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Sample records for fill-soft soil system

  1. SUPERFUND SOILS DATA MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes the Superfund Soil Data Management System (DMS), a PC-based data system being developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in its effort to manage and evaluate treatment and performance data for contaminated soil, sludge, and debris. his system...

  2. SOIL QUALITY IN ORGANIC AGRICULTURAL SYSTEMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Building and maintaining soil quality is the basis for successful organic farming. However, before developing a soil management plan focused on soil quality in organic systems, farmers should become knowledgeable regarding the overall philosophies, legalities, and marketing opportunities in organic ...

  3. Advancing Towards a Universal Soil Classification System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Phillip R.; Hempel, Jon; Micheli, Erika; McBratney, Alex

    2014-05-01

    Within the variability of soils across the globe, there are common soil attributes that pedologists have used to group soil within taxonomic classifications. Classification systems are necessary for the communication of information about soils. There are many national classification systems used within designated countries and two classification systems used globally, the US Soil Taxonomy and the World Reference Base. There is a great need for soil scientists to develop one common language or taxonomic system to communicate information within soil science as well as to other scientists in other disciplines. The International Union of Soil Sciences Working Group for Universal Soil Classification was officially established by an IUSS Council decision in August of 2010 at the World Congress of Soil Science in Brisbane, Australia. The charge for the Working Group includes development of common standards for methods and terminology in soil observations and investigations and the development of a universal soil classification system. The Universal Soil Classification Working Group was established and the initial meeting was held at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana USA. The Working Group has evaluated the current national systems and the two international systems to identify gaps in knowledge. Currently, it was determined that gaps in knowledge exists in cold soil, hydromorphic, salt affected, anthropengic, and tropical soil groups. Additionally, several members of the Working Group have utilized taxonomic distance calculations from large databases to determine the clusters of similar taxonomic groupings utilizing the classification. Additionally, the databases are being used to make allocations into logical groups to recognize "Great Soil Groups". The great soil groups will be equivalent to great groups level from Soil Taxonomy along with similar levels in the World Reference Base, Australian Soil Classification and other defined soil classification systems

  4. Ash in the Soil System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, P.

    2012-04-01

    , climate/meteorological conditions after the ash spread/fire and soil background characteristics. In addition, after the fire heating can change soil original properties increasing the complexity of the ash effects on soil properties. After fire, ash is highly dynamic and very easily transported by wind until the first rains. When wetted, ash compacts and binds onto soil surface, and wind has low capacity to transport it. The post-rain ash dynamic is influenced by water erosion (in slope areas), infiltration into soil profile and vegetation recuperation. This means that ash produced in one place will have implications in other areas, including not burned areas (e.g wind transport and water erosion). This is a clear indication that ash effects go much further than the fire affected area. Due the heterogeneity of soil and ash properties and their dynamic across the landscape, the impacts of ash on soil system can be diverse, producing a mosaic of different effects and responses after ash treatment and/ or fire. In this communication it will be presented and discussed the advances and scientific development of ash effects and dynamic in soil system.

  5. Cropping system effects on soil quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cropping systems can affect a range of soil properties depending on the specific crop rotation, nutrient amendments, and tillage practices employed. A soil quality index can be use to interpret changes in soil properties and assess improvement or degradation of soil quality. We evaluated a range of ...

  6. Soil Organic Matter in Agricultural Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In agricultural systems, soil organic matter (SOM) has been recognized as an important source of nutrients and maintains favorable soil structure. Organic matter is considered a major binding agent that stabilizes soil aggregates. Soil aggregates especially, water stable aggregates, are important i...

  7. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: SOIL WASHING SYSTEM - BIOTROL, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The three component technologies of the BioTrol Soil Washing System (BSWS). Tested in the SITE demonstration were a Soil Washer (SW), and Aqueous Treatment System (ATS), and a Slurry Bio-Reactor (SBR). The Soil Washer operates on the principle that a significant fraction of the...

  8. Soil Water and Temperature System (SWATS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, D

    2005-01-01

    The soil water and temperature system (SWATS) provides vertical profiles of soil temperature, soil-water potential, and soil moisture as a function of depth below the ground surface at hourly intervals. The temperature profiles are measured directly by in situ sensors at the Central Facility and many of the extended facilities of the SGP climate research site. The soil-water potential and soil moisture profiles are derived from measurements of soil temperature rise in response to small inputs of heat. Atmospheric scientists use the data in climate models to determine boundary conditions and to estimate the surface energy flux. The data are also useful to hydrologists, soil scientists, and agricultural scientists for determining the state of the soil.

  9. Soil classifications systems review. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    Systems used to classify soils are discussed and compared. Major types of classification systems that are reviewed include natural systems, technical systems, the FAO/UNESCO world soil map, soil survey map units, and numerical taxonomy. Natural Classification systems discussed in detail are the United States system, Soil Taxonomy, and the Russian and Canadian systems. Included in the section on technical classification systems are reviews on the AASHO and Unified (ASTM) classification systems. The review of soil classification systems was conducted to establish improved availability of accurate ground thermal conductivity and other heat transfer related properties information. These data are intended to help in the design of closed-loop ground heat exchange systems.

  10. Soil fauna community in the black soil of northeast China under different conservation tillage systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil fauna is an important component in soil ecosystem. Through the soil moisture changes, soil environment is changed under different tillage systems, and then the population of soil fauna also is changed. This study tested whether conservation tillage or conventional tillage (CT) of black soil fie...

  11. Nonlinear model for building-soil systems

    SciTech Connect

    McCallen, D.B.; Romstad, K.M.

    1994-05-01

    A finite-element based, numerical analysis methodology has been developed for the nonlinear analysis of building-soil systems. The methodology utilizes a reduced-order, nonlinear continuum model to represent the building, and the soil is represented with a simple nonlinear two-dimensional plane strain finite element. The foundation of the building is idealized as a rigid block and the interface between the soil and the foundation is modeled with an interface contract element. The objectives of the current paper are to provide the theoretical development of the system model, with particular emphasis on the modeling of the foundation-soil contact, and to demonstrate the special-purpose finite-element program that has been developed for nonlinear analysis of the building-soil system. Examples are included that compare the results obtained with the special-purpose program with the results of a general-purpose nonlinear finite-element program.

  12. Identifying Constraints to Potato System Sustainability: Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato yield in the Northeast U.S. has remained constant for over 50 years, despite increased inputs of pesticides, nutrients, and water. We established Status Quo, Soil Conserving, Soil Improving, and Disease Suppressive cropping systems under both irrigated and rainfed management to identify and q...

  13. Effect of soiling in CPV systems

    SciTech Connect

    Vivar, M.; Herrero, R.; Anton, I.; Martinez-Moreno, F.; Moreton, R.; Sala, G.

    2010-07-15

    The effect of soiling in flat PV modules has been already studied, causing a reduction of the electrical output of 4% on average. For CPV's, as far as soiling produces light scattering at the optical collector surface, the scattered rays should be definitively lost because they cannot be focused onto the receivers again. While the theoretical study becomes difficult because soiling is variable at different sites, it becomes easier to begin the monitoring of the real field performance of concentrators and then raise the following question: how much does the soiling affect to PV concentrators in comparison with flat panels?' The answers allow to predict the PV concentrator electrical performance and to establish a pattern of cleaning frequency. Some experiments have been conducted at the IES-UPM and CSES-ANU sites, consisting in linear reflective concentration systems, a point focus refractive concentrator and a flat module. All the systems have been measured when soiled and then after cleaning, achieving different increases of I{sub SC}. In general, results show that CPV systems are more sensitive to soiling than flat panels, accumulating losses in I{sub SC} of about 14% on average in three different tests conducted at IES-UPM and CSES-ANU test sites in Madrid (Spain) and Canberra (Australia). Some concentrators can reach losses up to 26% when the system is soiled for 4 months of exposure. (author)

  14. Data management system for organic soil

    SciTech Connect

    Stinnette, P.

    1999-07-01

    A Data Management System for Organic Soil (DMSOS) has been developed that enables the acquisition, management and analysis of organic soil data as well as the presentation of results to be conducted effectively through a common interface. This development was in response to the data management needs of research investigating the engineering properties of organic soil and its extension to the stabilization of organic soil through dynamic replacement (DR). It is shown how the above functions are implemented efficiently using Windows-based software to perform comprehensive data management and analysis of data gathered from both laboratory and field tests. When the engineering properties of a given organic soil deposit are needed, a build-in Computer Advisor for Organic Soil Projects (CAOSP) predicts the properties from DMSOS based correlations. A unique and useful feature of the CAOSP is its ability to estimate the anticipated ultimate settlement of an organic soil deposit given the loading conditions and the moisture or organic content. Also incorporated in the DMSOS is a quality control system that utilizes computerized data acquisition/data management techniques in order to evaluate the degree of improvement of an organic soil layer at a given stage of treatment using DR.

  15. National Soil Information System in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emrah Erdogan, Hakki; Sahin, Mehmet; Sahin, Yuksel

    2013-04-01

    Land consolidation (LC) represents complexity if management, legal, economic and technical procedures realized in order to adjust the land structure according to actual human preferences and needs. It includes changes in ownership rights to land and other real estate property, exchange of parcels among owners, changes in parcel borders, parcel size and shape, joining and dividing of parcels, changes in land use, construction works as roads, bridges, water changes etc.. Since the subject of LC is agricultural lands, the quality of consolidation depends on the quality of soil data. General Directorate of Agrarian Reform (GDAR) is the responsible institution on land consolidation whole of Turkey. Under GDAR, National Soil Information System (NSIS) has been build up with base soil data in relevant scale (1:5000). NSIS contain detailed information on soil chemical and physical properties, current land use, parent material, land capability class, Storie Index Values. SI were used on land consolidation, land use planning and farm development services. LCC was used for land distribution, rental land; define of village settlement, consolidation, expropriation, reconstruction, reclamation, non-agricultural usage. LCC were also specified to subclasses in four different limited factors as i) flow and erosion risk ii) requirement of drainage and soil moisture iii) Limits of soil tillage and root (shallow soils, low water retention capacity, stony, salty .etc) iv) climatic limits. In this study, digital soil survey and mapping project located in Yumurtalik, Adana is presented as an example of NSIS data structure. The project cover an area of 45709 ha that include crop lands as an area of 28528 ha and other land use (urban, roads..etc) as an area of 17181 ha. Soil profiles were described in 45 different points and totally 1279 soil samples were collected in field study and the check bore hole were made in 3170 points.

  16. Zero Tillage cotton systems and soil quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landers, J. N.; de Freitas, P. L.

    2012-04-01

    Monocropping in cotton production systems negates the benefits of zero tillage. With cotton in a 3-year rotation including other summer and cover crops, such as soybeans and intensive-rooting Brachiaria spp., research on sandy soils in Bahia improved soil fertility, structure and biological activity. Cotton is a deep tap-rooted crop, sensitive to physical and chemical impediments to root development; this has engendered a paradigm of heavy soil preparation operations to remove these. But, ZT can overcome such obstacles, allowing the cotton crop to benefit from cost reductions and a number of other benefits, especially erosion control.. Soil quality has three principal dimensions. Maximum yields only occur when soil fertility, structure and biological activity are in balance. Under Zero Tillage management of Brazilian soils, the processes of nutrient availability, nutrient cycling and efficiency result from increasing SOM and higher CEC. ZT system fertility is also strongly influenced by total annual aerial and root biomass generation; C:N ratios of the biomass, changes in aeration in residue breakdown processes (for roots, dependent on internal drainage), reduced fixation of Phosphorus fertilizers, the possibility of surface application of P and K, use of deep-rooted cover crops to re-cycle nutrients and deleterious effects of over-liming. Soil physical parameters undergo a transformation : greater water holding capacity, a small increase in bulk density (ameliorated by a reversal of soil aggregate breakdown inherent to conventional tillage by the binding action of root exudates and fungal hyphae), enhanced particle aggregate size protects SOM from oxidation; old root holes create semi-permanent macro-pores which facilitate rooting, aeration and rainfall infiltration.. Soil life of all types benefits from ZT management and contributes to soil fertility and structural improvements, plus enhancing certain biological controls of pathogenic organisms and allelopathic

  17. The Sand Land Soil System and Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahjoory, R. A.

    Worldwide arid soils such as Latterites from African Savannas to the Xeralfs and Xererts of the Mediterranean Basin Ortents and Orthids of Asian Deserts are uniquely different in their strategic roles for utilizing the land in places where a delicate balance between annual climatic cycles and general trends toward desertification predominate Arid lands cover 1 3 of global land surface and contain irreplaceable natural resources with potential productivity of meeting the demands of more than two billion people and serving as sources and sinks of atmospheric CO2 to combat global warming The soil system in these arid areas are being degraded underutilized and kept in a stage of obliviousness due to inadequate public literacy and most importantly in-sufficient scientific evaluations based on pedology and soil taxonomy standards Implementation of food security projects and sustainable development programs on randomly selected sites and assessment of land degradation worldwide by powerful computers and satellite imagery techniques without field work and identification of Representative Soil Units are data producing and grant attracting but counter productive We live in a world in which there is an order out there and things are precisely measured and categorized for efficient utilization Why not the soils mainly in arid areas How we could generalize the world of soils under our feet by concept of soils are the same Expansion of educational programs quantification of multiple ecosystems within the arid regions through detailed and correlated

  18. Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS). Volume 6, Soil subject area

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-14

    The purpose of the Soil subject area of the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS) is to manage the data acquired from soil samples, both geologic and surface, and sediment samples. Stored in the Soil subject area are data relevant to the soil samples, laboratory analytical results, and field measurements. The two major types of data make up the Soil subject area are data concerning the samples and data about the chemical and/or radiologic analyses of soil samples.

  19. Tillage system affects microbiological properties of soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, A.; de Santiago, A.; Avilés, M.; Perea, F.

    2012-04-01

    Shannon (H') and Gini (1-G) diversity index of microbial communities were determined in soil samples (0-10 cm depth) taken in autumn 2009. All the enzymatic activities and the biomass estimated by viable cell counting were significantly higher under no-till than under conventional tillage. However, only fluorescents pseudomonas population was increased under no-till, meanwhile oligotrophic bacteria and actinomycetes populations were higher with conventional tillage than with no-till. Overall, there was a higher use all the group of carbon sources used in the BiologR test with conventional tillage than with no-till, by except amines and phenols which showed non-significant differences. This reveals different physiological profiles in the microbial communities under both tillage systems. The Gini diversity was significantly lower with no-till than with conventional tillage. It can be concluded that no-till increases microbial biomass in soil and subsequently enzymatic activities likely ascribed to an increased organic matter content. Under low availability of hydrocarbon sources in soil due to conventional tillage, which promotes a decrease in the organic matter content of the soil, populations of oligotrophods and the diversity of microbial communities are increased. Under these conditions, there must not be dominant carbon sources promoting the selection of microorganisms with a given physiological profile. The reduced hydrocarbon availability and the higher diversity contribute to explain the increased use of carbon sources used in Biolog with conventional tillage than with no-till.

  20. Wavelet-based image analysis system for soil texture analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yun; Long, Zhiling; Jang, Ping-Rey; Plodinec, M. John

    2003-05-01

    Soil texture is defined as the relative proportion of clay, silt and sand found in a given soil sample. It is an important physical property of soil that affects such phenomena as plant growth and agricultural fertility. Traditional methods used to determine soil texture are either time consuming (hydrometer), or subjective and experience-demanding (field tactile evaluation). Considering that textural patterns observed at soil surfaces are uniquely associated with soil textures, we propose an innovative approach to soil texture analysis, in which wavelet frames-based features representing texture contents of soil images are extracted and categorized by applying a maximum likelihood criterion. The soil texture analysis system has been tested successfully with an accuracy of 91% in classifying soil samples into one of three general categories of soil textures. In comparison with the common methods, this wavelet-based image analysis approach is convenient, efficient, fast, and objective.

  1. Soil carbon and soil organic matter quality in soil size fractions from crop and livestock systems in Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton based rotations and monocultures in the Southern High Plains have resulted in soil quality degradation because the semiarid environment combined with low crop residue returns has diminished soil C. Integrated crop-livestock systems and no-till based rotations can increase soil C when used as ...

  2. Grey water treatment by the slanted soil system with unsorted soil media.

    PubMed

    Ushijima, Ken; Tanaka, Erina; Suzuki, Laís Yuko; Hijikata, Nowaki; Funamizu, Naoyuki; Ito, Ryusei

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the performance of unsorted soil media in the slanted soil treatment system, in terms of removal efficiency in suspended solids (SS), chemical oxygen demand (COD), linear alkylbenzene sulphonate (LAS) and Escherichia coli, and lifetime until clogging occurs. Unsorted soil performed longer lifetime until clogging than sorted fine soil. Removal of SS, COD, and LAS also performed same or better level in unsorted soil than fine soil. As reaction coefficients of COD and LAS were described as a function of the hydraulic loading rate, we can design a slanted soil system according to the expected hydraulic loading rate and the targeted level of COD or LAS in effluent. Regarding bacteria removal, unsorted soil performed sufficient reduction of E. coli for 5 weeks; however, the removal process occurred throughout all four chambers, while that of fine soil occurred in one to two chambers. PMID:25860717

  3. Regulatory guidance on soil cover systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J.D.

    1991-12-31

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in September 1991, completed revisions to 14 sections of the Standard Review Plan (SRP) for the Review of a License Application for a Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility. The major purposes of the SRP are to ensure the quality and uniformity of the NRC staff`s safety reviews, and to present a well-defined base from which to evaluate the acceptability of information and data provided in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) portion of the license application. SRP 3.2, entitled, Design Considerations for Normal and Abnormal/Accident Conditions, was one of the sections that was revised by the NRC staff. This revision was completed to provide additional regulatory guidance on the important considerations that need to be addressed for the proper design and construction of soil cover systems that are to be placed over the LLW. The cover system over the waste is acknowledged to be one of the most important engineered barriers for the long-term stable performance of the disposal facility. The guidance in revised SRP 3.2 summarizes the previous efforts and recommendations of the US Army Corps of Engineers (COE), and a peer review panel on the placement of soil cover systems. NRC published these efforts in NUREG/CR-5432. The discussions in this paper highlight selected recommendations on soil cover issues that the NRC staff considers important for ensuring the safe, long-term performance of the soil cover systems. The development phases to be discussed include: (1) cover design; (2) cover material selection; (3) laboratory and field testing; (4) field placement control and acceptance; and (5) penetrations through the constructed covers.

  4. 75 FR 75961 - Notice of Implementation of the Wind Erosion Prediction System for Soil Erodibility System...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-07

    ... Soil Erodibility System Calculations for the Natural Resources Conservation Service AGENCY: Natural...) for soil erodibility system calculations scheduled for implementation for public review and comment... computer model that predicts soil erosion via simulation of the fundamental processes controlling...

  5. A fluid-filled soft robot that exhibits spontaneous switching among versatile spatiotemporal oscillatory patterns inspired by the true slime mold.

    PubMed

    Umedachi, Takuya; Idei, Ryo; Ito, Kentaro; Ishiguro, Akio

    2013-01-01

    Behavioral diversity is an essential feature of living systems, enabling them to exhibit adaptive behavior in hostile and dynamically changing environments. However, traditional engineering approaches strive to avoid, or suppress, the behavioral diversity in artificial systems to achieve high performance in specific environments for given tasks. The goals of this research include understanding how living systems exhibit behavioral diversity and using these findings to build lifelike robots that exhibit truly adaptive behaviors. To this end, we have focused on one of the most primitive forms of intelligence concerning behavioral diversity, namely, a plasmodium of true slime mold. The plasmodium is a large amoeba-like unicellular organism that does not possess any nervous system or specialized organs. However, it exhibits versatile spatiotemporal oscillatory patterns and switches spontaneously between these. Inspired by the plasmodium, we built a mathematical model that exhibits versatile oscillatory patterns and spontaneously transitions between these patterns. This model demonstrates that, in contrast to coupled nonlinear oscillators with a well-designed complex diffusion network, physically interacting mechanosensory oscillators are capable of generating versatile oscillatory patterns without changing any parameters. Thus, the results are expected to shed new light on the design scheme for lifelike robots that exhibit amazingly versatile and adaptive behaviors. PMID:23186349

  6. Hydrologic modeling of soil water storage in landfill cover systems

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, F.J.; Rodgers, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    The accuracy of modeling soil water storage by two hydrologic models, CREAMS and HELP, was tested by comparing simulation results with field measurements of soil moisture in eight experimental landfill cover systems having a range of well-defined soil profiles and vegetative covers. Regression analysis showed that CREAMS generally represented soil moisture more accurately than HELP simulations. Soil profiles that more closely resembled natural agricultural soils were more accurately modeled than highly artificial layered soil profiles. Precautions for determining parameter values for model input and for interpreting simulation results are discussed.

  7. Evaluation of soil quality indicators in paddy soils under different crop rotation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadimi-Goki, Mandana; Bini, Claudio; Haefele, Stephan; Abooei, Monireh

    2013-04-01

    Evaluation of soil quality indicators in paddy soils under different crop rotation systems Soil quality, by definition, reflects the capacity to sustain plant and animal productivity, maintain or enhance water and air quality, and promote plant and animal health. Soil quality assessment is an essential issue in soil management for agriculture and natural resource protection. This study was conducted to detect the effects of four crop rotation systems (rice-rice-rice, soya-rice-rice, fallow-rice and pea-soya-rice) on soil quality indicators (soil moisture, porosity, bulk density, water-filled pore space, pH, extractable P, CEC, OC, OM, microbial respiration, active carbon) in paddy soils of Verona area, Northern Italy. Four adjacent plots which managed almost similarly, over five years were selected. Surface soil samples were collected from each four rotation systems in four times, during growing season. Each soil sample was a composite of sub-samples taken from 3 points within 350 m2 of agricultural land. A total of 48 samples were air-dried and passed through 2mm sieve, for some chemical, biological, and physical measurements. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS. Statistical results revealed that frequency distribution of most data was normal. The lowest CV% was related to pH. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and comparison test showed that there are significant differences in soil quality indicators among crop rotation systems and sampling times. Results of multivariable regression analysis revealed that soil respiration had positively correlation coefficient with soil organic matter, soil moisture and cation exchange capacity. Overall results indicated that the rice rotation with legumes such as bean and soybean improved soil quality over a long time in comparison to rice-fallow rotation, and this is reflected in rice yield. Keywords: Soil quality, Crop Rotation System, Paddy Soils, Italy

  8. No-till bioenergy cropping systems effect on soil aeration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioenergy cropping systems have been proposed as a way to enhance United States energy security. However, research on soil quality, such as the effects of maize stover harvesting on soil aeration and the relationships to soil structure and water, associated with bioenergy cropping systems has been l...

  9. Analysis of grounding systems in soils with hemispherical layering

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, J.; Dawalibi, F.P. ); Daily, W.K. )

    1993-10-01

    A theoretical model for the analysis of grounding systems located inside or near hemispherical soil heterogeneities is presented for the first time. Exact closed-form analytical expressions for the earth potential calculations due to current sources in different regions of this soil structure have been obtained. Numerical results are presented for different grounding systems and for different types of hemispherical soil volumes. The results clearly show that these finite hemispherical soil heterogeneities have a significant influence on the performance of grounding systems. The results obtained are in agreement with well known simple case results and converge asymptotically to the uniform soil case.

  10. History of Soil Survey and Evolution of the Brazilian Soil Classification System - SiBCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha dos Anjos, Lúcia Helena; Csekö Nolasco de Carvalho, Claudia; Homem Antunes, Mauro Antonio; Muggler, Cristine Carole

    2014-05-01

    In Brazil soil surveys started around 1940 and the first map with soil information of São Paulo State was published in 1943. The Committee of Soils of the National Service for Agronomic Research was created in 1947 by the Agriculture Ministry and became an historical landmark for soil survey in Brazil. In 1953, the National Program of soil survey was approved and the first soil map and report of Rio de Janeiro State was released in 1958, followed by São Paulo State in 1960. This is also the origin of Embrapa Soil Research institution. Other milestones were the soil surveys published by the Agronomic Institute of Campinas (IAC) and the natural resources studies published within the RADAMBRASIL Project, initially planned for the Amazon region and later covering the whole country. Many soil studies followed and a comprehensive knowledge of tropical soils was achieved resulting in successful technologies for agriculture production, in lands considered by many as of "low fertility and acid soils with limited or no agricultural potential". However, detailed soil surveys are still lacking; only 5% of the country soils are mapped in 1:25.000 scales, and 15-20% in 1:100.000. In the first soil survey reports of Rio de Janeiro (1958) and São Paulo (1960), soil classes were defined according to Baldwin, Kellog & Thorp (Yearbook of Agriculture for 1938), and Thorp & Smith (Soil Science, 67, 1949) publications. It was already clear that the existing classification systems were not adequate to represent the highly weathered tropical soils of the large old landscapes in the cerrado (savanna like) region, or the soils formed on recent hydromorphic conditions at the Amazon Basin and Pantanal region. A national classification system to embody the country's large territory and environmental variation from tropical to subtropical and semiarid conditions, as well as the diversity of soil forming processes in old and new landscapes had to be developed. In 1964, the first attempt of a

  11. SUSTAINING SOIL QUALITY WITH LEGUMES IN NO-TILLAGE SYSTEMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tillage, cropping system, and cover crops have seasonal and long-term effects on the N cycle and total soil organic C, which in turn affects soil quality. Our study evaluated the effects of crop, cover crop, and tillage practices on: inorganic N levels and total soil N, the timing of inorganic N rel...

  12. Enhancing Potato System Sustainability: Soilborne Diseases and Soil Microbial Communities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four different potato cropping systems, designed to address specific management goals of soil conservation (SC), soil improvement (SI), disease suppression (DS), and a status quo (standard rotation) control (SQ), were evaluated for their effects on soilborne diseases of potato and soil microbial com...

  13. Soil heterotrophic respiration responses to meteorology, soil types and cropping systems in a temperate agricultural watershed.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buysse, Pauline; Viaud, Valérie; Fléchard, Chris

    2015-04-01

    Within the context of Climate Change, a better understanding of soil organic matter dynamics is of considerable importance in agro-ecosystems, due to their large mitigation potential. This study aims at better understanding the process of soil heterotrophic respiration at the annual scale and at the watershed scale, with these temporal and spatial scales allowing an integration of the most important drivers: cropping systems and management, topography, soil types, soil organic carbon content and meteorological conditions. Twenty-four soil CO2 flux measurement sites - comprising three PVC collars each - were spread over the Naizin-Kervidy catchment (ORE AgrHys, 4.9 km², W. France) in March 2014. These sites were selected in order to represent most of the diversity in drainage classes, soil types and cropping systems. Soil CO2 flux measurements were performed about every ten to fifteen days at each site, starting from 20 March 2014, using the dynamic closed chamber system Li-COR 8100. Soil temperature and soil moisture content down to 5 cm depth were measured simultaneously. An empirical model taking the influence of meteorological drivers (soil temperature and soil water content) on soil CO2 fluxes was applied to each site and the different responses were analyzed with regard to site characteristics (topography, soil organic carbon content, soil microbial biomass, crop type, crop management,…) in order to determine the most important driving variables of soil heterotrophic respiration. The modeling objective is then to scale the fluxes measured at all sites up to the full watershed scale.

  14. Soil management systems to improve water availability for plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klik, A.; Rosner, J.

    2009-04-01

    Due to climate change it is expected that the air temperature will increase and the amount as well as the variability of rainfall will change drastically within this century. Higher temperatures and fewer rainy days with more extreme events will increase the risk of surface runoff and erosion. This will lead to reduced soil water storage and therefore to a lower water use efficiency of plants. Soil and land management systems need to be applied and adapted to improve the amount of water stored in the soil and to ensure crop productivity functions of soils under changing climatic conditions. In a 14-yr. long field experiment, the effects of three soil management systems have been studied at three sites in Austria with respect to surface runoff, soil erosion, losses of nutrients and pesticides. Eight years after beginning of the project soil samples have been taken from different depth throughout the root zone to investigate the effects on soil properties. The results show that soil management systems with reduced tillage intensity are able to improve infiltration and soil water storage. More soil water enables plant development during longer dry periods and decreases amounts of irrigation. Overall, the higher water retention in the landscape improves the regional water balance and reduces environmental problems like soil erosion and nutrient and pesticide losses

  15. Soil properties mapping with the DIGISOIL multi-sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandjean, G.

    2012-04-01

    The multidisciplinary DIGISOIL project aimed to integrate and improve in situ and proximal measurement technologies for the assessment of soil properties and soil degradation indicators, going from the sensing technologies to their integration and their application in (digital) soil mapping (DSM). In order to assess and prevent soil degradation and to benefit from the different ecological, economical and historical functions of the soil in a sustainable way, high resolution and quantitative maps of soil properties are needed. The core objective of the project is to explore and exploit new capabilities of advanced geophysical technologies for answering this societal demand. To this aim, DIGISOIL addresses four issues covering technological, soil science and economic aspects: (i) the validation of geophysical (in situ, proximal and airborne) technologies and integrated pedo-geophysical inversion techniques (mechanistic data fusion) (ii) the relation between the geophysical parameters and the soil properties, (iii) the integration of the derived soil properties for mapping soil functions and soil threats, (iv) the pre-evaluation, standardisation and sub-industrialization of the proposed methodologies, including technical and economical studies related to the societal demand. With respect to these issues, the DIGISOIL project allows to develop, test and validate the most relevant geophysical technologies for mapping soil properties. The system was tested on different field tests, and validated the proposed technologies and solutions for each of the identified methods: geoelectric, GPR, EMI, seismics, magnetic and hyperspectral. After data acquisition systems, sensor geometry, and advanced data processing techniques have been developed and validated, we present now the solutions for going from geophysical data to soil properties maps. For two test sites, located respectively in Luxembourg (LU) and Mugello (IT) a set of soil properties maps have been produced. They give

  16. Building healthy soils using conservation tillage systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil organic matter affects nearly every aspect of crop production. Soils with higher amounts of organic matter resist compaction, and have increased water holding capacity, infiltration, fertility, and disease resistance. All these factors ultimately affect productivity. Conservation tillage syste...

  17. Plant-uptake of uranium: Hydroponic and soil system studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramaswami, A.; Carr, P.; Burkhardt, M.

    2001-01-01

    Limited information is available on screening and selection of terrestrial plants for uptake and translocation of uranium from soil. This article evaluates the removal of uranium from water and soil by selected plants, comparing plant performance in hydroponic systems with that in two soil systems (a sandy-loam soil and an organic-rich soil). Plants selected for this study were Sunflower (Helianthus giganteus), Spring Vetch (Vicia sativa), Hairy Vetch (Vicia villosa), Juniper (Juniperus monosperma), Indian Mustard (Brassica juncea), and Bush Bean (Phaseolus nanus). Plant performance was evaluated both in terms of the percent uranium extracted from the three systems, as well as the biological absorption coefficient (BAC) that normalized uranium uptake to plant biomass. Study results indicate that uranium extraction efficiency decreased sharply across hydroponic, sandy and organic soil systems, indicating that soil organic matter sequestered uranium, rendering it largely unavailable for plant uptake. These results indicate that site-specific soils must be used to screen plants for uranium extraction capability; plant behavior in hydroponic systems does not correlate well with that in soil systems. One plant species, Juniper, exhibited consistent uranium extraction efficiencies and BACs in both sandy and organic soils, suggesting unique uranium extraction capabilities.

  18. A WebGIS system for relating genetic soil classification of China to soil taxonomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xuezheng; Yang, Guoxiang; Yu, Dongsheng; Xu, Shengxiang; Warner, Eric D.; Petersen, Gary W.; Sun, Weixia; Zhao, Yongcun; Easterling, William E.; Wang, Hongjie

    2010-06-01

    Soil classification is the basis for the exchange of soil science research results and the foundation for the application of modern soil resource management methods. A WebGIS-based system designed to relate genetic soil classification of China (GSCC) to soil taxonomy (ST) was developed to enhance global cooperation and to support communication between China and the other countries on important agricultural and environmental issues. The system has a Browse Server (B/S) structure and exploits the 1:1,000,000 soil databases of China using WebGIS functionality. This paper describes the application of the WebGIS system for easily accessing cross-reference information between GSCC to ST. First, we describe the three-level B/S structure of the system. The cross-reference methodologies, referenceability and maximum referenceability, are then explained and applied at three geographic scales (i.e. nation, region and pedon). Finally, three sub-modules based on the supported scales are described and illustrated with application scenarios to familiarize users with the inquiry system and its usage. The main advantage of the system is that it considers statistical similarity in the spatial distributions between the two different classification systems. Users with limited knowledge are able to obtain soil cross-reference information using an intuitive interface, which supports query, visualization and analysis via a web browser at the most detailed level. The inquiry system benefits the development of soil classification science and international academic exchange.

  19. Integrating soil solarization into crop production systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil solarization remains one of but a handful of nonchemical soil disinfestation methods suitable for high-value crops such as cut-flowers, strawberry and fresh market tomato and pepper. Recognition of soil solarization within the context of an integrated pest management (IPM) approach is paramoun...

  20. Permanent soil monitoring system as a basic tool for protection of soils and sustainable land use in Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobza, J.

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of soil monitoring system in Slovakia is to better protect the soils with regard to sustainable land use. The main object is the observation of soil parameters indicative of change to the equilibrium of soil system as far as to the irreversible change with possible development of degradation processes in soil. The soil monitoring system in Slovakia has been running since 1993. Its importance consists of providing the information on changing spatial and temporal variations of soil parameters as well as the evolution of soil quality in topsoil and subsoil. The soil monitoring network in Slovakia is constructed using ecological principles, taking into account all main soil types and subtypes, soil organic matter, climatic regions, emission regions, polluted and non-polluted regions as well as various other land uses. The results of soil monitoring of 318 sites on agricultural land in Slovakia have been presented. Soil properties are evaluated according to the main threats to soil relating to European Commission recommendation for European soil monitoring performance as follows: soil erosion, soil compaction, decline in soil organic matter, soil salinization and sodification and soil contamination. The most significant change has been determined in physical properties of soils. The physical degradation was especially manifested in compacted and the eroded soils. On the basis of our results about 40%of agricultural land is potentially affected by soil erosion in Slovakia. In addition, decline in soil organic matter and available nutrients indicate seriousness of soil degradation processes observed during the last monitoring period in Slovakia. Measured data and required outputs are reported to Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Ispra(Italy) and European Environmental Agency (EEA) in Copenhagen (Denmark). Finally, the soil monitoring system thus becomes a basic tool for protection of soils and sustainable land use as well as for the creation of legislation not

  1. Ecological niches of major soil types in Russia: Geographical aspects of the new Russian soil classification system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonkonogov, V. D.; Lebedeva, I. I.; Gerasimova, M. I.; Khokhlov, S. F.

    2009-09-01

    The factors of soil formation are not directly taken into account in the new profile-genetic Russian soil classification system; they are not reflected in the names and diagnostics of the soils. At the same time, as well as in many other modern soil classification systems, including the American Soil Taxonomy and the WRB system, the choice of the diagnostic criteria, the establishment of the relationships between them, and the setting of the quantitative boundaries between the soil taxa are based on our perception of soil geneses with due account for the factors of soil formation. In contrast to the ecological-genetic soil classification system of 1977, information on the factors of soil formation in the new system is encoded in the properties of the soil horizons. In some cases, this is insufficient for the definite geographic localization of soils and complicates the practical application of the new classification system. In this context, information on the ecological niches of soil types was included in the field manual on soil correlation-an abridged version of the soil classification system published in 2008—in the form of special tables developed for native and agrogenic soils. The analysis of these tables made it possible to outline certain geographic regularities in the distribution of soil types belonging to the trunk of postlithogenic soils.

  2. Spatial Variation of Soil Type and Soil Moisture in the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, R.

    2001-06-27

    Soil characteristics (texture and moisture) are typically assumed to be initially constant when performing simulations with the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). Soil texture is spatially homogeneous and time-independent, while soil moisture is often spatially homogeneous initially, but time-dependent. This report discusses the conversion of a global data set of Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) soil types to RAMS soil texture and the subsequent modifications required in RAMS to ingest this information. Spatial variations in initial soil moisture obtained from the National Center for Environmental Predictions (NCEP) large-scale models are also introduced. Comparisons involving simulations over the southeastern United States for two different time periods, one during warmer, more humid summer conditions, and one during cooler, dryer winter conditions, reveals differences in surface conditions related to increases or decreases in near-surface atmospheric moisture con tent as a result of different soil properties. Three separate simulation types were considered. The base case assumed spatially homogeneous soil texture and initial soil moisture. The second case assumed variable soil texture and constant initial soil moisture, while the third case allowed for both variable soil texture and initial soil moisture. The simulation domain was further divided into four geographically distinct regions. It is concluded there is a more dramatic impact on thermodynamic variables (surface temperature and dewpoint) than on surface winds, and a more pronounced variability in results during the summer period. While no obvious trends in surface winds or dewpoint temperature were found relative to observations covering all regions and times, improvement in surface temperatures in most regions and time periods was generally seen with the incorporation of variable soil texture and initial soil moisture.

  3. An integrated GIS application system for soil moisture data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Di; Shen, Runping; Huang, Xiaolong; Shi, Chunxiang

    2014-11-01

    The gaps in knowledge and existing challenges in precisely describing the land surface process make it critical to represent the massive soil moisture data visually and mine the data for further research.This article introduces a comprehensive soil moisture assimilation data analysis system, which is instructed by tools of C#, IDL, ArcSDE, Visual Studio 2008 and SQL Server 2005. The system provides integrated service, management of efficient graphics visualization and analysis of land surface data assimilation. The system is not only able to improve the efficiency of data assimilation management, but also comprehensively integrate the data processing and analysis tools into GIS development environment. So analyzing the soil moisture assimilation data and accomplishing GIS spatial analysis can be realized in the same system. This system provides basic GIS map functions, massive data process and soil moisture products analysis etc. Besides,it takes full advantage of a spatial data engine called ArcSDE to effeciently manage, retrieve and store all kinds of data. In the system, characteristics of temporal and spatial pattern of soil moiture will be plotted. By analyzing the soil moisture impact factors, it is possible to acquire the correlation coefficients between soil moisture value and its every single impact factor. Daily and monthly comparative analysis of soil moisture products among observations, simulation results and assimilations can be made in this system to display the different trends of these products. Furthermore, soil moisture map production function is realized for business application.

  4. Management of soil systems for the disposal of industrial wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Corey, J C

    1981-01-01

    Research continues to provide improved information about the toxicity of materials, their transport in soil, and the kinetics of detoxification that is most useful in evaluating alternative approaches for safely managing industrial wastes. The placement of industrial wastes into soil systems is a satisfactory management approach if the material is nontoxic, if the soil has the capability of detoxifying the material, or if the soil prevents the material from entering the biosphere. Examples from the literature of successful applications of industrial wastes to soil are discussed.

  5. System for the removal of contaminant soil-gas vapors

    DOEpatents

    Weidner, J.R.; Downs, W.C.; Kaser, T.G.; Hall, H.J.

    1997-12-16

    A system extracts contaminated vapors from soil or other subsurface regions by using changes in barometric pressure to operate sensitive check valves that control air entry and removal from wells in the ground. The system creates an efficient subterranean flow of air through a contaminated soil plume and causes final extraction of the contaminants from the soil to ambient air above ground without any external energy sources. 4 figs.

  6. System for the removal of contaminant soil-gas vapors

    DOEpatents

    Weidner, Jerry R.; Downs, Wayne C.; Kaser, Timothy G.; Hall, H. James

    1997-01-01

    A system extracts contaminated vapors from soil or other subsurface regions by using changes in barometric pressure to operate sensitive check valves that control air entry and removal from wells in the ground. The system creates an efficient subterranean flow of air through a contaminated soil plume and causes final extraction of the contaminants from the soil to ambient air above ground without any external energy sources.

  7. Classification of Moscow soils and parent materials and its possible inclusion in the classification system of Russian soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokofyeva, T. V.; Martynenko, I. A.; Ivannikov, F. A.

    2011-05-01

    The Law on Urban Soils was adopted by the Moscow Government in 2007. In the course of working out by-laws for its implementation, the systematization of Moscow soils was developed aimed at providing scientific grounds for the urban soils' inventory, mapping, and evaluation. The classification of Moscow soils comprises a description of the diagnostic horizons and soil types with the subtype subdivision fitting the principles of the new All-Russia soil classification. The authors hope that the developed system may trigger new discussions about the place of anthropogenically transformed soils and soil-like bodies in the Classification and Diagnostics of the Soils of Russia.

  8. Assessment and kinetics of soil phosphatase in Brazilian Savanna systems.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Adão S; Espíndola, Suéllen P; Campos, Maria Rita C

    2016-05-31

    The activity and kinetics of soil phosphatases are important indicators to evaluate soil quality in specific sites such as the Cerrado (Brazilian Savanna). This study aimed to determine the activity and kinetic parameters of soil phosphatase in Cerrado systems. Soil phosphatase activity was assessed in samples of native Cerrado (NC), no-tillage (NT), conventional tillage (CT) and pasture with Brachiaria brizantha (PBb) and evaluated with acetate buffer (AB), tris-HCl buffer (TB), modified universal buffer (MUB) and low MUB. The Michaelis-Menten equation and Eadie-Hofstee model were applied to obtain the kinetic parameters of soil phosphatase using different concentrations of p-nitrophenol phosphate (p-NPP). MUB showed the lowest soil phosphatase activity in all soils whereas AB in NC and NT presented the highest. Low MUB decreased interferences in the assessment of soil phosphatase activity when compared to MUB, suggesting that organic acids interfere on the soil phosphatase activity. In NC and NT, soil phosphatase activity performed with TB was similar to AB and low MUB. Km values from the Michaels-Menten equation were higher in NC than in NT, which indicate a lower affinity of phosphatase activity for the substrate in NC. Vmax values were also higher in NC than in NT. The Eadie-Hofstee model suggests that NC had more phosphatase isoforms than NT. The study showed that buffer type is of fundamental importance when assessing soil phosphatase activity in Cerrado soils. PMID:27254453

  9. Soil Biological Parameters Influenced By Cocoa Management Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cropping systems have a profound influence on the soil micro-fauna and they are responsible for nutrient cycling, and add stability to the soil. At Tarapoto, Peru, two field experiments were established on acidic medium fertility Alfisol to assess the influence of management systems on cacao rhizosp...

  10. Predicting the Spectral Effects of Soils on Concentrating Photovoltaic Systems

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Burton, Patrick D.; King, Bruce Hardison; Riley, Daniel M.

    2014-12-15

    The soiling losses on high concentrating photovoltaic (HCPV) systems may be influenced by the spectral properties of accumulated soil. We predicted the response of an isotype cell to changes in spectral content and reduction in transmission due to soiling using measured UV/vis transmittance through soil films. Artificial soil test blends deposited on glass coupons were used to supply the transmission data, which was then used to calculate the effect on model spectra. Moreover, the wavelength transparency of the test soil was varied by incorporating red and yellow mineral pigments into graded sand. The more spectrally responsive (yellow) soils were predictedmore » to alter the current balance between the top and middle subcells throughout a range of air masses corresponding to daily and seasonal variation.« less

  11. Predicting the Spectral Effects of Soils on Concentrating Photovoltaic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, Patrick D.; King, Bruce Hardison; Riley, Daniel M.

    2014-12-15

    The soiling losses on high concentrating photovoltaic (HCPV) systems may be influenced by the spectral properties of accumulated soil. We predicted the response of an isotype cell to changes in spectral content and reduction in transmission due to soiling using measured UV/vis transmittance through soil films. Artificial soil test blends deposited on glass coupons were used to supply the transmission data, which was then used to calculate the effect on model spectra. Moreover, the wavelength transparency of the test soil was varied by incorporating red and yellow mineral pigments into graded sand. The more spectrally responsive (yellow) soils were predicted to alter the current balance between the top and middle subcells throughout a range of air masses corresponding to daily and seasonal variation.

  12. Acidity field of soils as ion-exchange systems and the diagnostics of genetic soil horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokotov, Yu. A.; Sukhacheva, E. Yu.; Aparin, B. F.

    2014-12-01

    For the comprehensive description of the acidity of a two-phase ion-exchange system, we should analyze two curves of the ionite titration by a strong base in water and salt solutions and find the quantitative relationships between the corresponding pH characteristics. An idea of the three-dimensional field of acidity of ion-exchange systems (the phase space of the soil acidity characteristics) and its three two-dimensional projections is suggested. For soils, three interrelated characteristics—the pH values of the salt and water extracts and the degree of base saturation—can serve as spatial coordinates for the acidity field. Representation of factual data in this field makes it possible to compare and analyze the acidity characteristics of different soils and soil horizons and to determine their specific features. Differentiation of the field into separate volumes allows one to present the data in a discrete form. We have studied the distribution patterns of the groups of soil horizons from Leningrad oblast and other regions of northwestern Russia in the acidity field. The studied samples are grouped in different partially overlapping areas of the projections of the acidity field. The results of this grouping attest to the correctness of the modern classification of Russian soils. A notion of the characteristic soil area in the acidity field is suggested; it can be applied to all the soils with a leaching soil water regime.

  13. Soil Management Plan For The Potable Water System Upgrades Project

    SciTech Connect

    Field, S. M.

    2007-04-01

    This plan describes and applies to the handling and management of soils excavated in support of the Y-12 Potable Water Systems Upgrades (PWSU) Project. The plan is specific to the PWSU Project and is intended as a working document that provides guidance consistent with the 'Soil Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex' (Y/SUB/92-28B99923C-Y05) and the 'Record of Decision for Phase II Interim Remedial Actions for Contaminated Soils and Scrapyard in Upper East Fork Popular Creek, Oak Ridge, Tennessee' (DOE/OR/01-2229&D2). The purpose of this plan is to prevent and/or limit the spread of contamination when moving soil within the Y-12 complex. The major feature of the soil management plan is the decision tree. The intent of the decision tree is to provide step-by-step guidance for the handling and management of soil from excavation of soil through final disposition. The decision tree provides a framework of decisions and actions to facilitate Y-12 or subcontractor decisions on the reuse of excavated soil on site and whether excavated soil can be reused on site or managed as waste. Soil characterization results from soil sampling in support of the project are also presented.

  14. Vegetation on the Soil Infiltration System Treating Livestock Wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Shinji; Fujikawa, Yoko; Fukui, Masami; Hamasaki, Tastuhide; Sugahara, Masataka

    In the overland flow wastewater treatments and the constructed wetlands, the purification by soil infiltration units is enhanced using vegetation. However, wetland plants (i.e. cattail (Typha latifolia)) and trees, rather than agronomic crops, have been used in conventional systems. We carried out laboratory-scale soil infiltration experiments using two forage crops, tall fescue (Festuca araundinacea) and white clover (Trifolium repens) while using livestock wastewater for irrigation. The purpose of the study was to clarify the amount of accumulation of available phosphorus and exchangeable cations in the soil and its effect on the plant growth. The application of livestock wastewater increased available phosphorus, and exchangeable potassium and sodium in the upper soil. The soil sodification, examined based on exchangeable sodium ratio and plant growth, was not very significant after 10 months of livestock wastewater application. Growing forage crops on the soil infiltration system may be a promising technology to improve crop production and treatment efficacy.

  15. Soil carbon cycling in pasture systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carbon accumulation in soil under pastures occurs to various degrees depending upon management and length of time. This presentation describes research results on soil carbon sequestration under pastures from the southeastern USA to help inform the scientific basis for development of a protocol to ...

  16. Soil consumption: An innovative system for better planning and managing soil in urban planning context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basile, Angelo; Bonfante, Antonello; Langella, Giuliano; Minieri, Luciana; De Michele, Carlo; D'Antonio, Amedeo; Manna, Piero; Terribile, Fabio

    2015-04-01

    Soil is a key natural resource and most crucial ecosystem services and the most important environmental benefits to humankind and the environment depend by its properties. However, soil is a delicate resource. Urbanization is the most impactful use of soils because it can cancel all its ecosystem functions and ends forever its life cycle since soil is removed completely and/or sealed with a cement/bitumen layer. The absence of an adequate soil culture led common urban planning to do not consider the reality of soil as living multifunctional system. In such framework, this work - performed under the project LIFE + SOILCONSWEB - aims to illustrate a different approach for soil management in spatial planning using a Spatial Decision Support System operating through the web (w-SDSS) to evaluate soil consumption. The system - already operating in an area of Southern Italy (Telese valley, 20,000 ha) - allows - in real time - to provide answers such as (i) the use of land (type and size) on different dates, (ii) mapping and statistics on the sprawl at the municipality scale, (iii) detailed mapping of land fragmentation (and statistical fragmentation) on different dates, (iv) quantification of loss of ecosystem services after potential new urbanization.

  17. Electrokinetic electrode system for extraction of soil contaminants from unsaturated soils

    DOEpatents

    Lindgren, E.R.; Mattson, E.D.

    1995-07-25

    An electrokinetic electrode assembly is described for use in extraction of soil contaminants from unsaturated soil in situ. The assembly includes a housing for retaining a liquid comprising an electrolyte solution, pure water, and soil water, the housing being in part of porous material capable of holding a vacuum. An electrode is mounted in the housing. The housing is provided with a vacuum orifice for effecting a vacuum within the housing selectively to control flow of soil water through the housing into the chamber and to control outflow of the liquid from the chamber. The assembly further includes conduit means for removing the liquid from the housing and returning the electrolyte solution to the housing, and a conduit for admitting pure water to the housing. An electrode system and method are also revealed for extraction of soil contaminants. The system and method utilize at least two electrode assemblies as described above. 5 figs.

  18. Electrokinetic electrode system for extraction of soil contaminants from unsaturated soils

    DOEpatents

    Lindgren, Eric R.; Mattson, Earl D.

    1995-01-01

    There is presented an electrokinetic electrode assembly for use in extraction of soil contaminants from unsaturated soil in situ. The assembly includes a housing for retaining a liquid comprising an electrolyte solution, pure water, and soil water, the housing being in part of porous material capable of holding a vacuum. An electrode is mounted in the housing. The housing is provided with a vacuum orifice for effecting a vacuum within the housing selectively to control flow of soil water through the housing into the chamber and to control outflow of the liquid from the chamber. The assembly further includes conduit means for removing the liquid from the housing and returning the electrolyte solution to the housing, and a conduit for admitting pure water to the housing. There is further presented an electrode system and method for extraction of soil contaminants, the system and method utilizing at least two electrode assemblies as described above.

  19. Tree root systems competing for soil moisture in a 3D soil-plant model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoli, Gabriele; Bonetti, Sara; Domec, Jean-Christophe; Putti, Mario; Katul, Gabriel; Marani, Marco

    2014-04-01

    Competition for water among multiple tree rooting systems is investigated using a soil-plant model that accounts for soil moisture dynamics and root water uptake (RWU), whole plant transpiration, and leaf-level photosynthesis. The model is based on a numerical solution to the 3D Richards equation modified to account for a 3D RWU, trunk xylem, and stomatal conductances. The stomatal conductance is determined by combining a conventional biochemical demand formulation for photosynthesis with an optimization hypothesis that selects stomatal aperture so as to maximize carbon gain for a given water loss. Model results compare well with measurements of soil moisture throughout the rooting zone, of total sap flow in the trunk xylem, as well as of leaf water potential collected in a Loblolly pine forest. The model is then used to diagnose plant responses to water stress in the presence of competing rooting systems. Unsurprisingly, the overlap between rooting zones is shown to enhance soil drying. However, the 3D spatial model yielded transpiration-bulk root-zone soil moisture relations that do not deviate appreciably from their proto-typical form commonly assumed in lumped eco-hydrological models. The increased overlap among rooting systems primarily alters the timing at which the point of incipient soil moisture stress is reached by the entire soil-plant system.

  20. Evaluation of a soil slurry reactor system for treating soil contaminated with munitions compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Boopathy, R.; Manning, J.; Montemagno, C.; Kulpa, C.F.

    1994-05-01

    Two 0.5-L semicontinuous soil slurry reactors were operated for seven months to evaluate the performance of the slurry reactor system in bioremediating soil contaminated with munitions compounds. Nitrogen and carbon were supplemented. The soil slurry was mixed continuously and aerated 10 min/day. Ten percent of the contaminated soil was replaced every week. The 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) concentration in soil began to drop after 15 days of treatment, falling to less than 0.5 mg/kg from 7800 mg/kg. Total plate counts in both reactors indicated that the bacterial population was maintained, with an average plate count of about 10{sup 8} CFU/mL. The soil slurry was slightly acidic. In addition to TNT, the slurry reactor also removed the other munitions compounds trinitrobenzene (TNB), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT), RDX, and HMX. Radiolabeling studies on the reactor biomass showed that 23% of [{sup C}14]TNT was mineralized, while 27% was used as biomass and 8% was adsorbed on to the soil. The rest of the [{sup 14}C]TNT was accounted for as TNT metabolites. Increasing the frequency of soil replacement from once to two or three times weekly did not affect the TNT removal rates. However, the slurry system showed signs of stress, with highly acidic conditions and low oxygen uptake rates.

  1. ACID EXTRACTION TREATMENT SYSTEM FOR TREATMENT OF METAL CONTAMINATED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Acid Extraction Treatment System (AETS) reduces the concentrations and/or leachability of heavy metals in contaminated soils so the soil can be returned to the site from which it originated. he objective of the project was to determine the effectiveness and commercial viabili...

  2. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: SOIL/SEDIMENT WASHING SYSTEM BERGMANN USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Bergmann USA Soil/Sediment Washing System is a waste minimization technique designed to separate or "partition" soils and sediments by grain size and density. In this water-based volume reduction process, hazardous contaminants are concentrated into a small residual portion...

  3. Teaching Geographic Information Systems in a Soil Physics Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, H. D.; Smith, P. A.

    1995-01-01

    Presents the use of geographic information system (GIS) technology in the laboratory section of an upper-level college course in soil physics. The laboratory includes a lecture portion that provides an introduction to GIS and selected applications to soil science, agriculture, and environmental sciences. (LZ)

  4. In-situ remediation system for groundwater and soils

    DOEpatents

    Corey, J.C.; Kaback, D.S.; Looney, B.B.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention relates to a system for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater and soil. In particular the present invention relates to stabilizing toxic metals in groundwater and soil. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC09-89SR18035 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

  5. Broiler litter fertilization and cropping system impacts on soil properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A 3-year study was conducted at the Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, Verona, MS, in a Catalpa silty clay loam soil (Fine, smectitic, thermic Fluvaquentic Hapludolls) to evaluate soil chemical, physical, and biological changes resulting from cropping systems along with broile...

  6. Heavy metals in the soil-crop system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'in, V. B.

    2007-09-01

    Data on the bulk contents of heavy metals in polluted soils are not quite suitable to judge the ecological situation in an agrocenosis. According to the results of model experiments with artificial contamination of soil, the flux of zinc and lead from the starting point (from a medium loamy leached chernozem) to the final point (wheat grains) sharply decreases. It is possible to obtain an ecologically pure (uncontaminated) grain yield even on a strongly contaminated soil due to the buffering capacity of the latter and due to the self-protective capacity of agricultural crops. The ecological potential of the soil-crop system is formed mostly at the expense of the buffering capacity of soil to heavy metals; the barrier function of plants is less significant. It is argued that the existing ecological standards based on the total contents of heavy metals in soil are of little use for predicting the quality of crops.

  7. Soil water availability as controlling factor for actual evapotranspiration in urban soil-vegetation-systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, Simon; Reisdorff, Christoph; Gröngröft, Alexander; Jensen, Kai; Eschenbach, Annette

    2015-04-01

    The City of Hamburg is characterized by a large number of greens, parks and roadside trees: 600.000 trees cover about 14% of the city area, and moreover, 245.000 roadside trees can be found here. Urban vegetation is generally known to positively contribute to the urban micro-climate via cooling by evapotranspiration (ET). The water for ET is predominantly stored in the urban soils. Hence, the actual evapotranspiration (ETa) is - beside atmospheric drivers - determined by soil water availability at the soil surface and in the rooting zones of the respective vegetation. The overall aim of this study is to characterize soil water availability as a regulative factor for ETa in urban soil-vegetation systems. The specific questions addressed are: i) What is the spatio-temporal variation in soil water availability at the study sites? ii) Which soil depths are predominantly used for water uptake by the vegetation forms investigated? and iii) Which are the threshold values of soil water tension and soil water content (Θ), respectively, that limit ETa under dry conditions on both grass-dominated and tree-dominated sites? Three study areas were established in the urban region of Hamburg, Germany. We selected areas featuring both single tree stands and grass-dominated sites, both representing typical vegetation forms in Hamburg. The areas are characterized by relatively dry soil conditions. However, they differ in regard to soil water availability. At each area we selected one site dominated by Common Oak (Quercus ruber L.) with ages from 40 to 120 years, and paired each oak tree site with a neighboring grass-dominated site. All field measurements were performed during the years 2013 and 2014. At each site, we continuously measured soil water tension and Θ up to 160 cm depth, and xylem sap flux of each of three oak trees per site in a 15 min-resolution. Furthermore, we measured soil hydraulic properties as pF-curve, saturated and unsaturated conductivity at all sites

  8. A microwave systems approach to measuring root zone soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, R. W.; Paris, J. F.; Clark, B. V.

    1983-01-01

    Computer microwave satellite simulation models were developed and the program was used to test the ability of a coarse resolution passive microwave sensor to measure soil moisture over large areas, and to evaluate the effect of heterogeneous ground covers with the resolution cell on the accuracy of the soil moisture estimate. The use of realistic scenes containing only 10% to 15% bare soil and significant vegetation made it possible to observe a 60% K decrease in brightness temperature from a 5% soil moisture to a 35% soil moisture at a 21 cm microwave wavelength, providing a 1.5 K to 2 K per percent soil moisture sensitivity to soil moisture. It was shown that resolution does not affect the basic ability to measure soil moisture with a microwave radiometer system. Experimental microwave and ground field data were acquired for developing and testing a root zone soil moisture prediction algorithm. The experimental measurements demonstrated that the depth of penetration at a 21 cm microwave wavelength is not greater than 5 cm.

  9. Soil-Earthworm-Litter System Controls on the Soil Aggregates and Soil Organic Matter Dynamics in Eastern Deciduous Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yini; Filley, Timothy; Johnston, Cliff; Szlavecz, Kathy; McCormick, Melissa

    2010-05-01

    Many soils from forests in northern North America are undergoing a recent invasion of European Lumbricid earthworms with important implications for soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics. Our work seeks to identify how native and invasive earthworm (EW) activity alters the relative importance of physical, chemical, and biochemical protection mechanisms controlling SOM stabilization in deciduous forests by changing the dynamics of soil particulate organic matter (POM) and aggregates. Within forests of the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC) in coastal Maryland, USA, wood and litter amendment plots were established in high, low and no EW activity areas within forests of different stand age and land use history to study EW impacts to litter-soil systems. Older, mature successional forests have relatively fewer or no earthworms while forests with agricultural disturbance less than 75 years exhibit the greatest number of individuals. Our previous work demonstrated that the plant biopolymer chemistry of both decayed litter and soil (0-5 cm) POM is driven by differences in EW activity and is responsible for the differences observed in lignin and root aliphatic matter accumulation in this system. In the present study we compare soils to a depth of 15 cm among plots with 5 years of wood and litter amendment to track the control of EW activity on the vertical transport and microaggregation of litter. Elemental C&N, 13C, 15N abundances, and diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectra (DR-FTIR) data will be presented for bulk soil and size-density separated soil fractions. These plots have variable land use histories over the last 250 yrs which is mostly reflected in their stable 15N and 13C values of mineral bound SOC with depth but earthworm activity seems to have a control on the degree of isotope change with depth. Our results from analysis of stable isotopes and lignin phenols in soil indicate the invasive EW feeding habits and activity are a major

  10. The Soil Degradation Subsystem of the Hungarian Environmental Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, József; Pirkó, Béla; Szabóné Kele, Gabriella; Dombos, Miklós; László, Péter; Koós, Sándor; Bakacsi, Zsófia; Laborczi, Annamária; Pásztor, László

    2013-04-01

    Regular data collection on the state of agricultural soils has not been in operation in Hungary for more than two decades. In the meantime, mainly thanks to the Hungarian Soil Strategy and the planned Soil Framework Directive, the demand for the information on state of Hungarian soils and the follow up of the harmful changes in their conditions and functioning has greatly increased. In 2010 the establishment of a new national soil monitoring system was supported by the Environment and Energy Operational Programme for Informatics Development. The aim of the project was to collect, manage, analyse and publish soil data related to the state of soils and the environmental stresses attributed to the pressures due to agriculture; setting up an appropriate information system in order to fulfil the directives of the Thematic Strategy for Soil Protection. Further objective was the web-based publication of soil data as well as information to support the related public service mission and to inform publicity. The developed information system operates as the Soil Degradation Subsystem of the National Environmental Information System being compatible with its other elements. A suitable representative sampling method was elaborated. The representativity is meant for soil associations, landuse, agricultural practices and typical degradation processes. Soil data were collected on county levels led by regional representatives but altogether they are representative for the whole territory of Hungary. During the project, about 700,000 elementary data were generated, close to 2,000 parcels of 285 farms were surveyed resulting more than 9,000 analysis, 7,000 samples and 28,000 pictures. The overall number of the recorded parcels is 4500, with a total area of about 250,000 hectares. The effect of agricultural land use on soils manifests in rapid changes -related to natural processes- in qualitative and quantitative soil parameters. In intensively used agricultural areas, particularly

  11. Cropping systems modulate the rate and magnitude of soil microbial autotrophic CO2 fixation in soil.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaohong; Ge, Tida; Wang, Wei; Yuan, Hongzhao; Wegner, Carl-Eric; Zhu, Zhenke; Whiteley, Andrew S; Wu, Jinshui

    2015-01-01

    The effect of different cropping systems on CO2 fixation by soil microorganisms was studied by comparing soils from three exemplary cropping systems after 10 years of agricultural practice. Studied cropping systems included: continuous cropping of paddy rice (rice-rice), rotation of paddy rice and rapeseed (rice-rapeseed), and rotated cropping of rapeseed and corn (rapeseed-corn). Soils from different cropping systems were incubated with continuous (14)C-CO2 labeling for 110 days. The CO2-fixing bacterial communities were investigated by analyzing the cbbL gene encoding ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (RubisCO). Abundance, diversity and activity of cbbL-carrying bacteria were analyzed by quantitative PCR, cbbL clone libraries and enzyme assays. After 110 days incubation, substantial amounts of (14)C-CO2 were incorporated into soil organic carbon ((14)C-SOC) and microbial biomass carbon ((14)C-MBC). Rice-rice rotated soil showed stronger incorporation rates when looking at (14)C-SOC and (14)C-MBC contents. These differences in incorporation rates were also reflected by determined RubisCO activities. (14)C-MBC, cbbL gene abundances and RubisCO activity were found to correlate significantly with (14)C-SOC, indicating cbbL-carrying bacteria to be key players for CO2 fixation in these soils. The analysis of clone libraries revealed distinct cbbL-carrying bacterial communities for the individual soils analyzed. Most of the identified operational taxonomic units (OTU) were related to Nitrobacter hamburgensis, Methylibium petroleiphilum, Rhodoblastus acidophilus, Bradyrhizobium, Cupriavidus metallidurans, Rubrivivax, Burkholderia, Stappia, and Thiobacillus thiophilus. OTUs related to Rubrivivax gelatinosus were specific for rice-rice soil. OTUs linked to Methylibium petroleiphilum were exclusively found in rice-rapeseed soil. Observed differences could be linked to differences in soil parameters such as SOC. We conclude that the long-term application of

  12. Influence of Soil Tillage Systems on Soil Respiration and Production on Wheat, Maize and Soybean Crop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraru, P. I.; Rusu, T.

    2012-04-01

    Soil respiration leads to CO2 emissions from soil to the atmosphere, in significant amounts for the global carbon cycle. Soil capacity to produce CO2 varies depending on soil, season, intensity and quality of agrotechnical tillage, soil water, cultivated plant, fertilizer etc. The data presented in this paper were obtained on argic-stagnic Faeoziom (SRTS, 2003). These areas were was our research, presents a medium multiannual temperature of 8.20C, medium of multiannual rain drowns: 613 mm. The experimental variants chosen were: A. Conventional system (CS): V1-reversible plough (22-25 cm)+rotary grape (8-10 cm); B. Minimum tillage system (MT): V2 - paraplow (18-22 cm) + rotary grape (8-10 cm); V3 - chisel (18-22 cm) + rotary grape (8-10 cm);V4 - rotary grape (10-12 cm); C. No-Tillage systems (NT): V5 - direct sowing. The experimental design was a split-plot design with three replications. In one variant the area of a plot was 300 m2. The experimental variants were studied in the 3 years crop rotation: maize - soy-bean - autumn wheat. To soil respiration under different tillage practices, determinations were made for each crop in four vegetative stages (spring, 5-6 leaves, bean forming, harvest) using ACE Automated Soil CO2 Exchange System. Soil respiration varies throughout the year for all three crops of rotation, with a maximum in late spring (1383 to 2480 mmoli m-2s-1) and another in fall (2141 to 2350 mmoli m-2s-1). The determinations confirm the effect of soil tillage system on soil respiration, the daily average is lower at NT (315-1914 mmoli m-2s-1), followed by MT (318-2395 mmoli m-2s-1) and is higher in the CS (321-2480 mmol m-2s-1). Productions obtained at MT and NT don't have significant differences at wheat and are higher at soybean. The differences in crop yields are recorded at maize and can be a direct consequence of loosening, mineralization and intensive mobilization of soil fertility. Acknowledgments: This work was supported by CNCSIS

  13. Soil organic phosphorus in soils under different land use systems in northeast Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slazak, Anna; Freese, Dirk; Hüttl, Reinhard F.

    2010-05-01

    Phosphorus (P) is commonly known as a major plant nutrient, which can act as a limiting factor for plant growth in many ecosystems, including different land use systems. Organic P (Po), transformations in soil are important in determining the overall biological availability of P and additionally Po depletion is caused by land cultivation. It is expected that changes of land use modifies the distribution of soil P among the various P-pools (Ptotal, Plabile, Po), where the Plabile forms are considered to be readily available to plants and Po plays an important role with P nutrition supply for plants. The aim of the study was to measure the different soil P pools under different land use systems. The study was carried out in northeast of Brandenburg in Germany. Different land use systems were studied: i) different in age pine-oak mixed forest stands, ii) silvopastoral land, iii) arable lands. Samples were taken from two mineral soil layers: 0-10 and 10-20 cm. Recently, a variety of analytical methods are available to determine specific Po compounds in soils. The different P forms in the soil were obtained by a sequential P fractionation by using acid and alkaline extractants, which mean that single samples were subjected to increasingly stronger extractants, consequently separating the soil P into fractions based on P solubility. The soil Ptotal for the forest stands ranged from 100 to 183 mg kg -1 whereas Po from 77 to 148 mg kg -1. The Po and Plabile in both soil layers increased significantly with increase of age-old oak trees. The most available-P fraction was Plabile predominate in the oldest pine-oak forest stand, accounting for 29% of soil Ptotal. For the silvopasture and arable study sites the Ptotal content was comparable. However, the highest value of Ptotal was measured in the 30 years old silvopastoral system with 685 mg kg-1 and 728 mg kg-1 at 0-10 cm and 10-20 cm depth, respectively than in arable lands. The results have shown that the 30 years old

  14. Cropping systems modulate the rate and magnitude of soil microbial autotrophic CO2 fixation in soil

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaohong; Ge, Tida; Wang, Wei; Yuan, Hongzhao; Wegner, Carl-Eric; Zhu, Zhenke; Whiteley, Andrew S.; Wu, Jinshui

    2015-01-01

    The effect of different cropping systems on CO2 fixation by soil microorganisms was studied by comparing soils from three exemplary cropping systems after 10 years of agricultural practice. Studied cropping systems included: continuous cropping of paddy rice (rice-rice), rotation of paddy rice and rapeseed (rice-rapeseed), and rotated cropping of rapeseed and corn (rapeseed-corn). Soils from different cropping systems were incubated with continuous 14C-CO2 labeling for 110 days. The CO2-fixing bacterial communities were investigated by analyzing the cbbL gene encoding ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (RubisCO). Abundance, diversity and activity of cbbL-carrying bacteria were analyzed by quantitative PCR, cbbL clone libraries and enzyme assays. After 110 days incubation, substantial amounts of 14C-CO2 were incorporated into soil organic carbon (14C-SOC) and microbial biomass carbon (14C-MBC). Rice-rice rotated soil showed stronger incorporation rates when looking at 14C-SOC and 14C-MBC contents. These differences in incorporation rates were also reflected by determined RubisCO activities. 14C-MBC, cbbL gene abundances and RubisCO activity were found to correlate significantly with 14C-SOC, indicating cbbL-carrying bacteria to be key players for CO2 fixation in these soils. The analysis of clone libraries revealed distinct cbbL-carrying bacterial communities for the individual soils analyzed. Most of the identified operational taxonomic units (OTU) were related to Nitrobacter hamburgensis, Methylibium petroleiphilum, Rhodoblastus acidophilus, Bradyrhizobium, Cupriavidus metallidurans, Rubrivivax, Burkholderia, Stappia, and Thiobacillus thiophilus. OTUs related to Rubrivivax gelatinosus were specific for rice-rice soil. OTUs linked to Methylibium petroleiphilum were exclusively found in rice-rapeseed soil. Observed differences could be linked to differences in soil parameters such as SOC. We conclude that the long-term application of cropping systems

  15. Can we manipulate root system architecture to control soil erosion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ola, A.; Dodd, I. C.; Quinton, J. N.

    2015-09-01

    Soil erosion is a major threat to soil functioning. The use of vegetation to control erosion has long been a topic for research. Much of this research has focused on the above-ground properties of plants, demonstrating the important role that canopy structure and cover plays in the reduction of water erosion processes. Less attention has been paid to plant roots. Plant roots are a crucial yet under-researched factor for reducing water erosion through their ability to alter soil properties, such as aggregate stability, hydraulic function and shear strength. However, there have been few attempts to specifically manipulate plant root system properties to reduce soil erosion. Therefore, this review aims to explore the effects that plant roots have on soil erosion and hydrological processes, and how plant root architecture might be manipulated to enhance its erosion control properties. We demonstrate the importance of root system architecture for the control of soil erosion. We also show that some plant species respond to nutrient-enriched patches by increasing lateral root proliferation. The erosional response to root proliferation will depend upon its location: at the soil surface dense mats of roots may reduce soil erodibility but block soil pores thereby limiting infiltration, enhancing runoff. Additionally, in nutrient-deprived regions, root hair development may be stimulated and larger amounts of root exudates released, thereby improving aggregate stability and decreasing erodibility. Utilizing nutrient placement at specific depths may represent a potentially new, easily implemented, management strategy on nutrient-poor agricultural land or constructed slopes to control erosion, and further research in this area is needed.

  16. Soils organic C sequestration under poplar and willow agroforestry systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunina, Anna; Tariq, Azeem; Lamersdorf, Norbert

    2015-04-01

    Short rotation coppices (SRC) as monocultures or as agroforestry (AF) applications (e.g. alley cropping) are two techniques to implement forest into agricultural practices. Despite afforestation promotes soil carbon (C) accumulation, age and type of the tree stand can affect the C accumulation in different degrees. Here, we studied the impact of afforestation on C accumulation for: i) pure SCR of willow (Salix viminalis x Salix schwerinii) and poplar (Populus nigra x Populus maximowiczii) and ii) AF cropping system with willow. Forest systems have been established within the BEST agroforestry project in Germany. Adjacent agricultural field have been used as a control. Soil samples were collected in 2014, three years after plantation establishment, from three soil depths: 0-3, 3-20, and 20-30 cm. Total organic C, labile C (incubation of 20 g soil during 100 days with measuring of CO2) and aggregate structure were analysed. Additionally, density fractionation of the samples from 0-3 cm was applied to separate particulate organic matter (POM) and mineral fractions. Aggregates and density fractions were analyzed for C content. High input of plant litter as well as root exudates have led to increases of organic C in AF and SRC plots compare to cropland, mainly in the top 0-3 cm. The highest C content was found for willow SRC (18.2 g kg-1 soil), followed by willow-AF (15.6 g kg-1 soil), and poplar SRC (13.7 g kg-1 soil). Carbon content of cropland was 12.5 g kg-1 soil. Absence of ploughing caused increase portion of macroaggregates (>2000 μm) under SRC and AF in all soil layers as well as the highest percentage of C in that aggregate size class (70-80%). In contrast, C in cropland soil was mainly accumulated in small macroaggregates (250-2000 μm). Intensive mineralisation of fresh litter and old POM, taking place during first years of trees development, resulted to similar portions of free POM for willow AF, willow SRC and cropland (8%), and even lower ones for poplar

  17. Assessment of soil biological quality index (QBS-ar) in different crop rotation systems in paddy soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadimi-Goki, Mandana; Bini, Claudio; haefele, Stephan

    2013-04-01

    New methods, based on soil microarthropods for soil quality evaluation have been proposed by some Authors. Soil microarthropods demonstrated to respond sensitively to land management practices and to be correlated with beneficial soil functions. QBS Index (QBS-ar) is calculated on the basis of microarthropod groups present in a soil sample. Each biological form found in the sample receives a score from 1 to 20 (eco-morphological index, EMI), according to its adaptation to soil environment. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of various rotation systems and sampling periods on soil biological quality index, in paddy soils. For the purpose of this study surface soil samples (0-15 cm depth) were collected from different rotation systems (rice-rice-rice, soya-rice-rice, fallow-rice and pea-soya-rice) with three replications, and four sampling times in April (after field preparation), June (after seedling), August (after tillering stage) and October (after rice harvesting). The study area is located in paddy soils of Verona area, Northern Italy. Soil microarthropods from a total of 48 samples were extracted and classified according to the Biological Quality of Soil Index (QBS-ar) method. In addition soil moisture, Cumulative Soil Respiration and pH were measured in each site. More diversity of microarthropod groups was found in June and August sampling times. T-test results between different rotations did not show significant differences while the mean difference between rotation and different sampling times is statistically different. The highest QBS-ar value was found in the fallow-rice rotation in the forth soil sampling time. Similar value was found in soya-rice-rice rotation. Result of linear regression analysis indicated that there is significant correlation between QBS-ar values and Cumulative Soil Respiration. Keywords: soil biological quality index (QBS-ar), Crop Rotation System, paddy soils, Italy

  18. Explicitly representing soil microbial processes in Earth system models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieder, William R.; Allison, Steven D.; Davidson, Eric A.; Georgiou, Katerina; Hararuk, Oleksandra; He, Yujie; Hopkins, Francesca; Luo, Yiqi; Smith, Matthew J.; Sulman, Benjamin; Todd-Brown, Katherine; Wang, Ying-Ping; Xia, Jianyang; Xu, Xiaofeng

    2015-10-01

    Microbes influence soil organic matter decomposition and the long-term stabilization of carbon (C) in soils. We contend that by revising the representation of microbial processes and their interactions with the physicochemical soil environment, Earth system models (ESMs) will make more realistic global C cycle projections. Explicit representation of microbial processes presents considerable challenges due to the scale at which these processes occur. Thus, applying microbial theory in ESMs requires a framework to link micro-scale process-level understanding and measurements to macro-scale models used to make decadal- to century-long projections. Here we review the diversity, advantages, and pitfalls of simulating soil biogeochemical cycles using microbial-explicit modeling approaches. We present a roadmap for how to begin building, applying, and evaluating reliable microbial-explicit model formulations that can be applied in ESMs. Drawing from experience with traditional decomposition models, we suggest the following: (1) guidelines for common model parameters and output that can facilitate future model intercomparisons; (2) development of benchmarking and model-data integration frameworks that can be used to effectively guide, inform, and evaluate model parameterizations with data from well-curated repositories; and (3) the application of scaling methods to integrate microbial-explicit soil biogeochemistry modules within ESMs. With contributions across scientific disciplines, we feel this roadmap can advance our fundamental understanding of soil biogeochemical dynamics and more realistically project likely soil C response to environmental change at global scales.

  19. Explicitly Representing Soil Microbial Processes In Earth System Models

    SciTech Connect

    Wieder, William R.; Allison, Steven D.; Davidson, Eric A.; Georgiou, Katrina; Hararuk, Oleksandra; He, Yujie; Hopkins, Francesca; Luo, Yiqi; Smith, Mathew J.; Sulman, Benjamin; Todd-Brown, Katherine EO; Wang, Ying-Ping; Xia, Jianyang; Xu, Xiaofeng

    2015-10-26

    Microbes influence soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition and the long-term stabilization of carbon (C) in soils. We contend that by revising the representation of microbial processes and their interactions with the physicochemical soil environment, Earth system models (ESMs) may make more realistic global C cycle projections. Explicit representation of microbial processes presents considerable challenges due to the scale at which these processes occur. Thus, applying microbial theory in ESMs requires a framework to link micro-scale process-level understanding and measurements to macro-scale models used to make decadal- to century-long projections. Here, we review the diversity, advantages, and pitfalls of simulating soil biogeochemical cycles using microbial-explicit modeling approaches. We present a roadmap for how to begin building, applying, and evaluating reliable microbial-explicit model formulations that can be applied in ESMs. Drawing from experience with traditional decomposition models we suggest: (1) guidelines for common model parameters and output that can facilitate future model intercomparisons; (2) development of benchmarking and model-data integration frameworks that can be used to effectively guide, inform, and evaluate model parameterizations with data from well-curated repositories; and (3) the application of scaling methods to integrate microbial-explicit soil biogeochemistry modules within ESMs. With contributions across scientific disciplines, we feel this roadmap can advance our fundamental understanding of soil biogeochemical dynamics and more realistically project likely soil C response to environmental change at global scales.

  20. Soil organic carbon sequestration and tillage systems in Mediterranean environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francaviglia, Rosa; Di Bene, Claudia; Marchetti, Alessandro; Farina, Roberta

    2016-04-01

    Soil carbon sequestration is of special interest in Mediterranean areas, where rainfed cropping systems are prevalent, inputs of organic matter to soils are low and mostly rely on crop residues, while losses are high due to climatic and anthropic factors such as intensive and non-conservative farming practices. The adoption of reduced or no tillage systems, characterized by a lower soil disturbance in comparison with conventional tillage, has proved to be positively effective on soil organic carbon (SOC) conservation and other physical and chemical processes, parameters or functions, e.g. erosion, compaction, ion retention and exchange, buffering capacity, water retention and aggregate stability. Moreover, soil biological and biochemical processes are usually improved by the reduction of tillage intensity. The work deals with some results available in the scientific literature, and related to field experiment on arable crops performed in Italy, Greece, Morocco and Spain. Data were organized in a dataset containing the main environmental parameters (altitude, temperature, rainfall), soil tillage system information (conventional, minimum and no-tillage), soil parameters (bulk density, pH, particle size distribution and texture), crop type, rotation, management and length of the experiment in years, initial SOCi and final SOCf stocks. Sampling sites are located between 33° 00' and 43° 32' latitude N, 2-860 m a.s.l., with mean annual temperature and rainfall in the range 10.9-19.6° C and 355-900 mm. SOC data, expressed in t C ha‑1, have been evaluated both in terms of Carbon Sequestration Rate, given by [(SOCf-SOCi)/length in years], and as percentage change in comparison with the initial value [(SOCf-SOCi)/SOCi*100]. Data variability due to the different environmental, soil and crop management conditions that influence SOC sequestration and losses will be examined.

  1. The Soil-Plant-Atmosphere System - Past and Present.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, J. A.; Baker, I. T.; Randall, D. A.; Sellers, P. J.

    2012-12-01

    Plants with stomata, roots and a vascular system first appeared on earth about 415 million years ago. This evolutionary innovation helped to set in motion non-linear feedback mechanisms that led to an acceleration of the hydrologic cycle over the continents and an expansion of the climate zones favorable for plant (and animal) life. Skeletal soils that developed long before plants came onto the land would have held water and nutrients in their pore space, yet these resources would have been largely unavailable to primitive, surface-dwelling non-vascular plants due to physical limitations on water transport once the surface layer of soil dries. Plants with roots and a vascular system that could span this dry surface layer could gain increased and prolonged access to the water and nutrients stored in the soil for photosynthesis. Maintenance of the hydraulic connections permitting water to be drawn through the vascular system from deep in the soil to the sites of evaporation in the leaves required a cuticle and physiological regulation of stomata. These anatomical and physiological innovations changed properties of the terrestrial surface (albedo, roughness, a vascular system and control of surface conductance) and set in motion complex interactions of the soil - plant - atmosphere system. We will use coupled physiological and meteorological models to examine some of these interactions.

  2. Soil calcium and pH monitoring sensor system.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Sherlan G; Nogueira, Ana Rita A; Torre-Neto, André; Parra, Aleix; Alonso, Julian

    2007-06-13

    An agrarian sensorial system based on temperature, moisture, and all solid-state ion-selective potentiometric sensors was developed with the objective of monitoring the behavior of H+ and Ca2+ ions in soil and in real conditions, contributing with a new tool that tries to complement the current precision agriculture technology. The evaluation of the sensorial system to pH monitoring presented a good correlation between the results obtained by the system and the standard methodology, allowing us to notice the soil buffer capacity at different soil depths. With regard to calcium, the sensor system also presented an agreement between its results and those obtained by flame atomic absorption spectrometry, using a calibration model based on multiple linear regressions that allows the correct determination of Ca2+ concentrations in soil depths where the relative moisture is different. In this way, using well-known potentiometric sensors in a complex, discontinued, and heterogeneous matrix, such as soil, the sensorial system proved to be a useful task for agrochemical field applications. PMID:17500528

  3. Water table fluctuations and soil biogeochemistry: An experimental approach using an automated soil column system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezanezhad, F.; Couture, R.-M.; Kovac, R.; O'Connell, D.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2014-02-01

    Water table fluctuations significantly affect the biological and geochemical functioning of soils. Here, we introduce an automated soil column system in which the water table regime is imposed using a computer-controlled, multi-channel pump connected to a hydrostatic equilibrium reservoir and a water storage reservoir. The potential of this new system is illustrated by comparing results from two columns filled with 45 cm of the same homogenized riparian soil. In one soil column the water table remained constant at -20 cm below the soil surface, while in the other the water table oscillated between the soil surface and the bottom of the column, at a rate of 4.8 cm d-1. The experiment ran for 75 days at room temperature (25 ± 2 °C). Micro-sensors installed at -10 and -30 cm below the soil surface in the stable water table column recorded constant redox potentials on the order of 600 and -200 mV, respectively. In the fluctuating water table column, redox potentials at the same depths oscillated between oxidizing (∼700 mV) and reducing (∼-100 mV) conditions. Pore waters collected periodically and solid-phase analyses on core material obtained at the end of the experiment highlighted striking geochemical differences between the two columns, especially in the time series and depth distributions of Fe, Mn, K, P and S. Soil CO2 emissions derived from headspace gas analysis exhibited periodic variations in the fluctuating water table column, with peak values during water table drawdown. Transient redox conditions caused by the water table fluctuations enhanced microbial oxidation of soil organic matter, resulting in a pronounced depletion of particulate organic carbon in the midsection of the fluctuating water table column. Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) revealed the onset of differentiation of the bacterial communities in the upper (oxidizing) and lower (reducing) soil sections, although no systematic differences in microbial community structure

  4. Anaerobic soil disinfestation for soil borne disease control in strawberry and vegetable systems: Current knowledge and future directions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD), a biological alternative to soil fumigation, has been shown to control a wide range of soil-borne pathogens and nematodes in numerous crop production systems across Japan, the Netherlands and the U.S. A brief review of the status of the science behind ASD and its...

  5. Soil cover by natural trees in agroforestry systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Ambrona, C. G. H.; Almoguera Millán, C.; Tarquis Alfonso, A.

    2009-04-01

    The dehesa is common agroforestry system in the Iberian Peninsula. These open oak parklands with silvo-pastoral use cover about two million hectares. Traditionally annual pastures have been grazed by cows, sheep and also goats while acorns feed Iberian pig diet. Evergreen oak (Quercus ilex L.) has other uses as fuelwood collection and folder after tree pruning. The hypothesis of this work is that tree density and canopy depend on soil types. We using the spanish GIS called SIGPAC to download the images of dehesa in areas with different soil types. True colour images were restoring to a binary code, previously canopy colour range was selected. Soil cover by tree canopy was calculated and number of trees. Processing result was comparable to real data. With these data we have applied a dynamic simulation model Dehesa to determine evergreen oak acorn and annual pasture production. The model Dehesa is divided into five submodels: Climate, Soil, Evergreen oak, Pasture and Grazing. The first three require the inputs: (i) daily weather data (maximum and minimum temperatures, precipitation and solar radiation); (ii) the soil input parameters for three horizons (thickness, field capacity, permanent wilting point, and bulk density); and (iii) the tree characterization of the dehesa (tree density, canopy diameter and height, and diameter of the trunk). The influence of tree on pasture potential production is inversely proportional to the canopy cover. Acorn production increase with tree canopy cover until stabilizing itself, and will decrease if density becomes too high (more than 80% soil tree cover) at that point there is competition between the trees. Main driving force for dehesa productivity is soil type for pasture, and tree cover for acorn production. Highest pasture productivity was obtained on soil Dystric Planosol (Alfisol), Dystric Cambisol and Chromo-calcic-luvisol, these soils only cover 22.4% of southwest of the Iberian peninssula. Lowest productivity was

  6. Soil surface carbon dioxide efflux of bioenergy cropping systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioenergy cropping systems have been proposed as a way to enhance United States energy security. However, research on greenhouse gas emissions from such systems is needed to ensure environmental sustainability in the field. Since soil aeration properties are dynamic, high-resolution data are needed ...

  7. Bioenergy cropping systems for food, feed, fuel, and soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop production can meet multiple needs including food, livestock feed, and bioenergy or biofuels. Cropping systems can be developed to focus on meeting any one of these needs, or they can be developed to simultaneously meet multiple needs. In any case, these systems must also protect the soil resou...

  8. Soil carbon levels in irrigated Western Corn Belt cropping systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An irrigated monoculture corn, monoculture soybean, and soybean-corn cropping systems study was initiated in 1991 on a uniform site in the Platte Valley near Shelton, Nebraska. The objective was to determine the long-term effects of these cropping systems on soil organic carbon levels. Four corn hyb...

  9. Transfer model of lead in soil-carrot (Daucus carota L.) system and food safety thresholds in soil.

    PubMed

    Ding, Changfeng; Li, Xiaogang; Zhang, Taolin; Wang, Xingxiang

    2015-09-01

    Reliable empirical models describing lead (Pb) transfer in soil-plant systems are needed to improve soil environmental quality standards. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to develop soil-plant transfer models to predict Pb concentrations in carrot (Daucus carota L.). Soil thresholds for food safety were then derived inversely using the prediction model in view of the maximum allowable limit for Pb in food. The 2 most important soil properties that influenced carrot Pb uptake factor (ratio of Pb concentration in carrot to that in soil) were soil pH and cation exchange capacity (CEC), as revealed by path analysis. Stepwise multiple linear regression models were based on soil properties and the pseudo total (aqua regia) or extractable (0.01 M CaCl2 and 0.005 M diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid) soil Pb concentrations. Carrot Pb contents were best explained by the pseudo total soil Pb concentrations in combination with soil pH and CEC, with the percentage of variation explained being up to 93%. The derived soil thresholds based on added Pb (total soil Pb with the geogenic background part subtracted) have the advantage of better applicability to soils with high natural background Pb levels. Validation of the thresholds against data from field trials and literature studies indicated that the proposed thresholds are reasonable and reliable. PMID:25904232

  10. Non-equilibrium water flow in multimodal soil porous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodesova, R.; Nikodem, A.; Jirku, V.

    2009-04-01

    Soil hydraulic properties of various horizons of Haplic Luvisol were studied under the laboratory and field conditions. Multistep outflow experiments were performed in the laboratory, and tension disk and Guelph permeameter tests were carried out in the field. The dual-permeability flow model in HYDRUS-1D and HYDRUS-2D were used to estimate the soil hydraulic parameters of matrix and macropore domains from the laboratory and field transient flow data via numerical inversion. First, the laboratory experimental data were analyzed to obtain soil hydraulic properties of the one-dimensional (small column) dual-permeability system. Parameters obtained for the matrix domains were then used to analyze field transient flow data of both permeameters tests to estimate parameters of macropore domains in the radially symmetric dual-permeability system. Results showed impact of various pore fractions (gravitational and large capillary pores) and multimodality of soil porous system, which were previously documented by Kodesova et al. (2008) in the micromorphological images, on preferential flow occurrence in structured soils. Acknowledgement: Authors acknowledge the financial support of the Grant Agency of the Czech Republic grant No. 526/08/0434, and the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports grant No. MSM 6046070901.

  11. Simulation of large-scale soil water systems using groundwater data and satellite based soil moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreye, Phillip; Meon, Günter

    2016-04-01

    Complex concepts for the physically correct depiction of dominant processes in the hydrosphere are increasingly at the forefront of hydrological modelling. Many scientific issues in hydrological modelling demand for additional system variables besides a simulation of runoff only, such as groundwater recharge or soil moisture conditions. Models that include soil water simulations are either very simplified or require a high number of parameters. Against this backdrop there is a heightened demand of observations to be used to calibrate the model. A reasonable integration of groundwater data or remote sensing data in calibration procedures as well as the identifiability of physically plausible sets of parameters is subject to research in the field of hydrology. Since this data is often combined with conceptual models, the given interfaces are not suitable for such demands. Furthermore, the application of automated optimisation procedures is generally associated with conceptual models, whose (fast) computing times allow many iterations of the optimisation in an acceptable time frame. One of the main aims of this study is to reduce the discrepancy between scientific and practical applications in the field of hydrological modelling. Therefore, the soil model DYVESOM (DYnamic VEgetation SOil Model) was developed as one of the primary components of the hydrological modelling system PANTA RHEI. DYVESOMs structure provides the required interfaces for the calibrations made at runoff, satellite based soil moisture and groundwater level. The model considers spatial and temporal differentiated feedback of the development of the vegetation on the soil system. In addition, small scale heterogeneities of soil properties (subgrid-variability) are parameterized by variation of van Genuchten parameters depending on distribution functions. Different sets of parameters are operated simultaneously while interacting with each other. The developed soil model is innovative regarding concept

  12. In-situ remediation system for groundwater and soils

    DOEpatents

    Corey, J.C.; Kaback, D.S.; Looney, B.B.

    1993-11-23

    A method and system are presented for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater and soil where the contaminants, such as toxic metals, are carried in a subsurface plume. The method comprises selection and injection into the soil of a fluid that will cause the contaminants to form stable, non-toxic compounds either directly by combining with the contaminants or indirectly by creating conditions in the soil or changing the conditions of the soil so that the formation of stable, non-toxic compounds between the contaminants and existing substances in the soil are more favorable. In the case of non-toxic metal contaminants, sulfides or sulfates are injected so that metal sulfides or sulfates are formed. Alternatively, an inert gas may be injected to stimulate microorganisms in the soil to produce sulfides which, in turn, react with the metal contaminants. Preferably, two wells are used, one to inject the fluid and one to extract the unused portion of the fluid. The two wells work in combination to create a flow of the fluid across the plume to achieve better, more rapid mixing of the fluid and the contaminants. 4 figures.

  13. In-situ remediation system for groundwater and soils

    DOEpatents

    Corey, John C.; Kaback, Dawn S.; Looney, Brian B.

    1993-01-01

    A method and system for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater and soil where the contaminants, such as toxic metals, are carried in a subsurface plume. The method comprises selection and injection into the soil of a fluid that will cause the contaminants to form stable, non-toxic compounds either directly by combining with the contaminants or indirectly by creating conditions in the soil or changing the conditions of the soil so that the formation of stable, non-toxic compounds between the contaminants and existing substances in the soil are more favorable. In the case of non-toxic metal contaminants, sulfides or sulfates are injected so that metal sulfides or sulfates are formed. Alternatively, an inert gas may be injected to stimulate microorganisms in the soil to produce sulfides which, in turn, react with the metal contaminants. Preferably, two wells are used, one to inject the fluid and one to extract the unused portion of the fluid. The two wells work in combination to create a flow of the fluid across the plume to achieve better, more rapid mixing of the fluid and the contaminants.

  14. Soil phosphorus dynamics in a humid tropical silvopastoral system

    SciTech Connect

    Cooperband, L.R.

    1992-01-01

    In developing countries of the humid tropics, timber exploitation and agricultural expansion frequently result in deforestation. Extensive land management, coupled with inherently low soil fertility invariably produce declines in agricultural/livestock productivity which eventually lead to land abandonment and further deforestation. Phosphorus is often the major nutrient limiting plant growth in tropical soils. Agroforestry systems have been considered as viable alternatives to current land use practices. Several hypotheses suggest that combining trees with crops or pasture, especially leguminous species will improve soil nutrient cycling, soil structure and soil organic matter. In this experiment Erythrina berteroana (an arboreous legume) was grown in native grass pastures in Costa Rica to determine the effects of tree pruning and cattle grazing on soil P availability. I measured soil P fluxes as well as changes in pasture biomass over an 18-month period. In a separate field experiment, I determined decomposition rates and P release characteristics of Erythrina leaves, pasture grass clippings and cattle dung. Erythrina leaves decomposed faster than both pasture grass and cattle dung. Erythrina and pasture residues released 4-5 times less P than dung. Phosphorus fluxes after tree pruning and grazing were highly dynamic for all treatments. Tree pruning increased labile soil P over time when coupled with grazing. Pasture biomass production was greatest in the grazed tree treatment. Pasture biomass P production and concentration was greatest in the non-grazed treatment. Trees and grazing together tended to increase nutrient (P) turnover which stimulated biomass production. In contrast, trees without grazing promoted nutrient (P) accumulation in pasture biomass.

  15. Compact Subsurface Soil Investigation System. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    The compact subsurface soil investigation system is a mobile soil sampler used to obtain soil samples, including from below concrete floors, such as under fuel soil basins. If soils under buildings can be sampled and analyzed to document that the soil is not contaminated and thus can remain in place, the concrete structure over it may also be left in place or only partially removed. Taking soil samples through a concrete floor, often in inaccessible or congested locations, required rugged, portable equipment, such as the improved technology tested, the Geoprobe Model 540M soil sampler that is mounted on a hand cart. The traditional (baseline) technology used a comparable probe mounted on a full-size, 1-ton capacity, diesel-powered truck. The truck was not easily able to access all areas, because of its greater size and weight. In two sample holes from below the fuel storage basin at C-Reactor, the Geoprobe Model 540M was able to penetrate to the full sampling target depth of 3.3 m (10 ft). In the other three locations the sampler was stopped at lesser depths because of large stones. The Geoprobe 540M reduced schedule time and reduced costs by approximately 50% versus the baseline technology. For sampling at a congested fuel storage basin at five locations, the improved technology cost $7,300, whereas the baseline technology would have cost $13,000. As an extension of this demonstration, cost savings and schedule acceleration can be expected to increase commensurate with structure complexity/congestion and the number of samples required.

  16. Phosphorus cycling in natural and low input soil/plant systems: the role of soil microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamburini, F.; Bünemann, E. K.; Oberson, A.; Bernasconi, S. M.; Frossard, E.

    2011-12-01

    Availability of phosphorus (as orthophosphate, Pi) limits biological production in many terrestrial ecosystems. During the first phase of soil development, weathering of minerals and leaching of Pi are the processes controlling Pi concentrations in the soil solution, while in mature soils, Pi is made available by desorption of mineral Pi and mineralization of organic compounds. In agricultural soils additional Pi is supplied by fertilization, either with mineral P and/or organic inputs (animal manure or plant residues). Soil microorganisms (bacteria and fungi) mediate several processes, which are central to the availability of Pi to plants. They play a role in the initial release of Pi from the mineral phase, and through extracellular phosphatase enzymes, they decompose and mineralize organic compounds, releasing Pi. On the other hand, microbial immobilization and internal turnover of Pi can decrease the soil available Pi pool, competing in this way with plants. Using radio- and stable isotopic approaches, we show evidence from different soil/plant systems which points to the central role of the microbial activity. In the presented case studies, P contained in the soil microbial biomass is a larger pool than available Pi. In a soil chronosequence after deglaciation, stable isotopes of oxygen associated to phosphate showed that even in the youngest soils microbial activity highly impacted the isotopic signature of available Pi. These results suggested that microorganisms were rapidly taking up and cycling Pi, using it to sustain their community. Microbial P turnover time was faster in the young (about 20 days) than in older soils (about 120 days), reflecting a different functioning of the microbial community. Microbial community crashes, caused by drying/rewetting and freezing/thawing cycles, were most likely responsible for microbial P release to the available P pool. In grassland fertilization experiments with mineral NK and NPK amendments, microbial P turnover

  17. Understanding large-extent controls of soil organic carbon storage in relation to soil depth and soil-landscape systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulder, Vera L.; Lacoste, Marine; Martin, Manuel P.; Richer-de-Forges, Anne; Arrouays, Dominique

    2015-08-01

    In this work we aimed at developing a conceptual framework in which we improve our understanding of the controlling factors for soil organic carbon (SOC) over vast areas at different depths. We postulated that variability in SOC levels may be better explained by modeling SOC within soil-landscape systems (SLSs). The study was performed in mainland France, and explanatory SOC models were developed for the sampled topsoil (0-30 cm) and subsoil (>30 cm), using both directed and undirected data-mining techniques. With this study we demonstrated that there is a shift in controlling factors both in space and depth which were mainly related to (1) typical SLS characteristics and (2) human-induced changes to SLSs. The controlling factors in relation to depth alter from predominantly biotic to more abiotic with increasing depth. Especially, water availability, soil texture, and physical protection control deeper stored SOC. In SLSs with similar SOC levels, different combinations of physical protection, the input of organic matter, and climatic conditions largely determined the SOC level. The SLS approach provided the means to partition the data into data sets that were having homogenous conditions with respect to this combination of controlling factors. This information may provide important information on the carbon storage and sequestration potential of a soil.

  18. Advanced Assay Systems for Radionuclide Contamination in Soils

    SciTech Connect

    J. R. Giles; L. G. Roybal; M. V. Carpenter; C. P. Oertel; J. A. Roach

    2008-02-01

    Through the support of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) Technical Assistance Program, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed and deployed a suite of systems that rapidly scan, characterize, and analyze surface soil contamination. The INL systems integrate detector systems with data acquisition and synthesis software and with global positioning technology to provide a real-time, user-friendly field deployable turn-key system. INL real-time systems are designed to characterize surface soil contamination using methodologies set forth in the Multi-Agency Radiation Surveys and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM). MARSSIM provides guidance for planning, implementing, and evaluating environmental and facility radiological surveys conducted to demonstrate compliance with a dose or risk-based regulation and provides real-time information that is immediately available to field technicians and project management personnel. This paper discusses the history of the development of these systems and describes some of the more recent examples and their applications.

  19. A sensor array system for monitoring moisture dynamics inunsaturated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Salve, R.; Cook, P.J.

    2007-05-15

    To facilitate investigations of moisture dynamics inunsaturated soil, we have developed a technique to qualitatively monitorpatterns of saturation changes. Field results suggest that this device,the sensor array system (SAS), is suitable for determining changes inrelative wetness along vertical soil profiles. The performance of theseprobes was compared with that of the time domain reflectometry (TDR)technique under controlled and field conditions. Measurements from bothtechniques suggest that by obtaining data at high spatial and temporalresolution, the SAS technique was effective in determining patterns ofsaturation changes along a soil profile. In addition, hardware used inthe SAS technique was significantly cheaper than the TDR system, and thesensor arrays were much easier to install along a soilprofile.

  20. New approach to analyzing soil-building systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, E.

    1998-01-01

    A new method of analyzing seismic response of soil-building systems is introduced. The method is based on the discrete-time formulation of wave propagation in layered media for vertically propagating plane shear waves. Buildings are modeled as an extension of the layered soil media by assuming that each story in the building is another layer. The seismic response is expressed in terms of wave travel times between the layers, and the wave reflection and transmission coefficients at layer interfaces. The calculation of the response is reduced to a pair of simple finite-difference equations for each layer, which are solved recursively starting from the bedrock. Compared with commonly used vibration formulation, the wave propagation formulation provides several advantages, including the ability to incorporate soil layers, simplicity of the calculations, improved accuracy in modeling the mass and damping, and better tools for system identification and damage detection.A new method of analyzing seismic response of soil-building systems is introduced. The method is based on the discrete-time formulation of wave propagation in layered media for vertically propagating plane shear waves. Buildings are modeled as an extension of the layered soil media by assuming that each story in the building is another layer. The seismic response is expressed in terms of wave travel times between the layers, and the wave reflection and transmission coefficients at layer interfaces. The calculation of the response is reduced to a pair of simple finite-difference equations for each layer, which are solved recursively starting from the bedrock. Compared with commonly used vibration formulation, the wave propagation formulation provides several advantages, including the ability to incorporate soil layers, simplicity of the calculations, improved accuracy in modeling the mass and damping, and better tools for system identification and damage detection.

  1. Interactions in Natural Colloid Systems "Biosolids" - Soil and Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinichenko, Kira V.; Nikovskaya, Galina N.; Ulberg, Zoya R.

    2016-04-01

    The "biosolids" are complex biocolloid system arising in huge amounts (mln tons per year) from biological municipal wastewater treatment. These contain clusters of nanoparticles of heavy metal compounds (in slightly soluble or unsoluble forms, such as phosphates, sulphates, carbonates, hydroxides, and etc.), cells, humic substances and so on, involved in exopolysaccharides (EPS) net matrix. One may consider that biosolids are the natural nanocomposite. Due to the presence of nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and other macro- and microelements (heavy metals), vitamins, aminoacids, etc., the biosolids are a depot of bioelements for plant nutrition. Thus, it is generally recognized that most rationally to utilize them for land application. For this purpose the biocolloid process was developed in biosolids system by initiation of microbial vital ability followed by the synthesis of EPS, propagation of ecologically important microorganisms, loosening of the structure and weakening of the coagulation contacts between biosolids colloids, but the structure integrity maintaining [1,2]. It was demonstrated that the applying of biosolids with metabolizing microorganisms to soil provided the improving soil structure, namely the increasing of waterstable aggregates content (70% vs. 20%). It occurs due to flocculation ability of biosolids EPS. The experimental modelling of mutual interactions in systems of soils - biosolids (with metabolizing microorganisms) were realized and their colloid and chemical mechanisms were formulated [3]. As it is known, the most harmonious plant growth comes at a prolonged entering of nutrients under the action of plant roots exudates which include pool of organic acids and polysaccharides [4]. Special investigations showed that under the influence of exudates excreted by growing plants, the biosolids microelements can release gradually from immobilized state into environment and are able to absorb by plants. Thus, the biosolids can serve as an active

  2. Microbial Diversity in Soil Treatment Systems for Wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Cuyk, S.; Spear, J.; Siegrist, R.; Pace, N.

    2002-05-01

    There is an increasing awareness and concern over land based wastewater system performance with respect to the removal of bacteria and virus. The goal of this work is to describe and identify the organismal composition of the microbiota in the applied wastewater effluent, the rich biomat that develops at the infiltrative surface, and in the soil percolate in order to aid in the understanding of bacterial and virus purification in soil treatment systems. The traditional reliance on pure culture techniques to describe microbiota is circumvented by the employment of a molecular approach. Microbial community characterization is underway based on cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes for phylogenetic analyses, to determine the nature and quantity of microbiota that constitute these ecosystems. Knowledge of the organisms naturally present can influence the design and treatment capacity of these widely used land based systems. Laboratory, intermediate and field scale systems are currently under study. Since human pathogens are known to exist in sewage effluents, their removal in wastewater infiltration systems and within the underlying soil are in need of a more fundamental understanding. The relationship between design parameters and environmental conditions, including a microbial characterization, is essential for the prevention of contamination in groundwater sources. Preliminary results indicate the presence of uncultured organisms and phylogenetic kinds that had not been detected in these systems using other methods. Acinetobacter johnsonii and Acrobacter cryaerophilus were the two dominant species found in septic tank effluent, comprising 20% and 11% of the library respectively. In soil samples collected from the infiltrative surface of a column dosed with STE, there was no dominant bacterial species present. Percolate samples collected from the outflow of the column showed that a tuber borchii symbiont, a common soil microorganism, dominated the bacterial

  3. GAS DIFFUSION IN A 2-D SOIL SYSTEM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chemical alternatives for methyl bromide appear to be the only viable short to medium range replacements in pre-plant soil fumigation systems. However, current fumigation practices need to be improved to minimize negative societal and environmental impacts. Often the amount of fumigant applied to so...

  4. Soil Quality and the Solar Corridor Crop System

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The solar corridor crop system (SCCS) is designed for improved crop productivity based on highly efficient use of solar radiation by integrating row crops with drilled or solid-seeded crops in broad strips (corridors) that also facilitate establishment of cover crops for year-round soil cover. The S...

  5. REVIEW OF MATHEMATICAL MODELING FOR EVALUATING SOIL VAPOR EXTRACTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) is a commonly used remedial technology at sites contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOC5) such as chlorinated solvents and hydrocarbon fuels. Modeling tools are available to help evaluate the feasibility, design, and performance of SVE system...

  6. Soil quality and the solar corridor crop system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The solar corridor crop system (SCCS) is designed for improved crop productivity based on highly efficient use of solar radiation by integrating row crops with drilled or solid-seeded crops in broad strips (corridors) that also facilitate establishment of cover crops for year-round soil cover. The S...

  7. Soil vapor extraction system design scale-up considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, E.F.; Battey, R.F.

    1997-12-31

    Tried and true design considerations need to be reexamined when designing and implementing a 10,000 scfm soil vapor extraction system. Soil vapor extraction systems have typically been applied at many sites on a fairly small scale, involving air flows of several hundred to a thousand cubic feet per minute. Systems of 10,000 scfm are rarely encountered and entail some unique design considerations. This paper describes the technology options, equipment availability, and other design considerations for a 10,000 scfm system (installed at a former aircraft maintenance facility in Southern California). During the design, low pressure centrifugal fans, higher pressure centrifugal blowers, regenerative blowers and positive-displacement blowers are considered as exhausters. Several technologies are considered for treatment of the extracted air to reduce volatile organic compound (VOC) content: granular activated carbon adsorption, resin adsorption, thermal oxidation and catalytic oxidation. Cost and efficiency criteria are evaluated for the final selection of process equipment at this site. The choice of technology for reduction of VOCs is strongly dependent upon the estimate of recoverable VOCs initially in the soil, the cost of activated carbon replacement and reactivation service, and the cost of fuel. The choice of exhauster is most strongly influenced by the vacuum required at the vapor extraction wells to efficiently move air through the soil matrix and the treatment equipment. The choice of type of exhauster is also limited by the 10,000 scfm air flow rate.

  8. Identifying root exudates in field contaminated soil systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfeld, C.; Martinez, C. E.

    2012-12-01

    surface was covered by CO2 impermeable sheets to ensure that all 13C in the soil results from photoassimilated C released by roots and not soil-atmosphere gas exchange. Ambient CO2 was drawn down in the system until the CO2 concentration within the tent was less than 50 ppm, after which the labeled 13CO2 was introduced, returning the CO2 concentration to the ambient level (~375 ppm). The CO2 pulse lasted for 60 minutes to allow enough time for 13C assimilation within the plants. In order to determine the ideal sampling time, soil pore water samples were extracted every 1-2 hours following the 13C pulse application, over the course of 24 hours. Samples were analyzed for delta 13C as well as %C, and results indicate that the greatest plant-derived dissolved organic C is present at about 6 hours following the 13C pulse. A second experiment will also be conducted using a combination of NMR and mass spectrometry methods to obtain detailed information regarding chemical structures within exudate samples.

  9. Behaviour of mesotrione in maize and soil system and its influence on soil dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Kaczynski, Piotr; Lozowicka, Bozena; Hrynko, Izabela; Wolejko, Elzbieta

    2016-11-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the dissipation of mesotrione and effect on dehydrogenase activity (DHA) in maize and soil system. The paper for the first time describes behaviour of this herbicide applied at various doses (separately or in mixture with other herbicide) in acidic and alkaline environment. The experiments were conducted using the method randomized blocks in four repetition cycles. Chemical application in seven variants at recommended doses of herbicide were performed. The sample preparation was performed by a modified QuEChERS method and the concentrations of mesotrione in maize and soil were determined by the liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The limit of detection was 0.0005mgkg(-1) and quantification 0.001mgkg(-1). The dissipation of mesotrione were described according to first-order (FO) kinetics equation with R(2) were between 0.8794 and 0.9934. The initial deposit of herbicide in soil and maize was higher in an acidic environment (0.06-0.18mgkg(-1)). A positive correlation between an alkaline pH and the rate of dissipation in soil was observed. The results showed that the time after which 50% (DT50) of substance has been degraded was different for both plant and soil. DT50 for soil was within the range 3.2-6.0days and 2.9-4.4days, for the maize 3.9-4.8days and 3.4-4.5days in an alkaline and an acidic environment, respectively. Concentration of mesotrione at applicable MRL level of 0.05mgkg(-1) in maize was achieved at 0.5-5.9days and at proposed MRL of 0.01mgkg(-1) at 8.8-15.8days. The results indicate that the application of mesotrione affected on DHA in the soil. One day after application this herbicide, concentration of DHA in soil was lower than in control plots, but after 21days was observed trend of increasing DHA. PMID:27492351

  10. Bioelectric potentials in the soil-plant system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozdnyakov, A. I.

    2013-07-01

    A detailed study of the electric potentials in the soil-plant system was performed. It was found that the electric potential depends on the plant species and the soil properties. A theoretical interpretation of the obtained data was given. All the plants, independently from their species and their state, always had a negative electric potential relative to the soil. The electric potential of the herbaceous plants largely depended on the leaf area. In some plants, such as burdock ( Arctium lappa) and hogweed ( Heracleum sosnowskyi), the absolute values of the negative electric potential exceeded 100 mV. The electric potential was clearly differentiated by the plant organs: in the flowers, it was lower than in the leaves; in the leaves, it was usually lower than in the leaf rosettes and stems. The electric potentials displayed seasonal dynamics. As a rule, the higher the soil water content, the lower the electric potential of the plants. However, an inverse relationship was observed for dandelions ( Taraxacum officinale). It can be supposed that the electric potential between the soil and the plant characterizes the vital energy of the plant.

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OF SOIL DISPOSAL SYSTEM LEACHATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ground water from a total of ten septic tank systems around the country has been sampled and analyzed for inorganic ions, bacteria, viruses, and chromatographable trace level organics (C-TLOs). Generally, the distribution box at each site was sampled and taken to be input to the ...

  12. Contributions of Precipitation and Soil Moisture Observations to the Skill of Soil Moisture Estimates in a Land Data Assimilation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichle, Rolf H.; Liu, Qing; Bindlish, Rajat; Cosh, Michael H.; Crow, Wade T.; deJeu, Richard; DeLannoy, Gabrielle J. M.; Huffman, George J.; Jackson, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    The contributions of precipitation and soil moisture observations to the skill of soil moisture estimates from a land data assimilation system are assessed. Relative to baseline estimates from the Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA), the study investigates soil moisture skill derived from (i) model forcing corrections based on large-scale, gauge- and satellite-based precipitation observations and (ii) assimilation of surface soil moisture retrievals from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth Observing System (AMSR-E). Soil moisture skill is measured against in situ observations in the continental United States at 44 single-profile sites within the Soil Climate Analysis Network (SCAN) for which skillful AMSR-E retrievals are available and at four CalVal watersheds with high-quality distributed sensor networks that measure soil moisture at the scale of land model and satellite estimates. The average skill (in terms of the anomaly time series correlation coefficient R) of AMSR-E retrievals is R=0.39 versus SCAN and R=0.53 versus CalVal measurements. The skill of MERRA surface and root-zone soil moisture is R=0.42 and R=0.46, respectively, versus SCAN measurements, and MERRA surface moisture skill is R=0.56 versus CalVal measurements. Adding information from either precipitation observations or soil moisture retrievals increases surface soil moisture skill levels by IDDeltaR=0.06-0.08, and root zone soil moisture skill levels by DeltaR=0.05-0.07. Adding information from both sources increases surface soil moisture skill levels by DeltaR=0.13, and root zone soil moisture skill by DeltaR=0.11, demonstrating that precipitation corrections and assimilation of satellite soil moisture retrievals contribute similar and largely independent amounts of information.

  13. Remediation of transuranic-contaminated coral soil at Johnston Atoll using the segmented gate system

    SciTech Connect

    Bramlitt, E.; Johnson, N.

    1994-12-31

    Thermo Analytical, Inc. (TMA) has developed a system to remove clean soil from contaminated soil. The system consists of a soil conveyor, an array of radiation detectors toward the conveyor feed end, a gate assembly at the conveyor discharge end, and two additional conveyors which move discharged soil to one or another paths. The gate assembly is as wide as the ``sorter conveyor,`` and it has eight individual gates or segments. The segments automatically open or close depending on the amount of radioactivity present. In one position they pass soil to a clean soil conveyor, and in the other position they let soil fall to a hot soil conveyor. The soil sorting process recovers clean soil for beneficial use and it substantially reduces the quantity of soil which must be decontaminated or prepared for waste disposal. The Segmented Gate System (SGS) was developed for the cleanup of soil contaminated with some transuranium elements at Johnston Atoll. It has proven to be an effective means for recovering clean soil and verifying that soil is clean, minimizing the quantity of truly contaminated soil, and providing measures of contamination for waste transport and disposal. TMA is constructing a small, transportable soil cleanup as it is confident the SGS technology can be adapted to soils and contaminants other than those at Johnston Atoll. It will use this transportable plant to demonstrate the technology and to develop site specific parameters for use in designing plants to meet cleanup needs.

  14. Soil washwater treatment system operating procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Green, J.W.

    1993-11-02

    This report describes the Met-Pro Physical Chemical Treatment System which incorporates numerous integrated processes either physical or chemical in nature. They include the following: coagulation with chemicals; rapid mixing to assure intimate contact of influent and coagulant; controlled flocculation for maximum flock growth via addition of polymer; extended time clarification for optimum settling of solids; solids collection and disposal, and recycle for seeding; filtration for additional suspended solids removal; and ion exchange removal of uranium and heavy metals.

  15. Data acquisition system for soil degradation measurements in sloping vineyard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidoccu, Marcella; Opsi, Francesca; Cavallo, Eugenio

    2013-04-01

    The agricultural management techniques and mechanization adopted in sloping areas under temperate and sub-continental climate can affect the physical and hydrological characteristics of the soil with an increase of the soil erosion rates. Vineyards have been reported among the land uses most prone to erosion. Agricultural operations can be conducted to enhance the soil conservation, it is therefore important to know the site-specific characteristics and conditions of adopted practices. A long-term monitoring to evaluate the influence of management systems in hilly vineyard on erosion and runoff and soil properties has been carried out in the north-western Italy since 2000. Three different inter-rows tillage systems were compared: conventional tillage (CT), reduced tillage (RT) and controlled grass cover (GC). To record the rainfall amount and duration, an agro-meteorological station was located near experimental plots. The three plots are hydraulically isolated, thus runoff and sediment have been collected at the bottom by a drain, connected with a tipping bucket device to measure the discharge of runoff. The system was implemented with electromagnetic counters that allow the automatic accounting with data capture by a control unit, powered by a photovoltaic panel and transmitted to a data collection center for remote viewing via web page. A portion of the runoff-sediment mixture was usually sampled and analyzed for soil and nutrients losses. In order to analyze with more detail the erosion process by means of predictive models, a micro-plot system was placed in the experimental site in 2012. Splash cups have been installed in each plot since 2011 to evaluate how the soil management affects the in-field splash erosion process. Rapid measurement of soil moisture content and temperature were performed starting from August 2011 to allow continuous monitoring of parameters that can provide an evaluation of space-time hydrological processes, determining the surface

  16. Modeling soil vapor extraction to evaluate performance of a system

    SciTech Connect

    Struttman, T.J. ); Zachary, S.P. )

    1992-01-01

    The site described, located in northeast Ohio, originally had a 5,000 gallon UST that was used to supply gasoline. The tank was determined to be leaking from the fill port. Soil borings were augured to depth of 35 feet to determine the extent of soil contamination. At 20 to 30 feet in depth, contamination extended radially 50 to 60 feet. The estimated 1,600 cubic yard volume, as well as the proximity of existing buildings, made excavation, removal and disposal not cost effective. The depth of contaminated soils made bioremediation impractical. It was determined that sufficient information was available to install a vapor extraction system. The system includes 4 wells that can be individually drafted, a common vapor demister, and a 200 scfm induced draft fan. Vapor probes were installed to monitor both vacuum pressure and vapor concentration. The remediation was streamlined by focusing on installation of equipment and optimization of the system dynamics (operation). Data are collected monthly on individual well pressures, gas concentrations and mass loading in the exhaust. Analysis of these data yields radius of influence and contaminant mass withdrawal values. The draft to individual wells can be adjusted when needed to optimize system withdrawals. A model was developed, based on MODFLOW, and adapted to vapor extraction using known gas flow equations. The model was verified with known observed data. The results of this model were compared with data from the above site to determine appropriateness of using the model to design SVE system.

  17. Soil and litter fauna of cacao agroforestry systems in Bahia, Brazil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agroforestry systems deposit great amounts of plant residues on soil; and eventually, this leads to high levels of soil organic matter content and has increased soil biodiversity and improved its conservation. This study compares the distribution of meso and macrofaunal communities in soil and litte...

  18. SOIL MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES UNDER CONVENTIONAL-TILL AND NO-TILL CONTINUOUS COTTON SYSTEMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil management practices affect soil microbial communities, which in turn influence soil ecosystem processes. In this study, the effects of conventional- and no-tillage practices on soil microbial communities were examined under long-term continuous cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) systems on a Deca...

  19. The integration of innovative technologies into a physical-separation-based soil washing system

    SciTech Connect

    Krstich, M.A.

    1995-11-01

    An innovative system`s approach to the treatment of soils at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) has been proposed to effectively and cost competitively treat a significant mass of soil. The use of an integrated soil treatment system to decontaminate FEMP soils is a unique application of the soil washing technology. Due to the unfavorable soil particle size distribution and the ubiquitous distribution of uranium among these particle size fractions, conventional soil washing processes commonly used on predominantly sandy soils alone may not achieve the desirable waste minimization level without the inclusion of innovative technologies. This objective of this paper is to briefly describe the physical separation and chemical extraction process commonly used in soil washing operation and to present the baseline soil washing approach used on FEMP soils. Noting the successful and not-so-successful processes within the soil washing operation at the FEMP, a proposed innovative system`s approach to treating FEMP soils will be described. This system`s approach will integrate a conventional soil washing operation with proposed innovative technologies.

  20. A compositional shift in the soil microbiome induced by tetracycline, sulfamonomethoxine and ciprofloxacin entering a plant-soil system.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui; Jin, Danfeng; Freitag, Thomas E; Sun, Wanchun; Yu, Qiaogang; Fu, Jianrong; Ma, Junwei

    2016-05-01

    Antibiotics entering the soil likely disturb the complex regulatory network of the soil microbiome, which is closely associated with soil quality and ecological function. This study investigated the effects of tetracycline (TC), sulfamonomethoxine (SMM), ciprofloxacin (CIP) and their combination (AM) on the bacterial community in a soil-microbe-plant system and identified the main bacterial responders. Antibiotic effects on the soil microbiome depended on antibiotic type and exposure time. TC resulted in an acute but more rapidly declining effect on soil microbiome while CIP and SMM led to a delayed antibiotic effect. The soil exposed to AM presented a highly similar bacterial structure to that exposed to TC rather than to SMM and CIP. TC, SMM and CIP had their own predominantly impacted taxonomic groups that include both resistance and sensitive bacteria. The antibiotic sensitive responders predominantly distributed within the phylum Proteobacteria. The potential bacteria resistant to each antibiotic exhibited phyla preference to some extent, particularly those resistant to TC. CIP and SMM resistance in soil was increased with exposure time while TC resistance gave the opposite result. Overall, the work extended the understanding of antibiotic effects on soil microbiome after introduced into the soil during greenhouse vegetable cultivation. PMID:26952272

  1. SIMULATING SOIL ORGANIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN COTTON PRODUCTION SYSTEMS WITH EPIC AND THE SOIL CONDITIONING INDEX IN THE SOUTHEASTERN USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sequestration of soil organic carbon (SOC) in the southeastern USA is perceived as occurring at a relatively low rate, because of the inherent low SOC content of most agricultural soils. However, recent field estimates of SOC sequestration in conservation management systems suggest that the sequest...

  2. "Hot background" of the mobile inelastic neutron scattering system for soil carbon analysis.

    PubMed

    Kavetskiy, Aleksandr; Yakubova, Galina; Prior, Stephen A; Torbert, H Allen

    2016-01-01

    The problem of gamma spectrum peak identification arises when conducting soil carbon analysis using the inelastic neutron scattering (INS) system. Some spectral peaks could be associated with radioisotopes appearing due to neutron activation of both the measurement system and soil samples. The investigation of "hot background" gamma spectra from the construction materials, whole measurement system, and soil samples over time showed that activation of (28)Al isotope can contribute noticeable additions to the soil neutron stimulated gamma spectra. PMID:26595773

  3. Silicon Isotopic Fractionation in a Tropical Soil-Plant System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opfergelt, S.; Delstanche, S.; Cardinal, D.; Andre, L.; Delvaux, B.

    2006-12-01

    Silica fluxes to soil solutions and water streams are controlled by both abiotic and biotic processes occurring in a Si soil-plant cycle that can be significant in comparison with Si weathering input and hydrological output. The quantification of Si-isotopic fractionation by these processes is highly promising to study the Si soil-plant cycle. Therein, the fate of aqueous monosilicic acid H4SiO4, as produced by silicate weathering, may take four paths: (1) uptake by plants and recycling through falling litter, (2) formation of clay minerals, (3) specific adsorption onto Al and Fe oxides, (4) leaching in drainage waters and export from watersheds. Here we report on detailed Si-isotopic compositions of various Si pools in a tropical soil-plant system involving old stands of banana (Musa acuminata Colla, cv Grande Naine) cropped on a weathering sequence of soils derived from andesitic volcanic ash and pumice deposits in Cameroon, West Africa. Si-isotopic compositions were measured by MC-ICP-MS in dry plasma mode with external Mg doping with a reproducibility of 0.08 permil (2stdev). Results were expressed as delta29Si vs NBS28. The compositions were determined in plant parts, bulk soils, clay fractions (less than 2um) and stream waters used for crop irrigation. Of the weathering sequence, we selected young (Y) and old (O) volcanic soils (vs). Yvs are rich in weatherable minerals, and contain large amounts of pumice gravels; their clay fraction (10-35 percent) contains allophane, halloysite and ferrihydrite. Oppositely, Ovs are strongly weathered and fine clayey soils (75-96 percent clay) rich in halloysite, kaolinite, gibbsite and goethite. Intra-plant fractionation between roots and shoots and within shoots confirmed our previous data measured on banana plants grown in hydroponics. The bulk plant isotopic composition was heavier at Ovs than at Yvs giving a fractionation factor per atomic mass unit between plants and their irrigation water Si source (+0.61 permil) of

  4. Soil particle-size dependent partitioning behavior of pesticides within water-soil-cationic surfactant systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Keller, Arturo A

    2008-08-01

    Cationic surfactants have been proposed for enhanced sorption zones to contain hydrophobic organic compound (HOC) contamination. Benzalkonium chloride (BC), a cationic surfactant, was selected to study the particle-size dependent sorption behavior of the surfactant and its role in the immobilization of two hydrophobic pesticides (atrazine and diuron) within soil-water-surfactant systems for this application. Five different soils were considered in this study. Our results showed significant particle-size dependent behavior for surfactant sorption and pesticide immobilization in the presence of the sorbed cationic surfactant. The cation exchange capacity (CEC) of the bulk soils and their size fractions (clay, silt, and sand fractions) determined BC sorption capacity. In the absence of BC the sand fractions were the least effective sorbent for the pesticides compared with silts and clays. However, at relatively low BC mass sorbed (<10,000mg/kg) to any of the soil fractions, well below sorption saturation, the sand fractions became more effective sorbents for either pesticide than the clay and silt fractions. The pesticide partitioning coefficient onto sorbed BC (K(ss)) was not constant. Particle CEC, availability of CEC sites for sorption of the cationic surfactant, and the amount of the BC sorbed determined the phase of K(ss). The maximum K(ss) occurred before BC saturation sorption capacity was reached and at different % CEC occupancy for the different size fractions. For the clay fractions, the maximum K(ss) occurred at lower % CEC occupancy ( approximately 30-40%) than for the silt and sand fractions. The maximal K(ss) for the sand fractions occurred at the highest % CEC occupancy among all fractions ( approximately 50-60%). These findings suggest that for an in situ surfactant-enhanced sorption zone it may be better to operate well below the saturation sorption of the cationic surfactant. This would enhance sorption of the HOCs onto the immobile fractions (silt

  5. Cadmium Isotope Fractionation in Soil-Wheat Systems.

    PubMed

    Wiggenhauser, Matthias; Bigalke, Moritz; Imseng, Martin; Müller, Michael; Keller, Armin; Murphy, Katy; Kreissig, Katharina; Rehkämper, Mark; Wilcke, Wolfgang; Frossard, Emmanuel

    2016-09-01

    Analyses of stable metal isotope ratios constitute a novel tool in order to improve our understanding of biogeochemical processes in soil-plant systems. In this study, we used such measurements to assess Cd uptake and transport in wheat grown on three agricultural soils under controlled conditions. Isotope ratios of Cd were determined in the bulk C and A horizons, in the Ca(NO3)2-extractable Cd soil pool, and in roots, straw, and grains. The Ca(NO3)2-extractable Cd was isotopically heavier than the Cd in the bulk A horizon (Δ(114/110)Cdextract-Ahorizon = 0.16 to 0.45‰). The wheat plants were slightly enriched in light isotopes relative to the Ca(NO3)2-extractable Cd or showed no significant difference (Δ(114/110)Cdwheat-extract = -0.21 to 0.03‰). Among the plant parts, Cd isotopes were markedly fractionated: straw was isotopically heavier than roots (Δ(114/110)Cdstraw-root = 0.21 to 0.41‰), and grains were heavier than straw (Δ(114/110)Cdgrain-straw = 0.10 to 0.51‰). We suggest that the enrichment of heavy isotopes in the wheat grains was caused by mechanisms avoiding the accumulation of Cd in grains, such as the chelation of light Cd isotopes by thiol-containing peptides in roots and straw. These results demonstrate that Cd isotopes are significantly and systematically fractionated in soil-wheat systems, and the fractionation patterns provide information on the biogeochemical processes in these systems. PMID:27485095

  6. Soil organic carbon assessments in cropping systems using isotopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín De Dios Herrero, Juan; Cruz Colazo, Juan; Guzman, María Laura; Saenz, Claudio; Sager, Ricardo; Sakadevan, Karuppan

    2016-04-01

    Introduction of improved farming practices are important to address the challenges of agricultural production, food security, climate change and resource use efficiency. The integration of livestock with crops provides many benefits including: (1) resource conservation, (2) ecosystem services, (3) soil quality improvements, and (4) risk reduction through diversification of enterprises. Integrated crop livestock systems (ICLS) with the combination of no-tillage and pastures are useful practices to enhance soil organic carbon (SOC) compared with continuous cropping systems (CCS). In this study, the SOC and its fractions in two cropping systems namely (1) ICLS, and (2) CCS were evaluated in Southern Santa Fe Province in Argentina, and the use of delta carbon-13 technique and soil physical fractionation were evaluated to identify sources of SOC in these systems. Two farms inside the same soil cartographic unit and landscape position in the region were compared. The ICLS farm produces lucerne (Medicago sativa Merrill) and oat (Avena sativa L.) grazed by cattle alternatively with grain summer crops sequence of soybean (Glicine max L.) and corn (Zea mays L.), and the farm under continuous cropping system (CCS) produces soybean and corn in a continuous sequence. The soil in the area is predominantly a Typic Hapludoll. Soil samples from 0-5 and 0-20 cm depths (n=4) after the harvest of grain crops were collected in each system and analyzed for total organic carbon (SOC, 0-2000 μm), particulate organic carbon (POC, 50-100 μm) and mineral organic carbon (MOC, <50 μm). Delta carbon-13 was determined by isotopic ratio mass spectrometry. In addition, a site with natural vegetation (reference site, REF) was also sampled for delta carbon-13 determination. ANOVA and Tukey statistical analysis were carried out for all data. The SOC was higher in ICLS than in CCS at both depths (20.8 vs 17.7 g kg-1 for 0-5 cm and 16.1 vs 12.7 g kg-1 at 0-20 cm, respectively, P<0.05). MOC was

  7. Phosphorus in soil treatment systems: accumulation and mobility.

    PubMed

    Eveborn, David; Gustafsson, Jon Petter; Elmefors, Elin; Yu, Lin; Eriksson, Ann-Kristin; Ljung, Emelie; Renman, Gunno

    2014-11-01

    Septic tanks with subsequent soil treatment systems (STS) are a common treatment technique for domestic wastewater in rural areas. Phosphorus (P) leakage from such systems may pose a risk to water quality (especially if they are located relatively close to surface waters). In this study, six STS in Sweden (11-28 years old) were examined. Samples taken from the unsaturated subsoil beneath the distribution pipes were investigated by means of batch and column experiments, and accumulated phosphorus were characterized through X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis. At all sites the wastewater had clearly influenced the soil. This was observed through decreased pH, increased amounts of oxalate extractable metals and at some sites altered P sorption properties. The amount of accumulated P in the STS were found to be between 0.32 and 0.87 kg m(-3), which in most cases was just a fraction of the estimated P load (<30%). Column studies revealed that high P concentrations (up to 6 mg L(-1)) were leached from the material when deionized water was applied. However, the response to deionized water varied between the sites. As evidenced by XANES analysis, aluminium phosphates or P adsorbed to aluminium (hydr)oxides, as well as organically bound P, were important sinks for P. Generally soils with a high content of oxalate-extractable Al were also less vulnerable to P leakage. PMID:25036667

  8. Test of Regional Calibrations for a NIRS Soil Mapping System

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is an effective technique for simultaneously measuring several soil properties including soil organic carbon, total nitrogen, moisture, and cation exchange capacity. However, developing robust calibration models for predicting soil properties from spectral measureme...

  9. Continuous Cropping Systems Reduce Near-Surface Maximum Compaction in No-Till Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because of increased concerns over compaction in NT soils, it is important to assess how continuous cropping systems influence risks of soil compaction across a range of soils and NT management systems. We quantified differences in maximum bulk density (BDmax) and critical water content (CWC) by the...

  10. Collaboration support system for "Phobos-Soil" space mission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarov, V.; Nazirov, R.; Zakharov, A.

    2009-04-01

    Rapid development of communication facilities leads growth of interactions done via electronic means. However we can see some paradox in this segment in last times: Extending of communication facilities increases collaboration chaos. And it is very sensitive for space missions in general and scientific space mission particularly because effective decision of this task provides successful realization of the missions and promises increasing the ratio of functional characteristic and cost of mission at all. Resolving of this problem may be found by using respective modern technologies and methods which widely used in different branches and not in the space researches only. Such approaches as Social Networking, Web 2.0 and Enterprise 2.0 look most prospective in this context. The primary goal of the "Phobos-Soil" mission is an investigation of the Phobos which is the Martian moon and particularly its regolith, internal structure, peculiarities of the orbital and proper motion, as well as a number of different scientific measurements and experiments for investigation of the Martian environment. A lot of investigators involved in the mission. Effective collaboration system is key facility for information support of the mission therefore. Further to main goal: communication between users of the system, modern approaches allows using such capabilities as self-organizing community, user generated content, centralized and federative control of the system. Also it may have one unique possibility - knowledge management which is very important for space mission realization. Therefore collaboration support system for "Phobos-Soil" mission designed on the base of multilayer model which includes such levels as Communications, Announcement and Information, Data sharing and Knowledge management. The collaboration support system for "Phobos-Soil" mission will be used as prototype for prospective Russian scientific space missions and the presentation describes its architecture

  11. Management effects on soil quality in organic vegetable systems in western Washington

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Management practices in organic vegetable cropping systems and their contributions toward sustainable farming practices can differ greatly. Soil quality monitoring may help organic farmers evaluate and choose best management practices. This study 1) assessed the sensitivity of soil biological prop...

  12. Mechanistic understanding of MeHg-Se antagonism in soil-rice systems: the key role of antagonism in soil

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongjie; Dang, Fei; Evans, R. Douglas; Zhong, Huan; Zhao, Jiating; Zhou, Dongmei

    2016-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) accumulation in rice has great implications for human health. Here, effects of selenium (Se) on MeHg availability to rice are explored by growing rice under soil or foliar fertilization with Se. Results indicate that soil amendment with Se could reduce MeHg levels in soil and grain (maximally 73%). In contrast, foliar fertilization with Se enhanced plant Se levels (3–12 folds) without affecting grain MeHg concentrations. This evidence, along with the distinct distribution of MeHg and Se within the plant, demonstrate for the first time that Se-induced reduction in soil MeHg levels (i.e., MeHg-Se antagonism in soil) rather than MeHg-Se interactions within the plant might be the key process triggering the decreased grain MeHg levels under Se amendment. The reduction in soil MeHg concentrations could be mainly attributed to the formation of Hg-Se complexes (detected by TEM-EDX and XANES) and thus reduced microbial MeHg production. Moreover, selenite and selenate were equally effective in reducing soil MeHg concentrations, possibly because of rapid changes in Se speciation. The dominant role of Se-induced reduction in soil MeHg levels, which has been largely underestimated previously, together with the possible mechanisms advance our mechanistic understanding about MeHg dynamics in soil-rice systems. PMID:26778218

  13. Mechanistic understanding of MeHg-Se antagonism in soil-rice systems: the key role of antagonism in soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongjie; Dang, Fei; Evans, R Douglas; Zhong, Huan; Zhao, Jiating; Zhou, Dongmei

    2016-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) accumulation in rice has great implications for human health. Here, effects of selenium (Se) on MeHg availability to rice are explored by growing rice under soil or foliar fertilization with Se. Results indicate that soil amendment with Se could reduce MeHg levels in soil and grain (maximally 73%). In contrast, foliar fertilization with Se enhanced plant Se levels (3-12 folds) without affecting grain MeHg concentrations. This evidence, along with the distinct distribution of MeHg and Se within the plant, demonstrate for the first time that Se-induced reduction in soil MeHg levels (i.e., MeHg-Se antagonism in soil) rather than MeHg-Se interactions within the plant might be the key process triggering the decreased grain MeHg levels under Se amendment. The reduction in soil MeHg concentrations could be mainly attributed to the formation of Hg-Se complexes (detected by TEM-EDX and XANES) and thus reduced microbial MeHg production. Moreover, selenite and selenate were equally effective in reducing soil MeHg concentrations, possibly because of rapid changes in Se speciation. The dominant role of Se-induced reduction in soil MeHg levels, which has been largely underestimated previously, together with the possible mechanisms advance our mechanistic understanding about MeHg dynamics in soil-rice systems. PMID:26778218

  14. Mechanistic understanding of MeHg-Se antagonism in soil-rice systems: the key role of antagonism in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongjie; Dang, Fei; Evans, R. Douglas; Zhong, Huan; Zhao, Jiating; Zhou, Dongmei

    2016-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) accumulation in rice has great implications for human health. Here, effects of selenium (Se) on MeHg availability to rice are explored by growing rice under soil or foliar fertilization with Se. Results indicate that soil amendment with Se could reduce MeHg levels in soil and grain (maximally 73%). In contrast, foliar fertilization with Se enhanced plant Se levels (3-12 folds) without affecting grain MeHg concentrations. This evidence, along with the distinct distribution of MeHg and Se within the plant, demonstrate for the first time that Se-induced reduction in soil MeHg levels (i.e., MeHg-Se antagonism in soil) rather than MeHg-Se interactions within the plant might be the key process triggering the decreased grain MeHg levels under Se amendment. The reduction in soil MeHg concentrations could be mainly attributed to the formation of Hg-Se complexes (detected by TEM-EDX and XANES) and thus reduced microbial MeHg production. Moreover, selenite and selenate were equally effective in reducing soil MeHg concentrations, possibly because of rapid changes in Se speciation. The dominant role of Se-induced reduction in soil MeHg levels, which has been largely underestimated previously, together with the possible mechanisms advance our mechanistic understanding about MeHg dynamics in soil-rice systems.

  15. Dynamic modeling and response of soil-wall systems

    SciTech Connect

    Veletsos, A.S.; Younan, A.H.

    1993-10-01

    The study reported herein is the third in a series of investigations motivated by need to gain improved understanding of the responses to earthquakes of deeply embedded and underground tanks storing radioactive wastes, and to develop rational but simple methods of analysis and design for such systems. Following a brief review of the errors that may result from the use of a popular model for evaluating the dynamic soil forces induced in a base-excited rigid wall retaining an elastic stratum, the sources of the errors are identified and a modification is proposed which defines correctly the action of the system. In the proposed modification, the stratum is modeled by a series of elastically supported, semi-infinite horizontal bars with distributed mass instead of massless springs. The concepts involved are introduced by reference to a system composed of a fixed-based wall and a homogeneous elastic stratum, and are then applied to the analysis of more complex soil-wall systems. Both harmonic and transient excitations are considered, and comprehensive numerical solutions are presented which elucidate the actions involved and the effects and relative importance of the relevant parameters.

  16. Soil surface roughness decay in contrasting climates, tillage types and management systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal Vázquez, Eva; Bertol, Ildegardis; Tondello Barbosa, Fabricio; Paz-Ferreiro, Jorge

    2014-05-01

    Soil surface roughness describes the variations in the elevation of the soil surface. Such variations define the soil surface microrelief, which is characterized by a high spatial variability. Soil surface roughness is a property affecting many processes such as depression storage, infiltration, sediment generation, storage and transport and runoff routing. Therefore the soil surface microrelief is a key element in hydrology and soil erosion processes at different spatial scales as for example at the plot, field or catchment scale. In agricultural land soil surface roughness is mainly created by tillage operations, which promote to different extent the formation of microdepressions and microelevations and increase infiltration and temporal retention of water. The decay of soil surface roughness has been demonstrated to be mainly driven by rain height and rain intensity, and to depend also on runoff, aggregate stability, soil reface porosity and soil surface density. Soil roughness formation and decay may be also influenced by antecedent soil moisture (either before tillage or rain), quantity and type of plant residues over the soil surface and soil composition. Characterization of the rate and intensity of soil surface roughness decay provides valuable information about the degradation of the upper most soil surface layer before soil erosion has been initiated or at the very beginning of soil runoff and erosion processes. We analyzed the rate of decay of soil surface roughness from several experiments conducted in two regions under temperate and subtropical climate and with contrasting land use systems. The data sets studied were obtained both under natural and simulated rainfall for various soil tillage and management types. Soil surface roughness decay was characterized bay several parameters, including classic and single parameters such as the random roughness or the tortuosity and parameters based on advanced geostatistical methods or on the fractal theory. Our

  17. The maintenance of soil fertility in Amazonian managed systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luizão, Flávio J.; Fearnside, Philip M.; Cerri, Carlos E. P.; Lehmann, Johannes

    Most of Brazilian Amazonia faces important limitations for conventional agriculture and pastures due to a generally poor chemical fertility as well as the region's environmental conditions, especially high temperature and moisture. Without proper management, degradation of the soil and resulting unsustainability of agricultural and ranching production occur within a few years, leading to land abandonment. Use of perennial crops, especially those based on native tree species, would be instrumental in order to achieve best management such as that which assure recycling processes similar to those in the primary forest. Recommended alternative land uses are those producing high soil organic matter, recycling of nutrients, substantial agricultural production, and economic viability. These include agroforestry systems, enrichment of second growth with valuable native timber or fruit species, accelerated fallow regrowth via enrichment plantings, sequential agroforestry with slash-and-mulch, and diversified forest plantations. Improvement of agricultural soils can be based on lessons learned from the study of processes involved in the formation and maintenance of the rich "dark earths" (terra preta), which owe their high carbon content and fertility in part to high content of charcoal. Adding powdered charcoal combined with selected nutrients can increase soil carbon in modern agriculture. Considering that limitations to expansion of intensified land uses in Amazonia are serious, regional development should emphasize the natural forest, which can maintain itself without external inputs of nutrients. Instead of creating conditions to further expand deforestation, these forests may be used as they stand to provide a variety of valuable environmental services that could offer a sustainable basis for development of Amazonia.

  18. Soil Organic Carbon Dynamics under Conservation Agricultural Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) is a key element in the valuation of natural resources and the evaluation of how management affects soil quality and ecosystem services derived from soil. This paper describes a summary of some recent research aimed at understanding how SOC contributes to (a) various soil ...

  19. The impact of pyrogenic C on soil functioning : a study using ancient killn soil as a model system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumpel, Cornelia; Naisse, Christophe; Thi Ngo, Phuong; Davasse, Bernard; Girardin, Cyril; Chabbi, Abad

    2016-04-01

    The long-term effect of pyrogenic C on the physicochemical and biological functioning of soils is poorly understood. We used ancient killn soils as model systems in order to investigate soil properties after four centuries of pyrogenic C addition. In particular we were interested in the effect of the pyrogenic C amendment on the (micro-)biological functioning of the soil. We analysed for physicochemical properties, C mineralisation as well as C dynamics following input of 13C labelled charcoal and plant residues. Our results show compared to soil without any addition, that pyrogenic C amendment led in the long term to more rapid decomposition of the new materials. The decomposition rate was increased by about 17%. In contrast,a negative priming effect reduced soil organic carbon mineralization by about 30%. Soil physicochemical poperties, i.e. clay content, cation exchange and nutrient availability were durably improved in soil amended with pyrogenic C four centuries ago. These changes probably promoted higher microbial activity and thus intense mineralization when new plant litter was added. On the contrary, charcoal was degraded at a similar rate compared to soil without pyrogenic C amendment. Thus no specific adaptation of microorganism to charcoal degradation was observed even after several centuries. The negative priming effect induced by charcoal additiion can be due to a physical protection of the soluble carbon fraction at the surfaces of new charcoal. In contrast, the negative priming effect induced by plant residue input may be more likely due to a shift of substrate utilisation by microbial communities evolving in a nutrient-rich environment. Our results demonstrate that pyrogenic C addition modifies the carbon dynamic of soils in the long-term. We propose a conceptual model accounting for the alterations of soil functioning in the long term after pyrogenic C addition.

  20. Changes of soil pore system due to soil macrofauna: an experimental approach to study the contribution of different taxa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gargiulo, Laura; Buscemi, Gilda; Mele, Giacomo; Terribile, Fabio

    2015-04-01

    Soil fauna contributes to the ecosystem functioning, for example, by means of its direct influence on soil structure which modifies the physical environment of the microbial community. Changes in habitat structure due to soil fauna activities can influence resource availability, species' abundances, and community composition of soil microorganisms. X-ray tomography has been increasingly used to obtain precise and non-destructive analysis mostly of the macroporosity resulting from earthworm activity in repacked soil cores. However also other macrofauna species contribute in different manner and extent to the modification of soil pore system, and then to the soil functioning, by means of their burrows and bioturbation activity. In this work we have developed an experimental approach based on the use of repacked soil mesocosms specifically constructed for the purpose of distinguish separately the contribution to soil structure changes of different organisms naturally present in field or inoculated in laboratory. Six different orders of macrofauna were studied and after four weeks of fauna activity the cores were imaged using a medical X-ray tomograph. Three-dimensional image processing was used in order to obtain 3D reconstructions and preliminary analysis of the identified biopores. In addition to the earthworms (Haplotaxida, genus Lombricus), among the studied taxa, Embioptera showed the most intense burrowing activity, while Coleoptera larvae (sp. Elater sanguineus) and Julida (class Diplopoda) produced the thickest pore network in our mesocosms. The used experimental approach showed a promising potential to provide new useful information about the widely differentiated contribution of many types of macrofauna to the modification of soil pore system.

  1. Biodegradation of N-Nitrosodimethylamine in aqueous and soil systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.L.; Kaplan, A.M.

    1985-10-01

    N-Nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) was mineralized by microorganisms in aqueous and soil systems. Initial rates of mineralization (micrograms per milliliter per day) were calculated for a wide range of initial concentrations of NDMA (micrograms per milliliter to picograms per milliliter). Log-log plots of the data were fitted with both linear and nonlinear least-squares analyses; however, linear models provided better fits for the kinetic data in all cases. The slopes of the linear fits were not significantly different than 1.0 (P < 0.05); thus, first-order reaction kinetics were in effect over the range of concentrations tested, and saturation kinetics were not achieved. Rate constants (day/sup -1/) and total percent mineralized increased with decreasing initial concentrations of NDMA. Rates of mineralization were reduced in aqueous systems when supplemental carbon was available, whereas in soils, percentages of organic matter and supplemental carbon had little effect on rates of mineralization. Implications of these results for predictions of rates and threshold limits of mineralization activity in natural systems are discussed. A laboratory scale simulated trickling filter containing an activated charcoal bed provided a suitable environment for mineralization of NDMA at concentrations of 50 and 100 ..mu..g/ml on a continuous basis. NDMA was not toxic to natural populations of microorganisms at concentrations up to 10 mg/ml. Using high-pressure liquid chromatography coupled with radioactivity detection. The authors identified formaldehyde and methylamine as intermediates produced during the biodegradation of NDMA.

  2. Soil food web properties explain ecosystem services across European land use systems

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Franciska T.; Thébault, Elisa; Liiri, Mira; Birkhofer, Klaus; Tsiafouli, Maria A.; Bjørnlund, Lisa; Bracht Jørgensen, Helene; Brady, Mark Vincent; Christensen, Søren; de Ruiter, Peter C.; d’Hertefeldt, Tina; Frouz, Jan; Hedlund, Katarina; Hemerik, Lia; Hol, W. H. Gera; Hotes, Stefan; Mortimer, Simon R.; Setälä, Heikki; Sgardelis, Stefanos P.; Uteseny, Karoline; van der Putten, Wim H.; Wolters, Volkmar; Bardgett, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    Intensive land use reduces the diversity and abundance of many soil biota, with consequences for the processes that they govern and the ecosystem services that these processes underpin. Relationships between soil biota and ecosystem processes have mostly been found in laboratory experiments and rarely are found in the field. Here, we quantified, across four countries of contrasting climatic and soil conditions in Europe, how differences in soil food web composition resulting from land use systems (intensive wheat rotation, extensive rotation, and permanent grassland) influence the functioning of soils and the ecosystem services that they deliver. Intensive wheat rotation consistently reduced the biomass of all components of the soil food web across all countries. Soil food web properties strongly and consistently predicted processes of C and N cycling across land use systems and geographic locations, and they were a better predictor of these processes than land use. Processes of carbon loss increased with soil food web properties that correlated with soil C content, such as earthworm biomass and fungal/bacterial energy channel ratio, and were greatest in permanent grassland. In contrast, processes of N cycling were explained by soil food web properties independent of land use, such as arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and bacterial channel biomass. Our quantification of the contribution of soil organisms to processes of C and N cycling across land use systems and geographic locations shows that soil biota need to be included in C and N cycling models and highlights the need to map and conserve soil biodiversity across the world. PMID:23940339

  3. Soil food web properties explain ecosystem services across European land use systems.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Franciska T; Thébault, Elisa; Liiri, Mira; Birkhofer, Klaus; Tsiafouli, Maria A; Bjørnlund, Lisa; Bracht Jørgensen, Helene; Brady, Mark Vincent; Christensen, Søren; de Ruiter, Peter C; d'Hertefeldt, Tina; Frouz, Jan; Hedlund, Katarina; Hemerik, Lia; Hol, W H Gera; Hotes, Stefan; Mortimer, Simon R; Setälä, Heikki; Sgardelis, Stefanos P; Uteseny, Karoline; van der Putten, Wim H; Wolters, Volkmar; Bardgett, Richard D

    2013-08-27

    Intensive land use reduces the diversity and abundance of many soil biota, with consequences for the processes that they govern and the ecosystem services that these processes underpin. Relationships between soil biota and ecosystem processes have mostly been found in laboratory experiments and rarely are found in the field. Here, we quantified, across four countries of contrasting climatic and soil conditions in Europe, how differences in soil food web composition resulting from land use systems (intensive wheat rotation, extensive rotation, and permanent grassland) influence the functioning of soils and the ecosystem services that they deliver. Intensive wheat rotation consistently reduced the biomass of all components of the soil food web across all countries. Soil food web properties strongly and consistently predicted processes of C and N cycling across land use systems and geographic locations, and they were a better predictor of these processes than land use. Processes of carbon loss increased with soil food web properties that correlated with soil C content, such as earthworm biomass and fungal/bacterial energy channel ratio, and were greatest in permanent grassland. In contrast, processes of N cycling were explained by soil food web properties independent of land use, such as arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and bacterial channel biomass. Our quantification of the contribution of soil organisms to processes of C and N cycling across land use systems and geographic locations shows that soil biota need to be included in C and N cycling models and highlights the need to map and conserve soil biodiversity across the world. PMID:23940339

  4. EFFICIENCY OF SOIL CORE AND SOIL-PORE WATER SAMPLING SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A laboratory column and field lysimeter study were conducted to evaluate the efficiency of soil core and soil-pore water samples to detect the migration of the organic components of land treated wastes through soil. In the laboratory, column leaching studies were performed by pac...

  5. Short-term soil nutrient impact in a real-time drain field soil moisture controlled SDI wastewater disposal system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Alabama Black Belt area is widespread of Vertisols that are generally unsuitable for conventional septic systems; nonetheless, systems of this type have been widely used in this region for decades. In order to explore alternatives for these conventional septic systems, a real-time soil moisture ...

  6. Identifying constraints to potato systems sustainability: Soilborne diseases and soil microbial communities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four different potato cropping systems, designed to address specific management goals of soil conservation (SC), soil improvement (SI), disease suppression (DS), and a status quo (SQ) standard rotation control, were evaluated for their effects on soilborne diseases of potato and soil microbial commu...

  7. Cropping system effects on soilborne potato diseases and soil microbial communities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four different potato cropping systems, designed to address specific management goals of soil conservation (SC), soil improvement (SI), disease suppression (DS), and a status quo (SQ) standard rotation control, were evaluated for their effects on soilborne diseases of potato and soil microbial commu...

  8. Development of a coupled soil erosion and large-scale hydrology modeling system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The impact of frozen soil on soil erosion is becoming increasingly important for sustainable management of soil resources, especially in regions where agricultural land use is dominant. A newly developed coupled modeling system that integrates the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model and the p...

  9. Soil quality improvement under an ecologically based farming system in northwest Missouri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ecologically based farming conserves and improves the soil resource and protects environmental quality by using organic or natural resources without application of synthetic chemicals. Soil quality assessment indicates the ability of management systems to optimize soil productivity and to maintain i...

  10. Soil sustainability as measured by carbon sequestration using carbon isotopes from crop-livestock management systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil Organic Carbon (SOC) is an integral part of maintaining and measuring soil sustainability. This study was undertaken to document and better understand the relationships between two livestock-crop-forage systems and the sequestration of SOC with regards to soil sustainability and was conducted o...

  11. Development of an angular scanning system for sensing vertical profiles of soil electrical conductivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apparent soil electrical conductivity (EC**a**) is typically mapped to define soil spatial variability within an agricultural field. Knowledge of the vertical variability of EC**a** is desired to define site-specific behavior of the soil profile. A Pneumatic Angular Scanning System (PASS) was develo...

  12. Activities of N-Mineralization Enzymes Associated With Soil Aggregate Size Fractions of Three Tillage Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen mineralization occurring near the soil surface of agro-ecosystems determines the quantity of plant available N, and soil enzymes produced by microorganisms play significant roles in the N mineralization process. Tillage systems may influence soil microbial communities and N mineralization e...

  13. Carbon storage in soil-size fractions under two cacao agroforestry systems in Bahia, Brazil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shaded-perennial agroforestry systems contain relatively higher quantities of soil carbon (C) because of continuous deposition of plant residues; however, the amount of C sequestered in the soil will vary depending on the turnover time and the extent of physical protection of different soil organic ...

  14. Soil Quality in a Pecan Agroforestry System is Improved with Intercropped Kura Clover

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Intercropping alleys of agroforestry systems provides an income source until the tree crop produces harvestable yields. However, cultivation of annual crops decreases soil organic matter and increases soil erosion, especially on sloping landscapes. Perennial crops maintain a continuous soil cover, m...

  15. Reduction of Soil compaction in a cotton and peanut rotation using conservation systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Southern Coastal Plain soils benefit from the adoption of conservation tillage systems as water retention and organic matter increase which improves soil structure. However, some Coastal Plain soils are prone to compaction and tend to form hardpans which restrict root growth and reduce yields. The a...

  16. Effects of easter Arkansas production systems on soil strength and electrical conductivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eastern Arkansas cotton-growing soils are especially susceptible to soil compaction due to the large percentage of clay content present in these soils and the use of extensive tillage systems that require large equipment and frequent field trips. In this study, the effect of reduced tillage and cove...

  17. SOIL ORGANIC CARBON AND NITROGEN FRACTIONS IN TEMPERATE ALLEY CROPPING SYSTEMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alley cropping may promote greater sequestration of soil organic carbon. The objective of this study was to examine spatial variability of soil organic C and N fractions relative to tree rows in established alley cropping systems in north central Missouri. Soils were collected to a depth of 30 cm fr...

  18. Soil classification and carbon storage in cacao agroforestry farming systems of Bahia, Brazil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Information concerning the classification of soils and their properties under cacao agroforestry systems of the Atlantic rain forest biome region in the Southeast of Bahia Brazil is largely unknown. Soil and climatic conditions in this region are favorable for high soil carbon storage. This study is...

  19. Conversion of soil color parameters from the Munsell system to the CIE-L*a*b* system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillova, N. P.; Vodyanitskii, Yu. N.; Sileva, T. M.

    2015-05-01

    The Munsell optical system is unsuitable for assessing the role of pigments in the color of soils by statistical methods. Empirical approaches to the transformation of the Munsell system have been proposed only for a limited range of color tones; they do not ensure the exact calculation of correlative relationships between pigments and soil colors. A new procedure is developed for the conversion of soil colors from the Munsell system to the CIE-L*a*b* system, which does not require data interpolation. A base of converted data covering the entire range of the Munsell color system used by soil scientists is created and maintained in the tabular form using Munsell Conversion (version 4.01) software. A more significant contribution of Fe pigments to the characterization of soil color in the CIE-L*a*b* system than in the Munsell system has been substantiated with soddy-podzolic soils as an example.

  20. Thermal performance of soils and backfills in horizontal ground coupled heat pump system applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    The goal of this research was to address the appropriateness of different soils, in an unsaturated state, for placement adjacent to the buried heat exchanger for GSHP systems. Soils for the study were selected based on an analysis of common soil parent materials that exist in the US in conjunction with the current EPRI soil thermal classification system. Six soils were chosen (Cecil (clay), Fordville (sand), Kranzburg (loam), Moody (silt), Sharpsburg (silt) and Vienna (sandy loam)) which provided at least one soil in each of the EPRI classifications. Initial laboratory studies were concentrated on determination of basic physical, water holding and thermal properties of each soil. Each soil was evaluated for ability to sustain thermal contact conductance under thermal loading, and comparison of the results allowed the soils to be ranked, best to worst. Additional laboratory studies were performed on each soil to rate the long-term thermal performance of each relative to potential for drying adjacent to the heat exchanger along with reduction in heat transfer rate due to soil drying. Tests were conducted over a range of initial water contents and densities that would be common for each soil. Results were used to verify a theoretical analysis of the thermal stability of each soil, based on texture, and to rank each soil according to thermal performance under extended thermal load. Results of the thermal conductivity tests, the thermal contact conductance tests and the thermal performance tests were utilized to propose a thermal performance index (TPI) for soils based on texture. The final soil ranking were then expressed relative to the EPRI soil thermal classification system which identified clay as best, followed by loam, sandy loam, silt, and sand.

  1. Rice production in relation to soil quality under different rice-based cropping systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran Ba, Linh; Sleutel, Steven; Nguyen Van, Qui; Thi, Guong Vo; Le Van, Khoa; Cornelis, Wim

    2016-04-01

    Soil quality of shallow paddy soils may be improved by introducing upland crops and thus a more diverse crop cultivation pattern. Yet, the causal relationship between crop performance and enhanced soil traits in rice-upland crop rotations remains elusive. The objectives of this study were to (i) find correlations among soil properties under different rice-upland crop systems and link selected soil properties to rice growth and yield, (ii) present appropriate values of soil parameters for sustainable rice productivity in heavy clay soil, (iii) evaluate the effect of rotating rice with upland crops on rice yield and economic benefit in a long-term experiment. A rice-upland crop rotational field experiment in the Vietnamese Mekong delta was conducted for 10 years using a randomized complete block design with four treatments and four replications. Treatments were: (i) rice-rice-rice (control - conventional system as farmers' practice), (ii) rice-maize-rice, (iii) rice-mung bean-rice, and (iv) rice-mung bean-maize. Soil and plant sampling were performed after harvest of the rice crop at the end of the final winter-spring cropping season (i.e. year 10). Results show differences in rice growth and yield, and economic benefit as an effect of the crop rotation system. These differences were linked with changes in bulk density, soil porosity, soil aggregate stability index, soil penetration resistance, soil macro-porosity, soil organic carbon, acid hydrolysable soil C and soil nutrient elements, especially at soil depth of 20-30 cm. This is evidenced by the strong correlation (P < 0.01) between rice plant parameters, rice yield and soil properties such as bulk density, porosity, penetration resistance, soil organic carbon and Chydrolysable. It turned out that good rice root growth and rice yield corresponded to bulk density values lower than 1.3 Mg m-3, soil porosity higher than 50%, penetration resistance below 1.0 MPa, and soil organic carbon above 25 g kg-1. The optimal

  2. Role of unsaturated soil in a waste containment system

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, P.C.; Tay, J.H.

    1996-12-31

    The role of the unsaturated properties of sand as a drainage layer in a composite liner system for landfills is investigated. The effect of the unsaturated properties of coarse-grained soil on contaminant migration was evaluated by means of a series of simulations using a one-dimensional model of a two- and a three-layer soil liner system for advection and diffusion, respectively. The results showed that under seepage conditions, the effect of an unsaturated sand layer on the advancement of the concentration front was quite insignificant. The arrival time of the C/C{sub o} = 0.5 concentration front increased from 651 days for the case with no sand layer to approximately 951 days for the case with a 1.0-m sand layer. A steady-state flow condition was ultimately established in the sand, and this fact suggests that the capillary action might not be effective. For diffusion, the arrival time of the concentration front increased nonlinearly with a decrease in the degree of saturation and linearly with increasing depths of the sand layer. At a residual degree of saturation, the arrival times of the C/C{sub o} = 0.01 and 0.5 concentration front at the base of the 1-m sand layer were 26.9 and 877.4 years as compared to 1.52 and 2.62 years by advection, respectively. 17 refs., 11 figs.

  3. Soil physical quality changes under different management systems after 10 years in Argentinian Humid Pampa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, J. L.; Aparicio, V. C.; Cerda, A.

    2014-08-01

    The Argentinian Humid Pampa extends over about 60 million ha, 90% of which are agricultural lands. The southeast of the Buenos Aires Province is part of the Humid Pampa (1 206 162 ha). The main crops are wheat, sunflower, corn and soybean. The management systems used in the area are: moldboard plow (MP), chisel plow (CP) and no-till (NT). Excessive soil cultivation under MP causes decreases in the soil organic carbon content (SOC). Adopting NT may reduce the effects of intensive agriculture, through the maintenance and accumulation of SOC. However, the soil compaction under NT causes degradation of the soil structure, reduces the soil water availability and reduces the soil hydraulic conductivity. We evaluated the evolution of the soil physical parameters in three management systems. After 10 years of experiments in four farmers' fields, we found that: soil bulk density was significantly higher under NT. The change in mean weight diameter (CMWD) of aggregates increased as the management system became more intensive. We did not find significant differences in time and management systems in hydraulic conductivity at tension (h)0 cm and h=20 cm. The reduction in total porosity under NT is mainly a product of a reduction in the percentage of mesopores in the soil. Time had no statistically significant effect on the SOC content. The management system did not affect the yields of crop. In this work, the results indicate a modification of some soil physical parameters (porosity, near-saturated hydraulic conductivity, soil structure) due to uninterrupted agricultural production.

  4. DESIGN AND MANAGEMENT OF SUBSURFACE SOIL ABSORPTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The results of two studies are reported: (1) the effects of construction practices upon soil hydraulic properties; and (2) field examination of the effects of operational strategies upon soil infiltration properties. The investigation of construction practices showed that heavy m...

  5. MOBILE SYSTEM FOR EXTRACTING SPILLED HAZARDOUS MATERIALS FROM EXCAVATED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory tests were conducted with three separate pollutants (phenol, arsenic trioxide, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's) and two soils of widely different characteristics (sand/gravel/silt/clay and organic loam) to evaluate techniques for cleansing soil contaminated with r...

  6. [Development of an analyzing system for soil parameters based on NIR spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Li-Hua; Li, Min-Zan; Sun, Hong

    2009-10-01

    A rapid estimation system for soil parameters based on spectral analysis was developed by using object-oriented (OO) technology. A class of SOIL was designed. The instance of the SOIL class is the object of the soil samples with the particular type, specific physical properties and spectral characteristics. Through extracting the effective information from the modeling spectral data of soil object, a map model was established between the soil parameters and its spectral data, while it was possible to save the mapping model parameters in the database of the model. When forecasting the content of any soil parameter, the corresponding prediction model of this parameter can be selected with the same soil type and the similar soil physical properties of objects. And after the object of target soil samples was carried into the prediction model and processed by the system, the accurate forecasting content of the target soil samples could be obtained. The system includes modules such as file operations, spectra pretreatment, sample analysis, calibrating and validating, and samples content forecasting. The system was designed to run out of equipment. The parameters and spectral data files (*.xls) of the known soil samples can be input into the system. Due to various data pretreatment being selected according to the concrete conditions, the results of predicting content will appear in the terminal and the forecasting model can be stored in the model database. The system reads the predicting models and their parameters are saved in the model database from the module interface, and then the data of the tested samples are transferred into the selected model. Finally the content of soil parameters can be predicted by the developed system. The system was programmed with Visual C++6.0 and Matlab 7.0. And the Access XP was used to create and manage the model database. PMID:20038025

  7. [K fertility and K deficit index of aquic brown soil under different fertilization systems].

    PubMed

    Yu, Wan-Tai; Jiang, Zi-Shao; Shen, Shan-Min; Zhang, Lu

    2007-10-01

    A 15-year fertilization experiment was conducted on an aquic brown soil to study the variations of its K fertility and the index of K deficit under different fertilization systems. The results indicated that no K application accelerated the depletion of soil K, representing a certain decrease of soil available and slow-release K. Applying K alone could not keep soil K in balance, still having a decrease of soil available and slow-release K. The application of recycled compost combined with appropriate amount of fertilizer K could compensate soil K expenditure to a certain degree, and keep the concentrations of soil available and slow-release K somewhat constant. The statistic analysis on the past years test results showed that the critical values of soil available K in corn- and soybean fields obtained by crossing method were all 73 mg x kg(-1). PMID:18163304

  8. Organic cotton systems improved soil properties vis-a-vis the modern systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaise, D.; Venugopalan, M. V.; Singh, J. V.; Narkhedkar, N. G.; Velmourougane, K.

    2012-04-01

    India is the largest cotton growing country in the world. Traditionally, cotton in India was grown with minimal inputs and resources available on farm were put to efficient use. Advent of hybrids and Bt cotton revolutionized cotton production in the country and lead to heavy reliance on external inputs. However, there is a growing awareness of the detrimental effects of excessive use of pesticides and fertilizers. This is leading to growing interest in organic cultivation of crops. An organic system (OS) was compared with the modern systems (MS) for changes in the soil physical, chemical and biological properties in field experiments conducted both on station and farmers fields in Maharashtra, India on rain dependent cotton grown on Vertisols. Soil samples of the organic plots had significantly greater C content than the MS plots relying on mineral fertilizers and pesticides. Similarly, other nutrients were also greater in the OS than the MS across locations. Most of the increases were noticed in the top 30 cm of the soil profile. Interestingly, enrichment of the soil at lower depths was noticed in the OS which could be due to the surface creep of soils through the cracks in the Vertisols. With regard to the physical properties, water-stable aggregates and mean weight diameter in the MS were significantly lesser than the OS. Differences were restricted to the top 20 cm. Soil biological properties of the two systems were compared through the enzyme assays such as the dehydrogenase, glucosidase, phosphatase, sulfatase periodically during the crop growing season. All the enzyme assays indicated greater activities in the OS than the MS. Further, microfauna (nematodes) monitored indicated less of plant parasitic nematodes in the OS than the MS. Excessive tillage followed in the MS did bring about a reduction in the nematode numbers. But the systems had more parasitic nematodes.

  9. CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN SOIL MANAGEMENT AND PLANT ROTATION SYSTEMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research from Brazil has shown that warm humid climates have great potential to increase soil C. We conducted a 4 yr study on a sandy coastal plain soil in east-central Alabama (USA) to compare economics and soil C storage from various cotton rotations under conservation and conventional tillage. ...

  10. Predicting Boron, Molybdenum, Selenium, and Arsenic Adsorption in Soil Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A chemical surface complexation model was applied to boron, molybdenum, selenium, and arsenic adsorption on up to 49 soils selected for variation in soil properties. The surface complexation model was able to fit boron, molybdenum, selenite, and arsenate adsorption on the soils. General regression...

  11. A dynamical system approach to soil salinity and sodicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mau, Yair; Porporato, Amilcare

    2015-09-01

    Soil salinity and sodicity impose severe constrains to agriculture, especially in arid and semi-arid regions, where good-quality water for irrigation is scarce. While detailed models have been proposed in the past to describe the dynamics of salt and sodium in the soil, they typically require cumbersome calculations and are not amenable to theoretical analysis. Here we present an analytical model for the dynamics of salinity and sodicity in the root zone. We determine the dependence of steady-state salinity and sodicity levels on irrigation water quality and derive the trajectories in the phase space. The only stationary solution the equations admit is a stable node. Through numerical integration and analysis of the eigenvalues of the derived two-dimensional system of equations, the slower time scale associated with sodification is quantified with respect to the faster time scale associated to salinization. The role of different cation exchange equations (Gapon and Vanselow conventions) are shown to be practically the same with regard to the phase-space dynamics and the time scales. The results can be applied in controlling for low levels of salinity and sodicity, and in planning remediation strategies that are timely and economical.

  12. Ethnopedology and soil quality of bamboo (Bambusa sp.) based agroforestry system.

    PubMed

    Arun Jyoti, Nath; Lal, Rattan; Das, Ashesh Kumar

    2015-07-15

    It is widely recognized that farmers' hold important knowledge of folk soil classification for agricultural land for its uses, yet little has been studied for traditional agroforestry systems. This article explores the ethnopedology of bamboo (Bambusa sp.) based agroforestry system in North East India, and establishes the relationship of soil quality index (SQI) with bamboo productivity. The study revealed four basic folk soil (mati) types: kalo (black soil), lal (red soil), pathal (stony soil) and balu (sandy soil). Of these, lal mati soil was the most predominant soil type (~ 40%) in bamboo-based agroforestry system. Soil physio-chemical parameters were studied to validate the farmers' soil hierarchal classification and also to correlate with productivity of the bamboo stand. Farmers' hierarchal folk soil classification was consistent with the laboratory scientific analysis. Culm production (i.e. measure of productivity of bamboo) was the highest (27culmsclump(-1)) in kalo mati (black soil) and the lowest (19culmsclump(-1)) in balu mati (sandy soil). Linear correlation of individual soil quality parameter with bamboo productivity explained 16 to 49% of the variability. A multiple correlation of the best fitted linear soil quality parameter (soil organic carbon or SOC, water holding capacity or WHC, total nitrogen) with productivity improved explanatory power to 53%. Development of SQI from ten relevant soil quality parameters and its correlation with bamboo productivity explained the 64% of the variation and therefore, suggest SQI as the best determinant of bamboo yield. Data presented indicate that the kalo mati (black soil) is sustainable or sustainable with high input. However, the other three folk soil types (red, stony and sandy soil) are also sustainable but for other land uses. Therefore, ethnopedological studies may move beyond routine laboratory analysis and incorporate SQI for assessing the sustainability of land uses managed by the farmers'. Additional

  13. Soil Management Effects on Gas Fluxes from an Organic Soil Agricultural System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennewein, S. P.; Bhadha, J. H.; Lang, T. A.; Singh, M.; Daroub, S. H.; McCray, M.

    2015-12-01

    The role of soil management on gas flux isn't well understood for Histosols of the Everglades Agricultural Area (EAA) of southern Florida. The region is responsible for roughly half of sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrids) production in the USA along with supplying winter vegetable crops to the eastern USA. Future productivity in the EAA is jeopardized by soil subsidence resulting from oxidation of organic matter. Establishing the role of tillage, water-table depth, nitrogen fertilizer, and soil depth on gas flux will help determine how effective various managements are on conserving soil. Ongoing lysimeter and field studies examined effects of management practices (water-table, tillage, and nitrogen fertilizer), and soil depth on, gas emission and microbial biomass. The trials were set in Belle Glade, FL, on Lauderhill muck (Lithic Haplosaprists). Results to be presented include soil microbial biomass and soil gas (CO2, CH4, and N2O) flux. This study provides insight into management effectiveness and agriculture sustainability on shallow muck soils of the EAA and will help farmers mitigate problems associated with soil subsidence and seasonally high water-tables.

  14. Soil-Earthworm-Litter System Controls on the Stabilization of Soil Organic Carbon in Eastern Deciduous Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Y.; Filley, T. R.; Johnston, C. T.; Szlavecz, K. A.; McCormick, M.

    2009-12-01

    Our work seeks to identify how native and invasive earthworm (EW) activity alters the relative importance of physical, chemical, and biochemical protection mechanisms controlling SOM stabilization in deciduous Forests. Within forests of the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC) in coastal Maryland, USA, wood and litter amendment plots were established in high and low EW activity areas within forests of different stand age and land use history to study EW impacts to litter-soil systems. Our previous work demonstrated that the plant biopolymer chemistry of both decayed litter and soil (0-5 cm) particulate organic matter (POM) is driven by differences in EW activity and is responsible for the differences observed in lignin and root aliphatic matter accumulation in this system. In the present study we compare soils to a depth of 15 cm among plots with 5 years of wood and litter amendment to track the control of EW activity on the vertical transport of litter and clay particle and their partitioning within soil physical fractions. Elemental C&N and δ13C, δ15N data will be presented from each depth in each core among both bulk soil and size-density separated soil fractions. Preliminary results from these analyses indicate the invasive EW feeding habits and activity are the major control on the degree of mixing of surface litter and deep soil in all of research plots. This work will have important implications for understanding how invasive EW will influence soil-atmosphere carbon budget in Northern North America in the future.

  15. Mobile system for extracting spilled hazardous materials from excavated soils. Final report Dec 76-Apr 82

    SciTech Connect

    Scholz, R.; Milanowski, J.

    1983-10-01

    Laboratory tests were conducted with three separate pollutants (phenol, arsenic trioxide, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's) and two soils of widely different characteristics (sand/gravel/silt/clay and organic loam) to evaluate techniques for cleansing soil contaminated with released or spilled hazardous materials. The tests show that scrubbing of excavated soil on site is an efficient approach for freeing soils of certain contaminants but that the effectiveness depends on the washing fluid (water + additives) and on the soil composition and particle size distribution. Based on the test results, a full-scale, field-use system was designed, engineered, fabricated, assembled, and briefly tested; the unit is now ready for field demonstrations.

  16. STAX: a turbo prolog rule-based system for soil taxonomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Peter F.; Balachandran, Chandra S.

    This paper and the accompanying listing document a rule-based system which allocates soils according to the scheme of the USDA's Soil Taxonomy. This program goes to only the first, or order, level of the hierarchical system, but further work is extending it to lower levels in the classification system. The program is written in Borland International's Turbo Prolog, version 1.1, and operates on any IBM PC or compatible. The program mimics the eliminative classification process of Soil Taxonomy which is implemented as a semantic network, giving a depth-first search through soils and properties.

  17. Using the NRCS National Soils Information System (NASIS) to provide soil hydraulic properties for engineering applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Modern agricultural, biological, and environmental engineers have a multitude of uses for soil hydraulic parameters that quantify the ability of soils and sediments to retain and transmit water. These parameters are difficult and costly to obtain, especially if large areas of land need to be charac...

  18. Effect of anaerobic soil disinfestation and Brassica seed meal amendment on soil biology and system resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brassica seed meal amendments and anaerobic soil disinfestation control a spectrum of soil-borne plant pathogens via a diversity of mechanisms. Transformations in microbial community structure and function in certain instances were determinants of disease control and enhanced plant performance. Fo...

  19. Volatilization of lindance from water in soil-free and flooded soil systems.

    PubMed

    Siddaramppa, R; Sethunathan, N

    1976-01-01

    Volatilization of 14C-lindane from water in planchets and under flooded soil ecosystem was investigated. Lindane disappeared faster than parathion from planchets. More rapid loss of both insecticides occurred from water than from chloroform. Loss of lindane and parathion was related to measured losses of water by evaporation. During 5-day incubation under flooded soil conditions, disappearance of lindane was faster from open vials than from sealed vials, whereas in nonflooded soil, no volatile loss of the insecticide was evident despite water evaporation. Over 5 day incubation under flooded conditions, greater volatile loss of lindane occurred in sandy soil than in alluvial soil apparanetly due to greater adsorption to the soil colloids decreasing the insecticide concentration in the standing water on the laterite soil. Under identical conditions of water evaporation, lindane loss was directly proportional to its initial concentration in the water. These results suggest that considerable loss of soil applied pesticides can occur by volatilization from the standing water in flooded rice fields, particularly under tropical conditions. PMID:57974

  20. Anaerobic soil disinfestation and Brassica seed meal amendment alter soil microbiology and system resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brassica seed meal amendments and anaerobic soil disinfestation control a spectrum of soil-borne plant pathogens via a diversity of mechanisms. Transformations in microbial community structure and function in certain instances were determinants of disease control and enhanced plant performance. Fo...

  1. Soil Compaction Varies by Crop Management System over a Claypan Soil Landscape

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While the effects of landscape position and management practices on soil compaction have been documented as individual factors, limited understanding exists of their interactions. Such understanding is needed to prevent site-specific compaction and to better optimize soil management practices using ...

  2. Evaluation of zinc oxide nanoparticle toxicity in sludge products applied to agricultural soil using multispecies soil systems.

    PubMed

    Fernández, María Dolores; Alonso-Blázquez, María Nieves; García-Gómez, Concepción; Babin, Mar

    2014-11-01

    To study the environmental impact of nanoparticles, the sludges of wastewater (WWTS) and water treatment (WTS) plants enriched with ZnO nanoparticles were added to agricultural soil, and the toxic effects of the nanoparticles were studied using a microcosm system based on the soil. The WWTS treated soils were characterised by statistically significant decreases (p<0.05) in Vicia sativa germination at the lowest (76.2%) and medium (95.2%) application rates, decreases in the fresh biomass for Triticum aestivum (19.5%), Raphanus sativus (64.1%), V. sativa (37.4%) and Eisenia fetida (33.6%) at the highest application rate and a dose-related significant increase (p<0.05) in earthworm mortality. In WTS amended soils, significant reductions (p<0.05) of the fresh biomass (17.2%) and the chlorophyll index (24.4%) for T. aestivum and the fresh biomass for R. sativus (31.4%) were only recorded at the highest application doses. In addition, the soil phosphatase enzymatic activity decreased significantly (p<0.05) in both WWTS (dose related) and WTS treatments. For water organisms, a slight inhibition of the growth of Chlorella vulgaris was observed (WWTS treated soils), along with statistically significant dose-related inhibition responses on total glutathione cell content, and statistically significant dose-related induction responses on the glutathione S-transferase enzyme activity and the reactive oxygen species generation on the RTG-2 fish cell line. PMID:25194764

  3. Capabilities and limitations of neutron imaging for studying soil-root system (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, A. B.

    2010-12-01

    Soil is heterogeneous by nature. Additional heterogeneity is added to soil as a result of the activities of soil biota and vegetation. Plant roots and soil microorganisms exude organic and inorganic substances into the soil and change the soil properties in their vicinity. They take up water and nutrients and change the distribution of water and ions in the soil. Therefore, most of the soil physical, chemical, and biological parameters in the root-zone have a dynamic character and vary over time and space. Traditional methods of accessing soil parameters such as point-like measurements and extraction of soil solution are for many purposes too invasive, tedious, expensive, and insufficient with respect to spatial and temporal resolution. There is a growing need for the direct, non-destructive and non-invasive measurements of processes such as water flow and solute transport in soils. Imaging techniques provide an opportunity to measure dynamic processes in soil without disturbing the system. Numerous imaging methods have recently been developed and successfully tested in soil and other porous media. However, each method has its own benefits and limitations in applications and often a compromise between real soil conditions and the requirements of each technique is necessary. Neutron imaging is a unique tool to study water dynamics in soil, root developments, and root-soil interactions. This is due to the high interaction probability of hydrogen nuclei with neutrons. Therefore, all proton-bearing materials such as water and roots are easily visualized in great details. For quantitative studies of the processes, however, neutron imaging needs to be combined with proper image analysis techniques. Modeling simulations can also be employed for interpretation of results and for testing our understanding of the system. This study discusses the theory and potential application of neutron imaging as compared with other techniques such as MRI and X-ray. It evaluates the

  4. Soil carbon stabilization and turnover at alley-cropping systems, Eastern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medinski, T.; Freese, D.

    2012-04-01

    Alley-cropping system is seen as a viable land-use practice for mitigation of greenhouse gas CO2, energy-wood production and soil carbon sequestration. The extent to which carbon is stored in soil varies between ecosystems, and depends on tree species, soil types and on the extent of physical protection of carbon within soil aggregates. This study investigates soil carbon sequestration at alley-cropping systems presented by alleys of fast growing tree species (black locust and poplar) and maize, in Brandenburg, Eastern Germany. Carbon accumulation and turnover are assessed by measuring carbon fractions differing in decomposition rates. For this purpose soil samples were fractionated into labile and recalcitrant soil-size fractions by wet-sieving: macro (>250 µm), micro (53-250 µm) and clay + silt (<53 µm), followed by determination of organic carbon and nitrogen by gas-chromatography. Soil samples were also analysed for the total C&N content, cold-water extractable OC, and microbial C. Litter decomposition was evaluated by litter bags experiment. Soil CO2 flux was measured by LiCor automated device LI-8100A. No differences for the total and stable (clay+silt, <53 µm) carbon fraction were observed between treatment. While cold water-extractable carbon was significantly higher at maize alley compared to black locust alley. This may indicate faster turnover of organic matter at maize alley due to tillage, which influenced greater incorporation of plant residues into the soil, greater soil respiration and microbial activity.

  5. Soil moisture's underestimated role in climate change impact modelling in low-energy systems.

    PubMed

    le Roux, Peter Christiaan; Aalto, Juha; Luoto, Miska

    2013-10-01

    Shifts in precipitation regimes are an inherent component of climate change, but in low-energy systems are often assumed to be less important than changes in temperature. Because soil moisture is the hydrological variable most proximally linked to plant performance during the growing season in arctic-alpine habitats, it may offer the most useful perspective on the influence of changes in precipitation on vegetation. Here we quantify the influence of soil moisture for multiple vegetation properties at fine spatial scales, to determine the potential importance of soil moisture under changing climatic conditions. A fine-scale data set, comprising vascular species cover and field-quantified ecologically relevant environmental parameters, was analysed to determine the influence of soil moisture relative to other key abiotic predictors. Soil moisture was strongly related to community composition, species richness and the occurrence patterns of individual species, having a similar or greater influence than soil temperature, pH and solar radiation. Soil moisture varied considerably over short distances, and this fine-scale heterogeneity may contribute to offsetting the ecological impacts of changes in precipitation for species not limited to extreme soil moisture conditions. In conclusion, soil moisture is a key driver of vegetation properties, both at the species and community level, even in this low-energy system. Soil moisture conditions represent an important mechanism through which changing climatic conditions impact vegetation, and advancing our predictive capability will therefore require a better understanding of how soil moisture mediates the effects of climate change on biota. PMID:23749628

  6. Response of Soil Temperature to Climate Change in the CMIP5 Earth System Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, C. L.; Torn, M. S.; Koven, C. D.

    2014-12-01

    Predictions of soil temperature changes are as critical to policy development and climate change adaptation as predictions of air temperature, but have received comparatively little attention. Soil temperature determines seed germination and growth of wild and agricultural plants, and impacts climate through both geophysical and carbon-cycle feedbacks. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 5th Assessment Report does not report soil temperature predictions, but focuses instead on surface air temperatures, despite the fact that mean annual soil temperatures and mean surface air temperatures are often different from each other. Here we aim to fill this important knowledge gap by reporting soil temperature and moisture predictions for 15 earth system models (ESMs) that participated in phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison 5 Project (CMIP5). Under the RCP 4.5 and 8.5 emissions scenarios, soil warming is predicted to almost keep pace with soil air warming, with about 10% less warming in soil than air, globally. The slower warming of soil compared to air is likely related to predictions of soil drying, with drier soils having reduced soil heat capacity and thermal conductivity. Mollisol soils, which are typically regarded as the most productive soil order for cultivating cereal crops, are anticipated to see warming in North America of 3.5 to 5.5 °C at the end of the 21st century (2080-2100) compared to 1986-2005. One impact of soil warming is likely to be an acceleration of germination timing, with the 3°C temperature threshold for wheat germination anticipated to advance by several weeks in Mollisol regions. Furthermore, soil warming at 1 m depth is predicted to be almost equivalent to warming at 1 cm depth in frost-free regions, indicating vulnerability of deep soil carbon pools to destabilization. To assess model performance we compare the models' predictions with observations of damping depth, and offsets between mean annual soil and air temperature

  7. Fate of Acrylamide in Soil and Groundwater Systems: Microbial Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labahn, S.; Moser, D.; Arrowood, T.; Young, M.; Robleto, E.

    2007-12-01

    Acrylamide monomer (AMD), a suspected human neurotoxin and carcinogen, is present as a contaminant (up to 0.05%) in commercial preparations of polyacrylamide (PAM). PAM is currently being evaluated for wide-spread use as a temporary water-delivery canal sealant across the western United States. To better constrain potential risks associated with PAM applications, we examined the capacity of natural canal microorganisms to degrade AMD in laboratory and field experiments. Dilution cultivation and enrichment approaches were employed to determine the abundance of culturable microorganisms in several canal habitats which can utilize AMD as a sole nitrogen source (typically 104-106/mL) and a collection of isolates was developed. AMD-degrading microorganisms in our collection fell within a limited diversity of genera including Arthrobacter, Xanthomonas, and Pseudomonas; with the latter demonstrating highest capacity for degrading AMD under laboratory conditions. One strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens, isolated from Klamath Irrigation District (Klamath Falls, OR) canal sediment, was chosen for further study in part because this species is well-studied and ubiquitous. The potential for microbial AMD degradation was tested under laboratory conditions using this strain in repacked short (15 cm) column tests with two relevant soil types (sand and loam). Subsequently, the capacity of mixed natural microbial populations to degrade AMD was examined using soil cores collected from the Highline Canal (Rocky Ford, CO), and canal water/sediment slurries with spiked (5 ppm AMD) in situ bottle tests. Degradation of the monomer in the repacked column experiments was evaluated using a step input of 5 ppm AMD and the canal columns were tested with a range of AMD concentrations (1-5 ppm) followed by quantification with an HPLC. The repacked soil columns inoculated with P. fluorescens demonstrated 80-100% AMD degradation within 12 hours. Natural microbial communities in fresh canal sediment

  8. Sorption and transport of five sulfonamide antibiotics in agricultural soil and soil-manure systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Na; Guo, Xinyan; Xu, Jing; Hao, Lijun; Kong, Deyang; Gao, Shixiang

    2015-01-01

    Animal manure application is a main spreading route of veterinary antibiotics in soil and groundwater. The sorption and leaching behavior of five commonly used sulfonamides in five typical soil and soil/manure mixtures from China were investigated in this study. Results showed that the empirical Freundlich equation fits well the sorption behavior of selected sulfonamides (r(2) was between 0.803 and 0.999, 1/n was between 0.68 and 1.44), and pH and soil organic carbon (OC) were the key impact factors to sorption and leaching. Addition of manure was found to increase the Kd values of sulfonamides in five different soils, following the rules that the more polar substances, the more increased extent of sorption after manure amendment (5.87 times for sulfadiazine with Log Kow = -0.09, and 2.49 times for sulfamethoxazole with Log Kow = 0.89). When the simulated rainfall amount reached 300 mL (180 mm), sulfonamides have high migration potential to the groundwater, especially in the soil with low OC and high pH. However, manure amendment increased the sorption capacity of sulfonamides in the top layer, thus it might play a role in decreasing the mobility of sulfonamides in soils. The systematic study would be more significant to assess the ecological risks and suggest considering the influence of manure amendment for the environmental fate of antibiotics. PMID:25421625

  9. Irrigation system and tillage effects on soil carbon and nitrogen fractions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irrigation system and crop rotation may affect soil C and N fractions by influencing crop biomass yield and movement of water soluble C and N in the soil. We studied the effect of two irrigation systems (mid-elevation spray application [MESA] and low energy precision application [LEPA]) and two crop...

  10. Landscape variation in soil properties and potential impacts on biofuel cropping systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Goals: •Compare perennial grass systems v. a continuous corn (Zea mays) system in terms of soil inputs, soil property changes and yield •Potential benefits of perennials: can be grown on marginal crop land, potentially lower input levels, potentially higher biomass yield, and potentially increased s...

  11. Soil microbial communities and activities under different orchard floor management systems in Oregan Sweet Cherry Orchards

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although the importance of microorganisms in nutrient cycling and productivity is well recognized in annual cropping systems, specific information regarding the size, composition and activity of soil microbes in orchard systems is lacking. This study assessed the soil microbial community structure (...

  12. Soil Microbial Communities and Activities Under Different Orchard Floor Management Systems in Oregon Sweet Cherry Orchards

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although the importance of microorganisms in nutrient cycling and productivity is well recognized in annual cropping systems, specific information regarding the size, composition and activity of soil microbes in orchard systems is lacking. This study assessed the soil microbial community structure (...

  13. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: BESCORP SOIL WASHING SYSTEM ALASKAN BATTERY ENTERPRISES SITE - BRICE ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES CORPORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The BESCORP Soil Washing System is an aqueous volume reduction system that utilizes trommel agitation, high-pressure washing, sizing, and density separation to remove lead, lead compounds, and battery casing chips from soil contaminated by broken lead batteries. The basic concept...

  14. Early changes due to sorghum biofuel cropping systems in soil microbial communities and metabolic functioning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evaluation of biofuel production cropping systems should address not only energy yields but also the impacts on soil attributes are important for long-term sustainability. In this study, forage sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) cropping systems were initiated on a low organic matter soil (< 0.9%)...

  15. Water and salt extractable organic matter as affected by soil depth and tillage system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soluble organic matter (OM) has been suggested to reflect shifts in soil management. We characterized the pool size and properties of soluble OM along a soil profile to 125 cm in a maize-based agricultural system that was managed under conventional tillage (CT) and no-tillage (NT) systems for 23 yea...

  16. Microbial community structure and functionality under peanut based cropping systems in a sandy soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is little information on soil microbial and biochemical properties, important for nutrient cycling and organic matter dynamics, as affected by different peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) cropping systems and how they relate to soil quality and functioning and system sustainability. We studied a sa...

  17. Experimental System for Simulating a Natural Soil Temperature Profile during Freeze-thaw Cycles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to better assess the effects of freeze-thaw cycles on soil physical properties, water and contaminant transport, and microbial activity, a simple experimental soil thermal cycling system was developed. The system consisted of an insulated bin containing four cylindrical PVC lysimeters encas...

  18. Early Changes Due to Sorghum Biofuel Cropping Systems in Soil Microbial Communities and Metabolic Functioning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evaluation of biofuel production cropping systems needs to address not only energy yields but also the impacts on soil attributes important for long-term sustainability. In this study, forage sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) cropping systems were initiated on a low organic matter soil (<0.9%) wi...

  19. Effects of cover cropping on soil and rhizosphere microbial community structure in tomato production systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Black polyethylene film is frequently used in vegetable farming systems to promote rapid warming of the soil in spring, conserve soil moisture, and suppress weeds. Alternative systems have been developed using cover cropping with legumes to provide a weed-suppressive mulch while also fixing nitrogen...

  20. Development of a desiccated cadaver delivery system to apply entomopathogenic nematodes for control of soil pests

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pentomopathogenic nematodes may be more capable of controlling soil pests when they are harbored by desiccated cadavers. A small-scale system was developed from a modified crop seed planter to effectively deliver desiccated nematode-infected cadavers into the soil. The system mainly consists of a me...

  1. The contributions of precipitation and soil moisture observations to the skill of soil moisture estimates in a land data assimilation system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The contributions of precipitation and soil moisture observations to soil moisture skill in a land data assimilation system are assessed. Relative to baseline estimates from the Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA), the study investigates soil moisture skill derive...

  2. [Modeling the behavior of 137Cs in a soil-plant system after use of ameliorators].

    PubMed

    Spiridonov, S I; Fesenko, S V; Sanzharova, N I

    2001-01-01

    The main processes and mechanisms responsible for 137Cs behaviour in the soil-forest plants system following the application of ameliorants are described. Mathematical models are presented based on the identification of mechanisms governing the physico-chemical and biological processes, a set of which determined the radionuclides uptake by plants. The models parameterization is exemplified by forest soils subjected to radioactive contamination after the Chernobyl accident. Effects of ameliorants and time of their application on 137Cs behaviour in the soil-plant system are assessed. The contribution of soil chemical and biological processes to the decrease in the radionuclide uptake by plants is estimated. PMID:11458650

  3. Ground cover rice production system facilitates soil carbon and nitrogen stocks at regional scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, M.; Dannenmann, M.; Lin, S.; Saiz, G.; Yan, G.; Yao, Z.; Pelster, D.; Tao, H.; Sippel, S.; Tao, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zheng, X.; Zuo, Q.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.

    2015-02-01

    Rice production is increasingly challenged by irrigation water scarcity, however covering paddy rice soils with films (ground cover rice production system: GCRPS) can significantly reduce water demand as well as overcome temperature limitations at the beginning of the vegetation period resulting in increased grain yields in colder regions of rice production with seasonal water shortages. It has been speculated that the increased soil aeration and temperature under GCRPS may result in losses of soil organic carbon and nitrogen stocks. Here we report on a regional scale experiment, conducted by sampling paired adjacent Paddy and GCRPS fields at 49 representative sites in the Shiyan region, which is typical for many mountainous areas across China. Parameters evaluated included soil C and N stocks, soil physical and chemical properties, potential carbon mineralization rates, fractions of soil organic carbon and stable carbon isotopic composition of plant leaves. Furthermore, root biomass was quantified at maximum tillering stage at one of our paired sites. Against expectations the study showed that: (1) GCRPS significantly increased soil organic C and N stocks 5-20 years following conversion of production systems, (2) there were no differences between GCRPS and Paddy in soil physical and chemical properties for the various soil depths with the exception of soil bulk density, (3) GCRPS had lower mineralization potential for soil organic C compared with Paddy over the incubation period, (4) GCRPS showed lower δ15N in the soils and plant leafs indicating less NH3 volatilization in GCRPS than in Paddy; and (5) GCRPS increased yields and root biomass in all soil layers down to 40 cm depth. Our results suggest that GCRPS is an innovative rice production technique that not only increases yields using less irrigation water, but that it also is environmentally beneficial due to increased soil C and N stocks at regional scale.

  4. Ground cover rice production systems increase soil carbon and nitrogen stocks at regional scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, M.; Dannenmann, M.; Lin, S.; Saiz, G.; Yan, G.; Yao, Z.; Pelster, D. E.; Tao, H.; Sippel, S.; Tao, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zheng, X.; Zuo, Q.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.

    2015-08-01

    Rice production is increasingly limited by water scarcity. Covering paddy rice soils with films (so-called ground cover rice production system: GCRPS) can significantly reduce water demand as well as overcome temperature limitations at the beginning of the growing season, which results in greater grain yields in relatively cold regions and also in those suffering from seasonal water shortages. However, it has been speculated that both increased soil aeration and temperature under GCRPS result in lower soil organic carbon and nitrogen stocks. Here we report on a regional-scale experiment conducted in Shiyan, a typical rice-producing mountainous area of China. We sampled paired adjacent paddy and GCRPS fields at 49 representative sites. Measured parameters included soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) stocks (to 1 m depth), soil physical and chemical properties, δ15N composition of plants and soils, potential C mineralization rates, and soil organic carbon (SOC) fractions at all sampling sites. Root biomass was also quantified at one intensively monitored site. The study showed that: (1) GCRPS increased SOC and N stocks 5-20 years following conversion from traditional paddy systems; (2) there were no differences between GCRPS and paddy systems in soil physical and chemical properties for the various soil depths, with the exception of soil bulk density; (3) GCRPS increased above-ground and root biomass in all soil layers down to a 40 cm depth; (4) δ15N values were lower in soils and plant leaves indicating lower NH3 volatilization losses from GCRPS than in paddy systems; and (5) GCRPS had lower C mineralization potential than that observed in paddy systems over a 200-day incubation period. Our results suggest that GCRPS is an innovative production technique that not only increases rice yields using less irrigation water, but that it also increases SOC and N stocks.

  5. Soil Vapor Extraction System Optimization, Transition, and Closure Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Truex, Michael J.; Becker, Dave; Simon, Michelle A.; Oostrom, Martinus; Rice, Amy K.; Johnson, Christian D.

    2013-02-08

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) is a prevalent remediation approach for volatile contaminants in the vadose zone. A diminishing rate of contaminant extraction over time is typically observed due to 1) diminishing contaminant mass, and/or 2) slow rates of removal for contamination in low-permeability zones. After a SVE system begins to show indications of diminishing contaminant removal rate, SVE performance needs to be evaluated to determine whether the system should be optimized, terminated, or transitioned to another technology to replace or augment SVE. This guidance specifically addresses the elements of this type of performance assessment. While not specifically presented, the approach and analyses in this guidance could also be applied at the onset of remediation selection for a site as a way to evaluate current or future impacts to groundwater from vadose zone contamination. The guidance presented here builds from existing guidance for SVE design, operation, optimization, and closure from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and the Air Force Center for Engineering and the Environment. The purpose of the material herein is to clarify and focus on the specific actions and decisions related to SVE optimization, transition, and/or closure.

  6. Pneumatic System for Concentration of Micrometer-Size Lunar Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, David; Cooper, Bonnie

    2012-01-01

    A report describes a size-sorting method to separate and concentrate micrometer- size dust from a broad size range of particles without using sieves, fluids, or other processes that may modify the composition or the surface properties of the dust. The system consists of four processing units connected in series by tubing. Samples of dry particulates such as lunar soil are introduced into the first unit, a fluidized bed. The flow of introduced nitrogen fluidizes the particulates and preferentially moves the finer grain sizes on to the next unit, a flat plate impactor, followed by a cyclone separator, followed by a Nuclepore polycarbonate filter to collect the dust. By varying the gas flow rate and the sizes of various orifices in the system, the size of the final and intermediate particles can be varied to provide the desired products. The dust can be collected from the filter. In addition, electron microscope grids can be placed on the Nuclepore filter for direct sampling followed by electron microscope characterization of the dust without further handling.

  7. A systems approach for enhancing soil quality and plant health under organic and conventional conditions: Effects on Soil Microbial Communities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the second year of an integrated agricultural systems project, research plots established at both organic and conventional farm sites were sampled to assess soil microbial population dynamics in response to biocontrol and compost amendment, as well as with a rapeseed rotation. Compost amendment p...

  8. An integrated soil-crop system model for water and nitrogen management in North China

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Hao; Hu, Kelin; Batchelor, William D.; Qi, Zhiming; Li, Baoguo

    2016-01-01

    An integrated model WHCNS (soil Water Heat Carbon Nitrogen Simulator) was developed to assess water and nitrogen (N) management in North China. It included five main modules: soil water, soil temperature, soil carbon (C), soil N, and crop growth. The model integrated some features of several widely used crop and soil models, and some modifications were made in order to apply the WHCNS model under the complex conditions of intensive cropping systems in North China. The WHCNS model was evaluated using an open access dataset from the European International Conference on Modeling Soil Water and N Dynamics. WHCNS gave better estimations of soil water and N dynamics, dry matter accumulation and N uptake than 14 other models. The model was tested against data from four experimental sites in North China under various soil, crop, climate, and management practices. Simulated soil water content, soil nitrate concentrations, crop dry matter, leaf area index and grain yields all agreed well with measured values. This study indicates that the WHCNS model can be used to analyze and evaluate the effects of various field management practices on crop yield, fate of N, and water and N use efficiencies in North China. PMID:27181364

  9. An integrated soil-crop system model for water and nitrogen management in North China.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hao; Hu, Kelin; Batchelor, William D; Qi, Zhiming; Li, Baoguo

    2016-01-01

    An integrated model WHCNS (soil Water Heat Carbon Nitrogen Simulator) was developed to assess water and nitrogen (N) management in North China. It included five main modules: soil water, soil temperature, soil carbon (C), soil N, and crop growth. The model integrated some features of several widely used crop and soil models, and some modifications were made in order to apply the WHCNS model under the complex conditions of intensive cropping systems in North China. The WHCNS model was evaluated using an open access dataset from the European International Conference on Modeling Soil Water and N Dynamics. WHCNS gave better estimations of soil water and N dynamics, dry matter accumulation and N uptake than 14 other models. The model was tested against data from four experimental sites in North China under various soil, crop, climate, and management practices. Simulated soil water content, soil nitrate concentrations, crop dry matter, leaf area index and grain yields all agreed well with measured values. This study indicates that the WHCNS model can be used to analyze and evaluate the effects of various field management practices on crop yield, fate of N, and water and N use efficiencies in North China. PMID:27181364

  10. Trace element biogeochemistry in the soil-water-plant system of a temperate agricultural soil amended with different biochars.

    PubMed

    Kloss, Stefanie; Zehetner, Franz; Buecker, Jannis; Oburger, Eva; Wenzel, Walter W; Enders, Akio; Lehmann, Johannes; Soja, Gerhard

    2015-03-01

    Various biochar (BC) types have been investigated as soil amendment; however, information on their effects on trace element (TE) biogeochemistry in the soil-water-plant system is still scarce. In the present study, we determined aqua-regia (AR) and water-extractable TEs of four BC types (woodchips (WC), wheat straw (WS), vineyard pruning (VP), pyrolyzed at 525 °C, of which VP was also pyrolyzed at 400 °C) and studied their effects on TE concentrations in leachates and mustard (Sinapis alba L.) tissue in a greenhouse pot experiment. We used an acidic, sandy agricultural soil and a BC application rate of 3% (w/w). Our results show that contents and extractability of TEs in the BCs and effectuated changes of TE biogeochemistry in the soil-water-plant system strongly varied among the different BC types. High AR-digestable Cu was found in VP and high B contents in WC. WS had the highest impact on TEs in leachates showing increased concentrations of As, Cd, Mo, and Se, whereas WC application resulted in enhanced leaching of B. All BC types increased Mo and decreased Cu concentrations in the plant tissue; however, they showed diverging effects on Cu in the leachates with decreased concentrations for WC and WS, but increased concentrations for both VPs. Our results demonstrate that BCs may release TEs into the soil-water-plant system. A BC-induced liming effect in acidic soils may lead to decreased plant uptake of cationic TEs, including Pb and Cd, but may enhance the mobility of anionic TEs like Mo and As. We also found that BCs with high salt contents (e.g., straw-based BCs) may lead to increased mobility of both anionic and cationic TEs in the short term. PMID:25315931

  11. Non-stationarity of electrical resistivity and soil moisture relationship in heterogeneous soil system: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michot, D.; Thomas, Z.; Adam, I.

    2015-09-01

    Root uptake is the most decisive key in water transfer involving soil and vegetation. It depends on water availability which can be evaluated by punctual measurements. Additionally, surface geophysical methods such as Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) provide larger spatial scales. This paper focuses on investigating temporal and spatial soil moisture changes, along a toposequence crossed by a hedgerow, using ERT and punctual measurements. 10 ERT were performed over the studied period for a 28 m long transect and compared to matric potential and groundwater level measurements. Soil Volumetric Water Content (VWC) was predicted using two methods (i) from ER using Waxman and Smits model (ii) and from matric potential using experimental retention curve fitted by Van Genuchten model. Probability Density Functions (Pdfs) of our set of data show that the largest change, in mean values of ER as well as matric potential, was observed in the topsoil layer. We then analyzed the consistency between ER and punctual measurements in this layer by extracting the arrays in the junction between ER grids and punctual measurements. Pdfs of ER maps at each monitoring time (from T01 to T10) were also calculated to select the more contrasted distributions corresponding to the wettest (T06) and driest states (T10). Results of ER were consistent with matric potential measurements with two different behaviors for locations inside and outside the root zone. A strong correlation (r = 0.9) between VWC values from Waxman and Smits model and those obtained from retention curve was observed outside the root zone. The heterogeneous soil system inside the root zone shows a different pattern in this relationship. The shift in the relationship between ER and soil moisture for the locations outside and inside the root zone highlights the non-stationarity in heterogeneous soil system. Such systems were actually related to the high hedgerow root density and also to a particular topographical

  12. Regional estimation of soil C stocks and CO2 emissions as influenced by cropping systems and soil type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farina, Roberta; Marchetti, Alessandro; Di Bene, Claudia

    2015-04-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is of crucial importance for agricultural soil quality and fertility. At global level soil contains about three times the carbon stored in the vegetation and about twice that present in the atmosphere. Soil could act as source and sink of carbon, influencing the balance of CO2 concentration and consequently the global climate. The sink/source ratio depends on many factors that encompass climate, soil characteristics and different land management practices. Thus, the relatively large gross exchange of GHGs between atmosphere and soils and the significant stocks of carbon in soils, may have significant impact on climate and on soil quality. To quantify the dynamics of C induced by land cover change and the spatial and temporal dynamics of C sources and sinks at regional and, potentially, at national and global scales, we propose a methodology, based on a bio-physical model combined with a spatial explicit database to estimate C stock changes and emissions/removals. The study has been conducted in a pilot region in Italy (Apulia, Foggia province), considering the typical cropping systems of the area, namely rainfed cereals, tomato, vineyard and olives. For this purpose, the model RothC10N (Farina et al., 2013), that simulates soil C dynamics, has been modified to work directly in batch using data of climate, soil (over 290 georeferenced soil profiles), annual agriculture land use (1200 observations) The C inputs from crops have been estimated using statistics and data from literature. The model was run to equilibrium for each point of soil, in order to make all the data homogeneous in terms of time. The obtained data were interpolate with geostatisical procedures, obtaining a set of 30x30 km grid with the initial soil C. The new layer produced, together with soil and land use layers, were used for a long-term run (12 years). Results showed that olive groves and vineyards were able to stock a considerable amount of C (from 0.4 to 1.5 t ha-1 y

  13. Dechlorination of DDT, DDD and DDE in soil (slurry) phase using magnesium/palladium system.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Sumit Kumar; Suresh, Sumathi

    2006-12-01

    Mg0/Pd4+ was able to dechlorinate >99% of extractable DDT (initial concentration of 10 mg DDT kg(-1) of soil) and >90% of extractable DDT (initial concentration of 50 mg DDT kg(-1) of soil) in soil slurry. Mg0/Pd4+ was also found to be effective in dechlorinating of 50 mg kg(-1) DDD and DDE, in soil aged for varying time periods. GC-MS analyses revealed the formation of 1,1-diphenylethane as an end product from DDT, DDE and DDD. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report describing the application Mg0/Pd4+ system for remediation of DDT, DDD and DDE contaminated soil. We conclude that reductive dechlorination reaction catalyzed by Mg0/Pd4+ may be a promising system to remediate soil contaminated with DDT and its dechlorinated products such as DDD and DDE. PMID:16996073

  14. Toward Soil Spatial Information Systems (SSIS) for global modeling and ecosystem management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgardner, Marion F.

    1995-01-01

    The general objective is to conduct research to contribute toward the realization of a world soils and terrain (SOTER) database, which can stand alone or be incorporated into a more complete and comprehensive natural resources digital information system. The following specific objectives are focussed on: (1) to conduct research related to (a) translation and correlation of different soil classification systems to the SOTER database legend and (b) the inferfacing of disparate data sets in support of the SOTER Project; (2) to examine the potential use of AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) data for delineating meaningful soils and terrain boundaries for small scale soil survey (range of scale: 1:250,000 to 1:1,000,000) and terrestrial ecosystem assessment and monitoring; and (3) to determine the potential use of high dimensional spectral data (220 reflectance bands with 10 m spatial resolution) for delineating meaningful soils boundaries and conditions for the purpose of detailed soil survey and land management.

  15. Ecological optimality in water-limited natural soil-vegetation systems. I - Theory and hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eagleson, P. S.

    1982-01-01

    The solution space of an approximate statistical-dynamic model of the average annual water balance is explored with respect to the hydrologic parameters of both soil and vegetation. Within the accuracy of this model it is shown that water-limited natural vegetation systems are in stable equilibrium with their climatic and pedologic environments when the canopy density and species act to minimize average water demand stress. Theory shows a climatic limit to this equilibrium above which it is hypothesized that ecological pressure is toward maximization of biomass productivity. It is further hypothesized that natural soil-vegetation systems will develop gradually and synergistically, through vegetation-induced changes in soil structure, toward a set of hydraulic soil properties for which the minimum stress canopy density of a given species is maximum in a given climate. Using these hypotheses, only the soil effective porosity need be known to determine the optimum soil and vegetation parameters in a given climate.

  16. CHARACTERIZATION OF SEWAGE SLUDGE AND SEWAGE SLUDGE-SOIL SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field and laboratory studies were conducted to characterize the chemical properties of municipal sewage sludges, to evaluate the fate of sludge components in soils, and to determine the distribution of trace metals in milling fractions of grains grown on sludge-treated soils.

  17. Factors Affecting Soil Microbial Community Structure in Tomato Cropping Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil and rhizosphere microbial communities in agroecosystems may be affected by soil, climate, plant species, and management. We identified some of the most important factors controlling microbial biomass and community structure in an agroecosystem utilizing tomato plants with the following nine tre...

  18. Understanding plant root system influences on soil strength and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengough, A. Glyn; Brown, Jennifer L.; Loades, Kenneth W.; Knappett, Jonathan A.; Meijer, Gertjan; Nicoll, Bruce

    2016-04-01

    Keywords: root growth, soil reinforcement, tensile strength Plant roots modify and reinforce the soil matrix, stabilising it against erosion and shallow landslides. Roots mechanically bind the soil particles together and modify the soil hydrology via water uptake, creation of biopores, and modification of the soil water-release characteristic. Key to understanding the mechanical reinforcement of soil by roots is the relation between root strength and root diameter measured for roots in any given soil horizon. Thin roots have frequently been measured to have a greater tensile strength than thick roots, but their strength is also often much more variable. We consider the factors influencing this strength-diameter relationship, considering relations between root tensile strength and root dry density, root water content, root age, and root turnover in several woody and non-woody species. The role of possible experimental artefacts and measurement techniques will be considered. Tensile strength increased generally with root age and decreased with thermal time after excision as a result of root decomposition. Single factors alone do not appear to explain the strength-diameter relationship, and both strength/stiffness and dry density may vary between different layers of tissue within a single root. Results will be discussed to consider how we can achieve a more comprehensive understanding of the variation in root biomechanical properties, and its consequences for soil reinforcement. Acknowledgements: The James Hutton Institute receives funding from the Scottish Government. AGB and JAK acknowledge part funding from EPSRC (EP/M020355/1).

  19. Managing Soil Properties through Dryland Cropping System Intensities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Modification of soil functioning/quality parameters (i.e., organic matter content) is important to improve the capacity of soil as a water storage-reservoir for crop production in dryland. A long-term dryland cropping research study was established at the USDA-ARS farm near Lubbock, Texas in 2003, ...

  20. System of extraction of volatiles from soil using microwave processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, Edwin C. (Inventor); Kaukler, William F. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A device for the extraction and collection of volatiles from soil or planetary regolith. The device utilizes core drilled holes to gain access to underlying volatiles below the surface. Microwave energy beamed into the holes penetrates through the soil or regolith to heat it, and thereby produces vapor by sublimation. The device confines and transports volatiles to a cold trap for collection.

  1. Suppression of Chlorantraniliprole Sorption on Biochar in Soil-Biochar Systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting-Ting; Li, Yi-Song; Jiang, Alice C; Lu, Meng-Xiao; Liu, Xian-Jin; Yu, Xiang-Yang

    2015-09-01

    The sorption behavior of chlorantraniliprole (CAP) by biochar and effect of soil extracts on sorptivity in soil-biochar systems were examined. The results showed that biochar amendment could enhance the sorption of CAP in soils. The values of K F increased significantly when the soils were amended with 0.5 % BC850, which were from 1.54 to 196.5. The indigenous sorptivity of biochar was suppressed after it was applied to the soils. The degree of biochar sorptivity attenuation in different soil-biochar systems varied with the properties of soil water soluble matters. Sorption of CAP by biochar from the five soil extracts was found to be lower than that from a CaCl2 solution. The calculated K d values at C w of 0.01 mg kg(-1) for biochar sorption of CAP from CaCl2 solution were 21.4-26.6 times of that from soil extracts. Aging of biochar in soil extract reduced CAP sorption by up to 85 %. PMID:25904088

  2. Can subterranean cave systems affect soil CO2 fluxes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajnc, Bor; Ferlan, Mitja; Ogrinc, Nives

    2015-04-01

    Main factors affecting soil CO2 fluxes in most ecosystems are soil temperature and soil moisture. Nevertheless occasionally high soil CO2 fluxes were observed at carst areas, which could result from ventilation of subterranean cavities (Ferlan et al., 2011). The aim of this work was to determine the influence of cave ventilation to soil CO2 fluxes. Research was done in a dead-end passage of Postojna cave (Pisani rov) and on the surface area above the passage (Velika Jeršanova dolina) in south-western Slovenia. Inside the cave we measured CO2 concentrations, its carbon (13C) stable isotope composition, 222Rn activity concentrations, temperatures and air pressure. At the surface we had chosen two sampling plots; test plot above the cave and control. At both plots we measured soil CO2 fluxes with automatic chambers, CO2 concentrations, temperatures and carbon stable isotope composition of soil air at three different depths (0.2 m, 0.5 m and 0.8 m) and different meteorological parameters such as: air temperature, air pressure, wind speed an precipitation. To detect the cave influence, we compared two surface CO2 flux measurements with air temperatures and changes of CO2 concentrations in the cave atmosphere. Our results on CO2 concentrations in the gallery of the cave indicated that the ventilation of this particular gallery also depends on outside air temperatures. Outside temperature increased and corresponded to higher CO2 concentrations, whereas at lower temperatures (T < 9 oC) cave started to ventilate and exhaled CO2 reach air through unknown fissures and cracks. At the control plot the soil CO2 fluxes were in a good correlation with soil temperatures (r = 0.789, p =0.01), where greater soil temperatures correspond to greater soil CO2 fluxes. Soil CO2 fluxes at the plot above the cave did not show statistically significant correlations with soil temperatures or soil moisture indicating that other factors possibly cave ventilation could influence it. References

  3. Metals in soils of erosional systems in forest zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samonova, Olga; Aseyeva, Elena

    2013-04-01

    Basin approach is attracting increasing attention in modern geosciences because of its significance for pollution monitoring both at a large (regional) and small catchment (local) scale. The implication of this approach in geochemical studies faces many difficulties which arise mainly from methodological aspects. This paper presents a case study dealing with geochemistry of two small erosional systems - a gully and an aged balka - located in the southern taiga zone of European Russia (the Protva river basin). The erosional forms have been considered as integrated systems comprising slopes, bottoms, detrital fans as well as surrounding areas as sources of solid matter. We used chemical composition of topsoil (total concentrations of Ti, Zr, Mn, Co, Zn, Cu, Pb, Cr, V, Ni, Sn, Sr, Ba and concentrations of the acid-extractable Fe, Mn, Co, Zn, Cu, Pb, Cr, Ni) to explore the role of granulometry, pH and transport processes in geochemical differentiation of the systems. Spatial variations in topsoil granulometry across surrounding areas, slopes and bottoms of the studied systems indicate a removal of finer material through the gully system and accumulation of silt and clay-size particles within the balka. The statistical analysis has proved that the behavior of the majority of the metals in the studied systems is controlled by distribution of medium silt and clay fractions (in the gully) and by coarse and medium silt (in the balka). Total concentrations of Ti, Mn, V, Zn, Zr and the abundances of acid-extractible forms of all studied metals except of Ni are higher is the soils of balka. The young gully system operate as a transit system: total concentrations of Mn, Ti, Zr, Ba, Sr, V, Pb (as well as Zn, Cr) and the abundances of acid-extractible compounds of Mn, Co, Pb (as well as Cu, Zn, Ni) are decreasing from the gully's interfluve and slopes to its bottom. The balka system has the same trends for Mn, Ti, Ba, Co, Cu and mobile compounds of Pb, Co, Ni. However for some

  4. Feasibility for application of soil bioengineering techniques to natural wastewater treatment systems. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, A.J.

    1992-12-01

    This report examines the general feasibility for application of Soil Bioengineering techniques in construction, operation, and management of natural wastewater treatment systems. Soil Bioengineering is an applied science that combines structural, biological, and ecological concepts to construct living structures for erosion, sediment, and flood control (Sotir and Gray, 1989). Using live plant parts as major structural components to reinforce the soil mantle, Soil Bioengineering offers natural and effective solutions to land instability problems along streams and rivers, transportation and utilities transmission corridors, and in forest and wetlands sites. Natural treatment systems are wastewater treatment processes which use the soil-water-plant matrix as a 'natural reactor' for physically, chemically, and biologically stabilizing applied wastes. Recognized natural treatment systems currently include constructed and natural wetlands, aquatic plant systems(aquaculture), wastewater stabilization ponds, and land application of wastes, termed 'land treatment'.

  5. Organic fertilization for soil improvement in a vegetable cropping system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhaeghe, Micheline; De Rocker, Erwin; De Reycke, Luc

    2016-04-01

    Vegetable Research Centre East-Flanders Karreweg 6, 9770 Kruishoutem, Belgium A long term trial for soil improvement by organic fertilization was carried out in Kruishoutem from 2001 till 2010 in a vegetable rotation (carrots - leek - lettuce (2/year) - cauliflower (2/year) - leek - carrots - lettuce (2/year) - cauliflower (2/year) - leek and spinach). The trial compared yearly applications of 30 m²/ha of three types of compost (green compost, vfg-compost and spent mushroom compost) with an untreated object which did not receive any organic fertilization during the trial timescale. The organic fertilization was applied shortly before the cropping season. Looking at the soil quality, effects of organic fertilization manifest rather slow. The first four years after the beginning of the trial, no increase in carbon content of the soil is detectable yet. Although, mineralization of the soil has increased. The effect on the mineralization is mainly visible in crops with a lower N uptake (e.g. carrots) leading to a higher nitrate residue after harvest. Effects on soil structure and compaction occur rather slowly although, during the first two cropping seasons compost applications increase the water retention capacity of the soil. Compost increases the pH of the soil from the first year on till the end of the trial in 2010. Thus, organic fertilization impedes acidification in light sandy soils. Also soil fertility benefits from compost by an increase in K-, Ca- and Mg- content in the soil from the second year on. After 10 years of organic fertilization, yield and quality of spinach were increased significantly (p<0.05) compared to the untreated object. Also leek (2002 and 2009) and lettuce (2003 and 2007) benefit from organic fertilization.

  6. Modeling of Water Flow Processes in the Soil-Plant-Atmosphere System: The Soil-Tree-Atmosphere Continuum Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massoud, E. C.; Vrugt, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Trees and forests play a key role in controlling the water and energy balance at the land-air surface. This study reports on the calibration of an integrated soil-tree-atmosphere continuum (STAC) model using Bayesian inference with the DREAM algorithm and temporal observations of soil moisture content, matric head, sap flux, and leaf water potential from the King's River Experimental Watershed (KREW) in the southern Sierra Nevada mountain range in California. Water flow through the coupled system is described using the Richards' equation with both the soil and tree modeled as a porous medium with nonlinear soil and tree water relationships. Most of the model parameters appear to be reasonably well defined by calibration against the observed data. The posterior mean simulation reproduces the observed soil and tree data quite accurately, but a systematic mismatch is observed between early afternoon measured and simulated sap fluxes. We will show how this points to a structural error in the STAC-model and suggest and test an alternative hypothesis for root water uptake that alleviates this problem.

  7. Distribution patterns of phthalic acid esters in soil particle-size fractions determine biouptake in soil-cereal crop systems.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wenbing; Zhang, Yuan; He, Xiaosong; Xi, Beidou; Gao, Rutai; Mao, Xuhui; Huang, Caihong; Zhang, Hui; Li, Dan; Liang, Qiong; Cui, Dongyu; Alshawabkeh, Akram N

    2016-01-01

    The use of wastewater irrigation for food crops can lead to presence of bioavailable phthalic acid esters (PAEs) in soils, which increase the potential for human exposure and adverse carcinogenic and non-cancer health effects. This study presents the first investigation of the occurrence and distribution of PAEs in a maize-wheat double-cropping system in a wastewater-irrigated area in the North China Plain. PAE levels in maize and wheat were found to be mainly attributed to PAE stores in soil coarse (250-2000 μm) and fine sand (53-250 μm) fractions. Soil particle-size fractions with higher bioavailability (i.e., coarse and fine sands) showed greater influence on PAE congener bioconcentration factors compared to PAE molecular structures for both maize and wheat tissues. More PAEs were allocated to maize and wheat grains with increased soil PAE storages from wastewater irrigation. Additional findings showed that levels of both non-cancer and carcinogenic risk for PAE congeners in wheat were higher than those in maize, suggesting that wheat food security should be prioritized. In conclusion, increased soil PAE concentrations specifically in maize and wheat grains indicate that wastewater irrigation can pose a contamination threat to food resources. PMID:27555553

  8. Distribution patterns of phthalic acid esters in soil particle-size fractions determine biouptake in soil-cereal crop systems

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Wenbing; Zhang, Yuan; He, Xiaosong; Xi, Beidou; Gao, Rutai; Mao, Xuhui; Huang, Caihong; Zhang, Hui; Li, Dan; Liang, Qiong; Cui, Dongyu; Alshawabkeh, Akram N.

    2016-01-01

    The use of wastewater irrigation for food crops can lead to presence of bioavailable phthalic acid esters (PAEs) in soils, which increase the potential for human exposure and adverse carcinogenic and non-cancer health effects. This study presents the first investigation of the occurrence and distribution of PAEs in a maize-wheat double-cropping system in a wastewater-irrigated area in the North China Plain. PAE levels in maize and wheat were found to be mainly attributed to PAE stores in soil coarse (250–2000 μm) and fine sand (53–250 μm) fractions. Soil particle-size fractions with higher bioavailability (i.e., coarse and fine sands) showed greater influence on PAE congener bioconcentration factors compared to PAE molecular structures for both maize and wheat tissues. More PAEs were allocated to maize and wheat grains with increased soil PAE storages from wastewater irrigation. Additional findings showed that levels of both non-cancer and carcinogenic risk for PAE congeners in wheat were higher than those in maize, suggesting that wheat food security should be prioritized. In conclusion, increased soil PAE concentrations specifically in maize and wheat grains indicate that wastewater irrigation can pose a contamination threat to food resources. PMID:27555553

  9. Changes in soil lignin by the conversion of forest to silvopastoral systems in hill-lands of Appalachia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Establishment of silvopastoral systems in Appalachia has potential to increase farm income. Required fertilization and liming for the silvopastoral systems modifies soil chemical properties, including formation and stabilization of soil organic matter (SOM) though the impact is unknown. Lignin is ...

  10. A Tale of Four Stories: Soil Ecology, Theory, Evolution and the Publication System

    PubMed Central

    Barot, Sébastien; Blouin, Manuel; Fontaine, Sébastien; Jouquet, Pascal; Lata, Jean-Christophe; Mathieu, Jérôme

    2007-01-01

    Background Soil ecology has produced a huge corpus of results on relations between soil organisms, ecosystem processes controlled by these organisms and links between belowground and aboveground processes. However, some soil scientists think that soil ecology is short of modelling and evolutionary approaches and has developed too independently from general ecology. We have tested quantitatively these hypotheses through a bibliographic study (about 23000 articles) comparing soil ecology journals, generalist ecology journals, evolutionary ecology journals and theoretical ecology journals. Findings We have shown that soil ecology is not well represented in generalist ecology journals and that soil ecologists poorly use modelling and evolutionary approaches. Moreover, the articles published by a typical soil ecology journal (Soil Biology and Biochemistry) are cited by and cite low percentages of articles published in generalist ecology journals, evolutionary ecology journals and theoretical ecology journals. Conclusion This confirms our hypotheses and suggests that soil ecology would benefit from an effort towards modelling and evolutionary approaches. This effort should promote the building of a general conceptual framework for soil ecology and bridges between soil ecology and general ecology. We give some historical reasons for the parsimonious use of modelling and evolutionary approaches by soil ecologists. We finally suggest that a publication system that classifies journals according to their Impact Factors and their level of generality is probably inadequate to integrate “particularity” (empirical observations) and “generality” (general theories), which is the goal of all natural sciences. Such a system might also be particularly detrimental to the development of a science such as ecology that is intrinsically multidisciplinary. PMID:18043755

  11. Degradation and metabolism of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) in submerged soil and soil-plant systems.

    PubMed

    Sun, Feifei; Kolvenbach, Boris Alexander; Nastold, Peter; Jiang, Bingqi; Ji, Rong; Corvini, Philippe Francois-Xavier

    2014-12-16

    Contamination by tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), the most widely used brominated flame retardant, is a matter of environmental concern. Here, we investigated the fate and metabolites of (14)C-TBBPA in a submerged soil with an anoxic-oxic interface and planted or not with rice (Oryza sativa) and reed (Phragmites australis) seedlings. In unplanted soil, TBBPA dissipation (half-life 20.8 days) was accompanied by mineralization (11.5% of initial TBBPA) and the substantial formation (60.8%) of bound residues. Twelve metabolites (10 in unplanted soil and 7 in planted soil) were formed via four interconnected pathways: oxidative skeletal cleavage, O-methylation, type II ipso-substitution, and reductive debromination. The presence of the seedlings strongly reduced (14)C-TBBPA mineralization and bound-residue formation and stimulated debromination and O-methylation. Considerable radioactivity accumulated in rice (21.3%) and reed (33.1%) seedlings, mainly on or in the roots. While TBBPA dissipation was hardly affected by the rice seedlings, it was strongly enhanced by the reed seedlings, greatly reducing the half-life (11.4 days) and increasing monomethyl TBBPA formation (11.3%). The impact of the interconnected aerobic and anaerobic transformation of TBBPA and wetland plants on the profile and dynamics of the metabolites should be considered in phytoremediation strategies and environmental risk assessments of TBBPA in submerged soils. PMID:25402269

  12. [Effects of mixed chelators on the leaching of cadmium in contaminated soils under intercropping system].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian-Li; Wu, Qi-Tang; Wei, Ze-Bin; Guo, Xiao-Fang; Qiu, Jin-Rong; Huang, Zhu-Jian

    2011-11-01

    In order to elucidate the influence of chelators on Cd leaching in contaminated soil, outdoor soil column (100 cm) leaching experiments were conducted using two paddy soils irrigated with Pb-Zn mining wastewater. Soil samples which under intercropping systems were collected from Qingyuan City (acid soil with pH 4.63) and Lechang city (neutral soil with pH 6.51), Guangdong Province of China. The mixture of chelators (MC) comprised of citric acid, monosodium glutamate waste liquid, EDTA and KCl with molar ratio of 10 : 1 : 2 : 3 at the concentration of 5 mmol x kg(-1) soil. The intercropping system used in this study was a Zn- and Cd-hyperaccumulator (Sedum alfredii) and a low-accumulating crop (Zea mays). Results showed that at day 2 after the application of MC, the Cd concentrations in leachates from every layer of neutral and acid soils increased significantly in the treatment with intercropping and MC. At day 8 the concentrations of Cd in leachate from layers below 20 cm in the neutral soil and below 60 cm in the acid soil were still significantly higher than those of control. However, the mobility of Cd was decreased greatly compared with that at day 2. At day 2 and day 8 the Cd concentrations in leachates from every layer of neutral and acid soils in the Co-crop + MC treatments exceed the value of the Groundwater Quality Standards (GB/T 14848-93). Cd in all soil columns showed the trend to migrate downwards, especially in the acid soil. The total Cd in the soil layers of 20 cm and 40 cm was decreased by 40% -58% and 39%-49% respectively at the end of the experiments compared to the initial value. After leaching of 100 days,the total Cd in 0-40 cm soil layer of acid soil reached the limit of National Soil Environmental Quality Standards (GB 15618-1995). The results also implied that in Cd-contaminated soil MC addition might enhance the potential risks of Cd contamination in groundwater. PMID:22295648

  13. Impact of system chemistry on electroosmosis in contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Eykholt, G.R. . Corporate Research and Development); Daniel, D.E. )

    1994-05-01

    Electroosmosis in a copper-contaminated kaolinite was highly sensitive to chemical treatment schemes designed to remove the contamination. Nonuniform profiles of electric field intensity and pH as well as negative pore-water pressure develop during sustained electrokinetic treatment of clays. These nonlinearities and nonuniform pore-water pressures cannot be adequately described by classical analysis. Classical analysis is based on assumptions of a uniform and constant electroosmotic permeability coefficient, for instance. An extended capillary model which includes nonuniform contributions to electroosmosis and pore pressures that vary with space and time, is developed and compared with experimental findings. Subtle changes in initial and boundary conditions of the system chemistry have a very large effect on electroosmosis in soils. For instance, acid addition at the cathode reservoir may cause reversal of the direction of electroosmotic flow. Other species, such as the citrate, may form stable complexes with copper ions, thus reducing the impact of copper on the zeta potential of the clay. The model is used to simulate these effects.

  14. Particulate Organic Matter Affects Soil Nitrogen Mineralization under Two Crop Rotation Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Rongyan; Lu, Jianwei; Ren, Tao; Liu, Bo; Li, Xiaokun; Cong, Rihuan

    2015-01-01

    Changes in the quantity and/or quality of soil labile organic matter between and after different types of cultivation system could play a dominant role in soil nitrogen (N) mineralization. The quantity and quality of particulate organic matter (POM) and potentially mineralizable-N (PMN) contents were measured in soils from 16 paired rice-rapeseed (RR)/cotton-rapeseed (CR) rotations sites in Hubei province, central China. Then four paired soils encompassing low (10th percentile), intermediate (25th and 75th percentiles), and high (90th percentile) levels of soil PMN were selected to further study the effects of POM on soil N mineralization by quantifying the net N mineralization in original soils and soils from which POM was removed. Both soil POM carbon (POM-C) and N (POM-N) contents were 45.8% and 55.8% higher under the RR rotation compared to the CR rotation, respectively. The PMN contents were highly correlated with the POM contents. The PMN and microbial biomass N (MBN) contents concurrently and significantly decreased when POM was removed. The reduction rate of PMN was positively correlated with changes in MBN after the removal of POM. The reduction rates of PMN and MBN after POM removal are lower under RR rotations (38.0% and 16.3%, respectively) than CR rotations (45.6% and 19.5%, respectively). Furthermore, infrared spectroscopy indicated that compounds with low-bioavailability accumulated (e.g., aromatic recalcitrant materials) in the soil POM fraction under the RR rotation but not under the CR rotation. The results of the present study demonstrated that POM plays a vital role in soil N mineralization under different rotation systems. The discrepancy between POM content and composition resulting from different crop rotation systems caused differences in N mineralization in soils. PMID:26647157

  15. Particulate Organic Matter Affects Soil Nitrogen Mineralization under Two Crop Rotation Systems.

    PubMed

    Bu, Rongyan; Lu, Jianwei; Ren, Tao; Liu, Bo; Li, Xiaokun; Cong, Rihuan

    2015-01-01

    Changes in the quantity and/or quality of soil labile organic matter between and after different types of cultivation system could play a dominant role in soil nitrogen (N) mineralization. The quantity and quality of particulate organic matter (POM) and potentially mineralizable-N (PMN) contents were measured in soils from 16 paired rice-rapeseed (RR)/cotton-rapeseed (CR) rotations sites in Hubei province, central China. Then four paired soils encompassing low (10th percentile), intermediate (25th and 75th percentiles), and high (90th percentile) levels of soil PMN were selected to further study the effects of POM on soil N mineralization by quantifying the net N mineralization in original soils and soils from which POM was removed. Both soil POM carbon (POM-C) and N (POM-N) contents were 45.8% and 55.8% higher under the RR rotation compared to the CR rotation, respectively. The PMN contents were highly correlated with the POM contents. The PMN and microbial biomass N (MBN) contents concurrently and significantly decreased when POM was removed. The reduction rate of PMN was positively correlated with changes in MBN after the removal of POM. The reduction rates of PMN and MBN after POM removal are lower under RR rotations (38.0% and 16.3%, respectively) than CR rotations (45.6% and 19.5%, respectively). Furthermore, infrared spectroscopy indicated that compounds with low-bioavailability accumulated (e.g., aromatic recalcitrant materials) in the soil POM fraction under the RR rotation but not under the CR rotation. The results of the present study demonstrated that POM plays a vital role in soil N mineralization under different rotation systems. The discrepancy between POM content and composition resulting from different crop rotation systems caused differences in N mineralization in soils. PMID:26647157

  16. The Frequency and Damping of Soil-Structure Systems with Embedded Foundation

    SciTech Connect

    Ghannad, M. Ali; Rahmani, Mohammad T.; Jahankhah, Hossein

    2008-07-08

    The effect of foundation embedment on fundamental period and damping of buildings has been the title of several researches in three past decades. A review of the literature reveals some discrepancies between proposed formulations for dynamic characteristics of soil-embedded foundation-structure systems that raise the necessity of more investigation on this issue. Here, first a set of approximate polynomial equations for soil impedances, based on numerical data calculated from well known cone models, are presented. Then a simplified approach is suggested to calculate period and damping of the whole system considering soil medium as a viscoelastic half space. The procedure includes both material and radiation damping while frequency dependency of soil impedance functions is not ignored. Results show that soil-structure interaction can highly affect dynamic properties of system. Finally the results are compared with one of the commonly referred researches.

  17. A Virtual Soil System to Study Macroscopic Manifestation of Pore-Scale Biogeochemical Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Fang, Y.; Shang, J.; Bailey, V. L.

    2012-12-01

    Mechanistic soil biogeochemical processes occur at the pore-scale that fundamentally control the moisture and CO2 fluxes at the soil and atmosphere interface. This presentation will present an on-going research to investigate pore-scale moisture migration and biogeochemical processes of organic carbon degradation, and their macroscopic manifestation in soils. Soil cores collected from Rattlesnake Mountain in southeastern Washington, USA, where a field experiment was conducted to investigate dynamic response of soil biogeochemistry to changing climate conditions, were used as an example for this study. The cores were examined using computerized x-ray tomography (XCT) to determine soil pore structures. The XCT imaging, together with various measurements of soil properties such as porosity, moisture content, organic carbon, biochemistry, etc are used to establish a virtual soil core with a high spatial resolution (~20um). The virtual soil system is then used to simulate soil moisture migration and organic carbon degradation, to identify important physical and biogeochemical factors controlling macroscopic moisture and CO2 fluxes in response to changing climate conditions, and to develop and evaluate pragmatic biogeochemical process models for larger scale applications. Core-scale measurements of CO2 flux and moisture change are used for development and validation of the process models.

  18. Impact of Organic and Conventional Systems of Coffee Farming on Soil Properties and Culturable Microbial Diversity.

    PubMed

    Velmourougane, Kulandaivelu

    2016-01-01

    A study was undertaken with an objective of evaluating the long-term impacts of organic (ORG) and conventional (CON) methods of coffee farming on soil physical, chemical, biological, and microbial diversity. Electrical conductivity and bulk density were found to increase by 34% and 21%, respectively, in CON compared to ORG system, while water holding capacity was found decreased in both the systems. Significant increase in organic carbon was observed in ORG system. Major nutrients, nitrogen and potassium, levels showed inclination in both ORG and CON system, but the trend was much more pronounced in CON system. Phosphorus was found to increase in both ORG and CON system, but its availability was found to be more with CON system. In biological attributes, higher soil respiration and fluorescein diacetate activity were recorded in ORG system compared to CON system. Higher soil urease activity was observed in CON system, while dehydrogenase activity does not show significant differences between ORG and CON systems. ORG system was found to have higher macrofauna (31.4%), microbial population (34%), and microbial diversity indices compared to CON system. From the present study, it is accomplished that coffee soil under long-term ORG system has better soil properties compared to CON system. PMID:27042378

  19. Impact of Organic and Conventional Systems of Coffee Farming on Soil Properties and Culturable Microbial Diversity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A study was undertaken with an objective of evaluating the long-term impacts of organic (ORG) and conventional (CON) methods of coffee farming on soil physical, chemical, biological, and microbial diversity. Electrical conductivity and bulk density were found to increase by 34% and 21%, respectively, in CON compared to ORG system, while water holding capacity was found decreased in both the systems. Significant increase in organic carbon was observed in ORG system. Major nutrients, nitrogen and potassium, levels showed inclination in both ORG and CON system, but the trend was much more pronounced in CON system. Phosphorus was found to increase in both ORG and CON system, but its availability was found to be more with CON system. In biological attributes, higher soil respiration and fluorescein diacetate activity were recorded in ORG system compared to CON system. Higher soil urease activity was observed in CON system, while dehydrogenase activity does not show significant differences between ORG and CON systems. ORG system was found to have higher macrofauna (31.4%), microbial population (34%), and microbial diversity indices compared to CON system. From the present study, it is accomplished that coffee soil under long-term ORG system has better soil properties compared to CON system. PMID:27042378

  20. SOIL AND NUTRIENT EROSION RISK IN ORGANIC AND CONVENTIONAL CROPPING SYSTEMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic farming, which is growing in popularity, has been proposed as a sustainable alternative to conventional farming practices. However, it is not known how organic farming systems affect soil erosion risk and sediment-bound nutrient transport. Our objectives were to compare soil erosion risk and...

  1. Ecologically-based management improves soil health in an organic orchard production system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prairie Birthday Farm (PBF), a diversified, organic enterprise on the loess hill landscape in northwestern Missouri, was previously managed as a conventional corn-soybean production system. The soil (Sharpsburg silt loam; fine, montmorillonitic, mesic Typic Argiudolls) is mapped as an ‘eroded soil p...

  2. Remediation of Stratified Soil Acidity Through Surface Application of Lime in No-Till Cropping Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yield reduction and reduced crop vigor, resulting from soil acidification, are of increasing concern in eastern Washington and northern Idaho. In this region, soil pH has been decreasing at an accelerated rate, primarily due to the long-term use of ammonium based fertilizers. In no-till systems, the...

  3. KURA CLOVER INTERCROPPED IN A PECAN AGROFORESTRY SYSTEM IMPROVES SOIL QUALITY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Intercropping the alleys of agroforestry systems is desirable to provide income from the field until the tree crop begins to yield. However, cultivation of annual crops in the alleys may decrease soil organic matter and increase soil erosion, especially on sloping landscapes. Perennial crops maintai...

  4. Experimental system for simulating a natural soil temperature profile during freeze-thaw cycles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The controlled manipulation of freeze-thaw cycles has varied widely among studies and despite their value in demonstrating the mechanisms of freeze-thaw action in soils, many methodologies do not replicate actual field conditions. A simple soil thermal cycling system was developed to address several...

  5. Evaluation of a Soil Moisture Data Assimilation System Over the Conterminous United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A data assimilation system has been designed to integrate surface soil moisture estimates from the EOS Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) with an online soil moisture model used by the USDA Foreign Agriculture Service for global crop estimation. USDA’s International Production Assessmen...

  6. Emerging Technology Summary. ACID EXTRACTION TREATMENT SYSTEM FOR TREATMENT OF METAL CONTAMINATED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Acid Extraction Treatment System (AETS) is intended to reduce the concentrations and/or teachability of heavy metals in contaminated soils so the soil can be returned to the site from which it originated. The objective of the project was to determine the effectiveness and com...

  7. Impacts of an integrated crop-livestock system on soil properties to enhance precipitation capture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cropping/Livestock systems alter soil properties that are important in enhancing capture of precipitation by developing and maintaining water infiltration and storage. In this paper we will relate soil hydraulic conductivity and other physical properties on managed Old World Bluestem grassland, whea...

  8. Intercropping with Kura Clover Improves Soil Quality in a Pecan Agroforestry System

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Intercropping the alleys of agroforestry systems provides income until the tree crop begins to yield. However, cultivation of annual crops or intensive herbicidal control of vegetation in the alleys decreases soil organic matter and increases soil erosion, especially on sloping landscapes. Perennial...

  9. Sheep grazing effect on dryland soil carbon and nitrogen in the wheat-fallow system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed control by sheep grazing during fallow periods in the dryland wheat-fallow system may influence soil C and N levels. The effects of fallow management for weed control and soil water conservation [sheep grazing (grazing), herbicide application (chemical), and tillage (mechanical)] and cropping s...

  10. Effects of cropping and tillage systems on soil erosion under climate change in Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil erosion under future climate change is very likely to increase due to projected increases in frequency and magnitude of heavy storms. The objective of this study is to quantify the effects of common cropping and tillage systems on soil erosion and surface runoff during 2010-2039 in central Okl...