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Sample records for field slab gel

  1. Optimization of separation and detection schemes for DNA with pulsed field slab gel and capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    McGregor, D.A.

    1993-07-01

    The purpose of the Human Genome Project is outlined followed by a discussion of electrophoresis in slab gels and capillaries and its application to deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Techniques used to modify electroosmotic flow in capillaries are addressed. Several separation and detection schemes for DNA via gel and capillary electrophoresis are described. Emphasis is placed on the elucidation of DNA fragment size in real time and shortening separation times to approximate real time monitoring. The migration of DNA fragment bands through a slab gel can be monitored by UV absorption at 254 nm and imaged by a charge coupled device (CCD) camera. Background correction and immediate viewing of band positions to interactively change the field program in pulsed-field gel electrophoresis are possible throughout the separation. The use of absorption removes the need for staining or radioisotope labeling thereby simplifying sample preparation and reducing hazardous waste generation. This leaves the DNA in its native state and further analysis can be performed without de-staining. The optimization of several parameters considerably reduces total analysis time. DNA from 2 kb to 850 kb can be separated in 3 hours on a 7 cm gel with interactive control of the pulse time, which is 10 times faster than the use of a constant field program. The separation of {Phi}X174RF DNA-HaeIII fragments is studied in a 0.5% methyl cellulose polymer solution as a function of temperature and applied voltage. The migration times decreased with both increasing temperature and increasing field strength, as expected. The relative migration rates of the fragments do not change with temperature but are affected by the applied field. Conditions were established for the separation of the 271/281 bp fragments, even without the addition of intercalating agents. At 700 V/cm and 20{degrees}C, all fragments are separated in less than 4 minutes with an average plate number of 2.5 million per meter.

  2. Hybrid slab-microchannel gel electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Balch, Joseph W.; Carrano, Anthony V.; Davidson, James C.; Koo, Jackson C.

    1998-01-01

    A hybrid slab-microchannel gel electrophoresis system. The hybrid system permits the fabrication of isolated microchannels for biomolecule separations without imposing the constraint of a totally sealed system. The hybrid system is reusable and ultimately much simpler and less costly to manufacture than a closed channel plate system. The hybrid system incorporates a microslab portion of the separation medium above the microchannels, thus at least substantially reducing the possibility of non-uniform field distribution and breakdown due to uncontrollable leakage. A microslab of the sieving matrix is built into the system by using plastic spacer materials and is used to uniformly couple the top plate with the bottom microchannel plate.

  3. A Simple Vertical Slab Gel Electrophoresis Apparatus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, J. B.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive, easily constructed, and safe vertical slab gel kit used routinely for sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis research and student experiments. Five kits are run from a single transformer. Because toxic solutions are used, students are given plastic gloves and closely supervised during laboratory…

  4. Hybrid slab-microchannel gel electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Balch, J.W.; Carrano, A.V.; Davidson, J.C.; Koo, J.C.

    1998-05-05

    A hybrid slab-microchannel gel electrophoresis system is described. The hybrid system permits the fabrication of isolated microchannels for biomolecule separations without imposing the constraint of a totally sealed system. The hybrid system is reusable and ultimately much simpler and less costly to manufacture than a closed channel plate system. The hybrid system incorporates a microslab portion of the separation medium above the microchannels, thus at least substantially reducing the possibility of non-uniform field distribution and breakdown due to uncontrollable leakage. A microslab of the sieving matrix is built into the system by using plastic spacer materials and is used to uniformly couple the top plate with the bottom microchannel plate. 4 figs.

  5. Polyacrylamide Slab Gel Electrophoresis of Soluble Proteins for Studies of Bacterial Floras

    PubMed Central

    Moore, W. E. C.; Hash, D. E.; Holdeman, Lillian V.; Cato, Elizabeth P.

    1980-01-01

    A polyacrylamide slab gel electrophoresis procedure was used to compare cellular proteins from bacterial isolates of gingival crevice floras. Isolates with identical protein patterns consistently were shown to be members of the same species. When used to screen isolates, the procedure reduced total analytical time and expense without sacrificing accuracy, and it provided additional verification of the identity of strains characterized by conventional phenotypic tests. Images PMID:16345555

  6. Differentiation of Campylobacter species by protein banding patterns in polyacrylamide slab gels.

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, D A; Lambe, D W

    1984-01-01

    Soluble protein extracts of 37 catalase-positive strains of Campylobacter species were examined by polyacrylamide slab gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Electrophoretic banding patterns showed good correlation with biochemical tests and with available DNA homology data in distinguishing species of Campylobacter but did not differentiate subspecies or biotypes. PAGE patterns indicated that Campylobacter coli is a distinct species. Furthermore, the PAGE patterns indicated that C. jejuni and nalidixic acid-resistant thermophilic Campylobacter species (C. laridis) are each distinct species. The protein banding patterns of C. fetus subsp. venerealis and C. fetus subsp. fetus strains were distinctly different from those of the three thermophilic species. Images PMID:6490829

  7. Field Study and Numerical Simulation of Sub Slab Ventilation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnefous, Y.C.; Gadgil, A.J.; Fisk, W.J.; Prill, R.J.; Nematollahi, A.R.

    1992-05-01

    The effectiveness of the technique of subslab ventilation (SSV) for limiting radon entry into basements was investigated through complementary experimentation and numerical modeling. Subslab pressure fields resulting from SSV were measured in six well-characterized basements, each with a different combination of soil and aggregate permeability. The relationship between air velocity and pressure gradient was measured in the laboratory for the three types of aggregate installed beneath the basement slabs. A new numerical model of SSV was developed and verified with the field data. This model simulates non-Darcy flow in the aggregate. We demonstrate that non-Darcy effects significantly impact SSV performance. Field data and numerical simulations indicate that increasing the aggregate permeability within the investigated range of 2 x 10{sup -8} m{sup 2} to 3 x 10{sup -7} m{sup 2} substantially improves the extension of the subslab pressure field due to SSV operation. Sealing of cracks in the slab and excavation of a small pit where the SSV pipe penetrates the slab also dramatically improve this pressure field extension. Our findings are consistent with the results of prior field studies; however, the studies reported here have improved our understanding of factors affecting SSV performance. The dependence of SSV performance on the relevant parameters are currently under investigation with the model.

  8. The gravitational field of an infinite flat slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulling, S. A.; Bouas, J. D.; Carter, H. B.

    2015-08-01

    We study Einstein's equations with a localized plane-symmetric source, with close attention to gauge freedom/fixing and to listing all physically distinct solutions. In the vacuum regions there are only two qualitatively different solutions, one curved and one flat; in addition, on each of the two sides there is a free parameter describing how the slab is embedded into the vacuum region. Surprisingly, for a generic slab source the solution must be curved on one side and flat on the other. We treat infinitely thin slabs in full detail and indicate how thick slabs can increase the variety of external geometry pairs. Positive energy density seems to force external geometries with curvature singularities at some distance from the slab; we speculate that such singularities occur in regions where the solution cannot be physically relevant anyway.

  9. Effects of triggering mechanism on snow avalanche slope angles and slab depths from field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClung, David M.

    2013-04-01

    Field data from snow avalanche fracture lines for slope angle and slab depth (measured perpendicular to the weak layer) were analyzed for different triggering mechanisms. For slope angle, the results showed that the same probability density function (pdf) (of log-logistic type) and range (25 - 55 degrees) apply independent of triggering mechanism. For slab depth, the same pdf (generalized extreme value) applies independent of triggering mechanism. For both slope angle and slab depth, the data skewness differentiated between triggering mechanism and increased with applied triggering load. For slope angle, skewness is lowest for natural triggering by snow loads and highest for triggering from human intervention. For slab depth, the skewness is lowest for natural triggering and highest for a mix of triggers including explosive control with skier triggering being intermediate. The results reveal the effects of triggering mechanism which are important for risk analyses and to guide avalanche forecasting.

  10. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis for dairy propionibacteria.

    PubMed

    Chuat, Victoria; de Freitas, Rosangela; Dalmasso, Marion

    2015-01-01

    Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) is a technique using alternating electric fields to migrate high molecular weight DNA fragments with a high resolution. This method consists of the digestion of bacterial chromosomal DNA with rare-cutting restriction enzymes and in applying an alternating electrical current between spatially distinct pairs of electrodes. DNA molecules migrate at different speeds according to the size of the fragments. Among other things, this technique is considered as the "gold standard" for genotyping, genetic fingerprinting, epidemiological studies, genome size estimation, and studying radiation-induced DNA damage and repair. This chapter describes a PFGE method that can be used to differentiate dairy propionibacteria. PMID:25862063

  11. Optimization of electric field strength for DNA sequencing in capillary gel electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luckey, John A.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    1993-06-01

    Since its development, capillary gel electrophoresis has demonstrated the ability to separate DNA sequencing reactions at speeds roughly 25 times as great as conventional slab gel electrophoresis. These increased speeds are the result of using the more efficient dissipation of Joule heating by capillaries. However, to date there have been no studies which quantitate the advantages of disadvantages in operating these gels at high electric field strength. This work addresses this question by investigating the band-broadening of DNA sequencing reactions as they are separated through a fixed distance of gel at field strengths ranging from 50 V/cm to 400 V/cm. It is found that the bandwidths of DNA fragments do decrease with the higher field strengths due to a reduction in diffusional broadening. However, at sufficiently high electric field strengths, the bands begin to broaden again under the influence of an increasing thermal gradient across the diameter of the capillary. The result is an optimum electric field strength in the intermediate range of 100 - 250 V/cm depending on the length of fragments being separated. The relative importance of diffusion and thermal gradients are discussed and used to generate an equation that models the observed band broadening of DNA in capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE).

  12. High electric field measurement using slab-coupled optical sensors.

    PubMed

    Stan, Nikola; Seng, Frederick; Shumway, LeGrand; King, Rex; Selfridge, Richard; Schultz, Stephen

    2016-01-20

    A fiber-optic electric field sensor was developed to measure electric field up to 18 MV/m. The sensor uses resonant coupling between an optical fiber and a nonlinear electro-optical crystal. The sensing system uses high dielectric strength materials to eliminate dielectric breakdown. A postprocessing nonlinear calibration method is developed that maps voltage change to wavelength shift and then converts the wavelength shift to electric field using the transmission spectrum. The nonlinear calibration method is compared against the linear method with electric field pulses having magnitudes from 1.5 to 18 MV/m. PMID:26835936

  13. Electric field-induced deformation of polyelectrolyte gels

    SciTech Connect

    Adolf, D.; Hance, B.G.

    1995-08-01

    Water-swollen polyelectrolyte gels deform in an electric field. We observed that the sign and magnitude of the deformation is dependent on the nature of the salt bath in which the gel is immersed and electrocuted. These results are compatible with a deformation mechanism based upon creation of ion density gradients by the field which, in turn, creates osmotic pressure gradients within the gel. A consistent interpretation results only if gel mobility is allowed as well as free ion diffusion and migration.

  14. Stacking gels: A method for maximising output for pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Heng, See Kah; Heng, Chua Kek; Puthucheary, S D

    2009-01-01

    Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), the gold standard of molecular typing methods, has a major disadvantage of an unusually long electrophoretic time. From the original protocol of 6 days, it was modified to 3 days and subsequently to a single day. We describe the procedure of stacking five to six gels one on top of another in order to increase and maximize the output in a shorter time without compromising the resolution and reproducibility. All the variables that affect pulsed field gels during electrophoresis were taken into consideration. We firstly optimized the parameters to be used and secondly determined whether stacking of five to six gels had any effect on the molecular separation during electrophoresis in comparison with a single gel run. DNA preparation, restriction, electrophoresis, staining and gel documentation was carried out based on previously published methods. Gels were analysed using BioNumerics and dice coefficient and unweighted pair group methods were used to generate dendrograms based on 1.5% tolerance values. Identical band profiles and band resolution-separation were seen in the PFGE patterns with single gel and multiple stacking gels. Cluster analysis further strengthened the fact that results from stacking gels were reproducible and comparable with a single gel run. This method of stacking gels saves time and maximizes the output at the same time. The run time for a single gel was about 28 hours, but with six stacked gels the run time was 54 hours compared with 28 x 6 = 168 hours if they were run separately as single gels thus saving time of 67.86%. Beside the big factor of saving time, stacking gels save resources (electricity, reagents, water, chemicals and working time) by increasing the sample throughput in a shorter time without compromising on quality of data. But optimization of working parameters is vital depending on the PFGE system used. PMID:19384038

  15. Sub-slab pressure field extension in schools and other large buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, D. B.; Craig, A. B.; Leovic, K. W.

    1991-09-01

    The experiences of EPA are discussed in using pressure field extension (PFE) to design active subslab depressurization (ASD) systems to reduce radon levels in old and new schools, including instances where the data collected resulted in the installation of smaller systems than expected and selection of high vacuum fans instead of normal mitigation fans. A central collection system for use under very large slabs is discussed and PFE data are given for a hospital under construction. The most direct method of projecting or measuring the performance of an ASD system is to measure the strength and extent of the pressure field established under the slab. The PFE can be determined (during diagnostics) to help design an ASD system and (following installation) to ascertain system performance. In schools and other large buildings, these data are invaluable to provide a system that will mitigate the building without undue cost escalation.

  16. Effects of magnetic field on the interaction between terahertz wave and non-uniform plasma slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yuan; Ai, Xia; Han, YiPing; Guo, LiXin

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, the interaction between terahertz electromagnetic wave and a non-uniform magnetized plasma slab is investigated. Different from most of the published literatures, the plasma employed in this work is inhomogeneous in both collision frequency and electron density. Profiles are introduced to describe the non-uniformity of the plasma slab. At the same time, magnetic field is applied to the background of the plasma slab. It came out with an interesting phenomenon that there would be a valley in the absorption band as the plasma's electromagnetic characteristic is affected by the magnetic field. In addition, the valley located just near the middle of the absorption peak. The cause of the valley's appearance is inferred in this paper. And the influences of the variables, such as magnetic field strength, electron density, and collision frequency, are discussed in detail. The objective of this work is also pointed out, such as the applications in flight communication, stealth, emissivity, plasma diagnose, and other areas of plasma.

  17. Effects of magnetic field on the interaction between terahertz wave and non-uniform plasma slab

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Yuan; Han, YiPing; Guo, LiXin; Ai, Xia

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, the interaction between terahertz electromagnetic wave and a non-uniform magnetized plasma slab is investigated. Different from most of the published literatures, the plasma employed in this work is inhomogeneous in both collision frequency and electron density. Profiles are introduced to describe the non-uniformity of the plasma slab. At the same time, magnetic field is applied to the background of the plasma slab. It came out with an interesting phenomenon that there would be a valley in the absorption band as the plasma's electromagnetic characteristic is affected by the magnetic field. In addition, the valley located just near the middle of the absorption peak. The cause of the valley's appearance is inferred in this paper. And the influences of the variables, such as magnetic field strength, electron density, and collision frequency, are discussed in detail. The objective of this work is also pointed out, such as the applications in flight communication, stealth, emissivity, plasma diagnose, and other areas of plasma.

  18. Self-consistent solution for a collisionless plasma slab in motion across a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Echim, Marius M.; Lemaire, Joseph F.; Roth, Michel

    2005-07-15

    The problem of the dynamics of a plasma slab moving across a magnetic field is treated in the framework of the kinetic theory. A velocity distribution function (VDF) is found for each plasma species, electrons and protons, in terms of the constants of motion defined by the geometry of the problem. The zero- and first-order moments of the VDF are introduced into the right-hand side term of Maxwell's equations to compute the electric and magnetic vector potentials and corresponding fields. The solutions are found numerically. We obtain a region of plasma convection--the slab proper--where the plasma moves with a uniform velocity, V{sub x}=V{sub 0}=(ExB/B{sup 2}){sub x}. At the core margins two plasma 'wings' are formed, each being the result of a pair of interpenetrated boundary layers with different transition lengths. Inside these wings, the plasma velocity is not uniform, V{sub x}{ne}(ExB/B{sup 2}){sub x}. It decreases from the maximum value obtained in the core to a minimum value in the central region of the wings where a flow reversal is found with the plasma convecting in the opposite direction to the core motion. There is also an asymmetry of the velocity gradient at the borders of the core, which results in a corresponding asymmetry in the thickness of the wings. Furthermore, it is found that the reversed plasma flow in the thinner wing is larger than that in the broader wing. For a fixed direction of the magnetic field the two plasma wings interchange position with respect to the center of the slab when the plasma bulk velocity reverses sign.

  19. Tailoring of spectral response and spatial field distribution with corrugated photonic crystal slab.

    PubMed

    Gad, Raanan; Lau, Wah Tung; Nicholaou, Costa; Ahmadi, Soroosh; Sigal, Iliya; Levi, Ofer

    2015-08-15

    We report a new physical mechanism for simultaneous tuning of quality factors, spectral responses, and field distributions in photonic crystal slabs through removal of polarization mode degeneracy using a lattice of elliptical nano-holes. The quality factors in these structures can become higher than those obtained with much smaller circular nano-holes. Furthermore, the modes can be superimposed by either rotating or morphing the elliptical nano-holes into a corrugated grating. These findings will enable improved radiation-matter interaction in optical, microwave, and THZ frequencies along with enhanced opto-acoustic coupling. PMID:26274642

  20. Capacity degradation of field-tested silica gel samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penney, T. R.; Pesaran, A. A.; Thomas, T. M.

    1985-06-01

    Researchers at the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) have begun preliminary studies to quantify the effect of contamination of silica gel used in dehumidification processes of desiccant cooling systems. Sorption capacity degradation of field tested samples was measured, and the source of degradation was quantified using surface analysis experimental methods.

  1. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing of Staphylococcus aureus isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) is the most applied and effective genetic typing method for epidemiological studies and investigation of foodborne outbreaks caused by different pathogens, including Staphylococcus aureus. The technique relies on analysis of large DNA fragments generated by th...

  2. Tunable Lamb wave band gaps in two-dimensional magnetoelastic phononic crystal slabs by an applied external magnetostatic field.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Changjiang; Sai, Yi; Chen, Jiujiu

    2016-09-01

    This paper theoretically investigates the band gaps of Lamb mode waves in two-dimensional magnetoelastic phononic crystal slabs by an applied external magnetostatic field. With the assumption of uniformly oriented magnetization, an equivalent piezomagnetic material model is used. The effects of magnetostatic field on phononic crystals are considered carefully in this model. The numerical results indicate that the width of the first band gap is significantly changed by applying the external magnetic field with different amplitude, and the ratio between the maximum and minimum gap widths reaches 228%. Further calculations demonstrate that the orientation of the magnetic field obviously affects the width and location of the first band gap. The contactless tunability of the proposed phononic crystal slabs shows many potential applications of vibration isolation in engineering. PMID:27281285

  3. Field-Theoretic Studies of Nanostructured Triblock Polyelectrolyte Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audus, Debra; Fredrickson, Glenn

    2012-02-01

    Recently, experimentalists have developed nanostructured, reversible gels formed from triblock polyelectrolytes (Hunt et al. 2011, Lemmers et al. 2010, 2011). These gels have fascinating and tunable properties that reflect a heterogeneous morphology with domains on the order of tens of nanometers. The complex coacervate domains, aggregated oppositely charged end-blocks, are embedded in a continuous aqueous matrix and are bridged by uncharged, hydrophilic polymer mid-blocks. We report on simulation studies that employ statistical field theory models of triblock polyelectrolytes, and we explore the equilibrium self-assembly of these remarkable systems. As the charge complexation responsible for the formation of coacervate domains is driven by electrostatic correlations, we have found it necessary to pursue full ``field-theoretic simulations'' of the models, as opposed to the familiar self-consistent field theory approach. Our investigations have focused on morphological trends with mid- and end-block lengths, polymer concentration, salt concentration and charge density.

  4. Sub-slab pressure-field extension in schools and other large buildings. Rept. for 1988-91

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D.B.; Craig, A.B.; Leovic, K.W.

    1991-01-01

    The paper discusses EPA's experiences using pressure field extension (PFE) to design active subslab depressurization (ASD) systems to reduce radon levels in old and new schools, including instances where the data collected resulted in the installation of smaller systems than expected and selection of high vacuum fans instead of 'normal' mitigation fans. A central collection system for use under very large slabs is discussed and PFE data are given for a hospital under construction. The most direct method of projecting or measuring the performance of an ASD system is to measure the strength and extent of the pressure field established under the slab. The PFE can be determined (during diagnostics) to help design an ASD system and (following installation) to ascertain system performance. In schools and other large buildings, these data are invaluable to provide a system that will mitigate the building without undue cost escalation.

  5. The electromagnetic field in conductive slabs and cylinders submitted to a harmonic longitudinal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Íñiguez, J.; Raposo, V.; Zazo, M.; García-Flores, A.; Hernández-Gómez, P.

    2009-11-01

    The analysis of the induced current distribution in conducting wires subjected to a harmonic axial voltage is important in designing many electrical devices such as transformers and transmission lines. The azimuthal magnetic field induces axial electric currents and therefore the impedance of the wire depends on the excitation frequency. The current density is increasingly confined to a thin layer at the boundary of the wire as the frequency increases. To minimize this effect at higher frequencies it is necessary to enhance the surface-to-volume ratio by using thin high-conductivity wires. The study of induction phenomena in conducting samples subjected to a harmonic longitudinal magnetic field has attracted less attention. The time-varying magnetic flux induces eddy currents, which flow perpendicularly to the axis of the sample. We study the electromagnetic field in samples of simple geometry, making the usual approximations in good conductors. The validity of our calculations extends to several GHz and allows us to propose a method for determining the electrical conductivity by measuring the phase angle of the complex mutual inductance between a primary coil, responsible for the external magnetic field, and a secondary winding around the sample.

  6. The Application of Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis in Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Parizad, Eskandar Gholami; Valizadeh, Azar

    2016-01-01

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis is a method applied in separating large segments of deoxyribonucleotide using an alternating and cross field. In a uniform magnetic field, components larger than 50kb pass a route through the gel and since the movement of DNA (Deoxyribonucleic acid) molecules are in a Zigzag form, separation of DNAs as bands carried out better via gel. PFGE in microbiology is a standard method which is used for typing of bacteria. It is also a very useful tool in epidemiological studies and gene mapping in microbes and mammalian cell, also motivated development of large-insert cloning system such as bacterial and yeast artifical chromosomes. In this method, close and similar species in terms of genetic patterns show alike profiles regarding DNA separation, and those ones which don’t have similarity or are less similar, reveal different separation profiles. So this feature can be used to determine the common species as the prevalence agent of a disease. PFGE can be utilized for monitoring and evaluating different micro-organisms in clinical samples and existing ones in soil and water. This method can also be a reliable and standard method in vaccine preparation. In recent decades, PFGE is highly regarded as a powerful tool in control, prevention and monitoring diseases in different populations. PMID:26894068

  7. High field magnetic resonance imaging-based gel dosimetry for small radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xuanfeng

    Small megavoltage photon radiation fields (< 3cm diameter) are used in advanced radiation therapy techniques, such as intensity modulated radiotherapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery, as well as for cellular and preclinical radiobiology studies (very small fields, <1 mm diameter). Radiation dose characteristics for these small fields are difficult to determine in multiple dimensions because of steep dose gradients (30--40% per mm) and conditions of electronic disequilibrium. Conventional radiation dosimetry techniques have limitations for small fields because detector size may be large compared to radiation field size and/or dose acquisition may be restricted to one or two dimensions. Polymer gel dosimetry, is a three-dimensional (3D) dosimeter based on radiation-induced polymerization of tissue equivalent gelatin. Polymer gel dosimeters can be read using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which detects changes in relaxivity due to gel polymerization. Spatial resolution for dose readout is limited to 0.25--0.5mm pixel size because of available the magnetic field strengths (1.5T and 3T) and the stability of polymer gelatin at room temperature. A reliable glucose-based MAGIC (methacrylic and ascorbic acid in gelatine initiated by copper) gel dosimeter was formulated and evaluated for small field 3D dosimetry using 3T and 7T high field MRI for dose readout. The melting point of the original recipe MAGIC gel was increased by 4°C by adding 10% glucose to improve gel stability. Excellent spatial resolution of 79um (1.5 hr scan) and 39um (12 hr scan) was achieved using 7T MRI, proving gel stability for long scan times and high resolution 3D dosimetry.

  8. Slow light, open-cavity formation, and large longitudinal electric field on a slab waveguide made of indefinite permittivity metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, W. T.; Sridhar, S.

    2010-07-01

    The optical properties of slab waveguides made of indefinite permittivity (ɛ) materials (IEMs) are considered. In this medium, the real part of the transverse permittivity is negative while that of the longitudinal permittivity is positive. At any given frequency, the IEM waveguide supports an infinite number of transverse magnetic (TM) eigenmodes. For a slab waveguide with a fixed thickness, at most only one TM mode is forward wave. The remainder are backward waves which can have a very large phase index. At a critical thickness, the waveguide supports degenerate forward- and backward-wave modes with zero group velocity if loss is absent. Above the critical thickness, the waveguide supports complex-conjugate decay modes instead of propagating modes. The presence of loss in IEMs will lift the TM mode degeneracy, resulting in modes with finite group velocity. A feasible realization is proposed. The performance of the IEM waveguide is analyzed and possible applications are discussed, which are supported by numerical calculations. These slab waveguides can be used to make optical delay lines in optical buffers to slow down and trap light, to form open cavities, to generate strong longitudinal electric fields, and as phase shifters in optical integrated circuits. Although the presence of loss will hinder these applications, gain can be introduced to compensate the loss and enhance the performance.

  9. Interaction of electromagnetic fields with chondrocytes in gel culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Buschmann, Michael D.; Gluzband, Yehezkiel A.

    1992-01-01

    The specific objectives of this research period were: (1) to quantify the effect of applied electric fields on chondrocyte metabolism, using a range of stimulation frequencies and amplitudes; (2) to compare the chondrocyte biosynthetic response to applied fields at early times in agarose gel culture before an extracellular matrix has accumulated and at later times after significant deposition of matrix around and between the cells; and (3) to begin to interpret the biosynthetic response to applied fields in terms of models of physical mechanisms. The results of these studies suggest that electric fields applied to chondrocytes in agarose can modulate the synthesis of proteoglycans and protein constituents. Biosynthesis may be inhibited or stimulated depending on the amplitude of the applied current density. In addition, the presence of extracellular matrix may enhance the ability of normal chondrocytes and cells in intact cartilage to respond to electric fields, although the presence of matrix was not required for the stimulatory response to be observed with Swarm rat chondrosarcoma cells.

  10. ELECTROMAGNETISM, OPTICS, ACOUSTICS, HEAT TRANSFER, CLASSICAL MECHANICS, AND FLUID DYNAMICS: Analysis on Far-Field of Slab Waveguide and Its Gaussian Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lian-Huang; Guo, Fu-Yuan; Peng, Yu-Jia; Tang, Xiao-Shan; Gao, Rui

    2010-02-01

    This paper researches end diffraction of slab waveguide and then matching efficiency between the far-field and its Gaussian approximate field is analyzed leads to a new definition of divergence half-angle. Finally, why the far-field can be approximated by a Gaussian function is presented according to characteristic of beam propagation factor.

  11. Field lines and magnetic surfaces in a two-component slab/2D model of interplanetary magnetic fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Pontius, D. H., Jr.; Gray, P. C.; Bieber, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    A two-component model for the spectrum of interplanetary magnetic fluctuations was proposed on the basis of ISEE observations, and has found an intriguing level of application in other solar wind studies. The model fluctuations consist of a fraction of 'slab' fluctuations, varying only in the direction parallel to the locally uniform mean magnetic field B(0) and a complement of 2D (two-dimensional) fluctuations that vary in the directions transverse to B(0). We have developed an spectral method computational algorithm for computing the magnetic flux surfaces (flux tubes) associated with the composite model, based upon a precise analogy with equations for ideal transport of a passive scalar in planar two dimensional geometry. Visualization of various composite models will be presented, including the 80 percent 2D/ 20 percent slab model with delta B/B(0) approximately equals 1 and a minus 5/3 spectral law, that is thought to approximately represent a snapshot of solar wind turbulence. Characteristically, the visualizations show that flux tubes, even when defined as regular on some plane, shred and disperse rapidly as they are viewed along the parallel direction. This diffusive process, which generalizes the standard picture of field line random walk, will be discussed in detail. Evidently, the traditional picture that flux tubes randomize like strands of spaghetti with a uniform tangle along the axial direction is in need of modification.

  12. Oriented fibrin gels formed by polymerization in strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torbet, J.

    1981-01-01

    Fibrinogen is a soluble plasma protein which, after cleavage by the specific proteolytic enzyme thrombin, polymerizes to form the filamentous fibrin network during blood clotting (see refs 1 and 2 for reviews). Fibrinogen has a molecular weight of 340,000 and is composed of two identical halves, each containing three peptide chains designated Aα, Bβ and γ. Fibrin monomers are produced by thrombin which releases the small negatively charged fibrinopeptides A and B. The overall shape of the fibrinogen molecule has not been unequivocally established1,2. The trinodular, elongated (~450 Å long) structure proposed by Hall and Slayter3 is the most widely accepted model and it has obtained additional support from recent work4-6. Fibrin monomers are also about 450 Å long7 and in fibres they probably have a half-staggered arrangement along the axis7,8. The fibres are an assembly of protofibrils whose structure and packing are not reliably known. We report here that highly oriented fibrin gels are formed when polymerization takes place slowly in a strong magnetic field. It is shown that the protofibrils pack into a three-dimensional crystalline lattice. We introduce magnetically induced birefringence as a potential tool for studying polymerization and briefly speculate on the applications of strong magnetic fields.

  13. The textural properties and microstructure of konjac glucomannan - tungsten gels induced by DC electric fields.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lixia; Zhuang, Yuanhong; Li, Jingliang; Pang, Jie; Liu, Xiangyang

    2016-12-01

    Konjac glucomannan - tungsten (KGM-T) gels were successfully prepared under DC electric fields, in the presence of sodium tungstate. The textural properties and microstructure of the gels were investigated by Texture Analyzer, Rheometer and SEM. Based on the response surface methodology (RSM) results, the optimum conditions for KGM-T gel springiness is 0.32% sodium tungstate concentration, 0.54% KGM concentration, 24.66V voltage and 12.37min treatment time. Under these conditions, the maximum springiness value of KGM-T gel is 1.21mm. Steady flow measurement indicated that KGM-T gel showed characteristic non-Newtonian pseudoplastic behaviour, with low flow behaviour indexes in the shear thinning region. SEM demonstrated the porosity of the freeze-dried samples. These findings may pave the way to use DC electric fields for the design and development of KGM gels and to apply KGM gels for practical applications. PMID:27374531

  14. Temperature field inside an absorbing-emitting semi-transparent slab at radiative equilibrium with variable spatial refractive index.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, P. B.; Le Dez, V.

    2000-05-01

    The temperature field inside an absorbing-emitting slab of semi-transparent grey medium at radiative equilibrium has been determined with the help of a curved ray-tracing technique when the spatial variation of the refractive index in the medium is assumed to be linear. The integration of the radiative transfer equation has been carried out on the trajectories on which radiation propagates inside the medium, leading to the absorbed radiative energy at an internal point. For a linear refractive index, existence of totally reflected internal trajectories producing mirage effects have to be taken into account in the resolution of the radiative problem. Results obtained for different optical depths with low and strong gradients of refractive index display significant differences from the case of a constant refractive index.

  15. Effect of gel structure of matrix orientation in pulsed alternating electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Stellwagen, N.C.; Stellwagen, J.

    1993-12-31

    Four polymeric gels with different structures, LE agarose, HEEO agarose, beta-carrageenan, and polyacrylamide, were studied by transient electric birefringence to determine the importance of various structural features on the orientation of the gels in pulsed alternating electric fields. The birefrigence relaxation times observed for agarose gels in low voltage electric fields suggest that long fibers and/or domains, ranging up to tens of microns in size, are oriented by the electric field. The sign of the birefringence reverses when the direction of the electric field is reversed, suggesting that the oriented domains change their direction of orientation from parallel to perpendicular (or vice versa) when the polarity of the electric field is reversed. These anamalous orientation effects are observed with both types of agarose gels, but not with beta-carrageenan or polyacrylamide gels, suggesting that the alternating D,L galactose residues in the agarose backbone are responsible for the anomalies.

  16. Numerical modeling of deep oceanic slab dehydration: Implications for the possible origin of far field intra-continental volcanoes in northeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Jian; Liao, Jie; Gerya, Taras

    2016-03-01

    Intra-continental volcanoes have different origins compared to arc volcanoes, and several conflicting geodynamic mechanisms of intra-continental magmatism have been proposed, which require quantitative testing. In this paper, we investigate numerically possible influences of deep subducted slab dehydration processes for the development of intra-continental volcanoes distributed in northeastern China. We employ 2D thermo-mechanical numerical models to investigate the complex dynamics of long-term subduction process, including slab interaction with mantle transition zone, deep oceanic plate dehydration, trench rollback, and back-arc extension. Our experiments show systematically that water can be transported to the transition zone by stagnant slabs hydrating the overlaying deep asthenospheric mantle. Positively buoyant partially molten hydrous plumes arising from the hydrated area formed atop the slabs can propagate upwards and form partially molten mantle regions under the far field continental plate. Our numerical models thus suggest that the development of widely distributed intra-continental volcanism in northeastern China could be related to the rising of multiple relatively small hydrous plumes triggered by stagnant paleo-Pacific slab dehydration in the transition zone.

  17. Mechanical Properties of Electroactive Polymer Gels and Their Behavior in DC Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Li; Krause, Sonja

    2000-03-01

    We have reported the bending deformation of swollen crosslinked partially sulfonated triblock copolymer poly(styrene-b-ethylene-co-butylene-b-styrene) (S-SEBS) hydrogels in DC electric fields in previous APS meetings(Bull. Am. Phys. Soc., 43 (1), 598, 1998 and 44 (1), 757, 1999). However, very little force was generated from the bending of the S-SEBS gel due to the low modulus of this highly elastic material. For the present study, partially sulfonated crosslinked polystyrene gels (XL-S-PS) were prepared. The gel bending behavior of XL-S-PS gels was studied in four different sulfonated solutions with varied cations including Na^+, Cs^+, (CH_3)_4NH^+ and (Bu)_4NH^+. Comparison of gel bending of S-SEBS and XL-S-PS gels indicated qualitative similarities and quantitative differences. The bending motion of the XL-S-PS gels in electric fields was slower than that of the S-SEBS gels but more force was generated in the XL-S-PS gel system. Nanoparticles were used as fillers in some of the XL-S-PS gels to modify their mechanical properties which will be discussed in the presentation.

  18. Electromagnetic eigenstates and the field of an oscillating point electric dipole in a flat-slab composite structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhi, Asaf; Bergman, David J.

    2016-06-01

    An exact calculation of the local electric field E (r ) is described for the case of a time-dependent point electric dipole p e-i ω t in the top layer of an ɛ2, ɛ1, ɛ2 three parallel slabs composite structure, where the ɛ1 layer has a finite thickness 2 d but the ɛ2 layers are infinitely thick. For this purpose we first calculate all the eigenstates of the full Maxwell equations for the case where μ =1 everywhere in the system. The eigenvalues appear as special, nonphysical values of ɛ1 when ɛ2 is given. These eigenstates are then used to develop an exact expansion for the physical values of E (r ) in the system characterized by physical values of ɛ1(ω ) and ɛ2(ω ) . Results are compared with those of a previous calculation of the local field of a time-dependent point charge in the quasistatic regime. Numerical results are shown for the local electric field in practically important configurations where attaining an optical image with subwavelength resolution has practical significance.

  19. Push-pull slab coupled optical sensor for measuring electric fields in a vibrational environment.

    PubMed

    Seng, Frederick; Stan, Nikola; Josephson, Chad; King, Rex; Shumway, LeGrand; Selfridge, Richard; Schultz, Stephen

    2015-06-01

    Vibration-insensitive fiber optic electric field sensor is created by fabricating two sensing elements in close proximity onto the same optical fiber and subtracting the two signals. The device is used to measure an electric field of 10  kV/m, while the sensor is being bent and impacted. PMID:26192684

  20. Full-field dye concentration measurement within saturated/unsaturated thin slabs of porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, D.L.; Glass, R.J.

    1992-12-31

    This paper presents a full-field dye concentration measurement technique that extends our experimental capabilities to the measurement of transient dye concentration fields within steady state flow fields under unsaturated or saturated conditions. Simple light absorption theory provides a basis for translating images into high resolution dye concentration fields. A series of dye pulse experiments that demonstrate the combined use of the full-field saturation and dye concentration techniques was conducted at four different degrees of saturation. Each of these experimental sequences was evaluated with respect to mass balance, the results being within 5% of the known dye mass input. An image windowing technique allowed us to see increased dispersion due to decreasing moisture content, tailing of concentration at the rear of the dye pulse and slight velocity changes of the dispersive front due to changes in moisture content. The exceptional resolution of dye concentration in space and time provided by this laboratory technique allows systematic experimentation for examining basic processes affecting solute transport within saturated/unsaturated porous media. Future challenges for this work will be to use these techniques to analyze more complex systems involving heterogeneities, scaling laws, and detailed investigations of the relationship between transverse and longitudinal dispersion in unsaturated media.

  1. SUB-SLAB PRESSURE FIELD EXTENSION IN SCHOOLS AND OTHER LARGE BUILDINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses EPA's experiences using pressure field extension (PFE) to design active subslab depressurization (ASD) systems to reduce radon levels in old and new schools, including instances where the data collected resulted in the installation of smaller systems than expe...

  2. Slab reformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spurrier, Francis R. (Inventor); DeZubay, Egon A. (Inventor); Murray, Alexander P. (Inventor); Vidt, Edward J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Slab-shaped high efficiency catalytic reformer configurations particularly useful for generation of fuels to be used in fuel cell based generation systems. A plurality of structures forming a generally rectangular peripheral envelope are spaced about one another to form annular regions, an interior annular region containing a catalytic bed and being regeneratively heated on one side by a hot comubstion gas and on the other side by the gaseous products of the reformation. An integrally mounted combustor is cooled by impingement of incoming oxidant.

  3. Slab reformer

    DOEpatents

    Spurrier, Francis R.; DeZubay, Egon A.; Murray, Alexander P.; Vidt, Edward J.

    1984-02-07

    Slab-shaped high efficiency catalytic reformer configurations particularly useful for generation of fuels to be used in fuel cell based generation systems. A plurality of structures forming a generally rectangular peripheral envelope are spaced about one another to form annular regions, an interior annular region containing a catalytic bed and being regeneratively heated on one side by a hot comubstion gas and on the other side by the gaseous products of the reformation. An integrally mounted combustor is cooled by impingement of incoming oxidant.

  4. Slab reformer

    DOEpatents

    Spurrier, Francis R.; DeZubay, Egon A.; Murray, Alexander P.; Vidt, Edward J.

    1985-03-12

    Slab-shaped high efficiency catalytic reformer configurations particularly useful for generation of fuels to be used in fuel cell based generation systems. A plurality of structures forming a generally rectangular peripheral envelope are spaced about one another to form annular regions, an interior annular region containing a catalytic bed and being regeneratively heated on one side by a hot combustion gas and on the other side by the gaseous products of the reformation. An integrally mounted combustor is cooled by impingement of incoming oxidant.

  5. Rheological properties and formation mechanism of DC electric fields induced konjac glucomannan-tungsten gels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lixia; Jiang, Yaoping; Lin, Youhui; Pang, Jie; Liu, Xiang Yang

    2016-05-20

    Konjac glucomannan-tungsten (KGM-T) hydrogel of electrochemical reversibility was successfully produced under DC electric fields in the presence of sodium tungstate. The structure and the effects of sodium tungstate concentration, KGM concentration, voltage and electric processing time on the rheological properties of the gels were investigated. pH experiments showed that KGM sol containing Na2WO4·2H2O in the vicinity of the positive electrode became acidic and the negative electrode basic after the application of DC electric fields. Under acid conditions, WO4(2-) ions transformed into isopoly-tungstic acid ions. FTIR and Raman studies indicated that isopoly-tungstic acid ions absorbed on KGM molecular chain and cross-linked with -OH groups at C-6 position on sugar units of KGM. Frequency sweep data showed with increasing sodium tungstate concentration, voltage, and electric processing time, the viscoelastic moduli, i.e., the storage and the loss moduli of the gel increased, whereas an increase in KGM concentration led to a decrease in gel viscoelastic moduli. The temperature sweep measurements indicated the obtained gel exhibited high thermal stability. Finally, the mechanism of gel formation was proposed. Our work may pave the way to use DC electric fields for the design and development of KGM gels as well as polysaccharide gels. PMID:26917402

  6. Diode end-pumped high-power Q-switched double Nd:YAG slab laser and its efficient near-field second-harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Peng; Li, Daijun; Qi, Bingsong; Schell, Alexander; Shi, Peng; Haas, Claus; Fu, Shaojun; Wu, Nianle; Du, Keming

    2008-10-01

    We reported on an all-solid-state double Nd:YAG slab laser. The laser was based on two diode end-pumped Nd:YAG slabs and a stable-unstable hybrid resonator. A cw output of 189 W and an average Q-switched output of 169 W at 10 kHz with an M(2) factor of 1.5 in the slow direction and 1.7 in the fast direction were obtained. We demonstrated efficient near-field frequency doubling by imaging the one-dimensional top-hat near-field to a lithium triborate frequency doubler. We obtained 93 W green light at 10 kHz with a pulse width of 10.7 ns. The efficiency of second-harmonic generation was up to 57%. PMID:18830367

  7. Molecular stretching of long DNA in agarose gel using alternating current electric fields.

    PubMed Central

    Kaji, Noritada; Ueda, Masanori; Baba, Yoshinobu

    2002-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel method for stretching a long DNA molecule in agarose gel with alternating current (AC) electric fields. The molecular motion of a long DNA (T4 DNA; 165.6 kb) in agarose gel was studied using fluorescence microscopy. The effects of a wide range of field frequencies, field strengths, and gel concentrations were investigated. Stretching was only observed in the AC field when a frequency of approximately 10 Hz was used. The maximal length of the stretched DNA had the longest value when a field strength of 200 to 400 V/cm was used. Stretching was not sensitive to a range of agarose gel concentrations from 0.5 to 3%. Together, these experiments indicate that the optimal conditions for stretching long DNA in an AC electric field are a frequency of 10 Hz with a field strength of 200 V/cm and a gel concentration of 1% agarose. Using these conditions, we were able to successfully stretch Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosomal DNA molecules (225-2,200 kb). These results may aid in the development of a novel method to stretch much longer DNA, such as human chromosomal DNA, and may contribute to the analysis of a single chromosomal DNA from a single cell. PMID:11751320

  8. IMPROVED APPROACHES TO DESIGN OF POLYMER GEL TREATMENTS IN MATURE OIL FIELDS: FIELD DEMONSTRATION IN DICKMAN FIELD, NESS COUNTY, KANSAS

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald Fowler

    2004-11-30

    This report describes the results of the one-year project entitled ''Improved Approaches to Design of Polymer Gel Treatments in Mature Oil Fields: Field Demonstration in Dickman Field, Ness County, Kansas''. The project was a 12-month collaboration of Grand Mesa Operating Company (a small independent), TIORCO Inc. (a company focused on improved recovery technology) and the University of Kansas. The study undertook tasks to determine an optimum polymer gel treatment design in Mississippian reservoirs, demonstrate application, and evaluate the success of the program. The project investigated geologic and engineering parameters and cost-effective technologies required for design and implementation of effective polymer gel treatment programs in the Mississippian reservoir in the Midcontinent. The majority of Mississippian production in Kansas occurs at or near the top of the Mississippian section just below the regional sub-Pennsylvanian unconformity and karst surface. Dickman Field with the extremely high water cuts and low recovery factors is typical of Mississippian reservoirs. Producibility problems in these reservoirs include inadequate reservoir characterization, drilling and completion design problems, and most significantly extremely high water cuts and low recovery factors that place continued operations at or near their economic limits. Geologic, geophysical and engineering data were integrated to provide a technical foundation for candidate selection and treatment design. Data includes core, engineering data, and 3D seismic data. Based on technical and economic considerations a well was selected for gel-polymer treatment (Grand Mesa Operating Company Tilley No.2). The treatment was not successful due to the small amount of polymer that could be injected. Data from the initial well and other candidates in the demonstration area was analyzed using geologic, geophysical and engineering data. Based on the results of the treatment and the integrated reservoir

  9. Polymer gel dosimetry of an electron beam in the presence of a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandecasteele, J.; De Deene, Y.

    2013-06-01

    The effect of a strong external magnetic field on 4 MeV electron beam was measured with polymer gel dosimetry. The measured entrance dose distribution was compared with a calculated fluence map. The magnetic field was created by use of two permanent Neodymium (NdFeB) magnets that were positioned perpendicular to the electron beam. The magnetic field between the magnets was measured with Hall sensors. Based on the magnetic field measurement and the law of Biot-Savart, the magnetic field distribution was extrapolated. Electron trajectories were calculated using a relativistic Lorentz force operator. Although the simplified computational model that was applied, the shape and position of the calculated entrance fluence map are found to be in good agreement with the measured dose distribution in the first layer of the phantom. In combination with the development of low density polymer gel dosimeters, these preliminary results show the potential of 3D gel dosimetry in MRI-linac applications.

  10. Adaptation of radiation field analyser (RFA) as optical CT scanner for gel dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Brindha, S.; Kumar, Vinoth; Vasanth, S.; Ravindran Paul, B.

    2006-01-01

    Optical scanning is one of the emerging evaluation tools used for obtaining dose distributions in gel dosimetry. A radiation field analyzer adapted into an optical CT scanner to evaluate an irradiated Fricke gel has been already reported by others. This prototype optical CT scanner functions like a first generation x-ray CT scanner in the translate-rotate fashion. A similar scanner was constructed in our department for optical scanning of irradiated FX gel. At first, an aquarium was constructed and fitted into the water phantom of the RFA with provision to place the gel phantom to be scanned along with a light source and detector. The movements of the RFA were utilized to scan the gel phantom. A scan of a cuvette filled with colored solution was carried out and the resulting images were reconstructed and profiles obtained to evaluate the working of the optical scanner. A scan of the gel phantom was then obtained to evaluate the performance of the scanner. Thus a radiation field analyzer (DYNASCAN) was successfully adapted to an optical scanner to evaluate Fricke gels in our department. PMID:21206636

  11. Gel Electrophoresis of DNA --- New Measurements and the Repton Model at High Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, M. J.; Pasciak, P.; Dydejczyk, A.; Kulakowski, K.; Dulak, J.

    2005-05-01

    New experimental data are presented on the gel electrophoresis of DNA. Experiment was made for molecules of length 173 kbp, in 1 percent agarose gel, in TAE 1 × buffer and the field intensity between 5 and 9 V/cm. The results are compared with our computer simulations, performed within the repton model of Duke and Rubinstein. The ranges of field and molecule length are determined, where the geometration effect appears. We investigate also the field dependence of the velocity and the diffusion coefficient at the border of the geometration regime.

  12. Small-Field Measurements of 3D Polymer Gel Dosimeters through Optical Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Cheng-Ting; Lee, Yao-Ting; Wu, Shin-Hua; Yao, Chun-Hsu; Hsieh, Bor-Tsung

    2016-01-01

    With advances in therapeutic instruments and techniques, three-dimensional dose delivery has been widely used in radiotherapy. The verification of dose distribution in a small field becomes critical because of the obvious dose gradient within the field. The study investigates the dose distributions of various field sizes by using NIPAM polymer gel dosimeter. The dosimeter consists of 5% gelatin, 5% monomers, 3% cross linkers, and 5 mM THPC. After irradiation, a 24 to 96 hour delay was applied, and the gel dosimeters were read by a cone beam optical computed tomography (optical CT) scanner. The dose distributions measured by the NIPAM gel dosimeter were compared to the outputs of the treatment planning system using gamma evaluation. For the criteria of 3%/3 mm, the pass rates for 5 × 5, 3 × 3, 2 × 2, 1 × 1, and 0.5 × 0.5 cm2 were as high as 91.7%, 90.7%, 88.2%, 74.8%, and 37.3%, respectively. For the criteria of 5%/5 mm, the gamma pass rates of the 5 × 5, 3 × 3, and 2 × 2 cm2 fields were over 99%. The NIPAM gel dosimeter provides high chemical stability. With cone-beam optical CT readouts, the NIPAM polymer gel dosimeter has potential for clinical dose verification of small-field irradiation. PMID:26974434

  13. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis for epidemiologic studies of Campylobacter hyointestinalis isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Salama, S M; Tabor, H; Richter, M; Taylor, D E

    1992-01-01

    Campylobacter hyointestinalis was isolated from five members of the same family who had previously consumed raw milk. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of genomic DNAs from the five strains, after digestion with restriction endonuclease SalI, revealed that three strains had identical genome patterns and therefore appeared to be related, whereas the other two had completely different genome patterns and appeared to be unrelated. We report here for the first time the isolation of C. hyointestinalis from family members who had consumed raw milk. Our study also demonstrates the usefulness of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis for epidemiologic studies of this unusual campylobacter. Images PMID:1500503

  14. Progress on slab lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, G. F.; Eggleston, J. M.; Petr, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    After a brief overview of slab geometry work published to date, zig-zag optical path slab laser development toward a 100-Hz slab YAG system ('Centurion') and a 10-Hz dual slab glass system ('Gemini') is described. Some of the major diagnostic work performed and in the process is also described to illustrate the major mechanisms responsible for beam distortion observed in these types of slab lasers.

  15. Three-dimensional dosimetry of small megavoltage radiation fields using radiochromic gels and optical CT scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babic, Steven; McNiven, Andrea; Battista, Jerry; Jordan, Kevin

    2009-04-01

    The dosimetry of small fields as used in stereotactic radiotherapy, radiosurgery and intensity-modulated radiation therapy can be challenging and inaccurate due to partial volume averaging effects and possible disruption of charged particle equilibrium. Consequently, there exists a need for an integrating, tissue equivalent dosimeter with high spatial resolution to avoid perturbing the radiation beam and artificially broadening the measured beam penumbra. In this work, radiochromic ferrous xylenol-orange (FX) and leuco crystal violet (LCV) micelle gels were used to measure relative dose factors (RDFs), percent depth dose profiles and relative lateral beam profiles of 6 MV x-ray pencil beams of diameter 28.1, 9.8 and 4.9 mm. The pencil beams were produced via stereotactic collimators mounted on a Varian 2100 EX linear accelerator. The gels were read using optical computed tomography (CT). Data sets were compared quantitatively with dosimetric measurements made with radiographic (Kodak EDR2) and radiochromic (GAFChromic® EBT) film, respectively. Using a fast cone-beam optical CT scanner (Vista™), corrections for diffusion in the FX gel data yielded RDFs that were comparable to those obtained by minimally diffusing LCV gels. Considering EBT film-measured RDF data as reference, cone-beam CT-scanned LCV gel data, corrected for scattered stray light, were found to be in agreement within 0.5% and -0.6% for the 9.8 and 4.9 mm diameter fields, respectively. The validity of the scattered stray light correction was confirmed by general agreement with RDF data obtained from the same LCV gel read out with a laser CT scanner that is less prone to the acceptance of scattered stray light. Percent depth dose profiles and lateral beam profiles were found to agree within experimental error for the FX gel (corrected for diffusion), LCV gel (corrected for scattered stray light), and EBT and EDR2 films. The results from this study reveal that a three-dimensional dosimetry method

  16. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis as a discriminatory typing technique for the biothreat agent burkholderia mallei.

    PubMed

    Chantratita, Narisara; Vesaratchavest, Mongkol; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Tiyawisutsri, Rachaneeporn; Ulziitogtokh, Tsedev; Akcay, Erhan; Day, Nicholas P J; Peacock, Sharon J

    2006-03-01

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was used to type 21 laboratory strains of Burkholderia mallei. We demonstrated good resolution by PFGE together with clustering of some geographically related isolates, and confirmed previous observations that B. mallei is clonal as defined by MLST. PMID:16525089

  17. Comparison of restriction enzymes for pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing of Moraxella catarrhalis.

    PubMed

    Marti, Sara; Puig, Carmen; Domenech, Arnau; Liñares, Josefina; Ardanuy, Carmen

    2013-07-01

    NotI, the most prevalent restriction enzyme used for typing Moraxella catarrhalis, failed to digest genomic DNA from respiratory samples. An improved pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) methodology determined SpeI as the best choice for typing this bacterial species, with a good restriction of clinical samples and a good clustering correlation with NotI. PMID:23678064

  18. Preface: Deep Slab and Mantle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suetsugu, Daisuke; Bina, Craig R.; Inoue, Toru; Wiens, Douglas A.

    2010-11-01

    We are pleased to publish this special issue of the journal Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors entitled "Deep Slab and Mantle Dynamics". This issue is an outgrowth of the international symposium "Deep Slab and Mantle Dynamics", which was held on February 25-27, 2009, in Kyoto, Japan. This symposium was organized by the "Stagnant Slab Project" (SSP) research group to present the results of the 5-year project and to facilitate intensive discussion with well-known international researchers in related fields. The SSP and the symposium were supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (16075101) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of the Japanese Government. In the symposium, key issues discussed by participants included: transportation of water into the deep mantle and its role in slab-related dynamics; observational and experimental constraints on deep slab properties and the slab environment; modeling of slab stagnation to constrain its mechanisms in comparison with observational and experimental data; observational, experimental and modeling constraints on the fate of stagnant slabs; eventual accumulation of stagnant slabs on the core-mantle boundary and its geodynamic implications. This special issue is a collection of papers presented in the symposium and other papers related to the subject of the symposium. The collected papers provide an overview of the wide range of multidisciplinary studies of mantle dynamics, particularly in the context of subduction, stagnation, and the fate of deep slabs.

  19. A dosimetric study of small photon fields using polymer gel and Gafchromic EBT films

    SciTech Connect

    Hassani, Hossein; Nedaie, Hassan Ali; Zahmatkesh, Mohammad Hassan; Shirani, Kaveh

    2014-04-01

    The use of small field sizes is increasingly becoming important in radiotherapy particularly since the introduction of stereotactic radiosurgery and intensity-modulated radiation therapy techniques. The reliable measurement of delivered dose from such fields with conventional dosimeters, such as ionization chambers, is a challenging task. In this work, methacrylic and ascorbic acid in gelatin initiated by copper polymer gel dosimeters are employed to measure dose in 3 dimensions. Field sizes of 5 × 5 mm{sup 2}, 10 × 10 mm{sup 2}, 20 × 20 mm{sup 2}, and 30 × 30 mm{sup 2} are investigated for a 6-MV x-rays. The results show an agreement with Gafchromic film, with some variation in measured doses near the edge of the fields, where the film data decrease more rapidly than the other methods. Dose penumbra widths obtained with gel dosimeters and Gafchormic film were generally in agreement with each other. The results of this work indicate that polymer gel dosimetry could be invaluable for the quantification of the 3-dimensional dose distribution in small field size.

  20. Trapping and breaking of in vivo nicked DNA during pulsed field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sharik R; Kuzminov, Andrei

    2013-12-15

    Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) offers a high-resolution approach to quantify chromosomal fragmentation in bacteria, measured as percentage of chromosomal DNA entering the gel. The degree of separation in pulsed field gel (PFG) depends on the size of DNA as well as various conditions of electrophoresis such as electric field strength, time of electrophoresis, switch time, and buffer composition. Here we describe a new parameter, the structural integrity of the sample DNA itself, that influences its migration through PFGs. We show that subchromosomal fragments containing both spontaneous and DNA damage-induced nicks are prone to breakage during PFGE. Such breakage at single-strand interruptions results in artifactual decrease in molecular weight of linear DNA making accurate determination of the number of double-strand breaks difficult. Although breakage of nicked subchromosomal fragments is field strength independent, some high-molecular-weight subchromosomal fragments are also trapped within wells under the standard PFGE conditions. This trapping can be minimized by lowering the field strength and increasing the time of electrophoresis. We discuss how breakage of nicked DNA may be mechanistically linked to trapping. Our results suggest how to optimize conditions for PFGE when quantifying chromosomal fragmentation induced by DNA damage. PMID:23770235

  1. Simplified protocol for pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    McEllistrem, M C; Stout, J E; Harrison, L H

    2000-01-01

    A variety of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) protocols for the molecular subtyping of Streptococcus pneumoniae have been reported; most are time-consuming and complex. We sought to modify reference PFGE protocols to reduce the time required while creating high-quality gels. Only protocol modifications that resulted in high-quality banding patterns were considered. The following protocol components were modified. Lysis enzymes (lysozyme, mutanolysin, and RNase A) were deleted in a stepwise fashion, and then the lysis buffer was deleted. Lysis and digestion were accomplished in a single step with EDTA and N-lauroyl sarcosine (ES; pH 8.5 to 9.3) incubation at 50 degrees C in the absence of proteinase K. All enzymes except the restriction enzyme were omitted. A minimum incubation time of 6 h was required to achieve high-quality gels. All of the reactions were performed within 9 h, and the total protocol time from lysis to gel completion was reduced from 3 days to only 36 h. Combining lysis and digestion into a single step resulted in a substantial reduction in the time required to perform PFGE for S. pneumoniae. The ES solution may have caused cell lysis by activating N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanine amidase, the pneumococcal autolysin. PMID:10618114

  2. Band gap control using electric field of photonic gel cells fabricated with block copolymer and hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Nam; Baek, Young Bin; Shin, Dong Myung

    2014-08-01

    Optical and electrical characteristics of the devices using photonic gel film and hydrogel electrolyte were studied. Poly(styrene-b-2-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P2VP) lamellar film with alternating hydrophobic block and hydrophilic polyelectrolyte block polymers (52 kg/mol-b-57 kg/mol) were prepared for the photonic gel. Poly(isobutylene-co-maleic acid) sodium salts were prepared for the hydrogel. This hydrogel fiber is common water swelling material and it owned ions for a device has conductivity. Photonic gel and hydrogel was spin coating onto Indium-tin-oxide (ITO) glass for make electric fields. The reflectance maximum wavelength of photonic crystal device shifted from 538 nm and reached to 557 nm, 585 nm and 604 nm during 30 min voltage applying time. The bandwidth variation was very limited. Loss of electrolyte was much less with hydrogel compared to the pure water. We can control color of hydrogel used photonic device by electric field with reasonable time range under moderate electric field by applying 2 V between two facing electrodes. PMID:25936055

  3. Field-theoretic model of inhomogeneous supramolecular polymer networks and gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Aruna; Elliot, Richard; Fredrickson, Glenn H.

    2010-11-01

    We present a field-theoretic model of the gelation transition in inhomogeneous reversibly bonding systems and demonstrate that our model reproduces the classical Flory-Stockmayer theory of gelation in the homogeneous limit. As an illustration of our model in the context of inhomogeneous gelation, we analyze the mean-field behavior of an equilibrium system of reacting trifunctional units in a good solvent confined within a slit bounded by parallel, repulsive walls. Our results indicate higher conversions and, consequently, higher concentrations of gel following the gelation transition near the center of the slit relative to the edges.

  4. Field-theoretic model of inhomogeneous supramolecular polymer networks and gels.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Aruna; Elliot, Richard; Fredrickson, Glenn H

    2010-11-01

    We present a field-theoretic model of the gelation transition in inhomogeneous reversibly bonding systems and demonstrate that our model reproduces the classical Flory-Stockmayer theory of gelation in the homogeneous limit. As an illustration of our model in the context of inhomogeneous gelation, we analyze the mean-field behavior of an equilibrium system of reacting trifunctional units in a good solvent confined within a slit bounded by parallel, repulsive walls. Our results indicate higher conversions and, consequently, higher concentrations of gel following the gelation transition near the center of the slit relative to the edges. PMID:21054065

  5. Short protocol for pulsed field gel electrophoresis of a variety of Clostridia species.

    PubMed

    Sperner, B; Schalch, B; Eisgruber, H; Stolle, A

    1999-07-01

    While pulsed field gel electrophoresis has become an important tool for genotyping of bacteria, one of its drawbacks is that standard methods are rather time-consuming. In order to overcome this problem, shortened procedures for DNA preparation have been developed for some bacterial species. The aim of this study was to examine if a short procedure used for pulsed field gel electrophoresis of Clostridium botulinum could be applied to other Clostridia species. For this, the protocol was modified and used to prepare the DNA of 34 strains of 25 different Clostridia species. In contrast to a standard procedure, which takes at least 5 days from DNA extraction to completion of the electrophoresis, this protocol yielded results within 2 days. In order to directly compare the results of the short protocol with those of the standard, long procedure, parallel DNA preparations were performed using both methods and the two DNA samples thus obtained per strain were then run on the same gel. Briefly, the procedure was as follows. After embedding the bacterial cells in agarose, the agarose blocks were incubated for 1 h in lysis solution containing lysozyme, mutanolysin, lysostaphin and RNase. This was followed by a 1-h proteinase K treatment. Then, slices were cut from the agarose blocks and washed for 15 min in TE buffer, these washes were repeated four times with fresh TE. After a 2-h restriction with SmaI, electrophoresis was carried out overnight. PMID:10397313

  6. Compliant random fields in gels formed from side-chain liquid crystalline polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldbart, Paul; Ye, Fangfu; Lu, Bing; Xing, Xiangjun

    2013-03-01

    Localized polymer-chain backbones in gels formed from side-chain liquid crystalline polymers serve to create random fields that induce local orientational order of the nematogenic pendants of the side chains. These random fields differ, however, from conventional ones, in that they are compliant, and thus themselves undergo thermal fluctuations. We develop a free energy that describes local nematic ordering in presence of such compliant random fields. In particular, we show that, as a result of this compliance, the free energy has a qualitatively new structure, unattainable via truly static random fields. We discuss the physical implications this free energy, focusing on the consequences of the compliant nature of the random fields.

  7. Interlaboratory Agreement of Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis Identification of Leptospira Serovars

    PubMed Central

    Mende, Katrin; Galloway, Renee L.; Becker, Sara J.; Beckius, Miriam L.; Murray, Clinton K.; Hospenthal, Duane R.

    2013-01-01

    Leptospirosis may be caused by > 250 Leptospira serovars. Serovar classification is a complex task that most laboratories cannot perform. We assessed the interlaboratory reproducibility of a pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) identification technique developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Blinded exchange of 93 Leptospiraceae strains occurred between San Antonio Military Medical Center (SAMMC) and the CDC. PFGE was performed and gel images were analyzed and compared with patterns present in each laboratory's database (CDC database: > 800 strain patterns; SAMMC database: > 300 strain patterns). Overall, 93.7% (74 of 79) of strains present in each receiving laboratory's database were correctly identified. Five isolates were misidentified, and two isolates did not match serovar PFGE patterns in the receiving laboratory's database. Patterns for these seven isolates were identical between laboratories; four serovars represented misidentified reference strains. The PFGE methodology studied showed excellent interlaboratory reproducibility, enabling standardization and data sharing between laboratories. PMID:23817329

  8. Use of conductive gels for electric field homogenization increases the antitumor efficacy of electroporation therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivorra, Antoni; Al-Sakere, Bassim; Rubinsky, Boris; Mir, Lluis M.

    2008-11-01

    Electroporation is used in tissue for gene therapy, drug therapy and minimally invasive tissue ablation. The electrical field that develops during the application of the high voltage pulses needs to be precisely controlled. In the region to be treated, it is desirable to generate a homogeneous electric field magnitude between two specific thresholds whereas in other regions the field magnitude should be as low as possible. In the case of irregularly shaped tissue structures, such as bulky tumors, electric field homogeneity is almost impossible to be achieved with current electrode arrangements. We propose the use of conductive gels, matched to the conductivity of the tissues, to fill dead spaces between plate electrodes gripping the tissue so that the electric field distribution becomes less heterogeneous. Here it is shown that this technique indeed improves the antitumor efficacy of electrochemotherapy in sarcomas implanted in mice. Furthermore, we analyze, through finite element method simulations, how relevant the conductivity mismatches are. We found that conductivity mismatching errors are surprisingly well tolerated by the technique. Gels with conductivities ranging from 5 mS cm-1 to 10 mS cm-1 will be a proper solution for most cases.

  9. Strong Static Magnetic Fields Increase the Gel Signal in Partially Hydrated DPPC/DMPC Membranes.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jennifer; Alsop, Richard J; Schmalzl, Karin; Epand, Richard M; Rheinstädter, Maikel C

    2015-01-01

    NIt was recently reported that static magnetic fields increase lipid order in the hydrophobic membrane core of dehydrated native plant plasma membranes [Poinapen, Soft Matter 9:6804-6813, 2013]. As plasma membranes are multicomponent, highly complex structures, in order to elucidate the origin of this effect, we prepared model membranes consisting of a lipid species with low and high melting temperature. By controlling the temperature, bilayers coexisting of small gel and fluid domains were prepared as a basic model for the plasma membrane core. We studied molecular order in mixed lipid membranes made of dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) and dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) using neutron diffraction in the presence of strong static magnetic fields up to 3.5 T. The contribution of the hydrophobic membrane core was highlighted through deuterium labeling the lipid acyl chains. There was no observable effect on lipid organization in fluid or gel domains at high hydration of the membranes. However, lipid order was found to be enhanced at a reduced relative humidity of 43%: a magnetic field of 3.5 T led to an increase of the gel signal in the diffraction patterns of 5%. While all biological materials have weak diamagnetic properties, the corresponding energy is too small to compete against thermal disorder or viscous effects in the case of lipid molecules. We tentatively propose that the interaction between the fatty acid chains' electric moment and the external magnetic field is driving the lipid tails in the hydrophobic membrane core into a better ordered state. PMID:26426063

  10. Strong Static Magnetic Fields Increase the Gel Signal in Partially Hydrated DPPC/DMPC Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jennifer; Alsop, Richard J.; Schmalzl, Karin; Epand, Richard M.; Rheinstädter, Maikel C.

    2015-01-01

    It was recently reported that static magnetic fields increase lipid order in the hydrophobic membrane core of dehydrated native plant plasma membranes [Poinapen, Soft Matter 9:6804-6813, 2013]. As plasma membranes are multicomponent, highly complex structures, in order to elucidate the origin of this effect, we prepared model membranes consisting of a lipid species with low and high melting temperature. By controlling the temperature, bilayers coexisting of small gel and fluid domains were prepared as a basic model for the plasma membrane core. We studied molecular order in mixed lipid membranes made of dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) and dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) using neutron diffraction in the presence of strong static magnetic fields up to 3.5 T. The contribution of the hydrophobic membrane core was highlighted through deuterium labeling the lipid acyl chains. There was no observable effect on lipid organization in fluid or gel domains at high hydration of the membranes. However, lipid order was found to be enhanced at a reduced relative humidity of 43%: a magnetic field of 3.5 T led to an increase of the gel signal in the diffraction patterns of 5%. While all biological materials have weak diamagnetic properties, the corresponding energy is too small to compete against thermal disorder or viscous effects in the case of lipid molecules. We tentatively propose that the interaction between the fatty acid chains’ electric moment and the external magnetic field is driving the lipid tails in the hydrophobic membrane core into a better ordered state. PMID:26426063

  11. Direct observation by laser scanning confocal microscopy of microstructure and phase migration of PVC gels in an applied electric field.

    PubMed

    Xia, Hong; Ueki, Takamitsu; Hirai, Toshihiro

    2011-02-01

    The fluorescent probe lucigenin was incorporated in poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) gels, and laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) was used to clarify the internal structures of the gels. From the two-dimensional and three-dimensional information by LSCM, we first observed the internal structure of the PVC gel at a wet status, where the PVC gels comprised a polymer-rich phase and a polymer-poor phase uniformly with a three-dimensional network structure. After an electric field was applied, an effect of the electric field resulted in the change of internal structure in the gels. The polymer-poor phase moved from the cathode to the anode and the polymer-rich phase formed linelike arrangement between electrodes due to the attraction force. On the other hand, the freeze-dried PVC gels with/without in-situ dc voltage casting were particularly fabricated to confirm above results by the field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). It was found that many craters remained on the surface of the gel near the anode due to sublimation in freeze-drying. This phenomenon did not appear on the surface near the cathode. The results of in-situ dc voltage casting also suggested that a substantial amount of polymer-poor phase was moved and fixed at the anode. Thus, results of both LSCM and in-situ dc voltage casting corresponded to the effect of electric field on PVC gels and provided a convincing evidence for the interpretation of the deformation mechanism of PVC gel actuators by an applied electric field. PMID:21174424

  12. Linear Dichroism of Chlorosomes from Chloroflexus Aurantiacus in Compressed Gels and Electric Fields

    PubMed Central

    van Amerongen, H.; Vasmel, H.; van Grondelle, R.

    1988-01-01

    The linear dichroism of chlorosomes from Chloroflexus aurantiacus was measured between 250 and 800 nm. To orient the chlorosomes we used a new way of compressing polyacrylamide gels, where the dimension of the gel along the measuring light-beam is kept constant. The press required for such a way of compressing is relatively easy to construct. A theoretical description is given to interpret the measured linear dichroism in terms of the orientation of the transition moments. The results obtained with the polyacrylamide gels are compared with the linear dichroism measurements for chlorosomes oriented in electric fields. Both the spectral features as well as the absolute size of the linear dichroism signals are in reasonable agreement. We find that the transition moment corresponding to the 741 nm bacteriochlorophyll c (Bchl c) absorption band makes an angle of 20° with the long axis of the chlorosome. For the 461 nm Bchl c band an angle of 30° is found. Both angles are significantly lower than the values reported so far in literature and they imply that Bchl c is highly organized in the chlorosomes. PMID:19431726

  13. Small field dose delivery evaluations using cone beam optical computed tomography-based polymer gel dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Olding, Timothy; Holmes, Oliver; DeJean, Paul; McAuley, Kim B.; Nkongchu, Ken; Santyr, Giles; Schreiner, L. John

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the combination of cone beam optical computed tomography with an N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM)-based polymer gel dosimeter for three-dimensional dose imaging of small field deliveries. Initial investigations indicate that cone beam optical imaging of polymer gels is complicated by scattered stray light perturbation. This can lead to significant dosimetry failures in comparison to dose readout by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For example, only 60% of the voxels from an optical CT dose readout of a 1 l dosimeter passed a two-dimensional Low's gamma test (at a 3%, 3 mm criteria, relative to a treatment plan for a well-characterized pencil beam delivery). When the same dosimeter was probed by MRI, a 93% pass rate was observed. The optical dose measurement was improved after modifications to the dosimeter preparation, matching its performance with the imaging capabilities of the scanner. With the new dosimeter preparation, 99.7% of the optical CT voxels passed a Low's gamma test at the 3%, 3 mm criteria and 92.7% at a 2%, 2 mm criteria. The fitted interjar dose responses of a small sample set of modified dosimeters prepared (a) from the same gel batch and (b) from different gel batches prepared on the same day were found to be in agreement to within 3.6% and 3.8%, respectively, over the full dose range. Without drawing any statistical conclusions, this experiment gives a preliminary indication that intrabatch or interbatch NIPAM dosimeters prepared on the same day should be suitable for dose sensitivity calibration. PMID:21430853

  14. Equilibrium intermediate-state patterns in a type-I superconducting slab in an arbitrarily oriented applied magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Clem, John; Prozorov, Ruslan; Wijngaarden, Rinke J.

    2013-09-04

    The equilibrium topology of superconducting and normal domains in flat type-I superconductors is investigated. Important improvements with respect to previous work are that (1) the energy of the external magnetic field, as deformed by the presence of superconducting domains, is calculated in the same way for three different topologies and (2) calculations are made for arbitrary orientation of the applied field. A phase diagram is presented for the minimum-energy topology as a function of applied field magnitude and angle. For small (large) applied fields, normal (superconducting) tubes are found, while for intermediate fields, parallel domains have a lower energy. The range of field magnitudes for which the superconducting-tubes structure is favored shrinks when the field is more in-plane oriented.

  15. Equilibrium intermediate-state patterns in a type-I superconducting slab in an arbitrarily oriented applied magnetic field

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Clem, John; Prozorov, Ruslan; Wijngaarden, Rinke J.

    2013-09-04

    The equilibrium topology of superconducting and normal domains in flat type-I superconductors is investigated. Important improvements with respect to previous work are that (1) the energy of the external magnetic field, as deformed by the presence of superconducting domains, is calculated in the same way for three different topologies and (2) calculations are made for arbitrary orientation of the applied field. A phase diagram is presented for the minimum-energy topology as a function of applied field magnitude and angle. For small (large) applied fields, normal (superconducting) tubes are found, while for intermediate fields, parallel domains have a lower energy. Themore » range of field magnitudes for which the superconducting-tubes structure is favored shrinks when the field is more in-plane oriented.« less

  16. Simple, time saving pulsed-field gel electrophoresis protocol for the typing of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

    PubMed

    Shueh, Chong Seng; Neela, Vasanthakumari; Hussin, Salasawati; Hamat, Rukman Awang

    2013-08-01

    We developed a time-saving and cost-efficient Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) method for the typing of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia by modifying the conventional procedures. Our modifications related to the cell suspension preparation, lysis of bacterial cells in plugs, washing steps, and consumption of restriction enzyme. Although few rapid PFGE protocols on Gram-negative bacteria are available, the use of comparatively large amounts of costly reagents prompted us to look for other alternative. Hence, by considering the speed, simplicity, and relatively low cost, the modified protocol may be of more practical value than other established protocols in investigating S. maltophilia nosocomial outbreaks. PMID:23756145

  17. Genome size of human oral Treponema species by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Correia, F F; Plummer, A R; Paster, B J; Dewhirst, F E

    2004-04-01

    The genome sizes of seven strains of oral treponemes were determined using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). These strains represent members from six of the currently known cultivable oral treponeme groups. The PFGE fragments were digitally recorded and then quantitated using GIMP v 1.2, an image manipulation program. The results show that the six oral treponeme genomes are comparable in size, ranging from approximately 2.2 to 2.5 Mbp. The genome sizes of these strains are 20-25% smaller than Treponema denticola strains, which have genome sizes of approximately 2.8-3.0 Mbp. PMID:14871355

  18. Molecular karyotype analysis of Perkinsus atlanticus (Phylum Perkinsozoa) by pulsed field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Leonor Teles-Grilo, M; Duarte, Sérgio M; Tato-Costa, Joana; Gaspar-Maia, Alexandre; Oliveira, Carla; Rocha, António A; Marques, Américo; Cordeiro-da-Silva, Anabela; Azevedo, Carlos

    2007-11-01

    Perkinsus atlanticus is a pathogenic protist that infects the clam Ruditapes decussatus. Although it was recently proposed that the genus Perkinsus belongs to a new phylum, Perkinsozoa, in the infra-kingdom Alveolata, there remain different opinions about whether this genus should form a phylum on its own and consequently divergent views about its taxonomic characterization. In this work, we have identified nine chromosomes by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) combined with densitometry analysis. The obtained karyotype of Perkinsus atlanticus, like that of other early branches of the dinoflagellate lineage, displays a more conventional chromosome organization, different from that of most dinoflagellates. PMID:17822886

  19. Genetic profiling of Klebsiella pneumoniae: comparison of pulsed field gel electrophoresis and random amplified polymorphic DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ashayeri-Panah, Mitra; Eftekhar, Fereshteh; Ghamsari, Maryam Mobarak; Parvin, Mahmood; Feizabadi, Mohammad Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the discriminatory power of pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) methods for subtyping of 54 clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae were compared. All isolates were typeable by RAPD, while 3.6% of them were not typeable by PFGE. The repeatability of both typing methods were 100% with satisfying reproducibility (≥ 95%). Although the discriminatory power of PFGE was greater than RAPD, both methods showed sufficient discriminatory power (DI > 0.95) which reflects the heterogeneity among the K. pneumoniae isolates. An optimized RAPD protocol is less technically demanding and time consuming that makes it a reliable typing method and competitive with PFGE. PMID:24516423

  20. Optimization of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis protocols for Salmonella Paratyphi A subtyping.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunxia; Zhao, Yingwei; Han, Hui; Pang, Bo; Zhang, Jingyun; Yan, Meiying; Diao, Baowei; Cui, Zhigang; Zhou, Haijian; Liang, Weili; Feng, Yanfang; Kan, Biao

    2012-04-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi A infection has caused public health problems in some countries in recent years. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) has been used for the subtyping and epidemiological investigations of some serotypes of Salmonella, mainly in outbreaks caused by non-typhoidal Salmonella. In this study, different restriction endonucleases and electrophoresis parameters were compared for the PFGE subtyping by using Salmonella Paratyphi A strain panels. Two protocols for the enzymes SpeI and XbaI showed higher discriminatory power, which may facilitate epidemiological analysis for more accurate case definition, and clonality study of Salmonella Paratyphi A. PMID:22443482

  1. Model and field studies of the degradation of cross-linked polyacrylamide gels used during the revegetation of slate waste.

    PubMed

    Holliman, Peter J; Clark, Jennifer A; Williamson, Julie C; Jones, Davey L

    2005-01-01

    Cross-linked polyacrylamide gels are increasingly being used in environmental restoration schemes and horticulture as a means of enhancing water supply to plants. However, the environmental impact of cross-linked polyacrylamide gel deployment in soil remains poorly understood. This study assessed the chemical, physical and biological properties of new and field-conditioned cross-linked polyacrylamide gels. Both monomeric acrylamide (11 microg l(-1)) and acrylic acid (285 microg l(-1)) were observed in new gel; however, the levels of monomers in field-conditioned gels (1-6 years old) were very low (acrylamide <1 microg l(-1); acrylic acid <7 microg l(-1)). Generally, freeze-thaw processes and exposure to UV radiation had little effect on gel acrylic acid and acrylamide concentrations. However, elevated temperatures (35 degrees C) caused a significant release of up to 144 mug l(-1) of acrylamide and 453 microg l(-1) of acrylic acid in new gel and up to 25 microg l(-1) of acrylamide and 157 microg l(-1) of acrylic acid in field-conditioned gels. In contrast, gel water holding capacity was highly dependent upon environmental conditions (UV exposure and freeze/thaw cycles produced the greatest loss of water holding in new gels) and gel age. Optical microscopy revealed that after placement in the field the gels became increasingly colonised over time by fungi and bacteria. In enrichment cultures, we were unable, however, to demonstrate microbial growth when cross-linked polyacrylamide was used as the sole nitrogen source. In summary, under a range of conditions cross-linked polyacrylamide did not release acrylamide above legally permitted limits, with the exception of gel subjected to elevated temperatures. However, their capacity for holding water decreased sharply within 18 months. We therefore conclude that cross-linked polyacrylamide placed in soil is relatively stable with respect to the production of potentially toxic acrylamide, a species with a short half

  2. XPCS study of dynamic correlation in polyurethane gel-carbonyl iron composite under magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriew, Helena; Wiegart, Lutz; Boczkowska, Anna; Mirkowska, Monika

    2010-10-01

    An X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) study of composite-type material consisting of polyurethane gel and carbonyl iron micrometric spheres was performed under magnetic fields of 0, 300 and 600 mT. The onion-like spheres structure was destroyed during the composite processing. The following conclusions were obtained from the study: -The polyurethane matrix is preferred as a source for the observed dynamic effects. -Below 300mT the material dynamics in direction of the outer magnetic field are very clear. -For 600 mT the dependence of the dynamics on magnetic field direction disappears, but the correlation rate is much higher. These findings may be caused by a disturbance of the polymer mesostructure by larger strain leading to its cross-linking.

  3. Conformational Entropy Mechanism for Periodic Motion of DNA under Constant-Field Gel Electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Ryuzo; Takayama, Hajime

    2006-06-01

    Entropic elasticity of a single charged polymer undergoing gel electrophoresis is a fundamental theme of polymer statistical physics since the discovery of “periodic” behavior in constant field gel electrophoresis (CFGE). In the present work we address the problem numerically by two steps. In the first step, we carry out Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations on CFGE by solving semi-microscopic Langevin equations of a polymer consisting of beads separated by a mean distance much smaller than the Kuhn length. Results are analyzed based on coarse-graining over the Kuhn length scale. We show the averaged elongation-contraction motion involves asymmetric V-shaped configurations whose shorter arm length depends on the field and the temperature consistently with what is expected when the BD chain is described by the freely-jointed chain (FJC) model with a suitable Kuhn length. To our knowledge, this is the first numerical confirmation of the FJC model itself from a submicroscopic description of polymer motion. The saturation of chain mobility in high fields agrees well with the nonlinear dependence of this shorter arm length on the field. In the second step, we discuss the periodic elongation-contraction motion of the coarse-grained chain by such a simplified model as a one-dimensional chain consisting of beads, elastic strings, and obstacles. The results from these two chain models indicate that the periodic elongation-contraction motion of DNA under CFGE is self-organized by a balance between the field force and the conformational entropic force.

  4. Theory of gel electrophoresis in high fields: Evolution of a population of hernias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Didier; Viovy, Jean-Louis

    1997-02-01

    We consider long polyelectrolytes that are initially at rest in a gel and suddenly submitted to a strong electric field. The evolution of the conformation regime is described up to the final disengagement from the initial tube. Just after the field has been applied, the chain adopts a comb-like conformation with several “hernias”, which evolve in competition with each other. As long as the conformation has many hernias, the distribution of their size follows a self-similar law, first described by Deutsch. The number of hernias decreases, and ultimately the chain disengages from its initial tube. Various predictions for the conformation of the chain in this last stage and for time constants are proposed. In particular, the disengagement times are found to follow a self-similar law in the size of the chains.

  5. Molecular Epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates in 100 Patients With Tuberculosis Using Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Pooideh, Mohammad; Jabbarzadeh, Ismail; Ranjbar, Reza; Saifi, Mahnaz

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) is a widespread infectious disease. Today, TB has created a public health crisis in the world. Genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates is useful for surveying the dynamics of TB infection, identifying new outbreaks, and preventing the disease. Different molecular methods for clustering of M. tuberculosis isolates have been used. Objectives: During a one year study of genotyping, 100 M. tuberculosis isolates from patients referred to Pasteur Institute of Iran were collected and their genotyping was accomplished using pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) method. Materials and Methods: Identification of all M. tuberculosis isolates was accomplished using standard biochemical and species-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed using proportional method. After preparing PFGE plaques for each isolate of M. tuberculosis, XbaI restriction enzyme was applied for genome digestion. Finally, the digested DNA fragments were separated on 1% agarose gel and analyzed with GelCompar II software. Results: Genotyping of the studied isolates in comparison with the molecular weight marker revealed two common types; pulsotype A with 71 isolates and one multidrug resistant mycobacterium (MDR) case, and pulsotype B including 29 isolates and three MDR cases. No correlation between the antibiotypes and pulsotypes was observed. Conclusions: Molecular epidemiology studies of infectious diseases have been useful when bacterial isolates have been clustered in a period of time and in different geographical regions with variable antibiotic resistance patterns. In spite of high geographical differences and different antibiotic resistant patterns, low genetic diversity among the studied TB isolates may refer to the low rate of mutations in XbaI restriction sites in the mycobacterial genome. We also identified three MDR isolates in low-incidence pulsotype B, which could be disseminated and is highly

  6. Dc to ac field conversion due to leaky-wave excitation in a plasma slab behind an ionization front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostin, V. A.; Vvedenskii, N. V.

    2015-03-01

    We present a way for generating coherent tunable electromagnetic radiation through dc to ac field conversion by an ionization front. The conversion is caused by the excitation of leaky waves behind the transversely limited ionization front propagating in a uniform electrostatic field. This differs significantly from the well-known dc-to-ac-radiation-converter models which consider Doppler-like frequency conversion by a transversely unlimited ionization front propagating in a spatially periodic electric field. We explore the dispersion properties and excitation of these leaky waves radiated through the transverse plasma boundary at the Cherenkov angle to the direction of propagation of a superluminal ionization front as dependent on the parameters of the plasma produced and on the speed of the ionization front. It is shown that not only the center frequency but also the duration and waveform of the generated pulse may significantly depend on the speed of the ionization front. The results indicate the possibility of using such converters based on planar photoconductive antennas to create sources of microwave and terahertz radiation with controllable waveforms that are transformed from video to radio pulse when the angle of incident ionizing radiation is tuned.

  7. Sausage oscillations of coronal plasma slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornsey, C.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Fludra, A.

    2014-07-01

    Context. Sausage oscillations are observed in plasma non-uniformities of the solar corona as axisymmetric perturbations of the non-uniformity. Often, these non-uniformities can be modelled as field-aligned slabs of the density enhancement. Aims: We perform parametric studies of sausage oscillations of plasma slabs, aiming to determine the dependence of the oscillation period on its parameters, and the onset of leaky and trapped regimes of the oscillations. Methods: Slabs with smooth transverse profiles of the density of a zero-beta plasma are perturbed by an impulsive localised perturbation of the sausage symmetry. In particular, the slab can contain an infinitely thin current sheet in its centre. The initial value problem is then solved numerically. The numerical results are subject to spectral analysis. The results are compared with analytical solutions for a slab with a step-function profile and also with sausage oscillations of a plasma cylinder. Results: We established that sausage oscillations in slabs generally have the same properties as in plasma cylinders. In the trapped regime, the sausage oscillation period increases with the increase in the longitudinal wavelength. In the leaky regime, the dependence of the period on the wavelength experiences saturation, and the period becomes independent of the wavelength in the long-wavelength limit. In the leaky regime the period is always longer than in the trapped regime. The sausage oscillation period in a slab is always longer than in a cylinder with the same transverse profile. In slabs with steeper transverse profiles, sausage oscillations have longer periods. The leaky regime occurs at shorter wavelengths in slabs with smoother profiles.

  8. 5 × 5 cm2 silicon photonic crystal slabs on glass and plastic foil exhibiting broadband absorption and high-intensity near-fields

    PubMed Central

    Becker, C.; Wyss, P.; Eisenhauer, D.; Probst, J.; Preidel, V.; Hammerschmidt, M.; Burger, S.

    2014-01-01

    Crystalline silicon photonic crystal slabs are widely used in various photonics applications. So far, the commercial success of such structures is still limited owing to the lack of cost-effective fabrication processes enabling large nanopatterned areas (≫ 1 cm2). We present a simple method for producing crystalline silicon nanohole arrays of up to 5 × 5 cm2 size with lattice pitches between 600 and 1000 nm on glass and flexible plastic substrates. Exclusively up-scalable, fast fabrication processes are applied such as nanoimprint-lithography and silicon evaporation. The broadband light trapping efficiency of the arrays is among the best values reported for large-area experimental crystalline silicon nanostructures. Further, measured photonic crystal resonance modes are in good accordance with light scattering simulations predicting strong near-field intensity enhancements greater than 500. Hence, the large-area silicon nanohole arrays might become a promising platform for ultrathin solar cells on lightweight substrates, high-sensitive optical biosensors, and nonlinear optics. PMID:25073935

  9. Separation of chromosomal DNA molecules from yeast by orthogonal-field-alternation gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Carle, G F; Olson, M V

    1984-01-01

    A simple agarose-gel apparatus has been developed that allows the separation of DNA molecules in the size range from 50 kb to well over 750 kb, the largest size for which size standards were available. The apparatus is based on the recent discovery that large DNA molecules are readily fractionated on agarose gels if they are alternately subjected to two approximately orthogonal electric fields. The switching time, which was on the order of 20-50 sec in our experiments, can be adjusted to optimize fractionation in a given size range. The resolution of the technique is sufficient to allow the fractionation of a sample of self-ligated lambda DNA into a ladder of approximately 15 bands, spaced at 50 kb intervals. We have applied the technique to the fractionation of yeast DNA into 11 distinct bands, several of which have been shown by DNA-DNA hybridization to hybridize uniquely to different chromosome-specific hybridization probes. In this paper, we describe the design of the apparatus, the electrophoretic protocol, and the sample-handling procedures that we have employed. Images PMID:6379602

  10. Segmentation of 2D gel electrophoresis spots using a Markov random field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeflich, Christopher S.; Corso, Jason J.

    2009-02-01

    We propose a statistical model-based approach for the segmentation of fragments of DNA as a first step in the automation of the primarily manual process of comparing two or more images resulting from the Restriction Landmark Genomic Scanning (RLGS) method. These 2D gel electrophoresis images are the product of the separation of DNA into fragments that appear as spots on X-ray films. The goal is to find instances where a spot appears in one image and not in another since a missing spot can be correlated with a region of DNA that has been affected by a disease such as cancer. The entire comparison process is typically done manually, which is tedious and very error prone. We pose the problem as the labeling of each image pixel as either a spot or non-spot and use a Markov Random Field (MRF) model and simulated annealing for inference. Neighboring spot labels are then connected to form spot regions. The MRF based model was tested on actual 2D gel electrophoresis images.

  11. Deepest hypocentral distributions associated with stagnant slabs and penetrated slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukao, Y.; Obayashi, M.

    2013-12-01

    We constructed a new P-wave tomographic model of the mantle, GAP_P4, using more than ten millions of travel time data, including waveform-based differential travel times from ocean bottoms, to all of which the finite frequency kernels were applied in the inversion. Based on this model, we made a systematic survey for subducted slab images around the Circum Pacific. This survey revealed a progressive lateral variation of slab configuration along arc(s), where a subducted slab is in general in one or two of the following four stages: I. slab stagnant above the 660, II. slab penetrating the 660, III. slab trapped in the uppermost lower mantle (660 to ˜1000 km in depth), and IV. slab descending well into the deep lower mantle. The majority of the slab images are either at stage I or III. We interpret I to IV as the successive stages of slab subduction through the transition region with the 660 at the middle. There is a remarkable correlation of the slab configuration with the deepest shock hypocentral distribution. Subhorizontal distributions of deepest shocks are associated with stagnant slabs in the transition zone (slabs at stage I). Their focal depths are limited to shallower than ˜620 km. Steeply dipping deepest shock distributions are associated with penetrating slabs across the 660-km discontinuity or trapped slabs below it (slabs at stages II and III). Their focal depths extend well beyond ˜620 km. There are no cases of association of either a stagnant slab (at stage I) with subvertical distribution of deepest shocks or a trapped slab (at stage II or III) with their subhorizontal distribution. Only steeply dipping slabs appear to penetrate the 660 to be trapped in the uppermost lower mantle. The along-arc variations of stagnant-slab configuration and deepest shock distribution beneath the Bonin arc indicate a process of how the slab begins to penetrate the 660-km discontinuity after the slab stagnation. Those beneath the Java arc and Kermadec arc commonly

  12. Molecular analysis of chromosomal rearrangements using pulsed field gel electrophoresis and somatic cell hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, L.M. )

    1991-01-01

    Many human genetic diseases, including some cancers, are characterized by consistent chromosome abnormalities, such as deletions and translocations. Analyses of these mutations often prove crucial to the eventual cloning and characterization of the gene(s) responsible for the disease. Two methods for analyzing these chromosome abnormalities have been developed in recent years: somatic cell hybridization and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Somatic cell hybridization is a technique for segregating an aberrant chromosome from its normal homologue in a cell derived from an unrelated species, which is usually a rodent. Demonstrations of these analytic techniques are presented, using as an example chromosomal abnormalities involving human chromosome band 11p13, the locus for the Wilms' tumor, aniridia, genitourinary abnormality, and mental retardation (WAGR) syndrome.

  13. Epidemiological investigation of Salmonella tilene by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Chandar M; Fonseca, Kevin; Longmore, Ken; Rennie, Robert; Chui, Linda; Lingley, Mike; Woodward, David

    1997-01-01

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and DNA fingerprinting by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were performed on 11 isolates of Salmonella tilene. Five strains were from a cluster of human patients, six from sugar gliders and pygmy hedgehogs kept as family pets or from local pet retailers, and one isolate from the first North American case of S tilene described in Washington State in 1994. The PFGE restriction patterns showed all isolates to be similar. However, PCR using primers to the 16S and 23S rRNA genes of Escherichia coli demonstrated that the Washington State isolate differed from the rest of the other isolates, which were all similar based upon their DNA fingerprint. This study indicates that reliance on one technique alone may be insufficient to show nuances between strains that are, in many respects, closely related. PMID:22346526

  14. Epidemiological typing of Flavimonas oryzihabitans by PCR and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Liu, P Y; Shi, Z Y; Lau, Y J; Hu, B S; Shyr, J M; Tsai, W S; Lin, Y H; Tseng, C Y

    1996-01-01

    Flavimonas oryzihabitans has emerged as a potential nosocomial pathogen in recent years. The typing method for characterization of this species has never been reported before. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-based PCR were used to generate DNA fingerprints for 14F. oryzihabitans isolates obtained from eight episodes of nosocomial infections during a 2-year period. Both techniques successfully classified these clinical isolates into eight distinct genotypes, thus indicating that all of these episodes of infections were independent. In contrast, repeated isolates from the same patient were assigned to identical genotypes. The reproducibility of both techniques was good. Therefore, we conclude that both PFGE and ERIC-PCR have comparable reproducible and discriminatory powers for the typing of F. oryzihabitans and may be useful for clarifying the epidemiology of this species; however, ERIC-PCR has the advantages of both speed and simplicity. PMID:8748275

  15. Characterization of Listeria monocytogenes isolates from cattle and ground beef by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Foerster, Claudia; Vidal, Lorena; Troncoso, Miriam; Figueroa, Guillermo

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the occurrence of Listeria monocytogenes in cattle feces and ground beef, to characterize these strains by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and to compare them to three listeria strains found in humans. Cattle from different origins (n = 250) and ground beef obtained from supermarkets (n = 40) were sampled. The results show low occurrence in cattle feces (0.4 %) but a higher presence in ground beef (37 %). An important part of the ground beef strains (80 %) had > 95 % similarity with a strain isolated from a human sporadic case and the ATCC 19115 used as control. The strain isolated from cattle feces had 93 % similarity to clone 009, previously associated with a listeriosis outbreak related to cheese. Cattle and ground beef can harbor virulent L. monocytogenes strains. Further studies in animals and animal products are needed to improve listeriosis control. PMID:23102469

  16. Campylobacter coli pulsed field gel electrophoresis genotypic diversity among sows and piglets in a farrowing barn.

    PubMed

    Hume, Michael E; Droleskey, Robert E; Sheffield, Cynthia L; Harvey, Roger B

    2002-08-01

    Genotypes of Campylobacter coli isolates from feces of three sows and rectal swabs of 17 piglets were examined by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). All of the animals originated from a single farrowing barn of a farrow-to-finish swine operation. Five Campylobacter colonies were picked from a single agar plate for each sample after broth enrichment and growth on Campy-Cefex agar. Genotypes were examined by PFGE after genomic DNA digestion with SmaI and SacII restriction endonucleases. Twenty SmaI genotypes and 12 SacII genotypes were detected among 99 Campylobacter coli isolates. There was no pattern of shared genotypes between sows and their respective piglets, nor between littermates. Results indicate that a high number of Campylobacter genotypes may coexist in related pigs from a single housing facility. PMID:12070692

  17. Epidemiologic study of Taylorella equigenitalis strains by field inversion gel electrophoresis of genomic restriction endonuclease fragments.

    PubMed

    Bleumink-Pluym, N; ter Laak, E A; van der Zeijst, B A

    1990-09-01

    Contagious equine metritis (CEM), a sexually transmitted bacterial disease, was first described in thoroughbred horses. It also occurs in nonthoroughbred horses, in which it produces isolated, apparently unrelated outbreaks. Thirty-two strains of Taylorella equigenitalis, the causative agent of CEM, from all over the world were characterized by field inversion gel electrophoresis of fragments of genomic DNA obtained by digestion with low-cleavage-frequency restriction enzymes. This resulted in a division into five clearly distinct groups. Strains from thoroughbred horses from all continents belonged to one group. Strains from nonthoroughbred horses from various countries were different from strains from thoroughbred horses; four groups could be determined. Two groups contained both streptomycin-resistant and streptomycin-susceptible strains. The data indicate that CEM in nonthoroughbreds did not originate from the thoroughbred population; also, the reverse was not demonstrated. Thus, extensive international transportation directives regarding the testing of nonthoroughbred horses for CEM may need reconsideration. PMID:2172296

  18. Austin Chalk: cross-link gel water, slick water fracs common in Giddings field

    SciTech Connect

    Mickey, V.

    1981-05-01

    Of the approx. 600 wells drilled in the Giddings field, Austin Chalk trend in the last year, most were probably completed by cross-link gel fracs or slick water fracs. Although open hole completions are not uncommon in the chalk, they are not really practical in most situations, given the 600 to 800 ft of gross pay usually encountered in the Austin Chalk trend. Most of the open hole completions occur when an operator takes a kick while drilling and decides to drop a mud pill over the zone, run casing above it, cement it in and produce the interval open hole. Chalk wells are subject to kick at any time during drilling because of natural fracturing systems throughout the trend. Mud weights are generally fairly light for faster drilling, approx. 9.4 to 9.8 lb, depending on the particular area.

  19. Derivation of clones close to met by preparative field inversion gel electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Michiels, F.; Burmeister, M.; Lehrach, H.

    1987-06-05

    The molecular analysis of genes identified by mutations is a major problems in mammalian genetics. As a step toward this goal, preparative field inversion gel electrophoresis (FIGE) was used to selectively isolate clones from the environment of genetically linked markers, and to select a subset of these clones containing sequences next to specific restriction sites rare in mammalian DNA. This approach has been used to generate a library highly enriched in sequences closely linked to the cystic fibrosis marker met. One clone derived from the end of a Not I restriction fragment containing the met sequence was analyzed in detail and localized within a long range map to a position of 300 kilobase pairs 5' of the metD sequence.

  20. Laboratory and field evaluation of an indoxacarb gel bait against two cockroach species (Dictyoptera: Blattellidae, Blattidae) in Lagos, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Anikwe, Joseph Chuks; Adetoro, Fouad Abidemi; Anogwih, Joy Anuri; Makanjuola, Winifred Ayinke; Kemabonta, Kehinde Abike; Akinwande, Kayode Lawrence

    2014-08-01

    Indoxacarb gel bait was evaluated for its efficacy in the laboratory and field against American cockroaches, Periplaneta americana (L.), and German cockroaches, Blattella germanica (L.). Advion 0.6% indoxacarb gel bait was toxic to both P. americana and B. germanica. There were no significant differences in the LT50 (h) values for treatment levels of 0.25 g, 0.5 g, and 1.0 g gel applied against P. americana, whereas gel applied at 0.5 g to B. germanica had a significantly greater LT50 (h) in the laboratory than the gel treatments on P. americana. The LT50 for both cockroach species ranged from 40.65 to 145.60 h. There was no control mortality in the laboratory bioassays. In the field, 55 houses were treated with 0.5 g of 6-8 spots of indoxacarb gel bait per kitchen of two or three bedroom bungalows from three Local Government Areas of Lagos State, comprising Surulere (22), Alimosho (12), and Shomolu (21). Mean reduction in cockroach populations varied from location to location based on the level of infestations. Percentage reductions in the indoxacarb gel-treated units ranged from 3.5% at 1 d after treatment to 99.8% at 14 d at Surulere, while reductions ranged from 8.9% at 1 d after treatment to 99.7% at 14 d at Shomolu; a similar trend was observed for Alimosho. Indoxacarb gel bait was highly effective in the control of cockroaches. PMID:25195457

  1. Micro gel column technique is fit for detecting mixed fields post ABO incompatible hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Li, Min-Fang; Liu, Feng; Zhang, Min

    2015-04-01

    How to choose suitable serologic method for assessment of the actual stages of ABO chimera is more important to establish transfusion strategy for patients post-ABO incompatible hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We reported ABO phenotypes of a patient post-ABO minor incompatible hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from 1+ weak agglutination by tube method was obviously reaffirmed to mixed fields with 4+ positive reaction by micro gel column card. Hence, blood bank technologists must continually work together with hematologist to establish appropriate transfusion strategy, and micro gel column technique can be more appropriate for detecting mixed fields during the whole period of transplantation. PMID:25578650

  2. DNA electrophoresis in agarose gels: Effects of electric field and gel concentration on the exponential dependence of reciprocal mobility on DNA length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beheshti, Afshin; van Winkle, David; Randolph, Rill

    2002-03-01

    Electrophoresis was performed on double stranded DNA fragments ranging in length from 200 bp to 48502 bp at agarose gel concentrations T = 0.5% - 1.5% and electric fields E = 0.71 V/cm to 5 V/cm. A wide range of electric fields and gel concentrations were used to find what range of conditions work with the new interpolation equation, 1/μ(L) = 1/μl - (1/μl - 1/μ_s)e^-L/γ. The equation fit extremely well (\\chi^2 >= 0.999) to data with E = 2.5 V/cm to 5 V/cm and for lower fields (E < 2.5 V/cm) at low gel concentrations (T = 0.5% and 0.7%). This exponential relation seemed to hold when there is a smooth transition from the Ogston sieving regime to the reptation regime when looking at the “reptation plots” (plotting 3μL/μo vs. L) (Rousseau, J., Drouin, G., and Slater, G. W., Phys Rev Lett. 1997, 79, 1945-1948). For separations of single-stranded DNA in polyacrylamide, similar reptation plots have a region with a negative slope between the Ogston sieving regime and the reptation regime which has been interpreted as the signature of entropic trapping. When separating double-stranded DNA in agarose it was observed that fits deviate from the data when three different slopes are observed in the reptation plots. Failure of the simple exponential relationship between reciprocal mobility and DNA length appears to be the consequence of entropic trapping.

  3. Polyelectrolyte gels

    SciTech Connect

    Segalman, D.J.; Witkowski, W.R.

    1995-06-01

    Polyelectrolyte (PE) gels are swollen polymer/solvent networks that undergo a reversible volume collapse/expansion through various types of stimulation. Applications that could exploit this large deformation and solvent expulsion/absorption characteristics include robotic {open_quotes}fingers{close_quotes} and drug delivery systems. The goals of the research were to first explore the feasibility of using the PE gels as {open_quotes}smart materials{close_quotes} - materials whose response can be controlled by an external stimulus through a feedback mechanism. Then develop a predictive capability to simulate the dynamic behavior of these gels. This involved experimentally characterizing the response of well-characterized gels to an applied electric field and other stimuli to develop an understanding of the underlying mechanisms which cause the volume collapse. Lastly, the numerical analysis tool was used to simulate various potential engineering devices based on PE gels. This report discusses the pursuit of those goals through experimental and computational means.

  4. Safety Evaluation of Self-assembling Peptide Gel after Intracranial Administration to Rats Using the Open Field Test.

    PubMed

    Tsunoda, Masashi; Sugaya, Chiemi; Sugiura, Yumiko; Nagai, Yusuke; Sakanishi, Kotaro

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembling peptides have been developed as clinical materials, which could scaffold to regenerate nerve cells and hemostatic materials in vivo. However, there has not been enough information for their in vivo application. The safety of self-assembling peptides for the application on the brain was examined using behavioral tests for each rat in this study. Self-assembling peptide gel was administered to the surface of the brain at a volume of 20 µL at 1.5%. After 2 months, the open field test and the prepulse inhibition (PPI) test were performed. There were no significant differences between the peptide gel and the control groups in locomotor distances and in %PPIs in the PPI test. The mean values of the percentage of time the rats stayed in the central area of the open field during the first 5 min and instances of center rearing or face washing in the peptide gel group were significantly higher than those in the control. There were amorphous substance in the subarachnoid region, and infiltrations of mononuclear cells were also observed in the self-assembling peptide gel group. Although the meaning of the effects observed in this study was not fully elucidated, the self-assembling gel produced marginal but significant behavioral and histological effects. PMID:27582322

  5. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of the genomic restriction fragments of coagulase-negative staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Snopková, S; Götz, F; Doskar, J; Rosypal, S

    1994-12-01

    The genomes of 47 coagulase-negative staphylococcal strains assigned to different species were analysed by pulsed-field electrophoresis. The strains were clustered on the basis of their similarity in the SmaI restriction patterns into various groups, each group consisting of the type strain and the strains whose SmaI restriction patterns were similar to that of the type of strain. The SmaI restriction groups seem to correspond to the following species: Staphylococcus warneri, S. hominis, S. xylosus, S. lugdunensis, S. kloosii, S. haemolyticus, S. lentus, S. cohnii, S. equorum, S. chromogenes, S. saprophyticus, S. simulans, S. carnosus, S. capitis and S. auricularis. The species S. sciuri, S. caseolyticus, S. gallinarum, S. epidermidis and S. schleiferi were represented only by their type strains and showed no similarity in their SmaI restriction patterns neither to each other nor to all the other species investigated here. Thus, the classification of coagulase-negative staphylococcal strains into the above species seems to be confirmed also by genome restriction analysis carried out by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. PMID:7813882

  6. Improved Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis Procedure for the Analysis of F. columnare Isolates Previously Affected by DNA Degradation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flavobacterium columnare is a fresh water bacterium that causes columnaris diseases in over 36 fish species. Intra-species typing of F. columnare can be performed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). However, this method is hampered by the degradation of chromosomal DNA in about 10% of strain...

  7. Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis along with Antimicrobial Resistance pattern of Salmonella serotypes isolated from broiler whole carcass rinses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and antibiogram patterns have been used to evaluate the diversity within and between individual Salmonella serotypes. The objectives of the study were to evaluate the PFGE along with antimicrobial resistance patterns of Salmonella isolates originating from br...

  8. Application of multiplex PCR, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and BOX-PCR for molecular analysis of enterococci

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the study was to use band-based molecular methods including BOX-PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) to determine if genetically related enterococci were found among different stores, food types, or years. Enterococci were also characterized f...

  9. Implementation of Salmonella serotype determination using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis in a state public health laboratory.

    PubMed

    Bopp, Dianna J; Baker, Deborah J; Thompson, Lisa; Saylors, Amy; Root, Timothy P; Armstrong, Leeanna; Mitchell, Kara; Dumas, Nellie B; Musser, Kimberlee Arruda

    2016-08-01

    We examined the use of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) to predict serotype for Salmonella isolates. Between 2012 and 2014 we assessed 4481 isolates, resulting in >90% assigned serotypes. PFGE is efficient for determining serotype in the majority of cases and results in expedited serotype determination, as well as cost savings. PMID:27220605

  10. Characterization of Salmonella isolates from retail foods based on serotyping, pulse field gel electrophoresis, antibiotic resistance and other phenotypic properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sixteen Salmonella strains isolated from a variety of foods during 2000 and 2003, by the Florida State Department of Agriculture, were characterized by various genotypic and phenotypic tests. Among 16 isolates, 15 different serotypes were identified. Pulse-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) fingerpr...

  11. Genetic diversity demonstrated by pulsed field gel electrophoresis of Salmonella enterica isolates obtained from diverse sources in Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to determine the genetic diversity of Salmonella isolates recovered from a variety of sources using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) to assess their possible relatedness. Salmonella was isolated from ca. 52% of samples from a pepper var. Bell production system. A to...

  12. Cordilleran slab windows

    SciTech Connect

    Thorkelson, D.J.; Taylor, R.P. )

    1989-09-01

    The geometry and geologic implications of subducted spreading ridges are topics that have bedeviled earth scientists ever since the recognition of plate tectonics. As a consequence of subduction of the Kula-Farallon and East Pacific rises, slab windows formed and migrated beneath the North American Cordillera. The probable shape and extent of these windows, which represent the asthenosphere-filled gaps between two separating, subducting oceanic plates, are depicted from the Late Cretaceous to the present. Possible effects of the existence and migration of slab windows on the Cordillera at various times include cessation of arc volcanism and replacement by rift or plate-edge volcanism; lithospheric uplift, attenuation, and extension; and increased intensity of compressional tectonism. Eocene extensional tectonism and alkaline magmatism in southern British Columbia and the northwestern United States were facilitated by slab-window development.

  13. Sample collection system for gel electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Olivares, Jose A.; Stark, Peter C.; Dunbar, John M.; Hill, Karen K.; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Roybal, Gustavo

    2004-09-21

    An automatic sample collection system for use with an electrophoretic slab gel system is presented. The collection system can be used with a slab gel have one or more lanes. A detector is used to detect particle bands on the slab gel within a detection zone. Such detectors may use a laser to excite fluorescently labeled particles. The fluorescent light emitted from the excited particles is transmitted to low-level light detection electronics. Upon the detection of a particle of interest within the detection zone, a syringe pump is activated, sending a stream of buffer solution across the lane of the slab gel. The buffer solution collects the sample of interest and carries it through a collection port into a sample collection vial.

  14. Separation of long linear polymers in gel electrophoresis with alternating electric fields: A theoretical study using the necklace model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terranova, G. R.; Mártin, H. O.; Aldao, C. M.

    2012-06-01

    The necklace model, which mimics the reptation of a chain of N beads in a square lattice, is used to study the drift velocity of charged linear polymers in gels under an applied electric field that periodically changes its direction. The characteristics of the model allow us to determine the effects of the alternating electric field on the chains’ dynamics. We explain why chains of different N can be made to move in opposite directions with a nonuniform electric field with certain values of intensity and frequency. The key point is that, when alternating electric fields are applied, longer chains spend more time out of the steady-state regime than lower chains. Numerical results are obtained by means of Monte Carlo simulations and they are qualitatively in agreement with experiments of DNA migration in gel electrophoresis.

  15. Molecular Analysis of Mycobacterium avium Isolates by Using Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis and PCR

    PubMed Central

    Pestel-Caron, Martine; Graff, Gabriel; Berthelot, Gilles; Pons, Jean-Louis; Lemeland, Jean-François

    1999-01-01

    Genetic relationships among 46 isolates of Mycobacterium avium recovered from 37 patients in a 2,500-bed hospital from 1993 to 1998 were assessed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and PCR amplification of genomic sequences located between the repetitive elements IS1245 and IS1311. Each technique enabled the identification of 27 to 32 different patterns among the 46 isolates, confirming that the genetic heterogeneity of M. avium strains is high in a given community. Furthermore, this retrospective analysis of sporadic isolates allowed us (i) to suggest the existence of two remanent strains in our region, (ii) to raise the question of the possibility of nosocomial acquisition of M. avium strains, and (iii) to document laboratory contamination. The methods applied in the present study were found to be useful for the typing of M. avium isolates. In general, both methods yielded similar results for both related and unrelated isolates. However, the isolates in five of the six PCR clusters were distributed among two to three PFGE patterns, suggesting that this PCR-based method may have limitations for the analysis of strains with low insertion sequence copy numbers or for resolution of extended epidemiologic relationships. PMID:10405383

  16. Rapid identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Selim, Samy; El Kholy, Iman; Hagagy, Nashwa; El Alfay, Sahar; Aziz, Mohamed Abdel

    2015-01-01

    Twenty clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates recovered from patients admitted to The General Hospital in Ismailia Governorate (Egypt) were examined in this study. We analysed P. aeruginosa ATCC 9027 (as a control strain) and 19 of the isolates after digestion with SpeI restriction endonuclease. After this we conducted a pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and typed the obtained 10 unique patterns, designated as A, A1, B, B1, C, C1, D, D1, E and F. We evaluated the genetic relatedness between all strains, based on ≥87% band identity. As a result, the isolates were grouped in the 10 clusters as follows: patterns A, A1, B, B1, C contained two strains each and patterns C1, D, D1, E contained a single strain each; the five remaining strains were closely related (genomic pattern F). One isolate belonged to antibiotype ‘b’. The genotype patterns of the P. aeruginosa ATCC 9027 control strain and isolate no. 11 were closely related and had two different antibiotypes ‘d’ and ‘c’, respectively. PMID:26019629

  17. Genome fingerprinting of Salmonella typhi by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis for subtyping common phage types.

    PubMed Central

    Nair, S.; Poh, C. L.; Lim, Y. S.; Tay, L.; Goh, K. T.

    1994-01-01

    The genomic DNA of 39 strains of Salmonella typhi isolated from local residents and patients who had visited countries in the Asian region was analysed for restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP). Pulsed-field gel electrophoretic (PFGE) analysis of Xba I- and Spe I-generated genomic restriction fragments established 22 PFGE types whereas phage typing differentiated the 39 isolates into 9 distinct phage types. This study showed that PFGE is more discriminatory than phage typing as it is capable of subtyping S. typhi strains of the same phage types. Genetic relatedness among the isolates was determined. Seven major clusters were identified at SABs of > 0.80 and the remaining 13 isolates were distributed into minor clusters which were related at SABs of less than 0.80. In conclusion, PFGE analysis in conjunction with distance matrix analysis served as a useful tool for delineating common S. typhi phage types of diverse origins from different geographical locales and separated in time. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7995349

  18. Molecular epidemiologic analysis of Vibrio cholerae O1 isolates by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Mahalingam, S; Cheong, Y M; Kan, S; Yassin, R M; Vadivelu, J; Pang, T

    1994-01-01

    Isolates of Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor from two well-defined cholera outbreaks in Malaysia were analyzed by using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Isolates from sporadic cases occurring during the same time period were also studied. Digestion of chromosomal DNA from these isolates of V. cholerae O1 with restriction endonucleases NotI (5'-GCGGCCGC-3') and SfiI (5'-GGCCNNNN-3'), followed by PFGE, produced restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) patterns consisting of 13 to 24 bands (ranging in size from 46 to 398 kbp). Analysis of the REA patterns generated by PFGE after digestion with NotI and SfiI suggested the clonal nature and close genetic identity of the isolates obtained during each of the two outbreaks (Dice coefficient, 0.93 to 1.0). Although they had very similar REA patterns, the two outbreak clones were not identical. Isolates of V. cholerae O1 from sporadic cases, on the other hand, appeared to be much more heterogeneous (five different REA patterns detected in the five isolates tested; Dice coefficient, 0.31 to 0.81) than those obtained during the two outbreaks. We conclude that PFGE of V. cholerae O1 chromosomal DNA digested with infrequently cutting restriction endonucleases is a useful method for molecular typing of V. cholerae isolates for epidemiological purposes. Images PMID:7883885

  19. Characterization of Erwinia amylovora strains from Bulgaria by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Atanasova, Iliana; Urshev, Zoltan; Hristova, Petya; Bogatzevska, Nevena; Moncheva, Penka

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize genetically Bulgarian Erwinia amylovora strains using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis. Fifty E. amylovora strains isolated from different hosts, locations, as well as in different years were analysed by PFGE after XbaI, SpeI, and XhoI digestion of the genomic DNA. The strains were distributed into four groups according to their XbaI-generated profile. About 82% of the strains displayed a PFGE profile identical to that of type Pt2. Three strains belonged to the Central Europe Pt1 type. Two new PFGE profiles, not reported so far, were established--one for a strain isolated from Malus domestica and another for all Fragaria spp. strains. The same grouping of the strains was obtained after analysis of the SpeI digestion patterns. On the basis of PFGE profiles, after XbaI and SpeI digestion, a genetic differentiation between the strains associated with subfamily Maloideae and subfamily Rosoideae was revealed. The presence of more than one PFGE profile in the population of E. amylovora in Bulgaria suggests a multiple source of inoculum. PMID:22624335

  20. Slab Leaf Bowls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suitor, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    In science class, fourth graders investigate the structure of plants and leaves from trees and how the process of photosynthesis turns sunlight into sugar proteins. In this article, the author fuses art and science for a creative and successful clay slab project in her elementary art classroom. (Contains 1 online resource.)

  1. Characterization of Mannheimia haemolytica in beef calves via nasopharyngeal culture and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Capik, Sarah F; White, Brad J; Lubbers, Brian V; Apley, Michael D; Mosier, Derek A; Larson, Robert L; Murray, Robert W

    2015-09-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica is a major bacterial component of bovine respiratory disease (BRD); unfortunately, very little is known about M. haemolytica transmission dynamics among cattle. Identifying potential variation in M. haemolytica populations over time and induction of nasopharyngeal colonization and subsequent shedding are 2 areas where knowledge is lacking. In our study, 2 separate loads of 20 mixed-origin, male calves were purchased through an order buyer on different dates. Deep nasopharyngeal cultures (NPC) were performed on all calves on arrival and, if M. haemolytica-negative, a second screening culture was obtained. Calves that were negative on 2 initial NPCs (NEG; n = 4) were subsequently challenged with a previously isolated field strain of M. haemolytica in both the upper and lower respiratory tract, individually housed, and then monitored for M. haemolytica shedding via NPCs at 0.5, 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 days postchallenge. Naturally M. haemolytica-positive calves (2 per load) were kept for additional daily cultures (POS; n = 4). Individual calf M. haemolytica status for both the POS and NEG groups was inconsistent between study days. Additionally, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis performed on isolates from the positive cultures showed that the NEG calves did not shed the M. haemolytica challenge strain, but rather 2 distinct clusters of M. haemolytica were shared among POS and NEG calves regardless of their initial status. Although sample sizes were small, these findings illustrate how variable the results of a single nasopharyngeal swab can be and the challenges of using an individual culture to truly represent animal M. haemolytica status. PMID:26330399

  2. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE): application in population structure studies of bovine mastitis-causing streptococci.

    PubMed

    Santos-Sanches, Ilda; Chambel, Lélia; Tenreiro, Rogério

    2015-01-01

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) separates large DNA molecules by the use of an alternating electrical field, such that greater size resolution can be obtained when compared to normal agarose gel electrophoresis. PFGE is often employed to track pathogens and is a valuable typing scheme to detect and differentiate strains. Particularly, the contour-clamped homogeneous electric field (CHEF) PFGE system is considered to be the gold standard for use in epidemiological studies of many bacterial pathogens. Here we describe a PFGE protocol that was applicable to the study of bovine streptococci, namely, Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus, GBS), Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae (group C Streptococcus, GCS), and Streptococcus uberis-which are relevant pathogens causing mastitis, a highly prevalent and costly disease in dairy industry due to antibiotherapy and loss in milk production. PMID:25399106

  3. Reduction of a high-field dielectric artifact with homemade gel.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Yukihisa; Nonaka, Hiroi; Nakajima, Manabu; Obata, Takayuki; Ikehira, Hiroo

    2008-01-01

    We developed an original dielectric-equivalent gel (Japanese Patent Application ID: P2004-236876A, February 6, 2003) pad that could improve inhomogeneous images caused primarily by B(1) homogeneity on a high-tesla magnetic resonance (MR) system. Made easily from various ingredients, our gel could reduce interference from radiofrequency waves at an object's surface and show changes in B(1) inhomogeneity. We herein assess the gel's effect using a plastic-bottle phantom on a 3T MR system. PMID:18460847

  4. Application of pulsed field gel electrophoresis to the 1993 epidemic of whooping cough in the UK.

    PubMed Central

    Syedabubakar, S. N.; Matthews, R. C.; Preston, N. W.; Owen, D.; Hillier, V.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to DNA fingerprint the majority (64%) of isolates received at the Pertussis Reference Laboratory during the 1993 whooping cough epidemic by pulsed field gel electrophoresis of Xba I-generated restriction digests. Two DNA restriction patterns, types 1 and 3, predominated (40% and 23%, respectively, of 180 isolates) but type 2, identified in a previous study was notably absent. Twenty-one new DNA types occurred (24% of isolates), some being atypical as bands 155-230 kb were no longer conserved, but there was no statistically significant difference in their incidence in the upswing (June-September) compared to the downswing (October-December) phase of the epidemic. There was a relatively high proportion of new types, compared to type 1, at the peak (September). About 50% of isolates received were from the North Western Region, where 44% of isolates were DNA type 1. Whereas only 1 out of 10 isolates from Scotland were of this type, suggesting some geographic variation. Statistically significant findings included a higher proportion of isolates from female patients (P < 0.01), most marked in the 12-24 months age group (P < 0.05); a higher proportion of infants under 12 months requiring hospital admission compared to older children (P < 0.05); and a greater number of isolates from unvaccinated children (P < 0.01). Analysis of serotype according to four age groups (under 3 months, 3-12 months, 12-24 months and above 2 years) showed statistically significant differences (P < 0.05) with a noticeably lower proportion (38%) of serotype 1,3 in 3-12 months age group and higher prevalence (74%) of serotype 1,3 in the 12-24 months age group. There was no correlation between DNA type and serotype. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7641824

  5. Multilocus sequence typing scheme versus pulsed-field gel electrophoresis for typing Mycobacterium abscessus isolates.

    PubMed

    Machado, Gabriel Esquitini; Matsumoto, Cristianne Kayoko; Chimara, Erica; Duarte, Rafael da Silva; de Freitas, Denise; Palaci, Moises; Hadad, David Jamil; Lima, Karla Valéria Batista; Lopes, Maria Luiza; Ramos, Jesus Pais; Campos, Carlos Eduardo; Caldas, Paulo César; Heym, Beate; Leão, Sylvia Cardoso

    2014-08-01

    Outbreaks of infections by rapidly growing mycobacteria following invasive procedures, such as ophthalmological, laparoscopic, arthroscopic, plastic, and cardiac surgeries, mesotherapy, and vaccination, have been detected in Brazil since 1998. Members of the Mycobacterium chelonae-Mycobacterium abscessus group have caused most of these outbreaks. As part of an epidemiological investigation, the isolates were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). In this project, we performed a large-scale comparison of PFGE profiles with the results of a recently developed multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme for M. abscessus. Ninety-three isolates were analyzed, with 40 M. abscessus subsp. abscessus isolates, 47 M. abscessus subsp. bolletii isolates, and six isolates with no assigned subspecies. Forty-five isolates were obtained during five outbreaks, and 48 were sporadic isolates that were not associated with outbreaks. For MLST, seven housekeeping genes (argH, cya, glpK, gnd, murC, pta, and purH) were sequenced, and each isolate was assigned a sequence type (ST) from the combination of obtained alleles. The PFGE patterns of DraI-digested DNA were compared with the MLST results. All isolates were analyzable by both methods. Isolates from monoclonal outbreaks showed unique STs and indistinguishable or very similar PFGE patterns. Thirty-three STs and 49 unique PFGE patterns were identified among the 93 isolates. The Simpson's index of diversity values for MLST and PFGE were 0.69 and 0.93, respectively, for M. abscessus subsp. abscessus and 0.96 and 0.97, respectively, for M. abscessus subsp. bolletii. In conclusion, the MLST scheme showed 100% typeability and grouped monoclonal outbreak isolates in agreement with PFGE, but it was less discriminative than PFGE for M. abscessus. PMID:24899019

  6. Multilocus Sequence Typing Scheme versus Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis for Typing Mycobacterium abscessus Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Gabriel Esquitini; Matsumoto, Cristianne Kayoko; Chimara, Erica; Duarte, Rafael da Silva; de Freitas, Denise; Palaci, Moises; Hadad, David Jamil; Lima, Karla Valéria Batista; Lopes, Maria Luiza; Ramos, Jesus Pais; Campos, Carlos Eduardo; Caldas, Paulo César; Heym, Beate

    2014-01-01

    Outbreaks of infections by rapidly growing mycobacteria following invasive procedures, such as ophthalmological, laparoscopic, arthroscopic, plastic, and cardiac surgeries, mesotherapy, and vaccination, have been detected in Brazil since 1998. Members of the Mycobacterium chelonae-Mycobacterium abscessus group have caused most of these outbreaks. As part of an epidemiological investigation, the isolates were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). In this project, we performed a large-scale comparison of PFGE profiles with the results of a recently developed multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme for M. abscessus. Ninety-three isolates were analyzed, with 40 M. abscessus subsp. abscessus isolates, 47 M. abscessus subsp. bolletii isolates, and six isolates with no assigned subspecies. Forty-five isolates were obtained during five outbreaks, and 48 were sporadic isolates that were not associated with outbreaks. For MLST, seven housekeeping genes (argH, cya, glpK, gnd, murC, pta, and purH) were sequenced, and each isolate was assigned a sequence type (ST) from the combination of obtained alleles. The PFGE patterns of DraI-digested DNA were compared with the MLST results. All isolates were analyzable by both methods. Isolates from monoclonal outbreaks showed unique STs and indistinguishable or very similar PFGE patterns. Thirty-three STs and 49 unique PFGE patterns were identified among the 93 isolates. The Simpson's index of diversity values for MLST and PFGE were 0.69 and 0.93, respectively, for M. abscessus subsp. abscessus and 0.96 and 0.97, respectively, for M. abscessus subsp. bolletii. In conclusion, the MLST scheme showed 100% typeability and grouped monoclonal outbreak isolates in agreement with PFGE, but it was less discriminative than PFGE for M. abscessus. PMID:24899019

  7. High-Frequency Alternating-Crossed-Field Gel Electrophoresis WithNeutral or Slightly Charged Interpenetrating Networks to Improve DNASeparation

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, B.; Prausnitz, J.; Blanch, H.

    1998-07-01

    Toward improving DNA separations, this work reports theeffects of high-frequency square-wave AC fields superimposedperpendicular to the direct current (DC) separation field on DNAmigration in both polyacrylamide-based interpenetrating networks (IPNs)and in agarose networks. Compared to standard polyacrylamide gels, IPNsallow the separation of larger DNA (9000 bp vs. 5000 bp at 5 V/cm). Innovel polyacrylamide-based IPNs, an alternating current (AC) field of 5Hz increased the maximum DNA size separable. This effect was extended tolarger DNA sizes with increasing electric-field strength up to andapparently beyond the power supply-limited maximum electric-fieldstrength of 48 V/cm. The orthogonal AC field also increased mobility.These two results combine to yield a reduction in separation time of upto a factor of 20 in novel polyacrylamide-based IPNs. When negativelycharged acrylic-acid groups were incorporated into the IPNs, the use ofthe AC field changed the DNA-network interaction, which altered the sizedependence of DNA mobility. In agarose gels, an AC field of 50 Hzincreased the size range separable; however, there was no increase in DNAmobility. There was no change in size dependence of mobility in an ACfield when the number of charged groups in the agarose network wasincreased. Based on results in the literature, possible mechanisms wereexamined for the effects of the AC field on DNA separation.

  8. Carbon dioxide slab laser

    SciTech Connect

    Tulip, J.

    1988-01-12

    A gas slab laser is described comprising: first and second elongated electrodes each including a planar light reflecting surface disposed so as to form a light guide only in a plane perpendicular to the planar surface and to define a gas discharge gap therebetween; a laser gas disposed in the gap; and means for applying a radio frequency current between the first and second electrodes to establish a laser-exciting discharge in the laser gas.

  9. Water shutoff through fullbore placement of polymer gel in faulted and in hydraulically fractured producers of the Prudhoe Bay field

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, R.H.; Sanders, G.S.

    1995-12-31

    Selective shutoff of undesired water influx by nonselective (fullbore) placement of treating chemicals has been successfully demonstrated in production wells of the Prudhoe Bay field. This was accomplished through: (1) careful choice of candidates with known high conductivity water influx pathways (fault, hydraulic fracture, thief), (2) placement that exploited conductivity differences without zonal isolation, and (3) use of established polymer gel chemistry with previously demonstrated ability to shut off water preferentially to oil.

  10. Successful gas shutoff with polymer gel using temperature modeling and selective placement in the Prudhoe Bay field

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, G.S.; Chambers, M.J.; Lane, R.H.

    1995-12-31

    A combination of known crosslinked gel chemistry with careful problem diagnosis, wellbore and formation temperature modeling, and zone isolation techniques yields a high success rate for shutting off unwanted gas influx into production wells in the Prudhoe Bay Field of Alaska. The paper includes candidate selection criteria, methodology of temperature simulation, job design, field operations case histories, and pre- and post-job production data for evaluation of success. This approach has led to a 60% technical success rate, primarily on wells that had cement squeeze failures. Job costs are about 75% those of comparable cement squeezes.

  11. [Investigation of Salmonella serotype Enteritidis isolates by plasmid profile analysis and pulsed field gel electrophoresis].

    PubMed

    Us, Ebru; Erdem, Birsel; Tekeli, Alper; Gerçeker, Devran; Saran, Begüm; Bayramova, Mehseti; Sahin, Fikret

    2011-04-01

    In this study a total of 122 Salmonella serotype Enteritidis stock strains selected from the culture collection of Enterobacteriaceae Laboratory of Ankara University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Microbiology, were investigated by plasmid profile analysis with the method defined by Kado and Liu and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) according to World Health Organization protocols using SpeI and XbaI macrorestriction enzymes, for better understanding of the molecular epidemiology of S. Enteritidis. The study strains were selected from a collection of previously isolated epidemic (n= 13) and sporadic (n= 109) strains (103 stool, 16 blood and one each bile, urine and cerebrospinal fluid) obtained from 10 different cities after the year 2000. PFGE patterns were analyzed with Gene Directory software (Syngene, UK) and a similarity index was determined by using Dice coefficient and the unweighted pair group method with mathematical averaging (UPGMA). Plasmid-carrying 110 (90%) strains that harbored 1-4 plasmids with sizes ranging from 2.0 to 100 kb were separated into patterns more than 14 (p1-p14). A total of 85 (69.7%) isolates harbored the 57 kb plasmid solely or in combination with other plasmids. By PFGE, 11 distinct patterns were shown with each enzyme SpeI and XbaI. S. Enteritidis strains after digestion with macrorestriction enzyme SpeI generated 11 different PFGE patterns (A to K), whereas XbaI generated also 11 different PFGE patterns (a to k). PFGE pattern A consisted of 93 strains (76.2%) after digestion with macrorestriction enzyme SpeI, while PFGE pattern a consisted 53 (43.4%) and PFGE pattern b 42 strains (34.4%) after digestion with macrorestriction enzyme XbaI. Using two macrorestriction enzymes two PFGE cluster profiles Aa (50 strains, 40.9%) and Ab (42 strains, 34.4%) were found to be predominating among 17 different PFGE clusters. Our results confirmed the clonal nature of S. Enteritidis strains in Turkey. The use of two enzymes in

  12. Mantle Response to a Slab Gap and Three-dimensional Slab Interaction in Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadamec, M. A.; Fischer, K. M.

    2013-12-01

    southern Cocos slab edge and a separate region of toroidal flow around the northern Nazca slab edge, together leading to east directed mantle flow through the slab gap. The geodynamic models suggest the counterclockwise toroidal flow around the southern Cocos plate may provide a solid state mantle flow framework leading to the observed northward decrease in anomalous isotopic signatures in the Costa Rican-Nicaraguan volcanic front. Adding a third slab into the models, the west-dipping Antilles slab, further modulates the mantle flow field, leading to increased eastward directed slab entrained flow beneath the Caribbean plate and enhancing the east-directed flow of the mantle through the Cocos-Nazca slab gap. The incorporation of the Antilles slab also leads to an increase in the east-directed surface velocity of the overriding Caribbean plate, suggesting coupling between the interior of the Caribbean plate and the mantle, and that the observed eastward motion of the Caribbean plate in geodetic studies (Lopez et al., 2006) is due in part to mantle flow related to subduction of the Antilles slab.

  13. Fatigue of concrete beams and slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roesler, Jeffrey Raphael

    Traditionally, simply supported concrete beam (SSB) fatigue results have been used to characterize the fatigue resistance of fully supported concrete slabs (FSS). SSB concrete fatigue tests have been assumed to be equivalent to the fatigue resistance of concrete slabs in the field. The effect specimen size, boundary conditions, and loading configurations have on the fatigue of concrete beams and slabs have not been considered in the design of concrete pavements against fatigue. A laboratory study was undertaken to determine if the fatigue behavior of FSS and SSB were similar. A fully supported beam (FSB) was also tested under repeated loading, since it represented an intermediate specimen size and testing configuration between SSB and FSS. The best way to present fatigue results for all specimens was a stress ratio (S) to number of cycles to failure (N) curve (S-N curve). SSB fatigue behavior was similar to results obtained from the literature. FSB had similar fatigue behavior to SSB. The fatigue curve derived from repeated loading of FSS was 30 percent higher than the SSB fatigue curve. This suggested for a given number of cycles to failure, FSS could take a 30 percent higher bending stress as compared to SSB and FSB. The concrete modulus of rupture from a FSS test configuration was 30 percent greater than the concrete modulus of rupture from a SSB test setup. If the concrete modulus of rupture from a FSS test configuration was used in the slab's stress ratio, the slab's fatigue curve was the same as the SSB and FSB. This meant concrete behaved the same under fatigue loading, irrespective of specimen size and test configuration, as long as the correct concrete modulus of rupture was used in the stress ratio. Strain gages, attached to all specimens tested, indicated cracking in concrete occurred in a narrow band. Regions of high plastic strain were found in the plane of cracking, while adjacent areas experienced decreases in strain levels with cracking. Strain

  14. Diode-pumped efficient slab laser with two Nd:YLF crystals and second-harmonic generation by slab LBO.

    PubMed

    Li, Daijun; Ma, Zhe; Haas, Rüdiger; Schell, Alexander; Simon, Janosch; Diart, Robert; Shi, Peng; Hu, Peixin; Loosen, Peter; Du, Keming

    2007-05-15

    We demonstrate a diode-pumped electro-optical Q-switched slab laser with a high optical efficiency, high pulse energy, and short pulse width with two Nd:YLF crystals inside one resonator. The single compact slab resonator can generate a 1D top-hat beam at both the far field and the near field. With a slab-geometry-design lithium triborate (LBO) crystal, efficient critical phase-matching second-harmonic generation for a 1D top-hat beam with multiple transverse modes is achieved. PMID:17440558

  15. Use of Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis of Conserved XbaI Fragments for Identification of Swine Salmonella Serotypes▿

    PubMed Central

    Gaul, Stephen B.; Wedel, Stephanie; Erdman, Matthew M.; Harris, D. L.; Harris, Isabel Turney; Ferris, Kathleen E.; Hoffman, Lorraine

    2007-01-01

    Swine Salmonella isolates (n = 674) from various locations throughout the United States and Canada were analyzed via pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) with XbaI. PFGE subtypes were analyzed by cluster analysis and compared to conventional serotyping results. The analysis showed a correlation of serotype to PFGE subtype. In addition, conserved fragments were identified within the restriction patterns that were unique to each serotype. PFGE using XbaI restriction provided a possible alternative method for screening and identifying swine Salmonella serotypes. PMID:17166969

  16. The association of serotype and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis genotype in isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated in Israel.

    PubMed

    Bar-Meir, M; Naaman, G; Assous, M; Korenman, Z; Valinsky, L; Picard, E

    2015-05-01

    The relationship between Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates causing invasive infections in children admitted to a single center in central Israel was examined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and serotyping. Although there was a close correlation between serotype and PFGE clone, the genetic diversity varied by serotype, with some genotypes comprising multiple serotypes. Additionally, clones C and D were associated with higher penicillin minimum inhibitory concentrations. Serotyping alone may be insufficient for epidemiological mapping of pneumococcal isolates in the era of pneumococcal conjugate polysaccharide vaccines. PMID:25749648

  17. Preparation of α-mannoside hydrogel and electrical detection of saccharide-protein interactions using the smart gel-modified gate field effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Yasuhiro; Matsumoto, Akira; Miura, Yoshiko; Miyahara, Yuji

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to detect saccharide-protein interaction capitalizing on the gel-modified field effect transistor [FET]. A lectin-sensitive polymer gel that undergoes volume changes in response to the formation of molecular complex between 'pendant' carbohydrate and a 'target' lectin concanavalin A [Con A] was synthesized. It was revealed that direction and magnitude of the gel response (swelling or deswelling) could be readily designed depending on composition and network density of the gel. The Con A-sensitive polymer gel has shown the ability to transduce the detection of saccharide-protein interactions into electrical signals for FET. PACS: 87.85.jf, bio-based materials

  18. SUB-SLAB PROBE INSTALLATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sub-slab sampling has become an integral part of vapor intrusion investigations. It is now recommended in guidance documents developed by EPA and most states. A method for sub-slab probe installation was devised in 2002, presented at conferences through 2005, and finally docume...

  19. [Thermoluminescence Slab Dosimeter].

    PubMed

    Shinsho, Kiyomitsu; Koba, Yusuke; Tamatsu, Satoshi; Sakurai, Noboru; Wakabayashi, Genichiro; Fukuda, Kazusige

    2013-01-01

    In 1953 F. Daniels et al. used the property of thermoluminescence in dosimetry for the first time. Since then, numerous TLD have been developed. 2D TLD was investigated for the first time in 1972 by P Broadhead. However, due to excessive fading, difficulties with handling and the time required for measurements, development stalled. At the current time, the majority of TLD are used in small scale, localized dosimetry with a wide dynamic range and personal dosimeters for exposure management. Urushiyama et. al. have taken advantage of the commoditization of CCD cameras in recent years--making large area, high resolution imaging easier--to introduce and develop a 2D TLD. It is expected that these developments will give rise to a new generation of applications for 2D TL dosimetry. This paper introduces the "TL Slab Dosimeter" developed jointly by Urushiyama et. al. and our team, its measurement system and several typical usage scenarios. PMID:24893451

  20. Quantitative hybridization to genomic DNA fractionated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Leach, T J; Glaser, R L

    1998-10-15

    Hybridization to genomic DNA fractionated by CHEF electrophoresis can vary >100-fold if the DNA is acid depurinated prior to Southern blotting. The level of hybridization is high or low depending on whether the molecule being analyzed migrates at a size coincident with or different from the size of the majority of genomic DNA in the sample, respectively. Techniques that avoid acid depurination including in-gel hybridizations and UV irradiation of DNA prior to blotting provide more accurate quantitative results. CHEF analysis of DNA molecules containing repetitive satellite sequences is particularly prone to this effect. PMID:9753752

  1. Size-fractionation of the small chromosomes of Trypanozoon and Nannomonas trypanosomes by pulsed field gradient gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Gibson, W C; Borst, P

    1986-02-01

    We have compared the molecular karyotypes of trypanosomes from different subgroups within subgenus Trypanozoon by pulsed field gradient (PFG) gel electrophoresis. Although the overall karyotype was similar, there was much variation in the size of chromosomes between different stocks. Two of three stocks of Trypanosoma (Trypanozoon) brucei gambiense had remarkably small mini-chromosomes: 25-50 kilobase pairs compared to 50-150 kilobase pairs for the mini-chromosomes of other Trypanozoon stocks. The relative amount of DNA in the mini-chromosomal fraction of different stocks correlated well with the amount of 177 base pair satellite DNA monomer per microgram nuclear DNA. Hybridisation of Southern blots of pulsed field gradient gels with a number of gene probes showed that the loci for tubulin and phosphoglycerate kinase in Trypanozoon probably lie on the same chromosome, together with some variant surface glycoprotein genes; the genes for triose phosphate isomerase and glyceraldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase are separately located both with respect to each other and the above housekeeping genes. Therefore, there are at minimum three pairs of chromosomes carrying housekeeping genes in Trypanozoon. In some stocks the chromosomes carrying the tubulin and phosphoglycerate kinase genes are split into two bands, suggesting that homologous chromosomes may differ substantially in size in trypanosomes. One Trypanosoma (Nannomonas) congolense stock examined had a similar pattern of chromosome distribution to that of Trypanozoon, but with very small mini-chromosomes (25-50 kilobase pairs.) PMID:3960051

  2. Optimization of Pulsed-field Gel Electrophoresis Procedure for Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui Juan; Pan, Zhuo; Wei, Jian Chun; Zhang, En Min; Cai, Hong; Liang, Xu Dong; Li, Wei

    2016-03-01

    In order to develop a rapid and reliable method for B. cereus genotyping, factors influencing PFGE results, including preparation of bacterial cells embedded in agarose, lysis of embedded cells, enzymatic digestion of intact genomic DNA, and electrophoresis parameters allowing for reproducible and meaningful DNA fragment separation, were controlled. Optimal cellular growth (Luria-Bertani agar plates for 12-18 h) and lysis conditions (4 h incubation with 500 µg/mL lysozyme) produced sharp bands on the gel. Restriction enzyme NotI was chosen as the most suitable. Twenty-two isolates were analyzed by NotI digestion, using three electrophoretic parameters (EPs). The EP-a was optimal for distinguishing between isolates. The optimized protocol could be completed within 40 h which is a significant improvement over the previous methods. PMID:27109136

  3. Leaky unstable modes and electromagnetic radiation amplification by an anisotropic plasma slab

    SciTech Connect

    Vagin, K. Yu. Uryupin, S. A.

    2015-09-15

    The interaction between electromagnetic radiation and a photoionized plasma slab with an anisotropic electron velocity distribution is studied. It is shown that the fields of leaky modes are amplified due to the development of aperiodic instability in the slab, which leads to an increase in both the reflected and transmitted fields. The transmitted field can significantly increase only if the slab thickness does not exceed the ratio of the speed of light to the electron plasma frequency, whereas there is no upper bound on the slab thickness for the reflected signal to be amplified.

  4. New Packaging for Amplifier Slabs

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, M.; Thorsness, C.; Suratwala, T.; Steele, R.; Rogowski, G.

    2015-03-18

    The following memo provides a discussion and detailed procedure for a new finished amplifier slab shipping and storage container. The new package is designed to maintain an environment of <5% RH to minimize weathering.

  5. Efficient second-harmonic generation in micrometer-thick slabs with indefinite permittivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciattoni, A.; Spinozzi, E.

    2012-04-01

    We theoretically predict efficient optical second-harmonic generation (SHG) from a micrometer-thick slab consisting of a quadratic nonlinear anisotropic medium whose linear principal permittivities have, at the fundamental wavelength, real parts of different signs (indefinite permittivity) and magnitude smaller than 1. We show that, by illuminating the slab with a p-polarized fundamental wave (with intensity of a few MW/cm2), highly efficient scattering of the second-harmonic field occurs in conditions at which the slab is linearly fully transparent for the fundamental wave. The high efficiency of the SHG process stems from the enhancement of the longitudinal field, perpendicular to the slab surface, produced by the very small value of the slab dielectric permittivities. We investigate the role played by medium losses, showing that, even in the strong-absorption regime, the described process yields a second-harmonic field which is much stronger than that produced by a standard (not indefinite) nonlinear slab.

  6. Photo-Induced Anomalous Deformation of Poly(N-Isopropylacrylamide) Gel Hybridized with an Inorganic Nanosheet Liquid Crystal Aligned by Electric Field.

    PubMed

    Inadomi, Takumi; Ikeda, Shogo; Okumura, Yasushi; Kikuchi, Hirotsugu; Miyamoto, Nobuyoshi

    2014-09-16

    Poly-(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPA) hydrogel films doped with uniaxially aligned liquid crystalline (LC) nanosheets adsorbed with a dye are synthesized and its anomalous photothermal deformation is demonstrated. The alignment of the nanosheet LC at the cm-scale is easily achieved by the application of an in-plane or out-of-plane AC electric field during photo-polymerization. A photoresponsive pattern is printable onto the gel with μm-scale resolution by adsorption of the dye through a pattern-holed silicone rubber. When the gel is irradiated with light, only the colored part is photothermally deformed. Interestingly, the photo-irradiated gel shows temporal expansion along one direction followed by anisotropic shrinkage, which is an anomalous behavior for a conventional PNIPA gel. PMID:25228493

  7. Slab coupled optical fiber sensor calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, B.; Noren, J.; Chadderdon, S.; Wang, W.; Forber, R.; Selfridge, R.; Schultz, S.

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents a method for calibrating slab coupled optical fiber sensors (SCOS). An automated system is presented for selecting the optimal laser wavelength for use in SCOS interrogation. The wavelength calibration technique uses a computer sound card for both the creation of the applied electric field and the signal detection. The method used to determine the ratio between the measured SCOS signal and the applied electric field is also described along with a demonstration of the calibrated SCOS involving measuring the dielectric breakdown of air.

  8. Analysis of haemorrhagic septicaemia-causing isolates of Pasteurella multocida by ribotyping and field alternation gel electrophoresis (FAGE).

    PubMed

    Townsend, K M; Dawkins, H J; Papadimitriou, J M

    1997-10-16

    Ribotyping and field alternation gel electrophoresis (FAGE) were used to examine 19 Pasteurella multocida isolates, and to assess the ability of these techniques to differentiate P. multocida strains that cause haemorrhagic septicaemia (HS). Reproducible patterns were obtained from both methods, with FAGE demonstrating greater discriminatory power than ribotyping. FAGE analysis was particularly useful in distinguishing North American cultures originating from the 1922 Yellowstone National Park Buffalo 'B' strain, demonstrating the ability to detect genetic alterations induced by repeated subculture. A remarkable homogeneity was observed among Asian HS strains following ribotyping and FAGE analysis, with a clear distinction observed between virulent and avirulent HS isolates. This study has illustrated the value of genomic fingerprinting methods in distinguishing strains of similar serotype, and the capability of these methods to produce detailed characterisation of P. multocida isolates. PMID:9444075

  9. Diagnosis of an outbreak of Salmonella typhimurium in chinchillas (Chinchilla lanigera) by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Gornatti Churria, Carlos D; Vigo, Germán B; Origlia, Javier; Campos, Josefina; Caffer, María; Píscopo, Miguel; Herrero Loyola, Miguel; Petruccelli, Miguel; Pichel, Mariana

    2014-01-01

    Adult chinchillas (Chinchilla lanigera) that had suddenly died in a commercial farm located in La Plata City, Buenos Aires Province, Argentina, in July 2012 were macroscopically, histopathologically, and microbiologically examined. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) was isolated from the liver, spleen, heart, lungs, kidneys and intestines from each of the five animals evaluated. The five strains were susceptible to ampicillin, cephalotin, cefotaxime, nalidixic acid, gentamicin, streptomycin, chloramphenicol, fosfomycin, nitrofurantoin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and resistant to tetracycline. Each of the five S. Typhimurium isolates was analyzed by XbaI- pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), showing an identical electrophoretic profile with 15 defined bands, which was found to be identical to pattern ARJPXX01.0220 of the PulseNet Argentine National database of Salmonella PFGE patterns. This is the first work describing the postmortem diagnosis of an outbreak of salmonellosis in chinchillas by using molecular methods such as PFGE. PMID:25444129

  10. Cost-Effective Application of Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis to Typing of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Doran, Geraldine; Morris, Dearbhaile; O'Hare, Colette; DeLappe, Niall; Bradshaw, Bernard; Corbett-Feeney, Geraldine; Cormican, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is frequently isolated from humans and animals. Phage typing is historically the first-line reference typing technique in Europe. It is rapid and convenient for laboratories with appropriate training and experience, and costs of consumables are low. Phage typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were performed on 503 isolates of serovar Typhimurium. Twenty-nine phage types and 53 PFGE patterns were observed. Most isolates of phage types DT104, DT104b, and U310 are not distinguishable from other members of their phage type by PFGE. By contrast, PFGE of isolates of phage types DT193 and U302 shows great heterogeneity. Analysis of experience with PFGE and phage typing can facilitate the selective application of PFGE to maximize the yield of epidemiologically relevant additional information while controlling costs. PMID:16332808

  11. Changes in Predominance of Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis Profiles of Bordetella pertussis Isolates, United States, 2000-2012.

    PubMed

    Cassiday, Pamela K; Skoff, Tami H; Jawahir, Selina; Tondella, M Lucia

    2016-03-01

    To clarify the characteristics of circulating Bordetella pertussis isolates, we used pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) to analyze 5,262 isolates collected in the United States during 2000-2012. We found 199 PFGE profiles; 5 profiles accounted for 72% of isolates. The most common profile, CDC013, accounted for 35%-46% of isolates tested from 2000-2009; however, the proportion of isolates of this profile rapidly decreased in 2010. Profile CDC237, first seen in 2009, increased rapidly and accounted for 29% of 2012 isolates. No location bias was observed among profiles during 2000-2010, but differences were observed among isolates from different states during 2012. Predominant profiles match those observed in recent European PFGE studies. PFGE profile changes are concurrent with other recent molecular changes in B. pertussis and may be contributing to the reemergence of pertussis in the United States. Continued PFGE monitoring is critical for understanding the changing epidemiology of pertussis. PMID:26886905

  12. Changes in Predominance of Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis Profiles of Bordetella pertussis Isolates, United States, 2000–2012

    PubMed Central

    Skoff, Tami H.; Jawahir, Selina; Tondella, M. Lucia

    2016-01-01

    To clarify the characteristics of circulating Bordetella pertussis isolates, we used pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) to analyze 5,262 isolates collected in the United States during 2000–2012. We found 199 PFGE profiles; 5 profiles accounted for 72% of isolates. The most common profile, CDC013, accounted for 35%–46% of isolates tested from 2000–2009; however, the proportion of isolates of this profile rapidly decreased in 2010. Profile CDC237, first seen in 2009, increased rapidly and accounted for 29% of 2012 isolates. No location bias was observed among profiles during 2000–2010, but differences were observed among isolates from different states during 2012. Predominant profiles match those observed in recent European PFGE studies. PFGE profile changes are concurrent with other recent molecular changes in B. pertussis and may be contributing to the reemergence of pertussis in the United States. Continued PFGE monitoring is critical for understanding the changing epidemiology of pertussis. PMID:26886905

  13. Phenotypic and genotypic (pulsed-field gel electrophoresis) characteristics of enterotoxin-A-producing Staphylococcus aureus strains.

    PubMed

    Gouloumès, C; Bes, M; Renaud, F; Lina, B; Reverdy, M E; Brun, Y; Fleurette, J

    1996-05-01

    The phenotypic (antibiotype, serotype, phagetype) and genotypic (SmaI restriction patterns using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis) characters of 162 Staphylococcus aureus epidemiologically unrelated strains were studied. Eighty-two of the isolates produced enterotoxin-A (SEA+), while 80 produced none (SEA-). None of the phenotypic characters observed were characteristic of SEA+ strains. On the other hand, the electrophoretic profiles revealed a non-random distribution of the SEA+ strains (p < 0.01 in groups PI and PIII, and p < 0.03 in group PII). It can therefore reasonably be assumed that the enterotoxin-A-producing strains did not constitute a single clone, but rather, seemed to belong to strains derived from at least three clones with distinct genetic organization. PMID:8763613

  14. Analysis of Genomic Diversity among Helicobacter pylori Strains Isolated from Iranian Children by Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Falsafi, Tahereh; Sotoudeh, Nazli; Feizabadi, Mohammad-Mehdi; Mahjoub, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Presence of genomic diversity among Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) strains have been suggested by numerous investigators. Little is known about diversity of H. pylori strains isolated from Iranian children and their association with virulence of the strains. Our purpose was to assess the degree of genomic diversity among H. pylori strains isolated from Iranian-children, on the basis of vacA genotype, cagA status of the strains, sex, age as well as the pathological status of the patients. Methods: Genomic DNA from 44 unrelated H. pylori strains isolated during 1997–2009, was examined by pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Pathological status of the patients was performed according to the modified Sydney-system and genotype/status of vacA/cagA genes was determined by PCR. PFGE was performed using XbaI restriction-endonuclease and the field inversion-gel electrophoresis system. Findings: No significant relationship was observed between the patterns of PFGE and the cagA/vacA status/genotype. Also no relationship was observed between age, sex, and pathological status of the children and the PFGE patterns of their isolates. Similar conclusion was obtained by Total Lab software. However, more relationship was observed between the strains isolated in the close period (1997–2009, 2001–2003, 2005–2007, and 2007–2009) and more difference was observed among those obtained in the distant periods (1997 and 2009). Conclusion: H. pylori strains isolated from children in Iran are extremely diverse and this diversity is not related to their virulence characteristics. Occurrence of this extreme diversity may be related to adaptation of H. pylori strains to variable living conditions during transmission between various host individuals. PMID:26019775

  15. The impact of slab dip variations, gaps and rollback on mantle wedge flow: insights from fluids experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDougall, Julia G.; Kincaid, Chris; Szwaja, Sara; Fischer, Karen M.

    2014-05-01

    Observed seismic anisotropy and geochemical anomalies indicate the presence of 3-D flow around and above subducting slabs. To investigate how slab geometry and velocity affect mantle flow, we conducted a set of experiments using a subduction apparatus in a fluid-filled tank. Our models comprise two independently adjustable, continuous belts to represent discrete sections of subducting slabs that kinematically drive flow in the surrounding glucose syrup that represents the upper mantle. We analyse how slab dip (ranging from 30° to 80°), slab dip difference between slab segments (ranging from 20° to 50°), rates of subduction (4-8 cm yr-1) and slab/trench rollback (0-3 cm yr-1) affect mantle flow. Whiskers were used to approximate mineral alignment induced by the flow, as well as to predict directions of seismic anisotropy. We find that dip variations between slab segments generate 3-D flow in the mantle wedge, where the path lines of trenchward moving mantle material above the slab are deflected towards the slab segment with the shallower dip. The degree of path line deflection increases as the difference in slab dip between the segments increases, and, for a fixed dip difference, as slab dip decreases. In cases of slab rollback and large slab dip differences, we observe intrusion of subslab material through the gap and into the wedge. Flow through the gap remains largely horizontal before eventual downward entrainment. Whisker alignment in the wedge flow is largely trench-normal, except near the lateral edges of the slab where toroidal flow dominates. In addition, whisker azimuths located above the slab gap deviate most strongly from trench-normal orientations when slab rollback does not occur. Such flow field complexities are likely sufficient to affect deep melt production and shallow melt delivery. However, none of the experiments produced flow fields that explain the trench-parallel shear wave splitting fast directions observed over broad arc and backarc

  16. Estimation of circular DNA size using gamma-irradiation and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Beverley, S.M. )

    1989-02-15

    A method is described for estimating the size of large circular DNAs found within complex chromosomal DNA preparations. DNAs are treated with low levels of gamma-irradiation, sufficient to introduce a single double-stranded break per circle, and the resulting linear DNA is sized by pulsed-field electrophoresis and blot hybridization. The method is fast, reproducible, and very conveniently applied to the agarose-enclosed chromosomal DNA preparations commonly used in pulsed field electrophoresis.

  17. Random amplified polymorphic DNA assay is less discriminant than pulsed-field gel electrophoresis for typing strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Saulnier, P; Bourneix, C; Prévost, G; Andremont, A

    1993-04-01

    Twenty-six strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus with different pulsed-field gel electrophoresis fingerprints were tested by random amplified polymorphic DNA assay with three primers, resulting in 15 to 20 different random amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprints. By summing the results for the three primers, the number of different fingerprints increased to 25, but two strains could not be differentiated. We conclude that pulsed-field gel electrophoresis remains the best method of typing methicillin-resistant S. aureus strains. PMID:8463406

  18. Random amplified polymorphic DNA assay is less discriminant than pulsed-field gel electrophoresis for typing strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Saulnier, P; Bourneix, C; Prévost, G; Andremont, A

    1993-01-01

    Twenty-six strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus with different pulsed-field gel electrophoresis fingerprints were tested by random amplified polymorphic DNA assay with three primers, resulting in 15 to 20 different random amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprints. By summing the results for the three primers, the number of different fingerprints increased to 25, but two strains could not be differentiated. We conclude that pulsed-field gel electrophoresis remains the best method of typing methicillin-resistant S. aureus strains. Images PMID:8463406

  19. Genotyping Campylobacter jejuni by comparative genome indexing: an evaluation with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and flaA SVR sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aims: Comparative genome indexing (CGI) using whole-genome DNA microarrays was evaluated as a means of genotying Campylobacter jejuni relative to two standard methods, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and flaA short variable region sequencing (flaA SVR typing). Methods and Results: Thirty-six...

  20. A comparison of BOX-PCR and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to determine genetic relatedness of enterococci from different environments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aims: The genetic relatedness of enterococci from poultry litter to enterococci from nearby surface water and groundwater in the Lower Fraser Valley regions of British Columbia, Canada was determined. Methods and Results: BOX-PCR and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) were used to subtype en...

  1. A comparison of non-typhoidal Salmonella from humans and food animals using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonellosis is one of the most important foodborne diseases affecting humans. To characterize the relationship between Salmonella causing human infections and their food animal reservoirs, we compared pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of non-typhoida...

  2. Photonic crystal slab quantum cascade detector

    SciTech Connect

    Reininger, Peter Schwarz, Benedikt; Harrer, Andreas; Zederbauer, Tobias; Detz, Hermann; Maxwell Andrews, Aaron; Gansch, Roman; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried

    2013-12-09

    In this Letter, we demonstrate the design, fabrication, and characterization of a photonic crystal slab quantum cascade detector (PCS-QCD). By employing a specifically designed resonant cavity, the performance of the photodetector is improved in three distinct ways. The PCS makes the QCD sensitive to surface normal incident light. It resonantly enhances the photon lifetime inside the active zone, thus increasing the photocurrent significantly. And, the construction form of the device inherently decreases the noise. Finally, we compare the characteristics of the PCS-QCD to a PCS - quantum well infrared photodetector and outline the advantages for certain fields of applications.

  3. A wrinkly phononic crystal slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayat, Alireza; Gordaninejad, Faramarz

    2015-03-01

    The buckling induced surface instability is employed to propose a tunable phononic crystal slab composed of a stiff thin film bonded on a soft elastomer. Wrinkles formation is used to generate one-dimensional periodic scatterers at the surface of a finitely thick slab. Wrinkles' pattern change and corresponding stress is employed to control wave propagation triggered by a compressive strain. Simulation results show that the periodic wrinkly structure can be used as a transformative phononic crystal which can switch band diagram of the structure in a reversible behavior. Results of this study provide opportunities for the smart design of tunable switch and elastic wave filters at ultrasonic and hypersonic frequency ranges.

  4. Phase conjugated slab laser designator

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, S.; Paul, J.L.

    1989-06-06

    A laser designator is described comprising a laser pump means; a high power phase conjugated slab laser amplifier formed of GSGG:Cr:Nd as a lasing material on one side of the pump means; a low power rod shaped laser oscillator on the opposite side of the pump means; and a first plurality of optical reflecting and refracting means for directing and shaping a laser beam which surrounds the pump means and passes through the rod and slab; and a telescope means coupled to the beam to direct it to a distant target.

  5. A charge-coupled-device camera image analysis system for quantifying DNA distributions in agarose gels after pulsed-field gel electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Dewey, W.C.; Thompson, L.L.; Trinh, M.L.; Latz, D.L. |; Ward, J.F.

    1994-10-01

    A charge-coupled-device camera system was coupled to a personal computer and, with uniformity in illumination and detection (within 4-8%) along each lane, was used for quantifying the distribution of DNA molecules that migrate from the PFGE well (plug) into the lane at distances varying from 1 to 50 mm (with 0.5 mm/pixel). By using a specially designed transmission filter for transmitting 470-725 nm fluorescence from ethidium bromide-stained DNA while eliminating most of the fluorescence (<400 nm) from the agarose gel, and by using neutral density filters to prevent saturation of the camera, the fluorescence intensity is linearly related to the amount of DNA varying from {approximately} 0.03 {mu}g in a 3-mm-diameter cylindrical plug 5 mm long (equal to background) to {approximately} 4 {mu}g (where ethidium bromide staining saturates). The percentage DNA released from the plug and distribution in the lane (with 1-2 mm resolution) obtained by quantifying DNA fluorescence were not significantly different from the same data obtained by analysis of radioactivity of the same DNA labeled with [{sup 3}H]dThd. However, scattering of fluorescence from one lane into an adjacent lane 3 mm away and as far as 10 mm from the plug into the lane presented a problem. This problem was overcome by using a form with slots to cover every other lane when the images were obtained and either (1) cutting the lane from the plug and moving it 15 mm away or (2) imaging the intact gel and applying a correction for {approximately} 7% of the fluorescence from the plug tailing out {approximately} 10 mm beyond the first 1 mm in the lane. In addition, the following were required: (1) carefully controlled staining and destaining procedures, and (2) a low background that is obtained as an average uniform background in each lane 5 mm beyond where DNA migration stops. 31 refs., 7 figs.

  6. Design and experimental testing of air slab caps which convert commercial electron diodes into dual purpose, correction-free diodes for small field dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Charles, P. H.; Cranmer-Sargison, G.; Thwaites, D. I.; Kairn, T.; Crowe, S. B.; Langton, C. M.; Trapp, J. V.; Pedrazzini, G.; Aland, T.; Kenny, J.

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: Two diodes which do not require correction factors for small field relative output measurements are designed and validated using experimental methodology. This was achieved by adding an air layer above the active volume of the diode detectors, which canceled out the increase in response of the diodes in small fields relative to standard field sizes. Methods: Due to the increased density of silicon and other components within a diode, additional electrons are created. In very small fields, a very small air gap acts as an effective filter of electrons with a high angle of incidence. The aim was to design a diode that balanced these perturbations to give a response similar to a water-only geometry. Three thicknesses of air were placed at the proximal end of a PTW 60017 electron diode (PTWe) using an adjustable “air cap”. A set of output ratios (OR{sub Det}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n}}) for square field sizes of side length down to 5 mm was measured using each air thickness and compared to OR{sub Det}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n}} measured using an IBA stereotactic field diode (SFD). k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} was transferred from the SFD to the PTWe diode and plotted as a function of air gap thickness for each field size. This enabled the optimal air gap thickness to be obtained by observing which thickness of air was required such that k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} was equal to 1.00 at all field sizes. A similar procedure was used to find the optimal air thickness required to make a modified Sun Nuclear EDGE detector (EDGEe) which is “correction-free” in small field relative dosimetry. In addition, the feasibility of experimentally transferring k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r

  7. Controlling of optical bistability and multistability in a defect slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabbari, Masoud

    2016-02-01

    Optical bistability (OB) and optical multistability (OM) due to wide applications in all-optical switching and transistors is studied in this paper. Here, we study the OB and OM properties of incident light in a defect slab doped by a GaAs quantum well (QW) nanostructure. It is shown that OB and OM features can be manipulated by spin coherence created by circular polarized laser fields in GaAs QWs. The impacts of laser field features, such as intensity, frequency detuning, and relative phase, on OB and OM are simulated. Moreover, the dependence of OB and OM features of a probe light on the thickness of the slab, then, are analyzed. It is found that the thickness of the slab can provide a new way to optimize the intensity threshold of OB and OM. We hope that our proposed model may be useful for developing all-optical devices on nanoscales.

  8. How mantle slabs drive plate tectonics.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Clinton P; Lithgow-Bertelloni, Carolina

    2002-10-01

    The gravitational pull of subducted slabs is thought to drive the motions of Earth's tectonic plates, but the coupling between slabs and plates is not well established. If a slab is mechanically attached to a subducting plate, it can exert a direct pull on the plate. Alternatively, a detached slab may drive a plate by exciting flow in the mantle that exerts a shear traction on the base of the plate. From the geologic history of subduction, we estimated the relative importance of "pull" versus "suction" for the present-day plates. Observed plate motions are best predicted if slabs in the upper mantle are attached to plates and generate slab pull forces that account for about half of the total driving force on plates. Slabs in the lower mantle are supported by viscous mantle forces and drive plates through slab suction. PMID:12364804

  9. Use of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis for epidemiological study of Bordetella pertussis in a whooping cough outbreak.

    PubMed Central

    de Moissac, Y R; Ronald, S L; Peppler, M S

    1994-01-01

    We used pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of chromosomal DNA digested with XbaI to determine the distribution of different Bordetella pertussis strains from clinical isolates obtained during a large whooping cough outbreak that occurred in Alberta, Canada, from December 1989 to May 1991. Our initial study analyzed 28 clinical isolates, 14 from the city of Edmonton and 1 from each of 14 northern Alberta towns. These clinical isolates were randomly chosen over the course of the 18-month outbreak. The DNA profiles were more heterogeneous than anticipated and caused concern that PFGE was too sensitive a technique to characterize strains. Further analysis showed that this was not the case, as clusters of similar PFGE patterns were observed in strains isolated from the same outlying town. Identical PFGE patterns were also seen in clinical strains obtained from different members of the same family. Two PFGE pattern types, a and b, predominated in the outbreak, accounting overall for 44 of 70 B. pertussis strains tested. Results from isolates from outlying towns, however, indicated involvement of local strains rather than a single, highly infectious strain in the whooping cough outbreak in Alberta. Images PMID:8150949

  10. Multilocus Sequence Typing Lacks the Discriminatory Ability of Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis for Typing Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Fakhr, Mohamed K.; Nolan, Lisa K.; Logue, Catherine M.

    2005-01-01

    Nontyphoidal salmonellae are among the leading causes of food-borne disease in the United States. Because of the importance of Salmonella enterica in food-borne disease, numerous typing methodologies have been developed. Among the several molecular typing methods, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) is currently considered the “gold standard” technique in typing Salmonella. The aim of this study was to compare the discriminatory power of PFGE to multilocus sequence typing (MLST) in typing Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium clinical isolates. A total of 85 Salmonella Typhimurium clinical isolates from cattle were used in this study. PFGE using XbaI was performed on the 85 isolates by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention method, and data were analyzed using the BioNumerics software package. Fifty PFGE profiles were observed among the isolates, and these grouped into three major clusters. For the MLST analysis, the manB, pduF, glnA, and spaM genes were amplified by PCR from the same 85 isolates. DNA sequencing of these four genes, manB, pduF, glnA, and spaM, showed no genetic diversity among the isolates tested, with a 100% identity in nucleotide sequence. Moreover, the DNA sequences of the aforementioned genes showed 100% identity to the sequence reported in GenBank for the S. enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2 strain. Therefore, MLST, using these genes, lacks the discriminatory power of PFGE for typing Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. PMID:15872244

  11. Rapid estimation of chromosomal damage in yeast due to the effects of environmental chemicals using pulsed field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, J; Tosch, M; AlBaz, I; Lochmann, E R

    1991-10-01

    We present a procedure to rapidly estimate the damage to yeast chromosomes by toxic chemicals. This procedure employs the following steps: incubation of yeast cells with the chemicals, DNA preparation in an agarose matrix, separation of chromosome-sized DNA molecules into reproducible band patterns by pulsed field gel electrophoresis, and quantification of the intensity of chromosomal bands by densitometry. Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells have been treated with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) and cis-Platinum(II) diamminedichloride (cisPT), both of which are known to interact with DNA, and trichlorethylen (TCE), for which such an effect has not been shown in yeast. Treatment of cells with MNNG and cisPt led to an impairment of the intensity of the band pattern to an extent dependent on the concentration of the chemicals applied. For TCE a similar effect could not be discerned. This procedure will be useful as a screening test for the estimation of the biological hazards of toxic chemicals. PMID:1769347

  12. Random amplified polymorphic DNA typing versus pulsed-field gel electrophoresis for epidemiological typing of vancomycin-resistant enterococci.

    PubMed Central

    Barbier, N; Saulnier, P; Chachaty, E; Dumontier, S; Andremont, A

    1996-01-01

    Sixty vancomycin-resistant vanA mutant Enterococcus faecium (VRE) isolates, collected during a 40-month period from 48 patients hospitalized in a French Cancer Referral Center, were typed by using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), and the results were compared with those previously obtained by typing with SmaI pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), which is currently recognized as the "gold standard." The discriminating power of RAPD typing, with seven primers and 11 combinations of primers, was tested on 18 strains, and only the most discriminating combination was further tested on the whole collection. We compared the epidemiological usefulness of RAPD typing of 60 clinical VRE isolates with that of SmaI PFGE typing. With primers AP4 and ERIC1R, RAPD generated 30 patterns versus the 36 patterns generated by SmaI PFGE. However, this did not hamper the epidemiologically correct clustering of 15 related strains and the detection of multiple colonization in nine patients. We conclude that this simple RAPD technique is well suited to the epidemiological typing of VRE and the monitoring of its nosocomial spread. PMID:8727883

  13. Frequencies of virulence genes and pulse field gel electrophoresis fingerprints in Escherichia coli isolates from canine pyometra.

    PubMed

    Maluta, Renato P; Borges, Clarissa A; Beraldo, Lívia G; Cardozo, Marita V; Voorwald, Fabiana A; Santana, André M; Rigobelo, Everlon C; Toniollo, Gilson H; Avila, Fernando A

    2014-11-01

    Escherichia coli is the most common bacterial agent isolated from canine pyometra. The frequencies of 24 virulence genes and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiles were determined for 23 E. coli isolates from cases of canine pyometra in Brazil. The frequencies of virulence genes were 91.3% fimH, 91.3% irp-2, 82.6% fyuA, 56.5% iroN, 47.8% traT, 39.1% usp, 34.8% sfaD/E, 34.8% tsh, 30.4% papC, 30.4% hlyA, 26.1% papGIII, 26.1% cnf-1, 21.7% papE/F, 21.7% iss, 17.4% iutA, 17.4% ompT, 17.4% cvaC, 17.4% hlyF, 17.4% iucD, 13.0% iucC, 13.0% astA, 4.3% papGII, 0% afaB/C and 0% papGI. The high frequency of yersiniabactin (fyuA and irp2) and salmochelin (iroN) genes suggests that iron uptake systems might be important in the pathogenesis of canine pyometra. PFGE profiles of 19 isolates were heterogeneous, confirming that E. coli isolates from canine pyometra are unlikely to be epidemic clones. PMID:25201253

  14. Multilocus sequence typing lacks the discriminatory ability of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis for typing Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Fakhr, Mohamed K; Nolan, Lisa K; Logue, Catherine M

    2005-05-01

    Nontyphoidal salmonellae are among the leading causes of food-borne disease in the United States. Because of the importance of Salmonella enterica in food-borne disease, numerous typing methodologies have been developed. Among the several molecular typing methods, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) is currently considered the "gold standard" technique in typing Salmonella. The aim of this study was to compare the discriminatory power of PFGE to multilocus sequence typing (MLST) in typing Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium clinical isolates. A total of 85 Salmonella Typhimurium clinical isolates from cattle were used in this study. PFGE using XbaI was performed on the 85 isolates by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention method, and data were analyzed using the BioNumerics software package. Fifty PFGE profiles were observed among the isolates, and these grouped into three major clusters. For the MLST analysis, the manB, pduF, glnA, and spaM genes were amplified by PCR from the same 85 isolates. DNA sequencing of these four genes, manB, pduF, glnA, and spaM, showed no genetic diversity among the isolates tested, with a 100% identity in nucleotide sequence. Moreover, the DNA sequences of the aforementioned genes showed 100% identity to the sequence reported in GenBank for the S. enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2 strain. Therefore, MLST, using these genes, lacks the discriminatory power of PFGE for typing Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. PMID:15872244

  15. Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis Genotyping of Taylorella equigenitalis Isolates Collected in the United States from 1978 to 2010▿

    PubMed Central

    Aalsburg, Alan M.; Erdman, Matthew M.

    2011-01-01

    Taylorella equigenitalis is the etiologic agent of contagious equine metritis (CEM), a venereal disease of horses. A total of 82 strains of T. equigenitalis isolated in the United States were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) after digestion of genomic DNA with restriction enzyme ApaI. Twenty-eight of those strains isolated from horses in the 2009 U.S. outbreak (CEM09) were further analyzed with NotI and NaeI enzymes. When ApaI alone was used for analysis, the 82 isolates clustered into 15 different genotypes that clearly defined groups of horses with known epidemiological connections. The PFGE profiles of the CEM09 isolates were indistinguishable after digestion with ApaI, NotI, and NaeI and did not match those of isolates from previous U.S. outbreaks in 1978 and 2006 or of any other isolate from the National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) culture library. Coupled with the fact that the CEM09 isolates are epidemiologically related, these results suggest a common source for the outbreak not linked to previous occurrences of CEM in the United States. PMID:21191049

  16. Subduction and slab detachment in the Mediterranean-Carpathian region.

    PubMed

    Wortel, M J; Spakman, W

    2000-12-01

    Seismic tomography models of the three-dimensional upper mantle velocity structure of the Mediterranean-Carpathian region provide a better understanding of the lithospheric processes governing its geodynamical evolution. Slab detachment, in particular lateral migration of this process along the plate boundary, is a key element in the lithospheric dynamics of the region during the last 20 to 30 million years. It strongly affects arc and trench migration, and causes along-strike variations in vertical motions, stress fields, and magmatism. In a terminal-stage subduction zone, involving collision and suturing, slab detachment is the natural last stage in the gravitational settling of subducted lithosphere. PMID:11110653

  17. Vibration characteristics of floating slab track

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Chen-Ming; Huang, Cheng-Hao; Chen, Yi-Yi

    2008-11-01

    Coupled equilibrium equations of suspended wheels and floating slab track system were solved with the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method to obtain the deflections, vibration velocities, and wheel-rail contact forces. The program was validated through several aspects. Cases with various vehicle speed, slab mass, and stiffness of slab bearing were analyzed to reveal the effects of slab bearing on track responses. The correlation between wheel-rail resonance and train speed was also discussed. It was found that rail deflections increase significantly as train speed increases. Although large slab mass may lower tuning frequency, it could also result in higher wheel-rail contact force and rail deflections. The floating slab track is effective in isolating loading above 10 Hz, which might present in some railway sections with irregularities. Adopting floating slab track for vibration control for environment along the railway may cause concerns about ride quality and track damages.

  18. Comparison of multilocus sequence typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis for Salmonella spp. identification in surface water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Chun Wei; Hao Huang, Kuan; Hsu, Bing Mu; Tsai, Hsien Lung; Tseng, Shao Feng; Kao, Po Min; Shen, Shu Min; Chou Chiu, Yi; Chen, Jung Sheng

    2013-04-01

    Salmonella is one of the most important pathogens of waterborne diseases with outbreaks from contaminated water reported worldwide. In addition, Salmonella spp. can survive for long periods in aquatic environments. To realize genotypes and serovars of Salmonella in aquatic environments, we isolated the Salmonella strains by selective culture plates to identify the serovars of Salmonella by serological assay, and identify the genotypes by Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) based on the sequence data from University College Cork (UCC), respectively. The results show that 36 stream water samples (30.1%) and 18 drinking water samples (23.3%) were confirmed the existence of Salmonella using culture method combined PCR specific invA gene amplification. In this study, 24 cultured isolates of Salmonella from water samples were classified to fifteen Salmonella enterica serovars. In addition, we construct phylogenetic analysis using phylogenetic tree and Minimum spanning tree (MST) method to analyze the relationship of clinical, environmental, and geographical data. Phylogenetic tree showed that four main clusters and our strains can be distributed in all. The genotypes of isolates from stream water are more biodiversity while comparing the Salmonella strains genotypes from drinking water sources. According to MST data, we can found the positive correlation between serovars and genotypes of Salmonella. Previous studies revealed that the result of Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) method can predict the serovars of Salmonella strain. Hence, we used the MLST data combined phylogenetic analysis to identify the serovars of Salmonella strain and achieved effectiveness. While using the geographical data combined phylogenetic analysis, the result showed that the dominant strains were existed in whole stream area in rainy season. Keywords: Salmonella spp., MLST, phylogenetic analysis, PFGE

  19. Kodamaea ohmeri isolates from patients in a university hospital: identification, antifungal susceptibility, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Sol; Shin, Jong Hee; Kim, Mi-Na; Jung, Sook-In; Park, Kyung Hwa; Cho, Duck; Kee, Seung Jung; Shin, Myung Geun; Suh, Soon Pal; Ryang, Dong Wook

    2007-03-01

    Data on clinical isolates of Kodamaea (Pichia) ohmeri, an emerging fungal pathogen, are scarce. Over the past 5 years, we identified yeast isolates from nine patients with fungemia as K. ohmeri by using the API 20C system. Here, we reanalyzed these isolates first by sequencing the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) regions and then by growing the isolates on CHROMagar Candida medium and subjecting them to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Based on their ITS2 sequences, six of the nine isolates were confirmed as K. ohmeri, while the others were identified as Candida haemulonii (n = 2) and Candida parapsilosis (n = 1). PFGE karyotyping of the K. ohmeri isolates revealed similar major bands, and their colonies showed a characteristic color change from pink to blue when grown on CHROMagar Candida medium for more than 48 h. For K. ohmeri, the ranges of MICs of fluconazole, voriconazole, caspofungin, and micafungin were 2 to 32 mug/ml, 0.03 to 0.5 mug/ml, 0.125 to 0.25 mug/ml, and 0.03 to 0.06 mug/ml, respectively. Restriction endonuclease analysis of genomic NotI-digested DNA (REAG-N) from isolates from different patients produced unique patterns, suggesting that the fungemia had occurred sporadically. This study determined that ITS2 sequence data, PFGE karyotypes, and CHROMagar Candida chromogenic culture medium are reliable diagnostic tools for identifying K. ohmeri while REAG-N is useful for genotyping the clinical isolates of K. ohmeri. PMID:17251396

  20. Analysis of Molecular Epidemiology of Chilean Salmonella enterica Serotype Enteritidis Isolates by Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis and Bacteriophage Typing

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Jorge; Fica, Alberto; Ebensperger, German; Calfullan, Hector; Prat, Soledad; Fernandez, Alda; Alexandre, Marcela; Heitmann, Ingrid

    2003-01-01

    Human Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis infections emerged in Chile in 1994. S. enterica serotype Enteritidis phage type 1 isolates predominated in the north, and phage type 4 isolates predominated in the central and southern regions. A study was planned to characterize this epidemic using the best discriminatory typing technique. Research involved 441 S. enterica serotype Enteritidis isolates, including clinical preepidemic samples (n = 74; 1975 to 1993) and epidemic (n = 199), food (n = 72), poultry (n = 57), and some Latin American (n = 39) isolates. The best method was selected based on a sample of preepidemic isolates, analyzing the discriminatory power (DP) obtained by phage typing and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA and pulsed-field gel electophoresis (PFGE) analysis. The highest DP was associated with BlnI PFGE-bacteriophage typing analysis (0.993). A total of 38 BlnI patterns (B patterns) were identified before the epidemic period, 19 since 1994, and only 4 in both periods. Two major clusters were identified by phylogenetic analysis, and the predominant B patterns clustered in the same branch. Combined analysis revealed that specific B pattern-phage type combinations (subtypes) disappeared before 1994, that different genotypes associated with S. enterica serotype Enteritidis phage type 4 had been observed since 1988, and that strain diversity increased before the expansion of S. enterica serotype Enteritidis in 1994. Predominant subtype B3-phage type 4 was associated with the central and southern regions, and subtype B38-phage type 1 was associated with the north (P < 0.0001). Food and poultry isolates matched the predominant S. enterica serotype Enteritidis subtypes, but isolates identified in neighboring countries (Peru and Bolivia) did not match S. enterica serotype Enteritidis subtypes identified in the north of Chile. The results of this work demonstrate that genetic diversity, replacement, and expansion of specific S. enterica serotype

  1. Epidemiologic analysis of sporadic Salmonella typhi isolates and those from outbreaks by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Thong, K L; Cheong, Y M; Puthucheary, S; Koh, C L; Pang, T

    1994-01-01

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was used to compare and analyze 158 isolates of Salmonella typhi from five well-defined outbreaks of typhoid fever in Malaysia and also isolates involved in sporadic cases of typhoid fever occurring during the same period. Digestion of chromosomal DNAs from these S. typhi isolates with the restriction endonucleases XbaI (5'-TCTAGA-3'), SpeI (5'-ACTAGT-3'), and AvrII (5'-CCTAGG-3') and then PFGE produced restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) patterns consisting of 11 to 24 DNA fragments ranging in size from 20 to 630 kbp. Analysis of the REA patterns generated by PFGE after digestion with XbaI and SpeI indicated that the S. typhi isolates obtained from sporadic cases of infection were much more heterogeneous (at least 13 different REA patterns were detected; Dice coefficient, between 0.73 and 1.0) than those obtained during outbreaks of typhoid fever. The clonal nature and the close genetic identities of isolates from outbreaks in Alor Setar, Penang, Kota Kinabalu, Johor Bahru, and Kota Bahru were suggested by the fact that only a limited number of REA patterns, which mostly differed by only a single band, were detected (one to four patterns; Dice coefficient, between 0.82 and 1.0), although a different pattern was associated with each of these outbreaks. Comparison of REA patterns with ribotyping for 18 S. typhi isolates involved in sporadic cases of infection showed a good correlation, in that 72% of the isolates were in the same group. There was no clear correlation of phage types with a specific REA pattern. We conclude that PFGE of s. typhi chromosomal DNA digested with infrequently cutting restriction endonucleases is a useful method for comparing and differentiating S. typhi isolates for epidemiological purposes. Images PMID:7914202

  2. Comparison of restriction endonuclease analysis, ribotyping, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis for molecular differentiation of Clostridium difficile strains.

    PubMed Central

    Kristjánsson, M; Samore, M H; Gerding, D N; DeGirolami, P C; Bettin, K M; Karchmer, A W; Arbeit, R D

    1994-01-01

    A combined clinical and molecular epidemiologic analysis of 46 strains of Clostridium difficile, including 16 nosocomial isolates from one ward (outbreak ward) plus 17 other nosocomial isolates and 13 community-acquired isolates, was performed. HindIII digests of total cellular DNA were analyzed by restriction enzyme analysis (REA) and ribotyping; SmaI digests were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Isolates were assigned to typing groups on the basis of the profiles detected; isolates with closely related profiles were assigned to subgroups. The 16 isolates from the outbreak ward were resolved by both REA and PFGE into five distinct groups; 13 isolates represented two REA groups and three PFGE groups and two isolates were resolved as distinct groups by both techniques. DNA obtained from one isolate was persistently partially degraded, precluding analysis by PFGE. Seventeen sporadic nosocomial isolates were resolved by REA and PFGE into comparable numbers of groups (i.e., nine groups) and subgroups (i.e., 15 and 14 subgroups, respectively), with two isolates not evaluable by PFGE. The 13 epidemiologically unrelated community-acquired isolates were assigned to 11 groups by REA and to 12 groups by PFGE. Overall, ribotyping identified only nine groups among the 46 isolates. We conclude that REA and PFGE have comparable discriminatory powers for epidemiologic typing of C. difficile isolates and that ribotyping is appreciably less discriminatory. For a few isolates, partial DNA degradation prevented analysis by PFGE but not by REA or ribotyping; the cause of the degradation is unknown. Images PMID:7989550

  3. Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis characterization of Listeria monocytogenes isolates from cheese manufacturing plants in São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Barancelli, Giovana V; Camargo, Tarsila M; Gagliardi, Natália G; Porto, Ernani; Souza, Roberto A; Campioni, Fabio; Falcão, Juliana P; Hofer, Ernesto; Cruz, Adriano G; Oliveira, Carlos A F

    2014-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the occurrence of Listeria monocytogenes in cheese and in the environment of three small-scale dairy plants (A, B, C) located in the Northern region state of São Paulo, Brazil, and to characterize the isolates using conventional serotyping and PFGE. A total of 393 samples were collected and analyzed from October 2008 to September 2009. From these, 136 came from dairy plant A, where only L. seeligeri was isolated. In dairy plant B, 136 samples were analyzed, and L. innocua, L. seeligeri and L. welshimeri were isolated together with L. monocytogenes. In dairy plant C, 121 samples were analyzed, and L. monocytogenes and L. innocua were isolated. Cheese from dairy plants B and C were contaminated with Listeria spp, with L. innocua being found in Minas frescal cheese from both dairy plants, and L. innocua and L. monocytogenes in Prato cheese from dairy plant C. A total of 85 L. monocytogenes isolates were classified in 3 serotypes: 1/2b, 1/2c, and 4b, with predominance of serotype 4b in both dairy plants. The 85 isolates found in the dairy plants were characterized by genomic macrorestriction using ApaI and AscI with Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). Macrorestriction yielded 30 different pulsotypes. The presence of indistinguishable profiles repeatedly isolated during a 12-month period indicated the persistence of L. monocytogenes in dairy plants B and C, which were more than 100 km away from each other. Brine used in dairy plant C contained more than one L. monocytogenes lineage. The routes of contamination were identified in plants B and C, and highlighted the importance of using molecular techniques and serotyping to track L. monocytogenes sources of contamination, distribution, and routes of contamination in dairy plants, and to develop improved control strategies for L. monocytogenes in dairy plants and dairy products. PMID:24412413

  4. Analysis of molecular epidemiology of Chilean Salmonella enterica serotype enteritidis isolates by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and bacteriophage typing.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Jorge; Fica, Alberto; Ebensperger, German; Calfullan, Hector; Prat, Soledad; Fernandez, Alda; Alexandre, Marcela; Heitmann, Ingrid

    2003-04-01

    Human Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis infections emerged in Chile in 1994. S. enterica serotype Enteritidis phage type 1 isolates predominated in the north, and phage type 4 isolates predominated in the central and southern regions. A study was planned to characterize this epidemic using the best discriminatory typing technique. Research involved 441 S. enterica serotype Enteritidis isolates, including clinical preepidemic samples (n = 74; 1975 to 1993) and epidemic (n = 199), food (n = 72), poultry (n = 57), and some Latin American (n = 39) isolates. The best method was selected based on a sample of preepidemic isolates, analyzing the discriminatory power (DP) obtained by phage typing and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA and pulsed-field gel electophoresis (PFGE) analysis. The highest DP was associated with BlnI PFGE-bacteriophage typing analysis (0.993). A total of 38 BlnI patterns (B patterns) were identified before the epidemic period, 19 since 1994, and only 4 in both periods. Two major clusters were identified by phylogenetic analysis, and the predominant B patterns clustered in the same branch. Combined analysis revealed that specific B pattern-phage type combinations (subtypes) disappeared before 1994, that different genotypes associated with S. enterica serotype Enteritidis phage type 4 had been observed since 1988, and that strain diversity increased before the expansion of S. enterica serotype Enteritidis in 1994. Predominant subtype B3-phage type 4 was associated with the central and southern regions, and subtype B38-phage type 1 was associated with the north (P < 0.0001). Food and poultry isolates matched the predominant S. enterica serotype Enteritidis subtypes, but isolates identified in neighboring countries (Peru and Bolivia) did not match S. enterica serotype Enteritidis subtypes identified in the north of Chile. The results of this work demonstrate that genetic diversity, replacement, and expansion of specific S. enterica serotype

  5. The influence of particle size and static magnetic fields on the uptake of magnetic nanoparticles into three dimensional cell-seeded collagen gel cultures.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Emily E L; Child, Hannah W; Hursthouse, Andrew; Stirling, David; McCully, Mark; Paterson, David; Mullin, Margaret; Berry, Catherine C

    2015-08-01

    Over recent decades there has been and continues to be major advances in the imaging, diagnosis and potential treatment of medical conditions, by the use of magnetic nanoparticles. However, to date the majority of cell delivery studies employ a traditional 2D monolayer culture. This article aims to determine the ability of various sized magnetic nanoparticles to penetrate and travel through a cell seeded collagen gel model, in the presence or absence of a magnetic field. Three different sized (100, 200, and 500 nm) nanoparticles were employed in the study. The results showed cell viability was unaffected by the presence of nanoparticles over a 24-h test period. The initial uptake of the 100 nm nanoparticle into the collagen gel structure was superior compared to the larger sized nanoparticles under the influence of a magnetic field and incubated for 24 h. Interestingly, it was the 200 nm nanoparticles, which proved to penetrate the gel furthest, under the influence of a magnetic field, during the initial culture stage after 1-h incubation. PMID:25358626

  6. The transition from stress softening to stress hardening under cyclic loading induced by magnetic field for magneto-sensitive polymer gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yangguang; Liao, Guojiang; Zhang, Canyang; Wan, Qiang; Liu, Taixiang

    2016-04-01

    Magneto-sensitive polymer gel (MSPG) is a kind of ferromagnetic particle filled smart polymer composite, whose magneto-mechanical coupling mechanism has attracted increasing attention in recent years. In this work, the magneto-induced rheological response of MSPG under cyclic shear loading was investigated. It was found that magnetic field is the critical reason for the transition from stress softening to stress hardening under cyclic loading. Besides, the particle concentration and temperature are the controlling factors in the structure optimization of MSPG in the presence of magnetic field. The magneto-induced hardening mechanism was further proposed based on the related experimental results.

  7. Population Genetic Structure of Listeria monocytogenes Strains as Determined by Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis and Multilocus Sequence Typing

    PubMed Central

    Henri, Clémentine; Félix, Benjamin; Guillier, Laurent; Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Michelon, Damien; Mariet, Jean-François; Aarestrup, Frank M.; Mistou, Michel-Yves; Hendriksen, René S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Listeria monocytogenes is a ubiquitous bacterium that may cause the foodborne illness listeriosis. Only a small amount of data about the population genetic structure of strains isolated from food is available. This study aimed to provide an accurate view of the L. monocytogenes food strain population in France. From 1999 to 2014, 1,894 L. monocytogenes strains were isolated from food at the French National Reference Laboratory for L. monocytogenes and classified according to the five risk food matrices defined by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). A total of 396 strains were selected on the basis of different pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) clusters, serotypes, and strain origins and typed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and the MLST results were supplemented with MLST data available from Institut Pasteur, representing human and additional food strains from France. The distribution of sequence types (STs) was compared between food and clinical strains on a panel of 675 strains. High congruence between PFGE and MLST was found. Out of 73 PFGE clusters, the two most prevalent corresponded to ST9 and ST121. Using original statistical analysis, we demonstrated that (i) there was not a clear association between ST9 and ST121 and the food matrices, (ii) serotype IIc, ST8, and ST4 were associated with meat products, and (iii) ST13 was associated with dairy products. Of the two major STs, ST121 was the ST that included the fewest clinical strains, which might indicate lower virulence. This observation may be directly relevant for refining risk analysis models for the better management of food safety. IMPORTANCE This study showed a very useful backward compatibility between PFGE and MLST for surveillance. The results enabled better understanding of the population structure of L. monocytogenes strains isolated from food and management of the health risks associated with L. monocytogenes food strains. Moreover, this work provided an accurate view

  8. Numerical Models of Subduction and Slab Detachment: Placing a Lower Bound on the Strength of Slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billen, M. I.; Andrews, E.

    2007-12-01

    Subduction provides the main driving force for the motion of tectonic plates at the Earth's surface through slab- pull and sinking-induced flow in the surrounding mantle. The ability of the slab to directly transmit slab-pull forces to the tectonic plate at the surface depends on the minimum strength and rheology (e.g., viscous, plastic) of the slab. Previous models have shown that observations including the state of stress in slabs, dynamic topography and the geoid above slabs, the evolution of slab and the kinematic history of subduction can be well-matched by a variety of models with either low viscosity (i.e., 100-1,000 times more viscous than the surrounding mantle) or high viscosity slabs (i.e., more than 10,000 times more viscous than the surrounding mantle). However, in many of the models in which a good match to observations is found for low viscosity slabs, the maximum slab viscosity is imposed as a cut-off value, which forces the entire slab to have a more or less uniform viscosity independent of strain-rate or stress magnitude, rather than a plastic yielding-type rheology. We present numerical models demonstrating that when the non-Newtonian viscosity of the upper mantle and plastic yielding behavior of slabs are taken into account, the minimum yield strength that allows for continuous subduction is approximately 300- 500 MPa, which leads to high viscosity slabs with some localized lower viscosity regions. A yield stress of 10-100 MPa is required to form uniformly low viscosity slabs, but these slabs detach from the subducting plate, due to localized weakening, when the slab reaches a length of 200-300 km, even when subduction is facilitated by a low viscosity shear zone and kinematically-imposed surface velocities. In contrast, detachment of higher strength slabs in fully-dynamic models only occurs when the shear zone is removed and prevents further subduction.

  9. Role of Hydrogen in stagnant slabs and big mantle wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, E.; Zhao, D.

    2008-12-01

    Eastern China, Europe, and United State (e.g., [7]). According to the BMW model by Zhao [2], the intra-plate volcanisms in Northeast China including Mt. Changbai are different from the hot plumes and they might be generated due to some processes related to the deep-seated dehydration from the stagnant slab. Recent geochemical studies on volcanic rocks and associated mantle xenoliths in Northeast China (e.g., [8]) indicated that there is no geochemical evidence for involvement of subducting slab in most basalts, i.e., no depletion of high field strength elements and no enrichment of large ion lithophile elements. There is no clear evidence for a high-3He/4He mantle plume component in these rocks, i.e., 3He/4He ratios are significantly below the high 3He/4He ratios of mantle plumes such as those beneath Hawaii and Iceland. The geochemical signatures of the deep dehydration should be different from those in the conventional mantle wedge, since the fluids generated at such depths are completely different from those at the shallow depths. Further studies including the element partitioning between fluids and mantle under the deep upper mantle and the transition zone conditions are necessary to clarify the possible role of the Big Mantle Wedge on the intra-plate volcanism. [1] Fukao, et al., J. G. R. 108, doi:10.1029/2001JB000989, 2003. [2] Zhao et al., Chin. Sci. Bulletin 49, 1401, 2004, [3] Ohtani, Elements, 1, 25, 2005. [4] Richard et al., EPSL, 251, 156, 2006. [5] Hae et al., EPSL, 243, 141, 2006. [6] Litasov and Ohtani, PEPI, 134, 105, 2002. [7] Song et al., Nature, 427, 530, 2004. [8] Chen et al., Lithos, 96, 108, 2007

  10. Slab melting versus slab dehydration in subduction-zone magmatism.

    PubMed

    Mibe, Kenji; Kawamoto, Tatsuhiko; Matsukage, Kyoko N; Fei, Yingwei; Ono, Shigeaki

    2011-05-17

    The second critical endpoint in the basalt-H(2)O system was directly determined by a high-pressure and high-temperature X-ray radiography technique. We found that the second critical endpoint occurs at around 3.4 GPa and 770 °C (corresponding to a depth of approximately 100 km in a subducting slab), which is much shallower than the previously estimated conditions. Our results indicate that the melting temperature of the subducting oceanic crust can no longer be defined beyond this critical condition and that the fluid released from subducting oceanic crust at depths greater than 100 km under volcanic arcs is supercritical fluid rather than aqueous fluid and/or hydrous melts. The position of the second critical endpoint explains why there is a limitation to the slab depth at which adakitic magmas are produced, as well as the origin of across-arc geochemical variations of trace elements in volcanic rocks in subduction zones. PMID:21536910

  11. Slab melting versus slab dehydration in subduction-zone magmatism

    PubMed Central

    Mibe, Kenji; Kawamoto, Tatsuhiko; Matsukage, Kyoko N.; Fei, Yingwei; Ono, Shigeaki

    2011-01-01

    The second critical endpoint in the basalt-H2O system was directly determined by a high-pressure and high-temperature X-ray radiography technique. We found that the second critical endpoint occurs at around 3.4 GPa and 770 °C (corresponding to a depth of approximately 100 km in a subducting slab), which is much shallower than the previously estimated conditions. Our results indicate that the melting temperature of the subducting oceanic crust can no longer be defined beyond this critical condition and that the fluid released from subducting oceanic crust at depths greater than 100 km under volcanic arcs is supercritical fluid rather than aqueous fluid and/or hydrous melts. The position of the second critical endpoint explains why there is a limitation to the slab depth at which adakitic magmas are produced, as well as the origin of across-arc geochemical variations of trace elements in volcanic rocks in subduction zones. PMID:21536910

  12. Nonlinear Shear Instabilities in an Infinite Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nepveu, M.

    1982-08-01

    The dynamical evolution of an infinite slab moving in denser and noisy (turbulent) surroundings is investigated with a 2D hydrodynamic code. The applicability of the results to astrophysical jets is discussed. Inviscid beams show internal shocks at regular intervals of a few beamwidths. Kinks are not obvious. In viscous beams shocks are less outspoken, but turbulence is triggered with maximum scales of a few beamwidths. These viscous beams broaden. Linear stability analysis may hold up to a few e-folding times, although the seed disturbance field is not infinitesimal. The computations suggest that viscous astrophysical beams may become blurred quite suddenly and may give rise to sudden change in radiation patterns (NGC 1265).

  13. Laser applications in machining slab materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoping

    1990-10-01

    Since the invention of the laser back in 1960, laser technology has been extensively applied in many fields of science and technology. These has been a history of nearly two decades of using lasers as an energy source in machining materials, such as cutting, welding, ruling and boring, among other operations. With the development of flexible automation in production, the advantages of laser machining have has grown more and more obvious. The combination of laser technology and computer science further promotes the enhancement and upgrading of laser machining and related equipment. At present, many countries are building high quality laser equipment for machining slab materials, such as the Coherent and Spectra Physics corporations in the United States, the Trumpf Corporation in West Germany, the Amada Corporation in Japan, and the Bystronic Corporation in Switzerland, among other companies.

  14. Electrophoretic extraction of proteins from two-dimensional electrophoresis gel spots

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Jian-Shi; Giometti, C.S.; Tollaksen, S.L.

    1987-09-04

    After two-dimensional electrophoresis of proteins or the like, resulting in a polyacrylamide gel slab having a pattern of protein gel spots thereon, an individual protein gel spot is cored out from the slab, to form a gel spot core which is placed in an extraction tube, with a dialysis membrane across the lower end of the tube. Replicate gel spots can be cored out from replicate gel slabs and placed in the extraction tube. Molten agarose gel is poured into the extraction tube where the agarose gel hardens to form an immobilizing gel, covering the gel spot cores. The upper end portion of the extraction tube is filled with a volume of buffer solution, and the upper end is closed by another dialysis membrane. Upper and lower bodies of a buffer solution are brought into contact with the upper and lower membranes and are provided with electrodes connected to the positive and negative terminals of a dc power supply, thereby producing an electrical current which flows through the upper membrane, the volume of buffer solution, the agarose, the gel spot cores and the lower membrane. The current causes the proteins to be extracted electrophoretically from the gel spot cores, so that the extracted proteins accumulate and are contained in the space between the agarose gel and the upper membrane. 8 figs.

  15. Slab Driven Mantle Deformation and Plate-Mantle Decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadamec, M. A.; MacDougall, J.; Fischer, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    Observations of shear wave splitting derived from local sources in subduction zones suggest viscous flow in the mantle wedge is commonly non-parallel to both the subducting plate velocity vector and the motion of the overriding plate. However, far from the subduction zone trench, observations indicate the fast axis of shear wave splitting tends to align with the velocity vector of the surface plates. Similarly, previous 3D geodynamic models show the slab can drive local decoupling of the mantle and surface plates, in both direction and speed. This suggests that there is some distance from the trench over which there is significant decoupling of the mantle flow from surface plate motion, and that this decoupling zone then decays with continued distance from the trench, resulting in far-field plate-mantle coupling. Here we present results from geodynamic models of subduction coupled with calculations of olivine fabric deformation and synthetic splitting to 1) examine the influence of slab strength, slab dip, and non-Newtonian viscosity on the deformation fabric in the mantle wedge and subslab mantle and 2) quantify the spatial extent and intensity of this slab driven decoupling zone. We compare the deformation fabric in a 2D corner flow solution with varying dip to that of a 2D free subduction model with varying initial dip and slab strength. The results show that using an experimentally derived flow law to define viscosity (both diffusion creep and dislocation creep deformation mechanisms) has a first order effect on the viscosity structure and flow velocity in the upper mantle. The free subduction models using the composite viscosity formulation produce a zone of subduction induced mantle weakening that results in reduced viscous support of the slab and lateral variability in coupling of the mantle to the base of the surface plates. The maximum yield stress, which places an upper bound on the slab strength, can also have a significant impact on the viscosity

  16. A new model for yield stress of magneto-rheological greases/gels under combined effects of magnetic field and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, Huseyin; Wang, Xiaojie; Gordaninejad, Faramarz

    2009-03-01

    The goal of this study is to develop a new model to describe the behavior of shear yield stress of magnetorheological greases/gels (MRGs) under the combined effects of applied magnetic field and temperature. MRGs are a class of field-responsive materials which consist of micron-size ferrous particles suspended in a grease/gel-like material. The main advantage of a MRG over a MR fluid is that in a MRG, ferrous particles do not settle. However, the rheological properties of grease carrier materials are very sensitive to temperature. Therefore, the temperature effect on the yield stress of MRGs may be one of the main concerns in developing these materials. In this study, the steady-shear magneto-rheological response of MRGs subject to various temperatures is investigated. All experimental data are obtained for magnetic fields ranging from 0.14T to 0.53T and temperatures ranging from 10°C to 70°C. It is observed that temperature has a pronounced effect on the field induced yield stress of MRGs. A new yield stress model for MRGs which is a function of magnetic field and temperature is proposed based on the Herschel-Bulkley constitutive equation and the Arrhenius relationship. Excellent agreement between the model predictions and experimental data is obtained.

  17. Dynamic uplift during slab flattening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dávila, Federico M.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, Carolina

    2015-09-01

    Subduction exerts a strong control on surface topography and is the main cause of large vertical motions in continents, including past events of large-scale marine flooding and tilting. The mechanism is dynamic deflection: the sinking of dense subducted lithosphere gives rise to stresses that directly pull down the surface. Here we show that subduction does not always lead to downward deflections of the Earth's surface. Subduction of young lithosphere at shallow angles (flat subduction) leaves it neutrally or even positively buoyant with respect to underlying mantle because the lithosphere is relatively warm compared with older lithosphere, and because the thickened and hence drier oceanic crust does not undergo the transformation of basalt to denser eclogite. Accounting for neutrally buoyant flat segments along with large variations in slab morphology in the South American subduction zone explains along-strike and temporal changes in dynamic topography observed in the geologic record since the beginning of the Cenozoic. Our results show that the transition from normal subduction to slab flattening generates dynamic uplift, preventing back-arc marine flooding.

  18. A comparison of microseismicity induced by gel-proppant-and water-injected hydraulic fractures, Carthage Cotton Valley gas field, East Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Rutledge, J. T.; Phillips, W. S.

    2002-01-01

    In May and July, 1997, a consortia of operators and service companies conducted a series of hydraulic fracture imaging tests in the Carthage Cotton Valley gas field of East Texas (Walker, 1997). Microseismic data were collected and processed for six hydraulic fracture treatments in two wells (3 completion intervals per well) (Mayerhofer et al., 2000). One well was completed with gel-proppant treatments in which a viscous crosslink gel was injected to entrain high concentrations of sand proppant into formation. The second well was completed using treated water and very low proppant concentrations (waterfracs). Waterfracs have been shown to be just as effective as the conventional gel-proppant treatments in Cotton Valley reservoirs, but at greatly reduced cost. Mayerhofer and Meehan (1998) suggest two possible reasons why waterfracs are successful: (1) Induced shear displacement along natural and hydraulic fractures results in self-propping (shear dilation enhanced by fracture branching, proppant and spalled rock fragments), and (2) Fracture extension and cleanup is easier to achieve with low-viscosity fluids. With improved source location precision and focal mechanism determination (fracture plane orientation and sense of slip), we have reexamined the Cotton Valley data, comparing the seismicity induced by water and gel-proppant treatments at common depth intervals. We have improved the location precision and computed focal mechanism of microearthquakes induced during a series of hydraulic fracture completions within the Cotton Valley formation of East Texas. Conventional gel-proppant treatments and treatments using treated water and very low proppant concentrations (waterfracs) were monitored. Waterfracs have been shown to be just as effective as the conventional gel-proppant treatments in Cotton Valley reservoirs, but at greatly reduced cost (Mayerhofer and Meehan, 1998). Comparison of the seismicity induced by the two treatment types show similar distributions of

  19. Subducting Slabs: Jellyfishes in the Earth's Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiselet, C.; Braun, J.; Husson, L.; Le Carlier de Veslud, C.; Thieulot, C.; Yamato, P.; Grujic, D.

    2010-12-01

    The constantly improving resolution of geophysical data, seismic tomography and seismicity in particular, shows that the lithosphere does not subduct as a slab of uniform thickness but is rather thinned in the upper mantle and thickened around the transition zone between the upper and lower mantle. This observation has traditionally been interpreted as evidence for the buckling and piling of slabs at the boundary between the upper and lower mantle, where a strong contrast in viscosity may exist and cause resistance to the penetration of slabs into the lower mantle. The distribution and character of seismicity reveal, however, that slabs undergo vertical extension in the upper mantle and compression near the transition zone. In this paper, we demonstrate that during the subduction process, the shape of low viscosity slabs (1 to 100 times more viscous than the surrounding mantle) evolves toward an inverted plume shape that we coin jellyfish. Results of a 3D numerical model show that the leading tip of slabs deform toward a rounded head skirted by lateral tentacles that emerge from the sides of the jellyfish head. The head is linked to the body of the subducting slab by a thin tail. A complete parametric study reveals that subducting slabs may achieve a variety of shapes, in good agreement with the diversity of natural slab shapes evidenced by seismic tomography. Our work also suggests that the slab to mantle viscosity ratio in the Earth is most likely to be lower than 100. However, the sensitivity of slab shapes to upper and lower mantle viscosities and densities, which remain poorly constrained by independent evidence, precludes any systematic deciphering of the observations.

  20. Subducting slabs: Jellyfishes in the Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiselet, Christelle; Braun, Jean; Husson, Laurent; Le Carlier de Veslud, Christian; Thieulot, Cedric; Yamato, Philippe; Grujic, Djordje

    2010-08-01

    The constantly improving resolution of geophysical data, seismic tomography and seismicity in particular, shows that the lithosphere does not subduct as a slab of uniform thickness but is rather thinned in the upper mantle and thickened around the transition zone between the upper and lower mantle. This observation has traditionally been interpreted as evidence for the buckling and piling of slabs at the boundary between the upper and lower mantle, where a strong contrast in viscosity may exist and cause resistance to the penetration of slabs into the lower mantle. The distribution and character of seismicity reveal, however, that slabs undergo vertical extension in the upper mantle and compression near the transition zone. In this paper, we demonstrate that during the subduction process, the shape of low viscosity slabs (1 to 100 times more viscous than the surrounding mantle) evolves toward an inverted plume shape that we coin jellyfish. Results of a 3D numerical model show that the leading tip of slabs deform toward a rounded head skirted by lateral tentacles that emerge from the sides of the jellyfish head. The head is linked to the body of the subducting slab by a thin tail. A complete parametric study reveals that subducting slabs may achieve a variety of shapes, in good agreement with the diversity of natural slab shapes evidenced by seismic tomography. Our work also suggests that the slab to mantle viscosity ratio in the Earth is most likely to be lower than 100. However, the sensitivity of slab shapes to upper and lower mantle viscosities and densities, which remain poorly constrained by independent evidence, precludes any systematic deciphering of the observations.

  1. Goos-Haenchen shifts of the reflected waves from a cold, inhomogeneous, and magnetized plasma slab

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Guoding; Zang Taocheng; Pan Tao

    2010-01-15

    We discuss theoretically the Goos-Haenchen (GH) shifts of the reflected waves from a cold, inhomogeneous, and magnetized plasma slab by using the invariant imbedding approach. Aiming at the linear and parabolic electron-density profiles, we demonstrate numerically the dependences of the co- and cross-polarized GH shifts on the angle of incidence, external static magnetic field, and the thickness of the plasma slab. The results show that the different electron-density profiles of plasma can result in the very different dependences of the GH shifts on the angle of incidence, external magnetic field, and the slab's thickness; the GH shifts can be switched between the considerably large positive and negative values under certain conditions. Particularly, without altering the structure of the plasma slab, the GH shifts can be manipulated by modifying the angle of incident or the external static magnetic field.

  2. Slab fluid release: localized in space and time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, T.; Gussone, N. C.; Podladchikov, Y. Y.

    2012-12-01

    As subducting oceanic plates descend into the Earth's mantle, increasing pressures and temperatures lead to the progressive destabilization of hydrous mineral phases and the release of H2O-rich fluids. Some fraction of these fluids ascend into the overlying mantle wedge, inducing partial melting, and their "chemical freight" is thought to contribute to the distinctive chemical signature of the resulting arc magmas. Field evidences suggest that channelized fluid flow may be the dominant mechanism for intra-slab fluid flow. Along their pathways within slabs, these fluids can trigger mineral reactions and produce chemical changes in rocks with which they interact. However, the spatial and temporal scales of this fluid flow remain largely unknown. We employed the Ca and Li isotope systems on a fossil high-pressure fluid pathway and its associated reaction halo (Chinese Tianshan), formed at ~70 km depth during subduction of a coherent oceanic slab, allowing us to constrain the fluid flux, fluid source and the duration of the fluid-rock interaction. In the reaction halo, the degree of eclogitization along with Ca concentration increases towards the vein. A high fluid flux is required to obtain the observed Ca increase and changes in δ44/40Ca. The Ca isotope composition indicate mixing of two distinct Ca sources, the wall-rock blueschist and an external fluid source, the latter of which is enriched in heavy Ca isotopes. The relatively high δ44/40Ca (>1.3‰) of the infiltrating fluid is suggestive of partially hydrated slab mantle as the fluid source. Alternatively, Ca derived from MORB, (0.7 to 0.9‰) and AOC (0.6 to 1.0‰) might evolve towards heavier Ca isotope values while it is ascending through the slab and reacting with wall-rocks and forming carbonates, which are usually associated with the flow structures. This is because calcium carbonate precipitation preferentially removes light Ca from the fluid while the residual fluid will get heavier proportional to

  3. The slab geometry laser. I - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggleston, J. M.; Kane, T. J.; Kuhn, K.; Byer, R. L.; Unternahrer, J.

    1984-01-01

    Slab geometry solid-state lasers offer significant performance improvements over conventional rod-geometry lasers. A detailed theoretical description of the thermal, stress, and beam-propagation characteristics of a slab laser is presented. The analysis includes consideration of the effects of the zig-zag optical path, which eliminates thermal and stress focusing and reduces residual birefringence.

  4. Rapid pulsed-field gel electrophoresis protocol for typing of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and other gram-negative organisms in 1 day.

    PubMed Central

    Gautom, R K

    1997-01-01

    Genomic DNA patterns generated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis are highly specific for different strains of an organism and have significant value in epidemiologic investigations of infectious-disease outbreaks. Unfortunately, time-consuming and tedious specimen processing is an inherent problem which limits the use of this powerful technology as a real-time epidemic investigational tool. Here, I describe a rapid method to improve the response time and provide specific bacterial strain identification for the typing of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and other gram-negative organisms in a single day. PMID:9350772

  5. Electrophoretic extraction of proteins from two-dimensional electrophoresis gel spots

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Jian-Shi; Giometti, Carol S.; Tollaksen, Sandra L.

    1989-01-01

    After two-dimensional electrophoresis of proteins or the like, resulting in a polyacrylamide gel slab having a pattern of protein gel spots thereon, an individual protein gel spot is cored out from the slab, to form a gel spot core which is placed in an extraction tube, with a dialysis membrane across the lower end of the tube. Replicate gel spots can be cored out from replicate gel slabs and placed in the extraction tube. Molten agarose gel is poured into the extraction tube where the agarose gel hardens to form an immobilizing gel, covering the gel spot cores. The upper end portion of the extraction tube is filled with a volume of buffer solution, and the upper end is closed by another dialysis membrane. Upper and lower bodies of a buffer solution are brought into contact with the upper and lower membranes and are provided with electrodes connected to the positive and negative terminals of a DC power supply, thereby producing an electrical current which flows through the upper membrane, the volume of buffer solution, the agarose, the gel spot cores and the lower membrane. The current causes the proteins to be extracted electrophoretically from the gel spot cores, so that the extracted proteins accumulate and are contained in the space between the agarose gel and the upper membrane. A high percentage extraction of proteins is achieved. The extracted proteins can be removed and subjected to partial digestion by trypsin or the like, followed by two-dimensional electrophoresis, resulting in a gel slab having a pattern of peptide gel spots which can be cored out and subjected to electrophoretic extraction to extract individual peptides.

  6. INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE BUILDING 3550 SLAB AT OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, Phyllis C.

    2012-05-08

    The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has completed the independent verification survey of the Building 3550 Slab. The results of this effort are provided. The objective of this verification survey is to provide independent review and field assessment of remediation actions conducted by Safety and Ecology Corporation (SEC) to document that the final radiological condition of the slab meets the release guidelines. Verification survey activities on the Building 3550 Slab that included scans, measurements, and the collection of smears. Scans for alpha, alpha plus beta, and gamma activity identified several areas that were investigated.

  7. Looking east inside of the 44" slab mill building at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking east inside of the 44" slab mill building at the red hot slabs being conveyed to the hot beds. - U.S. Steel Edgar Thomson Works, 44" Slab Mill, Along Monongahela River, Braddock, Allegheny County, PA

  8. Magnetoelectric sensor excitations in hexaferrite slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zare, Saba; Izadkhah, Hessam; Somu, Sivasubramanian; Vittoria, Carmine

    2015-06-01

    We developed techniques for H- and E-field sensors utilizing single phase magnetoelectric (ME) hexaferrite slabs in the frequency range of 100 Hz to 10 MHz. Novel circuit designs incorporating both spiral and solenoid coils and single and multi-capacitor banks were developed to probe the physics and properties of ME hexaferrites and explore ME effects for sensor detections. Fundamental measurements of the anisotropic tensor elements of the magneto-electric coupling parameter were performed using these novel techniques. In addition, for H-field sensing experiments we measured sensitivity of about 3000 Vm-1/G using solenoid coils and 8000 Vm-1/G using spiral coils. For E-field, sensing the sensitivity was 10-4 G/Vm-1 and using single capacitor detector. Sensitivity for multi-capacitor detectors was measured to be in the order of 10-3 G/Vm-1 and frequency dependent exhibiting a maximum value at ˜1 MHz. Tunability of 0.1%-90% was achieved for tunable inductor applications using both single and multi-capacitors excitation. We believe that significant (˜106) improvements in sensitivity and tunability are feasible with simple modifications of the fabrication process.

  9. A cryogenic slab CO laser

    SciTech Connect

    Ionin, Andrei A; Kozlov, A Yu; Seleznev, L V; Sinitsyn, D V

    2009-03-31

    A compact capacitive transverse RF-discharge-pumped slab CO laser with cryogenically cooled electrodes, which operates both in the cw and repetitively pulsed regimes, is fabricated. The laser operation is studied in the free running multifrequency regime at the vibrational - rotational transitions of the fundamental (V + 1 {yields} V) vibrational bands of the CO molecule in the spectral region from 5.1 to 5.4 {mu}m. Optimal operation conditions (gas mixture composition and pressure, RF pump parameters) are determined. It is shown that only gas mixtures with a high content of oxygen (up to 20% with respect to the concentration of CO molecules) can be used as an active medium of this laser. It is demonstrated that repetitively pulsed pumping is more efficient compared to cw pumping. In this case, quasi-cw lasing regime can be obtained. The maximum average output power of {approx}12 W was obtained for this laser operating on fundamental bands and its efficiency achieved {approx}14 %. The frequency-selective operation regime of the slab RF-discharge-pumped CO laser was realised at {approx} 100 laser lines in the spectral region from 5.0 to 6.5 {mu}m with the average output power of up to several tens of milliwatts in each line. Lasing at the transitions of the first vibrational overtone (V + 2 {yields} V) of the CO molecule is obtained in the spectral region from 2.5 to 3.9 {mu}m. The average output power of the overtone laser achieved 0.3 W. All the results were obtained without the forced gas mixture exchange in the discharge chamber. Under fixed experimental conditions, repetitively pulsed lasing (with fluctuations of the output characteristics no more than {+-}10 %) was stable for more than an hour. (lasers)

  10. Slab stagnation and detachment under northeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Satoru

    2016-03-01

    Results of tomography models around the Japanese Islands show the existence of a gap between the horizontally lying (stagnant) slab extending under northeastern China and the fast seismic velocity anomaly in the lower mantle. A simple conversion from the fast velocity anomaly to the low-temperature anomaly shows a similar feature. This feature appears to be inconsistent with the results of numerical simulations on the interaction between the slab and phase transitions with temperature-dependent viscosity. Such numerical models predict a continuous slab throughout the mantle. I extend previous analyses of the tomography model and model calculations to infer the origins of the gap beneath northeastern China. Results of numerical simulations that take the geologic history of the subduction zone into account suggest two possible origins for the gap: (1) the opening of the Japan Sea led to a breaking off of the otherwise continuous subducting slab, or (2) the western edge of the stagnant slab is the previous subducted ridge, which was the plate boundary between the extinct Izanagi and the Pacific plates. Origin (2) suggesting the present horizontally lying slab has accumulated since the ridge subduction, is preferable for explaining the present length of the horizontally lying slab in the upper mantle. Numerical models of origin (1) predict a stagnant slab in the upper mantle that is too short, and a narrow or non-existent gap. Preferred models require rather stronger flow resistance of the 660-km phase change than expected from current estimates of the phase transition property. Future detailed estimates of the amount of the subducted Izanagi plate and the present stagnant slab would be useful to constrain models. A systematic along-arc variation of the slab morphology from the northeast Japan to Kurile arcs is also recognized, and its understanding may constrain the 3D mantle flow there.

  11. On the Viability of Slab Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hunen, J.; Bouilhol, P.; Magni, V.; Maunder, B. L.

    2014-12-01

    Melting subducted mafic crust is commonly assumed to be the main process leading to silicic melts with an adakitic signature, which may form Archaean granitoids and generate early continental crust. Alternatively, melting of the overriding lower mafic crust and near-Moho depth fractional crystallisation of mantle melts can form differentiated magmas with an adakitic signature. Previous work shows how only very young slabs melt through dehydration melting, or depict melting of dry eclogites via water addition from deeper slab dehydration. Alternatively, underplated subducted material via delamination and diapirism may be important in the generation of felsic continental crust. We quantify subduction dehydration and melting reactions in a warm subduction system using a thermo-mechanical subduction model with a thermodynamic database. We find that even young (hot) slabs dehydrate before reaching their solidus, which suppresses any slab dehydration melting and creates significant amounts of mantle wedge melting irrespective of slab age. Significant slab crust melting is only achieved in young slabs via water present melting if metamorphic fluids from the subducted mantle flux through the dry eclogites. These slab melts, however, interfere with massive mantle wedge melting and unlikely to participate in the overriding plate felsic magmatism, unlike the shallower, primitive mantle wedge melts. We also explore the conditions for delaminating the mafic subducted crust. For a wide range of ages, the uppermost part of the subducted slab might delaminate to form compositionally buoyant plumes that rise through the mantle wedge. Thick crust on young slabs (as perhaps representative for a hotter, early Earth) may delaminate entirely and reside in the mantle wedge. Under such conditions, this ponded crust might melts subsequently, forming "adakitic" felsic melts contributing to a significant amount of the overriding plate crustal volumes.

  12. Equilibrium Slab Models of Lyman-Alpha Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charlton, Jane C.; Salpeter, Edwin E.; Hogan, Craig J.

    1993-01-01

    We model the L(sub y(alpha)) clouds as slabs of hydrogen with an ionizing extragalactic radiation field incident from both sides. In general, the equilibrium configuration of a slab at redshift z approx. less than 5 is determined by a balance of the gas pressure, gravity (including the effects of a dark matter halo), and the pressure exerted by the inter-galactic medium, P(sub ext). These models have been used to make predictions of the number of slabs as a function of the neutral hydrogen column density, N(sub H). A break in the curve is predicted at the transition between regimes where gravity and pressure are the dominant confining forces, with a less rapid decrease at larger N(sub H). The transition from optically thin to optically thick slabs leads to a gap in the distribution, whose location is governed largely by the spectrum of ionizing radiation. There are certain parallels between lines of sight through the outer HI disk of spiral galaxy with increasing radius, and the progression from damped, to Lyman limit, to forest clouds. We discuss briefly the possibility that at least some of the observed low z forest clouds may be a separate population, associated with galaxies, as suggested by the observations of Bahcall et al. This population could dominate the forest at present if the dark matter attached to galaxies should lead to gravity confinement for this disk population, while the isolated clouds remain pressure confined. The formalism developed in this paper will allow a more detailed study. We also discuss a more general parameter study of the equilibrium configuration of slabs, including mock gravity and L(sub y(alpha)) photon trapping.

  13. Terminal Stage Subduction and Slab Detachment: From Structure to Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wortel, M. J.; Spakman, W.; Govers, R.

    2007-12-01

    In this contribution we focus on terminal stage subduction, often triggered by continent-continent or arc-continent collision. Rupturing of subducted lithosphere, including slab detachment, is a key process in this stage. Seismic tomography information on the 3D structure of subduction zones has been key towards developing a better understanding of subduction processes. We show how structural information on lithosphere and mantle structure, obtained from seismic tomography, can be used to formulate hypotheses concerning the evolution and dynamics of subduction zones which (1) can be subjected to numerical modeling to investigate the physical soundness of the hypotheses, and (2) can subsequently be tested against geological, geophysical, and geodetical data to assess their general or regional validity. In combination, this approach increases our understanding of the relation between deep processes and the geological processes at the surface. The landlocked basin setting of the Mediterranean region provides unique opportunities to study terminal stage subduction and its consequences. Subducted lithosphere is subject to various types of rupturing: Slab detachment, vertical slab tearing and the formation of STEP (tear) faults have been identified and analysed. The different Mediterranean arc systems being in slightly different stages of evolution provides additional clues towards unraveling the dynamics of the process. Using examples from the western-central and eastern Mediterranean, we show how temporal and spatial variations in slab structure affect the dynamics and stress field of convergent plate boundaries, with arc migration and back-arc extension as a prominent expression. In addition, terminal stage subduction appears to be have played a crucial role in Italian magmatism. Terminal stage subduction involving slab detachment is a strongly transient stage with great impact on geological processes, on a wide variety of scales. The information obtained from

  14. The use of high field strength and parallel imaging techniques for MRI-based gel dosimetry in stereotactic radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seimenis, I.; Moutsatsos, A.; Petrokokkinos, L.; Kantemiris, I.; Benekos, O.; Efstathopoulos, E.; Papagiannis, P.; Spevacek, V.; Semnicka, J.; Dvorak, P.

    2009-07-01

    The poor clinical acceptance of polymer gel dosimetry for dose verification in stereotactic radio-surgery applications stems, inter alia, from the increased MRI acquisition times needed to meet the associated spatial resolution demands. To examine whether this could be partly alleviated by the employment of 3 Tesla imagers and parallel imaging techniques, a PolyAcrylamide Gel filled tube was irradiated in a Leksell Gamma Knife unit with two single irradiation shots (4 mm and 8 mm) and underwent four different scanning sessions using an optimised, volume selective, 32 echo CPMG pulse sequence: One performed on a 1.5 T imager with 0.5 × 0.5 mm2 in-plane spatial resolution and 0.75 mm slice thickness (scan A), while the rest three on a 3.0 T imager; one with the same spatial resolution as in scan A (scan B) and two with finer in-plane resolution (scans C and D). In scans B and C the sensitivity encoding (SENSE) parallel imaging technique was employed. Relative dose distributions derived by scan A were benchmarked against Monte Carlo and treatment planning system calculations, and then used as the reference for the comparison of 2D relative dose distributions derived by each scan in terms of dose difference and distance-to-agreement criteria (γ index tool). Findings suggest that careful MRI planning based on a figure of merit accounting for scanning time and precision for a given increase in spatial resolution, could facilitate the introduction of polymer gel dosimetry into the clinical setting as a practical quality assurance tool for complex radio-surgery techniques.

  15. Reflection and transmission of Gaussian beam by a chiral slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Bing; Zhang, Huayong; Zhang, Jianyong

    2016-06-01

    Based on the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory framework, the reflection and transmission of an incident Gaussian beam by a chiral slab were investigated, by expanding the incident Gaussian beam, reflected beam, internal beam as well as transmitted beam in terms of cylindrical vector wave functions. The unknown expansion coefficients were determined by virtue of the boundary conditions. For a localized beam model, numerical results of the normalized field intensity distributions are presented, and the propagation characteristics are discussed concisely in this paper.

  16. Cretaceous Arctic magmatism: Slab vs. plume? Or slab and plume?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottlieb, E. S.; Miller, E. L.; Andronikov, A. V.; Brumley, K.; Mayer, L. A.; Mukasa, S. B.

    2010-12-01

    Tectonic models for the Cretaceous paleogeographic evolution of the Arctic Ocean and its adjacent landmasses propose that rifting in the Amerasia Basin (AB) began in Jura-Cretaceous time, accompanied by the development of the High Arctic Large Igneous Province (HALIP). During the same timespan, deformation and slab-related magmatism, followed by intra-arc rifting, took place along the Pacific side of what was to become the Arctic Ocean. A compilation and comparison of the ages, characteristics and space-time variation of circum-Arctic magmatism allows for a better understanding of the role of Pacific margin versus Arctic-Atlantic plate tectonics and the role of plume-related magmatism in the origin of the Arctic Ocean. In Jura-Cretaceous time, an arc built upon older terranes overthrust the Arctic continental margins of North America and Eurasia, shedding debris into foreland basins in the Brooks Range, Alaska, across Chukotka, Russia, to the Lena Delta and New Siberian Islands region of the Russian Arctic. These syn-tectonic sediments have some common sources (e.g., ~250-300 Ma magmatic rocks) as determined by U-Pb detrital zircon geochronology. They are as young as Valanginian-Berriasian (~136 Ma, Gradstein et al., 2004) and place a lower limit on the age of formation of the AB. Subsequent intrusions of granitoid plutons, inferred to be ultimately slab-retreat related, form a belt along the far eastern Russian Arctic continental margin onto Seward Peninsula and have yielded a continuous succession of zircon U-Pb ages from ~137-95 Ma (n=28) and a younger suite ~91-82 Ma (n=16). All plutons dated were intruded in an extensional tectonic setting based on their relations to wall-rock deformation. Regional distribution of ages shows a southward migration of the locus of magmatism during Cretaceous time. Basaltic lavas as old as 130 Ma and as young as 80 Ma (40Ar/39Ar)) erupted across the Canadian Arctic Islands, Svalbard and Franz Josef Land and are associated with

  17. The Casimir force between an ideal metal plate and a dissipative dielectric slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falinejad, H.; Bayat, F.

    2014-09-01

    In this research, a general formula for the Casimir force between ideal metal plate and a dissipative dielectric slab has been obtained. The dielectric function of the slab is assumed to be an arbitrary complex function of frequency satisfying Kramers-Kronig relations. A classical expression for the radiation pressure of the vacuum fields on the slab is presented by using the Maxwell stress tensor. With the transition to the quantum domain and using the fluctuation dissipation theorem and Kubo's formula, the resulting expression is written in terms of the imaginary part of the vector potential Green functions components of the system. Finally, by computing the Green function, the Casimir force on the slab is obtained. This formalism enables us to calculate the Casimir force without resorting to the explicit form of the field operators. The general expression is confirmed by limiting and comparing with one of the previous works.

  18. Hydrous manganese oxide doped gel probe sampler for measuring in situ reductive dissolution rates. 2. Field deployment.

    PubMed

    Farnsworth, Claire E; Griffis, Sarah D; Wildman, Richard A; Hering, Janet G

    2010-01-01

    In situ rates of reductive dissolution in submerged shoreline sediments at Lake Tegel (Berlin, Germany) were measured with a novel hydrous manganese (Mn) oxide-doped gel probe sampler in concert with equilibrium gel probe and sequential extraction measurements. Rates were low in the top 8 cm, then showed a peak from 8 to 14 cm, with a maximum at 12 cm depth. This rate corresponded with a peak in dissolved porewater iron (Fe) at 11 cm depth. Below 14 cm, the reductive dissolution rate reached an intermediate steady value. Lower rates at depth corresponded with increases in operationally defined fractions of carbonate-bound and organic- and sulfide-bound Mn and Fe as detected by sequential extraction. Observed rates of reductive dissolution, which reflect a capacity for Mn reduction rather than actual rates under ambient conditions, appear to correlate with porewater chemistry and sequential extraction fractions as expected in early sediment diagenesis, and are consistent with previous measurements of in situ reductive dissolution rates. Significant downward advection in this bank filtration setting depletes the Mn and Fe oxides in the sediments and enhances the transport of dissolved Fe and Mn into the infiltrating water. PMID:20039732

  19. Crystallization from Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayana Kalkura, S.; Natarajan, Subramanian

    Among the various crystallization techniques, crystallization in gels has found wide applications in the fields of biomineralization and macromolecular crystallization in addition to crystallizing materials having nonlinear optical, ferroelectric, ferromagnetic, and other properties. Furthermore, by using this method it is possible to grow single crystals with very high perfection that are difficult to grow by other techniques. The gel method of crystallization provides an ideal technique to study crystal deposition diseases, which could lead to better understanding of their etiology. This chapter focuses on crystallization in gels of compounds that are responsible for crystal deposition diseases. The introduction is followed by a description of the various gels used, the mechanism of gelling, and the fascinating phenomenon of Liesegang ring formation, along with various gel growth techniques. The importance and scope of study on crystal deposition diseases and the need for crystal growth experiments using gel media are stressed. The various crystal deposition diseases, viz. (1) urolithiasis, (2) gout or arthritis, (3) cholelithiasis and atherosclerosis, and (4) pancreatitis and details regarding the constituents of the crystal deposits responsible for the pathological mineralization are discussed. Brief accounts of the theories of the formation of urinary stones and gallstones and the role of trace elements in urinary stone formation are also given. The crystallization in gels of (1) the urinary stone constituents, viz. calcium oxalate, calcium phosphates, uric acid, cystine, etc., (2) the constituents of the gallstones, viz. cholesterol, calcium carbonate, etc., (3) the major constituent of the pancreatic calculi, viz., calcium carbonate, and (4) cholic acid, a steroidal hormone are presented. The effect of various organic and inorganic ions, trace elements, and extracts from cereals, herbs, and fruits on the crystallization of major urinary stone and gallstone

  20. Three-dimensional Numerical Models of Slab Edges: Implications for Mantle Upwelling and Anomalous Volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadamec, M.; Moresi, L. N.; Durance-Sie, P. M.; Mclean, K. A.

    2013-05-01

    addition, higher temperatures in the mantle wedge in regions of active back arc spreading and young oceanic lithosphere in the upper plate can enhance slab melting and lead to increased mantle flow velocities due to the reduction in the temperature-dependent viscosity. Models of this kind can provide a framework for interpreting how the 3D solid state flow field may influence melt migration patterns in subduction zones with slab edges.

  1. Down-dip and Along-strike Stress in Subducting Slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petricca, P.; Carminati, E.; Basili, R.; Doglioni, C.

    2014-12-01

    The reconstructed stress fields for intermediate depths in slabs (between 100 and 300 km) remain enigmatic. Slab pull should enhance downdip tension, but downdip compression is often observed.Based on hotspot tracks (indicating a relative motion between the lithosphere and the mantle) several researchers proposed a westward drift of the lithosphere with debated velocities (2-13 cm/yr). Available data indicates that dominant down-dip tension occurs along E-directed subductions (e.g., Chile) sustained by the eastward relative mantle flow and down-dip compression along W-directed subductions (e.g., Tonga) encroached by the mantle motion. In this perspective, 3D viscoelastic models (FEM) were performed to investigate the origin of stress in slabs at intermediate depths. Geometries inspired to real subduction zones, were used to analyze the effect of the principal geodynamic forces (slab pull, mantle flow, plate convergence), the correlation between subduction polarity (i.e., how the mantle flow approaches the slab) and geometry, the nature of down-dip and along-strike stresses (poorly investigated in the literature).We conclude that, although the stress in slabs is controlled by several geodynamic processes, down-dip compression is favored by mantle flow opposing the slab, whereas down-dip tension is enhanced by mantle flow sustaining the slab. These predictions are in agreement with available geophysical observations.Substantial along-strike deformation affects intermediate and deeper regions of the slab when mantle flow is enhanced. Down-dip and along-strike axes form couples that tend to rotate approaching the slab sides. The larger the lateral extent of the plate the most this effect is evident. According to these findings, along-strike tension or compression comes out in response to the flexure (forward or backward) of the lithosphere depending on the slab longitudinal curvature. Along-strike tension occurs in case of slabs curved towards the mantle flow direction

  2. Differential Single Nucleotide Polymorphism-Based Analysis of an Outbreak Caused by Salmonella enterica Serovar Manhattan Reveals Epidemiological Details Missed by Standard Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Scaltriti, Erika; Sassera, Davide; Comandatore, Francesco; Morganti, Marina; Mandalari, Carmen; Gaiarsa, Stefano; Bandi, Claudio; Zehender, Gianguglielmo; Bolzoni, Luca; Casadei, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed a rare Salmonella enterica serovar Manhattan outbreak that occurred in Italy in 2009 to evaluate the potential of new genomic tools based on differential single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis in comparison with the gold standard genotyping method, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. A total of 39 isolates were analyzed from patients (n = 15) and food, feed, animal, and environmental sources (n = 24), resulting in five different pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiles. Isolates epidemiologically related to the outbreak clustered within the same pulsotype, SXB_BS.0003, without any further differentiation. Thirty-three isolates were considered for genomic analysis based on different sets of SNPs, core, synonymous, nonsynonymous, as well as SNPs in different codon positions, by Bayesian and maximum likelihood algorithms. Trees generated from core and nonsynonymous SNPs, as well as SNPs at the second and first plus second codon positions detailed four distinct groups of isolates within the outbreak pulsotype, discriminating outbreak-related isolates of human and food origins. Conversely, the trees derived from synonymous and third-codon-position SNPs clustered food and human isolates together, indicating that all outbreak-related isolates constituted a single clone, which was in line with the epidemiological evidence. Further experiments are in place to extend this approach within our regional enteropathogen surveillance system. PMID:25653407

  3. High-quality slab-based intermixing method for fusion rendering of multiple medical objects.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Joon; Kim, Bohyoung; Lee, Jeongjin; Shin, Juneseuk; Kim, Kyoung Won; Shin, Yeong-Gil

    2016-01-01

    The visualization of multiple 3D objects has been increasingly required for recent applications in medical fields. Due to the heterogeneity in data representation or data configuration, it is difficult to efficiently render multiple medical objects in high quality. In this paper, we present a novel intermixing scheme for fusion rendering of multiple medical objects while preserving the real-time performance. First, we present an in-slab visibility interpolation method for the representation of subdivided slabs. Second, we introduce virtual zSlab, which extends an infinitely thin boundary (such as polygonal objects) into a slab with a finite thickness. Finally, based on virtual zSlab and in-slab visibility interpolation, we propose a slab-based visibility intermixing method with the newly proposed rendering pipeline. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method delivers more effective multiple-object renderings in terms of rendering quality, compared to conventional approaches. And proposed intermixing scheme provides high-quality intermixing results for the visualization of intersecting and overlapping surfaces by resolving aliasing and z-fighting problems. Moreover, two case studies are presented that apply the proposed method to the real clinical applications. These case studies manifest that the proposed method has the outstanding advantages of the rendering independency and reusability. PMID:26403436

  4. A numerical model for calculating vibration due to a harmonic moving load on a floating-slab track with discontinuous slabs in an underground railway tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, M. F. M.; Hunt, H. E. M.

    2009-03-01

    This paper presents a new method for modelling floating-slab tracks with discontinuous slabs in underground railway tunnels. The track is subjected to a harmonic load moving with a constant velocity. The model consists of two sub-models. The first is an infinite track with periodic double-beam unit formulated as a periodic infinite structure. The second is modelled with a new version of the Pipe-in-Pipe (PiP) model that accounts for a tunnel wall embedded in a half-space. The two sub-models are coupled by writing the force transmitted from the track to the tunnel as a continuous function using Fourier series representation and satisfying the compatibility condition. The displacements at the free surface are calculated for a track with discontinuous slab and compared with those of a track with continuous slab. The results show that the far-field vibration can be significantly increased due to resonance frequencies of slabs for tracks with discontinuous slabs.

  5. SU-D-213-06: Dosimetry of Modulated Electron Radiation Therapy Using Fricke Gel Dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Gawad, M Abdel; Elgohary, M; Hassaan, M; Emam, M; Desouky, O; Eldib, A; Ma, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Modulated electron radiation therapy (MERT) has been proposed as an effective modality for treatment of superficial targets. MERT utilizes multiple beams of different energies which are intensity modulated to deliver optimized dose distribution. Energy independent dosimeters are thus needed for quantitative evaluations of MERT dose distributions and measurements of absolute doses delivered to patients. Thus in the current work we study the feasibility of Fricke gel dosimeters in MERT dosimetry. Methods: Batches of radiation sensitive Fricke gel is fabricated and poured into polymethyl methacrylate cuvettes. The samples were irradiated in solid water phantom and a thick layer of bolus was used as a buildup. A spectrophotometer system was used for measuring the color changes (the absorbance) before and after irradiation and then we calculate net absorbance. We constructed calibration curves to relate the measured absorbance in terms of absorbed dose for all available electron energies. Dosimetric measurements were performed for mixed electron beam delivery and we also performed measurement for segmented field delivery with the dosimeter placed at the junction of two adjacent electron beams of different energies. Dose measured by our gel dosimetry is compared to that calculation from our precise treatment planning system. We also initiated a Monte Carlo study to evaluate the water equivalence of our dosimeters. MCBEAM and MCSIM codes were used for treatment head simulation and phantom dose calculation. PDDs and profiles were calculated for electron beams incident on a phantom designed with 1cm slab of Fricke gel. Results: The calibration curves showed no observed energy dependence with all studied electron beam energies. Good agreement was obtained between dose calculated and that obtained by gel dosimetry. Monte Carlo results illustrated the tissue equivalency of our Gel dosimeters. Conclusion: Fricke Gel dosimeters represent a good option for the dosimetric

  6. Detecting slab structure beneath the Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Meghan S.; Sun, Daoyuan; Piana Agostinetti, Nicola

    2013-04-01

    The presence of subducted slabs in the Mediterranean has been well documented with seismic tomography, however, these images, which are produced by smoothed, damped inversions, underestimate the sharpness of the structures. The position and extent of the slabs and the presence possible tears or gaps in the subducted lithosphere are still debated, yet the shape and location these structures are important for kinematic reconstructions and evolution of the entire subduction zone system. Extensive distribution of broadband seismic instrumentation in the Mediterranean (Italian National Seismic Network in Italy and the NSF-PICASSO project in Spain and Morocco) has allowed us to use alternative methodologies to detect the position of the slabs and slab tears beneath the Central and Western Mediterranean. Using S receiver functions we are able to identify S-to-p conversions from the bottom of the subducted slab and a lack of these signals where there are gaps or tears in the slab. We also analyze broadband waveforms for changes in P wave coda from deep (> 300 km depth) local earthquakes. The waveform records for stations in southern Italy and around the Betic-Rif show large amplitude, high frequency (f > 5 Hz) late arrivals with long coda after relatively low-frequency onset. High frequency arrivals are the strongest from events whose raypaths travel within the slab to the stations where they are recorded allowing for mapping of where the subducted material is located within the upper mantle. These two methods, along with inferring the slab position from fast P-wave velocity perturbations in tomography and intermediate depth seismicity, provide additional geophysical evidence to aid in interpretation of the complex, segmented slab structure beneath the Mediterranean.

  7. Andean flat subduction maintained by slab tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schepers, Gerben; van Hinsbergen, Douwe; Kosters, Martha; Boschman, Lydian; McQuarrie, Nadine; Spakman, Wim

    2016-04-01

    In two segments below the Andean mountain belt, the Nazca Plate is currently subducting sub-horizontally below South America over a distance of 200-300 km before the plate bends into the mantle. Such flat slab segments have pronounced effects on orogenesis and magmatism and are widely believed to be caused by the downgoing plate resisting subduction due to its local positive buoyancy. In contrast, here we show that flat slabs primarily result from a local resistance against rollback rather than against subduction. From a kinematic reconstruction of the Andean fold-thrust belt we determine up to ~390 km of shortening since ~50 Ma. During this time the South American Plate moved ~1400 km westward relative to the mantle, thus forcing ~1000 km of trench retreat. Importantly, since the 11-12 Ma onset of flat slab formation, ~1000 km of Nazca Plate subduction occurred, much more than the flat slab lengths, which leads to our main finding that the flat slabs, while being initiated by arrival of buoyant material at the trench, are primarily maintained by locally impeded rollback. We suggest that dynamic support of flat subduction comes from the formation of slab tunnels below segments with the most buoyant material. These tunnels trap mantle material until tearing of the tunnel wall provides an escape route. Fast subduction of this tear is followed by a continuous slab and the process can recur during ongoing rollback of the 7000 km wide Nazca slab at segments with the most buoyant subducting material, explaining the regional and transient character of flat slabs. Our study highlights the importance of studying subduction dynamics in absolute plate motion context.

  8. From field to gel blot: teaching a holistic view of developmental phenomena to undergraduate biology students at the University of Tokyo.

    PubMed

    Ariizumi, Takashi; Asashima, Makoto

    2003-01-01

    We present here an outline of the lectures and laboratory exercises for undergraduate developmental biology students at the University of Tokyo. The main aim of our course is to help students fill the gap between natural history, classical embryology and molecular developmental biology. To achieve this aim, we take up various topics in the lectures, from fertilization and early development to developmental engineering. Our laboratory exercises begin with an introduction to the natural history of the organism. The entire class and the instructors collect newts in the field and discuss features of their mating behavior and so on. In the laboratory, students are absorbed by exercises such as a lampbrush chromosome preparation and an in vitro beating heart induction. After that, students choose their own research projects for which they will employ both classical embryological and modern molecular biological techniques. At the end of our course, the connectivity principle from field to gel blot will be part of the students' understanding. PMID:12705655

  9. Application of PCR-Denaturing-Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) Method to Examine Microbial Community Structure in Asparagus Fields with Growth Inhibition due to Continuous Cropping

    PubMed Central

    Urashima, Yasufumi; Sonoda, Takahiro; Fujita, Yuko; Uragami, Atsuko

    2012-01-01

    Growth inhibition due to continuous cropping of asparagus is a major problem; the yield of asparagus in replanted fields is low compared to that in new fields, and missing plants occur among young seedlings. Although soil-borne disease and allelochemicals are considered to be involved in this effect, this is still controversial. We aimed to develop a technique for the biological field diagnosis of growth inhibition due to continuous cropping. Therefore, in this study, fungal community structure and Fusarium community structure in continuously cropped fields of asparagus were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction/denaturing-gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). Soil samples were collected from the Aizu region of Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. Soil samples were taken from both continuously cropped fields of asparagus with growth inhibition and healthy neighboring fields of asparagus. The soil samples were collected from the fields of 5 sets in 2008 and 4 sets in 2009. We were able to distinguish between pathogenic and non-pathogenic Fusarium by using Alfie1 and Alfie2GC as the second PCR primers and PCR-DGGE. Fungal community structure was not greatly involved in the growth inhibition of asparagus due to continuous cropping. By contrast, the band ratios of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. asparagi in growth-inhibited fields were higher than those in neighboring healthy fields. In addition, there was a positive correlation between the band ratios of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. asparagi and the ratios of missing asparagus plants. We showed the potential of biological field diagnosis of growth inhibition due to continuous cropping of asparagus using PCR-DGGE. PMID:22200640

  10. High transparent shape memory gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jin; Arai, Masanori; Kabir, M. H.; Makino, Masato; Furukawa, Hidemitsu

    2014-03-01

    Gels are a new material having three-dimensional network structures of macromolecules. They possess excellent properties as swellability, high permeability and biocompatibility, and have been applied in various fields of daily life, food, medicine, architecture, and chemistry. In this study, we tried to prepare new multi-functional and high-strength gels by using Meso-Decoration (Meso-Deco), one new method of structure design at intermediate mesoscale. High-performance rigid-rod aromatic polymorphic crystals, and the functional groups of thermoreversible Diels-Alder reaction were introduced into soft gels as crosslinkable pendent chains. The functionalization and strengthening of gels can be realized by meso-decorating the gels' structure using high-performance polymorphic crystals and thermoreversible pendent chains. New gels with good mechanical properties, novel optical properties and thermal properties are expected to be developed.

  11. Nonlocal microscopic theory of quantum friction between parallel metallic slabs

    SciTech Connect

    Despoja, Vito

    2011-05-15

    We present a new derivation of the friction force between two metallic slabs moving with constant relative parallel velocity, based on T=0 quantum-field theory formalism. By including a fully nonlocal description of dynamically screened electron fluctuations in the slab, and avoiding the usual matching-condition procedure, we generalize previous expressions for the friction force, to which our results reduce in the local limit. Analyzing the friction force calculated in the two local models and in the nonlocal theory, we show that for physically relevant velocities local theories using the plasmon and Drude models of dielectric response are inappropriate to describe friction, which is due to excitation of low-energy electron-hole pairs, which are properly included in nonlocal theory. We also show that inclusion of dissipation in the nonlocal electronic response has negligible influence on friction.

  12. Constraints of subducted slab geometries on trench migration and subduction velocities: flat slabs and slab curtains in the mantle under Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J. E.; Suppe, J.; Renqi, L.; Lin, C.; Kanda, R. V.

    2013-12-01

    The past locations, shapes and polarity of subduction trenches provide first-order constraints for plate tectonic reconstructions. Analogue and numerical models of subduction zones suggest that relative subducting (Vs) and overriding (Vor) plate velocities may strongly influence final subducted slab geometries. Here we have mapped the 3D geometries of subducted slabs in the upper and lower mantle of Asia from global seismic tomography. We have incorporated these slabs into plate tectonic models, which allows us to infer the subducting and overriding plate velocities. We describe two distinct slab geometry styles, ';flat slabs' and ';slab curtains', and show their implications for paleo-trench positions and subduction geometries in plate tectonic reconstructions. When compared to analogue and numerical models, the mapped slab styles show similarities to modeled slabs that occupy very different locations within Vs:Vor parameter space. ';Flat slabs' include large swaths of sub-horizontal slabs in the lower mantle that underlie the well-known northward paths of India and Australia from Eastern Gondwana, viewed in a moving hotspot reference. At India the flat slabs account for a significant proportion of the predicted lost Ceno-Tethys Ocean since ~100 Ma, whereas at Australia they record the existence of a major 8000km by 2500-3000km ocean that existed at ~43 Ma between East Asia, the Pacific and Australia. Plate reconstructions incorporating the slab constraints imply these flat slab geometries were generated when continent overran oceanic lithosphere to produce rapid trench retreat, or in other words, when subducting and overriding velocities were equal (i.e. Vs ~ Vor). ';Slab curtains' include subvertical Pacific slabs near the Izu-Bonin and Marianas trenches that extend from the surface down to 1500 km in the lower mantle and are 400 to 500 km thick. Reconstructed slab lengths were assessed from tomographic volumes calculated at serial cross-sections. The ';slab

  13. Ultra-low field T1 vs. T1rho at 3T and 7T: study of rotationally immobilized protein gels and animal brain tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Hui; Inglis, Ben; Barr, Ian; Clarke, John

    2015-03-01

    Clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machines operating in static fields of typically 1.5 T or 3 T can capture information on slow molecular dynamics utilizing the so-called T1rho technique. This technique, in which a radiofrequency (RF) spin-lock field is applied with microtesla amplitude, has been used, for example, to determine the onset time of stroke in studies on rats. The long RF pulse, however, may exceed the specific absorption rate (SAR) limit, putting subjects at risk. Ultra-low-field (ULF) MRI, based on Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs), directly detects proton signals at a static magnetic field of typically 50-250 μT. Using our ULF MRI system with adjustable static field of typically 55 to 240 μT, we systematically measured the T1 and T2 dispersion profiles of rotationally immobilized protein gels (bovine serum albumin), ex vivo pig brains, and ex vivo rat brains with induced stroke. Comparing the ULF results with T1rho dispersion obtained at 3 T and 7 T, we find that the degree of protein immobilization determines the frequency-dependence of both T1 and T1rho. Furthermore, T1rho and ULF T1 show similar results for stroke, suggesting that ULF MRI may be used to image traumatic brain injury with negligible SAR. This research was supported by the Henry H. Wheeler, Jr. Brain Imaging Center and the Donaldson Trust.

  14. Use of a ring chromosome and pulsed-field gels to study interhomolog recombination, double-strand DNA breaks and sister-chromatid exchange in yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Game, J.C. ); Sitney, K.C.; Cook, V.E.; Mortimer, R.K. )

    1989-12-01

    The authors describe a system that uses pulsed-field gels for the physical detection of recombinant DNA molecules, double-strand DNA breaks (DSB) and sister-chromatid exchange in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The system makes use of a circular variant of chromosome II (Chr. III). Meiotic recombination between this ring chromosome and a linear homolog produces new molecules of sizes distinguishable on gels from either parental molecule. They demonstrate that these recombinant molecules are not present either in strains with two linear Chr. III molecules or in rad50 mutants, which are defective in meiotic recombination. In conjunction with the molecular endpoints. They present data on the timing of commitment to meiotic recombination scored genetically. They have used x-rays to linearize circular Chr. III, both to develop a sensitive method for measuring frequency of DSB and as a means of detecting double-size circles originating in part from sister-chromatid exchange, which they find to be frequent during meiosis.

  15. Use of a Ring Chromosome and Pulsed-Field Gels to Study Interhomolog Recombination, Double-Strand DNA Breaks and Sister-Chromatid Exchange in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Game, J. C.; Sitney, K. C.; Cook, V. E.; Mortimer, R. K.

    1989-01-01

    We describe a system that uses pulsed-field gels for the physical detection of recombinant DNA molecules, double-strand DNA breaks (DSB) and sister-chromatid exchange in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The system makes use of a circular variant of chromosome III (Chr. III). Meiotic recombination between this ring chromosome and a linear homolog produces new molecules of sizes distinguishable on gels from either parental molecule. We demonstrate that these recombinant molecules are not present either in strains with two linear Chr. III molecules or in rad50 mutants, which are defective in meiotic recombination. In conjunction with the molecular endpoints, we present data on the timing of commitment to meiotic recombination scored genetically. We have used x-rays to linearize circular Chr. III, both to develop a sensitive method for measuring frequency of DSB and as a means of detecting double-sized circles originating in part from sister-chromatid exchange, which we find to be frequent during meiosis. PMID:2693206

  16. Separation performance of single-stranded DNA electrophoresis in photopolymerized cross-linked polyacrylamide gels.

    PubMed

    Lo, Roger C; Ugaz, Victor M

    2006-02-01

    Considerable effort has been directed toward optimizing performance and maximizing throughput in ssDNA electrophoresis because it is a critical analytical step in a variety of genomic assays. Ultimately, it would be desirable to quantitatively determine the achievable level of separation resolution directly from measurements of fundamental physical properties associated with the gel matrix rather than by the trial and error process often employed. Unfortunately, this predictive capability is currently lacking, due in large part to the need for a more detailed understanding of the fundamental parameters governing separation performance (mobility, diffusion, and dispersion). We seek to address this issue by systematically characterizing electrophoretic mobility, diffusion, and dispersion behavior of ssDNA fragments in the 70-1,000 base range in a photopolymerized cross-linked polyacrylamide matrix using a slab gel DNA sequencer. Data are collected for gel concentrations of 6, 9, and 12%T at electric fields ranging from 15 to 40 V/cm, and resolution predictions are compared with corresponding experimentally measured values. The data exhibit a transition from behavior consistent with the Ogston model for small fragments to behavior in agreement with the biased reptation model at larger fragment sizes. Mobility data are also used to estimate the mean gel pore size and compare the predictions of several models. PMID:16331587

  17. Photocatalytic, highly hydrophilic porcelain stoneware slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimondo, M.; Guarini, G.; Zanelli, C.; Marani, F.; Fossa, L.; Dondi, M.

    2011-10-01

    Photocatalytic, highly hydrophilic industrial porcelain stoneware large slabs were realized by deposition of nanostructured TiO2 coatings. Different surface finishing and experimental conditions were considered in order to assess the industrial feasibility. Photocatalytic and wetting behaviour of functionalized slabs mainly depends on surface phase composition in terms of anatase/rutile ratio, this involving - as a key issue - the deposition of TiO2 on industrially sintered products with an additional annealing step to strengthen coatings' performances and durability.

  18. Three-dimensional Numerical Models of Mantle Flow Through the Cocos-Nazca Slab Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadamec, M.; Fischer, K. M.

    2013-05-01

    , seafloor ages, and geologic history are used to construct the variable thickness of the overriding Caribbean and South American plates (Feng et al., 2007; Muller et al., 2008; Rychert et al., 2008; Abt et al., 2010b; Lekic and Romanowicz, 2011; Yuan et al., 2011). The predicted motion of the Cocos and Nazca plates are compared to observed plate motions (DeMets and Dixon, 1999) and the predicted mantle flow fields are compared to local S wave and teleseismic SK(K)S observations of seismic anisotropy (Abt et al., 2009, 2010a). The direction of Cocos and Nazca surface plate motion is reasonably well reproduced regardless of whether the Cocos and Nazca slabs are a continuous slab at depth or separated by a gap. However, the inclusion of a gap between the Cocos and Nazca slabs has a significant effect on the mantle flow field, reversing the direction of the slab entrained flow beneath the Caribbean plate and resulting in counterclockwise toroidal flow around the southern Cocos slab edge and clockwise toroidal flow around the northern Nazca slab edge. The results have implications for the initiation slab tears and indicate complexity in the coupling between the lithosphere and mantle in subduction zones.

  19. Dependency of slab geometry on absolute velocities and conditions for cyclicity: insights from numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibert, G.; Gerbault, M.; Hassani, R.; Tric, E.

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study is to quantify the relationship between the kinematics of subduction, deformation in the overriding plate and the evolution of slab geometry. A 2-D finite element numerical code is used, and a first objective consists in benchmarking previously published analogue models. Far-field plate velocities are applied, and once the subducting plate reaches the 660 km discontinuity, modelled as a rigid base, we obtain two different forms or styles of subduction that depend on the overriding plate velocity vop: if vop > 0, the slab lies forwards on the 660 km discontinuity (style 1), and if vop≤ 0, the slab lies backwards on the discontinuity (style 2). We also obtain a cyclic pattern with the slab folding on itself repeatedly when vsp > 0 and 2vop+vsp > 0 (where vsp is the subducting plate velocity). These conditions result from the analysis of several simulations in which the subduction velocities and plate viscosities are varied. When the slab periodically folds on the 660 km discontinuity, periods of shallow slab dip and compression in the overriding plate are followed by periods of slab steepening and relative extension in the overriding plate. Folding periodicity is controlled by the slab viscosity and subduction velocity. When a low-viscosity zone is included in the overriding plate, the trench motion is effectively decoupled from the overriding plate velocity, therefore allowing it to be directly controlled by the deep dynamics of the slab. For the cyclic style 2 corresponding to forward folding of the slab, the low-viscosity region in the overriding plate increases the stress amplitudes oscillations, the trench motion and the folding periodicity with time. Therefore the strength of the entire overriding plate is shown to directly control the dynamics of subduction. Using the Nazca and South American plate velocities we produce models of cyclic folding with a period of ca. 22 Ma and a minimal dip angle of ca. 10°. Episodic folding of the slab

  20. Tunable one-dimensional photonic crystal slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beccherelli, R.; Bellini, B.; Zografopoulos, D.; Kriezis, E.

    2007-05-01

    A 1D photonic crystal slab based on preferential etching of commercially available silicon-on-insulator wafers is presented. Compared to dry etching, anisotropic wet etching is more tolerant to errors as it is self-stopping on crystallographic {111} planes and it produces a more precise geometry with symmetries and homothetic properties, with surface roughness close to 1 nm. The resulting grooves are infiltrated by low viscosity liquid crystal having large positive optical anisotropy. The use of slanted grooves provides advantages: first of all the complete filling of slanted grooves is simplified when compared to vertical walls structures. Furthermore alignment is significantly facilitated. Indeed the liquid crystal molecules tend to align with their long axis along the submicron grooves. Therefore by forcing reorientation out of a rest position, the liquid crystal presents a choice of refractive indices to the propagating optical field. The liquid crystal behavior is simulated by a finite element method, and coupled to a finite difference time domain method. We investigate different photonic crystal configurations. Large tunability of bandgap edge for TE polarization is demonstrated when switching the liquid crystal with an applied voltage. We have also studied the use of the same device geometry as a very compact microfluidic refractometric sensor.

  1. Nanoscale Electrical Imaging of Metal-Insulator Transition in Ion-Gel Gated ZnO Field Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yuan; Yuan, Hongtao; Wu, Xiaoyu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro; Cui, Yi; Hwang, Harold; Lai, Keji

    2015-03-01

    Electric double-layer transistors (EDLTs) using ionic liquid as the gate dielectric have demonstrated a remarkably wide range of density modulation, a condition crucial for the study of novel electronic phases in complex quantum materials. Yet little is known microscopically when carriers are modulated in the EDLT structure because of the technical challenge to image the buried electrolyte-semiconductor interface with nanoscale resolution. Using a cryogenic microwave impedance microscope, we demonstrate the real-space conductivity mapping in ZnO EDLTs with a spatial resolution of 100nm. A thin layer of ion gel, which solidifies below the glass transition temperature of 200K, was spin-coated on the ZnO surface to induce the metal-insulator transition. The microwave images acquired at different channel conductance clearly showed the spatial evolution of local conductivity through the transition. In addition, by applying a large source-drain bias, electrical inhomogeneity was also observed across the source and drain electrodes.

  2. Three-dimensional necking during viscous slab detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tscharner, M.; Schmalholz, S. M.; Duretz, T.

    2014-06-01

    We study the three-dimensional (3-D) deformation during detachment of a lithospheric slab with simple numerical models using the finite element method. An initially vertical layer of power law viscous fluid mimics the slab and is surrounded by a linear or power law viscous fluid representing asthenospheric mantle. We quantify the impact of slab size and shape (symmetric/asymmetric) on slab detachment and identify two processes that control the lateral (i.e., along-trench) slab deformation: (1) the horizontal deflection of the lateral, vertical slab sides (> 100 km with velocities up to 16 mm/yr) and (2) the propagation of localized thinning (necking) inside the slab (with velocities >9 cm/yr). The lateral propagation velocity is approximately constant during slab detachment. Larger slabs (here wider than approximately 300 km) detach with rates similar to those predicted by 2-D models, whereas smaller slabs detach slower. Implications for geodynamic processes and interpretations of seismic tomography are discussed.

  3. Comparative Analysis of Infrequent-Restriction-Site PCR and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis for Epidemiological Typing of Legionella pneumophila Serogroup 1 Strains

    PubMed Central

    Riffard, Serge; Presti, François Lo; Vandenesch, François; Forey, Françoise; Reyrolle, Monique; Etienne, Jerome

    1998-01-01

    Two methods were compared for the analysis of 48 unrelated and epidemiologically related Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 isolates. These are the infrequent-restriction-site PCR (IRS-PCR) assay with adapters designed for XbaI and PstI restriction sites and the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis determined after DNA restriction with SfiI. Both methods demonstrated a high level of discrimination with a similar capacity for differentiating 23 of the 24 unrelated isolates. PFGE analysis and IRS-PCR assay were both able to identify epidemiologically related isolates of L. pneumophila from three outbreaks. Hence, IRS-PCR assay appears to be a reproducible (intergel reproducibility, 100%) and discriminative (discriminatory index, ≥0.996) tool for typing of Legionella. Compared to PFGE, however, IRS-PCR presented an advantage through ease of performance and with attributes of rapidity and sensitivity of target DNA. PMID:9431941

  4. Molecular epidemiology of Salmonella spp. isolates from gulls, fish-meal factories, feed factories, animals and humans in Norway based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Nesse, L. L.; Refsum, T.; Heir, E.; Nordby, K.; Vardund, T.; Holstad, G.

    2005-01-01

    The molecular epidemiology of 98 isolates of Salmonella serovar Agona (n = 27), S. Montevideo (n = 42) and S. Senftenberg (n = 29) from wild-living gulls, fish-meal factories, feed factories, humans and domestic animals was investigated using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and computerized numerical analysis. Two of the S. Agona profiles were identified both in gulls and in two of the factories. In addition, one of these profiles was detected in two infected poultry farms. Two of the S. Montevideo profiles were also identified both in gulls and in two of the factories, and one of these profiles was observed in a human isolate. Four factories shared an identical S. Senftenberg profile. The S. Senftenberg profile found in gulls was not identified in any other source investigated. The presence of isolates with identical PFGE profiles indicates potential epidemiological links between different factories, as well as between gulls and factories. PMID:15724711

  5. Comparison of arbitrarily primed PCR and macrorestriction (pulsed-field gel electrophoresis) typing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains from cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed Central

    Kersulyte, D; Struelens, M J; Deplano, A; Berg, D E

    1995-01-01

    Arbitrarily primed PCR fingerprinting was carried out on 43 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Seventeen major groups of strains that coincided with groups also distinguished by macrorestriction (pulsed-field gel electrophoresis) typing were identified. Our results illustrated that a CF patient can carry more than one strain and can carry a given strain for long periods of time and that strains can evolve by changes in drug resistance or other phenotypic traits during long-term colonization. The arbitrarily primed PCR method is recommended for first-pass screening of P. aeruginosa isolates from CF patients, especially when many strains are to be typed, because of its sensitivity and efficiency. PMID:7559985

  6. Monitoring fatigue life in concrete bridge deck slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newhook, J.; Limaye, V.

    2007-04-01

    Concrete bridge deck slabs are the most common form of bridge deck construction in short and medium span bridge structures in North America. Understanding and monitoring the condition of these bridge decks is an important component of a bridge management strategy. Progressive deterioration due to fatigue occurs in concrete decks due to the large number of cycles of heavy wheels loads and normally manifests itself as the progressive growth of cracks in the top and underside of the deck slab. While some laboratory fatigue testing programs have been reported in the literature, there is very little information on proposed techniques to monitor this phenomenon. This paper discusses the issue of how fatigue monitoring may be included as part of a structural health monitoring system for bridges. The paper draws upon previously published experimental results to identify the main characteristics of fatigue damage and structural response for concrete bridge deck slabs. Several means of monitoring this response are then evaluated and monitoring methods are proposed. A specific field structure monitoring program is used to illustrate the application of the concept. The cases study examines several sensor systems and discusses the various limitations and needs in this area. The results are of interest to both the general area of structural health monitoring as well as fatigue monitoring specifically.

  7. Was there a Laramide "flat slab"?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    Slab-continent interactions drive most non-collisional orogenies; this has led us to usually anticipate that temporal changes or spatial variations in orogenic style are related to changes in the slab, most especially in the slab's dip. This is most dramatically evident for orogenies in the foreland, well away from the trench, such as the Laramide orogeny. However, the physical means of connecting slab geometry to crustal deformation remain obscure. Dickinson and Snyder (1978) and Bird (1984) laid out a conceptually elegant means of creating foreland deformation from shear between a slab and overriding continental lithosphere, but such strong shear removed all of the continental lithosphere in the western U.S. when included in a numerical simulation of flat slab subduction (Bird, 1988), a removal in conflict with observations of volcanic rocks and xenoliths in many locations. Relying on an increase in edge normal stresses results, for the Laramide, in requiring the little-deformed Colorado Plateau to either be unusually strong or to have risen rapidly enough and high enough to balance edge stresses with body forces. Early deformation in the Plateau rules out unusual strength, and the accumulation and preservation of Late Cretaceous near-sea level sedimentary rocks makes profound uplift unlikely (though not impossible). Relying on comparisons with the Sierras Pampeanas is also fraught with problems: the Sierras are not separated from the Andean fold-and-thrust belt by several hundred kilometers of little-deformed crust, nor were they buried under kilometers of marine muds as were large parts of the Laramide foreland. We have instead suggested that some unusual interactions of an obliquely subducting plate with a thick Archean continental root might provide a better explanation than a truly flat slab (Jones et al., 2011). From this, and given that several flat-slab segments today are not associated with foreland orogenesis and noting that direct evidence for truly

  8. Polyclonal infections due to Mycobacterium avium complex in patients with AIDS detected by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of sequential clinical isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Slutsky, A M; Arbeit, R D; Barber, T W; Rich, J; von Reyn, C F; Pieciak, W; Barlow, M A; Maslow, J N

    1994-01-01

    Invasive infection with organisms of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is common among patients with advanced human immunodeficiency virus infection. In previous studies, we analyzed multiple individual colonies of MAC isolated from specimens obtained at the same time and observed that 14 to 20% of patients are simultaneously infected with more than one strain. In this study, we examined sequential isolates from 12 patients with AIDS who had two or more MAC isolates available from clinical specimens collected more than 1 week apart; the intervals between the first and last specimens ranged from 8 to 192 (median, 46) days. For each isolate, restriction digests of genomic DNA were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis; DNA was prepared by using a protocol, described here in detail, which had been optimized for conditions of bacterial growth and lysis. The pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis identified four patients (33%) infected with two different MAC strains. Both M. avium and M. intracellulare were cultured from blood specimens from two patients. In each of the four patients, the second strain was identified from a culture taken within 14 days of the initial study isolate, and in three of these patients, the first strain was detected again in a subsequent culture. These observations suggest that the presence of two different strains among isolates from sequential cultures may reflect ongoing polyclonal infection. We conclude that polyclonal infection with MAC is common among patients with AIDS. The identification of such infections may be critical in the development of effective treatments. Images PMID:7929773

  9. Water in the Slab: a Trilogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faccenda, M.; Burlini, L.; Gerya, T.; Mancktelow, N.

    2012-12-01

    In this presentation we summarize the results of a project started in 2007 from a brilliant intuition of Luigi Burlini that suggested an additional anisotropy source for the interpretation of seismic anisotropy patterns observed at subduction zones. Such an anisotropic body located in the upper part of the slab would result from the hydration of the oceanic plate at the trench outer-rise. The natural continuation of the project was to understand the mechanical processes behind slab hydration and the fluid flow patterns established during slab dehydration. In both cases, we found that tectonic pressure gradients due to the bending and unbending of the subducting oceanic plate are fundamental in driving fluid flow. This last part of the project led to the other two chapters of the final trilogy about the long route of water in the slab. This trilogy is here described in detail and a chronologically ordered series of events presented below. The first episode is related to slab hydration occurring during bending at the trench-outer rise. Here, fluids are driven downward along active normal faults by bending-related, sub-hydrostatic pressure gradients. Water can percolate down to 15-20 km below the seafloor, triggering hydrothermal reactions and the formation of hydrous minerals. This results in an elongated pattern of mostly trench-dipping hydrated faults with a strike parallel to the trench and whose orientation below the forearc becomes sub-vertical. The second episode is related to the geophysical implications of a hydrated slab below the forearc. Indeed, both the subvertical layering of closely spaced hydrated and dry levels (SPO) and the syn-deformational, fault-parallel alignment of highly anisotropic minerals (CPO) such as serpentine and talc may contribute to the SKS splitting patterns observed in the forearc. We suggest that the upper part of the slab may have a strong seismic anisotropy that can be approximated by a transverse isotropic body with a sub

  10. Aerosol gels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, Christopher M. (Inventor); Chakrabarti, Amitabha (Inventor); Dhaubhadel, Rajan (Inventor); Gerving, Corey (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An improved process for the production of ultralow density, high specific surface area gel products is provided which comprises providing, in an enclosed chamber, a mixture made up of small particles of material suspended in gas; the particles are then caused to aggregate in the chamber to form ramified fractal aggregate gels. The particles should have a radius (a) of up to about 50 nm and the aerosol should have a volume fraction (f.sub.v) of at least 10.sup.-4. In preferred practice, the mixture is created by a spark-induced explosion of a precursor material (e.g., a hydrocarbon) and oxygen within the chamber. New compositions of matter are disclosed having densities below 3.0 mg/cc.

  11. Contribution of Elasticity in Slab Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourel, L.; Goes, S. D. B.; Morra, G.

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that plate rheology exerts a dominant control on the shape and velocity of subducting plates. Here, we perform a systematic investigation of the, often disregarded, role of elasticity in slab bending at the trench, using simple, yet fully dynamic, set of 2.5D models where an elastic, visco-elastic or visco-elasto-plastic plate subducts freely into a purely viscous mantle. We derive a scaling relationship between the bending radius of visco-elastic slabs and the Deborah number, De, which is the ratio of Maxwell time over deformation time. We show that De controls the ratio of elastically stored energy over viscously dissipated energy and find that at De exceeding 10-2, it requires substantially less energy to bend a visco-elastic slab to the same shape as a purely viscous slab with the same viscosity (90% less for De=0.1). Elastically stored energy at higher De facilitates slab unbending and hence favours retreating modes of subduction, while trench advance only occurs for some cases with De<10-2. We use our scaling relation to estimate apparent Deborah numbers, Deapp, from a global compilation of subduction-zone parameters. Values range from 10-3 to >1, where most zones have low Deapp<10-2, but a few young plates have Deapp>0.1. Slabs with Deapp ≤ 10-2 either have very low viscosities, ≤10 times mantle viscosity, or they may be yielding, in which case our apparent Deborah number may underestimate actual De by up to an order of magnitude. If a significant portion of the low Deapp slabs yield, then elastically stored energy may actually be important in quite a large number of subduction zones. Interestingly, increasing Deapp correlates with increasing proportion of larger seismic events (b-value) in both instrumental and historic catalogues, indicating that increased contribution of elasticity may facilitate rupture in larger, less frequent earthquakes.

  12. Cracking behavior of structural slab bridge decks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baah, Prince

    Bridge deck cracking is a common problem throughout the United States, and it affects the durability and service life of concrete bridges. Several departments of transportation (DOTs) in the United States prefer using continuous three-span solid structural slab bridges without stringers over typical four-lane highways. Recent inspections of such bridges in Ohio revealed cracks as wide as 0.125 in. These measured crack widths are more than ten times the maximum limit recommended in ACI 224R-01 for bridge decks exposed to de-icing salts. Measurements using digital image correlation revealed that the cracks widened under truck loading, and in some cases, the cracks did not fully close after unloading. This dissertation includes details of an experimental investigation of the cracking behavior of structural concrete. Prism tests revealed that the concrete with epoxy-coated bars (ECB) develops the first crack at smaller loads, and develops larger crack widths compared to the corresponding specimens with uncoated (black) bars. Slab tests revealed that the slabs with longitudinal ECB developed first crack at smaller loads, exhibited wider cracks and a larger number of cracks, and failed at smaller ultimate loads compared to the corresponding test slabs with black bars. To develop a preventive measure, slabs with basalt and polypropylene fiber reinforced concrete were also included in the test program. These test slabs exhibited higher cracking loads, smaller crack widths, and higher ultimate loads at failure compared to the corresponding slab specimens without fibers. Merely satisfying the reinforcement spacing requirements given in AASHTO or ACI 318-11 is not adequate to limit cracking below the ACI 224R-01 recommended maximum limit, even though all the relevant design requirements are otherwise met. Addition of fiber to concrete without changing any steel reinforcing details is expected to reduce the severity and extent of cracking in reinforced concrete bridge decks.

  13. History vs. snapshot: how slab morphology relates to slab age evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garel, Fanny; Goes, Saskia; Davies, Rhodri; Davies, Huw; Lallemand, Serge; Kramer, Stephan; Wilson, Cian

    2016-04-01

    The age of the subducting plate at the trench ("slab age") spans a wide range, from less than 10 Myr in Central and South America to 150 Myr in the Marianas. The morphology of subducting slab in the upper mantle is also very variable, from slabs stagnating at the top of the lower mantle to slabs penetrating well beyond 1000 km depth. People have looked rather unsucessfully for correlations between slab morphology and subduction parameters, including age at the trench, on the basic assumption that old (thick) plates are likely to generate a large slab pull force that would influence slab dip. Thermo-mechanical models reveal complex feedbacks between temperature, strain rate and rheology, and are able to reproduce the evolution of plate ages as a function of time, subducting plate velocity and trench velocity. In particular, we show how initially young subducting plates can rapidly age at the surface because of a slow sinking velocity. As a consequence, different slab morphologies can exhibit similar ages at the trench provided that subduction history is different. We illustrate how models provide insights into Earth subduction zones for which we have to consider their history (evolution of trench velocity, relative plate ages at time of initiation) in order to unravel their present-day geometry.

  14. Measuring snow properties relevant to slab avalanche release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, Benjamin; Proksch, Martin; Löwe, Henning; van Herwijnen, Alec; Schweizer, Jürg

    2014-05-01

    The release of a slab avalanche is preceded by a sequence of fractures. The main material properties relevant for the fracture processes are the specific fracture energy of the weak layer, as also the elastic modulus and the density of the overlying slab layers. The snow micro-penetrometer (SMP) is the method of choice for snow stratigraphy measurements in the field with high resolution. Recent advances in signal processing allow us to derive the most needed material properties to model the fracture behaviour of snow. On a smaller scale, the three dimensional structure of snow samples is obtained from snow micro-tomography (CT) providing snow density directly. By modelling the mechanical behaviour of the ice matrix the elastic properties of the snow sample can be calculated. At the macro-scale, fracture mechanical field tests with particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) allow observing the in-situ fracture behaviour. Specific fracture energy and slab stiffness are derived from PTV measurement by fitting an analytical beam equation to the observed deformation field. Over the past years we were able to generate two datasets of overlapping SMP and CT as well as SMP and PTV measurements. SMP measurements and micro-tomography of snow samples show that snow density is well reproduced with current SMP signal processing algorithms. Also the specific fracture energy as derived from the SMP signal is in agreement with PTV results. The effective modulus, however, being the most sensitive parameter in fracture covers three orders of magnitude depending on measurement method. The present work discusses observed similarities and differences arising from measurement methods, theoretical assumptions and process scales. Reliable methods to determine the parameters describing the fracture process are key to snow instability modelling based on either snow cover simulations or field measurements. Preliminary modelling results from ongoing spatial variability studies illustrate the

  15. Accidents due to falls from roof slabs.

    PubMed

    Rudelli, Bruno Alves; Silva, Marcelo Valerio Alabarce da; Akkari, Miguel; Santili, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE Falls from the roof slabs of houses are accidents of high potential severity that occur in large Brazilian cities and often affect children and adolescents. The aims of this study were to characterize the factors that predispose towards this type of fall involving children and adolescents, quantify the severity of associated lesions and suggest preventive measures. DESIGN AND SETTING Descriptive observational prospective longitudinal study in two hospitals in the metropolitan region of São Paulo. METHODS Data were collected from 29 cases of falls from roof slabs involving children and adolescents between October 2008 and October 2009. RESULTS Cases involving males were more prevalent, accounting for 84%. The predominant age group was schoolchildren (7 to 12 years old; 44%). Leisure activities were most frequently being practiced on the roof slab at the time of the fall (86%), and flying a kite was the most prevalent game (37.9%). In 72% of the cases, the children were unaccompanied by an adult responsible for them. Severe conditions such as multiple trauma and traumatic brain injuries resulted from 79% of the accidents. CONCLUSION Falls from roof slabs are accidents of high potential severity, and preventive measures aimed towards informing parents and guardians about the dangers and risk factors associated with this type of accident are needed, along with physical protective measures, such as low walls around the slab and gates with locks to restrict free access to these places. PMID:23903263

  16. Controllable optical bistability and multistability in a slab defected with monolayer graphene nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solookinejad, Gh.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the optical bistability (OB) and optical multistability (OM) properties of weak probe light in a defect dielectric medium doped by four-level graphene nanostructure is theoretically discussed. The double dark resonance can arise by linear polarized control laser fields which consist of linear left and right circularly polarized light. We show that by adjusting the Rabi-frequencies of control fields, frequency detuning of bichromatic electric fields, the intensity threshold and hysteric curves of OB and OM can be manipulated. Moreover, the thickness of the slab is considered as a controllable parameter which can impact the OB and OM behaviors of weak probe light in a defect slab. We find that the transition from OB to OM or vice versa can be possible by adjusting the thickness of the slab. Our results may provide some new application on Nano-scale devices in future all-optical communication and quantum information technologies.

  17. Assessment of Resolution and Intercenter Reproducibility of Results of Genotyping Staphylococcus aureus by Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis of SmaI Macrorestriction Fragments: a Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    van Belkum, Alex; van Leeuwen, Willem; Kaufmann, Mary Elizabeth; Cookson, Barry; Forey, Françoise; Etienne, Jerome; Goering, Richard; Tenover, Fred; Steward, Christine; O’Brien, Frances; Grubb, Warren; Tassios, Panayotis; Legakis, Nicholas; Morvan, Anne; El Solh, Névine; de Ryck, Raf; Struelens, Marc; Salmenlinna, Saara; Vuopio-Varkila, Jaana; Kooistra, Mirjam; Talens, Adriaan; Witte, Wolfgang; Verbrugh, Henri

    1998-01-01

    Twenty well-characterized isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were used to study the optimal resolution and interlaboratory reproducibility of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of DNA macrorestriction fragments. Five identical isolates (one PFGE type), 5 isolates that produced related PFGE subtypes, and 10 isolates with unique PFGE patterns were analyzed blindly in 12 different laboratories by in-house protocols. In several laboratories a standardized PFGE protocol with a commercial kit was applied successfully as well. Eight of the centers correctly identified the genetic homogeneity of the identical isolates by both the in-house and standard protocols. Four of 12 laboratories failed to produce interpretable data by the standardized protocol, due to technical problems (primarily plug preparation). With the five related isolates, five of eight participants identified the same subtype interrelationships with both in-house and standard protocols. However, two participants identified multiple strain types in this group or classified some of the isolates as unrelated isolates rather than as subtypes. The remaining laboratory failed to distinguish differences between some of the related isolates by utilizing both the in-house and standardized protocols. There were large differences in the relative genome lengths of the isolates as calculated on the basis of the gel pictures. By visual inspection, the numbers of restriction fragments and overall banding pattern similarity in the three groups of isolates showed interlaboratory concordance, but centralized computer analysis of data from four laboratories yielded percent similarity values of only 85% for the group of identical isolates. The differences between the data sets obtained with in-house and standardized protocols could be the experimental parameters which differed with respect to the brand of equipment used, imaging software, running time (20 to 48 h), and pulsing conditions. In

  18. Improved protocol for isolation of Campylobacter spp. from retail broiler meat and use of pulsed field gel electrophoresis for the typing of isolates.

    PubMed

    Oyarzabal, Omar A; Williams, Aretha; Zhou, Ping; Samadpour, Mansour

    2013-10-01

    To improve the detection of Campylobacter spp. in retail broiler meat, a reference method (R subsamples) based on the enrichment of 25 g of meat in Bolton broth at 42°C under microaerobiosis was compared with an alternative method (A subsamples) consisting in the rinsing of meat samples for 30s in buffered peptone water with antimicrobials with incubation at 42°C under aerobiosis. One piece of meat (breasts, tenderloins and thighs) was rinse in experiment 1 (A1) and two pieces in experiment 2 (A2). Campylobacter spp. were isolated on agar plates and identified by PCR. Retail samples in Alabama had less prevalence (P ≤ 0.05) than samples in the state of Washington. The percentage of positive was higher (P ≤ 0.05) in A than in R subsamples and rinsing two pieces of meat yielded the highest percentage of positive subsamples. R subsamples showed variations in the prevalence by product. However, A subsamples had similar prevalence of positives among products compare to the result from reference method. More Campylobacter coli isolates were collected in A2 subsamples. Pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was used as subtyping method to study the genome similarity among the isolates from all methods. A larger diversity of isolates were detected by PFGE in A2 subsamples. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis suggested that the initial bacterial populations of the meat samples impact the final bacterial profile after enrichment. Rinsing broiler meats was less time consuming, required less sample preparation and was more sensitive than the reference method for the isolation of naturally occurring Campylobacter spp. This new method could help with epidemiological and intervention studies to control Campylobacter spp. PMID:23545445

  19. Functional behavior of isotropic magnetorheological gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkateswara Rao, P.; Maniprakash, S.; Srinivasan, S. M.; Srinivasa, A. R.

    2010-08-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) gels are a new class of soft polymers whose properties can be controlled using a magnetic field. The functional effectiveness of these gels depends on their magnetic controllability. In this paper, an experimental investigation on the functional behavior of a particular type of magnetorheological gels under dynamic and static shear conditions in the presence of a magnetic field is studied. MR gels are prepared with micron sized polarizable carbonyl iron particles interspersed in a polymer matrix gel. The compliance of this magnetic gel can be varied under the influence of an external magnetic field. Since dynamical mechanical analysis tests are difficult to conduct in the presence of large deformations of the order of 50% and strong magnetic fields, a free decay test apparatus is designed and fabricated for obtaining the magnetic field dependent shearing response under dynamic conditions at room temperature. It is observed that a significant change in the elastic modulus occurs in the gels under a magnetic field in the range of 0.1-0.4 T. However, no significant change in the damping ratio is observed under various magnitudes of magnetic field. It is shown that the increase in shear modulus of this kind of magnetic composite gel could be as high as 59% of the zero field value for a gel prepared with 50% by weight of carbonyl iron particles.

  20. Detecting lower mantle slabs beneath Asia and the Aleutians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, L.; Thomas, C.

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the descend of subducted slabs we search for and analyse seismic arrivals that reflected off the surface of the slab. In order to distinguish between such arrivals and other seismic phases, we search for waves that reach a seismic array with a backazimuth deviating from the theoretical backazimuth of the earthquake. Source-receiver combinations are chosen in a way that their great circle paths do not intersect the slab region, hence the direct arrivals can serve as reference. We focus on the North and Northwest Pacific region by using earthquakes from Japan, the Philippines and the Hindu Kush area recorded at North American networks (e.g. USArray, Alaska and Canada). Using seismic array techniques for analysing the data and record information on slowness, backazimuth and travel time of the observed out-of-plane arrivals we use these measurements to trace the wave back through a 1D velocity model to its scattering/reflection location. We find a number of out-of-plane reflections. Assuming only single scattering, most out-of-plane signals have to travel as P-to-P phases and only a few as S-to-P phases, due to the length of the seismograms we processed. The located reflection points present a view of the 3D structures within the mantle. In the upper mantle and the transition zone they correlate well with the edges of fast velocity regions in tomographic images. We also find reflection points in the mid- and lower mantle and their locations generally agree with fast velocities mapped by seismic tomography models suggesting that in the subduction regions we map, slabs enter the lower mantle. To validate our approach, we calculate and process synthetic seismograms for 3D wave field propagation through a model containing a slab-like heterogeneity. We show, that depending on the source-receiver geometry relative to the reflection plane, it is indeed possible to observe and back-trace out-of-plane signals.

  1. Design of energy efficient building with radiant slab cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Zhen

    2007-12-01

    Air-conditioning comprises a substantial fraction of commercial building energy use because of compressor-driven refrigeration and fan-driven air circulation. Core regions of large buildings require year-round cooling due to heat gains from people, lights and equipment. Negative environmental impacts include CO2 emissions from electric generation and leakage of ozone-depleting refrigerants. Some argue that radiant cooling simultaneously improves building efficiency and occupant thermal comfort, and that current thermal comfort models fail to reflect occupant experience with radiant thermal control systems. There is little field evidence to test these claims. The University of Calgary's Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Building, is a pioneering radiant slab cooling installation in North America. Thermal comfort and energy performance were evaluated. Measurements included: (1) heating and cooling energy use, (2) electrical energy use for lighting and equipment, and (3) indoor temperatures. Accuracy of a whole building energy simulation model was evaluated with these data. Simulation was then used to compare the radiant slab design with a conventional (variable air volume) system. The radiant system energy performance was found to be poorer mainly due to: (1) simultaneous cooling by the slab and heating by other systems, (2) omission of low-exergy (e.g., groundwater) cooling possible with the high cooling water temperatures possible with radiant slabs and (3) excessive solar gain and conductive heat loss due to the wall and fenestration design. Occupant thermal comfort was evaluated through questionnaires and concurrent measurement of workstation comfort parameters. Analysis of 116 sets of data from 82 occupants showed that occupant assessment was consistent with estimates based on current thermal comfort models. The main thermal comfort improvements were reductions in (1) local discomfort from draft and (2) vertical air temperature stratification. The

  2. Detecting lower-mantle slabs beneath Asia and the Aleutians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, L.; Thomas, C.

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the descend of subducted slabs we search for and analyse seismic arrivals that reflected off the surface of the slab. In order to distinguish between such arrivals and other seismic phases, we search for waves that reach a seismic array with a backazimuth deviating from the theoretical backazimuth of the earthquake. Source-receiver combinations are chosen in a way that their great circle paths do not intersect the slab region, hence the direct arrivals can serve as reference. We focus on the North and Northwest Pacific region by using earthquakes from Japan, the Philippines and the Hindu Kush area recorded at North American networks (e.g. USArray, Alaska and Canada). Using seismic array techniques for analysing the data and record information on slowness, backazimuth and traveltime of the observed out-of-plane arrivals we use these measurements to trace the wave back through a 1-D velocity model to its scattering/reflection location. We find a number of out-of-plane reflections. Assuming only single scattering, most out-of-plane signals have to travel as P-to-P phases and only a few as S-to-P phases, due to the length of the seismograms we processed. The located reflection points present a view of the 3-D structures within the mantle. In the upper mantle and the transition zone they correlate well with the edges of fast velocity regions in tomographic images. We also find reflection points in the mid- and lower mantle and their locations generally agree with fast velocities mapped by seismic tomography models suggesting that in the subduction regions we map, slabs enter the lower mantle. To validate our approach, we calculate and process synthetic seismograms for 3-D wave field propagation through a model containing a slab-like heterogeneity. We show, that depending on the source-receiver geometry relative to the reflection plane, it is indeed possible to observe and back-trace out-of-plane signals.

  3. Fluorescence losses from Yb:YAG slab lasers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Rapaport, Alexandra; Chung, Te-yuan; Chen, Bin; Bass, Michael

    2003-12-20

    We report on the distribution of fluorescence that can be emitted through the surfaces of a ytterbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Yb:YAG) slab-shaped high-power solid-state laser. Slab shapes considered include parallel or antiparallel Brewster endfaced slabs and rectangular parallelepiped slabs. We treat cases in which all the faces of these slabs are in air, or with water or another coating on the largest faces. The fraction of the fluorescence emitted through each face, its distribution over that face, and the directions in which it travels are shown to be important to the design of high-power slab lasers. PMID:14717292

  4. Deep ultraviolet laser direct write for patterning sol-gel InGaZnO semiconducting micro/nanowires and improving field-effect mobility.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hung-Cheng; Stehlin, Fabrice; Soppera, Olivier; Zan, Hsiao-Wen; Li, Chang-Hung; Wieder, Fernand; Ponche, Arnaud; Berling, Dominique; Yeh, Bo-Hung; Wang, Kuan-Hsun

    2015-01-01

    Deep-UV (DUV) laser was used to directly write indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO) precursor solution and form micro and nanoscale patterns. The directional DUV laser beam avoids the substrate heating and suppresses the diffraction effect. A IGZO precursor solution was also developed to fulfill the requirements for direct photopatterning and for achieving semi-conducting properties with thermal annealing at moderate temperature. The DUV-induced crosslinking of the starting material allows direct write of semi-conducting channels in thin-film transistors but also it improves the field-effect mobility and surface roughness. Material analysis has been carried out by XPS, FTIR, spectroscopic ellipsometry and AFM and the effect of DUV on the final material structure is discussed. The DUV irradiation step results in photolysis and a partial condensation of the inorganic network that freezes the sol-gel layer in a homogeneous distribution, lowering possibilities of thermally induced reorganization at the atomic scale. Laser irradiation allows high-resolution photopatterning and high-enough field-effect mobility, which enables the easy fabrication of oxide nanowires for applications in solar cell, display, flexible electronics, and biomedical sensors. PMID:26014902

  5. Deep ultraviolet laser direct write for patterning sol-gel InGaZnO semiconducting micro/nanowires and improving field-effect mobility

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hung-Cheng; Stehlin, Fabrice; Soppera, Olivier; Zan, Hsiao-Wen; Li, Chang-Hung; Wieder, Fernand; Ponche, Arnaud; Berling, Dominique; Yeh, Bo-Hung; Wang, Kuan-Hsun

    2015-01-01

    Deep-UV (DUV) laser was used to directly write indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO) precursor solution and form micro and nanoscale patterns. The directional DUV laser beam avoids the substrate heating and suppresses the diffraction effect. A IGZO precursor solution was also developed to fulfill the requirements for direct photopatterning and for achieving semi-conducting properties with thermal annealing at moderate temperature. The DUV-induced crosslinking of the starting material allows direct write of semi-conducting channels in thin-film transistors but also it improves the field-effect mobility and surface roughness. Material analysis has been carried out by XPS, FTIR, spectroscopic ellipsometry and AFM and the effect of DUV on the final material structure is discussed. The DUV irradiation step results in photolysis and a partial condensation of the inorganic network that freezes the sol-gel layer in a homogeneous distribution, lowering possibilities of thermally induced reorganization at the atomic scale. Laser irradiation allows high-resolution photopatterning and high-enough field-effect mobility, which enables the easy fabrication of oxide nanowires for applications in solar cell, display, flexible electronics, and biomedical sensors. PMID:26014902

  6. Exact image theory for the problem of dielectric/magnetic slab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindell, I. V.

    1987-01-01

    Exact image method, recently introduced for the exact solution of electromagnetic field problems involving homogeneous half spaces and microstrip-like geometries, is developed for the problem of homogeneous slab of dielectric and/or magnetic material in free space. Expressions for image sources, creating the exact reflected and transmitted fields, are given and their numerical evaluation is demonstrated. Nonradiating modes, guided by the slab and responsible for the loss of convergence of the image functions, are considered and extracted. The theory allows, for example, an analysis of finite ground planes in microstrip antenna structures.

  7. Prevalence and molecular characterization of Escherichia coli O157:H7 by multiple locus variable number tandem repeat analysis and pulsed field gel electrophoresis in three sheep farming operations in California.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A yearlong study was conducted to determine the fecal prevalence of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in three sheep ranches. Strain diversity and persistence was compared using multiple locus variable number tandem repeat analysis and pulsed field gel electrophoresis. Ranch C, a feedlot, consisted of young ...

  8. Slab dragging and the recent geodynamic evolution of the western Mediterranean plate boundary region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spakman, Wim; Chertova, Maria V.; van den Berg, Arie P.; Thieulot, Cedric; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.

    2016-04-01

    and African lithosphere, both plates are dragging the slab by their shared ~NNE component of absolute plate motion, which in fact is invisible in the relative plate convergence frame that is usually adopted. Slab dragging induces mantle resistance that, we demonstrate by numerical modelling, leads in the region to differential lateral motion between the slab and African plate driving indentation of the Africa continental lithosphere leading to crustal shortening explaining the closure of Moroccan seaways and the thickening of the Rif crust. The differential motion also explains the TASZ and the transition from western Betics shortening to eastern Betics extension, both still active today. During Miocene westward slab rollback mantle-resisted slab dragging also provided the driving force of edge delamination of African lithosphere, we propose. These explanations of geological features are fully corroborates by an analysis of the GPS motion field in terms of the strain- and rotation rate fields using the method of Spakman and Nyst (2002), and the predicted crustal flow field. In particular, we derive from the GPS and geological data that the direction of African absolute motion is ~NNE and that the slab experiences at present negligible rollback.

  9. Method for preparing hydrous zirconium oxide gels and spherules

    DOEpatents

    Collins, Jack L.

    2003-08-05

    Methods for preparing hydrous zirconium oxide spherules, hydrous zirconium oxide gels such as gel slabs, films, capillary and electrophoresis gels, zirconium monohydrogen phosphate spherules, hydrous zirconium oxide spherules having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite sorbent, zirconium monohydrogen phosphate spherules having suspendable particles of at least one different sorbent homogeneously embedded within to form a composite sorbent having a desired crystallinity, zirconium oxide spherules having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite, hydrous zirconium oxide fiber materials, zirconium oxide fiber materials, hydrous zirconium oxide fiber materials having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite, zirconium oxide fiber materials having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite and spherules of barium zirconate. The hydrous zirconium oxide spherules and gel forms prepared by the gel-sphere, internal gelation process are useful as inorganic ion exchangers, catalysts, getters and ceramics.

  10. Geomorphic Response to Flat Slab Subduction along the Eastern Foothills of the Colombian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veloza, G.; Taylor, M. H.; Gosse, J. C.; Mora, A.; Becker, T. W.

    2013-12-01

    It is thought that in northwest South America flat slab subduction plays a key role in the recent development of the eastern Colombian Andes. Here we show that the geomorphic response to flat slab subduction is presently occurring >500 km inboard of the subduction zone plate boundary. The Llanos basin located along the eastern edge of the Colombian Andes is experiencing active uplift along the seismically active Cusiana, Yopal, Paz de Ariporo and Tame thrust faults, which we refer to as the Llanos Foothills thrust system (LFTS). The LFTS is comprised of east-directed thrust faults that are listric in geometry with shallowly west-dipping decollements. Locally, actively growing north-south plunging folds are cored by blind thrust faults, and are being incised by antecedent east-flowing streams. Using a combination of field-based observations on the geometry of faulted and folded fluvial terraces, and geochronology from terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides, we show that the fluvial terraces have been uplifted, and locally, incised >200 meters at incision rates exceeding 3 mm/yr. The field observations in combination with earthquakes and geodynamic simulations can be reconciled by flat slab subduction, but it is presently unknown whether the flat slab has a Caribbean or Nazca plate affinity. Different geodynamic scenarios can be tested to understand how the leading edge of the flat slab interacts with the South American craton, and how that interaction controls upper crustal deformation.

  11. Electric field responsive chitosan-poly(N,N-dimethyl acrylamide) semi-IPN gel films and their dielectric, thermal and swelling characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarmad, Shokat; Yenici, Gökçen; Gürkan, Koray; Keçeli, Gönül; Gürdaǧ, Gülten

    2013-05-01

    The electroresponsive, dielectric and swelling behavior of semi-interpenetrated polymer network (semi-IPN) gel films prepared from chitosan (CS) and N,N-dimethyl acrylamide (DA) were investigated and compared with those CS film. CS-DA semi-IPN films were also characterized by Fourier transform infrared, x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry measurements. The electrosensitivity of CS-DA films to an electric field was investigated by determining their bending at 8 V in (0.05 M/0.1 M/0.15 M) NaCl solution. Equilibrium swelling values of CS-DA films both in distilled water and buffer solution with pH = 2.2 decreased with poly-DA (PDA) content of the films. While the maximum decomposition of CS film took place at about 296 °C, the presence of PDA in CS-DA semi-IPN films reduced the thermal stability, and their maximum decomposition temperature shifted from 261 to 240 °C with the increase in PDA content. In addition, the PDA network led to a decrease in the dielectric constant (ɛ‧), dielectric loss (ɛ″) and conductance (σ) of CS-DA semi-IPN films in the frequency range between 12 Hz and 100 kHz. The values of electric modulus and impedance, and Cole-Cole plots confirmed that the conductance values of CS-DA films are lower than that of CS film. The PDA network also led CS-DA films to respond more slowly to electric field. The increase in NaCl concentration in the bending medium increased the response rate of CS-DA films to an electric field. The final bending angle of all CS-DA films was 90°, and it was not dependent on either NaCl concentration or PDA content of the films.

  12. Circum-Slab Mantle Deformation: Insights from Finite Strain and Seismic Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Leo, J. F.; Li, Z. H.; Ribe, N. M.; Walker, A.; Wookey, J. M.; Kendall, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Recent numerical modeling studies of the time-dependent development of texture and seismic anisotropy during subduction have shed light on how the mantle deforms as a slab subducts. It is thus becoming more and more clear that the term "mantle flow" may be too ambiguous in the context of subduction. For instance, it has been suggested that trench-parallel shear wave splitting fast directions (from SKS and source-side S splitting) on the seaward side need not necessarily be the result of trench-parallel movement (i.e., "flow") of mantle material, but are rather due to pure shear deformation in the sub-slab mantle. Here we present results of a numerical modeling study where we have systematically investigated how mantle propagation, finite strain, olivine lattice-preferred orientation (LPO), and SKS splitting vary with slab width in a fully dynamic 3-D subduction model. We find that even in the complex circum-slab flow field, the finite strain ellipsoid (FSE) is a good proxy for LPO. However, it does not necessarily align with the instantaneous mantle flow velocity vector. We identify two distinct domains with different deformation types in the central sub-slab upper mantle: simple shear induced by plate advance dominates at shallow depths and results in trench-normal fast splitting, while pure shear due to slab rollback dominates in the deeper mantle (above 410 km) and produces trench-parallel fast orientations. In our models, the SKS splitting pattern strongly depends on these two competing effects as well as the subduction partition ratio, γ = Xp/Xt, where Xp and Xt are the lengths of plate advance and trench retreat, respectively. If γ < 1 (narrow slabs, < 1000 km), trench-parallel fast directions are produced. In contrast, γ > 1 (wide slabs, > 1000 km), results in trench-normal fast splitting. This may explain the observed dichotomy in natural subduction zones of sub-slab fast splitting patterns (away from slab edges) usually being either trench-parallel or

  13. Oceanic slab melting and mantle metasomatism.

    PubMed

    Scaillet, B; Prouteau, G

    2001-01-01

    Modern plate tectonic brings down oceanic crust along subduction zones where it either dehydrates or melts. Those hydrous fluids or melts migrate into the overlying mantle wedge trigerring its melting which produces arc magmas and thus additional continental crust. Nowadays, melting seems to be restricted to cases of young (< 50 Ma) subducted plates. Slab melts are silicic and strongly sodic (trondhjemitic). They are produced at low temperatures (< 1000 degrees C) and under water excess conditions. Their interaction with mantle peridotite produces hydrous metasomatic phases such as amphibole and phlogopite that can be more or less sodium rich. Upon interaction the slab melt becomes less silicic (dacitic to andesitic), and Mg, Ni and Cr richer. Virtually all exposed slab melts display geochemical evidence of ingestion of mantle material. Modern slab melts are thus unlike Archean Trondhjemite-Tonalite-Granodiorite rocks (TTG), which suggests that both types of magmas were generated via different petrogenetic pathways which may imply an Archean tectonic model of crust production different from that of the present-day, subduction-related, one. PMID:11838241

  14. Genetic stability of vaccine strains by multilocus sequence typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis: Implications for quality control of the leptospiral vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yinghua; Zhang, Jinlong; Cui, Shenghui; Li, Min; Zhang, Ying; Xue, Honggang; Xin, Xiaofang; Wang, Junzhi

    2015-01-01

    Quality control of vaccine strains is directly associated with the safety and efficacy of inactivated whole bacterial vaccines. The assessment of genetic stability is one of the essential elements to guarantee the quality of vaccine strains. The multiple-valence inactivated leptospiral vaccine, comprising the main circulating serogroups, has played an important role in the control of Leptospira infection in China. In the present study, to assess the genetic stability of vaccine strains and develop novel quality control tests that enhance and extend the existing procedures, 7 Chinese leptospiral vaccine strains were characterized during in vivo and in vitro passages by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis. The seven vaccine strains were found to have distinct sequence types (STs) and PFGE profiles. Further analysis showed that the ST and PFGE pattern of each vaccine strain, after in vivo or serial in vitro passages (up to 20 passages), were identical to those of the initial strain, demonstrating that these strains were genetically stable and homogeneous. Taken together, PFGE and MLST provide a reproducible and reliable means for confirming the identity and genetic stability of vaccine seeds, suggesting that these approaches can be used to evaluate the quality of leptospiral vaccine strains. PMID:25806658

  15. Genomic analysis of Mycobacterium bovis and other members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex by isoenzyme analysis and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Feizabadi, M M; Robertson, I D; Cousins, D V; Hampson, D J

    1996-01-01

    Initially, multilocus enzyme electrophoresis was used to examine genetic relationships among 63 isolates of Mycobacterium bovis and 13 other members of the M. tuberculosis complex. The isolates were divided into five electrophoretic types, with a mean genetic diversity of 0.1. The strains were genetically homogenous, indicating that members of the complex were closely related. This supported the suggestion that they should be considered as subspecies of a single species. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was then used to differentiate these isolates, as well as 59 additional isolates of M. bovis from different parts of the world. PFGE differentiated these strains into 63 patterns (53 patterns for M. bovis). Isolates of M. bovis from Western Australia (n = 46) were more homogenous than isolates from other regions. Eight strains were identified in that state, and one predominantly bovine strain was isolated from two human beings and a feral pig. Although M. bovis isolates from different parts of the world had distinct DNA patterns, some were very similar. PFGE is a highly discriminatory technique for epidemiological studies of bovine tuberculosis. For example, it allowed differentiation between isolates of M. bovis cultured from animals in separate outbreaks of tuberculosis, it suggested the transmission of infection between certain properties, and it demonstrated the existence of multiple infections with different strains at certain farms. PMID:8727890

  16. Molecular epidemiology of Legionella pneumophila environmental isolates representing nine different serogroups determined by automated ribotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Boccia, S.; Stenico, A.; Amore, R.; Moroder, L.; Orsini, M.; Romano-Spica, V.; Ricciardi, G.

    2005-01-01

    The purposes of the study were (i) to describe the abundance and epidemiology of Legionellaceae in the man-made environment in a northern Italian area, (ii) to assess the concordance between pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and automated ribotyping (AR) techniques for genotyping L. pneumophila and (iii) to investigate the correlation between serogrouping and genotyping data. Water was sampled from reservoirs in 12 buildings across an area of 80-km radius. Despite the water temperature always being maintained above 55 degrees C, all of the buildings sampled were contaminated with Legionellaceae on at least one occasion and 63 L. pneumophila isolates representing nine different serogroups were collected. The two DNA methods revealed a high degree of genetic heterogeneity, even though identical L. pneumophila clones were recovered at different sites. The AR technique provided a fairly reliable approximation of PFGE results (73% concordance), however there was poor correlation between serogrouping and genotyping data as identical DNA fingerprints were shared by isolates of different serogroups. PMID:16274507

  17. Molecular characterisation of Mycoplasma hyorhinis isolated from pigs using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and 16S rRNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguti, Maurício; Oliveira, Rosângela C; Marques, Lucas M; Buzinhani, Melissa; Buim, Marcos R; Neto, Renata L; Guimarães, Ana Márcia S; Timenetsky, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Economic loss in pig breeding is common due to respiratory disorders, and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma hyorhinis, namely, are the most common infectious agents. The aim of this study is to recover these mollicutes and detect their genotypic variations by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and sequencing the 16 s rRNA gene. One hundred and twenty-six swabs from tonsil and nasal mucus of pigs with respiratory disorders were analysed. A total of 78 lungs were sampled, as well as two trachea and two tonsils obtained from animals with respiratory disorder. A total of 59 isolates were obtained: 1 (1.70 per cent) of M hyopneumoniae, 2 (3.40 per cent) of Mycoplasma flocculare and 56 (94.90 per cent) of M hyorhinis. The PFGE for M hyorhinis showed 10 profiles with enzyme AvaI and 9 profiles with XhoI. A low polymorphism of the 16sRNS gene was detected in M hyorhinis isolates compared with the type strain in the GenBank. M hyorhinis isolates of different herds showed a large heterogenicity with enzymes AvaI and XhoI. The sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene allowed for analysing the interspecific and intraspecific variations of isolated mycoplasmas. PMID:26688737

  18. Molecular characterisation of Mycoplasma hyorhinis isolated from pigs using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and 16S rRNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yamaguti, Maurício; Oliveira, Rosângela C; Marques, Lucas M; Buzinhani, Melissa; Buim, Marcos R; Neto, Renata L; Guimarães, Ana Márcia S; Timenetsky, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Economic loss in pig breeding is common due to respiratory disorders, and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma hyorhinis, namely, are the most common infectious agents. The aim of this study is to recover these mollicutes and detect their genotypic variations by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and sequencing the 16 s rRNA gene. One hundred and twenty-six swabs from tonsil and nasal mucus of pigs with respiratory disorders were analysed. A total of 78 lungs were sampled, as well as two trachea and two tonsils obtained from animals with respiratory disorder. A total of 59 isolates were obtained: 1 (1.70 per cent) of M hyopneumoniae, 2 (3.40 per cent) of Mycoplasma flocculare and 56 (94.90 per cent) of M hyorhinis. The PFGE for M hyorhinis showed 10 profiles with enzyme AvaI and 9 profiles with XhoI. A low polymorphism of the 16sRNS gene was detected in M hyorhinis isolates compared with the type strain in the GenBank. M hyorhinis isolates of different herds showed a large heterogenicity with enzymes AvaI and XhoI. The sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene allowed for analysing the interspecific and intraspecific variations of isolated mycoplasmas. PMID:26688737

  19. Epidemiological Analysis of Salmonella enteritidis Isolates from Humans and Broiler Chickens in Thailand by Phage Typing and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Boonmar, Sumalee; Bangtrakulnonth, Aroon; Pornrunangwong, Srirat; Terajima, Jun; Watanabe, Haruo; Kaneko, Ken-Ichi; Ogawa, Masuo

    1998-01-01

    To determine the phage types (PT) of Salmonella enteritidis found in Thailand and to clarify the potential for human infection by S. enteritidis in broiler chicken meat, human and poultry isolates taken from Thailand between 1990 and 1997 were phage typed and analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Ten different PT were found among the 302 isolates phage typed, with PT 4 being the most frequent in human (73.9%) and poultry (76.2%) isolates, followed by PT 1 (8.0%), 8 (3.6%), and 7a (2.2%) in human isolates and by PT 7a (4.9%), 1 (3.7%), and 12 (2.4%) in poultry isolates. Of the 53 isolates analyzed by PFGE, 45 showed an indistinguishable pattern (pattern A) by BlnI-digested PFGE and the other 8 isolates showed a very similar pattern that differed by only a few bands. These results indicate the spread of a genetically identical clone of S. enteritidis in humans and poultry in Thailand. PMID:9542918

  20. Comparison of ribotyping, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis in typing of Lactobacillus rhamnosus and L. casei strains.

    PubMed

    Tynkkynen, S; Satokari, R; Saarela, M; Mattila-Sandholm, T; Saxelin, M

    1999-09-01

    A total of 24 strains, biochemically identified as members of the Lactobacillus casei group, were identified by PCR with species-specific primers. The same set of strains was typed by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis, ribotyping, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) in order to compare the discriminatory power of the methods. Species-specific primers for L. rhamnosus and L. casei identified the type strain L. rhamnosus ATCC 7469 and the neotype strain L. casei ATCC 334, respectively, but did not give any signal with the recently revived species L. zeae, which contains the type strain ATCC 15820 and the strain ATCC 393, which was previously classified as L. casei. Our results are in accordance with the suggested new classification of the L. casei group. Altogether, 21 of the 24 strains studied were identified with the species-specific primers. In strain typing, PFGE was the most discriminatory method, revealing 17 genotypes for the 24 strains studied. Ribotyping and RAPD analysis yielded 15 and 12 genotypes, respectively. PMID:10473394

  1. Molecular characterization of Salmonella paratyphi B dT+ and Salmonella Heidelberg from poultry and retail chicken meat in Colombia by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Donado-Godoy, Pilar; Byrne, Barbara A; Hume, Michael; León, Maribel; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Enriqué; Vives Flores, Martha J; Clavijo, Viviana; Holguin, Ángela; Romero-Zuñiga, Juan J; Castellanos, Ricardo; Tafur, McAllister; Smith, Woutrina A

    2015-04-01

    Salmonella Paratyphi B dT+ variant (also termed Salmonella Java) and Salmonella Heidelberg are pathogens of public health importance that are frequently isolated from poultry. As a step toward implementing the Colombian Integrated Program for Antimicrobial Resistant Surveillance, this study characterized molecular patterns of Salmonella Paratyphi B dT+ and Salmonella Heidelberg isolated from poultry farms, fecal samples, and retail chicken meat using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The objective of this study was to determine the genetic relationship among isolates and to determine potential geographically predominant genotypes. Based on PFGE analysis, both serovars exhibited high heterogeneity: the chromosomal DNA fingerprints of 82 Salmonella Paratyphi B dT+ isolates revealed 42 PFGE patterns, whereas the 21 isolates of Salmonella Heidelberg revealed 10 patterns. Similar genotypes of both serovars were demonstrated to be present on farms and in retail outlets. For Salmonella Paratyphi B dT+, closely genetically related strains were found among isolates coming from different farms and different integrated poultry companies within two departments (Santander and Cundinamarca) and also from farms located in the two geographically distant departments. For Salmonella Heidelberg, there were fewer farms with genetically related isolates than for Salmonella Paratyphi B dT+. A possible dissemination of similar genotypes of both serovars along the poultry production chain is hypothesized, and some facilitating factors existing in Colombia are reviewed. PMID:25836408

  2. Sources of Listeria monocytogenes Contamination in a Cold-Smoked Rainbow Trout Processing Plant Detected by Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis Typing

    PubMed Central

    Autio, Tiina; Hielm, Sebastian; Miettinen, Maria; Sjöberg, Anna-Maija; Aarnisalo, Kaarina; Björkroth, Johanna; Mattila-Sandholm, Tiina; Korkeala, Hannu

    1999-01-01

    Sites of Listeria monocytogenes contamination in a cold-smoked rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) processing plant were detected by sampling the production line, environment, and fish at different production stages. Two lots were monitored. The frequency of raw fish samples containing L. monocytogenes was low. During processing, the frequency of fish contaminated with L. monocytogenes clearly rose after brining, and the most contaminated sites of the processing plant were the brining and postbrining areas. A total of 303 isolates from the raw fish, product, and the environment were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). PFGE yielded nine pulsotypes, which formed four clusters. The predominating L. monocytogenes pulsotypes of the final product were associated with brining and slicing, whereas contaminants of raw fish were not detected in the final product. Air-mediated contamination in the plant could not be proved. In accordance with these results, an L. monocytogenes eradication program was planned. The use of hot steam, hot air, and hot water seemed to be useful in eliminating L. monocytogenes. None of the control samples taken in the 5 months after the eradication program was implemented contained L. monocytogenes. PMID:9872773

  3. Prevalence of Clostridium botulinum in Finnish Trout Farms: Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis Typing Reveals Extensive Genetic Diversity among Type E Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Hielm, Sebastian; Björkroth, Johanna; Hyytiä, Eija; Korkeala, Hannu

    1998-01-01

    The distribution of Clostridium botulinum serotypes A, B, E, and F in Finnish trout farms was examined. A total of 333 samples were tested with a neurotoxin-specific PCR assay. C. botulinum type E was found in 68% of the farm sediment samples, in 15% of the fish intestinal samples, and in 5% of the fish skin samples. No other serotypes were found. The spore counts determined by the most-probable-number method were considerably higher for the sediments than for the fish intestines and skin; the average values were 2,020, 166, and 310 C. botulinum type E spores kg−1, respectively. The contamination rates in traditional freshwater ponds and marine net cages were high, but in concrete ponds equipped with sediment suction devices the contamination rates were significantly lower. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing of 42 isolates obtained in this survey and 12 North American reference strains generated 28 pulsotypes upon visual inspection, suggesting that there was extensive genetic diversity and that the discriminatory power of PFGE typing in C. botulinum type E was high. A numerical analysis of SmaI-XmaI macrorestriction profiles confirmed these findings, as it divided the 54 isolates into 15 clusters at a similarity level of 76%. For this material, this level of similarity corresponded to a three-band difference in the macrorestriction profiles, which indicated that there is no genotypic proof of a close epidemiological relationship among the clusters. PMID:9797260

  4. Comparison of Ribotyping, Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA Analysis, and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis in Typing of Lactobacillus rhamnosus and L. casei Strains

    PubMed Central

    Tynkkynen, Soile; Satokari, Reetta; Saarela, Maria; Mattila-Sandholm, Tiina; Saxelin, Maija

    1999-01-01

    A total of 24 strains, biochemically identified as members of the Lactobacillus casei group, were identified by PCR with species-specific primers. The same set of strains was typed by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis, ribotyping, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) in order to compare the discriminatory power of the methods. Species-specific primers for L. rhamnosus and L. casei identified the type strain L. rhamnosus ATCC 7469 and the neotype strain L. casei ATCC 334, respectively, but did not give any signal with the recently revived species L. zeae, which contains the type strain ATCC 15820 and the strain ATCC 393, which was previously classified as L. casei. Our results are in accordance with the suggested new classification of the L. casei group. Altogether, 21 of the 24 strains studied were identified with the species-specific primers. In strain typing, PFGE was the most discriminatory method, revealing 17 genotypes for the 24 strains studied. Ribotyping and RAPD analysis yielded 15 and 12 genotypes, respectively. PMID:10473394

  5. Ionic gel as gate dielectric for the easy characterization of graphene and polymer field-effect transistors and electrochemical resistance modification of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettner, Michel; Vladimirov, Ilja; Strudwick, Andrew J.; Schwab, Matthias Georg; Weitz, R. Thomas

    2015-07-01

    In order to judge the usability of novel semiconductors for field-effect transistors (FETs), fast tools for the assessment of relevant electrical transistor parameters are necessary. We discuss here the use of an ionic gel (IG) as gate material that allows the quick fabrication of, for example, graphene FETs. Our IG-FETs show excellent performance. For example, IG-gated FETs have a charge carrier mobility of 2000 cm2/Vs, which is 5 times larger than that previously reported in similar devices. Using cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in a detail previously not shown, we furthermore investigate the gating mechanism of as-fabricated CVD-grown graphene FETs and compare it with IG gated FETs based on regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (rr-P3HT). Consistent with literature, we find that, while IG-based graphene transistors are gated electrostatically, IG-gated rr-P3HT transistors work via electrochemical doping. IGs and our presented electrical measurements will allow to judge the electrical quality and gating mechanism also of novel semiconductors. Finally, to the best of our knowledge, we are the first to show that with the aid of IGs, graphene can be functionalized electrochemically with a concomitant variation in conductance of more than an order of magnitude.

  6. Epidemiological fingerprinting of Enterobacter cloacae by small-fragment restriction endonuclease analysis and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of genomic restriction fragments.

    PubMed Central

    Haertl, R; Bandlow, G

    1993-01-01

    A cluster of infections caused by Enterobacter cloacae was observed among preterm neonates in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of a pediatric hospital in Osnabrück, Germany. The presence of similar antimicrobial susceptibility patterns among the bacterial isolates prompted an investigation to determine whether a limited spread of a single strain existed. All 12 E. cloacae isolates from the NICU and 50 nonrelated strains were fingerprinted by small-fragment restriction endonuclease analysis (SF-REA) of EcoRI DNA digests. Selected isolates were further characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of NotI- or XbaI-generated genomic restriction fragments. Epidemiologically unrelated strains were clearly discriminated by both methods. Results achieved by SF-REA and PFGE revealed that of the 12 isolates from the NICU, 11 belonged to the same genotypic cluster. Since all reagents and equipment for both techniques are commercially available, DNA fingerprinting by SF-REA or PFGE is proposed as a useful tool in the microbiology laboratory for investigating the epidemiological relatedness of E. cloacae strains of clinical and environmental origin. Images PMID:8093251

  7. Coagulase-negative staphylococci from non-mastitic bovine mammary gland: characterization of Staphylococcus chromogenes and Staphylococcus haemolyticus by antibiotic susceptibility testing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Pate, Mateja; Zdovc, Irena; Avberšek, Jana; Ocepek, Matjaž; Pengov, Andrej; Podpečan, Ožbalt

    2012-05-01

    During routine microbiological examination of milk samples from dairy cows without clinical signs of mastitis, quarter milk samples of 231 dairy cows from 12 herds were investigated for the presence of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS). The isolates were identified on the basis of colony morphology, Gram staining, catalase and coagulase test and the commercial kit, API Staph. CNS was detected in 29% (67/231) of the cows. A total of seven CNS species were identified with the most prevalent being Staphylococcus (Staph.) chromogenes (30%) and Staph. haemolyticus (28·8%), followed by Staph. simulans (11·2%), Staph. xylosus (11·2%), Staph. epidermidis (7·5%), Staph. hyicus (6·3%) and Staph. sciuri (5%). The predominant species, Staph. chromogenes and Staph. haemolyticus, were further characterized by antibiotic susceptibility testing using the agar disc diffusion method (Kirby-Bauer) and by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Considerable resistance to ampicillin and penicillin was observed in both species. Isolates with identical or highly similar PFGE profiles were detected at the herd level despite a marked heterogeneity seen for both species. On the basis of somatic cell count, absence of clinical signs of inflammation and heterogeneity of genotypes, we assume that CNS isolated in this study could not be considered as important causative agents of the bovine mammary gland inflammation. PMID:22067091

  8. INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING NORTHEAST, WITH OVENS AND SLAB BEING PROCESSED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING NORTHEAST, WITH OVENS AND SLAB BEING PROCESSED THROUGH PRESS/STECKLER (RIGHT). HEATED SLABS MAKE SEVERAL PASSES THROUGH THE STECKLER WITH THICKNESS OF THE SLAB DECREASED UNTIL REQUIRED GAGE IS REACHED. - Central Iron Foundry, Hot Strip Mill Building, 1700 Holt Road, Holt, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  9. Necessity of the Ridge for the Flat Slab Subduction: Insights from the Peruvian Flat Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knezevic Antonijevic, S.; Wagner, L. S.; Beck, S. L.; Long, M. D.; Zandt, G.; Tavera, H.

    2014-12-01

    Flattening of the subducting plate has been linked to the formation of various geological features, including basement-cored uplifts, the cessation of arc volcanism, ignimbrite flare-ups, and the formation of high plateaus and ore deposits [Humphreys et al., 2003; Gutscher et al., 2000; Rosenbaum et al., 2005]. However, the mechanism responsible for the slab flattening is still poorly understood. Here we focus on the Peruvian flat slab, where the Nazca plate starts to bend at ~80 km depth and travels horizontally for several hundred kilometers, at which point steep subduction resumes. Based on a 1500 km long volcanic gap and intermediate depth seismicity patterns, the Peruvian flat slab appears to have the greatest along-strike extent and, therefore, has been suggested as a modern analogue to the putative flat slab during the Laramide orogeny in the western United States (~80-55 Ma). Combining 3D shear wave velocity structure and Rayleigh wave phase anisotropy between ~10° and 18° S, we find that the subducting Nazca plate is not uniformly flat along the entire region, but fails to the north of the subducting Nazca Ridge. Our results show that, in combination with trench retreat, rapid overriding plate motion, and/or presence of a thick cratonic root, the subduction of buoyant overthickened oceanic crust, such as the Nazca Ridge, is necessary for the formation and sustainability of flat slabs. This finding has important implications for the formation of flat slabs both past and present.

  10. DNA double-strand breaks in mammalian cells exposed to gamma-rays and very heavy ions. Fragment-size distributions determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Kraxenberger, F; Weber, K J; Friedl, A A; Eckardt-Schupp, F; Flentje, M; Quicken, P; Kellerer, A M

    1998-07-01

    The spatial distribution of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) was assessed after treatment of mammalian cells (V79) with densely ionizing radiation. Cells were exposed to beams of heavy charged particles (calcium ions: 6.9 MeV/u, 2.1.10(3) keV/microm; uranium ions: 9.0 MeV/u, 1.4.10(4) keV/microm) at the linear accelerator UNILAC of GSI, Darmstadt. DNA was isolated in agarose plugs and subjected to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis under conditions that separated DNA fragments of size 50 kbp to 5 Mbp. The measured fragment distributions were compared to those obtained after gamma-irradiation and were analyzed by means of a convolution and a deconvolution technique. In contrast to the finding for gamma-radiation, the distributions produced by heavy ions do not correspond to the random breakage model. Their marked overdispersion and the observed excess of short fragments reflect spatial clustering of DSB that extends over large regions of the DNA, up to several mega base pairs (Mbp). At fluences of 0.75 and 1.5/microm2, calcium ions produce nearly the same shape of fragment spectrum, merely with a difference in the amount of DNA entering the gel; this suggests that the DNA is fragmented by individual calcium ions. At a fluence of 0.8/microm2 uranium ions produce a profile that is shifted to smaller fragment sizes in comparison to the profile obtained at a fluence of 0.4/microm2; this suggests cumulative action of two separate ions in the formation of fragments. These observations are not consistent with the expectation that the uranium ions, with their much larger LET, should be more likely to produce single particle action than the calcium ions. However, a consideration of the greater lateral extension of the tracks of the faster uranium ions explains the observed differences; it suggests that the DNA is closely coiled so that even DNA locations several Mbp apart are usually not separated by less than 0. 1 or 0.2 microm. PMID:9728743

  11. Use of CE-SDS gel for characterization of monoclonal antibody hinge region clipping due to copper and high pH stress.

    PubMed

    Rustandi, Richard R; Wang, Yang

    2011-11-01

    CE-SDS gel technique has been used extensively in the field of monoclonal antibody (mAb) as a tool for product purity, stability, and characterization. It offers many advantages over the traditional labor-intensive SDS-PAGE slab gel technology with respect to speed and resolution. Monoclonal antibodies are known to cleave in the hinge region due to extreme pH, high temperature and in the presence of metals, especially copper. This cleavage will impact the shelf lifetime of mAb product hence its quality. CESDS gel method using Beckman PA800 with UV detection is used to characterize the effects of copper and other metals such as iron and zinc on mAb clipping. In addition, mAb integrity under high temperature and high pH stress conditions was also evaluated and the results clearly show that CE-SDS gel can distinguish clipping due to copper versus heat and/or high pH. The data presented illustrate the power of this simple CESDS gel technique in supporting the development of mAb from product quality and stability to the final product characterization. PMID:22145164

  12. INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE CENTRAL CAMPUS AND SOUTHEAST LABORATORY COMPLEX BUILDING SLABS AT OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY, OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, Phyllis C.

    2012-07-24

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities/Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORAU/ORISE) has completed the independent verification survey of the Central Campus and Southeast Lab Complex Building Slabs. The results of this effort are provided. The objective of this verification survey was to provide independent review and field assessment of remediation actions conducted by SEC, and to independently assess whether the final radiological condition of the slabs met the release guidelines.

  13. Electromagnetic scattering from a structured slab comprised of periodically placed resistive cards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgenson, Roy E.; Mittra, Raj

    1989-05-01

    The structured slab, which is constructed by arranging cells composed of thin, lossy, dielectric cards on a one- or two-dimensional lattice, is an important material in the aerospace industry because of its high strength-to-weight ratio. Recently, the structured slab has also been used to reduce the radar cross section of various aircraft. It is important, therefore, to characterize how an electromagnetic wave scatters from this slab. The structured slabs discussed herein are constructed by repeating lossy strips periodically in one dimension or lossy plates in two dimensions. An electric field integral equation is formulated which has as its unknown the electric current flowing in a single unit cell of the structure. The periodicity of the structure is accounted for by using an efficiently calculated periodic Green's function. The loss is modeled by resistive boundary condition. The integral equation is solved by the method of moments using subdomain basis functions. The generalized scattering matrix is calculated and the propagating reflection coefficients are plotted as a function of frequency for various structures. The oblique scattering from one-dimensional arrays of strips is examined for various configurations of unit cells and various resistances. A depolarizing effect of the structure is found to be a function of incident angle and symmetry in the unit cell. The reflection from two-dimensional arrays of plates connected to form slabs of zigzag plates and honeycomb is also examined.

  14. Pockels cover for switchable control of the reflection from a grounded, isotropic, lossy dielectric slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valagiannopoulos, C. A.; Tsitsas, N. L.; Lakhtakia, A.; Burger, A.

    2015-02-01

    Theoretical analysis indicates that the reflection of obliquely incident light with arbitrary polarization state in the mid-wavelength (3-8 μm) and long-wavelength (8-15 μm) infrared regimes by a lossy, isotropic, dielectric slab backed by a perfect electric conductor can be electrically controlled by covering the dielectric slab by an epitaxial layer of cubic noncentrosymmetric materials, which are normally isotropic dielectric but display the Pockels effect. The reflectances change on the application of a dc electric field parallel to thickness direction of the Pockels cover, without causing depolarization.

  15. New low-loss wide-angle Y-branch configuration for optical dielectric slab waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatami-Hanza, H.; Chu, P. L.; Lederer, M. J.

    1994-04-01

    A new Y-branch configuration for dielectric slab waveguides is proposed, based on the natural refraction of optical field at the dielectric interfaces and analyzed by BPM. It has been shown that the radiation loss of the structure is very small with relatively wide branching angle and fairly insensitive to the fabrication errors.

  16. Thermally induced phase changes, lateral heterogeneity of the mantle, continental roots, and deep slab anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Don L.

    1987-01-01

    Factors which influence the lateral heterogeneity in density and seismic velocity with depth in the upper earth mantle are discussed. It is emphasized that most of the increases in density and seismic velocity with depth are caused by pressure-induced solid-solid phase changes in the high-density high-velocity phases of mineral assemblage, due to variations in temperature. In particular, the ilmenite form of MgSiO3 and the gamma-spinel form of Mg2SiO4 have broad stability fields in cold mantle and are not stable in hotter mantle. It is emphasized that the density and velocity anomalies associated with temperature-induced phase changes in mineral assemblage must be taken into account in the thermal models of the slabs; when these effects are accounted for, the geoid and seismic anomalies associated with subducted slabs are consistent with slab confinement to the upper mantle and with layered models of mantle convection.

  17. Synthetic Hydrogen Spectra of Oscillating Prominence Slabs Immersed in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapiór, M.; Oliver, R.; Ballester, J. L.; Heinzel, P.

    2016-08-01

    We study the behavior of Hα and Hβ spectral lines and their spectral indicators in an oscillating solar prominence slab surrounded by the solar corona, using an MHD model combined with a 1D radiative transfer code taken in the line of sight perpendicular to the slab. We calculate the time variation of the Doppler shift, half-width, and maximum intensity of the Hα and Hβ spectral lines for different modes of oscillation. We find a non-sinusoidal time dependence of some spectral parameters with time. Because Hα and Hβ spectral indicators have different behavior for different modes, caused by differing optical depths of formation and different plasma parameter variations in time and along the slab, they may be used for prominence seismology, especially to derive the internal velocity field in prominences.

  18. Slab photonic crystals with dimer colloid bases

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Erin K.; Liddell Watson, Chekesha M.

    2014-06-14

    The photonic band gap properties for centered rectangular monolayers of asymmetric dimers are reported. Colloids in suspension have been organized into the phase under confinement. The theoretical model is inspired by the range of asymmetric dimers synthesized via seeded emulsion polymerization and explores, in particular, the band structures as a function of degree of lobe symmetry and degree of lobe fusion. These parameters are varied incrementally from spheres to lobe-tangent dimers over morphologies yielding physically realizable particles. The work addresses the relative scarcity of theoretical studies on photonic crystal slabs with vertical variation that is consistent with colloidal self-assembly. Odd, even and polarization independent gaps in the guided modes are determined for direct slab structures. A wide range of lobe symmetry and degree of lobe fusion combinations having Brillouin zones with moderate to high isotropy support gaps between odd mode band indices 3-4 and even mode band indices 1-2 and 2-3.

  19. Subduction zone earthquakes and stress in slabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vassiliou, M. S.; Hager, B. H.

    1988-01-01

    Simple viscous fluid models of subducting slabs are used to explain observations of the distribution of earthquakes as a function of depth and the orientation of stress axes of deep (greater than 300 km) and intermediate (70-300 km) earthquakes. Results suggest the following features in the distribution of earthquakes with depth: (1) an exponential decrease from shallow depths down to 250 to 300 km, (2) a minimum near 250 to 300 km, and (3) a deep peak below 300 km. Many shallow subducting slabs show only the first characteristic, while deeper extending regions tend to show all three features, with the deep peak varying in position and intensity. These data, combined with the results on the stress orientations of various-depth earthquakes, are consistent with the existence of a barrier of some sort at 670-km depth and a uniform viscosity mantle above this barrier.

  20. Effects of Thermodynamic Properties on Slab Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, I.; King, S. D.; Caddick, M. J.; Ross, N.

    2012-12-01

    We perform a series of numerical experiments to investigate the effects of thermodynamic properties on the geometrical evolution of subducting slabs. We calculate density (ρ), thermal expansivity (α), and heat capacity (cp) of mantle mineral assemblages of a harzburgite composition over a range of pressure and temperature conditions applicable to the Earth's mantle, using the thermodynamic database of Stixrude and Lithgow-Bertelloni [2011] and the thermodynamic calculation code Perple_X [Connolly, 2009]. Following Nakagawa et al. [2009], we assume that thermal diffusivity (κ) follows a power-law relationship with density (κ=κ0(ρ/ρ0)3, where κ0 and ρ0 are reference diffusivity and density, respectively). The calculations show that ρ, α, and κ change significantly along mantle geotherms; the ranges of their values are 3300-5100 km/m3, 1.5-3.5 10-5/K, and 3-17 W/m K, respectively. The change in cp is small (< 5%). We incorporate the pressure and temperature (PT) dependence of these thermodynamic properties into a 2-D finite element code with compressible convection formulations under the truncated anelastic liquid approximation [Lee and King, 2009] and develop a dynamic subduction model with kinematic boundary conditions. In the model, we use a composite mantle rheology that accounts for both diffusion and dislocation creep with flow law parameterization of wet olivine [Hirth and Kohlstedt, 2003]. Following Billen and Hirth [2007] and Lee and King [2011], we adjust the flow law parameter values for the lower mantle to test the effects of viscosity contrast between the upper and lower mantle on slab evolution. We use a reference model with a constant ρ, κ α, and cp, which is equivalent to using the incompressible extended Bousisnesq approximation. Preliminary results show that incorporating PT-dependent ρ enhances the vigor of the buoyancy driven flow compared to the reference model. Further, lithostatic pressure at a given depth is higher than in the

  1. The effect of metastable pyroxene on the slab dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrusta, Roberto; Hunen, Jeroen; Goes, Saskia

    2014-12-01

    Seismic studies show that some subducting slabs penetrate straight into the lower mantle, whereas others seem to flatten near the base of the mantle transition zone. Slab stagnation is often attributed to an increase in viscosity and phase transformations in the olivine system. However, recent mineral physics studies showed that due to extremely low transformational diffusion rates, low-density metastable pyroxene may persist into the transition zone in cool slabs. Here we use a dynamically fully self-consistent subduction model to investigate the influence of metastable pyroxene on the dynamics of subducting oceanic lithosphere. Our results show that metastable pyroxene affects slab buoyancy at least as much as olivine metastability. However, unlike metastable olivine, which can inhibit slab penetration in the lower mantle only for cold, old, and fast slabs, metastable pyroxene is likely to also affect sinking of relatively young and slow slabs.

  2. GEM printer: 3D gel printer for free shaping of functional gel engineering materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Hidemitsu; Muroi, Hisato; Yamamoto, Kouki; Serizawa, Ryo; Gong, Jin

    2013-04-01

    In the past decade, several high-strength gels have been developed. These gels are expected to use as a kind of new engineering materials in the fields of industry and medical as substitutes to polyester fibers, which are materials of artificial blood vessels. The gels have both low surface friction and well permeability due to a large amount of water absorbed in the gels, which are superiority of the gels compering to the polyester fibers. It is, however, difficult for gels to be forked structure or cavity structure by using cutting or mold. Consequently, it is necessary to develop the additive manufacturing device to synthesize and mode freely gels at the same time. Here we try to develop an optical 3D gel printer that enables gels to be shaped precisely and freely. For the free forming of high-strength gels, the 1st gels are ground to particles and mixed with 2nd pregel solution, and the mixed solution is gelled by the irradiation of UV laser beam through an optical fiber. The use of the optical fiber makes one-point UV irradiation possible. Since the optical fiber is controlled by 3D-CAD, the precise and free molding in XYZ directions is easily realized. We successfully synthesized tough gels using the gel printer.

  3. Use of pulsed-field agarose gel electrophoresis to size genomes of Campylobacter species and to construct a SalI map of Campylobacter jejuni UA580.

    PubMed

    Chang, N; Taylor, D E

    1990-09-01

    To determine the physical length of the chromosome of Campylobacter jejuni, the genome was subjected to digestion by a series of restriction endonucleases to produce a small number of large restriction fragments. These fragments were then separated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis with the contour-clamped homogeneous electric field system. The DNA of C. jejuni, with its low G+C content, was found to have no restriction sites for enzymes NotI and SfiI, which cut a high-G+C regions. Most of the restriction enzymes that were used resulted in DNA fragments that were either too numerous or too small for genome size determination, with the exception of the enzymes SalI (5' ... G decreases TCGAG ... 3'), SmaI (5' .... CCC decreases GGG .... 3'), and KpnI (5' ... GGTAC decreases C .... 3'). With SalI, six restriction fragments with average values of 48.5, 80, 110, 220, 280, and 980 kilobases (kb) were obtained when calibrated with both a lambda DNA ladder and yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome markers. The sum of these fragments yielded an average genome size of 1.718 megabases (Mb). With SmaI, nine restriction fragments with average values ranging from 39 to 371 kb, which yielded an average genome size of 1.726 Mb were obtained. With KpnI, 11 restriction fragments with sizes ranging from 35 to 387.5 kb, which yielded an average genome size of 1.717 Mb were obtained. A SalI restriction map was derived by partial digestion of the C. jejuni DNA. The genome sizes of C. laridis, C. coli, and C. fetus were also determined with the contour-clamped homogeneous electric field system by SalI, SmaI, and KpnI digestion. Average genome sizes were found to be 1.714 Mb for C. coli, 1.267 Mb for C. fetus subsp. fetus, and 1.451 Mb for C. laridis. PMID:2168376

  4. Slab waveguide theory for general multi-slot waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, ZiChun; Yin, LiXiang; Zou, Yu; Wu, Xiang

    2016-07-01

    Optical devices based on slot waveguide are of considerable interest in numerous applications due to the distinct feature of strong electric field confinement in a low-refractive index region. A theoretical model based on multi-slab waveguide theory is used to reveal the physical mechanism of the slot waveguide. The calculation results derived from the basic Helmholtz equation for the conventional single-slot waveguide with a ~2% validation of the effective refractive index are compared to the former experiment results by the Cornell University group. Moreover, we extend the theoretical model to a general multi-slot waveguide. Its electric field distribution and key properties such as optical power confinement factor and enhancement factor in slot are deduced theoretically and fully discussed.

  5. Slab stagnation and buckling in the mantle transition zone: Rheology, phase transition, trench migration, and seismic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bina, Craig; Cizkova, Hana

    2014-05-01

    observations better than a flat-lying slab (Zhang et al., 2013). Earthquake hypocentral distributions and focal mechanisms may provide clearer insights into slab buckling, as they appear to vary systematically across regions of slab stagnation (Fukao and Obayashi, 2013). Stress fields computed from our dynamical models may help to illuminate such observations. References: Bina, C.R., and H. Kawakatsu, Buoyancy, bending, and seismic visibility in deep slab stagnation, Phys. Earth Planet. Inter., 183, 330-340, 2010. Čížková, H., and C.R. Bina, Effects of mantle and subduction-interface rheologies on slab stagnation and trench rollback, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 379, 95-103, 2013. Fukao, Y., and M. Obayashi, Deepest hypocentral distributions associated with stagnant slabs and penetrated slabs, Fall Meeting Abstracts, AGU, DI14A-01, 2013. Li, Z.-H., and N.M. Ribe, Dynamics of free subduction from 3-D boundary element modeling, J. Geophys. Res., 117, B06408. Matthews, D.C., L. Zheng, and R.G. Gordon, Do trenches advance? Fall Meeting Abstracts, AGU, T43D-2682, 2013. Zhang, Y., Y. Wang, Y. Wu, C. Bina, Z. Jin, and S. Dong, Phase transitions of harzburgite and buckled slab under eastern China, Geochem. Geophys. Geosys., 14, 1182-1199, 2013.

  6. The Effect of Subducting Slabs in Global Shear Wave Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chang; Grand, Stephen P.

    2016-03-01

    Subducting slabs create strong short wavelength seismic anomalies in the upper mantle where much of Earth's seismicity is located. As such, they have the potential to bias longer wavelength seismic tomography models. To evaluate the effect of subducting slabs in global tomography, we performed a series of inversions using a global synthetic shear wave travel time dataset for a theoretical slab model based on predicted thermal anomalies within slabs. The spectral element method was applied to predict the travel time anomalies produced by the 3D slab model for paths corresponding to our current data used in actual tomography models. Inversion tests have been conducted first using the raw travel time anomalies to check how well the slabs can be imaged in global tomography without the effect of earthquake mislocation. Our results indicate that most of the slabs can be identified in the inversion result but with smoothed and reduced amplitude. The recovery of the total mass anomaly in slab regions is about 88%. We then performed another inversion test to investigate the effect of mislocation caused by subducting slabs. We found that source mislocation largely removes slab signal and significantly degrades the imaging of subducting slabs - potentially reducing the recovery of mass anomalies in slab regions to only 41%. We tested two source relocation procedures - an iterative relocation inversion and joint relocation inversion. Both methods partially recover the true source locations and improve the inversion results, but the joint inversion method worked significantly better than the iterative method. In all of our inversion tests, the amplitude of artifact structures in the lower mantle caused by the incorrect imaging of slabs (up to ˜0.5% S velocity anomalies) are comparable to some large scale lower mantle heterogeneities seen in global tomography studies. Based on our inversion tests, we suggest including a-priori subducting slabs in the starting models in global

  7. The effect of subducting slabs in global shear wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chang; Grand, Stephen P.

    2016-05-01

    Subducting slabs create strong short wavelength seismic anomalies in the upper mantle where much of Earth's seismicity is located. As such, they have the potential to bias longer wavelength seismic tomography models. To evaluate the effect of subducting slabs in global tomography, we performed a series of inversions using a global synthetic shear wave traveltime data set for a theoretical slab model based on predicted thermal anomalies within slabs. The spectral element method was applied to predict the traveltime anomalies produced by the 3-D slab model for paths corresponding to our current data used in actual tomography models. Inversion tests have been conducted first using the raw traveltime anomalies to check how well the slabs can be imaged in global tomography without the effect of earthquake mislocation. Our results indicate that most of the slabs can be identified in the inversion result but with smoothed and reduced amplitude. The recovery of the total mass anomaly in slab regions is about 88 per cent. We then performed another inversion test to investigate the effect of mislocation caused by subducting slabs. We found that source mislocation largely removes slab signal and significantly degrades the imaging of subducting slabs-potentially reducing the recovery of mass anomalies in slab regions to only 41 per cent. We tested two source relocation procedures-an iterative relocation inversion and joint relocation inversion. Both methods partially recover the true source locations and improve the inversion results, but the joint inversion method worked significantly better than the iterative method. In all of our inversion tests, the amplitudes of artefact structures in the lower mantle caused by the incorrect imaging of slabs (up to ˜0.5 per cent S velocity anomalies) are comparable to some large-scale lower-mantle heterogeneities seen in global tomography studies. Based on our inversion tests, we suggest including a-priori subducting slabs in the

  8. Fast Waves in Smooth Coronal Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopin, I.; Nagorny, I.

    2015-03-01

    This work investigates the effect of transverse density structuring in coronal slab-like waveguides on the properties of fast waves. We generalized previous results obtained for the exponential and Epstein profiles to the case of an arbitrary transverse density distribution. The criteria are given to determine the possible (trapped or leaky) wave regime, depending on the type of density profile function. In particular, there are plasma slabs with transverse density structuring that support pure trapped fast waves for all wavelengths. Their phase speed is nearly equal to the external Alfvén speed for the typical parameters of coronal loops. Our findings are obtained on the basis of Kneser’s oscillation theorem. To confirm the results, we analytically solved the wave equation evaluated at the cutoff point and the original wave equation for particular cases of transverse density distribution. We also used the WKB method and obtained approximate solutions of the wave equation at the cutoff point for an arbitrary transverse density profile. The analytic results were supplemented by numerical solutions of the obtained dispersion relations. The observed high-quality quasi-periodic pulsations of flaring loops are interpreted in terms of the trapped fundamental fast-sausage mode in a slab-like coronal waveguide.

  9. Implementing slab solar water heating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raveendran, S. K.; Shen, C. Q.

    2015-08-01

    Water heating contributes a significant part of energy consumption in typical household. One of the most employed technologies today that helps in reducing the energy consumption of water heating would be conventional solar water heating system. However, this system is expensive and less affordable by most family. The main objective of this project is to design and implement an alternative type of solar water heating system that utilize only passive solar energy which is known as slab solar water heating system. Slab solar water heating system is a system that heat up cold water using the solar radiance from the sun. The unique part of this system is that it does not require any form of electricity in order to operate. Solar radiance is converted into heat energy through convection method and cold water will be heated up by using conduction method [1]. The design of this system is governed by the criteria of low implementation cost and energy saving. Selection of material in the construction of a slab solar water heating system is important as it will directly affect the efficiency and performance of the system. A prototype has been built to realize the idea and it had been proven that this system was able to provide sufficient hot water supply for typical household usage at any given time.

  10. Convection in Slab and Spheroidal Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, David H.; Woodward, Paul R.; Jacobs, Michael L.

    2000-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of compressible turbulent thermally driven convection, in both slab and spheroidal geometries, are reviewed and analyzed in terms of velocity spectra and mixing-length theory. The same ideal gas model is used in both geometries, and resulting flows are compared. The piecewise-parabolic method (PPM), with either thermal conductivity or photospheric boundary conditions, is used to solve the fluid equations of motion. Fluid motions in both geometries exhibit a Kolmogorov-like k(sup -5/3) range in their velocity spectra. The longest wavelength modes are energetically dominant in both geometries, typically leading to one convection cell dominating the flow. In spheroidal geometry, a dipolar flow dominates the largest scale convective motions. Downflows are intensely turbulent and up drafts are relatively laminar in both geometries. In slab geometry, correlations between temperature and velocity fluctuations, which lead to the enthalpy flux, are fairly independent of depth. In spheroidal geometry this same correlation increases linearly with radius over the inner 70 percent by radius, in which the local pressure scale heights are a sizable fraction of the radius. The effects from the impenetrable boundary conditions in the slab geometry models are confused with the effects from non-local convection. In spheroidal geometry nonlocal effects, due to coherent plumes, are seen as far as several pressure scale heights from the lower boundary and are clearly distinguishable from boundary effects.

  11. High-resolution hydrodynamic chromatographic separation of large DNA using narrow, bare open capillaries: a rapid and economical alternative technology to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis?

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Veerappan, Vijaykumar; Pu, Qiaosheng; Cheng, Chang; Wang, Xiayan; Lu, Liping; Allen, Randy D; Guo, Guangsheng

    2014-01-01

    A high-resolution, rapid, and economical hydrodynamic chromatographic (HDC) method for large DNA separations in free solution was developed using narrow (5 μm diameter), bare open capillaries. Size-based separation was achieved in a chromatographic format with larger DNA molecules being eluting faster than smaller ones. Lambda DNA Mono Cut Mix was baseline-separated with the percentage resolutions generally less than 9.0% for all DNA fragments (1.5 to 48.5 kbp) tested in this work. High efficiencies were achieved for large DNA from this chromatographic technique, and the number of theoretical plates reached 3.6 × 10(5) plates for the longest (48.5 kbp) and 3.7 × 10(5) plates for the shortest (1.5 kbp) fragments. HDC parameters and performances were also discussed. The method was further applied for fractionating large DNA fragments from real-world samples (SacII digested Arabidopsis plant bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) DNA and PmeI digested Rice BAC DNA) to demonstrate its feasibility for BAC DNA finger printing. Rapid separation of PmeI digested Rice BAC DNA covering from 0.44 to 119.041 kbp was achieved in less than 26 min. All DNA fragments of these samples were baseline separated in narrow bare open capillaries, while the smallest fragment (0.44 kbp) was missing in pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) separation mode. It is demonstrated that narrow bare open capillary chromatography can realize a rapid separation for a wide size range of DNA mixtures that contain both small and large DNA fragments in a single run. PMID:24274685

  12. Genetic Diversity of Clostridium sporogenes PA 3679 Isolates Obtained from Different Sources as Resolved by Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis and High-Throughput Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yun; Butler, Robert R.; Reddy, N. Rukma; Skinner, Guy E.; Larkin, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium sporogenes PA 3679 is a nonpathogenic, nontoxic model organism for proteolytic Clostridium botulinum used in the validation of conventional thermal food processes due to its ability to produce highly heat-resistant endospores. Because of its public safety importance, the uncertain taxonomic classification and genetic diversity of PA 3679 are concerns. Therefore, isolates of C. sporogenes PA 3679 were obtained from various sources and characterized using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and whole-genome sequencing. The phylogenetic relatedness and genetic variability were assessed based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing and whole-genome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. All C. sporogenes PA 3679 isolates were categorized into two clades (clade I containing ATCC 7955 NCA3679 isolates 1961-2, 1990, and 2007 and clade II containing PA 3679 isolates NFL, UW, FDA, and Campbell and ATCC 7955 NCA3679 isolate 1961-4). The 16S maximum likelihood (ML) tree clustered both clades within proteolytic C. botulinum strains, with clade I forming a distinct cluster with other C. sporogenes non-PA 3679 strains. SNP analysis revealed that clade I isolates were more similar to the genomic reference PA 3679 (NCTC8594) genome (GenBank accession number AGAH00000000.1) than clade II isolates were. The genomic reference C. sporogenes PA 3679 (NCTC8594) genome and clade I C. sporogenes isolates were genetically distinct from those obtained from other sources (University of Wisconsin, National Food Laboratory, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and Campbell's Soup Company). Thermal destruction studies revealed that clade I isolates were more sensitive to high temperature than clade II isolates were. Considering the widespread use of C. sporogenes PA 3679 and its genetic information in numerous studies, the accurate identification and genetic characterization of C. sporogenes PA 3679 are of critical importance. PMID:26519392

  13. Diversity of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pulsotypes, serovars, and antibiotic resistance among Salmonella isolates from wild amphibians and reptiles in the California Central Coast.

    PubMed

    Gorski, Lisa; Jay-Russell, Michele T; Liang, Anita S; Walker, Samarpita; Bengson, Yingjia; Govoni, Jessica; Mandrell, Robert E

    2013-06-01

    A survey of cold-blooded vertebrates and associated surface waters in a produce-growing region on the Central California Coast was done between May and September 2011 to determine the diversity of Salmonella. Samples from 460 amphibians and reptiles and 119 water samples were collected and cultured for Salmonella. Animals sampled were frogs (n=331), lizards (n=59), newts (n=5), salamanders (n=6), snakes (n=39), and toads (n=20). Salmonella was isolated from 37 individual animals, including frogs, lizards, snakes, and toads. Snakes were the most likely to contain Salmonella, with 59% testing positive followed by 15.3% of lizards, 5% of toads, and 1.2% of frogs. Fifteen water samples (12.6%) were positive. Twenty-two different serovars were identified, and the majority of isolates were S. enterica subsp. IIIb, with subsp. I, II, and IIIa also found. The serovar isolated most frequently was S. enterica subsp. IIIb 16:z₁₀:e,n,x,z₁₅, from snakes and frogs in five different locations. S. enterica subsp. I serovar Typhimurium and the monophasic I 6,8:d:- were isolated from water, and subspecies I Duisburg and its variants were found in animals and water. Some samples contained more than one type of Salmonella. Analysis of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pulsotypes indicated that some strains persisted in animals and water collected from the same location. Sixty-six isolates displayed antibiotic resistance, with 27 isolates resistant to more than one antibiotic, including a subspecies IIIb isolate from snake having resistance to five different antibiotics. Twenty-three isolates were resistant to more than one class of antibiotic, and six isolates were resistant to three classes. While these subspecies of IIIa and IIIb cause fewer instances of human illness, they may serve as reservoirs of antibiotic resistance, determinants in the environment, and be sources of contamination of leafy greens associated with product recalls. PMID:23577627

  14. Simultaneous analysis of multiple enzymes increases accuracy of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis in assigning genetic relationships among homogeneous Salmonella strains.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jie; Keys, Christine E; Zhao, Shaohua; Ahmed, Rafiq; Meng, Jianghong; Brown, Eric W

    2011-01-01

    Due to a highly homogeneous genetic composition, the subtyping of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis strains to an epidemiologically relevant level remains intangible for pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). We reported previously on a highly discriminatory PFGE-based subtyping scheme for S. enterica serovar Enteritidis that relies on a single combined cluster analysis of multiple restriction enzymes. However, the ability of a subtyping method to correctly infer genetic relatedness among outbreak strains is also essential for effective molecular epidemiological traceback. In this study, genetic and phylogenetic analyses were performed to assess whether concatenated enzyme methods can cluster closely related salmonellae into epidemiologically relevant hierarchies. PFGE profiles were generated by use of six restriction enzymes (XbaI, BlnI, SpeI, SfiI, PacI, and NotI) for 74 strains each of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis and S. enterica serovar Typhimurium. Correlation analysis of Dice similarity coefficients for all pairwise strain comparisons underscored the importance of combining multiple enzymes for the accurate assignment of genetic relatedness among Salmonella strains. The mean correlation increased from 81% and 41% for single-enzyme PFGE up to 99% and 96% for five-enzyme combined PFGE for S. enterica serovar Enteritidis and S. enterica serovar Typhimurium strains, respectively. Data regressions approached 100% correlation among Dice similarities for S. enterica serovar Enteritidis and S. enterica serovar Typhimurium strains when a minimum of six enzymes were concatenated. Phylogenetic congruence measures singled out XbaI, BlnI, SfiI, and PacI as most concordant for S. enterica serovar Enteritidis, while XbaI, BlnI, and SpeI were most concordant among S. enterica serovar Typhimurium strains. Together, these data indicate that PFGE coupled with sufficient enzyme numbers and combinations is capable of discerning accurate genetic relationships among

  15. Genetic Diversity of Clostridium sporogenes PA 3679 Isolates Obtained from Different Sources as Resolved by Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis and High-Throughput Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Schill, Kristin M; Wang, Yun; Butler, Robert R; Pombert, Jean-François; Reddy, N Rukma; Skinner, Guy E; Larkin, John W

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium sporogenes PA 3679 is a nonpathogenic, nontoxic model organism for proteolytic Clostridium botulinum used in the validation of conventional thermal food processes due to its ability to produce highly heat-resistant endospores. Because of its public safety importance, the uncertain taxonomic classification and genetic diversity of PA 3679 are concerns. Therefore, isolates of C. sporogenes PA 3679 were obtained from various sources and characterized using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and whole-genome sequencing. The phylogenetic relatedness and genetic variability were assessed based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing and whole-genome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. All C. sporogenes PA 3679 isolates were categorized into two clades (clade I containing ATCC 7955 NCA3679 isolates 1961-2, 1990, and 2007 and clade II containing PA 3679 isolates NFL, UW, FDA, and Campbell and ATCC 7955 NCA3679 isolate 1961-4). The 16S maximum likelihood (ML) tree clustered both clades within proteolytic C. botulinum strains, with clade I forming a distinct cluster with other C. sporogenes non-PA 3679 strains. SNP analysis revealed that clade I isolates were more similar to the genomic reference PA 3679 (NCTC8594) genome (GenBank accession number AGAH00000000.1) than clade II isolates were. The genomic reference C. sporogenes PA 3679 (NCTC8594) genome and clade I C. sporogenes isolates were genetically distinct from those obtained from other sources (University of Wisconsin, National Food Laboratory, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and Campbell's Soup Company). Thermal destruction studies revealed that clade I isolates were more sensitive to high temperature than clade II isolates were. Considering the widespread use of C. sporogenes PA 3679 and its genetic information in numerous studies, the accurate identification and genetic characterization of C. sporogenes PA 3679 are of critical importance. PMID:26519392

  16. Sol–gel composite material characteristics caused by different dielectric constant sol–gel phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimoto, Keisuke; Matsumoto, Makoto; Kaneko, Tsukasa; Kobayashi, Makiko

    2016-07-01

    Ultrasonic transducers prepared by a sol–gel composite method have been investigated in the field of nondestructive testing (NDT). Sol–gel composite materials could be ideal piezoelectric materials for ultrasonic transducer applications in the NDT field, and a new sol–gel composite with desirable characteristics has been developed. Three kinds of sol–gel composite materials composed of different dielectric constant sol–gel phases, Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT), Bi4Ti3O12 (BiT), and BaTiO3 (BT), and the same piezoelectric powder phase, PbTiO3 (PT), were fabricated and their properties were compared quantitatively. As a result, the PT/BT, sol–gel composite with the highest dielectric constant sol–gel phase showed the highest d 33 and signal strength. In addition, only PT/BT was successfully poled by room-temperature corona poling with reasonable signal strength.

  17. Causes for the Onset and Stability of Flat Slabs and Associated Overriding Plate Deformation Inferred from Numerical Thermo-Mechanical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, R. V. S.; Lowry, A. R.; Buiter, S. J.; Ellis, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Flat slab subduction comprises only ~10% of the present-day subduction systems. We systematically explore flat-slab subduction and over-riding plate deformation due to previously recognized factors (including a weak mantle wedge, a buoyant oceanic plateau/ridge, slab-age, presence of thick cratonic upper plate), as well as additional factors not considered before (transient plate-velocity variations, and the presence of stagnant slabs at the mantle transition zone). We use a visco-elasto-plastic code, SULEC (Buiter & Ellis, 2012), restrict ourselves to 2D models, and ignore phase transformations. We model a 6000 km by 1500 km domain with 1-10 km variable grid spacing using up-to-date laboratory-derived constitutive laws, and explore the effects of: (a) lateral/vertical structure of the crust and lithosphere (e.g., continental lithosphere with/without a craton; oceanic lithosphere with thickness governed by plate cooling, and a harzburgite layer); (b) a true free upper-surface to predict surface topography; and (c) only far-field (boundary) velocities driving plates, with trench-velocity depending on over-riding plate deformation and slab pull. As in previous studies, we find that positive trench-retreat velocity and weak integrated slab-strength (as measured by differential stress) are necessary, but not sufficient, conditions for flat-slab subduction. While mantle-wedge suction associated with the presence of a craton does promote flat slab subduction, models without a craton also produce flat-slabs when (a) trench-retreat velocities are large and (b) either the slab is positively (structurally or thermally) buoyant or there is an underlying slab at the mantle transition zone. In our models, the duration of flat slab subduction depends on overall slab buoyancy. Younger oceanic lithosphere, esp. if it contains a plateau/ridge, provides a longer-lasting flat-slab (~ 10 Myr or longer, e.g., central Mexico), while older slabs with oceanic ridge/plateau (e.g., Peru

  18. Laser-excited confocal-fluorescence gel scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Mathies, R.A.; Scherer, J.R.; Quesada, M.A. ); Rye, H.S.; Glazer, A.N. )

    1994-04-01

    A high-sensitivity, laser-excited, confocal-fluorescence scanner has been developed for the detection of fluorescently labeled nucleic acids separated on slab gels. The gel is placed on a motor-driven, two-dimensional scan stage and raster scanned past the optical detection system. The 488-nm argon ion laser beam is introduced into the confocal optical system at a long-pass dichroic beam splitter and focused within the gel to an [similar to]2 [mu]m diameter spot by a high-numerical aperture microscope objective. The resulting fluorescence is gathered by the objective, passed back through the first long-pass beam splitter, and relayed to a second dichroic beam splitter that separates the red and green emissions. The fluorescence is then focused on confocal spatial filters to reduce stray and scattered light, passed through spectral filters, and detected with photomultipliers. The resulting signals are amplified, filtered, and digitized for display on a computer. This system can detect as little as 5[times]10[sup [minus]12] M fluorescein, the resolution as operated is 160 [mu]m, and it can scan a 6 cm[times]6 cm gel using a scan rate of 4 cm/s in 12 min. The detection of DNA on slab gels, two-color DNA fragment sizing, and microtiter plate scanning are presented to illustrate some of the possible applications of this apparatus.

  19. Viscous Dissipation and Criticality of Subducting Slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, Mike; Karato, Shun; Yuen, Dave

    2016-04-01

    Rheology of subducting lithosphere appears to be complicated. In the shallow part, deformation is largely accomodated by brittle failure, whereas at greater depth, at higher confining pressures, ductile creep is expected to control slab strength. The amount of viscous dissipation ΔQ during subduction at greater depth, as constrained by experimental rock mechanics, can be estimated on the basis of a simple bending moment equation [1,2] 2ɛ˙0(z) ∫ +h/2 2 M (z) = h ṡ ‑h/2 4μ(y,z)y dy , (1) for a complex multi-phase rheology in the mantle transition zone, including the effects of a metastable phase transition as well as the pressure, temperature, grain-size and stress dependency of the relevant creep mechanisms; μ is here the effective viscosity and ɛ˙0(z) is a (reference) strain rate. Numerical analysis shows that the maximum bending moment, Mcrit, that can be sustained by a slab is of the order of 1019 Nm per m according to Mcrit˜=σp ∗h2/4, where σp is the Peierl's stress limit of slab materials and h is the slab thickness. Near Mcrit, the amount of viscous dissipation grows strongly as a consequence of a lattice instability of mantle minerals (dislocation glide in olivine), suggesting that thermo-mechanical instabilities become prone to occur at places where a critical shear-heating rate is exceeded, see figure. This implies that the lithosphere behaves in such cases like a perfectly plastic solid [3]. Recently available detailed data related to deep seismicity [4,5] seems to provide support to our conclusion. It shows, e.g., that thermal shear instabilities, and not transformational faulting, is likely the dominating mechanism for deep-focus earthquakes at the bottom of the transition zone, in accordance with this suggested "deep criticality" model. These new findings are therefore briefly outlined and possible implications are discussed. References [1] Riedel, M. R., Karato, S., Yuen, D. A. Criticality of Subducting Slabs. University of Minnesota

  20. Dynamic buckling of subducting slabs reconciles geological and geophysical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Changyeol; King, Scott D.

    2011-12-01

    Ever since the early days of the development of plate tectonic theory, subduction zones have been engrained in geological thinking as the place where steady, linear slabs descend into the mantle at a constant, uniform dip angle beneath volcanic arcs. However, growing evidence from geological and geophysical observations as well as analog and numerical modeling indicates that subducting slabs buckle in a time-dependent manner, in contrast to the steady-state, linear cartoons that dominate the literature. To evaluate the implication of time-dependent slab buckling of geological events, we conduct a series of 2-D numerical dynamic/kinematic subduction experiments by varying the viscosity increase across the 660 km discontinuity and the strength of the subducting slab. Our results show that slab buckling is a universal figure in all the experiments when rate of the trench migration ( Vtrench) is relatively slow ( Vtrench| < 2 cm/a) and viscosity increases across the 660 km discontinuity are greater than a factor of 30. Slab buckling is expressed as alternate shallowing and steepening dip of the subducting slab (from ~ 40 to ~ 100°) which is correlated with increasing and decreasing convergent rate of the incoming oceanic plate toward the trench. Further, the slab buckling in our experiments is consistent with the previously developed scaling laws for slab buckling; using reasonable parameters from subducted slabs the buckling amplitude and period are ~ 400 km and ~ 25 Myr, respectively. The slab buckling behavior in our experiments explains a variety of puzzling geological and geophysical observations. First, the period of slab buckling is consistent with short periodic variations (~ 25 Myr) in the motions of the oceanic plates that are anchored by subduction zones. Second, the scattered distributions of slab dips (from ~ 20 to ~ 90°) in the upper mantle are snapshots of time-dependent slab dip. Third, the current compressional and extensional stress environments in

  1. Along-strike translation of a fossil slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikser, Jacob E.; Forsyth, Donald W.; Hirth, Greg

    2012-05-01

    The Isabella anomaly is a high seismic velocity anomaly beneath the southern Central Valley of California that has previously been interpreted to represent a lithospheric drip or delaminated Sierra Nevada root. However, recent work suggests that the anomaly is a remnant slab, left over from Cenozoic subduction, attached to the Pacific plate underneath the edge of the North American plate. This hypothesis requires the slab to translate hundreds of kilometers along-strike while remaining intact and attached to the Pacific plate despite drag from the surrounding asthenosphere and overriding lithosphere. We use 3-D finite element models to simulate this scenario, and calculate the viscosity ratio between the slab and the surrounding asthenosphere required for the slab to translate undeformed. The required viscosity ratio increases with increasing downdip extent of the slab, and decreases with increasing slab dip; for geometries approximating that of our proposed slab, the required ratio ranges from 102 to 104. Given the thermal and petrologic history of the slab, mantle flow laws predict viscosity contrasts greater than or equal to these requirements. As such, we conclude that along-strike translation of a remnant slab is feasible, and serves as a possible explanation of the Isabella anomaly. The significance of this finding extends beyond our general understanding of subduction dynamics, in that the presence of such a slab could have implications for the water budget of the San Andreas Fault and its role in aseismic slip.

  2. Buoyancy, bending, and seismic visibility in deep slab stagnation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bina, Craig R.; Kawakatsu, Hitoshi; Suetsugu, D.; Bina, C.; Inoue, T.; Wiens, D.; Jellinek, M.

    2010-11-01

    The petrological consequences of deep subhorizontal deflection ("stagnation") of subducting slabs should affect both apparent seismic velocity structures and slab morphology. We construct kinematic thermal models of stagnant slabs and perform thermodynamic modeling of the consequent perturbation of high-pressure phase transitions in mantle minerals, focusing upon Japan as our study area. We calculate associated thermo-petrological buoyancy forces and bending moments which (along with other factors such as viscosity variations and rollback dynamics) may contribute to slab deformation. We consider effects of variations in depth of stagnation, post-stagnation dip angle, phase transition sharpness, transition triplication due to multiple intersection of geotherms with phase boundaries, and potential persistence of metastable phases due to kinetic hindrance. We also estimate seismic velocity anomalies, as might be imaged by seismic tomography, and corresponding seismic velocity gradients, as might be imaged by receiver-function analysis. We find that buoyant bending moment gradients of petrological origin at the base of the transition zone may contribute to slab stagnation. Such buoyancy forces vary with the depth at which stagnation occurs, so that slabs may seek an equilibrium slab stagnation depth. Metastable phase bending moment gradients further enhance slab stagnation, but they thermally decay after ∱/4600•700 km of horizontal travel, potentially allowing stagnant slabs to descend into the lower mantle. Stagnant slabs superimpose zones of negative velocity gradient onto a depressed 660-km seismic discontinuity, affecting the seismological visibility of such features. Seismologically resolvable details should depend upon both stagnation depth and the nature of the imaging technique (travel-time tomography vs. boundary-interaction phases). While seismic tomography appears to yield images of stagnant slabs, discontinuity topography beneath Japan resolved by

  3. Evolution and diversity of subduction zones controlled by slab width.

    PubMed

    Schellart, W P; Freeman, J; Stegman, D R; Moresi, L; May, D

    2007-03-15

    Subducting slabs provide the main driving force for plate motion and flow in the Earth's mantle, and geodynamic, seismic and geochemical studies offer insight into slab dynamics and subduction-induced flow. Most previous geodynamic studies treat subduction zones as either infinite in trench-parallel extent (that is, two-dimensional) or finite in width but fixed in space. Subduction zones and their associated slabs are, however, limited in lateral extent (250-7,400 km) and their three-dimensional geometry evolves over time. Here we show that slab width controls two first-order features of plate tectonics-the curvature of subduction zones and their tendency to retreat backwards with time. Using three-dimensional numerical simulations of free subduction, we show that trench migration rate is inversely related to slab width and depends on proximity to a lateral slab edge. These results are consistent with retreat velocities observed globally, with maximum velocities (6-16 cm yr(-1)) only observed close to slab edges (<1,200 km), whereas far from edges (>2,000 km) retreat velocities are always slow (<2.0 cm yr(-1)). Models with narrow slabs (< or =1,500 km) retreat fast and develop a curved geometry, concave towards the mantle wedge side. Models with slabs intermediate in width ( approximately 2,000-3,000 km) are sublinear and retreat more slowly. Models with wide slabs (> or =4,000 km) are nearly stationary in the centre and develop a convex geometry, whereas trench retreat increases towards concave-shaped edges. Additionally, we identify periods (5-10 Myr) of slow trench advance at the centre of wide slabs. Such wide-slab behaviour may explain mountain building in the central Andes, as being a consequence of its tectonic setting, far from slab edges. PMID:17361181

  4. Tectonic controls on earthquake size distribution and seismicity rate: slab buoyancy and slab bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, T.; Ide, S.

    2014-12-01

    There are clear variations in maximum earthquake magnitude among Earth's subduction zones. These variations have been studied extensively and attributed to differences in tectonic properties in subduction zones, such as relative plate velocity and subducting plate age [Ruff and Kanamori, 1980]. In addition to maximum earthquake magnitude, the seismicity of medium to large earthquakes also differs among subduction zones, such as the b-value (i.e., the slope of the earthquake size distribution) and the frequency of seismic events. However, the casual relationship between the seismicity of medium to large earthquakes and subduction zone tectonics has been unclear. Here we divide Earth's subduction zones into over 100 study regions following Ide [2013] and estimate b-values and the background seismicity rate—the frequency of seismic events excluding aftershocks—for subduction zones worldwide using the maximum likelihood method [Utsu, 1965; Aki, 1965] and the epidemic type aftershock sequence (ETAS) model [Ogata, 1988]. We demonstrate that the b-value varies as a function of subducting plate age and trench depth, and that the background seismicity rate is related to the degree of slab bending at the trench. Large earthquakes tend to occur relatively frequently (lower b-values) in shallower subduction zones with younger slabs, and more earthquakes occur in subduction zones with deeper trench and steeper dip angle. These results suggest that slab buoyancy, which depends on subducting plate age, controls the earthquake size distribution, and that intra-slab faults due to slab bending, which increase with the steepness of the slab dip angle, have influence on the frequency of seismic events, because they produce heterogeneity in plate coupling and efficiently inject fluid to elevate pore fluid pressure on the plate interface. This study reveals tectonic factors that control earthquake size distribution and seismicity rate, and these relationships between seismicity and

  5. Phase and thickness control of optical bistability and multistability in a defect slab with a single layer of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadpour, Seyyed Hossein; Rahimpour Soleimani, H.

    2016-01-01

    In this letter, controllable optical bistability (OB) and optical multistability (OM) in a defect slab doped with a single-layer graphene nanostructure are proposed. Our numerical results show that it is easy to control OB by Rabi frequencies of coupling fields, detuning of coherent fields, and relative phase of applied fields. Moreover, the thickness effect of the slab is considered as a new parameter for controlling the OB behaviors. It is found that the transition from OB to OM or vice versa can be made possible by the thickness of the slab and relative phase of the applied fields. We hope that our results will have potential applications in quantum information science and technology based nanoscale devices.

  6. Ionic liquid based multifunctional double network gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Kumkum; Higashihara, Tomoya; Arafune, Hiroyuki; Kamijo, Toshio; Morinaga, Takashi; Sato, Takaya; Furukawa, Hidemitsu

    2015-04-01

    Gels are a promising class of soft and wet materials with diverse application in tissue engineering and bio-medical purpose. In order to accelerate the development of gels, it is required to synthesize multi-functional gels of high mechanical strength, ultra low surface friction and suitable elastic modulus with a variety of methods and new materials. Among many types of gel ionic gel made from ionic liquids (ILs) could be used for diverse applications in electrochemical devices and in the field of tribology. IL, a promising materials for lubrication, is a salt with a melting point lower than 100 °C. As a lubricant, ILs are characterized by an extremely low vapor pressure, high thermal stability and high ion conductivity. In this work a novel approach of making double network DN ionic gel using IL has been made utilizing photo polymerization process. A hydrophobic monomer Methyl methacrylate (MMA) has been used as a first network and a hydrophobic IL monomer, N,N-diethyl-N-(2-mthacryloylethyl)-N-methylammonium bistrifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (DEMM-TFSI) has been used as a second network using photo initiator benzophenon and crosslinker triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA). The resulting DN ionic gel shows transparency, flexibility, high thermal stability, good mechanical toughness and low friction coefficient value which can be a potential candidate as a gel slider in different mechanical devices and can open a new area in the field of gel tribology.

  7. Fundamentals of gel dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAuley, K. B.; Nasr, A. T.

    2013-06-01

    Fundamental chemical and physical phenomena that occur in Fricke gel dosimeters, polymer gel dosimeters, micelle gel dosimeters and genipin gel dosimeters are discussed. Fricke gel dosimeters are effective even though their radiation sensitivity depends on oxygen concentration. Oxygen contamination can cause severe problems in polymer gel dosimeters, even when THPC is used. Oxygen leakage must be prevented between manufacturing and irradiation of polymer gels, and internal calibration methods should be used so that contamination problems can be detected. Micelle gel dosimeters are promising due to their favourable diffusion properties. The introduction of micelles to gel dosimetry may open up new areas of dosimetry research wherein a range of water-insoluble radiochromic materials can be explored as reporter molecules.

  8. A numerical study of the interaction between the mantle wedge, subducting slab, and overriding plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberle, Michael A.; Grasset, Olivier; Sotin, Christophe

    2002-12-01

    We have formulated a numerical model with strongly temperature-dependent viscosity to calculate thermal structure and flow-field in subduction zones. One important particularity of the model is that the overriding plate is not fixed over its whole thickness in order to allow material exchange between the wedge and the upper lithosphere. Numerical problems due to very high-viscosity contrasts are avoided by coupling a finite difference method and a finite element method for solving the energy conservation equation and the Stockes equation, respectively. In this model, a temperature decrease from 1400 to 1300 °C increases the viscosity by an order of magnitude. We study the temperature structure and the velocity field of the subducting slab and mantle wedge. Surface heat flow, velocity anomalies, and geometry of the partial melting zone are also calculated. To study the effect that boundary conditions play on the interaction between the mantle wedge, overriding plate and subducting plate, we examine models with both fixed and free-slip conditions applied to the overriding plate. When the overriding plate is allowed to move laterally (free-slip), the subducting slab is thick, and both the temperature field and the convective motions in the mantle wedge are similar to those observed when using constant viscosity numerical models or analytical corner flow models. If the surface of the overriding plate is fixed, the subducting slab is thin and the mantle wedge impinges upon the overriding plate forming a high-temperature nose between the overriding plate and subducting lithosphere. Furthermore, viscous decoupling occurs implicitly at shallow depth between the slab and the wedge because hot material from the wedge is entrained close to the trench. In that case, the subducting slab tectonically erodes the lower lithosphere of the overriding plate leading to high-temperatures, low seismic velocities, high attenuation and high heat flow beneath volcanic arc, in agreement

  9. Molecular characterization of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis isolates from humans by antimicrobial resistance, virulence genes, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Zou, Ming; Keelara, Shivaramu; Thakur, Siddhartha

    2012-03-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is a major serovar associated with human salmonellosis. A total of 425 clinical S. Enteritidis isolates of human origin were collected between June 2009 and September 2010 from North Carolina. The isolates were further characterized for antimicrobial susceptibility, antimicrobial resistance coding determinants, virulence genes, and fingerprint profiles to determine whether they were similar or different to the S. Enteritidis strain responsible for the human outbreak due to consumption of contaminated eggs. Ten different antimicrobial resistance phenotypes were observed with the highest frequency of resistance exhibited to ampicillin (n=10; 2.35%). The isolates were predominantly pansusceptible (n=409; 96.23%); however, seven isolates were multidrug resistant (MDR; i.e., resistant to three or more antimicrobials). Extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) coding genes (bla(TEM) and bla(PSE)) were detected in the ampicillin-resistant isolates, whereas a single MDR isolate tested positive for class 1 integron (1 kb). The majority of the isolates (n=422; 99.3%) carried the invA, mgtC, stn, sopB, sopE1, and sefA virulence genes. However, 37 (8.7%) and 46 (10.82%) S. Enteritidis isolates tested negative for the plasmid encoded genes spvC and rck, respectively. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing of 118 S. Enteritidis isolates by restriction enzymes XbaI and BlnI resulted in seven clusters, each with a discriminatory index (DI) of 0.715 and 0.785, respectively. The combination of XbaI-BlnI patterns generated a dendrogram with 14 clusters and a higher DI of 0.914. The PFGE profile of 80 isolates matched 100% with the S. Enteritidis strain that has been cited for the recent outbreak in the United States due to consumption of contaminated eggs. In conclusion, we identified a genotypic similar S. Enteritidis population in our study based on antimicrobial susceptibility, virulence gene, and PFGE fingerprint

  10. Salmonella enterica Subclinical Infection: Bacteriological, Serological, Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis, and Antimicrobial Resistance Profiles—Longitudinal Study in a Three-Site Farrow-to-Finish Farm

    PubMed Central

    Vigo, German B.; Cappuccio, Javier A.; Salve, Angela; Machuca, Mariana A.; Quiroga, Maria A.; Moredo, Fabiana; Giacoboni, Gabriel; Cancer, Jose L.; Caffer, Ines G.; Binsztein, Norma; Pichel, Mariana; Perfumo, Carlos J.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this surveillance was to study both Salmonella spp. shedding patterns and the time course of serological response in farrow-to-finish reared pigs from a subclinically infected farm. Antimicrobial resistance profile, molecular subtyping, and the relationship among the isolates were determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). A farrow-to-finish farm of 6000 sows, with a history of Salmonella Typhimurium septicemia, was selected. A longitudinal bacteriological and serological study was conducted in 25 sows before farrowing (M/S1) and in 50 offspring at 21 (M/S2), 35 (M/S3), 65 (M/S4), 86 (M/S5), 128 (M/S6), and 165 (M/S7) days of age. Serum antibodies were tested using Herdcheck® Swine Salmonella antibody test kit (Idexx Laboratories, ME). Bacteria were isolated from pooled fecal samples. Suspected isolates were confirmed by conventional biochemical assays, and those identified as Salmonella spp. were serotyped. A variation between seropositive percentages and positive fecal samples was observed. Serologically positive pigs decreased from S1 to S4, and subsequently increased from S4 to S7. The percentages of fecal positive culture increased from M1 to M3, and then declined in M4, increased in M5, and were negative in M6 and M7. In the study three serovars, Salmonella 3,10:e,h:-, Salmonella Muenster, and Salmonella Bovismorbificans, were identified with low pathogenicity for swine. Three multidrug resistance strains (one belonged to Salmonella 3,10:e,h:- and two belonged to Salmonella Muenster) were found. PFGE results showed three different but closely related patterns among the 13 isolates of Salmonella Bovismorbificans, and two patterns for the three Salmonella Muenster and Salmonella 3,10:e,h:- isolates. This longitudinal study established critical points of Salmonella spp. infection in the farm and the production stages, where appropriate control measures must be taken. PFGE showed clonal relationships in each serovar. Antibiotic

  11. Analysis of pulsed field gel electrophoresis profiles using multiple enzymes for predicting potential source reservoirs for strains of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium isolated from humans.

    PubMed

    Son, Insook; Zheng, Jie; Keys, Christine E; Zhao, Shaohua; Meng, Jianghong; Brown, Eric W

    2013-06-01

    We reported previously on a highly discriminatory pulsed field gel electrophoresis-based (PFGE) subtyping scheme for Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) and Salmonella Typhimurium (ST) that relies on combined cluster analysis of up to six restriction enzymes. This approach allowed for the high-resolution separation of numerous poultry-derived SE and ST isolates into several distinct clusters that sorted along several geographical and host-linked boundaries. In this study, 101 SE and 151 ST strains isolated from poultry, swine, beef, mouse, and produce origins were combined with 62 human SE and ST isolates of unknown sources. PFGE profiles were generated across six restriction enzymes (XbaI, BlnI, SpeI, SfiI, PacI, and NotI) for human SE and ST isolates. The combined six-enzyme UPGMA trees of SE and ST revealed six separate origins of North American human SE isolates including one association with a "cosmopolitan" cluster of SEs from poultry originating in Scotland, Mexico, and China. In the case of ST, human isolates assorted readily along host lines rather than geographical partitions with the majority of human STs clustering in a larger group of STs of potential porcine origin. Such observations may underscore the ecological importance of poultry and pork reservoirs for SE and ST transmission to humans, respectively. In an examination of the relationship between enzyme diversity and congruence among enzymes, pairwise genetic diversity ranged from 6.5% to 9.7% for SE isolates and, more widely, from 17.5% to 27.4% for ST isolates. Phylogenetic congruence measures singled out XbaI, BlnI, and SfiI as most concordant for SE while XbaI and SfiI were most concordant among ST strains. Thus, these data provide the first proof of principal for concatenated PFGE, when coupled with sufficient enzyme numbers and combinations, as one effective means for predicting geographical and food source reservoirs for human isolates of these two highly prevalent Salmonella

  12. Numerical quadrature for slab geometry transport algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Hennart, J.P.; Valle, E. del

    1995-12-31

    In recent papers, a generalized nodal finite element formalism has been presented for virtually all known linear finite difference approximations to the discrete ordinates equations in slab geometry. For a particular angular directions {mu}, the neutron flux {Phi} is approximated by a piecewise function Oh, which over each space interval can be polynomial or quasipolynomial. Here we shall restrict ourselves to the polynomial case. Over each space interval, {Phi} is a polynomial of degree k, interpolating parameters given by in the continuous and discontinuous cases, respectively. The angular flux at the left and right ends and the k`th Legendre moment of {Phi} over the cell considered are represented as.

  13. Automated inspection of hot steel slabs

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Ronald J.

    1985-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a real time digital image enhancement system for performing the image enhancement segmentation processing required for a real time automated system for detecting and classifying surface imperfections in hot steel slabs. The system provides for simultaneous execution of edge detection processing and intensity threshold processing in parallel on the same image data produced by a sensor device such as a scanning camera. The results of each process are utilized to validate the results of the other process and a resulting image is generated that contains only corresponding segmentation that is produced by both processes.

  14. Automated inspection of hot steel slabs

    DOEpatents

    Martin, R.J.

    1985-12-24

    The disclosure relates to a real time digital image enhancement system for performing the image enhancement segmentation processing required for a real time automated system for detecting and classifying surface imperfections in hot steel slabs. The system provides for simultaneous execution of edge detection processing and intensity threshold processing in parallel on the same image data produced by a sensor device such as a scanning camera. The results of each process are utilized to validate the results of the other process and a resulting image is generated that contains only corresponding segmentation that is produced by both processes. 5 figs.

  15. Slab Driven Plate Motions and Three-dimensional Mantle Flow Pathways in the Central American Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadamec, M. A.; Fischer, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    We present a series of three-dimensional (3D), high-resolution, end-member tectonic configurations of the Central American plate system and use these to solve for the 3D viscous mantle flow and surface plate motions. The 3D geodynamic models test the relative control of the viscosity structure (Newtonian versus Composite), subducting plate geometry (continuous slab versus Cocos-Nazca slab gap), and overriding plate thickness (uniform versus laterally variable) on the predicted motion of the Cocos and Nazca plates and the slab-induced 3D flow field in the upper mantle. Models using the composite viscosity formulation result in increased surface plate motions, which better fit the observed motion of the Cocos and Nazca plates. This is particularly significant because these 3D regional models contain the entire Cocos plate, suggesting the importance of the non-linear rheology in models that aim to predict surface plate motions. Faster flow velocities occur in models using the composite viscosity due to the decreased resistance to subduction and reduced viscous support of the slab as the mantle surrounding the slab undergoes non-linear weakening. A zone of partial decoupling between the uppermost mantle and lithosphere, thus, naturally develops due to the composite viscosity formulation. Models that include a gap between the Cocos and Nazca slabs better fit the mantle flow pathways interpreted from the geochemical signatures, as material is brought from beneath the Cocos plate around the slab edge and northward into the mantle wedge beneath Central America. The mantle-lithosphere decoupling is enhanced in models with the slab gap, wherein the mantle flow field contains both counter-clockwise toroidal flow around the Cocos slab edge and clockwise toroidal flow around the northern Nazca slab edge, both of which are non-parallel to surface motions. The models also demonstrate that overriding plate thickness places a control on both the predicted surface motion and

  16. Simultaneous measurements of mobility, dispersion, and orientation of DNA during steady-field gel electrophoresis coupling a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching apparatus with a fluorescence detected linear dichroism setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinland, B.; Meistermann, L.; Weill, G.

    2000-06-01

    Orientation of molecules is responsible for the loss of separability during steady-field gel electrophoresis. In this work we develop a technique to measure simultaneously the relevant parameters involved in the separation mechanism: electrophoretic mobility, band broadening, and molecular orientation. To do that we have associated a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) apparatus with a fluorescence detected linear dichroism setup. This coupling allows one to follow the buildup of orientation during the FRAP experiment. Because orientation involves a change in the angular distribution of fluorescence, we have added a fluorescence polarization setup which can be used in parallel with the FRAP and gives an exact value of the steady-state orientation factor. We illustrate the possibilities of these combined experiments by analyzing the coupling of electrophoretic transport and orientation of λ DNA in 1% agarose gels.

  17. Observation of the Early Transition from Slab to mixed Slab-Toroidal ETG Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balbaky, Abed; Sokolov, Vladimir; Sen, Amiya K.

    2014-10-01

    Parametric studies of the transition between the slab branch of electron temperature gradient (ETG) mode and the mixed slab-toroidal branch of the ETG mode in CLM are reported. CLM was operated in a mirror machine configuration with a cell length of 50--100 cm, and a mirror ratio of 1--2. For typical CLM parameters and a mode localized at r = 2 cm this provides a range for inverse radius of curvature Rc - 1 between 0 and .006 cm-1. Under normal conditions theory predicts transition between slab and toroidal modes would occur when the parameter k| |Rc / 2k⊥ ρ ~ 1. Recent experiments have obtained an experimental scaling of mode amplitude and frequency as a function of Rc - 1. They indicate that even for much more modest levels of k| |Rc / 2k⊥ ρ ~ . 1 , there are substantial increases in saturated mode, up to 5 times larger than the pure slab mode. Changes in real frequency in the mode are generally small, on the order of <5%. This research was supported by the Department of Electrical Engineering of Columbia University.

  18. Ryukyu Subduction Zone: 3D Geodynamic Simulations of the Effects of Slab Shape and Depth on Lattice-Preferred Orientation (LPO) and Seismic Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarlow, S.; Tan, E.; Billen, M. I.

    2015-12-01

    At the Ryukyu subduction zone, seismic anisotropy observations suggest that there may be strong trench-parallel flow within the mantle wedge driven by complex 3D slab geometry. However, previous simulations have either failed to account for 3D flow or used the infinite strain axis (ISA) approximation for LPO, which is known to be inaccurate in complex flow fields. Additionally, both the slab depth and shape of the Ryukyu slab are contentious. Development of strong trench-parallel flow requires low viscosity to decouple the mantle wedge from entrainment by the sinking slab. Therefore, understanding the relationship between seismic anisotropy and the accompanying flow field will better constrain the material and dynamic properties of the mantle near subduction zones. In this study, we integrate a kinematic model for calculation of LPO (D-Rex) into a buoyancy-driven, instantaneous 3D flow simulation (ASPECT), using composite non-Newtonian rheology to investigate the dependence of LPO on slab geometry and depth at the Ryukyu Trench. To incorporate the 3D flow effects, the trench and slab extends from the southern tip of Japan to the western edge of Taiwan and the model region is approximately 1/4 of a spherical shell extending from the surface to the core-mantle boundary. In the southern-most region we vary the slab depth and shape to test for the effects of the uncertainties in the observations. We also investigate the effect of adding locally hydrated regions above the slab that affect both the mantle rheology and development of LPO through the consequent changes in mantle flow and dominate (weakest) slip system. We characterize how changes in the simulation conditions affect the LPO within the mantle wedge, subducting slab and sub-slab mantle and relate these to surface observations of seismic anisotropy.

  19. A gel probe equilibrium sampler for measuring arsenic porewater profiles and sorption gradients in sediments: II. Field application to Haiwee reservoir sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, K.M.; Root, R.; O'Day, P. A.; Hering, J.G.

    2008-01-01

    Arsenic (As) geochemistry and sorption behavior were measured in As- and iron (Fe)-rich sediments of Haiwee Reservoir by deploying undoped (clear) polyacrylamide gels and hydrous ferric oxide (HFO)-doped gels in a gel probe equilibrium sampler, which is a novel technique for directly measuring the effects of porewater composition on As adsorption to Fe oxides phases in situ. Arsenic is deposited at the sediment surface as As(V) and is reduced to As(III) in the upper layers of the sediment (0-8 cm), but the reduction of As(V) does not cause mobilization into the porewater. Dissolved As and Fe concentrations increased at depth in the sediment column driven by the reductive dissolution of amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxides and conversion to a mixed Fe(II, III) green rust-type phase. Adsorption of As and phosphorous (P) onto HFO-doped gels was inhibited at intermediate depths (10-20 cm), possibly due to dissolved organic or inorganic carbon, indicating that dissolved As concentrations were at least partially controlled by porewater composition rather than surface site availability. In sediments that had been recently exposed to air, the region of sorption inhibition was not observed, suggesting that prior exposure to air affected the extent of reductive dissolution, porewater chemistry, and As adsorption behavior. Arsenic adsorption onto the HFO-doped gels increased at depths >20 cm, and the extent of adsorption was most likely controlled by the competitive effects of dissolved phosphate. Sediment As adsorption capacity appeared to be controlled by changes in porewater composition and competitive effects at shallower depths, and by reductive dissolution and availability of sorption sites at greater burial depths. ?? 2008 American Chemical Society.

  20. Unusually Deep Bonin Earthquake (M7.9) of May 30, 2015 Suggests that Stagnant Slab Transforms into Penetration Stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obayashi, M.; Fukao, Y.; Yoshimitsu, J.

    2015-12-01

    A great shock occurred at an unusual depth of 678 km far away from the well-defined Wadati-Benioff zone of the Izu-Bonin arc (Fig.1). To the north of this region the slab is stagnant above the 660 km discontinuity and to the south it penetrates the discontinuity (Fig.2). Thus, the slab in this region can be viewed as in a transitional state from the stagnant to penetrating slab. Here, the steeply dipping part of the slab bends sharply to horizontal and the great shock happened at the lowest corner of this bending. The CMT indicates a pure normal faulting with the trench-normal near horizontal tensional axis and the near vertical compressional axis (Fig.1). We suggest that this mechanism reflects a transitional state of slab deformation from the bending-dominant mode to the penetration-dominant mode. The mechanism is consistent with either of these two two modes. We show that the mechanism is also consistent with the resultant stress field generated by many deep shocks occurring along the Wadati-Benioff zone. The calculated stress field changes rapidly along a trench-normal profile at a depth of 680 km and becomes similar to that generated by the great shock at points near the hypocenter (Fig.3). Thus, the stress field due to the Wadati-Benioff zone earthquakes works to enhance the occurrence of deep shocks of the type of the 2015 great shock, which represents slab deformation associated with the transition from stagnant to penetrating slab.

  1. Thermally induced birefringence in Nd:YAG slab lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Ostermeyer, Martin; Mudge, Damien; Veitch, Peter J.; Munch, Jesper

    2006-07-20

    We study thermally induced birefringence in crystalline Nd:YAG zigzag slab lasers and the associated depolarization losses. The optimum crystallographic orientation of the zigzag slab within the Nd:YAG boule and photoelastic effects in crystalline Nd:YAG slabs are briefly discussed. The depolarization is evaluated using the temperature and stress distributions, calculated using a finite element model, for realistically pumped and cooled slabs of finite dimensions. Jones matrices are then used to calculate the depolarization of the zigzag laser mode. We compare the predictions with measurements of depolarization, and suggest useful criteria for the design of the gain media for such lasers.

  2. MULTIPLE SETS OF TWIN SLABS ON THE RUN OUT. THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MULTIPLE SETS OF TWIN SLABS ON THE RUN OUT. THE RUN OUT INCLUDES THE TRAVELING TORCH WHICH CUTS SLABS TO DESIRED LENGTH, AN IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM TO INDICATE HEAT NUMBER AND TRACE IDENTITY OF EVERY SLAB, AND A DEBURRING DEVICE TO SMOOTH SLABS. AT LEFT OF ROLLS IS THE DUMMY BAR. DUMMY BAR IS INSERTED UP THROUGH CONTAINMENT SECTION INTO MOLD PRIOR TO START OF CAST. WHEN STEEL IS INTRODUCED INTO MOLD IT CONNECTS WITH BAR AS CAST BEGINS, AT RUN OUT DUMMY BAR DISCONNECTS AND IS STORED - U.S. Steel, Fairfield Works, Continuous Caster, Fairfield, Jefferson County, AL

  3. MULTIPLE SETS OF TWIN SLABS ON THE RUN OUT. THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MULTIPLE SETS OF TWIN SLABS ON THE RUN OUT. THE RUN OUT INCLUDES THE TRAVELING TORCH WHICH CUTS SLABS TO DESIRED LENGTH, AN IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM TO INDICATE HEAT NUMBER AND TRACE IDENTITY OF EVERY SLAB, AND A DEBURRING DEVICE TO SMOOTH SLABS. AT LEFT OF ROLLS IS THE DUMMY BAR. DUMMY BAR IS INSERTED UP THROUGH CONTAINMENT SECTION INTO MOLD PRIOR TO START OF CAST. WHEN STEEL IS INTRODUCED INTO MOLD IT CONNECTS WITH BAR AS CAST BEGINS, AT RUN OUT DUMMY BAR DISCONNECTS AND IS STORED. - U.S. Steel, Fairfield Works, Continuous Caster, Fairfield, Jefferson County, AL

  4. Plate deformation at depth under northern California: Slab gap or stretched slab?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ten Brink, U.S.; Shimizu, N.; Molzer, P.C.

    1999-01-01

    Plate kinematic interpretations for northern California predict a gap in the underlying subducted slab caused by the northward migration of the Pacific-North America-Juan de Fuca triple junction. However, large-scale decompression melting and asthenospheric upwelling to the base of the overlying plate within the postulated gap are not supported by geophysical and geochemical observations. We suggest a model for the interaction between the three plates which is compatible with the observations. In this 'slab stretch' model the Juan de Fuca plate under coastal northern California deforms by stretching and thinning to fill the geometrical gap formed in the wake of the northward migrating Mendocino triple junction. The stretching is in response to boundary forces acting on the plate. The thinning results in an elevated geothermal gradient, which may be roughly equivalent to a 4 Ma oceanic lithosphere, still much cooler than that inferred by the slab gap model. We show that reequilibration of this geothermal gradient under 20-30 km thick overlying plate can explain the minor Neogene volcanic activity, its chemical composition, and the heat flow. In contrast to northern California, geochemical and geophysical consequences of a 'true' slab gap can be observed in the California Inner Continental Borderland offshore Los Angeles, where local asthenospheric upwelling probably took place during the Miocene as a result of horizontal extension and rotation of the overlying plate. The elevated heat flow in central California can be explained by thermal reequilibration of the stalled Monterey microplate under the Coast Ranges, rather than by a slab gap or viscous shear heating in the mantle.

  5. Radiative transfer model for contaminated rough slabs.

    PubMed

    Andrieu, François; Douté, Sylvain; Schmidt, Frédéric; Schmitt, Bernard

    2015-11-01

    We present a semi-analytical model to simulate the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of a rough slab layer containing impurities. This model has been optimized for fast computation in order to analyze massive hyperspectral data by a Bayesian approach. We designed it for planetary surface ice studies but it could be used for other purposes. It estimates the bidirectional reflectance of a rough slab of material containing inclusions, overlaying an optically thick media (semi-infinite media or stratified media, for instance granular material). The inclusions are assumed to be close to spherical and constituted of any type of material other than the ice matrix. It can be any other type of ice, mineral, or even bubbles defined by their optical constants. We assume a low roughness and we consider the geometrical optics conditions. This model is thus applicable for inclusions larger than the considered wavelength. The scattering on the inclusions is assumed to be isotropic. This model has a fast computation implementation and thus is suitable for high-resolution hyperspectral data analysis. PMID:26560577

  6. The Equivalent Slab Thickness of Mars' Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendillo, M.; Lawler, G.; Narvaez, C.; Kofman, W.; Mouginot, J.; Morgan, D.; Gurnett, D.

    2014-04-01

    The integral with height of an electron density profile, called the ionospheric total electron content (TEC), is dominated by plasma near the height of maximum electron density (Nmax). The ratio τ = TEC/Nmax has a unit of distance, representing the thickness of a slab of plasma of uniform density (Nmax) with the same TEC. At Earth, the parameter τ has been found to vary far less than either Nmax or TEC, and thus models of τ can be used to generate values of TEC or Nmax when only one is observed. For an ionospheric layer dominated by photo-chemical processes, τ has also been related to the scale height of the neutral gas (H = kT/mg) that is ionized by sunlight. The MARSIS radio science package on the Mars Express satellite has produced large independent data sets of TEC and Nmax. We have used them to form slab thickness patterns versus phase of the solar cycle and solar zenith angle. The overall sample average for daytime (SZA < 90o) conditions is < τ >day = 71 ± 21 km, and for SZA between 90o - 100o, < τ >terminator = 55 ± 25 km. We will report on the possible use of τ patterns to infer characteristics of the martian ionosphere and thermosphere.

  7. Testosterone Nasal Gel

    MedlinePlus

    Testosterone nasal gel is used to treat symptoms of low testosterone in men who have hypogonadism (a condition in which the body does not produce enough natural testosterone). Testosterone nasal gel is used only for men ...

  8. Slab Profile Encoding (PEN) for Minimizing Slab Boundary Artifact in 3D Diffusion-Weighted Multislab Acquisition*

    PubMed Central

    Van, Anh T; Aksoy, Murat; Holdsworth, Samantha J; Kopeinigg, Daniel; Vos, Sjoerd B; Bammer, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To propose a method for mitigating slab boundary artifacts in 3D multislab diffusion imaging with no or minimal increases in scan time. Methods The multislab acquisition was treated as parallel imaging acquisition where the slab profiles acted as the traditional receiver sensitivity profiles. All the slabs were then reconstructed simultaneously along the slab direction using Cartesian-based sensitivity encoding (SENSE) reconstruction. The slab profile estimation was performed using either a Bloch simulation or a calibration scan. Results Both phantom and in vivo results showed negligible slab boundary artifacts after reconstruction using the proposed method. The performance of the proposed method is comparable to the state-of-the-art slab combination method without the scan time penalty that depends on the number of acquired volumes. The obtained g-factor map of the SENSE reconstruction problem showed a maximum g-factor of 1.7 in the region of interest. Conclusion We proposed a novel method for mitigating slab boundary artifacts in 3D diffusion imaging by treating the multislab acquisition as a parallel imaging acquisition and reconstructing all slabs simultaneously using Cartesian SENSE. Unlike existing methods, the scan time increase, if any, does not scale with the number of image volumes acquired. PMID:24691843

  9. Factors Controlling Slab Retreat and the Formation of Back-Arcs: Insights from Numerical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huismans, R. S.; Grool, A.

    2014-12-01

    Although subduction is a first order plate tectonic process, the factors controlling the dynamics of slab roll-back and back-arc formation are still not very well understood. We present self-consistent thermo-mechanical models to study oceanic subduction, slab retreat, and back arc formation. We focus on two aspects of the subduction process: 1) factors that control retreat of the subduction zone, and 2) those that control the opening of the back arc. The model evolution is calculated using 2D plane strain thermo-mechanical finite element techniques for the finite element solution of incompressible viscous-plastic creeping flows (Fullsack, 1995). The models extend from the surface to 660 km depth. The upper surface of the model is free to move. We investigate interaction of the subducting slab with the overlying plate and focus on factors that may control the opening of a back-arc basin. The down going plate is driven by a kinematic boundary condition, far from the subduction zone. After an initial stage of far-field driven contraction, negative buoyant down welling of the oceanic lithosphere may drive continued subduction zone leading to mature subduction and the formation of an extensional back arc. The models suggest that two primary factors are required for slab retreat and the formation of an extensional back-arc system: 1) Convective destabilization and weakening of the overlying continental back arc region, and 2) sufficient negative buoyancy of the subducting plate.

  10. A two- and three-dimensional numerical comparison study of slab detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thieulot, Cedric; Buiter, Susanne; Brune, Sascha; Davies, Rhodri; Duretz, Thibault; Gerbault, Muriel; Glerum, Anne; Quinteros, Javier; Schmalholz, Stefan; Spakman, Wim

    2015-04-01

    Subduction is likely to be the most studied phenomenon in Numerical Geodynamics. Over the past 20 years, hundreds of publications have focused on its various aspects (influence of the rheology and thermal state of the plates, slab-mantle coupling, roll-back, mantle wedge evolution, buoyancy changes due to phase change, ...) and results were obtained with a variety of codes. Slab detachment has recently received some attention but remains a field worth exploring due to its profound influence on dynamic topography, mantle flow and subsequent stress state of the plates, and is believed to have occured in the Zagros, Carpathians and beneath eastern Anatolia, to name only a few regions. Following the work of Schmalholz (2011), we propose a two- and three-dimensional numerical benchmark of slab detachment. The geometry is simple: a power-law T-shaped plate including an already subducted slab overlies the mantle whose viscosity is either linear or power-law. Boundary conditions are free-slip on the top and the bottom of the domain, and no-slip on the sides. When the system evolves in time, the slab stretches out vertically and shows buoyancy-driven necking, until it finally detaches. The benchmark is subdivided into several sub-experiments with gradually increase in complexity (free surface, coupling of the rheology with temperature, ...). An array of objective measurements is recorded throughout the simulation such as the width of the necked slab over time and the exact time of detachment. The experiments will be run in two-dimensions and repeated in three-dimensional, the latter case being designed so as to allow both poloidal and toroidal flow. We show results obtained with a multitude of Finite Element and Finite Difference codes, using either compositional fields, level sets or tracers to track the compositions. A good agreement is found for most of the measurements in the two-dimensional case, and preliminary three-dimensional measurements will be shown. Schmalholz

  11. Tunable phase control of slow and fast light propagation in a slab doped by four-level quantum dot nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarzadeh, Hossein; Sangachin, Elnaz Ahmadi; Asadpour, Seyyed Hossein

    2015-12-01

    Tunable phase control of the slow and fast light propagation through a defect slab medium doped by four-level InGaN/GaN quantum dot structure is demonstrated. By solving the Schrödinger and Poisson’s equations self-consistently, a spherical InGaN quantum dot with GaN barrier shell which can interact by terahertz (THz) signal field is designed numerically. It is found that the phase variation of THz signal field imparts the tunability in the group velocity of the transmitted and reflected pulses through a dielectric slab.

  12. 42. PRESSING A SLAB OF CLAY ONTO A MOSAIC MOLD. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. PRESSING A SLAB OF CLAY ONTO A MOSAIC MOLD. THE MOLD, WHICH HAS A RAISED DESIGN, LEAVES AND OUTLINE IN THE SLAB, THE PIECES THUS DEFINED, ARE THEN CUT APART TO BE FIRED SEPARATELY AND REASSEMBLED. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  13. Scattering of electromagnetic waves from a turbulent plasma slab.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, C. H.

    1972-01-01

    Scattering of electromagnetic waves from a turbulent plasma slab is studied. Part of the effects of the multiple scattering is taken into account. The reflection coefficient is found to be increased and its variation with respect to the slab thickness is smoothed out by the random scattering.

  14. Evaluation of radiochromic gel dosimetry and polymer gel dosimetry in a clinical dose verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandecasteele, Jan; De Deene, Yves

    2013-09-01

    A quantitative comparison of two full three-dimensional (3D) gel dosimetry techniques was assessed in a clinical setting: radiochromic gel dosimetry with an in-house developed optical laser CT scanner and polymer gel dosimetry with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To benchmark both gel dosimeters, they were exposed to a 6 MV photon beam and the depth dose was compared against a diamond detector measurement that served as golden standard. Both gel dosimeters were found accurate within 4% accuracy. In the 3D dose matrix of the radiochromic gel, hotspot dose deviations up to 8% were observed which are attributed to the fabrication procedure. The polymer gel readout was shown to be sensitive to B0 field and B1 field non-uniformities as well as temperature variations during scanning. The performance of the two gel dosimeters was also evaluated for a brain tumour IMRT treatment. Both gel measured dose distributions were compared against treatment planning system predicted dose maps which were validated independently with ion chamber measurements and portal dosimetry. In the radiochromic gel measurement, two sources of deviations could be identified. Firstly, the dose in a cluster of voxels near the edge of the phantom deviated from the planned dose. Secondly, the presence of dose hotspots in the order of 10% related to inhomogeneities in the gel limit the clinical acceptance of this dosimetry technique. Based on the results of the micelle gel dosimeter prototype presented here, chemical optimization will be subject of future work. Polymer gel dosimetry is capable of measuring the absolute dose in the whole 3D volume within 5% accuracy. A temperature stabilization technique is incorporated to increase the accuracy during short measurements, however keeping the temperature stable during long measurement times in both calibration phantoms and the volumetric phantom is more challenging. The sensitivity of MRI readout to minimal temperature fluctuations is demonstrated which

  15. Superparamagnetic gel as a novel material for electromagnetically induced hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babincová, Melánia; Leszczynska, Danuta; Sourivong, Paul; Čičmanec, Pavol; Babinec, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Heating properties of a magnetically responsive gel in an alternating magnetic field at 217 kHz were evaluated. Superparamagnetic ferrite nanocrystals of approximately 10 nm were formed within the gel network by bridging anionic bis(ethylhexyl) sodium sulfosuccinate reverse micelles. Specific absorption rates up to 150 W/g for ferrite concentrations up to 50 mg/ml were observed. Temperature measurements of the gel without ferrite particles showed no heating effect. Magnetic gels therefore represent a novel promising hyperthermic material.

  16. Statistical physics of polymer gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panyukov, Sergei; Rabin, Yitzhak

    1996-05-01

    This work presents a comprehensive analysis of the statistical mechanics of randomly cross-linked polymer gels, starting from a microscopic model of a network made of instantaneously cross-linked Gaussian chains with excluded volume, and ending with the derivation of explicit expressions for the thermodynamic functions and for the density correlation functions which can be tested by experiments. Using replica field theory we calculate the mean field density in replica space and show that this solution contains statistical information about the behavior of individual chains in the network. The average monomer positions change affinely with macroscopic deformation and fluctuations about these positions are limited to length scales of the order of the mesh size. We prove that a given gel has a unique state of microscopic equilibrium which depends on the temperature, the solvent, the average monomer density and the imposed deformation. This state is characterized by the set of the average positions of all the monomers or, equivalently, by a unique inhomogeneous monomer density profile. Gels are thus the only known example of equilibrium solids with no long-range order. We calculate the RPA density correlation functions that describe the statistical properties of small deviations from the average density, due to both static spatial heterogeneities (which characterize the inhomogeneous equilibrium state) and thermal fluctuations (about this equilibrium). We explain how the deformation-induced anisotropy of the inhomogeneous equilibrium density profile is revealed by small angle neutron scattering and light scattering experiments, through the observation of the butterfly effect. We show that all the statistical information about the structure of polymer networks is contained in two parameters whose values are determined by the conditions of synthesis: the density of cross-links and the heterogeneity parameter. We find that the structure of instantaneously cross

  17. Flat slab deformation caused by interplate suction force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yiran; Clayton, Robert W.

    2015-09-01

    We image the structure at the southern end of the Peruvian flat subduction zone, using receiver function and surface wave methods. The Nazca slab subducts to ~100 km depth and then remains flat for ~300 km distance before it resumes the dipping subduction. The flat slab closely follows the topography of the continental Moho above, indicating a strong suction force between the slab and the overriding plate. A high-velocity mantle wedge exists above the initial half of the flat slab, and the velocity resumes to normal values before the slab steepens again, indicating the resumption of dehydration and ecologitization. Two prominent midcrust structures are revealed in the 70 km thick crust under the Central Andes: molten rocks beneath the Western Cordillera and the underthrusting Brazilian Shield beneath the Eastern Cordillera.

  18. Recent developments on the FEM3 and SLAB atmospheric dispersion models

    SciTech Connect

    Ermak, D.L.; Chan, S.T.

    1986-08-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy and other agencies, has been conducting research in the area of atmospheric dispersion of heavier-than-air gases over the past eight years. This research has successfully produced a number of field scale test series and two state-of-the-art dense gas dispersion models called FEM3 (a fully three-dimensional model) and SLAB (a quasi three-dimensional model). Over the past few years, the predictions from both models have been compared with the data obtained from a variety of field scale experiments. In this paper, we further evaluate the entrainment submodel in SLAB and present an improved turbulence submodel for FEM3, which is assessed via using the data obtained from two laboratory-scale dense gas dispersion experiments conducted by McQuaid.

  19. Space Plasma Slab Studies using a new 3D Embedded Reconfigurable MPSoC Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekoulis, George

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents recent ionospheric slab thickness measurements using a new mobile digital sounder system. The datasets obtained have been compared to the results of existing sounders in operation. The data validity has been verified. The slab thickness data allow constant monitoring of the lower ionosphere revealing the dynamic trends of the physical processes being involved. The prototype offers a tremendous amount of hardware processing power and a previously unseen response time in servicing the input and output data interfaces. This has been enabled by incorporating the latest three-dimensional Ultrascale+ technologies available commercially from the reconfigurable Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) computing industry. Furthermore, a previously developed Network-on-Chip (NoC) design methodology has been incorporated for connecting and controlling the application driven multiprocessor network. The system determines electron distributions, aggregate electromagnetic field gradients and plasma current density.

  20. Optimization of flow control devices in a single-strand slab continuous casting tundish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Ning; Bao, Yan-Ping; Sun, Qi-Song; Wang, Li-Feng

    2011-06-01

    The optimization of flow control devices in a single-slab continuous casting tundish was carried out by physical modeling, and the optimized scheme was presented. With the optimal tundish configuration, the minimum residence time of liquid steel was increased by 1.4 times, the peak concentration time was increased by 97%, and the dead volume fraction was decreased by 72%. A mathematical model for molten steel in the tundish was established by using the fluid dynamics package Fluent. The velocity field, concentration field, and the residence time distribution (RTD) curves of molten steel flow before and after optimization were obtained. Experimental results showed that the reasonable configuration with flow control devices can improve the fluid flow characteristics in the tundish. The results of industrial application show that the nonmetallic inclusion area ratio in casting slabs is decreased by 32% with the optimal tundish configuration.

  1. The Role of Subducting Ridges in the Formation of Flat Slabs: Insights from the Peruvian Flat Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knezevic Antonijevic, Sanja; Wagner, Lara; Kumar, Abhash; Beck, Susan; Long, Maureen; Zandt, George; Eakin, Caroline M.

    2015-04-01

    Flattening of the subducting plate is often used to explain various geological features removed far from the subducting margins, including basement-cored uplifts, the cessation of arc volcanism, ignimbrite flare-ups, and the formation of high plateaus and ore deposits [Humphreys et al., 2003; Gutscher et al., 2000; Rosenbaum et al., 2005, Kay and Mpodozis, 2001]. Today, flat slab subduction is observed in central Chile and Peru, representing the modern analogues to the immense paleo-flat slab that subducted beneath the North American continent during the Laramide orogeny (80-55 Ma) [English et al., 2003]. However, how flat slabs form and what controls their inboard and along-strike extent is still poorly understood. To better understand modern and paleo-flat slabs, we focus on the Peruvian flat slab, where the Nazca plate starts to bend at ~90 km depth and travels horizontally for several hundred kilometers beneath the South American plate. Earlier studies propose a correlation between the flat slab and the subducting Nazca Ridge that has been migrating to the south over the past 11 ~Ma [Hampel et al., 2004, Gutscher et al., 2003]. Combining 3D shear wave velocity structure and Rayleigh wave phase anisotropy between ~10° and 18° S, we find that the flat slab has the greatest inboard extent along the track of the subducting Nazca Ridge. North of the ridge track, where the flat slab was initially formed, the flat slab starts to sag, tear and re-initiate steep slab subduction, allowing inflow of warm asthenosphere. Based on our new constraints on the geometry of the subducted plate, we find that the subduction of buoyant oceanic features with overthickened oceanic crust plays a vital role in the formation of flat slabs. We further develop a model of temporal evolution of the Peruvian flab slab that forms as a result of the combined effects of the subducting ridge, trench retreat, and suction forces. Once the buoyant ridge subducts to ~90 km depth, it will fail to

  2. Slab anisotropy from subduction zone guided waves in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, K. H.; Tseng, Y. L.; Hu, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Frozen-in anisotropic structure in the oceanic lithosphere and faulting/hydration in the upper layer of the slab are expected to play an important role in anisotropic signature of the subducted slab. Over the past several decades, despite the advances in characterizing anisotropy using shear wave splitting method and its developments, the character of slab anisotropy remains poorly understood. In this study we investigate the slab anisotropy using subduction zone guided waves characterized by long path length in the slab. In the southernmost Ryukyu subduction zone, seismic waves from events deeper than 100 km offshore northern Taiwan reveal wave guide behavior: (1) a low-frequency (< 1 Hz) first arrival recognized on vertical and radial components but not transverse component (2) large, sustained high-frequency (3-10 Hz) signal in P and S wave trains. The depth dependent high-frequency content (3-10Hz) confirms the association with a waveguide effect in the subducting slab rather than localized site amplification effects. Using the selected subduction zone guided wave events, we further analyzed the shear wave splitting for intermediate-depth earthquakes in different frequency bands, to provide the statistically meaningful shear wave splitting parameters. We determine shear wave splitting parameters from the 34 PSP guided events that are deeper than 100 km with ray path traveling along the subducted slab. From shear wave splitting analysis, the slab and crust effects reveal consistent polarization pattern of fast directions of EN-WS and delay time of 0.13 - 0.27 sec. This implies that slab anisotropy is stronger than the crust effect (<0.1 s) but weaker than the mantle wedge and sub-slab mantle effect (0.3-1.3 s) in Taiwan.

  3. Along-strike translation of a fossil slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichenbaum-Pikser, J. M.; Forsyth, D. W.; Hirth, G.

    2011-12-01

    The Isabella anomaly is a high seismic velocity anomaly beneath the southern Central Valley of California. Breaking from previous interpretations of the anomaly as a lithospheric drip (Zandt and Carrigan, 1993) or delaminated Sierra Nevada root (Zandt et al., 2004), Forsyth et al. (2011) propose that it is a remnant slab, left over from Cenozoic subduction, attached to the Monterey microplate and translating along-strike with the Pacific plate underneath the edge of the North American plate. This hypothesis requires the slab to translate hundreds of kilometers along strike while remaining intact and attached to the Pacific plate despite drag from the surrounding asthenosphere and overriding lithosphere. Using COMSOL Multiphysics, we design 3-D finite element fluid flow models to simulate this scenario, and calculate the viscosity ratio required between the slab and the surrounding asthenosphere in order for the slab to translate undeformed. The ratio needed increases with downdip extent of the slab, and decreases with slab dip; for geometries approximating that of our proposed slab, it ranges from 10^2 to 10^4. Given the thermal and hydrological history of the slab, mantle flow laws predict viscosity contrasts greater than or equal to these requirements. As such, we conclude that along-strike translation of a remnant slab is entirely feasible, and serves as possible explanation of the Isabella anomaly. The significance of this finding extends beyond our general understanding of subduction dynamics, in that the presence of such a slab could have interesting implications for the water budget of the San Andreas Fault and its role in aseismic slip.

  4. Lithosphere-Mantle Interactions Associated with Flat-Slab Subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerault, M.; Becker, T. W.; Husson, L.; Humphreys, E.

    2014-12-01

    Episodes of flat-slab subduction along the western margin of the Americas may have lead to the formation of intra-continental basins and seas, as well as mountain belts and continental plateaux. Here, we explore some of the consequences of a flat slab morphology, linking dynamic topography and stress patterns in continents to slab and mantle dynamics. Using a 2-D cylindrical code, we develop general models and apply them to the North and South America plates. The results are primarily controlled by the coupling along the slab-continent interface (due to geometry and viscosity), the viscosity of the mantle wedge, and the buoyancy of the subducted lithosphere. All models predict broad subsidence, large deviatoric stresses, and horizontal compression above the tip of the flat slab and the deep slab hinge. In models where the slab lays horizontally for hundreds of kilometers, overriding plate compression focuses on both ends of the flat segment, where normal-dip subduction exerts a direct downward pull. In between, a broad low-stress region gets uplifted proportionally to the amount of coupling between the slab and the continent. Anomalously buoyant seafloor enhances this effect but is not required. The downward bending of the flat slab extremities causes its upper part to undergo extension and the lower part to compress. These results have potential for explaining the existence of relatively undeformed, uplifted regions surrounded by mountain belts, such as in the western U.S. and parts of the Andes. Adequately modeling topography and stress in the unusual setting of southwestern Mexico requires a low-viscosity subduction interface and mantle wedge. Our results are only partially controlled by the buoyancy of the subducting plate, suggesting that the viscosity and the morphology of the slab are important, and that the often-used low resolution and "Stokeslet" models may be missing substantial effects.

  5. Natural glide slab avalanches, Glacier National Park, USA: A unique hazard and forecasting challenge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reardon, Blase; Fagre, Daniel B.; Dundas, Mark; Lundy, Chris

    2006-01-01

    In a museum of avalanche phenomena, glide cracks and glide avalanches might be housed in the “strange but true” section. These oddities are uncommon in most snow climates and tend to be isolated to specific terrain features such as bedrock slabs. Many glide cracks never result in avalanches, and when they do, the wide range of time between crack formation and slab failure makes them highly unpredictable. Despite their relative rarity, glide cracks and glide avalanches pose a regular threat and complex forecasting challenge during the annual spring opening of the Going-to-the-Sun Road in Glacier National Park, U.S.A. During the 2006 season, a series of unusual glide cracks delayed snow removal operations by over a week and provided a unique opportunity to record detailed observations of glide avalanches and characterize their occurrence and associated weather conditions. Field observations were from snowpits, crown profiles and where possible, measurements of slab thickness, bed surface slope angle, substrate and other physical characteristics. Weather data were recorded at one SNOTEL site and two automated stations located from 0.6-10 km of observed glide slab avalanches. Nearly half (43%) of the 35 glide slab avalanches recorded were Class D2-2.5, with 15% Class D3-D3.5. The time between glide crack opening and failure ranged from 2 days to over six weeks, and the avalanches occurred in cycles associated with loss of snow water equivalent and spikes in temperature and radiation. We conclude with suggest ions for further study.

  6. Electrochemical stimulation and control of electroactive polymer gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guelch, Rainer W.; Holdenried, Jens; Weible, Andrea; Wallmersperger, Thomas; Kroeplin, Bernd

    2001-07-01

    Direct effects of electrical currents on polyelectrolyte gels are always associated with changes in their Donnan potential. Thus electrical stimulation of gels can be only completely understood if the direct effect of electric fields on the potential profile within the gels are known. The purpose of this study is to present recordings of Donnan potentials in electroactive gels of various compositions, especially under the influence of electric fields. An important finding is that opposite alterations in the Donnan potential simultaneously occur at the current inflow and outflow region of the gel. In anionic gels hyperpolarization, i.e. higher negativity, is induced on the anode-side of the gel, whereas depolarization is found on the cathode-side. As these shifts in the potential are supposed to affect swelling or deswelling of polyelectrolyte gels, they will primarily promote bending motions of the gel. To demonstrate the opposite bending behavior of anionic and cationic polymer gels under the influence of an electric field a short video sequence of an EAP gripper in action is presented. It is made exclusively of polyelectrolyte gel strips taking advantage of the fact that anionic and cationic polyacrylamide gels can be attached firmly to each other without any adhesive.

  7. Characteristics of the surface plasma wave in a self-gravitating magnetized dusty plasma slab

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2015-11-15

    The dispersion properties of surface dust ion-acoustic waves in a self-gravitating magnetized dusty plasma slab are investigated. The dispersion relation is derived by using the low-frequency magnetized dusty dielectric function and the surface wave dispersion integral for the slab geometry. We find that the self-gravitating effect suppresses the frequency of surface dust ion-acoustic wave for the symmetric mode in the long wavelength regime, whereas it hardly changes the frequency for the anti-symmetric mode. As the slab thickness and the wave number increase, the surface wave frequency slowly decreases for the symmetric mode but increases significantly for the anti-symmetric mode. The influence of external magnetic field is also investigated in the case of symmetric mode. We find that the strength of the magnetic field enhances the frequency of the symmetric-mode of the surface plasma wave. The increase of magnetic field reduces the self-gravitational effect and thus the self-gravitating collapse may be suppressed and the stability of dusty objects in space is enhanced.

  8. Terpolymer smart gels: synthesis and characterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bag, Dibyendu S.; Alam, Sarfaraz; Mathur, G. N.

    2004-10-01

    Two smart terpolymer gels, MS-1 and MS-2, were synthesized such that the same gel can respond to more than one external environmental condition, such as pH, temperature, solvent composition, electric field. So two terpolymers gels of vinyl monomers such as sodium acrylate, acrylamide and N-isopropyl acrylamide were synthesized by using ammonium persulfate (APS) as an initiator, N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl ethylene diamine (TMEDA) as an accelerator and methylene bisacrylamide as a cross-linker. These terpolymers were characterized by elemental and Fourier transform infrared analysis. The swelling behavior of these terpolymer smart gels was evaluated by changing the pH, temperature and solvent composition. The variation of the swelling behavior with time was evaluated in an aqueous medium at room temperature. The time taken for maximum swelling (tm) was about 20 min for the gel MS-2. However the tm value for the gel MS-1 is higher than that of MS-2. The swelling behavior remains almost unchanged over a temperature range of 22-50 °C for both the gels. The discontinuous volume transitions were observed at pH 7.6 and 8.2 for the two gels, MS-1 and MS-2, respectively. The gel MS-1 suddenly shrinks below and swells above pH 7.6. Correspondingly, the pH is 8.2 for the case of MS-2. Volume transitions in an acetone-water mixture were also observed for these gels. The swelling behaviors of these two smart gels are almost parallel above the 40% acetone concentration.

  9. Melting features along the western Ryukyu slab edge (northeast Taiwan) and Ryukyu slab tear (southernmost Okinawa Trough): Seismic evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.; Hsu, S.; Sibuet, J.

    2003-12-01

    Behind the sedimentary Ryukyu arc lies the Okinawa Trough whose termination is located at the tip of the Ilan plain (northern Taiwan), just above the Ryukyu slab edge. The present-day active volcanic front, located 80-100 km above the Ryukyu slab, extends from Japan to Kueishantao Island, an islet situated 10-km offshore the Ilan plain. 3370 earthquakes recorded in northern Taiwan by 65 seismic land stations between December 1990 and May 1999 were used to determine the 3-D Vp and Vs velocity structures and Vp/Vs ratios. A low Vp, low Vs and high Vp/Vs sausage like body, about 20 km in diameter, lies within the Eurasian mantle wedge, on top of the western Ryukyu slab extremity, from depths ranging between 20 km and 100 km. We suggest that the friction of the Ryukyu slab edge against the Eurasian lithosphere and/or the upwelling of the underlying Philippine Sea plate lithospheric mantle around the slab edge would cause an abnormal heating resulting in the formation of partial melt. Part of this melt feeds obliquely the Kueishantao andesitic Island. An abnormal amount of volcanism occurs within the Okinawa Trough, east of a slab tear located 140 km from the Ryukyu slab edge. The power spectrum analysis of magnetic data shows the presence of a thick crust located above the slab tear, suggesting that a similar pattern to the one identified above of the Ryukyu slab edge might exist in the slab tear region, feeding obliquely this area of abnormal volcanism.

  10. Sol-Gel Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukherjee, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    Multicomponent homogeneous, ultrapure noncrystalline gels/gel derived glasses are promising batch materials for the containerless glass melting experiments in microgravity. Hence, ultrapure, homogeneous gel precursors could be used to: (1) investigate the effect of the container induced nucleation on the glass forming ability of marginally glass forming compositions; and (2) investigate the influence of gravity on the phase separation and coarsening behavior of gel derived glasses in the liquid-liquid immiscibility zone of the nonsilicate systems having a high density phase. The structure and crystallization behavior of gels in the SiO2-GeO2 as a function of gel chemistry and thermal treatment were investigated. As are the chemical principles involved in the distribution of a second network former in silica gel matrix being investigated. The procedures for synthesizing noncrystalline gels/gel-monoliths in the SiO2-GeO2, GeO2-PbO systems were developed. Preliminary investigations on the levitation and thermal treatment of germania silicate gel-monoliths in the Pressure Facility Acoustic Levitator were done.

  11. Sol-gel kinetics by NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Assink, R.A.; Kay, B.D.

    1991-01-01

    The chemical synthesis of advanced ceramic and glass materials by the sol-gel process has become an area of increasing activity in the field of material science. The sol-gel process provides a means to prepare homogeneous, high purity materials with tailored chemical and physical properties. This paper surveyed the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of silicon-based sol-gel kinetics. A review of the various models which have been used to analyze the chemical kinetics of various sol-gel systems was presented. The utility of NMR spectroscopy was demonstrated in investigating the influence that various reaction conditions have on the reaction pathways by which sol-gel derived materials are synthesized. By observing in a direct fashion the chemical pathway of the sol-gel, it is often possible to relate the final properties of the material to the formulation and reaction conditions of the sol-gel. The study of reaction kinetics by NMR is expected to play an increasingly important role in understanding sol-gel processing and material properties. 15 refs. (DP)

  12. A dipping, thick Farallon slab below central United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, D.; Gurnis, M.; Saleeby, J.; Helmberger, D. V.

    2015-12-01

    It has been hypothesized that much of the Laramide orogeny was caused by dynamic effects induced by an extensive flat slab during a period of plateau subduction. A particularly thick block containing the Shatsky Rise conjugate, now in the mid-mantle, left a distinctive deformation footprint from southern California to Denver, Colorado. Thus mid-mantle, relic slabs can provide fundamental information about past subduction and the history of plate tectonics if properly imaged. Here we find clear evidence for a northeastward dipping (35° dip), slab-like, but fat (up to 400-500 km thick) seismic anomaly within the top of the lower mantle below the central United States. Using a deep focus earthquake below Spain with direct seismic paths that propagate along the top and bottom of the anomaly, we find that the observed, stacked seismic waveforms recorded with the dense USArray show multi-pathing indicative of sharp top and bottom surfaces. Plate tectonic reconstructions in which the slab is migrated back in time suggest strong coupling of the slab to North America. In combination with the reconstructions, we interpret the structure as arising from eastward dipping Farallon subduction at the western margin of North America during the Cretaceous, in contrast with recent interpretations. The slab could have been fattened through a combination of pure shear thickening during flat-slab subduction and a folding instability during penetration into the lower mantle.

  13. Impact Resistance Behaviour of Banana Fiber Reinforced Slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che Muda, Zakaria; Syamsir, Agusril; Nasharuddin Mustapha, Kamal; Rifdy Samsudin, Muhamad; Thiruchelvam, Sivadass; Usman, Fathoni; Beddu, Salmia; Liyana Mohd Kamal, Nur; Ashraful Alam, Md; Birima, Ahmed H.; Zaroog, O. S.

    2016-03-01

    This paper investigate the performance of banana fibre reinforced slabs 300mm × 300mm size with varied thickness subjected to low impact projectile test. A self-fabricated drop-weight impact test rig with a steel ball weight of 1.25 kg drop at 1 m height has been used in this research work. The main variables for the study is to find the relationship of the impact resistance against the BF contents and slab thickness. A linear relationship has been established between first and ultimate crack resistance against BF contents and slab thickness by the experiment. The linear relationship has also been established between the service (first) crack and ultimate crack resistance against the BF contents for a constant spacing for various banana fibre reinforced slab thickness. The increment in BF content has more effect on the first crack resistance than the ultimate crack resistance. The linear relationship has also been established between the service (first) crack and ultimate crack resistance against the various slab thickness. Overall 1.5% BF content with slab thickness of 40 mm exhibit better first and ultimate crack resistance up to 16 times and up to 17 times respectively against control slab (without BF)

  14. Reconciling surface plate motions with rapid three-dimensional mantle flow around a slab edge.

    PubMed

    Jadamec, Margarete A; Billen, Magali I

    2010-05-20

    The direction of tectonic plate motion at the Earth's surface and the flow field of the mantle inferred from seismic anisotropy are well correlated globally, suggesting large-scale coupling between the mantle and the surface plates. The fit is typically poor at subduction zones, however, where regional observations of seismic anisotropy suggest that the direction of mantle flow is not parallel to and may be several times faster than plate motions. Here we present three-dimensional numerical models of buoyancy-driven deformation with realistic slab geometry for the Alaska subduction-transform system and use them to determine the origin of this regional decoupling of flow. We find that near a subduction zone edge, mantle flow velocities can have magnitudes of more than ten times the surface plate motions, whereas surface plate velocities are consistent with plate motions and the complex mantle flow field is consistent with observations from seismic anisotropy. The seismic anisotropy observations constrain the shape of the eastern slab edge and require non-Newtonian mantle rheology. The incorporation of the non-Newtonian viscosity results in mantle viscosities of 10(17) to 10(18) Pa s in regions of high strain rate (10(-12) s(-1)), and this low viscosity enables the mantle flow field to decouple partially from the motion of the surface plates. These results imply local rapid transport of geochemical signatures through subduction zones and that the internal deformation of slabs decreases the slab-pull force available to drive subducting plates. PMID:20485433

  15. Tunable surface plasmon-polaritons in a gyroelectric slab sandwiched between two graphene layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guoding; Cao, Ming; Liu, Chang; Sun, Jian; Pan, Tao

    2016-05-01

    We study numerically the properties of surface plasmon-polaritons (SPPs) in a gyroelectric slab sandwiched between two graphene layers, where the external static magnetic field is applied in the Voigt geometry. It is shown that the dispersion characteristics and propagation lenghts of the SPPs for both the optical and the acoustic branches can be tuned flexibly by the external magnetic field and graphene's chemical potential, and that the nonreciprocal properties of the SPPs caused by the external magnetic field are rather obvious. The results provide a method for adjusting and improving the dispersion and propagation properties of the SPPs, which might be helpful for the design of the related plasmonic devices.

  16. May eclogite dehydration cause slab fracturation ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loury, Chloé; Lanari, Pierre; Rolland, Yann; Guillot, Stéphane; Ganino, Clément

    2015-04-01

    Petrological and geophysical evidences strongly indicate that fluids releases play a fundamental role in subduction zones as in subduction-related seismicity and arc magmatism. It is thus important to assess quantitatively their origin and to try to quantify the amount of such fluids. In HP metamorphism, it is well known that pressure-dependent dehydration reactions occur during the prograde path. Many geophysical models show that the variations in slab physical properties along depth could be linked to these fluid occurrences. However it remains tricky to test such models on natural sample, as it is difficult to assess or model the water content evolution in HP metamorphic rocks. This difficulty is bound to the fact that these rocks are generally heterogeneous, with zoned minerals and preservation of different paragenesis reflecting changing P-T conditions. To decipher the P-T-X(H2O) path of such heterogeneous rocks the concept of local effective bulk (LEB) composition is essential. Here we show how standardized X-ray maps can be used to constrain the scale of the equilibration volume of a garnet porphyroblast and to measure its composition. The composition of this equilibrium volume may be seen as the proportion of the rock likely to react at a given time to reach a thermodynamic equilibrium with the growing garnet. The studied sample is an eclogite coming from the carboniferous South-Tianshan suture (Central Asia) (Loury et al. in press). Compositional maps of a garnet and its surrounding matrix were obtained from standardized X-ray maps processed with the program XMapTools (Lanari et al, 2014). The initial equilibration volume was modeled using LEB compositions combined together with Gibbs free energy minimization. P-T sections were calculated for the next stages of garnet growth taking into account the fractionation of the composition at each stage of garnet growth. The modeled P-T-X(H2O) path indicates that the rock progressively dehydrates during the

  17. 3D gel printing for soft-matter systems innovation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Hidemitsu; Kawakami, Masaru; Gong, Jin; Makino, Masato; Kabir, M. Hasnat; Saito, Azusa

    2015-04-01

    In the past decade, several high-strength gels have been developed, especially from Japan. These gels are expected to use as a kind of new engineering materials in the fields of industry and medical as substitutes to polyester fibers, which are materials of artificial blood vessels. We consider if various gel materials including such high-strength gels are 3D-printable, many new soft and wet systems will be developed since the most intricate shape gels can be printed regardless of the quite softness and brittleness of gels. Recently we have tried to develop an optical 3D gel printer to realize the free-form formation of gel materials. We named this apparatus Easy Realizer of Soft and Wet Industrial Materials (SWIM-ER). The SWIM-ER will be applied to print bespoke artificial organs, including artificial blood vessels, which will be possibly used for both surgery trainings and actual surgery. The SWIM-ER can print one of the world strongest gels, called Double-Network (DN) gels, by using UV irradiation through an optical fiber. Now we also are developing another type of 3D gel printer for foods, named E-Chef. We believe these new 3D gel printers will broaden the applications of soft-matter gels.

  18. THE EFFECT OF INTERMITTENT GYRO-SCALE SLAB TURBULENCE ON PARALLEL AND PERPENDICULAR COSMIC-RAY TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Le Roux, J. A.

    2011-12-10

    Earlier work based on nonlinear guiding center (NLGC) theory suggested that perpendicular cosmic-ray transport is diffusive when cosmic rays encounter random three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence dominated by uniform two-dimensional (2D) turbulence with a minor uniform slab turbulence component. In this approach large-scale perpendicular cosmic-ray transport is due to cosmic rays microscopically diffusing along the meandering magnetic field dominated by 2D turbulence because of gyroresonant interactions with slab turbulence. However, turbulence in the solar wind is intermittent and it has been suggested that intermittent turbulence might be responsible for the observation of 'dropout' events in solar energetic particle fluxes on small scales. In a previous paper le Roux et al. suggested, using NLGC theory as a basis, that if gyro-scale slab turbulence is intermittent, large-scale perpendicular cosmic-ray transport in weak uniform 2D turbulence will be superdiffusive or subdiffusive depending on the statistical characteristics of the intermittent slab turbulence. In this paper we expand and refine our previous work further by investigating how both parallel and perpendicular transport are affected by intermittent slab turbulence for weak as well as strong uniform 2D turbulence. The main new finding is that both parallel and perpendicular transport are the net effect of an interplay between diffusive and nondiffusive (superdiffusive or subdiffusive) transport effects as a consequence of this intermittency.

  19. Finite-size scaling of the magnetization probability density for the critical Ising model in slab geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes Cardozo, David; Holdsworth, Peter C. W.

    2016-04-01

    The magnetization probability density in d  =  2 and 3 dimensional Ising models in slab geometry of volume L\\paralleld-1× {{L}\\bot} is computed through Monte-Carlo simulation at the critical temperature and zero magnetic field. The finite-size scaling of this distribution and its dependence on the system aspect-ratio ρ =\\frac{{{L}\\bot}}{{{L}\\parallel}} and boundary conditions are discussed. In the limiting case ρ \\to 0 of a macroscopically large slab ({{L}\\parallel}\\gg {{L}\\bot} ) the distribution is found to scale as a Gaussian function for all tested system sizes and boundary conditions.

  20. Improving image quality and stability of two-dimensional photonic crystal slab by changing surface structure of the photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhao-Jie; Liu, Peng-Fang; Tong, Yuan-Wei

    2016-03-01

    The propagation of electromagnetic (EM) waves in two-dimensional hexagon-lattice photonic crystals (PCs) is investigated through dispersion characteristics analysis and numerical simulation of field pattern. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the image reach 0.37λ which is much smaller than 0.5λ by changing surface structure of the photonic crystal, and the variance of FWHM of image focused by the changed slab seems to be less than the variance of FWHM of image focused by the original slab with the changing of source position.

  1. Modes competition in superradiant emission from an inverted sub-wavelength thick slab of two-level atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manassah, Jamal T.

    2016-08-01

    Using the expansion in the eigenmodes of 1-D Lienard-Wiechert kernel, the temporal and spectral profiles of the radiation emitted by a fully inverted collection of two-level atoms in a sub-wavelength slab geometry are computed. The initial number of amplifying modes determine the specific regime of radiation. In particular, the temporal profile of the field intensity is oscillatory and the spectral profile is non-Lorentzian with two unequal height peaks in a narrow band centered at the slab thickness value at which the real parts of the lowest order odd and even eigenvalues are equal.

  2. Temporal evolution of surface ripples on a finite plasma slab subject to the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    SciTech Connect

    Weis, M. R.; Zhang, P.; Lau, Y. Y. Rittersdorf, I. M.; Zier, J. C.; Gilgenbach, R. M.; Hess, M. H.; Peterson, K. J.

    2014-12-15

    Using the ideal magnetohydrodynamic model, we calculate the temporal evolution of initial ripples on the boundaries of a planar plasma slab that is subjected to the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The plasma slab consists of three regions. We assume that in each region the plasma density is constant with an arbitrary value and the magnetic field is also constant with an arbitrary magnitude and an arbitrary direction parallel to the interfaces. Thus, the instability may be driven by a combination of magnetic pressure and kinetic pressure. The general dispersion relation is derived, together with the feedthrough factor between the two interfaces. The temporal evolution is constructed from the superposition of the eigenmodes. Previously established results are recovered in the various limits. Numerical examples are given on the temporal evolution of ripples on the interfaces of the finite plasma slab.

  3. Temporal evolution of surface ripples on a finite plasma slab subject to the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Weis, Matthew Robert; Zhang, Peng; Lau, Yue Ying; Rittersdorf, Ian; Zier, Jacob; Gilgenbach, Ronald; Mark Harry Hess; Peterson, Kyle J.

    2014-12-17

    Using the ideal magnetohydrodynamic model, we calculate the temporal evolution of initial ripples on the boundaries of a planar plasma slab that is subjected to the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The plasma slab consists of three regions. We assume that in each region the plasma density is constant with an arbitrary value and the magnetic field is also constant with an arbitrary magnitude and an arbitrary direction parallel to the interfaces. Then, the instability may be driven by a combination of magnetic pressure and kinetic pressure. Thus the general dispersion relation is derived, together with the feedthrough factor between the two interfaces.more » The temporal evolution is constructed from the superposition of the eigenmodes. Those previously established results are recovered in the various limits. Numerical examples are given on the temporal evolution of ripples on the interfaces of the finite plasma slab.« less

  4. Experimental and theoretical analysis of THz-frequency, direction-dependent, phonon polariton modes in a subwavelength, anisotropic slab waveguide.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chengliang; Wu, Qiang; Xu, Jingjun; Nelson, Keith A; Werley, Christopher A

    2010-12-01

    Femtosecond optical pulses were used to generate THz-frequency phonon polariton waves in a 50 micrometer lithium niobate slab, which acts as a subwavelength, anisotropic planar waveguide. The spatial and temporal electric field profiles of the THz waves were recorded for different propagation directions using a polarization gating imaging system, and experimental dispersion curves were determined via a two-dimensional Fourier transform. Dispersion relations for an anisotropic slab waveguide were derived via analytical analysis and found to be in excellent agreement with all observed experimental modes. From the dispersion relations, we analyze the propagation-direction-dependent behavior, effective refractive index values, and generation efficiencies for THz-frequency modes in the subwavelength, anisotropic slab waveguide. PMID:21164986

  5. Temporal evolution of surface ripples on a finite plasma slab subject to the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    SciTech Connect

    Weis, Matthew Robert; Zhang, Peng; Lau, Yue Ying; Rittersdorf, Ian; Zier, Jacob; Gilgenbach, Ronald; Mark Harry Hess; Peterson, Kyle J.

    2014-12-17

    Using the ideal magnetohydrodynamic model, we calculate the temporal evolution of initial ripples on the boundaries of a planar plasma slab that is subjected to the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The plasma slab consists of three regions. We assume that in each region the plasma density is constant with an arbitrary value and the magnetic field is also constant with an arbitrary magnitude and an arbitrary direction parallel to the interfaces. Then, the instability may be driven by a combination of magnetic pressure and kinetic pressure. Thus the general dispersion relation is derived, together with the feedthrough factor between the two interfaces. The temporal evolution is constructed from the superposition of the eigenmodes. Those previously established results are recovered in the various limits. Numerical examples are given on the temporal evolution of ripples on the interfaces of the finite plasma slab.

  6. CONFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT USING GELS

    SciTech Connect

    Randall S. Seright

    2003-09-01

    This report describes work performed during the second year of the project, ''Conformance Improvement Using Gels.'' The project has two objectives. The first objective is to identify gel compositions and conditions that substantially reduce flow through fractures that allow direct channeling between wells, while leaving secondary fractures open so that high fluid injection and production rates can be maintained. The second objective is to optimize treatments in fractured production wells, where the gel must reduce permeability to water much more than that to oil. Pore-level images from X-ray computed microtomography were re-examined for Berea sandstone and porous polyethylene. This analysis suggests that oil penetration through gel-filled pores occurs by a gel-dehydration mechanism, rather than a gel-ripping mechanism. This finding helps to explain why aqueous gels can reduce permeability to water more than to oil. We analyzed a Cr(III)-acetate-HPAM gel treatment in a production well in the Arbuckle formation. The availability of accurate pressure data before, during, and after the treatment was critical for the analysis. After the gel treatment, water productivity was fairly constant at about 20% of the pre-treatment value. However, oil productivity was stimulated by a factor of 18 immediately after the treatment. During the six months after the treatment, oil productivity gradually decreased to approach the pre-treatment value. To explain this behavior, we proposed that the fracture area open to oil flow was increased substantially by the gel treatment, followed by a gradual closing of the fractures during subsequent production. For a conventional Cr(III)-acetate-HPAM gel, the delay between gelant preparation and injection into a fracture impacts the placement, leakoff, and permeability reduction behavior. Formulations placed as partially formed gels showed relatively low pressure gradients during placement, and yet substantially reduced the flow capacity of

  7. Effective bichromatic potential for ultra-high Q-factor photonic crystal slab cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Alpeggiani, Filippo Andreani, Lucio Claudio; Gerace, Dario

    2015-12-28

    We introduce a confinement mechanism in photonic crystal slab cavities, which relies on the superposition of two incommensurate one-dimensional lattices in a line-defect waveguide. It is shown that the resulting photonic profile realizes an effective quasi-periodic bichromatic potential for the electromagnetic field confinement yielding extremely high quality (Q) factor nanocavities, while simultaneously keeping the mode volume close to the diffraction limit. We apply these concepts to pillar- and hole-based photonic crystal slab cavities, respectively, and a Q-factor improvement by over an order of magnitude is shown over existing designs, especially in pillar-based structures. Thanks to the generality and easy adaptation of such confinement mechanism to a broad class of cavity designs and photonic lattices, this work opens interesting routes for applications where enhanced light–matter interaction in photonic crystal structures is required.

  8. Adaptive slab laser beam quality improvement using a weighted least-squares reconstruction algorithm.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shanqiu; Dong, LiZhi; Chen, XiaoJun; Tan, Yi; Liu, Wenjin; Wang, Shuai; Yang, Ping; Xu, Bing; Ye, YuTang

    2016-04-10

    Adaptive optics is an important technology for improving beam quality in solid-state slab lasers. However, there are uncorrectable aberrations in partial areas of the beam. In the criterion of the conventional least-squares reconstruction method, it makes the zones with small aberrations nonsensitive and hinders this zone from being further corrected. In this paper, a weighted least-squares reconstruction method is proposed to improve the relative sensitivity of zones with small aberrations and to further improve beam quality. Relatively small weights are applied to the zones with large residual aberrations. Comparisons of results show that peak intensity in the far field improved from 1242 analog digital units (ADU) to 2248 ADU, and beam quality β improved from 2.5 to 2.0. This indicates the weighted least-squares method has better performance than the least-squares reconstruction method when there are large zonal uncorrectable aberrations in the slab laser system. PMID:27139877

  9. Multiscale modeling of polyelectrolyte gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallmersperger, Thomas; Wittel, Falk K.; Kröplin, Bernd H.

    2006-03-01

    Electrolyte polymer gels are a very attractive class of actuation materials with remarkable electronic and mechanical properties having a great similarity to biological contractile tissues. They consist of a polymer network with ionizable groups and a liquid phase with mobile ions. Absorption and delivery of solvent lead to a considerably large change of volume. Due to this capability, they can be used as actuators for technical applications, where large swelling and shrinkage is desired. In the present work chemically and electrically stimulated polymer gels in a solution bath are investigated. To describe the different complicated phenomena occurring in these gels adequately, the modeling can be conducted on different scales. Therefore, models based on the statistical theory and porous media theory, as well as a multi-field model and a discrete element formulation are derived. A refinement of the different theories from global macroscopic to microscopic are presented in this paper: The statistical theory is a macroscopic theory capable to describe the global swelling or bending e.g. of a gel film, while the general theory of porous media (TPM) is a macroscopic continuum theory which is based on the theory of mixtures extended by the concept of volume fractions. The TPM is a homogenized model, i.e. all geometrical and physical quantities can be seen as statistical averages of the real quantities. The presented chemo-electro-mechanical multi-field formulation is a mesoscopic theory. It is capable of giving the concentrations and the electric potential in the whole domain. Finally the (micromechanical) discrete element (DE) theory is employed. In this case, the continuum is represented by distributed particles with local interaction relations combined with balance equations for the chemical field. This method is predestined for problems involving large displacements, strains and discontinuities. The presented formulations are compared and conclusions on their

  10. Rotational flow in tapered slab rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Tony; Sams, Oliver C.; Majdalani, Joseph

    2006-10-01

    Internal flow modeling is a requisite for obtaining critical parameters in the design and fabrication of modern solid rocket motors. In this work, the analytical formulation of internal flows particular to motors with tapered sidewalls is pursued. The analysis employs the vorticity-streamfunction approach to treat this problem assuming steady, incompressible, inviscid, and nonreactive flow conditions. The resulting solution is rotational following the analyses presented by Culick for a cylindrical motor. In an extension to Culick's work, Clayton has recently managed to incorporate the effect of tapered walls. Here, an approach similar to that of Clayton is applied to a slab motor in which the chamber is modeled as a rectangular channel with tapered sidewalls. The solutions are shown to be reducible, at leading order, to Taylor's inviscid profile in a porous channel. The analysis also captures the generation of vorticity at the surface of the propellant and its transport along the streamlines. It is from the axial pressure gradient that the proper form of the vorticity is ascertained. Regular perturbations are then used to solve the vorticity equation that prescribes the mean flow motion. Subsequently, numerical simulations via a finite volume solver are carried out to gain further confidence in the analytical approximations. In illustrating the effects of the taper on flow conditions, comparisons of total pressure and velocity profiles in tapered and nontapered chambers are entertained. Finally, a comparison with the axisymmetric flow analog is presented.

  11. Hybrid Heat Capacity - Moving Slab Laser Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Stappaerts, E A

    2002-04-01

    A hybrid configuration of a heat capacity laser (HCL) and a moving slab laser (MSL) has been studied. Multiple volumes of solid-state laser material are sequentially diode-pumped and their energy extracted. When a volume reaches a maximum temperature after a ''sub-magazine depth'', it is moved out of the pumping region into a cooling region, and a new volume is introduced. The total magazine depth equals the submagazine depth times the number of volumes. The design parameters are chosen to provide high duty factor operation, resulting in effective use of the diode arrays. The concept significantly reduces diode array cost over conventional heat capacity lasers, and it is considered enabling for many potential applications. A conceptual design study of the hybrid configuration has been carried out. Three concepts were evaluated using CAD tools. The concepts are described and their relative merits discussed. Because of reduced disk size and diode cost, the hybrid concept may allow scaling to average powers on the order of 0.5 MW/module.

  12. Sol-Gels for Optical Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podbielska, Halina; Ulatowska-Jarża, Agnieszka; Müller, Gerhard; Eichler, Hans J.

    Sol-gel process allows for formation of glassy and ceramics materials in temperatures much lower than offered by conventional melting techniques. The first paper on sol-gels was published over 150 years ago by Ebelmen, however, the rapid development of this technology and applications occurred in the last few years. There is a broad range of possible applications of solgel derived materials, what marked this technology as one of the most promising fields of contemporary material sciences

  13. CONFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT USING GELS

    SciTech Connect

    Randall S. Seright

    2004-09-30

    This report describes work performed during the third and final year of the project, ''Conformance Improvement Using Gels.'' Corefloods revealed throughput dependencies of permeability reduction by polymers and gels that were much more prolonged during oil flow than water flow. This behavior was explained using simple mobility ratio arguments. A model was developed that quantitatively fits the results and predicts ''clean up'' times for oil productivity when production wells are returned to service after application of a polymer or gel treatment. X-ray computed microtomography studies of gels in strongly water-wet Berea sandstone and strongly oil-wet porous polyethylene suggested that oil penetration through gel-filled pores occurs by a gel-dehydration mechanism, rather than gel-ripping or gel-displacement mechanisms. In contrast, analysis of data from the University of Kansas suggests that the gel-ripping or displacement mechanisms are more important in more permeable, strongly water-wet sandpacks. These findings help to explain why aqueous gels can reduce permeability to water more than to oil under different conditions. Since cement is the most commonly used material for water shutoff, we considered when gels are preferred over cements. Our analysis and experimental results indicated that cement cannot be expected to completely fill (top to bottom) a vertical fracture of any width, except near the wellbore. For vertical fractures with apertures less than 4 mm, the cement slurry will simply not penetrate very far into the fracture. For vertical fractures with apertures greater than 4 mm, the slurry may penetrate a substantial distance into the bottom part of the fracture. However, except near the wellbore, the upper part of the fracture will remain open due to gravity segregation. We compared various approaches to plugging fractures using gels, including (1) varying polymer content, (2) varying placement (extrusion) rate, (3) using partially formed gels, (4

  14. Comparison of Virulence Gene Identification, Ribosomal Spacer PCR, and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis for Typing of Staphylococcus aureus Strains Isolated from Cases of Subclinical Bovine Mastitis in the United States.

    PubMed

    Adkins, Pamela R F; Middleton, John R; Fox, Lawrence K

    2016-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important pathogens causing contagious mastitis in dairy cattle worldwide. The objectives of this study were to determine if recently described S. aureus genotype B was present among previously characterized isolates from cases of bovine intramammary infection in the United States and to compare pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) to the combination of ribosomal spacer PCR (RS-PCR) and virulence gene identification for typing of S. aureus strains. The hypothesis was that isolates that were previously characterized as contagious would be identified as genotype B and that the results of the two strain-typing methods would be comparable. Isolates were selected from a collection of S. aureus isolates from eight dairy farms. Mammary quarter milk somatic cell count (SCC) and N-acetyl-β-d-gluconaminidase (NAGase) activity data were known and used to evaluate strain pathogenicity. RS-PCR was performed with conventional gel electrophoresis, and PCR was used for toxin gene identification. RS-PCR patterns were associated with a specific virulence gene pattern, as previously reported. Five RS-PCR banding patterns were identified. None of the isolates were characterized as genotype B. No association between RS-PCR types and milk SCC was found; however, NAGase activity was significantly higher in milk from mammary glands infected with RS-PCR banding type 1 (RSP type 1) than in milk from those infected with RSP type 2. The discriminatory power values were 1.0 and 0.46 for PFGE and RS-PCR, respectively. These data suggest that genotype B may have a limited geographic distribution and that PFGE is more discriminatory than RS-PCR performed with conventional gel electrophoresis for typing of S. aureus isolates of bovine origin. PMID:27194685

  15. 34. VAL, DETAIL OF STAIRS ON COUNTERWEIGHT SLAB WITH COUNTERWEIGHT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. VAL, DETAIL OF STAIRS ON COUNTERWEIGHT SLAB WITH COUNTERWEIGHT CAR RAILS ON RIGHT AND PERSONNEL CAR RAILS ON LEFT. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. 14. LOOKING NORTHWEST THROUGH WOODS TOWARD THE SLAB AND BUTTRESS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. LOOKING NORTHWEST THROUGH WOODS TOWARD THE SLAB AND BUTTRESS SECTION. NEW DAM MODIFICATIONS WILL IMPACT THIS AREA. - Pit 4 Diversion Dam, Pit River west of State Highway 89, Big Bend, Shasta County, CA

  17. Waveform effects of a metastable olivine tongue in subducting slabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vidale, John E.; Williams, Quentin; Houston, Heidi

    1991-01-01

    Velocity models of subducting slabs with a kinetically-depressed olivine to beta- and gamma-spinel transition are constructed, and the effect that such structures would have on teleseismic P waveforms are examined using a full-wave finite-difference method. These 2D calculations yielded waveforms at a range of distances in the downdip direction. The slab models included a wedge-shaped, low-velocity metastable olivine tongue (MOTO) to a depth of 670 km, as well as a plausible thermal anomaly; one model further included a 10-km-thick fast layer on the surface of the slab. The principal effect of MOTO is to produce grazing reflections at wide angles off the phase boundary, generating a secondary arrival 0 to 4 seconds after the initial arrival depending on the take-off angle. The amplitude and timing of this feature vary with the lateral location of the seismic source within the slab cross-section.

  18. 9. FLAME DEFLECTOR FROM REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, VIEW TOWARDS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. FLAME DEFLECTOR FROM REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  19. 2. FLAME DEFLECTOR FROM THE REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. FLAME DEFLECTOR FROM THE REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-2, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  20. 7. NO. 2 CONTINUOUS SLAB REHEATING FURNACE OF THE 160' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. NO. 2 CONTINUOUS SLAB REHEATING FURNACE OF THE 160' PLATE MILL. INTERIOR REFRACTORY LINING VISIBLE BECAUSE OF DEMOLITION. - U.S. Steel Homestead Works, 160" Plate Mill, Along Monongahela River, Homestead, Allegheny County, PA

  1. PERSPECTIVE OF UNDERSIDE SHOWING ARCHED GIRDER AND SLAB CONSTRUCTION. NOTE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PERSPECTIVE OF UNDERSIDE SHOWING ARCHED GIRDER AND SLAB CONSTRUCTION. NOTE TWISTED BAR STOCK REINFORCING CAN BE SEEN. - Keggereis Ford Bridge, Spanning West Branch Conococheague Creek at State Route 4006, Willow Hill, Franklin County, PA

  2. 27. VAL, DETAIL OF LAUNCHER SLAB AND LAUNCHER RAIL WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. VAL, DETAIL OF LAUNCHER SLAB AND LAUNCHER RAIL WITH 7 INCH DIAMETER HOLE FOR SUPPORT CARRIAGE LOCKING PIN. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  3. 5. VAL LAUNCHER BRIDGE OVER LAUNCHER SLAB TAKEN FROM RESERVOIR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VAL LAUNCHER BRIDGE OVER LAUNCHER SLAB TAKEN FROM RESERVOIR LOOKING NORTH. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. DETAIL OF NORTH GUARDRAIL AND EXPANSION JOINT IN CONCRETE SLAB, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF NORTH GUARDRAIL AND EXPANSION JOINT IN CONCRETE SLAB, SHOWING DAMAGED SECTION OF GUARDRAIL AND ALUMINUM REPLACEMENT. VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Hassayampa Bridge, Spanning Hassayampa River at old U.S. Highway 80, Arlington, Maricopa County, AZ

  5. 31. VIEW OF CONCRETE SLAB AT WEST ENTRANCE OF WALKWAY. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. VIEW OF CONCRETE SLAB AT WEST ENTRANCE OF WALKWAY. '1944 JOE LANDETA' SCRATCHED INTO FRESH CONCRETE. March 1987 - Verde River Sheep Bridge, Spanning Verde River (Tonto National Forest), Cave Creek, Maricopa County, AZ

  6. OVERVIEW LOOKING SOUTH OF CONTAINMENT SYSTEM (TOP), SLAB CASTING MACHINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW LOOKING SOUTH OF CONTAINMENT SYSTEM (TOP), SLAB CASTING MACHINE AND RUN OUT WITH TRAVELING TORCH. MACHINE IS CASTING IN TWIN MOLD. - U.S. Steel, Fairfield Works, Continuous Caster, Fairfield, Jefferson County, AL

  7. INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING NORTHEAST, WITH OVENS AND STEEL SLAB EXITING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING NORTHEAST, WITH OVENS AND STEEL SLAB EXITING (LEFT) AND EDGING MACHINE/PRESS (RIGHT). - Central Iron Foundry, Hot Strip Mill Building, 1700 Holt Road, Holt, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  8. INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING NORTHEAST, WITH OVENS AND STEEL SLAB HAVING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING NORTHEAST, WITH OVENS AND STEEL SLAB HAVING EXITED (LEFT) AND PROCEEDING TO EDGER (RIGHT). - Central Iron Foundry, Hot Strip Mill Building, 1700 Holt Road, Holt, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  9. INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING NORTHEAST, WITH OVENS (LEFT) AND SLAB BEING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING NORTHEAST, WITH OVENS (LEFT) AND SLAB BEING PROCESSED THROUGH PRESS/STECKLER (RIGHT). - Central Iron Foundry, Hot Strip Mill Building, 1700 Holt Road, Holt, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  10. EXTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING NORTHEAST, WITH SLAB YARD. AT RIGHT IS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EXTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING NORTHEAST, WITH SLAB YARD. AT RIGHT IS HOT STRIP MILL BUILDING AND FURNACE. VIEW AT LEFT IS TOWARD CUT TO LENGTH BUILDING. - Central Iron Foundry Site, 1700 Holt Road, Holt, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  11. Estimation of dielectric slab permittivity using a flared coaxial line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Dong H.; Eom, Hyo J.

    2003-04-01

    Estimation of dielectric slab permittivity is considered by using a flared coaxial line. A problem of reflection from a flared coaxial line that radiates into a dielectric slab with a flange is solved. A flared coaxial line is modeled with multiply stepped coaxial lines with different inner and outer conductors. A set of simultaneous equations for the modal coefficients is constituted based on the boundary conditions. Computations are performed to illustrate the reflection behavior in terms of the coaxial line geometry, frequency, and permittivity of a dielectric slab. Nomograms are developed to estimate the permittivity from the measured reflection coefficients. The utility of a flared coaxial line for the determination of slab permittivity is discussed.

  12. 10. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM SOUTHEASTERN EDGE, ACCESS RAMPS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM SOUTHEASTERN EDGE, ACCESS RAMPS AT LEFT AND RIGHT, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  13. 11. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM THE SOUTHERN EDGE, VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM THE SOUTHERN EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS NORTH. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-2, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  14. 12. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM NORTHEASTERN EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM NORTHEASTERN EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  15. 7. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM NORTHWEST EDGE, FLAME DEFLECTOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM NORTHWEST EDGE, FLAME DEFLECTOR AT RIGHT, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHEAST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, CaptiveTest Stand D-3, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  16. 13. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM SOUTHWESTERN EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM SOUTHWESTERN EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHEAST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  17. 13. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM THE NORTHERN EDGE, VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM THE NORTHERN EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-2, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  18. 9. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM NORTHEAST EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM NORTHEAST EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-4, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  19. 11. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, FLAME DEFLECTOR AT RIGHT, CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, FLAME DEFLECTOR AT RIGHT, CONTROL BUILDING B AT FAR CENTER RIGHT. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-4, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  20. 10. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM SOUTHEAST EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM SOUTHEAST EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-4, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  1. 12. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM THE NORTHERN EDGE, VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM THE NORTHERN EDGE, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTH. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-2, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  2. 8. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM NORTHWEST EDGE, ACCESS RAMP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM NORTHWEST EDGE, ACCESS RAMP IN FOREGROUND, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHEAST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, CaptiveTest Stand D-3, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  3. 11. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, GUARD RAIL AT CENTER, VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, GUARD RAIL AT CENTER, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  4. A VIEW OF FOUNDATION (SLAB ON GRADE) WITH SCALE POLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A VIEW OF FOUNDATION (SLAB ON GRADE) WITH SCALE POLE LOOKING INTO SPRINKLER BOX ON EAST SIDE OF BUILDING (01/03/2008) - Wake Island Airfield, Terminal Building, West Side of Wake Avenue, Wake Island, Wake Island, UM

  5. 9. STONE SLAB CULVERT UNDER CARRIAGE ROAD AT HORSESHOE CURVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. STONE SLAB CULVERT UNDER CARRIAGE ROAD AT HORSESHOE CURVE NEAR GIANT SLIDE TRAIL MARKER ON AROUND-THE-MOUNTAIN LOOP. - Rockefeller Carriage Roads, Mount Desert Island, Bar Harbor, Hancock County, ME

  6. Decarbonation of subducting slabs: insight from thermomechanical-petrological numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Christopher M.; Gorczyk, Weronika; Gerya, Taras

    2015-04-01

    This work extends a numerical geodynamic modelling code (I2VIS) to simulate subduction of carbonated lithologies (altered basalts and carbonated sediments) into the mantle. Code modifications now consider devolatilisation of H2O-CO2 fluids, a CO2-melt solubility parameterisation for molten sediments, and allows for carbonation of mantle peridotites. The purpose is to better understand slab generated CO2 fluxes and consequent subduction of carbonates into the deep mantle via numerical simulation. Specifically, we vary two key model parameters: 1) slab convergence rate (1,2,3,4,5 cm y-1) and 2) converging oceanic slab age (20,40,60,80 Ma) based on a half-space cooling model. The aim is to elucidate the role subduction dynamics has (i.e., spontaneous sedimentary diapirism, slab roll-back, and shear heating) with respect to slab decarbonation trends not entirely captured in previous experimental and thermodynamic investigations. This is accomplished within a fully coupled petrological-thermomechanical modelling framework utilising a characteristics-based marker-in-cell technique capable of solving visco-plastic rheologies. The thermodynamic database is modified from its original state to reflect the addition of carbonate as CO2 added to the rock's overall bulk composition. Modifications to original lithological units and volatile bulk compositions are as follows: GLOSS average sediments (H2O: 7.29 wt% & CO2: 3.01 wt%), altered basalts (H2O: 2.63 wt% & CO2: 2.90 wt%), and metasomatised peridotite (H2O: 1.98 wt% & CO2: 1.5 wt%). We resolve stable mineralogy and extract rock properties via PerpleX at a resolution of 5K and 25 MPa. Devolatilisation/consumption and stability of H2O-CO2 fluid is determined by accessing the thermodynamic database. When fluid is released due to unstable conditions, it is tracked via markers that freely advect within the velocity field until consumed. 56 numerical models were completed and our results show excellent agreement in dynamics with

  7. High frequency seismic waves and slab structures beneath Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Daoyuan; Miller, Meghan S.; Piana Agostinetti, Nicola; Asimow, Paul D.; Li, Dunzhu

    2014-04-01

    Tomographic images indicate a complicated subducted slab structure beneath the central Mediterranean where gaps in fast velocity anomalies in the upper mantle are interpreted as slab tears. The detailed shape and location of these tears are important for kinematic reconstructions and understanding the evolution of the subduction system. However, tomographic images, which are produced by smoothed, damped inversions, will underestimate the sharpness of the structures. Here, we use the records from the Italian National Seismic Network (IV) to study the detailed slab structure. The waveform records for stations in Calabria show large amplitude, high frequency (f>5 Hz) late arrivals with long coda after a relatively low-frequency onset for both P and S waves. In contrast, the stations in the southern and central Apennines lack such high frequency arrivals, which correlate spatially with the central Apennines slab window inferred from tomography and receiver function studies. Thus, studying the high frequency arrivals provides an effective way to investigate the structure of slab and detect possible slab tears. The observed high frequency arrivals in the southern Italy are the strongest for events from 300 km depth and greater whose hypocenters are located within the slab inferred from fast P-wave velocity perturbations. This characteristic behavior agrees with previous studies from other tectonic regions, suggesting the high frequency energy is generated by small scale heterogeneities within the slab which act as scatterers. Furthermore, using a 2-D finite difference (FD) code, we calculate synthetic seismograms to search for the scale, shape and velocity perturbations of the heterogeneities that may explain features observed in the data. Our preferred model of the slab heterogeneities beneath the Tyrrhenian Sea has laminar structure parallel to the slab dip and can be described by a von Kármán function with a down-dip correlation length of 10 km and 0.5 km in

  8. Kinematic Thermal Model for Tonga Descending Slab: A Case Study on the Influence of Velocity Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, K.; Wei, D.

    2009-12-01

    Within the core of a colder slab (e.g., the Tonga slab), the existence of metastable olivine (MO), extending deeper than the 410 km, has several important implications for understanding both the mechanism of deep earthquakes (>300 km) and the slab dynamics. The effect of subduction kinematics on the slab thermal structure has been widely investigated by prescribing Constant Velocity field for the subducting Slab (CVS-model), which may result in artificial computational interferences along the slab interfaces by accelerating the heating of subducting slabs. For the purpose of moderating the CVS effect and investigating the influence of metastable phase transformations on deep seismicity, we construct a 2-dimensional finite element thermal model for a 120 Ma-old 50° dipping oceanic lithosphere descending at 10 cm/yr with Velocity Boundary Layers (VBL-model), within which the velocities decrease from v to zero with the distance to the interface. The density anomalies for the VBL-model show significant variations (~100 kg/m3) at depths of both ~230 and ~410 km, whereas CVS-model shows anomalies above ~410 km. Thus, the VBL-model result is in better agreement with our knowledge of the subducting evolution that the density anomalies are primarily controlled by the conductive cooling and the phase transitions for the shallow depths of the slab and the transition zone, respectively. The VBL-model pressure anomalies also indicate that the negative buoyancy force causes the downdip tensional (DDT) earthquakes occurring above depth of ~230 km. At depths >410 km, the zonal distributed pressures of the VBL-model show negative and positive anomalies within the core and the outermost portion of slab, respectively, whereas the CVS-model produces negative pressure anomalies. The seismicity shows that down-dip compressional (DDC) and DDT deep earthquakes occur along the lower and upper interfaces of Tonga slab, whereas the P- and T-axes for the earthquakes in-between portion are

  9. Development of common conversion point stacking of receiver functions for detecting subducted slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Y.; Ohkura, T.; Hirahara, K.; Shibutani, T.

    2010-12-01

    In subduction zones, the subducting slabs are thought to convey fluid into the mantle wedge to cause arc volcanism (Hasegawa et al., 2008. Iwamori, 2007). Kawakatsu & Watada (2007) examined the Pacific slab subducting beneath northeast Japan with receiver function (RF) analysis, and revealed where the hydrated oceanic crust and the serpentinized mantle wedge exist. In the other subduction zones, it is also essential to examine subducting slabs for better understanding of water transportation and volcanic activities. In this study, we develop a new method to migrate RFs in order to examine subducting slabs with high dip angle (Abe et al., submitted to GJI) and apply this method to examination of the Philippine Sea slab (PHS). The RF technique is one of the useful methods to obtain seismic velocity discontinuities. Ps phases converted at discontinuities in a teleseismic coda can be detected by RF analysis. RFs are usually converted to depth domain assuming a 1-d velocity structure, and the geometry of discontinuities is obtained (e.g. Yamauchi et al., 2003). In subduction zones, however, subducting slabs usually dip, and we should take into account the refraction of seismic waves at dipping interfaces. Therefore, we use the multi-stage fast marching method (FMM, de Kool et al., 2006) to convert RFs into depth domain. We stack transverse RFs, since polarity of them does not change depending on their dip angles and they are better at detecting phases converted at dipping interfaces than radial RFs. We have confirmed that this method works properly with synthetic test. We apply our method to waveform data observed in Kyushu, Japan, where PHS is subducting toward WNW and the Wadati-Benioff zone dips at 30° at depths up to 80 km, and dips at 70° at depths between 80 km and 170 km. We obtain a vertical section, on which RF amplitude is projected, across central part of Kyushu perpendicular to the depth contour of the Wadati-Benioff zone. On the section, positive peaks of

  10. Subduction and slab tearing dynamics constrained by thermal anomalies in the Anatolia-Aegean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, Vincent; Guillou-Frottier, Laurent; Jolivet, Laurent; Loiselet, Christelle; Bouchot, Vincent

    2015-04-01

    Most previous geodynamic studies treat subduction zones with backward migration (rollback), slab tearing or slab breakoff by numerical or laboratory experiments and by integrating seismicity, tomography data and geochemical studies. Here we investigate these processes in the Aegean-Anatolian domain and particularly the western side of Turkey (western Anatolia) by incorporating thermal regime of the crust, and in particular the geothermal fields as anomalies that could reflect the thermal state of Aegean subduction zone at depth. This domain is characterized by 1) extensional crustal deformation which progressively localized during the Aegean slab retreat from late Eocene to Present, enabling the development of a hot backarc domain; this extension accelerated between 15 and 8 Ma coeval with a fast rotation of the Hellenides and 2) since the latest Miocene, extension is coupled with the development of the North Anatolian Fault that accommodates the westward escape of the Anatolian block. Both the acceleration of extension in the Middle Miocene and the recent escape of Anatolia have been proposed to result from several slab tearing events, the first one being located below western Turkey and the Eastern Aegean Sea, a second one below eastern Turkey and a last one below the Corinth Rift (Faccenna et al., 2006; Jolivet et al., 2013). The distribution of magmatism and mineral resources has been suggested to be largely controlled by these retreat and tearing events (Menant et al., submitted). The development of a widespread active geothermal province in western Anatolia is unlikely to simply result from the Quaternary magmatism whose volcanism part has a too limited extent. Conversely, the long wavelength east-west variation of surface heat flow density could reflect deep thermal processes in the lower crust and/or deeper, and we thus look for possible connections with larger-scale mantle dynamics. We use the distribution of thermal anomalies at different scales and the 3

  11. Linear and nonlinear dielectric theory for a slab: The connections between the phenomenological coefficients and the susceptibilities.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Robert L

    2016-08-28

    The response of dielectric media to electromagnetic fields can be described by using either the response to a Maxwell field E or to an externally produced field E. The former response is measured by phenomenological (dielectric) coefficients and the latter by susceptibilities. With the purpose of clarifying some recent proposals, the connections between the linear (two-point) and first non-vanishing nonlinear (four-point) dielectric coefficients and the susceptibilities for media confined to a slab are examined using a general procedure developed sometime ago. Unlike the relations found for correlations between a local polarization density and the integrated polarization densities (total polarizations), the point-point connections give rise to non-vanishing cross correlations between polarization densities which are parallel and perpendicular to the slab surfaces. The cross correlations in the two-point connections vanish when one polarization density is integrated to form the correlations between a local polarization density and the total polarization thereby losing angular information. The integrated parallel and perpendicular correlations remain different. When the four-point connections are similarly integrated most, but not all, cross correlations vanish. The angular correlations induced by the slab surfaces render the use of point-point correlations that are valid for isotropic media invalid for use in the integrated slab densities. In addition, the nonlinear fluctuations in the perpendicular components are drastically reduced relative to those in the parallel components or in isotropic media. PMID:27586902

  12. CONFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT USING GELS

    SciTech Connect

    Randall S. Seright

    2004-03-01

    This technical progress report describes work performed from September 1, 2003, through February 29, 2004, for the project, ''Conformance Improvement Using Gels.'' We examined the properties of several ''partially formed'' gels that were formulated with a combination of high and low molecular weight HPAM polymers. After placement in 4-mm-wide fractures, these gels required about 25 psi/ft for brine to breach the gel (the best performance to date in fractures this wide). After this breach, stabilized residual resistance factors decreased significantly with increased flow rate. Also, residual resistance factors were up to 9 times greater for water than for oil. Nevertheless, permeability reduction factors were substantial for both water and oil flow. Gel with 2.5% chopped fiberglass effectively plugged 4-mm-wide fractures if a 0.5-mm-wide constriction was present. The ability to screen-out at a constriction appears crucial for particulate incorporation to be useful in plugging fractures. In addition to fiberglass, we examined incorporation of polypropylene fibers into gels. Once dispersed in brine or gelant, the polypropylene fibers exhibited the least gravity segregation of any particulate that we have tested to date. In fractures with widths of at least 2 mm, 24-hr-old gels (0.5% high molecular weight HPAM) with 0.5% fiber did not exhibit progressive plugging during placement and showed extrusion pressure gradients similar to those of gels without the fiber. The presence of the fiber roughly doubled the gel's resistance to first breach by brine flow. The breaching pressure gradients were not as large as for gels made with high and low molecular weight polymers (mentioned above). However, their material requirements and costs (i.e., polymer and/or particulate concentrations) were substantially lower than for those gels. A partially formed gel made with 0.5% HPAM did not enter a 0.052-mm-wide fracture when applying a pressure gradient of 65 psi/ft. This result

  13. Double seismic zone and dehydration embrittlement of the subducting slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, Tadashi; Seno, Tetsuzo

    2003-04-01

    Dehydration embrittlement of metamorphosed oceanic crust and mantle in the subducting slab may be responsible for the occurrence of intermediate-depth earthquakes. We explore the possibility that this hypothesis can explain the morphology of the double seismic zones observed in northeast Japan, southwest Japan, northeast Taiwan, northern Chile, Cape Mendocino, and eastern Aleutians. We calculate transient temperature structures of slabs based on geologically estimated subduction histories of these regions. We then determine dehydration loci of metamorphosed oceanic crust and serpentinized mantle using experimentally derived phase diagrams. The depth range of the dehydration loci of metamorphosed oceanic crust and serpentine is dependent on slab age. The dehydration loci of serpentine produce a double-layered structure. Because the upper dehydration loci of serpentine are mostly located in the wedge mantle above the slab, we regard the upper plane seismicity representing dehydration embrittlement in the oceanic crust, and we fix the slab geometry so that the upper plane seismicity is just below the upper surface of the slab. We find that the lower plane seismicity is located at the lower dehydration loci of serpentine, which indicates that the morphology of the double seismic zones is consistent with the dehydration embrittlement.

  14. Carrier transport in Bi2Se3 topological insulator slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Gaurav; Lin, Hsin; Bansil, Arun; Jalil, Mansoor Bin Abdul; Liang, Gengchiau

    2015-11-01

    Electron transport in Bi2Se3 topological insulator slabs is investigated in the thermal activation regime (>50 K) both in the absence (ballistic) and presence of weak and strong acoustic phonon scattering using the non-equilibrium Green function approach. Resistance of the slab is simulated as a function of temperature for a range of slab thicknesses and effective doping in order to gain a handle on how various factors interact and compete to determine the overall resistance of the slab. If the Bi2Se3 slab is biased at the Dirac point, resistance is found to display an insulating trend even for strong electron-phonon coupling strength. However, when the Fermi-level lies close to the bulk conduction band (heavy electron doping), phonon scattering can dominate and result in a metallic behavior, although the insulating trend is retained in the limit of ballistic transport. Depending on values of the operating parameters, the temperature dependence of the slab is found to exhibit a remarkably complex behavior, which ranges from insulating to metallic, and includes cases where the resistance exhibits a local maximum, much like the contradictory behaviors seen experimentally in various experiments.

  15. Modeling chemoresponsive polymer gels.

    PubMed

    Kuksenok, Olga; Deb, Debabrata; Dayal, Pratyush; Balazs, Anna C

    2014-01-01

    Stimuli-responsive gels are vital components in the next generation of smart devices, which can sense and dynamically respond to changes in the local environment and thereby exhibit more autonomous functionality. We describe recently developed computational methods for simulating the properties of such stimuli-responsive gels in the presence of optical, chemical, and thermal gradients. Using these models, we determine how to harness light to drive shape changes and directed motion in spirobenzopyran-containing gels. Focusing on oscillating gels undergoing the Belousov-Zhabotinksy reaction, we demonstrate that these materials can spontaneously form self-rotating assemblies, or pinwheels. Finally, we model temperature-sensitive gels that encompass chemically reactive filaments to optimize the performance of this system as a homeostatic device for regulating temperature. These studies could facilitate the development of soft robots that autonomously interconvert chemical and mechanical energy and thus perform vital functions without the continuous need of external power sources. PMID:24498954

  16. Fabrication, modeling and optimization of an ionic polymer gel actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Choonghee; Naguib, Hani E.; Kwon, Roy H.

    2011-04-01

    The modeling of the electro-active behavior of ionic polymer gel is studied and the optimum conditions that maximize the deflection of the gel are investigated. The bending deformation of polymer gel under an electric field is formulated by using chemo-electro-mechanical parameters. In the modeling, swelling and shrinking phenomena due to the differences in ion concentration at the boundary between the gel and solution are considered prior to the application of an electric field, and then bending actuation is applied. As the driving force of swelling, shrinking and bending deformation, differential osmotic pressure at the boundary of the gel and solution is considered. From this behavior, the strain or deflection of the gel is calculated. To find the optimum design parameter settings (electric voltage, thickness of gel, concentration of polyion in the gel, ion concentration in the solution, and degree of cross-linking in the gel) for bending deformation, a nonlinear constrained optimization model is formulated. In the optimization model, a bending deflection equation of the gel is used as an objective function, and a range of decision variables and their relationships are used as constraint equations. Also, actuation experiments are conducted using poly(2-acrylamido-2-methylpropane sulfonic acid) (PAMPS) gel and the optimum conditions predicted by the proposed model have been verified by the experiments.

  17. Scaling of Electron Thermal Conductivity during the Transition between Slab and Mixed Slab-Toroidal ETG Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Vladimir; Balbaky, Abed; Sen, Amiya K.

    2015-11-01

    Transition from the slab to the toroidal branch of the electron temperature gradient (ETG) mode has been successfully achieved in a basic experiment in Columbia Linear Machine CLM. We found a modest increase in saturated ETG potential fluctuations (~ 2 ×) and a substantial increase in the power density of individual mode peaks (~ 4 - 5 ×) with increased levels of curvature. We have obtained a set of experimental scalings for electron thermal conductivity χ⊥e as a function of the inverse radius of curvature Rc-1 for different fluctuation levels of the initial slab ETG mode. We found that thermal conductivity for pure slab modes is larger than it is for mixed slab-toroidal ETG modes with the same level of mode fluctuation. This effective reduction in diffusive transport can be partly explained by the flute nature of the toroidal ETG mode. This research was supported by the Department of Electrical Engineering of Columbia University.

  18. Characterizing Seismic Anisotropy across the Peruvian Flat-Slab Subduction Zone: Implications for the Dynamics of Flat-Slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eakin, Caroline; Long, Maureen; Beck, Susan; Wagner, Lara; Tavera, Hernando

    2014-05-01

    Although 10% of subduction zones worldwide today exhibit shallow or flat subduction, we are yet to fully understand how and why these slabs go flat. An excellent study location for such a problem is in Peru, where the largest region of flat-subduction currently exists, extending ~1500 km in length (from 3 °S to 15 °S) and ~300 km in width. Across this region we investigate the pattern of seismic anisotropy, an indicator for past and/or ongoing deformation in the upper mantle. To achieve this we conduct shear wave splitting analyzes at 40 broadband stations from the PULSE project (PerU Lithosphere and Slab Experiment). These stations were deployed for 2+ years across the southern half of the Peruvian flat-slab region. We present detailed shear wave splitting results for both teleseismic events (such as SKS, SKKS, PKS, sSKS) that sample the upper mantle column beneath the stations as well as direct S from local events that constrain anisotropy in the upper portion of the subduction zone. We analyze the variability of our results with respect to initial polarizations, ray paths, and frequency content as well as spatial variability between stations as the underlying slab morphology changes. Teleseismic results show predominately NW-SE fast polarizations (trench oblique to sub-parallel) over the flat-slab region east of Lima. These results are consistent with observations of more complex multi-layered anisotropy beneath a nearby permanent station (NNA) that suggests a trench-perpendicular fast direction in the lowest layer in the sub-slab mantle. Further south, towards the transition to steeper subduction, the splitting pattern becomes increasingly dominated by null measurements. Over to the east however, beyond Cuzco, where the mantle wedge might begin to play a role, we record fast polarizations quasi-parallel to the local slab contours. Local S results indicate the presence of weak (delay times typically less than 0.5 seconds) and heterogeneous supra-slab

  19. Analysis of mode scattering from an abruptly ended dielectric slab waveguide by an accelerated iteration technique.

    PubMed

    Tigelis, I G; Manenkov, A B

    2000-12-01

    A new modification of the integral equation method using an iteration technique with "accelerating" parameters is presented to solve the problem of guided-mode scattering from an abruptly ended asymmetrical slab waveguide. The optimal choice of the parameters is shown to be closely connected with the variational principle. The electric-field distribution at the terminal plane, the reflection coefficient of the guided mode, and the far-field radiation pattern are computed. Numerical results are presented for several cases of abruptly ended waveguides, including the systems with constant and variable profiles of the refractive indices. The phenomenon of the radiation pattern rotation is examined in detail. PMID:11140485

  20. SLAB symmetric dielectric micron scale structures for high gradient electron acceleration.

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, J. B.; Schoessow, P. V.

    1999-06-12

    A class of planar microstructure is proposed which provide high accelerating gradients when excited by an infrared laser pulse. These structures consist of parallel dielectric slabs separated by a vacuum gap; the dielectric or the outer surface coating are spatially modulated at the laser wavelength along the beam direction so as to support a standing wave accelerating field. We have developed numerical and analytic models of the accelerating mode fields in the structure. We show an optimized coupling scheme such that this mode is excited resonantly with a large quality factor. The status of planned experiments on fabricating and measuring these planar structures will be described.

  1. Fluorographic detection of tritiated glycopeptides and oligosaccharides separated on polyacrylamide gels: analysis of glycans from Dictyostelium discoideum glycoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Prem Das, O.; Henderson, E.J.

    1986-11-01

    Previous workers have shown that oligosaccharides and glycopeptides can be separated by electrophoresis in buffers containing borate ions. However, normal fluorography of tritium-labeled structures cannot be performed because the glycans are soluble and can diffuse during equilibration with scintillants. This problem has been circumvented by equilibration of the gel with 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) prior to electrophoresis. The presence of PPO in the gel during electrophoresis does not alter mobility of the glycopeptides and oligosaccharides. After electrophoresis, the gel is simply dried and fluorography performed. This allows sensitive and precise comparisons of labeled samples in parallel lanes of a slab gel and, since mobilities are highly reproducible, between different gels. The procedure is preparative in that after fluorography the gel bands can be quantitatively eluted for further study, without any apparent modification by the procedure. In this report, the procedure is illustrated by fractionation of both neutral and anionic glycopeptides produced by the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum.

  2. Method for preparing hydrous iron oxide gels and spherules

    DOEpatents

    Collins, Jack L.; Lauf, Robert J.; Anderson, Kimberly K.

    2003-07-29

    The present invention is directed to methods for preparing hydrous iron oxide spherules, hydrous iron oxide gels such as gel slabs, films, capillary and electrophoresis gels, iron monohydrogen phosphate spherules, hydrous iron oxide spherules having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form composite sorbents and catalysts, iron monohydrogen phosphate spherules having suspendable particles of at least one different sorbent homogeneously embedded within to form a composite sorbent, iron oxide spherules having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite of hydrous iron oxide fiber materials, iron oxide fiber materials, hydrous iron oxide fiber materials having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite, iron oxide fiber materials having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite, dielectric spherules of barium, strontium, and lead ferrites and mixtures thereof, and composite catalytic spherules of barium or strontium ferrite embedded with oxides of Mg, Zn, Pb, Ce and mixtures thereof. These variations of hydrous iron oxide spherules and gel forms prepared by the gel-sphere, internal gelation process offer more useful forms of inorganic ion exchangers, catalysts, getters, dielectrics, and ceramics.

  3. Analysis of Fusarium populations in a soybean field under different fertilization management by real-time quantitative PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The abundance and population structure of Fusarium spp. in field soils were assessed to determine the effect of different fertilization treatments on soil microbial community and potential role in disease management. The field was under soybean-wheat-corn rotation located in the black soil (Udic Mo...

  4. Analytical and numerical treatment of drift-tearing and resistive drift instabilities in plasma slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirnov, V. V.; Hegna, C. C.; Sauppe, J. P.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2015-11-01

    We consider modification to linear resistive MHD instability theory in a slab due to two categories of non-MHD effects: (1) electron and ion diamagnetic flows caused by equilibrium pressure gradients and (2) electron and ion decoupling on short scales associated with kinetic Alfven and whistler waves. The relationship between the expected stabilizing response due to the effects (1) and the destabilizing contribution caused by the dispersive waves (2) is investigated. An analytic solution combining the effect of diamagnetic flows and the ion-sound gyroradius contribution is derived using a perturbative approach. Linear numerical simulations using the NIMROD code are performed with cold ions and hot electrons in plasma slab with a doubly periodic box bounded by two perfectly conducting walls. Configurations with magnetic shear are unstable to current-driven drift-tearing instability. A second linearly unstable resistive drift type mode with largely electrostatic perturbations is also observed in simulations. The resistive-drift mode is suppressed by magnetic shear in unbounded domains but can remain unstable in the simulations with finite slab thickness and perfectly conducting wall. Additionally, the growth rate is sensitive to the magnetic shear length. We analyze whether these modes can be unstable in cylindrical configurations with magnetic shear typical for reversed field pinches. The material is based on work supported by the U.S. DOE and NSF.

  5. AREA FACTOR DETERMINATIONS FOR AN INDUSTRIAL WORKER EXPOSED TO A CONCRETE SLAB END-STATE

    SciTech Connect

    Jannik, T; Patricia Lee, P; Eduardo Farfan, E; Jesse Roach, J

    2007-02-08

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) is decommissioning many of its excess facilities through removal of the facility structures leaving only the concrete-slab foundations in place. Site-specific, risk-based derived concentration guideline levels (DCGLs) for radionuclides have been determined for a future industrial worker potentially exposed to residual contamination on these concrete slabs as described in Jannik [1]. These risk-based DCGLs were estimated for an exposure area of 100 m{sup 2}. During deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) operations at SRS, the need for area factors for larger and smaller contaminated areas arose. This paper compares the area factors determined for an industrial worker exposed to a concrete slab end-state for several radionuclides of concern at SRS with (1) the illustrative area factors provided in MARSSIM [2], (2) the area correction factors provided in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Soil Screening Guidance [3], and (3) the hot spot criterion for field application provided in the RESRAD User's Manual [4].

  6. Geochemical interaction between subducting slab and mantle wedge:Insight from observation and numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baitsch Ghirardello, B.; Gerya, T. V.; Burg, J.-P.; Jagoutz, O.

    2009-04-01

    Understanding the subduction factory and geochemical interactions between subducting slab and the overlying non homogeneously depleted mantle wedge requires better knowledge of passways of slab-derived fluids and melts and their interactions with the melt source in the mantle wedge. Our approach of understanding subduction-related processes consists in coupled geochemical-petrological-thermomechanical numerical geodynamic modelling of subduction zones. With this method we can simulate and visualize the evolution of various fields such as temperature, pressure, melt production etc. Furthermore we extend this tool for 2D and 3D modelling of the evolution of various geochemical signatures in subduction zones. Implementation of geochemical signatures in numerical models is based on marker-in-cell method and allows capturing influences of various key processes such as mechanical mixing of crustal and mantle rocks, fluid release, transport and consuming and melt generation and extraction. Concerning the isotopic signatures, we focus at the first stage on a limited number of elements: Pb, Hf, Sr and Nd. These incompatible elements are transported by hydrated fluids and/or melts through the mantle wedge and therefore they are good tracers for presenting the interaction between mantle wedge and slab. The chosen incompatible elements are also well explored and a large data set is available from literature. At this stage we focus on intra-oceanic subduction and numerical modelling predictions are compared to natural geochemical data from various modern and fossil subduction zones (Aleutian, Marianas, New Britain, Kermadec arcs, Kohistan, Vanuatu).

  7. The Period Ratio for Standing Kink and Sausage Modes in Solar Structures with Siphon Flow. I. Magnetized Slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Habbal, Shadia Rifai; Chen, Yanjun

    2013-04-01

    In the applications of solar magneto-seismology, the ratio of the period of the fundamental mode to twice the period of its first overtone, P 1/2P 2, plays an important role. We examine how field-aligned flows affect the dispersion properties, and hence the period ratios, of standing modes supported by magnetic slabs in the solar atmosphere. We numerically solve the dispersion relations and devise a graphic means to construct standing modes. For coronal slabs, we find that the flow effects are significant for the fast kink and sausage modes alike. For the kink ones, they may reduce P 1/2P 2 by up to 23% compared with the static case, and the minimum allowed P 1/2P 2 can fall below the lower limit analytically derived for static slabs. For the sausage modes, while introducing the flow reduces P 1/2P 2 by typically <~ 5% relative to the static case, it significantly increases the threshold aspect ratio only above which standing sausage modes can be supported, meaning that their detectability is restricted to even wider slabs. In the case of photospheric slabs, the flow effect is not as strong. However, standing modes are distinct from the coronal case in that standing kink modes show a P 1/2P 2 that deviates from unity even for a zero-width slab, while standing sausage modes no longer suffer from a threshold aspect ratio. We conclude that transverse structuring in plasma density and flow speed should be considered in seismological applications of multiple periodicities to solar atmospheric structures.

  8. THE PERIOD RATIO FOR STANDING KINK AND SAUSAGE MODES IN SOLAR STRUCTURES WITH SIPHON FLOW. I. MAGNETIZED SLABS

    SciTech Connect

    Li Bo; Habbal, Shadia Rifai; Chen Yanjun

    2013-04-20

    In the applications of solar magneto-seismology, the ratio of the period of the fundamental mode to twice the period of its first overtone, P{sub 1}/2P{sub 2}, plays an important role. We examine how field-aligned flows affect the dispersion properties, and hence the period ratios, of standing modes supported by magnetic slabs in the solar atmosphere. We numerically solve the dispersion relations and devise a graphic means to construct standing modes. For coronal slabs, we find that the flow effects are significant for the fast kink and sausage modes alike. For the kink ones, they may reduce P{sub 1}/2P{sub 2} by up to 23% compared with the static case, and the minimum allowed P{sub 1}/2P{sub 2} can fall below the lower limit analytically derived for static slabs. For the sausage modes, while introducing the flow reduces P{sub 1}/2P{sub 2} by typically {approx}< 5% relative to the static case, it significantly increases the threshold aspect ratio only above which standing sausage modes can be supported, meaning that their detectability is restricted to even wider slabs. In the case of photospheric slabs, the flow effect is not as strong. However, standing modes are distinct from the coronal case in that standing kink modes show a P{sub 1}/2P{sub 2} that deviates from unity even for a zero-width slab, while standing sausage modes no longer suffer from a threshold aspect ratio. We conclude that transverse structuring in plasma density and flow speed should be considered in seismological applications of multiple periodicities to solar atmospheric structures.

  9. Performance of a 500 watt Nd:GGG zigzag slab oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Zapata, L.; Manes, K.R.; Christie, D.; Davin, J.; Blink, J.; Penland, J.; Demaret, R.; Dallum, G.

    1990-01-12

    Realization of practical multi-kilowatt Nd:garnet lasers will require the scale-up of crystal dimensions as well as more powerful pumping sources. A high average power zigzag slab crystal amplifier testing facility has been established at LLNL which employs two 100 kW{sub e} vortex stabilized arc lamps, cooled reflectors and a cooled, spectrally filtered, crystal slab mounting fixture. The operational characteristics of the first crystal laser to be tested in this setup, a Nd:GGG zigzag oscillator, are presented. A Nd:GGG crystal of dimensions 18 {times} 7 {times} 0.5 cm{sup 3}, doped at 2 {times} 10{sup 20} cm{sup {minus}3} Nd{sup 3+} atomic density, was pumped by up to 40 kW of filtered argon line emission. A small-signal single pass gain (losses excluded) of 1.09 was measured with a probe laser when the DC input to the lamps was 43 kW{sub e}. Our power supply was then modified to operate in a pulsed mode and provided one to three milliseconds pulses at 120 Hz. An average optical output power of 490 watts was obtained at a lamp input power of 93 kW{sub e} in an unoptimized resonator. The laser output power declined after a few tens of seconds since the slab tips were not properly cooled. A birdhouse specular lamp reflector and a contoured diffuse reflector were tested; in both cases the pump illuminated crystal surface was smaller than the total crystal face area. Fluorescence imaging of the zigzag amplifier's output aperture registered a smoother, more uniform pumping profile when the diffuse reflector was used. Uniformity of pumping results in decreased resonator loss and yields higher laser output power. Thermo-optic distortions observed in these preliminary tests are analyzed with the aid of computer simulations of the thermal fields, stresses, and surface displacements of our crystal slab. 3 refs., 12 figs.

  10. Demonstration of a 500 mJ InnoSlab-amplifier for future lidar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löhring, J.; Strotkamp, M.; Elsen, F.; Kasemann, R.; Klein, J.; Traub, M.; Kochem, G.; Meissner, A.; Höfer, M.; Hoffmann, D.

    2016-03-01

    In the field of atmospheric research lidar is a powerful technology to measure remotely different parameters like gas or aerosol concentrations, wind speed or temperature profiles. For global coverage, spaceborne systems are advantageous. To achieve highly accurate measurements over long distances high pulse energies are required. A Nd:YAG-MOPA system consisting of a stable oscillator and two subsequent InnoSlab-based amplifier stages was designed and built as a breadboard demonstrator. Overall, more than 500 mJ of pulse energy at 100 Hz pulse repetition frequency at about 30 ns pulse duration in single longitudinal mode were demonstrated. When seeded with 75 mJ pulses, the 2nd amplifier stage achieved an optical efficiency (pump energy to extracted energy) of more than 23 % at excellent beam quality. Recently, different MOPA systems comprising a single InnoSlab amplifier stage in the 100 mJ regime were designed and built for current and future airborne and spaceborne lidar missions. Amplification factors of about 10 at optical efficiencies of about 23 % were achieved. In order to address the 500 mJ regime the established InnoSlab design was scaled geometrically in a straight forward way. Hereby, the basic design properties like stored energy densities, fluences and thermal load densities were retained. The InnoSlab concept has demonstrated the potential to fulfill the strong requirements of spaceborne instruments concerning high efficiency at low optical loads, excellent beam quality at low system complexity. Therefore, it was chosen as baseline concept for the MERLIN mission, currently in phase B.

  11. Imaging subducted high velocity slabs beneath the sea of Okhotsk using depth phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, K.; Li, D.; Helmberger, D. V.; Sun, D.; Wei, S.

    2014-12-01

    A recent study of a shallow Kuril subduction zone event displays significant waveform multi-pathing for paths propagating down the slab towards Europe(Zhan,Zhongwen 2014). Relatively fast structures (5%) are invoked to simulate such observations requiring numerical methods to capture such proportional distortions. Here, we present results from the reverse direction that is the effects on depth phases of deep events propagating up the slab. In particular the Mw6.7 Sea of Okhotsk deep earthquake occurred at a depth of 640 km is believed to be near the bottom of the slab structure and produced an abundance of depth phases. Differential travel time sP-P analysis shows a systematic decrease of up to 5 seconds from Europe to Australia and then to Pacific which is indicative of a dipping high velocity layer above the source region. Multiple simulations using WKM(An upgraded variation of the traditional WKBJ method) and finite difference methods were conducted in an effort to assess the effects of sharp structure on the whole wave-field. Results obtained from analytical methods, by the WKM code become questionable compared against the finite difference method due to its inability to handle the diffraction phases which become crucial in complex structures. In this example, seismicity clustered within a 45 degree dipping benioff zone at shallow depth but became blurred beyond 400 km. Finite difference simulations showed that a slab shapped structure that follows the benioff zone at shallow depth and steepens beyond 400 km produces a model that can account for the sP-P differential travel times of our 5s for oceanic paths.

  12. Magnetic Hyperthermia in ferrofluid-gel composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemala, Humeshkar; Wadehra, Anshu; Dixit, Ambesh; Regmi, Rajesh; Vaishnava, Prem; Lawes, Gavin; Naik, Ratna

    2012-02-01

    Magnetic hyperthermia is the generation of heat by an external magnetic field using superparamagnetic nanoparticles. However, there are still questions concerning magnetic hyperthermia in tissue; in particular the confinement of the nanoparticles at mesoscopic scales. We used Agarose and Alginate gels as models for human tissue and embedded magnetic nanoparticles in them. We report the synthesis and characterization of dextran coated iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles. Characterization of these nanoparticles was done using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, magnetometry, and hyperthermia measurements. Temperature dependent susceptibility measurements reveal a sharp anomaly in the ferrofluid sample at the freezing temperature. This is conspicuously absent in the ferrofluid-gel composites. Heat generation studies on these superparamagnetic gel-composites revealed a larger heat production in the ferrofluids(˜4W/g) as compared to the gels(˜1W/g), which we attribute to a reduction in Brownian relaxation for the nanoparticles embedded in Agarose and Alginate.

  13. SpeI restriction enzyme displays greater discriminatory power than XbaI enzyme does in a pulsed-field gel electrophoresis study on 146 clinical Burkholderia pseudomallei isolates.

    PubMed

    Chua, Kek Heng; See, Kah Heng; Thong, Kwai Lin; Puthucheary, S D

    2011-01-01

    Restriction enzymes SpeI and XbaI were used in a pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) study for molecular characterization of 146 clinical Burkholderia pseudomallei isolates. The PFGE parameters were optimized to enable comparable, reproducible, and robust results. The optimized parameters for both SpeI and XbaI restriction enzymes used in this study were 200 V and a pulse time of 5 to 65 s for a 28-h runtime. Using SpeI, 9 different clusters were identified, whereas 6 clusters were identified by XbaI digestion, which exhibited 85% similarity to SpeI. SpeI (discrimination index [D]=0.854) showed higher discriminatory power than XbaI did (D=0.464). PMID:21617308

  14. Can slabs melt beneath forearcs in hot subduction zones?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, J.; Maury, R.; Gregoire, M.

    2015-12-01

    At subduction zones, thermal modeling predict that the shallow part of the downgoing oceanic crust (< 80 - 100 km depth to the slab) is usually too cold to cross the water-rich solidus and melts beneath the forearc. Yet, the occasional occurrence of adakites, commonly considered as slab melts, in the forearc region challenges our understanding of the shallow subduction processes. Adakites are unusual felsic rocks commonly associated with asthenospheric slab window opening or fast subduction of young (< 25 Ma) oceanic plate that enable slab melting at shallow depths; but their genesis has remained controversial. Here, we present a new approach that provides new constraints on adakite petrogenesis in hot subduction zones (the Philippines) and above an asthenospheric window (Baja California, Mexico). We use amphibole compositions to estimate the magma storage depths and the composition of the parental melts to test the hypothesis that adakites are pristine slab melts. We find that adakites from Baja California and Philippines formed by two distinct petrogenetic scenarios. In Baja California, hydrous mantle melts mixed/mingled with high-pressure (HP) adakite-type, slab melts within a lower crustal (~30 km depth) magma storage region before stalling into the upper arc crust (~7-15 km depth). In contrast, in the Philippines, primitive mantle melts stalled and crystallized within lower and upper crustal magma storage regions to produce silica-rich melts with an adakitic signature. Thereby, slab melting is not required to produce an adakitic geochemical fingerprint in hot subduction zones. However, our results also suggest that the downgoing crust potentially melted beneath Baja California.

  15. Aegean tectonics: Strain localisation, slab tearing and trench retreat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolivet, Laurent; Faccenna, Claudio; Huet, Benjamin; Labrousse, Loïc; Le Pourhiet, Laetitia; Lacombe, Olivier; Lecomte, Emmanuel; Burov, Evguenii; Denèle, Yoann; Brun, Jean-Pierre; Philippon, Mélody; Paul, Anne; Salaün, Gwenaëlle; Karabulut, Hayrullah; Piromallo, Claudia; Monié, Patrick; Gueydan, Frédéric; Okay, Aral I.; Oberhänsli, Roland; Pourteau, Amaury; Augier, Romain; Gadenne, Leslie; Driussi, Olivier

    2013-06-01

    We review the geodynamic evolution of the Aegean-Anatolia region and discuss strain localisation there over geological times. From Late Eocene to Present, crustal deformation in the Aegean backarc has localised progressively during slab retreat. Extension started with the formation of the Rhodope Metamorphic Core Complex (Eocene) and migrated to the Cyclades and the northern Menderes Massif (Oligocene and Miocene), accommodated by crustal-scale detachments and a first series of core complexes (MCCs). Extension then localised in Western Turkey, the Corinth Rift and the external Hellenic arc after Messinian times, while the North Anatolian Fault penetrated the Aegean Sea. Through time the direction and style of extension have not changed significantly except in terms of localisation. The contributions of progressive slab retreat and tearing, basal drag, extrusion tectonics and tectonic inheritance are discussed and we favour a model (1) where slab retreat is the main driving engine, (2) successive slab tearing episodes are the main causes of this stepwise strain localisation and (3) the inherited heterogeneity of the crust is a major factor for localising detachments. The continental crust has an inherited strong heterogeneity and crustal-scale contacts such as major thrust planes act as weak zones or as zones of contrast of resistance and viscosity that can localise later deformation. The dynamics of slabs at depth and the asthenospheric flow due to slab retreat also have influence strain localisation in the upper plate. Successive slab ruptures from the Middle Miocene to the Late Miocene have isolated a narrow strip of lithosphere, still attached to the African lithosphere below Crete. The formation of the North Anatolian Fault is partly a consequence of this evolution. The extrusion of Anatolia and the Aegean extension are partly driven from below (asthenospheric flow) and from above (extrusion of a lid of rigid crust).

  16. Modeling the surface photovoltage of silicon slabs with varying thickness.

    PubMed

    Vazhappilly, Tijo; Kilin, Dmitri S; Micha, David A

    2015-04-10

    The variation with thickness of the energy band gap and photovoltage at the surface of a thin semiconductor film are of great interest in connection with their surface electronic structure and optical properties. In this work, the change of a surface photovoltage (SPV) with the number of layers of a crystalline silicon slab is extracted from models based on their atomic structure. Electronic properties of photoexcited slabs are investigated using generalized gradient and hybrid density functionals, and plane wave basis sets. Si(1 1 1) surfaces have been terminated by hydrogen atoms to compensate for dangling bonds and have been described by large supercells with periodic boundary conditions. Calculations of the SPV of the Si slabs have been done in terms of the reduced density matrix of the photoactive electrons including dissipative effects due to their interaction with medium phonons and excitons. Surface photovoltages have been calculated for model Si slabs with 4-12, and 16 layers, to determine convergence trends versus slab thickness. Band gaps and the inverse of the SPVs have been found to scale nearly linearly with the inverse thickness of the slab, while the electronic density of states increases quadratically with thickness. Our calculations show the same trends as experimental values indicating band gap reduction and absorption enhancement for Si films of increasing thickness. Simple arguments on confined electronic structures have been used to explain the main effects of changes with slab thickness. A procedure involving shifted electron excitation energies is described to improve results from generalized gradient functionals so they can be in better agreement with the more accurate but also more computer intensive values from screened exchange hybrid functionals. PMID:25767101

  17. Modeling the surface photovoltage of silicon slabs with varying thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazhappilly, Tijo; Kilin, Dmitri S.; Micha, David A.

    2015-04-01

    The variation with thickness of the energy band gap and photovoltage at the surface of a thin semiconductor film are of great interest in connection with their surface electronic structure and optical properties. In this work, the change of a surface photovoltage (SPV) with the number of layers of a crystalline silicon slab is extracted from models based on their atomic structure. Electronic properties of photoexcited slabs are investigated using generalized gradient and hybrid density functionals, and plane wave basis sets. Si(1 1 1) surfaces have been terminated by hydrogen atoms to compensate for dangling bonds and have been described by large supercells with periodic boundary conditions. Calculations of the SPV of the Si slabs have been done in terms of the reduced density matrix of the photoactive electrons including dissipative effects due to their interaction with medium phonons and excitons. Surface photovoltages have been calculated for model Si slabs with 4-12, and 16 layers, to determine convergence trends versus slab thickness. Band gaps and the inverse of the SPVs have been found to scale nearly linearly with the inverse thickness of the slab, while the electronic density of states increases quadratically with thickness. Our calculations show the same trends as experimental values indicating band gap reduction and absorption enhancement for Si films of increasing thickness. Simple arguments on confined electronic structures have been used to explain the main effects of changes with slab thickness. A procedure involving shifted electron excitation energies is described to improve results from generalized gradient functionals so they can be in better agreement with the more accurate but also more computer intensive values from screened exchange hybrid functionals.

  18. Observation of Optical Bistability and Multi-Stability in the Dielecrtric Slab Doped with a Quantum well Waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasehi, R.

    2016-08-01

    The optical bistability (OB) and multi-stability (OM) behavior in a dielectric slab medium doped with semiconductor quantum well nanostructure has been discussed by employing the spin coherence effect. It is shown that, by changing the relative phase of applied fields the bistable behavior switches from OB to OM or vice versa in a dielectric medium. The effect of the frequency detuning of laser fields on the OB and OM behavior are also discussed in this paper.

  19. Observation of Optical Bistability and Multi-Stability in the Dielecrtric Slab Doped with a Quantum well Waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasehi, R.

    2016-03-01

    The optical bistability (OB) and multi-stability (OM) behavior in a dielectric slab medium doped with semiconductor quantum well nanostructure has been discussed by employing the spin coherence effect. It is shown that, by changing the relative phase of applied fields the bistable behavior switches from OB to OM or vice versa in a dielectric medium. The effect of the frequency detuning of laser fields on the OB and OM behavior are also discussed in this paper.

  20. Modeling 3-D flow in the mantle wedge with complex slab geometries: Comparisons with seismic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kincaid, C. R.; MacDougall, J. G.; Druken, K. A.; Fischer, K. M.

    2010-12-01

    Understanding patterns in plate scale mantle flow in subduction zones is key to models of thermal structure, dehydration reactions, volatile distributions and magma generation and transport in convergent margins. Different patterns of flow in the mantle wedge can generate distinct signatures in seismological observables. Observed shear wave fast polarization directions in several subduction zones are inconsistent with predictions of simple 2-D wedge corner flow. Geochemical signatures in a number of subduction zones also indicate 3-D flow and entrainment patterns in the wedge. We report on a series of laboratory experiments on subduction driven flow to characterize spatial and temporal variability in 3-D patterns in flow and shear-induced finite strain. Cases focus on how rollback subduction, along-strike dip changes in subducting plates and evolving gaps or tears in subduction zones control temporal-spatial patterns in 3-D wedge flow. Models utilize a glucose working fluid with a temperature dependent viscosity to represent the upper 2000 km of the mantle. Subducting lithosphere is modeled with two rubber-reinforced continuous belts. Belts pass around trench and upper/lower mantle rollers. The deeper rollers can move laterally to allow for time varying dip angle. Each belt has independent speed control and dip adjustment, allowing for along-strike changes in convergence rate and the evolution of slab gaps. Rollback is modeled using a translation system to produce either uniform and asymmetric lateral trench motion. Neutral density finite strain markers are distributed throughout the fluid and used as proxies for tracking the evolution of anisotropy through space and time in the evolving flow fields. Particle image velocimetry methods are also used to track time varying 3-D velocity fields for directly calculating anisotropy patterns. Results show that complex plate motions (rollback, steepening) and morphologies (gaps) in convergent margins produce flows with

  1. Tomographic imaging of the effects of Peruvian flat slab subduction on the Nazca slab and surrounding mantle under central and southern Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scire, A. C.; Zandt, G.; Beck, S. L.; Bishop, B.; Biryol, C. B.; Wagner, L. S.; Long, M. D.; Minaya, E.; Tavera, H.

    2014-12-01

    The modern central Peruvian Andes are dominated by a laterally extensive region of flat slab subduction. The Peruvian flat slab extends for ~1500 km along the strike of the Andes, correlating with the subduction of the Nazca Ridge in the south and the theorized Inca Plateau in the north. We have used data from the CAUGHT and PULSE experiments for finite frequency teleseismic P- and S-wave tomography to image the Nazca slab in the upper mantle below 95 km depth under central Peru between 10°S and 18°S as well as the surrounding mantle. Since the slab inboard of the subducting Nazca Ridge is mostly aseismic, our results provide important constraints on the geometry of the subducting Nazca slab in this region. Our images of the Nazca slab suggest that steepening of the slab inboard of the subducting Nazca Ridge locally occurs ~100 km further inland than was indicated in previous studies. The region where we have imaged the steepening of the Nazca slab inboard of the Nazca Ridge correlates with the location of the Fitzcarrald Arch, a long wavelength upper plate topographic feature which has been suggested to be a consequence of ridge subduction. When the slab steepens inboard of the flat slab region, it does so at a very steep (~70°) angle. The transition from the Peruvian flat slab to the more normally dipping slab south of 16°S below Bolivia is characterized by an abrupt bending of the slab anomaly in the mantle in response to the shift from flat to normal subduction. The slab anomaly appears to be intact south of the Nazca Ridge with no evidence for tearing of the slab in response to the abrupt change in slab dip. A potential tear in the slab is inferred from an observed offset in the slab anomaly north of the Nazca Ridge extending subparallel to the ridge axis between 130 and 300 km depth. A high amplitude (-5-6%) slow S-wave velocity anomaly is observed below the projection of the Nazca Ridge. This anomaly appears to be laterally confined to the mantle

  2. Viscoelasticity of silica gels

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, G.W.

    1995-12-01

    The response of silica gels to mechanical loads depends on the properties of the solid phase and the permeability of the network. Understanding this behavior is essential for modeling of stresses developed during drying or heating of gels. The permeability and the mechanical properties are readily determined from a simple beam-bending experiment, by measuring the load relaxation that occurs at constant deflection. Load decay results from movement of the liquid within the network; in addition, there may be viscoelastic relaxation of the network itself. Silica gel is viscoelastic in chemically aggressive media, but in inert liquids (such as ethanol or acetone) it is elastic. Experiments show that the viscoelastic relaxation time decreases as the concentration and pH of the water in the pore liquid increase. During drying, the permeability decreases and the viscosity increases, both exhibiting a power-law dependence on density of the gel network.

  3. Testosterone Nasal Gel

    MedlinePlus

    ... enough natural testosterone). Testosterone nasal gel is used only for men with low testosterone levels caused by ... is a controlled substance. Prescriptions may be refilled only a limited number of times; ask your pharmacist ...

  4. Microfluidics with Gel Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priest, Craig; Surenjav, Enkhtuul; Herminghaus, Stephan; Seemann, Ralf

    2006-03-01

    Microfluidic processing is usually achieved using single phase liquids. Instead, we use monodisperse emulsions to compartment liquids within microchannel geometries. At low continuous phase volume fractions, droplets self-organize to form well-defined arrangements, analogous to foam. While it is well-known that confined geometries can induce rearrangement of foam compartments at the millimeter-scale, similar dynamics are also expected for gel emulsions. We have studied online generation, organization and manipulation of gel emulsions using a variety of microchannel geometries. ``Passive'' reorganization, based on fixed channel geometries, can be supplemented by ``active'' manipulation by incorporating a ferrofluid phase. A ferromagnetic phase facilitates reorganization of liquid compartments on demand using an electromagnetic trigger. Moreover, coalescence between adjacent compartments within a gel emulsion can be induced using electrical potential. Microfluidics using gel emulsions will be well-suited for combinatorial chemistry, DNA sequencing, drug screening and protein crystallizations.

  5. Pulse-like channelled long-distance fluid flow in subducting slabs (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, T.; Gussone, N. C.; Beinlich, A.; Halama, R.; Bebout, G. E.; Podladchikov, Y. Y.; Magna, T.

    2010-12-01

    Eclogite formation in subducting slabs has great geodynamic importance, as it causes changes in density and rheology and could contribute fluids and slab geochemical signatures to arc magma source regions. Field evidence shows that the preferential flow field of released slab fluids is highly channelized and that these fluids tend to react with their wall rocks, thereby serving as agents for the mobilization and transport of trace elements. However, well-preserved field occurences providing insights into the eclogite formation process are rare. We investigated exposures in the Chinese Tianshan high-P/low-T metamorphic belt containing a “frozen in” example of eclogitization of upper oceanic crust, where wall-rock blueschist is cross-cut by an eclogite vein with a reaction selvage. In this selvage, the degree of eclogitization, and thus dehydration, increases towards the vein. Calcium contents increase also towards the vein, indicating that Ca was introduced to the reacting wall-rock blueschist during the fluid-mediated eclogitization. A high time-integrated fluid flux is required to obtain the observed Ca increase. Hence, the petrological and structural observations suggest that an external fluid formed this major fluid conduit and its selvage within subducting oceanic crust [1]. We applied a multi-isotope approach, including radiogenic and stable isotope systems (Rb/Sr, δ44/40Ca and δ7Li), to a profile of samples drilled perpendicular to this fluid flow structure in order to obtain constraints on the timing and duration of the vein formation and the origin of the Ca-bearing fluid. A Rb/Sr whole rock isochron reveals that the vein formed at the time of peak metamorphism (~317±5 Ma) and has since then remained undisturbed. Calcium isotope ratios of these rocks indicate mixing of two distinct Ca sources, the blueschist and an external fluid source, the latter of which is enriched in heavy Ca isotopes compared to the wall rock. Whereas the initial 87Sr/86Sr

  6. Simulations of electrophoretic collisions of DNA knots with gel obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, C.; DeLos Rios, P.; Dietler, G.; Stasiak, A.

    2006-04-01

    Gel electrophoresis can be used to separate nicked circular DNA molecules of equal length but forming different knot types. At low electric fields, complex knots drift faster than simpler knots. However, at high electric field the opposite is the case and simpler knots migrate faster than more complex knots. Using Monte Carlo simulations we investigate the reasons of this reversal of relative order of electrophoretic mobility of DNA molecules forming different knot types. We observe that at high electric fields the simulated knotted molecules tend to hang over the gel fibres and require passing over a substantial energy barrier to slip over the impeding gel fibre. At low electric field the interactions of drifting molecules with the gel fibres are weak and there are no significant energy barriers that oppose the detachment of knotted molecules from transverse gel fibres.

  7. Preparation of chitosan gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussaoui, Y.; Mnasri, N.; Elaloui, E.; Ben Salem, R.; Lagerge, S.; de Menorval, L. C.

    2012-06-01

    Aerogel conditioning of the chitosan makes it possible to prepare porous solids of significant specific surface. The increase in the chitosan concentration or the degree of acetylation decreases the specific surface of the synthesized chitosan gel. Whereas drying with supercritical CO2 more effectively makes it possible to preserve the volume of the spheres of gel and to have a more significant specific surface in comparison with evaporative drying.

  8. Conformance Improvement Using Gels

    SciTech Connect

    Seright, Randall S.; Schrader, Richard; II Hagstrom, John; Wang, Ying; Al-Dahfeeri, Abdullah; Gary, Raven; Marin; Amaury; Lindquist, Brent

    2002-09-26

    This research project had two objectives. The first objective was to identify gel compositions and conditions that substantially reduce flow through fractures that allow direct channeling between wells, while leaving secondary fractures open so that high fluid injection and production rates can be maintained. The second objective was to optimize treatments in fractured production wells, where the gel must reduce permeability to water much more than that to oil.

  9. Optical distortions in end-pumped zigzag slab lasers.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bing; Zhou, Tangjian; Wang, Dan; Li, Mi

    2015-04-01

    Ray tracing is performed to investigate the optical distortions in the end-pumped, zigzag slab. Optical path differences caused by temperature, slab deformation, and stress birefringence are calculated under uniform pumping; the results show a steep edge in the width dimension and a thermal lens with an effective focal length as short as several meters in the thickness dimension. Dependence of depolarization on total internal reflection phase retardance as well as the slab's cut angle is studied by the Jones matrix technique; results show that although at the pumping power of 10 kW, the mean depolarization of the 2.5  mm×30  mm×150.2  mm Nd:YAG slab is generally below 3%, and it increases rapidly with pumping power. Besides, for the 0°- or 60°-cut slab, an optimal phase retardance range of 5° to 13° exists, in which the depolarization loss can be lower than 0.5%. Finally, experiments on temperature and depolarization measurements verify the numerical results. PMID:25967178

  10. Fossil slabs attached to unsubducted fragments of the Farallon plate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Forsyth, Donald W; Rau, Christina J; Carriero, Nina; Schmandt, Brandon; Gaherty, James B; Savage, Brian

    2013-04-01

    As the Pacific-Farallon spreading center approached North America, the Farallon plate fragmented into a number of small plates. Some of the microplate fragments ceased subducting before the spreading center reached the trench. Most tectonic models have assumed that the subducting oceanic slab detached from these microplates close to the trench, but recent seismic tomography studies have revealed a high-velocity anomaly beneath Baja California that appears to be a fossil slab still attached to the Guadalupe and Magdalena microplates. Here, using surface wave tomography, we establish the lateral extent of this fossil slab and show that it is correlated with the distribution of high-Mg andesites thought to derive from partial melting of the subducted oceanic crust. We also reinterpret the high seismic velocity anomaly beneath the southern central valley of California as another fossil slab extending to a depth of 200 km or more that is attached to the former Monterey microplate. The existence of these fossil slabs may force a reexamination of models of the tectonic evolution of western North America over the last 30 My. PMID:23509274

  11. Fossil slabs attached to unsubducted fragments of the Farallon plate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yun; Forsyth, Donald W.; Rau, Christina J.; Carriero, Nina; Schmandt, Brandon; Gaherty, James B.; Savage, Brian

    2013-01-01

    As the Pacific–Farallon spreading center approached North America, the Farallon plate fragmented into a number of small plates. Some of the microplate fragments ceased subducting before the spreading center reached the trench. Most tectonic models have assumed that the subducting oceanic slab detached from these microplates close to the trench, but recent seismic tomography studies have revealed a high-velocity anomaly beneath Baja California that appears to be a fossil slab still attached to the Guadalupe and Magdalena microplates. Here, using surface wave tomography, we establish the lateral extent of this fossil slab and show that it is correlated with the distribution of high-Mg andesites thought to derive from partial melting of the subducted oceanic crust. We also reinterpret the high seismic velocity anomaly beneath the southern central valley of California as another fossil slab extending to a depth of 200 km or more that is attached to the former Monterey microplate. The existence of these fossil slabs may force a reexamination of models of the tectonic evolution of western North America over the last 30 My. PMID:23509274

  12. Slab laser development at MSNW - The Gemini and Centurion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggleston, J. M.; Albrecht, G. F.

    Two, zig-zag-optical-path, slab-geometry, solid-state lasers, referred to as Gemini and Centurion, are described. The Nd:glass laser (Gemini) uses a pump geometry in which the flash lamps are located between two slabs in the same laser head. The dimensions and functions of the glass slabs are studied and the single-sided pumping of the Nd:glass laser is examined. The system is verified using the Nd:YAG laser system (Centurion). The Centurion system uses four flash lamps to pump a single 6 mm x 2 cm x 15.5 cm Nd:YAG slab; the reflector structure of the system is analyzed. The thermal-optical model for the Nd:glass laser and the Trace 3D, a three-dimensional flashlamp-slab coupling code, are evaluated. The oscillation performance and defocusing of a single-pass beam are measured; it is observed that the single-sided pump output is 30 percent more efficient than the standard configuration and no major defocusing effect is detected. The use of the Trace 3D code to design a reflector system for Gemini is discussed.

  13. The effect of metastable pyroxene on the slab dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrusta, R.; Van Hunen, J.; Goes, S. D. B.

    2014-12-01

    Global seismic studies show variations near the base of mantle transition zone, where some slabs penetrate straight into the lower mantle, whereas others seem to flatten. The dynamics of cold subducting slabs are mainly controlled by negative thermal buoyancy forces and by buoyancy anomalies due to density contrasts of the different mineralogical phases. Recent experiments show that pyroxene dissolves into the denser garnet, forming the majorite-garnet, at very slow rates, and pyroxene can remain metastable to temperatures as high as 1400 °C.Because metastable pyroxene may potentially persist in subduction zones over large volumes and to great depths, a self-consistent subduction model has been used to investigate the influence of metastable phase on the dynamics of subducting oceanic lithosphere. The phase boundary of pyroxene to garnet (300 km equilibrium depth) is considered together with the phase transition of olivine to wadsleyite (410 km equilibrium), and ringwoodite to perovskite-magnesiowustite (670 km equilibrium). The kinetics of the phase transition for ol-wd and in px-gt are treated considering a temperature-dependent diffusion rate. To quantify the buoyant contributions of the metastable phase on the subduction dynamics, an extensive parameter sensitivity study has been performed.Results from this study illustrate that metastable pyroxene affects slab buoyancy at least as much as olivine metastability. Slab age and phase change kinetics are the most dominant parameters, and buoyancy effects are stronger for old subducting lithosphere and for low diffusion rates, favouring slab stagnation in the transition zone.

  14. Systematic variation in the depths of slabs beneath arc volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    England, P.; Engdahl, R.; Thatcher, W.

    2004-01-01

    The depths to the tops of the zones of intermediate-depth seismicity beneath arc volcanoes are determined using the hypocentral locations of Engdahl et al. These depths are constant, to within a few kilometres, within individual arc segments, but differ by tens of kilometres from one arc segment to another. The range in depths is from 65 km to 130 km, inconsistent with the common belief that the volcanoes directly overlie the places where the slabs reach a critical depth that is roughly constant for all arcs. The depth to the top of the intermediate-depth seismicity beneath volcanoes correlates neither with age of the descending ocean floor nor with the thermal parameter of the slab. This depth does, however, exhibit an inverse correlation with the descent speed of the subducting plate, which is the controlling factor both for the thermal structure of the wedge of mantle above the slab and for the temperature at the top of the slab. We interpret this result as indicating that the location of arc volcanoes is controlled by a process that depends critically upon the temperature at the top of the slab, or in the wedge of mantle, immediately below the volcanic arc.

  15. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Chrambach, A; Rodbard, D

    1971-04-30

    Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) provides a versatile, gentle, high resolution method for fractionation and physical-chemical characterization of molecules on the basis of size, conformation, and net charge. The polymerization reaction can be rigorously controlled to provide uniform gels of reproducible, measurable pore size over a wide range. This makes it possible to obtain reproducible relative mobility (Rf) values as physical-chemical constants. Application and extension of Ogston's (random fiber) model for a gel allows for calculation of molecular volume, surface area, or radius, free mobility, and valence from RJ measurements at several gel concentrations, to calculate gel concentration for optimal resolution, and to predict behavior of macromolecules on gel gradients by computerized methods. Extension of classical moving boundary theory has been used to generate multiphasic buffer systems (providing selective stacking, unstacking, restacking, and preparative steady-state-stacking) with known operating characteristics for any pH at 0 degrees and 25 degrees C. A general strategy for isolation of macromolecules and for macromolecular mapping has been developed. Preparative scale PAGE is operational for milligram loads and feasible for gram quantities. PMID:4927678

  16. The Tonga-Vanuatu Subduction Complex -- a Self-Optimized 3D Slab-Slab-Mantle Heat Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCreary, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    Recently published geophysical and geochemical data and increasingly actualistic free subduction models prompted a fresh look at 2 classics hinting, in combination, that a coupled 3D slab-slab-upper mantle interaction (Scholz and Campos, 1995; full citations at URL below) might power the prodigious surface heat dissipation (Lagabrielle et al., 1997) characterizing one of Earth's most remarkable tectonomagmatic systems, the Tonga-Vanuatu Subduction Complex (TVSC). The 3D TVSC includes (1) the kinematically, magmatically, and bathymetrically distinct North Tonga (NT, 14-26° S) and South Vanuatu (SV, 16-23° S) trenches and slabs, (2) the shared NT-SV backarc, and (3) entrained mobile upper mantle (MUM). That Earth's greatest convergence, rollback, and spreading rates; most disseminated spreading (the North Fiji Basin (NFB) ridge swarm); and greatest concentration of aggregate active ridge length coincide in a 1,500 km TVSC can't be accidental. To the north and south, the respective active NT and SV trenches swing abruptly 90° counterclockwise into continuity with the Vitiaz and Hunter fossil trenches, both active in the Late Miocene but now sinistral strike-slip loci standing over long exposed PA and AU slab edges. These 2 active-fossil trench pairs bracket a hot, shallow and geophysically and geochemically exceptional TVSC interior consisting of 2 rapidly spreading backarcs set back-to-back in free sublithospheric communication: The Lau-Havre NT backarc on the east and the ridge-infested SV backarc (NFB) on the west. The NFB and adjacent North Fiji Plateau make up the unplatelike New Hebrides-Fiji Orogen (Bird, 2003). As in the western Aleutians, the NT-Vitiaz and SV-Hunter subduction-to-strike-slip transitions (SSSTs) stand above toroidal fluxes of hot, dry PA and AU MUM driven along-trench and around the free NT and SV slab edges from subslab to supraslab regions by dynamic pressure gradients powered by slab free-fall and induced viscous couplings. These edge

  17. Effects of shape and size of agar gels on heating uniformity during pulsed microwave treatment.

    PubMed

    Soto-Reyes, Nohemí; Temis-Pérez, Ana L; López-Malo, Aurelio; Rojas-Laguna, Roberto; Sosa-Morales, María Elena

    2015-05-01

    Model gel systems with different shape (sphere, cylinder, and slab) and size (180 and 290 g) were prepared with agar (5%) and sucrose (5%). Dielectric constant (ε'), loss factor (ε"), thermophysical properties, and temperature distribution of the model system were measured. Each agar model system was immersed and suspended in water, and then, heated in a microwave oven with intermittent heating until the core temperature reached 50 °C. The ε' and ε" of agar gels decreased when frequency increased. The density and thermal conductivity values of the agar gels were 1033 kg/m(3) and 0.55 W/m °C, respectively. The temperature distribution of sphere, cylinder, and slab was different when similar power doses were applied. The slab reached 50 °C in less time (10 min) and showed a more uniform heating than spheres and cylinders in both sizes. Agar model systems of 180 g heated faster than those of 290 g. The coldest point was the center of the model systems in all studied cases. Shape and size are critical food factors that affect the heating uniformity during microwave heating processes. PMID:25827444

  18. Cavitation of a Physically Associating Gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Satish; Kundu, Santanu

    Self-assembly of block copolymers in selective solvents form ordered structures such as micelles, vesicles, and physically crosslinked gels due to difference in their interaction with solvents. These gels have wide range of applications in tissue engineering, food science and biomedical field due to their tunable properties and responsiveness with changing environmental conditions. Pressurization of a defect inside a physically associating gel can lead to elastic instability (cavitation) leading to failure of the gel. The failure behavior involves dissociation of physical networks. A thermoreversible, physically associating gel with different volume fractions of a triblock copolymer, poly (methyl methacrylate)-poly (n-butyl acrylate)-poly (methyl methacrylate) [PMMA-PnBA-PMMA] in 2-ethyl 1-hexanol, a midblock selective solvent, is considered here. Mechanical properties were investigated using shear rheology and cavitation experiments. The experimental data is fitted with a constitutive model that captures the stiffening behavior followed by softening behavior of a physical gel. Finite element analysis has been performed on cavitation rheology geometry to capture the failure behavior and to calculate energy release rate during cavitation experiments.

  19. Search for deep slabs in the Northwest Pacific mantle.

    PubMed

    Zhou, H W; Anderson, D L

    1989-11-01

    A residual sphere is formed by projecting seismic ray travel-time anomalies, relative to a reference Earth model, onto an imaginary sphere around an earthquake. Any dominant slab-like fast band can be determined with spherical harmonic expansion. The technique is useful in detecting trends associated with high-velocity slabs beneath deep earthquakes after deep-mantle and near-receiver effects are removed. Two types of corrections are used. The first uses a tomographic global mantle model; the second uses teleseismic station averages of residuals from many events over a large area centered on the events of interest. Under the Mariana, Izu-Bonin, and Japan trenches, the dominant fast bands are generally consistent with seismicity trends. The results are unstable and differ from the seismicity trend for Kurile events. The predominant fast band for most deep earthquakes under Japan is subhorizontal rather than near vertical. We find little support for the deep slab penetration hypothesis. PMID:16594080

  20. Abrupt tectonics and rapid slab detachment with grain damage.

    PubMed

    Bercovici, David; Schubert, Gerald; Ricard, Yanick

    2015-02-01

    A simple model for necking and detachment of subducting slabs is developed to include the coupling between grain-sensitive rheology and grain-size evolution with damage. Necking is triggered by thickened buoyant crust entrained into a subduction zone, in which case grain damage accelerates necking and allows for relatively rapid slab detachment, i.e., within 1 My, depending on the size of the crustal plug. Thick continental crustal plugs can cause rapid necking while smaller plugs characteristic of ocean plateaux cause slower necking; oceanic lithosphere with normal or slightly thickened crust subducts without necking. The model potentially explains how large plateaux or continental crust drawn into subduction zones can cause slab loss and rapid changes in plate motion and/or induce abrupt continental rebound. PMID:25605890

  1. Abrupt tectonics and rapid slab detachment with grain damage

    PubMed Central

    Bercovici, David; Schubert, Gerald; Ricard, Yanick

    2015-01-01

    A simple model for necking and detachment of subducting slabs is developed to include the coupling between grain-sensitive rheology and grain-size evolution with damage. Necking is triggered by thickened buoyant crust entrained into a subduction zone, in which case grain damage accelerates necking and allows for relatively rapid slab detachment, i.e., within 1 My, depending on the size of the crustal plug. Thick continental crustal plugs can cause rapid necking while smaller plugs characteristic of ocean plateaux cause slower necking; oceanic lithosphere with normal or slightly thickened crust subducts without necking. The model potentially explains how large plateaux or continental crust drawn into subduction zones can cause slab loss and rapid changes in plate motion and/or induce abrupt continental rebound. PMID:25605890

  2. Elasticity and rheology of phase D and implications for seismic anisotropy in deep subducted slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, A. D.; Sanchez-Valle, C.; Ghosh, S.; Merkel, S.

    2011-12-01

    Dense hydrous magnesium silicate (DHMS) Phase D, MgSi2H2O6 (10-18 wt% H2O), may be the most important water carrier along cold slab geotherms and thus may play a critical role in the recycling of water into the deep mantle. Recent petrological studies have shown that Fe and Al substitutions extends the stability field of phase D toward higher slab temperatures [Ghosh, unpublished], and that phase D can account for more than 40 vol% in very hydrous peridotites between 700 and 1300 km depth [Iwamori 2004]. The stability and large volume fractions of phase D in subducted slabs, together with the highly anisotropic behavior under compression [Hushur et al. 2011] and ability to align in non-hydrostatic stress fields due to its layered structure [Rosa et al. 2010] suggest that phase D may strongly influence the seismic properties of down going slabs [Chen and Brudzinki, 2003; Laurence and Wysession, 2006]. In this contribution we combine elasticity measurements and plastic deformation experiments to evaluate the contribution of phase D to the seismic anisotropy and velocity anomalies of hydrous subducted slabs at lower mantle pressures. The elastic properties were determined by Brillouin scattering spectroscopy on Mg-bearing and Al-Fe-bearing Phase D single-crystals, synthesized at 24 GPa and 1200 °C in a multianvil apparatus at ETH Zurich. The results resolve discrepancies between previous experimental and computational studies [Liu et al 2004; Mainprice at al. 2007] and assess the effect of compositional variations on the seismic velocities of phase D. The end-member Mg-Phase D displays higher acoustic velocities than the Al-Fe-bearing Phase D. Synchrotron X-ray radial diffraction experiments were also performed to investigate the rheological properties (texturing and preferred orientations) of Mg-bearing, Fe-bearing and Al-Fe-bearing samples at pressures up to 45 GPa. Experiments were conducted in panoramic diamond anvil cells at the ESRF ID09 beamline. The uniaxial

  3. Heterogeneous source components of intraplate basalts from NE China induced by the ongoing Pacific slab subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huan; Xia, Qun-Ke; Ingrin, Jannick; Deloule, Etienne

    2016-04-01

    In recent few years, the recycled oceanic slab has been increasingly suggested to be the enriched component in the mantle source of widespread intra-plate small-volume basaltic magmatism in eastern China. The recycled oceanic slab is a mixture of sediment, upper oceanic crust and lower gabbro oceanic crust, and will undergo alteration and dehydration during the recycling progress. The influence of these different components on the mantle source needs to be further constrained. The Chaihe-aershan volcanic field in Northeast China is located close to the surface position of the front edge of the subducted Pacific slab and includes more than 35 small-volume Quaternary basaltic volcanoes, which provides an opportunity to study the evolution of mantle source in detail and the small-scale geochemical heterogeneity of the mantle source. We measured the oxygen isotopes and water content of clinopyroxene (cpx) phenocrysts by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR), respectively. The water content of magma was then estimated based on the partition coefficient of H2O between cpx and basaltic melt. The measured δ18O of cpx phenocrysts (4.27 to 8.57) and the calculated H2O content of magmas (0.23-2.70 wt.%) show large variations, reflecting the compositional heterogeneity of the mantle source. The δ18O values within individual samples also display a considerable variation, from 1.28 to 2.31‰ suggesting mixing of magmas or the sustained injection of magmas with different δ18O values during the crystallization. The relationship between the averaged δ18O values of cpx phenocrysts and the H2O/Ce, Ba/Th, Nb/La ratios and Eu anomaly of whole-rocks demonstrates the contribution to three components in the mantle source (hydrothermally altered upper oceanic crust or marine sediments, altered lower gabbroic oceanic crust, ambient mantle). The proportions of these three components varied strongly within a limited period (˜1.27 Ma to

  4. Influence of overriding plate velocity changes on slab dip and deformation: insights from laboratory models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillaume, Benjamin; Hertgen, Solenn; Martinod, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    Over geological times, plate reorganization associated with mantle convection led to changes in absolute plate velocities, which may in turn have impacted the geometry of the subducting plate as well as the overriding plate regime of deformation. Indeed, previous studies have shown a very good correlation between the absolute motion of the overriding plate on one hand and slab dip and overriding plate deformation on the other hand: extension and steep slab are associated with an overriding plate moving away from the trench while shortening and shallow slab occur if the upper plate goes the other way. However, these correlations are established when subduction has reached a steady-state regime and for a constant motion of the overriding plate over the subducting plate, which may not always be the case on Earth. The response of the subduction system to changes in absolute overriding plate velocity still remain an open question. In this study, we conducted a set of 3-D mantle-scale laboratory models of subduction in which we incrementally changed the velocity of the overriding plate to reproduce changes of velocities that may arise from variations of far-field boundary conditions in Nature. We first show that strain rates in the overriding plate are correlated with overriding plate absolute velocity but also that the regime of deformation adjusts rapidly to changes of velocity. This may explain for instance why despite the subduction has been continuous beneath South America since at least the middle Jurassic, shortening along its active margin is only recorded episodically, the main phases of Andean orogeny roughly corresponding to periods of South American plate westward acceleration. We also show that slab dip adjusts to changes of overriding plate velocity but it requires several Myr before it stabilizes. It may explain why the correlation between absolute overriding plate motion and slab dip from the analysis of present-day subduction zones is only moderate, part

  5. Waveform modeling the deep slab beneath northernmost Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmberger, D. V.; Sun, D.

    2011-12-01

    The interactions between subducted slab and transition zone are crucial issues in dynamic modeling. Previous mantle convection studies have shown that various viscosity structures can result in various slab shape, width, and edge sharpness. Recent tomographic images based on USArray data reveals strong multi-scale heterogeneous upper mantle beneath western US. Among those features, a slab-like fast anomaly extends from 300 to 600 km depth below Nevada and western Utah, which was suggested as a segmented chunk of the Farallon slab. But we still missing key information about the details of this structure and whether this structure flatten outs in the transition zone, where various tomographic models display inconsistent images. The study of multipathing and waveform broadening around sharp features have been proved a efficient way to study such features. Here, we use both P and S waveform data from High Lava Plains seismic experiments and USArray to produce a detailed image. If we amplify the Schmandt and Humphreys [2010] 's S-wave tomography model by 1.5, we can produce excellent travel-time fits. But the waveform distortions are not as strong as those observed in data for events coming from the southeast, which suggest a much sharper anomaly. The waveform broadening features are not observed for events arriving from northwestern. By fitting the SH waveform data, we suggest that this slab-like structure dips ~35° to the southeast, extending to a depth near 660 km with a velocity increase of about 5 per cent. To generate corresponding P model, we adapt the SH wave model and scale the model using a suite of R (=dlnVs/dlnVp) values. We find that synthetics from the model with R ≈ 2 can fit the observed data, which confirms the segmented slab interpretation of this high velocity anomaly.

  6. Slab Ice and Snow Flurries in the Martian Polar Night

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titus, T.; Kieffer, H.; Mullins, K.; Christensen, P.

    1999-11-01

    In the 1970s, spacecraft observations of the polar regions of Mars revealed polar brightness temperatures that were significantly below the expected kinetic temperatures for CO_2 sublimation. For the past few decades, we have speculated as to the nature of these Martian polar cold spots. Are the cold spots surface or atmospheric effects? Do the cold spots behave as blackbodies, or do they have emissivities less than unity? Two developments allow us to begin to answer these questions: the measurement of the optical constants of CO_2 by Gary Hansen and direct thermal spectroscopy by the Thermal Infrared Spectrometer (TES). TES thermal data has identified numerous cold spots at the Martian north pole. These areas of the polar cap have a strong absorption feature at 25 microns that is indicative of fine-grained CO_2. Brightness temperatures at 18 microns and 15 microns constrain most of these cold spots to the surface. Cold spot formation is strongly dependent on topography, forming preferentially near craters and on polar slopes. While most cold spots are surface effects, the formation of the fine-grained CO_2 is not restricted to formation on the surface. TES data, combined with MOLA cloud data, atmospheric condensates form a few of the observed cold spots. TES observations seem to indicate that another major component of the north polar cap's composition is slab CO2 ice. Slab ice has near unity spectral emissivity and appears to have a low albedo. Two explanations for the low albedo are that the slab ice is intrinsically dark or the slab ice is transparent and TES is seeing through to the underlying substrate. Regions of the cap where [T_18-T_25] < 5 degrees indicates deposits of slab ice. Slab ice is the dominant endmember of the polar cap at latitudes south of the polar night.

  7. Stress Distribution in the Subducted Slab in the Transition Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Běhounková, M.; Běhounková, M.; Čížková, H.; Matyska, C.; Špičák, A.

    2006-12-01

    We present the results of numerical modelling of subduction process in a 2-D cartesian box. Our numerical code is based on the method of Gerya and Yuen 2003. We concentrate on the deformation and stress distribution within the slab in the transition zone. Our composite rheological model includes diffusion creep, dislocation creep and power-law stress limiter. The effects of phase transitions at the depths 410 km and 660 km are taken into account. The model is applied to the Tonga subduction region, where the currently subducting plate might face the remnants of the high viscosity subducted material in the transition zone. This material might possibly originate either from a previous episode of the subduction (Chen and Brudzinski, 2001) or from the buoyant detached slab broken off from the active subducting slab (Green, 2001). We prescribe the cold and relatively high viscosity piece of old slab lying above the 660 km interface. The stress distribution in the new subducting place is then investigated as the plate approaches these remnants of old slab. Stress directions and amplitudes are compared to the data available from the analyses of the earthquake mechanisms in Tonga region. Chen W.-P., Brudzinski R, 2001. Evidence for a Large-Scale Remnant of Subducted Lithosphere Beneath Fiji, Science 292, 2475--2479. Gerya T.V., Yuen D.A., 2003. Characteristics-based marker-in-cell method with conservative finite-differences schemes for modelling geological flows with strongly variable transport properties, Phys. Earth Planet. Int. 140, 293--318. Green, H.W., 2001. A graveyard for buoyant slabs?, Science 292, 2445-2446.

  8. CONFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT USING GELS

    SciTech Connect

    Randall S. Seright

    2002-02-28

    This technical progress report describes work performed from June 20 through December 19, 2001, for the project, ''Conformance Improvement Using Gels''. Interest has increased in some new polymeric products that purport to substantially reduce permeability to water while causing minimum permeability reduction to oil. In view of this interest, we are currently studying BJ's Aqua Con. Results from six corefloods revealed that the Aqua Con gelant consistently reduced permeability to water more than that to oil. However, the magnitude of the disproportionate permeability reduction varied significantly for the various experiments. Thus, as with most materials tested to date, the issue of reproducibility and control of the disproportionate permeability remains to be resolved. Concern exists about the ability of gels to resist washout after placement in fractures. We examined whether a width constriction in the middle of a fracture would cause different gel washout behavior upstream versus downstream of the constriction. Tests were performed using a formed Cr(III)-acetate-HPAM gel in a 48-in.-long fracture with three sections of equal length, but with widths of 0.08-, 0.02-, and 0.08-in., respectively. The pressure gradients during gel extrusion (i.e., placement) were similar in the two 0.08-in.-wide fracture sections, even though they were separated by a 0.02-in.-wide fracture section. The constriction associated with the middle fracture section may have inhibited gel washout during the first pulse of brine injection after gel placement. However, during subsequent phases of brine injection, the constriction did not inhibit washout in the upstream fracture section any more than in the downstream section.

  9. Evolution of surface plasmon resonance with slab thickness in hybrid nano-structures of Au/InGaAs slab waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. H.; Lee, C. M.; Park, D. W.; Noh, S. K.; Sim, S. B.; Kim, J.; Kim, G. H.; Ahn, K. J.; Kim, D. S.; Yee, K. J.

    2014-04-01

    We report on the evolution of the surface plasmon (SP) and waveguide mode (WM) as the core thickness is varied in InGaAs slab waveguides covered by metallic sub-wavelength slit arrays. By comparing transmission spectrum in the near-infrared region with numerical simulations, transmission dips were assigned to resonant excitations of either SPs or WMs. As the core thickness was smaller than the SP penetration depth, the resonance energy exhibits a blue shift, which scales with the field intrusion into the substrate region. For the core thickness of 400 nm supporting both the WM and SP, effective refractive index of the SP is almost constant due to the field decay within the InGaAs region, which is different to the case of the WM.

  10. Seismic Behaviour of Masonry Vault-Slab Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Chesi, Claudio; Butti, Ferdinando; Ferrari, Marco

    2008-07-08

    Spandrel walls typically play a structural role in masonry buildings, transferring load from a slab to the supporting vault. Some indications are given in the literature on the behaviour of spandrels under the effect of vertical loads, but little attention is given to the effect coming from lateral forces acting on the building. An opportunity to investigate this problem has come from the need of analyzing a monumental building which was damaged by the Nov. 24, 2004 Val Sabbia earthquake in the north of Italy. The finite element model set up for the analysis of the vault-spandrel-slab system is presented and the structural role resulting for the spandrels is discussed.

  11. Investigating the Farallon Slab with Probabilistic Traveltime Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdick, S.; Lekic, V.

    2015-12-01

    Subduction of the Farallon Plate beneath North America played a key role in its tectonic development. Seismic constraints on the subducted remnants of the Farallon slab provide evidence needed to better understand the polarity and timing of subduction, the structure of the plate, and its relation to tectonic events like the uplift of the Rocky Mountains. Over the course of its deployment, the USArray Transportable Array (TA) has offered ideal data coverage for investigating the Farallon and related slabs in the upper mantle using seismic tomography and converted wave imaging. With its arrival in the east, data from the TA provides the crossing paths necessary to image the upper reaches of the oldest parts of the plate at mid-mantle depths. We perform a global tomographic inversion using the latest P-wave traveltime picks from TA combined with global catalogue data. While the new velocity model resolves upper mantle slab structure at unprecedented detail in the east, a quantitative grasp of model uncertainty is needed to reliably relate velocity variations to the thermal and mechanical properties of the slabs. In order to quantify the uncertainty of our tomographic model, we employ Transdimensional Hierarchical Bayesian (THB) inversion. THB tomography uses Markov chain Monte Carlo to create an ensemble of velocity models that can be analyzed to statistically infer the best-fit velocities, their uncertainties, and tradeoffs. We present and discuss various representations of uncertainty quantified by THB tomography—error bars, model covariance, multimodal distributions of velocity values—and demonstrate its importance for furthering our understanding of the slab fragments beneath North America. We illustrate how we are able to distinguish between spurious slab fragments from those required by the data. By examining bimodal velocity distributions, we put error bars on the spatial extent of the slabs that can then be analyzed using thermal diffusion modeling. By

  12. Expansion of a cold non-neutral plasma slab

    SciTech Connect

    Karimov, A. R.; Yu, M. Y.; Stenflo, L.

    2014-12-15

    Expansion of the ion and electron fronts of a cold non-neutral plasma slab with a quasi-neutral core bounded by layers containing only ions is investigated analytically and exact solutions are obtained. It is found that on average, the plasma expansion time scales linearly with the initial inverse ion plasma frequency as well as the degree of charge imbalance, and no expansion occurs if the cold plasma slab is stationary and overall neutral. However, in both cases, there can exist prominent oscillations on the electron front.

  13. Novel power switch using oblique incidence to a nonlinear slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hwei-Yuan; Wang, Way-Seen

    1995-05-01

    A simple 1 x n optical power switch employing oblique incidence to a nonlinear slab was recommended. When the input power was within the range of interest, the number n can be augmented by increasing the slab thickness, although the optimum input powers must be recomputed. This rendered the proposed switch extremely flexible and was potentially applicable to all-optical signal processing. In addition, it was determined that the nonlinear dispersion relation was usually applied for the analysis of the wave-guide modes in a specific nonlinear wave guide. However, it was not very precise in the analysis of soliton switching unless the effective index was substituted by an average one.

  14. Seismic Behaviour of Masonry Vault-Slab Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesi, Claudio; Butti, Ferdinando; Ferrari, Marco

    2008-07-01

    Spandrel walls typically play a structural role in masonry buildings, transferring load from a slab to the supporting vault. Some indications are given in the literature on the behaviour of spandrels under the effect of vertical loads, but little attention is given to the effect coming from lateral forces acting on the building. An opportunity to investigate this problem has come from the need of analyzing a monumental building which was damaged by the Nov. 24, 2004 Val Sabbia earthquake in the north of Italy. The finite element model set up for the analysis of the vault-spandrel-slab system is presented and the structural role resulting for the spandrels is discussed.

  15. Optical modes in slab waveguides with magnetoelectric effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talebi, Nahid

    2016-05-01

    Optical modes in anisotropic slab waveguides with topological and chiral magnetoelectric effects are investigated analytically, by deriving the closed-form characteristic equations of the modes and hence computing the dispersion-diagrams. In order to compute the characteristic equations, a vector-potential approach is introduced by incorporating a generalized Lorentz gauge, and the Helmholtz equations are derived correspondingly. It will be shown that the formation of the complex modes and hybridization of the optical modes in such slab waveguides is inevitable. Moreover, when the tensorial form of the permittivity in the waveguide allows for a hyperbolic dispersion, complex transition from the photonic kinds of modes to the plasmonic modes is expected.

  16. Diffractive properties of imaginary-part photonic crystal slab

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The diffraction spectra of imaginary-part photonic crystal (IPPC) slabs are analyzed using the scattering-matrix method. By investigating the thickness dependence of the diffraction, we find a remarkable red shift of central wavelength of the diffraction spectrum, which obviously distinguishes from the phenomenon of spectral hole. We observe that diffraction efficiency can be enhanced more than 20-fold by optimizing the geometry parameters. These imply that the diffraction spectra of the IPPC slab can be controlled at will and used to guide the design to achieve useful nanoscale devices. PMID:22720871

  17. Links between fluid circulation, temperature, and metamorphism in subducting slabs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spinelli, G.A.; Wang, K.

    2009-01-01

    The location and timing of metamorphic reactions in subducting lithosph??re are influenced by thermal effects of fluid circulation in the ocean crust aquifer. Fluid circulation in subducting crust extracts heat from the Nankai subduction zone, causing the crust to pass through cooler metamorphic faci??s than if no fluid circulation occurs. This fluid circulation shifts the basalt-to-eclogite transition and the associated slab dehydration 14 km deeper (35 km farther landward) than would be predicted with no fluid flow. For most subduction zones, hydrothermal cooling of the subducting slab will delay eclogitization relative to estimates made without considering fluid circulation. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Continuum Models of Stimuli-responsive Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Wei

    Immersed in a solution of small molecules and ions, a network of long-chain polymers may imbibe the solution and swell, resulting in a polymeric gel. Depending on the molecular structure of the polymers, the amount of swelling can be regulated by moisture, mechanical forces, ionic strength, electric field, pH value, and many other types of stimuli. Starting from the basic principles of non-equilibrium thermodynamics, this chapter formulates a field theory of the coupled large deformation and mass transportation in a neutral polymeric gel. The theory is then extended to study polyelectrolyte gels with charge-carrying networks by accounting for the electromechanical coupling and migration of solute ions. While the theoretical framework is adaptable to various types of material models, some representative ones are described through specific free-energy functions and kinetic laws. A specific material law for pH-sensitive gels—a special type of polyelectrolyte gels—is introduced as an example of incorporating chemical reactions in modeling stimuli-responsive gels. Finally, a simplified theory for the equilibrium but inhomogeneous swelling of a polymeric gel is deduced. The theory and the specific material models are illustrated through several examples.

  19. DNA DAMAGE QUANTITATION BY ALKALINE GEL ELECTROPHORESIS.

    SciTech Connect

    SUTHERLAND,B.M.; BENNETT,P.V.; SUTHERLAND, J.C.

    2004-03-24

    Physical and chemical agents in the environment, those used in clinical applications, or encountered during recreational exposures to sunlight, induce damages in DNA. Understanding the biological impact of these agents requires quantitation of the levels of such damages in laboratory test systems as well as in field or clinical samples. Alkaline gel electrophoresis provides a sensitive (down to {approx} a few lesions/5Mb), rapid method of direct quantitation of a wide variety of DNA damages in nanogram quantities of non-radioactive DNAs from laboratory, field, or clinical specimens, including higher plants and animals. This method stems from velocity sedimentation studies of DNA populations, and from the simple methods of agarose gel electrophoresis. Our laboratories have developed quantitative agarose gel methods, analytical descriptions of DNA migration during electrophoresis on agarose gels (1-6), and electronic imaging for accurate determinations of DNA mass (7-9). Although all these components improve sensitivity and throughput of large numbers of samples (7,8,10), a simple version using only standard molecular biology equipment allows routine analysis of DNA damages at moderate frequencies. We present here a description of the methods, as well as a brief description of the underlying principles, required for a simplified approach to quantitation of DNA damages by alkaline gel electrophoresis.

  20. Where's that Slab?: Simultaneous Inversion and Resolution of the Cascadia Slab Reflector Geometry, Wavespeeds and Hypocenters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, L.; Creager, K.; Crosson, R.; Symons, N.

    2002-12-01

    The 1998 Wet SHIPS experiment, an onshore-offshore active source experiment within NW Washington State and SW British Columbia, provided travel times for over 1200 secondary arrivals that we interpret as wide-angle reflections from the subducting Juan de Fuca slab. The reflection points are distributed over a broad area under the Olympic Peninsula, WA. Using a nonlinear, iterative inverse procedure incorporating full 3-D ray tracing, we combine these reflected arrivals with 100,000 first arrivals obtained from SHIPS and other active source experiments and from local earthquakes to simultaneously determine smooth 3-D velocity structure, smooth slab geometry and hypocentral positions. The inversion converges stably after many iterations to the same solution over the range of starting models we have tested. The reflector is generally parallel to and within the upper half of the intraslab events, which form a 6-km thick dipping zone. The vast majority of these earthquakes occur where seismic velocities exceed 7.5 km/s. We are especially interested in testing the hypothesis that dehydration embrittlement, associated with the basalt to eclogite phase transformation, is responsible for the intraslab earthquakes. This hypothesis predicts that the majority of the intraslab events should occur within the subducted oceanic crust above a Moho reflector. An unambiguous interpretation requires knowledge of the reflector depth, relative to the earthquakes, with relative errors less than a few km. We present results from a variety of empirical and numerical error and resolution tests including jack-knife and checkerboard analyses. We analyze the interrelationships and trade-offs among the reflector position, intraslab earthquakes, and the fine-scale deep velocity structure to determine error and resolution bounds in this crucial area of our model. In general, the active source experiments provide dense crossing rays with known source locations to give excellent resolution and