valve replacement: X-ray tube imaging performance

    PubMed Central

    Bracken, John A.; Komljenovic, Philip; Lillaney, Prasheel V.; Fahrig, Rebecca; Rowlands, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    A hybrid closed-bore x-ray∕MRI system (CBXMR) is proposed to improve the safety and efficacy of percutaneous aortic valve replacement procedures. In this system, an x-ray C-arm will be positioned about 1 m from the entrance of a 1.5 T MRI scanner. The CBXMR system will harness the complementary strengths of both modalities to guide and deploy a bioprosthetic valve into the aortic annulus of the heart without coronary artery obstruction. A major challenge in constructing this system is ensuring proper operation of a rotating-anode x-ray tube in the MRI magnetic fringe field environment. The electron beam in the x-ray tube responsible for producing x rays can be deflected by the fringe field. However, the clinical impact of electron beam deflection in a magnetic field has not yet been studied. Here, the authors investigated changes in focal spot resolving power, field of view shift, and field of view truncation in x-ray images as a result of electron beam deflection. The authors found that in the fringe field acting on the x-ray tube at the clinical location for the x-ray C-arm (4 mT), focal spot size increased by only 2%, so the fringe field did not limit the resolving power of the x-ray system. The magnetic field also caused the field of view to shift by 3 mm. This shift must be corrected to avoid unnecessary primary radiation exposure to the patient and the staff in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. The fringe field was too weak to cause field of view truncation. PMID:19472613

  16. Closed-bore XMR (CBXMR) systems for aortic valve replacement: x-ray tube imaging performance.

    PubMed

    Bracken, John A; Komljenovic, Philip; Lillaney, Prasheel V; Fahrig, Rebecca; Rowlands, J A

    2009-04-01

    A hybrid closed-bore x-ray/MRI system (CBXMR) is proposed to improve the safety and efficacy of percutaneous aortic valve replacement procedures. In this system, an x-ray C-arm will be positioned about 1 m from the entrance of a 1.5 T MRI scanner. The CBXMR system will harness the complementary strengths of both modalities to guide and deploy a bioprosthetic valve into the aortic annulus of the heart without coronary artery obstruction. A major challenge in constructing this system is ensuring proper operation of a rotating-anode x-ray tube in the MRI magnetic fringe field environment. The electron beam in the x-ray tube responsible for producing x rays can be deflected by the fringe field. However, the clinical impact of electron beam deflection in a magnetic field has not yet been studied. Here, the authors investigated changes in focal spot resolving power, field of view shift, and field of view truncation in x-ray images as a result of electron beam deflection. The authors found that in the fringe field acting on the x-ray tube at the clinical location for the x-ray C-arm (4 mT), focal spot size increased by only 2%, so the fringe field did not limit the resolving power of the x-ray system. The magnetic field also caused the field of view to shift by 3 mm. This shift must be corrected to avoid unnecessary primary radiation exposure to the patient and the staff in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. The fringe field was too weak to cause field of view truncation. PMID:19472613

  17. Biopolymers under large external forces and mean-field RNA virus evolutionary dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahsan, Syed Amir

    The modeling of the mechanical response of single-molecules of DNA and RNA under large external forces through statistical mechanical methods is central to this thesis with a small portion devoted to modeling the evolutionary dynamics of positive-sense single-stranded RNA viruses. In order to develop and test models of biopolymer mechanics and illuminate the mechanisms underlying biological processes where biopolymers undergo changes in energy on the order of the thermal energy, , entails measuring forces and lengths on the scale of piconewtons (pN) and nanometers (nm), respectively. A capacity achieved in the past two decades at the single-molecule level through the development of micromanipulation techniques such as magnetic and optical tweezers, atomic force microscopy, coupled with advances in micro- and nanofabrication. The statistical mechanical models of biopolymers developed in this dissertation are dependent upon and the outcome of these advancements and resulting experiments. The dissertation begins in chapter 1 with an introduction to the structure and thermodynamics of DNA and RNA, highlighting the importance and effectiveness of simple, two-state models in their description as a prelude to the emergence of two-state models in the research manuscripts. In chapter 2 the standard models of the elasticity of polymers and of a polymer gel are reviewed, characterizing the continuum and mean-field models, including the scaling behavior of DNA in confined spaces. The research manuscript presented in the last section of chapter 2 (section 2.5), subsequent to a review of a Flory gel and in contrast to it, is a model of the elasticity of RNA as a gel, with viral RNA illustrating an instance of such a network, and shown to exhibit anomalous elastic behavior, a negative Poisson ratio, and capable of facilitating viral RNA encapsidation with further context provided in section 5.1. In chapter 3 the experimental methods and behavior of DNA and RNA under mechanical

  18. Active and passive migration in boring isopods Limnoria spp. (Crustacea, Peracarida) from kelp holdfasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, Leonardo; Thiel, Martin

    2008-10-01

    Many boring isopods inhabit positively buoyant substrata (wood and algae), which float after detachment, permitting passive migration of inhabitants. Based on observations from previous studies, it was hypothesized that juvenile, subadult and male isopods migrate actively, and will rapidly abandon substrata after detachment. In contrast, reproductive females and small offspring were predicted to remain in floating substrata and thus have a high probability to disperse passively via rafting. In order to test this hypothesis, a colonization and an emigration experiment were conducted with giant kelp ( Macrocystis integrifolia), the holdfasts of which are inhabited by boring isopods from the genus Limnoria. A survey of benthic substrata in the kelp forest confirmed that limnoriids inhabited the holdfasts and did not occur in holdfast-free samples. Results of the colonization experiment showed that all life history stages of the boring isopods immigrated into young, largely uncolonized holdfasts, and after 16 weeks all holdfasts were densely colonized. In the emigration experiment, all life history stages of the isopods rapidly abandoned the detached holdfasts — already 5 min after detachment only few individuals remained in the floating holdfasts. After this initial rapid emigration of isopods, little changes in isopod abundance occurred during the following 24 h, and at the end of the experiment some individuals of all life history stages still remained in the holdfasts. These results indicate that all life history stages of Limnoria participate in both active migration and passive dispersal. It is discussed that storm-related dynamics within kelp forests may contribute to intense mixing of local populations of these burrow-dwelling isopods, and that most immigrants to young holdfasts probably are individuals emigrating from old holdfasts detached during storm events. The fact that some individuals of all life history stages and both sexes remain in floating

  19. Four large-scale field-aligned current systmes in the dayside high-latitude region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohtani, S.; Potemra, T. A.; Newell, P.T.; Zanetti, L. J.; Iijima, T.; Watanabe, M.; Blomberg, L. G.; Elphinstone, R. D.; Murphree, J. S.; Yamauchi, M.

    1995-01-01

    A system of four current sheets of large-scale field-aligned currents (FACs) was discovered in the data set of simultaneous Viking and Defense Meteorological Satellire Program-F7 (DMSP-F7) crossing of the dayside high-latitude region. This paper reports four examples of this system that were observed in the prenoon sector. The flow polarities of FACs are upward, downward, upward, and downward, from equatorward to poleward. The lowest-latitude upward current is flowing mostly in the central plasma sheet (CPS) precipitation region, often overlapping with the boundary plasma sheet (BPS) at its poleward edge, andis interpreted as a region 2 current. The pair of downward and upward FACs in the middle of te structure are collocated with structured electron precipitation. The precipitation of high-energy (greater than 1 keV) electrons is more intense in the lower-latitude downward current sheet. The highest-latitude downward flowing current sheet is located in a weak, low-energy particle precipitation region, suggesting that this current is flowing on open field lines. Simulaneous observations in the postnoon local time sector reveal the standard three-sheet structure of FACs, sometimes described as region 2, region 1, and mantle (referred to the midday region O) currents. A high correlation was found between the occurrence of the four FAC sheet structure and negative interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B(sub Y). We discuss the FAC structurein terms of three types of convection cells: the merging, viscous, andlobe cells. During strongly negative IMF B(sub Y), two convection reversals exist in the prenoon sector; one is inside the viscous cell, and the other is between the viscous cell and the lobe cell. This structure of convection flow is supported by the Viking electric field and auroral UV image data. Based on the convection pattern, the four FAC sheet structure is interpreted as the latitude overlap of midday and morning FAC systems. We suggest that the for

  20. [Research on the temperature field detection method of large cylinder forgings during heat treatment process based on infrared spectra].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Cun; Fu, Xian-Bin; Liu, Bin; Qi, Yan-De; Zhou, Shan

    2013-01-01

    In order to grasp the changes of the forging's temperature field during heat treatment, a temperature field detection method based on infrared spectra for large cylinder forgings is proposed in the present paper. On the basis of heat transfer a temperature field model of large barrel forgings was established by the method of separating variables. Using infrared spectroscopy the large forgings temperature measurement system was built based on the three-level interference filter. The temperature field detection of forging was realized in its heat treatment by combining the temperature data and the forgings temperature field detection model. Finally, this method is feasible according to the simulation experiment. The heating forging temperature detection method can provide the theoretical basis for the correct implementation of the heat treatment process. PMID:23586224