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Sample records for filarial nematode brugia

  1. Cloning and characterization of two nuclear receptors from the filarial nematode Brugia pahangi.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, J; Devaney, E

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) encompass a superfamily of cytoplasmic/nuclear localized receptors that on ligand binding (or by phosphorylation) directly regulate the transcription of target genes. NRs are involved in many developmental processes, including moulting in insects and dauer larva formation in Caenorhabditis elegans. Here we report the isolation of two genes related to NRs from the filarial nematode Brugia pahangi. Bp-nhr-1 is a member of the NGF1-B subfamily of NRs and is expressed at very low levels in post-infective larval stage 3 (L3) after their transmission to the mammalian host. The second gene, Bp-nhr-2, is related to XR78E/F of Drosophila, a gene involved in the ecdysone response, over the region of its DNA-binding domain. cDNA and genomic clones have been isolated that correspond to Bp-nhr-2. The most striking feature of the encoded protein is that, although there is a DNA-binding domain similar to that of other NRs, the ligand-binding domain is absent. To investigate the pattern of transcription of Bp-nhr-2 in the filarial life cycle, semi-quantitative reverse-transcriptase-mediated PCR was performed; this analysis demonstrated that the gene is expressed in early stages after infection and in the adult and microfilariae, and is up-regulated just before the moult between L3 and L4 but is not expressed during the moult between L4 and adult. Antibodies raised against a peptide corresponding to the transactivation domain of Bp-nhr-2 demonstrate that the protein is expressed in microfilariae and adult samples and that another cross-reactive protein is expressed in these life-cycle stages. PMID:10548557

  2. Cytokine production in BALB/c mice immunized with radiation attenuated third stage larvae of the filarial nematode, Brugia pahangi

    SciTech Connect

    Bancroft, A.J.; Devaney, E. ); Grencis, R.K.; Else, K.J. )

    1993-02-15

    BALB/c mice immunized with radiation-attenuated third stage larvae of the filarial nematode Brugia pahangi are strongly immune to challenge infection. Investigation of the profile of cytokines secreted by spleen cells from immune mice stimulated in vitro with either parasite Ag or with Con A revealed high levels of IL-5 and IL-9 and moderate levels of IL-4. In contrast, secretion of IFN-[gamma] by spleen cells from immune animals was negligible. Spleen cells from control mice secreted low levels of all cytokines assayed. Levels of parasite-specific IgE were significantly elevated in immune animals and a peripheral blood eosinophilia was observed, which exhibited a biphasic distribution. Our results are consistent with the preferential expansion of Th2 cells in immune animals and provide the basis for dissecting the means by which radiation-attenuated larvae of filarial nematodes stimulate immunity. 5l refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Purification and characterization of a novel transglutaminase from filarial nematode Brugia malayi.

    PubMed

    Singh, R N; Mehta, K

    1994-10-15

    A transglutaminase (pTGase) was purified from filarial nematode, Brugia malayi. The steps used for purification were thermoprecipitation, ammonium sulfate precipitation, gel filtration on Superose 12 HR 10/30, ion-exchange chromatography on a Mono-Q column and further gel filtration on Superose 12 HR 10/30. The last step yielded an electrophoretically homogenous enzyme protein with 2200-fold purification and a reproducible yield of approximately 20%. The purified enzyme had a molecular mass of 56 kDa, specific activity of 2.25 U/mg protein and an isoelectric point of 7.2. The enzyme was active in the basic pH range with an optimum activity at pH 8.5. The pTGase activity was Ca(2+)-dependent and was inhibited by ammonia, primary amines, EDTA, and -SH group blocking reagents. The enzyme activity was also inhibited by high salt (NaCl and KCl) concentrations, detergents, metal ions, and organic solvents. Ampholine (pH 6-8) at 1% (by vol.) caused about 20% inhibition of pTGase activity but at 3% (by vol.) the inhibition increased up to 80%. Similarly, the micromolar concentrations of GTP inhibited the enzyme activity only moderately but at millimolar concentration a significant inhibition was observed. The stability of the pTGase was not affected by 0.1% SDS or other physical parameters such as freezing and thawing. Further, the pTGase was found to be highly thermostable (stable at 60 degrees C for several hours) with optimum activity observed at 55 degrees C. The distinct substrate specificity, unique N-terminal sequence along with the other physico-chemical properties studied, suggested that pTGase is a novel member of transglutaminase family. PMID:7957177

  4. In vitro flubendazole-induced damage to vital tissues in adult females of the filarial nematode Brugia malayi.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Maeghan; Geary, James F; Agnew, Dalen W; Mackenzie, Charles D; Geary, Timothy G

    2015-12-01

    The use of a microfilaricidal drug for the control of onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis necessitates prolonged yearly dosing. Prospects for elimination or eradication of these diseases would be enhanced by availability of a macrofilaricidal drug. Flubendazole (FLBZ), a benzimidazole anthelmintic, is an appealing candidate macrofilaricide. FLBZ has demonstrated profound and potent macrofilaricidal effects in a number of experimental filarial rodent models and one human trial. Unfortunately, FLBZ was deemed unsatisfactory for use in mass drug administration (MDA) campaigns due to its markedly limited oral bioavailability. However, a new formulation that provided sufficient bioavailability following oral administration could render FLBZ an effective treatment for onchocerciasis and LF. This study characterized the effects of FLBZ and its reduced metabolite (FLBZ-R) on filarial nematodes in vitro to determine the exposure profile which results in demonstrable damage. Adult female Brugia malayi were exposed to varying concentrations of FLBZ or FLBZ-R (100 nM-10 μM) for up to five days, after which worms were fixed for histology. Morphological damage following exposure to FLBZ was observed prominently in the hypodermis and developing embryos at concentrations as low as 100 nM following 24 h exposure. The results indicate that damage to tissues required for reproduction and survival can be achieved at pharmacologically relevant concentrations. PMID:26288741

  5. In vitro flubendazole-induced damage to vital tissues in adult females of the filarial nematode Brugia malayi

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, Maeghan; Geary, James F.; Agnew, Dalen W.; Mackenzie, Charles D.; Geary, Timothy G.

    2015-01-01

    The use of a microfilaricidal drug for the control of onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis necessitates prolonged yearly dosing. Prospects for elimination or eradication of these diseases would be enhanced by availability of a macrofilaricidal drug. Flubendazole (FLBZ), a benzimidazole anthelmintic, is an appealing candidate macrofilaricide. FLBZ has demonstrated profound and potent macrofilaricidal effects in a number of experimental filarial rodent models and one human trial. Unfortunately, FLBZ was deemed unsatisfactory for use in mass drug administration (MDA) campaigns due to its markedly limited oral bioavailability. However, a new formulation that provided sufficient bioavailability following oral administration could render FLBZ an effective treatment for onchocerciasis and LF. This study characterized the effects of FLBZ and its reduced metabolite (FLBZ-R) on filarial nematodes in vitro to determine the exposure profile which results in demonstrable damage. Adult female Brugia malayi were exposed to varying concentrations of FLBZ or FLBZ-R (100 nM–10 μM) for up to five days, after which worms were fixed for histology. Morphological damage following exposure to FLBZ was observed prominently in the hypodermis and developing embryos at concentrations as low as 100 nM following 24 h exposure. The results indicate that damage to tissues required for reproduction and survival can be achieved at pharmacologically relevant concentrations. PMID:26288741

  6. Release of Small RNA-containing Exosome-like Vesicles from the Human Filarial Parasite Brugia malayi

    PubMed Central

    Agbedanu, Prince N; Harischandra, Hiruni; Moorhead, Andrew R; Day, Tim A; Bartholomay, Lyric C; Kimber, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis (LF) is a socio-economically devastating mosquito-borne Neglected Tropical Disease caused by parasitic filarial nematodes. The interaction between the parasite and host, both mosquito and human, during infection, development and persistence is dynamic and delicately balanced. Manipulation of this interface to the detriment of the parasite is a promising potential avenue to develop disease therapies but is prevented by our very limited understanding of the host-parasite relationship. Exosomes are bioactive small vesicles (30–120 nm) secreted by a wide range of cell types and involved in a wide range of physiological processes. Here, we report the identification and partial characterization of exosome-like vesicles (ELVs) released from the infective L3 stage of the human filarial parasite Brugia malayi. Exosome-like vesicles were isolated from parasites in culture media and electron microscopy and nanoparticle tracking analysis were used to confirm that vesicles produced by juvenile B. malayi are exosome-like based on size and morphology. We show that loss of parasite viability correlates with a time-dependent decay in vesicle size specificity and rate of release. The protein cargo of these vesicles is shown to include common exosomal protein markers and putative effector proteins. These Brugia-derived vesicles contain small RNA species that include microRNAs with host homology, suggesting a potential role in host manipulation. Confocal microscopy shows J774A.1, a murine macrophage cell line, internalize purified ELVs, and we demonstrate that these ELVs effectively stimulate a classically activated macrophage phenotype in J774A.1. To our knowledge, this is the first report of exosome-like vesicle release by a human parasitic nematode and our data suggest a novel mechanism by which human parasitic nematodes may actively direct the host responses to infection. Further interrogation of the makeup and function of these bioactive vesicles could seed

  7. Molecular epidemiology, phylogeny and evolution of the filarial nematode Wuchereria bancrofti.

    PubMed

    Small, Scott T; Tisch, Daniel J; Zimmerman, Peter A

    2014-12-01

    Wuchereria bancrofti (Wb) is the most widely distributed of the three nematodes known to cause lymphatic filariasis (LF), the other two being Brugia malayi and Brugia timori. Current tools available to monitor LF are limited to diagnostic tests targeting DNA repeats, filarial antigens, and anti-filarial antibodies. While these tools are useful for detection and surveillance, elimination programs have yet to take full advantage of molecular typing for inferring infection history, strain fingerprinting, and evolution. To date, molecular typing approaches have included whole mitochondrial genomes, genotyping, targeted sequencing, and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPDs). These studies have revealed much about Wb biology. For example, in one study in Papua New Guinea researchers identified 5 major strains that were widespread and many minor strains some of which exhibit geographic stratification. Genome data, while rare, has been utilized to reconstruct evolutionary relationships among taxa of the Onchocercidae (the clade of filarial nematodes) and identify gene synteny. Their phylogeny reveals that speciation from the common ancestor of both B. malayi and Wb occurred around 5-6 millions years ago with shared ancestry to other filarial nematodes as recent as 15 million years ago. These discoveries hold promise for gene discovery and identifying drug targets in species that are more amenable to in vivo experiments. Continued technological developments in whole genome sequencing and data analysis will likely replace many other forms of molecular typing, multiplying the amount of data available on population structure, genetic diversity, and phylogenetics. Once widely available, the addition of population genetic data from genomic studies should hasten the elimination of LF parasites like Wb. Infectious disease control programs have benefited greatly from population genetics data and recently from population genomics data. However, while there is currently a surplus

  8. Bacterial endosymbionts of plant-parasitic nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several groups of bacteria have been reported as endosymbionts of various orders of nematodes including the filarial nematodes (Brugia malayi, Wucheria bancrofti and Onchocerca volvulus (Spiruida)), the entomopathogenic nematodes (Steinernema spp., and Heterorhabditis spp. (Rhabditida)), and plant-p...

  9. Gender-Associated Genes in Filarial Nematodes Are Important for Reproduction and Potential Intervention Targets

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ben-Wen; Rush, Amy C.; Jiang, Dao-Jun; Mitreva, Makedonka; Abubucker, Sahar; Weil, Gary J.

    2011-01-01

    Background A better understanding of reproductive processes in parasitic nematodes may lead to development of new anthelmintics and control strategies for combating disabling and disfiguring neglected tropical diseases such as lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis. Transcriptomatic analysis has provided important new insights into mechanisms of reproduction and development in other invertebrates. We have performed the first genome-wide analysis of gender-associated (GA) gene expression in a filarial nematode to improve understanding of key reproductive processes in these parasites. Methodology/Principal Findings The Version 2 Filarial Microarray with 18,104 elements representing ∼85% of the filarial genome was used to identify GA gene transcripts in adult Brugia malayi worms. Approximately 19% of 14,293 genes were identified as GA genes. Many GA genes have potential Caenorhabditis elegans homologues annotated as germline-, oogenesis-, spermatogenesis-, and early embryogenesis- enriched. The potential C. elegans homologues of the filarial GA genes have a higher frequency of severe RNAi phenotypes (such as lethal and sterility) than other C. elegans genes. Molecular functions and biological processes associated with GA genes were gender-segregated. Peptidase, ligase, transferase, regulator activity for kinase and transcription, and rRNA and lipid binding were associated with female GA genes. In contrast, catalytic activity from kinase, ATP, and carbohydrate binding were associated with male GA genes. Cell cycle, transcription, translation, and biological regulation were increased in females, whereas metabolic processes of phosphate and carbohydrate metabolism, energy generation, and cell communication were increased in males. Significantly enriched pathways in females were associated with cell growth and protein synthesis, whereas metabolic pathways such as pentose phosphate and energy production pathways were enriched in males. There were also striking gender

  10. Phenotypic and molecular analysis of the effect of 20-hydroxyecdysone on the human filarial parasite Brugia malayi.

    PubMed

    Mhashilkar, Amruta S; Adapa, Swamy R; Jiang, Rays H Y; Williams, Steven A; Zaky, Weam; Slatko, Barton E; Luck, Ashley N; Moorhead, Andrew R; Unnasch, Thomas R

    2016-05-01

    A homologue of the ecdysone receptor has been identified and shown to be responsive to 20-hydroxyecdysone in Brugia malayi. However, the role of this master regulator of insect development has not been delineated in filarial nematodes. Gravid adult female B. malayi cultured in the presence of 20-hydroxyecdysone produced significantly more microfilariae and abortive immature progeny than control worms, implicating the ecdysone receptor in regulation of embryogenesis and microfilarial development. Transcriptome analyses identified 30 genes whose expression was significantly up-regulated in 20-hydroxyecdysone-treated parasites compared with untreated controls. Of these, 18% were identified to be regulating transcription. A comparative proteomic analysis revealed 932 proteins to be present in greater amounts in extracts of 20-hydroxyecdysone-treated adult females than in extracts prepared from worms cultured in the absence of the hormone. Of the proteins exhibiting a greater than two-fold difference in the 20-hydroxyecdysone-treated versus untreated parasite extracts, 16% were involved in transcriptional regulation. RNA interference (RNAi) phenotype analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans orthologs revealed that phenotypes involved in developmental processes associated with embryogenesis were significantly over-represented in the transcripts and proteins that were up-regulated by exposure to 20-hydroxyecdysone. Taken together, the transcriptomic, proteomic and phenotypic data suggest that the filarial ecdysone receptor may play a role analogous to that in insects, where it serves as a regulator of egg development. PMID:26896576

  11. The Wolbachia Genome of Brugia malayi: Endosymbiont Evolution within a Human Pathogenic Nematode

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Complete genome DNA sequence and analysis is presented for Wolbachia, the obligate alpha-proteobacterial endosymbiont required for fertility and survival of the human filarial parasitic nematode Brugia malayi. Although, quantitatively, the genome is even more degraded than those of closely related Rickettsia species, Wolbachia has retained more intact metabolic pathways. The ability to provide riboflavin, flavin adenine dinucleotide, heme, and nucleotides is likely to be Wolbachia's principal contribution to the mutualistic relationship, whereas the host nematode likely supplies amino acids required for Wolbachia growth. Genome comparison of the Wolbachia endosymbiont of B. malayi (wBm) with the Wolbachia endosymbiont of Drosophila melanogaster (wMel) shows that they share similar metabolic trends, although their genomes show a high degree of genome shuffling. In contrast to wMel, wBm contains no prophage and has a reduced level of repeated DNA. Both Wolbachia have lost a considerable number of membrane biogenesis genes that apparently make them unable to synthesize lipid A, the usual component of proteobacterial membranes. However, differences in their peptidoglycan structures may reflect the mutualistic lifestyle of wBm in contrast to the parasitic lifestyle of wMel. The smaller genome size of wBm, relative to wMel, may reflect the loss of genes required for infecting host cells and avoiding host defense systems. Analysis of this first sequenced endosymbiont genome from a filarial nematode provides insight into endosymbiont evolution and additionally provides new potential targets for elimination of cutaneous and lymphatic human filarial disease. PMID:15780005

  12. Molecular epidemiology, phylogeny and evolution of the filarial nematode Wuchereria bancrofti

    PubMed Central

    Small, Scott T.; Tisch, Daniel J.; Zimmerman, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Wuchereria bancrofti (Wb) is the most widely distributed of the three nematodes known to cause lymphatic filariasis (LF), the other two being Brugia malayi and B. timori. Current tools available to monitor LF are limited to diagnostic tests targeting DNA repeats, filarial antigens, and anti-filarial antibodies. While these tools are useful for detection and surveillance, elimination programs have yet to take full advantage of molecular typing for inferring infection history, strain fingerprinting, and evolution. To date, molecular typing approaches have included whole mitochondrial genomes, genotyping, targeted sequencing, and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPDs). These studies have revealed much about Wb biology. For example, in one study in Papua New Guinea researchers identified 5 major strains that were widespread and many minor strains some of which exhibit geographic stratification. Genome data, while rare, has been utilized to reconstruct evolutionary relationships among taxa of the Onchocercidae (the clade of filarial nematodes) and identify gene synteny. Their phylogeny reveals that speciation from the common ancestor of both B. malayi and Wb occurred around 5–6 millions years ago with shared ancestry to other filarial nematodes as recent as 15 million years ago. These discoveries hold promise for gene discovery and identifying drug targets in species that are more amenable to in vivo experiments. Continued technological developments in whole genome sequencing and data analysis will likely replace many other forms of molecular typing, multiplying the amount of data available on population structure, genetic diversity, and phylogenetics. Once widely available, the addition of population genetic data from genomic studies should hasten the elimination of LF parasites like Wb. PMID:25176600

  13. Mining Predicted Essential Genes of Brugia malayi for Nematode Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanjay; Chaudhary, Kshitiz; Foster, Jeremy M.; Novelli, Jacopo F.; Zhang, Yinhua; Wang, Shiliang; Spiro, David; Ghedin, Elodie; Carlow, Clotilde K. S.

    2007-01-01

    We report results from the first genome-wide application of a rational drug target selection methodology to a metazoan pathogen genome, the completed draft sequence of Brugia malayi, a parasitic nematode responsible for human lymphatic filariasis. More than 1.5 billion people worldwide are at risk of contracting lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis, a related filarial disease. Drug treatments for filariasis have not changed significantly in over 20 years, and with the risk of resistance rising, there is an urgent need for the development of new anti-filarial drug therapies. The recent publication of the draft genomic sequence for B. malayi enables a genome-wide search for new drug targets. However, there is no functional genomics data in B. malayi to guide the selection of potential drug targets. To circumvent this problem, we have utilized the free-living model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a surrogate for B. malayi. Sequence comparisons between the two genomes allow us to map C. elegans orthologs to B. malayi genes. Using these orthology mappings and by incorporating the extensive genomic and functional genomic data, including genome-wide RNAi screens, that already exist for C. elegans, we identify potentially essential genes in B. malayi. Further incorporation of human host genome sequence data and a custom algorithm for prioritization enables us to collect and rank nearly 600 drug target candidates. Previously identified potential drug targets cluster near the top of our prioritized list, lending credibility to our methodology. Over-represented Gene Ontology terms, predicted InterPro domains, and RNAi phenotypes of C. elegans orthologs associated with the potential target pool are identified. By virtue of the selection procedure, the potential B. malayi drug targets highlight components of key processes in nematode biology such as central metabolism, molting and regulation of gene expression. PMID:18000556

  14. How do the macrocyclic lactones kill filarial nematode larvae?

    PubMed

    Wolstenholme, Adrian J; Maclean, Mary J; Coates, Ruby; McCoy, Ciaran J; Reaves, Barbara J

    2016-09-01

    The macrocyclic lactones (MLs) are one of the few classes of drug used in the control of the human filarial infections, onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis, and the only one used to prevent heartworm disease in dogs and cats. Despite their importance in preventing filarial diseases, the way in which the MLs work against these parasites is unclear. In vitro measurements of nematode motility have revealed a large discrepancy between the maximum plasma concentrations achieved after drug administration and the amounts required to paralyze worms. Recent evidence has shed new light on the likely functions of the ML target, glutamate-gated chloride channels, in filarial nematodes and supports the hypothesis that the rapid clearance of microfilariae that follows treatment involves the host immune system. PMID:27279086

  15. Diversity and Expression of MicroRNAs in the Filarial Parasite, Brugia malayi

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Catherine B.; Gu, Weifeng; Kumar, Sanjay; Jin, Jingmin; Davis, Paul J.; Bauche, David; McReynolds, Larry A.

    2014-01-01

    Human filarial parasites infect an estimated 120 million people in 80 countries worldwide causing blindness and the gross disfigurement of limbs and genitals. An understanding of RNA-mediated regulatory pathways in these parasites may open new avenues for treatment. Toward this goal, small RNAs from Brugia malayi adult females, males and microfilariae were cloned for deep-sequencing. From ∼30 million sequencing reads, 145 miRNAs were identified in the B. malayi genome. Some microRNAs were validated using the p19 RNA binding protein and qPCR. B. malayi miRNAs segregate into 99 families each defined by a unique seed sequence. Sixty-one of the miRNA families are highly conserved with homologues in arthropods, vertebrates and helminths. Of those miRNAs not highly conserved, homologues of 20 B. malayi miRNA families were found in vertebrates. Nine B. malayi miRNA families appear to be filarial-specific as orthologues were not found in other organisms. The miR-2 family is the largest in B. malayi with 11 members. Analysis of the sequences shows that six members result from a recent expansion of the family. Library comparisons found that 1/3 of the B. malayi miRNAs are differentially expressed. For example, miR-71 is 5–7X more highly expressed in microfilariae than adults. Studies suggest that in C.elegans, miR-71 may enhance longevity by targeting the DAF-2 pathway. Characterization of B. malayi miRNAs and their targets will enhance our understanding of their regulatory pathways in filariads and aid in the search for novel therapeutics. PMID:24824352

  16. "Filarial dance sign" real-time ultrasound diagnosis of filarial oophoritis.

    PubMed

    Panditi, Surekha; Shelke, Ashwini G; Thummalakunta, Laxmi Narasimha Praveen

    2016-10-01

    Filariasis is a parasitic disease caused by Filarial nematodes (Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi, and Brugia timori) that commonly causes lymphatic obstruction resulting in edema and increase in the size of the affected organ. Filariasis is diagnosed by identifying microfilariae on Giemsa stain. The immunochromatographic card test is diagnostic. Ultrasound is the imaging modality of choice for detecting adult filarial worms/microfilaria in the lymphatic system, which are responsible for the classic "filarial dance sign" caused by twirling movements of the microfilariae. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Ultrasound 44:500-501, 2016. PMID:27130361

  17. Moxidectin causes adult worm mortality of human lymphatic filarial parasite Brugia malayi in rodent models.

    PubMed

    Verma, Meenakshi; Pathak, Manisha; Shahab, Mohd; Singh, Kavita; Mitra, Kalyan; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2014-12-01

    Moxidectin is a macrocyclic lactone belonging to milbemycin family closely related to ivermectin and is currently progressing towards Phase III clinical trial against human infection with the filaria Onchocerca volvulus (Leuckart, 1894). There is a single report on the microfilaricidal and embryostatic activity of moxidectin in case of the human lymphatic filarial parasite Brugia malayi (Brug, 1927) in Mastomys coucha (Smith) but without any adulticidal action. In the present study, the in vitro and in vivo antifilarial efficacy of moxidectin was evaluated on, B. malayi. In vitro moxidectin showed 100% reduction in adult female worm motility at 0.6 μM concentration within 7 days with 68% inhibition in the reduction of MTT (3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide dye) (which is used to detect viability of worms). A 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of moxidectin for adult female parasite was 0.242 μM, for male worm 0.186 μM and for microfilaria IC50 was 0.813 μM. In adult B. malayi-transplanted primary screening model (Meriones unguiculatus Milne-Edwards), moxidectin at a single optimal dose of 20 mg/kg by oral and subcutaneous route was found effective on both adult parasites and microfilariae. In secondary screening (M coucha, subcutaneously inoculated with infective larvae), moxidectin at the same dose by subcutaneous route brought about death of 49% of adult worms besides causing sterilisation in 54% of the recovered live female worms. The treated animals exhibited a continuous and sustained reduction in peripheral blood microfilaraemia throughout the observation period of 90 days. The mechanism of action of moxidectin is suggested to be similar to avermectins. The in silico studies were also designed to explore the interaction of moxidectin with glutamate-gated chloride channels of B. malayi. The docking results revealed a close interaction of moxidectin with various GluCl ligand sites of B. malayi. PMID:25651699

  18. Brugia lepori sp. n. (Filarioidea: Onchocercidae) from rabbits (Sylvilagus aquaticus, S. floridanus) in Louisiana.

    PubMed

    Eberhard, M L

    1984-08-01

    Brugia lepori sp. n., a filarial nematode from the abdominal lymphatics and subcutaneous tissues of rabbits (Sylvilagus aquaticus, S. floridanus), from St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana, is described. Brugia lepori is of moderate size (males 12 to 19 mm, females 39 to 45 mm) and within the genus most closely resembles Brugia beaveri of the raccoon, from which it can be distinguished by its larger size, smaller spicules, and smaller microfilaria which has a shorter cephalic space. Brugia lepori is only the second species of Brugia described from North America and the third species reported from the Western Hemisphere. PMID:6502360

  19. Discovery of filarial nematode DNA in Amblyomma americanum in Northern Virginia.

    PubMed

    Henning, Tyler C; Orr, John M; Smith, Joshua D; Arias, Jorge R; Rasgon, Jason L; Norris, Douglas E

    2016-03-01

    Ticks collected in 2011 were screened for the presence of filarial nematode genetic material, and positive samples were sequenced for analysis. Monanema-like filarial nematode DNA was recently discovered in Amblyomma americanum in northern Virginia, marking the first time genetic material from this parasite has been discovered in ticks in the state. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that this material was directly related to a previously discovered filarial nematode in A. americanum populations in Maryland as well as recently identified parasites in Ixodes scapularis from southern Connecticut. Further study is warranted to visually confirm the presence of these nematodes, characterize their distribution, and determine if these ticks are intermediate hosts. PMID:26707835

  20. Discovery of filarial nematode DNA in Amblyomma americanum in Northern Virginia

    PubMed Central

    Henning, Tyler C.; Orr, John M.; Smith, Joshua D.; Arias, Jorge R.; Rasgon, Jason L.; Norris, Douglas E.

    2016-01-01

    Ticks collected in 2011 were screened for the presence of filarial nematode genetic material, and positive samples were sequenced for analysis. Monanema-like filarial nematode DNA was recently discovered in Amblyomma americanum in northern Virginia, marking the first time genetic material from this parasite has been discovered in ticks in the state. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that this material was directly related to a previously discovered filarial nematode in A. americanum populations in Maryland as well as recently identified parasites in Ixodes scapularis from southern Connecticut. Further study is warranted to visually confirm the presence of these nematodes, characterize their distribution, and determine if these ticks are intermediate hosts. PMID:26707835

  1. Comparative Analysis of the Secretome from a Model Filarial Nematode (Litomosoides sigmodontis) Reveals Maximal Diversity in Gravid Female Parasites*

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Stuart D.; Babayan, Simon A.; Lhermitte-Vallarino, Nathaly; Gray, Nick; Xia, Dong; Martin, Coralie; Kumar, Sujai; Taylor, David W.; Blaxter, Mark L.; Wastling, Jonathan M.; Makepeace, Benjamin L.

    2014-01-01

    Filarial nematodes (superfamily Filarioidea) are responsible for an annual global health burden of ∼6.3 million disability-adjusted life-years, which represents the greatest single component of morbidity attributable to helminths affecting humans. No vaccine exists for the major filarial diseases, lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis; in part because research on protective immunity against filariae has been constrained by the inability of the human-parasitic species to complete their lifecycles in laboratory mice. However, the rodent filaria Litomosoides sigmodontis has become a popular experimental model, as BALB/c mice are fully permissive for its development and reproduction. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of excretory-secretory products from L. sigmodontis across five lifecycle stages and identifications of host proteins associated with first-stage larvae (microfilariae) in the blood. Applying intensity-based quantification, we determined the abundance of 302 unique excretory-secretory proteins, of which 64.6% were present in quantifiable amounts only from gravid adult female nematodes. This lifecycle stage, together with immature microfilariae, released four proteins that have not previously been evaluated as vaccine candidates: a predicted 28.5 kDa filaria-specific protein, a zonadhesin and SCO-spondin-like protein, a vitellogenin, and a protein containing six metridin-like ShK toxin domains. Female nematodes also released two proteins derived from the obligate Wolbachia symbiont. Notably, excretory-secretory products from all parasite stages contained several uncharacterized members of the transthyretin-like protein family. Furthermore, biotin labeling revealed that redox proteins and enzymes involved in purinergic signaling were enriched on the adult nematode cuticle. Comparison of the L. sigmodontis adult secretome with that of the human-infective filarial nematode Brugia malayi (reported previously in three independent published studies

  2. Comparative analysis of the secretome from a model filarial nematode (Litomosoides sigmodontis) reveals maximal diversity in gravid female parasites.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Stuart D; Babayan, Simon A; Lhermitte-Vallarino, Nathaly; Gray, Nick; Xia, Dong; Martin, Coralie; Kumar, Sujai; Taylor, David W; Blaxter, Mark L; Wastling, Jonathan M; Makepeace, Benjamin L

    2014-10-01

    Filarial nematodes (superfamily Filarioidea) are responsible for an annual global health burden of ∼6.3 million disability-adjusted life-years, which represents the greatest single component of morbidity attributable to helminths affecting humans. No vaccine exists for the major filarial diseases, lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis; in part because research on protective immunity against filariae has been constrained by the inability of the human-parasitic species to complete their lifecycles in laboratory mice. However, the rodent filaria Litomosoides sigmodontis has become a popular experimental model, as BALB/c mice are fully permissive for its development and reproduction. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of excretory-secretory products from L. sigmodontis across five lifecycle stages and identifications of host proteins associated with first-stage larvae (microfilariae) in the blood. Applying intensity-based quantification, we determined the abundance of 302 unique excretory-secretory proteins, of which 64.6% were present in quantifiable amounts only from gravid adult female nematodes. This lifecycle stage, together with immature microfilariae, released four proteins that have not previously been evaluated as vaccine candidates: a predicted 28.5 kDa filaria-specific protein, a zonadhesin and SCO-spondin-like protein, a vitellogenin, and a protein containing six metridin-like ShK toxin domains. Female nematodes also released two proteins derived from the obligate Wolbachia symbiont. Notably, excretory-secretory products from all parasite stages contained several uncharacterized members of the transthyretin-like protein family. Furthermore, biotin labeling revealed that redox proteins and enzymes involved in purinergic signaling were enriched on the adult nematode cuticle. Comparison of the L. sigmodontis adult secretome with that of the human-infective filarial nematode Brugia malayi (reported previously in three independent published studies

  3. Filarial and Wolbachia genomics.

    PubMed

    Scott, A L; Ghedin, E; Nutman, T B; McReynolds, L A; Poole, C B; Slatko, B E; Foster, J M

    2012-01-01

    Filarial nematode parasites, the causative agents for a spectrum of acute and chronic diseases including lymphatic filariasis and river blindness, threaten the well-being and livelihood of hundreds of millions of people in the developing regions of the world. The 2007 publication on a draft assembly of the 95-Mb genome of the human filarial parasite Brugia malayi- representing the first helminth parasite genome to be sequenced - has been followed in rapid succession by projects that have resulted in the genome sequencing of six additional filarial species, seven nonfilarial nematode parasites of animals and nearly 30 plant parasitic and free-living species. Parallel to the genomic sequencing, transcriptomic and proteomic projects have facilitated genome annotation, expanded our understanding of stage-associated gene expression and provided a first look at the role of epigenetic regulation of filarial genomes through microRNAs. The expansion in filarial genomics will also provide a significant enrichment in our knowledge of the diversity and variability in the genomes of the endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia leading to a better understanding of the genetic principles that govern filarial-Wolbachia mutualism. The goal here is to provide an overview of the trends and advances in filarial and Wolbachia genomics. PMID:22098559

  4. The genome of Brugia malayi - all worms are not created equal.

    PubMed

    Scott, Alan L; Ghedin, Elodie

    2009-03-01

    Filarial nematode parasites, the causative agents of elephantiasis and river blindness, undermine the livelihoods of over one hundred million people in the developing world. Recently, the Filarial Genome Project reported the draft sequence of the ~95 Mb genome of the human filarial parasite Brugia malayi - the first parasitic nematode genome to be sequenced. Comparative genome analysis with the prevailing model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans revealed similarities and differences in genome structure and organization that will prove useful as additional nematode genomes are completed. The Brugia genome provides the first opportunity to comprehensively compare the full gene repertoire of a free-living nematode species and one that has evolved as a human pathogen. The Brugia genome also provides an opportunity to gain insight into genetic basis for mutualism, as Brugia, like a majority of filarial species, harbors an endosybiotic bacterium (Wolbachia). The goal of this review is to provide an overview of the results of genomic analysis and how these observations provide new insights into the biology of filarial species. PMID:18952001

  5. Anti-filarial Activity of Antibiotic Therapy Is Due to Extensive Apoptosis after Wolbachia Depletion from Filarial Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, William; Taylor, Mark J.

    2011-01-01

    Filarial nematodes maintain a mutualistic relationship with the endosymbiont Wolbachia. Depletion of Wolbachia produces profound defects in nematode development, fertility and viability and thus has great promise as a novel approach for treating filarial diseases. However, little is known concerning the basis for this mutualistic relationship. Here we demonstrate using whole mount confocal microscopy that an immediate response to Wolbachia depletion is extensive apoptosis in the adult germline, and in the somatic cells of the embryos, microfilariae and fourth-stage larvae (L4). Surprisingly, apoptosis occurs in the majority of embryonic cells that had not been infected prior to antibiotic treatment. In addition, no apoptosis occurs in the hypodermal chords, which are populated with large numbers of Wolbachia, although disruption of the hypodermal cytoskeleton occurs following their depletion. Thus, the induction of apoptosis upon Wolbachia depletion is non-cell autonomous and suggests the involvement of factors originating from Wolbachia in the hypodermal chords. The pattern of apoptosis correlates closely with the nematode tissues and processes initially perturbed following depletion of Wolbachia, embryogenesis and long-term sterilization, which are sustained for several months until the premature death of the adult worms. Our observations provide a cellular mechanism to account for the sustained reductions in microfilarial loads and interruption of transmission that occurs prior to macrofilaricidal activity following antibiotic therapy of filarial nematodes. PMID:22072969

  6. Canine Filarial Infections in a Human Brugia malayi Endemic Area of India

    PubMed Central

    Ravindran, Reghu; Varghese, Sincy; Nair, Suresh N.; Balan, Vimalkumar M.; Lakshmanan, Bindu; Ashruf, Riyas M.; Kumar, Swaroop S.; Gopalan, Ajith Kumar K.; Nair, Archana S.; Malayil, Aparna; Chandrasekhar, Leena; Juliet, Sanis; Kopparambil, Devada; Ramachandran, Rajendran; Kunjupillai, Regu; Kakada, Showkath Ali M.

    2014-01-01

    A very high prevalence of microfilaremia of 42.68 per cent out of 164 canine blood samples examined was observed in Cherthala (of Alappuzha district of Kerala state), a known human Brugia malayi endemic area of south India. The species of canine microfilariae were identified as Dirofilaria repens, Brugia malayi, and Acanthocheilonema reconditum. D. repens was the most commonly detected species followed by B. pahangi. D. immitis was not detected in any of the samples examined. Based on molecular techniques, microfilariae with histochemical staining pattern of “local staining at anal pore and diffuse staining at central body” was identified as D. repens in addition to those showing acid phosphatase activity only at the anal pore. Even though B. malayi like acid phosphatase activity was observed in few dogs examined, they were identified as genetically closer to B. pahangi. Hence, the possibility of dogs acting as reservoirs of human B. malayi in this area was ruled out. PMID:24971339

  7. Canine filarial infections in a human Brugia malayi endemic area of India.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, Reghu; Varghese, Sincy; Nair, Suresh N; Balan, Vimalkumar M; Lakshmanan, Bindu; Ashruf, Riyas M; Kumar, Swaroop S; Gopalan, Ajith Kumar K; Nair, Archana S; Malayil, Aparna; Chandrasekhar, Leena; Juliet, Sanis; Kopparambil, Devada; Ramachandran, Rajendran; Kunjupillai, Regu; Kakada, Showkath Ali M

    2014-01-01

    A very high prevalence of microfilaremia of 42.68 per cent out of 164 canine blood samples examined was observed in Cherthala (of Alappuzha district of Kerala state), a known human Brugia malayi endemic area of south India. The species of canine microfilariae were identified as Dirofilaria repens, Brugia malayi, and Acanthocheilonema reconditum. D. repens was the most commonly detected species followed by B. pahangi. D. immitis was not detected in any of the samples examined. Based on molecular techniques, microfilariae with histochemical staining pattern of "local staining at anal pore and diffuse staining at central body" was identified as D. repens in addition to those showing acid phosphatase activity only at the anal pore. Even though B. malayi like acid phosphatase activity was observed in few dogs examined, they were identified as genetically closer to B. pahangi. Hence, the possibility of dogs acting as reservoirs of human B. malayi in this area was ruled out. PMID:24971339

  8. Cloning, expression and characterization of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine enolpyruvyl transferase (MurA) from Wolbachia endosymbiont of human lymphatic filarial parasite Brugia malayi.

    PubMed

    Shahab, Mohd; Verma, Meenakshi; Pathak, Manisha; Mitra, Kalyan; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2014-01-01

    Wolbachia, an endosymbiont of filarial nematode, is considered a promising target for treatment of lymphatic filariasis. Although functional characterization of the Wolbachia peptidoglycan assembly has not been fully explored, the Wolbachia genome provides evidence for coding all of the genes involved in lipid II biosynthesis, a part of peptidoglycan biosynthesis pathway. UDP-N-acetylglucosamine enolpyruvyl transferase (MurA) is one of the lipid II biosynthesis pathway enzymes and it has inevitably been recognized as an antibiotic target. In view of the vital role of MurA in bacterial viability and survival, MurA ortholog from Wolbachia endosymbiont of Brugia malayi (wBm-MurA) was cloned, expressed and purified for further molecular characterization. The enzyme kinetics and inhibition studies were undertaken using fosfomycin. wBm-MurA was found to be expressed in all the major life stages of B. malayi and was immunolocalized in Wolbachia within the microfilariae and female adults by the confocal microscopy. Sequence analysis suggests that the amino acids crucial for enzymatic activity are conserved. The purified wBm-MurA was shown to possess the EPSP synthase (3-phosphoshikimate 1-carboxyvinyltransferase) like activity at a broad pH range with optimal activity at pH 7.5 and 37°C temperature. The apparent affinity constant (Km) for the substrate UDP-N-acetylglucosamine was found to be 0.03149 mM and for phosphoenolpyruvate 0.009198 mM. The relative enzymatic activity was inhibited ∼2 fold in presence of fosfomycin. Superimposition of the wBm-MurA homology model with the structural model of Haemophilus influenzae (Hi-MurA) suggests binding of fosfomycin at the same active site. The findings suggest wBm-MurA to be a putative antifilarial drug target for screening of novel compounds. PMID:24941309

  9. Novel parasitic nematode-specific protein of bovine filarial parasite Setaria digitata displays conserved gene structure and ubiquitous expression.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, W W; Dassanayake, R S; Weerasena, S J; Silva Gunawardene, Y I

    2014-09-01

    Setaria digitata is an animal filarial parasite, which can cause fatal diseases to livestock such as cattle, sheep, goat, buffaloes, horses etc. inflicting considerable economic losses to livelihood of livestock farmers. In spite of this, the biology and parasitic nature of this organism is largely unknown. As a step towards understanding these, we screened the cDNA library of S. digitata and identified an open reading frame that code for parasitic nematode-specific protein, which showed a significant homology to functionally and structurally unannotated sequences of parasitic nematodes Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi, Onchocerca volvulus, Loa loa etc., suggesting its role in parasitism. RT-PCR analysis indicated that the S. digitata novel gene (SDNP) is expressed in adult female and male, and microfilariae. Southern hybridization studies revealed that this gene is a single-copy gene. Sequence analysis of the genomic region obtained from overlapping PCR amplification indicated that the size of the genomic region is 1819 bp in which four exons encoding 205 amino acids were interrupted by three introns of varying lengths of 419, 659 and 123 bp, and also the expansion of the size of the introns of S. digitata compared to its orthologues by integrating micro and mini-satellite containing sequence. Sequences around the splice junctions were conserved and agreed with the general GT-AG splicing rule. The gene was found to be AT rich with a GC content of 38.1%. Bioinformatic analysis indicated that the gene structure of SDNP and its orthologues is conserved and it expressed ubiqutously in all the stages of nematode's life cycle. Therefore, taking these outcomes together, it can be concluded that SDNP is a parasitic nematode-specific, single copy gene having conserved gene structure of four exons interrupted by three introns and that the gene is expressed ubiquitously throughout nematode's life cycle. PMID:25382479

  10. Mansonella ozzardi: a neglected New World filarial nematode.

    PubMed

    Lima, Nathália F; Veggiani Aybar, Cecilia A; Dantur Juri, María J; Ferreira, Marcelo U

    2016-05-01

    Mansonella ozzardi (Nematoda: Onchocercidae) is an understudied filarial nematode, originally described by Patrick Manson in 1897, that can be transmitted by two families of dipteran vectors, biting midges (most of them members of the genus Culicoides) and black flies (genus Simulium). With a patchy geographic distribution from southern Mexico to northwestern Argentina, human infection with M. ozzardi is highly prevalent in some of the Caribbean islands, along riverine communities in the Amazon Basin, and on both sides of the border between Bolivia and Argentina. There is no clinical entity unequivocally associated with M. ozzardi infection, although fever, arthralgia, headache, cold lower extremities, and itchy cutaneous rashes are occasionally mentioned in case report series. More recently, ocular manifestations (especially keratitis) have been associated with mansonelliasis, opening an important area of investigation. Here, we briefly review the biology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, and clinical aspects of M. ozzardi infection and point to some existing knowledge gaps, aiming to stimulate a research agenda to help filling them. PMID:27376501

  11. Gedunin and photogedunin of Xylocarpus granatum possess antifilarial activity against human lymphatic filarial parasite Brugia malayi in experimental rodent host.

    PubMed

    Misra, Sweta; Verma, Meenakshi; Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Srivastava, Shishir; Lakshmi, Vijai; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2011-11-01

    The present study is aimed to evaluate antifilarial activity of Xylocarpus granatum (fruit from Andaman) against human lymphatic filarial parasite Brugia malayi in vivo. The in vitro antifilarial activity has already been reported earlier for this mangrove plant which has traditionally been used against several ailments. Aqueous ethanolic crude extract, four fractions (ethyl acetate fraction, n-butanol fraction, water-soluble fraction and water-insoluble fraction) and pure molecule/s of X. granatum (fruit) were tested in vitro on adult worms and microfilariae (mf) of B. malayi and the active samples were further evaluated in vivo in B. malayi (intraperitoneally) i.p. transplanted in the jird model (Meriones unguiculatus) and Mastomys coucha subcutaneously infected with infective larvae (L3). The crude aqueous ethanolic extract was active in vitro (IC50: adult = 15.46 μg/ml; mf = 13.17 μg/ml) and demonstrated 52.8% and 62.7% adulticidal and embryostatic effect on B. malayi, respectively, in Mastomys at a dose of 5 × 50 mg/kg by oral route. The antifilarial activity was primarily localized in the ethyl acetate-soluble fraction which revealed IC50 of 8.5 and 6.9 μg/ml in adult and mf, respectively. This fraction possessed moderate adulticidal and embryostatic action in vivo in Mastomys. Out of eight pure molecules isolated from the active fraction, two compounds gedunin (IC50 = 0.239 μg/ml, CC50 = 212.5 μg/ml, SI = 889.1) and photogedunin (IC50 = 0.213 μg/ml, CC50 = 262.3 μg/ml, SI = 1231.4) at 5 × 100 mg/kg by subcutaneous route revealed excellent adulticidal efficacy resulting in to the death of 80% and 70% transplanted adult B. malayi in the peritoneal cavity of jirds respectively in addition to noticeable microfilaricidalo action on the day of autopsy. The findings reveal that the extract from the fruit X. granatum contains promising in vitro and in vivo antifilarial activity against human lymphatic filarial parasite B. malayi which could be attributed to

  12. Supergroup C Wolbachia, mutualist symbionts of filarial nematodes, have a distinct genome structure.

    PubMed

    Comandatore, Francesco; Cordaux, Richard; Bandi, Claudio; Blaxter, Mark; Darby, Alistair; Makepeace, Benjamin L; Montagna, Matteo; Sassera, Davide

    2015-12-01

    Wolbachia pipientis is possibly the most widespread endosymbiont of arthropods and nematodes. While all Wolbachia strains have historically been defined as a single species, 16 monophyletic clusters of diversity (called supergroups) have been described. Different supergroups have distinct host ranges and symbiotic relationships, ranging from mutualism to reproductive manipulation. In filarial nematodes, which include parasites responsible for major diseases of humans (such as Onchocerca volvulus, agent of river blindness) and companion animals (Dirofilaria immitis, the dog heartworm), Wolbachia has an obligate mutualist role and is the target of new treatment regimens. Here, we compare the genomes of eight Wolbachia strains, spanning the diversity of the major supergroups (A-F), analysing synteny, transposable element content, GC skew and gene loss or gain. We detected genomic features that differ between Wolbachia supergroups, most notably in the C and D clades from filarial nematodes. In particular, strains from supergroup C (symbionts of O. volvulus and D. immitis) present a pattern of GC skew, conserved synteny and lack of transposable elements, unique in the Wolbachia genus. These features could be the consequence of a distinct symbiotic relationship between C Wolbachia strains and their hosts, highlighting underappreciated differences between the mutualistic supergroups found within filarial nematodes. PMID:26631376

  13. Supergroup C Wolbachia, mutualist symbionts of filarial nematodes, have a distinct genome structure

    PubMed Central

    Comandatore, Francesco; Cordaux, Richard; Bandi, Claudio; Blaxter, Mark; Darby, Alistair; Makepeace, Benjamin L.; Montagna, Matteo; Sassera, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Wolbachia pipientis is possibly the most widespread endosymbiont of arthropods and nematodes. While all Wolbachia strains have historically been defined as a single species, 16 monophyletic clusters of diversity (called supergroups) have been described. Different supergroups have distinct host ranges and symbiotic relationships, ranging from mutualism to reproductive manipulation. In filarial nematodes, which include parasites responsible for major diseases of humans (such as Onchocerca volvulus, agent of river blindness) and companion animals (Dirofilaria immitis, the dog heartworm), Wolbachia has an obligate mutualist role and is the target of new treatment regimens. Here, we compare the genomes of eight Wolbachia strains, spanning the diversity of the major supergroups (A–F), analysing synteny, transposable element content, GC skew and gene loss or gain. We detected genomic features that differ between Wolbachia supergroups, most notably in the C and D clades from filarial nematodes. In particular, strains from supergroup C (symbionts of O. volvulus and D. immitis) present a pattern of GC skew, conserved synteny and lack of transposable elements, unique in the Wolbachia genus. These features could be the consequence of a distinct symbiotic relationship between C Wolbachia strains and their hosts, highlighting underappreciated differences between the mutualistic supergroups found within filarial nematodes. PMID:26631376

  14. Diversity, Host Specialization, and Geographic Structure of Filarial Nematodes Infecting Malagasy Bats.

    PubMed

    Ramasindrazana, Beza; Dellagi, Koussay; Lagadec, Erwan; Randrianarivelojosia, Milijaona; Goodman, Steven M; Tortosa, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    We investigated filarial infection in Malagasy bats to gain insights into the diversity of these parasites and explore the factors shaping their distribution. Samples were obtained from 947 individual bats collected from 52 sites on Madagascar and representing 31 of the 44 species currently recognized on the island. Samples were screened for the presence of micro- and macro-parasites through both molecular and morphological approaches. Phylogenetic analyses showed that filarial diversity in Malagasy bats formed three main groups, the most common represented by Litomosa spp. infecting Miniopterus spp. (Miniopteridae); a second group infecting Pipistrellus cf. hesperidus (Vespertilionidae) embedded within the Litomosoides cluster, which is recognized herein for the first time from Madagascar; and a third group composed of lineages with no clear genetic relationship to both previously described filarial nematodes and found in M. griveaudi, Myotis goudoti, Neoromicia matroka (Vespertilionidae), Otomops madagascariensis (Molossidae), and Paratriaenops furculus (Hipposideridae). We further analyzed the infection rates and distribution pattern of Litomosa spp., which was the most diverse and prevalent filarial taxon in our sample. Filarial infection was disproportionally more common in males than females in Miniopterus spp., which might be explained by some aspect of roosting behavior of these cave-dwelling bats. We also found marked geographic structure in the three Litomosa clades, mainly linked to bioclimatic conditions rather than host-parasite associations. While this study demonstrates distinct patterns of filarial nematode infection in Malagasy bats and highlights potential drivers of associated geographic distributions, future work should focus on their alpha taxonomy and characterize arthropod vectors. PMID:26751792

  15. Diversity, Host Specialization, and Geographic Structure of Filarial Nematodes Infecting Malagasy Bats

    PubMed Central

    Ramasindrazana, Beza; Dellagi, Koussay; Lagadec, Erwan; Randrianarivelojosia, Milijaona; Goodman, Steven M.; Tortosa, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    We investigated filarial infection in Malagasy bats to gain insights into the diversity of these parasites and explore the factors shaping their distribution. Samples were obtained from 947 individual bats collected from 52 sites on Madagascar and representing 31 of the 44 species currently recognized on the island. Samples were screened for the presence of micro- and macro-parasites through both molecular and morphological approaches. Phylogenetic analyses showed that filarial diversity in Malagasy bats formed three main groups, the most common represented by Litomosa spp. infecting Miniopterus spp. (Miniopteridae); a second group infecting Pipistrellus cf. hesperidus (Vespertilionidae) embedded within the Litomosoides cluster, which is recognized herein for the first time from Madagascar; and a third group composed of lineages with no clear genetic relationship to both previously described filarial nematodes and found in M. griveaudi, Myotis goudoti, Neoromicia matroka (Vespertilionidae), Otomops madagascariensis (Molossidae), and Paratriaenops furculus (Hipposideridae). We further analyzed the infection rates and distribution pattern of Litomosa spp., which was the most diverse and prevalent filarial taxon in our sample. Filarial infection was disproportionally more common in males than females in Miniopterus spp., which might be explained by some aspect of roosting behavior of these cave-dwelling bats. We also found marked geographic structure in the three Litomosa clades, mainly linked to bioclimatic conditions rather than host-parasite associations. While this study demonstrates distinct patterns of filarial nematode infection in Malagasy bats and highlights potential drivers of associated geographic distributions, future work should focus on their alpha taxonomy and characterize arthropod vectors. PMID:26751792

  16. A new filarial nematode (Onchocercidae) from warthogs (Phacochoerus aethiopicus) of the Kruger National Park.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, J R; Pletcher, J M; De Vos, V; Boomker, J

    1985-09-01

    Fifty-five warthogs [Phacochoerus aethiopicus (Suidae: Artiodactyla)] from the Kruger National Park, Republic of South Africa, were examined for parasites. Adult filarial nematodes were found in lymphatic vessels adjacent to peripheral and visceral lymph nodes, and microfilariae were found in lymph nodes and circulating blood. Both the adult parasite and the microfilaria are described. Specific identification is pending confirmation and recovery of intact adult specimens and microfilariae identical to those described herein. PMID:4067247

  17. Hyporesponsiveness of murine B lymphocytes exposed to the filarial nematode secreted product ES-62 in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Emma H; Deehan, Maureen R; Katz, Elad; Brown, Kirsty S; Houston, Katrina M; O'Grady, John; Harnett, Margaret M; Harnett, William

    2003-06-01

    ES-62 is a phosphorylcholine (PC)-containing glycoprotein secreted by filarial nematodes, parasites of vertebrates including humans. We have previously demonstrated that pre-exposure to this molecule in vitro interferes with subsequent B-cell receptor (BCR)-dependent activation of murine splenic B lymphocytes. To investigate the significance of this during filarial nematode infection, we now employ mice exposed to ES-62, at concentrations equivalent to those found for PC-containing molecules in the bloodstream of parasitized humans, via release from implanted osmotic pumps. Using this approach, we reveal that splenic and lymph node mononuclear cells, and also purified splenic B cells recovered from these mice have reduced ability ex vivo to proliferate in response to BCR ligation. The effect on BCR-induced proliferation was further investigated with respect to elucidating the mechanism of action of the parasite product and was shown to be associated with impaired signal transduction affecting the ErkMAPkinase pathway. Also, it was found that ES-62 did not act by promoting apoptosis or by priming for apoptosis following subsequent stimulation, but rather, appeared to render cells hyporesponsive to stimulation. ES-62 is thus shown for the first time to be a potent modulator of B lymphocyte function in vivo at a concentration relevant to natural filarial nematode infection. This finding considerably strengthens the idea that ES-62 plays a role in evasion of the immune response during parasitism. PMID:12757619

  18. A Repurposing Strategy for Hsp90 Inhibitors Demonstrates Their Potency against Filarial Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Gillan, Victoria; O'Neill, Kerry; Maitland, Kirsty; Sverdrup, Francis M.; Devaney, Eileen

    2014-01-01

    Novel drugs are required for the elimination of infections caused by filarial worms, as most commonly used drugs largely target the microfilariae or first stage larvae of these infections. Previous studies, conducted in vitro, have shown that inhibition of Hsp90 kills adult Brugia pahangi. As numerous small molecule inhibitors of Hsp90 have been developed for use in cancer chemotherapy, we tested the activity of several novel Hsp90 inhibitors in a fluorescence polarization assay and against microfilariae and adult worms of Brugia in vitro. The results from all three assays correlated reasonably well and one particular compound, NVP-AUY922, was shown to be particularly active, inhibiting Mf output from female worms at concentrations as low as 5.0 nanomolar after 6 days exposure to drug. NVP-AUY922 was also active on adult worms after a short 24 h exposure to drug. Based on these in vitro data, NVP-AUY922 was tested in vivo in a mouse model and was shown to significantly reduce the recovery of both adult worms and microfilariae. These studies provide proof of principle that the repurposing of currently available Hsp90 inhibitors may have potential for the development of novel agents with macrofilaricidal properties. PMID:24551261

  19. Construction of bacterial artificial chromosome libraries from the parasitic nematode Brugia malayi and physical mapping of the genome of its Wolbachia endosymbiont.

    PubMed

    Foster, Jeremy M; Kumar, Sanjay; Ganatra, Mehul B; Kamal, Ibrahim H; Ware, Jennifer; Ingram, Jessica; Pope-Chappell, Jesse; Guiliano, David; Whitton, Claire; Daub, Jennifer; Blaxter, Mark L; Slatko, Barton E

    2004-05-01

    The parasitic nematode, Brugia malayi, causes lymphatic filariasis in humans, which in severe cases leads to the condition known as elephantiasis. The parasite contains an endosymbiotic alpha-proteobacterium of the genus Wolbachia that is required for normal worm development and fecundity and is also implicated in the pathology associated with infections by these filarial nematodes. Bacterial artificial chromosome libraries were constructed from B. malayi DNA and provide over 11-fold coverage of the nematode genome. Wolbachia genomic fragments were simultaneously cloned into the libraries giving over 5-fold coverage of the 1.1 Mb bacterial genome. A physical framework for the Wolbachia genome was developed by construction of a plasmid library enriched for Wolbachia DNA as a source of sequences to hybridise to high-density bacterial artificial chromosome colony filters. Bacterial artificial chromosome end sequencing provided additional Wolbachia probe sequences to facilitate assembly of a contig that spanned the entire genome. The Wolbachia sequences provided a marker approximately every 10 kb. Four rare-cutting restriction endonucleases were used to restriction map the genome to a resolution of approximately 60 kb and demonstrate concordance between the bacterial artificial chromosome clones and native Wolbachia genomic DNA. Comparison of Wolbachia sequences to public databases using BLAST algorithms under stringent conditions allowed confident prediction of 69 Wolbachia peptide functions and two rRNA genes. Comparison to closely related complete genomes revealed that while most sequences had orthologs in the genome of the Wolbachia endosymbiont from Drosophila melanogaster, there was no evidence for long-range synteny. Rather, there were a few cases of short-range conservation of gene order extending over regions of less than 10 kb. The molecular scaffold produced for the genome of the Wolbachia from B. malayi forms the basis of a genomic sequencing effort for

  20. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the filarial nematode Wuchereria bancrofti from three geographic isolates provides evidence of complex demographic history.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Akshaya; Small, Scott T; Kloos, Zachary A; Kazura, James W; Nutman, Thomas B; Serre, David; Zimmerman, Peter A

    2012-05-01

    Mitochondrial (mt) genome sequences have enabled comparison of population genetics and evolution for numerous free-living and parasitic nematodes. Here we define the complete mt genome of Wuchereria bancrofti through analysis of isolates from Papua New Guinea, India and West Africa. Sequences were assembled for each isolate and annotated with reference to the mt genome sequence for Brugia malayi. The length of the W. bancrofti mt genome is approximately 13,637 nucleotides, contains 2 ribosomal RNAs (rrns), 22 transfer RNAs (trns), 12 protein-coding genes, and is characterized by a 74.6% AT content. The W. bancrofti mt gene order is identical to that reported for Onchocerca volvulus, Dirofilaria immitis, Setaria digitata and B. malayi. In addition to using translational start codons identified previously in the mt protein-coding genes of other filarial nematodes, W. bancrofti appears to be unique in using TGT as a translational start codon. Similarly, use of incomplete stop codons in mt protein-coding genes appears to be more common in W. bancrofti than in other human filarial parasites. The complete mt genome sequence reported here provides new genetic markers for investigating phylogenetic and geographic relationships between isolates, and assessing population diversity within endemic regions. The sequence polymorphism enables new strategies to monitor the progress of public health interventions to control and eliminate this important human parasite. We illustrate the utility of this sequence and single nucleotide polymorphisms by inferring the divergence times between the three W. bancrofti isolates, suggesting predictions into their origin and migration. PMID:22326389

  1. Xenomonitoring of different filarial nematodes using single and multiplex PCR in mosquitoes from Assiut Governorate, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Dyab, Ahmed Kamal; Galal, Lamia Ahmed; Mahmoud, Abeer El-Sayed; Mokhtar, Yasser

    2015-02-01

    Wuchereria bancrofti, Dirofilaria immitis, and Dirofilaria repens are filarial nematodes transmitted by mosquitoes belonging to Culex, Aedes, and Anopheles genera. Screening by vector dissection is a tiresome technique. We aimed to screen filarial parasites in their vectors by single and multiplex PCR and evaluate the usefulness of multiplex PCR as a rapid xenomonitoring and simultaneous differentiation tool, in area where 3 filarial parasites are coexisting. Female mosquitoes were collected from 7 localities in Assiut Governorate, were microscopically identified and divided into pools according to their species and collection site. Detection of W. bancrofti, D. immitis, and D. repens using single PCR was reached followed by multiplex PCR. Usefulness of multiplex PCR was evaluated by testing mosquito pools to know which genera and species are used by filarial parasites as a vector. An overall estimated rate of infection (ERI) in mosquitoes was 0.6%; the highest was Culex spp. (0.47%). W. bancrofti, D. immitis, and D. repens could be simultaneously and differentially detected in infected vectors by using multiplex PCR. Out of 100 mosquito pools, 8 were positive for W. bancrofti (ERI of 0.33%) and 3 pools each were positive for D. immitis and D. repens (ERI 0.12%). The technique showed 100% sensitivity and 98% specificity. El-Nikhila, El-Matiaa villages, and Sahel Seleem district in Assiut Governorate, Egypt are still endemic foci for filarial parasites. Multiplex PCR offers a reliable procedure for molecular xenomonitoring of filariasis within their respective vectors in endemic areas. Therefore, it is recommended for evaluation of mosquito infection after lymphatic filariasis eradication programs. PMID:25748712

  2. Genomics of Loa loa, a Wolbachia-free filarial parasite of humans.

    PubMed

    Desjardins, Christopher A; Cerqueira, Gustavo C; Goldberg, Jonathan M; Dunning Hotopp, Julie C; Haas, Brian J; Zucker, Jeremy; Ribeiro, José M C; Saif, Sakina; Levin, Joshua Z; Fan, Lin; Zeng, Qiandong; Russ, Carsten; Wortman, Jennifer R; Fink, Doran L; Birren, Bruce W; Nutman, Thomas B

    2013-05-01

    Loa loa, the African eyeworm, is a major filarial pathogen of humans. Unlike most filariae, L. loa does not contain the obligate intracellular Wolbachia endosymbiont. We describe the 91.4-Mb genome of L. loa and that of the related filarial parasite Wuchereria bancrofti and predict 14,907 L. loa genes on the basis of microfilarial RNA sequencing. By comparing these genomes to that of another filarial parasite, Brugia malayi, and to those of several other nematodes, we demonstrate synteny among filariae but not with nonparasitic nematodes. The L. loa genome encodes many immunologically relevant genes, as well as protein kinases targeted by drugs currently approved for use in humans. Despite lacking Wolbachia, L. loa shows no new metabolic synthesis or transport capabilities compared to other filariae. These results suggest that the role of Wolbachia in filarial biology is more subtle than previously thought and reveal marked differences between parasitic and nonparasitic nematodes. PMID:23525074

  3. Functional and phenotypic characteristics of alternative activation induced in human monocytes by interleukin-4 or the parasitic nematode Brugia malayi.

    PubMed

    Semnani, Roshanak Tolouei; Mahapatra, Lily; Moore, Vanessa; Sanprasert, Vivornpun; Nutman, Thomas B

    2011-10-01

    Human monocytes from patients with patent filarial infections are studded with filarial antigen and express markers associated with alternative activation of macrophages (MΦ). To explore the role of filaria-derived parasite antigen in differentiation of human monocytes, cells were exposed to microfilariae (mf) of Brugia malayi, and their phenotypic and functional characteristics were compared with those of monocytes exposed to factors known to generate either alternatively (interleukin-4 [IL-4]) or classically (macrophage colony-stimulating factor [MCSF]) activated MΦ. IL-4 upregulated mRNA expression of CCL13, CCL15, CCL17, CCL18, CCL22, CLEC10A, MRC1, CADH1, CD274, and CD273 associated with alternative activation of MΦ but not arginase 1. IL-4-cultured monocytes had a diminished ability to promote proliferation of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells compared to that of unexposed monocytes. Similar to results with IL-4, exposure of monocytes to live mf induced upregulation of CCL15, CCL17, CCL18, CCL22, CD274, and CD273 and downregulation of Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), TLR5, and TLR7. In contrast to results with MCSF-cultured monocytes, exposure of monocytes to mf resulted in significant inhibition of the phagocytic ability of these cells to the same degree as that seen with IL-4. Our data suggest that short exposure of human monocytes to IL-4 induces a phenotypic characteristic of alternative activation and that secreted filarial products skew monocytes similarly. PMID:21788379

  4. Ancient horizontal transfers of retrotransposons between birds and ancestors of human pathogenic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Suh, Alexander; Witt, Christopher C; Menger, Juliana; Sadanandan, Keren R; Podsiadlowski, Lars; Gerth, Michael; Weigert, Anne; McGuire, Jimmy A; Mudge, Joann; Edwards, Scott V; Rheindt, Frank E

    2016-01-01

    Parasite host switches may trigger disease emergence, but prehistoric host ranges are often unknowable. Lymphatic filariasis and loiasis are major human diseases caused by the insect-borne filarial nematodes Brugia, Wuchereria and Loa. Here we show that the genomes of these nematodes and seven tropical bird lineages exclusively share a novel retrotransposon, AviRTE, resulting from horizontal transfer (HT). AviRTE subfamilies exhibit 83-99% nucleotide identity between genomes, and their phylogenetic distribution, paleobiogeography and invasion times suggest that HTs involved filarial nematodes. The HTs between bird and nematode genomes took place in two pantropical waves, >25-22 million years ago (Myr ago) involving the Brugia/Wuchereria lineage and >20-17 Myr ago involving the Loa lineage. Contrary to the expectation from the mammal-dominated host range of filarial nematodes, we hypothesize that these major human pathogens may have independently evolved from bird endoparasites that formerly infected the global breadth of avian biodiversity. PMID:27097561

  5. Ancient horizontal transfers of retrotransposons between birds and ancestors of human pathogenic nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Alexander; Witt, Christopher C.; Menger, Juliana; Sadanandan, Keren R.; Podsiadlowski, Lars; Gerth, Michael; Weigert, Anne; McGuire, Jimmy A.; Mudge, Joann; Edwards, Scott V.; Rheindt, Frank E.

    2016-01-01

    Parasite host switches may trigger disease emergence, but prehistoric host ranges are often unknowable. Lymphatic filariasis and loiasis are major human diseases caused by the insect-borne filarial nematodes Brugia, Wuchereria and Loa. Here we show that the genomes of these nematodes and seven tropical bird lineages exclusively share a novel retrotransposon, AviRTE, resulting from horizontal transfer (HT). AviRTE subfamilies exhibit 83–99% nucleotide identity between genomes, and their phylogenetic distribution, paleobiogeography and invasion times suggest that HTs involved filarial nematodes. The HTs between bird and nematode genomes took place in two pantropical waves, >25–22 million years ago (Myr ago) involving the Brugia/Wuchereria lineage and >20–17 Myr ago involving the Loa lineage. Contrary to the expectation from the mammal-dominated host range of filarial nematodes, we hypothesize that these major human pathogens may have independently evolved from bird endoparasites that formerly infected the global breadth of avian biodiversity. PMID:27097561

  6. A new insight into the pathogenesis of filarial disease.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Mark J

    2002-05-01

    Filariasis is a major public health problem throughout many regions of the tropics. The disease is caused by several species of filarial nematode including Wuchereria bancrofti and Brugia malayi, the agents of lymphatic filariasis, and Onchocerca volvulus, the cause of 'riverblindness'. Disease caused by these worms varies depending on the tissue location of the parasite, and is associated with episodes of acute and chronic inflammation. These pathologies, including elephantiasis and blindness, rank among the most disabling in the world. Studies aimed at characterizing the molecular nature of the inflammatory stimuli derived from filarial nematodes uncovered a long forgotten secret, their symbiont Wolbachia. LPS-like molecules from these intracellular bacteria are responsible for potent inflammatory responses from macrophages and in animal models of filarial disease. Wolbachia has also been associated with severe inflammatory reactions to filarial chemotherapy, being released into the blood following the death of the parasite. Recent studies in animal models even implicate Wolbachia in the onset of lymphodema and blindness. Taken together these studies suggest a major role for Wolbachia in the pathogenesis of filarial disease. It may be possible, through the use of antibiotic therapy, to clear worms of their bacteria, in the hope that this will prevent the onset and development of filarial pathology. PMID:12041732

  7. Stage-specific proteomic expression patterns of the human filarial parasite Brugia malayi and its endosymbiont Wolbachia

    PubMed Central

    Bennuru, Sasisekhar; Meng, Zhaojing; Ribeiro, José M. C.; Semnani, Roshanak Tolouei; Ghedin, Elodie; Chan, King; Lucas, David A.; Veenstra, Timothy D.; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2011-01-01

    Global proteomic analyses of pathogens have thus far been limited to unicellular organisms (e.g., protozoa and bacteria). Proteomic analyses of most eukaryotic pathogens (e.g., helminths) have been restricted to specific organs, specific stages, or secretomes. We report here a large-scale proteomic characterization of almost all the major mammalian stages of Brugia malayi, a causative agent of lymphatic filariasis, resulting in the identification of more than 62% of the products predicted from the Bm draft genome. The analysis also yielded much of the proteome of Wolbachia, the obligate endosymbiont of Bm that also expressed proteins in a stage-specific manner. Of the 11,610 predicted Bm gene products, 7,103 were definitively identified from adult male, adult female, blood-borne and uterine microfilariae, and infective L3 larvae. Among the 4,956 gene products (42.5%) inferred from the genome as “hypothetical,” the present study was able to confirm 2,336 (47.1%) as bona fide proteins. Analysis of protein families and domains coupled with stage-specific expression highlight the important pathways that benefit the parasite during its development in the host. Gene set enrichment analysis identified extracellular matrix proteins and those with immunologic effects as enriched in the microfilarial and L3 stages. Parasite sex- and stage-specific protein expression identified those pathways related to parasite differentiation and demonstrates stage-specific expression by the Bm endosymbiont Wolbachia as well. PMID:21606368

  8. Stage-specific proteomic expression patterns of the human filarial parasite Brugia malayi and its endosymbiont Wolbachia.

    PubMed

    Bennuru, Sasisekhar; Meng, Zhaojing; Ribeiro, José M C; Semnani, Roshanak Tolouei; Ghedin, Elodie; Chan, King; Lucas, David A; Veenstra, Timothy D; Nutman, Thomas B

    2011-06-01

    Global proteomic analyses of pathogens have thus far been limited to unicellular organisms (e.g., protozoa and bacteria). Proteomic analyses of most eukaryotic pathogens (e.g., helminths) have been restricted to specific organs, specific stages, or secretomes. We report here a large-scale proteomic characterization of almost all the major mammalian stages of Brugia malayi, a causative agent of lymphatic filariasis, resulting in the identification of more than 62% of the products predicted from the Bm draft genome. The analysis also yielded much of the proteome of Wolbachia, the obligate endosymbiont of Bm that also expressed proteins in a stage-specific manner. Of the 11,610 predicted Bm gene products, 7,103 were definitively identified from adult male, adult female, blood-borne and uterine microfilariae, and infective L3 larvae. Among the 4,956 gene products (42.5%) inferred from the genome as "hypothetical," the present study was able to confirm 2,336 (47.1%) as bona fide proteins. Analysis of protein families and domains coupled with stage-specific expression highlight the important pathways that benefit the parasite during its development in the host. Gene set enrichment analysis identified extracellular matrix proteins and those with immunologic effects as enriched in the microfilarial and L3 stages. Parasite sex- and stage-specific protein expression identified those pathways related to parasite differentiation and demonstrates stage-specific expression by the Bm endosymbiont Wolbachia as well. PMID:21606368

  9. Shaking the Tree: Multi-locus Sequence Typing Usurps Current Onchocercid (Filarial Nematode) Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Lefoulon, Emilie; Bourret, Jérôme; Junker, Kerstin; Guerrero, Ricardo; Cañizales, Israel; Kuzmin, Yuriy; Satoto, Tri Baskoro T.; Cardenas-Callirgos, Jorge Manuel; de Souza Lima, Sueli; Raccurt, Christian; Mutafchiev, Yasen; Gavotte, Laurent; Martin, Coralie

    2015-01-01

    During the past twenty years, a number of molecular analyses have been performed to determine the evolutionary relationships of Onchocercidae, a family of filarial nematodes encompassing several species of medical or veterinary importance. However, opportunities for broad taxonomic sampling have been scarce, and analyses were based mainly on 12S rDNA and coxI gene sequences. While being suitable for species differentiation, these mitochondrial genes cannot be used to infer phylogenetic hypotheses at higher taxonomic levels. In the present study, 48 species, representing seven of eight subfamilies within the Onchocercidae, were sampled and sequences of seven gene loci (nuclear and mitochondrial) analysed, resulting in the hitherto largest molecular phylogenetic investigation into this family. Although our data support the current hypothesis that the Oswaldofilariinae, Waltonellinae and Icosiellinae subfamilies separated early from the remaining onchocercids, Setariinae was recovered as a well separated clade. Dirofilaria, Loxodontofilaria and Onchocerca constituted a strongly supported clade despite belonging to different subfamilies (Onchocercinae and Dirofilariinae). Finally, the separation between Splendidofilariinae, Dirofilariinae and Onchocercinae will have to be reconsidered. PMID:26588229

  10. Shaking the Tree: Multi-locus Sequence Typing Usurps Current Onchocercid (Filarial Nematode) Phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Lefoulon, Emilie; Bain, Odile; Bourret, Jérôme; Junker, Kerstin; Guerrero, Ricardo; Cañizales, Israel; Kuzmin, Yuriy; Satoto, Tri Baskoro T; Cardenas-Callirgos, Jorge Manuel; de Souza Lima, Sueli; Raccurt, Christian; Mutafchiev, Yasen; Gavotte, Laurent; Martin, Coralie

    2015-11-01

    During the past twenty years, a number of molecular analyses have been performed to determine the evolutionary relationships of Onchocercidae, a family of filarial nematodes encompassing several species of medical or veterinary importance. However, opportunities for broad taxonomic sampling have been scarce, and analyses were based mainly on 12S rDNA and coxI gene sequences. While being suitable for species differentiation, these mitochondrial genes cannot be used to infer phylogenetic hypotheses at higher taxonomic levels. In the present study, 48 species, representing seven of eight subfamilies within the Onchocercidae, were sampled and sequences of seven gene loci (nuclear and mitochondrial) analysed, resulting in the hitherto largest molecular phylogenetic investigation into this family. Although our data support the current hypothesis that the Oswaldofilariinae, Waltonellinae and Icosiellinae subfamilies separated early from the remaining onchocercids, Setariinae was recovered as a well separated clade. Dirofilaria, Loxodontofilaria and Onchocerca constituted a strongly supported clade despite belonging to different subfamilies (Onchocercinae and Dirofilariinae). Finally, the separation between Splendidofilariinae, Dirofilariinae and Onchocercinae will have to be reconsidered. PMID:26588229

  11. Efficient in vitro RNA interference and immunofluorescence-based phenotype analysis in a human parasitic nematode, Brugia malayi

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background RNA interference (RNAi) is an efficient reverse genetics technique for investigating gene function in eukaryotes. The method has been widely used in model organisms, such as the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, where it has been deployed in genome-wide high throughput screens to identify genes involved in many cellular and developmental processes. However, RNAi techniques have not translated efficiently to animal parasitic nematodes that afflict humans, livestock and companion animals across the globe, creating a dependency on data tentatively inferred from C. elegans. Results We report improved and effective in vitro RNAi procedures we have developed using heterogeneous short interfering RNA (hsiRNA) mixtures that when coupled with optimized immunostaining techniques yield detailed analysis of cytological defects in the human parasitic nematode, Brugia malayi. The cellular disorganization observed in B. malayi embryos following RNAi targeting the genes encoding γ-tubulin, and the polarity determinant protein, PAR-1, faithfully phenocopy the known defects associated with gene silencing of their C. elegans orthologs. Targeting the B. malayi cell junction protein, AJM-1 gave a similar but more severe phenotype than that observed in C. elegans. Cellular phenotypes induced by our in vitro RNAi procedure can be observed by immunofluorescence in as little as one week. Conclusions We observed cytological defects following RNAi targeting all seven B. malayi transcripts tested and the phenotypes mirror those documented for orthologous genes in the model organism C. elegans. This highlights the reliability, effectiveness and specificity of our RNAi and immunostaining procedures. We anticipate that these techniques will be widely applicable to other important animal parasitic nematodes, which have hitherto been mostly refractory to such genetic analysis. PMID:22243803

  12. A major allergen of lymphatic filarial nematodes is a parasite homolog of the gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase.

    PubMed Central

    Lobos, E.; Zahn, R.; Weiss, N.; Nutman, T. B.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bm2325, a major IgE-inducing antigen of the filarial parasite Brugia malayi has been implicated in the pathology of tropical pulmonary eosinophilia (TPE), a pulmonary syndrome thought to result from hypersensitivity to microfilariae. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Affinity-purified IgE to Bm2325 from patients with TPE was used to identify a complementary DNA (cDNA) from a B. malayi expression library. Sequence analysis of the cDNA revealed a hitherto unknown parasite protein. Immunoblotting of the recombinant filarial protein using sera of patients with TPE determined its IgE-binding capacity. Reactivity to human lung epithelial cell proteins was analyzed using murine anti-Bm2325 antibodies and serum from patients with TPE. RESULTS: The predicted protein is a homolog of the entire precursor of the gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (gamma-GT), a key enzyme in the synthesis and degradation of glutathione. The filarial precursor encodes both the heavy (H) and the light (L) chain subunits and shares structural similarities with the mammalian enzymes. The Bm2325 allergen was identified as the homolog of the enzyme light chain subunit. Murine antibodies against the recombinant parasite gamma-GT cross-reacted with the human enzyme present in human airway epithelial cells, and human gamma-GT is a target of antibodies present in the serum of patients with TPE. CONCLUSION: Molecular mimicry between the parasite gamma-GT homolog and the host membrane-bound gamma-GT present in lung epithelial cells likely contributes to the pathogenesis observed in tropical pulmonary eosinophilia. Images FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 FIG. 7 PMID:8972486

  13. Disorganized muscle protein-1 (DIM-1) of filarial parasite Brugia malayi: cDNA cloning, expression, purification, structural modeling and its potential as vaccine candidate for human filarial infection.

    PubMed

    Kushwaha, Vikas; Kumar, Vikash; Verma, Shiv K; Sharma, Rolee; Siddiqi, M I; Murthy, P K

    2014-03-26

    We have recently identified disorganized muscle protein-1 (DIM-1) in one of the proinflammatory fractions of the human filaria Brugia malayi adult worm. The present study was undertaken to characterize B. malayi DIM-1 (DIM-1bm) and explore its vaccine potential. In this study we cloned and expressed the DIM-1bm gene, investigated its sequence homology with other nematodes, constructed in silico structural model, purified the recombinant DIM-1bm (rDIM-1bm) protein, and studied the effect of immunization with rDIM-1bm on the establishment of B. malayi infection in Mastomys coucha. DIM-1bm showed similarity with DIM-1 of Caenorhabditis elegans, Ascaris suum and Loa loa. Structural modeling revealed three immunoglobulin domains in DIM-1bm indicating that it is a member of immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) and 'blastn' results showed that DIM-1bm coding sequence (CDS) have almost no homology with human and mouse nucleotide sequences. Immunization with rDIM-1bm partially protected M. coucha against establishment of infection as inferred by a low recovery of microfilariae (37-64%) and parasite burden (∼50%). The enhanced activity of macrophages, and IFN-γ and NO responses, and elevated levels of specific IgG, IgG1, IgG2a and IgG2b correlated with parasitological findings. This is the first report on cloning, expression, structural modeling and purification of rDIM-1bm and its ability to partially prevent establishment of B. malayi infection. DIM-1bm's almost complete lack of homology with the human counterpart makes it an attractive protein for exploring its vaccine potential. PMID:24513011

  14. Reproductive biology of Onchocerca ochengi, a nodule forming filarial nematode in zebu cattle.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, Julia C; Eisenbarth, Albert; Renz, Alfons; Streit, Adrian

    2014-09-15

    Onchocerca ochengi is a nodule-forming filarial nematode parasite of cattle in tropical Africa and closely related to the human pathogen Onchocerca volvulus. The adult worms reside in intradermal nodules. While females are sedentary, males may move between nodules. The first stage larvae (microfilariae) disperse in the skin of the host waiting to be taken up by the intermediate host. The density of microfilariae in the skin is largely independent of the number of adult worms present indicating some form of density dependent control. Recently, Onchocerca sp. Siisa, a form of Onchocerca distinguishable from O. ochengi by mitochondrial DNA sequences but not by morphology, was described to occur in cattle. This raised the question if Onchocerca sp. Siisa represents a different mitochondrial clade of O. ochengi or a new species. In order to study the reproductive biology and to understand this self-control of the off-spring population we systematically analyzed all Onchocerca nodules from the skin of one zebu cow and we examined a sample of microfilariae from a skin biopsy. We identified 87 O. ochengi females and 146 males. 56 (64.4%) of the females contained developing embryos. In order to assign the progeny to their respective parents we determined the genotypes at six nuclear and two mitochondrial molecular genetic markers in the adult worms, in a fraction of the progeny present in the uteri of the females and in the skin microfilariae. The 121 skin microfilariae we analyzed originated from at least 17 different mothers, which contributed rather differently to the total. Forty-five larvae (37.2%) were the progeny of a single female. Of the adult worms 16.7% were of the type Onchocerca sp. Siisa. These worms appeared to interbreed freely with the rest of the O. ochengi population and therefore belong to the same species. PMID:24986433

  15. Functional and Phenotypic Characteristics of Alternative Activation Induced in Human Monocytes by Interleukin-4 or the Parasitic Nematode Brugia malayi ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Semnani, Roshanak Tolouei; Mahapatra, Lily; Moore, Vanessa; Sanprasert, Vivornpun; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2011-01-01

    Human monocytes from patients with patent filarial infections are studded with filarial antigen and express markers associated with alternative activation of macrophages (MΦ). To explore the role of filaria-derived parasite antigen in differentiation of human monocytes, cells were exposed to microfilariae (mf) of Brugia malayi, and their phenotypic and functional characteristics were compared with those of monocytes exposed to factors known to generate either alternatively (interleukin-4 [IL-4]) or classically (macrophage colony-stimulating factor [MCSF]) activated MΦ. IL-4 upregulated mRNA expression of CCL13, CCL15, CCL17, CCL18, CCL22, CLEC10A, MRC1, CADH1, CD274, and CD273 associated with alternative activation of MΦ but not arginase 1. IL-4-cultured monocytes had a diminished ability to promote proliferation of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells compared to that of unexposed monocytes. Similar to results with IL-4, exposure of monocytes to live mf induced upregulation of CCL15, CCL17, CCL18, CCL22, CD274, and CD273 and downregulation of Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), TLR5, and TLR7. In contrast to results with MCSF-cultured monocytes, exposure of monocytes to mf resulted in significant inhibition of the phagocytic ability of these cells to the same degree as that seen with IL-4. Our data suggest that short exposure of human monocytes to IL-4 induces a phenotypic characteristic of alternative activation and that secreted filarial products skew monocytes similarly. PMID:21788379

  16. UDP-galactopyranose mutase, a potential drug target against human pathogenic nematode Brugia malayi.

    PubMed

    Misra, Sweta; Valicherla, Guru R; Mohd Shahab; Gupta, Jyoti; Gayen, Jiaur R; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2016-08-01

    Lymphatic filariasis, a vector-borne neglected tropical disease affects millions of population in tropical and subtropical countries. Vaccine unavailability and emerging drug resistance against standard antifilarial drugs necessitate search of novel drug targets for developing alternate drugs. Recently, UDP-galactopyranose mutases (UGM) have emerged as a promising drug target playing an important role in parasite virulence and survival. This study deals with the cloning and characterization of Brugia malayi UGM and further exploring its antifilarial drug target potential. The recombinant protein was actively involved in conversion of UDP-galactopyranose (substrate) to UDP-galactofuranose (product) revealing Km and Vmax to be ∼51.15 μM and ∼1.27 μM/min, respectively. The purified protein appeared to be decameric in native state and its 3D homology modeling using Aspergillus fumigatus UGM enzyme as template revealed conservation of active site residues. Two specific prokaryotic inhibitors (compounds A and B) of the enzyme inhibited B. malayi UGM enzymatic activity competitively depicting Ki values ∼22.68 and ∼23.0 μM, respectively. These compounds were also active in vitro and in vivo against B. malayi The findings suggest that B. malayi UGM could be a potential antifilarial therapeutic drug target. PMID:27465638

  17. Antigenic role of the endosymbionts of filarial nematodes: IgG response against the Wolbachia surface protein in cats infected with Dirofilaria immitis.

    PubMed Central

    Bazzocchi, C; Ceciliani, F; McCall, J W; Ricci, I; Genchi, C; Bandi, C

    2000-01-01

    Filarial nematodes harbour intracellular endosymbiotic bacteria, which have been assigned to the genus Wolbachia. These bacteria appear to play an important role in the pathogenesis of filarial diseases through their lipopolysaccharides. In view of the presence of Wolbachia endosymbionts in the body of filarial nematodes, one might also expect that proteins from these bacteria play an antigenic role in humans and animals affected by filariases. To test this hypothesis, we produced in recombinant form the surface protein WSP and a portion of the cell-cycle protein FTSZ from the Wolbachia of Dirofilaria immitis. Western immunoblot assays were then performed using cat sera to test the immunogenicity of these proteins. Sera were collected from owners' cats, which were either sero-negative or sero-positive for D. immitis and from cats before and after experimental infection with D. immitis. FTSZ was recognized in Western blots by sera from both positive and negative cats and from both uninfected and experimentally infected cats. WSP was recognized only by sera from positive cats and from cats experimentally infected with D. immitis; this protein was not recognized by sera from negative cats and from cats before experimental infection with D. immitis. The results of Western blot assays on WSP thus support the hypothesis that infection with filarial nematodes induces the production of antibodies against Wolbachia proteins. PMID:11197127

  18. Subtilisin-like proteases in nematodes.

    PubMed

    Poole, Catherine B; Jin, Jingmin; McReynolds, Larry A

    2007-09-01

    Cleavage by subtilisin-like proteases (subtilases) is an essential step in post-translational processing of proteins found in organisms ranging from yeast to mammals. Our knowledge of the diversity of this protease family in nematodes is aided by the rapid increase in sequence information, especially from the Brugia malayi genome project. Genetic studies of the subtilases in Caenorhabitis elegans give valuable insight into the biological function of these proteases in other nematode species. In this review, we focus on the subtilases in filarial nematodes as well as other parasitic and free-living nematodes in comparison to what is known in C. elegans. Topics to be addressed include expansion and diversity of the subtilase gene family during evolution, enhanced complexity created by alternative RNA splicing, molecular and biochemical characterization of the different subtilases and the challenges of designing subtilase-specific inhibitors for parasitic nematodes. PMID:17570539

  19. Cloning and sequence analysis of partial genomic DNA coding for HtrA-type serine protease of Wolbachia from human lymphatic filarial parasite, Wuchereria bancrofti

    PubMed Central

    Dhamodharan, R; Hoti, SL; Sivapragasam, G; Das, MK

    2011-01-01

    Background: Periplasmic serine proteases of HtrA type of Wolbachia have been shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of filarial disease. Aims: This study was aimed to sequence Wb-HtrA serine protease and analyze its phylogenetic position by comparing with other filarial and non-filarial nematode homologs. Materials and Methods: Partial HtrA gene fragment was amplified from DNA isolated from periodic and sub-periodic Wuchereria bancrofti parasites collected from Pondicherry and Nicobar islands, respectively. The amplicons were sequenced, and sequence homology and phylogenetic relationship with other filarial and non-filarial nematodes were analyzed. Results: Partial orthologue of HtrA-type serine protease from Wolbachia of W. bancrofti was amplified, cloned and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence exhibited 87%, 81% and 74% identity with the homologous Wolbachia proteases identified from Brugia malayi, Onchocerca volvulus and Drosophila melanogaster, respectively. The Wb-HtrA has arthologues in several proteobacteria with very high homology and hence is highly conserved not only among Wolbachia of filarial parasites but also across proteobacteria. The phylogenetic tree constructed using Neighbor-Joining method showed two main clusters: cluster-I containing bacteria that dwell in diverse habitats such as soil, fresh and marine waters and plants and cluster-II comprising Anaplasma sp. and Erlichia, and Wolbachia endosymbionts of insects and nematodes, in distinct groups. Conclusions: HtrA-type serine protease from Wolbachia of W. bancrofti is highly conserved among filarial parasites. It will be of interest to know whether filarial Wolbachia HtrA type of serine protease might influence apoptosis and lymphatic epithelium, thereby playing a role in the filarial pathogenesis. Such information will be useful for identifying targets for the development of newer drugs for filariasis treatment, especially for preventing lymphatic pathology. PMID:23508470

  20. Glucose and Glycogen Metabolism in Brugia malayi Is Associated with Wolbachia Symbiont Fitness

    PubMed Central

    Voronin, Denis; Bachu, Saheed; Shlossman, Michael; Unnasch, Thomas R.; Ghedin, Elodie; Lustigman, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Wolbachia are endosymbiotic bacteria found in the majority of arthropods and filarial nematodes of medical and veterinary importance. They have evolved a wide range of symbiotic associations. In filarial nematodes that cause human lymphatic filariasis (Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi) or onchocerciasis (Onchocerca volvulus), Wolbachia are important for parasite development, reproduction and survival. The symbiotic bacteria rely in part on nutrients and energy sources provided by the host. Genomic analyses suggest that the strain of Wolbachia found in B. malayi (wBm) lacks the genes for two glycolytic enzymes—6-phosphofructokinase and pyruvate kinase—and is thus potentially unable to convert glucose into pyruvate, an important substrate for energy generation. The Wolbachia surface protein, wBm00432, is complexed to six B. malayi glycolytic enzymes, including aldolase. In this study we characterized two B. malayi aldolase isozymes and found that their expression is dependent on Wolbachia fitness and number. We confirmed by immuno-transmission electron microscopy that aldolase is associated with the Wolbachia surface. RNAi experiments suggested that aldolase-2 plays a significant role in both Wolbachia survival and embryogenesis in B. malayi. Treatment with doxycycline reduced Wolbachia fitness and increased the amount of both glucose and glycogen detected in the filarial parasite, indicating that glucose metabolism and glycogen storage in B. malayi are associated with Wolbachia fitness. This metabolic co-dependency between Wolbachia and its filarial nematode indicates that glycolysis could be a shared metabolic pathway between the bacteria and B. malayi, and thus a potential new target for anti-filarial therapy. PMID:27078260

  1. Glucose and Glycogen Metabolism in Brugia malayi Is Associated with Wolbachia Symbiont Fitness.

    PubMed

    Voronin, Denis; Bachu, Saheed; Shlossman, Michael; Unnasch, Thomas R; Ghedin, Elodie; Lustigman, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Wolbachia are endosymbiotic bacteria found in the majority of arthropods and filarial nematodes of medical and veterinary importance. They have evolved a wide range of symbiotic associations. In filarial nematodes that cause human lymphatic filariasis (Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi) or onchocerciasis (Onchocerca volvulus), Wolbachia are important for parasite development, reproduction and survival. The symbiotic bacteria rely in part on nutrients and energy sources provided by the host. Genomic analyses suggest that the strain of Wolbachia found in B. malayi (wBm) lacks the genes for two glycolytic enzymes--6-phosphofructokinase and pyruvate kinase--and is thus potentially unable to convert glucose into pyruvate, an important substrate for energy generation. The Wolbachia surface protein, wBm00432, is complexed to six B. malayi glycolytic enzymes, including aldolase. In this study we characterized two B. malayi aldolase isozymes and found that their expression is dependent on Wolbachia fitness and number. We confirmed by immuno-transmission electron microscopy that aldolase is associated with the Wolbachia surface. RNAi experiments suggested that aldolase-2 plays a significant role in both Wolbachia survival and embryogenesis in B. malayi. Treatment with doxycycline reduced Wolbachia fitness and increased the amount of both glucose and glycogen detected in the filarial parasite, indicating that glucose metabolism and glycogen storage in B. malayi are associated with Wolbachia fitness. This metabolic co-dependency between Wolbachia and its filarial nematode indicates that glycolysis could be a shared metabolic pathway between the bacteria and B. malayi, and thus a potential new target for anti-filarial therapy. PMID:27078260

  2. Wolbachia filarial interactions.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Mark J; Voronin, Denis; Johnston, Kelly L; Ford, Louise

    2013-04-01

    Wolbachia pipientis is a widespread intracellular bacterial symbiont of arthropods and is common in insects. One of their more exotic and unexpected hosts is the filarial nematodes, notable for the parasites responsible for onchocerciasis (river blindness), lymphatic filariasis (elephantiasis) and dirofilariasis (heartworm). Wolbachia are only present in a subgroup of the filarial nematodes and do not extend to other groups of nematodes either parasitic or free-living. In the medically and veterinary important species that host Wolbachia, the symbiont has become an essential partner to key biological processes in the life of the nematode to the point where antibiotic elimination of the bacteria leads to a potent and effective anti-filarial drug treatment. We review the cellular and molecular basis of Wolbachia filarial interactions and highlight the key processes provided by the endosymbiont upon which the nematodes have become entirely dependent. This dependency is primarily restricted to periods of the lifecycle with heavy metabolic demands including growth and development of larval stages and embryogenesis in the adult female. Also, the longevity of filarial parasites is compromised following depletion of the symbiont, which for the first time has delivered a safe and effective treatment to kill adult parasites with antibiotics. PMID:23210448

  3. Protection against filarial infection by 45-49 kDa molecules of Brugia malayi via IFN-γ-mediated iNOS induction.

    PubMed

    Verma, Shiv K; Joseph, Sujith K; Verma, Richa; Kushwaha, Vikas; Parmar, Naveen; Yadav, Pawan K; Thota, Jagadeshwar Reddy; Kar, Susanta; Murthy, P Kalpana

    2015-01-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) mediated mechanisms have been implicated in killing of some life-stages of Brugia malayi/Wuchereria bancrofti and protect the host through type 1 responses and IFN-γ stimulated toxic mediators' release. However, the identity of NO stimulating molecules of the parasites is not known. Three predominantly NO-stimulating SDS-PAGE resolved fractions F8 (45.24-48.64 kDa), F11 (33.44-38.44 kDa) and F12 (28.44-33.44 kDa) from B. malayi were identified and their proteins were analyzed by 2-DE and MALDI-TOF/TOF. Tropomyosin, calponin and de novo peptides were identified by 2-DE and MALDI-TOF/TOF in F8 and immunization with F8 conferred most significant protection against L3-initiated infection in Mastomys coucha. Immunized animals showed upregulated F8-induced NO, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-10, TGF-β release, cellular proliferative responses and specific IgG and IgG1. Anti-IFN-γ, anti-TNF-α, and anti-IL-1β significantly reduced F8-mediated NO generation and iNOS induction at protein levels. Anti-IFN-γ treated cells showed maximum reduction (>74%) in NO generation suggesting a predominant role of IFN-γ in iNOS induction. In conclusion, the findings suggest that F8 which contains tropomyosin, calponin and de novo peptides protects the host via IFN-γ mediated iNOS induction and may hold promise as vaccine candidate(s). This is also the first report of identification of tropomyosin and calponin in B. malayi. PMID:25454090

  4. New Insights into the Evolution of Wolbachia Infections in Filarial Nematodes Inferred from a Large Range of Screened Species

    PubMed Central

    Barbuto, Michela; Martin, Coralie; Lo, Nathan; Uni, Shigehiko; Landmann, Frederic; Baccei, Sara G.; Guerrero, Ricardo; de Souza Lima, Sueli; Bandi, Claudio; Wanji, Samuel; Diagne, Moustapha; Casiraghi, Maurizio

    2011-01-01

    Background Wolbachia are intriguing symbiotic endobacteria with a peculiar host range that includes arthropods and a single nematode family, the Onchocercidae encompassing agents of filariases. This raises the question of the origin of infection in filariae. Wolbachia infect the female germline and the hypodermis. Some evidences lead to the theory that Wolbachia act as mutualist and coevolved with filariae from one infection event: their removal sterilizes female filariae; all the specimens of a positive species are infected; Wolbachia are vertically inherited; a few species lost the symbiont. However, most data on Wolbachia and filaria relationships derive from studies on few species of Onchocercinae and Dirofilariinae, from mammals. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the Wolbachia distribution testing 35 filarial species, including 28 species and 7 genera and/or subgenera newly screened, using PCR, immunohistochemical staining, whole mount fluorescent analysis, and cocladogenesis analysis. (i) Among the newly screened Onchocercinae from mammals eight species harbour Wolbachia but for some of them, bacteria are absent in the hypodermis, or in variable density. (ii) Wolbachia are not detected in the pathological model Monanema martini and in 8, upon 9, species of Cercopithifilaria. (iii) Supergroup F Wolbachia is identified in two newly screened Mansonella species and in Cercopithifilaria japonica. (iv) Type F Wolbachia infect the intestinal cells and somatic female genital tract. (v) Among Oswaldofilariinae, Waltonellinae and Splendidofilariinae, from saurian, anuran and bird respectively, Wolbachia are not detected. Conclusions/Significance The absence of Wolbachia in 63% of onchocercids, notably in the ancestral Oswaldofilariinae estimated 140 mya old, the diverse tissues or specimens distribution, and a recent lateral transfer in supergroup F Wolbachia, modify the current view on the role and evolution of the endosymbiont and their hosts. Further

  5. Efficacy of three-week oxytetracycline or rifampin monotherapy compared with a combination regimen against the filarial nematode Onchocerca ochengi.

    PubMed

    Bah, Germanus S; Ward, Emma L; Srivastava, Abhishek; Trees, Alexander J; Tanya, Vincent N; Makepeace, Benjamin L

    2014-01-01

    Onchocerciasis (river blindness), caused by the filarial nematode Onchocerca volvulus, is a major cause of visual impairment and dermatitis in sub-Saharan Africa. As O. volvulus contains an obligatory bacterial symbiont (Wolbachia), it is susceptible to antibiotic chemotherapy, although current regimens are considered too prolonged for community-level control programs. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacies of oxytetracycline and rifampin, administered separately or in combination, against a close relative of O. volvulus (Onchocerca ochengi) in cattle. Six animals per group were treated with continuous or intermittent oxytetracycline regimens, and effects on adult worm viability, dermal microfilarial loads, and Wolbachia density in worm tissues were assessed. Subsequently, the efficacies of 3-week regimens of oxytetracycline and rifampin alone and a combination regimen were compared, and rifampin levels in plasma and skin were quantified. A 6-month regimen of oxytetracycline with monthly dosing was strongly adulticidal, while 3-week and 6-week regimens exhibited weaker adulticidal effects. However, all three regimens achieved >2-log reductions in microfilarial load. In contrast, rifampin monotherapy and oxytetracycline-rifampin duotherapy failed to induce substantive reductions in either adult worm burden or microfilarial load, although a borderline effect on Wolbachia density was observed following duotherapy. Dermal rifampin levels were maintained above the MIC for >24 h after a single intravenous dose. We conclude that oxytetracycline-rifampin duotherapy is less efficacious against O. ochengi than oxytetracycline alone. Further studies will be required to determine whether rifampin reduces oxytetracycline bioavailability in this system, as suggested by human studies using other tetracycline-rifampin combinations. PMID:24247133

  6. Efficacy of Three-Week Oxytetracycline or Rifampin Monotherapy Compared with a Combination Regimen against the Filarial Nematode Onchocerca ochengi

    PubMed Central

    Bah, Germanus S.; Ward, Emma L.; Srivastava, Abhishek; Trees, Alexander J.; Tanya, Vincent N.

    2014-01-01

    Onchocerciasis (river blindness), caused by the filarial nematode Onchocerca volvulus, is a major cause of visual impairment and dermatitis in sub-Saharan Africa. As O. volvulus contains an obligatory bacterial symbiont (Wolbachia), it is susceptible to antibiotic chemotherapy, although current regimens are considered too prolonged for community-level control programs. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacies of oxytetracycline and rifampin, administered separately or in combination, against a close relative of O. volvulus (Onchocerca ochengi) in cattle. Six animals per group were treated with continuous or intermittent oxytetracycline regimens, and effects on adult worm viability, dermal microfilarial loads, and Wolbachia density in worm tissues were assessed. Subsequently, the efficacies of 3-week regimens of oxytetracycline and rifampin alone and a combination regimen were compared, and rifampin levels in plasma and skin were quantified. A 6-month regimen of oxytetracycline with monthly dosing was strongly adulticidal, while 3-week and 6-week regimens exhibited weaker adulticidal effects. However, all three regimens achieved >2-log reductions in microfilarial load. In contrast, rifampin monotherapy and oxytetracycline-rifampin duotherapy failed to induce substantive reductions in either adult worm burden or microfilarial load, although a borderline effect on Wolbachia density was observed following duotherapy. Dermal rifampin levels were maintained above the MIC for >24 h after a single intravenous dose. We conclude that oxytetracycline-rifampin duotherapy is less efficacious against O. ochengi than oxytetracycline alone. Further studies will be required to determine whether rifampin reduces oxytetracycline bioavailability in this system, as suggested by human studies using other tetracycline-rifampin combinations. PMID:24247133

  7. Identification and activity of inhibitors of the essential nematode-specific metalloprotease DPY-31.

    PubMed

    France, David J; Stepek, Gillian; Houston, Douglas R; Williams, Lewis; McCormack, Gillian; Walkinshaw, Malcolm D; Page, Antony P

    2015-12-15

    Infection by parasitic nematodes is widespread in the developing world causing extensive morbidity and mortality. Furthermore, infection of animals is a global problem, with a substantial impact on food production. Here we identify small molecule inhibitors of a nematode-specific metalloprotease, DPY-31, using both known metalloprotease inhibitors and virtual screening. This strategy successfully identified several μM inhibitors of DPY-31 from both the human filarial nematode Brugia malayi, and the parasitic gastrointestinal nematode of sheep Teladorsagia circumcincta. Further studies using both free living and parasitic nematodes show that these inhibitors elicit the severe body morphology defect 'Dumpy' (Dpy; shorter and fatter), a predominantly non-viable phenotype consistent with mutants lacking the DPY-31 gene. Taken together, these results represent a start point in developing DPY-31 inhibition as a totally novel mechanism for treating infection by parasitic nematodes in humans and animals. PMID:26546217

  8. Nature limits filarial transmission

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Goutam

    2008-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis, caused by Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi and B. timori is a public health problem of considerable magnitude of the tropics and subtropics. Presently 1.3 billion people are at risk of lymphatic filariasis (LF) infection and about 120 million people are affected in 83 countries. In this context it is worth mentioning that 'nature' itself limits filarial transmission to a great extent in a number of ways such as by reducing vector populations, parasitic load and many other bearings. Possibilities to utilize these bearings of natural control of filariasis should be searched and if manipulations on nature, like indiscriminate urbanization and deforestation, creating sites favourable for the breeding of filarial vectors and unsanitary conditions, water pollution with organic matters etc., are reduced below the threshold level, we will be highly benefited. Understandings of the factors related to natural phenomena of control of filariasis narrated in this article may help to adopt effective control strategies. PMID:18500974

  9. Population genomics of the filarial nematode parasite Wuchereria bancrofti from mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Small, Scott T; Reimer, Lisa J; Tisch, Daniel J; King, Christopher L; Christensen, Bruce M; Siba, Peter M; Kazura, James W; Serre, David; Zimmerman, Peter A

    2016-04-01

    Wuchereria bancrofti is a parasitic nematode and the primary cause of lymphatic filariasis--a disease specific to humans. W. bancrofti currently infects over 90 million people throughout the tropics and has been acknowledged by the world health organization as a vulnerable parasite. Current research has focused primarily on the clinical manifestations of disease and little is known about the evolutionary history of W. bancrofti. To improve upon knowledge of the evolutionary history of W. bancrofti, we whole genome sequenced 13 W. bancrofti larvae. We circumvent many of the difficulties of multiple infections by sampling larvae directly from mosquitoes that were experimentally inoculated with infected blood. To begin, we used whole genome data to reconstruct the historical population size. Our results support a history of fluctuating population sizes that can be correlated with human migration and fluctuating mosquito abundances. Next, we reconstructed the putative pedigree of W. bancrofti worms within an infection using the kinship coefficient. We deduced that there are full-sib and half-sib relationships residing within the same larval cohort. Through combined analysis of the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes we concluded that this is likely a results of polyandrous mating, the first time reported for W. bancrofti. Lastly, we scanned the genomes for signatures of natural selection. Annotation of putative selected regions identified proteins that may have aided in a parasitic life style or may have evolved to protect against current drug treatments. We discuss our results in the greater context of understanding the biology of an animal with a unique life history and ecology. PMID:26850696

  10. Filarial Excretory-Secretory Products Induce Human Monocytes to Produce Lymphangiogenic Mediators

    PubMed Central

    Weinkopff, Tiffany; Mackenzie, Charles; Eversole, Rob; Lammie, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    The nematodes Wuchereria bancrofti and Brugia spp. infect over 120 million people worldwide, causing lymphedema, elephantiasis and hydrocele, collectively known as lymphatic filariasis. Most infected individuals appear to be asymptomatic, but many exhibit sub-clinical manifestations including the lymphangiectasia that likely contributes to the development of lymphedema and elephantiasis. As adult worm excretory-secretory products (ES) do not directly activate lymphatic endothelial cells (LEC), we investigated the role of monocyte/macrophage-derived soluble factors in the development of filarial lymphatic pathology. We analyzed the production of IL-8, IL-6 and VEGF-A by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from naïve donors following stimulation with filarial ES products. ES-stimulated PBMCs produced significantly more IL-8, IL-6 and VEGF-A compared to cells cultured in medium alone; CD14+ monocytes appear to be the primary producers of IL-8 and VEGF-A, but not IL-6. Furthermore, IL-8, IL-6 and VEGF-A induced in vitro tubule formation in LEC Matrigel cultures. Matrigel plugs supplemented with IL-8, IL-6, VEGF-A, or with supernatants from ES-stimulated PBMCs and implanted in vivo stimulated lymphangiogenesis. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that monocytes/macrophages exposed to filarial ES products may modulate lymphatic function through the secretion of soluble factors that stimulate the vessel growth associated with the pathogenesis of filarial disease. PMID:25010672

  11. Evaluation of immuno diagnostic assay for the exposure of stage specific filarial infection.

    PubMed

    Ravishankaran, Rajendran; Shridharan, Radhika Nagamangalam; Vishal, Lawrence Ansel; Meenakshisundaram, Sankaranarayanan; Karande, Anjali Anoop; Kaliraj, Perumal

    2016-03-01

    Lymphatic filariasis is a debilitating diseases caused by filarial parasitic nematodes. The infection may be acquired in childhood but the symptoms become apparent only in later life. To evaluate the success of any intervention, sensitive diagnostics were used to identify infection among endemic normals that are likely to develop microfilaremia in due course of time. Capture assay was standardized using the recombinant protein Brugia malayi Abundant Larval Transcript-2 (ALT-2) specific monoclonal and poly-clonal antibodies and evaluated with serum samples of clinical groups from high and low filarial infection area individuals (HIA/LIA), Endemic Normal (EN, n = 478), microfilaeremics (MF, n = 77), chronic pathology (CP, n = 57) and non endemic normal (NEN, n = 20). In order to assess stage-specific infection, ALT-2 capture assay was compared with the early reported Venom allergen homologue (VAH) and microfilariae specific SXP-1 capture assays. Of the 632 serum samples tested, ALT-2 and VAH capture assays detected circulating filarial antigen (CFA) in 57% and 52% of HIA-EN individuals, respectively. As expected, the VAH and SXP-1 capture assays were positive for 100 % of MF individuals. The described capture assays can be useful for the detection of early and stage-specific filarial infections in endemic regions of developing countries. PMID:27078646

  12. Genes expressed in Brugia malayi infective third stage larvae.

    PubMed

    Blaxter, M L; Raghavan, N; Ghosh, I; Guiliano, D; Lu, W; Williams, S A; Slatko, B; Scott, A L

    1996-04-01

    We have used a tag sequencing approach to survey genes expressed in the third stage infective larvae of the human filarial nematode parasite Brugia malayi. RNA was isolated from late vector-stage L3 larvae after days 9 or 10 of infection in mosquitos, and converted to cDNA by reverse transcriptase. Double-stranded cDNA was produced by either conventional methods (non-SL cDNA library) or by PCR using the nematode spliced leader (SLI) and oligo(dT) primers (SL cDNA library). Two clone libraries (one from SL and one from non-SL cDNAs) were constructed in lambda ZapII. A set of these full-length clones was selected and 596 inserts were sequenced from the 5' end. We have identified 364 B. malayi genes (the majority of which are new) that encode housekeeping proteins, structural proteins, proteins of immediate immunological or drug-discovery interest as well as a large class of novel sequences which may prove to have significant involvement in host invasion. Extensive, genome-wide approaches to the analysis of larval gene expression are now possible for B. malayi. We present several examples of this approach. PMID:8784774

  13. Cystatins from filarial parasites: evolution, adaptation and function in the host-parasite relationship.

    PubMed

    Gregory, William F; Maizels, Rick M

    2008-01-01

    Cystatins, together with stefins and kininogens, are members of the cystatin superfamily of cysteine protease inhibitors (CPI) present across the animal and plant kingdoms. Their role in parasitic organisms may encompass both essential developmental processes and specific interactions with the parasite's vector and/or final host. We summarise information gathered on three cystatins from the human filarial nematode Brugia malayi (Bm-CPI-1, -2 and -3), and contrast them those expressed by other parasites and by the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Bm-CPI-2 differs from C. elegans cystatin, having acquired the additional function of inhibiting asparaginyl endopeptidase (AEP), in a manner similar to some human cystatins. Thus, we propose that Bm-CPI-2 and orthologues from related filarial parasites represent a new subset of nematode cystatins. Bm-CPI-1 and CPI-3 share only 25% amino acid identity with Bm-CPI-2, and lack an evolutionarily conserved glycine residue in the N-terminal region. These sequences group distantly from the other nematode cystatins, and represent a second novel subset of filarial cystatin-like genes. Expression analyses also show important differences between the CPI-2 and CPI-1/-3 groups. Bm-cpi-2 is expressed at all time points of the parasite life cycle, while Bm-cpi-1 and -3 expression is confined to the late stages of development in the mosquito vector, terminating within 48h of infection of the mammalian host. Hence, we hypothesise that CPI-2 has evolved to block mammalian proteases (including the antigen-processing enzyme AEP) while CPI-1 and -3 function in the milieu of the mosquito vector necessary for transmission of the parasite. PMID:18249028

  14. Transcriptomes and pathways associated with infectivity, survival and immunogenicity in Brugia malayi L3

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ben-Wen; Rush, Amy C; Mitreva, Makedonka; Yin, Yong; Spiro, David; Ghedin, Elodie; Weil, Gary J

    2009-01-01

    Background Filarial nematode parasites cause serious diseases such as elephantiasis and river blindness in humans, and heartworm infections in dogs. Third stage filarial larvae (L3) are a critical stage in the life cycle of filarial parasites, because this is the stage that is transmitted by arthropod vectors to initiate infections in mammals. Improved understanding of molecular mechanisms associated with this transition may provide important leads for development of new therapies and vaccines to prevent filarial infections. This study explores changes in gene expression associated with the transition of Brugia malayi third stage larvae (BmL3) from mosquitoes into mammalian hosts and how these changes are affected by radiation. Radiation effects are especially interesting because irradiated L3 induce partial immunity to filarial infections. The underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for the efficacy of such vaccines are unkown. Results Expression profiles were obtained using a new filarial microarray with 18, 104 64-mer elements. 771 genes were identified as differentially expressed in two-way comparative analyses of the three L3 types. 353 genes were up-regulated in mosquito L3 (L3i) relative to cultured L3 (L3c). These genes are important for establishment of filarial infections in mammalian hosts. Other genes were up-regulated in L3c relative to L3i (234) or irradiated L3 (L3ir) (22). These culture-induced transcripts include key molecules required for growth and development. 165 genes were up-regulated in L3ir relative to L3c; these genes encode highly immunogenic proteins and proteins involved in radiation repair. L3ir and L3i have similar transcription profiles for genes that encode highly immunogenic proteins, antioxidants and cuticle components. Conclusion Changes in gene expression that normally occur during culture under conditions that support L3 development and molting are prevented or delayed by radiation. This may explain the enhanced

  15. Immunohistochemical/immunogold detection and distribution of the endosymbiont Wolbachia of Dirofilaria immitis and Brugia pahangi using a polyclonal antiserum raised against WSP (Wolbachia surface protein).

    PubMed

    Kramer, L H; Passeri, B; Corona, S; Simoncini, L; Casiraghi, M

    2003-03-01

    Intracellular bacteria in filarial nematodes were described as early as the 1970s, yet it was only with the work on Dirofilaria immitis, the agent of canine and feline heartworm disease, that these microorganisms were identified as belonging to Wolbachia, a genus known for encompassing bacteria infecting insects and other arthropods. The implications for the presence of intracellular bacteria in filarial nematodes is now the subject of intense research, particularly regarding their role in the immunology and pathogenesis of disease in infected humans and animals and as a possible target for therapy. Here, the authors report results on the immunohistochemical and immunogold staining of Wolbachia in D. immitis and Brugia pahangi using polyclonal antibodies raised against the recombinant Wolbachia surface protein (WSP). The bacteria were present in the lateral hypodermal chords of both male and female worms and in the reproductive tract of adult females (oocytes, morulae, microfilariae). In D. immitis and B. pahangi from animals treated with tetracycline, positive staining was observed in the lateral chords of adult males and females, but was absent from the oocytes and morulae. These results indicate that Wolbachia endosymbionts can be identified immunohistochemically with anti-WSP polyclonal antibodies, that their distribution matches that already described for Wolbachia of other filarial worms, and that antibiotic treatment may impede the vertical transmission of these bacteria. Unequivocal detection of Wolbachia is essential for the study of this symbiont, in particular to monitor the effects of antibiotic treatment on worms. The use of a specific marker for bacteria in their nematode hosts represents an extremely useful tool in evaluating the pathogenic role and the effect of antibiotic treatment on these potential targets in the control of filarial disease. PMID:12632152

  16. The Effect of In Vitro Cultivation on the Transcriptome of Adult Brugia malayi

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, Maeghan; Burkman, Erica; Zaky, Weam I.; Xia, Jianguo; Moorhead, Andrew; Williams, Steven A.; Geary, Timothy G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Filarial nematodes cause serious and debilitating infections in human populations of tropical countries, contributing to an entrenched cycle of poverty. Only one human filarial parasite, Brugia malayi, can be maintained in rodents in the laboratory setting. It has been a widely used model organism in experiments that employ culture systems, the impact of which on the worms is unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings Using Illumina RNA sequencing, we characterized changes in gene expression upon in vitro maintenance of adult B. malayi female worms at four time points: immediately upon removal from the host, immediately after receipt following shipment, and after 48 h and 5 days in liquid culture media. The dramatic environmental change and the 24 h time lapse between removal from the host and establishment in culture caused a globally dysregulated gene expression profile. We found a maximum of 562 differentially expressed genes based on pairwise comparison between time points. After an initial shock upon removal from the host and shipping, a few stress fingerprints remained after 48 h in culture and until the experiment was stopped. This was best illustrated by a strong and persistent up-regulation of several genes encoding cuticle collagens, as well as serpins. Conclusions/Significance These findings suggest that B. malayi can be maintained in culture as a valid system for pharmacological and biological studies, at least for several days after removal from the host and adaptation to the new environment. However, genes encoding several stress indicators remained dysregulated until the experiment was stopped. PMID:26727204

  17. Oxidative stress plays major role in mediating apoptosis in filarial nematode Setaria cervi in the presence of trans-stilbene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Niladri; Parida, Pravat Kumar; Santra, Abhishek; Ghosh, Tamashree; Dutta, Ananya; Jana, Kuladip; Misra, Anup Kumar; Sinha Babu, Santi P

    2016-04-01

    Lymphatic filariasis, affecting around 120 million people in 80 countries worldwide, is an extremely painful disease and caused permanent and long term disability. Owing to its alarming prevalence there is immediate need for development of new therapeutics. A series of trans-stilbene derivatives were synthesized using aqueous reaction condition showing potential as antifilarial agents demonstrated in vitro. MTT reduction assay and dye exclusion test were performed to evaluate the micro and macrofilaricidal potential of these compounds. Amid 20 trans-stilbene derivatives together with Resveratrol (RSV), a multifunctional natural product was screened; nine compounds (28, 29, 33, 35, 36, 38, 39, 41 and 42) have showed promising micro and macrofilaricidal activities and four of them (28, 39, 41 and 42) showed better effectiveness than RSV. In the treated parasites apoptosis was established by DNA laddering, in situ DNA fragmentation and FACS analysis. The generation of ROS in the treated parasites was indicated by the depletion in the level of GSH, GR and GST activity and elevation of SOD, catalase, GPx activity and superoxide anion and H2O2 level. Along with the ROS generation and oxidative stress, the decreased expression of anti-apoptotic ced-9 gene and increased expression of nematode specific pro-apoptotic genes, egl-1, ced-4 and ced-3 at the level of transcription and translation level; the up-regulation of caspase-3 activity and involvement of caspase-8,9,3, cytochrome-c and PARP were also observed and which denotes the probable existence of both extrinsic and intrinsic pathways apoptosis in parasitic nematodes. This observation is reported first time and thus it confirmed the mode of action and effectiveness of the compounds. Further, the comparative bioavailability-pharmacokinetics studies showed that compound 28 possesses comparable properties with Ivermectin. This study will certainly intensify our understanding of the pharmacological importance of trans

  18. Molecular and phylogenetic analysis of the filarial nematode Micipsella numidica from the hare Lepus europaeus in Italy.

    PubMed

    Gabrielli, S; Galuppi, R; Fraulo, M; Savini, F; Morandi, B; Cancrini, G; Poglayen, G

    2016-07-01

    The genus Micipsella comprises three species of filariae to date identified in lagomorphs only, whereas the other genera belonging to the subfamily Splendidofilariinae are described as parasites of birds, reptiles and mammals. In the present study seven specimens of Micipsella numidica (Seurat, 1917), collected from the hare Lepus europaeus in Italy, were characterized genetically by molecular amplification of the mitochondrial genes (12S rDNA; cox1) and the 5S rDNA gene spacer region. Phylogenetic trees inferred using available sequences from filariae and those identified in this study evidenced a close relationship between M. numidica and Splendidofilariinae of other mammals and reptiles (Rumenfilaria andersoni and Madathamugadia hiepei). The present findings, apart from adding new data about the hosts in Italy, support the taxonomic position of M. numidica and highlight the substantial biological and molecular differences existing between Splendidofilariinae and other Onchocercidae. The study also contributes to our knowledge of the molecular/genetic diagnosis of filarial parasites of veterinary and medical concern in any vertebrate or invertebrate host. PMID:26123728

  19. Analysis of gene expression from the Wolbachia genome of a filarial nematode supports both metabolic and defensive roles within the symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Darby, Alistair C; Armstrong, Stuart D; Bah, Germanus S; Kaur, Gaganjot; Hughes, Margaret A; Kay, Suzanne M; Koldkjær, Pia; Rainbow, Lucille; Radford, Alan D; Blaxter, Mark L; Tanya, Vincent N; Trees, Alexander J; Cordaux, Richard; Wastling, Jonathan M; Makepeace, Benjamin L

    2012-12-01

    The α-proteobacterium Wolbachia is probably the most prevalent, vertically transmitted symbiont on Earth. In contrast with its wide distribution in arthropods, Wolbachia is restricted to one family of animal-parasitic nematodes, the Onchocercidae. This includes filarial pathogens such as Onchocerca volvulus, the cause of human onchocerciasis, or river blindness. The symbiosis between filariae and Wolbachia is obligate, although the basis of this dependency is not fully understood. Previous studies suggested that Wolbachia may provision metabolites (e.g., haem, riboflavin, and nucleotides) and/or contribute to immune defense. Importantly, Wolbachia is restricted to somatic tissues in adult male worms, whereas females also harbor bacteria in the germline. We sought to characterize the nature of the symbiosis between Wolbachia and O. ochengi, a bovine parasite representing the closest relative of O. volvulus. First, we sequenced the complete genome of Wolbachia strain wOo, which revealed an inability to synthesize riboflavin de novo. Using RNA-seq, we also generated endobacterial transcriptomes from male soma and female germline. In the soma, transcripts for membrane transport and respiration were up-regulated, while the gonad exhibited enrichment for DNA replication and translation. The most abundant Wolbachia proteins, as determined by geLC-MS, included ligands for mammalian Toll-like receptors. Enzymes involved in nucleotide synthesis were dominant among metabolism-related proteins, whereas the haem biosynthetic pathway was poorly represented. We conclude that Wolbachia may have a mitochondrion-like function in the soma, generating ATP for its host. Moreover, the abundance of immunogenic proteins in wOo suggests a role in diverting the immune system toward an ineffective antibacterial response. PMID:22919073

  20. Analysis of gene expression from the Wolbachia genome of a filarial nematode supports both metabolic and defensive roles within the symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Darby, Alistair C.; Armstrong, Stuart D.; Bah, Germanus S.; Kaur, Gaganjot; Hughes, Margaret A.; Kay, Suzanne M.; Koldkjær, Pia; Rainbow, Lucille; Radford, Alan D.; Blaxter, Mark L.; Tanya, Vincent N.; Trees, Alexander J.; Cordaux, Richard; Wastling, Jonathan M.; Makepeace, Benjamin L.

    2012-01-01

    The α-proteobacterium Wolbachia is probably the most prevalent, vertically transmitted symbiont on Earth. In contrast with its wide distribution in arthropods, Wolbachia is restricted to one family of animal-parasitic nematodes, the Onchocercidae. This includes filarial pathogens such as Onchocerca volvulus, the cause of human onchocerciasis, or river blindness. The symbiosis between filariae and Wolbachia is obligate, although the basis of this dependency is not fully understood. Previous studies suggested that Wolbachia may provision metabolites (e.g., haem, riboflavin, and nucleotides) and/or contribute to immune defense. Importantly, Wolbachia is restricted to somatic tissues in adult male worms, whereas females also harbor bacteria in the germline. We sought to characterize the nature of the symbiosis between Wolbachia and O. ochengi, a bovine parasite representing the closest relative of O. volvulus. First, we sequenced the complete genome of Wolbachia strain wOo, which revealed an inability to synthesize riboflavin de novo. Using RNA-seq, we also generated endobacterial transcriptomes from male soma and female germline. In the soma, transcripts for membrane transport and respiration were up-regulated, while the gonad exhibited enrichment for DNA replication and translation. The most abundant Wolbachia proteins, as determined by geLC-MS, included ligands for mammalian Toll-like receptors. Enzymes involved in nucleotide synthesis were dominant among metabolism-related proteins, whereas the haem biosynthetic pathway was poorly represented. We conclude that Wolbachia may have a mitochondrion-like function in the soma, generating ATP for its host. Moreover, the abundance of immunogenic proteins in wOo suggests a role in diverting the immune system toward an ineffective antibacterial response. PMID:22919073

  1. A Proteomic Analysis of the Body Wall, Digestive Tract, and Reproductive Tract of Brugia malayi.

    PubMed

    Morris, C Paul; Bennuru, Sasisekhar; Kropp, Laura E; Zweben, Jesse A; Meng, Zhaojing; Taylor, Rebekah T; Chan, King; Veenstra, Timothy D; Nutman, Thomas B; Mitre, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Filarial worms are parasitic nematodes that cause devastating diseases such as lymphatic filariasis (LF) and onchocerciasis. Filariae are nematodes with complex anatomy including fully developed digestive tracts and reproductive organs. To better understand the basic biology of filarial parasites and to provide insights into drug targets and vaccine design, we conducted a proteomic analysis of different anatomic fractions of Brugia malayi, a causative agent of LF. Approximately 500 adult female B. malayi worms were dissected, and three anatomical fractions (body wall, digestive tract, and reproductive tract) were obtained. Proteins from each anatomical fraction were extracted, desalted, trypsinized, and analyzed by microcapillary reverse-phase liquid chromatography-tandem-mass spectrometry. In total, we identified 4,785 B. malayi proteins. While 1,894 were identified in all three anatomic fractions, 396 were positively identified only within the digestive tract, 114 only within the body wall, and 1,011 only within the reproductive tract. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed a bias for transporters to be present within the digestive tract, suggesting that the intestine of adult filariae is functional and important for nutrient uptake or waste removal. As expected, the body wall exhibited increased frequencies of cytoskeletal proteins, and the reproductive tract had increased frequencies of proteins involved in nuclear regulation and transcription. In assessing for possible vaccine candidates, we focused on proteins sequestered within the digestive tract, as these could possibly represent "hidden antigens" with low risk of prior allergic sensitization. We identified 106 proteins that are enriched in the digestive tract and are predicted to localize to the surface of cells in the the digestive tract. It is possible that some of these proteins are on the luminal surface and may be accessible by antibodies ingested by the worm. A subset of 27 of these proteins appear

  2. Effects of Doxycycline on gene expression in Wolbachia and Brugia malayi adult female worms in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Most filarial nematodes contain Wolbachia symbionts. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of doxycycline on gene expression in Wolbachia and adult female Brugia malayi. Methods Brugia malayi infected gerbils were treated with doxycycline for 6-weeks. This treatment largely cleared Wolbachia and arrested worm reproduction. RNA recovered from treated and control female worms was labeled by random priming and hybridized to the Version 2- filarial microarray to obtain expression profiles. Results and discussion Results showed significant changes in expression for 200 Wolbachia (29% of Wolbachia genes with expression signals in untreated worms) and 546 B. malayi array elements after treatment. These elements correspond to known genes and also to novel genes with unknown biological functions. Most differentially expressed Wolbachia genes were down-regulated after treatment (98.5%). In contrast, doxycycline had a mixed effect on B. malayi gene expression with many more genes being significantly up-regulated after treatment (85% of differentially expressed genes). Genes and processes involved in reproduction (gender-regulated genes, collagen, amino acid metabolism, ribosomal processes, and cytoskeleton) were down-regulated after doxycycline while up-regulated genes and pathways suggest adaptations for survival in response to stress (energy metabolism, electron transport, anti-oxidants, nutrient transport, bacterial signaling pathways, and immune evasion). Conclusions Doxycycline reduced Wolbachia and significantly decreased bacterial gene expression. Wolbachia ribosomes are believed to be the primary biological target for doxycycline in filarial worms. B. malayi genes essential for reproduction, growth and development were also down-regulated; these changes are consistent with doxycycline effects on embryo development and reproduction. On the other hand, many B. malayi genes involved in energy production, electron-transport, metabolism, anti

  3. Detection of circulating parasite-derived microRNAs in filarial infections.

    PubMed

    Tritten, Lucienne; Burkman, Erica; Moorhead, Andrew; Satti, Mohammed; Geary, James; Mackenzie, Charles; Geary, Timothy

    2014-07-01

    Filarial nematodes cause chronic and profoundly debilitating diseases in both humans and animals. Applications of novel technology are providing unprecedented opportunities to improve diagnosis and our understanding of the molecular basis for host-parasite interactions. As a first step, we investigated the presence of circulating miRNAs released by filarial nematodes into the host bloodstream. miRNA deep-sequencing combined with bioinformatics revealed over 200 mature miRNA sequences of potential nematode origin in Dirofilaria immitis-infected dog plasma in two independent analyses, and 21 in Onchocerca volvulus-infected human serum. Total RNA obtained from D. immitis-infected dog plasma was subjected to stem-loop RT-qPCR assays targeting two detected miRNA candidates, miR-71 and miR-34. Additionally, Brugia pahangi-infected dog samples were included in the analysis, as these miRNAs were previously detected in extracts prepared from this species. The presence of miR-71 and miR-34 discriminated infected samples (both species) from uninfected samples, in which no specific miRNA amplification occurred. However, absolute miRNA copy numbers were not significantly correlated with microfilaraemia for either parasite. This may be due to the imprecision of mf counts to estimate infection intensity or to miRNA contributions from the unknown number of adult worms present. Nonetheless, parasite-derived circulating miRNAs are found in plasma or serum even for those species that do not live in the bloodstream. PMID:25033073

  4. Evaluation of immune response elicited by inulin as an adjuvant with filarial antigens in mice model.

    PubMed

    Mahalakshmi, N; Aparnaa, R; Kaliraj, P

    2014-10-01

    Filariasis caused by infectious parasitic nematodes has been identified as the second leading source of permanent and long-term disability in Sub-Saharan Africa, Asia and Latin America. Several vaccine candidates were identified from infective third-stage larvae (L3) which involves in the critical transition from arthropod to human. Hitherto studies of these antigens in combination with alum adjuvant have shown to elicit its characteristic Th2 responses. Inulin is a safe, non-toxic adjuvant that principally stimulates the innate immune response through the alternative complement pathway. In the present study, the immune response elicited by inulin and alum as adjuvants were compared with filarial antigens from different aetiological agents: secreted larval acidic protein 1 (SLAP1) from Onchocerca volvulus and venom allergen homologue (VAH) from Brugia malayi as single or as cocktail vaccines in mice model. The study revealed that inulin can induce better humoral response against these antigens than alum adjuvant. Antibody isotyping disclosed inulin's ability to elevate the levels of IgG2a and IgG3 antibodies which mediates in complement-dependent cytotoxicity and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), respectively, in mice. Splenocyte analysis showed that T cells prestimulated with inulin have higher stimulation index (P < 0.05) than alum except for BmVAH antigen. In vitro ADCC assay showed that inulin formulation had induced higher cytotoxicity with filarial antigens (as single P < 0.01 and as cocktail P < 0.05, respectively) than alum. The results had confirmed the capability of inulin to deplete the levels of Treg and brought a balance in Th1/Th2 arms against filarial antigens in mice. PMID:25041426

  5. Expression of five acetylcholine receptor subunit genes in Brugia malayi adult worms

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ben-Wen; Rush, Amy C.; Weil, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) are required for body movement in parasitic nematodes and are targets of “classical” anthelmintic drugs such as levamisole and pyrantel and of newer drugs such as tribendimidine and derquantel. While neurotransmission explains the effects of these drugs on nematode movement, their effects on parasite reproduction are unexplained. The levamisole AChR type (L-AChRs) in Caenorhabditis elegans is comprised of five subunits: Cel-UNC-29, Cel-UNC-38, Cel-UNC-63, Cel-LEV-1 and Cel-LEV-8. The genome of the filarial parasite Brugia malayi contains nine AChRs subunits including orthologues of Cel-unc-29, Cel-unc-38, and Cel-unc-63. We performed in situ hybridization with RNA probes to localize the expression of five AChR genes (Bm1_35890-Bma-unc-29, Bm1_20330-Bma-unc-38, Bm1_38195-Bma-unc-63, Bm1_48815-Bma-acr-26 and Bm1_40515-Bma-acr-12) in B. malayi adult worms. Four of these genes had similar expression patterns with signals in body muscle, developing embryos, spermatogonia, uterine wall adjacent to stretched microfilariae, wall of Vas deferens, and lateral cord. Three L-AChR subunit genes (Bma-unc-29, Bma-unc-38 and Bma-unc-63) were expressed in body muscle, which is a known target of levamisole. Bma-acr-12 was co-expressed with these levamisole subunit genes in muscle, and this suggests that its protein product may form receptors with other alpha subunits. Bma-acr-26 was expressed in male muscle but not in female muscle. Strong expression signals of these genes in early embryos and gametes in uterus and testis suggest that AChRs may have a role in nervous system development of embryogenesis and spermatogenesis. This would be consistent with embryotoxic effects of drugs that target these receptors in filarial worms. Our data show that the expression of these receptor genes is tightly regulated with regard to localization in adult worms and developmental stage in embryos and gametes. These results may help to explain the broad effects

  6. Stage- and Gender-Specific Proteomic Analysis of Brugia malayi Excretory-Secretory Products

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Yovany; Geary, Timothy G.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction While we lack a complete understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which parasites establish and achieve protection from host immune responses, it is accepted that many of these processes are mediated by products, primarily proteins, released from the parasite. Parasitic nematodes occur in different life stages and anatomical compartments within the host. Little is known about the composition and variability of products released at different developmental stages and their contribution to parasite survival and progression of the infection. Methodology/Principal Findings To gain a deeper understanding on these aspects, we collected and analyzed through 1D-SDS PAGE and LC-MS/MS the Excretory-Secretory Products (ESP) of adult female, adult male and microfilariae of the filarial nematode Brugia malayi, one of the etiological agents of human lymphatic filariasis. This proteomic analysis led to the identification of 228 proteins. The list includes 76 proteins with unknown function as well as also proteins with potential immunoregulatory properties, such as protease inhibitors, cytokine homologues and carbohydrate-binding proteins. Larval and adult ESP differed in composition. Only 32 proteins were shared between all three stages/genders. Consistent with this observation, different gene ontology profiles were associated with the different ESP. Conclusions/Significance A comparative analysis of the proteins released in vitro by different forms of a parasitic nematode dwelling in the same host is presented. The catalog of secreted proteins reflects different stage- and gender-specific related processes and different strategies of immune evasion, providing valuable insights on the contribution of each form of the parasite for establishing the host–parasite interaction. PMID:18958170

  7. Computational prediction of essential genes in an unculturable endosymbiotic bacterium, Wolbachia of Brugia malayi

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Wolbachia (wBm) is an obligate endosymbiotic bacterium of Brugia malayi, a parasitic filarial nematode of humans and one of the causative agents of lymphatic filariasis. There is a pressing need for new drugs against filarial parasites, such as B. malayi. As wBm is required for B. malayi development and fertility, targeting wBm is a promising approach. However, the lifecycle of neither B. malayi nor wBm can be maintained in vitro. To facilitate selection of potential drug targets we computationally ranked the wBm genome based on confidence that a particular gene is essential for the survival of the bacterium. Results wBm protein sequences were aligned using BLAST to the Database of Essential Genes (DEG) version 5.2, a collection of 5,260 experimentally identified essential genes in 15 bacterial strains. A confidence score, the Multiple Hit Score (MHS), was developed to predict each wBm gene's essentiality based on the top alignments to essential genes in each bacterial strain. This method was validated using a jackknife methodology to test the ability to recover known essential genes in a control genome. A second estimation of essentiality, the Gene Conservation Score (GCS), was calculated on the basis of phyletic conservation of genes across Wolbachia's parent order Rickettsiales. Clusters of orthologous genes were predicted within the 27 currently available complete genomes. Druggability of wBm proteins was predicted by alignment to a database of protein targets of known compounds. Conclusion Ranking wBm genes by either MHS or GCS predicts and prioritizes potentially essential genes. Comparison of the MHS to GCS produces quadrants representing four types of predictions: those with high confidence of essentiality by both methods (245 genes), those highly conserved across Rickettsiales (299 genes), those similar to distant essential genes (8 genes), and those with low confidence of essentiality (253 genes). These data facilitate selection of wBm genes

  8. Potential involvement of Brugia malayi cysteine proteases in the maintenance of the endosymbiotic relationship with Wolbachia

    PubMed Central

    Lustigman, Sara; Melnikow, Elena; Anand, Setty Balakrishnan; Contreras, Aroha; Nandi, Vijay; Liu, Jing; Bell, Aaron; Unnasch, Thomas R.; Rogers, Mathew B.; Ghedin, Elodie

    2014-01-01

    Brugia malayi, a parasitic nematode that causes lymphatic filariasis, harbors endosymbiotic intracellular bacteria, Wolbachia, that are required for the development and reproduction of the worm. The essential nature of this endosymbiosis led to the development of anti-Wolbachia chemotherapeutic approaches for the treatment of human filarial infections. Our study is aimed at identifying specific proteins that play a critical role in this endosymbiotic relationship leading to the identification of potential targets in the adult worms. Filarial cysteine proteases are known to be involved in molting and embryogenesis, processes shown to also be Wolbachia dependent. Based on the observation that cysteine protease transcripts are differentially regulated in response to tetracycline treatment, we focused on defining their role in symbiosis. We observe a bimodal regulation pattern of transcripts encoding cysteine proteases when in vitro tetracycline treated worms were examined. Using tetracycline-treated infertile female worms and purified embryos we established that the first peak of the bimodal pattern corresponds to embryonic transcripts while the second takes place within the hypodermis of the adult worms. Localization studies of the native proteins corresponding to Bm-cpl-3 and Bm-cpl-6 indicate that they are present in the area surrounding Wolbachia, and, in some cases, the proteins appear localized within the bacteria. Both proteins were also found in the inner bodies of microfilariae. The possible role of these cysteine proteases during development and endosymbiosis was further characterized using RNAi. Reduction in Bm-cpl-3 and Bm-cpl-6 transcript levels was accompanied by hindered microfilarial development and release, and reduced Wolbachia DNA levels, making these enzymes strong drug target candidates. PMID:25516837

  9. Identification of antigenic Brugia adult worm proteins by peptide mass fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Weinkopff, Tiffany; Atwood, James A; Punkosdy, George A; Moss, Delynn; Weatherly, D Brent; Orlando, Ron; Lammie, Patrick

    2009-12-01

    With the recent completion of the Brugia malayi genome, proteomics offers a new resource for a deeper understanding of the biology of filarial parasites. We employed 2-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis followed by peptide mass fingerprinting on a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-ToF) mass spectrometer to identify Brugia adult worm proteins and then determined which proteins were recognized by the host humoral immune response. We identified 18 unique proteins, several of which were determined to be antigenic by immunoblot. The proteins identified here may contribute to future studies to analyze the transmission and pathogenesis of lymphatic filariasis. PMID:19537848

  10. A Proteomic Analysis of the Body Wall, Digestive Tract, and Reproductive Tract of Brugia malayi

    PubMed Central

    Morris, C. Paul; Bennuru, Sasisekhar; Kropp, Laura E.; Zweben, Jesse A.; Meng, Zhaojing; Taylor, Rebekah T.; Chan, King; Veenstra, Timothy D.; Nutman, Thomas B.; Mitre, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Filarial worms are parasitic nematodes that cause devastating diseases such as lymphatic filariasis (LF) and onchocerciasis. Filariae are nematodes with complex anatomy including fully developed digestive tracts and reproductive organs. To better understand the basic biology of filarial parasites and to provide insights into drug targets and vaccine design, we conducted a proteomic analysis of different anatomic fractions of Brugia malayi, a causative agent of LF. Approximately 500 adult female B. malayi worms were dissected, and three anatomical fractions (body wall, digestive tract, and reproductive tract) were obtained. Proteins from each anatomical fraction were extracted, desalted, trypsinized, and analyzed by microcapillary reverse-phase liquid chromatography-tandem-mass spectrometry. In total, we identified 4,785 B. malayi proteins. While 1,894 were identified in all three anatomic fractions, 396 were positively identified only within the digestive tract, 114 only within the body wall, and 1,011 only within the reproductive tract. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed a bias for transporters to be present within the digestive tract, suggesting that the intestine of adult filariae is functional and important for nutrient uptake or waste removal. As expected, the body wall exhibited increased frequencies of cytoskeletal proteins, and the reproductive tract had increased frequencies of proteins involved in nuclear regulation and transcription. In assessing for possible vaccine candidates, we focused on proteins sequestered within the digestive tract, as these could possibly represent “hidden antigens” with low risk of prior allergic sensitization. We identified 106 proteins that are enriched in the digestive tract and are predicted to localize to the surface of cells in the the digestive tract. It is possible that some of these proteins are on the luminal surface and may be accessible by antibodies ingested by the worm. A subset of 27 of these proteins

  11. Nitric Oxide Limits the Expansion of Antigen-Specific T Cells in Mice Infected with the Microfilariae of Brugia pahangi

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Richard A.; Devaney, Eileen

    2002-01-01

    Infection of BALB/c mice with the microfilariae (Mf) of the filarial nematode Brugia pahangi results in an antigen-specific proliferative defect that is induced by high levels of NO. Using carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimydl ester and cell surface labeling, it was possible to identify a population of antigen-specific T cells from Mf-infected BALB/c mice that expressed particularly high levels of CD4 (CD4hi). These cells proliferated in culture only when inducible NO synthase was inhibited and accounted for almost all of the antigen-specific proliferative response under those conditions. CD4hi cells also expressed high levels of CD44, consistent with their status as activated T cells. A similar population of CD4hi cells was observed in cultures from Mf-infected gamma interferon receptor knockout (IFN-γR−/−) mice. Terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling staining revealed that the CD4+ T cells from Mf-infected wild-type mice were preferentially susceptible to apoptosis compared to CD4+ T cells from IFN-γR−/− mice. These studies suggest that the expansion of antigen-specific T cells in Mf-infected mice is limited by NO. PMID:12379675

  12. Homology Modeling of NAD+-Dependent DNA Ligase of the Wolbachia Endosymbiont of Brugia malayi and Its Drug Target Potential Using Dispiro-Cycloalkanones

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Nidhi; Nag, Jeetendra K.; Pandey, Jyoti; Tripathi, Rama Pati; Shah, Priyanka; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran

    2015-01-01

    Lymphatic filarial nematodes maintain a mutualistic relationship with the endosymbiont Wolbachia. Depletion of Wolbachia produces profound defects in nematode development, fertility, and viability and thus has great promise as a novel approach for treating filarial diseases. NAD+-dependent DNA ligase is an essential enzyme of DNA replication, repair, and recombination. Therefore, in the present study, the antifilarial drug target potential of the NAD+-dependent DNA ligase of the Wolbachia symbiont of Brugia malayi (wBm-LigA) was investigated using dispiro-cycloalkanone compounds. Dispiro-cycloalkanone specifically inhibited the nick-closing and cohesive-end ligation activities of the enzyme without inhibiting human or T4 DNA ligase. The mode of inhibition was competitive with the NAD+ cofactor. Docking studies also revealed the interaction of these compounds with the active site of the target enzyme. The adverse effects of these inhibitors were observed on adult and microfilarial stages of B. malayi in vitro, and the most active compounds were further monitored in vivo in jirds and mastomys rodent models. Compounds 1, 2, and 5 had severe adverse effects in vitro on the motility of both adult worms and microfilariae at low concentrations. Compound 2 was the best inhibitor, with the lowest 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) (1.02 μM), followed by compound 5 (IC50, 2.3 μM) and compound 1 (IC50, 2.9 μM). These compounds also exhibited the same adverse effect on adult worms and microfilariae in vivo (P < 0.05). These compounds also tremendously reduced the wolbachial load, as evident by quantitative real-time PCR (P < 0.05). wBm-LigA thus shows great promise as an antifilarial drug target, and dispiro-cycloalkanone compounds show great promise as antifilarial lead candidates. PMID:25845868

  13. In vivo exposure of murine dendritic cell and macrophage bone marrow progenitors to the phosphorylcholine-containing filarial nematode glycoprotein ES-62 polarizes their differentiation to an anti-inflammatory phenotype.

    PubMed

    Goodridge, Helen S; Marshall, Fraser A; Wilson, Emma H; Houston, Katrina M; Liew, Foo Y; Harnett, Margaret M; Harnett, William

    2004-12-01

    We have previously shown in an in vitro study that the filarial nematode phosphorylcholine (PC)-containing glycoprotein ES-62 promotes a murine dendritic cell (DC) phenotype that induces T helper type 2 (Th2) responses. We now show that, in addition to directly priming Th2 responses, ES-62 can act to dampen down the pro-inflammatory DC responses elicited by lipopolysaccharide. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that murine DCs and macrophages derived ex vivo from bone marrow cells exposed in vivo to ES-62 by release from osmotic pumps are hyporesponsive to subsequent stimulation with lipopolysaccharide. These effects can be largely mimicked by exposure to the PC moiety of ES-62 conjugated to an irrelevant protein. The data we provide are, as far as we aware, the first to show that a defined pathogen product can modulate the developmental pathway of bone marrow cells of the immune system in vivo. Such a finding could have important implications for the use of pathogen products or their derivatives for immunotherapy. PMID:15554927

  14. Pan-phylum Comparison of Nematode Metabolic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Rahul; Rosa, Bruce A.; Lewis, Warren G.; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2015-01-01

    Nematodes are among the most important causative pathogens of neglected tropical diseases. The increased availability of genomic and transcriptomic data for many understudied nematode species provides a great opportunity to investigate different aspects of their biology. Increasingly, metabolic potential of pathogens is recognized as a critical determinant governing their development, growth and pathogenicity. Comparing metabolic potential among species with distinct trophic ecologies can provide insights on overall biology or molecular adaptations. Furthermore, ascertaining gene expression at pathway level can help in understanding metabolic dynamics over development. Comparison of biochemical pathways (or subpathways, i.e. pathway modules) among related species can also retrospectively indicate potential mistakes in gene-calling and functional annotation. We show with numerous illustrative case studies that comparisons at the level of pathway modules have the potential to uncover biological insights while remaining computationally tractable. Here, we reconstruct and compare metabolic modules found in the deduced proteomes of 13 nematodes and 10 non-nematode species (including hosts of the parasitic nematode species). We observed that the metabolic potential is, in general, concomitant with phylogenetic and/or ecological similarity. Varied metabolic strategies are required among the nematodes, with only 8 out of 51 pathway modules being completely conserved. Enzyme comparison based on topology of metabolic modules uncovered diversification between parasite and host that can potentially guide therapeutic intervention. Gene expression data from 4 nematode species were used to study metabolic dynamics over their life cycles. We report unexpected differential metabolism between immature and mature microfilariae of the human filarial parasite Brugia malayi. A set of genes potentially important for parasitism is also reported, based on an analysis of gene expression in

  15. Pan-phylum Comparison of Nematode Metabolic Potential.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Rahul; Rosa, Bruce A; Lewis, Warren G; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2015-05-01

    Nematodes are among the most important causative pathogens of neglected tropical diseases. The increased availability of genomic and transcriptomic data for many understudied nematode species provides a great opportunity to investigate different aspects of their biology. Increasingly, metabolic potential of pathogens is recognized as a critical determinant governing their development, growth and pathogenicity. Comparing metabolic potential among species with distinct trophic ecologies can provide insights on overall biology or molecular adaptations. Furthermore, ascertaining gene expression at pathway level can help in understanding metabolic dynamics over development. Comparison of biochemical pathways (or subpathways, i.e. pathway modules) among related species can also retrospectively indicate potential mistakes in gene-calling and functional annotation. We show with numerous illustrative case studies that comparisons at the level of pathway modules have the potential to uncover biological insights while remaining computationally tractable. Here, we reconstruct and compare metabolic modules found in the deduced proteomes of 13 nematodes and 10 non-nematode species (including hosts of the parasitic nematode species). We observed that the metabolic potential is, in general, concomitant with phylogenetic and/or ecological similarity. Varied metabolic strategies are required among the nematodes, with only 8 out of 51 pathway modules being completely conserved. Enzyme comparison based on topology of metabolic modules uncovered diversification between parasite and host that can potentially guide therapeutic intervention. Gene expression data from 4 nematode species were used to study metabolic dynamics over their life cycles. We report unexpected differential metabolism between immature and mature microfilariae of the human filarial parasite Brugia malayi. A set of genes potentially important for parasitism is also reported, based on an analysis of gene expression in

  16. Analysis of Nematode Motion Using an Improved Light-Scatter Based System

    PubMed Central

    Nutting, Chuck S.; Eversole, Rob R.; Blair, Kevin; Specht, Sabine; Nutman, Thomas B.; Klion, Amy D.; Wanji, Samuel; Boussinesq, Michel; Mackenzie, Charles D.

    2015-01-01

    Background The detailed assessment of nematode activity and viability still remains a relatively undeveloped area of biological and medical research. Computer-based approaches to assessing the motility of larger nematode stages have been developed, yet these lack the capability to detect and analyze the more subtle and important characteristics of the motion of nematodes. There is currently a need to improved methods of assessing the viability and health of parasitic worms. Methods We describe here a system that converts the motion of nematodes through a light-scattering system into an electrical waveform, and allows for reproducible, and wholly non-subjective, assessment of alterations in motion, as well as estimation of the number of nematode worms of different forms and sizes. Here we have used Brugia sp. microfilariae (L1), infective larvae (L3) and adults, together with the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Results The motion of worms in a small (200ul) volume can be detected, with the presence of immotile worms not interfering with the readings at practical levels (up to at least 500 L1 /200ul). Alterations in the frequency of parasite movement following the application of the anti-parasitic drugs, (chloroquine and imatinib); the anti-filarial effect of the latter agent is the first demonstrated here for the first time. This system can also be used to estimate the number of parasites, and shortens the time required to estimate parasites numbers, and eliminates the need for microscopes and trained technicians to provide an estimate of microfilarial sample sizes up to 1000 parasites/ml. Alterations in the form of motion of the worms can also be depicted. Conclusions This new instrument, named a "WiggleTron", offers exciting opportunities to further study nematode biology and to aid drug discovery, as well as contributing to a rapid estimate of parasite numbers in various biological samples. PMID:25695776

  17. Polyanhydride Nanoparticle Delivery Platform Dramatically Enhances Killing of Filarial Worms

    PubMed Central

    Binnebose, Andrea M.; Haughney, Shannon L.; Martin, Richard; Imerman, Paula M.; Narasimhan, Balaji; Bellaire, Bryan H.

    2015-01-01

    Filarial diseases represent a significant social and economic burden to over 120 million people worldwide and are caused by endoparasites that require the presence of symbiotic bacteria of the genus Wolbachia for fertility and viability of the host parasite. Targeting Wolbachia for elimination is a therapeutic approach that shows promise in the treatment of onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis. Here we demonstrate the use of a biodegradable polyanhydride nanoparticle-based platform for the co-delivery of the antibiotic doxycycline with the antiparasitic drug, ivermectin, to reduce microfilarial burden and rapidly kill adult worms. When doxycycline and ivermectin were co-delivered within polyanhydride nanoparticles, effective killing of adult female Brugia malayi filarial worms was achieved with approximately 4,000-fold reduction in the amount of drug used. Additionally the time to death of the macrofilaria was also significantly reduced (five-fold) when the anti-filarial drug cocktail was delivered within polyanhydride nanoparticles. We hypothesize that the mechanism behind this dramatically enhanced killing of the macrofilaria is the ability of the polyanhydride nanoparticles to behave as a Trojan horse and penetrate the cuticle, bypassing excretory pumps of B. malayi, and effectively deliver drug directly to both the worm and Wolbachia at high enough microenvironmental concentrations to cause death. These provocative findings may have significant consequences for the reduction in the amount of drug and the length of treatment required for filarial infections in terms of patient compliance and reduced cost of treatment. PMID:26496201

  18. Polyanhydride Nanoparticle Delivery Platform Dramatically Enhances Killing of Filarial Worms.

    PubMed

    Binnebose, Andrea M; Haughney, Shannon L; Martin, Richard; Imerman, Paula M; Narasimhan, Balaji; Bellaire, Bryan H

    2015-01-01

    Filarial diseases represent a significant social and economic burden to over 120 million people worldwide and are caused by endoparasites that require the presence of symbiotic bacteria of the genus Wolbachia for fertility and viability of the host parasite. Targeting Wolbachia for elimination is a therapeutic approach that shows promise in the treatment of onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis. Here we demonstrate the use of a biodegradable polyanhydride nanoparticle-based platform for the co-delivery of the antibiotic doxycycline with the antiparasitic drug, ivermectin, to reduce microfilarial burden and rapidly kill adult worms. When doxycycline and ivermectin were co-delivered within polyanhydride nanoparticles, effective killing of adult female Brugia malayi filarial worms was achieved with approximately 4,000-fold reduction in the amount of drug used. Additionally the time to death of the macrofilaria was also significantly reduced (five-fold) when the anti-filarial drug cocktail was delivered within polyanhydride nanoparticles. We hypothesize that the mechanism behind this dramatically enhanced killing of the macrofilaria is the ability of the polyanhydride nanoparticles to behave as a Trojan horse and penetrate the cuticle, bypassing excretory pumps of B. malayi, and effectively deliver drug directly to both the worm and Wolbachia at high enough microenvironmental concentrations to cause death. These provocative findings may have significant consequences for the reduction in the amount of drug and the length of treatment required for filarial infections in terms of patient compliance and reduced cost of treatment. PMID:26496201

  19. Lymphangiosarcoma after filarial infection

    SciTech Connect

    Sordillo, E.M.; Sordillo, P.P.; Hajdu, S.I.; Good, R.A.

    1981-03-01

    A case of lymphangiosarcoma of a lower extremity is described in a patient with chronic lymphedema of that leg from a filarial infection in childhood. Histologically, the neoplasm resembled lymphangiosarcomas that arise in arms that become lymphedematous after mastectomies, but was different in that it also contained areas of calcification consistent with prior filarial infection. Calcifications were also present in muscle uninvolved by the lymphangiosarcoma of this case. The prolonged survival of this patient is unlike that of most patients with lymphangiosarcoma, which is generally shorter. Although lymphedema after filariasis is common, this is the first case of a lymphangiosarcoma arising in chronic lymphedema of filarial origin.

  20. Wolbachia endosymbiont of Brugia malayi elicits a T helper type 17-mediated pro-inflammatory immune response through Wolbachia surface protein

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Manisha; Verma, Meenakshi; Srivastava, Mrigank; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2015-01-01

    Wolbachia is an endosymbiotic bacterium of the filarial nematode Brugia malayi. The symbiotic relationship between Wolbachia and its filarial host is dependent on interactions between the proteins of both organisms. However, little is known about Wolbachia proteins that are involved in the inflammatory pathology of the host during lymphatic filariasis. In the present study, we cloned, expressed and purified Wolbachia surface protein (r-wsp) from Wolbachia and administered it to mice, either alone or in combination with infective larvae of B. malayi (Bm-L3) and monitored the developing immune response in infected animals. Our results show that spleens and mesenteric lymph nodes of mice immunized with either r-wsp or infected with Bm-L3 show increased percentages of CD4+ T helper type 17 (Th17) cells and Th1 cytokines like interferon-γ and interleukin-2 (IL-2) along with decreased percentages of regulatory T cells, Th2 cytokines like IL-4 and IL-10 and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) levels in culture supernatants of splenocytes. These observations were stronger in mice immunized with r-wsp alone. Interestingly, when mice were first immunized with r-wsp and subsequently infected with Bm-L3, percentages of CD4+ Th17 cells and Th1 cytokines increased even further while that of regulatory T cells, Th2 cytokines and TGF-β levels decreased. These results for the first time show that r-wsp acts synergistically with Bm-L3 in promoting a pro-inflammatory response by increasing Th17 cells and at the same time diminishes host immunological tolerance by decreasing regulatory T cells and TGF-β secretion. PMID:25059495

  1. Yeast-Based High-Throughput Screens to Identify Novel Compounds Active against Brugia malayi

    PubMed Central

    Bilsland, Elizabeth; Bean, Daniel M.; Devaney, Eileen; Oliver, Stephen G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Lymphatic filariasis is caused by the parasitic worms Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi or B. timori, which are transmitted via the bites from infected mosquitoes. Once in the human body, the parasites develop into adult worms in the lymphatic vessels, causing severe damage and swelling of the affected tissues. According to the World Health Organization, over 1.2 billion people in 58 countries are at risk of contracting lymphatic filariasis. Very few drugs are available to treat patients infected with these parasites, and these have low efficacy against the adult stages of the worms, which can live for 7–15 years in the human body. The requirement for annual treatment increases the risk of drug-resistant worms emerging, making it imperative to develop new drugs against these devastating diseases. Methodology/Principal Findings We have developed a yeast-based, high-throughput screening system whereby essential yeast genes are replaced with their filarial or human counterparts. These strains are labeled with different fluorescent proteins to allow the simultaneous monitoring of strains with parasite or human genes in competition, and hence the identification of compounds that inhibit the parasite target without affecting its human ortholog. We constructed yeast strains expressing eight different Brugia malayi drug targets (as well as seven of their human counterparts), and performed medium-throughput drug screens for compounds that specifically inhibit the parasite enzymes. Using the Malaria Box collection (400 compounds), we identified nine filarial specific inhibitors and confirmed the antifilarial activity of five of these using in vitro assays against Brugia pahangi. Conclusions/Significance We were able to functionally complement yeast deletions with eight different Brugia malayi enzymes that represent potential drug targets. We demonstrated that our yeast-based screening platform is efficient in identifying compounds that can discriminate between

  2. Characterization of cofactor-independent phosphoglycerate mutase isoform-1 (Wb-iPGM) gene: a drug and diagnostic target from human lymphatic filarial parasite, Wuchereria bancrofti.

    PubMed

    Dhamodharan, R; Hoti, S L; Sankari, T

    2012-07-01

    The inter-conversion of 3-phosphoglycerate and 2-phosphoglycerate during glycolysis and gluconeogenesis in filarial nematodes, is catalyzed by a co-factor-independent phosphoglycerate mutase (iPGM). The gene encoding iPGM isoform-1 was amplified from Wuchereria bancrofti, the major causative agent of human lymphatic filariasis. Partial genomic DNA (gDNA) fragment of the gene was also amplified from periodic and sub-periodic forms of W. bancrofti and Brugia malayi and sequenced. The Wb-iPGM isoform-1 gene encodes an ORF of 515 amino acids and is found to share 99.4%, 96.0%, and 64.0% amino acid sequence identity with iPGM of B. malayi, Onchocerca volvulus, and Caenorhabditis elegans, respectively. Serine and all the other 13 amino acid residues involved in the catalytic function of iPGM are highly conserved. Further comparison of iPGM nucleotide and amino acid sequences of Wolbachia of B. malayi with Wb-iPGM showed 41% and 54.4% similarity, respectively. The analysis of partial genomic and amino acid sequences and phylogenetic tree of Wb-iPGM indicated that this gene, apart from being a potential drug target, could provide diagnostic, taxonomical, and evolutionary markers. This is the first report of the characterization of iPGM gene from W. bancrofti. PMID:22386851

  3. The solution structure of the forkhead box-O DNA binding domain of Brugia malayi DAF-16a.

    PubMed

    Casper, Sarah K; Schoeller, Scott J; Zgoba, Danielle M; Phillips, Andrew J; Morien, Thomas J; Chaffee, Gary R; Sackett, Peter C; Peterson, Francis C; Crossgrove, Kirsten; Veldkamp, Christopher T

    2014-12-01

    Brugia malayi is a parasitic nematode that causes lymphatic filariasis in humans. Here the solution structure of the forkhead DNA binding domain of Brugia malayi DAF-16a, a putative ortholog of Caenorhabditis elegans DAF-16, is reported. It is believed to be the first structure of a forkhead or winged helix domain from an invertebrate. C. elegans DAF-16 is involved in the insulin/IGF-I signaling pathway and helps control metabolism, longevity, and development. Conservation of sequence and structure with human FOXO proteins suggests that B. malayi DAF-16a is a member of the FOXO family of forkhead proteins. PMID:25297652

  4. Exome and transcriptome sequencing of Aedes aegypti identifies a locus that confers resistance to Brugia malayi and alters the immune response.

    PubMed

    Juneja, Punita; Ariani, Cristina V; Ho, Yung Shwen; Akorli, Jewelna; Palmer, William J; Pain, Arnab; Jiggins, Francis M

    2015-03-01

    Many mosquito species are naturally polymorphic for their abilities to transmit parasites, a feature which is of great interest for controlling vector-borne disease. Aedes aegypti, the primary vector of dengue and yellow fever and a laboratory model for studying lymphatic filariasis, is genetically variable for its capacity to harbor the filarial nematode Brugia malayi. The genome of Ae. aegypti is large and repetitive, making genome resequencing difficult and expensive. We designed exome captures to target protein-coding regions of the genome, and used association mapping in a wild Kenyan population to identify a single, dominant, sex-linked locus underlying resistance. This falls in a region of the genome where a resistance locus was previously mapped in a line established in 1936, suggesting that this polymorphism has been maintained in the wild for the at least 80 years. We then crossed resistant and susceptible mosquitoes to place both alleles of the gene into a common genetic background, and used RNA-seq to measure the effect of this locus on gene expression. We found evidence for Toll, IMD, and JAK-STAT pathway activity in response to early stages of B. malayi infection when the parasites are beginning to die in the resistant genotype. We also found that resistant mosquitoes express anti-microbial peptides at the time of parasite-killing, and that this expression is suppressed in susceptible mosquitoes. Together, we have found that a single resistance locus leads to a higher immune response in resistant mosquitoes, and we identify genes in this region that may be responsible for this trait. PMID:25815506

  5. Exome and Transcriptome Sequencing of Aedes aegypti Identifies a Locus That Confers Resistance to Brugia malayi and Alters the Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Juneja, Punita; Ariani, Cristina V.; Ho, Yung Shwen; Akorli, Jewelna; Palmer, William J.; Pain, Arnab; Jiggins, Francis M.

    2015-01-01

    Many mosquito species are naturally polymorphic for their abilities to transmit parasites, a feature which is of great interest for controlling vector-borne disease. Aedes aegypti, the primary vector of dengue and yellow fever and a laboratory model for studying lymphatic filariasis, is genetically variable for its capacity to harbor the filarial nematode Brugia malayi. The genome of Ae. aegypti is large and repetitive, making genome resequencing difficult and expensive. We designed exome captures to target protein-coding regions of the genome, and used association mapping in a wild Kenyan population to identify a single, dominant, sex-linked locus underlying resistance. This falls in a region of the genome where a resistance locus was previously mapped in a line established in 1936, suggesting that this polymorphism has been maintained in the wild for the at least 80 years. We then crossed resistant and susceptible mosquitoes to place both alleles of the gene into a common genetic background, and used RNA-seq to measure the effect of this locus on gene expression. We found evidence for Toll, IMD, and JAK-STAT pathway activity in response to early stages of B. malayi infection when the parasites are beginning to die in the resistant genotype. We also found that resistant mosquitoes express anti-microbial peptides at the time of parasite-killing, and that this expression is suppressed in susceptible mosquitoes. Together, we have found that a single resistance locus leads to a higher immune response in resistant mosquitoes, and we identify genes in this region that may be responsible for this trait. PMID:25815506

  6. Eosinophils Are Important for Protection, Immunoregulation and Pathology during Infection with Nematode Microfilariae

    PubMed Central

    Cadman, Emma T.; Thysse, Katherine A.; Bearder, Siobhan; Cheung, Anita Y. N.; Johnston, Ashleigh C.; Lee, James J.; Lawrence, Rachel A.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophil responses typify both allergic and parasitic helminth disease. In helminthic disease, the role of eosinophils can be both protective in immune responses and destructive in pathological responses. To investigate whether eosinophils are involved in both protection and pathology during filarial nematode infection, we explored the role of eosinophils and their granule proteins, eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) and major basic protein-1 (MBP-1), during infection with Brugia malayi microfilariae. Using eosinophil-deficient mice (PHIL), we further clarify the role of eosinophils in clearance of microfilariae during primary, but not challenge infection in vivo. Deletion of EPO or MBP-1 alone was insufficient to abrogate parasite clearance suggesting that either these molecules are redundant or eosinophils act indirectly in parasite clearance via augmentation of other protective responses. Absence of eosinophils increased mast cell recruitment, but not other cell types, into the broncho-alveolar lavage fluid during challenge infection. In addition absence of eosinophils or EPO alone, augmented parasite-induced IgE responses, as measured by ELISA, demonstrating that eosinophils are involved in regulation of IgE. Whole body plethysmography indicated that nematode-induced changes in airway physiology were reduced in challenge infection in the absence of eosinophils and also during primary infection in the absence of EPO alone. However lack of eosinophils or MBP-1 actually increased goblet cell mucus production. We did not find any major differences in cytokine responses in the absence of eosinophils, EPO or MBP-1. These results reveal that eosinophils actively participate in regulation of IgE and goblet cell mucus production via granule secretion during nematode-induced pathology and highlight their importance both as effector cells, as damage-inducing cells and as supervisory cells that shape both innate and adaptive immunity. PMID:24626328

  7. Cloning and characterization of high mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1) of Wuchereria bancrofti and Brugia malayi.

    PubMed

    Thirugnanam, Sivasakthivel; Munirathinam, Gnanasekar; Veerapathran, Anandharaman; Dakshinamoorthy, Gajalakshmi; Reddy, Maryada V; Ramaswamy, Kalyanasundaram

    2012-08-01

    A human homologue of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein was cloned and characterized from the human filarial parasites Wuchereria bancrofti and Brugia malayi. Sequence analysis showed that W. bancrofti HMGB1 (WbHMGB1) and B. malayi HMGB1 (BmHMGB1) proteins share 99 % sequence identity. Filarial HMGB1 showed typical architectural sequence characteristics of HMGB family of proteins and consisted of only a single HMG box domain that had significant sequence similarity to the pro-inflammatory B box domain of human HMGB1. When incubated with mouse peritoneal macrophages and human promyelocytic leukemia cells, rBmHMGB1 induced secretion of significant levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, GM-CSF, and IL-6. Functional analysis also showed that the filarial HMGB1 proteins can bind to supercoiled DNA similar to other HMG family of proteins. BmHMGB1 protein is expressed in the adult and microfilarial stages of the parasite and is found in the excretory secretions of the live parasites. These findings suggest that filarial HMGB1 may have a significant role in lymphatic pathology associated with lymphatic filariasis. PMID:22402610

  8. Brugia malayi Antigen (BmA) Inhibits HIV-1 Trans-Infection but Neither BmA nor ES-62 Alter HIV-1 Infectivity of DC Induced CD4+ Th-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mouser, Emily E. I. M.; Pollakis, Georgios; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; Harnett, William

    2016-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of HIV-1 disease is the association of heightened CD4+ T-cell activation with HIV-1 replication. Parasitic helminths including filarial nematodes have evolved numerous and complex mechanisms to skew, dampen and evade human immune responses suggesting that HIV-1 infection may be modulated in co-infected individuals. Here we studied the effects of two filarial nematode products, adult worm antigen from Brugia malayi (BmA) and excretory-secretory product 62 (ES-62) from Acanthocheilonema viteae on HIV-1 infection in vitro. Neither BmA nor ES-62 influenced HIV-1 replication in CD4+ enriched T-cells, with either a CCR5- or CXCR4-using virus. BmA, but not ES-62, had the capacity to bind the C-type lectin dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) thereby inhibiting HIV-1 trans-infection of CD4+ enriched T-cells. As for their effect on DCs, neither BmA nor ES-62 could enhance or inhibit DC maturation as determined by CD83, CD86 and HLA-DR expression, or the production of IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 and TNF-α. As expected, due to the unaltered DC phenotype, no differences were found in CD4+ T helper (Th) cell phenotypes induced by DCs treated with either BmA or ES-62. Moreover, the HIV-1 susceptibility of the Th-cell populations induced by BmA or ES-62 exposed DCs was unaffected for both CCR5- and CXCR4-using HIV-1 viruses. In conclusion, although BmA has the potential capacity to interfere with HIV-1 transmission or initial viral dissemination through preventing the virus from interacting with DCs, no differences in the Th-cell polarizing capacity of DCs exposed to BmA or ES-62 were observed. Neither antigenic source demonstrated beneficial or detrimental effects on the HIV-1 susceptibility of CD4+ Th-cells induced by exposed DCs. PMID:26808476

  9. A Structural Biology Approach to Understand Human Lymphatic Filarial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nagampalli, Raghavendra Sashi Krishna; Gunasekaran, Krishnasamy; Narayanan, Rangarajan Badri; Peters, Angela; Bhaskaran, Rajagopalan

    2014-01-01

    The presence of aspartic protease inhibitor in filarial parasite Brugia malayi (Bm-Aspin) makes it interesting to study because of the fact that the filarial parasite never encounters the host digestive system. Here, the aspartic protease inhibition kinetics of Bm-Aspin and its NMR structural characteristics have been investigated. The overall aim of this study is to explain the inhibition and binding properties of Bm-Aspin from its structural point of view. UV-spectroscopy and multi-dimensional NMR are the experiments that have been performed to understand the kinetic and structural properties of Bm-Aspin respectively. The human aspartic proteases that are considered for this study are pepsin, renin, cathepsin-E and cathepsin-D. The results of this analysis performed with the specific substrate [Phe-Ala-Ala-Phe (4-NO2)-Phe-Val-Leu (4-pyridylmethyl) ester] against aspartic proteases suggest that Bm-Aspin inhibits the activities of all four human aspartic proteases. The kinetics studies indicate that Bm-Aspin follows a competitive mode of inhibition for pepsin and cathepsin-E, non-competitive for renin and mixed mode for cathepsin-D. The triple resonance NMR experiments on Bm-Aspin suggested the feasibility of carrying out NMR studies to obtain its solution structure. The NMR titration studies on the interactions of Bm-Aspin with the proteases indicate that it undergoes fast-exchange phenomena among themselves. In addition to this, the chemical shift perturbations for some of the residues of Bm-Aspin observed from 15N-HSQC spectra upon the addition of saturated amounts of aspartic proteases suggest the binding between Bm-Aspin and human aspartic proteases. They also provide information on the variations in the intensities and mode of binding between the proteases duly corroborating with the results from the protease inhibition assay method. PMID:24516678

  10. Brugia malayi Asparaginyl - tRNA Synthetase Stimulates Endothelial Cell Proliferation, Vasodilation and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    D, Jeeva Jothi; Dhanraj, Muthu; Solaiappan, Shanmugam; Sivanesan, Sanjana; Kron, Michael; Dhanasekaran, Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of chronic infection with lymphatic filarial parasites is the development of lymphatic disease which often results in permanent vasodilation and lymphedema, but all of the mechanisms by which filarial parasites induce pathology are not known. Prior work showed that the asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase (BmAsnRS) of Brugia malayi, an etiological agent of lymphatic filariasis, acts as a physiocrine that binds specifically to interleukin-8 (IL-8) chemokine receptors. Endothelial cells are one of the many cell types that express IL-8 receptors. IL-8 also has been reported previously to induce angiogenesis and vasodilation, however, the effect of BmAsnRS on endothelial cells has not been reported. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that BmAsnRS might produce physiological changes in endothelial by studying the in vitro effects of BmAsnRS using a human umbilical vein cell line EA.hy926 and six different endothelial cell assays. Our results demonstrated that BmAsnRS produces consistent and statistically significant effects on endothelial cells that are identical to the effects of VEGF, vascular endothelial growth factor. This study supports the idea that new drugs or immunotherapies that counteract the adverse effects of parasite-derived physiocrines may prevent or ameliorate the vascular pathology observed in patients with lymphatic filariasis. PMID:26751209

  11. Filarial hydropneumothorax: a strange journey.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Arkaprabha; Mukherjee, Anindya; Talukdar, Payel; Talukdar, Arunansu

    2015-01-01

    Filarial infection can have varied manifestations, but hydropneumothorax at presentation has not yet been reported. A 28-year-old man presented to our hospital with heaviness of the left chest for the past 10 days, which was preceded by a sudden, short stabbing pain in the left chest after straining. Chest X-ray revealed left-sided hydropneumothorax. A peripheral blood picture revealed significant eosinophilia. A pleural fluid report also showed eosinophilia and a few motile microfilaria of Wuchereria bancrofti. Microfilaria was also documented in peripheral blood. There was no evidence of other organ system involvement. The patient was diagnosed with 'Filarial Hydropneumothorax'. After treatment with a temporary chest drain and oral diethylcarbamazine citrate, there was dramatic relief of symptoms and radiological improvement. The patient has been symptom free with no features of recurrence through 8 months of follow-up. PMID:26604240

  12. Molecular phylogenetic studies on filarial parasites based on 5S ribosomal spacer sequences.

    PubMed

    Xie, H; Bain, O; Williams, S A

    1994-06-01

    This paper is the first large-scale molecular phylogenetic study on filarial parasites (family Onchocercidae) which includes 16 species of 6 genera: Brugia beaveri Ash et Little, 1962, B. buckleyi Dissanaike et Paramananthan, 1961; B. malayi (Brug, 1927) Buckley, 1960; B. pahangi (Buckley et Edeson, 1956) Buckley, 1960; B. patei (Buckley, Nelson et Heisch, 1958) Buckley, 1960; B. timori Partono et al, 1977; Wuchereria bancrofti (Cobbold, 1877) Seurat, 1921: W. kalimantani Palmieri. Purnomo, Dennis and Marwoto, 1980: Mansonella perstans (Manson, 1891) Eberhard et Orihel, 1984; loa loc, Stiles, 1905; Onchocerca volvulus (Leuckart, 1983) Railliet er Henry, 1910; O. ochengi Bwangamoi, 1969; O. gutturosa Neumann, 1910; Dirofilaria immitis (Leidy, 1856) Railliet e Henry, 1911; Acanthocheilonema viteae (Krepkogorskaya, 1933) Bain, Baker et Chabaud, 1982 and Litomosoides sigmodontis Chandler, 1931. 5S rRNA gene spacer region sequence data were collected by PCR, cloning and dideoxy sequencing. The 5S rRNA gene spacer region sequences were aligned and analyzed by maximum parsimony algorithms, distance methods and maximum likelihood methods to construct phylogenetic trees. Bootstrap analysis was used to test the robustness of the different phylogenetic reconstructions. The data indicated that 5S spacer region sequences are highly conserved within species yet differ significantly between species. Spliced leader sequences were observed in all of the 5S rDNA spacers with no sequence variation, although flanking region sequence and length heterogeneity was observed even within species. All of the various tree-building methods gave very similar results. This study identified four clades which are strongly supported by bootstrap analysis the Brugia clade; the Wuchereria clade; the Brugia-Wuchereria clade and the Onchocerca clade. The analyses indicated that L. sigmodontis and A. viteae may be the most primitive among the 16 species studied. The data did not show any close

  13. Filarial elephantiasis of penis: a crippling manifestation.

    PubMed

    Rakesh, K; Kumar, M V; Anant, K; Ashutosh, T

    1991-09-01

    Filarial involvement of penis in endemic areas is not an uncommon entity. In the late stage it may lead to crippling "ramhorn" penis. A case of filarial penis is presented which was successfully managed by split thickness free graft. PMID:1953079

  14. Absence of the Filarial Endosymbiont Wolbachia in Seal Heartworm (Acanthocheilonema spirocauda) but Evidence of Ancient Lateral Gene Transfer.

    PubMed

    Keroack, Caroline D; Wurster, Jenna I; Decker, Caroline G; Williams, Kalani M; Slatko, Barton E; Foster, Jeremy M; Williams, Steven A

    2016-06-01

    The symbiotic relationship of Wolbachia spp. was first observed in insects and subsequently in many parasitic filarial nematodes. This bacterium is believed to provide metabolic and developmental assistance to filarial parasitic nematodes, although the exact nature of this relationship remains to be fully elucidated. While Wolbachia is present in most filarial nematodes in the family Onchocercidae, it is absent in several disparate species such as the human parasite Loa loa . All tested members of the genus Acanthocheilonema, such as Acanthocheilonema viteae, have been shown to lack Wolbachia. Consistent with this, we show that Wolbachia is absent from the seal heartworm (Acanthocheilonema spirocauda), but lateral gene transfer (LGT) of DNA sequences between Wolbachia and A. spirocauda has occurred, indicating a past evolutionary association. Seal heartworm is an important pathogen of phocid seals and understanding its basic biology is essential for conservation of the host. The findings presented here may allow for the development of future treatments or diagnostics for the disease and also aid in clarification of the complicated nematode-Wolbachia relationship. PMID:26859724

  15. Cross reactive molecules of human lymphatic filaria Brugia malayi inhibit Leishmania donovani infection in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Verma, Richa; Joseph, Sujith K; Kushwaha, Vikas; Kumar, Vikash; Siddiqi, M I; Vishwakarma, Preeti; Shivahare, Rahul; Gupta, Suman; Murthy, P K

    2015-12-01

    Coinfections are common in natural populations and the outcome of their interactions depends on the immune responses of the host elicited by the parasites. Earlier we showed that immunization with BmAFII (Sephadex G-200 eluted) fraction of human lymphatic filaria Brugia malayi inhibited progression of Leishmania donovani infection in golden hamsters. In the present study we identified cross reactive molecules of B. malayi, and investigated their effect on L. donovani infection and associated immune responses in the host. The sequence alignment and sharing of linear T- and B-cell epitopes in protein molecules of B. malayi and L. donovani counterparts were studied in silico. Hamsters were immunized with robustly cross reactive SDS-PAGE resolved fractions F6 (54.2-67.8kDa) and F9 (41.3-45.0kDa) of B. malayi and subsequently inoculated with amastigotes of L. donovani intracardially. F6 inhibited (∼72%) L. donovani infection and upregulated Th1 cytokine expression, lymphoproliferation, IgG2, IgG2/3 levels and NO production, and downregulated Th2 cytokine expression. Sequences in HSP60 and EF-2 of F6 and L. donovani counterparts were conserved and B- and T-cell epitopes in the proteins shared antigenic regions. In conclusion, leishmania-cross reactive molecules of filarial parasite considerably inhibited leishmanial infection via Th1-mediated immune responses and NO production. Common B- and T-cell epitope regions in HSP60 and EF-2 of the parasites might have contributed to the inhibitory effect on the L. donovani infection. Thus, leishmania-cross reactive filarial parasite molecules may help in designing prophylactic(s) against L. donovani. PMID:26341753

  16. Tissue and Stage-Specific Distribution of Wolbachia in Brugia malayi

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Kerstin; Beatty, Wandy L.; Jiang, Daojun; Weil, Gary J.; Fischer, Peter U.

    2011-01-01

    Background Most filarial parasite species contain Wolbachia, obligatory bacterial endosymbionts that are crucial for filarial development and reproduction. They are targets for alternative chemotherapy, but their role in the biology of filarial nematodes is not well understood. Light microscopy provides important information on morphology, localization and potential function of these bacteria. Surprisingly, immunohistology and in situ hybridization techniques have not been widely used to monitor Wolbachia distribution during the filarial life cycle. Methods/Principal Findings A monoclonal antibody directed against Wolbachia surface protein and in situ hybridization targeting Wolbachia 16S rRNA were used to monitor Wolbachia during the life cycle of B. malayi. In microfilariae and vector stage larvae only a few cells contain Wolbachia. In contrast, large numbers of Wolbachia were detected in the lateral chords of L4 larvae, but no endobacteria were detected in the genital primordium. In young adult worms (5 weeks p.i.), a massive expansion of Wolbachia was observed in the lateral chords adjacent to ovaries or testis, but no endobacteria were detected in the growth zone of the ovaries, uterus, the growth zone of the testis or the vas deferens. Confocal laser scanning and transmission electron microscopy showed that numerous Wolbachia are aligned towards the developing ovaries and single endobacteria were detected in the germline. In inseminated females (8 weeks p.i.) Wolbachia were observed in the ovaries, embryos and in decreasing numbers in the lateral chords. In young males Wolbachia were found in distinct zones of the testis and in large numbers in the lateral chords in the vicinity of testicular tissue but never in mature spermatids or spermatozoa. Conclusions Immunohistology and in situ hybridization show distinct tissue and stage specific distribution patterns for Wolbachia in B. malayi. Extensive multiplication of Wolbachia occurs in the lateral chords of L4

  17. Biochemical studies on glutathione S-transferase from the bovine filarial worm Setaria digitata.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Lakshmy; Mathew, Nisha; Karunan, Twinkle; Muthuswamy, Kalyanasundaram

    2011-07-01

    Setaria digitata is a filarial worm of the cattle used as a model system for antifilarial drug screening, due to its similarity to the human filarial parasites Wuchereria bancrofti and Brugia malayi. Since filarial glutathione S-transferase (GST) is a good biochemical target for antifilarial drug development, a study has been undertaken for the biochemical characterization of GST from S. digitata. Cytosolic fraction was separated from the crude S.digitata worm homogenate by ultracentrifugation at 100,000 g and subjected to ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by affinity chromatography using GSH-agarose column. The kinetic parameters K (m) and V (max) values with respect to GSH were 0.45 mM and 0.105 μmol min(-1) mL(-1) respectively. With respect to 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, the K (m) and V (max) values were 1.21 and 0.117 μmol min(-1) mL(-1) respectively. The effect of temperature and pH on GST enzyme activity was studied. The protein retained its enzyme activity between 0°C and 40°C, beyond which it showed a decreasing tendency, and at 80°C, the activity was lost completely. The enzyme activity was varying with change in pH, and the maximum GST activity was observed at pH 7.5. Gel filtration chromatographic studies indicated that the protein has a native molecular mass of about 54 kDa. The single band of GST subunit appeared in sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was found to have molecular mass of ∼27 kDa. This shows that cytosolic S. digitata GST protein is homodimeric in nature. PMID:21207063

  18. Insights into the structure-function relationship of Brugia malayi thymidylate kinase (BmTMK).

    PubMed

    Doharey, Pawan Kumar; Singh, Sudhir Kumar; Verma, Pravesh; Verma, Anita; Rathaur, Sushma; Saxena, Jitendra Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Lymphatic filariasis is a debilitating disease caused by lymph dwelling nematodal parasites like Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi and Brugia timori. Thymidylate kinase of B. malayi is a key enzyme in the de novo and salvage pathways for thymidine 5'-triphosphate (dTTP) synthesis. Therefore, B. malayi thymidylate kinase (BmTMK) is an essential enzyme for DNA biosynthesis and an important drug target to rein in filariasis. In the present study, the structural and functional changes associated with recombinant BmTMK, in the presence of protein denaturant GdnHCl, urea and pH were studied. GdnHCl and urea induced unfolding of BmTMK is non-cooperative and influence the functional property of the enzyme much lower than their Cm values. The study delineate that BmTMK is more prone to ionic perturbation. The dimeric assembly of BmTMK is an absolute requirement for enzymatic acitivity and any subtle change in dimeric conformation due to denaturation leads to loss of enzymatic activity. The pH induced changes on structure and activity suggests that selective modification of active site microenvironment pertains to difference in activity profile. This study also envisages that chemical moieties which acts by modulating oligomeric assembly, could be used for better designing of inhibitors against BmTMK enzyme. PMID:27044348

  19. Brugia malayi Excreted/Secreted Proteins at the Host/Parasite Interface: Stage- and Gender-Specific Proteomic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Bennuru, Sasisekhar; Semnani, Roshanak; Meng, Zhaojing; Ribeiro, Jose M. C.; Veenstra, Timothy D.; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2009-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the filarial proteins that interact with the human host. Although the filarial genome has recently been completed, protein profiles have been limited to only a few recombinants or purified proteins of interest. Here, we describe a large-scale proteomic analysis using microcapillary reverse-phase liquid chromatography-tandem-mass spectrometry to identify the excretory-secretory (ES) products of the L3, L3 to L4 molting ES, adult male, adult female, and microfilarial stages of the filarial parasite Brugia malayi. The analysis of the ES products from adult male, adult female, microfilariae (Mf), L3, and molting L3 larvae identified 852 proteins. Annotation suggests that the functional and component distribution was very similar across each of the stages studied; however, the Mf contributed a higher proportion to the total number of identified proteins than the other stages. Of the 852 proteins identified in the ES, only 229 had previous confirmatory expressed sequence tags (ESTs) in the available databases. Moreover, this analysis was able to confirm the presence of 274 “hypothetical” proteins inferred from gene prediction algorithms applied to the B. malayi (Bm) genome. Not surprisingly, the majority (160/274) of these “hypothetical” proteins were predicted to be secreted by Signal IP and/or SecretomeP 2.0 analysis. Of major interest is the abundance of previously characterized immunomodulatory proteins such as ES-62 (leucyl aminopeptidase), MIF-1, SERPIN, glutathione peroxidase, and galectin in the ES of microfilariae (and Mf-containing adult females) compared to the adult males. In addition, searching the ES protein spectra against the Wolbachia database resulted in the identification of 90 Wolbachia-specific proteins, most of which were metabolic enzymes that have not been shown to be immunogenic. This proteomic analysis extends our knowledge of the ES and provides insight into the host–parasite interaction. PMID:19352421

  20. In Vitro, In Silico and In Vivo Studies of Ursolic Acid as an Anti-Filarial Agent

    PubMed Central

    Kalani, Komal; Kushwaha, Vikas; Sharma, Pooja; Verma, Richa; Srivastava, Mukesh; Khan, Feroz; Murthy, P. K.; Srivastava, Santosh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    As part of our drug discovery program for anti-filarial agents from Indian medicinal plants, leaves of Eucalyptus tereticornis were chemically investigated, which resulted in the isolation and characterization of an anti-filarial agent, ursolic acid (UA) as a major constituent. Antifilarial activity of UA against the human lymphatic filarial parasite Brugia malayi using in vitro and in vivo assays, and in silico docking search on glutathione-s-transferase (GST) parasitic enzyme were carried out. The UA was lethal to microfilariae (mf; LC100: 50; IC50: 8.84 µM) and female adult worms (LC100: 100; IC50: 35.36 µM) as observed by motility assay; it exerted 86% inhibition in MTT reduction potential of the adult parasites. The selectivity index (SI) of UA for the parasites was found safe. This was supported by the molecular docking studies, which showed adequate docking (LibDock) scores for UA (−8.6) with respect to the standard antifilarial drugs, ivermectin (IVM −8.4) and diethylcarbamazine (DEC-C −4.6) on glutathione-s-transferase enzyme. Further, in silico pharmacokinetic and drug-likeness studies showed that UA possesses drug-like properties. Furthermore, UA was evaluated in vivo in B. malayi-M. coucha model (natural infection), which showed 54% macrofilaricidal activity, 56% female worm sterility and almost unchanged microfilaraemia maintained throughout observation period with no adverse effect on the host. Thus, in conclusion in vitro, in silico and in vivo results indicate that UA is a promising, inexpensive, widely available natural lead, which can be designed and developed into a macrofilaricidal drug. To the best of our knowledge this is the first ever report on the anti-filarial potential of UA from E. tereticornis, which is in full agreement with the Thomson Reuter's ‘Metadrug’ tool screening predictions. PMID:25375886

  1. Brugia malayi abundant larval transcript 2 protein treatment attenuates experimentally-induced colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Vishal; Amdare, Nitin; Yadav, Ravi Shankar; Tarnekar, Aaditya; Goswami, Kalyan; Reddy, Maryada Venkata Rami

    2015-11-01

    Helminths are known to modulate host's immunity by suppressing host protective pro-inflammatory responses. Such immunomodulatory effects have been experimentally shown to have therapeutic implications in immune mediated disorders. In the present study, we have explored a filarial protein i.e. Brugia malayi recombinant abundant larval transcript 2 (rBmALT2) for its therapeutic effect in dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) induced colitis in mouse model. The immunomodulatory activity of rBmALT-2 was initially confirmed by demonstrating that it suppressed the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced nitric oxide synthesis and down-regulated the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in vitro by peritoneal exudate cells of mice. Treatment with rBmALT2 reduced severity of colitis associated with significant reduction in weight loss, disease activity, colon damage, mucosal edema and histopathological score including myeloperoxidase activity in colon tissues. rBmALT2 was comparatively more effective in attenuation of colitis when used in the preventive mode than when used for curative purpose. The therapeutic effect of rBmALT2 was found to be associated with downregulation of IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-17 and upregulation of IL-10 cytokines. These results provide strong experimental evidence that BmALT2 could be a potential alternative therapeutic agent in colitis. PMID:26669016

  2. Identification of a highly immunoreactive epitope of Brugia malayi TPx recognized by the endemic sera.

    PubMed

    Madhumathi, Jayaprakasam; Prince, Prabhu Rajaiah; Gayatri, Subash Chellam; Aparnaa, Ramanathan; Kaliraj, Perumal

    2010-12-01

    Filarial thiordoxin peroxidase is a major antioxidant that plays a crucial role in parasite survival. Although Brugia malayi TPx has been shown to be a potential vaccine candidate, it shares 63% homology with its mammalian counterpart, limiting its use as a vaccine or drug target. In silico analysis of TPx sequence revealed a linear B epitope in the host's nonhomologous region. The peptide sequence (TPx peptide(27-48)) was synthesized, and its reactivity with clinical sera from an endemic region was analyzed. The peptide showed significantly high reactivity (P < 0.05) against the sera of putatively immune individuals compared to the nonendemic control sera. It also showed high reactivity against the sera of patients with chronic pathology and patent infection. The high reactivity of the peptide with endemic immune sera equivalent to that of whole protein shows that it forms a dominant B epitope of TPx protein and thus could be utilized for incorporation into a multiepitope vaccine construct for filariasis. PMID:21158641

  3. Localization of a filarial phosphate permease that is up-regulated in response to depletion of essential Wolbachia endobacteria.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Sridhar; Hoerauf, Achim; Pfarr, Kenneth M

    2014-03-01

    Wolbachia of filarial nematodes are essential, obligate endobacteria. When depleted by doxycycline worm embryogenesis, larval development and worm survival are inhibited. The molecular basis governing the endosymbiosis between Wolbachia and their filarial host is still being deciphered. In rodent filarial nematode Litomosoides sigmodontis, a nematode encoded phosphate permease gene (Ls-ppe-1) was up-regulated at the mRNA level in response to Wolbachia depletion and this gene promises to have an important role in Wolbachia-nematode endosymbiosis. To further characterize this gene, the regulation of phosphate permease during Wolbachia depletion was studied at the protein level in L. sigmodontis and in the human filaria Onchocerca volvulus. And the localization of phosphate permease (PPE) and Wolbachia in L. sigmodontis and O. volvulus was investigated in untreated and antibiotic treated worms. Depletion of Wolbachia by tetracycline (Tet) resulted in up-regulation of Ls-ppe-1 in L. sigmodontis. On day 36 of Tet treatment, compared to controls (Con), >98% of Wolbachia were depleted with a 3-fold increase in mRNA levels of Ls-ppe-1. Anti-Ls-PPE serum used in Western blots showed up-regulation of Ls-PPE at the protein level in Tet worms on day 15 and 36 of treatment. Immunohistology revealed the localization of Wolbachia and Ls-PPE in the embryos, microfilariae and hypodermis of L. sigmodontis female worms and up-regulation of Ls-PPE in response to Wolbachia depletion. Expression of O. volvulus phosphate permease (Ov-PPE) studied using anti-Ov-PPE serum, showed up-regulation of Ov-PPE at the protein level in doxycycline treated Wolbachia depleted O. volvulus worms and immunohistology revealed localization of Ov-PPE and Wolbachia and up-regulation of Ov-PPE in the hypodermis and embryos of doxycycline treated worms. Ls-PPE and Ov-PPE are upregulated upon Wolbachia depletion in same tissues and regions where Wolbachia are located in untreated worms, reinforcing a link

  4. Filarial parasites possess an antizyme but lack a functional ornithine decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Kurosinski, Marc-André; Lüersen, Kai; Ndjonka, Dieudonne; Younis, Abuelhassan Elshazly; Brattig, Norbert W; Liebau, Eva

    2013-06-01

    In eukaryotes, the key player in polyamine metabolism is the ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) that catalyses the first and rate limiting step in cellular polyamine synthesis. The half life of ODC is strictly regulated by the antizyme (AZ), which promotes its degradation. Older reports on the polyamine situation in filarial parasites indicate a lack of ornithine decarboxylation activity and an increased uptake of polyamines. Our in silico analysis of the Brugia malayi genome revealed only an ODC-like protein that lacks essential residues. Consequently, the recombinant protein had no enzymatic ODC activity. Furthermore, only ODC-like genes were found in the available draft genomes of other filarial parasites. In this ODC-free scenario, we set out to investigate the AZ of O. volvulus (OvAZ). The expression of the recombinant protein allowed us to analyse the localization of OvAZ in different O. volvulus stages as well as to identify it as target for the human humoral immune response. Strong immunostaining was observed in the outer zone of the uterine epithelium as well as in the uterus lumen around the periphery of the developing parasite, indicating a potential role of the OvAZ in the control of polyamine levels during embryonic development. By employing a novel in vivo method using Caenorhabditis elegans, we postulate that the OvAZ enters the secretory pathway. Even though the ODCs are absent in filarial parasites, OvAZ has the ability to bind to various ODCs, thereby demonstrating the functionality of the conserved AZ-binding domains. Finally, pull-down assays show an interaction between B. malayi AZ and the B. malayi ODC-like protein, indicating that the B. malayi ODC-like protein might function as an AZI. Taken together, our results suggest that filarial species do not possess the ODC while retaining the ODC-regulatory proteins AZ and AZI. It is tempting to speculate that both proteins are retained for the regulation of polyamine transport systems. PMID:23474393

  5. Immune activation by life-shortening Wolbachia and reduced filarial competence in mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Kambris, Zakaria; Cook, Peter E.; Phuc, Hoang K.; Sinkins, Steven P.

    2010-01-01

    Wolbachia strain wMelPop reduces longevity of its Drosophila melanogaster host and halves lifespan when introduced into the mosquito Aedes aegypti. We show that wMelPop induces upregulation of the mosquito innate immune system and that its presence inhibits the development of filarial nematodes in the mosquito. These data suggest that wMelPop could be used in the global effort to eliminate lymphatic filariasis, and possibly the control of other mosquito-borne parasites where immune preactivation inhibits their development. The cost of constitutive immune upregulation may contribute to the life-shortening phenotype. PMID:19797660

  6. Neurological manifestations of filarial infections.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Devender; Dumas, Michel; Preux, Pierre-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Filarial infections cause a huge public health burden wherever they are endemic. These filaria may locate anywhere in the human body. Their manifestations and pathogenic mechanisms, except the most common ones, are rarely investigated systematically. Their neurological manifestations, however, are being increasingly recognized particularly with onchocerciasis or Loa loa infections, Wuchereria bancrofti, or Mansonella perstans. The risk of developing these manifestations may also increase in cases that harbor multiple filariasis or coinfections, for instance as with Plasmodium. The microfilaria of Onchocerca and Loa loa are seen in cerebrospinal fluid. The pathogenesis of neurological manifestations of these infections is complex; however, pathogenic reactions may be caused by mechanical disruption, e.g., degeneration often followed by granulomas, causing fibrosis or mass effects on other tissues, vascular lesions, e.g., vascular block of cerebral vessels, or disordered inflammatory responses resulting in meningitis, encephalitis or localized inflammatory responses. The chances of having neurological manifestations may also depend upon the frequency and"heaviness"of infection over a lifetime. Hence, this type of infection should no longer be considered a disease of the commonly affected areas but one that may produce systemic effects or other manifestations, and these should be considered in populations where they are endemic. PMID:23829914

  7. Characterization of Transcription Factors That Regulate the Type IV Secretion System and Riboflavin Biosynthesis in Wolbachia of Brugia malayi

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiru; Carlow, Clotilde K. S.

    2012-01-01

    The human filarial parasite Brugia malayi harbors an endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia (wBm) that is required for parasite survival. Consequently, targeting wBm is a promising approach for anti-filarial drug development. The Type IV secretion system (T4SS) plays an important role in bacteria-host interactions and is under stringent regulation by transcription factors. In wBm, most T4SS genes are contained in two operons. We show the wBm is active since the essential assembly factor virB8-1, is transcribed in adult worms and larval stages, and VirB8-1 is present in parasite lysates. We also identify two transcription factors (wBmxR1 and wBmxR2) that bind to the promoter region of several genes of the T4SS. Gel shift assays show binding of wBmxR1 to regions upstream of the virB9-2 and wBmxR2 genes, whereas wBmxR2 binds to virB4-2 and wBmxR1 promoter regions. Interestingly, both transcription factors bind to the promoter of the ribA gene that precedes virB8-1, the first gene in operon 1 of the wBm T4SS. RT-PCR reveals ribA and virB8-1 genes are co-transcribed as one operon, indicating the ribA gene and T4SS operon 1 are co-regulated by both wBmxR1 and wBmxR2. RibA encodes a bi-functional enzyme that catalyzes two essential steps in riboflavin (Vitamin B2) biosynthesis. Importantly, the riboflavin pathway is absent in B. malayi. We demonstrate the pathway is functional in wBm, and observe vitamin B2 supplementation partially rescues filarial parasites treated with doxycycline, indicating Wolbachia may supply the essential vitamin to its worm host. This is the first characterization of a transcription factor(s) from wBm and first report of co-regulation of genes of the T4SS and riboflavin biosynthesis pathway. In addition, our results demonstrate a requirement of vitamin B2 for worm health and fertility, and imply a nutritional role of the symbiont for the filarial parasite host. PMID:23251587

  8. Thermoregulation in the life cycle of nematodes.

    PubMed

    Devaney, Eileen

    2006-05-31

    An unanswered question in the biology of many parasites is the mechanism by which environmental (or external) and intrinsic signals are integrated to determine the switch from one developmental stage to the next. This is particularly pertinent for nematode parasites, many of which have a free-living stage in the environment prior to infection of the mammalian host, or for parasites such as filarial nematodes, which utilise an insect vector for transmission. The environmental changes experienced by a parasite upon infection of a mammalian host are extremely complex and poorly understood. However, the ability of a parasite to sense its new environment must be intrinsically linked to its developmental programme, as progression of the life cycle is dependent upon the infection event. In this review, the relationship between temperature and development in filarial nematodes and in the free-living species Caenorhabditis elegans is summarised, with a focus on the role of heat shock factor and heat shock protein 90 in the nematode life cycle. PMID:16620827

  9. Nematode Hsp90: highly conserved but functionally diverse.

    PubMed

    Gillan, Victoria; Devaney, Eileen

    2014-08-01

    Nematodes are amongst the most successful and abundant organisms on the planet with approximately 30 000 species described, although the actual number of species is estimated to be one million or more. Despite sharing a relatively simple and invariant body plan, there is considerable diversity within the phylum. Nematodes have evolved to colonize most ecological niches, and can be free-living or can parasitize plants or animals to the detriment of the host organism. In this review we consider the role of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) in the nematode life cycle. We describe studies on Hsp90 in the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and comparative work on the parasitic species Brugia pahangi, and consider whether a dependence upon Hsp90 can be exploited for the control of parasitic species. PMID:24721950

  10. Rapid detection and identification of Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi, B. pahangi, and Dirofilaria immitis in mosquito vectors and blood samples by high resolution melting real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Intapan, Pewpan M; Tantrawatpan, Chairat; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Chungpivat, Sudchit; Taweethavonsawat, Piyanan; Kaewkong, Worasak; Sanpool, Oranuch; Janwan, Penchom; Choochote, Wej; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2013-12-01

    A simple, rapid, and high-throughput method for detection and identification of Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi, Brugia pahangi, and Dirofilaria immitis in mosquito vectors and blood samples was developed using a real-time PCR combined with high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis. Amplicons of the 4 filarial species were generated from 5S rRNA and spliced leader sequences by the real-time PCR and their melting temperatures were determined by the HRM method. Melting of amplicons from W. bancrofti, B. malayi, D. immitis, and B. pahangi peaked at 81.5±0.2℃, 79.0±0.3℃, 76.8±0.1℃, and 79.9±0.1℃, respectively. This assay is relatively cheap since it does not require synthesis of hybridization probes. Its sensitivity and specificity were 100%. It is a rapid and technically simple approach, and an important tool for population surveys as well as molecular xenomonitoring of parasites in vectors. PMID:24516268

  11. Rapid Detection and Identification of Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi, B. pahangi, and Dirofilaria immitis in Mosquito Vectors and Blood Samples by High Resolution Melting Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Intapan, Pewpan M.; Tantrawatpan, Chairat; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Chungpivat, Sudchit; Taweethavonsawat, Piyanan; Kaewkong, Worasak; Sanpool, Oranuch; Janwan, Penchom; Choochote, Wej

    2013-01-01

    A simple, rapid, and high-throughput method for detection and identification of Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi, Brugia pahangi, and Dirofilaria immitis in mosquito vectors and blood samples was developed using a real-time PCR combined with high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis. Amplicons of the 4 filarial species were generated from 5S rRNA and spliced leader sequences by the real-time PCR and their melting temperatures were determined by the HRM method. Melting of amplicons from W. bancrofti, B. malayi, D. immitis, and B. pahangi peaked at 81.5±0.2℃, 79.0±0.3℃, 76.8±0.1℃, and 79.9±0.1℃, respectively. This assay is relatively cheap since it does not require synthesis of hybridization probes. Its sensitivity and specificity were 100%. It is a rapid and technically simple approach, and an important tool for population surveys as well as molecular xenomonitoring of parasites in vectors. PMID:24516268

  12. A multicenter evaluation of a new antibody test kit for lymphatic filariasis employing recombinant Brugia malayi antigen Bm-14.

    PubMed

    Weil, Gary J; Curtis, Kurt C; Fischer, Peter U; Won, Kimberly Y; Lammie, Patrick J; Joseph, Hayley; Melrose, Wayne D; Brattig, Norbert W

    2011-09-01

    Antibody tests are useful for mapping the distribution of lymphatic filariasis (LF) in countries and regions and for monitoring progress in elimination programs based on mass drug administration (MDA). Prior antibody tests have suffered from poor sensitivity and/or specificity or from a lack of standardization. We conducted a multicenter evaluation of a new commercial ELISA that detects IgG4 antibodies to the recombinant filarial antigen Bm14. Four laboratories tested a shared panel of coded serum or plasma samples that included 55 samples from people with microfilaremic Wuchereria bancrofti or Brugia infections and 26 control samples. Qualitative results were identical in all four test sites. In addition, each laboratory tested samples from their own serum banks. The test detected antibodies in 32 of 36 samples (91%) from people with Brugian filariasis and in 96 of 98 samples (98%) from people with Bancroftian filariasis. Specificity testing showed that many serum or plasma samples from patients with other filarial infections such as onchocerciasis had positive antibody tests. Specificity was otherwise excellent, although 3 of 30 samples from patients with ascariasis and 4 of 51 with strongyloidiasis had positive antibody tests; it is likely that some or all of these people had previously lived in filariasis-endemic areas. Antibody test results obtained with eluates from blood dried on filter paper were similar to those obtained with plasma tested at the same dilution. This test may be helpful for diagnosing LF in patients with clinical signs of filariasis. It may also be a useful tool for use in LF endemic countries to monitor the progress of filariasis elimination programs and for post-MDA surveillance. PMID:20430004

  13. Microfilariae of Brugia malayi Inhibit the mTOR Pathway and Induce Autophagy in Human Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Narasimhan, Prakash Babu; Bennuru, Sasisekhar; Meng, Zhaojing; Cotton, Rachel N; Elliott, Kathleen R; Ganesan, Sundar; McDonald-Fleming, Renee; Veenstra, Timothy D; Nutman, Thomas B; Tolouei Semnani, Roshanak

    2016-09-01

    Immune modulation is a hallmark of patent filarial infection, including suppression of antigen-presenting cell function and downmodulation of filarial antigen-specific T cell responses. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway has been implicated in immune regulation, not only by suppressing T cell responses but also by regulating autophagy (through mTOR sensing amino acid availability). Global proteomic analysis (liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry) of microfilaria (mf)-exposed monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) indicated that multiple components of the mTOR signaling pathway, including mTOR, eIF4A, and eIF4E, are downregulated by mf, suggesting that mf target this pathway for immune modulation in DC. Utilizing Western blot analysis, we demonstrate that similar to rapamycin (a known mTOR inhibitor), mf downregulate the phosphorylation of mTOR and its regulatory proteins, p70S6K1 and 4E-BP1, a process essential for DC protein synthesis. As active mTOR signaling regulates autophagy, we examined whether mf exposure alters autophagy-associated processes. mf-induced autophagy was reflected in marked upregulation of phosphorylated Beclin 1, known to play an important role in both autophagosome formation and autolysosome fusion, in induction of LC3II, a marker of autophagosome formation, and in induced degradation of p62, a ubiquitin-binding protein that aggregates protein in autophagosomes and is degraded upon autophagy that was reduced significantly by mf exposure and by rapamycin. Together, these results suggest that Brugia malayi mf employ mechanisms of metabolic modulation in DC to influence the regulation of the host immune response by downregulating mTOR signaling, resulting in increased autophagy. Whether this is a result of the parasite-secreted rapamycin homolog is currently under study. PMID:27297394

  14. Differential induction of Th2- and Th1-associated responses by filarial antigens and endosymbiotic Wolbachia in a murine model of river blindness.

    PubMed

    Gentil, K; Hoerauf, A; Pearlman, E

    2012-06-01

    Immune responses to filarial parasites like the river blindness inducing Onchocerca volvulus are obscured by combined reactions to the filarial nematodes themselves and their endosymbiont bacteria Wolbachia. Overall, infection with filarial nematodes induces a strong Th2 response characterized by IL-5 production and to a lesser degree a Th1 response and IFNγ production. Neutrophil and eosinophil infiltration into the corneal stroma are hallmark features of Onchocerca volvulus stimulation in a mouse model of river blindness. To determine the splenic and corneal response to filarial antigens in the absence of Wolbachia, C57BL/6 mice were immunized subcutaneously with either endosymbiotic Wolbachia alone, a soluble extract from the filaria Acanthocheilonema viteae that does not contain Wolbachia, or both, and injected into the corneal stroma. Neutrophil and eosinophil infiltration into the cornea was assessed by immunohistochemistry. In addition, Th1- and Th2-associated responses to filaria or Wolbachia were investigated by determining IL-5 and IFN-γ production by splenocytes. We found that A. viteae in the absence of Wolbachia induced IL-5 production and eosinophil infiltration, but not IFN-γ. Conversely, Wolbachia induced IFN-γ production and no migration of eosinophils. There was no difference in neutrophil infiltration. Together, these findings demonstrate a distinct Th-associated phenotype induced by filaria and Wolbachia. PMID:24672682

  15. Protective immune responses to biolistic DNA vaccination of Brugia malayi abundant larval transcript-2.

    PubMed

    Joseph, S K; Sambanthamoorthy, S; Dakshinamoorthy, G; Munirathinam, G; Ramaswamy, K

    2012-10-01

    Biolistic vaccination using gene gun is developed as a safer tool for delivery of DNA vaccines, a technique that combines high vaccine efficiency with lower antigen dosage and lower cost per vaccine dose. In this study, we compared the protective responses in mice after delivering the Brugia malayi abundant larval transcript-2 (BmALT-2) DNA vaccine using the conventional intradermal approach or with the needleless gene gun delivery approach. BmALT-2 is a leading vaccine candidate against B. malayi, a lymphatic filarial parasite of human. After optimizing the DNA dose and gene gun parameters for delivery into mouse skin, groups of mice were biolistically vaccinated with 5 μg of BmALT-2pVAX. Groups of mice vaccinated intradermally with 5 μg or 100 μg of BmALT-2pVAX was used for comparison of vaccine efficacy. Results demonstrated that gene gun vaccination with 5 μg of BmALT-2pVAX conferred significant protection against challenge infection that was comparable to the degree of protection conferred by intradermal vaccination with 100 μg of BmALT-2pVAX. This observation was further supported by an in vitro antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) assay. Analysis of the immune response showed that the gene gun vaccination predominantly induced an IgG1 antibody response and significantly high Th2 cytokine response (IL-4) from spleen cells compared to intradermal BmALT-2 DNA delivery that induced predominantly an IgG2a and Th1 cytokine response (IFN-γ, IL-12 and TNF-α). These findings show that host protective responses could be achieved with 20 fold decrease in DNA dose using a gene gun and could prove to be an efficient delivery method in BmALT-2 DNA vaccination against lymphatic filariasis. PMID:22885273

  16. Macrofilaricidal and microfilaricidal effects of Neurolaena lobata, a Guatemalan medicinal plant, on Brugia pahangi.

    PubMed

    Fujimaki, Y; Kamachi, T; Yanagi, T; Cáceres, A; Maki, J; Aoki, Y

    2005-03-01

    Twelve extracts of 11 Guatemalan medicinal plants were initially screened in vitro for potential macrofilaricidal activity against Brugia pahangi, a lymphatic dwelling filarial worm, using concentrations from 125 to 1000 microg ml(-1) of each extract that could be dissolved in the culture medium. Of 12 extracts used, the ethanol extract of leaves of Neurolaena lobata showed the strongest activity against the motility of adult worms. Subsequently, the extract of N. lobata was extensively examined in vitro for macro- and micro-filaricidal effects using a series of concentrations of 500, 250, 100, 50 and 10 microg ml(-1). The effects were assessed by worm motility, microfilarial release by female worms and a MTT assay. The effect on the motility of adult worms was observed in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The time required to stop motility of both sexes of adult worms was 6 h at 500 microg ml(-1), 24 h at 250 microg ml(-1), and 3 days for females and 4 days for males at 100 microg ml(-1). The movement of females ceased at 4 days at a concentration of 50 microg ml(-1) whereas the motility of males was only reduced. The loss of worm's viability was confirmed by the MTT assay and was similar to the motility results. These concentrations, including 10 microg ml(-1), prevented microfilarial release by females in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Concentrations higher than 100 microg ml(-1) even induced mortality of the microfilariae. The present study suggested that the ethanol extract of Neurolaena lobata has potential macro- and micro-filaricidal activities. PMID:15831109

  17. Assessment of Blood Collection from the Lateral Saphenous Vein for Microfilaria Counts in Mongolian Gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus) Infected with Brugia pahangi

    PubMed Central

    Alworth, Leanne C; Berghaus, Roy D; Kelly, Lisa M; Supakorndej, Prasit; Burkman, Erica J; Savadelis, Molly D; Cooper, Tanya L; Salyards, Gregory W; Harvey, Stephen B; Moorhead, Andrew R

    2015-01-01

    The NIH guidelines for survival bleeding of mice and rats note that using the retroorbital plexus has a greater potential for complications than do other methods of blood collection and that this procedure should be performed on anesthetized animals. Lateral saphenous vein puncture has a low potential for complications and can be performed without anesthesia. Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus) are the preferred rodent model for filarial parasite research. To monitor microfilaria counts in the blood, blood sampling from the orbital plexus has been the standard. Our goal was to refine the blood collection technique. To determine whether blood collection from the lateral saphenous vein was a feasible alternative to retroorbital sampling, we compared microfilaria counts in blood samples collected by both methods from 21 gerbils infected with the filarial parasitic worm Brugia pahangi. Lateral saphenous vein counts were equivalent to retroorbital counts at relatively high counts (greater than 50 microfilariae per 20 µL) but were significantly lower than retroorbital counts when microfilarial concentrations were lower. Our results indicate that although retroorbital collection may be preferable when low concentrations of microfilariae need to be enumerated, the lateral saphenous vein is a suitable alternative site for blood sampling to determine microfilaremia and is a feasible refinement that can benefit the wellbeing of gerbils. PMID:26678366

  18. Breakdown of coevolution between symbiotic bacteria Wolbachia and their filarial hosts.

    PubMed

    Lefoulon, Emilie; Bain, Odile; Makepeace, Benjamin L; d'Haese, Cyrille; Uni, Shigehiko; Martin, Coralie; Gavotte, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Wolbachia is an alpha-proteobacterial symbiont widely distributed in arthropods. Since the identification of Wolbachia in certain animal-parasitic nematodes (the Onchocercidae or filariae), the relationship between arthropod and nematode Wolbachia has attracted great interest. The obligate symbiosis in filariae, which renders infected species susceptible to antibiotic chemotherapy, was held to be distinct from the Wolbachia-arthropod relationship, typified by reproductive parasitism. While co-evolutionary signatures in Wolbachia-arthropod symbioses are generally weak, reflecting horizontal transmission events, strict co-evolution between filariae and Wolbachia has been reported previously. However, the absence of close outgroups for phylogenetic studies prevented the determination of which host group originally acquired Wolbachia. Here, we present the largest co-phylogenetic analysis of Wolbachia in filariae performed to date including: (i) a screening and an updated phylogeny of Wolbachia; (ii) a co-phylogenetic analysis; and (iii) a hypothesis on the acquisition of Wolbachia infection. First, our results show a general overestimation of Wolbachia occurrence and support the hypothesis of an ancestral absence of infection in the nematode phylum. The accuracy of supergroup J is also underlined. Second, although a global pattern of coevolution remains, the signal is derived predominantly from filarial clades associated with Wolbachia in supergroups C and J. In other filarial clades, harbouring Wolbachia supergroups D and F, horizontal acquisitions and secondary losses are common. Finally, our results suggest that supergroup C is the basal Wolbachia clade within the Ecdysozoa. This hypothesis on the origin of Wolbachia would change drastically our understanding of Wolbachia evolution. PMID:27069790

  19. Breakdown of coevolution between symbiotic bacteria Wolbachia and their filarial hosts

    PubMed Central

    Lefoulon, Emilie; Makepeace, Benjamin L.; d’Haese, Cyrille; Uni, Shigehiko; Gavotte, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Wolbachia is an alpha-proteobacterial symbiont widely distributed in arthropods. Since the identification of Wolbachia in certain animal-parasitic nematodes (the Onchocercidae or filariae), the relationship between arthropod and nematode Wolbachia has attracted great interest. The obligate symbiosis in filariae, which renders infected species susceptible to antibiotic chemotherapy, was held to be distinct from the Wolbachia-arthropod relationship, typified by reproductive parasitism. While co-evolutionary signatures in Wolbachia-arthropod symbioses are generally weak, reflecting horizontal transmission events, strict co-evolution between filariae and Wolbachia has been reported previously. However, the absence of close outgroups for phylogenetic studies prevented the determination of which host group originally acquired Wolbachia. Here, we present the largest co-phylogenetic analysis of Wolbachia in filariae performed to date including: (i) a screening and an updated phylogeny of Wolbachia; (ii) a co-phylogenetic analysis; and (iii) a hypothesis on the acquisition of Wolbachia infection. First, our results show a general overestimation of Wolbachia occurrence and support the hypothesis of an ancestral absence of infection in the nematode phylum. The accuracy of supergroup J is also underlined. Second, although a global pattern of coevolution remains, the signal is derived predominantly from filarial clades associated with Wolbachia in supergroups C and J. In other filarial clades, harbouring Wolbachia supergroups D and F, horizontal acquisitions and secondary losses are common. Finally, our results suggest that supergroup C is the basal Wolbachia clade within the Ecdysozoa. This hypothesis on the origin of Wolbachia would change drastically our understanding of Wolbachia evolution. PMID:27069790

  20. Immunopathogenesis of lymphatic filarial disease1

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Subash; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2012-01-01

    Although two-thirds of the 120 million people infected with lymph-dwelling filarial parasites have subclinical infections, ~ 40 million have lymphedema and/or other pathologic manifestations including hydroceles (and other forms of urogenital disease), episodic adenolymphangitis, tropical pulmonary eosinophilia, lymphedema, and (in its most severe form) elephantiasis. Adult filarial worms reside in the lymphatics and lymph nodes and induce changes that result in dilatation of lymphatics and thickening of the lymphatic vessel walls. Progressive lymphatic damage and pathology results from the summation of the effect of tissue alterations induced by both living and nonliving adult parasites, the host inflammatory response to the parasites and their secreted antigens, the host inflammatory response to the endosymbiont Wolbachia, and those seen as a consequence of secondary bacterial or fungal infections. Inflammatory damage induced by filarial parasites appears to be multifactorial, with endogenous parasite products, Wolbachia, and host immunity all playing important roles. This review will initially examine the prototypical immune responses engendered by the parasite and delineate the regulatory mechanisms elicited to prevent immune-mediated pathology. This will be followed by a discussion of the proposed mechanisms underlying pathogenesis, with the central theme being that pathogenesis is a two-step process - the first initiated by the parasite and host innate immune system and the second propagated mainly by the host’s adaptive immune system and by other factors (including secondary infections). PMID:23053393

  1. Storage of filarial parasites in CsTFA and precipitation of filarial DNA using MTAB.

    PubMed

    Egwang, T G; Akue, J P; Pinder, M

    1989-11-01

    Immunological and biochemical studies on some parasite species are hampered by a limited availability of parasite material. Thomas Egwang Jean-Paul Akue and Margaret Pinder discuss a technique for preserving material from adult filarial worms during transport through endemic areas. PMID:15463158

  2. Expanded Numbers of Circulating Myeloid Dendritic Cells in Patent Human Filarial Infection Reflect Lower CCR1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Semnani, Roshanak Tolouei; Mahapatra, Lily; Dembele, Benoit; Konate, Siaka; Metenou, Simon; Dolo, Housseini; Coulibaly, Michel E.; Soumaoro, Lamine; Coulibaly, Siaka Y.; Sanogo, Dramane; Doumbia, Salif Seriba; Diallo, Abdallah A.; Traoré, Sekou F.; Klion, Amy; Nutman, Thomas B.; Mahanty, Siddhartha

    2012-01-01

    APC dysfunction has been postulated to mediate some of the parasite-specific T cell unresponsiveness seen in patent filarial infection. We have shown that live microfilariae of Brugia malayi induce caspase-dependent apoptosis in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro. This study addresses whether apoptosis observed in vitro extends to patent filarial infections in humans and is reflected in the number of circulating myeloid DCs (mDCs; CD11c−CD123lo) in peripheral blood of infected microfilaremic individuals. Utilizing flow cytometry to identify DC subpopulations (mDCs and plasmacytoid DCs [pDCs]) based on expression of CD11c and CD123, we found a significant increase in numbers of circulating mDCs (CD11c+CD123lo) in filaria-infected individuals compared with uninfected controls from the same filaria-endemic region of Mali. Total numbers of pDCs, monocytes, and lymphocytes did not differ between the two groups. To investigate potential causes of differences in mDC numbers between the two groups, we assessed chemokine receptor expression on mDCs. Our data indicate that filaria-infected individuals had a lower percentage of circulating CCR1+ mDCs and a higher percentage of circulating CCR5+ mDCs and pDCs. Finally, live microfilariae of B. malayi were able to downregulate cell-surface expression of CCR1 on monocyte-derived DCs and diminish their calcium flux in response to stimulation by a CCR1 ligand. These findings suggest that microfilaria are capable of altering mDC migration through downregulation of expression of some chemokine receptors and their signaling functions. These observations have major implications for regulation of immune responses to these long-lived parasites. PMID:20956349

  3. Expanded numbers of circulating myeloid dendritic cells in patent human filarial infection reflect lower CCR1 expression.

    PubMed

    Semnani, Roshanak Tolouei; Mahapatra, Lily; Dembele, Benoit; Konate, Siaka; Metenou, Simon; Dolo, Housseini; Coulibaly, Michel E; Soumaoro, Lamine; Coulibaly, Siaka Y; Sanogo, Dramane; Seriba Doumbia, Salif; Diallo, Abdallah A; Traoré, Sekou F; Klion, Amy; Nutman, Thomas B; Mahanty, Siddhartha

    2010-11-15

    APC dysfunction has been postulated to mediate some of the parasite-specific T cell unresponsiveness seen in patent filarial infection. We have shown that live microfilariae of Brugia malayi induce caspase-dependent apoptosis in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro. This study addresses whether apoptosis observed in vitro extends to patent filarial infections in humans and is reflected in the number of circulating myeloid DCs (mDCs; CD11c(-)CD123(lo)) in peripheral blood of infected microfilaremic individuals. Utilizing flow cytometry to identify DC subpopulations (mDCs and plasmacytoid DCs [pDCs]) based on expression of CD11c and CD123, we found a significant increase in numbers of circulating mDCs (CD11c(+)CD123(lo)) in filaria-infected individuals compared with uninfected controls from the same filaria-endemic region of Mali. Total numbers of pDCs, monocytes, and lymphocytes did not differ between the two groups. To investigate potential causes of differences in mDC numbers between the two groups, we assessed chemokine receptor expression on mDCs. Our data indicate that filaria-infected individuals had a lower percentage of circulating CCR1(+) mDCs and a higher percentage of circulating CCR5(+) mDCs and pDCs. Finally, live microfilariae of B. malayi were able to downregulate cell-surface expression of CCR1 on monocyte-derived DCs and diminish their calcium flux in response to stimulation by a CCR1 ligand. These findings suggest that microfilaria are capable of altering mDC migration through downregulation of expression of some chemokine receptors and their signaling functions. These observations have major implications for regulation of immune responses to these long-lived parasites. PMID:20956349

  4. Structure of the Trehalose-6-phosphate Phosphatase from Brugia malayi Reveals Key Design Principles for Anthelmintic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Farelli, Jeremiah D.; Galvin, Brendan D.; Li, Zhiru; Liu, Chunliang; Aono, Miyuki; Garland, Megan; Hallett, Olivia E.; Causey, Thomas B.; Ali-Reynolds, Alana; Saltzberg, Daniel J.; Carlow, Clotilde K. S.; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Allen, Karen N.

    2014-01-01

    Parasitic nematodes are responsible for devastating illnesses that plague many of the world's poorest populations indigenous to the tropical areas of developing nations. Among these diseases is lymphatic filariasis, a major cause of permanent and long-term disability. Proteins essential to nematodes that do not have mammalian counterparts represent targets for therapeutic inhibitor discovery. One promising target is trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase (T6PP) from Brugia malayi. In the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, T6PP is essential for survival due to the toxic effect(s) of the accumulation of trehalose 6-phosphate. T6PP has also been shown to be essential in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of T6PP from B. malayi. The protein structure revealed a stabilizing N-terminal MIT-like domain and a catalytic C-terminal C2B-type HAD phosphatase fold. Structure-guided mutagenesis, combined with kinetic analyses using a designed competitive inhibitor, trehalose 6-sulfate, identified five residues important for binding and catalysis. This structure-function analysis along with computational mapping provided the basis for the proposed model of the T6PP-trehalose 6-phosphate complex. The model indicates a substrate-binding mode wherein shape complementarity and van der Waals interactions drive recognition. The mode of binding is in sharp contrast to the homolog sucrose-6-phosphate phosphatase where extensive hydrogen-bond interactions are made to the substrate. Together these results suggest that high-affinity inhibitors will be bi-dentate, taking advantage of substrate-like binding to the phosphoryl-binding pocket while simultaneously utilizing non-native binding to the trehalose pocket. The conservation of the key residues that enforce the shape of the substrate pocket in T6PP enzymes suggest that development of broad-range anthelmintic and antibacterial therapeutics employing this platform may be possible. PMID:24992307

  5. Brugia malayi Microfilariae Induce a Regulatory Monocyte/Macrophage Phenotype That Suppresses Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Venugopal, Gopinath; Rao, Gopala B.; Lucius, Richard; Srikantam, Aparna; Hartmann, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Background Monocytes and macrophages contribute to the dysfunction of immune responses in human filariasis. During patent infection monocytes encounter microfilariae in the blood, an event that occurs in asymptomatically infected filariasis patients that are immunologically hyporeactive. Aim To determine whether blood microfilariae directly act on blood monocytes and in vitro generated macrophages to induce a regulatory phenotype that interferes with innate and adaptive responses. Methodology and principal findings Monocytes and in vitro generated macrophages from filaria non-endemic normal donors were stimulated in vitro with Brugia malayi microfilarial (Mf) lysate. We could show that monocytes stimulated with Mf lysate develop a defined regulatory phenotype, characterised by expression of the immunoregulatory markers IL-10 and PD-L1. Significantly, this regulatory phenotype was recapitulated in monocytes from Wuchereria bancrofti asymptomatically infected patients but not patients with pathology or endemic normals. Monocytes from non-endemic donors stimulated with Mf lysate directly inhibited CD4+ T cell proliferation and cytokine production (IFN-γ, IL-13 and IL-10). IFN-γ responses were restored by neutralising IL-10 or PD-1. Furthermore, macrophages stimulated with Mf lysate expressed high levels of IL-10 and had suppressed phagocytic abilities. Finally Mf lysate applied during the differentiation of macrophages in vitro interfered with macrophage abilities to respond to subsequent LPS stimulation in a selective manner. Conclusions and significance Conclusively, our study demonstrates that Mf lysate stimulation of monocytes from healthy donors in vitro induces a regulatory phenotype, characterized by expression of PD-L1 and IL-10. This phenotype is directly reflected in monocytes from filarial patients with asymptomatic infection but not patients with pathology or endemic normals. We suggest that suppression of T cell functions typically seen in lymphatic

  6. Nucleic acid transfection and transgenesis in parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Lok, James B

    2012-04-01

    Transgenesis is an essential tool for assessing gene function in any organism, and it is especially crucial for parasitic nematodes given the dwindling armamentarium of effective anthelmintics and the consequent need to validate essential molecular targets for new drugs and vaccines. Two of the major routes of gene delivery evaluated to date in parasitic nematodes, bombardment with DNA-coated microparticles and intragonadal microinjection of DNA constructs, draw upon experience with the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Bombardment has been used to transiently transfect Ascaris suum, Brugia malayi and Litomosoides sigmodontis with both RNA and DNA. Microinjection has been used to achieve heritable transgenesis in Strongyloides stercoralis, S. ratti and Parastrongyloides trichosuri and for additional transient expression studies in B. malayi. A third route of gene delivery revisits a classic method involving DNA transfer facilitated by calcium-mediated permeabilization of recipient cells in developing B. malayi larvae and results in transgene inheritance through host and vector passage. Assembly of microinjected transgenes into multi-copy episomal arrays likely results in their transcriptional silencing in some parasitic nematodes. Methods such as transposon-mediated transgenesis that favour low-copy number chromosomal integration may remedy this impediment to establishing stable transgenic lines. In the future, stable transgenesis in parasitic nematodes could enable loss-of-function approaches by insertional mutagenesis, in situ expression of inhibitory double-stranded RNA or boosting RNAi susceptibility through heterologous expression of dsRNA processing and transport proteins. PMID:21880161

  7. The Effects of Ivermectin on Brugia malayi Females In Vitro: A Transcriptomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, Maeghan; Burkman, Erica; Zaky, Weam I.; Xia, Jianguo; Moorhead, Andrew; Williams, Steven A.; Geary, Timothy G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis are disabling and disfiguring neglected tropical diseases of major importance in developing countries. Ivermectin is the drug of choice for mass drug administration programs for the control of onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis in areas where the diseases are co-endemic. Although ivermectin paralyzes somatic and pharyngeal muscles in many nematodes, these actions are poorly characterized in adult filariae. We hypothesize that paralysis of pharyngeal pumping by ivermectin in filariae could result in deprivation of essential nutrients, especially iron, inducing a wide range of responses evidenced by altered gene expression, changes in metabolic pathways, and altered developmental states in embryos. Previous studies have shown that ivermectin treatment significantly reduces microfilariae release from females within four days of exposure in vivo, while not markedly affecting adult worms. However, the mechanisms responsible for reduced production of microfilariae are poorly understood. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed transcriptomic profiles from Brugia malayi adult females, an important model for other filariae, using RNAseq technology after exposure in culture to ivermectin at various concentrations (100 nM, 300 nM and 1 μM) and time points (24, 48, 72 h, and 5 days). Our analysis revealed drug-related changes in expression of genes involved in meiosis, as well as oxidative phosphorylation, which were significantly down-regulated as early as 24 h post-exposure. RNA interference phenotypes of the orthologs of these down-regulated genes in C. elegans include “maternal sterile”, “embryonic lethal”, “larval arrest”, “larval lethal” and “sick”. Conclusion/Significance These changes provide insight into the mechanisms involved in ivermectin-induced reduction in microfilaria output and impaired fertility, embryogenesis, and larval development. PMID:27529747

  8. Filamentation temperature-sensitive protein Z (FtsZ) of Wolbachia, endosymbiont of Wuchereria bancrofti: a potential target for anti-filarial chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rohit; Hoti, S L; Vasuki, V; Sankari, T; Meena, R L; Das, P K

    2013-03-01

    Lymphatic filariasis (LF) is a leading cause of morbidity in the tropical world. It is caused by the filarial parasites Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi and Brugia timori and transmitted by vector mosquitoes. Currently a programme for the elimination of LF, Global programme for Elimination of Lymphatic Filariasis (GPELF), is underway with the strategy of mass administration of single dose of diethylcarbamazine or ivermectin, in combination with an anthelmintic drug, albendazole. However, antifilarial drugs used in the programme are only microfilaricidal but not or only partially macrofilaricidal. Hence, there is a need to identify new targets for developing antifilarial drugs. Filarial parasites harbor rickettsial endosymbionts, Wolbachia sp., which play an important role in their biology and hence are considered as potential targets for antifilarial chemotherapy development. In this study, one of the cell division proteins of Wolbachia of the major lymphatic filarial parasite, W. bancrofti, viz., filamentation temperature-sensitive protein Z (FtsZ), was explored as a drug target. The gene coding for FtsZ protein was amplified from the genomic DNA of W. bancrofti, cloned and sequenced. The derived amino acid sequence of the gene revealed that FtsZ protein is 396 amino acids long and contained the tubulin motif (GGGTGTG) involved in GTP binding and the GTP hydrolyzing motif (NLDFAD). The FtsZ gene of endosymbiont showed limited sequence homology, but exhibited functional homology with β-tubulin of its host, W. bancrofti, as it had both the functional motifs and conserved amino acids that are critical for enzymatic activity. β-tubulin is the target for the anti-helminthic activity of albendazole and since FtsZ shares functional homology with, β-tubulin it may also be sensitive to albendazole. Therefore, the effect of albendazole was tested against Wolbachia occurring in mosquitoes instead of filarial parasites as the drug has lethal effect on the latter. Third

  9. Diseases caused by nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter comprises an updated review of plant-parasitic nematodes of alfalfa. Many species of plant-parasitic nematodes are associated with alfalfa, but the stem nematode, root-knot nematodes, and root-lesion nematodes are economically the most important. As a result of root injury, aboveground ...

  10. An In Vitro/In Vivo Model to Analyze the Effects of Flubendazole Exposure on Adult Female Brugia malayi

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, Maeghan; Mansour, Abdelmoneim; DiCosty, Utami; Geary, James; Dzimianski, Michael; McCall, Scott D.; McCall, John W.; Mackenzie, Charles D.; Geary, Timothy G.

    2016-01-01

    Current control strategies for onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis (LF) rely on prolonged yearly or twice-yearly mass administration of microfilaricidal drugs. Prospects for near-term elimination or eradication of these diseases would be improved by availability of a macrofilaricide that is highly effective in a short regimen. Flubendazole (FLBZ), a benzimidazole anthelmintic registered for control of human gastrointestinal nematode infections, is a potential candidate for this role. FLBZ has profound and potent macrofilaricidal effects in many experimental animal models of filariases and in one human trial for onchocerciasis after parental administration. Unfortunately, the marketed formulation of FLBZ provides very limited oral bioavailability and parenteral administration is required for macrofilaricidal efficacy. A new formulation that provided sufficient oral bioavailability could advance FLBZ as an effective treatment for onchocerciasis and LF. Short-term in vitro culture experiments in adult filariae have shown that FLBZ damages tissues required for reproduction and survival at pharmacologically relevant concentrations. The current study characterized the long-term effects of FLBZ on adult Brugia malayi by maintaining parasites in jirds for up to eight weeks following brief drug exposure (6–24 hr) to pharmacologically relevant concentrations (100 nM—10 μM) in culture. Morphological damage following exposure to FLBZ was observed prominently in developing embryos and was accompanied by a decrease in microfilarial output at 4 weeks post-exposure. Although FLBZ exposure clearly damaged the parasites, exposed worms recovered and were viable 8 weeks after treatment. PMID:27145083

  11. An In Vitro/In Vivo Model to Analyze the Effects of Flubendazole Exposure on Adult Female Brugia malayi.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Maeghan; Mansour, Abdelmoneim; DiCosty, Utami; Geary, James; Dzimianski, Michael; McCall, Scott D; McCall, John W; Mackenzie, Charles D; Geary, Timothy G

    2016-05-01

    Current control strategies for onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis (LF) rely on prolonged yearly or twice-yearly mass administration of microfilaricidal drugs. Prospects for near-term elimination or eradication of these diseases would be improved by availability of a macrofilaricide that is highly effective in a short regimen. Flubendazole (FLBZ), a benzimidazole anthelmintic registered for control of human gastrointestinal nematode infections, is a potential candidate for this role. FLBZ has profound and potent macrofilaricidal effects in many experimental animal models of filariases and in one human trial for onchocerciasis after parental administration. Unfortunately, the marketed formulation of FLBZ provides very limited oral bioavailability and parenteral administration is required for macrofilaricidal efficacy. A new formulation that provided sufficient oral bioavailability could advance FLBZ as an effective treatment for onchocerciasis and LF. Short-term in vitro culture experiments in adult filariae have shown that FLBZ damages tissues required for reproduction and survival at pharmacologically relevant concentrations. The current study characterized the long-term effects of FLBZ on adult Brugia malayi by maintaining parasites in jirds for up to eight weeks following brief drug exposure (6-24 hr) to pharmacologically relevant concentrations (100 nM-10 μM) in culture. Morphological damage following exposure to FLBZ was observed prominently in developing embryos and was accompanied by a decrease in microfilarial output at 4 weeks post-exposure. Although FLBZ exposure clearly damaged the parasites, exposed worms recovered and were viable 8 weeks after treatment. PMID:27145083

  12. IgG subclass responses to proinflammatory fraction of Brugia malayi in human filariasis

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, S.K.; Verma, S.K.; Sahoo, M.K.; Sharma, A.; Srivastava, M.; Reddy, M.V.R.; Murthy, P.K.

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Earlier we demonstrated that immunization with F6, a proinflammatory molecular fraction isolated from the human filarial parasite Brugia malayi, protected the host and eliminated the infection in Mastomys coucha by a Th1/Th2 response including IgG2a antibody response. Whether F6 molecules become accessible to human host during natural course of infection and elicit similar response is not known. The present study was undertaken to determine the profile of IgG subclasses specifically reactive to F6 in different categories of bancroftian filariasis cases to infer any relationship between the levels of a particular F6-specific IgG subclass and the infection or disease status. Methods: Serum samples of normal individuals from filariasis non-endemic regions of India like Jammu & Kashmir, Uttarakhand, and Chandigarh [(NEN-W; n=10), healthy subjects from USA (NEN-U; n=10) and three categories of bancroftian filariasis cases from endemic areas: endemic normals (EN; n=10) with no symptoms and no microfilariae, asymptomatic microfilaremics (ASM; n=10) and chronic symptomatic amicrofilaremics (CL; n=10) were assayed for F6-specific IgG1, IgG2, IgG3 and IgG4 by ELISA using SDS-PAGE-isolated F6 fraction of B. malayi adult worms. Results: Significantly high levels of F6-specific IgG1, IgG2 and IgG3 were found in CL (P<0.001) and EN (P<0.01-0.001) bancroftian filariasis cases compared to NEN-U. Significant levels of F6-specific IgG1 (P<0.01) and IgG2 (P<0.01) but not IgG3 were found in ASM cases compared to NEN-U. The most abundant was IgG2 which when compared to NEN-U, was significantly high in CL (P<0.001) and EN cases (P<0.001), followed by ASM (P<0.01). F6-specific IgG4 response in EN, ASM and CL subjects was not significantly different from the levels of NEN-U. Among the non-endemic normals, the NEN-W subjects showed significant reactivity with IgG2 (P<0.001) but not with IgG1, IgG3 and IgG4 as compared to NEN-U subjects. IgG subclass levels were

  13. Subcutaneously Administered Ultrafine PLGA Nanoparticles Containing Doxycycline Hydrochloride Target Lymphatic Filarial Parasites.

    PubMed

    Singh, Yuvraj; Srinivas, Adepu; Gangwar, Mamta; Meher, Jaya Gopal; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja; Chourasia, Manish K

    2016-06-01

    Systemic chemotherapeutic targeting of filarial parasites is unfocused due to their deep seated location in lymphatic vessels. This warrants a prolonged dosing regimen in high doses for an anthelmintic like doxycycline hydrochloride (DOX). In order to provide an alternative, we have constructed ultrafine PLGA nanoparticles of DOX (DPNPs), so as to exploit the peculiarity of lymphatic vasculature underneath the subcutaneous layer of skin, which preferentially allows entry of only 10-100 nm sized particles. DPNPs were constructed using a novel solvent diffusion method aided by probe sonication, which resulted in an average size 95.43 ± 0.8 nm as per DLS, PDI 0.168 ± 0.03, zeta potential -7.38 ± 0.32, entrapment efficiency 75.58 ± 1.94%, and refrigerator stability of 7 days with respect to size in the optimized batch. TEM further substantiated the spherical shape of DPNPs along with their actual nonhydrated size as being well below 100 nm. FTIR analysis of DOX, dummy nanoparticles, and freeze-dried DPNPs revealed that the formulation step did not induce prominent changes in the chemical nature of DOX. The drug release was significantly altered (p < 0.05) with 64.6 ± 1.67% release in 48 h from DPNPs and was dictated by Fickian diffusion. Pharmacokinetic studies in Wistar rats further revealed that DPNPs caused a 16-fold prolongation in attainment of plasma Tmax and a 2-fold extension of elimination half-life (28.569 ± 1.27 h) at a dose of 5 mg/kg when compared to native drug (DOX solution) of the same strength. Contrastingly the trend was reversed in regional lymph nodes where Cmax for DPNPs (820 ± 84 ng/mg) was 4-fold greater, and lymphatic Tmax was attained in one-fourth of what was required for DOX solution. This size based preferential lymphatic targeting resulted in significantly greater in vivo antifilarial activity of DPNPs when compared to DOX solution as gauged by several parameters in Brugia malayi infected Mastomys coucha. Interestingly, the

  14. Endosymbiotic bacteria associated with nematodes, ticks and amoebae.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Mark; Mediannikov, Oleg; Raoult, Didier; Greub, Gilbert

    2012-02-01

    Endosymbiosis is a mutualistic, parasitic or commensal symbiosis in which one symbiont is living within the body of another organism. Such symbiotic relationship with free-living amoebae and arthropods has been reported with a large biodiversity of microorganisms, encompassing various bacterial clades and to a lesser extent some fungi and viruses. By contrast, current knowledge on symbionts of nematodes is still mainly restricted to Wolbachia and its interaction with filarial worms that lead to increased pathogenicity of the infected nematode. In this review article, we aim to highlight the main characteristics of symbionts in term of their ecology, host cell interactions, parasitism and co-evolution, in order to stimulate future research in a field that remains largely unexplored despite the availability of modern tools. PMID:22126456

  15. Are C. elegans receptors useful targets for drug discovery: Pharmacological comparison of tyramine receptors with high identity from Caenorhabditis elegans (TYRA-2) and Brugia malayi (Bm4)

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Katherine A.; Rex, Elizabeth B.; Komuniecki, Richard W.

    2012-01-01

    The biogenic amine, tyramine (TA), modulates a number of key processes in nematodes and a number of TA-specific receptors have been identified. In the present study we have identified a putative TA receptor (Bm4) in the recently completed Brugia malayi genome and compared its pharmacology to its putative C. elegans orthologue, TYRA-2, under identical expression and assay conditions. TYRA-2 and Bm4 are the most closely related C. elegans and B. malayi BA receptors and differ by only 14 aa in the TM regions directly involved in ligand binding. Membranes from HEK-293 cells stably expressing Bm4 exhibited specific, saturable, high-affinity, [3H]LSD and [3H]TA binding with Kds of 18.1 ± 0.93 nM and 15.1 ± 0.2 nM, respectively. More importantly, both TYRA-2 and Bm4 TA exhibited similar rank orders of potencies for a number of potential tyraminergic ligands. However, some significant differences were noted. For example, chloropromazine exhibited an order of magnitude higher affinity for Bm4 than TYRA-2 (pKis of 7.6 ± 0.2 and 6.49 ± 0.1, respectively). In contrast, TYRA-2 had significantly higher affinity for phentolamine than Bm4. These results highlight the utility of the nearly completed B. malayi genome and the importance of using receptors from individual parasitic nematodes for drug discovery. PMID:17537528

  16. In Silico and In Vitro Studies on the Protein-Protein Interactions between Brugia malayi Immunomodulatory Protein Calreticulin and Human C1q

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Sunita; Gupta, Smita; Selvaraj, Chandrabose; Doharey, Pawan Kumar; Verma, Anita; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar; Saxena, Jitendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Filarial parasites modulate effective immune response of their host by releasing a variety of immunomodulatory molecules, which help in the long persistence of the parasite within the host. The present study was aimed to characterize an immunomodulatory protein of Brugia malayi and its interaction with the host immune component at the structural and functional level. Our findings showed that Brugia malayi Calreticulin (BmCRT) is responsible for the prevention of classical complement pathway activation via its interaction with the first component C1q of the human host. This was confirmed by inhibition of C1q dependent lysis of immunoglobulin-sensitized Red Blood Cells (S-RBCs). This is possibly the first report which predicts CRT-C1q interaction on the structural content of proteins to explain how BmCRT inhibits this pathway. The molecular docking of BmCRT-C1q complex indicated that C1qB chain (IgG/M and CRP binding sites on C1q) played a major role in the interaction with conserved and non-conserved regions of N and P domain of BmCRT. Out of 37 amino acids of BmCRT involved in the interaction, nine amino acids (Pro126, Glu132, His147, Arg151, His153, Met154, Lys156, Ala196 and Lys212) are absent in human CRT. Both ELISA and in silico analysis showed the significant role of Ca+2 in BmCRT-HuC1q complex formation and deactivation of C1r2–C1s2. Molecular dynamics studies of BmCRT-HuC1q complex showed a deviation from ∼0.4 nm to ∼1.0 nm. CD analyses indicated that BmCRT is composed of 49.6% α helix, 9.6% β sheet and 43.6% random coil. These findings provided valuable information on the architecture and chemistry of BmCRT-C1q interaction and supported the hypothesis that BmCRT binds with huC1q at their targets (IgG/M, CRP) binding sites. This interaction enables the parasite to interfere with the initial stage of host complement activation, which might be helpful in parasites establishment. These results might be utilized for help in blocking the C1q

  17. Prospects and challenges of CRISPR/Cas genome editing for the study and control of neglected vector-borne nematode diseases.

    PubMed

    Zamanian, Mostafa; Andersen, Erik C

    2016-09-01

    Neglected tropical diseases caused by parasitic nematodes inflict an immense health and socioeconomic burden throughout much of the developing world. Current estimates indicate that more than two billion people are infected with nematodes, resulting in the loss of 14 million disability-adjusted life years per annum. Although these parasites cause significant mortality, they primarily cause chronic morbidity through a wide range of severe clinical ailments. Treatment options for nematode infections are restricted to a small number of anthelmintic drugs, and the rapid expansion of anthelmintic mass drug administration raises concerns of drug resistance. Preservation of existing drugs is necessary, as well as the development of new treatment options and methods of control. We focus this review on how the democratization of CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology can be enlisted to improve our understanding of the biology of nematode parasites and our ability to treat the infections they cause. We will first explore how this robust method of genome manipulation can be used to newly exploit the powerful model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans for parasitology research. We will then discuss potential avenues to develop CRISPR/Cas9 editing protocols in filarial nematodes. Lastly, we will propose potential ways in which CRISPR/Cas9 can be used to engineer gene drives that target the transmission of mosquito-borne filarial nematodes. PMID:27300487

  18. Infections of Brugia pahangi in conventional and nude (athymic) mice.

    PubMed

    Suswillo, R R; Owen, D G; Denham, D A

    1980-12-01

    AKR, BALB/c and CBA/Ca and T.O. mice were completely resistant to infection with third stage infective larvae of Brugia pahangi. Third, fourth and fifth stage worms transplanted from the peritoneal cavity of jirds into the peritoneal cavity of mice continued to develop. BALB/c mice were the most susceptible of the strains tested and adult worms were obtained after each type of transplanted infection. Congenitally athymic nude mice were much less resistant to transplanted worms and infective larvae developed to full maturity in most of them. Ten of 14 athymic mice infected by the intraperitoneal (ip) inoculation of infective larvae had microfilariae in their blood or peritoneal cavities. At autopsy a percentage recovery of adult worms of 0-38% (mean 11.1%) was obtained. Microfilariae were only found in the blood of 2 of 6 athymic mice infected by subcutaneous (sc) infection and at autopsy 0-19.1% (mean 6.1%) recoveries were obtained. The thymic littermates of the nudes were more resistant than those most of the other strains used. PMID:6110323

  19. Immunization with Wuchereria bancrofti Glutathione-S-transferase Elicits a Mixed Th1/Th2 Type of Protective Immune Response Against Filarial Infection in Mastomys.

    PubMed

    Andure, Dhananjay; Pote, Kiran; Khatri, Vishal; Amdare, Nitin; Padalkar, Ramchandra; Reddy, Maryada Venkata Rami

    2016-10-01

    Lymphatic filariasis is a mosquito borne parasitic infection and can severely affect the normal working ability of an individual. Currently there is no vaccine available to prevent this infection and the development of a potential vaccine could effectively support the on-going mass drug administration program by World Health Organization (WHO). Filarial parasites have complex mechanisms to modulate the host immune responses against them. The glutathione-S-transferases (GST) are the important enzymes effectively involved to counteract the oxidative free radicals produced by the host. In the present study, we have shown that the mastomys which are fully permissible rodents for Brugia malayi when immunized with Wuchereria bancrofti recombinant GST (rWbGST) could induce 65.5 % in situ cytotoxicity against B. malayi infective (L3) larvae. There was a balanced Th1/Th2 immune response in the vaccinated animals, characterized by higher levels of WbGST-specific IgG1 and IgG2a antibodies and pronounced IFN-γ, IL-10 and IL-4 cytokines production by the spleen cells. PMID:27605739

  20. Nematodes (Rhabditida: Steinernematidae and Heterorhabditidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nematodes are roundworms in the phylum Nematoda. Although most are free-living, some nematodes are parasites of plants, humans, or livestock. Entomopathogenic nematodes in the families Steinernematidae & Heterorhabditidae only parasitize insects. These nematodes are used as environmentally friend...

  1. Spectral and landscape characterization of filarious and non-filarious villages in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Sowilem, Mohamed M; Bahgat, Iman M; el-Kady, Gamal A; el-Sawaf, Bahira M

    2006-08-01

    Filarial disease is endemic in Egypt in some villages of Nile Delta governorates where it is transmitted by Culex pipiens female. GIS functions are used to identify environmental indicators of high-risk village as indicated by mosquito density, human infection rate, vector species composition, mean life expectancy "e(o)" & environmental variables (geology, hydrology, soil types, etc) as well as meteorological factors (temperature, RH and rainfall) in relation to filaria transmission risk. Remote-sensing technology was used to distinguish between the two studied villages as high and non-infected, as defined by microfilarial prevalence. The results indicate that filaria transmission risk is higher at an area characterized by highly productive aquifers, silt clay soil, receiving little amount of rain with low relative humidity (RH). The results indicate that the most important landscape elements associated with prevalence are water and different vegetation. This work showed that the integration between GIS and remote sensing technologies to analyze and identify the environmental factors, associated with the disease, did not only allow mapping icurrent spatial patterns, but also predicting its distribution under expected future developmental and environmental changes. PMID:16927856

  2. Comparative analysis of macrophage migration inhibitory factors (MIFs) from the parasitic nematode Onchocerca volvulus and the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Ajonina-Ekoti, Irene; Kurosinski, Marc Andre; Younis, Abuelhassan Elshazly; Ndjonka, Dieudonne; Tanyi, Manchang Kingsley; Achukwi, Mbunkah; Eisenbarth, Albert; Ajonina, Caroline; Lüersen, Kai; Breloer, Minka; Brattig, Norbert W; Liebau, Eva

    2013-09-01

    The macrophage migration inhibitory factors (MIFs) from the filarial parasite Onchocerca volvulus (OvMIF) were compared to the MIFs from the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (CeMIF) with respect to molecular, biochemical and immunological properties. Except for CeMIF-4, all other MIFs demonstrated tautomerase activity. Surprisingly, OvMIF-1 displayed oxidoreductase activity. The strongest immunostaining for OvMIF-1 was observed in the outer cellular covering of the adult worm body, the syncytial hypodermis; moderate immunostaining was observed in the uterine wall. The generation of a strong humoral immune response towards OvMIF-1 and reduced reactivity to OvMIF-2 was indicated by high IgG levels in patients infected with O. volvulus and cows infected with the closely related Onchocerca ochengi, both MIFs revealing identical amino acid sequences. Using Litomosoides sigmodontis-infected mice, a laboratory model for filarial infection, MIFs derived from the tissue-dwelling O. volvulus, the rodent gut-dwelling Strongyloides ratti and from free-living C. elegans were recognized, suggesting that L. sigmodontis MIF-specific IgM and IgG1 were produced during L. sigmodontis infection of mice and cross-reacted with all MIF proteins tested. Thus, MIF apparently functions as a target of B cell response during nematode infection, but in the natural Onchocerca-specific human and bovine infection, the induced antibodies can discriminate between MIFs derived from parasitic or free-living nematodes. PMID:23820606

  3. Human filarial Wolbachia lipopeptide directly activates human neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tamarozzi, F; Wright, H L; Johnston, K L; Edwards, S W; Turner, J D; Taylor, M J

    2014-10-01

    The host inflammatory response to the Onchocerca volvulus endosymbiont, Wolbachia, is a major contributing factor in the development of chronic pathology in humans (onchocerciasis/river blindness). Recently, the toll-like pattern recognition receptor motif of the major inflammatory ligands of filarial Wolbachia, membrane-associated diacylated lipoproteins, was functionally defined in murine models of pathology, including mediation of neutrophil recruitment to the cornea. However, the extent to which human neutrophils can be activated in response to this Wolbachia pattern recognition motif is not known. Therefore, the responses of purified peripheral blood human neutrophils to a synthetic N-terminal diacylated lipopeptide (WoLP) of filarial Wolbachia peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein (PAL) were characterized. WoLP exposure led to a dose-dependent activation of healthy, human neutrophils that included gross morphological alterations and modulation of surface expressed integrins involved in tethering, rolling and extravasation. WoLP exposure induced chemotaxis but not chemokinesis of neutrophils, and secretion of the major neutrophil chemokine, interleukin 8. WoLP also induced and primed the respiratory burst, and enhanced neutrophil survival by delay of apoptosis. These results indicate that the major inflammatory motif of filarial Wolbachia lipoproteins directly activates human neutrophils in vitro and promotes a molecular pathway by which human neutrophils are recruited to sites of Onchocerca parasitism. PMID:24909063

  4. The Caenorhabditis globin gene family reveals extensive nematode-specific radiation and diversification

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Globin isoforms with variant properties and functions have been found in the pseudocoel, body wall and cuticle of various nematode species and even in the eyespots of the insect-parasite Mermis nigrescens. In fact, much higher levels of complexity exist, as shown by recent whole genome analysis studies. In silico analysis of the genome of Caenorhabditis elegans revealed an unexpectedly high number of globin genes featuring a remarkable diversity in gene structure, amino acid sequence and expression profiles. Results In the present study we have analyzed whole genomic data from C. briggsae, C. remanei, Pristionchus pacificus and Brugia malayi and EST data from several other nematode species to study the evolutionary history of the nematode globin gene family. We find a high level of conservation of the C. elegans globin complement, with even distantly related nematodes harboring orthologs to many Caenorhabditis globins. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis resolves all nematode globins into two distinct globin classes. Analysis of the globin intron-exon structures suggests extensive loss of ancestral introns and gain of new positions in deep nematode ancestors, and mainly loss in the Caenorhabditis lineage. We also show that the Caenorhabditis globin genes are expressed in distinct, mostly non-overlapping, sets of cells and that they are all under strong purifying selection. Conclusion Our results enable reconstruction of the evolutionary history of the globin gene family in the nematode phylum. A duplication of an ancestral globin gene occurred before the divergence of the Platyhelminthes and the Nematoda and one of the duplicated genes radiated further in the nematode phylum before the split of the Spirurina and Rhabditina and was followed by further radiation in the lineage leading to Caenorhabditis. The resulting globin genes were subject to processes of subfunctionalization and diversification leading to cell-specific expression patterns. Strong purifying

  5. Neutropenic Mice Provide Insight into the Role of Skin-Infiltrating Neutrophils in the Host Protective Immunity against Filarial Infective Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Pionnier, Nicolas; Brotin, Emilie; Karadjian, Gregory; Hemon, Patrice; Gaudin-Nomé, Françoise; Vallarino-Lhermitte, Nathaly; Nieguitsila, Adélaïde; Fercoq, Frédéric; Aknin, Marie-Laure; Marin-Esteban, Viviana; Chollet-Martin, Sylvie; Schlecht-Louf, Géraldine

    2016-01-01

    Our knowledge and control of the pathogenesis induced by the filariae remain limited due to experimental obstacles presented by parasitic nematode biology and the lack of selective prophylactic or curative drugs. Here we thought to investigate the role of neutrophils in the host innate immune response to the infection caused by the Litomosoides sigmodontis murine model of human filariasis using mice harboring a gain-of-function mutation of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 and characterized by a profound blood neutropenia (Cxcr4+/1013). We provided manifold evidence emphasizing the major role of neutrophils in the control of the early stages of infection occurring in the skin. Firstly, we uncovered that the filarial parasitic success was dramatically decreased in Cxcr4+/1013 mice upon subcutaneous delivery of the infective stages of filariae (infective larvae, L3). This protection was linked to a larger number of neutrophils constitutively present in the skin of the mutant mice herein characterized as compared to wild type (wt) mice. Indeed, the parasitic success in Cxcr4+/1013 mice was normalized either upon depleting neutrophils, including the pool in the skin, or bypassing the skin via the intravenous infection of L3. Second, extending these observations to wt mice we found that subcutaneous delivery of L3 elicited an increase of neutrophils in the skin. Finally, living L3 larvae were able to promote in both wt and mutant mice, an oxidative burst response and the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NET). This response of neutrophils, which is adapted to the large size of the L3 infective stages, likely directly contributes to the anti-parasitic strategies implemented by the host. Collectively, our results are demonstrating the contribution of neutrophils in early anti-filarial host responses through their capacity to undertake different anti-filarial strategies such as oxidative burst, degranulation and NETosis. PMID:27111140

  6. Neutropenic Mice Provide Insight into the Role of Skin-Infiltrating Neutrophils in the Host Protective Immunity against Filarial Infective Larvae.

    PubMed

    Pionnier, Nicolas; Brotin, Emilie; Karadjian, Gregory; Hemon, Patrice; Gaudin-Nomé, Françoise; Vallarino-Lhermitte, Nathaly; Nieguitsila, Adélaïde; Fercoq, Frédéric; Aknin, Marie-Laure; Marin-Esteban, Viviana; Chollet-Martin, Sylvie; Schlecht-Louf, Géraldine; Bachelerie, Françoise; Martin, Coralie

    2016-04-01

    Our knowledge and control of the pathogenesis induced by the filariae remain limited due to experimental obstacles presented by parasitic nematode biology and the lack of selective prophylactic or curative drugs. Here we thought to investigate the role of neutrophils in the host innate immune response to the infection caused by the Litomosoides sigmodontis murine model of human filariasis using mice harboring a gain-of-function mutation of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 and characterized by a profound blood neutropenia (Cxcr4(+/1013)). We provided manifold evidence emphasizing the major role of neutrophils in the control of the early stages of infection occurring in the skin. Firstly, we uncovered that the filarial parasitic success was dramatically decreased in Cxcr4(+/1013) mice upon subcutaneous delivery of the infective stages of filariae (infective larvae, L3). This protection was linked to a larger number of neutrophils constitutively present in the skin of the mutant mice herein characterized as compared to wild type (wt) mice. Indeed, the parasitic success in Cxcr4(+/1013) mice was normalized either upon depleting neutrophils, including the pool in the skin, or bypassing the skin via the intravenous infection of L3. Second, extending these observations to wt mice we found that subcutaneous delivery of L3 elicited an increase of neutrophils in the skin. Finally, living L3 larvae were able to promote in both wt and mutant mice, an oxidative burst response and the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NET). This response of neutrophils, which is adapted to the large size of the L3 infective stages, likely directly contributes to the anti-parasitic strategies implemented by the host. Collectively, our results are demonstrating the contribution of neutrophils in early anti-filarial host responses through their capacity to undertake different anti-filarial strategies such as oxidative burst, degranulation and NETosis. PMID:27111140

  7. Transcriptome analysis of stress tolerance in entomopathogenic nematodes of the genus Steinernema.

    PubMed

    Yaari, Mor; Doron-Faigenboim, Adi; Koltai, Hinanit; Salame, Liora; Glazer, Itamar

    2016-02-01

    Entomopathogenic nematodes of the genus Steinernema are effective biological control agents. The infective stage of these parasites can withstand environmental stresses such as desiccation and heat, but the molecular and physiological mechanisms involved in this tolerance are poorly understood. We used 454 pyrosequencing to analyse transcriptome expression in Steinernema spp. that differ in their tolerance to stress. We compared these species, following heat and desiccation treatments, with their non-stressed counterparts. More than 98% of the transcripts found matched homologous sequences in the UniRef90 database, mostly nematode genes (85%). Among those, 60.8% aligned to the vertebrate parasites including Ascaris suum, Loa loa, and Brugia malayi, 23.3% aligned to bacteriovores, mostly from the genus Caenorhabditis, and 1% aligned to EPNs. Analysing gene expression patterns of the stress response showed a large fraction of down-regulated genes in the desiccation-tolerant nematode Steinernema riobrave, whereas a larger fraction of the genes in the susceptible Steinernema feltiae Carmiel and Gvulot strains were up-regulated. We further compared metabolic pathways and the expression of specific stress-related genes. In the more tolerant nematode, more genes were down-regulated whereas in the less tolerant strains, more genes were up-regulated. This phenomenon warrants further exploration of the mechanism governing induction of the down-regulation process. The present study revealed many genes and metabolic cycles that are differentially expressed in the stressed nematodes. Some of those are well known in other nematodes or anhydrobiotic organisms, but several are new and should be further investigated for their involvement in desiccation and heat tolerance. Our data establish a foundation for further exploration of stress tolerance in entomopathogenic nematodes and, in the long term, for improving their ability to withstand suboptimal environmental conditions. PMID

  8. Entomopathogenic nematodes and insect management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Entomopathogenic nematodes (genera Heterorhabditis, Steinernema, and Neosteinernema) are used as bioinsecticides. The nematodes are ubiquitous and have been isolated in soil of every continent except Antarctica. The nematodes kill insects through a mutualism with a bacterium (Photorhabdus spp. or ...

  9. Application technology for entomopathogenic nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diverse technology is available for the application of entomopathogenic nematodes. Application usually consists of nematode distribution via aqueous suspension in various irrigation systems and spray equipment. The choice of application equipment, and method in which the nematodes are applied, can...

  10. Unique structure and regulation of the nematode detoxification gene regulator, SKN-1: implications to understanding and controlling drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Choe, Keith P; Leung, Chi K; Miyamoto, Michael M

    2012-08-01

    Nematodes parasitize an alarming number of people and agricultural animals globally and cause debilitating morbidity and mortality. Anthelmintics have been the primary tools used to control parasitic nematodes for the past several decades, but drug resistance is becoming a major obstacle. Xenobiotic detoxification pathways defend against drugs and other foreign chemicals in diverse organisms, and evidence is accumulating that they play a role in mediating resistance to anthelmintics in nematodes. Related antioxidation pathways may also provide filarial parasites with protection against host free-radical-mediated immune responses. Upstream regulatory pathways have received almost no attention in nematode parasites, despite their potential to coregulate multiple detoxification and antioxidation genes. The nuclear eurythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) transcription factor mediates inducible detoxification and antioxidation defenses in mammals, and recent studies have demonstrated that it promotes multidrug resistance in some human tumors. Recent studies in the free-living model nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, have defined the homologous transcription factor, SKN-1, as a master regulator of detoxification and antioxidation genes. Despite similar functions, SKN-1 and NRF2 have important differences in structure and regulatory pathways. Protein alignment and phylogenetic analyses indicate that these differences are shared among many nematodes, making SKN-1 a candidate for specifically targeting nematode detoxification and antioxidation. PMID:22656429

  11. On the escape of infective filarial larvae from the mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Zielke, E

    1977-12-01

    Experimentally infected females of Culex pipiens fatigans carrying infective larvae of Wuchereria bancrofti were fed, on the 16th day p.i., on four different solutions, which were offered "cold" (24 degrees C) or "warm" (34 degrees C) in Petri dishes as open fluids. Thus the sucking mosquitoes did not have to bend their labia. Only the "warm" human serum stimulated any considerable number of infective larvae (24.8%) to leave the mouthparts of the mosquitoes. 1289 infective C. fatigens females lost only an estimated 6.4% of their infective larvae of W. bancrofti, when they were maintained on sugar-water until their natural death. Most of the more heavily infected mosquitoes died relatively soon after the filarial larvae had reached maturity (15-20 days p.i.). The main stimulus provoking the filarial larvae to migrate into the labium is believed to be the movement of the muscles of the pharyngeal pump. Mature larvae protrude their anterior ends from the tip of the labellum. There they seem able to distinguish between suitable and unsuitable external conditions and accordingly they will either leave the proboscis completely or retract into the labium. PMID:601855

  12. Lymphangiogenesis and Lymphatic Remodeling Induced by Filarial Parasites: Implications for Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bennuru, Sasisekhar; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2009-01-01

    Even in the absence of an adaptive immune system in murine models, lymphatic dilatation and dysfunction occur in filarial infections, although severe irreversible lymphedema and elephantiasis appears to require an intact adaptive immune response in human infections. To address how filarial parasites and their antigens influence the lymphatics directly, human lymphatic endothelial cells were exposed to filarial antigens, live parasites, or infected patient serum. Live filarial parasites or filarial antigens induced both significant LEC proliferation and differentiation into tube-like structures in vitro. Moreover, serum from patently infected (microfilaria positive) patients and those with longstanding chronic lymphatic obstruction induced significantly increased LEC proliferation compared to sera from uninfected individuals. Differentiation of LEC into tube-like networks was found to be associated with significantly increased levels of matrix metalloproteases and inhibition of their TIMP inhibitors (Tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteases). Comparison of global gene expression induced by live parasites in LEC to parasite-unexposed LEC demonstrated that filarial parasites altered the expression of those genes involved in cellular organization and development as well as those associated with junction adherence pathways that in turn decreased trans-endothelial transport as assessed by FITC-Dextran. The data suggest that filarial parasites directly induce lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic differentiation and provide insight into the mechanisms underlying the pathology seen in lymphatic filariasis. PMID:20011114

  13. The effect of chitin synthesis inhibitors on the development of Brugia malayi in Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, R; Ranjit, M R; Dash, A P

    1996-09-01

    Two chitin synthesis inhibitors (CSIs) viz., triflumuron and hexaflumuron interfere++ with the development of Brugia malayi in Aedes aegypti (a black-eyed Liverpool strain). The development of B. malayi was slow in both the treated populations and the infection rate, infectivity rate and L3 load per mosquito decreased significantly (P < 0.001) in comparison with untreated controls. Hexaflumuron was found to be more inhibiting than triflumuron. PMID:8984113

  14. The Nematode Caenorhabditis Elegans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenyon, Cynthia

    1988-01-01

    Discusses advantages of nematode use for studying patterns of cell division, differentiation, and morphogenesis. Describes nematode development. Cites experimental approaches available for genetic studies. Reviews the topics of control of cell division and differentiation, the nervous system, and muscle assembly and function of the organism. (RT)

  15. Root-knot nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne species) can reduce crop yields worldwide, methods for their identification are often difficult to implement. This review summarizes the diagnostic morphological and molecular features for distinguishing the ten major previously described root-knot nematode ...

  16. Chemical Communicators in Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Huettel, R. N.

    1986-01-01

    Chemical signals released by one organism and perceived by another organism are classified as semiochemicals. Semiochemicals are divided into pheromones, which elicit intraspecific responses, and allelochemics, which elicit interspecific responses. Nematodes utilize and (or) recognize signals from both categories of semiochemicals. The existence of pheromones, specifically sex and aggregation pheromones, has been demonstrated in numerous plant and animal parasitic and free-living nematodes. Sex pheromones have been isolated and purified from Nippostrongylus brasiliensis and Heterodera glycines, and epidietic pheromones have been shown to be responsible for initiation of dauer juvenile formation in Caenorhabditis elegans. Allelochemics cause interspecific responses in insects and other invertebrates but are only postulated to occur in nematodes. Food-finding behavior of nematodes is almost certainly caused by host-released allelochemic messengers. Understanding of the behavioral responses and the chemical messengers that affect bioregulation of various processes in nematodes will influence future management strategies. PMID:19294130

  17. Vaccination of Gerbils with Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2 Concurrently or as a Fusion Protein Confers Consistent and Improved Protection against Brugia malayi Infection

    PubMed Central

    Arumugam, Sridhar; Wei, Junfei; Liu, Zhuyun; Abraham, David; Bell, Aaron; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Hotez, Peter J.; Zhan, Bin; Lustigman, Sara; Klei, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Brugia malayi Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2 proteins are orthologous to Onchocerca volvulus Ov-103 and Ov-RAL-2, and which were selected as the best candidates for the development of an O. volvulus vaccine. The B. malayi gerbil model was used to confirm the efficacy of these Ov vaccine candidates on adult worms and to determine whether their combination is more efficacious. Methodology and Principle Findings Vaccine efficacy of recombinant Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2 administered individually, concurrently or as a fusion protein were tested in gerbils using alum as adjuvant. Vaccination with Bm-103 resulted in worm reductions of 39%, 34% and 22% on 42, 120 and 150 days post infection (dpi), respectively, and vaccination with Bm-RAL-2 resulted in worm reductions of 42%, 22% and 46% on 42, 120 and 150 dpi, respectively. Vaccination with a fusion protein comprised of Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2 resulted in improved efficacy with significant reduction of worm burden of 51% and 49% at 90 dpi, as did the concurrent vaccination with Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2, with worm reduction of 61% and 56% at 90 dpi. Vaccination with Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2 as a fusion protein or concurrently not only induced a significant worm reduction of 61% and 42%, respectively, at 150 dpi, but also significantly reduced the fecundity of female worms as determined by embryograms. Elevated levels of antigen-specific IgG were observed in all vaccinated gerbils. Serum from gerbils vaccinated with Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2 individually, concurrently or as a fusion protein killed third stage larvae in vitro when combined with peritoneal exudate cells. Conclusion Although vaccination with Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2 individually conferred protection against B. malayi infection in gerbils, a more consistent and enhanced protection was induced by vaccination with Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2 fusion protein and when they were used concurrently. Further characterization and optimization of these filarial vaccines are warranted. PMID:27045170

  18. Immunogenicity and Protective Efficacy of Brugia malayi Heavy Chain Myosin as Homologous DNA, Protein and Heterologous DNA/Protein Prime Boost Vaccine in Rodent Model.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Jyoti; Pathak, Manisha; Misra, Sweta; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2015-01-01

    We earlier demonstrated the immunoprophylactic efficacy of recombinant heavy chain myosin (Bm-Myo) of Brugia malayi (B. malayi) in rodent models. In the current study, further attempts have been made to improve this efficacy by employing alternate approaches such as homologous DNA (pcD-Myo) and heterologous DNA/protein prime boost (pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo) in BALB/c mouse model. The gene bm-myo was cloned in a mammalian expression vector pcDNA 3.1(+) and protein expression was confirmed in mammalian Vero cell line. A significant degree of protection (79.2%±2.32) against L3 challenge in pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo immunized group was observed which was much higher than that exerted by Bm-Myo (66.6%±2.23) and pcD-Myo (41.6%±2.45). In the heterologous immunized group, the percentage of peritoneal leukocytes such as macrophages, neutrophils, B cells and T cells marginally increased and their population augmented further significantly following L3 challenge. pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo immunization elicited robust cellular and humoral immune responses as compared to pcD-Myo and Bm-Myo groups as evidenced by an increased accumulation of CD4+, CD8+ T cells and CD19+ B cells in the mouse spleen and activation of peritoneal macrophages. Though immunized animals produced antigen-specific IgG antibodies and isotypes, sera of mice receiving pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo or Bm-Myo developed much higher antibody levels than other groups and there was profound antibody-dependent cellular adhesion and cytotoxicity (ADCC) to B. malayi infective larvae (L3). pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo as well as Bm-Myo mice generated a mixed T helper cell phenotype as evidenced by the production of both pro-inflammatory (IL-2, IFN-γ) and anti-inflammatory (IL-4, IL-10) cytokines. Mice receiving pcD-Myo on contrary displayed a polarized pro-inflammatory immune response. The findings suggest that the priming of animals with DNA followed by protein booster generates heightened and mixed pro- and anti-inflammatory immune responses that are capable of providing

  19. Immunogenicity and Protective Efficacy of Brugia malayi Heavy Chain Myosin as Homologous DNA, Protein and Heterologous DNA/Protein Prime Boost Vaccine in Rodent Model

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Jyoti; Pathak, Manisha; Misra, Sweta; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2015-01-01

    We earlier demonstrated the immunoprophylactic efficacy of recombinant heavy chain myosin (Bm-Myo) of Brugia malayi (B. malayi) in rodent models. In the current study, further attempts have been made to improve this efficacy by employing alternate approaches such as homologous DNA (pcD-Myo) and heterologous DNA/protein prime boost (pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo) in BALB/c mouse model. The gene bm-myo was cloned in a mammalian expression vector pcDNA 3.1(+) and protein expression was confirmed in mammalian Vero cell line. A significant degree of protection (79.2%±2.32) against L3 challenge in pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo immunized group was observed which was much higher than that exerted by Bm-Myo (66.6%±2.23) and pcD-Myo (41.6%±2.45). In the heterologous immunized group, the percentage of peritoneal leukocytes such as macrophages, neutrophils, B cells and T cells marginally increased and their population augmented further significantly following L3 challenge. pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo immunization elicited robust cellular and humoral immune responses as compared to pcD-Myo and Bm-Myo groups as evidenced by an increased accumulation of CD4+, CD8+ T cells and CD19+ B cells in the mouse spleen and activation of peritoneal macrophages. Though immunized animals produced antigen-specific IgG antibodies and isotypes, sera of mice receiving pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo or Bm-Myo developed much higher antibody levels than other groups and there was profound antibody-dependent cellular adhesion and cytotoxicity (ADCC) to B. malayi infective larvae (L3). pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo as well as Bm-Myo mice generated a mixed T helper cell phenotype as evidenced by the production of both pro-inflammatory (IL-2, IFN-γ) and anti-inflammatory (IL-4, IL-10) cytokines. Mice receiving pcD-Myo on contrary displayed a polarized pro-inflammatory immune response. The findings suggest that the priming of animals with DNA followed by protein booster generates heightened and mixed pro- and anti-inflammatory immune responses that are capable of providing

  20. Exploring apposite therapeutic target for apoptosis in filarial parasite: a plausible hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Hande, Sneha; Goswami, Kalyan; Jena, Lingaraj; Reddy, Maryada Venkata Rami

    2014-03-01

    Human lymphatic filariasis is a parasitic disease with profound socioeconomic encumbrance owing to its associated disability, affecting predominantly but not limited to the developing nations of tropics and subtropics. There are several technical issues like poor therapeutic and preventive repertoire as well as administrative and infrastructural limitations which jeopardize the salvage measures and further complicate the plight. Therefore, considering the gravity of the problem, WHO has mandated (under tropical disease research scheme) for placing emphasis on validation of novel therapeutic targets against this disease with the unfortunate tag of 'neglected tropical disease'. However, dearth of knowledge of parasite biology viciously coupled with difficulty of access to parasitic material from suitable animal model along with growing cost burden of high end research poses formidable challenge. Based on the recent research evidences, here we propose a premise with targeted apoptotic impact as a novel rationale to be exploited towards anti-parasitic drug development. The new era of bioinformatics ushers in new optimism with a wide range of genomic and proteomic database in public domain. Such platform might offer wonders for drug research, but needs highly selective criterion specificity. In order to test our hypothesis presumptively, we deployed a scheme for identification of target proteins from filarial parasitic origin through wide database search with precise criteria of non-homology against the host along with functional essentiality for the parasite. Further screening for proteins with growth potential from such list of essential non-homologous proteins was undertaken to mine out suitable representative target for ensuing apoptotic impact though effective inhibitors. A unique protein enzyme, RNA dependent RNA polymerase, which besides its vital role in RNA virus is believed to have regulatory role in gene expression, emerged as a plausible target. This protein

  1. Entomopathogenic nematode application technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biocontrol success when using entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) in the genera Heterorhabditis and Steinernema relies on a variety of factors including components of the application event itself. Successful application encompasses both abiotic and biotic influences. For example, adverse array of equi...

  2. Neuroparasitic infections: nematodes.

    PubMed

    Walker, M D; Zunt, J R

    2005-09-01

    Globalization has produced an increase in the number of people at risk for contracting parasitic infection. Central nervous system infection by nematodal parasites can be devastating. Early recognition and treatment of infection can significantly decrease morbidity of the parasitic infection, as well as the risk of secondary superinfection. The clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment for five of the more common nematodal infections of the nervous system--Angiostrongylus spp., Baylisacaris procyonis, Gnathostoma spinigerum, Strongyloides stercoralis, and Toxocara spp.--is reviewed. PMID:16170738

  3. Rendering the Intractable More Tractable: Tools from Caenorhabditis elegans Ripe for Import into Parasitic Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Jordan D.

    2015-01-01

    Recent and rapid advances in genetic and molecular tools have brought spectacular tractability to Caenorhabditis elegans, a model that was initially prized because of its simple design and ease of imaging. C. elegans has long been a powerful model in biomedical research, and tools such as RNAi and the CRISPR/Cas9 system allow facile knockdown of genes and genome editing, respectively. These developments have created an additional opportunity to tackle one of the most debilitating burdens on global health and food security: parasitic nematodes. I review how development of nonparasitic nematodes as genetic models informs efforts to import tools into parasitic nematodes. Current tools in three commonly studied parasites (Strongyloides spp., Brugia malayi, and Ascaris suum) are described, as are tools from C. elegans that are ripe for adaptation and the benefits and barriers to doing so. These tools will enable dissection of a huge array of questions that have been all but completely impenetrable to date, allowing investigation into host–parasite and parasite–vector interactions, and the genetic basis of parasitism. PMID:26644478

  4. Rendering the Intractable More Tractable: Tools from Caenorhabditis elegans Ripe for Import into Parasitic Nematodes.

    PubMed

    Ward, Jordan D

    2015-12-01

    Recent and rapid advances in genetic and molecular tools have brought spectacular tractability to Caenorhabditis elegans, a model that was initially prized because of its simple design and ease of imaging. C. elegans has long been a powerful model in biomedical research, and tools such as RNAi and the CRISPR/Cas9 system allow facile knockdown of genes and genome editing, respectively. These developments have created an additional opportunity to tackle one of the most debilitating burdens on global health and food security: parasitic nematodes. I review how development of nonparasitic nematodes as genetic models informs efforts to import tools into parasitic nematodes. Current tools in three commonly studied parasites (Strongyloides spp., Brugia malayi, and Ascaris suum) are described, as are tools from C. elegans that are ripe for adaptation and the benefits and barriers to doing so. These tools will enable dissection of a huge array of questions that have been all but completely impenetrable to date, allowing investigation into host-parasite and parasite-vector interactions, and the genetic basis of parasitism. PMID:26644478

  5. Diethylcarbamazine-mediated clearance of Brugia pahangi microfilariae in immunodeficient nude mice.

    PubMed

    Vickery, A C; Nayar, J K; Tamplin, M L

    1985-05-01

    Congenitally athymic nude C3H/HeN mice, microfilaremic with Brugia pahangi, were treated with diethylcarbamazine citrate (DEC). A single oral dose (100 mg/Kg body weight) of DEC resulted in the rapid reduction of numbers of circulating microfilariae in nude, thymus-grafted nude and complement-depleted nude mice. Antibodies of the IgM and IgG isotypes were not detected in the serum of microfilaremic nudes or on the microfilarial surface. These results suggest that DEC-mediated clearance of microfilariae from the circulation of nude mice is probably independent of thymus-dependent immunological mechanisms. PMID:3890576

  6. In vitro antifilarial effects of three plant species against adult worms of subperiodic Brugia malayi.

    PubMed

    Zaridah, M Z; Idid, S Z; Omar, A W; Khozirah, S

    2001-11-01

    Five aqueous extracts from three plant species, i.e., dried husks (HX), dried seeds (SX) and dried leaves (LX) of Xylocarpus granatum (Meliaceae), dried stems (ST) of Tinospora crispa (Menispermaceae) and dried leaves (LA) of Andrographis paniculata (Acanthaceae) were tested in vitro against adult worms of subperiodic Brugia malayi. The relative movability (RM) value of the adult worms over the 24-h observation period was used as a measure of the antifilarial activity of the aqueous extracts. SX extract of X. granatum demonstrated the strongest activity, followed by the LA extract of A. paniculata, ST extract of T. crispa, HX extract and LX extract of X. granatum. PMID:11585692

  7. Extraintestinal nematodes of the red fox Vulpes vulpes in north-west Italy.

    PubMed

    Magi, M; Guardone, L; Prati, M C; Mignone, W; Macchioni, F

    2015-07-01

    Extraintestinal nematodes of the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) are a wide group of parasites that infect wild and domestic carnivores and occasionally humans. Nematodes in the cardiopulmonary system, stomach, urinary apparatus and muscle tissue of 165 red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) from north-west Italy (Liguria and Piedmont) were investigated between 2009 and 2012. Of the cardiopulmonary nematodes, a high prevalence of Angiostrongylus vasorum and Eucoleus aerophilus (syn. Capillaria aerophila) was found, 78.2% and 41.8% respectively; Crenosoma vulpis (15.8%) and Filaroides spp. (4.8%) were also found. Spirocerca lupi (23.5%), Aonchotheca putorii (syn. Capillaria putorii) (8.6%) and Physaloptera spp. (2.5%) were detected in the stomach and Pearsonema plica (syn. Capillaria plica) (56.8%) in the bladder. Eucoleus boehmi (syn. Capillaria boehmi) was also detected in the nasal cavities of one of the two foxes examined. A coprological examination revealed eggs of E. aerophilus, A. putorii, S. lupi, Physaloptera spp. and eggs of intestinal parasites. Filarial worms were absent in all the 165 animals examined, nor was there evidence of Trichinella spp. in any of the foxes. The foxes were found to host a high prevalence of many species of extraintestinal nematodes. The prevalence of A. vasorum in foxes found in the present study is among the highest in Europe. In addition, to the best of our knowledge, E. boehmi and Filaroides spp. have never been reported before in this host in Italy. PMID:24725462

  8. Finding Wolbachia in Filarial larvae and Culicidae Mosquitoes in Upper Egypt Governorate

    PubMed Central

    Dyab, Ahmed K.; Galal, Lamia A.; Mahmoud, Abeer E.; Mokhtar, Yasser

    2016-01-01

    Wolbachia is an obligatory intracellular endosymbiotic bacterium, present in over 20% of all insects altering insect reproductive capabilities and in a wide range of filarial worms which is essential for worm survival and reproduction. In Egypt, no available data were found about Wolbachia searching for it in either mosquitoes or filarial worms. Thus, we aimed to identify the possible concurrent presence of Wolbachia within different mosquitoes and filarial parasites, in Assiut Governorate, Egypt using multiplex PCR. Initially, 6 pools were detected positive for Wolbachia by single PCR. The simultaneous detection of Wolbachia and filarial parasites (Wuchereria bancrofti, Dirofilaria immitis, and Dirofilaria repens) by multiplex PCR was spotted in 5 out of 6 pools, with an overall estimated rate of infection (ERI) of 0.24%. Unexpectedly, the highest ERI (0.53%) was for Anopheles pharoensis with related Wolbachia and W. bancrofti, followed by Aedes (0.42%) and Culex (0.26%). We also observed that Wolbachia altered Culex spp. as a primary vector for W. bancrofti to be replaced by Anopheles sp. Wolbachia within filaria-infected mosquitoes in our locality gives a hope to use bacteria as a new control trend simultaneously targeting the vector and filarial parasites. PMID:27417080

  9. Toward molecular parasitologic diagnosis: enhanced diagnostic sensitivity for filarial infections in mobile populations.

    PubMed

    Fink, Doran L; Fahle, Gary A; Fischer, Steven; Fedorko, Daniel F; Nutman, Thomas B

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis of filarial infections among individuals residing in areas where the disease is not endemic requires both strong clinical suspicion and expert training in infrequently practiced parasitological methods. Recently developed filarial molecular diagnostic assays are highly sensitive and specific but have limited availability and have not been closely evaluated for clinical use outside populations residing in areas of endemicity. In this study, we assessed the performance of a panel of real-time PCR assays for the four most common human filarial pathogens among blood and tissue samples collected from a cohort of patients undergoing evaluation for suspected filarial infections. Compared to blood filtration, real-time PCR was equally sensitive for the detection of microfilaremia due to Wuchereria bancrofti (2 of 46 samples positive by both blood filtration and PCR with no discordant results) and Loa loa (24 of 208 samples positive by both blood filtration and PCR, 4 samples positive by PCR only, and 3 samples positive by blood filtration only). Real-time PCR of skin snip samples was significantly more sensitive than microscopic examination for the detection of Onchocerca volvulus microfiladermia (2 of 218 samples positive by both microscopy and PCR and 12 samples positive by PCR only). The molecular assays required smaller amounts of blood and tissue than conventional methods and could be performed by laboratory personnel without specialized parasitology training. Taken together, these data demonstrate the utility of the molecular diagnosis of filarial infections in mobile populations. PMID:20980560

  10. Finding Wolbachia in Filarial larvae and Culicidae Mosquitoes in Upper Egypt Governorate.

    PubMed

    Dyab, Ahmed K; Galal, Lamia A; Mahmoud, Abeer E; Mokhtar, Yasser

    2016-06-01

    Wolbachia is an obligatory intracellular endosymbiotic bacterium, present in over 20% of all insects altering insect reproductive capabilities and in a wide range of filarial worms which is essential for worm survival and reproduction. In Egypt, no available data were found about Wolbachia searching for it in either mosquitoes or filarial worms. Thus, we aimed to identify the possible concurrent presence of Wolbachia within different mosquitoes and filarial parasites, in Assiut Governorate, Egypt using multiplex PCR. Initially, 6 pools were detected positive for Wolbachia by single PCR. The simultaneous detection of Wolbachia and filarial parasites (Wuchereria bancrofti, Dirofilaria immitis, and Dirofilaria repens) by multiplex PCR was spotted in 5 out of 6 pools, with an overall estimated rate of infection (ERI) of 0.24%. Unexpectedly, the highest ERI (0.53%) was for Anopheles pharoensis with related Wolbachia and W. bancrofti, followed by Aedes (0.42%) and Culex (0.26%). We also observed that Wolbachia altered Culex spp. as a primary vector for W. bancrofti to be replaced by Anopheles sp. Wolbachia within filaria-infected mosquitoes in our locality gives a hope to use bacteria as a new control trend simultaneously targeting the vector and filarial parasites. PMID:27417080

  11. Roles of Steroids in Nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The inability of nematodes to biosynthesize steroids de novo and the resulting dependence of parasitic nematodes upon their hosts have enhanced the importance of elucidating the metabolism of sterols and the hormonal and other functions of steroids in nematodes. Biochemical research has revealed th...

  12. The interaction between filarial parasites and human monocyte/macrophage populations.

    PubMed

    Semnani, Roshanak Tolouei

    2013-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis is a mafor tropical disease affecting approximately 120 million people worldwide. Patent infection, by and large, is clinically asymptomatic but is associated with the inability of T cells to proliferate or produce IFN-γ in response to parasite antigen. Monocyte dysfunction is one hypothesis felt to explain the lack of an antigen-specific T cell response. In fact, monocytes from filaria-infected individuals have been shown to be studded with internalized filarial antigens. Understanding how the phenotype and the function of these monocytes are altered through the internalization of these parasite antigens is one of the areas our laboratory has focused on. In fact, the existence and/or function of alternatively activated macrophages in murine models of filarial infections have been extensively studied. Whether this population of macrophages can be induced in human filarial infections is the main focus of this review. PMID:23456837

  13. C-cinnamoyl glycosides as a new class of anti-filarial agents.

    PubMed

    Roy, Priya; Dhara, Debashis; Parida, Pravat Kumar; Kar, Rajiv Kumar; Bhunia, Anirban; Jana, Kuladip; Sinha Babu, Santi P; Misra, Anup Kumar

    2016-05-23

    A series of C-cinnamoyl glycosides has been synthesized in good yield by the BF3·OEt2 catalyzed aldol condensation of C-glycosylated acetone derivative with a variety of aromatic aldehydes. The synthesized compounds were evaluated for their potential as anti-filarial agents against bovine filarial parasite Setaria cervi and human filariid Wuchereria bancrofti using a number of biological assays such as relative movability (RM) assessment and MTT reduction assay. Among twenty seven test compounds six compounds were found active in terms of MIC, IC50 and LC50 values. Further biological studies were carried out using three lead compounds because of their significantly low MIC values and IC50 values compared to the standard anti-filarial drug Ivermectin. In addition, structure activity relationship study of the test compounds has been carried out using 3D-QSAR analysis. PMID:27015610

  14. Nematode cholinergic pharmacology

    SciTech Connect

    Segerberg, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Nematode acetylcholine (ACh) receptors were characterized using both biochemical and electrophysiological techniques, including: (1) receptor binding studies in crude homogenates of the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the parasitic nematode Ascaris lumbricoides with the high-affinity probe ({sup 3}H)N-methylscopolamine (({sup 3}H)NMS) which binds to muscarinic receptors in many vertebrate and invertebrate tissues (2) measurement of depolarization and contraction induced by a variety of cholinergic agents, including N-methylscopolamine (NMS), in an innervated dorsal muscle strip preparation of Ascaris; (3) examination of the antagonistic actions of d-tubocurarine (dTC) and NMS at dorsal neuromuscular junction; (4) measurement of input resistance changes in Ascaris commissural motorneurons induced by ACh, dTC, NMS, pilocarpine and other cholinergic drugs.

  15. Molecular and functional characterization of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) homolog of human from lymphatic filarial parasite Wuchereria bancrofti.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rohit; Hoti, S L; Meena, R L; Vasuki, V; Sankari, T; Kaliraj, P

    2012-11-01

    The ability of nematode parasites to survive in a highly complex immune system involves diverse strategies including production of a variety of host immune modulators. Various parasite-associated surface antigens or excretory and secretory products may possibly play a role in the host-parasite interactions and successful survival of parasite in their respective host. One among these molecules is a human cytokine homolog, macrophage migration inhibitory factor-1 (MIF-1) in various parasites. We identified a homolog of this cytokine from human lymphatic filarial parasite, Wuchereria bancrofti, expression cloned and investigated its molecular characteristics and catalytic properties. We also assessed the humoral reactivity of the recombinant MIF-1 of W. bancrofti (rWb-MIF-1) against sera belonging to different categories of individuals viz. microfilaremic, chronic patients, endemic normal, and non-endemic normal. Our results showed that the complete coding sequence of W. bancrofti is 1,078 bp, comprising two introns and three exons: first and second introns being 577 and 153 bp long, while the three exons I, II, and III being 108, 173, and 67 bp long, respectively. The rWb-MIF-1 was overexpressed in a salt-inducible host, Escherichia coli GJ 1158, and its functional activity was determined by dopachrome tautomerase and insulin reduction assays. The results of both the assays showed that the purified protein is functionally active and hence folded appropriately. The rWb-MIF-1 protein did not show elevation of specific IgG4 antibodies in microfilaremic cases, a hallmark in case of lymphatic filariasis, while it showed IgE reactivity in some of these cases (five out of ten). PMID:22875393

  16. Formulation of Nematodes.

    PubMed

    Peters, Arne

    2016-01-01

    The enduring stages of entomopathogenic nematodes of the genera Steinernema and Heterorhabditis are infective juveniles, which require a high humidity and sufficient ventilation for survival. Formulations must account for these requirements. Nematodes may be formulated inside the insects in which they reproduced or they need to be cleaned and mixed with a suitable binder to maintain humidity but allowing for gas exchange. Another method for formulation is the encapsulation in beads of Ca-alginate. Generic procedures for these formulation techniques are described. PMID:27565496

  17. Dirofilaria immitis. 5. Immunopathology of filarial nephropathy in dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Abramowsky, C. R.; Powers, K. G.; Aikawa, M.; Swinehart, G.

    1981-01-01

    Fourteen beagles infected with larvae (microfilariae) of Dirofilaria immitis, were randomly selected from another study in which the toxic effects of subfilaricidal doses of diethylcarbamazine were being evaluated. This group of 14 dogs, together with 4 uninfected control animals, were variably sacrificed between 14 and 25 months after larval inoculations, and the ensuing renal lesions were studied by light and ultrastructural microscopy and by immunofluorescence and antibody elution techniques. On the basis of these studies, two groups of animals were distinguished. The first group was characterized by a striking pattern of linear fluorescence and fine ultrastructural dense deposits along the glomerular basement membrane, poor antibody response, and an inability to clear microfilariae from the tissues and circulation. The second group, with a nonlinear pattern of fluorescence, was characterized by a strong immune response, efficient elimination of microfilariae, and immunofluorescence and ultrastructural evidence of predominantly mesangiopathic immune complex renal disease. In both groups, elution studies demonstrated tissue deposits of antiworm antibodies, suggesting a filaria-antibody immune-complex nephropathy. No evidence was found for the presence of anti-basement-membrane antibodies. On the basis of a previous experimental model, it is postulated that in the first group of animals with linear fluorescence, the observed lesions may represent a natural form of an immunopathogenic mechanism of glomerular damage in which filarial antigen becomes uniformly localized in the glomerulus and elicits an autologous antibody response. The possible role of the drug diethylcarbamazine in inducing this mechanism of immune injury is discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:7020425

  18. Production of entomopathogenic nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Production technology is critical for the success of entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) in biological control. Production approaches include in vivo and in vitro methods (solid or liquid fermentation). For laboratory use and small scale field experiments, in vivo production of EPNs appears to be th...

  19. Nematode management in pecans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2002, the pecan root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne partityla = PRKN) was found on pecan in the southeastern U.S. and was associated with stressed trees exhibiting dead branches in the upper canopy and (or) typical mouse ear (ME) associated foliar symptoms. This research evaluates the host susceptib...

  20. Identification of Brugia malayi in vectors with a species-specific DNA probe.

    PubMed

    Sim, B K; Mak, J W; Cheong, W H; Sutanto, I; Kurniawan, L; Marwoto, H A; Franke, E; Campell, J R; Wirth, D F; Piessens, W F

    1986-05-01

    We evaluated the potential value of a cloned sequence of genomic DNA of Brugia malayi as a species-specific probe. Clone pBm 15 reacted with all stages of 8 different geographic isolates of B. malayi and cross-hybridized with microfilariae of B. timori. It did not hybridize with Wuchereria bancrofti or with B. pahangi, W. kalimantani, Dirofilaria repens, Breinlia booliati or Cardiofilaria species, animal filariids that can be sympatric with B. malayi. P32-labeled clone pBm 15 correctly identified mosquitoes infected even with 1 infective larva of B. malayi. This specific DNA probe should be an invaluable tool to monitor control programs of Brugian filariasis. PMID:3518507

  1. Proinflammatory Cytokine Gene Expression by Murine Macrophages in Response to Brugia malayi Wolbachia Surface Protein

    PubMed Central

    Porksakorn, Chantima; Nuchprayoon, Surang; Park, Kiwon; Scott, Alan L.

    2007-01-01

    Wolbachia, an endosymbiotic bacterium found in most species of filarial parasites, is thought to play a significant role in inducing innate inflammatory responses in lymphatic filariasis patients. However, the Wolbachia-derived molecules that are recognized by the innate immune system have not yet been identified. In this study, we exposed the murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 to a recombinant form of the major Wolbachia surface protein (rWSP) to determine if WSP is capable of innately inducing cytokine transcription. Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) mRNAs were all upregulated by the rWSP stimulation in a dose-dependant manner. TNF transcription peaked at 3 hours, whereas IL-1β and IL-6 transcription peaked at 6 hours post-rWSP exposure. The levels of innate cytokine expression induced by a high-dose (9.0 μg/mL) rWSP in the RAW 264.7 cells were comparable to the levels induced by 0.1 μg/mL E. coli-derived lipopolysaccharides. Pretreatment of the rWSP with proteinase-K drastically reduced IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF transcription. However, the proinflammatory response was not inhibited by polymyxin B treatment. These results strongly suggest that the major Wolbachia surface protein molecule WSP is an important inducer of innate immune responses during filarial infections. PMID:17641731

  2. Phylum-Level Conservation of Regulatory Information in Nematodes despite Extensive Non-coding Sequence Divergence

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Kacy L.; Arthur, Robert K.; Ruvinsky, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    Gene regulatory information guides development and shapes the course of evolution. To test conservation of gene regulation within the phylum Nematoda, we compared the functions of putative cis-regulatory sequences of four sets of orthologs (unc-47, unc-25, mec-3 and elt-2) from distantly-related nematode species. These species, Caenorhabditis elegans, its congeneric C. briggsae, and three parasitic species Meloidogyne hapla, Brugia malayi, and Trichinella spiralis, represent four of the five major clades in the phylum Nematoda. Despite the great phylogenetic distances sampled and the extensive sequence divergence of nematode genomes, all but one of the regulatory elements we tested are able to drive at least a subset of the expected gene expression patterns. We show that functionally conserved cis-regulatory elements have no more extended sequence similarity to their C. elegans orthologs than would be expected by chance, but they do harbor motifs that are important for proper expression of the C. elegans genes. These motifs are too short to be distinguished from the background level of sequence similarity, and while identical in sequence they are not conserved in orientation or position. Functional tests reveal that some of these motifs contribute to proper expression. Our results suggest that conserved regulatory circuitry can persist despite considerable turnover within cis elements. PMID:26020930

  3. Escherichia coli-induced immune paralysis is not exacerbated during chronic filarial infection

    PubMed Central

    Buerfent, Benedikt C; Gondorf, Fabian; Wohlleber, Dirk; Schumak, Beatrix; Hoerauf, Achim; Hübner, Marc P

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis initially starts with a systemic inflammatory response (SIRS phase) and is followed by a compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome (CARS) that causes impaired adaptive T-cell immunity, immune paralysis and an increased susceptibility to secondary infections. In contrast, parasitic filariae release thousands of microfilariae into the peripheral blood without triggering inflammation, as they induce regulatory, anti-inflammatory host responses. Hence, we investigated the impact of chronic filarial infection on adaptive T-cell responses during the SIRS and CARS phases of a systemic bacterial infection and analysed the development of T-cell paralysis following a subsequent adenovirus challenge in BALB/c mice. Chronic filarial infection impaired adenovirus-specific CD8+ T-cell cytotoxicity and interferon-γ responses in the absence of a bacterial challenge and led to higher numbers of splenic CTLA-4+ CD4+ T cells, whereas splenic T-cell expression of CD69 and CD62 ligand, serum cytokine levels and regulatory T-cell frequencies were comparable to naive controls. Irrespective of filarial infection, the SIRS phase dominated 6–24 hr after intravenous Escherichia coli challenge with increased T-cell activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine production, whereas the CARS phase occurred 6 days post E. coli challenge and correlated with high levels of transforming growth factor-β and increased CD62 ligand T-cell expression. Escherichia coli-induced impairment of adenovirus-specific CD8+ T-cell cytotoxicity and interferon-γ production was not additionally impaired by chronic filarial infection. This suggests that filarial immunoregulation does not exacerbate E. coli-induced T-cell paralysis. PMID:25521437

  4. Intestinal nematodes: biology and control.

    PubMed

    Epe, Christian

    2009-11-01

    A variety of nematodes occur in dogs and cats. Several nematode species inhabit the small and large intestines. Important species that live in the small intestine are roundworms of the genus Toxocara (T canis, T cati) and Toxascaris (ie, T leonina), and hookworms of the genus Ancylostoma (A caninum, A braziliense, A tubaeforme) or Uncinaria (U stenocephala). Parasites of the large intestine are nematodes of the genus Trichuris (ie, whipworms, T vulpis). After a comprehensive description of their life cycle and biology, which are indispensable for understanding and justifying their control, current recommendations for nematode control are presented and discussed thereafter. PMID:19932365

  5. Gas sensing in nematodes.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, M A; Hallem, E A

    2015-01-01

    Nearly all animals are capable of sensing changes in environmental oxygen (O2) and carbon dioxide (CO2) levels, which can signal the presence of food, pathogens, conspecifics, predators, or hosts. The free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a powerful model system for the study of gas sensing. C. elegans detects changes in O2 and CO2 levels and integrates information about ambient gas levels with other internal and external cues to generate context-appropriate behavioral responses. Due to its small nervous system and amenability to genetic and genomic analyses, the functional properties of its gas-sensing microcircuits can be dissected with single-cell resolution, and signaling molecules and natural genetic variations that modulate gas responses can be identified. Here, we discuss the neural basis of gas sensing in C. elegans, and highlight changes in gas-evoked behaviors in the context of other sensory cues and natural genetic variations. We also discuss gas sensing in other free-living nematodes and parasitic nematodes, focusing on how gas-sensing behavior has evolved to mediate species-specific behavioral requirements. PMID:24906953

  6. Neuroparasitic Infections: Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Walker, M.D.; Zunt, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    Globalization has produced an increase in the number of people at risk for contracting parasitic infection. Central nervous system infection by nematodal parasites can be devastating. Early recognition and treatment of infection can significantly decrease morbidity of the parasitic infection, as well as the risk of secondary superinfection. The clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment for five of the more common nematodal infections of the nervous system—Angiostrongylus spp., Baylisacaris procyonis, Gnathostoma spinigerum, Strongyloides stercoralis, and Toxocara spp.—is reviewed. Objectives On completion of this article, the reader should be able to summarize the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of the common nematodal infections of the nervous system. Accreditation The Indiana University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. Credit The Indiana University School of Medicine designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1 Category 1 credit toward the AMA Physicians Recognition Award. Each physician should claim only those credits that he/she actually spent in the educational activity. Disclosure Statements of disclosure have been obtained regarding the authors’ relevant financial relationships. The authors have nothing to disclose. PMID:16170738

  7. Caspase Dependent Programmed Cell Death in Developing Embryos: A Potential Target for Therapeutic Intervention against Pathogenic Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Mohapatra, Alok Das; Kumar, Sunil; Satapathy, Ashok Kumar; Ravindran, Balachandran

    2011-01-01

    Background Successful embryogenesis is a critical rate limiting step for the survival and transmission of parasitic worms as well as pathology mediated by them. Hence, blockage of this important process through therapeutic induction of apoptosis in their embryonic stages offers promise for developing effective anti-parasitic measures against these extra cellular parasites. However, unlike in the case of protozoan parasites, induction of apoptosis as a therapeutic approach is yet to be explored against metazoan helminth parasites. Methodology/Principal Findings For the first time, here we developed and evaluated flow cytometry based assays to assess several conserved features of apoptosis in developing embryos of a pathogenic filarial nematode Setaria digitata, in-vitro as well as ex-vivo. We validated programmed cell death in developing embryos by using immuno-fluorescence microscopy and scoring expression profile of nematode specific proteins related to apoptosis [e.g. CED-3, CED-4 and CED-9]. Mechanistically, apoptotic death of embryonic stages was found to be a caspase dependent phenomenon mediated primarily through induction of intracellular ROS. The apoptogenicity of some pharmacological compounds viz. DEC, Chloroquine, Primaquine and Curcumin were also evaluated. Curcumin was found to be the most effective pharmacological agent followed by Primaquine while Chloroquine displayed minimal effect and DEC had no demonstrable effect. Further, demonstration of induction of apoptosis in embryonic stages by lipid peroxidation products [molecules commonly associated with inflammatory responses in filarial disease] and demonstration of in-situ apoptosis of developing embryos in adult parasites in a natural bovine model of filariasis have offered a framework to understand anti-fecundity host immunity operational against parasitic helminths. Conclusions/Significance Our observations have revealed for the first time, that induction of apoptosis in developing embryos can

  8. Social networks of educated nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Entomopathogenic nematodes are obligate lethal parasitoids of insect larvae that navigate a chemically complex belowground environment while interacting with their insect hosts, plants, and each other. In this environment, prior exposure to volatile compounds appears to prime nematodes in a compound...

  9. Using good nematodes to kill bad nematodes: Applications of entomopathogenic nematodes for control of the pecan root-knot nematode

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Meloidogyne partityla is a nematode parasite of pecan and walnut. Our objective was to determine interactions between the entomopathogenic nematode-bacterium complex and M. partityla. Specifically, we investigated suppressive effects of Steinernema feltiae and S. riobrave applied as infective juve...

  10. The Potentials and Pitfalls of Microarrays in Neglected Tropical Diseases: A Focus on Human Filarial Infections.

    PubMed

    Kwarteng, Alexander; Ahuno, Samuel Terkper

    2016-01-01

    Data obtained from expression microarrays enables deeper understanding of the molecular signatures of infectious diseases. It provides rapid and accurate information on how infections affect the clustering of gene expression profiles, pathways and networks that are transcriptionally active during various infection states compared to conventional diagnostic methods, which primarily focus on single genes or proteins. Thus, microarray technologies offer advantages in understanding host-parasite interactions associated with filarial infections. More importantly, the use of these technologies can aid diagnostics and helps translate current genomic research into effective treatment and interventions for filarial infections. Studying immune responses via microarray following infection can yield insight into genetic pathways and networks that can have a profound influence on the development of anti-parasitic vaccines. PMID:27600086

  11. Interactions of microfungi and plant parasitic nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant parasitic nematodes and microfungi inhabit many of the same ecological habitats and interact in almost every conceivable way. Nematodes can feed on fungi, and conversely fungi can use nematodes as a food source. Fungi have been widely studied as biological controls of plant parasitic nematod...

  12. Nematodes, bacteria, and flies: a tripartite model for nematode parasitism.

    PubMed

    Hallem, Elissa A; Rengarajan, Michelle; Ciche, Todd A; Sternberg, Paul W

    2007-05-15

    More than a quarter of the world's population is infected with nematode parasites, and more than a hundred species of nematodes are parasites of humans [1-3]. Despite extensive morbidity and mortality caused by nematode parasites, the biological mechanisms of host-parasite interactions are poorly understood, largely because of the lack of genetically tractable model systems. We have demonstrated that the insect parasitic nematode Heterorhabditis bacteriophora, its bacterial symbiont Photorhabdus luminescens, and the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster constitute a tripartite model for nematode parasitism and parasitic infection. We find that infective juveniles (IJs) of Heterorhabditis, which contain Photorhabdus in their gut, can infect and kill Drosophila larvae. We show that infection activates an immune response in Drosophila that results in the temporally dynamic expression of a subset of antimicrobial peptide (AMP) genes, and that this immune response is induced specifically by Photorhabdus. We also investigated the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying IJ recovery, the developmental process that occurs in parasitic nematodes upon host invasion and that is necessary for successful parasitism. We find that the chemosensory neurons and signaling pathways that control dauer recovery in Caenorhabditis elegans also control IJ recovery in Heterorhabditis, suggesting conservation of these developmental processes across free-living and parasitic nematodes. PMID:17475494

  13. Comparative Genomics of a Plant-Parasitic Nematode Endosymbiont Suggest a Role in Nutritional Symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Amanda M V; Howe, Dana K; Wasala, Sulochana K; Peetz, Amy B; Zasada, Inga A; Denver, Dee R

    2015-09-01

    Bacterial mutualists can modulate the biochemical capacity of animals. Highly coevolved nutritional mutualists do this by synthesizing nutrients missing from the host's diet. Genomics tools have advanced the study of these partnerships. Here we examined the endosymbiont Xiphinematobacter (phylum Verrucomicrobia) from the dagger nematode Xiphinema americanum, a migratory ectoparasite of numerous crops that also vectors nepovirus. Previously, this endosymbiont was identified in the gut, ovaries, and eggs, but its role was unknown. We explored the potential role of this symbiont using fluorescence in situ hybridization, genome sequencing, and comparative functional genomics. We report the first genome of an intracellular Verrucomicrobium and the first exclusively intracellular non-Wolbachia nematode symbiont. Results revealed that Xiphinematobacter had a small 0.916-Mb genome with only 817 predicted proteins, resembling genomes of other mutualist endosymbionts. Compared with free-living relatives, conserved proteins were shorter on average, and there was large-scale loss of regulatory pathways. Despite massive gene loss, more genes were retained for biosynthesis of amino acids predicted to be essential to the host. Gene ontology enrichment tests showed enrichment for biosynthesis of arginine, histidine, and aromatic amino acids, as well as thiamine and coenzyme A, diverging from the profiles of relatives Akkermansia muciniphilia (in the human colon), Methylacidiphilum infernorum, and the mutualist Wolbachia from filarial nematodes. Together, these features and the location in the gut suggest that Xiphinematobacter functions as a nutritional mutualist, supplementing essential nutrients that are depleted in the nematode diet. This pattern points to evolutionary convergence with endosymbionts found in sap-feeding insects. PMID:26362082

  14. Comparative Genomics of a Plant-Parasitic Nematode Endosymbiont Suggest a Role in Nutritional Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Amanda M.V.; Howe, Dana K.; Wasala, Sulochana K.; Peetz, Amy B.; Zasada, Inga A.; Denver, Dee R.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial mutualists can modulate the biochemical capacity of animals. Highly coevolved nutritional mutualists do this by synthesizing nutrients missing from the host’s diet. Genomics tools have advanced the study of these partnerships. Here we examined the endosymbiont Xiphinematobacter (phylum Verrucomicrobia) from the dagger nematode Xiphinema americanum, a migratory ectoparasite of numerous crops that also vectors nepovirus. Previously, this endosymbiont was identified in the gut, ovaries, and eggs, but its role was unknown. We explored the potential role of this symbiont using fluorescence in situ hybridization, genome sequencing, and comparative functional genomics. We report the first genome of an intracellular Verrucomicrobium and the first exclusively intracellular non-Wolbachia nematode symbiont. Results revealed that Xiphinematobacter had a small 0.916-Mb genome with only 817 predicted proteins, resembling genomes of other mutualist endosymbionts. Compared with free-living relatives, conserved proteins were shorter on average, and there was large-scale loss of regulatory pathways. Despite massive gene loss, more genes were retained for biosynthesis of amino acids predicted to be essential to the host. Gene ontology enrichment tests showed enrichment for biosynthesis of arginine, histidine, and aromatic amino acids, as well as thiamine and coenzyme A, diverging from the profiles of relatives Akkermansia muciniphilia (in the human colon), Methylacidiphilum infernorum, and the mutualist Wolbachia from filarial nematodes. Together, these features and the location in the gut suggest that Xiphinematobacter functions as a nutritional mutualist, supplementing essential nutrients that are depleted in the nematode diet. This pattern points to evolutionary convergence with endosymbionts found in sap-feeding insects. PMID:26362082

  15. A simple technique for the in vitro cultivation of nocturnally subperiodic Brugia malayi infective larvae.

    PubMed

    Tippawangkosol, Pongsri; Choochote, Wej; Riyong, Doungrat; Jitpakdi, Atchariya; Pitasawat, Benjawan

    2002-01-01

    A simple system for the in vitro cultivation of nocturnally subperiodic Brugia malayi was developed. The manner of cultivation consisted of a 1:1 (v/v) mixture of Iscove's Modified Dulbecco's medium and NCTC-135 medium supplemented with 20% fetal bovine serum by using candle jar incubation at 37 degrees C instead of CO2 incubator. Changing the media: every 2 days, 3 days and changing media on day 7, then every 2 days produced a larval survival rate of 50% (70/140) on day 10, 49% (82/166) on day 6, and 53% (105/200) on day 9. With this technique, up to 50% of the infective stage larvae (L3) survived for up to 10 days and had long life for at least 27 days in all experiments with low larval survival rate in the fourth week. In addition, the culture system promoted molting L3 to fourth stage larvae (L4) after 7 days, as shown by light microscope. PMID:12971468

  16. Immunity to Brugia pahangi in athymic nude and normal mice: eosinophilia, antibody and hypersensitivity responses.

    PubMed

    Vickery, A C; Vincent, A L

    1984-11-01

    Congenitally athymic nude (nu/nu) mice, immunologically reconstituted by thymus grafting before inoculation with infective larvae, and mice heterozygous for the nu gene (nu/+), mounted potent protective humoral and cellular immune responses to Brugia pahangi. Although responses were not identical, both groups of mice produced IgM, IgG and IgE antibodies specific for adult worm antigen (S-Ag) present in a crude aqueous extract, made immediate and delayed hypersensitivity footpad swelling responses when challenged with S-Ag and eliminated their infection in the early larval stages. Heterozygotes also exhibited a marked eosinophilia which peaked coincident with larval killing. In contrast, thymus grafting of patent nudes had no effect upon microfilaraemias or adult worm burdens and did not completely protect against a challenge larval inoculum although antibodies specific for S-Ag were produced. With the occasional exceptions of moderate immediate footpad swelling and very low titres of IgM specific for S-Ag, no specific immune responses to B. pahangi were found in ungrafted nude mice which allowed full development of adult worms and supported patent infections. PMID:6522098

  17. Human Monocyte Subsets at Homeostasis and Their Perturbation in Numbers and Function in Filarial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Vanessa; Bennuru, Sasisekhar; McDonald-Fleming, Renee; Ganesan, Sundar; Cotton, Rachel; Anuradha, Rajamanickam; Babu, Subash; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    To characterize the function and plasticity of the major human circulating monocyte populations and to explore their role in systemic helminth infection, highly purified (by flow-based sorting) human monocyte subsets (CD14hi/CD16neg [classical], CD14+ or hi/CD16med [intermediate], and CD14neg/CD16hi [nonclassical]) were examined at homeostasis and after activation. Among these three subsets the classical and intermediate subsets were found to be the major sources of inflammatory and regulatory cytokines, as well as cytokines/chemokines associated with alternative activation, whereas the nonclassical and classical populations demonstrated an ability to transmigrate through endothelial monolayers. Moreover, it was primarily the classical subset that was the most efficient in promoting autologous T cell proliferation. The distribution of these subsets changed in the context of a systemic helminth (Wuchereria bancrofti) infection such that patent infection altered the frequency and distribution of these monocyte subsets with the nonclassical monocytes being expanded (almost 2-fold) in filarial infection. To understand further the filarial/monocyte interface, in vitro modeling demonstrated that the classical subset internalized filarial antigens more efficiently than the other two subsets but that the parasite-driven regulatory cytokine interleukin-10 was exclusively coming from the intermediate subset. Our data suggest that monocyte subsets have a differential function at homeostasis and in response to helminth parasites. PMID:25114121

  18. Bacteria can mobilize nematode-trapping fungi to kill nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Li, Guo-Hong; Zou, Cheng-Gang; Ji, Xing-Lai; Liu, Tong; Zhao, Pei-Ji; Liang, Lian-Ming; Xu, Jian-Ping; An, Zhi-Qiang; Zheng, Xi; Qin, Yue-Ke; Tian, Meng-Qing; Xu, You-Yao; Ma, Yi-Cheng; Yu, Ze-Fen; Huang, Xiao-Wei; Liu, Shu-Qun; Niu, Xue-Mei; Yang, Jin-Kui; Huang, Ying; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2014-01-01

    In their natural habitat, bacteria are consumed by bacterivorous nematodes; however, they are not simply passive preys. Here we report a defensive mechanism used by certain bacteria to mobilize nematode-trapping fungi to kill nematodes. These bacteria release urea, which triggers a lifestyle switch in the fungus Arthrobotrys oligospora from saprophytic to nematode–predatory form; this predacious form is characterized by formation of specialized cellular structures or ‘traps’. The bacteria significantly promote the elimination of nematodes by A. oligospora. Disruption of genes involved in urea transport and metabolism in A. oligospora abolishes the urea-induced trap formation. Furthermore, the urea metabolite ammonia functions as a signal molecule in the fungus to initiate the lifestyle switch to form trap structures. Our findings highlight the importance of multiple predator–prey interactions in prey defense mechanisms. PMID:25514608

  19. Toll-Like Receptor- and Filarial Antigen-Mediated, Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase- and NF-κB-Dependent Regulation of Angiogenic Growth Factors in Filarial Lymphatic Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Anuradha, R.; Kumar, N. Pavan; George, P. Jovvian; Kumaraswami, V.; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2012-01-01

    Filarial lymphatic pathology is of multifactorial origin, with inflammation, lymphangiogenesis, and innate immune responses all playing important roles. The role of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in the development of filarial pathology is well characterized. Similarly, the association of pathology with elevated levels of plasma angiogenic factors has also been documented. To examine the association between TLR function and the development of lymphangiogenesis in filarial infections, we examined TLR- and filarial antigen-induced expression and production of various angiogenic growth factors. We demonstrate that TLR ligands (specifically TLR2, -3, and -5 ligands) induce significantly increased expression/production of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) and angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1) in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of individuals with lymphatic pathology (CP individuals) compared to that in cells of asymptomatic infected (INF) individuals. Similarly, filarial antigens induce significantly enhanced production of VEGF-C in CP compared with INF individuals. TLR2-mediated enhancement of angiogenic growth factor production in CP individuals was shown to be dependent on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and NF-κB signaling, as pharmacologic inhibition of either extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), p38 MAPK, or NF-κB signaling resulted in significantly diminished production of VEGF-A and Ang-1. Our data therefore strongly suggest an important association between TLR signaling and lymphangiogenesis in the development of pathology in human lymphatic filariasis. PMID:22508858

  20. Synthesis, molecular docking and Brugia malayi thymidylate kinase (BmTMK) enzyme inhibition study of novel derivatives of [6]-shogaol.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vinay Kr; Doharey, Pawan K; Kumar, Vikash; Saxena, J K; Siddiqi, M I; Rathaur, Sushma; Narender, Tadigoppula

    2015-03-26

    [6]-Shogaol (1) was isolated from Zingiber officinale. Twelve novel compounds have been synthesized and evaluated for their Brugia malayi thymidylate kinase (BmTMK) inhibition activity, which plays important role for the DNA synthesis in parasite. [6]-Shogaol (1) and shogaol with thymine head group (2), 5-bromouracil head group (3), adenine head group (4) and 2-amino-3-methylpyridine head group (5) showed potential inhibitory effect on BmTMK activity. Further molecular docking studies were carried out to explore the putative binding mode of compounds 1-5. PMID:25659753

  1. The Cyclooctadepsipeptide Anthelmintic Emodepside Differentially Modulates Nematode, Insect and Human Calcium-Activated Potassium (SLO) Channel Alpha Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Schoenhense, Eva; Harder, Achim; Raming, Klaus; O’Kelly, Ita; Ndukwe, Kelechi; O’Connor, Vincent; Walker, Robert J.; Holden-Dye, Lindy

    2015-01-01

    The anthelmintic emodepside paralyses adult filarial worms, via a mode of action distinct from previous anthelmintics and has recently garnered interest as a new treatment for onchocerciasis. Whole organism data suggest its anthelmintic action is underpinned by a selective activation of the nematode isoform of an evolutionary conserved Ca2+-activated K+ channel, SLO-1. To test this at the molecular level we compared the actions of emodepside at heterologously expressed SLO-1 alpha subunit orthologues from nematode (Caenorhabditis elegans), Drosophila melanogaster and human using whole cell voltage clamp. Intriguingly we found that emodepside modulated nematode (Ce slo-1), insect (Drosophila, Dm slo) and human (hum kcnma1)SLO channels but that there are discrete differences in the features of the modulation that are consistent with its anthelmintic efficacy. Nematode SLO-1 currents required 100 μM intracellular Ca2+ and were strongly facilitated by emodepside (100 nM; +73.0 ± 17.4%; n = 9; p<0.001). Drosophila Slo currents on the other hand were activated by emodepside (10 μM) in the presence of 52 nM Ca2+ but were inhibited in the presence of 290 nM Ca2+ and exhibited a characteristic loss of rectification. Human Slo required 300nM Ca2+ and emodepside transiently facilitated currents (100nM; +33.5 ± 9%; n = 8; p<0.05) followed by a sustained inhibition (-52.6 ± 9.8%; n = 8; p<0.001). This first cross phyla comparison of the actions of emodepside at nematode, insect and human channels provides new mechanistic insight into the compound’s complex modulation of SLO channels. Consistent with whole organism behavioural studies on C. elegans, it indicates its anthelmintic action derives from a strong activation of SLO current, not observed in the human channel. These data provide an important benchmark for the wider deployment of emodepside as an anthelmintic treatment. PMID:26437177

  2. Social Networks of Educated Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Willett, Denis S.; Alborn, Hans T.; Duncan, Larry W.; Stelinski, Lukasz L.

    2015-01-01

    Entomopathogenic nematodes are obligate lethal parasitoids of insect larvae that navigate a chemically complex belowground environment while interacting with their insect hosts, plants, and each other. In this environment, prior exposure to volatile compounds appears to prime nematodes in a compound specific manner, increasing preference for volatiles they previously were exposed to and decreasing attraction to other volatiles. In addition, persistence of volatile exposure influences this response. Longer exposure not only increases preference, but also results in longer retention of that preference. These entomopathogenic nematodes display interspecific social behavioral plasticity; experienced nematodes influence the behavior of different species. This interspecific social behavioral plasticity suggests a mechanism for rapid adaptation of belowground communities to dynamic environments. PMID:26404058

  3. Use of liposomized tetracycline in elimination of Wolbachia endobacterium of human lymphatic filariid Brugia malayi in a rodent model.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Preeti; Vedi, Satish; Owais, Mohammad; Sharma, Sharad K; Saxena, Prabh N; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2005-07-01

    Wolbachia bacteria, being filarial parasite symbiont have been implicated in a variety of roles, including development, fecundity and the pathogenesis of the filarial infections. Among various strategies used in the treatment of experimental filariasis, the elimination of symbiont Wolbachia seem to offer an efficient means of curing the disease. The antiwolbachial property of tetracycline has been well worked out; however, treatment needs to be continued for a prolonged period of time to achieve complete elimination of Wolbachia from the filarial parasites and their subsequent killing. This results in acute toxicity, thus limiting its practical utility for clinical implementation. In order to increase efficacy of the antibiotic with minimal toxic manifestations, we developed liposomized formulation of the tetracycline. The liposomized tetracycline was found to be significantly more effective when compared to the free form of the drug. In contrast to the 90/120 days oral administration of the drug, the treatment schedule using the liposomized form of the drug was reduced to 12 alternate days with better efficacy of the treatment. PMID:16278157

  4. Effect of immune reconstitution on resistance to Brugia pahangi in congenitally athymic nude mice.

    PubMed

    Vickery, A C; Vincent, A L; Sodeman, W A

    1983-06-01

    The dichotomy of resistance to Brugia pahangi (Nematoda: Filarioidea) between nonsusceptible, euthymic C3H/HeN mice, heterozygotic for the "nu" gene (+/nu), and susceptible, congenitally-athymic "nude" (nu/nu) C3H/HeN mice, suggests that resistance is thymus-dependent. To test this hypothesis, the effect of syngeneic neonatal thymus grafts and neonatal thymus cell suspensions on recovery of worms at day 40 PI, and responses to Concanavalin A (Con A) were examined in reconstituted nudes. Nude recipients of a thymus graft 7 or 14 wk before subcutaneous inoculation with 50 infective larvae (L3) yielded no worms and responded strongly to Con A. Serum from these mice reacted in two lines of identity with serum from similarly-infected heterozygotes by double radial immunodiffusion against an adult worm saline extract. Nude recipients of a thymus 2 days or 3 wk before inoculation harbored an average of three or two worms, respectively. Intravenous injection of nude recipients with 10(7) or 10(8) neonatal thymus cells seven weeks before inoculation was less effective in conferring resistance to B. pahangi and responsiveness to Con A. Complete resistance to B. pahangi could be adoptively transferred to nude mice by 10(8) spleen cells obtained from infection-primed heterozygotes and injected intravenously on the day of larval inoculation. The same numbers of worms were significantly reduced. less effective when injected 3 wk before inoculation, although numbers of worms were significantly reduced. Passive transfer of primed heterozygote serum, containing high titers of antibodies to adult worm and larval antigens, failed to protect nude recipients against a larval inoculum in the absence of cellular reconstitution.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6605421

  5. Utilization of computer processed high definition video imaging for measuring motility of microscopic nematode stages on a quantitative scale: “The Worminator”

    PubMed Central

    Storey, Bob; Marcellino, Chris; Miller, Melissa; Maclean, Mary; Mostafa, Eman; Howell, Sue; Sakanari, Judy; Wolstenholme, Adrian; Kaplan, Ray

    2014-01-01

    A major hindrance to evaluating nematode populations for anthelmintic resistance, as well as for screening existing drugs, new compounds, or bioactive plant extracts for anthelmintic properties, is the lack of an efficient, objective, and reproducible in vitro assay that is adaptable to multiple life stages and parasite genera. To address this need we have developed the “Worminator” system, which objectively and quantitatively measures the motility of microscopic stages of parasitic nematodes. The system is built around the computer application “WormAssay”, developed at the Center for Discovery and Innovation in Parasitic Diseases at the University of California, San Francisco. WormAssay was designed to assess motility of macroscopic parasites for the purpose of high throughput screening of potential anthelmintic compounds, utilizing high definition video as an input to assess motion of adult stage (macroscopic) parasites (e.g. Brugia malayi). We adapted this assay for use with microscopic parasites by modifying the software to support a full frame analysis mode that applies the motion algorithm to the entire video frame. Thus, the motility of all parasites in a given well are recorded and measured simultaneously. Assays performed on third-stage larvae (L3) of the bovine intestinal nematode Cooperia spp., as well as microfilariae (mf) of the filarioid nematodes B. malayi and Dirofilaria immitis, yielded reproducible dose responses using the macrocyclic lactones ivermectin, doramectin, and moxidectin, as well as the nicotinic agonists, pyrantel, oxantel, morantel, and tribendimidine. This new computer based-assay is simple to use, requires minimal new investment in equipment, is robust across nematode genera and developmental stage, and does not require subjective scoring of motility by an observer. Thus, the “Worminator” provides a relatively low-cost platform for developing genera- and stage-specific assays with high efficiency and reproducibility, low

  6. The Geological Record of Parasitic Nematode Evolution.

    PubMed

    Poinar, George O

    2015-01-01

    This chapter discusses the evolutionary history of nematode parasites of invertebrates, vertebrates and plants based on fossil remains in amber, stone and coprolites dating from the Palaeozoic to the Holocene. The earliest parasitic nematode is a primitive plant parasite from the Devonian. Fossil invertebrate-parasitic nematodes first appeared in the Early Cretaceous, while the earliest fossil vertebrate-parasitic nematodes are from Upper Triassic coprolites. Specific examples of fossil nematode parasites over time are presented, along with views on the origin and evolution of nematodes and their hosts. PMID:26597065

  7. Modulation of CD4+ and CD8+ T-Cell Function by Interleukin 19 and Interleukin 24 During Filarial Infections.

    PubMed

    Anuradha, Rajamanickam; Munisankar, Saravanan; Dolla, Chandrakumar; Kumaran, Paul; Nutman, Thomas B; Babu, Subash

    2016-03-01

    Interleukin 19 (IL-19) and interleukin 24 (IL-24) are cytokines that are highly expressed in filarial infections. To study the role of IL-19 and IL-24 in regulating T-cell responses, we examined the frequency of T-helper type 1 (Th1)/Tc1, Th2/Tc2, Th9/Tc9, Th17/Tc17, Th22/Tc22, and Tr1 cells in 26 filariae-infected individuals stimulated with filarial antigen following IL-19 or IL-24 neutralization. IL-19 or IL-24 neutralization resulted in significantly enhanced frequencies of Th1/Tc1 and/or Th17/Tc17 cells and significantly reduced frequencies of Th2/Tc2, Tr1, and/or Th9/Tc9 cells. Thus, we demonstrate that IL-19 and IL-24 are associated with the modulation of T-cell responses in filarial infections. PMID:26486636

  8. Factors affecting response to medical management in patients of filarial chyluria: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Neeraj Kumar; Goel, Apul; Sankhwar, Satyanarayan; Singh, Vishwajeet; Ali, Wahid; Natu, S. M.; Singh, Bhupendra Pal; Sinha, Rahul Janak; Dalela, Divakar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Filarial chyluria is a common problem in filarial endemic countries. Its management begins with medical therapy but some patients progress to require surgery. The present study aimed to determine factors affecting response to medical management in patients of filarial chyluria. Materials and Methods: This prospective study conducted between August 2008 and November 2012, included conservatively managed patients of chyluria. Demographic profile, clinical presentation, treatment history and urinary triglycerides (TGs) and cholesterol levels at baseline were compared between the responders and non-responders. Apart from the clinical grade of chyluria, hematuria was evaluated as an independent risk factor. Results: Out of the 222 patients (mean age, 37.99 ± 13.29 years, 129 males), 31 patients failed to respond while 35 had a recurrence after initial response; the overall success rate being 70.3% at a mean follow-up of 25 months. No difference was observed in demographics, clinical presentation, presence of hematuria, disease duration and mean urinary TGs loss between responders and non-responders. On multivariate analysis, patients with treatment failure were found to have a higher-grade disease (14.3% Grade-I, 36.6% Grades-II and 60% Grade-III), higher number of pretreatment courses (1.59 ± 1.08 vs. 1.02 ± 0.79) and heavier cholesterol (26.54 ± 23.46 vs. 8.81 ± 8.55 mg/dl) loss at baseline compared with responders (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Conservative management has a success rate in excess of 70%, not affected by the disease chronicity, previous episodes and recurrent nature. However, higher-grade disease, extensive pre-treatment with drugs and higher urinary cholesterol loss at baseline are the predictors of poor response. Hematuria is not an independent poor risk factor for conservative management. PMID:24497677

  9. The complete mitochondrial genome of an Antarctic moss Syntrichia filaris (Müll.Hal.) R.H. Zander.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Young-Jun; Kang, Yoonjee; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Lee, Jungeun; Park, Hyun; Kim, Ji Hee; Lee, Hyoungseok

    2016-07-01

    The mitogenome of the Syntrichia filaris (GenBank accession number KP984758) has a total length of 106,343 bp and consists of 40 protein-coding genes, 3 ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and 24 transfer RNA. The mitochondrial structure and gene order was similar to other Bryophytes. Phylogenetic tree based on the combined analysis of amino acid sequences of 31 mitochondrial genes common in S. filaris, 17 Bryophyta and 3 Marchantiophyta, was well congruent with traditional species relationship of the moss order Pottiales. PMID:26114320

  10. Basic and applied research: Entomopathogenic nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Entomopathogenic nematodes in the genera Heterorhabditis and Steinernema kill arthropods with the aid of their bacterial symbionts. These nematodes are potent microbial control agents that have been widely commercialized for control of economically important insect pests. Biocontrol efficacy relies...

  11. In Vivo Production of Entomopathogenic Nematodes.

    PubMed

    Shapiro-Ilan, David I; Morales-Ramos, Juan A; Rojas, M Guadalupe

    2016-01-01

    In nature, entomopathogenic nematodes in the genera Heterorhabditis and Steinernema are obligate parasites of insects. The nematodes are used widely as biopesticides for suppression of insect pests. More than a dozen entomopathogenic nematode species have been commercialized for use in biological control. Most nematodes intended for commercial application are produced in artificial media via solid or liquid fermentation. However, for laboratory research and small greenhouse or field trials, in vivo production of entomopathogenic nematodes is the common method of propagation. Additionally, small companies continue to produce nematodes using in vivo methods for application in niche markets. Advances in mechanization and alternative production routes (e.g., production geared toward application of nematodes in infected host cadavers) can improve efficiency and economy of scale. The objective of this chapter is to describe basic and advanced procedures for in vivo production of entomopathogenic nematodes. PMID:27565497

  12. Functional genomics of hsp-90 in parasitic and free-living nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Gillan, Victoria; Maitland, Kirsty; McCormack, Gillian; Nik Him, Nik A.I.I.; Devaney, Eileen

    2009-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp-90) is a highly conserved essential protein in eukaryotes. Here we describe the molecular characterisation of hsp-90 from three nematodes, the free-living Caenorhabditis elegans (Ce) and the parasitic worms Brugia pahangi (Bp) and Haemonchus contortus (Hc). These molecules were functionally characterised by rescue of a Ce-daf-21 (hsp-90) null mutant. Our results show a gradient of rescue: the C. elegans endogenous gene provided full rescue of the daf-21 mutant, while Hc-hsp-90 provided partial rescue. In contrast, no rescue could be obtained using a variety of Bp-hsp-90 constructs, despite the fact that Bp-hsp-90 was transcribed and translated in the mutant worms. daf-21 RNA interference (RNAi) experiments were carried out to determine whether knock-down of the endogenous daf-21 mRNA in N2 worms could be complemented by expression of either parasite gene. However neither parasite gene could rescue the daf-21 (RNAi) phenotypes. These results indicate that factors other than the level of sequence identity are important for determining whether parasite genes can functionally complement in C. elegans. PMID:19401205

  13. Draft genome of neurotropic nematode parasite Angiostrongylus cantonensis, causative agent of human eosinophilic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Yong, Hoi-Sen; Eamsobhana, Praphathip; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Razali, Rozaimi; Aziz, Farhanah Abdul; Rosli, Nurul Shielawati Mohamed; Poole-Johnson, Johan; Anwar, Arif

    2015-08-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis is a bursate nematode parasite that causes eosinophilic meningitis (or meningoencephalitis) in humans in many parts of the world. The genomic data from A. cantonensis will form a useful resource for comparative genomic and chemogenomic studies to aid the development of diagnostics and therapeutics. We have sequenced, assembled and annotated the genome of A. cantonensis. The genome size is estimated to be ∼260 Mb, with 17,280 genomic scaffolds, 91X coverage, 81.45% for complete and 93.95% for partial score based on CEGMA analysis of genome completeness. The number of predicted genes of ≥300 bp was 17,482. A total of 7737 predicted protein-coding genes of ≥50 amino acids were identified in the assembled genome. Among the proteins of known function, kinases are the most abundant followed by transferases. The draft genome contains 34 excretory-secretory proteins (ES), a minimum of 44 Nematode Astacin (NAS) metalloproteases, 12 Homeobox (HOX) genes, and 30 neurotransmitters. The assembled genome size (260 Mb) is larger than those of Pristionchus pacificus, Caenorhabditis elegans, Necator americanus, Caenorhabditis briggsae, Trichinella spiralis, Brugia malayi and Loa loa, but smaller than Haemonchus contortus and Ascaris suum. The repeat content (25%) is similar to H. contortus. The GC content (41.17%) is lower compared to P. pacificus (42.7%) and H. contortus (43.1%) but higher compared to C. briggsae (37.69%), A. suum (37.9%) and N. americanus (40.2%) while the scaffold N50 is 42,191. This draft genome will facilitate the understanding of many unresolved issues on the parasite and the disorder it causes. PMID:25910624

  14. Using entomopathogenic nematodes for crop insect control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this paper is to provide an overview on using entomopathogenic nematodes for insect pest control. Entomopathogenic nematodes (genera Steinernema and Heterorhabditis), are be used as natural biopesticides. Unlike plant parasitic nematodes, which can be serious crop pests, entomopat...

  15. Identification of Ecdysone Hormone Receptor Agonists as a Therapeutic Approach for Treating Filarial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Mhashilkar, Amruta S.; Vankayala, Sai L.; Liu, Canhui; Kearns, Fiona; Mehrotra, Priyanka; Tzertzinis, George; Palli, Subba R.; Woodcock, H. Lee; Unnasch, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    Background A homologue of the ecdysone receptor has previously been identified in human filarial parasites. As the ecdysone receptor is not found in vertebrates, it and the regulatory pathways it controls represent attractive potential chemotherapeutic targets. Methodology/ Principal Findings Administration of 20-hydroxyecdysone to gerbils infected with B. malayi infective larvae disrupted their development to adult stage parasites. A stable mammalian cell line was created incorporating the B. malayi ecdysone receptor ligand-binding domain, its heterodimer partner and a secreted luciferase reporter in HEK293 cells. This was employed to screen a series of ecdysone agonist, identifying seven agonists active at sub-micromolar concentrations. A B. malayi ecdysone receptor ligand-binding domain was developed and used to study the ligand-receptor interactions of these agonists. An excellent correlation between the virtual screening results and the screening assay was observed. Based on both of these approaches, steroidal ecdysone agonists and the diacylhydrazine family of compounds were identified as a fruitful source of potential receptor agonists. In further confirmation of the modeling and screening results, Ponasterone A and Muristerone A, two compounds predicted to be strong ecdysone agonists stimulated expulsion of microfilaria and immature stages from adult parasites. Conclusions The studies validate the potential of the B. malayi ecdysone receptor as a drug target and provide a means to rapidly evaluate compounds for development of a new class of drugs against the human filarial parasites. PMID:27300294

  16. Pine wood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus.

    PubMed

    Futai, Kazuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    After devastating vast areas of pine forests in Asian countries, the pine wilt disease spread into European forests in 1999 and is causing worldwide concern. This disease involves very complicated interactions between a pathogenic nematode, its vector beetle, host pine species, and fungi in dead hosts. Pathogenicity of the pine wood nematode is determined not only by its physical and chemical traits but also by its behavioral traits. Most life history traits of the pine wood nematode, such as its phoretic relationship with vector beetles, seem to be more effective in virulent than in avirulent isolates or species. As the pathogenicity determinants, secreted enzymes, and surface coat proteins are very important, they have therefore been studied intensively. The mechanism of quick death of a large pine tree as a result of infection by a tiny nematode could be ascribed to the dysfunction of the water-conducting system caused by the death of parenchyma cells, which must have originally evolved as an inherent resistant system. PMID:23663004

  17. ORAL NEMATODE INFECTION OF TARANTULAS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oral nematode infection of Theraphosidae spiders, known as tarantulas, has been recently identified from several collections in the UK and mainland Europe. The disease has also been seen in captive and wild spiders from the Americas, Asia and Africa. Spider symptoms are described from anorexia until...

  18. Plant Nematodes Occurring in Arkansas

    PubMed Central

    Wehunt, E. J.; Golden, A. M.; Robbins, R. T.

    1989-01-01

    A total of 110 species of plant nematodes were found in various habitats in Arkansas. Thirty species from 19 genera are reported here for the first time. Included in the new reports are the known plant pathogens Criconemella onoense, Hirshmanniella oryzae, Longidorus elongatus, and Pratylenchus pratensis. PMID:19287671

  19. Animal Manure Harms Entomopathogenic Nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal manure forms an alternative to synthetic fertilizer that provides the additional benefits of reducing nutrient leaching and soil erosion, and promoting greater soil biodiversity. Studies show that animal manures can suppress plant parasitic nematodes by increasing densities of antagonistic mi...

  20. Free-living nematode peptides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    All nematodes employ a wide array of peptide messengers to control nearly all aspects of the life cycle, including hatching, locomotion, feeding, defense, mating, reproduction, and other behavioral and metabolic events. There are molecular and biological similarities, as well as significant differen...

  1. Anthelmintic resistance in equine nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Jacqueline B.

    2014-01-01

    Anthelmintics have been applied indiscriminately to control horse nematodes for over 40 years. Three broad-spectrum anthelmintic classes are currently registered for nematode control in horses: benzimidazoles (fenbendazole, oxibendazole), tetrahydropyrimidines (pyrantel) and macrocyclic lactones (ivermectin, moxidectin). Generally, control strategies have focused on nematode egg suppression regimens that involve the frequent application of anthelmintics to all horses at intervals based on strongyle egg reappearance periods after treatment. The widespread use of such programmes has substantially reduced clinical disease, especially that associated with large strongyle species; however, high treatment frequency has led to considerable selection pressure for anthelmintic resistance, particularly in cyathostomin species. Field studies published over the last decade indicate that benzimidazole resistance is widespread globally in cyathostomins and there are also many reports of resistance to pyrantel in these worms. Cyathostomin resistance to macrocyclic lactone compounds is emerging, principally measured as a reduction in strongyle egg reappearance time observed after treatment. Ivermectin resistance is a further concern in the small intestinal nematode, Parascaris equorum, an important pathogen of foals. These issues indicate that horse nematodes must now be controlled using methods less dependent on anthelmintic use and more reliant on management practices designed to reduce the force of infection in the environment. Such strategies include improved grazing management integrated with targeted anthelmintic administration involving faecal egg count (FEC)-directed treatments. The latter require that the supporting diagnostic tests available are robust and practically applicable. Recent research has focused on maximising the value of FEC analysis in horses and on optimizing protocols for anthelmintic efficacy testing. Other studies have sought to develop diagnostics

  2. Anthelmintic resistance in equine nematodes.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Jacqueline B

    2014-12-01

    Anthelmintics have been applied indiscriminately to control horse nematodes for over 40 years. Three broad-spectrum anthelmintic classes are currently registered for nematode control in horses: benzimidazoles (fenbendazole, oxibendazole), tetrahydropyrimidines (pyrantel) and macrocyclic lactones (ivermectin, moxidectin). Generally, control strategies have focused on nematode egg suppression regimens that involve the frequent application of anthelmintics to all horses at intervals based on strongyle egg reappearance periods after treatment. The widespread use of such programmes has substantially reduced clinical disease, especially that associated with large strongyle species; however, high treatment frequency has led to considerable selection pressure for anthelmintic resistance, particularly in cyathostomin species. Field studies published over the last decade indicate that benzimidazole resistance is widespread globally in cyathostomins and there are also many reports of resistance to pyrantel in these worms. Cyathostomin resistance to macrocyclic lactone compounds is emerging, principally measured as a reduction in strongyle egg reappearance time observed after treatment. Ivermectin resistance is a further concern in the small intestinal nematode, Parascaris equorum, an important pathogen of foals. These issues indicate that horse nematodes must now be controlled using methods less dependent on anthelmintic use and more reliant on management practices designed to reduce the force of infection in the environment. Such strategies include improved grazing management integrated with targeted anthelmintic administration involving faecal egg count (FEC)-directed treatments. The latter require that the supporting diagnostic tests available are robust and practically applicable. Recent research has focused on maximising the value of FEC analysis in horses and on optimizing protocols for anthelmintic efficacy testing. Other studies have sought to develop diagnostics

  3. A TaqMan-based multiplex real-time PCR assay for the simultaneous detection of Wuchereria bancrofti and Brugia malayi.

    PubMed

    Pilotte, N; Torres, M; Tomaino, F R; Laney, S J; Williams, S A

    2013-05-01

    With the Global Program for the Elimination of Lymphatic Filariasis continuing to make strides towards disease eradication, many locations endemic for the causative parasites of lymphatic filariasis are realizing a substantial decrease in levels of infection and rates of disease transmission. However, with measures of disease continuing to decline, the need for time-saving and economical molecular diagnostic assays capable of detecting low levels of parasite presence is increasing. This need is greatest in locations co-endemic for both Wuchereria bancrofti and Brugia parasites because testing for both causative agents individually results in significant increases in labor and reagent costs. Here we describe a multiplex, TaqMan-based, real-time PCR assay capable of simultaneously detecting W. bancrofti and Brugia malayi DNA extracted from human bloodspots or vector mosquito pools. With comparable sensitivity to established singleplex assays, this assay provides significant cost and labor savings for disease monitoring efforts in co-endemic locations. PMID:23669148

  4. Adult filarial worm from the breast aspirate of a young man.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Hilda; Thomas, Beena Mary; Putran, Indira

    2016-06-01

    Microfilariae and adult filarial worm have been incidentally detected in fine needle aspirates of various lesions in clinically unsuspected cases. Here we report a male patient who presented with a tender breast nodule and single enlarged lymph node. Fine Needle Aspiration (FNA) yielded 1 ml of yellow coloured fluid and single thread like worm measuring 6 × 0.2 cm. A diagnosis of breast abscess with a worm morphologically consistent with filariasis was offered. A follow up visit after 2 months showed regression of the breast lesion and the lymph node. Filariasis of the breast is an uncommon condition and can cause a diagnostic dilemma at times. FNA cytology appears to be a more convenient and effective diagnostic tool in patients with mass lesions. Demonstration and identification of the parasite in smears helps in avoiding surgical excision and early institution of prompt therapy especially in young patients. PMID:27413335

  5. Nematode.net: a tool for navigating sequences from parasitic and free-living nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Todd; Martin, John C.; Dante, Michael; Mitreva, Makedonka Dautova; Clifton, Sandra W.; Chinwalla, Asif; Waterston, Robert H.; Wilson, Richard K.; McCarter, James P.

    2004-01-01

    Nematode.net (www.nematode.net) is a web- accessible resource for investigating gene sequences from nematode genomes. The database is an outgrowth of the parasitic nematode EST project at Washington University’s Genome Sequencing Center (GSC), St Louis. A sister project at the University of Edinburgh and the Sanger Institute is also underway. More than 295 000 ESTs have been generated from >30 nematodes other than Caenorhabditis elegans including key parasites of humans, animals and plants. Nematode.net currently provides NemaGene EST cluster consensus sequence, enhanced online BLAST search tools, functional classifications of cluster sequences and comprehensive information concerning the ongoing generation of nematode genome data. The long-term goal of nematode.net is to provide the scientific community with the highest quality sequence information and tools for studying these diverse species. PMID:14681448

  6. Laboratory and field evaluation of medicinal plant extracts against filarial vector, Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Kovendan, Kalimuthu; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Panneerselvam, Chellasamy; Mahesh Kumar, Palanisamy; Amerasan, Duraisamy; Subramaniam, Jayapal; Vincent, Savariar; Barnard, Donald R

    2012-06-01

    The present study explored the effects of Jatropha curcas, Hyptis suaveolens, Abutilon indicum, and Leucas aspera tested against third instar larvae of filarial vector, Culex quinquefasciatus. The dried plant materials were powdered by an electrical blender. From each sample, 500 g powder was macerated with 1.5 L of hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and methanol 8h, using Soxhlet apparatus, and filtered. The extracts were concentrated at reduced temperature on a rotary evaporator and stored at a temperature of 4°C. The yield of crude extract was 11.4, 12.2, 10.6, and 13.5 g in hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and methanol, respectively. The hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and methanol extract of J. curcas with LC(50) values of 230.32, 212.85, 192.07, and 113.23 ppm; H. suaveolens with LC(50) values of 213.09, 217.64, 167.59, and 86.93 ppm; A. indicum with LC(50) values of 204.18, 155.53, 166.32, and 111.58 ppm; and L. aspera with LC(50) values of 152.18, 118.29, 111.43, and 107.73 ppm, respectively, against third instar larvae of C. quinquefasciatus. The larval mortality was observed after 24 h of exposure. Maximum larvicidal activity was observed in the methanolic extract followed by ethyl acetate, chloroform, and hexane extract. No mortality was observed in the control. The observed mortality were statistically significant at P < 0.05 level. L. aspera showed the highest mortality rate against the mosquito larvae in laboratory and field. The larval density was decreased after the treatment of plant extracts at the breeding sites (sewage water), and hence, these plant extracts of the suitable alternatives of synthetic insecticides for the mosquito vector management. The present results suggest that the medicinal plants extract was an excellent potential for controlling filarial vector, C. quinquefasciatus. PMID:22146997

  7. Molecular detection of Setaria tundra (Nematoda: Filarioidea) and an unidentified filarial species in mosquitoes in Germany

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Knowledge of the potential vector role of Culicidae mosquitoes in Germany is very scanty, and until recently it was generally assumed that they are not involved in the transmission of anthroponotic or zoonotic pathogens in this country. However, anticipated changes in the course of global warming and globalization may alter their status. Methods We conducted a molecular mass screening of mosquitoes for filarial parasites using mitochondrial 12S rRNA-based real-time PCR. Results No parasites causing disease in humans such as Dirofilaria spp. were detected in about 83,000 mosquitoes tested, which had been collected in 2009 and 2010 in 16 locations throughout Germany. However, minimum infection rates of up to 24 per 1000 mosquitoes were revealed, which could be attributed to mosquito infection with Setaria tundra and a yet unidentified second parasite. Setaria tundra was found to be widespread in southern Germany in various mosquito species, except Culex spp. In contrast, the unidentified filarial species was exclusively found in Culex spp. in northern Baden-Württemberg, and is likely to be a bird parasite. Conclusions Although dirofilariasis appears to be emerging and spreading in Europe, the absence of Dirofilaria spp. or other zoonotic filariae in our sample allows the conclusion that the risk of autochthonous infection in Germany is still very low. Potential vectors of S. tundra in Germany are Ochlerotatus sticticus, Oc. cantans, Aedes vexans and Anopheles claviger. Technically, the synergism between entomologists, virologists and parasitologists, combined with state-of-the-art methods allows a very efficient near-real-time monitoring of a wide spectrum of both human and veterinary pathogens, including new distribution records of parasite species and the incrimination of their potential vectors. PMID:22236560

  8. Cloning of a cuticular antigen that contains multiple tandem repeats from the filarial parasite Dirofilaria immitis.

    PubMed Central

    Poole, C B; Grandea, A G; Maina, C V; Jenkins, R E; Selkirk, M E; McReynolds, L A

    1992-01-01

    An unusual antigen composed of tandemly repeated protein units was cloned from the filarial parasite Dirofilaria immitis. The antigen was initially identified by screening a lambda gt11 cDNA library with serum from dogs immunized with irradiated D. immitis third-stage larvae. DNA sequence analysis of the cDNA clone, Di5, revealed a continuous open reading frame composed of two 399-base-pair repeats arranged in tandem. Southern blot analysis of genomic D. immitis DNA showed that the gene coding for Di5 is composed of a tandem array of 25-50 copies of this same 399-base-pair repeat. Antiserum raised against recombinant Di5 protein detected a protein "ladder," from about 14 to greater than 200 kDa with steps approximately 15 kDa apart, on immunoblots of D. immitis extract. Metabolic labeling of adult parasites with [35S]methionine showed that Di5 is synthesized as a large precursor that is subsequently cleaved to produce the ladder-like array. These results suggest that the characteristic ladder is created by proteolytic cleavage of the precursor at the same site in each monomer. The Di5 antigen was localized to the cuticle and hypodermis of adult D. immitis by immunoelectron microscopy. Both male and female parasites were found to release Di5 when cultured in vitro. DNA hybridization analysis demonstrated that Di5 is a member of a gene family present in many filarial parasites that infect both animal and human populations. Images PMID:1631084

  9. Nematode communities in contaminated river sediments.

    PubMed

    Heininger, Peter; Höss, Sebastian; Claus, Evelyn; Pelzer, Jürgen; Traunspurger, Walter

    2007-03-01

    Nematode communities of eight sites from three river catchments were investigated in terms of the genera composition, feeding types, and life-history strategists. The sampling sites showed a gradient of anthropogenic contamination with heavy metals and organic pollutants being important factors in differentiating the sites. Nematode community structure was related to sediment pollution and the hydro-morphological structure of the sampling sites. Heavily contaminated sites were characterized by communities with high relative abundances of omnivorous and predacious nematodes (Tobrilus, c-p 3; Mononchus, c-p 4), while sites with low to medium contamination were dominated by bacterivorous nematodes (Monhystera, Daptonema; c-p 2) or suction feeders (Dorylaimus, c-p 4). The relatively high Maturity Index values in the heavily polluted sites were surprising. Nematodes turned out to be a suitable organism group for monitoring sediment quality, with generic composition being the most accurate indicator for assessing differences in nematode community structure. PMID:16905227

  10. Attenuation of Toll-Like Receptor Expression and Function in Latent Tuberculosis by Coexistent Filarial Infection with Restoration Following Antifilarial Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Subash; Bhat, Sajid Q.; Kumar, N. Pavan; Anuradha, R.; Kumaran, Paul; Gopi, P. G.; Kolappan, C.; Kumaraswami, V.; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and filarial coinfection is highly prevalent, and the presence of filarial infections may regulate the Toll-like receptor (TLR)-dependent immune response needed to control Mtb infection. By analyzing the baseline and mycobacterial antigen–stimulated expression of TLR1, 2, 4, and 9 (in individuals with latent tuberculosis [TB] with or without filarial infection), we were able to demonstrate that filarial infection, coincident with Mtb, significantly diminishes both baseline and Mtb antigen-specific TLR2 and TLR9 expression. In addition, pro-inflammatory cytokine responses to TLR2 and 9 ligands are significantly diminished in filaria/TB-coinfected individuals. Definitive treatment of lymphatic filariasis significantly restores the pro-inflammatory cytokine responses in individuals with latent TB. Coincident filarial infection exerted a profound inhibitory effect on protective mycobacteria-specific TLR-mediated immune responses in latent tuberculosis and suggests a novel mechanism by which concomitant filarial infections predispose to the development of active tuberculosis in humans. PMID:19636364

  11. Management of the Citrus Nematode, Tylenchulus semipenetrans.

    PubMed

    Verdejo-Lucas, S; McKenry, M V

    2004-12-01

    Of the many nematode species that parasitize citrus, Tylenchulus semipenetrans is the most important on a worldwide basis. Management of the citrus nematode remains problematic as no one tactic gives adequate control of the nematode. An overall management strategy must include such components as site selection, use of non-infected nursery stock, use of at lease one post-plant nematode control tactic, and careful management of other elements of the environment that may stress the trees. Nematicides continue to play a key role in management of this pest. Optimum results require careful attention to application techniques. PMID:19262822

  12. Management of the Citrus Nematode, Tylenchulus semipenetrans

    PubMed Central

    Verdejo-Lucas, S.; McKenry, M. V.

    2004-01-01

    Of the many nematode species that parasitize citrus, Tylenchulus semipenetrans is the most important on a worldwide basis. Management of the citrus nematode remains problematic as no one tactic gives adequate control of the nematode. An overall management strategy must include such components as site selection, use of non-infected nursery stock, use of at lease one post-plant nematode control tactic, and careful management of other elements of the environment that may stress the trees. Nematicides continue to play a key role in management of this pest. Optimum results require careful attention to application techniques. PMID:19262822

  13. Filaria taxideae in striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) of Colorado, USA, and commonly associated filarial dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Fox, Karen A; Martin, Laura E R; Baeten, Laurie A; Webb, Brett T; LeVan, Ivy K; Ballweber, Lora R; Wolfe, Lisa L

    2013-07-01

    During 2007-09, we necropsied striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) from Colorado, USA. Eight of 51 (16%) had severe infections with the subcutaneous filarid nematode Filaria taxideae, and four of the infected skunks (50%) had dermatitis that was histologically associated with parasite ova in the skin. PMID:23778634

  14. Functional analysis of a highly conserved abundant larval transcript-2 (alt-2) intron 2 repeat region of lymphatic filarial parasites.

    PubMed

    Sakthidevi, Moorthy; Hoti, Sugeerappa Laxmanappa; Kaliraj, Perumal

    2014-06-01

    The filarial-specific protein abundant larval transcript-2 (ALT-2) is expressed exclusively in the infective larval stage (L3) and is a crucial protein for establishing immunopathogenesis in human hosts. The alt-2 gene has a conserved minisatellite repeat (29 or 27bp) in intron 2 (IR2) whose significance within lymphatic filarial species is unknown. Here, we report the role of IR2 in the regulation of alt-2 gene expression using an in vitro model. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we identified the presence of a putative nuclear protein binding region within IR2. Subsequent transient expression experiments in eukaryotic cell lines demonstrated that the IR2 downregulated the expression of a downstream luciferase reporter gene, which was further validated with RT-PCR. We therefore identify IR2 as a suppressor element that regulates L3 stage-specific expression of alt-2. PMID:24681262

  15. Maternal filarial infection: association of anti-sheath antibody responses with plasma levels of IFN-γ and IL-10.

    PubMed

    Achary, K G; Mandal, N N; Mishra, S; Sarangi, S S; Kar, S K; Satapathy, A K; Bal, M S

    2013-04-01

    Maternal filarial infection influences the risk of acquiring infection and development of immunity in children. Here we have analysed the blood samples of 60 mothers (24 infected and 36 uninfected) and their corresponding cord bloods to assess the impact of maternal infection on the anti-sheath antibodies and cytokine production in neonates born from them. About 69·4% of non-infected mothers and their cord bloods showed the presence of anti-sheath antibodies, while only 16·6% of the cord bloods from infected mothers were positive for it. The IL-10 level was significantly high in cord bloods of infected mothers compared with non-infected mothers. At the same time the IL-10 level was also observed to be remarkably high in cord bloods of both infected and non-infected mothers negative for anti-sheath antibody. In contrast, IFN-γ levels were significantly high in cord bloods of non-infected mothers compared with infected mothers and the increment was prominent in cord bloods of both infected and non-infected mothers positive for anti-sheath antibody. The study reveals that the presence or absence of anti-sheath antibodies in association with cytokines skews the filarial specific immunity to either Th1 or Th2 responses in neonates. This may affect the natural history of filarial infection in early childhood. PMID:23343479

  16. Cofactor-Independent Phosphoglycerate Mutase from Nematodes Has Limited Druggability, as Revealed by Two High-Throughput Screens

    PubMed Central

    Crowther, Gregory J.; Booker, Michael L.; He, Min; Li, Ting; Raverdy, Sylvine; Novelli, Jacopo F.; He, Panqing; Dale, Natalie R. G.; Fife, Amy M.; Barker, Robert H.; Kramer, Martin L.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Carlow, Clotilde K. S.; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Cofactor-independent phosphoglycerate mutase (iPGAM) is essential for the growth of C. elegans but is absent from humans, suggesting its potential as a drug target in parasitic nematodes such as Brugia malayi, a cause of lymphatic filariasis (LF). iPGAM's active site is small and hydrophilic, implying that it may not be druggable, but another binding site might permit allosteric inhibition. As a comprehensive assessment of iPGAM's druggability, high-throughput screening (HTS) was conducted at two different locations: ∼220,000 compounds were tested against the C. elegans iPGAM by Genzyme Corporation, and ∼160,000 compounds were screened against the B. malayi iPGAM at the National Center for Drug Screening in Shanghai. iPGAM's catalytic activity was coupled to downstream glycolytic enzymes, resulting in NADH consumption, as monitored by a decline in visible-light absorbance at 340 nm. This assay performed well in both screens (Z′-factor >0.50) and identified two novel inhibitors that may be useful as chemical probes. However, these compounds have very modest potency against the B. malayi iPGAM (IC50 >10 µM) and represent isolated singleton hits rather than members of a common scaffold. Thus, despite the other appealing properties of the nematode iPGAMs, their low druggability makes them challenging to pursue as drug targets. This study illustrates a “druggability paradox” of target-based drug discovery: proteins are generally unsuitable for resource-intensive HTS unless they are considered druggable, yet druggability is often difficult to predict in the absence of HTS data. PMID:24416464

  17. Interspecific nematode signals regulate dispersal behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dispersal is an important nematode behavior. Upon crowding or food depletion, the free living bacteriovorus nematode Caenorhabditis elegans produces stress resistant dispersal larvae, called dauer, which are analogous to second stage juveniles (J2) of plant parasitic Meloidogyne spp. and infective ...

  18. Parasitic Nematodes - From Genomes to Control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The diseases caused by parasitic nematodes in domestic and companion animals are major factors that decrease production and quality of the agricultural products. Methods available for the control of the parasitic nematode infections are mainly based on chemical treatment, non-chemical management pra...

  19. Managing nematode pests in Midsouth soybeans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean producers must contend with nematode pests, several species of which may inhabit a single field. Significant yield losses caused by soybean cyst (Heterodera glycines), southern root-knot (Meloidogyne incognita), reniform (Rotylenchulus reniformis) and other nematodes were estimated at 2.6% (...

  20. Mechanisms of host seeking by parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Gang, Spencer S; Hallem, Elissa A

    2016-07-01

    The phylum Nematoda comprises a diverse group of roundworms that includes parasites of vertebrates, invertebrates, and plants. Human-parasitic nematodes infect more than one billion people worldwide and cause some of the most common neglected tropical diseases, particularly in low-resource countries [1]. Parasitic nematodes of livestock and crops result in billions of dollars in losses each year [1]. Many nematode infections are treatable with low-cost anthelmintic drugs, but repeated infections are common in endemic areas and drug resistance is a growing concern with increasing therapeutic and agricultural administration [1]. Many parasitic nematodes have an environmental infective larval stage that engages in host seeking, a process whereby the infective larvae use sensory cues to search for hosts. Host seeking is a complex behavior that involves multiple sensory modalities, including olfaction, gustation, thermosensation, and humidity sensation. As the initial step of the parasite-host interaction, host seeking could be a powerful target for preventative intervention. However, host-seeking behavior remains poorly understood. Here we review what is currently known about the host-seeking behaviors of different parasitic nematodes, including insect-parasitic nematodes, mammalian-parasitic nematodes, and plant-parasitic nematodes. We also discuss the neural bases of these behaviors. PMID:27211240

  1. Plant basal resistance to nematodes: an update.

    PubMed

    Holbein, Julia; Grundler, Florian M W; Siddique, Shahid

    2016-03-01

    Most plant-parasitic nematodes are obligate biotrophs feeding on the roots of their hosts. Whereas ectoparasites remain on the root surface and feed on the outer cell layers, endoparasitic nematodes enter the host to parasitize cells around or within the central cylinder. Nematode invasion and feeding causes tissue damage which may, in turn, lead to the activation of host basal defence responses. Hitherto, research interests in plant-nematode interaction have emphasized effector-triggered immunity rather than basal plant defence responses. However, some recent investigations suggest that basal defence pathways are not only activated but also play an important role in determining interaction outcomes. In this review we discuss the major findings and point out future directions to dissect the molecular mechanisms underlying plant basal defence to nematodes further. PMID:26842982

  2. How do humans affect wildlife nematodes?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weinstein, Sara B.; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2015-01-01

    Human actions can affect wildlife and their nematode parasites. Species introductions and human-facilitated range expansions can create new host–parasite interactions. Novel hosts can introduce parasites and have the potential to both amplify and dilute nematode transmission. Furthermore, humans can alter existing nematode dynamics by changing host densities and the abiotic conditions that affect larval parasite survival. Human impacts on wildlife might impair parasites by reducing the abundance of their hosts; however, domestic animal production and complex life cycles can maintain transmission even when wildlife becomes rare. Although wildlife nematodes have many possible responses to human actions, understanding host and parasite natural history, and the mechanisms behind the changing disease dynamics might improve disease control in the few cases where nematode parasitism impacts wildlife.

  3. How do humans affect wildlife nematodes?

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Sara B; Lafferty, Kevin D

    2015-05-01

    Human actions can affect wildlife and their nematode parasites. Species introductions and human-facilitated range expansions can create new host-parasite interactions. Novel hosts can introduce parasites and have the potential to both amplify and dilute nematode transmission. Furthermore, humans can alter existing nematode dynamics by changing host densities and the abiotic conditions that affect larval parasite survival. Human impacts on wildlife might impair parasites by reducing the abundance of their hosts; however, domestic animal production and complex life cycles can maintain transmission even when wildlife becomes rare. Although wildlife nematodes have many possible responses to human actions, understanding host and parasite natural history, and the mechanisms behind the changing disease dynamics might improve disease control in the few cases where nematode parasitism impacts wildlife. PMID:25680855

  4. Cryopreservation of the Pinewood Nematode, Bursaphelenchus spp.

    PubMed

    Riga, E; Webster, J M

    1991-10-01

    Populations of three isolates of Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, the pinewood nematode, and one of B. mucronatus were treated with three cryoprotectants at -70 C for 24 hours followed by deep freezing at -180 C in liquid nitrogen for different periods of time. A solution of 15% glycerol, 35% buffer S, and 50% M9, or 1% aqueous solution of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), or a mixture of 60% M9 and 40% S buffer were used as cryoprotectants. A significantly larger number of juveniles than adults survived deep freezing. Significantly more nematodes were motile after cryopreservation in the 15% glycerol-S-M9 soludon than in the M9-S buffer solution or the DMSO aqueous solution. When cryopreserved nematodes that had been treated with glycerol solution were plated onto Botrytis cinerea, they reproduced rapidly over several generations. Cryopreserved nematodes were as pathogenic as untreated nematodes to Scots pines. PMID:19283151

  5. Detection of Brugia malayi in laboratory and wild-caught Mansonioides mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) using Hha I PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Hoti, S L; Vasuki, V; Lizotte, M W; Patra, K P; Ravi, G; Vanamail, P; Manonmani, A; Sabesan, S; Krishnamoorthy, K; Williams, S A

    2001-04-01

    An Hha 1 based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay developed for the detection of Brugia malayi, the causative agent of Brugian lymphatic filariasis, was evaluated for its sensitivity in the laboratory and for its usefulness in measuring changes in transmission of the disease in the field. Laboratory studies showed that the new assay was highly sensitive in comparison with the standard dissection and microscopy technique. The assay can detect as little as 4 pg of parasite DNA or a single microfilaria in pools of up to 100 mosquitoes. The optimum pool size for convenience was found to be 50 mosquitoes per pool. The efficacy of PCR assay was evaluated in filariasis control programmes in operation in endemic areas of Kerala State, South India. The infection rates obtained by the Hha I PCR assay and the conventional dissection and microscopy technique were 1.2% and 1.7% respectively in operational areas and 8.3% and 4.4% respectively, in check areas, which were not significantly different (P < 0.05). Thus, the Hha I PCR assay was found to be as sensitive as the conventional technique and hence it can be used as a new epidemiological tool for assessing parasite infection in field-collected mosquitoes. PMID:11260722

  6. Filarial infection modulates the immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis through expansion of CD4+ IL-4 memory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Soumya; Clark, Carolyn E.; Lugli, Enrico; Roederer, Mario; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Exaggerated CD4+T helper 2-specific cytokine producing memory T cell responses developing concomitantly with a T helper1 response might have a detrimental role in immunity to infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). To assess the dynamics of antigen (Ag)-specific memory T cell compartments in the context of filarial infection we used multiparameter flow cytometry on PBMCs from 25 microfilaremic filarial -infected (Inf) and 14 filarial-uninfected (Uninf) subjects following stimulation with filarial (BmA) or with the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb)-specific Ag CFP10. Our data demonstrated that the Inf group not only had a marked increase in BmA-specific CD4+IL-4+ cells (Median net frequency compared to baseline (Fo)=0.09% vs. 0.01%, p=0.038) but also to CFP10 (Fo =0.16% vs. 0.007%, p=0.04) and Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B (SEB) (Fo =0.49% vs. 0.26%, p=0.04). The Inf subjects showed a BmA-specific expansion of CD4+CD45RO+IL-4+ producing central memory (TCM, CD45RO+CCR7+CD27+) (Fo =1.1% vs. 0.5%, p=0.04) as well as effector memory (TEM CD45RO+CCR7-CD27-) (Fo =1.5% vs. 0.2%, p=0.03) with a similar but non-significant response to CFP10. In addition, there was expansion of CD4+ IL-4+ CD45RA+ CCR7+CD27+ (naïve-like) in Inf individuals compared to Uninf subjects. Among Inf subjects with definitive latent tuberculosis , there were no differences in frequencies of IL-4 producing cells within any of the memory compartments compared to the Uninf group. Our data suggest that filarial infection induces antigen-specific, exaggerated IL-4 responses in distinct T cell memory compartments to Mtb-specific antigens, which are attenuated in subjects who are able to mount a delayed type hypersensitivity reaction to Mtb. PMID:25667413

  7. Filarial infection modulates the immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis through expansion of CD4+ IL-4 memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Soumya; Clark, Carolyn E; Lugli, Enrico; Roederer, Mario; Nutman, Thomas B

    2015-03-15

    Exaggerated CD4(+) T helper 2-specific cytokine producing memory T cell responses developing concomitantly with a T helper 1 response might have a detrimental role in immunity to infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. To assess the dynamics of Ag-specific memory T cell compartments in the context of filarial infection, we used multiparameter flow cytometry on PBMCs from 25 microfilaremic filarial-infected (Inf) and 14 filarial-uninfected (Uninf) subjects following stimulation with filarial Ag (BmA) or with the M. tuberculosis-specific Ag culture filtrate protein-10 (CFP-10). Our data demonstrated that the Inf group had a marked increase in BmA-specific CD4(+)IL-4(+) cells (median net frequency compared with baseline [Fo] = 0.09% versus 0.01%; p = 0.038) but also to CFP-10 (Fo = 0.16% versus 0.007%; p = 0.04) and staphylococcal enterotoxin B (Fo = 0.49% versus 0.26%; p = 0.04). The Inf subjects showed a BmA-specific expansion of CD4(+)CD45RO(+)IL-4(+) producing central memory (TCM, CD45RO(+)CCR7(+)CD27(+); Fo = 1.1% versus 0.5%; p = 0.04) as well as effector memory (TEM, CD45RO(+)CCR7(-)CD27(-); Fo = 1.5% versus 0.2%; p = 0.03) with a similar but nonsignificant response to CFP-10. In addition, there was expansion of CD4(+)IL-4(+)CD45RA(+)CCR7(+)CD27(+) (naive-like) in Inf individuals compared with Uninf subjects. Among Inf subjects with definitive latent tuberculosis, there were no differences in frequencies of IL-4-producing cells within any of the memory compartments compared with the Uninf group. Our data suggest that filarial infection induces Ag-specific, exaggerated IL-4 responses in distinct T cell memory compartments to M. tuberculosis-specific Ags, which are attenuated in subjects who are able to mount a delayed type hypersensitivity reaction to M. tuberculosis. PMID:25667413

  8. Human Type 1 and 17 Responses in Latent Tuberculosis Are Modulated by Coincident Filarial Infection through Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Antigen–4 and Programmed Death–1

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Subash; Bhat, Sajid Q.; Kumar, N. Pavan; Jayantasri, S.; Rukmani, S.; Kumaran, Paul; Gopi, P. G.; Kolappan, C.; Kumaraswami, V.; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis and filarial coinfection is highly prevalent, and the presence of a tissue-invasive helminth may modulate the predominant type 1 T helper (Th1; interferon [IFN]–γ–mediated) response needed to control M. tuberculosis infection. By analyzing the cellular responses to mycobacterial antigens in patients who had latent tuberculosis with or without filarial infection, we were able to demonstrate that filarial infection coincident with M. tuberculosis infection significantly diminishes M. tuberculosis–specific Th1 (interleukin [IL]–12 and IFN-γ) and type 17 T helper (Th17; IL-23 and IL-17) responses related to increased expression of cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen (CTLA)–4 and programmed death (PD)–1. Blockade of CTLA-4 restored production of both IFN-γ and IL-17, whereas PD-1 blockade restored IFN-γ production only. Thus, coincident filarial infection exerted a profound inhibitory effect on protective mycobacteria-specific Th1 and Th17 responses in latent tuberculosis, suggesting a mechanism by which concomitant filarial (and other systemic helminth) infections predispose to the development of active tuberculosis in humans. PMID:19505258

  9. Laser capture microdissection of nematode feeding cells.

    PubMed

    Ithal, Nagabhushana; Mitchum, Melissa G

    2011-01-01

    Obligate plant-parasitic nematodes, such as cyst nematodes (Heterodera and Globodera spp.) and root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.), form specialized feeding cells in host plant roots. These feeding cells provide the sole source of nutrition for the growth and reproduction of the nematode to complete its life cycle. Feeding cell formation involves complex physiological and morphological changes to normal root cells and is accompanied by dramatic changes in plant gene expression. The distinct features of feeding cells suggest that their formation entails a unique gene expression profile, a better understanding of which will assist in building models to explain signaling pathways that modulate transcriptional changes in response to nematodes. Ultimately, this knowledge can be used to design strategies to develop resistance against nematodes in crop plants. Feeding cells comprise a small fraction of the total root cell population, and identification of plant gene expression changes specific to these cells is difficult. Until recently, the specific isolation of nematode feeding cells could be accomplished only by manual dissection or microaspiration. These approaches are limited in that only mature feeding cells can be isolated. These limitations in tissue accessibility for macromolecule isolation at different stages of feeding cell development can be overcome through the use of laser microdissection (LM), a technique that enables the specific isolation of feeding cells from early to late stages for RNA isolation, amplification, and downstream analysis. PMID:21359812

  10. Nematode endogenous small RNA pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hoogstrate, Suzanne W; Volkers, Rita JM; Sterken, Mark G; Kammenga, Jan E; Snoek, L Basten

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of small RNA silencing pathways has greatly extended our knowledge of gene regulation. Small RNAs have been presumed to play a role in every field of biology because they affect many biological processes via regulation of gene expression and chromatin remodeling. Most well-known examples of affected processes are development, fertility, and maintenance of genome stability. Here we review the role of the three main endogenous small RNA silencing pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans: microRNAs, endogenous small interfering RNAs, and PIWI-interacting RNAs. After providing an entry-level overview on how these pathways function, we discuss research on other nematode species providing insight into the evolution of these small RNA pathways. In understanding the differences between the endogenous small RNA pathways and their evolution, a more comprehensive picture is formed of the functions and effects of small RNAs. PMID:25340013

  11. Immunodiagnostic Properties of Wucheraria bancrofti SXP-1, a Potential Filarial Diagnostic Candidate Expressed in Tobacco Plant, Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Ganapathy, Mathangi; Chakravarthi, M; Charles, S Jason; Harunipriya, P; Jaiganesh, S; Subramonian, N; Kaliraj, P

    2015-08-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants were developed expressing WbSXP-1, a diagnostic antigen isolated from the cDNA library of L3 stage larvae of Wucheraria bancrofti. This antigen produced by recombinant Escherichia coli has been demonstrated by to be successful as potential diagnostic candidate against lymphatic filariasis. A rapid format simple and qualitative flow through immune-filtration diagnostic kit has been developed for the identification of IgG antibodies to the recombinant WbSXP-1 and is being marketed by M/S Span Diagnostics Ltd in India and Africa. Here, we present the results of experiments on the transformation and expression of the same filarial antigen, WbSXP-1, in tobacco plant, Nicotiana tabacum, to produce plant-based diagnostic antigen. It was possible to successfully transform the tobacco plant with WbSXP-1, the integration of the parasite-specific gene in plants was confirmed by PCR amplification and the expression of the filarial protein by Western blotting. The immunoreactivity of the plant-produced WbSXP-1 was assessed based on its reaction with the monoclonal antibodies developed against the E. coli-produced protein. Immunological screening using clinical sera from patients indicates that the plant-produced protein is comparable to E. coli-produced diagnostic antigen. The result demonstrated that plants can be used as suitable expression systems for the production of diagnostic proteins against lymphatic filariasis, a neglected tropical infectious disease which has a negative impact on socioeconomic development. This is the first report of the integration, expression and efficacy of a diagnostic candidate of lymphatic filariasis in plants.Key MessageTransgenic tobacco plants with WbSXP-1, a filarial diagnostic candidate, were developed. The plant-produced protein showed immunoreactivity on par with the E. coli product. PMID:26043851

  12. How cellular slime molds evade nematodes.

    PubMed Central

    Kessin, R H; Gundersen, G G; Zaydfudim, V; Grimson, M

    1996-01-01

    We have found a predator-prey association between the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum and the free soil living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. C. elegans feeds on the amoebae and multiplies indefinitely when amoebae are the sole food source. In an environment created from soil, D. discoideum grows and develops, but not in the presence of C. elegans. During development, C. elegans feeds on amoebae until they aggregate and synthesize an extracellular matrix called the slime sheath. After the sheath forms, the aggregate and slug are protected. Adult nematodes ingest Dictyostelium spores, which pass through the gut of the worm without loss of structure and remain viable. Nematodes kill the amoebae but disperse the spores. The sheath that is constructed when the social amoebae aggregate and the spore coats of the individual cells may protect against this predator. Individual amoebae may also protect themselves by secreting compounds that repel nematodes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8643493

  13. Conserving and enhancing biological control of nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conservation biological control is the modification of the environment or existing practices to protect and enhance antagonistic organisms to reduce damage from plant-parasitic nematodes. This approach to biological control has received insufficient attention compared to inundative applications of ...

  14. Differential Evolutionary Selection and Natural Evolvability Observed in ALT Proteins of Human Filarial Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Devoe, Neil C.; Corbett, Ian J.; Barker, Linsey; Chang, Robert; Gudis, Polyxeni; Mullen, Nathan; Perez, Kailey; Raposo, Hugo; Scholz, John; May, Meghan

    2016-01-01

    The abundant larval transcript (ALT-2) protein is present in all members of the Filarioidea, and has been reported as a potential candidate antigen for a subunit vaccine against lymphatic filariasis. To assess the potential for vaccine escape or heterologous protection, we examined the evolutionary selection acting on ALT-2. The ratios of nonsynonymous (K(a)) to synonymous (K(s)) mutation frequencies (ω) were calculated for the alt-2 genes of the lymphatic filariasis agents Brugia malayi and Wuchereria bancrofti and the agents of river blindness and African eyeworm disease Onchocerca volvulus and Loa loa. Two distinct Bayesian models of sequence evolution showed that ALT-2 of W. bancrofti and L. loa were under significant (P<0.05; P < 0.001) diversifying selection, while ALT-2 of B. malayi and O. volvulus were under neutral to stabilizing selection. Diversifying selection as measured by ω values was notably strongest on the region of ALT-2 encoding the signal peptide of L. loa and was elevated in the variable acidic domain of L. loa and W. bancrofti. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the ALT-2 consensus sequences formed three clades: the first consisting of B. malayi, the second consisting of W. bancrofti, and the third containing both O. volvulus and L. loa. ALT-2 selection was therefore not predictable by phylogeny or pathology, as the two species parasitizing the eye were selected differently, as were the two species parasitizing the lymphatic system. The most immunogenic regions of L. loa and W. bancrofti ALT-2 sequence as modeled by antigenicity prediction analysis did not correspond with elevated levels of diversifying selection, and were not selected differently than predicted antigenic epitopes in B. malayi and O. volvulus. Measurements of ALT-2 evolvability made by χ2 analysis between alleles that were stable (O. volvulus and B. malayi) and those that were under diversifying selection (W. bancrofti and L. loa) indicated significant (P<0

  15. Differential Evolutionary Selection and Natural Evolvability Observed in ALT Proteins of Human Filarial Parasites.

    PubMed

    Devoe, Neil C; Corbett, Ian J; Barker, Linsey; Chang, Robert; Gudis, Polyxeni; Mullen, Nathan; Perez, Kailey; Raposo, Hugo; Scholz, John; May, Meghan

    2016-01-01

    The abundant larval transcript (ALT-2) protein is present in all members of the Filarioidea, and has been reported as a potential candidate antigen for a subunit vaccine against lymphatic filariasis. To assess the potential for vaccine escape or heterologous protection, we examined the evolutionary selection acting on ALT-2. The ratios of nonsynonymous (K(a)) to synonymous (K(s)) mutation frequencies (ω) were calculated for the alt-2 genes of the lymphatic filariasis agents Brugia malayi and Wuchereria bancrofti and the agents of river blindness and African eyeworm disease Onchocerca volvulus and Loa loa. Two distinct Bayesian models of sequence evolution showed that ALT-2 of W. bancrofti and L. loa were under significant (P<0.05; P < 0.001) diversifying selection, while ALT-2 of B. malayi and O. volvulus were under neutral to stabilizing selection. Diversifying selection as measured by ω values was notably strongest on the region of ALT-2 encoding the signal peptide of L. loa and was elevated in the variable acidic domain of L. loa and W. bancrofti. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the ALT-2 consensus sequences formed three clades: the first consisting of B. malayi, the second consisting of W. bancrofti, and the third containing both O. volvulus and L. loa. ALT-2 selection was therefore not predictable by phylogeny or pathology, as the two species parasitizing the eye were selected differently, as were the two species parasitizing the lymphatic system. The most immunogenic regions of L. loa and W. bancrofti ALT-2 sequence as modeled by antigenicity prediction analysis did not correspond with elevated levels of diversifying selection, and were not selected differently than predicted antigenic epitopes in B. malayi and O. volvulus. Measurements of ALT-2 evolvability made by χ2 analysis between alleles that were stable (O. volvulus and B. malayi) and those that were under diversifying selection (W. bancrofti and L. loa) indicated significant (P<0

  16. A Cell-Based Screen Reveals that the Albendazole Metabolite, Albendazole Sulfone, Targets Wolbachia

    PubMed Central

    Bray, Walter M.; White, Pamela M.; Ruybal, Jordan; Lokey, R. Scott; Debec, Alain; Sullivan, William

    2012-01-01

    Wolbachia endosymbionts carried by filarial nematodes give rise to the neglected diseases African river blindness and lymphatic filariasis afflicting millions worldwide. Here we identify new Wolbachia-disrupting compounds by conducting high-throughput cell-based chemical screens using a Wolbachia-infected, fluorescently labeled Drosophila cell line. This screen yielded several Wolbachia-disrupting compounds including three that resembled Albendazole, a widely used anthelmintic drug that targets nematode microtubules. Follow-up studies demonstrate that a common Albendazole metabolite, Albendazole sulfone, reduces intracellular Wolbachia titer both in Drosophila melanogaster and Brugia malayi, the nematode responsible for lymphatic filariasis. Significantly, Albendazole sulfone does not disrupt Drosophila microtubule organization, suggesting that this compound reduces titer through direct targeting of Wolbachia. Accordingly, both DNA staining and FtsZ immunofluorescence demonstrates that Albendazole sulfone treatment induces Wolbachia elongation, a phenotype indicative of binary fission defects. This suggests that the efficacy of Albendazole in treating filarial nematode-based diseases is attributable to dual targeting of nematode microtubules and their Wolbachia endosymbionts. PMID:23028321

  17. Conserving and Enhancing Biological Control of Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Timper, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Conservation biological control is the modification of the environment or existing practices to protect and enhance antagonistic organisms to reduce damage from pests. This approach to biological control has received insufficient attention compared with inundative applications of microbial antagonists to control nematodes. This review provides examples of how production practices can enhance or diminish biological control of plant-parasitic nematodes and other soilborne pests. Antagonists of nematodes can be enhanced by providing supplementary food sources such as occurs when organic amendments are applied to soil. However, some organic amendments (e.g., manures and plants containing allelopathic compounds) can also be detrimental to nematode antagonists. Plant species and genotype can strongly influence the outcome of biological control. For instance, the susceptibility of the plant to the nematode can determine the effectiveness of control; good hosts will require greater levels of suppression than poor hosts. Plant genotype can also influence the degree of rhizosphere colonization and antibiotic production by antagonists, as well the expression of induced resistance by plants. Production practices such as crop rotation, fallow periods, tillage, and pesticide applications can directly disrupt populations of antagonistic organisms. These practices can also indirectly affect antagonists by reducing their primary nematode host. One of the challenges of conservation biological control is that practices intended to protect or enhance suppression of nematodes may not be effective in all field sites because they are dependent on indigenous antagonists. Ultimately, indicators will need to be identified, such as the presence of particular antagonists, which can guide decisions on where it is practical to use conservation biological control. Antagonists can also be applied to field sites in conjunction with conservation practices to improve the consistency, efficacy, and

  18. Silver nanoparticles: a possibility for malarial and filarial vector control technology.

    PubMed

    Soni, Namita; Prakash, Soam

    2014-11-01

    Green synthesis technology is one of the rapid, reliable and best routes for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). There are bioactive compounds with enormous potential in Azadirachta indica (Neem). The extraordinary mosquitoes warrant nanotechnology to integrate with novel molecules. This will be sustainable technology for future. Here, we synthesized AgNPs using aqueous extracts of leaves and bark of Az. indica (Neem). We tested AgNPs as larvicides, pupicides and adulticides against the malaria vector Anopheles stephensi and filariasis vector Culex quinquefasciatus. The results were obtained using UV-visible spectrophotometer and the images were recorded with a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The efficacy tests were then performed at different concentrations varying many hours by probit analysis. The synthesized AgNPs were spherical in shape and with varied sizes (10.47-nm leaf and 19.22-nm bark). The larvae, pupae and adults of filariasis vector C. quinquefasciatus were found to be more susceptible to our AgNPs than the malaria vector An. stephensi. The first and the second instar larvae of C. quinquefasciatus show a mortality rate of 100% after 30 min of exposure. The results against the pupa of C. quinquefasciatus were recorded as LC₅₀ 4 ppm, LC₉₀ 11 ppm and LC₉₉ 13 ppm after 3 h of exposure. In the case of adult mosquitoes, LC₅₀ 1.06 μL/cm(2), LC₉₀ 2.13 μL/cm(2) and LC₉₉ 2.4 μL/cm(2) were obtained after 4 h of exposure. These results suggest that our AgNPs are environment-friendly for controlling malarial and filarial vectors. PMID:25132567

  19. Point-of-care quantification of blood-borne filarial parasites with a mobile phone microscope.

    PubMed

    D'Ambrosio, Michael V; Bakalar, Matthew; Bennuru, Sasisekhar; Reber, Clay; Skandarajah, Arunan; Nilsson, Lina; Switz, Neil; Kamgno, Joseph; Pion, Sébastien; Boussinesq, Michel; Nutman, Thomas B; Fletcher, Daniel A

    2015-05-01

    Parasitic helminths cause debilitating diseases that affect millions of people in primarily low-resource settings. Efforts to eliminate onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis in Central Africa through mass drug administration have been suspended because of ivermectin-associated serious adverse events, including death, in patients infected with the filarial parasite Loa loa. To safely administer ivermectin for onchocerciasis or lymphatic filariasis in regions co-endemic with L. loa, a strategy termed "test and (not) treat" has been proposed whereby those with high levels of L. loa microfilariae (>30,000/ml) that put them at risk for life-threatening serious adverse events are identified and excluded from mass drug administration. To enable this, we developed a mobile phone-based video microscope that automatically quantifies L. loa microfilariae in whole blood loaded directly into a small glass capillary from a fingerprick without the need for conventional sample preparation or staining. This point-of-care device automatically captures and analyzes videos of microfilarial motion in whole blood using motorized sample scanning and onboard motion detection, minimizing input from health care workers and providing a quantification of microfilariae per milliliter of whole blood in under 2 min. To validate performance and usability of the mobile phone microscope, we tested 33 potentially Loa-infected patients in Cameroon and confirmed that automated counts correlated with manual thick smear counts (94% specificity; 100% sensitivity). Use of this technology to exclude patients from ivermectin-based treatment at the point of care in Loa-endemic regions would allow resumption/expansion of mass drug administration programs for onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis in Central Africa. PMID:25947164

  20. Biocontrol: Fungi as Nematode Control Agents

    PubMed Central

    Mankau, R.

    1980-01-01

    The fungal antagonists of nematodes consist of a great variety of organisms belonging to widely divergent orders and families of fungi. They include the nematode-trapping fungi, endoparasitic fungi, parasites of nematode eggs and cysts, and fungi which produce metabolites toxic to nematodes. The diversity, adaptations, and distribution of nematode-destroying fungi and taxonomic problems encountered in their study are reviewed. The importance of nemato-phagous fungi in soil biology, with special emphasis on their relationship to populations of plant-parasitic nematodes, is considered. While predacious fungi have long been investigated as possible biocontrol agents and have often exhibited spectacular results in vitro, their performance in field studies has generated little enthusiasm among nematologists. To date no species has demonstrated control of any plant pest to a degree achieved with nematicides, but recent studies have provided a much clearer concept of possibilities and problems in the applied use of fungal antagonists. The discovery of new species, which appear to control certain pests effectively under specific conditions, holds out some promise that fungi may be utilized as alternatives to chemical control after a more thorough and expanded study of their biology and ecology. PMID:19300699

  1. Molecular mechanisms of nematode-nematophagous microbe interactions: basis for biological control of plant-parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Zou, Chenggang; Xu, Jianping; Ji, Xinglai; Niu, Xuemei; Yang, Jinkui; Huang, Xiaowei; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2015-01-01

    Plant-parasitic nematodes cause significant damage to a broad range of vegetables and agricultural crops throughout the world. As the natural enemies of nematodes, nematophagous microorganisms offer a promising approach to control the nematode pests. Some of these microorganisms produce traps to capture and kill the worms from the outside. Others act as internal parasites to produce toxins and virulence factors to kill the nematodes from within. Understanding the molecular basis of microbe-nematode interactions provides crucial insights for developing effective biological control agents against plant-parasitic nematodes. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the interactions between nematodes and nematophagous microorganisms, with a focus on the molecular mechanisms by which nematophagous microorganisms infect nematodes and on the nematode defense against pathogenic attacks. We conclude by discussing several key areas for future research and development, including potential approaches to apply our recent understandings to develop effective biocontrol strategies. PMID:25938277

  2. Filarial antigenemia and Loa loa night blood microfilaremia in an area without bancroftian filariasis in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

    PubMed

    Bakajika, Didier K; Nigo, Maurice M; Lotsima, Jean Pierre; Masikini, Germain A; Fischer, Kerstin; Lloyd, Melanie M; Weil, Gary J; Fischer, Peter U

    2014-12-01

    Implementation of mass drug administration for lymphatic filariasis (LF) has been delayed in central Africa because of incomplete mapping and coendemic loiasis. We mapped two regions in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo that were suspected to have LF. Night blood samples were collected from 2,724 subjects in 30 villages. Filarial antigenemia rates by card test exceeded 1% in 28 villages (range = 0-14%). Prevalence rates for large sheathed microfilariae (Mf) ranged from 4% to 40%; Mansonella perstans rates ranged from 22% to 98%. Large Mf were exclusively Loa loa by microscopy, and only 1 of 337 samples tested by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was positive for Wuchereria bancrofti DNA. Filarial antigen positivity was strongly associated with high L. loa Mf counts. Periodicity studies revealed atypical patterns, with no significant diurnal periodicity in some individuals. Thus, methods routinely used for LF mapping may not be reliable in areas in central Africa that are highly endemic for loiasis. PMID:25223938

  3. Purification and characterization of glutathione reductase (E.C. 1.8.1.7) from bovine filarial worms Setaria cervi.

    PubMed

    Arora, Kavita; Ahmad, Rumana; Srivastava, Arvind K

    2013-04-01

    Antioxidant enzymes are the parasite's premier resource to defend themselves against reactive oxygen species generated by macrophages, neutrophils and eosinophils of the host. These enzymes may be particularly important for parasites involved in chronic infections, such as parasitic helminths. Glutathione (GSH) and glutathione reductase (GR) are parts of the GSH redox cycle, which protects cells against damage by oxidants. Both GSH and GR are present in significant amounts in Setaria cervi female worms. GR has a central role in glutathione metabolism and as such is a potential target for chemotherapy. The aim of the work was to purify and characterize GR from S. cervi and to compare the properties of the helminth enzyme with its mammalian counterpart. GR was purified from filarial parasites S. cervi and preliminary steady state kinetics was performed. The purified protein was observed to be a dimer of 55 kDa subunit as evident from SDS-PAGE analysis. Kinetic studies revealed significant differences in the properties of S. cervi GR from its mammalian counterpart which may be exploited in chemotherapy of filariasis. Filarial GR is thus proposed as a potential drug target. PMID:24431548

  4. Attraction of pinewood nematode to endoparasitic nematophagous fungus Esteya vermicola.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun Yan; Wang, Zhen; Fang, Zhe Ming; Zhang, Dong Liang; Gu, Li Juan; Liu, Lei; Sung, Chang Keun

    2010-05-01

    The investigations on attraction of nematodes to nematophagous fungi have mostly dealt with the nematode-trapping species. Esteya vermicola is the endoparasitic fungus of pinewood nematode (PWN) with high infection activity. In the present study, the attraction of PWNs to E. vermicola was investigated. It was confirmed that the living mycelia and exudative substances of E. vermicola were attractive to PWN. Compared with the nematode-trapping fungus A. brochopaga as well as nematode-feeding fungus B. cinerea, E. vermicola showed the significantly strongest attraction ability to nematode. It therefore appeared that the attraction ability reflects the dependence of the fungi on nematodes for nutrients. Furthermore, a new method was developed and used in the study to confirm the effect of volatile substances for the attraction of nematode to fungi. The results suggested that the attractive substances were consisted of avolatile exudative and volatile diffusing compounds. PMID:20012046

  5. Modelling environmental factors correlated with podoconiosis: a geospatial study of non-filarial elephantiasis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The precise trigger of podoconiosis — endemic non-filarial elephantiasis of the lower legs — is unknown. Epidemiological and ecological studies have linked the disease with barefoot exposure to red clay soils of volcanic origin. Histopathology investigations have demonstrated that silicon, aluminium, magnesium and iron are present in the lower limb lymph node macrophages of both patients and non-patients living barefoot on these clays. We studied the spatial variation (variations across an area) in podoconiosis prevalence and the associated environmental factors with a goal to better understanding the pathogenesis of podoconiosis. Methods Fieldwork was conducted from June 2011 to February 2013 in 12 kebeles (administrative units) in northern Ethiopia. Geo-located prevalence data and soil samples were collected and analysed along with secondary geological, topographic, meteorological and elevation data. Soil data were analysed for chemical composition, mineralogy and particle size, and were interpolated to provide spatially continuous information. Exploratory, spatial, univariate and multivariate regression analyses of podoconiosis prevalence were conducted in relation to primary (soil) and secondary (elevation, precipitation, and geology) covariates. Results Podoconiosis distribution showed spatial correlation with variation in elevation and precipitation. Exploratory analysis identified that phyllosilicate minerals, particularly clay (smectite and kaolinite) and mica groups, quartz (crystalline silica), iron oxide, and zirconium were associated with podoconiosis prevalence. The final multivariate model showed that the quantities of smectite (RR = 2.76, 95% CI: 1.35, 5.73; p = 0.007), quartz (RR = 1.16, 95% CI: 1.06, 1.26; p = 0.001) and mica (RR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.05, 1.13; p < 0.001) in the soil had positive associations with podoconiosis prevalence. Conclusions More quantities of smectite, mica and quartz within the soil

  6. Durotaxis in Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Parida, Lipika; Padmanabhan, Venkat

    2016-08-01

    Durotaxis is a process where cells are able to sense the stiffness of substrates and preferentially migrate toward stiffer regions. Here, we show that the 1-mm-long nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans are also able to detect the rigidity of underlying substrates and always migrate to regions of higher stiffness. Our results indicate that C. elegans are able to judiciously make a decision to stay on stiffer regions. We found that the, undulation frequency, and wavelength of worms, crawling on surfaces show nonmonotonic behavior with increasing stiffness. A number of control experiments were also conducted to verify whether C. elegans are really able to detect the rigidity of substrates or whether the migration to stiffer regions is due to other factors already reported in the literature. As it is known that bacteria and other single-celled organisms exhibit durotaxis toward stiffer surfaces, we conjecture that durotaxis in C. elegans may be one of the strategies developed to improve their chances of locating food. PMID:27508449

  7. [Trichostrongyloidea nematodes, parasites of Microchiroptera].

    PubMed

    Durette-Desset, M C; Chabaud, A G

    1975-01-01

    1. a) List of Nematodes collected by Professor Aellen in european Microchiroptera. Additionnal morphological data to the study of Molinostrongylus alatus, M. panousei, M. skrjabini. Description of M. aelleni n. sp. b) Description of M. richardae n. sp., M. benexae n. sp. et M. bauchoti n. sp., parasites of malagasian Molossidae. c) Description of M. colleyi n. sp. and M. owyangi n. sp., parasites of Malaysian Vespertilioninae, and of Allintoschius dunni n. sp., discovered in Myotis mystacinus from Malaysia and Pipistrellus nanus from Africa. 2. Taking into account the characteristics of the synlophe, the 17 species of the genus Molinostrongylus may be divided into five groups, each one being reasonably well characteristic of the genus of their Chiropteran host. 3. The composition of the Trichostrongyloidea fauna of Chiroptera and its relationship with Trichostrongyloidea from other Mammals (Tupaiidae, Pholidotes, Primates, Sciuridés) are analysed. Six groups are separated and divided into two well defined lines: 1) genus Strongylacantha, and 2) 12 genera stemming more or less directly from the Molineinae, 4. The three conical outgrowths at the tip of the female tail which differenciate presently the Anoplostrogylinae from the Molineinae appear to be an unreliable characteristic. The two subfamilies form a complex group which will be better understood if the evolution of the synlophe and that of the caudal bursa of the males are taken into account. PMID:1211768

  8. Biocontrol: The Potential of Entomophilic Nematodes in Insect Management

    PubMed Central

    Webster, John M.

    1980-01-01

    A review of the development of entomophilic nematology and a commentary on the potential of entomophilic nematodes in controlling insect pests. The paper considers some of the major contributions to our knowledge of entomophilic nematology; factors involved in insect pest management and how they are applicable to the use of nematodes; nematodes which are most promising as biological control agents; and problems to be solved to facilitate the use of entomophilic nematodes in insect management. PMID:19300702

  9. Characterization of the Ca2+-Gated and Voltage-Dependent K+-Channel Slo-1 of Nematodes and Its Interaction with Emodepside

    PubMed Central

    Kulke, Daniel; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Miltsch, Sandra M.; Wolstenholme, Adrian J.; Jex, Aaron R.; Gasser, Robin B.; Ballesteros, Cristina; Geary, Timothy G.; Keiser, Jennifer; Townson, Simon; Harder, Achim; Krücken, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    The cyclooctadepsipeptide emodepside and its parent compound PF1022A are broad-spectrum nematicidal drugs which are able to eliminate nematodes resistant to other anthelmintics. The mode of action of cyclooctadepsipeptides is only partially understood, but involves the latrophilin Lat-1 receptor and the voltage- and calcium-activated potassium channel Slo-1. Genetic evidence suggests that emodepside exerts its anthelmintic activity predominantly through Slo-1. Indeed, slo-1 deficient Caenorhabditis elegans strains are completely emodepside resistant. However, direct effects of emodepside on Slo-1 have not been reported and these channels have only been characterized for C. elegans and related Strongylida. Molecular and bioinformatic analyses identified full-length Slo-1 cDNAs of Ascaris suum, Parascaris equorum, Toxocara canis, Dirofilaria immitis, Brugia malayi, Onchocerca gutturosa and Strongyloides ratti. Two paralogs were identified in the trichocephalids Trichuris muris, Trichuris suis and Trichinella spiralis. Several splice variants encoding truncated channels were identified in Trichuris spp. Slo-1 channels of trichocephalids form a monophyletic group, showing that duplication occurred after the divergence of Enoplea and Chromadorea. To explore the function of a representative protein, C. elegans Slo-1a was expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and studied in electrophysiological (voltage-clamp) experiments. Incubation of oocytes with 1-10 µM emodepside caused significantly increased currents over a wide range of step potentials in the absence of experimentally increased intracellular Ca2+, suggesting that emodepside directly opens C. elegans Slo-1a. Emodepside wash-out did not reverse the effect and the Slo-1 inhibitor verruculogen was only effective when applied before, but not after, emodepside. The identification of several splice variants and paralogs in some parasitic nematodes suggests that there are substantial differences in channel properties among

  10. Characterization of the Ca2+-gated and voltage-dependent K+-channel Slo-1 of nematodes and its interaction with emodepside.

    PubMed

    Kulke, Daniel; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Miltsch, Sandra M; Wolstenholme, Adrian J; Jex, Aaron R; Gasser, Robin B; Ballesteros, Cristina; Geary, Timothy G; Keiser, Jennifer; Townson, Simon; Harder, Achim; Krücken, Jürgen

    2014-12-01

    The cyclooctadepsipeptide emodepside and its parent compound PF1022A are broad-spectrum nematicidal drugs which are able to eliminate nematodes resistant to other anthelmintics. The mode of action of cyclooctadepsipeptides is only partially understood, but involves the latrophilin Lat-1 receptor and the voltage- and calcium-activated potassium channel Slo-1. Genetic evidence suggests that emodepside exerts its anthelmintic activity predominantly through Slo-1. Indeed, slo-1 deficient Caenorhabditis elegans strains are completely emodepside resistant. However, direct effects of emodepside on Slo-1 have not been reported and these channels have only been characterized for C. elegans and related Strongylida. Molecular and bioinformatic analyses identified full-length Slo-1 cDNAs of Ascaris suum, Parascaris equorum, Toxocara canis, Dirofilaria immitis, Brugia malayi, Onchocerca gutturosa and Strongyloides ratti. Two paralogs were identified in the trichocephalids Trichuris muris, Trichuris suis and Trichinella spiralis. Several splice variants encoding truncated channels were identified in Trichuris spp. Slo-1 channels of trichocephalids form a monophyletic group, showing that duplication occurred after the divergence of Enoplea and Chromadorea. To explore the function of a representative protein, C. elegans Slo-1a was expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and studied in electrophysiological (voltage-clamp) experiments. Incubation of oocytes with 1-10 µM emodepside caused significantly increased currents over a wide range of step potentials in the absence of experimentally increased intracellular Ca2+, suggesting that emodepside directly opens C. elegans Slo-1a. Emodepside wash-out did not reverse the effect and the Slo-1 inhibitor verruculogen was only effective when applied before, but not after, emodepside. The identification of several splice variants and paralogs in some parasitic nematodes suggests that there are substantial differences in channel properties among

  11. Nematode model systems in evolution and development.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Ralf J; Bumbarger, Daniel J

    2012-01-01

    The free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is one of the most important model organisms in all areas of modern biology. Using the knowledge about C. elegans as a baseline, nematodes are now intensively studied in evolution and development. Evolutionary developmental biology or for short, 'evo-devo' has been developed as a new research discipline during the last two decades to investigate how changes in developmental processes and mechanisms result in the modification of morphological structures and phenotypic novelty. In this article, we review the concepts that make nematode evo-devo a successful approach to evolutionary biology. We introduce selected model systems for nematode evo-devo and provide a detailed discussion of four selected case studies. The most striking finding of nematode evo-devo is the magnitude of developmental variation in the context of a conserved body plan. Detailed investigation of early embryogenesis, gonad formation, vulva development, and sex determination revealed that molecular mechanisms evolve rapidly, often in the context of a conserved body plan. These studies highlight the importance of developmental systems drift and neutrality in evolution. PMID:23801489

  12. Nematodes Associated with Blackberry in Arkansas

    PubMed Central

    Wehunt, E. J.; Golden, A. M.; Clark, J. R.; Kirkpatrick, T. L.; Baker, E. C.; Brown, M. A.

    1991-01-01

    A survey of the nematodes in blackberry (Rubus sp.) rhizospheres was conducted in Arkansas from 1986 to 1989. The state was divided arbitrarily into four quadrants. A total of 134 soil samples was collected, and 150-cm 3 subsamples were assayed for nematodes. Twenty-one species of plant-parasitic nematodes in 11 genera were extracted from the samples. There were differences (P = 0.05) among quadrants of the state in percentage occurrence of the nematodes and in population densities in samples. Xiphinema americanum, Helicotylenchus spp. (H. paraplatyurus, H. platyurus, and H. pseudorobustus), and Pratylenchus spp. (P. vulnus and P. zeae) were found in all quadrants. Xiphinema americanum population density was near 1,000 per 150 cm³ soil in soil samples from two locations. Other nematodes found in one or more quadrants were Criconemella spp. (C. axeste, C. curvata, C. denoudeni, C. ornata, C. sphaerocephala, and C. xenoplax), Paratrichodorus minor, Tylenchorhynchus claytoni, Hirschmanniella oryzae, Hoplolaimus magnistylus, Scutellonema bradys, and undescribed species of Criconema, Tylenchulus, Xiphinema, and Meloidogyne. Criconemella sphaerocephala and Helicotylenchus platyurus are reported from Arkansas for the first time. Helicotylenchus paraplatyurus is reported from the United States for the first time. PMID:19283173

  13. NEMBASE: a resource for parasitic nematode ESTs.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, John; Whitton, Claire; Schmid, Ralf; Thomson, Marian; Blaxter, Mark

    2004-01-01

    NEMBASE (available at http://www.nematodes.org) is a publicly available online database providing access to the sequence and associated meta-data currently being generated as part of the Edinburgh-Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute parasitic nematode EST project. NEMBASE currently holds approximately 100 000 sequences from 10 different species of nematode. To facilitate ease of use, sequences have been processed to generate a non-redundant set of gene objects ('partial genome') for each species. Users may query the database on the basis of BLAST annotation, sequence similarity or expression profiles. NEMBASE also features an interactive Java-based tool (SimiTri) which allows the simultaneous display and analysis of the relative similarity relationships of groups of sequences to three different databases. NEMBASE is currently being expanded to include sequence data from other nematode species. Other developments include access to accurate peptide predictions, improved functional annotation and incorporation of automated processes allowing rapid analysis of nematode-specific gene families. PMID:14681449

  14. Characterization of biocontrol traits in the entomopathogenic nematode Heterorhabditis georgiana (Kesah strain), and phylogenetic analysis of the nematode's symbiotic bacteria.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our objective was to estimate the biocontrol potential of the recently discovered entomopathogenic nematode species, Heterorhabditis georgiana (Kesha strain). Virulence and environmental tolerance were tested among several nematode species. Heterorhabditis georgiana expressed low or intermediate c...

  15. Towards a genome sequence for reniform nematode (Rotylenchulus reniformis)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reniform nematode (Rotylenchulus reniformis) currently accounts for $130M in annual losses to the U.S. cotton industry and has supplanted root-knot nematode as the major nematode pest of cotton in Mississippi, Louisiana, and Alabama. Moreover, in other cotton-producing states the range and influenc...

  16. METABOLISM OF AN INSECT NEUROPEPTIDE BY THE NEMATODE C. ELEGANS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We are interested in neuropeptides in nematodes as leads to new control agents for parasitic nematodes. This includes physiological aspects of neuropeptide action and metabolic regulation of these peptides. The free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, with its mapped genome, offers unique opport...

  17. Strawberry Cultivars Vary in their Resistance to Northern Lesion Nematode

    PubMed Central

    Dale, Adam; Potter, John W.

    1998-01-01

    The genetic diversity of commercial cultivars of strawberry Fragaria x ananassa from various parentages, as expressed by their resistance to the northem lesion nematode Pratylenchus penetrans, was evaluated in nematode-infested field plots for two growing seasons. Data taken for each plant in each season included soil nematode Pi and Pf, end-of-season nematode numbers in each entire root system, and end-of-season fresh and dry top weight and whole root system weight. Resistance was estimated using an index of the nematode load on the plant: Nematode load = {n(root) + (200 × n[soil])}/{root dry weight} where n (root) = number of nematodes in the root, n [soil] = number of nematodes in 50 g of nonfumigated soil, and 200 is a multiplier to convert the soil nematode count to a 10-kg basis. Nineteen strawberry cultivars varied in their resistance to the northern lesion nematode, from a mean load of 382 nematodes/plant for Pajaro to 1,818 nematodes/plant for Veestar. This variability could be related to the original family groupings, with the most resistant cultivars related to Lassen and the least resistant to Sparkle x Valentine. PMID:19274249

  18. How to identify nematode problems and why it is important

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant-parasitic nematodes are microscopic worms that feed on plants. Several nematode species are serious pathogens of cotton, reducing overall US cotton production by an estimated 4.7%. Though losses in nematode infested fields are frequently 10 to 30%, losses can be greater than 50%. Cotton pla...

  19. Nematode community structure of forest woodlots. I. Relationships based on similarity coefficients of nematode species.

    PubMed

    Johnson, S R; Ferris, V R; Ferris, J M

    1972-07-01

    Associations among nematode communities were studied in 18 Indiana mixed-hardwood stands of varying composition, soils, physiography, and past management practices. All sites were sampled in April, July, and October of 1968 and 1969. A total of 175 species representing eight orders were found, with 18 species occurring in all 18 sites, and approximately half the total species occurring in more than 50% of the sites. Taxonomic similarity, based on nematode species composition, was determined for the woodlots by means of a resemblance equation. Woodlots containing similar nematode species also showed similarities in dominant tree species and in soil types. Sites that had undergone major disturbances were the most dissimilar. PMID:19319263

  20. Nematode taxonomy: from morphology to metabarcoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M.; Sapp, M.; Prior, T.; Karssen, G.; Back, M.

    2015-11-01

    Nematodes represent a species rich and morphologically diverse group of metazoans inhabiting both aquatic and terrestrial environments. Their role as biological indicators and as key players in nutrient cycling has been well documented. Some groups of nematodes are also known to cause significant losses to crop production. In spite of this, knowledge of their diversity is still limited due to the difficulty in achieving species identification using morphological characters. Molecular methodology has provided very useful means of circumventing the numerous limitations associated with classical morphology based identification. We discuss herein the history and the progress made within the field of nematode systematics, the limitations of classical taxonomy and how the advent of high throughput sequencing is facilitating advanced ecological and molecular studies.

  1. Towards sustainable nematode parasite control of livestock.

    PubMed

    Waller, P J

    1993-06-01

    Farmers worldwide have come to expect, and rely almost exclusively on, broad-spectrum anthelmintics to effectively control nematode parasites amongst their livestock. However, the threats of resistance, residues and ecotoxicity are of increasing concern to the future of chemotherapy. It is imperative that sustainable parasite control schemes be developed and implemented which will integrate a range of techniques to minimise anthelmintic use and still maintain high levels of profitability of the farming enterprise. At present, these need to focus on the better use of existing drugs to maximise their effectiveness and minimise the selection for resistance and impact on the environment. New drugs should also be used according to these principles. In the future it is expected that other non-chemotherapeutic options will become available, e.g. helminth vaccines, resistant hosts, biological control, nematode growth regulators, which will revolutionize the current thinking on nematode parasite control of livestock. PMID:8346643

  2. Remote Sensing of Parasitic Nematodes in Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, Gary W.; King, Roger; Kelley, Amber T.; Vickery, John

    2007-01-01

    A method and apparatus for remote sensing of parasitic nematodes in plants, now undergoing development, is based on measurement of visible and infrared spectral reflectances of fields where the plants are growing. Initial development efforts have been concentrated on detecting reniform nematodes (Rotylenchulus reniformis) in cotton plants, because of the economic importance of cotton crops. The apparatus includes a hand-held spectroradiometer. The readings taken by the radiometer are processed to extract spectral reflectances at sixteen wavelengths between 451 and 949 nm that, taken together, have been found to be indicative of the presence of Rotylenchulus reniformis. The intensities of the spectral reflectances are used to estimate the population density of the nematodes in an area from which readings were taken.

  3. Delayed response to ring nematode (Mesocriconema xenoplax) feeding on grape roots linked to vine carbohydrate reserves and nematode feeding pressure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The chronic impact of ring nematode (Mesocriconema xenoplax) feeding on grapevine (Vitis vinifera) was studied under controlled conditions. 'Pinot noir' grapevines were exposed to ring nematode or kept nematode-free for three growing seasons, and vines were either grown in full sunlight, 15% of full...

  4. Hsp-90 and the biology of nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Him, Nik AIIN; Gillan, Victoria; Emes, Richard D; Maitland, Kirsty; Devaney, Eileen

    2009-01-01

    Background Hsp-90 from the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is unique in that it fails to bind to the specific Hsp-90 inhibitor, geldanamycin (GA). Here we surveyed 24 different free-living or parasitic nematodes with the aim of determining whether C. elegans Hsp-90 was the exception or the norm amongst the nematodes. We combined these data with codon evolution models in an attempt to identify whether hsp-90 from GA-binding and non-binding species has evolved under different evolutionary constraints. Results We show that GA-binding is associated with life history: free-living nematodes and those parasitic species with free-living larval stages failed to bind GA. In contrast, obligate parasites and those worms in which the free-living stage in the environment is enclosed within a resistant egg, possess a GA-binding Hsp-90. We analysed Hsp-90 sequences from fifteen nematode species to determine whether nematode hsp-90s have undergone adaptive evolution that influences GA-binding. Our data provide evidence of rapid diversifying selection in the evolution of the hsp-90 gene along three separate lineages, and identified a number of residues showing significant evidence of adaptive evolution. However, we were unable to prove that the selection observed is correlated with the ability to bind geldanamycin or not. Conclusion Hsp-90 is a multi-functional protein and the rapid evolution of the hsp-90 gene presumably correlates with other key cellular functions. Factors other than primary amino acid sequence may influence the ability of Hsp-90 to bind to geldanamycin. PMID:19849843

  5. Low positive predictive value of anti-Brugia malayi IgG and IgG4 serology for the diagnosis of Wuchereria bancrofti.

    PubMed

    Chanteau, S; Glaziou, P; Moulia-Pelat, J P; Plichart, C; Luquiaud, P; Cartel, J L

    1994-01-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for anti-Brugia malayi immunoglobulin (Ig) G and IgG4 were evaluated on sera from 1561 subjects in French Polynesia for the serodiagnosis of Wuchereria bancrofti filariasis, compared with the test for Onchocerca gibsoni circulating antigen (Og4C3) as a 'gold standard'. The sensitivity of the ELISA-IgG and ELISA-IgG4 assays was 90.8% and 94.5%, and the specificity was 45.9% and 50.7%. The positive predictive values were 41% and 45% respectively for an antigen prevalence rate of 30%. Thus antibody prevalences exceeded by two-fold the antigen prevalence, which itself exceeded by two-fold the prevalence of microfilaraemia. PMID:7886763

  6. Genomics of reproduction in nematodes: prospects for parasite intervention?

    PubMed

    Nisbet, Alasdair J; Cottee, Pauline A; Gasser, Robin B

    2008-02-01

    Understanding reproductive processes in parasitic nematodes has the potential to lead to the informed design of new anthelmintics and control strategies. Little is known, however, about the molecular mechanisms underlying sex determination, gametogenesis and reproductive physiology for most parasitic nematodes. Together with comparative analyses of data for the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, molecular investigations are beginning to provide insights into the processes involved in reproduction and development in parasitic nematodes. Here, we review recent developments, focusing on technological aspects and on molecules associated with sex-specific differences in adult nematodes. PMID:18182326

  7. The evolution of spliced leader trans-splicing in nematodes.

    PubMed

    Pettitt, Jonathan; Harrison, Neale; Stansfield, Ian; Connolly, Bernadette; Müller, Berndt

    2010-08-01

    Spliced leader trans-splicing occurs in many primitive eukaryotes including nematodes. Most of our knowledge of trans-splicing in nematodes stems from the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans and relatives, and from work with Ascaris. Our investigation of spliced leader trans-splicing in distantly related Dorylaimia nematodes indicates that spliced-leader trans-splicing arose before the nematode phylum and suggests that the spliced leader RNA gene complements in extant nematodes have evolved from a common ancestor with a diverse set of spliced leader RNA genes. PMID:20659016

  8. A Trojan horse mechanism of bacterial pathogenesis against nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Qiuhong; Huang, Xiaowei; Zhang, Lin; Xu, Jianping; Yang, Dongmei; Wei, Kangbi; Niu, Xuemei; An, Zhiqiang; Bennett, Joan Wennstrom; Zou, Chenggang; Yang, Jinkui; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of host–pathogen interaction can provide crucial information for successfully manipulating their relationships. Because of its genetic background and practical advantages over vertebrate model systems, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans model has become an attractive host for studying microbial pathogenesis. Here we report a “Trojan horse” mechanism of bacterial pathogenesis against nematodes. We show that the bacterium Bacillus nematocida B16 lures nematodes by emitting potent volatile organic compounds that are much more attractive to worms than those from ordinary dietary bacteria. Seventeen B. nematocida-attractant volatile organic compounds are identified, and seven are individually confirmed to lure nematodes. Once the bacteria enter the intestine of nematodes, they secrete two proteases with broad substrate ranges but preferentially target essential intestinal proteins, leading to nematode death. This Trojan horse pattern of bacterium–nematode interaction enriches our understanding of microbial pathogenesis. PMID:20733068

  9. Molecular phylogeny of beetle associated diplogastrid nematodes suggests host switching rather than nematode-beetle coevolution

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Nematodes are putatively the most species-rich animal phylum. They have various life styles and occur in a variety of habitats, ranging from free-living nematodes in aquatic or terrestrial environments to parasites of animals and plants. The rhabditid nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is one of the most important model organisms in modern biology. Pristionchus pacificus of the family of the Diplogastridae has been developed as a satellite model for comparison to C. elegans. The Diplogastridae, a monophyletic clade within the rhabditid nematodes, are frequently associated with beetles. How this beetle-association evolved and whether beetle-nematode coevolution occurred is still elusive. As a prerequisite to answering this question a robust phylogeny of beetle-associated Diplogastridae is needed. Results Sequences for the nuclear small subunit ribosomal RNA and for 12 ribosomal protein encoding nucleotide sequences were collected for 14 diplogastrid taxa yielding a dataset of 5996 bp of concatenated aligned sequences. A molecular phylogeny of beetle-associated diplogastrid nematodes was established by various algorithms. Robust subclades could be demonstrated embedded in a phylogenetic tree topology with short internal branches, indicating rapid ancestral divergences. Comparison of the diplogastrid phylogeny to a comprehensive beetle phylogeny revealed no major congruence and thus no evidence for a long-term coevolution. Conclusion Reconstruction of the phylogenetic history of beetle-associated Diplogastridae yields four distinct subclades, whose deep phylogenetic divergence, as indicated by short internal branch lengths, shows evidence for evolution by successions of ancient rapid radiation events. The stem species of the Diplogastridae existed at the same time period when the major radiations of the beetles occurred. Comparison of nematode and beetle phylogenies provides, however, no evidence for long-term coevolution of diplogastrid nematodes and their

  10. An unidentified filarial species and its impact on fitness in wild populations of the black-footed ferret (Mustela nigripes).

    PubMed

    Wisely, Samantha M; Howard, JoGayle; Williams, Steven A; Bain, Odile; Santymire, Rachel M; Bardsley, Katherine D; Williams, Elizabeth S

    2008-01-01

    Disease can threaten the restoration of endangered species directly by substantially decreasing host survival or indirectly via incremental decreases in survival and reproduction. During a biomedical survey of reintroduced populations of the highly endangered black-footed ferret from 2002 to 2005, microfilariae discovered in the blood were putatively identified as Dirofilaria immitis, and widespread screening was initiated using a commercially available antigen-based ELISA test. A subset of animals (n = 16) was screened for D. immitis using a highly sensitive PCR-based assay. Microfilariae were also molecularly and morphologically characterized. Of 198 animals at six reintroduction sites, 12% had positive results using the ELISA test. No antigen-positive animals which were screened via PCR (n = 11) had positive PCR results, and all antigen-positive animals (n = 24) were asymptomatic. No significant differences were found in body mass of antigen-positive (male: 1223 +/- 82 g [mean +/- SD], female: 726 +/- 75 g) vs. antigen-negative (male: 1,198 +/- 119 g, female: 710 +/- 53 g) individuals (P = 0.4). Antigen prevalence was lower in juveniles (3%) than adults (12%; P = 0.03), and higher in in situ, captive-reared individuals (33%) than wild-born individuals (10%; P = 0.005). Morphologic analysis of microfilariae revealed they were neither D. immitis nor any other previously characterized North American species. PCR amplification of the 5S spacer region of rDNA revealed that the filarial sequence shared only 76% identity with D. immitis. This previously unidentified filarial sequence was present in all antigen positive animals (11 of 11 tested). It appears that black-footed ferrets were infected with a previously undescribed species of filaria whose antigen cross-reacted with the ELISA assay, although further analysis is needed to make a conclusive statement. Nonetheless, this previously undescribed filaria does not appear to threaten recovery for this highly

  11. Induction of TRAIL- and TNF-α-dependent Apoptosis in Human Monocyte-derived Dendritic Cells by Microfilariae of Brugia Malayi1

    PubMed Central

    Semnani, Roshanak Tolouei; Venugopal, Priyanka Goel; Mahapatra, Lily; Skinner, Jason; Meylan, Francoise; Chien, Daniel; Dorward, David; Chaussabel, Damien; Siegel, Richard M.; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2013-01-01

    Dysregulation of professional APC has been postulated as a major mechanism underlying Ag-specific T cell hyporesponsiveness in patients with patent filarial infection. To address the nature of this dysregulation, dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages (MΦ) generated from elutriated monocytes were exposed to live microfilariae (mf), the parasite stage that circulates in blood and is responsible for most immune dysregulation in filarial infections. DC exposed to mf for 24–96 h showed a marked increase in cell death and caspase-positive cells compared with unexposed DC, while mf exposure did not induce apoptosis in MΦ. Interestingly, 48 h exposure of DC to mf induced mRNA expression of the pro-apoptotic gene TRAIL and both mRNA and protein expression of TNF-α. mAb to TRAIL-R2, TNF-R1, or TNF-α partially reversed mf-induced cell death in DC, as did knocking down the receptor for TRAIL-R2 using small interfering RNA. Mf also induced gene expression of BH3-interacting domain death agonist (Bid) and protein expression of cytochrome c in DC; mf-induced cleavage of Bid could be shown to induce release of cytochrome c, leading to activation of caspase 9. Our data suggest that mf induce DC apoptosis in a TRAIL- and TNF-α-dependent fashion. PMID:18981128

  12. The genomes of root-knot nematodes.

    PubMed

    Bird, David McK; Williamson, Valerie M; Abad, Pierre; McCarter, James; Danchin, Etienne G J; Castagnone-Sereno, Philippe; Opperman, Charles H

    2009-01-01

    Plant-parasitic nematodes are the most destructive group of plant pathogens worldwide and are extremely challenging to control. The recent completion of two root-knot nematode genomes opens the way for a comparative genomics approach to elucidate the success of these parasites. Sequencing revealed that Meloidogyne hapla, a diploid that reproduces by facultative, meiotic parthenogenesis, encodes approximately 14,200 genes in a compact, 54 Mpb genome. Indeed, this is the smallest metazoan genome completed to date. By contrast, the 86 Mbp Meloidogyne incognita genome encodes approximately 19,200 genes. This species reproduces by obligate mitotic parthenogenesis and exhibits a complex pattern of aneuploidy. The genome includes triplicated regions and contains allelic pairs with exceptionally high degrees of sequence divergence, presumably reflecting adaptations to the strictly asexual reproductive mode. Both root-knot nematode genomes have compacted gene families compared with the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and both encode large suites of enzymes that uniquely target the host plant. Acquisition of these genes, apparently via horizontal gene transfer, and their subsequent expansion and diversification point to the evolutionary history of these parasites. It also suggests new routes to their control. PMID:19400640

  13. Nematodes: Model Organisms in High School Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bliss, TJ; Anderson, Margery; Dillman, Adler; Yourick, Debra; Jett, Marti; Adams, Byron J.; Russell, RevaBeth

    2007-01-01

    In a collaborative effort between university researchers and high school science teachers, an inquiry-based laboratory module was designed using two species of insecticidal nematodes to help students apply scientific inquiry and elements of thoughtful experimental design. The learning experience and model are described in this article. (Contains 4…

  14. Entomopathogenic nematode production and application technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Production and application technology is critical for the success of entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) in biological control. Production approaches include in vivo, and in vitro methods (solid or liquid fermentation). For laboratory use and small scale field experiments, in vivo production of EPNs...

  15. Meloidogyne incognita nematode resistance QTL in carrot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) are major pests attacking carrots (Daucus carota) worldwide, causing galling and forking of the storage roots, rendering them unacceptable for market. Genetic resistance could significantly reduce the need for broad-spectrum soil fumigants in carrot production....

  16. The Future of Nematode Management in Cotton

    PubMed Central

    Starr, J. L.; Koenning, S. R.; Kirkpatrick, T. L.; Robinson, A. F.; Roberts, P. A.; Nichols, R. L.

    2007-01-01

    The importance of plant-parasitic nematodes as yield-limiting pathogens of cotton has received increased recognition and attention in the United States in the recent past. This paper summarizes the remarks made during a symposium of the same title that was held in July 2007 at the joint meeting of the Society of Nematologists and the American Phytopathological Society in San Diego, California. Although several cultural practices, including crop rotation, can be effective in suppressing the populations of the important nematode pathogens of cotton, the economic realities of cotton production limit their use. The use of nematicides is also limited by issues of efficacy and economics. There is a need for development of chemistries that will address these limitations. Also needed are systems that would enable precise nematicide application in terms of rate and placement only in areas where nematode population densities warrant application. Substantial progress is being made in the identification, characterization and mapping of loci for resistance to Meloidogyne incognita and Rotylenchulus reniformis. These data will lead to efficient marker-assisted selection systems that will likely result in development and release of nematode-resistant cotton cultivars with superior yield potential and high fiber quality. PMID:19259500

  17. Natural product synthesis: Making nematodes nervous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Scott A.

    2011-06-01

    A highly inventive route for the synthesis of a key substance that stimulates potato cyst nematodes to hatch has been developed. This discovery has potential to impact food supplies, as treatment of crops with this compound could alleviate the devastating effect of these parasites.

  18. Proteomic analysis of soybean cyst nematode

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines, SCN) is the most destructive pathogen of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) worldwide causing an estimated $2 billion in losses annually. Proteomic technologies are powerful tools to examine protein expression profiles as well as modification of proteins. W...

  19. Diverse CLE peptides from cyst nematode species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant CLAVATA3/ESR (CLE)-like peptides play diverse roles in plant growth and development including maintenance of the stem cell population in the root meristem. Small secreted peptides sharing similarity to plant CLE signaling peptides have been isolated from several cyst nematode species including...

  20. Key to nematodes reported in waterfowl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDonald, Malcolm E.

    1974-01-01

    This key, covering 171 species and subspecies of nematodes in 49 genera, is based on the the listings in the author's "Catalogue of Helminths of Waterfowl" (McDonald, 1969b), but includes 19 additional forms from his continuing survey of new literature.

  1. Histamine 1 Receptor Blockade Enhances Eosinophil-Mediated Clearance of Adult Filarial Worms

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Ellen Mueller; Morris, Christopher P.; Hübner, Marc P.; Mitre, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Filariae are tissue-invasive nematodes that cause diseases such as elephantiasis and river blindness. The goal of this study was to characterize the role of histamine during Litomosoides sigmodontis infection of BALB/c mice, a murine model of filariasis. Time course studies demonstrated that while expression of histidine decarboxylase mRNA increases throughout 12 weeks of infection, serum levels of histamine exhibit two peaks—one 30 minutes after primary infection and one 8 weeks later. Interestingly, mice treated with fexofenadine, a histamine receptor 1 inhibitor, demonstrated significantly reduced worm burden in infected mice compared to untreated infected controls. Although fexofenadine-treated mice had decreased antigen-specific IgE levels as well as lower splenocyte IL-5 and IFNγ production, they exhibited a greater than fourfold rise in eosinophil numbers at the tissue site where adult L. sigmodontis worms reside. Fexofenadine-mediated clearance of L. sigmodontis worms was dependent on host eosinophils, as fexofenadine did not decrease worm burdens in eosinophil-deficient dblGATA mice. These findings suggest that histamine release induced by tissue invasive helminths may aid parasite survival by diminishing eosinophilic responses. Further, these results raise the possibility that combining H1 receptor inhibitors with current anthelmintics may improve treatment efficacy for filariae and other tissue-invasive helminths. PMID:26204515

  2. Overview of nematodes infesting cotton in the U.S., life beyond Temik.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The three primary nematode pathogens of cotton are the cotton root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita), the reniform nematode (Rotylenchulus reniformis), and the Columbia lance nematode (Hoplolaimus columbus). Those three nematodes are estimated to reduce US cotton production by 4.2%, with the co...

  3. Top 10 plant-parasitic nematodes in molecular plant pathology.

    PubMed

    Jones, John T; Haegeman, Annelies; Danchin, Etienne G J; Gaur, Hari S; Helder, Johannes; Jones, Michael G K; Kikuchi, Taisei; Manzanilla-López, Rosa; Palomares-Rius, Juan E; Wesemael, Wim M L; Perry, Roland N

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this review was to undertake a survey of researchers working with plant-parasitic nematodes in order to determine a 'top 10' list of these pathogens based on scientific and economic importance. Any such list will not be definitive as economic importance will vary depending on the region of the world in which a researcher is based. However, care was taken to include researchers from as many parts of the world as possible when carrying out the survey. The top 10 list emerging from the survey is composed of: (1) root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.); (2) cyst nematodes (Heterodera and Globodera spp.); (3) root lesion nematodes (Pratylenchus spp.); (4) the burrowing nematode Radopholus similis; (5) Ditylenchus dipsaci; (6) the pine wilt nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus; (7) the reniform nematode Rotylenchulus reniformis; (8) Xiphinema index (the only virus vector nematode to make the list); (9) Nacobbus aberrans; and (10) Aphelenchoides besseyi. The biology of each nematode (or nematode group) is reviewed briefly. PMID:23809086

  4. Loss of the insulator protein CTCF during nematode evolution

    PubMed Central

    Heger, Peter; Marin, Birger; Schierenberg, Einhard

    2009-01-01

    Background The zinc finger (ZF) protein CTCF (CCCTC-binding factor) is highly conserved in Drosophila and vertebrates where it has been shown to mediate chromatin insulation at a genomewide level. A mode of genetic regulation that involves insulators and insulator binding proteins to establish independent transcriptional units is currently not known in nematodes including Caenorhabditis elegans. We therefore searched in nematodes for orthologs of proteins that are involved in chromatin insulation. Results While orthologs for other insulator proteins were absent in all 35 analysed nematode species, we find orthologs of CTCF in a subset of nematodes. As an example for these we cloned the Trichinella spiralis CTCF-like gene and revealed a genomic structure very similar to the Drosophila counterpart. To investigate the pattern of CTCF occurrence in nematodes, we performed phylogenetic analysis with the ZF protein sets of completely sequenced nematodes. We show that three ZF proteins from three basal nematodes cluster together with known CTCF proteins whereas no zinc finger protein of C. elegans and other derived nematodes does so. Conclusion Our findings show that CTCF and possibly chromatin insulation are present in basal nematodes. We suggest that the insulator protein CTCF has been secondarily lost in derived nematodes like C. elegans. We propose a switch in the regulation of gene expression during nematode evolution, from the common vertebrate and insect type involving distantly acting regulatory elements and chromatin insulation to a so far poorly characterised mode present in more derived nematodes. Here, all or some of these components are missing. Instead operons, polycistronic transcriptional units common in derived nematodes, seemingly adopted their function. PMID:19712444

  5. Nitrogen Addition Regulates Soil Nematode Community Composition through Ammonium Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Cunzheng; Zheng, Huifen; Li, Qi; Lü, Xiaotao; Yu, Qiang; Zhang, Haiyang; Chen, Quansheng; He, Nianpeng; Kardol, Paul; Liang, Wenju; Han, Xingguo

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) enrichment resulting from anthropogenic activities has greatly changed the composition and functioning of soil communities. Nematodes are one of the most abundant and diverse groups of soil organisms, and they occupy key trophic positions in the soil detritus food web. Nematodes have therefore been proposed as useful indicators for shifts in soil ecosystem functioning under N enrichment. Here, we monitored temporal dynamics of the soil nematode community using a multi-level N addition experiment in an Inner Mongolia grassland. Measurements were made three years after the start of the experiment. We used structural equation modeling (SEM) to explore the mechanisms regulating nematode responses to N enrichment. Across the N enrichment gradient, significant reductions in total nematode abundance, diversity (H' and taxonomic richness), maturity index (MI), and the abundance of root herbivores, fungivores and omnivores-predators were found in August. Root herbivores recovered in September, contributing to the temporal variation of total nematode abundance across the N gradient. Bacterivores showed a hump-shaped relationship with N addition rate, both in August and September. Ammonium concentration was negatively correlated with the abundance of total and herbivorous nematodes in August, but not in September. Ammonium suppression explained 61% of the variation in nematode richness and 43% of the variation in nematode trophic group composition. Ammonium toxicity may occur when herbivorous nematodes feed on root fluid, providing a possible explanation for the negative relationship between herbivorous nematodes and ammonium concentration in August. We found a significantly positive relationship between fungivores and fungal phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA), suggesting bottom-up control of fungivores. No such relationship was found between bacterivorous nematodes and bacterial PLFA. Our findings contribute to the understanding of effects of N enrichment in

  6. The bacterial community of entomophilic nematodes and host beetles.

    PubMed

    Koneru, Sneha L; Salinas, Heilly; Flores, Gilberto E; Hong, Ray L

    2016-05-01

    Insects form the most species-rich lineage of Eukaryotes and each is a potential host for organisms from multiple phyla, including fungi, protozoa, mites, bacteria and nematodes. In particular, beetles are known to be associated with distinct bacterial communities and entomophilic nematodes. While entomopathogenic nematodes require symbiotic bacteria to kill and reproduce inside their insect hosts, the microbial ecology that facilitates other types of nematode-insect associations is largely unknown. To illuminate detailed patterns of the tritrophic beetle-nematode-bacteria relationship, we surveyed the nematode infestation profiles of scarab beetles in the greater Los Angeles area over a five-year period and found distinct nematode infestation patterns for certain beetle hosts. Over a single season, we characterized the bacterial communities of beetles and their associated nematodes using high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. We found significant differences in bacterial community composition among the five prevalent beetle host species, independent of geographical origin. Anaerobes Synergistaceae and sulphate-reducing Desulfovibrionaceae were most abundant in Amblonoxia beetles, while Enterobacteriaceae and Lachnospiraceae were common in Cyclocephala beetles. Unlike entomopathogenic nematodes that carry bacterial symbionts, insect-associated nematodes do not alter the beetles' native bacterial communities, nor do their microbiomes differ according to nematode or beetle host species. The conservation of Diplogastrid nematodes associations with Melolonthinae beetles and sulphate-reducing bacteria suggests a possible link between beetle-bacterial communities and their associated nematodes. Our results establish a starting point towards understanding the dynamic interactions between soil macroinvertebrates and their microbiota in a highly accessible urban environment. PMID:26992100

  7. Characterization of Root-Knot Nematode Resistance in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Dhandaydham, Murali; Charles, Lauren; Zhu, Hongyan; Starr, James L.; Huguet, Thierry; Cook, Douglas R.; Prosperi, Jean-Marie; Opperman, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Root knot (Meloidogyne spp.) and cyst (Heterodera and Globodera spp.) nematodes infect all important crop species, and the annual economic loss due to these pathogens exceeds $90 billion. We screened the worldwide accession collection with the root-knot nematodes Meloidogyne incognita, M. arenaria and M. hapla, soybean cyst nematode (SCN-Heterodera glycines), sugar beet cyst nematode (SBCN-Heterodera schachtii) and clover cyst nematode (CLCN-Heterodera trifolii), revealing resistant and susceptible accessions. In the over 100 accessions evaluated, we observed a range of responses to the root-knot nematode species, and a non-host response was observed for SCN and SBCN infection. However, variation was observed with respect to infection by CLCN. While many cultivars including Jemalong A17 were resistant to H. trifolii, cultivar Paraggio was highly susceptible. Identification of M. truncatula as a host for root-knot nematodes and H. trifolii and the differential host response to both RKN and CLCN provide the opportunity to genetically and molecularly characterize genes involved in plant-nematode interaction. Accession DZA045, obtained from an Algerian population, was resistant to all three root-knot nematode species and was used for further studies. The mechanism of resistance in DZA045 appears different from Mi-mediated root-knot nematode resistance in tomato. Temporal analysis of nematode infection showed that there is no difference in nematode penetration between the resistant and susceptible accessions, and no hypersensitive response was observed in the resistant accession even several days after infection. However, less than 5% of the nematode population completed the life cycle as females in the resistant accession. The remainder emigrated from the roots, developed as males, or died inside the roots as undeveloped larvae. Genetic analyses carried out by crossing DZA045 with a susceptible French accession, F83005, suggest that one gene controls resistance in DZA

  8. A cyst nematode effector binds to diverse plant proteins, increases nematode susceptibility and affects root morphology.

    PubMed

    Pogorelko, Gennady; Juvale, Parijat S; Rutter, William B; Hewezi, Tarek; Hussey, Richard; Davis, Eric L; Mitchum, Melissa G; Baum, Thomas J

    2016-08-01

    Cyst nematodes are plant-parasitic roundworms that are of significance in many cropping systems around the world. Cyst nematode infection is facilitated by effector proteins secreted from the nematode into the plant host. The cDNAs of the 25A01-like effector family are novel sequences that were isolated from the oesophageal gland cells of the soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines). To aid functional characterization, we identified an orthologous member of this protein family (Hs25A01) from the closely related sugar beet cyst nematode H. schachtii, which infects Arabidopsis. Constitutive expression of the Hs25A01 CDS in Arabidopsis plants caused a small increase in root length, accompanied by up to a 22% increase in susceptibility to H. schachtii. A plant-expressed RNA interference (RNAi) construct targeting Hs25A01 transcripts in invading nematodes significantly reduced host susceptibility to H. schachtii. These data document that Hs25A01 has physiological functions in planta and a role in cyst nematode parasitism. In vivo and in vitro binding assays confirmed the specific interactions of Hs25A01 with an Arabidopsis F-box-containing protein, a chalcone synthase and the translation initiation factor eIF-2 β subunit (eIF-2bs), making these proteins probable candidates for involvement in the observed changes in plant growth and parasitism. A role of eIF-2bs in the mediation of Hs25A01 virulence function is further supported by the observation that two independent eIF-2bs Arabidopsis knock-out lines were significantly more susceptible to H. schachtii. PMID:26575318

  9. Plant actin cytoskeleton re-modeling by plant parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Engler, Janice de Almeida; Rodiuc, Natalia; Smertenko, Andrei; Abad, Pierre

    2010-03-01

    The cytoskeleton is an important component of the plant's defense mechanism against the attack of pathogenic organisms. Plants however, are defenseless against parasitic root-knot and cyst nematodes and respond to the invasion by the development of a special feeding site that supplies the parasite with nutrients required for the completion of its life cycle. Recent studies of nematode invasion under treatment with cytoskeletal drugs and in mutant plants where normal functions of the cytoskeleton have been affected, demonstrate the importance of the cytoskeleton in the establishment of a feeding site and successful nematode reproduction. It appears that in the case of microfilaments, nematodes hijack the intracellular machinery that regulates actin dynamics and modulate the organization and properties of the actin filament network. Intervening with this process reduces the nematode infection efficiency and inhibits its life cycle. This discovery uncovers a new pathway that can be exploited for the protection of plants against nematodes. PMID:20038822

  10. Rolling Circle Amplification of Complete Nematode Mitochondrial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Sha; Hyman, Bradley C.

    2005-01-01

    To enable investigation of nematode mitochondrial DNA evolution, methodology has been developed to amplify intact nematode mitochondrial genomes in preparative yields using a rolling circle replication strategy. Successful reactions were generated from whole cell template DNA prepared by alkaline lysis of the rhabditid nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and a mermithid nematode, Thaumamermis cosgrovei. These taxa, representing the two major nematode classes Chromodorea and Enoplea, maintain mitochondrial genomes of 13.8 kb and 20.0 kb, respectively. Efficient amplifications were conducted on template DNA isolated from individual or pooled nematodes that were alive or stored at -80°C. Unexpectedly, these experiments revealed that multiple T. cosgrovei mitochondrial DNA haplotypes are maintained in our local population. Rolling circle amplification products can be used as templates for standard PCR reactions with specific primers that target mitochondrial genes or for direct DNA sequencing. PMID:19262866

  11. RNAi and functional genomics in plant parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Rosso, M N; Jones, J T; Abad, P

    2009-01-01

    Plant nematology is currently undergoing a revolution with the availability of the first genome sequences as well as comprehensive expressed sequence tag (EST) libraries from a range of nematode species. Several strategies are being used to exploit this wealth of information. Comparative genomics is being used to explore the acquisition of novel genes associated with parasitic lifestyles. Functional analyses of nematode genes are moving toward larger scale studies including global transcriptome profiling. RNA interference (RNAi) has been shown to reduce expression of a range of plant parasitic nematode genes and is a powerful tool for functional analysis of nematode genes. RNAi-mediated suppression of genes essential for nematode development, survival, or parasitism is revealing new targets for nematode control. Plant nematology in the genomics era is now facing the challenge to develop RNAi screens adequate for high-throughput functional analyses. PMID:19400649

  12. Solution Structure of a Repeated Unit of the ABA-1 Nematode Polyprotein Allergen of Ascaris Reveals a Novel Fold and Two Discrete Lipid-Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Meenan, Nicola A. G.; Ball, Graeme; Bromek, Krystyna; Uhrín, Dušan; Cooper, Alan; Kennedy, Malcolm W.; Smith, Brian O.

    2011-01-01

    Background Nematode polyprotein allergens (NPAs) are an unusual class of lipid-binding proteins found only in nematodes. They are synthesized as large, tandemly repetitive polyproteins that are post-translationally cleaved into multiple copies of small lipid binding proteins with virtually identical fatty acid and retinol (Vitamin A)-binding characteristics. They are probably central to transport and distribution of small hydrophobic compounds between the tissues of nematodes, and may play key roles in nutrient scavenging, immunomodulation, and IgE antibody-based responses in infection. In some species the repeating units are diverse in amino acid sequence, but, in ascarid and filarial nematodes, many of the units are identical or near-identical. ABA-1A is the most common repeating unit of the NPA of Ascaris suum, and is closely similar to that of Ascaris lumbricoides, the large intestinal roundworm of humans. Immune responses to NPAs have been associated with naturally-acquired resistance to infection in humans, and the immune repertoire to them is under strict genetic control. Methodology/Principal Findings The solution structure of ABA-1A was determined by protein nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The protein adopts a novel seven-helical fold comprising a long central helix that participates in two hollow four-helical bundles on either side. Discrete hydrophobic ligand-binding pockets are found in the N-terminal and C-terminal bundles, and the amino acid sidechains affected by ligand (fatty acid) binding were identified. Recombinant ABA-1A contains tightly-bound ligand(s) of bacterial culture origin in one of its binding sites. Conclusions/Significance This is the first mature, post-translationally processed, unit of a naturally-occurring tandemly-repetitive polyprotein to be structurally characterized from any source, and it belongs to a new structural class. NPAs have no counterparts in vertebrates, so represent potential targets for drug or

  13. [Tendencies of nematodes communities to recover after soil cover degradation].

    PubMed

    Gruzdeva, L I; Sushchuk, A A

    2010-01-01

    The way nematodes form communities on a new substrate after complete soil and plant cover degradation is studied on a model of industrial dumping. It is revealed that recovery of soil cover after degradation begins with invasion of mainly the upper soil horizon by nematodes. At the early stages, species that are resistant to unfavorable environmental conditions dominate (bacteriophages), next the abundances of carnivores and nematodes that are connected with plants increase, which indicates the process of biocenosis regeneration. PMID:21275095

  14. Biogenic magnetite in the nematode caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed Central

    Cranfield, Charles G; Dawe, Adam; Karloukovski, Vassil; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E; de Pomerai, David; Dobson, Jon

    2004-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is widely used as a model system in biological research. Recently, examination of the production of heat-shock proteins in this organism in response to mobile phone-type electromagnetic field exposure produced the most robust demonstration to date of a non-thermal, deleterious biological effect. Though these results appear to be a sound demonstration of non-thermal bioeffects, to our knowledge, no mechanism has been proposed to explain them. We show, apparently for the first time, that biogenic magnetite, a ferrimagnetic iron oxide, is present in C. elegans. Its presence may have confounding effects on experiments involving electromagnetic fields as well as implications for the use of this nematode as a model system for iron biomineralization in multi-cellular organisms. PMID:15801597

  15. Mucocutaneous manifestations of helminth infections: Nematodes.

    PubMed

    Lupi, Omar; Downing, Christopher; Lee, Michael; Pino, Livia; Bravo, Francisco; Giglio, Patricia; Sethi, Aisha; Klaus, Sidney; Sangueza, Omar P; Fuller, Claire; Mendoza, Natalia; Ladizinski, Barry; Woc-Colburn, Laila; Tyring, Stephen K

    2015-12-01

    In the 21st century, despite increased globalization through international travel for business, medical volunteerism, pleasure, and immigration/refugees into the United States, there is little published in the dermatology literature regarding the cutaneous manifestations of helminth infections. Approximately 17% of travelers seek medical care because of cutaneous disorders, many related to infectious etiologies. This review will focus on the cutaneous manifestations of helminth infections and is divided into 2 parts: part I focuses on nematode infections, and part II focuses on trematode and cestode infections. This review highlights the clinical manifestations, transmission, diagnosis, and treatment of helminth infections. Nematodes are roundworms that cause diseases with cutaneous manifestations, such as cutaneous larval migrans, onchocerciasis, filariasis, gnathostomiasis, loiasis, dracunculiasis, strongyloidiasis, ascariasis, streptocerciasis, dirofilariasis, and trichinosis. Tremadotes, also known as flukes, cause schistosomiasis, paragonimiasis, and fascioliasis. Cestodes (tapeworms) are flat, hermaphroditic parasites that cause diseases such as sparganosis, cysticercosis, and echinococcus. PMID:26568337

  16. All the microbiology nematodes can teach us

    PubMed Central

    Bulgheresi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Be it their pervasiveness, experimental tractability or their impact on human health and agriculture, nematode–bacterium associations are far-reaching research subjects. Although the omics hype did not spare them and helped reveal mechanisms of communication and exchange between the associated partners, a huge amount of knowledge still awaits to be harvested from their study. Here, I summarize and compare the kind of research that has been already performed on the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and on symbiotic nematodes, both marine and entomopathogenic ones. The emerging picture highlights how complementing genetic studies with ecological ones (in the case of well-established genetic model systems such as C. elegans) and vice versa (in the case of the yet uncultured Stilbonematinae) will deepen our understanding of how microbial symbioses evolved and how they impact our environment. PMID:26839382

  17. Caenorhabditis Elegans—Applications to Nematode Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Parkinson, John

    2003-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was published 4 years ago. Since then, we have seen great strides in technologies that seek to exploit this data. Here we describe the application of some of these techniques and other advances that are helping us to understand about not only the biology of this important model organism but also the entire phylum Nematoda. PMID:18629128

  18. Distribution of entomopathogenic nematodes in Southern Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Kanga, Françoise Ngo; Waeyenberge, Lieven; Hauser, Stefan; Moens, Maurice

    2012-01-01

    A first survey of entomopathogenic nematodes (EPN) was conducted in three agro-ecological zones of Southern Cameroon in 2007 and 2008. Entomopathogenic nematodes were recovered from 26 of 251 soil samples (10.4%). Three species, Heterorhabditis baujardi, Steinernema sp. A and Steinernema sp. B were found. The two steinernematids were considered unidentified species. Among the positive samples, 23 samples contained only H. baujardi (88.5%), two contained Steinernema sp. A co-occurring with H. baujardi (7.7%), and one sample contained Steinernema sp. B (3.9%). H. baujardi was frequent in forest and fruit crop (cocoa and oil palm plantations). Steinernema sp. A was found in a tree plantation of teak, Steinernema sp. B in a forest habitat. Nematodes were mostly present in acidic soils with pH ranging from 3.7 to 7.0. The highest EPN presence was recorded in sandy loam, sandy clay loam, sandy clay and clay soils. EPNs were not recovered in sand, loamy sand and clay loam soils. Using principal component analysis for elucidating the major variation patterns among sampling sites, four factors explaining for 73.64% of the overall variance were extracted. Factors were a combination of geographical (latitude, longitude, altitude), soil (pH, contents of sand, silt and clay, organic carbon, texture), and moisture (wilting point, field capacity) parameters as well as climatic parameters (mean annual rainfall, mean air temperature). Logistic regression and redundancy analyses (RDA) revealed that soil pH, longitude, available water and altitude were associated with presence and absence of EPN. Both logistic regression and RDA indicated that, increasing soil pH and longitude, associated with decreasing altitude, led to higher percentages of samples containing entomopathogenic nematodes. PMID:21983478

  19. Distribution of Soybean Cyst Nematode in Nebraska

    PubMed Central

    Powers, T. O.; Sandall, L. J.; Wysong, D. S.

    1989-01-01

    A survey of 552 soybean fields in 20 counties in Nebraska in 1986-88 revealed 35 fields infested with the soybean cyst nematode (SCN), Heterodera glycines. Identification was confirmed with a greenhouse bioassay, using 'Lee 74' soybean, and by the application of a DNA hybridization probe derived from SCN mitochondrial DNA. Most of the SCN-infested fields were located on the Missouri River floodplain and in the southeastern corner of the state. PMID:19287657

  20. Nematodes Associated with Plants from Naturally Acidic Wetlands Soil

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Robert John; Smart, Grover C.

    1994-01-01

    Four plants, Cyperus ochraceus, Eriocaulon compressum, Lythrum alatum, and Xyris jupicai, growing along the shoreline of an oligotrophic lake in north central Florida were sampled for nematodes. The nematodes recovered were placed in four trophic groups: bacterivores, herbivores, omnivores, and predators. When the nematodes on all plants were considered, 27% were bacterivores, 23% were herbivores, 7% were omnivores, and 43% were predators. Tripyla was the dominant predator and the dominant genus of all nematodes, and Malenchus was the dominant herbivore. Dominance was not clearly pronounced in the other trophic groups. PMID:19279927

  1. Interactions Among Selected Endoparasitic Nematodes and Three Pseudomonads on Alfalfa

    PubMed Central

    Bookbinder, M. G.; Bloom, J. R.; Lukezic, F. L.

    1982-01-01

    Meloidogyne hapla, Pratylenchus penetrans, and Helicotylenchus dihystera, reduced the growth of 'Saranac AR alfalfa seedlings when applied at concentrations of 50 nematodes per plant. All except P. penetrans reduced seedling growth when applied at 25 per seedling. M. hapla reduced growth when applied at 12 per seedling. Nematodes interacted with three pseudomonads to produce greater growth reductions than were obtained with single pathogens, suggesting synergistic relationships. Ditylenchus dipsaci, applied at 25 or 50 nematodes per seedling, reduced plant weight compared with weights of control plants, but did not interact with test bacteria. All of the nematodes except D. dipsaci produced root wounds which were invaded by bacteria. PMID:19295682

  2. Nematode Response to Cool Season Annual Graminaceous Species and Cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, J. F.; Rodríguez-Kábana, R.

    1987-01-01

    The response of 29 rye, oat, triticale, and wheat cultivars to selected nematode species was determined in the greenhouse. Variability in nematode root galling and final nematode population densities in root and soil in response to cool season annual graminaceous crops occurred for spiral (Helicotylenchus dihystera), stubby root (Paratrichodorus minor), and root-knot (Meloidogyne incognita) nematodes. Although none of the graminaceous crops supported M. incognita at levels as high as the susceptible 'Davis' soybean control, sufficient variation existed among these to warrant field scale studies. PMID:19290289

  3. Detection and Description of Soils with Specific Nematode Suppressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Westphal, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    Soils with specific suppressiveness to plant-parasitic nematodes are of interest to define the mechanisms that regulate population density. Suppressive soils prevent nematodes from establishing and from causing disease, and they diminish disease severity after initial nematode damage in continuous culturing of a host. A range of non-specific and specific soil treatments, followed by infestation with a target nematode, have been employed to identify nematode-suppressive soils. Biocidal treatments, soil transfer tests, and baiting approaches together with observations of the plant-parasitic nematode in the root zone of susceptible host plants have improved the understanding of nematode-suppressive soils. Techniques to demonstrate specific soil suppressiveness against plant-parasitic nematodes are compared in this review. The overlap of studies on soil suppressiveness with recent advances in soil health and quality is briefly discussed. The emphasis is on methods (or criteria) used to detect and identify soils that maintain specific soil suppressiveness to plant-parasitic nematodes. While biocidal treatments can detect general and specific soil suppressiveness, soil transfer studies, by definition, apply only to specific soil suppressiveness. Finally, potential strategies to exploit suppressive soils are presented. PMID:19262851

  4. Entomopathogenic and plant pathogenic nematodes as opposing forces in agriculture.

    PubMed

    Kenney, Eric; Eleftherianos, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Plant-parasitic nematodes are responsible for substantial damages within the agriculture industry every year, which is a challenge that has thus far gone largely unimpeded. Chemical nematicides have been employed with varying degrees of success, but their implementation can be cumbersome, and furthermore they could potentially be neutralising an otherwise positive effect from the entomopathogenic nematodes that coexist with plant-parasitic nematodes in soil environments and provide protection for plants against insect pests. Recent research has explored the potential of employing entomopathogenic nematodes to protect plants from plant-parasitic nematodes, while providing their standard degree of protection against insects. The interactions involved are highly complex, due to both the three-organism system and the assortment of variables present in a soil environment, but a strong collection of evidence has accumulated regarding the suppressive capacity of certain entomopathogenic nematodes and their mutualistic bacteria, in the context of limiting the infectivity of plant-parasitic nematodes. Specific factors produced by certain entomopathogenic nematode complexes during the process of insect infection appear to have a selectively nematicidal, or at least repellant, effect on plant-parasitic nematodes. Using this information, an opportunity has formed to adapt this relationship to large-scale, field conditions and potentially relieve the agricultural industry of one of its most substantial burdens. PMID:26527129

  5. Extracting DNA of nematodes communities from Argentine Pampas agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Mondino, Eduardo A; Covacevich, Fernanda; Studdert, Guillermo A; Pimentel, João P; Berbara, Ricardo L L

    2015-01-01

    We examined four strategies (Tris/EDTA, sodium dodecyl sulfate, Chelex 100 resin and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide -CTAB-) for extracting nucleic acid (DNA) from communities of nematodes. Nematodes were isolated from an agricultural area under different management of long-term crop rotation experiment from Argentina during three seasons. After DNA extraction, Polymerase Chain Reaction-amplifications were performed and considered as indicators of successful DNA extraction. The CTAB combined with proteinase K and phenol-chloroform-isoamyl alcohol was the unique successful method because positive amplifications were obtained by using both eukaryotic and nematode specific primers. This work could contribute to biodiversity studies of nematodes on agroecosystems. PMID:26131632

  6. Engineering natural and synthetic resistance for nematode management.

    PubMed

    Vrain, T C

    1999-12-01

    Bioengineering strategies are being developed that will provide specific and durable resistance against plant-parasitic nematodes in crops. The strategies come under three categories: (i) transfer of natural resistance genes from plants that have them to plants that do not, to mobilize the defense mechanisms in susceptible crops; (ii) interference with the biochemical signals that nematodes exchange with plants during parasitic interactions, especially those resulting in the formation of specialized feeding sites for the sedentary endoparasites-many nematode genes and many plant genes are potential targets for manipulation; and (iii) expression in plant cells of proteins toxic to nematodes. PMID:19270915

  7. Engineering Natural and Synthetic Resistance for Nematode Management

    PubMed Central

    Vrain, Thierry C.

    1999-01-01

    Bioengineering strategies are being developed that will provide specific and durable resistance against plant-parasitic nematodes in crops. The strategies come under three categories: (i) transfer of natural resistance genes from plants that have them to plants that do not, to mobilize the defense mechanisms in susceptible crops; (ii) interference with the biochemical signals that nematodes exchange with plants during parasitic interactions, especially those resulting in the formation of specialized feeding sites for the sedentary endoparasites—many nematode genes and many plant genes are potential targets for manipulation; and (iii) expression in plant cells of proteins toxic to nematodes. PMID:19270915

  8. Assaying environmental nickel toxicity using model nematodes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rudel, David; Douglas, Chandler; Huffnagle, Ian; Besser, John M.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    Although nickel exposure results in allergic reactions, respiratory conditions, and cancer in humans and rodents, the ramifications of excess nickel in the environment for animal and human health remain largely undescribed. Nickel and other cationic metals travel through waterways and bind to soils and sediments. To evaluate the potential toxic effects of nickel at environmental contaminant levels (8.9-7,600 μg Ni/g dry weight of sediment and 50-800 μg NiCl2/L of water), we conducted assays using two cosmopolitan nematodes, Caenorhabditis elegans and Pristionchus pacificus. We assayed the effects of both sediment-bound and aqueous nickel upon animal growth, developmental survival, lifespan, and fecundity. Uncontaminated sediments were collected from sites in the Midwestern United States and spiked with a range of nickel concentrations. We found that nickel-spiked sediment substantially impairs both survival from larval to adult stages and adult longevity in a concentration-dependent manner. Further, while aqueous nickel showed no adverse effects on either survivorship or longevity, we observed a significant decrease in fecundity, indicating that aqueous nickel could have a negative impact on nematode physiology. Intriguingly, C. elegans and P. pacificus exhibit similar, but not identical, responses to nickel exposure. Moreover, P. pacificus could be tested successfully in sediments inhospitable to C. elegans. Our results add to a growing body of literature documenting the impact of nickel on animal physiology, and suggest that environmental toxicological studies could gain an advantage by widening their repertoire of nematode species.

  9. Assaying Environmental Nickel Toxicity Using Model Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Rudel, David; Douglas, Chandler D.; Huffnagle, Ian M.; Besser, John M.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    Although nickel exposure results in allergic reactions, respiratory conditions, and cancer in humans and rodents, the ramifications of excess nickel in the environment for animal and human health remain largely undescribed. Nickel and other cationic metals travel through waterways and bind to soils and sediments. To evaluate the potential toxic effects of nickel at environmental contaminant levels (8.9-7,600 µg Ni/g dry weight of sediment and 50-800 µg NiCl2/L of water), we conducted assays using two cosmopolitan nematodes, Caenorhabditis elegans and Pristionchus pacificus. We assayed the effects of both sediment-bound and aqueous nickel upon animal growth, developmental survival, lifespan, and fecundity. Uncontaminated sediments were collected from sites in the Midwestern United States and spiked with a range of nickel concentrations. We found that nickel-spiked sediment substantially impairs both survival from larval to adult stages and adult longevity in a concentration-dependent manner. Further, while aqueous nickel showed no adverse effects on either survivorship or longevity, we observed a significant decrease in fecundity, indicating that aqueous nickel could have a negative impact on nematode physiology. Intriguingly, C. elegans and P. pacificus exhibit similar, but not identical, responses to nickel exposure. Moreover, P. pacificus could be tested successfully in sediments inhospitable to C. elegans. Our results add to a growing body of literature documenting the impact of nickel on animal physiology, and suggest that environmental toxicological studies could gain an advantage by widening their repertoire of nematode species. PMID:24116204

  10. Nematode locomotion in unconfined and confined fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilbao, Alejandro; Wajnryb, Eligiusz; Vanapalli, Siva A.; Blawzdziewicz, Jerzy

    2013-08-01

    The millimeter-long soil-dwelling nematode Caenorhabditis elegans propels itself by producing undulations that propagate along its body and turns by assuming highly curved shapes. According to our recent study [V. Padmanabhan et al., PLoS ONE 7, e40121 (2012), 10.1371/journal.pone.0040121] all these postures can be accurately described by a piecewise-harmonic-curvature model. We combine this curvature-based description with highly accurate hydrodynamic bead models to evaluate the normalized velocity and turning angles for a worm swimming in an unconfined fluid and in a parallel-wall cell. We find that the worm moves twice as fast and navigates more effectively under a strong confinement, due to the large transverse-to-longitudinal resistance-coefficient ratio resulting from the wall-mediated far-field hydrodynamic coupling between body segments. We also note that the optimal swimming gait is similar to the gait observed for nematodes swimming in high-viscosity fluids. Our bead models allow us to determine the effects of confinement and finite thickness of the body of the nematode on its locomotion. These effects are not accounted for by the classical resistive-force and slender-body theories.

  11. Entomopathogenic Nematode Production and Application Technology

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro-Ilan, David I.; Han, Richou; Dolinksi, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Production and application technology is critical for the success of entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) in biological control. Production approaches include in vivo, and in vitro methods (solid or liquid fermentation). For laboratory use and small scale field experiments, in vivo production of EPNs appears to be the appropriate method. In vivo production is also appropriate for niche markets and small growers where a lack of capital, scientific expertise or infrastructure cannot justify large investments into in vitro culture technology. In vitro technology is used when large scale production is needed at reasonable quality and cost. Infective juveniles of entomopathogenic nematodes are usually applied using various spray equipment and standard irrigation systems. Enhanced efficacy in EPN applications can be facilitated through improved delivery mechanisms (e.g., cadaver application) or optimization of spray equipment. Substantial progress has been made in recent years in developing EPN formulations, particularly for above ground applications, e.g., mixing EPNs with surfactants or polymers or with sprayable gels. Bait formulations and insect host cadavers can enhance EPN persistence and reduce the quantity of nematodes required per unit area. This review provides a summary and analysis of factors that affect production and application of EPNs and offers insights for their future in biological insect suppression. PMID:23482883

  12. Presence of ecto-protein tyrosine phosphatase activity is vital for survival of Setaria cervi, a bovine filarial parasite.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neetu; Heneberg, Petr; Rathaur, Sushma

    2014-10-01

    The ecto protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP) are known to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis and survival of the intracellular parasites. However, their presence and role in filarial parasites is still unknown. We found a significant amount of tyrosine phosphatase activity in the surface antigen fraction extracted from Setaria cervi (S. cervi), a bovine filarial parasite. An antibody designed against the conserved catalytic core of human protein tyrosine phosphatases, PTP1B cross reacted with a 63 kDa band in the surface antigen. We detected a significant amount of PTP activity in the intact S. cervi adult parasites as well as microfilariae in this study for the first time. This PTP may be localized on the surface of the parasite with an exposed active site available for the external substrates. The PTP activity was also inhibited by sodium orthovanadate and phenyl arsine oxide, specific inhibitors of PTP in both the life stages. The Km and Vmax for PTP in the adult parasites and microfilariae were determined to be 2.574 ± 0.14 mM; 206.3 ± 2.75 μM Pi/h/two parasites and 5.510 ± 0.59 mM; 62.27 ± 2.27 μM Pi/h/10(6) parasites respectively using O-P-L-Tyrosine as substrate. Interestingly, a positive correlation was observed between the inhibition in PTP activity and reduction in the motility/ viability of the parasites when they were subjected to the specific PTP inhibitors (Orthovanadate and Phenyl arsine oxide) for 4 h in the KRB maintenance medium. The activity was also significantly inhibited in the parasites exposed to antifilarial drug/compounds for e.g. Diethylcarbamazine, Acetylsalicylic Acid and SK7, a methyl chalcone. Therefore suggesting a possible role played by PTP in the survival of the parasite, its interaction with the host as well as in the screening of newly synthesized antifilarials/drugs. PMID:25028209

  13. Unexpected Variation in Neuroanatomy among Diverse Nematode Species

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ziduan; Boas, Stephanie; Schroeder, Nathan E.

    2016-01-01

    Nematodes are considered excellent models for understanding fundamental aspects of neuron function. However, nematodes are less frequently used as models for examining the evolution of nervous systems. While the habitats and behaviors of nematodes are diverse, the neuroanatomy of nematodes is often considered highly conserved. A small number of nematode species greatly influences our understanding of nematode neurobiology. The free-living species Caenorhabditis elegans and, to a lesser extent, the mammalian gastrointestinal parasite Ascaris suum are, historically, the primary sources of knowledge regarding nematode neurobiology. Despite differences in size and habitat, C. elegans and A. suum share a surprisingly similar neuroanatomy. Here, we examined species across several clades in the phylum Nematoda and show that there is a surprising degree of neuroanatomical variation both within and among nematode clades when compared to C. elegans and Ascaris. We found variation in the numbers of neurons in the ventral nerve cord and dye-filling pattern of sensory neurons. For example, we found that Pristionchus pacificus, a bacterial feeding species used for comparative developmental research had 20% fewer ventral cord neurons compared to C. elegans. Steinernema carpocapsae, an insect-parasitic nematode capable of jumping behavior, had 40% more ventral cord neurons than C. elegans. Interestingly, the non-jumping congeneric nematode, S. glaseri showed an identical number of ventral cord neurons as S. carpocapsae. There was also variability in the timing of neurodevelopment of the ventral cord with two of five species that hatch as second-stage juveniles showing delayed neurodevelopment. We also found unexpected variation in the dye-filling of sensory neurons among examined species. Again, sensory neuron dye-filling pattern did not strictly correlate with phylogeny. Our results demonstrate that variation in nematode neuroanatomy is more prevalent than previously assumed and

  14. Unexpected Variation in Neuroanatomy among Diverse Nematode Species.

    PubMed

    Han, Ziduan; Boas, Stephanie; Schroeder, Nathan E

    2015-01-01

    Nematodes are considered excellent models for understanding fundamental aspects of neuron function. However, nematodes are less frequently used as models for examining the evolution of nervous systems. While the habitats and behaviors of nematodes are diverse, the neuroanatomy of nematodes is often considered highly conserved. A small number of nematode species greatly influences our understanding of nematode neurobiology. The free-living species Caenorhabditis elegans and, to a lesser extent, the mammalian gastrointestinal parasite Ascaris suum are, historically, the primary sources of knowledge regarding nematode neurobiology. Despite differences in size and habitat, C. elegans and A. suum share a surprisingly similar neuroanatomy. Here, we examined species across several clades in the phylum Nematoda and show that there is a surprising degree of neuroanatomical variation both within and among nematode clades when compared to C. elegans and Ascaris. We found variation in the numbers of neurons in the ventral nerve cord and dye-filling pattern of sensory neurons. For example, we found that Pristionchus pacificus, a bacterial feeding species used for comparative developmental research had 20% fewer ventral cord neurons compared to C. elegans. Steinernema carpocapsae, an insect-parasitic nematode capable of jumping behavior, had 40% more ventral cord neurons than C. elegans. Interestingly, the non-jumping congeneric nematode, S. glaseri showed an identical number of ventral cord neurons as S. carpocapsae. There was also variability in the timing of neurodevelopment of the ventral cord with two of five species that hatch as second-stage juveniles showing delayed neurodevelopment. We also found unexpected variation in the dye-filling of sensory neurons among examined species. Again, sensory neuron dye-filling pattern did not strictly correlate with phylogeny. Our results demonstrate that variation in nematode neuroanatomy is more prevalent than previously assumed and

  15. Identification and characterization of novel membrane-bound PRL protein tyrosine phosphatases from Setaria cervi, a bovine filarial parasite.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neetu; Yadav, Smita; Rathaur, Sushma

    2015-11-01

    A significant amount of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity was detected in the detergent-soluble membrane-bound fraction of Setaria cervi, a bovine filarial parasite. The membrane-bound PTP activity was significantly inhibited when the adult parasites were exposed to compounds having antifilarial activity like aspirin and SK7 as well as phenylarsine oxide, a specific PTP inhibitor suggesting that this activity is stress regulated. Further, this enzyme was purified as a single protein of apparently 21 kDa using two different chromatographic techniques. The MALDI-MS/MS analysis of its peptides showed closest match with protein tyrosine phosphatase PRL (Aedes aegypti). This purified enzyme (named as PRL) showed maximum activity at pH 5.5/37 °C and hydrolysed para nitro phenyl phosphate (pNPP) at the highest rate followed by O-P-L-tyrosine and O-P-L-threonine. It showed significant inhibition by specific inhibitors of PTP such as sodium orthovanadate, phenylarsine oxide and ammonium molybdate and was activated by dithiothreitol (DTT). The active site modification studies suggested involvement of cysteine, arginine, histidine and aspartic acid in the catalytic activity of PRL. The activity of S. cervi PRL was also found to be resistant towards the external oxidative stress. Thus, S. cervi PRL could be taken as a potential target for the management of human lymphatic filariasis. PMID:26341797

  16. Health-Seeking Behaviors and Self-Care Practices of People with Filarial Lymphoedema in Nepal: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Ram Kumar; Sherchand, Jeevan Bahadur; Mishra, Shiva Raj; Ranabhat, Kamal; Pokharel, Amrit; Devkota, Pramila; Mishra, Durga; Ghimire, Yadu Chandra; Gelal, Khageshwor; Paudel, Rajan; Wagle, Rajendra Raj

    2015-01-01

    Background. Lymphatic filariasis is endemic in Nepal. This study aimed to investigate health-seeking behaviors and self-care practices of people with filarial Lymphoedema in Nepal. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted using qualitative methods in three endemic districts. Twenty-three patients with current Lymphoedema were recruited in the study. Results. Hydrocele was found to be a well-known condition and a major health problem in the studied communities. People with Lymphoedema primarily sought health care from traditional healers, whereas sometimes home-based care was their first treatment. Later Ayurvedic and allopathic hospital-based care were sought. Respondents reported various psychological problems such as difficulty in engaging in sexual intercourse, anxiety, worry and stress, depression, low self-esteem, feeling weak, fear of being abandoned, and fear of transmitting disease to the children. Standard foot care practices except washing were largely absent. Conclusions. Lymphoedema in the limbs and hydrocele were found to be major health problems. The traditional health care providers were the first contact of care for the majority of respondents. Only a few patients had been practicing standard foot care practices. PMID:25694785

  17. Brugia pahangi in nude mice: protective immunity to infective larvae is Thy 1.2+ cell dependent and cyclosporin A resistant.

    PubMed

    Vickery, A C; Nayar, J K

    1987-03-01

    Mechanisms of protective immunity to larvae of Brugia pahangi were studied in congenitally athymic nude C3H/HeN mice and their syngeneic heterozygous littermates. An average 11% of subcutaneous larval inocula was recovered from control nudes 28 days after inoculation. No worms were recovered from nude recipients of viable splenic Thy 1.2+ T lymphocytes from heterozygotes which had killed a priming dose of B. pahangi larvae. Primed T lymphocytes, depleted of either Lyt 1.1+ or Lyt 2.1+ cells or incubated with anti-Thy 1.2 monoclonal antibody and complement, failed to protect nude mice against a larval challenge. Nor were primed B lymphocytes depleted by Thy 1.2+ T cell contaminants protective. Treatment with cyclosporin A (CsA) did not increase the numbers of worms recovered from heterozygotes nor did CsA treatment of heterozygous cell donors abolish the ability of primed Thy 1.2+ T lymphocytes to transfer protection to nude mice. IgG but not IgM antibody titres to B. pahangi antigens were depressed in all CsA-treated mice. CsA treatment of nude mice had no direct effect upon development of B. pahangi larvae. These results show that protective immunity to larvae of B. pahangi in mice depends upon small numbers of Thy 1.2+ T cells which are CsA-resistant. PMID:3494759

  18. Detection and quantification of Wuchereria bancrofti and Brugia malayi DNA in blood samples and mosquitoes using duplex droplet digital polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Jongthawin, Jurairat; Intapan, Pewpan M; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Sanpool, Oranuch; Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Sadaow, Lakkhana; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2016-08-01

    Lymphatic filariasis, a mosquito-borne disease, is still a major public health problem in tropical and sub-tropical countries. Effective diagnostic tools are required for identification of infected individuals, for epidemiological assessment, and for monitoring of control programs. A duplex droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) was conducted to differentiate and quantify Wuchereria bancrofti DNA by targeting the long DNA repeat (LDR) element and Brugia malayi DNA by targeting the HhaI element in blood samples and mosquito vectors. The analytical sensitivity and specificity were evaluated. Our results indicated that the duplex ddPCR assay could differentiate and quantify W. bancrofti and B. malayi DNA from blood samples and mosquitoes. DNA from a single larva in 50 μl of a blood sample, or in one mosquito vector, could be detected. The analytical sensitivity and specificity for W. bancrofti are both 100 %. Corresponding values for B. malayi are 100 and 98.3 %, respectively. Therefore, duplex ddPCR is a potential tool for simultaneous diagnosis and monitoring of bancroftian and brugian filariasis in endemic areas. PMID:27085707

  19. Influence of symbiotic bacteria on entomopathogenic nematode--host interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are three players in the infection process of entomopathogenic nematodes (Steinernematidae and Heterorhabditidae): the nematodes themselves, the host insect, and the nematode’s mutualistic bacteria (Xenorhabdus and Photorhabdus spp.). As a host infection progresses, all three of these players...

  20. Nematode effector proteins: an emerging paradigm of parasitism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytonematodes use a stylet and secreted effectors to invade host tissues and extract nutrients to support their growth and development. The molecular function of nematode effectors is currently the subject of intense investigation. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of nematode ...

  1. A SURVEY OF CYST NEMATODES (HETERODERA SPP.) IN NORTHERN EGYPT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Information concerning the occurrence and distribution of cyst nematodes (Heterodera spp.) in Egypt is important to assess their potential to cause economic damage to crop plants. A nematode survey was conducted in Alexandria and El-Behera Governorates in northern Egypt to identify the species of cy...

  2. Alternatives to methyl bromide for nematode control in ornamental crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nematode control options for production of in-ground ornamental crops are extremely limited. Ornamental production has different obstacles to nematode control and chemical application than raised-bed vegetable production. These challenges include a need for flat fumigation, lack of labeled herbicide...

  3. Sex-specific mating pheromones in the nematode Panagrellus redivivus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite advances in medicine and crop genetics, nematodes remain significant human pathogens and agricultural pests. This warrants investigation of alternative strategies for pest control, such as interference with pheromone-mediated reproduction. Because only two nematode species have had their phe...

  4. High Sensitivity NMR and Mixture Analysis for Nematode Behavioral Metabolomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nematodes are the most abundant animal on earth, and they parasitize virtually all plants and animals. Caenorhabditis elegans is a free-living nematode that lives in soil and composting material. We have shown that C. elegans releases at least 40 small molecules into its environment including many...

  5. Directional movement of entomopathogenic nematodes in response to electrical current

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Entomopathogenic nematodes in the genera Steinernema and Heterorhabditis are important regulating agents of insect populations. The infective juvenile nematodes respond to a variety of stimuli that aid in survival and host finding. Identification of novel cues in the nematodes’ environment can help ...

  6. 76 FR 60357 - Golden Nematode; Removal of Regulated Areas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... nematode (Globodera rostochiensis) is a destructive pest of potatoes and other solanaceous plants. Potatoes... no longer required. From 1977 until 2010, potato production fields in the townships of Elba and Byron... nematode quarantine. In 2007, there were 13 farms in Genesee County that harvested potatoes. These...

  7. Soybean lines evaluated for resistance to reniform nematode

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seventy-four wild and domestic soybean (Glycine max and G. soja) lines were evaluated for resistance to reniform nematode (Rotylenchulus reniformis) in growth chamber tests with a day length of 16 hours and temperature held constant at 28 C. Several entries for which reactions to reniform nematode w...

  8. Harmful Effects of Mustard Bio-fumigants on Entomopathogenic Nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Green manures, particularly mustards tilled into the soil preceding potato crops act as bio-fumigants that are toxic to plant parasitic nematodes, providing an alternative to synthetic soil fumigants. It is not known if mustard green manures also kill beneficial entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) tha...

  9. Two new species of soil nematodes from Manipur, India.

    PubMed

    Chanu, Loukrakpam Bina; Meitei, N Mohilal; Shah, M Manjur

    2016-09-01

    Survey for soil nematodes associated with mulberry plants in valley districts of Manipur revealed the presence of two new species of soil nematodes of the genus Tylenchus sp. and Telotylenchus sp. The two new species are described and illustrated here. PMID:27605765

  10. Occurrence and distribution of nematodes in Idaho crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surveys were conducted in Idaho during the 2000-2006 cropping seasons to study the occurrence, population density, host association and distribution of plant-parasitic nematodes associated with major crops, grasses and weeds. Eighty-four species and 43 genera of plant-parasitic nematodes were record...

  11. Viability and virulence of entomopathogenic nematodes exposed to ultraviolet radiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Entomopathogenic nematodes can be highly effective biocontrol agents, but their efficacy can be reduced due to exposure environmental stress such as from ultraviolet radiation. Our objective was to compare UV tolerance among a broad array of nematode species. We compared 9 different EPN species and ...

  12. Characterization of reniform nematode genome through shotgun sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The reniform nematode (RN), a major agricultural pest particularly on cotton in the United States(U.S.), is among the major plant parasitic nematodes for which limited genomic information exists. In this study, over 380 Mb of sequence data were generated from four pooled adult female RN and assembl...

  13. Book review: Systematics of Cyst Nematodes (Nematoda: Heteroderinae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cyst nematodes are an important group of plant-parasitic nematodes that cause billions of dollars in economic damage to crops every year. This article reviews a recently published, two-volume monograph that describes the morphological and molecular characteristics of these agriculturally signif...

  14. Collective behavior of nematodes in a thin fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gart, Sean; Jung, Sunghwan

    2010-11-01

    Many organisms live in a confined fluidic environment such as in a thin fluid layer on dermal tissues, in saturated soil, and others. In this study, we investigate collective behaviors of nematodes in a thin fluid layer. The actively moving nematodes feel various hydrodynamic forces such as surface tension from the top air-liquid interface, viscous stress from the bottom surface, and more. Two or more nematodes in close proximity can be drawn together by the capillary force between bodies. This capillary force also makes it difficult for nematodes to separate. The Strouhal number and a ratio of amplitude to wavelength are measured before and after nematode aggregation and separation. Grouped and separate nematodes have no significant changes of the Strouhal number and the ratio of amplitude to wavelength, which shows that body stroke and kinematic performance do not change while grouped together. This result implies that nematodes gain no mechanical advantage during locomotion when grouped but that the capillary force draws and keeps nematodes joined together.

  15. Development of Reniform Nematode Resistance in Upland Cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this review is to assess development of resistance to the reniform nematode (Rotylenchulus reniformis) in Upland Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). Cotton cultivars with reniform nematode resistance are needed. The development of resistant cultivars appears possible but presents a signifi...

  16. Evaluation of Nematode Resistant Grape Rootstock for Managing Mesocriconema xenoplax

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study is to better understand the impact of the ring nematode, Mesocriconema xenoplax, on the productivity and physiology of grapevines grafted onto different rootstocks that showed varying resistance to ring nematodes under greenhouse conditions. Pinot noir grapevines (grafted...

  17. Characterization of a New Species of Cyst Nematode Parasitizing Corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Examination of soil around unthrifty corn roots in northwestern Tennessee (Obion County) in 2006 revealed high population densities of juvenile nematodes and lemon-shaped cysts. This nematode resembles Cactodera spp. in possessing a circumfenestrate vulva but lacking bullae and an underbridge. These...

  18. Nematode resistance and agronomic performance of LONREN and NEMSTACK lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    LONREN lines have resistance to reniform nematodes that was obtained from Gossypium longicalyx. The NEMSTACK lines have the same resistance recombined with the rkn-1 gene for resistance to root knot nematode from 'Acala NemX.' Different LONREN lines vary depending on whether the resistance gene was...

  19. Directional movement of parasitic nematodes in response to electrical current

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Steinernematid nematodes are parasites that are important natural regulating agents of insect populations. The infective juvenile nematodes respond to a variety of stimuli that aid in survival and host finding. Host finding strategies among steinernematids differ along a continuum from ambush (sit...

  20. Conserved nematode signaling molecules elicit plant defenses and pathogen resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nematodes, which are ubiquitous in soil and are estimated to cause $100 B of agricultural damage annually, produce novel, highly conserved small sugar-based molecules call ascarosides. Ascarosides play critical roles in nematode development and behavior. We report here that plants recognize these un...

  1. Control of the peachtree borer using beneficial nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The peachtree borer, Synanthedon exitiosa, is a major pest of peaches and other stone fruits. Our research indicates that entomopathogenic nematodes, also known as beneficial nematodes, can be used effectively to control the insect. We conducted replicated experiments in randomized block designs ov...

  2. Soybean Cyst Nematode in North America - 55 Years Later

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines, was first discovered in North America in 1954 in Hanover County, North Carolina, USA, when it was found on soybean in a field that had been planted to Easter lilies obtained from Japan prior to World War II. The nematode is now distributed throughout soybe...

  3. Survey of nematodes associated with terrestrial slugs in Norway.

    PubMed

    Ross, J L; Ivanova, E S; Hatteland, B A; Brurberg, M B; Haukeland, S

    2016-09-01

    A survey of nematodes associated with terrestrial slugs was conducted for the first time in Norway. A total of 611 terrestrial slugs were collected from 32 sample sites. Slugs were identified by means of morphological examination, dissection of genitalia and molecular analysis using mitochondrial DNA. Twelve slug species were identified, representing four different slug families. Internal nematodes were identified by means of morphological analysis and the sequencing of the 18S rRNA gene. Of the sample sites studied, 62.5% were found to be positive for nematode parasites, with 18.7% of all slugs discovered being infected. Five nematode species were identified in this study: Alloionema appendiculatum, Agfa flexilis, Angiostoma limacis, Angiostoma sp. and Phasmarhabditis hermaphrodita. Of these species, only one nematode was previously undescribed (Angiostoma sp.). This is the first record of the presence of A. appendiculatum, A. flexilis and A. limacis in Norway. PMID:26411747

  4. [Evolution and systematics of nematodes based on molecular investigation].

    PubMed

    Okulewicz, Anna; Perec, Agnieszka

    2004-01-01

    Evolution and systematics of nematodes based on molecular investigation. The use of molecular phylogenetics to examine the interrelationships between animal parasites, free-living nematodes, and plant parasites versus traditional classification based on morphological-ecological characters was discussed and reviewed. Distinct differences were observed between parasitic nematodes and free-living ones. Within the former group, animal parasites turned out to be distinctly different from plant parasites. Using small subunit of ribosomal RNA gene sequence from a wide range of nematodes, there is a possibility to compare animal-parasitic, plant-parasitic and free-living taxa. Nowadays the parasitic nematodes expressed sequence tag (EST) project is currently generating sequence information to provide a new source of data to examine the evolutionary history of this taxonomic group. PMID:16859012

  5. Co-adaptation mechanisms in plant-nematode systems.

    PubMed

    Zinovieva, S V

    2014-01-01

    The review is aimed to analyze the biochemical and immune-breaking adaptive mechanisms established in evolution of plant parasitic nematodes. Plant parasitic nematodes are obligate, biotrophic pathogens of numerous plant species. These organisms cause dramatic changes in the morphology and physiology of their hosts. The group of sedentary nematodes which are among the most damaging plant-parasitic nematodes cause the formation of special organs called nematode feeding sites in the root tissue called syncytium (cyst nematodes, CN; Heterodera and Globodera spp.) or giant cells (root-knot nematodes, RKN; Meloidogyne spp.). The most pronounced morphological adaptations of nematodes for plant parasitism include a hollow, protrusible stylet (feeding spear) connected to three esophageal gland cells that express products secreted into plant tissues through the stylet. Several gene products secreted by the nematode during parasitism have been identified. The current battery of candidate parasitism proteins secreted by nematodes to modify plant tissues for parasitism includes cell-wall-modifying enzymes, multiple regulators of host cell cycle and metabolism, proteins that can localize near the plant cell nucleus, potential suppressors of host defense, and mimics of plant molecules. Plants are usually able to recognize and react to parasites by activating various defense responses. When the response of the plant is too weak or too late, a successful infection (compatible interaction) will result. A rapid and strong defense response (e. g. due to the presence of a resistance gene) will result in the resistant (incompatible) reaction. Defense responses include the production of toxic oxygen radicals and systemic signaling compounds as well as the activation of defense genes that lead to the production of structural barriers or other toxins. PMID:25272462

  6. Multifaceted effects of host plants on entomopathogenic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Hazir, Selcuk; Shapiro-Ilan, David I; Hazir, Canan; Leite, Luis G; Cakmak, Ibrahim; Olson, Dawn

    2016-03-01

    The success of parasites can be impacted by multi-trophic interactions. Tritrophic interactions have been observed in parasite-herbivore-host plant systems. Here we investigate aspects of multi-trophic interactions in a system involving an entomopathogenic nematode (EPN), its insect host, and host plant. Novel issues investigated include the impact of tritrophic interactions on nematode foraging behavior, the ability of EPNs to overcome negative tritrophic effects through genetic selection, and interactions with a fourth trophic level (nematode predators). We tested infectivity of the nematode, Steinernema riobrave, to corn earworm larvae (Helicoverpa zea) in three host plants, tobacco, eggplant and tomato. Tobacco reduced nematode virulence and reproduction relative to tomato and eggplant. However, successive selection (5 passages) overcame the deficiency; selected nematodes no longer exhibited reductions in phenotypic traits. Despite the loss in virulence and reproduction nematodes, first passage S. riobrave was more attracted to frass from insects fed tobacco than insects fed on other host plants. Therefore, we hypothesized the reduced virulence and reproduction in S. riobrave infecting tobacco fed insects would be based on a self-medicating tradeoff, such as deterring predation. We tested this hypothesis by assessing predatory success of the mite Sancassania polyphyllae and the springtail Sinella curviseta on nematodes reared on tobacco-fed larvae versus those fed on greater wax moth, Galleria mellonella, tomato fed larvae, or eggplant fed larvae. No advantage was observed in nematodes derived from tobacco fed larvae. In conclusion, our results indicated that insect-host plant diet has an important effect on nematode foraging, infectivity and reproduction. However, negative host plant effects, might be overcome through directed selection. We propose that host plant species should be considered when designing biocontrol programs using EPNs. PMID:26896698

  7. Digestion of FMRFamide and nematode FMRFamide-like peptides (nematode FLPs) by the soluble fraction from Panagrellus redivivus homogenate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteases in the soluble fraction of homogenates prepared from the free-living nematode Panagrellus redivivus hydrolyzed the amidated invertebrate neuropeptides FMRFa and FLRFa, and nematode FMRFa-like peptides (FLPs) KPNFLRFa (FLP-1), APKPKFIRFa (FLP-5), KNEFIRFa (FLP-8), KPSFVRFa (FLP-9), RNKFEFIR...

  8. Chemical signals from plants previously infected with root knot nematodes affect behavior of infective juvenile root knot nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nematodes are a worldwide problem in agriculture, with losses estimated to $100 billion per year in the US. Damage caused by root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) (RKN) disrupts the flow of water and nutrients to the plant and increases the plant’s vulnerability to other pathogens. While studies ...

  9. Expressed sequence tags of the peanut pod nematode Ditylenchus africanus: the first transcriptome analysis of an Anguinid nematode

    PubMed Central

    Haegeman, Annelies; Jacob, Joachim; Vanholme, Bartel; Kyndt, Tina; Mitreva, Makedonka; Gheysen, Godelieve

    2009-01-01

    In this study, 4847 expressed sequenced tags (ESTs) from mixed stages of the migratory plant-parasitic nematode Ditylenchus africanus (peanut pod nematode) were investigated. It is the first molecular survey of a nematode which belongs to the family of the Anguinidae (order Rhabditida, superfamily Sphaerularioidea). The sequences were clustered into 2596 unigenes, of which 43% did not show any homology to known protein, nucleotide, nematode EST or plant-parasitic nematode genome sequences. Gene ontology mapping revealed that most putative proteins are involved in developmental and reproductive processes. In addition unigenes involved in oxidative stress as well as in anhydrobiosis, such as LEA (late embryogenesis abundant protein) and trehalose-6-phosphate synthase were identified. Other tags showed homology to genes previously described as being involved in parasitism (expansin, SEC-2, calreticulin, 14-3-3b and various allergen proteins). In situ hybridization revealed that the expression of a putative expansin and a venom allergen protein was restricted to the gland cell area of the nematode, being in agreement with their presumed role in parasitism. Furthermore, 7 putative novel candidate parasitism genes were identified based on the prediction of a signal peptide in the corresponding protein sequence and homologous ESTs exclusively in parasitic nematodes. These genes are interesting for further research and functional characterization. Finally, 34 unigenes were retained as good target candidates for future RNAi experiments, because of their nematode specific nature and observed lethal phenotypes of Caenorhabditis elegans homologs. PMID:19383517

  10. Entomopathogenic nematodes in the European biocontrol market.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, R U

    2003-01-01

    In Europe total revenues in the biocontrol market have reached approximately 200 million Euros. The sector with the highest turn-over is the market for beneficial invertebrates with a 55% share, followed by microbial agents with approximately 25%. Annual growth rates of up to 20% have been estimated. Besides microbial plant protection products that are currently in the process of re-registration, several microbial products have been registered or are in the process of registration, following the EU directive 91/414. Entomopathogenic nematodes (EPN) are exceptionally safe biocontrol agents. Until today, they are exempted from registration in most European countries, the reason why SMEs were able to offer economically reasonable nematode-based products. The development of technology for mass production in liquid media significantly reduced the product costs and accelerated the introduction of nematode products in tree nurseries, ornamentals, strawberries, mushrooms, citrus and turf. Progress in storage and formulation technology has resulted in high quality products which are more resistant to environmental extremes occurring during transportation to the user. The cooperation between science, industry and extension within the EU COST Action 819 has supported the development of quality control methods. Today four companies produce EPN in liquid culture, offering 8 different nematode species. Problems with soil insects are increasing. Grubs, like Melolontha melolontha and other scarabaeidae cause damage in orchards and turf. Since the introduction of the Western Corn Rootworm Diabrotica virgifera into Serbia in 1992, this pests as spread all over the Balkan Region and has reached Italy, France and Austria. These soil insect pests are potential targets for EPN. The development of insecticide resistance has opened another sector for EPN. Novel adjuvants used to improve formulation of EPN have enabled the foliar application against Western Flower Thrips and Plutella

  11. Discovery and initial analysis of novel viral genomes in the soybean cyst nematode

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nematodes are the most abundant multi-cellular animals on earth, yet little is known about their natural viral pathogens and no nematode virus genomes have been published. Consequently, nematode viruses have been overlooked as important biotic factors in the study of nematode ecology. Here we show t...

  12. Effect of nematode-trapping fungi on an entomopathogenic nematode originating from the same field site in California.

    PubMed

    Koppenhöfer, A M; Jaffee, B A; Muldoon, A E; Strong, D R; Kaya, H K

    1996-11-01

    We determined whether nematode-trapping fungi may influence the dynamics of a coastal shrub community. The food chain interactions in the shrub community involve the dominant plant species, its major insect herbivore, and an entomopathogenic nematode, Heterorhabditis hepialus. Of the 12 nematode-trapping fungi previously isolated from soils at the study site, 5 were selected for this study. Arthrobotrys oligospora, Geniculifera paucispora, Monacrosporium eudermatum, and Monacrosporium cionopagum efficiently trapped and colonized H. hepialus on agar; in contrast Nematoctonus concurrens trapped but did not infect or colonize the nematode on agar. To determine whether these fungi can suppress H. hepialus in soil, we added the fungi in the form of fungal-colonized nematodes to pasteurized (2 hr at 62 degrees C) and raw (nontreated) soil from the study site. Suppression was measured by comparing nematode invasion into a wax moth larva in fungus-treated and untreated soil in vials at 20 degrees C. Fungal population density in soil was estimated using dilution plating and most probable number procedures. All fungi suppressed H. hepialus if the wax moth larvae were added 4 days after the nematodes. Suppression ranged between 37 and 54% and did not differ among fungi. Suppression was usually greater in raw than in pasteurized soil. Raw soil contained a constant background of nematode-trapping fungi, and A. oligospora was the most common among these; no background was detected in pasteurized soil. The presence of background fungi in raw soil may explain the higher suppression in raw than in pasteurized soil. Fungal propagule densities in our laboratory experiments were similar to those observed in the field, suggesting that nematode-trapping fungi may influence the dynamics of the plant, insect herbivore, and entomopathogenic nematode in the coastal ecosystem. PMID:8931364

  13. Use of a simple DNA extraction method for high-throughput detection of filarial parasite Wuchereria bancrofti in the vector mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Vasuki, V; Subramanian, S; Hoti, S L; Jambulingam, P

    2012-12-01

    Molecular xenomonitoring of filariasis is the detection of filarial DNA in mosquitoes by PCR and a useful tool for monitoring transmission. DNA extraction coupled with PCR allows rapid detection of the presence or absence of the filarial parasite in vector mosquitoes compared to traditional method of manual dissection of the mosquito and observation for parasite under a microscope. A Tris-EDTA (TE) buffer-based boiling method of DNA extraction developed earlier by us was employed and explored for its suitability in the detection of Wuchereria bancrofti DNA in pools of Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes in real-time PCR assay. In this preliminary study, 1,000 laboratory-reared C. quinquefasciatus were made into 40 pools, each containing 25 mosquitoes spiked with 2mf. DNA from the first 20 pools was extracted using Qiagen DNeasy blood and tissue kit as standard, and the other 20 pools were subjected to TE buffer-based boiling method of DNA extraction. When the results (Ct values) obtained for DNA samples extracted by TE buffer-based boiling method were compared with that of the DNA samples extracted by the standard Qiagen method, they were found to be highly concordant without any significant difference (P = 0.9). Besides being cost- and time-effective, this protocol was found useful in extracting filarial DNA from two other mosquito genus Aedes and Anopheles, species of which have been reported as important vectors of W. bancrofti in other endemic regions of the world. Thus, TE buffer-based boiling method of DNA extraction is useful for the high-throughput detection of W. bancrofti in vector mosquitoes. PMID:22777703

  14. Inter and intra-specific diversity of parasites that cause lymphatic filariasis

    PubMed Central

    McNulty, Samantha N.; Mitreva, Makedonka; Weil, Gary J.; Fischer, Peter U.

    2013-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis is caused by three closely related nematode parasites: Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi and Brugia timori. These species have many ecological variants that differ in several aspects of their biology such as mosquito vector species, host range, periodicity, and morphology. Although the genome of B. malayi (the first genome sequenced from a parasitic nematode) has been available for more than five years, very little is known about genetic variability among the lymphatic dwelling filariae. The genetic diversity among these worms is not only interesting from a biological perspective, but it may have important practical implications for the Global Program to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis, as the parasites may respond differently to diagnostic tests and/or medical interventions. Therefore, better information on their genetic variability is urgently needed. With improved methods for nucleic acid extraction and recent advances in sequencing chemistry and instrumentation, this gap can be filled relatively inexpensively. Improved information on filarial genetic diversity may increase the chances of success for lymphatic filariasis elimination programs. PMID:23201850

  15. A Novel Xenomonitoring Technique Using Mosquito Excreta/Feces for the Detection of Filarial Parasites and Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Pilotte, Nils; Zaky, Weam I.; Abrams, Brian P.; Chadee, Dave D.; Williams, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Given the continued successes of the world’s lymphatic filariasis (LF) elimination programs and the growing successes of many malaria elimination efforts, the necessity of low cost tools and methodologies applicable to long-term disease surveillance is greater than ever before. As many countries reach the end of their LF mass drug administration programs and a growing number of countries realize unprecedented successes in their malaria intervention efforts, the need for practical molecular xenomonitoring (MX), capable of providing surveillance for disease recrudescence in settings of decreased parasite prevalence is increasingly clear. Current protocols, however, require testing of mosquitoes in pools of 25 or fewer, making high-throughput examination a challenge. The new method we present here screens the excreta/feces from hundreds of mosquitoes per pool and provides proof-of-concept for a practical alternative to traditional methodologies resulting in significant cost and labor savings. Methodology/Principal Findings Excreta/feces of laboratory reared Aedes aegypti or Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes provided with a Brugia malayi microfilaria-positive or Plasmodium vivax-positive blood meal respectively were tested for the presence of parasite DNA using real-time PCR. A titration of samples containing various volumes of B. malayi-negative mosquito feces mixed with positive excreta/feces was also tested to determine sensitivity of detection. Real-time PCR amplification of B. malayi and P. vivax DNA from the excreta/feces of infected mosquitoes was demonstrated, and B. malayi DNA in excreta/feces from one to two mf-positive blood meal-receiving mosquitoes was detected when pooled with volumes of feces from as many as 500 uninfected mosquitoes. Conclusions/Significance While the operationalizing of excreta/feces testing may require the development of new strategies for sample collection, the high-throughput nature of this new methodology has the

  16. Identification and biochemical characterization of macrophage migration inhibitory factor-2 (MIF-2) homologue of human lymphatic filarial parasite, Wuchereria bancrofti.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Nikhil; Sharma, Rohit; Hoti, S L

    2015-02-01

    Homologues of human macrophage migration inhibitory factor (hMIF) have been reported from vertebrates, invertebrates and prokaryotes, as well as plants. Filarial parasites produce two homologues of hMIF viz., MIF-1 and MIF-2, which play important role in the host immune modulation. Earlier, we have characterized MIF-1 (Wba-mif-1) from Wuchereria bancrofti, the major causal organism of human lymphatic filariasis. Here, we are reporting the molecular and biochemical characterization of MIF-2 from this parasite (Wba-mif-2). The complete Wba-mif-2 gene and its cDNA were amplified, cloned and sequenced. The size of Wba-mif-2 gene and cDNA were found to be 4.275 kb and 363 bp, respectively. The gene annotation revealed the presence of a large intron of 3.912 kb interspersed with two exons of 183 bp and 180 bp. The alignment of derived amino acid sequences of Wba-MIF-2 with Wba-MIF-1 showed 44% homology. The conserved CXXC oxido-reductase catalytic site present in Wba-mif-1 was found absent in Wba-mif-2 coding sequence. The amplified Wba-mif-2 cDNA was cloned into an expression vector pRSET-B and transformed into salt inducible Escherichia coli strain GJ1158. The expressed recombinant Wba-MIF-2 protein showed tautomerase activity against L-dopachrome methyl ester and the specific activity was determined to be 18.57±0.77 μmol/mg/min. Three known inhibitors of hMIF tautomerase activity significantly inhibited the tautomerase activity of recombinant Wba-MIF-2. Although the conserved CXXC oxido-reductase motif is absent in Wba-mif-2, the recombinant protein showed significant oxido-reductase activity in the insulin reduction assay, possibly because of the presence of vicinal cysteine residues. PMID:25446175

  17. Pack hunting by a common soil amoeba on nematodes.

    PubMed

    Geisen, Stefan; Rosengarten, Jamila; Koller, Robert; Mulder, Christian; Urich, Tim; Bonkowski, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Soils host the most complex communities on Earth, including the most diverse and abundant eukaryotes, i.e. heterotrophic protists. Protists are generally considered as bacterivores, but evidence for negative interactions with nematodes both from laboratory and field studies exist. However, direct impacts of protists on nematodes remain unknown. We isolated the soil-borne testate amoeba Cryptodifflugia operculata and found a highly specialized and effective pack-hunting strategy to prey on bacterivorous nematodes. Enhanced reproduction in presence of prey nematodes suggests a beneficial predatory life history of these omnivorous soil amoebae. Cryptodifflugia operculata appears to selectively impact the nematode community composition as reductions of nematode numbers were species specific. Furthermore, we investigated 12 soil metatranscriptomes from five distinct locations throughout Europe for 18S ribosomal RNA transcripts of C. operculata. The presence of C. operculata transcripts in all samples, representing up to 4% of the active protist community, indicates a potential ecological importance of nematophagy performed by C. operculata in soil food webs. The unique pack-hunting strategy on nematodes that was previously unknown from protists, together with molecular evidence that these pack hunters are likely to be abundant and widespread in soils, imply a considerable importance of the hitherto neglected trophic link 'nematophagous protists' in soil food webs. PMID:26079718

  18. Susceptibility of the Plum Curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar, to Entomopathogenic Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro-Ilan, David I.; Mizell, Russell F.; Campbell, James F.

    2002-01-01

    The plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar, is a major pest of pome and stone fruit. Our objective was to determine virulence and reproductive potential of six commercially available nematode species in C. nenuphar larvae and adults. Nematodes tested were Heterorhabditis bacteriophora (Hb strain), H. marelatus (Point Reyes strains), H. megidis (UK211 strain), Steinernema riobrave (355 strain), S. carpocapsae (All strain), and S. feltiae (SN strain). Survival of C. nenuphar larvae treated with S. feltiae and S. riobrave, and survival of adults treated with S. carpocapsae and S. riobrave, was reduced relative to non-treated insects. Other nematode treatments were not different from the control. Conotrachelus nenuphar larvae were more susceptible to S. feltiae infection than were adults, but for other nematode species there was no significant insect-stage effect. Reproduction in C. nenuphar was greatest for H. marelatus, which produced approximately 10,000 nematodes in larvae and 5,500 in adults. Other nematodes produced approximately 1,000 to 3,700 infective juveniles per C. nenuphar with no significant differences among nematode species or insect stages. We conclude that S. carpocapsae or S. riobrave appears to have the most potential for controlling adults, whereas S. feltiae or S. riobrave appears to have the most potential for larval control. PMID:19265940

  19. Changes in soil nematode communities under the impact of fertilizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruzdeva, L. I.; Matveeva, E. M.; Kovalenko, T. E.

    2007-06-01

    Changes taking place in the communities of soil nematodes of an artificially sown meadow under the impact of annually applied mineral fertilizers have been studied in a field experiment for nine years. It is shown that changes in the species composition, trophic structure, and numbers of nematodes from different genera depend on the fertilizer applied and on the competitiveness of the plant species grown. The spectra of nematode genera sensitive to the complete mineral fertilizer (NPK) and to the particular nutrients have been identified with the use of a number of parameters, including the maturity index of nematode communities, the biotope preferences of the particular nematode genera, and the general pattern of nematode habitats. The results obtained in this study can be used to assess the effect of mineral fertilizers on the soil fauna and to suggest optimum application rates of mineral fertilizers ensuring the sustainable development of meadow herbs. The use of the data on the trophic structure of nematode communities for predicting the ways of organic matter decomposition in the soil is discussed.

  20. Resistance of Grape Rootstocks to Plant-parasitic Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, H.; Zheng, L.; Walker, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Candidate grape rootstocks were selected through a rigorous screening program initiated with important sources of resistance to Meloidogyne pathotypes and to Xiphinema index in Muscadinia rotundifolia and Vitis species native to North America. Based on their rooting capability and horticultural characteristics, 200 candidates were selected from 5,000 progeny of multiple crosses between commercial grape rootstocks and wild grape species that exhibited resistance to nematodes. After a 15-year screening process, 13 selections emerged with either almost complete or complete combined resistance to M. incognita Race 3, M. incognita pathotype Harmony C, M. arenaria pathotype Harmony A, and X. index, important nematode pests of grapevines. Durability of this broad resistance was tested by challenging the selections with the target nematodes in combination and with the target nematodes in combinations with species not included in the screening process. Durability of resistance of the candidate rootstocks was also tested by exposure to the nematode communities of infested field soils from different locations. Breadth of resistance was determined on the basis of their host status to non-target nematodes, including Mesocriconema xenoplax, Pratylenchus vulnus, Tylenchulus semipenetrans and Paratylenchus hamatus. After a total of 204 separate trials, the rootstocks were released to the grape industry as UCD GRN1, UCD GRN2, UCD GRN3, UCD GRN4, and UCD GRN5. We provide a compilation of current knowledge of the host status of these five newly released rootstocks and of 27 other rootstock cultivars to plant-parasitic nematodes. PMID:23482972

  1. Microsporidian infection in a free-living marine nematode.

    PubMed

    Ardila-Garcia, A M; Fast, N M

    2012-12-01

    Microsporidia are unicellular fungi that are obligate endoparasites. Although nematodes are one of the most abundant and diverse animal groups, the only confirmed report of microsporidian infection was that of the "nematode killer" (Nematocida parisii). N. parisii was isolated from a wild Caenorhabditis sp. and causes an acute and lethal intestinal infection in a lab strain of Caenorhabditis elegans. We set out to characterize a microsporidian infection in a wild nematode to determine whether the infection pattern of N. parisii in the lab is typical of microsporidian infections in nematodes. We describe a novel microsporidian species named Sporanauta perivermis (marine spore of roundworms) and characterize its infection in its natural host, the free-living marine nematode Odontophora rectangula. S. perivermis is not closely related to N. parisii and differs strikingly in all aspects of infection. Examination by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that the infection was localized in the hypodermal and muscle tissues only and did not involve the intestines. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) confirmed infection in the muscle and hypodermis, and surprisingly, it also revealed that the parasite infects O. rectangula eggs, suggesting a vertical mode of transmission. Our observations highlight the importance of studying parasites in their natural hosts and indicate that not all nematode-infecting microsporidia are "nematode killers"; instead, microsporidiosis can be more versatile and chronic in the wild. PMID:23087371

  2. Microsporidian Infection in a Free-Living Marine Nematode

    PubMed Central

    Ardila-Garcia, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    Microsporidia are unicellular fungi that are obligate endoparasites. Although nematodes are one of the most abundant and diverse animal groups, the only confirmed report of microsporidian infection was that of the “nematode killer” (Nematocida parisii). N. parisii was isolated from a wild Caenorhabditis sp. and causes an acute and lethal intestinal infection in a lab strain of Caenorhabditis elegans. We set out to characterize a microsporidian infection in a wild nematode to determine whether the infection pattern of N. parisii in the lab is typical of microsporidian infections in nematodes. We describe a novel microsporidian species named Sporanauta perivermis (marine spore of roundworms) and characterize its infection in its natural host, the free-living marine nematode Odontophora rectangula. S. perivermis is not closely related to N. parisii and differs strikingly in all aspects of infection. Examination by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that the infection was localized in the hypodermal and muscle tissues only and did not involve the intestines. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) confirmed infection in the muscle and hypodermis, and surprisingly, it also revealed that the parasite infects O. rectangula eggs, suggesting a vertical mode of transmission. Our observations highlight the importance of studying parasites in their natural hosts and indicate that not all nematode-infecting microsporidia are “nematode killers”; instead, microsporidiosis can be more versatile and chronic in the wild. PMID:23087371

  3. Molecular Characterization of an rsmD-Like rRNA Methyltransferase from the Wolbachia Endosymbiont of Brugia malayi and Antifilarial Activity of Specific Inhibitors of the Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Ajay Kumar; Chandra, Sharat; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran

    2013-01-01

    The endosymbiotic organism Wolbachia is an attractive antifilarial drug target. Here we report on the cloning and expression of an rsmD-like rRNA methyltransferase from the Wolbachia endosymbiont of Brugia malayi, its molecular properties, and assays for specific inhibitors. The gene was found to be expressed in all the major life stages of B. malayi. The purified enzyme expressed in Escherichia coli was found to be in monomer form in its native state. The activities of the specific inhibitors (heteroaryl compounds) against the enzyme were tested with B. malayi adult and microfilariae for 7 days in vitro at various concentrations, and NSC-659390 proved to be the most potent compound (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50], 0.32 μM), followed by NSC-658343 (IC50, 4.13 μM) and NSC-657589 (IC50, 7.5 μM). On intraperitoneal administration at 5 mg/kg of body weight for 7 days to adult jirds into which B. malayi had been transplanted intraperitoneally, all the compounds killed a significant proportion of the implanted worms. A very similar result was observed in infected mastomys when inhibitors were administered. Docking studies of enzyme and inhibitors and an in vitro tryptophan quenching experiment were also performed to understand the binding mode and affinity. The specific inhibitors of the enzyme showed a higher affinity for the catalytic site of the enzyme than the nonspecific inhibitors and were found to be potent enough to kill the worm (both adults and microfilariae) in vitro as well as in vivo in a matter of days at micromolar concentrations. The findings suggest that these compounds be evaluated against other pathogens possessing a methyltransferase with a DPPY motif and warrant the design and synthesis of more such inhibitors. PMID:23733469

  4. Larval nematodes found in amphibians from northeastern Argentina.

    PubMed

    González, C E; Hamann, M I

    2010-11-01

    Five species of amphibians, Leptodactylus podicipinus, Scinax acuminatus, S. nasicus, Rhinella fernandezae and Pseudis paradoxa, were collected in Corrientes province, Argentina and searched for larval nematodes. All larval nematodes were found as cysts in the serous of the stomach of hosts. Were identified one superfamily, Seuratoidea; one genus, Spiroxys (Superfamily Gnathostomatoidea) and one family, Rhabdochonidae (Superfamily Thelazioidea). We present a description and illustrations of these taxa. These nematodes have an indirect life cycle and amphibians are infected by consuming invertebrate, the intermediate hosts. The genus Spiroxys and superfamily Seuratoidea were reported for the first time for Argentinean amphibians. PMID:21180919

  5. Biocontrol: Bacillus penetrans and Related Parasites of Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Sayre, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    Bacillus penetrans Mankau, 1975, previously described as Duboscqia penetrans Thorne 1940, is a candidate agent for biocontrol of nematodes. This review considers the life stages of this bacterium: vegetative growth phase, colony fragmentation, sporogenesis, soil phase, spore attachment, and penetration into larvae of root-knot nematodes. The morphology of the microthallus colonies and the unusual external features of the spore are discussed. Taxonomic affinities with the actinomycetes, particularly with the genus Pasteuria, are considered. Also discussed are other soil bacterial species that are potential biocontrol agents. Products of their bacterial fermentation in soil are toxic to nematodes, making them effective biocontrol agents. PMID:19300701

  6. Nematode Community Structure in Forest Woodlots. II. Ordination of Nematode Communities.

    PubMed

    Johnson, S R; Ferris, J M; Ferris, V R

    1973-04-01

    Intersite relationships among nematode communities of 18 Indiana mixed hardwood stands of varying composition, soils, physiography and past management practices were determined by community ordination techniques. All sites were sampled in April, July and October of 1968 and 1969, and ordinations were based on the number of individuals of each nematode species at each site at each sampling period. The resulting groupings correlated well with groupings based on forest types and successional stages of the tree communities at the sites, and also with groupings based on well-defined soil types. Results were similar to those obtained previously with a resemblance equation which used qualitative data only; but the present study provided more information on species associations and relationships and ecological distance between sites. PMID:19319313

  7. Effects of catechin polyphenols and preparations from the plant-parasitic nematode Heterodera glycines on protease activity and behavior in three nematode species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protease activities in preparations from the plant-parasitic nematodes Heterodera glycines and Meloidogyne incognita and the free-living nematode Panagrellus redivivus were inhibited by exposure to a series of 8 catechin polyphenol analogs, (+)-catechin, (-)- epicatechin (EC), (-)-gallocatechin (GC)...

  8. The Effects of Root-knot Nematode Infection and Mi-mediated Nematode Resistance in Tomato on Plant Fitness

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, Brandon P.; Jia, Lingling; Sayler, Ronald J.; Arevalo-Soliz, Lirio Milenka

    2011-01-01

    The Mi-1.2 resistance gene in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) confers resistance against several species of root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.). This study examined the impact of M. javanica on the reproductive fitness of near-isogenic tomato cultivars with and without Mi-1.2 under field and greenhouse conditions. Surprisingly, neither nematode inoculation or host plant resistance impacted the yield of mature fruits in field microplots (inoculum=8,000 eggs/plant), or fruit or seed production in a follow-up greenhouse bioassay conducted with a higher inoculum level (20,000 eggs/plant). However, under heavy nematode pressure (200,000 eggs/plant), greenhouse-grown plants carrying Mi-1.2 had more than ten-fold greater fruit production than susceptible plants and nearly forty-fold greater estimated lifetime seed production, confirming prior reports of the benefits of Mi-1.2. In all cases Mi-mediated resistance significantly reduced nematode reproduction. These results indicated that tomato can utilize tolerance mechanisms to compensate for moderate levels of nematode infection, but that the Mi-1.2 resistance gene confers a dramatic fitness benefit under heavy nematode pressure. No significant cost of resistance was detected in the absence of nematode infection. PMID:22791916

  9. Sex and stripping

    PubMed Central

    Pellecchia, Marco; Grève, Pierre; Daffonchio, Daniele; Bandi, Claudio; Alma, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Wolbachia pipientis is known to infect only arthropods and nematodes (mainly filarial worms). A unique feature shared by the two Phyla is the ability to replace the exoskeleton, a process known as ecdysis. This shared characteristic is thought to reflect a common ancestry. Arthropod moulting is induced by the steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and a role for ecdysteroids in nematode ecdysis has also been suggested. Removing Wolbachia from filarial worms impairs the host’s development. From analyses of the genome of Wolbachia harbored by the filarial nematode Brugia malayi and that of its host, the bacterium may provide a source of heme, an essential component of cytochrome P450’s that are necessary for steroid hormone biosynthetic pathways. In arthropods, Wolbachia is a reproductive manipulator, inducing various phenotypic effects that may be due to differences in host physiology, in particular, endocrine-related processes governing development and reproduction. Insect steroids have well-defined roles in the coordination of multiple developmental processes, and in adults they control important aspects of reproduction, including ovarian development, oogenesis, sexual behavior, and in some taxa vitellogenin biosynthesis. According to some authors ecdysteroids may also act as sex hormones. In insects sex differentiation is generally thought to be a strictly genetic process, in which each cell decides its own sexual fate based on its sex chromosome constitution, but, surprisingly, recent data demonstrate that in Drosophila sex determination is not cell-autonomous, as it happens in mammals. Thus the presence of signals coordinating the development of a gender-specific phenotype cannot be excluded. This could explain why Wolbachia interferes with insect reproduction; and also could explain why Wolbachia interferes with insect development. Thus, is “sex (=reproduction) and stripping (=ecdysis)” the key to the intimate relationship between Wolbachia and its

  10. Measurement of Circulating Filarial Antigen Levels in Human Blood with a Point-of-Care Test Strip and a Portable Spectrodensitometer.

    PubMed

    Chesnais, Cédric B; Vlaminck, Johnny; Kunyu-Shako, Billy; Pion, Sébastien D; Awaca-Uvon, Naomi-Pitchouna; Weil, Gary J; Mumba, Dieudonné; Boussinesq, Michel

    2016-06-01

    The Alere Filariasis Test Strip (FTS) is a qualitative, point-of-care diagnostic tool that detects Wuchereria bancrofti circulating filarial antigen (CFA) in human blood, serum, or plasma. The Global Program to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis employs the FTS for mapping filariasis-endemic areas and assessing the success of elimination efforts. The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between the intensity of positive test lines obtained by FTS with CFA levels as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with blood and plasma samples from 188 individuals who live in a filariasis-endemic area. The intensity of the FTS test line was assessed visually to provide a semiquantitative score (visual Filariasis Test Strip [vFTS]), and line intensity was measured with a portable spectrodensitometer (quantitative Filariasis Test Strip [qFTS]). These results were compared with antigen levels measured by ELISA in plasma from the same subjects. qFTS measurements were highly correlated with vFTS scores (ρ = 0.94; P < 0.001) and with plasma CFA levels (ρ = 0.91; P < 0.001). Thus, qFTS assessment is a convenient method for quantifying W. bancrofti CFA levels in human blood, which are correlated with adult worm burdens. This tool may be useful for assessing the impact of treatment on adult filarial worms in individuals and communities. PMID:27114288

  11. Measurement of Circulating Filarial Antigen Levels in Human Blood with a Point-of-Care Test Strip and a Portable Spectrodensitometer

    PubMed Central

    Chesnais, Cédric B.; Vlaminck, Johnny; Kunyu-Shako, Billy; Pion, Sébastien D.; Awaca-Uvon, Naomi-Pitchouna; Weil, Gary J.; Mumba, Dieudonné; Boussinesq, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The Alere Filariasis Test Strip (FTS) is a qualitative, point-of-care diagnostic tool that detects Wuchereria bancrofti circulating filarial antigen (CFA) in human blood, serum, or plasma. The Global Program to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis employs the FTS for mapping filariasis-endemic areas and assessing the success of elimination efforts. The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between the intensity of positive test lines obtained by FTS with CFA levels as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with blood and plasma samples from 188 individuals who live in a filariasis-endemic area. The intensity of the FTS test line was assessed visually to provide a semiquantitative score (visual Filariasis Test Strip [vFTS]), and line intensity was measured with a portable spectrodensitometer (quantitative Filariasis Test Strip [qFTS]). These results were compared with antigen levels measured by ELISA in plasma from the same subjects. qFTS measurements were highly correlated with vFTS scores (ρ = 0.94; P < 0.001) and with plasma CFA levels (ρ = 0.91; P < 0.001). Thus, qFTS assessment is a convenient method for quantifying W. bancrofti CFA levels in human blood, which are correlated with adult worm burdens. This tool may be useful for assessing the impact of treatment on adult filarial worms in individuals and communities. PMID:27114288

  12. MSP Dynamics and Retraction in Nematode Sperm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolgemuth, Charles W.

    2005-03-01

    Most eukaryotic cells can crawl over surfaces. In general, this motility requires three distinct actions: polymerization at the leading edge, adhesion to the substrate, and retraction at the rear. Recent in vitro experiments with extracts from spermatozoa from the nematode Ascaris suum suggest that retraction forces are generated by depolymerization of the Major Sperm Protein (MSP) cytoskeleton. Combining polymer entropy with a simple kinetic model for disassembly I propose a model for disassembly-induced retraction that fit the in vitro experimental data. This model explains the mechanism by which deconstruction of the cytoskeleton produces the force necessary to pull the cell body forward and suggest further experiments that can test the validity of the model.

  13. MSP dynamics and retraction in nematode sperm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolgemuth, Charles; Miao, Long; Vanderlinde, Orion; Roberts, Tom; Oster, George

    2005-03-01

    Most eukaryotic cells can crawl over surfaces. In general, this motility requires three distinct actions: polymerization at the leading edge, adhesion to the substrate, and retraction at the rear. Recent in vitro experiments with extracts from spermatozoa from the nematode Ascaris suum suggest that retraction forces are generated by depolymerization of the Major Sperm Protein (MSP) cytoskeleton. Combining polymer entropy with a simple kinetic model for disassembly I propose a model for disassembly-induced retraction that fit the in vitro experimental data. This model explains the mechanism by which deconstruction of the cytoskeleton produces the force necessary to pull the cell body forward and suggest further experiments that can test the validity of the model.

  14. Nematode parasite genes: what's in a name?

    PubMed

    Beech, Robin N; Wolstenholme, Adrian J; Neveu, Cédric; Dent, Joseph A

    2010-07-01

    The central theme of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet is that names are meaningless, artificial constructs, detached from any underlying reality. By contrast, we argue that a well chosen gene name can concisely convey a wealth of relevant biological information. A consistent nomenclature adds transparency that can have a real impact on our understanding of gene function. Currently, genes in parasitic nematodes are often named ad hoc, leading to confusion that can be resolved by adherence to a nomenclature standard adapted from Caenorhabditis elegans. We demonstrate this with ligand-gated ion-channels and propose that the flood of genome data and differences between parasites and the free living C. elegans will require modification of the standard. PMID:20478743

  15. Breeding a super nematode for enhanced insect pest suppression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Entomopathogenic nematodes in the genera Heterorhabditis and Steinernema are important regulators of natural insect populations, and are used commercially as biological control agents for pest suppression. Successful biocontrol applications depend on the introduced organism having an array of benef...

  16. Ecological Biogeography of the Terrestrial Nematodes of Victoria Land, Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Byron J.; Wall, Diana H.; Virginia, Ross A.; Broos, Emma; Knox, Matthew A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The terrestrial ecosystems of Victoria Land, Antarctica are characteristically simple in terms of biological diversity and ecological functioning. Nematodes are the most commonly encountered and abundant metazoans of Victoria Land soils, yet little is known of their diversity and distribution. Herein we present a summary of the geographic distribution, habitats and ecology of the terrestrial nematodes of Victoria Land from published and unpublished sources. All Victoria Land nematodes are endemic to Antarctica, and many are common and widely distributed at landscape scales. However, at smaller spatial scales, populations can have patchy distributions, with the presence or absence of each species strongly influenced by specific habitat requirements. As the frequency of nematode introductions to Antarctica increases, and soil habitats are altered in response to climate change, our current understanding of the environmental parameters associated with the biogeography of Antarctic nematofauna will be crucial to monitoring and possibly mitigating changes to these unique soil ecosystems. PMID:25061360

  17. Potential for Nematode Control by Mycofloras Endemic in the Tropics

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Kábana, R.; Morgan-Jones, G.

    1988-01-01

    Results of mycological surveys of root-knot and cyst nematodes from tropical regions indicate that most fungal species associated with females or cysts of species of Globodera, Heterodera, and Meloidogyne are those found with nematodes from temperate areas. Some fungal species, however, were found in higher frequency in tropical regions than in temperate countries; e.g., Cylindrocarpon destructans and Ulocladium atrum were the most common species associated with G. pallida and G. rostochiensis cysts in Peru. These fungi are not so frequent in nematodes from temperate areas. Fungi associated with diseased nematodes in the tropics vary greatly in nutritional requirements and include thermophilic species as well as cold-tolerant fungi. Multi-cropping systems possible in most tropical regions may be designed to increase the frequency of occurrence of microbial species antagonistic to phytonematodes. PMID:19290202

  18. Proteomics: an efficient tool to analyze nematode proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteomic technologies have been successfully used to analyze proteins structure and characterization in plants, animals, microbes and humans. We used proteomics methodologies to separate and characterize soybean cyst nematode (SCN) proteins. Optimizing the quantity of proteins required to separat...

  19. Nematode parasites of waterfowl (Anseriformes) from western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDonald, M.E.

    1974-01-01

    Thirty-four species of nematodes were found in 415 Anseriformes (Anatidae) of 27 species; 93.7% of birds over 4 weeks old were infected. Data on prevalence, host specificity, age of host, and geographic distribution are given. Infections were more intense in sick birds and birds in poor physical condition. Accidental or abnormal infection was more likely in sick than in normal birds. From 1 to 13 species of nematodes are reported from each host species, including 118 new host records, 3 nematodes new for North America, and 1 new species. Multiple infections were present in 76.5% of birds parasitized; eight species of nematodes were found in one whistling swan (Olor columbianus).

  20. Soil Organic Matter and Management of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Widmer, T. L.; Mitkowski, N. A.; Abawi, G. S.

    2002-01-01

    Organic matter and its replenishment has become a major component of soil health management programs. Many of the soil's physical, chemical, and biological properties are a function of organic matter content and quality. Adding organic matter to soil influences diverse and important biological activities. The diversity and number of free-living and plant-parasitic nematodes are altered by rotational crops, cover crops, green manures, and other sources of organic matter. Soil management programs should include the use of the proper organic materials to improve soil chemical, physical, and biological parameters and to suppress plant-parasitic nematodes and soilborne pathogens. It is critical to monitor the effects of organic matter additions on activities of major and minor plant-parasitic nematodes in the production system. This paper presents a general review of information in the literature on the effects of crop rotation, cover crops, and green manures on nematodes and their damage to economic crops. PMID:19265946

  1. Human gastrointestinal nematode infections: are new control methods required?

    PubMed Central

    Stepek, Gillian; Buttle, David J; Duce, Ian R; Behnke, Jerzy M

    2006-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) nematode infections affect 50% of the human population worldwide, and cause great morbidity as well as hundreds of thousands of deaths. Despite modern medical practices, the proportion of the population infected with GI nematodes is not falling. This is due to a number of factors, the most important being the lack of good healthcare, sanitation and health education in many developing countries. A relatively new problem is the development of resistance to the small number of drugs available to treat GI nematode infections. Here we review the most important parasitic GI nematodes and the methods available to control them. In addition, we discuss the current status of new anthelmintic treatments, particularly the plant cysteine proteinases from various sources of latex-bearing plants and fruits. PMID:16965561

  2. Gastrointestinal nematodes in dogs from Debre Zeit, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Yacob, H T; Ayele, T; Fikru, R; Basu, A K

    2007-09-01

    The study was conducted during the period between January 2005 and June 2006 to determine the frequency of gastrointestinal (GI) nematode infections of dogs in and around Debre Zeit, using qualitative and quantitative coprological (N = 100) and postmortem examinations (N = 20). By coproscopy 51% dogs were positive for different types of nematodal eggs, out of which 23.5% were with mixed infections. On necropsy 95% animals were found positive for adult parasites, of which 31.6% were showing more than one species of adult nematodes. The coproscopical examination revealed 32% infection with Ancylostoma caninum followed by Toxocara canis (21%), Spirocerca lupi (7%) and Trichuris vulpis (3%), while postmortem examination showed 70, 45, 23.5 and 5% infection, respectively. The study further indicated significant difference (P < 0.05) in overall frequency of GI nematode infections among different age groups but no difference (P > 0.05) between sexes. PMID:17614203

  3. Soil organic matter and management of plant-parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Widmer, T L; Mitkowski, N A; Abawi, G S

    2002-12-01

    Organic matter and its replenishment has become a major component of soil health management programs. Many of the soil's physical, chemical, and biological properties are a function of organic matter content and quality. Adding organic matter to soil influences diverse and important biological activities. The diversity and number of free-living and plant-parasitic nematodes are altered by rotational crops, cover crops, green manures, and other sources of organic matter. Soil management programs should include the use of the proper organic materials to improve soil chemical, physical, and biological parameters and to suppress plant-parasitic nematodes and soilborne pathogens. It is critical to monitor the effects of organic matter additions on activities of major and minor plant-parasitic nematodes in the production system. This paper presents a general review of information in the literature on the effects of crop rotation, cover crops, and green manures on nematodes and their damage to economic crops. PMID:19265946

  4. Motility of small nematodes in disordered wet granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juarez, Gabriel; Lu, Kevin; Sznitman, Josue; Arratia, Paulo E.

    2010-11-01

    Organisms that evolve within complex fluidic environments often develop unique methods of locomotion that allow them to exploit the properties of the media. In this talk, we present an investigation on the motility of the worm nematode Caenorhabditis elegans in shallow, wet granular media as a function of particle size dispersity and area density (φ) using both particle- and nematode-tracking methods. Surprisingly, the nematode's propulsion speed is enhanced by the presence of particles in a fluid and is nearly independent of local area density. The undulation speed, often used to differentiate locomotion gaits, is significantly affected by particle size dispersity for area densities above φ> 0.55, and is characterized by a change in the nematode's waveform from swimming to crawling. This change occurs for dense polydisperse media only and highlights the organism's adaptability to subtle differences in local structure between monodisperse and polydisperse media.

  5. SCREENING OF TRANSGENIC ANTHURIUMS FOR BACTERIAL BLIGHT AND NEMATODE RESISTANCE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anthuriums exhibit limited resistance to bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae and to the nematodes Radopholus simile and Meloidogyne javanica. Agrobacterium tumefaciens transformation of embryogenic calli with strains LBA4404, EHA105, and AGLO resulted in transgenic p...

  6. [Effects of phytase transgenic corn planting on soil nematode community].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zong-Chao; Su, Ying; Mou, Wen-Ya; Liu, Man-Qiang; Chen, Xiao-Yun; Chen, Fa-Jun

    2014-04-01

    A healthy soil ecosystem is essential for nutrient cycling and energy conversion, and the impact of exogenous genes from genetically modified crops had aroused wide concerns. Phytase transgenic corn (i. e., the inbred line BVLA430101) was issued a bio-safety certificate on 27 September 2009 in China, which could improve the efficiency of feed utilization, reduce environmental pollution caused by animal manure. In this study, the abundance of trophic groups, community structure and ecological indices of soil nematodes were studied over the growing cycle of phytase transgenic corn (ab. transgenic corn) and control conventional parental corn (ab. control corn) in the field. Totally 29 and 26 nematode genera were isolated from transgenic corn and control corn fields, respectively. The abundances of bacterivores and omnivores-predators, the total number of soil nematodes, and the Shannon index (H) were significantly greater under transgenic corn than under control corn, while the opposite trend was found for the relative abundance of herbivores and the maturity index (Sigma MI) of soil nematodes. Repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) did not detect any significant effects of transgenic corn on the composition and abundance of nematode trophic groups and ecological indices of soil nematodes. Furthermore, the Student-T test showed that the abundances of bacterivores and omnivores-predators and the total number of soil nematodes during the milk-ripe stage were significant higher in the transgenic corn field than in the control corn field. The effects of transgenic corn planting on soil nematodes might be related to the increase in the nitrogen content of field soil under transgenic corn compared to control corn. PMID:25011306

  7. Dermatitis due to larvae of a soil nematode, Pelodera strongyloides.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, B; Beaver, P C; Wilson, E R; Whitley, R J

    1984-07-01

    A 6-month-old infant girl was seen because of failure to thrive and hyperpigmented papulonodules on the lower abdomen and thighs. Results of skin biopsy demonstrated dauer larvae of a soil nematode, Pelodera strongyloides, in the dermis. This is the second documented episode of human dermatitis due to this nematode, which more often invades the skin of dogs, cattle, horses, and sheep. PMID:6542207

  8. Low cryoprotectant concentrations and fast cooling for nematode cryostorage.

    PubMed

    Irdani, Tiziana; Scotto, Cristina; Roversi, Pio Federico

    2011-08-01

    Cryopreservation protocols based on slow freezing or vitrification often result in cell injury due to ice formation, cell dehydration and/or toxic concentrations of cryoprotectant (CPA). In this study, we present a cryopreservation technique based on low, non-toxic concentrations of cryoprotectants (≈ 2-4M) combined with a rapid cooling rate in the liquid nitrogen phase (-196°C). Protocols for successfully cryopreserving the plant parasitic nematodes Globodera tabacum tabacum, Heterodera schachtii and Meloidogyne incognita were developed, as demonstrated by the high survival rates and reproducibility of cyst and root-knot nematode species post-cryostorage. This approach for effective cryopreservation of viable plant-parasitic nematodes was developed by inducing an "apparent vitrification" by rapid cooling of the microscopic samples in less than 2M of cryoprotectant. The extremely thin structure (15-20 μm width, 350-400 μm length) of these nematodes, in combination with a direct and rapid exposure to LN(2), likely prevents the formation of damaging ice crystals. Moreover, this procedure results in viability of both short- and long-cryostorage samples. These techniques could potentially be used for the near-indefinite preservation of thousands of different nematode species. A cryo-nematode collection produced in our lab is available and presented here. PMID:21524646

  9. Communities of terrestrial nematodes after different approaches to heathland restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radochova, Petra; Frouz, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Since the 20th century, the distribution of European heathlands rapidly decreased due to agricultural intensification, heavy use of artificial fertilizers or acidification (Aerts & Heil, 1993). Therefore, various attempts of heathland restoration are under way in these days. Analysis of nematode community composition can be one of the tools suitable for succession evaluation (Ferris et al., 2001). In 2011, 2013 and 2014, soil samples were collected from heathland restoration experiment (launched in 2011) where different restoration methods were applied in a 3 × 3 factorial experiment; existing heathlands were also sampled to identify the target community both in dry and wet heathland. A total of 60 samples of extracted nematodes were analysed for absolute abundance, trophic groups, and genera dominance. Various indices were calculated to describe the nematode community. We were able to prove faster development of wet heathlands towards the target community. However, because of large data variability, there was no significant difference between treatments. Development of wet and dry heathlands differed also in increased proportion of omniphagous nematodes in 2013 and predators in 2014 in dry heathlands. After three years of heathland restoration, nematode community has not yet reached parameters of the target community. References Aerts, R., Heil, G. W., 1993. Heathlands: patterns and processes in a changing environment, 1st ed, Geobotany: 20. Springer Netherlands, Dordrecht, p. 229. Ferris, H., Bongers, T., De Goede, R. G. M., 2001. A framework for soil food web diagnostics: Extension of the nematode faunal analysis oncept. Appl. Soil Ecol. 18, 13-29.

  10. Dispersal and gene flow in free-living marine nematodes.

    PubMed

    Derycke, Sofie; Backeljau, Thierry; Moens, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Dispersal and gene flow determine connectivity among populations, and can be studied through population genetics and phylogeography. We here review the results of such a framework for free-living marine nematodes. Although field experiments have illustrated substantial dispersal in nematodes at ecological time scales, analysis of the genetic diversity illustrated the importance of priority effects, founder effects and genetic bottlenecks for population structuring between patches <1 km apart. In contrast, only little genetic structuring was observed within an estuary (<50 km), indicating that these small scale fluctuations in genetic differentiation are stabilized over deeper time scales through extensive gene flow. Interestingly, nematode species with contrasting life histories (extreme colonizers vs persisters) or with different habitat preferences (algae vs sediment) show similar, low genetic structuring. Finally, historical events have shaped the genetic pattern of marine nematodes and show that gene flow is restricted at large geographical scales. We also discuss the presence of substantial cryptic diversity in marine nematodes, and end with highlighting future important steps to further unravel nematode evolution and diversity. PMID:23356547

  11. Dispersal and gene flow in free-living marine nematodes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Dispersal and gene flow determine connectivity among populations, and can be studied through population genetics and phylogeography. We here review the results of such a framework for free-living marine nematodes. Although field experiments have illustrated substantial dispersal in nematodes at ecological time scales, analysis of the genetic diversity illustrated the importance of priority effects, founder effects and genetic bottlenecks for population structuring between patches <1 km apart. In contrast, only little genetic structuring was observed within an estuary (<50 km), indicating that these small scale fluctuations in genetic differentiation are stabilized over deeper time scales through extensive gene flow. Interestingly, nematode species with contrasting life histories (extreme colonizers vs persisters) or with different habitat preferences (algae vs sediment) show similar, low genetic structuring. Finally, historical events have shaped the genetic pattern of marine nematodes and show that gene flow is restricted at large geographical scales. We also discuss the presence of substantial cryptic diversity in marine nematodes, and end with highlighting future important steps to further unravel nematode evolution and diversity. PMID:23356547

  12. Conserved nematode signalling molecules elicit plant defenses and pathogen resistance

    PubMed Central

    Manosalva, Patricia; Manohar, Murli; von Reuss, Stephan H.; Chen, Shiyan; Koch, Aline; Kaplan, Fatma; Choe, Andrea; Micikas, Robert J.; Wang, Xiaohong; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Sternberg, Paul W.; Williamson, Valerie M.; Schroeder, Frank C.; Klessig, Daniel F.

    2015-01-01

    Plant-defense responses are triggered by perception of conserved microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs), for example, flagellin or peptidoglycan. However, it remained unknown whether plants can detect conserved molecular patterns derived from plant-parasitic animals, including nematodes. Here we show that several genera of plant-parasitic nematodes produce small molecules called ascarosides, an evolutionarily conserved family of nematode pheromones. Picomolar to micromolar concentrations of ascr#18, the major ascaroside in plant-parasitic nematodes, induce hallmark defense responses including the expression of genes associated with MAMP-triggered immunity, activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, as well as salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid-mediated defense signalling pathways. Ascr#18 perception increases resistance in Arabidopsis, tomato, potato and barley to viral, bacterial, oomycete, fungal and nematode infections. These results indicate that plants recognize ascarosides as a conserved molecular signature of nematodes. Using small-molecule signals such as ascarosides to activate plant immune responses has potential utility to improve economic and environmental sustainability of agriculture. PMID:26203561

  13. Conserved nematode signalling molecules elicit plant defenses and pathogen resistance.

    PubMed

    Manosalva, Patricia; Manohar, Murli; von Reuss, Stephan H; Chen, Shiyan; Koch, Aline; Kaplan, Fatma; Choe, Andrea; Micikas, Robert J; Wang, Xiaohong; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Sternberg, Paul W; Williamson, Valerie M; Schroeder, Frank C; Klessig, Daniel F

    2015-01-01

    Plant-defense responses are triggered by perception of conserved microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs), for example, flagellin or peptidoglycan. However, it remained unknown whether plants can detect conserved molecular patterns derived from plant-parasitic animals, including nematodes. Here we show that several genera of plant-parasitic nematodes produce small molecules called ascarosides, an evolutionarily conserved family of nematode pheromones. Picomolar to micromolar concentrations of ascr#18, the major ascaroside in plant-parasitic nematodes, induce hallmark defense responses including the expression of genes associated with MAMP-triggered immunity, activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, as well as salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid-mediated defense signalling pathways. Ascr#18 perception increases resistance in Arabidopsis, tomato, potato and barley to viral, bacterial, oomycete, fungal and nematode infections. These results indicate that plants recognize ascarosides as a conserved molecular signature of nematodes. Using small-molecule signals such as ascarosides to activate plant immune responses has potential utility to improve economic and environmental sustainability of agriculture. PMID:26203561

  14. Nematode Communities in Organically and Conventionally Managed Agricultural Soils

    PubMed Central

    Neher, Deborah A.

    1999-01-01

    Interpretation of nematode community indices requires a reference to a relatively undisturbed community. Maturity and trophic diversity index values were compared for five pairs of certified organically and conventionally managed soils in the Piedmont region of North Carolina. Available nitrogen (nitrate, ammonium) was estimated at various lag periods relative to times of sampling for nematode communities to determine the strength of correlative relationship between nematode communities and nitrogen availability. Soils were sampled six times yearly in 1993 and 1994 to determine the best time of year to sample. Maturity values for plant parasites were greater in organically than conventionally managed soils, and differences between management systems were greater in fall than spring months. However, other maturity and diversity indices did not differ between the two management practices. Differences in crop species grown in the two systems accounted for most differences observed in the community of plant-parasitic nematodes. Indices of free-living nematodes were correlated negatively with concentrations of ammonium, whereas indices of plant-parasitic nematodes were correlated positively with concentrations of nitrate. Due to the similarity of index values between the two systems, organically managed soils are not suitable reference sites for monitoring and assessing the biological aspects of soil quality for annually harvested crops. PMID:19270884

  15. Soil Sampling and Isolation of Entomopathogenic Nematodes (Steinernematidae, Heterorhabditidae)

    PubMed Central

    Orozco, Rousel A.; Lee, Ming-Min; Stock, S. Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Entomopathogenic nematodes (a.k.a. EPN) represent a group of soil-inhabiting nematodes that parasitize a wide range of insects. These nematodes belong to two families: Steinernematidae and Heterorhabditidae. Until now, more than 70 species have been described in the Steinernematidae and there are about 20 species in the Heterorhabditidae. The nematodes have a mutualistic partnership with Enterobacteriaceae bacteria and together they act as a potent insecticidal complex that kills a wide range of insect species. Herein, we focus on the most common techniques considered for collecting EPN from soil. The second part of this presentation focuses on the insect-baiting technique, a widely used approach for the isolation of EPN from soil samples, and the modified White trap technique which is used for the recovery of these nematodes from infected insects. These methods and techniques are key steps for the successful establishment of EPN cultures in the laboratory and also form the basis for other bioassays that consider these nematodes as model organisms for research in other biological disciplines. The techniques shown in this presentation correspond to those performed and/or designed by members of S. P. Stock laboratory as well as those described by various authors. PMID:25046023

  16. Nematode infection: A rare mimic of acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Hotchen, Andrew; Chin, Kian; Raja, Mahzar

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Acute appendicitis is a common condition seen in all surgical units. One rare condition that can mimic acute appendicitis is a nematode infection of the bowel. There have been few reported cases of nematode infection within the appendix and none that have been accompanied by intra-operative pictures. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 16-year-old female presented with a 12 h history of right iliac fossa pain and mild pyrexia. Bloods showed a neutrophilia and normal C-reactive protein. Laparoscopy was performed which revealed a non-inflamed appendix. The appendix was dissected and a live nematode was visualised exiting the base of the appendix. Anti-helminthics were given and the infection resolved. DISCUSSION Nematode infection is most commonly seen in Africa, Asia and South America. When seen within the United Kingdom (UK), it is seen most commonly within high-risk populations. Testing for these infections is not routine within the UK and when they are performed, the results take a considerable amount of time to return. These tests should be considered within high-risk populations so that unnecessary surgery can be avoided. CONCLUSION This case highlights the importance of considering rare causes of right iliac fossa pain including nematode infection in a young patient. The case highlights this by giving intra-operative pictures of live nematodes upon dissection of the appendix. PMID:25024022

  17. Directional movement of entomopathogenic nematodes in response to electrical fields: Effects of species, magnitude of voltage, and infective juvenile age

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Entomopathogenic nematodes respond to a variety of stimuli when foraging. Previously, we reported a directional response to electrical fields for two entomopathogenic nematode species; specifically, when electrical fields were generated on agar plates Steinernema glaseri (a nematode that utilizes a...

  18. Tomato transgenic plants expressing hairpin construct of a nematode protease gene conferred enhanced resistance to root-knot nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Tushar K.; Papolu, Pradeep K.; Banakar, Prakash; Choudhary, Divya; Sirohi, Anil; Rao, Uma

    2015-01-01

    Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne incognita) cause substantial yield losses in vegetables worldwide, and are difficult to manage. Continuous withdrawal of environmentally-harmful nematicides from the global market warrants the need for novel nematode management strategies. Utility of host-delivered RNAi has been demonstrated in several plants (Arabidopsis, tobacco, and soybean) that exhibited resistance against root-knot and cyst nematodes. Herein, a M. incognita-specific protease gene, cathepsin L cysteine proteinase (Mi-cpl-1), was targeted to generate tomato transgenic lines to evaluate the genetically modified nematode resistance. In vitro knockdown of Mi-cpl-1 gene led to the reduced attraction and penetration of M. incognita in tomato, suggesting the involvement of Mi-cpl-1 in nematode parasitism. Transgenic expression of the RNAi construct of Mi-cpl-1 gene resulted in 60–80% reduction in infection and multiplication of M. incognita in tomato. Evidence for in vitro and in vivo silencing of Mi-cpl-1 was confirmed by expression analysis using quantitative PCR. Our study demonstrates that Mi-cpl-1 plays crucial role during plant-nematode interaction and plant-mediated downregulation of this gene elicits detrimental effect on M. incognita development, reinforcing the potential of RNAi technology for management of phytonematodes in crop plants. PMID:25883594

  19. Glyceollin I in Soybean-Cyst Nematode Interactions 1

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jeng-Sheng; Barker, Kenneth R.

    1991-01-01

    Accumulation of the phytoalexin glyceollin I in roots of soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) following inoculation with race 1 of Heterodera glycines Ichinohe, the soybean cyst nematode (SCN), was determined in a whole-root system by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and in a cross-section system by a radioimmunoassay procedure. In the whole-root system, roots were harvested from controls and nematode-inoculated seedlings immediately after inoculation and at 2-day intervals for 8 days. The roots were extracted with ethanol, and the extracts were subjected to HPLC. Glyceollin I was not detected in roots of either resistant cultivar Centennial or susceptible cultivar Ransom immediately after inoculation with SCN but steadily accumulated in large quantity in roots of Centennial. Accumulation of glyceollin I in roots of Ransom following nematode inoculation was minimal. In the cross-section system, 3-day-old soybean seedlings were inoculated with juvenile nematodes, and root segments containing a single nematode were dissected from inoculated plants at 4-hour intervals under a dissecting microscope. The root segments were embedded in ice and cut into 16-micrometer sections with a cryostat microtome. The spatial and temporal distribution of glyceollin I was determined with a radioimmunoassay procedure specific for the phytoalexin. Glyceollin I was found to accumulate in tissues immediately adjacent to the head region of the nematode in Centennial but not in Ransom. Glyceollin I was detected 8 hours after nematode penetration, and the concentration increased steadily up to 0.3 micromole per milliliter in Centennial 24 hours after penetration. PMID:16668334

  20. Incidence and influence of plant-parasitic nematodes in southern Illinois peach orchards

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The frequency, distribution and impact of plant-parasitic nematodes in southern Illinois peach orchards were determined. Nine plant parasitic nematode genera were detected comprising 11 different species: Helicotylenchus platyurus, Helicotylenchus pseudorobustus, Hoplolaimus spp., Meloidogyne spp., ...

  1. SURVEY OF STYLET BEARING NEMATODES ASSOCIATED WITH DATE PALM IN KHUZDAR DISTRICT, BALOCHISTAN, PAKISTAN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surveys were conducted during September and October 2002 to identify the stylet-bearing nematodes associated with date palm in Khuzdar district, Balochistan, Pakistan. The nematodes recorded were Tylenchus sp., Merlinius sp., Helicotylenchus indicus, Psilenchus hilarulus, Aphelenchoides sp., Meloido...

  2. Taxonomy, morphology and phylogenetics of coffee-associated root-lesion nematodes, Pratylenchus spp

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Technical Abstract: Although lesion nematodes (Pratylenchus species) can reduce coffee yield worldwide, methods for their identification are often difficult to implement. This review summarizes the diagnostic morphological features for distinguishing the eight previously described lesion nematode sp...

  3. Precision and Selection of Extraction Methods of Aphelenchid Nematodes from Maritime Pine Wood, Pinus pinaster L.

    PubMed

    Penas, Ana C; Diias, Luis S; Mota, Manuel M

    2002-03-01

    Four extraction methods for Bursaphelenchus xylophilus and other aphelenchid nematodes were compared on the number of nematodes per gram recovered, and on the precision of the mean number of nematodes per gram of pine wood. The number of nematodes per gram recovered by each method, in addition to its inherent shortcomings when the actual number of nematodes is unknown, failed to provide clear rankings among the extraction methods. The precision of the mean number of nematodes per gram did provide clear guidelines for selection. Selection of the method may be based on prior knowledge about the range of nematodes to be expected or the independence of precision from the mean number of nematodes. PMID:19265909

  4. BACTERIAL PREFERENCES OF THE BACTERIVOROUS SOIL NEMATODE CEPHALOBUS BREVICAUDA (CEPHALOBIDAE): EFFECT OF BACTERIAL TYPE AND SIZE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cell size and type may affect availability of bacteria for consumption by bacterivorous nematodes in the soil and in culture. This study explored the bacterial preferences of the bacterivorous soil nematode Cephalobus brevicauda (Cephalobidae) by comparing bactgeria isolated dir...

  5. Susceptibility of the Strawberry Crown Moth Synanthedon bibionipennis (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae) to Entomopathogenic Nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to determine the susceptibility of the strawberry crown moth, Synanthedon bibionipennis (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae) larvae to two species of entomopathogenic nematodes(Steinernema carpocapsae (Weiser) Agriotos and Heterorhabditis bacteriophora (Steiner) Oswego). Nematodes...

  6. Phenotypic and molecular evaluation of cotton hairy roots as a model system for studying nematode resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cellular mechanisms that mediate resistance of allotetraploid cotton (Gossypium spp.) to root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) and reniform nematode (Rotylenchulus reniformis) are poorly understood. Here, Agrobacterium rhizogenes-induced hairy roots were investigated as a possible research...

  7. [Biology of gastrointestinal nematodes of ruminants].

    PubMed

    Manfredi, M T

    2006-09-01

    The development and survival of free-living stages of gastro-intestinal nematodes of small ruminants are influenced by several abiotic and biotic factors. Within the abiotic factors, most important are the environmental temperature and humidity. They regulate the development of larvae from eggs dispersed on the pasture by the animals faeces. Each parasite species that infect ruminants requires a different time to development, depending on temperature and humidity. Among trichostrongylids, Ostertagia, Teladorsagia and Nematodirus show a strong adaptation to low temperatures. Nematodirus larvae are able to survive to winter inside the egg shell. Temperature and humidity influence the distribution and survival of larvae on pasture. The larval third stage can migrate from faeces to pasture vegetation and they accumulate at the basis of vegetation where stay during the day or in the soil to avoid the desiccation. The forage species affects the migration of larvae on herbage too. Many biological factors contribute to disperse the larvae on the pasture. Dung burying beetles, coprophagous beetles and earthworms can greatly reduce the larvae of some trichostrongylids on pasture. They contribute to the spread of the faecal material on the pasture and allow the larval death as a consequence of drying. PMID:17176950

  8. Biodiversity of entomopathogenic nematodes in Italy.

    PubMed

    Tarasco, E; Clausi, M; Rappazzo, G; Panzavolta, T; Curto, G; Sorino, R; Oreste, M; Longo, A; Leone, D; Tiberi, R; Vinciguerra, M T; Triggiani, O

    2015-05-01

    An investigation was carried out on the distribution and biodiversity of steinernematid and heterorhabdtid entomopathogenic nematodes (EPN) in nine regions of Italy in the period 1990-2010. More than 2000 samples were collected from 580 localities and 133 of them yielded EPN specimens. A mapping of EPN distribution in Italy showed 133 indigenous EPN strains belonging to 12 species: 43 isolates of Heterorhabditis bacteriophora, 1 of H. downesi, 1 of H. megidis, 51 of Steinernema feltiae, 12 of S. affine, 4 of S. kraussei, 8 of S. apuliae, 5 of S. ichnusae, 3 of S. carpocapsae, 1 of S. vulcanicum, 3 of Steinernema 'isolate S.sp.MY7' of 'S. intermedium group' and 1 of S. arenarium. Steinernematids are more widespread than heterorhabditids and S. feltiae and H. bacteriophora are the most commonly encountered species. Sampling sites were grouped into 11 habitats: uncultivated land, orchard, field, sea coast, pinewood, broadleaf wood, grasslands, river and lake borders, caves, salt pan and moist zones; the soil texture of each site was defined and the preferences of habitat and soil texture of each species was assessed. Except for the two dominant species, S. feltiae and H. bacteriophora, EPN occurrence tends to be correlated with a specific vegetation habitat. Steinernema kraussei, H. downesi and H. megidis were collected only in Sicily and three of the species recently described - S. apuliae, S. ichnusae and S. vulcanicum - are known only from Italy and seem to be endemic. PMID:24721783

  9. In vitro proteolysis of nematode FLPs by preparations from the free-living nematode Panagrellus redivivus and two plant-parasitic nematodes (Heterodera glycines and Meloidogyne incognita)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteolytic activities in extracts from three nematodes, the plant parasites Heterodera glycines and Meloidogyne incognita, and the free-living Panagrellus redivivus, were surveyed for substrate preferences using a battery of seven FRET-modified peptide substrates, all derived from members of the la...

  10. Enzymology of the nematode cuticle: A potential drug target?

    PubMed

    Page, Antony P; Stepek, Gillian; Winter, Alan D; Pertab, David

    2014-08-01

    All nematodes possess an external structure known as the cuticle, which is crucial for their development and survival. This structure is composed primarily of collagen, which is secreted from the underlying hypodermal cells. Extensive studies using the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans demonstrate that formation of the cuticle requires the activity of an extensive range of enzymes. Enzymes are required both pre-secretion, for synthesis of component proteins such as collagen, and post-secretion, for removal of the previous developmental stage cuticle, in a process known as moulting or exsheathment. The excretion/secretion products of numerous parasitic nematodes contain metallo-, serine and cysteine proteases, and these proteases are conserved across the nematode phylum and many are involved in the moulting/exsheathment process. This review highlights the enzymes required for cuticle formation, with a focus on the post-secretion moulting events. Where orthologues of the C. elegans enzymes have been identified in parasitic nematodes these may represent novel candidate targets for future drug/vaccine development. PMID:25057463

  11. Signatures of adaptation to plant parasitism in nematode genomes.

    PubMed

    Bird, David McK; Jones, John T; Opperman, Charles H; Kikuchi, Taisei; Danchin, Etienne G J

    2015-02-01

    Plant-parasitic nematodes cause considerable damage to global agriculture. The ability to parasitize plants is a derived character that appears to have independently emerged several times in the phylum Nematoda. Morphological convergence to feeding style has been observed, but whether this is emergent from molecular convergence is less obvious. To address this, we assess whether genomic signatures can be associated with plant parasitism by nematodes. In this review, we report genomic features and characteristics that appear to be common in plant-parasitic nematodes while absent or rare in animal parasites, predators or free-living species. Candidate horizontal acquisitions of parasitism genes have systematically been found in all plant-parasitic species investigated at the sequence level. Presence of peptides that mimic plant hormones also appears to be a trait of plant-parasitic species. Annotations of the few genomes of plant-parasitic nematodes available to date have revealed a set of apparently species-specific genes on every occasion. Effector genes, important for parasitism are frequently found among those species-specific genes, indicating poor overlap. Overall, nematodes appear to have developed convergent genomic solutions to adapt to plant parasitism. PMID:25656361

  12. Organic and Inorganic Nitrogen Amendments to Soil as Nematode Suppressants

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Kábana, R.

    1986-01-01

    Inorganic fertilizers containing ammoniacal nitrogen or formulations releasing this form of N in the soil are most effective for suppressing nematode populations. Anhydrous ammonia has been shown to reduce soil populations of Tylenchorhynchus claytoni, Helicotylenchus dihystera, and Heterodera glycines. The rates required to obtain significant suppression of nematode populations are generally in excess of 150 kg N/ha. Urea also suppresses several nematode species, including Meloidogyne spp., when applied at rates above 300 kg N/ha. Additional available carbon must be provided with urea to permit soil microorganisms to metabolize excess N and avoid phytotoxic effects. There is a direct relation between the amount of "protein" N in organic amendments and their effectiveness as nematode population suppressants. Most nematicidal amendments are oil cakes, or animal excrements containing 2-7% (w:w) N; these materials are effective at rates of 4-10 t/ha. Organic soil amendments containing mucopolysaccharides (e.g., mycelial wastes, chitinous matter) are also effective nematode suppressants. PMID:19294153

  13. Proteomic Investigation of Photorhabdus Bacteria for Nematode-Host Specificity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ram; Kushwah, Jyoti; Ganguly, Sudershan; Garg, Veena; Somvanshi, Vishal S

    2016-09-01

    Majority of animals form symbiotic relationships with bacteria. Based on the number of bacterial species associating with an animal, these symbiotic associations can be mono-specific, relatively simple (2-25 bacterial species/animal) or highly complex (>10(2)-10(3) bacterial species/animal). Photorhabdus (family-Enterobacteriaceae) forms a mono-specific symbiotic relationship with the entomopathogenic nematode Heterorhabditis. This system provides a tractable genetic model for animal-microbe symbiosis studies. Here, we investigated the bacterial factors that may be responsible for governing host specificity between nematode and their symbiont bacteria using proteomics approach. Total protein profiles of P. luminescens ssp. laumondii (host nematode- H. bacteriophora) and P. luminescens ssp. akhurstii (host nematode- H. indica) were compared using 2-D gel electrophoresis, followed by identification of differentially expressed proteins by MALDI-TOF MS. Thirty-nine unique protein spots were identified - 24 from P. luminescens ssp. laumondii and 15 from P. luminescens ssp. akhurstii. These included proteins that might be involved in determining host specificity directly (for e.g. pilin FimA, outer membrane protein A), indirectly through effect on bacterial secondary metabolism (for e.g. malate dehydrogenase Mdh, Pyruvate formate-lyase PflA, flavo protein WrbA), or in a yet unknown manner (for e.g. hypothetical proteins, transcription regulators). Further functional validation is needed to establish the role of these bacterial proteins in nematode-host specificity. PMID:27407301

  14. Variation in the Susceptibility of Drosophila to Different Entomopathogenic Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Jennifer M.; Carrillo, Mayra A.

    2015-01-01

    Entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) in the genera Heterorhabditis and Steinernema are lethal parasites of insects that are of interest as models for understanding parasite-host interactions and as biocontrol agents for insect pests. EPNs harbor a bacterial endosymbiont in their gut that assists in insect killing. EPNs are capable of infecting and killing a wide range of insects, yet how the nematodes and their bacterial endosymbionts interact with the insect immune system is poorly understood. Here, we develop a versatile model system for understanding the insect immune response to parasitic nematode infection that consists of seven species of EPNs as model parasites and five species of Drosophila fruit flies as model hosts. We show that the EPN Steinernema carpocapsae, which is widely used for insect control, is capable of infecting and killing D. melanogaster larvae. S. carpocapsae is associated with the bacterium Xenorhabdus nematophila, and we show that X. nematophila induces expression of a subset of antimicrobial peptide genes and suppresses the melanization response to the nematode. We further show that EPNs vary in their virulence toward D. melanogaster and that Drosophila species vary in their susceptibilities to EPN infection. Differences in virulence among different EPN-host combinations result from differences in both rates of infection and rates of postinfection survival. Our results establish a powerful model system for understanding mechanisms of host-parasite interactions and the insect immune response to parasitic nematode infection. PMID:25561714

  15. Nematode Chemotaxis: Gradual Turns, Sharp Turns, and Modulated Turn Angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Amar; Padmanabhan, Venkat; Rumbaugh, Kendra; Vanapalli, Siva; Blawzdziewicz, Jerzy

    2013-03-01

    We examine strategies used by the soil-dwelling nematode Caenorhabditis Elegans for chemotaxis in complex environments. The proposed description is based on our recently developed piecewise-harmonic-curvature model of nematode locomotion [PLoS ONE, 7(7) e40121 (2012)], where random harmonic-curvature modes represent elementary locomotory movements. We show that the previously described gradual-turn and sharp-turn chemotaxis strategies can be unified in our model. The gradual-turn mechanism relies on crawling amplitude changes commensurate with the undulation frequency. The sharp-turn mechanism consists in modulation of the frequency of jumps to large-amplitude modes. We hypothesize that there exists a third strategy, where the nematode adjusts the variance of the amplitude distribution. Such adjustments result in a modulation of the magnitude of random turns, with smaller turns performed when the nematode moves toward the increasing chemoatractant concentration. Experiments are proposed to determine if the third strategy is present in the nematode behavior. This work was supported by NSF grant No. CBET 1059745.

  16. Experimental Studies with Nematodes in Ecotoxicology: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Hägerbäumer, Arne; Höss, Sebastian; Heininger, Peter; Traunspurger, Walter

    2015-01-01

    With respect to their high abundances, their role as intermediaries between microorganisms and higher trophic levels, and their ubiquitous occurrence in all habitats, nematodes are of strong potential interest as environmental indicators. Ecotoxicological methods to evaluate the risk of anthropogenic pollutants on ecosystems require both in vitro and in vivo toxicity tests to investigate either mechanisms or pathways of toxicity and to set accurate toxicity thresholds. For this, the interest in nematodes as model organisms in ecotoxicology increased over the past few decades and existing appropriate experimental methods are reviewed in this manuscript. An overview of the various existing ecotoxicological tools for nematodes, ranging from molecular laboratory methods to experimental model ecosystem approaches, and their role as indicator organisms is given. The reviewed studies, approaches that range from species-based to community-based methods, reveal exciting possibilities for the future use of nematodes in ecotoxicological studies. Suitable ecotoxicological tools and ecological indices for nematodes should be integrated in weight-of-evidence approaches for assessing the ecological risk of contamination. PMID:25861113

  17. The FMRFamide-Like Peptide Family in Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Peymen, Katleen; Watteyne, Jan; Frooninckx, Lotte; Schoofs, Liliane; Beets, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    In the three decades since the FMRFamide peptide was isolated from the mollusk Macrocallista nimbosa, structurally similar peptides sharing a C-terminal RFamide motif have been identified across the animal kingdom. FMRFamide-like peptides (FLPs) represent the largest known family of neuropeptides in invertebrates. In the phylum Nematoda, at least 32 flp-genes are classified, making the FLP system of nematodes unusually complex. The diversity of the nematode FLP complement is most extensively mapped in Caenorhabditis elegans, where over 70 FLPs have been predicted. FLPs have shown to be expressed in the majority of the 302 C. elegans neurons including interneurons, sensory neurons, and motor neurons. The vast expression of FLPs is reflected in the broad functional repertoire of nematode FLP signaling, including neuroendocrine and neuromodulatory effects on locomotory activity, reproduction, feeding, and behavior. In contrast to the many identified nematode FLPs, only few peptides have been assigned a receptor and there is the need to clarify the pathway components and working mechanisms of the FLP signaling network. Here, we review the diversity, distribution, and functions of FLPs in nematodes. PMID:24982652

  18. Filarial Lymphedema Is Characterized by Antigen-Specific Th1 and Th17 Proinflammatory Responses and a Lack of Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Subash; Bhat, Sajid Q.; Pavan Kumar, N.; Lipira, Angelo B.; Kumar, Sanath; Karthik, C.; Kumaraswami, V.; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2009-01-01

    Background Lymphatic filariasis can be associated with development of serious pathology in the form of lymphedema, hydrocele, and elephantiasis in a subset of infected patients. Methods and Findings To elucidate the role of CD4+ T cell subsets in the development of lymphatic pathology, we examined specific sets of cytokines in individuals with filarial lymphedema in response to parasite antigen (BmA) and compared them with responses from asymptomatic infected individuals. We also examined expression patterns of Toll-like receptors (TLR1–10) and Nod-like receptors (Nod1, Nod2, and NALP3) in response to BmA. BmA induced significantly higher production of Th1-type cytokines—IFN-γ and TNF-α—in patients with lymphedema compared with asymptomatic individuals. Notably, expression of the Th17 family of cytokines—IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-21, and IL-23—was also significantly upregulated by BmA stimulation in lymphedema patients. In contrast, expression of Foxp3, GITR, TGFβ, and CTLA-4, known to be expressed by regulatory T cells, was significantly impaired in patients with lymphedema. BmA also induced significantly higher expression of TLR2, 4, 7, and 9 as well Nod1 and 2 mRNA in patients with lymphedema compared with asymptomatic controls. Conclusion Our findings implicate increased Th1/Th17 responses and decreased regulatory T cells as well as regulation of Toll- and Nod-like receptors in pathogenesis of filarial lymphedema. PMID:19381284

  19. Mechanisms of molecular mimicry of plant CLE peptide ligands by the parasitic nematode Globodera rostochiensis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nematodes that parasitize plant roots cause huge economic losses and have few mechanisms for control. Many parasitic nematodes infect plants by reprogramming root development to drive the formation of feeding structures. How nematodes take control of plant development is largely unknown. The CLE ...

  20. 7 CFR 301.85-9 - Movement of live golden nematodes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Movement of live golden nematodes. 301.85-9 Section... INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Golden Nematode Quarantine and Regulations § 301.85-9 Movement of live golden nematodes. Regulations requiring a permit for and...

  1. 7 CFR 301.85-9 - Movement of live golden nematodes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Movement of live golden nematodes. 301.85-9 Section... INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Golden Nematode Quarantine and Regulations § 301.85-9 Movement of live golden nematodes. Regulations requiring a permit for and...

  2. Occurence of phytoparasitic nematodes associated with some crop plants in Northern Egypt

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Information concerning the occurrence and distribution of phytoparasitic nematodes in Egypt is very important for agricultural production. A nematode survey was conducted in northern Egypt to identify the genera and species of phytoparasitic nematodes associated with some crop plants. A total of 240...

  3. 7 CFR 301.85-9 - Movement of live golden nematodes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Movement of live golden nematodes. 301.85-9 Section... INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Golden Nematode Quarantine and Regulations § 301.85-9 Movement of live golden nematodes. Regulations requiring a permit for and...

  4. 7 CFR 301.85-9 - Movement of live golden nematodes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Movement of live golden nematodes. 301.85-9 Section... INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Golden Nematode Quarantine and Regulations § 301.85-9 Movement of live golden nematodes. Regulations requiring a permit for and...

  5. 7 CFR 301.85-9 - Movement of live golden nematodes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Movement of live golden nematodes. 301.85-9 Section... INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Golden Nematode Quarantine and Regulations § 301.85-9 Movement of live golden nematodes. Regulations requiring a permit for and...

  6. Regulatory interplay between soybean root and soybean cyst nematode during a resistant and susceptible reaction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Plant parasitic nematodes (PPNs) are obligate parasites that feed on the roots of living host plants. Often, these nematodes can lay hundreds of eggs, each capable of surviving in the soil for as long as 12 years. When it comes to wreaking havoc on agricultural yield, few nematodes can c...

  7. A SNARE-like protein and biotin are implicated in soybean cyst nematode virulence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Some phytoparasitic nematodes have the ability to infect and reproduce on plants that are normally considered resistant to nematode infection. Such nematodes are referred to as virulent and the mechanisms they use to evade or suppress host plant defenses are not well understood. Here, we report the ...

  8. 78 FR 1713 - Golden Nematode; Removal of Regulated Areas in Livingston and Steuben Counties, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-09

    ... The golden nematode (Globodera rostochiensis) is a destructive pest of potatoes and other solanaceous plants. Potatoes cannot be economically grown on land that contains large numbers of the nematode. The... total of 262,847 acres. Golden nematode is a major pest of potato plants and also attacks...

  9. A Treadmill to Localize, Exercise, and Measure the Propulsive Power of Nematodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jinzhou; Chuan, Han-Sheng; Gnatt, Michael; Raizen, David; Bau, Haim

    2011-11-01

    The nematodes C. elegans is often used as model biological system to study the genetic basis of behavior, disease-progression, and aging, as well as to develop new therapies and screen drugs. On occasion, it is desirable to quantify the nematode's muscle power. Here, we present a kind of nematode treadmill. The device consists of a tapered conduit filled with aqueous solution. The conduit is subjected to a DC electric field and to pressure-driven flow directed from the narrow end. The nematode is inserted at the conduit's wide end. Directed by the electric field (through electrotaxis), the nematode swims deliberately upstream toward the negative pole. As the conduit narrows, the average fluid velocity and the drag force on the nematode increase. Eventually, the nematode arrives at an equilibrium position, at which its propulsive power balances the viscous drag force. The nematode's propulsive power is estimated with direct numerical simulations of the flow field around the nematode. The calculations utilize the experimentally imaged gait as a boundary condition. The device is useful to retain the nematode at a nearly fixed position for prolonged observations under a microscope, to keep the nematode exercising, and to estimate the nematode's power based on the conduit's width at the equilibrium position.

  10. Body size change in various nematodes depending on bacterial food, sex and growth temperature.

    PubMed

    So, Shuhei; Garan, Yohei; Miyahara, Kohji; Ohshima, Yasumi

    2012-04-01

    We previously reported significant body size change in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, depending on the food strain of E. coli. Here, we examined this body size change in 11 other nematode species as well, and found that it is common to most of these nematodes. Furthermore, this food-dependent body size change is influenced by sex and growth temperature. PMID:24058830

  11. Body size change in various nematodes depending on bacterial food, sex and growth temperature

    PubMed Central

    So, Shuhei; Garan, Yohei; Miyahara, Kohji; Ohshima, Yasumi

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported significant body size change in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, depending on the food strain of E. coli. Here, we examined this body size change in 11 other nematode species as well, and found that it is common to most of these nematodes. Furthermore, this food-dependent body size change is influenced by sex and growth temperature. PMID:24058830

  12. Transcript analysis of sedentary female reniform nematodes identifies potential targets ofr RNAi-mediated resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RNA-interference (RNAi) has become an attractive avenue of research in the development of crop resistance to sedentary plant-parasitic nematodes. A prerequisite for this type of research is the availability of high quality gene sequence data for the nematode in question. The reniform nematode (Rot...

  13. Outcrossing and crossbreeding recovers deteriorated traits in laboratory cultured Steinernema carpocapsae nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nematode Steinernema carpocapsae is used as a natural biocontrol agent for suppression of many economically important insect pests. Culturing of the nematodes prior to distribution for biocontrol commonly results in deterioration of traits that are essential for nematode efficacy. To better un...

  14. In vitro assessment of plant lectins with anti-pinwood nematode activity.

    PubMed

    Gaofu, Qi; Shiqing, Mao; Fayin, Zhu; Zhiniu, Yu; Xiuyun, Zhao

    2008-05-01

    Two lectin proteins were purified from the corms of Pinellia ternata and Lycoris radiata. Both P. ternata agglutinin (PTA) protein and L. radiata agglutinin (LRA) protein formed polymers and coagulated both rabbit red blood cells and yeast cells. The two proteins were each diluted to different concentration and then mixed with pinewood nematodes, and nematode survival was measured. Results showed that the two lectin proteins showed significant levels of resistance against nematodes and the nematode population was significantly reduced, compared to PBS buffer without protein control group. The mean number of nematodes of two lectin proteins group was significantly lower than that of control group constantly throughout the assay period with differences being very significant at P<0.01 after 24 h. After 96 h, when 500 microg/ml proteins were used, nematode number significantly declined to an average of 26 (approximately 43% of the controls) and 32.2 (approximately 53.3% of the controls) nematodes at LRA and PTA protein, respectively, compared to the control group. Results also indicated that higher concentrations of protein were more toxic to the pinewood nematode. Even when the concentration was as low as 30 microg/ml, the toxic proteins retained their anti-nematode activity. Furthermore, pinewood nematode was exposed to the proteins for longer, more pinewood nematodes were killed. Our results indicated the two lectin proteins both apparently have a toxic effect on the pinewood nematode that affects its survival in vitro. PMID:18158158

  15. Discovery and virulence-screening of native nematodes in Wisconsin cranberries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three newly discovered entomopathogenic nematodes have been recovered from wild Wisconsin cranberry marshes. All three nematode strains have been shown to attack Sparganothis Fruitworm (SFW), and all seem similar in their virulence (ability to kill the host). Only one nematode line, however, has bee...

  16. Brassicaceous and rye cover crops altered free-living soil nematode community composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nematode community analysis was utilized to evaluate the biofumigant or allelopathic effects of brassicaceous and rye winter cover crops on non-target nematodes in three experiments in Maryland. Nematode response parameters were genus, family, trophic group population density, and percentage distri...

  17. New germplasm lines with high yield and fiber quality combined with nematode resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The lines BAR-8, -11, -13, -25, -33, -41, and -48 were developed to have both resistance to nematodes and superior yield and quality. All have resistance to reniform nematodes derived from G. barbadense GB 713 and several carry the DNA marker for Mi1, the gene for resistance to root-knot nematodes....

  18. Chemical ecology and isolation of biologically active compounds from parasitic nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Root knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp) are possibly the economically most important and best-studied species of plant parasitic nematodes. However, for Meloidogyne spp and the intensely studied nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, very little is known about signaling within and in-between species. It h...

  19. The Use of Glass Microbeads in Ecological Experiments with Bacteriophagic Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, R. V.; Coleman, D. C.

    1977-01-01

    A system that uses microbeads for the culture of bacteriophgic nematodes is described. Glass-bead culture was found to simulate a soil microcosm more closely than did agar culture i n terms of CO₂ production , number of nematodes produced, and nematode size. PMID:19305615

  20. Molecular and morphological characterization of the corn cyst nematode, Heterodera zeae, from Greece

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The corn cyst nematode Heterodera zeae was first detected in India, where it has wide distribution. This nematode has also been reported from Pakistan, Egypt, Thailand, Nepal, the United States, and Portugal. There is limited information regarding nematodes attacking cereals in Greece, and thus far ...

  1. Ups and downs of RNA interference in parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Britton, Collette; Samarasinghe, Buddhini; Knox, David P

    2012-09-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is widely used in Caenorhabiditis elegans to identify essential gene function. In parasitic nematodes RNAi has been reported to result in transcript knockdown of some target genes, but not others, thus limiting its use as a potential functional genomics tool. We recently extended work in Haemonchus contortus to examine why only some genes seem to be susceptible to RNAi and to test RNAi effects in vivo. Here we review our findings, which suggest that site of gene expression influences silencing. This most likely reflects limited uptake of dsRNA from the environment, a phenomenon also observed in other free-living nematodes. We discuss new technologies to improve dsRNA delivery, such as nanoparticles being developed for therapeutic siRNA delivery, and methods to monitor RNAi effects. Alternative approaches will be important in progressing the application of RNAi to identify essential gene function in parasitic nematodes. PMID:21854774

  2. Natural Occurrence of Entomogenous Nematodes in Tennessee Nursery Soils

    PubMed Central

    Rueda, L. M.; Osawaru, S. O.; Georgi, L. L.; Harrison, R. E.

    1993-01-01

    To isolate potential insect biocontrol agents, entomogenous nematodes were surveyed in Tennessee plant nurseries in 1991. Soil samples from 113 nursery sites were baited with greater wax moth (Galleria mellonella) larvae, house cricket (Acheta domesticus) adults, lesser mealworm (Alphitobius diaperings) adults, and house fly (Musca domestica) larvae. Heterorhabditis bacteriophora and Steinernema carpocapsae were each recovered from 17 soil samples. Heterorhabditis bacteriophora was more common in habitats with crape myrtle (Lagerstroemia indica) and Chinese juniper (Juniperus chinensis) than other nursery plants, and S. carpocapsae was more frequently recovered from habitats with juniper and Southern magnolia (Magnolia grandiflora). Bulk density, electrical conductivity, organic matter, pH, temperature, and moisture content of the entomogenous-nematode positive soil samples were compared. Other nematode genera recovered with insect baits included Rhabditis sp., Pelodera sp., Cryptaphelenchoides sp., and Mesodiplogaster sp., which was recovered from a greater percentage of soil samples than the other five genera. PMID:19279756

  3. Report on anisakid nematodes in polar regions - Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzido, Joanna; Kijewska, Agnieszka; Rokicka, Magdalena; Świątalska-Koseda, Agnieszka; Rokicki, Jerzy

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study is to extend our knowledge of the distribution of anisakid nematode parasites in Arctic and Antarctic polar regions. We examined vertebrate (fish) taxa characteristic of the faunas in both polar regions for the presence of parasitic nematodes. The material was collected from Svalbard (Arctic) between July and August 2008 and from King George Island (South Shetland Islands, Antarctic Peninsula) between November 2007 and January 2008. In addition, faecal, bird, and invertebrate samples were collected and examined for the presence of anisakid nematodes or eggs. Anisakis simplex s.s. was found in the body cavity of Arctic cod, and Contracaecum sp. and Pseudoterranova sp. were found in Antarctic notothenioids. Eggs of Anisakis sp. and Contracaecum sp. were recovered from the faeces of Mirounga leonina. We present the first record of the occurrence of A. simplex C in the Antarctic fishes Notothenia coriiceps and Notothenia rossii.

  4. Natural occurrence of entomogenous nematodes in tennessee nursery soils.

    PubMed

    Rueda, L M; Osawaru, S O; Georgi, L L; Harrison, R E

    1993-06-01

    To isolate potential insect biocontrol agents, entomogenous nematodes were surveyed in Tennessee plant nurseries in 1991. Soil samples from 113 nursery sites were baited with greater wax moth (Galleria mellonella) larvae, house cricket (Acheta domesticus) adults, lesser mealworm (Alphitobius diaperings) adults, and house fly (Musca domestica) larvae. Heterorhabditis bacteriophora and Steinernema carpocapsae were each recovered from 17 soil samples. Heterorhabditis bacteriophora was more common in habitats with crape myrtle (Lagerstroemia indica) and Chinese juniper (Juniperus chinensis) than other nursery plants, and S. carpocapsae was more frequently recovered from habitats with juniper and Southern magnolia (Magnolia grandiflora). Bulk density, electrical conductivity, organic matter, pH, temperature, and moisture content of the entomogenous-nematode positive soil samples were compared. Other nematode genera recovered with insect baits included Rhabditis sp., Pelodera sp., Cryptaphelenchoides sp., and Mesodiplogaster sp., which was recovered from a greater percentage of soil samples than the other five genera. PMID:19279756

  5. Orthologs of macrophage migration inhibitory factor from parasitic nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Vermeire, Jon J.; Cho, Yoonsang; Lolis, Elias; Bucala, Richard; Cappello, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Chronic helminth infections are associated with modulation of host cellular immune responses, presumably to prolong parasite survival within the mammalian host. This phenomenon is attributed, at least in part, to the elaboration of parasite molecules, including orthologs of host cytokines and receptors, at the host–parasite interface. This review describes recent progress in the characterization of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) orthologs from parasitic nematodes. The roles of these molecules in parasite developmental biology and pathogenesis are discussed. Further knowledge of the species-specific activities and three-dimensional structures of human and parasitic nematode MIF molecules should make them ideal targets for drug- and/or vaccine-based strategies aimed at nematode disease control. PMID:18603473

  6. Mechanisms Involved in Nematode Control by Endophytic Fungi.

    PubMed

    Schouten, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    Colonization of plants by particular endophytic fungi can provide plants with improved defenses toward nematodes. Evidently, such endophytes can be important in developing more sustainable agricultural practices. The mechanisms playing a role in this quantitative antagonism are poorly understood but most likely multifactorial. This knowledge gap obstructs the progress regarding the development of endophytes or endophyte-derived constituents into biocontrol agents. In part, this may be caused by the fact that endophytic fungi form a rather heterogeneous group. By combining the knowledge of the currently characterized antagonistic endophytic fungi and their effects on nematode behavior and biology with the knowledge of microbial competition and induced plant defenses, the various mechanisms by which this nematode antagonism operates or may operate are discussed. Now that new technologies are becoming available and more accessible, the currently unresolved mechanisms can be studied in greater detail than ever before. PMID:27296146

  7. Motility of small nematodes in wet granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juarez, G.; Lu, K.; Sznitman, J.; Arratia, P. E.

    2010-11-01

    The motility of the worm nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is investigated in shallow, wet granular media as a function of particle size dispersity and area density (phi). Surprisingly, we find that the nematode's propulsion speed is enhanced by the presence of particles in a fluid and is nearly independent of area density. The undulation speed, often used to differentiate locomotion gaits, is significantly affected by the bulk material properties of wet mono- and polydisperse granular media for phi>=0.55. This difference is characterized by a change in the nematode's waveform from swimming to crawling in dense polydisperse media only. This change highlights the organism's adaptability to subtle differences in local structure and response between monodisperse and polydisperse media.

  8. Plant-Parasitic Nematodes in Maine Agricultural Soils

    PubMed Central

    Huettel, W N.; Francl, L. J.; Henn, A.; Bourgoin, T.

    1990-01-01

    In a survey of plant-parasitic nematodes associated with agricultural crops in nine Maine counties, 744 soil samples from 26 potential host plants were analyzed between November 1987 and January 1989. The most commonly encountered nematode genus was Pratylenchus, occurring in 85% of the samples from most crops, except blueberries and onions. Pratylenchus penetrans and P. crenatus were found commonly as species mixtures, with P. penetrans composing 40-80% of the mixture. Meloidogyne hapla was encountered in 16% of the samples in four counties, generally in potato rotations. Other nematodes encountered were Aphelenchoides spp., Criconemella curvature, Ditylenchus spp., Helicotylenchus pseudorobustus, H. digonicus, Heterodera trifolii, Paratylenchus projectus, Trichodorus spp., Tylenchorhynchus maximus, and Xiphinema americanum. Potato fields were the most heavily sampled and thus weighted the statewide results. PMID:19287791

  9. Nematicidal bacteria associated to pinewood nematode produce extracellular proteases.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Gabriel; Proença, Diogo Neves; Francisco, Romeu; Verissimo, Paula; Santos, Susana S; Fonseca, Luís; Abrantes, Isabel M O; Morais, Paula V

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria associated with the nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, a pathogen of trees and the causal agent of pine wilt disease (PWD) may play a role in the disease. In order to evaluate their role (positive or negative to the tree), strains isolated from the track of nematodes from infected Pinus pinaster trees were screened, in vitro, for their nematicidal potential. The bacterial products, from strains more active in killing nematodes, were screened in order to identify and characterize the nematicidal agent. Forty-seven strains were tested and, of these, 21 strains showed capacity to produce extracellular products with nematicidal activity. All Burkholderia strains were non-toxic. In contrast, all Serratia strains except one exhibited high toxicity. Nematodes incubated with Serratia strains showed, by SEM observation, deposits of bacteria on the nematode cuticle. The most nematicidal strain, Serratia sp. A88copa13, produced proteases in the supernatant. The use of selective inhibitors revealed that a serine protease with 70 kDa was majorly responsible for the toxicity of the supernatant. This extracellular serine protease is different phylogenetically, in size and biochemically from previously described proteases. Nematicidal assays revealed differences in nematicidal activity of the proteases to different species of Bursaphelenchus, suggesting its usefulness in a primary screen of the nematodes. This study offers the basis for further investigation of PWD and brings new insights on the role bacteria play in the defense of pine trees against B. xylophilus. Understanding all the factors involved is important in order to develop strategies to control B. xylophilus dispersion. PMID:24244546

  10. Nematicidal Bacteria Associated to Pinewood Nematode Produce Extracellular Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, Romeu; Verissimo, Paula; Santos, Susana S.; Fonseca, Luís; Abrantes, Isabel M. O.; Morais, Paula V.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria associated with the nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, a pathogen of trees and the causal agent of pine wilt disease (PWD) may play a role in the disease. In order to evaluate their role (positive or negative to the tree), strains isolated from the track of nematodes from infected Pinus pinaster trees were screened, in vitro, for their nematicidal potential. The bacterial products, from strains more active in killing nematodes, were screened in order to identify and characterize the nematicidal agent. Forty-seven strains were tested and, of these, 21 strains showed capacity to produce extracellular products with nematicidal activity. All Burkholderia strains were non-toxic. In contrast, all Serratia strains except one exhibited high toxicity. Nematodes incubated with Serratia strains showed, by SEM observation, deposits of bacteria on the nematode cuticle. The most nematicidal strain, Serratia sp. A88copa13, produced proteases in the supernatant. The use of selective inhibitors revealed that a serine protease with 70 kDa was majorly responsible for the toxicity of the supernatant. This extracellular serine protease is different phylogenetically, in size and biochemically from previously described proteases. Nematicidal assays revealed differences in nematicidal activity of the proteases to different species of Bursaphelenchus, suggesting its usefulness in a primary screen of the nematodes. This study offers the basis for further investigation of PWD and brings new insights on the role bacteria play in the defense of pine trees against B. xylophilus. Understanding all the factors involved is important in order to develop strategies to control B. xylophilus dispersion. PMID:24244546

  11. Viability and Virulence of Entomopathogenic Nematodes Exposed to Ultraviolet Radiation.

    PubMed

    Shapiro-Ilan, David I; Hazir, Selcuk; Lete, Luis

    2015-09-01

    Entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) can be highly effective biocontrol agents, but their efficacy can be reduced due to exposure to environmental stress such as from ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Our objectives were to 1) compare UV tolerance among a broad array of EPN species, and 2) investigate the relationship between reduced nematode viability (after exposure to UV) and virulence. Nematodes exposed to a UV radiation (254 nm) for 10 or 20 min were assessed separately for viability (survival) and virulence to Galleria mellonella. We compared 9 different EPN species and 15 strains: Heterorhabditis bacteriophora (Baine, fl11, Oswego, and Vs strains), H. floridensis (332), H. georgiana (Kesha), H. indica (HOM1), H. megidis (UK211), Steinernema carpocapsae (All, Cxrd, DD136, and Sal strains), S. feltiae (SN), S. rarum (17C&E), and S. riobrave (355). In viability assessments, steinernematids, particularly strains of S. carpocapsae, generally exhibited superior UV tolerance compared with the heterorhabditids. However, some heterorhabditids tended to be more tolerant than others, e.g., H. megidis and H. bacteriophora (Baine) were most susceptible and H. bacteriophora (Vs) was the only heterorhabditid that did not exhibit a significant effect after 10 min of exposure. All heterorhabditids experienced reduced viability after 20 min exposure though several S. carpocapsae strains did not. In total, after 10 or 20 min exposure, the viability of seven nematode strains did not differ from their non-UV exposed controls. In virulence assays, steinernematids (particularly S. carpocapsae strains) also tended to exhibit higher UV tolerance. However, in contrast to the viability measurements, all nematodes experienced a reduction in virulence relative to their controls. Correlation analysis revealed that viability among nematode strains is not necessarily related to virulence. In conclusion, our results indicate that the impact of UV varies substantially among EPNs, and viability alone

  12. Temperature-based bioclimatic parameters can predict nematode metabolic footprints.

    PubMed

    Bhusal, Daya Ram; Tsiafouli, Maria A; Sgardelis, Stefanos P

    2015-09-01

    Nematode metabolic footprints (MFs) refer to the lifetime amount of metabolized carbon per individual, indicating a connection to soil food web functions and eventually to processes supporting ecosystem services. Estimating and managing these at a convenient scale requires information upscaling from the soil sample to the landscape level. We explore the feasibility of predicting nematode MFs from temperature-based bioclimatic parameters across a landscape. We assume that temperature effects are reflected in MFs, since temperature variations determine life processes ranging from enzyme activities to community structure. We use microclimate data recorded for 1 year from sites differing by orientation, altitude and vegetation cover. At the same sites we estimate MFs for each nematode trophic group. Our models show that bioclimatic parameters, specifically those accounting for temporal variations in temperature and extremities, predict most of the variation in nematode MFs. Higher fungivorous and lower bacterivorous nematode MFs are predicted for sites with high seasonality and low isothermality (sites of low vegetation, mostly at low altitudes), indicating differences in the relative contribution of the corresponding food web channels to the metabolism of carbon across the landscape. Higher plant-parasitic MFs were predicted for sites with high seasonality. The fitted models provide realistic predictions of unknown cases within the range of the predictor's values, allowing for the interpolation of MFs within the sampled region. We conclude that upscaling of the bioindication potential of nematode communities is feasible and can provide new perspectives not only in the field of soil ecology but other research areas as well. PMID:25899615

  13. Weather and the ecology of bursate nematodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, N. D.

    1980-12-01

    The free-living stages of bursate nematodes are affected in different ways by meteorological factors. The eggs and 1st and 2nd stage larvae live in the feces, and these factors act on them through the feces. The embryo in the egg is protected by the eggshell. The 1st and 2nd stage larvae feed on micro-organisms, and are affected by the species of microorganisms and their metabolic products. The 3rd stage, infective larvae do not feed but leave the feces and migrate onto the vegetation, where they are more directly affected by meteorological factors than the earlier stages. They are partially protected by their sheath. The degree day concept can be used to predict the length of time required for development to the infective stage. Under constant conditions at 100% relative humidity and 20 35° C, Trichostrongylus colubriformis requires 90 115 degree days (temperature times number of days) to reach the infective stage, and Haemonchus contortus requires 95 144 degree days. The great majority of eggs dies within the 1st day after reaching pasture, altho most of them would develop to the infective stage in the laboratory. Only 0.03% of H. contortus and T. colubriformis eggs placed on pasture were recovered from the vegetation as infective larvae. When larvae of H. contortus were placed on pasture, 1.6% (about 50 times as many but still only aout 1/30 of their potential) were later recovered. The cause of this die-off is unknown. Two types of potential worm burden prediction must be made-general and specific. The former can be made on the basis of temperature and moisture, but the latter requires information on many modifying factors.

  14. Respiratory nematodes in cat populations of Italy.

    PubMed

    Di Cesare, Angela; Veronesi, Fabrizia; Grillotti, Eleonora; Manzocchi, Simone; Perrucci, Stefania; Beraldo, Paola; Cazzin, Stefania; De Liberato, Claudio; Barros, Luciano A; Simonato, Giulia; Traversa, Donato

    2015-12-01

    The occurrence of common respiratory parasites of domestic cats (the metastrongyloid "cat lungworm" Aelurostrongylus abstrusus and the trichuroid Capillaria aerophila) and of neglected respiratory nematodes of felids (Troglostrongylus brevior, Angiostrongylus chabaudi and Oslerus rostratus) was here evaluated in two and three geographical sites of Northern and Central Italy, respectively. In 2014-2015, individual fecal samples of 868 domestic cats were examined microscopically and genetically, and epidemiological data related to parasitic infections were evaluated as possible risk factors by binary logistic regression models. The most common parasite was A. abstrusus in both mono- and poli-specific infections, followed by T. brevior and C. aerophila, while cats scored negative for other parasites. Cats positive for A. abstrusus (1.9-17 % infection rate) and C. aerophila (0.9-4.8 % infection rate) were found in all examined sites, while cats scored positive for T. brevior (1-14.3 % infection rate) in four sites. Also, T. brevior was here found for the first time in a domestic cat from a mountainous area of Northern Italy. The occurrence of lungworms was statistically related to the presence of respiratory signs and more significant in cats with mixed infection by other lungworms and/or intestinal parasites. Cats living in site C of Central Italy resulted statistically more at risk of infection for lungworms than cats living in the other study sites, while animals ageing less than 1 year were at more risk for troglostrongylosis. Finally, the presence of lungworms was more significant in cats with mixed infection by other lungworms and/or intestinal parasites. These results are discussed under epidemiological and clinical points of views. PMID:26319524

  15. New records of nematodes of passerine migratory birds.

    PubMed

    Okulewicz, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Parasitological examination of three passerine bird species: the Red-backed Shrike Lanius collurio, Eurasian Golden Oriole Oriolus oriolus and Yellow Wagtail Motacilla flava, revealed the presence of the nematodes Acuaria subula, Diplotriaena ozouxi, Viguiera euryoptera and Microtetrameres inermis. All the birds were obtained in the spring (April-May); the nematodes found were mature, which indicates infection in the hosts' wintering grounds. The gizzard worm Acuaria subula is a new record from Motacilla flava in Europe. Viguiera euryoptera and Diplotriaena ozouxi are new to the Polish fauna. PMID:24881284

  16. Commercial Development and Future Prospects for Entomogenous Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, J. J.; Cupello, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    Although entomogenous nenmtodes generally have many of the attributes of the ideal biocontrol agent, many of these attributes make the nematodes less than desirable for commercial production. Environmental limitations, lack of patent protection, "shelf life," shipping problems, and the need for users to receive specialized training are factors that have discouraged the involvement of larger companies. The future of these nematodes as commercially available biocontrol products appears to lie with the smaller "cottage industries" or with government-subsidized production. Problems encountered with attempts to produce commercially the mosquito parasite Romanomermis culicivorax are discussed. PMID:19300763

  17. ORGANIC VS CONVENTIONAL: SOIL NEMATODE COMMUNITY STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION.

    PubMed

    Kapp, C; Storey, S G; Malan, A P

    2014-01-01

    Global increases in human population are creating an ever-greater need for food production. Poor soil management practices have degraded soil to such an extent that rapidly improved management practices is the only way to ensure future food demands. In South Africa, deciduous fruit producers are realising the need for soil health, and for an increased understanding of the benefits of soil ecology, to ensure sustainable fruit production. This depends heavily on improved orchard management. Conventional farming relies on the addition of artificial fertilizers, and the application of chemicals, to prevent or minimise, the effects of the soil stages of pest insects, and of plant-parasitic nematodes. Currently, there is resistance toward conventional farming practices, which, it is believed, diminishes biodiversity within the soil. The study aimed to establish the soil nematode community structure and function in organically, and conventionally, managed deciduous fruit orchards. This was done by determining the abundance, the diversity, and the functionality of the naturally occurring free-living, and plant-parasitic, nematodes in deciduous fruit orchards in the Western Cape province of South Africa. The objective of the study was to form the basis for the use of nematodes as future indicators of soil health in deciduous fruit orchards. Orchards from neighbouring organic, and conventional, apricot farms, and from an organic apple orchard, were studied. All the nematodes were quantified, and identified, to family level. The five nematode-classified trophic groups were found at each site, while 14 families were identified in each orchard, respectively. Herbivores were dominant in all the orchards surveyed. Organic apples had the fewest herbivores and fungivores, with the highest number of carnivores. When comparing organic with conventional apricot orchards, higher numbers of plant-parasitic nematodes were found in the organic apricot orchards. The Maturity Index (MI

  18. Stacking resistance to crown gall and nematodes in walnut rootstocks

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Crown gall (CG) (Agrobacterium tumefaciens) and the root lesion nematodes (RLNs) (Pratylenchus vulnus) are major challenges faced by the California walnut industry, reducing productivity and increasing the cost of establishing and maintaining orchards. Current nematode control strategies include nematicides, crop rotation, and tolerant cultivars, but these methods have limits. Developing genetic resistance through novel approaches like RNA interference (RNAi) can address these problems. RNAi-mediated silencing of CG disease in walnut (Juglans regia L.) has been achieved previously. We sought to place both CG and nematode resistance into a single walnut rootstock genotype using co-transformation to stack the resistance genes. A. tumefaciens, carrying self-complimentary iaaM and ipt transgenes, and Agrobacterium rhizogenes, carrying a self-complimentary Pv010 gene from P. vulnus, were used as co-transformation vectors. RolABC genes were introduced by the resident T-DNA in the A. rhizogenes Ri-plasmid used as a vector for plant transformation. Pv010 and Pv194 (transgenic control) genes were also transferred separately using A. tumefaciens. To test for resistance, transformed walnut roots were challenged with P. vulnus and microshoots were challenged with a virulent strain of A. tumefaciens. Results Combining the two bacterial strains at a 1:1 rather than 1:3 ratio increased the co-transformation efficiency. Although complete immunity to nematode infection was not observed, transgenic lines yielded up to 79% fewer nematodes per root following in vitro co-culture than untransformed controls. Transgenic line 33-3-1 exhibited complete crown gall control and 32% fewer nematodes. The transgenic plants had thicker, longer roots than untransformed controls possibly due to insertion of rolABC genes. When the Pv010 gene was present in roots with or without rolABC genes there was partial or complete control of RLNs. Transformation using only one vector showed 100

  19. [Effect of the soil contamination with a potato cyst-forming nematode on the community structure of soil-inhabiting nematodes].

    PubMed

    Gruzdeva, L I; Suzhchuk, A A

    2008-01-01

    Nematode community structure of the potato fields with different infection levels of potato cyst-forming nematode (PCN) such as 10, 30 and 214 cysts per 100 g of soil has been investigated. The influence of specialized parasite on nematode fauna and dominance character of different ecological-trophic groups were described. Parasitic nematode genera in natural meadow biocenosis and agrocenoses without PCN are Paratylenchus, Tylenchorhynchus, and Helicotylenchus. It is established, that Paratylenchus nanus was the prevalent species among plant parasites at low infection level. Larvae of Globodera prevailed in the soil with middle and high infection levels and substituted individuals of other genera of parasitic nematodes. The fact of increase in number of hyphal-feeding nematode Aphelenchus avenae was revealed. PMID:19198175

  20. The complete mitochondrial genomes of three parasitic nematodes of birds: a unique gene order and insights into nematode phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Analyses of mitochondrial (mt) genome sequences in recent years challenge the current working hypothesis of Nematoda phylogeny proposed from morphology, ecology and nuclear small subunit rRNA gene sequences, and raise the need to sequence additional mt genomes for a broad range of nematode lineages. Results We sequenced the complete mt genomes of three Ascaridia species (family Ascaridiidae) that infest chickens, pigeons and parrots, respectively. These three Ascaridia species have an identical arrangement of mt genes to each other but differ substantially from other nematodes. Phylogenetic analyses of the mt genome sequences of the Ascaridia species, together with 62 other nematode species, support the monophylies of seven high-level taxa of the phylum Nematoda: 1) the subclass Dorylaimia; 2) the orders Rhabditida, Trichinellida and Mermithida; 3) the suborder Rhabditina; and 4) the infraorders Spiruromorpha and Oxyuridomorpha. Analyses of mt genome sequences, however, reject the monophylies of the suborders Spirurina and Tylenchina, and the infraorders Rhabditomorpha, Panagrolaimomorpha and Tylenchomorpha. Monophyly of the infraorder Ascaridomorpha varies depending on the methods of phylogenetic analysis. The Ascaridomorpha was more closely related to the infraorders Rhabditomorpha and Diplogasteromorpha (suborder Rhabditina) than they were to the other two infraorders of the Spirurina: Oxyuridorpha and Spiruromorpha. The closer relationship among Ascaridomorpha, Rhabditomorpha and Diplogasteromorpha was also supported by a shared common pattern of mitochondrial gene arrangement. Conclusions Analyses of mitochondrial genome sequences and gene arrangement has provided novel insights into the phylogenetic relationships among several major lineages of nematodes. Many lineages of nematodes, however, are underrepresented or not represented in these analyses. Expanding taxon sampling is necessary for future phylogenetic studies of nematodes with mt genome