Science.gov

Sample records for field part iii

  1. Electronic communication. Part III.

    PubMed

    Bergren, M D

    1995-02-01

    This is the concluding article of a three-part series on electronic communication for school nurses. The October 1994 column described electronic communication and the hardware and software required. The December 1994 column examined e-mail, bulletin boards, databases, and file transfers. This column will list many health and nursing resources available on-line. Some of the resources are available only through the Internet. Others are accessible by more than one route: dial-in, telnet, gopher, or world wide web. A few of the services, such as MEDLINE, are only accessed with purchased accounts (Glowniak & Bushway, 1994). The electronic resources of interest to school nurses are so numerous it would be impossible to cite all of them in a column of this length. Selected resources for the school health provider will be listed in alphabetical order. PMID:7767047

  2. Standards in neurosonology. Part III

    PubMed Central

    Tomczyk, Tomasz; Luchowski, Piotr; Kozera, Grzegorz; Kaźmierski, Radosław; Stelmasiak, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents standards related to ultrasound imaging of the cerebral vasculature and structures. The aim of this paper is to standardize both the performance and description of ultrasound imaging of the extracranial and intracranial cerebral arteries as well as a study of a specific brain structure, i.e. substantia nigra hyperechogenicity. The following aspects are included in the description of standards for each ultrasonographic method: equipment requirements, patient preparation, study technique and documentation as well as the required elements of ultrasound description. Practical criteria for the diagnosis of certain pathologies in accordance with the latest literature were also presented. Furthermore, additional comments were included in some of the sections. Part I discusses standards for the performance, documentation and description of different ultrasound methods (Duplex, Doppler). Part II and III are devoted to standards for specific clinical situations (vasospasm, monitoring after the acute stage of stroke, detection of a right-to-left shunts, confirmation of the arrest of the cerebral circulation, an assessment of the functional efficiency of circle of Willis, an assessment of the cerebrovascular vasomotor reserve as well as the measurement of substantia nigra hyperechogenicity). PMID:27446600

  3. Standards in neurosonology. Part III.

    PubMed

    Wojczal, Joanna; Tomczyk, Tomasz; Luchowski, Piotr; Kozera, Grzegorz; Kaźmierski, Radosław; Stelmasiak, Zbigniew

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents standards related to ultrasound imaging of the cerebral vasculature and structures. The aim of this paper is to standardize both the performance and description of ultrasound imaging of the extracranial and intracranial cerebral arteries as well as a study of a specific brain structure, i.e. substantia nigra hyperechogenicity. The following aspects are included in the description of standards for each ultrasonographic method: equipment requirements, patient preparation, study technique and documentation as well as the required elements of ultrasound description. Practical criteria for the diagnosis of certain pathologies in accordance with the latest literature were also presented. Furthermore, additional comments were included in some of the sections. Part I discusses standards for the performance, documentation and description of different ultrasound methods (Duplex, Doppler). Part II and III are devoted to standards for specific clinical situations (vasospasm, monitoring after the acute stage of stroke, detection of a right-to-left shunts, confirmation of the arrest of the cerebral circulation, an assessment of the functional efficiency of circle of Willis, an assessment of the cerebrovascular vasomotor reserve as well as the measurement of substantia nigra hyperechogenicity). PMID:27446600

  4. Perspectives of precipitation science: Part III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelides, Silas

    2016-03-01

    This Special Issue of Atmospheric Research entitled "Perspectives of Precipitation Science: Part III" encompasses selected papers that were presented at the General Assembly of the European Geosciences Union, held in Vienna, Austria, from 27 April to 2 May 2014, within the framework of the (General) Session "Precipitation: Measurement, Climatology, Remote Sensing, and Modeling".

  5. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 261 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false III Appendix III to Part 261 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION AND LISTING OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Appendix III to Part 261...

  6. 7. Photograph of a line drawing. 'PART III, SECTION 1, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photograph of a line drawing. 'PART III, SECTION 1, EQUIPMENT LAYOUT, BUILDING NO. 10, PRODUCER GAS & EXHAUSTER BLDG., PLANT A.' From U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Industrial Facilities Inventory, Holston Ordnance Works, Kingsport, Tennessee. Plant A, Parts I, II, III. (Nashville, TN: Office of District Engineer, 1944). - Holston Army Ammunition Plant, Producer Gas Plant, Kingsport, Sullivan County, TN

  7. 40 CFR Appendixes I-Ii to Part 268 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false I Appendixes I-II to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS Appendixes I-II to Part 268...

  8. 40 CFR Appendixes I-Ii to Part 268 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false I Appendixes I-II to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS Appendixes I-II to Part 268...

  9. Benchmarking the Sandia Pulsed Reactor III cavity neutron spectrum for electronic parts calibration and testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.G.; Griffin, P.J.; Fan, W.C.

    1993-08-01

    The SPR III bare cavity spectrum and integral parameters have been determined with 24 measured spectrum sensor responses and an independent, detailed, MCNP transport calculation. This environment qualifies as a benchmark field for electronic parts testing.

  10. 40 CFR Appendixes II-Iii to Part 264 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false II Appendixes II-III to Part 264 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Appendixes II-III...

  11. 43. Photograph of a line drawing. 'PART III, SECTION 1, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. Photograph of a line drawing. 'PART III, SECTION 1, EQUIPMENT LAYOUT, BUILDINGS H-1 TO H-10 INCL., GRINDING, MANUFACTURING AREA, PLANT 'B'.' From U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Industrial Facilities Inventory, Holston Ordnance Works, Kingsport, Tennessee. Plant B, Parts II, III. (Nashville, TN: Office of the District Engineer, 1944). - Holston Army Ammunition Plant, RDX-and-Composition-B Manufacturing Line 9, Kingsport, Sullivan County, TN

  12. 38. Photograph of a line drawing. 'PART III, SECTION 1, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. Photograph of a line drawing. 'PART III, SECTION 1, EQUIPMENT LAYOUT, BUILDINGS G-1 TO G-10 INCL., PURIFICATION, MANUFACTURING AREA, PLAN 'B'.' From U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Industrial Facilities Inventory, Holston Ordnance Works, Kingsport, Tennessee. Plant B, Parts II, III. (Nashville, TN: Office of District Engineer, 1944). - Holston Army Ammunition Plant, RDX-and-Composition-B Manufacturing Line 9, Kingsport, Sullivan County, TN

  13. Conception of a course for professional training and education in the field of computer and mobile forensics, part III: network forensics and penetration testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröger, Knut; Creutzburg, Reiner

    2014-02-01

    IT security and computer forensics are important components in the information technology. From year to year, incidents and crimes increase that target IT systems or were done with their help. More and more companies and authorities have security problems in their own IT infrastructure. To respond to these incidents professionally, it is important to have well trained staff. The fact that many agencies and companies work with very sensitive data make it necessary to further train the own employees in the field of network forensics and penetration testing. Motivated by these facts, this paper - a continuation of a paper of January 2012 [1], which showed the conception of a course for professional training and education in the field of computer and mobile forensics - addresses the practical implementation important relationships of network forensic and penetration testing.

  14. Magnetic Fields in Population III Star Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Turk, Matthew J.; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Abel, Tom; Bryan, Greg

    2012-02-22

    We study the buildup of magnetic fields during the formation of Population III star-forming regions, by conducting cosmological simulations from realistic initial conditions and varying the Jeans resolution. To investigate this in detail, we start simulations from identical initial conditions, mandating 16, 32 and 64 zones per Jeans length, and studied the variation in their magnetic field amplification. We find that, while compression results in some amplification, turbulent velocity fluctuations driven by the collapse can further amplify an initially weak seed field via dynamo action, provided there is sufficient numerical resolution to capture vortical motions (we find this requirement to be 64 zones per Jeans length, slightly larger than, but consistent with previous work run with more idealized collapse scenarios). We explore saturation of amplification of the magnetic field, which could potentially become dynamically important in subsequent, fully-resolved calculations. We have also identified a relatively surprising phenomena that is purely hydrodynamic: the higher-resolved simulations possess substantially different characteristics, including higher infall-velocity, increased temperatures inside 1000 AU, and decreased molecular hydrogen content in the innermost region. Furthermore, we find that disk formation is suppressed in higher-resolution calculations, at least at the times that we can follow the calculation. We discuss the effect this may have on the buildup of disks over the accretion history of the first clump to form as well as the potential for gravitational instabilities to develop and induce fragmentation.

  15. Group-III Nitride Field Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bensaoula, Abdelhak; Berishev, Igor

    2008-01-01

    Field-emission devices (cold cathodes) having low electron affinities can be fabricated through lattice-mismatched epitaxial growth of nitrides of elements from group III of the periodic table. Field emission of electrons from solid surfaces is typically utilized in vacuum microelectronic devices, including some display devices. The present field-emission devices and the method of fabricating them were developed to satisfy needs to reduce the cost of fabricating field emitters, make them compatible with established techniques for deposition of and on silicon, and enable monolithic integration of field emitters with silicon-based driving circuitry. In fabricating a device of this type, one deposits a nitride of one or more group-III elements on a substrate of (111) silicon or other suitable material. One example of a suitable deposition process is chemical vapor deposition in a reactor that contains plasma generated by use of electron cyclotron resonance. Under properly chosen growth conditions, the large mismatch between the crystal lattices of the substrate and the nitride causes strains to accumulate in the growing nitride film, such that the associated stresses cause the film to crack. The cracks lie in planes parallel to the direction of growth, so that the growing nitride film becomes divided into microscopic growing single-crystal columns. The outer ends of the fully-grown columns can serve as field-emission tips. By virtue of their chemical compositions and crystalline structures, the columns have low work functions and high electrical conductivities, both of which are desirable for field emission of electrons. From examination of transmission electron micrographs of a prototype device, the average column width was determined to be about 100 nm and the sharpness of the tips was determined to be characterized by a dimension somewhat less than 100 nm. The areal density of the columns was found to about 5 x 10(exp 9)/sq cm . about 4 to 5 orders of magnitude

  16. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart III of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III 2 Table 2 to Subpart III of Part 63 Protection of... Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production Pt. 63, Subpt. III, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart III of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III Subpart...

  17. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart III of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III 2 Table 2 to Subpart III of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production Pt. 63, Subpt. III, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart III of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III Subpart A reference...

  18. 12 CFR Appendix III to Part 27 - Fair Housing Lending Inquiry/Application Log Sheet

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fair Housing Lending Inquiry/Application Log Sheet III Appendix III to Part 27 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FAIR HOUSING HOME LOAN DATA SYSTEM Pt. 27, App. III Appendix III to Part 27—Fair Housing...

  19. 46 CFR Appendix III to Part 150 - Testing Procedures for Determining Exceptions to the Chart

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Testing Procedures for Determining Exceptions to the Chart III Appendix III to Part 150 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES Pt. 150, App. III Appendix III to Part 150—Testing Procedures for Determining Exceptions to...

  20. 19 CFR Annex III to Part 351 - Deadlines for Parties in Antidumping Investigations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Deadlines for Parties in Antidumping Investigations III Annex III to Part 351 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Pt. 351, Annex III Annex III to Part 351—Deadlines...

  1. 19 CFR Annex III to Part 351 - Deadlines for Parties in Antidumping Investigations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Deadlines for Parties in Antidumping Investigations III Annex III to Part 351 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Pt. 351, Annex III Annex III to Part 351—Deadlines...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation III Appendix III to Part 600 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. III Appendix III to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy...

  3. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation III Appendix III to Part 600 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. III Appendix III to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy...

  4. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation III Appendix III to Part 600 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. III Appendix III to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy...

  5. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 1068 - High-Altitude Counties

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false High-Altitude Counties III Appendix III to Part 1068 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS GENERAL COMPLIANCE PROVISIONS FOR ENGINE PROGRAMS Pt. 1068, App. III Appendix III to Part...

  6. 5 CFR Appendix III to Part 1201 - Approved Hearing Locations By Regional Office

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Approved Hearing Locations By Regional Office III Appendix III to Part 1201 Administrative Personnel MERIT SYSTEMS PROTECTION BOARD ORGANIZATION AND PROCEDURES PRACTICES AND PROCEDURES Pt. 1201, App. III Appendix III to Part 1201—Approved Hearing Locations By Regional Office...

  7. 77 FR 60743 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Schedule F, Part II and III (Form 1040)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-04

    ... Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Schedule F, Part II and III (Form 1040... Law 104-13 (44 U.S.C. 3506(c)(2)(A)). Currently, the IRS is soliciting comments concerning Schedule F... Number: Schedule F, Part II and III (Form 1040). Abstract: Schedule F, Part II and III (Form 1040)...

  8. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart III of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III 2 Table 2 to Subpart III of Part 63 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production Pt. 63, Subpt. III, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart III of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart...

  9. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart III of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III 2 Table 2 to Subpart III of Part 63 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production Pt. 63, Subpt. III, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart III of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart...

  10. The Theory of Quantized Fields. III

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Schwinger, J.

    1953-05-01

    In this paper we discuss the electromagnetic field, as perturbed by a prescribed current. All quantities of physical interest in various situations, eigenvalues, eigenfunctions, and transformation probabilities, are derived from a general transformation function which is expressed in a non-Hermitian representation. The problems treated are: the determination of the energy-momentum eigenvalues and eigenfunctions for the isolated electromagnetic field, and the energy eigenvalues and eigenfunctions for the field perturbed by a time-independent current that departs from zero only within a finite time interval, and for a time-dependent current that assumes non-vanishing time-independent values initially and finally. The results are applied in a discussion of the intra-red catastrophe and of the adiabatic theorem. It is shown how the latter can be exploited to give a uniform formulation for all problems requiring the evaluation of transition probabilities or eigenvalue displacements.

  11. THE DEEP SWIRE FIELD. III. WIYN SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Frazer N.; Morrison, G. E.

    2009-06-15

    We present the results of spectroscopy using HYDRA on the WIYN 3.5 m telescope of objects in the deep SWIRE radio field. The goal of the project was to determine spectroscopic redshifts for as many of the brighter objects in the field as possible, especially those detected in the radio and at 24 {mu}m. These redshifts are primarily being used in studies of galaxy evolution and the connection of that evolution to active galactic nuclei and star formation. Redshifts measured for 365 individual objects are reported. The redshifts range from 0.03 to 2.5, mostly with z < 0.9. The sources were selected to be within the WIYN HYDRA field of approximately 30' in radius from the center of the SWIRE deep field, 10{sup h}46{sup m}00{sup s}, 59{sup 0}01'00'' (J2000). Optical sources for spectroscopic observation were selected from an r-band image of the field. A priority list of spectroscopic targets was established in the following order: 20 cm detections, 24 m detections, galaxies with r < 20 and the balance made up of fainter galaxies in the field. We provide a table listing the galaxy positions, measured redshift and error, and note any emission lines that were visible in the spectrum. In practice, almost all the galaxies with r < 19 were observed including all of the radio sources and most of the 24 {mu}m sources with r < 20 and a sample of radio sources which had fainter optical counterparts on the r-band image.

  12. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 92 - Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized.... III Appendix III to Part 92—Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements Table III-1—Equivalent Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements Path length If the path length is: cm inches...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 92 - Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized.... III Appendix III to Part 92—Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements Table III-1—Equivalent Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements Path length If the path length is: cm inches...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 92 - Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized.... III Appendix III to Part 92—Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements Table III-1—Equivalent Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements Path length If the path length is: cm inches...

  15. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 92 - Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized.... III Appendix III to Part 92—Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements Table III-1—Equivalent Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements Path length If the path length is: cm inches...

  16. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 92 - Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized.... III Appendix III to Part 92—Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements Table III-1—Equivalent Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements Path length If the path length is: cm inches...

  17. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 280 - Statement for Shipping Tickets and Invoices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... OF UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS (UST) Pt. 280, App. III Appendix III to Part 280—Statement for Shipping... (Pub. L. 98-616)) requires owners of certain underground storage tanks to notify designated State or... (40 CFR part 280) to determine if you are affected by this law....

  18. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 280 - Statement for Shipping Tickets and Invoices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... OF UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS (UST) Pt. 280, App. III Appendix III to Part 280—Statement for Shipping... (Pub. L. 98-616)) requires owners of certain underground storage tanks to notify designated State or... (40 CFR part 280) to determine if you are affected by this law....

  19. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 280 - Statement for Shipping Tickets and Invoices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... OF UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS (UST) Pt. 280, App. III Appendix III to Part 280—Statement for Shipping... (Pub. L. 98-616)) requires owners of certain underground storage tanks to notify designated State or... (40 CFR part 280) to determine if you are affected by this law....

  20. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 280 - Statement for Shipping Tickets and Invoices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... OF UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS (UST) Pt. 280, App. III Appendix III to Part 280—Statement for Shipping... (Pub. L. 98-616)) requires owners of certain underground storage tanks to notify designated State or... (40 CFR part 280) to determine if you are affected by this law....

  1. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 280 - Statement for Shipping Tickets and Invoices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (40 CFR part 280) to determine if you are affected by this law. ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Statement for Shipping Tickets and... OF UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS (UST) Pt. 280, App. III Appendix III to Part 280—Statement for...

  2. Observational Analysis of Tropical Cyclone Formation. Part III: Budget Analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, John L.

    1981-06-01

    Vertically integrated budgets of moisture, heat, angular momentum and kinetic energy are calculated from the composite data sets of Part I (McBride, 1981).The transition from cloud cluster to typhoon/hurricane is characterized by a warming of the troposphere and increase of tangential wind. Observations are presented to show that these effects are not restricted to the system's inner core region, but rather take place over a volume extending out to at least 6° latitude radius from the system center. Accordingly, in this paper cyclogenesis is investigated by analyzing budgets over this large scale.The heat budget calculations show that the observed warming of the troposphere is an order of magnitude smaller than the other terms in the budget equation. Most of the released latent heat LP0 is exported laterally through the boundaries of the region through conversion to the term ·Vs. The portion of LP0 which is released within the volume acts to counter the net radiative cooling QR.All the composite weather systems export moist static energy h through their transverse circulation. This means that intensification cannot be brought about simply in response to increased cumulus heating due to increased mass circulation. To bring about an increase in h, any change must be such that the quantity (E0 ·Vh) is increased, where E0 is the surface evaporation.All the composite weather systems export kinetic energy. The export takes place completely in the upper tropospheric outflow layer.The kinetic energy budgets show a residual requirement for a generation of kinetic energy by subgrid-scale processes. This eddy generation appears to be of the same magnitude as the generation by the mean radial flow, ·¯.Compared to non-developing systems, developing cloud clusters have twice to three times as much import of relative angular momentum through their lateral boundaries. This is related to the developing system having greater outer radius low-level positive and upper level

  3. 46 CFR Appendix III to Part 390 - U.S. Department of Transportation, Maritime Administration-Sample Semiannual Report

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false U.S. Department of Transportation, Maritime Administration-Sample Semiannual Report III Appendix III to Part 390 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION REGULATIONS UNDER PUBLIC LAW 91-469 CAPITAL CONSTRUCTION FUND Pt. 390, App. III Appendix III to Part 390—U.S. Department...

  4. 46 CFR Appendix III to Part 390 - U.S. Department of Transportation, Maritime Administration-Sample Semiannual Report

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false U.S. Department of Transportation, Maritime Administration-Sample Semiannual Report III Appendix III to Part 390 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION REGULATIONS UNDER PUBLIC LAW 91-469 CAPITAL CONSTRUCTION FUND Pt. 390, App. III Appendix III to Part 390—U.S. Department...

  5. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 265 - EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water Standards

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water Standards III Appendix III to Part 265 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Water Standards Parameter Maximum level (mg/l) Arsenic 0.05 Barium 1.0 Cadmium 0.01 Chromium...

  6. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 265 - EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water Standards

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water Standards III Appendix III to Part 265 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) INTERIM STATUS STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES...

  7. 36 CFR Appendix A to Part 1234 - Minimum Security Standards for Level III Federal Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Minimum Security Standards... FACILITIES Pt. 1234, App. A Appendix A to Part 1234—Minimum Security Standards for Level III Federal Facilities Recommended Standards Chart Level III Perimeter Security Parking: Control of facility...

  8. 36 CFR Appendix A to Part 1234 - Minimum Security Standards for Level III Federal Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Minimum Security Standards for.... 1234, App. A Appendix A to Part 1234—Minimum Security Standards for Level III Federal Facilities Recommended Standards Chart Level III Perimeter Security Parking: Control of facility parking...

  9. 29 CFR Appendix III to Part 1918 - The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory.... 1918, App. III Appendix III to Part 1918—The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory) Note: This appendix is non-mandatory and provides an explanation of the mechanics in the correct spotting...

  10. 29 CFR Appendix III to Part 1918 - The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory.... 1918, App. III Appendix III to Part 1918—The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory) Note: This appendix is non-mandatory and provides an explanation of the mechanics in the correct spotting...

  11. 29 CFR Appendix III to Part 1918 - The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory.... 1918, App. III Appendix III to Part 1918—The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory) Note: This appendix is non-mandatory and provides an explanation of the mechanics in the correct spotting...

  12. 29 CFR Appendix III to Part 1918 - The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory.... 1918, App. III Appendix III to Part 1918—The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory) Note: This appendix is non-mandatory and provides an explanation of the mechanics in the correct spotting...

  13. 29 CFR Appendix III to Part 1918 - The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory.... 1918, App. III Appendix III to Part 1918—The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory) Note: This appendix is non-mandatory and provides an explanation of the mechanics in the correct spotting...

  14. How Principals Level the Playing Field of Accountability in Florida's High-Poverty/Low-Performing Schools--Part III: Effects of High-Poverty Schools on Teacher Recruitment and Retention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Touchton, Debra; Acker-Hocevar, Michelle

    2002-01-01

    Report on part of a study of 10 principals who were asked about their views toward the state's accountability measures in reference to their schools and their roles, and what, if any, effect external accountability had on internal accountability or developing the organizational capacity of their school. (Contains 19 references.) (WFA)

  15. A Design that Inspires All. Education by Design: Part III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theimer, James E.

    2009-01-01

    Too many schools are still being built today as warehouses with windows; they get the job done on some minimal level, but beyond that, they simply do not excite the children who spend a great deal of their lives within their walls. Creating an environmentally friendly building is important, but that's only part of the equation. The author and his…

  16. Guide to the Archives of International Organizations. Part III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mabbs, A. W., Comp.

    This compilation forms Part 3 of the guide according to the plan conceived by a working party of the Section of Archivists of International Organizations in 1974-1975. An information gathering questionnaire was sent to 246 organizations in two categories: intergovernmental organizations created before 1950 and non-governmental organizations with…

  17. Critical Thinking: The Art of Socratic Questioning, Part III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Richard; Elder, Linda

    2008-01-01

    In the last two articles, the authors introduced the concept of Socratic questioning and its relationship to critical thinking. They illuminated how understanding the concepts embedded in critical thinking naturally generates questions. For example, a thinker who understands the elements of thought asks questions which probe the parts of thinking.…

  18. DOE tallies Class III oil recovery field projects

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-25

    Here are details from midterm proposals submitted as part of the US Department of Energy's Class 3 oil recovery field demonstration candidate projects. All of the proposals emphasize dissemination of project details so that the results, if successful, can be applied widely in similar reservoirs. Project results will also be fed into a national petroleum technology transfer network. The proposals include: Gulf of Mexico, Gulf coast, offshore California, a California thermal, immiscible CO[sub 2], produced/potable water, microbial EOR, California diatomite, West Texas Spraberry field, and other Permian Basin fields.

  19. Friction drive of an SAW motor. Part III: modeling.

    PubMed

    Shigematsu, Takashi; Kurosawa, Minoru Kuribayashi

    2008-10-01

    A 2-layer modeling method of friction drive of a surface acoustic wave motor is proposed. The surface layer accounts for the previously proposed point-contact friction drive model, which was generalized to correspond spatially to the underlying layer that is comprised of a 3-D elasticity field. A method to determine stiffness through the use of analytical solutions of 3-D contact problems bridges the 2 layers. Because the determined stiffness expresses the accuracy of the results regarding either layer, the validity of the results concerning the stiffness and the resulting stress field was evaluated by comparison with the results of finite element analysis. Furthermore, we executed numerical simulations by using the friction drive model, which were compared with the measured displacements of the frictional surface of the slider. The simulation accurately represented the normal displacement of the frictional surface; the modeling procedure in the normal direction was found to be reliable. However, because the friction coefficient drastically changes the tangential displacement, we could not discuss the reliability of the modeling procedure in the tangential direction. A thorough discussion of the friction drive would thus require further investigation of the friction phenomena. PMID:18986874

  20. Dislocations and crowdions in two-dimensional crystals. Part III: Plastic deformation of the crystal as a result of defect movement and defect interaction with the field of elastic stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natsik, V. D.; Smirnov, S. N.

    2016-03-01

    A continuation of the theoretical study of the intrinsic properties of dislocation and crowdion structural defects in 2D crystals [V. D. Natsik and S. N. Smirnov, Fiz. Nizk. Temp. 40, 1366 (2014) and V. D. Natsik and S. N. Smirnov, Fiz. Nizk. Temp. 41, 271 (2015)]. The atomic lattice model of conservative (glide) and non-conservative (climb) defect movement is discussed in detail. It is shown that given a continuum description of the 2D crystal, an individual defect can be examined as a point carrier of plastic deformation, its value being determined by the topological charge, which is compliant with the crystal geometry defect parameters. It is found that the strain rate depends on the rate at which the defect center moves, as well as its topological charge. The elastic forces acting on the dislocation and crowdion centers in the field of applied mechanical stresses, and the forces of elastic interaction between defects, are calculated in terms of the linear theory of elasticity of a 2D crystal. The non-linear effect pertaining to the interaction between defects and bending deformation of the crystalline membrane, which is specific to 2D crystals, is also discussed.

  1. NEW RENIN-INHIBITORS--STABILITY AND ACTIVITY DETERMINATION. PART III.

    PubMed

    Marszałek, Dorota; Goldnik, Anna; Winiecka, Iwona; Jaworski, Paweł; Mazurek, Aleksander P

    2016-01-01

    A series of new four potential renin inhibitors containing pseudodipeptides were synthesized. Stability for all compounds (1-4) in homogenates of liver, kidney, lung and in serum, gastric, intestinal juice and in the presence of α-chymotrypsin was determined. Compound 1 was unstable, compounds 2, 3 were stable, compound 4 was partly unstable, (liver and kidney homogenates, (α-chymotrypsin solution). Inhibitory activity of the compounds was measured in vitro by HPLC determination of lowering concentration of substrate (angiotensinogen) in the presence of renin and the potential renin inhibitor (compounds 1-4). Compound 1, 2, 3 and 4 showed inhibitory activity (1.7 x 10(-6), 9.6 x 10(-7), 1.05 x 10(-9) and 1.31 x 10(-7)M, respectively). PMID:27180425

  2. Geometric constrained variational calculus. III: The second variation (Part II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massa, Enrico; Luria, Gianvittorio; Pagani, Enrico

    2016-03-01

    The problem of minimality for constrained variational calculus is analyzed within the class of piecewise differentiable extremaloids. A fully covariant representation of the second variation of the action functional based on a family of local gauge transformations of the original Lagrangian is proposed. The necessity of pursuing a local adaptation process, rather than the global one described in [1] is seen to depend on the value of certain scalar attributes of the extremaloid, here called the corners’ strengths. On this basis, both the necessary and the sufficient conditions for minimality are worked out. In the discussion, a crucial role is played by an analysis of the prolongability of the Jacobi fields across the corners. Eventually, in the appendix, an alternative approach to the concept of strength of a corner, more closely related to Pontryagin’s maximum principle, is presented.

  3. 10 CFR Appendix III to Part 960 - Application of the System and Technical Guidelines During the Siting Process

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Application of the System and Technical Guidelines During the Siting Process III Appendix III to Part 960 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Pt. 960, App. III Appendix III to...

  4. 10 CFR Appendix III to Part 960 - Application of the System and Technical Guidelines During the Siting Process

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Application of the System and Technical Guidelines During the Siting Process III Appendix III to Part 960 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Pt. 960, App. III Appendix III to...

  5. 10 CFR Appendix III to Part 960 - Application of the System and Technical Guidelines During the Siting Process

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Application of the System and Technical Guidelines During the Siting Process III Appendix III to Part 960 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Pt. 960, App. III Appendix III to...

  6. 10 CFR Appendix III to Part 960 - Application of the System and Technical Guidelines During the Siting Process

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Application of the System and Technical Guidelines During the Siting Process III Appendix III to Part 960 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Pt. 960, App. III Appendix III to...

  7. 36 CFR Appendix A to Part 1234 - Minimum Security Standards for Level III Federal Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Minimum Security Standards for Level III Federal Facilities A Appendix A to Part 1234 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT FACILITY STANDARDS FOR RECORDS STORAGE FACILITIES Pt. 1234, App. A Appendix A to Part...

  8. PROBABILITY BASED CORROSION CONTROL FOR LIQUID WASTE TANKS - PART III

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.; Edwards, T.

    2010-12-09

    The liquid waste chemistry control program is designed to reduce the pitting corrosion occurrence on tank walls. The chemistry control program has been implemented, in part, by applying engineering judgment safety factors to experimental data. However, the simple application of a general safety factor can result in use of excessive corrosion inhibiting agents. The required use of excess corrosion inhibitors can be costly for tank maintenance, waste processing, and in future tank closure. It is proposed that a probability-based approach can be used to quantify the risk associated with the chemistry control program. This approach can lead to the application of tank-specific chemistry control programs reducing overall costs associated with overly conservative use of inhibitor. Furthermore, when using nitrite as an inhibitor, the current chemistry control program is based on a linear model of increased aggressive species requiring increased protective species. This linear model was primarily supported by experimental data obtained from dilute solutions with nitrate concentrations less than 0.6 M, but is used to produce the current chemistry control program up to 1.0 M nitrate. Therefore, in the nitrate space between 0.6 and 1.0 M, the current control limit is based on assumptions that the linear model developed from data in the <0.6 M region is applicable in the 0.6-1.0 M region. Due to this assumption, further investigation of the nitrate region of 0.6 M to 1.0 M has potential for significant inhibitor reduction, while maintaining the same level of corrosion risk associated with the current chemistry control program. Ongoing studies have been conducted in FY07, FY08, FY09 and FY10 to evaluate the corrosion controls at the SRS tank farm and to assess the minimum nitrite concentrations to inhibit pitting in ASTM A537 carbon steel below 1.0 molar nitrate. The experimentation from FY08 suggested a non-linear model known as the mixture/amount model could be used to predict

  9. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart III of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III 2 Table 2 to Subpart III of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE...

  10. 43 CFR Appendix III to Part 11 - Format for Data Inputs and Modifications to the NRDAM/GLE

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Format for Data Inputs and Modifications to the NRDAM/GLE III Appendix III to Part 11 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Pt. 11, App. III Appendix III to Part 11—Format for Data Inputs and Modifications to the NRDAM/GLE...

  11. Assessing the Denominational Identity of American Evangelical Colleges and Universities, Part III: The Student Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davignon, Phil; Glanzer, Perry; Rine, P. Jesse

    2013-01-01

    As the conclusion to a three-part series assessing the denominational identity of American evangelical colleges and universities, this article presents findings from Phase III of the CCCU Denominational Study. Data for this research were gathered via an online survey that was completed by 3,160 full-time undergraduate students attending 16…

  12. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation... Appendix III to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation Suppose that a manufacturer called Mizer Motors has a product line composed of eight car lines. Of these eight, four are available with the...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation... Appendix III to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation Suppose that a manufacturer called Mizer Motors has a product line composed of eight car lines. Of these eight, four are available with the...

  14. The magnetic field of Mercury, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, N. F.; Behannon, K. W.; Lepping, R. P.; Whang, Y. C.

    1974-01-01

    An updated analysis and interpretation is presented of the magnetic field observations obtained during the Mariner 10 encounter with the planet Mercury. The combination of data relating to position of the detached bow shock wave and magnetopause, and the geometry and magnitude of the magnetic field within the magnetosphere-like region surrounding Mercury, lead to the conclusion that an internal planetary field exists with dipole moment approximately 5.1 x 10 the 22nd power Gauss sq cm. The dipole axis has a polarity sense similar to earth's and is tilted 7 deg from the normal to Mercury's orbital plane. The magnetic field observations reveal a significant distortion of the modest Hermean field (350 Gamma at the equator) by the solar wind flow and the formation of a magnetic tail and neutral sheet which begins close to the planet on the night side. The composite data is not consistent with a complex induction process driven by the solar wind flow.

  15. Electromagnetic fields-Part 1; Biological effects

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, I.; Morgan, M.G. )

    1990-08-01

    It is known that low-frequency electric and magnetic fields can produce a variety of effects in biological systems. Pulsed magnetic fields, for instance, are used to mend broken bones, and other beneficial medical applications are being developed. But in more chronic and less controlled environments, can exposure to such fields also pose health risks No one knows. Today that possibility, however, requires serious consideration. Though present knowledge is fragmentary, and a coherent theory to explain the observations seems far off, the continuous presence of power-frequency fields in the modern environment makes potential health effects a matter of serious scientific and public health policy concern. That concern has focused on cancer - especially leukemia and brain tumors - and developmental abnormalities, and, to a lesser extent on endocrine and nervous system disorders, including chronic depression. The authors focus on 60-hertz fields, where the mechanism of interaction probably involves the cell membrane, is nonlinear, and may act by causing some cooperative phenomena among the components of the cell membrane.

  16. Active Control of Low-Speed Fan Tonal Noise Using Actuators Mounted in Stator Vanes: Part III Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.; Remington, Paul J.; Walker, Bruce E.

    2003-01-01

    A test program to demonstrate simplification of Active Noise Control (ANC) systems relative to standard techniques was performed on the NASA Glenn Active Noise Control Fan from May through September 2001. The target mode was the m = 2 circumferential mode generated by the rotor-stator interaction at 2BPF. Seven radials (combined inlet and exhaust) were present at this condition. Several different error-sensing strategies were implemented. Integration of the error-sensors with passive treatment was investigated. These were: (i) an in-duct linear axial array, (ii) an induct steering array, (iii) a pylon-mounted array, and (iv) a near-field boom array. The effect of incorporating passive treatment was investigated as well as reducing the actuator count. These simplified systems were compared to a fully ANC specified system. Modal data acquired using the Rotating Rake are presented for a range of corrected fan rpm. Simplified control has been demonstrated to be possible but requires a well-known and dominant mode signature. The documented results here in are part III of a three-part series of reports with the same base title. Part I and II document the control system and error-sensing design and implementation.

  17. Inlet flow field investigation. Part 1: Transonic flow field survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yetter, J. A.; Salemann, V.; Sussman, M. B.

    1984-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was conducted to determine the local inlet flow field characteristics of an advanced tactical supersonic cruise airplane. A data base for the development and validation of analytical codes directed at the analysis of inlet flow fields for advanced supersonic airplanes was established. Testing was conducted at the NASA-Langley 16-foot Transonic Tunnel at freestream Mach numbers of 0.6 to 1.20 and angles of attack from 0.0 to 10.0 degrees. Inlet flow field surveys were made at locations representative of wing (upper and lower surface) and forebody mounted inlet concepts. Results are presented in the form of local inlet flow field angle of attack, sideflow angle, and Mach number contours. Wing surface pressure distributions supplement the flow field data.

  18. 2. EAST PART OF SOLIDIER FIELD, LOOKING NORTHWEST TOWARD BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. EAST PART OF SOLIDIER FIELD, LOOKING NORTHWEST TOWARD BUILDING 274 AND PLUMMER STREET, FROM BALL DIAMOND IN SOUTHEAST CORNER. (Panoramic view 2/2). - Presidio of Monterey, Soldier Field, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

  19. Field and laboratory evidence for intrinsic biodegradation of vinyl chloride contamination in a Fe(III)-reducing aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.; Wilson, J.T.

    1998-01-01

    Intrinsic bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes in anaerobic aquifers previously has not been considered feasible, due, in large part, to 1) the production of vinyl chloride during microbial reductive dechlorination of higher chlorinated contaminants and 2) the apparent poor biodegradability of vinyl chloride under anaerobic conditions. In this study, a combination of field geochemical analyses and laboratory radiotracer ([1,2-14C] vinyl chloride) experiments was utilized to assess the potential for intrinsic biodegradation of vinyl chloride contamination in an Fe(III)-reducing, anaerobic aquifer. Microcosm experiments conducted under Fe(III)-reducing conditions with material from the Fe(III)-reducing, chlorinated-ethene contaminated aquifer demonstrated significant oxidation of [1,2-14C] vinyl chloride to 14CO2 with no detectable production of ethene or other reductive dehalogenation products. Rates of degradation derived from the microcosm experiments (0.9-1.3% d-1) were consistent with field-estimated rates (0.03-0.2% d-1) of apparent vinyl chloride degradation. Field estimates of apparent vinyl chloride biodegradation were calculated using two distinct approaches; 1) a solute dispersion model and 2) a mass balance assessment. These findings demonstrate that degradation under Fe(III) reducing conditions can be an environmentally significant mechanism for intrinsic bioremediation of vinyl chloride in anaerobic ground-water systems.

  20. Building human resources capability in health care: a global analysis of best practice--Part III.

    PubMed

    Zairi, M

    1998-01-01

    This is the last part of a series of three papers which discussed very comprehensively best practice applications in human resource management by drawing special inferences to the healthcare context. It emerged from parts I and II that high performing organisations plan and intend to build sustainable capability through a systematic consideration of the human element as the key asset and through a continuous process of training, developing, empowering and engaging people in all aspects of organisational excellence. Part III brings this debate to a close by demonstrating what brings about organisational excellence and proposes a road map for effective human resource development and management, based on world class standards. Healthcare human resource professionals can now rise to the challenge and plan ahead for building organisational capability and sustainable performance. PMID:10346320

  1. Behind the scene with the fathead team: Part III. Molecular, biochemical, and in vitro analyses

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a research team focused on aquatic toxicity testing using fathead minnows as a model species, this presentation is the third in the three-part series, giving an overview of the types of field and laboratory studies as well as sample processing our team conducts at the ...

  2. 16 CFR Figure 6 to Part 1203 - Field of Vision

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Field of Vision 6 Figure 6 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 6 Figure 6 to Part 1203—Field of Vision ER10MR98.006...

  3. 16 CFR Figure 6 to Part 1203 - Field of Vision

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Field of Vision 6 Figure 6 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 6 Figure 6 to Part 1203—Field of Vision ER10MR98.006...

  4. 16 CFR Figure 6 to Part 1203 - Field of Vision

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Field of Vision 6 Figure 6 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 6 Figure 6 to Part 1203—Field of Vision ER10MR98.006...

  5. 16 CFR Figure 6 to Part 1203 - Field of Vision

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Field of Vision 6 Figure 6 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 6 Figure 6 to Part 1203—Field of Vision ER10MR98.006...

  6. 16 CFR Figure 6 to Part 1203 - Field of Vision

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Field of Vision 6 Figure 6 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 6 Figure 6 to Part 1203—Field of Vision ER10MR98.006...

  7. 10 CFR Appendix III to Part 960 - Application of the System and Technical Guidelines During the Siting Process

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the Siting Process III Appendix III to Part 960 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE... 960—Application of the System and Technical Guidelines During the Siting Process 1. This appendix... decision points of the siting process. The decision points, as referenced in the table, are defined...

  8. Social class, political power, and the state: their implications in medicine--part III.

    PubMed

    Navarro, V

    1977-01-01

    This is the third part of an article on the distribution of power and the nature of the state in Western industrialized societies and their implications in medicine. Parts I and II were published in the preceding issue of this Journal. Part I presented a critique of contemporary theories of the Western system of power; discussed the countervailing pluralist and power of elite theories, as well as those of bureaucratic and professional control; and concluded with an examination of the Marxist theories of economic determinism, structural determinism, and corporate statism. Part II presented a Marxist theory of the role, nature, and characteristics of state intervention. Part III focuses on the mode of that intervention and the reasons for its growth, with an added analysis of the attributes of state intervention in the health sector, and of the dialectical relationship between its growth and the current fiscal crisis of the state. In all three parts, the focus is on Western European countries and on North America, with many examples and categories from the area of medicine. PMID:870557

  9. Numerical simulation of wave field in the South China Sea using WAVEWATCH III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Liangming; Li, Zhanbin; Mou, Lin; Wang, Aifang

    2014-05-01

    Wave fields of the South China Sea (SCS) from 1976 to 2005 were simulated using WAVEWATCH III by inputting high-resolution reanalysis wind field datasets assimilated from several meteorological data sources. Comparisons of wave heights between WAVEWATCH III and TOPEX/Poseidon altimeter and buoy data show a good agreement. Our results show seasonal variation of wave direction as follows: 1. During the summer monsoon (April-September), waves from south occur from April through September in the southern SCS region, which prevail taking about 40% of the time; 2. During the winter monsoon (December-March), waves from northeast prevail throughout the SCS for 56% of the period; 3. The dominant wave direction in SCS is NE. The seasonal variation of wave height H s in SCS shows that in spring, H s ≥1 m in the central SCS region and is less than 1 m in other areas. In summer, H s is higher than in spring. During September-November, influenced by tropical cyclones, H s is mostly higher than 1 m. East of Hainan Island, H s>2 m. In winter, H s reaches its maximum value influenced by the north-east monsoon, and heights over 2 m are found over a large part of SCS. Finally, we calculated the extreme wave parameters in SCS and found that the extreme wind speed and wave height for the 100-year return period for SCS peaked at 45 m/s and 19 m, respectively, SE of Hainan Island and decreased from north to south.

  10. 18 CFR 410.1 - Basin regulations-Water Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... part with the approval of the Director of the Federal Register under 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Basin regulations-Water Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations. 410.1 Section 410.1 Conservation...

  11. Solar Micro-Type III Burst Storms and Long Dipolar Magnetic Field in the Outer Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morioka, A.; Miyoshi, Y.; Iwai, K.; Kasaba, Y.; Masuda, S.; Misawa, H.; Obara, T.

    2015-08-01

    Solar micro-type III radio bursts are elements of the so-called type III storms and are characterized by short-lived, continuous, and weak emissions. Their frequency of occurrence with respect to radiation power is quite different from that of ordinary type III bursts, suggesting that the generation process is not flare-related, but due to some recurrent acceleration processes around the active region. We examine the relationship of micro-type III radio bursts with coronal streamers. We also explore the propagation channel of bursts in the outer corona, the acceleration process, and the escape route of electron beams. It is observationally confirmed that micro-type III bursts occur near the edge of coronal streamers. The magnetic field line of the escaping electron beams is tracked on the basis of the frequency drift rate of micro-type III bursts and the electron density distribution model. The results demonstrate that electron beams are trapped along closed dipolar field lines in the outer coronal region, which arise from the interface region between the active region and the coronal hole. A 22 year statistical study reveals that the apex altitude of the magnetic loop ranges from 15 to 50 RS. The distribution of the apex altitude has a sharp upper limit around 50 RS suggesting that an unknown but universal condition regulates the upper boundary of the streamer dipolar field.

  12. Evaluation of the MOZAIC Capacitive Hygrometer during the airborne field study CIRRUS-III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neis, P.; Smit, H. G. J.; Krämer, M.; Spelten, N.; Petzold, A.

    2015-03-01

    The MOZAIC Capacitive Hygrometer (MCH) is usually operated aboard passenger aircraft in the framework of MOZAIC (Measurement of Ozone by Airbus In-Service Aircraft) for measuring atmospheric relative humidity (RH). In order to evaluate the performance of the MCH, the instrument was operated aboard a Learjet 35A research aircraft as part of the CIRRUS-III field study together with a closed-cell Lyman-α fluorescence hygrometer (Fast in situ Stratospheric Hygrometer, or FISH) and an open-path tunable diode laser system (Open-path Jülich Stratospheric TDL ExpeRiment, or OJSTER) for water vapour measurement. After reducing the CIRRUS-III data set to data corresponding to MOZAIC aircraft operation conditions, the 1 Hz RH data cross correlation between the MCH and reference instruments FISH (clear sky) and OJSTER (in-cirrus) yielded a remarkably good agreement of R2 = 0.92 and slope m = 1.02 and provided a MCH uncertainty of 5% RH. Probability distribution functions of RH deduced from the MCH and reference instruments agreed well between 10 and 70% RH with respect to liquid water in the ambient temperature range of ca. -70 to -40 °C. The use of MCH data is limited to sensor temperatures above the calibration limit of Tsensor = -40 °C (corresponds to ambient temperature of Tambient = -70 °C at typical cruising speed of long-haul passenger aircraft). Good performance of the MCH for clear sky as well as for in-cirrus conditions demonstrated the sensor robustness also for operation inside ice clouds.

  13. Mumps Virus Induces Protein-Kinase-R-Dependent Stress Granules, Partly Suppressing Type III Interferon Production.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Shin; Yamamoto, Soh; Ogasawara, Noriko; Sato, Toyotaka; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Katoh, Hiroshi; Kubota, Toru; Shiraishi, Tsukasa; Kojima, Takashi; Himi, Tetsuo; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki; Yokota, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs) are cytoplasmic granular aggregations that are induced by cellular stress, including viral infection. SGs have opposing antiviral and proviral roles, which depend on virus species. The exact function of SGs during viral infection is not fully understood. Here, we showed that mumps virus (MuV) induced SGs depending on activation of protein kinase R (PKR). MuV infection strongly induced interferon (IFN)-λ1, 2 and 3, and IFN-β through activation of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) via retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I) and the mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) pathway. MuV-induced IFNs were strongly upregulated in PKR-knockdown cells. MuV-induced SG formation was suppressed by knockdown of PKR and SG marker proteins, Ras-GTPase-activating protein SH3-domain-binding protein 1 and T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen-1, and significantly increased the levels of MuV-induced IFN-λ1. However, viral titer was not altered by suppression of SG formation. PKR was required for induction of SGs by MuV infection and regulated type III IFN (IFN-λ1) mRNA stability. MuV-induced SGs partly suppressed type III IFN production by MuV; however, the limited suppression was not sufficient to inhibit MuV replication in cell culture. Our results provide insight into the relationship between SGs and IFN production induced by MuV infection. PMID:27560627

  14. Mumps Virus Induces Protein-Kinase-R-Dependent Stress Granules, Partly Suppressing Type III Interferon Production

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Shin; Yamamoto, Soh; Ogasawara, Noriko; Sato, Toyotaka; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Katoh, Hiroshi; Kubota, Toru; Shiraishi, Tsukasa; Kojima, Takashi; Himi, Tetsuo; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki; Yokota, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs) are cytoplasmic granular aggregations that are induced by cellular stress, including viral infection. SGs have opposing antiviral and proviral roles, which depend on virus species. The exact function of SGs during viral infection is not fully understood. Here, we showed that mumps virus (MuV) induced SGs depending on activation of protein kinase R (PKR). MuV infection strongly induced interferon (IFN)-λ1, 2 and 3, and IFN-β through activation of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) via retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I) and the mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) pathway. MuV-induced IFNs were strongly upregulated in PKR-knockdown cells. MuV-induced SG formation was suppressed by knockdown of PKR and SG marker proteins, Ras-GTPase-activating protein SH3-domain-binding protein 1 and T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen-1, and significantly increased the levels of MuV-induced IFN-λ1. However, viral titer was not altered by suppression of SG formation. PKR was required for induction of SGs by MuV infection and regulated type III IFN (IFN-λ1) mRNA stability. MuV-induced SGs partly suppressed type III IFN production by MuV; however, the limited suppression was not sufficient to inhibit MuV replication in cell culture. Our results provide insight into the relationship between SGs and IFN production induced by MuV infection. PMID:27560627

  15. DISPERSION OF MAGNETIC FIELDS IN MOLECULAR CLOUDS. III

    SciTech Connect

    Houde, Martin; Rao, Ramprasad; Vaillancourt, John E.; Hildebrand, Roger H.

    2011-06-01

    We apply our technique on the dispersion of magnetic fields in molecular clouds to high spatial resolution Submillimeter Array polarization data obtained for Orion KL in OMC-1, IRAS 16293, and NGC 1333 IRAS 4A. We show how one can take advantage of such high-resolution data to characterize the magnetized turbulence power spectrum in the inertial and dissipation ranges. For Orion KL we determine that in the inertial range the spectrum can be approximately fitted with a power law k{sup -(2.9{+-}0.9)} and we report a value of 9.9 mpc for {lambda}{sub AD}, the high spatial frequency cutoff presumably due to turbulent ambipolar diffusion. For the same parameters we have {approx}k{sup -(1.4{+-}0.4)} and a tentative value of {lambda}{sub AD} {approx_equal} 2.2 mpc for NGC 1333 IRAS 4A, and {approx}k{sup -(1.8{+-}0.3)} with an upper limit of {lambda}{sub AD} {approx}< 1.8 mpc for IRAS 16293. We also discuss the application of the technique to interferometry measurements and the effects of the inherent spatial filtering process on the interpretation of the results.

  16. 18 CFR 410.1 - Basin regulations-Water Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Register under 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain or inspect a copy at the Delaware River... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Basin regulations-Water Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations. 410.1 Section 410.1 Conservation...

  17. 18 CFR 410.1 - Basin regulations-Water Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Register under 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain or inspect a copy at the Delaware River... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Basin regulations-Water Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations. 410.1 Section 410.1 Conservation...

  18. 18 CFR 410.1 - Basin regulations-Water Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Register under 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain or inspect a copy at the Delaware River... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Basin regulations-Water Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations. 410.1 Section 410.1 Conservation...

  19. 18 CFR 410.1 - Basin regulations-Water Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Basin regulations-Water Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations. 410.1 Section 410.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL BASIN REGULATIONS; WATER CODE AND ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL-PART...

  20. Heterometallic trinuclear {CoLn(III)} (Ln = Gd, Tb, Ho and Er) complexes in a bent geometry. Field-induced single-ion magnetic behavior of the Er(III) and Tb(III) analogues.

    PubMed

    Goura, Joydeb; Brambleby, Jamie; Topping, Craig V; Goddard, Paul A; Suriya Narayanan, Ramakirushnan; Bar, Arun Kumar; Chandrasekhar, Vadapalli

    2016-05-31

    Through the use of a multi-site compartmental ligand, 2-methoxy-6-[{2-(2-hydroxyethylamino)ethylimino}methyl]phenol (LH3), the family of heterometallic, trinuclear complexes of the formula [CoLn(L)2(μ-O2CCH3)2(H2O)3]·NO3·xMeOH·yH2O has been expanded beyond Ln = Dy(III) to include Gd(III) (), Tb(III) (), Ho(III) () and Er(III) () for , and (x = 1; y = 1) and for (x = 0; y = 2). The metallic core of these complexes consists of a (Co(III)-Ln(III)-Co(III)) motif bridged in a bent geometry resulting in six-coordinated distorted Co(III) octahedra and nine-coordinated Ln(III) monocapped square-antiprisms. The magnetic characterization of these compounds reveals the erbium and terbium analogues to display a field induced single-ion magnetic behavior similar to the dysprosium analogue but at lower temperatures. The energy barrier for the reversal of the magnetization of the CoTb(III) analogue is Ueff ≥ 15.6(4) K, while for the CoEr(III) analogue Ueff ≥ 9.9(8) K. The magnetic properties are discussed in terms of distortions of the 4f electron cloud. PMID:27180723

  1. Field Operations and Enforcement Manual for Air Pollution Control. Volume III: Inspection Procedures for Specific Industries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisburd, Melvin I.

    The Field Operations and Enforcement Manual for Air Pollution Control, Volume III, explains in detail the following: inspection procedures for specific sources, kraft pulp mills, animal rendering, steel mill furnaces, coking operations, petroleum refineries, chemical plants, non-ferrous smelting and refining, foundries, cement plants, aluminum…

  2. Evaluation of the MOZAIC Capacitive Hygrometer during the airborne field study CIRRUS-III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neis, P.; Smit, H. G. J.; Krämer, M.; Spelten, N.; Petzold, A.

    2014-09-01

    The MOZAIC Capacitive Hygrometer (MCH) is usually operated onboard of passenger aircraft in the framework of MOZAIC (Measurement of Ozone by AIRBUS In-Service Aircraft). In order to evaluate the performance of the MCH, it was operated aboard a Learjet 35A aircraft as part of the CIRRUS-III field study together with a closed-cell Lyman-α fluorescence hygrometer (FISH) and an open path tunable diode laser system (OJSTER) for water vapour measurement. After reducing the data set to MOZAIC-relevant conditions, the 1Hz relative humidity (RH) cross correlation between MCH and reference instruments FISH (clear sky) and OJSTER (in-cirrus) yielded a remarkably good agreement of R2 = 0.97 and slope m = 0.96 and provided the MCH uncertainty of 5% RH. Probability distribution functions of RH deduced from MCH and reference instruments agreed well over the entire range of observations. The main limitation for the use of MCH data is related to sensor temperatures below the calibration limit of Tsensor = -40 °C (corresponds to ambient temperature of Tambient = -70 °C at typical cruising speed of long-haul passenger aircraft), which causes a delay in the sensor's time response. Good performance of MCH for clear sky as well as for in-cirrus conditions demonstrated the sensor robustness also for operation inside ice clouds.

  3. Airbreathing Laser Propulsion Experiments with 1 {mu}m Terawatt Pharos III Laser: Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Myrabo, L. N.; Lyons, P. W.; Jones, R. A.; Liu, S.; Manka, C.

    2011-11-10

    This basic research study examines the physics of airbreathing laser propulsion at the extreme flux range of 1-2x10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2}--within the air breakdown threshold for l {mu}m radiation--using the terawatt PHAROS III neodymium-glass pulsed laser. Six different experimental setups were tested using a 34 mm line focus with 66 {mu}m focal waist, positioned near the flat impulse surface. The first campaign investigated impulse generation with the beam oriented almost normal to the target surface, with energies ranging from 23 to 376 J, and pulses of 5 to 30 ns FWHM. Air breakdown/ plasma dynamics were diagnosed with GOI cameras and color photography. Laser generated impulse was quantified with both vertical pendulums and piezoelectric pressure transducers using the standard performance metric, C{sub M}--the momentum coupling coefficient. Part 1 of this 2-part paper covers Campaign no. 1 results including laser plasma diagnostics, pressure gage and vertical pendulum data.

  4. Investigational drug tracking: phases I-III and NDA submissions--Part II.

    PubMed

    Grant, K L

    1994-10-01

    The author catalogs over 800 investigational drugs/biologicals currently in Phase I, II or III clinical trials or drugs/biologicals submitted to the FDA as new drug applications. Part I of this article appeared in the September issue of Hospital Pharmacy. The list assists in predicting when new drugs will be marketed. The entries include generic/chemical name, investigational drug number, synonyms, trade names, manufacturers, clinical trial status, predicted approval year, indications or drug class, whether the drug has been developed through biotechnology, and references. Entries were gleaned from medical journals, stock market analysis publications, and the Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association's Medicines in Development Series. The list is alphabetized by the generic/chemical name or investigational drug number and cross-indexed by the trade name and synonyms. The list reflects those drugs which were not FDA approved as of April 15, 1994. Part I concludes with the remaining alphabetical listing by generic/chemical name or investigational drug number. PMID:10137850

  5. Dynamics of Anisotropic Bianchi Type-III Bulk Viscous String Model with Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, M. K.; Ram, Shri

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we discuss the dynamics of spatially homogeneous and anisotropic Bianchi type-III string cosmological model in presence of bulk viscous fluid and electromagnetic field. Exact solutions of Einstein's field equations are obtained by assuming (i) a special form of the deceleration parameter and (ii) the component of the shear scalar tensor is proportional to mean Hubble parameter. The source of magnetic field is due to an electric current produced along z-axis. The role of bulk viscosity and magnetic field in establishing string phase of universe is presented. The physical and kinematical features of solutions are also discussed in detail.

  6. Field dependence-independence and the discrimination of musical parts.

    PubMed

    Ellis, M C

    1996-06-01

    The association of the cognitive style known as field dependence-independence and 168 subjects correct detection of the number of parts in 24 musical items was investigated. Each item was arranged in one of three textures. With the effects of general mental ability, experience in music, and gender held constant, scores on the Group Embedded Figures Test explained significant variance in discrimination (7.5%). Factorial analysis showed significant main effects for cognitive-style groups, number of parts, and texture. The interaction between the effects of part and texture was also significant. In some cases an individual's cognitive style may influence perception of "what's going on" in music. PMID:8774037

  7. A Structural Molar Volume Model for Oxide Melts Part III: Fe Oxide-Containing Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibodeau, Eric; Gheribi, Aimen E.; Jung, In-Ho

    2016-04-01

    As part III of this series, the model is extended to iron oxide-containing melts. All available experimental data in the FeO-Fe2O3-Na2O-K2O-MgO-CaO-MnO-Al2O3-SiO2 system were critically evaluated based on the experimental condition. The variations of FeO and Fe2O3 in the melts were taken into account by using FactSage to calculate the Fe2+/Fe3+ distribution. The molar volume model with unary and binary model parameters can be used to predict the molar volume of the molten oxide of the Li2O-Na2O-K2O-MgO-CaO-MnO-PbO-FeO-Fe2O3-Al2O3-SiO2 system in the entire range of compositions, temperatures, and oxygen partial pressures from Fe saturation to 1 atm pressure.

  8. 18 CFR 382.201 - Annual charges under Parts II and III of the Federal Power Act and related statutes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Annual charges under Parts II and III of the Federal Power Act and related statutes. 382.201 Section 382.201 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REVISED...

  9. 18 CFR 382.201 - Annual charges under Parts II and III of the Federal Power Act and related statutes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Annual charges under Parts II and III of the Federal Power Act and related statutes. 382.201 Section 382.201 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REVISED...

  10. 18 CFR 382.201 - Annual charges under Parts II and III of the Federal Power Act and related statutes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Annual charges under Parts II and III of the Federal Power Act and related statutes. 382.201 Section 382.201 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REVISED...

  11. 18 CFR 382.201 - Annual charges under Parts II and III of the Federal Power Act and related statutes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Annual charges under Parts II and III of the Federal Power Act and related statutes. 382.201 Section 382.201 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REVISED...

  12. 18 CFR 382.201 - Annual charges under Parts II and III of the Federal Power Act and related statutes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Annual charges under Parts II and III of the Federal Power Act and related statutes. 382.201 Section 382.201 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REVISED...

  13. 29 CFR 1918.51 - General requirements (See also § 1918.11 and appendix III of this part).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false General requirements (See also § 1918.11 and appendix III of this part). 1918.51 Section 1918.51 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL... LONGSHORING Vessel's Cargo Handling Gear § 1918.51 General requirements (See also § 1918.11 and appendix...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 310 - Form: Application for Reimbursement to Local Governments for Emergency Response to Hazardous...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Appendix III to Part 310 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND... apparatus; disposable, protective suits and gloves; and sampling supplies. EQ Equipment EQ1: Replacement—for... of equipment owned by others Equipment replacement costs will be considered if applicant...

  15. Committee of the Undergraduate Program in Mathematics Geometry Conference, Part III: Geometric Transformation Groups and Other Topics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durst, Lincoln K., Ed.

    This is Part III of the first volume of the proceedings of the Committee on the Undergraduate Program in Mathematics (CUPM) Geometry Conference, held at Santa Barbara in June, 1967. The purpose of the conference was to consider the status of geometry in colleges at the undergraduate level. The conference, attended by undergraduate mathematics…

  16. 29 CFR 1918.51 - General requirements (See also § 1918.11 and appendix III of this part).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false General requirements (See also § 1918.11 and appendix III of this part). 1918.51 Section 1918.51 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL... LONGSHORING Vessel's Cargo Handling Gear § 1918.51 General requirements (See also § 1918.11 and appendix...

  17. 29 CFR 1918.51 - General requirements (See also § 1918.11 and appendix III of this part).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false General requirements (See also § 1918.11 and appendix III of this part). 1918.51 Section 1918.51 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL... LONGSHORING Vessel's Cargo Handling Gear § 1918.51 General requirements (See also § 1918.11 and appendix...

  18. 29 CFR 1918.51 - General requirements (See also § 1918.11 and appendix III of this part).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false General requirements (See also § 1918.11 and appendix III of this part). 1918.51 Section 1918.51 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL... LONGSHORING Vessel's Cargo Handling Gear § 1918.51 General requirements (See also § 1918.11 and appendix...

  19. 29 CFR 1918.51 - General requirements (See also § 1918.11 and appendix III of this part).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General requirements (See also § 1918.11 and appendix III of this part). 1918.51 Section 1918.51 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL... LONGSHORING Vessel's Cargo Handling Gear § 1918.51 General requirements (See also § 1918.11 and appendix...

  20. Thulium(III) and ytterbium(III) in aqueous solution ab initio quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passler, Peter P.; Rode, Bernd M.

    2015-10-01

    Hydration properties of trivalent thulium and ytterbium ions in aqueous solution are investigated via quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics (QMCF-MD) simulations. The QMCF-MD formalism is a special type of QM/MM simulation, where the chemically most relevant part of the system - in this case the ion with its first and second hydration shells - is treated by quantum mechanics. The mean ionsbnd O distances and the average coordination numbers of the first hydration shells are compared with experimental EXAFS data. Mean ligand residence times, vibrational frequencies and force constants were evaluated to characterise the dynamics of the systems.

  1. An unprecedented zero field neodymium(iii) single-ion magnet based on a phosphonic diamide.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sandeep K; Rajeshkumar, Thayalan; Rajaraman, Gopalan; Murugavel, Ramaswamy

    2016-06-01

    The axial ligation by the -P[double bond, length as m-dash]O group of a phosphonic diamide in an air-stable Nd(iii) complex ensures a pseudo-D5h symmetry leading to the stabilization of the mJ = |±9/2〉 state; this in turn is responsible for the observed SIM behaviour at zero field and the slow relaxation of magnetization up to 8.0 K. PMID:27173026

  2. Field-Induced Slow Magnetic Relaxation in a Mononuclear Manganese(III)-Porphyrin Complex.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Álvarez, Alejandro; Vallejo, Julia; Pardo, Emilio; Julve, Miguel; Lloret, Francesc; Krzystek, J; Armentano, Donatella; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Cano, Joan

    2015-11-23

    We report on a novel manganese(III)-porphyrin complex with the formula [Mn(III) (TPP)(3,5-Me2 pyNO)2 ]ClO4 ⋅CH3 CN (2; 3,5-Me2 pyNO=3,5-dimethylpyridine N-oxide, H2 TPP=5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin), in which the Mn(III) ion is six-coordinate with two monodentate 3,5-Me2 pyNO molecules and a tetradentate TPP ligand to build a tetragonally elongated octahedral geometry. The environment in 2 is responsible for the large and negative axial zero-field splitting (D=-3.8 cm(-1) ), low rhombicity (E/|D|=0.04) of the high-spin Mn(III) ion, and, ultimately, for the observation of slow magnetic-relaxation effects (Ea =15.5 cm(-1) at H=1000 G) in this rare example of a manganese-based single-ion magnet (SIM). Structural, magnetic, and electronic characterizations were carried out by means of single-crystal diffraction studies, variable-temperature direct- and alternating-current measurements and high-frequency and -field EPR spectroscopic analysis followed by quantum-chemical calculations. Slow magnetic-relaxation effects were also observed in the already known analogous compound [Mn(III) (TPP)Cl] (1; Ea =10.5 cm(-1) at H=1000 G). The results obtained for 1 and 2 are compared and discussed herein. PMID:26481722

  3. A Midlatitude Cirrus Cloud Climatology from the Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing. Part III: Radiative Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Sassen, K.; Comstock, Jennifer M.

    2001-08-01

    In Part III of a series of papers describing the extended time high-cloud observations from the University of Utah Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (FARS) supporting the First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) Regional Experiment, the visible and infrared radiative properties of cirrus clouds over Salt Lake City, Utah, are examined. Using {approx}860 h of combined ruby (0.694 {micro}m) lidar and midinfrared (9.5-11.5 {micro}m) radiometer data collected between 1992 and 1999 from visually identified cirrus clouds, the visible optical depths {tau} and infrared layer emittance epsilon of the varieties of midlatitude cirrus are characterized. The mean and median values for the cirrus sample are 0.75 {+-} 0.91 and 0.61 for {tau}, and 0.30 {+-} 0.22 and 0.25 for epsilon. Other scattering parameters studied are the visible extinction and infrared absorption coefficients, and their ratio, and the lidar backscatter-to-extinction ratio, which has a mean value of 0.041 sr{sup -1}. Differences among cirrus clouds generated by general synoptic (e.g., jet stream), thunderstorm anvil, and orographic mechanisms are found, reflecting basic cloud microphysical effects. The authors draw parameterizations in terms of midcloud temperature T{sub m} and physical cloud thickness {Delta}z for epsilon and {tau}: both macrophysical variables are needed to adequately address the impact of the adiabatic process on ice cloud content, which modulates radiative transfer as a function of temperature. For the total cirrus dataset, the authors find epsilon = 1 -exp [-8.5 x 10{sup -5} (T{sub m} + 80 C) {Delta}z]. These parameterizations, based on a uniquely comprehensive dataset, hold the potential for improving weather and climate model predictions, and satellite cloud property retrieval methods.

  4. FIELD EVALUATION OF LOW-EMISSION COAL BURNER TECHNOLOGY ON UTILITY BOILERS VOLUME III. FIELD EVALUATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of field tests conducted to determine the emission characteristics of a Babcock and Wilcox Circular burner and Dual Register burner (DRB). The field tests were performed at two utility boilers, generally comparable in design and size except for the burner...

  5. FIELD EVALUATION OF LOW-EMISSION COAL BURNER TECHNOLOGY ON UTILITY BOILERS; VOLUME III. FIELD EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of field tests conducted to determine the emission characteristics of a Babcock and Wilcox Circular burner and Dual Register burner (DRB). The field tests were performed at two utility boilers, generally comparable in design and size except for the burner...

  6. Tandem Level II and Level III field analyses for in-field decision making

    SciTech Connect

    Gallis, D.E.; Christenson, J.

    1995-12-31

    In order to provide cost-effective and timely analytical support for a site investigation in central Pennsylvania, Environmental Resources Management, Inc. (ERM) used its mobile analytical service, the ERM-FAST{reg_sign} service to perform on-site soil analyses targeting both Level II and Level III data quality objectives. Of specific concern were volatile organic compounds. The soil concentration levels of these contaminants of interest were required on a rapid-turnaround basis in order to make decisions regarding subsequent boring locations and other analytical logistics. The strategy and analytical systems used for this investigation provided cost-effective, quick-turnaround results that would not have been possible through routine fixed-facility analyses.

  7. Systematic theoretical investigation of the zero-field splitting in Gd(III) complexes: Wave function and density functional approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Shehryar; Kubica-Misztal, Aleksandra; Kruk, Danuta; Kowalewski, Jozef; Odelius, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The zero-field splitting (ZFS) of the electronic ground state in paramagnetic ions is a sensitive probe of the variations in the electronic and molecular structure with an impact on fields ranging from fundamental physical chemistry to medical applications. A detailed analysis of the ZFS in a series of symmetric Gd(III) complexes is presented in order to establish the applicability and accuracy of computational methods using multiconfigurational complete-active-space self-consistent field wave functions and of density functional theory calculations. The various computational schemes are then applied to larger complexes Gd(III)DOTA(H2O)-, Gd(III)DTPA(H2O)2-, and Gd(III)(H2O)83+ in order to analyze how the theoretical results compare to experimentally derived parameters. In contrast to approximations based on density functional theory, the multiconfigurational methods produce results for the ZFS of Gd(III) complexes on the correct order of magnitude.

  8. Stratigraphic sections of the Phosphoria formation in Idaho, 1947-48, Part III

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Malley, F.W.; Davidson, D.F.; Hoppin, R.A.; Sheldon, R.P.

    1951-01-01

    .The U.S. Geological Survey has measured and sampled the Phosphoria formation at many localities in Idaho and other western states. These data will not be fully synthesized and analyzed for several years but segments of the data, accompanied by little or no interpretation, are published as preliminary reports as they are assembled. This report, which contains abstracts of many of the sections in southeastern Idaho (fig. 1), is one of this series and is the third report of data gathered in Idaho during 1947 and 1948. The field and laboratory procedures adopted in these investigations are described rather fully in a companion report (McKelvey and others, 1953). Many people have taken part in this investigation, which was organized and supervised by V. E. McKelvey. D. A. Bostwick, R. M. Campbell, R. A. Gulbrandsen, R. A. Harris, R. L. Parker, R. A. Smart, J. E. Smedley, R. H. Thurston, and R. G. Waring participated in the description of strata and collection of samples referred to in this report. D. B. Dimick, Jack George, W. S. Hunziker, J. E. Jones, H. A. Larsen, and T. K. Rigby assisted in the preparation of trenches and collection, crushing, and splitting of samples in the field. The laboratory preparation of samples for chemical analysis was done in Denver, Colo., under the direction of W. P. Huleatt.

  9. Retrieving Storm Electric Fields from Aircrfaft Field Mill Data: Part II: Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William; Mach, D. M.; Christian H. J.; Stewart, M. F.; Bateman M. G.

    2006-01-01

    The Lagrange multiplier theory developed in Part I of this study is applied to complete a relative calibration of a Citation aircraft that is instrumented with six field mill sensors. When side constraints related to average fields are used, the Lagrange multiplier method performs well in computer simulations. For mill measurement errors of 1 V m(sup -1) and a 5 V m(sup -1) error in the mean fair-weather field function, the 3D storm electric field is retrieved to within an error of about 12%. A side constraint that involves estimating the detailed structure of the fair-weather field was also tested using computer simulations. For mill measurement errors of 1 V m(sup -l), the method retrieves the 3D storm field to within an error of about 8% if the fair-weather field estimate is typically within 1 V m(sup -1) of the true fair-weather field. Using this type of side constraint and data from fair-weather field maneuvers taken on 29 June 2001, the Citation aircraft was calibrated. Absolute calibration was completed using the pitch down method developed in Part I, and conventional analyses. The resulting calibration matrices were then used to retrieve storm electric fields during a Citation flight on 2 June 2001. The storm field results are encouraging and agree favorably in many respects with results derived from earlier (iterative) techniques of calibration.

  10. Providing for energy efficiency in homes and small buildings. Part III. Determining which practices are most effective and installing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    The training program is designed to educate students and individuals in the importance of conserving energy and to provide for developing skills needed in the application of energy-saving techniques that result in energy-efficient buildings. A teacher guide and student workbook are available to supplement the basic manual. Subjects covered in Part III are: determining which practices are most efficient and economical; installing energy-saving materials; and improving efficiency of equipment.

  11. Wide Field Imaging of the Hubble Deep Field-South Region III: Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palunas, Povilas; Collins, Nicholas R.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Hill, Robert S.; Malumuth, Eliot M.; Rhodes, Jason; Teplitz, Harry I.; Woodgate, Bruce E.

    2002-01-01

    We present 1/2 square degree uBVRI imaging around the Hubble Deep Field - South. These data have been used in earlier papers to examine the QSO population and the evolution of the correlation function in the region around the HDF-S. The images were obtained with the Big Throughput Camera at CTIO in September 1998. The images reach 5 sigma limits of u approx. 24.4, B approx. 25.6, V approx. 25.3, R approx. 24.9 and I approx. 23.9. We present a catalog of approx. 22,000 galaxies. We also present number-magnitude counts and a comparison with other observations of the same field. The data presented here are available over the world wide web.

  12. High Btu gas from peat. Volume III. Part B. Environmental and socioeconomic feasibility assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-06-01

    In September 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded a grant (No. DE-FG01-80RA50348) to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the current commercial viability - technical, economic, environmental, financial, and regulatory - of producing 80 million SCF/day of substitute natural gas (SNG). Minnegasco's project team for this study consisted of Dravo Engineers and Constructors (for design, engineering, and economics of peat harvesting, dewatering, and gasification systems), Ertec, Inc. (for environmental and socio-economic analyses), IGT (for providing gasification process information, and technical and engineering support to Minnegasco), and Deloitte Haskins and Sells (for providing management structural support to Minnegasco). This Final Report presents the work conducted by Ertec, Inc. under tasks 6 and 7. The study objective was to provide an initial environmental and socio-economic evaluation of the proposed facility to assess project feasibility. To accomplish this objective, detailed field studies were conducted in the areas of Hydrology, Air Quality and Socio-Economics. Less extensive surveys were conducted in the areas of Geology, Ecology, Acoustics, Land Use, Archaeology and Resource Assessment. Part B of Volume 3 contains the following contents: (1) project impact assessment which covers geological impacts, hydrology, ecological impacts, air quality and meteorology, land use, archaeology, aesthetics, acoustics, socioeconomic impacts, and peat resources; (2) impact mitigation which covers hydrology, ecology, air quality, archaeology, acoustics, and socioeconomics; (3) conclusions; and (4) appendices. 2 figures, 18 tables.

  13. Retrieving Storm Electric Fields From Aircraft Field Mill Data. Part 2; Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, W. J.; Mach, D. M.; Christian, H. J.; Stewart, M. F.; Bateman, M. G.

    2005-01-01

    The Lagrange multiplier theory and "pitch down method" developed in Part I of this study are applied to complete the calibration of a Citation aircraft that is instrumented with six field mill sensors. When side constraints related to average fields are used, the method performs well in computer simulations. For mill measurement errors of 1 V/m and a 5 V/m error in the mean fair weather field function, the 3-D storm electric field is retrieved to within an error of about 12%. A side constraint that involves estimating the detailed structure of the fair weather field was also tested using computer simulations. For mill measurement errors of 1 V/m, the method retrieves the 3-D storm field to within an error of about 8% if the fair weather field estimate is typically within 1 V/m of the true fair weather field. Using this side constraint and data from fair weather field maneuvers taken on 29 June 2001, the Citation aircraft was calibrated. The resulting calibration matrix was then used to retrieve storm electric fields during a Citation flight on 2 June 2001. The storm field results are encouraging and agree favorably with the results obtained from earlier calibration analyses that were based on iterative techniques.

  14. THE TOPOLOGICAL CHANGES OF SOLAR CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELDS. III. RECONNECTED FIELD TOPOLOGY PRODUCED BY CURRENT-SHEET DISSIPATION

    SciTech Connect

    Janse, A. M.; Low, B. C.

    2010-10-20

    In this paper, the third in a series of papers on topological changes of magnetic fields, we study how the dissipation of an initial current sheet (CS) in a closed three-dimensional (3D) field affects the field topology. The initial field is everywhere potential except at the location of the CS which is in macroscopic equilibrium under the condition of perfect conductivity. In the physical world of extremely high, but finite, conductivity, the CS dissipates and the field seeks a new equilibrium state in the form of an everywhere potential field since the initial field is everywhere untwisted. Our semi-analytical study indicates that the dissipation of the single initial CS must induce formation of additional CSs in extensive parts of the magnetic volume. The subsequent dissipation of these other sheets brings about topological changes by magnetic reconnection in order for the global field to become potential. In 2D fields, the magnetic reconnection due to the dissipation of a CS is limited to the magnetic vicinity of the dissipating sheet. Thus, the consequence of CS dissipation is physically and topologically quite different in 2D and 3D fields. A discussion of this result is given in general relation to the Parker theory of spontaneous CSs and heating in the solar corona and solar flares.

  15. Working Smarter, Not Harder: Reaching the Tough to Teach. Part III--Strategies and Scaffolding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rockwell, Sylvia

    2008-01-01

    "Working Smarter, Not Harder: Reaching the Tough to Teach" is the topic of an exclusive four-part series by the author for the "Kappa Delta Pi Record." Part I, Prior Knowledge and Concept Development, appeared in the Fall 2007 issue of the "Record". Part II, Content Integration, appeared in the Winter 2008 issue. This article is the third of the…

  16. Main-sequence magnetic CP stars III. Results of magnetic field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanyuk, I. I.

    2010-10-01

    We present the third part of the survey of magnetic parameters of main-sequence magnetic CP stars. We analyze the main definitions and terminology, basic data on the magnetic fields of CP stars (catalogs, the history of the stellar magnetism research, the main observational results obtained over 60 years of studies). We describe the modern views on the properties of magnetic CP stars, i.e. their geometric structure, distribution of field strengths, magnetic field and rotation, magnetic field and energy distribution anomalies, and the evolutionary status of magnetic CP stars. We conclude that the observational data mostly support the theory of the relict origin and evolution of magnetic fields of CP stars.

  17. Basic Metrics--Part I, II and III. Teacher's Guide [and] Student Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noyes, Joan

    Individualized classroom activities for use in learning centers to teach junior and senior high school students about the metric system are provided. The activities are organized into three sequential parts, each of which takes from four to six hours to complete. There is a teacher's guide and a student booklet for each part. The teachers' guides…

  18. Pre-Career Curriculum Guide for Deaf-Blind. Parts I-III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, LaVernya K.; And Others

    The two-volume document provides a pre-career curriculum guide for professionals and teachers working with deaf-blind students. Part 1 contains professionals and teachers working with deaf-blind students. Part I contains introductory information. Pointed out is the void in providing adequate programs for deaf-blind students over the age of 10.…

  19. User Feedback Procedures; Part III of Scientific Report No. ISR-18, Information Storage and Retrieval...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY. Dept. of Computer Science.

    Part Three of this five part report on Salton's Magical Automatic Retriever of Texts (SMART) project contains four papers. The first: "Variations on the Query Splitting Technique with Relevance Feedback" by T. P. Baker discusses some experiments in relevance feedback performed with variations on the technique of query splitting. The results…

  20. Land-Grant College Education, 1910 to 1920. Part III: Agriculture. Bulletin, 1925, No. 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, C. John, Ed.

    1925-01-01

    This bulletin represents the third of a 5-part survey of land-grant college education. Other parts are: (1) History and Educational Objectives of Land-Grant College Education; (2) The Liberal Arts and Sciences and Miscellaneous Subjects in Land-Grant Colleges; (4) Engineering and Mechanic Arts in Land-Grant Colleges; and (5) Home Economics in…

  1. Preparing Instructional Designers for Game-Based Learning: Part III. Game Design as a Collaborative Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirumi, Atsusi; Appelman, Bob; Rieber, Lloyd; Van Eck, Richard

    2010-01-01

    In this three part series, four professors who teach graduate level courses on the design of instructional video games discuss their perspectives on preparing instructional designers to optimize game-based learning. Part I set the context for the series and one of four panelists discussed what he believes instructional designers should know about…

  2. English as a Second Language Resource Manual, Volume III, Part One. Supplement 1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Applied Linguistics, Washington, DC.

    This is the first part of a two-part volume of supplementary materials intended for use in the Department of State's Intensive English as a Second Language, Cultural Orientation and Pre-Employment Training Program for United States-bound Southeast Asian refugees. It contains an introductory section on the program's history and the development of…

  3. 2 CFR Appendix III to Part 200 - Indirect (F&A) Costs Identification and Assignment, and Rate Determination for Institutions of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Assignment, and Rate Determination for Institutions of Higher Education (IHEs) III Appendix III to Part 200... and Assignment, and Rate Determination for Institutions of Higher Education (IHEs) A. General This... “Labs for the 21st Century” benchmarking tool http://labs21benchmarking.lbl.gov/CompareData.php and...

  4. Gd(III)-Gd(III) EPR distance measurements--the range of accessible distances and the impact of zero field splitting.

    PubMed

    Dalaloyan, Arina; Qi, Mian; Ruthstein, Sharon; Vega, Shimon; Godt, Adelheid; Feintuch, Akiva; Goldfarb, Daniella

    2015-07-28

    Gd(III) complexes have emerged as spin labels for distance determination in biomolecules through double-electron-electron resonance (DEER) measurements at high fields. For data analysis, the standard approach developed for a pair of weakly coupled spins with S = 1/2 was applied, ignoring the actual properties of Gd(III) ions, i.e. S = 7/2 and ZFS (zero field splitting) ≠ 0. The present study reports on a careful investigation on the consequences of this approach, together with the range of distances accessible by DEER with Gd(III) complexes as spin labels. The experiments were performed on a series of specifically designed and synthesized Gd-rulers (Gd-PyMTA-spacer-Gd-PyMTA) covering Gd-Gd distances of 2-8 nm. These were dissolved in D2O-glycerol-d8 (0.03-0.10 mM solutions) which is the solvent used for the corresponding experiments on biomolecules. Q- and W-band DEER measurements, followed by data analysis using the standard data analysis approach, used for S = 1/2 pairs gave the distance-distribution curves, of which the absolute maxima agreed very well with the expected distances. However, in the case of the short distances of 2.1 and 2.9 nm, the distance distributions revealed additional peaks. These are a consequence of neglecting the pseudo-secular term in the dipolar Hamiltonian during the data analysis, as is outlined in a theoretical treatment. At distances of 3.4 nm and above, disregarding the pseudo-secular term leads to a broadening of a maximum of 0.4 nm of the distance-distribution curves at half height. Overall, the distances of up to 8.3 nm were determined, and the long evolution time of 16 μs at 10 K indicates that a distance of up to 9.4 nm can be accessed. A large distribution of the ZFS parameter, D, as is found for most Gd(III) complexes in a frozen solution, is crucial for the application of Gd(III) complexes as spin labels for distance determination via Gd(III)-Gd(III) DEER, especially for short distances. The larger ZFS of Gd-PyMTA, in

  5. Eclipsing Binary Stars in the OGLE-III Fields of the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlak, M.; Graczyk, D.; Soszyński, I.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Poleski, R.; Udalski, A.; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Ulaczyk, K.; Kozłowski, S.; Skowron, J.

    2013-09-01

    We present a large sample of eclipsing binary stars detected in the Small Magellanic Cloud fields covering about 14 square degrees that have been monitored for eight years during the third phase of the OGLE survey. This is the largest set of such variables containing 6138 objects, of which 777 are contact and 5361 non-contact binaries. The estimated completeness of this sample is around 82%. We analyze the statistical properties of the sample and present selected interesting objects: 32 systems having eccentric orbit with visible apsidal motion, one Transient Eclipsing Binary, ten RS CVn type stars, 22 still unexplained Double-Periodic Variable stars, and 15 candidates for doubly eclipsing quadruple systems. Based on the OGLE-III proper motions, we classified 47 binaries from our sample as foreground Galactic stars. We also list candidates suitable for the SMC distance determination.

  6. History of Lung Diseases of Coal Miners in Great BritainPART III, 1920-1952*

    PubMed Central

    Meiklejohn, Andrew

    1952-01-01

    All sciences are connected; they lend each other material aid as parts of one great whole, each doing its own work not for itself alone but for the other parts, as the eye guides the whole body and the foot sustains it and leads it from place to place. As with an eye torn out or a foot cut off, so it is with the different departments of knowledge; none can attain its proper result separately, since all are parts of one and the same complete wisdom. ROGER BACON (1214-1294). PMID:14944741

  7. Electronics and telecommunications in Poland, issues and perspectives: Part III. Innovativeness, applications, economy, development scenarios, politics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modelski, Józef; Romaniuk, Ryszard

    2010-09-01

    important role of ET is combined with the existence in the society of an adequate infrastructure which recreates the full development cycle of high technology embracing: people, institutions, finances and logistics, in this also science, higher education, education, continuous training, dissemination and outreach, professional social environment, legal basis, political support and lobbying, innovation structures, applications, industry and economy. The digest of chosen development tendencies in ET was made here from the academic perspective, in a wider scale and on this background the national one, trying to situate this branch in the society, determine its changing role to build a new technical infrastructure of a society based on knowledge, a role of builder of many practical gadgets facilitating life, a role of a big future integrator of today's single bricks into certain more useful unity. This digest does not have a character of a systematic analysis of ET. It is a kind of an arbitrary utterance of the authors inside their field of competence. The aim of this paper is to take an active part in the discussion of the academic community in this country on the development strategy of ET, choice of priorities for cyclically rebuilding economy, in competitive environments. The review paper was initiated by the Committee of Electronics and Telecommunications of Polish Academy of Sciences and was published in Polish as introductory chapter of a dedicated expertise, printed in a book format. This version makes the included opinions available for a wider community.

  8. Determination of polarization fields in group III-nitride heterostructures by capacitance-voltage-measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rychetsky, Monir; Koslow, Ingrid; Avinc, Baran; Rass, Jens; Wernicke, Tim; Bellmann, Konrad; Sulmoni, Luca; Hoffmann, Veit; Weyers, Markus; Wild, Johannes; Zweck, Josef; Witzigmann, Bernd; Kneissl, Michael

    2016-03-01

    The polarization fields in wurtzite group III-nitrides strongly influence the optical properties of InAlGaN-based light emitters, e.g., the electron and hole wave function overlap in quantum wells. In this paper, we propose a new approach to determine these fields by capacitance-voltage measurements (CVM). Sheet charges generated by a change of the microscopic polarization at heterointerfaces influence the charge distribution in PIN junctions and therefore the depletion width and the capacitance. We show that it is possible to determine the strength and direction of the internal fields by comparing the depletion widths of two PIN junctions, one influenced by internal polarization fields and one without as a reference. For comparison, we conducted coupled Poisson/carrier transport simulations on the CVM of the polarization-influenced sample. We also demonstrate the feasibility and limits of the method by determining the fields in GaN/InGaN and GaN/AlGaN double heterostructures on (0001) c-plane grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy and compare both evaluation methods. The method yields (-0.50 ± 0.07) MV/cm for In0.08Ga0.92N/GaN, (0.90 ± 0.13) MV/cm for Al0.18Ga0.82N/GaN, and (2.0 ± 0.3) MV/cm for Al0.31Ga0.69N/GaN heterostructures.

  9. Part I. Bacteriorhodopsin-related materials work for molecular electronics. Part II. Volumetric optical memory based on the branched photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin. Part III. The role of calcium in the bacteriorhodopsin binding site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, Jeffrey Alan

    Part I. A protocol for the routine isolation and purification of purple membrane sheets containing the integral membrane protein, bacteriorhodopsin, was developed based upon modifications of protocols already in the literature. This simplified protocol is geared toward the facile isolation of protein for use in molecular electronic devices. Methods for the incorporation of bacteriorhodopsin into various polymeric supports were also developed, primarily in the form of dried films and hydrated cubes. This work also represents the first reported production of dried films of the deionized protein, or blue membrane. Part II. An architecture for a volumetric optical memory based on the branched-photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin is presented. The branching reaction circumvents problems associated with destructive reading and writing processes and allows access to a stable, long-lived state, separated both temporally and energetically from the main photocycle, thereby making long-term data storage possible. The state, denoted as Q, can only be accessed by exposing the protein to two different wavelengths of light in the proper sequence, with the appropriate temporal separation (roughly 2 ms between the light pulses). The Q-state (assigned as a binary one) is transparent to both writing and reading processes, making them rigorously non-destructive. Bacteriorhodopsin in its resting state is assigned as a binary zero. A differential absorption reading process is used to determine the state of each volumetric binary element. Preliminary results are reported. Part III. The nature of the chromophore binding site of light-adapted bacteriorhodopsin is analyzed by using all-valence electron MNDO and MNDO-PSDCI molecular orbital theory to interpret previously reported linear and nonlinear optical spectroscopic measurements. It is concluded that the unique two-photon properties of the chromophore are due in part to the electrostatic field associated with a Casp{2+} ion near the

  10. Wetlands & Wildlife: Alaska Wildlife Curriculum Teacher Information Manual, Parts I-II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigman, Marilyn; And Others

    This document consists of a teacher manual and a set of information cards. The teacher manual is designed to educate Alaskan students about the important functions of Alaska's wetlands and about the fish and wildlife that live there. Part I of the manual explores Alaska's wetland habitats, the plants and animals that live there, and the…

  11. Providing for Energy Efficiency in Homes and Small Buildings, Part III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association for Vocational Instructional Materials, Athens, GA.

    Presented is part three of a training program designed to educate students and individuals in the importance of conserving energy and to provide for developing skills needed in the application of energy-saving techniques that result in energy efficient buildings. Alternatives are provided in this program to allow for specific instruction in…

  12. About the International System of Units (SI) Part III. SI Table

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aubrecht, Gordon J., II; French, Anthony P.; Iona, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Before discussing more details of SI, we will summarize the essentials in a few tables that can serve as ready references. If a unit isn't listed in Tables I-IV, it is not part of SI or specifically allowed for use with SI. The units and symbols that are sufficient for most everyday applications are given in bold.

  13. Mathematics Through Science, Part III: An Experimental Approach to Functions. Teacher's Commentary. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolduc, Elroy J., Jr.; And Others

    The purpose of this project is to teach learning and understanding of mathematics at the ninth grade level through the use of science experiments. This part of the program contains significant amounts of material normally found in a beginning algebra class. The material should be found useful for classes in general mathematics as a preparation for…

  14. Tone Systems of Tibeto-Burman Languages of Nepal. Part III, Texts, I. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehman, F. K., Ed.

    The present volume, the third of a four-part report on the Tibeto-Burman languages of Nepal, includes text materials on Burung, by Warren Glover; on Tamang, by Doreen Taylor, and on Thakali, by Annemarie Hari and Anita Maibaum. For each language, a list of included texts is given, with the native language divided into sequentially-numbered…

  15. Modern Standard Arabic: Intermediate Level, Part III, Drills, Glossary and Indexes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abboud, Peter; And Others

    This volume, the last in a three-volume series for use in intermediate Arabic language courses, is intended primarily for use outside of class. All written drills are contained in it, including those that test the student's comprehension of passages in Parts 3 and 5, the more complex drills on grammar, and most of the review drills in the first…

  16. The History of AAVSO Charts, Part III: The Henden Era (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonsen, M.

    2015-06-01

    (Abstract only) In this paper we pick up where “The History of AAVSO Charts, Part II: The 1960s Through 2006” left off and discuss the evolution of the automated chart plotter, the comp star database, the new tools available to the chart and sequences team and Director Arne Henden's influence and legacy.

  17. Beyond the Evident Content Goals Part III. An Undercurrent-Enhanced Approach to Trigonometric Identities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dugdale, Sharon

    1990-01-01

    The third in a series of 3 articles, a study of 30 students was conducted to test the effect of restructuring a unit on trigonometric identities around microcomputer activities based on the themes of educational undercurrents identified in Part II. Experimental-group students scored significantly higher relating trigonometric functions to their…

  18. Education of the Information Professional: New Dimensions, New Directions. Part III: The Fellow Travelers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lytle, Richard H.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Discusses archival management, information resources management, and medical informatics as information related fields and assesses current educational activities in these areas. The possible benefits of establishing a partnership between information resources management practitioners and information studies educators are also discussed. (CLB)

  19. Transportation Facilitation Education Program: A Handbook for Transportation and Distribution. Part III. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon Univ., Eugene. Coll. of Business Administration.

    The handbook accents the nature of transportation and related domestic and international business activities. Its objective is to provide basic information for the newcomer to the field. Chapters 2 and 3 describe assistance available from public and private agencies, as well as regulatory requirements for foreign traders and a resume of the…

  20. The Health of Healthcare, Part III: Dissolving (curing) the cancer in healthcare.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Deane

    2013-01-01

    In a previous part of this "The Health of Healthcare" series, the etiology of sickness in our healthcare system was established as cancer. This article offers a method to "cure" healthcare, taken from strategic management thinking called VOSIE. In this article, the use of VOSIE is described as well as who needs to apply this cure: the public. A unifying mantra is suggested: Think and decide. PMID:24772497

  1. Systematic theoretical investigation of the zero-field splitting in Gd(III) complexes: wave function and density functional approaches.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shehryar; Kubica-Misztal, Aleksandra; Kruk, Danuta; Kowalewski, Jozef; Odelius, Michael

    2015-01-21

    The zero-field splitting (ZFS) of the electronic ground state in paramagnetic ions is a sensitive probe of the variations in the electronic and molecular structure with an impact on fields ranging from fundamental physical chemistry to medical applications. A detailed analysis of the ZFS in a series of symmetric Gd(III) complexes is presented in order to establish the applicability and accuracy of computational methods using multiconfigurational complete-active-space self-consistent field wave functions and of density functional theory calculations. The various computational schemes are then applied to larger complexes Gd(III)DOTA(H2O)(-), Gd(III)DTPA(H2O)(2-), and Gd(III)(H2O)8(3+) in order to analyze how the theoretical results compare to experimentally derived parameters. In contrast to approximations based on density functional theory, the multiconfigurational methods produce results for the ZFS of Gd(III) complexes on the correct order of magnitude. PMID:25612706

  2. Systematic theoretical investigation of the zero-field splitting in Gd(III) complexes: Wave function and density functional approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Shehryar Odelius, Michael; Kubica-Misztal, Aleksandra; Kruk, Danuta; Kowalewski, Jozef

    2015-01-21

    The zero-field splitting (ZFS) of the electronic ground state in paramagnetic ions is a sensitive probe of the variations in the electronic and molecular structure with an impact on fields ranging from fundamental physical chemistry to medical applications. A detailed analysis of the ZFS in a series of symmetric Gd(III) complexes is presented in order to establish the applicability and accuracy of computational methods using multiconfigurational complete-active-space self-consistent field wave functions and of density functional theory calculations. The various computational schemes are then applied to larger complexes Gd(III)DOTA(H{sub 2}O){sup −}, Gd(III)DTPA(H{sub 2}O){sup 2−}, and Gd(III)(H{sub 2}O){sub 8}{sup 3+} in order to analyze how the theoretical results compare to experimentally derived parameters. In contrast to approximations based on density functional theory, the multiconfigurational methods produce results for the ZFS of Gd(III) complexes on the correct order of magnitude.

  3. Magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium. III - Helically symmetric fields. IV - Nonequilibrium of nonsymmetric hydrodynamic topologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsinganos, K. C.

    1982-01-01

    It is pointed out that plasma confinement in stable equilibrium states constitutes a fundamental and still unresolved question in plasma astrophysics and thermonuclear fusion research. The problem has two parts related to the equilibrium states themselves and their mechanical stability. The question of the existence of general solutions of the field and fluid equations for the steady dynamical interaction of inviscid compressible fluids of high electrical conductivity with magnetic and gravity fields is considered. In the absence of fluid motions, the presented equations become the familiar equations of magnetostatics supplemented by an equation of state. Starting from this simplest case of magnetostatic equilibrium, the investigation proceeds to the more complex case of magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium. Examples of helically symmetric fields are presented to illustrate the use of the formulation for treating the dynamics of helically symmetric hydromagnetic flows.

  4. The solar O III spectrum. II - Longer wavelengths, line widths, and the He II Lyman alpha radiation field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kastner, S. O.; Behring, W. E.; Bhatia, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    The solar O III spectrum above 900 A is analyzed, including several visible and infrared lines which are important in nebular studies. The dependence of the line intensities on the rate of photoexcitation by He Ly-alpha is determined, and the observability of these lines in the solar spectrum is studied. The impact approximation is employed to calculate the expected line widths of the stronger solar O III lines. The photoexciting field at 304 A calculated from the observed intensities of the O III lines below 900 A (Bhatia et al., 1982) is compared with the field predicted by a recent model (Avrett et al., 1976). It is shown that additional radiation trapping must be present beyond that given by this model.

  5. Making the CHARA Array, Part III: engineering decisions. to build or not to build

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Brummelaar, Theo A.; McAlister, Harold A.; Ridgway, Stephen

    2014-07-01

    The CHARA Array has been a PI led, low budget, and low manpower operation, and has followed a fairly unconventional path in its development. In this, the third paper of a series of three, we discuss some of the engineering and design decisions made along the way, some right and some wrong, with a focus on the choice between in-house development and the purchase of pre-built, or sub-contracted, subsystems. Along with these issues we will also address a few parts of the system that we might have done differently given our current knowledge, and those that somehow turned out very well.

  6. Building Worlds and Learning Astronomy on Facebook Part III: Testing, Launch, and Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harold, J.; Hines, D.; Vidugiris, E.; Goldman, K. H.

    2015-11-01

    James Harold (SSI), Dean Hines (STScI/SSI) and a team at the National Center for Interactive Learning at the Space Science Institute are developing Starchitect, an end-to-end stellar and planetary evolution game for the Facebook platform. Supported by NSF and NASA, and based in part on a prototype presented at ASP several years ago, Starchitect uses the “sporadic play” model of games such as Farmville, where players might only take actions a few times a day, but may continue playing for months. This paper is an update to a presentation at last year's ASP conference.

  7. The History of Articulators: The Wonderful World of "Grinders," Part III.

    PubMed

    Starcke, Edgar N; Engelmeier, Robert L

    2016-02-01

    This is the third article in a three-part series on the history of denture occlusal grinders. The first article reviewed the earliest attempts to "grind in" denture occlusion by hand manipulating simple articulators with special features to those more complex devices powered by hand cranks. The second article explored devices that were motor driven, either those with cast holders to grind the occlusion of processed dentures or those designed to utilize an articulator's condylar or incisal controls for that purpose. This article examines those articulators that have a rotary occlusal grinder as an essential feature. Additionally, this article reviews those grinding devices produced as attachments for popular contemporary articulators. PMID:25754238

  8. EFSUMB Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS), Part III - Abdominal Treatment Procedures (Short Version).

    PubMed

    Dietrich, C F; Lorentzen, T; Appelbaum, L; Buscarini, E; Cantisani, V; Correas, J M; Cui, X W; D'Onofrio, M; Gilja, O H; Hocke, M; Ignee, A; Jenssen, C; Kabaalioğlu, A; Leen, E; Nicolau, C; Nolsøe, C P; Radzina, M; Serra, C; Sidhu, P S; Sparchez, Z; Piscaglia, F

    2016-02-01

    The third part of the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound assesses the evidence for ultrasound-guided and assisted interventions in abdominal treatment procedures. Recommendations for clinical practice are presented covering indications, contraindications, safety and efficacy of the broad variety of these techniques. In particular, drainage of abscesses and fluid collections, interventional tumor ablation techniques, interventional treatment of symptomatic cysts and echinococcosis, percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and drainage, percutaneous gastrostomy, urinary bladder drainage, and nephrostomy are addressed (short version; a long version is published online). PMID:26871408

  9. EFSUMB Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS), Part III - Abdominal Treatment Procedures (Long Version).

    PubMed

    Dietrich, C F; Lorentzen, T; Appelbaum, L; Buscarini, E; Cantisani, V; Correas, J M; Cui, X W; D'Onofrio, M; Gilja, O H; Hocke, M; Ignee, A; Jenssen, C; Kabaalioğlu, A; Leen, E; Nicolau, C; Nolsøe, C P; Radzina, M; Serra, C; Sidhu, P S; Sparchez, Z; Piscaglia, F

    2016-02-01

    The third part of the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS) assesses the evidence for ultrasound-guided and assisted interventions in abdominal treatment procedures. Recommendations for clinical practice are presented covering indications, contraindications, and safe and effective performance of the broad variety of these techniques. In particular, drainage of abscesses and fluid collections, interventional tumor ablation techniques, interventional treatment of symptomatic cysts and echinococcosis, percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and drainage, percutaneous gastrostomy, urinary bladder drainage, and nephrostomy are addressed (long version). PMID:26670019

  10. Managing the multicultural laboratory, Part III: Putting the cross-cultural tools to work.

    PubMed

    Ketchum, S M

    1993-01-01

    This third article provides two case studies that enable laboratory managers to see how the cross-cultural model postulated by Dr. Geert Hofstede can be practically applied to two important issues--staff training and conflict resolution between employees. In addition, the opinions of several managers from a variety of industries are presented to add realism and perspective. This encourages laboratory managers to step outside the laboratory environment and learn from other managers who have years of experience supervising culturally diverse groups of employees. Part I of this series explained what is meant by "culture" and featured the research-based model set forth by Dutch social psychologist and management consultant, Dr. Geert Hofstede. His four dimensions of culture (Power Distance, Masculinity/Femininity, Individualism/Collectivism, and Uncertainty Avoidance) provide a useful framework for understanding the different values, attitudes, and behaviors exhibited by those of different cultural backgrounds. Part II presented advice in the form of 13 anecdotes from experienced cross-cultural managers. Issues of performance management, interpersonal skills, and language and safety were explored in light of the four dimensions. In this third article, abbreviated reference tables adapted from Hofstede's research are presented that make these cross-cultural data more useful for management decision making. Laboratory managers will receive practical, "real world" advice that will help them to positively resolve conflicts and to take full advantage of staff training opportunities. PMID:10123894

  11. [Selection from the Hungarian dental literature. Part III. 1945-2000].

    PubMed

    Kóbor, András; Molnár, László

    2005-08-01

    After 1948 a state monopoly was imposed on textbook publishing. Textbooks were written on ministerial requests in a given chronological order and submitted to a Textbook Committee for censoring. After the launch of the independent dental training in Hungary and special dental curricula was introduced, a number of new textbooks were published in the field of dentistry. Several lecturers provided authoritative textbooks in respective areas of their expertise. In the last decade textbook writing accurately reflects the economic changes and their themes follow the global trends in scientific specialization. PMID:16190510

  12. Retrieving Storm Electric Fields from Aircraft Field Mill Data. Part 1; Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, W. J.

    2006-01-01

    It is shown that the problem of retrieving storm electric fields from an aircraft instrumented with several electric field mill sensors can be expressed in terms of a standard Lagrange multiplier optimization problem. The method naturally removes aircraft charge from the retrieval process without having to use a high voltage stinger and linearly combined mill data values. It allows a variety of user-supplied physical constraints (the so-called side constraints in the theory of Lagrange multipliers) and also helps improve absolute calibration. Additionally, this paper introduces an alternate way of performing the absolute calibration of an aircraft that has some benefits over conventional analyses. It is accomplished by using the time derivatives of mill and pitch data for a pitch down maneuver performed at high (greater than 1 km) altitude. In Part II of this study, the above methods are tested and then applied to complete a full calibration of a Citation aircraft.

  13. Retrieving Storm Electric Fields From Aircraft Field Mill Data. Part I: Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, W. J.

    2005-01-01

    It is shown that the problem of retrieving storm electric fields from an aircraft instrumented with several electric field mill sensors can be expressed in terms of a standard Lagrange multiplier optimization problem. The method naturally removes aircraft charge from the retrieval process without having to use a high voltage stinger and linearly combined mill data values. It also allows a variety of user-supplied physical constraints (the so-called side constraints in the theory of Lagrange multipliers). Additionally, this paper introduces a novel way of performing the absolute calibration of an aircraft that has several benefits over conventional analyses. In the new approach, absolute calibration is completed by inspecting the time derivatives of mill and pitch data for a pitch down maneuver performed at high (greater than 1 km) altitude. In Part II of this study, the above methods are tested and then applied to complete a full calibration of a Citation aircraft.

  14. Dental caries: A complete changeover, PART III: Changeover in the treatment decisions and treatments

    PubMed Central

    Carounanidy, Usha; Sathyanarayanan, R

    2010-01-01

    Comprehensive management of dental caries should involve the management of disease as well as the lesion. Current decision making process in cariology is influenced by numerous factors such as the size/ depth/ activity of the carious lesion and age/ the caries risk status of the patient. Treatment decisions should involve planning the non-operative/ preventive treatment for non-cavitated or early cavitated lesions and also formulating operative treatment for cavitated lesions. Apart from these two responsibilities, a clinician should also be knowledgeable enough to decide when not to interfere in the caries dynamics and how frequently to recall the patient for follow-ups. The non-operative treatment prescriptions vary in dose, intensity and mode of delivery according to the caries risk status. Minimal invasion and maximal conservation of tooth structure has become the essence of current operative treatments. This part of the series elaborates on the paradigm shift in the management of dental caries. PMID:21217948

  15. Electric field control of room temperature ferromagnetism in III-N dilute magnetic semiconductor films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nepal, N.; Luen, M. Oliver; Zavada, J. M.; Bedair, S. M.; Frajtag, P.; El-Masry, N. A.

    2009-03-01

    We report on the electrical field control of ferromagnetism (FM) at room temperature in III-N dilute magnetic semiconductor (DMS) films. A GaMnN layer was grown on top of an n-GaN substrate and found to be almost always paramagnetic. However, when grown on a p-type GaN layer, a strong saturation magnetization (Ms) was observed. This FM in GaMnN can be controlled by depletion of the holes in the GaMnN/p-GaN/n-GaN multilayer structures. We have demonstrated the dependence of the FM on the thickness of the p-GaN in this heterostructure and on the applied bias to the GaN p-n junction. The Ms was measured by an alternating gradient magnetometer (AGM) and a strong correlation between the hole concentration near the GaMnN/p-GaN interface and the magnetic properties of the DMS was observed. At room temperature an anomalous Hall effect was measured for zero bias and an ordinary Hall effect for reverse bias in a fully depleted p-GaN layer. This is in close agreement with the AGM measurement results.

  16. Idaho Habitat and Natural Production Monitoring Part III, 1993 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Schrader, W.C.; Petrosky, Charles E. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Fisheries Research Section, Boise, ID

    1994-03-01

    Effective management of wild anadromous fisheries is partly dependent on defining relationships between escapement and production. These productivity relationships (or reproduction curves) depend on the nature of density-dependent mechanisms that control the population. Inherent is developing any relationship is specifying the fish population of interest and what is meant by escapement and production by that population. This report is a summary of sampling programs at all existing and proposed anadromous fish weirs in Idaho as of fall 1992. Only permanent or semi-permanent structures where long-term data could be collected are included. The summary is stratified by class of fish and by cell or drainage using the same classifications as the Idaho Anadromous Fish Management Plan. Included in the summary are escapement objectives above the existing and proposed weirs. Recommendations based on this summary were developed to provide coverage for all classes and most major drainages, yet minimize cost and duplication of efforts. this was a usefull approach as some chinook salmon weirs were identified that could be modified to monitor steelhead trout.

  17. Demonstration of anaerobic biogas digesters in developing countries. Part III. The Philippines

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, M.H.; Morales, E.C.

    1980-03-01

    The main theme of this series of articles is that ours is now a world-wide society, short on meeting needs for energy yet long on waste from our industrial, agricultural and human consumption processes. This is a study report about developments in the Philippines where waste management has been recognized and considered as an important practical source of energy. This is revealed by several reports of the number of biogas plants in operation in this country. According to the July 31, 1977 survey made by the Philippines Bureau of Animal Industries, 200 biogas plants were then installed and in operation of which 46 were government-owned and 154 privately-owned. More have been installed since then. This report presents some of the operating observations and developments from the joint engineering analyses project of the Philippines Bureau of Animal Industry, Man and the Biosphere Inter-Agency Committee on Ecological Studies, Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources and the National Institute of Science and Technology. The project's main objective was to show that establishing a biogas plant involves not only the production of a methane gas mixture but the integration of its other products as part of a system (i.e., using effluent water from the biogas digester for production of algae chlorell sp. for livestock and poultry feed, production of fish and fertilizing-irrigating of pasture and vegetable plots.). Housing development sewer systems with added biogas generators are also discussed.

  18. The Systemic Theory of Living Systems and Relevance to CAM: the Theory (Part III)

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Western medical science lacks a solid philosophical and theoretical approach to disease cognition and therapeutics. My first two articles provided a framework for a humane medicine based on Modern Biophysics. Its precepts encompass modern therapeutics and CAM. Modern Biophysics and its concepts are presently missing in medicine, whether orthodox or CAM, albeit they probably provide the long sought explanation that bridges the abyss between East and West. Key points that differentiate Systemic from other systems' approaches are ‘Intelligence’, ‘Energy’ and the objective ‘to survive’. The General System Theory (GST) took a forward step by proposing a departure from the mechanistic biological concept—of analyzing parts and processes in isolation—and brought us towards an organismic model. GST examines the system's components and results of their interaction. However, GST still does not go far enough. GST assumes ‘Self-Organization’ as a spontaneous phenomenon, ignoring a causative entity or central controller to all systems: Intelligence. It also neglects ‘Survive’ as the directional motivation common to any living system, and scarcely assigns ‘Energy’ its true inherent value. These three parameters, Intelligence, Energy and Survive, are vital variables to be considered, in our human quest, if we are to achieve a unified theory of life. PMID:16136205

  19. Carbon honeycomb grids for advanced lead-acid batteries. Part III: Technology scale-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchev, A.; Serra, L.; Dumenil, S.; Brichard, G.; Alias, M.; Jammet, B.; Vinit, L.

    2015-12-01

    The carbon honeycomb grid technology employs new carbon/carbon composites with ordered 3D structure instead of the classic lead-acid battery current collectors. The technology is laboratory scaled up from small size grids corresponding to electrodes with a capacity of 3 Ah to current collectors suitable for assembly of lead-acid batteries covering the majority of the typical lead-acid battery applications. Two series of 150 grids each (one positive and one negative) are manufactured using low-cost lab-scale equipment. They are further subjected to pasting with active materials and the resulting battery plates are assembled in 12 V AGM-VLRA battery mono-blocks for laboratory testing and outdoor demonstration in electric scooter replacing its original VRLAB pack. The obtained results demonstrate that the technology can replace successfully the state of the art negative grids with considerable benefits. The use of the carbon honeycomb grids as positive plate current collectors is limited by the anodic corrosion of the entire structure attacking both the carbon/carbon composite part and the electroplated lead-tin alloy coating.

  20. Figures and institutions of the neurological sciences in Paris from 1800 to 1950. Part III: neurology.

    PubMed

    Broussolle, E; Poirier, J; Clarac, F; Barbara, J-G

    2012-04-01

    We present a short historical review of the major figures, their administrative functions and their works that contributed to make Paris a renowned centre of physiology and neurology during the xixth and the first half of the xxth century. We purposely chose to focus on the period 1800-1950, as 1800 corresponds to the actual beginning of neurosciences, and 1950 marks their exponential rise. Our presentation is divided into four chapters, matching the main disciplines which have progressed and contributed the most to the knowledge we have of the brain sciences: anatomy, physiology, neurology, and psychiatry-psychology. The present article is the third of four parts of this review, and deals with neurology. A special credit should be given to Jean-Martin Charcot who founded the Salpêtrière School of neurology and became one of the world's most important neurologists of the xixth century. We provide below the biographical sketches of Armand Trousseau, Guillaume Benjamin Amand Duchenne, Jean-Martin Charcot, Alfred Vulpian, Désiré-Magloire Bourneville, Paul Richer, Henri Parinaud, Albert Pitres, Jules Joseph Dejerine, Mrs. Augusta Dejerine-Klumpke, Édouard Brissaud, Pierre Marie, Georges Édouard Brutus Gilles de la Tourette, Joseph Babinski, André Thomas, Georges Marinesco, Achille Alexandre Souques, Georges Guillain and Charles Foix. PMID:22387204

  1. Surgical considerations in aortitis. Part III: Syphilitic and other forms of aortitis.

    PubMed

    Duncan, J M; Cooley, D A

    1983-12-01

    The majority of cases involving clinically significant aortitis result from Takayasu's disease, syphilis, and mycotic aneurysms, although aortitis may occur as a part of the clinical manifestation in other diseases of known and unknown etiology. Syphilitic aortitis can be treated successfully if an accurate diagnosis is made early and if appropriate antibiotic therapy is instituted. Untreated or treated inadequately, late cardiovascular complications can occur, namely, aortic aneurysm, aortic valvular insufficiency and coronary osteal stenosis. Surgical treatment should be considered when any of these late complications become manifest. Aortitis can occur with rheumatic fever and, occasionally, in rheumatoid arthritis. Giant-cell arteritis is a disease that can affect large, medium or small arteries, and usually occurs in patients over 50 years of age, chiefly women. The entire aorta may be affected. It is the only form of aortitis commonly associated with dissecting aneurysm of the aorta. Corticosteroids are effective in treating the active form of the disease and can usually prevent the development of later severe complications. Surgery is indicated when a dissecting aneurysm develops. PMID:15226966

  2. Lumazine Synthase Protein Nanoparticle-Gd(III)-DOTA Conjugate as a T1 contrast agent for high-field MRI

    PubMed Central

    Song, YoungKyu; Kang, Young Ji; Jung, Hoesu; Kim, Hansol; Kang, Sebyung; Cho, HyungJoon

    2015-01-01

    With the applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at higher magnetic fields increasing, there is demand for MRI contrast agents with improved relaxivity at higher magnetic fields. Macromolecule-based contrast agents, such as protein-based ones, are known to yield significantly higher r1 relaxivity at low fields, but tend to lose this merit when used as T1 contrast agents (r1/r2 = 0.5 ~ 1), with their r1 decreasing and r2 increasing as magnetic field strength increases. Here, we developed and characterized an in vivo applicable magnetic resonance (MR) positive contrast agent by conjugating Gd(III)-chelating agent complexes to lumazine synthase isolated from Aquifex aeolicus (AaLS). The r1 relaxivity of Gd(III)-DOTA-AaLS-R108C was 16.49 mM−1s−1 and its r1/r2 ratio was 0.52 at the magnetic field strength of 7 T. The results of 3D MR angiography demonstrated the feasibility of vasculature imaging within 2 h of intravenous injection of the agent and a significant reduction in T1 values were observed in the tumor region 7 h post-injection in the SCC-7 flank tumor model. Our findings suggest that Gd(III)-DOTA-AaLS-R108C could serve as a potential theranostic nanoplatform at high magnetic field strength. PMID:26493381

  3. Lumazine Synthase Protein Nanoparticle-Gd(III)-DOTA Conjugate as a T1 contrast agent for high-field MRI.

    PubMed

    Song, YoungKyu; Kang, Young Ji; Jung, Hoesu; Kim, Hansol; Kang, Sebyung; Cho, HyungJoon

    2015-01-01

    With the applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at higher magnetic fields increasing, there is demand for MRI contrast agents with improved relaxivity at higher magnetic fields. Macromolecule-based contrast agents, such as protein-based ones, are known to yield significantly higher r1 relaxivity at low fields, but tend to lose this merit when used as T1 contrast agents (r1/r2 = 0.5 ~ 1), with their r1 decreasing and r2 increasing as magnetic field strength increases. Here, we developed and characterized an in vivo applicable magnetic resonance (MR) positive contrast agent by conjugating Gd(III)-chelating agent complexes to lumazine synthase isolated from Aquifex aeolicus (AaLS). The r1 relaxivity of Gd(III)-DOTA-AaLS-R108C was 16.49 mM(-1)s(-1) and its r1/r2 ratio was 0.52 at the magnetic field strength of 7 T. The results of 3D MR angiography demonstrated the feasibility of vasculature imaging within 2 h of intravenous injection of the agent and a significant reduction in T1 values were observed in the tumor region 7 h post-injection in the SCC-7 flank tumor model. Our findings suggest that Gd(III)-DOTA-AaLS-R108C could serve as a potential theranostic nanoplatform at high magnetic field strength. PMID:26493381

  4. 14 CFR 61.21 - Duration of a Category II and a Category III pilot authorization (for other than part 121 and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Duration of a Category II and a Category III pilot authorization (for other than part 121 and part 135 use). 61.21 Section 61.21 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND...

  5. PACE. A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Part III: Being an Entrepreneur. Unit D: Marketing Management. Research and Development Series No. 194 C-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This three-part curriculum for entrepreneurship education is primarily for postsecondary level, including four-year colleges and adult education, but it can be adapted for special groups or vocational teacher education. The emphasis of the eight instructional units in Part III is operating a business. Unit D focuses on market management. It…

  6. PACE. A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Part III: Being an Entrepreneur. Unit H: Business Protection. Research and Development Series No. 194 C-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This three-part curriculum for entrepreneurship education is primarily for postsecondary level, including four-year colleges and adult education, but it can be adapted for special groups or vocational teacher education. The emphasis of the eight instructional units in part III is operating a business. Unit H focuses on business protection. It…

  7. Inverse scattering solutions by a sinc basis, multiple source, moment method--Part III: Fast algorithms.

    PubMed

    Johnson, S A; Zhou, Y; Tracy, M K; Berggren, M J; Stenger, F

    1984-01-01

    olving the inverse scattering problem for the Helmholtz wave equation without employing the Born or Rytov approximations is a challenging problem, but some slow iterative methods have been proposed. One such method suggested by us is based on solving systems of nonlinear algebraic equations that are derived by applying the method of moments to a sinc basis function expansion of the fields and scattering potential. In the past, we have solved these equations for a 2-D object of n by n pixels in a time proportional to n5. In the present paper, we demonstrate a new method based on FFT convolution and the concept of backprojection which solves these equations in time proportional to n3 X log(n). Several numerical examples are given for images up to 7 by 7 pixels in size. Analogous algorithms to solve the Riccati wave equation in n3 X log(n) time are also suggested, but not verified. A method is suggested for interpolating measurements from one detector geometry to a new perturbed detector geometry whose measurement points fall on a FFT accessible, rectangular grid and thereby render many detector geometrics compatible for use by our fast methods. PMID:6540908

  8. A Study of Future Communications Concepts and Technologies for the National Airspace System-Part III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, Denise S.; Apaza, Rafael D.; Wichgersm Joel M.; Haynes, Brian; Roy, Aloke

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is investigating current and anticipated wireless communications concepts and technologies that the National Airspace System (NAS) may need in the next 50 years. NASA has awarded three NASA Research Announcements (NAR) studies with the objective to determine the most promising candidate technologies for air-to-air and air-to-ground data exchange and analyze their suitability in a post-NextGen NAS environment. This paper will present progress made in the studies and describe the communications challenges and opportunities that have been identified as part of the study. NASA's NextGen Concepts and Technology Development (CTD) Project integrates solutions for a safe, efficient and high-capacity airspace system through joint research efforts and partnerships with other government agencies. The CTD Project is one of two within NASA's Airspace Systems Program and is managed by the NASA Ames Research Center. Research within the CTD Project is in support the 2011 NASA Strategic Plan Sub-Goal 4.1: Develop innovative solutions and advanced technologies, through a balanced research portfolio, to improve current and future air transportation. The focus of CTD is on developing capabilities in traffic flow management, dynamic airspace configuration, separation assurance, super density operations and airport surface operations. Important to its research is the development of human/automation information requirements and decisionmaking guidelines for human-human and human-machine airportal decision-making. Airborne separation, oceanic intrail climb/descent and interval management applications depend on location and intent information of surrounding aircraft. ADS-B has been proposed to provide the information exchange, but other candidates such as satellite-based receivers, broadband or airborne internet, and cellular communications are possible candidate's.

  9. Assessing contaminant sensitivity of endangered and threatened aquatic species: Part III. Effluent toxicity tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dwyer, F.J.; Hardesty, D.K.; Henke, C.E.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Whites, D.W.; Augspurger, T.; Canfield, T.J.; Mount, D.R.; Mayer, F.L.

    2005-01-01

    Toxicity tests using standard effluent test procedures described by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency were conducted with Ceriodaphnia dubia, fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas), and seven threatened and endangered (listed) fish species from four families: (1) Acipenseridae: shortnose sturgeon (Acipenser brevirostrum); (2) Catostomidae; razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus); (3) Cyprinidae: bonytail chub (Gila elegans), Cape Fear shiner (Notropis mekistocholas) Colorado pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus lucius), and spotfin chub (Cyprinella monacha); and (4) Poecillidae: Gila topminnow (Poeciliopsis occidentalis). We conducted 7-day survival and growth studies with embryo-larval fathead minnows and analogous exposures using the listed species. Survival and reproduction were also determined with C. dubia. Tests were conducted with carbaryl, ammonia-or a simulated effluent complex mixture of carbaryl, copper, 4-nonylphenol, pentachlorophenol and permethrin at equitoxic proportions. In addition, Cape Fear shiners and spotfin chub were tested using diazinon, copper, and chlorine. Toxicity tests were also conducted with field-collected effluents from domestic or industrial facilities. Bonytail chub and razorback suckers were tested with effluents collected in Arizona whereas effluent samples collected from North Carolina were tested with Cape Fear shiner, spotfin chub, and shortnose sturgeon. The fathead minnow 7-day effluent test was often a reliable estimator of toxic effects to the listed fishes. However, in 21 % of the tests, a listed species was more sensitive than fathead minnows. More sensitive species results varied by test so that usually no species was always more or less sensitive than fathead minnows. Only the Gila topminnow was consistently less sensitive than the fathead minnow. Listed fish species were protected 96% of the time when results for both fathead minnows and C. dubia were considered, thus reinforcing the value of standard whole

  10. HLA alleles and haplotypes among the Lakota Sioux: report of the ASHI minority workshops, part III.

    PubMed

    Leffell, Mary S; Fallin, M Daniele; Hildebrand, William H; Cavett, Joshua W; Iglehart, Brian A; Zachary, Andrea A

    2004-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II alleles were defined for 302 Lakota Sioux American Indians as part of the American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics coordinated studies on minority populations. The study group was comprised of adult volunteers from the Cheyenne River and Ogala Sioux tribes residing, respectively, on the Cheyenne River and Pine Ridge Reservations in South Dakota. Of the participants, 263 (87%) claimed full American Indian ancestry through both maternal and paternal grandparents. The study group included 25 nuclear families that were informative for genotyping. HLA phenotypes from 202 adults with no other known first-degree relative included in the study were used for calculation of allele and haplotype frequencies by maximum likelihood estimation. HLA-A, -B, and -Cw alleles were found to be in Hardy Weinberg equilibrium. Deviation from equilibrium was observed for DRB1 alleles (p=0.01), but could be attributed to the sample size and the occurrence of some genotypes with low expected frequencies. Polymorphism among the Sioux was limited with four to seven alleles comprising >80% of those observed at each locus. Several alleles were found at high frequency (0.05-0.30) among the Sioux that are also prevalent in other Native Americans and Alaska Natives, including: A*2402, *3101, and *0206; B*3501,*3901, *5101, and *2705; Cw*0702, *0404, and *03041; DRB1*0407, *0404, *1402, and *16021; and DQB1*0301, *0302, and *0402. DRB1*0811, which has been only previously described in Navajo and Tlingit Indians, was found to occur at a frequency of 0.119 among the Sioux. Two new alleles were defined among the Sioux: Cw*0204 and DRB1*040703, which were found in two and four individuals, respectively. In the haplotype analyses, significant linkage disequilibrium (p<0.00001) was seen in all pairwise comparisons of loci and numerous two and three locus haplotypes were found to have strong, positive linkage disequilibrium values. The two most

  11. Environmental assessment of three egg production systems - Part III: Airborne bacteria concentrations and emissions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y; Zhao, D; Ma, H; Liu, K; Atilgan, A; Xin, H

    2016-07-01

    Airborne microorganism level is an important indoor air quality indicator, yet it has not been well documented for laying-hen houses in the United States. As a part of the Coalition for Sustainable Egg Supply (CSES) environmental monitoring project, this study comparatively monitored the concentrations and emissions of airborne total and Gram-negative (Gram(-)) bacteria in three types of commercial laying-hen houses, i.e., conventional cage (CC), aviary (AV), and enriched colony (EC) houses, over a period of eight months covering the mid and late stages of the flock cycle. It also delineated the relationship between airborne total bacteria and particulate matter smaller than 10 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM10). The results showed airborne total bacteria concentrations (log CFU/m(3)) of 4.7 ± 0.3 in CC, 6.0 ± 0.8 in AV, and 4.8 ± 0.3 in EC, all being higher than the level recommended for human environment (3.0 log CFU/m(3)). The much higher concentrations in AV arose from the presence of floor litter and hen activities on it, as evidenced by the higher concentrations in the afternoon (with litter access) than in the morning (without litter access). The overall means and standard deviation of airborne total bacteria emission rates, in log CFU/[h-hen] (or log CFU/[h-AU], AU = animal unit or 500 kg live weight) were 4.8 ± 0.4 (or 7.3 ± 0.4) for CC, 6.1 ± 0.7 (or 8.6 ± 0.7) for AV, and 4.8 ± 0.5 (or 7.3 ± 0.5) for EC. Both concentration and emission rate of airborne total bacteria were positively related to PM10 Gram(-) bacteria were present at low concentrations in all houses; and only 2 samples (6%) in CC, 7 (22%) samples in AV, and 2 (6%) samples in EC out of 32 air samples collected in each house were found positive with Gram(-) bacteria. The concentration of airborne Gram(-) bacteria was estimated to be <2% of the total bacteria. Total bacteria counts in manure on belt (in all houses) and floor litter (only in AV) were similar; however, the manure had

  12. Distribution function approach to redshift space distortions. Part III: halos and galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Okumura, Teppei; Seljak, Uroš; Desjacques, Vincent E-mail: useljak@berkeley.edu

    2012-11-01

    It was recently shown that the power spectrum in redshift space can be written as a sum of cross-power spectra between number weighted velocity moments, of which the lowest are density and momentum density. We investigate numerically the properties of these power spectra for simulated galaxies and dark matter halos and compare them to the dark matter power spectra, generalizing the concept of the bias in density-density power spectra. Because all of the quantities are number weighted this approach is well defined even for sparse systems such as massive halos. This contrasts to the previous approaches to RSD where velocity correlations have been explored, but velocity field is a poorly defined concept for sparse systems. We find that the number density weighting leads to a strong scale dependence of the bias terms for momentum density auto-correlation and cross-correlation with density. This trend becomes more significant for the more biased halos and leads to an enhancement of RSD power relative to the linear theory. Fingers-of-god effects, which in this formalism come from the correlations of the higher order moments beyond the momentum density, lead to smoothing of the power spectrum and can reduce this enhancement of power from the scale dependent bias, but are relatively small for halos with no small scale velocity dispersion. In comparison, for a more realistic galaxy sample with satellites the small scale velocity dispersion generated by satellite motions inside the halos leads to a larger power suppression on small scales, but this depends on the satellite fraction and on the details of how the satellites are distributed inside the halo. We investigate several statistics such as the two-dimensional power spectrum P(k,μ), where μ is the angle between the Fourier mode and line of sight, its multipole moments, its powers of μ{sup 2}, and configuration space statistics. Overall we find that the nonlinear effects in realistic galaxy samples such as luminous

  13. Magnetofluorescent micelles incorporating Dy(III)-DOTA as potential bimodal agents for optical and high field magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Harris, Michael; Vander Elst, Luce; Laurent, Sophie; Parac-Vogt, Tatjana N

    2016-03-21

    Dysprosium(iii) was coordinated to four 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) bisamide derivatives functionalized with amphiphilic p-dodecylaniline and p-tetradecylaniline in a differing cis- and trans-orientation. The complexes were assembled into mono-disperse micelles having size distribution maxima ranging from 10 to 15 nm and the magnetic and optical properties of the micelles were examined in detail. The micelles show characteristic Dy(iii) emission with quantum yields reaching 0.8%. The transverse relaxivity r2 per Dy(iii) ion at 500 MHz and 310 K reaches maximum values of ca. 20 s(-1) mM(-1) which is a large increase when compared to a value of 0.8 s(-1) mM(-1) observed for Dy(III)-DTPA. The micelles were stable in water when incubated at 37 °C for 1 week and showed no relaxivity decrease when measured in the presence of 4% (w/v) human serum albumin. The efficient T2 relaxation, especially at strong magnetic fields, is sustained by the high magnetic moment of the dysprosium(iii) ion, the coordination of water molecules and long rotational correlation times. PMID:26865457

  14. Vehicle-mounted ground penetrating radar (Mine Stalker III) field evaluation in Angola

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laudato, Stephen; Hart, Kerry; Nevard, Michael; Lauziere, Steven; Grant, Shaun

    2014-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Defense Humanitarian Demining Research and Development (HD R&D) Program, Non-Intrusive Inspection Technology (NIITEK), Inc. and The HALO Trust have over the last decade funded, developed and tested various prototype vehicle mounted ground penetrating radar (GPR) systems named the Mine Stalker. The HD R&D Program and NIITEK developed the Mine Stalker to detect low metal anti-tank (LM-AT) mines in roads. The country of Angola is severely affected by LM-AT mines in and off road, some of which are buried beyond the effective range of detection sensors current used in country. The threat from LM-AT mines such as the South African Number 8 (No. 8) and the Chinese Type 72 (72AT) still persist from Angola's 30 years of civil war. These LM-AT threats are undetectable at depths greater than 5 to 10 centimeters using metal detection technology. Clearing commerce routes are a critical requirement before Angola can rebuild its infrastructure and improve safety conditions for the local populace. The Halo Trust, a non-governmental demining organization (NGO) focused on demining and clearance of unexploded ordnance (UXO), has partnered with the HD R&D Program to conduct an operational field evaluation (OFE) of the Mine Stalker III (MS3) in Angola. Preliminary testing and training efforts yielded encouraging results. This paper presents a review of the data collected, testing results, system limitations and deficiencies while operating in a real world environment. Our goal is to demonstrate and validate this technology in live minefield environments, and to collect data to prompt future developments to the system.

  15. Review article: A primer for clinical researchers in the emergency department: Part III: How to write a scientific paper.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Andrew; McD Taylor, David; Babl, Franz E

    2012-08-01

    In this series we address key topics for clinicians who conduct research as part of their work in the ED. Analysis of research data does not represent the completion of a project as the findings need to be communicated to clinicians and other researchers in the field. In this section, we describe how to write up clinical research data for publication in a peer-reviewed journal. We also describe the editorial and peer-review process. PMID:22862751

  16. Single-field consistency relations of large scale structure part III: test of the equivalence principle

    SciTech Connect

    Creminelli, Paolo; Gleyzes, Jérôme; Vernizzi, Filippo; Hui, Lam; Simonović, Marko E-mail: jerome.gleyzes@cea.fr E-mail: msimonov@sissa.it

    2014-06-01

    The recently derived consistency relations for Large Scale Structure do not hold if the Equivalence Principle (EP) is violated. We show it explicitly in a toy model with two fluids, one of which is coupled to a fifth force. We explore the constraints that galaxy surveys can set on EP violation looking at the squeezed limit of the 3-point function involving two populations of objects. We find that one can explore EP violations of order 10{sup −3}÷10{sup −4} on cosmological scales. Chameleon models are already very constrained by the requirement of screening within the Solar System and only a very tiny region of the parameter space can be explored with this method. We show that no violation of the consistency relations is expected in Galileon models.

  17. DIETARY EXPOSURES OF YOUNG CHILDREN, PART II: FIELD STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A small, pilot field study was conducted to determine the adequacy of protocols for dietary exposure measurements. Samples were collected to estimate the amount of pesticides transferred from contaminated surfaces or hands to foods of young children and to validate a dietary mod...

  18. The interplanetary magnetic field B[sub y] effects on large-scale field-aligned currents near local noon: Contributions from cusp part and noncusp part

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, M.; Lundin, R.; Woch, J. )

    1993-04-01

    latitudinals develop a model to account for the effect of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B[sub y] component on the dayside field-aligned currents (FACs). As part of the model the FACs are divided into a [open quotes]cusp part[close quotes] and a [open quotes]noncusp part[close quotes]. The authors then propose that the cusp part FACs shift in the longitudinal direction while the noncusplike part FACs shift in both longitudinal and latitudinal directions in response to the y component of the IMF. If combined, it is observed that the noncusp part FAC is found poleward of the cusp part FAC system when the y component of the IMF is large. These two FAC systems flow in the same direction. They reinforce one another, creating a strong FAC, termed the DPY-FAC. The model also predicts that the polewardmost part of the DPY-FAC flows on closed field lines, even in regions conventionally occupied by the polar cap. Results of the model are successfully compared with particle and magnetic field data from Viking missions.

  19. Estimating the Reliability of Electronic Parts in High Radiation Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everline, Chester; Clark, Karla; Man, Guy; Rasmussen, Robert; Johnston, Allan; Kohlhase, Charles; Paulos, Todd

    2008-01-01

    Radiation effects on materials and electronic parts constrain the lifetime of flight systems visiting Europa. Understanding mission lifetime limits is critical to the design and planning of such a mission. Therefore, the operational aspects of radiation dose are a mission success issue. To predict and manage mission lifetime in a high radiation environment, system engineers need capable tools to trade radiation design choices against system design and reliability, and science achievements. Conventional tools and approaches provided past missions with conservative designs without the ability to predict their lifetime beyond the baseline mission.This paper describes a more systematic approach to understanding spacecraft design margin, allowing better prediction of spacecraft lifetime. This is possible because of newly available electronic parts radiation effects statistics and an enhanced spacecraft system reliability methodology. This new approach can be used in conjunction with traditional approaches for mission design. This paper describes the fundamentals of the new methodology.

  20. Metabolism. Part III: Lipids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodner, George M.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the metabolic processes of complex lipids, including saponification, activation and transport, and the beta-oxidation spiral. Discusses fatty acid degradation in regard to biochemical energy and ketone bodies. (TW)

  1. On squeezed limits in single-field inflation. Part I

    SciTech Connect

    Flauger, Raphael; Green, Daniel; Porto, Rafael A. E-mail: dgreen@stanford.edu

    2013-08-01

    The n-point correlation functions in single-field inflation obey a set of consistency conditions in the exact squeezed limit which are not present in multi-field models, and thus are powerful tools to distinguish between the two. However, these consistency conditions may be violated for a finite range of scales in single-field models, for example by departures from the Bunch-Davies state. These excited states may be the consequence of interactions during inflation, or may be a remnant of the era that preceded inflation. In this paper we analyze the bispectrum, and show that in the regime of theoretical control the resulting signal in the squeezed limit remains undetectably small in all known models which continuously excite the state. We also show that the signal remains undetectably small if the initial state is related to the Bunch-Davies state by a Bogoliubov transformation and the energy density in the state is small enough so that the usual slow-roll conditions are obeyed. Bogoliubov states that lead to violations of the slow-roll conditions, as well as more general excited states, require more careful treatment and will be discussed in a separate publication.

  2. Methyl bromide emissions from a covered field: III. Correcting chamber flux for temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, S.R.; Gan, J.; Ernst, F.F.; Wang, D.

    1996-07-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the environmental fate and transport of methyl bromide (MeBr) in agricultural systems. Part of this experiment involved the use of three flow-through chambers to estimate the MeBr flux through a sheet of clear polyethylene plastic covering the field. Using the chamber data, the total mass lost to the atmosphere was estimated to be 96% of the applied mass, and the results were highly variable between chambers (i.e., standard deviation of 298 kg or 35%). The air temperature inside the chamber was found to be much higher than the air temperature outside and was highly correlated with the diurnal variation in incoming solar radiation. Since the diffusion through polyethylene film was found to be strongly dependent on the temperature, a method was developed to correct the chamber flux density data for enhanced diffusion caused by increases in the temperature inside the chamber. After correcting for temperature, the estimated total MeBr emission was reduced to approximately 59% (21% standard deviation) of the applied amount, which is about 5% less than was measured using other methods. When chambers are used to measure volatilization of MeBr or other fumigants from fields covered with a sheet of polyethylene plastic, the chambers should be designed to minimize internal heating or some method should be used to correct the volatilization rate for the effects of temperature. 16 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. RF thermal and new cold part design studies on TTF-III input coupler for Project-X

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, Shilun; Adolphsen, Chris E.; Li, Zenghai; Solyak, Nikolay A.; Gonin, Ivan V.

    2015-05-15

    An RF power coupler is one of the key components in a superconducting (SC) linac. It provides RF power to the SC cavity and interconnects different temperature layers (1.8 K, 4.2 K, 70 K and 300 K). The TTF-III coupler is one of the most promising candidates for the High Energy (HE) linac of Project X, but it cannot meet the average power requirements because of the relatively high temperature rise on the warm inner conductor, so some design modifications will be required. In this paper, we describe our simulation studies on the copper coating thickness on the warm inner conductor with RRR values of 10 and 100. Our purpose is to rebalance the dynamic and static loads, and finally lower the temperature rise along the warm inner conductor. Additionally, to get stronger coupling, better power handling and less multipacting probability, one new cold part design was proposed using a 60 mm coaxial line; the corresponding multipacting simulation studies have also been investigated.

  4. Field Balancing in the Real World: Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Bracher, R.K.; Surrett, C.L.

    1999-10-06

    This paper is a follow-up to an earlier paper, Field Balancing in the Real World, which was presented at CSI Reliability Week 1997 in Nashville. Case studies of excessive vibrations on fans at ORNL will be discussed. Except for a few small sections from the earlier paper, this paper is entirely new. The case studies are new. As in the first paper, all fans are rigid-rotor type fans. Normal operation, therefore, is at less than the shaft's first critical speed. The presentation of case studies with root cause problems other than unbalance is a major departure from the first paper. We believe they belong here, since unbalance is suspected most of the time when a fan is vibrating excessively, even when it is not the root cause. In reality, unbalance is the underlying cause of the excess vibration on fans we have fixed at ORNL only about half the time. Furthermore, the analyst's credibility could be called into question upon an unsuccessful attempt at field balancing when underlying causes are later discovered and fixed. A demonstration will follow the case study presentation. The additional tests described in this paper to confirm centrifugal force (probable unbalance) will be performed.

  5. Field Investigations of Lactate-Stimulated Bioreduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) at Hanford 100H

    SciTech Connect

    T.C. Hazen; B. Faybishenko; J. Wan; T.Tokunaga; S. Hubbard; M. Conrad; S. Borglin; D. Joyner; S. Koenigsberg; A. Willet

    2004-03-17

    The objective of this report is to perform field investigations to assess the potential for immobilizing and detoxifying chromium contaminated soils and groundwater using bioremediation at Site 100H at Hanford. Specific goals are: (1) Designing a field test to measure the effect of lactate biostimulation on microbial community activity, redox gradients, transport limitations, and other reducing agents in comparison with our previous NABIR laboratory work. (2) Establishing the rates and conditions that may cause are oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI) following biostimulation. (3) Providing design criteria for full-scale deployment on in situ Cr(VI) bioreduction via lactate stimulation for use at DOE sites.

  6. Helping General Physical Educators and Adapted Physical Educators Address the Office of Civil Rights Dear Colleague Guidance Letter: Part III--Practitioners and Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poulin, David; Martinez, David; Aenchbacher, Amy; Aiello, Rocco; Doyle, Mike; Hilgenbrinck, Linda; Busse, Sean; Cappuccio, Jim

    2013-01-01

    In Part III of the feature, physical educators and adapted physical educators offer current best practices as models of implementation for readers. Contributions included are: (1) Answer to the Dear Colleague Letter from the Anchorage School District's Adapted Sport Program (David Poulin); (2) Georgia's Adapted Physical Educators…

  7. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (83rd, Phoenix, Arizona, August 9-12, 2000). Miscellaneous, Part III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Miscellaneous, part III section of the proceedings contains the following 11 papers: "The Relationship between Health and Fitness Magazine Reading and Eating-Disordered Weight-Loss Methods among High School Girls" (Steven R. Thomsen, Michelle M. Weber, and Lora Beth Brown); "A Practical Exercise for Teaching Ethical Decision Making to…

  8. Proceedings of the EMU Conference on Foreign Languages for Business and the Professions (Dearborn, Michigan, April 5-7, 1984). Part III: Taking the Humanities to Business.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voght, Geoffrey M., Ed.

    Part III of the proceedings contains 12 presentations. They are: "The Role of Business Language in the Traditional Curriculum" (Michel Rocchi); "Foreign Languages for Business and the Professions Belong in the Liberal Arts" (Robert A. Kreiter); "How Much and How Far? Commercial French and the Student, Instructor, Administrator, and the Business…

  9. Ozone process insights from field experiments - part I: overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidy, G. M.

    This paper gives an overview of selected approaches recently adopted to analyze observations from field experiments that characterize the tropospheric physics and chemistry of ozone and related oxidation products. Analysis of ambient oxidant and precursor concentration measurements, combined with meteorological observations, has provided important information about tropospheric processes. Projection of the response of tropospheric ozone concentrations to changes in precursor emissions is achieved through emissions based air quality models (AQMs). These models integrate several "process" elements from source emissions to meteorological and chemical phenomena. Through field campaigns, new knowledge has become available which has enabled workers to better understand the strengths and weaknesses of AQMs and their components. Examples of insightful results include: (a) reconciliation of ambient concentrations of speciated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with estimates from emissions models, and inventories, (b) verification of chemical mechanisms for ozone formation from its precursors using approximations applicable in different chemical regimes, (c) inference of regimes of sensitivity in ozone concentration to changes in VOC and NO x precursors from ozone management practices, (d) conceptualization of important air mass transport and mixing processes on different spatial and temporal scales that affect ozone and precursor concentrations distributions, and (e) application of the analysis of spatial and temporal variance to infer the origins of chemical product transport, and precursor distributions. Studies from the first category have been used to improve emissions models substantially over previous forms. The remainder of the analyses has yielded valuable insight into the chemical and meteorological mechanisms at work on different spatial and temporal scales. The methods have provided an observationally based framework for effective choices to improve ozone

  10. Premium performance heating oil - Part 2, Field trial results

    SciTech Connect

    Jetter, S.M.; Hoskin, D.; McClintock, W.R.

    1996-07-01

    Limited field trial results of a heating oil additive package developed to minimize unscheduled maintenance indicate that it achieves its goal of keeping heating oil systems cleaner. The multifunctional additive package was developed to provide improved fuel oxidation stability, improved corrosion protection, and dispersency. This combination of performance benefits was chosen because we believed it would retard the formation of sludge, as well as allow sludge already present to be carried through the system without fouling the fuel system components (dispersency should keep sludge particles small so they pass through the filtering system). Since many unscheduled maintenance calls are linked to fouling of the fuel filtering system, the overall goal of this technology is to reduce these maintenance calls. Photographic evidence shows that the additive package not only reduces the amount of sludge formed, but even removes existing sludge from filters and pump strainers. This {open_quotes}clean-up{close_quotes} performance is provided trouble free: we found no indication that nozzle/burner performance was impaired by dispersing sludge from filters and pump strainers. Qualitative assessments from specific accounts that used the premium heating oil also show marked reductions in unscheduled maintenance.

  11. Elasto-dynamic analysis of a gear pump-Part III: Experimental validation procedure and model extension to helical gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucchi, E.; Dalpiaz, G.

    2015-01-01

    This work concerns external gear pumps for automotive applications, which operate at high speed and low pressure. In previous works of the authors (Part I and II, [1,2]), a non-linear lumped-parameter kineto-elastodynamic model for the prediction of the dynamic behaviour of external gear pumps was presented. It takes into account the most important phenomena involved in the operation of this kind of machine. The two main sources of noise and vibration are considered: pressure pulsation and gear meshing. The model has been used in order to foresee the influence of working conditions and design modifications on vibration generation. The model's experimental validation is a difficult task. Thus, Part III proposes a novel methodology for the validation carried out by the comparison of simulations and experimental results concerning forces and moments: it deals with the external and inertial components acting on the gears, estimated by the model, and the reactions and inertial components on the pump casing and the test plate, obtained by measurements. The validation is carried out comparing the level of the time synchronous average in the time domain and the waterfall maps in the frequency domain, with particular attention to identify system resonances. The validation results are satisfactory globally, but discrepancies are still present. Moreover, the assessed model has been properly modified for the application to a new virtual pump prototype with helical gears in order to foresee gear accelerations and dynamic forces. Part IV is focused on improvements in the modelling and analysis of the phenomena bound to the pressure evolution around the gears in order to achieve results closer to the measured values. As a matter of fact, the simulation results have shown that a variable meshing stiffness has a notable contribution on the dynamic behaviour of the pump but this is not as important as the pressure phenomena. As a consequence, the original model was modified with the

  12. 5 CFR Appendix II to Part 1201 - Appropriate Regional or Field Office for Filing Appeals

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Appropriate Regional or Field Office for Filing Appeals II Appendix II to Part 1201 Administrative Personnel MERIT SYSTEMS PROTECTION BOARD ORGANIZATION AND PROCEDURES PRACTICES AND PROCEDURES Pt. 1201, App. II Appendix II to Part 1201—Appropriate Regional or Field Office for Filing...

  13. 12 CFR Appendix B to Part 701 - Chartering and Field of Membership Manual

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Chartering and Field of Membership Manual B Appendix B to Part 701 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS ORGANIZATION AND OPERATION OF FEDERAL CREDIT UNIONS Pt. 701, App. B Appendix B to Part 701—Chartering and Field of Membership...

  14. Virgo cluster and field dwarf ellipticals in 3D - III. Spatially and temporally resolved stellar populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryś, Agnieszka; Koleva, Mina; Falcón-Barroso, Jesús; Vazdekis, Alexandre; Lisker, Thorsten; Peletier, Reynier; van de Ven, Glenn

    2015-09-01

    We present the stellar population analysis of a sample of 12 dwarf elliptical galaxies, observed with the SAURON integral field unit, using the full-spectrum fitting method. We show that star formation histories (SFHs) resolved into two populations can be recovered even within a limited wavelength range, provided that high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) data are used. We confirm that dEs have had complex SFHs, with star formation extending to (more) recent epochs: for the majority of our galaxies star formation activity was either still strong a few (≲5) Gyr ago or they experienced a secondary burst of star formation roughly at that time. This latter possibility is in agreement with the proposed dE formation scenario where tidal harassment drives the gas remaining in their progenitors inwards and induces a star formation episode. For one of our field galaxies, ID 0918, we find a correlation between its stellar population and kinematic properties, pointing to a possible merger origin of its kinematically decoupled core. One of our cluster objects, VCC 1431, appears to be composed exclusively of an old population (≳10-12 Gyr). Combining this with our earlier dynamical results, we conclude that the galaxy was either ram-pressure stripped early on in its evolution in a group environment and subsequently tidally heated, or that it evolved in situ in the cluster's central parts, compact enough to avoid tidal disruption. These are only two of the examples illustrating the SFH richness of these objects confirmed with our data.

  15. Coronal extension of flaring region magnetic fields inferred from high-resolution microwave and type III burst observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lantos, P.; Pick, M.; Kundu, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    Observations of three solar radio bursts, obtained with the Very Large Array of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory at 6 cm wavelength, have been combined with meter observations from the Mark III Nancay Radioheliograph. There is a good correlation between solar activity observed at the two wavelength domains. A small change by about 10 sec in the centimetric burst location corresponds to a large change, by about 0.5 solar radius, in the related metric type III burst location. This indicates discrete injection/acceleration regions and the presence of very divergent magnetic fields. The bursts come from two distinct active regions. With two-dimensional spatial resolution, it is shown that, in this sample, each active region possesses a coronal extension that is separated from that of the neighboring active region.

  16. Ferrimagnetic ordering behaviors and compensation temperatures in the FeIIFeIII bimetallic oxalates: Effective-field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaoling; Qi, Yang

    2016-08-01

    A mixed spin-2 (FeII) and spin-5/2 (FeIII) ferrimagnetic Ising model on a honeycomb lattice was built to describe the FeII FeIII bimetallic oxalates, and the ferrimagnetic ordering behaviors and compensation temperatures were investigated through the effective-field theory based on Glauber-type stochastic dynamic. It was found that the effects of the interlayer coupling and the single-ion anisotropy contributed to the increase of the critical temperature with growing layer separation and the existence of compensation temperature depending on the organic cation. In particular, the magnetization of the system may show a small discontinuous jump in a certain range of the single-ion anisotropy.

  17. A Descriptive Analysis of the Del Mod System's Field Agent Component, Final Report, Volume III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golts, Uldis R.

    This monograph describes the field agent of the Delaware Del Mod System. The following sections are included in the report: (1) The Duties and Activities of the Del Mod System Field Agents; (2) The Field Agents' Mode of Operation; (3) The Conduct of Projects; (4) The Hiring and Training of Del Mod Field Agents; (5) The Administration of Del Mod…

  18. Field and dilution effects on the magnetic relaxation behaviours of a 1D dysprosium(iii)-carboxylate chain built from chiral ligands.

    PubMed

    Han, Tian; Leng, Ji-Dong; Ding, You-Song; Wang, Yanyan; Zheng, Zhiping; Zheng, Yan-Zhen

    2015-08-14

    A one-dimensional dysprosium(iii)-carboxylate chain in which the Dy(III) ions sit in a pseudo D(2d)-symmetry environment is synthesized and shows different slow magnetic relaxation behaviours depending on the field and dilution effects. Besides, the chiral ligand introduces the additional functions of the Cotton effect and polarization for this compound. PMID:26159885

  19. Exchange interactions and zero-field splittings in C3-symmetric Mn(III)6Fe(III): using molecular recognition for the construction of a series of high spin complexes based on the triplesalen ligand.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Thorsten; Heidemeier, Maik; Krickemeyer, Erich; Bögge, Hartmut; Stammler, Anja; Fröhlich, Roland; Bill, Eckhard; Schnack, Jürgen

    2009-01-19

    The reaction of the tris(tetradentate) triplesalen ligand H6talen(t-Bu2), which provides three salen-like coordination environments bridged in a meta-phenylene arrangement by a phloroglucinol backbone, with Mn(II) salts under aerobic conditions affords, in situ, the trinuclear Mn(III) triplesalen complexes [(talen(t-Bu2)){Mn(III)(solv)n}3]3+. These can be used as molecular building blocks in the reaction with [Fe(CN)6]3- as a hexaconnector to form the heptanuclear complex [{(talen(t-Bu2)){Mn(III)(solv)n}3}2{Fe(III)(CN)6}]3+ ([Mn(III)6Fe(III)]3+). The regular ligand folding observed in the trinuclear triplesalen complexes preorganizes the three metal ions for the reaction of three facially coordinated nitrogen atoms of a hexacyanometallate and provides a driving force for the formation of the heptanuclear complexes [M(t)6M(c)]n+ (M(t), terminal metal ion of the triplesalen building block; M(c), central metal ion of the hexacyanometallate) by molecular recognition, as has already been demonstrated for the single-molecule magnet [Mn(III)6Cr(III)]3+. [{(talen(t-Bu2))(Mn(III)(MeOH))3}2{Fe(III)(CN)6}][Fe(III)(CN)6] (1) was characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, FTIR, ESI- and MALDI-TOF-MS, Mössbauer spectroscopy, and magnetic measurements. The molecular structure of [Mn(III)6Fe(III)]3+ is overall identical to that of [Mn(III)6Cr(III)]3+ but exhibits a different ligand folding of the Mn(III) salen subunits with a helical distortion. The Mössbauer spectra demonstrate a stronger distortion from octahedral symmetry for the central [Fe(CN)6]3- in comparison to the ionic [Fe(CN)6]3-. At low temperatures in zero magnetic fields, the Mössbauer spectra show magnetic splittings indicative of slow relaxation of the magnetization on the Mössbauer time scale. Variable-temperature-variable-field and mu(eff) versus T magnetic data have been analyzed in detail by full-matrix diagonalization of the appropriate spin-Hamiltonian, consisting of isotropic exchange, zero-field

  20. Structural and magnetic properties of some lanthanide (Ln = Eu(iii), Gd(iii) and Nd(iii)) cyanoacetate polymers: field-induced slow magnetic relaxation in the Gd and Nd substitutions.

    PubMed

    Arauzo, A; Lazarescu, A; Shova, S; Bartolomé, E; Cases, R; Luzón, J; Bartolomé, J; Turta, C

    2014-08-28

    The lanthanide(iii) cyanoacetate complexes of the formula {[Ln2(CNCH2COO)6(H2O)4]·2H2O}n, where Ln = Eu (), Gd (), Nd (), have been prepared and characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis. Complexes and are isostructural and differ from the binding scheme of the neodymium compound , structurally described earlier. In all cases, the cyano group of the cyanoacetate ligand is not coordinated to the lanthanide cation. The carboxylic groups exhibit different binding modes: 2-bidentate-chelating, 2-bidentate and 2-tridentate-chelating bridging for and , and 4-bidentate and 2-tridentate-chelating bridging for the complex . The Eu compound shows field induced paramagnetism, as expected for a non-magnetic ground state with mixing from higher states. Combining the dc magnetization and luminescence measurements the spin-orbit coupling constant λ = 343 ± 4 cm(-1) was found, averaged over the two different sites for Eu in the lattice. In the Gd complex , a crystal field splitting of D/kB = -0.11 ± 0.01 K has been found for the S = 7/2 multiplet of the Gd(iii) ion. No slow relaxation at H = 0 is observed because the low anisotropy barrier allows fast spin reversal through classical processes. The application of an external magnetic field induces two slow relaxation processes. It is argued that the first relaxation rate is caused by the resonant phonon trapping (RPT) mechanism, while the second, slower relaxation rate is due to the lifting of the Kramers degeneracy on the ground state. For compound heat capacity and dc susceptibility measurements indicate that at very low temperatures the ground state Kramers doublet has strong single ion anisotropy. The energy to the next excited doublet ΔZFS/kB = 104 K has been calculated by ab initio calculation methods. The g* tensor has also been calculated, showing that it has predominant anisotropy along the z-axis, and there is an important transversal component. At H = 0 quantum tunnelling is an effective mechanism in producing a

  1. Eleven-year field study of Pu migration from Pu III, IV, and VI sources.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Daniel I; Demirkanli, Deniz I; Gumapas, Leo; Powell, Brian A; Fjeld, Robert A; Molz, Fred J; Serkiz, Steven M

    2006-01-15

    Understanding the processes controlling Pu mobility in the subsurface environment is important for estimating the amount of Pu waste that can be safely disposed in vadose zone burial sites. To study long-term Pu mobility, four 52-L lysimeters filled with sediment collected from the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina were amended with well-characterized solid Pu sources (PuIIICl3, PuIV(NO3)4, PuIV(C2O4)2, and PuVIO2(NO3)2) and left exposed to natural precipitation for 2-11 years. Pu oxidation state distribution in the Pu(III) and Pu(IV) lysimeters sediments (a red clayey sediment, pH = 6.3) were similar, consisting of 0% Pu(III), >92% Pu(IV), 1% Pu(V), 1% Pu(VI), and the remainder was a Pu polymer. These three lysimeters also had near identical sediment Pu concentration profiles, where >95% of the Pu remained within 1.25 cm of the source after 11 years; the other 5% of Pu moved at an overall rate of 0.9 cm yr(-1). As expected, Pu moved more rapidly through the Pu(VI) lysimeter, at an overall rate of 12.5 cm yr(-1). Solute transport modeling of the sediment Pu concentration profile data in the Pu(VI) lysimeter indicated that some transformation of Pu into a much less mobile form, presumably Pu(IV), had occurred during the course of the two-year study. This modeling also supported previous laboratory measurements showing that Pu(V) or Pu(VI) reduction was 5 orders of magnitude faster than corresponding Pu(III) or Pu(IV) oxidation. The slow oxidation rate (1 x 10(-8) hr(-1); t1/2 = 8000 yr) was not discernible from the Pu(VI) lysimeter data that reflected only two years of transport butwas readily discernible from the Pu(III) and Pu(IV) lysimeter data that reflected 11 years of transport. PMID:16468387

  2. In-plant demonstration of optimization of energy utilization in beck dyeing of carpet. Proposed Part III, Phase III extension of DOE contract

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    A proposal to demonstrate on a commercial scale an optimized procedure for beck dyeing of carpet to improve energy utilization is discussed. The proposal is for Phase III. A number of energy conserving procedural and equipment modification including lower dyeing temperature, lower liquor ratio, lower air exhaust flows, and recycle of hot spent dyebaths will be demonstrated in the plant dyeings. Pilot-scale experiments suggest that these modifications will reduce direct energy consumption in carpet dyeing by 400 Btu per pound of carpet processed. Adoption of the modified process by only 50% of the carpet industry would yield an annual reduction in energy consumption of 1 x 10/sup 12/ Btu's (1.7 x 10/sup 5/ BOE). The pilot-scale experiments also indicate that a cost savings of approximately 2 cents per pound of carpet dyed can be achieved with the suggested modifications. The demonstrated technology will have application in other types of nylon and polyester fiber dyeing. The Salem Carpet Mills carpet dyeing facility at Chickamauga, Georgia, will be the site of the demonstration.

  3. Pulsed currents carried by whistlers. III. Magnetic fields and currents excited by an electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Urrutia, J.M.; Stenzel, R.L.; Rousculp, C.L.

    1995-04-01

    Detailed measurements and analysis of electromagnetic fields asociated with pulsed plasma currents are reported. The objective is to demonstrate the properties of plasma currents in the electron magnetohydrodynamic regime and their relation to low frequency whistler waves. Short current pulses ({ital f}{sub {ital ce}}{sup {minus}1}{much_lt}{Delta}{ital t}{much_lt}{ital f}{sub {ital ci}}{sup {minus}1}) are injected from an electrode into a large, uniform magnetoplasma. The dynamic fields, B(r,{ital t}), are measured with probes in three-dimensional space and time, and are observed to propagate as wave packets predominantly along the guide magnetic field, B{sub 0}. Four-dimensional fast Fourier transformation of B(r,{ital t}) to B(k,{omega}) verifies that the wave fields fall on the dispersion surface of low-frequency oblique whistlers. The magnetic field topology of the packets consists of linked toroidal and solenoidal contributions in force-free configurations. The wave magnetic helicity is obtained quantitatively. Similarly, the topology of the current density field, J@={bold mc}{times}B/{mu}{sub 0}, is explained by its components, characteristic field lines, and helicity, {integral}J{center_dot}B{ital dV}. It is shown, both theoretically and experimentally, that A, B, and J are nearly parallel to one another. Field energy and helicity decay at the same rate without change in topology. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  4. Evaluation of the Field Test of Project Information Packages: Volume III--Resource Cost Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Salam, Nabeel; And Others

    The third of three volumes evaluating the first year field test of the Project Information Packages (PIPs) provides a cost analysis study as a key element in the total evaluation. The resource approach to cost analysis is explained and the specific resource methodology used in the main cost analysis of the 19 PIP field-test projects detailed. The…

  5. Field effect transistors for terahertz detection - silicon versus III-V material issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knap, W.; Videlier, H.; Nadar, S.; Coquillat, D.; Dyakonova, N.; Teppe, F.; Bialek, M.; Grynberg, M.; Karpierz, K.; Lusakowski, J.; Nogajewski, K.; Seliuta, D.; Kašalynas, I.; Valušis, G.

    2010-09-01

    Resonant frequencies of the two-dimensional plasma in FETs reach the THz range for nanometer transistor channels. Non-linear properties of the electron plasma are responsible for detection of THz radiation with FETs. Resonant excitation of plasma waves with sub-THz and THz radiation was demonstrated for short gate transistors at cryogenic temperatures. At room temperature, plasma oscillations are usually over-damped, but the FETs can still operate as efficient broadband THz detectors. The paper presents the main theoretical and experimental results on detection with FETs stressing their possible THz imaging applications. We discuss advantages and disadvantages of application of III-V GaAs and GaN HEMTs and silicon MOSFETs.

  6. Magnetic field effects on electron transfer reactions involving sextet-spin ( S = 5/2) intermediates generated on photoexcitation of a Cr(III)-porphyrin complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Yukie; Hoshino, Mikio; Hayashi, Hisaharu

    The excited trip-sextet ( 6 T 1 ) state of chloro-(3-methylimidazol)-( meso -tetraphenylporphyrinato) chromium(III) (Cr III P) is quenched by 1,1 '-dibenzyl-4,4 '-bipyridinium (BV 2+ ) in acetonitrile through electron transfer to give 5 (Cr III P .+ ) and 2 BV .+ . The intermediate is a geminate ion pair in the sextet (Sx) state 6 [ 5 (Cr III P .+ ) 2 BV .+ ], which decays through either the escape from a solvent cage to give the free ions or the spin conversion to the quartet (Qa) state followed by back electron transfer. The free ion yield ( ΦFI ) increased with increasing magnetic field from 0 to 4 T and then slightly decreased from 4 T to 10 T. These magnetic field effects are explained as follows. Under low fields where the Zeeman splitting of the spin sublevels is lower than or comparable with the electron spin dipole-dipole interaction within 5 (Cr III P .+ ), this interaction effectively induces the Sx ⇔Qa conversion of [ 5 (Cr III P .+ ) 2 BV + ] to result in low ΦFI values. Under high fields where the Zeeman splitting is larger than the dipole-dipole interaction, the Sx Qa conversion is decreased with increasing field to cause higher ΦFI values. The slight decrease in ΦFI above 4 T may be due to the Δg mechanism.

  7. Large Variety of New Pulsating Stars in the OGLE-III Galactic Disk Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrukowicz, P.; Dziembowski, W. A.; Mróz, P.; Soszyński, I.; Udalski, A.; Poleski, R.; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Ulaczyk, K.; Kozłowski, S.; Skowron, J.

    2013-12-01

    We present the results of a search for pulsating stars in the 7.12 deg2 OGLE-III Galactic disk area in the direction tangent to the Centaurus Arm. We report the identification of 20 Classical Cepheids, 45 RR Lyr type stars, 31 Long-Period Variables, such as Miras and Semi-Regular Variables, one pulsating white dwarf, and 58 very likely δ Sct type stars. Based on asteroseismic models constructed for one quadruple-mode and six triple-mode δ Sct type pulsators, we estimated masses, metallicities, ages, and distance moduli to these objects. The modeled stars have masses in the range 0.9-2.5 MSun and are located at distances between 2.5 kpc and 6.2 kpc. Two triple-mode and one double-mode pulsators seem to be Population II stars of the SX Phe type, probably from the Galactic halo. Our sample also includes candidates for Type II Cepheids and unclassified short-period (P<0.23 d) multi-mode stars which could be either δ Sct or β Cep type stars. One of the detected variables is a very likely δ Sct star with an exceptionally high peak-to-peak I-band amplitude of 0.35 mag at the very short period of 0.0196 d. All reported pulsating variable stars but one object are new discoveries. They are included in the OGLE-III Catalog of Variable Stars. Finally, we introduce the on-going OGLE-IV Galactic Disk Survey, which covers more than half of the Galactic plane. For the purposes of future works on the spiral structure and star formation history of the Milky Way, we have already compiled a list of known Galactic Classical Cepheids.

  8. A consistent and conservative scheme for incompressible MHD flows at a low magnetic Reynolds number. Part III: On a staggered mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Ming-Jiu; Li, Jun-Feng

    2012-01-01

    The consistent and conservative scheme developed on a rectangular collocated mesh [M.-J. Ni, R. Munipalli, N.B. Morley, P. Huang, M.A. Abdou, A current density conservative scheme for incompressible MHD flows at a low magnetic Reynolds number. Part I: on a rectangular collocated grid system, Journal of Computational Physics 227 (2007) 174-204] and on an arbitrary collocated mesh [M.-J. Ni, R. Munipalli, P. Huang, N.B. Morley, M.A. Abdou, A current density conservative scheme for incompressible MHD flows at a low magnetic Reynolds number. Part II: on an arbitrary collocated mesh, Journal of Computational Physics 227 (2007) 205-228] has been extended and specially designed for calculation of the Lorentz force on a staggered grid system (Part III) by solving the electrical potential equation for magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) at a low magnetic Reynolds number. In a staggered mesh, pressure ( p) and electrical potential ( φ) are located in the cell center, while velocities and current fluxes are located on the cell faces of a main control volume. The scheme numerically meets the physical conservation laws, charge conservation law and momentum conservation law. Physically, the Lorentz force conserves the momentum when the magnetic field is constant or spatial coordinate independent. The calculation of current density fluxes on cell faces is conducted using a scheme consistent with the discretization for solution of the electrical potential Poisson equation, which can ensure the calculated current density conserves the charge. A divergence formula of the Lorentz force is used to calculate the Lorentz force at the cell center of a main control volume, which can numerically conserve the momentum at constant or spatial coordinate independent magnetic field. The calculated cell-center Lorentz forces are then interpolated to the cell faces, which are used to obtain the corresponding velocity fluxes by solving the momentum equations. The "conservative" is an important property of

  9. 32 CFR Appendix E to Part 110 - Application of 4-Week Summer Field Training Formula (Sample)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Formula (Sample) E Appendix E to Part 110 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY... COMMUTATION INSTEAD OF UNIFORMS FOR MEMBERS OF THE SENIOR RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS Pt. 110, App. E Appendix E to Part 110—Application of 4-Week Summer Field Training Formula (Sample) Zone I Zone II...

  10. Numerical Modeling of Hailstorms and Hailstone Growth. Part III: Simulation of an Alberta Hailstorm--Natural and Seeded Cases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, Richard D.

    1987-07-01

    This paper reports on simulations of a multicellular hailstorm case observed during the 1983 Alberta Hail Project. The field operations on that day concentrated on two successive feeder cells which were subjected to controlled seeding experiments. The fist of these cells received the placebo treatment and the second was seeded with dry ice. The principal tool of this study is a modified version of the two-dimensional, time dependent hail category model described in Part I of this series of papers. It is with this model that hail growth processes are investigated, including the simulated effects of cloud seeding techniques as practiced in Alberta.The model simulation of the natural case produces a very good replication of the observed storm, particularly the placebo feeder cell. This is evidenced, in particular, by the high degree of fidelity of the observed and modeled radar reflectivity in terms of magnitudes, structure, and evolution. The character of the hailfall at the surface and the scale of the storm are captured nicely by the model, although cloud-top heights are generally too high, particularly for the mature storm system.Seeding experiments similar to those conducted in the field have also been simulated. These involve seeding the feeder cell early in its active development phase with dry ice (CO2) or silver iodide (AgI) introduced near cloud top. The model simulations of these seeded cases capture some of the observed seeding signatures detected by radar and aircraft. In these model experiments, CO2 seeding produced a stronger response than AgI seeding relative to inhibiting hail formation. For both seeded cases, production of precipitating ice was initially enhanced by the seeding, but retarded slightly in the later stages, the net result being modest increases in surface rainfall, with hail reduced slightly. In general, the model simulations support several subhypotheses of the operational strategy of the Alberta Research Council regarding the earlier

  11. Contributions of Major Committee Reports to the Teaching of Secondary School Chemistry: 1893-1975. Part III (1946-1975)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogden, William R.

    1976-01-01

    Presented is the third part of a three part report describing the contributions of major committee reports to secondary teaching of chemistry during the period 1893-1975. This third part covers the period 1947-1975, and includes a brief summary of the entire three part series. (SL)

  12. Comparison of geochemical data obtained using four brine sampling methods at the SECARB Phase III Anthropogenic Test CO2 injection site, Citronelle Oil Field, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conaway, Christopher; Thordsen, James J.; Manning, Michael A.; Cook, Paul J.; Trautz, Robert C.; Thomas, Burt; Kharaka, Yousif K.

    2016-01-01

    The chemical composition of formation water and associated gases from the lower Cretaceous Paluxy Formation was determined using four different sampling methods at a characterization well in the Citronelle Oil Field, Alabama, as part of the Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB) Phase III Anthropogenic Test, which is an integrated carbon capture and storage project. In this study, formation water and gas samples were obtained from well D-9-8 #2 at Citronelle using gas lift, electric submersible pump, U-tube, and a downhole vacuum sampler (VS) and subjected to both field and laboratory analyses. Field chemical analyses included electrical conductivity, dissolved sulfide concentration, alkalinity, and pH; laboratory analyses included major, minor and trace elements, dissolved carbon, volatile fatty acids, free and dissolved gas species. The formation water obtained from this well is a Na–Ca–Cl-type brine with a salinity of about 200,000 mg/L total dissolved solids. Differences were evident between sampling methodologies, particularly in pH, Fe and alkalinity. There was little gas in samples, and gas composition results were strongly influenced by sampling methods. The results of the comparison demonstrate the difficulty and importance of preserving volatile analytes in samples, with the VS and U-tube system performing most favorably in this aspect.

  13. Direct observation of lanthanide(III)-phthalocyanine molecules on Au(111) by using scanning tunneling microscopy and scanning tunneling spectroscopy and thin-film field-effect transistor properties of Tb(III)- and Dy(III)-phthalocyanine molecules.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Keiichi; Yoshida, Yusuke; Yamashita, Masahiro; Miyasaka, Hitoshi; Breedlove, Brian K; Kajiwara, Takashi; Takaishi, Shinya; Ishikawa, Naoto; Isshiki, Hironari; Zhang, Yan Feng; Komeda, Tadahiro; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Takeya, Jun

    2009-07-29

    The crystal structures of double-decker single molecule magnets (SMM) LnPc(2) (Ln = Tb(III) and Dy(III); Pc = phthalocyanine) and non-SMM YPc(2) were determined by using X-ray diffraction analysis. The compounds are isomorphous to each other. The compounds have metal centers (M = Tb(3+), Dy(3+), and Y(3+)) sandwiched by two Pc ligands via eight isoindole-nitrogen atoms in a square-antiprism fashion. The twist angle between the two Pc ligands is 41.4 degrees. Scanning tunneling microscopy was used to investigate the compounds adsorbed on a Au(111) surface, deposited by using the thermal evaporation in ultrahigh vacuum. Both MPc(2) with eight lobes and MPc with four lobes, which has lost one Pc ligand, were observed. In the scanning tunneling spectroscopy images of TbPc molecules at 4.8 K, a Kondo peak with a Kondo temperature (T(K)) of approximately 250 K was observed near the Fermi level (V = 0 V). On the other hand, DyPc, YPc, and MPc(2) exhibited no Kondo peak. To understand the observed Kondo effect, the energy splitting of sublevels in a crystal field should be taken into consideration. As the next step in our studies on the SMM/Kondo effect in Tb-Pc derivatives, we investigated the electronic transport properties of Ln-Pc molecules as the active layer in top- and bottom-contact thin-film organic field effect transistor devices. Tb-Pc molecule devices exhibit p-type semiconducting properties with a hole mobility (mu(H)) of approximately 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). Interestingly, the Dy-Pc based devices exhibited ambipolar semiconducting properties with an electron mobility (mu(e)) of approximately 10(-5) and a mu(H) of approximately 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). This behavior has important implications for the electronic structure of the molecules. PMID:19569681

  14. Two charges on plane in a magnetic field: III. He{sup +} ion

    SciTech Connect

    Escobar-Ruiz, M.A.

    2014-12-15

    The He{sup +} ion on a plane subject to a constant magnetic field B perpendicular to the plane is considered taking into account the finite nuclear mass. Factorization of eigenfunctions permits to reduce the four-dimensional problem to three-dimensional one. The ground state energy of the composite system is calculated in a wide range of magnetic fields from B=0.01 up to B=100a.u. and center-of-mass Pseudomomentum K from 0 to 1000 a.u. using a variational approach. The accuracy of calculations for B=0.1a.u. is cross-checked in Lagrange-mesh method and not less than five significant figures are reproduced in energy. Similarly to the case of moving neutral system on the plane a phenomenon of a sharp change of energy behavior as a function of K for a certain critical K{sub c} but a fixed magnetic field occurs.

  15. Global simulations of magnetorotational turbulence - III. Influence of field configuration and mass injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkin, E. R.

    2014-07-01

    The stresses produced by magnetorotational turbulence can provide effective angular momentum transport in accretion discs. However, questions remain about the ability of simulated discs to reproduce observationally inferred stress-to-gas-pressure ratios. In this paper, we present a set of high-resolution global magnetohydrodynamic disc simulations which are initialized with different field configurations: purely toroidal, vertical field lines, and nested poloidal loops. A mass source term is included which allows the total disc mass to equilibrate in simulations with long run times, and also enables the impact of rapid mass injection to be explored. Notably different levels of angular momentum transport are observed during the early-time transient disc evolution. However, given sufficient time to relax, the different models evolve to a statistically similar quasi-steady state with a stress-to-gas-pressure ratio, <αP> ˜ 0.032-0.036. Such behaviour is anticipated based on consideration of mean magnetic field evolution subject to our adopted simulation boundary conditions. The indication from our results is that steady, isolated discs may be unable to maintain a large-scale magnetic field or produce values for the stress-to-gas-pressure ratio implied by some observations. Supplementary simulations exploring the influence of trapping magnetic field, injecting vertical field, and rapidly injecting additional mass into the disc show that large stresses can be induced by these mechanisms. In the first instance, a highly magnetized disc is produced with <αP> ˜ 0.21, whereas the latter cases lead to a transient burst of accretion with a peak <αP> ≃ 0.1-0.25. As a whole, the simulations highlight the common late-time evolution and characteristics of turbulent discs for which the magnetic field is allowed to evolve freely (i.e. without constraint/replenishment). In contrast, if the boundaries of the disc, the rate of injection of magnetic field, or the rate of mass

  16. Internal rotation and toroidal part of the magnetic field of AB Doradus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiremath, K. M.

    2000-06-01

    We solve analytically Chandrasekhar's (1956) MHD equations for the steady parts of internal rotation and toroidal component of the magnetic field of the AB Doradus. By taking observed (Donati and Cameron 1997) surface rotation as the boundary condition and assuming that the base of the convection zone rotates rigidly, we estimate the size of the convective envelope to be 40% of the radius and the rotation velocity at the base to be not less than 1.42 x 10-4 rad/sec. We deduce that the toroidal magnetic field is distributed throughout the convective envelope. By taking the average density of 1.78gm cm-3 and radius 5.95 x 1010 cms (Allen 1972), we obtain a Mega gauss field near base of the convective envelope. We present rotational and toroidal magnetic field profiles in the interior, and conjecture on the time dependent part of the magnetic field.

  17. Operation of Wastewater Treatment Plants: A Field Study Training Program. Volume III, Instructor's Guide. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Sacramento. Dept. of Civil Engineering.

    The objective of this instructor's guide is to help provide students with knowledge and skills for employment in the field of wastewater treatment. Included in each chapter outline are: (1) objectives, (2) instructional approach, (3) answers to the objective test in the student's text, and (4) an explanation of these answers. The material…

  18. The National Council for Geographic Education Competency-Based Geography Test. Secondary Level. Form I. Parts I, II, and III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurfman, Dana G.; And Others

    A 3-part test measures the geography knowledge, skills, and understanding of secondary level students. Part 1, map skills and location, contains 20 questions involving the use of three maps: an imaginary sketch map, a contour map, and a political map of the world. Part 2 consists of 20 questions covering physical geography. Students analyze…

  19. Health risks of electromagnetic fields. Part I: Evaluation and assessment of electric and magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Habash, Riadh W Y; Brodsky, Lynn M; Leiss, William; Krewski, Daniel; Repacholi, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Exposure to electric and magnetic fields (EMF) emanating from the generation, distribution, and utilization of electricity is widespread. The major debate in recent years has focused on the possibility that exposure to EMF may result in adverse health consequences, including the development of cancer. This article provides a review and evaluation of potential health risks associated with residential and occupational exposure to EMF. In addition to reviewing data from laboratory, epidemiology, and clinical studies, we examine exposure data from field measurement surveys and exposure guidelines that have been established for EMF. Currently, the evidence in support of an association between EMF and childhood cancer is limited, although this issue warrants further investigation. Evidence of an association between EMF exposure and adult cancers, derived largely from occupational settings, is inconsistent, precluding clear conclusions. There is little evidence of an association between EMF and noncancer health effects. Epidemiological studies of EMF and population health are limited by exposure measurement error and the lack of a clear dose/response relationship in studies suggesting possible health risks. Further research is needed to clarify the ambiguous findings from present studies and to determine if EMF exposure poses a health risk. PMID:15018215

  20. Errata: A Wide-Field Multicolor Survey for High-Redshift Quasars, Z >= 2.2. III. The Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Stephen J.; Hewett, Paul C.; Osmer, Patrick S.

    1995-01-01

    In the paper "A Wide-Field Multicolor Survey for High-Redshift Quasars, z >= 2.2. III. The Luminosity Function" by Stephen. Warren, Paul C. Hewett and Patrick S. Osmer (ApJ, 421,412 [1994]), two equations should be corrected: On page 419, column one, line 11, the expression following the words "the error,, should have an opening parenthesis just before the integral sign, to read: [{SIGMA} 1/({integral} ρ(z)dV_a_)^2^]^1/2^. On page 421, equation (15) is missing the asterisk (*) in the M_c_^*^ term just prior to (β + 1); that is, the exponent in the second term the denominator should read: 0.4(M_c_ - M_c_^*^)(β + 1). The authors wish to draw these errors to the attention of any readers who will be using the expression and equation.

  1. TURBULENT CONVECTION IN STELLAR INTERIORS. III. MEAN-FIELD ANALYSIS AND STRATIFICATION EFFECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Viallet, Maxime; Meakin, Casey; Mocak, Miroslav; Arnett, David

    2013-05-20

    We present three-dimensional implicit large eddy simulations of the turbulent convection in the envelope of a 5 M{sub Sun} red giant star and in the oxygen-burning shell of a 23 M{sub Sun} supernova progenitor. The numerical models are analyzed in the framework of one-dimensional Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The effects of pressure fluctuations are more important in the red giant model, owing to larger stratification of the convective zone. We show how this impacts different terms in the mean-field equations. We clarify the driving sources of kinetic energy, and show that the rate of turbulent dissipation is comparable to the convective luminosity. Although our flows have low Mach numbers and are nearly adiabatic, our analysis is general and can be applied to photospheric convection as well. The robustness of our analysis of turbulent convection is supported by the insensitivity of the mean-field balances to linear mesh resolution. We find robust results for the turbulent convection zone and the stable layers in the oxygen-burning shell model, and robust results everywhere in the red giant model, but the mean fields are not well converged in the narrow boundary regions (which contain steep gradients) in the oxygen-burning shell model. This last result illustrates the importance of unresolved physics at the convective boundary, which governs the mixing there.

  2. Republication of: Geometrodynamics in the null case. Exact solutions of the field equations of the general theory of relativity III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Pascual; Kundt, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    This is an English translation of a paper by Pascual Jordan and Wolfgang Kundt, first published in 1961 in the proceedings of the Academy of Sciences and Literature in Mainz (Germany). The original paper was part 3 of a five-part series of articles containing the first summary of knowledge about exact solutions of Einstein's equations found until then. (Parts 1, 2 and 4 of the series have already been reprinted, part 5 will be printed as a Golden Oldie in near future.) This third paper shows how solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell equations with null Maxwell field can be incorporated into the scheme of geometrodynamics. It has been selected by the Editors of General Relativity and Gravitation for republication in the Golden Oldies series of the journal. The republication is accompanied by an editorial note written by Charles Misner.

  3. CMCC’s persistent pursuit of university affiliation Part III: the push for union with the University of Victoria, BC, 1988 to 1992

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Douglas M

    1996-01-01

    The period between 1988 and 1992 is reviewed with respect to the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (CMCC) and its attempted affiliation with the University of Victoria in British Columbia. Part I, published earlier, detailed the period between 1945 and 1969 and the proposals for university affiliation with the University of Alberta and Brandon College in Manitoba. Part II focused on the period between 1969 and 1988 and discussed government inquiries, strategic planning and political intervention. In Part III of this triad, the chronology of events with respect to CMCC’s sustained, sophisticated and focused attempt at affiliation with the University of Victoria is discussed and the problems encountered with the Senate are described which lead to the eventual breakdown of any potential union.

  4. Young Galaxy Candidates in the Hubble Frontier Fields. III. MACS J0717.5+3745

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laporte, N.; Infante, L.; Troncoso Iribarren, P.; Zheng, W.; Molino, A.; Bauer, F. E.; Bina, D.; Broadhurst, Tom; Chilingarian, I.; Huang, X.; Garcia, S.; Kim, S.; Marques-Chaves, R.; Moustakas, J.; Pelló, R.; Pérez-Fournon, I.; Shu, X.; Streblyanska, A.; Zitrin, A.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we present the results of our search for and study of z≳ 6 galaxy candidates behind the third Frontier Fields (FFs) cluster, MACS J0717.5+3745, and its parallel field, combining data from Hubble and Spitzer. We select 39 candidates using the Lyman break technique, for which the clear non-detection in optical make the extreme mid-z interlopers hypothesis unlikely. We also take benefit from z≳ 6 samples selected using the previous FF data sets of Abell 2744 and MACS 0416 to improve the constraints on the properties of very high redshift objects. We compute the redshift and the physical properties such emission lines properties, star formation rate, reddening, and stellar mass for all FF objects from their spectral energy distribution using templates including nebular emission lines. We study the relationship between several physical properties and confirm the trend already observed in previous surveys for evolution of star formation rate with galaxy mass and between the size and the UV luminosity of our candidates. The analysis of the evolution of the UV luminosity function with redshift seems more compatible with an evolution of density. Moreover, no robust z≥slant 8.5 object is selected behind the cluster field and few z∼ 9 candidates have been selected in the two previous data sets from this legacy survey, suggesting a strong evolution in the number density of galaxies between z∼ 8 and 9. Thanks to the use of the lensing cluster, we study the evolution of the star formation rate density produced by galaxies with L > 0.03 {L}\\star , and confirm the strong decrease observed between z∼ 8 and 9.

  5. The Development of a Model State Data Analysis Plan (SDAP). (Phase I.) Part III: The SDAP Data Compendium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scientific Educational Systems, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.

    This document is the third part of a 3-part report on the development of a generic State Educational Agency Data Analysis Plan (SDAP). It consists of a compendium of data available by program within the studied State education agencies. The compendium provides a direct comparison of the information elements that are available by program in the two…

  6. Critiquing Teacher Preparation Research: An Overview of the Field, Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran-Smith, Marilyn; Villegas, Ana Maria; Abrams, Linda; Chavez-Moreno, Laura; Mills, Tammy; Stern, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    This is the second of a two-part article intended to offer teacher educators a cohesive overview of the sprawling and uneven field of research on teacher preparation by identifying, analyzing, and critiquing its major programs. The article discusses research on teacher preparation for the knowledge society and research on teacher preparation for…

  7. NADE Members Respond--Developmental Education Research Agenda: Survey of Field Professionals, Part 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saxon, D. Patrick; Martirosyan, Nara M.; Wentworth, Rebecca A.; Boylan, Hunter R.

    2015-01-01

    This is the final of a two-part article that provides the results of a qualitative study designed to document ideas and beliefs that professionals have regarding an appropriate research agenda on which the field of developmental education should focus in the near future. The participants of the study were members of the National Association for…

  8. Major Field Achievement Test in Business: Guidelines for Improved Outcome Scores--Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, J. Patrick; White, Jason T.

    2007-01-01

    Outcomes measurements have always been an important part of proving to outside constituencies how you "measure up" to other schools with your business programs. A common nationally-normed exam that is used is the Major Field Achievement Test in Business from Educational Testing Services. Our paper discusses some guidelines that we are "pilot…

  9. 7 CFR Appendix A to Part 3434 - List of Agriculture-Related Fields

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false List of Agriculture-Related Fields A Appendix A to Part 3434 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE HISPANIC-SERVING AGRICULTURAL COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES CERTIFICATION...

  10. 7 CFR Appendix A to Part 3434 - List of Agriculture-Related Fields

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false List of Agriculture-Related Fields A Appendix A to Part 3434 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE HISPANIC-SERVING AGRICULTURAL COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES CERTIFICATION PROCESS...

  11. Your workers may be contingent but your liability for them is certain: Part III: other employment issues.

    PubMed

    Koen, Clifford M; Mitchell, Michael S; Crow, Stephen M

    2010-01-01

    Hiring contingent workers can significantly help health care employers reduce labor costs while maintaining the staff required for quality patient care. However, a number of federal laws create legal land mines that await the unsuspecting employer. This article, the concluding part of a 3-part examination of contingent employment, addresses additional issues including benefits, tax implications, workers' compensation, contract considerations, and the screening of potential staffing partners. PMID:20686392

  12. Predictability in orbital reconstruction. A human cadaver study, part III: Implant-oriented navigation for optimized reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Leander; Essig, Harald; Schreurs, Ruud; Jansen, Jesper; Maal, Thomas J J; Gooris, Peter J J; Becking, Alfred G

    2015-12-01

    Navigation-assisted orbital reconstruction remains a challenge, because the surgeon focuses on a two-dimensional multiplanar view in relation to the preoperative planning. This study explored the addition of navigation markers in the implant design for three-dimensional (3D) orientation of the actual implant position relative to the preoperative planning for more fail-safe and consistent results. Pre-injury computed tomography (CT) was performed for 10 orbits in human cadavers, and complex orbital fractures (Class III/IV) were created. The orbits were reconstructed using preformed orbital mesh through a transconjunctival approach under image-guided navigation and navigation by referencing orientating markers in the implant design. Ideal implant positions were planned using preoperative CT scans. Implant placement accuracy was evaluated by comparing the planned and realized implant positions. Significantly better translation (3.53 mm vs. 1.44 mm, p = 0.001) and rotation (pitch: -1.7° vs. -2.2°, P = 0.52; yaw: 10.9° vs. 5.9°, P = 0.02; roll: -2.2° vs. -0.5°, P = 0.16) of the placed implant relative to the planned position were obtained by implant-oriented navigation. Navigation-assisted surgery can be improved by using navigational markers on the orbital implant for orientation, resulting in fail-safe reconstruction of complex orbital defects and consistent implant positioning. PMID:26454321

  13. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 268 - List of Halogenated Organic Compounds Regulated Under § 268.32

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false List of Halogenated Organic Compounds... Part 268—List of Halogenated Organic Compounds Regulated Under § 268.32 In determining the... defined the HOCs that must be included in a calculation as any compounds having a carbon-halogen...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 268 - List of Halogenated Organic Compounds Regulated Under § 268.32

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false List of Halogenated Organic Compounds... Part 268—List of Halogenated Organic Compounds Regulated Under § 268.32 In determining the... defined the HOCs that must be included in a calculation as any compounds having a carbon-halogen...

  15. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 268 - List of Halogenated Organic Compounds Regulated Under § 268.32

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false List of Halogenated Organic Compounds... Part 268—List of Halogenated Organic Compounds Regulated Under § 268.32 In determining the... defined the HOCs that must be included in a calculation as any compounds having a carbon-halogen...

  16. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 268 - List of Halogenated Organic Compounds Regulated Under § 268.32

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false List of Halogenated Organic Compounds... Part 268—List of Halogenated Organic Compounds Regulated Under § 268.32 In determining the... defined the HOCs that must be included in a calculation as any compounds having a carbon-halogen...

  17. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 268 - List of Halogenated Organic Compounds Regulated Under § 268.32

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false List of Halogenated Organic Compounds... Part 268—List of Halogenated Organic Compounds Regulated Under § 268.32 In determining the... defined the HOCs that must be included in a calculation as any compounds having a carbon-halogen...

  18. Final Report for Dynamic Models for Causal Analysis of Panel Data. Dynamic Analysis of Event Histories. Part III, Chapter 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuma, Nancy Brandon; Hannan, Michael T.

    The document, part of a series of chapters described in SO 011 759, examines sociological research methods for the study of change. The advantages and procedures for dynamic analysis of event-history data (data giving the number, timing, and sequence of changes in a categorical dependent variable) are considered. The authors argue for grounding…

  19. Higher Education and Development in South-East Asia. Volume III, Part 2, Language Policy and Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noss, Richard

    This document, the second part of the third volume of a study concerned with the role of institutions of higher education in the development of countries in South-East Asia, discusses the problems aroused by language in the region. Chapters I-IV cover assumptions of the study, common problems of the region, current solutions, and future outlook.…

  20. Project SOUL: Computer Training Program for High School Students from Disadvantaged Areas. Part III, The Scientific Programming Course. Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lew, Art

    This report details the Scientific Programming Course that is a part of "Project SOUL." The course is intended for underprivileged high school juniors and seniors having an interest in mathematics or science and aspirations to attend college. The report is divided into three sections. In section I, the administration and operation of the course as…

  1. Higher Education and Development in South-East Asia. Volume III, Part 1, High-level Manpower for Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Guy

    This document, the first part of the third volume of a study concerned with the role of institutions of higher education in the development of countries in South-East Asia, appraises the high-level manpower needs of the region. The report is divided into two sections: the first includes the major comments on the position of high-level manpower in…

  2. Gd(III) complexes for electron-electron dipolar spectroscopy: Effects of deuteration, pH and zero field splitting.

    PubMed

    Garbuio, Luca; Zimmermann, Kaspar; Häussinger, Daniel; Yulikov, Maxim

    2015-10-01

    Spectral parameters of Gd(III) complexes are intimately linked to the performance of the Gd(III)-nitroxide or Gd(III)-Gd(III) double electron-electron resonance (DEER or PELDOR) techniques, as well as to that of relaxation induced dipolar modulation enhancement (RIDME) spectroscopy with Gd(III) ions. These techniques are of interest for applications in structural biology, since they can selectively detect site-to-site distances in biomolecules or biomolecular complexes in the nanometer range. Here we report relaxation properties, echo detected EPR spectra, as well as the magnitude of the echo reduction effect in Gd(III)-nitroxide DEER for a series of Gadolinium(III) complexes with chelating agents derived from tetraazacyclododecane. We observed that solvent deuteration does not only lengthen the relaxation times of Gd(III) centers but also weakens the DEER echo reduction effect. Both of these phenomena lead to an improved signal-to-noise ratios or, alternatively, longer accessible distance range in pulse EPR measurements. The presented data enrich the knowledge on paramagnetic Gd(III) chelate complexes in frozen solutions, and can help optimize the experimental conditions for most types of the pulse measurements of the electron-electron dipolar interactions. PMID:26342680

  3. Gd(III) complexes for electron-electron dipolar spectroscopy: Effects of deuteration, pH and zero field splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbuio, Luca; Zimmermann, Kaspar; Häussinger, Daniel; Yulikov, Maxim

    2015-10-01

    Spectral parameters of Gd(III) complexes are intimately linked to the performance of the Gd(III)-nitroxide or Gd(III)-Gd(III) double electron-electron resonance (DEER or PELDOR) techniques, as well as to that of relaxation induced dipolar modulation enhancement (RIDME) spectroscopy with Gd(III) ions. These techniques are of interest for applications in structural biology, since they can selectively detect site-to-site distances in biomolecules or biomolecular complexes in the nanometer range. Here we report relaxation properties, echo detected EPR spectra, as well as the magnitude of the echo reduction effect in Gd(III)-nitroxide DEER for a series of Gadolinium(III) complexes with chelating agents derived from tetraazacyclododecane. We observed that solvent deuteration does not only lengthen the relaxation times of Gd(III) centers but also weakens the DEER echo reduction effect. Both of these phenomena lead to an improved signal-to-noise ratios or, alternatively, longer accessible distance range in pulse EPR measurements. The presented data enrich the knowledge on paramagnetic Gd(III) chelate complexes in frozen solutions, and can help optimize the experimental conditions for most types of the pulse measurements of the electron-electron dipolar interactions.

  4. A Formative Evaluation Plan of the Bartlett Saga: Part III "United We Stand: Confederation," 1864-1873.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willing, Kathlene R.

    This field test report was completed for a producer of an educational computer software program. The program, designed to help students learn about Canadian history, is outlined. The program simulates the events and atmosphere of the years 1864-1873, formative years in Canada's history; the student user is cast in the role of a journalist on the…

  5. Data Preparation and Analysis for Annex III, USA/PRC Cooperation in the Field of Atmospheric Trace Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Easterling, D.R.; Karl, T.R.

    1999-04-13

    The National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) has been a long-time and very active participant in the joint research program on the Greenhouse Effect created by the bilateral agreement Annex III to the Protocol on Fossil Energy Research and Development on Cooperation in the Field of Atmospheric Trace Gases. This agreement between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the People's Republic of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) has fostered a large amount of data set development and research (Riches et al., 1992) as well as science exchange between the two countries. Within the agreement there have been four basic tasks: (1) to analyze general circulation models, (2) to prepare, validate, and analyze data, (3) analyze the relationship between large scale and local climate, and (4) atmospheric trace gas measurements, particularly methane (Riches et al. 1992). Within this framework the NCDC has had two basic tasks in this program: to develop, validate, analyze and exchange long-term climate data sets suitable for analyzing past climate change, and to perform research into past climate change and linking large-scale and regional climates. Following is a brief review of NCDC's accomplishments in the project.

  6. Different elution modes and field programming in gravitational field-flow fractionation. III. Field programming by flow-rate gradient generated by a programmable pump.

    PubMed

    Plocková, J; Chmelík, J

    2001-05-25

    Gravitational field-flow fractionation (GFFF) utilizes the Earth's gravitational field as an external force that causes the settlement of particles towards the channel accumulation wall. Hydrodynamic lift forces oppose this action by elevating particles away from the channel accumulation wall. These two counteracting forces enable modulation of the resulting force field acting on particles in GFFF. In this work, force-field programming based on modulating the magnitude of hydrodynamic lift forces was implemented via changes of flow-rate, which was accomplished by a programmable pump. Several flow-rate gradients (step gradients, linear gradients, parabolic, and combined gradients) were tested and evaluated as tools for optimization of the separation of a silica gel particle mixture. The influence of increasing amount of sample injected on the peak resolution under flow-rate gradient conditions was also investigated. This is the first time that flow-rate gradients have been implemented for programming of the resulting force field acting on particles in GFFF. PMID:11407583

  7. Metal-ligand interaction of lanthanides with coumarin derivatives. Part I. Complexation of 3-(1-aminoethylidene)-2H-chromene-2,4(3H)-dione with La(III), Ce(III), Nd(III) and Ho(III).

    PubMed

    Swiatek, Mirosława; Kufelnicki, Aleksander

    2012-01-01

    Solutions of lanthanum(III), cerium(III), neodymium(III) and holmium(III) nitrates with 3-(1-aminoethylidene)-2H-chromene-2,4(3H)-dione (1) in 10% v/v dioxane-water medium were used. Coordination modes of 1 with the selected lanthanides have been examined. Hydroxo-complexes with deprotonated water molecules from the inner coordination sphere have been stated in basic medium. Stability constants of the forming complex species were determined by potentiometric titrations using Superquad and Hyperquad2003 programs. The most stable complexes are formed with La(III). The UV-Vis spectra of the Nd(III)-1 system confirmed the L:M = 1:1 stoichiometry evaluated potentiometrically. PMID:23285658

  8. Pantoea agglomerans: a mysterious bacterium of evil and good. Part III. Deleterious effects: infections of humans, animals and plants.

    PubMed

    Dutkiewicz, Jacek; Mackiewicz, Barbara; Kinga Lemieszek, Marta; Golec, Marcin; Milanowski, Janusz

    2016-06-01

    (Arrhenatherum elatius). Some plant-pathogenic strains of P. agglomerans are tumourigenic, inducing gall formation on table beet, an ornamental plant gypsophila (Gypsophila paniculata), wisteria, Douglas-fir and cranberry. Recently, a Pantoea species closely related to P. agglomerans has been identified as a cause of bacterial blight disease in the edible mushroom Pleurotus eryngii cultivated in China. The genetically governed determinants of plant pathogenicity in Pantoea agglomerans include such mechanisms as the hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (hrp) system, phytohormones, the quorum-sensing (QS) feedback system and type III secretion system (T3SS) injecting the effector proteins into the cytosol of a plant cell. PMID:27294620

  9. Geology and mineral resources of part of the Cumberland Gap coal field, Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ashley, G.H.; Glenn, L.C.

    1906-01-01

    In this paper is described only the central part of the basin, or the area lying between Log Mountains at the head of Yell ow Creek of Cumberland and nearly north-south line about 10 miles east of Harlan, and while the data presented will give an idea of the general stratigraphy and structure of the whole field, they are not authoritative except within these limits.

  10. Monte Carlo modeling and analyses of YALINA booster subcritical assembly, Part III : low enriched uranium conversion analyses.

    SciTech Connect

    Talamo, A.; Gohar, Y.

    2011-05-12

    This study investigates the performance of the YALINA Booster subcritical assembly, located in Belarus, during operation with high (90%), medium (36%), and low (21%) enriched uranium fuels in the assembly's fast zone. The YALINA Booster is a zero-power, subcritical assembly driven by a conventional neutron generator. It was constructed for the purpose of investigating the static and dynamic neutronics properties of accelerator driven subcritical systems, and to serve as a fast neutron source for investigating the properties of nuclear reactions, in particular transmutation reactions involving minor-actinides. The first part of this study analyzes the assembly's performance with several fuel types. The MCNPX and MONK Monte Carlo codes were used to determine effective and source neutron multiplication factors, effective delayed neutron fraction, prompt neutron lifetime, neutron flux profiles and spectra, and neutron reaction rates produced from the use of three neutron sources: californium, deuterium-deuterium, and deuterium-tritium. In the latter two cases, the external neutron source operates in pulsed mode. The results discussed in the first part of this report show that the use of low enriched fuel in the fast zone of the assembly diminishes neutron multiplication. Therefore, the discussion in the second part of the report focuses on finding alternative fuel loading configurations that enhance neutron multiplication while using low enriched uranium fuel. It was found that arranging the interface absorber between the fast and the thermal zones in a circular rather than a square array is an effective method of operating the YALINA Booster subcritical assembly without downgrading neutron multiplication relative to the original value obtained with the use of the high enriched uranium fuels in the fast zone.

  11. Global ocean tides. Part III. The semidiurnal principal solar tide (S2), atlas of tidal charts and maps. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwiderski, E.W.

    1981-03-15

    In Part I of this report (AD-A060 913), a unique hydrodynamical interpolation technique was introduced, extensively tested, and evaluated in order to compute partial global ocean tides in great detail and with a high degree of accuracy. This novel method has been applied to construct the semidiurnal principal solar (S2) ocean tide with a relative accuracy of better than 5 cm anywhere in the open oceans. The resulting tidal amplitudes and phases are tabulated on a 1 deg x 1 deg grid system in an atlas of 42 deg x 71 deg overlapping charts covering the whole oceanic globe. A corresponding atlas of global corange and cotidal maps is included to provide the reader with a quick general overview of the major tidal phenomena. The specifying hydrodynamical parameters of the model are listed along with quoted sources of empirical tide data, and significant tidal features are explained and discussed. The S2 ocean tide is found to resemble closely the corresponding lunar M2 tide presented in Part II of this report (AD-A084 694).

  12. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates. Quarterly report 37 - Part 1, Text

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, J.W.

    1992-07-14

    The objective of this program is to investigate behavioral and neuroendocrine effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields, using the baboon (Papio cynocephalus). Results from this program are used to estimate consequences of human exposure to the electric and magnetic fields associated with electric power transmission. Electric and magnetic field measurements for Experiment IIIA (Confirmatory), Experiment IV and Social Behavior portion of Experiment III are presented. The systems for the production and monitoring of the fields performed satisfactorily during Experiment IIIA and during all but the last part of Experiment IV. In Experiment III, two-way repeated analyses of variance revealed statistically significant Group (Exposed and Sham Exposed) and Period (Baseline. Exposure, and Post-Exposure) main effects. Two significant Period by Group interactions were also found. Seven of the ten behavioral categories showed a main effect of Period. Two-sample t-test comparisons of the two groups for each period indicated that performance rates in two behavioral categories (Stereotypy and Posture) were significantly lower in the Exposure Group. In general, the Exposed subjects exhibited a trend of progressively lower performance rates across the three periods. Specific accomplishments reported in this document were: measurement of electric and magnetic fields for Experiments IIIA and IV, completed analysis of the Social Behavioral data from Experiment III, and a detailed discussion of statistical methods employed on the Social Behavioral portion of Experiment III, and hematology data were collected and recorded for Operant and Social Behavioral subjects for Experiment IV.

  13. High pressure annular two-phase flow in a narrow duct. Part 1: Local measurements in the droplet field, and Part 2: Three-field modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Trabold, T.A.; Kumar, R.

    1999-07-01

    In Part 1, detailed measurements were made in a high pressure, adiabatic (boiled at the inlet) annular flow in a narrow, high aspect ratio duct using a gamma densitometer, hot-film anemometer and high-speed video photography. Measurements of void fraction, droplet frequency, velocity, drop size, and interfacial area concentration have been made to support the three field computational capability. An important aspect of this testing is the use of a modeling fluid (R-134a) in a vertical duct which permits visual access in annular flow. This modeling fluid accurately simulates the low liquid-to-vapor density ratio of steam-water flows at high pressures. These measurements have been taken in a narrow duct of hydraulic diameter 4.85 mm, and a cross-section aspect ratio of 22.5. However, the flow displays profiles of various shapes not only in the narrow dimension, but also in the width dimension. In particular, the shape of the droplet profiles depends on the entrained droplet flux from the edges in the vapor core. The average diameter from these profiles compare well with the models developed in the literature. Interfacial area concentration for these low density ratio flows is higher than the highest concentration reported for air-water flows. Video records show that along with the bow-shaped waves, three-dimensional {lambda}-shaped waves appear in annular flows for high flow rates. Part 2 outlines the development of a three-field modeling approach in annular flow and the predictive capability of an analysis code. Models have been developed here or adapted from the literature for the thin film near the wall as well as the droplets in the vapor core, and have been locally applied in a fully developed, two-phase adiabatic boiling annular flow in a duct heated at the inlet at high pressure. Numerical results have been obtained using these models that are required for the closure of the continuity and momentum equations. The two-dimensional predictions are compared with

  14. Illustrated Imaging Essay on Congenital Heart Diseases: Multimodality Approach Part III: Cyanotic Heart Diseases and Complex Congenital Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Belaval, Vinay; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Raj, Vimal; Shah, Sejal

    2016-01-01

    From the stand point of radiographic analysis most of the complex cyanotic congenital heart diseases (CHD), can be divided into those associated with decreased or increased pulmonary vascularity. Combination of a specific cardiac configuration and status of lung vasculature in a clinical context allows plain film diagnosis to be predicted in some CHD. Correlation of the position of the cardiac apex in relation to the visceral situs is an important information that can be obtained from the plain film. This information helps in gathering information about the atrio-ventricular, ventricular arterial concordance or discordance. Categorization of the cyanotic heart disease based on vascularity is presented below. Thorough understanding of cardiac anatomy by different imaging methods is essential in understanding and interpreting complex cardiac disease. Basic anatomical details and background for interpretation are provided in the previous parts of this presentation.

  15. Systematics of the parasitic wasp genus Oxyscelio Kieffer (Hymenoptera, Platygastridae s.l.), part III: African fauna

    PubMed Central

    Burks, Roger A.; Masner, Lubomír; Johnson, Norman F.; Austin, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract African species of Oxyscelio (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae s.l.) are revised. A total of 14 species are recognized, 13 of which are described as new: Oxyscelio absentiae Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio galeri Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio gyri Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio idoli Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio intensionis Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio io Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio kylix Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio lunae Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio nemesis Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio pulveris Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio quassus Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio teli Burks, sp. n. and Oxyscelio xenii Burks, sp. n. The genus Freniger Szabó, syn. n. is recognized as part of an endemic African species group of Oxyscelio with incomplete hind wing venation, and Oxyscelio bicolor (Szabó), comb. n. is therefore recognized as the only previously described species of Oxyscelio from Africa. The Oxyscelio crateris and Oxyscelio cuculli species groups, previously known from southeast Asia, are represented in Africa by seven and one species respectively. PMID:27081336

  16. Anatomical and functional perspectives of the cervical spine: Part III: the “unstable” cervical spine †

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Marion

    1990-01-01

    In this, the last of the three part series on the anatomical and functional perspectives of the cervical spine, the clinical entity-instability-is addressed. A summative definition of instability, addressing both the clinical and radiographic issues, is presented based on current available literature. The etiology of instability is discussed as it pertains to three possible mechanisms: acute trauma, latent evidence of trauma and repetitive microtrauma. The anatomical, clinical and radiographic aspects in each of these meachanisms is discussed. A case report is presented to illustrate the salient features of this potentially disastrous condition. The conclusion emphasizes the importance of defineable limits in each of the presented definitions, calling for future research into the clinical and radiographic correlations of abnormal cervical motion. ImagesFigure 4Figure 5Figure 6

  17. Functional role of inorganic trace elements in angiogenesis part III: (Ti, Li, Ce, As, Hg, Va, Nb and Pb).

    PubMed

    Saghiri, Mohammad Ali; Orangi, Jafar; Asatourian, Armen; Sorenson, Christine M; Sheibani, Nader

    2016-02-01

    Many essential elements exist in nature with significant influence on human health. Angiogenesis is vital in developmental, repair, and regenerative processes, and its aberrant regulation contributes to pathogenesis of many diseases including cancer. Thus, it is of great importance to explore the role of these elements in such a vital process. This is third in a series of reviews that serve as an overview of the role of inorganic elements in regulation of angiogenesis and vascular function. Here we will review the roles of titanium, lithium, cerium, arsenic, mercury, vanadium, niobium, and lead in these processes. The roles of other inorganic elements in angiogenesis were discussed in part I (N, Fe, Se, P, Au, and Ca) and part II (Cr, Si, Zn, Cu, and S) of these series. The methods of exposure, structure, mechanisms, and potential activities of these elements are briefly discussed. An electronic search was performed on the role of these elements in angiogenesis from January 2005 to April 2014. These elements can promote and/or inhibit angiogenesis through different mechanisms. The anti-angiogenic effect of titanium dioxide nanoparticles comes from the inhibition of angiogenic processes, and not from its toxicity. Lithium affects vasculogenesis but not angiogenesis. Nanoceria treatment inhibited tumor growth by inhibiting angiogenesis. Vanadium treatment inhibited cell proliferation and induced cytotoxic effects through interactions with DNA. The negative impact of mercury on endothelial cell migration and tube formation activities was dose and time dependent. Lead induced IL-8 production, which is known to promote tumor angiogenesis. Thus, understanding the impact of these elements on angiogenesis will help in development of new modalities to modulate angiogenesis under various conditions. PMID:26638864

  18. Coastal zone wind energy. Part III: a procedure to determine the wind power potential of the coastal zone

    SciTech Connect

    Garstang, M.; Pielke, R.; Snow, J.W.

    1982-03-01

    A stepwise procedure is presented for determining the seasonal and/or annual mean potential wind power density for any location on the East and Gulf coasts of the United States. The steps include reference to the dominant wind regimes and mean power densities already obtained to estimate the wind power potential of the location under consideration; methods to calculate the potential wind power distributions and steps to be taken to locate the best site in the area of interest. The method can be best applied where the atmospheric systems which produce most of the wind energy at the surface are relatively persistent. The method is least successful in areas where the wind field is highly variable. Application of the complete method requires the use of an existing two- or three-dimensional mesoscale numerical model.

  19. Strong-field approximation for ionization of a diatomic molecule by a strong laser field. III. High-order above-threshold ionization by an elliptically polarized field

    SciTech Connect

    Busuladzic, M.; Gazibegovic-Busuladzic, A.; Milosevic, D. B.

    2009-07-15

    We investigate high-order above-threshold ionization (HATI) of diatomic molecules having different symmetries by an elliptically polarized laser field using the modified molecular strong-field approximation. The yields of high-energy electrons contributing to the plateau region of the photoelectron spectra strongly depend on the employed ellipticity. This is more pronounced if the major axis of the polarization ellipse is parallel or perpendicular to the molecular axis and at the end of the high-energy plateau. For the O{sub 2} molecule (characterized by {pi}{sub g} symmetry) the maximum yield is observed for some value of the ellipticity {epsilon} different from zero. On the other hand, in the same circumstances, the N{sub 2} molecule ({sigma}{sub g}) behaves as an atom, i.e., the yield is maximum for {epsilon}=0. These characteristics of the photoelectron spectra remain valid in a wide region of the molecular orientations and laser peak intensities. The symmetry properties of the molecular HATI spectra are considered in detail: by changing the molecular orientation one or other type of the symmetry emerges or disappears. Presenting differential ionization spectra in the ionized electron energy-emission angle plane we have observed similar interference effects as in the HATI spectra governed by a linearly polarized field.

  20. Strong-field approximation for ionization of a diatomic molecule by a strong laser field. III. High-order above-threshold ionization by an elliptically polarized field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busuladžić, M.; Gazibegović-Busuladžić, A.; Milošević, D. B.

    2009-07-01

    We investigate high-order above-threshold ionization (HATI) of diatomic molecules having different symmetries by an elliptically polarized laser field using the modified molecular strong-field approximation. The yields of high-energy electrons contributing to the plateau region of the photoelectron spectra strongly depend on the employed ellipticity. This is more pronounced if the major axis of the polarization ellipse is parallel or perpendicular to the molecular axis and at the end of the high-energy plateau. For the O2 molecule (characterized by πg symmetry) the maximum yield is observed for some value of the ellipticity ɛ different from zero. On the other hand, in the same circumstances, the N2 molecule (σg) behaves as an atom, i.e., the yield is maximum for ɛ=0 . These characteristics of the photoelectron spectra remain valid in a wide region of the molecular orientations and laser peak intensities. The symmetry properties of the molecular HATI spectra are considered in detail: by changing the molecular orientation one or other type of the symmetry emerges or disappears. Presenting differential ionization spectra in the ionized electron energy-emission angle plane we have observed similar interference effects as in the HATI spectra governed by a linearly polarized field.

  1. Lehr's fields of campaniform sensilla in beetles (Coleoptera): functional morphology. I. General part and allometry.

    PubMed

    Frantsevich, Leonid; Gorb, Stanislav; Radchenko, Vladimir; Gladun, Dmytro; Polilov, Alexey

    2014-11-01

    In this first of three articles we show the construction of the articular part of the elytron, the root. The root bears a conspicuous field of campaniform sensilla. This field was studied using light and scanning electron microscopes. The diversity of shape of the field among beetles, types of orientation of elongated sensilla within the field, individual variability of their number among conspecifics are demonstrated. Elongated sensilla point to the junction of the elytron with the second axillary plate. Presumably, they monitor twist movement in this junction, which is possible if the elytron is open. The goal of the whole project is to reveal the effect of both structure and function of the hind wings and elytra on the morphology of this mechanosensory field. Our data on allometric relationships between the animal size and quantitative characteristics of the field in normally flying beetles provide an important background for further functional analysis of this sensory organ. We selected 14 series of several species belonging to the same taxon but differing in size from big to small. It is revealed that the area of the sensory field is directly proportional to the elytral area, whereas the number of sensilla is proportional to the square root of the elytral area. Despite the great range in the elytral area (1500 times) in series of selected species the area of an external pit or cap of a single sensillum varies only 25-fold. The density of sensilla per unit area of the sensory field increases with decrease of the elytral area. PMID:25240964

  2. New perspectives in the use of ink evidence in forensic science: Part III: Operational applications and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Cedric; Margot, Pierre

    2009-11-20

    The research reported in this series of article aimed at (1) automating the search of questioned ink specimens in ink reference collections and (2) at evaluating the strength of ink evidence in a transparent and balanced manner. These aims require that ink samples are analysed in an accurate and reproducible way and that they are compared in an objective and automated way. This latter requirement is due to the large number of comparisons that are necessary in both scenarios. A research programme was designed to (a) develop a standard methodology for analysing ink samples in a reproducible way, (b) comparing automatically and objectively ink samples and (c) evaluate the proposed methodology in forensic contexts. This report focuses on the last of the three stages of the research programme. The calibration and acquisition process and the mathematical comparison algorithms were described in previous papers [C. Neumann, P. Margot, New perspectives in the use of ink evidence in forensic science-Part I: Development of a quality assurance process for forensic ink analysis by HPTLC, Forensic Sci. Int. 185 (2009) 29-37; C. Neumann, P. Margot, New perspectives in the use of ink evidence in forensic science-Part II: Development and testing of mathematical algorithms for the automatic comparison of ink samples analysed by HPTLC, Forensic Sci. Int. 185 (2009) 38-50]. In this paper, the benefits and challenges of the proposed concepts are tested in two forensic contexts: (1) ink identification and (2) ink evidential value assessment. The results show that different algorithms are better suited for different tasks. This research shows that it is possible to build digital ink libraries using the most commonly used ink analytical technique, i.e. high-performance thin layer chromatography, despite its reputation of lacking reproducibility. More importantly, it is possible to assign evidential value to ink evidence in a transparent way using a probabilistic model. It is therefore

  3. Injury and the orchestral environment: part III. the role of psychosocial factors in the experience of musicians undertaking rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Rickert, Dale Ll; Barrett, Margaret S; Ackermann, Bronwen J

    2014-09-01

    Workplace rehabilitation in the orchestral setting poses a number of challenges that arise in part due to a poor fit between generic injury insurance and medical care and the elite performance requirements of professional musicians. Currently, the orchestral profession lacks information and strategies to best deal with the unique challenges of this complex rehabilitation environment. In order to inform future directions for research and suggest possible changes of practice, the researchers conducted a qualitative case-study aimed at understanding the injury and rehabilitation experiences of professional musicians. In-depth semi-structured interviews were undertaken with three chronically injured professional cellists from a single Australian orchestra. After initial data analysis, further interviews were undertaken with a set of five orchestral management staff as a means of data triangulation. All data were analysed using a themes-based analysis-of-narrative approach. The findings indicate that injury concealment played a considerable role in the development of chronic injuries for these musicians, and management staff felt that this concealment may be the norm amongst orchestral musicians. The musicians in this study suffered emotional and psychological trauma as the result of their injuries, and two participants felt socially marginalised. During rehabilitation, the musicians in this study encountered difficulties with medical staff not understanding the elite performance requirements of orchestral work. The article proposes recommendations that may assist in dealing with the complex challenges of injury rehabilitation in the orchestral environment. PMID:25194109

  4. Kinetic modeling of hardwood prehydrolysis. Part III. Water and dilute acetic acid prehydorlysis of southern red oak

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, A.L.; Lorenz, L.F.

    1986-04-01

    Most processes for utilizing wood as a source of chemicals and liquid fuels include a prehydrolysis step to remove the hemicellulose prior to the main hydrolysis of the cellulose to glucose. Two promising prehydrolysis methods, the Iotech steam explosion process and the Stake process, are based on water prehydrolysis (autohydrolysis). The kinetics of water and of dilute (5%) acetic acid prehydrolysis of southern red oak wood over the temperature range of 170 to 240 C were investigated. Kinetic parameters were determined that permitted modeling not only of xylan removal from the wood but also of the occurrence of xylan oligosaccharides, free xylose, furfural, and further degradation products in the prehydrolyzate. At lower temperatures (approximately 170 to 200 C), xylan removal could be modeled as the sum of two parallel reactions (one for an easily hydrolyzed portion and one for a more resistant portion of xylan) using the equation derived in Part I. At the highest temperature studied (236.9 C), the removal of xylan from the wood was best modeled as a single reaction with a small fraction of the xylan being essentially nonreactive. The occurrence of xylan oligosaccharides, xylose, furfural, and further degradation products in the prehydrolyzate was modeled as consecutive, irreversible pseudo first-order reactions. A timelag associated with the depolymerization of the xylan oligosaccharides to xylose was accounted for in the model by allowing the apparent rate constant for the formation of xylose to increase exponentially with time to a maximum value.

  5. Controlled production of camembert-type cheeses: part III role of the ripening microflora on free fatty acid concentrations.

    PubMed

    Leclercq-Perlat, Marie-Noëlle; Corrieu, Georges; Spinnler, Henry-Eric

    2007-05-01

    Phenomena generating FFAs, important flavour precursors, are significant in cheese ripening. In Camembert-like cheeses, it was intended to establish the relationships between the dynamics of FFA concentrations changes and the succession of ripening microflora during ripening. Experimental Camembert-type cheeses were prepared in duplicate from pasteurised milk inoculated with Kluyveromyces lactis, Geotrichum candidum, Penicillium camemberti, and Brevibacterium aurantiacum under aseptic conditions. For each cheese and each cheesy medium, concentrations of FFAs with odd-numbered carbons, except for 9:0 and 13:0, did not change over time. For long-chain FFAs, concentrations varied with the given cheese part (rind or core). K. lactis produced only short or medium-chain FFAs during its growth and had a minor influence on caproic, caprylic, capric, and lauric acids in comparison with G. candidum, the most lipolytic of the strains used here. It generated all short or medium-chain FFAs (4:0-12:0) during its exponential and slowdown growth periods and only long-chain ones (14:0-18:0) during its stationary phase. Pen. camemberti produced more long-chain FFAs (14:0-18:0) during its sporulation. Brev. aurantiacum did not generate any FFAs. The evidence of links between specific FFAs and the growth of a given microorganism is shown. PMID:17291387

  6. Use of rumination and activity monitoring for the identification of dairy cows with health disorders: Part III. Metritis.

    PubMed

    Stangaferro, M L; Wijma, R; Caixeta, L S; Al-Abri, M A; Giordano, J O

    2016-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate (1) the performance of an automated health-monitoring system (AHMS) to identify cows with metritis based on an alert system (health index score, HIS) that combines rumination time and physical activity; (2) the number of days between the first HIS alert and clinical diagnosis (CD) of metritis by farm personnel; and (3) the daily rumination time, physical activity, and HIS patterns around CD. In this manuscript, the overall performance of HIS to detect cows with all disorders of interest in this study [ketosis, displaced abomasum, indigestion (companion paper, part I), mastitis (companion paper, part II), and metritis] is also reported. Holstein cattle (n=1,121; 451 nulliparous and 670 multiparous) were fitted with a neck-mounted electronic rumination and activity monitoring tag (HR Tags, SCR Dairy, Netanya, Israel) from at least -21 to 80 d in milk (DIM). Raw data collected in 2-h periods were summarized per 24 h as daily rumination and activity. An HIS (0 to 100 arbitrary units) was calculated daily for individual cows with an algorithm that used rumination and activity. A positive HIS outcome was defined as an HIS of <86 units during at least 1 d from -5 to 2 d after CD. Blood concentrations of nonesterified fatty acids, β-hydroxybutyrate, total calcium, and haptoglobin were determined in a subgroup of cows (n=459) at -11±3, -4±3, 0, 3±1, 7±1, 14±1, and 28±1 DIM. The overall sensitivity of HIS was 55% for all cases of metritis (n=349), but it was greater for cows with metritis and another disorder (78%) than for cows with metritis only (53%). Cows diagnosed with metritis and flagged based on HIS had substantial alterations in their rumination, activity, and HIS patterns around CD, alterations of blood markers of metabolic and health status around calving, reduced milk production, and were more likely to exit the herd than cows not flagged based on the HIS and cows without disease, suggesting that cows flagged

  7. "Why Not Stoichiometry" versus "Stoichiometry—Why Not?" Part III: Extension of GATES/GEB on Complex Dynamic Redox Systems.

    PubMed

    Michałowska-Kaczmarczyk, Anna M; Michałowski, Tadeusz; Toporek, Marcin; Asuero, Agustin G

    2015-01-01

    In the third part of a series of articles issued under a common title, some examples of complex dynamic redox systems are presented and considered from analytical and physico-chemical viewpoints; the analysis is a leitmotiv for detailed, physico-chemical considerations. All attainable physico-chemical knowledge is involved in algorithms applied for resolution of the systems, realized with use of iterative computer programs. The first redox system (System I) is related to titration of FeSO4 + H2C2O4 with KMnO4 solution in acidic (H2SO4) medium, where simultaneous determination of both analytes from a single curve of potentiometric titration is possible. The possibility of the formation of precipitates (FeC2O4 and/or MnC2O4) in this system is taken into considerations. The second system (System II) relates to the complete analytical procedure involved in the iodometric determination of Cu; four consecutive steps of this analysis are considered. As a reasonable tool for explanation of processes occurring during simulated redox titration, speciation diagrams are suggested. This explanation is based on graphical presentation of results obtained from the calculations. The calculations made for this purpose are performed in accordance with principles of the generalized approach to electrolytic systems (GATES) with generalized electron balance (GEB) or GATES/GEB and realized with use of iterative computer programs offered by MATLAB. The reactions proceeding in this system can be formulated, together with their efficiencies, at any stage of the titration. Stoichiometry is considered as the derivative concept when put in context with GATES/GEB. The article illustrates the enormous possibilities and advantages offered by GATES/GEB. PMID:25830547

  8. SCAI/AATS/ACC/STS operator and institutional requirements for transcatheter valve repair and replacement, Part III: Pulmonic valve.

    PubMed

    Hijazi, Ziyad M; Ruiz, Carlos E; Zahn, Evan; Ringel, Richard; Aldea, Gabriel S; Bacha, Emile A; Bavaria, Joseph; Bolman, R Morton; Cameron, Duke E; Dean, Larry S; Feldman, Ted; Fullerton, David; Horlick, Eric; Mack, Michael J; Miller, D Craig; Moon, Marc R; Mukherjee, Debabrata; Trento, Alfredo; Tommaso, Carl L

    2015-07-01

    surgeons was formed to include a majority of members with no relevant RWI and to be led by an interventional cardiology cochair and a surgical cochair with no relevant RWI. Authors with relevant RWI were not permitted to draft or vote on text or recommendations pertaining to their RWI. RWI were reviewed on all conference calls and updated as changes occurred. Author and peer reviewer RWI pertinent to this document are disclosed in the Appendices. In addition, to ensure complete transparency, authors' comprehensive disclosure information (including RWI not pertinent to this document) is available in Appendix AII. The work of the writing committee was supported exclusively by the partnering societies without commercial support. SCAI, AATS, ACC, and STS believe that adherence to these recommendations will maximize the chances that these therapies will become a successful part of the armamentarium for treating valvular heart disease in the United States. In addition, these recommendations will hopefully facilitate optimum quality during the delivery of this therapy, which will be important to the development and successful implementation of future, less invasive approaches to structural heart disease. PMID:25809590

  9. Evaluation of pump pulsation in respirable size-selective sampling: Part III. Investigation of European standard methods.

    PubMed

    Soo, Jhy-Charm; Lee, Eun Gyung; Lee, Larry A; Kashon, Michael L; Harper, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Lee et al. (Evaluation of pump pulsation in respirable size-selective sampling: part I. Pulsation measurements. Ann Occup Hyg 2014a;58:60-73) introduced an approach to measure pump pulsation (PP) using a real-world sampling train, while the European Standards (EN) (EN 1232-1997 and EN 12919-1999) suggest measuring PP using a resistor in place of the sampler. The goal of this study is to characterize PP according to both EN methods and to determine the relationship of PP between the published method (Lee et al., 2014a) and the EN methods. Additional test parameters were investigated to determine whether the test conditions suggested by the EN methods were appropriate for measuring pulsations. Experiments were conducted using a factorial combination of personal sampling pumps (six medium- and two high-volumetric flow rate pumps), back pressures (six medium- and seven high-flow rate pumps), resistors (two types), tubing lengths between a pump and resistor (60 and 90 cm), and different flow rates (2 and 2.5 l min(-1) for the medium- and 4.4, 10, and 11.2 l min(-1) for the high-flow rate pumps). The selection of sampling pumps and the ranges of back pressure were based on measurements obtained in the previous study (Lee et al., 2014a). Among six medium-flow rate pumps, only the Gilian5000 and the Apex IS conformed to the 10% criterion specified in EN 1232-1997. Although the AirChek XR5000 exceeded the 10% limit, the average PP (10.9%) was close to the criterion. One high-flow rate pump, the Legacy (PP=8.1%), conformed to the 10% criterion in EN 12919-1999, while the Elite12 did not (PP=18.3%). Conducting supplemental tests with additional test parameters beyond those used in the two subject EN standards did not strengthen the characterization of PPs. For the selected test conditions, a linear regression model [PPEN=0.014+0.375×PPNIOSH (adjusted R2=0.871)] was developed to determine the PP relationship between the published method (Lee et al., 2014a) and the EN methods

  10. The steady part of the secular variation of the Earth's magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloxham, Jeremy

    1992-01-01

    The secular variation of the Earth's magnetic field results from the effects of magnetic induction in the fluid outer core and from the effects of magnetic diffusion in the core and the mantle. Adequate observations to map the magnetic field at the core-mantle boundary extend back over three centuries, providing a model of the secular variation at the core-mantle boundary. Here we consider how best to analyze this time-dependent part of the field. To calculate steady core flow over long time periods, we introduce an adaptation of our earlier method of calculating the flow in order to achieve greater numerical stability. We perform this procedure for the periods 1840-1990 and 1690-1840 and find that well over 90 percent of the variance of the time-dependent field can be explained by simple steady core flow. The core flows obtained for the two intervals are broadly similar to each other and to flows determined over much shorter recent intervals.

  11. Management strategies to effect change in intensive care units: lessons from the world of business. Part III. Effectively effecting and sustaining change.

    PubMed

    Gershengorn, Hayley B; Kocher, Robert; Factor, Phillip

    2014-03-01

    Reaping the optimal rewards from any quality improvement project mandates sustainability after the initial implementation. In Part III of this three-part ATS Seminars series, we discuss strategies to create a culture for change, improve cooperation and interaction between multidisciplinary teams of clinicians, and position the intensive care unit (ICU) optimally within the hospital environment. Coaches are used throughout other industries to help professionals assess and continually improve upon their practice; use of this strategy is as of yet infrequent in health care, but would be easily transferable and potentially beneficial to ICU managers and clinicians alike. Similarly, activities focused on improving teamwork are commonplace outside of health care. Simulation training and classroom education about key components of successful team functioning are known to result in improvements. In addition to creating an ICU environment in which individuals and teams of clinicians perform well, ICU managers must position the ICU to function well within the hospital system. It is important to move away from the notion of a standalone ("siloed") ICU to one that is well integrated into the rest of the institution. Creating a "pull-system" (in which participants are active in searching out needed resources and admitting patients) can help ICU managers both provide better care for the critically ill and strengthen relationships with non-ICU staff. Although not necessary, there is potential upside to creating a unified critical care service to assist with achieving these ends. PMID:24601653

  12. A Pilot Survey for C III] Emission in the Reionization Era: Gravitationally Lensed z ˜ 7-8 Galaxies in the Frontier Fields Cluster Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitrin, Adi; Ellis, Richard S.; Belli, Sirio; Stark, Daniel P.

    2015-05-01

    We report results of a search for C iii] λ λ 1907, 1909 Å emission using Keck’s MOSFIRE spectrograph in a sample of 7 {{z}phot}˜ 7-8 candidates (H˜ 27) lensed by the Hubble Frontier Field cluster Abell 2744. Earlier work has suggested the promise of using the C iii] doublet for redshift confirmation of galaxies in the reionization era given that Lyα (λ1216 Å) is likely attenuated by the neutral intergalactic medium. The primary challenge of this approach is the feasibility of locating C iii] emission without advanced knowledge of the spectroscopic redshift. With an integration time of 5 hr in the H band, we reach a 5σ median flux limit (in between the skylines) of 1.5× {{10}-18} ergs cm-2 s-1 but no convincing C iii] emission was found. We also incorporate preliminary measurements from two other CLASH/HFF clusters in which, similarly, no line was detected, but these were observed to lesser depth. Using the known distribution of OH emission and the photometric redshift likelihood distribution of each lensed candidate, we present statistical upper limits on the mean total C iii] rest-frame equivalent width (EW) for our z≃ 7-8 sample. For a signal-to-noise ratio of 5, we estimate that the typical C iii] doublet rest-frame EW is, with 95% confidence, \\lt 26+/- 5 Å. Although consistent with the strength of earlier detections in brighter objects at z≃ 6-7, our study illustrates the necessity of studying more luminous or strongly lensed examples prior to the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope.

  13. Use of CD-ROM-based tool for analyzing contouring variations in involved-field radiotherapy for Stage III NSCLC

    SciTech Connect

    Soernsen De Koste, John R. van . E-mail: j.vansornsendekoste@vumc.nl; Senan, Suresh; Underberg, Rene W.M.; Oei, Swie Swat; Elshove, Dionne; Slotman, Ben J.; Lagerwaard, Frank J.

    2005-10-01

    Background: Interclinician variability in defining target volumes is a problem in conformal radiotherapy. A CD-ROM-based contouring tool was used to conduct a dummy run in an international trial of involved-field chemoradiotherapy for Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: The CT scan of an eligible patient was installed on an 'auto-run' CD-ROM incorporating a contouring program based on ImageJ for Windows, which runs on any personal computer equipped with a CD-ROM drive. This tool was initially piloted at four academic centers and was subsequently mailed, together with all relevant clinical, radiologic, and positron emission tomography findings, to all participating centers in the international trial. Clinicians were instructed to contour separate gross tumor volumes (GTVs) for the tumor and two enlarged nodes and a clinical target volume for the hilus. A reference 'consensus' target volume for each target was jointly generated by three other clinicians. Results: The data received from the four academic centers and 16 study participants were suitable for analysis. Data from one center was unsuitable for detailed analysis because the target volumes were contoured at 1.2-cm intervals. GTVs were available for a total of 21 tumors and 19 nodes, and 15 hilar clinical target volumes were available. The mean GTV of the primary tumor was 13.6 cm{sup 3} (SD, 5.2; median, 12.3; range, 8.3-26.9). The variation in the center of the mass relative to the mean center of the mass in the left-right, ventrodorsal, and craniocaudal axes was 1.5, 0.4, and 1.0 mm, respectively. The largest volume variation was observed for the right hilar clinical target volume (mean, 33.7 cm{sup 3}; SD, 31.2; median, 20.3; range, 4.8-109.9). Smaller variations were observed for the subcarinal node (mean, GTV, 1.9 cm{sup 3}; SD, 1.2; median, 1.7; range, 0.5-5.3), except caudally where the node was difficult to distinguish from the pericardium. The 'consensus' volumes for all

  14. Geologic Map of Part of the Uinkaret Volcanic Field, Mohave County, Northwestern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Billingsley, George H.; Hamblin, W. Kenneth; Wellmeyer, Jessica L.; Dudash, Stephanie L.

    2001-01-01

    The geologic map of part of the Uinkaret Volcanic Field is one product of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey, the National Park Service, and the Bureau of Land Management to provide geologic information about this part of the Grand Canyon-Parashant Canyon National Monument of Arizona. The Uinkaret Volcanic Field is a unique part of western Grand Canyon where volcanic rocks have preserved the geomorphic development of the landscape. Most of the Grand Canyon, and parts of adjacent plateaus have already been mapped. This map completes one of the remaining areas where uniform quality geologic mapping was needed. A few dozen volcanoes and lava flows within the Grand Canyon are not included in the map area, but their geologic significance to Grand Canyon development is documented by Hamblin (1994) and mapped by Billingsley and Huntoon (1983) and Wenrich and others (1997). The geologic information in this report may be useful to resource managers of the Bureau of Land Management for range management, biological, archaeological, and flood control programs. The map area lies within the Shivwits, Uinkaret, and Kanab Plateaus, which are subplateaus of the Colorado Plateaus physiographic province (Billingsley and others, 1997), and is part of the Arizona Strip north of the Colorado River. The nearest settlement is Colorado City, Arizona, about 58 km (36 mi) north of the map area (fig. 1). Elevations range from about 2,447 m (8,029 ft) at Mount Trumbull, in the northwest quarter of the map area, to about 732 m (2,400 ft) in Cove Canyon, in the southeast quarter of the map area. Vehicle access is via the Toroweap and Mount Trumbull dirt roads (fig. 1). Unimproved dirt roads traverse other parts of the area except in designated wilderness. Extra fuel, two spare tires, and extra food and water are highly recommended for travelers in this remote area. The U.S. Bureau of Land Management, Arizona Strip Field Office, St. George, Utah manages most of the area. In

  15. Field portable low temperature porous layer open tubular cryoadsorption headspace sampling and analysis part II: Applications.

    PubMed

    Harries, Megan; Bukovsky-Reyes, Santiago; Bruno, Thomas J

    2016-01-15

    This paper details the sampling methods used with the field portable porous layer open tubular cryoadsorption (PLOT-cryo) approach, described in Part I of this two-part series, applied to several analytes of interest. We conducted tests with coumarin and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (two solutes that were used in initial development of PLOT-cryo technology), naphthalene, aviation turbine kerosene, and diesel fuel, on a variety of matrices and test beds. We demonstrated that these analytes can be easily detected and reliably identified using the portable unit for analyte collection. By leveraging efficiency-boosting temperature control and the high flow rate multiple capillary wafer, very short collection times (as low as 3s) yielded accurate detection. For diesel fuel spiked on glass beads, we determined a method detection limit below 1 ppm. We observed greater variability among separate samples analyzed with the portable unit than previously documented in work using the laboratory-based PLOT-cryo technology. We identify three likely sources that may help explain the additional variation: the use of a compressed air source to generate suction, matrix geometry, and variability in the local vapor concentration around the sampling probe as solute depletion occurs both locally around the probe and in the test bed as a whole. This field-portable adaptation of the PLOT-cryo approach has numerous and diverse potential applications. PMID:26726934

  16. Validation of MSG vegetation products: part I. Field retrieval of LAI and FVC from hemispherical photographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Beatriz; Baret, Frederic; Camacho-de Coca, Fernando; Garcia-Haro, F. Javier; Verger, Aleixandre; Melia, Joaquin

    2004-10-01

    The Satellite Application Facilities on Land Surface Analysis (LSA SAF) is aimed to produce and disseminate geophysical products using data from EUMETSAT satellites such as the geostationary MSG1 and the polar orbiting METOP. One of the main scientific objectives for LSA SAF validation activities is to provide the User Community with measures of uncertainty for all derived products. In this context, this document is the first of a two-part set which proposes a consistent methodology for the validation of the LSA SAF vegetation products (LAI/FVC/fAPAR) derived from SEVIRI /MSG . The methodology includes (1) an appropriate field data sampling strategy over different test sites, (2) derivation of high-resolution biophysical variable maps over a larger area (approximately the same size as the SPOT4-HRVIR2 multispectral image) along with an associated uncertainty, and (3) up-scaling to medium and coarse (MSG) resolution scales. This paper aims at developing the stage (1) of the methodology at the specific test site of Barrax, an agricultural area in Central Spain (39°3'N, 2°12'W), whereas the part (2) is addressed in a second document (this issue) and the part (3) will be addressed for future tasks. This work includes a detailed description along with an exhaustive analysis of the vegetation product estimates by the hemispherical camera during the SPARC'03 field campaign, which took place in July 2003 at Barrax test site. The hemispherical photographs have proved to provide accurate estimates of biophysical parameters in crop canopies with significant advantages such as the possibility to evaluate the gap fraction in all viewing direction. On the other hand, a test analysis of the (CAN-EYE) software package used for the hemispherical photographs processing was undertaken. This paper also includes the intercomparison with another ground data set collected by the optical instrument LI-COR LAI2000 during the same campaign.

  17. The Four-Part Field-Aligned Current System in the Ionosphere at Substorm Onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliams, K. A.; Sofko, G. J.; Bristow, W. A.; Hussey, G. C.

    2015-12-01

    Whereas the plasma circulation in the ionosphere is driven by convective drift which is the same for ions and electrons, the magnetospheric plasma circulation includes curvature and gradient drifts, which are charge-dependent. There is even a region of the Neutral Sheet in which the ions, but not the electrons, are "unmagnetized" and where charge separation can occur even for convective drift, which the electrons execute but the ions do not. Due to the charge separations in the magnetosphere, field-aligned currents are generated. The FACs and the associated electric fields play an important role in producing the convection pattern in the ionosphere. Here we argue that there are two pairs of FACs near substorm onset. One pair involves the auroral zone portion of the convection. There, a downward D FAC occurs in the poleward part of the auroral zone and an upward U FAC occurs in the equatorward part. We show that the D-U auroral FAC pair results from the odd situation in the INSh, where the electrons can convect earthward while the unmagnetized ions do not and so remain further tailward of the electrons. The equatorward edge of the auroral zone is marked by a convection reversal, because the auroral zone flows have an eastward velocity component, whereas subauroral flows have a westward component. At the convection reversal, the flow is strictly southward and the electric field strictly westward. The subauroral zone maps out to the outer radiation belt, where the high-energy electrons precipitate tailward of the energetic electron trapping boundary,and high-energy ions precipitate tailward of the energetic ion trapping boundary, the latter being earthward of the former. As a result, another FAC pair forms on field lines in the ORB/subauroral regions. The U FAC of the latter region is adjacent but earthward of the U FAC of the auroral zone pair. The D-U auroral zone pair is poleward of the U-D subauroral (Radiation Belt) pair. Finally, we note that the electric field

  18. The Mushroom Place. Part III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlichter, Carol

    1978-01-01

    The final installment of a series of articles on the "Mushroom Place" learning center program, which involves creative thinking activities for young, gifted students, describes "Doing It the Hard Way," a performance task which involves the actual construction of objects from a selected set of materials in the absence of the usual project tools.…

  19. A Child's Brain: Part III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sylwester, Robert

    1982-01-01

    This article, the last in a series about the human brain, focuses on the skin and its importance for the brain. Physiological functions of the skin, concerning touch and body protection, are explained, as well as its social role in nonverbal communication. Suggestions for student discussions are given. (PP)

  20. Progressing in Spanish: Part III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    Contents of this Spanish text of instructional materials focus on a city in Spain, a city in South America, and a hypothetical visit to a railroad station. Students learn about the imperfect tense, reflexive pronouns, and several other grammatical concepts. Exercises and readings related to the stories "La Despedida" and "Recuerdos Juveniles" are…

  1. ASIST 2003: Part III: Posters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proceedings of the ASIST Annual Meeting, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Twenty-three posters address topics including access to information; metadata; personal information management; scholarly information communication; online resources; content analysis; interfaces; Web queries; information evaluation; informatics; information needs; search effectiveness; digital libraries; diversity; automated indexing; e-commerce;…

  2. Including Media in Field Research and Becoming Part of the Science Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelto, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    There are two primary strategies that I have pursued over the last decade to engage the media, policy makers, and public; after two decades of typical scientific publication methods. An effective method to engage the media with our ongoing 32 year glacier field research program has been to invite media members to join us in the field. From climate videographers to traditional reporters we have had a member of the media with us in nine of the last ten field seasons; two in 2015. The resulting stories have led to several awards for the journalists and an ongoing relationship with our research program. The second part of this science research communication strategy is to have readily available material on specific topics for the media to utilize; this requires social media outreach. The primary outlet media find is the AGU Blog: From a Glacier's Perspective. This blog pubishes two articles a week on a specific glacier's response to climate change. The blog yields on average a media contact on every fourth blog post in 2015. The contacts revolve around specific local glacier information published on the blog. The goal of each blog post is to tell a story about how each glacier is impacted by climate change.

  3. Botswana water and surface energy balance research program. Part 1: Integrated approach and field campaign results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandegriend, A. A.; Owe, M.; Vugts, H. F.; Ramothwa, G. K.

    1992-01-01

    The Botswana water and surface energy balance research program was developed to study and evaluate the integrated use of multispectral satellite remote sensing for monitoring the hydrological status of the Earth's surface. Results of the first part of the program (Botswana 1) which ran from 1 Jan. 1988 - 31 Dec. 1990 are summarized. Botswana 1 consisted of two major, mutually related components: a surface energy balance modeling component, built around an extensive field campaign; and a passive microwave research component which consisted of a retrospective study of large scale moisture conditions and Nimbus scanning multichannel microwave radiometer microwave signatures. The integrated approach of both components in general are described and activities performed during the surface energy modeling component including the extensive field campaign are summarized. The results of the passive microwave component are summarized. The key of the field campaign was a multilevel approach, whereby measurements by various similar sensors were made at several altitudes and resolution. Data collection was performed at two adjacent sites of contrasting surface character. The following measurements were made: micrometeorological measurements, surface temperatures, soil temperatures, soil moisture, vegetation (leaf area index and biomass), satellite data, aircraft data, atmospheric soundings, stomatal resistance, and surface emissivity.

  4. Earthquakes focal mechanism and stress field pattern in the northeastern part of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Emad K.; Hassoup, A.; Abou Elenean, K. M.; Othman, Adel A. A.; Hamed, Diaa-Eldin M. K.

    2015-12-01

    Egypt is characterized by moderate size seismicity where earthquakes are distributed within several active regions. In the present study, we investigated the source mechanism of earthquakes using the digital waveform data recorded by the Egyptian National Seismic Network (ENSN) during the period from 2004 to 2008. The focal mechanisms are constructed with high reliability based on the polarity of the first motion of P-wave. These solutions are used to examine the mode of tectonic deformation and the present-day stress field pattern affecting on different tectonic provinces in the northern part of Egypt. The results demonstrate mainly a normal faulting mechanism with minor strike slip component generally trending parallel to the northern Red Sea, the Suez rift, Aqaba rift with their connection with the great rift system of the Red Sea and the Gulf of Suez and Cairo-Alexandria trend. The inversion technique scheme is used also in the present study for determining the regional stress field parameters for earthquake focal mechanism solutions based on the grid search method of Gephart and Forsyth (1984). The Results of the stress tensor using focal mechanisms of recent earthquakes show a prevailed tension stress field in N52°E, N41°E and N52°E for the northern Red Sea, Gulf of Suez and Gulf of Aqaba zone respectively.

  5. FIRST SPECTROSCOPIC MEASUREMENTS OF [O III] EMISSION FROM Ly{alpha} SELECTED FIELD GALAXIES AT z {approx} 3.1

    SciTech Connect

    McLinden, Emily M.; Rhoads, James E.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Hibon, Pascale; Richardson, Mark L. A.; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Cresci, Giovanni; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Pasquali, Anna; Bian Fuyan; Fan Xiaohui; Woodward, Charles E.

    2011-04-01

    We present the first spectroscopic measurements of the [O III] 5007 A line in two z {approx} 3.1 Ly{alpha} emitting galaxies (LAEs) using the new near-infrared instrument LUCIFER1 on the 8.4 m Large Binocular Telescope. We also describe the optical imaging and spectroscopic observations used to identify these LAEs. Using the [O III] line we have measured accurate systemic redshifts for these two galaxies, and discovered a velocity offset between the [O III] and Ly{alpha} lines in both, with the Ly{alpha} line peaking 342 and 125 km s{sup -1} redward of the systemic velocity. These velocity offsets imply that there are powerful outflows in high-redshift LAEs. They also ease the transmission of Ly{alpha} photons through the interstellar medium and intergalactic medium around the galaxies. By measuring these offsets directly, we can refine both Ly{alpha}-based tests for reionization, and Ly{alpha} luminosity function measurements where the Ly{alpha} forest affects the blue wing of the line. Our work also provides the first direct constraints on the strength of the [O III] line in high-redshift LAEs. We find [O III] fluxes of 7 and 36 x10{sup -17} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} in two z {approx} 3.1 LAEs. These lines are strong enough to dominate broadband flux measurements that include the line (in this case, K{sub s} -band photometry). Spectral energy distribution fits that do not account for the lines would therefore overestimate the 4000 A (and/or Balmer) break strength in such galaxies, and hence also the ages and stellar masses of such high-z galaxies.

  6. Comparison for the carrier mobility between the III-V nitrides and AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructure field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chongbiao, Luan; Zhaojun, Lin; Yuanjie, Lü; Zhihong, Feng; Jingtao, Zhao; Yang, Zhou; Ming, Yang

    2014-09-01

    Using the measured capacitance-voltage curves of Ni/Au Schottky contacts with different areas and the current-voltage characteristics for the AlGaAs/GaAs, AlGaN/AlN/GaN and In0.18 Al0.82N/AlN/GaN heterostructure field-effect transistors (HFETs) at low drain-source voltage, the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) electron mobility for the prepared HFETs was calculated and analyzed. It was found that there is an obvious difference for the variation trend of the mobility curves between the III-V nitride HFETs and the AlGaAs/GaAs HFETs. In the III-V nitride HFETs, the variation trend for the curves of the 2DEG electron mobility with the gate bias is closely related to the ratio of the gate length to the drain-to-source distance. While the ratio of the gate length to the drain-to-source distance has no effect on the variation trend for the curves of the 2DEG electron mobility with the gate bias in the AlGaAs/GaAs HFETs. The reason is attributed to the polarization Coulomb field scattering in the III-V nitride HFETs.

  7. The SEGUE Stellar Parameter Pipeline. III. Comparison with High-Resolution Spectroscopy of SDSS/SEGUE Field Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Allende Prieto, C.; Sivarani, T.; Beers, T.C.; Lee, Y.S.; Koesterke, L.; Shetrone, M.; Sneden, C.; Lambert, D.L.; Wilhelm, R.; Rockosi, C.M.; Lai, D.

    2007-10-01

    The authors report high-resolution spectroscopy of 125 field stars previously observed as part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and its program for Galactic studies, the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE). These spectra are used to measure radial velocities and to derive atmospheric parameters, which they compare with those reported by the SEGUE Stellar Parameter Pipeline (SSPP). The SSPP obtains estimates of these quantities based on SDSS ugriz photometry and low-resolution (R {approx} 2000) spectroscopy. For F- and G-type stars observed with high signal-to-noise ratios (S/N), they empirically determine the typical random uncertainties in the radial velocities, effective temperatures, surface gravities, and metallicities delivered by the SSPP to be 2.4 km s{sup -1}, 130 K (2.2%), 0.21 dex, and 0.11 dex, respectively, with systematic uncertainties of a similar magnitude in the effective temperatures and metallicities. They estimate random errors for lower S/N spectra based on numerical simulations.

  8. Adamantyl-group containing mixed-mode acrylamide-based continuous beds for capillary electrochromatography. Part III. Optimization of the chromatographic efficiency.

    PubMed

    Al-Massaedh, Ayat Allah; Pyell, Ute

    2014-01-17

    In a previous article we described the synthesis of amphiphilic monolithic stationary phases by in situ free radical copolymerization of cyclodextrin-solubilized N-adamantyl acrylamide, piperazinediacrylamide, methacrylamide and vinylsulfonic acid in aqueous medium in pre-treated fused silica capillaries of 100μ.m I.D. In this work, a series of N-adamantyl-group containing acrylamide-based continuous beds is synthesized under variation of different synthesis parameters. The studied synthesis parameters are (i) concentration of the lyotropic salt ammonium sulfate, (ii) concentration of the initiator ammonium persulfate, and (iii) concentration of the negatively charged monomer vinylsulfonic acid in the polymerization mixture. The influence of the synthesis parameters on the chromatographic efficiency is studied under isocratic conditions for a homologues series of alkylphenones in the reversed-phase mode at constant composition of the mobile phase via capillary electrochromatography with varied electric field strength. With varied concentration of the lyotropic salt ammonium sulfate or varied concentration of the initiator ammonium persulfate in the polymerization mixture, a strong impact on the chromatographic efficiency is observed, while there is only a minor influence when varying the molar fraction of the charged monomer VSA. The absence of a significant influence of extra-column band broadening effects on the determined efficiency is confirmed. There is a good repeatability (with respect to capillary-to-capillary variation and run-to-run variation) reached for the theoretical plate heights obtained for DMF and selected alkylphenones in the reversed-phase mode. PMID:24296296

  9. Mining machinery/equipment/parts/services. Oil and Gas field equipment/machinery/parts/supplies (Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Trinidad and Tobago)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This 7-part set includes separate reports on market possibilities for field production equipment, drilling equipment, refinery equipment, and auxiliary equipment in the following countries: Argentina, Brazil (2 reports), Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Trinidad and Tobago. Each report has been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  10. Interaction between phase transformations and dislocations at the nanoscale. Part 1. General phase field approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitas, Valery I.; Javanbakht, Mahdi

    2015-09-01

    Thermodynamically consistent, three-dimensional (3D) phase field approach (PFA) for coupled multivariant martensitic transformations (PTs), including cyclic PTs, variant-variant transformations (i.e., twinning), and dislocation evolution is developed at large strains. One of our key points is in the justification of the multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient into elastic, transformational, and plastic parts. The plastic part includes four mechanisms: dislocation motion in martensite along slip systems of martensite and slip systems of austenite inherited during PT and dislocation motion in austenite along slip systems of austenite and slip systems of martensite inherited during reverse PT. The plastic part of the velocity gradient for all these mechanisms is defined in the crystal lattice of the austenite utilizing just slip systems of austenite and inherited slip systems of martensite, and just two corresponding types of order parameters. The explicit expressions for the Helmholtz free energy and the transformation and plastic deformation gradients are presented to satisfy the formulated conditions related to homogeneous thermodynamic equilibrium states of crystal lattice and their instabilities. In particular, they result in a constant (i.e., stress- and temperature-independent) transformation deformation gradient and Burgers vectors. Thermodynamic treatment resulted in the determination of the driving forces for change of the order parameters for PTs and dislocations. It also determined the boundary conditions for the order parameters that include a variation of the surface energy during PT and exit of dislocations. Ginzburg-Landau equations for dislocations include variation of properties during PTs, which in turn produces additional contributions from dislocations to the Ginzburg-Landau equations for PTs. A complete system of coupled PFA and mechanics equations is presented. A similar theory can be developed for PFA to dislocations and other

  11. Agricultural terraces montoring and modeling: a field survey in Chianti region, Firenze, Italy - First part

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preti, Federico; Caruso, Marco; Dani, Andrea; Errico, Alessandro; Guastini, Enrico; Trucchi, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    The two abstracts present the design and set-up of an experimental field plant whose aim is the study and modeling of water circulation in a terraced slope together with its influence on the stability of the retaining dry stone walls. The pilot plant is located at "Fattoria di Lamole" (Greve in Chianti, Firenze, Italy) where both ancient and recently restored or rebuilt dry stone retaining walls are present. The intense vineyards cultivation makes it very representative in terms of range of external stresses that affect both hillslopes and walls. The research is developed within a bigger framework of landscape preservation as a way to prevent hydrogeological instabilities and landslide risks. First Part A first/preliminary field survey was carried out in order to estimate the hydraulic and mechanical soil characteristics. Field saturated hydraulic conductivity measurements with the Simplified Falling Head (SFH) method on a terrace along an alignment were performed. Infiltrometer tests with a double ring device and soil texture determinations with both fine particle-size and skeleton fraction distributions were also performed. The Direct shear test on undisturbed and reconstituted soil samples will offer an estimation of the Mohr-Coulomb failure envelope parameters (friction angle and cohesion). A reference portion of a dry stone wall will be also monitored. Lateral earth pressure at backfill-retaining wall interface (compared to temperature and air pressure measured values), backfill volumetric water content (both in saturated and unsaturated states) and ground-water level are measured. Acknowledgements Italian Research Project of Relevant Interest (PRIN2010-2011), prot. 20104ALME4, National network for monitoring, modeling, and sustainable management of erosion processes in agricultural land and hilly-mountainous area

  12. Reflecting Equity and Diversity. Part I: Guidelines and Procedure for Evaluating Bias in Instructional Materials. Part II: Bias Awareness Training Worksheets. Part III: Bias Awareness and Procedure Training Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bebermeyer, Jim; Edmond, Mary, Ed.

    Reflecting a need to prepare students for working in diverse organizations, this document was developed to increase school officials' awareness of bias in instructional materials and help them select bias-free materials. A number of the examples illustrate situations dealing with diversity in the workplace. The guide is divided into three parts:…

  13. A Model for the Development and Implementation of Field Trips as an Integral Part of the Science Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orion, Nir

    1993-01-01

    Presents a practical model for planning and implementing a field trip as an integral part of the science curriculum. Reviews the literature related to the role of field trips in the learning process; describes the model; and provides an example implementing the learning cycle method. (Contains 17 references.) (MDH)

  14. Resistive diffusion of force-free magnetic fields in a passive medium. III - Acceleration of flare particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, B. C.

    1974-01-01

    A one-dimensional model is considered in which an increasingly large electric field is induced by a rapidly evolving magnetic field. In the case of solar flares, energies are estimated to which protons and electrons may be directly accelerated by such an induced electric field.

  15. A 3D MOF constructed from dysprosium(III) oxalate and capping ligands: ferromagnetic coupling and field-induced two-step magnetic relaxation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cai-Ming; Zhang, De-Qing; Zhu, Dao-Ben

    2016-04-01

    A novel 3D MOF based on dysprosium(iii) oxalate and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), {[Dy(C2O4)1.5phen]·0.5H2O}n (1), has been hydrothermally synthesized. The Dy(3+) ion acts as a typical Y-shaped node, linking to each other to generate an interesting 3D topology structure. Complex 1 is the first 3D DyMOF displaying both ferromagnetic coupling and field-induced two-step magnetic relaxation. PMID:26961387

  16. Dendritic Growth Morphologies in Al-Zn Alloys—Part II: Phase-Field Computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dantzig, J. A.; Di Napoli, Paolo; Friedli, J.; Rappaz, M.

    2013-12-01

    In Part I of this article, the role of the Zn content in the development of solidification microstructures in Al-Zn alloys was investigated experimentally using X-ray tomographic microscopy. The transition region between dendrites found at low Zn content and dendrites found at high Zn content was characterized by textured seaweed-type structures. This Dendrite Orientation Transition (DOT) was explained by the effect of the Zn content on the weak anisotropy of the solid-liquid interfacial energy of Al. In order to further support this interpretation and to elucidate the growth mechanisms of the complex structures that form in the DOT region, a detailed phase-field study exploring anisotropy parameters' space is presented in this paper. For equiaxed growth, our results essentially recapitulate those of Haxhimali et al.[1] in simulations for pure materials. We find distinct regions of the parameter space associated with and dendrites, separated by a region where hyperbranched dendrites are observed. In simulations of directional solidification, we find similar behavior at the extrema, but in this case, the anisotropy parameters corresponding to the hyperbranched region produce textured seaweeds. As noted in the experimental work reported in Part I, these structures are actually dendrites that prefer to grow misaligned with respect to the thermal gradient direction. We also show that in this region, the dendrites grow with a blunted tip that oscillates and splits, resulting in an oriented trunk that continuously emits side branches in other directions. We conclude by making a correlation between the alloy composition and surface energy anisotropy parameters.

  17. Economics of place-based monitoring under the safe drinking water act, part III: performance evaluation of place-based monitoring strategies.

    PubMed

    Brands, Edwin; Rajagopal, R

    2008-08-01

    The goals of environmental legislation and associated regulations are to protect public health, natural resources, and ecosystems. In this context, monitoring programs should provide timely and relevant information so that the regulatory community can implement legislation in a cost-effective and efficient manner. The Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) of 1974 attempts to ensure that public water systems (PWSs) supply safe water to its consumers. As is the case with many other federal environmental statutes, SDWA monitoring has been implemented in relatively uniform fashion across the USA. In this three part series, we present over 30 years of evidence to demonstrate unique patterns in water quality contaminants over space and time, develop alternative place-based monitoring approaches that exploit such patterns, and evaluate the economic performance of such approaches to current monitoring practice. Part III: Place-based (PBA) and current SDWA monitoring approaches were implemented on test datasets (1995-2001) from 19 water systems and evaluated based on the following criteria: percent of total detections, percent detections above threshold values (e.g. 20, 50, 90% of MCL), and cost. The PBA outperformed the current SDWA monitoring requirements in terms of total detections, missed only a small proportion of detections below the MCL, and captured all detections above 50% of the MCL. Essentially the same information obtained from current compliance monitoring requirements can be gained at approximately one-eighth the cost by implementing the PBA. Temporal sampling strategies were implemented on test datasets (1995-2001) from four water systems and evaluated by the following criteria: parameter estimation, percent deviation from "true" 90th, 95th, and 99th percentiles, and number of samples versus accuracy of the estimate. Non event-based (NEB) strategies were superior in estimating percentiles 1-50, but underestimated the higher percentiles. Event-based strategies were

  18. Field and petrochemical studies of pegmatites in parts of Lokoja, Central Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omada, J. I.; Kolawole, M. S.; Odoma, A. N.

    2015-01-01

    Field, petrological and geochemical studies of pegmatite bodies in parts of Lokoja, Central Nigeria, have been undertaken with a view to characterizing them and determining the rare earth mineralization potentials. Pegmatite bodies which are zoned or poorly zoned occur as dykes trending N-S, NE-SW and NW-SE consisting dominantly of feldspar-quartz, feldspar-quartz-mica, and feldspar-mica-quartz, respectively. Trace elements concentration in the Na-rich and K-rich feldspars is such that Rb > Ba > Sr > Pb > Ga and the pegmatites contain rare metals with moderately high contents of Nb, Sn, Rb, Li and Cs. The muscovite samples have enrichment pattern of Rb > Nb > Sn > Gn > Ta > Cs: each of the elements has concentration values that are higher than those in either the K-rich or Na-rich feldspars suggesting that muscovite and to a lesser extent feldspars, are the possible carriers of Ta, Sn and REE that are associated with the pegmatite bodies in the Lokoja area. The mineralogy and composition of the pegmatite bodies are indicative of post tectonic anorogenic acidic igneous protolith which underwent alkali metasomatism involving selective enrichment of trace elements and REE, fractionation and rock-fluid interactions.

  19. Curve squeal of urban rolling stock—Part 1: State of the art and field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, N.; Koch, J. R.; Chollet, H.; Guerder, J. Y.

    2006-06-01

    This is the first part of a series of three papers dealing with curve squeal of urban rolling stock such as metros and trams. After a brief review of the present state of the art, the key parameters involved in curve squeal generation are discussed. Then, some results of field measurement campaigns, on metro and on tramway systems, are presented. A specific measurement methodology is applied for both campaigns in order to record the main key parameters: rolling speed, axle angle of attack, wheel/rail lateral position and modal damping of relevant wheel modes. On-board microphones are mounted close to each wheel of the instrumented bogies in order to locate the squealing wheels. No squeal occurs on the outer wheel of the leading axle in flange contact with the rail. The highest squeal levels are generally found on the front inner wheel. Pure tone frequencies are related to wheel axial modes for metro (undamped steel wheel) and for tramway (resilient wheels). Squeal occurrence is also observed on a bogie with independent wheels.

  20. Mining machinery/equipment/parts/services. Oil and gas field equipment/machinery/parts/supplies (Ecuador). Refinery equipment, parts, and accessories, March 1991. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-01

    The petroleum sector in Ecuador brings in about 65 percent of the country's revenue. Three of the refineries are located in the coastal region. The other two, plus the Liquified Petroleum Gas Plant (LPG), are located in the Oriente region (Amazon jungle). The refineries operate at about 85% of their installation capacity. The Petroindustrial and Petropeninsula investment plan for 1991 comtemplates the expansion of the Esmeraldas refinery to 110,000 barrels a day, and the up-grading of the Shushufindi and Libertad refineries located near the city of Guayaquil. The United States is by far the largest supplier of refinery equipment, parts and accessories, controlling about 90% of the total market.

  1. ACRIM III

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-12-30

    ACRIM III Data and Information Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance ... the ACRIMSAT spacecraft on December 20, 1999. ACRIM III data are reprocessed every 90 days to utilize instrument recalibration.   ... ACRIM III Instrument Team Page ACRIM II Data Sets SCAR-B Block:  SCAR-B Products ...

  2. Field Coordination: Phase III-B, Beginning Teacher Evaluation Study. Technical Note Series. Technical Note II-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, W. Pearl; Rice, Carol F.

    The activities included in the field coordination and data collection phase of the Beginning Teacher Evaluation Study are described. A history of the recruitment, selection, and training of field personnel, a description of coordination efforts with teachers and school districts, a discussion of the various aspects of scheduling, and the…

  3. Use of radial self-field geometry for intense pulsed ion beam generation above 6 MeV on Hermes III.

    SciTech Connect

    Renk, Timothy Jerome; Harper-Slaboszewicz, Victor Jozef; Ginn, William Craig; Mikkelson, Kenneth A.; Schall, Michael; Cooper, Gary Wayne

    2012-12-01

    We investigate the generation and propagation of intense pulsed ion beams at the 6 MeV level and above using the Hermes III facility at Sandia National Laboratories. While high-power ion beams have previously been produced using Hermes III, we have conducted systematic studies of several ion diode geometries for the purpose of maximizing focused ion energy for a number of applications. A self-field axial-gap diode of the pinch reflex type and operated in positive polarity yielded beam power below predicted levels. This is ascribed both to power flow losses of unknown origin upstream of the diode load in Hermes positive polarity operation, and to anomalies in beam focusing in this configuration. A change to a radial self-field geometry and negative polarity operation resulted in greatly increased beam voltage (> 6 MeV) and estimated ion current. A comprehensive diagnostic set was developed to characterize beam performance, including both time-dependent and time-integrated measurements of local and total beam power. A substantial high-energy ion population was identified propagating in reverse direction, i.e. from the back side of the anode in the electron beam dump. While significant progress was made in increasing beam power, further improvements in assessing the beam focusing envelope will be required before ultimate ion generation efficiency with this geometry can be completely determined.

  4. Teaching and learning the geological knowledge as a part of the science education general field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre-Pérez, Constancio

    2010-05-01

    Since the early 50s of last century the Teaching of Science has undergone a process of continuous development, (Gutiérrez, 1987; Aliberas, Gutierrez and Izquierdo, 1989) to become a scientific discipline largely accepted as such by many different universities worldwide. Besides, the proliferation of publications, magazines, conferences, symposia, meetings, and so on, proves this assertion. In these publications and meetings the Teaching of Science (or Science Education in more general terms) is addressed as a new field of research, teaching and educational innovation focused on the processes of teaching and learning of the experimental sciences (all of them: Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Geology). The study of this discipline is undertaken from different pedagogical, epistemological, psychological and sociological approaches. From this general perspective we can say that over the last two decades each of the sciences has developed specific characteristics so that, today, we could speak about specific didactics for each one of them. In the case of Geology (or Geoscience) Teaching there have been significant contributions from the following fields of research: the students' prior ideas (constructivist approach), the history of geology (as a subject-specific field) and from epistemology (Pedrinaci, E. 2000). The body of geoscience knowledge has an internal logic (as happens with the other science subjects) that allows us to organize the contents to teach, selecting, arranging and establishing proper relations between them. Still geology has a central, transverse, inter-and transdisciplinary character for its relationship with the other sciences. This character makes it appear as one of the disciplines with a huge potential to combine different methodologies of teaching and learning and different learning models already tested in the research field of Physics, Chemistry or Biology Education. Moreover, the most recent term coined for it "geosciences or earth and

  5. Literature Search and Development of an Evaluation System in Early Childhood Education. III. Part C--Matching Objectives and Recommendations for Development of Measures. Part D--Titles I and III Program-Evaluation Survey Instruments: Scope and Design. Part E--Sampling Recommendations or Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Annie L.; And Others

    As part of the overall study of the development of behavioral objectives for preschool children, the three parts of this report discusses matching procedures, survey instruments, and sampling guidelines. Part C, Matching Objectives and Recommendations for Development of Measures, contains discussions of the following: A Matching of Existing…

  6. CORRTEX Diagnostic Deployment for the SPE-III experiment, 24 July 2012: Fielding Report and Preliminary Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, Thomas D.; Schultz-Fellenz, Emily S.

    2012-08-29

    The Continuous Reflectometry for Radius vs Time Experiments (CORRTEX) diagnostic system was deployed for the third explosives test in the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) sequence to monitor and verify several conditions of the experiment including the detonation velocity of the explosive package and functioning of explosive initiators. Six distance-marked coaxial cables were installed on the SPE-III explosives canister, and key locations documented through along-cable length measurements and photography. CORRTEX uses electrical-pulse time-domain reflectometry to continuously record the two-way transit time (TWTT) of the cables. As the shock front of the detonation advances, the coaxial cable is shorted or destroyed, and the resulting TWTT also decreases. Interpretation of these changes as a function of TWTT can be converted to positional measurements using known parameters of the cables.

  7. Interaction between phase transformations and dislocations at the nanoscale. Part 2: Phase field simulation examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javanbakht, Mahdi; Levitas, Valery I.

    2015-09-01

    The complete system of phase field equations for coupled martensitic phase transformations (PTs), dislocation evolution, and mechanics at large strains is presented. Finite element method (FEM) is utilized to solve this system for two important problems. The first one is related to the simulation of shear strain-induced PT at the evolving dislocation pile-ups in a nanosized bicrystal. Plasticity plays a dual part in the interaction with PT. Dislocation pile-ups produce strong stress tensor concentrators that lead to barrierless martensite (M) nucleation. On the other hand, plasticity in the transforming grain relaxes these stress concentrators suppressing PT. The final stationary M morphology is governed by the local thermodynamic equilibrium, either at the interfaces or in terms of stresses averaged over the martensitic region or the entire grain. This is very surprising because of strong heterogeneity of stress fields and is in contrast to previous statements that phase equilibrium conditions do not enter the description of strain-induced PTs. The second problem is devoted to martensitic plate propagation through a bicrystal during temperature-induced PT. For elastic growth (without dislocations) and a large thermal driving force, a complex transformation path with plate branching and direct and reverse PTs is observed, which still ends with the same stationary nanostructure as for a smaller driving force and a traditional transformation path. Sharp grain boundary arrests plate growth at a relatively small driving force, exhibiting an athermal friction. For elastoplastic growth, the generation of dislocations produces athermal friction and arrests the plate below some critical driving force, leading to a morphological transition from plate to lath M. The width of the martensitic plate increases in comparison with elastic growth due to internal stress relaxation. Plate growth is accompanied by the nucleation of dislocations within M and remaining in M, the

  8. FIELD AND LABORATORY EVIDENCE FOR INTRINSIC BIODEGRADATION OF VINYL CHLORIDE CONTAMINATION IN A FE(III)-REDUCING AQUIFER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Intrinsic bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes in anaerobic aquifers previously has not been considered feasible, due, in large part, to 1) the production of vinyl chloride during microbial reductive dechlorination of higher chlorinated contaminants and 2) the apparent poor biod...

  9. Results of magnetic field measurements of CP-stars performed with the 6-m telescope. III. Observations in 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanyuk, I. I.; Semenko, E. A.; Kudryavtsev, D. O.; Moiseevaa, A. V.

    2016-07-01

    We present the results of measuring longitudinal magnetic fields ( B e ), rotation velocities ( v e sin i), and radial velocities ( V r ) of 44 stars observed with the Main Stellar Spectrograph (MSS) of the 6-m BTA telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory in 2009. For the first time, magnetic fields were detected for the stars HD5441, HD199180, HD225627, and BD+00° 4535. We show that for the same stars, the longitudinal fields B e measured from the H β hydrogen line core and from metal lines can differ by 10% and up to a factor of 2-3. Except in rare cases, magnetic fields measured from the metal lines are stronger. We believe that this phenomenon is of a physical nature and depends on the magnetic field topology and the physical conditions inside a specific star. Observations of standard stars without magnetic fields confirm the absence of systematic errors capable of introducing distortions into the longitudinal-field measurement results. In this work we comment on the results for each of the stars.

  10. A redshift survey of IRAS galaxies. III - Reconstruction of the velocity and density fields in N-body model universes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Marc; Strauss, Michael A.; Yahil, Amos

    1991-01-01

    N-body simulations of a 'cold dark matter' universe are presently used to calibrate the accuracy, and assess the limitations, of the procedure previously employed to predict the velocity field within 8000 km/sec of the Local Group through the application of linear gravitational theory to a full-sky, flux-limited sample of IRAS galaxies. The rms difference between the one-dimensional acceleration and velocity of field particles is an increasing function of local density; linear theory can in this way account for all but one-sixth of kinetic energy. A series of artificial IRAS catalogs closely matching the real sample in space density and clustering amplitude is constructed. Velocity correlation functions are used to demonstrate that the predicted velocity fields are in good agreement with the true velocity fields on large scales.

  11. Unexpected suppression of spin-lattice relaxation via high magnetic field in a high-spin iron(iii) complex.

    PubMed

    Zadrozny, Joseph M; Graham, Michael J; Krzyaniak, Matthew D; Wasielewski, Michael R; Freedman, Danna E

    2016-08-01

    A counterintuitive three-order of magnitude slowing of the spin-lattice relaxation rate is observed in a high spin qubit at high magnetic field via multifrequency pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance measurements. PMID:27463410

  12. Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies, Class III

    SciTech Connect

    City of Long Beach; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California; David K. Davies and Associates

    2002-09-30

    The objective of this project was to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. It was hoped that the successful application of these technologies would result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs.

  13. Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies, Class III

    SciTech Connect

    City of Long Beach; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California; David K. Davies and Associates

    2002-09-30

    The objective of this project was to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The successful application of these technologies would result in expanding their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, to other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs.

  14. Aerodynamic sound generation due to vortex-aerofoil interaction. Part 2: Analysis of the acoustic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parasarathy, R.; Karamcheti, K.

    1972-01-01

    The Lighthill method was the basic procedure used to analyze the sound field associated with a vortex of modified strength interacting with an airfoil. A free vortex interacting with an airfoil in uniform motion was modeled in order to determine the sound field due to all the acoustic sources, not only on the airfoil surfaces (dipoles), but also the ones distributed on the perturbed flow field (quadrupoles) due to the vortex-airfoil interaction. Because inviscid flow is assumed in the study of the interaction, the quadrupoles considered in the perturbed flow field are entirely due to an unsteady flow field. The effects of airfoil thickness on the second radiation are examined by using a symmetric Joukowski airfoil for the vortex-airfoil interaction. Sound radiation in a plane, far field simplification, and computation of the sound field are discussed.

  15. Increasing Waterflooding Reservoirs in the Wilmington Oil Field through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management, Class III

    SciTech Connect

    Koerner, Roy; Clarke, Don; Walker, Scott; Phillips, Chris; Nguyen, John; Moos, Dan; Tagbor, Kwasi

    2001-08-07

    This project was intended to increase recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs, transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project.

  16. Further Characterization of a Type III Secretion System (T3SS) and of a New Effector Protein from a Clinical Isolate of Aeromonas Hydrophila - Part I

    EPA Science Inventory

    A type III secretion system (T3SS)-associated cytotoxin, AexT, with ADP-ribosyltransferase activity and homology to Pseudomonas aeruginosa bifuncational toxins ExoT/S, was recently identified from a fish pathogen Aeromonas salmonicida. In this study, we reported the molecular cha...

  17. Framing Teacher Preparation Research: An Overview of the Field, Part 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran-Smith, Marilyn; Villegas, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    This is the first of a two-part article that aims to chart the contemporary landscape of research on teacher preparation and certification. It is based on a review of more than 1,500 studies published between 2000 and 2012. Part 1 provides information about how the review was conducted and describes the theoretical/analytic framework the authors…

  18. Rapid wide-field Mueller matrix polarimetry imaging based on four photoelastic modulators with no moving parts.

    PubMed

    Alali, Sanaz; Gribble, Adam; Vitkin, I Alex

    2016-03-01

    A new polarimetry method is demonstrated to image the entire Mueller matrix of a turbid sample using four photoelastic modulators (PEMs) and a charge coupled device (CCD) camera, with no moving parts. Accurate wide-field imaging is enabled with a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) optical gating technique and an evolutionary algorithm (EA) that optimizes imaging times. This technique accurately and rapidly measured the Mueller matrices of air, polarization elements, and turbid phantoms. The system should prove advantageous for Mueller matrix analysis of turbid samples (e.g., biological tissues) over large fields of view, in less than a second. PMID:26974110

  19. Bumblebee program, aerodynamic data. Part 2: Flow fields at Mach number 2.0. [supersonic missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, G. A.; Cronvich, L. L.

    1979-01-01

    Available flow field data which can be used in validating theoretical procedures for computing flow fields around supersonic missiles are presented. Tabulated test data are given which define the flow field around a conical-nosed cylindrical body in a crossflow plane corresponding to a likely tail location. The data were obtained at a Mach number of 2.0 for an angle of attack of 0 to 23 degrees. The data define the flow field for cases both with and without a forward wing present.

  20. Gadolinium(III)-loaded nanoparticulate zeolites as potential high-field MRI contrast agents: relationship between structure and relaxivity.

    PubMed

    Csajbók, Eva; Bányai, István; Vander Elst, Luce; Muller, Robert N; Zhou, Wuzong; Peters, Joop A

    2005-08-01

    The effects of dealumination, pore size, and calcination on the efficiency (as expressed in the relaxivity) of Gd3+-loaded zeolites for potential application as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents were studied. Partial dealumination of zeolites NaY or NaA by treatment with (NH4)2SiF6 or diluted HCl resulted in materials that, upon loading with Gd3+, had a much higher relaxivity than the corresponding non-dealuminated materials. Analysis of the 1H NMR dispersion profiles of the various zeolites showed that this can be mainly ascribed to an increase of the amount of water inside the zeolite cavities as a result of the destruction of walls between cavities. However, the average residence time of water inside the Gd3+-loaded cavities did not change significantly, which suggests that the windows of the Gd3+-loaded cavities are not affected by the dealumination. Upon calcination, the Gd3+ ions moved to the small sodalite cavities and became less accessible for water, resulting in a decrease in relaxivity. The important role of diffusion for the relaxivity was demonstrated by a comparison of the relaxivity of Gd3+-loaded zeolite NaY and NaA samples. NaA had much lower relaxivities due to the smaller pore sizes. The transversal relaxivities of the Gd3+-doped zeolites are comparable in magnitude to the longitudinal ones at low magnetic fields (<60 MHz). However at higher fields, the transversal relaxivities steeply increased, whereas the longitudinal relaxivities decreased as field strength increased. Therefore, these materials have potential as T1 MRI contrast agents at low field, and as T2 agents at higher fields. PMID:15929138

  1. Field test and mathematical modeling of bioremediation of an oil-contaminated soil. Part 1: Field test

    SciTech Connect

    Li, K.Y.; Xu, T.; Colapret, J.A. ); Cawley, W.A. ); Bonner, J.S. . Civil Engineering Dept.); Ernest, A.; Verramachaneni, P.B. . Environmental Engineering Dept.)

    1994-01-01

    A fire-wall area (about 270 ft x 310 ft) with the Bunker C oil contaminated soil was selected for the bioremediation field test. This fire-wall area was separated into 18 plots by dirt dikes to test 6 bioremediation methods with three tests of each method. The six treatment methods were: (a) aeration with basic nutrients and indigenous organisms (BNIO); (b) aeration with basic nutrients and inoculation from a refinery wastewater treatment facility (BNSIWT); (c) aeration with an oleophilic fertilizer and indigenous organisms (INIPOL); (d) aeration with basic nutrients and biosurfactant organisms (EPA Seal Beach consortia) (EPA); (e) aeration with proprietary nutrients and organisms (PRO); and (f) aeration only for active control (CONTROL). This field test was conducted for 91 days. In general the oil contents in 18 plots were reduced, but the results showed significant fluctuations. A statistical method was used to examine if the oil reductions of six methods were the results from the random error of sampling and sample analysis or biodegradation. The results of the statistical analysis showed that oil reduction was concluded from all but the plots of PRO. From the data analysis, it may be concluded that the oil reduction rate in these studies is controlled by oil transfer from soil into the aqueous solution. An example of calculation was used to illustrate this conclusion.

  2. Peculiarities of extracellular potentials produced by deep muscles. Part 1: single fibre potential fields.

    PubMed

    Arabadzhiev, T I

    2013-06-01

    The similarity among surface electromyography (EMG) signals recorded by the poles of electrode arrays above deep muscles like erector spinae is a substantial obstacle in determining major muscle characteristics. What makes EMG signals so different when detected at various distances from the fibres? To answer this question, we simulated and analyzed extracellular potential fields produced by a single muscle fibre. We considered the fields at a few specific time instants. They corresponded to the origination of two depolarized zones at the end-plate, their propagation along both semi-fibres, and extinction at the fibre-ends. We used intracellular action potentials and muscle fibre propagation velocities typical for non-fatigued or fatigued muscle fibres. We have shown that at relatively small distances from the fibre, the strong potential fields are concentrated mainly near the sources. The interaction between potential fields is weak and the propagation of the fields and EMG signals in relatively long fibres is clearly apparent. At large distances, the potential fields are wide and the interaction between the fields produced by the two depolarized zones is strong. The total potential field could remain non-propagating during the entire main phase. As a result, the propagation will be obscured also in EMG signals. PMID:23361341

  3. Field Guide to the Geology of Parts of the Appalachian Highlands and Adjacent Interior Plains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenzie, Garry D.; Utgard, Russell O.

    This field guide is the basis for a five-day, 1000-mile trip through six states and six geomorphic provinces. The trip and the pre- and post-trip exercises included in the guide constitute a three credit course at The Ohio State University entitled "Field Geology for Science Teachers." The purpose of the trip is to study the regional geology,…

  4. Student-Designed Mapping Project as Part of a Geology Field Camp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Daniel F.; Sumrall, Jeanne L.; Sumrall, Jonathan B.

    2015-01-01

    During the summer of 2012, the Louisiana State University (LSU) field camp program was affected by close proximity to the large Waldo Canyon Fire in Colorado Springs, CO, as well as by a fire incident on the field camp property. A mapping exercise was created that incorporated spatial data acquired on the LSU property to investigate research…

  5. THE UDF05 FOLLOW-UP OF THE HUBBLE ULTRA DEEP FIELD. III. THE LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AT z {approx} 6

    SciTech Connect

    Su Jian; Stiavelli, Massimo; Bergeron, Eddie; Bradley, Larry; Dahlen, Tomas; Ferguson, Henry C.; Koekemoer, Anton; Lucas, Ray A.; Panagia, Nino; Pavlovsky, Cheryl; Oesch, Pascal; Carollo, Marcella; Lilly, Simon; Trenti, Michele; Giavalisco, Mauro; Mobasher, Bahram

    2011-09-10

    In this paper, we present a derivation of the rest-frame 1400 A luminosity function (LF) at redshift six from a new application of the maximum likelihood method by exploring the five deepest Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys (HST/ACS) fields, i.e., the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, two UDF05 fields, and two Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey fields. We work on the latest improved data products, which makes our results more robust than those of previous studies. We use unbinned data and thereby make optimal use of the information contained in the data set. We focus on the analysis to a magnitude limit where the completeness is larger than 50% to avoid possibly large errors in the faint end slope that are difficult to quantify. We also take into account scattering in and out of the dropout sample due to photometric errors by defining for each object a probability that it belongs to the dropout sample. We find the best-fit Schechter parameters to the z {approx} 6 LF are {alpha} = 1.87 {+-} 0.14, M{sub *} = -20.25 {+-} 0.23, and {phi}{sub *} = 1.77{sup +0.62}{sub -0.49} x 10{sup -3} Mpc{sup -3}. Such a steep slope suggests that galaxies, especially the faint ones, are possibly the main sources of ionizing photons in the universe at redshift six. We also combine results from all studies at z {approx} 6 to reach an agreement in the 95% confidence level that -20.45 < M{sub *} < -20.05 and -1.90 < {alpha} < -1.55. The luminosity density has been found not to evolve significantly between z {approx} 6 and z {approx} 5, but considerable evolution is detected from z {approx} 6 to z {approx} 3.

  6. Geology of quadrangles H-12, H-13, and parts of I-12 and I-13, (zone III) in northeastern Santander Department, Colombia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, Dwight Edward; Goldsmith, Richard; Cruz, Jaime B.; Restrepo, Hernan A.

    1974-01-01

    A program of geologic mapping and mineral investigation in Colombia was undertaken cooperatively by the Colombian Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Geologico-Mineras (formerly known as the Inventario Minero Nacional), and the U. S. Geological Survey; by the Government of Colombia and the Agency for International Development, U. S. Department of State. The purpose was to study, and evaluate mineral resources (excluding of petroleum, coal, emeralds, and alluvial gold) of four selected areas, designated Zones I to IV, that total about 70,000 km2. The work in Zone III, in the Cordillera Oriental, was done from 1965 to 1968. The northeast trend of the Cordillera Oriental of Colombia swings abruptly to north-northwest in the area of this report, and divides around the southern end of the Maracaibo Basin. This section of the Cordillera Oriental is referred to as the Santander Massif. Radiometric age determinations indicate that the oldest rocks of the Santander massif are Precambrian and include high-grade gneiss, schist, and migmatite of the Bucaramanga Formation. These rocks were probably part of the Precambrian Guayana Shield. Low- to medium-grade metamorphic rocks of late Precambrian to Ordovician age .include phyllite, schist, metasiltstone, metasandstone, and marble of the Silgara Formation, a geosynclinal series of considerable extent in the Cordillera Oriental and possibly the Cordillera de Merida of Venezuela. Orthogneiss ranging from granite to tonalite is widely distributed in the high- and medium-grade metamorphic rocks of the central core of the massif and probably represents rocks of two ages, Precambrian and Ordovician to Early Devonian. Younger orthogneiss and the Silgara are overlain by Middle Devonian beds of the Floresta Formation which show a generally low but varying degree of metamorphism. Phyllite and argillite are common, and infrequent marble and other calcareous beds are fossiliferous. Except for recrystallization in limestones of !the

  7. Lehr's fields of campaniform sensilla in beetles (Coleoptera): functional morphology. III. Modification of elytral mobility or shape in flying beetles.

    PubMed

    Frantsevich, Leonid; Gorb, Stanislav; Radchenko, Vladimir; Gladun, Dmytro

    2015-03-01

    Some flying beetles have peculiar functional properties of their elytra, if compared with the vast majority of beetles. A "typical" beetle covers its pterothorax and the abdomen from above with closed elytra and links closed elytra together along the sutural edges. In the open state during flight, the sutural edges diverge much more than by 90°. Several beetles of unrelated taxa spread wings through lateral incisions on the elytra and turn the elytron during opening about 10-12° (Cetoniini, Scarabaeus, Gymnopleurus) or elevate their elytra without partition (Sisyphus, Tragocerus). The number of campaniform sensilla in their elytral sensory field is diminished in comparison with beetles of closely related taxa lacking that incision. Elytra are very short in rove beetles and in long-horn beetles Necydalini. The abundance of sensilla in brachyelytrous long-horn beetles Necydalini does not decrease in comparison with macroelytrous Cerambycinae. Strong reduction of the sensory field was found in brachyelytrous Staphylinidae. Lastly, there are beetles lacking the linkage of the elytra down the sutural edge (stenoelytry). Effects of stenoelytry were also not uniform: Oedemera and flying Meloidae have the normal amount of sensilla with respect to their body size, whereas the sensory field in the stenoelytrous Eulosia bombyliformis is 5-6 times less than in chafers of the same size but with normally linking broad elytra. PMID:25499796

  8. An anaerobic field injection experiment in a landfill leachate plume, Grindsted, Denmark: 2. Deduction of anaerobic (methanogenic, sulfate-, and Fe (III)-reducing) redox conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrechtsen, Hans-JøRgen; Bjerg, Poul L.; Ludvigsen, Liselotte; Rügge, Kirsten; Christensen, Thomas H.

    1999-04-01

    Redox conditions may be environmental factors which affect the fate of the xenobiotic organic compounds. Therefore the redox conditions were characterized in an anaerobic, leachate-contaminated aquifer 15-60 m downgradient from the Grindsted Landfill, Denmark, where an field injection experiment was carried out. Furthermore, the stability of the redox conditions spatially and over time were investigated, and different approaches to deduce the redox conditions were evaluated. The redox conditions were evaluated in a set of 20 sediment and groundwater samples taken from locations adjacent to the sediment samples. Samples were investigated with respect to groundwater chemistry, including hydrogen and volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and sediment geochemistry, and bioassays were performed. The groundwater chemistry, including redox sensitive species for a large number of samples, varied over time during the experimental period of 924 days owing to variations in the leachate from the landfill. However, no indication of change in the redox environment resulting from the field injection experiment or natural variation was observed in the individual sampling points. The methane, Fe(II), hydrogen, and VFA groundwater chemistry parameters strongly indicated a Fe(III)-reducing environment. This was further supported by the bioassays, although methane production and sulfate-reduction were also observed in a few samples close to the landfill. On the basis of the calculated carbon conversion, Fe(III) was the dominant electron acceptor in the region of the aquifer, which was investigated. Because of the complexity of a landfill leachate plume, several redox processes may occur simultaneously, and an array of methods must be applied for redox characterization in such multicomponent systems.

  9. Design and Analysis of CMOS-Compatible III-V Compound Electron-Hole Bilayer Tunneling Field-Effect Transistor for Ultra-Low-Power Applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Yoon; Seo, Jae Hwa; Yoon, Young Jun; Lee, Ho-Young; Lee, Seong Min; Cho, Seongjae; Kang, In Man

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we design and analyze complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS)-compatible III-V compound electron-hole bilayer (EHB) tunneling field-effect transistors (TFETs) by using two-dimensional (2D) technology computer-aided design (TCAD) simulations. A recently proposed EHB TFET exploits a bias-induced band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) across the electron-hole bilayer by an electric field from the top and bottom gates. This is in contrast to conventional planar p(+)-p(-)-n TFETs, which utilize BTBT across the source-to-channel junction. We applied III-V compound semiconductor materials to the EHB TFETs in order to enhance the current drivability and switching performance. Devices based on various compound semiconductor materials have been designed and analyzed in terms of their primary DC characteristics. In addition, the operational principles were validated by close examination of the electron concentrations and energy-band diagrams under various operation conditions. The simulation results of the optimally designed In0.533Ga0.47As EHB TFET show outstanding performance, with an on-state current (Ion) of 249.5 μA/μm, subthreshold swing (S) of 11.4 mV/dec, and threshold voltage (Vth) of 50 mV at VDS = 0.5 V. Based on the DC-optimized InGaAs EHB TFET, the CMOS inverter circuit was simulated in views of static and dynamic behaviors of the p-channel device with exchanges between top and bottom gates or between source and drain electrodes maintaining the device structure. PMID:26726356

  10. Heavy metals accumulation in parts of paddy Oryza sativa L. grown in paddy field adjacent to ultrabasic soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadif, Waqeed Mahdi; Rahim, Sahibin Abd; Sahid, Ismail; Bhuiyan, Atiqur Rahman; Ibrahim, Izyanti

    2015-09-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the accumulation and translocation of heavy metals from soil around the root zone to various parts of the paddy plant, namely the roots, stems, leaves and rice grains. This study was conducted in 2014 in paddy field adjacent to ultrabasic soil (field 1 and 2) located in Ranau, Sabah and one field (Field 3) taken as control located at the UKM experimental plot in peninsular of Malaysia. The plant species used in the present investigation is Paddy Batu. The heavy metals studied were Chromium (Cr), Iron (Fe) and Nickel (Ni). Heavy metals in soil and plant were extracted by wet digestion method. Heavy metals present in paddy plants and soils extract were measured using the ICP-MS. Heavy metals concentrations in the plant parts in descending order is the root > leaves > stem > rice grain. Lower concentration of all heavy metals in soils and plant parts was shown by the control site (Field 3) in UKM Bangi. Higher concentration of heavy metals occurred in the roots compared to other above ground parts (stem, leaves, and grains) of the paddy plant in all of the paddy field. The bioaccumulation factor (BAF) of heavy metals in all locations were recorded in descending order as Ni > Cr > Fe, the BAF values for all metals in the rice grains were low, whereas the BAF values were recorded high for Ni in all locations. The results also showed that Fe was the most predominant metal ion in the roots, followed by Ni then Cr.

  11. Unsaturated hydrologic flow parameters based on laboratory and field data for soils near the mixed waste landfill, technical area III, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Roepke, C.S.; Strong, W.R.; Nguyen, H.A.

    1996-08-01

    This report presents the results of laboratory tests conducted on soil core samples obtained prior to an instantaneous profile test conducted west of the Mixed Waste Landfill in Technical Area III. The instantaneous profile test was conducted to measure in situ hydrologic parameters controlling unsaturated flow and contaminant transport in the near - surface vadose zone. Soil core samples from the instantaneous profile test plot were tested in the Sandia National Laboratory`s Environmental Restoration Project Hydrology Laboratory to measure saturated hydraulic conductivity and the relationships between moisture content and soil water tension. Data from laboratory tests and the instantaneous profile field test were then modeled using the computer code RETC to quantify moisture content, soil water tension, and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity relationships. Results content, soil verified that a combination of laboratory and field data yielded a more complete definition of hydrologic properties than either laboratory or field data alone. Results also indicated that at native moisture contents, the potential for significant unsaturated aqueous flow is limited, while at saturated or near - saturated conditions, preferential flow may occur.

  12. Phase field modeling of fracture in rubbery polymers. Part I: Finite elasticity coupled with brittle failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miehe, Christian; Schänzel, Lisa-Marie

    2014-04-01

    This work presents a new phase field model for rate-independent crack propagation in rubbery polymers at large strains and considers details of its numerical implementation. The approach accounts for micro-mechanically based features of both the elastic bulk response as well as the crack toughness of idealized polymer networks. The proposed diffusive crack modeling based on the introduction of a crack phase field overcomes difficulties associated with the computational realization of sharp crack discontinuities, in particular when it comes to complex crack topologies. The crack phase field governs a crack density function, which describes the macroscopic crack surface in the polymer per unit of the reference volume. It provides the basis for the constitutive modeling of a degrading free energy storage and a crack threshold function with a Griffith-type critical energy release rate, that governs the crack propagation in the polymer. Both the energy storage as well as the critical energy release due to fracture can be related to classical statistical network theories of polymers. The proposed framework of diffusive fracture in polymers is formulated in terms of a rate-type variational principle that determines the evolution of the coupled primary variable fields, i.e. the deformation field and the crack phase field. On the computational side, we outline a staggered solution procedure based on a one-pass operator split of the coupled equations, that successively updates in a typical time step the crack phase field and the displacement field. Such a solution algorithm is extremely robust, easy to implement and ideally suited for engineering problems. We finally demonstrate the performance of the phase field formulation of fracture at large strains by means of representative numerical examples.

  13. SAGE III

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-06-15

    SAGE III Data and Information The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas ... on the spacecraft. SAGE III produced L1 and L2 scientific data from 5/07/2002 until 12/31/2005. The flight of the second instrument is as ... Guide Documents:  Project Guide Data Products User's Guide  (PDF) Relevant Documents:  ...

  14. Subsurface Characterization and Seismic Monitoring for the Southwest Partnerships Phase III Demonstration Project at Farnsworth Field, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, R. A.; Balch, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    The Southwest Partnership on Carbon Sequestration is performing seismic based characterization and monitoring activities at an active CO2 EOR project at Farnsworth Field, Texas. CO2 is anthropogenically sourced from a fertilizer and an ethanol plant. The field has 13 CO2 injectors and has sequestered 302,982 metric tonnes of CO2 since October 2013. The field site provides an excellent laboratory for testing a range of monitoring technologies in an operating CO2 flood since planned development is sequential and allows for multiple opportunities to record zero CO2 baseline data, mid-flood data, and fully flooded data. The project is comparing and contrasting several scales of seismic technologies in order to determine best practices for large scale commercial sequestration projects. Characterization efforts include an 85 km2 3D surface seismic survey, baseline and repeat 3D VSP surveys centered on injection wells, cross-well tomography baseline and repeat surveys between injector/producer pairs, and a borehole passive seismic array to monitor induced seismicity. All surveys have contributed to detailed geologic models which were then used for fluid flow and risk assessment simulations. 3D VSP and cross-well data with repeat surveys have allowed for direct comparisons of the reservoir prior to CO2 injection and at eight months into injection, with a goal of imaging the CO2 plume as it moves away from injection wells. Additional repeat surveys at regular intervals will continue to refine the plume. The goal of this work is to demonstrate seismic based technologies to monitor CO2 sequestration projects, and to contribute to best practices manuals for commercial scale CO2 sequestration projects. In this talk the seismic plan will be outlined, progress towards goals enumerated, and preliminary results from baseline and repeat seismic data will be discussed. Funding for this project is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy under Award No. DE-FC26-05NT42591.

  15. 12 CFR Appendix B to Part 701 - Chartering and Field of Membership Manual

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... United States military installation or United States embassy without prior NCUA approval. Chapter 2 Field..., textile workers, realtors, nurses, teachers, police officers, or U.S. military personnel are...

  16. Flow Driven by an Archimedean Helical Permanent Magnetic Field. Part I: Flow Patterns and Their Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Wang, Xiaodong; Etay, Jacqueline; Na, Xianzhao; Zhang, Xinde; Fautrelle, Yves

    2016-04-01

    In this study, an Archimedean helical permanent magnetic field was constructed and its driving effects on liquid metal were examined. A magnetic stirrer was constructed using a series of arc-like magnets. The helical distribution of its magnetic field, which was confirmed via Gauss probe measurements and numerical simulations, can be considered a combination of rotating and traveling magnetic fields. The characteristics of the flow patterns, particularly the transitions between the meridian secondary flow (two vortices) and the global axial flow (one vortex), driven by this magnetic field were quantitatively measured using ultrasonic Doppler velocimetry. The transient and modulated flow behaviors will be presented in a companion article. The D/ H dimension ratio was used to characterize the transitions of these two flow patterns. The results demonstrated that the flow patterns depend on not only the intrinsic structure of the magnetic field, e.g., the helix lead angle, but also the performance parameters, e.g., the dimensional ratio of the liquid bulk. The notable opposing roles of these two flow patterns in the improvement of macrosegregations when imposing such magnetic fields near the solidifying front were qualitatively addressed.

  17. Field test of two high-pressure, direct-contact downhole steam generators. Volume III. Metallurgical analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, J.F.; Weirick, L.J.; Pettit, F.S.

    1983-10-01

    Two prototype downhole steam generator (DSG) systems were operated in an oil field environment during a test in the Wilmington Field, Long Beach, CA, from June 1981 through March 1982. One generator burned diesel fuel in air and was located downhole, the other burned diesel in oxygen and was operated on the surface. Components of the two systems experienced varying degrees of corrosion during the test. Severe degradation of certain critical components limited the operating lifetimes of both steam generators. Metallurgical analyses of degraded components were performed to determine the causes and mechanisms of corrosion of materials exposed to the diesel combustion, generator effluent, and downhole environments. Two separate analyses were conducted reflecting the two classes of attack mechanisms encountered in these environments, i.e., aqueous corrosion and mixed gas hot corrosion. Materials examined included plain carbon steel, 310 and 316 stainless steels, Inconel 600 and 625, and Hastelloy X. The degradation of combustor materials was caused primarily by fluctuations in the combustion environment, notably composition and temperature, at exposed surfaces. Most of the materials examined were found to be unsuitable for extended life in the environments to which they were exposed. Stainless steels, in particular, are not recommended for continued use in downhole steam generators. Other recommendations are provided, including alternate materials, design modifications, and changes in operating procedures, which should improve the lifetime of downhole steam generators. 83 references, 83 figures, 10 tables.

  18. Crystal-field analysis and calculation of two-photon absorption line strengths of dicesium sodium hexachlorogadolinate(III).

    PubMed

    Duan, Chang-Kui; Tanner, Peter A

    2010-03-31

    The crystal-field energy level calculation of the 4f(7) ion Gd(3+) in the crystal Cs(2)NaGdCl(6) has fitted 45 levels with standard deviation 12 cm(-1), with the energy parameters being consistent with those from other studies. The resulting eigenvectors have been employed in the calculation of two-photon absorption (TPA) intensities of transitions from the electronic ground state (8)S(7/2) to the crystal-field levels of excited (6)P, (6)I and (6)D multiplet terms. The TPA line strengths are highly polarization dependent and exhibit striking differences for linearly polarized incident radiation compared with circularly polarized radiation. The relative intensities are compared with those available from previous experimental studies and some reassignments have been made. Good agreement of calculated and experimental TPA spectra is found, except for the intensity ratio of the transitions to (6)P(7/2) or (6)P(5/2) compared with that to (6)P(3/2), for linear and circular polarizations, where the calculation overestimates the ratio. Reasons for this disagreement are presented. PMID:21389490

  19. A four-part working bibliography of neuroethics: part 1: overview and reviews – defining and describing the field and its practices

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuroethics entails investigations of neurocognitive mechanisms of morality and ethics; and studies and address of the ethical issues spawned by the use of neuroscience and its technologies to investigate cognition, emotion and actions. These two principal emphases, or what have been called “traditions” of neuroethics both mirror traditional bioethical discussions (such as debates about the safety of technological and pharmaceutical advances and ethical implications of new scientific and technological discoveries), and engage discourse about neuroscientific investigations of (proto-moral and moral) cognition, emotions and behaviors, and what such findings may mean for human beliefs and conduct - from the individual to the political levels. Given the growth, range, and rapid maturation of the field of neuroethics we provide an iterative, four-part document that affords a repository of international papers, books, and chapters that address the field in overview, and present discussion(s) of more particular aspects and topics of neuroethics. This first installment lists reviews and overviews of the discipline, and broad summaries of basic developments and issues of the field. Methods To systematically survey the neuroethics literature, searches were performed by accessing 11 databases, 8 additional literature depositories, and 4 individual journal searches using indexing language for National Library of Medicine (NLM) Medical Subject Heading databases. Searches and assurance against overlapping coverage were conducted using the RefWorks citation management program. Results Overview, review and reflections upon the history and multicultural perspectives of neuroethics were obtained and relevant listings from international journals, books, and book chapters are provided. Part I will be followed by three installments that will address a): the neuroscience of morality and ethics, including discussions of free will, and personal autonomy; b)

  20. THE PHOTOMETRIC AND KINEMATIC STRUCTURE OF FACE-ON DISK GALAXIES. III. KINEMATIC INCLINATIONS FROM H{alpha} VELOCITY FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, David R.; Bershady, Matthew A. E-mail: mab@astro.wisc.edu

    2013-05-01

    Using the integral field unit DensePak on the WIYN 3.5 m telescope we have obtained H{alpha} velocity fields of 39 nearly face-on disks at echelle resolutions. High-quality, uniform kinematic data and a new modeling technique enabled us to derive accurate and precise kinematic inclinations with mean i{sub kin} = 23 Degree-Sign for 90% of these galaxies. Modeling the kinematic data as single, inclined disks in circular rotation improves upon the traditional tilted-ring method. We measure kinematic inclinations with a precision in sin i of 25% at 20 Degree-Sign and 6% at 30 Degree-Sign . Kinematic inclinations are consistent with photometric and inverse Tully-Fisher inclinations when the sample is culled of galaxies with kinematic asymmetries, for which we give two specific prescriptions. Kinematic inclinations can therefore be used in statistical ''face-on'' Tully-Fisher studies. A weighted combination of multiple, independent inclination measurements yield the most precise and accurate inclination. Combining inverse Tully-Fisher inclinations with kinematic inclinations yields joint probability inclinations with a precision in sin i of 10% at 15 Degree-Sign and 5% at 30 Degree-Sign . This level of precision makes accurate mass decompositions of galaxies possible even at low inclination. We find scaling relations between rotation speed and disk-scale length identical to results from more inclined samples. We also observe the trend of more steeply rising rotation curves with increased rotation speed and light concentration. This trend appears to be uncorrelated with disk surface brightness.

  1. A Review of Large Solid Rocket Motor Free Field Acoustics, Part I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilkey, Debbie; Kenny, Robert Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    At the ATK facility in Utah, large full scale solid rocket motors are tested. The largest is a five segment version of the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor, which is for use on future launch vehicles. Since 2006, Acoustic measurements have been taken on large solid rocket motors at ATK. Both the four segment RSRM and the five segment RSRMV have been instrumented. Measurements are used to update acoustic prediction models and to correlate against vibration responses of the motor. Presentation focuses on two major sections: Part I) Unique challenges associated with measuring rocket acoustics Part II) Acoustic measurements summary over past five years

  2. The Natural Thermoluminescence of Meteorites. Part 5; Ordinary Chondrites at the Allan Hills Ice Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benoit, Paul H.; Sears, Hazel; Sears, Derek W. G.

    1993-01-01

    Natural thermoluminescence (TL) data have been obtained for 167 ordinary chondrites from the ice fields in the vicinity of the Allan Hills in Victoria Land, Antarctica, in order to investigate their thermal and radiation history, pairing, terrestrial age, and concentration mechanisms. Using fairly conservative criteria (including natural and induced TL, find location, and petrographic data), the 167 meteorite fragments are thought to represent a maximum of 129 separate meteorites. Natural TL values for meteorites from the Main ice field are fairly low (typically 5-30 krad, indicative of terrestrial ages of approx. 400 ka), while the Far western field shows a spread with many values 30-80 krad, suggestive of less then 150-ka terrestrial ages. There appear to be trends in TL levels within individual ice fields which are suggestive of directions of ice movement at these sites during the period of meteorite concentration. These directions seem to be confirmed by the orientations of elongation preserved in meteorite pairing groups. The proportion of meteorites with very low natural TL levels (less then 5 krad) at each field is comparable to that observed at the Lewis Cliff site and for modern non-Antarctic falls and is also similar to the fraction of small perihelia (less then 0.85 AU) orbits calculated from fireball and fall observations. Induced TL data for meteorites from the Allan Hills confirm trends observed for meteorites collected during the 1977/1978 and 1978/1979 field seasons which show that a select group of H chondrites from the Antarctic experienced a different extraterrestrial thermal history to that of non-Antarctic H chondrites.

  3. The Experience of Rural Independent Pharmacies with Medicare Part D: Reports from the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radford, Andrea; Slifkin, Rebecca; Fraser, Roslyn; Mason, Michelle; Mueller, Keith

    2007-01-01

    Context: The Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003 (MMA) created prescription drug coverage for Medicare beneficiaries through a new Part D program, the single largest addition to Medicare since its creation in 1965. Prior to program implementation in January 2006, concerns had been voiced as to how independent…

  4. Re-entry Women: Part-Time Enrollment, Full-Time Commitment. Field Evaluation Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Roberta M.

    Barriers re-entry women often face as they enroll, or attempt to enroll, in undergraduate and graduate degree programs on a part-time basis are discussed, and recommendations for change are offered. A wide range of possible actions is outlined so that institutions can pursue those most appropriate to their individual circumstances. Suggestions on…

  5. A Catalog of Candidate Field Horizontal-Branch and A-Type Stars. III. A 2MASS-Cleaned Version

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beers, Timothy C.; Almeida, Tiago; Rossi, Silvia; Wilhelm, Ronald; Marsteller, Brian

    2007-02-01

    We present coordinates and available photometric information (either from previous or recent broadband UBV observations, and near-infrared photometry from the 2MASS Point Source Catalog) for 12,056 stars (11,516 of which are unique) identified in the HK Survey of Beers and colleagues as candidate field horizontal-branch or A-type stars. These stars, in the apparent magnitude range 10<=B<=16.0, were selected using an objective-prism/interference-filter survey technique. The availability of 2MASS information permits assembly of a cleaned version of this catalog, comprising likely blue horizontal-branch (BHB) stars or blue stragglers in the color interval [-0.2<=(B-V)0<=+0.2], which are of particular interest for investigation of the structure, kinematics, and dynamics of the thick disk and inner halo of the Milky Way, the total mass and mass profile of the Galaxy, and as potential foreground/background objects in efforts to bracket distances to high-velocity clouds of H I. A comparison of the stars classified as high-likelihood BHB candidates with previous classifications based on UBV photometry and medium-resolution spectroscopy indicates that this class contains 78% correct identifications.

  6. Configuration-averaged 4f orbitals in ab initio calculations of low-lying crystal field levels in lanthanide(iii) complexes.

    PubMed

    Van den Heuvel, Willem; Calvello, Simone; Soncini, Alessandro

    2016-06-21

    A successful and commonly used ab initio method for the calculation of crystal field levels and magnetic anisotropy of lanthanide complexes consists of spin-adapted state-averaged CASSCF calculations followed by state interaction with spin-orbit coupling (SI-SO). Based on two observations valid for Ln(iii) complexes, namely: (i) CASSCF 4f orbitals are expected to change very little when optimized for different states belonging to the 4f electronic configuration, (ii) due to strong spin-orbit coupling the total spin is not a good quantum number, we show here via a straightforward analysis and direct calculation that the CASSCF/SI-SO method can be simplified to a single configuration-averaged HF calculation and one complete active space CI diagonalization, including spin-orbit coupling, on determinant basis. Besides its conceptual simplicity, this approach has the advantage that all spin states of the 4f(n) configuration are automatically included in the SO coupling, thereby overcoming one of the computational limitations of the existing CASSCF/SI-SO approach. As an example, we consider three isostructural complexes [Ln(acac)3(H2O)2], Ln = Dy(3+), Ho(3+), Er(3+), and find that the proposed simplified method yields crystal field levels and magnetic g-tensors that are in very good agreement with those obtained with CASSCF/SI-SO. PMID:27231024

  7. Crystal structure and conformational analysis of s-cis-(acetylacetonato)(ethylenediamine-N,N'-diacetato)-chromium(III): development of vibrationally optimized force field (VOFF).

    PubMed

    Choi, Jong-Ha; Niketić, Svetozar R; Djordjević, Ivana; Clegg, William; Harrington, Ross W

    2012-05-01

    The crystal structure of [Cr(edda)(acac)] (edda = ethylediamine-N,N'-diacetate; acac = acetylacetonato) has been determined by a single crystal X-ray diffraction study at 150 K. The chromium ion is in a distorted octahedral environment coordinated by two N and two O atoms of chelating edda and two O atoms of acac, resulting in s-cis configuration. The complex crystallizes in the space group P2(1)/c of the monoclinic system in a cell of dimensions a = 10.2588(9), b = 15.801(3), c = 8.7015(11) Å, β =101.201(9)° and Z = 4. The mean Cr-N(edda), Cr-O(edda) and Cr-O(acac) bond distances are 2.0829(14), 1.9678(11) and 1.9477(11) Å while the angles O-Cr-O of edda and O-Cr-O of acac are 171.47(5) and 92.72(5)°, respectively. The crystal structure is stabilized by N-H···O hydrogen bonds linking [Cr(edda)(acac)] molecules in distinct linear strands. The visible electronic and IR spectroscopic properties are also discussed. An improved, physically more realistic force field, Vibrationally Optimized Force Field (VOFF), capable of reproducing structural and vibrational properties of [Cr(edda)(acac)] was developed and its transferability demonstrated on selected chromium(III) complexes with similar ligands. PMID:21947416

  8. NADE Members Respond--Developmental Education Research Agenda: Survey of Field Professionals, Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saxon, D. Patrick; Martirosyan, Nara M.; Wentworth, Rebecca A.; Boylan, Hunter R.

    2015-01-01

    The field of developmental education has undergone substantial change in recent years. It seems there are two primary forces driving reform at this time. The first is policy makers who believe reform is necessary in order for developmental education to perform more effectively. The second are opportunists and for-profit companies using social,…

  9. School Psychology 2010--Part 2: School Psychologists' Professional Practices and Implications for the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castillo, Jose M.; Curtis, Michael J.; Gelley, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    Every 5 years, the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) conducts a national study of the field. Surveys are sent to randomly selected regular members of NASP to gather information on school psychologists' demographic characteristics, context for professional practices, and professional practices. The latest iteration of the national…

  10. Efficient technique for calculating multiple solutions of electric-field problems. Part I. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lauber, T.S.

    1980-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a digital computer program capable of calculating the electrostatic field in an arbitrary two-dimensional configuration. The program was developed as a preliminary result in a project aimed at producing a three-dimensional program. Thus, this report represents an interim report on the entire project.

  11. Water Complexes Take Part in Biological Effect Created by Weak Combined Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheykina, Nadiia

    2016-07-01

    It was revealed experimentally that at small level of magnetic field's noise (less than 4µT/Hz0.5) the dependence of gravitropc reaction of cress roots on frequency had a fine structure/ The peak that corresponded to the cyclotron frequency of Ca2+ ions for the static component of combined magnetic field that was equal to 40µT became split up into three peaks ( f1 = 31/3Hz, f2 = 32.5Hz i f3 = 34 Hz./ . The frequency f1 corresponded to the Ca2+ ion (theoretical value 31.6 Hz), the frequency f2 corresponded to the hydronium ion H3O+ (theoretical value 32.9 Hz), the frequency f3 corresponded to OH- ion (theoretical value 35 Hz). Taking into account the influence of combined magnetic field on hydronium ions and Del Giudice' hypothesis one may throw away doubts about the possibility of ion cyclotron resonance. The hydronium ions are unusual because they have a long free path length. It was revealed that pH of the distillated water changed under the treatment in combined magnetic field tuned to cyclotron frequency of hydronium ion. Such changes in pH had to lead to the biological effects on the molecular ,cell and organism levels.

  12. PLUME DISPERSION IN THE CONVECTIVE BOUNDARY LAYER PART II: ANALYSES OF THE CONDORS FIELD EXPERIMENT DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Extensive analyses are performed on data from the CONDORS field experiment, described in detail in Eberhard et al. (1988). onvective scaling is used to facilitate comparisons with laboratory and numerical simulations and to give the results generality. ear-surface X/Q from lidar-...

  13. Preservice Science Teachers' Field Experiences with Educational Technologies as Part of Portfolio Development: A Turkish Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korkmaz, Hunkar; Gucum, Berna; Hakverdi, Meral

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the usage of educational technology of pre-service science teachers in their field experiences. This study was carried out on 45 pre-service science teachers taking School Experience and Practice Teaching courses at Hacettepe University in Turkey. The data were obtained from the evaluation of pre-service…

  14. Superfund TIO videos. Set A. Regulatory overview - CERCLA's relationship to other programs: RCRA, Title III, UST, CWA, SDWA. Part 1. Audio-Visual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The videotape is divided into five sections. Section 1 provides definitions and historical information on both the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The four types of RCRA regulatory programs - Subtitles C, D, I, and J - are described. Treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) and recycling facilities are also discussed. Section 2 discusses the history behind the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (Title III). The four major provisions of Title III, which are emergency planning, emergency release notification, community right-to-know reporting, and the toxic chemical release inventory are covered. Section 3 outlines the UST program covering notification, record keeping, and the UST Trust Fund. Section 4 outlines the six major provisions of the Clean Water Act (CWA): water quality, pretreatment, prevention of oil and hazardous substance discharges, responses to oil and hazardous substance discharges, discharges of hazardous substances into the ocean, and dredge and fill. Section 5 explains the purpose, regulations, and standards of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). Specific issues such as underground injection, sole source aquifers, and lead contamination are discussed.

  15. Driving toroidally asymmetric current through the tokamak scrape-off layer, Part II: Magnetic field structure and spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, I

    2009-04-08

    The structure of the magnetic field perturbations due to non-axisymmetric field-aligned currents in the tokamak scrape-off layer (SOL) are analytically calculated near the X-point. Part I [I. Joseph, et al., submitted to Phys. Plasmas (2008)] demonstrated that biasing divertor target plates in a toroidally asymmetric fashion can generate an appreciable toroidally asymmetric parallel current density in the SOL along the separatrix. Here, the magnetic field perturbation caused by a SOL current channel of finite width and step-wise constant amplitude at the target plate is derived. Flux expansion amplifies the magnetic perturbation near the X-point, while phase interference causes the SOL amplitude to be reduced at large toroidal mode number. Far enough from the current channel, the magnetic field can be approximated as arising from a surface current near the separatrix with differing amplitudes in the SOL and the divertor leg. The perturbation spectrum and resonant components of this field are computed analytically asymptotically close to the separatrix in magnetic flux coordinates. The size of the stochastic layer due to the applied perturbation that would result without self-consistent plasma shielding is also estimated. If enough resonant field is generated, control of the edge pressure gradient may allow stabilization of edge localized modes.

  16. Tomographic retrieval of cloud liquid water fields from a single scanning microwave radiometer aboard a moving platform – Part 1: Field trial results from the Wakasa Bay experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, D.; Gasiewski, A.; Wiscombe, W.

    2010-07-22

    Tomographic methods offer great potential for retrieving three-dimensional spatial distributions of cloud liquid water from radiometric observations by passive microwave sensors. Fixed tomographic systems require multiple radiometers, while mobile systems can use just a single radiometer. Part 1 (this paper) examines the results from a limited cloud tomography trial with a single-radiometer airborne system carried out as part of the 2003 AMSR-E validation campaign over Wakasa Bay of the Sea of Japan. During this trial, the Polarimetric Scanning Radiometer (PSR) and Microwave Imaging Radiometer (MIR) aboard the NASA P-3 research aircraft provided a useful dataset for testing the cloud tomography method over a system of low-level clouds. We do tomographic retrievals with a constrained inversion algorithm using three configurations: PSR, MIR, and combined PSR and MIR data. The liquid water paths from the PSR retrieval are consistent with those from the MIR retrieval. The retrieved cloud field based on the combined data appears to be physically plausible and consistent with the cloud image obtained by a cloud radar. We find that some vertically-uniform clouds appear at high altitudes in the retrieved field where the radar shows clear sky. This is likely due to the sub-optimal data collection strategy. This sets the stage for Part 2 of this study that aims to define optimal data collection strategies using observation system simulation experiments.

  17. Acoustic streaming field structure. Part II. Examples that include boundary-driven flow.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Charles

    2012-01-01

    In this paper three simple acoustic streaming problems are presented and solved. The purpose of the paper is to demonstrate the use of a previously published streaming model by Bradley [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 100(3), 1399-1408 (1996)] and illustrate, with concrete examples, some of the features of streaming flows that were predicted by the general model. In particular, the problems are intended to demonstrate cases in which the streaming field boundary condition at the face of the radiator has a nontrivial lateral dc velocity component. Such a boundary condition drives a steady solenoidal flow just like a laterally translating boundary drives Couette flow. PMID:22280567

  18. Non-local photo-polymerization kinetics including multiple termination mechanisms and dark reactions: Part III. Primary radical generation and inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Gleeson, Michael R.; Liu Shui; Guo Jinxin; Sheridan, John T.

    2010-09-15

    Photopolymers are playing an ever more important role in diverse areas of research such as holographic data storage, hybrid photonic circuits, and solitary waves. In each of these applications, the production of primary radicals is the driving force of the polymerization processes. Therefore an understanding of the production, removal, and scavenging processes of free radicals in a photopolymer system is crucial in determining a material's response to a given exposure. One such scavenging process is inhibition. In this paper the non-local photo-polymerization driven diffusion model is extended to more accurately model the effects of (i) time varying primary radical production, (ii) the rate of removal of photosensitizer, and (iii) inhibition. The model is presented to specifically analyze the effects of inhibition, which occur most predominantly at the start of grating growth, and comparisons between theory and experiment are performed which quantify these effects.

  19. Unusual behavior of uranium dioxide at high magnetic fields. Part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gofryk, K.; Jaime, M.; Zapf, V.; Harrison, N.; Saul, A.; Radtke, G.; Lashley, J. C.; Salamon, M.; Andersson, A. D.; Stanek, C.; Durakiewicz, T.; Smith, J. L.

    UO2 is a Mott-Hubbard insulator with well-localized 5 f-electrons and its crystal structure is the face-centered-cubic fluorite. It experiences a first-order antiferromagnetic phase transition at 30.8 K to a non-collinear antiferromagnetic structure that remains a topic of debate. It is believed that the first order nature of the transition results from the competition between the exchange interaction and the Jahn-Teller distortion of oxygen atoms. Despite extensive experimental and theoretical efforts the nature of the competing degrees of freedom and their couplings (such as spin-phonon coupling) are still unclear. Here we present results of our extensive thermodynamic investigations, on well-characterized and oriented single crystals of UO2, focusing on magnetization M(T,H) measurements in DC and pulsed magnetic fields to up 65 T at the NHMFL. Work supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences, and Engineering Division. The NHMFL Pulsed Field Facility is supported by the NSF, the U.S. D.O.E., and the State of Florida through NSF cooperative Grant DMR.

  20. Single-field consistency relations of large scale structure part II: resummation and redshift space

    SciTech Connect

    Creminelli, Paolo; Gleyzes, Jérôme; Vernizzi, Filippo; Simonović, Marko E-mail: jerome.gleyzes@cea.fr E-mail: filippo.vernizzi@cea.fr

    2014-02-01

    We generalize the recently derived single-field consistency relations of Large Scale Structure in two directions. First, we treat the effect of the long modes (with momentum q) on the short ones (with momentum k) non-perturbatively, by writing resummed consistency relations which do not require k/q⋅δ{sub q} << 1. These relations do not make any assumptions on the short-scales physics and are extended to include (an arbitrary number of) multiple long modes, internal lines with soft momenta and soft loops. We do several checks of these relations in perturbation theory and we verify that the effect of soft modes always cancels out in equal-time correlators. Second, we write the relations directly in redshift space, without assuming the single-stream approximation: not only the long mode affects the short scales as a homogeneous gravitational field, but it also displaces them by its velocity along the line-of-sight. Redshift space consistency relations still vanish when short modes are taken at equal time: an observation of a signal in the squeezed limit would point towards multifield inflation or a violation of the equivalence principle.

  1. Field portable low temperature porous layer open tubular cryoadsorption headspace sampling and analysis part I: Instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Thomas J

    2016-01-15

    Building on the successful application in the laboratory of PLOT-cryoadsorption as a means of collecting vapor (or headspace) samples for chromatographic analysis, in this paper a field portable apparatus is introduced. This device fits inside of a briefcase (aluminum tool carrier), and can be easily transported by vehicle or by air. The portable apparatus functions entirely on compressed air, making it suitable for use in locations lacking electrical power, and for use in flammable and explosive environments. The apparatus consists of four aspects: a field capable PLOT-capillary platform, the supporting equipment platform, the service interface between the PLOT-capillary and the supporting equipment, and the necessary peripherals. Vapor sampling can be done with either a hand piece (containing the PLOT capillary) or with a custom fabricated standoff module. Both the hand piece and the standoff module can be heated and cooled to facilitate vapor collection and subsequent vapor sample removal. The service interface between the support platform and the sampling units makes use of a unique counter current approach that minimizes loss of cooling and heating due to heat transfer with the surroundings (recuperative thermostatting). Several types of PLOT-capillary elements and sampling probes are described in this report. Applications to a variety of samples relevant to forensic and environmental analysis are discussed in a companion paper. PMID:26687166

  2. COLOR PRINT OF NGC 4881 AND PART OF THE SURROUNDING FIELD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This photo mosaic, which shows a field of distant galaxies, is a computer enhanced reproduction of a picture taken 4 March 1994 with the repaired Hubble Space Telescope. It combines 16 exposures of 15 minutes each, taken through two filters (F555W and F814W) with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2. The HST WFPC2 field is chevron-shaped, because it is a mosaic of images recorded with three Wide Field cameras and one higher resolution camera (Planetary Camera) in the upper left. The brightest object in this picture is NGC 4881, approximately centered here in the Planetary Camera (the small quadrant). It is a 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy in the outskirts of the Coma Cluster, a great cluster of galaxies more than 5 times farther away than the Virgo Cluster. The radical velocity (redshift) of NGC 4881, based on the Doppler displacement of lines in its spectrum, is about 7000 km/sec. Except for a 16th-magnitude Coma spiral at the right and a few foreground stars of the Milky Way, nearly everything else in this field lies far beyond the Coma Cluster. There is a fascinating assortment of background galaxies, including an apparent galaxian merger in progress. Purpose: This HST-WFPC2 observation was made to explore the use the globular star clusters surrounding NGC 4881 as distance indicators for inferring the distance to the Coma Cluster. They are barely visible point sources in this reproduction. The distance to the Coma Cluster is an important cosmic yardstick for scaling the over all size of the universe, because Coma (unlike Virgo) is far enough away that regional departures from a smooth expansion of the universe should not be a major source of uncertainty if Coma is used for estimating the age and rate of expansion (the Hubble Constant). The brightness distribution of globular clusters has been studied in a number of nearer galaxies. They are most numerous between -7 and -8 absolute magnitude. In the Milky Way they peak at -7.6 absolute magnitude. We must find that

  3. Force constants of phosphorus (III) cyanide and arsenic (III) cyanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, H. G. M.; Fawcett, V.

    The force constants of phosphorus (III) cyanide and arsenic (III) cyanide have been calculated using a simple valence force-field approximation with interaction constants. Several revisions are proposed to the existing vibrational assignments for the As(CN) 3 species and the vibrational assignments for P(CN) 3 are confirmed.

  4. Summary of a 4-Year Fog Field Study in Northern Nanjing, Part 1: Fog Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D. Y.; Niu, S. J.; Yang, J.; Zhao, L. J.; Lü, J. J.; Lu, C. S.

    2012-05-01

    Comprehensive fog field observations were conducted during the winters of 2006-2009 at the Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology to study the macro and micro-physical structures and the physical-chemical processes of dense fogs in the area. The observations included features of the fog boundary layer, characteristics of fog water, the particle spectrum, the chemical composition of atmospheric aerosols, radiation and heat components, turbulence, meteorological elements (air temperature, pressure, wind speed, wind direction), and environmental monitoring. The fogs observed were divided into four types: radiation fog, advection-radiation fog, advection fog, and precipitation fog, according to the mechanisms and primary factors of the fog processes. Fog boundary-layer structures of different types and their corresponding characteristics were then studied. Fog boundary-layer features, temperature structures, wind fields, and fog maintenance are discussed. The results show that radiation fog had remarkable diurnal variation and formed mostly at sunset or midnight, and lifted after sunrise or at noon, and that advection-radiation fog and advection fog were of very long duration. Extremely dense fogs occurred only in radiation-related cases. Inversion in radiation fog was short-lived, disappearing 1 or 2 hours after sunrise or at noon, faster than that in advection-radiation fog. When wind direction reversed from easterly to westerly or from southerly to northerly, the fog became an extremely dense fog. Low-level jet at times impeded fog development, whereas at other times it encouraged fog continuance. The deep inversion was merely an essential condition for a thick fog layer; sufficient vapor supply was advantageous to the formation and maintenance of a deep fog layer.

  5. Nano-optical conveyor belt, part II: Demonstration of handoff between near-field optical traps.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yuxin; Ryan, Jason; Hansen, Paul; Cheng, Yao-Te; Lu, Tsung-Ju; Hesselink, Lambertus

    2014-06-11

    Optical tweezers have been widely used to manipulate biological and colloidal material, but the diffraction limit of far-field optics makes focused beams unsuitable for manipulating nanoscale objects with dimensions much smaller than the wavelength of light. While plasmonic structures have recently been successful in trapping nanoscale objects with high positioning accuracy, using such structures for manipulation over longer range has remained a significant challenge. In this work, we introduce a conveyor belt design based on a novel plasmonic structure, the resonant C-shaped engraving (CSE). We show how long-range manipulation is made possible by means of handoff between neighboring CSEs, and we present a simple technique for controlling handoff by rotating the polarization of laser illumination. We experimentally demonstrate handoff between a pair of CSEs for polystyrene spheres 200, 390, and 500 nm in diameter. We then extend this technique and demonstrate controlled particle transport down a 4.5 μm long "nano-optical conveyor belt." PMID:24807058

  6. Unusual behavior of uranium dioxide at high magnetic fields. Part II*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaime, M.; Gofryk, K.; Zapf, V.; Harrison, N.; Saul, A.; Radtke, G.; Lashley, J. C.; Salamon, M.; Andersson, A. D.; Stanek, C.; Durakiewicz, T.; Smith, J. L.

    More than 65 years worth of unrelenting experimental and theoretical research on seemingly uncomplicated UO2, a Mott-Hubbard insulator with well-localized 5 f - electrons and a fluorite fcc crystal structure, have not been able to elucidate some important questions such as the detailed nature of the low temperature AFM state, or the reasons behind unusual lattice properties that severely hinder the ability of this important nuclear material to transport heat. The high thermal conductivity shown by its non-magnetic counterpart, ThO2, has hinted to the notion that unusual spin-lattice coupling is behind the crippled thermal behavior of UO2. Here we present results of our thermodynamic investigations, on well-characterized and oriented single crystals,focusing on fiber Bragg grating magnetostriction measurements in pulsed magnetic fields to 90T at the NHMFL PFF. Our data support a multidomain non-collinear 3-k AFM order below 30.8K, coupled to an oxygen-cage trigonal distortion that breaks time reversal symmetry. *Work supported by the US DOE BES, Mat. Sci., and Eng. Div. The NHMFL PFF is supported by the NSF, the U.S. DOE., and the State of Florida through NSF coop. Grant DMR-1157490. Work at LANL was supported by the U.S. DOE BES project ''Science at 100 Tesla''.

  7. Part I. From the lab to the field: Recent developments in polymer coated ATR sensing for the determination of volatile organic compounds. Part II. From the field to the lab: Investigating IR signatures for remote sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlowatz, Manfred

    Part I. Successful transition of polymer coated, ATR-FTIR sensor devices from a laboratory environment to real world field applications for detecting and quantifying VOCs in water is shown. Simultaneous, quantitative detection of BTX mixtures in water during enrichment into polymer coated ZnSe ATR elements has been performed. The obtained results showed accurate detection and quantification to the low ppb concentration region. Fiber-optic evanescent field measurement campaigns have been conducted at simulated field conditions during which concentration gradients of various VOCs in the mg/L range have been monitored successfully. The first test of an ATR based, polymer coated sensor system under real world field conditions, the chlorobenzene concentration in groundwater at mg/L levels was determined. An interesting aspect of these measurements was the experimental proof for the dependence of analyte extraction dynamics on the flow conditions of the sample matrix surrounding the extractive polymer membrane. The obtained results demonstrate that MIR evanescent field sensors are suitable for in-situ analysis at real world field conditions for environmental monitoring applications. Part II. Recently, measurements of disturbed soils have shown different spectral contrast in comparison to undisturbed soils. In this work first measurements at controlled laboratory conditions have been performed to investigate individual minerals of the soil matrix and their spectral characteristics under various environmental conditions. ATR spectroscopy has been applied to investigate multi-disperse quartz sand and mono-disperse soda lime glass spheres samples. For the investigation of spectral differences between pristine and disturbed quartz sand, a wetting/drying procedure with subsequent sample aerating has been developed. In addition to established differences in spectral contrast of disturbed and undisturbed soil, a strong spectral shift of absorption features was observed. When

  8. Precise temperature monitoring in boreholes: evidence for oscillatory convection? Part 1: Experiments and field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cermak, Vladimir; Safanda, Jan; Bodri, Louise

    2008-04-01

    Temperature was monitored in two boreholes in Kamchatka (Russia) in years 2001 2003. Ten-min reading (sampling) interval was selected for the first half-year run followed by shorter (12 days) experiment with 5-s reading interval. A similar experiment was repeated later in the test borehole Sporilov (Prague, Czech Republic), where four temperature time series were performed with reading intervals varying from 1 to 20 s. All temperature time series (except the record from the bottom of the hole) displayed intermittent, non-periodic oscillations of temperature of up to several hundredths of degree with sharp gradients and large fluctuations over all observed time intervals. No such oscillation was detected at the bottom of the hole. The spectral analysis revealed a high level of stochasticity in the measured signal. Calculated spectra showed “band-pass” behavior without any definite peaks, which might characterize certain periodicity. Local growth of the second moment technique revealed the presence of at least two distinct temperature-forming processes. One of them can be related to heat transfer in the structurally and compositionally complex subsurface. The second process, which presents the bulk of the measured signal, probably reflects certain intra-hole convection. We hypothesized that the oscillatory regime of such convection is responsible for the stochastic nature of measured temperatures. Results of numerical modeling describing the fluctuation of water-cells in a vertical slot support the idea of thermally unstable water column in a hole, the instability of which produces a complex oscillation system. Model solutions and their discussion is presented in Part II of this work.

  9. Agricultural terraces montoring and modeling: a field survey in Chianti region, Firenze, Italy – Second part

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preti, Federico; Caruso, Marco; Dani, Andrea; Cassiani, Giorgio; Romano, Nunzio; Tarolli, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    The two abstracts present the design and set-up of an experimental campaign which aims at sup-porting the modeling (conceptual and numerical) of water circulation in a terraced slope, and its in-fluence on stability of retaining dry stone walls. The case study is located at "Fattoria di Lamole" (Greve in Chianti, Firenze, Italy). At Lamole site both ancient and recently restored or rebuilt (with different techniques) dry stone walls are present. Furthermore the intense vineyards cultivation makes it very representative in terms of range of external stresses that affect both hillslopes and wall. The survey is developed within the bigger framework of landscape preservation as a way to prevent hydrogeological instabilities and landslide risks. Second Part A second effort is devoted to couple hydrological, hydraulic and geotechnical modeling: - Flow directions and the drainage area have been derived from DTM (high-resolution digital terrain model obtained by a terrestrial laser scanner.), and served for the RPII index calcula-tion (Tarolli et al., 2013), that is coherent with the critical spots observed in situ and marked with GPS. - Direct shear test on undisturbed and reconstituted soil samples will offer an estimation of the Mohr-Coulomb failure envelope parameters (friction angle and cohesion). - Retention curves related with different depths have been derived. - Geoelectric analysis in order to locate the bedrock and to determine the subterranean water flows originated from controlled infitration tests (1 l/s discharge). - A simple dry-wall stability model has been carried out; this model analyses the wall stability with finite elements method, evaluating pressures derived from uphill water infiltration, stone friction and buoyancy in retaining wall layers: simulated deformation are suitable with the observed ones. Acknowledgements Italian Research Project of Relevant Interest (PRIN2010-2011), prot. 20104ALME4, National network for monitoring, modeling, and

  10. Unsteady three-dimensional flow in a single-stage transonic fan: Part 2: Unsteady stator exit flow field

    SciTech Connect

    Cherrett, M.A.; Bryce, J.D.; Ginder, R.B.

    1995-10-01

    Detailed unsteady aerodynamic measurements have been taken in a single-stage transonic fan with a very high stage-hub loading. Two-dimensional dynamic yawmeter probes, capable of measuring mean levels and fluctuations in stagnation pressure, static pressure, and yaw angle have been traversed at rotor exit and downstream of the stator, along with several types of pneumatic three-dimensional probe. Part 1 describes measurements taken at rotor exit. This paper, Part 2, describes measurements taken at stator exit when the fan was operating at near-peak efficiency, on the design speed characteristic. The measurements indicate the effects of rotor-stator interaction on the development of the viscous endwall-corner flows at the hub and casing. In addition, they illustrate that significant changes in stagnation pressure level occur within much of the stator exit flow field during the rotor passing cycle.

  11. Unsteady three-dimensional flow in a single-stage transonic fan. Part 1: Unsteady rotor exit flow field

    SciTech Connect

    Cherrett, M.A.; Bryce, J.D.; Ginder, R.B.

    1995-10-01

    Detailed unsteady aerodynamic measurements have been taken in a single-stage transonic fan with a very high stator-hub loading. Two-dimensional dynamic yawmeter probes, capable of measuring mean and fluctuating levels of stagnation pressure, static pressure, and yaw angle have been traversed at rotor exit, and downstream of the stator along with several types of pneumatic three-dimensional probe. Part 1 of this paper describes the dynamic yawmeters and their performance, and presents ensemble-averaged stagnation pressure and random stagnation pressure unsteadiness measurements taken at rotor exit. These are used to illustrate the salient features of the rotor flow field, and the effects of compressor aerodynamic loading. Part 2 presents measurements taken at stator exit.

  12. Numerical Simulation of Non-Rotating and Rotating Coolant Channel Flow Fields. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, David L.

    2000-01-01

    Future generations of ultra high bypass-ratio jet engines will require far higher pressure ratios and operating temperatures than those of current engines. For the foreseeable future, engine materials will not be able to withstand the high temperatures without some form of cooling. In particular the turbine blades, which are under high thermal as well as mechanical loads, must be cooled. Cooling of turbine blades is achieved by bleeding air from the compressor stage of the engine through complicated internal passages in the turbine blades (internal cooling, including jet-impingement cooling) and by bleeding small amounts of air into the boundary layer of the external flow through small discrete holes on the surface of the blade (film cooling and transpiration cooling). The cooling must be done using a minimum amount of air or any increases in efficiency gained through higher operating temperature will be lost due to added load on the compressor stage. Turbine cooling schemes have traditionally been based on extensive empirical data bases, quasi-one-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis, and trial and error. With improved capabilities of CFD, these traditional methods can be augmented by full three-dimensional simulations of the coolant flow to predict in detail the heat transfer and metal temperatures. Several aspects of turbine coolant flows make such application of CFD difficult, thus a highly effective CFD methodology must be used. First, high resolution of the flow field is required to attain the needed accuracy for heat transfer predictions, making highly efficient flow solvers essential for such computations. Second, the geometries of the flow passages are complicated but must be modeled accurately in order to capture all important details of the flow. This makes grid generation and grid quality important issues. Finally, since coolant flows are turbulent and separated the effects of turbulence must be modeled with a low Reynolds number

  13. Holocene Flows of the Cima Volcanic Field, Mojave Desert, Part 2: Flow Rheology from Laboratory Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, T.; Whittington, A. G.; Soldati, A.; Sehlke, A.; Beem, J. R.; Gomez, F. G.

    2014-12-01

    Lava flow morphology is often utilized as an indicator of rheological behavior during flow emplacement. Rheological behavior can be characterized by the viscosity and yield strength of lava, which in turn are dependent on physical and chemical properties including crystallinity, vesicularity, and bulk composition. We are studying the rheology of a basaltic lava flow from a monogenetic Holocene cinder cone in the Cima lava field (Mojave Desert, California). The flow is roughly 2.5 km long and up to 700m wide, with a well-developed central channel along much of its length. Samples were collected along seven different traverses across the flow, along with real-time kinematic (RTK) GPS profiles to allow levee heights and slopes to be measured. Surface textures change from pahoehoe ropes near the vent to predominantly jagged `a`a blocks over the majority of the flow, including all levees and the toe. Chemically the lava shows little variation, plotting on the trachybasalt-basanite boundary on the total alkali-silica diagram. Mineralogically the lava is dominated by plagioclase, clinopyroxene and olivine phenocrysts, with abundant flow-aligned plagioclase microcrystals. The total crystal fraction is ~50% near the vent, with higher percentages in the distal portion of the flow. Vesicularity varies between ~10 and more than ~60%. Levees are ~10-15m high with slopes typically ~25-35˚, suggesting a yield strength at final emplacement of ~150,000 Pa. The effective emplacement temperature and yield strength of lava samples will be determined using the parallel-plate technique. We will test the hypothesis that these physical and rheological properties of the lava during final emplacement correlate with spatial patterns in flow morphology, such as average slope and levee width, which have been determined using remote sensing observations (Beem et al. 2014).

  14. Efficacy of an insecticide paint against malaria vectors and nuisance in West Africa - Part 2: Field evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Widespread resistance of the main malaria vector Anopheles gambiae to pyrethroids reported in many African countries and operational drawbacks to current IRS methods suggest the convenience of exploring new products and approaches for vector control. Insecticide paint Inesfly 5A IGR™, containing two organophosphates (OPs), chlorpyrifos and diazinon, and one insect growth regulator (IGR), pyriproxyfen, was tested in Benin, West Africa, for 12 months. Methods Field trials were conducted in six experimental huts that were randomly allocated to one or two layers of insecticide at 1 Kg/6 m2 or control. Evaluations included: (i) early mosquito collection, (ii) mosquito release experiments, (iii) residual efficacy tests and (iv) distance tests. Early mosquito collections were performed on local populations of pyrethroid-resistant An. gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus. As per WHOPES phase II procedures, four entomological criteria were evaluated: deterrence, excito-repellence, blood-feeding inhibition and mortality. Mosquito release experiments were done using local malaria-free An. gambiae females reared at the CREC insectarium. Residual efficacy tests and distance tests were performed using reference susceptible strains of An. gambiae and Cx. quinquefasciatus. Results Six months after treatment, mortality rates were still 90-100% against pyrethroid-resistant mosquito populations in experimental huts. At nine months, mortality rates in huts treated with two layers was still about 90-93% against An. gambiae and 55% against Cx. quinquefasciatus. Malaria-free local mosquito release experiments yielded a 90% blood-feeding inhibition in the absence of a physical barrier. A long-term residual efficacy of 12 months was observed by WHO-bioassays in huts treated with two layers (60-80%). Mortality after an overnight exposition at distances of 1 meter was 96-100% for up to 12 months. Conclusion The encouraging results obtained on the insecticide paint Inesfly 5A IGR

  15. Unified Modern Mathematics, Course 3, Part 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Secondary School Mathematics Curriculum Improvement Study, New York, NY.

    The first part of Course III focuses on matrix algebra, graphs and functions, and combinatorics. Topics studied include: matrices and transformations, the solution of systems of linear equations, matrix multiplication, matrix inversion and a field of 2 x 2 matrices. The section on graphs and functions considers regions of the plane and…

  16. Job-Linked Literacy: Innovative Strategies at Work. Part III. Moving Ahead: Basic Skills for Career Advancement. A Work in America Policy Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosow, Jerome M.; Zager, Robert

    This volume, Interim Report No. 3 in a 3-year study, considers literacy programs designed to qualify employees for promotions or professional advancement. It adopts a multidimensional definition of moving ahead, one that extends to monetary rewards, career development, and employment security. The volume is divided into two parts: report and case…

  17. Final Report for Dynamic Models for Causal Analysis of Panel Data. Approaches to the Censoring Problem in Analysis of Event Histories. Part III, Chapter 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuma, Nancy Brandon; Hannan, Michael T.

    The document, part of a series of chapters described in SO 011 759, considers the problem of censoring in the analysis of event-histories (data on dated events, including dates of change from one qualitative state to another). Censoring refers to the lack of information on events that occur before or after the period for which data are available.…

  18. Fringe Benefits for Teachers, 1975-76. Part III of National Survey of Fringe Benefits for Professional Personnel in Public Schools, 1975-76. ERS Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stieber, Gertrude N.

    The major part of this report consists of a system-by-system listing of information on the 1,052 responding systems. Information is given on the benefits the districts provide to teachers in a number of areas--the number of days of vacation and sick leave, the maximum accumulation granted for each type of leave, the number of emergency or personal…

  19. Final Report for Dynamic Models for Causal Analysis of Panel Data. Alternative Estimation Procedures for Event-History Analysis: A Monte Carlo Study. Part III, Chapter 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Glenn R.; And Others

    This document is part of a series of chapters described in SO 011 759. The chapter examines the merits of four estimators in the causal analysis of event-histories (data giving the number, timing, and sequence of changes in a categorical dependent variable). The four procedures are ordinary least squares, Kaplan-Meier least squares, maximum…

  20. Problems associated with the use of urea-formaldehyde foam for residential insulation. Part III. Residential studies in Colorado and Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect

    Schutte, W.C.; Cole, R.S.; Frank, C.W.; Long, K.R.

    1981-02-01

    Formaldehyde levels were measured in homes in problem and non-problem areas in Wisconsin and Colorado to elucidate the severity and the extent of formaldehyde emission under field conditions, help correlate laboratory findings with field observations, and investigate the cause and effect relationship between insulation stability and weather conditions of an area. Methods for selecting homes and sampling are described. Interviews were conducted with occupants of the homes and the data are tabulated. Results are summarized. Investigation forms are shown and weather information in Denver and Wisconsin is tabulated. (MCW)

  1. Status of Shortnose Sturgeon in the Potomac River. Part 1: Field Studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kynard, Boyd; Breece, Matthew; Atcheson, Megan; Kieffer, Micah; Mangold, Mike

    2007-01-01

    Field studies during more than 3 years (March 2004–July 2007) collected data on life history of Potomac River shortnose sturgeon Acipenser brevirostrum to understand their biological status in the river. We sampled intensively for adults using gill nets, but captured only one adult in 2005. Another adult was captured in 2006 by a commercial fisher. Both fish were females with excellent body and fin condition, both had mature eggs, and both were telemetrytagged to track their movements. The lack of capturing adults, even when intensive netting was guided by movements of tracked fish, indicated abundance of the species was less than in any river known with a sustaining population of the species. Telemetry tracking of the two females (one during September 2005–July 2007, one during March 2006–February 2007) found they remained in the river for all the year, not for just a few months like sturgeons on a coastal migration. Further, one fish used the same freshwater reach during three summers. The two sturgeons used different reaches during some seasons, with one fish using saline water more than the other. The adults homed to small reaches in the same month each year, like shortnose sturgeon in their natal river. The total reach used by tracked sturgeons was 124 km (rkm 63–187), of which the lowermost 78 km, which was used for summering and wintering, contained the freshwater: saltwater interface. The most upstream reach used (rkm 185–187) contained potential spawning habitat. This reach was visited by one female on a pre-spawning migration in April 2006, but spawning was likely unsuccessful. Water quality (dissolved oxygen and temperature) in the summering–wintering reach was adequate all the year, although during the summer it was minimally acceptable. We periodically recaptured the same tagged female and found she healed well after tagging, appeared healthy in body and fins, grew well, and rapidly matured a new clutch of eggs. All surveys indicated adults

  2. Welding III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding III, an advanced course in arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with the proficiency necessary for industrial certification. The course objectives, which are outlined first, specify that students will…

  3. LANDVIEW III

    EPA Science Inventory

    LandView III is a desktop mapping system that includes database extracts from the Environmental Protection Agency, the Bureau of the Census, The U.S. Geological Survey, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Department of Transportation, and the Federal Emergency Management Agenc...

  4. Ion separation in imperfect fields of the quadrupole mass analyzer Part I. Ion beam dynamics in the phase-space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Vladimir V.

    1995-01-01

    The theoretical aspects of ion separation in imperfect fields of the quadrupole mass analyzer are discussed by applying analysis of the beam dynamics in a phase-space. The analytical method which uses an approximate solution of the Hill equation with a small heterogeneous part which indicates that the trap mechanism of ion separation is conditioned by the properties of characteristic solutions is improved. These solutions are reduced to an approximate solution in the form of a general solution of a homogeneous Mathieu equation with combined factors taking into account a small heterogeneous part which defines the region of beam capture (acceptance) in a phase-space. The estimation criterion of simulation accuracy is the relative deviation of an operating point on the Mathieu diagram from the top of a stability triangle. The infringement of independence principle of ion oscillations about each of the positional axes caused by distortions increases the cross-sectional area of the beam. The beam is cut out by the mass analyzer aperture. This causes transmission losses which depend on phase. Therefore, the ion current at the mass analyzer exit is amplitude modulated by the frequency of the alternate component of field. The maximum current is at zero phase. The modulation depth is proportional to the relative value of the distortions.

  5. Errors in dynamical fields inferred from oceanographic cruise data. Part II. The impact of the lack of synopticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomis, Damià; Pascual, Ananda; Pedder, Mike A.

    2005-06-01

    Diagnostic studies of ocean dynamics based on the analysis of oceanographic cruise data are usually quite sensitive to observation errors, to the station distribution and to the synopticity of the sampling. The first two sources have been evaluated in the Part I of this work. Here we evaluate synopticity errors for different sampling strategies applied to simulated unstable baroclinic waves. As suggested in previous studies, downstream and upstream cross-front samplings produce larger errors than along-front samplings. In our particular case study, the along-front sampling results in fractional errors (rms error divided by the standard deviation of the field) of about 15% for dynamic height and more than 50% for relative vorticity and vertical velocity. These values are significantly higher than those obtained in Part I for typical observation errors and sampling limitations (about 6% for dynamic height and between 15 and 30% for geostrophic vorticity and vertical velocity). We also propose and test two methods aimed at reducing the impact of the lack of synopticity. The first one corrects the observations using the quasi-geostrophic tendency equation. The second method combines the relocation of stations (based on a system velocity) and the correction of observations (through the estimation of a growth rate). For the fields simulated in this work, the second method gives better results than the first, being able to eliminate practically all synopticity errors in the case of the along-front sampling. In practice, the error reduction is likely to be less effective, since actual fields cannot be expected to have a system velocity as homogeneous as for the single-mode waves simulated in this work.

  6. A Theory for Nonprecipitating Convection between Two Parallel Plates. Part II: Nonlinear Theory and Cloud Field Organization.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretherton, Christopher S.

    1988-09-01

    In Part I, an idealized model of nonprecipitating moist convection in a shallow conditionally unstable layer of viscous and diffusive air between two parallel plates was introduced, and the `linear' instability of an exactly saturated static state maintained by diffusion was investigated. If there are initially many clouds, the `linear' theory predicted that weaker clouds are suppressed by the subsidence warming and drying from the ever-growing stronger clouds, and the average cloud spacing becomes arbitrarily large as time goes on. Each growing cloud is surrounded by compensating subsidence, which decreases away from the cloud with a characteristic decay scale Rs, the subsidence radius, which can be understood from gravity wave arguments.In Part II, fields of finite amplitude clouds are considered. An asymptotic analysis is performed in which the moist Rayleigh number Nc2 exceeds by only a small amount the value Nc02 necessary for the onset of convection. This leads to a nonlinear set of `cloud field equations' which predict how the amplitudes and positions of all the clouds evolve in time. These equations predict a minimum stable cloud spacing c Rslog(1). If the cloud spacing < c, slight differences in the strengths of neighboring clouds increase until the weaker clouds are suppressed. Unevenly spaced clouds drift until they become evenly spaced, ultimately resulting in a steady field of identical clouds with uniform spacing > c.Numerical experiments with dry stability Nd = Nc corroborate the conclusions from the cloud field equations when Nc2/Nc02 is less than ten. As Nc2 increases, the numerically determined c. becomes approximately 1.8Rs 1.8Nd. There is a second threshold spacing t 1.6Ndfield of identical growing clouds is transient. This leads to two types of cloud field evolution. If Nc2/Nc02 is less than 10, all initial conditions lead to steady uniformly spaced fields of identical clouds. If Nc2/Nc02

  7. Effects of inlet flow field conditions on the performance of centrifugal compressor diffusers: Part 1 -- Discrete-passage diffuser

    SciTech Connect

    Filipenco, V.G.; Deniz, S.; Johnston, J.M.; Greitzer, E.M.; Cumpsty, N.A.

    2000-01-01

    This is Part 1 of a two-part paper considering the performance of radial diffusers for use in a high-performance centrifugal compressor. Part 1 reports on discrete-passage diffusers, while Part 2 describes a test of a straight-channel diffuser designed for equivalent duty. Two builds of discrete-passage diffuser were tested, with 30 and 38 separate passages. Both the 30 and 38 passage diffusers investigated showed comparable range of unstalled operation and similar level of overall diffuser pressure recovery. The paper concentrates on the influence of inlet flow conditions on the pressure recovery and operating range of radial diffusers for centrifugal compressor stages. The flow conditions examined include diffuser inlet Mach number, flow angle, blockage, and axial flow nonuniformity. The investigation was carried out in a specially built test facility, designed to provide a controlled inlet flow field to the test diffusers. The facility can provide a wide range of diffuser inlet velocity profile distortion and skew with Mach numbers up to unity and flow angles of 63 to 75 deg from the radical direction. The consequences of different averaging methods for the inlet total pressure distributions, which are needed in the definition of diffuser pressure recovery coefficient for nonuniform diffuser inlet conditions, were also assessed. The overall diffuser pressure recovery coefficient, based on suitably averaged inlet total pressure, was found to correlate well with the momentum-averaged flow angle into the diffuser. It is shown that the generally accepted sensitivity of diffuser pressure recovery performance to inlet flow distortion and boundary layer blockage can be largely attributed to inappropriate quantification of the average dynamic pressure at diffuser inlet. Use of an inlet dynamic pressure based on availability or mass-averaging in combination with definition of inlet flow angle based on mass average of the radial and tangential velocity at diffuser inlet

  8. Effects of inlet flow field conditions on the performance of centrifugal compressor diffusers: Part 2 -- Straight-channel diffuser

    SciTech Connect

    Deniz, S.; Greitzer, E.M.; Cumpsty, N.A.

    2000-01-01

    This is Part 2 of an examination of the influence of inlet flow conditions on the performance and operating range of centrifugal compressor vaned diffusers. The paper describes tests of a straight-channel type diffuser, sometimes called a wedge-vane diffuser, and compares the results with those from the discrete-passage diffusers described in Part 1. Effects of diffuser inlet Mach number, flow angle, blockage, and axial flow nonuniformity on diffuser pressure recovery and operating range are addressed. The straight-channel diffuser investigated has 30 vanes and was designed for the same aerodynamic duty as the discrete-passage diffuser described in Part 1. The ranges of the overall pressure recovery coefficients were 0.50--0.78 for the straight-channel diffuser and 0.50--0.70 for the discrete-passage diffuser, except when the diffuser was choked. In other words, the maximum pressure recovery of the straight-channel diffuser was found to be roughly 10% higher than that of the discrete-passage diffuser investigated. The two types of diffuser showed similar behavior regarding the dependence of pressure recovery on diffuser inlet flow angle and the insensitivity of the performance to inlet flow field axial distortion and Mach number. The operating range of the straight-channel diffuser, as for the discrete-passage diffusers, was limited by the onset of rotating stall at a fixed momentum-averaged flow angle into the diffuser, which was for the straight-channel diffuser, {alpha}{sub crit} = 70 {+-} 0.5 deg. The background, nomenclature, and description of the facility and method are all given in Part 1.

  9. The general solution of Bianchi type III vacuum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christodoulakis, T.; Terzis, Petros A.

    2007-02-01

    The second-order ordinary differential equation which describes the unknown part of the solution space of some vacuum Bianchi cosmologies is completely integrated for type III, thus obtaining the general solution to Einstein's field equations for this case, with the aid of the sixth Painlevé transcendent PVI. For particular representations of PVI we obtain the known Kinnersley two-parameter spacetime and a solution of Euclidean signature. The imposition of the spacetime generalization of a 'hidden' symmetry of the generic type III spatial slice enables us to retrieve the two-parameter subfamily without considering the Painlevé transcendent.

  10. A Fully Nonmetallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing of Ceramic Composites. Part III; Additive Manufacturing and Characterization of Ceramic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Grady, Joseph E.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Ramsey, Jack; Patterson, Clark; Santelle, Tom

    2015-01-01

    This publication is the third part of a three part report of the project entitled "A Fully Nonmetallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing" funded by NASA Aeronautics Research Institute (NARI). The objective of this project was to conduct additive manufacturing to produce ceramic matrix composite materials and aircraft engine components by the binder jet process. Different SiC powders with median sizes ranging from 9.3 to 53.0 microns were investigated solely and in powder blends in order to maximize powder packing. Various infiltration approaches were investigated to include polycarbosilane (SMP-10), phenolic, and liquid silicon. Single infiltrations of SMP-10 and phenolic only slightly filled in the interior. When the SMP-10 was loaded with sub-micron sized SiC powders, the infiltrant gave a much better result of filling in the interior. Silicon carbide fibers were added to the powder bed to make ceramic matrix composite materials. Microscopy showed that the fibers were well distributed with no preferred orientation on the horizontal plane and fibers in the vertical plane were at angles as much as 45deg. Secondary infiltration steps were necessary to further densify the material. Two to three extra infiltration steps of SMP-10 increased the density by 0.20 to 0.55 g/cc. However, the highest densities achieved were 2.10 to 2.15 g/cc. Mechanical tests consisting of 4 point bend tests were conducted. Samples from the two CMC panels had higher strengths and strains to failure than the samples from the two nonfiber reinforced panels. The highest strengths were from Set N with 65 vol% fiber loading which had an average strength of 66 MPa. Analysis of the fracture surfaces did not reveal pullout of the reinforcing fibers. Blunt fiber failure suggested that there was not composite behavior. The binder jet additive manufacturing method was used to also demonstrate the fabrication of turbine engine vane components of two different designs and sizes. The

  11. Toxic and hazardous chemicals, Title III and communities: An outreach manual for community groups

    SciTech Connect

    McNeil, C.; Arkin, E.B.; McCallum, D.

    1989-09-01

    The manual was prepared for State and local government officials, local emergency planning committee (LEPCs), and other community groups that want to make Title III work. It is intended as a practical guide for those who have little or no previous experience in the field of communication, whose time must be snatched from home and office, and whose resources are limited. The manual has three major sections: Part I discusses planning, which is vital to the success of a communication program; Part II suggests ways to get and keep people involved, especially important because Title III affects so many different sectors of the community; Part III, a how-to-do-it section, talks about specific tasks, such as giving a speech or writing a press release. Appendices include a detailed explanation of the law, a glossary, a list of recent studies related to Title III communications, a list of educational materials, and a list of State contacts.

  12. Petrographic characterization of Kentucky coal. Final report. Part III. Petrographic characterization of the Upper Elkhorn No. 2 coal zone of eastern Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Raione, R.P.; Hower, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    This report presents the study of the Upper Elkhorn No. 2 coal zone in the Big Sandy Reserve District and the surrounding area of eastern Kentucky. The seams were analyzed using megascopic and microscopic petrography and chemical methods. The Upper Elkhorn No. 2 consists predominantly of clarain. A fair degree of correlation of fusain bands and clay partings between data sites is apparent. Microscopically, the vitrinite group of macerals are dominant. A rank increase from high volatile B to high volatile A bituminous to the southwest was noted. Pseudovitrinite is associated negatively with vitrinite and has a higher reflectance and microhardness than vitrinite. Both factors may indicate source material and/or environmental differences in the respective origins of the maceral. High inertinite and lipinite areas, low ash and sulfur contents, and the distribution of thin coals may be indicative of paleotopographic highs. 62 references, 26 figures, 8 tables.

  13. Studies of the pulse charge of lead-acid batteries for PV applications. Part III. Electrolyte concentration effects on the electrochemical performance of the positive plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchev, A.; Delaille, A.; Karoui, F.; Perrin, M.; Lemaire, E.; Mattera, F.

    2008-05-01

    In the third part of this work the effects of the sulphuric acid concentration on the positive plate discharge capacity, impedance and oxygen overvoltage are discussed. It has been found that the full discharge capacity of the positive plate is available down to electrolyte concentrations of 3 mol l-1 (s.g. 1.18 g ml-1). At further acid dilution, capacity of the positive plate declines, keeping the utilization of the sulphuric acid about 50%. Decreasing the acid concentration, the oxygen overvoltage decreases with a factor of 12-18 mV M-1, excluding the effect of the equilibrium potential of the oxygen electrode as a function of pH. The capacitance of the electrical double layer decrease linearly with the dilution of the sulphuric acid suggesting strong adsorption effects. This suggestion has been confirmed from the measurements of potential of the zero charge of the positive plate, which increases from 1.11 to 1.34 V vs. Ag/Ag2SO4 in the region 1.11-4.60 M H2SO4. From the measurement of the time constant of the electronic transfer through the gel part of the lead dioxide (Tgel) as a function of the acid concentration and the applied potential, a change in the mechanism of the lead dioxide hydration has been estimated-below 1 M H2SO4Tgel increases sharply, showing sharp increases of the extent of the hydration. The dilution of the electrolyte increases substantially the value of average double layer current in the beginning of the charge. During the pulse overcharge at the employed frequency of 1 Hz, the average double layer current is equal to the pulse amplitude, suggesting that the maximal efficiency of the pulse charge is reached.

  14. Application of flowing stream techniques to water analysis Part III. Metal ions: alkaline and alkaline-earth metals, elemental and harmful transition metals, and multielemental analysis.

    PubMed

    Miró, Manuel; Estela, José Manuel; Cerdà, Víctor

    2004-05-28

    In the earlier parts of this series of reviews [1,2], the most relevant flowing stream techniques (namely, segmented flow analysis, continuous flow analysis, flow injection (FI) analysis, sequential injection (SI) analysis, multicommuted flow injection analysis and multisyringe flow injection analysis) applied to the determination of several core inorganic parameters for water quality assessment, such as nutrients and anionic species including nitrogen, sulfur and halogen compounds, were described. In the present paper, flow techniques are presented as powerful analytical tools for the environmental monitoring of metal ions (alkaline and alkaline-earth metals, and elemental and harmful transition metals) as well as to perform both multielemental and speciation analysis in water samples. The potentials of flow techniques for automated sample treatment involving on-line analyte separation and/or pre-concentration are also discussed in the body of the text, and demonstrated for each individual ion with a variety of strategies successfully applied to trace analysis. In this context, the coupling of flow methodologies with atomic spectrometric techniques such as flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS), electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) or hydride-generation (HG)/cold-vapor (CV) approaches, launching the so-called hyphenated techniques, is specially worth mentioning. PMID:18969420

  15. The Atomic-to-Molecular Transition: Anatomy of a Forming Molecular Cloud. (Part III: CO(J=1-0) with Mopra)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Joanne; Mcclure-Griffiths, Naomi; Jones, Paul; Dickey, John; Cunningham, Maria; Jones, Courtney; Jachym, Pavel; Palouš, Jan; Sidorin, Vojt?ch

    2011-10-01

    The condensation of molecular clouds from the atomic ISM is a key link in the lifecycle of material in galactic systems, but one that remains poorly observationally constrained. This project will obtain HI, OH and CO line data at parsec and sub-parsec resolutions in order to form a comprehensive picture of the anatomy of a region in which this atomic-molecular transition is occurring. This combination of complementary tracers will reveal the medium throughout this evolutionary process, providing an unparalleled dataset for comparison with theoretical models, and allowing the testing of key predictions such as structure formation size scales and the degree of interpenetration of the molecular and atomic phases. This proposal requests 110 hours to observe the J=1-0 transitions of 12CO, 13CO and C18O, in order to complete mapping of the evolved molecular component of this region. This data will allow us to determine the detailed spatio-velocity distribution of the evolved molecular gas, and obtain column density, density and mass estimates in order to assess its relationship to the atomic and transition-state material. This document comprises one of a set of three observing proposals submitted this semester as part of this project.

  16. Non-Linear Dynamics and Stability of Circular Cylindrical Shells Containing Flowing Fluid. Part Iii: Truncation Effect Without Flow and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AMABILI, M.; PELLICANO, F.; PAÏDOUSSIS, M. P.

    2000-11-01

    The response of simply supported circular cylindrical shells to harmonic excitation in the spectral neighbourhood of one of the lowest natural frequencies is investigated by using improved mode expansions with respect to those assumed in Parts I and II of the present study. Two cases are studied: (1) shells in vacuo; and (2) shells filled with stagnant water. The improved expansions allow checking the accuracy of the solutions previously obtained and giving definitive results within the limits of Donnell's non-linear shallow-shell theory. The improved mode expansions include: (1) harmonics of the circumferential mode number n under consideration, and (2) only the principal n, but with harmonics of the longitudinal mode included. The effect of additional longitudinal modes is absolutely insignificant in both the driven and companion mode responses. The effect of modes with 2 n circumferential waves is very limited on the trend of non-linearity, but is significant in the response with companion mode participation in the case of lightly damped shells (empty shells). In particular, the travelling wave response appears for much lower vibration amplitudes and presents a frequency range without stable responses, corresponding to a beating phenomenon. A liquid (water) contained in the shell generates a much stronger softening behaviour of the system. Experiments with a water-filled circular cylindrical shell made of steel are in very good agreement with the present theory.

  17. Self-accommodation of B19' martensite in Ti-Ni shape memory alloys. Part III. Analysis of habit plane variant clusters by the geometrically nonlinear theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamura, T.; Nishiura, T.; Kawano, H.; Hosoda, H.; Nishida, M.

    2012-06-01

    Competition between the invariant plane (IP) condition at the habit plane, the twin orientation relation (OR) and the kinematic compatibility (KC) at the junction plane (JP) of self-accommodated B19‧ martensite in Ti-Ni was investigated via the geometrically nonlinear theory to understand the habit plane variant (HPV) clusters presented in Parts I and II of this work. As the IP condition cannot be satisfied simultaneously with KC, an additional rotation Q is necessary to form compatible JPs for all HPV pairs. The rotation J necessary to form the exact twin OR between the major correspondence variants (CVs) in each HPV was also examined. The observed HPV cluster was not the cluster with the smallest Q but the one satisfying Q = J with a { ? 1}B19‧ type I twin at JP. Both Q and J are crucial to understanding the various HPV clusters in realistic transformations. Finally, a scheme for the ideal HPV cluster composed of six HPVs is also proposed.

  18. Magnetic susceptibility and ground-state zero-field splitting in high-spin mononuclear manganese(III) of inverted N-methylated porphyrin complexes: Mn(2-NCH3NCTPP)Br.

    PubMed

    Hung, Sheng-Wei; Yang, Fuh-An; Chen, Jyh-Horung; Wang, Shin-Shin; Tung, Jo-Yu

    2008-08-18

    The crystal structures of diamagnetic dichloro(2-aza-2-methyl-5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21-carbaporphyrinato-N,N',N'')-tin(IV) methanol solvate [Sn(2-NCH 3NCTPP)Cl 2.2(0.2MeOH); 6.2(0.2MeOH)] and paramagnetic bromo(2-aza-2-methyl-5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21-carbaporphyrinato-N,N',N'')-manganese(III) [Mn(2-NCH 3NCTPP)Br; 5] were determined. The coordination sphere around Sn (4+) in 6.2(0.2MeOH) is described as six-coordinate octahedron ( OC-6) in which the apical site is occupied by two transoid Cl (-) ligands, whereas for the Mn (3+) ion in 5, it is a five-coordinate square pyramid ( SPY-5) in which the unidentate Br (-) ligand occupies the axial site. The g value of 9.19 (or 10.4) measured from the parallel polarization (or perpendicular polarization) of X-band EPR spectra at 4 K is consistent with a high spin mononuclear manganese(III) ( S = 2) in 5. The magnitude of axial ( D) and rhombic ( E) zero-field splitting (ZFS) for the mononuclear Mn(III) in 5 were determined approximately as -2.4 cm (-1) and -0.0013 cm (-1), respectively, by paramagnetic susceptibility measurements and conventional EPR spectroscopy. Owing to weak C(45)-H(45A)...Br(1) hydrogen bonds, the mononuclear Mn(III) neutral molecules of 5 are arranged in a one-dimensional network. A weak Mn(III)...Mn(III) ferromagnetic interaction ( J = 0.56 cm (-1)) operates via a [Mn(1)-C(2)-C(1)-N(4)-C(45)-H(45A)...Br(1)-Mn(1)] superexchange pathway in complex 5. PMID:18646843

  19. The Impact of Massage Therapy on Function in Pain Populations—A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials: Part III, Surgical Pain Populations

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Cindy; Paat, Charmagne F.; Price, Ashley; Xenakis, Lea; Zhang, Weimin

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Pain is multi-dimensional and may be better addressed through a holistic, biopsychosocial approach. Massage therapy is commonly practiced among patients seeking pain management; however, its efficacy is unclear. This systematic review and meta-analysis is the first to rigorously assess the quality of the evidence for massage therapy’s efficacy in treating pain, function-related, and health-related quality of life outcomes in surgical pain populations. Methods. Key databases were searched from inception through February 2014. Eligible randomized controlled trials were assessed for methodological quality using SIGN 50 Checklist. Meta-analysis was applied at the outcome level. A professionally diverse steering committee interpreted the results to develop recommendations. Results. Twelve high quality and four low quality studies were included in the review. Results indicate massage therapy is effective for treating pain [standardized mean difference (SMD) = −0.79] and anxiety (SMD = −0.57) compared to active comparators. Conclusion. Based on the available evidence, weak recommendations are suggested for massage therapy, compared to active comparators for reducing pain intensity/severity and anxiety in patients undergoing surgical procedures. This review also discusses massage therapy safety, challenges within this research field, how to address identified research gaps, and next steps for future research. PMID:27165970

  20. Application of Spectral Analysis Techniques in the Intercomparison of Aerosol Data: Part III. Using Combined PCA to Compare Spatiotemporal Variability of MODIS, MISR and OMI Aerosol Optical Depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing; Carlson, Barbara E.; Lacis, Andrew A.

    2014-01-01

    Satellite measurements of global aerosol properties are very useful in constraining aerosol parameterization in climate models. The reliability of different data sets in representing global and regional aerosol variability becomes an essential question. In this study, we present the results of a comparison using combined principal component analysis (CPCA), applied to monthly mean, mapped (Level 3) aerosol optical depth (AOD) product from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR), and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). This technique effectively finds the common space-time variability in the multiple data sets by decomposing the combined AOD field. The results suggest that all of the sensors capture the globally important aerosol regimes, including dust, biomass burning, pollution, and mixed aerosol types. Nonetheless, differences are also noted. Specifically, compared with MISR and OMI, MODIS variability is significantly higher over South America, India, and the Sahel. MODIS deep blue AOD has a lower seasonal variability in North Africa, accompanied by a decreasing trend that is not found in either MISR or OMI AOD data. The narrow swath of MISR results in an underestimation of dust variability over the Taklamakan Desert. The MISR AOD data also exhibit overall lower variability in South America and the Sahel. OMI does not capture the Russian wild fire in 2010 nor the phase shift in biomass burning over East South America compared to Central South America, likely due to cloud contamination and the OMI row anomaly. OMI also indicates a much stronger (boreal) winter peak in South Africa compared with MODIS and MISR.

  1. Application of spectral analysis techniques in the intercomparison of aerosol data: Part III. Using combined PCA to compare spatiotemporal variability of MODIS, MISR, and OMI aerosol optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Carlson, Barbara E.; Lacis, Andrew A.

    2014-04-01

    Satellite measurements of global aerosol properties are very useful in constraining aerosol parameterization in climate models. The reliability of different data sets in representing global and regional aerosol variability becomes an essential question. In this study, we present the results of a comparison using combined principal component analysis (CPCA), applied to monthly mean, mapped (Level 3) aerosol optical depth (AOD) product from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR), and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). This technique effectively finds the common space-time variability in the multiple data sets by decomposing the combined AOD field. The results suggest that all of the sensors capture the globally important aerosol regimes, including dust, biomass burning, pollution, and mixed aerosol types. Nonetheless, differences are also noted. Specifically, compared with MISR and OMI, MODIS variability is significantly higher over South America, India, and the Sahel. MODIS deep blue AOD has a lower seasonal variability in North Africa, accompanied by a decreasing trend that is not found in either MISR or OMI AOD data. The narrow swath of MISR results in an underestimation of dust variability over the Taklamakan Desert. The MISR AOD data also exhibit overall lower variability in South America and the Sahel. OMI does not capture the Russian wild fire in 2010 nor the phase shift in biomass burning over East South America compared to Central South America, likely due to cloud contamination and the OMI row anomaly. OMI also indicates a much stronger (boreal) winter peak in South Africa compared with MODIS and MISR.

  2. Numerical Modeling of Free Surface Dynamics of Melt in an Alternate Electromagnetic Field. Part II: Conventional Electromagnetic Levitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitans, Sergejs; Baake, Egbert; Nacke, Bernard; Jakovics, Andris

    2016-02-01

    By means of external coupling between electromagnetic (EM) problem in ANSYS and hydrodynamic problem in FLUENT, a numerical model for the liquid metal free surface flow in an alternate EM field has been developed and verified in the first part of the article. Volume of Fluid ( VOF) algorithm has been used for tracking of free surface. In this work, improved performance of the model is presented. General validation of the VOF algorithm is performed by comparison of the calculated free oscillations of the liquid column to its analytical solution. The 3D/ VOF calculation of coupled EM field and free surface flow with Large Eddy Simulation turbulence description for the first time is applied for modeling of conventional EM levitation. Calculation results are compared with 2D/ VOF and 3D/ VOF models that use less precise k- ɛ and k- ω SST turbulence formulations. Obtained time-averaged droplet shapes are used for single-phase flow calculations with different turbulence models and free-slip/no-slip velocity conditions at the fixed free surface for validation of the flow. Meanwhile, series of levitation melting experiments are performed for verification of the simulated droplet shapes. In conclusion, parameter impact on the fully developed flow and the levitated droplet shape is discussed.

  3. A quantitative phase field model for hydride precipitation in zirconium alloys: Part II. Modeling of temperature dependent hydride precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Zhihua; Hao, Mingjun; Guo, Xianghua; Tang, Guoyi; Shi, San-Qiang

    2015-04-01

    A quantitative free energy functional developed in Part I (Shi and Xiao, 2014 [1]) was applied to model temperature dependent δ-hydride precipitation in zirconium in real time and real length scale. At first, the effect of external tensile load on reorientation of δ-hydrides was calibrated against experimental observations, which provides a modification factor for the strain energy in free energy formulation. Then, two types of temperature-related problems were investigated. In the first type, the effect of temperature transient was studied by cooling the Zr-H system at different cooling rates from high temperature while an external tensile stress was maintained. At the end of temperature transients, the average hydride size as a function of cooling rate was compared to experimental data. In the second type, the effect of temperature gradients was studied in a one or two dimensional temperature field. Different boundary conditions were applied. The results show that the hydride precipitation concentrated in low temperature regions and that it eventually led to the formation of hydride blisters in zirconium. A brief discussion on how to implement the hysteresis of hydrogen solid solubility on hydride precipitation and dissolution in the developed phase field scheme is also presented.

  4. 3-D visualization of ensemble weather forecasts - Part 2: Forecasting warm conveyor belt situations for aircraft-based field campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rautenhaus, M.; Grams, C. M.; Schäfler, A.; Westermann, R.

    2015-02-01

    We present the application of interactive 3-D visualization of ensemble weather predictions to forecasting warm conveyor belt situations during aircraft-based atmospheric research campaigns. Motivated by forecast requirements of the T-NAWDEX-Falcon 2012 campaign, a method to predict 3-D probabilities of the spatial occurrence of warm conveyor belts has been developed. Probabilities are derived from Lagrangian particle trajectories computed on the forecast wind fields of the ECMWF ensemble prediction system. Integration of the method into the 3-D ensemble visualization tool Met.3D, introduced in the first part of this study, facilitates interactive visualization of WCB features and derived probabilities in the context of the ECMWF ensemble forecast. We investigate the sensitivity of the method with respect to trajectory seeding and forecast wind field resolution. Furthermore, we propose a visual analysis method to quantitatively analyse the contribution of ensemble members to a probability region and, thus, to assist the forecaster in interpreting the obtained probabilities. A case study, revisiting a forecast case from T-NAWDEX-Falcon, illustrates the practical application of Met.3D and demonstrates the use of 3-D and uncertainty visualization for weather forecasting and for planning flight routes in the medium forecast range (three to seven days before take-off).

  5. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 5, Appendix A, Part 2, Field Investigation report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This report contains information related to the sampling and chemical analysis of ground water at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. It is part of a field investigation of ground water contamination.

  6. Viability testing of material derived from Mycobacterium tuberculosis prior to removal from a Containment Level-III Laboratory as part of a Laboratory Risk Assessment Program

    PubMed Central

    Blackwood, Kym S; Burdz, Tamara V; Turenne, Christine Y; Sharma, Meenu K; Kabani, Amin M; Wolfe, Joyce N

    2005-01-01

    Background In the field of clinical mycobacteriology, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) can be a difficult organism to manipulate due to the restrictive environment of a containment level 3 (CL3) laboratory. Tests for rapid diagnostic work involving smears and molecular methods do not require CL3 practices after the organism has been rendered non-viable. While it has been assumed that after organism deactivation these techniques can be performed outside of a CL3, no conclusive study has consistently confirmed that the organisms are noninfectious after the theoretical 'deactivation' steps. Previous studies have shown that initial steps (such as heating /chemical fixation) may not consistently kill MTB organisms. Methods An inclusive viability study (n = 226) was undertaken to determine at which point handling of culture extraction materials does not necessitate a CL3 environment. Four different laboratory protocols tested for viability included: standard DNA extractions for IS6110 fingerprinting, crude DNA preparations for PCR by boiling and mechanical lysis, protein extractions, and smear preparations. For each protocol, laboratory staff planted a proportion of the resulting material to Bactec 12B medium that was observed for growth for 8 weeks. Results Of the 208 isolates initially tested, 21 samples grew within the 8-week period. Sixteen (7.7%) of these yielded positive results for MTB that included samples of: deactivated culture resuspensions exposed to 80°C for 20 minutes, smear preparations and protein extractions. Test procedures were consequently modified and tested again (n = 18), resulting in 0% viability. Conclusions This study demonstrates that it cannot be assumed that conventional practices (i.e. smear preparation) or extraction techniques render the organism non-viable. All methodologies, new and existing, should be examined by individual laboratories to validate the safe removal of material derived from MTB to the outside of a CL3 laboratory. This

  7. Fractionating power and outlet stream polydispersity in asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation. Part I: isocratic operation.

    PubMed

    Williams, P Stephen

    2016-05-01

    Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (As-FlFFF) has become the most commonly used of the field-flow fractionation techniques. However, because of the interdependence of the channel flow and the cross flow through the accumulation wall, it is the most difficult of the techniques to optimize, particularly for programmed cross flow operation. For the analysis of polydisperse samples, the optimization should ideally be guided by the predicted fractionating power. Many experimentalists, however, neglect fractionating power and rely on light scattering detection simply to confirm apparent selectivity across the breadth of the eluted peak. The size information returned by the light scattering software is assumed to dispense with any reliance on theory to predict retention, and any departure of theoretical predictions from experimental observations is therefore considered of no importance. Separation depends on efficiency as well as selectivity, however, and efficiency can be a strong function of retention. The fractionation of a polydisperse sample by field-flow fractionation never provides a perfectly separated series of monodisperse fractions at the channel outlet. The outlet stream has some residual polydispersity, and it will be shown in this manuscript that the residual polydispersity is inversely related to the fractionating power. Due to the strong dependence of light scattering intensity and its angular distribution on the size of the scattering species, the outlet polydispersity must be minimized if reliable size data are to be obtained from the light scattering detector signal. It is shown that light scattering detection should be used with careful control of fractionating power to obtain optimized analysis of polydisperse samples. Part I is concerned with isocratic operation of As-FlFFF, and part II with programmed operation. Graphical abstract The dash-dotted blue curve describes an assumed log-normal sample molecular weight distribution (right axis

  8. The Grasshopper and the Taxonomer. Use of Song and Structure in Orthoptera Saltatoria for Teaching the Principles of Taxonomy. Part 1. Field and Laboratory Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broughton, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    Describes the coordinated study of European grasshoppers as living specimens in the field and as permanent laboratory preparations for introducing taxonomic principles. Provides details for the preparation of specimens and sample instructions provided to students. Part I of a three-part series. (AL)

  9. Ligand Field Affected Single-Molecule Magnet Behavior of Lanthanide(III) Dinuclear Complexes with an 8-Hydroxyquinoline Schiff Base Derivative as Bridging Ligand.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Min; Zhang, Hong-Xia; Wang, Shi-Yu; Shen, Hai-Yun; Gao, Hong-Ling; Cui, Jian-Zhong; Zhao, Bin

    2015-11-16

    New dinuclear lanthanide(III) complexes based on an 8-hydroxyquinoline Schiff base derivative and β-diketonate ligands, [Ln2(hfac)4(L)2] (Ln(III) = Gd (1), Tb (2), Dy (3), Ho (4), Er (5)), [Ln2(tfac)4(L)2] (Ln(III) = Gd (6), Tb (7), Dy (8), Ho (9)), and [Dy(bfac)4(L)2·C7H16] (10) (L = 2-[[(4-fluorophenyl)imino] methyl]-8-hydroxyquinoline, hfac = hexafluoroacetylacetonate, tfac = trifluoroacetylacetonate, and bfac = benzoyltrifluoroacetone), have been synthesized. The single-crystal X-ray diffraction data show that complexes 1-10 are phenoxo-O-bridged dinuclear complexes; each eight-coordinated center Ln(III) ion is in a slightly distorted dodecahedral geometry with two bidentate β-diketonate coligands and two μ2-O bridging 8-hydroxyquinoline Schiff base derivative ligands. The magnetic study reveals that 1 and 6 display cryogenic magnetic refrigeration properties, whereas complexes 3, 8, and 10 show different SMM behaviors with energy barriers of 6.77 K for 3, 19.83 K for 8, and 25.65 K for 10. Meanwhile, slow magnetic relaxation was observed in 7, while no out-of-phase alternating-current signals were found for 2. The different dynamic magnetic behaviors of two Tb2 complexes and the three Dy2 complexes mainly derive from the tiny crystal structure changes around the Ln(III) ions. It is also proved that the β-diketonate coligands can play an important role in modulating magnetic dynamics of the lanthanide 8-hydroxyquinoline Schiff base derivative system. PMID:26516660

  10. Field data describing the movement and storage of sediment in the East Fork River, Wyoming; Part III, river hydraulics and sediment transport, 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emmett, W.W.; Myrick, R.M.; Meade, R.H.

    1982-01-01

    Frequent measurements of river stage, water discharge, sediment-transport rate and particle-size gradation, and river slope were made at 44 cross sections along a 1.83-kilometer reach of East Fork River, Wyoming, during the spring 1980 snowmelt runoff. Data are tabulated and explanatory text facilitates its use for description of river hydraulics and sediment transport. (USGS)

  11. Topics in Finance Part III--Leverage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laux, Judy

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates operating and financial leverage from the perspective of the financial manager, accenting the relationships to stockholder wealth maximization (SWM), risk and return, and potential agency problems. It also covers some of the pertinent literature related specifically to the implications of operating and financial risk and…

  12. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy Part III. Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, W. D.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the use of the FT-IR spectrometer in analyses that were previously avoided. Examines some of the applications of this spectroscopy with aqueous solutions, circular internal reflection, samples with low transmission, diffuse reflectance, infrared emission, and the infrared microscope. (TW)

  13. Essential Oils, Part III: Chemical Composition.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Anton C; Schmidt, Erich

    2016-01-01

    Data on the chemistry of essential oils which have caused contact allergy are provided. The largest group of chemicals found in essential oils consists of terpenes. The number of identified components usually ranges from 100 to 250, but in some oils (lavender, geranium, rosemary) 450 to 500 chemicals have been found. Many chemicals are present in a large number of oils, up to 98% for β-caryophyllene and 97% for limonene. Chemicals that are important constituents of >20 oils are limonene, linalool, and α-pinene. In many essential oils, there are 2 to 5 components which together constitute over 50% to 60% of the oil. In some oils, however, there is one dominant ingredient, making up more than 50% of the oil, including (E)-anethole in aniseed and star anise oil, carvone in spearmint oil, 1,8-cineole (eucalyptol) in Eucalyptus globulus oil, and (E)-cinnamaldehyde in cassia oil. The most important chemicals in 93 individual oils are specified. PMID:27427817

  14. Principles of Preschool Pedagogy: Part III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaporozhets, A. V.; Markova, T. A.

    1983-01-01

    Topics discussed in this issue include the cognitive education of the preschooler, general problems in aesthetic education and child development, educating children through play, family influence on the preschooler's personality, and the preparation of children for school. (RM)

  15. How to Get Published, Part III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lonergan, David

    2013-01-01

    A very high proportion of librarians are neither required to publish nor rewarded if they do. The would-be librarian/writer would be well advised to take a brief self-examination before developing a research and publication plan. The author provides a list of questions to consider and also suggests consultation with a colleague with greater…

  16. Management of hypodontia: restorative considerations. Part III.

    PubMed

    Forgie, Andrew H; Thind, Bikram S; Larmour, Colin J; Mossey, Peter A; Stirrups, David R

    2005-06-01

    This paper, the third in the series, initially details the role of the restorative dentist in treating patients with hypodontia. (See Quintessence Int 2005;36:263-270 and 345-353 for the first two papers.) A range of treatment options, including implants, adhesive techniques, and removable prostheses, are covered. The investigators have detailed the clinical indications, and noted their relative advantages and disadvantages. PMID:15954249

  17. Who's On Your Roots: Part III

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blueberry forms specific associations with ericoid mycorrhizal fungi (EMF), yet there is almost no information concerning how these fungi influence the physiology of their host plants in horticultural production systems. Although the importance of EMF in a few natural ecosystems has been documented,...

  18. Atomization of liquid fuels. Part III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuehn, R

    1925-01-01

    This report provides a critical discussion of the results of the experiments conducted in the previous NACA-TM's 329 and 330. The main object of this investigation was to determine the size of the drops in mechanical atomization.

  19. Interdisciplinary Studies Program. Teacher's Guide: Part III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valencia Community Coll., Orlando, FL.

    This teacher's guide was developed for the third of four courses in Valencia Community College's Interdisciplinary Studies program, a 2-year core general education curriculum which chronologically examines the major developments in the evolution of human knowledge. The guide provides an introductory overview of the course's topic (i.e., Western…

  20. Computer Education for Engineers, Part III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullough, Earl S.; Lofy, Frank J.

    1989-01-01

    Reports the results of the third survey of computer use in engineering education conducted in the fall of 1987 in comparing with 1981 and 1984 results. Summarizes survey data on computer course credits, languages, equipment use, CAD/CAM instruction, faculty access, and computer graphics. (YP)

  1. KURDISH READERS. PART III, KURDISH SHORT STORIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ABDULLA, JAMAL JALAL; MCCARUS, ERNEST N.

    THE SIX STORIES IN THIS COLLECTION ARE WRITTEN IN THE KURDISH DIALECT OF SULAIMANIA, THE LANGUAGE OF OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS AND TEXTBOOKS IN IRAQI KURDISTAN. THE VARIOUS THEMES INCLUDED ARE REPRESENTATIVE OF KURDISH CULTURE AND TRADITION. EACH SELECTION (WRITTEN IN KURDISH SCRIPT) IS FOLLOWED BY VOCABULARY AND EXPLANATORY NOTES IN ORDER OF…

  2. Long-term evaluation of solid oxide fuel cell candidate materials in a 3-cell generic stack test fixture, part III: Stability and microstructure of Ce-(Mn,Co)-spinel coating, AISI441 interconnect, alumina coating, cathode and anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Yeong-Shyung; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Choi, Jung-Pyung

    2014-07-01

    A generic solid oxide fuel cell stack test fixture was developed to evaluate candidate materials and processing under realistic conditions. Part III of the work investigated the stability of Ce-(Mn,Co) spinel coating, AISI441 metallic interconnect, alumina coating, and cell's degradation. After 6000 h test, the spinel coating showed densification with some diffusion of Cr. At the metal interface, segregation of Si and Ti was observed, however, no continuous layer formed. The alumina coating for perimeter sealing areas appeared more dense and thick at the air side than the fuel side. Both the spinel and alumina coatings remained bonded. EDS analysis of Cr within the metal showed small decrease in concentration near the coating interface and would expect to cause no issue of Cr depletion. Inter-diffusion of Ni, Fe, and Cr between spot-welded Ni wire and AISI441 interconnect was observed and Cr-oxide scale formed along the circumference of the weld. The microstructure of the anode and cathode was discussed relating to degradation of the top and middle cells. Overall, the Ce-(Mn,Co) spinel coating, alumina coating, and AISI441 steel showed the desired long-term stability and the developed generic stack fixture proved to be a useful tool to validate candidate materials for SOFC.

  3. Phenomenological Considerations of the Electric Field Induced Transitions in Improper Ferroelectrics and Ferroelastics. III. Application to Gd2(MoO4)3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Ikuo; Ishibashi, Yoshihiro

    1987-02-01

    The electric field induced phase transitions are discussed in the improper ferroelectrics and ferroelastics, where the high symmetry phase is assumed to be piezoelectric as in the gadolinium molybdate (GMO). The dependence on the electric field of the polarization is discussed, and the D-E hysteresis loops are compared with the one experimentally observed in GMO.

  4. Specific Intensity Direct Current (DC) Electric Field Improves Neural Stem Cell Migration and Enhances Differentiation towards βIII-Tubulin+ Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huiping; Steiger, Amanda; Nohner, Mitch; Ye, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Control of stem cell migration and differentiation is vital for efficient stem cell therapy. Literature reporting electric field–guided migration and differentiation is emerging. However, it is unknown if a field that causes cell migration is also capable of guiding cell differentiation—and the mechanisms for these processes remain unclear. Here, we report that a 115 V/m direct current (DC) electric field can induce directional migration of neural precursor cells (NPCs). Whole cell patching revealed that the cell membrane depolarized in the electric field, and buffering of extracellular calcium via EGTA prevented cell migration under these conditions. Immunocytochemical staining indicated that the same electric intensity could also be used to enhance differentiation and increase the percentage of cell differentiation into neurons, but not astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. The results indicate that DC electric field of this specific intensity is capable of promoting cell directional migration and orchestrating functional differentiation, suggestively mediated by calcium influx during DC field exposure. PMID:26068466

  5. Field Validation of the Career Education Curriculum Project Modules. Phase II. K-6 Validation. Final Report. Part I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Earl; Wellman, Frank

    Field validation of the Missouri Career Education Curriculum Project Modules, K-6, was conducted in two phases. In phase 1, three sets of evaluation instruments were produced: K-1, 2-3, and 4-6. In phase 2, the field validation of the K-6 modules was conducted (reported here). (An additional goal of phase 2 was to develop evaluation instruments…

  6. The case of King Richard III.

    PubMed

    Skrziepietz, A

    2011-11-01

    In this short essay we will discuss the possible diseases of King Richard III according to the descriptions in Shakespeare's plays King Richard III and Henry VI. Furthermore, it is shown that the description of the defeated enemy as physically and mentally deformed is part of a long tradition which has its roots in Ancient Greece. PMID:22089046

  7. Influence of an external magnetic field on the singlet and triplet emissions of tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum(III) (Alq3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gärditz, Christoph; Mückl, Anton G.; Cölle, Michael

    2005-11-01

    The effect of a magnetic field on the triplet emission in Alq3 was investigated by measuring the delayed electroluminescence (EL) and the phosphorescence in Alq3-based organic light-emitting diodes and amorphous films, respectively. The change of the delayed EL intensity in amorphous Alq3 is explained by Merrifield's theory of mutual triplet-triplet annihilation known for molecular crystals. The intensity of the instantaneous EL shows an increase of up to +4.8% depending on the magnetic-field strength, which is due to the influence of the magnetic-field on the charge balance factor and thus on the injection of minority charge carriers.

  8. Using Recent Advances in 2D Seismic Technology and Surface Geochemistry to Economically Redevelop a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Reservoir: Vernon Field, Isabella County, M, Class III

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, James R.; Bornhorst, T.J.; Chittick, S.D.; Harrison, William B.; Tayjor, W. Quinlan

    2001-08-07

    In this project a consortium consisting of Cronus Exploration (Traverse City, MI), Michigan Technological University (Houghton, MI) and Western Michigan University (Kalamazoo, MI) proposed to develop and execute an economical and environmentally sensitive plan for recovery of hydrocarbons from an abandoned shallow-shelf carbonate field that is typical of many fields in the U.S. Midwest. This is a 5-year project that will use surface geochemistry as a tool to reduce risk in locating and producing hydrocarbons in Class II fields. The project will develop new techniques for measuring hydrocarbon gases in the soil horizon to locate new and bypassed oil in the shallow-shelf carbonate environments typified by the Dundee and Trenton Formations of the Michigan Basin (Fisher et. al., 1988). In Phase I of the project, the consortium proposes to re-develop the Vernon Oil field located in Vernon Twp, Isabella County, Michigan and produce both bypassed hydrocarbons from the original field and to locate and produce extensions of the original field.

  9. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates. Quarterly report 37 - Part 2, Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, J.W.

    1992-07-14

    This volume contains detailed experimental data to accompany quarterly report, dated July 14, 1992, by this group entitled ``Investigation of Effects of 60-Hz Electric Fields on Operant and Social Behavior and on the Neuroendocrine System of Nonhuman Primates.`` This volume is a collection of Appendices which are entitled: Appendix A- Field Mapping Data Forms, Appendix B- Exposure Area (East Side) Electric Field Data, Appendix C- Exposure Area (East Side) Magnetic Field Data, Appendix D- Sham Area (West Side) Magnetic Field Data, Appendix E- Memoranda Concerning Field Onset During Experiment IV and the Crossover Experiment, Appendix F- Exposure Area (East Side) Electric Field Data, Appendix G- Exposure Area (East Side) Magnetic Field Data, Appendix H- Sham Area (west Side) Magnetic Field Data, Appendix I- Compiled Data and Anovas for Experiment III Social Data, Appendix J -Written Comments Provided by Statistician Dr. Robert Mason, and Appendix K- Reference Text Provided by Dr. Coelho.

  10. Regional Media Education Centers (For Non-Professionals in the Media Fields) in the European Part of Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitskaya, Anastasia

    2014-01-01

    In the European parts of Russia (Archangelsk, Belgorod, Vladimir, Voronezh, Kazan, Krasnodar, Penza, Rostov-on-Don, St. Petersburg, Saratov, Smolensk, Taganrog, Tambov, Tver, Tolyatti and so on.) there is a lot of pedagogues, who strive to develop media competence among different age groups with different social status. More and more media…

  11. AERMOD: A DISPERSION MODEL FOR INDUSTRIAL SOURCE APPLICATIONS PART II: MODEL PERFORMANCE AGAINST 17 FIELD STUDY DATABASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The formulations of the AMS/EPA Regulatory Model Improvement Committee's applied air dispersion model (AERMOD) are described. This is the second in a series of three articles. Part I describes the model's methods for characterizing the atmospheric boundary layer and complex ter...

  12. POPULATION III HYPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Smidt, Joseph; Whalen, Daniel J.; Wiggins, Brandon K.; Even, Wesley; Fryer, Chris L.; Johnson, Jarrett L.

    2014-12-20

    Population III supernovae have been of growing interest of late for their potential to directly probe the properties of the first stars, particularly the most energetic events that are visible near the edge of the observable universe. Until now, hypernovae, the unusually energetic Type Ib/c supernovae that are sometimes associated with gamma-ray bursts, have been overlooked as cosmic beacons at the highest redshifts. In this, the latest of a series of studies on Population III supernovae, we present numerical simulations of 25-50 M {sub ☉} hypernovae and their light curves done with the Los Alamos RAGE and SPECTRUM codes. We find that they will be visible at z = 10-15 to the James Webb Space Telescope and z = 4-5 to the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope, tracing star formation rates in the first galaxies and at the end of cosmological reionization. If, however, the hypernova crashes into a dense shell ejected by its progenitor, it is expected that a superluminous event will occur that may be seen at z ∼ 20 in the first generation of stars.

  13. A Phase I Study of Chemoradiotherapy With Use of Involved-Field Conformal Radiotherapy and Accelerated Hyperfractionation for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: WJTOG 3305

    SciTech Connect

    Tada, Takuhito; Chiba, Yasutaka; Tsujino, Kayoko; Fukuda, Haruyuki; Nishimura, Yasumasa; Kokubo, Masaki; Negoro, Shunichi; Kudoh, Shinzoh; Fukuoka, Masahiro; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Nakanishi, Yoichi

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: A Phase I study to determine a recommended dose of thoracic radiotherapy using accelerated hyperfractionation for unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer was conducted. Methods and Materials: Patients with unresectable Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer were treated intravenously with carboplatin (area under the concentration curve 2) and paclitaxel (40 mg/m{sup 2}) on Days 1, 8, 15, and 22 with concurrent twice-daily thoracic radiotherapy (1.5 Gy per fraction) beginning on Day 1 followed by two cycles of consolidation chemotherapy using carboplatin (area under the concentration curve 5) and paclitaxel (200 mg/m{sup 2}). Total doses were 54 Gy in 36 fractions, 60 Gy in 40 fractions, 66 Gy in 44 fractions, and 72 Gy in 48 fractions at Levels 1 to 4. The dose-limiting toxicity, defined as Grade {>=}4 esophagitis and neutropenic fever and Grade {>=}3 other nonhematologic toxicities, was monitored for 90 days. Results: Of 26 patients enrolled, 22 patients were assessable for response and toxicity. When 4 patients entered Level 4, enrollment was closed to avoid severe late toxicities. Dose-limiting toxicities occurred in 3 patients. They were Grade 3 neuropathy at Level 1 and Level 3 and Grade 3 infection at Level 1. However, the maximum tolerated dose was not reached. The median survival time was 28.6 months for all patients. Conclusions: The maximum tolerated dose was not reached, although the dose of radiation was escalated to 72 Gy in 48 fractions. However, a dose of 66 Gy in 44 fractions was adopted for this study because late toxicity data were insufficient.

  14. An empirical model of the auroral oval derived from CHAMP field-aligned current signatures - Part 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, C.; Lühr, H.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we introduce a new model for the location of the auroral oval. The auroral boundaries are derived from small- and medium-scale field-aligned current (FAC) based on the high-resolution CHAMP (CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload) magnetic field observations during the years 2000-2010. The basic shape of the auroral oval is controlled by the dayside merging electric field, Em, and can be fitted well by ellipses at all levels of activity. All five ellipse parameters show a dependence on Em which can be described by quadratic functions. Optimal delay times for the merging electric field at the bow shock are 30 and 15 min for the equatorward and poleward boundaries, respectively. A comparison between our model and the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) auroral model derived from IMAGE (Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration) optical observations has been performed. There is good agreement between the two models regarding both boundaries, and the differences show a Gaussian distribution with a width of ±2° in latitude. The difference of the equatorward boundary shows a local-time dependence, which is 1° in latitude poleward in the morning sector and 1° equatorward in the afternoon sector of the BAS model. We think the difference between the two models is caused by the appearance of auroral forms in connection with upward FACs. All information required for applying our auroral oval model (CH-Aurora-2014) is provided.

  15. Designing experiments to evaluate the effectiveness of precision agricultural practices on research fields. Part 1. Concepts for formulation.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this paper is to present a unique formulation methodology for designing experiments to evaluate the effectiveness of a precision agricultural practice on a research farm field. We demonstrate an efficient method of combining the georeferenced treatment structure and the georeferenc...

  16. Measured HEU Content in 110-Gallon overpacks and partly filled drums by field y-PHA Assay

    SciTech Connect

    RAYMOND, DEWBERRY

    2004-12-06

    The 321-M Reactor Fuel Fabrication facility was used to fabricate enriched uranium fuel assemblies, lithium-aluminum target tubes, neptunium assemblies, and miscellaneous components for the production reactors. It operated for 25 years. During this time, thousands of uranium-aluminum-alloy (U-Al) fuel tubes were produced. After the facility terminated operations in 1995, all of the easily accessible U-Al was removed from the building, and only residual amounts remained. The Analytical Development Section of SRTC was tasked to conduct the required assays of highly enriched uranium in the deactivation and decommissioning activities of the facility. In this report we demonstrate successful assay of thirteen 55-gallon and 110-gallon drums in the far field transmission corrected point source acquisition configuration. Several of the drums were assayed using the commercial Q2 instrument in both the direct mode and in the segmented gamma scanner mode adapted by SRTC in addition to the far field method described here. The 110-gallon drums would not fit into the Q2 instrument, and so assay by the far field technique was necessary. While the far field transmission corrected method used for these drums is a straightforward technique, it was important to obtain comparison measurements between it and the Q2 techniques to establish its accuracy for the 110-gallon overpack drums.

  17. Blockade of B2 receptors attenuates the responses of group III afferents to static contraction.

    PubMed

    Leal, Anna K; Stone, Audrey J; Yamauchi, Katsuya; McCord, Jennifer L; Kaufman, Marc P

    2013-10-25

    Recent evidence has been presented demonstrating that group III mechanoreceptors comprise an important part of the sensory arm of the exercise pressor reflex, which in turn functions to increase arterial blood flow to contracting skeletal muscles. Although group III afferents are stimulated by mechanical distortion of their receptive fields, they are also stimulated by bradykinin, which is produced by skeletal muscle when it contracts. Moreover, blockade of B (bradykinin)2 receptors has been shown to decrease the magnitude of the exercise pressor reflex. Nevertheless, the effect of blockade of B2 receptors on responses of group III afferents to contraction is not known. We therefore determined the effect of B2 receptor blockade with HOE 140 (40μg/kg) on the responses to both static and intermittent contraction of group III afferents with endings in the triceps surae muscle of decerebrated unanesthetized cats. We found that HOE 140 significantly attenuated (P=0.04) the responses of 14 group III afferents to static contraction, but did not significantly attenuate (P=0.16) the responses of 16 group III afferents to intermittent contraction. The attenuation induced by HOE 140 was present throughout the static contraction period, and led us to speculate that blockade of B2 receptors on the endings of group III afferents decreased their sensitivity to mechanical events occurring in the working muscles. PMID:24036460

  18. Balloon Borne Soundings of Water Vapor, Ozone and Temperature in the Upper Tropospheric and Lower Stratosphere as Part of the Second SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voemel, Holger

    2004-01-01

    The main goal of our work was to provide in situ water vapor and ozone profiles in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere as reference measurements for the validation of SAGE III water vapor and ozone retrievals. We used the NOAA/CMDL frost point hygrometer and ECC ozone sondes on small research balloons to provide continuous profiles between the surface and the mid stratosphere. The NOAA/CMDL frost point hygrometer is currently the only lightweight balloon borne instrument capable of measuring water vapor between the lower troposphere and middle stratosphere. The validation measurements were based in the arctic region of Scandinavia for northern hemisphere observations and in New Zealand for southern hemisphere observations and timed to coincide with overpasses of the SAGE III instrument. In addition to SAGE III validation we also tried to coordinate launches with other instruments and studied dehydration and transport processes in the Arctic stratospheric vortex.

  19. 17 CFR Table III to Subpart E of... - Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments III Table III to Subpart E of Part 201 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES..., Table III Table III to Subpart E of Part 201—Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments U.S....

  20. 17 CFR Table III to Subpart E of... - Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments III Table III to Subpart E of Part 201 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES..., Table III Table III to Subpart E of Part 201—Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments U.S....

  1. 17 CFR Table III to Subpart E of... - Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments III Table III to Subpart E of Part 201 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES..., Table III Table III to Subpart E of Part 201—Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments U.S....

  2. 17 CFR Table III to Subpart E of... - Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments III Table III to Subpart E of Part 201 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES..., Table III Table III to Subpart E of Part 201—Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments U.S....

  3. 17 CFR Table III to Subpart E of... - Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments III Table III to Subpart E of Part 201 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES..., Table III Table III to Subpart E of Part 201—Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments U.S....

  4. The formation of interstellar molecular lines in a turbulent velocity field with finite correlation length III. Spherical clouds in hydrostatic equilibrium.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piehler, G.; Kegel, W. H.

    1995-05-01

    We investigated the formation of interstellar molecular lines in a turbulent velocity field with finite correlation length, extending previous work (Albrecht & Kegel 1987; Kegel et al. 1992) to isothermal spheres in hydrostatic equilibrium as cloud models with σ>>v_ therm _. For this we use the transformed generalized radiative transfer equation (Kegel et al. 1992). We concentrate our calculations on the CO-molecule with up to 12 energy levels. We give numerical results for models with T_kin_=50K, σ=3.9km/sec (σ/v_ therm _=22), and different values of the central H_2_ density and different values of the correlation length. As our results show, accounting for a velocity field with a finite correlation length affects the line profiles, the center-to-limb variation, and the intensity ratios. We find that the higher transitions are more strongly affected than the J=1-0 transition.

  5. Joint development and tectonic stress field evolution in the southeastern Mesozoic Ordos Basin, west part of North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lin; Qiu, Zhen; Wang, Qingchen; Guo, Yusen; Wu, Chaofan; Wu, Zhijie; Xue, Zhenhua

    2016-09-01

    Major joint sets trending E-W (J1), ENE-WSW (J2), NE-SW (J3), N-S (J4), NNW-SSE (J5), NNE-SSW (J6), NW-SE (J7), and WNW-ESE (J8) respectively are recognized in Mesozoic strata within the southeast of Ordos Basin. Among them, the J1, J2 and J3 joint sets are systematic joints, while the other five joint sets (J4, J5, J6, J7, J8) are nonsystematic joints. There are three groups of orthogonal joint systems (i.e. J1 and J4 sets, J2 and J5 sets, and J6 and J8 sets) and two groups of conjugate shear fractures (ENE-WSW and NNE-SSW, ENE-WSW and ESE-WNW) in the study area. Joint spacing analysis indicates that: (1) layer thickness has an effect on the joint spacing, but the correlation of joint spacing and layer thickness is low; (2) joint density of systematic joints is greater than nonsystematic joints, and the joint density of a thin layer is also greater than that of a thick layer; and (3) the joints of Mesozoic strata in the basin are the result of tectonic events affected by multiple stress fields. All these joints in the Mesozoic strata are formed in the two main tectonic events since Late Mesozoic times. One is the westward subduction of the Pacific Plate beneath the Eurasia Plate, which formed the approximately E-W-trending compressive stress field in the China continent. The trends of the J1 joint set (E-W) and the bisector of conjugate shear fractures composed of ENE-WSW and ESE-WNW fractures are all parallel to the trend of maximum compressive stress (E-W). The other stress field is related to the collision of the Indian and Eurasian Plates, which formed the NE-SW-trending compressive stress field in the China continent. The trends of the J3 joint set and bisector of conjugate shear fractures composed of ENE-WSW and NNE-SSW fractures are all parallel to the trend of maximum compressive stress (NE-SW). Finally, we conclude that the J1 and J4 sets are formed in the E-W-trending compressive stress field, and the J2, J3, J5, J6, J7 and J8 sets are formed in the NE

  6. Remote sensing of strippable coal reserves and mine inventory in part of the Warrior Coal Field in Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, T. J.; Copeland, C. W., Jr.; Russell, D. D.; Evans, F. E., Jr.; Sapp, C. D.; Boone, P. A.

    1978-01-01

    Methods by which estimates of the remaining reserves of strippable coal in Alabama could be made were developed. Information acquired from NASA's Earth Resources Office was used to analyze and map existing surface mines in a four-quadrangle area in west central Alabama. Using this information and traditional methods for mapping coal reserves, an estimate of remaining strippable reserves was derived. Techniques for the computer analysis of remotely sensed data and other types of available coal data were developed to produce an estimate of strippable coal reserves for a second four-quadrangle area. Both areas lie in the Warrior coal field, the most prolific and active of Alabama's coal fields. They were chosen because of the amount and type of coal mining in the area, their location relative to urban areas, and the amount and availability of base data necessary for this type of study.

  7. AERMOD: A Dispersion Model for Industrial Source Applications. Part II: Model Performance against 17 Field Study Databases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Steven G.; Cimorelli, Alan J.; Paine, Robert J.; Brode, Roger W.; Weil, Jeffrey C.; Venkatram, Akula; Wilson, Robert B.; Lee, Russell F.; Peters, Warren D.

    2005-05-01

    The performance of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Regulatory Model (AERMOD) Improvement Committee's applied air dispersion model against 17 field study databases is described. AERMOD is a steady-state plume model with significant improvements over commonly applied regulatory models. The databases are characterized, and the performance measures are described. Emphasis is placed on statistics that demonstrate the model's abilities to reproduce the upper end of the concentration distribution. This is most important for applied regulatory modeling. The field measurements are characterized by flat and complex terrain, urban and rural conditions, and elevated and surface releases with and without building wake effects. As is indicated by comparisons of modeled and observed concentration distributions, with few exceptions AERMOD's performance is superior to that of the other applied models tested. This is the second of two articles, with the first describing the model formulations.

  8. Mixed field peronnel dosimetry: Part 1, High temperature peak characteristics of the reader-annealed TLD-600

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.C. ); Sims, C.S. )

    1991-02-01

    The high temperature peaks (TL peaks 6--7) of TLD-600 are known to have higher responses to high LET radiation than to low LET radiation. These high temperature peak characteristics were studied for the automatic reader-annealed Harshaw albedo neutron TLD. The high temperature peaks response is linear for neutrons over the dose equivalent range tested (0.05--3 mSv of a {sup 252}Cf source moderated by a 15 cm radius polyethylene sphere), but is supralinear above 20 mSv of {sup 137}Cs photons. The peaks ratio (peaks 6--7/peaks 3--5) of TLD-600 is 0.15 for neutrons of any incident energy, 0.01 for {sup 137}Cs gammas, and 0.02 for M-150 x-rays. Based on the high temperature peak characteristics, a mixed field neutron-photon personnel dosimetry methodology using a single TLD-600 element was developed. The dosimetric method was evaluated in mixed {sup 238}PuBe + {sup 137}Cs fields with four neutron-gamma dose equivalent ratios, and the neutron, photon and total dose equivalent estimations are better than 20% except in one case. However, it was found that the neutron and photon dose equivalent estimations are sensitive to the neutron and photon peaks ratios, depending on the neutron-photon dose equivalent ratio and the neutron source in the mixed field. Therefore, a successful use of this method requires knowledge of the photon and neutron energies in the mixed field. 13 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. A geometric optics method for high-frequency electromagnetic fields computations near fold caustics--Part II. The energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benamou, J.-D.; Lafitte, O.; Solliec, I.; Sentis, R.

    2004-05-01

    We present the computation of the amplitudes needed to evaluate the energy deposited by the laser wave in a plasma when a fold caustic forms. We first recall the Eulerian method designed in Benamou et al. (J. Comput. Appl. Math. 156 (2003) 93) to compute the caustic location and the phases associated to the two ray branches on its illuminated side. We then turn to the computation of the amplitudes needed to evaluate the energy. We use the classical geometrical form of the amplitudes to avoid the blow up problem at the caustic. As our proposed method is Eulerian we have to consider transport equations for these geometrical quantities where the advection field depends on the ray flow. The associated vector field structurally vanishes like the square root of the distance to the caustic when approaching the caustic. This introduces an additional difficulty as traditional finite difference scheme do not retain their accuracy for such advection fields. We propose a new scheme which remains of order 1 at the caustic and present a partial theoretical analysis as well as a numerical validation. We also test the capability of our Eulerian geometrical algorithm to produce numerical solution of the Helmholtz equation and attempt to check their frequency asymptotic accuracy.

  10. Error Modeling of Multi-baseline Optical Truss. Part II; Application to SIM Metrology Truss Field Dependent Error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Liwei Dennis; Milman, Mark; Korechoff, Robert

    2004-01-01

    The current design of the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) employs a 19 laser-metrology-beam system (also called L19 external metrology truss) to monitor changes of distances between the fiducials of the flight system's multiple baselines. The function of the external metrology truss is to aid in the determination of the time-variations of the interferometer baseline. The largest contributor to truss error occurs in SIM wide-angle observations when the articulation of the siderostat mirrors (in order to gather starlight from different sky coordinates) brings to light systematic errors due to offsets at levels of instrument components (which include comer cube retro-reflectors, etc.). This error is labeled external metrology wide-angle field-dependent error. Physics-based model of field-dependent error at single metrology gauge level is developed and linearly propagated to errors in interferometer delay. In this manner delay error sensitivity to various error parameters or their combination can be studied using eigenvalue/eigenvector analysis. Also validation of physics-based field-dependent model on SIM testbed lends support to the present approach. As a first example, dihedral error model is developed for the comer cubes (CC) attached to the siderostat mirrors. Then the delay errors due to this effect can be characterized using the eigenvectors of composite CC dihedral error. The essence of the linear error model is contained in an error-mapping matrix. A corresponding Zernike component matrix approach is developed in parallel, first for convenience of describing the RMS of errors across the field-of-regard (FOR), and second for convenience of combining with additional models. Average and worst case residual errors are computed when various orders of field-dependent terms are removed from the delay error. Results of the residual errors are important in arriving at external metrology system component requirements. Double CCs with ideally co-incident vertices

  11. Organophosphorus reagents as extractants-part 3. Synergic effect of triphenyl phosphine oxide and bis(diphenyl phosphinyl) alkanes on extraction of iron(III) from thiocyanate medium with 2,4-pentdione.

    PubMed

    Lobana, T S; Bhatia, P K

    1992-06-01

    The extraction of iron(III) from thiocyanate medium was carried out with a synergic combination of 2,4-pentdione (Hacac) and either triphenyl phosphine oxide (Ph(3) PO) or bis (diphenylphosphinyl) alkanes, Ph(2)P(O)(CH(2))(n).P(O)PH(2) [ligand abbreviation, n: dpeO(2), 2; dpbO(2), 4]. Iron(III) was quantitatively separated from its binary mixture with chromium(III), manganese(III), cobalt(II), nickel(II), zinc(II), cadmium(II), mercury(II), lead(II), magnesium(II) and from steel samples. Copper(II) and silver(I) however, interfered. The percentage extraction was 99.0%. The respective extraction constants, K(HA), K(L) or K(syn), for the extracted species, [Fe(NCS)(acac)(2)(H(2)O)] (HA Hacac), Fe(NCS)(3)L(2) [L b Ph(3)PO, dpeO(2) or dpbO(2)], or Fe(NCS)(acac)(2)L were found to be: K(HA), 1.48 x 10(3), K(L), 1.80 x 10(2) (L Ph(3)PO), 2.02 x 10(2) (L dpeO(2) or dpbO(2)) and K(syn), 1.87 x 10(6) (L Ph(3)PO), 2.56 x 10(6) [L dpeO(2) or dpbO(2)]. PMID:18965433

  12. Energy levels of terbium(III) in the elpasolite Cs2NaTbBr6. II. A correlation crystal field analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaw, C. S.; Denning, R. G.

    A set of more than 100 electronic energy levels in Cs2NaTbBr6, extending from the ground state to 5H4, is used to test different models of the correlation crystal field (CCF). These are based on Judd's orthogonal g(k)iQ two-electron operators, and more specifically on contributions due to spin-correlation, or ligand polarization. Similar data from Cs2NaTbCl6 and Cs2NaTbF6 has also been analysed. Only fourth-rank operators make clear improvements to the quality of the fit in deviant multiplets. Empirically the g7(4) and g9(4) operators are found to be the most effective. Although fourth-rank operators achieve modest success in correcting the calculated spread of the multiplets, no single operator has a significant impact on the shortcomings of the one-body crystal field. This result is discussed in terms of the limitations of an effective-operator Hamiltonian.

  13. THREE-DIMENSIONAL FEATURES OF THE OUTER HELIOSPHERE DUE TO COUPLING BETWEEN THE INTERSTELLAR AND INTERPLANETARY MAGNETIC FIELDS. III. THE EFFECTS OF SOLAR ROTATION AND ACTIVITY CYCLE

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelov, Nikolai V.; Borovikov, Sergey N.; Zank, Gary P.; Ogino, Tatsuki E-mail: snb0003@uah.edu E-mail: ogino@stelab.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2009-05-10

    We investigate the effects of the 11 year solar cycle and 25 day rotation period of the Sun on the interaction of the solar wind (SW) with the local interstellar medium (LISM). Our models take into account the partially ionized character of the LISM and include momentum and energy transfer between the ionized and neutral components. We assume that the interstellar magnetic field vector belongs to the hydrogen deflection plane as discovered in the SOHO SWAN experiment. This plane is inclined at an angle of about 60 deg. toward the ecliptic plane of the Sun, as suggested in recent publications relating the local interstellar cloud properties to the radio emission observed by Voyager 1. It is assumed that the latitudinal extent of the boundary between the slow and fast SW regions, as well as the angle between the Sun's rotation and magnetic-dipole axes, are periodic functions of time, while the polarity of the interstellar magnetic field changes sign every 11 years at the solar maximum. The global variation of the SW-LISM interaction pattern, the excursions of the termination shock and the heliopause, and parameter distributions in certain directions are investigated. The analysis of the behavior of the wavy heliospheric current sheet in the supersonic SW region shows the importance of neutral atoms on its dynamics.

  14. Geologic Interpretation of Data Sets Collected by Planetary Analog Geology Traverses and by Standard Geologic Field Mapping. Part 1; A Comparison Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppler, Dean B.; Bleacher, Jacob F.; Evans, Cynthia A.; Feng, Wanda; Gruener, John; Hurwitz, Debra M.; Skinner, J. A., Jr.; Whitson, Peggy; Janoiko, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Geologic maps integrate the distributions, contacts, and compositions of rock and sediment bodies as a means to interpret local to regional formative histories. Applying terrestrial mapping techniques to other planets is challenging because data is collected primarily by orbiting instruments, with infrequent, spatiallylimited in situ human and robotic exploration. Although geologic maps developed using remote data sets and limited "Apollo-style" field access likely contain inaccuracies, the magnitude, type, and occurrence of these are only marginally understood. This project evaluates the interpretative and cartographic accuracy of both field- and remote-based mapping approaches by comparing two 1:24,000 scale geologic maps of the San Francisco Volcanic Field (SFVF), north-central Arizona. The first map is based on traditional field mapping techniques, while the second is based on remote data sets, augmented with limited field observations collected during NASA Desert Research & Technology Studies (RATS) 2010 exercises. The RATS mission used Apollo-style methods not only for pre-mission traverse planning but also to conduct geologic sampling as part of science operation tests. Cross-comparison demonstrates that the Apollo-style map identifies many of the same rock units and determines a similar broad history as the field-based map. However, field mapping techniques allow markedly improved discrimination of map units, particularly unconsolidated surficial deposits, and recognize a more complex eruptive history than was possible using Apollo-style data. Further, the distribution of unconsolidated surface units was more obvious in the remote sensing data to the field team after conducting the fieldwork. The study raises questions about the most effective approach to balancing mission costs with the rate of knowledge capture, suggesting that there is an inflection point in the "knowledge capture curve" beyond which additional resource investment yields progressively

  15. Comparing historical and modern methods of Sea Surface Temperature measurement - Part 1: Review of methods, field comparisons and dataset adjustments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, J. B. R.

    2012-09-01

    Sea Surface Temperature (SST) measurements have been obtained from a variety of different platforms, instruments and depths over the post-industrial period. Today most measurements come from ships, moored and drifting buoys and satellites. Shipboard methods include temperature measurement of seawater sampled by bucket and in engine cooling water intakes. Engine intake temperatures are generally thought to average a few tenths of a °C warmer than simultaneous bucket temperatures. Here I review SST measurement methods, studies comparing shipboard methods by field experiment and adjustments applied to SST datasets to account for variable methods. In opposition to contemporary thinking, I find average bucket-intake temperature differences reported from field studies inconclusive. Non-zero average differences often have associated standard deviations that are several times larger than the averages themselves. Further, average differences have been found to vary widely between ships and between cruises on the same ship. The cause of non-zero average differences is typically unclear given the general absence of additional temperature observations to those from buckets and engine intakes. Shipboard measurements appear of variable quality, highly dependent upon the accuracy and precision of the thermometer used and the care of the observer where manually read. Methods are generally poorly documented, with written instructions not necessarily reflecting actual practices of merchant mariners. Measurements cannot be expected to be of high quality where obtained by untrained sailors using thermometers of low accuracy and precision.

  16. Ground-based CCD astrometry with wide field imagers. III. WFI@2.2m proper-motion catalog of the globular cluster ω Centauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellini, A.; Piotto, G.; Bedin, L. R.; Anderson, J.; Platais, I.; Momany, Y.; Moretti, A.; Milone, A. P.; Ortolani, S.

    2009-01-01

    Context: ω Centauri is the most well studied Galactic Globular Cluster because of its numerous puzzling features: significant dispersion in metallicity, multiple populations, triple main-sequence, horizontal branch morphology, He-rich population(s), and extended star-formation history. Intensive spectroscopic follow-up observing campaigns targeting stars at different positions in the color-magnitude diagram promises to clarify some of these peculiarities. Aims: To be able to target cluster members reliably during spectroscopic surveys and both spatial and radial distributions in the cluster outskirts without including field stars, a high quality proper-motion catalog of ω Cen and membership probability determination are required. The only available wide field proper-motion catalog of ω Cen is derived from photographic plates, and only for stars brighter than B~16. Using ESO archive data, we create a new, CCD-based, proper-motion catalog for this cluster, extending to B~20. Methods: We used high precision astrometric software developed specifically for data acquired by WFI@2.2m telescope and presented in the first paper of this series. We demonstrated previously that a 7 mas astrometric precision level can be achieved with this telescope and camera for well exposed stars in a single exposure, assuming an empirical PSF and a local transformation approach in measuring star displacements. Results: We achieved a good cluster-field separation with a temporal base-line of only four years. We corrected our photometry for sky-concentration effects. We provide calibrated photometry for UBVR_CIC wide-band data plus narrow-band filter data centered on Hα for almost 360 000 stars. We confirm that the ω Cen metal-poor and metal-rich components have the same proper motion, and demonstrate that the metal-intermediate component in addition exhibits the same mean motion as the other RGB stars. We provide membership probability determinations for published ω Cen variable star

  17. Developing of Regional Tectonic Stress Map for Two Oil Fields in Western part of Persian Gulf, Acquisition and Preparation of the General Structure of Stress Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghi, A.; Heidbach, O.; Kharrat, R.; Asef, M.

    2011-12-01

    Recently, application of stress field data in petroleum industry has significantly increased. Field stress databases are prerequisite data to study reservoir compaction and deformations, wellbore stability, reservoir stimulation, CO2 sequestration and the like. This has convinced petroleum industries and many sponsors to allocate investment for acquiring accurate stress field data and developing stress maps. In southern part of Iran, large scale sedimentation from different geological periods and intense tectonic activities create huge petroleum fields. Persian Gulf located in south to south-west of Iran, contains a great number of the most giant offshore oil and gas reservoirs in the world. The objective of this research is development of a regional tectonic stress map for two fields in western part of the Persian Gulf. For this purpose, standard stress indicators including earthquake focal mechanism solutions, well-bore breakouts and drilling-induced fractures, in-situ stress measurements (LOT, hydraulic fracturing), young geologic data (fault-slip analysis) and core tests (ASR, DSCA, Petal Centerline Fractures) were used to collect and rearrange field stress data. The data are quality ranked according to World Stress Map quality ranking scheme 2008 based on their standard deviation and a tectonic regime is assigned where possible. In these fields some stress indicators like hydraulic fracturing and core tests was not employed before. Primary stress data gathered from focal mechanism confirmed a TF regime in the area mainly with the quality C. WSM database only provides around 14 SH measurement from the northern border of our area. All these data gathered from FMS with quality C. In our study we will add several new stress measurements from other standard stress indicators including LOT, well-bore breakout, drilling induced fractures and core tests with higher quality than C. Almost SH orientation varied between 0 to 90°N based on primary information. On the

  18. The effect of an electric field on the morphological stability of the crystal-melt interface of a binary alloy. III - Weakly nonlinear theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, A. A.; Mcfadden, G. B.; Coriell, S. R.; Hurle, D. T. J.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of a constant electric current on the crystal-melt interface morphology during directional solidification at constant velocity of a binary alloy is considered. A linear temperature field is assumed, and thermoelectric effects and Joule heating are neglected; electromigration and differing electrical conductivities of crystal and melt are taken into account. A two-dimensional weakly nonlinear analysis is carried out to third order in the interface amplitude, resulting in a cubic amplitude equation that describes whether the bifurcation from the planar state is supercritical or subcritical. For wavelengths corresponding to the most dangerous mode of linear theory, the demarcation between supercritical and subcritical behavior is calculated as a function of processing conditions and material parameters. The bifurcation behavior is a sensitive function of the magnitude and direction of the electric current and of the electrical conductivity ratio.

  19. Effects of local field and inherent strain in reflectance anisotropy spectra of A{sup III}B{sup V} semiconductors with naturally oxidized surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Berkovits, V. L.; Kosobukin, V. A.; Gordeeva, A. B.

    2015-12-28

    Reflectance anisotropy (RA) spectra of naturally oxidized (001) surfaces of GaAs and InAs crystals are measured for photon energies from 1.5 up to 5.5 eV. The differential high-accuracy RA spectra reveal features substantially different from those caused by either a reconstruction of clean surface or a built-in near-surface electric field. Models of atomic structure with anisotropic transition layers of excess arsenic atoms specific for GaAs(001)/oxide and InAs(001)/oxide interfaces are proposed. In conformity with these models, a general theory of reflectance anisotropy is developed for semiconductor/oxide interfaces within the Green's function technique. The theory takes into account the combined effect of local field due to interface dipoles and of intrinsic near-surface strain of the crystal. Measured RA spectra are analyzed in the model of valence-bond dipoles occupying a rectangular lattice in a multilayer medium. Comparing the measured and calculated spectra, we conclude that RA spectra of oxidized GaAs(001) and InAs(001) surfaces are simultaneously influenced by interface and near-surface anisotropies. The former is responsible for the broad-band spectral features which are associated with polarizability of the valence bonds attached to As atoms at the crystal/oxide interface. The near-surface anisotropy is due to inherent uniaxial straining the near-surface region of crystal. The effect of strain on RA spectra is experimentally and theoretically substantiated for GaAs crystal wafers undergone a uniaxial applied stress. Basically, this work results in the following. It establishes the physical nature of different levels of RA spectra observed in a majority of papers, but never analyzed. It demonstrates how the studied features of RA spectra could be applied for optical characterization of strained interfaces and atomic layers.

  20. Large Hexadecametallic {Mn(III) -Ln(III) } Wheels: Synthesis, Structural, Magnetic, and Theoretical Characterization.

    PubMed

    Vignesh, Kuduva R; Langley, Stuart K; Moubaraki, Boujemaa; Murray, Keith S; Rajaraman, Gopalan

    2015-11-01

    The synthesis, gas sorption studies, magnetic properties, and theoretical studies of new molecular wheels of core type {Mn(III) 8 Ln(III) 8 } (Ln=Dy, Ho, Er, Y and Yb), using the ligand mdeaH2 , in the presence of ortho-toluic or benzoic acid are reported. From the seven wheels studied the {Mn8 Dy8 } and {Mn8 Y8 } analogues exhibit SMM behavior as determined from ac susceptibility experiments in a zero static magnetic field. From DFT calculations a S=16 ground state was determined for the {Mn8 Y8 } complex due to weak ferromagnetic Mn(III) -Mn(III) interactions. Ab initio CASSCF+RASSI-SO calculations on the {Mn8 Dy8 } wheel estimated the Mn(III) -Dy(III) exchange interaction as -0.1 cm(-1) . This weak exchange along with unfavorable single-ion anisotropy of Dy(III) /Mn(III) ions, however, led to the observation of SMM behavior with fast magnetic relaxation. The orientation of the g-anisotropy of the Dy(III) ions is found to be perpendicular to the plane of the wheel and this suggests the possibility of toroidal magnetic moments in the cluster. The {Mn8 Ln8 } clusters reported here are the largest heterometallic Mn(III) Ln(III) wheels and the largest {3d-4f} wheels to exhibit SMM behavior reported to date. PMID:26403264

  1. Geomagnetic field variations in Western Europe from 1500 BC to 200 AD. Part II: New intensity secular variation curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervé, Gwenaël; Chauvin, Annick; Lanos, Philippe

    2013-05-01

    In order to extend the secular variation curve (SVC) of archaeointensity in Western Europe to the first millennium BC, we studied 24 kilns and hearths in place, two displaced hearths and six sets of pottery sherds from French archaeological sites. Archaeological artefacts, radiocarbon and dendrochronology dated the acquisition of the thermoremanent magnetization (TRM) carried by the studied objects. Rock magnetism experiments suggest that the main carrier of the magnetization is a Ti-poor titanomagnetite. Archaeointensity was determined by the Thellier-Thellier classical protocol with pTRM-checks. A strict criteria set was applied to select only the most reliable results with linear NRM-TRM diagrams (55% of total specimens). This study demonstrates that pottery sherds with two TRMs give reliable archaeointensities in the low-temperature interval, if the NRM-TRM diagram is adequately adjusted. Eighteen new mean archaeointensities (14 corrected from the anisotropy of TRM and 16 from cooling rate) were computed. The comparison with previously published Western Europe paleointensities show a strong dispersion between data primarily due to their variable quality. Western Europe data were weighted following the archaeointensity protocol, the number of specimens per site and the type of studied materials, in order to better highlight the secular variation of archaeointensity during the first millennium BC. The SVC, built with sliding windows of 160 years shifted every 50 years, presents (at Paris) a maximum of 90 μT around 800 BC and a minimum of 60 μT around 250 BC. These archaeointensity maximum and minimum correspond to cusps of the geomagnetic field direction in Western Europe. This new curve is consistent with Mesopotamian and Eastern Europe data. The archaeointensity secular variation in Western Europe predicted by global geomagnetic models CALS3k.4, ARCH3k.1 and ARCH3k_cst.1 is smoother than our SVC. We used our directional dataset (Hervé et al., 2013) to build

  2. A new GPS velocity field for the Pacific Plate - Part 2: implications for fault slip rates in western California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMets, C.; Márquez-Azúa, Bertha; Cabral-Cano, Enrique

    2014-12-01

    Lower and upper bounds for present deformation rates across faults in central California between the San Andreas Fault and Pacific coast are estimated from a new Global Positioning System (GPS) velocity field for central, western California in light of geodetic evidence presented in a companion paper for slow, but significant deformation within the Pacific Plate between young seafloor in the eastern Pacific and older seafloor elsewhere on the plate. Transects of the GPS velocity field across the San Andreas Fault between Parkfield and San Juan Buatista, where fault slip is dominated by creep and the velocity field thus reveals the off-fault deformation, show that GPS sites in westernmost California move approximately parallel to the fault at an average rate of 3.4 ± 0.4 mm yr-1 relative to the older interior of the Pacific Plate, but only 1.8 ± 0.6 mm yr-1 if the Pacific Plate frame of reference is corrected for deformation within the plate. Modelled interseismic elastic deformation from the weakly coupled creeping segment of the San Andreas Fault is an order-of-magnitude too small to explain the southeastward motions of coastal sites in western California. Similarly, models that maximize residual viscoelastic deformation from the 1857 Fort Tejon and 1906 San Francisco earthquakes mismatch both the rates and directions of GPS site motions in central California relative to the Pacific Plate. Neither thus explains the site motions southwest of the San Andreas fault, indicating that the site motions measure deformation across faults and folds outboard of the San Andreas Fault. The non-zero site velocities thus constitute strong evidence for active folding and faulting outboard from the creeping segment of the San Andreas Fault and suggest limits of 0-2 mm yr-1 for the Rinconada Fault slip rate and 1.8 ± 0.6 to 3.4 ± 0.4 mm yr-1 for the slip rates integrated across near-coastal faults such as the Hosgri, San Gregorio and San Simeon faults.

  3. Comparison of storm-time changes of geomagnetic field at ground and at MAGSAT altitudes, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejesusparada, N. (Principal Investigator); Kane, R. P.; Trivedi, N. B.

    1982-01-01

    Geomagnetic field variations were studied by considering the parameter delta H which indicated H(observed) minus H(model), where H = (X squared + Y squared) (1/2) where X, Y, and Z are the components actually observed. Quiet time base values for 5 deg longitude belts were estimated. After subtracting these from the observed values, the residual delta H (dawn) and delta H (dusk) were studied for the two major storms. It was noticed that the dusk values attained larger (negative) values for a longer time, than the dawn value. Some changes in delta Y and delta Z were also noticed, indicating possibilities of either meridional currents and/or noncoincidence of the central plane of the ring current with the equatorial plane of the Earth. Other details are described.

  4. Wave propagation characteristics of helically orthotropic cylindrical shells and resonance emergence in scattered acoustic field. Part 1. Formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, Majid

    2016-05-01

    The method of wave function expansion is adopted to study the three dimensional scattering of a plane progressive harmonic acoustic wave incident upon an arbitrarily thick-walled helically filament-wound composite cylindrical shell submerged in and filled with compressible ideal fluids. An approximate laminate model in the context of the so-called state-space formulation is employed for the construction of T-matrix solution to solve for the unknown modal scattering coefficients. Considering the nonaxisymmetric wave propagation phenomenon in anisotropic cylindrical components and following the resonance scattering theory which determines the resonance and background scattering fields, the stimulated resonance frequencies of the shell are isolated and classified due to their fundamental mode of excitation, overtone and style of propagation along the cylindrical axis (i.e., clockwise or anticlockwise propagation around the shell) and are identified as the helically circumnavigating waves.

  5. Eliminating Unwanted Far-Field Excitation in Objective-Type TIRF. Part I. Identifying Sources of Nonevanescent Excitation Light

    PubMed Central

    Brunstein, Maia; Teremetz, Maxime; Hérault, Karine; Tourain, Christophe; Oheim, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) achieves subdiffraction axial sectioning by confining fluorophore excitation to a thin layer close to the cell/substrate boundary. However, it is often unknown how thin this light sheet actually is. Particularly in objective-type TIRFM, large deviations from the exponential intensity decay expected for pure evanescence have been reported. Nonevanescent excitation light diminishes the optical sectioning effect, reduces contrast, and renders TIRFM-image quantification uncertain. To identify the sources of this unwanted fluorescence excitation in deeper sample layers, we here combine azimuthal and polar beam scanning (spinning TIRF), atomic force microscopy, and wavefront analysis of beams passing through the objective periphery. Using a variety of intracellular fluorescent labels as well as negative staining experiments to measure cell-induced scattering, we find that azimuthal beam spinning produces TIRFM images that more accurately portray the real fluorophore distribution, but these images are still hampered by far-field excitation. Furthermore, although clearly measureable, cell-induced scattering is not the dominant source of far-field excitation light in objective-type TIRF, at least for most types of weakly scattering cells. It is the microscope illumination optical path that produces a large cell- and beam-angle invariant stray excitation that is insensitive to beam scanning. This instrument-induced glare is produced far from the sample plane, inside the microscope illumination optical path. We identify stray reflections and high-numerical aperture aberrations of the TIRF objective as one important source. This work is accompanied by a companion paper (Pt.2/2). PMID:24606927

  6. Eliminating unwanted far-field excitation in objective-type TIRF. Part I. identifying sources of nonevanescent excitation light.

    PubMed

    Brunstein, Maia; Teremetz, Maxime; Hérault, Karine; Tourain, Christophe; Oheim, Martin

    2014-03-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) achieves subdiffraction axial sectioning by confining fluorophore excitation to a thin layer close to the cell/substrate boundary. However, it is often unknown how thin this light sheet actually is. Particularly in objective-type TIRFM, large deviations from the exponential intensity decay expected for pure evanescence have been reported. Nonevanescent excitation light diminishes the optical sectioning effect, reduces contrast, and renders TIRFM-image quantification uncertain. To identify the sources of this unwanted fluorescence excitation in deeper sample layers, we here combine azimuthal and polar beam scanning (spinning TIRF), atomic force microscopy, and wavefront analysis of beams passing through the objective periphery. Using a variety of intracellular fluorescent labels as well as negative staining experiments to measure cell-induced scattering, we find that azimuthal beam spinning produces TIRFM images that more accurately portray the real fluorophore distribution, but these images are still hampered by far-field excitation. Furthermore, although clearly measureable, cell-induced scattering is not the dominant source of far-field excitation light in objective-type TIRF, at least for most types of weakly scattering cells. It is the microscope illumination optical path that produces a large cell- and beam-angle invariant stray excitation that is insensitive to beam scanning. This instrument-induced glare is produced far from the sample plane, inside the microscope illumination optical path. We identify stray reflections and high-numerical aperture aberrations of the TIRF objective as one important source. This work is accompanied by a companion paper (Pt.2/2). PMID:24606927

  7. Columnar modelling of nucleation burst evolution in the convective boundary layer - first results from a feasibility study Part III: Preliminary results on physicochemical model performance using two "clean air mass" reference scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellmuth, O.

    2006-09-01

    In Paper I of four papers, a revised columnar high-order model to investigate gas-aerosol-turbulence interactions in the convective boundary layer (CBL) was proposed. In Paper II, the model capability to predict first-, second- and third-order moments of meteorological variables in the CBL was demonstrated using available observational data. In the present Paper III, the high-order modelling concept is extended to sulphur and ammonia chemistry as well as to aerosol dynamics. Based on the previous CBL simulation, a feasibility study is performed using two "clean air mass" scenarios with an emission source at the ground but low aerosol background concentration. Such scenarios synoptically correspond to the advection of fresh post-frontal air in an anthropogenically influenced region. The aim is to evaluate the time-height evolution of ultrafine condensation nuclei (UCNs) and to elucidate the interactions between meteorological and physicochemical variables in a CBL column. The scenarios differ in the treatment of new particle formation (NPF), whereas homogeneous nucleation according to the classical nucleation theory (CNT) is considered. The first scenario considers nucleation of a binary system consisting of water vapour and sulphuric acid (H2SO4) vapour, the second one nucleation of a ternary system additionally involving ammonia (NH3). Here, the two synthetic scenarios are discussed in detail, whereas special attention is payed to the role of turbulence in the formation of the typical UCN burst behaviour, that can often be observed in the surface layer. The intercomparison of the two scenarios reveals large differences in the evolution of the UCN number concentration in the surface layer as well as in the time-height cross-sections of first-order moments and double correlation terms. Although in both cases the occurrence of NPF bursts could be simulated, the burst characteristics and genesis of the bursts are completely different. It is demonstrated, that

  8. Eliminating Unwanted Far-Field Excitation in Objective-Type TIRF. Part II. Combined Evanescent-Wave Excitation and Supercritical-Angle Fluorescence Detection Improves Optical Sectioning

    PubMed Central

    Brunstein, Maia; Hérault, Karine; Oheim, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Azimuthal beam scanning makes evanescent-wave (EW) excitation isotropic, thereby producing total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) images that are evenly lit. However, beam spinning does not fundamentally address the problem of propagating excitation light that is contaminating objective-type TIRF. Far-field excitation depends more on the specific objective than on cell scattering. As a consequence, the excitation impurities in objective-type TIRF are only weakly affected by changes of azimuthal or polar beam angle. These are the main results of the first part of this study (Eliminating unwanted far-field excitation in objective-type TIRF. Pt.1. Identifying sources of nonevanescent excitation light). This second part focuses on exactly where up beam in the illumination system stray light is generated that gives rise to nonevanescent components in TIRF. Using dark-field imaging of scattered excitation light we pinpoint the objective, intermediate lenses and, particularly, the beam scanner as the major sources of stray excitation. We study how adhesion-molecule coating and astrocytes or BON cells grown on the coverslip surface modify the dark-field signal. On flat and weakly scattering cells, most background comes from stray reflections produced far from the sample plane, in the beam scanner and the objective lens. On thick, optically dense cells roughly half of the scatter is generated by the sample itself. We finally show that combining objective-type EW excitation with supercritical-angle fluorescence (SAF) detection efficiently rejects the fluorescence originating from deeper sample regions. We demonstrate that SAF improves the surface selectivity of TIRF, even at shallow penetration depths. The coplanar microscopy scheme presented here merges the benefits of beam spinning EW excitation and SAF detection and provides the conditions for quantitative wide-field imaging of fluorophore dynamics at or near the plasma membrane. PMID:24606929

  9. Class III Mid-Term Project, "Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies"

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Hara

    2007-03-31

    The overall objective of this project was to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involved improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective has been to transfer technology that can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The first budget period addressed several producibility problems in the Tar II-A and Tar V thermal recovery operations that are common in SBC reservoirs. A few of the advanced technologies developed include a three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic geologic model, a 3-D deterministic thermal reservoir simulation model to aid in reservoir management and subsequent post-steamflood development work, and a detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rocks and fluids. State of the art operational work included drilling and performing a pilot steam injection and production project via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors), implementing a hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steamflood area to improve thermal efficiency, installing a 2400-foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location, testing a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems, and starting on an advanced reservoir management system through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation. The second budget period phase (BP2) continued to implement state-of-the-art operational work to optimize thermal recovery processes, improve well drilling and completion practices, and evaluate the

  10. Hexaammine Complexes of Cr(III) and Co(III): A Spectral Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, D. R.; Pavlis, R. R.

    1985-01-01

    Procedures are provided for experiments containing complex ions with octahedral symmetry, hexaamminecobalt(III) chloride and hexaamminechromium(III) nitrate, so students can interpret fully the ultra violet/visible spectra of the complex cations in terms of the ligand field parameters, 10 "Dq," the Racah interelectron repulsion parameters, "B,"…

  11. Observations on cattle schistosomiasis in the Sudan, a study in comparative medicine. III. Field testing of an irradiated Schistosoma bovis vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Majid, A.A.; Bushera, H.O.; Saad, A.M.; Hussein, M.F.; Taylor, M.G.; Dargie, J.D.; Marshall, T.F.; Nelson, G.S.

    1980-05-29

    Previous work has shown that cattle can acquire a strong resistance to Schistosoma bovis infection following repeated natural exposure. Partial resistance to a laboratory challenge with S. bovis has also been demonstrated in calves after immunization with an irradiated schistosomular or cercarial vaccine. The aim of the present study was to see whether this type of caccine could protect calves under the very different conditions of natural exposure to S. bovis in the field. Thirty 6- to 9-month-old calves were each immunized with 10,000 irradiated S. bovis schistosomula by intramuscular injection and 8 weeks later were released into an enzootic area along with 30 unvaccinated animals. The calves were followed up for 10 months, during which period protection was evidenced by a lower mortality rate, a slower rate of acquisition of infection, and lower fecal egg counts in the vaccinated calves. Necropsy of the survivors showed 60 to 70% reductions in worm and tissue egg counts of the vaccinated calves as compared to those not vaccinated.

  12. Simulation study of 14-nm-gate III-V trigate field effect transistor devices with In1-xGaxAs channel capping layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Cheng-Hao; Li, Yiming

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we study characteristics of 14-nm-gate InGaAs-based trigate MOSFET (metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor) devices with a channel capping layer. The impacts of thickness and gallium (Ga) concentration of the channel capping layer on the device characteristic are firstly simulated and optimized by using three-dimensional quantum-mechanically corrected device simulation. Devices with In1-xGaxAs/In0.53Ga0.47As channels have the large driving current owing to small energy band gap and low alloy scattering at the channel surface. By simultaneously considering various physical and switching properties, a 4-nm-thick In0.68Ga0.32As channel capping layer can be adopted for advanced applications. Under the optimized channel parameters, we further examine the effects of channel fin angle and the work-function fluctuation (WKF) resulting from nano-sized metal grains of NiSi gate on the characteristic degradation and variability. To maintain the device characteristics and achieve the minimal variation induced by WKF, the physical findings of this study indicate a critical channel fin angle of 85o is needed for the device with an averaged grain size of NiSi below 4x4 nm2.

  13. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction and resonant X-ray magnetic scattering at helium-3 temperatures in high magnetic fields at beamline P09 at PETRA III.

    PubMed

    Francoual, S; Strempfer, J; Warren, J; Liu, Y; Skaugen, A; Poli, S; Blume, J; Wolff-Fabris, F; Canfield, P C; Lograsso, T

    2015-09-01

    The resonant scattering and diffraction beamline P09 at PETRA III at DESY is equipped with a 14 T vertical field split-pair magnet. A helium-3 refrigerator is available that can be fitted inside the magnet's variable-temperature insert. Here the results of a series of experiments aimed at determining the beam conditions permitting operations with the He-3 insert are presented. By measuring the tetragonal-to-orthorhombic phase transition occurring at 2.1 K in the Jahn-Teller compound TmVO4, it is found that the photon flux at P09 must be attenuated down to 1.5 × 10(9) photons s(-1) for the sample to remain at temperatures below 800 mK. Despite such a reduction of the incident flux and the subsequent use of a Cu(111) analyzer, the resonant X-ray magnetic scattering signal at the Tm LIII absorption edge associated with the spin-density wave in TmNi2B2C below 1.5 K is intense enough to permit a complete study in magnetic field and at sub-Kelvin temperatures to be carried out. PMID:26289272

  14. The Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey. VLT/VIMOS spectroscopy in the GOODS-south field: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balestra, I.; Mainieri, V.; Popesso, P.; Dickinson, M.; Nonino, M.; Rosati, P.; Teimoorinia, H.; Vanzella, E.; Cristiani, S.; Cesarsky, C.; Fosbury, R. A. E.; Kuntschner, H.; Rettura, A.

    2010-03-01

    Context. We present the full data set of the VIsible Multi-Object Spectrograph (VIMOS) spectroscopic campaign of the ESO/GOODS program in the Chandra Deep Field South (CDFS), which complements the FORS2 ESO/GOODS spectroscopic campaign. Aims: The ESO/GOODS spectroscopic programs are aimed at reaching signal-to-noise ratios adequate to measure redshifts for galaxies with AB magnitudes in the range ~24-25 in the B and R band using VIMOS, and in the z band using FORS2. Methods: The GOODS/VIMOS spectroscopic campaign is structured in two separate surveys using two different VIMOS grisms. The VIMOS Low Resolution Blue (LR-Blue) and Medium Resolution (MR) orange grisms have been used to cover different redshift ranges. The LR-Blue campaign is aimed at observing galaxies mainly at 1.8 < z < 3.5, while the MR campaign mainly aims at galaxies at z < 1 and Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) at z > 3.5. Results: The full GOODS/VIMOS spectroscopic campaign consists of 20 VIMOS masks. This release adds 8 new masks to the previous release (12 masks, Popesso et al. 2009, A&A, 494, 443). In total we obtained 5052 spectra, 3634 from the 10 LR-Blue masks and 1418 from the 10 MR masks. A significant fraction of the extracted spectra comes from serendipitously observed sources: ~21% in the LR-Blue and ~16% in the MR masks. We obtained 2242 redshifts in the LR-Blue campaign and 976 in the MR campaign for a total success rate of 62% and 69% respectively, which increases to 66% and 73% if only primary targets are considered. The typical redshift uncertainty is estimated to be σz ≃ 0.00084 (~255 km s-1) for the LR-Blue grism and σz ≃ 0.00040 (~120 km s-1) for the MR grism. By complementing our VIMOS spectroscopic catalog with all existing spectroscopic redshifts publicly available in the CDFS, we compiled a redshift master catalog with 7332 entries, which we used to investigate large scale structures out to z ≃ 3.7. We produced stacked spectra of LBGs in a few bins of equivalent width

  15. Tin-polymetallic sulfide deposits in the eastern part of the Dachang tin field (South China) and the role of black shales in their origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pašava, Jan; Kříbek, Bohdan; Dobeš, Petr; Vavřín, Ivan; Žák, Karel; Delian, Fan; Tao, Zhang; Boiron, Marie-Christine

    2003-01-01

    The Dafulou and Huile vein and stratabound cassiterite-sulfide deposits and sheeted ore veins at the Kangma cassiterite-sulfide deposit are located in the eastern part of the Dachang tin field. These deposits are hosted in a sedimentary sequence containing significant concentrations of organic matter in the form of Lower Devonian calcareous black shales and hornfels. These rocks together with the younger intrusion of Longxianggai granite (91±2 Ma) actively participated in the formation of Sn-polymetallic deposits. The following three major stages have been distinguished in stratiform and vein-type orebodies at Dafulou, Huile and Kangma: stage I (cassiterite, pyrrhotite, arsenopyrite, tourmaline, carbonate), stage II - main sulfide stage (quartz, cassiterite, arsenopyrite, pyrrhotite, sphalerite, stannite, pyrite, carbonates) and stage III (native Bi, galena, electrum, sulfosalts). Stage IV (post-ore), recognized at Huile is represented by barren carbonates and zeolites. Whole rock geochemistry has revealed that at Dafulou, Bi and Cu correlate strongly with S, whereas V and Pb correlate well with Corg (organic carbon). The similar distribution patterns of selected elements in average slightly mineralized low-Ca black shales indicate a fluid composition similar for all deposits studied. Studies of graphitization of the organic matter in black shales adjacent to orebodies indicate that d(002) and FWHM (full width in half maximum)/peak height values gradually decrease in the following sequence: Dafulou deposit → Kangma deposit → Huile deposit. The pyrolysate of wall rocks at the Dafulou deposit is relatively enriched in asphaltenes and maltenes (55.6-72.0% of the pyrolysate) comparable with pyrolysate obtained from more distal black shales (19.2-28.5%). Typical GC-MS spectra of pyrolysate from distal black shales are dominated by alkanes in the n-C15 to n-C25 range, aromatic molecules being represented mostly by alkyl-naphthalenes. In contrast, only traces of

  16. Fast sorption measurements of volatile organic compounds on building materials: Part 1 – Methodology developed for field applications

    PubMed Central

    Rizk, M.; Verriele, M.; Dusanter, S.; Schoemaecker, C.; Le Calve, S.; Locoge, N.

    2016-01-01

    A Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS) has been coupled to the outlet of a Field and Laboratory Emission Cell (FLEC), to measure volatile organic compounds (VOC) concentration during a sorption experiments (Rizk et al., this issue) [1]. The limits of detection of the PTR-MS for three VOCs are presented for different time resolution (2, 10 and 20 s). The mass transfer coefficient was calculated in the FLEC cavity for the different flow rates. The concentration profile obtained from a sorption experiment performed on a gypsum board and a vinyl flooring are also presented in comparison with the profile obtained for a Pyrex glass used as a material that do not present any sorption behavior (no sink). Finally, the correlation between the concentration of VOCs adsorbed on the surface of the gypsum board at equilibrium (Cse) and the concentration of VOCs Ce measured in the gas phase at equilibrium is presented for benzene, C8 aromatics and toluene. PMID:26937475

  17. Fast sorption measurements of volatile organic compounds on building materials: Part 1 - Methodology developed for field applications.

    PubMed

    Rizk, M; Verriele, M; Dusanter, S; Schoemaecker, C; Le Calve, S; Locoge, N

    2016-03-01

    A Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS) has been coupled to the outlet of a Field and Laboratory Emission Cell (FLEC), to measure volatile organic compounds (VOC) concentration during a sorption experiments (Rizk et al., this issue) [1]. The limits of detection of the PTR-MS for three VOCs are presented for different time resolution (2, 10 and 20 s). The mass transfer coefficient was calculated in the FLEC cavity for the different flow rates. The concentration profile obtained from a sorption experiment performed on a gypsum board and a vinyl flooring are also presented in comparison with the profile obtained for a Pyrex glass used as a material that do not present any sorption behavior (no sink). Finally, the correlation between the concentration of VOCs adsorbed on the surface of the gypsum board at equilibrium (Cse ) and the concentration of VOCs Ce measured in the gas phase at equilibrium is presented for benzene, C8 aromatics and toluene. PMID:26937475

  18. Development and evaluation of methods for starch dissolution using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation. Part II: Dissolution of amylose.

    PubMed

    Perez-Rea, Daysi; Bergenståhl, Björn; Nilsson, Lars

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate whether dissolution in water under autoclaving conditions (140 °C, 20 min) or in dimethyl sulfoxide, DMSO (100 °C, 1 h), is preferable for characterization of amylose. Two types of amylose, potato and maize, were dissolved either in water using an autoclave or in DMSO. On the aqueous solutions obtained, the extent of molecular dissolution of the sample (referred to as the dissolution yield) was determined by enzymatic analysis as well as the molecular properties, such as molar mass and root-mean-square radius, obtained with asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation coupled to multi-angle light scattering and differential refractive index detection (AF4-MALS-dRI). The results showed that both dissolution methods are efficient at dissolving amylose. However, AF4-MALS-dRI analysis revealed substantial differences. Amylose aqueous solutions obtained by dissolution in DMSO were relatively stable over time, but the dissolution method in autoclave caused some degradation of the molecules, and their solutions display a high tendency to retrograde. PMID:26232931

  19. Development and evaluation of methods for starch dissolution using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation. Part I: Dissolution of amylopectin.

    PubMed

    Perez-Rea, Daysi; Bergenståhl, Björn; Nilsson, Lars

    2015-06-01

    We have investigated methods of starch dissolution with the aim of finding an optimum method to completely dissolve starch granules to form a molecularly dissolved starch solution without degradation of the polymers. Glycogen was used as a model molecule for amylopectin, to identify the dissolution conditions under which the degradation of the polymers was limited or not present. Dissolution was performed in water with temperatures up to 200 °C, facilitated by the use of heating in an autoclave or a microwave oven, or in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) at 100 °C. Waxy maize starch was chosen due to its high content of amylopectin and very low content of amylose. The degree of starch dissolution under different conditions was determined enzymatically. The effect of different dissolution conditions on the molar mass and root-mean-square radius of the polymers was determined with asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation coupled to multi-angle light scattering and differential refractive index (AF4-MALS-dRI) detectors under aqueous conditions. The results suggest that reliable and accurate size separation and characterization of amylopectin can be obtained by dissolution of starch granules in an aqueous environment at 140 °C by autoclaving or in DMSO at 100 °C. The results also clearly show an upper limit for heat treatment of starch, above which degradation cannot be avoided. PMID:25925852

  20. African, southern Indian and South American cratons were not part of the Rodinia supercontinent: evidence from field relationships and geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröner, Alfred; Cordani, Umberto

    2003-11-01

    We discuss the question whether the late Mesoproterozoic and early Neoproterozoic rocks of eastern, central and southern Africa, Madagascar, southern India, Sri Lanka and South America have played any role in the formation and dispersal of the supercontinent Rodinia, believed to have existed between about 1000 and 750 Ma ago. First, there is little evidence for the production of significant volumes of ~1.4-1.0 Ga (Kibaran or Grenvillian age) continental crust in the Mozambique belt (MB) of East Africa, except, perhaps, in parts of northern Mozambique. This is also valid for most terranes related to West Gondwana, which are made up of basement rocks older than Mesoproterozoic, reworked in the Brasiliano/Pan-African orogenic cycle. This crust cannot be conclusively related to either magmatic accretion processes on the active margin of Rodinia or continental collision leading to amalgamation of the supercontinent. So far, no 1.4-1.0 Ga rocks have been identified in Madagascar. Secondly, there is no conclusive evidence for a ~1.0 Ga high-grade metamorphic event in the MB, although such metamorphism has been recorded in the presumed continuation of the MB in East Antarctica. In South America, even the Sunsas mobile belt, which is correlated with the Grenville belt of North America, does not include high-grade metamorphic rocks. All terranes with Mesoproterozoic ages seem to have evolved within extensional, aulacogen-type structures, and their compressional deformation, where observed, is normally much younger and is related to amalgamation of Gondwana. This is also valid for the Trans-Saharan and West Congo belts of West Africa. Third, there is also no evidence for post-1000 Ma sedimentary sequences that were deposited on the passive margin(s) of Rodinia. In contrast, the MB of East Africa and Madagascar is characterized by extensive structural reworking and metamorphic overprinting of Archaean rocks, particularly in Tanzania and Madagascar, and these rocks either