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Sample records for field theoretical approach

  1. A Field-Theoretic Approach to the Wiener Sausage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekovar, S.; Pruessner, G.

    2016-05-01

    The Wiener Sausage, the volume traced out by a sphere attached to a Brownian particle, is a classical problem in statistics and mathematical physics. Initially motivated by a range of field-theoretic, technical questions, we present a single loop renormalised perturbation theory of a stochastic process closely related to the Wiener Sausage, which, however, proves to be exact for the exponents and some amplitudes. The field-theoretic approach is particularly elegant and very enjoyable to see at work on such a classic problem. While we recover a number of known, classical results, the field-theoretic techniques deployed provide a particularly versatile framework, which allows easy calculation with different boundary conditions even of higher momenta and more complicated correlation functions. At the same time, we provide a highly instructive, non-trivial example for some of the technical particularities of the field-theoretic description of stochastic processes, such as excluded volume, lack of translational invariance and immobile particles. The aim of the present work is not to improve upon the well-established results for the Wiener Sausage, but to provide a field-theoretic approach to it, in order to gain a better understanding of the field-theoretic obstacles to overcome.

  2. A microscopic field theoretical approach for active systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaimo, F.; Praetorius, S.; Voigt, A.

    2016-08-01

    We consider a microscopic modeling approach for active systems. The approach extends the phase field crystal (PFC) model and allows us to describe generic properties of active systems within a continuum model. The approach is validated by reproducing results obtained with corresponding agent-based and microscopic phase field models. We consider binary collisions, collective motion and vortex formation. For larger numbers of particles we analyze the coarsening process in active crystals and identify giant number fluctuation in a cluster formation process.

  3. Field theoretical approach for bio-membrane coupled with flow field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, Y.; Kawakatsu, T.

    2013-02-01

    Shape deformation of bio-membranes in flow field is well known phenomenon in biological systems, for example red blood cell in blood vessel. To simulate such deformation with use of field theoretical approach, we derived the dynamical equation of phase field for shape of membrane and coupled the equation with Navier-Stokes equation for flow field. In 2-dimensional simulations, we found that a bio-membrane in a Poiseuille flow takes a parachute shape similar to the red blood cells.

  4. Field-theoretic approach to fluctuation effects in neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Buice, Michael A.; Cowan, Jack D.

    2007-05-15

    A well-defined stochastic theory for neural activity, which permits the calculation of arbitrary statistical moments and equations governing them, is a potentially valuable tool for theoretical neuroscience. We produce such a theory by analyzing the dynamics of neural activity using field theoretic methods for nonequilibrium statistical processes. Assuming that neural network activity is Markovian, we construct the effective spike model, which describes both neural fluctuations and response. This analysis leads to a systematic expansion of corrections to mean field theory, which for the effective spike model is a simple version of the Wilson-Cowan equation. We argue that neural activity governed by this model exhibits a dynamical phase transition which is in the universality class of directed percolation. More general models (which may incorporate refractoriness) can exhibit other universality classes, such as dynamic isotropic percolation. Because of the extremely high connectivity in typical networks, it is expected that higher-order terms in the systematic expansion are small for experimentally accessible measurements, and thus, consistent with measurements in neocortical slice preparations, we expect mean field exponents for the transition. We provide a quantitative criterion for the relative magnitude of each term in the systematic expansion, analogous to the Ginsburg criterion. Experimental identification of dynamic universality classes in vivo is an outstanding and important question for neuroscience.

  5. Lead field theoretical approach in bioimpedance measurements: towards more controlled measurement sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Kauppinen, P K; Hyttinen, J A; Kööbi, T; Malmivuo, J

    1999-04-20

    This study was conducted to demonstrate the potentiality of lead field theoretical approach in analyzing bioimpedance (BI) measurements. Anatomically accurate computer models and the lead field theory were used to develop BI measurement configurations capable of detecting more localized BI changes in the human body. The methods were applied to assess the measurement properties of conventional impedance cardiography (ICG) and such BI measurement configurations as can be derived using (i) the 12-lead electrocardiography (ECG) and (ii) the international 10-20 electroencephalography (EEG) electrode systems. Information as to how various electrode configurations are sensitive to detecting conductivity changes in different tissues and organs was thus obtained. Theoretical results with the 12-lead system suggested that, compared to conventional ICGs, significantly more selective ICG configurations can be derived for cardiovascular structures. In addition to theoretical investigations, clinical test measurements were made with the 12-lead system to establish whether characteristic waveforms are available. Sensitivity distributions obtained with the 10-20 electrode system give promise of the possibility of monitoring noninvasively cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) impedance changes related to impending epileptic seizures. PMID:10372161

  6. Regulation of cellular function via electromagnetic field frequency and extracellular environment: A theoretical- experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghian, Toloo; Sheikh, Abdul; Narmoneva, Daria; Kogan, Andrei

    2015-03-01

    Application of external electric field (EF) as a non-pharmacological, non-invasive tool to control cell function is of great therapeutic interest. We developed a theoretical-experimental approach to investigate the biophysical mechanisms of EF interaction with cells in electrode-free physiologically-relevant configuration. Our numerical results demonstrated that EF frequency is the major parameter to control cell response to EF. Non-oscillating or low-frequency EF leads to charge accumulation on the cell surface membrane that may mediate membrane initiated cell responses. In contrast, high-frequency EF penetrates the cell membrane and reaches cell cytoplasm, where it may directly activate intracellular responses. The theoretical predictions were confirmed in our experimental studies of the effects of applied EF on vascular cell function. Results show that non-oscillating EF increases vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression while field polarity controls cell adhesion rate. High-frequency, but not low frequency, EF provides differential regulation of cytoplasmic focal adhesion kinase and VEGF expression depending on the substrate, with increased expression in cells cultured on RGD-rich synthetic hydrogels, and decreased expression for matrigel culture. The authors acknowledge the financial support from the NSF (DMR-1206784 & DMR-0804199 to AK); the NIH (1R21 DK078814-01A1 to DN) and the University of Cincinnati (Interdisciplinary Faculty Research Support Grant to DN and AK).

  7. Quantum-field-theoretical approach to phase-space techniques: Generalizing the positive-P representation

    SciTech Connect

    Plimak, L.I.; Fleischhauer, M.; Olsen, M.K.; Collett, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    We present an introduction to phase-space techniques (PST) based on a quantum-field-theoretical (QFT) approach. In addition to bridging the gap between PST and QFT, our approach results in a number of generalizations of the PST. First, for problems where the usual PST do not result in a genuine Fokker-Planck equation (even after phase-space doubling) and hence fail to produce a stochastic differential equation (SDE), we show how the system in question may be approximated via stochastic difference equations (S{delta}E). Second, we show that introducing sources into the SDE's (or S{delta}E's) generalizes them to a full quantum nonlinear stochastic response problem (thus generalizing Kubo's linear reaction theory to a quantum nonlinear stochastic response theory). Third, we establish general relations linking quantum response properties of the system in question to averages of operator products ordered in a way different from time normal. This extends PST to a much wider assemblage of operator products than are usually considered in phase-space approaches. In all cases, our approach yields a very simple and straightforward way of deriving stochastic equations in phase space.

  8. Mean field game theoretic approach for security in mobile ad-hoc networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanwei; Tang, Helen; Yu, F. Richard; Huang, Minyi

    2013-05-01

    Game theory can provide a useful tool to study the security problem in mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs). Most existing work on applying game theories to security only considers two players in the security game model: an attacker and a defender. While this assumption is valid for a network with centralized administration, it may not be realistic in MANETs, where centralized administration is not available. Consequently, each individual node in a MANET should be treated separately in the security game model. In this paper, using recent advances in mean field game theory, we propose a novel game theoretic approach for security in MANETs. Mean field game theory provides a powerful mathematical tool for problems with a large number of players. Since security defence mechanisms consume precious system resources (e.g., energy), the proposed scheme considers not only the security requirement of MANETs but also the system resources. In addition, each node only needs to know its own state information and the aggregate effect of the other nodes in the MANET. Therefore, the proposed scheme is a fully distributed scheme. Simulation results are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  9. Field Theory in Organizational Psychology: An Analysis of Theoretical Approaches in Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Joseph E.

    This literature review examines Kurt Lewin's influence in leadership psychology. Characteristics of field theory are described in detail and utilized in analyzing leadership research, including the trait approach, leader behavior studies, contingency theory, path-goal theory, and leader decision theory. Important trends in leadership research are…

  10. Theoretical Approaches to Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempa, Krzysztof

    Nanoparticles can be viewed as wave resonators. Involved waves are, for example, carrier waves, plasmon waves, polariton waves, etc. A few examples of successful theoretical treatments that follow this approach are given. In one, an effective medium theory of a nanoparticle composite is presented. In another, plasmon polaritonic solutions allow to extend concepts of radio technology, such as an antenna and a coaxial transmission line, to the visible frequency range.

  11. Unified theoretical approach for binary and ternary alloys via an effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Augusto S.; de Albuquerque, Douglas F.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the phase diagram of binary and ternary disordered alloys using the mixed-bond Ising model, via effective field theory (EFT). For example, we describe the Fe-Al alloy as a mixed-bond system instead of as diluted alloy. In our approach, we obtain the percolation threshold for some lattices and describe the lines of ferro-paramagnetic transition of Fe-Al, Fe-Mn, Fe-Mn-Al and Fe-Ni-Mn alloys and we obtain good agreement with the experimental data.

  12. A Functional Generalization of the Field-Theoretical Renormalization Group Approach for the Single-Impurity Anderson Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire, Hermann; Corrêa, Eberth

    2012-02-01

    We apply a functional implementation of the field-theoretical renormalization group (RG) method up to two loops to the single-impurity Anderson model. To achieve this, we follow a RG strategy similar to that proposed by Vojta et al. (in Phys. Rev. Lett. 85:4940, 2000), which consists of defining a soft ultraviolet regulator in the space of Matsubara frequencies for the renormalized Green's function. Then we proceed to derive analytically and solve numerically integro-differential flow equations for the effective couplings and the quasiparticle weight of the present model, which fully treat the interplay of particle-particle and particle-hole parquet diagrams and the effect of the two-loop self-energy feedback into them. We show that our results correctly reproduce accurate numerical renormalization group data for weak to slightly moderate interactions. These results are in excellent agreement with other functional Wilsonian RG works available in the literature. Since the field-theoretical RG method turns out to be easier to implement at higher loops than the Wilsonian approach, higher-order calculations within the present approach could improve further the results for this model at stronger couplings. We argue that the present RG scheme could thus offer a possible alternative to other functional RG methods to describe electronic correlations within this model.

  13. Thematic Approach to Theoretical Speculations in the Field of Educational Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Jae

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is a critical reflection on the field of educational administration and its varied and often conflicting epistemologies. It is argued that the field of educational administration is a community of diverse epistemologies. Although epistemological heterogeneity has been persistently vilified by both theorists and…

  14. A field-theoretic approach to the May-Leonard cyclic population dynamics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrao, Shannon; Täuber, Uwe

    Spatially extended stochastic population dynamics models with cyclic predation interactions display intriguing time evolution and spontaneous structure formation. We study a version of the May-Leonard cyclic competition model in d dimensions with diffusive particle propagation. We use the second-quantized Doi-Peliti formalism and ensuing coherent-state path integral representation to construct its continuum representation and explore its collective dynamics. Expanding the resulting action about the mean-field species concentrations enables us to compute the diagonalized harmonic propagators and hence 'masses', i.e., relaxation rates and eigenfrequencies of the fundamental modes. Furthermore, operating near the Hopf bifurcation point, we identify the validity range for the necessary time scale separation that allows us to project out the purely relaxing eigenmode. The remaining oscillating fields obey the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation, which is consistent with spiral pattern formation.

  15. Unusual dileptions at RHIC a field theoretic approach based on a non-equilibrium chiral phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, F.

    1997-09-22

    This paper contains viewgraphs on unusual dileptons at Brookhaven RHIC. A field theory approach is used based on a non-equilibrium chiral phase transformation utilizing the schroedinger and Heisenberg picture.

  16. Systematic theoretical investigation of the zero-field splitting in Gd(III) complexes: Wave function and density functional approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Shehryar; Kubica-Misztal, Aleksandra; Kruk, Danuta; Kowalewski, Jozef; Odelius, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The zero-field splitting (ZFS) of the electronic ground state in paramagnetic ions is a sensitive probe of the variations in the electronic and molecular structure with an impact on fields ranging from fundamental physical chemistry to medical applications. A detailed analysis of the ZFS in a series of symmetric Gd(III) complexes is presented in order to establish the applicability and accuracy of computational methods using multiconfigurational complete-active-space self-consistent field wave functions and of density functional theory calculations. The various computational schemes are then applied to larger complexes Gd(III)DOTA(H2O)-, Gd(III)DTPA(H2O)2-, and Gd(III)(H2O)83+ in order to analyze how the theoretical results compare to experimentally derived parameters. In contrast to approximations based on density functional theory, the multiconfigurational methods produce results for the ZFS of Gd(III) complexes on the correct order of magnitude.

  17. Systematic theoretical investigation of the zero-field splitting in Gd(III) complexes: wave function and density functional approaches.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shehryar; Kubica-Misztal, Aleksandra; Kruk, Danuta; Kowalewski, Jozef; Odelius, Michael

    2015-01-21

    The zero-field splitting (ZFS) of the electronic ground state in paramagnetic ions is a sensitive probe of the variations in the electronic and molecular structure with an impact on fields ranging from fundamental physical chemistry to medical applications. A detailed analysis of the ZFS in a series of symmetric Gd(III) complexes is presented in order to establish the applicability and accuracy of computational methods using multiconfigurational complete-active-space self-consistent field wave functions and of density functional theory calculations. The various computational schemes are then applied to larger complexes Gd(III)DOTA(H2O)(-), Gd(III)DTPA(H2O)(2-), and Gd(III)(H2O)8(3+) in order to analyze how the theoretical results compare to experimentally derived parameters. In contrast to approximations based on density functional theory, the multiconfigurational methods produce results for the ZFS of Gd(III) complexes on the correct order of magnitude. PMID:25612706

  18. Systematic theoretical investigation of the zero-field splitting in Gd(III) complexes: Wave function and density functional approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Shehryar Odelius, Michael; Kubica-Misztal, Aleksandra; Kruk, Danuta; Kowalewski, Jozef

    2015-01-21

    The zero-field splitting (ZFS) of the electronic ground state in paramagnetic ions is a sensitive probe of the variations in the electronic and molecular structure with an impact on fields ranging from fundamental physical chemistry to medical applications. A detailed analysis of the ZFS in a series of symmetric Gd(III) complexes is presented in order to establish the applicability and accuracy of computational methods using multiconfigurational complete-active-space self-consistent field wave functions and of density functional theory calculations. The various computational schemes are then applied to larger complexes Gd(III)DOTA(H{sub 2}O){sup −}, Gd(III)DTPA(H{sub 2}O){sup 2−}, and Gd(III)(H{sub 2}O){sub 8}{sup 3+} in order to analyze how the theoretical results compare to experimentally derived parameters. In contrast to approximations based on density functional theory, the multiconfigurational methods produce results for the ZFS of Gd(III) complexes on the correct order of magnitude.

  19. A theoretical resonant-tunnelling approach to electric-field effects in quasiperiodic Fibonacci GaAs-(Ga,Al)As semiconductor superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Gómez, E.; Perdomo-Leiva, C. A.; Oliveira, L. E.; de Dios-Leyva, M.

    1998-04-01

    A theoretical resonant-tunnelling approach is used in a detailed study of the electronic and transmission properties of quasiperiodic Fibonacci GaAs-(Ga,Al)As semiconductor superlattices, under applied electric fields. The theoretical scheme is based upon an exact solution of the corresponding Schroedinger equations in different wells and barriers, through the use of Airy functions, and a transfer-matrix technique. The calculated quasibound resonant energies agree quite well with previous theoretical parameter-based results within a tight-binding scheme, in the particular case of isolated Fibonacci building blocks. Theoretical resonant-tunnelling results for 0953-8984/10/16/009/img6 and 0953-8984/10/16/009/img7 generations of the quasiperiodic Fibonacci superlattice reveal the occurrence of anticrossings of the resonant levels with applied electric fields, together with the conduction- and valence-level wave function localization properties and electric-field-induced migration to specific regions of the semiconductor quasiperiodic heterostructure. Finally, theoretical resonant-tunnelling calculations for the interband transition energies are shown to be in quite good quantitative agreement with previously reported experimental photocurrent measurements.

  20. Field theoretic simulations of polymer nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Koski, Jason; Chao, Huikuan; Riggleman, Robert A.

    2013-12-28

    Polymer field theory has emerged as a powerful tool for describing the equilibrium phase behavior of complex polymer formulations, particularly when one is interested in the thermodynamics of dense polymer melts and solutions where the polymer chains can be accurately described using Gaussian models. However, there are many systems of interest where polymer field theory cannot be applied in such a straightforward manner, such as polymer nanocomposites. Current approaches for incorporating nanoparticles have been restricted to the mean-field level and often require approximations where it is unclear how to improve their accuracy. In this paper, we present a unified framework that enables the description of polymer nanocomposites using a field theoretic approach. This method enables straightforward simulations of the fully fluctuating field theory for polymer formulations containing spherical or anisotropic nanoparticles. We demonstrate our approach captures the correlations between particle positions, present results for spherical and cylindrical nanoparticles, and we explore the effect of the numerical parameters on the performance of our approach.

  1. Mass Media and Socialization: Theoretic Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Thomas F.

    This paper examines the major theoretical approaches to the study of socialization, with an emphasis on media effects. The three major bodies of literature studied are the major theoretic approaches utilized in the general area of developmental psychology, the theoretical paradigms evident in studies dealing more specifically with child…

  2. Nano/macro-integrated neuromorphic sensorimotor automata--a bioinspired nanoscale field-theoretic approach to motility.

    PubMed

    Santoli, Salvatore

    2010-11-01

    The previously formulated tool dubbed Huyghens Engine, concerning information sensing, processing and actuating through wave motion in connection with the ubiquitous phenomenon of coupled oscillator synchronization, is applied here on the nanoscale for designing deeper metaphors of biosystem sensorimotor behaviour to attain the long sought-after bioinspired autonomous, self-propelled, walking, swimming or flying macro-/microsized robots. A nanoscale description of information processing is in terms of neural images of perception/action coherent flows of information by resonant coupling of inner nano-fields and external aerodynamic/hydrodynamic and gravitational fields in Lie group geometrizable classical functional spaces, possibly through Heisenberg's molecular field. This concerns both metaphor-free biomimicry and nanobiological research. PMID:21138018

  3. A gauge-theoretic approach to gravity

    PubMed Central

    Krasnov, Kirill

    2012-01-01

    Einstein's general relativity (GR) is a dynamical theory of the space–time metric. We describe an approach in which GR becomes an SU(2) gauge theory. We start at the linearized level and show how a gauge-theoretic Lagrangian for non-interacting massless spin two particles (gravitons) takes a much more simple and compact form than in the standard metric description. Moreover, in contrast to the GR situation, the gauge theory Lagrangian is convex. We then proceed with a formulation of the full nonlinear theory. The equivalence to the metric-based GR holds only at the level of solutions of the field equations, that is, on-shell. The gauge-theoretic approach also makes it clear that GR is not the only interacting theory of massless spin two particles, in spite of the GR uniqueness theorems available in the metric description. Thus, there is an infinite-parameter class of gravity theories all describing just two propagating polarizations of the graviton. We describe how matter can be coupled to gravity in this formulation and, in particular, how both the gravity and Yang–Mills arise as sectors of a general diffeomorphism-invariant gauge theory. We finish by outlining a possible scenario of the ultraviolet completion of quantum gravity within this approach. PMID:22792040

  4. A gauge-theoretic approach to gravity.

    PubMed

    Krasnov, Kirill

    2012-08-01

    Einstein's general relativity (GR) is a dynamical theory of the space-time metric. We describe an approach in which GR becomes an SU(2) gauge theory. We start at the linearized level and show how a gauge-theoretic Lagrangian for non-interacting massless spin two particles (gravitons) takes a much more simple and compact form than in the standard metric description. Moreover, in contrast to the GR situation, the gauge theory Lagrangian is convex. We then proceed with a formulation of the full nonlinear theory. The equivalence to the metric-based GR holds only at the level of solutions of the field equations, that is, on-shell. The gauge-theoretic approach also makes it clear that GR is not the only interacting theory of massless spin two particles, in spite of the GR uniqueness theorems available in the metric description. Thus, there is an infinite-parameter class of gravity theories all describing just two propagating polarizations of the graviton. We describe how matter can be coupled to gravity in this formulation and, in particular, how both the gravity and Yang-Mills arise as sectors of a general diffeomorphism-invariant gauge theory. We finish by outlining a possible scenario of the ultraviolet completion of quantum gravity within this approach. PMID:22792040

  5. Theoretical approaches to metal chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Partridge, Harry; Halicioglu, Timur; Taylor, Peter R.

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical calculations on metals ranging from very accurate ab initio studies of diatomic and triatomic systems to model studies of larger clusters are presented. Recent improvements in the representation of one-particle and n-particle spaces have made possible the prediction that Al2 has a 3Pi(u) ground state, even though the 3Sigma(-)g state lies within 200/cm. Results suggest that cluster geometry varies dramatically with cluster size, and that rather large clusters are required before the bulk structure becomes optimal. Al cluster studies show that three-body terms are needed for quantitative agreement with ab initio calculations.

  6. Theoretical Approaches to Moral/Citizenship Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heslep, Robert D.

    Four theoretical approaches to moral/citizenship education are described and compared. Positive and negative aspects of the cognitive-decision, developmental, prosocial, and values approaches are discussed and ways of relating the four approaches to each other are suggested. The first approach, cognitive-decision, is distinctive for its…

  7. Rethinking Theoretical Approaches to Stigma

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jack K; Lang, Annie; Olafsdottir, Sigrun

    2008-01-01

    A resurgence of research and policy efforts on stigma both facilitates and forces a reconsideration of the levels and types of factors that shape reactions to persons with conditions that engender prejudice and discrimination. Focusing on the case of mental illness but drawing from theories and studies of stigma across the social sciences, we propose a framework that brings together theoretical insights from micro, meso and macro level research: Framework Integrating Normative Influences on Stigma (FINIS) starts with Goffman’s notion that understanding stigma requires a language of social relationships, but acknowledges that individuals do not come to social interaction devoid of affect and motivation. Further, all social interactions take place in a context in which organizations, media and larger cultures structure normative expectations which create the possibility of marking “difference”. Labelling theory, social network theory, the limited capacity model of media influence, the social psychology of prejudice and discrimination, and theories of the welfare state all contribute to an understanding of the complex web of expectations shaping stigma. FINIS offers the potential to build a broad-based scientific foundation based on understanding the effects of stigma on the lives of persons with mental illness, the resources devoted to the organizations and families who care for them, and policies and programs designed to combat stigma. We end by discussing the clear implications this framework holds for stigma reduction, even in the face of conflicting results. PMID:18436358

  8. New Theoretical Approaches for Human-Computer Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Yvonne

    2004-01-01

    Presents a critique of recent theoretical developments in the field of human-computer interaction (HCI) together with an overview of HCI practice. This chapter discusses why theoretically based approaches have had little impact on the practice of interaction design and suggests mechanisms to enable designers and researchers to better articulate…

  9. A theoretical approach to measuring pilot workload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantowitz, B. H.

    1984-01-01

    Theoretical assumptions used by researchers in the area of attention, with emphasis upon errors and inconsistent assumptions used by some researchers were studied. Two GAT experiments, two laboratory studies and one field experiment were conducted.

  10. Field-theoretical description of deep inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Geyer, B.; Robaschik, D.; Wieczorek, E.

    1980-01-01

    The most important theoretical notions concerning deep inelastic scattering are reviewed. Topics discussed are the model-independent approach, which is based on the general principles of quantum field theory, the application of quantum chromodynamics to deep inelastic scattering, approaches based on the quark--parton model, the light cone algebra, and conformal invariance, and also investigations in the framework of perturbation theory.

  11. New Theoretical Approach Integrated Education and Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Gang

    2010-01-01

    The paper focuses on exploring new theoretical approach in education with development of online learning technology, from e-learning to u-learning and virtual reality technology, and points out possibilities such as constructing a new teaching ecological system, ubiquitous educational awareness with ubiquitous technology, and changing the…

  12. Speaking of Gender Identity: Theoretical Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Susan A.

    Various definitions of gender identity have ranged from recognition of one's biological sex to an individual's sense of masculinity or femininity. For the purpose of this paper, which examines some of the theoretical approaches to the subject, gender identity will be defined as "the degree to which individuals are 'aware' of and accept their…

  13. Information theoretic approach for accounting classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, E. M. S.; Prataviera, G. A.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we consider an information theoretic approach for the accounting classification process. We propose a matrix formalism and an algorithm for calculations of information theoretic measures associated to accounting classification. The formalism may be useful for further generalizations and computer-based implementation. Information theoretic measures, mutual information and symmetric uncertainty, were evaluated for daily transactions recorded in the chart of accounts of a small company during two years. Variation in the information measures due the aggregation of data in the process of accounting classification is observed. In particular, the symmetric uncertainty seems to be a useful parameter for comparing companies over time or in different sectors or different accounting choices and standards.

  14. Sound velocity estimation: A system theoretic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V.; Sullivan, E.J.

    1993-07-30

    A system-theoretic approach is proposed to investigate the feasibility of reconstructing a sound velocity profile (SVP) from acoustical hydrophone measurements. This problem is based on a state-space representation of the normal-mode propagation model. It is shown that this representation can be utilized to investigate the so-called observability of the SVP from noisy measurement data. A model-based processor is developed to extract this information and it is shown that even in cases where limited SVP information is available, the SVP can be estimated using this approach.

  15. A decision theoretical approach for diffusion promotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Fei; Liu, Yun

    2009-09-01

    In order to maximize cost efficiency from scarce marketing resources, marketers are facing the problem of which group of consumers to target for promotions. We propose to use a decision theoretical approach to model this strategic situation. According to one promotion model that we develop, marketers balance between probabilities of successful persuasion and the expected profits on a diffusion scale, before making their decisions. In the other promotion model, the cost for identifying influence information is considered, and marketers are allowed to ignore individual heterogeneity. We apply the proposed approach to two threshold influence models, evaluate the utility of each promotion action, and provide discussions about the best strategy. Our results show that efforts for targeting influentials or easily influenced people might be redundant under some conditions.

  16. A graph theoretic approach to scene matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranganath, Heggere S.; Chipman, Laure J.

    1991-08-01

    The ability to match two scenes is a fundamental requirement in a variety of computer vision tasks. A graph theoretic approach to inexact scene matching is presented which is useful in dealing with problems due to imperfect image segmentation. A scene is described by a set of graphs, with nodes representing objects and arcs representing relationships between objects. Each node has a set of values representing the relations between pairs of objects, such as angle, adjacency, or distance. With this method of scene representation, the task in scene matching is to match two sets of graphs. Because of segmentation errors, variations in camera angle, illumination, and other conditions, an exact match between the sets of observed and stored graphs is usually not possible. In the developed approach, the problem is represented as an association graph, in which each node represents a possible mapping of an observed region to a stored object, and each arc represents the compatibility of two mappings. Nodes and arcs have weights indicating the merit or a region-object mapping and the degree of compatibility between two mappings. A match between the two graphs corresponds to a clique, or fully connected subgraph, in the association graph. The task is to find the clique that represents the best match. Fuzzy relaxation is used to update the node weights using the contextual information contained in the arcs and neighboring nodes. This simplifies the evaluation of cliques. A method of handling oversegmentation and undersegmentation problems is also presented. The approach is tested with a set of realistic images which exhibit many types of sementation errors.

  17. A graph theoretic approach to scene matching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ranganath, Heggere S.; Chipman, Laure J.

    1991-01-01

    The ability to match two scenes is a fundamental requirement in a variety of computer vision tasks. A graph theoretic approach to inexact scene matching is presented which is useful in dealing with problems due to imperfect image segmentation. A scene is described by a set of graphs, with nodes representing objects and arcs representing relationships between objects. Each node has a set of values representing the relations between pairs of objects, such as angle, adjacency, or distance. With this method of scene representation, the task in scene matching is to match two sets of graphs. Because of segmentation errors, variations in camera angle, illumination, and other conditions, an exact match between the sets of observed and stored graphs is usually not possible. In the developed approach, the problem is represented as an association graph, in which each node represents a possible mapping of an observed region to a stored object, and each arc represents the compatibility of two mappings. Nodes and arcs have weights indicating the merit or a region-object mapping and the degree of compatibility between two mappings. A match between the two graphs corresponds to a clique, or fully connected subgraph, in the association graph. The task is to find the clique that represents the best match. Fuzzy relaxation is used to update the node weights using the contextual information contained in the arcs and neighboring nodes. This simplifies the evaluation of cliques. A method of handling oversegmentation and undersegmentation problems is also presented. The approach is tested with a set of realistic images which exhibit many types of sementation errors.

  18. Heterochromatin and complexity: a theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Gino

    2003-10-01

    Heterochromatin represents 30% of eukaryotic genome in Drosophila and 15% in humans. Despite extensive research spanning many decades, its evolutionary significance, as well as the forces that guarantee its maintenance, are still elusive. Many theoretical and experimental approaches have led researchers to propose several conceptual frameworks to elucidate the nature of this huge mysterious genetic material and its spreading in all eukaryotic genomes. "Junk DNA" as well as "selfish genetic material" are two examples of such attempts, but several lines of evidence suggest that such explanations are incomplete. In fact, if the selfish DNA hypothesis does not explain the mapping of genetic functions in heterochromatin, then the junk DNA hypothesis is incomplete in describing both emergence of genetic functions and their maintenance in the eukaryotic heterochromatin. Recent developments in the physics of complex systems and mathematical concepts such as fractals provide new conceptual clues to answer several basic questions concerning the emergence of heterochromatin in eukaryotic genomes, its evolutionary significance, the forces that guarantee its maintenance, and its peculiar behavior in the eukaryotic cell. The aim of this paper is to provide a new theoretical framework for the heterochromatin, considering such genetic material in physical terms as a complex adaptive system. We apply some computer calculations to demonstrate the nonlinearity of the flux of genetic information along the phylogenic tree. Fractal dimensions of representative heterochromatic sequences are provided. A theory is proposed in which heterochromatin is considered a system that evolves in a self-organized manner at the edge of cellular and environmental chaos. PMID:14523268

  19. The celestial mechanics approach: theoretical foundations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beutler, Gerhard; Jäggi, Adrian; Mervart, Leoš; Meyer, Ulrich

    2010-10-01

    Gravity field determination using the measurements of Global Positioning receivers onboard low Earth orbiters and inter-satellite measurements in a constellation of satellites is a generalized orbit determination problem involving all satellites of the constellation. The celestial mechanics approach (CMA) is comprehensive in the sense that it encompasses many different methods currently in use, in particular so-called short-arc methods, reduced-dynamic methods, and pure dynamic methods. The method is very flexible because the actual solution type may be selected just prior to the combination of the satellite-, arc- and technique-specific normal equation systems. It is thus possible to generate ensembles of substantially different solutions—essentially at the cost of generating one particular solution. The article outlines the general aspects of orbit and gravity field determination. Then the focus is put on the particularities of the CMA, in particular on the way to use accelerometer data and the statistical information associated with it.

  20. Titanocene / cyclodextrin supramolecular systems: a theoretical approach

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Recently, various metallocenes were synthesized and analyzed by biological activity point of view (such as antiproliferative properties): ruthenocenes, cobaltoceniums, titanocenes, zirconocenes, vanadocenes, niobocenes, molibdocenes etc. Two main disadvantages of metallocenes are the poor hydrosolubility and the hydrolytic instability. These problems could be resolved in two ways: synthetically modifying the structure or finding new formulations with enhanced properties. The aqueous solubility of metallocenes with cytostatic activities could be enhanced by molecular encapsulation in cyclodextrins, as well as the hydrolytic instability of these compounds could be reduced. Results This study presents a theoretical approach on the nanoencapsulation of a series of titanocenes with cytotoxic activity in α-, β-, and γ-cyclodextrin. The HyperChem 5.11 package was used for building and molecular modelling of titanocene and cyclodextrin structures, as well as for titanocene/cyclodextrin complex optimization. For titanocene/cyclodextrin complex optimization experiments, the titanocene and cyclodextrin structures in minimal energy conformations were set up at various distances and positions between molecules (molecular mechanics functionality, MM+). The best interaction between titanocene structures and cyclodextrins was obtained in the case of β- and γ-cyclodextrin, having the hydrophobic moieties oriented to the secondary face of cyclodextrin. The hydrophobicity of titanocenes (logP) correlate with the titanocene-cyclodextrin interaction parameters, especially with the titanocene-cyclodextrin interaction energy; the compatible geometry and the interaction energy denote that the titanocene/β- and γ-cyclodextrin complex can be achieved. Valuable quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) were also obtained in the titanocene class by using the same logP as the main parameter for the in vitro cytotoxic activity against HeLa, K562, and Fem-x cell

  1. Field-Theoretic Studies of Nanostructured Triblock Polyelectrolyte Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audus, Debra; Fredrickson, Glenn

    2012-02-01

    Recently, experimentalists have developed nanostructured, reversible gels formed from triblock polyelectrolytes (Hunt et al. 2011, Lemmers et al. 2010, 2011). These gels have fascinating and tunable properties that reflect a heterogeneous morphology with domains on the order of tens of nanometers. The complex coacervate domains, aggregated oppositely charged end-blocks, are embedded in a continuous aqueous matrix and are bridged by uncharged, hydrophilic polymer mid-blocks. We report on simulation studies that employ statistical field theory models of triblock polyelectrolytes, and we explore the equilibrium self-assembly of these remarkable systems. As the charge complexation responsible for the formation of coacervate domains is driven by electrostatic correlations, we have found it necessary to pursue full ``field-theoretic simulations'' of the models, as opposed to the familiar self-consistent field theory approach. Our investigations have focused on morphological trends with mid- and end-block lengths, polymer concentration, salt concentration and charge density.

  2. Theoretical approach of the photoinjector exit aperture influence on the wake field driven by an electron beam accelerated in an RF gun of free-electron laser ``ELSA''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salah, Wa'el; Dolique, J.-M.

    2000-06-01

    The wake field generated in the cylindrical cavity of an RF photoinjector, by a strongly accelerated electron beam, has been analytically calculated (Salah, Dolique, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 437 (1999) 27) under the assumption that the perturbation of the field map by the exit hole is negligible as long as the ratio: exit hole radius/cavity radius is lower than approximately 1/3. Shown experimentally in the different context of a long accelerating structure formed by a sequence of bored pill-box cavity (Figuera et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 60 (1988) 2144; Kim et al., J. Appl. Phys. 68 (1990) 4942), this often-quoted result must be checked for the wake field map excited in a photo injector cavity. Further, in the latter case, the empirical rule in question can be broken more easily because, due to causality, the cavity radius to be considered is not the physical radius but that of the part of the anode wall around the exit hole reached by the beam electromagnetic influence. We present an analytical treatment of the wake field driven in a photoinjector by the accelerated electron beam which takes this hole effect into account, whatever the hole radius may be.

  3. Potential theoretic methods for far field sound radiation calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.; Stenger, Edward J.; Scott, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    In the area of computational acoustics, procedures which accurately predict the far-field sound radiation are much sought after. A systematic development of such procedures are found in a sequence of papers by Atassi. The method presented here is an alternate approach to predicting far field sound based on simple layer potential theoretic methods. The main advantages of this method are: it requires only a simple free space Green's function, it can accommodate arbitrary shapes of Kirchoff surfaces, and is readily extendable to three-dimensional problems. Moreover, the procedure presented here, though tested for unsteady lifting airfoil problems, can easily be adapted to other areas of interest, such as jet noise radiation problems. Results are presented for lifting airfoil problems and comparisons are made with the results reported by Atassi. Direct comparisons are also made for the flat plate case.

  4. Item Characteristic Curves: A New Theoretical Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Perez, Miguel A.; Frary, Robert B.

    A new approach to the development of the item characteristic curve (ICC), which expresses the functional relationship between the level of performance on a given task and an independent variable that is relevant to the task, is presented. The approach focuses on knowledge states, decision processes, and other circumstances underlying responses to…

  5. Understanding bimolecular machines: Theoretical and experimental approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goler, Adam Scott

    This dissertation concerns the study of two classes of molecular machines from a physical perspective: enzymes and membrane proteins. Though the functions of these classes of proteins are different, they each represent important test-beds from which new understanding can be developed by the application of different techniques. HIV1 Reverse Transcriptase is an enzyme that performs multiple functions, including reverse transcription of RNA into an RNA/DNA duplex, RNA degradation by the RNaseH domain, and synthesis of dsDNA. These functions allow for the incorporation of the retroviral genes into the host genome. Its catalytic cycle requires repeated large-scale conformational changes fundamental to its mechanism. Motivated by experimental work, these motions were studied theoretically by the application of normal mode analysis. It was observed that the lowest order modes correlate with largest amplitude (low-frequency) motion, which are most likely to be catalytically relevant. Comparisons between normal modes obtained via an elastic network model to those calculated from the essential dynamics of a series of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations show the self-consistency between these calculations. That similar conformational motions are seen between independent theoretical methods reinforces the importance of large-scale subdomain motion for the biochemical action of DNA polymerases in general. Moreover, it was observed that the major subunits of HIV1 Reverse Transcriptase interact quasi-harmonically. The 5HT3A Serotonin receptor and P2X1 receptor, by contrast, are trans-membrane proteins that function as ligand gated ion channels. Such proteins feature a central pore, which allows for the transit of ions necessary for cellular function across a membrane. The pore is opened by the ligation of binding sites on the extracellular portion of different protein subunits. In an attempt to resolve the individual subunits of these membrane proteins beyond the diffraction

  6. Approaching theoretical strength in glassy carbon nanolattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, J.; Schroer, A.; Schwaiger, R.; Kraft, O.

    2016-04-01

    The strength of lightweight mechanical metamaterials, which aim to exploit material-strengthening size effects by their microscale lattice structure, has been limited by the resolution of three-dimensional lithography technologies and their restriction to mainly polymer resins. Here, we demonstrate that pyrolysis of polymeric microlattices can overcome these limitations and create ultra-strong glassy carbon nanolattices with single struts shorter than 1 μm and diameters as small as 200 nm. They represent the smallest lattice structures yet produced--achieved by an 80% shrinkage of the polymer during pyrolysis--and exhibit material strengths of up to 3 GPa, corresponding approximately to the theoretical strength of glassy carbon. The strength-to-density ratios of the nanolattices are six times higher than those of reported microlattices. With a honeycomb topology, effective strengths of 1.2 GPa at 0.6 g cm-3 are achieved. Diamond is the only bulk material with a notably higher strength-to-density ratio.

  7. Planar dipolar polymer brush: field theoretical investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahalik, Jyoti; Kumar, Rajeev; Sumpter, Bobby

    2015-03-01

    Physical properties of polymer brushes bearing monomers with permanent dipole moments and immersed in a polar solvent are investigated using self-consistent field theory (SCFT). It is found that mismatch between the permanent dipole moments of the monomer and the solvent plays a significant role in determining the height of the polymer brush. Sign as well as magnitude of the mismatch determines the extent of collapse of the polymer brush. The mismatch in the dipole moments also affects the force-distance relations and interpenetration of polymers in opposing planar brushes. In particular, an attractive force between the opposing dipolar brushes is predicted for stronger mismatch parameter. Furthermore, effects of added monovalent salt on the structure of dipolar brushes will also be presented. This investigation highlights the significance of dipolar interactions in affecting the physical properties of polymer brushes. Csmd division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA.

  8. Information theoretic approaches to multidimensional neural computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, Jeffrey D.

    Many systems in nature process information by transforming inputs from their environments into observable output states. These systems are often difficult to study because they are performing computations on multidimensional inputs with many degrees of freedom using highly nonlinear functions. The work presented in this dissertation deals with some of the issues involved with characterizing real-world input/output systems and understanding the properties of idealized systems using information theoretic methods. Using the principle of maximum entropy, a family of models are created that are consistent with certain measurable correlations from an input/output dataset but are maximally unbiased in all other respects, thereby eliminating all unjustified assumptions about the computation. In certain cases, including spiking neurons, we show that these models also minimize the mutual information. This property gives one the advantage of being able to identify the relevant input/output statistics by calculating their information content. We argue that these maximum entropy models provide a much needed quantitative framework for characterizing and understanding sensory processing neurons that are selective for multiple stimulus features. To demonstrate their usefulness, these ideas are applied to neural recordings from macaque retina and thalamus. These neurons, which primarily respond to two stimulus features, are shown to be well described using only first and second order statistics, indicating that their firing rates encode information about stimulus correlations. In addition to modeling multi-feature computations in the relevant feature space, we also show that maximum entropy models are capable of discovering the relevant feature space themselves. This technique overcomes the disadvantages of two commonly used dimensionality reduction methods and is explored using several simulated neurons, as well as retinal and thalamic recordings. Finally, we ask how neurons in a

  9. Efficient field-theoretic simulation of polymer solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villet, Michael C.; Fredrickson, Glenn H.

    2014-12-01

    We present several developments that facilitate the efficient field-theoretic simulation of polymers by complex Langevin sampling. A regularization scheme using finite Gaussian excluded volume interactions is used to derive a polymer solution model that appears free of ultraviolet divergences and hence is well-suited for lattice-discretized field theoretic simulation. We show that such models can exhibit ultraviolet sensitivity, a numerical pathology that dramatically increases sampling error in the continuum lattice limit, and further show that this pathology can be eliminated by appropriate model reformulation by variable transformation. We present an exponential time differencing algorithm for integrating complex Langevin equations for field theoretic simulation, and show that the algorithm exhibits excellent accuracy and stability properties for our regularized polymer model. These developments collectively enable substantially more efficient field-theoretic simulation of polymers, and illustrate the importance of simultaneously addressing analytical and numerical pathologies when implementing such computations.

  10. Efficient field-theoretic simulation of polymer solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Villet, Michael C.; Fredrickson, Glenn H.

    2014-12-14

    We present several developments that facilitate the efficient field-theoretic simulation of polymers by complex Langevin sampling. A regularization scheme using finite Gaussian excluded volume interactions is used to derive a polymer solution model that appears free of ultraviolet divergences and hence is well-suited for lattice-discretized field theoretic simulation. We show that such models can exhibit ultraviolet sensitivity, a numerical pathology that dramatically increases sampling error in the continuum lattice limit, and further show that this pathology can be eliminated by appropriate model reformulation by variable transformation. We present an exponential time differencing algorithm for integrating complex Langevin equations for field theoretic simulation, and show that the algorithm exhibits excellent accuracy and stability properties for our regularized polymer model. These developments collectively enable substantially more efficient field-theoretic simulation of polymers, and illustrate the importance of simultaneously addressing analytical and numerical pathologies when implementing such computations.

  11. Biosensor commercialization strategy - a theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin-Tsai; Wang, Su-Man

    2005-01-01

    Biosensors are analytical devices, which use biological interactions to provide either qualitative or quantitative results. They are extensively employed in many fields such as clinical diagnosis and biomedicine, military applications, anti-terrorism, farm, garden and veterinary analysis, process control, fermentation control and analysis, pharmaceutical and drug analysis, food and drink production and analysis, pollution control and monitoring, microbiology, bacterial and viral analysis, mining, and industrial and toxic gases. The biosensor market has significantly increased and will be mushrooming in the next decade. The total biosensor market is estimated to be 10.8 billion dollars by 2007. The emerging biosensor market presents both opportunities and obstacles to start-up biosensor entrepreneurs. The major challenge and threat for these entrepreneurs is how to predict the biosensor market and how to convert promising biosensor technology into commercialized biosensors. By adopting a simple commercialization strategy framework, we identify two key elements of biosensor commercialization strategy: excludability and complementary asset. We further divide biosensor commercialization environments into four distinct sub-environments: the Attacker's Advantage, Reputation-Based Idea Trading, Greenfield Competition and Ideas Factories. This paper explains how the interaction between these two key elements shapes biosensor commercialization strategy and biosensor industry dynamics. This paper also discusses alternative commercialization strategies for each specific commercialization environment and how to choose from these alternatives. The analysis of this study further provides a good reference for start-up biosensor entrepreneurs to formulate effective biosensor commercialization strategy. PMID:15574353

  12. A perturbation theoretic approach to the Riccati equation for the Floquet energies, spectral intensities, and cutoff energy of harmonic generation in photon emission from nonadiabatic electron-transfer dynamics driven by infrared CW laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Yuta; Arasaki, Yasuki; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    A complicated yet interesting induced photon emission can take place by a nonadiabatic intramolecular electron transfer system like LiF under an intense CW laser [Y. Arasaki, S. Scheit, and K. Takatsuka, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 161103 (2013)]. Behind this phenomena, the crossing point between two potential energy curves of covalent and ionic natures in diabatic representation is forced to oscillate, since only the ionic potential curve is shifted significantly up and down repeatedly (called the Dynamical Stark effect). The wavepacket pumped initially to the excited covalent potential curve frequently encounters such a dynamically moving crossing point and thereby undergoes very complicated dynamics including wavepacket bifurcation and deformation. Intramolecular electron transfer thus driven by the coupling between nonadiabatic state-mixing and laser fields induces irregular photon emission. Here in this report we discuss the complicated spectral features of this kind of photon emission induced by infrared laser. In the low frequency domain, the photon emission is much more involved than those of ultraviolet/visible driving fields, since many field-dressed states are created on the ionic potential, which have their own classical turning points and crossing points with the covalent counterpart. To analyze the physics behind the phenomena, we develop a perturbation theoretic approach to the Riccati equation that is transformed from coupled first-order linear differential equations with periodic coefficients, which are supposed to produce the so-called Floquet states. We give mathematical expressions for the Floquet energies, frequencies, and intensities of the photon emission spectra, and the cutoff energy of their harmonic generation. Agreement between these approximate quantities and those estimated with full quantum calculations is found to be excellent. Furthermore, the present analysis provides with notions to facilitate deeper understanding for the physical and

  13. A perturbation theoretic approach to the Riccati equation for the Floquet energies, spectral intensities, and cutoff energy of harmonic generation in photon emission from nonadiabatic electron-transfer dynamics driven by infrared CW laser fields.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Yuta; Arasaki, Yasuki; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2016-01-14

    A complicated yet interesting induced photon emission can take place by a nonadiabatic intramolecular electron transfer system like LiF under an intense CW laser [Y. Arasaki, S. Scheit, and K. Takatsuka, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 161103 (2013)]. Behind this phenomena, the crossing point between two potential energy curves of covalent and ionic natures in diabatic representation is forced to oscillate, since only the ionic potential curve is shifted significantly up and down repeatedly (called the Dynamical Stark effect). The wavepacket pumped initially to the excited covalent potential curve frequently encounters such a dynamically moving crossing point and thereby undergoes very complicated dynamics including wavepacket bifurcation and deformation. Intramolecular electron transfer thus driven by the coupling between nonadiabatic state-mixing and laser fields induces irregular photon emission. Here in this report we discuss the complicated spectral features of this kind of photon emission induced by infrared laser. In the low frequency domain, the photon emission is much more involved than those of ultraviolet/visible driving fields, since many field-dressed states are created on the ionic potential, which have their own classical turning points and crossing points with the covalent counterpart. To analyze the physics behind the phenomena, we develop a perturbation theoretic approach to the Riccati equation that is transformed from coupled first-order linear differential equations with periodic coefficients, which are supposed to produce the so-called Floquet states. We give mathematical expressions for the Floquet energies, frequencies, and intensities of the photon emission spectra, and the cutoff energy of their harmonic generation. Agreement between these approximate quantities and those estimated with full quantum calculations is found to be excellent. Furthermore, the present analysis provides with notions to facilitate deeper understanding for the physical and

  14. Theoretical approaches to lightness and perception.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, Alan

    2015-01-01

    a better account of illusions and failures of constancy. Evidence for and against these approaches is reviewed. PMID:26492718

  15. A first-principles theoretical approach to heterogeneous nanocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Negreiros, Fabio R; Aprà, Edoardo; Barcaro, Giovanni; Sementa, Luca; Vajda, Stefan; Fortunelli, Alessandro

    2012-02-21

    A theoretical approach to heterogeneous catalysis by sub-nanometre supported metal clusters and alloys is presented and discussed. Its goal is to perform a computational sampling of the reaction paths in nanocatalysis via a global search in the phase space of structures and stoichiometry combined with filtering which takes into account the given experimental conditions (catalytically relevant temperature and reactant pressure), and corresponds to an incremental exploration of the disconnectivity diagram of the system. The approach is implemented and applied to the study of propylene partial oxidation by Ag(3) supported on MgO(100). First-principles density-functional theory calculations coupled with a Reactive Global Optimization algorithm are performed, finding that: (1) the presence of an oxide support drastically changes the potential energy landscape of the system with respect to the gas phase, favoring configurations which interact positively with the electrostatic field generated by the surface; (2) the reaction energy barriers for the various mechanisms are crucial in the competition between thermodynamically and kinetically favored reaction products; (3) a topological database of structures and saddle points is produced which has general validity and can serve for future studies or for deriving general trends; (4) the MgO(100) surface captures some major features of the effect of an oxide support and appears to be a good model of a simple oxide substrate; (5) strong cooperative effects are found in the co-adsorption of O(2) and other ligands on small metal clusters. The proposed approach appears as a viable route to advance the role of predictive computational science in the field of heterogeneous nanocatalysis. PMID:22057595

  16. Preservation of Newspapers: Theoretical Approaches and Practical Achievements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasenay, Damir; Krtalic, Maja

    2010-01-01

    The preservation of newspapers is the main topic of this paper. A theoretical overview of newspaper preservation is given, with an emphasis on the importance of a systematic and comprehensive approach. Efficient newspaper preservation implies understanding the meaning of preservation in general, as well as understanding specific approaches,…

  17. Dramaturgical and Music-Theoretical Approaches to Improvisation Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huovinen, Erkki; Tenkanen, Atte; Kuusinen, Vesa-Pekka

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this article is to assess the relative merits of two approaches to teaching musical improvisation: a music-theoretical approach, focusing on chords and scales, and a "dramaturgical" one, emphasizing questions of balance, variation and tension. Adult students of music pedagogy, with limited previous experience in improvisation, took part…

  18. Corporate Library Impact, Part I: A Theoretical Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgar, William

    2004-01-01

    Drawing on library and information science, strategy, and organizational theory, this article presents a theoretical approach to the determination of corporate library contribution to its parent firm. This approach departs from previous work on this topic, which focused on corporate library contribution to corporate operations and standing,…

  19. An integrated theoretical and practical approach for teaching hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonomi, Tullia; Fumagalli, Letizia; Cavallin, Angelo

    2013-04-01

    their limitations; C) by an evaluation process whose results contribute to the final examination, so that the students are evaluated on the basis of their ability to discuss theoretical subjects and/or projects and to resolving exercises and case studies either by hand calculations or by modelling. The applied hydrogeology examination is an example of the evaluation process. It involves development of a plan to resolve a real hydrogeological issue, such as the design of a hydraulic barrier for a landfill, the design of a well field to meet the supply requirements of a muncipality, or the control of possible seepage from a contaminated site close to to sensitive discharge features such as wells, springs, rivers. The students are allowed to work on computers for three consecutive mornings for a total 15 hours, and in the end are required to produce a technical report and a hydrogeological model. Obviously their solutions are neither unique nor completely optimized (just as in the real world), but the comparisons and debates among the students are important portals to learning and improvement. A second example: the groundwater pollution and remediation examination is based on the discussion of a remediation project elaborated in stages during the course, with the addition of increasing complex types of data and information. The students have one hour a week, during the course, to submit to the teacher their analysis of the problem and possible solutions. In ten years of experience all students have considered this method of examination a challenge, and found it engaging and helpful, even if unusual, at least in Italy. The University of Milano Bicocca has recently drilled a piezometric well both to monitor the flow of groundwater and to allow students to perform aquifer tests and to conduct standard groundwater sampling procedure, without any longer needing to rely on outside private donors for access to a field site. The overall approach, which includes, lectures

  20. The State and the Quality Agenda: A Theoretical Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filippakou, Ourania; Tapper, Ted

    2010-01-01

    This article adopts a theoretical approach to analyse the evolution of the quality agenda in English higher education. Using the concept of reification, it shows how the quasi-state has attempted to build a "natural" understanding of the idea of quality. However, the policy implementation process has demonstrated the fragility of the state's…

  1. Approach to Mars Field Geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muehlberger, William; Rice, James W.; Parker, Timothy; Lipps, Jere H.; Hoffman, Paul; Burchfiel, Clark; Brasier, Martin

    1998-01-01

    The goals of field study on Mars are nothing less than to understand the processes and history of the planet at whatever level of detail is necessary. A manned mission gives us an unprecedented opportunity to use the immense power of the human mind to comprehend Mars in extraordinary detail. To take advantage of this opportunity, it is important to examine how we should approach the field study of Mars. In this effort, we are guided by over 200 years of field exploration experience on Earth as well as six manned missions exploring the Moon.

  2. Geodetic methods for detecting volcanic unrest: a theoretical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, José; Carrasco, José M.; Rundle, John B.; Araña, Vicente

    In this paper we study the application of different geodetic techniques to volcanic activity monitoring, using theoretical analysis. This methodology is very useful for obtaining an idea of the most appropriate (and efficient) monitoring method, mainly when there are no records of geodetic changes previous to volcanic activity. The analysis takes into account the crustal structure of the area, its geology, and its known volcanic activity to estimate the deformation and gravity changes that might precede eruptions. The deformation model used includes the existing gravity field and vertical changes in the crustal properties. Both factors can have a considerable effect on computed deformation and gravity changes. Topography should be considered when there is a steep slope (greater than 10°). The case study of Teide stratovolcano (Tenerife, Canary Islands), for which no deformation or gravity changes are available, is used as a test. To avoid considering topography, we worked at the lowest level of Las Cañadas and examined a smaller area than the whole caldera or island. Therefore, the results are only a first approach to the most adequate geodetic monitoring system. The methodology can also be applied to active areas where volcanic risk is not associated with a stratovolcano but instead with monogenetic scattered centers, especially when sites must be chosen in terms of detection efficiency or existing facilities. The Canary Islands provide a good example of this type of active volcanic areas, and we apply our model to the island of Lanzarote to evaluate the efficiency of the monitoring system installed at the existing geodynamic station. On this island topography is not important. The results of our study show clearly that the most appropriate geodetic volcano monitoring system is not the same for all different volcanic zones and types, and the particular properties of each volcano/zone must be taken into account when designing each system.

  3. A theoretical approach to artificial intelligence systems in medicine.

    PubMed

    Spyropoulos, B; Papagounos, G

    1995-10-01

    The various theoretical models of disease, the nosology which is accepted by the medical community and the prevalent logic of diagnosis determine both the medical approach as well as the development of the relevant technology including the structure and function of the A.I. systems involved. A.I. systems in medicine, in addition to the specific parameters which enable them to reach a diagnostic and/or therapeutic proposal, entail implicitly theoretical assumptions and socio-cultural attitudes which prejudice the orientation and the final outcome of the procedure. The various models -causal, probabilistic, case-based etc. -are critically examined and their ethical and methodological limitations are brought to light. The lack of a self-consistent theoretical framework in medicine, the multi-faceted character of the human organism as well as the non-explicit nature of the theoretical assumptions involved in A.I. systems restrict them to the role of decision supporting "instruments" rather than regarding them as decision making "devices". This supporting role and, especially, the important function which A.I. systems should have in the structure, the methods and the content of medical education underscore the need of further research in the theoretical aspects and the actual development of such systems. PMID:8547968

  4. A control theoretic model for piloted approach to landing.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinman, D. L.; Baron, S.

    1972-01-01

    Using manned vehicle systems analysis, a model for manual approach to landing is developed. This model is developed and applied in the specific context of a problem of analytical evaluation of a pictorial display for longitudinal control of glide path errors. This makes it possible to discuss the model in concrete terms, and the availability of experimental data provides opportunities for checking the theoretical results obtained.

  5. Field theoretical prediction of a property of the tropical cyclone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spineanu, F.; Vlad, M.

    2014-01-01

    The large scale atmospheric vortices (tropical cyclones, tornadoes) are complex physical systems combining thermodynamics and fluid-mechanical processes. The late phase of the evolution towards stationarity consists of the vorticity concentration, a well known tendency to self-organization , an universal property of the two-dimensional fluids. It may then be expected that the stationary state of the tropical cyclone has the same nature as the vortices of many other systems in nature: ideal (Euler) fluids, superconductors, Bose-Einsetin condensate, cosmic strings, etc. Indeed it was found that there is a description of the atmospheric vortex in terms of a classical field theory. It is compatible with the more conventional treatment based on conservation laws, but the field theoretical model reveals properties that are almost inaccessible to the conventional formulation: it identifies the stationary states as being close to self-duality. This is of highest importance: the self-duality is known to be the origin of all coherent structures known in natural systems. Therefore the field theoretical (FT) formulation finds that the cuasi-coherent form of the atmospheric vortex (tropical cyclone) at stationarity is an expression of this particular property. In the present work we examine a strong property of the tropical cyclone, which arises in the FT formulation in a natural way: the equality of the masses of the particles associated to the matter field and respectively to the gauge field in the FT model is translated into the equality between the maximum radial extension of the tropical cyclone and the Rossby radius. For the cases where the FT model is a good approximation we calculate characteristic quantities of the tropical cyclone and find good comparison with observational data.

  6. A note on the field-theoretical description of superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrianopoli, L.; D'Auria, R.; Grassi, P. A.; Trigiante, M.

    2014-02-01

    Recently, a Lagrangian description of superfluids attracted some interest from the fluid/gravity-correspondence viewpoint. In this respect, the work of Dubovksy et al. has proposed a new field theoretical description of fluids, which has several interesting aspects. On another side, we have recently provided a supersymmetric extension of the original works. In the analysis of the Lagrangian structures a new invariant appeared which, although related to known invariants, provides, in our opinion, a better parametrization of the fluid dynamics in order to describe the fluid/superfluid phases. Above the critical temperature TC the fluid has a normal behavior and is invariant under the chemical-shift symmetry [8]. It is described in terms of the comoving coordinates ϕI(x) and by the U(1)-phase field ψ(x).On the other hand, below the critical temperature the chemical-shift symmetry is spontaneously broken, giving rise to the superfluid. In particular, at T=0, the superfluid is completely described in terms of ψ. One can consider, following [9], an isotropic and homogeneous background where ψ=y0t, ϕI=b01/3xI. It corresponds to taking a configuration where the fields ϕI are comoving with the normal fluid part (which is at rest in this background), the superfluid field ψ being in relative motion with respect to it. Note that the loss of interactions between the two fluids is expressed by the property that ZI=∂μψ∂μϕI=0 in the background. Small perturbations about the background (28): ψ=y0(t+π0(x)), ϕI=b01/3(xI+πI(x)) introduce a small interaction term ZI≠0. Note that the quantity BIJ-1ZIZJ=ɛ stays small in this regime, even if ϕI→0 as T→0. Given these considerations, we can make use of the relation (18) to observe that at very low temperatures the quantity y2=-X+BIJ-1ZIZJ=-X+ɛ approaches the value -X, which is not invariant under the chemical-shift symmetry. In this regime the Lagrangian F(b,y) can be expanded in powers of ɛ around the

  7. An information theoretic approach of designing sparse kernel adaptive filters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weifeng; Park, Il; Principe, José C

    2009-12-01

    This paper discusses an information theoretic approach of designing sparse kernel adaptive filters. To determine useful data to be learned and remove redundant ones, a subjective information measure called surprise is introduced. Surprise captures the amount of information a datum contains which is transferable to a learning system. Based on this concept, we propose a systematic sparsification scheme, which can drastically reduce the time and space complexity without harming the performance of kernel adaptive filters. Nonlinear regression, short term chaotic time-series prediction, and long term time-series forecasting examples are presented. PMID:19923047

  8. Theoretical description of teaching-learning processes: a multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Bordogna, C M; Albano, E V

    2001-09-10

    A multidisciplinary approach based on concepts from sociology, educational psychology, statistical physics, and computational science is developed for the theoretical description of teaching-learning processes that take place in the classroom. The emerging model is consistent with well-established empirical results, such as the higher achievements reached working in collaborative groups and the influence of the structure of the group on the achievements of the individuals. Furthermore, another social learning process that takes place in massive interactions among individuals via the Internet is also investigated. PMID:11531550

  9. Considering children and health literacy: a theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Borzekowski, Dina L G

    2009-11-01

    The theoretical approaches of Paulo Freire, Jean Piaget, and Lev Vygotsky frame the consideration of children and health literacy. This article includes a general discussion of literacy from the Freirian perspective. A definition of health literacy is then presented; first, the established meaning is introduced, but then a Freirian extension is proposed. Next, the theories of cognitive development by Piaget and Vygotsky are discussed, and examples related to children's health literacy are given. Finally, there is a discussion of why it is important to encourage and enable health literacy among children and adolescents. PMID:19861482

  10. Theoretical, Methodological, and Empirical Approaches to Cost Savings: A Compendium

    SciTech Connect

    M Weimar

    1998-12-10

    This publication summarizes and contains the original documentation for understanding why the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) privatization approach provides cost savings and the different approaches that could be used in calculating cost savings for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Phase I contract. The initial section summarizes the approaches in the different papers. The appendices are the individual source papers which have been reviewed by individuals outside of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the TWRS Program. Appendix A provides a theoretical basis for and estimate of the level of savings that can be" obtained from a fixed-priced contract with performance risk maintained by the contractor. Appendix B provides the methodology for determining cost savings when comparing a fixed-priced contractor with a Management and Operations (M&O) contractor (cost-plus contractor). Appendix C summarizes the economic model used to calculate cost savings and provides hypothetical output from preliminary calculations. Appendix D provides the summary of the approach for the DOE-Richland Operations Office (RL) estimate of the M&O contractor to perform the same work as BNFL Inc. Appendix E contains information on cost growth and per metric ton of glass costs for high-level waste at two other DOE sites, West Valley and Savannah River. Appendix F addresses a risk allocation analysis of the BNFL proposal that indicates,that the current approach is still better than the alternative.

  11. Monte Carlo field-theoretic simulations of a homopolymer blend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Russell; Matsen, Mark

    Fluctuation corrections to the macrophase segregation transition (MST) in a symmetric homopolymer blend are examined using Monte Carlo field-theoretic simulations (MC-FTS). This technique involves treating interactions between unlike monomers using standard Monte-Carlo techniques, while enforcing incompressibility as is done in mean-field theory. When using MC-FTS, we need to account for a UV divergence. This is done by renormalizing the Flory-Huggins interaction parameter to incorporate the divergent part of the Hamiltonian. We compare different ways of calculating this effective interaction parameter. Near the MST, the length scale of compositional fluctuations becomes large, however, the high computational requirements of MC-FTS restrict us to small system sizes. We account for these finite size effects using the method of Binder cumulants, allowing us to locate the MST with high precision. We examine fluctuation corrections to the mean field MST, χN = 2 , as they vary with the invariant degree of polymerization, N =ρ2a6 N . These results are compared with particle-based simulations as well as analytical calculations using the renormalized one loop theory. This research was funded by the Center for Sustainable Polymers.

  12. Theoretical and experimental examination of near-field acoustic levitation.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Hideyuki; Kamakura, Tomoo; Matsuda, Kazuhisa

    2002-04-01

    A planar object can be levitated stably close to a piston sound source by making use of acoustic radiation pressure. This phenomenon is called near-field acoustic levitation [Y. Hashimoto et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 100, 2057-2061 (1996)]. In the present article, the levitation distance is predicted theoretically by numerically solving basic equations in a compressible viscous fluid subject to the appropriate initial and boundary conditions. Additionally, experiments are carried out using a 19.5-kHz piston source with a 40-mm aperture and various aluminum disks of different sizes. The measured levitation distance agrees well with the theory, which is different from a conventional theory, and the levitation distance is not inversely proportional to the square root of the surface density of the levitated disk in a strict sense. PMID:12002842

  13. Irreversibility of financial time series: A graph-theoretical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, Ryan; Lacasa, Lucas

    2016-04-01

    The relation between time series irreversibility and entropy production has been recently investigated in thermodynamic systems operating away from equilibrium. In this work we explore this concept in the context of financial time series. We make use of visibility algorithms to quantify, in graph-theoretical terms, time irreversibility of 35 financial indices evolving over the period 1998-2012. We show that this metric is complementary to standard measures based on volatility and exploit it to both classify periods of financial stress and to rank companies accordingly. We then validate this approach by finding that a projection in principal components space of financial years, based on time irreversibility features, clusters together periods of financial stress from stable periods. Relations between irreversibility, efficiency and predictability are briefly discussed.

  14. Theoretical analysis of magnetic field interactions with aortic blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kinouchi, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Tenforde, T.S.

    1996-04-01

    The flow of blood in the presence of a magnetic field gives rise to induced voltages in the major arteries of the central circulatory system. Under certain simplifying conditions, such as the assumption that the length of major arteries (e.g., the aorta) is infinite and that the vessel walls are not electrically conductive, the distribution of induced voltages and currents within these blood vessels can be calculated with reasonable precision. However, the propagation of magnetically induced voltages and currents from the aorta into neighboring tissue structures such as the sinuatrial node of the heart has not been previously determined by any experimental or theoretical technique. In the analysis presented in this paper, a solution of the complete Navier-Stokes equation was obtained by the finite element technique for blood flow through the ascending and descending aortic vessels in the presence of a uniform static magnetic field. Spatial distributions of the magnetically induced voltage and current were obtained for the aortic vessel and surrounding tissues under the assumption that the wall of the aorta is electrically conductive. Results are presented for the calculated values of magnetically induced voltages and current densities in the aorta and surrounding tissue structures, including the sinuatrial node, and for their field-strength dependence. In addition, an analysis is presented of magnetohydrodynamic interactions that lead to a small reduction of blood volume flow at high field levels above approximately 10 tesla (T). Quantitative results are presented on the offsetting effects of oppositely directed blood flows in the ascending and descending aortic segments, and a quantitative estimate is made of the effects of assuming an infinite vs. a finite length of the aortic vessel in calculating the magnetically induced voltage and current density distribution in tissue.

  15. Essential amino acids interacting with flavonoids: A theoretical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codorniu-Hernández, Edelsys; Mesa-Ibirico, Ariel; Hernández-Santiesteban, Richel; Montero-Cabrera, Luis A.; Martínez-Luzardo, Francisco; Santana-Romero, Jorge L.; Borrmann, Tobias; Stohrer, Wolf-D.

    The interaction of two flavonoid species (resorcinolic and fluoroglucinolic) with the 20 essential amino acids was studied by the multiple minima hypersurface (MMH) procedures, through the AM1 and PM3 semiempirical methods. Remarkable thermodynamic data related to the properties of the molecular association of these compounds were obtained, which will be of great utility for future investigations concerning the interaction of flavonoids with proteins. These results are compared with experimental and classical force field results reported in the available literature, and new evidences and criteria are shown. The hydrophilic amino acids demonstrated high affinity in the interaction with flavonoid molecules; the complexes with lysine are especially extremely stable. An affinity order for the interaction of both flavonoid species with the essential amino acids is suggested. Our theoretical results are compared with experimental evidence on flavonoid interactions with proteins of biomedical interest.

  16. Rainbows from inhomogeneous transparent spheres: a ray-theoretic approach.

    PubMed

    Adam, John A; Laven, Philip

    2007-02-20

    A ray-theoretic account of the passage of light through a radially inhomogeneous transparent sphere has been used to establish the existence of multiple primary rainbows for some refractive index profiles. The existence of such additional bows is a consequence of a sufficiently attractive potential in the interior of the drop, i.e., the refractive index gradient should be sufficiently negative there. The profiles for which this gradient is monotonically increasing do not result in this phenomenon, but nonmonotone profiles can do so, depending on the form of n. Sufficiently oscillatory profiles can lead to apparently singular behavior in the deviation angle (within the geometrical optics approximation) as well as multiple rainbows. These results also apply to systems with circular cylindrical cross sections, and may be of value in the field of rainbow refractometry. PMID:17279138

  17. We need theoretical physics approaches to study living systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoev, Krastan B.; Shukla, Kamal; affil="3" >Herbert Levine,

    2013-08-01

    Living systems, as created initially by the transition from assemblies of large molecules to self-reproducing information-rich cells, have for centuries been studied via the empirical toolkit of biology. This has been a highly successful enterprise, bringing us from the vague non-scientific notions of vitalism to the modern appreciation of the biophysical and biochemical bases of life. Yet, the truly mind-boggling complexity of even the simplest self-sufficient cells, let alone the emergence of multicellular organisms, of brain and consciousness, and to ecological communities and human civilizations, calls out for a complementary approach. In this editorial, we propose that theoretical physics can play an essential role in making sense of living matter. When faced with a highly complex system, a physicist builds simplified models. Quoting Philip W Anderson's Nobel prize address, 'the art of model-building is the exclusion of real but irrelevant parts of the problem and entails hazards for the builder and the reader. The builder may leave out something genuinely relevant and the reader, armed with too sophisticated an experimental probe, may take literally a schematized model. Very often such a simplified model throws more light on the real working of nature....' In his formulation, the job of a theorist is to get at the crux of the system by ignoring details and yet to find a testable consequence of the resulting simple picture. This is rather different than the predilection of the applied mathematician who wants to include all the known details in the hope of a quantitative simulacrum of reality. These efforts may be practically useful, but do not usually lead to increased understanding. To illustrate how this works, we can look at a non-living example of complex behavior that was afforded by spatiotemporal patterning in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction [1]. Physicists who worked on this system did not attempt to determine all the relevant chemical intermediates

  18. GTA: a game theoretic approach to identifying cancer subnetwork markers.

    PubMed

    Farahmand, S; Goliaei, S; Ansari-Pour, N; Razaghi-Moghadam, Z

    2016-03-01

    The identification of genetic markers (e.g. genes, pathways and subnetworks) for cancer has been one of the most challenging research areas in recent years. A subset of these studies attempt to analyze genome-wide expression profiles to identify markers with high reliability and reusability across independent whole-transcriptome microarray datasets. Therefore, the functional relationships of genes are integrated with their expression data. However, for a more accurate representation of the functional relationships among genes, utilization of the protein-protein interaction network (PPIN) seems to be necessary. Herein, a novel game theoretic approach (GTA) is proposed for the identification of cancer subnetwork markers by integrating genome-wide expression profiles and PPIN. The GTA method was applied to three distinct whole-transcriptome breast cancer datasets to identify the subnetwork markers associated with metastasis. To evaluate the performance of our approach, the identified subnetwork markers were compared with gene-based, pathway-based and network-based markers. We show that GTA is not only capable of identifying robust metastatic markers, it also provides a higher classification performance. In addition, based on these GTA-based subnetworks, we identified a new bonafide candidate gene for breast cancer susceptibility. PMID:26750920

  19. Network-theoretic approach to model vortex interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Aditya; Taira, Kunihiko

    2014-11-01

    We present a network-theoretic approach to describe a system of point vortices in two-dimensional flow. By considering the point vortices as nodes, a complete graph is constructed with edges connecting each vortex to every other vortex. The interactions between the vortices are captured by the graph edge weights. We employ sparsification techniques on these graph representations based on spectral theory to construct sparsified models of the overall vortical interactions. The edge weights are redistributed through spectral sparsification of the graph such that the sum of the interactions associated with each vortex is maintained constant. In addition, sparse configurations maintain similar spectral properties as the original setup. Through the reduction in the number of interactions, key vortex interactions can be highlighted. Identification of vortex structures based on graph sparsification is demonstrated with an example of clusters of point vortices. We also evaluate the computational performance of sparsification for large collection of point vortices. Work supported by US Army Research Office (W911NF-14-1-0386) and US Air Force Office of Scientific Research (YIP: FA9550-13-1-0183).

  20. A game theoretic approach for trading discharge permits in rivers.

    PubMed

    Niksokhan, Mohammad Hossein; Kerachian, Reza; Karamouz, Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a new Cooperative Trading Discharge Permit (CTDP) methodology is designed for estimating equitable and efficient treatment cost allocation among dischargers in a river system considering their conflicting interests. The methodology consists of two main steps: (1) initial treatment cost allocation and (2) equitable treatment cost reallocation. In the first step, a Pareto front among objectives is developed using a powerful and recently developed multi-objective genetic algorithm known as Nondominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm-II (NSGA-II). The objectives of the optimization model are considered to be the average treatment level of dischargers and a fuzzy risk of violating the water quality standards. The fuzzy risk is evaluated using the Monte Carlo analysis. The best non-dominated solution on the Pareto front, which provides the initial cost allocation to dischargers, is selected using the Young Bargaining Theory (YBT). In the second step, some cooperative game theoretic approaches are utilized to investigate how the maximum saving cost of participating dischargers in a coalition can be fairly allocated to them. The final treatment cost allocation provides the optimal trading discharge permit policies. The practical utility of the proposed methodology for river water quality management is illustrated through a realistic case study of the Zarjub river in the northern part of Iran. PMID:19657175

  1. Intelligent cognitive radio jamming - a game-theoretical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabcevic, Kresimir; Betancourt, Alejandro; Marcenaro, Lucio; Regazzoni, Carlo S.

    2014-12-01

    Cognitive radio (CR) promises to be a solution for the spectrum underutilization problems. However, security issues pertaining to cognitive radio technology are still an understudied topic. One of the prevailing such issues are intelligent radio frequency (RF) jamming attacks, where adversaries are able to exploit on-the-fly reconfigurability potentials and learning mechanisms of cognitive radios in order to devise and deploy advanced jamming tactics. In this paper, we use a game-theoretical approach to analyze jamming/anti-jamming behavior between cognitive radio systems. A non-zero-sum game with incomplete information on an opponent's strategy and payoff is modelled as an extension of Markov decision process (MDP). Learning algorithms based on adaptive payoff play and fictitious play are considered. A combination of frequency hopping and power alteration is deployed as an anti-jamming scheme. A real-life software-defined radio (SDR) platform is used in order to perform measurements useful for quantifying the jamming impacts, as well as to infer relevant hardware-related properties. Results of these measurements are then used as parameters for the modelled jamming/anti-jamming game and are compared to the Nash equilibrium of the game. Simulation results indicate, among other, the benefit provided to the jammer when it is employed with the spectrum sensing algorithm in proactive frequency hopping and power alteration schemes.

  2. A novel theoretical approach to the analysis of dendritic transients.

    PubMed Central

    Agmon-Snir, H

    1995-01-01

    A novel theoretical framework for analyzing dendritic transients is introduced. This approach, called the method of moments, is an extension of Rall's cable theory for dendrites. It provides analytic investigation of voltage attenuation, signal delay, and synchronization problems in passive dendritic trees. In this method, the various moments of a transient signal are used to characterize the properties of the transient. The strength of the signal is measured by the time integral of the signal, its characteristic time is determined by its centroid ("center of gravity"), and the width of the signal is determined by a measure similar to the standard deviation in probability theory. Using these signal properties, the method of moments provides theorems, expressions, and efficient algorithms for analyzing the voltage response in arbitrary passive trees. The method yields new insights into spatiotemporal integration, coincidence detection mechanisms, and the properties of local interactions between synaptic inputs in dendritic trees. The method can also be used for matching dendritic neuron models to experimental data and for the analysis of synaptic inputs recorded experimentally. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 10 PMID:8580308

  3. An Interacting Gauge Field Theoretic Model for Hodge Theory: Basic Canonical Brackets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    R., Kumar; Gupta, S.; R. P., Malik

    2014-06-01

    We derive the basic canonical brackets amongst the creation and annihilation operators for a two (1 + 1)-dimensional (2D) gauge held theoretic model of an interacting Hodge theory where a U(1) gauge field (Aμ) is coupled with the fermionic Dirac fields (ψ and bar psi). In this derivation, we exploit the spin-statistics theorem, normal ordering and the strength of the underlying six infinitesimal continuous symmetries (and the concept of their generators) that are present in the theory. We do not use the definition of the canonical conjugate momenta (corresponding to the basic fields of the theory) anywhere in our whole discussion. Thus, we conjecture that our present approach provides an alternative to the canonical method of quantization for a class of gauge field theories that are physical examples of Hodge theory where the continuous symmetries (and corresponding generators) provide the physical realizations of the de Rham cohomological operators of differential geometry at the algebraic level.

  4. A choice-semantical approach to theoretical truth.

    PubMed

    Andreas, Holger; Schiemer, Georg

    2016-08-01

    A central topic in the logic of science concerns the proper semantic analysis of theoretical sentences, that is sentences containing theoretical terms. In this paper, we present a novel choice-semantical account of theoretical truth based on the epsilon-term definition of theoretical terms. Specifically, we develop two ways of specifying the truth conditions of theoretical statements in a choice functional semantics, each giving rise to a corresponding logic of such statements. In order to investigate the inferential strength of these logical systems, we provide a translation of each truth definition into a modal definition of theoretical truth. Based on this, we show that the stronger notion of choice-semantical truth captures more adequately our informal semantic understanding of scientific statements. PMID:27474181

  5. Postionization fragmentation of rare-gas trimers revisited with new theoretical approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janeček, Ivan; Cintavá, Silvie; Hrivňák, Daniel; Kalus, René; Fárník, Michal; Gadea, Florent Xavier

    2009-09-01

    A new theoretical approach is presented for the general treatment of nonadiabatic hybrid dynamics (mixing classical and quantum approach) and applied to the postionization of rare-gas trimers. There was an important disagreement between trajectory surface hopping (TSH) or mean field (MF) approaches and the experimental results; noteworthy, with the new method qualitative and almost quantitative agreement is found for the fragmentation ratios of ionic monomers and dimers. For the first time in the theory as in the experiment, the dimers prevail for argon while monomers strongly dominate for the heavier rare gases, krypton and xenon. A new compromise between MF and TSH approaches is proposed and the new method is found quite robust with results not too sensitive to various possible implementations.

  6. Theoretical analysis of a cell's oscillations in an acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, John S.; Zinin, Pavel

    2005-09-01

    The analysis and deformation of an individual cell in a high-frequency acoustic field is of fundamental interest for a variety of applications such as ultrasound cell separation and drug delivery. The oscillations of biological cells in a sound field are investigated using a shell model for the cell following an approach developed previously [Zinin, Ultrasonics, 30, 26-34 (1992)]. The model accounts for the three components which comprise the cell's motion: the internal fluid (cytoplasma), the cell membrane, and the surrounding fluid. The cell membrane whose thickness is small compared to the cell radius can be approximated as a thin elastic shell. The elastic properties of this shell together with the viscosities of the internal and external fluids determine the oscillations of the cell. The dipole oscillations of the cell depend on the surface area modulus and the maximum frequency for the relative change in cell area can be determined. Moreover, the higher order oscillations starting with the quadrupole oscillations are governed by the shell's shear modulus. Induced stresses in bacteria cell membranes in the vicinity of an oscillating bubble are investigated and cell rupture with respect to these stresses is analyzed.

  7. Three approaches to classical thermal field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozzi, E.; Penco, R.

    2011-04-01

    In this paper we study three different functional approaches to classical thermal field theory, which turn out to be the classical counterparts of three well-known different formulations of quantum thermal field theory: the closed-time path (CTP) formalism, the thermofield dynamics (TFD) and the Matsubara approach.

  8. A theoretical approach to understand spatial organization in complex ecologies.

    PubMed

    Roman, Ahmed; Dasgupta, Debanjan; Pleimling, Michel

    2016-08-21

    Predicting the fate of ecologies is a daunting, albeit extremely important, task. As part of this task one needs to develop an understanding of the organization, hierarchies, and correlations among the species forming the ecology. Focusing on complex food networks we present a theoretical method that allows to achieve this understanding. Starting from the adjacency matrix the method derives specific matrices that encode the various inter-species relationships. The full potential of the method is achieved in a spatial setting where one obtains detailed predictions for the emerging space-time patterns. For a variety of cases these theoretical predictions are verified through numerical simulations. PMID:27173644

  9. Inflation and quintessence: theoretical approach of cosmological reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Neupane, Ishwaree P; Scherer, Christoph

    2008-05-15

    In the first part of this paper, we outline the construction of an inflationary cosmology in the framework where inflation is described by a universally evolving scalar field {phi} with potential V ({phi}). By considering a generic situation that inflaton attains a nearly constant velocity during inflation. In the second part of this paper, we introduce a novel approach of constructing dark energy within the context of the standard scalar-tensor theory. The assumption that a scalar field might roll with a nearly constant velocity, during inflation, can also be applied to quintessence or dark energy models. For the minimally coupled quintessence, {alpha}{sub Q} {identical_to} dA(Q)/d({kappa}Q)=0 (where A(Q) is the standard matter-quintessence coupling), the dark energy equation of state in the range -1{<=}w{sub DE}<-0.82 can be obtained for 0{<=}{alpha}<0.63. For {alpha}<0.1, the model allows for only modest evolution of dark energy density with redshift. We also show, under certain conditions, that the {alpha}{sub Q}>0 solution decreases the dark energy equation of state w{sub Q} with decreasing redshift as compared to the {alpha}{sub Q} = 0 solution. This effect can be opposite in the {alpha}{sub Q}<0 case. The effect of the matter-quintessence coupling can be significant only if |{alpha}{sub Q}|{approx}>0.1, while a small coupling |{alpha}{sub Q}|<0.1 will have almost no effect on cosmological parameters, including {Omega}{sub Q}, w{sub Q} and H(z). The best fit value of {alpha}{sub Q} in our model is found to be {alpha}{sub Q}{approx_equal}0.06, but it may contain significant numerical errors, namely {alpha}{sub Q} = 0.06 {+-} 0.35, which clearly implies the consistency of our model with general relativity (for which {alpha}{sub Q} = 0) at 1{sigma} level.

  10. Inflation and quintessence: theoretical approach of cosmological reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neupane, Ishwaree P.; Scherer, Christoph

    2008-05-01

    In the first part of this paper, we outline the construction of an inflationary cosmology in the framework where inflation is described by a universally evolving scalar field phi with potential V (phi). By considering a generic situation that inflaton attains a nearly constant velocity, during inflation, m_{\\mathrm {P}}^{-1} |\\rmd \\phi /\\rmd N|\\equiv \\alpha+\\beta \\exp (\\beta N) (where N\\equiv \\ln a is the e-folding time), we reconstruct a scalar potential and find the conditions that have to be satisfied by the (reconstructed) potential to be consistent with the WMAP inflationary data. The consistency of our model with the WMAP result (such as ns = 0.951-0.019+0.015 and r<0.3) would require 0.16<α<0.26 and β<0. The running of the spectral index, \\widetilde {\\alpha }\\equiv \\,\\rmd n_{\\mathrm {s}}/\\rmd \\ln k , is found to be small for a wide range of α. In the second part of this paper, we introduce a novel approach of constructing dark energy within the context of the standard scalar-tensor theory. The assumption that a scalar field might roll with a nearly constant velocity, during inflation, can also be applied to quintessence or dark energy models. For the minimally coupled quintessence, \\alpha _{Q}\\equiv \\,\\rmd A(Q)/\\rmd (\\kappa Q)=0 (where A(Q) is the standard matter-quintessence coupling), the dark energy equation of state in the range -1<=wDE<-0.82 can be obtained for 0<=α<0.63. For α<0.1, the model allows for only modest evolution of dark energy density with redshift. We also show, under certain conditions, that the αQ>0 solution decreases the dark energy equation of state wQ with decreasing redshift as compared to the αQ = 0 solution. This effect can be opposite in the αQ<0 case. The effect of the matter-quintessence coupling can be significant only if |\\alpha _{Q}| \\gtrsim 0.1 , while a small coupling |αQ|<0.1 will have almost no effect on cosmological parameters, including ΩQ, wQ and H(z). The best fit value of αQ in

  11. We need theoretical physics approaches to study living systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoev, Krastan B.; Shukla, Kamal; affil="3" >Herbert Levine,

    2013-08-01

    Living systems, as created initially by the transition from assemblies of large molecules to self-reproducing information-rich cells, have for centuries been studied via the empirical toolkit of biology. This has been a highly successful enterprise, bringing us from the vague non-scientific notions of vitalism to the modern appreciation of the biophysical and biochemical bases of life. Yet, the truly mind-boggling complexity of even the simplest self-sufficient cells, let alone the emergence of multicellular organisms, of brain and consciousness, and to ecological communities and human civilizations, calls out for a complementary approach. In this editorial, we propose that theoretical physics can play an essential role in making sense of living matter. When faced with a highly complex system, a physicist builds simplified models. Quoting Philip W Anderson's Nobel prize address, 'the art of model-building is the exclusion of real but irrelevant parts of the problem and entails hazards for the builder and the reader. The builder may leave out something genuinely relevant and the reader, armed with too sophisticated an experimental probe, may take literally a schematized model. Very often such a simplified model throws more light on the real working of nature....' In his formulation, the job of a theorist is to get at the crux of the system by ignoring details and yet to find a testable consequence of the resulting simple picture. This is rather different than the predilection of the applied mathematician who wants to include all the known details in the hope of a quantitative simulacrum of reality. These efforts may be practically useful, but do not usually lead to increased understanding. To illustrate how this works, we can look at a non-living example of complex behavior that was afforded by spatiotemporal patterning in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction [1]. Physicists who worked on this system did not attempt to determine all the relevant chemical intermediates

  12. Is there a weak mixed polarity background field? Theoretical arguments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spruit, H. C.; Title, A. M.; Van Ballegooijen, A. A.

    1987-01-01

    A number of processes associated with the formation of active regions produce 'U-loops': fluxtubes having two ends at the photosphere but otherwise still embedded in the convection zone. The mass trapped on the field lines of such loops makes them behave in a qualitatively different way from the 'omega-loops' that form active regions. It is shown that U-loops will disperse though the convection zone and form a weak (down to a few gauss) field that covers a significant fraction of the solar surface. This field is tentatively identified with the inner-network fields observed at Kitt Peak and Big Bear. The process by which these fields escape through the surface is described; a remarkable property is that it can make active region fields apparently disappear in situ. The mixed polarity moving magnetic features near sunspots are interpreted as a locally intense form of this disappearance by escape of U-loops.

  13. Conjugate field approaches for active array compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Two approaches for calculating the compensating feed array complex excitations are namely, the indirect conjugate field matching (ICFM) and the direct conjugate field matching (DCFM) approach. In the ICFM approach the compensating feed array excitations are determined by considering the transmitting mode and the reciprocity principle. The DCF, in contrast calculates the array excitations by integrating directly the induced surface currents on the reflector under a receiving mode. DCFM allows the reflector to be illuminated by an incident plane wave with a tapered amplitude. The level of taper can effectively control the sidelobe level of the compensated antenna pattern. Both approaches are examined briefly.

  14. Theoretical investigation of hyperfine field parameters through mossbauer gamma ray

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Sikander; Hashim, Mohd

    2012-06-05

    When a Mossbauer gamma-ray emitting or absorbing nucleus is placed in a crystalline environment, the quadrupole moment of the nucleus interacts with the electric field gradient set up by the ligands around it. In the transition |7/2>{yields}|5/2> twelve lines are obtained. Applying the multipole radiation field theory and density matrix formalism, the determinant of coherency matrix, intensity and degree of polarization have been calculated for each line.

  15. Game Theoretic Approach to Post-Docked Satellite Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiramatsu, Takashi; Fitz-Coy, Norman G.

    2007-01-01

    This paper studies the interaction between two satellites after docking. In order to maintain the docked state with uncertainty in the motion of the target vehicle, a game theoretic controller with Stackelberg strategy to minimize the interaction between the satellites is considered. The small perturbation approximation leads to LQ differential game scheme, which is validated to address the docking interactions between a service vehicle and a target vehicle. The open-loop solution are compared with Nash strategy, and it is shown that less control efforts are obtained with Stackelberg strategy.

  16. Faraday effect: A field theoretical point of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Avijit K.; Konar, Sushan; Pal, Palash B.

    1999-11-01

    We analyze the structure of the vacuum polarization tensor in the presence of a background electromagnetic field in a medium. We use various discrete symmetries and crossing symmetry to constrain the form factors obtained for the most general case. From these symmetry arguments, we show why the vacuum polarization tensor has to be even in the background field when there is no background medium. Taking then the background field to be purely magnetic, we evaluate the vacuum polarization to linear order in it. The result shows the phenomenon of Faraday rotation, i.e., the rotation of the plane of polarization of a plane polarized light passing through this background. We find that the usual expression for Faraday rotation, which is derived for a non-degenerate plasma in the non-relativistic approximation, undergoes substantial modification if the background is degenerate and/or relativistic. We give explicit expressions for Faraday rotation in completely degenerate and ultra-relativistic media.

  17. Theoretical and experimental approaches for the hypercube-embedding problem

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Woeikae.

    1991-01-01

    The hypercube-embedding problem, a restricted version of the general mapping problem, is the problem of mapping a set of communicating processes to a hypercube multiprocessor. The goal is to find a mapping that minimizes the length of the paths between communicating processes so that communication overhead is minimized. Unfortunately, the hypercube-embedding problem has been shown to be NP-hard, even for trees. This thesis studies both experimental and theoretical issues for the hypercube-embedding problem. Many heuristics have been proposed for hypercube embedding. For experimental studies, a versatile test bed is established for the evaluation of heuristics. Extensive experiments were performed for a wide range of hypercube-embedding heuristics chosen from the literature. Overall, ten different heuristics are evaluated. It is shown that two of the new heuristic proposed are particularly successful in comparison with other heuristics. For theoretical studies, a simple linear-time heuristic is presented which embeds arbitrary binary trees to hypercubes with expansion 1 and average dilation no more than 2.

  18. On some theoretical problems of laser wake-field accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Hayashi, Y.; Kiriyama, H.; Koga, J. K.; Kotaki, H.; Mori, M.; Kando, M.

    2016-06-01

    > Enhancement of the quality of laser wake-field accelerated (LWFA) electron beams implies the improvement and controllability of the properties of the wake waves generated by ultra-short pulse lasers in underdense plasmas. In this work we present a compendium of useful formulas giving relations between the laser and plasma target parameters allowing one to obtain basic dependences, e.g. the energy scaling of the electrons accelerated by the wake field excited in inhomogeneous media including multi-stage LWFA accelerators. Consideration of the effects of using the chirped laser pulse driver allows us to find the regimes where the chirp enhances the wake field amplitude. We present an analysis of the three-dimensional effects on the electron beam loading and on the unlimited LWFA acceleration in inhomogeneous plasmas. Using the conditions of electron trapping to the wake-field acceleration phase we analyse the multi-equal stage and multiuneven stage LWFA configurations. In the first configuration the energy of fast electrons is a linear function of the number of stages, and in the second case, the accelerated electron energy grows exponentially with the number of stages. The results of the two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations presented here show the high quality electron acceleration in the triple stage injection-acceleration configuration.

  19. On some theoretical problems of laser wake-field accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Hayashi, Y.; Kiriyama, H.; Koga, J. K.; Kotaki, H.; Mori, M.; Kando, M.

    2016-06-01

    Enhancement of the quality of laser wake-field accelerated (LWFA) electron beams implies the improvement and controllability of the properties of the wake waves generated by ultra-short pulse lasers in underdense plasmas. In this work we present a compendium of useful formulas giving relations between the laser and plasma target parameters allowing one to obtain basic dependences, e.g. the energy scaling of the electrons accelerated by the wake field excited in inhomogeneous media including multi-stage LWFA accelerators. Consideration of the effects of using the chirped laser pulse driver allows us to find the regimes where the chirp enhances the wake field amplitude. We present an analysis of the three-dimensional effects on the electron beam loading and on the unlimited LWFA acceleration in inhomogeneous plasmas. Using the conditions of electron trapping to the wake-field acceleration phase we analyse the multi-equal stage and multiuneven stage LWFA configurations. In the first configuration the energy of fast electrons is a linear function of the number of stages, and in the second case, the accelerated electron energy grows exponentially with the number of stages. The results of the two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations presented here show the high quality electron acceleration in the triple stage injection-acceleration configuration.

  20. A system approach to pharmacodynamics. I: Theoretical framework.

    PubMed

    Veng-Pedersen, P; Gillespie, W R

    1988-01-01

    A general theoretical framework is constructed for the relationship between a pharmacokinetic response r (e.g., systemic drug concentration or input rate), and an observed pharmacologic effect response E. The overall relationship may be described mathematically by E = omega(r) = omega p(omega b(omega r(r))) where omega is an operator that describes the overall relationship, and omega r, omega b, and omega p are operators that describe the contributions of components of the pharmacodynamic system. The kinetic basis for applying certain general mathematical properties such as linearity are discussed. The result is the introduction of various specific mathematical structures that may be applied to pharmacodynamic systems [e.g., E = phi t(r), E = phi t(psi r*r), E = phi p(psi p*phi b(r)), and E = phi p(psi p*phi b(psi r*r))]. PMID:3346822

  1. A Game-Theoretical Approach to Multimedia Social Networks Security

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Enqiang; Liu, Zengliang; Shao, Fei; Zhang, Zhiyong

    2014-01-01

    The contents access and sharing in multimedia social networks (MSNs) mainly rely on access control models and mechanisms. Simple adoptions of security policies in the traditional access control model cannot effectively establish a trust relationship among parties. This paper proposed a novel two-party trust architecture (TPTA) to apply in a generic MSN scenario. According to the architecture, security policies are adopted through game-theoretic analyses and decisions. Based on formalized utilities of security policies and security rules, the choice of security policies in content access is described as a game between the content provider and the content requester. By the game method for the combination of security policies utility and its influences on each party's benefits, the Nash equilibrium is achieved, that is, an optimal and stable combination of security policies, to establish and enhance trust among stakeholders. PMID:24977226

  2. A lattice-theoretic approach to multigranulation approximation space.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoli; She, Yanhong

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we mainly investigate the equivalence between multigranulation approximation space and single-granulation approximation space from the lattice-theoretic viewpoint. It is proved that multigranulation approximation space is equivalent to single-granulation approximation space if and only if the pair of multigranulation rough approximation operators [Formula in text] forms an order-preserving Galois connection, if and only if the collection of lower (resp., upper) definable sets forms an (resp., union) intersection structure, if and only if the collection of multigranulation upper (lower) definable sets forms a distributive lattice when n = 2, and if and only if [Formula in text]. The obtained results help us gain more insights into the mathematical structure of multigranulation approximation spaces. PMID:25243226

  3. A Lattice-Theoretic Approach to Multigranulation Approximation Space

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaoli

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we mainly investigate the equivalence between multigranulation approximation space and single-granulation approximation space from the lattice-theoretic viewpoint. It is proved that multigranulation approximation space is equivalent to single-granulation approximation space if and only if the pair of multigranulation rough approximation operators (Σi=1nRi¯,Σi=1nRi_) forms an order-preserving Galois connection, if and only if the collection of lower (resp., upper) definable sets forms an (resp., union) intersection structure, if and only if the collection of multigranulation upper (lower) definable sets forms a distributive lattice when n = 2, and if and only if ∀X⊆U,  Σi=1nRi_(X)=∩i=1nRi_(X). The obtained results help us gain more insights into the mathematical structure of multigranulation approximation spaces. PMID:25243226

  4. Development of Warp Yarn Tension During Shedding: A Theoretical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Subrata; Chary, Prabhakara; Roy, Sukumar

    2015-10-01

    Theoretical investigation on the process of development of warp yarn tension during weaving for tappet shedding is carried out, based on the dynamic nature of shed geometry. The path of warp yarn on a weaving machine is divided into four different zones. The tension developed in each zone is estimated for every minute rotation of the bottom shaft. A model has been developed based on the dynamic nature of shed geometry and the possible yarn flow from one zone to another. A computer program, based on the model of shedding process, is developed for predicting the warp yarn tension variation during shedding. The output of the model and the experimental values of yarn tension developed in zone-D i.e. between the back rest and the back lease rod are compared, which shows a good agreement between them. The warp yarn tension values predicted by the model in zone-D are 10-13 % lesser than the experimentally measured values. By analyzing the theoretical data of the peak value of developed yarn tension at four zones i.e. zone-A, zone-B, zone-C and zone-D, it is observed that the peak yarn tension value of A, B, C-zones are much higher than the peak tension near the back rest i.e. at zone-D. It is about twice or more than the yarn tension near the back rest. The study also reveals that the developed yarn tension peak values are different for the extreme positions of a heald. The impact of coefficient of friction on peak value of yarn tension is nominal.

  5. Unified Theoretical Approach to Electron-Ion Recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Anil

    1998-05-01

    Electron-ion recombination occurs via the electron continuum and embedded resonances that are coupled to each other and thus unified in nature. However, theoretical methods generally separate the two as ``radiative recombination" (RR), referring to recombination through the non-resonant continuum, and ``di-electronic recombination" (DR) through the autoionizing resonances. A computationally unified scheme(S.N. Nahar and A.K. Pradhan, Phys.Rev.Lett.) 68,1488(1992); H.L. Zhang and A.K. Pradhan, Phys.Rev.Lett. 78,195(1997) is described that employs the coupled channel R-matrix method, and detailed balance (the Milne relation), to obtain photo-recombination cross sections including both the continuum and resonant recombination in an ab intio manner. In the energy region corresponding to high-n Rydberg resonances, where the background recombination (RR) is negligibly small, a precise theory of DR (R.H. Bell and M.J. Seaton, J.Phys.B) 18,1589(1985) yields DR collision strengths consistent with their threshold behaviour leading to the cross section for electron impact excitation. For highly charged ions the relativistic fine structure and the effect of radiation damping of resonances are considered. Theoretical cross sections agree well with recent experiments on ion stograge rings and the electron-beam-ion-trap (EBIT). Total electron-ion recombination rates can be obtained for practical applications. For many complex atomic systems, such as the important Iron-peak elements, the new results differ considerably from those hitherto available.

  6. Some theoretical and numerical results for delayed neural field equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faye, Grégory; Faugeras, Olivier

    2010-05-01

    In this paper we study neural field models with delays which define a useful framework for modeling macroscopic parts of the cortex involving several populations of neurons. Nonlinear delayed integro-differential equations describe the spatio-temporal behavior of these fields. Using methods from the theory of delay differential equations, we show the existence and uniqueness of a solution of these equations. A Lyapunov analysis gives us sufficient conditions for the solutions to be asymptotically stable. We also present a fairly detailed study of the numerical computation of these solutions. This is, to our knowledge, the first time that a serious analysis of the problem of the existence and uniqueness of a solution of these equations has been performed. Another original contribution of ours is the definition of a Lyapunov functional and the result of stability it implies. We illustrate our numerical schemes on a variety of examples that are relevant to modeling in neuroscience.

  7. The Acquisition of Chinese Relative Clauses: Contrasting Two Theoretical Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Shenai; Gavarró, Anna; Vernice, Mirta; Guasti, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the comprehension of relative clauses by Chinese-speaking children, and evaluates the validity of the predictions of the Dependency Locality Theory (Gibson, 1998, 2000) and the Relativized Minimality approach (Friedmann, Belletti & Rizzi, 2009). One hundred and twenty children from three to eight years of age were tested by…

  8. Theoretical and Methodological Approaches to Social Sciences and Knowledge Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Varela, Asuncion, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This is a unique and groundbreaking collection of questions and answers coming from higher education institutions on diverse fields and across a wide spectrum of countries and cultures. It creates routes for further innovation, collaboration amidst the Sciences (both Natural and Social), the Humanities, and the private and public sectors of…

  9. Advancing the theoretical foundation of the partially-averaged Navier-Stokes approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, Dasia Ann

    The goal of this dissertation is to consolidate the theoretical foundation of variable-resolution (VR) methods in general and the partially-averaged Navier-Stokes (PANS) approach in particular. The accurate simulation of complex turbulent flows remains an outstanding challenge in modern computational fluid dynamics. High-fidelity approaches such as direct numerical simulations (DNS) and large-eddy simulation (LES) are not typically feasible for complex engineering simulations with current computational technologies. Low-fidelity approaches such as Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS), although widely used, are inherently inadequate for turbulent flows with complex flow features. VR bridging methods fill the gap between DNS and RANS by allowing a tunable degree of resolution ranging from RANS to DNS. While the utility of VR methods is well established, the mathematical foundations and physical characterization require further development. This dissertation focuses on the physical attributes of fluctuations in partially-resolved simulations of turbulence. The specific objectives are to: (i) establish a framework for assessing the physical fidelity of VR methods to examine PANS fluctuations; (ii) investigate PANS simulations subject to multiple resolution changes; (iii) examine turbulent transport closure modeling for partially-resolved fields; (iv) examine the effect of filter control parameters in the limit of spectral cut-off in the dissipative region; and (v) validate low-Reynolds number corrections with RANS for eventual implementation with PANS. While the validation methods are carried out in the context of PANS, they are considered appropriate for all VR bridging methods. The key findings of this dissertation are summarized as follows. The Kolmogorov hypotheses are suitably adapted to describe fluctuations of partially-resolved turbulence fields, and the PANS partially-resolved field is physically consistent with the adapted Kolmogorov hypotheses. PANS

  10. Photodynamic therapy: Theoretical and experimental approaches to dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin

    Singlet oxygen (1O2) is the major cytotoxic species generated during photodynamic therapy (PDT), and 1O 2 reactions with biological targets define the photodynamic dose at the most fundamental level. We have developed a theoretical model for rigorously describing the spatial and temporal dynamics of oxygen (3O 2) consumption and transport and microscopic 1O 2 dose deposition during PDT in vivo. Using experimentally established physiological and photophysical parameters, the mathematical model allows computation of the dynamic variation of hemoglobin-3O 2 saturation within vessels, irreversible photosensitizer degradation due to photobleaching, therapy-induced blood flow decrease and the microscopic distributions of 3O2 and 1O 2 dose deposition under various irradiation conditions. mTHPC, a promising photosensitizer for PDT, is approved in Europe for the palliative treatment of head and neck cancer. Using the theoretical model and informed by intratumor sensitizer concentrations and distributions, we calculated photodynamic dose depositions for mTHPC-PDT. Our results demonstrate that the 1O 2 dose to the tumor volume does not track even qualitatively with long-term tumor responses. Thus, in this evaluation of mTHPC-PDT, any PDT dose metric that is proportional to singlet oxygen creation and/or deposition would fail to predict the tumor response. In situations like this one, other reporters of biological response to therapy would be necessary. In addition to the case study of mTHPC-PDT, we also use the mathematical model to simulate clinical photobleaching data, informed by a possible blood flow reduction during treatment. In a recently completed clinical trial at Roswell Park Cancer Institute, patients with superficial basal cell carcinoma received topical application of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and were irradiated with 633 nm light at 10-150 mW cm-2 . Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) photobleaching in the lesion and the adjacent perilesion normal margin was monitored by

  11. Theoretical Aspects of Magnetic Fields for Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanami, Hitoshi

    We propose magnetic cannon ball mechanism in which the collapse of a magnetosphere onto a black hole can generate strong outward Poynting flux which drives a baryon-free fireball called the magnetic cannon ball. In the early stage, the magnetic fields in the cannon ball can prepare the explanation for the cycrotoron absorptions observed by GINGA. The magnetic cannon ball can drive, in general, a relativistic outflow which interacts with the interstellar matter and forms a shock. The magnetic field in the shock approximately equal to 104 G can induce the synchrotron radiations with peaks at approximately equal to 10^2 keV observed. This magnetic field in the cannon ball can also confine the high energy protons (gamma_p > 30) which are required for delayed photons (>25 GeV) following a burst on 1994 February 17. Accretion induced collapse of a white dwarf of > 109 G, merger of a close binary and failed type Ib supernovae are possible scenarios even without the rotation of the central object. This mechanism works at the final phase of gravitational collapse even after a neutrino driven fireball proposed in most scenarios for gamma ray bursts. Twice bursts, which consist of primary neutrino driven fireball and secondary magnetic cannon ball can be induced sometime, can be explained in this model. It suggests that the magnetic cannon ball works some parts in multiple populations and delayed or multiple burst events. The final remnant in the model should be a black hole. It implies that any gamma ray bursts can have no optical counter part if they do not have a companion in a binary.

  12. An information-theoretic approach to microseismic source location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prange, Michael D.; Bose, Sandip; Kodio, Ousmane; Djikpesse, Hugues A.

    2015-04-01

    There has been extensive work on seismic source localization, going as far back as Geiger's 1912 paper, that is based on least-squares fitting of arrival times. The primary advantage of time-based methods over waveform-based methods (e.g. reverse-time migration and beam forming) is that simulated arrival times are considerably more reliable than simulated waveforms, especially in the context of an uncertain velocity model, thereby yielding more reliable estimates of source location. However, time-based methods are bedeviled by the unsolved challenges of accurate time picking and labelling of the seismic phases in the waveforms for each event. Drawing from Woodward's canonical 1953 text on the application of information theory to radar applications, we show that time-based methods can be applied directly to waveform data, thus capturing the advantages of time-based methods without being impacted by the aforementioned hindrances. We extend Woodward's approach to include an unknown distortion on wavelet amplitude and phase, showing that the related marginalization integrals can be analytically evaluated. We also provide extensions for correlation-based location methods such as relative localization and the S-P method. We demonstrate this approach through applications to microseismic event location, presenting formulations and results for both absolute and relative localization approaches, with receiver arrays either in a borehole or on the surface. By properly quantifying uncertainty in our location estimates, our formulations provide an objective measure for ranking the accuracy of microseismic source location methodologies.

  13. Oxidative dissolution of silver nanoparticles: A new theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Oćwieja, Magdalena; Mrowiec, Halina; Walas, Stanisław; Lupa, Dawid

    2016-05-01

    A general model of an oxidative dissolution of silver particle suspensions was developed that rigorously considers the bulk and surface solute transport. A two-step surface reaction scheme was proposed that comprises the formation of the silver oxide phase by direct oxidation and the acidic dissolution of this phase leading to silver ion release. By considering this, a complete set of equations is formulated describing oxygen and silver ion transport to and from particles' surfaces. These equations are solved in some limiting cases of nanoparticle dissolution in dilute suspensions. The obtained kinetic equations were used for the interpretation of experimental data pertinent to the dissolution kinetics of citrate-stabilized silver nanoparticles. In these kinetic measurements the role of pH and bulk suspension concentration was quantitatively evaluated by using the atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). It was shown that the theoretical model adequately reflects the main features of the experimental results, especially the significant increase in the dissolution rate for lower pH. Also the presence of two kinetic regimes was quantitatively explained in terms of the decrease in the coverage of the fast dissolving oxide layer. The overall silver dissolution rate constants characterizing these two regimes were determined. PMID:26921758

  14. Is DNA a metal, semiconductor or insulator? A theoretical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey-Gonzalez, Rafael; Fonseca-Romero, Karen; Plazas, Carlos; Grupo de Óptica e Información Cuántica Team

    Over the last years, scientific interest for designing and making low dimensional electronic devices with traditional or novel materials has been increased. These experimental and theoretical researches in electronic properties at molecular scale are looking for developing efficient devices able to carry out tasks which are currently done by silicon transistors and devices. Among the new materials DNA strands are highlighted, but the experimental results have been contradictories pointing to behaviors as conductor, semiconductor or insulator. To contribute to the understanding of the origin of the disparity of the measurements, we perform a numerical calculation of the electrical conductance of DNA segments, modeled as 1D disordered finite chains. The system is described into a Tight binding model with nearest neighbor interactions and a s orbital per site. Hydration effects are included as random variations of self-energies. The electronic current as a function of applied bias is calculated using Launder formalism, where the transmission probability is determined into the transfer matrix formalism. We find a conductor-to-semiconductor-to-insulator transition as a function of the three effects taken into account: chain size, intrinsic disorder, and hydration We thank Fundación para la Promoción de la Investigación y la Tecnología, Colombia, and Dirección de Investigación de Bogotá, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, for partial financial support.

  15. Approaching theoretical strength in glassy carbon nanolattices.

    PubMed

    Bauer, J; Schroer, A; Schwaiger, R; Kraft, O

    2016-04-01

    The strength of lightweight mechanical metamaterials, which aim to exploit material-strengthening size effects by their microscale lattice structure, has been limited by the resolution of three-dimensional lithography technologies and their restriction to mainly polymer resins. Here, we demonstrate that pyrolysis of polymeric microlattices can overcome these limitations and create ultra-strong glassy carbon nanolattices with single struts shorter than 1 μm and diameters as small as 200 nm. They represent the smallest lattice structures yet produced--achieved by an 80% shrinkage of the polymer during pyrolysis--and exhibit material strengths of up to 3 GPa, corresponding approximately to the theoretical strength of glassy carbon. The strength-to-density ratios of the nanolattices are six times higher than those of reported microlattices. With a honeycomb topology, effective strengths of 1.2 GPa at 0.6 g cm(-3) are achieved. Diamond is the only bulk material with a notably higher strength-to-density ratio. PMID:26828314

  16. A Game Theoretic Approach to Cyber Attack Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Liu

    2005-11-28

    The area investigated by this project is cyber attack prediction. With a focus on correlation-based prediction, current attack prediction methodologies overlook the strategic nature of cyber attack-defense scenarios. As a result, current cyber attack prediction methodologies are very limited in predicting strategic behaviors of attackers in enforcing nontrivial cyber attacks such as DDoS attacks, and may result in low accuracy in correlation-based predictions. This project develops a game theoretic framework for cyber attack prediction, where an automatic game-theory-based attack prediction method is proposed. Being able to quantitatively predict the likelihood of (sequences of) attack actions, our attack prediction methodology can predict fine-grained strategic behaviors of attackers and may greatly improve the accuracy of correlation-based prediction. To our best knowledge, this project develops the first comprehensive framework for incentive-based modeling and inference of attack intent, objectives, and strategies; and this project develops the first method that can predict fine-grained strategic behaviors of attackers. The significance of this research and the benefit to the public can be demonstrated to certain extent by (a) the severe threat of cyber attacks to the critical infrastructures of the nation, including many infrastructures overseen by the Department of Energy, (b) the importance of cyber security to critical infrastructure protection, and (c) the importance of cyber attack prediction to achieving cyber security.

  17. Exploring Job Satisfaction of Nursing Faculty: Theoretical Approaches.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingchen; Liesveld, Judy

    2015-01-01

    The Future of Nursing report identified the shortage of nursing faculty as 1 of the barriers to nursing education. In light of this, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the work-life of nursing faculty. The current research focused on job satisfaction of nursing faculty from 4 theoretical perspectives: human capital theory, which emphasizes the expected monetary and nonmonetary returns for any career choices; structural theory, which emphasizes the impact of institutional features on job satisfaction; positive extrinsic environment by self-determination theory, which asserts that a positive extrinsic environment promotes competency and effective outcomes at work; and psychological theory, which emphasizes the proposed relationship between job performance and satisfaction. In addition to the measures for human capital theory, institutional variables (from structural theory and self-determination theory), and productivity measures (from psychological theory), the authors also selected sets of variables for personal characteristics to investigate their effects on job satisfaction. The results indicated that variables related to human capital theory, especially salary, contributed the most to job satisfaction, followed by those related to institutional variables. Personal variables and productivity variables as a whole contributed as well. The only other variable with marginal significance was faculty's perception of institutional support for teaching. PMID:26653042

  18. BL Herculis stars - Theoretical models for field variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, R.; Stothers, R.

    1982-01-01

    Type II Cepheids with periods between 1 and 3 days, commonly designated as Bl Herculis stars, have been modeled here with the aim of interpreting the wide variety of light curves observed among the field variables. Previously modeled globular cluster members are used as standard calibration objects. The major finding is that only a small range of luminosities is capable of generating a large variety of light curve types at a given period. For a mass of approximately 0.60 solar mass, the models are able to reproduce the observed mean luminosities, dispersion of mean luminosities, periods, light amplitudes, light asymmetries, and phases of secondary features in the light curves of known BL Her stars. It is possible that the metal-rich variables (which are found only in the field) have luminosities lower than those of most metal-poor variables. The present revised mass for BL Her, a metal-rich object, is not significantly different from the mean mass of the metal-poor variables.

  19. Theoretical study of phosphorene tunneling field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Jiwon; Hobbs, Chris

    2015-02-23

    In this work, device performances of tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs) based on phosphorene are explored via self-consistent atomistic quantum transport simulations. Phosphorene is an ultra-thin two-dimensional (2-D) material with a direct band gap suitable for TFETs applications. Our simulation shows that phosphorene TFETs exhibit subthreshold slope below 60 mV/dec and a wide range of on-current depending on the transport direction due to highly anisotropic band structures of phosphorene. By benchmarking with monolayer MoTe{sub 2} TFETs, we predict that phosphorene TFETs oriented in the small effective mass direction can yield much larger on-current at the same on-current/off-current ratio than monolayer MoTe{sub 2} TFETs. It is also observed that a gate underlap structure is required for scaling down phosphorene TFETs in the small effective mass direction to suppress the source-to-drain direct tunneling leakage current.

  20. Is there a field-theoretic explanation for precursor biopolymers?

    PubMed

    Rosen, Gerald

    2002-08-01

    A Hu-Barkana-Gruzinov cold dark matter scalar field phi may enter a weak isospin invariant derivative interaction that causes the flow of right-handed electrons to align parallel to (inverted delta phi). Hence, in the outer regions of galaxies where (inverted delta phi) is large, as in galactic halos, the derivative interaction may induce a chirality-imbued quantum chemistry. Such a chirality-imbued chemistry would in turn be conducive to the formation of abundant precursor biopolymers on interstellar dust grains, comets and meteors in galactic halo regions, with subsequent delivery to planets in the inner galactic regions where phi and (inverted delta phi) are concomitantly near zero and left-right symmetric terrestrial quantum chemistry prevails. PMID:12458734

  1. An information theoretic approach to macromolecular modeling: I. Sequence alignments.

    PubMed

    Aynechi, Tiba; Kuntz, Irwin D

    2005-11-01

    We are interested in applying the principles of information theory to structural biology calculations. In this article, we explore the information content of an important computational procedure: sequence alignment. Using a reference state developed from exhaustive sequences, we measure alignment statistics and evaluate gap penalties based on first-principle considerations and gap distributions. We show that there are different gap penalties for different alphabet sizes and that the gap penalties can depend on the length of the sequences being aligned. In a companion article, we examine the information content of molecular force fields. PMID:16254389

  2. Theoretical Investigation of Field-Line Quality in a Driven Spheromak

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R H; Berj, H; Cohen, B I; Fowler, T K; Glasser, A H; Hooper, E B; Lo Destro, L L; Morse, E C; Pearlstein; Rognlien, T D; Ryutov, D D; Sovince, C R; Woodruff, S

    2002-10-07

    Theoretical studies aimed at predicting and diagnosing field-line quality in a spheromak are described. These include nonlinear 3-D MHD simulations, stability studies, analyses of confinement in spheromaks dominated by either open (stochastic) field lines or approximate flux surfaces, and a theory of fast electrons as a probe of field-line length.

  3. Theoretical approach to oxygen atom degradation of silver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fromhold, Albert T., Jr.; Noh, Seung; Beshears, Ronald; Whitaker, Ann F.; Little, Sally A.

    1987-01-01

    Based on available Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and ellipsometry data obtained on silver specimens subjected to atomic oxygen attack in low Earth orbit STS flight 41-G, a theory was developed to model the oxygen atom degradation of silver. The diffusion of atomic oxygen in a microscopically nonuniform medium is an essential constituent of the theory. The driving force for diffusion is the macroscopic electrochemical potential gradient developed between the specimen surface exposed to the ambient and the bulk of the silver specimen. The longitudinal electric effect developed parallel to the gradient is modified by space charge of the diffusing charged species. Lateral electric fields and concentration differences also exist due to the nonuniform nature of the medium. The lateral concentration differences are found to be more important than the lateral electric fields in modifying the diffusion rate. The model was evaluated numerically. Qualitative agreement exists between the kinetics predicted by the theory and kinetic data taken in ground-based experiments utilizing a plasma asher.

  4. Robust Orbit Determination and Classification: A Learning Theoretic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S.; Cutler, J. W.

    2015-11-01

    Orbit determination involves estimation of a non-linear mapping from feature vectors associated with the position of the spacecraft to its orbital parameters. The de facto standard in orbit determination in real-world scenarios for spacecraft has been linearized estimators such as the extended Kalman filter. Such an estimator, while very accurate and convergent over its linear region, is hard to generalize over arbitrary gravitational potentials and diverse sets of measurements. It is also challenging to perform exact mathematical characterizations of the Kalman filter performance over such general systems. Here we present a new approach to orbit determination as a learning problem involving distribution regression and, also, for the multiple-spacecraft scenario, a transfer learning system for classification of feature vectors associated with spacecraft, and provide some associated analysis of such systems.

  5. Modeling of laccase inhibition by formetanate pesticide using theoretical approaches.

    PubMed

    Martins, Ana C V; Ribeiro, Francisco W P; Zanatta, Geancarlo; Freire, Valder N; Morais, Simone; de Lima-Neto, Pedro; Correia, Adriana N

    2016-04-01

    The inhibition of laccase enzymatic catalytic activity by formetanate hydrochloride (FMT) was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and by quantum chemical calculations based on density functional theory with a protein fragmentation approach. The cyclic voltammograms were obtained using a biosensor prepared by enzyme immobilization on gold electrodes modified with gold nanoparticles and 4-aminophenol as the target molecule. The decrease in the peak current in the presence of FMT was used to characterize the inhibition process. The calculations identified Asp206 as the most relevant moiety in the interaction of FMT with the laccase enzymatic ligand binding domain. The amino acid residue Cys453 was important, because the Cys453-FMT interaction energy was not affected by the dielectric constant, although it was not a very close residue. This study provides an overview of how FMT inhibits laccase catalytic activity. PMID:26720841

  6. Quantum cognition: a new theoretical approach to psychology.

    PubMed

    Bruza, Peter D; Wang, Zheng; Busemeyer, Jerome R

    2015-07-01

    What type of probability theory best describes the way humans make judgments under uncertainty and decisions under conflict? Although rational models of cognition have become prominent and have achieved much success, they adhere to the laws of classical probability theory despite the fact that human reasoning does not always conform to these laws. For this reason we have seen the recent emergence of models based on an alternative probabilistic framework drawn from quantum theory. These quantum models show promise in addressing cognitive phenomena that have proven recalcitrant to modeling by means of classical probability theory. This review compares and contrasts probabilistic models based on Bayesian or classical versus quantum principles, and highlights the advantages and disadvantages of each approach. PMID:26058709

  7. Theoretical approach to explore the production routes of astatine radionuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Moumita; Lahiri, Susanta

    2009-02-01

    To fulfill the recent thrust of astatine radionuclides in the field of nuclear medicine, various production routes have been explored in the present work. The possible production routes of At209-211 comprise both light- and heavy-ion-induced reactions at the bombarding energy range starting from threshold to a maximum of 100 MeV. Excitation functions of those radionuclides, produced through various production routes, have been calculated by using nuclear reaction model codes TALYS, ALICE91, and PACE-II and are compared with the available measured data. Contributions of various reaction mechanisms, such as direct, pre-equilibrium, and equilibrium reactions, to the total reaction cross section have been studied using the codes. Results show that the equilibrium reaction dominates in all cases over other reaction mechanisms.

  8. Theoretical approach to explore the production routes of astatine radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, Moumita; Lahiri, Susanta

    2009-02-15

    To fulfill the recent thrust of astatine radionuclides in the field of nuclear medicine, various production routes have been explored in the present work. The possible production routes of {sup 209-211}At comprise both light- and heavy-ion-induced reactions at the bombarding energy range starting from threshold to a maximum of 100 MeV. Excitation functions of those radionuclides, produced through various production routes, have been calculated by using nuclear reaction model codes TALYS, ALICE91, and PACE-II and are compared with the available measured data. Contributions of various reaction mechanisms, such as direct, pre-equilibrium, and equilibrium reactions, to the total reaction cross section have been studied using the codes. Results show that the equilibrium reaction dominates in all cases over other reaction mechanisms.

  9. Theoretical Triangulation as an Approach for Revealing the Complexity of a Classroom Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Drie, Jannet; Dekker, Rijkje

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we explore the value of theoretical triangulation as a methodological approach for the analysis of classroom interaction. We analyze an excerpt of a whole-class discussion in history from three theoretical perspectives: interactivity of the discourse, conceptual level raising and historical reasoning. We conclude that using…

  10. Theoretical study of electromagnetic electron cyclotron waves in the presence of AC field in Uranian magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, R. S.; Kaur, Rajbir

    2015-10-01

    Electromagnetic electron cyclotron (EMEC) waves with temperature anisotropy in the magnetosphere of Uranus have been studied in present work. EMEC waves are investigated using method of characteristic solution by kinetic approach, in presence of AC field. In 1986, Voyager 2 encounter with Uranus revealed that magnetosphere of Uranus exhibit non-Maxwellian high-energy tail distribution. So, the dispersion relation, real frequency and growth rate are evaluated using Lorentzian Kappa distribution function. Effect of temperature anisotropy, AC frequency and number density of particles is found. The study is also extended to oblique propagation of EMEC waves in presence and absence of AC field. Through comprehensive mathematical analysis it is found that when EMEC wave propagates parallel to intrinsic magnetic field of Uranus, its growth is more enhanced than in case of oblique propagation. Results are also discussed in context to magnetosphere of Earth and also gives theoretical explanation to existence of high energetic particles observed by Voyager 2 in the magnetosphere of Uranus. The results can present a further insight into the nature of electron-cyclotron instability condition for the whistler mode waves in the outer radiation belts of Uranus or other space plasmas.

  11. System-theoretical approach to multistage image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grudin, Maxim A.; Timchenko, Leonid I.; Harvey, David M.; Gel, Vladimir P.

    1996-08-01

    We present a novel three-dimensional network and its application to pattern analysis. This is a multistage architecture which investigates partial correlations between structural image components. Mathematical description of the multistage hierarchical processing is provided together with the network architecture. Initially the image is partitioned to be processed in parallel channels. In each channel, the structural components are transformed and subsequently separated depending on their informational activity, to be mixed with the components from other channels for further processing. This procedure of temporal decomposition creates a flexible processing hierarchy, which reflects structural image complexity. An output result is represented as a pattern vector, whose components are computed one at a time to allow the quickest possible response. While several applications of the multistage network are possible, this paper represents an algorithm applied to image classification. The input gray-scale image is transformed so that each pixel contains information about the spatial structure of its neighborhood. A three-level representation of gray-scale image is used in order for each pixel to contain the maximum amount of structural information. The investigation of spatial regularities at all hierarchical levels provides a unified approach to pattern analysis. The most correlated information is extracted first, making the algorithm tolerant to minor structural changes.

  12. Vaccine adjuvant technology: from theoretical mechanisms to practical approaches.

    PubMed

    Schijns, V E J C; Tangerås, A

    2005-01-01

    Poorly immunogenic antigens depend on vaccine adjuvants to evoke an immune response. In addition, adjuvants largely determine the magnitude, quality, time of onset and the duration of immune responses to co-administered antigens. As late as 1989, Janeway aptly called adjuvants: "the immunologist's dirty little secret". This statement reflected the ignorance on the mechanisms of action of most known adjuvants. Yet, rational vaccine design involves a logical choice of adjuvant based on a knowledge of their mode of action and their effects on product efficacy and safety. However, even today the key processes critical for immune induction in general and those evoked by vaccine adjuvants in particular are being disputed among immunologists. This paper presents the four most important concepts likely to explain some of the mechanisms of vaccine adjuvants. They include: (i) the geographical concept of immune reactivity; (ii) the depot concept; (iii) the hypothesis of pathogen-structure recognition, and (iv) the damage/endogenous danger theory. These paradigms are based on observations gathered in mammalian species, largely in murine models. In aquatic animals the processes underlying immune induction will at least partly overlap those in mammals. However, due to inherent species differences, certain pathways may be different. Rational vaccine design, a difficult goal in mammals, is further hampered in aquatic animals by the lack of immunological tools in these species. Extensive trial and error-based approaches have yielded adjuvant candidates for various fish species, with acceptable safety and proven efficacy, some of which are presented. PMID:15962475

  13. How to measure soundscapes. A theoretical and practical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte-Fortkamp, Brigitte

    2002-11-01

    Noise sources interact with the specific acoustic and environmental makeup, topography, meteorology, land use pattern, and lifestyle. The evaluation of soundscapes needs subject-related methodological procedures. With such suitable measurements a way has to be found that allows us to rely on different dimensions on reaction to noise. Improving the soundscape of an urban environment imposes to account for the qualitative appreciation as a cognitive judgment given by listeners and, particularly, for the interaction between acoustic dimensions and other sensory modalities in qualitative judgments of an urban environment (Maffiolo). The structure of the residential area that is, the combination of noise sources are important for the judgment of a soundscope and are also important as subjective parameters which are relevant in people's point of view. Moreover, the relationship of both define the background for assessments. Studies are needed on the subject and its capability in perception and interpretation; studies on the subject inside the society, studies on the social and cultural context, and field studies including physical measurements. Soundscapes may be defined in its effects on man and vice versa and probably acoustical ecology will serve to understand the function of soundscapes.

  14. Conductivity of pure graphene: Theoretical approach using the polarization tensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2016-06-01

    We obtain analytic expressions for the conductivity of pristine (pure) graphene in the framework of the Dirac model using the polarization tensor in (2+1) dimensions defined along the real frequency axis. It is found that at both zero and nonzero temperature T the in-plane and out-of-plane conductivities of graphene are equal to each other with a high precision and essentially do not depend on the wave vector. At T =0 the conductivity of graphene is real and equal to σ0=e2/(4 ℏ ) up to small nonlocal corrections in accordance with many authors. At some fixed T ≠0 the real part of the conductivity varies between zero at low frequencies ω and σ0 for optical ω . If ω is fixed, the conductivity varies between σ0 at low T and zero at high T . The imaginary part of the conductivity of graphene is shown to depend on the ratio of ω to T . In accordance with the obtained asymptotic expressions, at fixed T it varies from infinity at ω =0 to a negative minimum value reached at some ω , and then approaches to zero with further increase of ω . At fixed ω the imaginary part of the conductivity varies from zero at T =0 , reaches a negative minimum at some T , and then goes to infinity together with T . The numerical computations of both the real and imaginary parts of the conductivity are performed. The above results are obtained in the framework of quantum electrodynamics at nonzero temperature and can be generalized for graphene samples with nonzero mass gap parameter and chemical potential.

  15. Fallacies and fantasies: the theoretical underpinnings of the Coexistence Approach for palaeoclimate reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, G. W.; Potts, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Coexistence Approach has been used infer palaeoclimates for many Eurasian fossil plant assemblage. However, the theory that underpins the method has never been examined in detail. Here we discuss acknowledged and implicit assumptions, and assess the statistical nature and pseudo-logic of the method. We also compare the Coexistence Approach theory with the active field of species distribution modelling. We argue that the assumptions will inevitably be violated to some degree and that the method has no means to identify and quantify these violations. The lack of a statistical framework makes the method highly vulnerable to the vagaries of statistical outliers and exotic elements. In addition, we find numerous logical inconsistencies, such as how climate shifts are quantified (the use of a "center value" of a coexistence interval) and the ability to reconstruct "extinct" climates from modern plant distributions. Given the problems that have surfaced in species distribution modelling, accurate and precise quantitative reconstructions of palaeoclimates (or even climate shifts) using the nearest-living-relative principle and rectilinear niches (the basis of the method) will not be possible. The Coexistence Approach can be summarised as an exercise that shoe-horns a plant fossil assemblages into coexistence and then naively assumes that this must be the climate. Given the theoretical issues, and methodological issues highlighted elsewhere, we suggest that the method be discontinued and that all past reconstructions be disregarded and revisited using less fallacious methods.

  16. An information-theoretic approach to motor action decoding with a reconfigurable parallel architecture.

    PubMed

    Craciun, Stefan; Brockmeier, Austin J; George, Alan D; Lam, Herman; Príncipe, José C

    2011-01-01

    Methods for decoding movements from neural spike counts using adaptive filters often rely on minimizing the mean-squared error. However, for non-Gaussian distribution of errors, this approach is not optimal for performance. Therefore, rather than using probabilistic modeling, we propose an alternate non-parametric approach. In order to extract more structure from the input signal (neuronal spike counts) we propose using minimum error entropy (MEE), an information-theoretic approach that minimizes the error entropy as part of an iterative cost function. However, the disadvantage of using MEE as the cost function for adaptive filters is the increase in computational complexity. In this paper we present a comparison between the decoding performance of the analytic Wiener filter and a linear filter trained with MEE, which is then mapped to a parallel architecture in reconfigurable hardware tailored to the computational needs of the MEE filter. We observe considerable speedup from the hardware design. The adaptation of filter weights for the multiple-input, multiple-output linear filters, necessary in motor decoding, is a highly parallelizable algorithm. It can be decomposed into many independent computational blocks with a parallel architecture readily mapped to a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) and scales to large numbers of neurons. By pipelining and parallelizing independent computations in the algorithm, the proposed parallel architecture has sublinear increases in execution time with respect to both window size and filter order. PMID:22255367

  17. Ferromagnetism of magnetic impurities coupled indirectly via conduction electrons: Insights from various theoretical approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titvinidze, Irakli; Schwabe, Andrej; Potthoff, Michael

    2014-07-01

    The magnetic ground-state properties of the periodic Anderson model with a regular depletion of the correlated sites are analyzed within different theoretical approaches. We consider the model on the one-dimensional chain and on the two-dimensional square lattice with hopping between nearest neighbors. At half-filling and with correlated impurities present at every second site, the depleted Anderson lattice is the most simple system where the indirect magnetic coupling mediated by the conduction electrons is ferromagnetic. We discuss the underlying electronic structure and the possible mechanisms that result in ferromagnetic long-range order. To this end, different numerical and analytical concepts are applied to the depleted Anderson and also to the related depleted Kondo lattice and are contrasted with each other. This includes numerical approaches, i.e., Hartree-Fock theory, density-matrix renormalization and dynamical mean-field theory, as well as analytical concepts, namely a variant of the Lieb-Mattis theorem and the concept of flat-band ferromagnetism, and, finally, perturbative approaches, i.e., the effective RKKY exchange in the limit of weak coupling and the "inverse indirect magnetic exchange" in the limit of strong coupling between the conduction band and the impurities.

  18. Schrödinger Approach to Mean Field Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swiecicki, Igor; Gobron, Thierry; Ullmo, Denis

    2016-03-01

    Mean field games (MFG) provide a theoretical frame to model socioeconomic systems. In this Letter, we study a particular class of MFG that shows strong analogies with the nonlinear Schrödinger and Gross-Pitaevskii equations introduced in physics to describe a variety of physical phenomena. Using this bridge, many results and techniques developed along the years in the latter context can be transferred to the former, which provides both a new domain of application for the nonlinear Schrödinger equation and a new and fruitful approach in the study of mean field games. Utilizing this approach, we analyze in detail a population dynamics model in which the "players" are under a strong incentive to coordinate themselves.

  19. A mean field approach to watershed hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Mark; Porporato, Amilcare

    2016-04-01

    Mean field theory (also known as self-consistent field theory) is commonly used in statistical physics when modeling the space-time behavior of complex systems. The mean field theory approximates a complex multi-component system by considering a lumped (or average) effect for all individual components acting on a single component. Thus, the many body problem is reduced to a one body problem. For watershed hydrology, a mean field theory reduces the numerous point component effects to more tractable watershed averages, resulting in a consistent method for linking the average watershed fluxes to the local fluxes at each point. We apply this approach to the spatial distribution of soil moisture, and as a result, the numerous local interactions related to lateral fluxes of soil water are parameterized in terms of the average soil moisture. The mean field approach provides a basis for unifying and extending common event-based models (e.g. Soil Conservation Service curve number (SCS-CN) method) with more modern semi-distributed models (e.g. Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model, the Probability Distributed (PDM) model, and TOPMODEL). We obtain simple equations for the fractions of the different source areas of runoff, the spatial variability of runoff, and the average runoff value (i.e., the so-called runoff curve). The resulting space time distribution of soil moisture offers a concise description of the variability of watershed fluxes.

  20. Theoretically informed Monte Carlo simulation of liquid crystals by sampling of alignment-tensor fields

    SciTech Connect

    Armas-Pérez, Julio C.; Londono-Hurtado, Alejandro; Guzmán, Orlando; Hernández-Ortiz, Juan P.; Pablo, Juan J. de

    2015-07-28

    A theoretically informed coarse-grained Monte Carlo method is proposed for studying liquid crystals. The free energy functional of the system is described in the framework of the Landau-de Gennes formalism. The alignment field and its gradients are approximated by finite differences, and the free energy is minimized through a stochastic sampling technique. The validity of the proposed method is established by comparing the results of the proposed approach to those of traditional free energy minimization techniques. Its usefulness is illustrated in the context of three systems, namely, a nematic liquid crystal confined in a slit channel, a nematic liquid crystal droplet, and a chiral liquid crystal in the bulk. It is found that for systems that exhibit multiple metastable morphologies, the proposed Monte Carlo method is generally able to identify lower free energy states that are often missed by traditional approaches. Importantly, the Monte Carlo method identifies such states from random initial configurations, thereby obviating the need for educated initial guesses that can be difficult to formulate.

  1. Theoretically informed Monte Carlo simulation of liquid crystals by sampling of alignment-tensor fields.

    SciTech Connect

    Armas-Perez, Julio C.; Londono-Hurtado, Alejandro; Guzman, Orlando; Hernandez-Ortiz, Juan P.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-07-27

    A theoretically informed coarse-grained Monte Carlo method is proposed for studying liquid crystals. The free energy functional of the system is described in the framework of the Landau-de Gennes formalism. The alignment field and its gradients are approximated by finite differences, and the free energy is minimized through a stochastic sampling technique. The validity of the proposed method is established by comparing the results of the proposed approach to those of traditional free energy minimization techniques. Its usefulness is illustrated in the context of three systems, namely, a nematic liquid crystal confined in a slit channel, a nematic liquid crystal droplet, and a chiral liquid crystal in the bulk. It is found that for systems that exhibit multiple metastable morphologies, the proposed Monte Carlo method is generally able to identify lower free energy states that are often missed by traditional approaches. Importantly, the Monte Carlo method identifies such states from random initial configurations, thereby obviating the need for educated initial guesses that can be difficult to formulate.

  2. Theoretically informed Monte Carlo simulation of liquid crystals by sampling of alignment-tensor fields.

    PubMed

    Armas-Pérez, Julio C; Londono-Hurtado, Alejandro; Guzmán, Orlando; Hernández-Ortiz, Juan P; de Pablo, Juan J

    2015-07-28

    A theoretically informed coarse-grained Monte Carlo method is proposed for studying liquid crystals. The free energy functional of the system is described in the framework of the Landau-de Gennes formalism. The alignment field and its gradients are approximated by finite differences, and the free energy is minimized through a stochastic sampling technique. The validity of the proposed method is established by comparing the results of the proposed approach to those of traditional free energy minimization techniques. Its usefulness is illustrated in the context of three systems, namely, a nematic liquid crystal confined in a slit channel, a nematic liquid crystal droplet, and a chiral liquid crystal in the bulk. It is found that for systems that exhibit multiple metastable morphologies, the proposed Monte Carlo method is generally able to identify lower free energy states that are often missed by traditional approaches. Importantly, the Monte Carlo method identifies such states from random initial configurations, thereby obviating the need for educated initial guesses that can be difficult to formulate. PMID:26233107

  3. Theoretical study of the photodissociation of Li2+ in one-color intense laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuanjun; Jiang, Wanyi; Khait, Yuriy G.; Hoffmann, Mark R.

    2011-05-01

    A theoretical treatment of the photodissociation of the molecular ion Li2+ in one-color intense laser fields, using the time-dependent wave packet approach in a Floquet Born-Oppenheimer representation, is presented. Six electronic states 1,2 2Σg+, 1,2 2Σu+, 1 2Πg, and 1 2Πu are of relevance in this simulation and have been included. The dependences of the fragmental dissociation probabilities and kinetic energy release (KER) spectra on pulse width, peak intensity, polarization angle, wavelength, and initial vibrational level are analyzed to interpret the influence of control parameters of the external field. Three main dissociation channels, 1 2Σg+ (m = -1), 2 2Σg+ (m = -2), and 2 2Σu+ (m = -3), are seen to dominate the dissociation processes under a wide variety of laser conditions and give rise to well separated groups of KER features. Different dissociation mechanisms for the involved Floquet channels are discussed.

  4. Crystal nucleation in the hard-sphere system revisited: a critical test of theoretical approaches.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Gyula I; Gránásy, László

    2009-04-16

    The hard-sphere system is the best known fluid that crystallizes: the solid-liquid interfacial free energy, the equations of state, and the height of the nucleation barrier are known accurately, offering a unique possibility for a quantitative validation of nucleation theories. A recent significant downward revision of the interfacial free energy from approximately 0.61kT/sigma(2) to (0.56 +/- 0.02)kT/sigma(2) [Davidchack, R.; Morris, J. R.; Laird, B. B. J. Chem. Phys. 2006, 125, 094710] necessitates a re-evaluation of theoretical approaches to crystal nucleation. This has been carried out for the droplet model of the classical nucleation theory (CNT), the self-consistent classical theory (SCCT), a phenomenological diffuse interface theory (DIT), and single- and two-field variants of the phase field theory that rely on either the usual double-well and interpolation functions (PFT/S1 and PFT/S2, respectively) or on a Ginzburg-Landau expanded free energy that reflects the crystal symmetries (PFT/GL1 and PFT/GL2). We find that the PFT/GL1, PFT/GL2, and DIT models predict fairly accurately the height of the nucleation barrier known from Monte Carlo simulations in the volume fraction range of 0.52 < varphi < 0.54, whereas the CNT, SCCT, PFT/S1, and PFT/S2 models underestimate it significantly. PMID:19320450

  5. A practical and theoretical definition of very small field size for radiotherapy output factor measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Charles, P. H. Crowe, S. B.; Langton, C. M.; Trapp, J. V.; Cranmer-Sargison, G.; Thwaites, D. I.; Kairn, T.; Knight, R. T.; Kenny, J.

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: This work introduces the concept of very small field size. Output factor (OPF) measurements at these field sizes require extremely careful experimental methodology including the measurement of dosimetric field size at the same time as each OPF measurement. Two quantifiable scientific definitions of the threshold of very small field size are presented. Methods: A practical definition was established by quantifying the effect that a 1 mm error in field size or detector position had on OPFs and setting acceptable uncertainties on OPF at 1%. Alternatively, for a theoretical definition of very small field size, the OPFs were separated into additional factors to investigate the specific effects of lateral electronic disequilibrium, photon scatter in the phantom, and source occlusion. The dominant effect was established and formed the basis of a theoretical definition of very small fields. Each factor was obtained using Monte Carlo simulations of a Varian iX linear accelerator for various square field sizes of side length from 4 to 100 mm, using a nominal photon energy of 6 MV. Results: According to the practical definition established in this project, field sizes ≤15 mm were considered to be very small for 6 MV beams for maximal field size uncertainties of 1 mm. If the acceptable uncertainty in the OPF was increased from 1.0% to 2.0%, or field size uncertainties are 0.5 mm, field sizes ≤12 mm were considered to be very small. Lateral electronic disequilibrium in the phantom was the dominant cause of change in OPF at very small field sizes. Thus the theoretical definition of very small field size coincided to the field size at which lateral electronic disequilibrium clearly caused a greater change in OPF than any other effects. This was found to occur at field sizes ≤12 mm. Source occlusion also caused a large change in OPF for field sizes ≤8 mm. Based on the results of this study, field sizes ≤12 mm were considered to be theoretically very small for 6

  6. Awareness of music therapy practices and factors influencing specific theoretical approaches.

    PubMed

    Choi, Byung-Chuel

    2008-01-01

    The investigator identified music therapists' theoretical awareness of their practices and analyzed factors influencing their specific theoretical orientations and models. A 2-page survey was mailed to 500 board-certified music therapists in the United States; 272 returned surveys were analyzed. Data analysis revealed that respondents': (a) adoption of current theoretical approaches is contingent on the attended college, area of practice, and their age groups; (b) work satisfaction is not a function of involvement with theoretical orientations but rather of their area of practice and attendance at national music therapy conferences; (c) involvement in music making is not a function of theoretical orientations but of academic degrees; (d) emphasis on client's musical growth and aesthetic quality of music was not a function of theoretical orientations or any other investigated factor; (e) satisfaction with past education was not a function of involvement with theoretical orientations but of the area of practice; (f) desire to expand their theoretical knowledge was not a function of theoretical orientations but of academic degrees. PMID:18447575

  7. Theoretical calculation of zero field splitting parameters of Cr3+ doped ammonium oxalate monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kripal, Ram; Yadav, Awadhesh Kumar

    2015-06-01

    Zero field splitting parameters (ZFSPs) D and E of Cr3+ ion doped ammonium oxalate monohydrate (AOM) are calculated with formula using the superposition model. The theoretically calculated ZFSPs for Cr3+ in AOM crystal are compared with the experimental value obtained by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Theoretical ZFSPs are in good agreement with the experimental ones. The energy band positions of optical absorption spectra of Cr3+ in AOM crystal calculated with CFA package are in good match with the experimental values.

  8. PREFACE: The Second International Conference on Inverse Problems: Recent Theoretical Developments and Numerical Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jin; Hon, Yiu-Chung; Seo, Jin Keun; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2005-01-01

    The Second International Conference on Inverse Problems: Recent Theoretical Developments and Numerical Approaches was held at Fudan University, Shanghai from 16-21 June 2004. The first conference in this series was held at the City University of Hong Kong in January 2002 and it was agreed to hold the conference once every two years in a Pan-Pacific Asian country. The next conference is scheduled to be held at Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan in July 2006. The purpose of this series of biennial conferences is to establish and develop constant international collaboration, especially among the Pan-Pacific Asian countries. In recent decades, interest in inverse problems has been flourishing all over the globe because of both the theoretical interest and practical requirements. In particular, in Asian countries, one is witnessing remarkable new trends of research in inverse problems as well as the participation of many young talents. Considering these trends, the second conference was organized with the chairperson Professor Li Tat-tsien (Fudan University), in order to provide forums for developing research cooperation and to promote activities in the field of inverse problems. Because solutions to inverse problems are needed in various applied fields, we entertained a total of 92 participants at the second conference and arranged various talks which ranged from mathematical analyses to solutions of concrete inverse problems in the real world. This volume contains 18 selected papers, all of which have undergone peer review. The 18 papers are classified as follows: Surveys: four papers give reviews of specific inverse problems. Theoretical aspects: six papers investigate the uniqueness, stability, and reconstruction schemes. Numerical methods: four papers devise new numerical methods and their applications to inverse problems. Solutions to applied inverse problems: four papers discuss concrete inverse problems such as scattering problems and inverse problems in

  9. Theoretical investigation of zero field splitting parameter of Cr3+ doped diammonium hexaaqua magnesium sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kripal, Ram; Yadav, Awadhesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The zero field splitting parameter D of Cr3+ doped diammonium hexaaqua magnesium sulfate (DHMS) are calculated with perturbation formula using crystal field (CF) parameters from superposition model. The theoretically calculated ZFS parameters for Cr3+ in DHMS single crystal are compared with the experimental value obtained by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The theoretical ZFS parameter D is similar to that from experiment. The energy band positions of optical absorption spectra of Cr3+ doped DHMS single crystal are calculated with CFA package, which are in good match with experimental values.

  10. Fallacies and fantasies: the theoretical underpinnings of the Coexistence Approach for palaeoclimate reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, Guido W.; Potts, Alastair J.

    2016-03-01

    The Coexistence Approach has been used to infer palaeoclimates for many Eurasian fossil plant assemblages. However, the theory that underpins the method has never been examined in detail. Here we discuss acknowledged and implicit assumptions and assess the statistical nature and pseudo-logic of the method. We also compare the Coexistence Approach theory with the active field of species distribution modelling. We argue that the assumptions will inevitably be violated to some degree and that the method lacks any substantive means to identify or quantify these violations. The absence of a statistical framework makes the method highly vulnerable to the vagaries of statistical outliers and exotic elements. In addition, we find numerous logical inconsistencies, such as how climate shifts are quantified (the use of a "centre value" of a coexistence interval) and the ability to reconstruct "extinct" climates from modern plant distributions. Given the problems that have surfaced in species distribution modelling, accurate and precise quantitative reconstructions of palaeoclimates (or even climate shifts) using the nearest-living-relative principle and rectilinear niches (the basis of the method) will not be possible. The Coexistence Approach can be summarised as an exercise that shoehorns a plant fossil assemblage into coexistence and then assumes that this must be the climate. Given the theoretical issues and methodological issues highlighted elsewhere, we suggest that the method be discontinued and that all past reconstructions be disregarded and revisited using less fallacious methods. We outline six steps for (further) validation of available and future taxon-based methods and advocate developing (semi-quantitative) methods that prioritise robustness over precision.

  11. A minimax approach to mean field games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averboukh, Yu V.

    2015-07-01

    An initial boundary value problem for the system of equations of a determined mean field game is considered. The proposed definition of a generalized solution is based on the minimax approach to the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. We prove the existence of the generalized (minimax) solution using the Nash equilibrium in the auxiliary differential game with infinitely many identical players. We show that the minimax solution of the original system provides the \\varepsilon-Nash equilibrium in the differential game with a finite number of players. Bibliography: 34 titles.

  12. New approaches to nonlinear diffractive field propagation.

    PubMed

    Christopher, P T; Parker, K J

    1991-07-01

    In many domains of acoustic field propagation, such as medical ultrasound imaging, lithotripsy shock treatment, and underwater sonar, a realistic calculation of beam patterns requires treatment of the effects of diffraction from finite sources. Also, the mechanisms of loss and nonlinear effects within the medium are typically nonnegligible. The combination of diffraction, attenuation, and nonlinear effects has been treated by a number of formulations and numerical techniques. A novel model that incrementally propagates the field of baffled planar sources with substeps that account for the physics of diffraction, attenuation, and nonlinearity is presented. The model accounts for the effect of refraction and reflection (but not multiple reflections) in the case of propagation through multiple, parallel layers of fluid medium. An implementation of the model for axis symmetric sources has been developed. In one substep of the implementation, a new discrete Hankel transform is used with spatial transform techniques to propagate the field over a short distance with diffraction and attenuation. In the other substep, the temporal frequency domain solution to Burgers' equation is implemented to account for the nonlinear accretion and depletion of harmonics. This approach yields a computationally efficient procedure for calculating beam patterns from a baffled planar, axially symmetric source under conditions ranging from quasilinear through shock. The model is not restricted by the usual parabolic wave approximation and the field's directionality is explicitly accounted for at each point. Useage of a harmonic-limiting scheme allows the model to propagate some previously intractable high-intensity nonlinear fields. Results of the model are shown to be in excellent agreement with measurements performed on the nonlinear field of an unfocused 2.25-MHz piston source, even in the near field where the established parabolic wave approximation model fails. Next, the model is used to

  13. Field dependence of gaseous-ion mobility - Theoretical tests of approximate formulas.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, H.; Mason, E. A.

    1972-01-01

    The approximate formulas considered include relations based on the Wannier free-flight theory, the Kihara medium-field expansion, and the Frost-Patterson interpolation formulas. A few accurate theoretical results are available for testing the foregoing formulas. Cases concerning high fields, intermediate fields, and resonant charge transfer are examined. It is found that of the formulas tested, the one based on the Wannier free-flight theory is the most flexible, since it can be used for all fields and all ion-neutral force laws and mass ratios.

  14. [Theoretical perspectives on medicine and the medical profession: an anthropological approach].

    PubMed

    Queiroz, M de S

    1991-08-01

    The medical field and profession are studied from the theoretical point of view of the social sciences. The most representative works on this subject are presented. The analysis shows that conservative positivism and orthodox Marxism are the main obstacles to development in this field of study. At the same time it suggests the concept of culture and the anthropological method of research as the best means for the overcoming of some of the main contradictions which paralyse its progress. PMID:1820621

  15. Making a Traditional Study-Abroad Program Geographic: A Theoretically Informed Regional Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jokisch, Brad

    2009-01-01

    Geographers have been active in numerous focused study-abroad programs, but few have created or led language-based programs overseas. This article describes the development of a Spanish language program in Ecuador and how it was made geographic primarily through a theoretically informed regional geography course. The approach employs theoretical…

  16. A Critical Analysis of Approaches To Targeted PTSD Prevention: Current Status and Theoretically Derived Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldner, Matthew T.; Monson, Candice M.; Friedman, Matthew J.

    2007-01-01

    Although efforts to prevent posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have met with relatively limited success, theoretically driven preventive approaches with promising efficacy are emerging. The current article critically reviews investigations of PTSD prevention programs that target persons at risk for being exposed to a traumatic event or who have…

  17. An Information Theoretic Approach for Identifying Shared Information and Asymmetric Relationships among Variables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golden, Linda L.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The general-information-theoretic approach was used to identify informational overlap and asymmetry between variables, using affective, cognitive, and behavioral measures. Using the chi-squared test, no significant differences were found in response rates, demographics, or patronage frequency of three stores between numerical (n=453) and graphic…

  18. Understanding Older Adults' Physical Activity Behavior: A Multi-Theoretical Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grodesky, Janene M.; Kosma, Maria; Solmon, Melinda A.

    2006-01-01

    Physical inactivity is a health issue with serious consequences for older adults. Investigating physical activity promotion within a multi-theoretical approach may increase the predictive strength of physical activity determinants and facilitate the development and implementation of effective interventions for older adults. This article examines…

  19. Can realistic interaction be useful for nuclear mean-field approaches?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakada, H.; Sugiura, K.; Inakura, T.; Margueron, J.

    2016-07-01

    Recent applications of the M3Y-type semi-realistic interaction to the nuclear mean-field approaches are presented: i) Prediction of magic numbers and ii) isotope shifts of nuclei with magic proton numbers. The results exemplify that the realistic interaction, which is derived from the bare 2 N and 3 N interaction, furnishes a new theoretical instrument for advancing nuclear mean-field approaches.

  20. A theoretical investigation of the sound radiation fields associated with a Bellmouth inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, W. L.; Zinn, B. T.

    1983-01-01

    Analytical results are obtained by numerical integration of a cylindrically symmetric integral representation of the external solutions of the Helmholtz equation. The accuracy of this method is checked by comparisons of computed results with 'exact' solutions generated by the point source method. In all cases, the average error for the amplitude and phase of the points calculated in the field is found to be less than ten percent. Theoretical studies which model experiments run for the NASA Langely Bellmouth inlet configuration are presented and comparisons are made with the experimental results. In all cases very good agreement is obtained between the experimental and theoretically calculated values.

  1. A theoretical investigation of the sound radiation fields associated with a Bellmouth inlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, W. L.; Zinn, B. T.

    1983-04-01

    Analytical results are obtained by numerical integration of a cylindrically symmetric integral representation of the external solutions of the Helmholtz equation. The accuracy of this method is checked by comparisons of computed results with 'exact' solutions generated by the point source method. In all cases, the average error for the amplitude and phase of the points calculated in the field is found to be less than ten percent. Theoretical studies which model experiments run for the NASA Langely Bellmouth inlet configuration are presented and comparisons are made with the experimental results. In all cases very good agreement is obtained between the experimental and theoretically calculated values.

  2. A group theoretical approach to structural transitions of icosahedral quasicrystals and point arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zappa, Emilio; Dykeman, Eric C.; Geraets, James A.; Twarock, Reidun

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we describe a group theoretical approach to the study of structural transitions of icosahedral quasicrystals and point arrays. We apply the concept of Schur rotations, originally proposed by Kramer, to the case of aperiodic structures with icosahedral symmetry; these rotations induce a rotation of the physical and orthogonal spaces invariant under the icosahedral group, and hence, via the cut-and-project method, a continuous transformation of the corresponding model sets. We prove that this approach allows for a characterisation of such transitions in a purely group theoretical framework, and provide explicit computations and specific examples. Moreover, we prove that this approach can be used in the case of finite point sets with icosahedral symmetry, which have a wide range of applications in carbon chemistry (fullerenes) and biology (viral capsids).

  3. Elementary Theoretical Forms for the Spatial Power Spectrum of Earth's Crustal Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, C.

    1998-01-01

    The magnetic field produced by magnetization in Earth's crust and lithosphere can be distinguished from the field produced by electric currents in Earth's core because the spatial magnetic power spectrum of the crustal field differs from that of the core field. Theoretical forms for the spectrum of the crustal field are derived by treating each magnetic domain in the crust as the point source of a dipole field. The geologic null-hypothesis that such moments are uncorrelated is used to obtain the magnetic spectrum expected from a randomly magnetized, or unstructured, spherical crust of negligible thickness. This simplest spectral form is modified to allow for uniform crustal thickness, ellipsoidality, and the polarization of domains by an periodically reversing, geocentric axial dipole field from Earth's core. Such spectra are intended to describe the background crustal field. Magnetic anomalies due to correlated magnetization within coherent geologic structures may well be superimposed upon this background; yet representing each such anomaly with a single point dipole may lead to similar spectral forms. Results from attempts to fit these forms to observational spectra, determined via spherical harmonic analysis of MAGSAT data, are summarized in terms of amplitude, source depth, and misfit. Each theoretical spectrum reduces to a source factor multiplied by the usual exponential function of spherical harmonic degree n due to geometric attenuation with attitude above the source layer. The source factors always vary with n and are approximately proportional to n(exp 3) for degrees 12 through 120. The theoretical spectra are therefore not directly proportional to an exponential function of spherical harmonic degree n. There is no radius at which these spectra are flat, level, or otherwise independent of n.

  4. Toward a novel theoretical approach for determining the nature of electronic excitations in quasi-two-dimensional systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Politano, A.; Chiarello, G.; Cupolillo, A.

    2015-08-01

    The discovery of quasi-two-dimensional (Q2D) crystals has started a new era of materials science. Novel materials, atomically thin and mechanically, thermally and chemically stable, with a large variety of electronic properties are available and they can be assembled in ultrathin flexible devices. Understanding collective electronic excitations (plasmons) in Q2D systems is mandatory for engineering applications in plasmonics. In view of recent developments in the emerging field of graphene-based plasmonics, the correspondence between the theoretically calculated quantities and the observables experimentally measured in Q2D crystals is still unsatisfactory. Motivated by recent Nazarov’s findings (Nazarov 2015 New J. Phys. 17 073018), here we discuss some crucial issues of current theoretical approaches as well as the computational methods applied to two-dimensional materials with special emphasis to cover their peculiarities, range of application and pitfalls.

  5. Cardiovascular alterations in Macaca monkeys exposed to stationary magnetic fields: experimental observations and theoretical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T.S.; Gaffey, C.T.; Moyer, B.R.; Budinger, T.F.

    1983-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements were made of the electrocardiogram (ECG) and the intraarterial blood pressure of adult male Macaca monkeys during acute exposure to homogeneous stationary magnetic fields ranging in strength up to 1.5 tesla. An instantaneous, field strength-dependent increase in the ECG signal amplitude at the locus of the T wave was observed in fields greater than 0.1 tesla. The temporal sequence of this signal in the ECG record and its reversibility following termination of the magnetic field exposure are consistent with an earlier suggestion that it arises from a magnetically induced aortic blood flow potential superimposed on the native T-wave signal. No measurable alterations in blood pressure resulted from exposure to fields up to 1.5 tesla. This experimental finding is in agreement with theoretical calculations of the magnetohydrodynamic effect on blood flow in the major arteries of the cardiovascular system. 27 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  6. Theoretical modeling of the plasma-assisted catalytic growth and field emission properties of graphene sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Suresh C.; Gupta, Neha

    2015-12-15

    A theoretical modeling for the catalyst-assisted growth of graphene sheet in the presence of plasma has been investigated. It is observed that the plasma parameters can strongly affect the growth and field emission properties of graphene sheet. The model developed accounts for the charging rate of the graphene sheet; number density of electrons, ions, and neutral atoms; various elementary processes on the surface of the catalyst nanoparticle; surface diffusion and accretion of ions; and formation of carbon-clusters and large graphene islands. In our investigation, it is found that the thickness of the graphene sheet decreases with the plasma parameters, number density of hydrogen ions and RF power, and consequently, the field emission of electrons from the graphene sheet surface increases. The time evolution of the height of graphene sheet with ion density and sticking coefficient of carbon species has also been examined. Some of our theoretical results are in compliance with the experimental observations.

  7. Dynamical gap generation in graphene nanoribbons: An effective relativistic field theoretical model

    SciTech Connect

    Chaves, A. J.; Paula, W. de; Frederico, T.; Lima, G. D.; Cordeiro, C. E.; Delfino, A.

    2011-04-15

    We show that the assumption of a nontrivial zero band gap for a graphene sheet within an effective relativistic field theoretical model description of interacting Dirac electrons on the surface of graphene describes the experimental band gap of graphene nanoribbons for a wide range of widths. The graphene band gap is dynamically generated, corresponding to a nontrivial gapless solution, found in the limit of an infinitely wide graphene ribbon. The nanoribbon band gap is determined by the experimental graphene work function.

  8. Nuclear radii calculations in various theoretical approaches for nucleus-nucleus interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Merino, C.; Novikov, I. S.; Shabelski, Yu.

    2009-12-15

    The information about sizes and nuclear density distributions in unstable (radioactive) nuclei is usually extracted from the data on interaction of radioactive nuclear beams with a nuclear target. We show that in the case of nucleus-nucleus collisions the values of the parameters depend somewhat strongly on the considered theoretical approach and on the assumption about the parametrization of the nuclear density distribution. The obtained values of root-mean-square radii (R{sub rms}) for stable nuclei with atomic weights A=12-40 vary by approximately 0.1 fm when calculated in the optical approximation, in the rigid target approximation, and using the exact expression of the Glauber theory. We present several examples of R{sub rms} radii calculations using these three theoretical approaches and compare these results with the data obtained from electron-nucleus scattering.

  9. Theoretical approach of the electroluminescence quenching in (polymer-CdSe quantum dot) nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastour, N.; Mejatty, M.; Bouchriha, H.

    2015-06-01

    A theoretical approach based on the rate equation of exciton density for the electroluminescence quenching in (polymers-quantum dots) nanocomposite is developed. It is shown that the light intensity observed in the nanocomposite depends respectively on the quantum dots concentration, the injected charge carriers, the exciton density, and the Förster energy transfer between polymer and quantum dots. We have found that the significant reduction of the light intensity is related to the exciton density profiles which exhibit a monotonic decrease with the increase of Förster transfer mechanism. Our theoretical approach for the electroluminescence agrees with experimental results observed in hybrid structure (MEH-PPV) with CdSe quantum dots. The maximum of exciton density is also estimated and we have obtained a value for the exciton diffusion length of 10 nm which is consistent with the available experimental results.

  10. Investigation of the interfacial tension of complex coacervates using field-theoretic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rajeev

    2012-01-01

    Complex coacervation, a liquid-liquid phase separation that occurs when two oppositely charged polyelectrolytes are mixed in a solution, has the potential to be exploited for many emerging applications including wet adhesives and drug delivery vehicles. The ultra-low interfacial tension of coacervate systems against water is critical for such applications, and it would be advantageous if molecular models could be used to characterize how various system properties (e.g., salt concentration) affect the interfacial tension. In this article we use field-theoretic simulations to characterize the interfacial tension between a complex coacervate and its supernatant. After demonstrating that our model is free of ultraviolet divergences (calculated properties converge as the collocation grid is refined), we develop two methods for calculating the interfacial tension from field-theoretic simulations. One method relies on the mechanical interpretation of the interfacial tension as the interfacial pressure, and the second method estimates the change in free energy as the area between the two phases is changed. These are the first calculations of the interfacial tension from full field theoretic simulation of which we are aware, and both the magnitude and scaling behaviors of our calculated interfacial tension agree with recent experiments.

  11. Comparison of experimental and theoretical reaction rail currents, rail voltages, and airgap fields for the linear induction motor research vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, D. G.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of reaction rail currents, reaction rail voltages, and airgap magnetic fields in tests of the Linear Induction Motor Research Vehicle (LIMRV) were compared with theoretical calculations from the mesh/matrix theory. It was found that the rail currents and magnetic fields predicted by the theory are within 20 percent of the measured currents and fields at most motor locations in most of the runs, but differ by as much as a factor of two in some cases. The most consistent difference is a higher experimental than theoretical magnetic field near the entrance of the motor and a lower experimental than theoretical magnetic field near the exit. The observed differences between the theoretical and experimental magnetic fields and currents do not account for the differences of as much as 26 percent between the theoretical and experimental thrusts.

  12. Field-theoretic model of inhomogeneous supramolecular polymer networks and gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Aruna; Elliot, Richard; Fredrickson, Glenn H.

    2010-11-01

    We present a field-theoretic model of the gelation transition in inhomogeneous reversibly bonding systems and demonstrate that our model reproduces the classical Flory-Stockmayer theory of gelation in the homogeneous limit. As an illustration of our model in the context of inhomogeneous gelation, we analyze the mean-field behavior of an equilibrium system of reacting trifunctional units in a good solvent confined within a slit bounded by parallel, repulsive walls. Our results indicate higher conversions and, consequently, higher concentrations of gel following the gelation transition near the center of the slit relative to the edges.

  13. Field-theoretic model of inhomogeneous supramolecular polymer networks and gels.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Aruna; Elliot, Richard; Fredrickson, Glenn H

    2010-11-01

    We present a field-theoretic model of the gelation transition in inhomogeneous reversibly bonding systems and demonstrate that our model reproduces the classical Flory-Stockmayer theory of gelation in the homogeneous limit. As an illustration of our model in the context of inhomogeneous gelation, we analyze the mean-field behavior of an equilibrium system of reacting trifunctional units in a good solvent confined within a slit bounded by parallel, repulsive walls. Our results indicate higher conversions and, consequently, higher concentrations of gel following the gelation transition near the center of the slit relative to the edges. PMID:21054065

  14. Electric field driven fractal growth in polymer electrolyte composites: Experimental evidence of theoretical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawar, Anit; Chandra, Amita

    2012-11-01

    The influence of electric field on the diffusion limited aggregation has been observed experimentally. The observation provides experimental confirmation of the theoretical model proposed by Zhi-Jie Tan et al. [Phys. Lett. A 268 (2000) 112]. Most strikingly, a transition from a disordered ramified pattern to an ordered pattern (chain-like growth) has been observed. The growth is governed by diffusion, convection and migration in an electric field which give rise to the different patterns. This Letter can also be considered as an experimental evidence of computer simulated fractal growth given by Huang and Hibbert [Physica A 233 (1996) 888].

  15. Fast polynomial approach to calculating wake fields

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, C.I.; Peierls, R.F.

    1997-06-15

    In the computation of transverse wake field effects in accelerators, it is necessary to compute expressions of the form given in equations (1). It is usually desired to compute this a large number of times, the values of z{sub i} and x{sub i} being different at each iteration, other quantities remaining the same. The problem in practical applications is that the computational work grows as N{sub m}{sup 2}. Thus even using parallel computation to achieve speedup, the elapsed time to obtain a result still increases linearly with N{sub m}. The authors introduce here an approximate method of evaluating the sum in (1) whose computational work increases only as N{sub m}logN{sub m}. It involves some significant initial computation which does not have to be repeated at each subsequent iteration. The basis of the approach is to replace the individual contributions of a group of distant macroparticles with a local series expansion. In this respect it is similar in spirit to the so called fast multipole method.

  16. A theoretical study for parallel electric field in nonlinear magnetosonic waves in three-component plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toida, Mieko

    2016-07-01

    The electric field parallel to the magnetic field in nonlinear magnetosonic waves in three component plasmas (two-ion-species plasma and electron-positron-ion plasma) is theoretically studied based on a three-fluid model. In a two-ion-species plasma, a magnetosonic mode has two branches, high-frequency mode and low-frequency mode. The parallel electric field E ∥ and its integral along the magnetic field, F = - ∫ E ∥ d s , in the two modes propagating quasiperpendicular to the magnetic field are derived as functions of the wave amplitude ɛ and the density ratio and cyclotron frequency ratio of the two ion species. The theory shows that the magnitude of F in the high-frequency-mode pulse is much greater than that in the low-frequency-mode pulse. Theoretical expressions for E ∥ and F in nonlinear magnetosonic pulses in an electron-positron-ion plasma are also obtained under the assumption that the wave amplitudes are in the range of ( m e / m i ) 1 / 2 < ɛ < 1 , where m e / m i is the electron to ion mass ratio.

  17. Physical context for theoretical approaches to sediment transport magnitude-frequency analysis in alluvial channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sholtes, Joel; Werbylo, Kevin; Bledsoe, Brian

    2014-10-01

    Theoretical approaches to magnitude-frequency analysis (MFA) of sediment transport in channels couple continuous flow probability density functions (PDFs) with power law flow-sediment transport relations (rating curves) to produce closed-form equations relating MFA metrics such as the effective discharge, Qeff, and fraction of sediment transported by discharges greater than Qeff, f+, to statistical moments of the flow PDF and rating curve parameters. These approaches have proven useful in understanding the theoretical drivers behind the magnitude and frequency of sediment transport. However, some of their basic assumptions and findings may not apply to natural rivers and streams with more complex flow-sediment transport relationships or management and design scenarios, which have finite time horizons. We use simple numerical experiments to test the validity of theoretical MFA approaches in predicting the magnitude and frequency of sediment transport. Median values of Qeff and f+ generated from repeated, synthetic, finite flow series diverge from those produced with theoretical approaches using the same underlying flow PDF. The closed-form relation for f+ is a monotonically increasing function of flow variance. However, using finite flow series, we find that f+ increases with flow variance to a threshold that increases with flow record length. By introducing a sediment entrainment threshold, we present a physical mechanism for the observed diverging relationship between Qeff and flow variance in fine and coarse-bed channels. Our work shows that through complex and threshold-driven relationships sediment transport mode, channel morphology, flow variance, and flow record length all interact to influence estimates of what flow frequencies are most responsible for transporting sediment in alluvial channels.

  18. Decision support models for solid waste management: Review and game-theoretic approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Karmperis, Athanasios C.; Aravossis, Konstantinos; Tatsiopoulos, Ilias P.; Sotirchos, Anastasios

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► The mainly used decision support frameworks for solid waste management are reviewed. ► The LCA, CBA and MCDM models are presented and their strengths, weaknesses, similarities and possible combinations are analyzed. ► The game-theoretic approach in a solid waste management context is presented. ► The waste management bargaining game is introduced as a specific decision support framework. ► Cooperative and non-cooperative game-theoretic approaches to decision support for solid waste management are discussed. - Abstract: This paper surveys decision support models that are commonly used in the solid waste management area. Most models are mainly developed within three decision support frameworks, which are the life-cycle assessment, the cost–benefit analysis and the multi-criteria decision-making. These frameworks are reviewed and their strengths and weaknesses as well as their critical issues are analyzed, while their possible combinations and extensions are also discussed. Furthermore, the paper presents how cooperative and non-cooperative game-theoretic approaches can be used for the purpose of modeling and analyzing decision-making in situations with multiple stakeholders. Specifically, since a waste management model is sustainable when considering not only environmental and economic but also social aspects, the waste management bargaining game is introduced as a specific decision support framework in which future models can be developed.

  19. Theoretical model of the electric field produced by charged particles in windblown sand flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiaojing; He, Lihong; Zhou, Youhe

    2004-08-01

    Taking into account the coupled interactions among wind velocity, sand movement, and the electric field, we develop a general theoretical model for calculating the electric fields produced by charged sand particles in the three sand movement types, saltation, suspension and creep, quantifying the electric field of a point charge by Coulomb's law. The numerical results of the electric field are in good agreement with both the field data and the wind tunnel experimental results. The profile of the electric field intensity produced by charged particles in windblown sand flux is quantitatively analyzed in detail and compared with those generated by charged particles only in the saltation layer or in the creep layer. The results demonstrate that the profile of the electric field produced by charged particles in one sand movement type is different from that by those in other types and that the signs of the charge acquired by the particles also alter the features of the profile. Finally, the effects of the wind velocity and the charge of the windblown sand particles on the electric field intensity are discussed.

  20. A Study on Theoretical Performance of Graphene FET using Analytical Approach with Reference to High Cutoff Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahim-Al-Fattah, Md.; Rahman, Md. Tawabur; Islam, Md. Sherajul; Bhuiyan, Ashraful G.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a detailed study of theoretical performance of graphene field effect transistor (GFET) using analytical approach. GFET shows promising performance in terms of faster saturation as well as extremely high cutoff frequency (3.9THz). A significant shift of the Dirac point as well as an asymmetrical ambipolar behavior is observed on the transfer characteristics. Similarly, an approximate symmetrical capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics is obtained where it has guaranteed the consistency because it shows a significant saturation both in the accumulation and inversion region. In addition, a high transconductance of 6800uS at small channel length (20nm) along with high cutoff frequency (3.9THz) has been observed which demands for high speed field effect devices.

  1. Field-widened Michelson interferometer for spectral discrimination in high-spectral-resolution lidar: theoretical framework.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhongtao; Liu, Dong; Luo, Jing; Yang, Yongying; Zhou, Yudi; Zhang, Yupeng; Duan, Lulin; Su, Lin; Yang, Liming; Shen, Yibing; Wang, Kaiwei; Bai, Jian

    2015-05-01

    A field-widened Michelson interferometer (FWMI) is developed to act as the spectral discriminator in high-spectral-resolution lidar (HSRL). This realization is motivated by the wide-angle Michelson interferometer (WAMI) which has been used broadly in the atmospheric wind and temperature detection. This paper describes an independent theoretical framework about the application of the FWMI in HSRL for the first time. In the framework, the operation principles and application requirements of the FWMI are discussed in comparison with that of the WAMI. Theoretical foundations for designing this type of interferometer are introduced based on these comparisons. Moreover, a general performance estimation model for the FWMI is established, which can provide common guidelines for the performance budget and evaluation of the FWMI in the both design and operation stages. Examples incorporating many practical imperfections or conditions that may degrade the performance of the FWMI are given to illustrate the implementation of the modeling. This theoretical framework presents a complete and powerful tool for solving most of theoretical or engineering problems encountered in the FWMI application, including the designing, parameter calibration, prior performance budget, posterior performance estimation, and so on. It will be a valuable contribution to the lidar community to develop a new generation of HSRLs based on the FWMI spectroscopic filter. PMID:25969300

  2. Experimental and theoretical study on field emission properties of zinc oxide nanoparticles decorated carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Zhou, Wei-Man; Liu, Wei-Hua; Wang, Xiao-Li

    2015-05-01

    Field emission properties of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) decorated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are investigated experimentally and theoretically. CNTs are in situ decorated with ZnO NPs during the growth process by chemical vapor deposition using a carbon source from the iron phthalocyanine pyrolysis. The experimental field emission test shows that the ZnO NP decoration significantly improves the emission current from 50 μA to 275 μA at 550 V and the reduced threshold voltage from 450 V to 350 V. The field emission mechanism of ZnO NPs on CNTs is theoretically studied by the density functional theory (DFT) combined with the Penn-Plummer method. The ZnO NPs reconstruct the ZnO-CNT structure and pull down the surface barrier of the entire emitter system to 0.49 eV so as to reduce the threshold electric field. The simulation results suggest that the presence of ZnO NPs would increase the LDOS near the Fermi level and increase the emission current. The calculation results are consistent with the experiment results. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 91123018, 61172040, and 61172041) and the Natural Science Foundation of Shaanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2014JM7277).

  3. Near-field study of magneto-optical samples: theoretical comparison of transversal and polar effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Labeke, Daniel; Vial, A.; Barchiesi, Dominique

    1996-09-01

    The density of integration of magneto-optical devices is limited by diffraction of light. Recently some groups have proposed to use Near-Field Microscopy to overcome this limitation and some experiments have been performed both in transmission and reflection. In this paper we study theoretically magneto-optical effect in near-field. We consider a magneto-optical sample with details smaller than the wavelength. This sample is modelled as a multilayer rough structure. At least one layer has magneto-optical properties. The corrugation at the interfaces are very small compared to the optical wavelength. We do not consider the writing problem and the experiment is only modelled in the reading mode. Moreover, the magnetic properties are considered in the saturation regime. For this study we use an extension of the method that we used to describe near- field microscope with isotropic sample. The diffracted fields are determined in each layer by using a perturbative version of the Rayleigh method which leads to the resolution of a linear equation for each diffracted wave. The near- field above the sample is thus obtained by summing all the diffracted waves. We consider two geometries for the magnetization: polar effect where the magnetization is perpendicular to the sample and transversal effect where it is in the plane. We compare near-field images obtained in transmission and reflection by changing magnetization orientation. Comparisons with far-field results are also proposed.

  4. Work and Inter-subjectivity: a theoretical reflection on its dialectics in the field of health and nursing.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Brígida Gimenez; Peduzzi, Marina; Mandú, Edir Nei Teixeira; Ayres, José Ricardo de Carvalho Mesquita

    2012-01-01

    This theoretical reflection intends to show the inter-subjective relationship that takes place in health and nursing practices under the following theoretical perspectives: Institutional Analysis, Psychodynamics of Labor and the Theory of Communicative Action, with an emphasis on the latter. Linking these concepts to the Marxist approach to work in the field of health emerges from recognizing the need for its continuous reconstruction-in this case, with a view to understand the interaction and communication intrinsic to work in action. The theory of Communicative Action seeks to consider these two inextricable dimensions: work as productive action and as interaction. The first corresponds to instrumental action based on technical rules with a production-guided rationale. The second refers to the interaction that takes place as communicative action and seeks understanding among subjects. We assume that adopting this theoretical perspective in the analysis of health and nursing practices opens new possibilities for clarifying its social and historical process and inter-subjective connections. PMID:22481717

  5. Inferring electric fields and currents from ground magnetometer data - A test with theoretically derived inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, R. A.; Kamide, Y.

    1983-01-01

    Advanced techniques considered by Kamide et al. (1981) seem to have the potential for providing observation-based high time resolution pictures of the global ionospheric current and electric field patterns for interesting events. However, a reliance on the proposed magnetogram-inversion schemes for the deduction of global ionospheric current and electric field patterns requires proof that reliable results are obtained. 'Theoretical' tests of the accuracy of the magnetogram inversion schemes have, therefore, been considered. The present investigation is concerned with a test, involving the developed KRM algorithm and the Rice Convection Model (RCM). The test was successful in the sense that there was overall agreement between electric fields and currents calculated by the RCM and KRM schemes.

  6. Field-induced periodic distortions in a nematic liquid crystal: deuterium NMR study and theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Sugimura, A; Zakharov, A V

    2011-08-01

    The peculiarities in the dynamic of the director reorientation in a liquid crystal (LC) film under the influence of the electric E field directed at an angle α to the magnetic B field have been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Time-resolved deuterium NMR spectroscopy is employed to investigate the field-induced director dynamics. Analysis of the experimental results, based on the predictions of hydrodynamic theory including both the director motion and fluid flow, provides an evidence for the appearance of the spatially periodic patterns in 4-n-pentyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl LC film, at the angles α>60∘, in response to the suddenly applied E. These periodic distortions produce a lower effective rotational viscosity. This gives a faster response of the director rotation than for a uniform mode, as observed in our NMR experiment. PMID:21929001

  7. Quantum-field-theoretic analysis of inflation dynamics in a (2+1)-dimensional universe

    SciTech Connect

    Samiullah, M. ); Eboli, O. ); Pi, S. )

    1991-10-15

    We reexamine inflationary scenarios based on slow-rollover transitions, which occur under various initial conditions of the inflation-driving scalar field. We examine inflation dynamics using a recently developed calculational technique for studying a quantum-field-theoretic system in an external environment that is itself changing with time. This method, based on the functional Schroedinger picture, uses a self-consistent Gaussian approximation that, unlike ordinary perturbation theory, reflects some of the nonlinearities of the full quantum theory. Our treatment is confined to planar universes, where the approximation techniques do not suffer from well-known problems associated with scalar field self-interactions in four-dimensional space-time. However, for these toy models we can present concrete and explicit results.

  8. Predicting excitonic gaps of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes from a field theoretic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Konik, Robert M.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Misewich, James A.

    2015-02-17

    We demonstrate that a non-perturbative framework for the treatment of the excitations of single walled carbon nanotubes based upon a field theoretic reduction is able to accurately describe experiment observations of the absolute values of excitonic energies. This theoretical framework yields a simple scaling function from which the excitonic energies can be read off. This scaling function is primarily determined by a single parameter, the charge Luttinger parameter of the tube, which is in turn a function of the tube chirality, dielectric environment, and the tube's dimensions, thus expressing disparate influences on the excitonic energies in a unified fashion. As a result, we test this theory explicitly on the data reported in [NanoLetters 5, 2314 (2005)] and [Phys. Rev. B 82, 195424 (2010)] and so demonstrate the method works over a wide range of reported excitonic spectra.

  9. Predicting excitonic gaps of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes from a field theoretic analysis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Konik, Robert M.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Misewich, James A.

    2015-02-17

    We demonstrate that a non-perturbative framework for the treatment of the excitations of single walled carbon nanotubes based upon a field theoretic reduction is able to accurately describe experiment observations of the absolute values of excitonic energies. This theoretical framework yields a simple scaling function from which the excitonic energies can be read off. This scaling function is primarily determined by a single parameter, the charge Luttinger parameter of the tube, which is in turn a function of the tube chirality, dielectric environment, and the tube's dimensions, thus expressing disparate influences on the excitonic energies in a unified fashion. Asmore » a result, we test this theory explicitly on the data reported in [NanoLetters 5, 2314 (2005)] and [Phys. Rev. B 82, 195424 (2010)] and so demonstrate the method works over a wide range of reported excitonic spectra.« less

  10. Predicting excitonic gaps of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes from a field theoretic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konik, Robert M.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Misewich, James A.

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate that a nonperturbative framework for the treatment of the excitations of single-walled carbon nanotubes based upon a field theoretic reduction is able to accurately describe experiment observations of the absolute values of excitonic energies. This theoretical framework yields a simple scaling function from which the excitonic energies can be read off. This scaling function is primarily determined by a single parameter, the charge Luttinger parameter of the tube, which is in turn a function of the tube chirality, dielectric environment, and the tube's dimensions, thus expressing disparate influences on the excitonic energies in a unified fashion. We test this theory explicitly on the data reported by Dukovic et al. [Nano Lett. 5, 2314 (2005), 10.1021/nl0518122] and Sfeir et al. [Phys. Rev. B 82, 195424 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevB.82.195424] and so demonstrate the method works over a wide range of reported excitonic spectra.

  11. Dislocation accumulation at large plastic strains -- An approach to the theoretical strength of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Embury, J.D. |; Han, K.

    1999-04-01

    The usual method of introducing engineers to the concept of dislocations and their role in plastic flow is to compare an estimate of the theoretical strength of solid (of order {micro}/30 where {micro} is the shear modulus) and the observed strength of either single crystals ({mu}/10{sup 4}) or practical engineering material such as structural steels where the yield stress in shear is of order {mu}/10{sup 3}. However, if one considers the problem in reverse, one can consider the accumulation of dislocations as an important mechanism by which one can produce engineering materials in which the strength level approaches the theoretical strength. If one assumes that the flow stress can be expressed in terms of te mean free path between stored dislocations or as the square root of the global dislocation density, then one can see the influence of dislocation density in a diagrammatic form. It is clear that the strengthening by dislocation accumulation due to large imposed plastic strains represents an important approach both to the development of new, potentially valuable, engineering materials and an important area of basic understanding in terms of the mechanical response of materials close to their theoretical strength. Thus, this article will survey some of the factors which influence dislocation accumulation at large strains and the consequences of such accumulation processes.

  12. Illustrating the quantum approach with an Earth magnetic field MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pars Benli, Kami; Dillmann, Baudouin; Louelh, Ryma; Poirier-Quinot, Marie; Darrasse, Luc

    2015-05-01

    Teaching imaging of magnetic resonance (MR) today is still as challenging as it has always been, because it requires admitting that we cannot express fundamental questions of quantum mechanics with straightforward language or without using extensive theory. Here we allow students to face a real MR setup based on the Earth's magnetic field. We address the applied side of teaching MR using a device that is affordable and that proves to be sufficiently robust, at universities in Orsay, France, and San Sebastian, Spain, in experimental practicals at undergraduate and graduate levels. We specifically present some of the advantages of low field for measuring R2 relaxation rates, reaching a power of separation of 1.5 μmol on Mn(II) ions between two water bottles each of half a liter. Finally we propose key approaches for the lecturers to adopt when they are asked to pass from theoretical knowledge to teachable knowhow. The outcomes are fast calibration and the MR acquisition protocols, demonstrating the reproducibility of energy transfer during the saturation pulses, and the quantitative nature of MR, with water protons and a helium-3 sample.

  13. Theoretical analysis of integral neutron transport equation using collision probability method with quadratic flux approach

    SciTech Connect

    Shafii, Mohammad Ali Meidianti, Rahma Wildian, Fitriyani, Dian; Tongkukut, Seni H. J.; Arkundato, Artoto

    2014-09-30

    Theoretical analysis of integral neutron transport equation using collision probability (CP) method with quadratic flux approach has been carried out. In general, the solution of the neutron transport using the CP method is performed with the flat flux approach. In this research, the CP method is implemented in the cylindrical nuclear fuel cell with the spatial of mesh being conducted into non flat flux approach. It means that the neutron flux at any point in the nuclear fuel cell are considered different each other followed the distribution pattern of quadratic flux. The result is presented here in the form of quadratic flux that is better understanding of the real condition in the cell calculation and as a starting point to be applied in computational calculation.

  14. Forming Limits in Sheet Metal Forming for Non-Proportional Loading Conditions - Experimental and Theoretical Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Ofenheimer, Aldo; Buchmayr, Bruno; Kolleck, Ralf

    2005-08-05

    The influence of strain paths (loading history) on material formability is well known in sheet forming processes. Sophisticated experimental methods are used to determine the entire shape of strain paths of forming limits for aluminum AA6016-T4 alloy. Forming limits for sheet metal in as-received condition as well as for different pre-deformation are presented. A theoretical approach based on Arrieux's intrinsic Forming Limit Stress Curve (FLSC) concept is employed to numerically predict the influence of loading history on forming severity. The detailed experimental strain paths are used in the theoretical study instead of any linear or bilinear simplified loading histories to demonstrate the predictive quality of forming limits in the state of stress.

  15. Conceptual and theoretical approaches to patient care: associate versus baccalaureate degree prepared nurses.

    PubMed

    Giger, J N; Davidhizar, R E

    1990-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine if there is a relationship between types of entry-level preparatory nursing programmes in which a nurse receives basic nursing education and conceptual and theoretical approaches to patient care. A secondary purpose of the study was to determine if there is a relationship between entry-level basic preparatory nursing education and nursing leadership, the ability to make nursing diagnosis, and implementation, as well as evaluation of the nursing process. Three nursing practice categories were identified and included: professional, all-nurse and technical. Useable data collected by short-essay questionnaire from 343 out of 344 sample subjects were computed to determine the relationship, if any, between basic preparatory nursing education and conceptual and theoretical approaches to patient care. Decisions about three null hypotheses were made at the 0.05 level of significance utilizing analysis of covariance and the 0.01 level of significance utilizing chi-square analysis. For Hypothesis 1, the main effect for degree work when covaried with Verbal Scholastic Aptitude Test scores, Quantitative Scholastic Aptitude Test scores, time and age indicated a significance of 0.001 for all item associations in the professional, all-nurse and technical categories utilizing analysis of covariance, and 0.001 utilizing chi-square analysis. For Hypotheses 2 and 3, the main effect for degree work when covaried with the aforementioned variables indicated a significance of 0.001 utilizing analysis of covariance, and 0.001 utilizing chi-square analysis. In conclusion, the findings from the study suggest that graduates of baccalaureate degree programmes do vary in conceptual and theoretical approach to nursing care in specific nursing care situations.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2229698

  16. Theoretical approach for plasma series resonance effect in geometrically symmetric dual radio frequency plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bora, B.; Bhuyan, H.; Favre, M.; Wyndham, E.; Chuaqui, H.

    2012-02-27

    Plasma series resonance (PSR) effect is well known in geometrically asymmetric capacitively couple radio frequency plasma. However, plasma series resonance effect in geometrically symmetric plasma has not been properly investigated. In this work, a theoretical approach is made to investigate the plasma series resonance effect and its influence on Ohmic and stochastic heating in geometrically symmetric discharge. Electrical asymmetry effect by means of dual frequency voltage waveform is applied to excite the plasma series resonance. The results show considerable variation in heating with phase difference between the voltage waveforms, which may be applicable in controlling the plasma parameters in such plasma.

  17. Theoretical approach to surface plasmon scattering microscopy for single nanoparticle detection in near infrared region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Taehwang; Kim, Donghyun

    2015-03-01

    We present a theoretical approach to single nanoparticle detection using surface plasmon scattering microscopy. Through rigorous coupled wave analysis assuming light incidence on a gold coated BK7 glass substrate under total internal reflection condition for a 200-nm polystyrene as targets attached to the gold film, it was found that surface plasmon polariton induced by incident light on the gold thin film is perturbed. As a result, parabolic waves were observed in the reflection plane. By varying angles of incidence and wavelengths, optimum incident conditions for surface plasmon scattering microscopy were obtained.

  18. A Maximum-Likelihood Approach to Force-Field Calibration.

    PubMed

    Zaborowski, Bartłomiej; Jagieła, Dawid; Czaplewski, Cezary; Hałabis, Anna; Lewandowska, Agnieszka; Żmudzińska, Wioletta; Ołdziej, Stanisław; Karczyńska, Agnieszka; Omieczynski, Christian; Wirecki, Tomasz; Liwo, Adam

    2015-09-28

    A new approach to the calibration of the force fields is proposed, in which the force-field parameters are obtained by maximum-likelihood fitting of the calculated conformational ensembles to the experimental ensembles of training system(s). The maximum-likelihood function is composed of logarithms of the Boltzmann probabilities of the experimental conformations, calculated with the current energy function. Because the theoretical distribution is given in the form of the simulated conformations only, the contributions from all of the simulated conformations, with Gaussian weights in the distances from a given experimental conformation, are added to give the contribution to the target function from this conformation. In contrast to earlier methods for force-field calibration, the approach does not suffer from the arbitrariness of dividing the decoy set into native-like and non-native structures; however, if such a division is made instead of using Gaussian weights, application of the maximum-likelihood method results in the well-known energy-gap maximization. The computational procedure consists of cycles of decoy generation and maximum-likelihood-function optimization, which are iterated until convergence is reached. The method was tested with Gaussian distributions and then applied to the physics-based coarse-grained UNRES force field for proteins. The NMR structures of the tryptophan cage, a small α-helical protein, determined at three temperatures (T = 280, 305, and 313 K) by Hałabis et al. ( J. Phys. Chem. B 2012 , 116 , 6898 - 6907 ), were used. Multiplexed replica-exchange molecular dynamics was used to generate the decoys. The iterative procedure exhibited steady convergence. Three variants of optimization were tried: optimization of the energy-term weights alone and use of the experimental ensemble of the folded protein only at T = 280 K (run 1); optimization of the energy-term weights and use of experimental ensembles at all three temperatures (run 2

  19. A study of Ti-doped WO3 thin films using comparative theoretical and experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paez, Aurelio

    Metal oxides like Tungsten Oxide (WO3) are well documented and characterized in the literature, with uses in darkening windows and mirrors, flat computer displays, solar panel cooling, and sensors (of interest in this study). Ti doping of WO3 is less documented and the focus of this study. Sample thin films of pure WO3 and varyingly Ti doped WO3 were prepared using Radio Frequency magnetron sputtering (RF) (13.56 MHz) to grow thin films on a silicon substrate. This study aims to compare multiple Ti doping percentages in WO3 theoretically and then compare with experimental data taken from thin films of various Ti doping levels grown at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 400 0°C. Characterization of the materials was to be conducted using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Raman Spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and other theoretical and simulated approaches. Theoretical calculations optimized Ti doping at somewhere between 6.25% and 12%. Experimental data indicates that under the given growing conditions optimal Ti doping is 5%. The percentage of Ti may be able to be increased and the material retain desired characteristics with an increased growth temperature above 400 0°C as annealing samples post-growth has no positive impact on the thin film structure.

  20. An Alternative Theoretical Approach to Escape Decision-Making: The Role of Visual Cues

    PubMed Central

    Javůrková, Veronika; Šizling, Arnošt Leoš; Kreisinger, Jakub; Albrecht, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    Escape enables prey to avoid an approaching predator. The escape decision-making process has traditionally been interpreted using theoretical models that consider ultimate explanations based on the cost/benefit paradigm. Ultimate approaches, however, suffer from inseparable extra-assumptions due to an inability to accurately parameterize the model's variables and their interactive relationships. In this study, we propose a mathematical model that uses intensity of predator-mediated visual stimuli as a basic cue for the escape response. We consider looming stimuli (i.e. expanding retinal image of the moving predator) as a cue to flight initiation distance (FID; distance at which escape begins) of incubating Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). We then examine the relationship between FID, vegetation cover and directness of predator trajectory, and fit the resultant model to experimental data. As predicted by the model, vegetation concealment and directness of predator trajectory interact, with FID decreasing with increased concealment during a direct approach toward prey, but not during a tangential approach. Thus, we show that a simple proximate expectation, which involves only visual processing of a moving predator, may explain interactive effects of environmental and predator-induced variables on an escape response. We assume that our proximate approach, which offers a plausible and parsimonious explanation for variation in FID, may serve as an evolutionary background for traditional, ultimate explanations and should be incorporated into interpretation of escape behavior. PMID:22427851

  1. Recent Developments in Fully Fluctuating Field-Theoretic Simulations of Polymer Melts and Solutions.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Kris T; Fredrickson, Glenn H

    2016-08-11

    We review the latest developments in computational methods for direct simulation of fully fluctuating field theories of polymeric assemblies. In this context, we describe a newly developed theoretical and computational framework for accurately computing fluctuation-corrected phase diagrams of mesostructured polymer systems and report the first such complete phase diagram for a diblock copolymer melt. The method is based on complex Langevin sampling of a UV regularized field-theoretic model, with Helmholtz free energies computed using thermodynamic integration. UV regularization ensures that the free energies do not have an arbitrary reference; they can be compared between incommensurate phases, permitting for the first time the computation of order-order transitions with fluctuation corrections. We further demonstrate that computed free energies are accurate in the disordered phase by comparison to perturbation theory on the one-loop level. Importantly, we note that our method uses no uncontrolled approximations beyond the initial definition of a coarse-grained molecular model for the polymer melt or solution. The method can be applied straightforwardly to melts and solutions containing multiple species with diverse polymer architectures. PMID:27414265

  2. Theoretical analysis of the microwave-drill near-field localized heating effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerby, E.; Aktushev, O.; Dikhtyar, V.

    2005-02-01

    The microwave-drill principle [Jerby et al., Science 298, 587 (2002)] is based on a localized hot-spot effect induced by a near-field coaxial applicator. The microwave drill melts the nonmetallic material locally and penetrates mechanically into it to shape the hole. This paper presents a theoretical analysis of the thermal-runaway effect induced in front of the microwave drill. The model couples the Maxwell's and heat equations including the material's temperature-dependent properties. A finite-difference time-domain algorithm is applied in a two-time-scale numerical model. The simulation is demonstrated for mullite, and benchmarked in simplified cases. The results show a temperature rise of ˜103K/s up to 1300K within a hot spot confined to a ˜4-mm width (˜0.1 wavelength). The input-port response to this near-field effect is modeled by equivalent time-varying lumped-circuit elements. Besides the physical insight, this theoretical study provides computational tools for design and analysis of microwave drills and for their real-time monitoring and adaptive impedance matching.

  3. Joint United States-European Union Theoretical and Practical Course on Molecular Approaches for In Situ Biogradation

    SciTech Connect

    Suflita, Joseph M.; Duncan, Kathleen E.

    2010-08-14

    The Joint United States - European Union Theoretical and Practical Course on Molecular Approaches for in situ Biodegradation was held May 24 through June 7 at The University of Oklahoma. Twenty-four graduate and postgraduate students from both the United States and the European Union attended the course. Nine states and ten European countries were represented. Students were assigned living quarters and laboratory partners to maximize interactions between US and EU participants as well as to mix people with different technical backgrounds together. The students used the latest methods in molecular biology to characterize beneficial microorganisms and genes involved in the biodegradation of pollutants at a nearby landfill as well as an active hydrocarbon-producing site, part of which is undergoing bioremediation. Seminars by distinguished scientists were organized to expose the students to the breadth of the environmental field, including field assay and engineering applications, laboratory scale bioreactors, microbiology, genetics, regulation, pathway analysis, design of recombinant bacteria, and application of the associated techniques to the field. Lectures were given by various OU faculty on the principles behind the techniques to be used in the laboratory. These lectures included troubleshooting hints and encouraged questions and comments from the audience. The laboratory experiments covered chemical, microbiological, and molecular genetic analyses of soils; bioavailability of contaminants; enrichment cultures; gene probing; PCR amplification of known genes and gene families; identification of microbes based traditional and nontraditional approaches, nutritional capabilities, and 16S rRNA sequence; mRNA detection; and enzyme assays. Field trips were made to the USGS landfill field sampling site, and to the Tall Grass Prairie Preserve, a Nature Conservancy site which also featured long-term studies of bioremediation of crude oil and brine spills by one of the

  4. Electric-field induced mutation of DNA: a theoretical investigation of the GC base pair.

    PubMed

    Cerón-Carrasco, José P; Jacquemin, Denis

    2013-04-01

    It is known that intense external electric fields affect the proton transfer (PT) reactions in simple chemical systems, such as hydrated chlorhydric acid or formic acid dimer. Accordingly, electric fields might be used to modulate the PT reactions responsible for the spontaneous mutation mechanism in DNA. In this contribution, we investigate the effect of these fields on the tautomeric equilibria of the guanine-cytosine (GC) base pair in order to gain further insight into this hypothesis. This task is performed with both density functional theory (DFT) and second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) approaches. Our results demonstrate that electric fields not only drastically alter the rate constants of PT but also tune the mechanism of the PT reactions in the GC base pair. PMID:23338206

  5. Avian genetics: A field and ecological approach

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, F.; Buckley, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    The authors wanted to present the ecological/population approach they used in their own research, and a compendium of carefully referred chapters written by invited experts was essential. The book follows the historical evolution of work in avian genetics, proceeding from a discussion of Mendelian (i.e. classical) genes through quantitative genetics, chromosomal genetics, biochemical genetics, to extensive treatment of population genetics, and concluding with some examples of long-term studies. In this book concentration has been more on intra- than on inter-specific variation; in that sense the approach has been more genetic than evolutionary or taxonomic.

  6. UQ and Decision Making for Groundwater Contamination: A Measure-Theoretic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattis, S. A.; Dawson, C.; Butler, T.

    2014-12-01

    The movement of contaminant plumes in underground aquifers is highly dependent on many hydrogeological parameters. We model the transport with an advection, diffusion, reaction system requiring the specification of porosity, flow direction, flow speed, dispersivities, and effects of geochemical reactions. It is often prohibitively expensive or impossible to make accurate and reliable measurements of these parameters in the field. It is also difficult to know the position and shape of a contaminant plume at a given time or the exact details of the source of the contamination, e.g. size, location, origin time, and magnitude. If decisions are to be made regarding contaminant remediation strategies or predictions of future contaminant concentrations in and near water-supply wells, then these uncertain hydrogeological and source parameters need to be analyzed and estimated. We utilize a measure-theoretic framework to formulate and solve the physics-based stochastic inverse problem to quantify the uncertainty for these parameters. We solve the model using both analytical and finite element solutions. We define quantities of interest (QoI) for the groundwater contaminant problem in terms of observable field measurements. We develop adjoint problems to compute accurate and reliable a posteriori error estimates of the QoIs. The adjoint solutions are also useful in the solution of the inverse problem. The measure-theoretic formulation and solution of the inverse problem and modeling framework define a solution as a probability measure on the parameter domain. In the typical case where the number of output quantities is less than the number of parameters, the inverse of the map from parameters to data defines a type of generalized contour map where the geometry plays a pivotal role in determining an optimal set of QoI. We determine and analyze solutions for geometrically distinct QoI defining reduced-dimension set-valued inverses for this measure-theoretic inverse framework.

  7. Experimental and theoretical approaches for identification of p-benzophenoneoxycarbonylphenyl acrylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaboga, F.; Soykan, U.; Dogruer, M.; Ozturk, B.; Yildirim, G.; Cetin, S.; Terzioglu, C.

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this multidisciplinary study is to characterize a title compound, p-benzophenoneoxycarbonylphenyl acrylate (BPOCPA) synthesized by condensation reaction of p-acryloyloxybenzoyl chloride (ABC) with 4-hydroxybenzophenone (HBP) by means of experimental and theoretical evidences. The spectroscopic properties of the compound are experimentally examined by Fourier transformation-infrared (FTIR) spectra (in the region 400-4000 cm-1) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts (with a frequency of 400 MHz). For the theoretical studies, the optimized molecular structures, vibrational frequencies including infrared intensities and Raman activities, corresponding vibrational spectra interpreted with the aid of normal coordinate analysis based on scaled density functional force field, atomic charges, thermodynamic properties, 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts, JCH and JCC coupling constants belonging to the BPOCPA compound are analyzed in the ground state by the way of the density functional theory (B3LYP) with the standard 6-311++G(d,p) level of theory for the first time. All the results obtained show that the calculated vibrational frequencies and chemical shifts are observed to be in good agreement with the available experimental findings. According to the comparison between experimental results and theoretical data, the calculation level chosen plays an important role in understanding of dynamics of the title compound studied in this work. The self-consistent field (SCF) energy of the molecule in six different solvent media is also analyzed at the same basis set by applying both the Onsager and Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM). It is found that the SCF energies deduced from the methods reduce with the enhancement of the solvent polarity as a consequence of the increment in the stability of the compound studied. Besides, the changes of the PCM calculations are found to be higher than those of the Onsager ones, confirming that the former method displays a

  8. Semiclassical and quantum field theoretic bounds for traversable Lorentzian stringy wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Nandi, Kamal Kanti; Zhang Yuanzhong; Kumar, K.B. Vijaya

    2004-09-15

    A lower bound on the size of a Lorentzian wormhole can be obtained by semiclassically introducing the Planck cutoff on the magnitude of tidal forces (Horowitz-Ross constraint). Also, an upper bound is provided by the quantum field theoretic constraint in the form of the Ford-Roman Quantum Inequality for massless minimally coupled scalar fields. To date, however, exact static solutions belonging to this scalar field theory have not been worked out to verify these bounds. To fill this gap, we examine the wormhole features of two examples from the Einstein frame description of the vacuum low energy string theory in four dimensions which is the same as the minimally coupled scalar field theory. Analyses in this paper support the conclusion of Ford and Roman that wormholes in this theory can have sizes that are indeed only a few order of magnitudes larger than the Planck scale. It is shown that the two types of bounds are also compatible. In the process, we point out a 'wormhole' analog of naked black holes.

  9. Synergies between Theoretical Approaches to Mathematics Education with Technology: A Case Study through a Cross-Analysis Methodology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maracci, Mirko; Cazes, Claire; Vandebrouck, Fabrice; Mariotti, Maria Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Mathematics education as a research domain is characterized by a plurality of theoretical approaches. Acknowledging the existence of such diversity and the risks of an excessive theoretical fragmentation does not mean to search for a unifying theory but to urge the community to develop strategies for coping with this diversity. This article is…

  10. A new approach to observe toroidal magnetic fields of magnetars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, H.; Makishima, K.; Enoto, T.; Nakano, T.; Furuta, Y.; Nakazawa, K.

    2016-06-01

    Over the last decade, observational evidence has amounted that magnetars harbor enormous surface dipole magnetic fields (MFs) of B_{d} = 10^{14-15} {G}. Theoretically, we expect even stronger toroidal MFs B_{t} (e.g., Takiwaki+2009), which is observationally supported by a discovery of low-B_{d} magnetars (e.g., SGR 0418+5729; Rea+2013). Here, we will present a new approach to access B_{t} more directly. {Suzaku} allows us to simultaneously observe a soft thermal component and a distinct hard X-ray tail of magnetars. Extensively analyzing two magnetars, 4U 0142+61 and 1E 1547.0-5408, we found that their hard X-ray pulses suffered from slow phase modulations (Makishima+2014, 2015). This can be interpreted as a manifestation of free precession, under an axial deformation by ˜0.01%. If this effect is attributed to the magnetic stress, B_{t}˜10^{16} G is inferred. We further found that, within 6 years observation of 4U 0142+61, the modulation periods remained constant, while the amplitude gradually increased from < 0.4 to ˜1.3 sec. These results suggest the shift of the hard X-ray emission region (or direction).

  11. A new approach to observe toroidal magnetic fields of magnetars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, H.; Makishima, K.; Enoto, T.; Nakano, T.; Furuta, Y.; Nakazawa, K.

    2016-06-01

    Over the last decade, observational evidence has amounted that magnetars harbor enormous surface dipole magnetic fields (MFs) of B_{d} = 10^{14-15} {G}. Theoretically, we expect even stronger toroidal MFs B_{t} (e.g., Takiwaki+2009), which is observationally supported by a discovery of low-B_{d} magnetars (e.g., SGR 0418+5729; Rea+2013). Here, we will present a new approach to access B_{t} more directly. Suzaku allows us to simultaneously observe a soft thermal component and a distinct hard X-ray tail of magnetars. Extensively analyzing two magnetars, 4U 0142+61 and 1E 1547.0-5408, we found that their hard X-ray pulses suffered from slow phase modulations (Makishima+2014, 2015). This can be interpreted as a manifestation of free precession, under an axial deformation by ˜0.01%. If this effect is attributed to the magnetic stress, B_{t}˜10^{16} G is inferred. We further found that, within 6 years observation of 4U 0142+61, the modulation periods remained constant, while the amplitude gradually increased from < 0.4 to ˜1.3 sec. These results suggest the shift of the hard X-ray emission region (or direction).

  12. A Theoretical Method for Characterizing Nonlinear Effects in Paul Traps with Added Octopole Field.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Caiqiao; Zhou, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Ning; Zhan, Lingpeng; Chen, Yongtai; Chen, Suming; Nie, Zongxiu

    2015-08-01

    In comparison with numerical methods, theoretical characterizations of ion motion in the nonlinear Paul traps always suffer from low accuracy and little applicability. To overcome the difficulties, the theoretical harmonic balance (HB) method was developed, and was validated by the numerical fourth-order Runge-Kutta (4th RK) method. Using the HB method, analytical ion trajectory and ion motion frequency in the superimposed octopole field, ε, were obtained by solving the nonlinear Mathieu equation (NME). The obtained accuracy of the HB method was comparable with that of the 4th RK method at the Mathieu parameter, q = 0.6, and the applicable q values could be extended to the entire first stability region with satisfactory accuracy. Two sorts of nonlinear effects of ion motion were studied, including ion frequency shift, Δβ, and ion amplitude variation, Δ(C(2n)/C0) (n ≠ 0). New phenomena regarding Δβ were observed, although extensive studies have been performed based on the pseudo-potential well (PW) model. For instance, the |Δβ| at ε = 0.1 and ε = -0.1 were found to be different, but they were the same in the PW model. This is the first time the nonlinear effects regarding Δ(C(2n)/C0) (n ≠ 0) are studied, and the associated study has been a challenge for both theoretical and numerical methods. The nonlinear effects of Δ(C(2n)/C0) (n ≠ 0) and Δβ were found to share some similarities at q < 0.6: both of them were proportional to ε, and the square of the initial ion displacement, z(0)(2). PMID:25924875

  13. Field-theoretic simulations of directed self-assembly in cylindrical confinement: placement and rectification aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laachi, Nabil; Iwama, Tatsuhiro; Delaney, Kris T.; Kim, Bongkeun; Bristol, Robert; Shykind, David; Weinheimer, Corey J.; Fredrickson, Glenn H.

    2014-03-01

    We have investigated the directed self-assembly (DSA) of cylinder-forming block copolymers inside cylindrical guiding templates. To complement and corroborate our experimental study, we use field-theoretic simulations to examine the fluctuations-induced variations in the size and position of the cylindrical microdomain that forms in the middle of the guiding hole. Our study goes beyond the usual mean-field approximation and self-consistent field theory simulations (SCFT) and incorporates the effects of thermal fluctuations in the description of the self-assembly process using complex Langevin (CL) dynamics. In both our experimental and modeling efforts, we focus on minor-block-attractive sidewalls and bottom substrates and neutral top surfaces and explore the properties of the formed cylinders, including fluctuations in the center position and the size of the domain, for various prepattern conditions. Our results indicate robust critical dimensions (CD) of the DSA cylinders relative to the incoming CD, with a sigma CD < 0.9nm. Likewise, we find that the DSA cylinders are accurately registered in the center of the guiding hole, with deviations in the hole-inhole distance on the order of ≍ 0.7-1nm, translating to errors in the hole-to-hole distance of ≍ 1-1.5nm.

  14. Inclusion of persistence length-based secondary structure in replica field theoretic models of heteropolymer freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Jeffrey K.; Pande, Vijay S.

    2013-09-01

    The protein folding problem has long represented a "holy grail" in statistical physics due to its physical complexity and its relevance to many human diseases. While past theoretical work has yielded apt descriptions of protein folding landscapes, recent large-scale simulations have provided insights into protein folding that were impractical to obtain from early theories. In particular, the role that non-native contacts play in protein folding, and their relation to the existence of misfolded, β-sheet rich trap states on folding landscapes, has emerged as a topic of interest in the field. In this paper, we present a modified model of heteropolymer freezing that includes explicit secondary structural characteristics which allow observations of "intramolecular amyloid" states to be probed from a theoretical perspective. We introduce a variable persistence length-based energy penalty to a model Hamiltonian, and we illustrate how this modification alters the phase transitions present in the theory. We find, in particular, that inclusion of this variable persistence length increases both generic freezing and folding temperatures in the model, allowing both folding and glass transitions to occur in a more highly optimized fashion. We go on to discuss how these changes might relate to protein evolution, misfolding, and the emergence of intramolecular amyloid states.

  15. [A theoretical analysis of coordination in the field of health care: application to coordinated care systems].

    PubMed

    Sebai, Jihane

    2016-01-01

    Various organizational, functional or structural issues have led to a review of the foundations of the former health care system based on a traditional market segmentation between general practice and hospital medicine, and between health and social sectors and marked by competition between private and public sectors. The current reconfiguration of the health care system has resulted in “new” levers explained by the development of a new organizational reconfiguration of the primary health care model. Coordinated care structures (SSC) have been developed in this context by making coordination the cornerstone of relations between professionals to ensure global, continuous and quality health care. This article highlights the contributions of various theoretical approaches to the understanding of the concept of coordination in the analysis of the current specificity of health care. PMID:27392057

  16. Theoretical Investigation of Graphene Nanoribbon Field-Effect Transistors Designed for Digital Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Naoki; Sato, Shintaro; Yokoyama, Naoki

    2013-09-01

    Nanometer-scale, single-gate graphene nanoribbon Schottky barrier field-effect transistors (FETs) were theoretically investigated using self-consistent atomistic simulation. The device geometry was determined by referring to the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors. The target performance levels were the requirements specified in the roadmap for 2024, particularly a maximum leakage current of 0.1 A/m, an on-current of 2017 A/m, and a delay time of 0.13 ps. The device conditions needed to meet these requirements were found to be a bandgap larger than 1.1 eV, a supply voltage of 0.6 V, and a gate length of 7 nm.

  17. Constraints on field theoretical models for variation of the fine structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhardt, Charles L.

    2005-02-01

    Recent theoretical ideas and observational claims suggest that the fine structure constant α may be variable. We examine a spectrum of models in which α is a function of a scalar field. Specifically, we consider three scenarios: oscillating α, monotonic time variation of α, and time-independent α that is spatially varying. We examine the constraints imposed upon these theories by cosmological observations, particle detector experiments, and “fifth force” experiments. These constraints are very strong on models involving oscillation but cannot compete with bounds from the Oklo subnuclear reactor on models with monotonic timelike variation of α. One particular model with spatial variation is consistent with all current experimental and observational measurements, including those from two seemingly conflicting measurements of the fine structure constant using the many multiplet method on absorption lines.

  18. Calculation of membrane bending rigidity using field-theoretic umbrella sampling.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Y G; Müller, M

    2015-12-28

    The free-energy change of membrane shape transformations can be small, e.g., as in the case of membrane bending. Therefore, the calculation of the free-energy difference between different membrane morphologies is a challenge. Here, we discuss a computational method - field-theoretic umbrella sampling - to compute the local chemical potential of a non-equilibrium configuration and illustrate how one can apply it to study free-energy changes of membrane transformations using simulations. Specifically, the chemical potential profile of the bent membrane and the bending rigidity of membrane are calculated for a soft, coarse-grained amphiphile model and the MARTINI model of a dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) membrane. PMID:26723640

  19. Bridging the theoretical divide in Holocene landscape studies: social and ecological approaches to ancient Oaxacan landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Arthur A.; Goman, Michelle

    2012-11-01

    In this article we discuss two theoretical approaches to landscape studies in archaeology: the ecological and social/symbolic. We suggest that an integrated approach can provide a more effective means through which archaeologists and earth scientists can model the complex interplay between people and the environment. Our perspective views peoples' engagements with the landscape as simultaneously ecological and social, material and symbolic. To illustrate this synthetic approach we discuss our research from the highland and lowland regions of the Mexican state of Oaxaca using archaeological, ethnographic, ethnohistorical, paleoecological, and geomorphological data. In highland Oaxaca we examine the ways in which political and religious principles were embedded in the landscape as well as the social, symbolic, and material dimensions of anthropogenic landscape change during the Formative period. For the coastal lowlands, we discuss the social and ecological implications of the transition to sedentism and the effects of anthropogenic landscape change during the Formative period. We also examine the interplay between politics and land use during the Classic and Postclassic periods.

  20. Model-free information-theoretic approach to infer leadership in pairs of zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Butail, Sachit; Mwaffo, Violet; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    Collective behavior affords several advantages to fish in avoiding predators, foraging, mating, and swimming. Although fish schools have been traditionally considered egalitarian superorganisms, a number of empirical observations suggest the emergence of leadership in gregarious groups. Detecting and classifying leader-follower relationships is central to elucidate the behavioral and physiological causes of leadership and understand its consequences. Here, we demonstrate an information-theoretic approach to infer leadership from positional data of fish swimming. In this framework, we measure social interactions between fish pairs through the mathematical construct of transfer entropy, which quantifies the predictive power of a time series to anticipate another, possibly coupled, time series. We focus on the zebrafish model organism, which is rapidly emerging as a species of choice in preclinical research for its genetic similarity to humans and reduced neurobiological complexity with respect to mammals. To overcome experimental confounds and generate test data sets on which we can thoroughly assess our approach, we adapt and calibrate a data-driven stochastic model of zebrafish motion for the simulation of a coupled dynamical system of zebrafish pairs. In this synthetic data set, the extent and direction of the coupling between the fish are systematically varied across a wide parameter range to demonstrate the accuracy and reliability of transfer entropy in inferring leadership. Our approach is expected to aid in the analysis of collective behavior, providing a data-driven perspective to understand social interactions. PMID:27176333

  1. A Graph-Theoretical Approach for Tracing Filamentary Structures in Neuronal and Retinal Images.

    PubMed

    De, Jaydeep; Cheng, Li; Zhang, Xiaowei; Lin, Feng; Li, Huiqi; Ong, Kok Haur; Yu, Weimiao; Yu, Yuanhong; Ahmed, Sohail

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is about tracing filamentary structures in both neuronal and retinal images. It is often crucial to identify single neurons in neuronal networks, or separate vessel tree structures in retinal blood vessel networks, in applications such as drug screening for neurological disorders or computer-aided diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy. Both tasks are challenging as the same bottleneck issue of filament crossovers is commonly encountered, which essentially hinders the ability of existing systems to conduct large-scale drug screening or practical clinical usage. To address the filament crossovers' problem, a two-step graph-theoretical approach is proposed in this paper. The first step focuses on segmenting filamentary pixels out of the background. This produces a filament segmentation map used as input for the second step, where they are further separated into disjointed filaments. Key to our approach is the idea that the problem can be reformulated as label propagation over directed graphs, such that the graph is to be partitioned into disjoint sub-graphs, or equivalently, each of the neurons (vessel trees) is separated from the rest of the neuronal (vessel) network. This enables us to make the interesting connection between the tracing problem and the digraph matrix-forest theorem in algebraic graph theory for the first time. Empirical experiments on neuronal and retinal image datasets demonstrate the superior performance of our approach over existing methods. PMID:26316029

  2. An information-theoretic approach to assess practical identifiability of parametric dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Pant, Sanjay; Lombardi, Damiano

    2015-10-01

    A new approach for assessing parameter identifiability of dynamical systems in a Bayesian setting is presented. The concept of Shannon entropy is employed to measure the inherent uncertainty in the parameters. The expected reduction in this uncertainty is seen as the amount of information one expects to gain about the parameters due to the availability of noisy measurements of the dynamical system. Such expected information gain is interpreted in terms of the variance of a hypothetical measurement device that can measure the parameters directly, and is related to practical identifiability of the parameters. If the individual parameters are unidentifiable, correlation between parameter combinations is assessed through conditional mutual information to determine which sets of parameters can be identified together. The information theoretic quantities of entropy and information are evaluated numerically through a combination of Monte Carlo and k-nearest neighbour methods in a non-parametric fashion. Unlike many methods to evaluate identifiability proposed in the literature, the proposed approach takes the measurement-noise into account and is not restricted to any particular noise-structure. Whilst computationally intensive for large dynamical systems, it is easily parallelisable and is non-intrusive as it does not necessitate re-writing of the numerical solvers of the dynamical system. The application of such an approach is presented for a variety of dynamical systems--ranging from systems governed by ordinary differential equations to partial differential equations--and, where possible, validated against results previously published in the literature. PMID:26292167

  3. Model-free information-theoretic approach to infer leadership in pairs of zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butail, Sachit; Mwaffo, Violet; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    Collective behavior affords several advantages to fish in avoiding predators, foraging, mating, and swimming. Although fish schools have been traditionally considered egalitarian superorganisms, a number of empirical observations suggest the emergence of leadership in gregarious groups. Detecting and classifying leader-follower relationships is central to elucidate the behavioral and physiological causes of leadership and understand its consequences. Here, we demonstrate an information-theoretic approach to infer leadership from positional data of fish swimming. In this framework, we measure social interactions between fish pairs through the mathematical construct of transfer entropy, which quantifies the predictive power of a time series to anticipate another, possibly coupled, time series. We focus on the zebrafish model organism, which is rapidly emerging as a species of choice in preclinical research for its genetic similarity to humans and reduced neurobiological complexity with respect to mammals. To overcome experimental confounds and generate test data sets on which we can thoroughly assess our approach, we adapt and calibrate a data-driven stochastic model of zebrafish motion for the simulation of a coupled dynamical system of zebrafish pairs. In this synthetic data set, the extent and direction of the coupling between the fish are systematically varied across a wide parameter range to demonstrate the accuracy and reliability of transfer entropy in inferring leadership. Our approach is expected to aid in the analysis of collective behavior, providing a data-driven perspective to understand social interactions.

  4. Evolutionary Game Theoretic Approach to Self-Organized Data Aggregation in Delay Tolerant Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabir, K. Habibul; Sasabe, Masahiro; Takine, Tetsuya

    Custody transfer in delay tolerant networks (DTNs) provides reliable end-to-end data delivery by delegating the responsibility of data transfer among special nodes (custodians) in a hop-by-hop manner. However, storage congestion occurs when data increases and/or the network is partitioned into multiple sub-networks for a long time. The storage congestion can be alleviated by message ferries which move around the network and proactively collect data from the custodians. In such a scenario, data should be aggregated to some custodians so that message ferries can collect them effectively. In this paper, we propose a scheme to aggregate data into selected custodians, called aggregators, in a fully distributed and autonomous manner with the help of evolutionary game theoretic approach. Through theoretical analysis and several simulation experiments, taking account of the uncooperative behavior of nodes, we show that aggregators can be selected in a self-organized manner and the number of aggregators can be controlled to a desired value.

  5. Array measurements adapted to the number of available sensors: Theoretical and practical approach for ESAC method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galiana-Merino, J. J.; Rosa-Cintas, S.; Rosa-Herranz, J.; Garrido, J.; Peláez, J. A.; Martino, S.; Delgado, J.

    2016-05-01

    Array measurements of ambient noise have become a useful technique to estimate the surface wave dispersion curves and subsequently the subsurface elastic parameters that characterize the studied soil. One of the logistical handicaps associated with this kind of measurements is the requirement of several stations recording at the same time, which limits their applicability in the case of research groups without enough infrastructure resources. In this paper, we describe the theoretical basis of the ESAC method and we deduce how the number of stations needed to implement any array layout can be reduced to only two stations. In this way, we propose a new methodology to implement an N stations array layout by using only M stations (M < N), which will be recording in different positions of the original prearranged N stations geometry at different times. We also provide some practical guidelines to implement the proposed approach and we show different examples where the obtained results confirm the theoretical foundations. Thus, the study carried out reflects that we can use a minimum of 2 stations to deploy any array layout originally designed for higher number of sensors.

  6. A Game-Theoretic Approach to Branching Time Abstract-Check-Refine Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yi; Tamai, Tetsuo

    2009-01-01

    Since the complexity of software systems continues to grow, most engineers face two serious problems: the state space explosion problem and the problem of how to debug systems. In this paper, we propose a game-theoretic approach to full branching time model checking on three-valued semantics. The three-valued models and logics provide successful abstraction that overcomes the state space explosion problem. The game style model checking that generates counter-examples can guide refinement or identify validated formulas, which solves the system debugging problem. Furthermore, output of our game style method will give significant information to engineers in detecting where errors have occurred and what the causes of the errors are.

  7. A theoretical study of Ne3 using hyperspherical coordinates and a slow variable discretization approach.

    PubMed

    Suno, Hiroya

    2011-10-01

    We study theoretically the ground and excited bound states of the bosonic rare gas van der Waals trimer Ne(3). A slow variable discretization approach is adopted to solve the nuclear Schrödinger equation, in which the Schrödinger equation in hyperangular coordinates is solved using basis splines at a series of fixed finite-element methods discrete variable representation hyper-radii. We consider not only zero total nuclear orbital angular momentum, J = 0, states but also J > 0 states. By using the best empirical neon dimer interaction potentials, all the bound state energy levels of Ne(3) will be calculated for total angular momenta up to J = 6, as well as their average root-mean-square radii. We also analyze the wave functions in hyperspherical coordinates for several selected bound states. PMID:21992310

  8. Understanding Confounding Effects in Linguistic Coordination: An Information-Theoretic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shuyang; Ver Steeg, Greg; Galstyan, Aram

    2015-01-01

    We suggest an information-theoretic approach for measuring stylistic coordination in dialogues. The proposed measure has a simple predictive interpretation and can account for various confounding factors through proper conditioning. We revisit some of the previous studies that reported strong signatures of stylistic accommodation, and find that a significant part of the observed coordination can be attributed to a simple confounding effect—length coordination. Specifically, longer utterances tend to be followed by longer responses, which gives rise to spurious correlations in the other stylistic features. We propose a test to distinguish correlations in length due to contextual factors (topic of conversation, user verbosity, etc.) and turn-by-turn coordination. We also suggest a test to identify whether stylistic coordination persists even after accounting for length coordination and contextual factors. PMID:26115446

  9. Information-Theoretic Approaches for Evaluating Complex Adaptive Social Simulation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Ganguly, Auroop R; Jiao, Yu

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose information-theoretic approaches for comparing and evaluating complex agent-based models. In information theoretic terms, entropy and mutual information are two measures of system complexity. We used entropy as a measure of the regularity of the number of agents in a social class; and mutual information as a measure of information shared by two social classes. Using our approaches, we compared two analogous agent-based (AB) models developed for regional-scale social-simulation system. The first AB model, called ABM-1, is a complex AB built with 10,000 agents on a desktop environment and used aggregate data; the second AB model, ABM-2, was built with 31 million agents on a highperformance computing framework located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and fine-resolution data from the LandScan Global Population Database. The initializations were slightly different, with ABM-1 using samples from a probability distribution and ABM-2 using polling data from Gallop for a deterministic initialization. The geographical and temporal domain was present-day Afghanistan, and the end result was the number of agents with one of three behavioral modes (proinsurgent, neutral, and pro-government) corresponding to the population mindshare. The theories embedded in each model were identical, and the test simulations focused on a test of three leadership theories - legitimacy, coercion, and representative, and two social mobilization theories - social influence and repression. The theories are tied together using the Cobb-Douglas utility function. Based on our results, the hypothesis that performance measures can be developed to compare and contrast AB models appears to be supported. Furthermore, we observed significant bias in the two models. Even so, further tests and investigations are required not only with a wider class of theories and AB models, but also with additional observed or simulated data and more comprehensive performance measures.

  10. Field theoretic treatment of an effective action for a model of catalyzed autoamplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchernookov, Martin; Warmflash, Aryeh; Dinner, Aaron R.

    2010-01-01

    Reaction-diffusion models can exhibit continuous phase transitions in behaviors, and their dynamics at criticality often exhibit scalings with key parameters that can be characterized by exponents. While models with only a single field that transitions between absorbing and nonabsorbing states are well characterized and typically fall in the directed percolation universality class, the effects of coupling multiple fields remain poorly understood. We recently introduced a model which has three fields: one of which relaxes exponentially, one of which displays critical behavior, and one of which has purely diffusive dynamics but exerts an influence on the critical field [Tchernookov , J. Chem. Phys. 130, 134906 (2009)]. Simulations suggested that this model is in a universality class distinct from other reaction-diffusion systems studied previously. Although the three fields give rise to interesting physics, they complicate analysis of the model with renormalization-group methods. Here, we show how to systematically simplify the action for this model such that analytical expressions for the exponents of this universality class can be obtained by standard means. We expect the approach taken here to be of general applicability in reaction-diffusion systems with coupled order parameters that display qualitatively different behaviors close to criticality.

  11. Field theoretic treatment of an effective action for a model of catalyzed autoamplification.

    PubMed

    Tchernookov, Martin; Warmflash, Aryeh; Dinner, Aaron R

    2010-01-01

    Reaction-diffusion models can exhibit continuous phase transitions in behaviors, and their dynamics at criticality often exhibit scalings with key parameters that can be characterized by exponents. While models with only a single field that transitions between absorbing and nonabsorbing states are well characterized and typically fall in the directed percolation universality class, the effects of coupling multiple fields remain poorly understood. We recently introduced a model which has three fields: one of which relaxes exponentially, one of which displays critical behavior, and one of which has purely diffusive dynamics but exerts an influence on the critical field [Tchernookov, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 134906 (2009)]. Simulations suggested that this model is in a universality class distinct from other reaction-diffusion systems studied previously. Although the three fields give rise to interesting physics, they complicate analysis of the model with renormalization-group methods. Here, we show how to systematically simplify the action for this model such that analytical expressions for the exponents of this universality class can be obtained by standard means. We expect the approach taken here to be of general applicability in reaction-diffusion systems with coupled order parameters that display qualitatively different behaviors close to criticality. PMID:20365328

  12. Comparison of GOCE-GPS gravity fields derived by different approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baur, O.; Bock, H.; Höck, E.; Jäggi, A.; Krauss, S.; Mayer-Gürr, T.; Reubelt, T.; Siemes, C.; Zehentner, N.

    2014-10-01

    Several techniques have been proposed to exploit GNSS-derived kinematic orbit information for the determination of long-wavelength gravity field features. These methods include the (i) celestial mechanics approach, (ii) short-arc approach, (iii) point-wise acceleration approach, (iv) averaged acceleration approach, and (v) energy balance approach. Although there is a general consensus that—except for energy balance—these methods theoretically provide equivalent results, real data gravity field solutions from kinematic orbit analysis have never been evaluated against each other within a consistent data processing environment. This contribution strives to close this gap. Target consistency criteria for our study are the input data sets, period of investigation, spherical harmonic resolution, a priori gravity field information, etc. We compare GOCE gravity field estimates based on the aforementioned approaches as computed at the Graz University of Technology, the University of Bern, the University of Stuttgart/Austrian Academy of Sciences, and by RHEA Systems for the European Space Agency. The involved research groups complied with most of the consistency criterions. Deviations only occur where technical unfeasibility exists. Performance measures include formal errors, differences with respect to a state-of-the-art GRACE gravity field, (cumulative) geoid height differences, and SLR residuals from precise orbit determination of geodetic satellites. We found that for the approaches (i) to (iv), the cumulative geoid height differences at spherical harmonic degree 100 differ by only ; in the absence of the polar data gap, SLR residuals agree by . From our investigations, we conclude that real data analysis results are in agreement with the theoretical considerations concerning the (relative) performance of the different approaches.

  13. Theoretical model of the polarization Coulomb field scattering in strained AlGaN/AlN/GaN heterostructure field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Luan, Chongbiao; Lin, Zhaojun Zhao, Jingtao; Wang, Yutang; Lv, Yuanjie; Chen, Hong; Wang, Zhanguo

    2014-07-28

    The theoretical model of the polarization Coulomb field scattering (PCF) caused by the polarization charge density variation at the AlGaN/AlN interface in strained AlGaN/AlN/GaN heterostructure field-effect transistors has been developed. And the theoretical values for the electron drift mobility, which were calculated using the Matthiessen's rule that includes PCF, piezoelectric scattering, polar optical-phonon scattering, and interface roughness scattering, are in good agreement with our experimental values. Therefore, the theoretical model for PCF has been confirmed.

  14. Nonsmooth optimization approaches to VDA of models with on/off parameterizations: Theoretical issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhu; Kamachi, Masafumi; Guangqing, Zhou

    2002-05-01

    Some variational data assimilation problems of time-and space-discrete models with on/ off parameterizations can be regarded as nonsmooth optimization problems. Some theoretical issues related to those problems is systematically addressed. One of the basic concept in nonsmooth optimization is subgradient, a generalized notation of a gradient of the cost function. First it is shown that the concept of subgradient leads to a clear definition of the adjoint variables in the conventional adjoint model at singular points caused by on/ off switches. Using an illustrated example of a multi-layer diffusion model with the convective adjustment, it is proved that the solution of the conventional adjoint model can not be inter-preted as Gateaux derivatives or directional derivatives, at singular points, but can be interpreted as a subgradient of the cost function. Two existing smooth optimization approaches are then reviewed which are used in current data assimi-lation practice. The first approach is the conventional adjoint model plus smooth optimization algorithms. Some conditions under which the approach can converge to the minimal are discussed. Another approach is smoothing and regularization approach, which removes some thresholds in physical parameterizations. Two nonsmooth optimization approaches are also reviewed. One is the subgradient method, which uses the conventional adjoint model. The method is convergent, but very slow. Another approach, the bundle methods are more efficient. The main idea of the bundle method is to use the minimal norm vector of subdifferential, which is the convex hull of all subgradients, as the descent director. However finding all subgradients is very difficult in general. Therefore bundle methods are modified to use only one subgradient that can be calculated by the conventional adjoint model. In order to develop an efficient bundle method, a set-valued adjoint model, as a generalization of the conventional adjoint model, is proposed. It

  15. Logarithmic conformal field theory: a lattice approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gainutdinov, A. M.; Jacobsen, J. L.; Read, N.; Saleur, H.; Vasseur, R.

    2013-12-01

    Logarithmic conformal field theories (LCFT) play a key role, for instance, in the description of critical geometrical problems (percolation, self-avoiding walks, etc), or of critical points in several classes of disordered systems (transition between plateaux in the integer and spin quantum Hall effects). Much progress in their understanding has been obtained by studying algebraic features of their lattice regularizations. For reasons which are not entirely understood, the non-semi-simple associative algebras underlying these lattice models—such as the Temperley-Lieb algebra or the blob algebra—indeed exhibit, in finite size, properties that are in full correspondence with those of their continuum limits. This applies not only to the structure of indecomposable modules, but also to fusion rules, and provides an ‘experimental’ way of measuring couplings, such as the ‘number b’ quantifying the logarithmic coupling of the stress-energy tensor with its partner. Most results obtained so far have concerned boundary LCFTs and the associated indecomposability in the chiral sector. While the bulk case is considerably more involved (mixing in general left and right moving sectors), progress has also recently been made in this direction, uncovering fascinating structures. This study provides a short general review of our work in this area.

  16. Theoretical investigation of alignment-dependent intense-field fragmentation of acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doblhoff-Dier, Katharina; Kitzler, Markus; Gräfe, Stefanie

    2016-07-01

    We analyze the alignment-dependent dissociative and nondissociative ionization of acetylene, C2H2 . Numerical models describing the yield of the singly and doubly charged ions (C2H2+,C2H22 +) and several fragmentation and isomerization channels (C2H++H+ ,CH++CH+ ,CH2++C+ ) as a function of the relative alignment angle between the laser polarization axis and the molecular axis are presented. We apply and compare two different approaches. The first is based on time-dependent density functional theory. The second is a quasi-single-particle approach using the Dyson orbitals. We find good agreement between the results of both methods. A comparison of our theoretical predictions with experimental data allows us to show that the alignment-dependent yield of most reaction channels is described to high accuracy assuming sequential ionization. However, for some of the fragmentation channels, namely, CH++CH+ and C2H++H+ , we find non-negligible influence of recollisional ionization.

  17. A dynamic systems approach to psychotherapy: A meta-theoretical framework for explaining psychotherapy change processes.

    PubMed

    Gelo, Omar Carlo Gioacchino; Salvatore, Sergio

    2016-07-01

    Notwithstanding the many methodological advances made in the field of psychotherapy research, at present a metatheoretical, school-independent framework to explain psychotherapy change processes taking into account their dynamic and complex nature is still lacking. Over the last years, several authors have suggested that a dynamic systems (DS) approach might provide such a framework. In the present paper, we review the main characteristics of a DS approach to psychotherapy. After an overview of the general principles of the DS approach, we describe the extent to which psychotherapy can be considered as a self-organizing open complex system, whose developmental change processes are described in terms of a dialectic dynamics between stability and change over time. Empirical evidence in support of this conceptualization is provided and discussed. Finally, we propose a research design strategy for the empirical investigation of psychotherapy from a DS approach, together with a research case example. We conclude that a DS approach may provide a metatheoretical, school-independent framework allowing us to constructively rethink and enhance the way we conceptualize and empirically investigate psychotherapy. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27177027

  18. MAGNETARS VERSUS HIGH MAGNETIC FIELD PULSARS: A THEORETICAL INTERPRETATION OF THE APPARENT DICHOTOMY

    SciTech Connect

    Pons, Jose A.; Perna, Rosalba

    2011-11-10

    Highly magnetized neutron stars (NSs) are characterized by a bewildering range of astrophysical manifestations. Here, building on our simulations of the evolution of magnetic stresses in the NS crust and its ensuing fractures, we explore in detail, for the middle-aged and old NSs, the dependence of starquake frequency and energetics on the relative strength of the poloidal (B{sub p}) and toroidal (B{sub tor}) components. We find that, for B{sub p} {approx}> 10{sup 14} G, since a strong crustal toroidal field B{sub tor} {approx} B{sub p} is quickly formed on a Hall timescale, the initial toroidal field needs to be B{sub tor} >> B{sub p} to have a clear influence on the outbursting behavior. For initial fields B{sub p} {approx}< 10{sup 14} G, it is very unlikely that a middle-aged (t {approx} 10{sup 5} years) NS shows any bursting activity. This study allows us to solve the apparent puzzle of how NSs with similar dipolar magnetic fields can behave in a remarkably different way: an outbursting 'magnetar' with a high X-ray luminosity, or a quiet, low-luminosity, 'high-B' radio pulsar. As an example, we consider the specific cases of the magnetar 1E 2259+586 and the radio pulsar PSR J1814-1744, which at present have a similar dipolar field {approx}6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} G. We determine for each object an initial magnetic field configuration that reproduces the observed timing parameters at their current age. The same two configurations also account for the differences in quiescent X-ray luminosity and for the 'magnetar/outbursting' behavior of 1E 2259+586 but not of PSR J1814-1744. We further use the theoretically predicted surface temperature distribution to compute the light curve for these objects. In the case of 1E 2259+586, for which data are available, our predicted temperature distribution gives rise to a pulse profile whose double-peaked nature and modulation level are consistent with the observations.

  19. Ultrafast dynamics of finite Hubbard clusters: A stochastic mean-field approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, Denis; Hermanns, S.; Hinz, C. M.; Bonitz, M.

    2014-09-01

    Finite lattice models are a prototype for interacting quantum systems and capture essential properties of condensed matter systems. With the dramatic progress in ultracold atoms in optical lattices, finite fermionic Hubbard systems have become directly accessible in experiments, including their ultrafast dynamics far from equilibrium. Here, we present a theoretical approach that is able to treat these dynamics in any dimension and fully includes inhomogeneity effects. The method consists in stochastic sampling of mean-field trajectories and is—for not too large two-body interaction strength—found to be much more accurate than time-dependent mean-field at the same order of numerical costs. Furthermore, it can well compete with recent nonequilibrium Green function approaches using second-order Born approximation, which are of substantially larger complexity. The performance of the stochastic mean-field approach is demonstrated for Hubbard clusters with up to 512 particles in one, two, and three dimensions.

  20. An effectiveness analysis of healthcare systems using a systems theoretic approach

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Sheuwen; Inder, Kerry

    2009-01-01

    provides a systematic search for improving the impact of accreditation on quality of care and hence on the accreditation/performance correlation. Conclusion There is clear value in developing a theoretical systems approach to achieving quality in health care. The introduction of the systematic surveyor-based search for improvements creates an adaptive-control system to optimize health care quality. It is hoped that these outcomes will stimulate further research in the development of strategic planning using systems theoretic approach for the improvement of quality in health care. PMID:19852837

  1. A theoretical study of the feasibility of acoustical tweezer: Ray acoustics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jungwoo; Shung, Kirk

    2005-04-01

    Optical tweezer has been found to have many biomedical applications in trapping macromolecules and cells. For the trapping mechanism, there has to be a sharp spatial change in axial optical intensity and the particle size must be much greater than the wavelength. Similar phenomenon may exist in acoustics. This work was undertaken to demonstrate theoretically that it is possible to acoustically trap particles near the focal point if certain conditions are met. Acoustic force exerted on fat tissue in ultrasonic fields is analyzed in ray acoustics regime where the wavelength of acoustic beam is much smaller than the size of the particle. In this paper, the analysis is therefore based on the field pattern produced by a strongly focused 100 MHz ultrasonic transducer with Gaussian intensity distribution. The magnitude of force and Fresnel coefficients at various positions are calculated. According to the simulation results, acoustical tweezer works particularly when the beam width at focus is one wavelength and the tolerance of acoustic impedance mismatch between two media lies within 6.7%. [Work supported by NIH Grant P41-EB2182.

  2. Effective field theory: A modern approach to anomalous couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Degrande, Céline; Centre for Particle Physics and Phenomenology , Université Catholique de Louvain, Chemin du Cyclotron 2, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve ; Greiner, Nicolas; Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München ; Kilian, Wolfgang; University of Siegen, Fachbereich Physik, D-57068 Siegen ; Mattelaer, Olivier; Mebane, Harrison; Stelzer, Tim; Willenbrock, Scott; Zhang, Cen; Centre for Particle Physics and Phenomenology , Université Catholique de Louvain, Chemin du Cyclotron 2, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve

    2013-08-15

    We advocate an effective field theory approach to anomalous couplings. The effective field theory approach is the natural way to extend the standard model such that the gauge symmetries are respected. It is general enough to capture any physics beyond the standard model, yet also provides guidance as to the most likely place to see the effects of new physics. The effective field theory approach also clarifies that one need not be concerned with the violation of unitarity in scattering processes at high energy. We apply these ideas to pair production of electroweak vector bosons. -- Highlights: •We discuss the advantages of effective field theories compared to anomalous couplings. •We show that one need not be concerned with unitarity violation at high energy. •We discuss the application of effective field theory to weak boson physics.

  3. Cell death following BNCT: a theoretical approach based on Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Ballarini, F; Bakeine, J; Bortolussi, S; Bruschi, P; Cansolino, L; Clerici, A M; Ferrari, C; Protti, N; Stella, S; Zonta, A; Zonta, C; Altieri, S

    2011-12-01

    In parallel to boron measurements and animal studies, investigations on radiation-induced cell death are also in progress in Pavia, with the aim of better characterisation of the effects of a BNCT treatment down to the cellular level. Such studies are being carried out not only experimentally but also theoretically, based on a mechanistic model and a Monte Carlo code. Such model assumes that: (1) only clustered DNA strand breaks can lead to chromosome aberrations; (2) only chromosome fragments within a certain threshold distance can undergo misrejoining; (3) the so-called "lethal aberrations" (dicentrics, rings and large deletions) lead to cell death. After applying the model to normal cells exposed to monochromatic fields of different radiation types, the irradiation section of the code was purposely extended to mimic the cell exposure to a mixed radiation field produced by the (10)B(n,α) (7)Li reaction, which gives rise to alpha particles and Li ions of short range and high biological effectiveness, and by the (14)N(n,p)(14)C reaction, which produces 0.58 MeV protons. Very good agreement between model predictions and literature data was found for human and animal cells exposed to X- or gamma-rays, protons and alpha particles, thus allowing to validate the model for cell death induced by monochromatic radiation fields. The model predictions showed good agreement also with experimental data obtained by our group exposing DHD cells to thermal neutrons in the TRIGA Mark II reactor of the University of Pavia; this allowed to validate the model also for a BNCT exposure scenario, providing a useful predictive tool to bridge the gap between irradiation and cell death. PMID:21481595

  4. The Electromagnetic Dipole Radiation Field through the Hamiltonian Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likar, A.; Razpet, N.

    2009-01-01

    The dipole radiation from an oscillating charge is treated using the Hamiltonian approach to electrodynamics where the concept of cavity modes plays a central role. We show that the calculation of the radiation field can be obtained in a closed form within this approach by emphasizing the role of coherence between the cavity modes, which is…

  5. Approach to non-equilibrium behaviour in quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kripfganz, J.; Perlt, H.

    1989-05-01

    We study the real-time evolution of quantum field theoretic systems in non-equilibrium situations. Results are presented for the example of scalar /lambda//phi//sup 4/ theory. The degrees of freedom are discretized by studying the system on a torus. Short-wavelength modes are integrated out to one-loop order. The long-wavelength modes considered to be the relevant degrees of freedom are treated by semiclassical phase-space methods. /copyright/ 1989 Academic Press, Inc.

  6. GRAIL gravity field determination using the Celestial Mechanics Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Daniel; Bertone, Stefano; Jäggi, Adrian; Beutler, Gerhard; Mervart, Leos

    2015-11-01

    The NASA mission GRAIL (Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory) inherited its concept from the GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) mission to determine the gravity field of the Moon. We present lunar gravity fields based on the data of GRAIL's primary mission phase. Gravity field recovery is realized in the framework of the Celestial Mechanics Approach, using a development version of the Bernese GNSS Software along with Ka-band range-rate data series as observations and the GNI1B positions provided by NASA JPL as pseudo-observations. By comparing our results with the official level-2 GRAIL gravity field models we show that the lunar gravity field can be recovered with a high quality by adapting the Celestial Mechanics Approach, even when using pre-GRAIL gravity field models as a priori fields and when replacing sophisticated models of non-gravitational accelerations by appropriately spaced pseudo-stochastic pulses (i.e., instantaneous velocity changes). We present and evaluate two lunar gravity field solutions up to degree and order 200 - AIUB-GRL200A and AIUB-GRL200B. While the first solution uses no gravity field information beyond degree 200, the second is obtained by using the official GRAIL field GRGM900C up to degree and order 660 as a priori information. This reduces the omission errors and demonstrates the potential quality of our solution if we resolved the gravity field to higher degree.

  7. A comprehensive theoretical, numerical and experimental approach for crack detection in power plant rotating machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoisser, C. M.; Audebert, S.

    2008-05-01

    In order to describe the state-of-the-art on cracked rotor related problems, the current work presents the comprehensive theoretical, numerical and experimental approach adopted by EDF for crack detection in power plant rotating machinery. The work mainly focuses on the theoretical cracked beam model developed in the past years by S. Andrieux and C. Varé and associates both numerical and experimental aspects related to the crack detection problem in either turboset or turbo pump units. The theoretical part consists of the derivation of a lumped cracked beam model from the three-dimensional formulation of the general problem of elasticity with unilateral contact conditions on the crack lips, valid for any shape and number of cracks in the beam section and extended to cracks not located in a cross-section. This leads to the assessment of the cracked beam rigidity as a function of the rotation angle, in case of pure bending load or bending plus shear load. In this way the function can be implemented in a 1D rotordynamics code. An extension of the cracked beam model taking into account the torsion behaviour is also proposed. It is based on the assumption of full adherence between crack lips, when the crack closes, and on an incremental formulation of deformation energy. An experimental validation has been carried out using different cracked samples, both in static and dynamic configurations, considering one or three elliptic cracks in the same cross-section and helix-shaped cracks. Concerning the static configuration, a good agreement between numerical and experimental results is found. It is shown to be equal to 1% maximal gap of the beam deflection. Concerning the dynamical analysis, the main well-known indicator 2× rev. bending vibration component at half critical speed is approximated at maximum by 18% near the crack position. Our experiments also allowed for the observation of the bending and torsion resonance frequency shifts determined by the extra

  8. Origin of the Zero-Field Splitting in Mononuclear Octahedral Mn(IV) Complexes: A Combined Experimental and Theoretical Investigation.

    PubMed

    Zlatar, Matija; Gruden, Maja; Vassilyeva, Olga Yu; Buvaylo, Elena A; Ponomarev, A N; Zvyagin, S A; Wosnitza, J; Krzystek, J; Garcia-Fernandez, Pablo; Duboc, Carole

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this work was to determine and understand the origin of the electronic properties of Mn(IV) complexes, especially the zero-field splitting (ZFS), through a combined experimental and theoretical investigation on five well-characterized mononuclear octahedral Mn(IV) compounds, with various coordination spheres (N6, N3O3, N2O4 in both trans (trans-N2O4) and cis configurations (cis-N2O4) and O4S2). High-frequency and -field EPR (HFEPR) spectroscopy has been applied to determine the ZFS parameters of two of these compounds, MnL(trans-N2O4) and MnL(O4S2). While at X-band EPR, the axial-component of the ZFS tensor, D, was estimated to be +0.47 cm(-1) for MnL(O4S2), and a D-value of +2.289(5) cm(-1) was determined by HFEPR, which is the largest D-magnitude ever measured for a Mn(IV) complex. A moderate D value of -0.997(6) cm(-1) has been found for MnL(trans-N2O4). Quantum chemical calculations based on two theoretical frameworks (the Density Functional Theory based on a coupled perturbed approach (CP-DFT) and the hybrid Ligand-Field DFT (LF-DFT)) have been performed to define appropriate methodologies to calculate the ZFS tensor for Mn(IV) centers, to predict the orientation of the magnetic axes with respect to the molecular ones, and to define and quantify the physical origin of the different contributions to the ZFS. Except in the case of MnL(trans-N2O4), the experimental and calculated D values are in good agreement, and the sign of D is well predicted, LF-DFT being more satisfactory than CP-DFT. The calculations performed on MnL(cis-N2O4) are consistent with the orientation of the principal anisotropic axis determined by single-crystal EPR, validating the calculated ZFS tensor orientation. The different contributions to D were analyzed demonstrating that the d-d transitions mainly govern D in Mn(IV) ion. However, a deep analysis evidences that many factors enter into the game, explaining why no obvious magnetostructural correlations can be drawn in this

  9. Estimating the local geometry of magnetic field lines with Cluster: a theoretical discussion of physical and geometrical errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanteur, Gerard

    A multi-spacecraft mission with at least four spacecraft, like CLUSTER, MMS, or Cross-Scales, can determine the local geometry of the magnetic field lines when the size of the cluster of spacecraft is small enough compared to the gradient scale lengths of the magnetic field. Shen et al. (2003) and Runov et al. (2003 and 2005) used CLUSTER data to estimate the normal and the curvature of magnetic field lines in the terrestrial current sheet: the two groups used different approaches. Reciprocal vectors of the tetrahedron formed by four spacecraft are a powerful tool for estimating gradients of fields (Chanteur, 1998 and 2000). Considering a thick and planar current sheet model and making use of the statistical properties of the reciprocal vectors allows to discuss theoretically how physical and geometrical errors affect these estimations. References Chanteur, G., Spatial Interpolation for Four Spacecraft: Theory, in Analysis Methods for Multi-Spacecraft Data, ISSI SR-001, pp. 349-369, ESA Publications Division, 1998. Chanteur, G., Accuracy of field gradient estimations by Cluster: Explanation of its dependency upon elongation and planarity of the tetrahedron, pp. 265-268, ESA SP-449, 2000. Runov, A., Nakamura, R., Baumjohann, W., Treumann, R. A., Zhang, T. L., Volwerk, M., V¨r¨s, Z., Balogh, A., Glaßmeier, K.-H., Klecker, B., R‘eme, H., and Kistler, L., Current sheet oo structure near magnetic X-line observed by Cluster, Geophys. Res. Lett., 30, 33-1, 2003. Runov, A., Sergeev, V. A., Nakamura, R., Baumjohann, W., Apatenkov, S., Asano, Y., Takada, T., Volwerk, M.,V¨r¨s, Z., Zhang, T. L., Sauvaud, J.-A., R‘eme, H., and Balogh, A., Local oo structure of the magnetotail current sheet: 2001 Cluster observations, Ann. Geophys., 24, 247-262, 2006. Shen, C., Li, X., Dunlop, M., Liu, Z. X., Balogh, A., Baker, D. N., Hapgood, M., and Wang, X., Analyses on the geometrical structure of magnetic field in the current sheet based on cluster measurements, J. Geophys. Res

  10. Network-Based Enriched Gene Subnetwork Identification: A Game-Theoretic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Razi, Abolfazl; Afghah, Fatemeh; Singh, Salendra; Varadan, Vinay

    2016-01-01

    Identifying subsets of genes that jointly mediate cancer etiology, progression, or therapy response remains a challenging problem due to the complexity and heterogeneity in cancer biology, a problem further exacerbated by the relatively small number of cancer samples profiled as compared with the sheer number of potential molecular factors involved. Pure data-driven methods that merely rely on multiomics data have been successful in discovering potentially functional genes but suffer from high false-positive rates and tend to report subsets of genes whose biological interrelationships are unclear. Recently, integrative data-driven models have been developed to integrate multiomics data with signaling pathway networks in order to identify pathways associated with clinical or biological phenotypes. However, these approaches suffer from an important drawback of being restricted to previously discovered pathway structures and miss novel genomic interactions as well as potential crosstalk among the pathways. In this article, we propose a novel coalition-based game-theoretic approach to overcome the challenge of identifying biologically relevant gene subnetworks associated with disease phenotypes. The algorithm starts from a set of seed genes and traverses a protein–protein interaction network to identify modulated subnetworks. The optimal set of modulated subnetworks is identified using Shapley value that accounts for both individual and collective utility of the subnetwork of genes. The algorithm is applied to two illustrative applications, including the identification of subnetworks associated with (i) disease progression risk in response to platinum-based therapy in ovarian cancer and (ii) immune infiltration in triple-negative breast cancer. The results demonstrate an improved predictive power of the proposed method when compared with state-of-the-art feature selection methods, with the added advantage of identifying novel potentially functional gene subnetworks