Science.gov

Sample records for field plane rotators

  1. Note: A time-resolved Kerr rotation system with a rotatable in-plane magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Xuan; Gu, Xiaofang; Ji, Yang

    2010-10-01

    A time-resolved Kerr rotation system with a rotatable in-plane magnetic field has been constructed to study anisotropic spin relaxation of electrons in semiconductors. A permanent magnet magic ring is placed on top of a motor-driven rotation stage (RS) to create the rotatable in-plane magnetic field. The RS is placed on a second translation stage to vary the local magnetic field around a sample. The in-plane magnetic field in such a system varies from 0.05 to 0.95 T, with full-round 360° rotatablity, thus offering a convenient and low-cost way to study the anisotropy of spin dynamics in semiconductors. Its performance was demonstrated via measurement of the anisotropy of the spin dephasing time (SDT) of electrons in a two-dimensional electron system embedded in a GaAs/Al0.35Ga0.65As heterostructure. The SDT with B∥[11¯0] was observed to be 10% larger than that with B∥[110], consistent with the results of others, which was measured via rotating sample.

  2. Dynamical Aspects of Mean Field Plane Rotators and the Kuramoto Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertini, Lorenzo; Giacomin, Giambattista; Pakdaman, Khashayar

    2010-02-01

    The Kuramoto model has been introduced in order to describe synchronization phenomena observed in groups of cells, individuals, circuits, etc. We look at the Kuramoto model with white noise forces: in mathematical terms it is a set of N oscillators, each driven by an independent Brownian motion with a constant drift, that is each oscillator has its own frequency, which, in general, changes from one oscillator to another (these frequencies are usually taken to be random and they may be viewed as a quenched disorder). The interactions between oscillators are of long range type (mean field). We review some results on the Kuramoto model from a statistical mechanics standpoint: we give in particular necessary and sufficient conditions for reversibility and we point out a formal analogy, in the N→∞ limit, with local mean field models with conservative dynamics (an analogy that is exploited to identify in particular a Lyapunov functional in the reversible set-up). We then focus on the reversible Kuramoto model with sinusoidal interactions in the N→∞ limit and analyze the stability of the non-trivial stationary profiles arising when the interaction parameter K is larger than its critical value K c . We provide an analysis of the linear operator describing the time evolution in a neighborhood of the synchronized profile: we exhibit a Hilbert space in which this operator has a self-adjoint extension and we establish, as our main result, a spectral gap inequality for every K> K c .

  3. Turbulent plane Couette flow subject to strong system rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bech, Knut H.; Andersson, Helge I.

    1997-09-01

    System rotation is known to substantially affect the mean flow pattern as well as the turbulence structure in rotating channel flows. In a numerical study of plane Couette flow rotating slowly about an axis aligned with the mean vorticity, Bech & Andersson (1996a) found that the turbulence level was damped in the presence of anticyclonic system rotation, in spite of the occurrence of longitudinal counter-rotating roll cells. Moreover, the turbulence anisotropy was practically unaffected by the weak rotation, for which the rotation number Ro, defined as the ratio of twice the imposed angular vorticity [Omega] to the shear rate of the corresponding laminar flow, was ±0.01. The aim of the present paper is to explore the effects of stronger anticyclonic system rotation on directly simulated turbulent plane Couette flow. Turbulence statistics like energy, enstrophy and Taylor lengthscales, both componental and directional, were computed from the statistically steady flow fields and supplemented by structural information obtained by conditional sampling.

  4. Rotation Measures of Extragalactic Sources behind the Southern Galactic Plane: New Insights into the Large-Scale Magnetic Field of the Inner Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. C.; Haverkorn, M.; Gaensler, B. M.; Taylor, A. R.; Bizunok, N. S.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Dickey, J. M.; Green, A. J.

    2007-07-01

    We present new Faraday rotation measures (RMs) for 148 extragalactic radio sources behind the southern Galactic plane (253deg<=l<=356deg, |b|<=1.5deg), and use these data in combination with published data to probe the large-scale structure of the Milky Way's magnetic field. We show that the magnitudes of these RMs oscillate with longitude in a manner that correlates with the locations of the Galactic spiral arms. The observed pattern in RMs requires the presence of at least one large-scale magnetic reversal in the fourth Galactic quadrant, located between the Sagittarius-Carina and Scutum-Crux spiral arms. To quantitatively compare our measurements to other recent studies, we consider all available extragalactic and pulsar RMs in the region we have surveyed, and jointly fit these data to simple models in which the large-scale field follows the spiral arms. In the best-fitting model, the magnetic field in the fourth Galactic quadrant is directed clockwise in the Sagittarius-Carina spiral arm (as viewed from the north Galactic pole), but is oriented counterclockwise in the Scutum-Crux arm. This contrasts with recent analyses of pulsar RMs alone, in which the fourth-quadrant field was presumed to be directed counterclockwise in the Sagittarius-Carina arm. Also in contrast to recent pulsar RM studies, our joint modeling of pulsar and extragalactic RMs demonstrates that large numbers of large-scale magnetic field reversals are not required to account for observations.

  5. Comparing viewer and array mental rotations in different planes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, M.; Proffitt, D. R.; Kaiser, M. K. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Participants imagined rotating either themselves or an array of objects that surrounded them. Their task was to report on the egocentric position of an item in the array following the imagined rotation. The dependent measures were response latency and number of errors committed. Past research has shown that self-rotation is easier than array rotation. However, we found that imagined egocentric rotations were as difficult to imagine as rotations of the environment when people performed imagined rotations in the midsagittal or coronal plane. The advantages of imagined self-rotations are specific to mental rotations performed in the transverse plane.

  6. Flow field survey near the rotational plane of an advanced design propeller on a JetStar airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, K. R.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to obtain upper fuselage surface static pressures and boundary layer velocity profiles below the centerline of an advanced design propeller. This investigation documents the upper fuselage velocity flow field in support of the in-flight acoustic tests conducted on a JetStar airplane. Initial results of the boundary layer survey show evidence of an unusual flow disturbance, which is attributed to the two windshield wiper assemblies on the aircraft. The assemblies were removed, eliminating the disturbances from the flow field. This report presents boundary layer velocity profiles at altitudes of 6096 and 9144 m (20,000 and 30,000 ft) and Mach numbers from 0.6 to 0.8, and it investigated the effects of windshield wiper assemblies on these profiles. Because of the unconventional velocity profiles that were obtained with the assemblies mounted, classical boundary layer parameters, such as momentum and displacement thicknesses, are not presented. The effects of flight test variables (Mach number and angles of attack and sideslip) and an advanced design propeller on boundary layer profiles - with the wiper assemblies mounted and removed - are presented.

  7. Turbulent rotating plane Couette flow: Reynolds and rotation number dependency of flow structure and momentum transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, Takuya; Alfredsson, P. Henrik

    2016-07-01

    Plane Couette flow under spanwise, anticyclonic system rotation [rotating plane Couette flow (RPCF)] is studied experimentally using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry for different Reynolds and rotation numbers in the fully turbulent regime. Similar to the laminar regime, the turbulent flow in RPCF is characterized by roll cells, however both instantaneous snapshots of the velocity field and space correlations show that the roll cell structure varies with the rotation number. All three velocity components are measured and both the mean flow and all four nonzero Reynolds stresses are obtained across the central parts of the channel. This also allows us to determine the wall shear stress from the viscous stress and the Reynolds stress in the center of the channel, and for low rotation rates the wall shear stress increases with increasing rotation rate as expected. The results show that zero absolute vorticity is established in the central parts of the channel of turbulent RPCF for high enough rotation rates, but also that the mean velocity profile for certain parameter ranges shows an S shape giving rise to a negative velocity gradient in the center of the channel. We find that from an analysis of the Reynolds stress transport equation using the present data there is a transport of the Reynolds shear stress towards the center of the channel, which may then result in a negative mean velocity gradient there.

  8. Apodised aperture using rotation of plane of polarization

    DOEpatents

    Simmons, W.W.; Leppelmeier, G.W.; Johnson, B.C.

    1975-09-01

    An apodised aperture based on the rotation of plane of polarization producing desirable characteristics on a transmitted light beam such as beam profiling in high flux laser amplifier chains is described. The apodised aperture is made with a lossless element by using one or more polarizers and/or analyzers and magneto-optical Faraday means for selectively rotating the plane of polarized radiation over the cross section to effect the desired apodisation. (auth)

  9. In-plane rotation of magnetic stripe domains in Fe1 -xGax thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fin, S.; Tomasello, R.; Bisero, D.; Marangolo, M.; Sacchi, M.; Popescu, H.; Eddrief, M.; Hepburn, C.; Finocchio, G.; Carpentieri, M.; Rettori, A.; Pini, M. G.; Tacchi, S.

    2015-12-01

    The in-plane rotation of magnetic stripe domains in a 65-nm magnetostrictive Fe0.8Ga0.2 epitaxial film was investigated combining magnetic force microscopy, vibration sample magnetometry, and x-ray resonant magnetic scattering measurements. We analyzed the behavior of the stripe pattern under the application of a bias magnetic field along the in-plane direction perpendicular to the stripe axis, and made a comparison with the analogous behavior at remanence. The experimental results have been explained by means of micromagnetic simulations, supported by energy balance considerations. Fields smaller than ˜400 Oe do not induce any stripe rotation; rather, a deformation of the closure domains pattern was evidenced. Larger fields produce a sudden rotation of the stripe structure.

  10. Clocking Surface Reaction by In-Plane Product Rotation.

    PubMed

    Anggara, Kelvin; Huang, Kai; Leung, Lydie; Chatterjee, Avisek; Cheng, Fang; Polanyi, John C

    2016-06-15

    Electron-induced reaction of physisorbed meta-diiodobenzene (mDIB) on Cu(110) at 4.6 K was studied by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and molecular dynamics theory. Single-electron dissociation of the first C-I bond led to in-plane rotation of an iodophenyl (IPh) intermediate, whose motion could be treated as a "clock" of the reaction dynamics. Alternative reaction mechanisms, successive and concerted, were observed giving different product distributions. In the successive mechanism, two electrons successively broke single C-I bonds; the first C-I bond breaking yielded IPh that rotated directionally by three different angles, with the second C-I bond breaking giving chemisorbed I atoms (#2) at three preferred locations corresponding to the C-I bond alignments in the prior rotated IPh configurations. In the concerted mechanism a single electron broke two C-I bonds, giving two chemisorbed I atoms; significantly these were found at angles corresponding to the C-I bond direction for unrotated mDIB. Molecular dynamics accounted for the difference in reaction outcomes between the successive and the concerted mechanisms in terms of the time required for the IPh to rotate in-plane; in successive reaction the time delay between first and second C-I bond-breaking events allowed the IPh to rotate, whereas in concerted reaction the computed delay between excitation and reaction (∼1 ps) was too short for molecular rotation before the second C-I bond broke. The dependence of the extent of motion at a surface on the delay between first and second bond breaking suggested a novel means to "clock" sub-picosecond dynamics by imaging the products arising from varying time delays between impacting pairs of electrons. PMID:27191189

  11. Rotating superconductor magnet for producing rotating lobed magnetic field lines

    DOEpatents

    Hilal, Sadek K.; Sampson, William B.; Leonard, Edward F.

    1978-01-01

    This invention provides a rotating superconductor magnet for producing a rotating lobed magnetic field, comprising a cryostat; a superconducting magnet in the cryostat having a collar for producing a lobed magnetic field having oppositely directed adjacent field lines; rotatable support means for selectively rotating the superconductor magnet; and means for energizing the superconductor magnet.

  12. Hysteresis in rotation magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanyi, Amalia

    2000-01-01

    The different properties of the vector Jiles-Atherton hysteresis operator is proved under forced H- and B-field supply. Feeding the magnetic material with alternating and circular polarised rotational excitation, the different properties of the model under the input field intensity and the flux density are investigated and the results are proved in figures.

  13. Gravitomagnetic field of rotating rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, Matteo Luca

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the so-called gravitoelectromagnetic formalism, according to which the equations of the gravitational field can be written in analogy with classical electromagnetism, we study the gravitomagnetic field of a rotating ring, orbiting around a central body. We calculate the gravitomagnetic component of the field, both in the intermediate zone between the ring and the central body, and far away from the ring and central body. We evaluate the impact of the gravitomagnetic field on the motion of test particles and, as an application, we study the possibility of using these results, together with the Solar System ephemeris, to infer information on the spin of ring-like structures.

  14. Split-field pupil plane determination apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Salmon, Joseph T.

    1996-01-01

    A split-field pupil plane determination apparatus (10) having a wedge assembly (16) with a first glass wedge (18) and a second glass wedge (20) positioned to divide a laser beam (12) into a first laser beam half (22) and a second laser beam half (24) which diverge away from the wedge assembly (16). A wire mask (26) is positioned immediately after the wedge assembly (16) in the path of the laser beam halves (22, 24) such that a shadow thereof is cast as a first shadow half (30) and a second shadow half (32) at the input to a relay telescope (14). The relay telescope (14) causes the laser beam halves (22, 24) to converge such that the first shadow half (30) of the wire mask (26) is aligned with the second shadow half (32) at any subsequent pupil plane (34).

  15. Detecting an in-plane rotation of magnetization in GdFeCo films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoveyda, Farzaneh; Smadici, Serban

    It is often important to distinguish between magnetization reversal by coherent rotation in different planes and domain wall motion. Magnetization curves were measured at different temperatures with magneto-optical Kerr Effect in longitudinal (L-MOKE) and polar (P-MOKE) geometries on sputter-deposited GdxFeyCo1 - x - y (GFC) films of variable thickness. Depending on the probed region, the L-MOKE signal measured with decreasing external field Hext was found to be lower than the signal observed with increasing Hext (negative remanence magnetization). We show that this is due to a contribution to the signal of M⊥ , the magnetization component perpendicular to the scattering plane. This identifies the type of reversal in these GFC films as in-plane coherent rotation of magnetization. M⊥ is also proportional to the torque. Azimuthal measurements on Co2FeAl samples showed a regular variation of the MOKE signal, in one possible application of these observations to torque measurements. Work supported by the University of Louisville Research Foundation.

  16. Rotating real-valued functions in the plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, Daniel; Fera, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    Let f be a real-valued function defined over a subset of ?. In the following article, we investigate the graph of f under rotation by a fixed angle about the origin. In particular, we give necessary and sufficient conditions on the angles of rotation which result in an image that still describes a function. We include several illuminating examples and use the converse of the mean value theorem to extend previously known results.

  17. Uniform stress fields inside multiple inclusions in an elastic infinite plane under plane deformation

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Ming; Gao, Cun-Fa; Ru, C. Q.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple elastic inclusions with uniform internal stress fields in an infinite elastic matrix are constructed under given uniform remote in-plane loadings. The method is based on the sufficient and necessary condition imposed on the boundary value of a holomorphic function that guarantees the existence of the holomorphic function in a multiply connected region. The unknown shape of each of the multiple inclusions is characterized by a conformal mapping. This work focuses on a major large class of multiple inclusions characterized by a simple condition that covers and is much beyond the known related results reported in previous works. Extensive examples of multiple inclusions with or without geometrical symmetry are shown. Our results showed that the inclusion shapes obtained for the uniformity of internal stress fields are independent of the remote loading only when all of the multiple inclusions have the same shear modulus as that of the matrix. Moreover, specific conditions are derived on remote loading, elastic constants of the inclusions and uniform internal stress fields, which guarantee the existence of multiple symmetric inclusions or multiple rotationally symmetrical inclusions with uniform internal stress fields.

  18. Flow Transitions in a Rotating Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Mazuruk, K.

    1996-01-01

    Critical Rayleigh numbers have been measured in a liquid metal cylinder of finite height in the presence of a rotating magnetic field. Several different stability regimes were observed, which were determined by the values of the Rayleigh and Hartmann numbers. For weak rotating magnetic fields and small Rayleigh numbers, the experimental observations can be explained by the existence of a single non-axisymmetric meridional roll rotating around the cylinder, driven by the azimuthal component of the magnetic field. The measured dependence of rotational velocity on magnetic field strength is consistent with the existence of laminar flow in this regime.

  19. Estimation of the in-plane vibrations of a rotating spindle, using out-of-plane laser vibrometry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatar, Kourosh; Gren, Per

    2016-05-01

    A method for estimating the in-plane vibrations of a rotating spindle using out-of-plane laser vibrometry measurements is described. This method enables the possibility to obtain the two orthogonal radial vibration components of a rotating spindle. The method uses the fact that the laser vibrometer signal is a total surface velocity of the measurement point in the laser direction. Measurements are conducted on a rotating milling machine spindle. The spindle is excited in a controlled manner by an active magnetic bearing and the response is measured by laser vibrometer in one of the two orthogonal directions and inductive displacement sensors in two orthogonal directions simultaneously. The work shows how the laser vibrometry crosstalk can be used for resolving the in-plane vibration component, that is the vibrations in the laser vibrometer cross direction. The result is compared to independent measurement signals from the displacement sensors. The measurement method can be used for vibration measurements on rotating parts, for example, where there is lack of space for orthogonal measurements.

  20. Boundary Layer Flow over a Rotating Permeable Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, K.; Rao, K.

    1994-06-01

    This paper examines the effect of permeability on boundary layerflow over an infinite permeable bed rotatingin a mass of still fluid occupying the upper half space.The slip boundar condition proposed by Beavers and Joseph1) isemployed to analyse the dynamic coupling of boundary layer flowwith the Darcy flow induced in the bed due to transfer of momentumby seepage into the porous medium,occupying the lower half space below the fluid.The effect of permeability and rotation on the componentsof slip velocity and shear stress in the radialand transverse directions is examined.Rotation and tangential slip are found to cause axial flow reversalin the boundary layer.Dependence of the location of point of flow reversalon rotation and permeability has been also studied.

  1. Rotational Analysis of Phase Plane Curves: Complex and Pure Imaginary Eigenvalues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Russell H.

    2005-01-01

    Although the phase plane can be plotted and analyzed using an appropriate software package, the author found it worthwhile to engage the students with the theorem and the two proofs. The theorem is a powerful tool that provides insight into the rotational behavior of the phase plane diagram in a simple way: just check the signs of c and [alpha].…

  2. RoboPol: optical polarization-plane rotations and flaring activity in blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blinov, D.; Pavlidou, V.; Papadakis, I. E.; Hovatta, T.; Pearson, T. J.; Liodakis, I.; Panopoulou, G. V.; Angelakis, E.; Baloković, M.; Das, H.; Khodade, P.; Kiehlmann, S.; King, O. G.; Kus, A.; Kylafis, N.; Mahabal, A.; Marecki, A.; Modi, D.; Myserlis, I.; Paleologou, E.; Papamastorakis, I.; Pazderska, B.; Pazderski, E.; Rajarshi, C.; Ramaprakash, A.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Reig, P.; Tassis, K.; Zensus, J. A.

    2016-04-01

    We present measurements of rotations of the optical polarization of blazars during the second year of operation of RoboPol, a monitoring programme of an unbiased sample of gamma-ray bright blazars specially designed for effective detection of such events, and we analyse the large set of rotation events discovered in two years of observation. We investigate patterns of variability in the polarization parameters and total flux density during the rotation events and compare them to the behaviour in a non-rotating state. We have searched for possible correlations between average parameters of the polarization-plane rotations and average parameters of polarization, with the following results: (1) there is no statistical association of the rotations with contemporaneous optical flares; (2) the average fractional polarization during the rotations tends to be lower than that in a non-rotating state; (3) the average fractional polarization during rotations is correlated with the rotation rate of the polarization plane in the jet rest frame; (4) it is likely that distributions of amplitudes and durations of the rotations have physical upper bounds, so arbitrarily long rotations are not realized in nature.

  3. In-plane rotation of the doubly coupled photonic crystal nanobeam cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tong; Tian, Feng; Zhang, Wei; Zou, Yongchao; Chau, Fook Siong; Deng, Jie; Zhou, Guangya

    2016-05-01

    In this letter, a nano-electro-mechanical-systems (NEMS) mechanism is proposed to drive the in-plane rotation of the doubly coupled photonic crystal (PhC) nanobeam cavities. The corresponding interactions between optical resonances and rotations are investigated. This is the first in-plane rotational tuning of the PhC cavities, which benefits from the flexible design of NEMS actuators. In experiments, more than 18 linewidths of the third order TE even mode corresponding to 0.037 mrad of the shrinking angle between the two nanobeam cavities are demonstrated; this study provides one more mechanical degree of freedom for the practical optomechanical interactions.

  4. Faster in-plane switching and reduced rotational viscosity characteristics in a graphene-nematic suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Rajratan; Kinnamon, Daniel; Skaggs, Nicole; Womack, James

    2016-05-01

    The in-plane switching (IPS) for a nematic liquid crystal (LC) was found to be considerably faster when the LC was doped with dilute concentrations of monolayer graphene flakes. Additional studies revealed that the presence of graphene reduced the rotational viscosity of the LC, permitting the nematic director to respond quicker in IPS mode on turning the electric field on. The studies were carried out with several graphene concentrations in the LC, and the experimental results coherently suggest that there exists an optimal concentration of graphene, allowing a reduction in the IPS response time and rotational viscosity in the LC. Above this optimal graphene concentration, the rotational viscosity was found to increase, and consequently, the LC no longer switched faster in IPS mode. The presence of graphene suspension was also found to decrease the LC's pretilt angle significantly due to the π-π electron stacking between the LC molecules and graphene flakes. To understand the π-π stacking interaction, the anchoring mechanism of the LC on a CVD grown monolayer graphene film on copper substrate was studied by reflected crossed polarized microscopy. Optical microphotographs revealed that the LC alignment direction depended on monolayer graphene's hexagonal crystal structure and its orientation.

  5. Far-field patterns of spaceborne antennas from plane-polar near-field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahmat-Samii, Y.; Gatti, M. S.

    1985-01-01

    Certain unique features of a recently constructed plane-polar near-field measurement facility for determining the far-field patterns of large and fragile spaceborne antennas are described. In this facility, the horizontally positioned antenna rotates about its axis while the measuring probe is advanced incrementally in a fixed radial direction. The near-field measured data is then processed using a Jacobi-Bessel expansion to obtain the antenna far fields. A summary of the measurement and computational steps is given. Comparisons between the outdoor far-field measurements and the constructed far-field patterns from the near-field measured data are provided for different antenna sizes and frequencies. Application of the substitution method for the absolute gain measurement is discussed. In particular, results are shown for the 4.8-m mesh-deployable high-gain antenna of the Galileo spacecraft which has the mission of orbiting Jupiter in 1988.

  6. Rotationally Vibrating Electric-Field Mill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkham, Harold

    2008-01-01

    A proposed instrument for measuring a static electric field would be based partly on a conventional rotating-split-cylinder or rotating-split-sphere electric-field mill. However, the design of the proposed instrument would overcome the difficulty, encountered in conventional rotational field mills, of transferring measurement signals and power via either electrical or fiber-optic rotary couplings that must be aligned and installed in conjunction with rotary bearings. Instead of being made to rotate in one direction at a steady speed as in a conventional rotational field mill, a split-cylinder or split-sphere electrode assembly in the proposed instrument would be set into rotational vibration like that of a metronome. The rotational vibration, synchronized with appropriate rapid electronic switching of electrical connections between electric-current-measuring circuitry and the split-cylinder or split-sphere electrodes, would result in an electrical measurement effect equivalent to that of a conventional rotational field mill. A version of the proposed instrument is described.

  7. Rhomboid prism pair for rotating the plane of parallel light beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orloff, K. L. (Inventor); Yanagita, H.

    1982-01-01

    An optical system is described for rotating the plane defined by a pair of parallel light beams. In one embodiment a single pair of rhomboid prisms have their respective input faces disposed to receive the respective input beams. Each prism is rotated about an axis of revolution coaxial with each of the respective input beams by means of a suitable motor and gear arrangement to cause the plane of the parallel output beams to be rotated relative to the plane of the input beams. In a second embodiment, two pairs of rhomboid prisms are provided. In a first angular orientation of the output beams, the prisms merely decrease the lateral displacement of the output beams in order to keep in the same plane as the input beams. In a second angular orientation of the prisms, the input faces of the second pair of prisms are brought into coincidence with the input beams for rotating the plane of the output beams by a substantial angle such as 90 deg.

  8. Hip rotation angle is associated with frontal plane knee joint mechanics during running.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Masanori; Shimizu, Norifumi; Yanai, Toshimasa; Stefanyshyn, Darren J; Kawakami, Yasuo

    2015-02-01

    Inability to control lower extremity segments in the frontal and transverse planes resulting in large knee abduction angle and increased internal knee abduction impulse has been associated with patellofemoral pain (PFP). However, the influence of hip rotation angles on frontal plane knee joint kinematics and kinetics remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to explore how hip rotation angles are related to frontal plane knee joint kinematics and kinetics during running. Seventy runners participated in this study. Three-dimensional marker positions and ground reaction forces were recorded with an 8-camera motion analysis system and a force plate while subjects ran along a 25-m runway at a speed of 4m/s. Knee abduction, hip rotation and toe-out angles, frontal plane lever arm at the knee, internal knee abduction moment and impulse, ground reaction forces and the medio-lateral distance from the ankle joint center to the center of pressure (AJC-CoP) were quantified. The findings of this study indicate that greater hip external rotation angles were associated with greater toe-out angles, longer AJC-CoP distances, smaller internal knee abduction impulses with shorter frontal plane lever arms and greater knee abduction angles. Thus, there appears to exist a conflict between kinematic and kinetic risk factors of PFP, and hip external rotation angle may be a key factor to control frontal plane knee joint kinematics and kinetics. These results may help provide an appropriate manipulation and/or intervention on running style to reduce the risk of PFP. PMID:25572723

  9. Symmetry breaking in spin spirals and skyrmions by in-plane and canted magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, L.; Hagemeister, J.; Hsu, P.-J.; Kubetzka, A.; von Bergmann, K.; Wiesendanger, R.

    2016-07-01

    The influence of in-plane and canted magnetic fields on spin spirals and skyrmions in atomic bilayer islands of palladium and iron on an Ir(111) substrate is investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy at low temperatures. It is shown that the spin spiral propagation direction is determined by the island’s border which can be explained by equilibrium state calculations on a triangular lattice. We find a different response of spin spirals to in-plane magnetic fields for a propagation direction parallel to the applied field as compared to perpendicular, which originates from their cycloidal nature. As a result, the spin spiral propagation direction may be reorientated by in-plane fields. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that also skyrmions are distorted in canted fields which allows to determine the sense of magnetization rotation as enforced by the interfacial Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction.

  10. Verification of theoretically computed spectra for a point rotating in a vertical plane

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, D.C.; Connell, J.R.; George, R.L.

    1985-03-01

    A theoretical model is modified and tested that produces the power spectrum of the alongwind component of turbulence as experienced by a point rotating in a vertical plane perpendicular to the mean wind direction. The ability to generate such a power spectrum, independent of measurement, is important in wind turbine design and testing. The radius of the circle of rotation, its height above the ground, and the rate of rotation are typical for those for a MOD-OA wind turbine. Verification of this model is attempted by comparing two sets of variances that correspond to individual harmonic bands of spectra of turbulence in the rotational frame. One set of variances is calculated by integrating the theoretically generated rotational spectra; the other is calculated by integrating rotational spectra from real data analysis. The theoretical spectrum is generated by Fourier transformation of an autocorrelation function taken from von Karman and modified for the rotational frame. The autocorrelation is based on dimensionless parameters, each of which incorporates both atmospheric and wind turbine parameters. The real data time series are formed by sampling around the circle of anemometers of the Vertical Plane Array at the former MOD-OA site at Clayton, New Mexico.

  11. An evaluation of the rotation of electrodes in multi-plane electrical capacitance tomography sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jiamin; Mao, Mingxu; Wang, Haigang; Yang, Wuqiang

    2015-12-01

    The structure of electrodes in a multi-plane electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) sensor is vital for obtaining high-quality capacitance measurements and good images. In this paper, issues with the relative position of electrodes on each plane in three-plane ECT sensors are discussed. Five ECT sensors with different structures are compared by numerical simulation. For the five sensors, the electrodes on the second and third planes are arranged with rotation angles of 0° and 0°, 0° and 15°, 0° and 30°, 0° and 45°, and 22.5° and 45°, respectively, relative to the electrodes on the first plane. The capacitance data obtained from different sensors by numerical simulation are used for image reconstruction using linear back projection and Landweber iteration algorithms. The image quality is evaluated quantitatively in terms of image error. The sensitivity distributions of all the ECT sensors are compared. The effect of the rotation angles of electrodes on the stability of measured capacitance and on the image quality is also evaluated by experiment. The main conclusion is that the electrodes with no rotation angle should be chosen.

  12. The orthogonal planes split of quaternions and its relation to quaternion geometry of rotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitzer, Eckhard

    2015-04-01

    Recently the general orthogonal planes split with respect to any two pure unit quaternions f,g ∈ H, f2 = g2 = -1, including the case f = g, has proved extremely useful for the construction and geometric interpretation of general classes of double-kernel quaternion Fourier transformations (QFT) [7]. Applications include color image processing, where the orthogonal planes split with f = g = the grayline, naturally splits a pure quaternionic three-dimensional color signal into luminance and chrominance components. Yet it is found independently in the quaternion geometry of rotations [3], that the pure quaternion units f, g and the analysis planes, which they define, play a key role in the geometry of rotations, and the geometrical interpretation of integrals related to the spherical Radon transform of probability density functions of unit quaternions, as relevant for texture analysis in crystallography. In our contribution we further investigate these connections.

  13. Rotating copper plasmoid in external magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Pramod K.; Thareja, Raj K.

    2013-02-15

    Effect of nonuniform magnetic field on the expanding copper plasmoid in helium and argon gases using optical emission spectroscopy and fast imaging is presented. We report a peculiar oscillatory rotation of plasmoid in magnetic field and argon ambient. The temporal variation and appearance of the dip in the electron temperature show a direct evidence of the threading and expulsion of the magnetic field lines from the plasmoid. Rayleigh Taylor instability produced at the interface separating magnetic field and plasma is discussed.

  14. Equilibrium rotation in field-reversed configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhauer, Loren

    2008-01-15

    The turbulence that drives anomalous transport in field-reversed configurations (FRCs) is believed to break the otherwise closed magnetic surfaces inside the separatrix. This places electrons in the core of the plasma in electrical contact with those in the periphery. This effect was proposed and investigated in the context of spheromaks [D. D. Ryutov, Phys. Plasmas 14, 022506 (2007)]. The opening up of internal magnetic field lines serves to regulate the electrostatic potential in the interior of the plasma, and in turn drives ion rotation. In effect, 'end-shorting', a well-known phenomenon in the FRC scrape-off layer, also extends into the plasma interior. For conditions relevant to experiments, the ion rotation can be expressed in terms of equilibrium properties (density and temperature gradients) and as such is the 'equilibrium' rotation. This theory is incomplete in that it neglects evolving, transport-related effects that modify the equilibrium and, indirectly, the rotation rate. Consequently, the equilibrium rotation theory is only partially successful in predicting experimental results: although it predicts the average rotation well, the estimated degree of rotational shear seems unlikely, especially at late times in the plasma lifetime.

  15. Magnetic field in the plane of a physical dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, P.-M.; Grace, Alyssa L.; Hui, Kaleonui J.; Loving, Rebekah K.

    2016-07-01

    We study the magnetic field in the plane of a circular current-carrying loop. We both solve Biot–Savart’s equation numerically and perform measurements with high spatial resolution. The results extend our quantitative understanding of a physical magnetic dipole by providing an accurate and complete picture of the field in this plane, which complements existing analytical expressions valid at very small and large radius, near the loop axis, and for point dipoles.

  16. Route to Topological Superconductivity via Magnetic Field Rotation.

    PubMed

    Loder, Florian; Kampf, Arno P; Kopp, Thilo

    2015-01-01

    The verification of topological superconductivity has become a major experimental challenge. Apart from the very few spin-triplet superconductors with p-wave pairing symmetry, another candidate system is a conventional, two-dimensional (2D) s-wave superconductor in a magnetic field with a sufficiently strong Rashba spin-orbit coupling. Typically, the required magnetic field to convert the superconductor into a topologically non-trivial state is however by far larger than the upper critical field H(c2), which excludes its realization. In this article, we argue that this problem can be overcome by rotating the magnetic field into the superconducting plane. We explore the character of the superconducting state upon changing the strength and the orientation of the magnetic field and show that a topological state, established for a sufficiently strong out-of-plane magnetic field, indeed extends to an in-plane field orientation. We present a three-band model applicable to the superconducting interface between LaAlO3 and SrTiO3, which should fulfil the necessary conditions to realize a topological superconductor. PMID:26477669

  17. Route to Topological Superconductivity via Magnetic Field Rotation

    PubMed Central

    Loder, Florian; Kampf, Arno P.; Kopp, Thilo

    2015-01-01

    The verification of topological superconductivity has become a major experimental challenge. Apart from the very few spin-triplet superconductors with p-wave pairing symmetry, another candidate system is a conventional, two-dimensional (2D) s-wave superconductor in a magnetic field with a sufficiently strong Rashba spin-orbit coupling. Typically, the required magnetic field to convert the superconductor into a topologically non-trivial state is however by far larger than the upper critical field Hc2, which excludes its realization. In this article, we argue that this problem can be overcome by rotating the magnetic field into the superconducting plane. We explore the character of the superconducting state upon changing the strength and the orientation of the magnetic field and show that a topological state, established for a sufficiently strong out-of-plane magnetic field, indeed extends to an in-plane field orientation. We present a three-band model applicable to the superconducting interface between LaAlO3 and SrTiO3, which should fulfil the necessary conditions to realize a topological superconductor. PMID:26477669

  18. Rotating field mass and velocity analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Steven Joel (Inventor); Chutjian, Ara (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A rotating field mass and velocity analyzer having a cell with four walls, time dependent RF potentials that are applied to each wall, and a detector. The time dependent RF potentials create an RF field in the cell which effectively rotates within the cell. An ion beam is accelerated into the cell and the rotating RF field disperses the incident ion beam according to the mass-to-charge (m/e) ratio and velocity distribution present in the ion beam. The ions of the beam either collide with the ion detector or deflect away from the ion detector, depending on the m/e, RF amplitude, and RF frequency. The detector counts the incident ions to determine the m/e and velocity distribution in the ion beam.

  19. In-plane trapping and manipulation of ZnO nanowires by a hybrid plasmonic field.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lichao; Dou, Xiujie; Min, Changjun; Zhang, Yuquan; Du, Luping; Xie, Zhenwei; Shen, Junfeng; Zeng, Yujia; Yuan, Xiaocong

    2016-05-14

    In general, when a semiconductor nanowire is trapped by conventional laser beam tweezers, it tends to be aligned with the trapping beam axis rather than confined in the horizontal plane, and this limits the application of these nanowires in many in-plane nanoscale optoelectronic devices. In this work, we achieve the in-plane trapping and manipulation of a single ZnO nanowire by a hybrid plasmonic tweezer system on a flat metal surface. The gap between the nanowire and the metallic substrate leads to an enhanced gradient force caused by deep subwavelength optical energy confinement. As a result, the nanowire can be securely trapped in-plane at the center of the excited surface plasmon polariton field, and can also be dynamically moved and rotated by varying the position and polarization direction of the incident laser beam, which cannot be performed using conventional optical tweezers. The theoretical results show that the focused plasmonic field induces a strong in-plane trapping force and a high rotational torque on the nanowire, while the focused optical field produces a vertical trapping force to produce the upright alignment of the nanowire; this is in good agreement with the experimental results. Finally, some typical ZnO nanowire structures are built based on this technique, which thus further confirms the potential of this method for precise manipulation of components during the production of nanoelectronic and nanophotonic devices. PMID:27117313

  20. Pumping of water through carbon nanotubes by rotating electric field and rotating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-Peng; Kong, Gao-Pan; Zhang, Xing; He, Guo-Wei

    2013-09-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrate pumping of water through a carbon nanotube by applying the combination of a rotating electric field and a rotating magnetic field. The driving force is a Lorentz force generated from the motion of charges in the magnetic field, and the motion is caused by the rotation of the electric field. We find that there exits a linear relationship between the average pumping velocity v and magnetic field strength B, which can be used to control the flux of the continuous unidirectional water flow. This approach is expected to be used in liquid circulation without a pressure gradient.

  1. Rotating-frame gradient fields for magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance in low fields

    DOEpatents

    Bouchard, Louis-Serge; Pines, Alexander; Demas, Vasiliki

    2014-01-21

    A system and method for Fourier encoding a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal is disclosed. A static magnetic field B.sub.0 is provided along a first direction. An NMR signal from the sample is Fourier encoded by applying a rotating-frame gradient field B.sub.G superimposed on the B.sub.0, where the B.sub.G comprises a vector component rotating in a plane perpendicular to the first direction at an angular frequency .omega.in a laboratory frame. The Fourier-encoded NMR signal is detected.

  2. MACE-type correlation filter with controlled in-plane rotation response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Teck-Khim; Vijaya Kumar, Bhagavatula

    1996-03-01

    The circular harmonic function (CHF) correlation filter originally proposed by Hsu and Arsenault uses only one harmonic of the reference image and thus ignores much of the discriminatory information contained in the reference image. Various methods have been proposed to make use of multiple harmonics. In this work, we present a method that combines three useful objectives: using multiple circular harmonics, controlling the correlation response to in-plane rotation and minimizing the correlation plane energy in order to achieve sharp correlation peaks. Basic theory underlying this method as well as some simulation results are presented. The implications of dealing with spatially discretized images on the interpretation of CHF coefficients also is discussed.

  3. Electromechanical effects on multilayered cells in nonuniform rotating fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastián, José Luis; Muñoz, Sagrario; Sancho, Miguel; Martínez, Genoveva; Álvarez, Gabriel

    2011-07-01

    We use the Maxwell stress tensor to calculate the dielectrophoretic force and electrorotational torque acting on a realistic four-shelled model of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a nonuniform rotating electric field generated by four coplanar square electrodes. The comparison of these results with numerical calculations of the dipolar and quadrupolar contributions obtained from an integral equation for the polarization charge density shows the effect of the quadrupole contribution in the proximity of the electrode plane. We also show that under typical experimental conditions the substitution of the multilayered cell by an equivalent cell with homogeneous permittivity underestimates the quadrupole contribution to the force and torque by 1 order of magnitude.

  4. Brownian dipole rotator in alternating electric field.

    PubMed

    Rozenbaum, V M; Vovchenko, O Ye; Korochkova, T Ye

    2008-06-01

    The study addresses the azimuthal jumping motion of an adsorbed polar molecule in a periodic n -well potential under the action of an external alternating electric field. Starting from the perturbation theory of the Pauli equation with respect to the weak field intensity, explicit analytical expressions have been derived for the time dependence of the average dipole moment as well as the frequency dependences of polarizability and the average angular velocity, the three quantities exhibiting conspicuous stochastic resonance. As shown, unidirectional rotation can arise only provided simultaneous modulation of the minima and maxima of the potential by an external alternating field. For a symmetric potential of hindered rotation, the average angular velocity, if calculated by the second-order perturbation theory with respect to the field intensity, has a nonzero value only at n=2 , i.e., when two azimuthal wells specify a selected axis in the system. Particular consideration is given to the effect caused by the asymmetry of the two-well potential on the dielectric loss spectrum and other Brownian motion parameters. When the asymmetric potential in a system of dipole rotators arises from the average local fields induced by an orientational phase transition, the characteristics concerned show certain peculiarities which enable detection of the phase transition and determination of its parameters. PMID:18643221

  5. Brownian dipole rotator in alternating electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenbaum, V. M.; Vovchenko, O. Ye.; Korochkova, T. Ye.

    2008-06-01

    The study addresses the azimuthal jumping motion of an adsorbed polar molecule in a periodic n -well potential under the action of an external alternating electric field. Starting from the perturbation theory of the Pauli equation with respect to the weak field intensity, explicit analytical expressions have been derived for the time dependence of the average dipole moment as well as the frequency dependences of polarizability and the average angular velocity, the three quantities exhibiting conspicuous stochastic resonance. As shown, unidirectional rotation can arise only provided simultaneous modulation of the minima and maxima of the potential by an external alternating field. For a symmetric potential of hindered rotation, the average angular velocity, if calculated by the second-order perturbation theory with respect to the field intensity, has a nonzero value only at n=2 , i.e., when two azimuthal wells specify a selected axis in the system. Particular consideration is given to the effect caused by the asymmetry of the two-well potential on the dielectric loss spectrum and other Brownian motion parameters. When the asymmetric potential in a system of dipole rotators arises from the average local fields induced by an orientational phase transition, the characteristics concerned show certain peculiarities which enable detection of the phase transition and determination of its parameters.

  6. Plane symmetric metrics associated with semi-plane symmetric electromagnetic fields in higher dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Canbin; Tian, Guihua

    1994-11-01

    Electromagnetic fields yielding plane symmetric metrics in higher-dimensional spacetimes are exhausted and classified. It is shown that these EM fields must fall into one of the following two cases: (i)F it =F iz =0,i=1,...,n; (ii)Ftz=0. We give the general solution to the Einstein-Maxwell equations in higher dimensions corresponding to electromagnetic fields of case (ii) withF it =F iz , which covers all even-dimensional spacetimes as well as a subcase of odd-dimensional spacetimes.

  7. Interactive Visualization of Rotational Symmetry Fields on Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Jonathan; Zhang, Eugene

    2011-07-01

    Rotational symmetries (RoSys) have found uses in several computer graphics applications, such as global surface parameterization, geometry remeshing, texture and geometry synthesis, and nonphotorealistic visualization of surfaces. The visualization of N-way rotational symmetry (N-RoSy) fields is a challenging problem due to the ambiguities in the N directions represented by an N-way symmetry. We provide an algorithm that allows faithful and interactive representation of N-RoSy fields in the plane and on surfaces, by adapting the well-known line integral convolution (LIC) technique from vector and second-order tensor fields. Our algorithm captures N directions associated with each point in a given field by decomposing the field into multiple different vector fields, generating LIC images of these fields, and then blending the results. To address the loss of contrast caused by the blending of images, we observe that the pixel values in LIC images closely approximate normally distributed random variables. This allows us to use concepts from probability theory to correct the loss of contrast without the need to perform any image analysis at each frame. PMID:20855918

  8. A New Model to Produce Sagittal Plane Rotational Induced Diffuse Axonal Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Davidsson, Johan; Risling, Marten

    2011-01-01

    A new in vivo animal model that produces diffuse brain injuries in sagittal plane rearward rotational acceleration has been developed. In this model, the skull of an anesthetized adult rat is tightly secured to a rotating bar. During trauma, the bar is impacted by a striker that causes the bar and the animal head to rotate rearward; the acceleration phase last 0.4 ms and is followed by a rotation at constant speed and a gentle deceleration when the bar makes contact with a padded stop. The total head angle change is less than 30°. By adjusting the air pressure in the rifle used to accelerate the striker, resulting rotational acceleration between 0.3 and 2.1 Mrad/s2 can be produced. Numerous combinations of trauma levels, post-trauma survival times, brain and serum retrieval, and tissue preparation techniques were adopted to characterize this new model. The trauma caused subdural bleedings in animals exposed to severe trauma. Staining brain tissue with β-Amyloid Precursor Protein antibodies and FD Neurosilver that detect degenerating axons revealed wide spread axonal injuries (AI) in the corpus callosum, the border between the corpus callosum and cortex and in tracts in the brain stem. The observed AIs were apparent only when the rotational acceleration level was moderate and above. On the contrary, only limited signs of contusion injuries were observed following trauma. Macrophage invasions, glial fibrillary acidic protein redistribution or hypertrophy, and blood brain barrier (BBB) changes were unusual. S100 serum analyses indicate that blood vessel and glia cell injuries occur following moderate levels of trauma despite the absence of obvious BBB injuries. We conclude that this rotational trauma model is capable of producing graded axonal injury, is repeatable and produces limited other types of traumatic brain injuries and as such is useful in the study of injury biomechanics, diagnostics, and treatment strategies following diffuse axonal injury. PMID

  9. NMR in rotating magnetic fields: Magic angle field spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Sakellariou, D.; Meriles, C.; Martin, R.; Pines, A.

    2004-09-10

    Magic angle sample spinning has been one of the cornerstones in high-resolution solid state NMR. Spinning frequencies nowadays have increased by at least one order of magnitude over the ones used in the first experiments and the technique has gained tremendous popularity. It is currently a routine procedure in solid-state NMR, high-resolution liquid-state NMR and solid-state MRI. The technique enhances the spectral resolution by averaging away rank 2 anisotropic spin interactions thereby producing isotropic-like spectra with resolved chemical shifts and scalar couplings. Andrew proposed that it should be possible to induce similar effects in a static sample if the direction of the magnetic field is varied, e.g., magic-angle rotation of the B0 field (B0-MAS) and this has been recently demonstrated using electromagnetic field rotation. Here we discuss on the possibilities to perform field rotation using alternative hardware, together with spectroscopic methods to recover isotropic resolution even in cases where the field is not rotating at the magic angle. Extension to higher magnetic fields would be beneficial in situations where the physical manipulation of the sample is inconvenient or impossible. Such situations occur often in materials or biomedical samples where ''ex-situ'' NMR spectroscopy and imaging analysis is needed.

  10. Slowly rotating pulsars and magnetic field decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, J. L.

    1997-02-01

    Two dozen long period pulsars are separated from the swarm of ordinary pulsars by an obvious gap in the P versus Sd diagram (where Sd=log˙(P)+21.0), with a plausible upper boundary for ordinary pulsars. Possible pulsar evolutionary tracks are discussed to explain the diagram in terms of previously suggested scenarios of magnetic field decay. The (P-Sd) diagram is difficult to understand if there is no magnetic field decay during the active life of pulsars. However, if the magnetic fields of neutron stars decay exponentially, almost all slowly rotating pulsars must have been injected with a very long initial spin period of about 2 seconds, which seems impossible. Based on qualitative analyses, it is concluded that magnetic fields of neutron stars decay as a power-law, with a time scale related to the initial field strengths. The plausible boundary and the gap are suggested to naturally divide pulsars with distinct magnetic "genes", ie. pulsars which were born from strongly magnetized progenitors -- such as Bp stars, and pulsars born from normal massive stars. The possibility remains open that a fraction of slowly rotating pulsars were injected with long initial spin periods, while others would have a classical pulsar evolution history. It is suggested that PSR B1849+00 was born in the supernova remnant Kes-79 with an initial period of about 2 seconds.

  11. Concircular vector fields for plane-symmetric static spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Ahmad Tawfik; Khan, Suhail

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate concircular vector fields (CVFs) of static plane symmetric four-dimensional Lorentzian manifold. Ten conformal Killing equations and their general form of conformal Killing vector fields (CKVFs) are derived along with their conformal factor. These CKVFs are then placed into the conformal Ricci collineation equations to obtain the final form of CVFs. The existence of concircular symmetry imposes restrictions on the metric functions. The conditions imposing restrictions on these metric functions are obtained as a set of integrability conditions. It is shown that plane-symmetric static spacetimes admit four, six, seven or fifteen-dimensional concircular vector fields. Analysis of our results are also given in the light of some established results in the literature.

  12. One-dimensional analysis of plane and radial thin film flows including solid-body rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, S.; Hankey, W.; Faghri, A.; Swanson, T.

    1989-01-01

    The flow of a thin liquid film with a free surface along a horizontal plate which emanates from a pressurized vessel is examined by integrating the equations of motion across the thin liquid layer and discretizing the integrated equations using finite difference techniques. The effects of 0-g and solid-body rotation will be discussed. The two cases of interest are plane flow and radial flow. In plane flow, the liquid is considered to be flowing along a channel with no change in the width of the channel, whereas in radial flow the liquid spreads out radially over a disk, so that the area changes along the radius. It is desired to determine the height of the liquid film at any location along the plate of disk, so that the heat transfer from the plate or disk can be found. The possibility that the flow could encounter a hydraulic jump is accounted for.

  13. Asymmetric error field interaction with rotating conducting walls

    SciTech Connect

    Paz-Soldan, C.; Brookhart, M. I.; Hegna, C. C.; Forest, C. B.

    2012-07-15

    The interaction of error fields with a system of differentially rotating conducting walls is studied analytically and compared to experimental data. Wall rotation causes eddy currents to persist indefinitely, attenuating and rotating the original error field. Superposition of error fields from external coils and plasma currents are found to break the symmetry in wall rotation direction. The vacuum and plasma eigenmodes are modified by wall rotation, with the error field penetration time decreased and the kink instability stabilized, respectively. Wall rotation is also predicted to reduce error field amplification by the marginally stable plasma.

  14. In-plane trapping and manipulation of ZnO nanowires by a hybrid plasmonic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lichao; Dou, Xiujie; Min, Changjun; Zhang, Yuquan; Du, Luping; Xie, Zhenwei; Shen, Junfeng; Zeng, Yujia; Yuan, Xiaocong

    2016-05-01

    In general, when a semiconductor nanowire is trapped by conventional laser beam tweezers, it tends to be aligned with the trapping beam axis rather than confined in the horizontal plane, and this limits the application of these nanowires in many in-plane nanoscale optoelectronic devices. In this work, we achieve the in-plane trapping and manipulation of a single ZnO nanowire by a hybrid plasmonic tweezer system on a flat metal surface. The gap between the nanowire and the metallic substrate leads to an enhanced gradient force caused by deep subwavelength optical energy confinement. As a result, the nanowire can be securely trapped in-plane at the center of the excited surface plasmon polariton field, and can also be dynamically moved and rotated by varying the position and polarization direction of the incident laser beam, which cannot be performed using conventional optical tweezers. The theoretical results show that the focused plasmonic field induces a strong in-plane trapping force and a high rotational torque on the nanowire, while the focused optical field produces a vertical trapping force to produce the upright alignment of the nanowire; this is in good agreement with the experimental results. Finally, some typical ZnO nanowire structures are built based on this technique, which thus further confirms the potential of this method for precise manipulation of components during the production of nanoelectronic and nanophotonic devices.In general, when a semiconductor nanowire is trapped by conventional laser beam tweezers, it tends to be aligned with the trapping beam axis rather than confined in the horizontal plane, and this limits the application of these nanowires in many in-plane nanoscale optoelectronic devices. In this work, we achieve the in-plane trapping and manipulation of a single ZnO nanowire by a hybrid plasmonic tweezer system on a flat metal surface. The gap between the nanowire and the metallic substrate leads to an enhanced gradient force

  15. Multipole and plane wave expansions of diverging and converging fields.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Thanh Xuan; Chen, Xudong; Sheppard, Colin J R

    2014-04-21

    This paper presents and compares two basis systems, spherical harmonics and plane waves, for studying diverging and converging beams in an optical system. We show a similarity between a converging field and the time reversed field of a radiation field. We present and analyze the differences between the Debye-Wolf diffraction integral and the multipole theory for focusing of polarized light. The Debye-Wolf diffraction integral gives a well-known anomalous behavior on the optical axis and at the edge of the focused beam that can be avoided by using the multipole theory. PMID:24787784

  16. Measurement And Shape Analysis Including Vertebral Rotation Of Scoliotic Spines From Single Plane Radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drerup, B.; Hierholzer, E.

    1986-07-01

    Radiological assessment and follow-up control of scoliosis, i.e. of a lateral and rotational deviation of the spine, is performed mainly by single plane radiographs. Additional information may be gained from these radiographs by introducing a parametrized vertebral model. By analyzing the radiographic contours according to this model, axial rotation can be determined for any position and orientation of the vertebra. In addition to rotation several other data are determined for each vertebra, such as the tilting angle and the two-dimensional coordinates of the centre. By handling the data as a function of the vertebral location in spine, characteristic curves are generated. In order to find simple shape parameters for these characteristics, a smooth curve has to be fitted to the data points by a least squares approximation. This problem may be solved by a Fourier decomposition of the spinal curves. It appears, that the Fourier coefficients (amplitudes and phases) and some derived shape parameters lend themselves to a medical interpretation, which is consistent with the existing classification of the scoliotic spine.

  17. Propagation of plane waves in a rotating transversely isotropic two temperature generalized thermoelastic solid half-space with voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijarnia, R.; Singh, B.

    2016-05-01

    The paper is concerned with the propagation of plane waves in a transversely isotropic two temperature generalized thermoelastic solid half-space with voids and rotation. The governing equations are modified in the context of Lord and Shulman theory of generalized thermoelasticity and solved to show the existence of four plane waves in the x - z plane. Reflection of these plane waves from thermally insulated stress free surface is also studied to obtain a system of four non-homogeneous equations. For numerical computations of speed and reflection coefficients, a particular material is modelled as transversely isotropic generalized thermoelastic solid half-space. The speeds of plane waves are computed against the angle of propagation to observe the effects of two temperature and rotation. Reflection coefficients of various reflected waves are also computed against the angle of incidence to observe the effects of various parameters.

  18. Interference effects in angular streaking with a rotating terahertz field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazansky, A. K.; Bozhevolnov, A. V.; Sazhina, I. P.; Kabachnik, N. M.

    2016-01-01

    A method of angular streaking with a rotating terahertz electric field for photoelectrons produced by femtosecond extreme ultraviolet pulses is suggested and theoretically analyzed. The method can be used for free electron laser (FEL) pulse characterization on a shot-to-shot basis. It is shown that in related measurements an interesting phenomenon appears: formation of very bright and sharp features in the angular resolved electron spectra measured in the plane perpendicular to the collinear beam direction. These features are similar to the conventional caustics in the wave propagation. The caustics are accompanied by a well-developed interference structure. The intensity distribution along the caustic is determined by the envelope of the FEL pulse.

  19. Electropumping of water with rotating electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Luca, Sergio; Todd, B. D.; Hansen, J. S.; Daivis, Peter J.

    2013-04-01

    Pumping of fluids confined to nanometer dimension spaces is a technically challenging yet vitally important technological application with far reaching consequences for lab-on-a-chip devices, biomimetic nanoscale reactors, nanoscale filtration devices and the like. All current pumping mechanisms require some sort of direct intrusion into the nanofluidic system, and involve mechanical or electronic components. In this paper, we present the first nonequilibrium molecular dynamics results to demonstrate that non-intrusive electropumping of liquid water on the nanoscale can be performed by subtly exploiting the coupling of spin angular momentum to linear streaming momentum. A spatially uniform rotating electric field is applied to water molecules, which couples to their permanent electric dipole moments. The resulting molecular rotational momentum is converted into linear streaming momentum of the fluid. By selectively tuning the degree of hydrophobicity of the solid walls one can generate a net unidirectional flow. Our results for the linear streaming and angular velocities of the confined water are in general agreement with the extended hydrodynamical theory for this process, though also suggest refinements to the theory are required. These numerical experiments confirm that this new concept for pumping of polar nanofluids can be employed under laboratory conditions, opening up significant new technological possibilities.

  20. Caustics in a field negatively refracted at a plane interface.

    PubMed

    Shendeleva, M L

    2008-03-01

    An electromagnetic field radiated by a line source situated near a plane interface between a medium with positive refractive index and a medium with negative refractive index is considered by using the geometrical optics approach. Rays and wave fronts of the refracted field are constructed using Fermat's principle. It is shown that the negatively refracted rays intersecting in pairs create 2-fold caustics that meet at a cusp point. The cusp of the caustic is directed towards the interface for |n| > 1 and away from the interface for |n| < 1, where n is the relative refractive index. It is also shown that wave fronts of the refracted field propagate towards the interface, in the direction from negative to positive optical path lengths. PMID:18331494

  1. Comparison of rotational imaging optical coherence tomography and selective plane illumination microscopy for embryonic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chen; Ran, Shihao; Le, Henry H.; Singh, Manmohan; Larina, Irina V.; Mayerich, David; Dickinson, Mary E.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2016-03-01

    The mouse is a common model for studying developmental diseases. Different optical techniques have been developed to investigate mouse embryos, but each has its own set of limitations and restrictions. In this study, we imaged the same E9.5 mouse embryo with rotational imaging Optical Coherence Tomography (RI-OCT) and Selective Plane Illumination Microscopy (SPIM), and compared the two techniques. Results demonstrate that both methods can provide images with micrometer-scale spatial resolution. The RI-OCT technique was developed to increase imaging depth of OCT by performing traditional OCT imaging at multiple sides and co-registering the images. In SPIM, optical sectioning is achieved by illuminating the sample with a sheet of light. In this study, the images acquired from both techniques are compared with each other to evaluate the benefits and drawbacks of each technique for embryonic imaging. Since 3D stacks can be obtained by SPIM from different angles by rotating the sample, it might be possible to build a hybrid setup of two imaging modalities to combine the advantages of each technique.

  2. Slowly rotating scalar field wormholes: The second order approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Kashargin, P. E.; Sushkov, S. V.

    2008-09-15

    We discuss rotating wormholes in general relativity with a scalar field with negative kinetic energy. To solve the problem, we use the assumption about slow rotation. The role of a small dimensionless parameter plays the ratio of the linear velocity of rotation of the wormhole's throat and the velocity of light. We construct the rotating wormhole solution in the second-order approximation with respect to the small parameter. The analysis shows that the asymptotical mass of the rotating wormhole is greater than that of the nonrotating one, and the null energy condition violation in the rotating wormhole spacetime is weaker than that in the nonrotating one.

  3. Rotational Doppler Effect and Barnett Field in Spinning NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudo, Hiroyuki; Harii, Kazuya; Matsuo, Mamoru; Ieda, Jun'ichi; Ono, Masao; Maekawa, Sadamichi; Saitoh, Eiji

    2015-04-01

    We report the observation of the rotational Doppler effect using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). We have developed a coil-spinning technique that enables measurements by rotating a detector and fixing a sample. We found that the rotational Doppler effect gives rise to NMR frequency shifts equal to the rotation frequency. We formulate the rotational Doppler effect and the Barnett field using a vector model for the nuclear magnetic moment. This formulation reveals that, with just the sample rotating, both effects cancel each other, thereby explaining the absence of an NMR frequency shift in conventional sample-spinning NMR measurements.

  4. Magnetic field structure evolution in rotating magnetic field plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, Yuri; Yang Xiaokang; Huang, T.-S.

    2008-07-15

    A study of magnetic field structure evolution during 40-ms plasma discharge has been performed in a new device with 80 cm long/40 cm diameter cylindrical chamber, in which a plasma current I{sub p}{approx_equal}2 kA was driven and sustained by a rotating magnetic field. The main focus of the experiments is on how the changes in externally applied magnetic field affect the current profile and magnetic field in plasma. During plasma discharge, a pulse current was briefly fed to a magnetic coil located at the midplane (middle coil). The magnetic field in cross section of plasma was scanned with pickup probes. Two regimes were studied: without and with an external toroidal field (TF) produced by axial I{sub z} current. With a relatively small current (I{sub m} {<=} 600 A) in the middle coil, the plasma current is boosted up to 5 kA. The magnetic flux surfaces become extended along the axial Z direction, sometimes with the formation of doublet shape plasma. The regime without TF appears to be less stable, presumably due to the reversal of plasma current in central area of plasma column.

  5. Core-collapsed supernovae. Magnetic field and rotation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseenko, Sergey; Gennady, Bisnovatyi-Kogan

    We discuss the problem of physical mechanism of core-collapse supernovae explosions. Nonuniform contraction of the rotating iron core in presupernova leads to the formation of the differentially rotating cofiguartion. Rapidly rotating dence core and slowly rotating envelope. In the presence of initial poloidal magnetic field the differential rotation generates toroidal component of the magnetic field. At the developed stage of the magnetic field evolution magneto-differenial-rotational instability appears what leads to the exponential growth of all components of the magnetic field. Increased magnetic pressure produces a compression wave what tranforms to the MHD shock wave and produces the supernova explosion. The explosion energy corresponds to the observational data and theoretical predictions. It weakly depends on the details of neutrino transport and equation of state.

  6. Note: Design of a novel rotating magnetic field device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godínez, F. A.; Chávez, O.; Zenit, R.

    2012-06-01

    A novel device to produce a rotating magnetic field was designed, constructed, and tested. The system consists of a Helmholtz coil pair which is mechanically coupled to a dc electric motor whose angular velocity is controlled. The coil pair generates a uniform magnetic field; the whole system is rotated maintaining the coils energized using brushes. The magnetic field strength is uniform (≈5.8 mT) for a workspace of about 100 mm along the rotation axis. The system remains free of undesirable high amplitude mechanical vibrations for rotation frequencies below 10 Hz. We verified the performance of the apparatus by conducting experiments with magnetic swimmers.

  7. Stress field rotation or block rotation: An example from the Lake Mead fault system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ron, Hagai; Nur, Amos; Aydin, Atilla

    1990-01-01

    The Coulomb criterion, as applied by Anderson (1951), has been widely used as the basis for inferring paleostresses from in situ fault slip data, assuming that faults are optimally oriented relative to the tectonic stress direction. Consequently if stress direction is fixed during deformation so must be the faults. Freund (1974) has shown that faults, when arranged in sets, must generally rotate as they slip. Nur et al., (1986) showed how sufficiently large rotations require the development of new sets of faults which are more favorably oriented to the principal direction of stress. This leads to the appearance of multiple fault sets in which older faults are offset by younger ones, both having the same sense of slip. Consequently correct paleostress analysis must include the possible effect of fault and material rotation, in addition to stress field rotation. The combined effects of stress field rotation and material rotation were investigated in the Lake Meade Fault System (LMFS) especially in the Hoover Dam area. Fault inversion results imply an apparent 60 degrees clockwise (CW) rotation of the stress field since mid-Miocene time. In contrast structural data from the rest of the Great Basin suggest only a 30 degrees CW stress field rotation. By incorporating paleomagnetic and seismic evidence, the 30 degrees discrepancy can be neatly resolved. Based on paleomagnetic declination anomalies, it is inferred that slip on NW trending right lateral faults caused a local 30 degrees counter-clockwise (CCW) rotation of blocks and faults in the Lake Mead area. Consequently the inferred 60 degrees CW rotation of the stress field in the LMFS consists of an actual 30 degrees CW rotation of the stress field (as for the entire Great Basin) plus a local 30 degrees CCW material rotation of the LMFS fault blocks.

  8. Stress field rotation or block rotation: An example from the Lake Mead fault system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ron, Hagai; Nur, Amos; Aydin, Atilla

    1990-02-01

    The Coulomb criterion, as applied by Anderson (1951), has been widely used as the basis for inferring paleostresses from in situ fault slip data, assuming that faults are optimally oriented relative to the tectonic stress direction. Consequently if stress direction is fixed during deformation so must be the faults. Freund (1974) has shown that faults, when arranged in sets, must generally rotate as they slip. Nur et al., (1986) showed how sufficiently large rotations require the development of new sets of faults which are more favorably oriented to the principal direction of stress. This leads to the appearance of multiple fault sets in which older faults are offset by younger ones, both having the same sense of slip. Consequently correct paleostress analysis must include the possible effect of fault and material rotation, in addition to stress field rotation. The combined effects of stress field rotation and material rotation were investigated in the Lake Meade Fault System (LMFS) especially in the Hoover Dam area. Fault inversion results imply an apparent 60 degrees clockwise (CW) rotation of the stress field since mid-Miocene time. In contrast structural data from the rest of the Great Basin suggest only a 30 degrees CW stress field rotation. By incorporating paleomagnetic and seismic evidence, the 30 degrees discrepancy can be neatly resolved. Based on paleomagnetic declination anomalies, it is inferred that slip on NW trending right lateral faults caused a local 30 degrees counter-clockwise (CCW) rotation of blocks and faults in the Lake Mead area. Consequently the inferred 60 degrees CW rotation of the stress field in the LMFS consists of an actual 30 degrees CW rotation of the stress field (as for the entire Great Basin) plus a local 30 degrees CCW material rotation of the LMFS fault blocks.

  9. Mechanisms controlling human head stabilization during random rotational perturbations in the horizontal plane revisited.

    PubMed

    Stensdotter, Ann-Katrin; DinhoffPedersen, Morten; Meisingset, Ingebrigt; Vasseljen, Ottar; Stavdahl, Øyvind

    2016-05-01

    This study repeats the experimental protocol for investigation of head stabilization in healthy humans, described by Keshner and Peterson (1995) but with a modification of the analysis. Head movements were considered with respect to the room instead of relative to the trunk. The aim was to investigate the approximate contribution of reflex and voluntary control across perturbing frequencies and conditions with modulation of visual information and mental attention and discuss the resulting outcome while comparing methods. Seventeen healthy individuals were asked to keep the head steady in space while subjected to pseudorandom rotational perturbations in the horizontal plane, firmly seated on an actuated chair. Both methods confirmed the results for gain in previous studies showing fair ability to keep the head steady in space below 1 Hz with vision. Compensation deteriorated when vision was removed and worsened further with addition of a mental task. Between 1 and 2 Hz, unity gain occurred between head and trunk movements, whereas above 2 Hz the head moved more than the trunk. For phase angles, the original method demonstrated a phase split occurring from ~1 Hz, a purely mathematical artifact that caused subjects with virtually identical movements to appear as significantly different. This artifact was eliminated by analyzing the head-room relative to trunk-room rather than head-trunk relative to trunk-room angles, thus preventing potentially erroneous interpretations of the results. PMID:27225623

  10. Emitting waves from heterogeneity by a rotating electric field.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ye-Hua; Lou, Qin; Chen, Jiang-Xing; Sun, Wei-Gang; Ma, Jun; Ying, He-Ping

    2013-09-01

    In a generic model of excitable media, we simulate wave emission from a heterogeneity (WEH) induced by an electric field. Based on the WEH effect, a rotating electric field is proposed to terminate existed spatiotemporal turbulence. Compared with the effects resulted by a periodic pulsed electric field, the rotating electric field displays several improvements, such as lower required intensity, emitting waves on smaller obstacles, and shorter suppression time. Furthermore, due to rotation of the electric field, it can automatically source waves from the boundary of an obstacle with small curvature. PMID:24089977

  11. Modelling the Galactic magnetic field on the plane in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, T. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Banday, A. J.; Leach, S. M.; Lowe, S. R.; Wilkinson, A.

    2010-01-01

    We present a method for parametric modelling of the physical components of the Galaxy's magnetized interstellar medium, simulating the observables and mapping out the likelihood space using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis. We then demonstrate it using total and polarized synchrotron emission data as well as rotation measures of extragalactic sources. With these three data sets, we define and study three components of the magnetic field: the large-scale coherent field, the small-scale isotropic random field and the ordered field. In this first paper, we use only data along the Galactic plane and test a simple two-dimensional (2D) logarithmic spiral model for the magnetic field that includes a compression and a shearing of the random component giving rise to an ordered component. We demonstrate with simulations that the method can indeed constrain multiple parameters yielding measures of, for example, the ratios of the magnetic field components. Though subject to uncertainties in thermal and cosmic ray electron densities and depending on our particular model parametrization, our preliminary analysis shows that the coherent component is a small fraction of the total magnetic field and an ordered component comparable in strength to the isotropic random component is required to explain the polarization fraction of synchrotron emission. We outline further work to extend this type of analysis to study the magnetic spiral arm structure, the details of the turbulence as well as the 3D structure of the magnetic field.

  12. Magnetic field sensor for isotropically sensing an incident magnetic field in a sensor plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pant, Bharat B. (Inventor); Wan, Hong (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A magnetic field sensor that isotropically senses an incident magnetic field. This is preferably accomplished by providing a magnetic field sensor device that has one or more circular shaped magnetoresistive sensor elements for sensing the incident magnetic field. The magnetoresistive material used is preferably isotropic, and may be a CMR material or some form of a GMR material. Because the sensor elements are circular in shape, shape anisotropy is eliminated. Thus, the resulting magnetic field sensor device provides an output that is relatively independent of the direction of the incident magnetic field in the sensor plane.

  13. Propagation speed of rotation signals for field lines undergoing magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Goldman, Martin; Newman, David; Markidis, Stefano

    2013-10-15

    Reconnection is associated with two bending of the magnetic field lines. Considering the usual plane of a 2D reconnection simulation, the first bending is in-plane and produces the needed topological changes by bringing oppositely directed filed lines in proximity. The second is typical of fast reconnection and is out of plane, leading to the formation of the Hall magnetic field. This second rotation has recently been observed to proceed at superAlfvénic speeds and to carry substantial energy fluxes (Shay et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 065001 (2011)). We revisit these rotations with a new diagnostics based on dispersing a multitude of virtual probes into a kinetic simulation, akin the approach of multi spacecraft missions. The results of the new diagnostics are compared with the theory of characteristics applied to the two fluid model. The comparison of virtual probes and the method of characteristics confirm the findings relative to the out of plane rotation and uncover the existence of two families of characteristics. Both are observed in the simulation. The early stage of reconnection develops on the slower compressional branch and the later faster phase develops on the faster torsional branch. The superAlfvénic signal is only relevant in the second phase.

  14. Propagation speed of rotation signals for field lines undergoing magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Goldman, Martin; Newman, David; Markidis, Stefano

    2013-10-01

    Reconnection is associated with two bending of the magnetic field lines. Considering the usual plane of a 2D reconnection simulation, the first bending is in-plane and produces the needed topological changes by bringing oppositely directed filed lines in proximity. The second is typical of fast reconnection and is out of plane, leading to the formation of the Hall magnetic field. This second rotation has recently been observed to proceed at superAlfvénic speeds and to carry substantial energy fluxes (Shay et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 065001 (2011)). We revisit these rotations with a new diagnostics based on dispersing a multitude of virtual probes into a kinetic simulation, akin the approach of multi spacecraft missions. The results of the new diagnostics are compared with the theory of characteristics applied to the two fluid model. The comparison of virtual probes and the method of characteristics confirm the findings relative to the out of plane rotation and uncover the existence of two families of characteristics. Both are observed in the simulation. The early stage of reconnection develops on the slower compressional branch and the later faster phase develops on the faster torsional branch. The superAlfvénic signal is only relevant in the second phase.

  15. Rotation and Magnetic Fields: the Evil Twins of Stellar Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonneau, P.

    In this paper I give an overview of the numerous ways in which rotation and magnetic fields can interact under stellar interior conditions. I first provide “tutorial” examples of how magnetic fields can (1) alter existing stellar internal flows, (2) generate internal flows, and of how rotation can (3) amplify or (4) destroy magnetic fields. The upshot of all this is that treating rotation or magnetic fields in isolation of one another, as intermediate steps towards the “full picture”, may yield a situation that can only be applied meaningfully under very limited and specific astrophysical circumstances, if any.

  16. Theoretical study of alignment dynamics of magnetic oblate spheroids in rotating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Mingyang; Song, Han; Dhagat, Pallavi; Jander, Albrecht; Walker, Travis W.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic composites containing anisotropic magnetic particles can achieve properties not possible in corresponding bulk or thin films of the magnetic material. In this work, we discuss how planar magnetic anisotropy may be achieved in a composite by aligning disk-shaped particles in an in-plane rotating magnetic field. Previous efforts have reported a simple model of aligning particles in a high-frequency rotating magnetic field. However, no complete analytic solution was proposed. Here, we provide a full analytic solution that describes the alignment dynamics of microdisks in a rotating field that covers the entire frequency range. We also provide simplified solutions at both high-frequency and low-frequency limits through asymptotic expansions for easy implementation into industrial settings. The analytic solution is confirmed by numerical simulation and shows agreement with experiments.

  17. Sagittal plane rotation center of lower lumbar spine during a dynamic weight-lifting activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhan; Tsai, Tsung-Yuan; Wang, Shaobai; Wu, Minfei; Zhong, Weiye; Li, Jing-Sheng; Cha, Thomas; Wood, Kirk; Li, Guoan

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the center of rotation (COR) of the intervertebral segments of the lower lumbar spine (L4-L5 and L5-S1 segments) in sagittal plane during a weight-lifting (3.6 kg in each hand) extension activity performed with the pelvis constrained. Seven healthy subjects were studied using a dual fluoroscopic imaging technique. Using the non-weightbearing, supine position during MRI scan as a reference, the average intervertebral flexion angles of the L4-L5 and L5-S1 were 6.6° and 5.3° at flexion position of the body, respectively, and were -1.8° and -3.5° at extension position of the body, respectively. The CORs of the lower lumbar spine were found segment-dependent and changed with the body postures. The CORs of the L4-L5 segment were at the location about 75% posterior from the anterior edge of the disc at flexion positions of the body, and moved to about 92% of the posterior portion of the disc at extension positions of the body. The CORs of the L5-S1 segment were at 95% posterior portion of the disc at flexion positions of the body, and moved outside of the posterior edge of the disc by about 12% of the disc length at extension positions of the body. These results could help understand the physiological motion characters of the lower lumbar spine. The data could also provide important insights for future improvement of artificial disc designs and surgical implantation of the discs that are aimed to reproduce normal spinal functions. PMID:26805460

  18. A THOUSAND SHADOWS OF ANDROMEDA: ROTATING PLANES OF SATELLITES IN THE MILLENNIUM-II COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Ibata, Neil G.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Conn, Anthony; Elahi, Pascal; Arias, Veronica; Fernando, Nuwanthika

    2014-03-20

    In a recent contribution, Bahl and Baumgardt investigated the incidence of planar alignments of satellite galaxies in the Millennium-II simulation and concluded that vast, thin planes of dwarf galaxies, similar to that observed in the Andromeda galaxy (M31), occur frequently by chance in Λ-cold dark matter cosmology. However, their analysis did not capture the essential fact that the observed alignment is simultaneously radially extended, yet thin, and kinematically unusual. With the caveat that the Millennium-II simulation may not have sufficient mass resolution to identify confidently simulacra of low-luminosity dwarf galaxies, we re-examine that simulation for planar structures, using the same method as employed by Ibata et al. on the real M31 satellites. We find that 0.04% of host galaxies display satellite alignments that are at least as extreme as the observations, when we consider their extent, thickness, and number of members rotating in the same sense. We further investigate the angular momentum properties of the co-planar satellites, and find that the median of the specific angular momentum derived from the line-of-sight velocities in the real M31 structure (1.3 × 10{sup 4} km s{sup –1} kpc) is very high compared to systems drawn from the simulations. This analysis confirms that it is highly unlikely that the observed structure around the Andromeda galaxy is due to a chance occurrence. Interestingly, the few extreme systems that are similar to M31 arise from the accretion of a massive sub-halo with its own spatially concentrated entourage of orphan satellites.

  19. Gradient feature matching for in-plane rotation invariant face sketch recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alex, Ann Theja; Asari, Vijayan K.; Mathew, Alex

    2013-03-01

    Automatic recognition of face sketches is a challenging and interesting problem. An artist drawn sketch is compared against a mugshot database to identify criminals. It is a very cumbersome task to manually compare images. This necessitates a pattern recognition system to perform the comparisons. Existing methods fall into two main categories - those that allow recognition across modalities and methods that require a sketch/photo symthesis step and then copare in some modality. The methods that require synthesis require a lot of computing power since it involves high time and space complexity. Our method allows recognition across modalities. It uses the edge feature of a face sketch and face photo image to create a feature string called 'edge-string' which is a polar coordinate representation of the edge image. To generate a polar coordinate representation, we need the reference point and reference line. Using the center point of the edge image as the reference point and using a horizontal line as the reference line is the simplest solution. But, it cannot handle in-plane rotations. For this reason, we propose an approach for finding the reference line and the centroid point. The edge-strings of the face photo and face sketch are then compared using the Smith-Waterman algorithm for local string alignments. The face photo that gave the highest similarity score is the photo that matches the test face sketch input. The results on CUHK (Chinese University of Hong Kong) student dataset show the effectiveness of the proposed approach in face sketch recognition.

  20. A Thousand Shadows of Andromeda: Rotating Planes of Satellites in the Millennium-II Cosmological Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Ibata, Neil G.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Conn, Anthony; Elahi, Pascal; Arias, Veronica; Fernando, Nuwanthika

    2014-03-01

    In a recent contribution, Bahl & Baumgardt investigated the incidence of planar alignments of satellite galaxies in the Millennium-II simulation and concluded that vast, thin planes of dwarf galaxies, similar to that observed in the Andromeda galaxy (M31), occur frequently by chance in Λ-cold dark matter cosmology. However, their analysis did not capture the essential fact that the observed alignment is simultaneously radially extended, yet thin, and kinematically unusual. With the caveat that the Millennium-II simulation may not have sufficient mass resolution to identify confidently simulacra of low-luminosity dwarf galaxies, we re-examine that simulation for planar structures, using the same method as employed by Ibata et al. on the real M31 satellites. We find that 0.04% of host galaxies display satellite alignments that are at least as extreme as the observations, when we consider their extent, thickness, and number of members rotating in the same sense. We further investigate the angular momentum properties of the co-planar satellites, and find that the median of the specific angular momentum derived from the line-of-sight velocities in the real M31 structure (1.3 × 104 km s-1 kpc) is very high compared to systems drawn from the simulations. This analysis confirms that it is highly unlikely that the observed structure around the Andromeda galaxy is due to a chance occurrence. Interestingly, the few extreme systems that are similar to M31 arise from the accretion of a massive sub-halo with its own spatially concentrated entourage of orphan satellites.

  1. New methodology for use in rotating field nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jachman, Rebecca Corina

    High-resolution NMR spectra of samples with anisotropic broadening are simplified to their isotropic spectra by fast rotation of the sample at the magic angle 54.7°. This dissertation concerns the development of novel Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) methodologies which would rotate the magnetic field instead of the sample, i.e. rotating field NMR. It also provides an overview of the NMR concepts, procedures, and experiments needed to understand the methodologies that will be used for rotating field NMR. A simple two-dimensional shimming method based on harmonic corrector rings provides arbitrary multiple order shimming corrections that are necessary for rotating field systems, but can be used in shimming other systems as well. Those results demonstrate, for example, that quadrupolar order shimming improves the linewidth by up to a factor of ten. An additional order of magnitude reduction is in principle achievable by utilizing this shimming method for z-gradient correction and higher order xy gradients. Additionally, initial investigations into a specialized pulse sequence for the rotating field NMR experiment, which allows for spinning at angles other than the magic angle and spinning slower than the anisotropic broadening is discussed. This will be useful for rotating field NMR because there are limits on how fast a field can be spun and difficulties of reaching the magic angle. This pulse sequence is a combination of the previously established projected magic angle spinning (p-MAS) and magic angle turning (MAT) pulse sequences. One of the goals of this project is for rotating field NMR to be used on biological systems. The p-MAS pulse sequence was successfully tested on bovine tissue samples, which suggests that it will be a viable methodology to use in rotating field NMR. A side experiment on steering magnetic particles by MRI gradients was also carried out. Initial investigations indicate some movement, but for total steering control, further experiments are

  2. Optical polarization plane rotation for the blazar PG 1553+113

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blinov, D.; Casadi, C.

    2016-09-01

    We report about RoboPol observations of the ongoing rotation of the optical polarization angle for the blazar PG 1553+113 (RA=15h55m43s; Dec=+11d11m24s). The rotation began around August, 19. So far the total amplitude of the rotation is ~130 degrees with an average rate of ~8 deg/day.

  3. Single-Plane Magnetically Focused Elongated Small Field Proton Beams.

    PubMed

    McAuley, Grant A; Slater, James M; Wroe, Andrew J

    2015-08-01

    We previously performed Monte Carlo simulations of magnetically focused proton beams shaped by a single quadrapole magnet and thereby created narrow elongated beams with superior dose delivery characteristics (compared to collimated beams) suitable for targets of similar geometry. The present study seeks to experimentally validate these simulations using a focusing magnet consisting of 24 segments of samarium cobalt permanent magnetic material adhered into a hollow cylinder. Proton beams with properties relevant to clinical radiosurgery applications were delivered through the magnet to a water tank containing a diode detector or radiochromic film. Dose profiles were analyzed and compared with analogous Monte Carlo simulations. The focused beams produced elongated beam spots with high elliptical symmetry, indicative of magnet quality. Experimental data showed good agreement with simulations, affirming the utility of Monte Carlo simulations as a tool to model the inherent complexity of a magnetic focusing system. Compared to target-matched unfocused simulations, focused beams showed larger peak to entrance ratios (26% to 38%) and focused simulations showed a two-fold increase in beam delivery efficiency. These advantages can be attributed to the magnetic acceleration of protons in the transverse plane that tends to counteract the particle outscatter that leads to degradation of peak to entrance performance in small field proton beams. Our results have important clinical implications and suggest rare earth focusing magnet assemblies are feasible and could reduce skin dose and beam number while delivering enhanced dose to narrow elongated targets (eg, in and around the spinal cord) in less time compared to collimated beams. PMID:25414143

  4. Rotating magnetic quadrupole current drive for field-reversed configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Milroy, Richard D.; Guo, H.Y.

    2005-07-15

    In the translation, confinement, and sustainment experiment [A. L. Hoffman, H. Y. Guo, J. T. Slough, S. J. Tobin, L. S. Schrank, W. A. Reass, and G. A. Wurden, Fusion Sci. Technol. 41, 92 (2002)], field-reversed configurations (FRCs) are created and sustained using a rotating magnetic field (RMF). The RMF is usually in the form of a rotating dipole, which in vacuum penetrates uniformly to the axis of symmetry. However, plasma conditions in the FRC normally adjust so that the RMF only partially penetrates the plasma column. We have investigated the possibility of using a rotating quadrupole rather than a rotating dipole magnetic field. The vacuum field from a quadrupole is proportional to radius and cannot penetrate to the axis of symmetry; however, this is not a disadvantage if the current drive is confined to the outer region of the FRC. It was found that the quadrupole drive efficiency is comparable to that of a dipole, but the rotating dipole is more effective at stabilizing the n=2 rotational instability. A strong internal oscillation in B{sub {theta}} is often observed in FRCs sustained by a quadrupole field. The spectral content of the signals indicates that an internal n=1 magnetic structure forms and corotates with the electrons. Similar but much lower amplitude structures can form when a rotating dipole is employed (edge-driven mode)

  5. Destabilization of hydrodynamically stable rotation laws by azimuthal magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüdiger, Günther; Hollerbach, Rainer; Schultz, Manfred; Elstner, Detlef

    2007-06-01

    We consider the effect of toroidal magnetic fields on hydrodynamically stable Taylor-Couette differential rotation flows. For current-free magnetic fields a non-axisymmetric m = 1 magnetorotational instability arises when the magnetic Reynolds number exceeds O(100). We then consider how this `azimuthal magnetorotational instability' (AMRI) is modified if the magnetic field is not current-free, but also has an associated electric current throughout the fluid. This gives rise to current-driven Tayler instabilities (TIs) that exist even without any differential rotation at all. The interaction of the AMRI and the TI is then considered when both electric currents and differential rotation are present simultaneously. The magnetic Prandtl number Pm turns out to be crucial in this case. Large Pm have a destabilizing influence, and lead to a smooth transition between the AMRI and the TI. In contrast, small Pm have a stabilizing influence, with a broad stable zone separating the AMRI and the TI. In this region the differential rotation is acting to stabilize the TIs, with possible astrophysical applications (Ap stars). The growth rates of both the AMRI and the TI are largely independent of Pm, with the TI acting on the time-scale of a single rotation period, and the AMRI slightly slower, but still on the basic rotational time-scale. The azimuthal drift time-scale is ~20 rotations, and may thus be a (flip-flop) time-scale of stellar activity between the rotation period and the diffusion time.

  6. Rotating Capacitor Measures Steady Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, A. R.; Kirkham, H.; Eng, B.

    1986-01-01

    Portable sensor measures electric fields created by dc powerlines or other dc-high-voltage sources. Measures fields from 70 to 50,000 V/m with linearity of 2 percent. Sensor used at any height above ground. Measures both magnitude and direction of field and provides signals representing these measurements to remote readout device. Sensor functions with minimal disturbance of field it is measuring.

  7. Argand-plane vorticity singularities in complex scalar optical fields: an experimental study using optical speckle.

    PubMed

    Rothschild, Freda; Bishop, Alexis I; Kitchen, Marcus J; Paganin, David M

    2014-03-24

    The Cornu spiral is, in essence, the image resulting from an Argand-plane map associated with monochromatic complex scalar plane waves diffracting from an infinite edge. Argand-plane maps can be useful in the analysis of more general optical fields. We experimentally study particular features of Argand-plane mappings known as "vorticity singularities" that are associated with mapping continuous single-valued complex scalar speckle fields to the Argand plane. Vorticity singularities possess a hierarchy of Argand-plane catastrophes including the fold, cusp and elliptic umbilic. We also confirm their connection to vortices in two-dimensional complex scalar waves. The study of vorticity singularities may also have implications for higher-dimensional fields such as coherence functions and multi-component fields such as vector and spinor fields. PMID:24663998

  8. Measuring strain and rotation fields at the dislocation core in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonilla, L. L.; Carpio, A.; Gong, C.; Warner, J. H.

    2015-10-01

    Strain fields, dislocations, and defects may be used to control electronic properties of graphene. By using advanced imaging techniques with high-resolution transmission electron microscopes, we have measured the strain and rotation fields about dislocations in monolayer graphene with single-atom sensitivity. These fields differ qualitatively from those given by conventional linear elasticity. However, atom positions calculated from two-dimensional (2D) discrete elasticity and three-dimensional discrete periodized Föppl-von Kármán equations (dpFvKEs) yield fields close to experiments when determined by geometric phase analysis. 2D theories produce symmetric fields whereas those from experiments exhibit asymmetries. Numerical solutions of dpFvKEs provide strain and rotation fields of dislocation dipoles and pairs that also exhibit asymmetries and, compared with experiments, may yield information on out-of-plane displacements of atoms. While discrete theories need to be solved numerically, analytical formulas for strains and rotation about dislocations can be obtained from 2D Mindlin's hyperstress theory. These formulas are very useful for fitting experimental data and provide a template to ascertain the importance of nonlinear and nonplanar effects. Measuring the parameters of this theory, we find two characteristic lengths between three and four times the lattice spacings that control dilatation and rotation about a dislocation. At larger distances from the dislocation core, the elastic fields decay to those of conventional elasticity. Our results may be relevant for strain engineering in graphene and other 2D materials of current interest.

  9. Effect of rotation and imperfection on reflection and transmission of plane waves in anisotropic generalized thermoelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajneesh; Singh, Manjeet

    2009-07-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the propagation of plane waves at an imperfectly bonded interface of two orthotropic generalized thermoelastic rotating half-spaces with different elastic and thermal properties. The thermoelastic theory with one relaxation time developed by Lord and Shulman [A generalized dynamical theory of thermoelasticity, J. Mech. Phys. Solids 15 (1967) 299-309] is used to study the problem. The reflection and transmission coefficients of Quasi Longitudinal (QL-) wave, Quasi Thermal (T-mode) wave and Quasi Transverse (QT-) wave have been derived. The effect of rotation has been studied on the velocities of different waves. Some special cases of boundaries i.e. normal stiffness, transverse stiffness, thermal contact conductance, slip boundary and welded contact boundary have been deduced from an imperfect one. Impact of different boundaries has been studied graphically. It is observed that thermal properties, rotation and imperfect boundary have significant effect on the propagation of waves.

  10. New Limits on Extragalactic Magnetic Fields from Rotation Measures.

    PubMed

    Pshirkov, M S; Tinyakov, P G; Urban, F R

    2016-05-13

    We take advantage of the wealth of rotation measures data contained in the NRAO VLA Sky Survey catalog to derive new, statistically robust, upper limits on the strength of extragalactic magnetic fields. We simulate the extragalactic magnetic field contribution to the rotation measures for a given field strength and correlation length, by assuming that the electron density follows the distribution of Lyman-α clouds. Based on the observation that rotation measures from distant radio sources do not exhibit any trend with redshift, while the extragalactic contribution instead grows with distance, we constrain fields with Jeans' length coherence length to be below 1.7 nG at the 2σ level, and fields coherent across the entire observable Universe below 0.65 nG. These limits do not depend on the particular origin of these cosmological fields. PMID:27232014

  11. New Limits on Extragalactic Magnetic Fields from Rotation Measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pshirkov, M. S.; Tinyakov, P. G.; Urban, F. R.

    2016-05-01

    We take advantage of the wealth of rotation measures data contained in the NRAO VLA Sky Survey catalog to derive new, statistically robust, upper limits on the strength of extragalactic magnetic fields. We simulate the extragalactic magnetic field contribution to the rotation measures for a given field strength and correlation length, by assuming that the electron density follows the distribution of Lyman-α clouds. Based on the observation that rotation measures from distant radio sources do not exhibit any trend with redshift, while the extragalactic contribution instead grows with distance, we constrain fields with Jeans' length coherence length to be below 1.7 nG at the 2 σ level, and fields coherent across the entire observable Universe below 0.65 nG. These limits do not depend on the particular origin of these cosmological fields.

  12. Electric-field-induced rotation of Brownian metal nanowires.

    PubMed

    Arcenegui, Juan J; García-Sánchez, Pablo; Morgan, Hywel; Ramos, Antonio

    2013-09-01

    We describe the physical mechanism responsible for the rotation of Brownian metal nanowires suspended in an electrolyte exposed to a rotating electric field. The electric field interacts with the induced charge in the electrical double layer at the metal-electrolyte interface, causing rotation due to the torque on the induced dipole and to the induced-charge electro-osmotic flow around the particle. Experiments demonstrate that the primary driving mechanism is the former of these two. Our analysis contrasts with previous work describing the electrical manipulation of metallic particles with electric fields, which neglected the electrical double layer. Theoretical values for the rotation speed are calculated and good agreement with experiments is found. PMID:24125362

  13. Novel rotating field probe for inspection of tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, J.; Tarkleson, E.; Lei, N.; Udpa, L.; Udpa, S. S.

    2012-05-01

    Inspection of steam generator tubes in nuclear power plants is extremely critical for safe operation of the power plant. In the nuclear industry, steam generator tube inspection using eddy current techniques has evolved over the years from a single bobbin coil, to rotating probe coil (RPC) and array probe, in an attempt to improve the speed and reliability of inspection. The RPC probe offers the accurate spatial resolution but involves complex mechanical rotation. This paper presents a novel design of eddy current probes based on rotating fields produced by three identical coils excited by a balanced three-phase supply. The sensor thereby achieves rotating probe functionality by electronic means and eliminates the need for mechanical rotation. The field generated by the probe is largely radial that result in induced currents that flow circularly around the radial axis and rotating around the tube at a synchronous speed effectively producing induced eddy currents that are multidirectional. The probe will consequently be sensitive to cracks of all orientations in the tube wall. The finite element model (FEM) results of the rotating fields and induced currents are presented. A prototype probe is being built to validate simulation results.

  14. Novel rotating field probe for inspection of tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Xin, J.; Tarkleson, E.; Lei, N.; Udpa, L.; Udpa, S. S.

    2012-05-17

    Inspection of steam generator tubes in nuclear power plants is extremely critical for safe operation of the power plant. In the nuclear industry, steam generator tube inspection using eddy current techniques has evolved over the years from a single bobbin coil, to rotating probe coil (RPC) and array probe, in an attempt to improve the speed and reliability of inspection. The RPC probe offers the accurate spatial resolution but involves complex mechanical rotation. This paper presents a novel design of eddy current probes based on rotating fields produced by three identical coils excited by a balanced three-phase supply. The sensor thereby achieves rotating probe functionality by electronic means and eliminates the need for mechanical rotation. The field generated by the probe is largely radial that result in induced currents that flow circularly around the radial axis and rotating around the tube at a synchronous speed effectively producing induced eddy currents that are multidirectional. The probe will consequently be sensitive to cracks of all orientations in the tube wall. The finite element model (FEM) results of the rotating fields and induced currents are presented. A prototype probe is being built to validate simulation results.

  15. Dynamical representation of the operators for the Dirac particle in the field of a plane wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanov, A. E.

    2015-01-01

    We find an explicit form of the integrals of motion for a Dirac particle placed in a plane-wave field. These operators are a realization of the Lie algebra of the Poincaré group in the case where the representation space consists of solutions of the Dirac-Pauli equation for the particle in a plane-wave field.

  16. Pulsar rotation and dispersion measures and the galactic magnetic field.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manchester, R. N.

    1972-01-01

    Use of observations of pulsar polarization and pulse time of arrival at frequencies between 250 and 500 MHz to determine rotation and dispersion measures for 19 and 21 pulsars, respectively. These measurements have been used to calculate mean line-of-sight components of the magnetic field in the path to the pulsars. These and other observations show that there is probably no contribution to the observed rotation measure from the pulsar itself. Low-latitude, low-dispersion pulsars are observed to have strong field components, and a strong dependence of rotation-measure sign on galactic longitude has been found. The observations are consistent with a relatively uniform field of about 3.5 microgauss directed toward about l = 90 deg in the local region, but appear to be inconsistent with the helical model for the local field.

  17. Surface chirality induced by rotational electrodeposition in magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Mogi, Iwao; Morimoto, Ryoichi; Aogaki, Ryoichi; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    The surfaces of minerals could serve important catalytic roles in the prebiotic syntheses of organic molecules, such as amino acids. Thus, the surface chirality is responsible for the asymmetric syntheses of biomolecules. Here, we show induction of the surface chirality of copper metal film by electrodeposition via electrochemical cell rotation in magnetic fields. Such copper film electrodes exhibit chiral behaviour in the electrochemical reaction of alanine enantiomers, and the rotating direction allows control of the chiral sign. These findings are discussed in connection with the asymmetric influence of the system rotation on the magnetohydrodynamic micro-vortices around the electrode surfaces. PMID:23999254

  18. Magnetic-Field-Induced Rotation of Polarized Light Emission from Monolayer WS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Robert; Arora, Ashish; Plechinger, Gerd; Nagler, Philipp; Granados del Águila, Andrés; Ballottin, Mariana V.; Christianen, Peter C. M.; Michaelis de Vasconcellos, Steffen; Schüller, Christian; Korn, Tobias; Bratschitsch, Rudolf

    2016-08-01

    We control the linear polarization of emission from the coherently emitting K+ and K- valleys (valley coherence) in monolayer WS2 with an out-of-plane magnetic field of up to 25 T. The magnetic-field-induced valley Zeeman splitting causes a rotation of the emission polarization with respect to the excitation by up to 35° and reduces the polarization degree by up to 16%. We explain both of these phenomena with a model based on two noninteracting coherent two-level systems. We deduce that the coherent light emission from the valleys decays with a time constant of τc=260 fs .

  19. External Electromagnetic Fields of Slowly Rotating Relativistic Magnetized NUT Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmedov, B. J.; Khugaev, A. V.

    2006-08-01

    Analytic general relativistic expressions for the electromagnetic fields external to a slowly-rotating magnetized NUT star with non-vanishing gravitomagnetic charge have been presented. Solutions for the electric and magnetic fields have been found after separating the Maxwell equations in the external background spacetime of a slowly rotating NUT star into angular and radial parts in the lowest order approximation in specific angular momentum and NUT parameter . The relativistic star is considered isolated and in vacuum, with different models for stellar magnetic field: i) monopolar magnetic field and ii) dipolar magnetic field aligned with the axis of rotation. It has been shown that the general relativistic corrections due to the dragging of reference frames and gravitomagnetic charge are not present in the form of the magnetic fields but emerge only in the form of the electric fields. In particular, it has been obtained that the frame-dragging and gravitomagnetic charge provide an additional induced electric field which is analogous to the one introduced by the rotation of the star in the flat spacetime limit.

  20. Sensitivity to full-field visual movement compatible with head rotation: variations among axes of rotation.

    PubMed

    Harris, L R; Lott, L A

    1995-01-01

    Movement detection thresholds for full-field visual motion about various axes were measured in three subjects using a two-alternative forced-choice staircase method. Thresholds for 1-s exposures to rotation about different rotation axes varied significantly over the range 0.139 +/- 0.05 deg/s to 0.463 +/- 0.166 deg/s. The highest thresholds were found in response to rotation about axes closely aligned to the line of sight. Variations among the thresholds for different axes could not be explained by different movement patterns in the fovea or variations in motion sensitivity with eccentricity. The variations can be well simulated by a three-channel model for coding the axis and velocity of full-field visual motion. A three-channel visual coding system would be well suited for extracting information about self-rotation from a complex pattern of retinal image motion containing components due to both rotation and translation. A three-channel visual motion system would also be readily compatible with vestibular information concerning self-rotation arising from the semicircular canals. PMID:8527373

  1. A novel method for automatic detection of patient out-of-plane rotation by comparing a single portal image to a reference image.

    PubMed

    Jabbari, Keyvan; Pistorius, Stephen

    2005-12-01

    A novel method for detecting out-of-plane patient rotation by comparing a single portal image to its reference image is presented. Out-of-plane rotation results in an apparent distortion of the anatomy in a portal image. This distortion can be mathematically predicted with the magnification varying at each point in the image. While scaling of points at equal depth is invariant under in-plane rotation or translation, and changes equally in both dimensions for an axial shift of the patient, a change of scaling in only one dimension can be ascribed to an out-of-plane rotation. For the two conditions that are used in this study, it is shown that out-of-plane rotation yields a different scaling of the image in two perpendicular directions and therefore it is feasible to calculate the scale factors as a function of out-of-plane rotation. Conversely the recovery of scale factors in two different directions at the same time would enable the magnitude of the out-of-plane rotation to be recovered. The properties of the Fourier transform of the image are used to align the portal image with the reference image (a simulator image or first approved portal image) prior to the recovery of the scale factors. Correlating the Fourier transform of the portal image on a log-scale with that of the reference image enables the scale factors to be automatically extracted from a single portal image. In the two approaches investigated, out-of-plane rotations of up to 41 degrees and 20 degrees (respectively) have been recovered with a maximum error of 2.4 degrees. This technique could be used to automatically detect patient roll or tilt prior to or during a treatment session. PMID:16475767

  2. A novel method for automatic detection of patient out-of-plane rotation by comparing a single portal image to a reference image

    SciTech Connect

    Jabbari, Keyvan; Pistorius, Stephen

    2005-12-15

    A novel method for detecting out-of-plane patient rotation by comparing a single portal image to its reference image is presented. Out-of-plane rotation results in an apparent distortion of the anatomy in a portal image. This distortion can be mathematically predicted with the magnification varying at each point in the image. While scaling of points at equal depth is invariant under in-plane rotation or translation, and changes equally in both dimensions for an axial shift of the patient, a change of scaling in only one dimension can be ascribed to an out-of-plane rotation. For the two conditions that are used in this study, it is shown that out-of-plane rotation yields a different scaling of the image in two perpendicular directions and therefore it is feasible to calculate the scale factors as a function of out-of-plane rotation. Conversely the recovery of scale factors in two different directions at the same time would enable the magnitude of the out-of-plane rotation to be recovered. The properties of the Fourier transform of the image are used to align the portal image with the reference image (a simulator image or first approved portal image) prior to the recovery of the scale factors. Correlating the Fourier transform of the portal image on a log-scale with that of the reference image enables the scale factors to be automatically extracted from a single portal image. In the two approaches investigated, out-of-plane rotations of up to 41 deg. and 20 deg. (respectively) have been recovered with a maximum error of 2.4 deg. . This technique could be used to automatically detect patient roll or tilt prior to or during a treatment session.

  3. Magnetic Field Rotations at Kinetic Scales in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Christopher; Matteini, Lorenzo; Burgess, David; Horbury, Timothy

    2015-04-01

    The distribution of spatial angle changes in the solar wind magnetic field is usually attributed to a mixture of turbulence and other structures. Recent results have suggested that in the MHD inertial range this distribution may be scale invariant, generated by the turbulence, and consist mainly of field rotations. Here, we examine the distribution of magnetic field rotations in the smaller scale kinetic range (from ion to electron scales), where the turbulence is thought to be dissipated, using combined fluxgate/search-coil magnetometer data from Cluster. The degree of self-similarity is measured and the spatial distribution of the fluctuations at different scales is compared. At ion scales, the energy in angle rotations larger than α drops exponentially with α with e-folding ~10°, and at electron scales with e-folding

  4. Rotation of the optical polarization plane for the blazar 4C +38.41

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panopoulou, G. V.; Maragkakis, G. M.; Xexakis, K.

    2016-08-01

    We report on the ongoing rotation of the optical polarization angle (R-band) seen in the monitored blazar 4C +38.41 (RA=16:35:15.5, DEC=38:08:05, J2000) as recorded within the framework of the RoboPol program.

  5. Exchange bias field induced symmetry-breaking of magnetization rotation in two-dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, B.; Song, C.; Sun, Y.; Wang, Y. Y.; Zhao, Y. L.; Li, F.; Wang, G. Y.; Zeng, F.; Pan, F.

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the effect of strain-induced intrinsic exchange bias field (HEB) on the magnetization rotation process in a nominally "single" layered La2/3Sr1/3MnO3 (LSMO) film. The intrinsic exchange bias appears when the LSMO film is grown on LaAlO3 substrate. The HEB is proved to be an effective approach to tuning the in-plane magnetization rotation, producing a 360° instead of 180° periodicity in the anisotropic magnetoresistance curves measured in a low external magnetic field. The planar Hall effect curves are asymmetric when the in-plane magnetization rotate between two orthogonal axes of LSMO, helped or hindered by the HEB. Our study reveals that the HEB in but not limited to LSMO with phase separation exhibits an unprecedentedly two-dimensional effect rather than merely establishing a reference magnetization direction as achieved in ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic bilayers, thus furthering the cognition of manipulating the magnetization orientation.

  6. Jet Rotation Driven by Magnetohydrodynamic Shocks in Helical Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fendt, Christian

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, we present a detailed numerical investigation of the hypothesis that a rotation of astrophysical jets can be caused by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks in a helical magnetic field. Shock compression of the helical magnetic field results in a toroidal Lorentz force component that will accelerate the jet material in the toroidal direction. This process transforms magnetic angular momentum (magnetic stress) carried along the jet into kinetic angular momentum (rotation). The mechanism proposed here only works in a helical magnetic field configuration. We demonstrate the feasibility of this mechanism by axisymmetric MHD simulations in 1.5 and 2.5 dimensions using the PLUTO code. In our setup, the jet is injected into the ambient gas with zero kinetic angular momentum (no rotation). We apply different dynamical parameters for jet propagation such as the jet internal Alfvén Mach number and fast magnetosonic Mach number, the density contrast of the jet to the ambient medium, and the external sonic Mach number of the jet. The mechanism we suggest should work for a variety of jet applications, e.g., protostellar or extragalactic jets, and internal jet shocks (jet knots) or external shocks between the jet and the ambient gas (entrainment). For typical parameter values for protostellar jets, the numerically derived rotation feature looks consistent with the observations, i.e., rotational velocities of 0.1%-1% of the jet bulk velocity.

  7. JET ROTATION DRIVEN BY MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SHOCKS IN HELICAL MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Fendt, Christian

    2011-08-10

    In this paper, we present a detailed numerical investigation of the hypothesis that a rotation of astrophysical jets can be caused by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks in a helical magnetic field. Shock compression of the helical magnetic field results in a toroidal Lorentz force component that will accelerate the jet material in the toroidal direction. This process transforms magnetic angular momentum (magnetic stress) carried along the jet into kinetic angular momentum (rotation). The mechanism proposed here only works in a helical magnetic field configuration. We demonstrate the feasibility of this mechanism by axisymmetric MHD simulations in 1.5 and 2.5 dimensions using the PLUTO code. In our setup, the jet is injected into the ambient gas with zero kinetic angular momentum (no rotation). We apply different dynamical parameters for jet propagation such as the jet internal Alfven Mach number and fast magnetosonic Mach number, the density contrast of the jet to the ambient medium, and the external sonic Mach number of the jet. The mechanism we suggest should work for a variety of jet applications, e.g., protostellar or extragalactic jets, and internal jet shocks (jet knots) or external shocks between the jet and the ambient gas (entrainment). For typical parameter values for protostellar jets, the numerically derived rotation feature looks consistent with the observations, i.e., rotational velocities of 0.1%-1% of the jet bulk velocity.

  8. MR patterns of rotator cuff and labral lesions: comparison between low-field and high-field images.

    PubMed

    Shih, T T; Chen, W G; Su, C T; Huang, K M; Ericson, F; Chiu, L C

    1993-02-01

    Eighteen people (10 men, 8 women) were examined on a 0.3-T (low-field) imager with T1-weighted axial and coronal images and either axial or coronal T2-weighted images. Thirty-two people (22 men, 10 women) were examined on a 1.5-T (high-field) imager with axial T1-weighted images and coronal, sagittal dual-echo images. Rotator cuff lesions were diagnosed by the following findings: abnormal signal in the tendon, irregularity or discontinuity at the musculo-tendinous junction, or muscle abnormality. Glenoid labrum tears were considered if one or more of the following criteria were present: labral deformity of unusual size, focal defect, amputation or displacement with fluid, or capsular stripping. Comparison between the high-field and low-field MR images in the evaluation of rotator cuff lesions suggests that the high-field imager is better than the low-field imager in the differentiation of tendinitis from tears, in the confirmation of bursitis and in detection of subscapularis lesions. A higher contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), less time consumption, and more section planes (especially, sagittal sections) appear to be the main reasons for this. As far as labral lesions are concerned, the performances of the high-field imagers and low-field imagers were almost equal. The artifact of greater chemical shift with a high-field imager would more or less, we assume, degrade the better CNR achievable in the diagnosis of labral lesions. PMID:8101743

  9. General Relativistic Effect on the Energy Deposition Rate for Neutrino Pair Annihilation above the Equatorial Plane Along the Symmetry Axis Near a Rotating Neutron Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallick, Ritam; Bhattacharyya, Abhijit; Ghosh, Sanjay K.; Raha, Sibaji

    2013-02-01

    The estimate of the energy deposition rate (EDR) for neutrino pair annihilation has been carried out. The EDR for the neutrinos coming from the equatorial plane of a rotating neutron star is calculated along the rotation axis using the Cook-Shapiro-Teukolsky metric. The neutrino trajectories and hence the neutrinos emitted from the disk are affected by the redshift due to disk rotation and gravitation. The EDR is very sensitive to the value of the temperature and its variation along the disk. The rotation of the star has a negative effect on the EDR; it decreases with increase in rotational velocity.

  10. Simultaneous Generalizations of the Theorems of Ceva and Menelaus for Field Planes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houston, Kelly B.; Powers, Robert C.

    2009-01-01

    In 1992, Klamkin and Liu proved a very general result in the Extended Euclidean Plane that contains the theorems of Ceva and Menelaus as special cases. In this article, we extend the Klamkin and Liu result to projective planes "PG"(2, F) where F is a field. (Contains 2 figures.)

  11. Perpendicular magnetisation from in-plane fields in nano-scaled antidot lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräfe, Joachim; Haering, Felix; Tietze, Thomas; Audehm, Patrick; Weigand, Markus; Wiedwald, Ulf; Ziemann, Paul; Gawroński, Przemysław; Schütz, Gisela; Goering, Eberhard J.

    2015-06-01

    Investigations of geometric frustrations in magnetic antidot lattices have led to the observation of interesting phenomena like spin-ice and magnetic monopoles. By using highly focused magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements and x-ray microscopy with magnetic contrast we deduce that geometrical frustration in these nanostructured thin film systems also leads to an out-of-plane magnetization from a purely in-plane applied magnetic field. For certain orientations of the antidot lattice, formation of perpendicular magnetic domains has been found with a size of several μm that may be used for an in-plane/out-of-plane transducer.

  12. Rotational Sweepback of Magnetic Field Lines in Geometrical Models of Pulsar Radio Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyks, J.; Harding, Alice K.

    2004-01-01

    We study the rotational distortions of the vacuum dipole magnetic field in the context of geometrical models of the radio emission from pulsars. We find that at low altitudes the rotation deflects the local direction of the magnetic field by at most an angle of the order of r(sup 2 sub n), where r(sub n) = r/R(sub lc), r is the radial distance and R(sub lc) is the light cylinder radius. To the lowest (i.e. second) order in r(sub n) this distortion is symmetrical with respect to the plane containing the dipole axis and the rotation axis ((Omega, mu) plane). The lowest order distortion which is asymmetrical with respect to the (Omega, mu) plane is third order in r(sub n). These results confirm the common assumption that the rotational sweepback has negligible effect on the position angle (PA) curve. We show, however, that the influence of the sweep back on the outer boundary of the open field line region (open volume) is a much larger effect, of the order of r(sup 1/2 sub n). The open volume is shifted backwards with respect to the rotation direction by an angle delta(sub o nu) approx. 0.2 sin alpha r(sup 1/2 sub n) where alpha is the dipole inclination with respect to the rotation axis. The associated phase shift of the pulse profile Delta phi(sub o nu) approx. 0.2 r(sup 1/2 sub n) can easily exceed the shift due to combined effects of aberration and propagation time delays (approx. 2r(sub n)). This strongly affects the misalignment of the center of the PA curve and the center of the pulse profile, thereby modifying the delay radius relation. Contrary to intuition, the effect of sweepback dominates over other effects when emission occurs at low altitudes. For r(sub n) < or approx. 3 x 10(exp -3) the shift becomes negative, i.e. the center of the position angle curve precedes the profile center. With the sweepback effect included, the modified delay-radius relation predicts larger emission radii and is in much better agreement with the other methods of determining r

  13. ON THE ROTATION OF THE MAGNETIC FIELD ACROSS THE HELIOPAUSE

    SciTech Connect

    Opher, M.; Drake, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    Based on the difference between the orientation of the interstellar and the solar magnetic fields, there was an expectation by the community that the magnetic field direction will rotate dramatically across the heliopause (HP). Recently, the Voyager team concluded that Voyager 1 (V1) crossed into interstellar space last year. The question is then why there was no significant rotation in the direction of the magnetic field across the HP. Here we present simulations that reveal that strong rotations in the direction of the magnetic field at the HP at the location of V1 (and Voyager 2) are not expected. The solar magnetic field strongly affects the drapping of the interstellar magnetic field (B {sub ISM}) around the HP. B {sub ISM} twists as it approaches the HP and acquires a strong T component (East-West). The strong increase in the T component occurs where the interstellar flow stagnates in front of the HP. At this same location the N component B{sub N} is significantly reduced. Above and below, the neighboring B {sub ISM} lines also twist into the T direction. This behavior occurs for a wide range of orientations of B {sub ISM}. The angle δ = asin (B{sub N} /B) is small (around 10°-20°), as seen in the observations. Only after some significant distance outside the HP is the direction of the interstellar field distinguishably different from that of the Parker spiral.

  14. PIC simulation of electrodeless plasma thruster with rotating electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Ryosuke; Ohnishi, Naofumi; Nishida, Hiroyuki

    2012-11-01

    For longer lifetime of electric propulsion system, an electrodeless plasma thruster with rotating electric field have been proposed utilizing a helicon plasma source. The rotating electric field may produce so-called Lissajous acceleration of helicon plasma in the presence of diverging magnetic field through a complicated mechanism originating from many parameters. Two-dimensional simulations of the Lissajous acceleration were conducted by a code based on Particle-In-Cell (PIC) method and Monte Carlo Collision (MCC) method for understanding plasma motion in acceleration area and for finding the optimal condition. Obtained results show that azimuthal current depends on ratio of electron drift radius to plasma region length, AC frequency, and axial magnetic field. When ratio of cyclotron frequency to the AC frequency is higher than unity, reduction of the azimuthal current by collision effect is little or nothing.

  15. PIC simulation of electrodeless plasma thruster with rotating electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Ryosuke; Ohnishi, Naofumi; Nishida, Hiroyuki

    2012-11-27

    For longer lifetime of electric propulsion system, an electrodeless plasma thruster with rotating electric field have been proposed utilizing a helicon plasma source. The rotating electric field may produce so-called Lissajous acceleration of helicon plasma in the presence of diverging magnetic field through a complicated mechanism originating from many parameters. Two-dimensional simulations of the Lissajous acceleration were conducted by a code based on Particle-In-Cell (PIC) method and Monte Carlo Collision (MCC) method for understanding plasma motion in acceleration area and for finding the optimal condition. Obtained results show that azimuthal current depends on ratio of electron drift radius to plasma region length, AC frequency, and axial magnetic field. When ratio of cyclotron frequency to the AC frequency is higher than unity, reduction of the azimuthal current by collision effect is little or nothing.

  16. Rotational stability of a long field-reversed configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, D. C. Steinhauer, L. C.

    2014-02-15

    Rotationally driven modes of long systems with dominantly axial magnetic field are considered. We apply the incompressible model and order axial wavenumber small. A recently developed gyro-viscous model is incorporated. A one-dimensional equilibrium is assumed, but radial profiles are arbitrary. The dominant toroidal (azimuthal) mode numbers ℓ=1 and ℓ=2 modes are examined for a variety of non-reversed (B) and reversed profiles. Previous results for both systems with rigid rotor equilibria are reproduced. New results are obtained by incorporation of finite axial wavenumber and by relaxing the assumption of rigid electron and ion rotation. It is shown that the frequently troublesome ℓ=2 field reversed configuration (FRC) mode is not strongly affected by ion kinetic effects (in contrast to non-reversed cases) and is likely stabilized experimentally only by finite length effects. It is also shown that the ℓ=1 wobble mode has a complicated behavior and is affected by a variety of configuration and profile effects. The rotationally driven ℓ=1 wobble is completely stabilized by strong rotational shear, which is anticipated to be active in high performance FRC experiments. Thus, observed wobble modes in these systems are likely not driven by rotation alone.

  17. NEW CONSTRAINTS ON THE GALACTIC HALO MAGNETIC FIELD USING ROTATION MEASURES OF EXTRAGALACTIC SOURCES TOWARD THE OUTER GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, S. A.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Gaensler, B. M.; Brown, J. C.; Van Eck, C. L.; Stil, J. M.; Taylor, A. R.; Haverkorn, M.; Kronberg, P. P.; Shukurov, A.

    2012-08-10

    We present a study of the Milky Way disk and halo magnetic field, determined from observations of Faraday rotation measure (RM) toward 641 polarized extragalactic radio sources in the Galactic longitude range 100 Degree-Sign -117 Degree-Sign , within 30 Degree-Sign of the Galactic plane. For |b| < 15 Degree-Sign , we observe a symmetric RM distribution about the Galactic plane. This is consistent with a disk field in the Perseus arm of even parity across the Galactic mid-plane. In the range 15 Degree-Sign < |b| < 30 Degree-Sign , we find median RMs of -15 {+-} 4 rad m{sup -2} and -62 {+-} 5 rad m{sup -2} in the northern and southern Galactic hemispheres, respectively. If the RM distribution is a signature of the large-scale field parallel to the Galactic plane, then this suggests that the halo magnetic field toward the outer Galaxy does not reverse direction across the mid-plane. The variation of RM as a function of Galactic latitude in this longitude range is such that RMs become more negative at larger |b|. This is consistent with an azimuthal magnetic field of strength 2 {mu}G (7 {mu}G) at a height 0.8-2 kpc above (below) the Galactic plane between the local and the Perseus spiral arm. We propose that the Milky Way could possess spiral-like halo magnetic fields similar to those observed in M51.

  18. Single Plane Illumination Module and Micro-capillary Approach for a Wide-field Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Bruns, Thomas; Schickinger, Sarah; Schneckenburger, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    A module for light sheet or single plane illumination microscopy (SPIM) is described which is easily adapted to an inverted wide-field microscope and optimized for 3-dimensional cell cultures, e.g., multi-cellular tumor spheroids (MCTS). The SPIM excitation module shapes and deflects the light such that the sample is illuminated by a light sheet perpendicular to the detection path of the microscope. The system is characterized by use of a rectangular capillary for holding (and in an advanced version also by a micro-capillary approach for rotating) the samples, by synchronous adjustment of the illuminating light sheet and the objective lens used for fluorescence detection as well as by adaptation of a microfluidic system for application of fluorescent dyes, pharmaceutical agents or drugs in small quantities. A protocol for working with this system is given, and some technical details are reported. Representative results include (1) measurements of the uptake of a cytostatic drug (doxorubicin) and its partial conversion to a degradation product, (2) redox measurements by use of a genetically encoded glutathione sensor upon addition of an oxidizing agent, and (3) initiation and labeling of cell necrosis upon inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Differences and advantages of the present SPIM module in comparison with existing systems are discussed. PMID:25146321

  19. Single plane illumination module and micro-capillary approach for a wide-field microscope.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Thomas; Schickinger, Sarah; Schneckenburger, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    A module for light sheet or single plane illumination microscopy (SPIM) is described which is easily adapted to an inverted wide-field microscope and optimized for 3-dimensional cell cultures, e.g., multi-cellular tumor spheroids (MCTS). The SPIM excitation module shapes and deflects the light such that the sample is illuminated by a light sheet perpendicular to the detection path of the microscope. The system is characterized by use of a rectangular capillary for holding (and in an advanced version also by a micro-capillary approach for rotating) the samples, by synchronous adjustment of the illuminating light sheet and the objective lens used for fluorescence detection as well as by adaptation of a microfluidic system for application of fluorescent dyes, pharmaceutical agents or drugs in small quantities. A protocol for working with this system is given, and some technical details are reported. Representative results include (1) measurements of the uptake of a cytostatic drug (doxorubicin) and its partial conversion to a degradation product, (2) redox measurements by use of a genetically encoded glutathione sensor upon addition of an oxidizing agent, and (3) initiation and labeling of cell necrosis upon inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Differences and advantages of the present SPIM module in comparison with existing systems are discussed. PMID:25146321

  20. Biomechanical Comparison of 3 Ankle Braces With and Without Free Rotation in the Sagittal Plane

    PubMed Central

    Alfuth, Martin; Klein, Dieter; Koch, Raphael; Rosenbaum, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Context: Various designs of braces including hinged and nonhinged models are used to provide external support of the ankle. Hinged ankle braces supposedly allow almost free dorsiflexion and plantar flexion of the foot in the sagittal plane. It is unclear, however, whether this additional degree of freedom affects the stabilizing effect of the brace in the other planes of motion. Objective: To investigate the dynamic and passive stabilizing effects of 3 ankle braces, 2 hinged models that provide free plantar flexion–dorsiflexion in the sagittal plane and 1 ankle brace without a hinge. Design: Crossover study. Setting: University Movement Analysis Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Seventeen healthy volunteers (5 women, 12 men; age = 25.4 ± 4.8 years; height = 180.3 ± 6.5 cm; body mass = 75.5 ± 10.4 kg). Intervention(s): We dynamically induced foot inversion on a tilting platform and passively induced foot movements in 6 directions via a custom-built apparatus in 3 brace conditions and a control condition (no brace). Main Outcome Measure(s): Maximum inversion was determined dynamically using an in-shoe electrogoniometer. Passively induced maximal joint angles were measured using a torque and angle sensor. We analyzed differences among the 4 ankle-brace conditions (3 braces, 1 control) for each of the dependent variables with Friedman and post hoc tests (P < .05). Results: Each ankle brace restricted dynamic foot-inversion movements on the tilting platform as compared with the control condition, whereas only the 2 hinged ankle braces differed from each other, with greater movement restriction caused by the Ankle X model. Passive foot inversion was reduced with all ankle braces. Passive plantar flexion was greater in the hinged models as compared with the nonhinged brace. Conclusions: All ankle braces showed stabilizing effects against dynamic and passive foot inversion. Differences between the hinged braces and the nonhinged brace did not appear to be

  1. Implementing digital holograms to create and measure complex-plane optical fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudley, Angela; Majola, Nombuso; Chetty, Naven; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-02-01

    The coherent superposition of a Gaussian beam with an optical vortex can be mathematically described to occupy the complex plane. We provide a simple analogy between the mathematics, in the form of the complex plane, and the visual representation of these two superimposed optical fields. We provide detailed instructions as to how one can experimentally produce, measure, and control these fields with the use of digital holograms encoded on a spatial light modulator.

  2. Quantum mechanics in rotating-radio-frequency traps and Penning traps with a quadrupole rotating field

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Hasegawa, T.

    2010-03-15

    Quantum-mechanical analysis of ion motion in a rotating-radio-frequency (rrf) trap or in a Penning trap with a quadrupole rotating field is carried out. Rrf traps were introduced by Hasegawa and Bollinger [Phys. Rev. A 72, 043404 (2005)]. The classical motion of a single ion in this trap is described by only trigonometric functions, whereas in the conventional linear radio-frequency (rf) traps it is by the Mathieu functions. Because of the simple classical motion in the rrf trap, it is expected that the quantum-mechanical analysis of the rrf traps is also simple compared to that of the linear rf traps. The analysis of Penning traps with a quadrupole rotating field is also possible in a way similar to the rrf traps. As a result, the Hamiltonian in these traps is the same as the two-dimensional harmonic oscillator, and energy levels and wave functions are derived as exact results. In these traps, it is found that one of the vibrational modes in the rotating frame can have negative energy levels, which means that the zero-quantum-number state (''ground'' state) is the highest energy state.

  3. The interaction between plasma rotation, stochastic fields and tearing mode excitation by external perturbation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBock, M. F. M.; Classen, I. G. J.; Busch, C.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; Koslowski, H. R.; Unterberg, B.; TEXTOR Team

    2008-01-01

    For fusion reactors, based on the principle of magnetic confinement, it is important to avoid so-called magnetic islands or tearing modes. They reduce confinement and can be the cause of major disruptions. One class of magnetic islands is that of the perturbation field driven modes. This perturbation field can, for example, be the intrinsic error field. Theoretical work predicts a strong relationship between plasma rotation and the excitation of perturbation field modes. Experimentally, the theory on mode excitation and plasma rotation has been confirmed on several tokamaks. In those experiments, however, the control over the plasma rotation velocity and direction, and over the externally applied perturbation field was limited. In this paper experiments are presented that were carried out at the TEXTOR tokamak. Two tangential neutral beam injectors and a set of helical perturbation coils, called the dynamic ergodic divertor (DED), provide control over both the plasma rotation and the external perturbation field in TEXTOR. This made it possible to set up a series of experiments to test the theory on mode excitation and plasma rotation in detail. The perturbation field induced by the DED not only excites magnetic islands, it also sets up a layer near the plasma boundary where the magnetic field is stochastic. It will be shown that this stochastic field alters both the rotational response of the plasma on the perturbation field and the threshold for mode excitation. It therefore has to be included in an extended theory on mode excitation.

  4. Computation of instantaneous and time-averaged active acoustic intensity field around rotating source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yijun; Xu, Chen; Qi, Datong

    2015-02-01

    A vector aeroacoustics method is developed to analyze the acoustic energy flow path from the rotating source. In this method, the instantaneous and time-averaged active acoustic intensity vectors are evaluated from the time-domain and frequency-domain acoustic pressure and acoustic velocity formulations, respectively. With the above method, the acoustic intensity vectors and the acoustic energy streamlines are visualized to investigate the propagation feature of the noise radiated from the monopole and dipole point sources and the rotor in subsonic rotation. The result reveals that a portion of the acoustic energy spirals many circles before moving towards the far field, and another portion of the acoustic energy firstly flows inward along the radial direction and then propagates along the axial direction. Further, an acoustic black hole exists in the plane of source rotation, from which the acoustic energy cannot escape once the acoustic energy flows into it. Moreover, by visualizing the acoustic intensity field around the rotating sources, the acoustic-absorption performance of the acoustic liner built in the casing and centerbody is discussed.

  5. Generation of Whistler Wave by a Rotating Magnetic Field Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karavaev, A.; Papadopoulos, K.; Shao, X.; Sharma, A. S.; Gigliotti, A.; Gekelman, W.; Pribyl, P.; Vincena, S.

    2008-12-01

    The interaction of Rotating Magnetic Fields (RMF) with plasmas is a fundamental plasma physics problem with implications to fusion related Field-Reversed Configurations (FRC), space propulsion, astronaut protection from cosmic rays in long interstellar travel, control of the energetic population in the radiation belts and near zone processes in pulsar magnetospheres. In this paper we report recent experiments on the generation of whistler waves with a new type RMF-based antenna. The experiments were conducted on UCLA's Large Plasma Device (LAPD). The Rotating Magnetic Field (RMF) is created using poly-phased loop antennas. A number of parameter combinations, e.g. plasma density, background magnetic field, and driving current, were used. It was found that RMF created by a two phase-delayed loop antenna drives significant currents along the ambient magnetic field. The measured amplitude of induced wave field was proportional to the square-root of the plasma density. The spatial decay rate for the wave perturbation across the background magnetic field was found to scale with the plasma skin depth. A small amplitude second harmonic was also measured. The paper will also present analytic and simulation results that account for the experimental results; in particular, the scaling of the induced magnetic field as a function of the RMF and plasma parameters and the spatial decay rate of magnetic field. Applications of RMF as an efficient radiation source of plasma waves in space plasmas will be discussed. This work was sponsored by ONR MURI Grant 5-28828

  6. Nonlinear magneto-optical rotation with modulated light in tilted magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Pustelny, S.; Gawlik, W.; Rochester, S. M.; Kimball, D. F. Jackson; Yashchuk, V. V.; Budker, D.

    2006-12-15

    Larmor precession of laser-polarized atoms contained in antirelaxation-coated cells, detected via nonlinear magneto-optical rotation (NMOR), is a promising technique for a new generation of ultrasensitive atomic magnetometers. For magnetic fields directed along the light propagation direction, resonances in NMOR appear when linearly polarized light is frequency or amplitude modulated at twice the Larmor frequency. Because the frequency of these resonances depends on the magnitude but not the direction of the field, they are useful for scalar magnetometry. Additional NMOR resonances at the Larmor frequency appear when the magnetic field is tilted away from the light propagation direction in the plane defined by the light propagation and polarization vectors. These resonances, studied both experimentally and with a density matrix calculation in the present work, offer a convenient method of achieving additional information about a direction of the magnetic field.

  7. NMR system and method having a permanent magnet providing a rotating magnetic field

    DOEpatents

    Schlueter, Ross D [Berkeley, CA; Budinger, Thomas F [Berkeley, CA

    2009-05-19

    Disclosed herein are systems and methods for generating a rotating magnetic field. The rotating magnetic field can be used to obtain rotating-field NMR spectra, such as magic angle spinning spectra, without having to physically rotate the sample. This result allows magic angle spinning NMR to be conducted on biological samples such as live animals, including humans.

  8. Dynamics of Magnetotactic Bacteria in a Rotating Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Ērglis, Kaspars; Wen, Qi; Ose, Velta; Zeltins, Andris; Sharipo, Anatolijs; Janmey, Paul A.; Cēbers, Andrejs

    2007-01-01

    The dynamics of the motile magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense in a rotating magnetic field is investigated experimentally and analyzed by a theoretical model. These elongated bacteria are propelled by single flagella at each bacterial end and contain a magnetic filament formed by a linear assembly of ∼40 ferromagnetic nanoparticles. The movements of the bacteria in suspension are analyzed by consideration of the orientation of their magnetic dipoles in the field, the hydrodynamic resistance of the bacteria, and the propulsive force of the flagella. Several novel features found in experiments include a velocity reversal during motion in the rotating field and an interesting diffusive wandering of the trajectory curvature centers. A new method to measure the magnetic moment of an individual bacterium is proposed based on the theory developed. PMID:17526564

  9. Large-scale velocity fields. [of solar rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Robert F.; Kichatinov, L. L.; Bogart, Richard S.; Ribes, Elizabeth

    1991-01-01

    The present evaluation of recent observational results bearing on the nature and characteristics of solar rotation gives attention to the status of current understanding on such large-scale velocity-field-associated phenomena as solar supergranulation, mesogranulation, and giant-scale convection. Also noted are theoretical suggestions reconciling theory and observations of giant-scale solar convection. The photosphere's global meridional circulation is suggested by solar rotation models requiring pole-to-equator flows of a few m/sec, as well as by the observed migration of magnetic activity over the solar cycle. The solar rotation exhibits a latitude and cycle dependence which can be understood in terms of a time-dependent convective toroidal roll pattern.

  10. Specific heat of twisted bilayer graphene: Engineering phonons by atomic plane rotations

    SciTech Connect

    Nika, Denis L.; Cocemasov, Alexandr I.; Balandin, Alexander A.

    2014-07-21

    We have studied the phonon specific heat in single-layer, bilayer, and twisted bilayer graphene. The calculations were performed using the Born-von Karman model of lattice dynamics for intralayer atomic interactions and spherically symmetric interatomic potential for interlayer interactions. We found that at temperature T < 15 K, specific heat varies with temperature as T{sup n}, where n = 1 for graphene, n = 1.6 for bilayer graphene, and n = 1.3 for the twisted bilayer graphene. The phonon specific heat reveals an intriguing dependence on the twist angle in bilayer graphene, which is particularly pronounced at low temperature. The results suggest a possibility of phonon engineering of thermal properties of layered materials by twisting the atomic planes.

  11. Rotating magnetic field induced oscillation of magnetic particles for in vivo mechanical destruction of malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu; Muroski, Megan E; Petit, Dorothée C M C; Mansell, Rhodri; Vemulkar, Tarun; Morshed, Ramin A; Han, Yu; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Horbinski, Craig M; Huang, Xinlei; Zhang, Lingjiao; Cowburn, Russell P; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2016-02-10

    Magnetic particles that can be precisely controlled under a magnetic field and transduce energy from the applied field open the way for innovative cancer treatment. Although these particles represent an area of active development for drug delivery and magnetic hyperthermia, the in vivo anti-tumor effect under a low-frequency magnetic field using magnetic particles has not yet been demonstrated. To-date, induced cancer cell death via the oscillation of nanoparticles under a low-frequency magnetic field has only been observed in vitro. In this report, we demonstrate the successful use of spin-vortex, disk-shaped permalloy magnetic particles in a low-frequency, rotating magnetic field for the in vitro and in vivo destruction of glioma cells. The internalized nanomagnets align themselves to the plane of the rotating magnetic field, creating a strong mechanical force which damages the cancer cell structure inducing programmed cell death. In vivo, the magnetic field treatment successfully reduces brain tumor size and increases the survival rate of mice bearing intracranial glioma xenografts, without adverse side effects. This study demonstrates a novel approach of controlling magnetic particles for treating malignant glioma that should be applicable to treat a wide range of cancers. PMID:26708022

  12. Sheared Plasma Rotation in Partially Stochastic Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Wingen, A.; Spatschek, K. H.

    2009-05-08

    It is shown that resonant magnetic perturbations generate sheared flow velocities in magnetized plasmas. Stochastic magnetic fields in incomplete chaos influence the drift motion of electrons and ions differently. Using a fast mapping technique, it is demonstrated that a radial electric field is generated due to the different behavior of passing particles (electrons and ions) in tokamak geometry; magnetic trapping of ions is neglected. Radial profiles of the polodial velocity resulting from the force balance in the presence of a strong toroidal magnetic field are obtained. Scaling laws for plasma losses and the forms of sheared plasma rotation profiles are discussed.

  13. Analytical model for electromagnetic cascades in rotating electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Nerush, E. N.; Bashmakov, V. F.; Kostyukov, I. Yu.

    2011-08-15

    Electromagnetic cascades attract a lot of attention as an important quantum electrodynamics effect that will reveal itself in various electromagnetic field configurations at ultrahigh intensities. We study cascade dynamics in rotating electric field analytically and numerically. The kinetic equations for the electron-positron plasma and gamma-quanta are formulated. The scaling laws are derived and analyzed. For the cascades arising far above the threshold the dependence of the cascade parameters on the field frequency is derived. The spectra of high-energy cascade particles are calculated. The analytical results are verified by numerical simulations.

  14. Computation of Bound Orbits in the Plane of a Galaxy with a Flat Rotation Curve

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacon, M. E.; Sharrar, Amber

    2010-01-01

    A standard topic in an advanced undergraduate classical mechanics course is the determination of the orbits in a gravitational field. In the present paper we report on the calculation of bound orbits in the gravitational field of a spiral galaxy. Calculations such as these could serve to focus attention on an area of cutting edge astrophysics and…

  15. Investigations on the Incompletely Developed Plane Diagonal-Tension Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Paul

    1940-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation on the incompletely developed diagonal-tension field. Actual diagonal-tension beams work in an intermediate stage between pure shear and pure diagonal tension; the theory developed by wagner for diagonal tension is not directly applicable. The first part of the paper reviews the most essential items of the theory of pure diagonal tension as well as previous attempts to formulate a theory of incomplete diagonal tension. The second part of the paper describes strain measurement made by the N. A. C. A. to obtain the necessary coefficients for the proposed theory. The third part of the paper discusses the stress analysis of diagonal-tension beams by means of the proposed theory.

  16. Microscopic observation of magnetic bacteria in the magnetic field of a rotating permanent magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smid, Pieter; Shcherbakov, Valeriy; Petersen, Nikolai

    2015-09-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are ubiquitous and can be found in both freshwater and marine environments. Due to intracellular chains of magnetic single domain particles, they behave like swimming compass needles. In external magnetic fields like the Earth's magnetic field, a torque is acting on the chain. This will cause the bacterium to be rotated and aligned with the external field. The swimming direction of magnetotactic bacteria can be controlled with external magnetic fields, which makes it convenient to study them under a light microscope. Usually, a special set of coils arranged around a light microscope is used to control the swimming magnetotactic bacteria. Here, we present a simple mechanical system with a permanent magnet, which produces a rotating magnetic field of nearly constant amplitude in the focal plane of a light microscope. The device is placed beside the light microscope and easily adaptable to almost any microscope and thus convenient for field experiments. To describe the trajectories qualitatively, a theoretical model of the trajectories is presented. This device can be used to control the swimming direction of magnetotactic bacteria and also for studying their magnetic and hydrodynamic properties.

  17. Microscopic observation of magnetic bacteria in the magnetic field of a rotating permanent magnet.

    PubMed

    Smid, Pieter; Shcherbakov, Valeriy; Petersen, Nikolai

    2015-09-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are ubiquitous and can be found in both freshwater and marine environments. Due to intracellular chains of magnetic single domain particles, they behave like swimming compass needles. In external magnetic fields like the Earth's magnetic field, a torque is acting on the chain. This will cause the bacterium to be rotated and aligned with the external field. The swimming direction of magnetotactic bacteria can be controlled with external magnetic fields, which makes it convenient to study them under a light microscope. Usually, a special set of coils arranged around a light microscope is used to control the swimming magnetotactic bacteria. Here, we present a simple mechanical system with a permanent magnet, which produces a rotating magnetic field of nearly constant amplitude in the focal plane of a light microscope. The device is placed beside the light microscope and easily adaptable to almost any microscope and thus convenient for field experiments. To describe the trajectories qualitatively, a theoretical model of the trajectories is presented. This device can be used to control the swimming direction of magnetotactic bacteria and also for studying their magnetic and hydrodynamic properties. PMID:26429479

  18. Submicrometer resolution far field high sensitivity Kerr microscopy for in-plane magnetization detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, C H; Yang, Z

    2009-07-01

    We report that a far field magneto-optical system designed for detecting the off-plane magnetization in polar configuration can also detect the in-plane magnetization, while preserving the high sensitivity by using symmetric illumination and photoelastic modulation, even though the optical axis of the system is vertical to the sample surface. The spatial resolution can reach 500 nm at 514 nm in wavelength. The in-plane sensitivity can be eliminated by using an aperture to remove the off-axis obliquely incident light generated by the high numerical aperture objective lens that focuses the laser beam onto the sample surface. PMID:19655943

  19. OBLIQUELY ROTATING PULSARS: SCREENING OF THE INDUCTIVE ELECTRIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Melrose, D. B.; Yuen Rai

    2012-02-01

    Pulsar electrodynamics has been built up by taking ingredients from two models, the vacuum-dipole model, which ignores the magnetosphere but includes the inductive electric field due to the obliquely rotating magnetic dipole, and the corotating-magnetosphere model, which neglects the vacuum inductive electric field and assumes a corotating magnetosphere. We argue that the inductive field can be neglected only if it is screened by a current, J{sub sc}, which we calculate for a rigidly rotating magnetosphere. Screening of the parallel component of the inductive field can be effective, but the perpendicular component cannot be screened in a pulsar magnetosphere. The incompletely screened inductive electric field has not been included in any model for a pulsar magnetosphere, and taking it into account has important implications. One effect is that it implies that the magnetosphere cannot be corotating, and we suggest that drift relative to corotation offers a natural explanation for the drifting of subpulses. A second effect is that this screening of the parallel inductive electric field must break down in the outer magnetosphere, and this offers a natural explanation for the acceleration of the electrons that produce pulsed gamma-ray emission.

  20. When is rotational angiography superior to conventional single‐plane angiography for planning coronary angioplasty?

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Jane; Boutong, Sara; Brett, Sarah; Louis, Amal; Heppenstall, James; Morton, Allison C.; Gunn, Julian P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the value of rotational coronary angiography (RoCA) in the context of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) planning. Background As a diagnostic tool, RoCA is associated with decreased patient irradiation and contrast use compared with conventional coronary angiography (CA) and provides superior appreciation of three‐dimensional anatomy. However, its value in PCI remains unknown. Methods We studied stable coronary artery disease assessment and PCI planning by interventional cardiologists. Patients underwent either RoCA or conventional CA pre‐PCI for planning. These were compared with the referral CA (all conventional) in terms of quantitative lesion assessment and operator confidence. An independent panel reanalyzed all parameters. Results Six operators performed 127 procedures (60 RoCA, 60 conventional CA, and 7 crossed‐over) and assessed 212 lesions. RoCA was associated with a reduction in the number of lesions judged to involve a bifurcation (23 vs. 30 lesions, P < 0.05) and a reduction in the assessment of vessel caliber (2.8 vs. 3.0 mm, P < 0.05). RoCA improved confidence assessing lesion length (P = 0.01), percentage stenosis (P = 0.02), tortuosity (P < 0.04), and proximity to a bifurcation (P = 0.03), particularly in left coronary artery cases. X‐ray dose, contrast agent volume, and procedure duration were not significantly different. Conclusions Compared with conventional CA, RoCA augments quantitative lesion assessment, enhances confidence in the assessment of coronary artery disease and the precise details of the proposed procedure, but does not affect X‐ray dose, contrast agent volume, or procedure duration. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26012725

  1. Barotropic, baroclinic, and inertial instabilities of the Gaussian jet on the equatorial β-plane in rotating shallow water model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribstein, Bruno; Tissier, Ann-Sophie; Zeitlin, Vladimir

    2014-05-01

    abstract A detailed linear stability analysis of an easterly barotropic Gaussian jet centered at the equator is performed in the long-wave sector in the framework of one- and two-layer shallow-water models on the equatorial β-plane. It is shown that the dominant instability of the jet is due to phase-locking and resonance between Yanai waves, although the standard barotropic and baroclinic instabilities due to the resonance between Rossby waves are also present. In the one-layer case this dominant instability has non-zero growth rate at zero wavenumber for high enough Rossby and low enough Burger numbers, thus reproducing the classical symmetric inertial instability. Yet its asymmetric counterpart has the highest growth rate [1, 2]. In the two-layer case the dominant instability may be barotropic or baroclinic, the latter being stronger, with the maximum of the growth rate shifting towards smaller downstream wavenumbers as Rossby number increases at fixed Burger number and given thickness and density ratios [1, 2]. At large enough Rossby numbers this instability has a non-zero growth rate limit at zero wavenumber, giving the baroclinic symmetric inertial instability. Again, the maximal growth rate is achieved at small but non-zero wavenumbers, corresponding to the asymmetric inertial instability. At high enough Rossby number and low enough Burger number not only the baroclinic, but also the barotropic symmetric instability appears, as well as higher meridional modes of the baroclinic symmetric instability. Still, all of them are dominated by their asymmetric counterparts. Direct numerical simulations of the saturation of the leading instabilities are performed, showing that the barotropic species of the instability saturates by forming a double vortex street subject to nonlinear oscillations, while the baroclinic, the most vigorous one, saturates by producing strong vertical shears and related dissipation and mixing. Key words: Rotating equatorial β-plane flows

  2. Transverse field muon-spin rotation measurement of the topological anomaly in a thin film of MnSi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancaster, T.; Xiao, F.; Salman, Z.; Thomas, I. O.; Blundell, S. J.; Pratt, F. L.; Clark, S. J.; Prokscha, T.; Suter, A.; Zhang, S. L.; Baker, A. A.; Hesjedal, T.

    2016-04-01

    We present the results of transverse-field muon-spin rotation measurements on an epitaxially grown 40-nm-thick film of MnSi on Si(111) in the region of the field-temperature phase diagram where a skyrmion phase has been observed in the bulk. We identify changes in the quasistatic magnetic field distribution sampled by the muon, along with evidence for magnetic transitions around T ≈40 and 30 K. Our results suggest that the cone phase is not the only magnetic texture realized in film samples for out-of-plane fields.

  3. Spin-rotation couplings: spinning test particles and Dirac field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bini, Donato; Lusanna, Luca

    2008-06-01

    The hypothesis of coupling between spin and rotation introduced long ago by Mashhoon is examined in the context of “1 + 3” and “3 + 1” space-time splitting techniques, either in special or in general relativity. Its content is discussed in terms of classical (Mathisson-Papapetrou-Dixon-Souriou model) as well as quantum physics (Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation for the Dirac field in an external field), reviewing and discussing all the relevant theoretical literature concerning the existence of such effect. Some original contributions are also included.

  4. Stellar Rotation in the Orion Nebula Cluster Flanking Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebull, L.

    1999-12-01

    We present an optical study of four 45' x 45' fields centered 35' north, south, east, and west of the Orion Nebula Cluster center. We have measured V and I C photometry for 5000 stars in three of these fields, and U photometry for 1600 of those. We have obtained spectral classifications for 300 of the stars with UVI C photometry plus an additional 200 stars located outside the area of our photometric survey. Based on these data, we find 230 active accretion disk candidates. We have also obtained time-series data for stars in each of these four fields, and 300 periods derived from these data will be presented and discussed. In recent months, several investigators have presented rotation rates for stars in the Trapezium and its immediate environs. The paradigm (e.g. Choi and Herbst 1996) until now has been that the slow rotators are still (magnetically) locked to their disks, and that the fast rotators have dissipated their disks sufficiently as to allow spinup. Herbst et al. (2000) claim they see a bimodal distribution of rotators in Orion; Stassun et al. (1999) claim not to see such a distribution in a very similar region, and in fact cast doubt on the bimodality of the original distribution. Different selection effects (as well as different numbers of stars) are likely to be affecting these conclusions; the addition of data presented here will clarify the issues. This research has made use of data taken at McDonald Observatory (by R. Makidon and M. Adams), data taken at the KPNO 0.9m (with B. Patten and C. Pavlovsky), data taken through the WIYN-Queue program, software written by B. Patten, and partial funding via NASA Origins Grants (L. Hillenbrand and S. Strom).

  5. Derivation of the coupled equations of motion for a circular ring rotating about an axis in the plane of the ring

    SciTech Connect

    Benedetti, G.A.

    1996-03-01

    The coupled equations of motion for a circular ring or circular ring segment are developed for the case where the ring is rotating about an axis in its plane and subjected to an angular velocity as well as an angular acceleration. Coupling results from bending in and out of the plane of the ring as well as from extension and torsion of the ring. These equations are then applied to special cases to determine the coupled equations of motion for a ring, beam and cable rotating at a constant angular speed. Coupled equations of motion for a non-rotating circular ring or circular ring segment are developed for the cases of extensional motion and inextensional motion. These equations are subsequently linearized and uncoupled for extensional and inextensional motion in the plane of the ring as well as for uncoupled motion out of the plane of the ring. The critical angular speed for lateral dynamic instability is determined for a rotating circular shaft which supports several rotating circular ring segments.

  6. Differential Rotation and Magnetic Field Generation in Giant Gas Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glatzmaier, G. A.

    2012-12-01

    Observations of the zonal winds and magnetic fields on the surfaces of giant planets like Jupiter and Saturn beg the questions of what flows and fields exist well below their surfaces and how they are maintained. In roughly four years, NASA's Juno mission to Jupiter and the Cassini Solstice mission at Saturn will provide near-surface measurements of the magnetic fields of these giant planets that will help to answer these questions. Until then, theoretical models and computer simulations continue to provide predictions for what the NASA missions at Jupiter and Saturn will discover. A major question is how deep below the surface do the latitudinally-banded zonal winds extend, i.e., what is the subsurface differential rotation. If the zonal winds are maintained only within the shallow Jovian atmosphere, they should play no significant role in the dynamo mechanism because the dynamo operates well below the surface where the electrical conductivity is high. On the other hand, latitudinally banded magnetic field structures measured by Juno at Jupiter and Cassini at Saturn would support the prediction that the zonal winds on these giant planets extend deep below their surfaces. Computer simulations of convective dynamos with electrical conductivity increasing by several orders of magnitude with depth are presented. Examples are shown of how the magnetic field structures, for different simulated patterns of differential rotation, would appear as a function of the eccentric orbital radius of the spacecraft.

  7. Effect of electric-field fluctuations on rotational revival amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Andrew J.; Antonsen, Thomas M.

    2009-11-01

    We study numerically the behavior of rotational revivals in a molecular gas when subject to the fluctuating electric field of a background plasma. We model a molecule using a rigid rotor Hamiltonian and couple it to an electric field using permanent and induced multipole interaction terms. The evolution of the density matrix for the molecule is calculated for a short intense laser pulse, followed by a fluctuating background electric field. A broad superposition of angular momentum eigenstates of a molecule is created by the laser field, and the result of an ensemble average over initial molecular orientation is a set of recurring peaks in the probability density for observing a particular orientation—the so-called “rotational revivals.” The fluctuating background field is created using the dressed particle technique, and the result is a loss of coherence between the phases of the various basis states of the molecule, which causes a decreasing amplitude for subsequent alignment peaks. Modern short-pulse lasers operate with sufficient intensity to make this effect relevant to experiments in molecular alignment.

  8. Extracting full-field dynamic strain response of a rotating wind turbine using photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baqersad, Javad; Poozesh, Peyman; Niezrecki, Christopher; Avitabile, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Health monitoring of wind turbines is typically performed using conventional sensors (e.g. strain-gages and accelerometers) that are usually mounted to the nacelle or gearbox. Although many wind turbines stop operating due to blade failures, there are typically few to no sensor mounted on the blades. Placing sensors on the rotating parts of the structure is a challenge due to the wiring and data transmission constraints. Within the current work, an approach to monitor full-field dynamic response of rotating structures (e.g. wind turbine blades or helicopter rotors) is developed and experimentally verified. A wind turbine rotor was used as the test structure and was mounted to a block and horizontally placed on the ground. A pair of bearings connected to the rotor shaft allowed the turbine to freely spin along the shaft. Several optical targets were mounted to the blades and a pair of high-speed cameras was used to monitor the dynamics of the spinning turbine. Displacements of the targets during rotation were measured using three-dimensional point tracking. The point tracking technique measured both rigid body displacement and flexible deformation of the blades at target locations. While the structure is rotating, only flap displacements of optical targets (displacements out of the rotation plane) were used in strain prediction process. The measured displacements were expanded and applied to the finite element model of the turbine to extract full-field dynamic strain on the structure. The proposed approach enabled the prediction of dynamic response on the outer surface as well as within the inner points of the structure where no other sensor could be easily mounted. In order to validate the proposed approach, the predicted strain was compared to strain measured at four locations on the spinning blades using a wireless strain-gage system.

  9. Dynamic magnetic fields remote-control apoptosis via nanoparticle rotation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Enming; Kircher, Moritz F; Koch, Martin; Eliasson, Lena; Goldberg, S Nahum; Renström, Erik

    2014-04-22

    The ability to control the movement of nanoparticles remotely and with high precision would have far-reaching implications in many areas of nanotechnology. We have designed a unique dynamic magnetic field (DMF) generator that can induce rotational movements of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs). We examined whether the rotational nanoparticle movement could be used for remote induction of cell death by injuring lysosomal membrane structures. We further hypothesized that the shear forces created by the generation of oscillatory torques (incomplete rotation) of SPIONs bound to lysosomal membranes would cause membrane permeabilization, lead to extravasation of lysosomal contents into the cytoplasm, and induce apoptosis. To this end, we covalently conjugated SPIONs with antibodies targeting the lysosomal protein marker LAMP1 (LAMP1-SPION). Remote activation of slow rotation of LAMP1-SPIONs significantly improved the efficacy of cellular internalization of the nanoparticles. LAMP1-SPIONs then preferentially accumulated along the membrane in lysosomes in both rat insulinoma tumor cells and human pancreatic beta cells due to binding of LAMP1-SPIONs to endogenous LAMP1. Further activation of torques by the LAMP1-SPIONs bound to lysosomes resulted in rapid decrease in size and number of lysosomes, attributable to tearing of the lysosomal membrane by the shear force of the rotationally activated LAMP1-SPIONs. This remote activation resulted in an increased expression of early and late apoptotic markers and impaired cell growth. Our findings suggest that DMF treatment of lysosome-targeted nanoparticles offers a noninvasive tool to induce apoptosis remotely and could serve as an important platform technology for a wide range of biomedical applications. PMID:24597847

  10. Rotating sample magnetometer for cryogenic temperatures and high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisterer, M.; Hengstberger, F.; Voutsinas, C. S.; Hörhager, N.; Sorta, S.; Hecher, J.; Weber, H. W.

    2011-06-01

    We report on the design and implementation of a rotating sample magnetometer (RSM) operating in the variable temperature insert (VTI) of a cryostat equipped with a high-field magnet. The limited space and the cryogenic temperatures impose the most critical design parameters: the small bore size of the magnet requires a very compact pick-up coil system and the low temperatures demand a very careful design of the bearings. Despite these difficulties the RSM achieves excellent resolution at high magnetic field sweep rates, exceeding that of a typical vibrating sample magnetometer by about a factor of ten. In addition the gas-flow cryostat and the high-field superconducting magnet provide a temperature and magnetic field range unprecedented for this type of magnetometer.

  11. Two charges on plane in a magnetic field: III. He{sup +} ion

    SciTech Connect

    Escobar-Ruiz, M.A.

    2014-12-15

    The He{sup +} ion on a plane subject to a constant magnetic field B perpendicular to the plane is considered taking into account the finite nuclear mass. Factorization of eigenfunctions permits to reduce the four-dimensional problem to three-dimensional one. The ground state energy of the composite system is calculated in a wide range of magnetic fields from B=0.01 up to B=100a.u. and center-of-mass Pseudomomentum K from 0 to 1000 a.u. using a variational approach. The accuracy of calculations for B=0.1a.u. is cross-checked in Lagrange-mesh method and not less than five significant figures are reproduced in energy. Similarly to the case of moving neutral system on the plane a phenomenon of a sharp change of energy behavior as a function of K for a certain critical K{sub c} but a fixed magnetic field occurs.

  12. The Spin-Plane Double Probe Electric Field Instrument for MMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindqvist, P.-A.; Olsson, G.; Torbert, R. B.; King, B.; Granoff, M.; Rau, D.; Needell, G.; Turco, S.; Dors, I.; Beckman, P.; Macri, J.; Frost, C.; Salwen, J.; Eriksson, A.; Åhlén, L.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Porter, J.; Lappalainen, K.; Ergun, R. E.; Wermeer, W.; Tucker, S.

    2016-03-01

    The Spin-plane double probe instrument (SDP) is part of the FIELDS instrument suite of the Magnetospheric Multiscale mission (MMS). Together with the Axial double probe instrument (ADP) and the Electron Drift Instrument (EDI), SDP will measure the 3-D electric field with an accuracy of 0.5 mV/m over the frequency range from DC to 100 kHz. SDP consists of 4 biased spherical probes extended on 60 m long wire booms 90∘ apart in the spin plane, giving a 120 m baseline for each of the two spin-plane electric field components. The mechanical and electrical design of SDP is described, together with results from ground tests and calibration of the instrument.

  13. Transitional and weakly turbulent flow in a rotating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiller, J.; Fraňa, K.; Cramer, A.

    2006-07-01

    The early stage of turbulent flow driven by a rotating magnetic field is studied via direct numerical simulations and electric potential measurements for the case of a cylindrical geometry. The numerical results show that the undisturbed flow remains stable up to the linear stability limit (Tac), whereas small perturbations may initiate a nonlinear transition at subcritical Taylor numbers. The observed instabilities occur randomly as isolated pairs of Taylor-Görtler vortices, which grow from spots to long tubes until they are dissipated in the lid boundary layers. At 7.5Tac, the flow is governed by large-scale three-dimensional fluctuations and may be characterized as weakly turbulent. Taylor-Görtler vortices provide the major turbulence mechanism, apart from oscillations of the rotation axis. As the vortices tend to align with the azimuthal direction, they result in a locally two-dimensional turbulence pattern.

  14. Rotating field antenna experiments in Phaedrus-B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasaka, Y.; Majeski, R.; Browning, J.; Hershkowitz, N.; Roberts, D.

    1987-09-01

    The rotating field antenna installed in the central cell of the Phaedrus-B tandem mirror consists of two close-spaced dual half-turn ICRF antennas. The symmetry axes of the antennas are rotated 90° with respect to each other. Each antenna is driven by a separate rf amplifier, with ≳200 KW power output. The polarization of the resultant antenna near fields is selected by the relative phasing of the antenna currents. In particular, the antenna set can produce nearly pure left or right circularly polarized fields. We find an increase in ion heating as the field polarization is varied from right circularly polarized through linear polarization to left circular polarization, for plasma densities up to 3-4×1012 cm-3, when the antenna set is driven at ω˜ωci (midplane). Ion temperature is diagnosed by a time of flight neutral energy analyzer. Results are compared to the predictions of the ICRF code ANTENA of Brian McVey.

  15. Rotation dependence of a phase delay between plasma edge electron density and temperature fields due to a fast rotating, resonant magnetic perturbation field

    SciTech Connect

    Stoschus, H.; Schmitz, O.; Frerichs, H.; Unterberg, B.; Abdullaev, S. S.; Clever, M.; Coenen, J. W.; Kruezi, U.; Schega, D.; Samm, U.; Jakubowski, M. W.

    2010-06-15

    Measurements of the plasma edge electron density n{sub e} and temperature T{sub e} fields during application of a fast rotating, resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) field show a characteristic modulation of both, n{sub e} and T{sub e} coherent to the rotation frequency of the RMP field. A phase delay PHI between the n{sub e}(t) and T{sub e}(t) waveforms is observed and it is demonstrated that this phase delay PHI is a function of the radius with PHI(r) depending on the relative rotation of the RMP field and the toroidal plasma rotation. This provides for the first time direct experimental evidence for a rotation dependent damping of the external RMP field in the edge layer of a resistive high-temperature plasma which breaks down at low rotation and high resonant field amplitudes.

  16. Rotational symmetry breaking in the topological superconductor SrxBi2Se3 probed by upper-critical field experiments

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Y.; Nikitin, A. M.; Araizi, G. K.; Huang, Y. K.; Matsushita, Y.; Naka, T.; de Visser, A.

    2016-01-01

    Recently it was demonstrated that Sr intercalation provides a new route to induce superconductivity in the topological insulator Bi2Se3. Topological superconductors are predicted to be unconventional with an odd-parity pairing symmetry. An adequate probe to test for unconventional superconductivity is the upper critical field, Bc2. For a standard BCS layered superconductor Bc2 shows an anisotropy when the magnetic field is applied parallel and perpendicular to the layers, but is isotropic when the field is rotated in the plane of the layers. Here we report measurements of the upper critical field of superconducting SrxBi2Se3 crystals (Tc = 3.0 K). Surprisingly, field-angle dependent magnetotransport measurements reveal a large anisotropy of Bc2 when the magnet field is rotated in the basal plane. The large two-fold anisotropy, while six-fold is anticipated, cannot be explained with the Ginzburg-Landau anisotropic effective mass model or flux flow induced by the Lorentz force. The rotational symmetry breaking of Bc2 indicates unconventional superconductivity with odd-parity spin-triplet Cooper pairs (Δ4-pairing) recently proposed for rhombohedral topological superconductors, or might have a structural nature, such as self-organized stripe ordering of Sr atoms. PMID:27350295

  17. Rotational symmetry breaking in the topological superconductor SrxBi2Se3 probed by upper-critical field experiments.

    PubMed

    Pan, Y; Nikitin, A M; Araizi, G K; Huang, Y K; Matsushita, Y; Naka, T; de Visser, A

    2016-01-01

    Recently it was demonstrated that Sr intercalation provides a new route to induce superconductivity in the topological insulator Bi2Se3. Topological superconductors are predicted to be unconventional with an odd-parity pairing symmetry. An adequate probe to test for unconventional superconductivity is the upper critical field, Bc2. For a standard BCS layered superconductor Bc2 shows an anisotropy when the magnetic field is applied parallel and perpendicular to the layers, but is isotropic when the field is rotated in the plane of the layers. Here we report measurements of the upper critical field of superconducting SrxBi2Se3 crystals (Tc = 3.0 K). Surprisingly, field-angle dependent magnetotransport measurements reveal a large anisotropy of Bc2 when the magnet field is rotated in the basal plane. The large two-fold anisotropy, while six-fold is anticipated, cannot be explained with the Ginzburg-Landau anisotropic effective mass model or flux flow induced by the Lorentz force. The rotational symmetry breaking of Bc2 indicates unconventional superconductivity with odd-parity spin-triplet Cooper pairs (Δ4-pairing) recently proposed for rhombohedral topological superconductors, or might have a structural nature, such as self-organized stripe ordering of Sr atoms. PMID:27350295

  18. Dynamics of Crowd Behaviors: From Complex Plane to Quantum Random Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivancevic, Vladimir G.; Reid, Darryn J.

    2015-11-01

    The following sections are included: * Complex Plane Dynamics of Crowds and Groups * Introduction * Complex-Valued Dynamics of Crowd and Group Behaviors * Kähler Geometry of Crowd and Group Dynamics * Computer Simulations of Crowds and Croups Dynamics * Braids of Agents' Behaviors in the Complex Plane * Hilbert-Space Control of Crowds and Groups Dynamics * Quantum Random Fields: A Unique Framework for Simulation, Optimization, Control and Learning * Introduction * Adaptive Quantum Oscillator * Optimization and Learning on Banach and Hilbert Spaces * Appendix * Complex-Valued Image Processing * Linear Integral Equations * Riemann-Liouville Fractional Calculus * Rigorous Geometric Quantization * Supervised Machine-Learning Methods * First-Order Logic and Quantum Random Fields

  19. Magnetic-Field-Induced Rotation of Polarized Light Emission from Monolayer WS_{2}.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Robert; Arora, Ashish; Plechinger, Gerd; Nagler, Philipp; Granados Del Águila, Andrés; Ballottin, Mariana V; Christianen, Peter C M; Michaelis de Vasconcellos, Steffen; Schüller, Christian; Korn, Tobias; Bratschitsch, Rudolf

    2016-08-12

    We control the linear polarization of emission from the coherently emitting K^{+} and K^{-} valleys (valley coherence) in monolayer WS_{2} with an out-of-plane magnetic field of up to 25 T. The magnetic-field-induced valley Zeeman splitting causes a rotation of the emission polarization with respect to the excitation by up to 35° and reduces the polarization degree by up to 16%. We explain both of these phenomena with a model based on two noninteracting coherent two-level systems. We deduce that the coherent light emission from the valleys decays with a time constant of τ_{c}=260  fs. PMID:27563997

  20. One-sided outflows/jets from rotating stars with complex magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovelace, R. V. E.; Romanova, M. M.; Ustyugova, G. V.; Koldoba, A. V.

    2010-11-01

    We present for the first time axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic simulations which show the formation of intrinsically asymmetric or one-sided outflows or jets from disc accretion on to a rotating star with a complex magnetic field. The intrinsic magnetic field of the star is assumed to consist of a superposition of an aligned dipole and an aligned quadrupole in different proportions. The star is assumed to be rapidly rotating in the sense that the star's magnetosphere is in the propeller regime where strong outflows occur. Our simulations show that for conditions where there is a significant quadrupole component in addition to the dipole component, then a dominantly one-sided conical wind tends to form on the side of the equatorial plane with the larger value of the intrinsic axial magnetic field at a given distance. For cases where the quadrupole component is absent or very small, we find that dominantly one-sided outflows also form, but the direction of the flow `flip-flops' between upward and downward on a time-scale of ~30d for a protostar. The average outflow will thus be symmetrical. In the case of a pure quadrupole field we find symmetric outflows in the upward and downward directions.

  1. Rotational and magnetic field instabilities in neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Kokkotas, Kostas D.

    2014-01-14

    In this short review we present recent results on the dynamics of neutron stars and their magnetic fields. We discuss the progress that has been made, during the last 5 years, in understanding the rotational instabilities with emphasis to the one due to the f-mode, the possibility of using gravitational wave detection in constraining the parameters of neutron stars and revealing the equation of state as well as the detectability of gravitational waves produced during the unstable phase of a neutron star’s life. In addition we discuss the dynamics of extremely strong magnetic fields observed in a class of neutron stars (magnetars). Magnetic fields of that strength are responsible for highly energetic phenomena (giant flares) and we demonstrate that the analysis of the emitted electromagnetic radiation can lead in constraining the parameters of neutron stars. Furthermore, we present our results from the study of such violent phenomena in association with the emission of gravitational radiation.

  2. Semiconductor Crystal Growth in Static and Rotating Magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic fields have been applied during the growth of bulk semiconductor crystals to control the convective flow behavior of the melt. A static magnetic field established Lorentz forces which tend to reduce the convective intensity in the melt. At sufficiently high magnetic field strengths, a boundary layer is established ahead of the solid-liquid interface where mass transport is dominated by diffusion. This can have a significant effect on segregation behavior and can eliminate striations in grown crystals resulting from convective instabilities. Experiments on dilute (Ge:Ga) and solid solution (Ge-Si) semiconductor systems show a transition from a completely mixed convective state to a diffusion-controlled state between 0 and 5 Tesla. In HgCdTe, radial segregation approached the diffusion limited regime and the curvature of the solid-liquid interface was reduced by a factor of 3 during growth in magnetic fields in excess of 0.5 Tesla. Convection can also be controlled during growth at reduced gravitational levels. However, the direction of the residual steady-state acceleration vector can compromise this effect if it cannot be controlled. A magnetic field in reduced gravity can suppress disturbances caused by residual transverse accelerations and by random non-steady accelerations. Indeed, a joint program between NASA and the NHMFL resulted in the construction of a prototype spaceflight magnet for crystal growth applications. An alternative to the suppression of convection by static magnetic fields and reduced gravity is the imposition of controlled steady flow generated by rotating magnetic fields (RMF)'s. The potential benefits of an RMF include homogenization of the melt temperature and concentration distribution, and control of the solid-liquid interface shape. Adjusting the strength and frequency of the applied magnetic field allows tailoring of the resultant flow field. A limitation of RMF's is that they introduce deleterious instabilities above a

  3. How good a clock is rotation? The stellar rotation-mass-age relationship for old field stars

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, Courtney R.; Pinsonneault, Marc H. E-mail: pinsono@astronomy.ohio-state.edu

    2014-01-10

    The rotation-mass-age relationship offers a promising avenue for measuring the ages of field stars, assuming the attendant uncertainties to this technique can be well characterized. We model stellar angular momentum evolution starting with a rotation distribution from open cluster M37. Our predicted rotation-mass-age relationship shows significant zero-point offsets compared to an alternative angular momentum loss law and published gyrochronology relations. Systematic errors at the 30% level are permitted by current data, highlighting the need for empirical guidance. We identify two fundamental sources of uncertainty that limit the precision of rotation-based ages and quantify their impact. Stars are born with a range of rotation rates, which leads to an age range at fixed rotation period. We find that the inherent ambiguity from the initial conditions is important for all young stars, and remains large for old stars below 0.6 M {sub ☉}. Latitudinal surface differential rotation also introduces a minimum uncertainty into rotation period measurements and, by extension, rotation-based ages. Both models and the data from binary star systems 61 Cyg and α Cen demonstrate that latitudinal differential rotation is the limiting factor for rotation-based age precision among old field stars, inducing uncertainties at the ∼2 Gyr level. We also examine the relationship between variability amplitude, rotation period, and age. Existing ground-based surveys can detect field populations with ages as old as 1-2 Gyr, while space missions can detect stars as old as the Galactic disk. In comparison with other techniques for measuring the ages of lower main sequence stars, including geometric parallax and asteroseismology, rotation-based ages have the potential to be the most precise chronometer for 0.6-1.0 M {sub ☉} stars.

  4. Fast and accurate near-field - far-field transformation by sampling interpolation of plane-polar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucci, Ovidio M.; Gennarelli, Claudio; Savarese, Catello

    1991-01-01

    An optimal sampling interpolation algorithm which allows the accurate recovery of plane-rectangular near-field samples from the knowledge of the plane-polar ones is developed. This enables the standard near field-far field (NF-FF) transformation, which takes full advantage of the FFT algorithm, to be applied to plane-polar scanning. The maximum allowable sample spacing is also rigorously derived, and it is shown that it can be significantly greater than lambda/2 as the measurement place moves away from the source. This allows a remarkable reduction of both measurement time and memory storage requirements. The sampling approach is compared with that based on the bivariate Lagrange interpolation (BLI) method. The sampling reconstruction agrees with the exact results significantly better than the BLI, in spite of the significantly lower number of required measurements.

  5. Rotating and binary relativistic stars with magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markakis, Charalampos

    We develop a geometrical treatment of general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics for perfectly conducting fluids in Einstein--Maxwell--Euler spacetimes. The theory is applied to describe a neutron star that is rotating or is orbiting a black hole or another neutron star. Under the hypotheses of stationarity and axisymmetry, we obtain the equations governing magnetohydrodynamic equilibria of rotating neutron stars with poloidal, toroidal or mixed magnetic fields. Under the hypothesis of an approximate helical symmetry, we obtain the first law of thermodynamics governing magnetized equilibria of double neutron star or black hole - neutron star systems in close circular orbits. The first law is written as a relation between the change in the asymptotic Noether charge deltaQ and the changes in the area and electric charge of black holes, and in the vorticity, baryon rest mass, entropy, charge and magnetic flux of the magnetofluid. In an attempt to provide a better theoretical understanding of the methods used to construct models of isolated rotating stars and corotating or irrotational binaries and their unexplained convergence properties, we analytically examine the behavior of different iterative schemes near a static solution. We find the spectrum of the linearized iteration operator and show for self-consistent field methods that iterative instability corresponds to unstable modes of this operator. On the other hand, we show that the success of iteratively stable methods is due to (quasi-)nilpotency of this operator. Finally, we examine the integrability of motion of test particles in a stationary axisymmetric gravitational field. We use a direct approach to seek nontrivial constants of motion polynomial in the momenta---in addition to energy and angular momentum about the symmetry axis. We establish the existence and uniqueness of quadratic constants and the nonexistence of quartic constants for stationary axisymmetric Newtonian potentials with equatorial symmetry

  6. Growth and Transverse Field Muon Spin Rotation of Cobalt Niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munsie, Timothy; Millington, Anna; Marjerrison, Casey; Medina, Teresa; Wilson, Murray; Kermarrec, Edwin; Liu, Lian; Dabkowska, Hanna; Uemura, Yasutomo; Williams, Travis; Luke, Graeme

    2014-03-01

    Cobalt niobate, CoNb2O6, is a material whose spins, when in a transverse field, act like the theoretical ideal 1D-Ising model. This occurs due to the magnetic spins aligning highly anisotropically along the Co2+ chains. Because of this unique structure and material performance, the creation and characterization of this material is of both experimental and theoretical interest. The research we will present is a detailing of changes in the characteristics of the growth of the material utilizing the optical floating zone crystal growth method compared to previous growth parameters and an examination of this material in a moderately high transverse field using the technique of muon spin rotation (μSR). We have determined that the quality of crystals created by the floating zone are highly dependent on the growth parameters utilized (original ceramic shape and rotation rate) and dictate the speed at which the growth can be performed. Transverse Field μSR shows a gradual but significant change to the magnetic structure of the material below 5 K. Second Affiliation: Brockhouse Institute for Materials Research.

  7. Chandrasekhar's relation and stellar rotation in the Kepler field

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, J. R. P.; Soares, B. B.; De Freitas, D. B. E-mail: brauliosoares@uern.br

    2014-11-20

    According to the statistical law of large numbers, the expected mean of identically distributed random variables of a sample tends toward the actual mean as the sample increases. Under this law, it is possible to test the Chandrasekhar's relation (CR), (V) = (π/4){sup –1}(Vsin i), using a large amount of Vsin i and V data from different samples of similar stars. In this context, we conducted a statistical test to check the consistency of the CR in the Kepler field. In order to achieve this, we use three large samples of V obtained from Kepler rotation periods and a homogeneous control sample of Vsin i to overcome the scarcity of Vsin i data for stars in the Kepler field. We used the bootstrap-resampling method to estimate the mean rotations ((V) and (Vsin i)) and their corresponding confidence intervals for the stars segregated by effective temperature. Then, we compared the estimated means to check the consistency of CR, and analyzed the influence of the uncertainties in radii measurements, and possible selection effects. We found that the CR with (sin i) = π/4 is consistent with the behavior of the (V) as a function of (Vsin i) for stars from the Kepler field as there is a very good agreement between such a relation and the data.

  8. Spin in stationary gravitational fields and rotating frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obukhov, Yuri N.; Silenko, Alexander J.; Teryaev, Oleg V.

    2010-03-01

    A spin motion of particles in stationary spacetimes is investigated in the framework of the classical gravity and relativistic quantum mechanics. We bring the Dirac equation for relativistic particles in nonstatic spacetimes to the Hamiltonian form and perform the Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation. We show the importance of the choice of tetrads for description of spin dynamics in the classical gravity. We derive classical and quantum mechanical equations of motion of the spin for relativistic particles in stationary gravitational fields and rotating frames and establish the full agreement between the classical and quantum mechanical approaches.

  9. Comparison of potential field solutions for Carrington Rotation 2144

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Keiji; Yang, Shangbin; Deng, Yuagyong

    2016-02-01

    We examined differences among the coronal magnetic field structures derived with the potential field source surface (PFSS) model for Carrington Rotation 2144, from 21 November to 19 December 2013. We used the synoptic maps of solar photospheric magnetic field from four observatories, the Huairou Solar Observing Station (HSOS), Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG), Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI), and Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO). We tested two smoothing methods, Gaussian and boxcar averaging, and correction of unbalanced net magnetic flux. The solutions of three-dimensional coronal magnetic field are significantly different each other. An open-field region derived with HSOS data agrees best with the corresponding coronal hole observed by Solar Dynamics Observatories/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly, while HMI data yielded best agreements with the near-Earth OMNI database. The GONG data overall gave agreements as good as the HMI. The PFSS calculations using WSO data were least sensitive to the choices we examined in this work. Differences in PFSS solutions using different choices and parameters in smoothing imply that the photospheric magnetic field distributions with size of several degrees at midlatitude and low-latitude regions can be decisive, at least, in the examined period. To better determine the global solar corona, therefore, further evaluation of influences from compact bipolar magnetic field is needed.

  10. An experimental study of multiple zonal jet formation in rotating, thermally driven convective flows on a topographic beta-plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, P. L.; Jacoby, T. N. L.; Rogberg, P. H. T.; Wordsworth, R. D.; Yamazaki, Y. H.; Miki-Yamazaki, K.; Young, R. M. B.; Sommeria, J.; Didelle, H.; Viboud, S.

    2015-08-01

    A series of rotating, thermal convection experiments were carried out on the Coriolis platform in Grenoble, France, to investigate the formation and energetics of systems of zonal jets through nonlinear eddy/wave-zonal flow interactions on a topographic β-plane. The latter was produced by a combination of a rigid, conically sloping bottom and the rotational deformation of the free upper surface. Convection was driven by a system of electrical heaters laid under the (thermally conducting) sloping bottom and led to the production of intense, convective vortices. These were observed to grow in size as each experiment proceeded and led to the development of weak but clear azimuthal jet-like flows, with a radial scale that varied according to the rotation speed of the platform. Detailed analyses reveal that the kinetic energy-weighted radial wavenumber of the zonal jets, kJy, scales quite closely either with the Rhines wavenumber as kJy ≃ 2(βT/2urms)1/2, where urms is the rms total or eddy velocity and βT is the vorticity gradient produced by the sloping topography, or the anisotropy wavenumber as k J y ≃ 1 . 25 ( βT 3 / ɛ ) 1 / 5 , where ɛ is the upscale turbulent energy transfer rate. Jets are primarily produced by the direct quasi-linear action of horizontal Reynolds stresses produced by trains of topographic Rossby waves. The nonlinear production rate of zonal kinetic energy is found to be strongly unsteady, however, with fluctuations of order 10-100 times the amplitude of the mean production rate for all cases considered. The time scale of such fluctuations is found to scale consistently with either an inertial time scale, τ p ˜ 1 . / √{ u r m s β T } , or the Ekman spin-down time scale. Kinetic energy spectra show some evidence for a k-5/3 inertial subrange in the isotropic component, suggestive of a classical Kolmogorov-Batchelor-Kraichnan upscale energy cascade and a steeper spectrum in the zonal mean flow, though not as steep as k-5, as

  11. The changes in shoulder rotation strength ratio for various shoulder positions and speeds in the scapular plane between baseball players and non-players

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hwai-Ting; Ko, Hsing-Tsen; Lee, Kung-Che; Chen, Ying-Cheng; Wang, Dean-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effect of shoulder positions and speeds on internal and external rotation torque of college baseball players and age-matched non-players. [Subjects] Twenty first-level collegiate baseball players and 19 college students were recruited. [Methods] A dynamometer system was used to evaluate the shoulder rotation strength in sitting postures. Three testing positions, namely shoulder abduction of 45°, 70°, and 90° in the scapular plane, were combined with three testing speeds at 60°/s, 120°/s, and 210°/s. [Results] The maximum external and internal rotation torques both occurred at shoulder abduction of 70°. However, only external rotation torque was affected by the speed, with the peak value observed at 60°/s. The internal rotation torque of baseball players was larger than that of the control group under all testing conditions, but the external rotation did not show any difference. The ratio of external to internal rotation torque changed with the testing positions and speeds in both groups. The ratio in the control group was greater than that in the player group. [Conclusion] The shoulder position could affect the rotational strength, and the baseball players could strengthen their external rotators for better performance and injury prevention. PMID:26157263

  12. Calculation Of Correction Angles Of 3-Dimensional Vertebral Rotations Based On Bi-Plane X-Ray Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamaki, Tamotsu; Umezaki, Eisaku; Yamagata, Masatsune; Inoue, Shun-ichi

    1984-10-01

    For the therapy of diseases of spinal deformity such as scoliosis, the data of 3-dimensional and correct spinal configuration are needed. Authors developed the system of spinal configuration analysis using bi-plane X-ray photogrammetry which is strong aid for this subject. The idea of correction angle of rotation of vertebra is introduced for this system. Calculated result under this idea has the clinical meaning because the correction angle is the angle which should be corrected on the treatment such as operation or wearing the equipment. Method of 30° oblique projection which gives the apparent X-ray image and eases the measurement of the anatomically characteristic points is presented. The anatomically characteristic bony points whose images should be measured on a- or b-film are of four points. These are centers of upper and lower end plates of each vertebra the center is calculated from two points which are most distant each other on the contour of vertebral end plate ), the lower end points of root of right and left pedicles. Some clinical applications and the effectiveness of this system are presented.

  13. Detection of in-plane displacements of acoustic wave fields using extrinsic Fizeau fiber interferometric sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhawan, R.; Gunther, M. F.; Claus, R. O.

    1991-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of the in-plane particle displacement components of ultrasonic surface acoustic wave fields using extrinsic Fizeau fiber interferometric (EFFI) sensors are reported. Wave propagation in materials and the fiber sensor elements are briefly discussed. Calibrated experimental results obtained for simulated acoustic emission events on homogeneous metal test specimens are reported and compared to previous results obtained using piezoelectric transducers.

  14. The unique effect of in-plane anisotropic strain in the magnetization control by electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y. Y.; Wang, J.; Hu, F. X.; Liu, Y.; Kuang, H.; Wu, R. R.; Sun, J. R.; Shen, B. G.

    2016-05-01

    The electric field control of magnetization in both (100)- and (011)-Pr0.7Sr0.3MnO3/Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)0.7Ti0.3O3(PSMO/PMN-PT) heterostructures were investigated. It was found that the in-plane isotropic strain induced by electric field only slightly reduces the magnetization at low temperature in (100)-PSMO/PMN-PT film. On the other hand, for (011)-PSMO/PMN-PT film, the in-plane anisotropic strain results in in-plane anisotropic, nonvolatile change of magnetization at low-temperature. The magnetization, remanence and coercivity along in-plane [100] direction are suppressed by the electric field while the ones along [01-1] direction are enhanced, which is ascribed to the extra effective magnetic anisotropy induced by the electric field via anisotropic piezostrains. More interestingly, such anisotropic modulation behaviors are nonvolatile, demonstrating a memory effect.

  15. The flow field in a rotating detonation-wave engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kailasanath, Kazhikathra; Schwer, Douglas

    2011-11-01

    Rotating detonation-wave engines (RDE) are a form of continuous detonation-wave engine. They potentially provide further gains than an intermittent or pulsed detonation-wave engine (PDE). However, significantly less work has been on this concept when compared to the PDE. In this talk, we present the detailed flow field in an idealized RDE, primarily consisting of two concentric cylinders. A premixed detonable mixture is injected into the annulus between the two concentric cylinders. Once a detonation is initiated, it keeps travelling around in the annulus as long as there is fresh detonable mixture ahead of it. Hence, the injection process is critically important to the stability and performance of the RDE. Furthermore, we show that the flow field is quite complex consisting of multiple shock waves and the outflow is primarily axial, although the detonation-wave is travelling around circumferentially. Sponsored by the NRL 6.1 Computational Physics Task Area.

  16. Bridgman Growth of Germanium Crystals in a Rotating Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Schweizer, M.; Cobb, S. D.; Walker, J. S.; Szofran, F. R.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A series of (100)-oriented gallium-doped germanium crystals have been grown by the Bridgman method and under the influence of a rotating magnetic field (RMF). The RMF has a marked affect on the interface shape, changing it from concave to nearly flat. The onset of time-dependent flow instabilities occurs when the critical magnetic Taylor number is exceeded, and this can be observed by noting the appearance of striations in the grown crystals. The critical magnetic Taylor number is a sensitive function of the aspect ratio and, as the crystal grows under a constant applied magnetic field, the induced striations change from nonperiodic to periodic, undergo a period-doubling transition, and then cease to exist. Also, by pulsing the RMF on and off, it is shown that intentional interface demarcations can be introduced.

  17. Quantitative measurement of in-plane acoustic field components using surface-mounted fiber sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claus, Richard O.; Dhawan, Rajat R.; Gunther, Michael F.; Murphy, Kent A.

    1993-01-01

    Extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric sensors have been used to obtain calibrated, quantitative measurements of the in-plane displacement components associated with the propagation of ultrasonic elastic stress waves on the surfaces of solids. The frequency response of the sensor is determined by the internal spacing between the two reflecting fiber endface surfaces which form the Fabry-Perot cavity, a distance which is easily controlled during fabrication. With knowledge of the material properties of the solid, the out-of-plane displacement component of the wave may also be determined, giving full field data.

  18. Composite magnetorheological elastomers as dielectrics for plane capacitors: Effects of magnetic field intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasoiu, Maria; Bica, Ioan

    The fabrication of composite magnetorheological elastomers (MRECs) based on silicone rubber, carbonyl iron microparticles (10% vol.) and polyurethane elastomer doped with 0%, 10% and 20% volume concentration TiO2 microparticles is presented. The obtained MRECs have the shape of thin foils and are used as dielectric materials for manufacturing plane capacitors. Using the plane capacitor method and expression of capacitance as a function of magnetic field intensity, combined with linear elasticity theory, the static magnetoelastic model of the composite is obtained and analyzed.

  19. Characterization of rf-SSET in both in-plane and perpendicular magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chunyang; Yang, Zhen; Yuan, Mingyun; Rimberg, A. J.; Savage, D. E.; Eriksson, M. A.; Rimberg Team; Eriksson Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    Previous success in coupling an aluminum radio-frequency superconducting single electron transistor (rf-SSET) to quantum dots (QDs) has demonstrated use of the rf-SSET as an ultra-sensitive and fast charge sensor. Since a magnetic field is usually necessary for quantum dot qubit manipulation, it is important to understand the effect of magnetic fields, either in-plane or perpendicular, on the performance of any charge sensor near the QDs. Here we report characterization of rf-SSETs in both in-plane and perpendicular magnetic fields. The rf-SSET works well in an in-plane fields up to 1 Tesla at a temperature of 30 mK. At 0.3K, in a perpendicular field generated by a stripline located 700 nm away, the rf-SSET charge sensitivity even shows improvement for up to 2.1 mA current through the stripline (corresponding roughly to a field of 6 Gauss). This work was supported by NSA, LPS and ARO

  20. Directed Transformation from Quadrupolar to Dipolar Nematic Colloids by an In-Plane Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagashira, Kenji; Asakura, Keita; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Ozaki, Masanori

    2013-02-01

    We demonstrate direction-controlled transformation from quadrupolar to dipolar nematic colloids using an in-plane electric field. When the electric field is applied in the direction perpendicular to the rubbing direction, a splay-bend wall is induced, which traps colloidal particles. Above the applied electric field of 0.14 V/µm, a Saturn-ring defect shrinks into a hedgehog defect due to the symmetric reorientation of the liquid crystal molecules around the particle. The direction of the shrinking is determined by the pretilt angle of the liquid crystal and the field direction near the edge of the electrode.

  1. Exterior field of slowly and rapidly rotating neutron stars: Rehabilitating spacetime metrics involving hyperextreme objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manko, V. S.; Ruiz, E.

    2016-05-01

    The 4-parameter exact solution presumably describing the exterior gravitational field of a generic neutron star is presented in a concise explicit form defined by only three potentials. In the equatorial plane, the metric functions of the solution are found to be given by particularly simple expressions that make them very suitable for the use in concrete applications. Following Pappas and Apostolatos, we perform a comparison of the multipole structure of the solution with the multipole moments of the known physically realistic Berti-Stergioulas numerical models of neutron stars to argue that the hyperextreme sectors of the solution are not less (but are possibly even more) important for the correct description of rapidly rotating neutron stars than the subextreme sector involving exclusively the black-hole constituents. We have also worked out in explicit form an exact analog of the well-known Hartle-Thorne approximate metric.

  2. Magnetic Field Effect on the Stability of Flow Induced by a Rotating Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.; Gillies, D. C.

    1999-01-01

    A linear stability analysis has been performed for the flow induced by a rotating magnetic field in a cylindrical column filled with electrically conducting fluid. The first transition is time- independent and results in the generation of Taylor vortices. The critical value of the magnetic Taylor number has been examined as a function of the strength of the transverse rotating magnetic field, the strength of an axial static magnetic field, and thermal buoyancy. Increasing the transverse field increases the critical magnetic Taylor number and decreases the aspect ratio of the Taylor vortices at the onset of instability. An increase in the axial magnetic field also increases the critical magnetic Taylor number but increases the aspect ratio of the Taylor vortices. Thermal buoyancy is found to have only a negligible effect on the onset of instability.

  3. Magnetic Field Effect on the Stability of Flow Induced by a Rotating Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Gillies, D. C.; Volz, M. P.

    1999-01-01

    A linear stability analysis has been performed for the flow induced by a rotating magnetic field in a cylindrical column filled with electrically conducting fluid. The first transition is time-independent and results in the generation of Taylor vortices. The critical value of the magnetic Taylor number has been examined as a function of the strength of the transverse rotating magnetic field, the strength of an axial static magnetic field, and thermal buoyancy. Increasing the transverse field increases the critical magnetic Taylor number and decreases the aspect ratio of the Taylor vortices at the onset of instability. An increase in the axial magnetic field also increases the critical magnetic Taylor number but increases the aspect ratio of the Taylor vortices. Thermal buoyancy is found to have only a negligible effect on the onset of instability.

  4. Domain wall depinning from notches using combined in- and out-of-plane magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goertz, Jelle J. W.; Ziemys, Grazvydas; Eichwald, Irina; Becherer, Markus; Swagten, Henk J. M.; Breitkreutz-v. Gamm, Stephan

    2016-05-01

    Controlled domain wall motion and pinning in nanowires with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy are of great importance in modern magnetic memory and logic devices. Here, we investigate by experiment the DW pinning and depinning from a notch in a magnetic nanowire, under the influence of combined in- and out-of-plane magnetic fields. In our experiment, the perpendicular magnetization of the Co/Pt nanowires is tilted with the help of sub-μs in-plane field pulses generated by an on-chip coil. Consequently, the energy density of the DW is decreased and the depinning field of the notch is reduced. A theoretical model is applied and compared to the measurement results. The DW depinning mechanism and the DW type are further investigated by micromagnetic simulations.

  5. FFT applications to plane-polar near-field antenna measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatti, Mark S.; Rahmat-Samii, Yahya

    1988-01-01

    The four-point bivariate Lagrange interpolation algorithm was applied to near-field antenna data measured in a plane-polar facility. The results were sufficiently accurate to permit the use of the FFT (fast Fourier transform) algorithm to calculate the far-field patterns of the antenna. Good agreement was obtained between the far-field patterns as calculated by the Jacobi-Bessel and the FFT algorithms. The significant advantage in using the FFT is in the calculation of the principal plane cuts, which may be made very quickly. Also, the application of the FFT algorithm directly to the near-field data was used to perform surface holographic diagnosis of a reflector antenna. The effects due to the focusing of the emergent beam from the reflector, as well as the effects of the information in the wide-angle regions, are shown. The use of the plane-polar near-field antenna test range has therfore been expanded to include these useful FFT applications.

  6. Giant rotating magnetocaloric effect at low magnetic fields in multiferroic TbMn2O5 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balli, M.; Jandl, S.; Fournier, P.; Dimitrov, D. Z.

    2016-03-01

    In conventional magnetocaloric refrigeration systems, the magnetocaloric effect is exploited by moving the active material in and out of the magnetic field source. Here, we demonstrate that a large and reversible magnetocaloric effect (-ΔSR, max = 6.4 J/kg K and ΔTR, max = 8 K under 2 T) can be generated simply by rotating the multiferroic TbMn2O5 single crystal around its b axis in a relatively low constant magnetic field applied in the ac plane. Our results should inspire and open ways toward the implementation of compact, efficient and embedded magnetocaloric devices for low temperature and space applications.

  7. Rotational Resonance in milli-tesla fields detected by Field Cycling NMR.

    PubMed

    Reutter, S; Privalov, A; Buntkowsky, G; Fujara, F

    2012-02-01

    Rotational Resonance (R(2)) between different spin Zeeman levels in samples of adamantane C(10)H(16) (homonuclear R(2)) and a mixture of C(10)H(16) and C(10)D(16) (both homonuclear and heteronuclear R(2)) has been studied. A Field Cycling NMR instrument was used to match the external field frequency ν(0) to a fixed frequency of sample rotation ν(r) at ν(r) = 40, 50 or 60 kHz. Rotational Resonance is observed at rational frequency ratios of ν(0)/ν(r), such as 12, 23, 32 and 1. The method may prove to become a useful tool for the determination of spin-spin distances in condensed matter. PMID:22239819

  8. Poloidal asymmetry in perpendicular plasma rotation and radial electric field measured with correlation reflectometry at TEXTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Soldatov, S.; Kramer-Flecken, A.; Wassenhove, G. Van

    2008-09-15

    Measurements of plasma rotation and electric field are crucial for the study of plasma confinement and transport. The present paper is devoted to experimental observations of poloidal asymmetry in perpendicular plasma rotation with correlation reflectometry on TEXTOR.

  9. Electric Field Reconstruction in the Image Plane of a High-Contrast Coronagraph Using a Set of Pinholes around the Lyot Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giveona, Amir; Shaklan, Stuart; Kern, Brian; Noecker, Charley; Kendrick, Steve; Wallace, Kent

    2012-01-01

    In a setup similar to the self coherent camera, we have added a set of pinholes in the diffraction ring of the Lyot plane in a high-contrast stellar Lyot coronagraph. We describe a novel complex electric field reconstruction from image plane intensity measurements consisting of light in the coronagraph's dark hole interfering with light from the pinholes. The image plane field is modified by letting light through one pinhole at a time. In addition to estimation of the field at the science camera, this method allows for self-calibration of the probes by letting light through the pinholes in various permutations while blocking the main Lyot opening. We present results of estimation and calibration from the High Contrast Imaging Testbed along with a comparison to the pair-wise deformable mirror diversity based estimation technique. Tests are carried out in narrow-band light and over a composite 10% bandpass.

  10. Vibration of Induction Motor Rotor in Rotating Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Yoshio; Sato, Hidenori; Komatsuzaki, Toshihiko; Saito, Takuhiro

    The rotor vibration of two-pole induction motor with rotating magnetic field has been investigated. The vibration is measured at any relative location of the stator and the rotor with various power supply frequencies in the experiment and is analyzed in consideration of mechanical factors of the rotor. The following conclusion is obtained through the experiment and the analysis; (1) 2ω vibration of twice the power supply frequency ω is generated because of offset between the stator center and the gyrational center of the rotor. (2) Two vibrations of ω(1-s) and ω(1+s) where s is slip ratio are generated because of the rotor unbalance or the disagreement between the gyrational center and geometrical center of the rotor. (3) An unstable vibration is predicted in the analysis when the power supply frequency is equal to natural frequency of the rotor, however, the unstable vibration was not generated in the experiment because of the damping.

  11. Bridgman Growth of Germanium Crystals in a Rotating Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Szofran, F. R.; Cobb, S. D.; Schweizer, M.; Walker, J. S.

    2005-01-01

    A series of (100)-oriented gallium-doped germanium crystals has been grown by the vertical Bridgman method and under the influence of a rotating magnetic field (RMF). Time-dependent flow instabilities occur when the critical magnetic Taylor number (Tm(sup c)) is exceeded, and this can be observed by noting the appearance of striations in the grown crystals. Tm(sup c) decreases as the aspect ratio of the melt increases, and approaches the theoretical limit expected for an infinite cylinder. Intentional interface demarcations are introduced by pulsing the RMF on and off The RMF has a marked affect on the interface shape, changing it from concave to nearly flat as the RMF strength is increased.

  12. Bridgman Growth of Germanium Crystals in a Rotating Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Walker, J. S.; Schweizer, M.; Cobb, S. D.; Szofran, F. R.

    2004-01-01

    A series of (100)-oriented gallium-doped germanium crystals have been grown by the Bridgman method and under the influence of a rotating magnetic field (RMF). Time-dependent flow instabilities occur when the critical magnetic Taylor number (Tm(sup c) is exceeded, and this can be observed by noting the appearance of striations in the grown crystals. The experimental data indicate that Tm(sup c) increases as the aspect ratio of the melt decreases. Modeling calculations predicting Tm(sup c) as a function of aspect ratio are in reasonable agreement with the experimental data. The RMF has a marked affect on the interface shape, changing it from concave to nearly flat as the RMF strength is increased. Also, by pulsing the RMF on and off, it is shown that intentional interface demarcations can be introduced.

  13. Physical states and properties of barium titanate films in a plane electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirokov, V. B.; Kalinchuk, V. V.; Shakhovoi, R. A.; Yuzyuk, Yu. I.

    2016-07-01

    The influence of a plane electric field on the phase states of barium titanate thin films under the conditions of forced deformation has been studied. The field dependence of a complete set of material constants has been taken in the region of the c-phase, where polarization losses are absent. The material constants are calculated using equations of the piezoelectric effect derived by linearizing the nonlinear equations of state from the phenomenological; theory for barium titanate. It has been shown that there is a critical value of the field at which the electromechanical coupling coefficient reaches a maximum.

  14. Rotating dipole and quadrupole field for a multiple cathode system

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, X.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Kewisch, J.; Litvinenko, V.; Meng, W.; Pikin, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Rao, T.; Sheehy, B.; Skarita, J.; Wang, E.; Wu, Q.; Xin, T.

    2011-03-28

    A multiple cathode system has been designed to provide the high average current polarized electron bunches for the future electron-ion collider eRHIC [1]. One of the key research topics in this design is the technique to generate a combined dipole and quadrupole rotating field at high frequency (700 kHz). This type of field is necessary for combining bunches from different cathodes to the same axis with minimum emittance growth. Our simulations and the prototype test results to achieve this will be presented. The future eRHIC project, next upgrade of EHIC, will be the first electron-heavy ion collider in the world. For polarized-electron and polarized proton collisions, it requires a polarized electron source with high average current ({approx}50 mA), short bunch ({approx}3 mm), emittance of about 20 {micro}m and energy spread of {approx}1% at 10 MeV. The state-of-art polarized electron cathode can generate average current of about more than 1 mA, but much less than 50 mA. The current is limited by the quantum efficiency, lifetime, space charge and ultra-high vacuum requirement of the polarized cathode. A possible approach to achieve the 50 mA beam is to employ multiple cathodes, such as 20 cathodes, and combine the multiple bunched beams from cathodes to the same axis. We name it as 'Gatling gun' because its operations bear similarity to a multi-barrel Gatling gun. The electron spin direction is not affected by electric field but will follow to the direction of the magnetic bending. This requires that, to preserve the spin polarization from cathode, the fixed bending field after the solenoid and the rotating bending field in combiner must be either a pair of electric bendings or a pair of magnetic bendings. We choose the scheme with a pair of magnetic bendings because it is much easier than the scheme with a pair of electric bendings at our 200 keV electron energy level.

  15. Transverse field muon-spin rotation in skyrmion-hosting materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancaster, Tom; Xiao, Fan; Williams, Robert; Salman, Zaher; Blundell, Stephen; Pratt, Francis; Thomas, Iorwerth; Ciomaga Hatnean, Monica; Balakrishnan, Geetha; Zhang, Shilei; Hesjedal, Thorsten

    We present the results of transverse field (TF) muon-spin rotation (μ+SR) measurements on examples of materials that host a skyrmion lattice (SL) phase. In measurements on bulk Cu2OSeO3, we measure the response of the TF μ+SR signal in the SL phase along with the surrounding ones, and suggest how the phases might be distinguished using the results of these measurements. Dipole field simulations support the conclusion that the muon is sensitive to the SL via the TF lineshape and, based on this interpretation, our measurements suggest that the SL is quasistatic on a timescale τ > 100 ns. We also discuss TF μ+SR measurements on an epitaxially grown 40 nm-thick film of MnSi on Si(111) in the region of the field-temperature phase diagram where a skyrmion phase has been observed in the bulk. We identify changes in the quasistatic magnetic field distribution sampled by the muon, along with evidence for magnetic transitions around T ~ 40 K and 30 K. Our results suggest that the cone phase is not the only magnetic texture realized in film samples for out-of-plane fields.

  16. Rotation of solar magnetic fields for the current solar cycle 24

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, X. J.; Xie, J. L.

    2014-11-01

    The rotation of solar magnetic fields for the current solar cycle 24 is investigated through a cross-correlation analysis of the Carrington synoptic maps of solar photospheric magnetic fields during Carrington rotation numbers 2076-2146 (2008 October to 2014 January). The sidereal rotation rates of positive and negative magnetic fields at some latitudes are shown, and it can be found that the positive (negative) fields generally rotate faster than the negative (positive) fields in the southern (northern) hemisphere at low latitudes. The mean rotation profiles of total, positive, and negative magnetic fields between ±60° latitudes in the time interval are also obtained. It should be noted that both of the mean rotation profiles of the positive and negative magnetic fields, as well as the mean rotation profile of the total magnetic field, exhibit a quasi-rigid rotation at latitudes above about 55°. The mean rotation rates of the positive (negative) polarity reach their maximum values at about 9°(6)° latitude in the southern (northern) hemisphere. The mean rotation profile of the total magnetic field displays an obvious north-south asymmetry, where the rotation seems to be more differential in the northern hemisphere. The latitude variation in the rotation rate differences between positive and negative magnetic fields is further studied, and it is found that magnetic fields with the same polarity as the leading sunspots at a given hemisphere rotate faster than those with the opposite polarity, except for the zones around 52° latitude of the southern hemisphere and around 35° latitude of the northern hemisphere. The implication of these results is discussed. It is clear that the obtained results can provide some observational constraints on the theoretical research of the mechanisms of differential rotation and solar cycle.

  17. New insights into rotating frame relaxation at high field.

    PubMed

    Spear, John T; Gore, John C

    2016-09-01

    Measurements of spin-lock relaxation rates in the rotating frame (R1ρ ) at high magnetic fields afford the ability to probe not only relatively slow molecular motions, but also other dynamic processes, such as chemical exchange and diffusion. In particular, measurements of the variation (or dispersion) of R1ρ with locking field allow the derivation of quantitative parameters that describe these processes. Measurements in deuterated solutions demonstrate the manner and degree to which exchange dominates relaxation at high fields (4.7 T, 7 T) in simple solutions, whereas temperature and pH are shown to be very influential factors affecting the rates of proton exchange. Simulations and experiments show that multiple exchanging pools of protons in realistic tissues can be assumed to behave independently of each other. R1ρ measurements can be combined to derive an exchange rate contrast (ERC) that produces images whose intensities emphasize protons with specific exchange rates rather than chemical shifts. In addition, water diffusion in the presence of intrinsic susceptibility gradients may produce significant effects on R1ρ dispersions at high fields. The exchange and diffusion effects act independently of each other, as confirmed by simulation and experimentally in studies of red blood cells at different levels of oxygenation. Collectively, R1ρ measurements provide an ability to quantify exchange processes, to provide images that depict protons with specific exchange rates and to describe the microstructure of tissues containing magnetic inhomogeneities. As such, they complement traditional T1 or T2 measurements and provide additional insights from measurements of R1ρ at a single locking field. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26866422

  18. Spin-torque diode with tunable sensitivity and bandwidth by out-of-plane magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Zheng, C.; Zhou, Y.; Kubota, H.; Yuasa, S.; Pong, Philip W. T.

    2016-06-01

    Spin-torque diodes based on nanosized magnetic tunnel junctions are novel microwave detectors with high sensitivity and wide frequency bandwidth. While previous reports mainly focus on improving the sensitivity, the approaches to extend the bandwidth are limited. This work experimentally demonstrates that through optimizing the orientation of the external magnetic field, wide bandwidth can be achieved while maintaining high sensitivity. The mechanism of the frequency- and sensitivity-tuning is investigated through analyzing the dependence of resonant frequency and DC voltage on the magnitude and the tilt angle of hard-plane magnetic field. The frequency dependence is qualitatively explicated by Kittel's ferromagnetic resonance model. The asymmetric resonant frequency at positive and negative magnetic field is verified by the numerical simulation considering the in-plane anisotropy. The DC voltage dependence is interpreted through evaluating the misalignment angle between the magnetization of the free layer and the reference layer. The tunability of the detector performance by the magnetic field angle is evaluated through characterizing the sensitivity and bandwidth under 3D magnetic field. The frequency bandwidth up to 9.8 GHz or maximum sensitivity up to 154 mV/mW (after impedance mismatch correction) can be achieved by tuning the angle of the applied magnetic field. The results show that the bandwidth and sensitivity can be controlled and adjusted through optimizing the orientation of the magnetic field for various applications and requirements.

  19. Rotating magnetic field current drive of high-temperature field reversed configurations with high {zeta} scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, H. Y.; Hoffman, A. L.; Milroy, R. D.

    2007-11-15

    Greatly reduced recycling and impurity ingestion in the Translation, Confinement, and Sustainment--Upgrade (TCSU) device has allowed much higher plasma temperatures to be achieved in the field reversed configurations (FRC) under rotating magnetic field (RMF) formation and sustainment. The hotter plasmas have higher magnetic fields and much higher diamagnetic electron rotation rates so that the important ratio of average electron rotation frequency to RMF frequency, called {zeta}, approaches unity, for the first time, in TCSU. A large fraction of the RMF power is absorbed by an as yet unexplained (anomalous) mechanism directly proportional to the square of the RMF magnitude. It becomes of relatively lesser significance as the FRC current increases, and simple resistive heating begins to dominate, but the anomalous absorption is useful for initial plasma heating. Measurements of total absorbed power, and comparisons of applied RMF torque to torque on the electrons due to electron-ion friction under high-{zeta} operation, over a range of temperatures and fields, have allowed the separation of the classical Ohmic and anomalous heating to be inferred, and cross-field plasma resistivities to be calculated.

  20. Groundwater treatment in a field pilot methanotrophic rotating biological contactor

    SciTech Connect

    Belcher, D.M.; Vira, A.; Dooley, M.A.; Johnson, J.C.

    1995-12-31

    A pilot-scale rotating biological contactor (RBC) was operated under field conditions for approximately 1 month to remove chlorinated and nonchlorinated organic compounds from groundwater. Methanotrophic conditions were successfully established and maintained in the RBC during the field program. Results of the pilot program indicated that low concentrations of cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) and vinyl chloride could be treated to below the maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) of 70 ad 2 {micro}g/L, respectively. Maximum removal rates for cis-DCE and vinyl chloride measured during the pilot study were 2.14 {micro}g cis-DCE/ft{sup 2} disc media-minute (952 {micro}g cis-DCE/mg volatile solids [VS]-day) and 0.3 {micro}g vinyl chloride/ft{sup 2}-minute (143 {micro}g vinyl chloride/mg VS-day), respectively. Chlorinated ethene removal efficiencies decreased after the first 2 weeks of operation. Low concentrations of toluene, ethylbenzene, and total xylenes (TEX) were effectively removed from groundwater throughout the course of the pilot study. The maximum observed TEX removal rate was 3.0 {micro}g TEX/ft{sup 2}-minute.

  1. Electromagnetic fields and torque for a rotating gyroscope with a superconducting shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebner, C.; Sung, C. C.

    1975-01-01

    In a proposed experiment, a measurement is to be made of the angular precession of a rotating superconducting gyroscope for the purpose of testing different general-relativity theories. For various reasons having to do with the design of the experiment, the superconducting shield surrounding the gyroscope is not spherically symmetric and produces a torque. There are two distinct features of the shield which lead to a torque on the gyroscope. First, its shape is a sphere intersected by a plane. If the angular momentum of the gyroscope is not parallel to the rotational symmetry axis of the shield, there is a torque which is calculated. Second, there are small holes in the spherical portion of the shield. The earth's field can penetrate through these holes and give an additional torque which is also calculated. In the actual experiment, these torques must be accurately known or made very small in order to obtain meaningful results. The present calculation is sufficiently general for application over a wide range of experimental design parameters.

  2. Wide-field Monitoring of the Galactic Plane in the K- and the H-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, K.; Nakada, Y.; Izumiura, H.; Watanabe, E.; Shimizu, Y.; Okada, N.; Okita, K.; Norimoto, K.; Okata, T.; Koyano, H.; Yoshida, M.

    The Okayama Astrophysical Observatory of NAOJ started the monitoring program of mass-losing AGB stars using an imaging camera named Okayama Astrophysical Observatory Wide Field Camera. The fast optics yields a field of view of 1¡ß1 deg2 and the pixel resolution of 2 arcsec at the focus of the 91-cm telescope. A HAWAII2 array will be installed inside the camera reaching the limiting magnitude of K=13 with a 45-s exposure. In 2003 the monitoring will start covering the Galactic plane from l=0 to 270 deg every three weeks.

  3. Tools and Setups for Experiments with AC and Rotating Magnetic Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponikvar, D.

    2010-01-01

    A rotating magnetic field is the basis for the transformation of electrical energy to mechanical energy. School experiments on the rotating magnetic field are rare since they require the use of specially prepared mechanical setups and/or relatively large, three-phase power supplies to achieve strong magnetic fields. This paper proposes several…

  4. A study of solidification with a rotating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roplekar, Jayant K.

    Due to the drive for weight reduction in the automobile industry, near net shape parts produced by semi-solid processing of aluminum alloys are increasingly replacing traditional steel parts. Magnetohydrodynamic direct chill casting (MHD-DC) process, developed in the mid-eighties, is the method of choice to produce rheocast metal alloys for semi-solid applications. In spite of commercial applicability of the MHD-DC process there is no integrated process model available for this process. In the present work we use an experimental setup that combines directional solidification with magnetic stirring to develop a numerical model for the MHD-DC process. We use the finite element method to solve the coupled equations of turbulent fluid flow, species transport and heat transfer with solidification on a fixed grid. Effects of the rotating magnetic field are incorporated through a body-force term which is determined a priori based on a detailed analytical study and experimental data. Due to the nature of temperature-solute coupling and the advection dominated evolution of the liquid fraction, special numerical procedures had to be implemented in the present work. The numerical procedure used in the present work is validated against two validation problems. In the first validation problem, we apply the two-phase methodology to solve the classical problem of diffusion-dominated solidification. The good agreement between the finite element solution and the analytical solution establishes soundness of the two-phase formulation developed in this work. In the second validation problem, a finite element prediction of the flow induced in a cylindrical cavity due to a rotating magnetic field is compared with an independent spectral solution. The close agreement between two radically different solution procedures establishes the accuracy in the formulation and implementation of the both procedures. We then simulate the experiments using the numerical model. The numerical model

  5. In-plane electric fields in magnetic islands during collisionless magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Lijen; Bhattacharjee, Amitava; Torbert, Roy B.; Bessho, Naoki; Daughton, William; Roytershteyn, Vadim

    2012-11-15

    Magnetic islands are a common feature in both the onset and nonlinear evolution of magnetic reconnection. In collisionless regimes, the onset typically occurs within ion-scale current layers leading to the formation of magnetic islands when multiple X lines are involved. The nonlinear evolution of reconnection often gives rise to extended electron current layers (ECL) which are also unstable to formation of magnetic islands. Here, we show that the excess negative charge and strong out-of-plane electron velocity in the ECL are passed on to the islands generated therein, and that the corresponding observable distinguishing the islands generated in the ECL is the strongly enhanced in-plane electric fields near the island core. The islands formed in ion-scale current layers do not have these properties of the ECL-generated islands. The above result provides a way to assess the occurrence and importance of extended ECLs that are unstable to island formation in space and laboratory plasmas.

  6. Orientational dynamics of a ferronematic liquid crystal in a rotating magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Boychuk, A. N. Zakhlevnykh, A. N.; Makarov, D. V.

    2015-09-15

    The behavior of the orientational structure of a ferronematic in a rotating uniform magnetic field is investigated using the continual theory. The time-dependent system of equations describing the dynamics of the ferronematic is derived. The dependences of the angles of rotation of the director and of the magnetization of the ferronematic on the velocity of field rotation are determined for various values of the material parameters. Two regimes (synchronous and asynchronous) of rotation of the ferronematic structure are detected. In the synchronous regime, the director rotates with the frequency of the magnetic field and a constant phase delay. The asynchronous regime is characterized by a time-dependent phase delay. The dependence of the critical angular velocity of magnetic field rotation, which determines the boundary between the synchronous and asynchronous regimes, on the magnetic field strength is derived.

  7. Dynamics of disklike clusters formed in a magnetorheological fluid under a rotational magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, Yutaka; Morimoto, Hisao; Maekawa, Toru

    2005-03-01

    We investigate the cluster formations and dynamics in a magnetorheological fluid under a rotational magnetic field focusing on the case of a relatively high volume fraction. We find that isotropic disklike clusters, which rotate more slowly than the field rotation, are formed at low Mason numbers (the ratio of viscous to magnetic forces) and, what is more, we show short rod clusters, which rotate stably thanks to the low Mason numbers and circulate along the surface of the disklike clusters. The circulation velocity of the surface particles is much higher than the rotational surface velocity of the rigid disklike clusters. PMID:15903473

  8. Plane-wise sensitivity based inhomogeneous excitation fields for magnetorelaxometry imaging of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgarten, Daniel; Braune, Friedemann; Supriyanto, Eko; Haueisen, Jens

    2015-04-01

    Promising biomedical applications of magnetic nanoparticles share the need for a quantitative knowledge of their in vivo distribution. From multichannel magnetorelaxometry measurements with sequential activation of inhomogeneous excitation fields, the distribution can be quantitatively determined. In first studies, single excitation coils were consecutively activated. We aim at further advancing this imaging technology by suitable activation patterns involving multiple excitation coils. In this work, we propose the estimation of these patterns based on the spatial sensitivity in order to reduce the number of required measurements. The sensitivity of a voxel carrying magnetic nanoparticles is determined by its position relative to the sensors and the excitation field. Whereas the position is fixed within a given setup, the excitation is controlled by the currents in the coils. The currents required for a defined target sensitivity are estimated by solving an inverse problem. In our work, two target sensitivity paradigms are presented: (a) plane-wise activation, where only one plane with high sensitivities is sought and moved through the source space and (b) plane-wise non-activation, where all voxels except for one plane should receive high sensitivity. Our approach is investigated in simulation studies using a setup with a cubic region of interest and a planar sensor array. The imaging quality of both activation paradigms is evaluated. Our results demonstrate the principal applicability of this spatial sensitivity based approach for defining inhomogeneous activation patterns. The obtained patterns allow for a similar imaging quality using a lower number of activation sequences compared to the conventional single coil activation.

  9. Terahertz 3D printed diffractive lens matrices for field-effect transistor detector focal plane arrays.

    PubMed

    Szkudlarek, Krzesimir; Sypek, Maciej; Cywiński, Grzegorz; Suszek, Jarosław; Zagrajek, Przemysław; Feduniewicz-Żmuda, Anna; Yahniuk, Ivan; Yatsunenko, Sergey; Nowakowska-Siwińska, Anna; Coquillat, Dominique; But, Dmytro B; Rachoń, Martyna; Węgrzyńska, Karolina; Skierbiszewski, Czesław; Knap, Wojciech

    2016-09-01

    We present the concept, the fabrication processes and the experimental results for materials and optics that can be used for terahertz field-effect transistor detector focal plane arrays. More specifically, we propose 3D printed arrays of a new type - diffractive multi-zone lenses of which the performance is superior to that of previously used mono-zone diffractive or refractive elements and evaluate them with GaN/AlGaN field-effect transistor terahertz detectors. Experiments performed in the 300-GHz atmospheric window show that the lens arrays offer both a good efficiency and good uniformity, and may improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the terahertz field-effect transistor detectors by more than one order of magnitude. In practice, we tested 3 × 12 lens linear arrays with printed circuit board THz detector arrays used in postal security scanners and observed significant signal-to-noise improvements. Our results clearly show that the proposed technology provides a way to produce cost-effective, reproducible, flat optics for large-size field-effect transistor THz-detector focal plane arrays. PMID:27607620

  10. Model for the growth of electrodeposited ferromagnetic aggregates under an in-plane magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Cronemberger, C; Sampaio, L C; Guimarães, A P; Molho, P

    2010-02-01

    The quasi-two-dimensional deposition of ferromagnetic materials by electrochemical process under the influence of a magnetic field applied in the plane of the growth leads to a surprising symmetry breaking in the dendritic structures found. The reasons for these features are still not completely understood. The original dense circular envelope becomes rectangular, as well as the sparse figures have their shapes elongated. This paper reports the results of a diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) -like simulation. The model proposed here, a modification of the original DLA model, can deal with ferromagnetic particles under the influence of an electric field and the dipolar interactions between particles, submitted to an applied magnetic field in the plane of growth of such structures. The results were produced varying the applied magnetic field and the magnetic moment of the particles and show that the balance between these interactions is an important mechanisms that can be responsible for the changes in shape of the aggregates observed in the experiments. PMID:20365564

  11. Model for the growth of electrodeposited ferromagnetic aggregates under an in-plane magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronemberger, C.; Sampaio, L. C.; Guimarães, A. P.; Molho, P.

    2010-02-01

    The quasi-two-dimensional deposition of ferromagnetic materials by electrochemical process under the influence of a magnetic field applied in the plane of the growth leads to a surprising symmetry breaking in the dendritic structures found. The reasons for these features are still not completely understood. The original dense circular envelope becomes rectangular, as well as the sparse figures have their shapes elongated. This paper reports the results of a diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) -like simulation. The model proposed here, a modification of the original DLA model, can deal with ferromagnetic particles under the influence of an electric field and the dipolar interactions between particles, submitted to an applied magnetic field in the plane of growth of such structures. The results were produced varying the applied magnetic field and the magnetic moment of the particles and show that the balance between these interactions is an important mechanisms that can be responsible for the changes in shape of the aggregates observed in the experiments.

  12. Dynamic domain wall chirality rectification by rotating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisig, Andre; Mawass, Mohamad-Assaad; Stärk, Martin; Moutafis, Christoforos; Rhensius, Jan; Heidler, Jakoba; Gliga, Sebastian; Weigand, Markus; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Van Waeyenberge, Bartel; Stoll, Hermann; Schütz, Gisela; Kläui, Mathias

    2015-03-01

    We report on the observation of magnetic vortex domain wall chirality reversal in ferromagnetic rings that is controlled by the sense of rotation of a magnetic field. We use time-resolved X-ray microscopy to dynamically image the chirality-switching process and perform micromagnetic simulations to deduce the switching details from time-resolved snapshots. We find experimentally that the switching occurs within less than 4 ns and is observed in all samples with ring widths ranging from 0.5 μm to 2 μm, ring diameters between 2 μm and 5 μm, and a thickness of 30 nm, where a vortex domain wall is present in the magnetic onion state of the ring. From the magnetic contrast in the time-resolved images, we can identify effects of thermal activation, which plays a role for the switching process. Moreover, we find that the process is highly reproducible so that the domain wall chirality can be set with high fidelity.

  13. 3-D explosions: a meditation on rotation (and magnetic fields)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, J. C.

    This is the text of an introduction to a workshop on asymmetric explosions held in Austin in June, 2003. The great progress in supernova research over thirty-odd years is briefly reviewed. The context in which the meeting was called is then summarized. The theoretical success of the intrinsically multidimensional delayed detonation paradigm in explaining the nature of Type Ia supernovae coupled with new techniques of observations in the near IR and with spectropolarimetry promise great advances in understanding binary progenitors, the explosion physics, and the ever more accurate application to cosmology. Spectropolarimetry has also revealed the strongly asymmetric nature of core collapse and given valuable perspectives on the supernova - gamma-ray burst connection. The capability of the magneto-rotational instability to rapidly create strong toroidal magnetic fields in the core collapse ambiance is outlined. This physics may be the precursor to driving MHD jets that play a role in asymmetric supernovae. Welcome to the brave new world of three-dimensional explosions!

  14. Laboratory and field testing of commercial rotational seismometers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nigbor, R.L.; Evans, J.R.; Hutt, C.R.

    2009-01-01

    There are a small number of commercially available sensors to measure rotational motion in the frequency and amplitude ranges appropriate for earthquake motions on the ground and in structures. However, the performance of these rotational seismometers has not been rigorously and independently tested and characterized for earthquake monitoring purposes as is done for translational strong- and weak-motion seismometers. Quantities such as sensitivity, frequency response, resolution, and linearity are needed for the understanding of recorded rotational data. To address this need, we, with assistance from colleagues in the United States and Taiwan, have been developing performance test methodologies and equipment for rotational seismometers. In this article the performance testing methodologies are applied to samples of a commonly used commercial rotational seismometer, the eentec model R-1. Several examples were obtained for various test sequences in 2006, 2007, and 2008. Performance testing of these sensors consisted of measuring: (1) sensitivity and frequency response; (2) clip level; (3) self noise and resolution; and (4) cross-axis sensitivity, both rotational and translational. These sensor-specific results will assist in understanding the performance envelope of the R-1 rotational seismometer, and the test methodologies can be applied to other rotational seismometers.

  15. Linearity of the Faraday-rotation-type ac magnetic-field sensor with a ferrimagnetic or ferromagnetic rotator film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Hiroshi; Asahara, Yousuke

    1996-03-01

    We analyze the linearity and modulation depth of ac magnetic-field sensors or current sensors, using a ferrimagnetic or ferromagnetic film as the Faraday rotator and employing the detection of only the zeroth-order optical diffraction component from the rotator. It is theoretically shown that for this class of sensor the condition of a constant modulation depth and that of a constant ratio error give an identical series of curves for the relationship between Faraday rotation angle greater than or equals V and polarizer/analyzer relative angle Phi . We give some numerical examples to demonstrate the usefulness of the result with reference to a rare-earth iron garnet film as the rotator.

  16. Magnetic field angle dependence of out-of-plane precession in spin torque oscillators having an in-plane magnetized free layer and a perpendicularly magnetized reference layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiramatsu, Ryo; Kubota, Hitoshi; Tsunegi, Sumito; Tamaru, Shingo; Yakushiji, Kay; Fukushima, Akio; Matsumoto, Rie; Imamura, Hiroshi; Yuasa, Shinji

    2016-05-01

    Out-of-plane (OP) precession in spin torque oscillators having an in-plane (IP) magnetized free layer and a perpendicularly magnetized reference layer was studied. The bias voltage (V B) and magnetic field angle (θ) dependence of the OP precession were investigated. The absolute values of the critical magnetic fields (H\\text{B}\\text{c - } and H\\text{B}\\text{c + }) between which OP precession is excited increased as V B increased and as θ changed from the IP to the OP direction. The IP components of H\\text{B}\\text{c +/- } converged to a constant value regardless of θ. This result indicates that excitation of OP precession is suppressed entirely by the IP component of the magnetic field, and the contribution of the OP component can be ignored. The experimentally observed precession behavior was successfully modeled by macrospin simulations.

  17. Calculation of the electric field resulting from human body rotation in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobos Sánchez, Clemente; Glover, Paul; Power, Henry; Bowtell, Richard

    2012-08-01

    A number of recent studies have shown that the electric field and current density induced in the human body by movement in and around magnetic resonance imaging installations can exceed regulatory levels. Although it is possible to measure the induced electric fields at the surface of the body, it is usually more convenient to use numerical models to predict likely exposure under well-defined movement conditions. Whilst the accuracy of these models is not in doubt, this paper shows that modelling of particular rotational movements should be treated with care. In particular, we show that v  ×  B rather than -(v  ·  ∇)A should be used as the driving term in potential-based modelling of induced fields. Although for translational motion the two driving terms are equivalent, specific examples of rotational rigid-body motion are given where incorrect results are obtained when -(v  ·  ∇)A is employed. In addition, we show that it is important to take into account the space charge which can be generated by rotations and we also consider particular cases where neglecting the space charge generates erroneous results. Along with analytic calculations based on simple models, boundary-element-based numerical calculations are used to illustrate these findings.

  18. Uniform rotating field network structure to efficiently package a magnetic bubble domain memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfshagen, Ronald G. (Inventor); Ypma, John E. (Inventor); Murray, Glen W. (Inventor); Chen, Thomas T. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A unique and compact open coil rotating magnetic field network structure to efficiently package an array of bubble domain devices is disclosed. The field network has a configuration which effectively enables selected bubble domain devices from the array to be driven in a vertical magnetic field and in an independent and uniform horizontal rotating magnetic field. The field network is suitably adapted to minimize undesirable inductance effects, improve capabilities of heat dissipation, and facilitate repair or replacement of a bubble device.

  19. E-field extraction from Hx- and Hy- near field values by using plane wave spectrum method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravelo, B.; Riah, Z.; Baudry, D.; Mazari, B.

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with a technique for calculating the 3D E-field components knowing only the two components (Hx and Hy) of the H-field in near-zone. The originality of the under study technique lies on the possibility to take into account the evanescent wave influences. The presented E-field extraction process is based on the exploitation of the Maxwell-Ampere relation combined with the plane wave spectrum (PWS) method. The efficiency of the proposed technique is evidenced by comparing the E-field deduced from H-field and the own E-field radiated by the association of electrical- and also magnetic- elementary dipoles in different configurations by using Matlab text programming environment. In addition, as a concrete demonstrator, the concept was also validated with the computation of EM-wave radiated by an open-end microstrip transmission line. As result of comparison, very good agreement between the exact E-field and that one extracted from the H-field was realized by considering the near-field scanned at the height, z = 5 mm and 8 mm above the under test structure at the operating frequency, f = 1 GHz. The presented technique can simplify the difficulties about the E-near-field measurement in EMC applications.

  20. Rotational shear near the solar surface as a probe for subphotospheric magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitchatinov, L. L.

    2016-05-01

    Helioseismology revealed an increase in the rotation rate with depth just beneath the solar surface. The relative magnitude of the radial shear is almost constant with latitude. This rotational state can be interpreted as a consequence of two conditions characteristic of the near-surface convection: the smallness of convective turnover time in comparison with the rotation period and absence of a horizontal preferred direction of convection anisotropy. The latter condition is violated in the presence of a magnetic field. This raises the question of whether the subphotospheric fields can be probed with measurements of near-surface rotational shear. The shear is shown to be weakly sensitive to magnetic fields but can serve as a probe for sufficiently strong fields of the order of one kilogauss. It is suggested that the radial differential rotation in extended convective envelopes of red giants is of the same origin as the near-surface rotational shear of the Sun.

  1. An Analysis of the Torsion-Rotation-Vibration Rotational Spectrum of the Lowest In-Plane Bend and First Excited Torsional State of the C(3V) Internal Rotor C2H5CN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, J. C.; Pickett, Herbert M.; Sastry, K. V. L. N.

    2000-01-01

    C2H5CN (Propionitrile or ethyl cyanide) is a well known interstellar species abundantly observed in hot cores during the onset of star formation. The onset of star formation generally results in elevated temperature, which thermally populates may low lying vibrational states such as the 206/cm in-plane bend and the 212/cm first excited torsional state in C2H5CN. Unfortunately, these two states are strongly coupled through a complex series of torsion-vibration-rotation interactions, which dominate the spectrum. In order to understand the details of these interactions and develop models capable of predicting unmeasured transitions for astronomical observations in C2H5CN and similar molecules, several thousand rotational transitions in the lowest excited in-plane bend and first excited torsional state have been recorded, assigned and analyzed. The analysis reveals very strong a- and b-type Coriolis interactions and a number of other smaller interactions and has a number of important implications for other C3V torsion-rotation-vibration systems. The relative importance and the physical origins of the coupling among the rotational, vibrational and torsional motions will be presented along with a full spectroscopic analysis and supporting astronomical observations.

  2. Phase diagram and collective modes in Rashba spin-orbit coupled BEC: Effect of in-plane magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Dong; Zou, Xu-Bo; Guo, Guang-Can

    2015-07-01

    We studied the system of pure Rashba spin-orbit coupled Bose gas with an in-plane magnetic field. Based on the mean field theory, we obtained the zero temperature phase diagram of the system which exhibits three phases, plane wave (PW) phase, striped wave (SW) phase, and zero momentum (ZM) phase. It was shown that with a growing in-plane field, both SW and ZM phases will eventually turn into the PW phase. Furthermore, we adopted the Bogoliubov theory to study the excitation spectrum as well as the sound speed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 10774088).

  3. Non-minimally coupled scalar field cosmology on the phase plane

    SciTech Connect

    Hrycyna, Orest; Szydlowski, Marek E-mail: uoszydlo@cyf-kr.edu.pl

    2009-04-15

    In this publication we investigate dynamics of a flat FRW cosmological model with a non-minimally coupled scalar field with the coupling term {xi}R{psi}{sup 2} in the scalar field action. The quadratic potential function V({psi}) {proportional_to} {psi}{sup 2} is assumed. All the evolutional paths are visualized and classified in the phase plane, at which the parameter of non-minimal coupling {xi} plays the role of a control parameter. The fragility of global dynamics with respect to changes of the coupling constant is studied in details. We find that the future big rip singularity appearing in the phantom scalar field cosmological models can be avoided due to non-minimal coupling constant effects. We have shown the existence of a finite scale factor singular point (future or past) where the Hubble function as well as its first cosmological time derivative diverge.

  4. A discussion of Bl conservation on a two dimensional magnetic field plane in watt balances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shisong; Zhao, Wei; Huang, Songling

    2016-05-01

    The watt balance is an experiment being pursued in national metrology institutes for precision determination of the Planck constant h. In watt balances, the 1/r magnetic field, expected to generate a geometrical factor Bl independent to any coil horizontal displacement, can be created by a strict two dimensional, symmetric (horizontal r and vertical z) construction of the magnet system. In this paper, we present an analytical understanding of magnetic field distribution when the r symmetry of the magnet is broken and the establishment of the Bl conservation is shown. By using either Gauss’s law on magnetism with monopoles or conformal transformations, we extend the Bl conservation to arbitrary two dimensional magnetic planes where the vertical magnetic field component equals zero. The generalized Bl conservation allows a relaxed physical alignment criteria for watt balance magnet systems.

  5. On the smoothness of electric fields near plane gratings of cylindrical conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, D.L.

    1995-02-01

    The electric field near an infinite plane grating of equally spaced round rods at the same potential, forming the boundary of a uniform field, is determined analytically to good accuracy by conformal transformations and evaluated numerically. This contribution, which has a frankly pedagogical flavor, to the Klaus Halbach Festschrift is offered to honor his displayed mastery of conformal techniques. Although the numerical work and the form of its presentation are new, the transformation used is not original. However, to locate its antecedents in an archival journal it was necessary to seek out a paper published in 1923 (close to the year of his birth, and of mine), in a place obscure to modern physicists, so the authors efforts cannot be said to replicate recent published work. A new insight is obtained in the form of a simple estimate of departures from field uniformity at all distances from rods of any size.

  6. Effect of Magnetic Field on Thermal Instability of Oldroydian Viscoelastic Rotating Fluid in Porous Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, R. C.; Rana, G. C.

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate the effect of a vertical magnetic field on thermal instability of an Oldroydian visco-elastic rotating fluid in a porous medium. By applying the normal mode analysis method, the dispersion relation governing the effects of rotation, magnetic field and medium permeability is derived and solved analytically and numerically. For the case of stationary convection, the Oldroydian viscoelastic fluid behaves like an ordinary Newtonian fluid and it is observed that rotation has a stabilizing effect while the magnetic field and medium permeability have a stabilizing/destabilizing effect under certain conditions on thermal instability of the Oldroydian viscoelastic fluid in a porous medium. The oscillatory modes are introduced due to the presence of rotation, the magnetic field and gravity field. It is also observed that the `principle of exchange of stability' is invalid in the presence of rotation and the magnetic field.

  7. Confinement of Plasma along Shaped Open Magnetic Fields from the Centrifugal Force of Supersonic Plasma Rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Teodorescu, C.; Young, W. C.; Swan, G. W. S.; Ellis, R. F.; Hassam, A. B.; Romero-Talamas, C. A.

    2010-08-20

    Interferometric density measurements in plasmas rotating in shaped, open magnetic fields demonstrate strong confinement of plasma parallel to the magnetic field, with density drops of more than a factor of 10. Taken together with spectroscopic measurements of supersonic ExB rotation of sonic Mach 2, these measurements are in agreement with ideal MHD theory which predicts large parallel pressure drops balanced by centrifugal forces in supersonically rotating plasmas.

  8. Stable oscillation in spin torque oscillator excited by a small in-plane magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, Tomohiro; Tsunegi, Sumito; Kubota, Hitoshi; Ito, Takahiro; Utsumi, Yasuhiro

    2015-08-07

    Theoretical conditions to excite self-oscillation in a spin torque oscillator consisting of a perpendicularly magnetized free layer and an in-plane magnetized pinned layer are investigated by analytically solving the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. The analytical relation between the current and oscillation frequency is derived. It is found that a large amplitude oscillation can be excited by applying a small field pointing to the direction anti-parallel to the magnetization of the pinned layer. The validity of the analytical results is confirmed by comparing with numerical simulation, showing good agreement especially in a low current region.

  9. Stable oscillation in spin torque oscillator excited by a small in-plane magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Tomohiro; Ito, Takahiro; Utsumi, Yasuhiro; Tsunegi, Sumito; Kubota, Hitoshi

    2015-08-01

    Theoretical conditions to excite self-oscillation in a spin torque oscillator consisting of a perpendicularly magnetized free layer and an in-plane magnetized pinned layer are investigated by analytically solving the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. The analytical relation between the current and oscillation frequency is derived. It is found that a large amplitude oscillation can be excited by applying a small field pointing to the direction anti-parallel to the magnetization of the pinned layer. The validity of the analytical results is confirmed by comparing with numerical simulation, showing good agreement especially in a low current region.

  10. New method to determine proton trajectories in the equatorial plane of a dipole magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Ioanoviciu, Damaschin

    2015-01-01

    A parametric description of proton trajectories in the equatorial plane of Earth's dipole magnetic field has been derived. The exact expression of the angular coordinate contains an integral to be performed numerically. The radial coordinate results from the initial conditions by basic mathematical operations and by using trigonometric functions. With the approximate angular coordinate formula, applicable for a wide variety of cases of protons trapped in Earth's radiation belts, no numerical integration is needed. The results of exact and approximate expressions were compared for a specific case and small differences were found. PMID:25815248

  11. High-quality InN films on MgO (100) substrates: The key role of 30° in-plane rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Compeán García, V. D.; López Luna, E.; Rodríguez, A. G.; Vidal, M. A.; Orozco Hinostroza, I. E.; Escobosa Echavarría, A.

    2014-05-12

    High crystalline layers of InN were grown on MgO(100) substrates by gas source molecular beam epitaxy. Good quality films were obtained by means of an in-plane rotation process induced by the annealing of an InN buffer layer to minimize the misfit between InN and MgO. In situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction showed linear streaky patterns along the [011{sup ¯}0] azimuth and a superimposed diffraction along the [112{sup ¯}0] azimuth, which correspond to a 30° α-InN film rotation. This rotation reduces the mismatch at the MgO/InN interface from 19.5% to less than 3.5%, increasing the structural quality, which was analyzed by high-resolution X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Only the (0002) c plane diffraction of α-InN was observed and was centered at 2θ = 31.4°. Raman spectroscopy showed two modes corresponding to the hexagonal phase: E1(LO) at 591 cm{sup −1} and E2(high) at 488 cm{sup −1}. Hall effect measurements showed a carrier density of 9 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3} and an electron Hall mobility of 340 cm{sup 2}/(V s) for a film thickness of 140 nm.

  12. Forced magnetic reconnection and field penetration of an externally applied rotating helical magnetic field in the TEXTOR tokamak.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Y; de Bock, M F M; Finken, K H; Jakubowski, M; Jaspers, R; Koslowski, H R; Kraemer-Flecken, A; Lehnen, M; Liang, Y; Matsunaga, G; Reiser, D; Wolf, R C; Zimmermann, O

    2006-08-25

    The magnetic field penetration process into a magnetized plasma is of basic interest both for plasma physics and astrophysics. In this context special measurements on the field penetration and field amplification are performed by a Hall probe on the dynamic ergodic divertor (DED) on the TEXTOR tokamak and the data are interpreted by a two-fluid plasma model. It is observed that the growth of the forced magnetic reconnection by the rotating DED field is accompanied by a change of the plasma fluid rotation. The differential rotation frequency between the DED field and the plasma plays an important role in the process of the excitation of tearing modes. The momentum input from the rotating DED field to the plasma is interpreted by both a ponderomotive force at the rational surface and a radial electric field modified by an edge ergodization. PMID:17026312

  13. Quantum tunneling from scalar fields in rotating black strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohar, H.; Saifullah, K.

    2013-08-01

    Using the Hamilton-Jacobi method of quantum tunneling and complex path integration, we study Hawking radiation of scalar particles from rotating black strings. We discuss tunneling of both charged and uncharged scalar particles from the event horizons. For this purpose, we use the Klein-Gordon equation and find the tunneling probability of outgoing scalar particles. The procedure gives Hawking temperature for rotating charged black strings as well.

  14. Luminescence of double quantum wells subject to in-plane magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlita, M.; Grill, R.; Hlídek, P.; Zvára, M.; Döhler, G. H.; Malzer, S.; Byszewski, M.

    2005-10-01

    We report on photoluminescence (PL) measurements of a symmetric GaAs/AlGaAs double quantum well (DQW) in high magnetic fields. For this study, a selectively contacted p-δn-DQW-δn-p structure was chosen, allowing an independent tuning of the electron density in the DQW and thus a creation of a two-dimensional electron gas. Our attention was focused on phenomena in in-plane magnetic fields, where the field-induced depopulation of the antibonding subband observable in the PL spectra as a so-called N -type kink was predicted by Huang and Lyo (HL) [Phys. Rev. B 59, 7600 (1999)]. Whereas the equivalent behavior has been observed several times in the electric transport measurements and a proper theoretical description has been found, to the best of our knowledge, no PL experiment in a direct comparison with the theoretical model developed by HL has ever been published. We carried out a self-consistent calculation based on their model and achieved a good agreement with our experimental results. Additionally, the influence of the excitonic interaction on the PL spectra, not taken into account by HL, is also discussed. This enables us to explain small deviations from the HL theory. The interpretation of the in-plane magnetic field measurements is supported by the experiment with the magnetic field in the perpendicular orientation that allows a sufficiently accurate estimation of the electron density in the DQW. Distinctive renormalization effects of DQW subbands at various electron densities are also observed and discussed.

  15. A DLVO model for catalyst motion in metal-assisted chemical etching based upon controlled out-of-plane rotational etching and force-displacement measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildreth, Owen J.; Rykaczewski, Konrad; Fedorov, Andrei G.; Wong, Ching P.

    2013-01-01

    Metal-assisted Chemical Etching of silicon has recently emerged as a powerful technique to fabricate 1D, 2D, and 3D nanostructures in silicon with high feature fidelity. This work demonstrates that out-of-plane rotational catalysts utilizing polymer pinning structures can be designed with excellent control over rotation angle. A plastic deformation model was developed establishing that the catalyst is driven into the silicon substrate with a minimum pressure differential across the catalyst thickness of 0.4-0.6 MPa. Force-displacement curves were gathered between an Au tip and Si or SiO2 substrates under acidic conditions to show that Derjaguin and Landau, Verwey and Overbeek (DLVO) based forces are capable of providing restorative forces on the order of 0.2-0.3 nN with a calculated 11-18 MPa pressure differential across the catalyst. This work illustrates that out-of-plane rotational structures can be designed with controllable rotation and also suggests a new model for the driving force for catalyst motion based on DLVO theory. This process enables the facile fabrication of vertically aligned thin-film metallic structures and scalloped nanostructures in silicon for applications in 3D micro/nano-electromechanical systems, photonic devices, nanofluidics, etc.Metal-assisted Chemical Etching of silicon has recently emerged as a powerful technique to fabricate 1D, 2D, and 3D nanostructures in silicon with high feature fidelity. This work demonstrates that out-of-plane rotational catalysts utilizing polymer pinning structures can be designed with excellent control over rotation angle. A plastic deformation model was developed establishing that the catalyst is driven into the silicon substrate with a minimum pressure differential across the catalyst thickness of 0.4-0.6 MPa. Force-displacement curves were gathered between an Au tip and Si or SiO2 substrates under acidic conditions to show that Derjaguin and Landau, Verwey and Overbeek (DLVO) based forces are capable of

  16. Observations of improved confinement in field reversed configurations sustained by antisymmetric rotating magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, H.Y.; Hoffman, A.L.; Steinhauer, L.C.

    2005-06-15

    Rotating magnetic fields (RMF) have been employed to both form and sustain currents in field reversed configurations (FRC). A major concern about this method has been the fear of opening up magnetic field lines with even small ratios of vacuum RMF B{sub {omega}} to external confinement field B{sub e}. A recently proposed innovation was to use an antisymmetric arrangement of RMF, but vacuum calculations with full RMF penetration showed that very low values of B{sub {omega}}/B{sub e} would still be required to provide field-line closure. Recent comparisons of symmetric and antisymmetric RMF drive on the translation, confinement, and sustainment (TCS) facility [A. L. Hoffman, H. Y. Guo, J. T. Slough et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 41, 92 (2002)] have shown strong improvements in the basic confinement properties of the FRCs when using antisymmetric drive, even with ratios of B{sub {omega}}/B{sub e} as high as 0.3. This is due to normal standard operation with only partial penetration of the RMF beyond the FRC separatrix. The uniform transverse RMF in vacuum is shielded by the conducting plasma, resulting in a mostly azimuthal field near the FRC separatrix with a very small radial component. Simple numerical calculations using analytical solutions for the partially penetrated antisymmetric RMF, superimposed on Grad-Shafranov solutions for the poloidal FRC fields, show good field-line closure for the TCS experimental conditions. The antisymmetric arrangement also leads to more efficient current drive and improved stabilization of rotational modes.

  17. Internal rotation and toroidal part of the magnetic field of AB Doradus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiremath, K. M.

    2000-06-01

    We solve analytically Chandrasekhar's (1956) MHD equations for the steady parts of internal rotation and toroidal component of the magnetic field of the AB Doradus. By taking observed (Donati and Cameron 1997) surface rotation as the boundary condition and assuming that the base of the convection zone rotates rigidly, we estimate the size of the convective envelope to be 40% of the radius and the rotation velocity at the base to be not less than 1.42 x 10-4 rad/sec. We deduce that the toroidal magnetic field is distributed throughout the convective envelope. By taking the average density of 1.78gm cm-3 and radius 5.95 x 1010 cms (Allen 1972), we obtain a Mega gauss field near base of the convective envelope. We present rotational and toroidal magnetic field profiles in the interior, and conjecture on the time dependent part of the magnetic field.

  18. External electromagnetic fields of a slowly rotating magnetized star with gravitomagnetic charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmedov, B. J.; Khugaev, A. V.; Abdujabbarov, A. A.

    2012-02-01

    We study Maxwell equations in the external background spacetime of a slowly rotating magnetized NUT star and find analytical solutions for the exterior electric fields after separating the equations for electric field into angular and radial parts in the lowest order in angular momentum and NUT charge approximation. The star is considered isolated and in vacuum, with dipolar magnetic field aligned with the axis of rotation. The contribution to the external electric field of star from the NUT charge is considered in detail.

  19. Polygonal Web Representation for Higher Order Correlation Functions of Consistent Polygonal Markov Fields in the Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Tomasz

    2010-08-01

    We consider polygonal Markov fields originally introduced by Arak in 4th USSR-Japan Symposium on Probability Theory and Mathematical Statistics, Abstracts of Communications, 1982; Arak and Surgailis in Probab. Theory Relat. Fields 80:543-579, 1989. Our attention is focused on fields with nodes of order two, which can be regarded as continuum ensembles of non-intersecting contours in the plane, sharing a number of salient features with the two-dimensional Ising model. The purpose of this paper is to establish an explicit stochastic representation for the higher-order correlation functions of polygonal Markov fields in their consistency regime. The representation is given in terms of the so-called crop functionals (defined by a Möbius-type formula) of polygonal webs which arise in a graphical construction dual to that giving rise to polygonal fields. The proof of our representation formula goes by constructing a martingale interpolation between the correlation functions of polygonal fields and crop functionals of polygonal webs.

  20. The Role of Rotation and Magnetic Fields in a Core Collapse Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Shizuka

    While the process that converts implosion into explosion in core collapse supernovae is poorly understood, their observed asphericity provides new constraints on the physics of these events. Since pulsars are rotating and magnetized neutron stars, there is no doubt that rotation and magnetic fields are inherent to the exploding engine. We have shown that magnetic field amplification is an inevitable by-product of the differential rotation that accompanies core-collapse. We performed 1D core-collapse simulations of rotating iron cores with various rotational profiles and velocities. We found that differential rotation was a generic feature of rotating iron core collapse. As a result, the magnetorotational instability (MRI) generates magnetic fields of order 1015-17 G in a few tens of milliseconds where the negative shear is the strongest. Although magnetic fields of order 1015-17 G are very strong, they are not strong enough to modify the equation of state of degenerate electron gas near the proto-neutron star. The corresponding MHD luminosity available is ˜ 1052erg s-1, which can modify the explosion dynamics if the power is sustained for a fraction of a second. When rotational effects are included, we found that there is a critical iron core rotation rate that gives the most rapidly rotating proto-neutron star, faster than which the rotational velocity of the proto-neutron star decreases due to centrifugal support. This non-monotonic behavior of post-collapse core rotation suggests that the progenitor of the most rapidly rotating proto-neutron star is not the most rapidly rotating iron core, but that those iron cores with nearly the critical initial rotation rate may produce the maximum proto-neutron star rotation, the strongest magnetic fields, and the most robust supernova explosions. Even small rotation may induce non-axisymmetric instabilities, which drive magneto-acoustic flux in to the mantle, transporting enegy out of the proto-neutron star to the region

  1. Dependence of spin dynamics on in-plane magnetic field in AlGaN/GaN quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Meng; Yu, Guolin; Xu, Yonggang; Chang, Zhigang; Lin, Tie; Zhao, Degang; Dai, Ning; Chu, Junhao; Lockwood, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    We systematically investigate the weak antilocalization effect and the dependence of spin dynamics on the in-plane magnetic field for two Al x Ga1-x N/GaN quantum wells, in which these effects are dominated by the spin-orbit interaction originating from the structural inversion asymmetry and the bulk inversion asymmetry, respectively. By fitting the weak antilocalization magnetoconductance, the phase coherence time and spin-orbit scattering time are obtained. With the increase of in-plane magnetic fields, the phase coherence time decreases quadratically while the spin-orbit scattering time increases quadratically. We attribute these variations to the competition between the Zeeman splitting and the spin-orbit interaction. The comparison between systems dominated by structural inversion asymmetry and bulk inversion asymmetry in the in-plane magnetic field is also made. Our findings may provide clues to control the weak antilocalization effect and spin-orbit interaction via the in-plane field.

  2. The silicon micro-strip detector plane for the LOFT/wide-field monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldwurm, A.; Ferrando, P.; Götz, D.; Laurent, P.; Lebrun, F.; Limousin, O.; Basa, S.; Bertoli, W.; Delagnes, Eric; Dolgorouky, Y.; Gevin, O.; Gros, A.; Gouiffes, C.; Jeanneau, F.; Lachaud, C.; Llored, M.; Olivetto, C.; Prevot, G.; Renaud, D.; Rodriguez, J.; Rossin, C.; Schanne, S.; Soldi, S.; Varniere, P.

    2012-09-01

    The main objective of the Wide Field Monitor (WFM) on the LOFT mission is to provide unambiguous detection of the high-energy sources in a large field of view, in order to support science operations of the LOFT primary instrument, the LAD. The monitor will also provide by itself a large number of results on the timing and spectral behavior of hundreds of galactic compact objects, Active Galactic Nuclei and Gamma-Ray Bursts. The WFM is based on the coded aperture concept where a position sensitive detector records the shadow of a mask projected by the celestial sources. The proposed WFM detector plane, based on Double Sided micro-Strip Silicon Detectors (DSSD), will allow proper 2-dimensional recording of the projected shadows. Indeed the positioning of the photon interaction in the detector with equivalent fine resolution in both directions insures the best imaging capability compatible with the allocated budgets for this telescope on LOFT. We will describe here the overall configuration of this 2D-WFM and the design and characteristics of the DSSD detector plane including its imaging and spectral performances. We will also present a number of simulated results discussing the advantages that this configuration offers to LOFT. A DSSD-based WFM will in particular reduce significantly the source confusion experienced by the WFM in crowded regions of the sky like the Galactic Center and will in general increase the observatory science capability of the mission.

  3. Influence of field size on a PTW type 23342 plane-parallel ionization chamber's response

    SciTech Connect

    Austerlitz, C.; Villar, H.P.; Santos, M.A.P.

    2004-12-01

    The response of a PTW type 23342 plane-parallel ionization chamber, both in air and in phantom, was evaluated for x-ray tube potentials between 30 and 100 kV and radiation field diameters ranging from 30 to 70 mm. The experiments were performed with a calibrated Pantak x-ray machine and made use of the same set of x-ray qualities adopted by the PTB primary laboratory for the calibration of such chambers. A Plexiglas registered phantom (1.18 g cm{sup -3}) 110 mm long, 110 mm wide, and 80 mm deep was used for phantom measurements. X-ray qualities were characterized by using 99.99% pure aluminum filters. On the basis of the IAEA's TRS 398, the article discusses the dependence of the plane-parallel ionization chamber readings with field size in air and in phantom, its implication with regard to clinical dosimetry, cross-calibration, and dissemination of calibration factors.

  4. In-plane magnetic anisotropy and coercive field dependence upon thickness of CoFeB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipgen, Lalminthang; Fulara, Himanshu; Raju, M.; Chaudhary, Sujeet

    2012-09-01

    The structural and magnetic properties of as-grown 5-50 nm thin ion-beam sputter deposited transition metal-metalloid Co20Fe60B20 (CFB) films are reported in this communication. A broad peak observed at 2θ∼45° in the glancing angle X-ray diffraction pattern revealed the formation of very fine nano-sized grains embedded in majority amorphous CFB matrix. Although no magnetic field is applied during deposition, the longitudinal magneto-optic Kerr effect measurements performed at 300 K in these as-grown films clearly established the presence of in-plane uniaxial magnetic anisotropy (Ku). It is argued that this observed anisotropy is strain-induced. This is supported by the observed dependence of direction of Ku on the angle between applied magnetic field and crystallographic orientation of the underlying Si(100) substrate, and increase in the coercivity with the increase of the film thickness.

  5. Flow field and thermal characteristics induced by a rotationally oscillating heated flat plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koffi, Moise

    The objective of this dissertation is the study the flow and heat transfer in the vicinity of a rectangular flat heated plate of subject to rotational oscillations. Of interest is the effect of the flow field on the thermal characteristics of the plate's surface. A constant heat flux is applied to both sides while the plate is rotated about a fixed edge at a frequency of 2 rad/s in an infinite domain at atmospheric pressure. A computational simulation of the flow with FLUENT reveals a hooked-shape vortex tube around the free edges of the plate, which is confirmed by the flow visualization with smoke particles. During the flapping cycle, vortices form and grow progressively on one face while they shed from the opposite, until they are completely detached from both surfaces at stroke reversal. A data acquisition system uses a numerical computing and programming software (MATLAB) to track the surface temperature recorded by J- type thermocouples at desired locations on the plate. Both experimental and computational results agree with local surface temperature profiles characterized by a transient unsteady periodic variation followed by a steady periodic phase. These characteristics are symmetrical about the median plane of the plate, which is normal to its axis of rotation. The cooling rate of the surface, proportional to the frequency of rotation, depends on the angular position of the plate and the spatial location on the plate's surface. However, the highest heat transfer coefficient is recorded at free edges, especially in the corners swept by strong tip vortices shedding in two orthogonal directions. Conclusions of the present study are used to explain the role of ear flapping in the metabolic heat regulation of large mammals such as elephants. Flow visualization and surface temperature measurements of full size rigid and flexible elephant ear-shape models were carried out. Results indicate improved interaction between the shedding vortex and the model's boundary

  6. Commensurability oscillations in a quasi-two-dimensional electron gas subject to strong in-plane magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smrčka, L.

    2016-03-01

    We report on a theoretical study of the commensurability oscillations in a quasi-two-dimensional electron gas modulated by a unidirectional periodic potential and subject to tilted magnetic fields with a strong in-plane component. As a result of coupling of the in-plane field component and the confining potential in the finite-width quantum well, the originally circular cyclotron orbits become anisotropic and tilted out of the sample plane. A quasi-classical approach to the theory, that relates the magneto-resistance oscillations to the guiding-center drift, is extended to this case.

  7. Free vibration of conducting nanoplates exposed to unidirectional in-plane magnetic fields using nonlocal shear deformable plate theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiani, Keivan

    2014-03-01

    The alteration of the frequencies of nanostructures via an external field is of great importance in the design of nanomechanical devices whose vibrations should be appropriately controlled. Herein, free in-plane and out-of-plane vibration behaviors of conducting rectangular nanoplates subjected to unidirectional in-plane steady magnetic fields are of concern. To this end, the body forces exerted on the nanoplate based on the hypotheses of Kirchhoff, Mindlin, and higher-order plate theories are obtained. Subsequently, the nonlocal versions of the equations of motion of the conducting nanoplate for the suggested plate models are extracted. The presented formulations show that the small-scale parameter is incorporated into the exerted forces on the nanoplate due to the applied magnetic field. For the proposed models, the frequencies pertinent to the in-plane and out-of-plane vibrations of the nanoplates are evaluated. In the continuing, the roles of the length-to-thickness ratio, length-to-width ratio, small-scale parameter, and magnetic field strength on both in-plane and out-of-plane frequencies are addressed. The capabilities of the proposed models in predicting such frequencies are also explained and discussed.

  8. THE ROTATION PROFILE OF SOLAR MAGNETIC FIELDS BETWEEN {+-}60 Degree-Sign LATITUDES

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, X. J.; Xie, J. L.

    2013-08-10

    Through a cross-correlation analysis of the Carrington synoptic maps of solar photospheric magnetic fields from Carrington Rotation Nos. 1625 to 2129 (from 1975 February to 2012 October), the sidereal rotation rates of solar magnetic fields between {+-}60 Degree-Sign latitudes are investigated. It seems that the temporal variation of rotation rates should be related to the solar cycle phase. The rotation profile of magnetic fields is obtained: the sidereal rotation rates decrease from the equator to mid-latitude and reach their minimum values of about 13.16 deg day{sup -1} (13.17 deg day{sup -1}) at 53 Degree-Sign (54 Degree-Sign ) latitude in the northern (southern) hemisphere, then increase toward higher latitudes. This rotation profile is different from the differential rotation law obtained by Snodgrass from a cross-correlation analysis of daily magnetograms, in which the rotation rates show a steep decrease from the equator to the poles. However, it is much closer to the quasi-rigid rotation law derived by Stenflo from an auto-correlation analysis of daily magnetograms. Some possible interpretations are discussed for the resulting rotation profile.

  9. Truncation planes from a dilute pyroclastic density current: field data and analogue experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douillet, Guilhem Amin; Gegg, Lukas; Mato, Celia; Kueppers, Ulrich; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-04-01

    Pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) are a catastrophic transport mode of ground hugging gas-particle mixtures associated with explosive volcanic eruptions. The extremely high sedimentation rates and turbulence levels of these particulate density currents can freeze and preserve dynamic phenomena that happen but are not recorded in other sedimentary environments. Several intriguing and unanticipated features have been identified in outcrops and reproduced via analogue experiments, with the potential to change our views on morphodynamics and particle motion. Three types of small-scale (ca. 10 cm) erosion structures were observed on the stoss side of dune bedforms in the field: 1) vertical erosion planes covered with stoss-aggrading, vertical lamination, 2) overturned laminations at the preserved limit of erosion planes and 3) loss of stratification at erosion planes. These features are interpreted to indicate rapidly evolving velocities, undeveloped boundary layers, and a diffuse zone rather than a sharp border defining the flow-bed interface. Most experimental work on particle motion and erosion from the literature has been accomplished under constant conditions and with planar particle beds. Here, in order to reproduce the field observations, short-lived air-jets generated with a compressor-gun were shot into stratified beds of coarse particles (300 μm) of low density (1000 kg/m3). These "eroding jets" were filmed with a high speed camera and the deposits were sectioned after the experiments. The three natural types of erosion characteristics were experimentally generated. Vertical erosion planes are produced by small-scale, relatively sustained jets. Overturned laminations are due to a fluidization-like behavior at the erosion front of short-lived, strong jets, demonstrating that the fluid's velocity profile penetrates into the deposit. Loss of lamination seems related to the nature of erosion onset in packages. Rather than providing simple answers, the dataset

  10. Numerical study of magnetohydrodynamic viscous plasma flow in rotating porous media with Hall currents and inclined magnetic field influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bég, O. Anwar; Sim, Lik; Zueco, J.; Bhargava, R.

    2010-02-01

    A numerical solution is developed for the viscous, incompressible, magnetohydrodynamic flow in a rotating channel comprising two infinite parallel plates and containing a Darcian porous medium, the plates lying in the x-z plane, under constant pressure gradient. The system is subjected to a strong, inclined magnetic field orientated to the positive direction of the y-axis (rotational axis, normal to the x-z plane). The Navier-Stokes flow equations for a general rotating hydromagnetic flow are reduced to a pair of linear, viscous partial differential equations neglecting convective acceleration terms, for primary velocity (u‧) and secondary velocity (v‧) where these velocities are directed along the x and y axes. Only viscous terms are retained in the momenta equations. The model is non-dimensionalized and shown to be controlled by a number of dimensionless parameters. The resulting dimensionless ordinary differential equations are solved using a robust numerical method, Network Simulation Methodology. Full details of the numerics are provided. The present solutions are also benchmarked against the analytical solutions presented recently by Ghosh and Pop [Ghosh SK, Pop I. An analytical approach to MHD plasma behaviour of a rotating environment in the presence of an inclined magnetic field as compared to excitation frequency. Int J Appl Mech Eng 2006;11(4):845-856] for the case of a purely fluid medium (infinite permeability). We study graphically the influence of Hartmann number (Ha, magnetic field parameter), Ekman number (Ek, rotation parameter), Hall current parameter (Nh), Darcy number (Da, permeability parameter), pressure gradient (Np) and also magnetic field inclination (θ) on primary and secondary velocity fields. Additionally we investigate the effects of these multiphysical parameters on the dimensionless shear stresses at the plates. Both primary and secondary velocity are seen to be increased with a rise in Darcy number, owing to a simultaneous

  11. Direct observation of an out-of-plane spin polarization caused by an in-plane magnetic field in a GaAs 2D hole system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeoh, Lareine; Srinivasan, Ashwin; Klochan, Oleh; Micolich, Adam; Winkler, Roland; Simmons, Michelle; Ritchie, David; Pepper, Michael; Hamilton, Alexander

    2014-03-01

    Recent interest in spin-orbit coupling has led to studies of quantum confined, hole based semiconductor devices, which naturally possess strong spin-orbit interaction due to the intrinsic spin-3/2 nature of holes. In general both crystal anisotropies and quantum confinement will affect the spin properties of holes. In high symmetry crystals such anisotropies can be ignored, however in low symmetry crystals this complex interplay between the crystal and the confining potential gives rise to intriguing spin behavior, which has no counterpart in spin-1/2 electron-based systems. Here I will present the first direct observations of an unusual effect where a magnetic field applied in the plane of the 2D hole system generates a spin polarization perpendicular to the 2D plane. This out-of-plane spin polarisation is detected in transport measurements of a symmetrically doped, GaAs 2D hole quantum well in tilted magnetic fields. We are able to extract the sign of this off-diagonal component of the Landé g-factor and show that it is consistent with theory.

  12. Scaling of plane-wave functions in statistically optimized near-field acoustic holography.

    PubMed

    Hald, Jørgen

    2014-11-01

    Statistically Optimized Near-field Acoustic Holography (SONAH) is a Patch Holography method, meaning that it can be applied in cases where the measurement area covers only part of the source surface. The method performs projections directly in the spatial domain, avoiding the use of spatial discrete Fourier transforms and the associated errors. First, an inverse problem is solved using regularization. For each calculation point a multiplication must then be performed with two transfer vectors--one to get the sound pressure and the other to get the particle velocity. Considering SONAH based on sound pressure measurements, existing derivations consider only pressure reconstruction when setting up the inverse problem, so the evanescent wave amplification associated with the calculation of particle velocity is not taken into account in the regularized solution of the inverse problem. The present paper introduces a scaling of the applied plane wave functions that takes the amplification into account, and it is shown that the previously published virtual source-plane retraction has almost the same effect. The effectiveness of the different solutions is verified through a set of simulated measurements. PMID:25373969

  13. Near-field coupling model between PCB and grounded transmission line based on plane wave spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leseigneur, Christelle; Baudry, David; Ravelo, Blaise; Louis, Anne

    2013-10-01

    This article presents an explicit model of electromagnetic (EM) coupling between electronic circuits and metallic wire placed above the ground plane. The model is based on the interaction between the EM near-field (NF) that has been treated with plane wave spectrum (PWS) and the Taylor model. The routine process illustrating the methodology is addressed is this article. The practicability of the model developed was upheld with different analytical and real demonstrators. First, the NF coupling between a straight transmission line (TL) and 1 GHz Wilkinson power divider (PWD) designed and implemented in planar technology was provided. Subsequently, simulations with a powerful commercial tool and measurements from 0.2 GHz to 2 GHz revealed a good agreement between the coupling voltages from the proposed model. As a second proof of concept, a printed circuit board incorporating a 40 MHz RF oscillator was placed 5 mm above the grounded TL. Once again, coupling voltages matched measurements were observed with magnitude relative difference lower than 5 dB. The hereby model presents huge benefits not only in terms of flexibility in the design process but it can also be run with very less computation time compared to the existing standard simulators. The model can be potentially a good candidate for investigating complex systems EMC engineering.

  14. Apparatus and method for generating a magnetic field by rotation of a charge holding object

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Vukovic, Lela; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2009-10-13

    A device and a method for the production of a magnetic field using a Charge Holding Object that is mechanically rotated. In a preferred embodiment, a Charge Holding Object surrounding a sample rotates and subjects the sample to one or more magnetic fields. The one or more magnetic fields are used by NMR Electronics connected to an NMR Conductor positioned within the Charge Holding Object to perform NMR analysis of the sample.

  15. Activity of Lipase and Chitinase Immobilized on Superparamagnetic Particles in a Rotational Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Mizuki, Toru; Sawai, Miyuki; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Morimoto, Hisao; Maekawa, Toru

    2013-01-01

    We immobilize hydrolases such as lipase and chitinase on superparamagnetic particles, which are subjected to a rotational magnetic field, and measure the activities of the enzymes. We find that the activities of lipase and chitinase increase in the rotational magnetic field compared to those in the absence of a magnetic field and reach maximum at certain frequencies. The present methodology may well be utilized for the design and development of efficient micro reactors and micro total analysis systems (μ-TASs). PMID:23799111

  16. The sound field of a rotating monopole in a plug flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, I. V.

    2016-07-01

    A theoretical study is performed on the sound field generated by a rotating point monopole in a jet flow, the mixing layer of which is simulated by a velocity discontinuity. Its sound in the far field is compared to the sound field generated by a rotating monopole in a uniform flow in the absence of a velocity discontinuity, which makes it possible to estimate the size of the sound refraction effect.

  17. Local field and quantum effects for current perpendicular to planes in multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.G.; Butler, W.H.

    1996-12-31

    The calculation of giant-magnetoresistance and in general, of electron transport for multilayers in the case of current perpendicular to the planes (CPP) requires both the two-point conductivity and the solution to the local field problem. In this paper we present a solution to the local field problem at an interface using two approaches. In the first approach we find the semiclassical solution for the local field when there is a band mismatch between two sides of an interface, and examine the deviation of the total resistance from the result of ``self-averaging``, in the lowest order of the value of the potential step. In the second approach, we solve for the quantum correction to the local field through a numerical iterative scheme. The oscillations due to the quantum correction are surprisingly large, but their correction to the total resistance is remarkably small. Our results imply that the ``self-averaging`` of the resistance, which is usually assumed in analysis of CPP, is only approximate. 8 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Vortex Formation of Rotating Bose-Einstein Condensates in Synthetic Magnetic Field with Optical Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    Motivated by recent experiments carried out by Spielman's group at NIST, we study the vortex formation in a rotating Bose-Einstein condensate in synthetic magnetic field confined in a harmonic potential combined with an optical lattice. We obtain numerical solutions of the two-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation and compare the vortex formation by synthetic magnetic field method with those by rotating frame method. We conclude that a large angular momentum indeed can be created in the presence of the optical lattice. However, it is still more difficult to rotate the condensate by the synthetic magnetic field than by the rotating frame even if the optical lattice is added, and the chemical potential and energy remain almost unchanged by increasing rotational frequency.

  19. Design and implementation of low profile antenna for dual-band applications using rotated e-shaped conductor-backed plane.

    PubMed

    Jalali, Mahdi; Sedghi, Tohid; Shafei, Shahin

    2014-01-01

    A novel configuration of a printed monopole antenna with a very compact size for satisfying WLAN operations at the 5.2/5.8 GHz and also for X-band operations at the 10 GHz has been proposed. The antenna includes a simple square-shaped patch as the radiator, the rotated U-shaped conductor back plane element with embedded strip on it, and the partial rectangular ground surface. By using the rotated U-shaped conductor-backed plane with proper values, good impedance matching and improvement in bandwidth can be achieved, at the lower and upper bands. The impedance bandwidth for S11 < -10 dB is about 1.15 GHz for 5 GHz band and 5.3 GHz for X-band. The measured peak gains are about 1.9 dBi at WLAN-band and 4.2 dBi at X-band. The experimental results represent that the realized antenna with good omnidirectional radiation characteristics, enough impedance bandwidth, and reasonable gains can be appropriate for various applications of the future developed technologies and handheld devices. PMID:24711732

  20. Design and Implementation of Low Profile Antenna for Dual-Band Applications Using Rotated E-Shaped Conductor-Backed Plane

    PubMed Central

    Jalali, Mahdi; Sedghi, Tohid; Shafei, Shahin

    2014-01-01

    A novel configuration of a printed monopole antenna with a very compact size for satisfying WLAN operations at the 5.2/5.8 GHz and also for X-band operations at the 10 GHz has been proposed. The antenna includes a simple square-shaped patch as the radiator, the rotated U-shaped conductor back plane element with embedded strip on it, and the partial rectangular ground surface. By using the rotated U-shaped conductor-backed plane with proper values, good impedance matching and improvement in bandwidth can be achieved, at the lower and upper bands. The impedance bandwidth for S11 < −10 dB is about 1.15 GHz for 5 GHz band and 5.3 GHz for X-band. The measured peak gains are about 1.9 dBi at WLAN-band and 4.2 dBi at X-band. The experimental results represent that the realized antenna with good omnidirectional radiation characteristics, enough impedance bandwidth, and reasonable gains can be appropriate for various applications of the future developed technologies and handheld devices. PMID:24711732

  1. In-plane tunnelling field-effect transistor integrated on Silicon.

    PubMed

    Fina, Ignasi; Apachitei, Geanina; Preziosi, Daniele; Deniz, Hakan; Kriegner, Dominik; Marti, Xavier; Alexe, Marin

    2015-01-01

    Silicon has persevered as the primary substrate of microelectronics during last decades. During last years, it has been gradually embracing the integration of ferroelectricity and ferromagnetism. The successful incorporation of these two functionalities to silicon has delivered the desired non-volatility via charge-effects and giant magneto-resistance. On the other hand, there has been a numerous demonstrations of the so-called magnetoelectric effect (coupling between ferroelectric and ferromagnetic order) using nearly-perfect heterostructures. However, the scrutiny of the ingredients that lead to magnetoelectric coupling, namely magnetic moment and a conducting channel, does not necessarily require structural perfection. In this work, we circumvent the stringent requirements for epilayers while preserving the magnetoelectric functionality in a silicon-integrated device. Additionally, we have identified an in-plane tunnelling mechanism which responds to a vertical electric field. This genuine electroresistance effect is distinct from known resistive-switching or tunnel electro resistance. PMID:26403693

  2. A study of the round jet/plane wall flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foss, J. F.; Kleis, S. J.

    1971-01-01

    Impingement angles, between the axisymmetric jet axis and the plane wall, from zero to 15 degrees have been examined for nozzle heights of 0.75, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 diameters and for: (1) a fully developed pipe flow, and (2) a relatively uniform exit velocity condition. Velocity measurements have been used to define isotach contours and to determine mass, momentum and energy flux values for the near field (within five diameters) of the jet. Surface pressure measurements have been used to define surface pressure forces and jet centerline trajectories. The geometric and flow conditions examined and the interpretation of the results have been motivated by the externally blown flap STOL aircraft application.

  3. In-plane tunnelling field-effect transistor integrated on Silicon

    PubMed Central

    Fina, Ignasi; Apachitei, Geanina; Preziosi, Daniele; Deniz, Hakan; Kriegner, Dominik; Marti, Xavier; Alexe, Marin

    2015-01-01

    Silicon has persevered as the primary substrate of microelectronics during last decades. During last years, it has been gradually embracing the integration of ferroelectricity and ferromagnetism. The successful incorporation of these two functionalities to silicon has delivered the desired non-volatility via charge-effects and giant magneto-resistance. On the other hand, there has been a numerous demonstrations of the so-called magnetoelectric effect (coupling between ferroelectric and ferromagnetic order) using nearly-perfect heterostructures. However, the scrutiny of the ingredients that lead to magnetoelectric coupling, namely magnetic moment and a conducting channel, does not necessarily require structural perfection. In this work, we circumvent the stringent requirements for epilayers while preserving the magnetoelectric functionality in a silicon-integrated device. Additionally, we have identified an in-plane tunnelling mechanism which responds to a vertical electric field. This genuine electroresistance effect is distinct from known resistive-switching or tunnel electro resistance. PMID:26403693

  4. In-plane ultrasonic velocity measurement of longitudinal and shear waves in the machine direction with transducers in rotating wheels

    DOEpatents

    Hall, M.S.; Jackson, T.G.; Knerr, C.

    1998-02-17

    An improved system for measuring the velocity of ultrasonic signals within the plane of moving web-like materials, such as paper, paperboard and the like. In addition to velocity measurements of ultrasonic signals in the plane of the web in the MD and CD, one embodiment of the system in accordance with the present invention is also adapted to provide on-line indication of the polar specific stiffness of the moving web. In another embodiment of the invention, the velocity of ultrasonic signals in the plane of the web are measured by way of a plurality of ultrasonic transducers carried by synchronously driven wheels or cylinders, thus eliminating undue transducer wear due to any speed differences between the transducers and the web. In order to provide relatively constant contact force between the transducers and the webs, the transducers are mounted in a sensor housings which include a spring for biasing the transducer radially outwardly. The sensor housings are adapted to be easily and conveniently mounted to the carrier to provide a relatively constant contact force between the transducers and the moving web. 37 figs.

  5. In-plane ultrasonic velocity measurement of longitudinal and shear waves in the machine direction with transducers in rotating wheels

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Maclin S.; Jackson, Theodore G.; Knerr, Christopher

    1998-02-17

    An improved system for measuring the velocity of ultrasonic signals within the plane of moving web-like materials, such as paper, paperboard and the like. In addition to velocity measurements of ultrasonic signals in the plane of the web in the MD and CD, one embodiment of the system in accordance with the present invention is also adapted to provide on-line indication of the polar specific stiffness of the moving web. In another embodiment of the invention, the velocity of ultrasonic signals in the plane of the web are measured by way of a plurality of ultrasonic transducers carried by synchronously driven wheels or cylinders, thus eliminating undue transducer wear due to any speed differences between the transducers and the web. In order to provide relatively constant contact force between the transducers and the webs, the transducers are mounted in a sensor housings which include a spring for biasing the transducer radially outwardly. The sensor housings are adapted to be easily and conveniently mounted to the carrier to provide a relatively constant contact force between the transducers and the moving web.

  6. Stochastic Ion Heating in a Field-reversed Configuration Geometry by Rotating Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    S.A. Cohen, A.S. Landsman, and A.H. Glasser

    2007-06-25

    Ion heating by application of rotating magnetic fields (RMF) to a prolate field-reversed configuration(FRC) is explored by analytical and numerical techniques. For odd-parity RMF (RMFo), perturbation analysis shows ions in figure-8 orbits gain energy at resonances of the RMFo frequency, ωR, with the figure-8 orbital frequency, ω. Since figure-8 orbits tend to gain the most energy from the RMF and are unlikely to escape in the cusp region (where most losses occur), they are optimal candidates for rapid stochastic heating, as compared to cyclotron and betatron orbits. Comparisons are made between heating caused by even- and odd-parity RMFs and between heating in currently operating and in reactor-scale FRC devices.

  7. Convective Power Loss Measurements in a Field Reversed Configuration with Rotating Magnetic Field Current Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, Paul

    The Translation, Confinement, and Sustainment Upgrade (TCSU) experiment achieves direct formation and sustainment of a field reversed configuration (FRC) plasma through rotating magnetic fields (RMF). The pre-ionized gas necessary for FRC formation is supplied by a magnetized cascade arc source that has been developed for TCSU. To ensure ideal FRC performance, the condition of the vacuum chamber prior to RMF start-up has been characterized with the use of a fast response ion gauge. A circuit capable of gating the puff valves with initial high voltage for quick response and then indefinite operational voltage was also designed. A fully translatable combination Langmuir / Mach probe was also built to measure the electron temperature, electron density, and ion velocity of the FRC. These measurements were also successfully completed in the FRC exhaust jets allowing for an accurate analysis of the FRC power loss through convection.

  8. In situ biaxial rotation at low-temperatures in high magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Selby, N S; Crawford, M; Tracy, L; Tracey, L; Reno, J L; Pan, W

    2014-09-01

    We report the design, construction, and characterization of a biaxial sample rotation stage for use in a cryogenic system for orientation-dependent studies of anisotropic electronic transport phenomena at low temperatures and high magnetic fields. Our apparatus allows for continuous rotation of a sample about two axes, both independently and simultaneously. PMID:25273781

  9. In situ biaxial rotation at low-temperatures in high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, N. S.; Crawford, M.; Tracy, L.; Reno, J. L.; Pan, W.

    2014-09-15

    We report the design, construction, and characterization of a biaxial sample rotation stage for use in a cryogenic system for orientation-dependent studies of anisotropic electronic transport phenomena at low temperatures and high magnetic fields. Our apparatus allows for continuous rotation of a sample about two axes, both independently and simultaneously.

  10. Rotation of the photospheric magnetic fields: A north-south asymmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonucci, E.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Scherrer, P. H.

    1989-01-01

    During most of solar cycle 21 the large-scale photospheric field rotated more rapidly in the Northern Hemisphere than in the southern. The large-scale northern field rotated with a 26.9 day period (synodic), was centered at 15 degress N, and covered a latitude zone about 24 degrees wide. The large-scale southern field rotated with a periodicity of 28.1 days, was centered at 26 degrees S, and covered a latitude zone about 32 degrees wide. Our analysis showed rotational power at only a few discrete latitudes and frequencies in each hemisphere. The center of each peak lies near the sunspot differential rotation curve. The largest scale field contributes to the configuration of the coronal and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The strength of the first harmonic of the northern field suggests that this structure may be related to the 4-sector pattern observed in the IMF polarity. The southern field had much lower power at the first harmonic of the solar rotation rate and so would contribute only to a 2-sector structure in the IMF. These results were discovered in Fourier analysis of photospheric synoptic charts obtained at the Wilcox Solar Observatory from 1976 to 1986 and confirmed in higher resolution maps from the National Solar Observatory. Mt. Wilson magnetic field measurements from solar cycle 20 show a similar north-south asymmetry.

  11. Is Quadrupole Structure of Out-of-Plane Magnetic Field Evidence for Hall Reconnection?

    SciTech Connect

    Karimabadi, H.; Vu, H. X.; Loring, B.; Omelchenko, Y.; Dorelli, J.

    2011-01-04

    The experimental observation of a quadrupole pattern in the ''out-of-plane'' field B{sub y} is usually interpreted as a tell-tale sign of Hall MHD mediated magnetic reconnection in the vicinity of a reconnecting X-point. In contrast to these conventional expectations, it is shown B{sub y} means of analytical equations describing the generation of B{sub y} that quadrupole structure can be formed even in the absence of Hall effects. In general, B{sub y} can be generated due to inhomogeneous ion flow, inhomogeneous current (Hall effect), or terms proportional to a pre-existing B{sub y}. This prediction is validated in a 3D global MHD simulation where it is shown that vortex flows at the dayside magnetopause lead to formation of a finite B{sub y} even in the absence of a pre-existing IMF B{sub y}. The generated field is shown to have a quadrupolar pattern in B{sub y} with peak amplitude {approx}0.5 of the total field. Similar vortex flows are also observed in 3D global hybrid simulations but the resulting B{sub y} structure in this case is a combination of the Hall effects and the inhomogeneous ion flows. Thus special care must be taken in using observations of quadrupole B{sub y} in satellite and experiments to infer information about its particular generation mechanism or attributing it to the Hall MHD reconnection regime.

  12. Spectral properties of fluctuating electromagnetic fields in a plane cavity: implication for nanoscale physics.

    PubMed

    Dorofeyev, I; Fuchs, H; Jersch, J

    2002-02-01

    Spectral power densities of fluctuating electromagnetic fields and their spatial derivatives of all orders in any point of a transparent plane gap between two media described by different complex permittivities and by different temperatures were derived on a basis of generalized Kirchhoff's law. Electromagnetic losses into the two absorbing media induced by a field of a point dipole or of point multipolelike origins situated in any place of interest at the transparent gap were determined. The corresponding electrodynamical regular Green problem for a point dipole and for point multipoles of any orders constituted by the point dipole was solved. We demonstrate ways to obtain different asymptotic cases following from our general solution including the problem for a half space, Planck's formula for black body radiation, the van der Waals forces for solids kept at different temperatures, and contributions from propagating and evanescent waves. Expressions for electromagnetic loss of a point multipole of any order in selected geometry of the problem were derived and, as an important limiting case related to problems of near field microscopy, when the multipole is situated over a half space. PMID:11863681

  13. Effect of electromagnetic field on the stability of viscoelastic fluid film flowing down an inclined plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haldar, Samadyuti

    2016-04-01

    The stability of thin electrically conducting viscoelastic fluid film flowing down on a non-conducting inclined plane in the presence of electromagnetic field is investigated under induction-free approximation. Surface evolution equation is derived by long-wave expansion method. The stabilizing role of Hartman number M (magnetic field) and the destabilizing role of the viscoelastic property {\\varGamma} and the electric parameter E on such fluid film are established through the linear stability analysis of the surface evolution equation. Investigation shows that at small values of Hartman number ( M), the influence of electric parameter ( E) on the viscoelastic parameter {(\\varGamma)} is insignificant, while for large values of M, E introduces more destabilizing effect at low values of {\\varGamma} than that at high values of {\\varGamma }. An interesting result also perceived from our analysis is that the stabilizing effect of Hartman number ( M) is decreasing with the increase of the values of {\\varGamma} and E, even it gives destabilizing effect after a certain high value of the electric field depending on the high value of {\\varGamma}. The weakly nonlinear study reveals that the increase of {\\varGamma} decreases the explosive and subcritical unstable zones but increases the supercritical stable zone keeping the unconditional zone almost constant.

  14. Mechanical design of mounts for IGRINS focal plane arrays and field flattening lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jae Sok; Park, Chan; Cha, Sang-Mok; Yuk, In-Soo; Kim, Kang-Min; Chun, Moo-Young; Ko, Kyeongyeon; Oh, Heeyeong; Jeong, Ueejeong; Nah, Jakyoung; Lee, Hanshin; Pavel, Michael; Jaffe, Daniel T.

    2014-07-01

    IGRINS, the Immersion GRating INfrared Spectrometer, is a near-infrared wide-band high-resolution spectrograph jointly developed by the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute and the University of Texas at Austin. IGRINS employs three HAWAII-2RG focal plane array (FPA) detectors. The mechanical mounts for these detectors and for the final (field-flattening) lens in the optical train serve a critical function in the overall instrument design: Optically, they permit the only positional compensation in the otherwise "build to print" design. Thermally, they permit setting and control of the detector operating temperature independently of the cryostat bench. We present the design and fabrication of the mechanical mount as a single module. The detector mount includes the array housing, housing for the SIDECAR ASIC, a field flattener lens holder, and a support base. The detector and ASIC housing will be kept at 65 K and the support base at 130 K. G10 supports thermally isolate the detector and ASIC housing from the support base. The field flattening lens holder attaches directly to the FPA array housing and holds the lens with a six-point kinematic mount. Fine adjustment features permit changes in axial position and in yaw and pitch angles. We optimized the structural stability and thermal characteristics of the mount design using computer-aided 3D modeling and finite element analysis. Based on the computer simulation, the designed detector mount meets the optical and thermal requirements very well.

  15. Alignment of the Earth's Magnetic Field with the Axis of Rotation and Reversals of Polarity: Laboratory Experiments on a Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Crane, H. R.

    1974-01-01

    A mechanism that can cause the earth's external magnetic field to be aligned with the axis of rotation and to reverse at random times is described. It depends upon two arbitrary assumptions: (a) A dipole magnetic source, of unspecified nature, deep within the core, wanders randomly in direction. (b) The conducting fluid at the outer boundary of the core circulates in a pattern that is symmetrical with respect to the earth's axis of rotation. It is shown that such a circulating layer will act as an anisotropic screen, which will suppress the field of the transverse component of the source dipole. The field observed outside the core will be mainly that of the axial component of the source, and it will reverse abruptly whenever the direction of the source crosses the equatorial plane. Quantitative experimental studies, made on small-scale models, of the effects and their properties are described. The only datum that even suggests a value that may be used for the angular velocity of the circulating outer layer with respect to the source is the angular velocity of the westward drift of the earth's nondipolar field. If that value is used, the anisotropic screening effect comes out to be strong enough to give alignment and reversal characteristics that are similar to those found from paleomagnetic studies. PMID:16592194

  16. Cycloid manipulation by electric field in BiFeO3 films: Coupling between polarization, octahedral rotation, and antiferromagnetic order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popkov, A. F.; Kulagin, N. E.; Soloviov, S. V.; Sukmanova, K. S.; Gareeva, Z. V.; Zvezdin, A. K.

    2015-10-01

    The room temperature multiferroic BiFeO3, by far the most studied experimentally, exhibits outstanding ferroelectric properties with a cycloidal magnetic order in the bulk and many unexpected advantages for possible applications in spintronics, sensor techniques, and photovoltaics. To consider ferroelectric and magnetic phase transitions in multiferroic BiFeO3 under electric field, we suggest the Ginsburg-Landau-like approach based on the symmetry and P -ω -L coupling, where the order parameters are: P is the electric polarization, ω is the axial vector of antidistorsion (describing a rotation of the oxygen octahedrons), and L is the antiferromagnetic vector. The theoretical model is consistent with experiment and ab initio calculations data. We give the complete set of numerical coefficients of the model and explore the behavior of P and ω vectors in strong electric field. The proposed approach is particularly promising for the analysis of magnetoelectric phenomena whose length scale is significantly larger than the length of the cell used in ab initio calculations. The considered cycloid problem is the clear example of such a system. Electric field-induced transformations of cycloid are exemplified on an epitaxial BiFeO3 film grown on the (001)-oriented substrate. We show that the jump of vectors P and ω in the field E =6 MV/m is accompanied by a jump of a cycloid spin rotation plane. This effect is of particular interest for spintronics and nanoelectronics.

  17. Shifting nodal-plane suppressions in high-order-harmonic spectra from diatomic molecules in orthogonally polarized driving fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, T.; Figueira de Morisson Faria, C.

    2016-08-01

    We analyze the imprint of nodal planes in high-order-harmonic spectra from aligned diatomic molecules in intense laser fields whose components exhibit orthogonal polarizations. We show that the typical suppression in the spectra associated to nodal planes is distorted, and that this distortion can be employed to map the electron's angle of return to its parent ion. This investigation is performed semianalytically at the single-molecule response and single-active orbital level, using the strong-field approximation and the steepest descent method. We show that the velocity form of the dipole operator is superior to the length form in providing information about this distortion. However, both forms introduce artifacts that are absent in the actual momentum-space wave function. Furthermore, elliptically polarized fields lead to larger distortions in comparison to two-color orthogonally polarized fields. These features are investigated in detail for O2, whose highest occupied molecular orbital provides two orthogonal nodal planes.

  18. Plane waves at or near grazing incidence in the parabolic approximation. [acoustic equations of motion for sound fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcaninch, G. L.; Myers, M. K.

    1980-01-01

    The parabolic approximation for the acoustic equations of motion is applied to the study of the sound field generated by a plane wave at or near grazing incidence to a finite impedance boundary. It is shown how this approximation accounts for effects neglected in the usual plane wave reflection analysis which, at grazing incidence, erroneously predicts complete cancellation of the incident field by the reflected field. Examples are presented which illustrate that the solution obtained by the parabolic approximation contains several of the physical phenomena known to occur in wave propagation near an absorbing boundary.

  19. Radio Frequency Trap for Containment of Plasmas in Antimatter Propulsion Systems Using Rotating Wall Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, William Herbert, III (Inventor); Martin, James Joseph (Inventor); Lewis, Raymond A. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A containment apparatus for containing a cloud of charged particles comprises a cylindrical vacuum chamber having a longitudinal axis. Within the vacuum chamber is a containment region. A magnetic field is aligned with the longitudinal axis of the vacuum chamber. The magnetic field is time invariant and uniform in strength over the containment region. An electric field is also aligned with the longitudinal axis of the vacuum chamber and the magnetic field. The electric field is time invariant, and forms a potential well over the containment region. One or more means are disposed around the cloud of particles for inducing a rotating electric field internal to the vacuum chamber. The rotating electric field imparts energy to the charged particles within the containment region and compress the cloud of particles. The means disposed around the outer surface of the vacuum chamber for inducing a rotating electric field are four or more segments forming a segmented ring, the segments conforming to the outer surface of the vacuum chamber. Each of the segments is energized by a separate alternating voltage. The sum of the voltages imposed on each segment establishes the rotating field. When four segments form a ring, the rotating field is obtained by a signal generator applying a sinusoidal signal phase delayed by 90,180 and 270 degrees in sequence to the four segments.

  20. DARK MATTER, MAGNETIC FIELDS, AND THE ROTATION CURVE OF THE MILKY WAY

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz-Granados, B.; Battaner, E.; Florido, E.; Calvo, J.; Rubino-Martin, J. A.

    2012-08-20

    The study of the disk rotation curve of our Galaxy at large distances provides an interesting scenario for us to test whether magnetic fields should be considered as a non-negligible dynamical ingredient. By assuming a bulge, an exponential disk for the stellar and gaseous distributions, and a dark halo and disk magnetic fields, we fit the rotation velocity of the Milky Way. In general, when the magnetic contribution is added to the dynamics, a better description of the rotation curve is obtained. Our main conclusion is that magnetic fields should be taken into account for the Milky Way dynamics. Azimuthal magnetic field strengths of B{sub {phi}} {approx} 2 {mu}G at distances of {approx}2 R{sub 0}(16 kpc) are able to explain the rise-up for the rotation curve in the outer disk.

  1. The Rotational Spectrum and Anharmonic Force Field of Chlorine Dioxide, OClO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, Holger S. P.; Sorensen, G.; Birk, Manfred; Friedl, Randy R.

    1997-01-01

    The ground state rotational and quartic centrifugal distortion constants, their vibrational changes, and the sextic centrifugal distortion constants were used in a calculation of the quartic force field together with data from infrared studies.

  2. Energy dissipation and heat exchange in magnetorheological suspensions in a rotating magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Shul'man, Z.P.; Kordonskii, V.I.; Gorodkin, S.R.; Kashevskii, B.E.; Prokhorov, I.V.

    1987-07-01

    The authors present the results of experiments on the effect of the rheological properties of magnetic suspensions and the regime parameters on energy dissipation and heat transport in a rotating magnetic field.

  3. Rotation of the Large-Scale Solar Magnetic Fields in the Equatorial Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latushko, S.

    1996-07-01

    A study is made of the rotation of large-scale magnetic fields using the synoptic maps from the Kitt Peak National Observatory for the time interval 1976 1985. The auto-correlation method and the mass-centers method of magnetic structures was applied to infer mean differential rotation profiles and rotation profiles separately for each magnetic field polarity. It has been found that in both hemispheres the leading polarity rotates faster than the following polarity at all latitudes by about 0.04° day-1. The maximum rotation rate of the leading polarity is reached at about 6° latitude. In the mean profile for both polarities, this brings about two angular velocity maxima at 6° latitudes in both hemispheres. Such a profile appears as to have a ‘dimple’ on the equator.

  4. Biaxial order and a rotation of the minor director in the nematic phase of an organo-siloxane tetrapode by the electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkel, K.; Nagaraj, M.; Kocot, A.; Kohlmeier, A.; Mehl, G. H.; Vij, J. K.

    2012-03-01

    Biaxiality in the nematic phase for a liquid crystalline tetrapode made up of organo-siloxanes mesogens is investigated using polarized infrared spectroscopy. An ordering of the minor director for the homeotropically aligned sample is found to depend on the amplitude of the in-plane electric field. On increasing the in-plane electric field, the minor director, lying initially along the rubbing direction, rotates to the direction of the applied field. The scalar order parameters of the second rank tensor are found to depend significantly on the strength of the electric field. A most significant increase is found in the nematic order parameter and in the parameter that characterizes the phase biaxiality.

  5. Stability of rotating self-gravitating filaments: effects of magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadhukhan, Shubhadeep; Mondal, Surajit; Chakraborty, Sagar

    2016-07-01

    We have performed systematic local linear stability analysis on a radially stratified infinite self-gravitating cylinder of rotating plasma under the influence of magnetic field. In order to render the system analytically tractable, we have focused solely on the axisymmetric modes of perturbations. Using cylindrical coordinate system, we have derived the critical linear mass density of a non-rotating filament required for gravitational collapse to ensue in the presence of azimuthal magnetic field. Moreover, for such filaments threaded by axial magnetic field, we show that the growth rates of the modes having non-zero radial wavenumber are reduced more strongly by the magnetic field than that of the modes having zero radial wavenumber. More importantly, our study contributes to the understanding of the stability property of rotating astrophysical filaments that are more often than not influenced by magnetic fields. In addition to complementing many relevant numerical studies reported the literature, our results on filaments under the influence of magnetic field generalize some of the very recent analytical works. For example, here we prove that even a weak magnetic field can play a dominant role in determining stability of the filament when the rotation time-scale is larger than the free-fall time-scale. A filamentary structure with faster rotation is, however, comparatively more stable for the same magnetic field. The results reported herein, due to strong locality assumption, are strictly valid for the modes for which one can ignore the radial variations in the density and the magnetic field profiles.

  6. Far-field diffraction and focal plane misalignment effects on simulated GIFTS data from the IHOP field program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Erik R.; Knuteson, Robert O.; Revercomb, Hank E.; Li, Jun; Huang, Hung-Lung A.

    2004-10-01

    The Geosynchronous Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) and the Hyperspectral Environmental Suite (HES) instruments are geostationary infrared spectrometers. Geostationary orbit provides observations with very good time resolution, but also increases the effect of diffraction. There can be significant differences in emitted radiances due to clouds and changes in surface characteristics. High, thick clouds in particular are much cooler than clear areas. Diffraction causes radiation that originates from cloudy areas outside of the detector field of view to contaminate the clear pixels. GIFTS will also have two detector arrays on different focal planes, which may not be perfectly aligned. This can cause spatial misalignment between the data for the two spectral regions. High spatial resolution numerical models run at the University of Wisconsin - Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (UW-CIMSS) provide data for examining the diffraction and misalignment effects. The model data represents a variable cloud case during the IHOP field experiment at 1.3-km resolution. This paper outlines the production of high spatial resolution simulated data, characterization of the far field diffraction effects on radiances, and analysis of misalignment effects on temperature and moisture profile retrievals.

  7. Probe measurements of the three-dimensional magnetic field structure in a rotating magnetic field sustained field-reversed configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Velas, K. M.; Milroy, R. D.

    2014-01-15

    A translatable three-axis probe was constructed and installed on the translation, confinement, and sustainment upgrade (TCSU) experiment. With ninety windings, the probe can simultaneously measure B{sub r}, B{sub θ}, and B{sub z} at 30 radial positions, and can be placed at any desired axial position within the field reversed configuration (FRC) confinement chamber. Positioning the probe at multiple axial positions and taking multiple repeatable shots allows for a full r-z map of the magnetic field. Measurements were made for odd-parity rotating magnetic field (RMF) antennas and even-parity RMF. The steady state data from applying a 10 kHz low pass filter used in conjunction with data at the RMF frequency yields a map of the full 3D rotating field structure. Comparisons will be made to the 3D magnetic structure predicted by NIMROD simulations, with parameters adjusted to match that of the TCSU experiments. The probe provides sufficient data to utilize a Maxwell stress tensor approach to directly measure the torque applied to the FRC's electrons, which combined with a resistive torque model, yields an estimate of the average FRC resistivity.

  8. Principal physics of rotating magnetic-field current drive of field reversed configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, A.L.; Guo, H.Y.; Miller, K.E.; Milroy, R.D.

    2006-01-15

    After extensive experimentation on the Translation, Confinement, and Sustainment rotating magnetic-field (RMF)-driven field reversed configuration (FRC) device [A. L. Hoffman et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 41, 92 (2002)], the principal physics of RMF formation and sustainment of standard prolate FRCs inside a flux conserver is reasonably well understood. If the RMF magnitude B{sub {omega}} at a given frequency {omega} is high enough compared to other experimental parameters, it will drive the outer electrons of a plasma column into near synchronous rotation, allowing the RMF to penetrate into the plasma. If the resultant azimuthal current is strong enough to reverse an initial axial bias field B{sub o} a FRC will be formed. A balance between the RMF applied torque and electron-ion friction will determine the peak plasma density n{sub m}{proportional_to}B{sub {omega}}/{eta}{sup 1/2}{omega}{sup 1/2}r{sub s}, where r{sub s} is the FRC separatrix radius and {eta} is an effective weighted plasma resistivity. The plasma total temperature T{sub t} is free to be any value allowed by power balance as long as the ratio of FRC diamagnetic current, I{sup '}{sub dia}{approx_equal}2B{sub e}/{mu}{sub o}, is less than the maximum possible synchronous current, I{sup '}{sub sync}=e{omega}r{sub s}{sup 2}/2. The RMF will self-consistently penetrate a distance {delta}{sup *} governed by the ratio {zeta}=I{sup '}{sub dia}/I{sup '}{sub sync}. Since the FRC is a diamagnetic entity, its peak pressure p{sub m}=n{sub m}kT{sub t} determines its external magnetic field B{sub e}{approx_equal}(2{mu}{sub o}p{sub m}){sup 1/2}. Higher FRC currents, magnetic fields, and poloidal fluxes can thus be obtained, with the same RMF parameters, simply by raising the plasma temperature. Higher temperatures have also been noted to reduce the effective plasma resistivity, so that these higher currents can be supported with surprisingly little increase in absorbed RMF power.

  9. Spatial-temporal three-dimensional ultrasound plane-by-plane active cavitation mapping for high-intensity focused ultrasound in free field and pulsatile flow.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ting; Hu, Hong; Bai, Chen; Guo, Shifang; Yang, Miao; Wang, Supin; Wan, Mingxi

    2016-07-01

    Cavitation plays important roles in almost all high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) applications. However, current two-dimensional (2D) cavitation mapping could only provide cavitation activity in one plane. This study proposed a three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound plane-by-plane active cavitation mapping (3D-UPACM) for HIFU in free field and pulsatile flow. The acquisition of channel-domain raw radio-frequency (RF) data in 3D space was performed by sequential plane-by-plane 2D ultrafast active cavitation mapping. Between two adjacent unit locations, there was a waiting time to make cavitation nuclei distribution of the liquid back to the original state. The 3D cavitation map equivalent to the one detected at one time and over the entire volume could be reconstructed by Marching Cube algorithm. Minimum variance (MV) adaptive beamforming was combined with coherence factor (CF) weighting (MVCF) or compressive sensing (CS) method (MVCS) to process the raw RF data for improved beamforming or more rapid data processing. The feasibility of 3D-UPACM was demonstrated in tap-water and a phantom vessel with pulsatile flow. The time interval between temporal evolutions of cavitation bubble cloud could be several microseconds. MVCF beamformer had a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at 14.17dB higher, lateral and axial resolution at 2.88times and 1.88times, respectively, which were compared with those of B-mode active cavitation mapping. MVCS beamformer had only 14.94% time penalty of that of MVCF beamformer. This 3D-UPACM technique employs the linear array of a current ultrasound diagnosis system rather than a 2D array transducer to decrease the cost of the instrument. Moreover, although the application is limited by the requirement for a gassy fluid medium or a constant supply of new cavitation nuclei that allows replenishment of nuclei between HIFU exposures, this technique may exhibit a useful tool in 3D cavitation mapping for HIFU with high speed, precision and resolution

  10. The elastostatic plane strain mode I crack tip stress and displacement fields in a generalized linear neo-Hookean elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begley, Matthew R.; Creton, Costantino; McMeeking, Robert M.

    2015-11-01

    A general asymptotic plane strain crack tip stress field is constructed for linear versions of neo-Hookean materials, which spans a wide variety of special cases including incompressible Mooney elastomers, the compressible Blatz-Ko elastomer, several cases of the Ogden constitutive law and a new result for a compressible linear neo-Hookean material. The nominal stress field has dominant terms that have a square root singularity with respect to the distance of material points from the crack tip in the undeformed reference configuration. At second order, there is a uniform tension parallel to the crack. The associated displacement field in plane strain at leading order has dependence proportional to the square root of the same coordinate. The relationship between the amplitude of the crack tip singularity (a stress intensity factor) and the plane strain energy release rate is outlined for the general linear material, with simplified relationships presented for notable special cases.

  11. In-plane magnetic field effect on switching voltage and thermal stability in electric-field-controlled perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grezes, C.; Rojas Rozas, A.; Ebrahimi, F.; Alzate, J. G.; Cai, X.; Katine, J. A.; Langer, J.; Ocker, B.; Khalili Amiri, P.; Wang, K. L.

    2016-07-01

    The effect of in-plane magnetic field on switching voltage (Vsw) and thermal stability factor (Δ) are investigated in electric-field-controlled perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions (p-MTJs). Dwell time measurements are used to determine the voltage dependence of the energy barrier height for various in-plane magnetic fields (Hin), and gain insight into the Hin dependent energy landscape. We find that both Vsw and Δ decrease with increasing Hin, with a dominant linear dependence. The results are reproduced by calculations based on a macrospin model while accounting for the modified magnetization configuration in the presence of an external magnetic field.

  12. Magnetostrictive behaviors of Fe-Si(001) single-crystal films under rotating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Tetsuroh; Aida, Takuya; Ohtake, Mitsuru; Futamoto, Masaaki

    2015-05-01

    Magnetostrictive behaviors under rotating magnetic fields are investigated for bcc(001) single-crystal films of Fe100-x-Six(x = 0, 6, 10 at. %). The magnetostriction observation directions are along bcc[100] and bcc[110] of the films. The magnetostriction waveform varies greatly depending on the observation direction. For the observation along [100], the magnetostriction waveform of all the films is bathtub-like and the amplitude stays at almost constant even when the magnetic field is increased up to the anisotropy field. On the other hand, the waveform along [110] is triangular and the amplitude increases with increasing magnetic field up to the anisotropy field and then saturates. In addition, the waveform of Fe90Si10 film is distorted triangular when the applied magnetic fields are less than its anisotropy field. These magnetostrictive behaviors under rotating magnetic fields are well explained by employing a proposed modified coherent rotation model where the anisotropy field and the magnetization reversal field are determined by using measured magnetization curves. The results show that magnetocrystalline anisotropy plays important role on magnetostrictive behavior under rotating magnetic fields.

  13. The influence of differential rotation on the equatorial component of the sun's magnetic dipole field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheeley, N. R., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    This paper examines the effect that solar differential rotation would have on a hypothetical large-scale equatorial dipole field. The evolving large-scale field pattern is expressed as a series of non-axisymmetric moments. As time increases, power is transferred to progressively higher order moments. In the 27d rotating coordinate system, each moment undergoes a small retrograde drift which remains nearly uniform until that mode begins to fade. The synodic rotation periods of the first few moments are comparable to the observed 28.5d period of the sun's large-scale field near sunspot maximum. Differential rotation may be the source of this 28.5d period, but the eruption of new flux is necessary to keep the pattern going.

  14. Four-hair relations for differentially rotating neutron stars in the weak-field limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretz, Joseph; Yagi, Kent; Yunes, Nicolas

    2016-03-01

    The opportunity to study physics at supra-nuclear densities through x-ray observations of neutron stars has led to in-depth investigations of certain approximately universal relations that can remove degeneracies in pulse profile models. One such set of relations, the three-hair relations, were found to hold in neutron stars that rotate rigidly, but neutron stars can also rotate differentially, as is the case for proto-neutron stars and hypermassive transient remnants of binary mergers. We extend the three-hair relations to differentially rotating stars for the first time with a generic rotation law using two approximations: a weak-field scheme (an expansion in powers of the neutron star compactness) and a perturbative differential rotation scheme (an expansion about rigid rotation). The resulting relations include the fourth moment, hence deemed the four-hair relations for differentially rotating neutron stars, and are found to be approximately independent of the equation of state to a higher degree than the three-hair relations for uniformly rotating stars. Our results can be instrumental in the development of four-hair relations for rapidly differentially rotating stars in full general relativity using numerical simulations.

  15. A polarizing situation: Taking an in-plane perspective for next-generation near-field studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuck, P. James; Bao, Wei; Borys, Nicholas J.

    2016-04-01

    By enabling the probing of light-matter interactions at the functionally relevant length scales of most materials, near-field optical imaging and spectroscopy accesses information that is unobtainable with other methods. The advent of apertureless techniques, which exploit the ultralocalized and enhanced near-fields created by sharp metallic tips or plasmonic nanoparticles, has resulted in rapid adoption of near-field approaches for studying novel materials and phenomena, with spatial resolution approaching sub-molecular levels. However, these approaches are generally limited by the dominant out-of-plane polarization response of apertureless tips, restricting the exploration and discovery of many material properties. This has led to recent design and fabrication breakthroughs in near-field tips engineered specifically for enhancing in-plane interactions with near-field light components. This mini-review provides a perspective on recent progress and emerging directions aimed at utilizing and controlling in-plane optical polarization, highlighting key application spaces where in-plane near-field tip responses have enabled recent advancements in the understanding and development of new nanostructured materials and devices.

  16. Influence of the lateral ventricles and irregular skull base on brain kinematics due to sagittal plane head rotation.

    PubMed

    Ivarsson, J; Viano, D C; Lövsund, P

    2002-08-01

    Two-dimensional physical models of the human head were used to investigate how the lateral ventricles and irregular skull base influence kinematics in the medial brain during sagittal angular head dynamics. Silicone gel simulated the brain and was separatedfrom the surrounding skull vessel by paraffin that provided a slip interface between the gel and vessel. A humanlike skull base model (HSB) included a surrogate skull base mimicking the irregular geometry of the human. An HSBV model added an elliptical inclusion filled with liquid paraffin simulating the lateral ventricles to the HSB model. A simplified skull base model (SSBV) included ventricle substitute but approximated the anterior and middle cranial fossae by a flat and slightly angled surface. The models were exposed to 7600 rad/s2 peak angular acceleration with 6 ms pulse duration and 5 deg forced rotation. After 90 deg free rotation, the models were decelerated during 30 ms. Rigid body displacement, shear strain and principal strains were determined from high-speed video recorded trajectories of grid markers in the surrogate brains. Peak values of inferior brain surface displacement and strains were up to 10.9X (times) and 3.3X higher in SSBV than in HSBV. Peak strain was up to 2.7X higher in HSB than in HSBV. The results indicate that the irregular skull base protects nerves and vessels passing through the cranial floor by reducing brain displacement and that the intraventricular cerebrospinal fluid relieves strain in regions inferior and superior to the ventricles. The ventricles and irregular skull base are necessary in modeling head impact and understanding brain injury mechanisms. PMID:12188208

  17. Triggered star formation: Rotation, magnetic fields and outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, A.; Li, S.; Blackman, E. G.

    2015-12-01

    Star formation can be triggered by compression from wind or supernova driven shock waves that sweep over molecular clouds. In a previous work we used Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) simulation methods, including sink particles, to simulate the full collapse of a stable Bonnor-Ebert sphere subjected to a passing shock. We tracked the flow of cloud material after a star (a sink particle) had formed. For rotating clouds we observed the formation of disks which then interact with the post-shock flow. In this paper we take the next step forward in complexity, presenting first results of simulations that include a magnetized cloud. Our results show that after a disk is formed a collimated magneto-centrifugal outflow is launched. The outflow is bipolar but asymmetric, due to interactions with the shocked flow. We explore the influence of the outflows on the post-triggering collapse dynamics.

  18. Combining a rotating magnetic field and crystal rotation in the floating-zone process with a needle-eye induction coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, N.; Walker, J. S.; Lüdge, A.; Riemann, H.

    2001-08-01

    This paper presents numerical solutions for the steady, axisymmetric melt motions in a simplified model of the floating-zone process with a needle-eye induction coil. With only buoyant and thermocapillary convections, there are two meridional circulations, and the stronger, outer circulation involves an undesirable radially inward flow near the crystal-melt interface. Adding crystal rotation alone can only decrease the magnitudes of the meridional circulations. Adding a rotating magnetic field alone has the undesirable effect of increasing the magnitude and extent of the radially inward flow near the crystal-melt interface. Combining a rotating magnetic field in one azimuthal direction with crystal rotation in the opposite azimuthal direction overwhelms the buoyant and thermocapillary convections and produces the desired radially outward flow over the entire crystal-melt interface. The magnitude of this radially outward flow is easily controlled by changing either the angular velocity of the crystal rotation or the strength of the rotating magnetic field.

  19. Plane-grating flat-field soft x-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hague, C.F.; Underwood, J.H.; Avila, A.; Delaunay, R.; Ringuenet, H.; Marsi, M.; Sacchi, M.

    2005-02-01

    We describe a soft x-ray spectrometer covering the 120-800 eV range. It is intended for resonant inelastic x-ray scattering experiments performed at third generation synchrotron radiation (SR) facilities and has been developed with SOLEIL, the future French national SR source in mind. The Hettrick-Underwood principle is at the heart of the design using a combination of varied line-spacing plane grating and spherical-mirror to provide a flat-field image. It is slitless for optimum acceptance. This means the source size determines the resolving power. A spot size of {<=}5 {mu}m is planned at SOLEIL which, according to simulations, should ensure a resolving power {>=}1000 over the whole energy range. A 1024x1024 pixel charge-coupled device (CCD) with a 13 {mu}mx13 {mu}m pixel size is used. This is an improvement on the use of microchannel-plate detectors, both as concerns efficiency and spatial resolution. Additionally spectral line curvature is avoided by the use of a horizontal focusing mirror concentrating the beam in the nondispersing direction. It allows for readout using a binning mode to reduce the intrinsically large CCD readout noise. Preliminary results taken at beamlines at Elettra (Trieste) and at BESSY (Berlin) are presented.

  20. Laser velocimeter measurements of the flow fields around single- and counter-rotation propeller models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunham, D. M.; Sellers, W. L., III; Elliott, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    A two-component LV system was used to make detailed measurements of the flow field around both a single-rotation and a counter-rotation propeller/nacelle. The conditions measured for the single-rotation tractor configuration include two different blade angles and two propeller advance ratios, and for the counter-rotation propeller configuration include both pusher and tractor mounts. The measurements show the increasing slipstream velocities and contraction with increasing blade angle and with decreasing advance ratios. Data for the counter-rotation system show that the aft propeller turns the flow in the opposite direction from the front propeller. Additionally, the LV system was used as a diagnostic tool to provide data to explain the large side force measured on the propeller/nacelle at angle-of-attack.

  1. The role of rotation in the evolution of dynamo-generated magnetic fields in Super Earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuluaga, Jorge I.; Cuartas, Pablo A.

    2012-01-01

    Planetary magnetic fields could impact the evolution of planetary atmospheres and have a role in the determination of the required conditions for the emergence and evolution of life (planetary habitability). We study here the role of rotation in the evolution of dynamo-generated magnetic fields in massive Earth-like planets, Super Earths (1-10 M⊕). Using the most recent thermal evolution models of Super Earths (Gaidos, E., Conrad, C.P., Manga, M., Hernlund, J. [2010]. Astrophys. J. 718, 596-609; Tachinami, C., Senshu, H., Ida, S. [2011]. Astrophys. J. 726, 70) and updated scaling laws for convection-driven dynamos, we predict the evolution of the local Rossby number. This quantity is one of the proxies for core magnetic field regime, i.e. non-reversing dipolar, reversing dipolar and multipolar. We study the dependence of the local Rossby number and hence the core magnetic field regime on planetary mass and rotation rate. Previous works have focused only on the evolution of core magnetic fields assuming rapidly rotating planets, i.e. planets in the dipolar regime. In this work we go further, including the effects of rotation in the evolution of planetary magnetic field regime and obtaining global constraints to the existence of intense protective magnetic fields in rapidly and slowly rotating Super Earths. We find that the emergence and continued existence of a protective planetary magnetic field is not only a function of planetary mass but also depend on rotation rate. Low-mass Super Earths ( M ≲ 2 M⊕) develop intense surface magnetic fields but their lifetimes will be limited to 2-4 Gyrs for rotational periods larger than 1-4 days. On the other hand and also in the case of slowly rotating planets, more massive Super Earths ( M ≳ 2 M⊕) have weak magnetic fields but their dipoles will last longer. Finally we analyze tidally locked Super Earths inside and outside the habitable zone of GKM stars. Using the results obtained here we develop a classification of

  2. Radial current density effects on rotating magnetic field current drive in field-reversed configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Clemente, R. A.; Gilli, M.; Farengo, R.

    2008-10-15

    Steady state solutions, suitable for field-reversed configurations (FRCs) sustained by rotating magnetic fields (RMFs) are obtained by properly including three-dimensional effects, in the limit of large FRC elongation, and the radial component of Ohm's law. The steady electrostatic potential, necessary to satisfy Ohm's law, is considered to be a surface function. The problem is analyzed at the midplane of the configuration and it is reduced to the solution of two coupled nonlinear differential equations for the real and imaginary parts of the phasor associated to the longitudinal component of the vector potential. Additional constraints are obtained by requesting that the steady radial current density and poloidal magnetic flux vanish at the plasma boundary which is set at the time-averaged separatrix. The results are presented in terms of the degree of synchronism of the electrons with the RMF and compared with those obtained when radial current effects are neglected. Three important differences are observed when compared with the case without radial current density. First, at low penetration of the RMF into the plasma there is a significant increase in the driven azimuthal current. Second, the RMF amplitude necessary to access the high synchronism regime, starting from low synchronism, is larger and the difference appears to increase as the separatrix to classical skin depth ratio increases. Third, the minimum RMF amplitude necessary to sustain almost full synchronism is reduced.

  3. Simulating magnetic nanoparticle behavior in low-field MRI under transverse rotating fields and imposed fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantillon-Murphy, P.; Wald, L. L.; Adalsteinsson, E.; Zahn, M.

    2010-09-01

    In the presence of alternating-sinusoidal or rotating magnetic fields, magnetic nanoparticles will act to realign their magnetic moment with the applied magnetic field. The realignment is characterized by the nanoparticle's time constant, τ. As the magnetic field frequency is increased, the nanoparticle's magnetic moment lags the applied magnetic field at a constant angle for a given frequency, Ω, in rad s -1. Associated with this misalignment is a power dissipation that increases the bulk magnetic fluid's temperature which has been utilized as a method of magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia, particularly suited for cancer in low-perfusion tissue (e.g., breast) where temperature increases of between 4 and 7 °C above the ambient in vivo temperature cause tumor hyperthermia. This work examines the rise in the magnetic fluid's temperature in the MRI environment which is characterized by a large DC field, B0. Theoretical analysis and simulation is used to predict the effect of both alternating-sinusoidal and rotating magnetic fields transverse to B0. Results are presented for the expected temperature increase in small tumors ( ˜1 cm radius) over an appropriate range of magnetic fluid concentrations (0.002-0.01 solid volume fraction) and nanoparticle radii (1-10 nm). The results indicate that significant heating can take place, even in low-field MRI systems where magnetic fluid saturation is not significant, with careful the goal of this work is to examine, by means of analysis and simulation, the concept of interactive fluid magnetization using the dynamic behavior of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle suspensions in the MRI environment. In addition to the usual magnetic fields associated with MRI, a rotating magnetic field is applied transverse to the main B0 field of the MRI. Additional or modified magnetic fields have been previously proposed for hyperthermia and targeted drug delivery within MRI. Analytical predictions and numerical simulations of the

  4. Simulating Magnetic Nanoparticle Behavior in Low-field MRI under Transverse Rotating Fields and Imposed Fluid Flow

    PubMed Central

    Wald, L.L.; Adalsteinsson, E.; Zahn, M.

    2010-01-01

    In the presence of alternating-sinusoidal or rotating magnetic fields, magnetic nanoparticles will act to realign their magnetic moment with the applied magnetic field. The realignment is characterized by the nanoparticle’s time constant, τ. As the magnetic field frequency is increased, the nanoparticle’s magnetic moment lags the applied magnetic field at a constant angle for a given frequency, Ω, in rad/s. Associated with this misalignment is a power dissipation that increases the bulk magnetic fluid’s temperature which has been utilized as a method of magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia, particularly suited for cancer in low-perfusion tissue (e.g., breast) where temperature increases of between 4°C and 7°C above the ambient in vivo temperature cause tumor hyperthermia. This work examines the rise in the magnetic fluid’s temperature in the MRI environment which is characterized by a large DC field, B0. Theoretical analysis and simulation is used to predict the effect of both alternating-sinusoidal and rotating magnetic fields transverse to B0. Results are presented for the expected temperature increase in small tumors (~1 cm radius) over an appropriate range of magnetic fluid concentrations (0.002 to 0.01 solid volume fraction) and nanoparticle radii (1 to 10 nm). The results indicate that significant heating can take place, even in low-field MRI systems where magnetic fluid saturation is not significant, with careful The goal of this work is to examine, by means of analysis and simulation, the concept of interactive fluid magnetization using the dynamic behavior of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle suspensions in the MRI environment. In addition to the usual magnetic fields associated with MRI, a rotating magnetic field is applied transverse to the main B0 field of the MRI. Additional or modified magnetic fields have been previously proposed for hyperthermia and targeted drug delivery within MRI. Analytical predictions and numerical simulations

  5. Coupling of translational and rotational motion in chiral liquids in electromagnetic and circularly polarised electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    English, Niall J.; Kusalik, Peter G.; Woods, Sarah A.

    2012-03-01

    Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of R and S enantiomers of 1,1-chlorofluoroethane, both for pure liquids and racemic mixtures, have been performed at 298 K in the absence and presence of both electromagnetic (e/m) and circularly polarised electric (CP) fields of varying frequency (100-2200 GHz) and intensity (0.025-0.2 V Å-1rms). Significant non-thermal field effects were noted in the coupling of rotational and translational motion; for instance, in microwave and far-infrared (MW/IR) e/m fields, marked increases in rotational and translational diffusion vis-à-vis the zero-field case took place at 0.025-0.1 V Å-1rms, with a reduction in translational diffusion vis-à-vis the zero-field case above 0.1 V Å-1rms above 100 GHz. This was due to enhanced direct coupling of rotational motion with the more intense e/m field at the ideal intrinsic rotational coupling frequency (approximately 700 GHz) leading to such rapidly oscillating rotational motion that extent of translational motion was effectively reduced. In the case of CP fields, rotational and translational diffusion was also enhanced for all intensities, particularly at approximately 700 GHz. For both MW/IR and CP fields, non-linear field effects were evident above around 0.1 V Å-1rms intensity, in terms of enhancements in translational and rotational motion. Simulation of 90-10 mol. % liquid mixtures of a Lennard-Jones solvent with R and S enantiomer-solutes in MW/IR and CP fields led to more limited promotion of rotational and translational diffusion, due primarily to increased frictional effects. For both e/m and CP fields, examination of the laboratory- and inertial-frame auto- and cross-correlation functions of velocity and angular velocity demonstrated the development of explicit coupling with the external fields at the applied frequencies, especially so in the more intense fields where nonlinear effects come into play. For racemic mixtures, elements of the laboratory- and inertial

  6. The effect of rotating magnetic field on the microstructure of in situ TiB2/Cu composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, C.; Kang, H.; Li, R.; Li, M.; Wang, W.; Chen, Z.; Wang, T.

    2016-03-01

    Nano ceramic particulate reinforced metal matrix composites are confronted with the problem of particle aggregation emerging in the process of solidification. It sharply deteriorates the mechanical properties of the composites. In order to improve the microstructure and particle distribution, in situ TiB2/Cu composites were prepared using Ti and Cu-B master alloys in a vacuum medium frequency induction furnace equipped with a rotating magnetic field (RMF). The effect of RMF magnetic field intensity employed on the microstructure and particles distribution of the TiB2/Cu composites were investigated. The results show that with the applied RMF, TiB2 particles are homogeneously distributed in the copper matrix, which significantly improves the mechanical properties of TiB2/Cu composites. The mechanism of RMF may be ascribed to the following two aspects. On the one hand, the electromagnetic body force generated by appropriate RMF drives forced convection in the equatorial plane of composite melt during solidification. On the other hand, a secondary flow in the meridional plane is engendered by a radial pressure gradient, thus making a strong agitation in the melt. These two effects result in a homogenous dispersion of TiB2 particles in the copper matrix, and hence excellent properties of TiB2/Cu composites were obtained.

  7. Accuracy and repeatability of quantitative fluoroscopy for the measurement of sagittal plane translation and finite centre of rotation in the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Breen, Alexander; Breen, Alan

    2016-07-01

    Quantitative fluoroscopy (QF) was developed to measure intervertebral mechanics in vivo and has been found to have high repeatability and accuracy for the measurement of intervertebral rotations. However, sagittal plane translation and finite centre of rotation (FCR) are potential measures of stability but have not yet been fully validated for current QF. This study investigated the repeatability and accuracy of QF for measuring these variables. Repeatability was assessed from L2-S1 in 20 human volunteers. Accuracy was investigated using 10 consecutive measurements from each of two pairs of linked and instrumented dry human vertebrae as reference; one which tilted without translation and one which translated without tilt. The results found intra- and inter-observer repeatability for translation to be 1.1mm or less (SEM) with fair to substantial reliability (ICC 0.533-0.998). Intra-observer repeatability of FCR location for inter-vertebral rotations of 5° and above ranged from 1.5mm to 1.8mm (SEM) with moderate to substantial reliability (ICC 0.626-0.988). Inter-observer repeatability for FCR ranged from 1.2mm to 5.7mm, also with moderate to substantial reliability (ICC 0.621-0.878). Reliability was substantial (ICC>0.81) for 10/16 measures for translation and 5/8 for FCR location. Accuracy for translation was 0.1mm (fixed centre) and 2.2mm (moveable centre), with an FCR error of 0.3mm(x) and 0.4mm(y) (fixed centre). This technology was found to have a high level of accuracy and with a few exceptions, moderate to substantial repeatability for the measurement of translation and FCR from fluoroscopic motion sequences. PMID:27129784

  8. A note on electromagnetic fields of a slowly rotating magnetized neutron star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paolis, F.; Ingrosso, G.; Nucita, A. A.; Qadir, A.

    2003-05-01

    Using the electromagnetic fields of an aligned rotating magnetic dipole in a Schwarzschild background, the fields and the surface and bulk charge densities had been computed for an obliquely rotating dipole by De Paolis, Qadir and Tarman (Nuovo Cimento B, 114 (1999) 11). Rezzolla, Ahmedov and Miller (Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc., 322 (2001) 723) had argued that the analysis was not valid as the Kerr background should have been used. As such the charge density and fields obtained earlier needed to be recomputed using their analysis. This suggestion has been followed here.

  9. A single beam near-field laser trap for optical stretching, folding and rotation of erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Min; Kuriakose, Smitha; Gan, Xiaosong

    2007-02-01

    To understand the fundamental mechanical and viscoelastic properties of RBCs, one needs laser tweezers in which cells can not only be trapped, but also be stretched, folded, and rotated. Stretching, folding and rotating an RBC is particularly important in order to reveal the shear elasticity of the RBC membrane. Here we show a single beam near-field laser trapping technique under focused evanescent wave illumination for optical stretching, folding and rotation of a single RBC. This multifunctional manipulation method will provide a new platform for measuring cell properties such as the membrane elasticity, viscoelasticity and deformability.

  10. Plane waves in de Sitter space: Spin-1/2 field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reza Tanhayi, M.; Mohsenzadeh, M.; Yusofi, E.

    2016-06-01

    We employ the coordinate-independent plane wave solution in de Sitter space to study the spin-1/2 particle production. The so-called plane waves in the zero-curvature limit reduce to the usual plane waves in flat space. Previously in (Int. J. Mod. Phys. D 24, 1550052 (2015)) we used such modes to study the instability of the de Sitter space, here, by explicit calculation, we study the sipn-1/2 particle creation in de Sitter space caused by mixing modes.

  11. Rotational energy of the hydrogen molecular ion in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Maluendes, S.A.; Fernandez, F.M.; Castro, E.A.

    1983-10-01

    A general method which combines hypervirial relations with the Hellmann-Feynman theorem and perturbation theory is applied in order to calculate the rotational eigenvalues of the hydrogen molecular ion in a magnetic field. Analytical expressions as well as numerical results are presented for both low and high field strengths.

  12. External Electromagnetic Fields of a Slowly Rotating Magnetized Star with Nonvanishing Gravitomagnetic Charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmedov, B. J.; Khugaev, A. V.; Rakhmatov, N. I.

    2008-09-01

    We write Maxwell equations in the external background spacetime of a slowly rotating magnetized NUT star and find analytical solutions after separating them into angular and radial parts. The star is considered isolated and in vacuum, with monopolar configuration model for the stellar magnetic field. The contribution to the external field from the NUT charge and frame-dragging effect are considered in detail.

  13. Collisionless Magnetic Reconnection and Dynamo Processes in a Spatially Rotating Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, Gwangson; Lee, Junggi

    2016-04-01

    Spatially rotating magnetic fields have been observed in the solar wind and in the Earth's magnetopause as well as in reversed field pinch (RFP) devices. Such field configurations have a similarity with extended current layers having a spatially varying plasma pressure instead of the spatially varying guide field. It is thus expected that magnetic reconnection may take place in a rotating magnetic field no less than in an extended current layer. We have investigated the spontaneous evolution of a collisionless plasma system embedding a rotating magnetic field with a two-and-a-half-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. It is found that a magnetic-flux-reducing diffusion phase and a magnetic-flux-increasing dynamo phase are alternating with a certain period. The temperature of the system also varies with the same period, showing a similarity to sawtooth oscillations in tokamaks. We have shown that a modified theory of sawtooth oscillations can explain the periodic behavior observed in the simulation. A strong guide field distorts the current layer as was observed in laboratory experiments. This distortion is smoothed out as magnetic islands fade away by the O-line diffusion, but is soon strengthened by the growth of magnetic islands. These processes are all repeating with a fixed period. Our results suggest that a rotating magnetic field configuration continuously undergoes deformation and relaxation in a short time-scale although it might look rather steady in a long-term view.

  14. Effect of two-dimensional confinement on switching of vertically aligned liquid crystals by an in-plane electric field.

    PubMed

    Choi, Tae-Hoon; Woo, Jae-Hyeon; Choi, Yeongyu; Yoon, Tae-Hoon

    2016-09-01

    We investigated the two-dimensional (2-D) confinement effect of liquid crystals (LCs) on the switching of vertically aligned LCs by an in-plane electric field. When an in-plane field is applied to a vertical alignment (VA) cell, virtual walls are built at the center of the interdigitated electrodes and at the middle of the gaps between them. The LC molecules are confined not only by the two substrates but also by the virtual walls so that the turn-off time of a VA cell driven by an in-plane field is dependent on the pitch of the interdigitated electrodes as well as the cell gap. Therefore, the turn-off time of a VA cell driven by an in-plane field can be reduced simply by decreasing the pitch of the interdigitated electrodes as a result of the enhanced anchoring provided by the virtual walls. The experimental results showed good agreement with a simple model based on the 2-D confinement effect of LCs. PMID:27607702

  15. Chiral pumping effect induced by rotating electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebihara, Shu; Fukushima, Kenji; Oka, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    We propose an experimental setup using 3D Dirac semimetals to access a novel phenomenon induced by the chiral anomaly. We show that the combination of a magnetic field and a circularly polarized laser induces a finite charge density with an accompanying axial current. This is because the circularly polarized laser breaks time-reversal symmetry and the Dirac point splits into two Weyl points, which results in an axial-vector field. We elucidate the appearance of the axial-vector field with the help of the Floquet theory by deriving an effective Hamiltonian for high-frequency electric fields. This anomalous charge density, i.e., the chiral pumping effect, is a phenomenon reminiscent of the chiral magnetic effect with a chiral chemical potential. We explicitly compute the pumped density and the axial-current expectation value. We also take account of coupling to the chiral magnetic effect to calculate a balanced distribution of charge and chirality in a material that behaves as a chiral battery.

  16. New Methodology For Use in Rotating Field Nuclear MagneticResonance

    SciTech Connect

    Jachmann, Rebecca C.

    2007-05-18

    High-resolution NMR spectra of samples with anisotropicbroadening are simplified to their isotropic spectra by fast rotation ofthe sample at the magic angle 54.7 circ. This dissertation concerns thedevelopment of novel Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) methodologies basedwhich would rotate the magnetic field instead of the sample, rotatingfield NMR. It provides an over of the NMR concepts, procedures, andexperiments needed to understand the methodologies that will be used forrotating field NMR. A simple two-dimensional shimming method based onharmonic corrector rings which can provide arbitrary multiple ordershimming corrections were developed for rotating field systems, but couldbe used in shimming other systems as well. Those results demonstrate, forexample, that quadrupolar order shimming improves the linewidth by up toan order of magnitude. An additional order of magnitude reduction is inprinciple achievable by utilizing this shimming method for z-gradientcorrection and higher order xy gradients. A specialized pulse sequencefor the rotating field NMR experiment is under development. The pulsesequence allows for spinning away from the magic angle and spinningslower than the anisotropic broadening. This pulse sequence is acombination of the projected magic angle spinning (p-MAS) and magic angleturning (MAT) pulse sequences. This will be useful to rotating field NMRbecause there are limits on how fast a field can be spun and spin at themagic angle is difficult. One of the goals of this project is forrotating field NMR to be used on biological systems. The p-MAS pulsesequence was successfully tested on bovine tissue samples which suggeststhat it will be a viable methodology to use in a rotating field set up. Aside experiment on steering magnetic particle by MRI gradients was alsocarried out. Some movement was seen in these experiment, but for totalcontrol over steering further experiments would need to bedone.

  17. MAGNETIC FIELDS IN LARGE-DIAMETER H II REGIONS REVEALED BY THE FARADAY ROTATION OF COMPACT EXTRAGALACTIC RADIO SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey-Smith, L.; Madsen, G. J.; Gaensler, B. M.

    2011-08-01

    We present a study of the line-of-sight magnetic fields in five large-diameter Galactic H II regions. Using the Faraday rotation of background polarized radio sources, as well as dust-corrected H{alpha} surface brightness as a probe of electron density, we estimated the strength and orientation of the magnetic field along 93 individual sight lines through the H II regions. Each of the H II regions displayed a coherent magnetic field. The magnetic field strength (line-of-sight component) in the regions ranges from 2 to 6 {mu}G, which is similar to the typical magnetic field strength in the diffuse interstellar medium. We investigated the relationship between magnetic field strength and electron density in the five H II regions. The slope of magnetic field versus density in the low-density regime (0.8 cm{sup -3} < n{sub e} <30 cm{sup -3}) is very slightly above zero. We also calculated the ratio of thermal to magnetic pressure, {beta}{sub th}, for each data point, which fell in the range 1.01 < {beta}{sub th} < 25. Finally, we studied the orientation of the magnetic field in the solar neighborhood (d < 1.1 kpc) using our data from five H II regions along with existing measurements of the line-of-sight magnetic field strength from polarized pulsars whose distances have been determined from their annual parallax. We identify a net direction for the magnetic field in the solar neighborhood, but find no evidence for a preferred vertical direction of the magnetic field above or below the Galactic plane.

  18. Rotating field eddy current probe for characterization of cracking in non-magnetic tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Capobianco, T.E.

    1998-07-01

    A rotating field eddy current probe was built and tested for use in small diameter, non-magnetic tubing. The rotating field probe is a driver/pickup style with two orthogonally wound drive coils and a pancake pickup coil. The driver coils are excited by two sine waves 90{degree} out of phase with each other. The physical arrangement of the drive coils and the 90{degree} phase shift of the excitation waveforms creates a field which rotates in the test piece under the drive coils. Preliminary tests on electrical discharge machined (EDM) notches show that phased based estimates of notch depth are possible. Probes currently used for detection of cracks in tubing produce responses that have proven unreliable for estimating defect depths. This recently developed version of the rotating field eddy current probe produces a bipolar response in the presence of a crack or a notch. Typically, the phase angle of a bipolar eddy current response is easily identified and measured and is used extensively for estimating depths of volumetric defects. Data are shown relating the phase angle of the rotating field probe`s bipolar response to the depth of circumferential EDM notches.

  19. On the angle between the average interplanetary magnetic field and the propagation direction of plane large amplitude Alfven waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtenstein, B. R.; Sonett, C. P.

    1979-01-01

    The paper shows that the experimentally observed close alignment of magnetic field minimum variance direction with the average magnetic field for Alfven waves in the solar wind is consistent with theoretically predicted properties of plane large amplitude Alfven waves in the MHD approximation. The theoretical properties of these Alfven waves constrain the time averaged magnetic field to cluster around the direction of minimum variance, which is aligned with the wave normal. Thus, spacecraft magnetometer observations in the solar wind of minimum variance directions strongly peaked about the average magnetic field direction are consistent with plane large amplitude Alfven waves which have wave normals aligned with the directions of minimum variance. This does not imply that geometrical hydromagnetic calculations for Alfven wave propagation direction in the solar wind are incorrect, but there is a discrepancy between geometrical hydromagnetics theory and observations that IMF minimum variance directions tend to be aligned with the ideal Parker spiral instead of the radial direction.

  20. Focusing dual-wavelength surface plasmons to the same focal plane by a far-field plasmonic lens.

    PubMed

    Venugopalan, Priyamvada; Zhang, Qiming; Li, Xiangping; Kuipers, L; Gu, Min

    2014-10-01

    In this Letter, we demonstrate the nanoscale focusing of surface plasmons (SPs) at two different wavelengths to the same focal plane by a far-field plasmonic lens both numerically and experimentally. The far-field plasmonic lens, which consists of an annular slit and a concentric groove and is capable of focusing dual-wavelength SPs to the same focal plane, is characterized by a scanning near-field optical microscope under both linearly and radially polarized illuminations. The demonstrated far-field plasmonic lens can provide immense opportunities for on-chip photonic applications, including dual-wavelength-based super-resolution imaging and ultra-high-density optical data storage. PMID:25360974

  1. Poloidal rotation in tokamaks with large electric field gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, F.L.; Kim, Y.

    1995-01-01

    The ion poloidal flow velocity near the plasma edge in a tokamak has been calculated by extending neoclassical theory to include orbit squeezing, which is the reduction of the ion banana widths due to radial electric field shear. The pressure gradient-driven ion parallel flow is reduced by orbit squeezing, and then no longer cancels the diamagnetic flow in its contribution to poloidal flow. This allows the poloidal flow velocity to be a significant fraction of the ion diamagnetic velocity, which can be much larger than the standard neoclassical value (proportional to the ion temperature gradient). Equations for determining the poloidal flow and radial electric field profiles self-consistently are given. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  2. Structure of field rotating disturbances in warm plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfson, R.

    1982-01-01

    A model in which thermal effects are simulated through use of a multibeam plasma distribution function is developed and investigated to see if solutions which take an initially uniform magnetized plasma to a new uniform state with different field orientation are possible. The momentum conservation integrals are found to admit two classes of such solutions, but only one class exhibits appropriate asymptotic behavior. Extensive numerical integrations have failed to demonstrate the existence of the desired solutions.

  3. Four-hair relations for differentially rotating neutron stars in the weak-field limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretz, Joseph; Yagi, Kent; Yunes, Nicolás

    2015-10-01

    The opportunity to study physics at supra-nuclear densities through x-ray observations of neutron stars has led to in-depth investigations of certain approximately universal relations that can remove degeneracies in pulse profile models. One such set of relations determines all of the multipole moments of a neutron star just from the first three (the mass monopole, the current dipole and the mass quadrupole moment) approximately independently of the equation of state. These three-hair relations were found to hold in neutron stars that rotate rigidly, as is the case in old pulsars, but neutron stars can also rotate differentially, as is the case for proto-neutron stars and hypermassive transient remnants of binary mergers. We here extend the three-hair relations to differentially rotating stars for the first time with a generic rotation law using two approximations: a weak-field scheme (an expansion in powers of the neutron star compactness) and a perturbative differential rotation scheme (an expansion about rigid rotation). These approximations allow us to analytically derive approximately universal relations that allow us to determine all of the multipole moments of a (perturbative) differentially rotating star in terms of only the first four moments. These new four-hair relations for differentially rotating neutron stars are found to be approximately independent of the equation of state to a higher degree than the three-hair relations for uniformly rotating stars. Our results can be instrumental in the development of four-hair relations for rapidly differentially rotating stars in full general relativity using numerical simulations.

  4. Polarity reversal of a magnetic vortex core by a unipolar, non-resonant in-plane pulsed magnetic field.

    SciTech Connect

    Keavney, D. J.; Cheng, X. M.; Buchanan, K. S.

    2009-06-24

    We report the polarity reversal of a magnetic vortex core using a nonresonant in-plane pulsed magnetic field of arbitrary waveform studied using time-resolved x-ray photoemission electron microscopy and micromagnetic simulations. The imaging and simulations show that a 5 mT pulse, higher than the critical field for nonlinear effects, effectively leads to the randomization of the vortex core polarity. The micromagnetic simulations further show that the onset of stochastic core polarity randomization does not necessarily coincide with the critical reversal field, leading to a field window for predictable core reversal.

  5. Absorption of massless scalar field by rotating black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leite, Luiz C. S.; Crispino, Luís C. B.; de Oliveira, Ednilton S.; Macedo, Caio F. B.; Dolan, Sam R.

    2016-07-01

    We compute the absorption cross-section of the Kerr black holes (BH) for the massless scalar field, and present a selection of numerical results, to complement the results of Ref.[C. F. B. Macedo, L. C. S. Leite, E. S. Oliveria, S. R. Dolan and L. C. B. Crispino, Phys. Rev. D 88 (2013) 064033.] We show that, in the high-frequency regime, the cross-section approaches the geodesic capture cross-section. We split the absorption cross-section into corotating and counterrotating contributions, and we show that the counterrotating contribution exceeds the corotating one.

  6. Passive Superconducting Flux Conservers for Rotating-Magnetic-Field-Driven Field-Reversed Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Oz, E.; Myers, C. E.; Edwards, M. R.; Berlinger, B.; Brooks, A.; Cohen, S. A.

    2011-01-05

    The Princeton Field-Reversed Configuration (PFRC) experiment employs an odd-parity rotating magnetic field (RMFo) current drive and plasma heating system to form and sustain high-Β plasmas. For radial confinement, an array of coaxial, internal, passive, flux-conserving (FC) rings applies magnetic pressure to the plasma while still allowing radio-frequency RMFo from external coils to reach the plasma. The 3 ms pulse duration of the present experiment is limited by the skin time (τfc) of its room-temperature copper FC rings. To explore plasma phenomena with longer characteristic times, the pulse duration of the next-generation PFRC-2 device will exceed 100 ms, necessitating FC rings with (τfc > 300 ms. In this paper we review the physics of internal, discrete, passive FCs and describe the evolution of the PFRC's FC array. We then detail new experiments that have produced higher performance FC rings that contain embedded high-temperature superconducting (HTS) tapes. Several HTS tape winding configurations have been studied and a wide range of extended skin times, from 0.4 s to over 103 s, has been achieved. The new FC rings must carry up to 3 kA of current to balance the expected PFRC-2 plasma pressure, so the dependence of the HTS-FC critical current on the winding configuration and temperature was also studied. From these experiments, the key HTS-FC design considerations have been identified and HTS-FC rings with the desired performance characteristics have been produced.

  7. Numerical Simulation of Non-Rotating and Rotating Coolant Channel Flow Fields. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, David L.

    2000-01-01

    Future generations of ultra high bypass-ratio jet engines will require far higher pressure ratios and operating temperatures than those of current engines. For the foreseeable future, engine materials will not be able to withstand the high temperatures without some form of cooling. In particular the turbine blades, which are under high thermal as well as mechanical loads, must be cooled. Cooling of turbine blades is achieved by bleeding air from the compressor stage of the engine through complicated internal passages in the turbine blades (internal cooling, including jet-impingement cooling) and by bleeding small amounts of air into the boundary layer of the external flow through small discrete holes on the surface of the blade (film cooling and transpiration cooling). The cooling must be done using a minimum amount of air or any increases in efficiency gained through higher operating temperature will be lost due to added load on the compressor stage. Turbine cooling schemes have traditionally been based on extensive empirical data bases, quasi-one-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis, and trial and error. With improved capabilities of CFD, these traditional methods can be augmented by full three-dimensional simulations of the coolant flow to predict in detail the heat transfer and metal temperatures. Several aspects of turbine coolant flows make such application of CFD difficult, thus a highly effective CFD methodology must be used. First, high resolution of the flow field is required to attain the needed accuracy for heat transfer predictions, making highly efficient flow solvers essential for such computations. Second, the geometries of the flow passages are complicated but must be modeled accurately in order to capture all important details of the flow. This makes grid generation and grid quality important issues. Finally, since coolant flows are turbulent and separated the effects of turbulence must be modeled with a low Reynolds number

  8. Gravitational Instability of Cylindrical Viscoelastic Medium Permeated with Non Uniform Magnetic Field and Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhiman, Joginder Singh; Sharma, Rajni

    2016-03-01

    The self-gravitating instability of an infinitely extending axisymmetric cylinder of viscoelastic medium permeated with non uniform magnetic field and rotation is studied for both the strongly coupled plasma (SCP) and weakly coupled plasma (WCP). The non uniform magnetic field and rotation are considered to act along the axial direction of the cylinder. The normal mode method of perturbations is applied to obtain the dispersion relation. The condition for the onset of gravitational instability has been derived from the dispersion relation under both strongly and weakly coupling limits. It is found that the Jeans criterion for gravitational collapse gets modified due to the presence of shear and bulk viscosities for the SCP, however, the magnetic field and rotation whether uniform or non uniform has no effect on the Jeans criterion of an infinitely extending axisymmetric cylinder of a self-gravitating viscoelastic medium.

  9. Rigid-body rotation of an electron cloud in divergent magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Fruchtman, A.; Gueroult, R.; Fisch, N. J.

    2013-07-10

    For a given voltage across a divergent poloidal magnetic field, two electric potential distributions, each supported by a rigid-rotor electron cloud rotating with a different frequency, are found analytically. The two rotation frequencies correspond to the slow and fast rotation frequencies known in uniform plasma. Due to the centrifugal force, the equipotential surfaces, that correspond to the two electric potential distributions, diverge more than the magnetic surfaces do, the equipotential surfaces in the fast mode diverge largely in particular. The departure of the equipotential surfaces from the magnetic field surfaces may have a significant focusing effect on the ions accelerated by the electric field. Furthermore, the focusing effect could be important for laboratory plasma accelerators as well as for collimation of astrophysical jets.

  10. Model for B1 Imaging in MRI Using the Rotating RF Field

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Ewald; Crozier, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Conventionally, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is performed by pulsing gradient coils, which invariably leads to strong acoustic noise, patient safety concerns due to induced currents, and costly power/space requirements. This modeling study investigates a new silent, gradient coil-free MR imaging method, in which a radiofrequency (RF) coil and its nonuniform field (B 1 +) are mechanically rotated about the patient. The advantage of the rotating B 1 + field is that, for the first time, it provides a large number of degrees of freedom to aid a successful B 1 + image encoding process. The mathematical modeling was performed using flip angle modulation as part of a finite-difference-based Bloch equation solver. Preliminary results suggest that representative MR images with intensity deviations of <5% from the original image can be obtained using rotating RF field approach. This method may open up new avenues towards anatomical and functional imaging in medicine. PMID:24963336

  11. Rigid-body rotation of an electron cloud in divergent magnetic fields

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fruchtman, A.; Gueroult, R.; Fisch, N. J.

    2013-07-10

    For a given voltage across a divergent poloidal magnetic field, two electric potential distributions, each supported by a rigid-rotor electron cloud rotating with a different frequency, are found analytically. The two rotation frequencies correspond to the slow and fast rotation frequencies known in uniform plasma. Due to the centrifugal force, the equipotential surfaces, that correspond to the two electric potential distributions, diverge more than the magnetic surfaces do, the equipotential surfaces in the fast mode diverge largely in particular. The departure of the equipotential surfaces from the magnetic field surfaces may have a significant focusing effect on the ions acceleratedmore » by the electric field. Furthermore, the focusing effect could be important for laboratory plasma accelerators as well as for collimation of astrophysical jets.« less

  12. On the dissipation of the rotation energy of dust grains in interstellar magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papoular, R.

    2016-04-01

    A new mechanism is described, analysed and visualized, for the dissipation of suprathermal rotation energy of molecules in magnetic fields, a necessary condition for their alignment. It relies upon the Lorentz force perturbing the motion of every atom of the structure, as each is known to carry its own net electric charge because of spatial fluctuations in electron density. If the molecule is large enough that the frequency of its lowest frequency phonon lies near or below the rotation frequency, then the rotation couples with the molecular normal modes and energy flows from the former to the latter. The rate of this exchange is very fast, and the vibrational energy is radiated away in the IR at a still faster rate, which completes the removal of rotation energy. The energy decay rate scales like the field intensity, the initial angular velocity, the number of atoms in the grain and the inverse of the moment of inertia. It does not depend on the susceptibility. Here, the focus is on carbon-rich molecules which are diamagnetic. The same process must occur if the molecule is paramagnetic or bathes in an electric field instead. A semi-empirical method of chemical modelling was used extensively to illustrate and quantify these concepts as applied to a hydrocarbon molecule. The motion of a rotating molecule in a field was monitored in time so as to reveal the energy transfer and visualize the evolution of its orientation towards the stable configuration.

  13. Magnetic-field-induced rotation of light with orbital angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Shuai; Ding, Dong-Sheng Zhou, Zhi-Yuan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Wei; Shi, Bao-Sen

    2015-06-29

    Light carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) has attractive applications in the fields of precise optical measurements and high capacity optical communications. We study the rotation of a light beam propagating in warm {sup 87}Rb atomic vapor using a method based on magnetic-field-induced circular birefringence. The dependence of the rotation angle on the magnetic field makes it appropriate for weak magnetic field measurements. We quote a detailed theoretical description that agrees well with the experimental observations. The experiment shown here provides a method to measure the magnetic field intensity precisely and expands the application of OAM-carrying light. This technique has advantage in measurement of magnetic field weaker than 0.5 G, and the precision we achieved is 0.8 mG.

  14. The Latitudinal Excursion of Coronal Magnetic Field Lines in Response to Differential Rotation: MHD Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran; Riley, Pete

    2006-01-01

    Solar energetic particles, which are believed to originate from corotating interacting regions (CIRS) at low heliographic latitude, were observed by the Ulysses spacecraft even as it passed over the Sun's poles. One interpretation of this result is that high-latitude field lines intercepted by Ulysses connect to low-latitude CIRs at much larger heliocentric distances. The Fisk model explains the latitudinal excursion of magnetic field lines in the solar corona and heliosphere as the inevitable consequence of the interaction of a tilted dipole in a differentially rotating photosphere with rigidly rotating coronal holes. We use a time-dependent three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) algorithm to follow the evolution of a simple model of the solar corona in response to the differential rotation of the photospheric magnetic flux. We examine the changes of the coronal-hole boundaries, the redistribution of the line-of-sight magnetic field, and the precession of field lines in the corona. Our results confirm the basic idea of the Fisk model, that differential rotation leads to changes in the heliographic latitude of magnetic field lines. However, the latitudinal excursion of magnetic field lines in this simple "tilted dipole" model is too small to explain the Ulysses observations. Although coronal holes in our model rotate more rigidly than do photospheric features (in general agreement with observations), they do not rotate strictly rigidly as assumed by Fisk. This basic difference between our model and Fisk's will be explored in the future by considering more realistic magnetic flux distributions, as observed during Ulysses polar excursions.

  15. Macroscopic biaxiality and electric-field-induced rotation of the minor director in the nematic phase of a bent-core liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraj, Mamatha; Merkel, K.; Vij, J. K.; Kocot, A.

    2010-09-01

    Biaxiality in the nematic phase has been investigated for the bent-core liquid-crystal para-heptylbenzoate diester, using polarised IR spectroscopy. Anisotropic fluctuations of the nematic director are discussed in terms of the self-assembly of the chiral conformers. The ordering of the minor director for the homeotropicaly aligned sample is found to depend on the rubbing of the substrates of the cell and the amplitude of in-plane electric field. On increasing the in-plane electric field, the rotation of the minor director in the plane of the substrate is observed with an angle of approximately 45°, where initially the minor director is shown to lie along the rubbing direction. It is also shown that on the average the long axis of the molecules is normal to the substrate with surface treatment, with and without rubbing. The electric in-plane field combined with rubbing is shown to induce biaxial order in the nematic phase of a material with negative dielectic anisotropy for the first time.

  16. Effects of neoclassical toroidal viscosity induced by the intrinsic error fields and toroidal field ripple on the toroidal rotation in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H. H.; Seol, J.; Ko, W. H.; Terzolo, L.; Aydemir, A. Y.; In, Y.; Ghim, Y.-c.; Lee, S. G.

    2016-08-01

    Effects of neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) induced by intrinsic error fields and toroidal field ripple on cocurrent toroidal rotation in H-mode tokamak plasmas are investigated. It is expected that large NTV torque can be localized at the edge region through the 1/ν-regime in the vicinity of E r ˜ 0 in the cocurrent rotating H-mode plasma. Numerical simulation on toroidal rotation demonstrates that the edge localized NTV torque determined by the intrinsic error fields and toroidal field ripples in the level of most tokamaks can damp the toroidal rotation velocity over the whole region while reducing the toroidal rotation pedestal which is clearly observed in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) tokamak. It is found that the NTV torque changes the toroidal rotation gradient in the pedestal region dramatically, but the toroidal rotation profile in the core region responds rigidly without a change in the gradient. On the other hand, it shows that the NTV torque induced by the intrinsic error fields and toroidal field ripple in the level of the KSTAR tokamak, which are expected to be smaller than most tokamaks by at least one order of magnitude, is negligible in determining the toroidal rotation velocity profile. Experimental observation on the toroidal rotation change by the externally applied nonaxisymmetric magnetic fields on KSTAR also suggests that NTV torque arising from nonaxisymmetric magnetic fields can damp the toroidal rotation over the whole region while diminishing the toroidal rotation pedestal.

  17. THREE-DIMENSIONAL FEATURES OF THE OUTER HELIOSPHERE DUE TO COUPLING BETWEEN THE INTERSTELLAR AND INTERPLANETARY MAGNETIC FIELDS. III. THE EFFECTS OF SOLAR ROTATION AND ACTIVITY CYCLE

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelov, Nikolai V.; Borovikov, Sergey N.; Zank, Gary P.; Ogino, Tatsuki E-mail: snb0003@uah.edu E-mail: ogino@stelab.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2009-05-10

    We investigate the effects of the 11 year solar cycle and 25 day rotation period of the Sun on the interaction of the solar wind (SW) with the local interstellar medium (LISM). Our models take into account the partially ionized character of the LISM and include momentum and energy transfer between the ionized and neutral components. We assume that the interstellar magnetic field vector belongs to the hydrogen deflection plane as discovered in the SOHO SWAN experiment. This plane is inclined at an angle of about 60 deg. toward the ecliptic plane of the Sun, as suggested in recent publications relating the local interstellar cloud properties to the radio emission observed by Voyager 1. It is assumed that the latitudinal extent of the boundary between the slow and fast SW regions, as well as the angle between the Sun's rotation and magnetic-dipole axes, are periodic functions of time, while the polarity of the interstellar magnetic field changes sign every 11 years at the solar maximum. The global variation of the SW-LISM interaction pattern, the excursions of the termination shock and the heliopause, and parameter distributions in certain directions are investigated. The analysis of the behavior of the wavy heliospheric current sheet in the supersonic SW region shows the importance of neutral atoms on its dynamics.

  18. Rotation and Magnetic Fields in Supernovae and Gamma-ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, J. Craig

    2005-10-01

    Spectropolarimetry of core collapse supernovae has shown that they are asymmetric and often, but not universally, bi-polar; in some the dominant axes associated with hydrogen, oxygen, and calcium are oriented substantially differently. Jet-induced supernova models give a typical jet/torus structure that is reminiscent of some objects like the Crab nebula, SN 1987A and perhaps Cas A. Jets, in turn, may arise from the intrinsic rotation and magnetic fields that are expected to accompany core collapse. We summarize the potential importance of the magneto-rotational instability for the core collapse problem, stress the non- monotonic response of the final rotation and magnetic field to the initial iron core rotation, and the potential role of non-axisymmetric instabilities in the new-born neutron star. We sketch some of the effects that large magnetic fields, ˜10^15 - 10^17 G, may have on the physics at core bounce and in the subsequent cooling, de-leptonization phase. Production and dissipation of MHD waves in this strongly differentially rotating environment may affect the success of the supernova explosion, the nature of the compact remnant -- neutron star or black hole, pulsar or magnetar -- and whether the outcome is a normal supernova or a gamma-ray burst. In collaboration with Shizuka Akiyama, University of Texas at Austin.

  19. Signal processing and compensation electronics for junction field-effect transistor /JFET/ focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittig, K. R.

    1982-06-01

    A signal processing system has been designed and constructed for a pyroelectric infrared area detector which uses a matrix-addressable JFET array for readout and for on-focal plane preamplification. The system compensates for all offset and gain nonuniformities in and after the array. Both compensations are performed in real time at standard television rates, so that changes in the response characteristics of the array are automatically corrected for. Two-point compensation is achieved without the need for two separate temperature references. The focal plane circuitry used to read out the array, the offset and gain compensation algorithms, the architecture of the signal processor, and the system hardware are described.

  20. Wick rotation for quantum field theories on degenerate Moyal space(-time)

    SciTech Connect

    Grosse, Harald; Lechner, Gandalf; Ludwig, Thomas; Verch, Rainer

    2013-02-15

    In this paper the connection between quantum field theories on flat noncommutative space(-times) in Euclidean and Lorentzian signature is studied for the case that time is still commutative. By making use of the algebraic framework of quantum field theory and an analytic continuation of the symmetry groups which are compatible with the structure of Moyal space, a general correspondence between field theories on Euclidean space satisfying a time zero condition and quantum field theories on Moyal Minkowski space is presented ('Wick rotation'). It is then shown that field theories transferred to Moyal space(-time) by Rieffel deformation and warped convolution fit into this framework, and that the processes of Wick rotation and deformation commute.

  1. Rotating coil field measurement of superconducting magnet for BEPCII interaction region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Quanling; Ren, Fanglin; Yin, Baogui; Wu, Yingzhi; Dong, Lan; Sun, Zhirui

    2011-06-01

    Two multifunction superconducting magnets in the interaction region (IR) for Beijing electron positron collider upgrade project (BEPCII) have been measured in BESIII detector hall in 2007. Each superconducting magnet package contains multiple concentric layers with several function magnets called as a vertical focusing quadrupole (SCQ), a horizontal corrector (HDC/SCB), a vertical corrector (VDC), a skew quadrupole (SKQ) and three anti-solenoids (AS1, AS2 and AS3) to compensate the experimental detector solenoid field. All these function magnets SCQs, SCB/HDCs, VDCs and SKQs have been measured using two rotating coils. Their integral fields, their high order harmonics contents and the local fields along the beam line are obtained in detail with the rotating coil probe system. Comparing the results to the stretched wire, the differences for the integral fields are less than 0.2%. As a result, the method presented in this paper can be used as an absolute field measurement in our lab.

  2. Phaseless auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo calculations with plane waves and pseudopotentials: Applications to atoms and molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suewattana, Malliga; Purwanto, Wirawan; Zhang, Shiwei; Krakauer, Henry; Walter, Eric J.

    2007-06-01

    The phaseless auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo (AF QMC) method [S. Zhang and H. Krakauer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 136401 (2003)] is used to carry out a systematic study of the dissociation and ionization energies of second-row group 3A-7A atoms and dimers: Al, Si, P, S, and Cl. In addition, the P2 dimer is compared to the third-row As2 dimer, which is also triply bonded. This method projects the many-body ground state by means of importance-sampled random walks in the space of Slater determinants. The Monte Carlo phase problem, due to the electron-electron Coulomb interaction, is controlled via the phaseless approximation, with a trial wave function ∣ΨT⟩ . As in previous calculations, a mean-field single Slater determinant is used as ∣ΨT⟩ . The method is formulated in the Hilbert space defined by any chosen one-particle basis. The present calculations use a plane wave basis under periodic boundary conditions with norm-conserving pseudopotentials. Computational details of the plane wave AF QMC method are presented. The isolated systems chosen here allow a systematic study of the various algorithmic issues. We show the accuracy of the plane wave method and discuss its convergence with respect to parameters such as the supercell size and plane wave cutoff. The use of standard norm-conserving pseudopotentials in the many-body AF QMC framework is examined.

  3. Calorimetric method of ac loss measurement in a rotating magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Ghoshal, P K; Coombs, T A; Campbell, A M

    2010-07-01

    A method is described for calorimetric ac-loss measurements of high-T(c) superconductors (HTS) at 80 K. It is based on a technique used at 4.2 K for conventional superconducting wires that allows an easy loss measurement in parallel or perpendicular external field orientation. This paper focuses on ac loss measurement setup and calibration in a rotating magnetic field. This experimental setup is to demonstrate measuring loss using a temperature rise method under the influence of a rotating magnetic field. The slight temperature increase of the sample in an ac-field is used as a measure of losses. The aim is to simulate the loss in rotating machines using HTS. This is a unique technique to measure total ac loss in HTS at power frequencies. The sample is mounted on to a cold finger extended from a liquid nitrogen heat exchanger (HEX). The thermal insulation between the HEX and sample is provided by a material of low thermal conductivity, and low eddy current heating sample holder in vacuum vessel. A temperature sensor and noninductive heater have been incorporated in the sample holder allowing a rapid sample change. The main part of the data is obtained in the calorimetric measurement is used for calibration. The focus is on the accuracy and calibrations required to predict the actual ac losses in HTS. This setup has the advantage of being able to measure the total ac loss under the influence of a continuous moving field as experienced by any rotating machines. PMID:20687748

  4. Calorimetric method of ac loss measurement in a rotating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoshal, P. K.; Coombs, T. A.; Campbell, A. M.

    2010-07-01

    A method is described for calorimetric ac-loss measurements of high-Tc superconductors (HTS) at 80 K. It is based on a technique used at 4.2 K for conventional superconducting wires that allows an easy loss measurement in parallel or perpendicular external field orientation. This paper focuses on ac loss measurement setup and calibration in a rotating magnetic field. This experimental setup is to demonstrate measuring loss using a temperature rise method under the influence of a rotating magnetic field. The slight temperature increase of the sample in an ac-field is used as a measure of losses. The aim is to simulate the loss in rotating machines using HTS. This is a unique technique to measure total ac loss in HTS at power frequencies. The sample is mounted on to a cold finger extended from a liquid nitrogen heat exchanger (HEX). The thermal insulation between the HEX and sample is provided by a material of low thermal conductivity, and low eddy current heating sample holder in vacuum vessel. A temperature sensor and noninductive heater have been incorporated in the sample holder allowing a rapid sample change. The main part of the data is obtained in the calorimetric measurement is used for calibration. The focus is on the accuracy and calibrations required to predict the actual ac losses in HTS. This setup has the advantage of being able to measure the total ac loss under the influence of a continuous moving field as experienced by any rotating machines.

  5. Calorimetric method of ac loss measurement in a rotating magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Ghoshal, P. K.; Coombs, T. A.; Campbell, A. M.

    2010-07-15

    A method is described for calorimetric ac-loss measurements of high-T{sub c} superconductors (HTS) at 80 K. It is based on a technique used at 4.2 K for conventional superconducting wires that allows an easy loss measurement in parallel or perpendicular external field orientation. This paper focuses on ac loss measurement setup and calibration in a rotating magnetic field. This experimental setup is to demonstrate measuring loss using a temperature rise method under the influence of a rotating magnetic field. The slight temperature increase of the sample in an ac-field is used as a measure of losses. The aim is to simulate the loss in rotating machines using HTS. This is a unique technique to measure total ac loss in HTS at power frequencies. The sample is mounted on to a cold finger extended from a liquid nitrogen heat exchanger (HEX). The thermal insulation between the HEX and sample is provided by a material of low thermal conductivity, and low eddy current heating sample holder in vacuum vessel. A temperature sensor and noninductive heater have been incorporated in the sample holder allowing a rapid sample change. The main part of the data is obtained in the calorimetric measurement is used for calibration. The focus is on the accuracy and calibrations required to predict the actual ac losses in HTS. This setup has the advantage of being able to measure the total ac loss under the influence of a continuous moving field as experienced by any rotating machines.

  6. The magnetic field of the Large Magellanic Cloud revealed through Faraday rotation.

    PubMed

    Gaensler, B M; Haverkorn, M; Staveley-Smith, L; Dickey, J M; McClure-Griffiths, N M; Dickel, J R; Wolleben, M

    2005-03-11

    We have measured the Faraday rotation toward a large sample of polarized radio sources behind the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) to determine the structure of this galaxy's magnetic field. The magnetic field of the LMC consists of a coherent axisymmetric spiral of field strength approximately 1 microgauss. Strong fluctuations in the magnetic field are also seen on small (<0.5 parsec) and large (approximately 100 parsecs) scales. The large bursts of recent star formation and supernova activity in the LMC argue against standard dynamo theory, adding to the growing evidence for rapid field amplification in galaxies. PMID:15761149

  7. Spin texturing in quantum wires with Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions and in-plane magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    B, Gisi; S, Sakiroglu; İ, Sokmen

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the effects of interplay of spin-orbit interaction and in-plane magnetic fields on the electronic structure and spin texturing of parabolically confined quantum wire. Numerical results reveal that the competing effects between Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions and the external magnetic field lead to a complicated energy spectrum. We find that the spin texturing owing to the coupling between subbands can be modified by the strength of spin-orbit couplings as well as the magnitude and the orientation angle of the external magnetic field.

  8. Octupolar out-of-plane magnetic field structure generation during collisionless magnetic reconnection in a stressed X-point collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Graf von der Pahlen, J.; Tsiklauri, D.

    2014-06-15

    The out-of-plane magnetic field, generated by fast magnetic reconnection, during collisionless, stressed X-point collapse, was studied with a kinetic, 2.5D, fully electromagnetic, relativistic particle-in-cell numerical code, using both closed (flux conserving) and open boundary conditions on a square grid. It was discovered that the well known quadrupolar structure in the out-of-plane magnetic field gains four additional regions of opposite magnetic polarity, emerging near the corners of the simulation box, moving towards the X-point. The emerging, outer, magnetic field structure has opposite polarity to the inner quadrupolar structure, leading to an overall octupolar structure. Using Ampere's law and integrating electron and ion currents, defined at grid cells, over the simulation domain, contributions to the out-of-plane magnetic field from electron and ion currents were determined. The emerging regions of opposite magnetic polarity were shown to be the result of ion currents. Magnetic octupolar structure is found to be a signature of X-point collapse, rather than tearing mode, and factors relating to potential discoveries in experimental scenarios or space-craft observations are discussed.

  9. Convection Induced by High Frequency Rotating Magnetic Field in Ionic Aqueous Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, Martin P.; Mazuruk, Konstantin

    2000-01-01

    Rotating magnetic fields (RMF) have found applications in modern metallurgy. Examples are casting and semiconductor crystal growth technology. Rotating convective flows can also be induced in ionic fluids. Due to optical transparency, these fluids offer a great opportunity to visualize convection. In this work, we investigate the dynamics of convection induced by a high frequency (100 kHz range) RMF. A dye injected into a cylindrical column of salty water serves as an indicator of the flow. The developed technique has been used to study mixing phenomena induced by a RMF both when the direc'tion of the field rotation is constant and when it is alternated. Optical recording has been used to analyze this process. A numerical model describing RMF mixing in the laminar regime will also be presented.

  10. Possible relationship between the Earth's rotation variations and geomagnetic field reversals over the past 510 Myr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacca, Igor; Frigo, Everton; Hartmann, Gelvam

    2015-04-01

    The Earth’s rotation can change as a result of several internal and external processes, each of which is at a different timescale. Here, we present some possible connections between the Earth’s rotation variations and the geomagnetic reversal frequency rates over the past 120 Myr. In addition, we show the possible relationship between the geomagnetic field reversal frequency and the δ18O oscillations. Because the latter reflects the glacial and interglacial periods, we hypothesize that it can be used as a possible indicator to explain the length of day (LOD) variations and consequently the reversal field frequency over the past 510 Myr. Therefore, our analysis suggests that the relationships between the geomagnetic reversal frequency rates and the Earth’s rotation changes during the Phanerozoic. However, more reversal data are required for periods before the KRS to strengthen the perspective of using the geomagnetic reversal data as a marker for the LOD variations through geological times.

  11. Effect of an in-plane magnetic field and a δ-doping on the electron transport in a nonmagnetic heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jian-Duo; Li, Yun-Bao; Peng, Shun-Jin; Liu, Hong-Yu; Wang, Yu-Hua; Chen, Hong

    2016-04-01

    The electron tunneling through a nonmagnetic heterostructure modulated by both the in-plane magnetic field and the δ-doping has been investigated in detail using the transfer-matrix method. The numerical results indicate that, in such a nonmagnetic device, one can obtain the considerable spin polarization which is dependent on the in-plane magnetic field and the δ-doping as well as the wave vector in the plane of the barrier. Thus, we can design the spintronic devices based on nonmagnetic heterostructures controlled by the in-plane magnetic field and the δ-doping as well as the wave vector.

  12. Effect of the in-plane/out-of-plane applied magnetic field on the magnetic response of symmetric epitaxial LaCaMnO/YBaCuO/LaCaMnO junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morán, O.; Perez, F.; Baca, E.

    2008-07-01

    The anisotropic magnetic behavior of all oxide symmetric Ferromagnet (F)/Superconductor(S)/ Ferromagnet(F) [La 2/3Ca 1/3MnO 3(F)/Y Ba 2Cu 3O 7-δ(S)/La 2/3Ca 1/3MnO 3(F)] heterostructures is reported. An external magnetic field was applied both parallel (in-plane, μ0H∥a- b-plane) and perpendicular (out-of-plane, μ0H∥c-axis) to the plane of the heterostructure. The magnetization hysteresis loops, recorded at 5 K (< superconducting transition temperature Tc˜40 K), showed a clear central peak around of zero field when the magnetic field was applied perpendicular to the plane of the trilayer. In turn, by measuring the in-plane M-H dependence, the central peak disappeared. Contrarily, at temperatures T>Tc, the expected magnetic behavior of the ferromagnetic layer was detected independent of the direction of the applied magnetic field. Additionally, the active presence of the diamagnetic and ferromagnetic phases in the F/S/F heterostructure was corroborated by measuring the dependence M(T) under the zero field cooling (ZFC) and field cooling (FC) regimen. Whereas the in-plane ZFC and FC M-T dependences showed the typical behavior of the ferromagnetic component, the out-of-plane ZFC and FC M-T dependences displayed a conspicuous increase in M at ˜40 K. Such rise in M below Tc points out to the presence of a paramagnetic Meissner effect, which had been reported only for fields applied parallel to the surface of the films.

  13. Inducing self-rotation of cells with natural and artificial melanin in a linearly polarized alternating current electric field

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Mengxing; Ki Cheung, Wing; Liang, Wenfeng; Mai, John D.; Keung Liu, Wing; Jung Li, Wen

    2013-01-01

    The phenomenon of self-rotation observed in naturally and artificially pigmented cells under an applied linearly polarized alternating current (non-rotating) electrical field has been investigated. The repeatable and controllable rotation speeds of the cells were quantified and their dependence on dielectrophoretic parameters such as frequency, voltage, and waveform was studied. Moreover, the rotation behavior of the pigmented cells with different melanin content was compared to quantify the correlation between self-rotation and the presence of melanin. Most importantly, macrophages, which did not originally rotate in the applied non-rotating electric field, began to exhibit self-rotation that was very similar to that of the pigmented cells, after ingesting foreign particles (e.g., synthetic melanin or latex beads). We envision the discovery presented in this paper will enable the development of a rapid, non-intrusive, and automated process to obtain the electrical conductivities and permittivities of cellular membrane and cytoplasm in the near future. PMID:24404075

  14. Magnetic fields on young, moderately rotating Sun-like stars - I. HD 35296 and HD 29615

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waite, I. A.; Marsden, S. C.; Carter, B. D.; Petit, P.; Donati, J.-F.; Jeffers, S. V.; Boro Saikia, S.

    2015-05-01

    Observations of the magnetic fields of young solar-type stars provide a way to investigate the signatures of their magnetic activity and dynamos. Spectropolarimetry enables the study of these stellar magnetic fields and was thus employed at the Télescope Bernard Lyot and the Anglo-Australian Telescope to investigate two moderately rotating young Sun-like stars, namely HD 35296 (V119 Tau, HIP 25278) and HD 29615 (HIP 21632). The results indicate that both stars display rotational variation in chromospheric indices consistent with their spot activity, with variations indicating a probable long-term cyclic period for HD 35296. Additionally, both stars have complex, and evolving, large-scale surface magnetic fields with a significant toroidal component. High levels of surface differential rotation were measured for both stars. For the F8V star HD 35296 a rotational shear of ΔΩ = 0.22^{+0.04}_{-0.02} rad d- 1 was derived from the observed magnetic profiles. For the G3V star HD 29615, the magnetic features indicate a rotational shear of ΔΩ = 0.48_{-0.12}^{+0.11} rad d- 1, while the spot features, with a distinctive polar spot, provide a much lower value of ΔΩ of 0.07_{-0.03}^{+0.10} rad d- 1. Such a significant discrepancy in shear values between spot and magnetic features for HD 29615 is an extreme example of the variation observed for other lower mass stars. From the extensive and persistent azimuthal field observed for both targets, it is concluded that a distributed dynamo operates in these moderately rotating Sun-like stars, in marked contrast to the Sun's interface-layer dynamo.

  15. Electric field induced magnetization rotation in patterned Ni ring/Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3](1-0.32)-[PbTiO3]0.32 heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockel, Joshua L.; Bur, Alexandre; Wu, Tao; Wetzlar, Kyle P.; Carman, Gregory P.

    2012-01-01

    Electric field induced magnetoelastic anisotropy is shown to rotate the magnetization of a ring-shaped magnet by 90° in a Ni ring/(011) Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3](1-0.32)-[PbTiO3]0.32 heterostructure. The 2000 nm diameter ring is initially field annealed forming the "onion" magnetization state. A 0.8 MV/m electric field is applied to the substrate creating anisotropic piezostrain and a perpendicular in-plane easy axis. Magnetic force microscopy confirms the 90° rotation of the vortex-type domain walls from the field annealing direction. Rotations are stable without electric field due to remnant strains induced during the poling process, supporting the viability of strain-based magnetic recording methods.

  16. Comment on "Creating in-plane pseudomagnetic fields in excess of 1000 T by misoriented stacking in a graphene bilayer"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van der Donck, M.; Peeters, F. M.; Van Duppen, B.

    2016-06-01

    In a recent paper [Phys. Rev. B 89, 125418 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevB.89.125418], the authors argue that it is possible to map the electronic properties of twisted bilayer graphene to those of bilayer graphene in an in-plane magnetic field. However, their description of the low-energy dynamics of twisted bilayer graphene is restricted to the extended zone scheme and therefore neglects the effects of the superperiodic structure. If the energy spectrum is studied in the supercell Brillouin zone, we find that the comparison with an in-plane magnetic field fails because (i) the energy spectra of the two situations exhibit different symmetries and (ii) the low-energy spectra are very different.

  17. Pair-Wise, Deformable Mirror, Image Plane-Based Diversity Electric Field Estimation for High Contrast Coronagraphy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Give'on, Amir; Kern, Brian D.; Shaklan, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we describe the complex electric field reconstruction from image plane intensity measurements for high contrast coronagraphic imaging. A deformable mirror (DM) surface is modied with pairs of complementary shapes to create diversity in the image plane of the science camera where the intensity of the light is measured. Along with the Electric Field Conjugation correction algorithm, this estimation method has been used in various high contrast imaging testbeds to achieve the best contrasts to date both in narrow and in broad band light. We present the basic methodology of estimation in easy to follow list of steps, present results from HCIT and raise several open quations we are confronted with using this method.

  18. Arc-Polarized, Nonlinear Alfven Waves and Rotational Discontinuities: Directions of Propogation?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Ho, C. M.; Sakurai, R.; Arballo, J. K.; Riley, P.; Balogh, A.

    1996-01-01

    Large amplitude, noncompressive Alfven waves and rotational discontinuities are shown to be arc-polarized. The slowly rotating Alfven wave portion plus the fast rotating discontinuity comprise 360(deg) in phase rotation. The magnetic field vector perturbation lies in a plane. There are two (or more) possible interpretations to the observations.

  19. All-Fiber Optical Magnetic Field Sensor Based on Faraday Rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, L.; Jiang, S.; Marciante, J.R.

    2010-06-18

    An all-fiber optical magnetic field sensor with a sensitivity of 0.49 rad/T is demonstrated. It consists of a fiber Faraday rotator (56-wt.%-terbium–doped silica fiber) and a fiber polarizer (Corning SP1060 fiber).

  20. Photometric light curves for ten rapidly rotating stars in Alpha Persei, the Pleiades, and the field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, Charles F.; Schild, Rudolph E.; Stauffer, John R.; Jones, Burton F.

    1993-01-01

    We present the results from a photometric monitoring program of ten rapidly rotating stars observed during 1991 using the FLWO 48-in. telescope. Brightness variations for an additional six cluster stars observed with the Lick 40-in. telescope are also given. The periods and light curves for seven Alpha Persei members, two Pleiades members, and one naked T Tauri field star are reported.

  1. Eddy current in a rotating cylinder in a static field by a stochastic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lévêque, J.; Lubin, T.; Mezani, S.; Rezzoug, A.

    2012-02-01

    This paper deals with the calculation of eddy current in a copper cylinder. This cylinder rotates in an applied static magnetic field. The electromagnetic problem is solved in two-dimension by considering transient motion. Two methods for eddy current computation are compared: stochastic method and classical finite element method. The main goal of this paper is to compare these methods.

  2. Laboratory and field studies in rotational spectroscopy at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drouin, Brian J.

    2004-01-01

    Rotational spectroscopy of atmospheric molecules has long been a hallmark of laboratory and field studies at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. in addition to maintenance of the millimeter and submillimeter spectral line catalog, the laboratory has actively purued the challenging laboratory tasks of quantitative linewidth measurements and transient species identification.

  3. Gravitomagnetic Field of the Universe and Coriolis Force on the Rotating Earth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veto, B.

    2011-01-01

    The Machian effect of distant masses of the universe in the frame of reference of the rotating Earth is demonstrated using the gravitomagnetic approach of general relativity. This effect appears in the form of a gravitomagnetic Lorentz force acting on moving bodies on the Earth. The gravitomagnetic field of the universe--deduced from a simple…

  4. Computational estimation of magnetically induced electric fields in a rotating head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilvonen, Sami; Laakso, Ilkka

    2009-01-01

    Change in a magnetic field, or similarly, movement in a strong static magnetic field induces electric fields in human tissues, which could potentially cause harmful effects. In this paper, the fields induced by different rotational movements of a head in a strong homogeneous magnetic field are computed numerically. Average field magnitudes near the retinas and inner ears are studied in order to gain insight into the causes of phosphenes and vertigo-like effects, which are associated with extremely low-frequency (ELF) magnetic fields. The induced electric fields are calculated in four different anatomically realistic head models using an efficient finite-element method (FEM) solver. The results are compared with basic restriction limits by IEEE and ICNIRP. Under rotational movement of the head, with a magnetic flux rate of change of 1 T s-1, the maximum IEEE-averaged electric field and maximum ICNIRP-averaged current density were 337 mV m-1 and 8.84 mA m-2, respectively. The limits by IEEE seem significantly stricter than those by ICNIRP. The results show that a magnetic flux rate of change of 1 T s-1 may induce electric field in the range of 50 mV m-1 near retinas, and possibly even larger values near the inner ears. These results provide information for approximating the threshold electric field values of phosphenes and vertigo-like effects.

  5. Using Faraday Rotation to Infer the Inner Heliospheric Radial Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, S.; Garzelli, M. V.

    In this work, we use Faraday rotation measurements of the polarized emission from several extragalactic radio sources occulted by the corona in May 1997. The electron density distribution along the lines of sight to the sources is obtained by inverting LASCO/SOHO polarized brightness (pB) data taken during the days of observations, thus allowing to disentangle the two main plasma properties that contribute to the observed rotation measures (RM). By comparing the observed RM values to those theoretically predicted by a dual power-law model of the radial component of the coronal magnetic field, using a best-fitting procedure, we are able to infer the inner heliospheric radial magnetic field profile. Our analysis suggests that the radial computation of the potential field source surface (PFSS) model from the Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO), assuming a radial field in the photosphere and a source surface located at 2.5 rsun, is the preferred choice near solar minimum.

  6. Process e/sup -/. -->. e/sup -/(. nu. nu-bar) in the field of a circularly polarized plane wave

    SciTech Connect

    Skobelev, V.V.

    1987-12-01

    The e/sup -/..-->..e/sup -/(..nu..nu-bar) process in the field of a circularly polarized plane wave is studied in the framework of the Glashow-Weinberg-Salam model. General expressions for the probability of creation of neutrino pairs are obtained, and the case of a low-intensity wave is studied in detail. The effects of asymmetry of emission of electron and muon neutrinos are estimated, and comparison with previous results is performed.

  7. Superparamagnetic particle dynamics and mixing in a rotating capillary tube with a stationary magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun-Tae; Abid, Aamir; Cheung, Ka Ho; Sudheendra, L; Kennedy, Ian M

    2012-09-01

    The dynamics of superparamagnetic particles subject to competing magnetic and viscous drag forces have been examined with a uniform, stationary, external magnetic field. In this approach, competing drag and magnetic forces were created in a fluid suspension of superparamagnetic particles that was confined in a capillary tube; competing viscous drag and magnetic forces were established by rotating the tube. A critical Mason number was determined for conditions under which the rotation of the capillary prevents the formation of chains from individual particles. The statistics of chain length were investigated by image analysis while varying parameters such as the rotation speed and the viscosity of the liquid. The measurements showed that the rate of particle chain formation was decreased with increased viscosity and rotation speed ; the particle dynamics could be quantified by the same dimensionless Mason number that has been demonstrated for rotating magnetic fields. The potential for enhancement of mixing in a bioassay was assessed using a fast chemical reaction that was diffusion-limited. Reducing the Mason below the critical value, so that chains were formed in the fluid, gave rise to a modest improvement in the time to completion of the reaction. PMID:23066382

  8. Superparamagnetic particle dynamics and mixing in a rotating capillary tube with a stationary magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun-Tae; Abid, Aamir; Cheung, Ka Ho; Sudheendra, L.; Kennedy, Ian M.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of superparamagnetic particles subject to competing magnetic and viscous drag forces have been examined with a uniform, stationary, external magnetic field. In this approach, competing drag and magnetic forces were created in a fluid suspension of superparamagnetic particles that was confined in a capillary tube; competing viscous drag and magnetic forces were established by rotating the tube. A critical Mason number was determined for conditions under which the rotation of the capillary prevents the formation of chains from individual particles. The statistics of chain length were investigated by image analysis while varying parameters such as the rotation speed and the viscosity of the liquid. The measurements showed that the rate of particle chain formation was decreased with increased viscosity and rotation speed ; the particle dynamics could be quantified by the same dimensionless Mason number that has been demonstrated for rotating magnetic fields. The potential for enhancement of mixing in a bioassay was assessed using a fast chemical reaction that was diffusion-limited. Reducing the Mason below the critical value, so that chains were formed in the fluid, gave rise to a modest improvement in the time to completion of the reaction. PMID:23066382

  9. Constraining the String Gauge Field by Galaxy Rotation Curves and Perihelion Precession of Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Yeuk-Kwan E.; Xu, Feng

    2013-09-01

    We discuss a cosmological model in which the string gauge field coupled universally to matter gives rise to an extra centripetal force and will have observable signatures on cosmological and astronomical observations. Several tests are performed using data including galaxy rotation curves of 22 spiral galaxies of varied luminosities and sizes and perihelion precessions of planets in the solar system. The rotation curves of the same group of galaxies are independently fit using a dark matter model with the generalized Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile and the string model. A remarkable fit of galaxy rotation curves is achieved using the one-parameter string model as compared to the three-parameter dark matter model with the NFW profile. The average χ2 value of the NFW fit is 9% better than that of the string model at a price of two more free parameters. Furthermore, from the string model, we can give a dynamical explanation for the phenomenological Tully-Fisher relation. We are able to derive a relation between field strength, galaxy size, and luminosity, which can be verified with data from the 22 galaxies. To further test the hypothesis of the universal existence of the string gauge field, we apply our string model to the solar system. Constraint on the magnitude of the string field in the solar system is deduced from the current ranges for any anomalous perihelion precession of planets allowed by the latest observations. The field distribution resembles a dipole field originating from the Sun. The string field strength deduced from the solar system observations is of a similar magnitude as the field strength needed to sustain the rotational speed of the Sun inside the Milky Way. This hypothesis can be tested further by future observations with higher precision.

  10. CONSTRAINING THE STRING GAUGE FIELD BY GALAXY ROTATION CURVES AND PERIHELION PRECESSION OF PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Yeuk-Kwan E.; Xu Feng

    2013-09-01

    We discuss a cosmological model in which the string gauge field coupled universally to matter gives rise to an extra centripetal force and will have observable signatures on cosmological and astronomical observations. Several tests are performed using data including galaxy rotation curves of 22 spiral galaxies of varied luminosities and sizes and perihelion precessions of planets in the solar system. The rotation curves of the same group of galaxies are independently fit using a dark matter model with the generalized Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile and the string model. A remarkable fit of galaxy rotation curves is achieved using the one-parameter string model as compared to the three-parameter dark matter model with the NFW profile. The average {chi}{sup 2} value of the NFW fit is 9% better than that of the string model at a price of two more free parameters. Furthermore, from the string model, we can give a dynamical explanation for the phenomenological Tully-Fisher relation. We are able to derive a relation between field strength, galaxy size, and luminosity, which can be verified with data from the 22 galaxies. To further test the hypothesis of the universal existence of the string gauge field, we apply our string model to the solar system. Constraint on the magnitude of the string field in the solar system is deduced from the current ranges for any anomalous perihelion precession of planets allowed by the latest observations. The field distribution resembles a dipole field originating from the Sun. The string field strength deduced from the solar system observations is of a similar magnitude as the field strength needed to sustain the rotational speed of the Sun inside the Milky Way. This hypothesis can be tested further by future observations with higher precision.

  11. A slowly rotating coil system for AC field measurements of Fermilab booster correctors

    SciTech Connect

    Velev, G.; DiMarco, J.; Harding, David J.; Kashikhin, V.; Lamm, Michael J.; Schlabach, P.; Tartaglia, Michael Albert; Tompkins, John C.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    A method for measurement of rapidly changing magnetic fields has been developed and applied to the testing of new room temperature corrector packages designed for the Fermilab Booster Synchrotron. The method is based on fast digitization of a slowly rotating tangential coil probe, with analysis combining the measured coil voltages across a set of successive magnet current cycles. This paper presents results on the field quality measured for the normal and skew dipole, quadrupole, and sextupole elements in several of these corrector packages.

  12. An Experimental Study of the Effects of A Rotating Magnetic Field on Electrically Conducting Aqueous Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran Narayanan; Mazuruk, Konstantin

    1998-01-01

    The use of a rotating magnetic field for stirring metallic melts has been a commonly adopted practice for a fairly long period. The elegance of the technique stems from its non-intrusive nature and the intense stirring it can produce in an electrically conducting medium. A further application of the method in recent times has been in the area of crystal growth from melts (e.g. germanium). The latter experiments have been mainly research oriented in order to understand the basic physics of the process and to establish norms for optimizing such a technique for the commercial production of crystals. When adapted for crystal growth applications, the rotating magnetic field is used to induce a slow flow or rotation in the melt which in effect significantly curtails temperature field oscillations in the melt. These oscillations are known to cause dopant striations and thereby inhomogeneities in the grown crystal that essentially degrades the crystal quality. The applied field strength is typically of the order of milli-Teslas with a frequency range between 50-400 Hz. In this investigation, we report findings from experiments that explore the feasibility of applying a rotating magnetic field to aqueous salt solutions, that are characterized by conductivities that are several orders of magnitude smaller than semi-conductor melts. The aim is to study the induced magnetic field and consequently the induced flow in such in application. Detailed flow field description obtained through non-intrusive particle displacement tracking will be reported along with an analytical assessment of the results. It is anticipated that the obtained results will facilitate in establishing a parameter range over which the technique can be applied to obtain a desired flow field distribution. This method can find applicability in the growth of crystals from aqueous solutions and give an experimenter another controllable parameter towards improving the quality of the grown crystal.

  13. The relativistic dynamics of a point charge in the field of a plane electromagnetic wave traveling in the direction of a uniform static magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, T. P.

    1973-01-01

    The motion of a charged particle in electromagnetic fields of various geometric configurations and arising from a variety of sources is of intrinsic interest in electromagnetic theory. The particular configuration consisting of a plane wave propagating in the presence of a static uniform magnetic field whose direction is parallel to the wave normal is examined. The analysis presented here is treated within the context of classical electromagnetic theory. A numerical solution - at least to the approximate Lorentz-Dirac equation - is obtained.

  14. Electroelastic field of a sphere located in the vicinity of a plane piezoelectric surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starkov, A. S.; Pakhomov, O. V.; Starkov, I. A.

    2016-01-01

    The electric field generated by a scanning probe microscope is determined. Analytical expressions for the electroelastic field in a piezoelectric sample and the external electric field are derived for a spherical probe. It is demonstrated that the coupling of elastic and electrostatic fields in the piezoelectric material leads to energy redistribution between such fields. This circumstance causes variations in the normal component of the electric field strength at the interface and the capacitance of a probe.

  15. Rotational properties of ferromagnetic nanoparticles driven by a precessing magnetic field in a viscous fluid.

    PubMed

    Lyutyy, T V; Denisov, S I; Reva, V V; Bystrik, Yu S

    2015-10-01

    We study the deterministic and stochastic rotational dynamics of ferromagnetic nanoparticles in a precessing magnetic field. Our approach is based on the system of effective Langevin equations and on the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation. Two key characteristics of the rotational dynamics, namely the average angular frequency of precession of nanoparticles and their average magnetization, are of interest. Using the Langevin and Fokker-Planck equations, we calculate both analytically and numerically these characteristics in the deterministic and stochastic cases, determine their dependence on the model parameters, and analyze in detail the role of thermal fluctuations. PMID:26565245

  16. Rotational properties of ferromagnetic nanoparticles driven by a precessing magnetic field in a viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyutyy, T. V.; Denisov, S. I.; Reva, V. V.; Bystrik, Yu. S.

    2015-10-01

    We study the deterministic and stochastic rotational dynamics of ferromagnetic nanoparticles in a precessing magnetic field. Our approach is based on the system of effective Langevin equations and on the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation. Two key characteristics of the rotational dynamics, namely the average angular frequency of precession of nanoparticles and their average magnetization, are of interest. Using the Langevin and Fokker-Planck equations, we calculate both analytically and numerically these characteristics in the deterministic and stochastic cases, determine their dependence on the model parameters, and analyze in detail the role of thermal fluctuations.

  17. Eye torsion and the apparent horizon under head tilt and visual field rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merker, B. H.; Held, R.

    1981-01-01

    Two different experimental manipulations, namely head tilt and the viewing of a visual display rotating around the line of sight, induce torsional displacements of the eyes and a tilting of the apparent horizon. The present study examines the routes by which visual (field rotation) and otolith-proprioceptive (head tilt) sources of afference influence horizon judgments. In particular, the relationship between torsional eye movements and horizon estimates is addressed. The results indicate that visual and otolith-proprioceptive information sum directly in their influence on eye torsion, but interact more complexly in horizon estimates, indicating a dissociation of their central determinants.

  18. Destabilization of rotating flows with positive shear by azimuthal magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefani, Frank; Kirillov, Oleg N.

    2015-11-01

    According to Rayleigh's criterion, rotating flows are linearly stable when their specific angular momentum increases radially outward. The celebrated magnetorotational instability opens a way to destabilize those flows, as long as the angular velocity is decreasing outward. Using a local approximation we demonstrate that even flows with very steep positive shear can be destabilized by azimuthal magnetic fields which are current free within the fluid. We illustrate the transition of this instability to a rotationally enhanced kink-type instability in the case of a homogeneous current in the fluid, and discuss the prospects for observing it in a magnetized Taylor-Couette flow.

  19. Antimagnetic rotation in 108,110In with tilted axis cranking relativistic mean-field approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wu-Ji; Xu, Hai-Dan; Li, Jian; Liu, Yong-Hao; Ma, Ke-Yan; Yang, Dong; Lu, Jing-Bing; Ma, Ying-Jun

    2016-08-01

    Based on tilted axis cranking relativistic mean-field theory within point-coupling interaction PC-PK1, the rotational structure and the characteristic features of antimagnetic rotation for ΔI = 2 bands in 108,110In are studied. Tilted axis cranking relativistic mean-field calculations reproduce the experimental energy spectrum well and are in agreement with the experimental I ∼ ω plot, although the calculated spin overestimates the experimental values. In addition, the two-shears-like mechanism in candidate antimagnetic rotation bands is clearly illustrated and the contributions from two-shears-like orbits, neutron (gd) orbits above Z = 50 shell and Z = 50, N = 50 core are investigated microscopically. The predicted B(E2), dynamic moment of inertia ℑ(2), deformation parameters β and γ, and ℑ(2)/B(E2) ratios in tilted axis cranking relativistic mean-field calculations are discussed and the characteristic features of antimagnetic rotation for the bands before and after alignment are shown. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11205068, 11205069, 11405072, 11475072, 11547308) and China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (2012M520667)

  20. Out-of-Plane Computed-Tomography-Guided Biopsy Using a Magnetic-Field-Based Navigation System

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Michael J. Gupta, Sanjay; Hicks, Marshall E.

    2006-02-15

    The purpose of this article is to report our clinical experience with out-of-plane computed-tomography (CT)-guided biopsies using a magnetic-field-based navigation system. Between February 2002 and March 2003, 20 patients underwent CT-guided biopsy in which an adjunct magnetic-field-based navigation system was used to aid an out-of-plane biopsy approach. Eighteen patients had an underlying primary malignancy. All biopsies involved the use of a coaxial needle system in which an outer 18G guide needle was inserted to the lesion using the navigation system and an inner 22G needle was then used to obtain fine-needle aspirates. Complications and technical success were recorded. Target lesions were located in the adrenal gland (n = 7), liver (n = 6), pancreas (n = 3), lung (n = 2), retroperitoneal lymph node (n = 1), and pelvis (n = 1). The mean lesion size (maximum transverse diameter) was 26.5 mm (range: 8-70 mm) and the mean and median cranial-caudal distance, between the transaxial planes of the final needle tip location and the needle insertion site, was 40 mm (range: 18-90 mm). Needle tip positioning was successfully placed within the lesion in all 20 biopsies. A diagnosis of malignancy was obtained in 14 biopsies. Benign diagnoses were encountered in the remaining six biopsies and included a benign adrenal gland (n = 2), fibroelastic tissue (n = 1), hepocytes with steatosis (n = 2) and reactive hepatocytes (n = 1). No complications were encountered. A magnetic-field-based navigation system is an effective adjunct tool for accurate and safe biopsy of lesions that require an out-of-plane CT approach.

  1. Enhancement of rotatable anisotropy in ferrite doped FeNi thin film with oblique sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Cai; Jiang, Changjun; Zhao, Zhong

    2015-07-01

    Rotatable anisotropy of stripe domain (SD) was investigated in a ferrite doped FeNi thin film with different oblique angles. Rotation of SD under an in-plane magnetic field was observed by magnetic force microscopy, suggesting the existence of rotatable anisotropy. A rotatable anisotropy field Hrot was derived from the fitting curves of the in-plane resonance field versus the angle between the orientation of easy axis and applied field. As the oblique angle increases, an increase of Hrot from 305 Oe to 468 Oe was observed and the perpendicular anisotropy increased as well, indicating a correlation between rotatable anisotropy and perpendicular anisotropy.

  2. Influence of an in-plane magnetic field in the off-resonance magnetoresistance spike in irradiated ultraclean 2DES

    SciTech Connect

    Iñarrea, J.

    2013-12-04

    We report on theoretical studies of a recently discovered strong radiation-induced magnetoresistance spike obtained in ultraclean two-dimensional electron systems at low temperatures. The most striking feature of this spike is that it shows up on the second harmonic of the cyclotron resonance. We apply the radiation-driven electron orbits model in the ultraclean scenario to offer a theoretical approach of this striking effect. We explain the effect of an in-plane magnetic field on the spike which consists in a vanishing effect when this field increases.

  3. Liquid-metal flow through a thin-walled elbow in a plane perpendicular to a uniform magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.S.

    1986-04-01

    This paper presents analytical solutions for the liquid-metal flow through two straight pipes connected by a smooth elbow with the same inside radius. The pipes and the elbow lie in a plane which is perpendicular to a uniform, applied magnetic field. The strength of the magnetic field is assumed to be sufficiently strong that inertial and viscous effects are negligible. This assumption is appropriate for the liquid-lithium flow in the blanket of a magnetic confinement fusion reactor, such as a tokamak. The pipes and the elbow have thin metal walls.

  4. Evidence of internal rotation and a helical magnetic field in the jet of the quasar NRAO 150

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, Sol N.; Agudo, Iván; Gómez, José L.; Krichbaum, Thomas P.; Martí-Vidal, Iván; Roy, Alan L.

    2014-06-01

    The source NRAO 150 is a very prominent millimeter to radio emitting quasar at redshift z = 1.52 for which previous millimeter VLBI observations revealed a fast counterclockwise rotation of the innermost regions of the jet. Here we present new polarimetric multi-epoch VLBI-imaging observations of NRAO 150 performed at 8, 15, 22, 43, and 86 GHz with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), and the Global Millimeter VLBI Array (GMVA) between 2006 and 2010. All new and previous observational evidence - i.e., spectral index maps, multi-epoch image cross-correlation, and low level of linear polarization degree in optically thin regions - are consistent with an interpretation of the source behavior where the jet is seen at an extremely small angle to the line of sight, and the high frequency emitting regions in NRAO 150 rotate at high speeds on the plane of the sky with respect to a reference point that does not need to be related to any particularly prominent jet feature. The observed polarization angle distribution at 22, 43, and 86 GHz during observing epochs with high polarization degree suggests that we have detected the toroidal component of the magnetic field threading the innermost jet plasma regions. This is also consistent with the lower degree of polarization detected at progressively poorer angular resolutions, where the integrated polarization intensity produced by the toroidal field is explained by polarization cancellation inside the observing beam. All this evidence is fully consistent with a kinematic scenario where the main kinematic and polarization properties of the 43 GHz emitting structure of NRAO 150 are explained by the internal rotation of such emission regions around the jet axis when the jet is seen almost face on. A simplified model developed to fit helical trajectories to the observed kinematics of the 43 GHz features fully supports this hypothesis. This explains the kinematics of the innermost regions of the jet in NRAO 150 in terms of internal

  5. Distinctive translational and self-rotational motion of lymphoma cells in an optically induced non-rotational alternating current electric field

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ke; Yang, Xieliu; Liu, Lianqing; Yu, Haibo; Zhang, Weijing

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the translational motion and self-rotational behaviors of the Raji cells, a type of B-cell lymphoma cell, in an optically induced, non-rotational, electric field have been characterized by utilizing a digitally programmable and optically activated microfluidics chip with the assistance of an externally applied AC bias potential. The crossover frequency spectrum of the Raji cells was studied by observing the different linear translation responses of these cells to the positive and negative optically induced dielectrophoresis force generated by a projected light pattern. This digitally projected spot served as the virtual electrode to generate an axisymmetric and non-uniform electric field. Then, the membrane capacitance of the Raji cells could be directly measured. Furthermore, Raji cells under this condition also exhibited a self-rotation behavior. The repeatable and controlled self-rotation speeds of the Raji cells to the externally applied frequency and voltage were systematically investigated and characterized via computer-vision algorithms. The self-rotational speed of the Raji cells reached a maximum value at 60 kHz and demonstrated a quadratic relationship with respect to the applied voltage. Furthermore, optically projected patterns of four orthogonal electrodes were also employed as the virtual electrodes to manipulate the Raji cells. These results demonstrated that Raji cells located at the center of the four electrode pattern could not be self-rotated. Instead any Raji cells that deviated from this center area would also self-rotate. Most importantly, the Raji cells did not exhibit the self-rotational behavior after translating and rotating with respect to the center of any two adjacent electrodes. The spatial distributions of the electric field generated by the optically projected spot and the pattern of four electrodes were also modeled using a finite element numerical simulation. These simulations validated that the electric field

  6. Distinctive translational and self-rotational motion of lymphoma cells in an optically induced non-rotational alternating current electric field.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wenfeng; Zhang, Ke; Yang, Xieliu; Liu, Lianqing; Yu, Haibo; Zhang, Weijing

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the translational motion and self-rotational behaviors of the Raji cells, a type of B-cell lymphoma cell, in an optically induced, non-rotational, electric field have been characterized by utilizing a digitally programmable and optically activated microfluidics chip with the assistance of an externally applied AC bias potential. The crossover frequency spectrum of the Raji cells was studied by observing the different linear translation responses of these cells to the positive and negative optically induced dielectrophoresis force generated by a projected light pattern. This digitally projected spot served as the virtual electrode to generate an axisymmetric and non-uniform electric field. Then, the membrane capacitance of the Raji cells could be directly measured. Furthermore, Raji cells under this condition also exhibited a self-rotation behavior. The repeatable and controlled self-rotation speeds of the Raji cells to the externally applied frequency and voltage were systematically investigated and characterized via computer-vision algorithms. The self-rotational speed of the Raji cells reached a maximum value at 60 kHz and demonstrated a quadratic relationship with respect to the applied voltage. Furthermore, optically projected patterns of four orthogonal electrodes were also employed as the virtual electrodes to manipulate the Raji cells. These results demonstrated that Raji cells located at the center of the four electrode pattern could not be self-rotated. Instead any Raji cells that deviated from this center area would also self-rotate. Most importantly, the Raji cells did not exhibit the self-rotational behavior after translating and rotating with respect to the center of any two adjacent electrodes. The spatial distributions of the electric field generated by the optically projected spot and the pattern of four electrodes were also modeled using a finite element numerical simulation. These simulations validated that the electric field

  7. Rotation and Macroturbulence in Metal-Poor Field Red Giant and Red Horizontal Branch Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carney, Bruce W.; Gray, David F.; Yong, David; Latham, David W.; Manset, Nadine; Zelman, Rachel; Laird, John B.

    2008-03-01

    We report the results for rotational velocities, Vrot sin i, and macroturbulence dispersions, ζRT, for 12 metal-poor field red giant branch (RGB) stars and 7 metal-poor field red horizontal branch (RHB) stars. The results are based on Fourier transform analyses of absorption line profiles from high-resolution (R ≈ 120,000), high-S/N (≈215 per pixel; ≈345 per resolution element) spectra obtained with the Gecko spectrograph at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT). The stars were selected from the authors' previous studies of 20 RHB and 116 RGB stars, based primarily on larger-than-average line-broadening values. We find that ζRT values for the metal-poor RGB stars are very similar to those for metal-rich disk giants studied earlier by Gray and his collaborators. Six of the RGB stars have small rotational values, less than 2.0 km s-1, while five show significant rotation/enhanced line broadening, over 3 km s-1. We confirm the rapid rotation rate for RHB star HD 195636, found earlier by Preston. This star's rotation is comparable to that of the fastest known rotating blue horizontal branch (BHB) stars, when allowance is made for differences in radii and moments of inertia. The other six RHB stars have somewhat lower rotation but show a trend to higher values at higher temperatures (lower radii). Comparing our results with those for BHB stars from Kinman et al., we find that the fraction of rapidly rotating RHB stars is somewhat lower than is found among BHB stars. The number of rapidly rotating RHB stars is also smaller than we would have expected from the observed rotation of the RGB stars. We devise two empirical methods to translate our earlier line-broadening results into Vrot sin i for all the RGB and RHB stars they studied. Binning the RGB stars by luminosity, we find that most metal-poor field RGB stars show no detectable sign, on average, of rotation, which is not surprising given the stars' large radii. However, the most luminous stars, with MV

  8. Heating in the MRI environment due to superparamagnetic fluid suspensions in a rotating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantillon-Murphy, P.; Wald, L. L.; Adalsteinsson, E.; Zahn, M.

    2010-03-01

    In the presence of alternating-sinusoidal or rotating magnetic fields, magnetic nanoparticles will act to realign their magnetic moment with the applied magnetic field. The realignment is characterized by the nanoparticle's time constant, τ. As the magnetic field frequency is increased, the nanoparticle's magnetic moment lags the applied magnetic field at a constant angle for a given frequency, Ω, in rad/s. Associated with this misalignment is a power dissipation that increases the bulk magnetic fluid's temperature which has been utilized as a method of magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia, particularly suited for cancer in low-perfusion tissue (e.g., breast) where temperature increases of between 4 and 7 degree Centigrade above the ambient in vivo temperature cause tumor hyperthermia. This work examines the rise in the magnetic fluid's temperature in the MRI environment which is characterized by a large DC field, B0. Theoretical analysis and simulation is used to predict the effect of both alternating-sinusoidal and rotating magnetic fields transverse to B0. Results are presented for the expected temperature increase in small tumors (approximately 1 cm radius) over an appropriate range of magnetic fluid concentrations (0.002-0.01 solid volume fraction) and nanoparticle radii (1-10 nm). The results indicate that significant heating can take place, even in low-field MRI systems where magnetic fluid saturation is not significant, with careful selection of the rotating or sinusoidal field parameters (field frequency and amplitude). The work indicates that it may be feasible to combine low-field MRI with a magnetic hyperthermia system using superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

  9. Heating in the MRI environment due to superparamagnetic fluid suspensions in a rotating magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Wald, L.L.; Adalsteinsson, E.; Zahn, M.

    2009-01-01

    In the presence of alternating-sinusoidal or rotating magnetic fields, magnetic nanoparticles will act to realign their magnetic moment with the applied magnetic field. The realignment is characterized by the nanoparticle’s time constant, τ. As the magnetic field frequency is increased, the nanoparticle’s magnetic moment lags the applied magnetic field at a constant angle for a given frequency, Ω, in rad/s. Associated with this misalignment is a power dissipation that increases the bulk magnetic fluid’s temperature which has been utilized as a method of magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia, particularly suited for cancer in low-perfusion tissue (e.g., breast) where temperature increases of between 4°C and 7°C above the ambient in vivo temperature cause tumor hyperthermia. This work examines the rise in the magnetic fluid’s temperature in the MRI environment which is characterized by a large DC field, B0. Theoretical analysis and simulation is used to predict the effect of both alternating-sinusoidal and rotating magnetic fields transverse to B0. Results are presented for the expected temperature increase in small tumors (~1 cm radius) over an appropriate range of magnetic fluid concentrations (0.002 to 0.01 solid volume fraction) and nanoparticle radii (1 to 10 nm). The results indicate that significant heating can take place, even in low-field MRI systems where magnetic fluid saturation is not significant, with careful selection of the rotating or sinusoidal field parameters (field frequency and amplitude). The work indicates that it may be feasible to combine low-field MRI with a magnetic hyperthermia system using superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. PMID:20161608

  10. Discovery of a strong magnetic field in the rapidly rotating B2Vn star HR 7355

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksala, M. E.; Wade, G. A.; Marcolino, W. L. F.; Grunhut, J.; Bohlender, D.; Manset, N.; Townsend, R. H. D.; Mimes Collaboration

    2010-06-01

    We report the detection of a strong, organized magnetic field in the He-variable early B-type star HR 7355 using spectropolarimetric data obtained with ESPaDOnS on the 3.6-m Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope within the context of the Magnetism in Massive Stars (MiMeS) Large Program. HR 7355 is both the most rapidly rotating known main-sequence magnetic star and the most rapidly rotating He-strong star, with v sin i = 300 +/- 15 km s-1 and a rotational period of 0.5214404+/-0.0000006 d. We have modelled our eight longitudinal magnetic field measurements assuming an oblique dipole magnetic field. Constraining the inclination of the rotation axis to be between 38° and 86°, we find the magnetic obliquity angle to be between 30° and 85°, and the polar strength of the magnetic field at the stellar surface to be between 13-17 kG. The photometric light curve constructed from HIPPARCOS archival data and new CTIO measurements shows two minima separated by 0.5 in rotational phase and occurring 0.25 cycles before/after the magnetic extrema. This photometric behaviour, coupled with previously reported variable emission of the Hα line (which we confirm), strongly supports the proposal that HR 7355 harbours a structured magnetosphere similar to that in the prototypical He-strong star, σ Ori E. Based on observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France and the University of Hawaii.

  11. Minimalist coupled evolution model for stellar X-ray activity, rotation, mass loss, and magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackman, Eric G.; Owen, James E.

    2016-05-01

    Late-type main-sequence stars exhibit an X-ray to bolometric flux ratio that depends on {tilde{R}o}, the ratio of rotation period to convective turnover time, as {tilde{R}o}^{-ζ } with 2 ≤ ζ ≤ 3 for {tilde{R}o} > 0.13, but saturates with |ζ| < 0.2 for {tilde{R}o} < 0.13. Saturated stars are younger than unsaturated stars and show a broader spread of rotation rates and X-ray activity. The unsaturated stars have magnetic fields and rotation speeds that scale roughly with the square root of their age, though possibly flattening for stars older than the Sun. The connection between faster rotators, stronger fields, and higher activity has been established observationally, but a theory for the unified time-evolution of X-ray luminosity, rotation, magnetic field and mass loss that captures the above trends has been lacking. Here we derive a minimalist holistic framework for the time evolution of these quantities built from combining a Parker wind with new ingredients: (1) explicit sourcing of both the thermal energy launching the wind and the X-ray luminosity via dynamo produced magnetic fields; (2) explicit coupling of X-ray activity and mass-loss saturation to dynamo saturation (via magnetic helicity build-up and convection eddy shredding); (3) use of coronal equilibrium to determine how magnetic energy is divided into wind and X-ray contributions. For solar-type stars younger than the Sun, we infer conduction to be a subdominant power loss compared to X-rays and wind. For older stars, conduction is more important, possibly quenching the wind and reducing angular momentum loss. We focus on the time evolution for stars younger than the Sun, highlighting what is possible for further generalizations. Overall, the approach shows promise towards a unified explanation of all of the aforementioned observational trends.

  12. Suppression of the n=2 rotational instability in field-reversed configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Alan L.; Slough, J.; Harding, Dennis G.

    1983-06-01

    Compact toroid plasmas formed in field-reversed theta pinches are generally destroyed after 30-50 μsec by a rotating n=2 instability. In the reported experiment, instability is controlled, and the plasma destruction is avoided in the TRX-1 theta pinch through the application of octopole magnetic fields. The decay times for loss of poloidal flux and particles are unaffected by the octopole fields. These decay times are about 100 μsec based on inferences from interferometry and excluded flux measurements. The weak, rotating elliptical disturbance (controlled n=2 mode) also made possible a novel determination of the density profile near the separatrix using single-chord interferometry. The local density gradient scale length in this region is found to be about one ion gyrodiameter.

  13. Advanced methods for controlling untethered magnetic devices using rotating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahoney, Arthur W., Jr.

    This dissertation presents results documenting advancements on the control of untethered magnetic devices, such as magnetic "microrobots" and magnetically actuated capsule endoscopes, motivated by problems in minimally invasive medicine. This dissertation focuses on applying rotating magnetic fields for magnetic manipulation. The contributions include advancements in the way that helical microswimmers (devices that mimic the propulsion of bacterial flagella) are controlled in the presence of gravitational forces, advancements in ways that groups of untethered magnetic devices can be differentiated and semi-independently controlled, advancements in the way that untethered magnetic device can be controlled with a single rotating permanent magnet, and an improved understanding in the nature of the magnetic force applied to an untethered device by a rotating magnet.

  14. Field Tests of Wind Turbine Unit with Tandem Wind Rotors and Double Rotational Armatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galal, Ahmed Mohamed; Kanemoto, Toshiaki

    This paper discusses the field tests of the wind turbine unit, in which the front and the rear wind rotors drive the inner and the outer armatures of the synchronous generator. The wind rotors were designed conveniently by the traditional procedure for the single wind rotor, where the diameters of the front and the rear wind rotors are 2 m and 1.33 m. The tests were done on a pick-up type truck driven straightly at constant speed. The rotational torque of the unit is directly proportional to the induced electric current irrespective of the rotational speeds of the wind rotors, while the induced voltage is proportional to the relative rotational speed. The performance of the unit is significantly affected not only by the wind velocity, but also by the blade setting angles of both wind rotors and the applied load especially at lower wind velocity.

  15. Is there a magnetic field that can enforce almost uniform rotation in a stellar radiative zone?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassoul, Jean-Louis; Tassoul, Monique

    1989-10-01

    Using methods proposed by Mestel et al. (1988), a large set of low-viscosity numerical models was developed to verify the prediction of these authors that, unless the magnetic field is extremely weak, the influence of the Lorentz force becomes so strong that only very slight differential rotation will be possible. Present results clearly show either the gradual appearance or the maintenance (depending on the initial conditions) of differential rotation over a time of the order of the Alfven time t(A). The conflicting roles of the viscous and magnetic forces are discussed. It is emphasized that uniform rotation can only be achieved with some kind of viscous action; purely magnetic action cannot do the job.

  16. Time-odd mean fields in covariant density functional theory: Rotating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasjev, A. V.; Abusara, H.

    2010-09-01

    Time-odd mean fields (nuclear magnetism) and their impact on physical observables in rotating nuclei are studied in the framework of covariant density functional theory (CDFT). It is shown that they have profound effect on the dynamic and kinematic moments of inertia. Particle number, configuration, and rotational frequency dependencies of their impact on the moments of inertia have been analyzed in a systematic way. Nuclear magnetism can also considerably modify the band crossing features such as crossing frequencies and the properties of the kinematic and dynamic moments of inertia in the band crossing region. The impact of time-odd mean fields on the moments of inertia in the regions away from band crossing only weakly depends on the relativistic mean-field parametrization, reflecting good localization of the properties of time-odd mean fields in CDFT. The moments of inertia of normal-deformed nuclei considerably deviate from the rigid-body value. On the contrary, superdeformed and hyperdeformed nuclei have the moments of inertia which are close to rigid-body value. The structure of the currents in rotating frame, their microscopic origin, and the relations to the moments of inertia have been systematically analyzed. The phenomenon of signature separation in odd-odd nuclei, induced by time-odd mean fields, has been analyzed in detail.

  17. Magnetic field geometries of two slowly rotating Ap/Bp stars: HD 12288 and HD 14437

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, G. A.; Kudryavtsev, D.; Romanyuk, I. I.; Landstreet, J. D.; Mathys, G.

    2000-03-01

    In this paper we report magnetic field models and basic physical parameters for the slowly rotating Ap/Bp stars HD 12288 and HD 14437. Using new and previously published mean longitudinal magnetic field, mean magnetic field modulus, and hipparcos photometric measurements, we have inferred the rotational periods of both stars (HD 12288: P_rot=34.9d +/- 0.2d HD 14437: P_rot=26.87d +/- 0.02d). From the magnetic measurements we have determined the best-fit decentred magnetic dipole configurations. For HD 12288, we find that the field geometry is consistent with a centred dipole, while for HD 14437 a large decentring parameter (a=0.23 R_*) is inferred. Both stars show one angle in the ambiguous (i,beta ) couplet which is smaller than about 20degr . This is consistent with the observation of Landstreet & Mathys (2000), who point out that almost all magnetic Ap stars with periods longer than about 30 days exhibit magnetic fields aligned with their rotational axis.

  18. Thermodynamics of charged rotating dilaton black branes with power-law Maxwell field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangeneh, M. Kord; Sheykhi, A.; Dehghani, M. H.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we construct a new class of charged rotating dilaton black brane solutions, with a complete set of rotation parameters, which is coupled to a nonlinear Maxwell field. The Lagrangian of the matter field has the form of the power-law Maxwell field. We study the causal structure of the spacetime and its physical properties in ample details. We also compute thermodynamic and conserved quantities of the spacetime, such as the temperature, entropy, mass, charge, and angular momentum. We find a Smarr-formula for the mass and verify the validity of the first law of thermodynamics on the black brane horizon. Finally, we investigate the thermal stability of solutions in both the canonical and the grand-canonical ensembles and disclose the effects of dilaton field and nonlinearity of the Maxwell field on the thermal stability of the solutions. We find that, for α ≤ 1, charged rotating black brane solutions are thermally stable independent of the values of the other parameters. For α >1, the solutions can encounter an unstable phase depending on the metric parameters.

  19. Time-odd mean fields in covariant density functional theory: Rotating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Afanasjev, A. V.; Abusara, H.

    2010-09-15

    Time-odd mean fields (nuclear magnetism) and their impact on physical observables in rotating nuclei are studied in the framework of covariant density functional theory (CDFT). It is shown that they have profound effect on the dynamic and kinematic moments of inertia. Particle number, configuration, and rotational frequency dependencies of their impact on the moments of inertia have been analyzed in a systematic way. Nuclear magnetism can also considerably modify the band crossing features such as crossing frequencies and the properties of the kinematic and dynamic moments of inertia in the band crossing region. The impact of time-odd mean fields on the moments of inertia in the regions away from band crossing only weakly depends on the relativistic mean-field parametrization, reflecting good localization of the properties of time-odd mean fields in CDFT. The moments of inertia of normal-deformed nuclei considerably deviate from the rigid-body value. On the contrary, superdeformed and hyperdeformed nuclei have the moments of inertia which are close to rigid-body value. The structure of the currents in rotating frame, their microscopic origin, and the relations to the moments of inertia have been systematically analyzed. The phenomenon of signature separation in odd-odd nuclei, induced by time-odd mean fields, has been analyzed in detail.

  20. HD 18078: A very slowly rotating Ap star with an unusual magnetic field structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathys, G.; Romanyuk, I. I.; Kudryavtsev, D. O.; Landstreet, J. D.; Pyper, D. M.; Adelman, S. J.

    2016-02-01

    Context. The existence of a significant population of Ap stars with very long rotation periods (up to several hundred years) has progressively emerged over the past two decades. However, only lower limits of the periods are known for most of them because their variations have not yet been observed over a sufficient timebase. Aims: We determine the rotation period of the slowly rotating Ap star HD 18078 and we derive constraints on the geometrical structure of its magnetic field. Methods: We combine measurements of the mean magnetic field modulus obtained from 1990 to 1997 with determinations of the mean longitudinal magnetic field spanning the 1999-2007 time interval to derive an unambiguous value of the rotation period. We show that this value is consistent with photometric variations recorded in the Strömgren uvby photometric system between 1995 and 2004. We fit the variations of the two above-mentioned field moments with a simple model to constrain the magnetic structure. Results: The rotation period of HD 18078 is (1358 ± 12) d. The geometrical structure of its magnetic field is consistent to first order with a colinear multipole model whose axis is offset from the centre of the star. Conclusions: HD 18078 is only the fifth Ap star with a rotation period longer than 1000 d for which the exact value of that period (as opposed to a lower limit) could be determined. The strong anharmonicity of the variations of its mean longitudinal magnetic field and the shift between their extrema and those of the mean magnetic field modulus are exceptional and indicative of a very unusual magnetic structure. Based in part on observations made at Observatoire de Haute Provence (CNRS), France; at Kitt Peak National Observatory, National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO Prop. ID: KP2442; PI: T. Lanz), which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation; at the Canada

  1. Rotation in a reversed field pinch with active feedback stabilization of resistive wall modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconello, M.; Menmuir, S.; Brunsell, P. R.; Kuldkepp, M.

    2006-09-01

    Active feedback stabilization of multiple resistive wall modes (RWMs) has been successfully proven in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch. One of the features of plasma discharges operated with active feedback stabilization, in addition to the prolongation of the plasma discharge, is the sustainment of the plasma rotation. Sustained rotation is observed both for the internally resonant tearing modes (TMs) and the intrinsic impurity oxygen ions. Good quantitative agreement between the toroidal rotation velocities of both is found: the toroidal rotation is characterized by an acceleration phase followed, after one wall time, by a deceleration phase that is slower than in standard discharges. The TMs and the impurity ions rotate in the same poloidal direction with also similar velocities. Poloidal and toroidal velocities have comparable amplitudes and a simple model of their radial profile reproduces the main features of the helical angular phase velocity. RWMs feedback does not qualitatively change the TMs behaviour and typical phenomena such as the dynamo and the 'slinky' are still observed. The improved sustainment of the plasma and TMs rotation occurs also when feedback only acts on internally non-resonant RWMs. This may be due to an indirect positive effect, through non-linear coupling between TMs and RWMs, of feedback on the TMs or to a reduced plasma-wall interaction affecting the plasma flow rotation. Electromagnetic torque calculations show that with active feedback stabilization the TMs amplitude remains well below the locking threshold condition for a thick shell. Finally, it is suggested that active feedback stabilization of RWMs and current profile control techniques can be employed simultaneously thus improving both the plasma duration and its confinement properties.

  2. The JCMT Plane Survey: early results from the ℓ = 30° field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, T. J. T.; Plume, R.; Thompson, M. A.; Parsons, H.; Urquhart, J. S.; Eden, D. J.; Dempsey, J. T.; Morgan, L. K.; Thomas, H. S.; Buckle, J.; Brunt, C. M.; Butner, H.; Carretero, D.; Chrysostomou, A.; deVilliers, H. M.; Fich, M.; Hoare, M. G.; Manser, G.; Mottram, J. C.; Natario, C.; Olguin, F.; Peretto, N.; Polychroni, D.; Redman, R. O.; Rigby, A. J.; Salji, C.; Summers, L. J.; Berry, D.; Currie, M. J.; Jenness, T.; Pestalozzi, M.; Traficante, A.; Bastien, P.; diFrancesco, J.; Davis, C. J.; Evans, A.; Friberg, P.; Fuller, G. A.; Gibb, A. G.; Gibson, S.; Hill, T.; Johnstone, D.; Joncas, G.; Longmore, S. N.; Lumsden, S. L.; Martin, P. G.; Lu'o'ng, Q. Nguyê˜n.; Pineda, J. E.; Purcell, C.; Richer, J. S.; Schieven, G. H.; Shipman, R.; Spaans, M.; Taylor, A. R.; Viti, S.; Weferling, B.; White, G. J.; Zhu, M.

    2015-11-01

    We present early results from the JCMT (James Clerk Maxwell Telescope) Plane Survey (JPS), which has surveyed the northern inner Galactic plane between longitudes ℓ = 7° and ℓ = 63° in the 850-μm continuum with SCUBA-2 (Submm Common-User Bolometer Array 2), as part of the JCMT Legacy Survey programme. Data from the ℓ = 30° survey region, which contains the massive-star-forming regions W43 and G29.96, are analysed after approximately 40 per cent of the observations had been completed. The pixel-to-pixel noise is found to be 19 mJy beam-1 after a smooth over the beam area, and the projected equivalent noise levels in the final survey are expected to be around 10 mJy beam-1. An initial extraction of compact sources was performed using the FELLWALKER method, resulting in the detection of 1029 sources above a 5σ surface-brightness threshold. The completeness limits in these data are estimated to be around 0.2 Jy beam-1 (peak flux density) and 0.8 Jy (integrated flux density) and are therefore probably already dominated by source confusion in this relatively crowded section of the survey. The flux densities of extracted compact sources are consistent with those of matching detections in the shallower APEX (Atacama Pathfinder Experiment) Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy (ATLASGAL) survey. We analyse the virial and evolutionary state of the detected clumps in the W43 star-forming complex and find that they appear younger than the Galactic-plane average.

  3. Magnetoresistance and cyclotron mass in extremely-coupled double quantum wells under in-plane magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Blount, M.A.; Simmons, J.A.; Lyo, S.K.; Harff, N.E.; Weckwerth, M.V.

    1997-12-01

    The authors experimentally investigate the transport properties of an extremely-coupled AlGaAs/GaAs double quantum well, subject to in-plane magnetic fields (B{sub {parallel}}). The coupling of the double quantum well is sufficiently strong that the symmetric-antisymmetric energy gap ({Delta}{sub SAS}) is larger than the Fermi energy (E{sub F}). Thus for all B{sub {parallel}} only the lower energy branch of the dispersion curve is occupied. In contrast to systems with weaker coupling such that {Delta}{sub SAS} < E{sub F} the authors find: (1) only a single feature, a maximum, in the in-plane magnetoresistance, (2) a monotonic increase with B{sub {parallel}} in the cyclotron mass up to 2.2 times the bulk GaAs mass, and (3) an increasing Fermi surface orbit area with B{sub {parallel}}, in good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  4. Propagation of electromagnetic fields between non-parallel planes: a fully vectorial formulation and an efficient implementation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Site; Asoubar, Daniel; Hellmann, Christian; Wyrowski, Frank

    2016-01-20

    The propagation of electromagnetic fields between non-parallel planes based on a spectrum-of-plane-wave analysis is discussed and formulations for an efficient numerical implementation are presented in detail. It is shown that with the help of interpolation techniques, the numerical implementation can be done with the standard uniform fast Fourier transform (FFT) of easy access. Different interpolation techniques are numerically examined, and it turns out that the use of cubic interpolation, together with the uniform FFT, brings both significantly increased computational efficiency and high simulation accuracy. Apart from the aspect of computational efficiency, all formulations in this work are generalized in a fully vectorial manner in comparison to previous works. PMID:26835928

  5. Electro-Active Transducer Using Radial Electric Field To Produce/Motion Sense Out-Of-Plane Transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor); Fox, Robert L. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An electro-active transducer includes a ferroelectric material sandwiched by first and second electrode patterns. When the device is used as an actuator, the first and second electrode patterns are configured to introduce an electric field into the ferroelectric material when voltage is applied to the electrode patterns. When the device is used as a sensor. the first and second electrode patterns are configured to introduce an electric field into the ferroelectric material when the ferroelectric material experiences deflection in a direction substantially perpendicular thereto. In each case, the electrode patterns are designed to cause the electric field to: i) originate at a region of the ferroelectric material between the first and second electrode patterns. and ii) extend radially outward from the region of the ferroelectric material (at which the electric field originates) and substantially parallel to the ferroelectric material s plane.

  6. Measurements accounting for the impediment of ion spin-up in rotating magnetic field driven field reversed configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Deards, C. L.; Hoffman, A. L.; Steinhauer, L. C.

    2011-11-15

    Improved vacuum hygiene, wall conditioning, and reduced recycling in the rotating magnetic field (RMF) driven translation, confinement, and sustainment-upgrade (TCSU) field reversed configuration experiment have made possible a more accurate assessment of the forces affecting ion spin-up. This issue is critical in plasmas sustained by RMFs, such as TCSU since ion spin-up can substantially reduce or cancel the RMF current drive effect. Several diagnostics are brought to bear, including a 3-axis translatable magnetic probe allowing the first experimental measurement of the end shorting effect. These results show that the ion rotation is determined by a balance between electron-ion friction, the end shorting effect, and ion drag against neutrals.

  7. Measurements accounting for the impediment of ion spin-up in rotating magnetic field driven field reversed configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deards, C. L.; Hoffman, A. L.; Steinhauer, L. C.

    2011-11-01

    Improved vacuum hygiene, wall conditioning, and reduced recycling in the rotating magnetic field (RMF) driven translation, confinement, and sustainment-upgrade (TCSU) field reversed configuration experiment have made possible a more accurate assessment of the forces affecting ion spin-up. This issue is critical in plasmas sustained by RMFs, such as TCSU since ion spin-up can substantially reduce or cancel the RMF current drive effect. Several diagnostics are brought to bear, including a 3-axis translatable magnetic probe allowing the first experimental measurement of the end shorting effect. These results show that the ion rotation is determined by a balance between electron-ion friction, the end shorting effect, and ion drag against neutrals.

  8. Detection of a weak magnetic field via cavity-enhanced Faraday rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Keyu; Zhao, Nan; Twamley, Jason; EQuS Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    We study the sensitive detection of a weak static magnetic field via Faraday rotation induced by an ensemble of spins in a bimodal degenerate microwave cavity. We determine the limit of the resolution for the sensitivity of the magnetometry achieved using either single-photon or multiphoton inputs. For the case of a microwave cavity containing an ensemble of nitrogen-vacancy defects in diamond, we obtain a magnetometry sensitivity exceeding 5.2 n T /√{Hz } utilizing a single-photon probe field, while for a multiphoton input we achieve a subfemtotesla sensitivity using a coherent-probe microwave field with power of Pin=1 n W .

  9. Nonlinear resonance of the rotating circular plate under static loads in magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yuda; Wang, Tong

    2015-11-01

    The rotating circular plate is widely used in mechanical engineering, meanwhile the plates are often in the electromagnetic field in modern industry with complex loads. In order to study the resonance of a rotating circular plate under static loads in magnetic field, the nonlinear vibration equation about the spinning circular plate is derived according to Hamilton principle. The algebraic expression of the initial deflection and the magneto elastic forced disturbance differential equation are obtained through the application of Galerkin integral method. By mean of modified Multiple scale method, the strongly nonlinear amplitude-frequency response equation in steady state is established. The amplitude frequency characteristic curve and the relationship curve of amplitude changing with the static loads and the excitation force of the plate are obtained according to the numerical calculation. The influence of magnetic induction intensity, the speed of rotation and the static loads on the amplitude and the nonlinear characteristics of the spinning plate are analyzed. The proposed research provides the theory reference for the research of nonlinear resonance of rotating plates in engineering.

  10. Magnetic Alignment of Magnetically Biaxial Diamagnetic Rods under Rotating Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukui, Shu; Kimura, Tsunehisa

    2012-05-01

    The alignment behavior of magnetically biaxial diamagnetic rods under rotating magnetic fields is studied to elucidate the effects of particle shape and rotation speed on alignment manner. Three types of rod (ca. 1.1 mmφ × 3 mm) are prepared: (i) rod axes parallel to χ1, (ii) parallel to χ2, and (iii) parallel to χ3, where χs are the principal axes of the diamagnetic susceptibility tensor and χ1 > χ2 > χ3. The motion of the rod is recorded on video and the angles required for the comparison with simulation are measured. Simulation is performed by numerically solving a torque equation including magnetic and hydrodynamic torques. The experimental results show a good agreement with simulation results. It is shown that the χ3-axis of rod sample (ii) does not align parallel to the axis of the rotating magnetic field under most experimental conditions; this is in marked contrast to the case with magnetically uniaxial particles (χ1 = χ2 > χ3), for which the χ3-axis aligns irrespective of particle shape and/or rotation speed. This observation is interpreted in terms of magnetic energy and orientation kinetics.

  11. Influence of light sheet separation on SPIV measurement in a large field spanwise plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucaut, J. M.; Coudert, S.; Braud, C.; Velte, C.

    2014-03-01

    Stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (SPIV) is nowadays a well-established measurement technique for turbulent flows. However, the accuracy and the spatial resolution are still highly questionable in the presence of complex flow with both strong gradients and out-of-plane motions. To give guidelines for both setup and measurements of such flow configurations, a large region of overlap between two SPIV systems on the same laser light sheet is acquired in a plane normal to the streamwise direction of a high Reynolds turbulent boundary layer flow. A simple separation of the two light sheets is used to improve the accuracy of the measurements by increasing the velocity dynamic range especially. It also presents the enhancement of accuracy due to the light sheet separation for characterizing streamwise vortices (i.e. perpendicular to the sheet). The proposed technique has been demonstrated in the Laboratoire de Mécanique de Lille wind tunnel facility which has been specially designed to study fully developed turbulent boundary layers at high Reynolds numbers. The outlook is to study in detail the physics of the streamwise vortices generated from vortex generators taking advantage of the large scales of this turbulent boundary layer.

  12. Ion heating in the field-reversed configuration (FRC) by rotating magnetic fields (RMF) near cyclotron resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel A. Cohen; Alan H. Glasser

    2000-07-20

    The trajectories of ions confined in a Solovev FRC equilibrium magnetic geometry and heated with a small-amplitude, odd-parity rotating magnetic field, have been studied with a Hamiltonian computer code. When the RMF frequency is in the ion-cyclotron range, explosive heating occurs. Higher-energy ions are found to have betatron-type orbits, preferentially localized near the FRC midplane. These results are relevant to a compact magnetic-fusion-reactor design.

  13. Neutrino emission by electrons in the field of a plane electromagnetic wave

    SciTech Connect

    Merenkov, N.P.

    1985-12-01

    The emission of a neutrino pair by an electron in the field of an intense linearly-polarized wave is examined in the local limit of the Weinberg-Salam model. The emission probability is obtained in fields of weak and strong intensity. The effect of neutrino mass on the probability of neutrino emission by the electron in weak fields near threshold is studied.

  14. Excitation of Earth Rotation and Gravitational Field Changes by the December 26, 2004 Sumatran Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, R. S.; Chao, B. F.

    2005-05-01

    Besides generating seismic waves, which eventually dissipate, an earthquake also generates a static displacement field everywhere within the Earth. This global displacement field rearranges the Earth's mass, causing the Earth's rotation and gravitational field to change. The size of these changes depends upon the size, focal mechanism, and location of the earthquake. The Sumatran earthquake of December 26, 2004 is the largest earthquake to have occurred since the 1964 Alaskan earthquake. The coseismic effect of the Sumatran earthquake upon the Earth's length-of-day, polar motion, and low-degree harmonic coefficients of the gravitational field are computed. It is found that this earthquake should have caused the length-of-day to decrease by 2.68 μsec, the position of the mean rotation pole to shift 0.821 mas towards 145°E longitude, the Earth's oblateness J2 to decrease by 0.90×10-11, and the Earth's pear-shapedness J3 to decrease by 0.19×10-11. This predicted change in the length-of-day is probably not detectable by current measurement systems, the change in oblateness is perhaps just detectable, and the change in the mean position of the rotation pole is perhaps detectable if other effects, such as those of the atmosphere, oceans, and continental water storage, can be adequately removed from the observations.

  15. Plasma rotation by electric and magnetic fields in a discharge cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, H. E.; Hong, S. H.

    1977-01-01

    A theoretical model for an electric discharge consisting of a spatially diverging plasma sustained electrically between a small ring cathode and a larger ring anode in a cylindrical chamber with an axial magnetic field is developed to study the rotation of the discharge plasma in the crossed electric and magnetic fields. The associated boundary-value problem for the coupled partial differential equations which describe the electric potential and the plasma velocity fields is solved in closed form. The electric field, current density, and velocity distributions are discussed in terms of the Hartmann number and the Hall coefficient. As a result of Lorentz forces, the plasma rotates with speeds as high as 1 million cm/sec around its axis of symmetry at typical conditions. As an application, it is noted that rotating discharges of this type could be used to develop a high-density plasma-ultracentrifuge driven by j x B forces, in which the lighter (heavier) ion and atom components would be enriched in (off) the center of the discharge cylinder.

  16. Reconstruction of the 3D flow field in a differentially heated rotating annulus laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlander, U.; Wright, G. B.; Egbers, C.

    2012-04-01

    In the earth's atmosphere baroclinic instability is responsible for the heat and momentum transport from low to high latitudes. In the fifties, Raymond Hide used a rather simple laboratory experiment to study such vortices in the lab. The experiment is comprised by a cooled inner and heated outer cylinder mounted on a rotating platform, which mimics the heated tropical and cooled polar regions of the earth's atmosphere. The experiment shows rich dynamics that have been studied by varying the radial temperature difference and the rate of annulus revolution. At the Brandenburg University of Technology (BTU) Cottbus the differentially heated rotating annulus is a reference experiment of the DFG priority program 'MetStröm'. The 3D structure of the annulus flow field has been numerically simulated but, to our knowledge, has not been measured in the laboratory. In the present paper we use novel interpolation techniques to reconstruct the 3D annulus flow field from synchronous Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Infrared Thermography (IRT) measurements. The PIV system is used to measure the horizontal velocity components at 40, 60, 80, 100, and 120 mm above the bottom. The uppermost level is thus 15 mm below the fluid's surface. The surface temperature is simultaneously measured by an infrared (IR) camera. The PIV and infrared cameras have been mounted above the annulus and they co-rotate with the annulus. From the PIV observations alone a coherent 3D picture of the flow cannot be constructed since the PIV measurements have been taken at different instants of time. Therefore a corresponding IR image has been recorded for each PIV measurement. These IR images can be used to reconstruct the correct phase of the measured velocity fields. Each IR and PIV image for which t>0 is rotated back to the position at t=0. Then all surface waves have the same phase. In contrast, the PIV velocity fields generally have different phases since they have been taken at different vertical

  17. On the Rotation the Interstellar Magnetic Field Ahead of the Heliopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opher, Merav; Drake, James

    Based on the difference between the orientation of the interstellar and the solar magnetic fields, there was an expectation by the community that the magnetic field direction will rotate dramatically across the heliopause (HP). Recently, the Voyager team concluded that Voyager 1 (V1) crossed into interstellar space last year. The question is then why there was no significant rotation in the direction of the magnetic field across the HP. Here we present simulations that reveal that strong rotations in the direction of the magnetic field at the HP at the location of V1 (and Voyager 2) are not expected. The solar magnetic field strongly affects the draping of the interstellar magnetic field (BISM) around the HP. BISM twists as it approaches the HP and acquires a strong T component (East-West). The strong increase in the T component occurs where the interstellar flow stagnates in front of the HP. At this same location the N component BN is significantly reduced. Above and below, the neighboring BISM lines also twist into the T direction. This behavior occurs for a wide range of orientations of BISM. The angle delta = a sin(BN /B) is small (around 10(°) -20(°) ), as seen in the observations. Only after some significant distance outside the HP is the direction of the interstellar field distinguishably different from that of the Parker spiral. In the twist region (after the HP) there is a fast variation of the angle delta/AU and then a slower one farther away as seen in the observations (Burlaga & Ness 2014). We will discuss, as well in this talk, the mechanism responsible for the twist. The same twist is seen ahead of the magnetopause, where the field in the magnetosheath (equivalent to BISM) (in cases where reconnection is small) rotates toward the direction of the magnetospheric magnetic field (equivalent to the HS magnetic field) well upstream of the magnetopause (Phan et al. 1994). The IBEX ribbon, the band of increased intensity of energetic neutral atoms at 1 ke

  18. Generation and maintenance of bisymmetric spiral magnetic fields in disk galaxies in differential rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawa, Takeyasu; Fujimoto, M.

    1993-05-01

    The approximate dynamo equation, which yields asymptotic solutions for the large scale bisymmetric spiral (BSS) magnetic fields rotating rigidly over a large area of the galactic disk, is derived. The vertical thickness and the dynamo strength of the gaseous disk which are necessary to generate and sustain the BSS magnetic fields is determined. The globally BSS magnetic fields which propagate over the disk as a wave without being twisted more tightly are reproduced. A poloidal field configuration is theoretically predicted in the halo around the disk, and is observed in the edge-on galaxy NGC4631. Mathematical methods for the galactic dynamo are shown to be equivalent. Those methods give different growth rates between the BSS and the axisymmetric spiral (ASS) magnetic fields in the disk. Magnetohydrodynamical excitation is discussed between the BSS magnetic fields and the two armed spiral density waves.

  19. Effect of Transverse Magnetic Fields on Cold-Atom Nonlinear Magneto-Optical Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, David; Kunz, Paul; Fatemi, Fredrik; Quraishi, Qudsia

    2016-05-01

    We investigate nonlinear magneto-optical rotation (NMOR) in cold atoms in the presence of a transverse magnetic field where alignment-to-orientation conversion (AOC) dominates. The AOC mechanism, which relies on AC-Stark shifts generated by a strong, off-resonant probe beam, significantly alters the NMOR resonance. When an additional magnetic field is present, parallel to the electric field of the light, a nested feature within this NMOR resonance manifests. Unlike similar features observed with lower optical power in warm vapors, attributed to optical pumping through nearby hyperfine levels, this feature is due solely to the AOC mechanism. Using numerical simulations, a perturbative solution, and experimental observations we characterize the feature with respect to optical power, optical polarization, magnetic field strength, and magnetic field direction. These results shed further light on the AOC mechanism common to NMOR-based experiments and we demonstrate a potential application to measure transverse DC magnetic fields and spatial gradients.

  20. Physics of locked modes in ITER: Error field limits, rotation for obviation, and measurement of field errors

    SciTech Connect

    La Haye, R.J.

    1997-02-01

    The existing theoretical and experimental basis for predicting the levels of resonant static error field at different components m,n that stop plasma rotation and produce a locked mode is reviewed. For ITER ohmic discharges, the slow rotation of the very large plasma is predicted to incur a locked mode (and subsequent disastrous large magnetic islands) at a simultaneous weighted error field ({Sigma}{sub 1}{sup 3}w{sub m1}B{sup 2}{sub rm1}){sup {1/2}}/B{sub T} {ge} 1.9 x 10{sup -5}. Here the weights w{sub m1} are empirically determined from measurements on DIII-D to be w{sub 11} = 0. 2, w{sub 21} = 1.0, and w{sub 31} = 0. 8 and point out the relative importance of different error field components. This could be greatly obviated by application of counter injected neutral beams (which adds fluid flow to the natural ohmic electron drift). The addition of 5 MW of 1 MeV beams at 45{degrees} injection would increase the error field limit by a factor of 5; 13 MW would produce a factor of 10 improvement. Co-injection beams would also be effective but not as much as counter-injection as the co direction opposes the intrinsic rotation while the counter direction adds to it. A means for measuring individual PF and TF coil total axisymmetric field error to less than 1 in 10,000 is described. This would allow alignment of coils to mm accuracy and with correction coils make possible the very low levels of error field needed.

  1. Solidification of II-VI Compounds in a Rotating Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, D. C.; Volz, M. P.; Mazuruk, K.; Motakef, S.; Dudley, M.; Matyi, R.

    1999-01-01

    This project is aimed at using a rotating magnetic field (RMF) to control fluid flow and transport during directional solidification of elemental and compound melts. Microgravity experiments have demonstrated that small amounts of residual acceleration of less than a micro-g can initiate and prolong fluid flow, particularly when there is a static component of the field perpendicular to the liquid solid interface. Thus a true diffusion boundary layer is not formed, and it becomes difficult to verify theories of solidification or to achieve diffusion controlled solidification. The RMF superimposes a stirring effect on an electrically conducting liquid, and with appropriate field strengths and frequencies, controlled transport of material through a liquid column can be obtained. As diffusion conditions are precluded and complete mixing conditions prevail, the technique is appropriate for traveling solvent zone or float zone growth methods in which the overall composition of the liquid can be maintained throughout the growth experiment. Crystals grown by RMF techniques in microgravity in previous, unrelated missions have shown exceptional properties. The objective of the project is two-fold, namely (1) using numerical modeling to simulate the behavior of a solvent zone with applied thermal boundary conditions and demonstrate the effects of decreasing gravity levels, or an increasing applied RMF, or both, and (2) to grow elements and II-VI compounds from traveling solvent zones both with and without applied RMFs, and to determine objectively how well the modeling predicts solidification parameters. Numerical modeling has demonstrated that, in the growth of CdTe from a tellurium solution, a rotating magnetic field can advantageously modify the shape of the liquid solid interface such that the interface is convex as seen from the liquid. Under such circumstances, the defect structure is reduced as any defects which are formed tend to grow out and not propagate. The flow

  2. Joint Instability of Differential Rotation and Toroidal Magnetic Fields below the Solar Convection Zone, II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, P. A.; Fox, P.

    1997-05-01

    At the 1996 AAS/SPD meeting in Madison we reported first results for the joint instability of differential rotation and toroidal magnetic fields to 2D disturbances (see also Gilman and Fox, Paper I, July 20 1997 issue of ApJ). This analysis was for the toroidal field profile B=a*sin(LAT)cos(LAT). This paper reports results for the profile B=(a*sin(LAT)+b*(sin(LAT))(3) ))cos(LAT), which, with b<-a<0, allows for a node in the toroidal field at latitude arcsin (-a/b). This generalization is of interest because we should expect such a node to appear and migrate equatorward as the sun proceeds from one sunspot cycle to the next. As with the simpler profile, instability occurs for virtually all differential rotation amplitudes, and all toroidal field amplitudes and shapes, and remains confined to disturbances with longitudinal wave number m=1. For a, b>0, the instability is enhanced for the same a compared to the b=0 case, particularly in high latitudes. For 0>b>-a (so no node is present) the instability is similar to the b=0 case but with diminished growth rates, due to the reduction of toroidal fields at high latitudes. At b=-a, the symmetric mode of instability vanishes, but the antisymmetric mode remains. For b<-a<0, both symmetric and antisymmetric modes are unstable, but with disturbances confined largely to the domain poleward of the node, unless the toroidal field energy greatly exceeds the kinetic energy of differential rotation. Unstable disturbances spread and migrate toward the equator as the field strength is increased and as the node is moved equatorward. Thus, the instability may still contribute to the existence of the solar butterfly diagram, and to other solar dynamo presses.

  3. The Influence of a Rotating Magnetic Field on Solidification from a Traveling Solvent Zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, Donald C.

    1997-01-01

    Application of a high frequency rotating magnetic field (50-400Hz) (RMF) with a strength of the order of 1 mT can be used to influence the fluid flow in an electrically conductive melt. The advantage of the RMF during the traveling solvent zone method for growth of semiconductor materials will be discussed. Preliminary modeling results for cadmium telluride growth from a tellurium solvent zone will be discussed.

  4. Application of a rotating magnetic field to semiconductor crystal growth in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senchenkov, A. S.; Barmin, I. V.

    2003-12-01

    To eliminate the tremendous influence of the residual accelerations on homogeneity of the crystal growing in a space experiment, a rotating magnetic field (RMF) is used. A number of the experiments have been performed in space within the RMF both in the frame of the Russian national program and together with European scientists. In the paper some theoretical and experimental results illustrating the effectiveness of RMF application to crystal growth under microgravity conditions are presented. Tables 2, Figs 5, Refs 8.

  5. Radio Frequency (RF) Trap for Confinement of Antimatter Plasmas Using Rotating Wall Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, William Herbert, III; Pearson, J. Boise

    2004-01-01

    Perturbations associated with a rotating wall electric field enable the confinement of ions for periods approaching weeks. This steady state confinement is a result of a radio frequency manipulation of the ions. Using state-of-the-art techniques it is shown that radio frequency energy can produce useable manipulation of the ion cloud (matter or antimatter) for use in containment experiments. The current research focuses on the improvement of confinement systems capable of containing and transporting antimatter.

  6. Photoluminescence of n-doped double quantum well—electron subbands under influence of in-plane magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlita, M.; Byszewski, M.; Döhler, G. H.; Grill, M.; Hlídek, P.; Malzer, S.; Zvára, M.

    2006-08-01

    We report on photoluminescence (PL) measurements of a GaAs/AlGaAs double quantum well (DQW) in high magnetic fields. Measurements were carried out on a selectively contacted symmetric p- δn-DQW- δn-p structure, which allows a variation of the electron density in DQW by a p-n bias and simultaneously a tilting of DQW, when a p-p bias is applied. Attention was paid to phenomena in in-plane magnetic fields, theoretically studied by Huang and Lyo (HL), [Phys. Rev. B 59, (1999) 7600]. In this paper, we compare our results for both symmetric and asymmetric DQWs with the theoretical model made by HL. Whereas the spectra from a symmetric DQW fully confirmed the theoretical predictions, the results gained from DQW with an electric-field-induced asymmetry did not allow a proper study of anticipated effects. The reasons for that are discussed.

  7. Magnetotransport properties of Co90Fe10/Cu/Ni80Fe20 pseudo-spin-valve with out-of-plane tilted magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Linqiang; Dao, Nam; Kittiwatanakul, Salinporn; Wolf, Stuart; Lu, Jiwei; UVa NanoStar Team

    The giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect of a pseudo spin valve made of Co90Fe10/Cu/Ni80Fe20 has been investigated, with a magnetic field applied perpendicularly tilted to the sample plane. Without using a pinning layer, the magnetic separation of the free and fixed layers is uniquely achieved by utilizing perpendicular fields due to different anisotropy energies between Ni80Fe20 and Co90Fe10. The magneto-transport measurements are carried out by Van der Pauw method in current-in-plane geometry at room temperature. By tilting the magnetic field at different angles from out-of-plane, the GMR plateau's width can be tuned. A plateau width of about 2000 Oe is observed at tilted angle 0.5o, which opens a significantly larger window for high-resistance states comparing with a plateau width of 10 Oe for in-plane fields. With the out-of-plane tilted fields, the orientation of the magnetic moments can be tuned continuously out of the sample plane, and the relative orientation between Ni80Fe20 and Co90Fe10 can also be tuned by the tilted angle, enabling us to precisely control the sample's states for current-induced spin dynamics study that is very difficult in the case of in-plane applied magnetic fields.

  8. Electric in-plane polarization in multiferroic CoFe₂O₄/BaTiO₃ nanocomposite tuned by magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Schmitz-Antoniak, Carolin; Schmitz, Detlef; Borisov, Pavel; de Groot, Frank M F; Stienen, Sven; Warland, Anne; Krumme, Bernhard; Feyerherm, Ralf; Dudzik, Esther; Kleemann, Wolfgang; Wende, Heiko

    2013-01-01

    Ferrimagnetic CoFe2O4 nanopillars embedded in a ferroelectric BaTiO3 matrix are an example for a two-phase magnetoelectrically coupled system. They operate at room temperature and are free of any resource-critical rare-earth element, which makes them interesting for potential applications. Prior studies succeeded in showing strain-mediated coupling between the two subsystems. In particular, the electric properties can be tuned by magnetic fields and the magnetic properties by electric fields. Here we take the analysis of the coupling to a new level utilizing soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy and its associated linear dichroism. We demonstrate that an in-plane magnetic field breaks the tetragonal symmetry of the (1,3)-type CoFe2O4/BaTiO3 structures and discuss it in terms of off-diagonal magnetostrictive-piezoelectric coupling. This coupling creates staggered in-plane components of the electric polarization, which are stable even at magnetic remanence due to hysteretic behaviour of structural changes in the BaTiO3 matrix. The competing mechanisms of clamping and relaxation effects are discussed in detail. PMID:23797562

  9. Giant Faraday rotation induced by the Berry phase in bilayer graphene under strong terahertz fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Xu, Xiaodong; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2014-04-01

    High-order terahertz (THz) sideband generation in semiconductors is a phenomenon with physics similar to that of high-order harmonic generation but in a regime of much lower frequency. Our previous paper [1] found that the electron-hole pair excited by a weak optical laser can accumulate a Berry phase along a cyclic trajectory under the driving of a strong elliptically polarized THz field. Furthermore, the Berry phase appears as the Faraday rotation angle of the emission signal under short-pulse excitation in monolayer MoS_{2}. In this paper, the theory of the Berry phase in THz extreme nonlinear optics is applied to biased bilayer graphene with Bernal stacking, which has similar Bloch band features and optical properties to monolayer MoS_{2}, such as the time-reversal related valleys and the valley contrasting optical selection rule. However, the biased bilayer graphene has much larger Berry curvature than monolayer MoS_{2}, which leads to a large Berry phase of the quantum trajectory and in turn a giant Faraday rotation of the optical emission (˜1 rad for a THz field with frequency 1 THz and strength 8 kV cm-1). This surprisingly big angle shows that the Faraday rotation can be induced more efficiently by the Berry curvature in momentum space than by the magnetic field in real space. It provides opportunities to use bilayer graphene and THz lasers for ultrafast electro-optical devices.

  10. Cross-field electron transport induced by a rotating spoke in a cylindrical Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, C. L.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2012-01-15

    Rotating spoke phenomena have been observed in a variety of Hall thruster and other E x B devices. It has been suggested that the spoke may be associated with the enhancement of the electron cross-field transport. In this paper, the current conducted across the magnetic field via a rotating spoke has been directly measured for the first time in the E x B discharge of a cylindrical Hall thruster. The spoke current was measured using a segmented anode. Synchronized measurements with a high speed camera and a four-segment anode allow observation of the current as a function of time and azimuthal position. Upwards of 50% of the total current is conducted through the spoke, which occupies a quarter of the Hall thruster channel area. To determine the transport mechanism, emissive and Langmuir probes were installed to measure fluctuating plasma potential, electron density, and temperature. A perturbed, azimuthal electric field and density are observed to oscillate in-phase with the rotating spoke. The resulting drift current is found to enhance electron transport with a magnitude equal to the spoke current to within margins of error.

  11. Determining the Ocean's Role on the Variable Gravity Field and Earth Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponte, Rui M.

    2000-01-01

    Our three year investigation, carried out over the period 18-19 Nov 2000, focused on the study of the variability in ocean angular momentum and mass signals and their relation to the Earth's variable rotation and gravity field. This final report includes a summary description of our work and a list of related publications and presentations. One thrust of the investigation was to determine and interpret the changes in the ocean mass field, as they impact on the variable gravity field and Earth rotation. In this regard, the seasonal cycle in local vertically-integrated ocean mass was analyzed using two ocean models of different complexity: (1) the simple constant-density, coarse resolution model of Ponte; and (2) the fully stratified, eddy-resolving model of Semtner and Chervin. The dynamics and thermodynamics of the seasonal variability in ocean mass were examined in detail, as well as the methodologies to calculate those changes under different model formulations. Another thrust of the investigation was to examine signals in ocean angular momentum (OAM) in relation to Earth rotation changes. A number of efforts were undertaken in this regard. Sensitivity of the oceanic excitation to different assumptions about how the ocean is forced and how it dissipates its energy was explored.

  12. Characteristics of Nitrogen and Phosphorus Effluent Load from a Paddy-field District Implementing Crop Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hama, Takehide; Aoki, Takeru; Osuga, Katsuyuki; Nakamura, Kimihito; Sugiyama, Sho; Kawashima, Shigeto

    Implementation of collective crop rotation in a paddy-field district may increase nutrients effluent load. We have investigated a paddy-field district implementing collective crop rotation of wheat and soybeans, measured temporal variations in nutrients concentration of drainage water and the amount of discharged water for consecutive three years, and estimated nutrients effluent load from the district during the irrigation and non-irrigation periods. As a result, the highest concentration of nutrients was observed during the non-irrigation period in every investigation year. It was shown that high nutrients concentration of drainage water during the non-irrigation period was caused by runoff of fertilizer applied to wheat because the peaks of nutrients concentration of drainage water were seen in rainy days after fertilizer application in the crop-rotation field. The effluent load during the non-irrigation periods was 16.9-22.1 kgN ha-1 (nitrogen) and 0.84-1.42 kgP ha-1 (phosphorus), which respectively accounted for 46-66% and 27-54% of annual nutrients effluent load.

  13. Reverse plasma motion driven by moderately screened rotating electric field in an electrodeless plasma thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Naofumi; Nomura, Ryosuke; Nakamura, Takahiro; Nishida, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    A reversely-induced azimuthal current has been found in two-dimensional particle simulations with moderately screened rotating electric field (REF) though an ideally penetrating REF drives a “positive” azimuthal current following rotating E × B drifts. This brings us an alternative acceleration concept, called a negative-moving response (NMR) acceleration, of the helicon plasma under practical conditions using a converging magnetic field because the internal electric potential, formed by the plasma response against the external field, drives the “negative” azimuthal current. Under realistic experimental conditions, e.g., a magnetic field of 0.2 T, AC frequency of <100 MHz, and AC voltage of <1000 V, the resultant thrust can be estimated at an observable level of >0.1 mN with the NMR acceleration. Moreover, the reverse REF is more favorable to the NMR acceleration than the conventional forward one because the reverse field produces a Lissajous acceleration in the converging magnetic field.

  14. Ru/FeCoB double layered film with high in-plane magnetic anisotropy field of 500 Oe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Ken-ichiro; Hashimoto, Atsuto; Matsuu, Toshimitsu; Nakagawa, Shigeki

    2009-04-01

    FeCoB layers prepared on Ru underlayer possess a high saturation magnetization Ms and a high in-plane magnetic anisotropy filed Hk. Effects of preparation conditions were investigated. Low Ar gas pressure condition and thicker film thickness were effective to attain distortion of FeCo crystallite. As the crystallinity of Ru underlayer became higher, higher Hk was induced. The accumulation of anisotropic stress in the film caused by the oblique incidences of depositing atoms with high energy seems to be one of the important effects to attain high anisotropy field. It was succeeded to prepare the Ru/FeCoB film with high Hk of 500 Oe.

  15. Nonsingular electrodynamics of a rotating black hole moving in an asymptotically uniform magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozova, Viktoriya; Ahmedov, Bobomurat; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2016-07-01

    We extend the Wald solution for magnetic field to a black hole that is also moving at constant velocity. In particular, we derive analytic solutions for the Maxwell equations for a rotating black hole moving at constant speed in an asymptotically uniform magnetic test field. By adopting Kerr-Schild coordinates we avoid singular behaviors at the horizon and obtain a complete description of the charge and current distributions in terms of the black-hole spin and velocity. Using this solution, we compute the energy losses expected when charged particles are accelerated along the magnetic field lines, improving previous estimates that had to cope with singular electromagnetic fields on the horizon. When used to approximate the emission from binary black holes in a uniform magnetic field, our estimates match reasonably well those from numericalrelativity calculations in the force-free approximation.

  16. Achievement of the switch-off condition through Rotational Discontinuity structures in PIC simulations of collisionless magnetic reconnection with guide field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innocenti, Maria Elena; Lapenta, Giovanni; Goldman, Martin; Newman, David; Markidis, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    In Petschek's model for magnetic reconnection, switch-off (SO) condition is achieved through back-to-back slow mode shocks (SS). No rotational discontinuity (RD) is needed, unless in specific cases detailed in [Vasyliunas 1975]. Decades of simulations with different models (MHD, Hall MHD, hybrid, PIC) have yielded contradictory results regarding the achievement of the SO condition during magnetic reconnection events. It has been recently argued that the formation of Petschek's SO-SS is inhibited by the development of the firehose instability, which provokes the flapping of the magnetic field in the reconnection exhausts (Liu et al., 2012). We report here on the formation of localized switch-off areas in simulations of collisionless magnetic reconnection in extremely large domains (hundreds of ion skin depths) for extremely long times (hundreds of inverse ion cyclotron frequency). A guide field (a magnetic field in the direction perpendicular to the reconnection plane) prevents the development of the firehose instability. The switch-off areas are marked by magnetic field line bending (in a way closely resembling the textbook description of RDs), by the formation of a nozzle-like structure in the in-plane projection of the ion and electron velocities perpendicular to the magnetic field direction and by a reduced rate of plasmoid formation. We use Rankine-Hugoniot conditions to characterize the transitions as Rotational Discontinuities and we comment on their origin. Priest, E. and Forbes, T. (2007). Magnetic reconnection. Magnetic Reconnection, by Eric Priest, Terry Forbes, Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2007, 1. Vasyliunas V. (1975). Theoretical models of magnetic field line merging. Review of Geophysics and Space Phsyics, 1975. Liu, Y.-H., Drake, J. F., and Swisdak, M. (2012). The structure of the magnetic reconnection exhaust boundary. Physics of Plasmas (1994-present), 19(2):-.

  17. Weakened magnetic braking as the origin of anomalously rapid rotation in old field stars.

    PubMed

    van Saders, Jennifer L; Ceillier, Tugdual; Metcalfe, Travis S; Aguirre, Victor Silva; Pinsonneault, Marc H; García, Rafael A; Mathur, Savita; Davies, Guy R

    2016-01-14

    A knowledge of stellar ages is crucial for our understanding of many astrophysical phenomena, and yet ages can be difficult to determine. As they become older, stars lose mass and angular momentum, resulting in an observed slowdown in surface rotation. The technique of 'gyrochronology' uses the rotation period of a star to calculate its age. However, stars of known age must be used for calibration, and, until recently, the approach was untested for old stars (older than 1 gigayear, Gyr). Rotation periods are now known for stars in an open cluster of intermediate age (NGC 6819; 2.5 Gyr old), and for old field stars whose ages have been determined with asteroseismology. The data for the cluster agree with previous period-age relations, but these relations fail to describe the asteroseismic sample. Here we report stellar evolutionary modelling, and confirm the presence of unexpectedly rapid rotation in stars that are more evolved than the Sun. We demonstrate that models that incorporate dramatically weakened magnetic braking for old stars can--unlike existing models--reproduce both the asteroseismic and the cluster data. Our findings might suggest a fundamental change in the nature of ageing stellar dynamos, with the Sun being close to the critical transition to much weaker magnetized winds. This weakened braking limits the diagnostic power of gyrochronology for those stars that are more than halfway through their main-sequence lifetimes. PMID:26727162

  18. Weakened magnetic braking as the origin of anomalously rapid rotation in old field stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Saders, Jennifer L.; Ceillier, Tugdual; Metcalfe, Travis S.; Silva Aguirre, Victor; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; García, Rafael A.; Mathur, Savita; Davies, Guy R.

    2016-01-01

    A knowledge of stellar ages is crucial for our understanding of many astrophysical phenomena, and yet ages can be difficult to determine. As they become older, stars lose mass and angular momentum, resulting in an observed slowdown in surface rotation. The technique of ‘gyrochronology’ uses the rotation period of a star to calculate its age. However, stars of known age must be used for calibration, and, until recently, the approach was untested for old stars (older than 1 gigayear, Gyr). Rotation periods are now known for stars in an open cluster of intermediate age (NGC 6819; 2.5 Gyr old), and for old field stars whose ages have been determined with asteroseismology. The data for the cluster agree with previous period-age relations, but these relations fail to describe the asteroseismic sample. Here we report stellar evolutionary modelling, and confirm the presence of unexpectedly rapid rotation in stars that are more evolved than the Sun. We demonstrate that models that incorporate dramatically weakened magnetic braking for old stars can—unlike existing models—reproduce both the asteroseismic and the cluster data. Our findings might suggest a fundamental change in the nature of ageing stellar dynamos, with the Sun being close to the critical transition to much weaker magnetized winds. This weakened braking limits the diagnostic power of gyrochronology for those stars that are more than halfway through their main-sequence lifetimes.

  19. A torsional oscillation in the rotation of the solar magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snodgrass, Herschel B.

    1991-12-01

    The pattern rotation rate for the sun's magnetic field, determined by cross-correlating Mount Wilson full disk 5250.2 (Fe I) magnetograms spaced a full solar rotation apart, closely parallels at all latitudes the photospheric plasma rotation profile determined from the Doppler shifts of the same spectral line. When an 11-yr running mean is subtracted, a torsional oscillation is revealed, in the form of an equatorward-migrating pattern of fast and slow zones. Although the magnetic rotation torsional pattern is similar enough to its much-studied Doppler counterpart to provide confirmation, there are significant differences between the two - the magnetic pattern is strongest (about 20 m/s) at high latitudes, weakens at sunspot latitudes where the Doppler pattern is strongest, and is offset at all latitudes by about 10 deg toward the equator, so that its slow zones approximately coincide with the maximal shear zones of the Doppler pattern. These zones appear to be fore-runners to the wings of the magnetic flux (sunspot) butterflies of the activity cycle.

  20. Reconstruction of polar magnetic field from single axis tomography of Faraday rotation in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Flacco, A.; Rax, J.-M.; Malka, V.

    2012-10-15

    An integral back-transform has been developed to retrieve the polar magnetic component in a cylindrically symmetric plasma from a single projection. The formula is derived from parallel forward Radon transform (Abel transform) of a source-free vector field. Two numerical schemes are proposed to solve the backward transform. These schemes have been tested successfully with predefined plasma parameters. The practical application to the analysis of experimental Faraday rotation measurements is also presented, leading to the reconstruction of the transverse profile of the magnetic field.

  1. Determining the Ocean's Role on the Variable Gravity Field on Earth Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponte, Rui M.

    1999-01-01

    A number of ocean models of different complexity have been used to study changes in the oceanic mass field and angular momentum and their relation to the variable Earth rotation and gravity field. Time scales examined range from seasonal to a few days. Results point to the importance of oceanic signals in driving polar motion, in particular the Chandler and annual wobbles. Results also show that oceanic signals have a measurable impact on length-of-day variations. Various circulation features and associated mass signals, including the North Pacific subtropical gyre, the equatorial currents, and the Antarctic Circumpolar Current play a significant role in oceanic angular momentum variability.

  2. Paramagnetic colloids in rotating fields: from chains through chaos to clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdi, Hamed; Soheilian, Rasam; Erb, Randall; Maloney, Craig

    We present computer simulations and experiments on dilute suspensions of superparamagnetic particles subject to rotating magnetic fields. We focus on short chains of particles and their decay routes to stable structures. At low rate, the chains track the external field. At intermediate rate, the short chains break up but perform a periodic (albeit complex) motion. At sufficiently high rates, the chains generally undergo chaotic motion at short times and decay to either close-packed clusters or more dispersed colloidal ``molecules'' at long times. We show that the transition out of the chaotic states follows a first order reaction kinetics. NSF.

  3. In-plane carbon nanotube field emitters for high temperature integrated electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monica, Andrew Hayes

    Lateral carbon nanotube (CNT)-based field emission devices have been developed for the purpose of fabricating diodes, triodes, and ultimately integrated circuits. The goal of this research is to create CNT-based field emission devices that offer high performance operation in harsh environments, particularly high temperature. Silicon based technologies suffer from an inherent inability to operate at temperatures above ˜300°C; however, a need still exists for such electronics. The devices developed by this research seek to address the need for robust microelectronics capable of wide temperature range operation without the need for elaborate cooling systems. The field emitter structures consist of carbon nanotubes that are created using one of two distinct techniques: dielectrophoretic assembly or thermal chemical vapor deposition synthesis. I will discuss how such techniques can be used to create lateral CNT structures suitable for planar field emission while also enabling complete compatibility with modern semiconductor processing techniques. The electrical and thermal performance results of planar CNT field emitters operating in diode and triode configurations are also reported. Carbon nanotube based field emission devices, such as those I have developed, have characteristics that could result in benefits to an exceedingly wide range of applications beyond operation in harsh environments. High-frequency analog applications are particularly of interest because of the very low capacitances and the high current/unit area capability of typical CNT field emitters, which is in the Amps/cm2 range. Also, since field emitted current is a very strong function of the applied electric field, these devices will undoubtedly find potential use in applications requiring large gain.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: JCMT Plane Survey: l=30° field (Moore+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, T. J. T.; Plume, R.; Thompson, M. A.; Parsons, H.; Urquhart, J. S.; Eden, D. J.; Dempsey, J. T.; Morgan, L. K.; Thomas, H. S.; Buckle, J.; Brunt, C. M.; Butner, H.; Carretero, D.; Chrysostomou, A.; Devilliers, H. M.; Fich, M.; Hoare, M. G.; Manser, G.; Mottram, J. C.; Natario, C.; Olguin, F.; Peretto, N.; Polychroni, D.; Redman, R. O.; Rigby, A. J.; Salji, C.; Summers, L. J.; Berry, D.; Currie, M. J.; Jenness, T.; Pestalozzi, M.; Traficante, A.; Bastien, P.; Difrancesco, J.; Davis, C. J.; Evans, A.; Friberg, P.; Fuller, G. A.; Gibb, A. G.; Gibson, S.; Hill, T.; Johnstone, D.; Joncas, G.; Longmore, S. N.; Lumsden, S. L.; Martin, P. G.; Nguyen Luong, Q.; Pineda, J. E.; Purcell, C.; Richer, J. S.; Schieven, G. H.; Shipman, R.; Spaans, M.; Taylor, A. R.; Viti, S.; Weferling, B.; White, G. J.; Zhu, M.

    2016-06-01

    JPS uses the wide-field submm-band bolometer camera SCUBA-2 (the Submm Common-User Bolometer Array 2) in the 850um band at a spatial resolution of 14.5-arcsec. The 850um survey data presented in this paper cover the l=30° field of the JPS and were observed between 2012 June and 2013 October. The 11 tiles making up the field were observed on average three times each. A strategy of minimum elevation limits for given atmospheric opacity bands within the allocated range was adopted, in order to minimize variations in the resulting noise in each repeated tile. (1 data file).

  5. Parallelization of exoplanets detection algorithms based on field rotation; example of the MOODS algorithm for SPHERE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattei, D.; Smith, I.; Ferrari, A.; Carbillet, M.

    2010-10-01

    Post-processing for exoplanet detection using direct imaging requires large data cubes and/or sophisticated signal processing technics. For alt-azimuthal mounts, a projection effect called field rotation makes the potential planet rotate in a known manner on the set of images. For ground based telescopes that use extreme adaptive optics and advanced coronagraphy, technics based on field rotation are already broadly used and still under progress. In most such technics, for a given initial position of the planet the planet intensity estimate is a linear function of the set of images. However, due to field rotation the modified instrumental response applied is not shift invariant like usual linear filters. Testing all possible initial positions is therefore very time-consuming. To reduce the time process, we propose to deal with each subset of initial positions computed on a different machine using parallelization programming. In particular, the MOODS algorithm dedicated to the VLT-SPHERE instrument, that estimates jointly the light contributions of the star and the potential exoplanet, is parallelized on the Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur cluster. Different parallelization methods (OpenMP, MPI, Jobs Array) have been elaborated for the initial MOODS code and compared to each other. The one finally chosen splits the initial positions on the processors available by accounting at best for the different constraints of the cluster structure: memory, job submission queues, number of available CPUs, cluster average load. At the end, a standard set of images is satisfactorily processed in a few hours instead of a few days.

  6. Numerical simulation of the induced magnetic field within a rotating concentric annulus with self gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabello, Ares; Avila, Ruben

    2014-11-01

    In order to study the GEODYNAMO is necessary to know the behavior of the natural convection of the electrical conducting fluid confined in a rotating spherical shell. In this work, the convective patterns within this geometry are presented. Natural convection is induced by a temperature difference between the inner sphere and outer sphere and a gravitational field which varies like 1 /r3 . The patterns presented are known as Busse cells and are moving around the rotational axis. The magnetic fields induced by previously mentioned convective patterns are presented. These magnetic fields are obtained by solving the equations of MHD. The free-divergence magnetic field is obtained by using a Lagrange multiplier scheme. All the equations are solved based on a spectral element method (SEM). To avoid the singularity at the poles, the cubed-sphere algorithm is used to generate the mesh. The obtained magnetic fields are similar to the results reported by other research groups. Thanks to DGAPA-PAPIIT Project: IN117314-3.

  7. Magnetic fields produced by rotating symmetrical bodies with homogeneous surface charge density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espejel-Morales, R.; Murguía-Romero, G.; Calles, A.; Cabrera-Bravo, E.; Morán-López, J. L.

    2016-07-01

    We present a numerical calculation for the stationary magnetic field produced by different rotating bodies with homogeneous and constant surface charge density. The calculation is done by superposing the magnetic field produced by a set of loops of current which mimic the magnetic field produced by belts of current defined by slices of fixed width. We consider the cases of a sphere, ellipsoids, open and closed cylinders and a combination of these in a dumbbell-like shell. We also plot their magnetic field lines using a technique that make use of the Runge–Kutta fourth-order method. Up to our knowledge, the case of closed cylinders was not calculated before. In contrast to previous results, we find that the magnetic field inside finite hollow bodies is homogeneous only in the case of a sphere. This is consequence of the fact that, for the sphere, the surface of any slice taken perpendicularly to the rotation axis, depends only on its thickness, like in the case of an infinite cylinder.

  8. A search for white dwarfs in the Galactic plane: the field and the open cluster population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raddi, R.; Catalán, S.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Hermes, J. J.; Napiwotzki, R.; Koester, D.; Tremblay, P.-E.; Barentsen, G.; Farnhill, H. J.; Mohr-Smith, M.; Drew, J. E.; Groot, P. J.; Guzman-Ramirez, L.; Parker, Q. A.; Steeghs, D.; Zijlstra, A.

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the prospects for systematic searches of white dwarfs at low Galactic latitudes, using the VLT Survey Telescope H α Photometric Survey of the Galactic plane and Bulge (VPHAS+). We targeted 17 white dwarf candidates along sightlines of known open clusters, aiming to identify potential cluster members. We confirmed all the 17 white dwarf candidates from blue/optical spectroscopy, and we suggest five of them to be likely cluster members. We estimated progenitor ages and masses for the candidate cluster members, and compare our findings to those for other cluster white dwarfs. A white dwarf in NGC 3532 is the most massive known cluster member (1.13 M⊙), likely with an oxygen-neon core, for which we estimate an 8.8_{-4.3}^{+1.2} M⊙ progenitor, close to the mass-divide between white dwarf and neutron star progenitors. A cluster member in Ruprecht 131 is a magnetic white dwarf, whose progenitor mass exceeded 2-3 M⊙. We stress that wider searches, and improved cluster distances and ages derived from data of the ESA Gaia mission, will advance the understanding of the mass-loss processes for low- to intermediate-mass stars.

  9. Rotating Casimir systems: Magnetic-field-enhanced perpetual motion, possible realization in doped nanotubes, and laws of thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernodub, M. N.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated that for a certain class of Casimir-type systems (“devices”) the energy of zero-point vacuum fluctuations reaches its global minimum when the device rotates about a certain axis rather than remains static. This rotational vacuum effect may lead to the emergence of permanently rotating objects provided the negative rotational energy of zero-point fluctuations cancels the positive rotational energy of the device itself. In this paper, we show that for massless electrically charged particles the rotational vacuum effect should be drastically (astronomically) enhanced in the presence of a magnetic field. As an illustration, we show that in a background of experimentally available magnetic fields the zero-point energy of massless excitations in rotating torus-shaped doped carbon nanotubes may indeed overwhelm the classical energy of rotation for certain angular frequencies so that the permanently rotating state is energetically favored. The suggested “zero-point-driven” devices—which have no internally moving parts—correspond to a perpetuum mobile of a new, fourth kind: They do not produce any work despite the fact that their equilibrium (ground) state corresponds to a permanent rotation even in the presence of an external environment. We show that our proposal is consistent with the laws of thermodynamics.

  10. Evolution of a magnetic field in a differentially rotating radiative zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaurat, M.; Jouve, L.; Lignières, F.; Gastine, T.

    2015-08-01

    Context. Recent spectropolarimetric surveys of main-sequence intermediate-mass stars have exhibited a dichotomy in the distribution of the observed magnetic field between the kG dipoles of Ap/Bp stars and the sub-Gauss magnetism of Vega and Sirius. Aims: We would like to test whether this dichotomy is linked to the stability versus instability of large-scale magnetic configurations in differentially rotating radiative zones. Methods: We computed the axisymmetric magnetic field obtained from the evolution of a dipolar field threading a differentially rotating shell. A full parameter study including various density profiles and initial and boundary conditions was performed with a 2D numerical code. We then focused on the ratio between the toroidal and poloidal components of the magnetic field and discuss the stability of the configurations dominated by the toroidal component using local stability criteria and insights from recent 3D numerical simulations. Results: The numerical results and a simple model show that the ratio between the toroidal and the poloidal magnetic fields is highest after an Alfvén crossing time of the initial poloidal field. For high density contrasts, this ratio converges towards an asymptotic value that can thus be extrapolated to realistic stellar cases. We then consider the stability of the magnetic configurations to non-axisymmetric perturbations and find that configurations dominated by the toroidal component are likely to be unstable if the shear strength is significantly higher than the poloidal Alfvén frequency. An expression for the critical poloidal field below which magnetic fields are likely to be unstable is found and is compared to the lower bound of Ap/Bp magnetic fields.

  11. Improvement of in-plane anisotropy field in FeCoB/NiFe/Si thin films by Kr sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, A.; Ito, S.; Nakagawa, S.

    2007-03-01

    Deterioration of magnetic anisotropy field in the FeCoB/NiFe/Si trilayers deposited on glass substrates was investigated. It was found that the choice of Kr as sputtering gas instead of Ar was quite effective to improve the soft magnetic characteristics of FeCoB/NiFe/Si thin films deposited on glass substrates. Kr sputtering is effective to reduce compressive residual stress in the film. The rotatable magnetic anisotropy observed in the FeCoB/NiFe/Si films deposited by Ar sputtering disappeared in the film deposited by Kr sputtering, even though they are prepared on glass disk substrates.

  12. Position, rotation, and intensity invariant recognizing method

    DOEpatents

    Ochoa, E.; Schils, G.F.; Sweeney, D.W.

    1987-09-15

    A method for recognizing the presence of a particular target in a field of view which is target position, rotation, and intensity invariant includes the preparing of a target-specific invariant filter from a combination of all eigen-modes of a pattern of the particular target. Coherent radiation from the field of view is then imaged into an optical correlator in which the invariant filter is located. The invariant filter is rotated in the frequency plane of the optical correlator in order to produce a constant-amplitude rotational response in a correlation output plane when the particular target is present in the field of view. Any constant response is thus detected in the output plane to determine whether a particular target is present in the field of view. Preferably, a temporal pattern is imaged in the output plane with a optical detector having a plurality of pixels and a correlation coefficient for each pixel is determined by accumulating the intensity and intensity-square of each pixel. The orbiting of the constant response caused by the filter rotation is also preferably eliminated either by the use of two orthogonal mirrors pivoted correspondingly to the rotation of the filter or the attaching of a refracting wedge to the filter to remove the offset angle. Detection is preferably performed of the temporal pattern in the output plane at a plurality of different angles with angular separation sufficient to decorrelate successive frames. 1 fig.

  13. Stress field variations along the Maghreb region derived from inversion of fault plane solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ousadou, Farida; Dorbath, Louis; Ayadi, abdelhakim; Dorbath, Catherine; Gharbi, Sofiane

    2014-05-01

    The analysis of the stress state along the Maghreb region is made on the basis of the inversion of focal solutions. We have inverted the main shock and aftershock focal mechanisms of the strongest seismic events that occurred in five seismogenic zones from west to east : Al Hoceima (2004), Cheliff (1980), Tipasa-Chenoua (1989), Zemmouri (2003) and Constantine (1985). Most of the focal mechanisms of the aftershock sequences have been constructed within this study. Compressive stress regime is observed in the central part of Algeria between Cheliff and Zemmouri. On both edges of the Maghreb region, the stress regime becomes strike-slip in Constantine region and in the Moroccan Rif. These different regimes seem to be linked to the free-edge effect (Ionian slab subduction) and to the dynamics of the Alboran Sea in the eastern and western part of the study area respectively. The sigma1 directions experience an anticlockwise rotation of about 20° from eastern to central Algeria. We observe that the difference between the direction of sigma1 and the direction of convergence decreases towards the west. In central Algeria, where the collision is not perturbated by edge effects, both directions are the closest.

  14. Probing Out-of-Plane Charge Transport in Black Phosphorus with Graphene-Contacted Vertical Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Junmo; Jariwala, Deep; Ryder, Christopher R.; Wells, Spencer A.; Choi, Yongsuk; Hwang, Euyheon; Cho, Jeong Ho; Marks, Tobin J.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2016-04-01

    Black phosphorus (BP) has recently emerged as a promising narrow band gap layered semiconductor with optoelectronic properties that bridge the gap between semi-metallic graphene and wide band gap transition metal dichalcogenides such as MoS2. To date, BP field-effect transistors have utilized a lateral geometry with in-plane transport dominating device characteristics. In contrast, we present here a vertical field-effect transistor geometry based on a graphene/BP van der Waals heterostructure. The resulting device characteristics include high on-state current densities (> 1600 A/cm2) and current on/off ratios exceeding 800 at low temperature. Two distinct charge transport mechanisms are identified, which are dominant for different regimes of temperature and gate voltage. In particular, the Schottky barrier between graphene and BP determines charge transport at high temperatures and positive gate voltages, whereas tunneling dominates at low temperatures and negative gate voltages. These results elucidate out-of-plane electronic transport in BP, and thus have implications for the design and operation of BP-based van der Waals heterostructures.

  15. Full multi grid method for electric field computation in point-to-plane streamer discharge in air at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacem, S.; Eichwald, O.; Ducasse, O.; Renon, N.; Yousfi, M.; Charrada, K.

    2012-01-01

    Streamers dynamics are characterized by the fast propagation of ionized shock waves at the nanosecond scale under very sharp space charge variations. The streamer dynamics modelling needs the solution of charged particle transport equations coupled to the elliptic Poisson's equation. The latter has to be solved at each time step of the streamers evolution in order to follow the propagation of the resulting space charge electric field. In the present paper, a full multi grid (FMG) and a multi grid (MG) methods have been adapted to solve Poisson's equation for streamer discharge simulations between asymmetric electrodes. The validity of the FMG method for the computation of the potential field is first shown by performing direct comparisons with analytic solution of the Laplacian potential in the case of a point-to-plane geometry. The efficiency of the method is also compared with the classical successive over relaxation method (SOR) and MUltifrontal massively parallel solver (MUMPS). MG method is then applied in the case of the simulation of positive streamer propagation and its efficiency is evaluated from comparisons to SOR and MUMPS methods in the chosen point-to-plane configuration. Very good agreements are obtained between the three methods for all electro-hydrodynamics characteristics of the streamer during its propagation in the inter-electrode gap. However in the case of MG method, the computational time to solve the Poisson's equation is at least 2 times faster in our simulation conditions.

  16. Probing Out-of-Plane Charge Transport in Black Phosphorus with Graphene-Contacted Vertical Field-Effect Transistors.

    PubMed

    Kang, Junmo; Jariwala, Deep; Ryder, Christopher R; Wells, Spencer A; Choi, Yongsuk; Hwang, Euyheon; Cho, Jeong Ho; Marks, Tobin J; Hersam, Mark C

    2016-04-13

    Black phosphorus (BP) has recently emerged as a promising narrow band gap layered semiconductor with optoelectronic properties that bridge the gap between semimetallic graphene and wide band gap transition metal dichalcogenides such as MoS2. To date, BP field-effect transistors have utilized a lateral geometry with in-plane transport dominating device characteristics. In contrast, we present here a vertical field-effect transistor geometry based on a graphene/BP van der Waals heterostructure. The resulting device characteristics include high on-state current densities (>1600 A/cm(2)) and current on/off ratios exceeding 800 at low temperature. Two distinct charge transport mechanisms are identified, which are dominant for different regimes of temperature and gate voltage. In particular, the Schottky barrier between graphene and BP determines charge transport at high temperatures and positive gate voltages, whereas tunneling dominates at low temperatures and negative gate voltages. These results elucidate out-of-plane electronic transport in BP and thus have implications for the design and operation of BP-based van der Waals heterostructures. PMID:26950174

  17. Electro-phoretic rotation and orientation of polarizable spheroidal particles in AC fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloh, Touvia; Goldstein, Ben Weis

    2015-02-01

    A theoretical study is provided for determining the angular rotation rate of an ideally polarized (metallic) spheroidal particle freely suspended in a symmetric electrolyte under general alternating current ambient electric excitations. In particular, we discuss cases of electro-rotation (ROT) and electro-orientation (EOR) of such nano/micro particles incited by two orthogonal electric field components which may be out of phase. The analysis is carried under the Poisson-Nernst-Planck approximation and the "weak" field model. The analytic expressions thus obtained are valid for a conducting prolate spheroid with arbitrary eccentricity including the limiting cases of isotropic spheres and infinitely long cylindrical rods. The total dipolophoretic (DIP) angular velocity is decomposed from contributions due to dielectrophoresis (DEP) induced by the dipole-moment within the particle and by the induced-charge electrophoresis (ICEP) mechanism near the conducting surface. It is demonstrated that the explicit expressions for the DIP angular velocities reduce to the well-known ROT solution for the sphere as well as to the recently found expressions (based on slender-body approximation) for both ROT and EOR of metal nanowires [Arcenegui et al., "Electro-orientation and electrorotation of metal nanowires," Phys. Rev. E 88(6), 063018 (2013)]. Some comparisons with available experimental data are also provided for slender spheroidal geometries including a detailed discussion of DEP and ICEP effects and their relative contributions to the overall DIP rotational velocity.

  18. Accelerated immunoassays based on magnetic particle dynamics in a rotating capillary tube with stationary magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun-Tae; Sudheendra, L.; Kennedy, Ian M.

    2012-01-01

    A rapid and simple magnetic particle-based immunoassay has been demonstrated in a capillary mixing system. Antibody-coated micrometer size super-paramagnetic polystyrene (SPP) particles were used in an assay for rabbit IgG in a sandwich (non-competitive) format. The kinetics of the assay was compared between a plate – based system and a single capillary tube. The interaction between the antigen (R-IgG) and the antibody (anti-R-IgG) that was carried by the SPP particles in a rotating capillary was tested under a stationary magnetic field. Competing magnetic and viscous drag forces helped to enhance the interaction between the analyte and the capture antibodies on the particles. The dimensionless Mason number (Mn) was employed to characterize the magnetic particle dynamics – a previously determined critical Mason number (Mnc) was employed as a guide to the appropriate experimental conditions of magnetic field strength and rotational speed of the capillary. The advantage of the rotating capillary system included a short assay time and a reduced reactive volume (20μl). The results show that the immunoassay kinetics were improved by the formation of chains of the SPP particles for the conditions that corresponded to the critical Mason number. PMID:22931580

  19. Magnetic field effect on waves in a centrifuged layer of a rotating conducting viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klueva, N. V.; Sandalov, V. M.; Tkach, M. E.; Soldatov, I. N.

    2015-05-01

    This paper considers wave processes in a centrifuged layer of an incompressible viscous conducting fluid in an axial magnetic field in the cavity of a rapidly rotating infinite cylinder with insulating walls. Inertial modes (solutions of the linearized boundary-value problem of magnetohydrodynamics) are represented as a superposition of helical fields. Expressions for the vorticity parameters of the helical flows forming the inertial mode at a small Stewart number are given. Dispersion curves of inertial waves are constructed, and the influence of the magnetic field on the flow field is analyzed. The critical frequencies at which the lowest (surface) mode arises are determined. The spatial and temporal stability of the modes are investigated.

  20. Fourfold symmetry in the ab-plane of the upper critical field for the high-T{sub c} cuprates

    SciTech Connect

    Noji, T.; Koike, Y.; Nishizaki, T.; Kobayashi, N.

    1996-11-01

    The authors have found clear anisotropy in the ab plane with fourfold symmetry of the resistive superconducting transition under magnetic fields for single-crystal Pb{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Y{sub 0.62}Ca{sub 0.38}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 8}, which is regarded as anisotropy of the upper critical field Hc{sub 2}. This is not only qualitatively but also quantitatively similar to that formerly observed in La{sub 1.86}Sr{sub 0.14}CuO{sub 4}. The observed fourfold symmetry is explained as being mainly due to the anisotropy of the superconducting energy gap owing to d{sub x{sup 2}{minus}y{sup 2}} pairing. H{sub c2}, one of the bulk properties, supports d{sub x{sup 2}{minus}y{sup 2}} pairing in the high-T{sub c} superconductivity.

  1. Effects of three-dimensional polymer networks in vertical alignment liquid crystal display controlled by in-plane field.

    PubMed

    Lim, Young Jin; Choi, Young Eun; Lee, Jun Hee; Lee, Gi-Dong; Komitov, Lachezar; Lee, Seung Hee

    2014-05-01

    Polymer network in vertical alignment liquid crystal cell driven by in-plane field (VA-IPS) is formed in three dimensions to achieve fast response time and to keep the liquid crystal alignment even when an external pressure is applied to the cell. The network formed by UV irradiation to vertically aligned liquid crystal cell with reactive mesogen does not disturb a dark state while exhibiting very fast decaying response time less than 2ms in all grey scales and almost zero pooling mura. The proposed device has a strong potential to be applicable to field sequential display owing to super-fast response time and flexible display owing to polymer network in bulk which supports a gap between two substrates. PMID:24921764

  2. Coherent quantum states of a relativistic particle in an electromagnetic plane wave and a parallel magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Colavita, E.; Hacyan, S.

    2014-03-15

    We analyze the solutions of the Klein–Gordon and Dirac equations describing a charged particle in an electromagnetic plane wave combined with a magnetic field parallel to the direction of propagation of the wave. It is shown that the Klein–Gordon equation admits coherent states as solutions, while the corresponding solutions of the Dirac equation are superpositions of coherent and displaced-number states. Particular attention is paid to the resonant case in which the motion of the particle is unbounded. -- Highlights: •We study a relativistic electron in a particular electromagnetic field configuration. •New exact solutions of the Klein–Gordon and Dirac equations are obtained. •Coherent and displaced number states can describe a relativistic particle.

  3. Reply to "Comment on `Creating in-plane pseudomagnetic fields in excess of 1000 T by misoriented stacking in a graphene bilayer' "

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wen-Yu; Su, Ying; Yang, Mudan; He, Lin

    2016-06-01

    In the Comment, the authors argue that due to the different symmetry properties, the comparison between the twisting and in-plane magnetic field in bilayer graphene fails. However, we do not think it addresses the main result of our work. Here from the perspective of tunable chirality and quantum transmission signature, we review the feature shared by twisting and in-plane magnetic field in bilayer graphene and show that the Comment does not contradict our main results.

  4. The Rotational Spectrum and Anharmonic Force Field of Chlorine Dioxide, OClO

    PubMed

    Müller; Sørensen; Birk; Friedl

    1997-11-01

    The rotational spectra of O35ClO and O37ClO in their (000), (100), (010), (001), and (020) states have been reinvestigated in selected regions between 130 and 526 GHz. About 800 newly measured lines spanning the quantum numbers 2 rotational and quartic centrifugal distortion constants, their vibrational changes, and the sextic centrifugal distortion constants were used together with data from infrared studies in a calculation of the quartic force field. Copyright 1997 Academic Press. Copyright 1997Academic Press PMID:9417962

  5. Rotation of a magnetorheological suspension in a constant magnetic field. II. Unbounded and semibounded cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Shul'man, Z.P.; Zal'tsgendler, E.A.; Husid, B.M.

    1988-07-01

    The intensity of flow of a magnetorheological suspension in a magnetic field depends on the radial and axial viscosity as well as the magnetic stress. These values are determined by the microstructure of the suspension, characterized by two quantities: the form parameter and the orientation angle. This paper derives expressions for determining these values, and uses them to construct equations for the viscosity and stress parameters. Using these parameters, the rotation hydrodynamics of magnetorheological suspensions are then considered for two cases: the first, where the free-surface effect is absent, and the suspension fills the clearance between infinite concentric cylindrical surfaces, and the second, where the free-surface effect is taken into account and the suspension is contained in a rotating cylindrical vessel. Expressions for angular flow velocity, intensity, and discharge are derived.

  6. Continuum resonance induced electromagnetic torque by a rotating plasma response to static resonant magnetic perturbation field

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yueqiang; Connor, J. W.; Cowley, S. C.; Ham, C. J.; Hastie, R. J.; Hender, T. C.

    2012-10-15

    A numerical study is carried out, based on a simple toroidal tokamak equilibrium, to demonstrate the radial re-distribution of the electromagnetic torque density, as a result of a rotating resistive plasma (linear) response to a static resonant magnetic perturbation field. The computed electromagnetic torque peaks at several radial locations even in the presence of a single rational surface, due to resonances between the rotating response, in the plasma frame, and both Alfven and sound continuum waves. These peaks tend to merge together to form a rather global torque distribution, when the plasma resistivity is large. The continuum resonance induced net electromagnetic torque remains finite even in the limit of an ideal plasma.

  7. Use of disease-suppressive Brassica rotation crops in potato production: overview of 10 years of field trials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disease-suppressive Brassica rotation crops have shown promise for management of soilborne diseases and enhanced yield in a variety of crop production systems. Over the last 10 years, numerous field trials have focused on how to best use Brassica crops in potato rotations in the Northeast, including...

  8. Suppression of vortex pinning by field component parallel to the superconducting plane in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakaharai, S.; Ishiguro, T.; Watauchi, S.; Shimoyama, J.; Kishio, K.

    2000-02-01

    The response of magnetic fluxoids nearly parallel to the superconducting plane of the layered superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 has been investigated through the ac susceptibility measurement. The fluxoids respond diamagnetically due to pinning when they pierce the superconducting plane to form pancake vortices, but they are released due to melting and become mobile in the high field. The liberation is enhanced by approaching the parallel field direction by the effect of decoupling between planes and finally the vortex pinning is suppressed. The pinning of fluxoids with pancakes and releasing in relation to their lock-in state are presented.

  9. Statistical techniques for detecting the intergalactic magnetic field from large samples of extragalactic Faraday rotation data

    SciTech Connect

    Akahori, Takuya; Gaensler, B. M.; Ryu, Dongsu E-mail: bryan.gaensler@sydney.edu.au

    2014-08-01

    Rotation measure (RM) grids of extragalactic radio sources have been widely used for studying cosmic magnetism. However, their potential for exploring the intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF) in filaments of galaxies is unclear, since other Faraday-rotation media such as the radio source itself, intervening galaxies, and the interstellar medium of our Galaxy are all significant contributors. We study statistical techniques for discriminating the Faraday rotation of filaments from other sources of Faraday rotation in future large-scale surveys of radio polarization. We consider a 30° × 30° field of view toward the south Galactic pole, while varying the number of sources detected in both present and future observations. We select sources located at high redshifts and toward which depolarization and optical absorption systems are not observed so as to reduce the RM contributions from the sources and intervening galaxies. It is found that a high-pass filter can satisfactorily reduce the RM contribution from the Galaxy since the angular scale of this component toward high Galactic latitudes would be much larger than that expected for the IGMF. Present observations do not yet provide a sufficient source density to be able to estimate the RM of filaments. However, from the proposed approach with forthcoming surveys, we predict significant residuals of RM that should be ascribable to filaments. The predicted structure of the IGMF down to scales of 0.°1 should be observable with data from the Square Kilometre Array, if we achieve selections of sources toward which sightlines do not contain intervening galaxies and RM errors are less than a few rad m{sup –2}.

  10. Coloring 3D line fields using Boy's real projective plane immersion.

    PubMed

    Demiralp, Cağatay; Hughes, John F; Laidlaw, David H

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a new method for coloring 3D line fields and show results from its application in visualizing orientation in DTI brain data sets. The method uses Boy's surface, an immersion of RP2 in 3D. This coloring method is smooth and one-to-one except on a set of measure zero, the double curve of Boy's surface. PMID:19834221

  11. Observations of ferrofluid flow under a uniform rotating magnetic field in a spherical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Díaz, Isaac; Rinaldi, Carlos; Khushrushahi, Shahriar; Zahn, Markus

    2012-04-01

    Flow of a ferrofluid in spherical and cylindrical geometries were measured under the influence of a uniform rotating magnetic field produced by two perpendicular spherical coils, a so-called fluxball, excited by quadrature currents. Using an ultrasound velocity profile technique and a commercial oil based ferrofluid (EFH1, Ferrotec) we observed rotational flow around the z-axis. In comparison, the radial component of the flow was found to be negligible. Results show that the magnitude of the azimuthal velocity profile increases as the applied magnetic field amplitude increases. This behavior is also observed for ferrofluid in a cylindrical container placed inside the fluxball cavity and inside a two-pole stator winding. These results indicate that inhomogeneities in the magnetic field produced by slots and finite height of the stator winding used in prior experiments are not the source of previously observed flows produced by a two pole stator winding. The experiments reported here either point to the existence of non-uniform demagnetizing magnetic fields due to the finite height of the cylindrical container, the existence of couple stresses and spin viscosity in ferrofluids, or to the need to develop alternate governing and constitutive equations capable of describing the experimental observations.

  12. Magnetohydrodynamic counter-rotating vortices and synergetic stabilizing effects of magnetic field and plasma flow

    SciTech Connect

    Throumoulopoulos, G. N.; Tasso, H.

    2010-03-15

    A nonlinear two-dimensional steady state solution in the framework of hydrodynamics describing a row of periodic counter-rotating vortices is extended to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium equation with incompressible flow of arbitrary direction. The extended solution covers a variety of equilibria because four surface quantities remain free. Similar to the case of the MHD cat-eyes equilibrium [Throumoulopoulos et al., J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 42, 335501 (2009)] and unlike linear equilibria, the flow has a strong impact on isobaric surfaces by forming pressure islands located within the counter-rotating vortices even for values of beta (defined as the ratio of the thermal pressure over the external axial magnetic-field pressure) on the order of 0.01. Also, the axial current density is appreciably modified by the flow. Furthermore, a magnetic-field-aligned flow of experimental fusion relevance, i.e., for Alfven Mach numbers of the order of 0.01, and the flow shear in combination with the variation of the magnetic field perpendicular to the magnetic surfaces have significant stabilizing effects potentially related to the equilibrium nonlinearity. The stable region is enhanced by an external axial magnetic field.

  13. Rotational polarities of sudden impulses in the magnetotail lobe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawano, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Kokubun, S.; Lepping, R. P.

    1992-01-01

    A sudden impulse (SI) is a sudden change in the magnetic field strength which is caused by a change in the solar wind pressure and is observed throughout the magnetosphere. In this report we have examined the rotations of the magnetic field vectors at times of SIs in the magnetotail lobe, by using IMP 6, 7, and 8 magnetometer data. The following properties have been found: (1) at the time of SI the arrowhead of the magnetic vector tends to rotate in one plane; (2) the plane of rotation tends to include the unperturbed magnetic field vector; (3) the plane of rotation tends to be aligned with the radial direction from the magnetotail axis; and (4) the magnetic vectors have a particular rotational polarity: when the plane of rotation is viewed so that the Sun is to the right of the viewed plane and the magnetotail axis is to the bottom, the arrowhead of the vector tends to rotate counterclockwise in this plane. These magnetic vector properties are consistent with those expected when part of an increase in solar wind lateral pressure squeezes the magnetotail axisymmetrically while moving tailward.

  14. Implication for using heme methyl hyperfine shifts as indicators of heme seating as related to stereoselectivity in the catabolism of heme by heme oxygenase: in-plane heme versus axial his rotation.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Hiroshi; Evans, John P; de Montellano, Paul R Ortiz; La Mar, Gerd N

    2008-01-01

    The triple mutant of the solubilized, 265-residue construct of human heme oxygenase, K18E/E29K/R183E-hHO, has been shown to redirect the exclusive alpha-regioselectivity of wild-type hHO to primarily beta,delta-selectivity in the cleavage of heme (Wang, J., Evans, J. P., Ogura, H., La Mar, G. N., and Ortiz de Montellano, P. R. (2006) Biochemistry 45, 61-73). The 1H NMR hyperfine shift pattern for the substrate and axial His CbetaH's and the substrate-protein contacts of the cyanide-inhibited protohemin and 2,4-dimethyldeuterohemin complexes of the triple mutant have been analyzed in detail and compared to data for the WT complex. It is shown that protein contacts for the major solution isomers for both substrates in the mutant dictate approximately 90 degrees in-plane clockwise rotation relative to that in the WT. The conventional interpretation of the pattern of substrate methyl hyperfine shifts, however, indicates substrate rotations of only approximately 50 degrees . This paradox is resolved by demonstrating that the axial His25 imidazole ring also rotates counterclockwise with respect to the protein matrix in the mutant relative to that in the WT. The axial His25 CbetaH hyperfine shifts are shown to serve as independent probes of the imidazole plane orientation relative to the protein matrix. The analysis indicates that the pattern of heme methyl hyperfine shifts cannot be used alone to determine the in-plane orientation of the substrate as it relates to the stereospecificity of heme cleavage, without explicit consideration of the orientation of the axial His imidazole plane relative to the protein matrix. PMID:18078349

  15. Dynamics of an active magnetic particle in a rotating magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Cēbers, A; Ozols, M

    2006-02-01

    The motion of an active (self-propelling) particle with a permanent magnetic moment under the action of a rotating magnetic field is considered. We show that below a critical frequency of the external field the trajectory of a particle is a circle. For frequencies slightly above the critical point the particle moves on an approximately circular trajectory and from time to time jumps to another region of space. Symmetry of the particle trajectory depends on the commensurability of the field period and the period of the orientational motion of the particle. We also show how our results can be used to study the properties of naturally occurring active magnetic particles, so-called magnetotactic bacteria. PMID:16605340

  16. Detection of radio-frequency magnetic fields using nonlinear magneto-optical rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Ledbetter, M. P.; Acosta, V. M.; Rochester, S. M.; Budker, D.; Pustelny, S.; Yashchuk, V. V.

    2007-02-15

    We describe a room-temperature alkali-metal atomic magnetometer for detection of small, high-frequency magnetic fields. The magnetometer operates by detecting optical rotation due to the precession of an aligned ground state in the presence of a small oscillating magnetic field. The resonance frequency of the magnetometer can be adjusted to any desired value by tuning the bias magnetic field. Based on experimentally measured signal-to-noise ratio, we demonstrate a sensitivity of 100 pG/{radical}(Hz) (rms) in a 3.5-cm-diameter paraffin coated cell. Assuming detection at the photon shot-noise limit, we project a sensitivity as low as 25 pG/{radical}(Hz) (rms)

  17. AC field measurements of Fermilab Booster correctors using a rotating coil system

    SciTech Connect

    Velev, G.V.; DiMarco, J.; Harding, D.J.; Kashikhin, V.; Lamm, M.; Makulski, A.; Orris, D.; Schlabach, P.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.; Tompkins, J.; /Fermilab

    2006-07-01

    The first prototype of a new corrector package for the Fermilab Booster Synchrotron is presently in production. This water-cooled package includes normal and skew dipole, quadrupole and sextupole elements to control orbit, tune and chromaticity of the beam over the full range of Booster energies (0.4-8 GeV). These correctors operate at the 15 Hz excitation cycle of the main synchrotron magnets, but must also make more rapid excursions, in some cases even switching polarity in approximately 1 ms at transition crossing. To measure the dynamic field changes during operation, a new method based on a relatively slow rotating coil system is proposed. The method pieces together the measured voltages from successive current cycles to reconstruct the field harmonics. This paper describes the method and presents initial field quality measurements from a Tevatron corrector.

  18. Electric field measurements at the magnetopause. I Observation of large convective velocities at rotational magnetopause discontinuities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggson, T. L.; Maynard, N. C.; Gambardella, P. J.

    1983-01-01

    Large convective electric fields of the order of 10 mV/m (sometimes as high as 22 mV/m) are observed at rotational magnetopause discontinuities. These observations were made with the long cylindrical (179-m base line) probes carried on the ISEE 1 satellite. These electric field observations yield convective velocity magnitudes (equal to the cross product of the vector E and the vector B, the latter divided by the square of the magnitude of B) of the order of 150 km/s. In this format for the convective velocity magnitudes, some of these observations are similar to the high speed plasma velocity observations that were made at the magnetopause with the plasma experiment carried on the ISEE 1 satellite. It is shown that, for many of these magnetopause crossings, there exists a special moving coordinate system where the observed electric fields vanish. Such a unique reference system is often used in theoretical studies of magnetic discontinuities. This special coordinate system does not move at the local plasma velocity but moves instead at a velocity intermediate between the convective velocity and the local Alfven velocity. It is used here as a diagnostic tool for the experimental investigation of rotational discontinuities at the magnetopause.

  19. Determining the Ocean's Role on the Variable Gravity Field and Earth Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponte, Rui M.; Frey, H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A number of ocean models of different complexity have been used to study changes in the oceanic angular momentum (OAM) and mass fields and their relation to the variable Earth rotation and gravity field. Time scales examined range from seasonal to a few days. Results point to the importance of oceanic signals in driving polar motion, in particular the Chandler and annual wobbles. Results also show that oceanic signals have a measurable impact on length-of-day variations. Various circulation features and associated mass signals, including the North Pacific subtropical gyre, the equatorial currents, and the Antarctic Circumpolar Current play a significant role in oceanic angular momentum variability. The impact on OAM values of an optimization procedure that uses available data to constrain ocean model results was also tested for the first time. The optimization procedure yielded substantial changes, in OAM, related to adjustments in both motion and mass fields,as well as in the wind stress torques acting on the ocean. Constrained OAM values were found to yield noticeable improvements in the agreement with the observed Earth rotation parameters, particularly at the seasonal timescale.

  20. Field-current phase diagrams of in-plane spin transfer torque memory cells with low effective magnetization storage layers

    SciTech Connect

    San Emeterio Alvarez, L.; Lacoste, B.; Rodmacq, B.; Sousa, R. C. Dieny, B.; Pakala, M.

    2014-05-07

    Field-current phase diagrams were measured on in-plane anisotropy Co{sub 60}Fe{sub 20}B{sub 20} magnetic tunnel junctions to obtain the spin transfer torque (STT) field-current switching window. These measurements were used to characterise junctions with varying free layer thicknesses from 2.5 down to 1.1 nm having a reduced effective demagnetizing field due to the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy at CoFeB/MgO interface. Diagrams were obtained with 100 ns current pulses, of either same or alternating polarity. When consecutive pulses have the same polarity, it is possible to realize the STT switching even for conditions having a low switching probability. This was evidenced in diagrams with consecutive pulses of alternating polarity, with 100% switching obtained at 4.7 MA/cm{sup 2}, compared to the lower 3.4 MA/cm{sup 2} value for same polarity pulses. Although the low level of the current density window is higher in alternating polarity diagrams, the field window in both diagrams is the same and therefore independent of the pulse polarity sequence.

  1. The acoustic field of singing humpback whales in the vertical plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Au, Whitlow W. L.; Pack, Adam A.; Lammers, Marc O.; Herman, Louis; Andrews, Kimberly; Deakos, Mark

    2003-04-01

    A vertical array of five hydrophones was used to measure the acoustic field of singing humpback whales. Once a singer was located, two swimmers with snorkel gear were deployed to determine the orientation of the whale and to position the boat so that the array could be deployed in front of the whale at a minimum standoff distance of 10 m. The spacing of the hydrophones was 7 m with the deepest hydrophone deployed at depth of 35 m. An 8-channel TASCAM recorder having a bandwidth of 24 kHz was used to record the hydrophone signals. The location of the singer was determined by computing the time of arrival differences between the hydrophone signals. The maximum source level varied between individual units in a song, with values between 180 and 190 dB. The acoustic field determined by considering the relative intensity of higher frequency harmonics in the signals indicate that the sounds are projected in the horizontal direction with the singer's head canted downward 45 to 60°. High-frequency harmonics extended beyond 24 kHz, suggesting that humpback whales may have an upper frequency limit of hearing as high as 24 kHz.

  2. Selective trapping or rotation of isotropic dielectric microparticles by optical near field in a plasmonic archimedes spiral.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wei-Yi; Huang, Jer-Shing; Huang, Chen-Bin

    2014-02-12

    We demonstrate selective trapping or rotation of optically isotropic dielectric microparticles by plasmonic near field in a single gold plasmonic Archimedes spiral. Depending on the handedness of circularly polarized excitation, plasmonic near fields can be selectively engineered into either a focusing spot for particle trapping or a plasmonic vortex for particle rotation. Our design provides a simple solution for subwavelength optical manipulation and may find applications in micromechanical and microfluidic systems. PMID:24392638

  3. Free MHD Shear Layers In The Presence Of Rotation And Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, E. J.; Roach, A. H.; Edlund, E. M.; Sloboda, P.; Ji, H.

    2012-03-20

    We present an experimental and numerical study of hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic free shear layers and their stability. We first examine the experimental measurement of globally unstable hydrodynamic shear layers in the presence of rotation, and their range of instability. These are compared to numerical simulations, which are used to explain the modification of the shear layer and thus the critical Rossby number for stability. Magnetic fields are then applied to these scenarios, and globally unstable magnetohydrodynamic shear layers generated. These too are compared to numerical simulations, showing behavior consistent with the hydrodynamic case and previously reported measurements.

  4. Influence of Magnetic Field Ripple on the Intrinsic Rotation of Tokamak Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nave, M. F. F.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Crombe, K.; Ongena, J.; Giroud, C.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Tsalas, M.

    2010-09-03

    Using the unique capability of JET to monotonically change the amplitude of the magnetic field ripple, without modifying other relevant equilibrium conditions, the effect of the ripple on the angular rotation frequency of the plasma column was investigated under the conditions of no external momentum input. The ripple amplitude was varied from 0.08% to 1.5% in Ohmic and ion-cyclotron radio-frequency (ICRF) heated plasmas. In both cases the ripple causes counterrotation, indicating a strong torque due to nonambipolar transport of thermal ions and in the case of ICRF also fast ions.

  5. Grain Rotation in Ion-Complexed Symmetric Diblock Copolymer Thin Films under an Electric Field

    SciTech Connect

    Wang,J.; Leiston-Belanger, J.; Sievert, J.; Russell, T.

    2006-01-01

    In symmetric polystyrene-block-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PS-b-PMMA) diblock copolymer thin films, lithium-PMMA complexes were formed with the addition of lithium chloride (LiCl), significantly increasing both {chi} and dielectric constant. These led to a transition in the kinetic pathway of the orientation of lamellar microdomains under an applied electric field from a disruption and re-formation of the microdomains to a grain rotation mediated by movement of defects. By controlling the number of lithium-PMMA complexes, the microdomain alignment is possibly regulated in PS-b-PMMA copolymer thin films.

  6. Magnetic field-dependent shape anisotropy in small patterned films studied using rotating magnetoresistance

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiaolong; Zhou, Hengan; Rao, Jinwei; Zhao, Xiaobing; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Fengzhen; Xue, Desheng

    2015-01-01

    Based on the electric rotating magnetoresistance method, the shape anisotropy of a Co microstrip has been systematically investigated. We find that the shape anisotropy is dependent not only on the shape itself, but also on the magnetization distribution controlled by an applied magnetic field. Together with micro-magnetic simulations, we present a visualized picture of how non-uniform magnetization affects the values and polarities of the anisotropy constants and . From the perspective of potential appliantions, our results are useful in designing and understanding the performance of micro- and nano-scale patterned ferromagnetic units and the related device properties. PMID:26563520

  7. Changes in the earth's rotation and low-degree gravitational field induced by earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, B. Fong; Gross, Richard S.

    1987-01-01

    Analytical formulas based on the normal-mode theory are used together with a spherically symmetric earth model and the centroid-moment tensor solutions for earthquake sources to compute the earthquake-induced changes in the earth's rotation and low-degree harmonics of the gravitational field for the period 1977-1985. Spectral and statistical analyses are conducted on these changes. It is found that the earthquake-induced changes are two orders of magnitude smaller than those observed; most of these changes show strong evidence of nonrandomness either in their polarity or in their directions.

  8. Anti-de Sitter-Space/Conformal-Field-Theory Casimir Energy for Rotating Black Holes

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, G.W.; Perry, M.J.; Pope, C.N.

    2005-12-02

    We show that, if one chooses the Einstein static universe as the metric on the conformal boundary of Kerr-anti-de Sitter spacetime, then the Casimir energy of the boundary conformal field theory can easily be determined. The result is independent of the rotation parameters, and the total boundary energy then straightforwardly obeys the first law of thermodynamics. Other choices for the metric on the conformal boundary will give different, more complicated, results. As an application, we calculate the Casimir energy for free self-dual tensor multiplets in six dimensions and compare it with that of the seven-dimensional supergravity dual. They differ by a factor of 5/4.

  9. Structured caustic vector vortex optical field: manipulating optical angular momentum flux and polarization rotation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rui-Pin; Chen, Zhaozhong; Chew, Khian-Hooi; Li, Pei-Gang; Yu, Zhongliang; Ding, Jianping; He, Sailing

    2015-01-01

    A caustic vector vortex optical field is experimentally generated and demonstrated by a caustic-based approach. The desired caustic with arbitrary acceleration trajectories, as well as the structured states of polarization (SoP) and vortex orders located in different positions in the field cross-section, is generated by imposing the corresponding spatial phase function in a vector vortex optical field. Our study reveals that different spin and orbital angular momentum flux distributions (including opposite directions) in different positions in the cross-section of a caustic vector vortex optical field can be dynamically managed during propagation by intentionally choosing the initial polarization and vortex topological charges, as a result of the modulation of the caustic phase. We find that the SoP in the field cross-section rotates during propagation due to the existence of the vortex. The unique structured feature of the caustic vector vortex optical field opens the possibility of multi-manipulation of optical angular momentum fluxes and SoP, leading to more complex manipulation of the optical field scenarios. Thus this approach further expands the functionality of an optical system. PMID:26024434

  10. Shapes and gravitational fields of rotating two-layer Maclaurin ellipsoids: Application to planets and satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Gerald; Anderson, John; Zhang, Keke; Kong, D.; Helled, Ravit

    2011-08-01

    The exact solution for the shape and gravitational field of a rotating two-layer Maclaurin ellipsoid of revolution is compared with predictions of the theory of figures up to third order in the small rotational parameter of the theory of figures. An explicit formula is derived for the external gravitational coefficient J2 of the exact solution. A new approach to the evaluation of the theory of figures based on numerical integration of ordinary differential equations is presented. The classical Radau-Darwin formula is found not to be valid for the rotational parameter ɛ2 = Ω2/(2 πG ρ2) ⩾ 0.17 since the formula then predicts a surface eccentricity that is smaller than the eccentricity of the core-envelope boundary. Interface eccentricity must be smaller than surface eccentricity. In the formula for ɛ2, Ω is the angular velocity of the two-layer body, ρ2 is the density of the outer layer, and G is the gravitational constant. For an envelope density of 3000 kg m -3 the failure of the Radau-Darwin formula corresponds to a rotation period of about 3 h. Application of the exact solution and the theory of figures is made to models of Earth, Mars, Uranus, and Neptune. The two-layer model with constant densities in the layers can provide realistic approximations to terrestrial planets and icy outer planet satellites. The two-layer model needs to be generalized to allow for a continuous envelope (outer layer) radial density profile in order to realistically model a gas or ice giant planet.

  11. Change of translational-rotational coupling in liquids revealed by field-cycling 1H NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, R.; Schneider, E.; Rössler, E. A.

    2015-01-01

    Applying the field-cycling nuclear magnetic resonance technique, the frequency dependence of the 1H spin-lattice relaxation rate, R 1 ω = T1 - 1 ω , is measured for propylene glycol (PG) which is increasingly diluted with deuterated chloroform. A frequency range of 10 kHz-20 MHz and a broad temperature interval from 220 to about 100 K are covered. The results are compared to those of experiments, where glycerol and o-terphenyl are diluted with their deuterated counter-part. Reflecting intra- as well as intermolecular relaxation, the dispersion curves R 1 ω , x (x denotes mole fraction PG) allow to extract the rotational time constant τrot(T, x) and the self-diffusion coefficient D(T, x) in a single experiment. The Stokes-Einstein-Debye (SED) relation is tested in terms of the quantity D(T, x) τrot(T, x) which provides a measure of an effective hydrodynamic radius or equivalently of the spectral separation of the translational and the rotational relaxation contribution. In contrast to o-terphenyl, glycerol and PG show a spectral separation much larger than suggested by the SED relation. In the case of PG/chloroform mixtures, not only an acceleration of the PG dynamics is observed with increasing dilution but also the spectral separation of rotational and translational relaxation contributions continuously decreases. Finally, following a behavior similar to that of o-terphenyl already at about x = 0.6; i.e., while D(T, x) τrot(T, x) in the mixture is essentially temperature independent, it strongly increases with x signaling thus a change of translational-rotational coupling. This directly reflects the dissolution of the hydrogen-bond network and thus a change of solution structure.

  12. Inertia-gravity wave radiation from the merging of two co-rotating vortices in the f-plane shallow water system

    SciTech Connect

    Sugimoto, Norihiko

    2015-12-15

    Inertia-gravity wave radiation from the merging of two co-rotating vortices is investigated numerically in a rotating shallow water system in order to focus on cyclone–anticyclone asymmetry at different values of the Rossby number (Ro). A numerical study is conducted on a model using a spectral method in an unbounded domain to estimate the gravity wave flux with high accuracy. Continuous gravity wave radiation is observed in three stages of vortical flows: co-rotating of the vortices, merging of the vortices, and unsteady motion of the merged vortex. A cyclone–anticyclone asymmetry appears at all stages at smaller Ro (≤20). Gravity waves from anticyclones are always larger than those from cyclones and have a local maximum at smaller Ro (∼2) compared with that for an idealized case of a co-rotating vortex pair with a constant rotation rate. The source originating in the Coriolis acceleration has a key role in cyclone–anticyclone asymmetry in gravity waves. An additional important factor is that at later stages, the merged axisymmetric anticyclone rotates faster than the elliptical cyclone due to the effect of the Rossby deformation radius, since a rotation rate higher than the inertial cutoff frequency is required to radiate gravity waves.

  13. Inertia-gravity wave radiation from the merging of two co-rotating vortices in the f-plane shallow water system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Norihiko

    2015-12-01

    Inertia-gravity wave radiation from the merging of two co-rotating vortices is investigated numerically in a rotating shallow water system in order to focus on cyclone-anticyclone asymmetry at different values of the Rossby number (Ro). A numerical study is conducted on a model using a spectral method in an unbounded domain to estimate the gravity wave flux with high accuracy. Continuous gravity wave radiation is observed in three stages of vortical flows: co-rotating of the vortices, merging of the vortices, and unsteady motion of the merged vortex. A cyclone-anticyclone asymmetry appears at all stages at smaller Ro (≤20). Gravity waves from anticyclones are always larger than those from cyclones and have a local maximum at smaller Ro (˜2) compared with that for an idealized case of a co-rotating vortex pair with a constant rotation rate. The source originating in the Coriolis acceleration has a key role in cyclone-anticyclone asymmetry in gravity waves. An additional important factor is that at later stages, the merged axisymmetric anticyclone rotates faster than the elliptical cyclone due to the effect of the Rossby deformation radius, since a rotation rate higher than the inertial cutoff frequency is required to radiate gravity waves.

  14. Involvement of membrane proteins and ion channels on the self-rotation of human cells in a non-rotating AC electric field.

    PubMed

    Vaillier, Clarisse; Honegger, Thibault; Kermarrec, Frédérique; Gidrol, Xavier; Peyrade, David

    2015-05-01

    Dielectrophoresis is a force that has been exploited in microsystems for label-free characterization and separation of cells, when their electrical signature is known. However, the polarization effect of cells at the transmembrane protein level is not well established. In this work, we have use the self-rotation effect of cells in a non-rotating field, known as the "Quincke effect," in order to measure the maximum rotation frequency (frotmax ) of different cell populations when modifying the composition of their membrane. We investigated the influence of active ionic transportation of membrane protein concentration on frotmax of HEK cells. Our results show that ionic transportation is responsible for the reduction of conductivity within the cytoplasm, which results in higher frotmax . However, the influence of the concentration of proteins in the membrane, achieved by silencing gene expression in cancer cells, changes significantly frotmax , which is not explained by the changes of ionic conductivity within the cell. PMID:25808576

  15. Giant capacitance of a plane capacitor with a two-dimensional electron gas in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, Brian; Shklovskii, B. I.

    2013-01-01

    If a clean two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) with a low concentration n comprises one electrode of a plane capacitor, the resulting capacitance C can be higher than the “geometric capacitance” Cg determined by the physical separation d between electrodes. A recent paper [B. Skinner and B. I. Shklovskii, Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.82.155111 82, 155111 (2010)] argued that when the effective Bohr radius aB of the 2DEG satisfies aB≪d, one can achieve C≫Cg at a low concentration nd2≪1. Here we show that even for devices with aB>d, including graphene, for which aB is effectively infinite, one also arrives at C≫Cg at low electron concentrations if there is a strong perpendicular magnetic field.

  16. Ru/FeCoB double layered film with high in-plane magnetic anisotropy field of 500 Oe

    SciTech Connect

    Hirata, Ken-ichiro; Hashimoto, Atsuto; Matsuu, Toshimitsu; Nakagawa, Shigeki

    2009-04-01

    FeCoB layers prepared on Ru underlayer possess a high saturation magnetization M{sub s} and a high in-plane magnetic anisotropy filed H{sub k}. Effects of preparation conditions were investigated. Low Ar gas pressure condition and thicker film thickness were effective to attain distortion of FeCo crystallite. As the crystallinity of Ru underlayer became higher, higher H{sub k} was induced. The accumulation of anisotropic stress in the film caused by the oblique incidences of depositing atoms with high energy seems to be one of the important effects to attain high anisotropy field. It was succeeded to prepare the Ru/FeCoB film with high H{sub k} of 500 Oe.

  17. Exact off-resonance near fields of small-size extended hemielliptic 2-D lenses illuminated by plane waves.

    PubMed

    Boriskin, Artem V; Sauleau, Ronan; Nosich, Alexander I

    2009-02-01

    The near fields of small-size extended hemielliptic lenses made of rexolite and isotropic quartz and illuminated by E- and H-polarized plane waves are studied. Variations in the focal domain size, shape, and location are reported versus the angle of incidence of the incoming wave. The problem is solved numerically in a two-dimensional formulation. The accuracy of results is guaranteed by using a highly efficient numerical algorithm based on the combination of the Muller boundary integral equations, the method of analytical regularization, and the trigonometric Galerkin discretization scheme. The analysis fully accounts for the finite size of the lens as well as its curvature and thus can be considered as a reference solution for other electromagnetic solvers. Moreover, the trusted description of the focusing ability of a finite-size hemielliptic lens can be useful in the design of antenna receivers. PMID:19183675

  18. A thin conducting viscous film on an inclined plane in the presence of a uniform normal electric field: Bifurcation scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uma, B.; Usha, R.

    2008-03-01

    A theory for two dimensional long and stationary waves of finite amplitude on a thin viscous liquid film down an inclined plane in the presence of uniform electric field at infinity is investigated. A set of exact averaged equations for the film flow system is described and linearized stability analysis of the uniform flow is performed using normal-mode formulation and the critical condition for linear instability is obtained. The linearized instability for the permanent wave equation, consistent to the second order in ɛ, is examined and the eigenvalue properties of the fixed points are classified in various parametric regimes. Numerical integration of the permanent wave equation as a third-order dynamical system is carried out. Different bifurcation scenarios leading to multiple-hump solitary waves or leading to chaos are exhibited in the parametric space.

  19. Interaction of the 4-rotational gauge field with orbital momentum, gravidiamagnetic effect, and orbital experiment ''Gravity Probe B''

    SciTech Connect

    Babourova, O. V.; Frolov, B. N.

    2010-07-15

    The direct interaction of the 4-rotational (Lorentzian) gauge field with angular orbital momentum of an external field is considered. This interaction appears in a new Poincare gauge theory of gravitation, in which tetrads are not true gauge fields, but represent some functions of the translational and 4-rotational gauge fields. The given interaction leads to a new effect: the existence of an electronic orbit precession under the action of an intensive external gravitational field (gravidiamagnetic effect), and also substantiates the existence of the direct interaction of the proper angular momentum of a gyroscope with the torsion field, which theoretically can be generated by the rotational angular momentum of the planet Earth. The latter interaction can be detected by the experiment Gravity Probe B on the satellite orbit.

  20. Control of Meridional Flow by a Non-Uniform Rotational Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Ramachandran, Narayanan

    1999-01-01

    The diffusive mass transfer of species during crystal growth in vertical ampoules is significantly affected by fluid flow in the liquid mother phase (melt). For electrically conductive melts, an elegant way of remotely inducing and controlling this flow is by utilizing a uniform rotational magnetic field (RMF) in the transverse direction. It induces an azimuthal flow which tends to homogenize the thermal and solutal fields. The rotating field also reduces the diffusion boundary layer, stabilizes temperature fluctuations, and promotes better overall crystal growth. For moderate strengths of the applied magnetic field (2-20 m Tesla) with frequencies of up to 400 Hz, the induced secondary meridional flow becomes significant. It typically consists of one roll at the bottom of the liquid column and a second roll (vortex) at the top. The flow along the centerline (ampoule axis) is directed from the growing solid (interface) towards the liquid (melt). In case of convex interfaces (e.g. in floating zone crystal growth) such flow behavior is beneficial since it suppresses diffusion at the center. However, for concave interfaces (e.g. vertical Bridgman crystal growth) such a flow tends to exacerbate the situation in making the interface shape more concave. It would be beneficial to have some control of this meridional flow- for example, a single recirculating cell with controllable direction and flow magnitude will make this technique even more attractive for crystal growth. Such flow control is a possibility if a non-uniform PNE field is utilized for this purpose. Although this idea has been proposed earlier, it has not been conclusively demonstrated so far. In this work, we derive the governing equations for the fluid dynamics for such a system and obtain solutions for a few important cases. Results from parallel experimental measurements of fluid flow in a mercury column subjected to non-uniform RMF will also be presented.