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Sample records for field tests-low input

  1. Field tests-low input, side-wall vented boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Litzke, W.L.; Butcher, T.A.; Celebi, Y.

    1996-07-01

    The Fan Atomized Burner (FAB) was developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory as part of the Oil Heat Combustion Equipment Technology Program to provide a practical low-firing rate technology leading to new, high efficiency oil-fired appliances. The development of the burner design and results of application testing have been presented in prior oil heat conferences over the past several years. This information is also summarized in a more comprehensive BNL report. The first field trial of a prototype unit was initiated during the 1994-95 heating season. This paper presents the results of the second year of testing, during the 1995-96 heating season. The field tests enable the demonstration of the reliability and performance of the FAB under practical, typical operating conditions. Another important objective of the field test was to demonstrate that the low input is adequate to satisfy the heating and hot water demands of the household. During the first field trial it was shown that at a maximum input rate of 0.4 gph (55,000 Btu/hr) the burner was able to heat a home with over 2,000 square feet of conditioned living space and provide adequate supply of domestic hot water for a family of six. The test is located in Long Island, NY.

  2. COSMIC/NASTRAN Free-field Input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, G. C.

    1984-01-01

    A user's guide to the COSMIC/NASTRAN free field input for the Bulk Data section of the NASTRAN program is proposed. The free field input is designed to be user friendly and the user is not forced out of the computer system due to input errors. It is easy to use, with only a few simple rules to follow. A stand alone version of the COSMIC/NASTRAN free field input is also available. The use of free field input is illustrated by a number of examples.

  3. Response of traveling waves to transient inputs in neural fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilpatrick, Zachary P.; Ermentrout, Bard

    2012-02-01

    We analyze the effects of transient stimulation on traveling waves in neural field equations. Neural fields are modeled as integro-differential equations whose convolution term represents the synaptic connections of a spatially extended neuronal network. The adjoint of the linearized wave equation can be used to identify how a particular input will shift the location of a traveling wave. This wave response function is analogous to the phase response curve of limit cycle oscillators. For traveling fronts in an excitatory network, the sign of the shift depends solely on the sign of the transient input. A complementary estimate of the effective shift is derived using an equation for the time-dependent speed of the perturbed front. Traveling pulses are analyzed in an asymmetric lateral inhibitory network and they can be advanced or delayed, depending on the position of spatially localized transient inputs. We also develop bounds on the amplitude of transient input necessary to terminate traveling pulses, based on the global bifurcation structure of the neural field.

  4. Mapping Synaptic Input Fields of Neurons with Super-Resolution Imaging.

    PubMed

    Sigal, Yaron M; Speer, Colenso M; Babcock, Hazen P; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2015-10-01

    As a basic functional unit in neural circuits, each neuron integrates input signals from hundreds to thousands of synapses. Knowledge of the synaptic input fields of individual neurons, including the identity, strength, and location of each synapse, is essential for understanding how neurons compute. Here, we developed a volumetric super-resolution reconstruction platform for large-volume imaging and automated segmentation of neurons and synapses with molecular identity information. We used this platform to map inhibitory synaptic input fields of On-Off direction-selective ganglion cells (On-Off DSGCs), which are important for computing visual motion direction in the mouse retina. The reconstructions of On-Off DSGCs showed a GABAergic, receptor subtype-specific input field for generating direction selective responses without significant glycinergic inputs for mediating monosynaptic crossover inhibition. These results demonstrate unique capabilities of this super-resolution platform for interrogating neural circuitry. PMID:26435106

  5. Active control of sound fields in elastic cylinders by vibrational inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. D.; Fuller, C. R.

    1987-01-01

    An experiment is performed to study the mechanisms of active control of sound fields in elastic cylinders via vibrational outputs. In the present method of control, a vibrational force input was used as the secondary control input to reduce the radiated acoustic field. For the frequencies considered, the active vibration technique provided good global reduction of interior sound even though only one actuator was used.

  6. Multi-bump solutions in a neural field model with external inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Flora; Erlhagen, Wolfram; Bicho, Estela

    2016-07-01

    We study the conditions for the formation of multiple regions of high activity or "bumps" in a one-dimensional, homogeneous neural field with localized inputs. Stable multi-bump solutions of the integro-differential equation have been proposed as a model of a neural population representation of remembered external stimuli. We apply a class of oscillatory coupling functions and first derive criteria to the input width and distance, which relate to the synaptic couplings that guarantee the existence and stability of one and two regions of high activity. These input-induced patterns are attracted by the corresponding stable one-bump and two-bump solutions when the input is removed. We then extend our analytical and numerical investigation to N-bump solutions showing that the constraints on the input shape derived for the two-bump case can be exploited to generate a memory of N > 2 localized inputs. We discuss the pattern formation process when either the conditions on the input shape are violated or when the spatial ranges of the excitatory and inhibitory connections are changed. An important aspect for applications is that the theoretical findings allow us to determine for a given coupling function the maximum number of localized inputs that can be stored in a given finite interval.

  7. Quantification of deterministic matched-field source localization error in the face of random model inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, Peter M.; Hebenstreit, Gerald T.

    2003-04-01

    Deterministic source localization using matched-field processing (MFP) has yielded good results in propagation scenarios where the nonrandom model parameter input assumption is valid. In many shallow water environments, inputs to acoustic propagation models may be better represented using random distributions rather than fixed quantities. One can estimate the negative effect of random source inputs on deterministic MFP by (1) obtaining a realistic statistical representation of a signal model parameter, then (2) using the mean of the parameter as input to the MFP signal model (the so-called ``replica vector''), (3) synthesizing a source signal using multiple realizations of the random parameter, and (4) estimating the source localization error by correlating the synthesized signal vector with the replica vector over a three dimensional space. This approach allows one to quantify deterministic localization error introduced by random model parameters, including sound velocity profile, hydrophone locations, and sediment thickness and speed. [Work supported by DARPA Advanced Technology Office.

  8. Hebbian Analysis of the Transformation of Medial Entorhinal Grid-Cell Inputs to Hippocampal Place Fields

    PubMed Central

    Knierim, James J.

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of grid cells in the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) permits the characterization of hippocampal computation in much greater detail than previously possible. The present study addresses how an integrate-and-fire unit driven by grid-cell spike trains may transform the multipeaked, spatial firing pattern of grid cells into the single-peaked activity that is typical of hippocampal place cells. Previous studies have shown that in the absence of network interactions, this transformation can succeed only if the place cell receives inputs from grids with overlapping vertices at the location of the place cell's firing field. In our simulations, the selection of these inputs was accomplished by fast Hebbian plasticity alone. The resulting nonlinear process was acutely sensitive to small input variations. Simulations differing only in the exact spike timing of grid cells produced different field locations for the same place cells. Place fields became concentrated in areas that correlated with the initial trajectory of the animal; the introduction of feedback inhibitory cells reduced this bias. These results suggest distinct roles for plasticity of the perforant path synapses and for competition via feedback inhibition in the formation of place fields in a novel environment. Furthermore, they imply that variability in MEC spiking patterns or in the rat's trajectory is sufficient for generating a distinct population code in a novel environment and suggest that recalling this code in a familiar environment involves additional inputs and/or a different mode of operation of the network. PMID:20357069

  9. Active control of structurally-coupled sound fields in elastic cylinders by vibrational force inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. D.; Fuller, C. R.

    1990-01-01

    Active control of structurally-coupled sound fields in elastic cylinders is analytically and experimentally studied. The primary (noise) field in the cylinder model is generated by the coupled dynamic response of the shell under loading by a single exterior acoustic source. Control of the interior sound field is achieved by applying vibrational force inputs directly to the shell wall. Action of the point controllers serve to increase the input impedance of select structural modes of the shell which are well-coupled to the interior acoustic cavity, thus substantially reducing sound transmission into the cavity. Spatially-averaged noise reductions in excess of 30 dB are demonstrated for acoustic resonant conditions within the cavity. Twin controller configurations are presented which demonstrate the ability to independently control orthogonal modes of the interior acoustic space. Benefits and drawbacks of this new methodology for noise control are discussed and clearly demonstrated.

  10. Diffuse-source pesticide inputs in surface waters: online risk assessment at field scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichenberger, S.; Röpke, B.; Bach, M.; Frede, H.-G.

    2003-04-01

    Diffuse pesticide input from agricultural fields into surface waters depends, apart from substance properties, also on soil properties, site hydrology, tillage and application practices, weather conditions, and distance to water bodies. A product which can be used safely at one site may pose unacceptable risk to aquatic life at another site. Thus, there is a great need for site-specific risk assessment approaches. Our objective is therefore to develop a tool for assessing pesticide inputs via runoff/erosion, drainflow, and spraydrift for single fields. The tool will be part of the web-based Information System for Integrated Plant Production (ISIP, www.isip.de), but also able to run independently. ISIP is an interactive portal for both farmers and advisors and will become the leading decision support system for plant production and plant protection in Germany over the next years. The aim is an approach which i) is applicable for the majority of European countries, ii) needs only input data readily available for large areas (such as provided by hydrological and soil maps), iii) predicts, with daily resolution, realistic (not worst-case) loads and resulting aquatic concentrations (PECsw), and iv) provides a substance-specific risk assessment on the basis of model results for consulting and management purposes. Special emphasis is laid on scientifically up-to-date model approaches and robust, but site-specific parameterization. For instance, drainage inputs will be calculated using the preferential flow model MACRO 5 (Nick Jarvis, SLU, Sweden). In the later stages of the project, the tool will provide a fully GIS-based risk assessment in ISIP for single fields in Germany.

  11. What input data are needed to accurately model electromagnetic fields from mobile phone base stations?

    PubMed

    Beekhuizen, Johan; Kromhout, Hans; Bürgi, Alfred; Huss, Anke; Vermeulen, Roel

    2015-01-01

    The increase in mobile communication technology has led to concern about potential health effects of radio frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs) from mobile phone base stations. Different RF-EMF prediction models have been applied to assess population exposure to RF-EMF. Our study examines what input data are needed to accurately model RF-EMF, as detailed data are not always available for epidemiological studies. We used NISMap, a 3D radio wave propagation model, to test models with various levels of detail in building and antenna input data. The model outcomes were compared with outdoor measurements taken in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Results showed good agreement between modelled and measured RF-EMF when 3D building data and basic antenna information (location, height, frequency and direction) were used: Spearman correlations were >0.6. Model performance was not sensitive to changes in building damping parameters. Antenna-specific information about down-tilt, type and output power did not significantly improve model performance compared with using average down-tilt and power values, or assuming one standard antenna type. We conclude that 3D radio wave propagation modelling is a feasible approach to predict outdoor RF-EMF levels for ranking exposure levels in epidemiological studies, when 3D building data and information on the antenna height, frequency, location and direction are available. PMID:24472756

  12. A seismic free field input model for FE-SBFE coupling in time domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junyi, Yan; Feng, Jin; Yanjie, Xu; Guanglun, Wang; Chuhan, Zhang

    2003-06-01

    A seismic free field input formulation of the coupling procedure of the finite element (FE) and the scaled boundary finite-element (SBFE) is proposed to perform the unbounded soil-structure interaction analysis in time domain. Based on the substructure technique, seismic excitation of the soil-structure system is represented by the free-field motion of an elastic half-space. To reduce the computational effort, the acceleration unit-impulse response function of the unbounded soil is decomposed into two functions; linear and residual. The latter converges to zero and can be truncated as required. With the prescribed tolerance parameter, the balance between accuracy and efficiency of the procedure can be controlled. The validity of the model is verified by the scattering analysis of a hemi-spherical canyon subjected to plane harmonic P, SV and SH wave incidence. Numerical results show that the new procedure is very efficient for seismic problems within a normal range of frequency. The coupling procedure presented herein can be applied to linear and nonlinear earthquake response analysis of practical structures which are built on unbounded soil.

  13. Using Whole-House Field Tests to Empirically Derive Moisture Buffering Model Inputs

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, J.; Winkler, J.; Christensen, D.; Hancock, E.

    2014-08-01

    Building energy simulations can be used to predict a building's interior conditions, along with the energy use associated with keeping these conditions comfortable. These models simulate the loads on the building (e.g., internal gains, envelope heat transfer), determine the operation of the space conditioning equipment, and then calculate the building's temperature and humidity throughout the year. The indoor temperature and humidity are affected not only by the loads and the space conditioning equipment, but also by the capacitance of the building materials, which buffer changes in temperature and humidity. This research developed an empirical method to extract whole-house model inputs for use with a more accurate moisture capacitance model (the effective moisture penetration depth model). The experimental approach was to subject the materials in the house to a square-wave relative humidity profile, measure all of the moisture transfer terms (e.g., infiltration, air conditioner condensate) and calculate the only unmeasured term: the moisture absorption into the materials. After validating the method with laboratory measurements, we performed the tests in a field house. A least-squares fit of an analytical solution to the measured moisture absorption curves was used to determine the three independent model parameters representing the moisture buffering potential of this house and its furnishings. Follow on tests with realistic latent and sensible loads showed good agreement with the derived parameters, especially compared to the commonly-used effective capacitance approach. These results show that the EMPD model, once the inputs are known, is an accurate moisture buffering model.

  14. Reconstructing the 3D coronal magnetic field using a Potential Field Source Surface model comparing different magnetograph input data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, M. A., II; Peleikis, T.; Berger, L.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.

    2014-12-01

    We utilize a Potential Field Source Sourface (PFSS) model developed by Altschuler & Newkirk (1969) to model and analyze the coronal magnetic field up to the source surface at 2.5 solar radii. As the photospheric boundary to that model we employ data from several instruments, namely the Wilcox Solar Observatory, NSO's Kitt Peak Vacuum Telescope, the Michelson Doppler Imager onboard the SOHO spacecraft and its successor, the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager onboard SDO. Instead of the harmonic function approach commonly used, we employ a three dimensional computational grid and methods of computational fluid dynamics to solve the governing equations in order to easily incorporate more complex phenomena if the need for doing so arises during the course of our work. Another advantage of the grid approach is the possibility to outsource the computational work to a parallel computing architecture like NVIDIA's CUDA, which we employ to speed up processing time and increase data throughput significantly. The obtained magnetic field data is utilized in several ways. First it is compared with in-situ data from several spacecraft like Ulysses to validate the employed PFSS model. We further use the expansion geometry of the magnetic field as an input to a 1D-solar-wind model developed by Cranmer et al. (2007) to determine characteristics of the solar wind in several magnetic flux tubes. We can then infer the theoretical charge-state composition inside these flux tubes, which in turn can be employed to test our hypotheses on the origin of the slow solar wind.

  15. Selecting a first-guess sea surface temperature field as input to forward radiative transfer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Korak; Ignatov, Alexander; Liang, Xing Ming; Dash, Prasanjit

    2012-12-01

    Advanced Clear-Sky Processor for Oceans (ACSPO), developed at National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service, reports observed top-of-atmosphere clear-sky brightness temperatures (BT) in AVHRR channels 3B (3.7), 4 (11), and 5 (12μm) along with the sea surface temperatures (SST) retrieved from these BTs as a level 2 (L2) product. Additionally, ACSPO provides the corresponding BTs simulated with Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM), using Reynolds daily Level 4 (L4) optimum interpolation SST (OISST) and NCEP-GFS profiles as inputs. Accuracy of simulated BTs is critical for ACSPO functionalities, including detecting clouds, retrieving physical SSTs, monitoring sensor performance, and validating CRTM. This paper tests 11 gap-free gridded L4 SSTs for their potential use as first-guess fields in ACSPO to improve accuracy of simulated BTs. As a first step toward the objective, this study checks for consistency between various L4 products and ACSPO L2 SSTs. This SST consistency was shown earlier to be representative of, and equivalent to, the consistency between measured and simulated BTs, thus avoiding expensive CRTM calculations. The metrics employed in L4 comparisons include the global spatial L4-L2 SST biases and variances and their temporal stability. Also, the effect of L4 fields on the corresponding satellite-to-satellite consistency (calculated as L2-L2 double differences) is examined. Several L4 products, including the GHRSST Multi-Product Ensemble and Canadian Meteorological Centre analysis (CMC-0.2°), show better consistency with ACSPO L2 SST and will be explored in the future versions of ACSPO.

  16. Field measurement of moisture-buffering model inputs for residential buildings

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Woods, Jason; Winkler, Jon

    2016-02-05

    Moisture adsorption and desorption in building materials impact indoor humidity. This effect should be included in building-energy simulations, particularly when humidity is being investigated or controlled. Several models can calculate this moisture-buffering effect, but accurate ones require model inputs that are not always known to the user of the building-energy simulation. This research developed an empirical method to extract whole-house model inputs for the effective moisture penetration depth (EMPD) model. The experimental approach was to subject the materials in the house to a square-wave relative-humidity profile, measure all of the moisture-transfer terms (e.g., infiltration, air-conditioner condensate), and calculate the onlymore » unmeasured term—the moisture sorption into the materials. We validated this method with laboratory measurements, which we used to measure the EMPD model inputs of two houses. After deriving these inputs, we measured the humidity of the same houses during tests with realistic latent and sensible loads and demonstrated the accuracy of this approach. Furthermore, these results show that the EMPD model, when given reasonable inputs, is an accurate moisture-buffering model.« less

  17. Field performance of potential biomass feedstocks under no inputs in South Georgia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Warm-season perennial grasses have the greatest potential for biomass production in the Southeast for the emerging bioenergy industry. The larger root systems of perennial crops should be able to adapt to lower inputs of water and fertilizer, and should also contribute to soil carbon sequestration....

  18. Reorganization in processing of spectral and temporal input in the rat posterior auditory field induced by environmental enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Jakkamsetti, Vikram; Chang, Kevin Q.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental enrichment induces powerful changes in the adult cerebral cortex. Studies in primary sensory cortex have observed that environmental enrichment modulates neuronal response strength, selectivity, speed of response, and synchronization to rapid sensory input. Other reports suggest that nonprimary sensory fields are more plastic than primary sensory cortex. The consequences of environmental enrichment on information processing in nonprimary sensory cortex have yet to be studied. Here we examine physiological effects of enrichment in the posterior auditory field (PAF), a field distinguished from primary auditory cortex (A1) by wider receptive fields, slower response times, and a greater preference for slowly modulated sounds. Environmental enrichment induced a significant increase in spectral and temporal selectivity in PAF. PAF neurons exhibited narrower receptive fields and responded significantly faster and for a briefer period to sounds after enrichment. Enrichment increased time-locking to rapidly successive sensory input in PAF neurons. Compared with previous enrichment studies in A1, we observe a greater magnitude of reorganization in PAF after environmental enrichment. Along with other reports observing greater reorganization in nonprimary sensory cortex, our results in PAF suggest that nonprimary fields might have a greater capacity for reorganization compared with primary fields. PMID:22131375

  19. Uncertainty related to input parameters of (137)Cs soil redistribution model for undisturbed fields.

    PubMed

    Iurian, Andra-Rada; Mabit, Lionel; Cosma, Constantin

    2014-10-01

    This study presents an alternative method to empirically establish the effective diffusion coefficient and the convective velocity of (137)Cs in undisturbed soils. This approach offers the possibility to improve the parameterisation and the accuracy of the (137)Cs Diffusion and Migration Model (DMM) used to assess soil erosion magnitudes. The impact of the different input parameters of this radiometric model on the derived-soil redistribution rates has been determined for a Romanian pastureland located in the northwest extremity of the Transylvanian Plain. By fitting the convection-diffusion equation to the available experimental data, the diffusion coefficient and convection velocity of (137)Cs in soil could be determined; 72% of the (137)Cs soil content could be attributed to the (137)Cs fallout originating from Chernobyl. The medium-term net erosion rate obtained with the calculated input parameters reached -6.6 t ha(-1) yr(-1). The model highlights great sensitivity to parameter estimations and the calculated erosion rates for undisturbed landscapes can be highly impacted if the input parameters are not accurately determined from the experimental data set. Upper and lower bounds should be established based on the determined uncertainty budget for the reliable estimates of the derived redistribution rates. PMID:24929506

  20. Processing of vestibular inputs by the medullary lateral tegmental field of conscious cats: implications for generation of motion sickness

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Andrew A.; Moy, Jennifer D.; DeMayo, William M.; Puterbaugh, Sonya R.; Miller, Daniel J.; Catanzaro, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    The dorsolateral reticular formation of the caudal medulla, the lateral tegmental field (LTF), participates in generating vomiting. LTF neurons exhibited complex responses to vestibular stimulation in decerebrate cats, indicating that they received converging inputs from a variety of labyrinthine receptors. Such a convergence pattern of vestibular inputs is appropriate for a brain region that participates in generating motion sickness. Since responses of brainstem neurons to vestibular stimulation can differ between decerebrate and conscious animals, the current study examined the effects of whole-body rotations in vertical planes on the activity of LTF neurons in conscious felines. Wobble stimuli, fixed-amplitude tilts, the direction of which moves around the animal at a constant speed, were used to determine the response vector orientation, and also to ascertain whether neurons had spatial–temporal convergence (STC) behavior (which is due to the convergence of vestibular inputs with different spatial and temporal properties). The proportion of LTF neurons with STC behavior in conscious animals (25 %) was similar to that in decerebrate cats. Far fewer neurons in other regions of the feline brainstem had STC behavior, confirming findings that many LTF neurons receive converging inputs from a variety of labyrinthine receptors. However, responses to vertical plane vestibular stimulation were considerably different in decerebrate and conscious felines for LTF neurons lacking STC behavior. In decerebrate cats, most LTF neurons had graviceptive responses to rotations, similar to those of otolith organ afferents. However, in conscious animals, the response properties were similar to those of semicircular canal afferents. These differences show that higher centers of the brain that are removed during decerebration regulate the labyrinthine inputs relayed to the LTF, either by gating connections in the brainstem or by conveying vestibular inputs directly to the region

  1. Genesis of Dune Fields Under Unidirectional Wind with Sand Input Flux Control: An Experimental Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, A.; Courrech du Pont, S.; Rodriguez, S.; Valance, A.; Narteau, C.; Gao, X.; Lucas, A.

    2015-05-01

    Our experimental studies with control of wind and sediment source will characterize more precisely the different modes of dune formation and long-term evolution, and constrain the physics behind the morphogenesis and dynamics of dunes fields.

  2. Inferring electric fields and currents from ground magnetometer data - A test with theoretically derived inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, R. A.; Kamide, Y.

    1983-01-01

    Advanced techniques considered by Kamide et al. (1981) seem to have the potential for providing observation-based high time resolution pictures of the global ionospheric current and electric field patterns for interesting events. However, a reliance on the proposed magnetogram-inversion schemes for the deduction of global ionospheric current and electric field patterns requires proof that reliable results are obtained. 'Theoretical' tests of the accuracy of the magnetogram inversion schemes have, therefore, been considered. The present investigation is concerned with a test, involving the developed KRM algorithm and the Rice Convection Model (RCM). The test was successful in the sense that there was overall agreement between electric fields and currents calculated by the RCM and KRM schemes.

  3. The post-natal development of cutaneous afferent fibre input and receptive field organization in the rat dorsal horn.

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, M

    1985-01-01

    The responses evoked in lumbar dorsal horn cells by both natural and electrical hind-limb skin stimulation were recorded in the spinal cord of rat pups aged 0-15 days under urethane anaesthesia. The input volley was recorded on the L4 dorsal root and consisted of two separate waves from birth. Latency and threshold measurements were consistent with these two waves being immature A (myelinated fibre) waves and C (non-myelinated fibre) waves. On the first 3 days of life background activity of cells in the dorsal horn was low and evoked discharges were sluggish. On electrical stimulation of the skin, neonatal dorsal horn cells frequently responded with only 1 or 2 impulses per input volley with long central delays of up to 20 ms. Synaptic linkage appeared weak and many cells failed to follow stimulation rates of 5 Hz. Natural skin stimulation showed that the majority of cells at days 0-3 responded to pinching the skin only. The development of responses evoked by C fibres in the dorsal horn was delayed compared to that of responses evoked by A fibres. Short and long latency responses corresponding to the early A and late C afferent input volleys could be recorded in the superficial laminae (I, II and III) of the dorsal horn from day 0, but in the deeper laminae only early short latency A responses were evoked until the age of day 7-8. After this time, a long latency C response also appeared and increased in strength with age. Convergence of low and high threshold inputs onto dorsal horn cells was rare at birth but increased gradually over the following two weeks. Receptive field areas, mapped by natural mechanical stimulation of skin, were large at birth and decreased in size with age. At birth the mean receptive field area was 14.2% of the total hind-limb area whereas at day 15 it was 3.6%. This fall in size was particularly marked in cells of the deep dorsal horn. Pinching or brushing the receptive field of many neonatal dorsal horn cells resulted in long

  4. Influence of spatiotemporally distributed irradiance data input on temperature evolution in parabolic trough solar field simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubolz, K.; Schenk, H.; Hirsch, T.

    2016-05-01

    Concentrating solar field operation is affected by shadowing through cloud movement. For line focusing systems the impact of varying irradiance has been studied before by several authors with simulations of relevant thermodynamics assuming spatially homogeneous irradiance or using artificial test signals. While today's simulation capabilities allow more and more a higher spatiotemporal resolution of plant processes there are only few studies on influence of spatially distributed irradiance due to lack of available data. Based on recent work on generating real irradiance maps with high spatial resolution this paper demonstrates their influence on solar field thermodynamics. For a case study an irradiance time series is chosen. One solar field section with several loops and collecting header is modeled for simulation purpose of parabolic trough collectors and oil as heat transfer medium. Assuming homogeneous mass flow distribution among all loops we observe spatially varying temperature characteristics. They are analysed without and with mass flow control and their impact on solar field control design is discussed. Finally, the potential of distributed irradiance data is outlined.

  5. Comparative value of respiratory input and transfer impedances in field studies.

    PubMed

    Peslin, R; Pham, Q T; Teculescu, D; Gallina, C; Duvivier, C

    1987-01-01

    Total respiratory impedance was obtained from 4 to 30 Hz in 39 healthy males and in 140 iron miners by studying the relationship between transrespiratory pressure and mouth flow when forced oscillations were applied to the respiratory system in two different ways: by varying pressure at the mouth (input impedance, Zin); by varying pressure around the chest (transfer impedance, Ztr). Zin was characterized by the slope (S) and intercept (R0) of the resistance-frequency curve, by the resonant frequency (fn), and by total respiratory inertance (I) and compliance (C) obtained from the reactance. Transfer resistance and reactance curves were respectively analysed with a two-parameter (m1, m3) and a three-parameter (m0, m2, m4) equation. Significant correlations were found between impedance indices, particularly between m1 and both R0 (r = 0.931; p less than 0.001) and m2 (r = 0.739; p less than 0.001), and also between impedance indices and maximal expiratory flows. Nonsmoking miners (n = 40), compared to control nonsmokers (n = 16), had slightly lower maximal flows at high lung volumes (p less than 0.05) and higher values of m1 (p less than 0.001), R0, S, m3 (p less than 0.01) and m2 (p less than 0.05). In contrast, miners who smoked (n = 46) mainly differed from miners who did not smoke by lower flows at middle and low lung volumes (p less than 0.01) and larger m0 (p less than 0.01), m2 and m4 (p less than 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3593995

  6. Tidal and groundwater fluxes to a shallow, microtidal estuary: Constraining inputs through field observations and hydrodynamic modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ganju, Neil K.; Hayn, Melanie; Chen, Shih-Nan; Howarth, Robert W.; Dickhudt, Patrick J.; Aretxabaleta, Alfredo L.; Marino, Roxanne

    2012-01-01

    Increased nutrient loading to estuaries has led to eutrophication, degraded water quality, and ecological transformations. Quantifying nutrient loads in systems with significant groundwater input can be difficult due to the challenge of measuring groundwater fluxes. We quantified tidal and freshwater fluxes over an 8-week period at the entrance of West Falmouth Harbor, Massachusetts, a eutrophic, groundwater-fed estuary. Fluxes were estimated from velocity and salinity measurements and a total exchange flow (TEF) methodology. Intermittent cross-sectional measurements of velocity and salinity were used to convert point measurements to cross-sectionally averaged values over the entire deployment (index relationships). The estimated mean freshwater flux (0.19 m3/s) for the 8-week period was mainly due to groundwater input (0.21 m3/s) with contributions from precipitation to the estuary surface (0.026 m3/s) and removal by evaporation (0.048 m3/s). Spring–neap variations in freshwater export that appeared in shorter-term averages were mostly artifacts of the index relationships. Hydrodynamic modeling with steady groundwater input demonstrated that while the TEF methodology resolves the freshwater flux signal, calibration of the index–salinity relationships during spring tide conditions only was responsible for most of the spring–neap signal. The mean freshwater flux over the entire period estimated from the combination of the index-velocity, index–salinity, and TEF calculations were consistent with the model, suggesting that this methodology is a reliable way of estimating freshwater fluxes in the estuary over timescales greater than the spring–neap cycle. Combining this type of field campaign with hydrodynamic modeling provides guidance for estimating both magnitude of groundwater input and estuarine storage of freshwater and sets the stage for robust estimation of the nutrient load in groundwater.

  7. Map transfer from the thalamus to the neocortex: inputs from the barrel field.

    PubMed

    Lokmane, Ludmilla; Garel, Sonia

    2014-11-01

    Sensory perception relies on the formation of stereotyped maps inside the brain. This feature is particularly well illustrated in the mammalian neocortex, which is subdivided into distinct cortical sensory areas that comprise topological maps, such as the somatosensory homunculus in humans or the barrel field of the large whiskers in rodents. How somatosensory maps are formed and relayed into the neocortex remain essential questions in developmental neuroscience. Here, we will present our current knowledge on whisker map transfer in the mouse model, with the goal of linking embryonic and postnatal studies into a comprehensive framework. PMID:25020201

  8. A biologically inspired model of bat echolocation in a cluttered environment with inputs designed from field Recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loncich, Kristen Teczar

    Bat echolocation strategies and neural processing of acoustic information, with a focus on cluttered environments, is investigated in this study. How a bat processes the dense field of echoes received while navigating and foraging in the dark is not well understood. While several models have been developed to describe the mechanisms behind bat echolocation, most are based in mathematics rather than biology, and focus on either peripheral or neural processing---not exploring how these two levels of processing are vitally connected. Current echolocation models also do not use habitat specific acoustic input, or account for field observations of echolocation strategies. Here, a new approach to echolocation modeling is described capturing the full picture of echolocation from signal generation to a neural picture of the acoustic scene. A biologically inspired echolocation model is developed using field research measurements of the interpulse interval timing used by a frequency modulating (FM) bat in the wild, with a whole method approach to modeling echolocation including habitat specific acoustic inputs, a biologically accurate peripheral model of sound processing by the outer, middle, and inner ear, and finally a neural model incorporating established auditory pathways and neuron types with echolocation adaptations. Field recordings analyzed underscore bat sonar design differences observed in the laboratory and wild, and suggest a correlation between interpulse interval groupings and increased clutter. The scenario model provides habitat and behavior specific echoes and is a useful tool for both modeling and behavioral studies, and the peripheral and neural model show that spike-time information and echolocation specific neuron types can produce target localization in the midbrain.

  9. Sensitivity of Global Modeling Initiative Model Predictions of Antarctic Ozone Recovery to Input Meteorological Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Considine, David B.; Connell, Peter S.; Bergmann, Daniel J.; Rotman, Douglas A.; Strahan, Susan E.

    2004-01-01

    We use the Global Modeling Initiative chemistry and transport model to simulate the evolution of stratospheric ozone between 1995 and 2030, using boundary conditions consistent with the recent World Meteorological Organization ozone assessment. We compare the Antarctic ozone recovery predictions of two simulations, one driven by an annually repeated year of meteorological data from a general circulation model (GCM), the other using a year of output from a data assimilation system (DAS), to examine the sensitivity of Antarctic ozone recovery predictions to the characteristic dynamical differences between GCM- and DAS-generated meteorological data. Although the age of air in the Antarctic lower stratosphere differs by a factor of 2 between the simulations, we find little sensitivity of the 1995-2030 Antarctic ozone recovery between 350 and 650 K to the differing meteorological fields, particularly when the recovery is specified in mixing ratio units. Percent changes are smaller in the DAS-driven simulation compared to the GCM-driven simulation because of a surplus of Antarctic ozone in the DAS-driven simulation which is not consistent with observations. The peak ozone change between 1995 and 2030 in both simulations is approx.20% lower than photochemical expectations, indicating that changes in ozone transport due to changing ozone gradients at 450 K between 1995 and 2030 constitute a small negative feedback. Total winter/spring ozone loss during the base year (1995) of both simulations and the rate of ozone loss during August and September is somewhat weaker than observed. This appears to be due to underestimates of Antarctic Cl(sub y) at the 450 K potential temperature level.

  10. Response variability of frontal eye field neurons modulates with sensory input and saccade preparation but not visual search salience.

    PubMed

    Purcell, Braden A; Heitz, Richard P; Cohen, Jeremiah Y; Schall, Jeffrey D

    2012-11-01

    Discharge rate modulation of frontal eye field (FEF) neurons has been identified with a representation of visual search salience (physical conspicuity and behavioral relevance) and saccade preparation. We tested whether salience or saccade preparation are evident in the trial-to-trial variability of discharge rate. We quantified response variability via the Fano factor in FEF neurons recorded in monkeys performing efficient and inefficient visual search tasks. Response variability declined following stimulus presentation in most neurons, but despite clear discharge rate modulation, variability did not change with target salience. Instead, we found that response variability was modulated by stimulus luminance and the number of items in the visual field independently of attentional demands. Response variability declined to a minimum before saccade initiation, and presaccadic response variability was directionally tuned. In addition, response variability was correlated with the response time of memory-guided saccades. These results indicate that the trial-by-trial response variability of FEF neurons reflects saccade preparation and the strength of sensory input, but not visual search salience or attentional allocation. PMID:22956785

  11. Parallel ON and OFF cone bipolar inputs establish spatially-coextensive receptive field structure of blue-yellow ganglion cells in primate retina

    PubMed Central

    Crook, Joanna D.; Davenport, Christopher M.; Peterson, Beth B.; Packer, Orin S.; Detwiler, Peter B.; Dacey, Dennis M.

    2009-01-01

    In the primate retina the small bistratified, ‘blue-yellow’ color-opponent ganglion cell receives parallel ON-depolarizing and OFF-hyperpolarizing inputs from short (S) wavelength sensitive and combined long (L) and middle (M) wavelength sensitive cone photoreceptors respectively. However the synaptic pathways that create S vs LM cone-opponent receptive field structure remain controversial. Here we show in the macaque monkey retina in vitro that at photopic light levels, when an identified rod input is excluded, the small bistratified cell displays a spatially coextensive receptive field in which the S-ON-input is in spatial, temporal and chromatic balance with the LM-OFF-input. ON pathway block with L-AP-4, the mGluR6 receptor agonist, abolished the SON response but spared the LM-OFF response. The isolated LM component showed a center-surround receptive field structure consistent with an input from OFF-center, ON-surround ‘diffuse’ cone bipolar cells. Increasing retinal buffering capacity with HEPES attenuated the LM-ON surround component, consistent with a non-GABAergic outer retina feedback mechanism for the bipolar surround. The GABAa/c receptor antagonist picrotoxin and the glycine receptor antagonist strychnine did not affect chromatic balance or the basic coextensive receptive field structure suggesting that the LM-OFF field is not generated by an inner retinal inhibitory pathway. We conclude that the opponent S-ON and LM-OFF responses originate from the excitatory receptive field centers of S-ON and LM-OFF cone bipolar cells and that the LM-OFF- and ON-surrounds of these parallel bipolar inputs largely cancel, explaining the small, spatially coextensive but spectrally antagonistic receptive field structure of the blue-ON ganglion cell. PMID:19571128

  12. Towards integrating the influence of erosion on within field variability of C input, stock and stability in regional SOC estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meersmans, J.; Quine, T. A.

    2013-12-01

    approach allows us to unravel the influence of lateral transport processes (erosion) on the within field vertical heterogeneity in SOC stock and stability and associated variation in C input, and hence can be considered as a first step to refine spatial-temporal mapping of SOC at regional scales.

  13. Water vapour correction of the daily 1 km AVHRR global land dataset: Part I validation and use of the Water Vapour input field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeFelice, Thomas P.; Lloyd, D.; Meyer, D.J.; Baltzer, T. T.; Piraina, P.

    2003-01-01

    An atmospheric correction algorithm developed for the 1 km Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) global land dataset was modified to include a near real-time total column water vapour data input field to account for the natural variability of atmospheric water vapour. The real-time data input field used for this study is the Television and Infrared Observational Satellite (TIROS) Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) Pathfinder A global total column water vapour dataset. It was validated prior to its use in the AVHRR atmospheric correction process using two North American AVHRR scenes, namely 13 June and 28 November 1996. The validation results are consistent with those reported by others and entail a comparison between TOVS, radiosonde, experimental sounding, microwave radiometer, and data from a hand-held sunphotometer. The use of this data layer as input to the AVHRR atmospheric correction process is discussed.

  14. Testing low cost anaerobic digestion (AD) systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To evaluate the potential for low technology and low cost digesters for small dairies, BARC and researchers from the University of Maryland installed six modified Taiwanese-model field-scale (FS) digesters near the original dairy manure digester. The FS units receive the same post-separated liquid ...

  15. Bedtime Stories in English: Field-Testing Comprehensible Input Materials for Natural Second-Language Acquisition in Japanese Pre-School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the prototype of a new type of bilingual picture book was field-tested with two sets of mother-son subject pairs. This picture book was designed as a possible tool for providing children with comprehensible input during their critical period for second language acquisition. Context is provided by visual cues and both Japanese and…

  16. Simulation of a two step TGF ignition above cloudtops with MeV electron input fluxes generated in the electric fields of lightning streamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connell, P. H.

    2014-12-01

    The origin of high energy electrons which contribute to the Runaway Electron Avalanche of a TGF are not precisely known, or yet observed, though the most obvious source would seem to be the products of cosmic ray showers, or electron avalanches generated in the high electric field near the tips of lightning leaders. With our TGF simulation software package LEPTRACK we can easily create all kinds of electric field geometries and are investigating the second scenario with combinations of lightning leader and streamer micro-fields producing electron avalanches, which may or may not be runaway, which are then input to the macro-fields expected at or above thunderstorm cloudtops.We will present the detailed evolution of photon, electron, neutron/proton and ionization density fields resulting to demonstrate the possibility that TGF origin is not one of the two models currently proposed but may be a combination of both.

  17. The Central Complex of the Flesh Fly, Neobellieria bullata: Recordings and Morphologies of Protocerebral Inputs and Small-Field Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Phillips-Portillo, James

    2014-01-01

    The central complex in the brains of insects is a series of midline neuropils involved in motor control, sensory integration, and associative learning. To understand better the role of this center and its supply of sensory information, intracellular recordings and dye fills were made of central complex neurons in the fly, Neobellieria bullata. Recordings were obtained from 24 neurons associated with the ellipsoid body, fan-shaped body, and protocerebral bridge, all of which receive both visual and mechanosensory information from protocerebral centers. One neuron with dendrites in an area of the lateral protocerebrum associated with motion-sensitive outputs from the optic lobes invades the entire protocerebral bridge and was driven by visual motion. Inputs to the fan-shaped body and ellipsoid body responded both to visual stimuli and to air puffs directed at the head and abdomen. Intrinsic neurons in both of these structures respond to changes in illumination. A putative output neuron connecting the protocerebral bridge, the fan-shaped body, and one of the lateral accessory lobes showed opponent responses to moving visual stimuli. These recordings identify neurons with response properties previously known only from extracellular recordings in other species. Dye injections into neurons connecting the central complex with areas of the protocerebrum suggest that some classes of inputs into the central complex are electrically coupled. PMID:22528883

  18. Dual Input AND Gate Fabricated From a Single Channel Poly (3-Hexylthiophene) Thin Film Field Effect Transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinto, N. J.; Perez, R.; Mueller, C. H.; Theofylaktos, N.; Miranda, F. A.

    2006-01-01

    A regio-regular poly (3-hexylthiophene) (RRP3HT) thin film transistor having a split-gate architecture has been fabricated on a doped silicon/silicon nitride substrate and characterized. This device demonstrates AND logic functionality. The device functionality was controlled by applying either 0 or -10 V to each of the gate electrodes. When -10 V was simultaneously applied to both gates, the device was conductive (ON), while any other combination of gate voltages rendered the device resistive (OFF). The p-type carrier charge mobility was about 5x10(exp -4) per square centimeter per V-sec. The low mobility is attributed to the sharp contours of the RRP3HT film due to substrate non-planarity. A significant advantage of this architecture is that AND logic devices with multiple inputs can be fabricated using a single RRP3HT channel with multiple gates.

  19. The influence of anatomical and physiological parameters on the interference voltage at the input of unipolar cardiac pacemakers in low frequency electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joosten, S.; Pammler, K.; Silny, J.

    2009-02-01

    The problem of electromagnetic interference of electronic implants such as cardiac pacemakers has been well known for many years. An increasing number of field sources in everyday life and occupational environment leads unavoidably to an increased risk for patients with electronic implants. However, no obligatory national or international safety regulations exist for the protection of this patient group. The aim of this study is to find out the anatomical and physiological worst-case conditions for patients with an implanted pacemaker adjusted to unipolar sensing in external time-varying electric fields. The results of this study with 15 volunteers show that, in electric fields, variation of the interference voltage at the input of a cardiac pacemaker adds up to 200% only because of individual factors. These factors should be considered in human studies and in the setting of safety regulations.

  20. Pre-Mission Input Requirements to Enable Successful Sample Collection by A Remote Field/EVA Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, B. A.; Lim, D. S. S.; Young, K. E.; Brunner, A.; Elphic, R. E.; Horne, A.; Kerrigan, M. C.; Osinski, G. R.; Skok, J. R.; Squyres, S. W.; Saint-Jacques, D.; Heldmann, J. L.

    2016-01-01

    The FINESSE (Field Investigations to Enable Solar System Science and Exploration) team, part of the Solar System Exploration Virtual Institute (SSERVI), is a field-based research program aimed at generating strategic knowledge in preparation for human and robotic exploration of the Moon, near-Earth asteroids, Phobos and Deimos, and beyond. In contract to other technology-driven NASA analog studies, The FINESSE WCIS activity is science-focused and, moreover, is sampling-focused with the explicit intent to return the best samples for geochronology studies in the laboratory. We used the FINESSE field excursion to the West Clearwater Lake Impact structure (WCIS) as an opportunity to test factors related to sampling decisions. We examined the in situ sample characterization and real-time decision-making process of the astronauts, with a guiding hypothesis that pre-mission training that included detailed background information on the analytical fate of a sample would better enable future astronauts to select samples that would best meet science requirements. We conducted three tests of this hypothesis over several days in the field. Our investigation was designed to document processes, tools and procedures for crew sampling of planetary targets. This was not meant to be a blind, controlled test of crew efficacy, but rather an effort to explicitly recognize the relevant variables that enter into sampling protocol and to be able to develop recommendations for crew and backroom training in future endeavors.

  1. Organic and inorganic inputs and losses in an irrigated corn field after inorganic fertilizer or manure application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about inorganic fertilizer or manure effects on organic carbon (OC) and inorganic C (IC) losses from a furrow irrigated field, particularly in the context of other system C gains or losses. In 2003 and 2004, we measured dissolved organic and inorganic C (DOC, DIC), particulate OC an...

  2. Pre-Mission Input Requirements to Enable Successful Sample Collection by a Remote Field/EVA Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, B. A.; Young, K. E.; Lim, D. S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is intended to evaluate the sample collection process with respect to sample characterization and decision making. In some cases, it may be sufficient to know whether a given outcrop or hand sample is the same as or different from previous sampling localities or samples. In other cases, it may be important to have more in-depth characterization of the sample, such as basic composition, mineralogy, and petrology, in order to effectively identify the best sample. Contextual field observations, in situ/handheld analysis, and backroom evaluation may all play a role in understanding field lithologies and their importance for return. For example, whether a rock is a breccia or a clast-laden impact melt may be difficult based on a single sample, but becomes clear as exploration of a field site puts it into context. The FINESSE (Field Investigations to Enable Solar System Science and Exploration) team is a new activity focused on a science and exploration field based research program aimed at generating strategic knowledge in preparation for the human and robotic exploration of the Moon, near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) and Phobos and Deimos. We used the FINESSE field excursion to the West Clearwater Lake Impact structure (WCIS) as an opportunity to test factors related to sampling decisions. In contract to other technology-driven NASA analog studies, The FINESSE WCIS activity is science-focused, and moreover, is sampling-focused, with the explicit intent to return the best samples for geochronology studies in the laboratory. This specific objective effectively reduces the number of variables in the goals of the field test and enables a more controlled investigation of the role of the crewmember in selecting samples. We formulated one hypothesis to test: that providing details regarding the analytical fate of the samples (e.g. geochronology, XRF/XRD, etc.) to the crew prior to their traverse will result in samples that are more likely to meet specific analytical

  3. Ctip1 Controls Acquisition of Sensory Area Identity and Establishment of Sensory Input Fields in the Developing Neocortex.

    PubMed

    Greig, Luciano C; Woodworth, Mollie B; Greppi, Chloé; Macklis, Jeffrey D

    2016-04-20

    While transcriptional controls over the size and relative position of cortical areas have been identified, less is known about regulators that direct acquisition of area-specific characteristics. Here, we report that the transcription factor Ctip1 functions in primary sensory areas to repress motor and activate sensory programs of gene expression, enabling establishment of sharp molecular boundaries defining functional areas. In Ctip1 mutants, abnormal gene expression leads to aberrantly motorized corticocortical and corticofugal output connectivity. Ctip1 critically regulates differentiation of layer IV neurons, and selective loss of Ctip1 in cortex deprives thalamocortical axons of their receptive "sensory field" in layer IV, which normally provides a tangentially and radially defined compartment of dedicated synaptic territory. Therefore, although thalamocortical axons invade appropriate cortical regions, they are unable to organize into properly configured sensory maps. Together, these data identify Ctip1 as a critical control over sensory area development. PMID:27100196

  4. Wireless hippocampal neural recording via a multiple input RF receiver to construct place-specific firing fields.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Bae; Manns, Joseph R; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports scientifically meaningful in vivo experiments using a 32-channel wireless neural recording system (WINeR). The WINeR system is divided into transmitter (Tx) and receiver (Rx) parts. On the Tx side, we had WINeR-6, a system-on-a-chip (SoC) that operated based on time division multiplexing (TDM) of pulse width modulated (PWM) samples. The chip was fabricated in a 0.5-µm CMOS process, occupying 4.9 × 3.3 mm(2) and consuming 15 mW from ±1.5V supplies. The Rx used two antennas with separate pathways to down-convert the RF signal from a large area. A time-to-digital converter (TDC) in an FPGA converted the PWM pulses into digitized samples. In order to further increase the wireless coverage area and eliminate blind spots within a large experimental arena, two receivers were synchronized. The WINeR system was used to record epileptic activities from a rat that was injected with tetanus toxin (TT) in the dorsal hippocampus. In a different in vivo experiment, place-specific firing fields of place cells, which are parts of the hippocampal-dependent memory, were mapped from a series of behavioral experiments from a rat running in a circular track. Results from the same animal were compared against a commercial hard-wired recording system to evaluate the quality of the wireless recordings. PMID:23366004

  5. Logic gates realized by nonvolatile GeTe/Sb2Te3 super lattice phase-change memory with a magnetic field input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bin; Cheng, Xiaomin; Feng, Jinlong; Guan, Xiawei; Miao, Xiangshui

    2016-07-01

    Nonvolatile memory devices or circuits that can implement both storage and calculation are a crucial requirement for the efficiency improvement of modern computer. In this work, we realize logic functions by using [GeTe/Sb2Te3]n super lattice phase change memory (PCM) cell in which higher threshold voltage is needed for phase change with a magnetic field applied. First, the [GeTe/Sb2Te3]n super lattice cells were fabricated and the R-V curve was measured. Then we designed the logic circuits with the super lattice PCM cell verified by HSPICE simulation and experiments. Seven basic logic functions are first demonstrated in this letter; then several multi-input logic gates are presented. The proposed logic devices offer the advantages of simple structures and low power consumption, indicating that the super lattice PCM has the potential in the future nonvolatile central processing unit design, facilitating the development of massive parallel computing architecture.

  6. Parallel molecular computation of modular-multiplication with two same inputs over finite field GF(2(n)) using self-assembly of DNA tiles.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongnan; Xiao, Limin; Ruan, Li

    2014-06-01

    Two major advantages of DNA computing - huge memory capacity and high parallelism - are being explored for large-scale parallel computing, mass data storage and cryptography. Tile assembly model is a highly distributed parallel model of DNA computing. Finite field GF(2(n)) is one of the most commonly used mathematic sets for constructing public-key cryptosystem. It is still an open question that how to implement the basic operations over finite field GF(2(n)) using DNA tiles. This paper proposes how the parallel tile assembly process could be used for computing the modular-square, modular-multiplication with two same inputs, over finite field GF(2(n)). This system could obtain the final result within less steps than another molecular computing system designed in our previous study, because square and reduction are executed simultaneously and the previous system computes reduction after calculating square. Rigorous theoretical proofs are described and specific computing instance is given after defining the basic tiles and the assembly rules. Time complexity of this system is 3n-1 and space complexity is 2n(2). PMID:24534382

  7. More Gamma More Predictions: Gamma-Synchronization as a Key Mechanism for Efficient Integration of Classical Receptive Field Inputs with Surround Predictions

    PubMed Central

    Vinck, Martin; Bosman, Conrado A.

    2016-01-01

    During visual stimulation, neurons in visual cortex often exhibit rhythmic and synchronous firing in the gamma-frequency (30–90 Hz) band. Whether this phenomenon plays a functional role during visual processing is not fully clear and remains heavily debated. In this article, we explore the function of gamma-synchronization in the context of predictive and efficient coding theories. These theories hold that sensory neurons utilize the statistical regularities in the natural world in order to improve the efficiency of the neural code, and to optimize the inference of the stimulus causes of the sensory data. In visual cortex, this relies on the integration of classical receptive field (CRF) data with predictions from the surround. Here we outline two main hypotheses about gamma-synchronization in visual cortex. First, we hypothesize that the precision of gamma-synchronization reflects the extent to which CRF data can be accurately predicted by the surround. Second, we hypothesize that different cortical columns synchronize to the extent that they accurately predict each other’s CRF visual input. We argue that these two hypotheses can account for a large number of empirical observations made on the stimulus dependencies of gamma-synchronization. Furthermore, we show that they are consistent with the known laminar dependencies of gamma-synchronization and the spatial profile of intercolumnar gamma-synchronization, as well as the dependence of gamma-synchronization on experience and development. Based on our two main hypotheses, we outline two additional hypotheses. First, we hypothesize that the precision of gamma-synchronization shows, in general, a negative dependence on RF size. In support, we review evidence showing that gamma-synchronization decreases in strength along the visual hierarchy, and tends to be more prominent in species with small V1 RFs. Second, we hypothesize that gamma-synchronized network dynamics facilitate the emergence of spiking output that

  8. More Gamma More Predictions: Gamma-Synchronization as a Key Mechanism for Efficient Integration of Classical Receptive Field Inputs with Surround Predictions.

    PubMed

    Vinck, Martin; Bosman, Conrado A

    2016-01-01

    During visual stimulation, neurons in visual cortex often exhibit rhythmic and synchronous firing in the gamma-frequency (30-90 Hz) band. Whether this phenomenon plays a functional role during visual processing is not fully clear and remains heavily debated. In this article, we explore the function of gamma-synchronization in the context of predictive and efficient coding theories. These theories hold that sensory neurons utilize the statistical regularities in the natural world in order to improve the efficiency of the neural code, and to optimize the inference of the stimulus causes of the sensory data. In visual cortex, this relies on the integration of classical receptive field (CRF) data with predictions from the surround. Here we outline two main hypotheses about gamma-synchronization in visual cortex. First, we hypothesize that the precision of gamma-synchronization reflects the extent to which CRF data can be accurately predicted by the surround. Second, we hypothesize that different cortical columns synchronize to the extent that they accurately predict each other's CRF visual input. We argue that these two hypotheses can account for a large number of empirical observations made on the stimulus dependencies of gamma-synchronization. Furthermore, we show that they are consistent with the known laminar dependencies of gamma-synchronization and the spatial profile of intercolumnar gamma-synchronization, as well as the dependence of gamma-synchronization on experience and development. Based on our two main hypotheses, we outline two additional hypotheses. First, we hypothesize that the precision of gamma-synchronization shows, in general, a negative dependence on RF size. In support, we review evidence showing that gamma-synchronization decreases in strength along the visual hierarchy, and tends to be more prominent in species with small V1 RFs. Second, we hypothesize that gamma-synchronized network dynamics facilitate the emergence of spiking output that is

  9. QuickFF: A program for a quick and easy derivation of force fields for metal-organic frameworks from ab initio input.

    PubMed

    Vanduyfhuys, Louis; Vandenbrande, Steven; Verstraelen, Toon; Schmid, Rochus; Waroquier, Michel; Van Speybroeck, Veronique

    2015-05-15

    QuickFF is a software package to derive accurate force fields for isolated and complex molecular systems in a quick and easy manner. Apart from its general applicability, the program has been designed to generate force fields for metal-organic frameworks in an automated fashion. The force field parameters for the covalent interaction are derived from ab initio data. The mathematical expression of the covalent energy is kept simple to ensure robustness and to avoid fitting deficiencies as much as possible. The user needs to produce an equilibrium structure and a Hessian matrix for one or more building units. Afterward, a force field is generated for the system using a three-step method implemented in QuickFF. The first two steps of the methodology are designed to minimize correlations among the force field parameters. In the last step, the parameters are refined by imposing the force field parameters to reproduce the ab initio Hessian matrix in Cartesian coordinate space as accurate as possible. The method is applied on a set of 1000 organic molecules to show the easiness of the software protocol. To illustrate its application to metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), QuickFF is used to determine force fields for MIL-53(Al) and MOF-5. For both materials, accurate force fields were already generated in literature but they requested a lot of manual interventions. QuickFF is a tool that can easily be used by anyone with a basic knowledge of performing ab initio calculations. As a result, accurate force fields are generated with minimal effort. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25740170

  10. Differences in Visual-Spatial Input May Underlie Different Compression Properties of Firing Fields for Grid Cell Modules in Medial Entorhinal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Raudies, Florian; Hasselmo, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Firing fields of grid cells in medial entorhinal cortex show compression or expansion after manipulations of the location of environmental barriers. This compression or expansion could be selective for individual grid cell modules with particular properties of spatial scaling. We present a model for differences in the response of modules to barrier location that arise from different mechanisms for the influence of visual features on the computation of location that drives grid cell firing patterns. These differences could arise from differences in the position of visual features within the visual field. When location was computed from the movement of visual features on the ground plane (optic flow) in the ventral visual field, this resulted in grid cell spatial firing that was not sensitive to barrier location in modules modeled with small spacing between grid cell firing fields. In contrast, when location was computed from static visual features on walls of barriers, i.e. in the more dorsal visual field, this resulted in grid cell spatial firing that compressed or expanded based on the barrier locations in modules modeled with large spacing between grid cell firing fields. This indicates that different grid cell modules might have differential properties for computing location based on visual cues, or the spatial radius of sensitivity to visual cues might differ between modules. PMID:26584432

  11. Talking Speech Input.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berliss-Vincent, Jane; Whitford, Gigi

    2002-01-01

    This article presents both the factors involved in successful speech input use and the potential barriers that may suggest that other access technologies could be more appropriate for a given individual. Speech input options that are available are reviewed and strategies for optimizing use of speech recognition technology are discussed. (Contains…

  12. MDS MIC Catalog Inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.; Vowell, C. W.; Smith, Byron; Darcy, Jeannette

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the inputs to the MDS Medical Information Communique (MIC) catalog. The purpose of the group is to provide input for updating the MDS MIC Catalog and to request that MMOP assign Action Item to other working groups and FSs to support the MITWG Process for developing MIC-DDs.

  13. High input impedance amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, Leonard L.

    1995-01-01

    High input impedance amplifiers are provided which reduce the input impedance solely to a capacitive reactance, or, in a somewhat more complex design, provide an extremely high essentially infinite, capacitive reactance. In one embodiment, where the input impedance is reduced in essence, to solely a capacitive reactance, an operational amplifier in a follower configuration is driven at its non-inverting input and a resistor with a predetermined magnitude is connected between the inverting and non-inverting inputs. A second embodiment eliminates the capacitance from the input by adding a second stage to the first embodiment. The second stage is a second operational amplifier in a non-inverting gain-stage configuration where the output of the first follower stage drives the non-inverting input of the second stage and the output of the second stage is fed back to the non-inverting input of the first stage through a capacitor of a predetermined magnitude. These amplifiers, while generally useful, are very useful as sensor buffer amplifiers that may eliminate significant sources of error.

  14. Method for first-order design of a transfer optics system to throughput match a Fourier transform spectrometer to a sample cell without use of a field lens at the cell input.

    PubMed

    Olson, W B

    1987-06-15

    The realization that the usual optical geometry of an absorption cell is the frustrum of a cone and that a requirement can be put on any transfer optics system that eliminates the need for a field lens at the cell input leads to a powerful method of first-order optical system design through (1) determination of a required ray transfer matrix, unique except for sign, which requires a single concave spherical mirror (or lens) to implement and (2) getting additional degrees of freedom to make the system more practical at the expense of additional spherical mirrors (or lenses). Two successful applications of the method are described. PMID:20489890

  15. A methodology for fast assessments to the electrical activity of barrel fields in vivo: from population inputs to single unit outputs

    PubMed Central

    Riera, Jorge J.; Goto, Takakuni; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2014-01-01

    Here we propose a methodology to analyze volumetric electrical activity of neuronal masses in the somatosensory barrel field of Wistar rats. The key elements of the proposed methodology are a three-dimensional microelectrode array, which was customized by our group to observe extracellular recordings from an extended area of the barrel field, and a novel method for the current source density analysis. By means of this methodology, we were able to localize single barrels from their event-related responses to single whisker deflection. It was also possible to assess the spatiotemporal dynamics of neuronal aggregates in several barrels at the same time with the resolution of single neurons. We used simulations to study the robustness of our methodology to unavoidable physiological noise and electrode configuration. We compared the accuracy to reconstruct neocortical current sources with that obtained with a previous method. This constitutes a type of electrophysiological microscopy with high spatial and temporal resolution, which could change the way we analyze the activity of cortical neurons in the future. PMID:24550785

  16. Format( )MEDIC( )Input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, K.

    1994-09-01

    This document is a description of a computer program called Format( )MEDIC( )Input. The purpose of this program is to allow the user to quickly reformat wind velocity data in the Model Evaluation Database (MEDb) into a reasonable 'first cut' set of MEDIC input files (MEDIC.nml, StnLoc.Met, and Observ.Met). The user is cautioned that these resulting input files must be reviewed for correctness and completeness. This program will not format MEDb data into a Problem Station Library or Problem Metdata File. A description of how the program reformats the data is provided, along with a description of the required and optional user input and a description of the resulting output files. A description of the MEDb is not provided here but can be found in the RAS Division Model Evaluation Database Description document.

  17. Limitations of short range Mexican hat connection for driving target selection in a 2D neural field: activity suppression and deviation from input stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Mégardon, Geoffrey; Tandonnet, Christophe; Sumner, Petroc; Guillaume, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic Neural Field models (DNF) often use a kernel of connection with short range excitation and long range inhibition. This organization has been suggested as a model for brain structures or for artificial systems involved in winner-take-all processes such as saliency localization, perceptual decision or target/action selection. A good example of such a DNF is the superior colliculus (SC), a key structure for eye movements. Recent results suggest that the superficial layers of the SC (SCs) exhibit relatively short range inhibition with a longer time constant than excitation. The aim of the present study was to further examine the properties of a DNF with such an inhibition pattern in the context of target selection. First we tested the effects of stimulus size and shape on when and where self-maintained clusters of firing neurons appeared, using three variants of the model. In each model variant, small stimuli led to rapid formation of a spiking cluster, a range of medium sizes led to the suppression of any activity on the network and hence to no target selection, while larger sizes led to delayed selection of multiple loci. Second, we tested the model with two stimuli separated by a varying distance. Again single, none, or multiple spiking clusters could occur, depending on distance and relative stimulus strength. For short distances, activity attracted toward the strongest stimulus, reminiscent of well-known behavioral data for saccadic eye movements, while for larger distances repulsion away from the second stimulus occurred. All these properties predicted by the model suggest that the SCs, or any other neural structure thought to implement a short range MH, is an imperfect winner-take-all system. Although, those properties call for systematic testing, the discussion gathers neurophysiological and behavioral data suggesting that such properties are indeed present in target selection for saccadic eye movements. PMID:26539103

  18. CHARMM-GUI Input Generator for NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM Simulations Using the CHARMM36 Additive Force Field

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jumin; Cheng, Xi; Swails, Jason M.; Yeom, Min Sun; Eastman, Peter K.; Lemkul, Justin A.; Wei, Shuai; Buckner, Joshua; Jeong, Jong Cheol; Qi, Yifei; Jo, Sunhwan; Pande, Vijay S.; Case, David A.; Brooks, Charles L.; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Klauda, Jeffery B.; Im, Wonpil

    2015-11-12

    Here we report that proper treatment of nonbonded interactions is essential for the accuracy of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, especially in studies of lipid bilayers. The use of the CHARMM36 force field (C36 FF) in different MD simulation programs can result in disagreements with published simulations performed with CHARMM due to differences in the protocols used to treat the long-range and 1-4 nonbonded interactions. In this study, we systematically test the use of the C36 lipid FF in NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM. A wide range of Lennard-Jones (LJ) cutoff schemes and integrator algorithms were tested to find the optimal simulation protocol to best match bilayer properties of six lipids with varying acyl chain saturation and head groups. MD simulations of a 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer were used to obtain the optimal protocol for each program. MD simulations with all programs were found to reasonably match the DPPC bilayer properties (surface area per lipid, chain order parameters, and area compressibility modulus) obtained using the standard protocol used in CHARMM as well as from experiments. The optimal simulation protocol was then applied to the other five lipid simulations and resulted in excellent agreement between results from most simulation programs as well as with experimental data. AMBER compared least favorably with the expected membrane properties, which appears to be due to its use of the hard-truncation in the LJ potential versus a force-based switching function used to smooth the LJ potential as it approaches the cutoff distance. The optimal simulation protocol for each program has been implemented in CHARMM-GUI. This protocol is expected to be applicable to the remainder of the additive C36 FF including the proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and small molecules.

  19. Limitations of short range Mexican hat connection for driving target selection in a 2D neural field: activity suppression and deviation from input stimuli.

    PubMed

    Mégardon, Geoffrey; Tandonnet, Christophe; Sumner, Petroc; Guillaume, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic Neural Field models (DNF) often use a kernel of connection with short range excitation and long range inhibition. This organization has been suggested as a model for brain structures or for artificial systems involved in winner-take-all processes such as saliency localization, perceptual decision or target/action selection. A good example of such a DNF is the superior colliculus (SC), a key structure for eye movements. Recent results suggest that the superficial layers of the SC (SCs) exhibit relatively short range inhibition with a longer time constant than excitation. The aim of the present study was to further examine the properties of a DNF with such an inhibition pattern in the context of target selection. First we tested the effects of stimulus size and shape on when and where self-maintained clusters of firing neurons appeared, using three variants of the model. In each model variant, small stimuli led to rapid formation of a spiking cluster, a range of medium sizes led to the suppression of any activity on the network and hence to no target selection, while larger sizes led to delayed selection of multiple loci. Second, we tested the model with two stimuli separated by a varying distance. Again single, none, or multiple spiking clusters could occur, depending on distance and relative stimulus strength. For short distances, activity attracted toward the strongest stimulus, reminiscent of well-known behavioral data for saccadic eye movements, while for larger distances repulsion away from the second stimulus occurred. All these properties predicted by the model suggest that the SCs, or any other neural structure thought to implement a short range MH, is an imperfect winner-take-all system. Although, those properties call for systematic testing, the discussion gathers neurophysiological and behavioral data suggesting that such properties are indeed present in target selection for saccadic eye movements. PMID:26539103

  20. CHARMM-GUI Input Generator for NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM Simulations Using the CHARMM36 Additive Force Field

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Proper treatment of nonbonded interactions is essential for the accuracy of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, especially in studies of lipid bilayers. The use of the CHARMM36 force field (C36 FF) in different MD simulation programs can result in disagreements with published simulations performed with CHARMM due to differences in the protocols used to treat the long-range and 1-4 nonbonded interactions. In this study, we systematically test the use of the C36 lipid FF in NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM. A wide range of Lennard-Jones (LJ) cutoff schemes and integrator algorithms were tested to find the optimal simulation protocol to best match bilayer properties of six lipids with varying acyl chain saturation and head groups. MD simulations of a 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer were used to obtain the optimal protocol for each program. MD simulations with all programs were found to reasonably match the DPPC bilayer properties (surface area per lipid, chain order parameters, and area compressibility modulus) obtained using the standard protocol used in CHARMM as well as from experiments. The optimal simulation protocol was then applied to the other five lipid simulations and resulted in excellent agreement between results from most simulation programs as well as with experimental data. AMBER compared least favorably with the expected membrane properties, which appears to be due to its use of the hard-truncation in the LJ potential versus a force-based switching function used to smooth the LJ potential as it approaches the cutoff distance. The optimal simulation protocol for each program has been implemented in CHARMM-GUI. This protocol is expected to be applicable to the remainder of the additive C36 FF including the proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and small molecules. PMID:26631602

  1. CHARMM-GUI Input Generator for NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM Simulations Using the CHARMM36 Additive Force Field

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lee, Jumin; Cheng, Xi; Swails, Jason M.; Yeom, Min Sun; Eastman, Peter K.; Lemkul, Justin A.; Wei, Shuai; Buckner, Joshua; Jeong, Jong Cheol; Qi, Yifei; et al

    2015-11-12

    Here we report that proper treatment of nonbonded interactions is essential for the accuracy of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, especially in studies of lipid bilayers. The use of the CHARMM36 force field (C36 FF) in different MD simulation programs can result in disagreements with published simulations performed with CHARMM due to differences in the protocols used to treat the long-range and 1-4 nonbonded interactions. In this study, we systematically test the use of the C36 lipid FF in NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM. A wide range of Lennard-Jones (LJ) cutoff schemes and integrator algorithms were tested to find themore » optimal simulation protocol to best match bilayer properties of six lipids with varying acyl chain saturation and head groups. MD simulations of a 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer were used to obtain the optimal protocol for each program. MD simulations with all programs were found to reasonably match the DPPC bilayer properties (surface area per lipid, chain order parameters, and area compressibility modulus) obtained using the standard protocol used in CHARMM as well as from experiments. The optimal simulation protocol was then applied to the other five lipid simulations and resulted in excellent agreement between results from most simulation programs as well as with experimental data. AMBER compared least favorably with the expected membrane properties, which appears to be due to its use of the hard-truncation in the LJ potential versus a force-based switching function used to smooth the LJ potential as it approaches the cutoff distance. The optimal simulation protocol for each program has been implemented in CHARMM-GUI. This protocol is expected to be applicable to the remainder of the additive C36 FF including the proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and small molecules.« less

  2. Climate Change and Potassium Effects Under Different N-Fertilization Input on Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) Yield in a Long Term Field Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    László, Márton, ,, Dr.

    2010-05-01

    Climate change of Hungary was initiated about of 1850. Nowadays among the natural catastrophes, drought and flooding caused by over-abundant rainfall cause the greatest problems in field crop production. The droughts and the floods were experienced in the early eighties as well as today have drawn renewed attention to the analysis of this problem. The potato is demanding indicator crop of climate factors (temperature, rainfall) and soil nutrient status. Has a particularly high requirement for quantity of precipitation and for supply of soil potassium, nitrogen, phosphorus and magnesium. This paper reports the results achieved in the period from 1962 to 2001 of a long term small- plot fertilization experiment set up on acidic sandy brown forest soil at Nyírlugos in the Nyírség region in North- Eastern Hungary. Characteristics of the experiment soil were a pH (KCl) 4.5, humus 0.5%, CEC 5-10 mgeq 100g-1 in the ploughed layer. The topsoil was poor in all four macronutrient N, P, K and Mg. The mineral fertilization experiment involved 2 (genotype: Gülbaba and Aranyalma) x 2 (ploughed depth: 20 and 40 cm) x 16 (fertilizations: N, P, K, Mg) = 64 treatments in 8 replications, giving a total of 512 plots. The gross and net plot sizes were 10x5=50 m2 and 35.5 m2. The experimental designe was split-split-plot. The N levels were 0, 50, 100, 150 kg ha-1 year-1 and the P, K, Mg levels were 48, 150, 30 kg ha-1 year-1 P2O5, K2O, MgO in the form of 25% calcium ammonium nitrate, 18% superphosphate, 40% potassium chloride, and technological powdered magnesium sulphate. The forecrop every second year was rye. The groundwater level was at a depth of 2-3 m. From the 64 treatments, eight replications, altogether 512- experimental plots with 7 treatments and their 16 combinations are summarised of experiment period from 1962 to 1979. The main conclusions were as follows: 1. The experiment years (1962-1963, 1964-1965, 1966-1967, 1968-1969, 1970-1971, 1972-1973, 1974-1975, 1976

  3. Input Decimated Ensembles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumer, Kagan; Oza, Nikunj C.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Using an ensemble of classifiers instead of a single classifier has been shown to improve generalization performance in many pattern recognition problems. However, the extent of such improvement depends greatly on the amount of correlation among the errors of the base classifiers. Therefore, reducing those correlations while keeping the classifiers' performance levels high is an important area of research. In this article, we explore input decimation (ID), a method which selects feature subsets for their ability to discriminate among the classes and uses them to decouple the base classifiers. We provide a summary of the theoretical benefits of correlation reduction, along with results of our method on two underwater sonar data sets, three benchmarks from the Probenl/UCI repositories, and two synthetic data sets. The results indicate that input decimated ensembles (IDEs) outperform ensembles whose base classifiers use all the input features; randomly selected subsets of features; and features created using principal components analysis, on a wide range of domains.

  4. Climate Change and Potassium Effects Under Different N-Fertilization Input on Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) Yield in a Long Term Field Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    László, Márton, ,, Dr.

    2010-05-01

    Climate change of Hungary was initiated about of 1850. Nowadays among the natural catastrophes, drought and flooding caused by over-abundant rainfall cause the greatest problems in field crop production. The droughts and the floods were experienced in the early eighties as well as today have drawn renewed attention to the analysis of this problem. The potato is demanding indicator crop of climate factors (temperature, rainfall) and soil nutrient status. Has a particularly high requirement for quantity of precipitation and for supply of soil potassium, nitrogen, phosphorus and magnesium. This paper reports the results achieved in the period from 1962 to 2001 of a long term small- plot fertilization experiment set up on acidic sandy brown forest soil at Nyírlugos in the Nyírség region in North- Eastern Hungary. Characteristics of the experiment soil were a pH (KCl) 4.5, humus 0.5%, CEC 5-10 mgeq 100g-1 in the ploughed layer. The topsoil was poor in all four macronutrient N, P, K and Mg. The mineral fertilization experiment involved 2 (genotype: Gülbaba and Aranyalma) x 2 (ploughed depth: 20 and 40 cm) x 16 (fertilizations: N, P, K, Mg) = 64 treatments in 8 replications, giving a total of 512 plots. The gross and net plot sizes were 10x5=50 m2 and 35.5 m2. The experimental designe was split-split-plot. The N levels were 0, 50, 100, 150 kg ha-1 year-1 and the P, K, Mg levels were 48, 150, 30 kg ha-1 year-1 P2O5, K2O, MgO in the form of 25% calcium ammonium nitrate, 18% superphosphate, 40% potassium chloride, and technological powdered magnesium sulphate. The forecrop every second year was rye. The groundwater level was at a depth of 2-3 m. From the 64 treatments, eight replications, altogether 512- experimental plots with 7 treatments and their 16 combinations are summarised of experiment period from 1962 to 1979. The main conclusions were as follows: 1. The experiment years (1962-1963, 1964-1965, 1966-1967, 1968-1969, 1970-1971, 1972-1973, 1974-1975, 1976

  5. Impacts of an African Green Revolution on Greenhouse Gases and Pollution Precursors: Nonlinear Trace N Gas Emission Responses to Incremental Increases in Fertilizer Inputs in a Western Kenyan Maize Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickman, J. E.; Palm, C.

    2011-12-01

    Over the last several decades, agricultural soils in many parts of sub-Saharan Africa have become depleted of nitrogen (N) and other nutrients, creating challenges to achieving food security in many countries. At only 7 kg N ha-1 yr-1, average fertilizer application rates in the region are an order of magnitude lower than typical rates in the United States, and well below optimal levels. Increased use of nutrient inputs is a centerpiece of most African Green Revolution strategies, making it important to quantify the impacts of this change in practices as farmers begin moving towards 50-80 kg N ha-1 yr-1. Increased N inputs are invariably accompanied by losses of trace N gases to the atmosphere, including the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O), and nitric oxide (NO), a precursor to tropospheric ozone pollution. Several investigations of greenhouse gas emissions and one investigation of NO emissions from sub-Saharan agricultural systems have been conducted over the last 20 years, but they are few in number and were not designed to identify potentially important thresholds in the response of trace gas emissions to fertilization rate. Here we examine the response function of NO and N2O emissions to 6 different levels of inorganic fertilizer additions in a maize field in Yala, Kenya during the 2011 long rainy season. We used a randomized complete block design incorporating inorganic fertilizer treatments of 0, 50, 75, 100, 150, and 200 kg N ha-1 in 4 blocks. After each of 2 fertilizer applications, we measured trace gas fluxes daily, and conducted weekly measurements until trace gas emissions subsided to control levels. We fit the data to linear and exponential models relating N gas emissions to N input levels, and conducted a model comparison using AIC. Preliminary analysis suggests that NO emissions do respond in a non-linear fashion over the course of 67 days, as has been found in several commercial agroecosystems for N2O. Although N2O emissions responded linearly

  6. Hypermnesia using auditory input.

    PubMed

    Allen, J

    1992-07-01

    The author investigated whether hypermnesia would occur with auditory input. In addition, the author examined the effects of subjects' knowledge that they would later be asked to recall the stimuli. Two groups of 26 subjects each were given three successive recall trials after they listened to an audiotape of 59 high-imagery nouns. The subjects in the uninformed group were not told that they would later be asked to remember the words; those in the informed group were. Hypermnesia was evident, but only in the uninformed group. PMID:1447564

  7. Input distributions for VISA

    SciTech Connect

    Liebetrau, A.M.

    1983-10-01

    Work is underway at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to improve the probabilistic analysis used to model pressurized thermal shock (PTS) incidents in reactor pressure vessels, and, further, to incorporate these improvements into the existing Vessel Integrity Simulation Analysis (VISA) code. Two topics related to work on input distributions in VISA are discussed in this paper. The first involves the treatment of flaw size distributions and the second concerns errors in the parameters in the (Guthrie) equation which is used to compute ..delta..RT/sub NDT/, the shift in reference temperature for nil ductility transition.

  8. Nitrogen loss from high N-input vegetable fields: a) Direct N2O emissions b) Spatiotemporal variability of N species (N2O, NH4+, NO3-) in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, I.; Pfab, H.; Ruser, R.; Fiedler, S.

    2009-04-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a greenhouse gas contributing to stratospheric ozone depletion. Soils are considered to be the major (70%) source for atmospheric N2O. Agriculture in general accounts for about 85% of the anthropogenic N2O emissions. Whereas 80% of these, are emitted from ag-riculturally used soils. Such estimations of N2O fluxes are associated with a high degree of uncertainties. Uncertainty of source strength estimates mainly results from local scale variability of known and unknown sources. It is not known how much uncertainty is due to unmeasured sources. For example, considerations of N2O fluxes from soils used for intensive vegetable production within inventories are still missing. We speculate that these types of arable soils act as ‚hot spots' for N2O. Given conditions (1) high N-input due to fertilization in concert with (2) easily mineralizable harvest residues should pro-mote disproportional high reaction rates in N-cycling and enhance N2O production as a by-product of nitrification and denitrification. Our investigation focused on the influence of: (1) N-input level (Ammonium Sulfate Nitrate (ASN)) below and above common N doses used for "good agricultural practice". (2) Application of modified fertilizers including nitrification inhibitor DMPP (Dimethylpyrazolphosphate, ENTEC®) and depot fertilization (pseudo-CULTAN) in comparison to non-fertilized control and common ASN application. (3) Effects of plant residues on N-cycling and (4) the deduction of mitigation strategies to reduce the potential N-loss from theses sites. The study was carried out during summer and autumn 2008 on a field cropped with cauliflower, located at the "Heidfeldhof" (South-West Germany; MAT 10.5°C, MAP 660 mm). Three different N-species (N2O; within gaseous soil phase, ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3-) extracted from bulk soil) were measured weekly in three different soil depths (0-25 cm; 25-50 cm and 50-75 cm) in a fully randomized field design. At same depths water

  9. Arctic science input wanted

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Arctic Research and Policy Act (Eos, June 26, 1984, p. 412) was signed into law by President Ronald Reagan this past July. One of its objectives is to develop a 5-year research plan for the Arctic. A request for input to this plan is being issued this week to nearly 500 people in science, engineering, and industry.To promote Arctic research and to recommend research policy in the Arctic, the new law establishes a five-member Arctic Research Commission, to be appointed by the President, and establishes an Interagency Arctic Research Policy Committee, to be composed of representatives from nearly a dozen agencies having interests in the region. The commission will make policy recommendations, and the interagency committee will implement those recommendations. The National Science Foundation (NSF) has been designated as the lead agency of the interagency committee.

  10. Input Multiplicities in Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koppel, Lowell B.

    1983-01-01

    Describes research investigating potential effect of input multiplicity on multivariable chemical process control systems. Several simple processes are shown to exhibit the possibility of theoretical developments on input multiplicity and closely related phenomena are discussed. (JN)

  11. Modeling and generating input processes

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    This tutorial paper provides information relevant to the selection and generation of stochastic inputs to simulation studies. The primary area considered is multivariate but much of the philosophy at least is relevant to univariate inputs as well. 14 refs.

  12. Serial Input Output

    SciTech Connect

    Waite, Anthony; /SLAC

    2011-09-07

    Serial Input/Output (SIO) is designed to be a long term storage format of a sophistication somewhere between simple ASCII files and the techniques provided by inter alia Objectivity and Root. The former tend to be low density, information lossy (floating point numbers lose precision) and inflexible. The latter require abstract descriptions of the data with all that that implies in terms of extra complexity. The basic building blocks of SIO are streams, records and blocks. Streams provide the connections between the program and files. The user can define an arbitrary list of streams as required. A given stream must be opened for either reading or writing. SIO does not support read/write streams. If a stream is closed during the execution of a program, it can be reopened in either read or write mode to the same or a different file. Records represent a coherent grouping of data. Records consist of a collection of blocks (see next paragraph). The user can define a variety of records (headers, events, error logs, etc.) and request that any of them be written to any stream. When SIO reads a file, it first decodes the record name and if that record has been defined and unpacking has been requested for it, SIO proceeds to unpack the blocks. Blocks are user provided objects which do the real work of reading/writing the data. The user is responsible for writing the code for these blocks and for identifying these blocks to SIO at run time. To write a collection of blocks, the user must first connect them to a record. The record can then be written to a stream as described above. Note that the same block can be connected to many different records. When SIO reads a record, it scans through the blocks written and calls the corresponding block object (if it has been defined) to decode it. Undefined blocks are skipped. Each of these categories (streams, records and blocks) have some characteristics in common. Every stream, record and block has a name with the condition that each

  13. SDR input power estimation algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briones, J. C.; Nappier, J. M.

    The General Dynamics (GD) S-Band software defined radio (SDR) in the Space Communications and Navigation (SCAN) Testbed on the International Space Station (ISS) provides experimenters an opportunity to develop and demonstrate experimental waveforms in space. The SDR has an analog and a digital automatic gain control (AGC) and the response of the AGCs to changes in SDR input power and temperature was characterized prior to the launch and installation of the SCAN Testbed on the ISS. The AGCs were used to estimate the SDR input power and SNR of the received signal and the characterization results showed a nonlinear response to SDR input power and temperature. In order to estimate the SDR input from the AGCs, three algorithms were developed and implemented on the ground software of the SCAN Testbed. The algorithms include a linear straight line estimator, which used the digital AGC and the temperature to estimate the SDR input power over a narrower section of the SDR input power range. There is a linear adaptive filter algorithm that uses both AGCs and the temperature to estimate the SDR input power over a wide input power range. Finally, an algorithm that uses neural networks was designed to estimate the input power over a wide range. This paper describes the algorithms in detail and their associated performance in estimating the SDR input power.

  14. SDR Input Power Estimation Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nappier, Jennifer M.; Briones, Janette C.

    2013-01-01

    The General Dynamics (GD) S-Band software defined radio (SDR) in the Space Communications and Navigation (SCAN) Testbed on the International Space Station (ISS) provides experimenters an opportunity to develop and demonstrate experimental waveforms in space. The SDR has an analog and a digital automatic gain control (AGC) and the response of the AGCs to changes in SDR input power and temperature was characterized prior to the launch and installation of the SCAN Testbed on the ISS. The AGCs were used to estimate the SDR input power and SNR of the received signal and the characterization results showed a nonlinear response to SDR input power and temperature. In order to estimate the SDR input from the AGCs, three algorithms were developed and implemented on the ground software of the SCAN Testbed. The algorithms include a linear straight line estimator, which used the digital AGC and the temperature to estimate the SDR input power over a narrower section of the SDR input power range. There is a linear adaptive filter algorithm that uses both AGCs and the temperature to estimate the SDR input power over a wide input power range. Finally, an algorithm that uses neural networks was designed to estimate the input power over a wide range. This paper describes the algorithms in detail and their associated performance in estimating the SDR input power.

  15. Nitrogen loss from high N-input vegetable fields - a) direct N2O emissions b) Spatiotemporal variability of N species (N2O, NH4+, NO3-) in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfab, H.; Ruser, R.; Palmer, I.; Fiedler, S.

    2009-04-01

    Nitrous oxide is a climate relevant trace gas. It contributes 7.9 % to the total anthropogenic greenhouse gas emission and it is also involved in stratospheric ozone depletion. Approximately 85 % of the anthropogenic N2O emissions result from agricultural activities, more than 50 % are produced during microbial N-turnover processes in soils. Especially soils with high N-input (N-fertilizer and high amount of N in plant residues) like vegetable cropped soils are assumed to cause high N2O losses. The aims of the study presented were (i) to quantify the N2O loss from a vegetable field (lettuce-cauliflower crop rotation), (ii) to calculate an emission factor for the study site in Southwest Germany and to compare this factor with the default value provided by the IPCC (2006) and (iii) to test the emission reduction potential (Ammonium Sulfate Nitrate fertilizer, ASN either by reduced N-fertilization) in comparison with common N doses used for good agricultural practice or by the use of a nitrification inhibitor (DMPP), a banded N-application (lettuce) or a depot fertilization measure (pseudo-CULTAN in order to suppress nitrification). N2O fluxes determined with the closed chamber method were highly variable in time with strongly increased flux rates after N-fertilization in combination with rainfall or irrigation measures and after the incorporation of cauliflower crop residues. Using the mean soil nitrate contents of the top soil of our investigated treatments (0-25 cm depth), we could explain approximately 60 % of the variability of the cumulative N2O losses during the vegetation period of lettuce and cauliflower. The cumulative N2O emissions ranged between 0,99 kg N2O-N ha-1 from the unfertilized control plots (vegetation period) and 6,81 kg N2O-N ha-1 from the plots with the highest N-dose. Based on the guidelines of the IPCC (2006), we calculated an emission factor around 0,9 % for the cropping season. This value is in good agreement with the default value of the

  16. REL - English Bulk Data Input.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigelow, Richard Henry

    A bulk data input processor which is available for the Rapidly Extensible Language (REL) English versions is described. In REL English versions, statements that declare names of data items and their interrelationships normally are lines from a terminal or cards in a batch input stream. These statements provide a convenient means of declaring some…

  17. Input Range Testing for the General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Steven P.

    2007-01-01

    This document contains a test plan for testing input values to the General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT). The plan includes four primary types of information, which rigorously define all tests that should be performed to validate that GMAT will accept allowable inputs and deny disallowed inputs. The first is a complete list of all allowed object fields in GMAT. The second type of information, is test input to be attempted for each field. The third type of information is allowable input values for all objects fields in GMAT. The final piece of information is how GMAT should respond to both valid and invalid information. It is VERY important to note that the tests below must be performed for both the Graphical User Interface and the script!! The examples are illustrated using a scripting perspective, because it is simpler to write up. However, the test must be performed for both interfaces to GMAT.

  18. Solar wind-magnetosphere energy input functions

    SciTech Connect

    Bargatze, L.F.; McPherron, R.L.; Baker, D.N.

    1985-01-01

    A new formula for the solar wind-magnetosphere energy input parameter, P/sub i/, is sought by applying the constraints imposed by dimensional analysis. Applying these constraints yields a general equation for P/sub i/ which is equal to rho V/sup 3/l/sub CF//sup 2/F(M/sub A/,theta) where, rho V/sup 3/ is the solar wind kinetic energy density and l/sub CF//sup 2/ is the scale size of the magnetosphere's effective energy ''collection'' region. The function F which depends on M/sub A/, the Alfven Mach number, and on theta, the interplanetary magnetic field clock angle is included in the general equation for P/sub i/ in order to model the magnetohydrodynamic processes which are responsible for solar wind-magnetosphere energy transfer. By assuming the form of the function F, it is possible to further constrain the formula for P/sub i/. This is accomplished by using solar wind data, geomagnetic activity indices, and simple statistical methods. It is found that P/sub i/ is proportional to (rho V/sup 2/)/sup 1/6/VBG(theta) where, rho V/sup 2/ is the solar wind dynamic pressure and VBG(theta) is a rectified version of the solar wind motional electric field. Furthermore, it is found that G(theta), the gating function which modulates the energy input to the magnetosphere, is well represented by a ''leaky'' rectifier function such as sin/sup 4/(theta/2). This function allows for enhanced energy input when the interplanetary magnetic field is oriented southward. This function also allows for some energy input when the interplanetary magnetic field is oriented northward. 9 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Nonlinear input-output systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, L. R.; Luksic, Mladen; Su, Renjeng

    1987-01-01

    Necessary and sufficient conditions that the nonlinear system dot-x = f(x) + ug(x) and y = h(x) be locally feedback equivalent to the controllable linear system dot-xi = A xi + bv and y = C xi having linear output are found. Only the single input and single output case is considered, however, the results generalize to multi-input and multi-output systems.

  20. Time course of soil carbon storage, 15N and radiocarbon signature in top- and subsoil of a 60-years agricultural field trial - indications for compensating effects of carbon input and turnover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leifeld, Jens; Conen, Franz; Oberholzer, Hans Rudolf; Jochen, Mayer

    2014-05-01

    Soil carbon dynamics are controlled by the delicate balance between carbon inputs and outputs which both are co-regulated by land use and management (LUM) as important anthropogenic drivers. Upon land use change to cropland carbon stocks generally tend to decline but often the contribution of two opposing factors, namely changes in input and decomposition rates, to soil carbon stock changes is indistinguishable. Here we report on an ongoing cropland experiment in Zurich, Switzerland, named ZOFE (Zurich Organic Fertilization Experiment), established on former grassland in 1949. ZOFE encompasses a range of mineral and organic fertilization practices and a zero fertilizer treatment as control. The experiment has a block design with five replicates per treatment. We make use of productivity and fertilization gradients in selected treatments of the ZOFE trial to evaluate how low or high inputs (induced by differential yields and organic fertilization) may affect soil organic carbon storage and transformation. For the most recent sampling that also included subsoil down to 0.9 m, all properties were measured for every single replicate. Topsoil carbon storage declined after grassland conversion at rates of c. 0.2 t C ha-1 a-1, particularly in treatments with mineral fertilizer and high yields, and without fertilization and low yields. Organic matter amendments such as manure or compost could partially offset but not fully compensate some of the topsoil carbon loss. Over time the soil's delta 15N signature declined as well, probably due to increased atmospheric nitrogen deposition. It increased from the top- to the subsoil, indicating increasing microbial transformation, particularly with manure added. The soil's radiocarbon signature revealed distinct bomb peak patterns in all treatments but only in the topsoil. The 14C data confirmed that with higher productivity more recent organic matter was incorporated, both in top and subsoil. Because, in contrast to topsoil

  1. Convergence of sensory inputs upon projection neurons of somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Zarzecki, P; Wiggin, D M

    1982-01-01

    Cortico-cortical neurons and pyramidal tract neurons of the cat were tested for convergent inputs from forelimb afferents. Neurons were recorded in cortical areas 1, 2, and 3a. Consideration was given to both suprathreshold and subthreshold inputs evoked by electrical stimulation of forelimb nerves. Individual cortico-cortical neurons and also pyramidal tract neurons were characterized by convergence of multiple somatosensory inputs from different regions of skin, from several muscle groups, and between group I deep afferents and low threshold cutaneous afferents. Certain patterns of afferent input varied with cytoarchitectonic area. There was, however, no difference between area 3a and areas 1-2 in the incidence of cross-modality convergence in the form of input from cutaneous and also deep nerves. Many of the inputs were subthreshold. Arguments are presented that these inputs, though subthreshold, must be considered for a role in cortical information processing. The convergent nature of the sensory inputs is discussed in relation to the proposed specificities of cortical columns. The patterns of afferent inputs reaching cortico-cortical neurons seem to be appropriate for them to have a role in the formation of sensory fields of motor cortex neurons. PT neurons of somatosensory cortex have possible roles as modifiers of ascending sensory systems, however, the convergent input which these PT neurons receive argues against a simple relationship between the modality of peripheral stimuli influencing them and the modality of the ascending tract neurons under their descending control. PMID:7140889

  2. Input Type and Parameter Resetting: Is Naturalistic Input Necessary?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothman, Jason; Iverson, Michael

    2007-01-01

    It has been argued that extended exposure to naturalistic input provides L2 learners with more of an opportunity to converge of target morphosyntactic competence as compared to classroom-only environments, given that the former provide more positive evidence of less salient linguistic properties than the latter (e.g., Isabelli 2004). Implicitly,…

  3. The advanced LIGO input optics.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Chris L; Arain, Muzammil A; Ciani, Giacomo; DeRosa, Ryan T; Effler, Anamaria; Feldbaum, David; Frolov, Valery V; Fulda, Paul; Gleason, Joseph; Heintze, Matthew; Kawabe, Keita; King, Eleanor J; Kokeyama, Keiko; Korth, William Z; Martin, Rodica M; Mullavey, Adam; Peold, Jan; Quetschke, Volker; Reitze, David H; Tanner, David B; Vorvick, Cheryl; Williams, Luke F; Mueller, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are nearing their design sensitivity and should begin taking meaningful astrophysical data in the fall of 2015. These resonant optical interferometers will have unprecedented sensitivity to the strains caused by passing gravitational waves. The input optics play a significant part in allowing these devices to reach such sensitivities. Residing between the pre-stabilized laser and the main interferometer, the input optics subsystem is tasked with preparing the laser beam for interferometry at the sub-attometer level while operating at continuous wave input power levels ranging from 100 mW to 150 W. These extreme operating conditions required every major component to be custom designed. These designs draw heavily on the experience and understanding gained during the operation of Initial LIGO and Enhanced LIGO. In this article, we report on how the components of the input optics were designed to meet their stringent requirements and present measurements showing how well they have lived up to their design. PMID:26827334

  4. The advanced LIGO input optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Chris L.; Arain, Muzammil A.; Ciani, Giacomo; DeRosa, Ryan. T.; Effler, Anamaria; Feldbaum, David; Frolov, Valery V.; Fulda, Paul; Gleason, Joseph; Heintze, Matthew; Kawabe, Keita; King, Eleanor J.; Kokeyama, Keiko; Korth, William Z.; Martin, Rodica M.; Mullavey, Adam; Peold, Jan; Quetschke, Volker; Reitze, David H.; Tanner, David B.; Vorvick, Cheryl; Williams, Luke F.; Mueller, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are nearing their design sensitivity and should begin taking meaningful astrophysical data in the fall of 2015. These resonant optical interferometers will have unprecedented sensitivity to the strains caused by passing gravitational waves. The input optics play a significant part in allowing these devices to reach such sensitivities. Residing between the pre-stabilized laser and the main interferometer, the input optics subsystem is tasked with preparing the laser beam for interferometry at the sub-attometer level while operating at continuous wave input power levels ranging from 100 mW to 150 W. These extreme operating conditions required every major component to be custom designed. These designs draw heavily on the experience and understanding gained during the operation of Initial LIGO and Enhanced LIGO. In this article, we report on how the components of the input optics were designed to meet their stringent requirements and present measurements showing how well they have lived up to their design.

  5. Signal Prediction With Input Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Chen, Ya-Chin

    1999-01-01

    A novel coding technique is presented for signal prediction with applications including speech coding, system identification, and estimation of input excitation. The approach is based on the blind equalization method for speech signal processing in conjunction with the geometric subspace projection theory to formulate the basic prediction equation. The speech-coding problem is often divided into two parts, a linear prediction model and excitation input. The parameter coefficients of the linear predictor and the input excitation are solved simultaneously and recursively by a conventional recursive least-squares algorithm. The excitation input is computed by coding all possible outcomes into a binary codebook. The coefficients of the linear predictor and excitation, and the index of the codebook can then be used to represent the signal. In addition, a variable-frame concept is proposed to block the same excitation signal in sequence in order to reduce the storage size and increase the transmission rate. The results of this work can be easily extended to the problem of disturbance identification. The basic principles are outlined in this report and differences from other existing methods are discussed. Simulations are included to demonstrate the proposed method.

  6. World Input-Output Network

    PubMed Central

    Cerina, Federica; Zhu, Zhen; Chessa, Alessandro; Riccaboni, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Production systems, traditionally analyzed as almost independent national systems, are increasingly connected on a global scale. Only recently becoming available, the World Input-Output Database (WIOD) is one of the first efforts to construct the global multi-regional input-output (GMRIO) tables. By viewing the world input-output system as an interdependent network where the nodes are the individual industries in different economies and the edges are the monetary goods flows between industries, we analyze respectively the global, regional, and local network properties of the so-called world input-output network (WION) and document its evolution over time. At global level, we find that the industries are highly but asymmetrically connected, which implies that micro shocks can lead to macro fluctuations. At regional level, we find that the world production is still operated nationally or at most regionally as the communities detected are either individual economies or geographically well defined regions. Finally, at local level, for each industry we compare the network-based measures with the traditional methods of backward linkages. We find that the network-based measures such as PageRank centrality and community coreness measure can give valuable insights into identifying the key industries. PMID:26222389

  7. Regional Hospital Input Price Indexes

    PubMed Central

    Freeland, Mark S.; Schendler, Carol Ellen; Anderson, Gerard

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes the development of regional hospital input price indexes that is consistent with the general methodology used for the National Hospital Input Price Index. The feasibility of developing regional indexes was investigated because individuals inquired whether different regions experienced different rates of increase in hospital input prices. The regional indexes incorporate variations in cost-share weights (the amount an expense category contributes to total spending) associated with hospital type and location, and variations in the rate of input price increases for various regions. We found that between 1972 and 1979 none of the regional price indexes increased at average annual rates significantly different from the national rate. For the more recent period 1977 through 1979, the increase in one Census Region was significantly below the national rate. Further analyses indicated that variations in cost-share weights for various types of hospitals produced no substantial variations in the regional price indexes relative to the national index. We consider these findings preliminary because of limitations in the availability of current, relevant, and reliable data, especially for local area wage rate increases. PMID:10309557

  8. World Input-Output Network.

    PubMed

    Cerina, Federica; Zhu, Zhen; Chessa, Alessandro; Riccaboni, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Production systems, traditionally analyzed as almost independent national systems, are increasingly connected on a global scale. Only recently becoming available, the World Input-Output Database (WIOD) is one of the first efforts to construct the global multi-regional input-output (GMRIO) tables. By viewing the world input-output system as an interdependent network where the nodes are the individual industries in different economies and the edges are the monetary goods flows between industries, we analyze respectively the global, regional, and local network properties of the so-called world input-output network (WION) and document its evolution over time. At global level, we find that the industries are highly but asymmetrically connected, which implies that micro shocks can lead to macro fluctuations. At regional level, we find that the world production is still operated nationally or at most regionally as the communities detected are either individual economies or geographically well defined regions. Finally, at local level, for each industry we compare the network-based measures with the traditional methods of backward linkages. We find that the network-based measures such as PageRank centrality and community coreness measure can give valuable insights into identifying the key industries. PMID:26222389

  9. Analog Input Data Acquisition Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arens, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    DAQ Master Software allows users to easily set up a system to monitor up to five analog input channels and save the data after acquisition. This program was written in LabVIEW 8.0, and requires the LabVIEW runtime engine 8.0 to run the executable.

  10. Input/output interface module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozyazici, E. M.

    1980-01-01

    Module detects level changes in any of its 16 inputs, transfers changes to its outputs, and generates interrupts when changes are detected. Up to four changes-in-state per line are stored for later retrieval by controlling computer. Using standard TTL logic, module fits 19-inch rack-mounted console.

  11. Changing and shielded magnetic fields suppress c-Fos expression in the navigation circuit: input from the magnetosensory system contributes to the internal representation of space in a subterranean rodent

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Tomáš; Lucová, Marcela; Moritz, Regina E.; Oelschläger, Helmut H. A.; Druga, Rastislav; Burda, Hynek; Wiltschko, Wolfgang; Wiltschko, Roswitha; Němec, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    The neural substrate subserving magnetoreception and magnetic orientation in mammals is largely unknown. Previous experiments have demonstrated that the processing of magnetic sensory information takes place in the superior colliculus. Here, the effects of magnetic field conditions on neuronal activity in the rodent navigation circuit were assessed by quantifying c-Fos expression. Ansell's mole-rats (Fukomys anselli), a mammalian model to study the mechanisms of magnetic compass orientation, were subjected to natural, periodically changing, and shielded magnetic fields while exploring an unfamiliar circular arena. In the undisturbed local geomagnetic field, the exploration of the novel environment and/or nesting behaviour induced c-Fos expression throughout the head direction system and the entorhinal–hippocampal spatial representation system. This induction was significantly suppressed by exposure to periodically changing and/or shielded magnetic fields; discrete decreases in c-Fos were seen in the dorsal tegmental nucleus, the anterodorsal and the laterodorsal thalamic nuclei, the postsubiculum, the retrosplenial and entorhinal cortices, and the hippocampus. Moreover, in inactive animals, magnetic field intensity manipulation suppressed c-Fos expression in the CA1 and CA3 fields of the hippocampus and the dorsal subiculum, but induced expression in the polymorph layer of the dentate gyrus. These findings suggest that key constituents of the rodent navigation circuit contain populations of neurons responsive to magnetic stimuli. Thus, magnetic information may be integrated with multimodal sensory and motor information into a common spatial representation of allocentric space within this circuit. PMID:20219838

  12. Systems and methods for reconfiguring input devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancaster, Jeff (Inventor); De Mers, Robert E. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A system includes an input device having first and second input members configured to be activated by a user. The input device is configured to generate activation signals associated with activation of the first and second input members, and each of the first and second input members are associated with an input function. A processor is coupled to the input device and configured to receive the activation signals. A memory coupled to the processor, and includes a reconfiguration module configured to store the input functions assigned to the first and second input members and, upon execution of the processor, to reconfigure the input functions assigned to the input members when the first input member is inoperable.

  13. National Hospital Input Price Index

    PubMed Central

    Freeland, Mark S.; Anderson, Gerard; Schendler, Carol Ellen

    1979-01-01

    The national community hospital input price index presented here isolates the effects of prices of goods and services required to produce hospital care and measures the average percent change in prices for a fixed market basket of hospital inputs. Using the methodology described in this article, weights for various expenditure categories were estimated and proxy price variables associated with each were selected. The index is calculated for the historical period 1970 through 1978 and forecast for 1979 through 1981. During the historical period, the input price index increased an average of 8.0 percent a year, compared with an average rate of increase of 6.6 percent for overall consumer prices. For the period 1979 through 1981, the average annual increase is forecast at between 8.5 and 9.0 percent. Using the index to deflate growth in expenses, the level of real growth in expenditures per inpatient day (net service intensity growth) averaged 4.5 percent per year with considerable annual variation related to government and hospital industry policies. PMID:10309052

  14. Reconstruction of dynamic structural inputs in the presence of noise

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, V.I.; Solomon, O.M. Jr.

    1986-08-01

    This report describes a technique to reconstruct dynamic structural inputs by deconvolution of measured data. The structure to which this technique has been applied is a mild steel bar (3 in diameter and 60 in. long) with a conical nose which provides some geometric simulation of penetrating structures which are used in field test. The deconvolution technique successfully reconstructs dynamic inputs to the bar with and without additive white noise present in the measured response.

  15. Sensitivity of acoustic predictions to variation of input parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brentner, Kenneth S.; Burley, Casey L.; Marcolini, Michael A.

    1994-01-01

    Rotor noise prediction codes predict the thickness and loading noise produced by a helicopter rotor, given the blade motion, rotor operating conditions, and fluctuating force distribution over the blade surface. However, the criticality of these various inputs, and their respective effects on the predicted acoustic field, have never been fully addressed. This paper examines the importance of these inputs, and the sensitivity of the acoustic predicitions to a variation of each parameter. The effects of collective and cyclic pitch, as well as coning and cyclic flapping, are presented. Blade loading inputs are examined to determine the necessary spatial and temporal resolution, as well as the importance of the chordwise distribution. The acoustic predictions show regions in the acoustic field where significant errors occur when simplified blade motions or blade loadings are used. An assessment of the variation in the predicted acoustic field is balanced by a consideration of Central Processing Unit (CPU) time necessary for the various approximations.

  16. Sensitivity of acoustic predictions to variation of input parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brentner, Kenneth S.; Marcolini, Michael A.; Burley, Casey L.

    1991-01-01

    The noise prediction code WOPWOP predicts the thickness and loading noise produced by a helicopter rotor, given the blade motion, rotor operating conditions, and fluctuating force distribution over the blade surface. However, the criticality of these various inputs, and their respective effects on the predicted acoustic field, have never been fully addressed. This paper examines the importance of these inputs, and the sensitivity of the acoustic predictions to a variation of each parameter. The effects of collective and cyclic pitch, as well as coning and flapping, are presented. Blade loading inputs are examined to determine the necessary spatial and temporal resolution, as well as the importance of the cordwise distribution. The acoustic predictions show regions in the acoustic field where significant errors occur when simplified blade motions or blade loadings are used. An assessment of the variation in the predicted acoustic field is balanced by a consideration of CPU time necessary for the various approximations.

  17. Finite Difference Simulations of Seismic Wave Propagation for the 2007 Mw 6.6 Niigata-ken Chuetsu-Oki Earthquake: Validity of Models and Reliable Input Ground Motion in the Near-Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aochi, Hideo; Ducellier, Ariane; Dupros, Fabrice; Delatre, Mickael; Ulrich, Thomas; de Martin, Florent; Yoshimi, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    Finite difference simulations of seismic wave propagation are performed in the Niigata area, Japan, for the 2007 Mw 6.6 Niigata-ken Chuetsu-Oki earthquake at low frequencies. We test three 3D structural models built independently in various studies. First aftershock simulations are carried out. The model based on 3D tomography yields correct body waves in the near field, but later phases are imperfectly reproduced due to the lack of shallow sediment layers; other models based on various 1D/2D profiles and geological interpretation provide good site responses but generate seismic phases that may be shifted from those actually observed. Next, for the mainshock simulations, we adopt two different finite source models that differ in the near-field ground motion, especially above the fault plane (but under the sea) and then along the coastline. Each model is found to be calibrated differently for the given stations. For engineering purposes, the variations observed in simulated ground motion are significant, but for seismological purposes, additional parameter calibrations would be possible for such a complex 3D case.

  18. EPICS Input Output Controller (IOC) Record Reference Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.B.; Kraimer, M.R.

    1994-12-01

    This manual describes all supported EPICS record types. The first chapter gives introduction and describes the field summary table. The second chapter describes the fields in database common, i.e. the fields that are present in every record type. The third chapter describes the input and output field that are common to many record types and have the same usage wherever they are used. Following the third chapter is a separate chapter for each record type containing a description of all the fields for that record type except those in database common.

  19. Dendritic Organization of Olfactory Inputs to Medial Amygdala Neurons.

    PubMed

    Keshavarzi, Sepideh; Power, John M; Albers, Eva H H; Sullivan, Robert K S; Sah, Pankaj

    2015-09-23

    The medial amygdala (MeA) is a central hub in the olfactory neural network. It receives vomeronasal information directly from the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) and main olfactory information largely via odor-processing regions such as the olfactory cortical amygdala (CoA). How these inputs are processed by MeA neurons is poorly understood. Using the GAD67-GFP mouse, we show that MeA principal neurons receive convergent AOB and CoA inputs. Somatically recorded AOB synaptic inputs had slower kinetics than CoA inputs, suggesting that they are electrotonically more distant. Field potential recording, pharmacological manipulation, and Ca(2+) imaging revealed that AOB synapses are confined to distal dendrites and segregated from the proximally located CoA synapses. Moreover, unsynchronized AOB inputs had significantly broader temporal summation that was dependent on the activation of NMDA receptors. These findings show that MeA principal neurons process main and accessory olfactory inputs differentially in distinct dendritic compartments. Significance statement: In most vertebrates, olfactory cues are processed by two largely segregated neural pathways, the main and accessory olfactory systems, which are specialized to detect odors and nonvolatile chemosignals, respectively. Information from these two pathways ultimately converges at higher brain regions, one of the major hubs being the medial amygdala. Little is known about how olfactory inputs are processed by medial amygdala neurons. This study shows that individual principal neurons in this region receive input from both pathways and that these synapses are spatially segregated on their dendritic tree. We provide evidence suggesting that this dendritic segregation leads to distinct input integration and impact on neuronal output; hence, dendritic mechanisms control olfactory processing in the amygdala. PMID:26400933

  20. Repositioning Recitation Input in College English Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Qing

    2009-01-01

    This paper tries to discuss how recitation input helps overcome the negative influences on the basis of second language acquisition theory and confirms the important role that recitation input plays in improving college students' oral and written English.

  1. Flight Test Validation of Optimal Input Design and Comparison to Conventional Inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    1997-01-01

    A technique for designing optimal inputs for aerodynamic parameter estimation was flight tested on the F-18 High Angle of Attack Research Vehicle (HARV). Model parameter accuracies calculated from flight test data were compared on an equal basis for optimal input designs and conventional inputs at the same flight condition. In spite of errors in the a priori input design models and distortions of the input form by the feedback control system, the optimal inputs increased estimated parameter accuracies compared to conventional 3-2-1-1 and doublet inputs. In addition, the tests using optimal input designs demonstrated enhanced design flexibility, allowing the optimal input design technique to use a larger input amplitude to achieve further increases in estimated parameter accuracy without departing from the desired flight test condition. This work validated the analysis used to develop the optimal input designs, and demonstrated the feasibility and practical utility of the optimal input design technique.

  2. Input cavity for high-order asymmetric-mode gyroklystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, Yu. Yu.

    2012-06-01

    A new input cavity design for a high-order asymmetric-mode gyroklystron is proposed. Methods of the selective excitation of a resonant mode with a rotating field structure and the prevention of cavity self-excitation at harmonics of the gyrofrequency are proposed. Results of experimental investigation of the H711 mode cavity for a multimegawatt pulsed gyroklystron are presented.

  3. Solid state switch provides high input-to-output isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magee, R. L.; Trowbridge, L. E.

    1970-01-01

    Switch uses a combination of N-channel and P-channel Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors /MOSFET/ to obtain a normally open switch with no power applied. Series-shunt-series MOSFET switching achieves high input-output isolation.

  4. Effects of Auditory Input in Individuation Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Christopher W.; Sloutsky, Vladimir M.

    2008-01-01

    Under many conditions auditory input interferes with visual processing, especially early in development. These interference effects are often more pronounced when the auditory input is unfamiliar than when the auditory input is familiar (e.g. human speech, pre-familiarized sounds, etc.). The current study extends this research by examining how…

  5. Input filter compensation for switching regulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, F. C.

    1984-01-01

    Problems caused by input filter interaction and conventional input filter design techniques are discussed. The concept of feedforward control is modeled with an input filter and a buck regulator. Experimental measurement and comparison to the analytical predictions is carried out. Transient response and the use of a feedforward loop to stabilize the regulator system is described. Other possible applications for feedforward control are included.

  6. Textual Enhancement of Input: Issues and Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, ZhaoHong; Park, Eun Sung; Combs, Charles

    2008-01-01

    The input enhancement hypothesis proposed by Sharwood Smith (1991, 1993) has stimulated considerable research over the last 15 years. This article reviews the research on textual enhancement of input (TE), an area where the majority of input enhancement studies have aggregated. Methodological idiosyncrasies are the norm of this body of research.…

  7. Input Devices for Young Handicapped Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Karen

    The versatility of the computer can be expanded considerably for young handicapped children by using input devices other than the typewriter-style keyboard. Input devices appropriate for young children can be classified into four categories: alternative keyboards, contact switches, speech input devices, and cursor control devices. Described are…

  8. Investigation of abnormal negative threshold voltage shift under positive bias stress in input/output n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors with TiN/HfO{sub 2} structure using fast I-V measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Szu-Han; Chen, Ching-En; Tseng, Tseung-Yuen; Chang, Ting-Chang Lu, Ying-Hsin; Tsai, Jyun-Yu; Liu, Kuan-Ju; Cheng, Osbert; Huang, Cheng-Tung; Lu, Ching-Sen

    2014-03-17

    This letter investigates abnormal negative threshold voltage shifts under positive bias stress in input/output (I/O) TiN/HfO{sub 2} n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors using fast I-V measurement. This phenomenon is attributed to a reversible charge/discharge effect in pre-existing bulk traps. Moreover, in standard performance devices, threshold-voltage (V{sub t}) shifts positively during fast I-V double sweep measurement. However, in I/O devices, V{sub t} shifts negatively since electrons escape from bulk traps to metal gate rather than channel electrons injecting to bulk traps. Consequently, decreasing pre-existing bulk traps in I/O devices, which can be achieved by adopting Hf{sub x}Zr{sub 1−x}O{sub 2} as gate oxide, can reduce the charge/discharge effect.

  9. PREVIMER : Meteorological inputs and outputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravenel, H.; Lecornu, F.; Kerléguer, L.

    2009-09-01

    PREVIMER is a pre-operational system aiming to provide a wide range of users, from private individuals to professionals, with short-term forecasts about the coastal environment along the French coastlines bordering the English Channel, the Atlantic Ocean, and the Mediterranean Sea. Observation data and digital modelling tools first provide 48-hour (probably 96-hour by summer 2009) forecasts of sea states, currents, sea water levels and temperatures. The follow-up of an increasing number of biological parameters will, in time, complete this overview of coastal environment. Working in partnership with the French Naval Hydrographic and Oceanographic Service (Service Hydrographique et Océanographique de la Marine, SHOM), the French National Weather Service (Météo-France), the French public science and technology research institute (Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, IRD), the European Institute of Marine Studies (Institut Universitaire Européen de la Mer, IUEM) and many others, IFREMER (the French public institute fo marine research) is supplying the technologies needed to ensure this pertinent information, available daily on Internet at http://www.previmer.org, and stored at the Operational Coastal Oceanographic Data Centre. Since 2006, PREVIMER publishes the results of demonstrators assigned to limited geographic areas and to specific applications. This system remains experimental. The following topics are covered : Hydrodynamic circulation, sea states, follow-up of passive tracers, conservative or non-conservative (specifically of microbiological origin), biogeochemical state, primary production. Lastly, PREVIMER provides researchers and R&D departments with modelling tools and access to the database, in which the observation data and the modelling results are stored, to undertake environmental studies on new sites. The communication will focus on meteorological inputs to and outputs from PREVIMER. It will draw the lessons from almost 3 years during

  10. Turn customer input into innovation.

    PubMed

    Ulwick, Anthony W

    2002-01-01

    It's difficult to find a company these days that doesn't strive to be customer-driven. Too bad, then, that most companies go about the process of listening to customers all wrong--so wrong, in fact, that they undermine innovation and, ultimately, the bottom line. What usually happens is this: Companies ask their customers what they want. Customers offer solutions in the form of products or services. Companies then deliver these tangibles, and customers just don't buy. The reason is simple--customers aren't expert or informed enough to come up with solutions. That's what your R&D team is for. Rather, customers should be asked only for outcomes--what they want a new product or service to do for them. The form the solutions take should be up to you, and you alone. Using Cordis Corporation as an example, this article describes, in fine detail, a series of effective steps for capturing, analyzing, and utilizing customer input. First come indepth interviews, in which a moderator works with customers to deconstruct a process or activity in order to unearth "desired outcomes." Addressing participants' comments one at a time, the moderator rephrases them to be both unambiguous and measurable. Once the interviews are complete, researchers then compile a comprehensive list of outcomes that participants rank in order of importance and degree to which they are satisfied by existing products. Finally, using a simple mathematical formula called the "opportunity calculation," researchers can learn the relative attractiveness of key opportunity areas. These data can be used to uncover opportunities for product development, to properly segment markets, and to conduct competitive analysis. PMID:12964470

  11. Optical device with conical input and output prism faces

    DOEpatents

    Brunsden, Barry S.

    1981-01-01

    A device for radially translating radiation in which a right circular cylinder is provided at each end thereof with conical prism faces. The faces are oppositely extending and the device may be severed in the middle and separated to allow access to the central part of the beam. Radiation entering the input end of the device is radially translated such that radiation entering the input end at the perimeter is concentrated toward the output central axis and radiation at the input central axis is dispersed toward the output perimeter. Devices are disclosed for compressing beam energy to enhance drilling techniques, for beam manipulation of optical spatial frequencies in the Fourier plane and for simplification of dark field and color contrast microscopy. Both refracting and reflecting devices are disclosed.

  12. Driving neural oscillations with correlated spatial input and topographic feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutt, Axel; Sutherland, Connie; Longtin, André

    2008-08-01

    We consider how oscillatory activity in networks of excitable systems depends on spatial correlations of random inputs and the spatial range of feedback coupling. Analysis of a neural field model with topographic delayed recurrent feedback reveals how oscillations in certain frequency bands, including the gamma band, are enhanced by increases in the input correlation length. Further, the enhancement is maximal when this length exceeds the feedback coupling range. Suppression of oscillatory power occurs concomitantly in other bands. These effects depend solely on the ratio of input and feedback length scales. The precise positions of these bands are determined by the synaptic constants and the delays. The results agree with numerical simulations of the model and of a network of stochastic spiking neurons, and are expected for any noise-driven excitable element networks.

  13. Input filter compensation for switching regulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, F. C.; Kelkar, S. S.

    1982-01-01

    The problems caused by the interaction between the input filter, output filter, and the control loop are discussed. The input filter design is made more complicated because of the need to avoid performance degradation and also stay within the weight and loss limitations. Conventional input filter design techniques are then dicussed. The concept of pole zero cancellation is reviewed; this concept is the basis for an approach to control the peaking of the output impedance of the input filter and thus mitigate some of the problems caused by the input filter. The proposed approach for control of the peaking of the output impedance of the input filter is to use a feedforward loop working in conjunction with feedback loops, thus forming a total state control scheme. The design of the feedforward loop for a buck regulator is described. A possible implementation of the feedforward loop design is suggested.

  14. Input estimation from measured structural response

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Dustin; Cross, Elizabeth; Silva, Ramon A; Farrar, Charles R; Bement, Matt

    2009-01-01

    This report will focus on the estimation of unmeasured dynamic inputs to a structure given a numerical model of the structure and measured response acquired at discrete locations. While the estimation of inputs has not received as much attention historically as state estimation, there are many applications where an improved understanding of the immeasurable input to a structure is vital (e.g. validating temporally varying and spatially-varying load models for large structures such as buildings and ships). In this paper, the introduction contains a brief summary of previous input estimation studies. Next, an adjoint-based optimization method is used to estimate dynamic inputs to two experimental structures. The technique is evaluated in simulation and with experimental data both on a cantilever beam and on a three-story frame structure. The performance and limitations of the adjoint-based input estimation technique are discussed.

  15. Input apparatus for dynamic signature verification systems

    DOEpatents

    EerNisse, Errol P.; Land, Cecil E.; Snelling, Jay B.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure relates to signature verification input apparatus comprising a writing instrument and platen containing piezoelectric transducers which generate signals in response to writing pressures.

  16. Robust image retrieval from noisy inputs using lattice associative memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urcid, Gonzalo; Nieves-V., José Angel; García-A., Anmi; Valdiviezo-N., Juan Carlos

    2009-02-01

    Lattice associative memories also known as morphological associative memories are fully connected feedforward neural networks with no hidden layers, whose computation at each node is carried out with lattice algebra operations. These networks are a relatively recent development in the field of associative memories that has proven to be an alternative way to work with sets of pattern pairs for which the storage and retrieval stages use minimax algebra. Different associative memory models have been proposed to cope with the problem of pattern recall under input degradations, such as occlusions or random noise, where input patterns can be composed of binary or real valued entries. In comparison to these and other artificial neural network memories, lattice algebra based memories display better performance for storage and recall capability; however, the computational techniques devised to achieve that purpose require additional processing or provide partial success when inputs are presented with undetermined noise levels. Robust retrieval capability of an associative memory model is usually expressed by a high percentage of perfect recalls from non-perfect input. The procedure described here uses noise masking defined by simple lattice operations together with appropriate metrics, such as the normalized mean squared error or signal to noise ratio, to boost the recall performance of either the min or max lattice auto-associative memories. Using a single lattice associative memory, illustrative examples are given that demonstrate the enhanced retrieval of correct gray-scale image associations from inputs corrupted with random noise.

  17. Remote sensing inputs to water demand modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, J. E.; Jensen, J. R.; Tinney, L. R.; Rector, M.

    1975-01-01

    In an attempt to determine the ability of remote sensing techniques to economically generate data required by water demand models, the Geography Remote Sensing Unit, in conjunction with the Kern County Water Agency of California, developed an analysis model. As a result it was determined that agricultural cropland inventories utilizing both high altitude photography and LANDSAT imagery can be conducted cost effectively. In addition, by using average irrigation application rates in conjunction with cropland data, estimates of agricultural water demand can be generated. However, more accurate estimates are possible if crop type, acreage, and crop specific application rates are employed. An analysis of the effect of saline-alkali soils on water demand in the study area is also examined. Finally, reference is made to the detection and delineation of water tables that are perched near the surface by semi-permeable clay layers. Soil salinity prediction, automated crop identification on a by-field basis, and a potential input to the determination of zones of equal benefit taxation are briefly touched upon.

  18. EDP Applications to Musical Bibliography: Input Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Donald C.

    1972-01-01

    The application of Electronic Data Processing (EDP) has been a boon in the analysis and bibliographic control of music. However, an extra step of encoding must be undertaken for input of music. The best hope to facilitate musical input is the development of an Optical Character Recognition (OCR) music-reading machine. (29 references) (Author/NH)

  19. 7 CFR 3430.607 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.607 Section 3430.607 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND... input and/or via Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal Register, from the...

  20. 7 CFR 3430.907 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.907 Section 3430.907 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND..., requests for input and/or Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal Register, from...

  1. 7 CFR 3430.907 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.907 Section 3430.907 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND... input and/or Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal Register, from the following...

  2. 7 CFR 3430.907 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.907 Section 3430.907 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND... input and/or Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal Register, from the following...

  3. 7 CFR 3430.607 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.607 Section 3430.607 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND... input and/or via Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal Register, from the...

  4. 7 CFR 3430.907 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.907 Section 3430.907 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND... input and/or Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal Register, from the following...

  5. 7 CFR 3430.607 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.607 Section 3430.607 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND... input and/or via Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal Register, from the...

  6. 7 CFR 3430.607 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.607 Section 3430.607 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND... input and/or via Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal Register, from the...

  7. Computing Functions by Approximating the Input

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Mayer

    2012-01-01

    In computing real-valued functions, it is ordinarily assumed that the input to the function is known, and it is the output that we need to approximate. In this work, we take the opposite approach: we show how to compute the values of some transcendental functions by approximating the input to these functions, and obtaining exact answers for their…

  8. Managing Input during Assistive Technology Product Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Young Mi

    2011-01-01

    Many different sources of input are available to assistive technology innovators during the course of designing products. However, there is little information on which ones may be most effective or how they may be efficiently utilized within the design process. The aim of this project was to compare how three types of input--from simulation tools,…

  9. 39 CFR 3020.92 - Public input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Public input. 3020.92 Section 3020.92 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL PRODUCT LISTS Requests Initiated by the Postal Service to Change the Mail Classification Schedule § 3020.92 Public input. The Commission shall publish...

  10. Statistical identification of effective input variables. [SCREEN

    SciTech Connect

    Vaurio, J.K.

    1982-09-01

    A statistical sensitivity analysis procedure has been developed for ranking the input data of large computer codes in the order of sensitivity-importance. The method is economical for large codes with many input variables, since it uses a relatively small number of computer runs. No prior judgemental elimination of input variables is needed. The sceening method is based on stagewise correlation and extensive regression analysis of output values calculated with selected input value combinations. The regression process deals with multivariate nonlinear functions, and statistical tests are also available for identifying input variables that contribute to threshold effects, i.e., discontinuities in the output variables. A computer code SCREEN has been developed for implementing the screening techniques. The efficiency has been demonstrated by several examples and applied to a fast reactor safety analysis code (Venus-II). However, the methods and the coding are general and not limited to such applications.

  11. Beyond Field Education: Leadership of Field Directors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wertheimer, Mindy R.; Sodhi, Mimi

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a conceptual model of the field director's role outside of field education, specifically in the following 3 areas of leadership: (1) curricular, (2) programmatic, and (3) institutional. A survey was conducted to explore the field director's input targeted in these areas beyond prescribed field education tasks. The…

  12. Measuring Input Thresholds on an Existing Board

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuperman, Igor; Gutrich, Daniel G.; Berkun, Andrew C.

    2011-01-01

    A critical PECL (positive emitter-coupled logic) interface to Xilinx interface needed to be changed on an existing flight board. The new Xilinx input interface used a CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor) type of input, and the driver could meet its thresholds typically, but not in worst-case, according to the data sheet. The previous interface had been based on comparison with an external reference, but the CMOS input is based on comparison with an internal divider from the power supply. A way to measure what the exact input threshold was for this device for 64 inputs on a flight board was needed. The measurement technique allowed an accurate measurement of the voltage required to switch a Xilinx input from high to low for each of the 64 lines, while only probing two of them. Directly driving an external voltage was considered too risky, and tests done on any other unit could not be used to qualify the flight board. The two lines directly probed gave an absolute voltage threshold calibration, while data collected on the remaining 62 lines without probing gave relative measurements that could be used to identify any outliers. The PECL interface was forced to a long-period square wave by driving a saturated square wave into the ADC (analog to digital converter). The active pull-down circuit was turned off, causing each line to rise rapidly and fall slowly according to the input s weak pull-down circuitry. The fall time shows up as a change in the pulse width of the signal ready by the Xilinx. This change in pulse width is a function of capacitance, pulldown current, and input threshold. Capacitance was known from the different trace lengths, plus a gate input capacitance, which is the same for all inputs. The pull-down current is the same for all inputs including the two that are probed directly. The data was combined, and the Excel solver tool was used to find input thresholds for the 62 lines. This was repeated over different supply voltages and

  13. Reticular thalamic responses to nociceptive inputs in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Yen, Chen-Tung; Shaw, Fu-Zen

    2003-04-11

    The present study compares nociceptive responses of neurons in the reticular thalamic nucleus (RT) to those of the ventroposterior lateral nucleus (VPL). Extracellular single-unit activities of cells in the RT and VPL were recorded in anesthetized rats. Only units with identified tactile receptive fields in the forepaw or hindpaw were studied. In the first series of experiments, RT and VPL responses to pinching with a small artery clamp were tested with the rats under pentobarbital, urethane, ketamine, or halothane anesthesia. Under all types of anesthesia, many RT units were inhibited. Second, the specificity of the nociceptive response was tested by pinching and noxious heating of the unit's tactile receptive field. Of the 39 VPL units tested, 20 were excited by both types of noxious stimuli. In sharp contrast, of the 30 RT units tested, none were excited and 17 were inhibited. In a third series of experiments, low-intensity and beam-diffused CO(2) laser irradiation was used to activate peripheral nociceptive afferents. Wide-dynamic-range VPL units responded with short- and long-latency excitations. In contrast, RT units had short-latency excitation followed by long-latency inhibition. Nociceptive input inhibited RT units in less than 500 ms. We conclude that a significant portion of RT neurons were polysynaptically inhibited by nociceptive inputs. Since all the cells tested were excited by light tactile inputs, the somatosensory RT may serve in the role of a modality gate, which modifies (i.e. inhibits) tactile inputs while letting noxious inputs pass. PMID:12663087

  14. Optical input impedance of nanostrip antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ivan; Du, Ya-ping

    2012-05-01

    We conduct an investigation into optical nanoantennas in the form of a strip dipole made from aluminum. With the finite-difference time domain simulation both optical input impedance and radiation efficiency of nanostrip antennas are addressed. An equivalent circuit is presented as well for the nanostrip antennas at optical resonances. The optical input resistance can be adjusted by varying the geometric parameters of antenna strips. By changing both strip area and strip length simultaneously, optical input resistance can be adjusted for matching impedance with an external feeding or loading circuit. It is found that the optical radiation efficiency does not change significantly when the size of a nanostrip antenna varies moderately.

  15. Wireless, relative-motion computer input device

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F.; Rosenbury, Erwin T.

    2004-05-18

    The present invention provides a system for controlling a computer display in a workspace using an input unit/output unit. A train of EM waves are sent out to flood the workspace. EM waves are reflected from the input unit/output unit. A relative distance moved information signal is created using the EM waves that are reflected from the input unit/output unit. Algorithms are used to convert the relative distance moved information signal to a display signal. The computer display is controlled in response to the display signal.

  16. Quantum Trajectories for Squeezed Input Processes: Explicit Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowska, Anita; Gough, John

    2016-03-01

    We consider the quantum (trajectories) filtering equation for the case when the system is driven by Bose field inputs prepared in an arbitrary non-zero mean Gaussian state. The a posteriori evolution of the system is conditioned by the results of a single or double homodyne measurements. The system interacting with the Bose field is a single cavity mode taken initially in a Gaussian state. We show explicit solutions using the method of characteristic functions to the filtering equations exploiting the linear Gaussian nature of the problem.

  17. Design of frequency domain multiplexing of TES signals by multi-input SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Masui, Kensuke; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Morooka, Toshimitsu; Nakayama, Satoshi; Takei, Yoh

    2006-04-01

    In frequency-domain Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) multiplexing for Transition Edge Sensor (TES) readout, a magnetic field summation method utilizing multi-input SQUIDs has a fundamental merit of small degradation of signal-to-noise ratio. Independent wiring without common impedance avoids the cross talk current, and the current induced by magnetic coupling between the input coils is suppressed by the direct feedback at the summing point. A multi-input SQUID which has 8 input coils has been fabricated and requirements for Flux Locked Loop (FLL) circuits are summarized.

  18. Impact of land use change on atmospheric P inputs in a tropical dry forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Rishiraj; Lawrence, Deborah; D'Odorico, Paolo; Delonge, Marcia

    2011-03-01

    Forest canopies increase atmospheric inputs of nutrients to forest ecosystems by trapping dust and particulates. In tropical dry forests, this mechanism may contribute significant amounts of phosphorus, often a limiting nutrient in these ecosystems. Shifting cultivation may reduce the atmospheric inputs of phosphorus through the removal and restructuring of the forest canopy. We studied the impacts of land clearing by shifting cultivation in the southern Yucatan peninsula by measuring P in atmospheric bulk deposition and throughfall in two secondary forest stands and one mature forest stand to determine whether mature forests have greater throughfall P inputs than regenerating areas. From May to November 2007, we sampled rainfall in an open field and throughfall in three adjacent forest stands of different ages: 6 year old, 20 year old and mature (>60 year). We analyzed subsamples for inorganic and organic P. During the 7 month wet season, cumulative P input for the open field was 0.28 kg/ha, the 6 year stand accumulated 0.44 kg/ha, the 20 year stand accumulated 0.55 kg/ha and the mature stand accumulated 0.81 kg/ha. Organic P inputs were ˜50% of total P inputs in the open field, and 30-38% of total P inputs for the forest stands. The mature forest had significantly higher P concentrations and inputs than the open field or secondary forest stands, and forest stands had significantly greater P inputs than the open field, but there were no significant differences between the older and younger secondary forests. The repeated clearing of forests may thus reduce important P inputs to the ecosystem in the long-term.

  19. Scaling of global input-output networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Sai; Qi, Zhengling; Qu, Shen; Zhu, Ji; Chiu, Anthony S. F.; Jia, Xiaoping; Xu, Ming

    2016-06-01

    Examining scaling patterns of networks can help understand how structural features relate to the behavior of the networks. Input-output networks consist of industries as nodes and inter-industrial exchanges of products as links. Previous studies consider limited measures for node strengths and link weights, and also ignore the impact of dataset choice. We consider a comprehensive set of indicators in this study that are important in economic analysis, and also examine the impact of dataset choice, by studying input-output networks in individual countries and the entire world. Results show that Burr, Log-Logistic, Log-normal, and Weibull distributions can better describe scaling patterns of global input-output networks. We also find that dataset choice has limited impacts on the observed scaling patterns. Our findings can help examine the quality of economic statistics, estimate missing data in economic statistics, and identify key nodes and links in input-output networks to support economic policymaking.

  20. Multiple-input experimental modal analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allemang, R. J.; Brown, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    The development of experimental modal analysis techniques is reviewed. System and excitation assumptions are discussed. The methods examined include the forced normal mode excitation method, the frequency response function method, the damped complex exponential response method, the Ibrahim time domain approach, the polyreference approach, and mathematical input-output model methods. The current trend toward multiple input utilization in the estimation of system parameters is noted.

  1. Input/output system for multiprocessors

    SciTech Connect

    Bernick, D.L.; Chan, K.K.; Chan, W.M.; Dan, Y.F.; Hoang, D.M.; Hussain, Z.; Iswandhi, G.I.; Korpi, J.E.; Sanner, M.W.; Zwangerman, J.A.

    1989-04-11

    A device controller is described, comprising: a first port-input/output controller coupled to a first input/output channel bus; and a second port-input/output controlled coupled to a second input/output channel bus; each of the first and second port-input/output controllers having: a first ownership latch means for granting shared ownership of the device controller to a first host processor to provide a first data path on a first I/O channel through the first port I/O controller between the first host processor and any peripheral, and at least a second ownership latch means operative independently of the first ownership latch means for granting shared ownership of the device controller to a second host processor independently of the first port input/output controller to provide a second data path on a second I/O channel through the second port I/O controller between the second host processor and any peripheral devices coupled to the device controller.

  2. Input filter compensation for switching regulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelkar, S. S.; Lee, F. C.

    1983-01-01

    A novel input filter compensation scheme for a buck regulator that eliminates the interaction between the input filter output impedance and the regulator control loop is presented. The scheme is implemented using a feedforward loop that senses the input filter state variables and uses this information to modulate the duty cycle signal. The feedforward design process presented is seen to be straightforward and the feedforward easy to implement. Extensive experimental data supported by analytical results show that significant performance improvement is achieved with the use of feedforward in the following performance categories: loop stability, audiosusceptibility, output impedance and transient response. The use of feedforward results in isolating the switching regulator from its power source thus eliminating all interaction between the regulator and equipment upstream. In addition the use of feedforward removes some of the input filter design constraints and makes the input filter design process simpler thus making it possible to optimize the input filter. The concept of feedforward compensation can also be extended to other types of switching regulators.

  3. Significance of Input Correlations in Striatal Function

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Man Yi; Aertsen, Ad; Kumar, Arvind

    2011-01-01

    The striatum is the main input station of the basal ganglia and is strongly associated with motor and cognitive functions. Anatomical evidence suggests that individual striatal neurons are unlikely to share their inputs from the cortex. Using a biologically realistic large-scale network model of striatum and cortico-striatal projections, we provide a functional interpretation of the special anatomical structure of these projections. Specifically, we show that weak pairwise correlation within the pool of inputs to individual striatal neurons enhances the saliency of signal representation in the striatum. By contrast, correlations among the input pools of different striatal neurons render the signal representation less distinct from background activity. We suggest that for the network architecture of the striatum, there is a preferred cortico-striatal input configuration for optimal signal representation. It is further enhanced by the low-rate asynchronous background activity in striatum, supported by the balance between feedforward and feedback inhibitions in the striatal network. Thus, an appropriate combination of rates and correlations in the striatal input sets the stage for action selection presumably implemented in the basal ganglia. PMID:22125480

  4. Influential input classification in probabilistic multimedia models

    SciTech Connect

    Maddalena, Randy L.; McKone, Thomas E.; Hsieh, Dennis P.H.; Geng, Shu

    1999-05-01

    Monte Carlo analysis is a statistical simulation method that is often used to assess and quantify the outcome variance in complex environmental fate and effects models. Total outcome variance of these models is a function of (1) the uncertainty and/or variability associated with each model input and (2) the sensitivity of the model outcome to changes in the inputs. To propagate variance through a model using Monte Carlo techniques, each variable must be assigned a probability distribution. The validity of these distributions directly influences the accuracy and reliability of the model outcome. To efficiently allocate resources for constructing distributions one should first identify the most influential set of variables in the model. Although existing sensitivity and uncertainty analysis methods can provide a relative ranking of the importance of model inputs, they fail to identify the minimum set of stochastic inputs necessary to sufficiently characterize the outcome variance. In this paper, we describe and demonstrate a novel sensitivity/uncertainty analysis method for assessing the importance of each variable in a multimedia environmental fate model. Our analyses show that for a given scenario, a relatively small number of input variables influence the central tendency of the model and an even smaller set determines the shape of the outcome distribution. For each input, the level of influence depends on the scenario under consideration. This information is useful for developing site specific models and improving our understanding of the processes that have the greatest influence on the variance in outcomes from multimedia models.

  5. Rat olfactory bulb mitral cells receive sparse glomerular inputs.

    PubMed

    Fantana, Antoniu L; Soucy, Edward R; Meister, Markus

    2008-09-11

    Center-surround receptive fields are a fundamental unit of brain organization. It has been proposed that olfactory bulb mitral cells exhibit this functional circuitry, with excitation from one glomerulus and inhibition from a broad field of glomeruli within reach of the lateral dendrites. We investigated this hypothesis using a combination of in vivo intrinsic imaging, single-unit recording, and a large panel of odors. Assuming a broad inhibitory field, a mitral cell would be influenced by >100 contiguous glomeruli and should respond to many odors. Instead, the observed response rate was an order of magnitude lower. A quantitative model indicates that mitral cell responses can be explained by just a handful of glomeruli. These glomeruli are spatially dispersed on the bulb and represent a broad range of odor sensitivities. We conclude that mitral cells do not have center-surround receptive fields. Instead, each mitral cell performs a specific computation combining a small and diverse set of glomerular inputs. PMID:18786363

  6. Examination of time-variable input effects in a nonlinear analogue magnetosphere model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, D. N.; Klimas, A. J.; Roberts, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    The plasma physical analog model (an extension of the damped, harmonic-oscillator dripping faucet model) is employed to consider explicitly the effect of time-varying the inputs. This work is equivalent to considering the effects of northward and southward turnings of the interplanetary magnetic field for various periods of time. It is found that relatively extended episodes (not less than 2 hours) of turned-on input with shorter (about 1 hour) periods of turned-off input lead to model behavior much like the continuously driven case. Going to short input intervals with longer periods of zero input leads to highly irregular and dramatically fluctuating episodes of magnetotail unloading. These results give an insight into the diversity of apparent magnetospheric responses during relatively isolated substorm conditions. This work shows the absolutely critical interdependence (in a nonlinear dynamical system) of input phasing and internal magnetospheric response cycles.

  7. A new synthesis for terrestrial nitrogen inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houlton, B. Z.; Morford, S. L.

    2015-04-01

    Nitrogen (N) inputs sustain many different aspects of local soil processes, their services, and their interactions with the broader Earth system. We present a new synthesis for terrestrial N inputs that explicitly considers both rock and atmospheric sources of N. We review evidence for state-factor regulation over biological fixation, deposition, and rock-weathering inputs from local to global scales and in transient vs. steady-state landscapes. Our investigation highlights strong organism and topographic (relief) controls over all three N input pathways, with the anthropogenic factor clearly important in rising N deposition rates. In addition, the climate, parent material, and time factors are shown to influence patterns of fixation and rock-weathering inputs of N in diverse soil systems. Data reanalysis suggests that weathering of N-rich parent material could resolve several known cases of "missing N inputs" in ecosystems, and demonstrates how the inclusion of rock N sources into modern concepts can lead to a richer understanding of spatial and temporal patterns of ecosystem N availability. For example, explicit consideration of rock N inputs into classic pedogenic models (e.g., the Walker and Syers model) yields a fundamentally different expectation from the standard case: weathering of N-rich parent material could enhance N availability and facilitate terrestrial succession in developmentally young sites even in the absence of N-fixing organisms. We conclude that a state-factor framework for N complements our growing understanding multiple-source controls on phosphorus and cation availability in Earth's soil, but with significant exceptions given the lack of an N fixation analogue in all other biogeochemical cycles. Rather, non-symmetrical feedbacks among input pathways in which high N inputs via deposition or rock-weathering sources have the potential to reduce biological fixation rates mark N as fundamentally different from other nutrients. The new synthesis

  8. Micromachined dual input axis rate gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juneau, Thor Nelson

    The need for inexpensive yet reliable angular rate sensors in fields ranging from automotive to consumer electronics has motivated prolific micromachined rate gyroscope research. The vast majority of research has focused on single input axis rate gyroscopes based upon either translational resonance, such as tuning forks, or structural mode resonance, such as vibrating rings. However, this work presents a novel, contrasting approach based on angular resonance of a rotating rigid rotor suspended by torsional springs. The inherent symmetry of the circular design allows angular rate measurement about two axes simultaneously, hence the name micromachined dual-axis rate gyroscope. The underlying theory of operation, mechanical structure design optimization, electrical interface circuitry, and signal processing are described in detail. Several operational versions were fabricated using two different fully integrated surface micromachining processes as proof of concept. The heart of the dual-axis rate gyroscope is a ˜2 mum thick polysilicon disk or rotor suspended above the substrate by a four beam suspension. When this rotor in driven into angular oscillation about the axis perpendicular to the substrate, a rotation rate about the two axes parallel to the substrate invokes an out of plane rotor tilting motion due to Coriolis acceleration. This tilting motion is capacitively measured and on board integrated signal processing provides two output voltages proportional to angular rate input about the two axes parallel to the substrate. The design process begins with the derivation of gyroscopic dynamics. The equations suggest that tuning sense mode frequencies to the drive oscillation frequency can vastly increase mechanical sensitivity. Hence the supporting four beam suspension is designed such that electrostatic tuning can match modes despite process variations. The electrostatic tuning range is limited only by rotor collapse to the substrate when tuning-voltage induced

  9. Inferring Nonlinear Neuronal Computation Based on Physiologically Plausible Inputs

    PubMed Central

    McFarland, James M.; Cui, Yuwei; Butts, Daniel A.

    2013-01-01

    The computation represented by a sensory neuron's response to stimuli is constructed from an array of physiological processes both belonging to that neuron and inherited from its inputs. Although many of these physiological processes are known to be nonlinear, linear approximations are commonly used to describe the stimulus selectivity of sensory neurons (i.e., linear receptive fields). Here we present an approach for modeling sensory processing, termed the Nonlinear Input Model (NIM), which is based on the hypothesis that the dominant nonlinearities imposed by physiological mechanisms arise from rectification of a neuron's inputs. Incorporating such ‘upstream nonlinearities’ within the standard linear-nonlinear (LN) cascade modeling structure implicitly allows for the identification of multiple stimulus features driving a neuron's response, which become directly interpretable as either excitatory or inhibitory. Because its form is analogous to an integrate-and-fire neuron receiving excitatory and inhibitory inputs, model fitting can be guided by prior knowledge about the inputs to a given neuron, and elements of the resulting model can often result in specific physiological predictions. Furthermore, by providing an explicit probabilistic model with a relatively simple nonlinear structure, its parameters can be efficiently optimized and appropriately regularized. Parameter estimation is robust and efficient even with large numbers of model components and in the context of high-dimensional stimuli with complex statistical structure (e.g. natural stimuli). We describe detailed methods for estimating the model parameters, and illustrate the advantages of the NIM using a range of example sensory neurons in the visual and auditory systems. We thus present a modeling framework that can capture a broad range of nonlinear response functions while providing physiologically interpretable descriptions of neural computation. PMID:23874185

  10. Multi-input distributed classifiers for synthetic genetic circuits.

    PubMed

    Kanakov, Oleg; Kotelnikov, Roman; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Tsimring, Lev; Huerta, Ramón; Zaikin, Alexey; Ivanchenko, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    For practical construction of complex synthetic genetic networks able to perform elaborate functions it is important to have a pool of relatively simple modules with different functionality which can be compounded together. To complement engineering of very different existing synthetic genetic devices such as switches, oscillators or logical gates, we propose and develop here a design of synthetic multi-input classifier based on a recently introduced distributed classifier concept. A heterogeneous population of cells acts as a single classifier, whose output is obtained by summarizing the outputs of individual cells. The learning ability is achieved by pruning the population, instead of tuning parameters of an individual cell. The present paper is focused on evaluating two possible schemes of multi-input gene classifier circuits. We demonstrate their suitability for implementing a multi-input distributed classifier capable of separating data which are inseparable for single-input classifiers, and characterize performance of the classifiers by analytical and numerical results. The simpler scheme implements a linear classifier in a single cell and is targeted at separable classification problems with simple class borders. A hard learning strategy is used to train a distributed classifier by removing from the population any cell answering incorrectly to at least one training example. The other scheme implements a circuit with a bell-shaped response in a single cell to allow potentially arbitrary shape of the classification border in the input space of a distributed classifier. Inseparable classification problems are addressed using soft learning strategy, characterized by probabilistic decision to keep or discard a cell at each training iteration. We expect that our classifier design contributes to the development of robust and predictable synthetic biosensors, which have the potential to affect applications in a lot of fields, including that of medicine and industry

  11. Multi-Input Distributed Classifiers for Synthetic Genetic Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Kanakov, Oleg; Kotelnikov, Roman; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Tsimring, Lev; Huerta, Ramón; Zaikin, Alexey; Ivanchenko, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    For practical construction of complex synthetic genetic networks able to perform elaborate functions it is important to have a pool of relatively simple modules with different functionality which can be compounded together. To complement engineering of very different existing synthetic genetic devices such as switches, oscillators or logical gates, we propose and develop here a design of synthetic multi-input classifier based on a recently introduced distributed classifier concept. A heterogeneous population of cells acts as a single classifier, whose output is obtained by summarizing the outputs of individual cells. The learning ability is achieved by pruning the population, instead of tuning parameters of an individual cell. The present paper is focused on evaluating two possible schemes of multi-input gene classifier circuits. We demonstrate their suitability for implementing a multi-input distributed classifier capable of separating data which are inseparable for single-input classifiers, and characterize performance of the classifiers by analytical and numerical results. The simpler scheme implements a linear classifier in a single cell and is targeted at separable classification problems with simple class borders. A hard learning strategy is used to train a distributed classifier by removing from the population any cell answering incorrectly to at least one training example. The other scheme implements a circuit with a bell-shaped response in a single cell to allow potentially arbitrary shape of the classification border in the input space of a distributed classifier. Inseparable classification problems are addressed using soft learning strategy, characterized by probabilistic decision to keep or discard a cell at each training iteration. We expect that our classifier design contributes to the development of robust and predictable synthetic biosensors, which have the potential to affect applications in a lot of fields, including that of medicine and industry

  12. Blurring the Inputs: A Natural Language Approach to Sensitivity Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, William L.; Thompson, Richard A.; Johnston, Christopher O.

    2007-01-01

    To document model parameter uncertainties and to automate sensitivity analyses for numerical simulation codes, a natural-language-based method to specify tolerances has been developed. With this new method, uncertainties are expressed in a natural manner, i.e., as one would on an engineering drawing, namely, 5.25 +/- 0.01. This approach is robust and readily adapted to various application domains because it does not rely on parsing the particular structure of input file formats. Instead, tolerances of a standard format are added to existing fields within an input file. As a demonstration of the power of this simple, natural language approach, a Monte Carlo sensitivity analysis is performed for three disparate simulation codes: fluid dynamics (LAURA), radiation (HARA), and ablation (FIAT). Effort required to harness each code for sensitivity analysis was recorded to demonstrate the generality and flexibility of this new approach.

  13. Noise facilitates transcriptional control under dynamic inputs.

    PubMed

    Kellogg, Ryan A; Tay, Savaş

    2015-01-29

    Cells must respond sensitively to time-varying inputs in complex signaling environments. To understand how signaling networks process dynamic inputs into gene expression outputs and the role of noise in cellular information processing, we studied the immune pathway NF-κB under periodic cytokine inputs using microfluidic single-cell measurements and stochastic modeling. We find that NF-κB dynamics in fibroblasts synchronize with oscillating TNF signal and become entrained, leading to significantly increased NF-κB oscillation amplitude and mRNA output compared to non-entrained response. Simulations show that intrinsic biochemical noise in individual cells improves NF-κB oscillation and entrainment, whereas cell-to-cell variability in NF-κB natural frequency creates population robustness, together enabling entrainment over a wider range of dynamic inputs. This wide range is confirmed by experiments where entrained cells were measured under all input periods. These results indicate that synergy between oscillation and noise allows cells to achieve efficient gene expression in dynamically changing signaling environments. PMID:25635454

  14. Six axis force feedback input device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohm, Timothy (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a low friction, low inertia, six-axis force feedback input device comprising an arm with double-jointed, tendon-driven revolute joints, a decoupled tendon-driven wrist, and a base with encoders and motors. The input device functions as a master robot manipulator of a microsurgical teleoperated robot system including a slave robot manipulator coupled to an amplifier chassis, which is coupled to a control chassis, which is coupled to a workstation with a graphical user interface. The amplifier chassis is coupled to the motors of the master robot manipulator and the control chassis is coupled to the encoders of the master robot manipulator. A force feedback can be applied to the input device and can be generated from the slave robot to enable a user to operate the slave robot via the input device without physically viewing the slave robot. Also, the force feedback can be generated from the workstation to represent fictitious forces to constrain the input device's control of the slave robot to be within imaginary predetermined boundaries.

  15. Retrieval of Branching Sequences in an Associative Memory Model with Common External Input and Bias Input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katahira, Kentaro; Kawamura, Masaki; Okanoya, Kazuo; Okada, Masato

    2007-04-01

    We investigate a recurrent neural network model with common external and bias inputs that can retrieve branching sequences. Retrieval of memory sequences is one of the most important functions of the brain. A lot of research has been done on neural networks that process memory sequences. Most of it has focused on fixed memory sequences. However, many animals can remember and recall branching sequences. Therefore, we propose an associative memory model that can retrieve branching sequences. Our model has bias input and common external input. Kawamura and Okada reported that common external input enables sequential memory retrieval in an associative memory model with auto- and weak cross-correlation connections. We show that retrieval processes along branching sequences are controllable with both the bias input and the common external input. To analyze the behaviors of our model, we derived the macroscopic dynamical description as a probability density function. The results obtained by our theory agree with those obtained by computer simulations.

  16. The input optics of Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, D. B.; Arain, M. A.; Ciani, G.; Feldbaum, D.; Fulda, P.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, R.; Heintze, M.; Martin, R. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Williams, L. F.; Mueller, G.; Quetschke, V.; Korth, W. Z.; Reitze, D. H.; Derosa, R. T.; Effler, A.; Kokeyama, K.; Frolov, V. V.; Mullavey, A.; Poeld, J.

    2016-03-01

    The Input Optics (IO) of advanced LIGO will be described. The IO consists of all the optics between the laser and the power recycling mirror. The scope of the IO includes the following hardware: phase modulators, power control, input mode cleaner, an in-vacuum Faraday isolator, and mode matching telescopes. The IO group has developed and characterized RTP-based phase modulators capable of operation at 180 W cw input power. In addition, the Faraday isolator is compensated for depolarization and thermal lensing effects up to the same power and is capable of achieving greater than 40 dB isolation. This research has been supported by the NSF through Grants PHY-1205512 and PHY-1505598. LIGO-G1600067.

  17. Computer Generated Inputs for NMIS Processor Verification

    SciTech Connect

    J. A. Mullens; J. E. Breeding; J. A. McEvers; R. W. Wysor; L. G. Chiang; J. R. Lenarduzzi; J. T. Mihalczo; J. K. Mattingly

    2001-06-29

    Proper operation of the Nuclear Identification Materials System (NMIS) processor can be verified using computer-generated inputs [BIST (Built-In-Self-Test)] at the digital inputs. Preselected sequences of input pulses to all channels with known correlation functions are compared to the output of the processor. These types of verifications have been utilized in NMIS type correlation processors at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory since 1984. The use of this test confirmed a malfunction in a NMIS processor at the All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) in 1998. The NMIS processor boards were returned to the U.S. for repair and subsequently used in NMIS passive and active measurements with Pu at VNIIEF in 1999.

  18. Replenishment of magma chambers by light inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huppert, Herbert E.; Sparks, R. Stephen J.; Whitehead, John A.; Hallworth, Mark A.

    1986-05-01

    Magma chambers, particularly those of basaltic composition, are often replenished by an influx of magma whose density is less than that of the resident magma. This paper describes the fundamental fluid mechanics involved in the replenishment by light inputs. If ρ denotes the uniform density of the resident magma and ρ — Δρ that of the input, the situation is described by the reduced gravity g' = gΔρ/ρ, the volume flux Q, and the viscosities of the resident and input magmas νe and νi, respectively. The (nondimensional) Reynolds numbers, Ree = (g'Q3)1/5/νe and Rei = (g'Q3)1/5/νi and chamber geometry then completely specify the system. For sufficiently low values of the two Reynolds numbers (each less than approximately 10), the input rises as a laminar conduit. For larger values of the Reynolds numbers, the conduit may break down and exhibit either a varicose or a meander instability and entrain some resident magma. At still larger Reynolds numbers, the flow will become quite unsteady and finally turbulent. The values of the Reynolds numbers at which these transitions occur have been documented by a series of experiments with water, glycerine, and corn syrup. If the input rises as a turbulent plume, significant entrainment of the resident magma can take place. The final spatial distribution of the mixed magma depends on the geometry of the chamber. If the chamber is much wider than it is high, the mixed magma forms a compositionally stratified region between the roof and a sharp front above uncontaminated magma. In the other geometrical extreme, the input magma is mixed with almost all of the resident magma. If the density of the resident magma is already stratified, the input plume may penetrate only part way into the chamber, even though its initial density is less than that of the lowest density resident magma. The plume will then intrude horizontally and form a hybrid layer at an intermediate depth. This provides a mechanism for preventing even

  19. An update of input instructions to TEMOD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The theory and operation of a FORTRAN 4 computer code, designated as TEMOD, used to calcuate tubular thermoelectric generator performance is described in WANL-TME-1906. The original version of TEMOD was developed in 1969. A description is given of additions to the mathematical model and an update of the input instructions to the code. Although the basic mathematical model described in WANL-TME-1906 has remained unchanged, a substantial number of input/output options were added to allow completion of module performance parametrics as required in support of the compact thermoelectric converter system technology program.

  20. Input/Output Subroutine Library Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, James B.

    1988-01-01

    Efficient, easy-to-use program moved easily to different computers. Purpose of NAVIO, Input/Output Subroutine Library, provides input/output package of software for FORTRAN programs that is portable, efficient, and easy to use. Implemented as hierarchy of libraries. At bottom is very small library containing only non-portable routines called "I/O Kernel." Design makes NAVIO easy to move from one computer to another, by simply changing kernel. NAVIO appropriate for software system of almost any size wherein different programs communicate through files.

  1. Locked-mode avoidance and recovery without momentum input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Rice, J. E.; Wolfe, S.; Cziegler, I.; Gao, C.; Granetz, R.; Wukitch, S.; Terry, J.; Greenwald, M.; Sugiyama, L.; Hubbard, A.; Hugges, J.; Marmar, E.; Phillips, P.; Rowan, W.

    2015-11-01

    Error-field-induced locked-modes (LMs) have been studied in Alcator C-Mod at ITER-Bϕ, without NBI fueling and momentum input. Delay of the mode-onset and locked-mode recovery has been successfully obtained without external momentum input using Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH). The use of external heating in-sync with the error-field ramp-up resulted in a successful delay of the mode-onset when PICRH > 1 MW, which demonstrates the existence of a power threshold to ``unlock'' the mode; in the presence of an error field the L-mode discharge can transition into H-mode only when PICRH > 2 MW and at high densities, avoiding also the density pump-out. The effects of ion heating observed on unlocking the core plasma may be due to ICRH induced flows in the plasma boundary, or modifications of plasma profiles that changed the underlying turbulence. This work was performed under US DoE contracts including DE-FC02-99ER54512 and others at MIT, DE-FG03-96ER-54373 at University of Texas at Austin, and DE-AC02-09CH11466 at PPPL.

  2. Encoding of whisker input by cerebellar Purkinje cells

    PubMed Central

    Bosman, Laurens W J; Koekkoek, Sebastiaan K E; Shapiro, Joël; Rijken, Bianca F M; Zandstra, Froukje; van der Ende, Barry; Owens, Cullen B; Potters, Jan-Willem; de Gruijl, Jornt R; Ruigrok, Tom J H; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2010-01-01

    The cerebellar cortex is crucial for sensorimotor integration. Sensorimotor inputs converge on cerebellar Purkinje cells via two afferent pathways: the climbing fibre pathway triggering complex spikes, and the mossy fibre–parallel fibre pathway, modulating the simple spike activities of Purkinje cells. We used, for the first time, the mouse whisker system as a model system to study the encoding of somatosensory input by Purkinje cells. We show that most Purkinje cells in ipsilateral crus 1 and crus 2 of awake mice respond to whisker stimulation with complex spike and/or simple spike responses. Single-whisker stimulation in anaesthetised mice revealed that the receptive fields of complex spike and simple spike responses were strikingly different. Complex spike responses, which proved to be sensitive to the amplitude, speed and direction of whisker movement, were evoked by only one or a few whiskers. Simple spike responses, which were not affected by the direction of movement, could be evoked by many individual whiskers. The receptive fields of Purkinje cells were largely intermingled, and we suggest that this facilitates the rapid integration of sensory inputs from different sources. Furthermore, we describe that individual Purkinje cells, at least under anaesthesia, may be bound in two functional ensembles based on the receptive fields and the synchrony of the complex spike and simple spike responses. The ‘complex spike ensembles’ were oriented in the sagittal plane, following the anatomical organization of the climbing fibres, while the ‘simple spike ensembles’ were oriented in the transversal plane, as are the beams of parallel fibres. PMID:20724365

  3. Instrumentation for measuring energy inputs to implements

    SciTech Connect

    Tompkins, F.D.; Wilhelm, L.R.

    1981-01-01

    A microcomputer-based instrumentation system for monitoring tractor operating parameters and energy inputs to implements was developed and mounted on a 75-power-takeoff-KW tractor. The instrumentation system, including sensors and data handling equipment, is discussed. 10 refs.

  4. Selecting training inputs via greedy rank covering

    SciTech Connect

    Buchsbaum, A.L.; Santen, J.P.H. van

    1996-12-31

    We present a general method for selecting a small set of training inputs, the observations of which will suffice to estimate the parameters of a given linear model. We exemplify the algorithm in terms of predicting segmental duration of phonetic-segment feature vectors in a text-to-speech synthesizer, but the algorithm will work for any linear model and its associated domain.

  5. Multichannel analyzers at high rates of input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudnick, S. J.; Strauss, M. G.

    1969-01-01

    Multichannel analyzer, used with a gating system incorporating pole-zero compensation, pile-up rejection, and baseline-restoration, achieves good resolution at high rates of input. It improves resolution, reduces tailing and rate-contributed continuum, and eliminates spectral shift.

  6. Adaptive Random Testing with Combinatorial Input Domain

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yansheng

    2014-01-01

    Random testing (RT) is a fundamental testing technique to assess software reliability, by simply selecting test cases in a random manner from the whole input domain. As an enhancement of RT, adaptive random testing (ART) has better failure-detection capability and has been widely applied in different scenarios, such as numerical programs, some object-oriented programs, and mobile applications. However, not much work has been done on the effectiveness of ART for the programs with combinatorial input domain (i.e., the set of categorical data). To extend the ideas to the testing for combinatorial input domain, we have adopted different similarity measures that are widely used for categorical data in data mining and have proposed two similarity measures based on interaction coverage. Then, we propose a new version named ART-CID as an extension of ART in combinatorial input domain, which selects an element from categorical data as the next test case such that it has the lowest similarity against already generated test cases. Experimental results show that ART-CID generally performs better than RT, with respect to different evaluation metrics. PMID:24772036

  7. Soil Organic Carbon Input from Urban Turfgrasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Turfgrass is a major vegetation type in the urban and suburban environment. Management practices such as species selection, irrigation, and mowing may affect carbon (C) input and storage in these systems. Research was conducted to determine the rate of soil organic carbon (SOC) changes, soil carbon ...

  8. Multiple Input Microcantilever Sensor with Capacitive Readout

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, C.L., Jr.; Brown, G.M.; Bryan, W.L.; Clonts, L.G.; DePriest, J.C.; Emergy, M.S.; Ericson, M.N.; Hu, Z.; Jones, R.L.; Moore, M.R.; Oden, P.I.; Rochelle, J.M.; Smith, S.F.; Threatt, T.D.; Thundat, T.; Turner, G.W.; Warmack, R.J.; Wintenberg, A.L.

    1999-03-11

    A surface-micromachined MEMS process has been used to demonstrate multiple-input chemical sensing using selectively coated cantilever arrays. Combined hydrogen and mercury-vapor detection was achieved with a palm-sized, self-powered module with spread-spectrum telemetry reporting.

  9. Input-Based Incremental Vocabulary Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barcroft, Joe

    2012-01-01

    This fascinating presentation of current research undoes numerous myths about how we most effectively learn new words in a second language. In clear, reader-friendly text, the author details the successful approach of IBI vocabulary instruction, which emphasizes the presentation of target vocabulary as input early on and the incremental (gradual)…

  10. Soil Organic Carbon Input from Urban Turfgrasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Turfgrass is a major vegetation type in the urban and suburban environment. Management practices such as species selection, irrigation, and mowing may affect carbon input and storage in these systems. Research was conducted to determine the rate of soil organic carbon (SOC) changes, soil carbon sequ...

  11. Anomalous neuronal responses to fluctuated inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosaka, Ryosuke; Sakai, Yutaka

    2015-10-01

    The irregular firing of a cortical neuron is thought to result from a highly fluctuating drive that is generated by the balance of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. A previous study reported anomalous responses of the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron to the fluctuated inputs where an irregularity of spike trains is inversely proportional to an input irregularity. In the current study, we investigated the origin of these anomalous responses with the Hindmarsh-Rose neuron model, map-based models, and a simple mixture of interspike interval distributions. First, we specified the parameter regions for the bifurcations in the Hindmarsh-Rose model, and we confirmed that the model reproduced the anomalous responses in the dynamics of the saddle-node and subcritical Hopf bifurcations. For both bifurcations, the Hindmarsh-Rose model shows bistability in the resting state and the repetitive firing state, which indicated that the bistability was the origin of the anomalous input-output relationship. Similarly, the map-based model that contained bistability reproduced the anomalous responses, while the model without bistability did not. These results were supported by additional findings that the anomalous responses were reproduced by mimicking the bistable firing with a mixture of two different interspike interval distributions. Decorrelation of spike trains is important for neural information processing. For such spike train decorrelation, irregular firing is key. Our results indicated that irregular firing can emerge from fluctuating drives, even weak ones, under conditions involving bistability. The anomalous responses, therefore, contribute to efficient processing in the brain.

  12. DO MODEL UNCERTAINTY WITH CORRELATED INPUTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of correlation among the input parameters and variables on the output uncertainty of the Streeter-Phelps water quality model is examined. hree uncertainty analysis techniques are used: sensitivity analysis, first-order error analysis, and Monte Carlo simulation. odifie...

  13. 7 CFR 3430.607 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.607 Section 3430.607 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND EXTENSION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMPETITIVE AND NONCOMPETITIVE NON-FORMULA...

  14. 7 CFR 3430.15 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.15 Section 3430.15 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND EXTENSION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMPETITIVE AND NONCOMPETITIVE NON-FORMULA...

  15. 7 CFR 3430.907 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.907 Section 3430.907 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND EXTENSION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMPETITIVE AND NONCOMPETITIVE NON-FORMULA...

  16. 7 CFR 3430.15 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.15 Section 3430.15 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE COMPETITIVE AND NONCOMPETITIVE NON-FORMULA FEDERAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS-GENERAL...

  17. Anomalous neuronal responses to fluctuated inputs.

    PubMed

    Hosaka, Ryosuke; Sakai, Yutaka

    2015-10-01

    The irregular firing of a cortical neuron is thought to result from a highly fluctuating drive that is generated by the balance of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. A previous study reported anomalous responses of the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron to the fluctuated inputs where an irregularity of spike trains is inversely proportional to an input irregularity. In the current study, we investigated the origin of these anomalous responses with the Hindmarsh-Rose neuron model, map-based models, and a simple mixture of interspike interval distributions. First, we specified the parameter regions for the bifurcations in the Hindmarsh-Rose model, and we confirmed that the model reproduced the anomalous responses in the dynamics of the saddle-node and subcritical Hopf bifurcations. For both bifurcations, the Hindmarsh-Rose model shows bistability in the resting state and the repetitive firing state, which indicated that the bistability was the origin of the anomalous input-output relationship. Similarly, the map-based model that contained bistability reproduced the anomalous responses, while the model without bistability did not. These results were supported by additional findings that the anomalous responses were reproduced by mimicking the bistable firing with a mixture of two different interspike interval distributions. Decorrelation of spike trains is important for neural information processing. For such spike train decorrelation, irregular firing is key. Our results indicated that irregular firing can emerge from fluctuating drives, even weak ones, under conditions involving bistability. The anomalous responses, therefore, contribute to efficient processing in the brain. PMID:26565270

  18. Numerical simulation of LIGO input optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    None, Shivanand; Jamal, Nafis; Yoshida, Sanichiro

    2005-11-01

    Numerical analysis has been carried out to understand the performance of the Input Optics used in the first generation of LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory) detector. The input optics is a subsystem consisting of a mode cleaner and mode-matching telescope, where all the optics are suspended and installed in vacuum. Using the end-to-end package (LIGO programming language), computer codes have been made to simulate the input optics. Giving realistic seismic noise to the suspension point of the optics and using the length sensing/alignment sensing control for the mode cleaner, the performance of the input optics has been simulated under various scenarios such as with an order of magnitude higher seismic noise than the normal level, and with/without the alignment sensing control feedback from the arm cavity to the mode-matching telescope. The results are assessed in terms of the beam pointing fluctuation of the laser beam going into the arm cavities, and its influence on the optical coupling to the arm cavities and the noise level at the gravitational wave port signal.

  19. Treatments of Precipitation Inputs to Hydrologic Models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrological models are used to assess many water resources problems from agricultural use and water quality to engineering issues. The success of these models are dependent on correct parameterization; the most sensitive being the rainfall input time series. These records can come from land-based ...

  20. Input, Interaction and Output: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gass, Susan; Mackey, Alison

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of what has come to be known as the "Interaction Hypothesis," the basic tenet of which is that through input and interaction with interlocutors, language learners have opportunities to notice differences between their own formulations of the target language and the language of their conversational…

  1. A probabilistic graphical model based stochastic input model construction

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Jiang; Zabaras, Nicholas

    2014-09-01

    Model reduction techniques have been widely used in modeling of high-dimensional stochastic input in uncertainty quantification tasks. However, the probabilistic modeling of random variables projected into reduced-order spaces presents a number of computational challenges. Due to the curse of dimensionality, the underlying dependence relationships between these random variables are difficult to capture. In this work, a probabilistic graphical model based approach is employed to learn the dependence by running a number of conditional independence tests using observation data. Thus a probabilistic model of the joint PDF is obtained and the PDF is factorized into a set of conditional distributions based on the dependence structure of the variables. The estimation of the joint PDF from data is then transformed to estimating conditional distributions under reduced dimensions. To improve the computational efficiency, a polynomial chaos expansion is further applied to represent the random field in terms of a set of standard random variables. This technique is combined with both linear and nonlinear model reduction methods. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the probabilistic graphical model based stochastic input models. - Highlights: • Data-driven stochastic input models without the assumption of independence of the reduced random variables. • The problem is transformed to a Bayesian network structure learning problem. • Examples are given in flows in random media.

  2. Input to state stability in reservoir models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Markus; Sierra, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Models in ecology and biogeochemistry, in particular models of the global carbon cycle, can be generalized as systems of non-autonomous ordinary differential equations (ODEs). For many applications, it is important to determine the stability properties for this type of systems, but most methods available for autonomous systems are not necessarily applicable for the non-autonomous case. We discuss here stability notions for non-autonomous nonlinear models represented by systems of ODEs explicitly dependent on time and a time-varying input signal. We propose Input to State Stability (ISS) as candidate for the necessary generalization of the established analysis with respect to equilibria or invariant sets for autonomous systems, and show its usefulness by applying it to reservoir models typical for element cycling in ecosystem, e.g. in soil organic matter decomposition. We also show how ISS generalizes existent concepts formerly only available for Linear Time Invariant (LTI) and Linear Time Variant (LTV) systems to the nonlinear case.

  3. XBox Input -Version 1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-10-03

    Contains class for connecting to the Xbox 360 controller, displaying the user inputs {buttons, triggers, analog sticks), and controlling the rumble motors. Also contains classes for converting the raw Xbox 360 controller inputs into meaningful commands for the following objects: • Robot arms - Provides joint control and several tool control schemes • UGV's - Provides translational and rotational commands for "skid-steer" vehicles • Pan-tilt units - Provides several modes of control including velocity, position,more » and point-tracking • Head-mounted displays (HMO)- Controls the viewpoint of a HMO • Umbra frames - Controls the position andorientation of an Umbra posrot object • Umbra graphics window - Provides several modes of control for the Umbra OSG window viewpoint including free-fly, cursor-focused, and object following.« less

  4. Multimodal interfaces with voice and gesture input

    SciTech Connect

    Milota, A.D.; Blattner, M.M.

    1995-07-20

    The modalities of speech and gesture have different strengths and weaknesses, but combined they create synergy where each modality corrects the weaknesses of the other. We believe that a multimodal system such a one interwining speech and gesture must start from a different foundation than ones which are based solely on pen input. In order to provide a basis for the design of a speech and gesture system, we have examined the research in other disciplines such as anthropology and linguistics. The result of this investigation was a taxonomy that gave us material for the incorporation of gestures whose meanings are largely transparent to the users. This study describes the taxonomy and gives examples of applications to pen input systems.

  5. Circadian light-input pathways in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Taishi; Hermann-Luibl, Christiane; Helfrich-Förster, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Light is the most important environmental cue to entrain the circadian clock in most animals. In the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, the light entrainment mechanisms of the clock have been well-studied. The Drosophila brain contains approximately 150 neurons that rhythmically express circadian clock genes. These neurons are called "clock neurons" and control behavioral activity rhythms. Many clock neurons express the Cryptochrome (CRY) protein, which is sensitive to UV and blue light, and thus enables clock neurons deep in the brain to directly perceive light. In addition to the CRY protein, external photoreceptors in the Drosophila eyes play an important role in circadian light-input pathways. Recent studies have provided new insights into the mechanisms that integrate these light inputs into the circadian network of the brain. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge on the light entrainment pathways in the Drosophila circadian clock. PMID:27066180

  6. Input on NIH Toolbox inclusion criteria

    PubMed Central

    Victorson, David; Debb, Scott M.; Gershon, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The NIH Toolbox is intended to be responsive to the needs of investigators evaluating neurologic and behavioral function in diverse settings. Early phases of the project involved gathering information and input from potential end users. Methods: Information was collected through literature and instrument database reviews, requests for information, consensus meetings, and expert interviews and integrated into the NIH Toolbox development process in an iterative manner. Results: Criteria for instrument inclusion, subdomains to be assessed, and preferences regarding instrument cost and length were obtained. Existing measures suitable for inclusion in the NIH Toolbox and areas requiring new measure development were identified. Conclusion: The NIH Toolbox was developed with explicit input from potential end users regarding many of its key features. PMID:23479548

  7. XBox Input -Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    2012-10-03

    Contains class for connecting to the Xbox 360 controller, displaying the user inputs {buttons, triggers, analog sticks), and controlling the rumble motors. Also contains classes for converting the raw Xbox 360 controller inputs into meaningful commands for the following objects: • Robot arms - Provides joint control and several tool control schemes • UGV's - Provides translational and rotational commands for "skid-steer" vehicles • Pan-tilt units - Provides several modes of control including velocity, position, and point-tracking • Head-mounted displays (HMO)- Controls the viewpoint of a HMO • Umbra frames - Controls the position andorientation of an Umbra posrot object • Umbra graphics window - Provides several modes of control for the Umbra OSG window viewpoint including free-fly, cursor-focused, and object following.

  8. Multi-input square iterative learning control with input rate limits and bounds.

    PubMed

    Driessen, B J; Sadegh, N

    2002-01-01

    We present a simple modification of the iterative learning control algorithm of Arimoto et al. (1984) for the case where the inputs are bounded and time-rate-limited. The Jacobian error condition for monotonicity of input-error, rather than output-error, norms, is specified, the latter being insufficient to assure convergence, as proved herein. To the best of our knowledge, these facts have not been previously pointed out in the iterative learning control literature. We present a new proof that the modified controller produces monotonically decreasing input error norms, with a norm that covers the entire time interval of a learning trial. PMID:18238150

  9. Sensory synergy as environmental input integration

    PubMed Central

    Alnajjar, Fady; Itkonen, Matti; Berenz, Vincent; Tournier, Maxime; Nagai, Chikara; Shimoda, Shingo

    2015-01-01

    The development of a method to feed proper environmental inputs back to the central nervous system (CNS) remains one of the challenges in achieving natural movement when part of the body is replaced with an artificial device. Muscle synergies are widely accepted as a biologically plausible interpretation of the neural dynamics between the CNS and the muscular system. Yet the sensorineural dynamics of environmental feedback to the CNS has not been investigated in detail. In this study, we address this issue by exploring the concept of sensory synergy. In contrast to muscle synergy, we hypothesize that sensory synergy plays an essential role in integrating the overall environmental inputs to provide low-dimensional information to the CNS. We assume that sensor synergy and muscle synergy communicate using these low-dimensional signals. To examine our hypothesis, we conducted posture control experiments involving lateral disturbance with nine healthy participants. Proprioceptive information represented by the changes on muscle lengths were estimated by using the musculoskeletal model analysis software SIMM. Changes on muscles lengths were then used to compute sensory synergies. The experimental results indicate that the environmental inputs were translated into the two dimensional signals and used to move the upper limb to the desired position immediately after the lateral disturbance. Participants who showed high skill in posture control were found to be likely to have a strong correlation between sensory and muscle signaling as well as high coordination between the utilized sensory synergies. These results suggest the importance of integrating environmental inputs into suitable low-dimensional signals before providing them to the CNS. This mechanism should be essential when designing the prosthesis' sensory system to make the controller simpler. PMID:25628523

  10. Generalized Input-Output Inequality Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yingfan Zhang Qinghong

    2006-09-15

    In this paper two types of generalized Leontief input-output inequality systems are introduced. The minimax properties for a class of functions associated with the inequalities are studied. Sufficient and necessary conditions for the inequality systems to have solutions are obtained in terms of the minimax value. Stability analysis for the solution set is provided in terms of upper semi-continuity and hemi-continuity of set-valued maps.

  11. Aortic Input Impedance during Nitroprusside Infusion

    PubMed Central

    Pepine, Carl J.; Nichols, W. W.; Curry, R. C.; Conti, C. Richard

    1979-01-01

    Beneficial effects of nitroprusside infusion in heart failure are purportedly a result of decreased afterload through “impedance” reduction. To study the effect of nitroprusside on vascular factors that determine the total load opposing left ventricular ejection, the total aortic input impedance spectrum was examined in 12 patients with heart failure (cardiac index <2.0 liters/min per m2 and left ventricular end diastolic pressure >20 mm Hg). This input impedance spectrum expresses both mean flow (resistance) and pulsatile flow (compliance and wave reflections) components of vascular load. Aortic root blood flow velocity and pressure were recorded continuously with a catheter-tip electromagnetic velocity probe in addition to left ventricular pressure. Small doses of nitroprusside (9-19 μg/min) altered the total aortic input impedance spectrum as significant (P < 0.05) reductions in both mean and pulsatile components were observed within 60-90 s. With these acute changes in vascular load, left ventricular end diastolic pressure declined (44%) and stroke volume increased (20%, both P < 0.05). Larger nitroprusside doses (20-38 μg/min) caused additional alteration in the aortic input impedance spectrum with further reduction in left ventricular end diastolic pressure and increase in stroke volume but no additional changes in the impedance spectrum or stroke volume occurred with 39-77 μg/min. Improved ventricular function persisted when aortic pressure was restored to control values with simultaneous phenylephrine infusion in three patients. These data indicate that nitroprusside acutely alters both the mean and pulsatile components of vascular load to effect improvement in ventricular function in patients with heart failure. The evidence presented suggests that it may be possible to reduce vascular load and improve ventricular function independent of aortic pressure reduction. PMID:457874

  12. Optimum employment of satellite indirect soundings as numerical model input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horn, L. H.; Derber, J. C.; Koehler, T. L.; Schmidt, B. D.

    1981-01-01

    The characteristics of satellite-derived temperature soundings that would significantly affect their use as input for numerical weather prediction models were examined. Independent evaluations of satellite soundings were emphasized to better define error characteristics. Results of a Nimbus-6 sounding study reveal an underestimation of the strength of synoptic scale troughs and ridges, and associated gradients in isobaric height and temperature fields. The most significant errors occurred near the Earth's surface and the tropopause. Soundings from the TIROS-N and NOAA-6 satellites were also evaluated. Results again showed an underestimation of upper level trough amplitudes leading to weaker thermal gradient depictions in satellite-only fields. These errors show a definite correlation to the synoptic flow patterns. In a satellite-only analysis used to initialize a numerical model forecast, it was found that these synoptically correlated errors were retained in the forecast sequence.

  13. Minimizing structural vibrations with Input Shaping (TM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhose, Bill; Singer, Neil

    1995-01-01

    A new method for commanding machines to move with increased dynamic performance was developed. This method is an enhanced version of input shaping, a patented vibration suppression algorithm. This technique intercepts a command input to a system command that moves the mechanical system with increased performance and reduced residual vibration. This document describes many advanced methods for generating highly optimized shaping sequences which are tuned to particular systems. The shaping sequence is important because it determines the trade off between move/settle time of the system and the insensitivity of the input shaping algorithm to variations or uncertainties in the machine which can be controlled. For example, a system with a 5 Hz resonance that takes 1 second to settle can be improved to settle instantaneously using a 0.2 shaping sequence (thus improving settle time by a factor of 5). This system could vary by plus or minus 15% in its natural frequency and still have no apparent vibration. However, the same system shaped with a 0.3 second shaping sequence could tolerate plus or minus 40% or more variation in natural frequency. This document describes how to generate sequences that maximize performance, sequences that maximize insensitivity, and sequences that trade off between the two. Several software tools are documented and included.

  14. [Input and output channels of quantum biocomputers].

    PubMed

    Minina, S V; Liberman, E A

    1990-01-01

    It is proposed that "Quantum Molecular" computer of a neuron consists of the cell cytoskeleton serving as calculating media and input ionic channel sending a hypersound signal to observe these media. The sound spreads through the media travelling along microtubules and microfilaments and switching between those via molecular bridges which serve as elementary switches. The whole system works like a wave guiding net connecting input ionic channels (which generate different sound signals) and output ionic channels (which are controlled by the processed sound signals). Thus the output of such systems depends on the input (controlled by synaptic activity) and on the construction and state of these calculating media. We think that the sound waves spreading through different calculating media solve different physical problems. The construction of the calculating part of the cytoskeleton, according to the hypothesis, is different in different neurons. It is defined by special protein which is produced by DNA, RNA and protein molecular word processor (during brain development and, may be, education). We comment on how the existence of an extremal computer produces an impact on physics and mathematics exemplified by the optimality principle as substitution of physical relativity principle for a complex problem. PMID:1693290

  15. A mathematical method to estimate the thalamic input to the cerebral cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jradeh, Mouhamad

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop a new mathematical method to predict the thalamic input to the cerebral cortex. The thalamus projects all over the cortex and receives projections from many brain regions. For that, the thalamic signals can be reasonably introduced in the neural field, as an input signal to the cortex, as already proposed by Robinson and colleagues [1]. By solving an ordinary differential equation, we provide a method to estimate this efferent signal in the brain.

  16. INDES User's guide multistep input design with nonlinear rotorcraft modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The INDES computer program, a multistep input design program used as part of a data processing technique for rotorcraft systems identification, is described. Flight test inputs base on INDES improve the accuracy of parameter estimates. The input design algorithm, program input, and program output are presented.

  17. Cone inputs to murine striate cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ekesten, Björn; Gouras, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Background We have recorded responses from single neurons in murine visual cortex to determine the effectiveness of the input from the two murine cone photoreceptor mechanisms and whether there is any unique selectivity for cone inputs at this higher region of the visual system that would support the possibility of colour vision in mice. Each eye was stimulated by diffuse light, either 370 (strong stimulus for the ultra-violet (UV) cone opsin) or 505 nm (exclusively stimulating the middle wavelength sensitive (M) cone opsin), obtained from light emitting diodes (LEDs) in the presence of a strong adapting light that suppressed the responses of rods. Results Single cells responded to these diffuse stimuli in all areas of striate cortex. Two types of responsive cells were encountered. One type (135/323 – 42%) had little to no spontaneous activity and responded at either the on and/or the off phase of the light stimulus with a few impulses often of relatively large amplitude. A second type (166/323 – 51%) had spontaneous activity and responded tonically to light stimuli with impulses often of small amplitude. Most of the cells responded similarly to both spectral stimuli. A few (18/323 – 6%) responded strongly or exclusively to one or the other spectral stimulus and rarely in a spectrally opponent manner. Conclusion Most cells in murine striate cortex receive excitatory inputs from both UV- and M-cones. A small fraction shows either strong selectivity for one or the other cone mechanism and occasionally cone opponent responses. Cells that could underlie chromatic contrast detection are present but extremely rare in murine striate cortex. PMID:19014590

  18. Conjunctive input processing drives feature selectivity in hippocampal CA1 neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bittner, Katie C.; Grienberger, Christine; Vaidya, Sachin P.; Milstein, Aaron D.; Macklin, John J.; Suh, Junghyup; Tonegawa, Susumu; Magee, Jeffrey C.

    2016-01-01

    Feature selective firing allows networks to produce representations of the external and internal environments. Despite its importance, the mechanisms generating neuronal feature selectivity are incompletely understood. In many cortical microcircuits the integration of two functionally distinct inputs occurs nonlinearly via generation of active dendritic signals that drive burst firing and robust plasticity. To examine the role of this processing in feature selectivity we recorded CA1 pyramidal neuron membrane potential and local field potential in mice running on a linear treadmill. We found that dendritic plateau potentials are produced by an interaction between properly timed input from entorhinal cortex (EC3) and hippocampal CA3. These conjunctive signals positively modulate the firing of previously established place fields and rapidly induce novel place field formation to produce feature selectivity in CA1 that is a function of both EC3 and CA3 input. Such selectivity could allow mixed network level representations that support context-dependent spatial maps. PMID:26167906

  19. Conjunctive input processing drives feature selectivity in hippocampal CA1 neurons.

    PubMed

    Bittner, Katie C; Grienberger, Christine; Vaidya, Sachin P; Milstein, Aaron D; Macklin, John J; Suh, Junghyup; Tonegawa, Susumu; Magee, Jeffrey C

    2015-08-01

    Feature-selective firing allows networks to produce representations of the external and internal environments. Despite its importance, the mechanisms generating neuronal feature selectivity are incompletely understood. In many cortical microcircuits the integration of two functionally distinct inputs occurs nonlinearly through generation of active dendritic signals that drive burst firing and robust plasticity. To examine the role of this processing in feature selectivity, we recorded CA1 pyramidal neuron membrane potential and local field potential in mice running on a linear treadmill. We found that dendritic plateau potentials were produced by an interaction between properly timed input from entorhinal cortex and hippocampal CA3. These conjunctive signals positively modulated the firing of previously established place fields and rapidly induced new place field formation to produce feature selectivity in CA1 that is a function of both entorhinal cortex and CA3 input. Such selectivity could allow mixed network level representations that support context-dependent spatial maps. PMID:26167906

  20. Intelligent Graph Layout Using Many Users' Input.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiaoru; Che, Limei; Hu, Yifan; Zhang, Xin

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a new strategy for graph drawing utilizing layouts of many sub-graphs supplied by a large group of people in a crowd sourcing manner. We developed an algorithm based on Laplacian constrained distance embedding to merge subgraphs submitted by different users, while attempting to maintain the topological information of the individual input layouts. To facilitate collection of layouts from many people, a light-weight interactive system has been designed to enable convenient dynamic viewing, modification and traversing between layouts. Compared with other existing graph layout algorithms, our approach can achieve more aesthetic and meaningful layouts with high user preference. PMID:26357179

  1. Example of input-output analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The thirty sectors included in the ECASTAR energy input-output model were listed. Five of these belong to energy producing sectors, fifteen to manufacturing industries, two to residential and commercial sectors, and eight to service industries. The model is capable of tracing impacts of an action in three dimensions: dollars, BTU's of energy, and labor. Four conservation actions considered were listed and then discussed separately, dealing with the following areas: increase in fuel efficiency, reduction in fuel used by the transportation and warehousing group, manufacturing of smaller automobiles, and a communications/transportation trade-off.

  2. Input-output-controlled nonlinear equation solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padovan, Joseph

    1988-01-01

    To upgrade the efficiency and stability of the successive substitution (SS) and Newton-Raphson (NR) schemes, the concept of input-output-controlled solvers (IOCS) is introduced. By employing the formal properties of the constrained version of the SS and NR schemes, the IOCS algorithm can handle indefiniteness of the system Jacobian, can maintain iterate monotonicity, and provide for separate control of load incrementation and iterate excursions, as well as having other features. To illustrate the algorithmic properties, the results for several benchmark examples are presented. These define the associated numerical efficiency and stability of the IOCS.

  3. Feed and manure use in low-N-input and high-N-input dairy cattle production systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, J. Mark

    2014-11-01

    In most parts of Sub-Saharan Africa fertilizers and feeds are costly, not readily available and used sparingly in agricultural production. In many parts of Western Europe, North America, and Oceania fertilizers and feeds are relatively inexpensive, readily available and used abundantly to maximize profitable agricultural production. A case study, dairy systems approach was used to illustrate how differences in feed and manure management in a low-N-input dairy cattle system (Niger, West Africa) and a high-N-input dairy production system (Wisconsin, USA) impact agricultural production and environmental N loss. In Niger, an additional daily feed N intake of 114 g per dairy animal unit (AU, 1000 kg live weight) could increase annual milk production from 560 to 1320 kg AU-1, and the additional manure N could greatly increase millet production. In Wisconsin, reductions in daily feed N intake of 100 g AU-1 would not greatly impact milk production but decrease urinary N excretion by 25% and ammonia and nitrous oxide emissions from manure by 18% to 30%. In Niger, compared to the practice of housing livestock and applying dung only onto fields, corralling cattle or sheep on cropland (to capture urinary N) increased millet yields by 25% to 95%. The additional millet grain due to dung applications or corralling would satisfy the annual food grain requirements of 2-5 persons; the additional forage would provide 120-300 more days of feed for a typical head of cattle; and 850 to 1600 kg ha-1 more biomass would be available for soil conservation. In Wisconsin, compared to application of barn manure only, corralling heifers in fields increased forage production by only 8% to 11%. The application of barn manure or corralling increased forage production by 20% to 70%. This additional forage would provide 350-580 more days of feed for a typical dairy heifer. Study results demonstrate how different approaches to feed and manure management in low-N-input and high-N-input dairy cattle

  4. Water resources and environmental input-output analysis and its key study issues: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YANG, Z.; Xu, X.

    2013-12-01

    Used to study the material and energy flow in socioeconomic system, Input-Output Analysis(IOA) had been an effective analysis tool since its appearance. The research fields of Input-Output Analysis were increasingly expanded and studied in depth with the development of fundamental theory. In this paper, starting with introduction of theory development, the water resources input-output analysis and environmental input-output analysis had been specifically reviewed, and two key study issues mentioned as well. Input-Occupancy-Output Analysis and Grey Input-Output Analysis whose proposal and development were introduced firstly could be regard as the effective complements of traditional IOA theory. Because of the hypotheses of homogeneity, stability and proportionality, Input-Occupancy-Output Analysis and Grey Input-Output Analysis always had been restricted in practical application inevitably. In the applied study aspect, with investigation of abundant literatures, research of water resources input-output analysis and environmental input-output analysis had been comprehensively reviewed and analyzed. The regional water resources flow between different economic sectors had been systematically analyzed and stated, and several types of environmental input-output analysis models combined with other effective analysis tools concluded. In two perspectives in terms of external and inland aspect, the development of water resources and environmental input-output analysis model had been explained, and several typical study cases in recent years listed respectively. By the aid of sufficient literature analysis, the internal development tendency and study hotspot had also been summarized. In recent years, Chinese literatures reporting water resources consumption analysis and virtue water study had occupied a large share. Water resources consumption analysis had always been the emphasis of inland water resources IOA. Virtue water study had been considered as the new hotspot of

  5. The Effects of Pre Modified Input, Interactionally Modified Input, and Modified Output on EFL Learners' Comprehension of New Vocabularies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maleki, Zinat; Pazhakh, AbdolReza

    2012-01-01

    The present study was an attempt to investigate the effects of premodified input, interactionally modified input and modified output on 80 EFL learners' comprehension of new words. The subjects were randomly assigned into four groups of pre modified input, interactionally modified input, modified output and unmodified (control) groups. Each group…

  6. Ground motion input in seismic evaluation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sewell, R.T.; Wu, S.C.

    1996-07-01

    This report documents research pertaining to conservatism and variability in seismic risk estimates. Specifically, it examines whether or not artificial motions produce unrealistic evaluation demands, i.e., demands significantly inconsistent with those expected from real earthquake motions. To study these issues, two types of artificial motions are considered: (a) motions with smooth response spectra, and (b) motions with realistic variations in spectral amplitude across vibration frequency. For both types of artificial motion, time histories are generated to match target spectral shapes. For comparison, empirical motions representative of those that might result from strong earthquakes in the Eastern U.S. are also considered. The study findings suggest that artificial motions resulting from typical simulation approaches (aimed at matching a given target spectrum) are generally adequate and appropriate in representing the peak-response demands that may be induced in linear structures and equipment responding to real earthquake motions. Also, given similar input Fourier energies at high-frequencies, levels of input Fourier energy at low frequencies observed for artificial motions are substantially similar to those levels noted in real earthquake motions. In addition, the study reveals specific problems resulting from the application of Western U.S. type motions for seismic evaluation of Eastern U.S. nuclear power plants.

  7. Input-output dynamic mode decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annoni, Jennifer; Jovanovic, Mihailo; Nichols, Joseph; Seiler, Peter

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this work is to obtain reduced-order models for fluid flows that can be used for control design. High-fidelity computational fluid dynamic models provide accurate characterizations of complex flow dynamics but are not suitable for control design due to their prohibitive computational complexity. A variety of methods, including proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) and dynamic mode decomposition (DMD), can be used to extract the dominant flow structures and obtain reduced-order models. In this presentation, we introduce an extension to DMD that can handle problems with inputs and outputs. The proposed method, termed input-output dynamic mode decomposition (IODMD), utilizes a subspace identification technique to obtain models of low-complexity. We show that, relative to standard DMD, the introduction of the external forcing in IODMD provides robustness with respect to small disturbances and noise. We use the linearized Navier-Stokes equations in a channel flow to demonstrate the utility of the proposed approach and to provide a comparison with standard techniques for obtaining reduced-order dynamical representations. NSF Career Grant No. NSFCMMI-1254129.

  8. Echo state property linked to an input: exploring a fundamental characteristic of recurrent neural networks.

    PubMed

    Manjunath, G; Jaeger, H

    2013-03-01

    The echo state property is a key for the design and training of recurrent neural networks within the paradigm of reservoir computing. In intuitive terms, this is a passivity condition: a network having this property, when driven by an input signal, will become entrained by the input and develop an internal response signal. This excited internal dynamics can be seen as a high-dimensional, nonlinear, unique transform of the input with a rich memory content. This view has implications for understanding neural dynamics beyond the field of reservoir computing. Available definitions and theorems concerning the echo state property, however, are of little practical use because they do not relate the network response to temporal or statistical properties of the driving input. Here we present a new definition of the echo state property that directly connects it to such properties. We derive a fundamental 0-1 law: if the input comes from an ergodic source, the network response has the echo state property with probability one or zero, independent of the given network. Furthermore, we give a sufficient condition for the echo state property that connects statistical characteristics of the input to algebraic properties of the network connection matrix. The mathematical methods that we employ are freshly imported from the young field of nonautonomous dynamical systems theory. Since these methods are not yet well known in neural computation research, we introduce them in some detail. As a side story, we hope to demonstrate the eminent usefulness of these methods. PMID:23272918

  9. Two-Input Enzymatic Logic Gates Made Sigmoid by Modifications of the Biocatalytic Reaction Cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Zavalov, Oleksandr; Bocharova, Vera; Halamek, Jan; Halamkova, Lenka; Korkmaz, Sevim; Arugula, Mary; Chinnapareddy, Soujanya; Katz, Evgeny; Privman, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Computing based on biochemical processes is a newest rapidly developing field of unconventional information and signal processing. In this paper we present results of our research in the field of biochemical computing and summarize the obtained numerical and experimental data for implementations of the standard two-input OR and AND gates with double-sigmoid shape of the output signal. This form of response was obtained as a function of the two inputs in each of the realized biochemical systems. The enzymatic gate processes in the first system were activated with two chemical inputs and resulted in optically detected chromogen oxidation, which happens when either one or both of the inputs are present. In this case, the biochemical system is functioning as the OR gate. We demonstrate that the addition of a filtering biocatalytic process leads to a considerable reduction of the noise transmission factor and the resulting gate response has sigmoid shape in both inputs. The second system was developed for functioning as an AND gate, where the output signal was activated only by a simultaneous action of two enzymatic biomarkers. This response can be used as an indicator of liver damage, but only if both of these of the inputs are present at their elevated, pathophysiological values of concentrations. A kinetic numerical model was developed and used to estimate the range of parameters for which the experimentally realized logic gate is close to optimal. We also analyzed the system to evaluate its noise-handling properties.

  10. Residential oil burners with low input and two stages firing

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, T.; Krajewski, R.; Leigh, R.

    1997-12-31

    The residential oil burner market is currently dominated by the pressure-atomized, retention head burner. At low firing rates pressure atomizing nozzles suffer rapid fouling of the small internal passages, leading to bad spray patterns and poor combustion performance. To overcome the low input limitations of conventional burners, a low pressure air-atomized burner has been developed watch can operate at fining rates as low as 0.25 gallons of oil per hour (10 kW). In addition, the burner can be operated in a high/low fining rate mode. Field tests with this burner have been conducted at a fixed input rate of 0.35 gph (14 kW) with a side-wall vented boiler/water storage tank combination. At the test home, instrumentation was installed to measure fuel and energy flows and record trends in system temperatures. Laboratory efficiency testing with water heaters and boilers has been completed using standard single purpose and combined appliance test procedures. The tests quantify benefits due to low firing rates and other burner features. A two stage oil burner gains a strong advantage in rated efficiency while maintaining capacity for high domestic hot water and space heating loads.

  11. Influence of magnetospheric inputs definition on modeling of ionospheric storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashchilin, A. V.; Romanova, E. B.; Kurkin, V. I.

    Usually for numerical modeling of ionospheric storms corresponding empirical models specify parameters of neutral atmosphere and magnetosphere. Statistical kind of these models renders them impractical for simulation of the individual storm. Therefore one has to correct the empirical models using various additional speculations. The influence of magnetospheric inputs such as distributions of electric potential, number and energy fluxes of the precipitating electrons on the results of the ionospheric storm simulations has been investigated in this work. With this aim for the strong geomagnetic storm on September 25, 1998 hour global distributions of those magnetospheric inputs from 20 to 27 September were calculated by the magnetogram inversion technique (MIT). Then with the help of 3-D ionospheric model two variants of ionospheric response to this magnetic storm were simulated using MIT data and empirical models of the electric fields (Sojka et al., 1986) and electron precipitations (Hardy et al., 1985). The comparison of the received results showed that for high-latitude and subauroral stations the daily variations of electron density calculated with MIT data are more close to observations than those of empirical models. In addition using of the MIT data allows revealing some peculiarities in the daily variations of electron density during strong geomagnetic storm. References Sojka J.J., Rasmussen C.E., Schunk R.W. J.Geophys.Res., 1986, N10, p.11281. Hardy D.A., Gussenhoven M.S., Holeman E.A. J.Geophys.Res., 1985, N5, p.4229.

  12. Extreme inputs/outputs for multiple input multiple output linear systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Smallwood, David Ora

    2005-09-01

    A linear structure is excited at multiple points with a stationary normal random process. The response of the structure is measured at multiple outputs. If the auto spectral densities of the inputs are specified, the phase relationships between the inputs are derived that will minimize or maximize the trace of the auto spectral density matrix of the outputs. If the autospectral densities of the outputs are specified, the phase relationships between the outputs that will minimize or maximize the trace of the input auto spectral density matrix are derived. It is shown that other phase relationships and ordinary coherence less than one will result in a trace intermediate between these extremes. Least favorable response and some classes of critical response are special cases of the development. It is shown that the derivation for stationary random waveforms can also be applied to nonstationary random, transients, and deterministic waveforms.

  13. Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) Linear Systems Extreme Inputs/Outputs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Smallwood, David O.

    2007-01-01

    A linear structure is excited at multiple points with a stationary normal random process. The response of the structure is measured at multiple outputs. If the autospectral densities of the inputs are specified, the phase relationships between the inputs are derived that will minimize or maximize the trace of the autospectral density matrix of the outputs. If the autospectral densities of the outputs are specified, the phase relationships between the outputs that will minimize or maximize the trace of the input autospectral density matrix are derived. It is shown that other phase relationships and ordinary coherence less than one willmore » result in a trace intermediate between these extremes. Least favorable response and some classes of critical response are special cases of the development. It is shown that the derivation for stationary random waveforms can also be applied to nonstationary random, transients, and deterministic waveforms.« less

  14. A Role for Synaptic Input Distribution in a Dendritic Computation of Motion Direction in the Retina.

    PubMed

    Vlasits, Anna L; Morrie, Ryan D; Tran-Van-Minh, Alexandra; Bleckert, Adam; Gainer, Christian F; DiGregorio, David A; Feller, Marla B

    2016-03-16

    The starburst amacrine cell in the mouse retina presents an opportunity to examine the precise role of sensory input location on neuronal computations. Using visual receptive field mapping, glutamate uncaging, two-photon Ca(2+) imaging, and genetic labeling of putative synapses, we identify a unique arrangement of excitatory inputs and neurotransmitter release sites on starburst amacrine cell dendrites: the excitatory input distribution is skewed away from the release sites. By comparing computational simulations with Ca(2+) transients recorded near release sites, we show that this anatomical arrangement of inputs and outputs supports a dendritic mechanism for computing motion direction. Direction-selective Ca(2+) transients persist in the presence of a GABA-A receptor antagonist, though the directional tuning is reduced. These results indicate a synergistic interaction between dendritic and circuit mechanisms for generating direction selectivity in the starburst amacrine cell. PMID:26985724

  15. Variation in freshwater input to the Eastern US coastal ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, D.; Yoon, Y.; Beighley, E., II; Hughes, R.; Kimbro, D.

    2014-12-01

    Phragmites is one of the most invasive plants in North American wetlands. Although its spread in coastal marshes has been linked by independent studies to urbanization, eutrophication, and salinity change, there is good evidence that these factors may interactively determine invasion success and in turn, the ecosystem services provided by marshes. We hypothesize that the invasion of Phragmites is linked to changes in freshwater inputs due to climate and/or land use change. El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO), originating in the sea surface temperature anomalies (warm or cold) in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean, is a notable and prominent signal in inter-annual climatic variation. Recent studies shows that the probability of strong El Nino events may increase in the future. In this study, we will investigate the teleconnections between freshwater inputs to the coastal zone along the eastern U.S. and ENSO indices, and attempt to explore the predictability of temporal and spatial variation of freshwater inputs based on ENSO conditions. To quantify changes in freshwater input in this region, hydrologic modeling, remote sensing and field measurements are combined. The Hillslope River Routing (HRR) model is used to simulate hourly streamflow from all watersheds from southern Florida to northern Maine draining into the Atlantic Ocean. The modeling effort utilizes satellite precipitation (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Product 3B42v7: 2001-current with a 3-hr temporal resolution and 0.25 degree spatial resolution), land surface temperature and vegetation measures (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, MODIS, products: 2001-current with a monthly temporal resolution and 0.05 degree spatial resolution). To account for land cover change, annual MODIS land cover data and time varying population statics are merged to estimate annual land cover characteristics for each sub-catchment within the study region. Static datasets for soils and ground elevations are

  16. High-performance parallel input device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, R. W.; Fischer, Patrick J.; Hunter, B.

    1993-12-01

    Research into force reflecting remote manipulation has recently started to move away from common error systems towards explicit force control. In order to maximize the benefit provided by explicit force reflection the designer has to take into account the asymmetry of the bandwidths of the forward and reflecting loops. This paper reports on a high performance system designed and built at Oxford University and Harwell Laboratories and on the preliminary results achieved when performing simple force reflecting tasks. The input device is based on a modified Stewart Platform, which offers the potential of very high bandwidth force reflection, well above the normal 2 - 10 Hz range achieved with common error systems. The slave is a nuclear hardened Puma industrial robot, offering a low cost, reliable solution to remote manipulation tasks.

  17. Acoustic input impedance measurements on brass instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyle, Robert W., Jr.

    2002-11-01

    Measurement of the acoustic input impedance of a brass instrument can reveal something about the instrument's intonation, its reasonable playing range, its tone color, and perhaps whether the mouthpiece used for the impedance measurement is appropriate for the instrument. Such measurements are made at sound-presssure levels much lower than those encountered under playing conditions. Thus, impedance measurements may offer the only feasible way to infer something about the playing characteristics of instruments, typically museum specimens, that are too rare or too fragile to be played. In this paper the effects of some of the available choices of sound source and stimulus signal on measurement accuracy will be explored. Driver-transducer nonlinearity, source impedance, signal-to-noise ratio, and any necessary signal processing will be discussed.

  18. Auto Draw from Excel Input Files

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strauss, Karl F.; Goullioud, Renaud; Cox, Brian; Grimes, James M.

    2011-01-01

    The design process often involves the use of Excel files during project development. To facilitate communications of the information in the Excel files, drawings are often generated. During the design process, the Excel files are updated often to reflect new input. The problem is that the drawings often lag the updates, often leading to confusion of the current state of the design. The use of this program allows visualization of complex data in a format that is more easily understandable than pages of numbers. Because the graphical output can be updated automatically, the manual labor of diagram drawing can be eliminated. The more frequent update of system diagrams can reduce confusion and reduce errors and is likely to uncover symmetric problems earlier in the design cycle, thus reducing rework and redesign.

  19. Automatic Parsing of Parental Verbal Input

    PubMed Central

    Sagae, Kenji; MacWhinney, Brian; Lavie, Alon

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate theoretical proposals regarding the course of child language acquisition, researchers often need to rely on the processing of large numbers of syntactically parsed utterances, both from children and their parents. Because it is so difficult to do this by hand, there are currently no parsed corpora of child language input data. To automate this process, we developed a system that combined the MOR tagger, a rule-based parser, and statistical disambiguation techniques. The resultant system obtained nearly 80% correct parses for the sentences spoken to children. To achieve this level, we had to construct a particular processing sequence that minimizes problems caused by the coverage/ambiguity trade-off in parser design. These procedures are particularly appropriate for use with the CHILDES database, an international corpus of transcripts. The data and programs are now freely available over the Internet. PMID:15190707

  20. Standardized input for Hanford environmental impact statements

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.

    1981-05-01

    Models and computer programs for simulating the environmental behavior of radionuclides in the environment and the resulting radiation dose to humans have been developed over the years by the Environmental Analysis Section staff, Ecological Sciences Department at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Methodologies have evolved for calculating raidation doses from many exposure pathways for any type of release mechanism. Depending on the situation or process being simulated, different sets of computer programs, assumptions, and modeling techniques must be used. This report is a compilation of recommended computer programs and necessary input information for use in calculating doses to members of the general public for environmental impact statements prepared for DOE activities to be conducted on or near the Hanford Reservation.

  1. The IVS data input to ITRF2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nothnagel, Axel; Alef, Walter; Amagai, Jun; Andersen, Per Helge; Andreeva, Tatiana; Artz, Thomas; Bachmann, Sabine; Barache, Christophe; Baudry, Alain; Bauernfeind, Erhard; Baver, Karen; Beaudoin, Christopher; Behrend, Dirk; Bellanger, Antoine; Berdnikov, Anton; Bergman, Per; Bernhart, Simone; Bertarini, Alessandra; Bianco, Giuseppe; Bielmaier, Ewald; Boboltz, David; Böhm, Johannes; Böhm, Sigrid; Boer, Armin; Bolotin, Sergei; Bougeard, Mireille; Bourda, Geraldine; Buttaccio, Salvo; Cannizzaro, Letizia; Cappallo, Roger; Carlson, Brent; Carter, Merri Sue; Charlot, Patrick; Chen, Chenyu; Chen, Maozheng; Cho, Jungho; Clark, Thomas; Collioud, Arnaud; Colomer, Francisco; Colucci, Giuseppe; Combrinck, Ludwig; Conway, John; Corey, Brian; Curtis, Ronald; Dassing, Reiner; Davis, Maria; de-Vicente, Pablo; De Witt, Aletha; Diakov, Alexey; Dickey, John; Diegel, Irv; Doi, Koichiro; Drewes, Hermann; Dube, Maurice; Elgered, Gunnar; Engelhardt, Gerald; Evangelista, Mark; Fan, Qingyuan; Fedotov, Leonid; Fey, Alan; Figueroa, Ricardo; Fukuzaki, Yoshihiro; Gambis, Daniel; Garcia-Espada, Susana; Gaume, Ralph; Gaylard, Michael; Geiger, Nicole; Gipson, John; Gomez, Frank; Gomez-Gonzalez, Jesus; Gordon, David; Govind, Ramesh; Gubanov, Vadim; Gulyaev, Sergei; Haas, Ruediger; Hall, David; Halsig, Sebastian; Hammargren, Roger; Hase, Hayo; Heinkelmann, Robert; Helldner, Leif; Herrera, Cristian; Himwich, Ed; Hobiger, Thomas; Holst, Christoph; Hong, Xiaoyu; Honma, Mareki; Huang, Xinyong; Hugentobler, Urs; Ichikawa, Ryuichi; Iddink, Andreas; Ihde, Johannes; Ilijin, Gennadiy; Ipatov, Alexander; Ipatova, Irina; Ishihara, Misao; Ivanov, D. V.; Jacobs, Chris; Jike, Takaaki; Johansson, Karl-Ake; Johnson, Heidi; Johnston, Kenneth; Ju, Hyunhee; Karasawa, Masao; Kaufmann, Pierre; Kawabata, Ryoji; Kawaguchi, Noriyuki; Kawai, Eiji; Kaydanovsky, Michael; Kharinov, Mikhail; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Kokado, Kensuke; Kondo, Tetsuro; Korkin, Edward; Koyama, Yasuhiro; Krasna, Hana; Kronschnabl, Gerhard; Kurdubov, Sergey; Kurihara, Shinobu; Kuroda, Jiro; Kwak, Younghee; La Porta, Laura; Labelle, Ruth; Lamb, Doug; Lambert, Sébastien; Langkaas, Line; Lanotte, Roberto; Lavrov, Alexey; Le Bail, Karine; Leek, Judith; Li, Bing; Li, Huihua; Li, Jinling; Liang, Shiguang; Lindqvist, Michael; Liu, Xiang; Loesler, Michael; Long, Jim; Lonsdale, Colin; Lovell, Jim; Lowe, Stephen; Lucena, Antonio; Luzum, Brian; Ma, Chopo; Ma, Jun; Maccaferri, Giuseppe; Machida, Morito; MacMillan, Dan; Madzak, Matthias; Malkin, Zinovy; Manabe, Seiji; Mantovani, Franco; Mardyshkin, Vyacheslav; Marshalov, Dmitry; Mathiassen, Geir; Matsuzaka, Shigeru; McCarthy, Dennis; Melnikov, Alexey; Michailov, Andrey; Miller, Natalia; Mitchell, Donald; Mora-Diaz, Julian Andres; Mueskens, Arno; Mukai, Yasuko; Nanni, Mauro; Natusch, Tim; Negusini, Monia; Neidhardt, Alexander; Nickola, Marisa; Nicolson, George; Niell, Arthur; Nikitin, Pavel; Nilsson, Tobias; Ning, Tong; Nishikawa, Takashi; Noll, Carey; Nozawa, Kentarou; Ogaja, Clement; Oh, Hongjong; Olofsson, Hans; Opseth, Per Erik; Orfei, Sandro; Pacione, Rosa; Pazamickas, Katherine; Petrachenko, William; Pettersson, Lars; Pino, Pedro; Plank, Lucia; Ploetz, Christian; Poirier, Michael; Poutanen, Markku; Qian, Zhihan; Quick, Jonathan; Rahimov, Ismail; Redmond, Jay; Reid, Brett; Reynolds, John; Richter, Bernd; Rioja, Maria; Romero-Wolf, Andres; Ruszczyk, Chester; Salnikov, Alexander; Sarti, Pierguido; Schatz, Raimund; Scherneck, Hans-Georg; Schiavone, Francesco; Schreiber, Ulrich; Schuh, Harald; Schwarz, Walter; Sciarretta, Cecilia; Searle, Anthony; Sekido, Mamoru; Seitz, Manuela; Shao, Minghui; Shibuya, Kazuo; Shu, Fengchun; Sieber, Moritz; Skjaeveland, Asmund; Skurikhina, Elena; Smolentsev, Sergey; Smythe, Dan; Sousa, Don; Sovers, Ojars; Stanford, Laura; Stanghellini, Carlo; Steppe, Alan; Strand, Rich; Sun, Jing; Surkis, Igor; Takashima, Kazuhiro; Takefuji, Kazuhiro; Takiguchi, Hiroshi; Tamura, Yoshiaki; Tanabe, Tadashi; Tanir, Emine; Tao, An; Tateyama, Claudio; Teke, Kamil; Thomas, Cynthia; Thorandt, Volkmar; Thornton, Bruce; Tierno Ros, Claudia; Titov, Oleg; Titus, Mike; Tomasi, Paolo; Tornatore, Vincenza; Trigilio, Corrado; Trofimov, Dmitriy; Tsutsumi, Masanori; Tuccari, Gino; Tzioumis, Tasso; Ujihara, Hideki; Ullrich, Dieter; Uunila, Minttu; Venturi, Tiziana; Vespe, Francesco; Vityazev, Veniamin; Volvach, Alexandr; Vytnov, Alexander; Wang, Guangli; Wang, Jinqing; Wang, Lingling; Wang, Na; Wang, Shiqiang; Wei, Wenren; Weston, Stuart; Whitney, Alan; Wojdziak, Reiner; Yatskiv, Yaroslav; Yang, Wenjun; Ye, Shuhua; Yi, Sangoh; Yusup, Aili; Zapata, Octavio; Zeitlhoefler, Reinhard; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Ming; Zhang, Xiuzhong; Zhao, Rongbing; Zheng, Weimin; Zhou, Ruixian; Zubko, Nataliya

    2015-01-01

    Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) is a primary space-geodetic technique for determining precise coordinates on the Earth, for monitoring the variable Earth rotation and orientation with highest precision, and for deriving many other parameters of the Earth system. The International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS, http://ivscc.gsfc.nasa.gov/) is a service of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) and the International Astronomical Union (IAU). The datasets published here are the results of individual Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) sessions in the form of normal equations in SINEX 2.0 format (http://www.iers.org/IERS/EN/Organization/AnalysisCoordinator/SinexFormat/sinex.html, the SINEX 2.0 description is attached as pdf) provided by IVS as the input for the next release of the International Terrestrial Reference System (ITRF): ITRF2014. This is a new version of the ITRF2008 release (Bockmann et al., 2009). For each session/ file, the normal equation systems contain elements for the coordinate components of all stations having participated in the respective session as well as for the Earth orientation parameters (x-pole, y-pole, UT1 and its time derivatives plus offset to the IAU2006 precession-nutation components dX, dY (https://www.iau.org/static/resolutions/IAU2006_Resol1.pdf). The terrestrial part is free of datum. The data sets are the result of a weighted combination of the input of several IVS Analysis Centers. The IVS contribution for ITRF2014 is described in Bachmann et al (2015), Schuh and Behrend (2012) provide a general overview on the VLBI method, details on the internal data handling can be found at Behrend (2013).

  2. Input and output constraints affecting irrigation development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schramm, G.

    1981-05-01

    In many of the developing countries the expansion of irrigated agriculture is used as a major development tool for bringing about increases in agricultural output, rural economic growth and income distribution. Apart from constraints imposed by water availability, the major limitations considered to any acceleration of such programs are usually thought to be those of costs and financial resources. However, as is shown on the basis of empirical data drawn from Mexico, in reality the feasibility and effectiveness of such development programs is even more constrained by the lack of specialized physical and human factors on the input and market limitations on the output side. On the input side, the limited availability of complementary factors such as, for example, truly functioning credit systems for small-scale farmers or effective agricultural extension services impose long-term constraints on development. On the output side the limited availability, high risk, and relatively slow growth of markets for high-value crops sharply reduce the usually hoped-for and projected profitable crop mix that would warrant the frequently high costs of irrigation investments. Three conclusions are drawn: (1) Factors in limited supply have to be shadow-priced to reflect their high opportunity costs in alternative uses. (2) Re-allocation of financial resources from immediate construction of projects to longer-term increase in the supply of scarce, highly-trained manpower resources are necessary in order to optimize development over time. (3) Inclusion of high-value, high-income producing crops in the benefit-cost analysis of new projects is inappropriate if these crops could potentially be grown in already existing projects.

  3. Effect of the shrinking dipole on solar-terrestrial energy input to the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPherron, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    The global average temperature of the Earth is rising rapidly. This rise is primarily attributed to the release of greenhouse gases as a result of human activity. However, it has been argued that changes in radiation from the Sun might play a role. Most energy input to the Earth is light in the visible spectrum. Our best measurements suggest this power input has been constant for the last 40 years (the space age) apart from a small 11-year variation due to the solar cycle of sunspot activity. Another possible energy input from the Sun is the solar wind. The supersonic solar wind carries the magnetic field of the Sun into the solar system. As it passes the Earth it can connect to the Earth's magnetic field whenever it is antiparallel t the Earth's field. This connection allows mass, momentum, and energy from the solar wind to enter the magnetosphere producing geomagnetic activity. Ultimately much of this energy is deposited at high latitudes in the form of particle precipitation (aurora) and heating by electrical currents. Although the energy input by this process is miniscule compared to that from visible radiation it might alter the absorption of visible radiation. Two other processes affected by the solar cycle are atmospheric entry of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar energetic protons (SEP). A weak solar magnetic field at sunspot minimum facilitates GCR entry which has been implicated in creation of clouds. Large coronal mass ejections and solar flares create SEP at solar maximum. All of these alternative energy inputs and their effects depend on the strength of the Earth's magnetic field. Currently the Earth's field is decreasing rapidly and conceivably might reverse polarity in 1000 years. In this paper we describe the changes in the Earth's magnetic field and how this might affect GCR, SEP, electrical heating, aurora, and radio propagation. Whether these effects are important in global climate change can only be determined by detailed physical models.

  4. Locked-mode avoidance and recovery without external momentum input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Gates, D. A.; Wolfe, S.; Rice, J. E.; Gao, C.; Wukitch, S.; Greenwald, M.; Hughes, J.; Marmar, E.; Scott, S.

    2014-10-01

    Error-field-induced locked-modes (LMs) have been studied in C-Mod at ITER toroidal fields without NBI fueling and momentum input. The use of ICRH heating in synch with the error-field ramp-up resulted in a successful delay of the mode-onset when PICRH > 1 MW and a transition into H-mode when PICRH > 2 MW. The recovery experiments consisted in applying ICRH power during the LM non-rotating phase successfully unlocking the core plasma. The ``induced'' toroidal rotation was in the counter-current direction, restoring the direction and magnitude of the toroidal flow before the LM formation, but contrary to the expected Rice-scaling in the co-current direction. However, the LM occurs near the LOC/SOC transition where rotation reversals are commonly observed. Once PICRH is turned off, the core plasma ``locks'' at later times depending on the evolution of ne and Vt. This work was performed under US DoE contracts including DE-FC02-99ER54512 and others at MIT and DE-AC02-09CH11466 at PPPL.

  5. Operation of the MPD thruster with stepped current input

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    A magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster was operated with stepped current pulses in order to investigate the sensitivity of its operation to non-constant current input. The thruster terminal voltage is found to lag the current increment by increasing times as the highest level of the stepped current pulse nears the onset condition. Magnetic field transients corresponding to the terminal voltage transients appear in the thruster exhaust. The magnetic field and terminal voltage equilibrations can be interpreted in terms of magnetic diffusion and convection processes. The time constants of equilibration are largest in the exhaust portion of the discharge, where the discharge scale length is much larger than in the thrust chamber. The transient thrust following a current step up is estimated to be below the quasi steady thrust, while the transient thrust following a current step down is estimated to be above the quasi steady thrust. When the thruster is powered with a current step up whose upper plateau is near the onset conditions, the prolonged discharge transient allows a diagnostic look at the development on the onset condition. Electric field probing for different propellant injection geometries suggest that the larger terminal voltages associated with operation near onset may result from two distinct processes: an increasing anode fall, probably caused by insufficient propellant near the anode, or the back emf of the plasma flow.

  6. Uncertainties in emissions inputs for near-road assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, M. G.; Isakov, V.; Arunachalam, S.; Cook, R.; Kimbrough, S.

    2013-12-01

    Dispersion modeling tools have traditionally provided critical information for air quality management decisions. However, these models can be challenging to implement, particularly in near-road studies, due to the detailed input requirements necessary to estimate traffic-related emissions. Emissions, travel demand, and dispersion models are all needed to obtain temporally and spatially resolved pollutant concentrations. Current methodology combines these three models in a bottom-up approach based on hourly traffic and emissions estimates, and hourly dispersion concentrations from individual road links that represent the traffic activity. To model a large urban area, this method can be computationally expensive, but can significantly improve characterization of spatial and temporal variability, and reduce model uncertainties. Uncertainties in emissions are hard to quantify and are unique to each urban area. In a recent health study application in Detroit, Michigan, current methodology was used to determine pollutant exposure levels near major roadways. This application provided an opportunity to combine emissions, travel demand, and dispersion models to estimate spatiotemporally resolved concentration fields in the near-road environment for two and a half years. During this health study period pollutant measurements were taken at multiple AQS sites around the Detroit area. In addition, an intensive near-road field study with continuous measurements of multiple pollutants and traffic volumes was conducted. Traffic volumes are also measured on a continuous basis around the city on various roadway types. The duration and spatial separation of pollutant measurements and traffic volumes allow comparison of traffic-related pollutant concentration measurements to model predictions. In this paper, we outline the current methodology to combine emissions, traffic, and dispersion models for near-road assessments. Then the temporally and spatially pollutant estimates are

  7. How Much Input Is Enough? Correlating Comprehension and Child Language Input in an Endangered Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meakins, Felicity; Wigglesworth, Gillian

    2013-01-01

    In situations of language endangerment, the ability to understand a language tends to persevere longer than the ability to speak it. As a result, the possibility of language revival remains high even when few speakers remain. Nonetheless, this potential requires that those with high levels of comprehension received sufficient input as children for…

  8. Parallel momentum input by tangential neutral beam injections in stellarator and heliotron plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, S.; Nakamura, Y.; Nishioka, K.

    2015-09-15

    The configuration dependence of parallel momentum inputs to target plasma particle species by tangentially injected neutral beams is investigated in non-axisymmetric stellarator/heliotron model magnetic fields by assuming the existence of magnetic flux-surfaces. In parallel friction integrals of the full Rosenbluth-MacDonald-Judd collision operator in thermal particles' kinetic equations, numerically obtained eigenfunctions are used for excluding trapped fast ions that cannot contribute to the friction integrals. It is found that the momentum inputs to thermal ions strongly depend on magnetic field strength modulations on the flux-surfaces, while the input to electrons is insensitive to the modulation. In future plasma flow studies requiring flow calculations of all particle species in more general non-symmetric toroidal configurations, the eigenfunction method investigated here will be useful.

  9. INGEN: A COBRA-NC input generator user's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, C.L.; Dodge, R.E.

    1986-12-01

    The INGEN (INput GENerator) computer program has been developed as a preprocessor to simplify input generation for the COBRA-NC computer program. INGEN uses several empirical correlations and geometric assumptions to simplify the data input requirements for the COBRA-NC computer code. The simplified input scheme is obtained at the expense of much flexibility provided by COBRA-NC. For more complex problems requiring additional flexibility however, INGEN may be used to provide a skeletal input file to which the more detailed input may be added. This report describes the input requirements for INGEN and describes the algorithms and correlations used to generate the COBRA-NC input. 9 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. Automatic gain control circuit handles wide input range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, S. H.

    1966-01-01

    Automatic gain control circuit for a radio receiver handles a wide range of input signal levels without overloading the output stage. The transistorized circuit maintains a relatively constant output by varying attenuation of the input signal.

  11. Toward an inventory of nitrogen input to the United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate accounting of nitrogen inputs is increasingly necessary for policy decisions related to aquatic nutrient pollution. Here we synthesize available data to provide the first integrated estimates of the amount and uncertainty of nitrogen inputs to the United States. Abou...

  12. Life-threatening postpartum hemolysis, elevated liver functions tests, low platelets syndrome versus thrombocytopenic purpura – Therapeutic plasma exchange is the answer

    PubMed Central

    Nasa, Prashant; Dua, J. M.; Kansal, Sudha; Chadha, Geeta; Chawla, Rajesh; Manchanda, Manav

    2011-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of life-threatening microangiopathic disorders in a postpartum female includes severe preeclampsia–eclampsia, hemolysis, elevated liver functions tests, low platelets syndrome and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. There is considerable overlapping in the clinical and laboratory findings between these conditions, and hence an exact diagnosis may not be always possible. However, there is considerable maternal mortality and morbidity associated with these disorders. This case underlines the complexity of pregnancy-related microangiopathies regarding their differential diagnosis, multiple organ dysfunction and role of therapeutic plasma exchange in their management. PMID:21814380

  13. Input File Creation for the Molecular Dynamics Program LAMMPS.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2001-05-30

    The program creates an input data file for the molecular dynamics program LAMMPS. The input file created is a liquid mixture between two walls explicitly composed of particles. The liquid molecules are modeled as a bead-spring molecule. The input data file specifies the position and topology of the starting state. The data structure of input allows for dynamic bond creation (cross-linking) within the LAMMPS code.

  14. IG/OG program for generating and displaying NASTRAN input and output data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishima, R.; Myojin, A.

    1978-01-01

    A software system was provided for structural analysis fields using NASTRAN. The HITAC users in Japan can use IG/OG (input generator/output generator) program for NASTRAN. The IG/OG saves time required to make a structure analysis for interpreting NASTRAN results.

  15. Informing Decision-Making in Libraries: Informetric Research as Input to LIS Education and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Mari; Wilson, Concepcion S.; Horn, Anne

    2005-01-01

    Findings from informetric research represent an important background resource to add to the mix of information useful for resolving difficult and ongoing problems in specific library environments or information service settings. This paper provides examples of informetric research that can be useful input to decision-making in the field of library…

  16. Density of Visual Input Enhancement and Grammar Learning: A Research Proposal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tran, Thu Hoang

    2009-01-01

    Research in the field of second language acquisition (SLA) has been done to ascertain the effectiveness of visual input enhancement (VIE) on grammar learning. However, one issue remains unexplored: the effects of VIE density on grammar learning. This paper presents a research proposal to investigate the effects of the density of VIE on English…

  17. Investigation of Effects of Varying Model Inputs on Mercury Deposition Estimates in the Southwest US

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model version 4.7.1 was used to simulate mercury wet and dry deposition for a domain covering the continental United States (US). The simulations used MM5-derived meteorological input fields and the US Environmental Protection Agency (E...

  18. 42 CFR 460.138 - Committees with community input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Committees with community input. 460.138 Section 460.138 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... community input. A PACE organization must establish one or more committees, with community input, to do...

  19. 42 CFR 460.138 - Committees with community input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Committees with community input. 460.138 Section 460.138 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... community input. A PACE organization must establish one or more committees, with community input, to do...

  20. 42 CFR 460.138 - Committees with community input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Committees with community input. 460.138 Section 460.138 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... community input. A PACE organization must establish one or more committees, with community input, to do...

  1. Comparison of Linear Microinstability Calculations of Varying Input Realism

    SciTech Connect

    G. Rewoldt

    2003-09-08

    The effect of varying ''input realism'' or varying completeness of the input data for linear microinstability calculations, in particular on the critical value of the ion temperature gradient for the ion temperature gradient mode, is investigated using gyrokinetic and gyrofluid approaches. The calculations show that varying input realism can have a substantial quantitative effect on the results.

  2. Analysis of Stochastic Response of Neural Networks with Stochastic Input

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1996-10-10

    Software permits the user to extend capability of his/her neural network to include probablistic characteristics of input parameter. User inputs topology and weights associated with neural network along with distributional characteristics of input parameters. Network response is provided via a cumulative density function of network response variable.

  3. New input data for synthetic AGB evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenhuber, J.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.

    1998-12-01

    Analytic formulae are presented to construct detailed secular lightcurves of both early asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and thermally pulsing AGB stars. They are based on an extensive grid of evolutionary calculations, performed with an updated stellar evolution code. Basic input parameters are the initial mass MI i, 0.8 <= MI i/Msun <= 7, metallicity ZI i =0.0001, 0.008, 0.02, and the mixing length theory (MLT) parameter. The formulae allow for two important effects, namely that the first pulses do not reach the full amplitude, and hot bottom burning (HBB) in massive stars, which are both not accounted for by core mass - luminosity relations of the usual type. Furthermore, the dependence of the effective temperature and a few other quantities characterizing the conditions at the base of the convective envelope, which are relevant for HBB, are investigated as functions of luminosity, total and core mass for different formulations of the convection theory applied, MLT or Canuto & Mazzitelli's (\\cite{can:maz}) theory.

  4. Combined contributions of feedforward and feedback inputs to bottom-up attention

    PubMed Central

    Khorsand, Peyman; Moore, Tirin; Soltani, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    In order to deal with a large amount of information carried by visual inputs entering the brain at any given point in time, the brain swiftly uses the same inputs to enhance processing in one part of visual field at the expense of the others. These processes, collectively called bottom-up attentional selection, are assumed to solely rely on feedforward processing of the external inputs, as it is implied by the nomenclature. Nevertheless, evidence from recent experimental and modeling studies points to the role of feedback in bottom-up attention. Here, we review behavioral and neural evidence that feedback inputs are important for the formation of signals that could guide attentional selection based on exogenous inputs. Moreover, we review results from a modeling study elucidating mechanisms underlying the emergence of these signals in successive layers of neural populations and how they depend on feedback from higher visual areas. We use these results to interpret and discuss more recent findings that can further unravel feedforward and feedback neural mechanisms underlying bottom-up attention. We argue that while it is descriptively useful to separate feedforward and feedback processes underlying bottom-up attention, these processes cannot be mechanistically separated into two successive stages as they occur at almost the same time and affect neural activity within the same brain areas using similar neural mechanisms. Therefore, understanding the interaction and integration of feedforward and feedback inputs is crucial for better understanding of bottom-up attention. PMID:25784883

  5. Influences of sensory input from the limbs on feline corticospinal neurons during postural responses

    PubMed Central

    Karayannidou, A; Deliagina, T G; Tamarova, Z A; Sirota, M G; Zelenin, P V; Orlovsky, G N; Beloozerova, I N

    2008-01-01

    The dorsal-side-up body posture of standing quadrupeds is maintained by coordinated activity of all limbs. Somatosensory input from the limbs evokes postural responses when the supporting surface is perturbed. The aim of this study was to reveal the contribution of sensory inputs from individual limbs to the posture-related modulation of pyramidal tract neurons (PTNs) arising in the primary motor cortex. We recorded the activity of PTNs from the limb representation of motor cortex in the cat maintaining balance on a platform periodically tilted in the frontal plane. Each PTN was recorded during standing on four limbs, and when two or three limbs were lifted from the platform and thus did not signal its displacement to motor cortex. By comparing PTN responses to tilts in different tests we found that the amplitude and the phase of the response in the majority of them were determined primarily by the sensory input from the corresponding contralateral limb. In a portion of PTNs, this input originated from afferents of the peripheral receptive field. Sensory input from the ipsilateral limb, as well as input from limbs of the other girdle made a much smaller contribution to the PTN modulation. These results show that, during postural activity, a key role of PTNs is the feedback control of the corresponding contralateral limb and, to a lesser extent, the coordination of posture within a girdle and between the two girdles. PMID:17974591

  6. Optimal control of chaotic systems with input saturation using an input-state linearization scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuh, Chyun-Chau

    2009-08-01

    Chaos is undesirable in many engineering applications since it causes a serious degradation of the system performance and restricts the system's operating range. Therefore, the problem of controlling chaos has attracted intense interest in recent years. This paper proposes an approach for optimizing the control of chaotic systems with input saturation using an input-state linearization scheme. In the proposed approach, the optimal system gains are identified using the Nelder-Mead simplex algorithm. This algorithm does not require the derivatives of the cost function (or the performance index) to be optimized, and is therefore particularly applicable to problems with undifferentiable elements or discontinuities. Two numerical simulations are performed to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  7. Input-anticipating critical reservoirs show power law forgetting of unexpected input events.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Norbert Michael

    2015-05-01

    Usually reservoir computing shows an exponential memory decay. This letter investigates under which circumstances echo state networks can show a power law forgetting. That means traces of earlier events can be found in the reservoir for very long time spans. Such a setting requires critical connectivity exactly at the limit of what is permissible according to the echo state condition. However, for general matrices, the limit cannot be determined exactly from theory. In addition, the behavior of the network is strongly influenced by the input flow. Results are presented that use certain types of restricted recurrent connectivity and anticipation learning with regard to the input, where power law forgetting can indeed be achieved. PMID:25774542

  8. Evaluation of Piloted Inputs for Onboard Frequency Response Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grauer, Jared A.; Martos, Borja

    2013-01-01

    Frequency response estimation results are presented using piloted inputs and a real-time estimation method recently developed for multisine inputs. A nonlinear simulation of the F-16 and a Piper Saratoga research aircraft were subjected to different piloted test inputs while the short period stabilator/elevator to pitch rate frequency response was estimated. Results show that the method can produce accurate results using wide-band piloted inputs instead of multisines. A new metric is introduced for evaluating which data points to include in the analysis and recommendations are provided for applying this method with piloted inputs.

  9. An affine projection algorithm using grouping selection of input vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, JaeWook; Kong, NamWoong; Park, PooGyeon

    2011-10-01

    This paper present an affine projection algorithm (APA) using grouping selection of input vectors. To improve the performance of conventional APA, the proposed algorithm adjusts the number of the input vectors using two procedures: grouping procedure and selection procedure. In grouping procedure, the some input vectors that have overlapping information for update is grouped using normalized inner product. Then, few input vectors that have enough information for for coefficient update is selected using steady-state mean square error (MSE) in selection procedure. Finally, the filter coefficients update using selected input vectors. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm has small steady-state estimation errors comparing with the existing algorithms.

  10. Handling Input and Output for COAMPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzpatrick, Patrick; Tran, Nam; Li, Yongzuo; Anantharaj, Valentine

    2007-01-01

    Two suites of software have been developed to handle the input and output of the Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Prediction System (COAMPS), which is a regional atmospheric model developed by the Navy for simulating and predicting weather. Typically, the initial and boundary conditions for COAMPS are provided by a flat-file representation of the Navy s global model. Additional algorithms are needed for running the COAMPS software using global models. One of the present suites satisfies this need for running COAMPS using the Global Forecast System (GFS) model of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The first step in running COAMPS downloading of GFS data from an Internet file-transfer-protocol (FTP) server computer of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) is performed by one of the programs (SSC-00273) in this suite. The GFS data, which are in gridded binary (GRIB) format, are then changed to a COAMPS-compatible format by another program in the suite (SSC-00278). Once a forecast is complete, still another program in the suite (SSC-00274) sends the output data to a different server computer. The second suite of software (SSC- 00275) addresses the need to ingest up-to-date land-use-and-land-cover (LULC) data into COAMPS for use in specifying typical climatological values of such surface parameters as albedo, aerodynamic roughness, and ground wetness. This suite includes (1) a program to process LULC data derived from observations by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments aboard NASA s Terra and Aqua satellites, (2) programs to derive new climatological parameters for the 17-land-use-category MODIS data; and (3) a modified version of a FORTRAN subroutine to be used by COAMPS. The MODIS data files are processed to reformat them into a compressed American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) format used by COAMPS for efficient processing.

  11. Soil-related Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    SciTech Connect

    A. J. Smith

    2003-07-02

    This analysis is one of the technical reports containing documentation of the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain Nevada (ERMYN), a biosphere model supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the Yucca Mountain repository. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN biosphere model is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling, and the plan for development of the biosphere abstraction products for TSPA, as identified in the ''Technical Work Plan: for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (BSC 2003 [163602]). It should be noted that some documents identified in Figure 1-1 may be under development at the time this report is issued and therefore not available. This figure is included to provide an understanding of how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling in support of the license application, and is not intended to imply that access to the listed documents is required to understand the contents of this report. This report, ''Soil Related Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model'', is one of the five analysis reports that develop input parameters for use in the ERMYN model. This report is the source documentation for the six biosphere parameters identified in Table 1-1. ''The Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2003 [160699]) describes in detail the conceptual model as well as the mathematical model and its input parameters. The purpose of this analysis was to develop the biosphere model parameters needed to evaluate doses from pathways associated with the accumulation and depletion of radionuclides in the soil. These parameters support the calculation of radionuclide concentrations in soil from on-going irrigation and ash

  12. Eolian inputs of lead to the North Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.E.; Halliday, A.N.; Rea, D.K.; Owen, R.M.

    2000-04-01

    The authors evaluate the importance of natural eolian Pb to the dissolved oceanic Pb budget by measuring the isotopic composition of Pb in 35 Holocene and late Quaternary sediment samples from the North Pacific and in 10 samples of Chinese loess. When the Pacific is divided into sediments provinces based on published {var_epsilon}{sub Nd} and sedimentological data, Pb from the central North Pacific tends to be the most radiogenic and homogeneous due to the dominance of eolian Chinese loess. Lead from the marginal North Pacific and the sparsely sampled regions south of 5{degree}N are less radiogenic and more variable owing to hemipelagic inputs from various volcanic arcs and older continental crust located around the Pacific Rim. {sup 208}Pb/{sup 204}Pb ratios provide the most distinctive provenance information due to the relatively high ratios in Chinese loess. The Chinese loess samples come from 3 localities and span up to 2 Myr of time. Acetic-acid leachate, bulk loess, and loess silicate fractions were analyzed separately. Leachate Pb is considerably less radiogenic than silicate Pb. The isotopic composition of the silicate component closely matches the sediment data from the central North Pacific, confirming the dominance of eolian loess in this region. The authors divided up a suite of published hydrogenous Pb-isotope data from the Pacific Ocean according to their locations within the three independently defined sediment provinces. These data define three distinct fields differentiated primarily by their {sup 206}Pb/{sup 204}Pb ratios, which increase going form the Central to Southern to Marginal provinces. This relationship with sediment province strongly suggests that natural eolian and probably hemipelagic inputs significantly impact the seawater Pb budget. Direct support for the dominance of eolian Chinese loess in the central North Pacific dissolved Pb budget comes from the close match between loess leachate Pb and the Central Province hydrogenous Pb data

  13. High-frequency matrix converter with square wave input

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, Joseph Alexander; Balda, Juan Carlos

    2015-03-31

    A device for producing an alternating current output voltage from a high-frequency, square-wave input voltage comprising, high-frequency, square-wave input a matrix converter and a control system. The matrix converter comprises a plurality of electrical switches. The high-frequency input and the matrix converter are electrically connected to each other. The control system is connected to each switch of the matrix converter. The control system is electrically connected to the input of the matrix converter. The control system is configured to operate each electrical switch of the matrix converter converting a high-frequency, square-wave input voltage across the first input port of the matrix converter and the second input port of the matrix converter to an alternating current output voltage at the output of the matrix converter.

  14. Lattice QCD input for axion cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkowitz, Evan; Buchoff, Michael I.; Rinaldi, Enrico

    2015-08-01

    One intriguing beyond-the-Standard-Model particle is the QCD axion, which could simultaneously provide a solution to the Strong C P Problem and account for some, if not all, of the dark matter density in the Universe. This particle is a pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson of the conjectured Peccei-Quinn symmetry of the Standard Model. Its mass and interactions are suppressed by a heavy symmetry-breaking scale, fa, the value of which is roughly greater than 109 GeV (or, conversely, the axion mass, ma, is roughly less than 104 μ eV ). The density of axions in the Universe, which cannot exceed the relic dark matter density and is a quantity of great interest in axion experiments like ADMX, is a result of the early Universe interplay between cosmological evolution and the axion mass as a function of temperature. The latter quantity is proportional to the second derivative of the temperature-dependent QCD free energy with respect to the C P -violating phase, θ . However, this quantity is generically nonperturbative, and previous calculations have only employed instanton models at the high temperatures of interest (roughly 1 GeV). In this and future works, we aim to calculate the temperature-dependent axion mass at small θ from first-principle lattice calculations, with controlled statistical and systematic errors. Once calculated, this temperature-dependent axion mass is input for the classical evolution equations of the axion density of the Universe, which is required to be less than or equal to the dark matter density. Due to a variety of lattice systematic effects at the very high temperatures required, we perform a calculation of the leading small-θ cumulant of the theta vacua on large volume lattices for SU(3) Yang-Mills with high statistics as a first proof of concept, before attempting a full QCD calculation in the future. From these pure glue results, the misalignment mechanism yields the axion mass bound ma≥(14.6 ±0.1 ) μ eV when Peccei-Quinn breaking occurs

  15. Rapid Airplane Parametric Input Design (RAPID)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Robert E.

    1995-01-01

    RAPID is a methodology and software system to define a class of airplane configurations and directly evaluate surface grids, volume grids, and grid sensitivity on and about the configurations. A distinguishing characteristic which separates RAPID from other airplane surface modellers is that the output grids and grid sensitivity are directly applicable in CFD analysis. A small set of design parameters and grid control parameters govern the process which is incorporated into interactive software for 'real time' visual analysis and into batch software for the application of optimization technology. The computed surface grids and volume grids are suitable for a wide range of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation. The general airplane configuration has wing, fuselage, horizontal tail, and vertical tail components. The double-delta wing and tail components are manifested by solving a fourth order partial differential equation (PDE) subject to Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. The design parameters are incorporated into the boundary conditions and therefore govern the shapes of the surfaces. The PDE solution yields a smooth transition between boundaries. Surface grids suitable for CFD calculation are created by establishing an H-type topology about the configuration and incorporating grid spacing functions in the PDE equation for the lifting components and the fuselage definition equations. User specified grid parameters govern the location and degree of grid concentration. A two-block volume grid about a configuration is calculated using the Control Point Form (CPF) technique. The interactive software, which runs on Silicon Graphics IRIS workstations, allows design parameters to be continuously varied and the resulting surface grid to be observed in real time. The batch software computes both the surface and volume grids and also computes the sensitivity of the output grid with respect to the input design parameters by applying the precompiler tool

  16. Soil-Related Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    SciTech Connect

    A. J. Smith

    2004-09-09

    This report presents one of the analyses that support the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain Nevada (ERMYN). The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes the details of the conceptual model as well as the mathematical model and the required input parameters. The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the postclosure Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the Yucca Mountain repository. A schematic representation of the documentation flow for the Biosphere input to TSPA is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the evolutionary relationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling, and the biosphere abstraction products for TSPA, as identified in the ''Technical Work Plan for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (TWP) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]). This figure is included to provide an understanding of how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling in support of the license application, and is not intended to imply that access to the listed documents is required to understand the contents of this report. This report, ''Soil-Related Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model'', is one of the five analysis reports that develop input parameters for use in the ERMYN model. This report is the source documentation for the six biosphere parameters identified in Table 1-1. The purpose of this analysis was to develop the biosphere model parameters associated with the accumulation and depletion of radionuclides in the soil. These parameters support the calculation of radionuclide concentrations in soil from on-going irrigation or ash deposition and, as a direct consequence, radionuclide concentration in other environmental media that are affected by radionuclide concentrations in soil. The analysis was performed in accordance with the TWP (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]) where the governing procedure was defined as AP-SIII.9Q, ''Scientific Analyses''. This

  17. Numerical simulations of input and output couplers for linear accelerator structures

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, C.K.; Ko, K.

    1993-04-01

    We present the numerical procedures involved in the design of coupler cavities for accelerator sections for linear colliders. The MAFIA code is used to simulate an X-band accelerator section with a symmetrical double-input coupler at each end. The transmission properties of the structure are calculated in the time domain and the dimensions of the coupler cavities are adjusted until the power coupling is optimized and frequency synchronism is obtained. We compare the performance of the symmetrical double-input design with that of the conventional single-input type by evaluating the field amplitude and phase asymmetries. We also evaluate the peak gradient in the coupler and discuss the implication of pulse rise time on dark current generation.

  18. NIDR (New Input Deck Reader) V2.0 2

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2010-03-31

    NIDR (New Input Deck Reader) is a facility for processing block-structured input to large programs. NIDR was written to simplify maintenance of DAKOTA (a program for uncertainty quantification and optimization), to provide better error checking of input and to allow use of aliases in the input. While written to support DAKOTA input conventions, NIDR itself is independent of DAKOTA and can be used in many kinds of programs. The initial version of NIDR was copyrightedmore » in 2008. We have since extended NIDR to support a graphical user interface called Jaguar for DAKOTA. In the Review and Approval process for an updated paper on NIDR, the Classification Approver states that a new copyright assertion should be performed.processing input to programs. NIDR is not primarily for military applications.« less

  19. NIDR (New Input Deck Reader) V2.0 2

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, David

    2010-03-31

    NIDR (New Input Deck Reader) is a facility for processing block-structured input to large programs. NIDR was written to simplify maintenance of DAKOTA (a program for uncertainty quantification and optimization), to provide better error checking of input and to allow use of aliases in the input. While written to support DAKOTA input conventions, NIDR itself is independent of DAKOTA and can be used in many kinds of programs. The initial version of NIDR was copyrighted in 2008. We have since extended NIDR to support a graphical user interface called Jaguar for DAKOTA. In the Review and Approval process for an updated paper on NIDR, the Classification Approver states that a new copyright assertion should be performed.processing input to programs. NIDR is not primarily for military applications.

  20. Developing low-input, high-biomass, perennial cropping systems for advanced biofuels in the Intermountain West

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lignocellulosic biomass studies are being conducted to evaluate perennial herbaceous feedstocks and to determine their field performance and adaptation potential for biomass production in the Intermountain West. Field performance of four biomass entries and four inputs are being evaluated over a lo...

  1. MAZE96. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1992-02-24

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  2. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1996-07-15

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  3. Input design for identification of aircraft stability and control derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, N. K.; Hall, W. E., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    An approach for designing inputs to identify stability and control derivatives from flight test data is presented. This approach is based on finding inputs which provide the maximum possible accuracy of derivative estimates. Two techniques of input specification are implemented for this objective - a time domain technique and a frequency domain technique. The time domain technique gives the control input time history and can be used for any allowable duration of test maneuver, including those where data lengths can only be of short duration. The frequency domain technique specifies the input frequency spectrum, and is best applied for tests where extended data lengths, much longer than the time constants of the modes of interest, are possible. These technqiues are used to design inputs to identify parameters in longitudinal and lateral linear models of conventional aircraft. The constraints of aircraft response limits, such as on structural loads, are realized indirectly through a total energy constraint on the input. Tests with simulated data and theoretical predictions show that the new approaches give input signals which can provide more accurate parameter estimates than can conventional inputs of the same total energy. Results obtained indicate that the approach has been brought to the point where it should be used on flight tests for further evaluation.

  4. The cholinergic basal forebrain in the ferret and its inputs to the auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Bajo, Victoria M; Leach, Nicholas D; Cordery, Patricia M; Nodal, Fernando R; King, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Cholinergic inputs to the auditory cortex can modulate sensory processing and regulate stimulus-specific plasticity according to the behavioural state of the subject. In order to understand how acetylcholine achieves this, it is essential to elucidate the circuitry by which cholinergic inputs influence the cortex. In this study, we described the distribution of cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain and their inputs to the auditory cortex of the ferret, a species used increasingly in studies of auditory learning and plasticity. Cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain, visualized by choline acetyltransferase and p75 neurotrophin receptor immunocytochemistry, were distributed through the medial septum, diagonal band of Broca, and nucleus basalis magnocellularis. Epipial tracer deposits and injections of the immunotoxin ME20.4-SAP (monoclonal antibody specific for the p75 neurotrophin receptor conjugated to saporin) in the auditory cortex showed that cholinergic inputs originate almost exclusively in the ipsilateral nucleus basalis. Moreover, tracer injections in the nucleus basalis revealed a pattern of labelled fibres and terminal fields that resembled acetylcholinesterase fibre staining in the auditory cortex, with the heaviest labelling in layers II/III and in the infragranular layers. Labelled fibres with small en-passant varicosities and simple terminal swellings were observed throughout all auditory cortical regions. The widespread distribution of cholinergic inputs from the nucleus basalis to both primary and higher level areas of the auditory cortex suggests that acetylcholine is likely to be involved in modulating many aspects of auditory processing. PMID:24945075

  5. Orientation selectivity and the functional clustering of synaptic inputs in primary visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Daniel E; Whitney, David E; Scholl, Benjamin; Fitzpatrick, David

    2016-08-01

    The majority of neurons in primary visual cortex are tuned for stimulus orientation, but the factors that account for the range of orientation selectivities exhibited by cortical neurons remain unclear. To address this issue, we used in vivo two-photon calcium imaging to characterize the orientation tuning and spatial arrangement of synaptic inputs to the dendritic spines of individual pyramidal neurons in layer 2/3 of ferret visual cortex. The summed synaptic input to individual neurons reliably predicted the neuron's orientation preference, but did not account for differences in orientation selectivity among neurons. These differences reflected a robust input-output nonlinearity that could not be explained by spike threshold alone and was strongly correlated with the spatial clustering of co-tuned synaptic inputs within the dendritic field. Dendritic branches with more co-tuned synaptic clusters exhibited greater rates of local dendritic calcium events, supporting a prominent role for functional clustering of synaptic inputs in dendritic nonlinearities that shape orientation selectivity. PMID:27294510

  6. [Regional differences of inputs of organic matter and chemical fertilizer in South Central China].

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan-yao; Wu, Jin-shui; Zhou, Jiao-gen; Xiao, He-ai; Zhou, Ping

    2015-09-01

    This article analyzed the inputs of organic matter and chemical fertilizer in the cropland of South Central China, i.e., Hunan, Hubei, Guangdong and Guangxi, and then calculated the budgets of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K), based on the data from field investigations and peasant household surveys in the four provinces. The results showed that total amounts of organic matter inputs in the four provinces was ranked as follow: 8993 kg · hm(-2) in Guangxi, 6390 kg · hm(-2) in Hunan, 5012 kg · hm(-2) in Hubei, 4630 kg · hm(-2) in Guangdong, and average NPK inputs in the four provinces were ranked as follow: 777.5 kg · hm(-2) in Guangxi, 501.6 kg · hm(-2) in Hunan, 486.4 kg · hm(-2) in Hubei, 340.4 kg · hm(-2) in Guangdong. The N and P input surpluses were greatest in Guangxi (67.2% and 99.0% as for N and P, respectively) , followed by Hunan (33.2% and 50.8%), Hubei (11.8% and 11.0%), and Guangdong (7.8% and 30.0%). However, K input was deficient in Hunan, Hubei, and Guangdong (6.6%, 18.7% and 12.4%), but surplus in Guangxi (19.5%). PMID:26785554

  7. Retrograde analyses of spinothalamic projections in the macaque monkey: input to ventral posterior nuclei.

    PubMed

    Craig, A D ' Bud '

    2006-12-20

    The distribution of retrogradely labeled spinothalamic tract (STT) neurons was analyzed in monkeys following variously sized injections of cholera toxin subunit B (CTb) in order to determine whether different STT termination sites receive input from different sets of STT cells. This report focuses on STT input to the ventral posterior lateral nucleus (VPL) and the subjacent ventral posterior inferior nucleus (VPI), where prior anterograde tracing studies identified scattered STT terminal bursts and a dense terminal field, respectively. In cases with small or medium-sized injections in VPL, labeled STT cells were located almost entirely in lamina V (in spinal segments consistent with the mediolateral VPL topography); few cells were labeled in lamina I (<8%) and essentially none in lamina VII. Large and very large injections in VPL produced marked increases in labeling in lamina I, associated first with spread into VPI and next into the posterior part of the ventral medial nucleus (VMpo), and abundant labeling in lamina VII, associated with spread into the ventral lateral (VL) nucleus. Small injections restricted to VPI labeled many STT cells in laminae I and V with an anteroposterior topography. These observations indicate that VPL receives STT input almost entirely from lamina V neurons, whereas VPI receives STT input from both laminae I and V cells, with two different topographic organizations. Together with the preceding observation that STT input to VMpo originates almost entirely from lamina I, these findings provide strong evidence that the primate STT consists of anatomically and functionally differentiable components. PMID:17072832

  8. Sedimentary input of trace metals from the Chukchi Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Islas, A. M.; Seguré, M.; Rember, R.; Nishino, S.

    2014-12-01

    The distribution of trace metals in the Arctic Ocean has implications for their global cycles, yet until recently few trace metal observations were available from this rapidly changing ocean. Profiles of dissolved Fe from recent Japanese field efforts in the Western Canada Basin (2008, 2010) indicate the broad Chukchi Shelf as a source of Fe to the halocline of the Western Canada Basin. Here we present dissolved and particulate data for crustal (Al, Mn, Fe) and non-crustal elements (Co, Cu, Zn) from the productive Chukchi Sea to characterize the sedimentary input of these metals to shelf waters contributing to the halocline layer of the Canada Basin. Water column profiles were collected in late summer 2013 onboard the R/V Mirai at 10 stations from the Bering Strait to the slope, and at a time-series (10 days) station located over the outer shelf. A narrow and variable (5-10 m) benthic boundary layer was sampled at the time-series station with highly elevated dissolved and suspended particulate metal concentrations. High metal concentrations were also observed in the subsurface at a station over Barrow Canyon where mixing is enhanced. Reactivity of suspended particulate metals was determined by the leachable vs. refractory fractions. Metal concentrations were determined by ICP-MS. Trace metal transport from the shelf to the interior will be discussed in context with shelf mechanisms contributing to this export, and to expected future changes in the Arctic Ocean.

  9. A REVISED EFFECTIVE TEMPERATURE SCALE FOR THE KEPLER INPUT CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsonneault, Marc H.; An, Deokkeun; Molenda-Zakowicz, Joanna; Chaplin, William J.; Metcalfe, Travis S.; Bruntt, Hans

    2012-04-01

    We present a catalog of revised effective temperatures for stars observed in long-cadence mode in the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC). We use Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) griz filters tied to the fundamental temperature scale. Polynomials for griz color-temperature relations are presented, along with correction terms for surface gravity effects, metallicity, and statistical corrections for binary companions or blending. We compare our temperature scale to the published infrared flux method (IRFM) scale for V{sub T}JK{sub s} in both open clusters and the Kepler fields. We find good agreement overall, with some deviations between (J - K{sub s} )-based temperatures from the IRFM and both SDSS filter and other diagnostic IRFM color-temperature relationships above 6000 K. For field dwarfs, we find a mean shift toward hotter temperatures relative to the KIC, of order 215 K, in the regime where the IRFM scale is well defined (4000 K to 6500 K). This change is of comparable magnitude in both color systems and in spectroscopy for stars with T{sub eff} below 6000 K. Systematic differences between temperature estimators appear for hotter stars, and we define corrections to put the SDSS temperatures on the IRFM scale for them. When the theoretical dependence on gravity is accounted for, we find a similar temperature scale offset between the fundamental and KIC scales for giants. We demonstrate that statistical corrections to color-based temperatures from binaries are significant. Typical errors, mostly from uncertainties in extinction, are of order 100 K. Implications for other applications of the KIC are discussed.

  10. Input-output analysis of high-speed axisymmetric isothermal jet noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeun, Jinah; Nichols, Joseph W.; Jovanović, Mihailo R.

    2016-04-01

    We use input-output analysis to predict and understand the aeroacoustics of high-speed isothermal turbulent jets. We consider axisymmetric linear perturbations about Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solutions of ideally expanded turbulent jets with jet Mach numbers 0.6 < Mj < 1.8. For each base flow, we compute the optimal harmonic forcing function and the corresponding linear response using singular value decomposition of the resolvent operator. In addition to the optimal mode, input-output analysis also yields sub-optimal modes associated with smaller singular values. For supersonic jets, the optimal response closely resembles a wavepacket in both the near-field and the far-field such as those obtained by the parabolized stability equations (PSE), and this mode dominates the response. For subsonic jets, however, the singular values indicate that the contributions of sub-optimal modes to noise generation are nearly equal to that of the optimal mode, explaining why the PSE do not fully capture the far-field sound in this case. Furthermore, high-fidelity large eddy simulation (LES) is used to assess the prevalence of sub-optimal modes in the unsteady data. By projecting LES source term data onto input modes and the LES acoustic far-field onto output modes, we demonstrate that sub-optimal modes of both types are physically relevant.

  11. Cutaneous and periodontal inputs to the cerebellum of the naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber)

    PubMed Central

    Sarko, Diana K.; Leitch, Duncan B.; Catania, Kenneth C.

    2013-01-01

    The naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber) is a small fossorial rodent with specialized dentition that is reflected by the large cortical area dedicated to representation of the prominent incisors. Due to naked mole-rats’ behavioral reliance on the incisors for digging and for manipulating objects, as well as their ability to move the lower incisors independently, we hypothesized that expanded somatosensory representations of the incisors would be present within the cerebellum in order to accommodate a greater degree of proprioceptive, cutaneous, and periodontal input. Multiunit electrophysiological recordings targeting the ansiform lobule were used to investigate tactile inputs from receptive fields on the entire body with a focus on the incisors. Similar to other rodents, a fractured somatotopy appeared to be present with discrete representations of the same receptive fields repeated within each folium of the cerebellum. These findings confirm the presence of somatosensory inputs to a large area of the naked mole-rat cerebellum with particularly extensive representations of the lower incisors and mystacial vibrissae. We speculate that these extensive inputs facilitate processing of tactile cues as part of a sensorimotor integration network that optimizes how sensory stimuli are acquired through active exploration and in turn adjusts motor outputs (such as independent movement of the lower incisors). These results highlight the diverse sensory specializations and corresponding brain organizational schemes that have evolved in different mammals to facilitate exploration of and interaction with their environment. PMID:24302898

  12. Orthogonal arrays for computer experiments to assess important inputs

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, L. M.; McKay, Michael D.

    2002-01-01

    The topic of this paper is experiment planning, particularly fractional factorial designs or orthogonal arrays, for computer experiments to assess important inputs. The work presented in the paper is motivated by considering a non-stochastic computer simulation which has many inputs and which can, in a reasonable period of time, be run thousands of times. With many inputs, information that allows focus on a subset of important inputs is valuable. The characterization of 'importance' is expected to follow suggestions in McKay (1995) or McKay, et al. (1992). This analysis approach leads to considering factorial experiment designs. Inputs are associated with a finite number of discrete values, referred to as levels, so if each input has K levels and there are p inputs then there are K{sup P} possible distinct runs which constitute the K{sup P} factorial design space. The suggested size of p has been 35 to 50 so that even with K=2 the complete 2{sup P} factorial design space would not be run. Further, it is expected that the complexity of the simulation code and discrete levels possibly associated with equi-probable intervals from the input distribution make it desirable to consider more than 2 level inputs. Inputs levels of 5 and 7 have been investigated. In this paper, orthogonal array experiment designs, which are subsets of factorial designs also referred to as fractional factorial designs, are suggested as candidate experiments which provide meaningful basis for calculating and comparing R{sup 2} across subsets of inputs.

  13. Somatosensory Anticipatory Alpha Activity Increases to Suppress Distracting Input

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haegens, Saskia; Luther, Lisa; Jensen, Ole

    2012-01-01

    Effective processing of sensory input in daily life requires attentional selection and amplification of relevant input and, just as importantly, attenuation of irrelevant information. It has been proposed that top-down modulation of oscillatory alpha band activity (8-14 Hz) serves to allocate resources to various regions, depending on task…

  14. Modified Oral Input and the Acquisition of Word Meanings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Rod

    1995-01-01

    Studied the relationship between modified oral input and the acquisition of word meanings by Japanese high school students. Results include a strong relationship between comprehension and word meaning acquisition was only evident in a test replicating learning format; and rate of word acquisition was faster with the premodified input. (54…

  15. Naturally Simplified Input, Comprehension, and Second Language Acquisition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Rod

    This article examines the concept of simplification in second language (SL) learning, reviewing research on the simplified input that both naturalistic and classroom SL learners receive. Research indicates that simplified input, particularly if derived from naturally occurring interactions, does aid comprehension but has not been shown to…

  16. 40 CFR 1065.210 - Work input and output sensors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Work input and output sensors. 1065... Ambient Conditions § 1065.210 Work input and output sensors. (a) Application. Use instruments as specified... sensors, transducers, and meters that meet the specifications in Table 1 of § 1065.205. Note that...

  17. 40 CFR 1065.210 - Work input and output sensors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Work input and output sensors. 1065... Ambient Conditions § 1065.210 Work input and output sensors. (a) Application. Use instruments as specified... sensors, transducers, and meters that meet the specifications in Table 1 of § 1065.205. Note that...

  18. Modeling Recognition Memory Using the Similarity Structure of Natural Input

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacroix, Joyca P. W.; Murre, Jaap M. J.; Postma, Eric O.; van den Herik, H. Jaap

    2006-01-01

    The natural input memory (NAM) model is a new model for recognition memory that operates on natural visual input. A biologically informed perceptual preprocessing method takes local samples (eye fixations) from a natural image and translates these into a feature-vector representation. During recognition, the model compares incoming preprocessed…

  19. Optimal input sizes for neural network de-interlacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hyunsoo; Seo, Guiwon; Lee, Chulhee

    2009-02-01

    Neural network de-interlacing has shown promising results among various de-interlacing methods. In this paper, we investigate the effects of input size for neural networks for various video formats when the neural networks are used for de-interlacing. In particular, we investigate optimal input sizes for CIF, VGA and HD video formats.

  20. 40 CFR 1065.210 - Work input and output sensors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Work input and output sensors. 1065... Ambient Conditions § 1065.210 Work input and output sensors. (a) Application. Use instruments as specified... sensors, transducers, and meters that meet the specifications in Table 1 of § 1065.205. Note that...

  1. 40 CFR 1065.210 - Work input and output sensors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Work input and output sensors. 1065... Ambient Conditions § 1065.210 Work input and output sensors. (a) Application. Use instruments as specified... sensors, transducers, and meters that meet the specifications in Table 1 of § 1065.205. Note that...

  2. 40 CFR 1065.210 - Work input and output sensors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Work input and output sensors. 1065... Ambient Conditions § 1065.210 Work input and output sensors. (a) Application. Use instruments as specified... sensors, transducers, and meters that meet the specifications in Table 1 of § 1065.205. Note that...

  3. Estimating nonstationary input signals from a single neuronal spike train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hideaki; Shinomoto, Shigeru

    2012-11-01

    Neurons temporally integrate input signals, translating them into timed output spikes. Because neurons nonperiodically emit spikes, examining spike timing can reveal information about input signals, which are determined by activities in the populations of excitatory and inhibitory presynaptic neurons. Although a number of mathematical methods have been developed to estimate such input parameters as the mean and fluctuation of the input current, these techniques are based on the unrealistic assumption that presynaptic activity is constant over time. Here, we propose tracking temporal variations in input parameters with a two-step analysis method. First, nonstationary firing characteristics comprising the firing rate and non-Poisson irregularity are estimated from a spike train using a computationally feasible state-space algorithm. Then, information about the firing characteristics is converted into likely input parameters over time using a transformation formula, which was constructed by inverting the neuronal forward transformation of the input current to output spikes. By analyzing spike trains recorded in vivo, we found that neuronal input parameters are similar in the primary visual cortex V1 and middle temporal area, whereas parameters in the lateral geniculate nucleus of the thalamus were markedly different.

  4. Measuring Equity: Creating a New Standard for Inputs and Outputs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoeppel, Robert C.; Della Sala, Matthew R.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce a new statistic to capture the ratio of equitable student outcomes given equitable inputs. Given the fact that finance structures should be aligned to outcome standards according to judicial interpretation, a ratio of outputs to inputs, or "equity ratio," is introduced to discern if conclusions can be…

  5. Does Input Enhancement Work for Learning Politeness Strategies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khatib, Mohammad; Safari, Mahmood

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of input enhancement on the acquisition of English politeness strategies by intermediate EFL learners. Two groups of freshman English majors were randomly assigned to the experimental (enhanced input) group and the control (mere exposure) group. Initially, a TOEFL test and a discourse completion test (DCT)…

  6. Clearly defined design input is key to product development.

    PubMed

    Pelnik, Tammy M

    2006-01-01

    Robust Design Input is critical to the cost-effective and timely development of safe and effective medical devices. By ensuring that the Design Input considers both technical performance characteristics and safety, the designer can proceed with confidence that the finished device will address the full complement of required functionality, user needs, and intended uses. PMID:16544789

  7. Visual display panel functions as computer input/output device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilborn, E. H.

    1970-01-01

    Display panel permits information entry and erasure using a probe, and has an inherent storage capability for use on time-shared systems. Data input need not be online. Other advantages include direct display of input and output, simplicity, and low fabrication cost.

  8. The Comparison of Visual Working Memory Representations with Perceptual Inputs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyun, Joo-seok; Woodman, Geoffrey F.; Vogel, Edward K.; Hollingworth, Andrew; Luck, Steven J.

    2009-01-01

    The human visual system can notice differences between memories of previous visual inputs and perceptions of new visual inputs, but the comparison process that detects these differences has not been well characterized. In this study, the authors tested the hypothesis that differences between the memory of a stimulus array and the perception of a…

  9. Exact Repetition as Input Enhancement in Second Language Acquisition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Eva Dam; Vinther, Thora

    2003-01-01

    Reports on two studies on input enhancement used to support learners' selection of focus of attention in Spanish second language listening material. Input consisted of video recordings of dialogues between native speakers. Exact repetition and speech rate reduction were examined for effect on comprehension, acquisition of decoding strategies, and…

  10. Application of optimal input synthesis to aircraft parameter identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, N. K.; Hall, W. E., Jr.; Mehra, R. K.

    1976-01-01

    The Frequency Domain Input Synthesis procedure is used in identifying the stability and control derivatives of an aircraft. By using a frequency-domain approach, one can handle criteria that are not easily handled by the time-domain approaches. Numerical results are presented for optimal elevator deflections to estimate the longitudinal stability and control derivatives subject to root-mean square constraints on the input. The applicability of the steady state optimal inputs to finite duration flight testing is investigated. The steady state approximation of frequency-domain synthesis is good for data lengths greater than two time cycles for the short period mode of the aircraft longitudinal motions. Phase relationships between different frequency components become important for shorter data lengths. The frequency domain inputs are shown to be much better than the conventional doublet inputs.

  11. Organization of monosynaptic inputs to the serotonin and dopamine neuromodulatorysystems

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Sachie K.; Cohen, Jeremiah Y.; Hwang, Dabin; Uchida, Naoshige; Watabe-Uchida, Mitsuko

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Serotonin and dopamine are major neuromodulators. Here we used a modified rabies virus to identify monosynaptic inputs to serotonin neurons in the dorsal and median raphe (DR and MR). We found that inputs to DR and MR serotonin neurons are spatially shiftedin the forebrain, with MRserotonin neurons receiving inputs from more medial structures. We then compared these data with inputs to dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantianigra pars compacta (SNc). We found that DR serotonin neurons receive inputs from a remarkably similar set of areas as VTA dopamine neurons, apart from the striatum, which preferentially targets dopamine neurons. Ourresults suggest three majorinput streams: amedial stream regulates MR serotonin neurons, anintermediate stream regulatesDR serotonin and VTA dopamine neurons, and alateral stream regulatesSNc dopamine neurons. These results providefundamental organizational principlesofafferent control forserotonin and dopamine. PMID:25108805

  12. On Optimal Input Design and Model Selection for Communication Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yanyan; Djouadi, Seddik M; Olama, Mohammed M

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the optimal model (structure) selection and input design which minimize the worst case identification error for communication systems are provided. The problem is formulated using metric complexity theory in a Hilbert space setting. It is pointed out that model selection and input design can be handled independently. Kolmogorov n-width is used to characterize the representation error introduced by model selection, while Gel fand and Time n-widths are used to represent the inherent error introduced by input design. After the model is selected, an optimal input which minimizes the worst case identification error is shown to exist. In particular, it is proven that the optimal model for reducing the representation error is a Finite Impulse Response (FIR) model, and the optimal input is an impulse at the start of the observation interval. FIR models are widely popular in communication systems, such as, in Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) systems.

  13. Steering and focusing effects in TESLA cavity due to high order mode and input couplers

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, P.; Dohlus, M.; Flottmann, K.; Marx, M.; Wipf, S.G.; /DESY

    2005-05-01

    Many state-of-art electron accelerator proposals incorporate TESLA-type superconducting radio-frequency (rf) cavities [1]. These standing wave rf cavities include rf input couplers and a pair of high order mode (HOM) couplers to absorb the energy associated to HOM field excited as the bunch passes through the cavity. In the present paper we investigate, using numerical simulations, the impact of the input and HOM couplers on the beam dynamics to zeroth and first order in initial position, and present parametric studies of the strength of these effects for various incoming beam energies. We finally study the impact of this asymmetric field on the beam dynamics, taking as an example the low energy section of the X-ray FEL injector.

  14. Input impedance of a probe-fed circular microstrip antenna with thick substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidovitz, M.; Lo, Y. T.

    1986-01-01

    A method of computing the input impedance for the probe fed circular microstrip antenna with thick dielectric substrate is presented. Utilizing the framework of the cavity model, the fields under the microstrip patch are expanded in a set of modes satisfying the boundary conditions on the eccentrically located probe, as well as on the cavity magnetic wall. A mode-matching technique is used to solve for the electric field at the junction between the cavity and the coaxial feed cable. The reflection coefficient of the transverse electromagnetic (TEM) mode incident in the coaxial cable is determined, from which the input impedance of the antenna is computed. Measured data are presented to verify the theoretical calculations. Results of the computation of various losses for the circular printed antenna as a function of substrate thickness are also included.

  15. Active control of sound transmission/radiation from elastic plates by vibration inputs. II - Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, V. L.; Fuller, C. R.; Silcox, R. J.; Brown, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    Actively controlled harmonic force inputs were applied experimentally to reduce the sound transmitted through an elastic circular plate. The control implementation used a time domain least mean square adaptive algorithm with two error sensors. The control forces were applied directly to the plate by point force vibration inputs, while the error information and performance were measured in the radiated acoustic field by microphones. Test cases were also performed in which the error sensors were accelerometers mounted on the plate. When accelerometers were used as error sensors, the controller performance was degraded; leading to the conclusion that minimizing plate motion does not necessarily lead to an associated decrease in radiated sound levels. In contrast, the results show excellent attenuation of the transmitted sound field when microphone error sensors were used. This result was consistent over a range of frequencies. In addition, the experimental results are compared to previously derived analytical results and the effect of using a point or global minimization scheme is discussed.

  16. KEPLER INPUT CATALOG: PHOTOMETRIC CALIBRATION AND STELLAR CLASSIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Timothy M.; Latham, David W.; Esquerdo, Gilbert A.; Everett, Mark E. E-mail: latham@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: everett@noao.edu

    2011-10-15

    We describe the photometric calibration and stellar classification methods used by the Stellar Classification Project to produce the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC). The KIC is a catalog containing photometric and physical data for sources in the Kepler mission field of view; it is used by the mission to select optimal targets. Four of the visible-light (g, r, i, z) magnitudes used in the KIC are tied to Sloan Digital Sky Survey magnitudes; the fifth (D51) is an AB magnitude calibrated to be consistent with Castelli and Kurucz (CK) model atmosphere fluxes. We derived atmospheric extinction corrections from hourly observations of secondary standard fields within the Kepler field of view. For these filters and extinction estimates, repeatability of absolute photometry for stars brighter than magnitude 15 is typically 2%. We estimated stellar parameters {l_brace}T{sub eff}, log (g), log (Z), E{sub B-V}{r_brace} using Bayesian posterior probability maximization to match observed colors to CK stellar atmosphere models. We applied Bayesian priors describing the distribution of solar-neighborhood stars in the color-magnitude diagram, in log (Z), and in height above the galactic plane. Several comparisons with samples of stars classified by other means indicate that for 4500 K {<=}T{sub eff} {<=} 6500 K, our classifications are reliable within about {+-}200 K and 0.4 dex in log (g) for dwarfs, with somewhat larger log (g) uncertainties for giants. It is difficult to assess the reliability of our log (Z) estimates, but there is reason to suspect that it is poor, particularly at extreme T{sub eff}. Comparisons between the CK models and observed colors are generally satisfactory with some exceptions, notably for stars cooler than 4500 K. Of great importance for the Kepler mission, for T{sub eff} {<=} 5400 K, comparison with asteroseismic results shows that the distinction between main-sequence stars and giants is reliable with about 98% confidence. Larger errors in log (g) occur

  17. Kepler Input Catalog: Photometric Calibration and Stellar Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Timothy M.; Latham, David W.; Everett, Mark E.; Esquerdo, Gilbert A.

    2011-10-01

    We describe the photometric calibration and stellar classification methods used by the Stellar Classification Project to produce the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC). The KIC is a catalog containing photometric and physical data for sources in the Kepler mission field of view; it is used by the mission to select optimal targets. Four of the visible-light (g, r, i, z) magnitudes used in the KIC are tied to Sloan Digital Sky Survey magnitudes; the fifth (D51) is an AB magnitude calibrated to be consistent with Castelli & Kurucz (CK) model atmosphere fluxes. We derived atmospheric extinction corrections from hourly observations of secondary standard fields within the Kepler field of view. For these filters and extinction estimates, repeatability of absolute photometry for stars brighter than magnitude 15 is typically 2%. We estimated stellar parameters {T eff, log (g), log (Z), E B - V } using Bayesian posterior probability maximization to match observed colors to CK stellar atmosphere models. We applied Bayesian priors describing the distribution of solar-neighborhood stars in the color-magnitude diagram, in log (Z), and in height above the galactic plane. Several comparisons with samples of stars classified by other means indicate that for 4500 K <=T eff <= 6500 K, our classifications are reliable within about ±200 K and 0.4 dex in log (g) for dwarfs, with somewhat larger log (g) uncertainties for giants. It is difficult to assess the reliability of our log (Z) estimates, but there is reason to suspect that it is poor, particularly at extreme T eff. Comparisons between the CK models and observed colors are generally satisfactory with some exceptions, notably for stars cooler than 4500 K. Of great importance for the Kepler mission, for T eff <= 5400 K, comparison with asteroseismic results shows that the distinction between main-sequence stars and giants is reliable with about 98% confidence. Larger errors in log (g) occur for warmer stars, for which our filter set

  18. Statistics of the electrosensory input in the freely swimming weakly electric fish Apteronotus leptorhynchus.

    PubMed

    Fotowat, Haleh; Harrison, Reid R; Krahe, Rüdiger

    2013-08-21

    The neural computations underlying sensory-guided behaviors can best be understood in view of the sensory stimuli to be processed under natural conditions. This input is often actively shaped by the movements of the animal and its sensory receptors. Little is known about natural sensory scene statistics taking into account the concomitant movement of sensory receptors in freely moving animals. South American weakly electric fish use a self-generated quasi-sinusoidal electric field for electrolocation and electrocommunication. Thousands of cutaneous electroreceptors detect changes in the transdermal potential (TDP) as the fish interact with conspecifics and the environment. Despite substantial knowledge about the circuitry and physiology of the electrosensory system, the statistical properties of the electrosensory input evoked by natural swimming movements have never been measured directly. Using underwater wireless telemetry, we recorded the TDP of Apteronotus leptorhynchus as they swam freely by themselves and during interaction with a conspecific. Swimming movements caused low-frequency TDP amplitude modulations (AMs). Interacting with a conspecific caused additional AMs around the difference frequency of their electric fields, with the amplitude of the AMs (envelope) varying at low frequencies due to mutual movements. Both AMs and envelopes showed a power-law relationship with frequency, indicating spectral scale invariance. Combining a computational model of the electric field with video tracking of movements, we show that specific swimming patterns cause characteristic spatiotemporal sensory input correlations that contain information that may be used by the brain to guide behavior. PMID:23966697

  19. Pump combiner loss as a function of input numerical aperture power distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sévigny, Benoit; Poirier, Pierre; Faucher, Mathieu

    2009-02-01

    High-power combiner designs (such as kilowatt-class combiners and beyond) are increasingly aggressive on brightness conservation in order to reduce the brightness loss of the pumps as much as possible in both direct diode combining and pump and signal coupling, especially with the advent of next-generation high-power pumps. Since most of the pump loss is due to brightness loss across the combiner, tighter designs (close to the brightness limit) are considerably more sensitive to variations in the input power distribution as a function of numerical aperture; for instance, next-generation, high-power multi-emitter pumps are likely to have larger numerical apertures than conventional single-emitter diodes. As a consequence, pump insertion loss for a given combiner design sitting close to the brightness limit should be dependant on the input power distribution. Aside from presenting a manufacturing challenge, high brightness combiners also imply more sophisticated testing to allow a deeper understanding of the loss with respect to the far-field distribution of the pump inputs and thus enable the extrapolation of loss for an arbitrary, cylindrically symmetric radiant intensity distribution. In this paper, we present a novel test method to measure loss as a function of numerical aperture (NA) fill factor using a variable NA source with square-shaped far field distributions. Results are presented for a range of combiners, such as 7x1 and 19x1 pump combiners, with different brightness ratio and fiber inputs. Combiners violating the brightness conservation equation are also characterized in order to estimate the loss as a function of input power vs. NA distribution and fill factor.

  20. A compact, low input capacitance neural recording amplifier.

    PubMed

    Ng, K A; Xu, Yong Ping

    2013-10-01

    Conventional capacitively coupled neural recording amplifiers often present a large input load capacitance to the neural signal source and hence take up large circuit area. They suffer due to the unavoidable trade-off between the input capacitance and chip area versus the amplifier gain. In this work, this trade-off is relaxed by replacing the single feedback capacitor with a clamped T-capacitor network. With this simple modification, the proposed amplifier can achieve the same mid-band gain with less input capacitance, resulting in a higher input impedance and a smaller silicon area. Prototype neural recording amplifiers based on this proposal were fabricated in 0.35 μm CMOS, and their performance is reported. The amplifiers occupy smaller area and have lower input loading capacitance compared to conventional neural amplifiers. One of the proposed amplifiers occupies merely 0.056 mm(2). It achieves 38.1-dB mid-band gain with 1.6 pF input capacitance, and hence has an effective feedback capacitance of 20 fF. Consuming 6 μW, it has an input referred noise of 13.3 μVrms over 8.5 kHz bandwidth and NEF of 7.87. In-vivo recordings from animal experiments are also demonstrated. PMID:24144666

  1. Wavelength meter having single mode fiber optics multiplexed inputs

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, R.P.; Paris, R.D.; Feldman, M.

    1993-02-23

    A wavelength meter having a single mode fiber optics input is disclosed. The single mode fiber enables a plurality of laser beams to be multiplexed to form a multiplexed input to the wavelength meter. The wavelength meter can provide a determination of the wavelength of any one or all of the plurality of laser beams by suitable processing. Another aspect of the present invention is that one of the laser beams could be a known reference laser having a predetermined wavelength. Hence, the improved wavelength meter can provide an on-line calibration capability with the reference laser input as one of the plurality of laser beams.

  2. Wavelength meter having single mode fiber optics multiplexed inputs

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Richard P.; Paris, Robert D.; Feldman, Mark

    1993-01-01

    A wavelength meter having a single mode fiber optics input is disclosed. The single mode fiber enables a plurality of laser beams to be multiplexed to form a multiplexed input to the wavelength meter. The wavelength meter can provide a determination of the wavelength of any one or all of the plurality of laser beams by suitable processing. Another aspect of the present invention is that one of the laser beams could be a known reference laser having a predetermined wavelength. Hence, the improved wavelength meter can provide an on-line calibration capability with the reference laser input as one of the plurality of laser beams.

  3. Power regulation of kinematic control inputs for forward flying Drosophila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacFarlane, Kenneth; Faruque, Imraan; Sean Humbert, J.

    2014-12-01

    The choices of insect wing kinematic programs is not well understood, particularly the mechanism by which an insect selects a distortion to achieve flight control. A methodology to evaluate prospective kinematic control inputs is presented based on the reachable states when control actuation was constrained to a unit of power. The method implements a computationally-derived reduced order model of the insect's flight dynamics combined with calculation of power requirement. Four kinematic inputs are evaluated based on this criterion for a Drosophila size insect in forward flight. Stroke bias is shown to be the dominant control input using this power normalized evaluation measure.

  4. Input clustering and the microscale structure of local circuits

    PubMed Central

    DeBello, William M.; McBride, Thomas J.; Nichols, Grant S.; Pannoni, Katy E.; Sanculi, Daniel; Totten, Douglas J.

    2014-01-01

    The recent development of powerful tools for high-throughput mapping of synaptic networks promises major advances in understanding brain function. One open question is how circuits integrate and store information. Competing models based on random vs. structured connectivity make distinct predictions regarding the dendritic addressing of synaptic inputs. In this article we review recent experimental tests of one of these models, the input clustering hypothesis. Across circuits, brain regions and species, there is growing evidence of a link between synaptic co-activation and dendritic location, although this finding is not universal. The functional implications of input clustering and future challenges are discussed. PMID:25309336

  5. Robotics control using isolated word recognition of voice input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiner, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    A speech input/output system is presented that can be used to communicate with a task oriented system. Human speech commands and synthesized voice output extend conventional information exchange capabilities between man and machine by utilizing audio input and output channels. The speech input facility is comprised of a hardware feature extractor and a microprocessor implemented isolated word or phrase recognition system. The recognizer offers a medium sized (100 commands), syntactically constrained vocabulary, and exhibits close to real time performance. The major portion of the recognition processing required is accomplished through software, minimizing the complexity of the hardware feature extractor.

  6. Numerical analysis of heat input effects in thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Tossell, D.A.

    1987-06-01

    A numerical model, suited for use on microcomputers, has been developed to examine the effect of heat input function on surface temperature contrast for passive thermographic NDE. Single and double step input functions have been compared, and the effects of varying pulse length and power, defect condition, defect depth to diameter ratio, and maximum allowed front face temperature rise examined. Results indicate that a two-step heat input function enhances the generated surface temperature contrast by up to 10% over the single pulse and compares well with that generated by contact heating.

  7. A Single Input Change Test Pattern Generator for Sequential Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Feng; Lei, Shaochong; Shao, Zhibiao

    An optimized Built-In Self-Test technology is proposed in this paper. A simplified algebraic model is developed to represent the configurations of single input change circuits. A novel single input change sequence generation technique is designed. It consists of a modified scan shift register, a seed storage array and a series of XOR gates. This circuitry can automatically generate single input change sequences of more unique vectors. Experimental results based on the ISCAS-89 benchmark show that the proposed method can achieve high stuck-at fault coverage with low switching activity during test applications.

  8. Multiple input/output random vibration control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unruh, James F.

    1988-01-01

    A multi-input/output random vibration control algorithm was developed based on system identification concepts derived from random vibration spectral analysis theory. The unique features of the algorithm are: (1) the number of input excitors and the number of output control responses need not be identical; (2) the system inverse response matrix is obtained directly from the input/output spectral matrix; and (3) the system inverse response matrix is updated every control loop cycle to accommodate system amplitude nonlinearities. A laboratory demonstration case of two imputs with three outputs is presented to demonstrate the system capabilities.

  9. Flight investigation of various control inputs intended for parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    NASA's F-8 digital fly-by-wire aircraft has been subjected to stability and control derivative assessments, leading to the proposal of improved control inputs for more efficient control derivative estimation. This will reduce program costs by reducing flight test and data analysis requirements. Inputs were divided into sinusoidal types and cornered types. Those with corners produced the best set of stability and control derivatives for the unaugmented flight control system mode. Small inputs are noted to have provided worse derivatives than larger ones.

  10. Flexible Peripheral Component Interconnect Input/Output Card

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, Kirk K.; Jerry, Albert L.; Baricio, Alisha G.; Cummings, Jon K.

    2010-01-01

    The Flexible Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI) Input/Output (I/O) Card is an innovative circuit board that provides functionality to interface between a variety of devices. It supports user-defined interrupts for interface synchronization, tracks system faults and failures, and includes checksum and parity evaluation of interface data. The card supports up to 16 channels of high-speed, half-duplex, low-voltage digital signaling (LVDS) serial data, and can interface combinations of serial and parallel devices. Placement of a processor within the field programmable gate array (FPGA) controls an embedded application with links to host memory over its PCI bus. The FPGA also provides protocol stacking and quick digital signal processor (DSP) functions to improve host performance. Hardware timers, counters, state machines, and other glue logic support interface communications. The Flexible PCI I/O Card provides an interface for a variety of dissimilar computer systems, featuring direct memory access functionality. The card has the following attributes: 8/16/32-bit, 33-MHz PCI r2.2 compliance, Configurable for universal 3.3V/5V interface slots, PCI interface based on PLX Technology's PCI9056 ASIC, General-use 512K 16 SDRAM memory, General-use 1M 16 Flash memory, FPGA with 3K to 56K logical cells with embedded 27K to 198K bits RAM, I/O interface: 32-channel LVDS differential transceivers configured in eight, 4-bit banks; signaling rates to 200 MHz per channel, Common SCSI-3, 68-pin interface connector.

  11. Soil Manganese Enrichment from Industrial Inputs: A Gastropod Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bordean, Despina-Maria; Nica, Dragos V.; Harmanescu, Monica; Banatean-Dunea, Ionut; Gergen, Iosif I.

    2014-01-01

    Manganese is one of the most abundant metal in natural environments and serves as an essential microelement for all living systems. However, the enrichment of soil with manganese resulting from industrial inputs may threaten terrestrial ecosystems. Several studies have demonstrated harmful effects of manganese exposure by cutaneous contact and/or by soil ingestion to a wide range of soil invertebrates. The link between soil manganese and land snails has never been made although these invertebrates routinely come in contact with the upper soil horizons through cutaneous contact, egg-laying, and feeding activities in soil. Therefore, we have investigated the direct transfer of manganese from soils to snails and assessed its toxicity at background concentrations in the soil. Juvenile Cantareus aspersus snails were caged under semi-field conditions and exposed first, for a period of 30 days, to a series of soil manganese concentrations, and then, for a second period of 30 days, to soils with higher manganese concentrations. Manganese levels were measured in the snail hepatopancreas, foot, and shell. The snail survival and shell growth were used to assess the lethal and sublethal effects of manganese exposure. The transfer of manganese from soil to snails occurred independently of food ingestion, but had no consistent effect on either the snail survival or shell growth. The hepatopancreas was the best biomarker of manganese exposure, whereas the shell did not serve as a long-term sink for this metal. The kinetics of manganese retention in the hepatopancreas of snails previously exposed to manganese-spiked soils was significantly influenced by a new exposure event. The results of this study reveal the importance of land snails for manganese cycling in terrestrial biotopes and suggest that the direct transfer from soils to snails should be considered when precisely assessing the impact of anthropogenic Mn releases on soil ecosystems. PMID:24454856

  12. Carbon balance of renovated grasslands: input- or output-driven?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choncubhair, Órlaith Ní; Osborne, Bruce; Lanigan, Gary

    2015-04-01

    Temperate grasslands constitute over 30% of the Earth's naturally-occurring biomes and make an important contribution towards the partial mitigation of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions by terrestrial ecosystems. In permanent temperate grasslands, biomass production and sward quality can deteriorate over time and periodic renovation activities, involving soil tillage and reseeding, are commonly carried out to halt this decline. Long-term cultivation of agricultural land has been associated with soil aggregate degradation and reduced soil carbon storage. However, the impact of these single tillage disturbances on C cycling in grasslands is less clear. This study evaluated gaseous and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) losses following a single tillage event by subjecting grassland lysimeters with contrasting soil drainage characteristics to simulated conventional inversion or minimum tillage. Field-scale CO2 emissions after conventional tillage were also quantified and empirically modelled over short- and medium-term timeframes to delineate the ecosystem response to environmental variables. Soil moisture was the limiting determinant of ecosystem carbon release following conventional tillage. Freshly-tilled soils were associated with reduced water retention and increased sensitivity to soil moisture, which was particularly pronounced following rewetting events. Significantly elevated but ephemeral CO2 effluxes were detected in the hours following inversion ploughing, however tillage disturbance did not generate significantly enhanced C emission rates in the medium term. Equally, DOC losses were not significantly amplified by conventional tillage compared with conservative minimum tillage and were predominantly controlled by soil drainage across tillage regimes. Our results suggest that a net ecosystem source of 120 to 210 g C m-2 over an approximately two-month period was most likely a consequence of reduced productivity and C input rather than enhanced soil CO2

  13. Input Variable Selection for Hydrologic Modeling Using Anns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganti, R.; Jain, A.

    2011-12-01

    The use of artificial neural network (ANN) models in water resources applications has grown considerably over the last couple of decades. In learning problems, where a connectionist network is trained with a finite sized training set, better generalization performance is often obtained when unneeded weights in the network are eliminated. One source of unneeded weights comes from the inclusion of input variables that provide little information about the output variables. Hence, in the ANN modeling methodology, one of the approaches that has received little attention, is the selection of appropriate model inputs. In the past, different methods have been used for identifying and eliminating these input variables. Normally, linear methods of Auto Correlation Function (ACF) and Partial Auto Correlation Function (PACF) have been adopted. For nonlinear physical systems e.g. hydrological systems, model inputs selected based on the linear correlation analysis among input and output variables cannot assure to capture the non-linearity in the system. In the present study, two of the non-linear methods have been explored for the Input Variable Selection (IVS). The linear method employing ACF and PACF is also used for comparison purposes. The first non-linear method utilizes a measure of the Mutual Information Criterion (MIC) to characterize the dependence between a potential model input and the output, which is a step wise input selection procedure. The second non-linear method is improvement over the first method which eliminates redundant inputs based on a partial measure of mutual information criterion (PMIC), which is also a step wise procedure. Further, the number of input variables to be considered for the development of ANN model was determined using the Principal Component Analysis (PCA), which previously used to be done by trial and error approach. The daily river flow data derived from Godavari River Basin @ Polavaram, Andhra Pradesh, India, and the daily average

  14. The effect of smoothed solar wind inputs on global modeling results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilie, Raluca; Liemohn, Michael W.; Ridley, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the role of fluctuations in the solar wind parameters in triggering a magnetic storm and assesses the storm simulation ability of the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) through a model-data comparison. The event of 22 September 1999 is examined through global magnetosphere simulations, using as input Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) observations (4 min temporal resolution) along with running averages of this data with windows of 60, 120, and 180 min. It is noted that for this storm the model produces a two phase, fast then slow recovery phase due to a sudden drop in plasma sheet density during the interval of southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). Also, smoothing the input with a window larger than 60 min changes the entire magnetosphere and reduces the plasma sheet density and pressure, therefore a less intense storm develops. It is worth mentioning that the main phase (measured from Storm Sudden Commencement to minimum Dst) for this magnetic storm lasted about 3 h. This explains the change in the Dst profile for the 120 and 180 min averaged input. Averaging only IMF Bz or solar wind density reveals that all input parameters are important for the development of the storm, but Bz is the most significant. Also, comparison with Dst predictions (using the formula of O'Brien and McPherron (2000)) are presented and discussed. For all cases studied, there are no significant differences for Cross Polar Cap Potential (CPCP) in both hemispheres, while the nightside plasma sheet density shows a sharp drop when the input is averaged over 60 min or more. Our results indicate that the magnetosphere responds nonlinearly to the changes in the energy input, suggesting the need for a threshold in the amount of energy transferred to the system in order for the ring current to develop. Further increase of the energy input leads to a saturation limit where the inner magnetosphere response is no longer affected by any additional amount of energy

  15. Identification of Multiple-Input Systems with Highly Coupled Inputs: Application to EMG Prediction from Multiple Intracortical Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Westwick, David T.; Pohlmeyer, Eric A.; Solla, Sara A.; Miller, Lee E.; Perreault, Eric J.

    2008-01-01

    A robust identification algorithm has been developed for linear, time-invariant, multiple-input single-output systems, with an emphasis on how this algorithm can be used to estimate the dynamic relationship between a set of neural recordings and related physiological signals. The identification algorithm provides a decomposition of the system output such that each component is uniquely attributable to a specific input signal, and then reduces the complexity of the estimation problem by discarding those input signals that are deemed to be insignificant. Numerical difficulties due to limited input bandwidth and correlations among the inputs are addressed using a robust estimation technique based on singular value decomposition. The algorithm has been evaluated on both simulated and experimental data. The latter involved estimating the relationship between up to 40 simultaneously recorded motor cortical signals and peripheral electromyograms (EMGs) from four upper limb muscles in a freely moving primate. The algorithm performed well in both cases: it provided reliable estimates of the system output and significantly reduced the number of inputs needed for output prediction. For example, although physiological recordings from up to 40 different neuronal signals were available, the input selection algorithm reduced this to 10 neuronal signals that made significant contributions to the recorded EMGs. PMID:16378517

  16. The Neurobiological Basis of Cognition: Identification by Multi-Input, Multioutput Nonlinear Dynamic Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Theodore W.; Song, Dong; Chan, Rosa H. M.; Marmarelis, Vasilis Z.

    2010-01-01

    The successful development of neural prostheses requires an understanding of the neurobiological bases of cognitive processes, i.e., how the collective activity of populations of neurons results in a higher level process not predictable based on knowledge of the individual neurons and/or synapses alone. We have been studying and applying novel methods for representing nonlinear transformations of multiple spike train inputs (multiple time series of pulse train inputs) produced by synaptic and field interactions among multiple subclasses of neurons arrayed in multiple layers of incompletely connected units. We have been applying our methods to study of the hippocampus, a cortical brain structure that has been demonstrated, in humans and in animals, to perform the cognitive function of encoding new long-term (declarative) memories. Without their hippocampi, animals and humans retain a short-term memory (memory lasting approximately 1 min), and long-term memory for information learned prior to loss of hippocampal function. Results of more than 20 years of studies have demonstrated that both individual hippocampal neurons, and populations of hippocampal cells, e.g., the neurons comprising one of the three principal subsystems of the hippocampus, induce strong, higher order, nonlinear transformations of hippocampal inputs into hippocampal outputs. For one synaptic input or for a population of synchronously active synaptic inputs, such a transformation is represented by a sequence of action potential inputs being changed into a different sequence of action potential outputs. In other words, an incoming temporal pattern is transformed into a different, outgoing temporal pattern. For multiple, asynchronous synaptic inputs, such a transformation is represented by a spatiotemporal pattern of action potential inputs being changed into a different spatiotemporal pattern of action potential outputs. Our primary thesis is that the encoding of short-term memories into new, long

  17. Selection of relevant input variables in storm water quality modeling by multiobjective evolutionary polynomial regression paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creaco, E.; Berardi, L.; Sun, Siao; Giustolisi, O.; Savic, D.

    2016-04-01

    The growing availability of field data, from information and communication technologies (ICTs) in "smart" urban infrastructures, allows data modeling to understand complex phenomena and to support management decisions. Among the analyzed phenomena, those related to storm water quality modeling have recently been gaining interest in the scientific literature. Nonetheless, the large amount of available data poses the problem of selecting relevant variables to describe a phenomenon and enable robust data modeling. This paper presents a procedure for the selection of relevant input variables using the multiobjective evolutionary polynomial regression (EPR-MOGA) paradigm. The procedure is based on scrutinizing the explanatory variables that appear inside the set of EPR-MOGA symbolic model expressions of increasing complexity and goodness of fit to target output. The strategy also enables the selection to be validated by engineering judgement. In such context, the multiple case study extension of EPR-MOGA, called MCS-EPR-MOGA, is adopted. The application of the proposed procedure to modeling storm water quality parameters in two French catchments shows that it was able to significantly reduce the number of explanatory variables for successive analyses. Finally, the EPR-MOGA models obtained after the input selection are compared with those obtained by using the same technique without benefitting from input selection and with those obtained in previous works where other data-modeling techniques were used on the same data. The comparison highlights the effectiveness of both EPR-MOGA and the input selection procedure.

  18. Third order TRANSPORT with MAD (Methodical Accelerator Design) input

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, D.C.

    1988-09-20

    This paper describes computer-aided design codes for particle accelerators. Among the topics discussed are: input beam description; parameters and algebraic expressions; the physical elements; beam lines; operations; and third-order transfer matrix. (LSP)

  19. Guidance laws with input saturation and nonlinear robust H∞ observers.

    PubMed

    Liao, Fei; Luo, Qiang; Ji, Haibo; Gai, Wen

    2016-07-01

    A novel three-dimensional law based on input-to-state stability (ISS) and nonlinear robust H∞ filtering is proposed for interception of maneuvering targets in the presence of input saturation. A dead zone operator model is introduced to design an ISS-based guidance law to guarantee robust tracking of a maneuvering target. Input saturation and system stability are considered simultaneously, and the globally input-to-state stability have been ensured in theory. Since in practice line-of-sight (LOS) rate is difficult for a pursuer to measure accurately, the nonlinear robust H∞ filtering method is utilized to estimate it. The stability analyses and performed simulation results show that the presented approach is effective. PMID:27018143

  20. Test Input Generation for Red-Black Trees using Abstraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visser, Willem; Pasareanu, Corina S.; Pelanek, Radek

    2005-01-01

    We consider the problem of test input generation for code that manipulates complex data structures. Test inputs are sequences of method calls from the data structure interface. We describe test input generation techniques that rely on state matching to avoid generation of redundant tests. Exhaustive techniques use explicit state model checking to explore all the possible test sequences up to predefined input sizes. Lossy techniques rely on abstraction mappings to compute and store abstract versions of the concrete states; they explore under-approximations of all the possible test sequences. We have implemented the techniques on top of the Java PathFinder model checker and we evaluate them using a Java implementation of red-black trees.

  1. EFFECTS OF CORRELATED PROBABILISTIC EXPOSURE MODEL INPUTS ON SIMULATED RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In recent years, more probabilistic models have been developed to quantify aggregate human exposures to environmental pollutants. The impact of correlation among inputs in these models is an important issue, which has not been resolved. Obtaining correlated data and implementi...

  2. PESTICIDE INPUTS AND RISKS IN COASTAL WETLANDS PROVINCE - 1991

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coastal wetland habitats may receive pesticide inputs indirectly from agricultural and forest control of weeds and insects in upland drainage areas; indirectly or directly from weed, insect, and biofouling control from development of adjacent lands for agricultural, recreational ...

  3. Two (or more) rotary outputs from one input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleberry, W. T.

    1979-01-01

    Mechanical sequencing device produces cyclic rotations of two outputs from single cyclic rotary input. Device is useful in automatic assemble apparatus, in food-processing machinery, and as controller for sequentially operated valves.

  4. Input from Key Stakeholders in the National Security Technology Incubator

    SciTech Connect

    2008-01-31

    This report documents the input from key stakeholders of the National Security Technology Incubator (NSTI) in developing a new technology incubator and related programs for southern New Mexico. The technology incubator is being developed as part of the National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP), funded by a Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) grant. This report includes identification of key stakeholders as well as a description and analysis of their input for the development of an incubator.

  5. Reducing future nutrient inputs to the Black Sea.

    PubMed

    Strokal, Maryna Petrivna; Kroeze, Carolien; Kopilevych, Volodymyr Abramovych; Voytenko, Larysa Vladyslavivna

    2014-01-01

    Rivers export increasing amounts of dissolved inorganic (DIN, DIP) and organic (DON, DOP) nitrogen and phosphorus to the Black Sea causing coastal eutrophication. The aim of this study is to explore future trends in river export of these nutrients to the sea through a sensitivity analysis. We used the Global NEWS (Nutrient Export from WaterSheds) model to this end. We calculated that between 2000 and 2050 nutrient inputs to the Black Sea may increase or decrease, depending on the assumed environmental management. We analyzed the effects of agricultural and sewage management on nutrient inputs to the sea in 2050 relative to two Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MEA) scenarios, Global Orchestration (GO) and Adaptive Mosaic (AM). In these baselines, total N and P inputs to the Black Sea decrease between 2000 and 2050, but not for all rivers and nutrient forms. Our results indicate that it is possible to reduce nutrient inputs to the sea further between 2000 and 2050 in particular for dissolved inorganic N and P and for many river basins, but not for all. For scenarios assuming combined agricultural and sewage management dissolved inorganic N and P inputs to the Black Sea are reduced by up to two-thirds between 2000 and 2050 and dissolved organic N and P inputs by one-third. River export of DIN is mainly affected by agricultural management and that of DIP by sewage management. On the other hand, in scenarios assuming increased fertilizer use for, for instance bioenergy crops, nutrient inputs to the sea increase. An increase in DIP inputs by southern rivers seems difficult to avoid because of the increasing number of people connected to sewage systems. PMID:23906857

  6. An on-line system for hand-printed input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, T. G.; Bebb, J.

    1971-01-01

    The capability of graphic input/output systems is described. Topics considered are a character recognizer and dictionary building program, an initial flow chart element input program, and a system entitled The Assistant Mathematician, which uses ordinary mathematics to specify numeric computation. All three parts are necessary to allow a user to carry on a mathematical dialogue with the computer in the language and notation of his discipline or problem domain.

  7. XINPUT: a program to edit "DOSRZ" input files.

    PubMed

    Lauterbach, M H; Lehmann, J; Rosenow, U F

    1999-05-01

    The DOSRZ user code, which is part of the EGS4 standard distribution, is widely used in medical physics for the calculation of dose deposition in cylindrical geometries. The code provides the use of advanced Monte-Carlo techniques (PRESTA) and variance reduction methods. In the case of complex cylinder geometries the input of coordinates and radii is not only tedious but also prone to a high error rate. Coordinates are to be stated in absolute numbers. A change of one number, e.g., the slab thickness, requires the change of all subsequent numbers. Furthermore, parameters are only stated as numbers with no indication of their meaning. Obviously, there is a need for a user interface to facilitate the input for DOSRZ and to largely reduce the possibility for errors. We, therefore, wrote a graphical user interface (GUI) consisting of an input mask, a coordinate input interpreter, and a two-dimensional and/or pseudo-three-dimensional display section. The GUI is based on the scripting language Tcl/Tk, which runs under various platforms such as UNIX (LINUX), w95, and WIN NT. It consists of a main window which provides common-style menus and buttons to navigate through the edit dialog boxes. The most important tools are the region input, which enables the user to create the simulation geometry, and the graphics section where the scaled output can be displayed. Different media are shown in different colors which are user defined. Furthermore, the program contains some tools to reduce the probability of an erroneous input in the EGS4 input file. Since Tcl/Tk is a modern scripting language, it offers advanced tools to create the GUI and to "glue" different applications to it. XINPUT may also be considered as a model program for the development of a more general interface to other input areas of the EGS4 simulation code. PMID:10360538

  8. Interspike interval distributions of spiking neurons driven by fluctuating inputs.

    PubMed

    Ostojic, Srdjan

    2011-07-01

    Interspike interval (ISI) distributions of cortical neurons exhibit a range of different shapes. Wide ISI distributions are believed to stem from a balance of excitatory and inhibitory inputs that leads to a strongly fluctuating total drive. An important question is whether the full range of experimentally observed ISI distributions can be reproduced by modulating this balance. To address this issue, we investigate the shape of the ISI distributions of spiking neuron models receiving fluctuating inputs. Using analytical tools to describe the ISI distribution of a leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) neuron, we identify three key features: 1) the ISI distribution displays an exponential decay at long ISIs independently of the strength of the fluctuating input; 2) as the amplitude of the input fluctuations is increased, the ISI distribution evolves progressively between three types, a narrow distribution (suprathreshold input), an exponential with an effective refractory period (subthreshold but suprareset input), and a bursting exponential (subreset input); 3) the shape of the ISI distribution is approximately independent of the mean ISI and determined only by the coefficient of variation. Numerical simulations show that these features are not specific to the LIF model but are also present in the ISI distributions of the exponential integrate-and-fire model and a Hodgkin-Huxley-like model. Moreover, we observe that for a fixed mean and coefficient of variation of ISIs, the full ISI distributions of the three models are nearly identical. We conclude that the ISI distributions of spiking neurons in the presence of fluctuating inputs are well described by gamma distributions. PMID:21525364

  9. Input-output stability for accelerometer control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Morris, K. A.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that, although accelerometer control systems are not well-posed in the sense of Salamon, a well-defined input-output relation exists. It is established that the output of an accelerometer control system can be described by the convolution of the input and a distribution. This distribution is Laplace transformable, and the Laplace transform of the distribution is the transfer function of the system.

  10. Input current shaped ac-to-dc converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Input current shaping techniques for ac-to-dc converters were investigated. Input frequencies much higher than normal, up to 20 kHz were emphasized. Several methods of shaping the input current waveform in ac-to-dc converters were reviewed. The simplest method is the LC filter following the rectifier. The next simplest method is the resistor emulation approach in which the inductor size is determined by the converter switching frequency and not by the line input frequency. Other methods require complicated switch drive algorithms to construct the input current waveshape. For a high-frequency line input, on the order of 20 kHz, the simple LC cannot be discarded so peremptorily, since the inductor size can be compared with that for the resistor emulation method. In fact, since a dc regulator will normally be required after the filter anyway, the total component count is almost the same as for the resistor emulation method, in which the filter is effectively incorporated into the regulator.

  11. Input Shaping to Reduce Solar Array Structural Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, Michael J.; Tolson, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    Structural vibrations induced by actuators can be minimized using input shaping. Input shaping is a feedforward method in which actuator commands are convolved with shaping functions to yield a shaped set of commands. These commands are designed to perform the maneuver while minimizing the residual structural vibration. In this report, input shaping is extended to stepper motor actuators. As a demonstration, an input-shaping technique based on pole-zero cancellation was used to modify the Solar Array Drive Assembly (SADA) actuator commands for the Lewis satellite. A series of impulses were calculated as the ideal SADA output for vibration control. These impulses were then discretized for use by the SADA stepper motor actuator and simulated actuator outputs were used to calculate the structural response. The effectiveness of input shaping is limited by the accuracy of the knowledge of the modal frequencies. Assuming perfect knowledge resulted in significant vibration reduction. Errors of 10% in the modal frequencies caused notably higher levels of vibration. Controller robustness was improved by incorporating additional zeros in the shaping function. The additional zeros did not require increased performance from the actuator. Despite the identification errors, the resulting feedforward controller reduced residual vibrations to the level of the exactly modeled input shaper and well below the baseline cases. These results could be easily applied to many other vibration-sensitive applications involving stepper motor actuators.

  12. Hysteresis in rotation magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanyi, Amalia

    2000-01-01

    The different properties of the vector Jiles-Atherton hysteresis operator is proved under forced H- and B-field supply. Feeding the magnetic material with alternating and circular polarised rotational excitation, the different properties of the model under the input field intensity and the flux density are investigated and the results are proved in figures.

  13. High-Voltage-Input Level Translator Using Standard CMOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Jeremy A.; Mojarradi, Mohammad M.; Vo, Tuan A.; Blalock, Benjamin J.

    2011-01-01

    proposed integrated circuit would translate (1) a pair of input signals having a low differential potential and a possibly high common-mode potential into (2) a pair of output signals having the same low differential potential and a low common-mode potential. As used here, "low" and "high" refer to potentials that are, respectively, below or above the nominal supply potential (3.3 V) at which standard complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits are designed to operate. The input common-mode potential could lie between 0 and 10 V; the output common-mode potential would be 2 V. This translation would make it possible to process the pair of signals by use of standard 3.3-V CMOS analog and/or mixed-signal (analog and digital) circuitry on the same integrated-circuit chip. A schematic of the circuit is shown in the figure. Standard 3.3-V CMOS circuitry cannot withstand input potentials greater than about 4 V. However, there are many applications that involve low-differential-potential, high-common-mode-potential input signal pairs and in which standard 3.3-V CMOS circuitry, which is relatively inexpensive, would be the most appropriate circuitry for performing other functions on the integrated-circuit chip that handles the high-potential input signals. Thus, there is a need to combine high-voltage input circuitry with standard low-voltage CMOS circuitry on the same integrated-circuit chip. The proposed circuit would satisfy this need. In the proposed circuit, the input signals would be coupled into both a level-shifting pair and a common-mode-sensing pair of CMOS transistors. The output of the level-shifting pair would be fed as input to a differential pair of transistors. The resulting differential current output would pass through six standoff transistors to be mirrored into an output branch by four heterojunction bipolar transistors. The mirrored differential current would be converted back to potential by a pair of diode-connected transistors

  14. Anomalous electron loading in SLAC 5045 klystron and relativistic klystron input cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, R.F.; Fowkes, R.W.; Lavine, T.L.; Miller, R.H.; Vlieks, A.E.

    1989-03-01

    Recent studies of RF breakup and instability in the SLAC 5045 klystrons have revealed that many production klystrons show loading of the input cavity by low energy electrons even under cold cathode no beam conditions. Sometime after the onset of the RF drive pulse, the input cavity absorbs a portion of the incident RF drive that would otherwise be reflected from the not-beam-loaded cavity. This power absorption is a function of drive level, and of axial magnetic field surrounding the cavity. No power absorption is present when the axial magnetic field is zero. This same phenomenon has been observed in the input cavity of relativistic klystron experiments being conducted as part of the SLAC-LBL-LLNL development program. The phenomenon may be associated with RF breakup and RF instability in SLAC 5045 klystrons, and with unstable pulse shortening in the relativistic klystron experiments. This paper outlines some old and new observations of microwave beam device malfunctions that probably are associated with low energy electron fluxes in the vacuum environments of microwave power devices. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Characteristic length scale of input data in distributed models: implications for modeling grain size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Artan, Guleid A.; Neale, C. M. U.; Tarboton, D. G.

    2000-01-01

    The appropriate spatial scale for a distributed energy balance model was investigated by: (a) determining the scale of variability associated with the remotely sensed and GIS-generated model input data; and (b) examining the effects of input data spatial aggregation on model response. The semi-variogram and the characteristic length calculated from the spatial autocorrelation were used to determine the scale of variability of the remotely sensed and GIS-generated model input data. The data were collected from two hillsides at Upper Sheep Creek, a sub-basin of the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed, in southwest Idaho. The data were analyzed in terms of the semivariance and the integral of the autocorrelation. The minimum characteristic length associated with the variability of the data used in the analysis was 15 m. Simulated and observed radiometric surface temperature fields at different spatial resolutions were compared. The correlation between agreement simulated and observed fields sharply declined after a 10×10 m2 modeling grid size. A modeling grid size of about 10×10 m2 was deemed to be the best compromise to achieve: (a) reduction of computation time and the size of the support data; and (b) a reproduction of the observed radiometric surface temperature.

  16. The proportion of common synaptic input to motor neurons increases with an increase in net excitatory input.

    PubMed

    Castronovo, Anna Margherita; Negro, Francesco; Conforto, Silvia; Farina, Dario

    2015-12-01

    α-Motor neurons receive synaptic inputs from spinal and supraspinal centers that comprise components either common to the motor neuron pool or independent. The input shared by motor neurons--common input--determines force control. The aim of the study was to investigate the changes in the strength of common synaptic input delivered to motor neurons with changes in force and with fatigue, two conditions that underlie an increase in the net excitatory drive to the motor neurons. High-density surface electromyogram (EMG) signals were recorded from the tibialis anterior muscle during contractions at 20, 50, and 75% of the maximal voluntary contraction force (in 3 sessions separated by at least 2 days), all sustained until task failure. EMG signal decomposition identified the activity of a total of 1,245 motor units. The coherence values between cumulative motor unit spike trains increased with increasing force, especially for low frequencies. This increase in coherence was not observed when comparing two subsets of motor units having different recruitment thresholds, but detected at the same force level. Moreover, the coherence values for frequencies <5 Hz increased at task failure with respect to the beginning of the contractions for all force levels. In conclusion, the results indicated that the relative strength of common synaptic input to motor neurons increases with respect to independent input when the net excitatory drive to motor neurons increases as a consequence of a change in force and fatigue. PMID:26404614

  17. Optimization of precipitation inputs for SWAT modeling in mountainous catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuo, Ye; Chiogna, Gabriele; Disse, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Precipitation is often the most important input data in hydrological models when simulating streamflow in mountainous catchment. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), a widely used hydrological model, only makes use of data from one precipitation gauging station which is nearest to the centroid of each subcatchment, eventually corrected using the band elevation method. This leads in general to inaccurate subcatchment precipitation representation, which results in unreliable simulation results in mountainous catchment. To investigate the impact of the precipitation inputs and consider the high spatial and temporal variability of precipitation, we first interpolated 21 years (1990-2010) of daily measured data using the Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW) method. Averaged IDW daily values have been calculated at the subcatchment scale to be further supplied as optimized precipitation inputs for SWAT. Both datasets (Measured data and IDW data) are applied to three Alpine subcatchments of the Adige catchment (North-eastern Italy, 12100 km2) as precipitation inputs. Based on the calibration and validation results, model performances are evaluated according to the Nash Sutchliffe Efficiency (NSE) and Coefficient of Determination (R2). For all three subcatchments, the simulation results with IDW inputs are better than the original method which uses measured inputs from the nearest station. This suggests that IDW method could improve the model performance in Alpine catchments to some extent. By taking into account and weighting the distance between precipitation records, IDW supplies more accurate precipitation inputs for each individual Alpine subcatchment, which would as a whole lead to an improved description of the hydrological behavior of the entire Adige catchment.

  18. A low-temperature bridge-input CMOS circuit for low-impedance detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, HongHui; Chen, YongPing

    2014-09-01

    Low-impedance long-wave infrared detectors (the wavelength longer than 10 microns) have very important applications in cryogenic aim detection, super-distance detection, anti-jamming target identify and so on. Therefore the research in the field of infrared detector technology is of importance. At present, no low-impedance photoconductive detectors are integrated with CMOS circuit. To design low-temperature CMOS circuit being fit for low impedance infrared photoconductive detector and realize high performance IR imaging, using differential amplifier with symmetrical positive and negative power is necessary, the low-resist detector is connected between an input and grounding, the corresponding low resistance is connected between another input and grounding, a larger feedback resistor is used between negative input and output, this structure can effectively solve the matching problem of low-impedance and high-impedance CMOS. In addition, the noise voltage from VBIAS terminal can be effectively reduced by increasing the ratio of the bias resistor and the detector resistance. The whole circuit is designed two grade. The first grade is adopted bridge input structure, this structure is fit for low impedance detector. The positive amplifying method is applied in second grade . The first grade feedback resistance is designed 1M ohm, the circuit is supplied by +/-1.5V. The testing showed that the circuit can work well when it connects with low-impedance infrared photoconductive detector at the liquid nitrogen low temperature. The magnification is up to 30000 times, 3dB bandwidth is more than 4kHz, the equivalent input noise is near 1.5 micron volts. This circuit has perfectly solved the matching problem between high impedance CMOS circuit and low impedance detector.

  19. Nitrogen input effectiveness on carbon sequestration in rainfed cropping system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novara, Agata; Gristina, Luciano; Poma, Ignazio

    2016-04-01

    The combined effect of total N and C/N ratio had a large influence on the decomposition rate and consequently on potential soil organic carbon sequestration. The aim of the work was to evaluate Carbon sequestration potentiality under three mineral N fertilization levels in interaction with two cropping systems characterized by addition of N input due to leguminous species in the rotation. The study was carried out in the semiarid Mediterranean environment in a 18years long-term experiment. Is well know that in the semiarid environment the excess of N fertilization reduces biomass yield and the consequent C input. On the contrary, both N and C input determine high difference in C/N input ratio and faster organic matter mineralization. Results showed no influence of N fertilization on SOC sequestration and a reduction of SOC stock due to crop rotation due to lower C input. Crop residue quality of durum wheat-pea crop rotation characterized by a faster decomposition rate could explain the lower ability of crop rotation to sequester C in the semiarid environment.

  20. Controlling chaos in balanced neural circuits with input spike trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelken, Rainer; Wolf, Fred

    The cerebral cortex can be seen as a system of neural circuits driving each other with spike trains. Here we study how the statistics of these spike trains affects chaos in balanced target circuits.Earlier studies of chaos in balanced neural circuits either used a fixed input [van Vreeswijk, Sompolinsky 1996, Monteforte, Wolf 2010] or white noise [Lajoie et al. 2014]. We study dynamical stability of balanced networks driven by input spike trains with variable statistics. The analytically obtained Jacobian enables us to calculate the complete Lyapunov spectrum. We solved the dynamics in event-based simulations and calculated Lyapunov spectra, entropy production rate and attractor dimension. We vary correlations, irregularity, coupling strength and spike rate of the input and action potential onset rapidness of recurrent neurons.We generally find a suppression of chaos by input spike trains. This is strengthened by bursty and correlated input spike trains and increased action potential onset rapidness. We find a link between response reliability and the Lyapunov spectrum. Our study extends findings in chaotic rate models [Molgedey et al. 1992] to spiking neuron models and opens a novel avenue to study the role of projections in shaping the dynamics of large neural circuits.

  1. Circuit-level input integration in bacterial gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Espinar, Lorena; Dies, Marta; Cagatay, Tolga; Süel, Gürol M; Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi

    2013-04-23

    Gene regulatory circuits can receive multiple simultaneous inputs, which can enter the system through different locations. It is thus necessary to establish how these genetic circuits integrate multiple inputs as a function of their relative entry points. Here, we use the dynamic circuit regulating competence for DNA uptake in Bacillus subtilis as a model system to investigate this issue. Specifically, we map the response of single cells in vivo to a combination of (i) a chemical signal controlling the constitutive expression of key competence genes, and (ii) a genetic perturbation in the form of copy number variation of one of these genes, which mimics the level of stress signals sensed by the bacteria. Quantitative time-lapse fluorescence microscopy shows that a variety of dynamical behaviors can be reached by the combination of the two inputs. Additionally, the integration depends strongly on the relative locations where the two perturbations enter the circuit. Specifically, when the two inputs act upon different circuit elements, their integration generates novel dynamical behavior, whereas inputs affecting the same element do not. An in silico bidimensional bifurcation analysis of a mathematical model of the circuit offers good quantitative agreement with the experimental observations, and sheds light on the dynamical mechanisms leading to the different integrated responses exhibited by the gene regulatory circuit. PMID:23572583

  2. Identifying local and descending inputs for primary sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Zhao, Shengli; Rodriguez, Erica; Takatoh, Jun; Han, Bao-Xia; Zhou, Xiang; Wang, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Primary pain and touch sensory neurons not only detect internal and external sensory stimuli, but also receive inputs from other neurons. However, the neuronal derived inputs for primary neurons have not been systematically identified. Using a monosynaptic rabies viruses–based transneuronal tracing method combined with sensory-specific Cre-drivers, we found that sensory neurons receive intraganglion, intraspinal, and supraspinal inputs, the latter of which are mainly derived from the rostroventral medulla (RVM). The viral-traced central neurons were largely inhibitory but also consisted of some glutamatergic neurons in the spinal cord and serotonergic neurons in the RVM. The majority of RVM-derived descending inputs were dual GABAergic and enkephalinergic (opioidergic). These inputs projected through the dorsolateral funiculus and primarily innervated layers I, II, and V of the dorsal horn, where pain-sensory afferents terminate. Silencing or activation of the dual GABA/enkephalinergic RVM neurons in adult animals substantially increased or decreased behavioral sensitivity, respectively, to heat and mechanical stimuli. These results are consistent with the fact that both GABA and enkephalin can exert presynaptic inhibition of the sensory afferents. Taken together, this work provides a systematic view of and a set of tools for examining peri- and extrasynaptic regulations of pain-afferent transmission. PMID:26426077

  3. Identifying local and descending inputs for primary sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Zhao, Shengli; Rodriguez, Erica; Takatoh, Jun; Han, Bao-Xia; Zhou, Xiang; Wang, Fan

    2015-10-01

    Primary pain and touch sensory neurons not only detect internal and external sensory stimuli, but also receive inputs from other neurons. However, the neuronal derived inputs for primary neurons have not been systematically identified. Using a monosynaptic rabies viruses-based transneuronal tracing method combined with sensory-specific Cre-drivers, we found that sensory neurons receive intraganglion, intraspinal, and supraspinal inputs, the latter of which are mainly derived from the rostroventral medulla (RVM). The viral-traced central neurons were largely inhibitory but also consisted of some glutamatergic neurons in the spinal cord and serotonergic neurons in the RVM. The majority of RVM-derived descending inputs were dual GABAergic and enkephalinergic (opioidergic). These inputs projected through the dorsolateral funiculus and primarily innervated layers I, II, and V of the dorsal horn, where pain-sensory afferents terminate. Silencing or activation of the dual GABA/enkephalinergic RVM neurons in adult animals substantially increased or decreased behavioral sensitivity, respectively, to heat and mechanical stimuli. These results are consistent with the fact that both GABA and enkephalin can exert presynaptic inhibition of the sensory afferents. Taken together, this work provides a systematic view of and a set of tools for examining peri- and extrasynaptic regulations of pain-afferent transmission. PMID:26426077

  4. Sensitivity of piping seismic responses to input factors

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, W.J.

    1985-05-01

    This report summarizes the sensitivity of peak dynamic seismic responses to input parameters. The responses have been modeled and calculated for the Zion Unit 1 plant as part of a seismic probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) performed by the US NRC Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP). The SSMRP was supported by the US NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Two sensitivity topics motivated the study. The first is the sensitivity of piping response to the mean value of piping damping. The second is the sensitivity of all the responses to the earthquake and model input parameters including soil, structure and piping parameters; this information is required for another study, the sensitivity of the plant system response (in terms of risk) to these dynamic input parameters and to other input factors. We evaluate the response sensitivities by performing a linear regression analysis (LRA) of the computer code SMACS. With SMACS we have a detailed model of the Zion plant and of the important dynamic processes in the soil, structures and piping systems. The qualitative results change with the location of the individual response. Different responses are in locations where the many potential influences have different effectiveness. The results give an overview of the complexity of the seismic dyanmic response of a plant. Within the diversity trends are evident in the influences of the input variables on the responses.

  5. Input- and output-oriented approaches to implementing ecosystem management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, David R.

    1995-03-01

    Input- and output-oriented approaches to landscape management have distinct roles for resource protection, environmental restoration, and sustainable land management. Implementing recent proposals for ecosystem management in the western United States involves a synthesis of input and output management. Within the broader context of ecosystem management, input management focuses on tailoring land use to the landscape, whereas output management employs assessments of resource condition to trigger modified management activity once resources are degraded to specified threshold conditions. Current approaches to landscape-scale management, however, tend to rely primarily on output-oriented strategies that are most effective for monitoring environmental conditions. Current uses of input management focus on environmental impact assessments, which generally are site- or project-specific analyses. The compeexity and dynamic nature of ecosystems, and the range of scales over which ecological processes operate, imply that development and incorporation of input-oriented approaches into landscape-scale management is necessary to implement ecosystem management as a strategy for sustainable land use.

  6. Statistical Signal Analysis for Systems with Interferenced Inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, R. M.; Mielnicka-Pate, A. L.

    1985-01-01

    A new approach is introduced, based on statistical signal analysis, which overcomes the error due to input signal interference. The model analyzed is given. The input signals u sub 1 (t) and u sub 2 (t) are assumed to be unknown. The measurable signals x sub 1 (t) and x sub 2 (t) are interferened according to the frequency response functions, H sub 12 (f) and H sub 21 (f). The goal of the analysis was to evaluate the power output due to each input, u sub 1 (t) and u sub 2 (t), for the case where both are applied to the same time. In addition, all frequency response functions are calculated. The interferenced system is described by a set of five equations with six unknown functions. An IBM XT Personal Computer, which was interfaced with the FFT, was used to solve the set of equations. The software was tested on an electrical two-input, one-output system. The results were excellent. The research presented includes the analysis of the acoustic radiation from a rectangular plate with two force inputs and the sound pressure as an output signal.

  7. Large uncertainty in soil carbon modelling related to carbon input calculation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keel, Sonja G.; Leifeld, Jens; Taghizadeh-Toosi, Arezoo; Oleson, Jørgen E.

    2016-04-01

    A model-based inventory for carbon (C) sinks and sources in agricultural soils is being established for Switzerland. As part of this project, five frequently used allometric equations that estimate soil C inputs based on measured yields are compared. To evaluate the different methods, we calculate soil C inputs for a long-term field trial in Switzerland. This DOK experiment (bio-Dynamic, bio-Organic, and conventional (German: Konventionell)) compares five different management systems, that are applied to identical crop rotations. Average calculated soil C inputs vary largely between allometric equations and range from 1.6 t C ha-1 yr-1 to 2.6 t C ha-1 yr-1. Among the most important crops in Switzerland, the uncertainty is largest for barley (difference between highest and lowest estimate: 3.0 t C ha-1 yr-1). For the unfertilized control treatment, the estimated soil C inputs vary less between allometric equations than for the treatment that received mineral fertilizer and farmyard manure. Most likely, this is due to the higher yields in the latter treatment, i.e. the difference between methods might be amplified because yields differ more. To evaluate the influence of these allometric equations on soil C dynamics we simulate the DOK trial for the years 1977-2004 using the model C-TOOL (Taghizadeh-Toosi et al. 2014) and the five different soil C input calculation methods. Across all treatments, C-TOOL simulates a decrease in soil C in line with the experimental data. This decline, however, varies between allometric equations (-2.4 t C ha-1 to -6.3 t C ha-1 for the years 1977-2004) and has the same order of magnitude as the difference between treatments. In summary, the method to estimate soil C inputs is identified as a significant source of uncertainty in soil C modelling. Choosing an appropriate allometric equation to derive the input data is thus a critical step when setting up a model-based national soil C inventory. References Taghizadeh-Toosi A et al. (2014) C

  8. Modelling Oyster Population Response to Variation in Freshwater Input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livingston, R. J.; Lewis, F. G.; Woodsum, G. C.; Niu, X.-F.; Galperin, B.; Huang, W.; Christensen, J. D.; Monaco, M. E.; Battista, T. A.; Klein, C. J.; Howell, R. L.; Ray, G. L.

    2000-05-01

    This paper describes the linkage of a three-dimensional hydrodynamic circulation model with descriptive and experimental biological data concerning oyster (Crassostrea virginica) population dynamics in the Apalachicola Estuary (Florida, U.S.A.). Our intent was to determine the direct and indirect role of Apalachicola River flow in the maintenance of oyster production. Results of a monthly field sampling programme conducted on the oyster reefs in the Apalachicola system during 1985-1986 were used to develop statistical models relating several life-history characteristics of oysters to physical-chemical aspects of water quality. The same life-history characteristics were related statistically to output from a circulation model of Apalachicola Bay. Highest oyster densities and overall bar growth were found in the vicinity of the confluence of high salinity water moving westwards from St George Sound and river-dominated (low salinity) water moving south and eastwards from East Bay. With the exception of models for oyster mortality, the predictive capability of results from the parallel modelling efforts was low. A time-averaged model was developed for oyster mortality during the summer of 1985 by running a regression analysis with averaged predictors derived from the hydrodynamic model and observed (experimental) mortality rates throughout the estuary. A geographic information system was then used to depict the results spatially and to compare the extent of expected mortality in 1985 and 1986. High salinity, relatively low-velocity current patterns, and the proximity of a given oyster bar to entry points of saline Gulf water into the bay were important factors that contribute to increased oyster mortality. Mortality was a major determinant of oyster production in the Apalachicola Estuary with predation as a significant aspect of such mortality. By influencing salinity levels and current patterns throughout the bay, the Apalachicola River was important in controlling

  9. Frequency-Band Signatures of Visual Responses to Naturalistic Input in Ferret Primary Visual Cortex during Free Viewing

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, Kristin K.; Bennett, Davis V.; Frohlich, Flavio

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal firing responses reflect the statistics of visual input and emerge from the interaction with endogenous network dynamics. Artificial visual stimuli presented to animals in which the network dynamics were constrained by anesthetic agents or trained behavioral tasks have provided fundamental understanding of how individual neurons in primary visual cortex respond to input. In contrast, very little is known about the mesoscale network dynamics and their relationship to microscopic spiking activity in the awake animal during free viewing of naturalistic visual input. To address this gap in knowledge, we recorded local field potential (LFP) and multiunit activity (MUA) in all layers of primary visual cortex (V1) of awake, freely viewing ferrets presented with naturalistic visual input (nature movie clips). We found that naturalistic visual stimuli modulated the entire oscillation spectrum; low frequency oscillations were mostly suppressed whereas higher frequency oscillations were enhanced. In average across all cortical layers, stimulus-induced change in delta and alpha power negatively correlated with the MUA responses, whereas sensory-evoked increases in gamma power positively correlated with MUA responses. The time-course of the band-limited power in these frequency bands provided evidence for a model in which naturalistic visual input switched V1 between two distinct, endogenously present activity states defined by the power of low (delta, alpha) and high (gamma) frequency oscillatory activity. Therefore, the two mesoscale activity states delineated in this study may define the engagement of the circuit with processing sensory input at the level of spiking activity. PMID:25498982

  10. Optimal Input Signal Design for Data-Centric Estimation Methods.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Sunil; Rivera, Daniel E

    2013-01-01

    Data-centric estimation methods such as Model-on-Demand and Direct Weight Optimization form attractive techniques for estimating unknown functions from noisy data. These methods rely on generating a local function approximation from a database of regressors at the current operating point with the process repeated at each new operating point. This paper examines the design of optimal input signals formulated to produce informative data to be used by local modeling procedures. The proposed method specifically addresses the distribution of the regressor vectors. The design is examined for a linear time-invariant system under amplitude constraints on the input. The resulting optimization problem is solved using semidefinite relaxation methods. Numerical examples show the benefits in comparison to a classical PRBS input design. PMID:24317042

  11. Input/output properties of the lateral vestibular nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, R.; Bush, G.; Ehsanian, R.

    2004-01-01

    This article is a review of work in three species, squirrel monkey, cat, and rat studying the inputs and outputs from the lateral vestibular nucleus (LVN). Different electrophysiological shock paradigms were used to determine the synaptic inputs derived from thick to thin diameter vestibular nerve afferents. Angular and linear mechanical stimulations were used to activate and study the combined and individual contribution of inner ear organs and neck afferents. The spatio-temporal properties of LVN neurons in the decerebrated rat were studied in response to dynamic acceleration inputs using sinusoidal linear translation in the horizontal head plane. Outputs were evaluated using antidromic identification techniques and identified LVN neurons were intracellularly injected with biocytin and their morphology studied.

  12. Methods for freshwater riverine input into regional ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzfeld, M.

    2015-06-01

    The input of freshwater at the coast in regional models is a non-trivial exercise that has been studied extensively in the past. Several issues are of relevance; firstly, estuaries process water properties along their length, so that while freshwater may enter at the estuary head, it is no longer fresh at the mouth. Secondly, models create a numerical response that results in excessive upstream or offshore transport compared to what is typically observed. The cause of this has been traced to the lack of landward flow at the coast where freshwater is input. In this study we assess the performance of various methods of freshwater input in coarse resolution regional models where the estuary cannot be explicitly resolved, and present a formulation that attempts to account for upstream flow in the salt wedge and in-estuary mixing that elevates salinity at the mouth.

  13. Linearisation via input-output injection of time delay systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Ramírez, Eduardo; Moog, Claude H.; Califano, Claudia; Alejandro Márquez-Martínez, Luis

    2016-06-01

    This paper deals with the problem of linearisation of systems with constant commensurable delays by input-output injection using algebraic control tools based on the theory of non-commutative rings. Solutions for the problem of linearisation free of delays, and with delays of an observable nonlinear time-delay systems are presented based on the analysis of the input-output equation. These results are achieved by means of constructive algorithms that use the nth derivative of the output expressed in terms of the state-space variables instead of the explicit computation of the input-output representation of the system. Necessary and sufficient conditions are established in both cases by means of an invertible change of coordinates.

  14. Adaptation to sensory input tunes visual cortex to criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shew, Woodrow L.; Clawson, Wesley P.; Pobst, Jeff; Karimipanah, Yahya; Wright, Nathaniel C.; Wessel, Ralf

    2015-08-01

    A long-standing hypothesis at the interface of physics and neuroscience is that neural networks self-organize to the critical point of a phase transition, thereby optimizing aspects of sensory information processing. This idea is partially supported by strong evidence for critical dynamics observed in the cerebral cortex, but the impact of sensory input on these dynamics is largely unknown. Thus, the foundations of this hypothesis--the self-organization process and how it manifests during strong sensory input--remain unstudied experimentally. Here we show in visual cortex and in a computational model that strong sensory input initially elicits cortical network dynamics that are not critical, but adaptive changes in the network rapidly tune the system to criticality. This conclusion is based on observations of multifaceted scaling laws predicted to occur at criticality. Our findings establish sensory adaptation as a self-organizing mechanism that maintains criticality in visual cortex during sensory information processing.

  15. Effect of input noise on neuronal firing rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalo-Cogno, S.; Samengo, I.

    2013-01-01

    When neurons are driven with a noisy input, the mean and the variance of the stimulus modulate the firing rate. Previous studies have shown that in linear-nonlinear model neurons the mean firing rate obtained in response to a noisy input is the average rate that would be obtained from an ensemble of constant currents. In this work, we study the firing rate of several neuron models, focusing on its dependence on the amount of input noise. We find that for models with monotonic activation curves, the theory provides a good qualitative approximation of the firing rate. For neurons with non-monotonic activation curves, however, the theory fails. The discrepancies between the theory and the simulations appear because rapidly fluctuating stimuli involve intrinsically dynamical processes that cannot be interpreted as an ensemble of constant stimuli.

  16. Input shaped control of 3-dimensional maneuvers of flexible spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, T.; Vadali, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper deals with the control of three dimensional rotational maneuvers of flexible spacecraft. A spacecraft with a spherical hub and six symmetric appendages is considered here as a model. The appendages are long and flexible leading to low frequency vibration under any control action. To provide a comprehensive treatment of input shaped controllers, both open loop and closed loop controllers are considered. The minimum-time bang-bang and the near-minimum-time controller, used in conjunction with the shaped input technique are studied. In addition, a combination of a Liapunov controller with the shaped input control technique is proposed to take advantage of the simple feedback control strategy and augment it with a technique that can eliminate the vibratory motion of the flexible appendages more efficiently.

  17. Dynamic Input Conductances Shape Neuronal Spiking1,2

    PubMed Central

    Franci, Alessio; Dethier, Julie; Sepulchre, Rodolphe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Assessing the role of biophysical parameter variations in neuronal activity is critical to the understanding of modulation, robustness, and homeostasis of neuronal signalling. The paper proposes that this question can be addressed through the analysis of dynamic input conductances. Those voltage-dependent curves aggregate the concomitant activity of all ion channels in distinct timescales. They are shown to shape the current−voltage dynamical relationships that determine neuronal spiking. We propose an experimental protocol to measure dynamic input conductances in neurons. In addition, we provide a computational method to extract dynamic input conductances from arbitrary conductance-based models and to analyze their sensitivity to arbitrary parameters. We illustrate the relevance of the proposed approach for modulation, compensation, and robustness studies in a published neuron model based on data of the stomatogastric ganglion of the crab Cancer borealis. PMID:26464969

  18. Input and Language Development in Bilingually Developing Children

    PubMed Central

    Hoff, Erika; Core, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Language skills in young bilingual children are highly varied as a result of the variability in their language experiences, making it difficult for speech-language pathologists to differentiate language disorder from language difference in bilingual children. Understanding the sources of variability in bilingual contexts and the resulting variability in children’s skills will help improve language assessment practices by speech-language pathologists. In this article, we review literature on bilingual first language development for children under 5 years of age. We describe the rate of development in single and total language growth, we describe effects of quantity of input and quality of input on growth, and we describe effects of family composition on language input and language growth in bilingual children. We provide recommendations for language assessment of young bilingual children and consider implications for optimizing children’s dual language development. PMID:24297614

  19. Optimal Input Signal Design for Data-Centric Estimation Methods

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Sunil; Rivera, Daniel E.

    2013-01-01

    Data-centric estimation methods such as Model-on-Demand and Direct Weight Optimization form attractive techniques for estimating unknown functions from noisy data. These methods rely on generating a local function approximation from a database of regressors at the current operating point with the process repeated at each new operating point. This paper examines the design of optimal input signals formulated to produce informative data to be used by local modeling procedures. The proposed method specifically addresses the distribution of the regressor vectors. The design is examined for a linear time-invariant system under amplitude constraints on the input. The resulting optimization problem is solved using semidefinite relaxation methods. Numerical examples show the benefits in comparison to a classical PRBS input design. PMID:24317042

  20. Incorporating uncertainty in RADTRAN 6.0 input files.

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, Matthew L.; Weiner, Ruth F.; Heames, Terence John

    2010-02-01

    Uncertainty may be introduced into RADTRAN analyses by distributing input parameters. The MELCOR Uncertainty Engine (Gauntt and Erickson, 2004) has been adapted for use in RADTRAN to determine the parameter shape and minimum and maximum of the distribution, to sample on the distribution, and to create an appropriate RADTRAN batch file. Coupling input parameters is not possible in this initial application. It is recommended that the analyst be very familiar with RADTRAN and able to edit or create a RADTRAN input file using a text editor before implementing the RADTRAN Uncertainty Analysis Module. Installation of the MELCOR Uncertainty Engine is required for incorporation of uncertainty into RADTRAN. Gauntt and Erickson (2004) provides installation instructions as well as a description and user guide for the uncertainty engine.

  1. Mechanism of phase control in a klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator by an input signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Renzhen; Song, Zhimin; Deng, Yuqun; Chen, Changhua

    2014-09-01

    Theoretical analyses and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations are carried out to understand the mechanism of microwave phase control realized by the external RF signal in a klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO). Theoretical calculations show that a modulated electron beam can lead the microwave field with an arbitrary initial phase to the same equilibrium phase, which is determined by the phase factor of the modulated current, and the difference between them is fixed. Furthermore, PIC simulations demonstrate that the phase of input signal has a close relation to that of modulated current, which initiates the phase of the irregularly microwave during the build-up of oscillation. Since the microwave field is weak during the early time of starting oscillation, it is easy to be induced, and a small input signal is sufficient to control the phase of output microwave. For the klystron-like RBWO with two pre-modulation cavities and a reentrant input cavity, an input signal with 100 kW power and 4.21 GHz frequency can control the phase of 5 GW output microwave with relative phase difference less than 6% when the diode voltage is 760 kV, and beam current is 9.8 kA, corresponding to a power ratio of output microwave to input signal of 47 dB.

  2. Mechanism of phase control in a klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator by an input signal

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Renzhen; Song, Zhimin; Deng, Yuqun; Chen, Changhua

    2014-09-15

    Theoretical analyses and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations are carried out to understand the mechanism of microwave phase control realized by the external RF signal in a klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO). Theoretical calculations show that a modulated electron beam can lead the microwave field with an arbitrary initial phase to the same equilibrium phase, which is determined by the phase factor of the modulated current, and the difference between them is fixed. Furthermore, PIC simulations demonstrate that the phase of input signal has a close relation to that of modulated current, which initiates the phase of the irregularly microwave during the build-up of oscillation. Since the microwave field is weak during the early time of starting oscillation, it is easy to be induced, and a small input signal is sufficient to control the phase of output microwave. For the klystron-like RBWO with two pre-modulation cavities and a reentrant input cavity, an input signal with 100 kW power and 4.21 GHz frequency can control the phase of 5 GW output microwave with relative phase difference less than 6% when the diode voltage is 760 kV, and beam current is 9.8 kA, corresponding to a power ratio of output microwave to input signal of 47 dB.

  3. AC-DC converter with an improved input current waveform

    SciTech Connect

    Yuvarajan, S.; Weng, D.F.; Chen, M.S.

    1995-12-31

    The paper proposes a new control scheme for an ac-dc converter that will reduce the total harmonic distortion in the input current while operating at an improved power factor. The circuit uses a diode rectifier whose output is varied by a boost regulator with a second-harmonic injected PWM. An approximate analysis shows that the addition of a second harmonic component in the PWM helps to reduce the third harmonic in the input current. The design parameters are obtained using digital simulation. The results obtained on an experimental converter are compared with the ones obtained from a conventional scheme.

  4. Signal delay and input synchronization in passive dendritic structures.

    PubMed

    Agmon-Snir, H; Segev, I

    1993-11-01

    1. A novel approach for analyzing transients in passive structures called "the method of moments" is introduced. It provides, as a special case, an analytic method for calculating the time delay and speed of propagation of electrical signals in any passive dendritic tree without the need for numerical simulations. 2. Total dendritic delay (TD) between two points (y, x) is defined as the difference between the centroid (the center of gravity) of the transient current input, I, at point y[tI(y)] and the centroid of the transient voltage response, V, at point x [tV(x)]. The TD measured at the input points is nonzero and is called the local delay (LD). Propagation delay, PD(y, x), is then defined as TD(y, x)--LD(y) whereas the net dendritic delay, NDD(y, 0), of an input point, y, is defined as TD(y, 0) - LD(0), where 0 is the target point, typically the soma. The signal velocity at a point x0 in the tree, theta(x0), is defined as [1/(dtv(x)/dx)[x = x0. 3. With the use of these definitions, several properties of dendritic delay exist. First, the delay between any two points in a given tree is independent of the properties (shape and duration) of the transient current input. Second, the velocity of the signal at any given point (y) in a given direction from (y) does not depend on the morphology of the tree "behind" the signal, and of the input location. Third, TD(y, x) = TD(x, y), for any two points, x, y. 4. Two additional properties are useful for efficiently calculating delays in arbitrary passive trees. 1) The subtrees connected at the ends of any dendritic segment can each be functionally lumped into an equivalent isopotential R-C compartment. 2) The local delay at any given point (y) in a tree is the mean of the local delays of the separate structures (subtrees) connected at y, weighted by the relative input conductance of the corresponding subtrees. 5. Because the definitions for delays utilize difference between centroids, the local delay and the total delay can

  5. ATCA-based ATLAS FTK input interface system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Y.; Liu, T.; Olsen, J.; Iizawa, T.; Mitani, T.; Korikawa, T.; Yorita, K.; Annovi, A.; Beretta, M.; Gatta, M.; Sotiropoulou, C.-L.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Kordas, K.; Kimura, N.; Cremonesi, M.; Yin, H.; Xu, Z.

    2015-04-01

    The first stage of the ATLAS Fast TracKer (FTK) is an ATCA-based input interface system, where hits from the entire silicon tracker are clustered and organized into overlapping η-phi trigger towers before being sent to the tracking engines. First, FTK Input Mezzanine cards receive hit data and perform clustering to reduce data volume. Then, the ATCA-based Data Formatter system will organize the trigger tower data, sharing data among boards over full mesh backplanes and optic fibers. The board and system level design concepts and implementation details, as well as the operation experiences from the FTK full-chain testing, will be presented.

  6. A multiple-input OTA circuit for neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Russel D.; Geiger, Randall L.

    1989-05-01

    An operational transconductance amplifier (OTA) circuit suitable for modeling neurons in VLSI implementations of artificial neural networks (NN) is described. It generates an output voltage which is a sigmoidal-like function of the linear sum of a number of weighted inputs. The weight of each input is individually controlled by a bias voltage which can be varied continuously and dynamically. Large numbers of these cells can be fashioned in regular arrays. It appears to be efficient because each weighted connection is implemented with only two MOSFET transistors.

  7. Identification of an object by input and output spectral characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redko, S. F.; Ushkalov, V. F.

    1973-01-01

    The problem is discussed of identification of a linear object of known structure, the movement of which is described by a system of differential equations of the type y = Ay + Bu, where y is an n-dimensional output vector, u is an m-dimensional vector of stationary, random disturbances (inputs), A and B are matrices of unknown parameters of the dimension, n x n and n x m, respectively. The spectral and reciprocal spectral densities of the inputs and outputs are used as the initial information on the object.

  8. Programming input-output operations in FORTRAN on magnetic tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorokov, V. N.

    1980-01-01

    The subprogram MTCFF was designed for carrying out input-output operations in FORTRAN on magnetic tape within the framework of the DOS ES EVM operation system. It is possible, by means of this subprogram, to perform any input-output operations of interest to the programmer such as recording and reading various control operations in the direct and reverse directions, even though for these purposes the facilities of the language FORTRAN itself are limited. The subprogram can also be used in programs written in other programming languages.

  9. Do microorganism stoichiometric alterations affect carbon sequestration in paddy soil subjected to phosphorus input?

    PubMed

    Zhang, ZhiJian; Li, HongYi; Hu, Jiao; Li, Xia; He, Qiang; Tian, GuangMing; Wang, Hang; Wang, ShunYao; Wang, Bei

    2015-04-01

    Ecological stoichiometry provides a powerful tool for integrating microbial biomass stoichiometry with ecosystem processes, opening far-reaching possibilities for linking microbial dynamics to soil carbon (C) metabolism in response to agricultural nutrient management. Despite its importance to crop yield, the role of phosphorus (P) with respect to ecological stoichiometry and soil C sequestration in paddy fields remains poorly understood, which limits our ability to predict nutrient-related soil C cycling. Here, we collected soil samples from a paddy field experiment after seven years of superphosphate application along a gradient of 0, 30, 60, and 90 (P-0 through P-90, respectively) kg.ha-1.yr-1 in order to evaluate the role of exogenous P on soil C sequestration through regulating microbial stoichiometry. P fertilization increased soil total organic C and labile organic C by 1-14% and 4-96%, respectively, while rice yield is a function of the activities of soil β-1,4-glucosidase (BG), acid phosphatase (AP), and the level of available soil P through a stepwise linear regression model. P input induced C limitation, as reflected by decreases in the ratios of C:P in soil and microbial biomass. An eco-enzymatic ratio indicating microbial investment in C vs. P acquisition, i.e., ln(BG): ln(AP), changed the ecological function of microbial C acquisition, and was stoichiometrically related to P input. This mechanism drove a shift in soil resource availability by increasing bacterial community richness and diversity, and stimulated soil C sequestration in the paddy field by enhancing C-degradation-related bacteria for the breakdown of plant-derived carbon sources. Therefore, the decline in the C:P stoichiometric ratio of soil microorganism biomass under P input was beneficial for soil C sequestration, which offered a "win-win" relationship for the maximum balance point between C sequestration and P availability for rice production in the face of climate change. PMID

  10. The Effect of Input-Based Instruction Type on the Acquisition of Spanish Accusative Clitics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Justin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to compare structured input (SI) with other input-based instructional treatments. The input-based instructional types include: input flood (IF), text enhancement (TE), SI activities, and focused input (FI; SI without implicit negative feedback). Participants included 145 adult learners enrolled in an intermediate…

  11. How do mammillary body inputs contribute to anterior thalamic function?

    PubMed Central

    Dillingham, Christopher M.; Frizzati, Aura; Nelson, Andrew J.D.; Vann, Seralynne D.

    2015-01-01

    It has long been assumed that the main function of the mammillary bodies is to provide a relay for indirect hippocampal inputs to the anterior thalamic nuclei. Such models afford the mammillary bodies no independent role in memory and overlook the importance of their other, non-hippocampal, inputs. This review focuses on recent advances that herald a new understanding of the importance of the mammillary bodies, and their inputs from the limbic midbrain, for anterior thalamic function. It has become apparent that the mammillary bodies’ contribution to memory is not dependent on afferents from the subicular complex. Rather, the ventral tegmental nucleus of Gudden is a vital source of inputs that support memory processes within the medial mammillary bodies. In parallel, the lateral mammillary bodies, via their connections with the dorsal tegmental nucleus of Gudden, are critical for generating head-direction signals. These two parallel, but distinct, information streams converge on the anterior thalamic nuclei and support different aspects of spatial memory. PMID:25107491

  12. A gap junction circuit enhances processing of coincident mechanosensory inputs.

    PubMed

    Rabinowitch, Ithai; Chatzigeorgiou, Marios; Schafer, William R

    2013-06-01

    Electrical synapses have been shown to be important for enabling and detecting neuronal synchrony in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Hub-and-spoke circuits, in which a central hub neuron is electrically coupled to several input neurons, are an overrepresented motif in the C. elegans nervous system and may represent a conserved functional unit. The functional relevance of this configuration has been demonstrated for circuits mediating aggregation behavior and nose touch perception. Modeling approaches have been useful for understanding structurally and dynamically more complex electrical circuits. Therefore, we formulated a simple analytical model with minimal assumptions to obtain insight into the properties of the hub-and-spoke microcircuit motif. A key prediction of the model is that an active input neuron should facilitate activity throughout the network, whereas an inactive input should suppress network activity through shunting; this prediction was supported by cell ablation and in vivo neuroimaging experiments in the C. elegans nose touch circuit. Thus, the hub-and-spoke architecture may implement an analog coincidence detector enabling distinct responses to distributed and localized patterns of sensory input. PMID:23707432

  13. Multisensor optimal information fusion input white noise deconvolution estimators.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shuli

    2004-08-01

    The unified multisensor optimal information fusion criterion weighted by matrices is rederived in the linear minimum variance sense, where the assumption of normal distribution is avoided. Based on this fusion criterion, the optimal information fusion input white noise deconvolution estimators are presented for discrete time-varying linear stochastic control system with multiple sensors and correlated noises, which can be applied to seismic data processing in oil exploration. A three-layer fusion structure with fault tolerant property and reliability is given. The first fusion layer and the second fusion layer both have netted parallel structures to determine the first-step prediction error cross-covariance for the state and the estimation error cross-covariance for the input white noise between any two sensors at each time step, respectively. The third fusion layer is the fusion center to determine the optimal matrix weights and obtain the optimal fusion input white noise estimators. The simulation results for Bernoulli-Gaussian input white noise deconvolution estimators show the effectiveness. PMID:15462453

  14. Adult Regularization of Inconsistent Input Depends on Pragmatic Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perfors, Amy

    2016-01-01

    In a variety of domains, adults who are given input that is only partially consistent do not discard the inconsistent portion (regularize) but rather maintain the probability of consistent and inconsistent portions in their behavior (probability match). This research investigates the possibility that adults probability match, at least in part,…

  15. Nitrogen inputs, ouptut, and retention in a coastal suburban basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, W. H.; Daley, M. L.; Gettel, G.

    2005-12-01

    Understanding the biogeochemistry of suburban basins is becoming increasingly important due to the rapidly accelerating suburban sprawl in many parts of the US. In southeastern New Hampshire, population density is expected to increase by 50% over 20 years, and most of the development will occur as low-density suburban home lots with wells and on-site waste disposal. We measured the N inputs, outputs, and loss/storage in a 470 sq km basin, the Lamprey River of coastal New Hampshire. Atmospheric deposition and food imported into the basin were both significant inputs, and totaled 13 kg/ha/yr. Output was 0.6 kg/ha/yr, for a net loss/retention of 95% of inputs. Net retention among various sub-watersheds of the Lamprey ranged from 50 to 98%. Because the Lamprey river basin contains a high proportion of wetlands (14% wetlands and open water), has some water courses that undergo periodic oxygen depletion, and has high levels of dissolved organic carbon in surface waters (6 mg/l), in-stream and wetland denitrification may be a major loss pathway for N in the basin. Results from a study of riparian zone biogeochemistry suggest that riparian denitrification may also be a significant loss pathway. Accelerating suburbanization may greatly increase N delivery to the coast if it shortens hydrologic flow paths and decreases wetland coverage while increasing N inputs.

  16. Considering Linguistic Input in a Bilingual Situation: Implications for Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Peggy F.; Cairns, Helen S.

    2008-01-01

    One aspect of linguistic input that may vary in bilingual speech communities is the use of overregularization (e.g., "catched"). In an earlier study, typically developing bilingual Spanish/English-speaking children were noted to use overregularizations in an elicited production task, accept these forms in a grammaticality judgment task, and reject…

  17. 7 CFR 3431.4 - Solicitation of stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Solicitation of stakeholder input. 3431.4 Section 3431.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE VETERINARY MEDICINE LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM Designation of Veterinarian...

  18. 7 CFR 3431.4 - Solicitation of stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Solicitation of stakeholder input. 3431.4 Section 3431.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE VETERINARY MEDICINE LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM Designation of Veterinarian...

  19. 7 CFR 3431.4 - Solicitation of stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Solicitation of stakeholder input. 3431.4 Section 3431.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE VETERINARY MEDICINE LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM Designation of Veterinarian...

  20. Estimating soil organic carbon input to marine sediments (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weijers, J.; Schouten, S.; Schefuss, E.; Schneider, R. R.; Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.

    2009-12-01

    Estimating (past) input of terrestrial organic carbon (OC) in marine sediments is complicated due to the heterogeneity of the OC. Two end member mixing models based on different parameters often give different results. This is in part due to the fact that terrestrial OC is only represented by one end member (often representing plant OC) where it in fact consists of two OC pools, i.e., plant and soil OC. The branched vs. isoprenoid tetraether (BIT) index is a new proxy for soil OC input, with the branched tetraether membrane lipids being derived from bacteria living in soils and peat bogs [1]. We have now applied this molecular proxy in a three end member mixing model, in conjunction with d13C and C/N values of total organic matter, in a marine sediment core from the Congo deep sea fan to estimate inputs of marine, soil and plant OC to this location over the last deglaciation. Results indicate an average of 45% of the OC being of soil origin, pointing to the importance of soil OC and the need for proper characterization of this fraction. [1] Hopmans et al. (2004) EPSL 224, 107-116. Figure 1: Composition of the organic carbon input to the Congo deep sea fan over the last 20 thousand years. YD = Younger Dryas; LGM = Last Glacial Maximum

  1. INPUT SUBSTITUTION AND DEMAND IN THE WATER SUPPLY PRODUCTION PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The structure of input demand for U.S. water utilities is analyzed by estimating a translog cost function. An important feature of the model includes the multiproduct specification of the water supply production process. Operating variables are also specified to include capacity ...

  2. High Input Voltage, Silicon Carbide Power Processing Unit Performance Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Karin E.; Pinero, Luis R.; Scheidegger, Robert J.; Aulisio, Michael V.; Gonzalez, Marcelo C.; Birchenough, Arthur G.

    2015-01-01

    A silicon carbide brassboard power processing unit has been developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The power processing unit operates from two sources: a nominal 300 Volt high voltage input bus and a nominal 28 Volt low voltage input bus. The design of the power processing unit includes four low voltage, low power auxiliary supplies, and two parallel 7.5 kilowatt (kW) discharge power supplies that are capable of providing up to 15 kilowatts of total power at 300 to 500 Volts (V) to the thruster. Additionally, the unit contains a housekeeping supply, high voltage input filter, low voltage input filter, and master control board, such that the complete brassboard unit is capable of operating a 12.5 kilowatt Hall effect thruster. The performance of the unit was characterized under both ambient and thermal vacuum test conditions, and the results demonstrate exceptional performance with full power efficiencies exceeding 97%. The unit was also tested with a 12.5kW Hall effect thruster to verify compatibility and output filter specifications. With space-qualified silicon carbide or similar high voltage, high efficiency power devices, this would provide a design solution to address the need for high power electric propulsion systems.

  3. High Input Voltage, Silicon Carbide Power Processing Unit Performance Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Karin E.; Pinero, Luis R.; Scheidegger, Robert J.; Aulisio, Michael V.; Gonzalez, Marcelo C.; Birchenough, Arthur G.

    2015-01-01

    A silicon carbide brassboard power processing unit has been developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The power processing unit operates from two sources - a nominal 300-Volt high voltage input bus and a nominal 28-Volt low voltage input bus. The design of the power processing unit includes four low voltage, low power supplies that provide power to the thruster auxiliary supplies, and two parallel 7.5 kilowatt power supplies that are capable of providing up to 15 kilowatts of total power at 300-Volts to 500-Volts to the thruster discharge supply. Additionally, the unit contains a housekeeping supply, high voltage input filter, low voltage input filter, and master control board, such that the complete brassboard unit is capable of operating a 12.5 kilowatt Hall Effect Thruster. The performance of unit was characterized under both ambient and thermal vacuum test conditions, and the results demonstrate the exceptional performance with full power efficiencies exceeding 97. With a space-qualified silicon carbide or similar high voltage, high efficiency power device, this design could evolve into a flight design for future missions that require high power electric propulsion systems.

  4. 7 CFR 3431.4 - Solicitation of stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Solicitation of stakeholder input. 3431.4 Section 3431.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD... Register , on the Agency's Web site, or other appropriate format or forum. This request for...

  5. Second Language Vocabulary Acquisition: A Lexical Input Processing Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barcroft, Joe

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses the importance of vocabulary in second language acquisition (SLA), presents an overview of major strands of research on vocabulary acquisition, and discusses five principles for effective second language (L2) vocabulary instruction based on research findings on lexical input processing. These principles emphasize…

  6. Input Variability Facilitates Unguided Subcategory Learning in Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eidsvåg, Sunniva Sørhus; Austad, Margit; Plante, Elena; Asbjørnsen, Arve E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This experiment investigated whether input variability would affect initial learning of noun gender subcategories in an unfamiliar, natural language (Russian), as it is known to assist learning of other grammatical forms. Method: Forty adults (20 men, 20 women) were familiarized with examples of masculine and feminine Russian words. Half…

  7. Agricultural and Environmental Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    SciTech Connect

    Kaylie Rasmuson; Kurt Rautenstrauch

    2003-06-20

    This analysis is one of nine technical reports that support the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain Nevada (ERMYN) biosphere model. It documents input parameters for the biosphere model, and supports the use of the model to develop Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors (BDCF). The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the repository at Yucca Mountain. The ERMYN provides the TSPA with the capability to perform dose assessments. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the interrelationships between the major activities and their products (the analysis and model reports) that were planned in the biosphere Technical Work Plan (TWP, BSC 2003a). It should be noted that some documents identified in Figure 1-1 may be under development and therefore not available at the time this document is issued. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2003b) describes the ERMYN and its input parameters. This analysis report, ANL-MGR-MD-000006, ''Agricultural and Environmental Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model'', is one of the five reports that develop input parameters for the biosphere model. This report defines and justifies values for twelve parameters required in the biosphere model. These parameters are related to use of contaminated groundwater to grow crops. The parameter values recommended in this report are used in the soil, plant, and carbon-14 submodels of the ERMYN.

  8. Input space-dependent controller for multi-hazard mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Liang; Laflamme, Simon

    2016-04-01

    Semi-active and active structural control systems are advanced mechanical devices and systems capable of high damping performance, ideal for mitigation of multi-hazards. The implementation of these devices within structural systems is still in its infancy, because of the complexity in designing a robust closed-loop control system that can ensure reliable and high mitigation performance. Particular challenges in designing a controller for multi-hazard mitigation include: 1) very large uncertainties on dynamic parameters and unknown excitations; 2) limited measurements with probabilities of sensor failure; 3) immediate performance requirements; and 4) unavailable sets of input-output during design. To facilitate the implementation of structural control systems, a new type of controllers with high adaptive capabilities is proposed. It is based on real-time identification of an embedding that represents the essential dynamics found in the input space, or in the sensors measurements. This type of controller is termed input-space dependent controllers (ISDC). In this paper, the principle of ISDC is presented, their stability and performance derived analytically for the case of harmonic inputs, and their performance demonstrated in the case of different types of hazards. Results show the promise of this new type of controller at mitigating multi-hazards by 1) relying on local and limited sensors only; 2) not requiring prior evaluation or training; and 3) adapting to systems non-stationarities.

  9. 78 FR 65960 - Enhancing Agricultural Coexistence; Request for Public Input

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ... Office of the Secretary Enhancing Agricultural Coexistence; Request for Public Input ACTION: Request for... agricultural production systems in order to further agricultural coexistence. We are taking this action in... to Docket No. APHIS-2013-0047, Regulatory Analysis and Development, PPD, APHIS, Station 3A-03.8,...

  10. G-seat system step input and sinusoidal response characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Showalter, T. W.; Miller, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    The step input and sinusoidal response characteristics of a pneumatically driven computer controlled G set are examined in this study. The response data show that this system can be modeled as a first order system with an 0.08 sec time lag and a 0.53 sec time constant.

  11. Quality assurance of weather data for agricultural system model input

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is well known that crop production and hydrologic variation on watersheds is weather related. Rarely, however, is meteorological data quality checks reported for agricultural systems model research. We present quality assurance procedures for agricultural system model weather data input. Problems...

  12. Songs as Ambient Language Input in Phonology Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Au, Terry Kit-fong

    2013-01-01

    Children cannot learn to speak a language simply from occasional noninteractive exposure to native speakers' input (e.g., by hearing television dialogues), but can they learn something about its phonology? To answer this question, the present study varied ambient hearing experience for 126 5- to 7-year-old native Cantonese-Chinese speakers…

  13. Inferring heuristic classification hierarchies from natural language input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, Richard; Gomez, Fernando

    1993-01-01

    A methodology for inferring hierarchies representing heuristic knowledge about the check out, control, and monitoring sub-system (CCMS) of the space shuttle launch processing system from natural language input is explained. Our method identifies failures explicitly and implicitly described in natural language by domain experts and uses those descriptions to recommend classifications for inclusion in the experts' heuristic hierarchies.

  14. A Web Browsing System by Eye-gaze Input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Kiyohiko; Owada, Kosuke; Ohi, Shoichi; Ohyama, Minoru

    We have developed an eye-gaze input system for people with severe physical disabilities, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. This system utilizes a personal computer and a home video camera to detect eye-gaze under natural light. The system detects both vertical and horizontal eye-gaze by simple image analysis, and does not require special image processing units or sensors. We also developed the platform for eye-gaze input based on our system. In this paper, we propose a new web browsing system for physically disabled computer users as an application of the platform for eye-gaze input. The proposed web browsing system uses a method of direct indicator selection. The method categorizes indicators by their function. These indicators are hierarchized relations; users can select the felicitous function by switching indicators group. This system also analyzes the location of selectable object on web page, such as hyperlink, radio button, edit box, etc. This system stores the locations of these objects, in other words, the mouse cursor skips to the object of candidate input. Therefore it enables web browsing at a faster pace.

  15. On the Nature of Input Channels in Visual Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjork, Elizabeth Ligon; Murray, J. Thomas

    1977-01-01

    This research assesses whether the presence of noise elements in a visual display affects the detection of target letters at the perceptual or feature extraction level of information processing and whether (a) input or processing channels operate in an independent or interactive fashion and (b) how the spatial relation between signal and noise…

  16. An Innovative Class Registration Method Based on Bar Code Input.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Raoul J.

    1983-01-01

    Describes system of computerized class registration utilizing bar code input which is part of the Student Data System, developed by Management Information Division of the Los Angeles Unified School District. An explanation of the system notes the hardware used, printing of bar code labels, registration procedures, and operational aspects. (EJS)

  17. Statistics & Input-Output Measures for Colorado Public Libraries, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidl, Ann M.

    This document contains statistics and input-output measures for all Colorado public libraries. Tables of the following 1997 survey data are provided: state totals and averages; public library addresses; telephone, fax, and URL for public libraries; public library directors; borrowers, outlets and bookmobiles; ALA-MLS librarians, other staff and…

  18. Statistics & Input-Output Measures for Colorado Public Libraries, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Education, Denver. State Library and Adult Education Office.

    "Statistics and Input-Output Measures for Colorado Public Libraries, 1999" is a compilation of data collected from the Colorado Public Library Annual Report sent to each public library jurisdiction in February of 2000 and returned in March. The 1999 response rate was excellent: 100% of Colorado public libraries returned the Annual Report and there…

  19. EFFECT OF CORRELATED INPUTS ON DO (DISSOLVED OXYGEN) UNCERTAINTY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although uncertainty analysis has been discussed in recent water quality modeling literature, much of the work has assumed that all input variables and parameters are mutually independent. The objective of the paper is to evaluate the importance of correlation among the model inp...

  20. The Missing Variable in Input-Output Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Edmond H.

    1974-01-01

    Suggests that evaluations of educational input-output studies frequently overlook some basic characteristics of the nation's schools as a whole, which, when conjoined with economic theory, permit viewing the results of these studies as neither counter intuitive nor damaging to the education profession. (Author/DN)

  1. Retention and Retrieval of Unidirectional, Paired-Associate Verbal Input

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozcan, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    This study is designed to investigate whether the sequence of input is influential in the recollection of the retained information. Eighty first year students, 40 girls and 40 boys, studying in ELT department participated in the study. Three tasks were administered to the participants. In the first test three different lists of words and their…

  2. New concept input and output systems for high power gyroklystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaoxi; Lawson, W.; Liu, C.; Cheng, J.; Anderson, J.; Hogan, B.; Granatstein, V. L.; Reiser, M.

    1999-07-01

    In order to obtain the high mode purity of a TE011 mode in an overmoded gyroklystron input cavity while maintaining high coupling efficiency, a coaxial dual-cavity input structure with an outer TE411 mode and an inner TE011 mode coaxial cavity has been designed to get a reasonable low Q and to avoid mode distortion due to a single coupling aperture between an input waveguide and input cavity. A quality factor of 73 and a resonant frequency of 8.570 GHz with high mode purity have been obtained for the inner TE011 mode coaxial cavity. Furthermore, in order to inject the output power of a second harmonic gyroklystron (17.136 GHz) into our future pulse composer and accelerator system, a coaxial TE021 output cavity with a TE02-TE01 mode converter is proposed and designed as the output structure of the gyroklystron. The output power can be extracted radially, and at the same time the TE02 mode is converted to TE01 mode into a inner coaxial waveguide.

  3. Sociolinguistics Inputs and English as Second Language Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onovughe, Ofodu Graceful

    2012-01-01

    Sociolinguistic inputs in language acquisition and use of English as Second Language in classrooms is the main focus of this study. A survey research design was adopted. The population consisted of all secondary school students in Akure Local Government of Ondo State, Nigeria. Two hundred and forty (240) students in senior secondary school classes…

  4. 7 CFR 3430.307 - Coordination and stakeholder input requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Coordination and stakeholder input requirements. 3430.307 Section 3430.307 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE COMPETITIVE AND NONCOMPETITIVE NON-FORMULA FEDERAL ASSISTANCE...

  5. 7 CFR 3431.4 - Solicitation of stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Solicitation of stakeholder input. 3431.4 Section 3431.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND EXTENSION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VETERINARY MEDICINE LOAN REPAYMENT...

  6. Visual and Auditory Input in Second-Language Speech Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardison, Debra M.

    2010-01-01

    The majority of studies in second-language (L2) speech processing have involved unimodal (i.e., auditory) input; however, in many instances, speech communication involves both visual and auditory sources of information. Some researchers have argued that multimodal speech is the primary mode of speech perception (e.g., Rosenblum 2005). Research on…

  7. Minimizing Input-to-Output Latency in Virtual Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelstein, Bernard D.; Ellis, Stephen R.; Hill, Michael I.

    2009-01-01

    A method and apparatus were developed to minimize latency (time delay ) in virtual environment (VE) and other discrete- time computer-base d systems that require real-time display in response to sensor input s. Latency in such systems is due to the sum of the finite time requi red for information processing and communication within and between sensors, software, and displays.

  8. Input Processing of Chinese by "ab initio" Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, ZhaoHong; Liu, Zehua

    2013-01-01

    We report on a study of first-exposure learners with different first languages (L1s: English, Japanese) to examine their ability to process input for form and meaning. We used a rich set of tasks to tap respectively into processing, comprehension, imitation, and working memory. We show that there are advantages to having a first language (L1) that…

  9. Learning a Novel Pattern through Balanced and Skewed Input

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonough, Kim; Trofimovich, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    This study compared the effectiveness of balanced and skewed input at facilitating the acquisition of the transitive construction in Esperanto, characterized by the accusative suffix "-n" and variable word order (SVO, OVS). Thai university students (N = 98) listened to 24 sentences under skewed (one noun with high token frequency) or…

  10. What Influences Children's Conceptualizations of Language Input?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plante, Elena; Vance, Rebecca; Moody, Amanda; Gerken, LouAnn

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Children learning language conceptualize the nature of input they receive in ways that allow them to understand and construct utterances they have never heard before. This study was designed to illuminate the types of information children with and without specific language impairment (SLI) focus on to develop their conceptualizations and…

  11. Does Frequency Count? Parental Input and the Acquisition of Vocabulary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Judith C.; Dale, Philip S.; Li, Ping

    2008-01-01

    Studies examining factors that influence when words are learned typically investigate one lexical category or a small set of words. We provide the first evaluation of the relation between input frequency and age of acquisition for a large sample of words. The MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventory provides norming data on age of…

  12. Input-Based Grammar Pedagogy: A Comparison of Two Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsden, Emma

    2005-01-01

    This article presents arguments for using listening and reading activities as an option for techniques in grammar pedagogy. It describes two possible approaches: Processing Instruction (PI) and Enriched Input (EI), and examples of their key features are included in the appendices. The article goes on to report on a classroom based quasi-experiment…

  13. The realization of input-output maps using bialgebras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, Robert; Larson, Richard G.

    1989-01-01

    The theory of bialgebras is used to prove a state space realization theorem for input/output maps of dynamical systems. This approach allows for the consideration of the classical results of Fliess and more recent results on realizations involving families of trees. Two examples of applications of the theorum are given.

  14. Variable Input and the Acquisition of Plural Morphology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Karen L.; Schmitt, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    The present article examines the effect of variable input on the acquisition of plural morphology in two varieties of Spanish: Chilean Spanish, where the plural marker is sometimes omitted due to a phonological process of syllable final /s/ lenition, and Mexican Spanish (of Mexico City), with no such lenition process. The goal of the study is to…

  15. Polarization changes at Lyot depolarizer output for different types of input beams.

    PubMed

    de Sande, J Carlos G; Piquero, Gemma; Teijeiro, Cristina

    2012-03-01

    Lyot depolarizers are optical devices made of birefringent materials used for producing unpolarized beams from totally polarized incident light. The depolarization is produced for polychromatic input beams due to the different phase introduced by the Lyot depolarizer for each wavelength. The effect of this device on other types of incident fields is investigated. In particular two cases are analyzed: (i) monochromatic and nonuniformly polarized incident beams and (ii) incident light synthesized by superposition of two monochromatic orthogonally polarized beams with different wavelengths. In the last case, it is theoretically and experimentally shown that the Lyot depolarizer increases the degree of polarization instead of depolarizes. PMID:22472758

  16. Conceptualizing, Understanding, and Predicting Responsible Decisions and Quality Input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, N.; PytlikZillig, L. M.

    2012-12-01

    In areas such as climate change, where uncertainty is high, it is arguably less difficult to tell when efforts have resulted in changes in knowledge, than when those efforts have resulted in responsible decisions. What is a responsible decision? More broadly, when it comes to citizen input, what is "high quality" input? And most importantly, how are responsible decisions and quality input enhanced? The aim of this paper is to contribute to the understanding of the different dimensions of "responsible" or "quality" public input and citizen decisions by comparing and contrasting the different predictors of those different dimensions. We first present different possibilities for defining, operationalizing and assessing responsible or high quality decisions. For example, responsible decisions or quality input might be defined as using specific content (e.g., using climate change information in decisions appropriately), as using specific processes (e.g., investing time and effort in learning about and discussing the issues prior to making decisions), or on the basis of some judgment of the decision or input itself (e.g., judgments of the rationale provided for the decisions, or number of issues considered when giving input). Second, we present results from our work engaging people with science policy topics, and the different ways that we have tried to define these two constructs. In the area of climate change specifically, we describe the development of a short survey that assesses exposure to climate information, knowledge of and attitudes toward climate change, and use of climate information in one's decisions. Specifically, the short survey was developed based on a review of common surveys of climate change related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors, and extensive piloting and cognitive interviews. Next, we analyze more than 200 responses to that survey (data collection is currently ongoing and will be complete after the AGU deadline), and report the predictors of

  17. Observations of the directional distribution of the wind energy input function over swell waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabani, Behnam; Babanin, Alex V.; Baldock, Tom E.

    2016-02-01

    Field measurements of wind stress over shallow water swell traveling in different directions relative to the wind are presented. The directional distribution of the measured stresses is used to confirm the previously proposed but unverified directional distribution of the wind energy input function. The observed wind energy input function is found to follow a much narrower distribution (β∝cos⁡3.6θ) than the Plant (1982) cosine distribution. The observation of negative stress angles at large wind-wave angles, however, indicates that the onset of negative wind shearing occurs at about θ≈ 50°, and supports the use of the Snyder et al. (1981) directional distribution. Taking into account the reverse momentum transfer from swell to the wind, Snyder's proposed parameterization is found to perform exceptionally well in explaining the observed narrow directional distribution of the wind energy input function, and predicting the wind drag coefficients. The empirical coefficient (ɛ) in Snyder's parameterization is hypothesised to be a function of the wave shape parameter, with ɛ value increasing as the wave shape changes between sinusoidal, sawtooth, and sharp-crested shoaling waves.

  18. Interactions between multisensory inputs with voluntary spatial attention: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Yan, Tianyi; Geng, Yansong; Wu, Jinglong; Li, Chunlin

    2015-08-01

    Cross-modal attention and multisensory integration are very essential for us to perceive the world. The most intuitive feelings about the environment around us are based on what we see and what we hear. Therefore, it is important to understand the interactions between visual inputs and auditory inputs. Previous studies have shown that multisensory integration can be modulated by attention. However, how top-down attention is controlled or allocated across the sensory modalities remains unclear. In this study, we measured the cortical areas activated by the cue-target spatial attention paradigm in both visual and auditory fields using functional MRI. The reaction times of the behavioral results indicated that interactions between the two types of stimuli exist. The imaging results indicated that interactions between multisensory inputs can lead to enhancement or depression of the cortical response with top-down spatial attention. Moreover, the activation of the middle temporal gyrus and insula in tasks with irrelevant stimuli appears to indicate that multisensory integration proceeds automatically. PMID:26103115

  19. A Theoretical Investigation of the Input Characteristics of a Rectangular Cavity-Backed Slot Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockrell, C. R.

    1975-01-01

    Equations which represent the magnetic and electric stored energies are derived for an infinite section of rectangular waveguide and a rectangular cavity. These representations which are referred to as being physically observable are obtained by considering the difference in the volume integrals appearing in the complex Poynting theorem. It is shown that the physically observable stored energies are determined by the field components that vanish in a reference plane outside the aperture. These physically observable representations are used to compute the input admittance of a rectangular cavity-backed slot antenna in which a single propagating wave is assumed to exist in the cavity. The slot is excited by a voltage source connected across its center; a sinusoidal distribution is assumed in the slot. Input-admittance calculations are compared with measured data. In addition, input-admittance curves as a function of electrical slot length are presented for several size cavities. For the rectangular cavity backed slot antenna, the quality factor and relative bandwidth were computed independently by using these energy relationships. It is shown that the asymptotic relationship which is usually assumed to exist between the quality bandwidth and the reciprocal of relative bandwidth is equally valid for the rectangular cavity backed slot antenna.

  20. Organization of columnar inputs in the third optic ganglion of a highly visual crab.

    PubMed

    Bengochea, Mercedes; Berón de Astrada, Martín

    2014-01-01

    Motion information provides essential cues for a wide variety of animal behaviors such as mate, prey, or predator detection. In decapod crustaceans and pterygote insects, visual codification of object motion is associated with visual processing in the third optic neuropile, the lobula. In this neuropile, tangential neurons collect motion information from small field columnar neurons and relay it to the midbrain where behavioral responses would be finally shaped. In highly ordered structures, detailed knowledge of the neuroanatomy can give insight into their function. In spite of the relevance of the lobula in processing motion information, studies on the neuroarchitecture of this neuropile are scant. Here, by applying dextran-conjugated dyes in the second optic neuropile (the medulla) of the crab Neohelice, we mass stained the columnar neurons that convey visual information into the lobula. We found that the arborizations of these afferent columnar neurons lie at four main lobula depths. A detailed examination of serial optical sections of the lobula revealed that these input strata are composed of different number of substrata and that the strata are thicker in the centre of the neuropile. Finally, by staining the different lobula layers composed of tangential processes we combined the present characterization of lobula input strata with the previous characterization of the neuroarchitecture of the crab's lobula based on reduced-silver preparations. We found that the third lobula input stratum overlaps with the dendrites of lobula giant tangential neurons. This suggests that columnar neurons projecting from the medulla can directly provide visual input to the crab's lobula giant neurons. PMID:24929118

  1. A New Ensemble of Perturbed-Input-Parameter Simulations by the Community Atmosphere Model

    SciTech Connect

    Covey, C; Brandon, S; Bremer, P T; Domyancis, D; Garaizar, X; Johannesson, G; Klein, R; Klein, S A; Lucas, D D; Tannahill, J; Zhang, Y

    2011-10-27

    Uncertainty quantification (UQ) is a fundamental challenge in the numerical simulation of Earth's weather and climate, and other complex systems. It entails much more than attaching defensible error bars to predictions: in particular it includes assessing low-probability but high-consequence events. To achieve these goals with models containing a large number of uncertain input parameters, structural uncertainties, etc., raw computational power is needed. An automated, self-adapting search of the possible model configurations is also useful. Our UQ initiative at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has produced the most extensive set to date of simulations from the US Community Atmosphere Model. We are examining output from about 3,000 twelve-year climate simulations generated with a specialized UQ software framework, and assessing the model's accuracy as a function of 21 to 28 uncertain input parameter values. Most of the input parameters we vary are related to the boundary layer, clouds, and other sub-grid scale processes. Our simulations prescribe surface boundary conditions (sea surface temperatures and sea ice amounts) to match recent observations. Fully searching this 21+ dimensional space is impossible, but sensitivity and ranking algorithms can identify input parameters having relatively little effect on a variety of output fields, either individually or in nonlinear combination. Bayesian statistical constraints, employing a variety of climate observations as metrics, also seem promising. Observational constraints will be important in the next step of our project, which will compute sea surface temperatures and sea ice interactively, and will study climate change due to increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide.

  2. Singular year of high geomagnetic responses to the same solar wind input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Masatoshi; Olsthoorn, Bart; Nicolaou, Georgios

    2016-04-01

    Using high-resolution (5 min) solar wind data and westward auroral electrojet index (AL) index since 1981, temporal variation of the Sun-Earth coupling efficiency (AL response to the solar wind electromagnetic energy/flux input) was examined. To separate the seasonal variation, 3-month averaged statistics is used. (1) The Sun-Earth coupling efficiency for moderate solar wind input occasionally increased beyond the seasonal variation for about half a year during the declining phase of solar cycles; (2) Excluding these singular years and seasonal variation, the Sun-Earth coupling efficiency for moderate or low solar wind input continuously decreased over the past three decades; (3) These temporal variations do not correlate with F10.7 index (proxy for the Solar UV flux). The results confirm some of the previous study using 1-hour resolution data with a better accuracy, and suggest that the existence of additional controlling mechanisms either at the Sun (e.g., magnetic field or solar cycle strength) or solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling (e.g., through the solar wind composition). On the other hand, the Sun-Earth coupling efficiency for large solar wind input is very variable and the present correlation method is not sufficient to determine the conditions for large AL activities and its temporal variation. Acknowledgement: Auroral electrojet (AE) indices and sunspot numbers (RI) are official IAGA and IAA endorsed indices that are provided by World Data Center for Geomagnetism, Kyoto University, Japan (AE) and the Royal Observatory of Belgium, Brussels (RI). Including these indices, all data in 5-minutes values are obtained from NASA-GSFC/SPDF through OMNIWeb (http://omniweb.gsfc.nasa.gov/ow.html).

  3. Effects of Ground Motion Input on the Derived Fragility Functions: Case study of 2010 Haiti Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancilar, Ufuk; Harmandar, Ebru; Çakti, Eser

    2014-05-01

    Empirical fragility functions are derived by statistical processing of the data on: i) Damaged and undamaged buildings, and ii) Ground motion intensity values at the buildings' locations. This study investigates effects of different ground motion inputs on the derived fragility functions. The previously constructed fragility curves (Hancilar et al. 2013), which rely on specific shaking intensity maps published by the USGS after the 2010 Haiti Earthquake, are compared with the fragility functions computed in the present study. Building data come from field surveys of 6,347 buildings that are grouped with respect to structural material type and number of stories. For damage assessment, the European Macroseismic Scale (EMS-98) damage grades are adopted. The simplest way to account for the variability in ground motion input could have been achieved by employing different ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) and their standard variations. However, in this work, we prefer to rely on stochastically simulated ground motions of the Haiti earthquake. We employ five different source models available in the literature and calculate the resulting strong ground motion in time domain. In our simulations we also consider the local site effects by published studies on NEHRP site classes and micro-zoning maps of the city of Port-au-Prince. We estimate the regional distributions from the waveforms simulated at the same coordinates that we have damage information from. The estimated spatial distributions of peak ground accelerations and velocities, PGA and PGV respectively, are then used as input to fragility computations. The results show that changing the ground motion input causes significant variability in the resulting fragility functions.

  4. Spatial distributions of cone inputs to cells of the parvocellular pathway investigated with cone-isolating gratings

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Barry B.; Shapley, Robert M.; Hawken, Michael J.; Sun, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Receptive fields of midget ganglion cells and parvocellular lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) neurons show color-opponent responses because they receive antagonistic input from the middle- and long-wavelength sensitive cones. It has been controversial as to whether this opponency can derive from random connectivity; if receptive field centers of cells near the fovea are cone-specific due to midget morphology, this would confer some degree of color opponency even with random cone input to the surround. A simple test of this mixed surround hypothesis is to compare spatial frequency tuning curves for luminance gratings and gratings isolating cone input to the receptive field center. If tuning curves for luminance gratings were bandpass, then with the mixed surround hypothesis tuning curves for gratings isolating the receptive field center cone class should also be bandpass, but to a lesser extent than for luminance. Tuning curves for luminance, chromatic, and cone-isolating gratings were measured in macaque retinal ganglion cells and LGN cells. We defined and measured a bandpass index to compare luminance and center cone-isolating tuning curves. Midget retinal ganglion cells and parvocellular LGN cells had bandpass indices between 0.1 and 1 with luminance gratings, but the index was usually near 1 (meaning low-pass tuning) when the receptive field center cone class alone was modulated. This is strong evidence for a considerable degree of cone-specific input to the surround. A fraction of midget and parvocellular cells showed evidence of incomplete specificity. Fitting the data with receptive field models revealed considerable intercell variability, with indications in some cells of a more complex receptive structure than a simple difference of Gaussians model. PMID:22330383

  5. Spatial distributions of cone inputs to cells of the parvocellular pathway investigated with cone-isolating gratings.

    PubMed

    Lee, Barry B; Shapley, Robert M; Hawken, Michael J; Sun, Hao

    2012-02-01

    Receptive fields of midget ganglion cells and parvocellular lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) neurons show color-opponent responses because they receive antagonistic input from the middle- and long-wavelength sensitive cones. It has been controversial as to whether this opponency can derive from random connectivity; if receptive field centers of cells near the fovea are cone-specific due to midget morphology, this would confer some degree of color opponency even with random cone input to the surround. A simple test of this mixed surround hypothesis is to compare spatial frequency tuning curves for luminance gratings and gratings isolating cone input to the receptive field center. If tuning curves for luminance gratings were bandpass, then with the mixed surround hypothesis tuning curves for gratings isolating the receptive field center cone class should also be bandpass, but to a lesser extent than for luminance. Tuning curves for luminance, chromatic, and cone-isolating gratings were measured in macaque retinal ganglion cells and LGN cells. We defined and measured a bandpass index to compare luminance and center cone-isolating tuning curves. Midget retinal ganglion cells and parvocellular LGN cells had bandpass indices between 0.1 and 1 with luminance gratings, but the index was usually near 1 (meaning low-pass tuning) when the receptive field center cone class alone was modulated. This is strong evidence for a considerable degree of cone-specific input to the surround. A fraction of midget and parvocellular cells showed evidence of incomplete specificity. Fitting the data with receptive field models revealed considerable intercell variability, with indications in some cells of a more complex receptive structure than a simple difference of Gaussians model. PMID:22330383

  6. When Is Input Salient? An Exploratory Study of Sentence Location and Word Length Effects on Input Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Susanne E.

    2012-01-01

    Sentence position and word length have been claimed to contribute to the perceptual salience of words. The perceptual salience of words in turn is said to predict L2 developmental sequences. Data for such claims come from sentence repetition tasks that required perceptual re-encoding of input and that did not control for focal accent. We used a…

  7. Integrate-and-fire vs Poisson models of LGN input to V1 cortex: noisier inputs reduce orientation selectivity.

    PubMed

    Lin, I-Chun; Xing, Dajun; Shapley, Robert

    2012-12-01

    One of the reasons the visual cortex has attracted the interest of computational neuroscience is that it has well-defined inputs. The lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) of the thalamus is the source of visual signals to the primary visual cortex (V1). Most large-scale cortical network models approximate the spike trains of LGN neurons as simple Poisson point processes. However, many studies have shown that neurons in the early visual pathway are capable of spiking with high temporal precision and their discharges are not Poisson-like. To gain an understanding of how response variability in the LGN influences the behavior of V1, we study response properties of model V1 neurons that receive purely feedforward inputs from LGN cells modeled either as noisy leaky integrate-and-fire (NLIF) neurons or as inhomogeneous Poisson processes. We first demonstrate that the NLIF model is capable of reproducing many experimentally observed statistical properties of LGN neurons. Then we show that a V1 model in which the LGN input to a V1 neuron is modeled as a group of NLIF neurons produces higher orientation selectivity than the one with Poisson LGN input. The second result implies that statistical characteristics of LGN spike trains are important for V1's function. We conclude that physiologically motivated models of V1 need to include more realistic LGN spike trains that are less noisy than inhomogeneous Poisson processes. PMID:22684587

  8. Low-voltage constant- g m rail-to-rail CMOS operational amplifier input stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yan; Yao, Ruo He

    2008-06-01

    This paper presents a rail-to-rail constant-gm operational amplifier input stage. The proposed circuit changes the tail current of the input differential pairs dynamically for a constant-gm by using dummy input differential pairs. The problem which causes total gm variation is input pairs and dummy input pairs can not take effect at the same time with the common-mode input voltage changes, because the tail current transistor of the input pairs are in triode region when the input pairs are turned off, the dummy input pairs will enter subthreshold region from cut-off region before the input pairs when common-mode voltage changes. The effect of this problem is more obviously in low supply voltage design. To solve this problem, compensate current sources is added to the tail current transistors of each dummy input differential pairs for lower gm variation. The gm of this Op Amp's input stage varies around ±2%.

  9. Effects of welding heat input on microstructure and hardness in heat-affected zone of HQ130 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J. S.; Wu, C. S.; Sun, J. S.

    2001-01-01

    There are two parts of the heat input in gas-metal arc welding (GMAW): one is the arc heat flux and the other is the heat content of filler metal droplets. This paper introduces a new mode of arc heat flux density distribution on the deformed GMAW weldpool surface. A numerical model of fluid flow and temperature field in GMAW is established according to the new mode of arc heat flux distribution. By using a numerical simulation technique, the effects of welding heat input on microstructure and hardness in HAZ of HQ130 steel are studied. The dimensions of Austenitic grains and hardness in different locations in HAZ of HQ130 steel are calculated under different welding heat inputs. Experiments show that the calculated results of welding thermal cycle and microstructure and hardness in HAZ of HQ130 steel are in agreement with measured ones.

  10. A stochastic model of input effectiveness during irregular gamma rhythms.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Grégory; Northoff, Georg; Longtin, André

    2016-02-01

    Gamma-band synchronization has been linked to attention and communication between brain regions, yet the underlying dynamical mechanisms are still unclear. How does the timing and amplitude of inputs to cells that generate an endogenously noisy gamma rhythm affect the network activity and rhythm? How does such "communication through coherence" (CTC) survive in the face of rhythm and input variability? We present a stochastic modelling approach to this question that yields a very fast computation of the effectiveness of inputs to cells involved in gamma rhythms. Our work is partly motivated by recent optogenetic experiments (Cardin et al. Nature, 459(7247), 663-667 2009) that tested the gamma phase-dependence of network responses by first stabilizing the rhythm with periodic light pulses to the interneurons (I). Our computationally efficient model E-I network of stochastic two-state neurons exhibits finite-size fluctuations. Using the Hilbert transform and Kuramoto index, we study how the stochastic phase of its gamma rhythm is entrained by external pulses. We then compute how this rhythmic inhibition controls the effectiveness of external input onto pyramidal (E) cells, and how variability shapes the window of firing opportunity. For transferring the time variations of an external input to the E cells, we find a tradeoff between the phase selectivity and depth of rate modulation. We also show that the CTC is sensitive to the jitter in the arrival times of spikes to the E cells, and to the degree of I-cell entrainment. We further find that CTC can occur even if the underlying deterministic system does not oscillate; quasicycle-type rhythms induced by the finite-size noise retain the basic CTC properties. Finally a resonance analysis confirms the relative importance of the I cell pacing for rhythm generation. Analysis of whole network behaviour, including computations of synchrony, phase and shifts in excitatory-inhibitory balance, can be further sped up by orders of

  11. Multi-site validation of a soil organic matter model based on generally available input data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franko, Uwe; Kolbe, Hartmut; Thiel, Enrico; Ließ, Ekkehard

    2010-05-01

    Regionalization of soil organic matter (SOM) dynamics by means of modelling is often restricted by the availability of model inputs on the used scale. Taking this into account the approach of the CANDY model (Franko et al., 1995) has been strongly simplified with a remarkable reduction of input requirements. This simplified model called Candy Carbon balance (CCB) was validated against a large number of long term datasets from arable field experiments mainly situated in Germany but also from some places in Europe altogether containing 41 sites with 65 experiments and a total number of 598 different treatments. The required input data are: - soil: clay content, soil classification - climate: rainfall and air temperature as long term averages - management: crop rotation with yields and organic amendments - SOM: at least one initial value; more observations for validation purpose During the calculation process the model makes use of some other soil parameters like silt content, bulk density, pore volume, field capacity and permanent wilting point. These data may be delivered by the user or if absent they will be calculated from pedotransfer functions. If the initial information includes not only organic Carbon (Corg) but also total Nitrogen (Nt) the SOM dynamics will be modelled for both elements. The CCB model follows the CANDY concept distributing SOM in a long term stabilized and a decomposable fraction. The long term stabilized part is calculated comparable to the CIPS model (Kuka,2005) taking the SOM in soil micro pores as highly stabilized so that its turnover can be neglected for this model application and hence will show no dynamics during simulation. Soil texture, rainfall, irrigation amount and air temperature are used to estimate the site specific biologic activity for SOM turnover in terms of Biological Active Time (BAT). Annual yield data are transformed to the amounts of organic matter input due to cropping that together with organic amendments are the

  12. Agricultural and Environmental Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    SciTech Connect

    K. Rasmuson; K. Rautenstrauch

    2004-09-14

    This analysis is one of 10 technical reports that support the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain Nevada (ERMYN) (i.e., the biosphere model). It documents development of agricultural and environmental input parameters for the biosphere model, and supports the use of the model to develop biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs). The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the repository at Yucca Mountain. The ERMYN provides the TSPA with the capability to perform dose assessments. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the interrelationships between the major activities and their products (the analysis and model reports) that were planned in ''Technical Work Plan for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]). The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes the ERMYN and its input parameters.

  13. Synchronized amplification of local information transmission by peripheral retinal input.

    PubMed

    Jadzinsky, Pablo D; Baccus, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    Sensory stimuli have varying statistics influenced by both the environment and by active sensing behaviors that rapidly and globally change the sensory input. Consequently, sensory systems often adjust their neural code to the expected statistics of their sensory input to transmit novel sensory information. Here, we show that sudden peripheral motion amplifies and accelerates information transmission in salamander ganglion cells in a 50 ms time window. Underlying this gating of information is a transient increase in adaptation to contrast, enhancing sensitivity to a broader range of stimuli. Using a model and natural images, we show that this effect coincides with an expected increase in information in bipolar cells after a global image shift. Our findings reveal the dynamic allocation of energy resources to increase neural activity at times of expected high information content, a principle of adaptation that balances the competing requirements of conserving spikes and transmitting information. PMID:26568312

  14. The Generalization Complexity Measure for Continuous Input Data

    PubMed Central

    Cannas, Sergio A.; Osenda, Omar; Jerez, José M.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce in this work an extension for the generalization complexity measure to continuous input data. The measure, originally defined in Boolean space, quantifies the complexity of data in relationship to the prediction accuracy that can be expected when using a supervised classifier like a neural network, SVM, and so forth. We first extend the original measure for its use with continuous functions to later on, using an approach based on the use of the set of Walsh functions, consider the case of having a finite number of data points (inputs/outputs pairs), that is, usually the practical case. Using a set of trigonometric functions a model that gives a relationship between the size of the hidden layer of a neural network and the complexity is constructed. Finally, we demonstrate the application of the introduced complexity measure, by using the generated model, to the problem of estimating an adequate neural network architecture for real-world data sets. PMID:24983000

  15. Input-current shaped ac to dc converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The problem of achieving near unity power factor while supplying power to a dc load from a single phase ac source of power is examined. Power processors for this application must perform three functions: input current shaping, energy storage, and output voltage regulation. The methods available for performing each of these three functions are reviewed. Input current shaping methods are either active or passive, with the active methods divided into buck-like and boost-like techniques. In addition to large reactances, energy storage methods include resonant filters, active filters, and active storage schemes. Fast voltage regulation can be achieved by post regulation or by supplementing the current shaping topology with an extra switch. Some indications of which methods are best suited for particular applications concludes the discussion.

  16. Clauser-Horne Bell test with imperfect random inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiao; Zhao, Qi; Ma, Xiongfeng

    2015-08-01

    The Bell test is one of the most important tools in quantum information science. On the one hand, it enables fundamental tests of the basic physics laws of nature, and on the other hand, it can also be applied in a variety of device-independent tasks such as quantum key distribution and random number generation. In practice, loopholes existing in experimental demonstrations of Bell tests may affect the validity of the conclusions. In this work, we focus on the randomness (freewill) loophole and investigate the randomness requirement in a well-known Bell test, the Clauser-Horne test, under various conditions. We explicitly bound the Bell value for all local hidden variable models by optimizing over all classical strategies exploiting the knowledge of the partially random inputs. Our result thus provides input randomness requirements on the Clauser-Horne test under varieties of practical scenarios. The employed analysis technique can also be generalized to other Bell inequalities.

  17. Dynamic test input generation for multiple-fault isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Phil

    1990-01-01

    Recent work is Causal Reasoning has provided practical techniques for multiple fault diagnosis. These techniques provide a hypothesis/measurement diagnosis cycle. Using probabilistic methods, they choose the best measurements to make, then update fault hypotheses in response. For many applications such as computers and spacecraft, few measurement points may be accessible, or values may change quickly as the system under diagnosis operates. In these cases, a hypothesis/measurement cycle is insufficient. A technique is presented for a hypothesis/test-input/measurement diagnosis cycle. In contrast to generating tests a priori for determining device functionality, it dynamically generates tests in response to current knowledge about fault probabilities. It is shown how the mathematics previously used for measurement specification can be applied to the test input generation process. An example from an efficient implementation called Multi-Purpose Causal (MPC) is presented.

  18. Effects of input uncertainty on cross-scale crop modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waha, Katharina; Huth, Neil; Carberry, Peter

    2014-05-01

    The quality of data on climate, soils and agricultural management in the tropics is in general low or data is scarce leading to uncertainty in process-based modeling of cropping systems. Process-based crop models are common tools for simulating crop yields and crop production in climate change impact studies, studies on mitigation and adaptation options or food security studies. Crop modelers are concerned about input data accuracy as this, together with an adequate representation of plant physiology processes and choice of model parameters, are the key factors for a reliable simulation. For example, assuming an error in measurements of air temperature, radiation and precipitation of ± 0.2°C, ± 2 % and ± 3 % respectively, Fodor & Kovacs (2005) estimate that this translates into an uncertainty of 5-7 % in yield and biomass simulations. In our study we seek to answer the following questions: (1) are there important uncertainties in the spatial variability of simulated crop yields on the grid-cell level displayed on maps, (2) are there important uncertainties in the temporal variability of simulated crop yields on the aggregated, national level displayed in time-series, and (3) how does the accuracy of different soil, climate and management information influence the simulated crop yields in two crop models designed for use at different spatial scales? The study will help to determine whether more detailed information improves the simulations and to advise model users on the uncertainty related to input data. We analyse the performance of the point-scale crop model APSIM (Keating et al., 2003) and the global scale crop model LPJmL (Bondeau et al., 2007) with different climate information (monthly and daily) and soil conditions (global soil map and African soil map) under different agricultural management (uniform and variable sowing dates) for the low-input maize-growing areas in Burkina Faso/West Africa. We test the models' response to different levels of input

  19. Microchannel cross load array with dense parallel input

    DOEpatents

    Swierkowski, Stefan P.

    2004-04-06

    An architecture or layout for microchannel arrays using T or Cross (+) loading for electrophoresis or other injection and separation chemistry that are performed in microfluidic configurations. This architecture enables a very dense layout of arrays of functionally identical shaped channels and it also solves the problem of simultaneously enabling efficient parallel shapes and biasing of the input wells, waste wells, and bias wells at the input end of the separation columns. One T load architecture uses circular holes with common rows, but not columns, which allows the flow paths for each channel to be identical in shape, using multiple mirror image pieces. Another T load architecture enables the access hole array to be formed on a biaxial, collinear grid suitable for EDM micromachining (square holes), with common rows and columns.

  20. Fiber-optic input and output for superconducting circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Bunz, L.A.; Track, E.K.; Rylov, S.V.; Perng Feiyuh; Morse, J.

    1994-12-31

    Superconducting devices operate at speeds where coaxial copper cables can be a limiting factor. Coaxial cables can limit frequency response and impose significant thermal loading on a cryogenic system. The high bandwidth of optical fibers and their low thermal conductivity make them good candidates for providing data into and out of superconducting circuits. In this paper, the authors present the results of their experience in operating photodetectors and laser diodes together with superconducting circuits in the same low temperature (4.2 K) environment. Using these photodetectors, they demonstrate the input of optical signals to an analog superconducting circuit at 6 GHz. Output from a superconducting circuit operating at 500 MHz is fed into a laser diode, and optically coupled to room temperature electronics. By combining these two techniques, they demonstrate a fully operational superconducting shift register with both input and output signals supplied by optical fiber.

  1. Magnetospheric Energy Input during Intense Geomagnetic Storms in SC23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besliu-Ionescu, Diana; Maris Muntean, Georgeta; Dobrica, Venera; Mierla, Marilena

    2015-04-01

    Geomagnetic storm connections to solar eruptive phenomena in solar cycle 23 (SC23) have been intensively studied and it is a subject of great importance because of their various effects in our day-to-day life. We analyse the energy transfer from the solar wind into the magnetosphere during intense geomagnetic storms defined by Dst ≤ -150 nT. There were 29 intense storms during SC23. We will use the Akasofu parameter (Akasofu, 1981) to compute the ɛ function and study its time profile. We compute the energy input efficiency during the main phase of the geomagnetic storm. We compute the magnetospheric energy input using the formula introduced by Wang et al. (2014) and compare these results with the ɛ function for the geomagnetic storms of October 29-30, 2003.

  2. Subcortical input heterogeneity in the mouse inferior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Geis, H-Rüdiger A P; van der Heijden, Marcel; Borst, J Gerard G

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Simultaneous intracellular recordings of nearby neocortical neurons have demonstrated that their membrane potentials are highly correlated. The correlation between the spiking activity of nearby neocortical neurons may be much smaller, suggesting that inputs are more similar than outputs. Much less is known about the similarity of inputs in subcortical sensory areas. Here we investigate this question by making simultaneous whole-cell recordings from neighbouring neurons in the dorsal cortex of the mouse inferior colliculus. No evidence for monosynaptic connections between neighbouring cells was observed, suggesting that integration of afferent signals plays a more important role than local processing. The correlation between frequency response areas of neighbouring cells varied but, surprisingly, neighbouring cells were on average not more similar in their responses to tones than non-neighbouring neurons. This large micro-heterogeneity suggests a sparse representation of acoustic features within the dorsal cortex. PMID:21727222

  3. Sinusoidal input describing function for hysteresis followed by elementary backlash

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ringland, R. F.

    1976-01-01

    The author proposes a new sinusoidal input describing function which accounts for the serial combination of hysteresis followed by elementary backlash in a single nonlinear element. The output of the hysteresis element drives the elementary backlash element. Various analytical forms of the describing function are given, depending on the a/A ratio, where a is the half width of the hysteresis band or backlash gap, and A is the amplitude of the assumed input sinusoid, and on the value of the parameter representing the fraction of a attributed to the backlash characteristic. The negative inverse describing function is plotted on a gain-phase plot, and it is seen that a relatively small amount of backlash leads to domination of the backlash character in the describing function. The extent of the region of the gain-phase plane covered by the describing function is such as to guarantee some form of limit cycle behavior in most closed-loop systems.

  4. Neuronal Inputs and Outputs of Aging and Longevity

    PubMed Central

    Alcedo, Joy; Flatt, Thomas; Pasyukova, Elena G.

    2013-01-01

    An animal’s survival strongly depends on its ability to maintain homeostasis in response to the changing quality of its external and internal environment. This is achieved through intracellular and intercellular communication within and among different tissues. One of the organ systems that plays a major role in this communication and the maintenance of homeostasis is the nervous system. Here we highlight different aspects of the neuronal inputs and outputs of pathways that affect aging and longevity. Accordingly, we discuss how sensory inputs influence homeostasis and lifespan through the modulation of different types of neuronal signals, which reflects the complexity of the environmental cues that affect physiology. We also describe feedback, compensatory, and feed-forward mechanisms in these longevity-modulating pathways that are necessary for homeostasis. Finally, we consider the temporal requirements for these neuronal processes and the potential role of natural genetic variation in shaping the neurobiology of aging. PMID:23653632

  5. An input shaping controller enabling cranes to move without sway

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, N.; Singhose, W.; Kriikku, E.

    1997-06-01

    A gantry crane at the Savannah River Technology Center was retrofitted with an Input Shaping controller. The controller intercepts the operator`s pendant commands and modifies them in real time so that the crane is moved without residual sway in the suspended load. Mechanical components on the crane were modified to make the crane suitable for the anti-sway algorithm. This paper will describe the required mechanical modifications to the crane, as well as, a new form of Input Shaping that was developed for use on the crane. Experimental results are presented which demonstrate the effectiveness of the new process. Several practical considerations will be discussed including a novel (patent pending) approach for making small, accurate moves without residual oscillations.

  6. General-Purpose Data-Formatting Input/Output System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busquets, Anthony M.; Hogge, Thomas W.

    1990-01-01

    Multiplexable input/output (I/O) system developed as interface between host computer and real-time, fixed-base simulator cockpit. Unit designed to be general-purpose interface and operated through virtually any 8- or 16-bit, transistor/transistor-logic-level, parallel-I/O port with or without handshaking. Accepts byte-coded data in form of data blocks from host computer and routes data to various system I/O modules like discrete outputs, lamp drivers, and seven-segment-display drivers. Formats and routes data from input modules back to host computer. Other modules designed to drive alphanumeric displays and communications interfaces and to serve as analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog converter modules.

  7. Prediction uncertainty reflects both data input quality and model software sophistication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syvitski, J.

    2011-12-01

    Recently Syvitski et al. (2011, The Sedimentary Record, v. 9) put forth three concepts related to earth surface modeling: 1) Prediction, as opposed to cataloging, is a major step in the evolution of geoscience; 2) Quantitative modeling provides a framework in which researchers express their predictive ideas in a precise, consistent format; and 3) Models are an encyclopedia of what we know, and often reveal what we cannot yet quantify. This burgeoning field of earth surface science has proportioned itself into three loose fields of endeavor: 1) those that provide data for model initialization and model boundary conditions; 2) those that develop the algorithms, the numerical models and even the middle ware that links models and input data; and 3) the observational specialists that provide test case data that can be used to judge the skill of a model or parts of a model. This 'modern' way of conducting geoscience requires a team approach offering diverse expertise. Uncertainties associated with this workflow are not always understood or appreciated or transparent - leading to poor or over interpretation of model results. To avoid this perception, uncertainties associated with input data must be involved in the model runs, model-run uncertainties must also be expressed independent of the input data uncertainties, and finally model skill testing must be appreciated with full knowledge of uncertainties associated with test case data. While methods have been developed to cope with geo-model skill (ensemble model run averaging or intercomparison; data ingestion schemes to deal with model drift), workflow uncertainty studies are seldom carried out (i.e. is the expense worth the effort?). Prediction uncertainty examples will be presented based on experience from the Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System 'CSDMS' community.

  8. Responses of two nonlinear microbial models to warming and increased carbon input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. P.; Jiang, J.; Chen-Charpentier, B.; Agusto, F. B.; Hastings, A.; Hoffman, F.; Rasmussen, M.; Smith, M. J.; Todd-Brown, K.; Wang, Y.; Xu, X.; Luo, Y. Q.

    2016-02-01

    A number of nonlinear microbial models of soil carbon decomposition have been developed. Some of them have been applied globally but have yet to be shown to realistically represent soil carbon dynamics in the field. A thorough analysis of their key differences is needed to inform future model developments. Here we compare two nonlinear microbial models of soil carbon decomposition: one based on reverse Michaelis-Menten kinetics (model A) and the other on regular Michaelis-Menten kinetics (model B). Using analytic approximations and numerical solutions, we find that the oscillatory responses of carbon pools to a small perturbation in their initial pool sizes dampen faster in model A than in model B. Soil warming always decreases carbon storage in model A, but in model B it predominantly decreases carbon storage in cool regions and increases carbon storage in warm regions. For both models, the CO2 efflux from soil carbon decomposition reaches a maximum value some time after increased carbon input (as in priming experiments). This maximum CO2 efflux (Fmax) decreases with an increase in soil temperature in both models. However, the sensitivity of Fmax to the increased amount of carbon input increases with soil temperature in model A but decreases monotonically with an increase in soil temperature in model B. These differences in the responses to soil warming and carbon input between the two nonlinear models can be used to discern which model is more realistic when compared to results from field or laboratory experiments. These insights will contribute to an improved understanding of the significance of soil microbial processes in soil carbon responses to future climate change.

  9. Environmental Transport Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    SciTech Connect

    M. Wasiolek

    2004-09-10

    This analysis report is one of the technical reports documenting the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), a biosphere model supporting the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) for the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows relationships among the reports developed for biosphere modeling and biosphere abstraction products for the TSPA-LA, as identified in the ''Technical Work Plan for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]) (TWP). This figure provides an understanding of how this report contributes to biosphere modeling in support of the license application (LA). This report is one of the five reports that develop input parameter values for the biosphere model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes the conceptual model and the mathematical model. The input parameter reports, shown to the right of the Biosphere Model Report in Figure 1-1, contain detailed description of the model input parameters. The output of this report is used as direct input in the ''Nominal Performance Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis'' and in the ''Disruptive Event Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis'' that calculate the values of biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs) for the groundwater and volcanic ash exposure scenarios, respectively. The purpose of this analysis was to develop biosphere model parameter values related to radionuclide transport and accumulation in the environment. These parameters support calculations of radionuclide concentrations in the environmental media (e.g., soil, crops, animal products, and air) resulting from a given radionuclide concentration at the source of contamination (i.e., either in groundwater or in volcanic ash). The analysis was performed in accordance with the TWP (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]).

  10. Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    SciTech Connect

    K. Rautenstrauch

    2004-09-10

    This analysis is one of 10 reports that support the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN) biosphere model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes in detail the conceptual model as well as the mathematical model and its input parameters. This report documents development of input parameters for the biosphere model that are related to atmospheric mass loading and supports the use of the model to develop biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs). The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for a Yucca Mountain repository. Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model is one of five reports that develop input parameters for the biosphere model. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling, and the plan for development of the biosphere abstraction products for TSPA, as identified in the Technical Work Plan for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]). This analysis report defines and justifies values of mass loading for the biosphere model. Mass loading is the total mass concentration of resuspended particles (e.g., dust, ash) in a volume of air. Mass loading values are used in the air submodel of ERMYN to calculate concentrations of radionuclides in air inhaled by a receptor and concentrations in air surrounding crops. Concentrations in air to which the receptor is exposed are then used in the inhalation submodel to calculate the dose contribution to the receptor from inhalation of contaminated airborne particles. Concentrations in air surrounding plants are used in the plant submodel to calculate the concentrations of radionuclides in foodstuffs contributed from uptake by foliar interception.

  11. A novel feedforward compensation canceling input filter-regulator interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelkar, S. S.; Lee, F. C.

    1983-01-01

    The interaction between the input and the control loop of switching regulators often results in deterimental effects, such as loop instability, degradation of transient response, and audiosusceptibility, etc. The concept of pole-zero cancelation is employed to mitigate some of these detrimental effects and is implemented using a novel feedforward loop, in addition to existing feedback loops of a buck regulator. Experimental results are presented which show excellent correlation with theory.

  12. The use of synthetic input sequences in time series modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Dair José; Letellier, Christophe; Gomes, Murilo E. D.; Aguirre, Luis A.

    2008-08-01

    In many situations time series models obtained from noise-like data settle to trivial solutions under iteration. This Letter proposes a way of producing a synthetic (dummy) input, that is included to prevent the model from settling down to a trivial solution, while maintaining features of the original signal. Simulated benchmark models and a real time series of RR intervals from an ECG are used to illustrate the procedure.

  13. Evaluating Multi-Input/Multi-Output Digital Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pototzky, Anthony S.; Wieseman, Carol D.; Hoadley, Sherwood T.; Mukhopadhyay, Vivek

    1994-01-01

    Controller-performance-evaluation (CPE) methodology for multi-input/multi-output (MIMO) digital control systems developed. Procedures identify potentially destabilizing controllers and confirm satisfactory performance of stabilizing ones. Methodology generic and used in many types of multi-loop digital-controller applications, including digital flight-control systems, digitally controlled spacecraft structures, and actively controlled wind-tunnel models. Also applicable to other complex, highly dynamic digital controllers, such as those in high-performance robot systems.

  14. Advanced information processing system: Input/output network management software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagle, Gail; Alger, Linda; Kemp, Alexander

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide the software requirements and specifications for the Input/Output Network Management Services for the Advanced Information Processing System. This introduction and overview section is provided to briefly outline the overall architecture and software requirements of the AIPS system before discussing the details of the design requirements and specifications of the AIPS I/O Network Management software. A brief overview of the AIPS architecture followed by a more detailed description of the network architecture.

  15. SU(3) quantum interferometry with single-photon input pulses.

    PubMed

    Tan, Si-Hui; Gao, Yvonne Y; de Guise, Hubert; Sanders, Barry C

    2013-03-15

    We develop a framework for solving the action of a three-channel passive optical interferometer on single-photon pulse inputs to each channel using SU(3) group-theoretic methods, which can be readily generalized to higher-order photon-coincidence experiments. We show that features of the coincidence plots versus relative time delays of photons yield information about permanents, immanants, and determinants of the interferometer SU(3) matrix. PMID:25166532

  16. Precise lamination of retinal axons generates multiple parallel input pathways in the tectum

    PubMed Central

    Robles, Estuardo; Filosa, Alessandro; Baier, Herwig

    2013-01-01

    The axons of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) form topographic connections in the optic tectum, recreating a two-dimensional map of the visual field in the midbrain. RGC axons are also targeted to specific positions along the laminar axis of the tectum. Understanding the sensory transformations performed by the tectum requires identification of the rules that control the formation of synaptic laminae by RGC axons. However, there is little information regarding the spatial relationships between multiple axons as they establish laminar and retinotopic arborization fields within the same region of neuropil. Moreover, the contribution of RGC axon lamination to the processing of visual information is unknown. We have utilized Brainbow genetic labeling to visualize groups of individually identifiable axons during the assembly of a precise laminar map in the tectum. Live imaging of multiple RGCs revealed that axons target specific sublaminar positions during initial innervation and maintain their relative laminar positions throughout early larval development, ruling out a model for lamina selection based on iterative refinements. During this period of laminar stability, RGC arbors undergo structural rearrangements that shift their relative retinotopic positions. Analysis of cell type-specific lamination patterns revealed that distinct combinations of RGCs converge to form each sublamina, and this input heterogeneity correlates with different functional responses to visual stimuli. These findings suggest that lamina-specific sorting of retinal inputs provides an anatomical blueprint for the integration of visual features in the tectum. PMID:23486973

  17. Dopaminergic Input to the Inferior Colliculus in Mice.

    PubMed

    Nevue, Alexander A; Elde, Cameron J; Perkel, David J; Portfors, Christine V

    2015-01-01

    The response of sensory neurons to stimuli can be modulated by a variety of factors including attention, emotion, behavioral context, and disorders involving neuromodulatory systems. For example, patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) have disordered speech processing, suggesting that dopamine alters normal representation of these salient sounds. Understanding the mechanisms by which dopamine modulates auditory processing is thus an important goal. The principal auditory midbrain nucleus, the inferior colliculus (IC), is a likely location for dopaminergic modulation of auditory processing because it contains dopamine receptors and nerve terminals immunoreactive for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis. However, the sources of dopaminergic input to the IC are unknown. In this study, we iontophoretically injected a retrograde tracer into the IC of mice and then stained the tissue for TH. We also immunostained for dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH), an enzyme critical for the conversion of dopamine to norepinephrine, to differentiate between dopaminergic and noradrenergic inputs. Retrogradely labeled neurons that were positive for TH were seen bilaterally, with strong ipsilateral dominance, in the subparafascicular thalamic nucleus (SPF). All retrogradely labeled neurons that we observed in other brain regions were TH-negative. Projections from the SPF were confirmed using an anterograde tracer, revealing TH-positive and DBH-negative anterogradely labeled fibers and terminals in the IC. While the functional role of this dopaminergic input to the IC is not yet known, it provides a potential mechanism for context dependent modulation of auditory processing. PMID:26834578

  18. Input space versus feature space in kernel-based methods.

    PubMed

    Schölkopf, B; Mika, S; Burges, C C; Knirsch, P; Müller, K R; Rätsch, G; Smola, A J

    1999-01-01

    This paper collects some ideas targeted at advancing our understanding of the feature spaces associated with support vector (SV) kernel functions. We first discuss the geometry of feature space. In particular, we review what is known about the shape of the image of input space under the feature space map, and how this influences the capacity of SV methods. Following this, we describe how the metric governing the intrinsic geometry of the mapped surface can be computed in terms of the kernel, using the example of the class of inhomogeneous polynomial kernels, which are often used in SV pattern recognition. We then discuss the connection between feature space and input space by dealing with the question of how one can, given some vector in feature space, find a preimage (exact or approximate) in input space. We describe algorithms to tackle this issue, and show their utility in two applications of kernel methods. First, we use it to reduce the computational complexity of SV decision functions; second, we combine it with the Kernel PCA algorithm, thereby constructing a nonlinear statistical denoising technique which is shown to perform well on real-world data. PMID:18252603

  19. PERSPECTIVES ON A DOE CONSEQUENCE INPUTS FOR ACCIDENT ANALYSIS APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    , K; Jonathan Lowrie, J; David Thoman , D; Austin Keller , A

    2008-07-30

    Department of Energy (DOE) accident analysis for establishing the required control sets for nuclear facility safety applies a series of simplifying, reasonably conservative assumptions regarding inputs and methodologies for quantifying dose consequences. Most of the analytical practices are conservative, have a technical basis, and are based on regulatory precedent. However, others are judgmental and based on older understanding of phenomenology. The latter type of practices can be found in modeling hypothetical releases into the atmosphere and the subsequent exposure. Often the judgments applied are not based on current technical understanding but on work that has been superseded. The objective of this paper is to review the technical basis for the major inputs and assumptions in the quantification of consequence estimates supporting DOE accident analysis, and to identify those that could be reassessed in light of current understanding of atmospheric dispersion and radiological exposure. Inputs and assumptions of interest include: Meteorological data basis; Breathing rate; and Inhalation dose conversion factor. A simple dose calculation is provided to show the relative difference achieved by improving the technical bases.

  20. The Role of Input Noise in Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Tkačik, Gašper; Gregor, Thomas; Bialek, William

    2008-01-01

    Gene expression levels fluctuate even under constant external conditions. Much emphasis has usually been placed on the components of this noise that are due to randomness in transcription and translation. Here we focus on the role of noise associated with the inputs to transcriptional regulation; in particular, we analyze the effects of random arrival times and binding of transcription factors to their target sites along the genome. This contribution to the total noise sets a fundamental physical limit to the reliability of genetic control, and has clear signatures, but we show that these are easily obscured by experimental limitations and even by conventional methods for plotting the variance vs. mean expression level. We argue that simple, universal models of noise dominated by transcription and translation are inconsistent with the embedding of gene expression in a network of regulatory interactions. Analysis of recent experiments on transcriptional control in the early Drosophila embryo shows that these results are quantitatively consistent with the predicted signatures of input noise, and we discuss the experiments needed to test the importance of input noise more generally. PMID:18648612

  1. Biological 2-input decoder circuit in human cells.

    PubMed

    Guinn, Michael; Bleris, Leonidas

    2014-08-15

    Decoders are combinational circuits that convert information from n inputs to a maximum of 2(n) outputs. This operation is of major importance in computing systems yet it is vastly underexplored in synthetic biology. Here, we present a synthetic gene network architecture that operates as a biological decoder in human cells, converting 2 inputs to 4 outputs. As a proof-of-principle, we use small molecules to emulate the two inputs and fluorescent reporters as the corresponding four outputs. The experiments are performed using transient transfections in human kidney embryonic cells and the characterization by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. We show a clear separation between the ON and OFF mean fluorescent intensity states. Additionally, we adopt the integrated mean fluorescence intensity for the characterization of the circuit and show that this metric is more robust to transfection conditions when compared to the mean fluorescent intensity. To conclude, we present the first implementation of a genetic decoder. This combinational system can be valuable toward engineering higher-order circuits as well as accommodate a multiplexed interface with endogenous cellular functions. PMID:24694115

  2. Bayesian analysis of input uncertainty in hydrological modeling: 2. Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavetski, Dmitri; Kuczera, George; Franks, Stewart W.

    2006-03-01

    The Bayesian total error analysis (BATEA) methodology directly addresses both input and output errors in hydrological modeling, requiring the modeler to make explicit, rather than implicit, assumptions about the likely extent of data uncertainty. This study considers a BATEA assessment of two North American catchments: (1) French Broad River and (2) Potomac basins. It assesses the performance of the conceptual Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model with and without accounting for input (precipitation) uncertainty. The results show the considerable effects of precipitation errors on the predicted hydrographs (especially the prediction limits) and on the calibrated parameters. In addition, the performance of BATEA in the presence of severe model errors is analyzed. While BATEA allows a very direct treatment of input uncertainty and yields some limited insight into model errors, it requires the specification of valid error models, which are currently poorly understood and require further work. Moreover, it leads to computationally challenging highly dimensional problems. For some types of models, including the VIC implemented using robust numerical methods, the computational cost of BATEA can be reduced using Newton-type methods.

  3. Control of food handling by cutaneous receptor input in squirrels.

    PubMed

    Brenowitz, G L

    1980-01-01

    In a complementary neuroanatomical study by Brenowitz in 1980, it was shown that tree squirrels (Sciurus niger) have a higher relative density of mechanoreceptors in their glabrous forepaw skin than do ground squirrels (Spermophilus tridecemlineatus). The main purpose of this sudy was to test the prediction that tree squirrels would depend upon somatic sensory (cutaneous) input from their forepaws to a greater extent than would ground squirrels in food handling behavior. In addition, a series of more general questions about the sensory control of food handling was examined. First, using different sized food items, it was shown that food handling (rate of manipulation) is subject to sensory control, in general. Secondly, comparision of sham-operated groups with groups receiving median nerve (innervating the palmar surface) lesions showed that cutaneous input from the volar surface of the forepaw contributes to the sensory control in both species of squirrels. Thirdly, comparison of lesion effects in the two species showed that, as predicted, tree squirrels depend upon cutaneous input from their volar forepaw to a greater extent than do ground squirrels. Fourthly, by reanalyzing the above data it was shown that there is continued sensory feedback from food items rather than only an initial evaluation of them. PMID:7437901

  4. Evaluating nuclear physics inputs in core-collapse supernova models

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, Eric J; Hix, William Raphael; Baird, Mark L; Messer, Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Core-collapse supernova models depend on the details of the nuclear and weak interaction physics inputs just as they depend on the details of the macroscopic physics (transport, hydrodynamics, etc.), numerical methods, and progenitors. We present the results of our ongoing comparison studies of nuclear and weak interaction physics inputs to core collapse supernova models using the spherically-symmetric, general relativistic, neutrino radiation hydrodynamics code Agile-Boltztran. We focus on comparisons of the effects of the nuclear EoS and the effects of improving the opacities, particularly neutrino--nucleon interactions. We present the results of our ongoing comparison studies of nuclear and weak interaction physics inputs to core collapse supernova models using the spherically-symmetric, general relativistic, neutrino radiation hydrodynamics code Agile-Boltztran. We focus on comparisons of the effects of the nuclear EoS and the effects of improving the opacities, particularly neutrino--nucleon interactions. We also investigate the feedback between different EoSs and opacities in the context of different progenitors.

  5. Which insect species numerically respond to allochthonous inputs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Shinji; Ikeda, Hiroshi

    2013-08-01

    Herons (Ardeidae) frequently breed in inland forests and provide organic material in the form of carcasses of prey (that they drop) and chicks (that die) to the forest floor. Such allochthonous inputs of organic materials are known to increase arthropod populations in forests. However, the exact species that show numerical responses to allochthonous inputs in heron breeding colonies remains unclear. Very few studies have clarified which factors determine numerical responses in individual species. We used pitfall and baited traps to compare the densities of arthropods between forest patches in heron breeding colonies (five sites) and areas outside of colonies (five sites) in central Japan. The density of all arthropods was not significantly different between colonies and non-colony areas. However, significant differences between colonies and non-colony areas were found in four arthropod groups. Earwigs (Dermaptera: Anisolabididae), hister beetles (Coleoptera: Histeridae), and carrion beetles (Coleoptera: Silphidae) were more abundant in colonies, while ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) were less abundant in colonies. We detected numerical responses to heron breeding in two earwig, one histerid, five silphid, and one ant species. Chick and prey carcasses from herons may have directly led to increases in consumer populations such as earwigs, histerids, and silphids in colonies, while microenvironmental changes caused by heron breeding may have reduced ant abundance. In the Silphidae, five species showed numerical responses to allochthonous inputs, and the other two species did not. Numerical responses in individual species may have been determined by life history traits such as reproductive behaviour.

  6. Fast metabolite identification with Input Output Kernel Regression

    PubMed Central

    Brouard, Céline; Shen, Huibin; Dührkop, Kai; d'Alché-Buc, Florence; Böcker, Sebastian; Rousu, Juho

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: An important problematic of metabolomics is to identify metabolites using tandem mass spectrometry data. Machine learning methods have been proposed recently to solve this problem by predicting molecular fingerprint vectors and matching these fingerprints against existing molecular structure databases. In this work we propose to address the metabolite identification problem using a structured output prediction approach. This type of approach is not limited to vector output space and can handle structured output space such as the molecule space. Results: We use the Input Output Kernel Regression method to learn the mapping between tandem mass spectra and molecular structures. The principle of this method is to encode the similarities in the input (spectra) space and the similarities in the output (molecule) space using two kernel functions. This method approximates the spectra-molecule mapping in two phases. The first phase corresponds to a regression problem from the input space to the feature space associated to the output kernel. The second phase is a preimage problem, consisting in mapping back the predicted output feature vectors to the molecule space. We show that our approach achieves state-of-the-art accuracy in metabolite identification. Moreover, our method has the advantage of decreasing the running times for the training step and the test step by several orders of magnitude over the preceding methods. Availability and implementation: Contact: celine.brouard@aalto.fi Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27307628

  7. Allochthonous Matter Input in Five Headwater Streams in Southwestern Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chara, J.; Baird, D.; Telfer, T.

    2005-05-01

    In order to determine the interactions between riparian vegetation and the stream environment in relation to the provision and seasonality of allochthonous energy, a study was done measuring the amount of litter inputs in five streams at mid altitude in southwestern Colombia during one year. Direct and lateral litter traps were placed in a 100m reach of each stream. Total amount of litter fall ranged from 1406 to 2812 g-m-2 year-1. Leaves were the most important component of the litter representing between 56 to 72% of direct and between 68 to 81% of lateral inputs. Seasonality of litter fall was minimal and only in one stream direct input was negatively correlated with rainfall (r=-0.62; p=0.033). According to these results, low-order streams in middle altitude in Colombia receive one of the highest amounts of litter fall reported so far. This supply is constant throughout the year providing a continuous source of food and substrate for the stream environment. As in temperate streams litterfall in the Andean zone is an important link between streams and the riparian environment. The higher amount recorded and the constant supply demonstrate that deforestation of riparian forests may be more negative for the streams in tropical areas.

  8. Dopaminergic Input to the Inferior Colliculus in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nevue, Alexander A.; Elde, Cameron J.; Perkel, David J.; Portfors, Christine V.

    2016-01-01

    The response of sensory neurons to stimuli can be modulated by a variety of factors including attention, emotion, behavioral context, and disorders involving neuromodulatory systems. For example, patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) have disordered speech processing, suggesting that dopamine alters normal representation of these salient sounds. Understanding the mechanisms by which dopamine modulates auditory processing is thus an important goal. The principal auditory midbrain nucleus, the inferior colliculus (IC), is a likely location for dopaminergic modulation of auditory processing because it contains dopamine receptors and nerve terminals immunoreactive for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis. However, the sources of dopaminergic input to the IC are unknown. In this study, we iontophoretically injected a retrograde tracer into the IC of mice and then stained the tissue for TH. We also immunostained for dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH), an enzyme critical for the conversion of dopamine to norepinephrine, to differentiate between dopaminergic and noradrenergic inputs. Retrogradely labeled neurons that were positive for TH were seen bilaterally, with strong ipsilateral dominance, in the subparafascicular thalamic nucleus (SPF). All retrogradely labeled neurons that we observed in other brain regions were TH-negative. Projections from the SPF were confirmed using an anterograde tracer, revealing TH-positive and DBH-negative anterogradely labeled fibers and terminals in the IC. While the functional role of this dopaminergic input to the IC is not yet known, it provides a potential mechanism for context dependent modulation of auditory processing. PMID:26834578

  9. Input transformation by dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Araya, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    In the mammalian brain, most inputs received by a neuron are formed on the dendritic tree. In the neocortex, the dendrites of pyramidal neurons are covered by thousands of tiny protrusions known as dendritic spines, which are the major recipient sites for excitatory synaptic information in the brain. Their peculiar morphology, with a small head connected to the dendritic shaft by a slender neck, has inspired decades of theoretical and more recently experimental work in an attempt to understand how excitatory synaptic inputs are processed, stored and integrated in pyramidal neurons. Advances in electrophysiological, optical and genetic tools are now enabling us to unravel the biophysical and molecular mechanisms controlling spine function in health and disease. Here I highlight relevant findings, challenges and hypotheses on spine function, with an emphasis on the electrical properties of spines and on how these affect the storage and integration of excitatory synaptic inputs in pyramidal neurons. In an attempt to make sense of the published data, I propose that the raison d'etre for dendritic spines lies in their ability to undergo activity-dependent structural and molecular changes that can modify synaptic strength, and hence alter the gain of the linearly integrated sub-threshold depolarizations in pyramidal neuron dendrites before the generation of a dendritic spike. PMID:25520626

  10. Detailed map of a cis-regulatory input function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setty, Y.; Mayo, A. E.; Surette, M. G.; Alon, U.

    2003-06-01

    Most genes are regulated by multiple transcription factors that bind specific sites in DNA regulatory regions. These cis-regulatory regions perform a computation: the rate of transcription is a function of the active concentrations of each of the input transcription factors. Here, we used accurate gene expression measurements from living cell cultures, bearing GFP reporters, to map in detail the input function of the classic lacZYA operon of Escherichia coli, as a function of about a hundred combinations of its two inducers, cAMP and isopropyl -D-thiogalactoside (IPTG). We found an unexpectedly intricate function with four plateau levels and four thresholds. This result compares well with a mathematical model of the binding of the regulatory proteins cAMP receptor protein (CRP) and LacI to the lac regulatory region. The model is also used to demonstrate that with few mutations, the same region could encode much purer AND-like or even OR-like functions. This possibility means that the wild-type region is selected to perform an elaborate computation in setting the transcription rate. The present approach can be generally used to map the input functions of other genes.

  11. Which insect species numerically respond to allochthonous inputs?

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Shinji; Ikeda, Hiroshi

    2013-08-01

    Herons (Ardeidae) frequently breed in inland forests and provide organic material in the form of carcasses of prey (that they drop) and chicks (that die) to the forest floor. Such allochthonous inputs of organic materials are known to increase arthropod populations in forests. However, the exact species that show numerical responses to allochthonous inputs in heron breeding colonies remains unclear. Very few studies have clarified which factors determine numerical responses in individual species. We used pitfall and baited traps to compare the densities of arthropods between forest patches in heron breeding colonies (five sites) and areas outside of colonies (five sites) in central Japan. The density of all arthropods was not significantly different between colonies and non-colony areas. However, significant differences between colonies and non-colony areas were found in four arthropod groups. Earwigs (Dermaptera: Anisolabididae), hister beetles (Coleoptera: Histeridae), and carrion beetles (Coleoptera: Silphidae) were more abundant in colonies, while ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) were less abundant in colonies. We detected numerical responses to heron breeding in two earwig, one histerid, five silphid, and one ant species. Chick and prey carcasses from herons may have directly led to increases in consumer populations such as earwigs, histerids, and silphids in colonies, while microenvironmental changes caused by heron breeding may have reduced ant abundance. In the Silphidae, five species showed numerical responses to allochthonous inputs, and the other two species did not. Numerical responses in individual species may have been determined by life history traits such as reproductive behaviour. PMID:23780624

  12. Detection of decoupled input/output pairs in multivariable systems.

    PubMed

    Potts, Alain Segundo; Massaro, Leandro Cuenca; Garcia, Claudio

    2015-03-01

    A method is proposed to detect if there is no coupling between an input and an output in systems operating in open-loop, that is, without a supervisory controller. The proposed technique is applicable to multiple input multiple output (MIMO) systems, whose intent is to detect no-model input/output (IO) combinations in a transfer matrix. Traditional approaches for selecting IO pairs are usually performed after the plant model is identified. The presented approach is applied during the pre-identification stage and is based on IO cross-correlation, signal filtering and fuzzy logic analysis. A case study involving the identification of a 7×6 simulated Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) is discussed, as well as an influence analysis of detecting no-model IO pairs in the identification process and in the performance index of a Model Predictive Controller (MPC) applied to a 2×2 simulated distillation column. Finally, the method is tested with a real dataset obtained from an FCC unit of a petrol refinery. PMID:25433943

  13. Transpulmonary speed of sound input into the supraclavicular space.

    PubMed

    Paciej, R; Vyshedskiy, A; Shane, J; Murphy, R

    2003-02-01

    The transpulmonary speed of sound input at the mouth has been shown to vary with lung volume. To avoid the disadvantages that exist in certain clinical situations in inputting sound at the mouth, we input sound in the supraclavicular space of 21 healthy volunteers to determine whether similar information on the relationship of sound speed to lung volume could be obtained. We measured the transit time at multiple microphones placed over the chest wall using a 16-channel lung sound analyzer (Stethographics). There was a tight distribution of transit times in this population of subjects. At functional residual capacity, it was 9 +/- 1 (SD) ms at the apical sites and 13 +/- 1 ms at the lung bases. The sound speed at total lung capacity was 24 +/- 2 m/s and was 22 +/- 2 m/s at residual volume (P < 0.001). In all subjects, the speed of sound was faster at higher lung volume. This improved method of studying the mechanism of sound transmission in the lung may help in the development of noninvasive tools for diagnosis and monitoring of lung diseases. PMID:12391045

  14. Automatic generation of IGUN{sup (C)} input files for enhanced mesh resolution at the plasma meniscus

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Reinard

    2012-02-15

    The plasma-beam interface (meniscus) is highly nonlinear and its correct simulation needs a mesh resolution of the order of the Debye length. In high intensity ion sources, the plasma density is usually too high and the Debye length is too small for a sufficient mesh resolution. A well established method to overcome this dilemma is the use of a field line and an equipotential line to be created in a first run, in order to dissect the simulation problem into a plasma part with much higher mesh resolution and a transport part with usual resolution. In the past many users of IGUN have found it difficult to perform this dissection. Therefore, a new feature has been added to IGUN to automatically write new input files for the dissected areas. For this a field line starting point needs to be defined as well as the potential of a pseudo electrode. The field line then is used for the plasma part as a slanted and curved Neumann boundary, while the pseudo electrode will act as the extraction electrode. The trajectory end data then are used in the automatically generated concatenating run as ion starting input without any need for the user to adjust for positions or different mesh resolutions. Here we show as an example the simulation of the well-known CHORDIS ion source, the calculated field line, the pseudo equipotential line, and the resulting simulations for the automatically generated input files for the plasma and the transport parts.

  15. Nerve injury induces a new profile of tactile and mechanical nociceptor input from undamaged peripheral afferents

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Silvia; Aschenbrenner, Carol A.; Houle, Timothy T.; Hayashida, Ken-ichiro; Ririe, Douglas G.; Eisenach, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain after nerve injury is often accompanied by hypersensitivity to mechanical stimuli, yet whether this reflects altered input, altered processing, or both remains unclear. Spinal nerve ligation or transection results in hypersensitivity to mechanical stimuli in skin innervated by adjacent dorsal root ganglia, but no previous study has quantified the changes in receptive field properties of these neurons in vivo. To address this, we recorded intracellularly from L4 dorsal root ganglion neurons of anesthetized young adult rats, 1 wk after L5 partial spinal nerve ligation (pSNL) or sham surgery. One week after pSNL, hindpaw mechanical withdrawal threshold in awake, freely behaving animals was decreased in the L4 distribution on the nerve-injured side compared with sham controls. Electrophysiology revealed that high-threshold mechanoreceptive cells of A-fiber conduction velocity in L4 were sensitized, with a seven-fold reduction in mechanical threshold, a seven-fold increase in receptive field area, and doubling of maximum instantaneous frequency in response to peripheral stimuli, accompanied by reductions in after-hyperpolarization amplitude and duration. Only a reduction in mechanical threshold (minimum von Frey hair producing neuronal activity) was observed in C-fiber conduction velocity high-threshold mechanoreceptive cells. In contrast, low-threshold mechanoreceptive cells were desensitized, with a 13-fold increase in mechanical threshold, a 60% reduction in receptive field area, and a 40% reduction in instantaneous frequency to stimulation. No spontaneous activity was observed in L4 ganglia, and the likelihood of recording from neurons without a mechanical receptive field was increased after pSNL. These data suggest massively altered input from undamaged sensory afferents innervating areas of hypersensitivity after nerve injury, with reduced tactile and increased nociceptive afferent response. These findings differ importantly from previous preclinical

  16. Using MFACE as input in the UAM to specify the MIT dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokhorov, B. E.; Förster, M.; He, M.; Namgaladze, A. A.; Holschneider, M.

    2014-08-01

    The magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere (MIT) dynamic system significantly depends on the highly variable solar wind conditions, in particular, on changes of the strength and orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The solar wind and IMF interactions with the magnetosphere drive the MIT system via the magnetospheric field-aligned currents (FACs). The global modeling helps us to understand the physical background of this complex system. With the present study, we test the recently developed high-resolution empirical model of field-aligned currents MFACE (a high-resolution Model of Field-Aligned Currents through Empirical orthogonal functions analysis). These FAC distributions were used as input of the time-dependent, fully self-consistent global Upper Atmosphere Model (UAM) for different seasons and various solar wind and IMF conditions. The modeling results for neutral mass density and thermospheric wind are directly compared with the CHAMP satellite measurements. In addition, we perform comparisons with the global empirical models: the thermospheric wind model (HWM07) and the atmosphere density model (Naval Research Laboratory Mass Spectrometer and Incoherent Scatter Extended 2000). The theoretical model shows a good agreement with the satellite observations and an improved behavior compared with the empirical models at high latitudes. Using the MFACE model as input parameter of the UAM model, we obtain a realistic distribution of the upper atmosphere parameters for the Northern and Southern Hemispheres during stable IMF orientation as well as during dynamic situations. This variant of the UAM can therefore be used for modeling the MIT system and space weather predictions.

  17. Nutrients and defoliation increase soil carbon inputs in grassland.

    PubMed

    Ziter, Carly; MacDougall, Andrew S

    2013-01-01

    Given the regulatory impact of resources and consumers on plant production, decomposition, and soil carbon sequestration, anthropogenic changes to nutrient inputs and grazing have likely transformed how grasslands process atmospheric CO2. The direction and magnitude of these changes, however, remain unclear in this system, whose soils contain -20% of the world's carbon pool. Nutrients stimulate production but can also increase tissue palatability and decomposition. Grazing variously affects tissue quality and quantity, decreasing, standing biomass, but potentially increasing leaf nutrient concentrations, root production, or investment in tissue defenses that slow litter decay. Here, we quantified individual and interactive impacts of nutrient addition and simulated grazing (mowing) on above- and belowground production, tissue quality, and soil carbon inputs in a western North American grassland with globally distributed agronomic species. Given that nutrients and grazing are often connected with increased root production and higher foliar tissue quality, we hypothesized that these treatments would combine to reduce inputs of recalcitrant-rich litter critical for C storage. This hypothesis was unsupported. Nutrients and defoliation combined to significantly increase belowground production but did not affect root tissue quality. There were no significant interactions between nutrients and defoliation for any measured response. Three years of nutrient addition increased root and shoot biomass by 37% and 23%, respectively, and had no impact on decomposition, resulting in a -15% increase in soil organic matter and soil carbon. Defoliation triggered a significant burst of short-lived lignin-rich roots, presumably a compensatory response to foliar loss, which increased root litter inputs by 33%. The majority of root and shoot responses were positively correlated, with aboveground biomass a reasonable proxy for whole plant responses. The exceptions were decomposition, with

  18. Eolian dust input to the Subarctic North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serno, Sascha; Winckler, Gisela; Anderson, Robert F.; Hayes, Christopher T.; McGee, David; Machalett, Björn; Ren, Haojia; Straub, Susanne M.; Gersonde, Rainer; Haug, Gerald H.

    2014-02-01

    Eolian dust is a significant source of iron and other nutrients that are essential for the health of marine ecosystems and potentially a controlling factor of the high nutrient-low chlorophyll status of the Subarctic North Pacific. We map the spatial distribution of dust input using three different geochemical tracers of eolian dust, 4He, 232Th and rare earth elements, in combination with grain size distribution data, from a set of core-top sediments covering the entire Subarctic North Pacific. Using the suite of geochemical proxies to fingerprint different lithogenic components, we deconvolve eolian dust input from other lithogenic inputs such as volcanic ash, ice-rafted debris, riverine and hemipelagic input. While the open ocean sites far away from the volcanic arcs are dominantly composed of pure eolian dust, lithogenic components other than eolian dust play a more crucial role along the arcs. In sites dominated by dust, eolian dust input appears to be characterized by a nearly uniform grain size mode at ∼4 μm. Applying the 230Th-normalization technique, our proxies yield a consistent pattern of uniform dust fluxes of 1-2 g/m2/yr across the Subarctic North Pacific. Elevated eolian dust fluxes of 2-4 g/m2/yr characterize the westernmost region off Japan and the southern Kurile Islands south of 45° N and west of 165° E along the main pathway of the westerly winds. The core-top based dust flux reconstruction is consistent with recent estimates based on dissolved thorium isotope concentrations in seawater from the Subarctic North Pacific. The dust flux pattern compares well with state-of-the-art dust model predictions in the western and central Subarctic North Pacific, but we find that dust fluxes are higher than modeled fluxes by 0.5-1 g/m2/yr in the northwest, northeast and eastern Subarctic North Pacific. Our results provide an important benchmark for biogeochemical models and a robust approach for downcore studies testing dust-induced iron fertilization of

  19. Interim Report: 100-NR-2 Apatite Treatability Test: Low Concentration Calcium Citrate-Phosphate Solution Injection for In Situ Strontium-90 Immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Mark D.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Thorne, Paul D.; Xie, YuLong; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Mackley, Rob D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Szecsody, James E.; Vermeul, Vincent R.

    2008-07-11

    Following an evaluation of potential Sr-90 treatment technologies and their applicability under 100-NR-2 hydrogeologic conditions, U.S. Department of Energy, Fluor Hanford, Inc., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and the Washington Department of Ecology agreed that the long-term strategy for groundwater remediation at 100-N Area will include apatite sequestration as the primary treatment, followed by a secondary treatment if necessary (most likely phytoremediation). Since then, the agencies have worked together to agree on which apatite sequestration technology has the greatest chance of reducing Sr-90 flux to the river at a reasonable cost. In July 2005, aqueous injection, (i.e., the introduction of apatite-forming chemicals into the subsurface) was endorsed as the interim remedy and selected for field testing. Studies are in progress to assess the efficacy of in situ apatite formation by aqueous solution injection to address both the vadose zone and the shallow aquifer along the 300 ft of shoreline where Sr-90 concentrations are highest. This report describes the field testing of the shallow aquifer treatment.

  20. Atmospheric Nitrogen Inputs to the Ocean and their Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jickells, Tim D.

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric Nitrogen Inputs to the Ocean and their Impact T Jickells (1), K. Altieri (2), D. Capone (3), E. Buitenhuis (1), R. Duce (4), F. Dentener (5), K. Fennel (6), J. Galloway (7), M. Kanakidou (8), J. LaRoche (9), K. Lee (10), P. Liss (1), J. Middleburg (11), K. Moore (12), S. Nickovic (13), G. Okin (14), A. Oschilies (15), J. Prospero (16), M. Sarin (17), S. Seitzinger (18), J. Scharples (19), P. Suntharalingram (1), M. Uematsu (20), L. Zamora (21) Atmospheric nitrogen inputs to the ocean have been identified as an important source of nitrogen to the oceans which has increased greatly as a result of human activity. The significance of atmospheric inputs for ocean biogeochemistry were evaluated in a seminal paper by Duce et al., 2008 (Science 320, 893-7). In this presentation we will update the Duce et al 2008 study estimating the impact of atmospheric deposition on the oceans. We will summarise the latest model estimates of total atmospheric nitrogen deposition to the ocean, their chemical form (nitrate, ammonium and organic nitrogen) and spatial distribution from the TM4 model. The model estimates are somewhat smaller than the Duce et al estimate, but with similar spatial distributions. We will compare these flux estimates with a new estimate of the impact of fluvial nitrogen inputs on the open ocean (Sharples submitted) which estimates some transfer of fluvial nitrogen to the open ocean, particularly at low latitudes, compared to the complete trapping of fluvial inputs on the continental shelf assumed by Duce et al. We will then estimate the impact of atmospheric deposition on ocean primary productivity and N2O emissions from the oceans using the PlankTOM10 model. The impacts of atmospheric deposition we estimate on ocean productivity here are smaller than those predicted by Duce et al impacts, consistent with the smaller atmospheric deposition estimates. However, the atmospheric input is still larger than the estimated fluvial inputs to the open ocean

  1. Earth observing system. Output data products and input requirements, version 2.0. Volume 2: Analysis of IDS input requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Yun-Chi; Chang, Hyo Duck; Krupp, Brian; Kumar, Ravindra; Swaroop, Anand

    1992-01-01

    On 18 Jan. 1991, NASA confirmed 29 Inter-Disciplinary Science (IDS) teams, each involving a group of investigators, to conduct interdisciplinary research using data products from Earth Observing System (EOS) instruments. These studies are multi-disciplinary and require output data products from multiple EOS instruments, including both FI and PI instruments. The purpose of this volume is to provide information on output products expected from IDS investigators, required input data, and retrieval algorithms. Also included in this volume is the revised analysis of the 'best' and 'alternative' match data products for IDS input requirements. The original analysis presented in the August 1991 release of the SPSO Report was revised to incorporate the restructuring of the EOS platform. As a result of the reduced EOS payload, some of EOS instruments were deselected and their data products would not be available for IDS research. Information on these data products is also presented.

  2. Evaluation of severe accident risks: Quantification of major input parameters: MAACS (MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System) input

    SciTech Connect

    Sprung, J.L.; Jow, H-N ); Rollstin, J.A. ); Helton, J.C. )

    1990-12-01

    Estimation of offsite accident consequences is the customary final step in a probabilistic assessment of the risks of severe nuclear reactor accidents. Recently, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission reassessed the risks of severe accidents at five US power reactors (NUREG-1150). Offsite accident consequences for NUREG-1150 source terms were estimated using the MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System (MACCS). Before these calculations were performed, most MACCS input parameters were reviewed, and for each parameter reviewed, a best-estimate value was recommended. This report presents the results of these reviews. Specifically, recommended values and the basis for their selection are presented for MACCS atmospheric and biospheric transport, emergency response, food pathway, and economic input parameters. Dose conversion factors and health effect parameters are not reviewed in this report. 134 refs., 15 figs., 110 tabs.

  3. Microwave field effect transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Ho-Chung (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Electrodes of a high power, microwave field effect transistor are substantially matched to external input and output networks. The field effect transistor includes a metal ground plane layer, a dielectric layer on the ground plane layer, a gallium arsenide active region on the dielectric layer, and substantially coplanar spaced source, gate, and drain electrodes having active segments covering the active region. The active segment of the gate electrode is located between edges of the active segments of the source and drain electrodes. The gate and drain electrodes include inactive pads remote from the active segments. The pads are connected directly to the input and output networks. The source electrode is connected to the ground plane layer. The space between the electrodes and the geometry of the electrodes extablish parasitic shunt capacitances and series inductances that provide substantial matches between the input network and the gate electrode and between the output network and the drain electrode. Many of the devices are connected in parallel and share a common active region, so that each pair of adjacent devices shares the same source electrodes and each pair of adjacent devices shares the same drain electrodes. The gate electrodes for the parallel devices are formed by a continuous stripe that extends between adjacent devices and is connected at different points to the common gate pad.

  4. How to Assess the Signature of the Data: Catchments and Aquifers as Input Processing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lischeid, G.

    2010-12-01

    It has been argued recently that hydrological models should not only mimic observed data, but should reproduce the signatures of the data appropriately. However, there is no consent how these signatures could be assessed. In general, hydrological models aim at predicting groundwater head dynamics or hydrograph response to input signals (e.g., groundwater recharge, effective rain), based on information about structural properties of the system, like e.g., transmissivity fields, soil hydraulic conductivity, or size of the catchment water storage. That approach usually faces substantial spatial heterogeneities and nonlinear feedbacks. Here, an alternative approach is suggested for characterizing catchments or aquifers as input signal processing systems. The concept was developed for remote areas where direct anthropogenic effects (groundwater withdrawal, injection wells, etc.), plant water uptake and evaporation from groundwater and streams are negligible. Then, any increase of groundwater head or discharge is related to a corresponding input signal, i.e., groundwater recharge or effective rainfall. That signal propagates through the system and is increasingly attenuated and decelerated with increasing flowpath length. This attenuation differs from simple low-pass-filtering. E.g., different input signals propagate at different velocities, depending on rainfall intensity, antecedent soil moisture, etc. The new approach is based on a principal component analysis of time series of groundwater or lake water level, soil water content, or discharge at different sites. This information is used to for assessing the functional properties of the system rather than its structural heterogeneity at different measurement sites, and to assess first order controls on its spatial patterns. Thus, hydrologic measurements provide a mean to measure the functional properties of the system. It is suggested to use this as signatures of the data. In a next step, model structure can be

  5. Dispersion modeling of accidental releases of toxic gases - Sensitivity study and optimization of the meteorological input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann-Stanzer, K.; Stenzel, S.

    2009-04-01

    based on the weather forecast model ALADIN. The meteorological field's analysis with INCA include: Temperature, Humidity, Wind, Precipitation and Cloudiness. In the frame of the project INCA data were compared with measurements conducted at traffic-near sites. INCA analysis and very short term forecast fields (up to 6 hours) are found to be an advanced possibility to provide on-line meteorological input for the model package used by the fire brigade. Nevertheless a high degree of caution in the interpretation of the model results is required - especially in the case of very slow wind speeds, very stable atmospheric condition, and flow deflection by buildings in the urban area or by complex topography.

  6. Nutrient Inputs to Estuaries from Nine Scottish East Coast Rivers; Influence of Estuarine Processes on Inputs to the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balls, Philip W.

    1994-10-01

    Nutrient distributions (nitrate, ammonia, phosphate and silicate) have been determined in the surface waters of nine North Sea estuaries: Tweed, Forth, Tay, Dee, Don, Ythan, Beauly/Inverness Firth, Cromarty Firth and Dornoch Firth. Seasonal variability has been examined by conducting surveys in April, July and September 1991 and February 1992. On each occasion, surveys of all nine estuaries were normally completed in 3-5 days of each other, around high water on spring tides. This intensive and strictly controlled sampling regime ensures a realistic comparison between nutrient concentrations in individual estuaries. Nutrient concentrations in individual rivers and estuaries are demonstrated to be related to land use. River catchments with intensive agriculture and low freshwater input, such as the Don and Ythan, have enhanced nitrate (up to 600 μM) and phosphate (up to 5 μM) concentrations in their estuaries. By contrast, Highland river catchments with mineral-poor soils, low populations and low agricultural intensity (Inverness, Cromarty and Dornoch Firths) generally lead to nutrient concentrations being lower in river water than in coastal seawater. Conservative mixing of dissolved nutrients is demonstrated to be a function of estuarine flushing time which controls the extent to which internal processes (biological and abiological) can modify nutrient inputs. Nutrients tend to behave conservatively in short rapidly flushed estuaries such as the Tweed, Don and Ythan. In contrast, internal processes are shown to be important when estimating riverine nutrient fluxes to the coastal zone from large slowly flushed estuaries such as the Forth, Tay and Dornoch Firth. For these systems, estimates of riverine inputs to the estuary do not provide a good estimate of the load entering the coastal zone. This is primarily due to the cycling of nutrient elements between dissolved and particulate (including sediment) phases. On a regional basis, gross nutrient inputs are

  7. Method of validating measurement data of a process parameter from a plurality of individual sensor inputs

    DOEpatents

    Scarola, Kenneth; Jamison, David S.; Manazir, Richard M.; Rescorl, Robert L.; Harmon, Daryl L.

    1998-01-01

    A method for generating a validated measurement of a process parameter at a point in time by using a plurality of individual sensor inputs from a scan of said sensors at said point in time. The sensor inputs from said scan are stored and a first validation pass is initiated by computing an initial average of all stored sensor inputs. Each sensor input is deviation checked by comparing each input including a preset tolerance against the initial average input. If the first deviation check is unsatisfactory, the sensor which produced the unsatisfactory input is flagged as suspect. It is then determined whether at least two of the inputs have not been flagged as suspect and are therefore considered good inputs. If two or more inputs are good, a second validation pass is initiated by computing a second average of all the good sensor inputs, and deviation checking the good inputs by comparing each good input including a present tolerance against the second average. If the second deviation check is satisfactory, the second average is displayed as the validated measurement and the suspect sensor as flagged as bad. A validation fault occurs if at least two inputs are not considered good, or if the second deviation check is not satisfactory. In the latter situation the inputs from each of all the sensors are compared against the last validated measurement and the value from the sensor input that deviates the least from the last valid measurement is displayed.

  8. Quantum Mechanical Noise in a Michelson Interferometer with Nonclassical Inputs: Nonperturbative Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Sun-Kun

    1996-01-01

    The variances of the quantum-mechanical noise in a two-input-port Michelson interferometer within the framework of the Loudon-Ni model were solved exactly in two general cases: (1) one coherent state input and one squeezed state input, and (2) two photon number states inputs. Low intensity limit, exponential decaying signal and the noise due to mixing were discussed briefly.

  9. 40 CFR 75.36 - Missing data procedures for heat input rate determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Missing data procedures for heat input....36 Missing data procedures for heat input rate determinations. (a) When hourly heat input rate is... provided to calculate the heat input whenever quality-assured data are unavailable from the flow...

  10. 40 CFR 75.36 - Missing data procedures for heat input rate determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Missing data procedures for heat input....36 Missing data procedures for heat input rate determinations. (a) When hourly heat input rate is... provided to calculate the heat input whenever quality-assured data are unavailable from the flow...

  11. 40 CFR 75.36 - Missing data procedures for heat input rate determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Missing data procedures for heat input....36 Missing data procedures for heat input rate determinations. (a) When hourly heat input rate is... provided to calculate the heat input whenever quality-assured data are unavailable from the flow...

  12. 40 CFR 75.36 - Missing data procedures for heat input rate determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Missing data procedures for heat input....36 Missing data procedures for heat input rate determinations. (a) When hourly heat input rate is... provided to calculate the heat input whenever quality-assured data are unavailable from the flow...

  13. Electromagnetic Field Penetration Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, M.D.

    2000-01-01

    A numerical method is presented to determine electromagnetic shielding effectiveness of rectangular enclosure with apertures on its wall used for input and output connections, control panels, visual-access windows, ventilation panels, etc. Expressing EM fields in terms of cavity Green's function inside the enclosure and the free space Green's function outside the enclosure, integral equations with aperture tangential electric fields as unknown variables are obtained by enforcing the continuity of tangential electric and magnetic fields across the apertures. Using the Method of Moments, the integral equations are solved for unknown aperture fields. From these aperture fields, the EM field inside a rectangular enclosure due to external electromagnetic sources are determined. Numerical results on electric field shielding of a rectangular cavity with a thin rectangular slot obtained using the present method are compared with the results obtained using simple transmission line technique for code validation. The present technique is applied to determine field penetration inside a Boeing-757 by approximating its passenger cabin as a rectangular cavity filled with a homogeneous medium and its passenger windows by rectangular apertures. Preliminary results for, two windows, one on each side of fuselage were considered. Numerical results for Boeing-757 at frequencies 26 MHz, 171-175 MHz, and 428-432 MHz are presented.

  14. Double input capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detector with phase shift.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hao; Li, Meng; Dai, Jianyuan; Wang, Zhen; Li, Xiuting; Yuan, Hongyan; Xiao, Dan

    2014-10-21

    A double input capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detector (DIC(4)D) device which gets higher sensitivity has been described in this paper. The detector consists of two input electrodes and one output electrode. When two alternating current (AC) voltages with the same amplitude and different phases are imposed on each input electrode, the equivalent resistance of the output electrode is reduced because of the interference of the two signals with different phase angles. For a capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detector (C(4)D), the ratio of the response of KCl solution to that of distilled water is 1.6. However, for DIC(4)D, the ratio is 1.55 at a phase difference of 0° and increases to 1.8 at the phase difference of 170°, respectively. For C(4)D, the response of KCl solution is a linear function of the logarithm of concentrations from 10(-5) M to 10(-2) M, and the slope is 5.58. However, the slope of the response increases to 7.13 in DIC(4)D, and the limit of detection (LOD) of DIC(4)D is estimated to be 5 × 10(-8) M. The slope of the three-way DIC(4)D is increased to 69.78. A flow injection device is employed for the evaluation of the applicability of DIC(4)D with the same range, and good reproducibility is confirmed through flow injection of the same solution 10 times. The relative standard deviation (RSD) is 0.7%, which demonstrates a promising application to capillary electrophoresis (CE). PMID:25250534

  15. Measuring input prices for physicians: The revised Medicare Economic Index

    PubMed Central

    Freeland, Mark S.; Chulis, George S.; Arnett, Ross H.; Brown, Aaron P.

    1991-01-01

    Medicare payments for physician services under Part B were historically restrained by capping prevailing charges using the Medicare Economic Index (MEI). The MEI, an input price index for physician services that incorporates an adjustment for economywide labor productivity, has not undergone a major revision since 1975. The MEI is an important determinant of the annual volume performance standard that will be used to set aggregate increases in the revised system for paying physicians under Medicare beginning in 1992. The MEI will also be used in establishing the annual changes to the payment conversion factors under the new payment system. PMID:10170807

  16. Earth Reflected Solar Radiation Input to Spherical Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, F. G.

    1961-01-01

    A general calculation is given for the earth's albedo input to a spherical satellite, with the assumption that the earth can be considered a diffusely reflecting sphere. The results are presented in general form so that appropriate values for the solar constant and albedo of the earth can be used as more accurate values become available. The results are also presented graphically; the incident power is determined on the assumption that the mean solar constant is 1.353 x 10( exp 6) erg/(sq cm.sec) and the albedo of the earth is 0.34.

  17. Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    SciTech Connect

    M. Wasiolek

    2006-06-05

    This analysis is one of the technical reports that support the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), referred to in this report as the biosphere model. ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes in detail the conceptual model as well as the mathematical model and its input parameters. This report documents development of input parameters for the biosphere model that are related to atmospheric mass loading and supports the use of the model to develop biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs). The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for a Yucca Mountain repository. ''Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model'' is one of five reports that develop input parameters for the biosphere model. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the biosphere model is presented in Figure 1-1 (based on BSC 2006 [DIRS 176938]). This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling and how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling. This analysis report defines and justifies values of atmospheric mass loading for the biosphere model. Mass loading is the total mass concentration of resuspended particles (e.g., dust, ash) in a volume of air. Mass loading values are used in the air submodel of the biosphere model to calculate concentrations of radionuclides in air inhaled by a receptor and concentrations in air surrounding crops. Concentrations in air to which the receptor is exposed are then used in the inhalation submodel to calculate the dose contribution to the receptor from inhalation of contaminated airborne particles. Concentrations in air surrounding plants are used in the plant submodel to calculate the concentrations of radionuclides in foodstuffs contributed from uptake by foliar interception. This report is concerned primarily with the

  18. Evaluating the uncertainty of input quantities in measurement models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Possolo, Antonio; Elster, Clemens

    2014-06-01

    The Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) gives guidance about how values and uncertainties should be assigned to the input quantities that appear in measurement models. This contribution offers a concrete proposal for how that guidance may be updated in light of the advances in the evaluation and expression of measurement uncertainty that were made in the course of the twenty years that have elapsed since the publication of the GUM, and also considering situations that the GUM does not yet contemplate. Our motivation is the ongoing conversation about a new edition of the GUM. While generally we favour a Bayesian approach to uncertainty evaluation, we also recognize the value that other approaches may bring to the problems considered here, and focus on methods for uncertainty evaluation and propagation that are widely applicable, including to cases that the GUM has not yet addressed. In addition to Bayesian methods, we discuss maximum-likelihood estimation, robust statistical methods, and measurement models where values of nominal properties play the same role that input quantities play in traditional models. We illustrate these general-purpose techniques in concrete examples, employing data sets that are realistic but that also are of conveniently small sizes. The supplementary material available online lists the R computer code that we have used to produce these examples (stacks.iop.org/Met/51/3/339/mmedia). Although we strive to stay close to clause 4 of the GUM, which addresses the evaluation of uncertainty for input quantities, we depart from it as we review the classes of measurement models that we believe are generally useful in contemporary measurement science. We also considerably expand and update the treatment that the GUM gives to Type B evaluations of uncertainty: reviewing the state-of-the-art, disciplined approach to the elicitation of expert knowledge, and its encapsulation in probability distributions that are usable in

  19. The role of the input scale in parton distribution analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Pedro Jimenez-Delgado

    2012-08-01

    A first systematic study of the effects of the choice of the input scale in global determinations of parton distributions and QCD parameters is presented. It is shown that, although in principle the results should not depend on these choices, in practice a relevant dependence develops as a consequence of what is called procedural bias. This uncertainty should be considered in addition to other theoretical and experimental errors, and a practical procedure for its estimation is proposed. Possible sources of mistakes in the determination of QCD parameter from parton distribution analysis are pointed out.

  20. Characterization of industrial process waste heat and input heat streams

    SciTech Connect

    Wilfert, G.L.; Huber, H.B.; Dodge, R.E.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Fassbender, L.L.; Griffin, E.A.; Brown, D.R.; Moore, N.L.

    1984-05-01

    The nature and extent of industrial waste heat associated with the manufacturing sector of the US economy are identified. Industry energy information is reviewed and the energy content in waste heat streams emanating from 108 energy-intensive industrial processes is estimated. Generic types of process equipment are identified and the energy content in gaseous, liquid, and steam waste streams emanating from this equipment is evaluated. Matchups between the energy content of waste heat streams and candidate uses are identified. The resultant matrix identifies 256 source/sink (waste heat/candidate input heat) temperature combinations. (MHR)